USER MANUAL
IMC-1000M(S)
Industrial Gigabit Ethernet OAM/IP
Web Smart Media Converter
CTC Union Technologies Co., Ltd.
Far Eastern Vienna Technology Center
(Neihu Technology Park)
8F, No. 60 Zhouzi St., Neihu, Taipei 114,
Taiwan
T +886-2-26591021
F +886-2-26590237
E sales@ctcu.com
marketing@ctcu.com
techsupport@ctcu.com
H www.ctcu.com
IMC-1000M(S) Operation Manual
Industrial Gigabit Ethernet OAM/IP Web Smart Media Converter
Version 1.1 December 23, 2013 (Update Release)
This Manual supports the following models:
IMC-1000M : 1x1000Base-FX + 1x10/100/1000Base-TX
IMC-1000M-E : 1x1000Base-FX + 1x10/100/1000Base-TX, wide temperature
IMC-1000MS : 1x100/1000Base-FX (SFP) + 1x10/100/1000Base-TX
IMC-1000MS-E : 1x100/1000Base-FX (SFP) + 1x10/100/1000Base-TX, wide temperature
2013 CTC Union Technologies Co., LTD.
All trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
Technical information in this document is subject to change without notice.
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Legal
The information in this publication has been carefully checked and is believed to be entirely accurate at the time of publication. CTC Union Technologies
assumes no responsibility, however, for possible errors or omissions, or for any consequences resulting from the use of the information contained herein.
CTC Union Technologies reserves the right to make changes in its products or product specifications with the intent to improve function or design at any
time and without notice and is not required to update this documentation to reflect such changes.
CTC Union Technologies makes no warranty, representation, or guarantee regarding the suitability of its products for any particular purpose, nor does CTC
Union assume any liability arising out of the application or use of any product and specifically disclaims any and all liability, including without limitation any
consequential or incidental damages.
CTC Union products are not designed, intended, or authorized for use in systems or applications intended to support or sustain life, or for any other
application in which the failure of the product could create a situation where personal injury or death may occur. Should the Buyer purchase or use a CTC
Union product for any such unintended or unauthorized application, the Buyer shall indemnify and hold CTC Union Technologies and its officers,
employees, subsidiaries, affiliates, and distributors harmless against all claims, costs, damages, expenses, and reasonable attorney fees arising out of,
either directly or indirectly, any claim of personal injury or death that may be associated with such unintended or unauthorized use, even if such claim
alleges that CTC Union Technologies was negligent regarding the design or manufacture of said product.
TRADEMARKS
Microsoft is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corp.
HyperTerminal™ is a registered trademark of Hilgraeve Inc.
FCC WARNING:
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are
designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment
generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual may cause harmful
interference in which case the user will be required to correct the interference at his own expense. NOTICE: (1) The changes or modifications not
expressively approved by the party responsible for compliance could void the user's authority to operate the equipment. (2) Shielded interface cables and
AC power cord, if any, must be used in order to comply with the emission limits.
CISPR PUB.22 Class A COMPLIANCE:
This device complies with EMC directive of the European Community and meets or exceeds the following technical standard. EN 55022 - Limits and
Methods of Measurement of Radio Interference Characteristics of Information Technology Equipment. This device complies with CISPR Class A.
