studenthandbook English

studenthandbook English
Code of Conduct and
Student Handbook
2012–2013
The Student Handbook is a general reference guide only and is designed
to be in harmony with board policy and the Student Code of Conduct.
Please be aware that it is not a complete statement of all policies,
procedures, or rules that may be applicable in a given circumstance.
Educating All Students for Success
Board of Trustees
Elizabeth Jones
District 1: Northwest Dallas
Lew Blackburn, Ph.D.
President
District 5: Oak Lawn,
West Dallas, Wilmer,
Hutchins, and portions
of East Oak Cliff
Adam Medrano
First Vice President
District 8: Love Field,
Northwest Dallas, and
Central Dallas
Eric Cowan
Second Vice President
District 7: North Central
Oak Cliff and portions of
West Dallas
Nancy Bingham
Secretary
District 4: Southeast Dallas,
Seagoville, Balch Springs
Mike Morath
District 2: North and
Near East Dallas
Dan Micciche
District 3: Northeast Dallas
Carla Ranger
District 6: Southwest Dallas
Bernadette Nutall
District 9: South Dallas and
portions of Downtown
Dallas, Pleasant Grove,
Deep Ellum, Uptown,
and East Dallas
Mike Miles
Superintendent of Schools
The Dallas Independent School District, as an equal opportunity educational provider and
employer, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin,
age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, genetic information, or any other basis prohibited by law in educational programs or activities that it
operates or in employment decisions. The district is required by Title VI and Title VII of the
Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the Age Discrimination
Act of 1975, as amended, as well as board policy not to discriminate in such a manner. (Not
all prohibited bases apply to all programs.)
If you suspect discrimination please contact: Mary McCants, Title VII or Title IX, at (972)
925-3250; Daphne LaMontagne, Section 504, at (972) 581-4238; Marita Hawkins, Americans
with Disabilities Act, at (972) 925-4287; or Employee Relations at (972) 925-4200. General
questions about the district should be directed to Customer Service at (972) 925-5555.
3700 Ross Avenue • Dallas, TX 75204-5491 • (972) 925-3700 • www.dallasisd.org
08/21/12
Student Handbook
Table of Contents
SECTION I: REQUIRED NOTICES AND INFORMATION FOR PARENTS
Parent Responsibilities.......................................................................................................................................1
Parent Involvement in Schools Receiving Title I Funds.......................................................................1
Parental Rights....................................................................................................................................................1
Accessing Student Records.................................................................................................................1
Accommodations for Children of Military Families................................................................................1
Asbestos Management Plan.................................................................................................................2
Bullying.....................................................................................................................…………………….2
Corporal Punishment.............................................................................................................................2
Directory Information.............................................................................................................................2
Displaying Student Artwork and Projects.............................................................................................. 2
Excusing a Student from Reciting the Pledges the U.S. and Texas Flags...........................................2
Excusing a Student from Reciting a Portion of the Declaration of Independence................................2
Granting Permission to Video or Audio Record a Student...................................................................2
Obtaining Information and Protecting Student Rights...........................................................................3
“Opting Out” of Surveys and Activities.................................................................................................3
Pest Management Plan.........................................................................................................................3
Public Information Requests.................................................................................................................3
Release of Student Information to Military Recruiters and Institutions of Higher Education.................3
Removing a student temporarily From the Classroom.........................................................................3
Removing a Student from Human Growth, Development, and Sexuality Instruction...........................3
Removing a Student from Parenting and Paternity Awareness (p.a.p.a) Instruction............................4
Requesting Classroom Assignment for Multiple Birth Siblings.............................................................4
Requesting Limited or No Contact with a Student through Electronic Media.......................................4
Requesting Notices of Certain Student Misconduct.............................................................................5
Requesting Professional Qualifications of Teachers and Staff.............................................................5
Reviewing Instructional Materials..........................................................................................................5
School Health Advisory Council............................................................................................................5
School Safety Transfers........................................................................................................................5
Student Records....................................................................................................................................5
Students Who Speak a Primary Language Other Than English...........................................................6
Parents of Students with Disabilities....................................................................................................................6
Options and Requirements for Providing Assistance............................................................................7
Request for use of a Service Animal.....................................................................................................7
§504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973..................................................................................................7
SECTION II: INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS AND PARENTS
Absences/Attendance..........................................................................................................................................8
Compulsory Attendance and Exemptions.............................................................................................8
Exemptions to Compulsory Attendance...............................................................................................8
Violation of Compulsory School Attendance Notice..............................................................................8
Attendance for Credit.............................................................................................................................9
Doctor’s Note after an Absence for Illness........................................................................................... 9
Driver’s License Attendance Verification...............................................................................................9
Military Dependents...............................................................................................................................9
Parent’s Note After an Absence........................................................................................................... 9
Temporary Absence.............................................................................................................................. 9
Unexcused Absences........................................................................................................................... 9
Academic Programs........................................................................................................................................... 10
Career and Technical Education.........................................................................................................................10
Career Pathways………………………………………………………………………………………........…10
Child Abuse and Domestic Violence..................................................................................................................10
Class Rank/Top Ten Percent/Highest Ranking Student....................................................................................11
Top Ten Percent....................................................................................................................................................................11
Valedictorian and Salutatorian (Highest Ranking Students)................................................................11
Class Schedules..................................................................................................................................................12
College Admission..............................................................................................................................................12
College Credit Courses.....................................................................................................................................12
Complaints and Concerns.................................................................................................................................13
Conduct..............................................................................................................................................................13
Applicability of School Rules................................................................................................................13
Disruptions of School Operations........................................................................................................13
Social Events.......................................................................................................................................13
Correspondence Courses.........................................................................................................................................13
Counseling.....................................................................................................................................................................................13
Course Credit.....................................................................................................................................................14
Credit by Exam ……………………………………………………………………...…………………………...……14
If a Student Has Taken the Course........................................................... ........................14
If a Student Has Not Taken the Course..............................................................................................15
Dating Violence...................................................................................................................................................15
Discrimination: Racial, Ethnic, Religious, Gender, Disability, National Origin, Sexual Orientation………...…..16
Harassment and Retaliation............................................................................................................................... 16
Discrimination.......................................................................................................................................................................16
Harassment: Including Racial, Ethnic, Religious, Gender, Disability, and Sexual Orientation................16
Sexual Harassment........................................................................................................................... 16
Retaliation...........................................................................................................................................16
Reporting Procedures..........................................................................................................................16
Investigation of Report.........................................................................................................................16
Distance Learning.............................................................................................................................................17
Distribution of Published Materials or Documents..............................................................................................17
School Materials............................................................................................................................... 17
Non-school Materials...from students................................................................................................... 17
Non-school Materials...from others....................................................................................................17
Dress and Grooming.......................................................................................................................................... 17
Electronic Devices and Technology Resources................................................................................................ 18
Possession and Use of Personal Telecommunications Devices, including Cellular Phone...............18
Possession and Use of Other Personal Electronic Devices................................................................19
Instructional Use of Personal Telecommunications and Other Electronic Devices............................19
Acceptable Use of District Technology Resources.................................................................................19
Unacceptable and Inappropriate Use of Technology Resources.......................................................... 19
Extracurricular Activities, Clubs, and Organizations.......................................................................................... 19
Academic requirements ...........................................................................................................................20
Eligibility for All Participants......................................................................................................................20
Fees................................................................................................................................................................................................ 20
Fund-Raising.....................................................................................................................................................21
Gang Free Zones…………………………………………………………………………………………….…………21
Grade Classification....................................................................................................................................................................21
Grading.............................................................................................................................................................. 21
Graduation......................................................................................................................................................... 22
Requirements for a Diploma................................................................................................................22
Graduation or Certificate of Attendance for Students with Disabilities................................................22
Certificates of Coursework Completion..............................................................................................22
Graduation Expenses................................................................................................................................................................... 22
State Scholarships and Grants..................................................................................................................................................................... 22
Graduation Programs.........................................................................................................................22
Texas State Graduation Requirements.................................................................................................................23
Side-by-Side Graduation Programs and Requirements...................................................................... 24
Hazing.................................................................................................................................................................27
Health information and Requirements................................................................................................................28
Bacterial Meningitis............................................................................................................................28
Contagious Diseases/Condition..........................................................................................................28
Food Allergies......................................................................................................................................29
Health Screenings...............................................................................................................................29
Immunizations......................................................................................................................................29
Medication at School...........................................................................................................................29
Psychotropic Drugs..............................................................................................................................30
Tobacco Prohibited..............................................................................................................................30
Homeless Students.............................................................................................................................................................................................. 30
Homework.........................................................................................................................................................30
Law Enforcement Agencies............................................................................................................................... 30
Questioning of Students............................................................................................................................ 30
Students Taken into Custody.............................................................................................................. 30
Notification of Law Violations...............................................................................................................31
Limited English Proficient Students...................................................................................................................31
Makeup Work................................................................................................................................................... ..31
Makeup Work after an Absence................................................................................................................. .31
DAEP or In-school Suspension Makeup Work.............................................................................................................................31
Nondiscrimination Policy ………………………………………………………………………………………….…...31
Nontraditional Academic Programs....................................................................................................................32
J.L. Patton, Jr. Academic Center.........................................................................................................32
Early College Programs.......................................................................................................................32
Evening Academy................................................................................................................................32
Evening Academy..............................................................................................................................32
Gilliam Collegiate Academy................................................................................................................ 32
Maya Angelo High School..................................................................................................................32
Middle College High School.................................................................................................................33
Reconnection Centers.........................................................................................................................33
Trinidad Garza Early College .............................................................................................................33
PhysicalvActivity................................................................................................................................. 33
Physical Fitness Assessment..............................................................................................................33
Promotion and Retention....................................................................................................................................33
Psychological and Social Services.................................................................................................................... 34
Psychological Exams, Tests, or Treatment............................................................................................34
Release of Students from School.......................................................................................................................34
Report Cards and Conferences..........................................................................................................................35
Safety.................................................................................................................................................................. 35
Emergency Medical Treatment and Information..................................................................................35
Emergency School-Closing Information................................................................................................ 35
Drills: Fire, Tornado, and Other Emergencies.................................................................................... 35
School Lunch Program.......................................................................................................................................35
Searches, Metal Detectors, and Video Cameras.............................................................................................. 35
Special Programs...............................................................................................................................................36
Standardized Testing.........................................................................................................................................36
STAAR(State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness) ..........................................................36
End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments....................................................................................................37
Impact of STAAR/EOCs on Graduation Plans.....................................................................................37
TAKS(Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills) ...........................................................................37
THEA (Texas Higher Education Assessment) ....................................................................................38
Steroids..............................................................................................................................................................38
Summer School/Extended Year Programs........................................................................................................38
Teen Pregnancy and Parenting Services......................................................................................................... 38
Textbooks, Electronic Textbooks, and Technological Equipment.................................................................... 39
Transfers Between District Schools...................................................................................................................39
Transportation..................................................................................................................................................................................... 40
Buses and Other School Vehicles................................................................................................................................ 40
School-Sponsored Trips.................................................................................................................................................... 40
Student Bus Riders Code of Conduct...............................................................................................40
Vandalism...........................................................................................................................................................41
Visitors to the School..........................................................................................................................................41
Vending Machines............................................................................................................................................. 41
Withdrawing from School...........................................................................................................................................................41
Glossary
Contract/Acknowledgement Forms
STUDENT HANDBOOK SECTION I
REQUIRED NOTICES AND INFORMATION FOR PARENTS
This section of the Dallas ISD Student Handbook includes several notices that the district is required to provide
to you, as well as other information on topics of particular interest to you as a parent.
PARENT RESPONSIBILITIES
Every parent is a role model to their child for
teaching and learning. When parents are involved in
their child’s education, grades, attendance and
behavior improves. Preparing every child for
academic success is the goal for all district
personnel. Dallas ISD recognizes parents in this
partnership. As a parent in this partnership, you are
expected to:
Support school, district, and classroom rules for
student behavior, dress code, and ensure that
your children conduct themselves according to
district standards.
Provide current home address and home, work,
and cell phone numbers to school staff for
emergency purposes.
Ensure child’s attendance at school as required
by law and provide written note to explain
absences and tardies.
Provide the appropriate school personnel with
any information that will affect your child’s
ability to learn.
Cooperate with the school nurse to obtain
state-required
immunizations.
Follow
procedures for administration of medications at
school and take/keep your child at home when
ill.
Emphasize the importance of education and set
high expectations for your child’s academic
success.
Make sure your child completes assignments
and projects and comes to school each day
prepared, rested, and ready to learn.
Create a learning environment at home where
your child can read, study, and do homework.
Monitor your child’s progress and encourage
your child to attend school tutorials as needed.
Discuss school assignments and report cards
with your child. Request a conference with the
teacher if your child receives a failing grade for
the reporting period. If you would like to
schedule a conference, call the school office for
an
appointment
during
the
teacher’s
conference period.
Know what your child is taught and tested in
every subject, every year.
Stay informed of your child’s activities by
attending parent conferences and meetings.
Volunteer at your child’s school.
1
Read and discuss with your child the Student Code
of Conduct handbook before signing and returning
to the school.
Parent Involvement in Schools Receiving
Title I Funds
Each Title I eligible campus will hold an annual
meeting for parents in order to:
Provide timely information concerning the
school's participation in Title I, as well as
explain the program and requirements,
including parents’ right to be involved;
Provide information regarding the curriculum,
state and local assessments, and academic
performance expectations;
Jointly develop an agreed upon campus parent
involvement policy, establishing the school’s
expectations for parental involvement. The
policy will be distributed to parents of all
children participating in Title I, Part A programs.
PARENTAL RIGHTS
Accessing Student Records
A parent is entitled to access all written records of
the District concerning the parent’s child. These
records include: attendance records, test scores,
grades, disciplinary records, counseling records,
psychological records, applications for admissions,
health and immunization information, other medical
records, teacher and counselor evaluations, reports
of behavioral patterns, and state assessment
instruments that have been administered to your
child. [See Student Records]
Accommodations for Children of Military
Families
Children of military families will be provided flexibility
regarding certain district requirements, including
immunization requirements; grade level, course, or
educational program placement; eligibility
requirements for participation in extracurricular
activities; and graduation requirements. In addition,
absences related to a student visiting with his/her
parent related to leave or deployment activities may
be excused by the district.
Additional information may be found at
http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index2.aspx?id=7995
Asbestos Management Plan
The district works diligently to maintain compliance
with federal and state laws governing asbestos in
school buildings. An asbestos management plan has
been developed for each school and submitted to
the Texas Department of State Health Services for
approval. An updated management plan for the
school is kept on campus and can be made
available for inspection by parents, school
personnel, and the public within five working days
after a request is received. For additional information
see policy CKA (LEGAL).
Bullying
Bullying is addressed in depth in the Student Code
of Conduct. For disciplinary actions, the child will be
subject to the provisions provided in the Student
Code of Conduct
If a student believes that he or she has experienced
bullying or has witnessed bullying of another
student, it is important for the student or parent to
notify a teacher, counselor, principal, or another
district employee as soon as possible. The
administration will investigate any allegations of
bullying and will take appropriate disciplinary action
if an investigation indicates that bullying has
occurred. Any retaliation against a student who
reports an incident of bullying is prohibited. [Also see
the Student Code of Conduct, School Safety
Transfers, Hazing, and policy FFI (LOCAL)]
Corporal Punishment
District policy prohibits the use of
punishment. [See policy FO (LOCAL).]
corporal
Directory Information
The law permits the district to designate certain
personally identifiable information about students as
“directory information.” The district has designated
the following categories of information as directory
information: student name, address, telephone
listing, date and place of birth, major field of study,
participation in an officially recognized activity or
sport, weight and height of members of athletic
teams, dates of attendance, degrees and awards
received, grade level, and most recent previous
educational agency or institution attended. This
“directory information” will be released to anyone
who follows the procedures for requesting directory
information. However, the parent or an eligible
student may prevent the release of a student’s
directory information. The written objection to the
release of directory information shall be sent to the
student’s principal within 15 school days after the
annual notice is given concerning directory
information. A “Student Directory Information” form
should have been included in the student enrollment
packet. If you did not receive one from your child’s
2
school and you wish to withhold
information, please contact your principal.
directory
Displaying Student Artwork and Projects
Teachers may display student’s work either in a
classroom or on and off campus as recognition of
student achievement. However, the district will
obtain parental consent before displaying a student’s
artwork, special projects, photographs taken by a
student, and the like, either on the district’s web site,
in printed material, by video, or by any other method
of mass communication.
Excusing a Student from Reciting the
Pledges to the U.S. and Texas Flags
You may request that your child be excused from
participation in the daily recitation of the Pledge of
Allegiance to the United States flag and the Pledge
of Allegiance to the Texas flag. The request must
be in writing. State law does not allow your child to
be excused from participation in the required minute
of silence. Students may reflect, pray, or meditate, or
engage in any silent activity that does not interfere
with or distract another student during this time.
[See EC (LEGAL)]
Excusing a Student From Reciting a Portion
of the Declaration of Independence
You may request that your child be excused from
recitation of a portion of the Declaration of
Independence. State law requires students in social
studies classes in grades 3–12 to recite a portion of
the text of the Declaration of Independence during
Celebrate Freedom Week unless (1) you provide a
written statement requesting that your child be
excused, (2) the district determines that your child
has a conscientious objection to the recitation, or (3)
you are a representative of a foreign government to
whom the United States government extends
diplomatic immunity. [See policy EHBK(LEGAL).]
Granting Permission to Video or Audio
Record a Student
You may grant or deny any written request from the
district to make a video or voice recording of your
child. State law, however, permits the school to
make a video or voice recording without parental
permission for the following circumstances: 1) when
it is to be used for school safety, including the
maintenance of order and discipline in common
areas of the school or on school buses; 2) when it
relates to classroom instruction or a co-curricular or
extracurricular activity; 3) when it relates to regular
classroom instruction; or 4) when it relates to media
coverage of the school.
Obtaining Information
Student Rights
and
Protecting
Your child will not be required to participate without
parental consent in any survey, analysis, or
evaluation—funded in whole or in part by the U.S.
Department of Education—that concerns:
Political affiliations or beliefs of the student or
the student’s parent.
Mental and psychological problems potentially
embarrassing to the student or the student’s
family.
Sexual behavior or attitudes.
Illegal, anti-social,
demeaning behavior.
self-incriminating,
and
Critical appraisals of individuals with whom the
student has a close family relationship.
Legally recognized privileged or analogous
relationships such as those of lawyers,
physicians, and ministers.
Religious practices, affiliations, or beliefs of the
student or parents.
Income, except when the information is required
by law and will be used to determine the
student’s eligibility to participate in a special
program or to receive financial assistance under
such a program.
You will be able to review the survey or other
instrument and any instructional materials used in
connection with such a survey, analysis, or
evaluation. [For further information, see policy
EF(LEGAL).]
“Opting Out” of Surveys and Activities
As a parent, you have a right to receive notice of
and deny permission for your child’s participation in:
Any
survey
concerning
the
protected
information listed above, regardless of funding.
