MSP-EXP430FR5969 LaunchPad™ Evaluation Kit User's Guide

MSP-EXP430FR5969 LaunchPad™ Evaluation Kit User's Guide
User's Guide
SLAU535 – February 2014
MSP-EXP430FR5969 LaunchPad™ Evaluation Kit
MSP430™ ultra-low-power (ULP) FRAM technology now joins the LaunchPad™ family.
The MSP-EXP430FR5969 LaunchPad (or the "FR5969 LaunchPad") is an easy-to-use evaluation module
(EVM) for the MSP430FR5969 microcontroller. It contains everything needed to start developing on
MSP430's ULP FRAM platform, including on-board emulation for programming, debugging, and energy
measurements.
Figure 1. MSP-EXP430FR5969
MSP430, LaunchPad, Code Composer Studio are trademarks of Texas Instruments.
IAR Embedded Workbench is a trademark of IAR Systems.
Sharp is a registered trademark of Sharp Corporation.
All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
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Contents
Getting Started .............................................................................................................. 3
Hardware ..................................................................................................................... 5
Software Examples ........................................................................................................ 18
Additional Resources ..................................................................................................... 26
FAQs ........................................................................................................................ 28
Schematics ................................................................................................................. 29
1
MSP-EXP430FR5969 ......................................................................................................
1
2
EVM Overview...............................................................................................................
5
3
Block Diagram ...............................................................................................................
6
4
MSP430FR5969 Pinout ....................................................................................................
7
5
eZ-FET Emulator ............................................................................................................
8
6
eZ-FET Isolation Jumper Block Diagram ................................................................................
9
7
Application Backchannel UART in Device Manager ..................................................................
10
8
MSP430FR5969 LaunchPad Power Domain Block Diagram........................................................
11
9
Debugger Power Configuration – USB eZ-FET and JTAG ..........................................................
12
10
External Power Configuration – External and BoosterPack .........................................................
13
11
Super Cap Power Configuration – Charging and Running Standalone ............................................
15
12
FR5969 LaunchPad to BoosterPack Connector Pinout ..............................................................
17
13
Directing the Project→Import Function to the Demo Project ........................................................
19
14
When CCS Has Found the Project......................................................................................
20
15
FRAM Unified Memory with Dynamic Partitioning
List of Figures
16
17
18
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20
21
....................................................................
MSP-EXP430FR5969 Software Examples in TI Resource Explorer ...............................................
Schematic 1 of 5 ...........................................................................................................
Schematic 2 of 5 ...........................................................................................................
Schematic 3 of 5 ...........................................................................................................
Schematic 4 of 5 ...........................................................................................................
Schematic 5 of 5 ...........................................................................................................
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27
29
30
31
32
33
List of Tables
1
Isolation Block Connections ...............................................................................................
9
2
Hardware Change Log ....................................................................................................
18
3
Software Examples ........................................................................................................
18
4
IDE Minimum Requirements for MSP430FR5969
....................................................................
Source Files and Folders .................................................................................................
FRAM Endurance Calculation for 1KB Block of FRAM...............................................................
How MSP430 Device Documentation is Organized ..................................................................
19
5
6
7
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Getting Started
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1
Getting Started
1.1
Introduction
The MSP-EXP430FR5969 LaunchPad (or the "FR5969 LaunchPad") is an easy-to-use evaluation module
(EVM) for the MSP430FR5969 microcontroller. It contains everything needed to start developing on
MSP430's ULP FRAM platform, including on-board emulation for programming, debugging, and energy
measurements. The board features on-board buttons and LEDs for quick integration of a simple user
interface as well as a super capacitor (super cap) that allows standalone applications without external
power supply. The MSP430FR5969 device features embedded FRAM (Ferroelectric Random Access
Memory), a nonvolatile memory known for its ultra-low power, high endurance, and high-speed write
access.
Rapid prototyping is a snap thanks to 20-pin headers and a wide range of BoosterPack plug-in modules
that enable technologies such as wireless connectivity, graphical displays, environmental sensing, and
much more. More information about the LaunchPad, supported BoosterPacks, and available resources
can be found at TI's LaunchPad portal and the LaunchPad wiki for design resources and example
projects.
The out-of-box experience provided with the MSP-EXP430FR5969 LaunchPad uses the 430BOOSTSHARP96 Dot Matrix Memory LCD BoosterPack. The display enables a better user experience and allows
developers to more easily model their end application.
The MSP-EXP430FR5969 LaunchPad and 430BOOST-SHARP96 BoosterPack are available in a bundled
package from the TI eStore, with part number MSP-BNDL-FR5969LCD. The MSP-EXP430FR5969
LaunchPad is not available standalone at this time.
Free software development tools are also available, such as TI's Eclipse-based Code Composer Studio™
IDE and IAR Embedded Workbench™ IDE. More information about the LaunchPad, the supported
BoosterPacks, and available resources can be found at TI's LaunchPad portal and the MSP430
LaunchPad wiki for design resources and example projects.
1.2
Key Features
•
•
•
•
•
•
1.3
Kit Contents
•
•
•
1.4
MSP430 ultra-low-power FRAM technology based MSP430FR5969 16-bit MCU
20-pin LaunchPad standard that leverages the BoosterPack ecosystem
0.1-F super capacitor for standalone power
Onboard eZ-FET emulation
Two buttons and two LEDs for user interaction
Backchannel UART through USB to PC
1x MSP-EXP430FR5969
1x Micro USB cable
1x Quick Start Guide
First Steps – Out-of-Box Experience
An easy way to get familiar with the EVM is by using its pre-programmed out-of-box code. It demonstrates
some key features from a user level.
The out-of-box experience is based on the 430BOOST-SHARP96 Dot Matrix Memory LCD BoosterPack
to better showcase the device functionality.
The first step is to connect the BoosterPack to the LaunchPad and ensure the correct placement: Rockets
facing upward.
Now the included Micro USB cable is used to connect the LaunchPad to the computer.
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Getting Started
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The board is pre-programmed with the out-of-box demo. A splash screen displaying the TI logo indicates
that the software is loaded and the board has powered up as expected. An LED also blinks briefly at
startup.
NOTE: The BoosterPack needs to be plugged in at device power up for the out-of-box code to work
properly.
The user interacts with the demo by using the two capacitive touch sliders on the BoosterPack and by
using push buttons S1 (left button) and S2 (right button). The LCD provides a method to interact with the
various user modes and view the output based on user interaction.
A more detailed explanation of each mode can be found in Section 3.
1.5
Next Steps – Looking Into the Provided Code
After the EVM features have been explored, the fun can begin. It is time to open an integrated
development environment (IDE) and start digging into the code example. Refer to Section 3 for more
information on IDEs and where to download them.
The out-of-box source code and more code examples are provided for download at
http://www.ti.com/tool/msp-exp430fr5969. Code is licensed under BSD and TI encourages reuse and
modifications to fit specific needs.
Section 3 describes all functions in detail and provides a project structure to help familiarize yourself with
the code.
With the onboard eZ-FET emulator, debugging and downloading new code is a breeze. A USB connection
between the EVM and a PC through the provided USB cable is all that is needed.
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Hardware
Figure 2 shows an overview of the LaunchPad hardware.
Micro-B
USB
LED
Red, Green
ESD
Protection
Emulation
MCU
Crystal
4 MHz
Power, UART, SBW
to Target
Reset
Button
Target
Button
LaunchPad header 1x10
LaunchPad header 1x10
0.1-F
Super Cap
Target Device
MSP430FR5969
HF
Crystal
Red, Green
LED
LF
Crystal
Target
Button
Figure 2. EVM Overview
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Block Diagram
Figure 3 shows the block diagram.
Micro-B
USB
LED
Red, Green
ESD
Protection
Crystal
4 MHz
Debug
MCU
3.3-V LDO
UART, SBW to Target
Power to Target
14-pin JTAG
header
Power Selection
Reset
button
Crystals
HF (MHz)
and
32.768 kHz
Target Device
MSP430FR5969
100-mF
SuperCap
20-pin LaunchPad
standard headers
User Interface
2 buttons and 2 LEDs
Figure 3. Block Diagram
2.2
2.2.1
Hardware Features
MSP430FR5969
The MSP430FR5969 is the first device in TI's new ULP FRAM technology platform. FRAM is a cutting
edge memory technology, combining the best features of flash and RAM into one nonvolatile memory.
More information on FRAM can be found at www.ti.com/fram.
