Craftsman 358.796131- 26.2cc Specifications

Wingspan: 100.5" [2553mm]
Wing Area: 1487 sq. in. [95.9 sq. dm]
Weight: 16 - 25 Lbs. [7258 - 11340g]
Wing Loading: 24.8 - 38.7 oz./sq. ft.
[75.7 - 118.1 g/sq. dm]
Fuselage Length: 67.8 in. [1722mm]
DE
MA
IN
A
S
U
WARRANTY.....Top Flite Models guarantees this kit to be free of defects in both material and workmanship at the date of purchase. This warranty does
not cover any component parts damaged by use or modification. In no case shall Top Flite‘s liability exceed the original cost of the purchased kit. Further, Top Flite reserves
the right to change or modify this warranty without notice. In that Top Flite has no control over the final assembly or material used for final assembly, no liability shall be assumed
nor accepted for any damage resulting from the use by the user of the final user-assembled product. By the act of using the user-assembled product the user accepts all
resulting liability. If the buyer is not prepared to accept the liability associated with the use of this product, the buyer is advised to immediately return this kit in new and
unused condition to the place of purchase.
Top Flite Models P.O. Box 788 Urbana, Il 61803
Technical Assistance Call (217)398-8970 productsupport@top-flite.com
READ THROUGH THIS INSTRUCTION BOOK FIRST. IT CONTAINS IMPORTANT INSTRUCTIONS AND WARNINGS CONCERNING THE ASSEMBLY AND USE OF THIS MODEL.
Entire Contents © Copyright 1999
STNGP03
V1.0
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PRECAUTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
DECISIONS YOU MUST MAKE . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Flaps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Hinges & Pull-Pull System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Cockpit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Covering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
COMPETITION-MINDED MODELERS . . . . . . . .4
Scale documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
DESIGNER'S NOTES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
OTHER ITEMS REQUIRED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
BUILDING SUPPLIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Adhesives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
IMPORTANT BUILDING NOTES . . . . . . . . . . . .7
DIE-CUT PATTERNS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 & 9
METRIC CONVERSIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
GET READY TO BUILD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
BUILD THE TAIL SURFACES . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
Build the stabilizer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
Build the elevators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Hinge the elevators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
Build the fin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Build the rudder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
BUILD THE WING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
Preliminary assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
Frame the panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
Build the aileron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
Build the flap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Mount the wing servos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
Hook up the controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
BUILD THE FUSELAGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
Build the formers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
Build the bottom of the fuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
Add the tops of the formers . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
Add the stab saddles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
Build the front of the fuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
Mount the landing gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
FINAL CONSTRUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
Mount the engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
Mount the stab and fin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
Mount the wing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
Mount the servos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
Sheet the bottom of the fuselage . . . . . . . . . .39
Sheet the top of the fuselage . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
Make the windows and doors . . . . . . . . . . . .40
Build the landing gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Mount the cowl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
Finish the front cabin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Make the pushrod exit covers . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Assemble the wheel pants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Mount the stab struts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
Mount the landing gear fairings & wing struts .49
Prepare the model for covering . . . . . . . . . . .51
Balance the airplane laterally . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
FINISHING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
Painting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
Covering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
Final assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
GET YOUR MODEL READY TO FLY . . . . . . . .53
Balance your model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Final hookups and checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Control surface throws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
PREFLIGHT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
Identify your model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
Charge your batteries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
Balance your propellers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
Find a safe place to fly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
Ground check your model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
Range check your radio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
Check list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
ENGINE SAFETY PRECAUTIONS . . . . . . . . . .55
AMA SAFETY CODE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
FLYING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .back cover
Takeoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .back cover
Flight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .back cover
Landing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .back cover
NOTE: We, as the kit manufacturer, provide you
with a top quality kit and great instructions, but
ultimately the quality and flyability of your finished
model depends on how you build it; therefore, we
cannot in any way guarantee the performance of
your completed model, and no representations
are expressed or implied as to the performance or
safety of your completed model.
-2-
PROTECT YOUR MODEL,
YOURSELF & OTHERS
FOLLOW THESE IMPORTANT
SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
Your Stinson is not a toy, but a sophisticated working
model that functions very much like an actual
airplane. Because of its realistic performance, if you
do not assemble and operate your Stinson correctly,
you could possibly injure yourself or spectators and
damage property.
To make your R/C modeling experience totally
enjoyable, get assistance with assembly and
your first flights from an experienced,
knowledgeable modeler. You’ll learn faster and
avoid risking your model before you’re truly ready to
solo. Your local hobby shop has information about
flying clubs in your area whose membership includes
qualified instructors.
You can also contact the Academy of Model
Aeronautics (AMA), which has more than 2,500
chartered clubs across the country. We recommend
you join the AMA which will insure you at AMA club
sites and events. AMA Membership is required at
chartered club fields where qualified flight instructors
are available.
Contact the AMA at the address or toll-free phone
number below.
Academy of Model Aeronautics
5151 East Memorial Drive
Muncie, IN 47302
(800) 435-9262
Fax (765) 741-0057
or via the Internet at: http://www.modelaircraft.org
1. You must build the plane according to the plan and
instructions. Do not alter or modify the model, as
doing so may result in an unsafe or unflyable model. In
a few cases the plan and instructions may differ
slightly from the photos. In those instances the
plan and written instructions are correct.
2. You must take time to build straight, true and strong.
3. You must use a proper R/C radio that is in first
class condition, the correct sized engine and correct
components (fuel tank, wheels, etc.) throughout
your building process.
4. You must properly install all R/C and other
components so that the model operates properly on
the ground and in the air.
5. You must test the operation of the model before
every flight to insure that all equipment is operating
and you must make certain that the model has
remained structurally sound.
6. If you are not already an experienced R/C pilot,
you must fly the model only with the help of a
competent, experienced R/C pilot.
Please inspect all parts carefully before you start
to build! If any parts are missing, broken or
defective, or if you have any questions about
building or flying this model, please call us at:
(217) 398-8970 or e-mail us at
productsupport@top-flite.com
We’ll be glad to help. If you are calling for
replacement parts, please look up the part
numbers and the kit identification number
(stamped on the end of the carton) and have
them ready when you call.
Remember: Take your time and follow
instructions to end up with a well-built model
that is straight and true.
INTRODUCTION
Congratulations and thank you for purchasing the Top
Flite Gold Edition Stinson SR-9. Due to the large
quantity of details and accessories on the full size
subject (cowl blisters, windows & doors, step ladder,
landing gear covers, etc.), the Stinson makes an ideal
project for experienced scale modelers. However, due
to the familiar building techniques and all wood
construction, this Gold Edition kit is also an ideal
project for moderately experienced builders who have
not yet ventured into the realm of scale craftsmanship.
Those who wish to go all out can even cover their
“Reliant” with a fabric and paint system and add rib
stitching. That’s the beauty of this Gold Edition kit—
since we’ve done all the engineering you’ll end up with
an impressively detailed scale model. Another benefit of
choosing the Stinson as a scale subject is its relaxing
flight characteristics. The Stinson’s large, high wing and
long tail moment yield an “honest” craft that instills
confidence. Working flaps are the icing on the cake!
This is one bird among your squadron that is sure to
make many appearances at your local flying field.
Though the Stinson requires a little more skill to build
than some of the other models in the Gold Edition
lineup, complete instructions (right down to the
airfoiled landing gear covers and opening doors)
leave little or nothing up to the imagination. Highly
experienced scale builders may venture off in areas
of scale detail and apply their own techniques, but
should refrain from making modifications to the main
structure. Less experienced modelers need only to
follow the instructions while building such details.
One last note before you continue: We highly
recommend that you get photos or a book about the
Stinson Reliant, or send for a documentation package
as soon as possible (see Scale Documentation on
page 4). This way, you can study the drawings and
photos while you’re building to get a feel for how your
SR-9 should look when you’re done. This will also help
you figure out what scale details to add and decide on
a trim scheme (you can also dream about how cool
your SR-9 is going to look when it’s done!).
-3-
DECISIONS YOU MUST MAKE
ENGINE
Recommended engine size:
1.08 to 1.99 cu. in. [17.7 to 32.6cc] 2-stroke
1.2 to 1.6 cu. in. [19.7 to 26.2cc] 4-stroke
25 to 35cc ignition
The Top Flite Gold Edition Stinson will perform well
with any of the engines within the recommended
range, but you must base your engine selection upon
how much your finished model will weigh. This is
greatly determined by the level of scale detail you
plan to achieve and the method of covering. Refer to
the Designer’s Notes section for further details on
engine selection.
We highly recommend the O.S.® FT-160 Twin
Cylinder glow engine featured in the instructions. It
has ample power for even a 22 lb. model with scale
appearance and sound!
FLAPS (Optional)
Your SR-9 is designed to incorporate working flaps;
however, flaps are optional and not required for an
excellent flying experience. Without flaps, the takeoff
roll is a bit longer and the landing speed is a bit
faster. If you do not wish to build working flaps,
simply glue them into position. You can wait until you
are well into wing construction until deciding whether
or not to build working flaps. For flaps, you will need
these additional items:
Hinges of your choice
Two servos
Y-connector
Servo extension cords (if the Y-connector is
not long enough)
HINGES & PULL-PULL SYSTEM
COMPETITION-MINDED MODELERS
Due to the variety of hinges available, and the
preferences some modelers have for certain types,
this kit does not include hinges. Our preference is
Robart® #310 Super Hinge Points (24 required,
ROBQ2510), but other hinges may be used as long
as they are suitable for giant-scale use.
The Top Flite Gold Edition Stinson SR-9 was
designed from scale three-view drawings supplied by
Scale Model Research (address follows) and photos
of various full-size Stinsons. The scale of this kit is
1:5, or one-fifth scale.
Similarly, a pull-pull cable system for rudder control is
not supplied with the kit. We used the Sullivan No.
520 Pull-Pull Cable Kit, but other systems will work,
provided they are suitable for use in giant models.
COCKPIT
Since the Top Flite Stinson features scale opening
doors, a complete scale cockpit interior is virtually a
“must.” While you could just “black out” the cabin with
fuel proof paint, a highly detailed scale interior is easy
to achieve with Top Flite’s Stinson Reliant Scale
Interior Kit (TOPQ8409). The kit features front and rear
seats, a laser-cut wood instrument panel and other
accessories. The interior may be installed at any time,
but will be easier to fit during fuse construction.
COVERING
Of the many different types of model airplane
coverings available, a “fabric” type of covering is
most preferable due to its scale appearance. The
prototype on the box was covered with 21st Century
Super Coverite, then primed and painted with Stits
paint. If you prefer not to use a covering which
requires painting, you could use 21st Century® Fabric
which is available in a wide variety of colors and
closely simulates painted cloth.
If you plan to enter your SR-9 in scale competition
(it’s lots of fun, and the runways are usually paved!),
this kit qualifies for Fun Scale, Sportsman Scale and
Expert Scale. All the scale classes have the same
flight requirements in which you must perform ten
maneuvers, five of which are mandatory. The other
five are up to you—easy stuff like a slow, low
“inspection pass” with flaps extended, or maybe a
touch-and-go. If you have never competed in a scale
contest, you could start out in Fun Scale. In Fun
Scale, the only documentation you need for static
judging is any proof that a full-size aircraft of this
type, in the paint/markings scheme on your model,
did exist. A single photo, a kit box cover from a plastic
model, or even a painting is sufficient proof! If you’re
interested, contact the AMA for a rule book that will
tell you everything you need to know. Look in the
back of the AMA magazine (Model Aviation) for a
schedule of events.
The trim scheme we selected for the prototype
featured on the kit box cover is a variation of a trim
scheme taken from an SR-9 produced in 1937, NC17154—which was still flying when this was written.
If you are not concerned with a 100% accurate trim
scheme you can make a variation of the one on the
box, or design your own. If you plan to compete in
scale competition, use the photos in your
documentation package as a guide.
One last note for those interested in scale
competition: Strive to build your model to reflect your
documentation. Whatever lines and features appear
on the full-size plane should also appear on your
model. There seems to be much variation of the
Stinson restorations in existence, so refer to the
photos and documentation of the Stinson you are
using for your model.
-4-
Your Top Flite Gold Edition Stinson Reliant is
intended for scale and general sport flying
including mild aerobatics such as chandelles
and stall turns. Its structure is designed to
withstand such stresses. If you intend to use
your Stinson for more rigorous types of flying
such as aggressive aerobatics or flying from
rough fields, it is your responsibility to reinforce
areas of the model that will be subjected to the
resulting unusually high stresses.
SCALE DOCUMENTATION
Three-view drawings and photo packs of full size SR9’s are available from:
Scale Model Research
3114 Yukon Ave, Costa Mesa, CA 92626
(714) 979-8058
Fax: (714) 979-7279
DESIGNER’S NOTES
For several years I’ve been hearing modelers say, “It’s time
for something different.”
Well, this is it - The Top Flite Stinson Reliant, Gold Edition, for
the scale craftsman. We have tried hard to design a
‘traditional’ stick model with Gold Edition engineering. This
model is a departure from what we normally do, so if you like
it, please let us know.
The Top Flite Stinson Reliant is a LARGE model that requires
strong craftsmanship and modeling skills. Be prepared for a
richly rewarding project that requires dedication to a
sometimes challenging project. Do not be intimidated by the
Gull Wing of the Reliant. The wing is relatively easy to build on
a flat building board with the included die-cut jigs. DO be mildly
intimidated by the traditional mostly stick-built fuselage.
The Top Flite Stinson Reliant is a sport scale model of the
model SR-9 Reliant, manufactured by Stinson in the late
1930’s. With some modifications, it can also be built as a
model SR-10. The most recognizable features of the aircraft
are the gull wing and the 18 blisters on the engine cowl for
the engine valve assemblies.
The gull wing at first looks difficult to build, but, it is actually
comparatively easy to build using the die-cut trailing edge
jigs. The most difficult part of the wing construction is the
extensive cap stripping needed to duplicate the fabric
covered appearance of the full-size aircraft. There are 132
feet of cap stripping material included in this kit, but you
won’t need all if it. You should end up with at least two feet
of scrap!
With its eighteen blisters, the cowl looks, and is,
intimidating! We like to call it our easy-to-build
20-piece cowl. It sure does look nice on the model though. If
you aren’t up to it, leave the blisters off and tell everyone
your model is the SR-10-2. The plans show where to modify
the top fuselage formers to the outline of the SR-10.
Speaking of the fuselage, it’s pretty much your typical stickbuilt structure. We have worked hard to engineer a structure
that is easier to build than most stick type structures and to
assure a straight, square structure. We have even die-cut
some of the sticks where precision is required (die-cut
sticks; now that’s unique). As the full-scale aircraft is very
big, so is this 1/5 scale model. Its very size makes it easier
to incorporate some impressive scale details. To gain access
to the wing hold-in bolts you must build at least one
functional door. Once you build one, the second won’t take
nearly as long.
Just keep one thing in mind as you build this model: “You
never finish a scale model; you eventually come to a point
where you stop working on it and fly.” While this is a
moderately difficult project, it is also richly rewarding.
SCALE ACCURACY
The Top Flite Stinson Reliant SR-9 is a faithful reproduction
of the full-size aircraft, with a few exceptions:
1. The horizontal stab/elevator area has been increased by 9%
to improve pitch stability. To make the stab closer to scale,
move the stab leading edge 1/2" aft. Then re-contour the
ribs and stab tip.
2. The wing strut attaches directly to the side of the fuselage
to simplify construction. This is close to the location of the
SR-10 but is noticeably different than the SR-9. If desired,
you could move the mounting location to the scale
location.
3. The windscreen shown is for the SR-9. With some balsa
blocks you could make one that looks like the SR-10. This
is one area where your craftsmanship will allow you to
make the windscreen as scale-like as you desire.
This is one model that can be made very true
to scale.
POWER
DO NOT overpower this model. The power plant needed for
your model will largely depend on how you finish it and
whether you use a gas or glow engine. If you cover the model
with fabric and then paint it, you could easily add four or
more pounds to the finished weight of the model. A gas
engine will also add a pound or two. This model can easily
handle the weight, however, as it has a large wing area and
high-lift airfoil.
The weight of the model does affect the power required to fly
it, however. If you are careful to build the model as light as
possible and cover if with film instead of fabric, the flying
weight will be closer to 16 lbs. At this weight a strong 1.20size four-stroke engine will be ample power. But if you build
heavy and cover the model with fabric and paint, the model
will weigh closer to 25 lbs., requiring a more powerful engine.
Our prototype model was covered with Super Coverite Fabric
and then painted with the Stits paint system. It was detailed
with pinking tape, rib stitching and other detailing. It had a
flying weight of 23 lbs. and was powered by an O.S. FT-160
twin-cylinder engine. This proved to be a near perfect
combination. The engine produced a static thrust of 13 lbs.,
8 oz. with a Zinger 18 x 6-10 prop. A strong 1.20-size engine,
such as the O.S. FS-120 III or the YS-120 NC, will produce a
static thrust of 13 lbs. on a 16 x 6-10 prop. This would be
ample thrust for a model that weighs less than 20 lbs.
-5-
You should also bare in mind that this is a high-drag aircraft.
Weight is not the only factor you need to consider when
selecting an engine. Normally, a 1.20-size engine would be
adequate power for a 16 lb. model - and is for the Stinson as
well. But, due to the higher drag of the Stinson, a tired 1.20 size
engine will not give the performance you would expect during
slow speed maneuvers, such as a go-around during a landing.
That is why we recommend only powerful 1.20 engines.
It is important that you do not overpower this model as well.
This is a fabric-covered aircraft which means the tail surfaces
and wings will not have the rigidity you are used to with other
models. Too much power will result in higher airspeeds, which
could cause flutter. While a 35cc gas engine is within the
recommended power range, a high performance, powerful 3W
type of engine should not be used. Our 23 lb prototype model
flew in a convincing, scale like manner on an OS FT-160
engine producing 13 lbs., 8 oz of thrust.
If you do install an engine at the upper end of the power
range, you should sheet the tail surfaces with 1/16" balsa to
increase their rigidity.
If you cover the model with fabric and paint, be careful not to
allow excess weight to accumulate by applying too much
filler and paint. This is a large model and paint can quickly
increase its weight if not properly applied.
WHAT’S INCLUDED IN THE KIT
This is a very complete kit for a model of its size and type.
However, there are a few items that are not included. We
have not included an engine mount and mounting hardware
because of the wide variety and type of engines that could
be used on this model. We do not feel it fair to increase the
cost of the kit by including a mount that most modelers
won’t use anyway. Similarly, we have not included control
surface hinges or the rudder pull-pull linkage system. It has
been our experience that many modelers building this type
of kit are likely to have strong preferences for these
components. (If you have no preference, we recommend
Robart #310 Super Hinge Points (24 total) (2-ROBQ2510) and
the Sullivan No. 520 steel Pull-Pull Cable Kit.)
FLIGHT CHARACTERISTICS
Our prototype model had no bad habits or other areas to be
concerned about. Its ground handling was excellent for a tail
dragger and it was easy to takeoff and land from a grass
field. It showed little tendency to ground loop, even on a
smooth hard surface runway. It has a thick airfoil, and its
fuselage cross section is large, so the model has a great deal
of drag. This limits the top speed of the model and allows it
to slow quickly for landing. With full flaps, steep approaches
can be accomplished, just as in the full-scale aircraft.
Because of the high drag, be prepared to carry more power
for landing than you are accustomed to with other models.
OTHER ITEMS REQUIRED
These are additional items you will need to complete
your Stinson that are not included with your kit. Order
numbers are in parentheses (GPMQ4130). Our
exclusive brand is listed where possible: TOP is the
Top Flite® brand, GPM is the Great Planes® brand,
and HCA is the Hobbico® brand.