School activities involving the collection,
disclosure, or use of personal information
gathered from your child for the purpose of
marketing the information, or otherwise
distributing the information to others.
Any
non-emergency,
invasive
physical
examination or screening required as a
condition of attendance, administered and
scheduled by the school in advance, and not
necessary to protect the immediate health and
safety of the student or of other students. [See
policy EF.]
As a parent, you may review any survey created by
a third party before the survey is administered or
distributed to your child.
3
Pest Management Plan
The district is required to follow integrated pest
management (IPM) procedures to control pests on
school grounds. Although the district strives to use
the safest and most effective methods to manage
pests, including a variety of non-chemical control
measures, pesticide use is sometimes necessary to
maintain adequate pest control and ensure a safe,
pest-free school environment. All pesticides used
are registered for their intended use by the United
States Environmental Protection Agency and are
applied only by certified pesticide applicators. Before
treatment, except in an emergency, the schools shall
ensure that the necessary signs and information for
employees and parents of students are posted or
made available 48 hours before application. All
outdoor applications will be posted at the time of
treatment, and signs will remain until it is safe to
enter the area. For additional information, contact
the school principal.
Public Information Requests
The Dallas ISD, as a local governmental entity, is
subject to the requirements of the Texas Public
Information Act. Information regarding public
information requests and the procedures for making
a request are posted on the district’s website,
http://www.dallasisd.org/ by clicking the link “Public
Information Requests” located at the bottom of the
homepage or www.dallasisd.org/page/102/
Release of Student Information to Military
Recruiters and Institutions of Higher
Education
The district is required by federal law to comply with
a request by a military recruiter or an institution of
higher education for students’ names, addresses,
and telephone listings, unless parents have advised
the district not to release their child’s information
without prior written consent (See Directory
Information above).
Removing a Student Temporarily from the
Classroom
You may remove your child temporarily from the
classroom if an instructional activity in which your
child is scheduled to participate conflicts with your
religious or moral beliefs. The removal cannot be for
the purpose of avoiding a test and may not extend
for an entire semester. Further, your child must
satisfy grade-level and graduation requirements as
determined by the District and the Texas Education
Agency. [EMB (Legal)]
Removing a Student from Human Growth,
Development, and Sexuality Instruction
The district offers Human Growth, Development, and
Sexuality instruction to students in grades 4, 5, 6–8,
and 9-12. The school will provide a letter to parents
describing the basic content of the district’s human
sexuality instruction to be provided to the student
and of the parent’s right to review the material, as
well as the right to remove the student from any part
of that instruction.
State law requires that any instruction related to
human sexuality, sexually transmitted diseases, or
human immunodeficiency virus or acquired immune
deficiency syndrome must:
Present abstinence from sexual activity as the
preferred choice of behavior in relationship to all
sexual activity for unmarried persons of school
age;
Devote more attention to abstinence from
sexual activity than to any other behavior;
Emphasize that abstinence is the only method
that is 100 percent effective in preventing
pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, and
the
emotional trauma associated with
adolescent sexual activity;
Direct adolescents to a standard of behavior in
which abstinence from sexual activity before
marriage is the most effective way to prevent
pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases;
and
If included in the content of the curriculum,
teach contraception and condom use in terms of
human use reality rates instead of theoretical
laboratory rates.
In addition to the above requirements, the following
points comprise a summary of the District’s
curriculum regarding human sexuality instruction.
The instruction must:
Prohibit the distribution or dissemination of
contraceptive devices in District facilities;
Be delivered in grades 4-12 in a
developmentally and age-appropriate manner
and include the most current and scientifically
accurate information regarding child and
adolescent health issues; contraception, and
accurate information on failure rates; and risk
reduction of sexually transmitted diseases
(STDs), including HIV; and
Include communication, goal-setting, decisionmaking, assertiveness, and refusal skills
necessary to support a student’s ability to avoid,
postpone, and abstain from risk-taking
behaviors prior to, and into, adulthood.
The Board shall select any instruction relating to
human sexuality, sexually transmitted diseases, or
human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or acquired
immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) with the advice
of the local school health advisory council. The
School Health Advisory Council (SHAC) assists the
District in ensuring that local community values are
reflected in the District’s health education instruction.
4
As a parent, you are entitled to review the curriculum
materials. In addition, you may remove your child
from any part of this instruction with no academic,
disciplinary, or other penalties. You may also choose
to become more involved with the development of
curriculum used for this purpose by becoming a
member of the District’s SHAC.
For more information please consult EHAA (LEGAL,
LOCAL).
Removing a Student from Parenting and
Paternity Awareness (p.a.p.a.) Instruction
If your child is under 14 years of age, your
permission is required for him or her to participate in
the health education instructional unit that includes
p.a.p.a. Teaching p.a.p.a. in health class and
obtaining parent permission for students under 14
years of age conforms to the Texas Education Code,
Section 28.002. You are invited to browse the
curriculum videos, handouts, and goals on the
Texas Attorney General’s webpage.
Click on Child Support, then
www.texasattorneygeneral.gov
Requesting Classroom
Multiple Birth Siblings
p.a.p.a.
Assignment
at
for
If your children are multiple birth siblings (e.g., twins,
triplets, etc.) assigned to the same grade and
campus, you may request that they be placed either
in the same or in separate classrooms. Your written
request must be submitted no later than the 14th
day after the enrollment of your children. [See FDB
(LEGAL).]
Requesting Limited or No Contact with a
Student through Electronic Media
Electronic media includes all forms of social media,
such as text messaging, instant messaging,
electronic mail (e-mail), web logs (blogs), electronic
forms (chat rooms), video-sharing Web sites,
editorial comments posted on the Internet, and
social network sites. Electronic media also includes
all forms of telecommunication, such as landlines,
cell phones, and Web-based applications.
In accordance with administrative regulations, a
certified or licensed employee, or any other
employee
designated
in
writing
by
the
Superintendent of Schools or a campus principal,
may use electronic media to communicate with
currently enrolled students about matters within the
scope
of
the
employee’s
professional
responsibilities. All other employees are prohibited
from using electronic media to communicate directly
with students who are currently enrolled in the
District. If you prefer that your child not receive any
one-to-one electronic communications from a district
employee, please submit a written request to the
campus principal stating this preference.
Requesting Notices of Certain Student
Misconduct
A noncustodial parent may request in writing that he
or she be provided, for the remainder of the school
year, a copy of any written notice usually provided to
a parent, related to his or her child’s misconduct that
may involve placement in a disciplinary alternative
education program (DAEP) or expulsion. [See
policy FO(LEGAL) and the Student Code of
Conduct.]
Requesting Professional Qualifications of
Teachers and Staff
You may request information about your child’s
teachers’ state qualifications, license status, degree
major(s), and certification of undergraduate and
graduate degrees, including fields of study. You
also have the right to request information about the
qualifications of any paraprofessional who provides
services to your child. This information may be
obtained by making a public information request.
Directions for making a request are located at the
district’s homepage www.dallasisd.org at the link
“Public Information Requests.
Reviewing Instructional Materials
As a parent, you have a right to review teaching
materials, textbooks, library books, and other
teaching aids and instructional materials used in the
curriculum, and to examine tests that have been
administered to your child. Specific curriculum
information is available on the district’s website or
printed information may be obtained from the school.
Also see “Removing a Student from Human Sexuality
Instruction,” for additional information.
School Health Advisory Committee
This council serves in an advisory capacity to ensure
that local community values are reflected in healthrelated curriculum and programs for the district. They
do not have any legal responsibilities within the
school system, and SHAC members must be
approved by the Board of Trustees and comply with
written by-laws of the organization. The duties of the
SHAC range from recommending curriculum to
developing strategies for integrating curriculum into a
coordinated school health program encompassing
school health services, counseling services, a safe
and
healthy
school
environment,
recess
recommendations, and employee wellness. [See also
policies at BDF and EHAA.]
Additional information regarding the district’s School
Health Advisory Council is available from the
Director of Health and Physical Education.
5
School Safety Transfers
As a parent, you have a right:
To request the transfer of your child to another
classroom or campus if your child has been
determined by the Superintendent or designee
and the school principal to have been a victim of
bullying as the term is defined by Education
Code 25.0341. Transportation is not provided
for a transfer to another campus. See policy
FDB (LEGAL).
To request the transfer of your child to attend a
safe public school in the district if your child
attends school at a campus identified by TEA as
persistently dangerous or if your child has been
a victim of a violent criminal offense, as
determined by state law, while at school or on
school grounds. [See policy FDE (LEGAL).]
To request the transfer of your child to another
campus if your child has been the victim of a
sexual assault by another student assigned to
the same campus, whether that assault
occurred on or off campus, and that student has
been convicted of or placed on deferred
adjudication for that assault. [See policies FDD
(LOCAL) and FDE (LEGAL) (LOCAL).]
Transfers may be requested through the campus
principal.
Student Records
Both federal and state laws safeguard student
records from unauthorized inspection or use and
provide parents and eligible students certain rights
of privacy.
Before disclosing any personally
identifiable information from a student’s records, the
district must verify the identity of the person,
including a parent or the student, requesting the
information. For purposes of student records, an
“eligible” student is one who is 18 or older or who is
attending an institution of postsecondary education.
Virtually all information pertaining to student
performance, including grades, test results, and
disciplinary records, is considered confidential
educational records. As a general rule, prior written
consent must be obtained from the parent or eligible
student to release student education records.
Exceptions to this general rule include allowing
access to:
The parents—whether married, separated, or
divorced—unless the school is given a copy of a
court order terminating parental rights or the right
to access a student’s education records. As soon
as a student becomes 18, is emancipated by a
court, or enrolls in a post-secondary institution,
control of the records goes to the student. The
parents may continue to have access to the
records if the student is a dependent for tax
purposes and under limited circumstances when
there is a threat to the health and safety of the
student or other individuals.
District school officials who have a “legitimate
educational interest” in a student’s records.
School officials would include trustees and
employees, such as the superintendent,
administrators,
and
principals;
teachers,
counselors, diagnosticians, and support staff; a
person or company with whom the district has
contracted or allowed to provide a particular
service or function (such as an attorney,
consultant,
auditor,
medical
consultant,
therapist, or volunteer); a parent or student
serving on a school committee; or a parent or
student assisting a school official in the
performance of his or her duties. A “legitimate
educational interest” exists when the school
official is working with the student; considering
disciplinary or academic actions, the student’s
case, or an individualized education program for
a student with disabilities; compiling statistical
data; or investigating or evaluating programs.
Authorized governmental agencies.
Individuals granted access in response to a
subpoena or court order.
A school or institution of postsecondary
education to which a student seeks or intends to
enroll or in which he or she is already enrolled.
The full list of exceptions may be found at policy FL
(LEGAL).
The parent’s or eligible student’s right of access to
student records under the Family Educational Rights
and Privacy Act (FERPA) does not extend to all
records. The term “education records” does not
include:
1.
Records created or received by the district
after the individual is no longer a student in
attendance and are not directly related to
the individual’s attendance as a student.
2.
Records made by district personnel that are
kept in the sole possession of the maker,
are used only as a personal memory aid,
and are not accessible or revealed to
anyone other than a temporary substitute
for the maker of the record.
Records maintained by a law enforcement
unit of the district that were created by that
law enforcement unit for the purpose of law
enforcement.
3.
Access to records not covered by FERPA is
governed by the Texas Public Information Act.
A parent (or eligible student) may inspect the
student’s records and request a correction if the
records are considered inaccurate, misleading, or
otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy rights.
6
A request to correct a student’s record should be
submitted to the principal. The request must clearly
identify the part of the record that should be
corrected and include an explanation of how the
information in the record is inaccurate. Although
improperly recorded grades may be challenged,
contesting a student’s grade in a course is handled
through the general complaint process found in
policy FNG (LOCAL).
The principal is the custodian of records for
currently enrolled students at the assigned school.
Records of elementary students who have
withdrawn during the current school year remain at
the school. Records of elementary students who
have withdrawn the previous year are maintained
by Student Record Services located at Dallas ISD
Administration Building, 3700 Ross Avenue.
Records of all secondary students remain at the
school last attended for five years after the year of
their graduating class and are then transferred to
Student Record Services.
The district’s policy regarding student records found
at FL (LOCAL) is available from the principal’s office
or
on
the
district’s
web
site
at
http://www.dallasisd.org/.
Please note:
Parents or eligible students have the right to file a
complaint with the U.S. Department of Education if
they believe the district is not in compliance with the
federal laws regarding student records. A complaint
may be mailed to:
Family Policy Compliance Office
U. S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-5901
Students Who Speak a Primary Language
Other than English
A student may be eligible to receive specialized
language support if his or her primary language is
not English, and the student is identified as limited
English proficient. If the student meets eligibility
criteria, the Language Proficiency Assessment
Committee (LPAC) will determine the types of
services the student needs, including language
accommodations related to classroom instruction,
and local assessments.
PARENTS OF STUDENTS WITH
DISABILITIES
If a student is receiving special education services at
a campus outside his or her attendance zone, the
parent or guardian may request that any other
student residing in the household be transferred to
the same campus, if the appropriate grade level for
the transferring student is offered on that campus.
[See policy FDB (LEGAL).]
Options and Requirements for Providing
Assistance to Students Who Have Learning
Difficulties or Who Need or May Need
Special Education Services
If a child is experiencing learning difficulties, the
parent may contact the child’s counselor to learn
about the district’s overall general education system
of support services. This system links students to a
variety of support options. Students having difficulty
accessing the general education curriculum should
be considered for academic or behavior support
services that are available to all students, including a
process based on Response to Intervention (RtI).
The implementation of RtI has the potential to have
a positive impact on the ability of the district to meet
the needs of all struggling students. At any time, a
parent is entitled to request an initial evaluation to
determine if their child qualifies as a child with a
disability under the Individuals with Disabilities
Education Act (IDEA). Within a reasonable amount
of time, the district must decide if it will perform the
evaluation. The parent will be notified and asked to
provide informed written consent for the evaluation.
The district must complete the evaluation and the
report within 60 calendar days of the date the district
receives the written consent. The district must give
a copy of the report to the parent.
If the district refuses the request to evaluate, the
district provides the parent with a written notice that
explains why the child will not be evaluated. This
written notice includes a statement that informs the
parents of their rights if they disagree with the
district. The district is required to give parents the
Notice of Procedural Safeguards–Rights of Parents
of Students with Disabilities. Additional information
regarding the Individuals with Disabilities Education
Act (IDEA) is available from the school district in a
companion document entitled A Guide to the
Admission, Review, and Dismissal Process.
The following web sites provide information to those
who are seeking information and resources specific
to students with disabilities and their families: Texas
Project First, at http://www.texasprojectfirst.org and
Partners Resource Network at
http://www.partnerstx.org/howPRNhelps.html
Parents may contact the Dallas ISD Special
Education Department at 972-581-4100.
7
Request for the Use of a Service Animal
Granting the use of a service animal shall be
determined in accordance with policy FBA (LEGAL).
§504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
Students with disabilities who are not eligible for
special education services may qualify for §504
accommodations. §504 of the Rehabilitation Act of
1973 prohibits discrimination and assures that
disabled students have educational opportunities
and benefits equal to those provided to nondisabled students.
Student Eligibility:
1.
2.
3.
Currently has a physical or mental
impairment that substantially limits one or
more major life activities,
Has a record of such an impairment, or
Is regarded as having such an
impairment
When parent(s) or district personnel believe that a
student has a physical or mental impairment that
substantially limits a major life activity and the
student is in need of accommodations, a §504
referral may be initiated. Parents must be given
Notice of §504 Evaluation and Parental Consent
and §504 Parent/Student Rights in Identification,
Evaluation and Placement. The district then
conducts an evaluation and determines eligibility
and any need for accommodations. A §504
evaluation consists of documentation of the
condition and a review of relevant educational
records needed to determine whether the
condition creates a significant impairment in the
school/academic setting. For additional
information, contact your child’s counselor or call
Daphne LaMontagne, the §504 coordinator, (972)
581-4238.
STUDENT HANDBOOK SECTION II
INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS AND PARENTS
Topics in this section of the handbook contain important information on academics, school activities, and
school operations and requirements. It is organized in alphabetical order to serve as a quick-reference when
there are questions about a specific school-related issue. Should you be unable to find information on a
particular topic, please contact the school principal or your child’s counselor.
absent without permission from school; from any
class, or from required special programs, such as
additional special or accelerated instruction assigned
by a grade placement committee, will be considered
in violation of the compulsory attendance law and
subject to legal action. A complaint against the parent
and/or student may be filed in court if the student:
ABSENCES/ATTENDANCE
Regular attendance is essential for a student to make
the most of his or her education. Absences from
class may result in serious disruption of a student’s
mastery of the instructional materials; therefore, the
student and parent should make every effort to avoid
unnecessary absences. Two areas of state law--one
dealing with compulsory attendance, the other with
attendance for course credit--are of special interest to
students and parents.
Is absent on three or more days or parts of days
within a four-week period, and a complaint shall
be filed if the student:
Is absent from school on ten or more days or
parts of days within a six-month period in the
same school year.
Compulsory Attendance
State law requires that a student age six and who
has not yet reached 18 years old attend school, as
well as any applicable accelerated instruction
program, extended year program, or tutorial session,
unless the student is otherwise excused from
attendance or legally exempt. A student enrolled in
prekindergarten or kindergarten is required to attend
school each day of instruction. A student who
voluntarily attends or enrolls after his or her
eighteenth birthday is required to attend each school
day until the end of the school year. If a student 18
or older has more than five unexcused absences in a
semester, the district may revoke the student’s
enrollment for the remainder of the school year. The
student’s presence on school property thereafter
would be unauthorized and may be considered
trespassing. State law requires a student to attend
each school day for the entire period the program of
instruction is provided.
Exemptions to Compulsory Attendance
State law allows exemptions to the compulsory
attendance requirements for the following absences:
Religious holy days, including up to a total of two
days for travel to/from the site of observation;
Required court appearances;
Activities related to obtaining citizenship and
taking part in a U.S. naturalization oath ceremony;
Students in grades 6-12 for sounding “Taps” at a
military honors funeral;
College visits of no more than two days during
each of the student’s junior and senior years;
Service as an election clerk; and
Documented health-care appointments, including
absences for recognized services for students
diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders. A note
from the health-care provider must be submitted
upon the student’s return to campus.
Attendance officers will file a complaint against the
parent and/or student in court if the compulsory
attendance law is violated. Exemptions from the law
may be found in Policy FEA (LEGAL).
State law also requires attendance in an accelerated
reading instruction program when kindergarten, first
grade, or second grade students are assigned to
such a program. Parents will be notified in writing if
their child is assigned to an accelerated reading
instruction program as a result of a diagnostic reading
instrument. A student in grades 3-8 will be required to
attend any assigned accelerated instruction program,
which may occur before or after school or during the
summer, if the student does not meet the passing
standards on the state assessment for his or her
grade level and applicable subject area. A student
Violation of Compulsory School Attendance
Notice
This serves as the district’s notice to parents that if
the student is absent without an excuse for ten or
more days, or parts of days in a six-month period, or
three or more days or parts of a day in a four week
period, the student and the student's parents are
subject to prosecution.
