ML-315 Manual

ML-315

3G Data logger

ICT International

Enabling better global research outcomes in soil, plant & environmental monitoring.

WARNING

THE FOLLOWING OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS ARE FOR USE BY QUALIFIED PERSONNEL ONLY. TO

AVOID DAMAGE OR MALFUNCTION, DO NOT PERFORM ANY OPERATION OTHER THAN THAT

CONTAINED WITHIN THIS MANUAL. ALL OPERATORS SHOULD BE SKILLED, WITH A TECHNICAL

BACKGROUND.

Congratulations on your purchase of a YDOC Low Power data logger with 2G/3G capabilities.

This manual describes the operation and installation of the ML-315 data logger.

We recommend you read this manual carefully before installation of the data logger.

Warranty

All YDOC Loggers are supplied with a 3-year warranty against defective materials and workmanship.

Contact the distributor for further information.

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Contents

WARNING ............................................................................................................................................ 2

Warranty ............................................................................................................................................. 2

1. Product Description ............................................................................................................................ 5

1.1 – ML-315 ....................................................................................................................................... 6

2. Getting Started .................................................................................................................................... 7

2.1 – Vibration ..................................................................................................................................... 7

2.1.1 – Basic Care ............................................................................................................................ 7

2.2 – Inserting the SIM card ................................................................................................................ 7

2.3 – Initial Power On .......................................................................................................................... 8

2.4 – Connect to a Computer .............................................................................................................. 9

3. Operating Basics ................................................................................................................................ 10

3.1 – Configuration Menu ................................................................................................................. 10

3.1.1 – Data Outputs ..................................................................................................................... 15

3.1.2 – FTP, TCP and Email output ................................................................................................ 16

4. Reference .......................................................................................................................................... 17

4.1 - Principle of Operation ............................................................................................................... 17

4.1.1 – Sample Interval ................................................................................................................. 17

4.1.2 – Data Logging Interval ........................................................................................................ 17

4.1.3 – Send Interval ..................................................................................................................... 17

4.1.4 – Example ............................................................................................................................. 17

4.2 – SDI-12 ....................................................................................................................................... 18

4.2.1 – SDI-12 Hardware ............................................................................................................... 18

4.2.2 – SDI-12 Wiring .................................................................................................................... 18

4.2.3 – SDI-12 Baud Rate and Frame Format ................................................................................ 19

4.3 – RS232 ........................................................................................................................................ 20

4.4 – RS485 ........................................................................................................................................ 20

4.5 – Analogue Inputs ....................................................................................................................... 21

4.5.1 – Loop Powered Devices ...................................................................................................... 21

4.5.2 – Potentiometer Input ......................................................................................................... 21

4.5.3 – Analogue Inputs (0 to 10V) ............................................................................................... 21

4.6 – Digital Inputs ............................................................................................................................ 22

4.6.1 – Pull up type ....................................................................................................................... 22

4.6.2 – Pull down type .................................................................................................................. 22

4.7 – Alarms ...................................................................................................................................... 23

4.7.1 – Alarm principal of operation ............................................................................................. 23

4.8 – Firmware Upgrade ................................................................................................................... 24

4.8.1 – When to use Firmware upgrades ...................................................................................... 24

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4.8.2 – Firmware upgrade procedure ........................................................................................... 24

4.8.3 – 2G/3G Firmware Upgrade ................................................................................................. 24

4.8.4 – Firmware Driver Limitations ............................................................................................. 24

4.8.5 – Power Switch Limitations .................................................................................................. 24

4.8.6 – Modem .............................................................................................................................. 24

4.9 – Micro SD Card .......................................................................................................................... 25

4.9.1 – Inserting a Micro SD card .................................................................................................. 25

4.10 – Input drivers ........................................................................................................................... 26

4.10.1 – Analogue Sensors ............................................................................................................ 26

4.10.2 – Digital Pulse Sensors ....................................................................................................... 26

4.11 – Power Supply ......................................................................................................................... 28

4.11.1 – Internal RTC backup battery ........................................................................................... 28

4.11.2 – Power Consumption and Battery Life ............................................................................. 28

4.12 – Internal Sensors ..................................................................................................................... 29

4.13 - Optional Accessories ............................................................................................................... 30

4.14 – International Provider Settings .............................................................................................. 31

5. ML-315 Pin Configuration ................................................................................................................. 39

5.1 – Pin Descriptions ........................................................................................................................ 40

5.1.1 – Analog Inputs .................................................................................................................... 40

5.1.2 – RS232 TX and RX................................................................................................................ 40

5.1.3 – RS485 A and B ................................................................................................................... 40

5.1.4 – SDI-12 ................................................................................................................................ 40

5.1.5 – Digital inputs ..................................................................................................................... 40

5.1.6 – Switched Power Output .................................................................................................... 40

5.1.7 – +VBAT and –VBAT ............................................................................................................. 41

6. Antenna Placement and Signal Strength .......................................................................................... 42

7. Maintenance and Repair ................................................................................................................... 43

7.1 – Real Time Clock Battery Replacement ..................................................................................... 43

7.2 – Recalibration ............................................................................................................................ 43

7.3 – X-Ray Exposure ......................................................................................................................... 43

8. Logger Specifications ........................................................................................................................ 44

9. Supported Serial Sensor Protocols .................................................................................................... 45

10. Troubleshooting .............................................................................................................................. 46

11. Declaration of Conformity .............................................................................................................. 47

12. Contact Information ........................................................................................................................ 48

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1. Product Description

The YDOC Data Logger is designed to retrieve and store data from various sensors. Data is stored on the internal SD card. Stored data can be sent automatically to an email address, a FTP server or via

TCP using the SIM card.

The ML-315 is a small, ultra-low power, high-end data logger with a built in 2G/3G cellular modem.

The logger also features several internal sensors (Rest Capacity, Rest Power, Processor Temperature,

Average Voltage, Max Voltage, Min Voltage, Average Current, Max Current, Min Current, Operating

Cycle and Free Disk Space), a 2GB Micro SD card, SIM card, and Solar Panel with Battery Pack.

The ML-315 has 2 4-20mA inputs, 2 voltage inputs, 1 resistance input, SDI-12 input, one RS232 input,

RS485 input, and 3 digital inputs. Drivers are provided for ASCII, MODBUS/RTU, NMEA and SDI-12 sensors. External sensors can be powered by the data logger itself, which automatically powers the sensors only when required in order to save power.

The integrated solar panel allows the ML-315 to operate indefinitely with most sensor setups.