❏ 4 to 5 Channel radio with 5 high-torque servos
for ailerons, elevator and rudder, and standard
servos for flaps (2) and throttle (1)
❏ Y-connectors for aileron, elevator and flap servos
❏ (2) 24" Servo extensions for aileron servos
❏ (4) 24" Servo extensions for battery, rudder,
elevator servos (for gasolineengine installation, in
which these components are installed in the tail)
❏ Pull-Pull cable kit for rudder steering (SULQ3120)
❏ (2) 5" Main Wheels (DUBQ0800)
❏ 2" Tail wheel (DUBQ0755)
❏ 16 oz. Fuel tank (GPMQ4107) (for glow engines)
❏ Silicone fuel tubing (GPMQ4131) (for glow engines)
❏ 24 oz. Fuel tank (GPMQ4112) (for gas engines)
❏ Gasoline fuel tubing (for gas engines)
❏ Fuel filler valve (GPMQ4160) (for glow engine)
❏ 1/2" (HCAQ1050) or 1/4" (HCAQ1000) R/C
Foam rubber padding
❏ 1/5 Scale replica radial engine (TOPQ7903)
❏ Covering
❏ Paint
❏ Large capacity Rx battery pack suitable for giant
scale models
BUILDING SUPPLIES
Here’s a list of supplies you should have on hand
while you’re building. Some of these are optional.
Use your own experience to decide what you need.
We recommend Great Planes Pro™ CA and Epoxy.
❏ Long handle 7/64" ball end hex wrench
(GPMR8003)
❏ Silver Solder w/flux (GPMR8070)
❏ Great Planes Plan Protector (GPMR6167) or
wax paper
❏ Masking Tape
❏ Easy–Touch™ Bar Sanders
❏ Dremel® #178 cutting bit (for countersinking
screws in the servo hatch covers)
ADHESIVES
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
❏
4 oz. Thin CA (GPMR6004)
4 oz. Medium CA+ (GPMR6010)
2 oz. Thick CA- (GPMR6015)
CA Accelerator (GPMR6035)
CA Debonder (GMPR6039)
CA Applicator Tips (HCAR3780)
30-minute Epoxy (GPMR6047)
or
45-minute Epoxy (GPMR6048)
❏ 6-minute Epoxy (GPMR6045)
❏ Pro Wood Glue (GPMR6161)
❏ Microballoons (TOPR1090)
❏ Milled Fiberglass (GPMR6165)
❏ Lightweight Hobby Filler (Balsa Color,
HCAR3401)
❏ Auto body filler (Bondo® or similar)
❏ Isopropyl Alcohol (to clean up excess epoxy)
Note: In several instances the manual suggests
using brass tubing sharpened on one end to cut
accurate, clean holes in balsa. Use a rotary tool with
a cut-off wheel to sharpen the outside edge of the
tube, and a hobby knife to sharpen the inside edge of
the tube. The sizes of tubing used are 3/16", 7/32"
and 3/8".
RECOMMENDED COVERING
TOOLS AND ACCESSORIES
❏ Top Flite Heat Gun (TOPR2000)
❏ Top Flite Trim Seal Tool (TOPR2200)
-and❏ Top Flite Sealing Iron (TOPR2100)
❏ Top Flite Hot Sock (TOPR2175)
TOOLS
-or-
❏ #11 Blades (HCAR0311, 100 qty.)
❏ Single-Edge Razor Blades (HCAR0312, 100 qty.)
❏ Razor Plane (MASR1510)
❏ Hobbico Builder’s Triangle (HCAR0480)
❏ T-Pins (HCAR5100 (S), HCAR5150 (M),
HCAR5200 (L)
❏ Drill Bits: 1/16", #48 (or 5/64"), 3/32", #36 (or
7/64") and 6-32 tap, 1/8", 9/64" (or 5/32"), 5/32",
7/32", 1/4"
❏ Curved-Tip Scissors (HCAR0667)
-6-
❏ 21st Century Sealing Iron (COVR2700)
❏ 21st Century Cover Sock (COVR2702)
EASY-TOUCH BAR SANDER
There are two types of screws used in this kit:
Sheet metal screws are designated by a number
and a length.
main spar even if the wing is upside-down when
you are working on it. Similarly, move the former
up means move the former toward the top of the
fuselage even if the fuselage is upside-down when
you are working on it.
For example #6 x 3/4" [1.91mm]
A flat, durable, easy to handle sanding tool is a necessity
for building a well finished model. Great Planes makes a
complete range of patented Easy-Touch Bar Sanders
and replaceable Easy-Touch Adhesive-backed
Sandpaper. While building the Stinson we used two
5-1/2" Bar Sanders and two 11" Bar Sanders equipped
with 80-grit and 150-grit Adhesive-backed Sandpaper.
Machine screws are designated by a number,
threads per inch, and a length.
For example 4-40 x 3/4" [1.91mm]
IMPORTANT BUILDING NOTES
• When you get to each step, read that step
completely through to the end before you begin.
Frequently there is important information or a note
at the end of the step that you need to know before
you start.
• Photos and sketches are placed before the step
they refer to. Frequently you can study photos in
following steps to get another view of the same parts.
• Note that there are four plan sheets. Two of them
must be cut along the dashed lines and joined with
tape. The other two plans are used separately.
(Continued on page 10)
Here’s the complete list of Easy-Touch Bar Sanders
and Adhesive Backed Sandpaper:
5-1/2" Bar Sander (GPMR6169)
11" Bar Sander (GPMR6170)
22" Bar Sander (GPMR6172)
33" Bar Sander (GPMR6174)
44" Bar Sander (GPMR6176)
11" Contour Multi-Sander (GPMR6190)
12’ roll of Adhesive-backed sandpaper
80-grit (GPMR6180)
150-grit (GPMR6183)
180-grit (GPMR6184)
220-grit (GPMR6185)
Assortment pack of 5-1/2" strips (GPMR6189)
We also use Top Flite 320-grit (TOPR8030, 4 sheets)
and 400-grit (TOPR8032, 4 sheets) wet-or-dry
sandpaper for finish sanding.
• When you see the term test fit in the instructions,
it means that you should first position the part on
the assembly without using any glue, then
slightly modify or custom fit the part as necessary
for the best fit.
• Whenever the term glue is used you should rely
upon your experience to decide what type of glue
to use. When a specific type of adhesive works
best for that step we will tell you what type of glue
to use.
• Whenever just epoxy is specified you may use
either 30-minute epoxy or 6-minute epoxy. When
30-minute epoxy is specified it is highly
recommended that you use only 30-minute (or
45-minute) epoxy because you will need the
working time and/or the additional strength.
• Occasionally we refer to the top or bottom of the
model or up or down. To avoid confusion, the top
or bottom of the model is as it would be when the
airplane is right side up and will be referred to as
the top even if the model is upside-down during
that step, i.e. the top main spar is always the top
-7-
DIE-CUT PATTERNS
-8-
DIE-CUT PATTERNS
-9-
COMMON ABBREVIATIONS
Deg
Fuse
LE
Stab
LG
=
=
=
=
=
degrees
fuselage
leading edge
stabilizer
landing gear
Elev
"
Ply
TE
mm
=
=
=
=
=
elevator
inches
plywood
trailing edge
millimeters
TYPES OF WOOD
BALSA
BASSWOOD
GET READY TO BUILD
METRIC CONVERSION
1" = 25.4mm (conversion factor)
1/64"
1/32"
1/16"
3/32"
1/8"
5/32"
3/16"
1/4"
3/8"
1/2"
5/8"
3/4"
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
.4mm
.8mm
1.6mm
2.4mm
3.2mm
4mm
4.8mm
6.4mm
9.5mm
12.7mm
15.9mm
19mm
1"
2"
3"
6"
12"
15"
18"
21"
24"
30"
36"
PLYWOOD
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
25.4mm
50.8mm
76.2mm
152.4mm
304.8mm
381mm
457.2mm
533.4mm
609.6mm
762mm
914.4mm
1. Unroll the plan sheets. Roll them inside out so they lie
flat. Cut the two fuselage plan sheets where indicated
along the dashed lines and join them with tape.
2. Remove all the parts from the box. Use a ballpoint
pen (not a felt tip pen) to lightly write the name or
size on each piece so you can identify it later. Use
the die-cut patterns on page 8 & 9 to identify and
mark the die-cut parts before you remove them from
their die sheets. Many of the parts already have
numbers stamped on them, but in some cases the
numbers are located alongside the parts or only on
the die drawings in the manual. You may remove all
the die-cut parts from their die sheets now or wait
until you need them. If a part is difficult to remove,
don’t force it out but cut around it with a hobby knife
and a #11 blade. After you remove the parts from
their die sheets, lightly sand the edges to remove
slivers or die-cutting irregularities. Save some of the
larger scraps of wood.
3. Separate the parts into groups such as stab, fin,
wing, and fuse. Store smaller parts in zipper-top
food storage bags.
- 10 -
BUILD THE TAIL SURFACES
Build the stabilizer
❏ 1. Place the stab plan over your building board
(you may cut it from the fuse plan) and cover it with
Great Planes Plan Protector or waxed paper.
❏ 2. Without using any glue, position the die-cut 1/8"
balsa stab spar on the die-cut 1/8" balsa stab TE.
Note that the stab spar is centered height-wise on
the stab TE to accommodate the cap strips and is
centered lengthwise to accommodate rib S7 at both
tips. Glue the stab spar to the stab TE as described.
From now on, this assembly will be referred to as the
stab TE.
Some modelers prefer to vent the air that gets
trapped inside the control surfaces (stab, elevators,
fin, rudder, ailerons, flaps) while covering. Trapped
air expands and prevents the covering from fully
shrinking. To avoid this, drill or cut holes in the ribs
before you begin building. Later, drill a hole in an
inconspicuous spot near the tip of the leading edge
of the control surfaces and in the trailing edge of the
stab and fin. This is most important on smaller parts
like the elevators and rudder (though they’re not so
small on this model!).
❏ 8. Test fit both die-cut 3/32" balsa ribs S1A and
the die-cut 1/8" balsa stab LE brace to the
assembly. Make adjustments where required for a
good fit, then glue the pieces into position.
❏ 5. Without using any glue, insert the die-cut 3/32"
balsa stab ribs S1 - S6 into the notches of the stab
TE. Position the assembly over the plan. Do not
install S1A at this time.
❏ 3. Make the 1/4" stab TE brace by gluing together
both die-cut 1/8" balsa stab TE braces so the
notches align.
❏ 4. Glue the stab TE brace to the stab TE. Note that
the notches in the stab TE brace are opposite the
notches in the stab TE.
Now that the preliminary stuff is done, let’s start
framing this baby up!
❏ 6. Cut rib jigs from four 1/4" x 1/4" x 36" balsa
sticks. The rib jigs extend from the forward jig tabs to
the aft jig tabs on all the ribs. Use the rib jigs and Tpins to hold the ribs over their location on the plan.
After all the ribs are in position, use a small square
to align the TE over the plan.
❏ 7. Use thin CA to glue the ribs to the TE. As you
proceed, be certain the jig tabs of all the ribs are
contacting the plan.
- 11 -
❏ 9. Use a hobby knife or a bar sander to bevel the
leading edge of the ribs to match the aft sweeping
angle of the LE. Cut two shaped 15" balsa stab LE’s
to match the plan, then glue them centered, as
shown in the sketch, to the fronts of the ribs and the
LE brace.
❏ 12. Build the right stab tip the same way.
❏ 13. Cut ten 1" long stab hinge blocks from a 1/4"
x 7/16" x 24" balsa stick, then glue them to the stab
TE where shown on the plan. The hinge blocks
should be vertically centered on the TE.
both sides of the stab. Glue the cap strips to the top
of the ribs. Carefully and lightly sand the LE and TE,
blending them to the cap strips, but do not round the
LE until instructed to do so.
❏ 16. Remove the stab from your building board.
Save the rib jigs for use on the fin.
❏ 17. Use a hobby knife to carefully trim the jig tabs
from the bottom of the stab ribs. Follow up with a bar
sander to make a smooth transition as though the jig
tabs never were there.
Note: If you are sheeting the entire stab, perform
step 19 before step 18.
❏ 18. Sheet the bottom of the center section using
❏ 10. Cut the stab cross-bracing as shown on the
plan from two 3/16" x 3/16" x 36" balsa sticks. Glue
the bracing into position (you may have to
reposition some of your T-pins if they interfere with
the cross-bracing).
❏ 11. Glue together the three die-cut 1/8" balsa stab
tip LE’s to make a stab tip LE. The larger piece is
“sandwiched” between the two smaller pieces. Build
the left stab tip using the stab tip LE you just made,
the die-cut 1/8" balsa stab tip gussets, the die-cut
3/32" balsa stab rib S7 and an additional 3/16" x
3/16" cross-brace. Trim the TE even with tip rib S7.
❏ 14. Sheet the top of the center section across ribs
S1A with a 1/16" x 3" x 24" balsa sheet.
Important: If you are using a large engine, sheet the
entire stab with 1/16" balsa (not included).
the remainder of the 1/16" sheeting you used for the
top (aren’t you glad you’ve already cut them?). Make
the cap strips for the bottom of the ribs using the two
remaining harder 1/16" x 1/4" x 36" balsa sticks you
set aside earlier and glue them into position. Sand
the bottom of the stab to blend the LE and TE to the
cap strips and the sheeting.
❏ 19. Drill a 9/64" (or 5/32") hole through both die❏ 15. Of the 1/16" x 1/4" x 36" balsa sticks supplied
with this kit, select four of the harder sticks. Use two
of the sticks you selected to make the cap strips
extending from the LE to the TE on ribs S2 to S6 on
- 12 -
cut 1/8" plywood strut mount plates. Glue a 4-40
blind nut in both plates. Trim the cap strips between
ribs S4 and S5 to accommodate the plates, then glue
them to the bottom of the stab between the ribs as
shown. Fill the space between the aft edge of the
mount plate and the TE with leftover balsa.
Build the elevators
centerline to be exact) to make certain the elevator
core will remain true and on center when it’s time to
glue it to the elevator LE.
Build the left elevator first.
❏ ❏ 6. Glue two die-cut 3/32" balsa elevator S7A
ribs together. Refer to the following photo, then clamp
the glued-together ribs to S7 on the end of the stab
with a 1/16" spacer in between. Use your bar sander
to sand the end of the ribs even with the trailing
edge. Leave the ribs temporarily clamped to the stab
until instructed to remove the clamps.
Note: The following steps are intended to assure
accurate alignment of the elevator, the elevator tip
and the stab. When the elevator is neutral or
centered, the elevator tip must also be centered to
align with the stab—especially at the leading edge
where even a slight misalignment will be easily seen.
Keep this in mind while you proceed.
❏ 1. Make both elevator cores by gluing together
the two die-cut 3/32" balsa pieces as shown in the
photo and on the plan.
❏ ❏ 4. Glue one of the elevator cores to one of the
elevator LE’s using the guidelines you drew to keep
the core on center and straight. Use a small square
to hold the core perpendicular to the LE as you
proceed. Note that the LE extends beyond the root
end of the core by 1/8".
❏ 2. Make two 1/4" elevator leading edges by
gluing together two sets of die-cut 1/8" balsa
elevator leading edges (ELE). Lightly sand the
edges to align them and to remove excess glue.
❏ 3. Use a ballpoint pen and a straightedge to mark ❏ ❏ 5. Glue the die-cut 3/32" balsa elevator tip
a centerline on both elevator LE’s. Use T-pins to hold
the straightedge on center while you mark the line.
Using the centerline as a guide, mark an additional
guideline close to the centerline (3/64" from the
core to the elevator LE. Hint: Place both cores on
pieces of 1/2" balsa or something similar to assure
correct alignment. Trim the tip of the elevator LE even
with the tip core and elevator core.
- 13 -
❏ ❏ 7. Temporarily, but securely pin the elevator LE
to the stab TE and S7 ribs to the stab. Be certain
the elevator core and elevator tip core are centered
and neutral, then glue the elevator tip core to the
S7A tip ribs.
❏ ❏ 8. Remove the clamps. Use a bar sander to
carefully sand the elevator LE and elevator tip ribs to
match the stab.
❏ ❏ 11. Of the remaining 1/16" x 1/4" x 36" sticks
supplied, select four of the softest sticks for the
elevator edging. Glue one of the sticks to the edge
of the elevator as shown on the plan. This is easily
done if you begin at the tip (at ribs S7A), use thin CA
to glue just a couple of inches at a time and keep the
edging centered as you proceed toward the root.
When you near the curve at the root, use a fine razor
saw to lightly cut part way through the inside of the
edging to assist in bending around the curve. Trim
the edging to the correct length, bend it around the
curve and glue it in place.
Use this photo and the sketch below for the
following four steps.
❏ ❏ 14. Remove the elevator from the stab. Make
❏ ❏ 12. Bend an additional 1/16" x 1/4" x 36" stick
around the first layer of edging and glue it in place
with medium CA.
the elevator control horn mounting block for the
bottom of the elevator from the 5/8" x 5/8" x 22"
basswood stick and glue it to the bottom of the
elevator. Make the elevator ribs for the end of the
elevator from leftover 1/8" balsa and glue them in
position, then blend the ribs, elevator LE and control
horn block by sanding.
Set the first elevator aside, take a break, clean off your
workbench and return to step four and build the right
elevator. We’ll see you when you get back to here!
Hinge the elevators
❏ ❏ 9. Use 3/32" x 5/8" x 24" balsa sticks to make
the elevator ribs that align with stab ribs 2, 3, 4, 5
and 6 for both sides of the elevator. Notice that the
ribs should be 1/16" below the elevator LE and taper
to a point at the TE to accommodate the cap strips.
Glue the ribs to the elevator.
❏ ❏ 10. Cut the cap strips for both sides of the
elevator ribs from a 1/16" x 1/4" x 36" balsa stick and
glue them in place. Sand the ends of the cap strips
even with the elevator core.
❏ 1. Make the elevator hinge blocks from leftover
3/16" balsa and 1/4" x 7/16" balsa. Glue them in
❏ ❏ 13. Make the last rib for the end of the elevator place on both sides of the elevator. Notice that the
from one of the 1/4" x 1/4" rib jigs you used when
framing the stab. Sand the rib to blend with the rest
of the structure, then carefully sand the elevator
edging and the elevator cap strips, blending them
as well. Round the leading edge of the stab as
shown in the cross section of the plan and finish
sanding the elevator and stab, carefully blending all
surfaces together.
- 14 -
hinge blocks should slide under the cap strips and
next to the elevator ribs so they will rest below the
covering when it is applied.
❏ 2. See the Hot Tip that follows, then drill holes or
cut slots for your hinges (not supplied) in both
elevators and the stab.
Build the Fin
❏ 1. Place the fin plan over your building board (you
may cut it from the fuse plan) and cover it with Great
Planes Plan Protector or waxed paper.
How to accurately mark the centerlines of the
control surfaces for hinging.
NOTE: In the following two photos, disregard the
sheeting on the right side of the fin and the fact
that the fin is no longer on the building board. Your
fin should still be pinned to your building board at
this stage.
❏ 2. Glue both die-cut 1/8" balsa fin TE’s together
so the notches align. Use a straightedge and a
ballpoint pen to draw a centerline on the back of the
fin TE.
❏ 3. Without using any glue, join the die-cut 3/32"
balsa fin ribs to the fin TE and place the assembly
over the fin plan. Use leftover 1/4" x 1/4" rib jigs from
the stab to hold the fin ribs to the plan.
❏ 7. Use a 1/16" x 3" x 24" balsa sheet to sheet the
LE of the fin as shown in the photo and on the plan.
A. Insert T-pins through the center of the elevator
LE near both ends. Position a straightedge along
the T-pins and mark a centerline with a fine-point
ballpoint pen.
B. Do the same for the other elevator and the TE of
the stab.
❏ 3. Bevel the LE of both elevators for control throw.
Make certain you can achieve 1" of up and down
control throw as measured at the widest part of
the elevators.
❏ 4. Use a small builder’s square to align the fin TE
with the plan and to make sure it is perpendicular to
your building board. Measure the distance between
the centerline you drew and your building board to
make sure the fin TE is true and level. Glue the TE to
the ribs.
❏ 5. Bevel the front of the fin ribs to the same angle
as the LE. Cut a shaped 15" balsa fin LE to the
length shown on the plan, then glue it into position.
The LE is centered on the fin ribs the same as it was
on the stab ribs.
❏ 6. Use the 3/16" x 3/16" sticks leftover from the
stab bracing to make the fin bracing between the
ribs where shown on the plan. Glue the fin bracing
into position.
- 15 -
❏ 8. Using the bottom fin sheeting pattern on the
plan, make the bottom fin sheeting from the
remainder of the 1/16" x 3" x 24" balsa sheet you
used in the previous step. Note: When using the
patterns provided, always cut the pieces larger than
the pattern to allow for positioning, trimming and
variances between individual models. Glue the
bottom fin sheeting to the fin.