CE NOTICE
Marking by the symbol CE indicates compliance of this equipment to the EMC and LVD directives of the European Community. Such marking is indicative
that this equipment meets or exceeds the following technical standards: EN 55022:2006, Class A, EN55024:1998+A1:2001+A2:2003, and EN60950-1:2001
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Table of Contents
CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 7 1.1 WELCOME ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 7 1.2 PRODUCT DESCRIPTION............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 7 1.3 PRODUCT FEATURES ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 8 1.4 SPECIFICATIONS ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 9 1.5 MANAGEMENT FEATURES ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 9 1.6 PANEL 1000M 1000MS .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 10 1.7 LED INDICATORS ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 11 CHAPTER 2 INSTALLATION........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 12 2.1 MOUNTING OPTIONS ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 12 2.2 ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 13 2.3 INSTALLATION OF SFP MODULES ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 14 2.3.1 Inserting a Bale Clasp SFP Module into the Cage........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 14 2.3.2 Removing a Bale Clasp SFP Module ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 14 CHAPTER 3 WEB BASED PROVISIONING....................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 15 3.1 INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 15 3.2 WEB LOGIN PAGE .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 15 3.3 WEB MAIN PAGE .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 16 3.4 SYSTEM INFORMATION ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 17 3.4.1 Network Information .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 17 3.4.2 DD Information ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 18 3.5 LOCAL SETTINGS ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 18 3.5.1 IP Configuration .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 19 3.5.2 Password Setting......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 20 3.5.3 Converter Configuration ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 21 3.5.4 Port Configuration ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 24 3.5.5 MIB Counters .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 25 3.5.6 SNMP Configuration ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 26 3.6.7 VLAN ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 27 3.6.8 Management VLAN Setting ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 29 3.6.9 Alarm Configuration.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 30 5
3.7 REMOTE SETTINGS ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 31 3.8 802.3AH OAM FUNCTIONS ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 31 3.8.1 802.3ah Configuration ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 32 3.8.2 Loop back Test ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 33 3.8.3 802.3ah Status ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 34 3.9 TOOLS ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 36 3.9.1 System Reboot ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 37 3.9.2 Save and Restore......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 37 3.9.3 Firmware Upgrade ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 38 3.10 LOGOUT ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 40 3.11 TROUBLESHOOTING ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 41 3.11.1 Factory Default. ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 41 3.11.2 Reset ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 41 3.11.3 LED Observations ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 42 3.11.4 Operation Checks ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 42 6
Chapter 1 Introduction
1.1 Welcome
Thank you for choosing IMC-1000M(S) Industrial Gigabit Ethernet OAM/IP Web Smart Media Converter. Throughout this document, the
two different models of this family will be referred to as IMC-1000MS or in an abbreviated form as just 1000MS. If you would like to skip right to
the installation of the industrial grade converter, proceed to Chapter 2.
This manual is used to explain the hardware installation procedures and operation of IMC-1000MS, and present its capabilities and
specifications. This manual is divided into 3 chapters, the Introduction, Installation, and Provisioning Chapters.
Installers should carefully read the Chapters 1&2, Introduction and Installation. The divisions in that manual are intended for use by
personnel to answer questions in general areas. Planners and potential purchasers may read the Introduction to determine the suitability of the
product to its intended use; Operating Personnel would use the Web Based Management Chapters and Appendices to become familiar with
the settings. Network Administrators should read the chapters on Web Based Management and Trouble Shooting to become familiar with the
diagnostic capabilities, network settings and management strategies.
1.2 Product Description
IMC-1000MS is an industrial grade electrical to optical media converter for Gigabit Ethernet. There are two models, one with fixed optical
transceiver (1000M) and one supporting pluggable SFP transceiver (1000MS). These converters sport embedded stand-alone Web based
management over IP networks as well as IEEE802.3ah OAM for remote in-band management.
IMC-1000MS is an IEEE802.3ah OAM compliant copper to fiber Gigabit Ethernet solution housed in rugged DIN rail or wall mountable
enclosure. These converters are designed for harsh environments, such as industrial networking and intelligent transportation systems (ITS)
and are also suitable for many military and utility market applications where environmental conditions exceed commercial product
specifications. Standard operating temperature range models (-10 to 60°C) and wide operating temperature range models (-20 to 75°C) fulfill
the special needs of industrial automation applications. These devices are designed to make conversion between 10/100/1000Base-TX and
100/1000Base-FX with SC, ST connector (IMC-1000M) or SFP LC connector (IMC-1000MS). When deployed as a stand-alone solution, this
industrial media converter incorporates an easy to use Web user interface for operation, administration and maintenance of both local and
remotely connected IMC-1000MS converters. By offering 802.3ah OAM compliance, this converter can be linked to any 802.3ah compliant
fiber switch and support loop back and dying gasp functions. When used as a remote converter for our centrally controlled and managed
FRM220 managed rack, all functions of this converter can be remotely controlled and monitored via in-band management, including bandwidth control, duplex, speed, VLAN configuration and more.
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1.3 Product Features
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Redundant dual DC inputs
IP30 rugged metal housing
Wide temperature model supported (-20C~75C)
Auto-Cross over for MDI/MDIX at UTP port
Auto-Negotiation or Forced Manual mode for UTP port
Supports Dual Rate (100/1000) SFP for selectable Fast or Gigabit speed on fiber
Supports 802.3X flow control Enable or Disable
Supports Jumbo Frames up to 9600 bytes
Supports 16 Tag VLAN Groups
Supports 802.1Q tagging
Ingress/Egress Bandwidth control with 64K granularity
Supports 802.3ah-OAM loop back and dying gasp (remote power failure detection)
Supports firmware upgrade via Web
Supports Digital Diagnostics (DOM) for supported SFP
Includes RMON counters
Supports password setting for authentication
Supports Link Fault Pass Through (LFP) Function
Supports Auto Laser Shutdown (ALS) Function
Supports DHCP client for automatic TCP/IP configuration
Supports in-band remote management from FRM220 rack management
IMC-1000MS SFP socket supports a wide range of standard SFP modules to address any network situation.