ML-315 Key Features:

- Maximum sample rate: 4Hz

- 2GB Micro SD card based data storage.

- Four 12bit A/D input channels.

- One resistance input.

- 3 digital inputs.

- SDI-12, RS232 and RS485 inputs.

- Internal Micro SD card, FAT-32 formatted for use with Windows and Mac.

- Low power, long battery life, integrated solar panel.

- Embedded 2G/3G modem.

- SMS alarms.

- Data delivery by email, FTP and TCP.

- Internal voltage convertor for supplying 12V DC to connected sensors.

- Firmware upgrades to add new features.

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1.1 – ML-315

The ML-315 has an IP67 rated waterproof enclosure, made out of polycarbonate, with a solar panel enclosure made of glass fibre reinforced polyamide and a silicone gasket. The ML-315 is designed to operate outdoors.

1) Analog Inputs.

2) RS232/RS-485/SDI-12 Input.

3) Digital Inputs.

4) 12V Power Switch and Alarm Output.

5) Optional Accessory Port (TFT Display, Camera etc.)

6) 3G Modem.

7) Internal/External antenna selection jumper.

8) U.FL connector for external antenna.

9) Internal Antenna.

10) Connector for optional external waterproof USB connector.

11) Internal USB Connector.

12) Processor.

13) SIM (2FF) and Micro SD card holder.

14) Fuse.

15) 3.6V Power Supply Connector (To PV Solar Panel Enclosure).

16) Optional D-Size Lithium Battery Holder (For Non-Solar models).

17) Real Time Clock (RTC) battery.

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2. Getting Started

2.1 – Vibration

The data logger must be protected against vibration at all times. Long lasting vibration can impede the performance of the data logger, particularly the real time clock.

2.1.1 – Basic Care

- Only open the case of the data logger in a clean, dry environment.

- Use a 2mm Philips Screwdriver, using a flathead screwdriver may damage the screws.

- Ensure the data logger is protected against mechanical stress and vibration.

- Avoid touching the PCB.

2.2 – Inserting the SIM card

The wireless data functions of the logger will only work when an active SIM card is placed in the data logger. The configuration and network settings supplied by the SIM card provider must be entered into the ML-315 configuration menu (Below). The SIM card’s PIN code must be removed prior to insertion in the data logger.

To prevent problems with the SIM card, it should be tested in a mobile phone or data modem.

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Notes:

- Ensure the logger is not connected to power before changing or inserting a SIM card or Micro SD card.

- Remove the PIN code (This can be done with a mobile phone).

- Check the settings of your mobile provider.

- Check the settings for communication via FTP/Email/TCP.

- Ensure that your SIM card has data.

- Ensure that the SIM card is installed correctly. The Oblique side of the card should be visible (see picture).

- Installation of the SIM card must be done in a clean, dry environment.

- Avoid contact with the electronic parts around the SIM card.

Electrostatic Discharge (ESD): The logger is designed to withstand certain amounts of electrostatic discharge, however ESD should be avoided. Please do not touch the PCB unless absolutely required, and use an earthed wristband if you must touch the PCB.

Ensure that, when connecting a sensor or any other wiring, there is no power supplied to either the logger or the sensor.

2.3 – Initial Power On

The data logger can be pre-programed with many of the necessary settings if requested. Setup information can be accessed in the menus, however the data logger should be ready to use out of the box.

Check that the SIM card is inserted, the Micro SD card is inserted, sensors are correctly connected, the Solar Enclosure is connected and, if required, the optional antenna is connected.

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2.4 – Connect to a Computer

The data logger can be connected to any PC with a USB 2.0 or 3.0 port and Windows Vista, 7, 8, 8.1, and 10.

You can use the provided YDOC-Terminal or any other Terminal Emulator (such as PuTTY) to configure the data logger.

Please note, the ML-315 USB driver can be installed by installing YDOC-Terminal.

Connect the ML-315 to your computer using a Mini-USB to USB cable. Once the logger is connected, open Device Manager and note the COM port of the ML-315:

Open your Terminal Emulator program and connect to the port listed in Device Manager.

Further information on the terminal connection can be found in Chapter 3 .

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3. Operating Basics

3.1 – Configuration Menu

The data logger can be configured using a terminal emulator. YDOC Terminal Emulation software can be downloaded from www.your-data-our-care.com

.

The configuration menu is comprehensive. The same basic setup procedure can be used for many sensors.

The following will be an example of sensor configuration.

For example, let’s configure:

- A SP-214 4-20mA Pyranometer

- A DS-2 Sonic Anemometer

- FTP Data output.

- Email data output.

Connect the logger to a free USB port on your computer and open a terminal emulator. The first time the logger is connected, Windows will need to install the USB driver, which can also be downloaded from the YDOC website.

Connect to the COM port assigned to the logger by Windows ( Chapter 2.4

).

Once the terminal emulator has opened the COM port, press:

<Ctrl> + A, <Shift> + M, <Ctrl> + D to enter the configuration menu.

You’ll see a screen similar to this:

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We recommend first giving the logger an appropriate identification code. This can be done by pressing 3 (Configuration Setup).

You’ll see a screen similar to this:

First name your device by selecting option 1 (General Settings)

Then select 1 (System Name) and enter the name by which you would like to identify the logger.

NB: ‘Summer time’ has not been set in the above example.

2. Choose the data logging interval – we use 10 minutes. (Option 2)

3. Enter the deployment time and date. This is when the logger will begin logging. Use the current time and date to begin logging immediately. (Option 6)

4. You can now exit (Option 0 – Exit), press ‘y’ when prompted to save changes.

5. This completes the initial configuration, we can now proceed to set up sensors and data output.

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6. You should be back on the Configuration Setup screen. Press 7 (Analog Sensors)

7. Choose 1 (Port 1 (mA))

8. Assign a name to the sensor (Option 1: Name)

9. Set the power switch to enabled and enter the warm up time required by the sensor. (The power switch will provide 12 volts to the sensor, the warm up time indicates how long prior to measurement the power switch will be activated)

10. Set the sample interval. A small (or high range) sample interval is not an issue for battery life, the sensor will sleep until the logging interval is reached.

11. Set the parameter name in option 5.

12. Set both the minimum and maximum (Options 6 and 7) values of the sensor at 4mA and 20mA. If you do not know these values, you can determine scaling by measuring 2 calibration points (Option

8). Calibration points do not need to be at the sensor’s maximum and minimum values, just at two different points within the range of the sensor (eg: a measurement at 1m under water and 2m under water for a depth sensor with a range of 0 to 10m)

13. If necessary, Option 9 may be used to perform an offset correction by measuring a single calibration point.

14. Save and Exit. (0, then y when prompted)

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Now to add a SDI-12 sensor to the logger:

From the Configuration Setup menu, select A (Serial Port) and then SDI-12 sensors.