Device features include:
• 1.8-V to 3.6-V operation
• Up to 16-MHz system clock and 8-MHz FRAM access
• 64KB FRAM and 2KB SRAM
• Ultra-low-power operation
• Five timer blocks and up to three serial interfaces (SPI, UART, or I2C)
• Analog: 16-channel 12-bit differential ADC and 16-channel comparator
• Digital: AES256, CRC, DMA, and hardware MPY32
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DVCC
P2.7
P2.3/TA0.0/UCA1STE/A6/C10
P2.4/TA1.0/UCA1CLK/A7/C11
AVSS
PJ.6/HFXIN
PJ.7/HFXOUT
AVSS
PJ.4/LFXIN
PJ.5/LFXOUT
AVSS
AVCC
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48 47 46 45 44 43 42 41 40 39 38 37
P1.0/TA0.1/DMAE0/RTCCLK/A0/C0/VREF-/VeREF-
1
36
DVSS
P1.1/TA0.2/TA1CLK/COUT/A1/C1/VREF+/VeREF+
2
35
P4.6
P1.2/TA1.1/TA0CLK/COUT/A2/C2
3
34
P4.5
P3.0/A12/C12
4
33
P4.4/TB0.5
P3.1/A13/C13
5
32
P1.7/TB0.4/UCB0SOMI/UCB0SCL/TA1.0
P3.2/A14/C14
6
31
P1.6/TB0.3/UCB0SIMO/UCB0SDA/TA0.0
P3.3/A15/C15
7
30
P3.7/TB0.6
P4.7
8
29
P3.6/TB0.5
P1.3/TA1.2/UCB0STE/A3/C3
9
28
P3.5/TB0.4/COUT
P1.4/TB0.1/UCA0STE/A4/C4
10
27
P3.4/TB0.3/SMCLK
P1.5/TB0.2/UCA0CLK/A5/C5
11
26
P2.2/TB0.2/UCB0CLK
P2.1/TB0.0/UCA0RXD/UCA0SOMI/TB0.0
P2.0/TB0.6/UCA0TXD/UCA0SIMO/TB0CLK/ACLK
RST/NMI/SBWTDIO
TEST/SBWTCK
P2.6/TB0.1/UCA1RXD/UCA1SOMI
P2.5/TB0.0/UCA1TXD/UCA1SIMO
P4.3/A11
P4.1/A9
P4.2/A10
P4.0/A8
PJ.3/TCK/SRCPUOFF/C9
PJ.2/TMS/ACLK/SROSCOFF/C8
12
25
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
PJ.1/TDI/TCLK/MCLK/SRSCG0/C7
PJ.0/TDO/TB0OUTH/SMCLK/SRSCG1/C6
MSP430FR596x
MSP430FR586x
Figure 4. MSP430FR5969 Pinout
To compare the various MSP430 derivatives, download the MSP430 Product Brochure (SLAB034), which
is also available from http://www.ti.com/msp430. The brochure has a table that lets you see, at a glance,
how the families compare, and their pricing. This document is frequently updated, as new MSP430
derivatives become available.
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eZ-FET Onboard Emulator
To keep development easy and cost effective, TI's LaunchPad development tools integrate an onboard
emulator, eliminating the need for expensive programmers.
The FR5969 LaunchPad has the new eZ-FET emulator (see Figure 5), a simple and low-cost debugger
that supports almost all MSP430 device derivatives.
Figure 5. eZ-FET Emulator
The eZ-FET provides a "backchannel" UART-over-USB connection with the host, which can be very useful
during debugging and for easy communication with a PC. The provided UART supports hardware flow
control (RTS and CTS), although these signals are not connected to the target by default.
The dotted line through J13 shown in Figure 5 divides the eZ-FET emulator from the target area. The
signals that cross this line can be disconnected by jumpers on J13, the isolation jumper block. More
details on the isolation jumper block are in Section 2.2.3.
The eZ-FET hardware can be found in the schematics in Section 6 and in the accompanying design files
(SLAC645). The software and more information about the debugger can be found at the eZ-FET lite wiki.
2.2.3
Emulator Connection – Isolation Jumper Block
The isolation jumper block at Jumper J13 allows the user to connect/disconnect signals that cross from
the eZ-FET domain into the FR5969 target domain. This includes eZ-FET Spy-Bi-Wire signals, application
UART signals, and 3V3 and 5V power (see Table 1).
Reasons to open these connections:
• To remove any and all influence from the eZ-FET emulator for high accuracy target power
measurements
• To control 3-V and 5-V power flow between eZ-FET and target domains
• To expose the target MCU pins for other use than onboard debugging and application UART
communication
• To expose programming and UART interface of the eZ-FET so it can be used for devices other than
the onboard MCU.
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Table 1. Isolation Block Connections
Jumper
GND
V+
Description
Ground
3.3-V rail, derived from VBUS by an LDO in the eZ-FET domain
RTS >>
Backchannel UART: Ready-To-Send, for hardware flow control. The target can use this to indicate whether 'it is
ready to receive data from the host PC. The arrows indicate the direction of the signal.
CTS <<
Backchannel UART: Clear-To-Send, for hardware flow control. The host PC (through the emulator) uses this to
indicate whether or not it is ready to receive data. The arrows indicate the direction of the signal.
RXD <<
Backchannel UART: the target FR5969 receives data through this signal. The arrows indicate the direction of the
signal.
TXD >>
Backchannel UART: the target FR5969 sends data through this signal. The arrows indicate the direction of the
signal.
RST
Spy-Bi-Wire emulation: SBWTDIO data signal. This pin also functions as the RST signal (active low)
TST
Spy-Bi-Wire emulation: SBWTCK clock signal. This pin also functions as the TST signal
USB Connector
eZ-FET
USB
in
out
LDO
eZ-FET
Emulator
MCU
Target
MSP430FR5969
MCU
BoosterPack Header
Spy-Bi-Wire (SBW)
Emulation
Application UART
USCI A0
3.3V Power
BoosterPack Header
MSP430FR5969 Target
Isolation
Jumper Block
Figure 6. eZ-FET Isolation Jumper Block Diagram
2.2.4
14-Pin JTAG Connector
This EVM contains a footprint for TI's standard 14-pin MSP430 JTAG header. This connector can be used
as needed. For debug purposes, this connector offers 4 wire JTAG compared to the 2-wire Spy-Bi-Wire
from the eZ-FET. In certain use cases this can be advantageous. The MSP-FET430UIF or another
MSP430 external debug tool can be used. This JTAG connector can be used to power the system directly
or can be used with external power. See Section 2.3 for more details on the JTAG system power
requirements.
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Application (or "Backchannel") UART
The backchannel UART allows communication with the USB host that isn't part of the target application's
main functionality. This is very useful during development, and also provides a communication channel to
the PC host side. This can be used to create GUIs and other programs on the PC that communicate with
the FR5969 LaunchPad.
The pathway of the backchannel UART is shown in Figure 6. The backchannel UART (USCI_A0) is
independent of the UART on the 20-pin BoosterPack connector (USCI_A1).
On the host side, a virtual COM port for the application backchannel UART is generated when the
LaunchPad enumerates on the host. You can use any PC application that interfaces with COM ports,
including terminal applications like Hyperterminal or Docklight, to open this port and communicate with the
target application. You need to identify the COM port for the backchannel. On Windows PCs, Device
Manager can assist (see Figure 7).
Figure 7. Application Backchannel UART in Device Manager
The backchannel UART is the "MSP Application UART1" port. In this case, Figure 7 shows COM13, but
this varies from one host PC to the next. After you identify the correct COM port, configure it in your host
application, according to its documentation. You can then open the port and begin talking to it from the
host.
On the target FR5969 side, the backchannel is connected to the USCI_A0 module.
The eZ-FET has a configurable baudrate, therefore, it is important that the PC application configures the
baudrate to be the same as what's configured on the USCI_A0.
The eZ-FET also supports hardware flow control, if desired. Hardware flow control (CTS/RTS
handshaking) allows the target FR5969 and the emulator to tell each other to wait before sending more
data. At low baud rates and with simple target applications, flow control may not be necessary.
Applications with faster baud rates and more interrupts to service have a higher likelihood that they cannot
read the USCI_A0's RXBUF register in time, before the next byte arrives. If this happens, the USCI_A0's
UCA0STATW register will report an overrun error.
2.2.6
100-mF Super Capacitor (Super Cap)
A 100-mF (0.1-F) super cap is mounted onboard and allows powering the system without any external
power. This highlights the ultra-low power of the MSP430FR5969 target device. See how long you can run
your application on the super cap alone!
For more power information on the super cap, see Section 2.3.5.
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2.3
Power
The board is designed to support five different power scenarios. The board can be powered by the eZFET or JTAG debugger, external power, BoosterPack power, or standalone super cap power.
Legend
Debug
Power
Domain
J13
V+
eZ-FET
J3
JTAG
Bypass
Use
J2
J11
Charge
External
Power
Domain
J10
J9
Super Cap
Power
Domain
J4
Target and
BoosterPack
Power
Domain
External
VCC
J12
GND
GND
External
Measure
Current
Super
Cap
Debugger
J5
Target
MSP430FR5969
Device
MSP430FR5969
target and
BoosterPack
GND
J1
GND
VCC
Figure 8. MSP430FR5969 LaunchPad Power Domain Block Diagram
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eZ-FET USB Power
The most common scenario is power from USB through the eZ-FET debugger. This provides 5-V power
from USB and also regulates this power rail to 3.3 V for eZ-FET operation and 3.3 V to the target side of
the LaunchPad. Power from the eZ-FET is controlled by jumper J13. For 3.3 V, ensure that a jumper is
connected across the J13 "V+" terminal. The eZ-FET is a debugger, so J10 must be set to debugger for
power to reach the target MSP430FR5969 device.
For the power configuration diagram, see Figure 9.
2.3.2
14-Pin JTAG
When powering directly from the JTAG connector through the MSP-FET430UIF or other MSP430
debugger tool, ensure that jumper J10 is set to "Debugger." JTAG debugging can also be used with an
external power source, when J10 is set to "External," and some external power source is connected
through J12. In this case the JTAG debugger will sense the external power and debug the system without
providing its own power.
For power configuration diagram, see Figure 9.
USB (eZ-FET)
Power Configuration
JTAG
Power Configuration
eZ-FET
J13
V+
J13
J3
J3
J11
J9
J4
External
Bypass
J12
Use
J11
GND
J9
J4
Target
MSP430FR5969
Device
MSP430FR5969
target and
BoosterPack
External
VCC
J12
Super
Cap
GND
External
J5
Debugger
J10
J2
VCC
Measure
Current
Super
Cap
JTAG
Debugger
Charge
Use
J2
Charge
J10
GND
GND
External
Measure
Current
JTAG
Bypass
V+
eZ-FET
J5
Target
MSP430FR5969
Device
GND
J1
GND
VCC
MSP430FR5969
target and
BoosterPack
GND
J1
GND
VCC
Figure 9. Debugger Power Configuration – USB eZ-FET and JTAG
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2.3.3
External Power Supply
An extra header J12 is present on the board to supply external power. When supplying external power,
jumper J10 must be set to "External." It is important to understand the device voltage operation
specifications when supplying external power. The MSP430FR5969 has an operating range of 1.8V –
3.6V. More information can be found in the device data sheet.