The fact that a parent did not receive the notice
described above is not a defense to prosecution for
8
the parent's failure to require a child to attend school,
nor for the student's failure to attend school.
Military Dependents
A student whose parent or legal guardian is an active
duty member of the uniformed services and has been
called to duty for, is on leave from, or immediately
returned from deployment to a combat zone or
combat support posting, shall be granted additional
excused absences at the discretion of the
Superintendent to visit with the student’s parent or
legal guardian relative to such leave or deployment of
the parent or guardian.
Attendance for Credit
To receive credit in a class, a student must attend at
least 90 percent of the days the class is offered. A
student who attends at least 75 percent but fewer
than 90 percent of the days the class is offered and
earns a passing grade, may receive credit for the
class if the student completes a plan, approved by
the principal that provides for the student to fulfill the
instructional requirements for the class. If a student
is involved in a criminal or juvenile court proceeding,
the approval of the judge presiding over the case is
also required before the student receives credit for
the class.
Parent’s Note After an Absence
To excuse legitimate student absences, including
days or parts of a day resulting from a nurse sending
the student home, a written excuse signed by the
student’s parent must be given to the proper school
authorities no later than three school days after the
student returns to school, describing the reason for
the absence. [See FEC (LOCAL).] The note shall be
signed by the student’s parent or, if the student is 18
or older or is an emancipated minor, by the student.
[See FEB (LOCAL).]
If a student attends less than 75 percent of the days a
class is offered or has not completed a plan approved
by the principal, then the student will be referred to
the attendance review committee to determine
whether there are extenuating circumstances for the
absences and how the student can regain credit, if
appropriate. [See policies at FEC.]
The principal or appropriate designee may investigate
any absence to verify extenuating circumstances.
The student or parent may appeal the attendance
committee’s decision to the Board of Trustees by
filing a written request in accordance with policy FNG
(LOCAL).
Special Education Matters
Students may be excused for special education
assessment procedures and for special educationrelated services.
The actual number of days a student must be in
attendance in order to receive credit will depend on
the number of instructional days and whether the
class is for a full semester (secondary) or for a full
year (most elementary classes).
Temporary Absence
When a student’s absence for personal illness
exceeds five consecutive days or a total of ten days
in a six-week grading period, the student may be
required to present a statement from a physician or
health clinic verifying the illness or other condition
requiring the student’s absence from school. If the
student has established a questionable pattern of
attendance, a physician’s or clinic’s statement may
be required after a single day’s absence. [See
FEC(LOCAL).]
A student may be excused for temporary absence
resulting from any cause acceptable to the teacher,
principal, or superintendent of the school in which the
child is enrolled. To excuse legitimate student
absences, the principal requires a written excuse
signed by the student's parent. (See Parent’s Note
After an Absence.) Excused absences are not
counted when determining the number of absences
that trigger a referral or complaint for failure to comply
with the compulsory attendance requirement.
Excused absences are counted in determining
whether a student is in compliance with the
attendance requirements for class credit.
Driver’s License Attendance Verification
Unexcused Absences
For a student between the ages of 16 and 18 to
obtain a driver’s license, written parental permission
must be provided for the Texas Department of Public
Safety (DPS) to access the student’s attendance
records and, in certain circumstances, for a school
administrator to provide the student’s attendance
information to DPS.
Absences not eligible to be excused and absences
for which a written excuse is not received within three
school days shall be counted as unexcused
absences. Students who are absent from school for
the following reasons are not given an excused
absence:
Doctor’s Note after an Absence for Illness
Aptitude and achievement testing by outside
agencies
Truancy
9
Non-school instruction
Career Pathways
Vacations
Career pathways are a way for students to plan their
four-year high school program by selecting electives
that allow them to explore careers that interest them.
Career pathways are grouped because people in
those careers may share the same interests, talents,
and abilities. Within a cluster there are careers and
jobs that require different levels of educational
preparation.
Non-school club, youth, or other organization’s
activities
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
The district offers a variety of academic programs,
including those from the core, enrichment, and
career/technical curricula, as well as a number of
special programs. The school counselor provides
students and parents information regarding the
academic programs to prepare for higher education
and career choices. (See policies at EIF.)
Career pathways are for all students. A career
pathway choice does not have to be permanent.
Skyline Career Development Center and all magnet
schools arrange the students’ four-year high school
course of study in a career path (or cluster).
Eventually, all high schools will have a selection of
career pathways with a coherent sequence of
planned electives. Until then, comprehensive high
schools assist students by encouraging them to
select electives that match their career objectives.
CAREER AND TECHNICAL
EDUCATION (CTE) PROGRAMS
Each public school student shall master the basic
skills and knowledge necessary for managing the dual
roles of family member and wage earner and for
having the option of gaining entry-level employment in
a high-skill, high-wage job or continuing the student's
education at the post-secondary level. The district
offers career and technical education programs that
support student career pathways to ensure that
students have the opportunity to identify the
relationship between the skills taught in the classroom
and the skills required for the workforce.
Admission to these programs is based on student
interest and program availability. Students interested
in programs not offered on their high school campus
may apply for programs on other campuses.
Information and application procedures can be
obtained from the campus counselor.
The Dallas ISD takes steps to ensure that lack of
English language skills will not be a barrier to
admission and participation in all educational and
career/technical preparation programs.
The following career clusters are the framework of Achieve Texas for Dallas students:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Sciences
Hospitality and Tourism
Arts, Audiovisual Technology and Communications
Information Technology
Architecture and Construction
Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security
Business, Management and Administration
Manufacturing
Education and Training
Marketing, Sales and Service
Finance
Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics
Government and Public Administration
Transportation, Logistics, and Distribution
Health Science and Human Services
at
http://www.dallasisd.org/
and
selecting
Compliance Division from the menu list. A brochure
in both English and Spanish can be downloaded
from the Child Abuse/Domestic Violence Prevention
section of that site.
CHILD ABUSE AND DOMESTIC
VIOLENCE PREVENTION
The district has established a plan for addressing
child sexual abuse and other maltreatment of
children which may be accessed through reviewing
Board Policies FFG (Legal, Local, Regulations, and
Forms/Exhibits) found at
The safety and well-being of all students is
paramount to a successful educational experience.
When an employee has cause to believe that a
student has been or may be abused or neglected,
that person is required to make an oral report
immediately to the district’s Child Abuse/Domestic
Violence Prevention Office and Child Protective
http://pol.tasb.org/Home/index/361
Additional information may also be found on the
district’s website by selecting the “Departments” tab
10
Services or the Dallas Police Department. If an
allegation is made against an employee of the
district, it should be reported to the Dallas ISD Police
and Security Services in lieu of the Dallas Police
Department.
English I class for the fall semester. Since English is
a regular education course, the student earns 644
points (92 x 7 = 644) for the semester class. Rank is
calculated at the end of each semester beginning
with the first semester of the junior year. The first
calculation is based on the highest 15 credits. At the
end of the junior year, rank is calculated based on
the highest 18 credits. First semester senior rank is
calculated on the highest 21 credits and the final
rank is calculated on the highest 24 credits.
If a parent has cause to believe that a child has
been or may be abused or neglected at school, the
parent shall immediately notify the principal at the
school and make an oral report to Child Protective
Services at 1 (800) 252-5400 or the Dallas Police
Department (911). A parent may also call the
district’s Child Abuse/Domestic Violence Prevention
Office at (972) 502-4180 for assistance.
Top Ten Percent: College and University
Admissions
For two school years following graduation, a district
student who graduates in the top ten percent of his or
her class, or the top eight percent for admission to
the University of Texas at Austin, is eligible for
automatic admission into four-year public universities
and colleges in Texas if the student:
All district staff are trained annually in child abuse
awareness and reporting procedures. Programs are
also available for students and parents to increase
awareness of child abuse. For additional
information, contact the Child Abuse Office at (972)
502-4182.
Completes the Recommended or
Advanced/Distinguished Achievement Program;
or
CLASS RANK / TOP TEN PERCENT /
HIGHEST RANKING STUDENT
Satisfies the ACT College Readiness
Benchmarks by scoring 22 out of 36 or earns at
least a 1500 out of 2400 on the SAT.
Rank in class is based on a weighted grading
system. Eligible courses for the computation of rank
include all courses taken for state credit in grades 912. Courses taken for state credit in summer or
evening school, as well as approved correspondence
and college courses taken for high school credit will
count toward class rank.
The University of Texas at Austin may limit the
number of students automatically admitted to 75
percent of the university’s enrollment capacity for
incoming freshmen.
Credit earned through credit-by-exam, with or without
prior instruction, does not count toward rank in class.
Rank points are awarded based on semester
grades. For each student, rank points for each
semester course are sorted in descending order.
Rank in class is computed by totaling the weighted
rank points of eligible courses representing the
highest twenty-four credits taken and earned in
grades 9-12. See policy EIC (LOCAL) for details.
Students and parents should contact the counselor
for further information about automatic admissions,
the application process, and deadlines.
Valedictorian and
Ranking Students)
Course weights are assigned to Texas Education
Agency approved courses as follows:
Advanced Placement/International Baccalaureate
9
Pre-AP /Pre-IB/Dual Credit *
8
Regular Education/ESOL
7
Remedial Education/Special Education
6
Local credit courses
0
Should a college or university adopt an admissions
policy that automatically accepts the top 25 percent
of a graduating class, the provisions above will also
apply to a student ranked in the top 25 percent of his
or her class.
Salutatorian
(Highest
Students must be enrolled in their graduating school
the last four semesters prior to graduation, exclusive
of summer and evening school, in order to be
considered for valedictorian or salutatorian.
Valedictorian and salutatorian shall be those eligible
students completing the Recommended High School
Program or Distinguished Achievement Program
with the highest and second highest class rank in
each high school. The graduating school must
award every six weeks grade in the final four
semesters. Students entering after the third week of
the first six weeks of the initial semester will not be
eligible for consideration. [Also, see EIC LOCAL.]
Below 70 in any course
* Only applies to transferable courses as indicated on the
Dual Credit matrices.
To obtain rank points, the semester grade in each
course is multiplied by the course weight. For
example, a student earns a grade of 92 in an
11
point average and performance on standardized
tests.
CLASS SCHEDULES
Many hours go into the planning of student and
school schedules. Course offerings and teacher
assignments are based on the choices students
make during spring scheduling each year.
Nevertheless, some schedule adjustments are
necessary due to courses having been taken in
summer school, omission of a required course,
course conflicts, or other circumstances that warrant
a schedule change. The school will make every
effort to place each student in the classes indicated
on the student’s choice sheet. Student requests for
changes
other
than
meeting
graduation
requirements or correcting an error will not be
approved, and no schedule change will be made
after the first ten days of each semester except at
the direction of the principal.
To Qualify For Automatic Admission an Applicant
Must:
1.
Submit an application before the deadline
established by the college or university to which
the student seeks admission; and
2.
Provide a high school transcript or diploma that
indicates whether the student has satisfied or is
on schedule to satisfy the requirements of the
Recommended High School Program (RHSP)
or the Distinguished Achievement Program
(DAP)
COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES
Students in the Dallas ISD are offered several
opportunities to earn college credit for courses taken
while still in high school. Opportunities include the
following:
In accordance with State Board curriculum
requirements, students in grades 9-12 shall be
scheduled for a full day of classes, including a
minimum of 2 1/2 graduation units or five creditearning courses per semester, plus PE or equivalent
and Heath.
1.
The College Board Advanced Placement
Program: Students may enroll in a variety of
Advanced Placement (AP) courses during
grades 9-12.
Each spring, students are
encouraged to take the AP examination for the
course(s) taken during the year. Colleges and
universities award credit based on the score
earned on each exam. Scores required for
credit vary from college to college.
2.
Dual-credit Programs: A variety of dual-credit
college courses are available to eligible high
school students through the Dallas County
Community College District (DCCCD). High
schools, College and Career Readiness dual
credit coordinators and dual credit coordinators
work collaboratively to determine which courses
will be offered on the high school campus. Not
all courses are available on all campuses.
Some high school courses require the
completion of two (or more) college courses in
order for high school credit to be awarded.
3.
Tech Prep Programs: Tech Prep is a
partnership between Dallas ISD and DCCCD
that provides qualified junior and senior
students the opportunity to earn high school
credit NOW and college credit LATER. A high
school graduate who earned grades of ‘B' or
better in an approved high school course
sequence and enrolls at a DCCCD campus
within fifteen (15) months of high school
graduation may receive college credit for the
high school courses.
4.
Other Programs: Students may also receive
college credit through the district’s International
With parent approval and signature, seniors who
have passed all sections of the exit exam and will
complete graduation requirements with less than five
credit earning courses per semester may modify
their course schedule, but to no less than 1/2 day of
instruction daily, under the following conditions:
1.
The student is enrolled in post-secondary
courses being taken on a college/technical
school campus (courses may or may not be for
dual credit), or
2.
The student is employed for more than 20 hours
per week, or
3.
The student has parenting responsibilities, or
4.
Other circumstances as approved by the
principal, and
5.
The student arrives late or leaves early and
does not remain on campus when other
students are in classes. Courses are to be
scheduled consecutively, without allowing
students to leave and return to the campus on
the same day. [See EED (LOCAL).]
COLLEGE ADMISSION
Colleges and universities are required to admit an
applicant for admission as an undergraduate student
if the applicant is the child of a public servant who
was killed or sustained a fatal injury in the line of
duty and meets the minimum requirements, if any,
established by the governing board of the college or
university for high school or prior college-level grade
12
Baccalaureate program or through programs
offered at colleges or universities accredited by
one of the regional higher education accrediting
associations, such as Southern Association of
Colleges
and
Schools,
Middle
States
Association of Colleges and Schools. For
students to be eligible to enroll and be awarded
credit toward state graduation requirements, a
student shall have the approval of the high
school principal or other school official
designated by the district. The course(s) for
which credit is awarded must provide academic
instruction beyond or in greater depth than the
essential knowledge and skills for the equivalent
high school course.
5.
Interference with an authorized activity by
seizing control of all or part of a building.
Use of force, violence, or threats in an attempt
to prevent participation in an authorized assembly.
Use of force, violence, or threats to cause
disruption during an assembly.
Interference with the movement of people at an
exit or an entrance to district property.
Use of force, violence, or threats in an attempt
to prevent people from entering or leaving district
property without authorization from an administrator.
Disruption of classes or other school activities
while on district property or on public property that is
within 500 feet of district property. Class disruption
includes making loud noises; trying to entice a
student away from, or to prevent a student from
attending, a required class or activity; and entering a
classroom without authorization and disrupting the
activity with loud or profane language or any
misconduct.
For additional information, please contact your
child’s counselor or call the office of College
and Career Readiness, (972) 925-5520.
COMPLAINTS AND CONCERNS
Usually student or parent concerns can be addressed
by a phone call or a conference with the teacher or
principal. For those complaints and concerns that
cannot be handled so easily, the district has adopted
a standard complaint policy at FNG (LOCAL) in the
district’s policy manual. A copy of this policy may be
obtained in the principal’s office or on the district’s
website at http://www.dallasisd.org
Interference with the transportation of students
in vehicles owned or operated by the district.
[See policy FNCI (LEGAL) and GKA (LEGAL).]
Social Events
In general, the student or parent should submit a
written complaint and request a conference with the
campus principal. If the concern is not resolved, a
request for a conference should be sent to the
principal’s supervisor. Until resolved, the district
provides for the complaint to be forwarded through
the administration and finally presented to the Board
of Trustees.
The rules of good conduct and grooming will be
observed at school social events held outside the
regular school day. Guests are expected to observe
the same rules as students, and a student inviting a
guest will share responsibility for the conduct of the
guest
CORRESPONDENCE COURSES
The district permits high school students to take
correspondence courses—by mail or via the
Internet—for credit toward high school graduation.
All high school students are eligible to take
correspondence courses
and earn credit toward graduation. Prior to
enrollment in correspondence courses, students
must make a written request to the principal or
designee for approval to enroll in the course.
Students will not be awarded credit toward
graduation if approval was not granted prior to
enrollment.
CONDUCT
Applicability of School Rules
As required by law, the board has adopted a Student
Code of Conduct that prohibits certain behaviors and
defines standards of acceptable behavior—both on
and off campus—and consequences for violation of
these standards. A copy of the Code of Conduct is
printed within this manual.
Disruptions of School Operations
Disruptions of school operations are not tolerated
and may constitute a misdemeanor offense. As
identified by law, disruptions include the following:
COUNSELING
The school counselor is available to assist students
and their families with a wide range of academic
and personal concerns, including areas such as
academic, career, and college planning; academic
success; social, family, or emotional issues; or
substance abuse. The school counselor coordinates
Interference with the movement of people at an
exit, entrance, or hallway of a district building without
authorization from an administrator.
13
planning,
implementing,
and
evaluating
a
comprehensive developmental guidance program to
serve the needs of all students as well as address
special needs of students. The program consists of
the following:
form of child abuse or endangerment whether to self
or others.
All materials used in the counseling program are
available during school hours for parents to review.
If parents/guardians have any questions regarding
counseling services or programs in the school, they
may call their child’s counselor or the school
principal. [For more information, refer to Policies EJ
and FFEA.]
Presenting classroom guidance lessons to help
students develop their full educational potential
Counseling and referral services for any
student whose immediate personal concerns or
problems put the student's continued
educational, career, personal, or social
development at risk
Guiding students as they plan, monitor, and
manage their own academic, career, personal,
and social development
Supporting the efforts of teachers, staff,
parents, and other members of the community
in promoting students’ educational, career,
personal, and social development
COURSE CREDIT
A student in grades 9-12 will earn credit for a course
only if the final grade is 70 or above. For a twosemester (1 credit) course, the student’s grades
from both semesters will be averaged and credit will
be awarded if the combined average is 70 or above.
Should the student’s combined average be less
than 70, the student will be required to retake the
semester(s) failed.
Each counselor at an elementary or middle school
shall advise students and their parents or guardians
regarding the importance of higher education,
coursework designed to prepare students for higher
education, and financial aid availability and
requirements.
First time ninth graders in 2011-2012 will also have
the End of Course Assessment count 15% towards
their final grade for credit. The district is in the
process of establishing procedures for awarding
credit based on results of the 15% End of Course.
CREDIT BY EXAM
During the first school year a student is enrolled in
high school, and again during a student’s senior
year, a counselor shall provide information about
higher education to the student and the student’s
parent or guardian. The information must include
the importance of higher education, financial aid
eligibility and application processes, automatic
admission, and the availability of programs under
which a student may earn college credit.
If a Student Has Taken the Course
Credit by Examination (CBE) is a means by which a
Dallas ISD student in grades 7-12, who has received
prior instruction in a course but not attained a passing
grade, may take a test to demonstrate mastery of the
course.
Parent approval is required.
On
recommendation of the principal, or designee, or
attendance review committee, a student who has
excessive absences may be permitted to earn or
regain a passing semester score through credit by
examination if a score of 70 or above is attained. In
grades 9-12, CBE scores do not count toward rank or
GPA. With administrative approval, CBE may also be
used to attain course credit for special circumstances.