Select Option 1 if there are currently no SDI-12 sensors connected, or (Next Sensor) if there are preexisting SDI-12 sensors.

Each SDI-12 sensor should have its own SDI-12 address. Addresses can be set by using a device like a

Decagon ProCheck or an ICT AML. If you are ordering SDI-12 sensors for a ML-315, you can request

SDI-12 addresses to be pre-set for each sensor.

Measurement commands for SDI-12 sensors are typically found in the sensor manuals. Where a sensor monitors multiple parameters, ensure all parameters you wish to log are selected.

SDI-12 breakout boxes are available from ICT International, and allow you to more easily connect multiple SDI-12 sensors to a single logger.

Note: Digital sensors take longer to measure than analogue sensors, ensure that the sample interval is long enough. YDOC recommends at least 1 second.

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It's often best to include some internal sensors in the configuration. Internal sensors allow for the monitoring of the data logger itself.

Go to Configuration Setup, menu option 6 – Internal Sensors.

Only set ‘Battery Replaced’ (4) to Yes when a new battery is installed.

Enable whichever sensors you like; a new column will be added to the csv file for each of the

enabled sensors. The Reference contains a complete list of the internal sensors.

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3.1.1 – Data Outputs

To set up data outputs, general modem settings must first be entered. Contact your provider for

your local settings. A table is included in References with some international providers and their

settings, which may have changed since the publishing of this manual.

From the Configuration Setup menu, select 2 (Modem Settings)

From this menu, select your provider (1) and make sure settings are correct.

Example output from selecting option 1.

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3.1.2 – FTP, TCP and Email output

FTP, TCP and Email output is set up from the main menu (Configuration Setup).

Menu options D, E and F.

Email (Option F)

1 – Name can be set to whatever you like.

2 – Send interval: (HH:MM:SS). A 6-hour interval means that data will be sent out at midnight, 6 am, noon and 6 pm.

3 – Send delay sets the delay between the interval time and the actual time the data is sent.

4 – Sets the format, CSV ( . ,) is a standard CSV file.

5 – Enter your email server’s SMTP server address.

6 – Enter your email server’s SMTP port.

7 – Enter the username for your email account.

8 – Enter the password for your email account.

9 – Enter the email address associated with the username and password from 7 & 8.

A – Enter the email address to which the data will be sent.

B – Enter the email subject.

Once the information has been entered, perform an email test (T) to make sure it’s working.

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4. Reference

4.1 - Principle of Operation

The YDOC data logger is capable of collecting and storing data from multiple sensors. The collection of data from sensors requires an internal scheduler which keeps track of all internal states, and assigns processor time to tasks. Each task is executed in its own interval.

There are three different intervals:

1) Sample Interval

2) Data Log Interval

3) Send Interval.

4.1.1 – Sample Interval

The sample interval is the interval on which a sample from the sensor(s) is taken. Sampling occurs only when the device is active. Sampling will not occur if the data logger is in sleep mode.

4.1.2 – Data Logging Interval

The data logging interval determines when data values, obtained during the sample interval, are written to the micro SD card. This interval will always occur. If the data logger is in sleep mode, it will be woken.

4.1.3 – Send Interval

The send interval determines when data is sent via the internal modem (via email, TCP or FTP).

This interval will always occur. If the data logger is in sleep mode, it will be woken.

4.1.4 – Example

Based on the following settings:

- Sample interval of 5 seconds.

- Data log interval of 10 minutes.

- Send interval of 3 hours.

Once the data logger has been configured and disconnected from USB power:

1. The data logger will enter sleep mode; current draw is reduced to the minimum value.

2. The sample interval is ignored; no logging occurs until the data log interval is reached. (ie: a reading will be taken every 10 minutes)

3. Once the data log interval has been reached, the data logger will wake from sleep mode, take a sample and write the data to the micro SD card. Once data collection has completed, the data logger will enter sleep mode until the next data log interval is reached.

4. When the Send Interval is reached, the data logger will wake and send all data that has been collected since the previous ‘Send Interval’.

Note: The data logger does not average across sample intervals. Sample interval is to be used to ensure that the system is correctly configured whilst connected to a computer. Real time data will be displayed on the terminal every 5 seconds. In the previous sensor setup examples, sample interval was set to Data log interval, however leaving sample interval on 5 seconds will not interfere with the operation of the data logger.

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4.2 – SDI-12

The SDI-12 port is Connector Block X2 pin 5. When requested, ICT can provide a SDI-12 breakout box, which allows for the simple connection of additional SDI-12 sensors. The ML-315 supports up to

16 SDI-12 sensors, the basic breakout box allows for the connection of 7 SDI-12 sensors.

If an SDI-12 sensor is set up, the data logger acts like an SDI-12 recorder, specific SDI-12 commands are embedded in the driver of the input sensor. Thus, the user can easily select the sensor and specify its SDI-12 address.

4.2.1 – SDI-12 Hardware

The SDI-12 standard is a commonly used interface standard in the United States, however SDI-12 is rarely used in Europe. SDI-12 is not compatible with RS232 or RS485.

Convertors are available for RS-232/485 to SDI-12 and vice versa, however, these are often expensive and perform poorly. It is preferable that the RS232 and RS485 ports be used where applicable.

4.2.2 – SDI-12 Wiring

The SDi-12 electrical interface uses the SDI-12 bus to transmit serial data between SDI-12 data recorders and sensors. Commonly, a cable is used to connect multiple SDI-12 devices. This cable should be three core: 1. Serial Data line, 2. Ground, 3. Power (12V DC).

As an alternative, ICT International can provide SDI-12 breakout boxes. (Below)

The above is using Decagon’s wiring scheme.

Simply wire up your sensor, according to the particular sensor’s wiring diagram, and plug it in to the breakout box. Use of a breakout box significantly simplifies SDI-12 wiring.

The data logger is protected against transients on the SDI-12 bus.

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4.2.3 – SDI-12 Baud Rate and Frame Format

The baud rate for SDI-12 is 1200. Frame format is:

1 start bit.

7 data bits, least significant bit transmitted first.

1 parity bit, even parity.

1 stop bit.

For more information on the SDI-12 protocol see: www.sdi-12.org

.

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4.3 – RS232

The ML-315 comes with one RS-232 port, connector block X2. Pin 1 is TX (Transmit Line), Pin 2 is RX

(Receive Line). The RS232 interface standard uses a minimum of 3 wires for data communication. It is an asymmetrical interface, using one wire for Tx, one wire for Rx and one wire for ground.