For power configuration diagram, see Figure 10.
2.3.4
BoosterPack
In some use cases it might be required to power the board from a BoosterPack. When powered from a
BoosterPack, the BoosterPack voltage should be across J4 Pin1 (Vcc) and J5 Pin20 (GND). This
complies with the BoosterPack pinout shown in Section 2.7. These pins are connected directly to the
FR5969 target device, and do not require any specific jumper configuration. Header J1 also provides
power directly to the target device.
Because J1 and the BoosterPack headers are connected directly to the target device Vcc, there are two
primary consequences:
• The super cap cannot charge through J11. Use of the super cap with this power scenario is not
recommended.
• Current of the target device through J9 cannot be measured. It is best to remove J9 in this scenario to
prevent back-powering of any additional circuitry such as the eZ-FET.
For power configuration diagram, see Figure 10.
External Power
Source Configuration
BoosterPack Power
Configuration
eZ-FET
eZ-FET
J3
J2
J11
J9
J4
External
Bypass
Use
J11
GND
Super
Cap
GND
External
J9
J5
J4
VCC
Target
MSP430FR5969
Device
MSP430FR5969
target and
BoosterPack
Debugger
J10
J2
VCC
J12
Measure
Current
Super
Cap
JTAG
Debugger
External
Charge
Use
Charge
J10
VCC
J12
GND
GND
External
Measure
Current
JTAG
Bypass
V+
J13
V+
J13
J3
J5
GND
Target
MSP430FR5969
Device
GND
J1
GND
VCC
MSP430FR5969
target and
BoosterPack
GND
J1
GND
VCC
Figure 10. External Power Configuration – External and BoosterPack
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Super Cap
2.3.5.1
Charging the Super Cap
To charge the super cap, jumper J11 is used. By default there is no jumper across J11. Place a jumper
across J11 to charge the super cap. If another jumper is not handy, the GND jumper on the isolation
jumper block can be used- as this jumper doesn't actually disconnect the GND connection.
To charge the super cap, power must be coming from a debugger (eZ-FET or JTAG) or external power
through J10. External power through J1 or a BoosterPack will not charge the super cap through J11.
Placing a jumper across J11 will charge the super cap when there is 3.3V Vcc present, regardless of the
state of the Bypass/Use J2 jumper, however if J2 is in the "Bypass" state, changing it over to the "Use"
state will remove power from the target MSP430FR5969 and it will be reset.
2.3.5.2
Using the Super Cap
To use the super cap to power the LaunchPad, first change the J2 jumper to select "Use" and then set a
jumper on J11 to charge the super cap. After waiting for it to charge, any external power can be removed
from the system, and it will be powered completely by the super cap.
To remove any additional power drain from the super cap, remove any jumper to disconnect power to any
external source. This can be J11, J10, or J13 depending on the power configuration. This prevents the
super cap from back-powering the debug circuitry or any external power circuitry connected.
The most effective method for charging the capacitor is outlined in the following steps. These steps
assume the LaunchPad is powered by USB cable through the eZ-FET debugger.
1. Set "Power Selector" jumper (J10) to "Debugger" position
2. Set jumper J2 to "Use" super cap position
3. Set jumper J11 to "Charge" super cap position
4. Set "V+" jumper J13
5. Connect board to PC with USB cable
6. Allow 2-3 minutes for the super cap to charge (time may vary depending on initial charge of the super
cap) to full Vcc
7. Remove the "V+" jumper J13
For power configuration diagram, see Figure 11.
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Super Cap Charging
Configuration
Super Cap Running
Standalone Configuration
Bypass
Use
J2
J11
Charge
J10
J9
J4
JTAG
External
Bypass
Use
J11
GND
Super
Cap
GND
External
J9
J5
J4
Target
MSP430FR5969
Device
MSP430FR5969
target and
BoosterPack
J10
J2
VCC
J12
Measure
Current
Super
Cap
Debugger
J3
Debugger
External
VCC
J12
GND
GND
External
Measure
Current
JTAG
J13
*Power from
Debugger or
External
Charge
V+
J13
J3
V+
eZ-FET
eZ-FET
J5
Target
MSP430FR5969
Device
GND
J1
GND
VCC
MSP430FR5969
target and
BoosterPack
GND
J1
GND
VCC
Figure 11. Super Cap Power Configuration – Charging and Running Standalone
2.3.5.3
Disabling the Super Cap
To disable the super cap, change J2 to "Bypass," and remove jumper J11 to prevent additional current for
charging the super cap. With these 2 jumper selections, the super cap is completely disconnected from
the system.
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Measure MSP430 Current Draw
A specific jumper J9 is placed on the LaunchPad to allow for measuring current draw of the
MSP430FR5969 device. The current measured includes the FR5969, and any current drawn through the
BoosterPack headers and jumper J1.
To measure ultra-low power, follow these steps:
1. Remove the J9 jumper; attach an ammeter across this jumper.
2. Consider the effect that the backchannel UART and any circuitry attached to the FR5969 may have on
current draw. Maybe these should be disconnected at the isolation jumper block, or their current
sinking and sourcing capability at least considered in the final measurement.
3. Make sure there are no floating input I/Os. These cause unnecessary extra current draw. Every I/O
should either be driven out or, if an input, should be pulled or driven to a high or low level.
4. Begin target FR5969 execution.
5. Measure the current. (Keep in mind that if the current levels are fluctuating, it may be difficult to get a
stable measurement. It is easier to measure quiescent states.)
2.5
Clocking
The FR5969 LaunchPad provides external clocks in addition to the internal clocks in the device.
• Y4: a 32-kHz crystal
• Y1: an unpopulated region that supports HF crystal or resonator (4 to 24 MHz)
The 32-kHz crystal allows for lower LPM3 sleep currents than do the other low-frequency clock sources.
Therefore, the presence of the crystal allows the full range of low-power modes to be used.
For more information about internal clocks and how to use the 32-kHz or HF crystal, see the
MSP430FR59xx family user's guide.
2.6
Using the eZ-FET Emulator With a Different Target
The eZ-FET emulator on the FR5969 LaunchPad can interface to most MSP430 derivative devices, not
just the on-board FR5969 target device.
To do this, disconnect every jumper in the isolation jumper block. This is necessary because the emulator
cannot connect to more than one target at a time over the Spy-Bi-Wire (SBW) connection.
Next, make sure the target board has proper connections for Spy-Bi-Wire. Note that to be compatible with
SBW, the capacitor on RST/SBWTDIO cannot be greater than 2.2 nF. The documentation for designing
MSP430 JTAG interface circuitry is the MSP430 Hardware Tools User's Guide (SLAU278).
Finally, wire together these signals from the emulator's side of the isolation jumper block to the target
hardware:
• 3.3 V (V+)
• GND
• SBWTDIO
• SBWTCK
• TXD (if the UART backchannel is to be used)
• RXD (if the UART backchannel is to be used)
• CTS (if hardware flow control is to be used)
• RTS (if hardware flow control is to be used)
This wiring can be done either with jumper wires or by designing the board with a connector that plugs into
the isolation jumper block.
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2.7
BoosterPack Pinout
The FR5969 LaunchPad adheres to the 20-pin LaunchPad pinout standard. A standard was created to aid
compatibility between LaunchPad and BoosterPack tools across the TI ecosystem.
The 20-pin standard is compatible with the 40-pin standard used by other LaunchPads like the MSPEXP430F5529LP. This allows some subset of functionality of 40-pin BoosterPacks to be used with 20-pin
LaunchPads.
This having been said, while most BoosterPacks are compliant with the standard, some are not. The
FR5969 LaunchPad is compatible with all 20-pin BoosterPacks that are compliant with the standard. If the
reseller or owner of the BoosterPack does not explicitly indicate compatibility with the FR5969 LaunchPad,
you might want to compare the schematic of the candidate BoosterPack with the LaunchPad to ensure
compatibility. Keep in mind that sometimes conflicts can be resolved by changing the FR5969 device pin
function configuration in software. More information about compatibility might also be found at
http://www.ti.com/launchpad.
Figure 12 shows the 20-pin pinout of the FR5969 LaunchPad.
Note that software's configuration of the pin functions plays a role in compatibility. The FR5969
LaunchPad side of the dashed line shows all of the functions for which the FR5969 device's pins can be
configured. This can also be seen in the MSP430FR5969 data sheet. The BoosterPack side of the dashed
line shows the standard. The FR5969 function whose color matches the BoosterPack function shows the
specific software-configurable function by which the FR5969 LaunchPad adheres to the standard.
Below are the pins exposed at the BoosterPack connector.
Also shown are functions that map with the BoosterPack standard.
* Note that to comply with the I2C channels of the BoosterPack standard, a software-emulated I2C must be used.
(!) Denotes I/O pins that are interrupt-capable.
Light Gray boxes in the BoosterPack standard indic ate that some LaunchPads may be missing that functionality.
BoosterPack
Standard
MSP-EXP430FR5969 Pin Map
+3.3V
Analog In
RX
UART
TX
GPIO (!)
Analog In
SPI CLK
GPIO (!)