Single-mode, Multi-mode, Multi-rate, Dual Rate (100/1000), Single fiber bi-directional, Coarse and Dense Wave Division Multiplexing (CWDM
and DWDM) and Copper media
WARNING: Fiber optic equipment may emit laser or infrared light that can injure your eyes. Never look into an optical fiber or connector port.
Always assume that fiber optic cables are connected to an active laser light source.
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1.4 Specifications
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Optical Interface
Connector
Data rate
Duplex mode
Fiber
Distance
Wavelength
Electrical Interface
Connector
Data rate
Duplex mode
Cable
Distance
Indications
Power
Input
Consumption
Dimensions
Weight
Temperature
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Humidity
Certification
MTBF
SFP cage (1000MS) or Duplex SC, ST, FC (1000M)
100/1000Base-FX (125Mbps/1.25GMbps optical rate) Dual Rate Support
Full duplex on fiber
Depends on SFP
Depends on SFP
Depends on SFP
RJ-45, shielded
auto, 10Mbps (10Base), 100Mbps (100Base), or 1000Mbps (1000Base)
auto, Full or Half
Cat 5e or better
100Meters maximum
LED (PWR, FX Link, LAN Link, LAN Speed)
Dual Inputs for redundancy
12/24/48VDC, 9.6~60VCD absolute
<5W
155 x 88 x 23mm (D x W x H)
110g
Operating: -10 ~ 60°C (standard), -20~75°C (extended range)
Storage: -20 ~ 85°C
10 ~ 90% non-condensing
CE (EMI/LVD), FCC, RoHS Compliant
75000 hrs
1.5 Management Features
Once configured for TCP/IP access, these units support a Web Smart GUI for intuitive setting via point & click.
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1.6 Panel
1000M
1000MS
LED Indicators
(see next page)
The LAN Speed and Fiber Speed LEDs
use dual color to indicate speed.
Green indicates Fast Ethernet (100M).
Amber indicates Gigabit Speed.
When off, the LAN Speed LED
Fixed
indicates 10M speed.
GbE Optical
1 x RJ-45 port, supports
10/100/1000M Ethernet
1 x SFP port, supports any
155M or 1.25G transceiver
Transceiver
Factory reset procedure
Apply power to 1000M(S).
Allow 30 seconds to fully boot.
Using a pencil or ball-point pen, press the
'DEFAULT' recessed push-button switch (located
on the face plate) and hold for 6 seconds. The unit
will be restored to factory default almost
immediately. The defaults are:
DEFAULT:
Use to recover from lost password or to return
all settings to factory default values.
Figure 1. Panel Graphics
IP=10.1.1.1
netmask=255.255.255.0
GW=10.1.1.254
password reset to 'admin'
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1.7 LED Indicators
IMC-1000M and IMC-1000MS have LEDs on the front face that report the condition of power, Fiber link & Speed, LAN link & Speed as well
as power or link fault.
PWR1
PWR2
Fault
Fiber
LINK/ACT
Speed
LAN
LINK/ACT
Speed
IMC-1000M(S) LED Indicators
PWR1: This green LED will light if power is connected and active at the PWR1 terminal connection.
PWR2: This green LED will light if power is connected and active at the PWR2 terminal connection.
Fault: This red LED will light if there is a power, fiber or TP fault condition.
Fiber LINK/ACT: This green LED will light when the fiber port has an optical link and flash when there is data traffic.
Fiber Speed: This two color LED will indicate the fiber speed setting. Green indicates 100M, while amber color indicates 1000M fiber speed.
LAN LINK/ACT: This green LED will light when the LAN port has a link and will flash when there is Ethernet traffic.
LAN Speed: This two color LED will indicate the UTP (LAN) speed. Green indicates 100M, while amber color indicates 1000M UTP speed. If
not lit, a LAN speed of 10M is indicated.
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Chapter 2 Installation
2.1 Mounting Options
IMC-1000M(S) comes with both wall mount and DIN rail hardware brackets. When installing the DIN rail bracket, be sure to correctly align
the orientation pin.
Pin hole
DIN Rail
Wall Mount
mounting
un-mounting
IMC-1000M(S) with DIN Rail bracket has a steel spring in the upper rail of the bracket. This spring is compressed for mounting and unmounting by applying downward force.