Because of this asymmetrical interface, RS232 is susceptible to interference, limiting the maximum cable length to 15m.

RS232 is not a bus port, only one device/sensor can be connected to an RS232 port. RS232 sensors should be connected to the data logger with their signals crossed, ie: Rx < - > Tx.

RS485 should be used where required cable length is greater than 15 meters.

4.4 – RS485

RS485 is a serial bus system, using 3 wires for communication. RS485 uses a differential balanced line, allowing it to span relatively large distances, up to 1.2km (4000 feet). A rule of thumb is that the speed in bits/second multiplied by the length in meters should not exceed 10

8

. With a 50-meter cable, the signal speed should be no faster than 2 Mbit/s.

Unlike RS232, RS485 is capable of communicating with more than one device.

RS485 sensors (referred to as ‘slaves’) must each have a unique address. The data logger acts as a master and retrieves information from the ‘slaves’. Only one ‘slave’ can respond to a request at a time.

When setting up your RS485 sensor for use with the data logger, make sure that the address is programmed correctly, and that each sensor address is unique.

Figure 1: RS485 Wiring

RS485 is often used with MODBUS/RTU sensors, and is less susceptible to electrical interference than RS232.

The ML-315 has a single RS485 port, which is capable of managing multiple sensors. The maximum amount of sensors depends of individual sensor specifications, defined by the sensor manufacturer.

A practical figure is 10 sensors. For the exact number of sensors, refer to Firmware Driver

Limitations .

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4.5 – Analogue Inputs

The ML-315 is equipped with two 12 bit, milliamp, Analogue-Digital Conversion Inputs. The input signal must be a 4-20mA current loop. The impedance of the system is 150 ohms.

4.5.1 – Loop Powered Devices

Some devices don’t need a power supply, but instead take their power from the 4-20mA Current

Loop. The primary power circuit of the data logger does NOT provide power for this.

If your 4-20mA sensor requires power, it must be connected to the power switch (Connector Block

X4 pin 1 – 12v @ 100mA).

Consult the manual of the loop-powered device you intend to connect, and use the positive side of the power switch to supply power.

In most cases, the 4-20mA sensor will have an active output signal, so there will be no problems connecting it. If you have questions about interfacing your device with the ML-315, contact ICT

International.

4.5.2 – Potentiometer Input

The ML-315 features a potentiometer input to allow the connection of Angular and Rotational

Devices such as wind speed/direction.

This input is designed to be configured only with a 3 wire sensor connection, such that the supply to the potentiometer is supplied from the 3.3 Volt Resistance Reference Terminal output (Terminal

X1.8) and one ground (Terminal X1.5/6 or X3.4) from the ML-315. The supply and ground to the sensor and the resulting output wiper produces an ADC translated value between 0 and 100%.

Recommended Potentiometers are ones that are between 100Kohms and 4.7Mohms in total resistance. Lower values introduce the possibility of more power draw.

4.5.3 – Analogue Inputs (0 to 10V)

The ML-315 is equipped with two analogue 0 to 10 volts, 12 bit, ADC inputs. The input signal must be a DC signal of 10 volts or less. Higher voltage may be used if external resistors are used.

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4.6 – Digital Inputs

The ML-315 is equipped with 2 digital inputs. These inputs are interrupt driven – they can wake the data logger from sleep mode so that a signal change on the input is never missed. These inputs are ideal for use with pulse based instruments, like rain gauges. The digital inputs are also useful for setting alarm states (level or float switches).

The signal levels need to be zero volts and 3.6 volts (0 and 1 – on and off), however the inputs are 5 volts tolerant, so standard 5 volt signals will work.

Any other voltage level must be adapted before connecting.

Inputs can be either ‘Pull-up’ or ‘Pull-down’, user selectable.

4.6.1 – Pull up type

The pull up type of input means there is an internal resistor mounted between the input and the Vcc power supply. When no signal is connected, the input will be logical high. This type of input is for use with open collector systems or NPN outputs.

4.6.2 – Pull down type

The pull down type of input means there is an internal resistor mounted between input and ground.

When no signal is connected, the input will be logical low. This type of input is for use with active output systems or PNP outputs.

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4.7 – Alarms

In some circumstances, normal data logging may be insufficient. Alarms can be used to keep track of certain conditions. There are 4 available alarms:

Alarm Description Notes

Low-Low Alarm level for lowest value This alarm level is triggered when the data logger reads a value lower than the set Low-Low limit. This level should be set for rare and critical conditions.

Low Alarm level for low value

(Often called STOP level)

This alarm level is triggered when the data logger reads a value lower than the set Low limit. This is the first stage alarm, often called the WARNING level.

High Alarm level for high value This alarm level is triggered when the data logger reads a value higher than the set High limit. This is the first stage alarm, often called the WARNING level.

High-High Alarm level for highest value This alarm level is triggered when the data logger reads a value higher than the set High-High limit. This level should be set for rare and critical conditions.

(Often called STOP level)

4.7.1 – Alarm principal of operation

When a data logger is running and a measurement exceeds an alarm threshold, the data logger will switch to the alarm sample interval. The alarm sample interval can be set to read from sensors more frequently than the normal logging interval.

Alarm Sample Delay determines what happens next – if the alarm sample delay is set to zero, the alarm will be triggered immediately. If the alarm sample delay is set to 1, the data logger will ‘wait’ for one more sample interval. If that sample also exceeds the alarm threshold, the alarm will be triggered. If the alarm sample delay is set to 2, the next 2 samples must exceed the threshold to trigger an alarm, and so on.

Once an alarm has been triggered, the data logger will add “A” to the data record. Additionally, any of the following options can be set to occur:

1) Alarm SMS – Send an SMS to a mobile phone.

2) Alarm Email

3) Alarm TCP

4) Alarm FTP

Alarm states are not affected by hysteresis. Hysteresis is used to determine when the alarm state should end, and normal logging should resume.

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4.8 – Firmware Upgrade

The ML-315 is equipped with a boot loader, enabling firmware upgrades.

Firmware upgrades can be done via:

- USB

- 2G/3G

- Comport

4.8.1 – When to use Firmware upgrades

Normally, firmware upgrades are unnecessary if the data logger is performing correctly.

However, new sensors may be released which require a firmware upgrade.

Once a firmware upgrade has been released to support this new sensor, the ML-315’s firmware should be upgraded.

Note: YDOC recommends not updating the device firmware unless you intend to connect a sensor which requires a new firmware version.