SCL
I2C*
SDA
UCA1SOMI UCA1RXD
UCA1SIMO UCA1TXD
C11
A7
UCA1CLK
UCB0CLK
SMCLK
COUT
A10
TB0.1
TB0.0
A11
TA1.0
TB0.2
TB0.3
TB0.4
TB0.5
(!)
(!)
(!)
(!)
(!)
(!)
(!)
(!)
(!)
+3.3V
P4.2
P2.6
P2.5
P4.3
P2.4
P2.2
P3.4
P3.5
P3.6
MSP-EXP430FR5969 Pin Map
GND
P1.2
P3.0
NC
RST
P1.6
P1.7
P1.5
P1.4
P1.3
(!) TA1.1
(!) A12
(!)
(!)
(!)
(!)
(!)
TA0CLK
C12
COUT
A2
BoosterPack Standard
C2
TB0.3 UCB0SIMO UCB0SDA TA0.0
TB0.4 UCB0SOMI UCB0SCL TA1.0
A5
C5
TB0.2 UCA0CLK
A4
C4
TB0.1 UCA0STE
A3
C3
TA1.2 UCB0STE
PWM Out
SPI CS Wireless
SPI CS Display
SPI CS Other
GND
GPIO (!)
GPIO (!)
TEST
RST
MOSI
SPI
MISO
GPIO (!)
GPIO (!)
GPIO (!)
Figure 12. FR5969 LaunchPad to BoosterPack Connector Pinout
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Design Files
Schematics can be found in Section 6. All design files including schematics, layout, bill of materials
(BOM), and Gerber files are made available in a zip folder (SLAC645) from ti.com. The zip folder also
contains the software examples, TI-TXT object-code firmware images, and documentation.
The MSP-EXP430FR5969 LaunchPad was designed in Mentor Graphics PADS schematic and layout. A
free viewer is available to see both the schematic and layout files on the Mentor Graphics website at
http://www.mentor.com/pcb/downloads/pads-pcb-viewer. A full time-limited version of PADS is available
online for free. This version has complete functionality until the 30 day license expires. This version can be
downloaded directly from http://www.mentor.com/pcb/product-eval/pads-download-evaluation.
2.9
Hardware Change log
Table 2 shows the hardware revision history.
Table 2. Hardware Change Log
PCB Revision
Rev 1.6
3
Description
Initial Release
Software Examples
There are two software examples included with the FR5969 LaunchPad, which can be found in the zip
source folder (SLAC645), shown in Table 3.
Table 3. Software Examples
Demo Name
3.1
BoosterPack Required
Description
More Details
Section 3.3
Section 3.4
430BOOSTSHARP96_OutOfBox
430BOOST-SHARP96
The out-of-box demo pre-programmed on the LaunchPad from
the factory. Its function was described in Section 1.4.
Demonstrates features of MSP430FR5969 ULP FRAM device
430BOOSTSHARP96_GrlibDisplay
430BOOST-SHARP96
A very simple example showing how to use MSP430 Graphics
Library (grlib) to display graphics primitives and images.
MSP430 Software: Driver Library, Graphics Library, and Capacitive Touch Library
The examples are built upon three MSP430 libraries available from TI shown below. All three libraries are
available as part of MSP430Ware. Downloading CCS will include MSP430Ware along with TI Resource
Explorer.
• Driver library (driverlib): a foundational MSP430 software library, useful for interfacing with all MSP430
core functions and peripherals, especially clocks and power.
• Graphics library (grlib): a library for interfacing MSP430 devices to dot-matrix LCD displays. Contains
primitives for simple drawing as well as images and more.
• Capacitive Touch Library: a library for capacitive touch sensing applications. This library supports the
use of buttons, sliders, wheels and more. Highly configurable for each application.
When you begin your own development, you will need more information about these libraries than can be
included in this User's Guide. All the information you need is in MSP430Ware or specific library
documentation linked above.
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3.2
Development Environment Requirements
To use any of the below software examples with the MSP430FR5969 LaunchPad, you must have an
integrated development environment (IDE) that supports the MSP430FR5969 device.
Table 4. IDE Minimum Requirements for
MSP430FR5969
Code Composer Studio™ IDE
IAR Embedded Workbench™
IDE
CCS v5.5 or later
IAR EW430 v5.60 or later
For more details on where to download the latest IDE, see Section 4.3.
3.2.1
CCS
CCS v5.5 or higher is required. When CCS has been launched, and a workspace directory chosen, use
Project→Import Existing CCS Eclipse Project. Direct it to the desired demo's project directory containing
main.c. This is either the 430BOOST-SHARP96_OutOfBox or 430BOOST-SHARP96_GrlibDisplay project
(see Figure 13).
Figure 13. Directing the Project→Import Function to the Demo Project
Selecting the \CCS or \CCS_Code_Size_Limited sub-directory also works. The CCS-specific files are
located there.
When you click "OK", CCS should recognize the project and allow you to import it. The indication that
CCS has found it is that the project appears in the box shown in Figure 14, and it has a checkmark to the
left of it.
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Figure 14. When CCS Has Found the Project
Sometimes CCS finds it, but does not have a checkmark; this might mean that your workspace already
has a project by that name. You can resolve this by re-naming or deleting that project. (Even if you don't
see it in the CCS workspace, be sure to check the workspace's directory on the file system.)
Finally, click "Finish". Note that even if you check the "Copy projects into workspace" checkbox, most of
the resources are linked and will remain in their original location.
3.2.2
IAR
IAR Embedded Workbench™ IDE v5.60 or higher is required. To open the demo in IAR, simply choose
File→Open→Workspace…, and direct it to the *.eww workspace file inside the \IAR subdirectory of the
desired demo. All workspace information is contained within this file.
The subdirectory also has an *.ewp project file; this file can be opened into an existing workspace, using
Project→Add-Existing-Project….
Although the software examples have all the code required to run them, IAR users may wish to download
and install MSP430Ware, which contains driverlib, grlib, capacitive touch library, and the TI Resource
Explorer. These are already included in a CCS installation (unless the user selected otherwise).
3.3
Out-of-Box Software Example
This section describes the functionality and structure of the out-of-box software that is preloaded on the
EVM.
NOTE: The out-of-box experience relies on the 430BOOST-SHARP96 BoosterPack and has a very
limited use without it. A 430BOOST-SHARP96 BoosterPack is included in the MSP-BNDLFR5969LCD bundle along with the FR5969 LaunchPad.
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The full out-of-box demo cannot be built with the free version of CCS or IAR (IAR Kickstart) due to the
code size limit. To bypass this limitation, a code-size-limited CCS version is provided that has most
functionality integrated into a library. The code that is built into the library can be viewed by the user, but it
cannot be edited. For full functionality, download the full version of either CCS or IAR.
There are five applications in the out-of-box software. All of them are in one project and the different
applications can be cycled through in the user interface.
3.3.1
Source File Structure
The project is split into multiple files. This makes it easier to navigate and reuse parts of it for other
projects.
Table 5. Source Files and Folders
Name
3.3.2
Description
Main.c
The user experience demo main function, shared ISRs, and other functions
ActivePowerMeasure.c
Main function file for Active Mode Power app
ClockApp.c
Main function file for Clock app
FR59xx_EXP.c
File for handling system init, main menu, and button operations
FRAMSpeedApp.c
Main function file for FRAM Speed app
Game.c
Main function file for SliderBall video game app
SYS.c
Functions to enter and exit LPM3.5
myTimer.c
Contains all timer-based functions and interrupts
ULPMeter.c
Main function file for Battery Free Stopwatch app
Library: CTS
Capacitive Touch Software Library (CAPSENSELIBRARY)
Library: Driverlib
Device driver library (MSP430DRIVERLIB)
Library: grlib
Graphics library for the SHARP LCD (MSP430-GRLIB)
Folder: Preloaded images
Images for the LCD screen
Navigation and Main Menu
Upon powering up the out-of-box demo, the title screens appear on the LCD, and are followed by the main
selection menu. The main menu displays all the applications available in the demo. The application
options in the menu are highlighted by using the left capacitive touch slider.
NOTE: Only the left capacitive touch slider is activated for navigation.
Once an application is selected, the right button (S2) is used to enter the application. To change the
application or exit, use the left button (S1) and then navigate the main menu to switch to a different
application.
3.3.3
Clock Application
NOTE: This application relies on the operation of the 32.768-kHz clock crystal that is pre-populated
on the LaunchPad.
To enter this application the "Clock" option on the main menu must be highlighted and the right button
(S2) then pushed.
Immediately upon entering the Clock app, the user is expected to setup the date and time details before
the clock starts running. This needs to be done every time the application is entered since the clock
values are not maintained when running any of the other applications. To set the time and data
parameters use the following steps:
1. On entering the app, the parameter being modified will begin to blink
2. The left capacitive touch slider can be used to increment or decrement the blinking parameter by
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placing a finger on the top or bottom portion, respectively, of the slider
3. The value of the blinking parameter can be locked by placing a finger in the middle of the left
capacitive touch slider
4. The parameter which is being modified can be changed with the right button (S2).
5. Repeat steps 2 to 4 until all parameters have been set, after which the clock will reset the seconds and
begin to track the time from the set time and date
When the clock begins to run, note that an option to turn on or off the seconds display is provided using
the left button (S1). This is useful when attempting to measure power. The device spends most of the time
in standby (LPM3), waking up every one second to update the RTC values. However if the display is
updated every second, the average power is much higher than just the LPM3 power due to time and
energy required to modify the LCD through SPI. If the SecON option is turned off, the device continues to
provide a one second wakeup to update the RTC values but the display is updated only once a minute to
save power. In this configuration the device power will be similar to power in LPM3 (refer device data
sheet for exact values).