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2.2 Electrical Installation
Power & Alarm
9.6 ~ 60VDC
Dual Inputs
A removable terminal block provides both power and alarm connections. Power can be provided through the dual inputs from separate
sources. One electrical relay can be wired into an alarm circuit. From the common pin (COM), the relay can be connected as Normally Open
(NO) or Normally Closed (NC). The alarm is triggered by programmable events of either link loss for optical or electrical or both. The relay is
able to support a maximum current carrying capacity of 1A@24VDC.
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2.3 Installation of SFP Modules
CTC Union supplied SFP modules are of the Bale Clasp type. The bale clasp pluggable module has a bale clasp that secures the module
into the SFP cage and has a handle to aid in removing the module.
Bale Clasp type SFP
2.3.1 Inserting a Bale Clasp SFP Module into the Cage
Step 1 Close the bale clasp upward before inserting the pluggable module.
Step 2 Line up the SFP module with the port, and slide it into the cage. Seat it. Attach fiber cable.
2.3.2 Removing a Bale Clasp SFP Module
Step 1 Remove fiber cable. Open the bale clasp on the SFP module. Press the clasp downward with your index finger.
Step 2 Grasp the SFP module between your thumb and index finger and carefully remove it from the SFP cage.
Follow all ESD precautions when handling SFP modules.
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Chapter 3 Web Based Provisioning
3.1 Introduction
In an effort to make Networking devices easier to configure, many devices can now be configured via a Web Page, which should be
familiar to all Internet users.
The web page is accessed by the Default IP Address of the device from a Web Browser such as Internet Explorer or Firefox in the
following way:
http://10.1.1.1/ (Assuming the device has Default IP Address of 10.1.1.1 )
Before accessing this device by web browser, the IP address must be known or it must be reset or changed to be used on the desired
network. Please refer to Chapter 1, section 1.6 for the factory reset procedure. For initial configuration, you must set your PC to the default IP
subnet and access this device that way. Then you can change the IP address through the web interface.
3.2 Web Login Page
Access the device via a web browser.
Enter the password 'admin' and click "Login".
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3.3 Web Main Page
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3.4 System Information
3.4.1 Network Information
The information displayed on this page gives specific device, network information, and port status for the local 1000MS and for any remote
that is accessible via IEEE802.3ah OAM in-band management.
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3.4.2 DD Information
The DD or DDOM information is read from the MSA compliant SFP module and can be displayed via the web user interface.
3.5 Local Settings
The following is a listing of the local settings that can be performed via the web interface for the IMC-1000M(S) industrial media converter.
We will go through the settings here, one by one, in detail.
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3.5.1 IP Configuration
Use this screen to set the TCP/IP configuration for the local unit. Note, that if you change the IP address you could lose remote
management for this device. Remember to save settings under the “Tools” menu.
The above shows the factory default TCP/IP settings for IMC-1000MS.
DHCP Client, when enabled, will allow the IMC-1000MS to automatically get the IP configuration settings from the network's Dynamic Host
Configuration Protocol server. When setting this device with static IP, make sure this is disabled (disabled is the default).
IP Address is the dotted/decimal format for the IPv4 address to remotely manage this device.
The Subnet Mask defines the type of subnet the device will be on. The proper subnet setting will be defined by the network administrator.
The Gateway is the default path for any packets NOT belonging to the local subnet. This IP address is the address of the router on your
network. It is also entered as a dotted/decimal IPv4 format address. If the device will only be managed on the local subnet, setting a gateway
address is optional.
After applying settings, do not forget to save the configuration under the ‘Tools’ menu so that the settings are permanent.
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3.5.2 Password Setting
This function is used to modify the default password for the device. The password is required so that only authorized users have access to the
management of the IMC-1000MS.
Key in the current password and type in the new password twice, then click the “Apply” button.
After applying settings, do not forget to save the configuration under the ‘Tools’ menu so that the settings are permanent.
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3.5.3 Converter Configuration
The Converter configuration menu includes special features of IMC-1000MS.
All of these special functions will be explained on the following two pages. Select the proper radio buttons and then click the “Apply” button.
Remember to save settings under the “Tools” menu.
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The remote Management functions of the converter can be disabled. Once disabled and saved, regardless of the 802.3ah OAM settings,
the remote management feature is disabled. When management is enabled, the remote management feature will be available.
This converter is capable of supporting Jumbo Frames (9k byte packets) when this option is enabled. Note that in order to support jumbo
frames, the TP speed and duplex must match the FX. i.e., 1000M/Full. Jumbo Frames are not typically used on a normal network, since most
devices are not able to handle them and they would be truncated. Most PCs, servers, switches, DSL and WiFi do not support jumbo frames.