4.8.2 – Firmware upgrade procedure

How to perform a firmware upgrade (USB):

- Download the latest version of the firmware – available from your-data-our-care.com

- Connect the logger to your computer, open YDOC terminal/a terminal emulator

- Select ‘Maintenance’ and follow the instructions displayed

- Use ‘Y-Modem protocol’ to upload the new firmware to the data logger

YDOC recommends the use of USB. Wireless updates may be interrupted due to poor signal or interference. If the firmware upgrade procedure is interrupted, the upgrade will fail and the data logger will continue to operate using the ‘old’ firmware.

4.8.3 – 2G/3G Firmware Upgrade

It is possible to perform a firmware upgrade over 2G/3G using the Terminal Link software.

Contact your YDOC dealer for more information.

4.8.4 – Firmware Driver Limitations

The data logger is equipped with drivers for various tasks. The number of total drivers is limited to

16. Each driver can collect or send up to 4 parameters, for a total of 64. At least two drivers are required for operation of the data logger (Internal driver, output driver).

This means that a practical maximum number of sensors is 14.

4.8.5 – Power Switch Limitations

The Power Switch is capable of powering sensors up to 200mA. The output voltage is 12 volts DC.

4.8.6 – Modem

The modem inside the ML-315 is capable of 3G communication, and can be used in the EMEA, APAC and NA regions.

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4.9 – Micro SD Card

The included Micro SD card is a FAT32 formatted 2GB card, compatible with most computers manufactured since 1996. A Micro SD card adaptor may be required. If you need to replace the

Micro SD card, ensure the replacement card’s transfer speeds are at least as good as the included card.

Data can be downloaded from the ML-315 using the ‘Data-Download’ option whilst the logger is connected via USB.

YDOC recommends not removing the Micro SD card.

4.9.1 – Inserting a Micro SD card

The Micro SD card comes preinstalled. If the card needs to be reinstalled, pay attention to ensure it is installed in the correct orientation – terminal side ‘up’, logo side facing the ML-315’s circuit board.

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4.10 – Input drivers

Input drivers obtain data from sensors.

When a sensor requires Warm-up Time, the power switch can be used to power the sensor prior to measurement. The maximum Warm-up Time is 5 minutes.

Note: Using the power switch consumes a significant amount of power and may shorten the battery life of the ML-315. Please consult the individual sensor manuals and contact ICT or YDOC for an estimation of battery life/power usage.

4.10.1 – Analogue Sensors

2

3

4

5

The ML-315 has 5 factory calibrated analogue inputs with 12 bit ADC resolution:

Input Range

1 4-20mA

Accuracy

<0.1%

Impedance

150 Ohm

4-20mA

0-10 V

0-10 V

Potentiometer (0-100%)

<0.1%

<0.2%

<0.2%

<0.2%

150 Ohm

4.10.2 – Digital Pulse Sensors

Digital pulse sensors such as tipping bucket rain gauges are based on the reed contact principle, magnet triggered magnetic switches, or ‘reed contacts’, send electrical pulses to the data logger.

Rain gauges, for example, trigger a reed switch once the internal bucket has filled to measurement capacity and tipped.

The ML-315 has a special input triggered by these events. Each pulse is recorded even when the data logger is in sleep mode. This is made possible by the use of an interrupt input.

To connect a rain gauge, use the interrupt input and ground.

26

Example Rain Gauge Configuration:

This is an example setup for a Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge.

First, change the name from ‘Digital Pulse’ to a more easily recognizable one. Here ‘Rain Gauge’ is used.

Units per pulse is used to convert input pulses into a physical value. Here 1 is used – 1mm rainfall is one tip. A more accurate rain gauge could have a Units per Pulse of 0.2.

It’s a good idea to test the hardware. To test the Units per Pulse, ensure the sensor is connected to the data logger, connect the data logger to your computer, enter YDOC Terminal and apply a known amount of pulses, either by manually tipping the bucket or adding water. You can verify this count with the command <Ctrl> + A, <Shift>+V, <Ctrl> + D.

If you wish to reset the counter, set option 6 (Register value) to 0.

If you would like the counter to reset at midnight (ie: daily rainfall), use option 7.

Parameters

There are 3 digital input parameters:

Counter (unit) – This is the most important parameter, a plain counter that counts every pulse.

Unless option 7 (Register reset) is used, the counter will keep counting pulses forever.

The maximum value for this parameter is 4294967295 (2

32

). The counter will reset to 0 when this value is reached.

The counter continues to operate in sleep mode. If power is disconnected or the batteries are replaced, this value is not reset.

Quantity (unit)

Quantity is the difference between the actual counter-value and the previous counter-value. Using a

10-minute logging interval, this parameter shows you the number of pulses per 10-minute interval.

The count is reset every 10 minutes.

Rate (unit/h)

Rate is the time between the last two pulses, scaled to one hour. This parameter can be used to calculate rain intensity.

27

4.11 – Power Supply

The data logger is designed to operate with a power supply of between 0.8 and 5 volts, DC.

This is provided by the integrated NiMH AA solar charger.

4.11.1 – Internal RTC backup battery

The data logger contains an internal battery to keep the internal real-time-clock running. The lifetime of the battery is 10-20 years. YDOC claims that the battery will not need to be replaced during the lifetime of the data logger.

4.11.2 – Power Consumption and Battery Life

Average current consumption @ 3.6V:

Data Logger State Consumption Notes

Low-power sleep <100µA Preferred mode of operation.

Modem sleep

Awake

2mA

65mA

Modem is in standby mode, can be accessed by dialling in.

Logger is awake and able to take and log measurement.

GPRS Upload 220mA Requires a good GPRS signal

Long Self Discharge NiMH AA Rechargeable batteries with a capacity of at least 2000mAh are recommended for use with the solar charger.

An online power consumption calculator is available at: www.your-data-our-care.com

.

28

4.12 – Internal Sensors

Rest Capacity – Battery Rest Capacity.

Rest Power – Battery Rest Power.

Processor Temperature – Internal Processor Temperature.

Average Voltage – Average battery voltage during the logging interval.

Max Voltage – Maximum battery voltage during the logging interval.

Min Voltage – Minimum battery voltage during the logging interval.

Average Current – Average current consumption during the logging interval.

Max Current – Maximum current consumption during the logging interval.

Min Current – Minimum current consumption during the logging interval.

Operating Cycle – Time in seconds since the last operating cycle reset.

Free Disk Space – Remaining space on the Micro SD card, in MB.