When attempting to measure power using the Current jumper J9, ensure that the meter is in place before
the board is powered up. If this jumper is removed while running the application it results in a power cycle
of the device (since the connection to Vcc is broken) and the clock parameters will need to be re-entered.
3.3.4
FRAM Speed Application
To enter the FRAM Speed app, the "FRAM Speed" option on the main menu must be highlighted and the
right button (S2) then pushed. In this application, the FRAM write speed (in kilobytes per second), the total
data written to FRAM (in kilobytes), and the FRAM endurance (in percentage) is tracked and displayed on
the LCD. No user interaction is required.
The application uses Direct Memory Access (DMA) to transfer data to a 1KB block of FRAM. The starting
address of this block is defined and can be modified within the FRAMSpeedApp.h file. Note that changing
this location can cause an overlap with other application code. This is not advised since code may be over
written while running the application. Hence special care needs to be taken to evaluate the size of the
code to ensure that it is not over-written while measuring the FRAM write speed.
It should be noted that this application is optimized for speed rather than power. The speed of this
application is approximately 7500KB (7.5MB) per second. On a flash device, the achievable speed would
be approximately 13KB per second.
Larger blocks of data can be written to, resulting in faster write speeds, but also higher power
consumption. For more information on how to optimize FRAM write speeds, refer to the application report
Maximizing FRAM Write Speed on the MSP430FR57xx (SLAA498).
In this application, the system main clock is configured to use the DCO at 8 MHz. The application
configures the DMA transfer of data and continuously executes it while remaining in LPM0. Each time the
DMA writes the 1KB block, a count variable is incremented and the next DMA transfer is triggered. A timer
is set up to interrupt the FRAM writing every 0.25 second to calculate the speed, total the kilobytes of data
written, update the endurance, and then output these parameters on the LCD.
Note that the FRAM endurance percentage is retained after a power cycle. To exit the application and
stop the FRAM writes, the left button (S1) can be pushed allowing the user to return to the main menu.
3.3.4.1
Understanding the Numbers Behind the FRAM Speed Application
The LCD is updated every 250 ms with an updated percentage change in the FRAM endurance. To
calculate the endurance, some approximations were made in order to provide a meaningful output on the
LCD.
Every 250 ms, 1.8MB of FRAM are programmed with a pattern. Hence the speed of FRAM writes is
calculated as 7.564 MB/s. The FRAM is written to in blocks of 1K bytes; it is this 1KB block that is subject
to the lifetime FRAM endurance specification.
FRAM endurance of block = E = 1015 write cycles. This is a minimum specification for FRAM endurance
found in the device data sheet.
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Table 6. FRAM Endurance Calculation for 1KB Block of FRAM
Variable
Derived From
Value
E (FRAM Endurance)
Data sheet
1015 writes
W (Write Speed)
Application
7.564 MB/second
B (FRAM block size)
Application
1KB (1024 bytes)
N (number of writes to a unique byte/sec)
N=W/B
7386 writes/second
TLCD (time between LCD updates)
Application
250 ms
TLIFE = E / N
1.35 × 1011 seconds
(over 4000 years)
L = (TLCD / TLIFE) × 100
1.85 × 10-10%
TLIFE (time until endurance spec is met)
L (lifetime percentage reduction/LCD update)
The calculated value is rounded up to 2 × 10-10%, or 0.0000000002%. This is the amount the FRAM
endurance is decremented on the LCD every 250 ms.
Note that the FRAM endurance percentage is retained during on a power cycle. This parameter is
preserved by storing it in FRAM and preventing the variable from being overwritten on a power cycle.
Refer to the NO INIT and LOCATION pragmas in the CCS compiler documentation for more details. This
parameter will be reset when the device is reprogrammed, and the address overwritten.
3.3.5
Battery Free Application
To enter the Battery Free Stopwatch application, the "Battery Free" option on the main menu must be
highlighted and the right button (S2) then pushed.
This mode is intended to be used when running from the super cap only. See Section 2.2.6 for more
information on how to power the LaunchPad from the super cap.
When the application is entered, a submenu appears showing two possible actions to be taken. The first
action is to "Run App," which will start the Battery Free Stopwatch application, and log . The other option
is to "Transmit Data," which will transmit all logged data from previous runs through the MSP430 UART to
a PC.
The "Run App" selection has four modes:
1. Title Mode (Warning Page)
2. Deep Sleep -LPM3.5 Mode
3. Display Mode
4. Low Battery Indicator Mode
When in Title mode or Display mode, the right button (S2) can be used to put the device into LPM3.5
(Deep Sleep Mode). Also in these two modes, the left button (S1) can be used to exit the app and return
to the main menu at any time.
When in Deep Sleep mode, the device remains in LPM3.5, and only the RTC is active. The left button
(S1) is deactivated while in this mode, and the right button (S2) can be used to wake the device from
LPM3.5 and send the device into Display mode. Also, in this mode the RTC wakes up the device
periodically to allow the ADC to sample the supply voltage before returning to LPM3.5. These ADC
samples of the supply voltage are logged into FRAM and can be transmitted back to a PC in the "Transmit
Data" mode.
The Display mode shows the stopwatch display and also the charge consumed while in LPM3.5. The
stopwatch is started when the device enters LPM3.5 and stopped on exit. Hence the total time spent in
LPM3.5 is displayed in HH:MM:SS format. The charge indicator is a reflection of the most recent ADC
sample of supply voltage. If the device is left inactive at the "Display Mode" screen for more than ten
seconds, the app will timeout and control reverts to the main menu.
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Low Battery mode is entered conditionally following an ADC measurement of the supply voltage. When
VCC < 2.2 V, the device will display a "Low Battery" warning screen. The screen will recommend that the
device be plugged into the PC through USB for charging. In this mode, the left button (S1) is deactivated,
and the right button (S2) is used to check if USB has been plugged in or not. If the device has not been
plugged into USB and the right button (S2) is pushed, the device remains in Low Battery mode. If the
device has been plugged into USB and the right button (S2) is pushed, the device will enter Deep Sleep
mode once again.
When running this application, the ADC measurements are logged in FRAM while the device is running
from the super cap indicating that the ADC sampling and FRAM write have a very low power footprint.
These logged values can then be sent to the PC and the data processed to analyze the reduction of
charge over time. The transfer of data can be done in the UART transmit mode.
The basic operation of the UART transmit mode is outlined below.
1. The eUSCI-UART and DMA modules are set up to transfer the data from FRAM
2. "Sending Data – Please Wait" screen displayed while the operation is in progress
3. On completion "Data Send Complete" screen is displayed
4. The data can be viewed using any hyper terminal application on the PC
3.3.6
Active Power Application
The active power of the MSP430FR5969 device is directly dependent on the code and data cache hit ratio
and the clock speed of the CPU. The Active Power application shows the impact of both these factors on
overall system power.
To measure the power consumption of the MSP430FR5969 for the different frequencies and cache hit
ratios, the following steps should be followed:
1. Remove the "Measure Current" jumper from the LaunchPad
2. Use an ammeter set to the "mA" range and connect the leads of the ammeter to the nodes of the
"Measure Current" jumper
3. Navigate the main menu to the "Active Mode" app
4. Choose a frequency and cache hit ratio from the subsequent menus
5. Press the right button (S2) to enter the cache hit code
6. Tune the ammeter range to obtain the most accurate current measurement values
7. Prior to exiting the cache hit code, ensure that ammeter is in "mA" range, then press right button (S2)
to exit cache hit code
3.3.7
SliderBall Game
This application was designed to show the functioning ability of the two Capacitive Touch sliders in
conjunction with the LCD from the 430BOOST-SHARP96 BoosterPack.
To enter the application, the SliderBall game option on the main menu must be highlighted and the right
button (S2) then pushed. The SliderBall game requires the player to use a sliding paddle to keep the ball
in play. The goal of the game is to keep the ball alive and on the screen by having it hit off of the two
paddles at each end of the screen. Users start off with five lives to accumulate as many points as
possible. For each time that the ball is blocked by the paddle, points are awarded. The higher the
difficulty, the more points are awarded for each hit. Each time the ball reaches the end of the screen and
the paddle has not hit the ball, the user loses a life. After the life is lost, the ball automatically starts again
for another round. This repeats until all lives are exhausted, and the game is over. If the high score has
been achieved, a congratulations screen will be displayed to notify the user. At this point the final score,
as well as the board high score will be displayed and the user may then choose a new level of difficulty to
play once again.
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To navigate the user levels menu and choose an option, the left capacitive touch slider and right button
are used similar to all previous menus. The user may choose between the following: easy, normal, hard,
and Insane. After selecting a difficulty, the game will begin to start, with the ball moving to the right-hand
side first. Both capacitive touch sliders are used to control their respective paddles along the side of the
screen. When the user misses the ball, it will be held in place for a few cycles before starting to move
again to give the user a chance to regroup following losing a life. To create "easier" versions of the game,
sleep cycles are added to slow down the game play.
The high score for each user level is stored in FRAM and is retained on subsequent power cycles. This
value is erased only when the device is re-programmed.
3.3.8
Special Notes: Inverting the Display Color Scheme
A feature that has been built in to the out-of-box demo code is the ability to invert the display colors. This
can be a useful feature for times when the original display color settings are difficult to read.
To invert the colors edit the file 'sharp96x96.h' within the 'grlib' directory. In the 'User Configuration for the
LCD Driver' section under 'Invert Display Option' use either one of the # defines 'NORMAL_DISPLAY' or
'INVERT_DISPLAY' as needed.
When INVERT_DISPLAY is defined it allows the out-of-box demo to display with a black background and
white foreground once the demo code is re-downloaded onto the MSP-EXP430FR5969 board.