The following students may apply for CBE through
the school counselor when:
At the beginning of grades 10 and 11, a counselor
shall explain the requirements of automatic
admission to higher education institutions to each
student who has a grade point average in the top 25
percent of the student’s high school class.
To plan for the future, each student should work
closely with the counselor in order to enroll in
courses that best prepare him or her for attendance
at a college, university, or other type of advanced
education.
The student is enrolling from a nonaccredited
school (See FD);
The counseling relationship is a professional
relationship and counselors have a professional
code of ethics. There are times when it is necessary
for counselors to confer with other school
professionals regarding a particular student’s
problem to best serve that student. To the extent
possible under legal and ethical guidelines, the
counselor protects the privacy rights of students and
their families. Counselors are required by state law
and their professional code of ethics to report any
The student has failed a subject or course;
The student has earned a passing grade in a
subject or course but has failed to earn credit
because of excessive absences (See FEC); or
The student has completed all or nearly all of the
instruction required for a course, but has not
received a semester grade due to special
circumstances.
14
Prior to offering a student an opportunity to
demonstrate mastery or earn credit by this method,
an appropriate District employee shall review the
student’s educational records to determine whether
the student has had prior instruction in the subject or
course.
Distance Education. EFA test administration will be
coordinated by Local Assessment and examinations
will be given to students at no cost. Students scoring
90 percent or above on examinations shall be
accelerated and/or receive appropriate credit. Written
approval for the acceleration of students scoring at 90
percent or above will be obtained from parents on the
application form. A student in elementary school will
accelerate to the next grade level if the student
scores at least 90 on each exam in the subject areas
of language arts, mathematics, science, and social
studies. The implications of having students
accelerate as a result of the exams should be
considered by parents, as well as by the student,
prior to applying for testing. Counselors should submit
required application(s) and enrollment form(s) to
Local Assessment. Check with your school counselor
for more information. Specific test study guides are
available through the Texas Tech website. See
EHDC (LOCAL).
Students who have been offered a free and
appropriate education and failed a course will be
required to pay the necessary fee(s) for CBE. The fee
shall consist of the cost of the examination and may
include an administration fee for examinations given
after school or on Saturdays. [See Policies at EHDB.]
CBE scheduling and test administration is
coordinated by school personnel with principal
approval throughout the school year. The Office of
Local
Assessment
will
coordinate
CBE
administration during the summer only for students
that schools were unable to schedule during the
school year. Required application(s), fees, and/or
enrollment form(s) must be submitted to Local
Assessment for summer test administration by May
3, 2013. Testing will be scheduled within the month
of June 2013
http://www.depts.ttu.edu/ode/cbereview/HSCBE.php
Promotion/reclassification for secondary students will
be based on the standards in effect for the student’s
grade level. Scores are not counted toward a high
school student’s grade point average (GPA) or rank in
class (RC).
Credit by examination cannot be used to gain
eligibility for participation in extracurricular activities.
If a Student Has Not Taken the Course
Examinations for acceleration are offered for
students having no prior instruction; therefore, the
Credit by examinations for acceleration (CEFA) are
district is not obligated to furnish textbooks, study
means by which high-achieving students may “test
guides, tutoring, or other instructional aids to
out” of a grade level or particular courses. Students
students registering for the examinations.
may be accelerated in any academic course for which
tests are available through Texas Tech University and
CBE APPLICATION DEADLINES 2012-2013 TEST WINDOW DATES
September 21, 2012(Grades 9-12)
October 29 – November 30, 2012(Grades 9-12)
February 8, 2013 (Grades 9-12)
March 25 – April 26, 2013(Grades 9-12)
May 3, 2013 (Grades K-12)
June 10-14, 2013 (Grades K-8)
June 17-21, 2013 (Grades 9-12)
Specific examination dates will be scheduled within the testing windows and are subject to change.
performance. Any student who believes that he or
she has experienced dating violence should
immediately report the problem to a teacher,
counselor, principal or other district employee.
(See additional information in the following section
regarding retaliation, reporting procedures, and
investigation of reports.)
DATING VIOLENCE
Dating violence occurs when a person in a current
or past dating relationship uses physical, sexual,
verbal, or emotional abuse to harm, threaten,
intimidate, or control the other person. This is
considered harassment if it is so severe,
persistent, or pervasive that it affects the student’s
ability to participate in or benefit from an
educational program or activity; creates an
intimidating, threatening, hostile, or offensive
educational
environment;
or
substantially
interferes
with
the
student’s
academic
The Child Abuse/Domestic Violence Prevention
Office provides training to enhance awareness of
dating violence for secondary education students,
district staff and parents. For more information,
contact the Child Abuse/Domestic Violence
Prevention Office at (972) 502-4182.
15
nature; sexual advances; jokes or conversations of a
sexual nature; and other sexually motivated conduct,
communications, or contact.
DISCRIMINATION AND
HARASSMENT; RACIAL, ETHNIC,
RELIGIOUS, GENDER, GENDER
IDENTITY, GENDER EXPRESSION,
SEXUAL ORIENTATION,
DISABILITY, AND NATIONAL
ORIGIN; AND RETALIATION
Sexual harassment of a student by an employee or
volunteer does not include necessary or permissible
physical contact that is not reasonably construed as
sexual in nature. However, romantic or inappropriate
social relationships, as well as all sexual
relationships, between students and district
employees are prohibited, even if consensual.
Discrimination
Discrimination is defined as any conduct directed at a
student on the basis of race, color, religion, gender,
gender
identity,
gender
expression,
sexual
orientation, national origin, disability, or any other
basis prohibited by law that negatively affects the
student.
Harassment:
Including
Racial,
Ethnic,
Religious, Disability, Gender, Gender Identity,
Gender Expression, and Sexual Orientation
Students are expected to treat other students and
district employees with courtesy and respect, to avoid
behaviors known to be offensive, and to stop those
behaviors when asked or told to stop.
District
employees are expected to treat students with
courtesy and respect.
The district expressly prohibits racial, ethnic, religious,
disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression,
or sexual orientation harassment of its students,
employees, and those who seek to join the campus
community in any capacity or those who interface with
the district (i.e., citizens, parents, vendors).
Examples of harassment include, but are not limited
to, threatening or intimidating conduct; verbal, written,
electronic, or physical conduct; and any other
demonstrative actions based on race, color, ethnic
origin, nationality, religious preference, disability,
gender, gender identity, gender expression, or sexual
orientation that has the purpose or effect of creating a
hostile, intimidating, or offensive learning environment
and substantially interfering with the learning
environment.
Sexual Harassment
Students and/or parents are encouraged to discuss
their questions or concerns about the expectations in
this area with the teacher, the principal, or designee.
Students, parents, and/or a student’s representative
may contact the principal, counselor, Child Abuse and
Domestic Violence Prevention Office, or designee
regarding available counseling as a result of
harassment
Retaliation
Retaliation against a person, who makes a good faith
report of dating violence, discrimination, or
harassment, is prohibited. Retaliation against a
person who is participating in an investigation of
alleged dating violence, discrimination, or harassment
is also prohibited. A person who makes a false claim
or offers false statements or refuses to cooperate with
a district investigation, however, may be subject to
appropriate discipline.
Reporting Procedures
Any student who believes that he or she has
experienced harassment or retaliation should
immediately report the problem to a teacher,
counselor, principal or other district employee. All
allegations of harassment involving a student shall be
reported to a teacher or principal. The discipline
guidelines are located in the Student Code of
Conduct. No procedure in district policy shall have the
effect of requiring the student alleging harassment to
bring the matter to the person who is the subject of
the complaint. Should the complaint be against a
district administrator, the complaint should be filed
with the next level of authority.
Investigation of Report
All students are prohibited from engaging in offensive
verbal, written, electronic, or physical conduct of a
sexual nature directed toward another student. This
prohibition applies whether the conduct is by word,
gesture, or other intimidating sexual conduct,
including requests for sexual favors that the other
student regards as offensive or provocative.
District officials shall promptly investigate all
allegations of dating violence; racial, ethnic,
religious, disability, gender, gender identity, gender
expression,
sexual
orientation,
or
sexual
harassment; discrimination; and retaliation. Action
as deemed appropriate pursuant to district policy
will be taken. Filing allegations without substantive
cause is strictly prohibited and may result in
disciplinary action. Any person who files a false
claim may be subject to any and all available State
Examples of prohibited sexual harassment may
include, but is not limited to, touching private body
parts or coercing physical contact that is sexual in
16
and district penalties. A student or parent who is
dissatisfied with the outcome of the investigation
may appeal in accordance with policy FNG
(LOCAL).
DISTRIBUTION OF PUBLISHED
MATERIALS OR DOCUMENTS
School Materials
DISTANCE LEARNING
Publications prepared by and for the school may be
posted or distributed, with the prior approval of the
principal, sponsor, or teacher. Such items may
include school newsletters, posters, brochures, flyers,
etc. All school publications are under the supervision
of a teacher, sponsor, and the principal.
Distance learning is offered for students when
specialized learning needs can be met most
effectively through such learning. Distance learning
opportunities may include, but are not limited to,
correspondence
courses,
interactive
video
conferencing, online courses, and web-enhanced
features available to support traditional face-to-face
courses.
Nonschool Materials...from students
Students must obtain prior approval from the principal
or designee before posting, circulating, or distributing
written materials, handbills, photographs, pictures,
petitions, films, tapes, posters, or other visual or
auditory materials that were not developed under the
oversight of the school.
The district is in the process of establishing
procedures governing the use of distance learning.
All district approved electronic distance learning
courses are designated as eDISD courses and must
comply with the policies, protocols, and procedures in
policy and the electronic course handbook. These
courses encompass the state-required essential
knowledge and skills but are taught through multiple
technologies and alternative methodologies such as
mail, satellite, Internet, video-conferencing, and
instructional television.
To be considered, any nonschool material must
include the name of the sponsoring person or
organization. The decision regarding approval will be
made in two school days. A student may appeal a
principal’s decision in accordance with policy
FNG(LOCAL). Any student who posts nonschool
material without prior approval will be subject to
disciplinary action.
The Texas Virtual School Network (TxVSN) has
been established as one method of distance
learning. A student has the option, with certain
limitations, to enroll in a course offered through the
TxVSN to earn course credit for graduation. In
limited circumstances, a student in grade 8 may also
be eligible to enroll in a course through the TxVSN.
Depending on the course in which a student enrolls,
the course may be subject to the “no pass, no play”
rules.
Nonschool Materials...from others
Written or printed materials, handbills, photographs,
pictures, films, tapes, or other visual or auditory
materials not sponsored by the district or by a districtaffiliated, school-support organization will not be sold,
circulated, distributed, or posted on any district
premises by any district employee or by persons or
groups not associated with the district, except as
permitted by policies at GKDA. Contact the principal
for specific guidelines.
For additional information, see EHDE (LOCAL).
DRESS AND GROOMING
Grades Pre-K - 8
The district requires all students prekindergarten–grade 8 to wear a school uniform unless the parent or
guardian has filed an objection as provided in FNCA(LEGAL) and (REGULATION). All clothing must adhere to
the standards set out below.
APPROPRIATE ATTIRE FOR PRE-K – GRADE 8 STUDENTS
Item
Color
Style
Other
Slacks and
Pants
Khaki, navy blue, or black, in a
solid, single color.
Pleated or flat front, full length,
appropriately fastened at the waist. Pants
with loops require belts. Material may be
cotton, canvas, corduroy, linen, polyester,
or twill.
17
Tops
All pre-k–grade 8 students shall
wear white shirts and/or one
additional solid color top as
determined by the campus.
Undershirts must be white or
match the color of the top.
Shirts and blouses must have short or
long sleeves with button down or straight
collars. Turtleneck and polo styles are
permitted.
Skirts and
Jumpers
Khaki, navy blue or black, in a
single, solid color.
Skirt must be at least knee length.
Shorts and
Capris
Khaki, navy blue, or black, in a
solid, single color.
Must be at least knee length.
Jackets,
Cardigans,
and
Sweaters
Should match an accepted
uniform color.
All must be worn over a collared shirt,
turtleneck, or polo style top.
All tops must be worn tucked inside pants.
Jackets for middle school students cannot
have hoods.
Footwear
District school logos are
permitted and are not
limited in size. (All districtissued school jackets are
permitted.)
Athletic shoes, loafers, dress shoes, or
other closed-toed/closed-heel shoes.
Mules described as closed-toed and openheel are appropriate.
Grades 9-12
ELECTRONIC DEVICES AND
TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES
Principals, working in consultation with the site-based
decision-making
committee,
Parent
Teacher
Association, and administrative staff, are authorized
to implement mandatory uniforms for their individual
campus provided they comply with the 90-day rules
and the exemption guidelines outlined in FNCA
(LEGAL).
See policies at CQ.
Possession
and
Use
of
Telecommunications Devices,
Cellular Phones
All grades
The use of cellular phones or any device capable of
capturing images is strictly prohibited in locker rooms
or restroom areas while at school or at a schoolrelated or school-sponsored event.
Deviations or exceptions to dress code policy must
relate to the curriculum of the specific class, i.e.,
physical education, JROTC, etc. Whether or not a
student is dressed appropriately or properly groomed
shall be left to the discretion of the principal or his/her
designee.
If a student uses a cellular phone without
authorization during the school day, the device will be
confiscated. The cellular phone may be picked up
from the principal’s office for a fee of $5 to $15,
depending on the number of times it has been
confiscated.
Student complaints regarding appropriate attire and
grooming for religious and/or philosophical reasons
shall follow the complaint procedures outlined in
See
Complaints
Personal
Including
For safety purposes, the district permits students to
possess personal cellular phones; however, these
devices must remain turned off during instructional
class time, including all testing, unless they are being
used for approved instructional purposes. A student
must
have
approval
to
possess
other
telecommunication devices such as netbooks,
laptops, tablets, or other personal computers.
In high school, the length of dresses, skirts, and
shorts shall be no shorter than “finger-tip length” with
arms in normal position, i.e., arms hanging naturally,
as student is standing straight and upright. Each high
school will inform students and parents of appropriate
dress and grooming requirements.
FNCA(REGULATION).
Concerns, p.12.
Trademarks (logos), if any,
must be one inch or less.
District school logos are
permitted and are not
limited in size.
and
Confiscated telecommunications devices that are not
retrieved by the student or the student’s parents will
be disposed of after the notice required by law. (See
policy FNCE.)
18
the district’s network systems and use of district
equipment, is restricted to approved purposes only.
Students and parents will be asked to sign a user
agreement (separate from this handbook) regarding
use of these district resources. Violations of the user
may result in withdrawal of privileges and other
disciplinary action.
In limited circumstances and in accordance with law,
a student’s personal telecommunications device may
be searched by authorized personnel.
Any disciplinary action will be in accordance with the
Student Code of Conduct. The district will not be
responsible
for
damaged,
lost,
or
stolen
telecommunication devices.
Students and their parents should be aware that
student access and use of the district network is
monitored by district staff. All Internet access is
filtered in accordance with regulations of No Child
Left Behind and the Children’s Internet Protection
Act. Additional information regarding such filtering
can be found on-line at:
Possession and Use of Other Personal
Electronic Devices
Except as described below, students are not
permitted to possess or use personal electronic
devices such as MP3 players, video or audio
recorders, DVD players, cameras, games, ereaders, or other electronic devices at school, unless
prior permission has been obtained. Without such
permission, teachers will collect the items and turn
them in to the principal’s office. The principal will
determine whether to return items to students at the
end of the day or to contact parents to pick up the
items.
http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/consumerfacts/cipa.htm.
Efforts to bypass the district’s filter or engage in
unauthorized acts may result in withdrawal of
privileges and other disciplinary action. (For
additional information, see policies at CQ.)
Unacceptable and Inappropriate Use of
Technology Resources
In limited circumstances and in accordance with law,
a student’s personal electronic device may be
searched by authorized personnel.
Students are prohibited from possessing, sending,
forwarding, posting, accessing, or displaying
electronic messages that are abusive, obscene,
sexually oriented, threatening, harassing, damaging
to another’s reputation, or illegal. This prohibition
also apples to conduct on or off school property,
regardless of whether the equipment used to send
such messages is district or personally owned, if it
results in a substantial disruption to the educational
environment. Any person taking, disseminating,
transferring, possessing, or sharing obscene,
sexually oriented, lewd, or otherwise illegal images
or other content, commonly referred to as “sexting,”
will be disciplined according to the Student Code of
Conduct and may, in certain circumstances, be
reported to law enforcement.
Any disciplinary action will be in accordance with the
Student Code of Conduct. The district will not be
responsible for any damaged, lost, or stolen
electronic device.
Instructional
Use
of
Personal
Telecommunications and Other Electronic
Devices
In some cases, students may find it beneficial or
might
be
encouraged
to
use
personal
telecommunications or other personal electronic
devices for instructional purposes while on campus.
Students must obtain prior approval before using
personal telecommunications or other personal
electronic devices for instructional use. Students
must also sign a user agreement that contains
applicable rules for use (separate from this
handbook). When students are not using the devices
for approved instructional purposes, all devices must
be turned off during instructional class time.
Violations of the user agreement may result in
withdrawal of privileges and other disciplinary action.
EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES,
CLUBS, AND ORGANIZATIONS
Participation in school-sponsored activities is an
excellent way for a student to develop talents,
receive individual recognition, and build strong
friendships with other students; participation,
however, is a privilege, not a right. Eligibility for
participation in many of these activities is governed
by state law and the rules of the University
Interscholastic
League
(UIL)—a
statewide
association overseeing interdistrict competition. If a
student is involved in an academic, athletic, or music
activity governed by UIL, the student and parent are
expected to know and follow all rules of the UIL
organization. (See http://www.uiltexas.org for
additional information.)
Acceptable Use of District Technology
Resources
To prepare students for an increasingly
technological society, the district has made an
investment in the use of district-owned technology
resources for instructional purposes; specific
resources may be issued individually to students.
Use of these technological resources, which include
19
Academic Requirements (No Pass/No Play)
UIL participants are eligible to participate in
contests during the first six weeks of the school
year provided the following standards have
been met:
A student regains eligibility after the sevencalendar-day waiting period has ended following
a grading period or the three- school-week
evaluation period when the principal and
teachers determine that the student has earned
a passing grade (70 or above) in all classes or a
grade of 60 or higher in honors courses
(previously identified).
Students beginning grade nine and below must
have been promoted from the previous grade
prior to the beginning of the current school year.
A student is allowed in a school year up to 10
absences
not
related
to
post-district
competition, a maximum of 5.
Students beginning their second year of high
school must have earned five credits which
count toward state high school graduation
requirements.
Absences for post-district competition prior to
state, and a maximum of 2 absences for state
competition. All extracurricular activities and
public performances, whether UIL activities or
other activities approved by the board, are
subject to these restrictions.
The following requirements apply to all
extracurricular activities.
Students beginning their third year of high
school either must have earned a total of 10
credits which count toward high school
graduation credits or have earned a total of five
credits which count toward high school
graduation requirements during the 12 months
preceding the first day of the current school
year.