29

4.13 - Optional Accessories

Stainless steel cable glands – an alternative to the standard plastic cable glands for long term outdoor installations.

Stainless steel cable glands (left) compared with plastic cable glands. External antenna connector shown between the plastic cable glands.

Gortex vent to equalize pressure and manage condensation.

External antennae (2G/3G).

Pole mount kit.

JPEG camera CAM-D1.3M

- Dual lens daylight and night vision camera, max resolution

1280x1024 pixels; or CAM-x0.3M

– Single lens daylight and night vision camera, max resolution 640x480 pixels.

Optional GPS receiver GPS-E3329.

Waterproof external USB connector.

The external USB connector allows you to connect the ML -315 to your computer without opening the logger enclosure.

30

4.14 – International Provider Settings

Provider APN

Argentina

CTI

Personal

Australia

Optus

Telstra

Three

Username

internet.ctimovil.com.ar [blank] gprs.personal.com internet telstra.internet

X

X

3netaccess

[mobile number]

[blank]

[blank] qncuser ssqnc [email protected] telstra a a

Password

[blank] adgj

[blank]

[blank]

Belgium

BASE

Mobistar

Proximus

Brasil

Claro

Oi

TIM

Bulgaria

GloBul

Vodafone

Austria

Drei vfinternet.au drei.at

Max Online Metro gprsmetro

T-Mobile A (Max Online) gprsinternet business.gprsinternet T-Mobile A (Max Online

Business)

Mobilkom A1

OneNet

A1.net web.one.at tele.ring

Azerbaijan

Azercell

Belarus

Velcom web internet web.velcom.by

(Orange)

BASE-pro web.pro.be internet.proximus.be claro.com.br gprs.oi.com.br tim.br internet.globul.gl

[blank]

[blank]

GPRS

GPRS

GPRS

[blank] claro

[blank] tim globul [email protected]

[user specific] [email protected]

[blank] web orangeinternet busint.base.be mobistar

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank] claro

[blank] tim

[blank]

[blank]

[user specific] web

[blank] web

[blank]

BusinessInternet mobistar

31

Provider

Canada

Microcell

Chile

Entel PCS

Telefonica Movil

Costa Rica

IceRegular

Croatia

T-Mobile

VIPNET Start

VIPNET Pro

APN

internet.fido.ca imovil.entelpcs.cl web.tmovil.cl iceregular web.htgpr gprs0.vipnet.hr gprs5.vipnet.hr

VIPNET 3G 3g.vip.hr

Czech Republic

Cesky Mobil (contract) internet

Cesky Mobil (prepaid) cinternet

Eurotel (contract) internet

Eurotel Go

Paegas Internet gointernet internet.click.cz

Telefonica (contract)

Telefonica (Go)

T-Mobile

Vodafone (contract)

Vodafore (pre-pay)

Denmark

3 internet gointernet internet.t-mobile.cz internet ointernet

[none]

Orange DK

TDC

Dominican Republic

Orange

Egypt

Click Vodafone

MobiNil

Estonia

EMT

RLE web.orange.dk internet orangenet.com.do internet.vodafone.net mobinilweb internet.emt.ee internet

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

38591

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

Username

fido entelpcs web

[blank]

38591

38591

38591

[blank]

[blank]

[blank] internet

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

38591

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

Password

fido entelpcs web

[blank]

38591

38591

38591

[blank]

[blank]

[blank] internet

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

32

Orange MIB

SFR

Germany

E-Plus

O2

T-Mobile

Vodafone

Ghana

Provider

Finland

Dna

Elisa

Radiolinja

Sonera

Song

France

Bouygues

Bouygues

Orange

Areeba

Greece

Cosmote

Telestet

TIM

Vodafone GR

APN internet internet internet internet internet.song.fi ebouygtel.com a2bouygtel.com fipbouygtel.com vpnbouygtel.com b2bouygtel.com orange.fr orange.ie internet-entreprise orange-mib websfr internet.eplus.de internet internet pinternet.interkom.de surfo2 internet.t-d1.de web.vodafone.de event.vodafone.de internet.spacefon.com internet gnet.b-online.gr gint.b-online.gr internet.vodafone.gr

[blank]

[blank]

[blank] gprs

[any]

[blank] orange orange mib

[blank] gprs

[blank]

Password

[blank] internet internet

[blank] songnet

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank] orange

[blank]

[blank]

24680 web

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank] td1

[any]

[blank] orange orange mportail

[blank] eplus

[blank]

Username

[blank] rlnet rlnet

[blank] [email protected]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank] orange

[blank]

[blank] your phone number web

[blank]

33

Provider

Hungary

Pannon (contract)

Pannon (flat rate)

Pannon (compressed)

Vodafone (contract, compressed)

Vodafone (contract, uncompressed)

Vodafone (pre-pay, compressed)

Vodafone (pre-pay, uncompressed)

Westel (contract)

India

AirTel

BPL

Idea Cellular

MTNL Mumbai

Orange

Ireland

O2 (contract)

O2 (prepaid)

Vodafone (contract)

Vodafone (pre-pay)

Israel

Cellcom

MTC-Vodafone

Orange

Italy

Blu (Contratto)

Blu (Prepagata)

H3G

Vodafone (Omnitel)

TIM

Wind

Kazakhstan

Beeline

APN net netx snet internet.vodafone.net

Username

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank] standardnet.vodafone.net [blank] vitamax.internet.vodafone.net [blank] vitamax.snet.vodafone.net internet airtelgprs.com bplgprs.com internet gprsmtnlmum portalnmms open.internet pp.internet isp.vodafone.ie live.codafone.com internetg apn01 internet

INTERNET

PINTERNET tre.it web.omnitel.it ibox.tim.it internet.wind internet.beeline.kz

Password

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank] [blank]

[user specific]

[blank] bplmobile

[blank] mtnl

[blank] gprs gprs vodafone vodafone

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank] internet.beeline [blank] vodafone

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[user specific]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank] mtnl123

[blank] gprs gprs vodafone

34

Provider

Latvia

LMT

Tele2

Lebanon

Cellis FTML

APN internet.lmt.lv internet.tele2.lv internet.ftml.com.lb

Lithuania

Bite GSM banga

Omnitel (contract) gprs.omnitel.net gprs.startas.lt Omnitel (no contract)

Luxembourg

LUXGSM

Tango web.pt.lu internet

VOXmobile

Malta

HSPA vox.lu

Go Mobile

(contract) gosurfing

Go Mobile (pre.pay) rtgsurfing

Mexico

Telcel

Moldavia

Moldcell

Netherlands

KPN Mobile

O2

Telfort internet.itelcel.com internet internet internet internet internet-act T-Mobile (Ben) acitve