Jumbo frames can only work on a pure Jumbo frame network, which currently only exists in data centers for server-to-server or server-tostorage connections and on some education back bone networks. Jumbo frames will always be considered to be illegal, non-standard
Ethernet packets, according to IEEE802.3. In most cases, the call for jumbo frame support is just marketing hype.
Link Loss Carry Forward or Link Fault Pass through (LFP) allows a link condition to be passed from fiber to TP or from TP to fiber. This
function is disabled by default.
Auto Laser Shutdown (ALS) is an optical safety mechanism which will shutoff laser transmission if the transceiver experiences a loss of
receive signal. This function is disabled by default.
Forward CRC Frame option is disabled by default. The normal behavior of a switch is to read the entire Ethernet frame (store), calculate
the check sum and compare to the FCS in the packet. If the checksum matches, the packet is transmitted (&forward). If the checksum does
not match, the switch considers the packet to have CRC error and drops it. If this option is enabled, the packet with CRC error will still be
forwarded instead of being dropped.
The option Forward Pause Frame allows pause frame forwarding to occur when enabled. Pause frames are special broadcast frames
defined in IEEE802.3X. Normally pause frames are used by the switch to throttle packets through a bottle neck rather than drop excess
packets (for example, if 1000M data stream is exiting a lower speed 100M port). Normally, the pause frames are not forwarded between
interfaces in the switch. In many cases, pause frames are considered problematic. Therefore, their forwarding is disabled by default in this
converter.
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Management Packet High Priority is a function which is enabled by default. Unless VLAN is enabled, this function is meaningless. The
packet priority is included as 3 bit priority in the VLAN tag. Management packets will be assigned highest priority so that even in the presence
of high traffic throughput, this converter can still be easily managed.
Broadcast Storm is a condition where either a loop exists on the network or an Ethernet transceiver is bad and exhibiting jabber. In
addition there are the deliberate attempts to bring a network down through virus and denial of service routines. When enabled, the Broadcast
Storm Filter will recognize and block the forwarding of these broadcasts.
Multicast storms happen when application participants request retransmits of information they have missed in the multicast stream. There
are many applications, like video streaming, IP based punch clocks, IP based surveillance trackers and camera, that come with multicast or
some broadcast based protocol turned on by default. The Multicast Storm Filter can be enabled to filter these unwanted effects.
The Unknown DA Unicast Storm Filter can be used to filter the Unicast broadcasts whose objective is to cause deny-of-service. Some
Trojans and virus start scanning multicast IP ranges causing excess broadcasts and reducing network performance.
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3.5.4 Port Configuration
This screen is for the configuration of the electrical Ethernet port (TP) and the optical port (FX).
Both the TP and FX Port Active are enabled by default. If a port is disabled, all transmission through this port will be stopped. The
1000M’s LAN or Fiber Link LED will be extinguished if the port is made inactive. However, any connected device will still detect an Ethernet
link.
The UTP port Mode supports auto-negotiation per IEEE802.3u as well as manual forced mode setting of Speed (10/100/1000) and
Duplex (Half/Full). In 802.3u, speed can be auto detected, however the Duplex mode MUST be negotiated. When an 802.3u compliant device
is configured in auto negotiation mode, failure to negotiate Duplex (for example, if connected to legacy equipment or to equipment configured
in forced mode) will result in the Auto device assuming a Half-Duplex operating mode. Do not connect forced Full mode Ethernet ports to an
auto device as this will result in a Duplex-Mismatch.
The FX port will be able to auto detect speed (100M or 1000M) although there is no standard for fiber speed and duplex negotiation.
Therefore, it is important that at least one device on the fiber link be manually configured for speed. In the example here, the device is
manually configured for fiber speed of 100M.
Ethernet Flow Control (IEEE802.3X) is a mechanism for temporarily stopping the transmission of data on Ethernet family computer
networks. It can work in conjunction with rate limiting to avoid dropped packets from TCP. Flow control should also be used with care and with
full knowledge of its effect when used to pause traffic coming from a switch.
The rate limiting is adjustable for both ingress (packets received into the TP or FX port) and egress (packets transmitted from the TP or
FX port) in granularity of 64k. By default, rate limiting is disabled. Once enabled, the rate limit can be set in nx64k rates where n=1 to 16000.
Entering an “n” value of zero (0) will again disable the rate limiting.