An absence for participation in an activity that
has not been approved will receive an
unexcused absence.
Please note:
Sponsors of student clubs and
performing groups such as the band, choir,
cheerleading, drill teams, and athletic teams must
follow all eligibility requirements (No Pass No Play)
and may establish standards of behavior—including
consequences for misbehavior—that are stricter
than those for students in general. If a violation is
also a violation of school rules, the consequences
specified by the Student Code of Conduct or by local
policy will apply in addition to any consequences
specified by the organization’s standards of
behavior. [For further information, see policies at
FM and FO.]
Students beginning their fourth year of high
school either must have earned a total of 15
credits which count toward state high school
graduation credits or have earned a total of five
credits which count toward state high school
graduation requirements during the 12 months
preceding the first day of the current school
year.
Eligibility for All Extracurricular Participants
After the First Six Weeks of the School Year
FEES
A student who receives, at the end of any
grading period (after the first six weeks of the
school year), a grade below 70 in any class may
not participate in extracurricular activities for at
least three school weeks.
Materials that are part of the basic educational
program are provided with state and local funds at
no charge to a student. A student, however, is
expected to provide his or her own pencils, paper,
erasers, and notebooks and may be required to pay
certain other fees or deposits, including:
Students enrolled in honors courses (such as
Advanced Placement (AP), PreAP, International
Baccalaureate course or dual credit course)
must have a grade of 60 or higher at the end of
any grading period for eligibility purposes only.
If a student makes below a 60 in an honors
class, at the end of a grading period, they may
submit an application as a waiver to maintain
their eligibility if approved (EIA Regulation).
Costs for materials for a class project that the
student will keep
Membership dues in voluntary clubs or student
organizations
and
admission
fees
to
extracurricular activities
Security deposits
A student with disabilities who fails to meet the
standards in the individualized education
program (IEP) may not participate for at least
three school weeks.
Personal physical education
equipment and apparel
and
athletic
Voluntarily purchased pictures, publications,
class
rings,
yearbooks,
graduation
announcements, etc.
An ineligible student may practice or rehearse.
20
Voluntarily
insurance
purchased
student
GANG-FREE ZONES
accident
Certain criminal offenses, including those involving
organized criminal activity such as gang related
crimes, will be enhanced to the next highest
category of offense if they are committed in a gangfree zone. For purposes of the district, a gang-free
zone includes a school bus and a location in, on, or
within 1000 feet of any district-owned or leased
property or campus playground.
Musical instrument rental and uniform
maintenance, when uniforms are provided by
the district
Personal apparel used in extracurricular
activities that becomes the property of the
student
Parking fees and student identification cards
GRADE CLASSIFICATION
Fees for lost, damaged, or overdue library
books
See Promotion and Retention.
GRADING
Fees for optional courses offered for credit that
require use of facilities not available on district
premises
Guidelines, Report Cards, and Progress
Reports
Summer school for courses that are offered
tuition-free during the regular school year
Teachers follow grading guidelines that have been
approved by the superintendent and are designed to
reflect each student’s academic achievement for the
grading period, semester, or course.
A reasonable fee for providing transportation to
a student who lives within two miles of the
school
Report cards are issued at the end of every six weeks
grading period. Teachers send interim progress
reports to parents every three weeks if a student’s
performance in any subject or class is below 70 or
whose average is deemed borderline according to
district guidelines.
A fee not to exceed $50 for costs of providing
an educational program outside of regular
school hours for a student who has lost credit
because of absences and whose parent
chooses the program in order for the student to
meet the 90 percent attendance requirement.
The fee will be charged only if the parent or
guardian signs a district-provided request form.
To ensure that test grades reflect content mastery,
students are permitted to retake any major test they
have failed within five school days the failing grade
was received or no later than ten days of the date of
the test. If the test is passed on the second attempt,
the failing grade will be removed from the grade book,
and the passing grade recorded with the following
exception. When student behavior or actions clearly
demonstrate that a major test was failed due to lack
of effort or inappropriate behavior, teachers, with
principal approval, may assess a grade penalty. The
grade penalty shall be either the average of the two
tests or a 70 (if either the average or the second
attempt is above 70). The grade given to a student
failing a test for the second time will be the higher
score earned on either test. [The retesting policy
does not apply to Assessments of Course
Performance (ACPs)].
In some cases, a fee for a course taken through
the Texas Virtual School Network (TxVSN).
Fees permitted by any other statute
Any required fee or deposit may be waived if the
student and parent are unable to pay. Application
for such a waiver may be made to the principal. [For
further information, see policies at FP.]
FUND-RAISING
Board Polices FJ(Local) and FJ(Regulation) address
fund-raising activities. All fund-raising projects shall
be subject to the approval of the principal and
superintendent. Fund-raising activities by student
groups and/or for school-sponsored projects are
allowed, with prior administration approval and under
the supervision of the project sponsor, for students in
all grades. Funds raised must be receipted,
deposited, and disbursed in accordance with
CFD(LOCAL). No outside organizations of any sort
may solicit contributions of any type from students
within the schools.
State law provides that a test or course grade issued
by a teacher cannot be changed unless the board
determines that the grade was arbitrary or contains
an error, or that the teacher did not follow the district’s
grading policy. [See policy EIA (LOCAL) and FNG
(LEGAL).]
Grading Pre-K-1
Essential knowledge and skills for pre-k-grade 1 are
used for documenting mastery of the expectations per
21
grade level. In recording grades for pre-k,
kindergarten, and first grade students, the symbols
“E” indicating excellent progress, “S” for satisfactory
progress, and “N” for needs improvement are used on
the report card.
For all subjects taught in 2-12, teachers use
numerical grades on the report cards to report
progress to parents and students. The numerical
grade ranges are:
A student who receives special education services
and has completed four years of high school, but
has not met the requirements of his or her IEP, may
participate in graduation ceremonies and receive a
certificate of attendance.
Even if the student
participates in graduation ceremonies to receive the
certificate of attendance, he or she may remain
enrolled to complete the IEP and earn his or her
high school diploma; however, the student will only
be allowed to participate in one graduation
ceremony. [See FMH (LEGAL)]
70 – 100, Passing;
Certificate of Coursework Completion
Below 70, Failing;
The district does not issue a certificate of
coursework completion to seniors who successfully
complete state and local credit requirements for
graduation but fail to perform satisfactorily on the
exit-level exams.
Numerical Grades for 2-12
I, Incomplete (must be made up within guidelines).
Students with excessive absences who did not
complete a plan approved by the principal or whose
appeal to the attendance committee was denied will
be given the numerical grade earned, but it will be
shown with an asterisk (*) to denote that no credit
was received due to excessive absences.
Graduation Expenses
Because students and parents will incur expenses in
order to participate in the traditions of graduation—
such as the purchase of invitations, senior ring, cap
and gown, and senior picture—both student and
parent should monitor progress toward completion of
all requirements for graduation. The expenses often
are incurred in the junior year or first semester of the
senior year.
GRADUATION
Requirements for a Diploma
To receive a high school diploma from the district, a
student must successfully complete the required
number of credits and pass required statewide exitlevel exams. A student who does not pass the exitlevel exams will have additional opportunities to take
the tests.
State Scholarships and Grants
Students who have a financial need according to
federal
criteria
and
who
complete
the
Recommended
High
School
Program
or
Distinguished Achievement Program may be eligible
under the TEXAS Grant Program for tuition and fees
to Texas public universities, community colleges,
and technical schools, as well as to private
institutions.
Graduation or Certificate of Attendance for
Students with Disabilities
Upon the recommendation of the Admission,
Review, and Dismissal Committee (ARDC),a student
with disabilities who receives special education
services may be permitted to graduate under the
provisions of his or her Individualized Education
Program (IEP).
Graduation Programs
The district offers the graduation programs listed below. All students entering grade 9 are required to enroll in
the Recommended High School Program or Advanced/Distinguished Achievement Program. Permission to
enroll in the Minimum Graduation Program will be granted only after the student has completed four semesters
in high school; is at least age 16; has earned 2 credits required for graduation in each subject of the foundation
th
curriculum or has failed to be promoted to the 10 grade at least once; and has a written agreement signed by
the student, the student’s parent or person standing in parental relation, and the counselor or school
administrator. [See policy EIF (LEGAL).]
An Admission, Review, and Dismissal (ARD) Committee may determine that a student who is eligible for and
enrolled in one or more locally developed special education courses qualifies to be enrolled in the Minimum
High School Program prior to completing four semesters of high school.
22
Students entering the ninth grade prior to the 2007-08 school year should consult with their counselor to confirm
credit requirements for graduation.
Beginning with the 2007–2008 school year, in addition to all state and local course requirements for the selected
program, a student entering the ninth grade must meet the following credit requirements for graduation:
Minimum Program
22 credits
Recommended Program
26 credits
Distinguished Achievement Program
26 credits
Not all state approved courses are offered at every secondary campus in the district. A student who wants to
take a course not offered at his or her regular campus should contact the counselor about a transfer or other
alternatives.
Beginning with the entering freshman class in 2011-12, performance on the End of Course (EOC) exams is a
factor in determining the eligibility to graduate under each of the graduation plans. See End of Course
Assessments section on p.18.
Texas State Graduation Requirements
Distinguished Achievement Program – Requirements for Advanced Measures
The measures must focus on demonstrated student performance at the college or professional level.
Student performance on advanced measures must be assessed through an external review process.
Except for the original research/project a student may not count two measures derived from a single
activity. For example, a student who scores a three or better on the AP Economics exam cannot count a
grade from a dual credit economics college course.
A student must achieve any combination of four from the following:
Original Research/Project: The research/project may not be used for more than two of the advanced
measures. The research/project may be judged by a panel of professionals in the field that is the focus of
the project; or conducted under the direction of mentor(s) and reported to an appropriate audience; and
related to the required curriculum set forth in 19 TAC§74.1 (relating to TEKS).
AP Exam: A score of three or above on the College Board Advanced Placement examination.
PSAT: A score on the Preliminary Scholastic Assessment Test (PSAT/NMSQT) that qualifies a student for
recognition as a Commended Scholar or higher by the College Board and National Merit Scholarship
Corporation; as part of the National Hispanic Recognition Program of the College Board; or as part of the
National Achievement Scholarship Program of the National Merit Scholarship Corporation.
The
PSAT/NMSQT score may count as only one advanced measure regardless of the number of honors
received by the student.
College Courses: College-level courses provided by the higher education institutions must be accredited
by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. A grade of 3.0 or higher on a one semester college
course (including tech prep programs), will give students an advanced measure. The student must arrange
for an official transcript to be sent from the college to the high school counselor well in advance of
graduation in order to have the advanced measure(s) recorded on the student’s academic achievement
record. The college transcript will be kept by the high school.
Examples: A student may have combinations meeting the above criteria such as the following:
3 AP exams and 1 college course = 4 measures; 2 AP exams, 1 college course, and 1 PSAT = 4 measures;
4 dual credit courses = 4 measures; or 4 AP exams = 4 measure
23
Texas State Graduation Requirements
(Applies to students entering Grade 9 in or after the 2007-08 school year with notes for students entering Grade 9 in or
after the 2010-11 school year.)
Discipline
Minimum Graduation Plan
Recommended High
School Program
Distinguished
Achievement Program**
English Language
Arts
Four credits:
English I, II, III
English I and II for Speakers of
Other Languages may be
substituted for English I and II
for students with limited English
proficiency who are at the
beginning or intermediate levels
of English language proficiency.
The fourth credit of English may
be selected from any of the
following: English IV,
Research/Technical Writing,
Creative/Imaginative Writing,
Practical Writing Skills, Literary
Genres, Business English,
Journalism,
AP
English Lang & Comp, AP
English Lit & Comp
Three credits to include:
Algebra I and
Geometry. The third credit may be
selected from any of the following:
Algebra II
Precalculus
Mathematical Models with
Applications
Independent Study in
Mathematics
AP Statistics
AP Calculus AB
AP Calculus BC
AP Computer Science
Mathematical Applications in
Agriculture, Food, and Natural
Resources (CTE)
Engineering Mathematics (CTE)
Statistics and Risk Management
(CTE)
Four credits:
English I, II, III, and IV.
English I and II for
Speakers of Other
Languages may be
substituted for English I
and II for students with
limited English proficiency
who are at the beginning
or intermediate levels of
English language
proficiency.
English I Pre-AP, English
II Pre-AP,
AP Eng. Lang & Comp,
AP Eng. Lit & Comp
Four credits:
English I, II, III, and IV.
English I and II for
Speakers of Other
Languages may be
substituted for English I
and II for students with
limited English
proficiency who are at
the beginning or
intermediate levels of
English language
proficiency.
English I Pre-AP, English
II Pre-AP,
AP Eng. Lang & Comp,
AP Eng. Lit & Comp
Four credits. Three of the
credits must be Alg. I, Alg. II,
and Geometry.
An additional credit may be
selected from either of the
following and must be
successfully completed prior to
Algebra II:
Mathematical Models with
Applications
Mathematical Applications
in Agriculture, Food, and
Natural Resources (CTE)
The fourth credit may be
selected from the following
after successfully completion
of Algebra I, Geometry, and
Algebra II
Precalculus
Independent Study in
Mathematics
AP Statistics
AP Calculus AB
AP Calculus BC
AP Computer Science
Advanced Quantitative
Reasoning (AQR)
Engineering Mathematics
(CTE)
Statistics and Risk
Management (CTE)
Four credits, which must
consist of Algebra I,
Geometry, Algebra II
The fourth credit may be
selected from any of the
following after successful
completion of Algebra I,
Geometry, and Algebra II
Precalculus
Independent Study in
Mathematics
(AP) Statistics
(AP) Calculus AB
(AP) Calculus BC
AP Computer Science
Engineering
Mathematics
Statistics and Risk
Management
Mathematics
Regardless of any high
school mathematics
credit completed prior
to 9th grade, at least 3
mathematics credits
must be earned in
grades 9-12.
24
Discipline
Minimum Graduation
Plan
Recommended High
School Program
Distinguished
Achievement Program**
Science
Three credits to include:
Biology and Integrated
Physics and Chemistry.
Regardless of any high
school science credit
completed prior to 9th grade,
at least three science credits
must be earned in grades 912.
The Student may substitute
Chemistry and Physics for
IPC.
Four credits,
Biology, AP or IB
Biology
Chemistry, AP or IB
Chemistry
Principals of Technology
Physics, AP or IB
Physics
Four credits,
Biology, AP or IB Biology
Chemistry, AP or IB
Chemistry
Physics, AP or IB
Physics
Students who have taken IPC
prior to Fall 2010-2011 must
follow the science graduation
requirements for 2007-2008,
2008-2009.
Students who have not
completed IPC before Fall
2010-2011 must adhere to
the science graduation
requirements for 2010-2011.
This newly adopted state
guideline also applies to
students who entered 9th
grade in Fall 2009.
Select from the following:
Biology
Chemistry
Physics
Principles of Technology
OR
Biology
IPC
and any additional one
credit state approved
science course
The third science credit
satisfies the requirement for
an Academic Elective on the
Minimum Plan.
IPC may be taken, but must
be successfully completed
prior to Chemistry and
Physics and it may not be
taken as the final or fourth
year of science.
The fourth credit may be
selected from any of the
following:
Aquatic Science
Astronomy
Earth and Space
Science
Environmental Systems
AP Biology
AP Chemistry
AP Physics B
AP Physics C
AP Environmental
Science • Scientific
Research and Design
(CTE)
Anatomy and Physiology
(CTE)
Medical Microbiology
Pathophysiology (CTE)
Engineering Design and
Problem Solving (CTE)
Advanced Animal
Science (CTE)
Advanced Biotechnology
(CTE)
Advanced Plant and Soil
Science (CTE)
Food Science (CTE)
Forensic Science (CTE)
Note: Chemistry (equivalent)
and Physics (equivalent) are
required even if a student
elects to take IPC.
25
After successful completion of
a biology course, a chemistry
course, and a physics course,
the fourth credit may be
selected from any of the
following:
Aquatic Science
Astronomy
Earth and Space
Science
Environmental Systems
AP Biology
AP Chemistry
AP Physics B
AP Physics C
AP Environmental
Science
Research and Design
(CTE)
Engineering Design and
Problem Solving (CTE)
Anatomy and Physiology
(CTE)
Medical Microbiology
(CTE)
Pathophysiology (CTE)
Advanced Animal
Science (CTE)
Advanced Biotechnology
(CTE)
Advanced Plant and Soil
Science (CTE)
Food Science (CTE)
Forensic Science (CTE)
Note: IPC and Principles of
Technology I may not be
taken to fulfill any of the four
credits of science required
under the DAP.
Discipline
Minimum Graduation
Plan
Recommended High
School Program
Distinguished
Achievement Program**
Social Studies
Three credits must consist
of:
World History Studies
(1)
or
World Geography Studies
(1)
and
U.S. History Studies
Since Reconstruction
(1),
U.S. Government (1/2),
and Economics with
Emphasis on the Free
Enterprise System and
Its Benefits (1/2)
Four credits must consist of:
World History Studies
(1)
World Geography
Studies (1)
U.S. History Studies
Since Reconstruction (1)
U.S. Government (1/2),
and
Economics with
Emphasis on the Free
Enterprise System and
Its Benefits (1/2)
Four credits must consist of:
World History Studies (1)
World Geography
Studies (1)
U.S. History Studies
Since Reconstruction
(1),
U.S. Government (1/2),
and
Economics with
Emphasis on the Free
Enterprise System and
Its Benefits (1/2)
Physical Education
One and one-half credits:
The required credit may be
from any combination of the
following one-half to one
credit courses:
Foundations of
Personal Fitness
Adventure/Outdoor
Education
Aerobic Activities
Team or Individual
Sports
Credit for any of the courses
listed above may be earned
through participation in the
following activities:
Athletics
JROTC
Approved private or
commercially sponsored
physical activity
programs
Up to one credit for any one
of the courses listed above
may be earned through
participation in any of the
following
Drill Team
Marching Band
Cheerleading
All allowed substitution
activities must include at least
100 minutes per five-day
school week of moderate to
vigorous physical activity.
Credit may not be earned for
any TEKS-based course
more than once. No more
than four substitution credits
may be earned through any
combination of substitutions.
One and one-half credits
The required credit may be
from any combination of the
following one-half to one
credit courses:
Foundations of Personal
Fitness
Adventure/Outdoor
Education
Aerobic Activities
Team or Individual
Sports
Credit for any of the courses
listed above may be earned
through participation in the
following activities:
Athletics
JROTC
Approved private or
commercially sponsored
physical activity
programs
Up to one credit for any one
of the courses listed above
may be earned through
participation in any of the
following:
Drill Team
Marching Band
Cheerleading
All allowed substitution
activities must include at least
100 minutes per five-day
school week of moderate to
vigorous physical activity.
Credit may not be earned for
any TEKS-based course
more than once. No more
than four substitution credits
may be earned through any
combination of substitutions.