❏ 9. Remove the fin from your building board. Turn it make the rudder core. (It’s kind of like a puzzle; can
over and cut off the jig tabs.
❏ 10. Make the three fin hinge blocks from a 1/4" x
7/16" balsa stick and glue them to the fin TE where
shown on the plan.
❏ 11. Sheet the right side of the fin with an additional
1/16" x 3" x 24" balsa sheet the same way you
sheeted the left side.
you figure it out?) Sand both sides of the rudder core
flat and even.
❏ 2. Glue both die-cut 1/8" balsa rudder LE’s
together. Glue the rudder core, on center, to the
rudder LE the same way you did the stab cores.
❏ 3. The same way you did the elevators, securely
but temporarily T-pin the rudder LE, accurately
aligned and on center, to the fin. Note: The top of the
rudder core and the rudder LE should extend above
the top of the fin by 1/16". Carefully sand the sides of
the rudder LE to match the fin TE.
❏ 6. The same way you did for the elevators, make
the rudder cap strips from 1/16" x 1/4" x 36" balsa
sticks and glue them to the rudder ribs. Sand the
ends of the cap strips flush with the rudder core and
glue the rudder edging around the TE.
❏ 7. Using leftover 3/32" balsa, make the small
❏ 12. Use two 1/16" x 1/4" x 36" balsa sticks to make
gusset as shown on the plan for the top of the fin.
Glue the gusset to the LE and rib V6.
the cap strips for the TE and ribs V3, 4 and 5. Sand
the fin, blending the sheeting, cap strips and LE
together. Set the fin aside for now.
Build the Rudder
❏ 4. The same as you did for the elevator ribs, cut
the rudder ribs from 3/32" x 5/8" x 24" balsa sticks
and glue them to the rudder core where shown on
the plan. Note that the rudder ribs should be 1/16"
below the rudder LE to accommodate the cap
strips (just the same as the elevators were).
❏ 5. Use leftover 3/32" and 1/4" balsa to make the ❏ 8. Test fit the 3/8" x 1" x 5-5/8" balsa rudder tip to
❏ 1. Working over the rudder plan, glue the six rudder hinge blocks and glue them to both sides of the top of the rudder. Carefully align the rudder tip
die-cut 3/32" balsa rudder core pieces together to
the rudder core where shown on the plan.
- 16 -
with the fin, then glue it to the rudder.
BUILD THE WING
Preliminary assembly
❏ ❏ 3. Cut along the partially die-cut line of one diecut 1/8" balsa outer TE spars and remove the jig.
Glue that outer TE spar to the front of another outer
TE spar that has the jig still attached.
❏ ❏ 1. When removing ribs from die-cut sheets,
save the 1-1/8" round plug from both rib 10’s.
Build the left wing panel first so yours matches
the photos.
❏ 9. Insert a 1/16" balsa spacer between the rudder
tip and fin rib V6. Hold the rudder tip to the fin with a
T-pin. Shape the rudder tip as shown on the plan to
match the rudder and fin.
Now you may separate the rudder from the fin.
❏ ❏ 4. Working over Great Planes Plan Protector,
glue together the die-cut 3/32" balsa pieces that
make up ribs W4, 5, 6 and 7. Note: Be certain to
leave a 1/4" gap between W7B M and W7B R.
❏ 10. Make the rudder control horn blocks for
both sides of the rudder from the remainder of the
5/8" x 5/8" basswood stick. Make the rudder base for
both sides of the rudder from the 3/8" x 1/2" x 12"
balsa stick. Trim the bottom cap strip and the rudder
edging to accommodate the rudder base, then glue
the rudder bases to the rudder. Trim, then sand the
rudder control horn blocks and the rudder bases to
blend with the rudder, but do not round or final shape
until instructed to do so (when it’s time to match the
rudder to the bottom of the fuse).
❏ 11. Hinge the rudder and fin the same as you did
the stab and elevators. Bevel the leading edge of the
rudder to allow for control throw. Be certain you can
achieve 2" control throw in both directions.
❏ ❏ 2. Glue together two die-cut 1/8" balsa inner TE
spars with the notches in alignment. Securely, but
temporarily, tack-glue the die-cut 1/8" balsa inner
TE spar jig to the bottom of the inner TE spar along
the aft edge. The jig will support the inner TE during
construction, but will be removed after the wing panel
is removed from the building board.
- 17 -
❏ ❏ 5. Glue the die-cut 1/8" balsa rib doublers to ribs
4 and 6 and the die-cut 1/8" plywood rib doublers to
ribs 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7. Refer to the plan to see which side
of the ribs the respective doublers are glued to (the
doublers go on the outside of all ribs except rib 7).
adjustments to the slots in the ribs as necessary so
the joiner box top can slide all the way through. Hint:
The joiner box top passes through the ribs at an
angle. A thin sanding tool such as a Perma-Grit
(F-102) makes sanding the angle in the slots easy.
❏ ❏ 10. Test fit the joiner box bottom through the slot
cut straight through. Therefore, you must bevel the
notches in ribs 4 thru 15 to allow the spars to pass at
the required angle. Use a single-edge razor blade, a
sharp hobby knife or a Perma-Grit sander to bevel
the notches in the ribs. Study the ribs and the spars
for the wing panel you are building to be certain you
are cutting the bevel in the correct direction.
in the bottom of ribs 2 thru 7 the same way.
❏ ❏ 11. Cut the bottom outer main spar from a
❏ ❏ 6. Cut four 17" joiner box rails from two 1/4" x
❏ ❏ 14. Bevel the notches of the die-cut 1/8" balsa
spar web and the outer TE spar the same way.
1/4" x 3/8" x 36" basswood stick to the length shown
on the plan (between ribs 15 and 5).
3/8" x 36" basswood sticks. Refer to the note at the
end of this step (you’re reading the steps all the way
through before proceeding, aren’t you?), then use
epoxy to glue two of the rails to the 1/8" x 1-11/16" x
14" ply joiner box top. Use the die-cut 1/8" balsa
and ply rail spacers to maintain the correct spacing
of the rails. Use C-clamps or weights to hold the rails
to the joiner top until the epoxy is fully cured. From
now on this assembly will be referred to as the joiner
box top. Note: The root end of the rails extend
beyond the 1/8" ply joiner box top by 3/32".
❏ ❏ 7. After the epoxy has fully cured, remove the ❏ ❏ 12. Following the dimensions in the sketch, cut ❏ ❏ 15. Bevel the aft edge of the outer TE spar to
spacers and sand the edges of the rails and ply box
top even. Use a ballpoint pen to write “top”
somewhere on the joiner box top.
the bottom inner main spar that fits between rib 5
and rib 2 from a 1/4" x 3/8" x 36" basswood stick (or
use the remainder of the same stick you used for this
step if you are building the second (right) wing panel).
❏ ❏ 8. Make an identical assembly the same way.
Mark it as the “bottom.”
the angle at which it will meet the inner TE spar 1"
from the end.
Clean all the balsa dust and wood chips off your
workbench and put away the CA. We still have more
work to do before it’s time to start gluing (but at least
we’re finally going to start fitting parts together!).
Frame the panel
❏ ❏ 1. Without using any glue until instructed to do
❏ ❏ 13. As you can see by observing the wing plan, so, fit ribs W5 through W15 on the spar web, then
the spar web, outer TE spar, top main spar and
add the bottom outer main spar and the outer TE
❏ ❏ 9. One rib at a time, test fit the joiner box top bottom main spar join the ribs at an angle. However, spar. Cut the top outer main spar from a 1/4" x 3/8"
through the slot in the top of ribs 2 thru 7. Make
the notches in the ribs for the spars can only be die-
- 18 -
x 36" basswood stick and add it to the assembly.
❏ ❏ 8. Use a metal file or sandpaper to remove any
burrs you find on both ends of the aluminum wing
joiner tube. Test fit the aluminum joiner tube into the
cardboard tube you just prepared to make sure it fits.
If necessary, remove glue bumps from the end of the
cardboard tube so the aluminum joiner slides
through without resistance.
❏ ❏ 2. Position the assembly over the wing plan
covered with Great Planes Plan Protector. Use 1/4" x
1/4" balsa jig sticks leftover from building the stab and
fin to securely hold the bottom outer main spar and the
outer TE spar over their positions on the plan.
❏ ❏ 5. Glue the die-cut 1/8" plywood root rib W1D to
W1. From now on these ribs will be referred to as W1.
Add W1 to the wing panel making certain the end of
the joiner box rails key into W1. Align the die-cut 1/8"
plywood dihedral gauge with the line indicated on the
plan. Position the joiner box top and bottom so that W1
is fully contacting the dihedral gauge.
❏ ❏ 9. Test fit the cardboard wing joiner tube
through ribs 1, 2 and 3.
❏ ❏ 3. Still without using any glue, add the inner TE
spar and ribs 2, 3 and 4 to the assembly. Tack glue
the die-cut 1/8" balsa spar wedge to the bottom
inner main spar and slip the assembly into position
under ribs 2 thru 5. Use additional leftover 1/4" x 1/4"
balsa rib jigs to hold the inner TE spar in position.
❏ ❏ 4. Slide the joiner box bottom through ribs 2 thru
7, then fit the joiner box top the same way.
❏ ❏ 6. Cut the top inner main spar to the
dimensions shown in the sketch from the remainder
of the basswood stick you used for the bottom inner
main spar (or use an additional 1/4" x 3/8" x 36"
basswood stick if this is your second (right) wing
panel). Still without using any glue, join the top inner
spar to the wing (you can take a peek at how the spar
fits the assembly in the following photo).
❏ ❏ 7. Cut a 6-5/8" piece from the cardboard wing
joiner tube. True the ends of the 6-5/8" tube with a bar
sander. Apply a small amount of thin CA to one end
of the tube, allow to cure, then sand smooth. Trim the
1-1/8" diameter 3/32" plug you saved from rib 10, to fit
in the other end of the tube. Glue it in place.
- 19 -
Time to get out the CA. Make sure it’s fresh and you
have plenty of spare tips because it’s finally time to
start gluing! As you proceed, be certain the bottom
outer main spar and the jig tabs of the TE spars are
fully contacting your building board and be certain all
the ribs are fully seated into the notches of the spar
web and TE spars.
❏ ❏ 10. Glue the spar web to the bottom spar, then
to ribs 4 through 15. Glue all ribs except rib 1 to the
TE spars and glue the outer TE spar to the inner TE
spar. Glue the outer and inner top main spars to each
other with epoxy and to all the ribs and the spar web
with CA. Do not glue the inner top spar to the joiner
box top until instructed to do so.
❏ ❏ 11. Glue rib W16 in place.
front of the outer LE near the end and carefully bend
LE stick, make the saw cuts, wet the end and glue it
❏ ❏ 12. Glue the die-cut 3/32" balsa LE brace to it into position. When you can achieve the bend, trim to ribs 1 thru 5 and the LE brace.
ribs 1, 2 and 3. Glue rib 1 to the inner TE spar only,
while using the dihedral gauge to hold rib 1 at the
correct angle over the plan.
the outer LE to the correct length, then glue it to the
front of the ribs.
❏ ❏ 18. Use a razor plane followed with a bar
❏ ❏ 13. From the larger of the two shaped 24" balsa
sander and 80-grit sandpaper to trim the LE even
with the ribs.
LE sticks, cut the inner LE section (that goes from
rib 5 to rib 9) to the length shown on the plan. Glue it
to the front of the ribs with the upper edge aligned
with the front of the ribs.
Now that the wing is stabilized, we can securely glue
the joiner box into position.
Use a felt tip pen to mark a line 5/32" above the
saw teeth on your razor saw. Use the line as a
guide so all your cuts will be the same depth for
uniform and controlled bending.
❏ ❏ 15. Cut 3/16" wide strips of leftover 1/8" balsa
and glue them to aft edge of the outer LE as shown.
Refer to this photo for the following four steps.
❏ ❏ 16. Glue together the eight die-cut 3/32" and 1/8"
❏ ❏ 14. Refer to the Hot Tip that follows, then cut the balsa pieces that make up the wing tip. Bevel the front
outer LE from the smaller shaped 24" balsa LE stick
and make the saw cuts at the end of the LE as shown
on the plan. Trim the bottom of the LE near the end
so you can lower it to the fronts of the ribs. Wet the
pieces to accommodate the wing tip sheeting that will
be added later on, then glue the wing tip to the wing.
Add the top gusset cut from leftover 3/32" balsa.
❏ ❏ 17. Trim the remainder of the larger balsa inner
- 20 -
❏ ❏ 19. Mix up about 1/4 oz. of 30 or 45-minute epoxy.
Add milled fiberglass for additional strength. Reposition
the dihedral gauge on rib W1 and align it with the plan
the same way you did before. Use the gauge to make
certain the top and bottom joiner boxes are in the
correct position and that W1 is at the correct angle.
Glue the top and bottom joiner boxes to the ribs
everywhere you can reach and glue the cardboard
joiner tube in position. Glue W1 to the ends of the joiner
box and glue the top inner spar to the ribs and the
joiner box top. Keep this operation nice and neat and
refrain from using gobs of epoxy, yet be thorough and
glue all the joints you can reach. Don’t worry about
areas you can’t reach because we will remind you to
apply glue to the rest of the joints after removing the
wing panel from the building board. Before the epoxy
cures, confirm the joiner box positioning and the
alignment of W1 with the dihedral gauge. Allow the
epoxy to fully harden before proceeding.
from a 3/32" x 3" x 36" balsa sheet. Test fit the
sheeting to the wing and trim as required for the
correct fit. The sheet ends in the middle of rib 13. If
necessary, wet the top of the sheeting with water or
window cleaner to facilitate bending. Place a shim
from leftover balsa, under the wing tip so you don’t
misalign it as you are pressing the sheeting down.
Then, glue the tip sheeting to the wing.
plywood strip to a leftover 1/16" balsa strip. Cut the
strip into two pieces as shown and glue them, ply
side down, to the wing with 3/8" extending aft of the
inner TE (this can be seen in the sketch at step 5 on
page 24).
❏ ❏ 20. Cut notches in rib 5 on both sides of the top
main spar to accommodate the die-cut 1/16"
plywood top spar braces. Glue the braces in
position with epoxy.
❏ ❏ 21. Use a 1/8" x 1/4" x 31" basswood stick for
❏ ❏ 24. Use a 3/32" x 3" x 36" balsa sheet to make
the top LE spar that goes from rib 15 to rib 5 and a
1/8" x 1/4" x 24" basswood stick from rib 5 to rib 1.
Save the remainder of the 24" stick for the bottom of
the wing. Glue the spars in position.
the top wing sheeting that runs from the tip
sheeting at rib 13 to rib 1. You’ll have to trim a piece
of the sheeting from the tip and glue it near the other
end so the sheet will be wide enough to reach from
the LE spar to the LE at rib 5. After you’ve trimmed
the sheet to the correct size, glue it only to the LE
spar. Wet the sheet and bend it to the LE and glue it
to the ribs and LE. Hint: Place weights over the
trailing edge of the wing to hold it to your building
board while you apply pressure to the LE as you
bend the sheeting down.
❏ ❏ 22. Use a bar sander with 80-grit sandpaper to
sand the top of the wing, blending all the spars to
the ribs.
❏ ❏ 26. Glue the die-cut 3/32" balsa mid TE to the
notches in the bottom of ribs 7, 8 and 9. Bevel the
aft edge of the mid TE to match the tapering angle
of the ribs.
Now for the fun part!
Refer to this photo for the following two steps.
❏ ❏ 27. Cut the cap strip for the outer TE spar that
❏ ❏ 23. Use the wing tip sheeting template ❏ ❏ 25. Make the 3/32" balsa/ply wing TE sheeting fits between ribs 9 and 15 from a 3/32" x 1/4" x 36"
provided on the plan to make the wing tip sheeting
for the flap area by laminating a 1/32" x 1" x 18"
- 21 -
balsa stick and glue it into position.
❏ ❏ 28. Cut the cap strips for the top of all the ribs
from five more 3/32" x 1/4" x 36" balsa sticks and
glue them into position. The cap strips are most
easily and accurately cut with a sharp, single-edged
razor blade. Start with the longest cap strips first. If
you cut one too short, it may still be used for the next
rib down the line. Note that the cap strips on ribs 9
and 15 are offset for the aileron and the cap strip on
rib 7 is offset for the flap.
❏ ❏ 33. Use a razor plane and a bar sander with 80grit sandpaper to clean up the leading edge of the
wing by removing excess glue and trimming the top
and bottom sheeting even with the LE. Just roughly
shape the LE for now. Do not final sand until
instructed to do so.
Build the aileron
The aileron is built directly onto the wing, then
removed after completion. This insures accurate
alignment which may otherwise be difficult to achieve
due to the built-in washout of the wing.
❏ ❏ 34. Use six more 3/32" x 1/4" x 36" balsa sticks
for the cap strips over the ribs and outer and inner TE
spars of the wing panel. Cut but do not glue the cap
strips for ribs 3, 4, 10 & 11.
❏ ❏ 29. Take the wing off the building board.
Remove the spar wedge you tack glued to the
bottom inner main spar. Use 30-minute epoxy to glue
the bottom inner main spar and the die-cut 1/16"
plywood bottom spar braces into position. While
you have your epoxy out, glue the joints around the
joiner box that you couldn’t reach earlier (I told you
we’d remind you!).
❏ ❏ 30. Carefully trim the jig tabs off the outer and
inner TE spars. Sand the spars even with the ribs.
Use a razor plane followed by a bar sander and 80grit sandpaper to trim the bottom of the LE even with
the ribs.
❏ ❏ 31. Cut the bottom outer LE spar from a 1/8" x
1/4" x 36" basswood stick and the bottom inner LE
spar from the remainder of the 1/8" x 1/4" x 24" stick
that was used for top inner LE spar.
❏ ❏ 1. Cut the aileron LE from a 1/4" x 1-1/2" x 24"
balsa stick to fit between ribs 15 and 9. Temporarily
tack glue the aileron LE to the outer TE spar by
applying about three or four drops of thick or medium
CA evenly spaced along the outer TE, then pressing
the aileron LE into position.
❏ ❏ 2. Use a razor plane followed with a bar sander
❏ ❏ 35. Cut the flap and aileron servo hatch rails and 80-grit sandpaper to shape the aileron LE to
from leftover 1/4" x 3/8" basswood and glue them into
the slots of ribs 3 & 4 and 10 & 11. Glue the cap strips
cut in the previous step to the ribs. Note that the cap
strips are offset to accommodate the hatch covers.
match the wing.
At any time from this point forward you may set
aside the first wing panel and begin construction on
the second, or you may continue with this panel
until completion.
❏ ❏ 32. Sheet the bottom of the wing over the
leading edge the same way you did the top, using a
3/32" x 3" x 36" balsa sheet and the remainder of the
3/32" x 3" x 36" sheet that was used for the top tip
sheeting. If you’re building the second (right) wing
panel, use an additional 3/32" x 3" x 36" balsa sheet
for the last tip sheeting piece.
❏ ❏ 3. Make the aileron tip rib from leftover 1/8"
balsa, then tack glue it to rib 15 with a 1/16" balsa shim
in between. Make the aileron root rib the same way.
- 22 -
❏ ❏ 4. Test fit the die-cut 3/32" balsa aileron core to
the wing and trim as necessary for a good fit between
the aileron tip ribs. Mark the rib locations on both sides
of the aileron core where shown on the plan.
❏ ❏ 11. Use a bar sander and 80-grit sandpaper to
gradually taper the 3/32" cap strips on ribs 7, 8 and
9 to 1/16" at the ends (to blend them to the 1/16" cap
strips on the aileron).
❏ ❏ 12. Use two 1/16" x 1/4" x 36" balsa sticks for
the aileron edging. Glue the edging to the aileron and
the mid TE. Sand the edging even with the cap strips.
❏ ❏ 5. Position the aileron core on the aileron LE.
Align the core so that both ends of the trailing edge
align with the wing (at ribs 9 and 15). Because of this
alignment, the leading edge of the core may not be
exactly centered on the LE, but it should be close.
This is to account for the washout in the wing. If you
are not accurate here, the ends of the aileron may
not align with the wing when it’s finished.