T-Mobile

Vodafone

New Zealand

Vodafone internet office.vodafone.nl live.vodafone.com www.vodafone.net.nz

[blank] webgprs gprs

KPN

[blank] telfortnl

[blank]

[blank] vodafone vodafone

[blank]

[blank] tango tango

[blank]

[blank]

Username

[blank] gprs plugged

[blank]

[blank] omni

[blank] webgprs2002 gprs gprs

[blank] password

[blank]

[blank] vodafone vodafone

[blank]

[blank] tango tango

[blank]

[blank]

Password

[blank] internet plugged

[blank]

[blank] omni

35

Provider

Norway

Telenor Mobil

Netcom

Philippines

Globe Telecoms

Smart

Sun Cellular

Poland

ERA

Heyah

Idea

Orange

APN internet internet.netcom.no internet.globe.com.ph internet minternet erainternet heyah.pl www.idea.pl internet

Polkomtel

Portugal

Optimus

TMN

Vodafone PT

Romania

www.plusgsm.pl internet internet internet.vodafone.pt

Connex (Vodafone) internet.connex.ro

Orange internet

Russia

BeeLine

Megafon (dv)

Megafon (kvk)

Megafon (ltmsk) internet.beeline.ru internet.dv internet.kvk internet.ltmsk

Megafon (mc) internet.mc

Megafon (NWGSM) internet.nw

Megafon (Siberia) internet.sib

Megafon (UGSM) internet.ugsm

Megafon (usi)

Megafon (Volga)

Motiv (uses

BeeLine)

MTS

NCC

NTC

PrimTel internet.usi.ru internet.volga internet.beeline.ru internet.mts.ru internet internet.ntc internet.primtel.ru

Username model name

[blank] globe witsductoor

[blank] erainternet heyah idea internet

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank] internet.connex.ro

[blank] beeline

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank] beeline mts ncc

[blank]

[blank] connex

[blank] beeline

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

Password

1111

[blank] globe banonoy

[blank] erainternet heyah idea internet

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank] beeline mts

[supplied]

[blank]

[blank]

36

Provider

Slovakia

Eurotel

Globtel

Orange

Slovenia

Telsim

Turkcell

UAE

Etisalat

APN

internet internet internet

Mobitel (Internet) internet

Mobitel (Internet

Pro)

Simobil internetpro internet.si.mobil

South Africa

Cell-C

MTN

Vodacom internet internet internet

Spain

Amena

Telefonica

(Movistar)

Vodafone (Airtel)

Sweden

Tele2, Comviq

Telia

Tre (3G)

Vodafone (GPRS)

Vodafone (3G)

Switzerland

Orange CH

Sunrise

Swisscom

Turkey

Aycell internet movistar.es airtelnet.es

GPRS

3G online.telia.se data.tre.se internet.vodafone.net

Services.vodafone.net internet internet gprs.swisscom.ch aycell telsim internet mnet

Username

[blank]

[blank]

[blank] mobitel mobitel

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

CLIENTE movistar

[blank] telsim gprs mnet vodafone isplnk1.swip.net internet.tele2.se

[blank] void

[blank]

[blank]

[blank] internet

[blank]

Password

[blank]

[blank]

[blank] internet internet

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

[blank]

AMENA movistar

[blank] telsim gprs mnet vodafone gprs

[blank]

[blank] void

[blank]

[blank]

[blank] internet

[blank]

37

Provider

UK

3

APN wireless Web

Jersey Telecom

O2 (contract) pepper

Postpaid

O2 (contract, faster) mobile.o2.co.uk

O2 UK (pre-pay) payandgo.o2.co.uk orangeinternet Orange (pay monthly)

Orange (Pay and

Go)

T-Mobile

Virgin Mobile

Vodafone orangewap general.t-mobile.uk goto.virginmobile.com

Contract

Prepaid

Ukraine

Djuice

Jeans

Kyivstar

Mobi-GSM

Uruguay

www.djuice.com.ua www.jeans.ua www.kyivstar.ua internet.urs

ANCEL

USA

Cingular

T-Mobile gprs.ancel isp.cingular

Internet

Username three.co.uk abc mobile.o2.co.uk faster payandgo user

Multimedia user user internet pp.vodafone.co.uk igprs

[blank]

Password

[blank] abc web password payandgo pass

Orange pass

[blank] web web igprs

[blank] igprs

[blank]

[blank] internet

[blank]

[blank] [email protected] CINGULAR1 internet2.voicestream.com [blank]

Settings may have changed since the publishing of this manual.

38

5. ML-315 Pin Configuration

Connector Pin# Name

X1

1

2

3

0-20mA Input 1

0-20mA Input 2

0-10 Volt Input 3

4 0-10 Volt Input 4

5,6 Ground

7 0-100% Resistance, Input 5

8 Resistance Reference Terminal

X2

X4

X5

Optional

X6

X7

J1

J2

X3

Description

Positive terminal analogue input

Positive terminal analogue input

Positive terminal analogue input

Positive terminal analogue input

Ground

Positive potentiometer input

3.3V potentiometer reference terminal

1

2

5

6

1

2

1

2

3

4

RS232 TX

RS232 RX

RS485 A

RS485 B

SDI-12 (0-5V)

Ground

Digital Input 1 (0-5V)

Digital Input 2 (0-5V)

Transmit line RS232

Receive line RS232

+RS485 positive terminal

-RS485 negative terminal

Terminal to connect SDI-12 sensors

Ground

Positive terminal digital input 1/wake-up line

Positive terminal digital input 2

4

5

3

4

1

2

Digital Input 3 (0-5V)

Ground

Positive terminal digital input 3

Ground

Switched Power Output (12V 100mA) Terminal to supply power to sensors

Alarm Output Open collector

3

1

Ground

5V Switched Power Output

2,3 Ground

Ground

Accessory Power (Optional)

Ground (Optional)

Transmit line to RS232 Accessory RX (Optional)

RS232 TX

RS232 RX

External USB Connector

Receive line from RS232 Accessory TX (Optional)

Optional USB Connector for local configuration

External antenna connector

+VBAT (3.6V DC)

-VBAT (3.6V DC)

Internal USB Connector

U.FL connector for external antenna

Positive terminal for power source

Negative terminal for power source

USB connector for local configuration

39

5.1 – Pin Descriptions

5.1.1 – Analog Inputs

Analogue Inputs 1 and 2

These are Current inputs, with an input impedance of 15 ohms. 4-20mA input range.