3.3.9
Special Notes: Adding the Out-of-Box Source Files to an Existing Project
These instructions for Code Composer Studio™ IDE also apply to creating a new project for downloading
the out-of-box code. Once the source files have been added the following additional project options need
to be set.
1. From the Project Properties -> MSP430 Compiler -> Advanced Language Options , Check the 'Enable
GCC Support' box
2. From the Project -> Properties -> MSP430 Compiler -> Optimization, set the optimization level to '1'
3. Add all the include paths for the header files present in each subfolder. This is done from Project ->
Properties -> MSP430 Compiler -> Include Options. Edit the box titled "Add dir to #include search
path" as shown below.
3.4
430BOOST-SHARP96 Graphics Library Demo
NOTE: This graphics library demo is dependent on the 430BOOST-SHARP96 BoosterPack that
comes with the MSP-BNDL-FR5969LCD bundle.
The grlib demo shows how to use the MSP430 Graphics Library http://www.ti.com/tool/msp430-grlib or
"grlib," in a project with the Sharp® display. This demo cycles screens without user interaction to show
simple graphics primitives.
• Pixels
• Lines
• Circles
• Rectangles
• Text
• Images
The demo introduces the functions to configure grlib such as initialization, color inversion, and using
foreground and background colors properly.
FRAM memory devices like the MSP430FR5969 are touted for ultra-low power, but in some applications
the FRAM memory can provide additional benefits such as dynamic memory allocation. In applications
with dot matrix LCD displays, it is often advantageous to keep a RAM buffer of the contents currently on
the display. For a smaller display such as the Sharp display on the 430BOOST-SHARP96 BoosterPack,
this doesn't require much RAM to keep the display contents.
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Additional Resources
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4#/ >UPAO [email protected] =
96 LETAHO/NKS
× 96 NKSO = 1152 >UPAO
8 LETAHO/>UPA
(1)
But in displays with more pixels or color displays, these RAM buffers can quickly become very large. If the
Sharp display was a color display with 16 bits or color per pixel, (common in color displays) this buffer
would be significantly larger.
96 LETAHO/NKS
4#/ >UPAO [email protected] =
× 96 NKSO = 18432 >UPAO
0.5 LETAHO/>UPA
(2)
When selecting a microcontroller for an application with a display like this would require a very large
memory device for a typical RAM/Flash microcontroller. Typical RAM memory cutoffs would likely require
a 32kB RAM device with around 128kB or 256kB of Flash. This may be significantly more memory than
the application requires.
FRAM's unified memory block can be dynamically partitioned into data or code memory, providing
unmatched flexibility. Applications like this can be easily supported with a 32kB or 64kB FRAM device.
Figure 15. FRAM Unified Memory with Dynamic Partitioning
4
Additional Resources
4.1
LaunchPad Websites
More information about the FR5969 LaunchPad, supported BoosterPacks, and available resources can be
found at:
• FR5969 LaunchPad tool page: resources specific to this particular LaunchPad
• TI's LaunchPad portal: information about all LaunchPads from TI for all MCUs
4.2
Information on the MSP430FR5969
At some point, you will probably want more information about the FR5969 device. For every MSP430
device, the documentation is organized as shown in Table 7.
Table 7. How MSP430 Device Documentation is Organized
Document
26
For FR5969
Description
Device family user's
guide
MSP430FR58xx, MSP430FR59xx,
MSP430FR68xx, and MSP430FR69xx Family
User's Guide (SLAU367)
Architectural information about the device,
including clocks, timers, ADC, and other
peripherals.
Device-specific data
sheet
MSP430FR59xx, MSP430FR58xx Mixed Signal
Microcontroller data sheet (SLAS704)
Device-specific information and all parametric
information for this device
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4.3
Download CCS, IAR, or MSPGCC
Although the files can be viewed with any text editor, 'more can be done with the projects if they're opened
with a development environment like Code Composer Studio (CCS), IAR, or Energia.
CCS and IAR are each available in a full version, or a free, code-size-limited version. The full out-of-box
demo cannot be built with the free version of CCS or IAR (IAR Kickstart) due to the code size limit. To
bypass this limitation, a code-size-limited CCS version is provided, that has most functionality integrated
into a library. The code that is built into the library is able to be viewed by the user, but it cannot be edited.
For full functionality download the full version of either CCS or IAR.
See the MSP430 software tools page to download them, and for instructions on installation.
4.4
MSP430Ware and TI Resource Explorer
MSP430Ware is a complete collection of libraries and tools. It includes a driver library (driverlib) and the
graphics library (grlib) used in the software demo. By default, MSP430Ware is included in a CCS
installation. IAR users must download it separately.
MSP430Ware includes the TI Resource Explorer, for easily browsing tools. For example, all the software
examples are shown in the tree below.
Figure 16. MSP-EXP430FR5969 Software Examples in TI Resource Explorer
Inside TI Resource Explorer, these examples and many more can be found, and easily imported into CCS
with one click.
4.5
MSP430FR5969 Code Examples
This is a set of very simple code examples that demonstrate how to use the MSP430's entire set of
peripherals: ADC12, Timer_A, Timer_B, and so on. These do not use driverlib, rather they access the
MSP430 registers directly.
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FAQs
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Every MSP430 derivative has a set of these code examples. When writing code that uses a peripheral,
they can often serve as a starting point.
There are also code examples available that use driver library. These code examples are part of the
driverlib download included with MSP430Ware. To access these code examples, navigate into the
driverlib folder or use the TI Resource Explorer to import into CCS.
4.6
MSP430 Application Notes
There are many application notes at www.ti.com/msp430 with practical design examples and topics.
4.7
The Community
4.7.1
TI E2E Community
Search the forums at e2e.ti.com. If you 'cannot find your answer, post your question to the community!
4.7.2
Community at Large
Many online communities focus on the LaunchPad – for example, http://www.43oh.com. You can find
additional tools, resources, and support from these communities.
5
FAQs
Q: I can't get the backchannel UART to connect. What's wrong?
A:
•
•
•
Check the following:
Do the baud rate in the host's terminal application and the USCI_A0 settings match?
Are the appropriate jumpers in place on the isolation jumper block?
Probe on RXD and send data from the host; if you don't see data, it might be a problem on the host
side.
• Probe on TXD while sending data from the MSP430. If you don't see data, it might be a configuration
problem on the USCI_A0 module.
• Consider the use of the hardware flow control lines (especially for higher baud rates)
Q: So the onboard emulator is really open source? And I can build my own onboard emulator?
A: Yes! We encourage you to do so. The design files are on ti.com.
Q: The MSP430 G2 LaunchPad had a socket, allowing me change the target device. Why doesn't
this LaunchPad use one?
A: This LaunchPad provides more functionality, and this means using a device with more pins. Sockets for
devices with this many pins are too expensive for the LaunchPad's target price.
Q: With the female headers on the bottom, the board doesn't sit flat on the table, and I can't
unsolder them. Why did TI do this?
A: For several reasons. A major feedback item on previous LaunchPads was the desire for female
headers instead of male ones. But simply using female instead is problematic, because compatibility with
existing BoosterPacks would be lost, and some people prefer male headers. So, adding female headers
without removing male ones satisfies both preferences. It also allows more flexibility in stacking
BoosterPacks and other LaunchPads.
The downside to this approach is perhaps that the board doesn't sit flat. But while a USB cable is attached
(the usual development model), it tends to not sit flat anyway.
For those wishing it to sit flat, holes were drilled in the corners, so that standoffs could be fastened.
Rubber bumper feet also should work.