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3.5.5 MIB Counters
The counters have an accumulation of received bytes and packets for each port (UTP, Fiber and Management). The distribution of those
packets is further delineated into packet types (Unicast, Multicast, Broadcast) and packet sizes. Also counted are illegal packets and dropped
events. This display can be refreshed or the counters cleared by clicking the appropriate buttons.
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3.5.6 SNMP Configuration
SNMP or Simple Network Management Protocol is an industry standard, ISO layer 7 application, for management of network devices. The
SNMP deployed in the IMC-1000MS is SNMPv1. By default, SNMP is disabled.
In the example above, SNMP has been enabled along with trap mode. SNMP traps will be sent, unsolicited, to the trap server at the
configured IP address (10.1.1.100 in the example). The community strings further control authentication for the SNMP 'get' and 'set'
operations.
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3.6.7 VLAN
3.6.7.1 VLAN Group By default, this device is VLAN unaware, making it completely transparent to VLAN tags. In most application, this device only acts as a media
converter and therefore the device should be transparent. IMC-1000MS does support up to 16 VLAN groups. By using the check boxes for
each port, the ingress access to different VIDs can be controlled here for TP, FX and management.
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3.6.7.2 VLAN Per Port Configuration Within the IMC-1000MS there are actually three different ports, the external copper and fiber ports, plus the internal CPU port
(management). The VLAN Per Port Setting page deals with how frames exit (egress) the copper, fiber and CPU (management). These are the
Frame Egress Type. The following operations may be performed to the outgoing frames: <1>: Replace Tag The switch will remove VLAN
tags from packets then add new tags to them. The inserted tag is defined in ”Port VLAN Entry”. <2>: Remove Tag The switch will remove
VLAN tags from packets, if they are tagged. The switch will not modify packets received without tags <3>: Add Tag The switch will add VLAN
tags to packets, if they are not tagged when these packets are output on this port. The switch will not add tags to packets already tagged. The
inserted tag is defined in ”Port VLAN Entry”. <4>: Don't Touch Tag Do not insert or remove VLAN tags to/from packet which is output on this
port.
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3.6.8 Management VLAN Setting
This function is independent of any other VLAN group or per port settings. The settings here provide a very quick method to configure how
access to management is controlled.
There are three control 'states' defined as follows:
Disable : This means that the "access control" is not enabled. When set to disable, management is allowed in the respective port. By default,
both the TP and FX ports allow full management using untagged packets.
Enable : The access control for the effected port is now enabled. Only packets tagged with the assigned "Management VID" are allowed for
management of the 1000MS.
Drop : No management is allowed from this port connection. If, for example, the TP port is set for 'Drop', then there will be no way to manage
this device when connected to the UTP port. The management is effectively blocked on that port. This dropped setting might be used in an
application where only management arriving from the FX port is desired and all management from TP is blocked.
Caution : The "Apply" button is immediate and persistent. An incorrect setting here could result in 'loss of management' when applying that
setting. For example, if you are managing the device via the UTP connection, select 'Drop' for the UTP port and then click 'Apply',
management will be immediately lost. In fact, the device will no longer reply to 'ping' at its IP address. Simply rebooting the device will not be
enough to recover. To regain management control, either access management from the fiber side, or reset the device to factory default and
start over again.
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3.6.9 Alarm Configuration
IMC-1000MS has an alarm relay with NO (normally open) and NC (normally closed) relay contacts which are available at the terminal block
on the top of the unit. When there is an alarm condition (the RED alarm LED is lit) the NC relay will be closed. When there is no alarm
condition (the RED alarm LED is off) the NO relay will be closed. If the device has no power, the NC relay will also be in a closed state (alarm
active).
The programming here of the alarm serves two functions. First, the alarm indication of LED and the relay state are controlled by fault
conditions of power, UTP link and/or Fiber link. Second, if SNMP is enabled, traps will be generated only on those alarm conditions that are
configured.
In the default configuration, all sources for alarm are enabled. Settings are applied immediately.
Example configuration:
An alarm will be triggered (and SNMP trap sent) only in the event of a loss of fiber link.
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3.7 Remote Settings
When 802.3ah is active in both the local and remote unit (with fiber connection), the in-band management provides an embedded channel
to control and configure the remote by using OAM (layer 2) Ethernet packets. The same settings available to the local unit are available under
the Remote Setting menu, with the exception of password setting, SNMP, Counters and Alarm configuration.