❏ ❏ 6. After you have aligned the aileron core, glue
it to the aileron LE and the tip ribs.
Refer to this photo for the following five steps.
❏ ❏ 7. Cut the top and bottom aileron ribs from a
3/32" x 5/8" x 24" balsa stick and glue them to the
aileron. Be certain to cut the ribs 1/16" below the aileron
LE to accommodate 1/16" cap strips which will be
added later. Note: Don’t forget to cut small vent holes
through the aileron ribs the same as we suggested for
the elevators and rudder. As you may recall, this is to
allow expanded air to escape during the covering
procedure so the covering will fully tighten.
❏ ❏ 8. Cut the aileron control horn block from the
5/8" x 5/8" basswood stick used for the elevators and
rudder. Glue the horn block to the bottom of the
aileron as shown on the plan.
❏ ❏ 9. Cut sixteen 1" long TE hinge blocks from a
1/4" x 1/2" x 24" balsa stick. Glue the hinge blocks to
both sides of the aileron core and to the outer TE
spar where shown on the plan. Trim the hinge blocks
on the aileron where necessary so they will not
contact the covering.
❏ ❏ 10. Cut the aileron cap strips from a 1/16" x 1/4"
x 36" balsa stick and glue them to the aileron ribs.
- 23 -
❏ ❏ 13. Cut the edging between the end of the
aileron and the mid TE. Carefully “break” the aileron
free from the wing. True the ends of the aileron with
a bar sander and 80-grit sandpaper.
❏ ❏ 14. Use a straightedge and T-pins to mark the
hinge line across the front of the aileron LE. Note:
The hinge line should be directly in line with the
aileron core which may not be exactly centered on
the LE. (As described in step 5.)
❏ ❏ 15. Mark the hinge line on the outer TE spar to
match up with the hinge line of the aileron. Mark the
hinge locations where shown on the plan and drill the
holes in the aileron and the wing for the hinges.
❏ ❏ 16. Test fit the aileron to the wing with the
hinges. Make adjustments where necessary.
❏ ❏ 17. Bevel the LE of the aileron as shown in the
sketch. The dimensions shown should provide the
correct control throw, but measure the throw of your
aileron to be certain you can achieve 1" of up and
7/8" of down throw. Increase the angle of the bevel if
necessary to permit the correct throw.
❏ ❏ 8. Make the flap hinge blocks for the top and
Build the flap
bottom of the flap from the remainder of the 1/4" x
1/2" balsa stick used for the aileron hinge blocks and
glue them into position. Note that there are only two
hinge blocks on the bottom of the flap and they lie on
the 1/4" side. The hinge blocks on the top of the flap
lie on the 1/2" side.
The flap is built much the same as the aileron—
attached to the wing for accurate alignment and a
perfect fit.
❏ ❏ 1. Cut a 1/4" x 1-1/2" x 36" balsa stick into two
❏ ❏ 9. Cut three 1"-long flap hinge blocks for the
wing from the 3/4" x 1" x 7" balsa stick and glue them
to the inner wing TE where shown on the plan. Glue
a piece of leftover balsa over the outer TE spar aft of
the middle hinge block (this can be seen in the photo
at step 13 on page 25).
18"-long pieces and glue them together to make the
flap LE.
❏ ❏ 2. Trim the ends of the flap LE to fit between ribs
1 and 7. Trim the top of the flap LE to fit the TE
sheeting that extends past the inner TE in flap area.
❏ ❏ 3. As you did the aileron LE, tack glue the flap
LE to the wing. There must be a 1/16" gap between
the top of the flap LE and the TE sheeting (you can
see the gap in the following photo). Trim the bottom
of the flap LE to match the wing.
❏ ❏ 5. Study the sketch to understand how the flap is
constructed and what it should look like when
completed. Make the bottom flap ribs from a 3/32" x
5/8" x 24" balsa stick and glue them into position. Note
that there should be a 1/16" gap between the bottom of
the flap ribs and the bottom of the flap LE to
accommodate 1/16" cap strips which will be added later.
❏ ❏ 6. Make the top flap ribs from the remainder of
the 3/32" x 5/8" balsa stick you used for the bottom
flap ribs and glue them into position. Note that the
top flap ribs should align with the top of the flap LE.
Refer to this photo for the following three steps
❏ ❏ 10. Cut the flap LE cap strip from a 1/8" x
5/16" x 36" balsa stick (if this is your second wing
panel, use the remainder of the stick you used for the
first wing panel). Glue the strip to the top of the flap
LE allowing a 1/32" gap between the strip and the
wing TE sheeting. Sand the cap strip even with wing
TE sheeting.
Refer to this photo for the following four steps.
Refer to this photo for the following three steps.
❏ ❏ 7. Use the 5/8" x 5/8" basswood stick to make
❏ ❏ 4. As you did with the aileron core, glue the die- the flap control horn block that fits on the bottom
cut 3/32" balsa flap core to the flap LE. The ends of
the flap core should align with ribs 7 and 1.
of the flap between flap ribs 3 & 4. Glue the horn
block into position.
- 24 -
❏ ❏ 11. Cut the cap strips for the top of the flap from
a 3/32" x 1/4" x 36" balsa stick and cut the cap strips
for the bottom of the flap from a 1/16" x 1/4" x 36"
stick and glue them into position. Cut notches in the
cap strips where necessary to accommodate the
hinge blocks on the bottom of the wing.
❏ ❏ 12. As you did for the cap strips over ribs 7, 8
You can use a 3/16" drill bit, but a 3/16" O.D. brass
tube sharpened at the end cuts much cleaner holes.
and 9, taper the 3/32" cap strips on the top of the flap
down to 1/16" at the TE of the flap. Use a 1/16" x 1/4"
x 36" balsa stick for the flap edging and glue it to the
TE of the flap. Sand the edging even with cap strips
and the edging on the center TE. Sand all surfaces
so the flap blends to the wing.
❏ ❏ 15. On one drill guide, use a hobby knife to cut
the rest of the way through the partially die-cut line.
❏ ❏ 16. Glue the two separated pieces to the other
drill guide as shown in the following photos. You can
see how the drill guide will be used to align your drill
for the flap hinges. For additional guidance and
accuracy, glue 7/32" O.D. (3/16" I.D.) brass tubes to
the guide.
❏ ❏ 13. Locate both of the die-cut 1/8" plywood flap
hinge drill guides. Use one of the guides to mark
the location of the center flap hinge using the closer
together set of embossed lines on the drill guide.
Note that the center line on the guide is positioned
where the flap LE meets the inner TE.
❏ ❏ 18. Carefully remove the flap from the wing.
True the ends of the flap with a bar sander and 80grit sandpaper for a good fit to the wing. Test fit the
flap to the wing with your hinges.
❏ ❏ 14. Mark the location of both outer flap hinges
the same way, only this time using the farther apart
set of embossed lines on the flap hinge drill guide.
❏ ❏ 19. Shape the LE of the flap as shown in the
❏ ❏ 17. Using the drill guide, drill 3/16" holes in the cross section on the plan and in the sketch at step 5
wing and in the flap at the marks you made earlier.
- 25 -
on page 24.
Mount the wing servos
❏ ❏ 4. Place the die-cut 1/16" plywood flap hatch
Refer to this photo to hook up the flap and aileron.
Let’s start with the flap...
punchmarks in the hatch cover and into the rails.
Enlarge the holes in the hatch cover only with a
3/32" drill bit, then countersink the holes for the flathead screws the same way you did for the bottom of
the servo plate. Mount the hatch cover with #2 x 3/8"
flat-head screws.
horn block that is in alignment with your flap servo
arm. Tap 6-32 threads in the control horn block. Add
a few drops of thin CA in the hole, allow to fully cure,
then retap the threads.
❏ ❏ 1. Check the orientation of the flap servo in the
wing panel you are building. Mount your flap servo to
the 1/2" x 1" x 3/4" basswood servo mounting blocks
using the screws that came with your servo. If
necessary, trim the blocks to accommodate your servo.
cover on the servo plate. Drill 1/16" holes through the ❏ ❏ 1. Drill a #36 or 7/64" hole in the flap control
❏ ❏ 2. Thread a large nylon torque rod horn onto
one end of a 6-32 x 1-1/2" threaded rod. Temporarily
thread the control rod 1/2" into the hole you tapped
in the control horn block. The control rod won’t be
glued in place until after the model is covered.
❏ ❏ 3. Make the flap pushrod from a 4-40 solder
clevis, a .095" x 4-1/2" threaded one-end pushrod
and a 4-40 threaded clevis. Silver solder should be
used on the solder clevis. After soldering, remove
residual soldering flux, then coat the clevis and the
rod with a film of oil to prevent corrosion.
❏ ❏ 2. Use 30-minute epoxy and two #2 x 3/8" flathead screws to securely and permanently mount the
blocks to the 1/8" x 1-1/2" x 3-11/16" plywood flap
servo plate. Be certain the flap servo is in the correct
orientation for the wing panel you are building. A
Dremel® #178 cutting bit works great for countersinking
the screws in the bottom of the servo plate.
❏ ❏ 5. Glue leftover 1/4" x 1/4" balsa sticks between ❏ ❏ 4. Connect the flap to the servo with the control
the ribs on both ends of the hatch cover. Cut the slot
in the hatch cover for your servo arm.
rod. Notice that the servo arm is 90 degrees (straight
down) when the flap is up.
❏ ❏ 6. Mount the aileron servo and hatch cover the ❏ ❏ 5. After you’ve set up the flap linkage, install
same way noting the orientation of the servo for the
wing panel you are building. The plywood aileron
servo plate is 1/8" x 1-3/4" x 3-11/16"
silicone retainers on the clevises and a 4-40 nut
behind the threaded clevis.
Hook up the controls
❏ ❏ 7. While you have both servos in the wing,
❏ ❏ 6. Make the aileron linkage the same way.
determine how you are going to route your servo
cords and determine what type of servo extension
cords you will use.You could make paper guide tubes
and glue them in place, or just route the servo cords
through the holes in the ribs.
❏ ❏ 8. Reinforce any glue joints you missed earlier
or those that don’t look strong.
If you haven’t yet began the second wing panel,
return to step 1 on page 17 and start building it.
Otherwise, pick up where you left off and finish
building the right panel.
❏ ❏ 3. Place the servo plate with the flap servo on
the rails. Cut spacers from leftover 1/8" plywood and
glue them to the rail.
- 26 -
BUILD THE FUSELAGE
The bottom half of the fuselage is framed upsidedown over the plan. This ensures that you have a
straight, true structure from which to build. After the
bottom half is constructed, it is removed from the
plan, then the tops of the formers and remaining
stringers are added to it. But, before you can begin
constructing the bottom half of the fuse, you must
build the formers. The formers are constructed over
the plan just the same as the wing and tail surfaces.
The “trueness” and “straightness” of the fuse greatly
depends upon how accurately you build the formers.
Therefore, it is important to work carefully. As
mentioned earlier in the manual, refrain from using
excessive CA that will interfere with parts that will be
added later. You can reinforce glue joints that don’t
look strong after the fuse is completed.
❏ 3. Make a 1/4" bottom former side by gluing
together two die-cut 1/8" balsa F3SB former sides.
❏ 6. Glue two die-cut 1/8" plywood bottom corner
braces F3CB to the bottom of F3 where shown.
Remove the former from the plan, then glue two
more corner braces to the other side.
❏ 4. Make the other bottom former side and two top
former sides (F3ST) the same way.
Build the formers
All the formers are constructed basically the same
way. Detailed instructions are provided for building
the first one, with notes where necessary to build
the others. The bottom and top of the formers are
built separately.
Start with former 3...
❏ 1. Cover the former drawings on the plan with
Great Planes Plan Protector or wax paper.
❏ 7. Build the top of former F3 over the plan the
same way. Glue the die-cut 1/8" balsa former top F3T
❏ 5. Position the laminated bottom former sides to the assembly. Add the die-cut 1/8" plywood top
F3SB over the plan and hold them in position with
corner braces F3CT while the former is still pinned to
❏ 2. Using the plan and the die-drawings on pages T-pins. Build the framework around the bottom half of your building board. Remove the assembly from the
8 & 9, identify all the die-cut 1/8” balsa and ply parts
used to construct former 3. Remove the parts from
their die sheets. While you’re at it, you could gather
the parts required for the rest of the formers and set
them aside, or remove the parts from their die sheets
as you need them.
F3 from a 1/4" x 3/4" x 36" balsa stick, a 1/4" x 1/2"
x 24" balsa stick, and a 1/4" x 1/4" x 36" balsa stick.
Note that some of the bracing is temporary and will
be removed from the structure after the fuselage is
fully framed. This ensures that the formers remain
square during fuselage construction.
- 27 -
plan and glue the corner braces to the other side.
❏ 8. Refer to the following photos and notes to build
formers 4 through 8 from the die-cut parts and balsa
sticks specified on the plan.
Notes for building former 6
Build the bottom of the fuse
A. For formers 6, 7 and 8, there are die-cut 1/8"
plywood corner braces for only one side (the front)
of the former.
❏ 1. Accurately tape the fuse plans together along
B. Add the die-cut 1/8" balsa former sides F6S and
bottom F6B to the assembly while it is pinned to
your building board.
the dotted lines. Place the top view over your building
board and cover it with Great Planes Plan Protector.
Note: Your building board needs to extend only from
former 3 to former 9.
❏ 2. Securely pin both 1/8" x 3/8" x 42" balsa main
stringers to the plan. Cut the aft end of the stringers
at the aft edge of former 9.
Notes for building former 4
A. Add the laser-cut 1/8" plywood former top F4C to
the upward facing side of the former top (this will be
the front) while it is pinned to the plan.
B. After you remove the top of the former from your
building board, add the die-cut 1/8" plywood top
corner braces F4CT to the back.
C. The former tops on formers 6, 7 and 8, consist of
two die-cut 1/8" plywood halves. After joining the
halves over the plan, reinforce the joint with leftover
3/32" balsa. Note: Do not be alarmed if the die-cut
ply formers will not rest flat on your building board.
You will be able to remove any twists when the
stringers are added later on.
❏ 3. Glue the bottom portions of formers 3, 4 and 5
to the stringers over their locations on the plan. As
you proceed, use a small builder’s square to be
certain the formers are vertical.
Notes for building formers 7 & 8
Notes for building former 5
A. From former 5 onward, all of the cross bracing
is permanent.
B. Glue the die-cut 1/8" balsa former bottom F5B to
the bottom of the former while it’s still pinned to the plan,
and glue the former top F5T to the top of the former.
Use two 1/8" x 1/2" x 24" balsa sticks and two 1/8" x
1/4" x 24" balsa sticks for the framework of formers 7
and 8.
That was a good evening’s work wasn’t it! Clean up
your building board and neatly stack up all your
beautifully constructed formers. You can knock off for
the evening, or forge ahead and start framing the
fuse bottom.
- 28 -
❏ 4. Use 1/4" x 1/4" balsa sticks you have left over
from building the formers, and additional 1/4" x 1/4"
x 36" balsa sticks to make the temporary cross
bracing between formers 3, 4 and 5. Use a builder’s
square to hold each former vertical as you glue the
bracing into position.
❏ 6. Place a straightedge along both sides of
formers 9 through 5 where the bottom longerons will
be fitted. Observe any high spots that will prevent the
longerons from making a straight line from former 9
to 5. Bring the formers into alignment by sanding
down any high spots or by adding shims as needed.
Add the tops of the formers
❏ 1. Glue the tops of the formers into position. As
you proceed, use a straightedge to hold the tops of
the formers in vertical alignment with the bottoms of
the formers.
❏ 7. Cut the bottom longerons from three 1/4" x
3/4" x 36" balsa sticks. Make the saw cuts to aid in
bending where shown on the plan, then glue the
longerons into position. Notice that the splice is at
former 5 and the longerons extend past former 9 to
the end of the fuse.
❏ 8. Glue together the die-cut 1/8" balsa former
❏ 5. Glue the bottom portions of formers 6 through
9 and the rest of the cross bracing into position as
shown in the photo and on the plan.
IMPORTANT! Be certain former 9 is perpendicular to
your building board when you glue it into position,
and be certain it remains perpendicular when you
glue the 1/4" x 1/4" bracing into position. The
positioning of former 9 has a great effect upon the
stab incidence because the stab saddles attach to
former 9.
bottoms F4B and F4BD. Glue the assembly,
centered, to the bottom of F4 with F4B (the one
without the notches) facing forward.
❏ 9. Cut the cabin longerons to the correct length
from a 1/8" x 3/8" x 42" balsa stick. The cabin
longerons extend from the front of former 6 to the
front of former 3 and fit below the main stringer on
both sides of the fuse. Glue the cabin longerons into
position (this can be best seen in the next photo).
❏ 10. Cut and test fit the stringers for the bottom of
the fuselage from five 1/8" x 1/4" x 36" basswood
sticks. All the stringers begin at former 4. The middle
stringer extends to former 9. The stringers on both
sides of the middle stringer extend to former 8. The
outer two stringers extend to former 7. View the
fuselage from the front or the rear. If necessary,
adjust the notches in the formers to keep the
stringers straight, then permanently glue the
stringers into position.
❏ 11. Remove the bottom half of the fuse from your
❏ 2. Fit one 1/8" x 1/4" x 36" basswood stringer into
the center notch in the top of formers 3 through 8.
Starting at former 3, use a straightedge to hold the
top of the formers in alignment with the bottom of the
formers. The same as you did with the bottom
stringers, view the stringer from the front or the rear
of the fuselage. If necessary, adjust the notch in any
of the formers to keep the stringer straight. When the
stringer and top of the formers are in alignment, glue
the stringer into position.
If you’re a messy builder, now’s the time to start
putting away tools you don’t need and keeping your
workbench cleared as much as possible. This thing’s
beginning to take up considerable room and it’s not
going to get any smaller!
building board.
❏ 3.
Glue the rest of the 1/8" x 1/4" x 36"
basswood top stringers in place the same way
being certain to pull any twisted former tops
into alignment as you proceed. Refer to the
photo in step 12 on page 34 to see where the
stringers end.
Refer to this photo for the following 6 steps.
- 29 -
Build the front of the fuse
❏ 4. Use four 1/4" x 1/2" x 24" balsa sticks for the top
longerons on both sides of the fuselage and glue
them into position. Note the splice at former 6.
Note: When observing the fuselage from the rear, you
may note a concave bend in the top longerons at
former 6. Do not be alarmed as this is the intended
design and will be worked out when more parts are
added to the fuselage later on.
Add the stab saddles
Refer to this photo (and the fuse plan) for the
following four steps.
❏ 1. Glue both sets of die-cut 1/8" plywood right
❏ 2. Glue both die-cut 1/8" plywood inner stab and left forward fuse sides together to make two
saddles to former 9 and to the bottom longerons.
Note that the inside edge of the saddle aligns with
the inner edge of the bottom longeron, thus providing
a ledge on the outside for the outer stab saddle.
1/4" forward fuse sides. Note: The left side is longer
than the right side.
❏ 3. Glue both die-cut 1/8" plywood outer stab
saddles to the inner stab saddles and to the bottom
longerons.
❏ 4. Glue two pieces of leftover 1/4" x 3/4" balsa
together to make the tail wedge that will be inserted
between the end of the stab saddles. Bevel the sides
of the tail wedge to match the angle of the stab
saddles, then glue it into position, flush with the aft
edge of the stab saddles. Sand the ends of the
longerons even with the stab saddles.
❏ 1.
Glue the die-cut 1/8" plywood tail gear
mounting plate to the die-cut 1/8" plywood tail gear
plate doubler. Drill 11/64" (or 5/32") holes through the
three forward punch marks and a 1/8" hole through
the aft punch mark. Insert three 6-32 blind nuts into
the holes in the tail gear plate doubler, use a hammer
to lightly tap them all the way in, and permanently
secure them with a few drops of thin CA. Glue the
assembly to former 9 and the bottom longerons.
❏ 5. Glue strips of leftover 1/8" x 1/4" balsa to the
longerons to support the tail gear mounting plate.
❏ 2. Remove the bottom temporary cross bracing
from formers 3 and 4. Test fit the die-cut 1/8" plywood
left bottom deck and the left forward fuse side to the
fuse. Note that the forward fuse side must be
notched to accommodate the bottom corner braces
of former 3 and 4.