28
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Schematics
www.ti.com
6
Schematics
A
C
B
MSP430FR5969 LaunchPad
Main MCU
1
TDO
TMS
TDI
JTAG
TCK
TEST
RST
RST
CTS_TARGETIN
TX_TARGETOUT
RX_TARGETIN
1
RTS_TARGETOUT
APPLICATION_UART
D
JTAG
VCC
J5
J4
BP1-VCC
25 P2.1/TB0.0
BP7
26 P2.2/TB0.2
BP8
BP9
PJ.1/TDI13
PJ.3/TCK15
P4.1/A9 17
P4.0/A8 16
P4.3/A11 19
P4.2/A1018
PJ.2/TMS/ACLK14
BP6
P2.5/TB0.020
BP5
P2.6/TB0.121
BP4
TEST/SBWTCK22
BP18
P2.0/TB0.624
BP19
BP3
NMI/SBWTDIO/RST
23
BP16-RST
PJ.0/TDO12
BP15
BP14
27 P3.4/TB0.3/SMCLK
P1.4/TB0.110
BP13
28 P3.5/TB0.4/COUT
P1.3/TA1.2 9
BP12
P4.7 8
BP11
29 P3.6/TB0.5
30 P3.7/TB0.6
31 P1.6/TB0.3
P3.1/A13/C13 5
33 P4.4/TB0.5
S2
P1.0/TA0.1/DMAE01
47 AVSS
C9
46 PJ.5/LFXOUT
C2
44 AVSS
VCC
45 PJ.4/LFXIN
Low Current Red
Basic User Interface (left)
100n
37 DVCC
1u
J6
41 AVSS
36 DVSS
38 P2.7
470
P1.1/TA0.2 2
42 PJ.6/HFXIN
R3
P1.2/TA1.1 3
35 P4.6
39 P2.3/TA0.0
3
P3.0/A12/C12 4
34 P4.5
40 P2.4/TA1.0
S1
LaunchPad Header (right)
P3.2/A14/C14 6
MSP430FR5969RGZ
32 P1.7/TB0.4
LED1
P3.3/A15/C15 7
R6
49 PWPD
LaunchPad Header (left)
U1
48 AVCC
BP10
Y1
4 MHz (DNP)
Low Current Green
R4
10p10p
C3
27p (DNP)
C4
27p (DNP)
0
Expand functionality with BoosterPacks:
VCC
100n
C8
Crystals
Texas Instruments
R5
Title
0
www.ti.com/LaunchPad
Size
Connect Analog and Digital Power Supply
Engineer
A
LED2
Basic User Interface (right)
32.7638 kHz, 7.0pF
Y4
C5 C6
3
390
Place Jumper
4
2
BP17-TEST
P1.5/TB0.211
43 PJ.7/HFXOUT
2
BP20-GND
BP2
B
C
D.Schneider
B
4
MSP430 LaunchPad FR5969
Number
Rev
MSP-EXP430FR5969
2.0
Drawn by D.Schneider
Date
12/19/2013
1
5
Filename
of
LaunchPad-MSP430FR5969.sch Sheet
D
12/19/2013
Figure 17. Schematic 1 of 5
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Schematics
www.ti.com
A
C
B
D
Main MCU - Debugger and Power Connections
1
1
External Power Supply
J21
1
RX_TARGETIN
2
V_DEBUGGER
V_EXT 3
2
3 TEST
1
4
RST
J12
5
6
TX_TARGETOUT
Measure Current
J10
dnp
V_EXT 1
eZ430 50mil header
Power Selection2
V_DEBUGGER 3
Bypass
External
V_CHARGE
R2
Debugger
10
Place Jumper
R7
Cap Selection
VCC
1
VCC 1
Place Jumper
J11
Current Limiter
3
+
Charge Cap
EZFET_SBWNC
C7
J8
dnp
EEC-S0HD104H
0.1F
Place Jumper
EZFET_SBWTCK
TEST
EZFET_SBWTDIO
RST
EZFET_UARTRXD
TX_TARGETOUT
EZFET_UARTTXD
RX_TARGETIN
EZFET_UARTRTS
CTS_TARGETIN
EZFET_UARTCTS
RTS_TARGETOUT
EZFET_VCCTARGET
2
3
Place Jumper
J13
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
2
V_CAP
Use
10
Measure Voltage
J9
2
3
2
eZ-FET
J2
Super Cap
EZFET_VBUS
J7 5V_VBUS
JTAG
3
LaunchPad Power Hooks (bottom right)
VCC
VCC
1 VCC
J3
2
J1
TMS
RST
TCK
TEST
C1
TX_TARGETOUT
RST
1n
Reset
S3
Texas Instruments
Title
CTS_TARGETIN
dnp
3
TDI
RX_TARGETIN
4
R1
47k
TDO
RTS_TARGETOUT
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
14 pin JTAG
Size
B
APPLICATION_UART
Engineer
A
B
C
D.Schneider
4
MSP430 LaunchPad FR5969
Number
Rev
MSP-EXP430FR5969
2.0
Drawn by D.Schneider
Date
12/19/2013
2
5
Filename
of
LaunchPad-MSP430FR5969.sch Sheet
D
12/19/2013
Figure 18. Schematic 2 of 5
30
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Schematics
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A
C
B
D
eZ-FET - USB Interface and Power Supply
eZ-FET Rev1.2
1
7
6
1
CONN_USB_ZX62R-B-5P
5
PGND
4
3
2
R104 27
EZFET_DP
EZFET_PU.0/DP
EZFET_DM
EZFET_PU.1/DM
1
13
12
1 IO1
VCC 6
2 IO2
IO4 5
3 GND
2
R103 27
IC102
EZFET_VBUS
PGND
IO3 4
R123
R106
C110
C111
10p
10p
EZFET_PUR
PGND
PGND
R105
1M
33k
TPD4E004DRY
1k4
PGND
2
PGND
ezFET - DEBUG
1 1
TP-038
1 1
TP101
TP-038
IC101
EZFET_VCC
TP102
PGND
C108
1 1
TP-038
1 1
TP103
3
TP-038
100n
EZFET_VBUS
TP104
1 IN
EN 6
2 GND
NC 5
3 OUT
NC 4
TLV70036DSE
EZFET_VCC
PGND
3
PGND
PGND
1 1
TP-038
1 1
TP-038
1 1
TP-038
1 1
TP-038
1 1
TP-038
1 1
TP105
TP-038
C105
100n
EZFET_TEST
TP106
EZFET_TDO
TP107
PGND
EZFET_TDI
TP108
EZFET_TMS
TP109
EZFET_TCK
TP110
EZFET_RST
Texas Instruments
4
Title
4
MSP430 LaunchPad FR5969
1 1
TP-038
1 1
TP113
TP-038
Size
EZFET_DCDCRST
TP114
B
EZFET_DCDCTEST
Engineer
A
B
C
D.Schneider
Number
Rev
MSP-EXP430FR5969
2.0
Drawn by D.Schneider
Date
12/19/2013
3
5
Filename
of
LaunchPad-MSP430FR5969.sch Sheet
D
12/19/2013
Figure 19. Schematic 3 of 5
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Schematics
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A
C
B
D
eZ-FET - Host MCU for emulation
Q101
PIEZO_CSTCR4M00G15L992
EZFET_TEST
PJ.0/TDO 60
TEST/SBWTCK 59
EZFET_VBUS
EZFET_TDI
EZFET_TDO
PJ.1/TDI/TCLK 61
EZFET_TCK
EZFET_TMS
PJ.3/TCK 63
EZFET_RST
PJ.2/TMS 62
R109
47k
EZFET_PUR
1
EZFET_VCC
EZFET_PU.0/DP
3
1
EZFET_PU.1/DM
eZ-FET Rev1.2
C102
C107
220n
220n
1
EZFET_RST
C112
1 P6.0/CB0/A0
2
R125
150k
VSSU 49
PUR 51
PU.0/DP 50
VBUS 53
PU.1/DM 52
V18 55
VUSB 54
AVSS2 56
P5.2/XT2IN 57
P5.3/XT2OUT 58
PWPD 65
R124
240k
NMI-SBWTDIO/RST64
1n
EZFET_VBUS
P4.7/PM_NONE 48
C123EZFET_AVCCOUT2ADC
2 P6.1/CB1/A1
P4.6/PM_NONE 47
33p
3 P6.2/CB2/A2
46
P4.5/PM_UCA1RXD/PM_UCA1SOMI
4 P6.3/CB3/A3
45
P4.4/PM_UCA1TXD/PM_UCA1SIMO
EZFET_SBWNC
EZFET_DCDCIO0
5 P6.4/CB4/A4
44
P4.3/PM_UCB1CLK/PM_UCA1STE
EZFET_SBWTCK
EZFET_DCDCIO1
6 P6.5/CB5/A5
43
P4.2/PM_UCB1SOMI/PM_UCB1SCL
EZFET_SBWTDIO
EZFET_DCDCRST
7 P6.6/CB6/A6
EZFET_DCDCTEST
42
P4.1/PM_UCB1SIMO/PM_UCB1SDA
MSP101
8 P6.7/CB7/A7
MSP430F5528IRGC
9 P5.0/A8/VREF+/VEREF+
41
P4.0/PM_UCB1STE/PM_UCA1CLK
EZFET_VCC
DVCC2 40
DVSS2 39
10 P5.1/A9/VREF-/VEREF-
C103
C121
11 AVCC1
P3.4/UCA0RXD/UCA0SOMI38
EZFET_UARTRXD
100n
12 P5.4/XIN
P3.3/UCA0TXD/UCA0SIMO37
EZFET_UARTTXD
R102
LED101
LED102
Red
Green
32 P2.6/RTCCLK/
30 P2.4/TA2.1
31 P2.5/TA2.2
28 P2.2/TA2CLK/SMCLK
27 P2.1/TA1.2
26 P2.0/TA1.1
29 P2.3/TA2.0
EZFET_UARTCTS
EZFET_DCDCPULSE
Texas Instruments
Title
Size
B
Engineer
A
3
390
EZFET_VCCEN2
470n
4
24 P1.6/TA1CLK/CBOUT
R101
470
EZFET_VCCEN1
C101
25 P1.7/TA1.0
EZFET_UARTRTS
22 P1.4/TA0.3
P2.7/UCB0STE/UCA0CLK33
16 DVSS1
23 P1.5/TA0.4
100n
EZFET_HOSTSDA
21 P1.3/TA0.2
10u
EZFET_HOSTSCL
P3.0/UCB0SIMO/UCB0SDA34
20 P1.2/TA0.1
C113
P3.1/UCB0SOMI/UCB0SCL35
15 DVCC1
18 P1.0/TA0CLK/ACLK
C104
14 AVSS1
19 P1.1/TA0.0
EZFET_VCC
17 VCORE(2)
3
100n
P3.2/UCB0CLK/UCA0STE36
13 P5.5/XOUT
+
2
B
C
D.Schneider
4
MSP430 LaunchPad FR5969
Number
Rev
MSP-EXP430FR5969
2.0
Drawn by D.Schneider
Date
12/19/2013
4
5
Filename
of
LaunchPad-MSP430FR5969.sch Sheet
D
12/19/2013
Figure 20. Schematic 4 of 5
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A
C
B
D
eZ-FET - MCU controlled DCDC converter
eZ-FET Rev1.2
1
1
EZFET_VCC
+
C106
C124
4.7u
100n
AVSS 13
DVSS 14
AVCC 15
PWPD
R112
220k
DVCC 16
17
EZFET_VCCOUT
EZFET_AVCCOUT 1 P1.0
2 P1.1
3k3
EZFET_DCDCPULSE
2k2
EZFET_VCCOUT
EZFET_DCDCTEST
4 P1.3MSP430G2452RSARST 9
5
P1.7
EZFET_DCDCRST
2
8
P1.4
2
R117
4k7
EZFET_VCCOUT
6k8
TEST 10
3 P1.2
EZFET_DCDCIO0
R114
220k
R128
XOUT 11
MSP102
P1.5
33p
R127
P1.6
EZFET_VCCOUT
7
C115
6
R113
220k
R116
4k7
R126
XIN 12
EZFET_DCDCIO1
EZFET_HOSTSDA
EZFET_HOSTSDA
EZFET_HOSTSCL
R115
220k
EZFET_AVCC
C116
EZFET_HOSTSCL
33p
EZFET_VCCEN1
EZFET_VBUS
EZFET_VBUS
+
R120
470
C109
C117
C118
4.7u
4.7u
100n
EZFET_VCC
2
IN2 7
3 IN1
GND 6
4 COM2
NO2 5
EZFET_VCCEN2
R108
47k
EZFET_VCCTARGET
TS5A21366RSE
3
DMG1013UW-7
T101
D
3
D101
BAS40-05W
COM1 8
47k
G
3
EZFET_DCDCPULSE
2 V+
R107
S
1
3
EZFET_VCCEN2
IC103
1 NO1
2
1
L101
1
B
820
D102
BAS40-05W
E
1
EZFET_VCCOUT
R121
220k
C119
4.7u
C120
100n
R119
0
EZFET_AVCCOUT2ADC
4
2.2uH
2
TARGET VCC SENSE
T102
BC850CW-115
3
R118
2
EZFET_VCCOUT
C
C122
R122
220k
Texas Instruments
33p
Title
Size
B
Engineer
A
B
C
D.Schneider
4
MSP430 LaunchPad FR5969
Number
Rev
MSP-EXP430FR5969
2.0
Drawn by D.Schneider
Date
12/19/2013
5
5
Filename
of
LaunchPad-MSP430FR5969.sch Sheet
D
12/19/2013
Figure 21. Schematic 5 of 5
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33
EVALUATION BOARD/KIT/MODULE (EVM) ADDITIONAL TERMS
Texas Instruments (TI) provides the enclosed Evaluation Board/Kit/Module (EVM) under the following conditions:
The user assumes all responsibility and liability for proper and safe handling of the goods. Further, the user indemnifies TI from all claims
arising from the handling or use of the goods.