One and one-half credits
The required credit may be
from any combination of the
following one-half to one
credit courses:
Foundations of Personal
Fitness
Adventure/Outdoor
Education
Aerobic Activities
Team or Individual
Sports
Credit for any of the courses
listed above may be earned
through participation in the
following activities:
Athletics
JROTC
Approved private or
commercially sponsored
physical activity
programs
Up to one credit for any one
of the courses listed above
may be earned through
participation in any of the
following:
Drill Team
Marching Band
Cheerleading
All allowed substitution
activities must include at least
100 minutes per five-day
school week of moderate to
vigorous physical activity.
Credit may not be earned for
any TEKS-based course
more than once. No more
than four substitution credits
may be earned through any
combination of substitutions
A student who is unable to
participate
in
physical
activity due to a disability
or illness may be able to
substitute a course in
English language arts,
mathematics, science, or
social studies for the
required credits of physical
education.
This
determination will be made
by the student’s ARD
committee, Section 504
committee,
or
other
campus committee, as
applicable.
Adaptive PE may also be
considered for a student
receiving special education
services.
.
26
Discipline
Minimum Graduation
Plan
Recommended High
School Program
Distinguished
Achievement Program**
Academic Elective
One credit which is satisfied
by the third science credit.
None
None
None
Languages Other Than
English
Health Education
Technology
Applications
The credit required for
students entering grade 9
prior to 2010-2011 must be
earned by completing two
semesters of the same
eligible course.
Fine Arts
A Fine Arts credit is not
required for Minimum
Graduation Plan students
entering grade 9 prior to
2010-2011.
Speech
Additional Components
(Elective Courses)
Total Program and
Elective Credits
Two credits
Must consist of any two levels
in the same language.
One-half credit Health
One-half credit Health
Education or one credit
Education or one credit
Health Science
Health Science
None for students entering grade 9 in 2010-2011 or after.
Three credits
Must consist of any three
levels in the same language.
One-half credit Health
Education or one credit
Health Science
One credit for students entering grade 9 prior to 2010-2011. The credit may be satisfied by
the following: Computer Science I, Computer Science II, Desktop Publishing, Digital
Graphics/Animation, Multimedia, Video Technology, Web Mastering, or Independent Study in
Technology Applications; Animation, Advanced Animation, Graphic Design and Illustration,
Advanced Graphic Design and Illustration, Business Information Management I, Business
Information Management II, Principles of Information Technology, Telecommunication &
Networking, Computer Technician, Computer Programming, Advanced Computer Programming,
Digital & Interactive Media, Web Technologies, Research in Information Technology Solutions
None for students who
One credit from any of the
One credit from any of the
entered grade 9 before
following:
following:
2010-2011
Art I, II, III, IV
Art I, II, III, IV
Dance I, II, III, IV
Dance I, II, III, IV
One credit for students who Music I, II, III, IV
Music I, II, III, IV
enter grade 9 in 2010-11 or
Theatre I, II, III, IV
Theatre I, II, III, IV
later from any of the
Principles and Elements of
Principles and Elements of
following:
Floral Design (CTE)
Floral Design (CTE)
Art I, II, III, IV
Dance I, II, III, IV
Music I, II, III, IV
Theatre I, II, III, IV
Principles and Elements of
Floral Design (CTE)
One-half credit from either:
One-half credit from either:
One-half credit from either:
• Communication Applications • Communication Applications • Communication Applications
• Professional
• Professional
• Professional
Communications (CTE)
Communications (CTE)
Communications (CTE)
Five and one-half credits
Four and one-half credits
Three and one-half credits
from the list of courses
from the list of courses
from the list of courses
approved by the SBOE for
approved by the SBOE for
approved by the SBOE for
Grades 9-12, including stateGrades 9-12, including stateGrades 9-12, including stateapproved innovative courses,
approved innovative courses,
approved innovative courses,
and JROTC (one to four
and JROTC (one to four
and JROTC (one to four
credits).
credits).
credits).
22
26
26
College Board advanced placement and college-level concurrent/dual enrollment courses may be substituted for requirements in
appropriate areas.
** The Distinguished Achievement Program requirements also include student achievement of four advanced measures.
any organization whose members are or include
other students.
HAZING
Hazing is defined as any intentional, knowing, or
reckless act occurring on or off campus directed
against a student that endangers the mental or
physical health or the safety of a student for the
purpose of pledging, being initiated to, affiliating
with, holding office in, or maintaining membership in
Hazing will not be tolerated by the district. If an
incident of hazing occurs, disciplinary consequences
will be handled in accordance with the Student Code
of Conduct. It is a criminal offense if a person
engages in hazing; solicits, encourages, directs,
aids, or attempts to aid another in hazing; or has
27
firsthand knowledge of an incident of hazing being
planned or having occurred and fails to report this to
the principal or superintendent. (See policies FFI
and FNCC.)
sharing drinking containers, utensils, or
cigarettes).
The germ does not cause meningitis in most
people. Instead, most people become carriers
of the germ for days, weeks, or even months.
The bacteria rarely overcome the body’s
immune system and cause meningitis or other
serious illness.
How can bacterial meningitis be prevented?
Do not share food, drinks, utensils,
toothbrushes, or cigarettes. Limit the number of
persons you kiss.
th th
Students entering 7 -8 grade will receive one
dose of meningococcal vaccine. This vaccine
protects against these infections. Pre-teens
should receive a single shot of this vaccine
during their 11 or 12 year old check-up. If your
teenage student missed getting the vaccine
contact your medical provider. The vaccine is
available for those between the ages of 11
years to 55 years of age or for others in high
risk categories.
HEALTH INFORMATION AND
REQUIREMENTS
Bacterial Meningitis
State law specifically requires the district to provide
the following information:
What is meningitis?
Meningitis is an inflammation of the covering of
the brain and spinal cord. It can be caused by
viruses, parasites, fungi, and bacteria. Viral
meningitis is most common and the least
serious. Bacterial meningitis is the most
common form of serious bacterial infection with
the
potential
for
serious,
long-term
complications. It is an uncommon disease, but
requires urgent treatment with antibiotics to
prevent permanent damage or death.
What should you do if you think you or a
friend might have bacterial meningitis?
What are the symptoms?
You should seek prompt medical attention.
Someone with meningitis will become very ill.
The illness may develop over one or two days,
but it can also rapidly progress in a matter of
hours. Not everyone with meningitis will have
the same symptoms.
Children (over 1 year old) and adults with
meningitis may have a severe headache, high
temperature, vomiting, sensitivity to bright lights,
neck stiffness or joint pains, and drowsiness or
confusion. In both children and adults, there
may be a rash of tiny, red-purple spots. These
can occur anywhere on the body.
The diagnosis of bacterial meningitis is based
on a combination of symptoms and laboratory
results.
Where can you get more information?
Your school nurse, family doctor, and the staff
at your local or regional health department
office are excellent sources for information on
all communicable diseases. You may also call
your local health department or Regional
Department of State Health Services office to
ask about a meningococcal vaccine. Additional
information may also be found at the Web sites
for the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention,
http://www.cdc.gov,
and
the
Department of
State Health Services,
http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/.
Contagious Diseases/ Conditions
How serious is bacterial meningitis?
To protect others from the spread of contagious
diseases, students with confirmed communicable
conditions are not allowed to attend school while
contagious or until released to return to school by
their medical provider. If a parent suspects that his
or her child has a condition that is contagious the
parent should notify the school nurse so that other
students who might have been exposed to the
disease can be alerted. The school nurse can
provide information from the Texas Department of
State Health Services regarding these diseases.
[See policies at FFAD]
If it is diagnosed early and treated promptly, the
majority of people make a complete recovery.
In some cases it can be fatal or a person may
be left with a permanent disability.
How is bacterial meningitis spread?
Fortunately, none of the bacteria that cause
meningitis are as contagious as diseases like
the common cold or the flu, and they are not
spread by casual contact or by simply breathing
the air where a person with meningitis has
been. The germs live naturally in the back of
our noses and throats, but they do not live for
long outside the body. They are spread when
people exchange saliva (such as by kissing,
28
Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS),
Immunization Branch. This form may be obtained at
https://webds.dshs.state.tx.us/immco/affidavit.shtm or
by writing the DSHS Immunization Branch (MC
1946), P.O. Box 149347, Austin, Texas 78714-9347.
The form must be notarized and submitted to the
principal or school nurse within 90 days of
notarization. If the parent is seeking an exemption for
more than one student in the family, a separate form
must be provided for each student. In case of an
epidemic declared by the Commissioner of Health,
the student will need to be immunized or cannot
attend school.
Food Allergies
Notify the campus administrator and the nurse when
your child has been diagnosed with a food allergy,
especially if the risk of anaphylaxis or severe or
possibly life-threatening reactions exists to a
particular food. It is important to disclose the food to
which your child is allergic, as well as the nature of
the allergic reaction. Medical information shared by
the parent and health care provider will be
incorporated into a plan to reduce the risk of
exposure to identified food allergens.
Health Screenings
Current immunizations are required for: diphtheria,
rubeola (measles), rubella (German measles),
mumps, tetanus, pertussis, poliomyelitis (polio),
hepatitis A, hepatitis B, varicella (chicken pox), and
meningococcal meningitis. The school nurse can
provide information on age-appropriate doses or on
an acceptable physician-validated history of illness
required by the Department of State Health Services.
Proof of immunization may be established by
personal records from a licensed physician or public
health clinic with a signature or rubber-stamp
validation.
School health services are provided to all students in
accordance with State Board rules and standards
established by the Texas Department of State
Health Services and other applicable laws. District
registered nurses are skilled in nursing physical
assessments and required screenings, emergency
care, first aid, and certified in cardiopulmonary
resuscitation (CPR).
Students may request a
conference with the nurse anytime. Students should
follow campus procedures during class time. Other
routine health services include:
Administering emergency care and first aid to
students and staff.
Providing and implementing an effective
communicable disease control program including
immunization
surveillance
and
protective
measures.
Assessing the needs of students with disabilities
and providing or supervising specialized medical
procedures as directed by a health care provider.
For further information, see policy FFAB (LEGAL)
and the Department of State Health Services Web
site:
http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/immunize/school/default.
shtm.
Medication at School
Only authorized district employees may
administer medication and only medication that
cannot be scheduled for outside of school hours
may be given.
All prescription medication must be in the
original prescription bottle, with a prescription
label bearing student name, the name of the
doctor, and instructions for administration. A
written request from the parent, granting
permission for administration and indicating the
time the last dose was given must accompany
the medication. When the student must take
medication for more than ten days, a
Physician/Parent Request for Administration of
Medicine or Special Procedure by School
Personnel form is required. This form is
available from the school nurse. The request is
kept on file in the nurse’s office for the length of
time the medication is given at school or one
calendar year.
Over the counter medications are not routinely
administered at school. However, when
administration is necessary, the medication
must be in its original container/package. A
Physician/Parent Request for Administration of
Students new to the district and/or enrolled in grades
designated by the Texas Department of State Health
Services receive vision, hearing, spinal, and
acanthosis nigricans (a sign of insulin resistance
usually seen on the back of the neck) screenings.
The school nurse will provide the required screenings
unless the parent chooses to submit test results
signed by a physician.
Health appraisals, including height, weight, body
mass index (BMI), and blood pressure, will be done
at age appropriate intervals and for new-to-thedistrict students.
Immunization
A student must be fully immunized or a delay in
school enrollment may be necessary. Exemptions
from immunization requirements may be granted on a
medical basis or for reasons of conscience. A medical
exemption signed by the physician is required
annually if not otherwise stated by the physician.
Exemptions for reasons of conscience must be
submitted on an official affidavit form issued by the
29
Medicine or Special Procedure by School
Personnel form completed and signed by the
student’s health care provider is required.
All medications must be stored in the school
clinic. Students may not carry or self-administer
medications themselves at school except by
written physician order and parent request and
only for anaphylaxis medication, asthma inhaler
or diabetic supplies. The student must also
demonstrate to his or her physician or healthcare provider and school nurse the capability for
self-administration including any device required
to administer the medication as well as
responsible behavior.
When the duration of the medication is
complete, the parent will be required to collect
any unused medication. Any unclaimed
medication will be destroyed.
Physician requests for medication and/or
special procedure must be renewed yearly with
a new request form completed by physician and
parent.
Narcotics are not given at school unless
approved by Central Health Services and only
with a completed Physician’s/Parent Request
for Administration of Medicine or Special
Procedure by School Personnel form on file.
HOMEWORK
Homework assignments are related to the essential
knowledge and skills and used as independent
practice activities. They are to be completed outside
the regular classroom and returned so they can be
reviewed by the teacher, with feedback provided to
the student.
LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES
Questioning of Students
When law enforcement officers or other lawful
authorities wish to question or interview a student at
school, the principal will cooperate fully regarding
the conditions of the interview, if the questioning or
interview is part of a child abuse investigation. The
principal will verify and record the identity of the
officer or other authority and ask for an explanation
of the need to question or interview the student at
school.
Students Taken Into Custody
State law requires the district to permit a student to
be taken into legal custody:
To comply with an order of the juvenile court
Psychotropic Drugs
To comply with the laws of arrest
A psychotropic drug is a substance used in the
diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of a disease or
as a component of a medication. It is intended to
have an altering effect on perception, emotion, or
behavior. Teachers and other district employees
may discuss a student’s academic progress or
behavior with the student’s parents or another
employee as appropriate; however, they are not
permitted to recommend use of psychotropic drugs.
A district employee who is a registered nurse, an
advanced nurse practitioner, a physician, or a
certified or credentialed mental health professional
can recommend that a student be evaluated by an
appropriate medical practitioner, if appropriate. [For
further information, see policies at FFAC.]
By a law enforcement officer if there is probable
cause to believe the student has engaged in
delinquent conduct or conduct in need of
supervision
By a probation officer if there is probable cause
to believe the student has violated a condition of
probation imposed by the juvenile court
By an authorized representative of Child
Protective Services, Texas Department of
Family and Protective Services, a law
enforcement officer, or a juvenile probation
officer, without a court order, under the
conditions set out in the Family Code relating to
the student’s physical health or safety
Tobacco Prohibited
Upon receipt of a lawfully issued directive to
apprehend from a juvenile court presented by a
law enforcement or probation officer.
The district and its staff strictly enforce prohibitions
against the use of tobacco products by students and
others on school property and at school-sponsored
and school-related activities on or off school
property. [See the Student Code of Conduct and
policies at FNCD and GKA.]
Before a student is released to a law enforcement
officer or other legally authorized person, the
principal will verify the officer’s identity and, to the
best of his or her ability, will verify the official’s
authority to take custody of the student.
HOMELESS STUDENTS
For more information on services for homeless
students, contact the district’s McKinney-Vento
homeless liaison, Mark Pierce, at (972) 794-4519.
The principal does not have the authority to prevent
or delay a student’s release to a law enforcement
officer. It is the responsibility of the entity taking the
student into custody to notify the parents
30
recommended for program exit are to be monitored
by the LPAC for two academic years after the exit.
Notification of Law Violations
The district is required by state law to notify:
If a student is considered LEP and receives special
education services because of a qualifying disability,
the student’s Admission, Review, and Dismissal
(ARD) committee will make these decisions
All instructional and support personnel who have
responsibility for supervising a student who has
been arrested or referred to the juvenile court for
any felony offense or for certain misdemeanors. All
instructional support personnel who have regular
contact with a student who is required to register as
a sex offender or who has been convicted, received
deferred
prosecution,
received
deferred
adjudication, or was adjudicated for delinquent
conduct for any felony offense or certain
misdemeanors.
MAKEUP WORK
Makeup Work After an Absence
Students are permitted to make up assignments and
tests after an absence. Students receive credit
without penalty for satisfactory makeup work after an
absence, including absences as a result of
suspension, but shall receive a zero for any
assignment or test not made up within the allotted
time.
LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT
STUDENTS
A student who is identified as limited English
proficient (LEP) by the Language Proficiency
Assessment Committee (LPAC) based on state
established criteria, is entitled to receive specialized
language services from the district. To determine
whether the student qualifies for services, an LPAC
will be convened, consisting of both district
personnel and at least one parent representative.
The LPAC shall give written notice to the student’s
parent or guardian advising that the student has
been classified as limited English proficient (LEP)
and requesting approval to place the student in the
required Bilingual Education or English as a Second
Language Program. In order to determine a
student’s level of proficiency in English, the LPAC
will use information from state approved language
proficiency assessments. Once the parent approves
program placement, the student will receive
instructional accommodations and language support.
Ongoing assessments will be conducted to monitor
and review the student’s progress to ensure
academic success.
DAEP or In-school Suspension Makeup
Work
A student removed to a Disciplinary Alternative
Education Program (DAEP) during the school year
will have an opportunity to complete, before the
beginning of the next school year, coursework
needed to fulfill the student’s high school graduation
requirements. The district may provide the
opportunity to complete the coursework through an
alternative method, including a correspondence
course, distance learning, or summer school. The
district will not charge the student for any method of
completion provided by the district. [See policy
FOCA (LEGAL).]
A student removed from the regular classroom to inschool suspension or another setting, other than a
DAEP, is expected to complete all work assigned
while in ISS. A student assigned to ISS will receive
assignments from each classroom teacher while
assigned to ISS. The district may also provide the
opportunity to complete the coursework through
alternative methods, including distance learning or
summer school.
Annually, the LPAC will determine the most
appropriate assessment for each LEP student to
demonstrate mastery of academic knowledge and
skills, including which accommodations are
necessary for any local or state-mandated
assessments. The Texas English Language
Proficiency Assessment System (TELPAS) is
administered to all LEP students annually including
dually identified LEP students who receive special
education services and students whose parents did
not approve services. At the end of the academic
year, the LPAC will meet to review progress of
identified LEP students and determine whether the
student will continue in the Dual Language program,
ESL program, or qualifies for exiting. The campus
LPAC is responsible for exiting all LEP students
according to the criteria monitored by the Texas
Education Agency. Identified LEP students who are
Students and their parents are encouraged to discuss
options with the teacher or counselor to ensure the
student completes all work required for the course or
grade level.
NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY
The Dallas Independent School District, as an equal
opportunity educational provider and employer, does
not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion,
sex, national origin, age, disability, sexual
orientation, gender identity, gender expression,
genetic information, or any other basis prohibited by
law in educational programs or activities that it
operates or in employment decisions. The district is
required by Title VI and Title VII of the Civil Rights
31
Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments
of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of
1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the
Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended, as well
as board policy not to discriminate in such a manner.
(Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) If
you suspect discrimination please contact: Mary
McCants, Title VII or Title IX, at (972) 925-3250;
Daphne LaMontagne, Section 504, at (972) 5814238; Marita Hawkins, Americans with Disabilities
Act, at (972) 925-4047; or Employee Relations at
(972) 925-4200. General questions about the district
should be directed to Customer Service at (972)
925-5555.
5.
Early College Programs
Early College High Schools (ECHS) prepare
students for successful career and educational
futures through a full integration of high school,
college, and the world of work. ECHS improve
academic performance and self-concept, and
increase high school and college/university
completion rates. As students progress through
Early College, they develop the skills and confidence
that enable them to be successful in a college
environment. The college and the high school
support them with counseling, seminar classes, and
enrichment opportunities; and provide tuition and
books for college classes.