❏ 3. Test fit the right forward fuse side and the right
bottom deck to the fuse the same way. Remove both
assemblies from the fuselage.
- 30 -
❏ 7. Mark a line on the inside of both forward fuse
sides 1/4" from the front edge. Mark a line on the
inside of the top deck that aligns with the lines you
marked on the forward fuse sides (the parts must be
fitted together to see where to mark the lines on the
top deck).
❏ 8. Cut three firewall reinforcement sticks from
❏ 4. Removing additional cross bracing as you
proceed, use epoxy to glue the laser-cut 1/8" plywood
vertical former bracing to both sides of formers 3, 4
and 5. Where necessary, cut notches in the 1/8" x 3/8"
balsa main stringers to accommodate the bracing.
❏ 5. Use 30-minute epoxy to glue the second lasercut 1/8" plywood former brace F4C to the front of
F4C on the top of former 4.
a 1/4" x 3/8" x 36" basswood stick and use 30-minute
epoxy to glue them to the forward fuse sides and the
top deck along the lines you marked.
❏ 11. Mix up a new batch of 30-minute epoxy and
glue the right fuse side and the right bottom deck in
position the same way. Add the top deck to the
assembly to help with alignment, but do not apply
any glue. Though there is no glue forward of F3, note
the C-clamps holding the fuse sides to the bottom
decks. This is to help establish the correct curvature
in the fuse sides. Do not remove the C-clamps until
the epoxy is fully cured.
❏ 12. Make the center bottom deck by gluing
together two 1/8" x 3" x 24" balsa sheets to make a
1/8" x 6" x 24" balsa sheet. Trim the center bottom
deck to fit between the left and right bottom deck.
❏ 9. Once more, test fit the left and right bottom
deck and the left and right forward fuse sides to the
fuse and hold in position with C-clamps. Add the top
deck. Make certain you understand how the parts fit
together and join to the fuse. Make adjustments
where required for good fitting joints.
❏ 13. Test fit the center bottom deck in the fuse.
Make certain that when the center bottom deck is
glued to the right and left bottom decks, the distance
between the insides of the forward fuse sides will be
7-3/32" (the same width as the firewall). Glue the
center bottom deck into position. Glue a 1/4" x 3/8"
basswood stick across the bottom deck in alignment
with the sticks on the forward fuse sides.
❏ 6. Glue together the die-cut 1/8" plywood left and
right top deck. Sand both pieces flat and even, then
glue a piece of leftover 1/8" x 1/4" basswood to the
bottom of the assembly across the glue joint, 1/2" aft
of the front edge. Use a ballpoint pen to mark the
partially die-cut lines on the bottom of the right top
deck on the top, so you will know where to cut for the
instrument panel when instructed to do so. Test fit the
assembly to the forward fuse sides.
Refer to this photo for the following two steps.
❏ 10.
Remove the parts from the fuse. Use
30-minute epoxy to glue the left fuse side and the left
bottom deck to each other and to the fuse. Do not
apply glue to the left fuse side or to the left bottom
deck forward of former 3. This will be done later when
it’s time to join the firewall. Proceed to the next step
before the epoxy fully cures.
- 31 -
❏ 14. Position the 1/4" x 5-11/16" x 7-3/32" firewall
over the firewall drawing on the plan. Use a ballpoint
pen to transfer the engine mount centerlines on the plan
to the firewall. For future reference, this is where the
centerline of your engine should meet the firewall so the
crank shaft will be centered in the front of the cowl.
Mount the landing gear
❏ 4. After the epoxy from the previous step has
fully cured, temporarily mount the landing gear to the
rails with six 6-32 x 5/8" socket head cap screws
and washers.
FINAL CONSTRUCTION
Mount the engine
❏ 1. Glue the die-cut 1/8" balsa former sides and
top of F2 to the fuse where shown on the plan. Glue
a leftover 1/4" x 3/4" balsa stick across the bottom
deck aligning with the sides of F2.
❏ 15. Use 30-minute epoxy to glue the forward fuse
sides, the top deck, the bottom deck and the firewall
together. #64 Rubber bands are perfect for holding
everything tight until the epoxy hardens. Hint: Where
necessary, #2 wood screws may be used to pull the
sides to the firewall.
❏ 16. After the epoxy from the previous step has
fully cured, “pin” the edges of the firewall to the fuse
sides and top and bottom deck with round toothpicks
and epoxy. A 3/32" drill bit should work for most
round toothpicks.
❏ 2. Use the landing gear rail template on the plan
to make two landing gear rails from the 1/4" x 2-1/8"
x 11" plywood sheets. Position the landing gear over
the templates and confirm that the holes in the gear
align with the holes in the template. Make
adjustments if necessary. Drill 11/64" (or 5/32") holes
through the rails where shown on the templates, then
insert three 6-32 blind nuts into the holes of both
landing gear rails, making a right and a left rail.
If you haven’t yet decided on which engine you are going
to use, or if you haven’t purchased it yet, or if it’s just your
preference to mount the tail surfaces before the engine,
you may skip ahead to Mount the Stab and Fin on
page 33. Return to this page when you’re ready.
❏ 1. Use a bar sander and 80-grit sandpaper to sand
the fuse sides, bottom deck and top deck even with
the firewall. Redraw the engine mount alignment lines
you marked earlier if you’ve sanded them off.
❏ 17. From two 1/8" x 1/4" x 36" basswood sticks,
cut the side stringers that run from former 5 to the
front of the stab saddles. Note that the front of the
side stringers protrude 1/8" outside of former 5 to
accommodate the 1/8" fuse sheeting that will be
added later. Glue the side stringers into position.
❏ 2. Glue the die-cut 1/8" plywood formers F1B
and F1S to the fuse sides and top and bottom deck.
Use a straightedge to make certain all the formers
are in alignment with the firewall.
❏ 3. Use 30-minute epoxy to glue both landing gear
❏ 18. Glue leftover 1/4" x 3/8" basswood sticks rails and the 1/4" x 2-1/2" x 6-1/16" balsa landing Note: Whatever engine and mounting method you
across both sides of the bottom of former 3, between
the corner braces as shown on the plan.
gear brace to the fuse. Be certain the rails and the
brace are centered on the fuse.
- 32 -
decide to use, the distance from the firewall to the
back plate of the spinner (or the front of the drive
washer) should be 7-7/16". Most glow engines will
require an “extension box” made from 1/4" Plywood
(not included). For ignition engines and large glow
engines some modelers prefer to mount the box (if
required) to a vibration isolation mount such as the
Great Planes Vibration Isolation Plate (GPMG2000,
not included).
Skip the following two steps if you are not building an
extension box.
Materials required for extension box: sheet of 1/4"
5-ply birch plywood, 1/2" balsa triangle stock, and
1/2" x 1/2" basswood.
❏ 3. To determine the length to make the extension
box, measure the distance from the back of the
mount to the front of the drive washer. Subtract that
distance from 7-7/16". That’s how long the extension
box must be. In the case of the O.S. Gemini 160
shown here, the box must be 2-3/4" long.
Refer to this photo for the following three steps.
❏ 5. Mount your engine to the box using the
appropriately sized screws and blind nuts (not
included). Make the back of the box from 1/4"
plywood and glue it inside the back of the box, flush
with the back edge of the box sides. Mark reference
lines on all four sides of the box that align with the
crankshaft on the engine. Some engines have “tick
marks” that indicate the centerline.
tank mount from the 1/8" x 4-3/8" x 5-3/4" plywood
fuel tank floor and leftover 1/4" x 3/8" basswood as
shown on the plan. Use screw eyes (not included) or
something similar to secure the tank, then glue the
assembly into position. In the case of the model
shown in the manual (using the O.S. Gemini 160), no
fuel tank floor was required due to the low positioning
of the carburetor. Removable balsa rails were used to
secure the tank. Position your fuel tank and drill holes
for routing the fuel lines. Later, the vent line will be
connected to the pressure tap (or connected to a
drain tube in the case of the Gemini as no tank
pressure is required) and the fuel line will be
connected to a Great Planes Easy Fueler Fuel Filler
Valve (GPMG4160, not included). Note: Do not
permanently mount the tank until after you have
hooked up the throttle.
Mount the stab and fin
❏ 6. Make reinforcement rails from 1/2" x 1/2"
basswood (not included) and glue them around the
base of the box. Position the box on the firewall in
alignment with the tic marks, then temporarily
secure the box to the firewall with #6 x 1" screws (not
included). The box will be permanently glued to the
firewall after the fuse is sheeted.
Let’s temporarily mount the fuel tank before sheeting
the front of the fuse.
❏ 4. Build the extension box from 1/4" birch
plywood (not included) using 30-minute epoxy.
Reinforce the inside corners of the box with triangle
stock (not included). If using a Great Planes Isolation
Mount, be certain the box will fit on the mount and
will not interfere with the grommets.
Note: Before continuing, plan the routing of your
throttle pushrod, as this may have an effect on
fuel tank location.
❏ 1. Cut two 7-1/4" long pieces from the 1/2" x 24"
balsa tri stock. Use a fine razor saw to make saw cuts
in the tri stock so you can bend it to the stab saddle,
then securely glue both pieces to the saddles. Where
necessary, carefully trim the tri stock even with the
stab saddles.
❏ 2. Place the stab in the stab saddle. Take
❏ 7. Determine the height of the fuel tank in relation measurements and make marks with a ballpoint pen
to the carb on your engine. The fuel tank should be
positioned, so that when half full, the fuel level is
even with your carburetor. If necessary, build a fuel
- 33 -
to center the TE of the stab in the saddle. Place a
weight on top of the stab to hold it down and keep it
from shifting.
❏ 3. Stick a T-pin into the center fuse stringer above
sides of former 9. Note: It is important that the fin be
accurately aligned with the fuse centerline.
former 3. Tie a small loop in one end of a 50" piece
of string and slip it over the T-pin.
❏ 8. Test fit the fin to the fuse and the top of the stab.
❏ 11. Glue the fin to the stab and fuse with 30-minute
epoxy. Before the epoxy hardens, confirm the vertical
and lateral fin alignment as described previously.
Note: Be certain the fin sheeting is securely glued to
the stab sheeting, but do not build up a large fillet. This
joint will be reinforced with tri stock in the next step.
Trim the sheeting on the bottom of the fin as
necessary for a good fit to the stab. The fin TE should
rest tightly against the aft end of the saddles and the
tail wedge.
❏ 4. Fold a piece of masking tape over the other end
of the string and draw an arrow on it. Slide the tape
along the string and align the arrow with one tip of the
stab. Swing the string over to the other tip of the stab
and check the alignment. Shift the stab and slide the
tape along the string until the arrow reads the same on
both sides of the stab. Now your stab is aligned.
Refer to this photo for the following five steps.
❏ 12. Cut two pieces from the 1/4" x 18" balsa tri
❏
9.
Use
a
C-clamp
to
hold
the
bottom
of
the
fin
TE
stock
and glue them to the fin and stab with 30in front of former 4 and hold it in place with C-clamps
❏ 5. Place a straightedge across the top longerons
or clothes pins.
to the stab saddle. Align one edge of a large
draftsman’s triangle with the centerline on the TE of
the fin. Use a small C-clamp to hold the triangle in
position. Check the alignment of the bottom of the
triangle with the centerline on the stab TE. Trim the
bottom of the fin sheeting where it rests on the stab
until you can get the fin vertical.
minute epoxy. Note that the tri stock should end 1-1/2
forward of the fin TE.
❏ 13. Gradually taper the 1/8" x 1/4" basswood
stringers on both sides of the center stringer on top
of the fuse. The ends of these stringers just “float” in
the structure and will gradually and smoothly
disappear underneath the covering.
❏ 6. Observe the fuselage from the rear and check
❏ 14. Use the stab fairing pattern on the plan to
the alignment of the stab with the straightedge. If
necessary, remove the stab and adjust the height of
one of the stab saddles until the stab is parallel with
the straightedge.
make two stab fairings from leftover 1/4" balsa and
glue them into position on both sides of the fuse.
❏ 15. Glue the ends of the 1/8" x 1/4" basswood outer
stringers on the top of the fuse to former 8. Glue leftover
1/4" x 1/4" balsa sticks between the top stringers.
❏ 7. Once the stab is level with the straightedge,
glue the stab into position with 30-minute epoxy.
Place a weight on top of the stab to hold it down. Use
the pin and string to recheck the stab alignment.
Wipe away excess epoxy before it hardens.
❏ 16. Make the fin fillet as shown on the plan from
❏ 10. Adjust the front of the fin laterally by measuring leftover 1/4" balsa and glue it into position. Round the fin
the distance between both sides of the fin and the
- 34 -
LE and the fin fillet smoothly blending the two together.
Mount the wing
❏ 1. As you did for the wing, (shown on page 18 in
steps 6, 7 & 8), build the joiner box top and bottom
for the fuse from two 1/8" x 1-11/16" x
10-9/16" ply sheets and two 1/4" x 3/8" x 36"
basswood sticks.
❏ 2. Trim the ends of the joiner box bottom and top so
plywood joiner box webs. Once you are sure all the
parts fit well, glue the assembly into position with 30minute epoxy. Be certain the cardboard tube is
centered in the fuse. Hint: Fit the aluminum joiner
tube into the cardboard tube so it cannot be
inadvertently deformed during clamping.
root ribs to the wing. The photo illustrates the root
ribs clamped to the wing (but the wing and root ribs
should be on the fuse).
❏ 9. Glue two 1/2" x 1" x 3/4" basswood wing bolt
blocks, centered vertically, to the inside of rib 1 on
both wing panels where shown on the plan.
they are exactly the same width as the fuselage on the
1/4" x 1/2" longerons at former 4. Use 30-minute
epoxy to glue one of the joiner box assemblies to the
longerons and the front of F4C. Note: F4C is two
layers of laser-cut 1/8" ply, previously installed.
❏ 10. With the fuse root ribs clamped to the wing,
❏ 6. Test fit both die-cut 1/8" plywood wing saddle remove the wing panels from the fuse. Drill 5/32"
❏ 3. Use your bar sander with 80-grit sandpaper to true
Now for the moment of truth. Hopefully you have a
large workbench!
the edges of formers 3 & 4 and the joiner box bottom.
bases to the fuse sides between formers 4, 5 and 6
over the top longerons, and hold them in position
with clamps or T-pins.
holes through the fuse root ribs and the wing bolt
blocks in both wing panels. Insert 6-32 blind nuts into
the wing bolt blocks of both wing panels. Fasten both
fuse root ribs to both wing panels with 6-32 x 1"
socket head cap screws and #6 washers—now your
wing is guaranteed to align with the fuse root rib.You
may remove the C-clamps.
❏ 4. Cut the remainder of the cardboard tube to a ❏ 7. Place the die-cut 1/8" plywood fuselage root
length of 10-7/8" and harden the ends with thin CA
just the same as you did for the wing tubes.
ribs W1F on both sides of the fuse over the ends of
the cardboard tube, then slide the wing panels into
position with the aluminum joiner tube.
Now we have to glue the fuse root rib to the fuse...
❏ 5. Test clamp the joiner box top and the cardboard ❏ 8. Align the fuselage root ribs with the root ribs of ❏ 11. With both fuselage root ribs bolted to the wing
joiner tube to the fuse with the three die-cut 1/8"
the wing panels, then use C-clamps to hold the fuse
- 35 -
panels, place the panels on the fuse with the joiner
tube. Adjust the wing saddle bases so they are
contacting the fuselage root ribs, then glue only the
saddle bases to the fuselage.
❏ 12. Align the bottom of the fuse root rib on both
wings with the bottom of the wing saddle bases at
the rear (pivoting the wings about the joiner tube).
Clamp both wing panels to the saddle bases near the
aft wing bolt block.
❏ 16. With both wing panels still bolted to the fuse, ❏ ❏ 19. Sand the edge of the top fillet even with the
glue leftover 1/4" x 1/4" balsa sticks along the bottom
of both fuse root ribs permanently joining them to the
top longeron and the saddle bases. Important: If you
plan to do aggressive aerobatics, use leftover
basswood sticks as reinforcement.
root rib. Bolt the wing to the fuse and check the fit.
Build the top fillet for the other side of the fuse the
same way.
❏ 13. Place an incidence meter on one wing panel
at rib 8 and read the incidence. Check the incidence
of the other wing panel at rib 8. Adjust both wing
panels until the incidences are the same, keeping in
mind that the rear of both root ribs should align with
the bottom of both wing saddle bases.
❏ 14. Now that you have confirmed that both wings
are at the same incidence, remove the panels, apply
epoxy to the ends of the joiner box on both sides of
the fuse, reposition both wing panels and clamp
them into position. Recheck the incidence of both
panels, make adjustments if required, and do not
disturb the model until the epoxy cures.
❏ 15. Remove the clamps and finish gluing both
❏ ❏ 20. Glue the die-cut 3/32" balsa bottom wing
❏ 17. Remove the wing panels. Bevel the aft, curved fillet to the bottom of the ply wing saddle base. Glue
edge of the wing saddle base. Trim the top of formers
3, 4 and 5 so they are even with the top of the fuse
root rib to accommodate the top wing fillet.
an additional leftover 3/32" balsa strip on the bottom
of the fuse root rib continuing the fillet to former 3.
❏ ❏ 21. Sand the bottom fillet even with the root rib,
then sand the end even with the top fillet, neatly
blending it to the fuse.
fuse root ribs to the fuse.
Now, the only way to get the wing off the fuse is to
use your 7/64" ball driver!
❏ 22. Build the other bottom fillet the same way,
then bolt the wings to the fuse and blend the fillets
neatly to the wing and fuse.
Mount the servos
For clarity, we took the wing off the fuse in this photo
(plus, this thing won’t fit in our photo studio with the
wings on!).
❏ ❏ 18. Test fit, then glue the die-cut 3/32" balsa
top wing fillet to the fuse root rib, saddle base and
the top longeron. Glue an additional leftover 3/32"
balsa strip on top of the fuse root rib continuing the
fillet to the top of former 3.
- 36 -
Note: The following instructions show how to mount
the servos in the forward of two optional mounting
locations. For illustration in this manual, the forward
location is chosen due to the size and weight of the
engine used in the prototype. If you are using a
heavier ignition engine, your model may come out
nose heavy, so you may choose to mount your
servos in the aft location.
❏ 6. Join both elevators to the stab. Make both elevator
pushrods as shown on the plan from two 4-40 solder
clevises, two .095" x 36" threaded one-end pushrods
and two 4-40 threaded clevises. Silver solder should be
used on the solder clevis. After soldering, remove
residual soldering flux, then coat the clevis and the rod
with a film of oil to prevent corrosion.
As you proceed, keep in mind that, after the
model is completed, components in the cabin
(radio system, fuel tank, cockpit interior, wing
bolts, etc.) will be accessed through the side
doors. Although some modelers prefer to leave
radio installation and other interior details until
after the model is covered and/or painted, it will be
easier to do as much of this work as possible
while the cabin is open.
❏ 3. Refer to the top view of the plan. Notice that the
elevator servos and rail spacer are offset, so both
elevator pushrods will be at the same angle and have
the same geometry. Glue the rails and rail spacers
into position.
❏ 4. Drill a #36 or 7/64" hole in both elevator control
horn blocks where shown on the plan. Tap 6-32
threads in the control horn blocks, then add a few
drops of thin CA in the holes, allow the CA to fully
harden, then re-tap the threads.
❏ 1. The servos will be mounted to 1/4" x 3/8"
❏ 7. Cut two 3/16" pushrod guide tubes (Gray) so
basswood rails, spaced apart and held in position by
the die-cut 1/8" plywood servo rail spacers. Be
certain the rail spacers are the correct size for your
servos by test fitting one of your servos on rails held
in position on your workbench by the rail spacers. If
necessary, modify the rail spacers, or make new
ones from leftover 1/8" plywood to accommodate
your servos.
that there is approximately 1-1/2" between the ends
of the tube and the clevises at both ends. Slide the
guide tubes over the elevator pushrods in the fuse.
Drill a 13/64" (or 7/32") hole in eight die-cut 1/8"
plywood guide tube holders and slide four holders
over each guide tube. Connect the pushrods to the
elevators and servos, and glue the guide tube
holders to the cross braces. Glue the guide tubes to
the guide tube holders.