3.8 802.3ah OAM Functions
This converter supports IEEE 802.3ah, an OAM protocol that operates at Ethernet Layer 2 (Data Link layer). OAM provides mechanisms to
monitor link operation / health and to improve fault isolation. OAM only works point-to-point over the fiber link. In addition to standard 802.3ah
functions like loop back and dying gasp, IMC-1000MS also implements OAM to provide complete provisioning of the remote fiber connected
converter, without using Layer 3 IP protocol. By using OAM, we can remote manage another fiber connected 1000M(S) converter, without IP
addressing. From this menu we can also perform some basic diagnostics, such as loop back test.
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3.8.1 802.3ah Configuration
To use the OAM functions, the 802.3ah Function setting must be enabled. It is not enabled by default. The 802.3ah mode is used to
configure an OAM pair. In a pair, one unit must be ‘active’, while the other must be ‘passive’. We typically place the remote converter (CPE) in
‘passive’ mode and make the local converter ‘active’. ‘Passive’ is the default setting when 802.3ah function is enabled.
In order to do Remote Loop Back test, this option must be enabled in both converters. By default it is enabled.
The normal status when OAM is working is shown above. If OAM is not passing due to fiber disconnect, Discovery Status will be Fault. If
OAM is not enabled, this status window will not even be shown.
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3.8.2 Loop back Test
The loop back test is a non-intrusive test which uses OAM packets and will not affect normal transmissions. The number of OAM frames
used (the number of times the loop back is done) is set by the Send Packet Number. The default is 1 packet.
The Packet Length (Not including CRC) controls the packet size of the OAM frames used for loop back testing. The default is 60 bytes.
The CRC of Ethernet packets uses 4 bytes. Valid Ethernet packets range in size from 64 bytes to 1518 bytes. VLAN tag adds another 4 bytes
for a maximum size of 1522 bytes. Any frame size larger than this is technically called a jumbo frame and is not IEEE802.3 compliant.
The Loop Back Test Start is accomplished by clicking the “Apply” button.
802.3ah is a slow protocol with a maximum throughput of 10 packets per second. The test above takes about 10 seconds for 100 packets.
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3.8.3 802.3ah Status
The Global Config fields display the state of OAM, if OAM is enabled. We can also see the MAC addresses of the local and remote units
in the OAM manageable pair. The Flags Field list the results of individual events based on the results of OAM protocol data units
(OAMPDUs). Lastly, when two OAM devices start negotiation, there is Discovery Information passed between them. The results are shown
here.
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Most information carried by OAMPDU is encoded using type-length-value (TLV) format. The first octet (or byte) of the OAMPDU indicates
the type. This type is used to let the OAM client know how to decode the bytes containing the information. The next octet carries the length of
the information. This display has TLV information for both the local and remote OAM units.
Ethernet OAM also defines a set of standard event conditions that Ethernet links should monitor in normal operation, and if detected,
should be signaled to a peer entity. The Link Event Notification Status conditions reflect a degraded, but not yet inoperable, Ethernet
connection. These conditions include threshold-crossing alarms on the frequency of symbol errors and frame errors.
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One of the most critical problems in an access network for carriers is differentiating between a simple power failure at the customer
premise and an equipment or facility failure. Dying gasp provides this information by having a station indicate to the network that it is having a
power failure.
If remote management is lost, we simply need to check the Remote Dying Gasp Count register to see if it has been incremented.
3.9 Tools
The Tools menu includes the System Reboot, Save and Restore settings and Firmware Upgrade functions.
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3.9.1 System Reboot
When the converter is rebooted, all counters and registers are cleared and the converter starts fresh. If OAM is enabled, the discovery
process will start. After selecting the System Reboot menu item, a confirmation dialogue box will pop up. Click “OK” to reboot the converter or
click “Cancel” to leave without rebooting. The converter requires about 20~25 seconds to fully reboot.
3.9.2 Save and Restore
After performing configuration of the converter, the settings must be saved. Click the “Save To Flash” button to save settings. If you wish
to abandon all settings and return to the previous settings before doing configuration, click the “Load From Flash” button.
To restore all settings to factory default, click the “Reset To Factory” button. The IP address will also be reset, so you might lose
management contact with the converter. So, be careful.
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3.9.3 Firmware Upgrade
If bugs are discovered, if functions are added, or if factory default settings are changed, the firmware in the converter will require
upgrading. The only method to do upgrade for this converter is through the local Web (HTTP) user interface. The firmware image is uploaded
from the browser (Post), it is checked for integrity, the flash is erased and then the flash is written with the new image.
DO NOT LET ANY POWER INTERRUPTION OCCUR DURING THE UPGRADE PROCEDURE.