NONTRADITIONAL ACADEMIC
PROGRAMS
Adult Basic Education
Students have the opportunity to earn up to two
years of college credit, complete the 42 hours of
credit transferable by law to Texas public
universities, and earn an Associate Degree by taking
dual credit and concurrent credit classes. Early
College Programs include the following:
The Adult Basic Education Department exists to
enable adult learners to be literate, productive, and
successful in the workplace, home, and community
by delivering comprehensive adult education
instruction in a learner-centered, supportive, and
collaborative environment. Through our free GED
(General Educational Development) preparation,
ESL (English as a Second Language), Distance
Learning, and El Civics classes, adults in Dallas and
Rockwall counties are instructed in literacy,
numeracy, language acquisition, community and
civic awareness, and workforce and college
readiness. Program participants must be eighteen
years or older. Seventeen year olds can enroll if
officially withdrawn from high school and with written
parental approval. Only in the case of a court
mandate may sixteen year olds enroll. For more
information, contact the Adult Basic Education office
at (972) 749-2419.
Kathlyn Joy Gilliam Collegiate Academy
Students from W.H. Atwell, E.B. Comstock, O.W.
Holmes, Maynard Jackson, Boude Storey, Seagoville
and Sarah Zumwalt are eligible to make application to
Kathlyn Joy Gilliam Collegiate Academy.
Evening Academy
Students currently enrolled in school may, with the
approval of their day school counselor and principal,
recover lost credit(s) by taking evening classes either
at the Skyline Center or Justin F. Kimball High
School. Students must be at least 16 years of age to
participate and they must have their enrollment card
completed and approved by the day school counselor
prior to enrollment. Evening Academy classes begin
two weeks after the start of each semester, and end
two weeks prior to each semester’s close so that
earned credits may be posted on student grade
reports. Classes meet on Monday, Tuesday, and
Thursday evenings from 5:30 – 9:30 pm, with fall
semester classes meeting from 5:30 – 7:25 pm and
spring semester classes meeting from 7:35 – 9:30
pm. Students may enroll in a maximum of two (2)
one-half (1/2) credit classes each semester. Evening
classes are offered at no cost, whether in-district or
from out-of-district. For more information, please
speak with a day school counselor or call the Evening
Academy Office at (972) 502-3458.
J.L. Patton, Jr. Academic Center
This high school campus is for overage students.
For information regarding program offerings, contact
your high school counselor.
Admission to the center is in accordance with
policies FD (LEGAL), EHB (LOCAL) and the
following criteria:
1.
The student is 17 years or older with fewer than
3 credits.
2.
The student is 18 years or older with fewer than
9 credits.
3.
The student is 19 years or older with fewer than
15 credits.
4.
The student is 20 years or older.
The Superintendent or designee may assign
and transfer a student to the academic center if
the student meets the above criteria.
Maya Angelou High School
This educational program meets the needs of
pregnant students by offering the district curriculum in
32
grades 6-12 with a focus on health, child
development, and parenting skills. In addition to
regular academic classes, programs and services
emphasizing prenatal health, parenting, and childcare
are provided for pregnant students who choose to
attend this alternative school. Referral to the program
is coordinated by the school nurse who will provide
forms to be completed by the attending physician.
The sending school counselor will plan the student’s
academic program. Credit earned at Maya Angelou
applies toward GPA, rank, and honors eligibility at the
home school. Graduation will be from the home
school.
Physical Fitness Assessment
Middle College High School at El Centro
College
Grades Pre-K - 8
Annually, the district will conduct a physical fitness
assessment of students in grades 3–12 who are
enrolled in a physical education course or a course
for which physical education credit is awarded. At
the end of the school year, a parent may submit a
written request to the school’s physical education
teacher to obtain the results of his or her child’s
physical fitness assessment conducted during the
school year.
PROMOTION AND RETENTION
Promotion is based on mastery of the curriculum.
Expectations and standards for mastery are
established for each grade level, content area, and
are coordinated with compensatory/accelerated
services.
Students must apply by January of their eighth-grade
year, provide recommendations from administrators
and core subject teachers, and be interviewed.
Students must meet Texas Success Initiative
requirements before they can take college classes.
Pre-kindergarten and kindergarten students are not
retained due to the voluntary status of enrollment.
Pre-kindergarten, kindergarten, and first grade
students receive grades of E (excellent), S
(satisfactory), and N (needs improvement). First
grade students are considered for retention if
mastery of grade-level objectives is not reflected by
assessment methods, especially in language arts
and mathematics. Parental permission is required
for retention of first grade students.
Reconnection Centers
Reconnection Centers are located on Title I
comprehensive high school campuses. The campus
centers provide an opportunity to recover credits that
a student has failed. A student is scheduled in for a
period(s) before, during, and/or after school to
regain the missing core class credit while
maintaining a regular campus schedule.
In grades 2-8, promotion to the next grade level is
based on an overall average of 70 on a scale of 100
based upon course-level, grade-level standards for
all subject areas and a grade of 70 or above in three
of the following areas: language arts, mathematics,
science, and social studies.
Trinidad “Trini” Garza Early College High
School
Students from T.W. Browne, T.A. Edison, L.V.
Stockard, W.E Greiner, H.P. Garcia and Raul
Quintanilla are eligible to submit an application to
Trinidad “Trini” Garza Early College High School.
Any student in grades 1-8 who does not meet the
criteria outlined above for promotion to the next
grade level may attend extended-year program(s)
provided by the district in applicable content areas.
Students who attend at least 90% of the extendedyear program days in the applicable content area(s)
will be promoted to the next grade level at the
beginning of the school year, on the basis of
academic achievement or demonstrated proficiency
of the subject matter of the course or grade level.
PHYSICAL ACTIVITY
In accordance with policies at EHAB and EHBG, the
district will ensure that students in full-day
prekindergarten through grade 5 engage in
moderate to vigorous physical activity for at least 30
minutes per day or 135 minutes per week.
Students in middle or junior high school engage in
30 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity
per day for at least four semesters OR at least 225
minutes of moderate or vigorous physical activity
within a two-week period for at least four semesters.
For additional information on the district’s
requirements and programs regarding elementary,
middle, and junior high school student physical
activity requirements, please see the principal. [For
additional
information,
see
Retention of students is not shown to be an effective
strategy for improving student achievement. The
district and individual campuses have established
procedures designed to reduce the numbers of
students retained. A parent, however, may present a
written request to the school principal asking that the
student not be promoted.
policy
The Admission, Review, and Dismissal committee
(ARD) determines promotion/retention procedures
and academic achievement level expectations for
EHAC(LEGAL)(LOCAL).]
33
special education students through the Individual
Education Program (IEP).
PSYCHOLOGICAL AND SOCIAL
SERVICES
Any student who attends optional extended-year
programs with the required 90 percent attendance
rate and meets the academic achievement
requirements but still experiences difficulty or is
defined as at-risk will be required to participate the
following year in additional strategic intervention
strategies/programs designed to provide accelerated
instructional services.
In assessing students who are speakers of
languages other than English for mastery of
essential knowledge and skills, the district will be
flexible in determining methods to allow the students
to
demonstrate
knowledge
or
competency
independent of their English language skills.
Psychological and Social Services is a unique
department within the Dallas ISD serving students
who are experiencing significant social, emotional, or
academic difficulties. The department is comprised of
licensed specialists in school psychology (LSSP) and
licensed social workers with personnel assigned to
each campus. These student-centered professionals
provide prevention, intervention, and crisis services,
including consultation on suicide and violence risk
assessments for K-12 students. Services may be
initiated by Student Support Team referral or a
counselor, parent, or administrator referral. [For
additional
information,
see
Policy
FFE
(LEGAL)(LOCAL)]
Grades 9-12
Psychological Exams, Tests, or Treatment
High school students are promoted/retained
according to semesters completed and the number
of state credits earned in grades 9-12. Classification
is based on the following:
The school will not conduct a formal psychological
examination, test, or treatment without first obtaining
the parent’s written consent. Parental consent is not
necessary when a psychological examination, test, or
treatment is required by the Texas Education Agency
for child abuse investigations and reports. Evaluations
for Special Education eligibility will be conducted by
the Special Education Department.
Grade 10 (Sophomore) 5 or more credits and two
full semesters in grades 9-12
Grade 11 (Junior) 12 or more credits and four full
semesters in grades 9-12
RELEASE OF STUDENTS FROM
SCHOOL
Grade 12 (Senior) 19 or more credits and five or
more full semesters in grades 9-12
A student who will need to leave school during the
day must bring a note from his or her parent that
morning and follow the campus sign-out procedures
before leaving the campus. Otherwise, a student will
not be released from school at times other than at the
end of the school day. Unless the principal has
granted
approval
because
of
extenuating
circumstances, a student will not regularly be
released before the end of the instructional day.
Classification is established at the beginning of the
fall semester only. Exceptions are made for junior
students who become eligible for spring graduation
on the basis of credits earned during the fall
semester. High school principals are responsible for
the classification of students. [Information regarding
promotion/retention is found in Policy EIE (LOCAL)]
A Personal Graduation Plan (PGP) will be prepared
for any student in a middle school or beyond who did
not perform satisfactorily on a state-mandated
assessment or is determined by the district as not
likely to earn a high school diploma before the fifth
school year following enrollment in grade 9. The
PGP will be designed and implemented by a
guidance counselor, teacher, or other staff member
designated by the principal. The plan will, among
other items, identify the student’s educational goals,
address the parent’s educational expectations for the
student, and outline an intensive instruction program
for the student. [See EIF(LEGAL).] For a student
receiving special education services, the student’s
IEP may serve as the student’s PGP and would
therefore be developed by the student’s ARD
committee.
To protect student safety, the following guidelines
should be adhered to when parents are not able or
willing to pick up students being removed from the
campus for disciplinary reasons:
Parents should be contacted to pick up the
student.
Students should be placed in in-school
suspension or other appropriate areas of isolation
if parents are not able to pick them up.
Administrators should not transport students in
their own vehicles to their home or parent’s
workplace as they would be liable for any
accident or injury that occurs.
Police and Security Services should be called to
pick up students whose behavior continues to
34
compromise the safety and security of the
campus and creates a public nuisance.
If a student becomes ill during the school day, the
student should receive permission from the teacher
before reporting to the school nurse. The nurse will
decide whether or not the student should be sent
home and will notify the principal and the student’s
parent.
REPORT CARDS AND
CONFERENCES
Emergency School-Closing Information
Questions about grade calculation should first be
discussed with the teacher; if the question is not
resolved, the student or parent may request a
conference with the principal in accordance with
FNG(LOCAL). Also, see information at GRADING.
SAFETY
Student safety on campus and at school-related
events is a high priority of the district. Although the
district has implemented safety procedures, the
cooperation of students is essential to ensuring
school safety. A student should:
Avoid conduct that is likely to put the student or
other students at risk.
Follow the behavioral standards in this handbook
and the Student Code of Conduct, as well as any
additional rules for behavior and safety set by the
principal, teachers, or bus drivers.
Remain alert to and promptly report to a teacher
or the principal any safety hazards, such as
intruders on campus or threats made by any
person toward a student or staff member.
Know emergency evacuation routes and signals.
Follow immediately the instructions of teachers,
bus drivers, and other district employees who are
overseeing the welfare of students.
Drills: Fire, Tornado, and Other Emergencies
From time to time, students, teachers, and other
district employees will participate in drills of
emergency procedures. When the alarm is sounded,
students should follow the direction of teachers or
others in charge quickly, quietly, and in an orderly
manner.
Emergency
Information
Medical
Treatment
reached, the school needs to have student specific
health related information, as well as written parental
consent to obtain emergency medical treatment.
Therefore, parents should keep emergency care
information up-to-date, such as name of doctor,
emergency phone numbers, allergies, current health
history, etc. Please contact the school nurse to
update any information that the nurse or the teacher
needs to know.
and
In case of a serious student accident at school, the
student’s parent is immediately notified using contact
information located on the enrollment form. If a
student has a medical emergency at school or a
school-related activity when the parent cannot be
35
If the schools are to be closed when inclement
weather is forecast or prevalent, the Communications
Department of the district shall notify TV and radio
stations so that students, their parents, and
employees can make plans accordingly.
Once the school day has commenced, the district
shall hold the schools open all day regardless of
weather. Only in extenuating circumstances, i.e., lack
of heat, damage to the building, or the like, will
consideration be given for early release of
students/staff. This consideration will be made on an
individual school basis and determined by the
superintendent or designee. The safety, health, and
well-being of the students will remain a priority.
SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM
The district participates in the National School
Breakfast and Lunch Program and offers students
nutritionally balanced lunches daily.
Free and
reduced-price lunches are available based on
financial need.
Information about a student’s
participation is confidential. Applications are available
at the school and online. Menu modifications for
special dietary needs are available as needed. For
more information, contact your school cafeteria. The
district follows the federal and state guidelines
regarding foods of minimal nutritional value being
served or sold on school premises during the school
day. [For more information, see policy CO (LEGAL).]
SEARCHES, METAL DETECTORS,
AND VIDEO CAMERAS
In the interest of promoting student safety and
attempting to ensure that schools are safe and drug
free, district officials may from time to time conduct
searches. Such searches are conducted without a
warrant and as permitted by law. Searches may
include but are not limited to a student’s outer
clothing, a vehicle driven to school by a student and
parked on school property, and the student’s desk or
locker. Any searches of personal telecommunications
or other personal electronic devices will be conducted
in accordance with law
and the device may be
confiscated in order to perform a lawful search. A
confiscated device may be turned over to law
enforcement to determine whether a crime has been
committed. (See policy FNF LEGAL
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Students may also be subject to search by a metal
detector on a random or regular basis—or on the
basis of individualized reasonable suspicion.
The district provides special programs for gifted and
talented students, homeless students, bilingual
students, migrant students, students with limited
English proficiency, dyslexic students, and students
with disabilities. The coordinator of each program
can answer questions about eligibility requirements,
as well as programs and services offered in the
district or by other organizations. A student or
parent with questions about these programs should
contact the student’s counselor.
Video/audio equipment may be used to monitor
student behavior on buses and in common areas on
campus.
Students will not be told when the
equipment is being used. See Student Code of
Conduct.
STANDARDIZED TESTING
Many colleges require either the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American College Test (ACT) for
admission. Students are encouraged to talk with the counselor early during their junior year to determine the
appropriate exam to take; admissions exams are usually taken at the end of the junior year. (Prior to enrollment
in a Texas public college or university, most students must take a standardized test, such as the Texas Higher
Education Assessment [THEA]).
Test
Date
Test
Date
SAT
October 6, 2012
ACT
September 8, 2012
November 3, 2012
October 27, 2012
December 1, 2012
December 8, 2012
January 26, 2013
February 9, 2013
March 9, 2013
April 13, 2013
May 4, 2013
June 8, 2013
June 1, 2013
PSAT/NMSQT *
October 17 or 20, 2012
ReadiStep
October 17 – 31, 2012
College Board AP Exams**
May 6-10 and 13-17, 2013
* The PSAT/NMSQT that qualifies students for scholarships and National Merit recognition is taken in October of the student’s
junior year.
** AP Exams provide students the opportunity to receive college credit if they obtain qualifying scores.
STAAR (State of Texas Assessments of
Academic Readiness)
Reading, annually in grades 3–8
Writing, including spelling and grammar, in
grades 4 and 7
Grades 3–8
Science in grades 5 and 8
In addition to routine tests and other measures of
achievement, students at certain grade levels will
take state-mandated assessments, such as the
STAAR, in the following subjects:
Social Studies in grade 8
Successful performance on the reading and math
assessments in grades 5 and 8 is required by law in
Mathematics, annually in grades 3–8
36
order for the student to be promoted to the next
grade level. See Promotion and Retention on page
for additional information.
A student may choose to retake an EOC
assessment in situations other than those listed
above as well.
STAAR Modified and STAAR Alternate, for
students receiving special education services, will
be available for eligible students, as determined by
the student’s ARD committee. These particular
EOC assessments may have different testing
windows than the general assessments, and the
ARD committee will determine whether successful
performance on the assessments will be required
for graduation
Impact of STAAR/EOCs on Graduation
Plans
STAAR-L, which is a linguistically accommodated
assessment, will be available for students who have
been determined to be limited English proficient
(LEP) and who require this type of testing
accommodation.
Recommended Plan: required credits, plus meet
the minimum cumulative score for each of the 4
core content areas and meet the minimum standard
on the English III and Algebra II EOCs.
Additional information may be found by on the
following
website:
http://www.tea.state.tx.us/student.assessment/
Distinguished Plan: required credits and advanced
measures, plus meet the cumulative score for each
of the 4 content areas and meet the college
readiness standard on the English III and Algebra II
EOCs.
End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments
Students in Grades 9–12
Beginning with students entering grade 9 in 201112, students must meet the following additional
graduation requirements:
Minimum Plan: required credits, plus meet the
minimum cumulative score for each of the core
content areas.
for
Also see Course Credit, Grading Guidelines, and
Graduation for additional information.
Beginning with ninth graders in the 2011–2012
school year, end-of-course (EOC) assessments will
be administered for the following courses:
TAKS (Texas Assessment of Knowledge
and Skills)
Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II
TAKS is a state-mandated assessment currently
being transitioned to the STAAR program.
However, depending on the grade level of the
student, TAKS may still be administered to a
student.
English I, English II, and English III
Biology, Chemistry, and Physics
World Geography, World History, and United
States History
The State of Texas requires all students to pass an
"Exit-Level" exam (in addition to course
requirements) in order to earn a high school
diploma. Beginning in the 2011-2012 year, the
Satisfactory performance on the applicable
assessments will be required for graduation and will
also affect the plan under which the student may
graduate.
STAAR/EOC exams replaced the "Exit-Level"
TAKS test for all incoming 9th grade students.
Students who entered 9th grade prior to 2011-2012
must still pass the Texas Assessment of
Knowledge
and
Skills
(TAKS)
test
in
English/Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and
Social Studies. Students who entered 9th grade in
2011-2012 and beyond are required to meet the
minimum standard on the new State of Texas
Assessments of Academic Readiness/End-ofCourse (STAAR/EOC) exams in English I, English
II, English III; Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II;
Biology, Chemistry, Physics; World Geography,
World History, and U.S. History. Also see
"Graduation" for more information.
There will be three testing windows during the year
in which a student may take an EOC assessment,
which will occur during the fall, spring, and summer
months. In each content area (English language
arts, mathematics, science, and social studies), a
student must achieve a cumulative score. To
determine whether the student meets the
cumulative score, the student’s EOC assessment
scores in each content area will be added together.
If the student’s total score on the assessments
within the content area is not equal to or greater
than the cumulative score set by TEA, the student
may retake any of the assessments in that content
area until the student achieves the cumulative
score.
A student who does not achieve the
minimum required score on any individual
assessment will be required to take the
assessment.
Also see Graduation for more information.