❏ 2. Simulate the 1/8" balsa fuse sheeting that will
be added later by temporarily clamping pieces of
leftover balsa across both sides of formers 4 and 5 in
the area of the servo rails. Cut the servo rails to fit
between the sheeting from a 1/4" x 3/8" x 36"
basswood stick.
❏ 5. Thread a large nylon torque rod horn onto one
end of a 6-32 x 1-1/2" threaded rod. Temporarily screw
the thread control rod 1/2" into the hole you tapped in
the control horn block. The threaded rod won’t be
glued in place until after the model is covered.
- 37 -
❏ 8.
The same way you did the elevators,
temporarily insert the 6-32 x 1-1/2" threaded rods
into both sides of the rudder as shown on the plan.
❏ 14. Cut eight 3/8" long bushings from the leftover
❏ 11. Insert a 5/32" wheel collar into the nylon guide tubes you used to guide the pull-pull cable for
❏ 9. Install your rudder control linkage. We used a
Sullivan No. 520 Pull-Pull Cable Kit (not included)
and connected one end of the cable to the rudder,
but did not connect the other end to the servo at this
time. This way, the cables can be removed for
finishing and covering, then reinstalled and
connected after the model is completed. To ensure
that the cables do not contact any of the balsa
formers or cross braces, route the pull-pull cable
through two 36" inner pushrod tubes (White)
included with this kit. Cut notches in the stab saddles
to accommodate the cable guide tubes and glue
them to formers 7 and 8 and the saddles with epoxy.
steering arm. Trim the arm as shown on the top view
of the fuse plan. File a flat spot on the back of the
1/8" pre bent tail gear wire, so that the steering arm
will be parallel with the “axle” portion of the wire.
Temporarily mount the steering arm to the tail gear
with a 6-32 x 1/4" socket head cap screw to be
certain it is parallel. If necessary, adjust the position
or angle of the flat spot (the better the job done here,
the less trouble you will have at the flying field).
the rudder. Slide the bushings evenly spaced, onto
the pushrod. If the bushings fit loosely, secure them
with a small drop of thin CA.
❏ 15. Hook up the tail wheel steering the same way
you did the elevators with the pushrod you just made,
a 3/16" guide tube and four 1/8" plywood guide tube
holders. If you prefer to remove the tail gear
assembly when it’s time for covering, proceed to the
next step. Otherwise, remove the screw in the
steering arm and the two set screws on the collars,
apply a small drop of thread lock to the screws, then
reinstall and securely tighten. Be certain the screw in
the steering arm is securely fitted in the flat spot on
the tail gear wire.
❏ 10. Route the throttle pushrod through the firewall
and connect it to the engine, but do not mount the
throttle servo until you have tested the fit of your cockpit
interior. An 11-3/4" inner pushrod tube, 36" outer
pushrod guide tube, .074" x 4" one-end threaded rod,
2-56 x 1" threaded rod, screw-lock connector and ball
link are supplied for hooking up the throttle (see the
detail on the fuse plan). On our prototype, we routed
the throttle pushrod under the fuel tank. If you are going
for an all-out, fully detailed cockpit interior, you may
mount your throttle servo on its side under one of the
front seats. Use two 1/2" x 1" x 3/4" basswood blocks
just the same as you did the aileron and flap servos. If
you are not installing a cockpit interior, mount your
throttle servo wherever most convenient.
❏ 12. Temporarily mount the tail gear assembly to
the fuselage with three 6-32 x 1/2" Phillips head
screws. Secure the steering arm to the tail gear wire.
It will be necessary to drill an 1/8" hole through the
side of the fuse to access the screw on the steering
arm with your hex wrench. Be certain the steering
arm is locked onto the flat spot.
❏ 13. Use denatured alcohol or other solvent to
clean the .074" x 36" threaded one-end pushrod. Cut
the pushrod to the correct length for the tail gear
steering pushrod that connects the rudder servo to
the steering arm on the tail gear.
- 38 -
❏ 16. Secure the aft end of both elevator pushrod
guide tubes with leftover 1/8" balsa. Cut a slot in the
balsa to accommodate the tubes, then glue the balsa
pieces to the inside of the stab saddles. This area will
be concealed later with pushrod exit covers.
❏ 17. If you intend to install the Top Flite Full Cockpit
interior (not included with this kit), glue leftover 1/4"
balsa supports to the servo rails to raise the back
seat above the servos (as shown in the instructions
included with the cockpit kit). If you haven’t done so
already, remove the temporary cross bracing
between formers 3 and 4. Test fit the cockpit kit
referring to the instructions included with the kit.
Sheet the bottom of the fuselage
❏ 4. Glue one of the remaining 1/8" x 3" x 24" balsa ❏ 7. Use one of the two softest sheets you set aside
Before you begin, remove the engine, elevators and
rudder to make the fuselage easier to maneuver
around on your workbench.
sheets to the fuse side as shown in the photo. The
top edge is flush against the main stringer. If
necessary, wet the sheet with water so it will be
easier to bend around the front of the fuse.
earlier to sheet the corner of the fuse, wrapping the
sides around to the bottom. This should be done in
three sections as shown in the photo. Wet the
sheeting if necessary—this bend may appear to be
extreme, but with soft balsa you should encounter no
problems. After gluing the sheeting down, trim the
front sheet parallel with the inner edge of the 1/4" ply
landing gear plate as shown.
❏ 8. Glue the other side of the sheeting into position
the same way.
❏ 9. Sheet the bottom of the fuse using two 1/8" x
3" x 30" balsa sheets. Save leftover 1/8" balsa for
sheeting the top of the fuse.
Refer to this photo for the following two steps.
❏ 1. With the landing gear in place, glue formers
F2B and F3B into position. Glue a leftover 1/8" x 1/4"
basswood stick into the notch in the bottom formers.
Glue an additional leftover 1/8" x 1/4" basswood stick
into the notch in the top of formers 1 & 2.
❏ 2. Remove the landing gear. Round the corners of
the landing gear plates to match the contour of the
side and bottom formers.
❏ 3. Of the eight 1/8" x 3" x 24" balsa sheets, select
the two softest sheets and set them aside for use
later in step 7.
❏ 5. Glue a second 1/8" x 3" x 24" sheet to the fuse
as shown. Before continuing with the sheeting, use a
straightedge and a ballpoint pen to lightly mark the
edges of formers 3 & 4. This will help later when it’s
time to cut out the doors.
❏ 6. Glue two additional 1/8" x 3" x 24" balsa sheets
to the other side of the fuse the same way.
- 39 -
❏ 10. Blend the aft edge of the sheeting to the
longerons by gluing pieces of leftover 1/8" x 3/4"
balsa to both bottom longerons. Taper the balsa
pieces by sanding them to make a seamless
transition from the sheeting to the longerons.
much experience in this area, you may use your own
method for constructing and attaching opening
doors. As in other detailed areas of construction with
this model, neatness and minimal glue will yield the
best results.
The photos in this section show the left door. If you’re
only building one door, make the right.
❏ 11. Sand the sheeting you’ve completed thus far
Let’s start with the rear window.
smooth and even. Cut slots in the sheeting for the
landing gear and drill a hole for the innermost landing
gear screw. Mount the landing gear.
❏ 2. Using 1/8" balsa left from sheeting the sides
and bottom, cut a 3/4" wide strip and glue it into
position as shown on the photo. Cut a second piece
of 1/8" balsa as shown and glue it to the 3/4" strip.
❏ 3. Sheet the other side of the top of the fuse the
same way. Cover the space between both sides to
finish the job. Sand the sheeting smooth and even.
Sheet the top of the fuselage
❏ 4. Now that the fuselage is nearly completed,
examine all glue joints and look for those that don’t
appear to be strong. Apply glue where necessary.
Make the windows and doors
❏ 1. If installing the full cockpit kit, cut the top deck
along the die-cut lines and test fit the instrument
panel (included with the cockpit kit). If you’re going
for an all-out scale cockpit, refer to your
documentation photos in case any modifications
need to be made at this time.
Note: In order to access components inside the
fuselage (radio system, fuel tank, scale interior, etc.)
and to facilitate bolting and unbolting the wing at the
flying field, frequent and easy access to the cabin is
necessary. Therefore, this model was designed to
withstand the stresses of scale flight even with one or
two opening scale doors. On many full-size Stinsons,
the right door was standard, while the left door was
optional. On this model, only one door is necessary
to access the cabin and to bolt the wings on, but you
should refer to your documentation package to see if
you need to make both doors. Making opening doors
may be done several different ways. The method
illustrated in this manual is rather straightforward and
reproducible by the average modeler. If you have
- 40 -
❏ ❏ 1. Make the aft window frame from a 1/8" x 3"
x 24" balsa sheet. Cut the corners in the window
opening using a 3/8" brass tube sharpened at the
end. Be certain to position the window opening in the
frame so the sides are 1/8" from former 4, the top
longeron and the main stringer (as shown on the
plan). If you wish to add any scale details to the
window frame (such as interior trim or edging) it may
be easiest to do this now.
❏ ❏ 2. Glue the aft window frame in position. Use
additional 1/8" balsa to blend the aft window frame to
the top longeron and former 3. Note that the 1/8"
sheeting aft of the window frame is 1/8" thick at the front
(at the window frame) and then tapers to zero thickness
at the aft end where it blends to the longeron.
❏ ❏ 3. From inside the fuselage, use the bottom of ❏ ❏ 6. Build the door frame over the plan using a 3/16"
the 1/4" ply fuse sides as a guide to mark the outline
of the bottom of the door on the 1/8" balsa fuse sides
with a ballpoint pen. Cut the opening in the fuse for
the door. Be certain to cut at least an 1/8" away from
formers 3 & 4 and from the bottom of the door outline
you marked earlier to allow for accurate trimming.
x 3/16" x 36" balsa stick and a 1/4" x 1/2" x 24" balsa
stick. Make the gussets from the 3/16" x 3/16" stick.
❏ ❏ 7. Trim the door frame to match the curve on
the plan at the bottom corner.
❏ ❏ 8. Build the window frame for the door just the
same way you did for the fuse (aft of the door). Sheet
the rest of the door with 1/8" x 3" x 24" balsa.
❏ ❏ 10. Cut two notches in the aft edge of former 3
to accommodate the door hinges so they will be flush
with the aft edge of the former.
❏ ❏ 4. Cut a 7/8" x 6-3/8" strip of plastic from one
of the molded ABS landing gear fairings. Test fit, then
glue the strip to the bottom of the door opening
joining the 1/8" fuse sheeting to the 1/4" ply fuse
sides. Trim the inner edge even with the ply fuse
sides. Trim the edges of the door opening even with
the formers, the top longeron and the plastic sheet.
❏ ❏ 5. Hold a piece of paper backed up by a
❏ ❏ 11. Confirm that the door fits well in the fuse. Make
any final adjustments necessary, then glue one half of
both hinges into the notches you cut in former 3.
magazine or cardboard to the door opening. From
inside the fuse, use a ballpoint pen to trace the
edges of the door outline onto the sheet of paper.
This is your “plan” for building the door frame.
❏ ❏ 9. Test fit the door in the fuse.Trim where necessary
for a good fit.
Refer to this photo for the following two steps.
Note: For hinging your doors, you may use the Great
Planes hinges included with the kit, or hinges of your
own choice. Hinges with removable pins are
recommended, so the doors may be removed during
finishing and covering and after the model is
completed. If you use the Great Planes hinges, make
removable hinge pins from large T-pins or similar size
piano wire. Make an “L” bend on the end of the hinge
pin so it can be removed.
- 41 -
❏ ❏ 12. Mark the hinge locations on the door. Cut
the hinge slots in the door to position the hinges as
❏ 20. Return to step one and build the other window
shown in the sketch. Without using glue, fit the other
half of the hinges in the door, then test fit the door to
the fuse. If necessary, sand the fuse or door sheeting
so the fuse and door blend together (it is most likely
that you will have to sand the bottom of the door to
match the fuse were it begins to curve slightly toward
the bottom).
frame and door. If you’re only building one door, just
make the front and rear window frames instead of the
opening door.
❏ ❏ 13. Make a stop for the aft edge of the door so
it can’t be pushed inward, and glue it to former 4.
Now let’s make the door latching mechanism...
Note: As explained earlier, this is one of those areas
where experienced scale modelers may have their
own preferences on how to make mechanisms such
as the door latch. If you decide to develop a method
other than the one shown here, it is a good idea to
make the door latch removable so final sanding and
covering will be easier.
❏ ❏ 17. Make the latch from leftover 1/16" plywood.
Drill a 1/8" hole through the latch and insert a 2-56
blind nut. Thread the latch onto the torque rod until it
will catch the inside of former 4 and pull the door
closed. Lock the latch to the torque rod with a 2-56 nut.
Build the landing gear
❏ 1. Use denatured alcohol or other solvent to clean
both prebent aluminum landing gears. Roughen the
landing gear with coarse sandpaper so glue will adhere.
❏ ❏ 18. Make final adjustments to the fit and sizing
of the door to accommodate the thickness of added
covering and paint.
Refer to the door latch detail in the bottom, righthand corner of the fuse plan while you make the
door latch.
❏ ❏ 14.
Make the guide block from leftover
basswood. Drill a 5/64" (or #48) hole through the block
for the torque rod which will be made from a threaded
pushrod. Glue the guide block to the inside of the door,
then drill the hole through the door.
❏ ❏ 2. Cut two 7-3/8" landing gear sub LE’s from
❏ ❏ 15. Make the torque rod and the door handle
from a .074" x 4" threaded one end rod. Solder the
handle to the torque rod. After the model is finished,
the handle can be shaped with automotive filler or
epoxy to match the full size aircraft.
❏ ❏ 19. If you wish to go that extra mile for scale
❏ ❏ 16.
Thread the torque rod through the
basswood block. The torque rod will fit tightly into the
block, making threads as it goes through. This is
what holds it in and pulls the door to the fuselage.
realism, add door trim made from sheet plastic or
plywood (not included). For illustration, the photo
shows the trim in position, but it may be better to add
the trim after you paint or cover your model.
- 42 -
a 1/4" x 1/4" x 36" balsa stick. Test fit the die-cut 1/8"
plywood landing gear ribs to the gear using one of
the sub LE’s to determine the exact location of the
ribs on the gear. Note: You will have to finish the diecuts where indicated by the arrows in the sketch to
remove the landing gear ribs from their die sheets.
❏ ❏ 3. Glue both sub LE’s and the ribs to the gear
with epoxy (CA does not adhere well to aluminum). If
you’re working on the second gear, don’t forget to
make a right and a left!
of the cowl to the front of the cowl. These will be used
later for aligning the cowl blisters. Trim the forward
cowl along the line you marked around the base.
❏ ❏ 4. Shape the sub LE’s to match the downward
curving angle of the ribs.
❏ ❏ 7. Glue leftover 1/8" balsa to the LE and
leftover 1/8" x 1/4" basswood to the TE of the gear.
Blend the LE and TE to the sheeting. The landing
gear may now be covered with iron-on covering, but
for the best durability and appearance, it is
recommended that the landing gear be covered with
glass cloth and resin, then primed and painted.
❏ 8. Build the other landing gear the same way. Be
certain to make a right and a left, as both aluminum
landing gears are the same.
❏ 3. Mark and trim the bottom of the molded ABS
aft cowl the same way. Cut a hole in the middle of
the aft cowl leaving a 1/2" ring all the way around.
Save the leftover circular sheet of plastic for the
pushrod exit covers to be made later.
❏ 4. Thoroughly sand the inside of the forward and
Mount the Cowl
❏ 1. Trim the bottom flange around the molded ABS
forward cowl so that approximately only 1/8” remains.
Use 250-grit sandpaper to thoroughly scuff the outside
of the cowl so you can make marks with a pencil. Place
the forward cowl and a pencil on a flat surface. Hold the
pencil to the base of the cowl and turn the cowl around
the pencil marking a trim line all the way around.
aft cowl, and the groove where the forward cowl will
join the aft cowl with coarse sandpaper so glue and
glass cloth will adhere.
❏ 5. Center the forward cowl on the aft cowl and
glue them together with CA. Refrain from using CA
accelerator because it may soften the plastic.
❏ ❏ 5. Cut two landing gear skins from the 1/32"
x 6" x 8" plywood sheet using the dimensions shown
in the sketch. Glue one of the skins to the top of the
landing gear and the other to the bottom.
❏ ❏ 6. Sand the sheeting even with the front of the ❏ 2. Use a builder’s square as a guide to mark lines ❏ 6. Determine where to fit the four die-cut 1/8"
aluminum gear and the end of the ribs.
extending from the molded-in “dots” near the bottom
- 43 -
plywood aft cowl ring sections on the firewall. The
“tabs” on the cowl ring sections are where the cowl
mounting screws will be located, so position the tabs
where you will be able to access the mounting
screws, taking into consideration the positioning of
the engine, exhaust, and whatever other systems
you plan to install inside the cowl. If necessary, trim
the extension box to accommodate the cowl ring
sections (as we have done to our prototype seen in
the photo). Position the tabs over the 1/4" firewall if
possible. Note: It may be necessary to trim the ends
of the cowl ring sections so they will all fit together on
the firewall. From now on the joined assembly of the
four aft cowl ring sections will be referred to as the
aft cowl ring.
❏ 9. Temporarily secure the cowl ring to the firewall that indicate the location of the cowl blisters straddle
with four #2 x 3/8" screws. Be certain a small “ledge”
exists where the 1/8" fuse sheeting steps down to the
cowl ring for the thickness of the cowl. If necessary,
trim the cowl ring.
❏ 7. Temporarily hold the aft cowl ring to the firewall
with a few drops of CA or 3M® 77 or 75 spray
adhesive.
the centerline on the top and bottom of the fuse.
❏ 13. Little by little, trim the aft edge of the cowl for
❏ 10. Drill a 1/4" hole in the exact center of the cowl.
Make a cowl alignment jig by drilling a hole to fit the
crankshaft of your engine in a piece of leftover 1/8"
plywood or balsa. Align the hole in the jig with the
hole you drilled in the center of the cowl, then
temporarily glue the jig to the cowl with spacers in
between to set the desired prop clearance (1/4" is
recommended).
❏ 11. The jig will center the front of the cowl on the
engine, so now cut the opening in the front of the
cowl as shown in the following photo.
a good fit to the fuse. Hint: Scuff the outside of the
cowl so you can use a pencil to make marks. As you
“zero in” on the fit of the cowl to the fuse, mark the
high spots that interfere with a good fit to the fuse,
then remove the cowl and sand where you marked.
Test fit, mark and trim as necessary.
❏ 14. After you are satisfied with the fit of the cowl
to the fuse, remove the cowl and the cowl ring. Use
a 1/4" drill to enlarge the holes in the firewall left by
the #2 screws. Use epoxy to glue four 6-32 threaded
inserts into the holes.
❏ 15. Enlarge the holes in the cowl ring with a 5/32"
drill bit, then test fit the cowl ring to the fuse with four
6-32 x 5/8" socket head cap screws, #6 lock washers
and #6 flat washers.
❏ 8. With the aft cowl ring temporarily held to the
fuse, glue the four die-cut 1/8" plywood forward
cowl ring sections and the four die-cut 1/8"
plywood tabs to the aft cowl ring. Note that the joints
in the forward cowl ring sections do not align with
the joints in the aft cowl ring. From now on this
assembly will be referred to as the cowl ring. For
illustration the cowl ring shown in the photo is off the
firewall, but yours should be on the firewall.
❏ 16. Remove the cowl ring. Cover the entire firewall
with a piece of waxed paper, then remount the cowl
ring. Position the cowl on the fuse, confirm alignment,
then glue the cowl to the cowl ring with a mixture of
epoxy and microballoons to keep it from flowing.
❏ 17. Blend the fuse to the cowl by sanding where
❏ 12. Fit the cowl to the fuse with the cowl alignment necessary. Remove the cowl and take off the cowl
jig on the engine. Be certain the molded-in dimples
- 44 -
alignment jig.
the two blisters on the bottom of the cowl straddle the
centerline of the fuse.
❏ 20. Thoroughly sand the outside of the cowl so
❏ 18. Cut the air exit slot around the bottom of the filler will adhere. Use filler such as automotive Bondo®
cowl. On our prototype, we made this slot about 5/8"
wide and extended it about 1/2-way around the cowl.