Click the “Browse” button and locate the image upgrade file through the “File Upload” dialogue box, then click “Open”.
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Next, click the “Upgrade” button.
The “Upload success!” indicates the image was transferred OK. Do not do anything for the next 60 seconds!!!!.
After 60 seconds, you may click the link to re-login to the web interface. Login as usual.
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3.10 Logout
Logging out will ensure that the management session with IMC-1000MS is terminated. This is especially important if you are using a public
computer to manage the device. Once logged out, a password must be entered to access IMC-1000MS again.
Click the “OK” button to completely log out. Click the “Cancel” button to return to configuration of IMC-1000MS.
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3.11 Troubleshooting
3.11.1 Factory Default.
Apply power to IMC-1000MS and allow 25-30 seconds to fully boot. Using a pencil or ball-point pen, press the 'DEFAULT' recessed pushbutton switch (located on the face plate) and hold for 10 seconds or more then release. DO NOT POWER OFF; Allow the unit to again fully
reboot (about 25 seconds). The factory default TCP/IP settings are:
IP=10.1.1.1
netmask=255.255.255.0
GW=10.1.1.254
The username and password are both reset to 'admin'.
Additionally, any VLAN, 1Q or bandwidth control will be disabled. All ports will be enabled, UTP ports set for auto-negotiation.
3.11.2 Reset
The reset function is a hardware reboot. Using a pencil or ball-point pen, press the 'DEFAULT' recessed push-button switch (located on the
face plate) and hold for 3 seconds (no more than 4 seconds) and release. The unit will reboot using the previous saved configuration.
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3.11.3 LED Observations
3.11.3.1 Power On At initial power on, PWR LED will not be lit. If active LAN is connected to the TP port, that Link and Speed LED will be lit. After 25 seconds
the CPU has fully booted, PWR LED will be lit and any fiber link or alarm will be actively shown by the LEDs
Error conditions :
If all LEDs immediately light and never turn off, or if no LED ever lights, then the unit is possibly defective. Be sure to double check power
source.
3.11.3.2 UTP Link Test. Following a complete power and boot up (about 25 seconds) the converter will be active and LAN port will display LAN LNK state when
connected to a live Ethernet circuit. The LAN SPD LED will be green when connected to Fast Ethernet (100M) and yellow when connected to
Gigabit Ethernet (1000M). When connected to 10Base-T the LAN SPD LED will be off.
3.11.3.3 Fiber Link Test Following a complete power and boot up (about 25 seconds) the converter will be active. For IMC-1000MS, place a known good SFP
module into Fiber Port cage. Use a simplex patch cable (single fiber strand, LC to LC), route the SFP Tx back to the Rx optical connection.
The FX LNK LED should light. For IMC-1000M, use a simplex patch cable (single fiber strand, SC to SC, ST to ST or FC to FC), route the Tx
back to the Rx optical connection. The FX LNK LED should light.
Caution: When performing a physical loop back on any fiber port, DO NOT connect the LAN port to a live Ethernet network. Doing so
could create a broadcast storm.
3.11.4 Operation Checks
3.11.4.1 Converter Check A very easy way to ensure a pair of IMC-1000MS is passing traffic, is to place them between two PCs. Connect PC1 to LAN of one
converter and PC2 to LAN of the other converter. When the two PCs can ping each other, it indicates IMC-1000MS pair is operational.
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3.11.4.2 Ping Test With IMC-1000MS reset to factory default, connect a PC and configure the PC to the 10.1.1.0 network (10.1.1.100 recommended). Use a
PC to ping IMC-1000MS at its factory default IP address of 10.1.1.1. With a direct connection to PC, there should be no time outs and ping
latency should be less than 1 millisecond. If you switch to another IMC-1000MS, be sure to clear the PC ARP table. Every IMC-1000MS has
the same default IP address, but every unit has a different MAC address. To clear the PC’s MAC table, open a command window and execute
the command ‘arp –d’. In addition, if you disconnect the PC from any LAN connection and then re-connect, the ARP table should also be
cleared.
3.11.4.3 Web Access Test With IMC-1000MS reset to factory default, connect a PC and configure the PC to the 10.1.1.0 network (10.1.1.100 recommended). Use a
PC to connect to IMC-1000MS at its factory default IP address of 10.1.1.1 using a web browser (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, etc.). The
local web page login page should display. Use ‘admin/admin’ to login; the local main page should be displayed in the browser.
If the ping test can pass and the login page can be displayed but login fails, we recommend that cookies be deleted. You may either delete
all cookies for your browser or only the individual cookie created for the IP address of IMC-1000MS.
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