37
THEA (Texas Higher Education Assessment)
Grades 9-12
Prior to enrollment in a Texas public college or
university, most students must take a standardized
test, such as the Texas Higher Education
Assessment [THEA]. The purpose of the THEA is
to assess the reading, mathematics, and writing
skills that entering freshmen-level students should
have if they are to perform effectively in
undergraduate certificate or degree programs in
Texas public colleges and universities. This test
may be required before a student enrolls in a dualcredit course offered through the district as well.
Summer school/extended year courses are
available to students in grades 9-12. Each year
prior to the dates scheduled for summer
registration, counselors distribute information
regarding locations, course offerings, tuition, and
dates for the summer program. The parents or
guardians of each student who has not successfully
completed a subject or course for any semester
shall be notified by the district as soon as practical
of any available district program that may permit the
student to successfully complete the failed subjects
or courses.
STEROIDS
Courses will be offered depending upon
sufficient enrollment (10 students per period)
and “highly qualified” teacher availability.
Parents and students should be aware that state law
prohibits students from possessing, dispensing,
delivering, or administering an anabolic steroid.
Anabolic steroids are for medical use only, and only
a physician can prescribe use.
Students may take up to two semester
courses.
One credit is the maximum number that can be
earned during the summer.
Bodybuilding, muscle enhancement, or the increase
of muscle bulk or strength through the use of an
anabolic steroid or human growth hormone by a
healthy student is not a valid medical use and is a
criminal offense.
Students may take courses to gain (advance)
or recover credit for one-semester courses.
Seniors who need both semesters of a course
failed, may take courses to recover credit for
the two semester courses failed.
Students participating in UIL athletic competition
may be subject to random steroid testing. Go to
http://www.uiltexas.org/health/steroidinformation for more information.
Student progress shall be evaluated according
to the same standards as those used during
the regular term.
SUMMER SCHOOL/EXTENDED
YEAR PROGRAMS
All district policies and guidelines are in effect
during the summer school program.
Grades 1-8
At the close of the summer session, graduation
exercises will be held for those who have
completed all graduation requirements.
Any student in grades 1–8 who does not meet the
criteria for promotion to the next grade level may
attend extended year program(s) provided by the
district in applicable content areas. A student who
attends at least 90 percent of the extended year
program days in the applicable content area(s) shall
be promoted to the next grade level at the beginning
of the school year but only on the basis of academic
achievement or demonstrated proficiency of the
subject matter of the course or grade level.
TEEN PREGNANCY AND
PARENTING RELATED SERVICES
The Health Services Department Teen Pregnancy
and Parenting Program provides supplemental
services to the regular education program for the
purpose of increasing the academic achievement
and reducing the dropout rate of pregnant and
parenting teens. Case management services are
provided to meet the emotional, social, physical
health, and financial needs of the pregnant and
parenting student. Services are provided to assist
and support the student’s academic achievement
through graduation while learning to manage the
responsibilities of parenthood.
A maximum of two middle school foundation courses
may be taken in summer school. A student who has
failed three foundation courses may attend summer
school and shall be eligible for promotion if his or her
summer school grades enable him or her to meet the
promotion criteria. A student who attends 90 percent
of the summer school session in one or two failed
foundation courses may be exempted from the
mandatory accelerated instruction program.
A
student who has failed more than three foundation
courses may attend summer school if he or she so
chooses, but shall not be eligible for promotion.
For other non-traditional academic opportunities,
see
headings
regarding
the
following:
38
Correspondence Courses, Credit by Exam, and
Summer School.
have until the last day of the spring transfer period
to apply for a transfer for the next school year.
Students requesting transfer for medical reasons
must also complete the student transfer form.
Transportation is not provided.
TEXTBOOKS, ELECTRONIC
TEXTBOOKS, AND
TECHNOLOGICAL EQUIPMENT
School Choice Transfers/Public Education
Grant (PEG)
State-approved textbooks are provided to students
free of charge for each subject or class. Books
must be covered by the student, as directed by the
teacher, and treated with care.
Electronic
textbooks and technological equipment may also
be provided to students in certain circumstances. A
student who is issued a damaged item should
report the damage to the teacher. Any student
failing to return an item in acceptable condition
loses the right to free textbooks and equipment
until the item is returned or paid for by the parent;
however, the student will be provided textbooks
and equipment for use at school during the school
day. [See Policy CMD (LEGAL), (LOCAL)]
State law enables students in certain schools
identified by the state to apply for transfers to other
schools within the district dependent upon space
availability. The state criteria for these schools are
that (1) fewer than 50 percent of the school’s
students passed either the reading, writing, or
mathematics section of the Texas Assessment of
Knowledge and Skills in two of the last three years,
or (2) the school was rated by the Texas Education
Agency as “academic unacceptable” in any of the
last three years. Students have until the last day of
the spring semester to apply for a School Choice
Transfer for the following year. If a student wishes
to transfer outside the district, he/she must contact
the other district. If a student wishes to transfer to a
school within the district, he/she must follow the
procedures for a student transfer. Transportation is
not provided.
TRANSFERS BETWEEN DISTRICT
SCHOOLS
[See Policy FD (LEGAL)(LOCAL), FDA (LEGAL),
FDB (LEGAL) (LOCAL) (REGULATION), FDAA
(LEGAL)]
School Choice/No Child Left Behind (NCLB)
Federal law enables students in schools that have
not made adequate yearly progress (AYP) for two
or more consecutive years the right to transfer from
those schools to other schools selected by the
district. Students may apply at specified times
during the school year. Transportation is provided
or paid for by the district.
General Authority
The Board or its designee may assign and transfer
any student from one school facility or classroom to
another facility or classroom within its jurisdiction.
Education Code 25.031
Students requesting a transfer may lose eligibility to
participate in UIL activities for at least one year –
depending on the transfer.
Senior Option
Seniors who move into another Dallas ISD
attendance area will be allowed, without transfer, to
finish in the school where they are enrolled if they
have sufficient credits to complete their work within
that year. Seniors who have completed most of
their work in a Dallas high school and who move
out of the area may elect to receive their diploma
from their Dallas high school. They may offer as
much as one semester’s work in the new school
toward credit for their diploma, provided they have
passed the state exit exam and their work fulfills
graduation requirements. Careful planning with the
receiving school to arrange for meeting deadlines is
necessary.
Curriculum Transfers
Students may request a transfer from their
neighborhood school to the school nearest to their
neighborhood to take a course that is not offered in
their home school, provided a student transfer
application form is completed and approved, and
space is available in the receiving school. Students
have until the last day of the spring transfer period
to apply for a transfer for the next school year.
Transportation is not provided.
Hardship and Medical Transfers
Students may request a transfer from their
neighborhood school to attend another Dallas ISD
school with available space if personal or family
circumstances prevent a student from attending the
assigned school, provided a student transfer
application form is completed and approved, and
space is available in the receiving school. Students
Transfer of Students Who Move During a
Semester
In the event of a student’s residence being moved
from one district school attendance area to another
or to another school district during the course of a
39
semester, the student shall be eligible to enroll in
the school serving the new residence, or the
student may remain in the home school until the
completion of the current semester. [See policy
FDB (REGULATION)]
School-Sponsored Trips
Students who participate in school-sponsored
activity trips, excursions, or tours are required to
use transportation provided by the school to and
from the event. Exceptions may be made only if the
student presents a written request signed by the
parent or guardian to the principal the day before
the scheduled event that the student be allowed to
ride with a person designated by the parent or
guardian, or that the student be allowed to furnish
and drive the student’s own transportation. The
district shall not be liable or responsible for any
action, injuries, or damages that occur to students
riding in vehicles that are not provided by the
school. See policy FDB (LOCAL).
TRANSPORTATION
Buses and Other School Vehicles
The district makes school bus transportation
available to all students living two or more miles
from school. This service is provided at no cost to
students. Bus routes and any subsequent changes
are posted at the school or on the district’s website.
See the Student Code of Conduct for provisions
regarding transportation to the Disciplinary
Alternative Education Program (DAEP).
Student Bus Riders’ Code of Conduct:
Certain rules of conduct are necessary for the
safety of all students who ride the bus. Students
displaying the following infractions will be reported
to the principal by the bus driver.
Students are expected to assist district staff in
ensuring that buses remain in good condition and
that transportation is provided safely. When riding
in district vehicles, students are held to behavioral
standards established in this handbook. Students
must:
Improper boarding/departing procedures;
Ride the bus only if eligible.
Bringing any type of weapon or other article of
injurious or objectionable nature aboard the
bus;
Not bring friends or unauthorized persons to
ride the bus.
Failure to remain seated when directed or
when the bus is moving;
Be at bus stop a minimum of five minutes prior
to bus stop time.
Refusing to obey driver or monitor or
addressing driver or monitor in disrespectful
manner;
Enter and leave the bus or van in an orderly
manner at the designated stop nearest home.
Fighting, pushing, tripping, or assault;
Follow the driver’s directions at all times.
Eating or drinking on the bus;
Keep feet, books, instrument cases, and other
objects out of the aisle.
Not deface the bus, van, or its equipment.
Extending any part of a student's body,
clothing, or any other article outside a bus
window;
Not put head, hands, arms, or legs out of the
window, hold any object out of the window, or
throw objects within or out of the bus or van.
Throwing, pitching, or shooting objects inside
or out of the bus;
Not possess or use any form of tobacco on
school buses.
Lighting matches or smoking or using tobacco
products on the bus;
Observe all usual classroom rules.
Spitting or littering;
Be seated while the vehicle is moving.
Unnecessary noise;
Fasten seat belt when directed or when the
bus is moving (if bus is equipped with seat
belts).
Tampering with bus equipment or vandalism of
bus property;
Wait for the driver’s signal upon leaving the
bus or van and before crossing in front of the
vehicle.
Destruction of property;
Rude, discourteous, or annoying conduct;
Using profanity
Harassing or distracting the driver;
40
VISITORS TO THE SCHOOL
Possession or use of tobacco, tobacco
products, drugs, abusable volatile chemicals,
or alcohol;
Parents and others are welcome to visit district
schools. For the safety of those within the school
and to avoid disruption of instructional time, all
visitors must first report to the principal’s office and
must comply with all applicable district policies and
procedures.
Public lewdness or indecent exposure;
Making a false alarm or report or terroristic
threat;
Engaging in conduct that constitutes a felony;
or
Visits to individual classrooms during instructional
time are permitted only with approval of the principal
and teacher and only so long as their duration or
frequency does not interfere with the delivery of
instruction or disrupt the normal school environment.
All visitors are expected to demonstrate the highest
standards of courtesy and conduct; disruptive
behavior will not be permitted.
Other behavior detrimental to safety, wellbeing, and respect for others.
School transportation is a privilege and not a state
requirement. The slightest distraction to the driver
may have significant student safety consequences.
Appropriate student behavior is essential to the
safe operation of the school bus. School campus
administrators are responsible for the students
while on the bus and reserve the right to resolve
discipline problems that occur between home and
campus. It is the duty of the principal, not the driver,
to exclude a child from riding a school bus. The
principal shall take steps to maintain acceptable
student conduct, including the discretion to deny
the privilege of school bus transportation. This
privilege may be temporarily denied or permanently
revoked if misconduct jeopardizes the safe
operation of the school bus or the safety of students
riding the bus.
VENDING MACHINES
The district has adopted policies and implemented
procedures to comply with state and federal
guidelines to restrict student access to vending
machines in any food services area.
WITHDRAWING FROM SCHOOL
Minor students may be withdrawn from school by the
student’s parent or guardian stating the reason for
the withdrawal. Students 18 or older, or who have
established residence away from home may request
withdrawal without a parent or guardian’s signature.
[See FD (LOCAL)] On the student’s last day, the
withdrawal form must be obtained from the
(elementary) data controller or the (secondary)
registrar and presented to each teacher for current
grade averages, absences, and book and equipment
clearance; to the librarian to ensure a clear library
record; to the counselor for course clearance; and
finally, back to the registrar or elementary data
controller. A copy of the withdrawal form will be
given to the student, and a copy will be kept at the
school.
Students should be aware that the bus is an
extension of the school. All Student Code of
Conduct offenses are subject to the same
disciplinary actions and consequences while riding
Dallas ISD-provided transportation.
VANDALISM
The taxpayers of the community have made a
sustained financial commitment for the construction
and upkeep of school facilities. To ensure that
school facilities can serve those for whom they are
intended, littering, defacing, or damaging school
property will not be tolerated. Students will be
required to pay for damages they cause and will be
subject to criminal proceedings as well as
disciplinary consequences in accordance with the
Student Code of Conduct.
41
Glossary
Accelerated instruction is an intensive supplemental program designed to address the needs of an individual
student in acquiring the knowledge and skills required at his or her grade level and/or as a result of a student
not meeting the passing standard on a state-mandated assessment.
ACT refers to one of the two most frequently used college or university admissions exams: the American
College Test. The test may be a requirement for admission to certain colleges or universities.
ARD is the admission, review, and dismissal committee convened for each student who is identified as needing
a full and individual evaluation for special education services. The eligible student and his or her parents are
members of the committee.
Attendance review committee is sometimes responsible for reviewing a student’s absences when the
student’s attendance drops below 90 percent of the days the class is offered. Under guidelines adopted by the
board, the committee will determine whether there were extenuating circumstances for the absences and
whether the student needs to complete certain conditions to master the course and regain credit lost because
of absences.
DAEP stands for disciplinary alternative education program, a placement for students who have violated
certain provisions of the Student Code of Conduct.
EOC assessments are end-of-course tests, which are state-mandated, and are part of the STAAR program.
Successful performance on EOC assessments will be required for graduation beginning with students in grade
9 during the 2011–2012 school year. These exams will be given in English I, English II, English III, Algebra I,
Geometry, Algebra II, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, World Geography, World History, and United States
History.
FERPA refers to the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act that grants specific privacy protections
to student records. The law contains certain exceptions, such as for directory information, unless a student’s
parent or a student 18 or older directs the school not to release directory information.
IEP is the written record of the individualized education program prepared by the ARD committee for a student
with disabilities who is eligible for special education services. The IEP contains several parts, such as a
statement of the student’s present educational performance; a statement of measurable annual goals, with
short-term objectives; the special education and related services and supplemental aids and services to be
provided, and program modifications or support by school personnel; a statement regarding how the student’s
progress will be measured and how the parents will be kept informed; accommodations for state or district wide
tests; whether successful completion of state-mandated assessments is required for graduation, etc.
ISS refers to in-school suspension, a disciplinary technique for misconduct found in the Student Code of
Conduct. Although different from out-of-school suspension and placement in a DAEP, ISS removes the
student from the regular classroom.
LAT stands for linguistically accommodated testing, which is an assessment process for recent immigrant
English language learners who are required to be assessed in certain grades and subjects under the NCLB
Act.
NCLB Act is the federal No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.
PGP stands for Personal Graduation Plan, which is recommended for all students entering grade 9 and is
required by state law for any student in middle school or higher who fails a section on a state-mandated test or
is identified by the district as not likely to earn a high school diploma before the fifth school year after he or she
begins grade 9.
SAT refers to one of the two most frequently used college or university admissions exams: the Scholastic
Aptitude Test. The test may be a requirement for admissions to certain colleges or universities.
SHAC stands for School Health Advisory Council, a group of at least five members, a majority of whom must
be parents, appointed by the school board to assist the district in ensuring that local community values and
health issues are reflected in the district’s health education instruction.
42
Section 504 is the federal law that prohibits discrimination against a student with a disability, requiring schools
to provide opportunities for equal services, programs, and participation in activities. Unless the student is
determined to be eligible for special education services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act
(IDEA), general education with appropriate instructional accommodations will be provided.
STAAR is the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness, the state’s system of standardized
academic achievement assessments, effective beginning with certain students for the 2011–2012 school year.
STAAR Alternate is an alternative state-mandated assessment designed for students with severe cognitive
disabilities receiving special education services who meet the participation requirements, as determined by the
student’s ARD committee.
STAAR Modified is an alternative state-mandated assessment based on modified achievement standards that
is administered to eligible students receiving special education services, as determined by the student’s ARD
committee.
STAAR Linguistically Accommodated (STAAR L) is an alternative state-mandated assessment with
linguistic accommodations designed for certain recent immigrant English language learners.
State-mandated assessments are required of students at certain grade levels and in specified subjects.
Successful performance sometimes is a condition of promotion, and passing the grade 11 exit-level test or endof-course assessments, when applicable, is a condition of graduation. Students have multiple opportunities to
take the tests if necessary for promotion or graduation.
Student Code of Conduct is developed with the advice of the district-level committee and adopted by the
board and identifies the circumstances, consistent with law, when a student may be removed from the
classroom or campus. It also sets out the conditions that authorize or require the principal or another
administrator to place the student in a DAEP. It outlines conditions for out-of-school suspension and for
expulsion. The Student Code of Conduct also addresses notice to the parent regarding a student’s violation of
one of its provisions.
TAKS is the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills, the state’s standardized achievement test currently
given to students in certain subjects in grades 10 and 11 and is required for graduation for students at these
grade levels. .
TELPAS stands for the Texas English Language Proficiency Assessment System, which assesses the
progress that English language learners make in learning the English language, and is administered for those
who meet the participation requirements in kindergarten–grade 12.
TxVSN is the Texas Virtual School Network, which provides online courses for Texas students to supplement
the instructional programs of public school districts. Courses are taught by qualified instructors, and courses
are equivalent in rigor and scope to a course taught in a traditional classroom setting.
UIL refers to the University Interscholastic League, the statewide voluntary nonprofit organization that oversees
educational extracurricular academic, athletic, and music contests.
43
Student Code of Conduct and Student Handbook
Contract Campus Copy
As the parent/guardian of the student listed below, I hereby confirm that I have been given a copy of the
Dallas Independent School District’s Student Code of Conduct and that:
1.
2.
3.
4.
I accept the responsibilities expected of me as a parent/guardian of a student.
I acknowledge receipt of the policies, procedures, rules, regulations and practices as presented in
this document.
I have read the procedures listed in the appeal process.
I accept the consequences should my child fail to abide by these provisions.
Date
Name of Student (please print)
Parent’s/Guardian’s Signature
NOTE: This Handbook is designed to be used as a guide for parents/guardians and students of the Dallas
Independent School District.
This form is to be signed and returned by the student within five days of the time this handbook is distributed
and discussed. The signature sheet is to be filed in the student’s permanent record folder for the 2012-2013
school year.
Student Code of Conduct and Student Handbook
Acknowledgement Receipt
Student/Parent Copy
As the parent/guardian of the student listed below, I hereby confirm that I have been given a copy of the
Dallas Independent School District’s Student Code of Conduct and that:
1.
2.
3.
4.
I accept the responsibilities expected of me as a parent/guardian of a student.
I acknowledge receipt of the policies, procedures, rules, regulations and practices as presented in
this document.
I have read the procedures listed in the appeal process.
I accept the consequences should my child fail to abide by these provisions.
Date
Name of Student (please print)
Parent’s/Guardian’s Signature
NOTE: This Handbook is designed to be used as a guide for parents/guardians and students of the Dallas
Independent School District.
This form is to be signed and returned by the student within five days of the time this handbook is distributed
and discussed. The signature sheet is to be filed in the student’s permanent record folder for the 2012-2013
school year.
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