Refer to your own documentation for the exact sizing
and location of the slot on your model.
or something similar to blend the aft cowl to the
forward cowl. Hint: Wrap the cowl with masking tape
about 1-1/2" on both sides of seam. Apply only as
much filler as is required, then remove the tape. This
will greatly reduce the amount of sanding required.
❏ 21. Sand the filler smooth, blending the aft cowl
❏ 24. Align the cowl blisters over the lines you
marked on the cowl and glue them into position with
thin CA. Drill 1/16" vent holes through the cowl under
the blisters so they won’t pop off in hot conditions.
to the forward cowl.
❏ 22. Trim the eighteen molded ABS cowl blisters
so only about a 1/16" lip remains around the edge.
Thoroughly sand the cowl blisters so adhesive, filler
and paint will adhere.
❏ 19. Use the die-cut 1/8" plywood cowl brace as
a pattern to make two more cowl braces from leftover
1/8" plywood. Trim each cowl brace to fit inside the
bottom of the cowl, bridging the gap between the
cowl ring and the bottom of the cowl. Glue the braces
into position.
NOTE: There are four additional cowl ring pieces
labeled CRM. If desired, they can be used to
reinforce the joint between the forward and aft cowl.
❏ 23. Refresh the pencil lines that you drew earlier
in step 2. Notice that the two blisters on the top and
- 45 -
❏ 25. Cut the 50" strip of 1" wide glass cloth into
three-inch strips. Use 30-minute epoxy to glue the
strips around the inside of the cowl to reinforce the
joint between the forward and aft cowl and between
the aft cowl and the cowl ring. Be certain the cowl is
thoroughly sanded in these areas so the epoxy
will adhere.
❏ 26. If you haven’t done so already, hook up your ❏ 29. Test fit the dummy engine inside the cowl and
exhaust system. Since there are many different
engine configurations available for this model, it is up
to you to select a suitable exhaust system. On one of
our prototype Stinsons with the O.S. 160 Gemini, we
made exhaust tubes from K&S 11/32" brass tubing
and connected them to the exhaust headers with
high temp (1,100 degree minimum) silver solder.
Other suitable exhaust systems for the O.S. Gemini
(and other four stroke engines) are Aerotrend tubing
(AERG2205), O.S. flex tubing (OSMG2672) or C.B.
Associates tubing (CBAG3136). We recommend you
place the highest priority on making a reliable
exhaust system rather than making a scale exhaust
system with difficult bends that may cause
overheating or other problems.
trim as necessary for a good fit. Glue the dummy
engine to a piece of 1/8" lite-ply (not supplied). Trim
where necessary to allow air passage over the
head(s) of your engine and to accommodate the
carburetor and wrench for access to the cowl screws.
After the model is finished and the cowl and engine
are painted, glue the dummy engine inside the cowl
with RTV silicone adhesive.
Finish the front cabin
Before proceeding, be certain you have finalized
❏ 27. Mount your fueling system, remote glow plug any details that will be difficult to reach once the
hookups and any other accessories you plan to use,
then cut holes in the cowl to accommodate or access
those items as well as your needle valve and choke
(if one is used on your engine).
cabin top and windshield are in place. Such details
(should you decide to add them) would be the
instrument panel, scale interior lining, painting in the
cabin area, additional instrumentation, etc.
the fuse root ribs you cut off with leftover 1/8" balsa
and glue to the fuse as shown. Shape the 1/8" balsa
pieces to match the wing, leaving approximately
3/16" extending below the bottom of the wing.
❏ 4. Cut the front of the molded ABS cabin top
❏ 28. If you’ve decided to use one, fit a dummy
radial engine inside the cowl. We adapted the 1/5scale Top Flite Corsair radial engine to fit inside the
cowl of the Stinson. To do this, the overall diameter of
the dummy cylinders has to be trimmed by cutting off
a portion of the valve covers. The diameter when
trimmed should be approximately 8-1/4". Note that
the valve covers have been trimmed at an angle to
match the shape of the cowl.
❏ 3. Join the wing to the fuse. Replace the fronts of
❏ 1. Cut off both ply fuse root ribs flush with the front
of former F3.
along the cutlines. Cut the rest of the cabin top along
the aft edges as shown. Glue 3/16" wide strips of
leftover ABS inside the top edge to support the clear
windshield that will be added later.
❏ 2. Glue a piece of leftover 1/8" balsa across the
top of former 3 above the corner braces. Shape the
balsa to match the top of the fuse and the stringers.
❏ 5. Glue the cabin top to the fuse, then trim the
ends even with fuse root ribs.
Refer to this photo for the following two steps.
- 46 -
❏ 6. Cut three 1/4" x 5-3/4" wood dowels to the
correct length as shown in the photo, then bevel the
ends to match the fuse. Glue the dowels to the fuse
and cabin top with epoxy.
❏ 7. Use the side and front windshield patterns
on the plan to cut the windshields from the 10" x 20"
clear plastic sheet. IMPORTANT: The fit of the
windshields may vary from model to model
depending upon dowel placement and the final
shape of the cabin top. For this reason, be sure to cut
your windshields larger than the patterns to allow for
accurate trimming and positioning.
❏ 9. At this stage the instrument panel and dashboard
area should be nearly completed, because we’re
getting ready to install the front windshield which will
make these areas virtually inaccessible. The way the
prototype in this manual was finished was to mark the
outline of the side and front windshields on the fuse,
then remove the windshields and paint the front of the
cabin black. Some modelers may prefer to finish the
cabin and install the windshields after the model is
covered, but this may be easier to do now because of
the windshield trim that will be added soon.
NOTE: The window material may be covered with a
clear plastic protective layer on both sides.
If you prefer to glue the windows in place and add
the trim after the model is covered, skip ahead to the
next section, then return when you’re ready.
❏ 10. Wash the side and front windshields with a
❏ 8. Test fit the side and front windshields to the
cabin top and fuse. Trim where necessary.
mild soap and water solution, then glue them into
position. If you’re careful, you may use CA. If you’ve
had bad luck gluing windows in with CA, use canopy
glue such as RC-56. The edges of the windows will
be concealed with filler to simulate window trim, so
you don’t have to do a perfect gluing job, but use care
not to get glue or any other unremovable “guck”
anywhere else on the windows.
- 47 -
❏ 11. Use filler or epoxy mixed with microballoons
to make a fillet that simulates window trim joining the
windows to each other and to the fuse and the cabin
top. Allow the filler to harden, then cover the windows
with masking tape to avoid scratches and carefully
sand the filler to remove any rough edges.
Note: In case you wish to modify your windows if you
are building another version of the Stinson, molded
ABS window trim is supplied with this kit. The
triangular parts of the molded window trim may be
used for the vertical posts over the 1/4" dowels on
this model.
❏ 12. While you’re at it, use the remaining clear
plastic sheet to make the side windows for the aft
cabin and doors. You can cut them slightly oversize
and simply glue them to the inside of the cabin (after
you’ve covered the model), or inset them into the
window openings and add trim made from plastic
sheeting (not supplied) just the same as was shown
for the opening doors.
Make the Pushrod Exit Covers
❏ ❏ 4. Fit the pushrod exit cover over the fuse. Drill
1/16" holes in the fuse and 3/32" holes in the cover, then
secure the cover to the fuse with #2 x 3/8" screws.
❏ ❏ 5. If you prefer, glue an additional hooded
pushrod exit to the pushrod exit cover over the
rudder cable guide tube, or leave the guide tube
extending from the fuse as shown in the photo.
❏ ❏ 5. Glue the inner wheel pant half to the outer
wheel pant half with CA. Refrain from using
accelerator because it may soften the plastic. Be
certain the two halves are securely glued together by
reinforcing the seam from the inside with CA.
❏ 6. Make the pushrod exit cover for the other side
of the fuse the same way.
❏ ❏ 1. Use the pushrod exit cover pattern on the
plan to make a pushrod exit cover from the circular
sheet of plastic you cut from the aft cowl.
Assemble the Wheel Pants
❏ ❏ 1. Cut one set of wheel pant halves along the
molded-in cutlines. Thoroughly roughen the insides
of both wheel pant halves so glue will adhere.
❏ ❏ 2. Cut a piece of leftover 1/16" plywood to fit
in the recess in the inner wheel pant half and glue
it into position (you can see the ply piece in the
following photo).
❏ ❏ 3.
Test fit the inner wheel pant to the
corresponding landing gear. If necessary, round the
edges of the gear so it will fully contact the ply plate.
by another 3/16" wheel collar onto the axle. Fit the
assembly into the wheel pant, then mount the pant
and the axle to the landing gear with a nut. Note: If
necessary, use a #11 drill to enlarge the hole in your
wheel to fit the axle.
❏ ❏ 7. Center the wheel in the wheel pant. Be
certain the opening for the wheel provides at least
3/16" clearance all the way around. Enlarge the
opening if necessary.
Refer to this photo for the following three steps.
❏ ❏ 2. Cut slots in the pushrod exit cover so the
elevator pushrod and rudder cable can pass through.
Test fit the cover over the fuse to make sure the
slots are in the correct location. Make adjustments
if necessary.
❏ ❏ 3. Glue a hooded pushrod exit in the upper
slot for the elevator pushrod. Trim the flange on the
base of the hooded pushrod exit flush with the inside
surface of the pushrod exit cover. Cut the remaining
portion of the elevator pushrod guide tube that
protrudes from the fuselage.
❏ ❏ 6. Slip a 3/16" wheel collar, a 5" wheel followed
❏ ❏ 8. Tighten and loosen the set screws a few times
to mark where they contact the axle. Remove the
wheel and wheel pant and file flat spots on the axle
where the set screws left their marks. Do not omit the
outer flat spot on the axle, otherwise the wheel collar
may shift or fall off. (One wheel landings are not
particularly difficult, but can be embarrassing.)
❏ ❏ 4. Temporarily fit the inside wheel pant to the
matching landing gear. Mark the location of the hole
on the pant, then drill or cut a 5/16" hole for the axle.
- 48 -
❏ 9. You know the drill. Return to the first step and
assemble the other wheel pant the same way.
❏ 10. The same as you did for the cowl, fill seams ❏ ❏ 5. Add a few drops of thin CA to the hole in the
between the wheel pant halves with filler such as
automotive Bondo® or similar.
fuse strut mount, allow to harden, then secure the
strut to the fuse with a #4 x 5/8" screw.
You may remount the wheels and pants to the
model at this time, or wait until after they are
painted. When you mount the wheels on the axles
during final assembly, lubricate the wheels on the
axles to be certain they roll freely.
❏ 6. Mount the strut to the other side of the stab
the same way. When it’s time for finishing, you may
cover the stab struts with iron-on covering, or cover
them with lightweight glass cloth and resin, then
prime and paint.
Mount the Stab Struts
Mount the Landing Gear Fairings and
Wing Struts
Note: The wing struts are for scale appearance only
and do not add structural support to the wing. Due to
the design of the wing and its own internal bracing, the
additional support of functional struts is not required
when the Stinson is flown in a scale-like manner.
❏ ❏ 3. Separate two shaped 18" basswood wing
strut halves as shown in the sketch. Glue the two
halves together, then sand smooth and even.
Make the left side first so yours will match the photos.
Refer to this photo while you mount the stab struts.
❏ ❏ 1. Cut a pocket in the bottom longeron to
accommodate a 3/4" x 1-1/4" fuselage strut mount
made from leftover 1/8" plywood. Glue the strut
mount into position.
one of the stab struts to the correct length and bevel
the ends to fit the stab and the fuse.
❏ ❏ 4. Drill a 5/32" hole through the 3/4" x 1" x 31/2" wing strut mounting block where shown on
the plan. Trim the block to fit in the wing, then glue it
in place to rib doubler 5D flush with the bottom wing
sheeting and cap strips as shown. Do not install the
6-32 blind nut until instructed to do so.
❏ ❏ 3. Drill a 1/8" hole through the top of the strut ❏ ❏ 1. Cut the left molded ABS landing gear fairing
❏ ❏ 5. Mount the wing to the fuse. Cut the wing strut
in alignment with the hole in the strut mount on the
stab. Secure the strut to the stab with a 4-40 x 1/2"
socket head cap screw.
to the correct length, then bevel one end to match
the angle at which it meets the wing. The bottom of
the strut simply rests against the landing gear fairing.
Note: You’ll find that the wing strut interferes with the
door and does not allow it to open all the way (in fact,
the door can only open about halfway). This is “scale”
and is the same on the full-size Stinson.
❏ ❏ 2. Cut the 21" basswood stab strut in half. Cut
❏ ❏ 4. Drill a 3/32" hole through the other end of the
strut and the fuselage strut mount. Enlarge the hole
in the strut only with a 1/8" drill.
along the cutlines, then trim the opening for the landing
gear. Test fit the fairing and trim the opening until it fits
the fuse and the landing gear. NOTE: The smaller of the
two fairings is the left one.
❏ ❏ 2. Temporarily attach the landing gear fairing to
the fuse with masking tape.
- 49 -
x 1-1/4" socket head cap screw. Install a 6-32 blind
nut into the top of the wing strut mounting block. Test
mount the strut to the wing with the screw.
❏ ❏ 13. Mount the landing gear fairing. There are two
ways to do this. The first way is to permanently glue it
to the landing gear. Drill holes in the bottom of the
fairing for the landing gear screws. The second way is
to use eight #2 screws, evenly spaced around the
edges, to hold the fairing to the fuse sheeting. If you
use this method add a few drops of thin CA to the
holes in the balsa to get a secure grip on the screws.
❏ ❏ 6. Cut out the molded ABS lower strut fairing
along the cutlines. With the strut in position, trim the
lower strut fairing to fit the landing gear fairing and the
wing strut. After you’ve achieved a good fit, glue the
lower strut fairing to the landing gear fairing. Note: You
don’t have to get a perfect fit between the lower strut
fairing and the landing gear fairing—filler will be added
later, blending the two for a seamless transition.
IMPORTANT: If you plan to do aggressive aerobatics,
you should make the wing strut load bearing. Make an
aluminum bracket that is attached to the bottom of the
strut and mounts to one of the landing gear screws.
❏ ❏ 9. Temporarily cover the bottom of the wing
with iron-on covering where the top of the strut
comes into contact. Cover that part of the wing with
wax paper, Saran wrap, or spray on a light coat of
mold release agent. Fill the top strut fairing with filler
such as automotive Bondo or something similar, then
fit the strut to the wing and allow the filler to harden.
❏ 14. Use filler to blend the lower strut fairing to the
landing gear fairing. When the filler hardens, sand it
to shape.
❏ 15. Return to step 1 and build the other wing strut
the same way.
❏ ❏ 10. Remove the strut from the wing, then sand
the filler, blending it to the top strut fairing.
❏ ❏ 11. Position the strut on the bottom of the wing,
centering it under the hole in the strut mounting
block. From the top of the wing, use the hole you
already drilled in the strut mounting block as a guide
to drill a 5/32" hole through the strut (now the holes
are guaranteed to line up).
❏ ❏ 7. Test fit the molded ABS upper strut fairing
to the top of the wing strut and the wing the same
way you did the lower strut fairing.
❏ ❏ 8. After you are satisfied with the fit of the
upper strut fairing to the wing and the strut, position
the assembly on the wing, then glue the fairing to the
strut, (don't glue them to the wing).
❏ ❏ 12. Enlarge the opening of the hole in the
upper strut fairing to countersink the head of a 6-32
- 50 -
❏ 16. While the model is upside-down, cut out the
molded ABS tail gear cover and test fit it to the
bottom of the fuse over the tail gear. You can use #2
screws to hold it in position, or glue it in place with
RTV silicone after the fuse is covered and the cover
is painted.
Prepare the Model for Covering
With a scale model such as this, there may be
several “loose ends” to be completed before or after
the model is covered. Use your own expertise and
preference as a guide, but some of the following
items may be easier to tackle now, before the model
is covered.
❏ 1. Determine where to route the servo extension
cords and make provisions for internal connectors.
Connections between servo cords and extension
cords should be secured with vinyl tape, heat shrink
tubing, or special clips intended for this purpose.
Conceal connectors and extension cords inside the
cabin where they won’t be seen (if you are installing
a scale cockpit kit).
❏ 6. Inspect all surfaces for uneven glue joints and use a covering that requires painting, cover the
seams that require filler. Apply filler where needed.
Many small dents or scratches in balsa can be
repaired by applying a few drops of water or
moistening the area with a wet tissue. This will swell
the wood so you can sand it when it dries.
❏ 7. Final sand the entire model with progressively ❏ 2. Prime and paint parts that will not be covered
finer grits of sandpaper, finishing with 320 or 400-grit.
Round the outer square edges of the top and bottom
longerons on the fuselage to simulate metal tubing.
This is as close as your model will get to being
finished before the covering is added. Now is the
time to balance the model laterally.
❏ 3. Determine what scale details you will be adding
and make provisions for them now. Accessories such
as the step ladder, storage compartments, lighting
and various antennas may be easier to fashion and
figure out how to attach now, rather than after the
model is covered. If possible, make these delicate
scale accessories removable so they will not get
damaged during transportation.
❏ 4. If you prefer an internal receiver antenna,
mount an antenna guide tube inside the fuselage.
❏ 5. If you haven’t already done so, determine
where to mount the receiver and battery pack. You
don’t have to actually mount them now, but you
should at least make provisions for where they are to
be located. At this preliminary stage, your battery
pack location should just be tentative. If it becomes
necessary to adjust the C.G., it may help to relocate
the battery pack rather than adding additional
ballast. Full information on balancing the model is on
page 53.
with iron-on covering. These include the wheel pants,
landing gear, wing and tail struts, pushrod exit
covers, landing gear fairings and cowl. Wood parts
such as the landing gear and struts should be
covered with glass cloth and resin before painting.
❏ 3. Paint the cockpit interior (or if you prefer, wait
until after the rest of the model is finished).
Balance the Airplane Laterally
❏ 2. Mount your on/off switch and external charge ❏ 1. Mount the wings to the fuse.
jack. Since this model has opening doors, you may
mount the switches inside the cabin.
model first, then paint the cabin top and window trim
when you paint the rest of the model. If the covering
you are going to use does not require painting (such
as 21st Century fabric), you could paint the cabin top
and window trim first, then apply the covering.
❏ 2. With the wing level, carefully lift the model by
the crankshaft and the aft end of the fuselage under
the stab (this will require two people). Do this several
times.
❏ 3. If one wing always drops when you lift the
model, that side is heavy. Balance the airplane by
gluing weight inside the other wing tip. Do this by
carving a cavity in the bottom of the balsa wing tip
and filling it with the amount of weight required to
balance the model laterally. Glue the weight in place
with epoxy and cover the rest of the cavity with balsa
filler. An airplane that has been laterally balanced will
track better in certain maneuvers.
FINISHING
Painting
❏ 1. Determine whether to paint the cabin top and
window trim before or after the model is covered.
This depends upon the covering system and
finishing method you have chosen. If you are going to
- 51 -
Covering
NEVER CUT THE COVERING DIRECTLY ON
THE MODEL. Modelers who cut through the
covering tend to cut into the sheeting or leading
edges, weakening the structure.
Most of the covering on this model is
straightforward. The only area where you may
encounter difficulty is around the base of the fin.
Following are instructions on how to cover this area.
❏ 1. Before you begin covering, use a dust brush,
compressed air or a Top Flite Tack Cloth to remove
balsa dust from the model.
❏ 2. Cut the covering to fit the fin. It is said that some
coverings have a “grain.” For sake of this illustration,
we will establish that the grain direction of a covering
is the direction in which it shrinks the most. If you are
using 21st Century fabric, the grain runs the length of
the roll. Cut the covering to fit the fin so the grain runs
vertically. For 21st Century Fabric, the edges of the
roll of covering should run vertically, or parallel with
the trailing edge of the fin.
❏ 3. Using a trim iron set on low heat, seal the
covering to the model in the order shown in the photo
and described below.
Note: When 21st Century Fabric is heated, the
adhesive softens and the covering shrinks. For this
reason, 21st Century Fabric cannot be applied using
an iron on high heat. It must be thoroughly bonded to
the wood with low heat (wrapping the covering around
corners such as trailing edges and the sides of ribs
helps), then tightened with high heat. While shrinking
the covering, never apply heat where it is attached to
the airframe. Otherwise, the adhesive will soften and
the covering will pull away. Where the fabric is under
much tension (such as around wing tips and other
curved surfaces near open structure), use a generous
amount of “overlap” to make certain the edges are
securely bonded to the structure. As much as 1/2" or
5/8" overlap is desirable in these areas.