These inputs have over-current protection.

To use these inputs, connect the positive wire of the sensor to the positive pin of the power switch and the negative wire of the sensor to the analogue input pin.

Analogue Inputs 3 and 4

0 to 10 volt single ended inputs.

Analog Input 5

Resistance input, 100k to 4.7M ohm potentiometer recommended.

Ground

There are several ground terminals available – X1 pins 5 and 6, X2 pin 6, X3 pin 4 and X4 pin 4.

These are both sensor ground and battery ground. Multiple sensors can be connected to the same ground pin if necessary.

5.1.2 – RS232 TX and RX

These are the pins for RS232 communication, use these pins and a ground pin to connect an RS232 sensor. Only one device/sensor can be connected to the RS232 port. RS232 sensors should be connected to the data logger with their signals crossed, ie: Rx < - > Tx.

The RS232 pins are protected against ESD. Voltage levels are according to the RS232 Standard.

5.1.3 – RS485 A and B

These are the pins for RS485 communication. Use these pins together with a ground pin. The RS485 input is ESD protected by the driver circuit. Signal levels are according to the TIA/EIA-485 Standard.

5.1.4 – SDI-12

This is the in/out terminal for SDI-12 communication. It is protected against overvoltage. Use this terminal with a ground pin and power to connect SDI-12 sensors.

5.1.5 – Digital inputs

These are interrupt driven inputs with internal pull-down resistors.

Suitable for water meters, rain gauges, and anemometers. Connect sensor output to X3 pins 1-3 and ground.

5.1.6 – Switched Power Output

Power output for sensors, 12 volt, 100mA.

40

5.1.7 – +VBAT and –VBAT

This is the main power supply input for the data logger, 3.6 volts.

Input voltage may be between 0.8 and 5 volts. Input Voltage and Current is monitored by the logger

– “Primary Input Voltage” and “Primary Input Current”.

41

6. Antenna Placement and Signal Strength

An antenna is required for 2G/3G and GSM operation. Normally, a dual-band 900MHz and 1800MHz antenna is needed.

Depending on signal strength at the installation site, the integrated antenna or a simple whip antenna may be suitable.

Signal strength can be monitored using the YDOC Terminal software, or added as a parameter to the data file.

To ensure optimum signal strength:

- Make sure the antenna is mounted according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

- Make sure all connectors are tightened and free of moisture.

- Make sure the antenna is vertical.

- Make sure the antenna is not near metal surfaces or structures.

- Place the antenna such that it has line of sight to the nearest phone tower.

- Generally, the higher the antenna is mounted, the better.

- Avoid unnecessary adaptors and connectors in the antenna cable.

- Use an antenna with higher gain.

42

7. Maintenance and Repair

7.1 – Real Time Clock Battery Replacement

The battery of the data logger is designed to last the lifetime of the instrument. If the battery has to be replaced, it must be done by a certified YDOC dealer.

7.2 – Recalibration

The data logger is calibrated in the factory. YDOC guarantees the calibration for 2 years. In most cases, the calibration will last the lifetime of the instrument. Calibration is important for high accuracy measurements and where precise time stamping is required.

The analogue inputs and the real time clock are the only components of the data logger which may require calibration. The logger may require calibration if installed in a location with high temperature deviations and/or harsh environmental conditions.

Contact YDOC if you require overall configuration.

7.3 – X-Ray Exposure

Significant exposure to x-ray radiation may affect the analogue input calibration. For example, more than 10 x-ray scans during shipping will cause analogue input calibration drift.

In the event x-ray protection is required, the data logger can be shielded with a metal can.

43

8. Logger Specifications

Battery Life Up to 10 years

Configuration Programming Via USB Port, YDOC terminal or any other terminal emulator

Data Retrieval

Alarms

Sensor Power Supply

System

Manual exchange of Micro SD card or USB, Automatic via Email, FTP, TCP

User defined thresholds, via SMS, Email

12 volts, 100mA. Internal voltage convertor

CPU

Real Time Clock (RTC)

Flash memory

SRAM

NVRAM

ADC Resolution

Temperature Sensor

Power sensor

ARM Cortex M3, 72MHz, with Watchdog

Internally calibrated, <100 ppm accuracy, battery backup

512 KB

64 KB

84 B, battery backup

12 bit

Yes, Integrated

Yes, Integrates. Monitors power consumption and battery rest capacity.

Expansion bus (X5)

USB Port

Max Sample Frequency

Max Data Log Frequency

RoHS Compliant

Analog Inputs

Single-Ended Channels

Resolution

Input Types

Digital Inputs

Voltage

Max Sample Rate

Comm Ports

RS232

RS485

Optional, extra IO, GPS, Camera and other devices.

USB 2.0

4Hz

4Hz

Yes

4

12 bit

4-20mA, 0-10 Volt

0-3.6 Volt

50 KHz

Single port, one sensor.

Single port, up to 14 sensors. Breakout boxes available from ICT.

Single port, up to 14 sensors. Breakout boxes available from ICT. SDI-12

Memory Card

Type

Capacity

Format

GSM/GPRS

Frequency Range

Capabilities

Dimensions

W x H x D (mm)

Weight

Micro SD

2 GB, expandable

FAT32

Quad Band 850/900/1800/1900 MHz

GSM/GPRS/FTP/EMAIL/SMS

125 x 115 x 120

1 kg

44

9. Supported Serial Sensor Protocols

Protocol

ASCII

MODBUS/RTU

SDI-12

NMEA GGA

NMEA DBT

NMEA HDG

NMEA MWV

Brand

Generic

Generic

Generic

Generic

Generic

Generic

Generic

Interface

RS232/485

RS232/485

SDI-12

RS232

RS232

RS232

RS232

45

10. Troubleshooting

If you encounter problems with the data logger, attempt the following:

- Connect the logger to your computer via USB and attempt to establish a connection with YDOC

Terminal.

- If you are unable to connect with YDOC Terminal, check that the device is receiving power. This can be done with the aid of a multimeter.

- Check the fuse.

46

11. Declaration of Conformity

47

12. Contact Information

ICT International Pty Ltd.

Enabling better global research outcomes in soil, plant & environmental monitoring.

www.ictinternational.com

[email protected]

Phone: 61 2 6772 6770

Fax: 61 2 6772 7616

PO Box 503, Armidale, NSW, Australia, 2350.

Your Data Our Care

www.your-data-our-care.com

Swammerdamlaan 14

6721BK, BENNEKOM

The Netherlands

Phone: +31.85.877.0290

E-mail: [email protected]

48

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