❏ 4. Cover the rest of the model using the tips ❏ 4. Mount the tail gear fairing and install a 2" tail
mentioned previously.
❏ 5. After you cover the wings, mount them to the
fuselage. Check the incidence at the tip of both
panels at rib 15. There should be 1 degree of
washout* at the tips. If necessary, correct by twisting
the wing panel in the correct direction and applying
heat to tighten the covering. Recheck the incidence
at the tips to be certain you have achieved the
correct washout.
*Washout is a “twist” intensionally built into the wing
where the tip is at a lower angle of attack than the root.
During stall situations this allows the tips to provide lift
longer than the rest of the wing and helps the wing
remain level so the model will not enter a spin.
wheel with two 1/8" wheel collars—don’t forget the
flat spot for the set screw on the wheel collar that
holds the wheel on and a drop of oil on the axle.
❏ 5. Mount the engine, install the fuel tank, (if it’s not
installed already), and hook up all the connections
including the throttle pushrod, fuel lines, fuel filler,
exhaust system, etc.
❏ 6. Mount the pushrod exit covers on the aft end
of the fuse.
❏ 7. If you haven’t done so already, mount the
servos in the wing and fuse.
❏ 8. Install the pull/pull cables for the rudder. The
connections should already be made for the elevator,
but now is the time to connect the other end of the
cables to the rudder servo. Follow the instructions
included with the pull/pull cable.
❏ 9. Hook up the rest of the controls. Secure all
clevises with a silicone retainer and use a 4-40 jam
nut on all threaded steel clevises.
❏ 10. Mount your battery pack and receiver. As
mentioned previously, upon checking the CG, be
prepared to relocate the battery pack.
Final Assembly
❏ 1. Gather all the control surfaces and the 6-32 x
1-1/2" threaded rods. Use 30-minute epoxy to
permanently glue the threaded rods into the holes
you previously tapped in the basswood blocks.
A. Iron the covering to the corner of the bottom of
the fin and the stab TE.
B. Iron the covering to the TE, tip and LE of the fin.
C. Iron the covering to the stab fairing and the top
of the stab.
D. Iron the covering to the fin fillet.
E. Pull the covering tight, then iron it to the top
longeron and the top of former 8.
F. Be certain all edges of the covering are
securely bonded to the airframe, then use a
heat gun or an iron to tighten it.
G. Trim the excess covering with a sharp razor
blade or a hobby knife.
❏ 11. Install the cockpit interior, followed by the side
windows. We suggest using special “canopy glue” such
as RC/56 (JOZR5007) to glue in the side windows.
12. Glue the door hinges to the door. Mount the
❏ 2. Permanently attach the control surfaces with ❏
doors with the removable hinge pins and the door
your hinges using the adhesive recommended by the
manufacturer of the hinges—most require 30-minute
epoxy. Hint: Apply a small amount of petroleum jelly to
hinge pins to keep epoxy from locking up the hinge.
❏ 3. Assemble the wheel pants and wheels, then
join the landing gear and the landing gear fairings to
the fuse. Don’t forget to file flat spots on the axles for
the set screws and to apply a drop of oil to the axles.
A small drop of thread locking cement on the set
screws is also highly recommended.
- 52 -
latch mechanism.
❏ 13. Study the photos on the box to decide where
to place the decals. Trim the decals close to the
edges and carefully apply them to your model. You
can float them into position by dipping them into a
solution of dish soap and water (just a few drops to a
quart of water), then squeegeeing out the solution
with a piece of soft balsa or a credit card wrapped
with a tissue. Let the decals set for at least 12 hours
before running the engine.
GET YOUR MODEL READY TO FLY
Balance your Model
NOTE: This section is VERY important and must
NOT be omitted! A model that is not properly
balanced will be unstable and possibly
unflyable.
❏ 1. Since this model is mostly an “open” structure
that is fabric covered, the wing has no structural
“hard points” at which to support the model while
checking the C.G. Place leftover pieces of balsa or
plywood across the ribs on the bottom of the wing
where you wish to lift the model for checking the C.G.
balance aft it may make the Stinson more agile with
a lighter feel and allow you to slow the model more
for landing. In any case, please start at the location
we recommend and do not at any time balance your
model outside the recommended range. Our model
flew best in the forward half of the CG range.
radio to provide the control surface movements as
follows. Use a ruler or a Great Planes AccuThrow™
Control Surface Deflection Meter (GPMR2405) to
measure the throws.
❏ 3. The model must be in a ready-to-fly condition
with all components installed and an empty fuel tank.
Place blocks or something similar under the tail so
the fuselage is level on your workbench.
❏ 4. With the wing attached to the fuselage, lift the
model at the balance point or place it on a CG stand.
If you're using a C.G. Machine, use longer wires (not
included) to spread the base further apart and blocks
to raise it off your bench. If the tail drops, the model
is tail heavy and you must shift your battery pack or
other components forward or add weight to the nose.
If the nose drops, it is nose heavy and you must shift
your battery pack or other components aft or add
weight to the tail. In order to save weight, relocate the
battery pack and/or receiver or other components
before adding additional weight to arrive at the
correct CG. You may install nose or tail weight by
gluing lead weights inside the fuselage where
necessary. If nose weight is required, position it as
far forward as possible. Securing nose weight to the
engine box is preferable.
❏ 2. Accurately mark the balance point on the
bottom of the wing on both sides of the fuselage. The
balance point is shown on the plan (CG) and is
located 4-1/2" [114mm] aft of the leading edge of the
wing at the root ribs where they contact the fuse. This
is the balance point at which the model should be
balanced for the first flights. Later, you may
experiment by shifting the balance up to 1/2" [13mm]
forward or back to change the flying characteristics.
If you move the balance point forward it may improve
the smoothness and tracking, but the Stinson may
then require more speed for takeoff and become
more difficult to slow for landing. If you move the
❏ 4. Adjust your pushrod hookups and set up your
Final Hookups and Checks
❏ 1. Take the servo arms off your servos, turn on
your transmitter and center all the trims. Reinstall all
the servo arms and secure them with the screws.
❏ 2. Double-check all the servos and make sure the
servo arms and mounting screws are secure and all
the clevises have a silicone retainer.
❏ 3. Make sure the control surfaces move in the
correct direction.
- 53 -
Control Surface Throws
Recommend control surface throws:
High Rate
Low Rate
ELEVATOR:
1" up
1" down
9/16" up
9/16" down
AILERONS:
1" up
7/8" down
3/4" up
5/8" down
RUDDER:
FLAPS:
2" right
2" left
1-1/2" down
Note: Throws are measured at the widest part of
the control surface.
TRIM MIXING: If your transmitter has flap-to-elevator
mixing, we recommend mixing 5% (1/16", or 1/20" to
be exact) down elevator when the flaps are fully
extended. This will allow the model to maintain a level
attitude when the flaps are extended.
The balance point and control surface throws
listed in this manual are the ones at which the
Stinson flies best. Set up your aircraft to those
specifications. If, after a few flights, you would like
to adjust the throws or CG to suit your tastes, that
is fine. Too much control surface throw can make
your model difficult to control or force it into a
stall, so remember...More is not better.
PREFLIGHT
Identify your Model
Whether you fly at an AMA sanctioned R/C club site
or somewhere on your own, you should always have
your name, address, telephone number and AMA
number on or inside your model. It is required at all
AMA R/C club flying sites and AMA sanctioned flying
events. Fill out the identification sticker included with
this kit and place it on or inside your model.
Find a Safe Place to Fly
The best place to fly your model is an AMA
chartered R/C club flying field. Contact the AMA
(their address is on page 2) or your hobby shop
dealer for the club in your area and join it. Club fields
are intended for R/C flying, making your outing safer
and more enjoyable. The AMA also provides
insurance in case of a flying accident. If an R/C
flying field is not available, find a large, grassy area
at least six miles from buildings, streets and other
R/C activities. A schoolyard is usually not an
acceptable area because of people, power lines and
possible radio interference.
Charge your Batteries
Follow the battery charging procedures in your radio
instruction manual. You should always charge your
transmitter and receiver batteries the night before
you go flying and at other times as recommended by
the radio manufacturer.
Balance your Propellers
Carefully balance your propellers before you fly. An
unbalanced prop is the single most significant cause
of vibration that can damage your model. Not only
will engine mounting screws and bolts loosen,
possibly with disastrous effect, but vibration may
also damage your radio receiver and battery.
Vibration can also cause your fuel to foam, which
will, in turn, cause your engine to run hot or quit.
We use a Top Flite Precision Magnetic Prop
Balancer(tm) (TOPQ5700) in the workshop and
keep a Great Planes Fingertip Prop Balancer
(GPMQ5000) in our flight box.
Ground Check your Model
If you are not thoroughly familiar with the operation
of R/C models, ask an experienced modeler to
inspect your radio installation and control surface
setup. Follow the engine manufacturer’s instructions
to break-in your engine. After you run the engine on
the model, perform a close inspection to make sure
all screws remain tight and your pushrods and
connectors are secure.
Range Check your Radio
Ground check the range of your radio before the first
flight of the day. With the transmitter antenna
collapsed and the receiver and transmitter on, you
should be able to walk at least 100 feet away from
the model and still have control. Have an assistant
stand by the model and, while you work the controls,
tell you what the control surfaces are doing.
Repeat this test with the engine running at various
speeds with an assistant holding the model, using
hand signals to show you what is happening. If the
control surfaces do not respond correctly, do not fly!
Find and correct the problem first. Look for loose
servo connections or broken wires, corroded wires on
old servo connectors, poor solder joints in your
battery pack or a defective cell in your battery pack,
or a damaged receiver crystal from a previous crash.
- 54 -
During the last few moments of preparation your
mind may be elsewhere, anticipating the
excitement of your first flight. Because of this, you
may be more likely to overlook certain checks and
procedures you should perform after your model is
built. To help you avoid this, we’ve provided a
checklist to make sure you don’t overlook these
important areas. Many are covered in the
instruction manual so, where appropriate, refer to
the manual for complete instructions. Be sure to
check the items off as you complete them (that’s
why we call it a check list!).
❏ 1. Fuelproof all areas exposed to fuel or exhaust
residue, such as the firewall/engine compartment
and the fuel tank compartment.
❏ 2. Check the CG according to the measurements
provided in the manual.
❏ 3. Secure the battery and receiver with a strip of
balsa or plywood or other secure mounting method.
Simply stuffing them into place with foam rubber is
not sufficient.
❏ 4. Extend your receiver antenna and make sure it
has a strain relief inside the fuselage to keep tension
off the solder joint inside the receiver.
❏ 5. Balance your model laterally as explained in
the instructions.
❏ 6. Secure critical fasteners with thread-locking
compound (the screws that hold the carburetor arm,
set screws on wheel collars, screw-lock pushrod
connectors, etc.).
❏ 7. Add a drop of oil to the axles so the wheels will
turn freely.
❏ 8. Make sure all hinges are securely glued in place.
ENGINE SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
❏ 9. Reinforce holes for wood screws with thin CA Note: Failure to follow these safety precautions
where appropriate (servo mounting plates, servo
mounting screws, etc,).
❏ 10. Confirm that all controls operate in the correct
direction and the throws are set up according to
the manual.
❏ 11. Make sure there are silicone retainers on all
the clevises and jam nuts on thread-on clevises.
may result in severe injury to yourself and others.
Store model fuel in a safe place away from high
heat, sparks or flames. Do not smoke near the
engine or fuel as it is very flammable. Engine
exhaust gives off a great deal of deadly carbon
monoxide so do not run the engine in a closed
room or garage.
Get help from an experienced pilot when you are
learning to operate engines.
❏ 12. Fasten all servo arms to the servos with the Use safety glasses when you operate model engines.
screws included with your radio.
❏ 13. Secure connections between servo wires and
Y-connectors or servo extensions and the connection
between your battery pack and the on/off switch with
vinyl tape or heat shrink tubing.
Do not run the engine near loose gravel or sand; the
propeller may throw loose material in your eyes.
When you start and run the engine, keep your face
and body as well as all spectators away from the
plane of rotation of the propeller.
❏ 14. Make sure any servo extension cords you may Always be aware and very conscious of hand
have used do not interfere with other systems (servo
arms, pushrods, etc.).
movements and be deliberate in your reach for the
needle valve, glow plug clip, or other items near a
spinning propeller.
❏ 15. Make sure your fuel lines and pressure lines Keep loose clothing, shirt sleeves, ties, scarfs, long
are connected and are not kinked.
❏ 16. Use an incidence meter to check the wing for
twists and correct before flying.
❏ 17. Balance your propellers (and spare propellers).
hair or loose objects away from the prop. Be
conscious of pencils, screw drivers or other objects
that may fall out of your shirt or jacket pockets.
Use a chicken stick or electric starter and follow the
instructions to start your engine.
(if used).
Make certain the glow plug clip or connector is
secure so that it will not pop off or get into the
running propeller.
❏ 19. Place your name, address, AMA number and
telephone number on or inside your model.
Ask an assistant to hold the model from the rear
while you start the engine and operate the controls.
❏ 18. Securely tighten the propeller nut and jam nut
❏ 20. Cycle your transmitter and receiver battery Make all engine adjustments from behind the
pack and make sure they are fully charged.
❏ 21. If you wish to photograph your model, do this
before your first flight.
❏ 22. Range check your radio when you get to the
flying field.
rotating propeller.
The engine gets hot! Do not touch the engine during
or immediately after you operate it. Make sure fuel
lines are in good condition so fuel will not leak onto
a hot engine and cause a fire.
- 55 -
To stop the engine, close the carburetor barrel
(rotor) or pinch the fuel line to discontinue the fuel
flow. Do not use your hands, fingers or any body
part to stop the engine. Never throw anything into
the prop of a running engine.
AMA SAFETY CODE (excerpts)
Read and abide by the following Academy of Model
Aeronautics Official Safety Code:
GENERAL
1. I will not fly my model aircraft in sanctioned
events, air shows, or model flying demonstrations
until it has been proven to be airworthy by having
been previously successfully flight tested.
2. I will not fly my model aircraft higher than
approximately 400 feet within 3 miles of an
airport without notifying the airport operator. I will
give right of way to and avoid flying in the
proximity of full scale aircraft. Where necessary
an observer shall be used to supervise flying to
avoid having models fly in the proximity of full
scale aircraft.
3. Where established, I will abide by the safety rules
for the flying site I use and I will not willfully and
deliberately fly my models in a careless, reckless
and/or dangerous manner.
7. I will not fly my model unless it is identified with
my name and address or AMA number, on or in
the model.
9. I will not operate models with pyrotechnics (any
device that explodes, burns, or propels a
projectile of any kind).
RADIO CONTROL
1. I will have completed a successful radio
equipment ground check before the first flight of a
new or repaired model.
2. I will not fly my model aircraft in the presence of
spectators until I become a qualified flier, unless
assisted by an experienced helper.
3. I will perform my initial turn after takeoff away
from the pit or spectator areas and I will not
thereafter fly over pit or spectator areas, unless
beyond my control.
Flight
To aid in ground handling during taxiing and your
initial takeoff roll, hold up elevator to keep the tail
wheel in contact with the ground. Up elevator should
be gradually relaxed as you gain speed to keep the
model from lifting into the air before you are ready.
In the flying section of most of our other instruction
manuals, we recommend that modelers take it easy
with their new model for the first few flights,
gradually getting acquainted as they gain
confidence in the engine and flight characteristics.
However, with the Stinson we recommend you
always take it easy! Keep in mind that this is a
large, docile, scale model of a civilian small
transport aircraft. Therefore, the Stinson is not
intended for aerobatic maneuvers other than those
such as chandelles and stall turns. Barrel rolls and
gentle loops—with proper throttle management—
can also be accomplished, but are not prototypical.
The Stinson should be flown in a scale-like manner
prototypical of the full size aircraft (surely, all
advanced scale pilots know this already!).
As with most tail draggers, engine torque will cause
the nose to turn to the left as you accelerate and roll
down the runway during takeoff—especially on
pavement. Though this tendency is minimal with the
Stinson, it is something you should expect and be
prepared for. To minimize this, always be ready to
apply a bit of right rudder. Additionally, hold a bit of
up elevator during initial rollout (as mentioned
previously) and advance the throttle smoothly and
gradually, using rudder to keep the model on the
centerline of the runway. As you near full throttle and
the model’s speed increases, decrease up elevator
and allow the tail to lift off the runway—always at the
ready with right rudder. Do not allow the model to
leave the ground yet. Allow the Stinson to build up
as much speed as your runway or flying site will
safely provide (this may take a little longer due to the
relatively thick airfoil and large fuselage cross
section), then apply up elevator and gently lift her
into the air. Once the model “breaks ground,” be
ready to apply right rudder to counteract torque.
Establish a gentle climb. After you have reached a
safe altitude, begin your turn away from the runway
and get into the traffic pattern.
After you have reached a safe altitude after takeoff,
adjust the trims so the Stinson will fly straight and
level at cruise speed. Though rudder is not
absolutely necessary, we found that the Stinson
turns best, and most scale-like, by using a small
amount of rudder to initiate the turn before adding
ailerons. You can even electronically mix in a small
amount (start with about 5%) of rudder to ailerons.
Try different throttle settings to see how the model
reacts and what kind of trim changes may be
required. Still at altitude, execute practice landing
approaches to see how the Stinson handles at lower
speeds. Do the same with the flaps extended so you
know what to expect when you’re in an actual
landing approach. Add power and see how she
climbs with flaps as well. Do this exercise a few
times and decide whether or not you will be using
flaps for your first landing. Fly around and execute
various maneuvers making mental notes (or having
a friend standing by with a note pad) on how she
behaves. Note what might be required to fine tune
your Stinson so it handles just the way you like. Use
this time and altitude to become as familiar as
possible with the Stinson before your first landing.
4. I will operate my model using only radio control
frequencies currently allowed by the Federal
Communications Commission.
FLYING
Takeoff
CAUTION (THIS APPLIES TO ALL R/C AIRPLANES): If, while flying,
you notice any unusual sounds, such as a low-pitched “buzz,” this may
indicate control surface flutter. Because flutter can quickly destroy
components of your airplane, any time you detect flutter you must
immediately cut the throttle and land the airplane! Check all servo
grommets for deterioration (this may indicate which surface fluttered),
and make sure all pushrod linkages are secure and free of play. If the
control surface fluttered once, it probably will flutter again under similar
circumstances unless you can eliminate the free-play or flexing in the
linkages. Here are some things which can cause flutter: Excessive
hinge gap; Not mounting control horns solidly; Poor fit of clevis pin in
horn; Side-play of pushrod in guide tube caused by tight bends; Poor fit
of Z-bend in servo arm; Insufficient glue used when gluing in the elevator
joiner wire; Excessive play or backlash in servo gears; and insecure
servo mounting.
Landing
The Stinson lands much the same as any other high
wing model, except it bleeds off air speed a little
faster due to the higher drag of the airframe. Just
carry a little extra power to stretch the glide path.
Landings may be performed with or without flaps.
With flaps she comes in slower yet, though at a
steeper glide angle. If you choose to use flaps,
maintain an engine R.P.M. that is slightly higher than
normal to overcome the additional drag. Flaps should
be extended after the throttle is reduced on the
downwind leg. If you extend the flaps at too high an
airspeed, the nose may pitch up strongly. To initiate a
landing approach, make your final turn toward the
runway (always into the wind) keeping the nose down
to maintain airspeed and control. Level the attitude
when the Stinson reaches the runway threshold,
modulating the throttle as necessary to maintain your
glide path and airspeed. When it’s over the runway
and just a foot or so off the deck, smoothly increase
up elevator to execute the landing flare. Mind your
fuel so you can make as many attempts as required
before you’re ready to touch down. Refrain from
using flaps during dead-stick landings unless you’re
near the runway and lined up. Otherwise, flaps will
reduce the model’s range causing it to land much
shorter than you might normally expect.
Have a ball! But always stay in control and fly in a safe manner. GOOD LUCK AND GREAT FLYING!
- 56 -