Should this evaluation board/kit not meet the specifications indicated in the User’s Guide, the board/kit may be returned within 30 days from
the date of delivery for a full refund. THE FOREGOING LIMITED WARRANTY IS THE EXCLUSIVE WARRANTY MADE BY SELLER TO
BUYER AND IS IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER WARRANTIES, EXPRESSED, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, INCLUDING ANY WARRANTY OF
MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR ANY PARTICULAR PURPOSE. EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT OF THE INDEMNITY SET FORTH
ABOVE, NEITHER PARTY SHALL BE LIABLE TO THE OTHER FOR ANY INDIRECT, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL
DAMAGES.
Please read the User's Guide and, specifically, the Warnings and Restrictions notice in the User's Guide prior to handling the product. This
notice contains important safety information about temperatures and voltages. For additional information on TI's environmental and/or safety
programs, please visit www.ti.com/esh or contact TI.
No license is granted under any patent right or other intellectual property right of TI covering or relating to any machine, process, or
combination in which such TI products or services might be or are used. TI currently deals with a variety of customers for products, and
therefore our arrangement with the user is not exclusive. TI assumes no liability for applications assistance, customer product design,
software performance, or infringement of patents or services described herein.
REGULATORY COMPLIANCE INFORMATION
As noted in the EVM User’s Guide and/or EVM itself, this EVM and/or accompanying hardware may or may not be subject to the Federal
Communications Commission (FCC) and Industry Canada (IC) rules.
For EVMs not subject to the above rules, this evaluation board/kit/module is intended for use for ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT,
DEMONSTRATION OR EVALUATION PURPOSES ONLY and is not considered by TI to be a finished end product fit for general consumer
use. It generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and has not been tested for compliance with the limits of computing
devices pursuant to part 15 of FCC or ICES-003 rules, which are designed to provide reasonable protection against radio frequency
interference. Operation of the equipment may cause interference with radio communications, in which case the user at his own expense will
be required to take whatever measures may be required to correct this interference.
General Statement for EVMs including a radio
User Power/Frequency Use Obligations: This radio is intended for development/professional use only in legally allocated frequency and
power limits. Any use of radio frequencies and/or power availability of this EVM and its development application(s) must comply with local
laws governing radio spectrum allocation and power limits for this evaluation module. It is the user’s sole responsibility to only operate this
radio in legally acceptable frequency space and within legally mandated power limitations. Any exceptions to this are strictly prohibited and
unauthorized by Texas Instruments unless user has obtained appropriate experimental/development licenses from local regulatory
authorities, which is responsibility of user including its acceptable authorization.
For EVMs annotated as FCC – FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Part 15 Compliant
Caution
This device complies with part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) This device may not cause
harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.
Changes or modifications not expressly approved by the party responsible for compliance could void the user's authority to operate the
equipment.
FCC Interference Statement for Class A EVM devices
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to part 15 of the FCC Rules.
These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial
environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the
instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to
cause harmful interference in which case the user will be required to correct the interference at his own expense.
FCC Interference Statement for Class B EVM devices
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to part 15 of the FCC Rules.
These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation. This equipment
generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause
harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If
this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and
on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:
• Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
• Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
• Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is connected.
• Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
For EVMs annotated as IC – INDUSTRY CANADA Compliant
This Class A or B digital apparatus complies with Canadian ICES-003.
Changes or modifications not expressly approved by the party responsible for compliance could void the user’s authority to operate the
equipment.
Concerning EVMs including radio transmitters
This device complies with Industry Canada licence-exempt RSS standard(s). Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) this
device may not cause interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference, including interference that may cause undesired
operation of the device.
Concerning EVMs including detachable antennas
Under Industry Canada regulations, this radio transmitter may only operate using an antenna of a type and maximum (or lesser) gain
approved for the transmitter by Industry Canada. To reduce potential radio interference to other users, the antenna type and its gain should
be so chosen that the equivalent isotropically radiated power (e.i.r.p.) is not more than that necessary for successful communication.
This radio transmitter has been approved by Industry Canada to operate with the antenna types listed in the user guide with the maximum
permissible gain and required antenna impedance for each antenna type indicated. Antenna types not included in this list, having a gain
greater than the maximum gain indicated for that type, are strictly prohibited for use with this device.
Cet appareil numérique de la classe A ou B est conforme à la norme NMB-003 du Canada.
Les changements ou les modifications pas expressément approuvés par la partie responsable de la conformité ont pu vider l’autorité de
l'utilisateur pour actionner l'équipement.
Concernant les EVMs avec appareils radio
Le présent appareil est conforme aux CNR d'Industrie Canada applicables aux appareils radio exempts de licence. L'exploitation est
autorisée aux deux conditions suivantes : (1) l'appareil ne doit pas produire de brouillage, et (2) l'utilisateur de l'appareil doit accepter tout
brouillage radioélectrique subi, même si le brouillage est susceptible d'en compromettre le fonctionnement.
Concernant les EVMs avec antennes détachables
Conformément à la réglementation d'Industrie Canada, le présent émetteur radio peut fonctionner avec une antenne d'un type et d'un gain
maximal (ou inférieur) approuvé pour l'émetteur par Industrie Canada. Dans le but de réduire les risques de brouillage radioélectrique à
l'intention des autres utilisateurs, il faut choisir le type d'antenne et son gain de sorte que la puissance isotrope rayonnée équivalente
(p.i.r.e.) ne dépasse pas l'intensité nécessaire à l'établissement d'une communication satisfaisante.
Le présent émetteur radio a été approuvé par Industrie Canada pour fonctionner avec les types d'antenne énumérés dans le manuel
d’usage et ayant un gain admissible maximal et l'impédance requise pour chaque type d'antenne. Les types d'antenne non inclus dans
cette liste, ou dont le gain est supérieur au gain maximal indiqué, sont strictement interdits pour l'exploitation de l'émetteur.
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【Important Notice for Users of EVMs for RF Products in Japan】
】
This development kit is NOT certified as Confirming to Technical Regulations of Radio Law of Japan
If you use this product in Japan, you are required by Radio Law of Japan to follow the instructions below with respect to this product:
1.
2.
3.
Use this product in a shielded room or any other test facility as defined in the notification #173 issued by Ministry of Internal Affairs and
Communications on March 28, 2006, based on Sub-section 1.1 of Article 6 of the Ministry’s Rule for Enforcement of Radio Law of
Japan,
Use this product only after you obtained the license of Test Radio Station as provided in Radio Law of Japan with respect to this
product, or
Use of this product only after you obtained the Technical Regulations Conformity Certification as provided in Radio Law of Japan with
respect to this product. Also, please do not transfer this product, unless you give the same notice above to the transferee. Please note
that if you could not follow the instructions above, you will be subject to penalties of Radio Law of Japan.
Texas Instruments Japan Limited
(address) 24-1, Nishi-Shinjuku 6 chome, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan
http://www.tij.co.jp
【無線電波を送信する製品の開発キットをお使いになる際の注意事項】
本開発キットは技術基準適合証明を受けておりません。
本製品のご使用に際しては、電波法遵守のため、以下のいずれかの措置を取っていただく必要がありますのでご注意ください。
1.
2.
3.
電波法施行規則第6条第1項第1号に基づく平成18年3月28日総務省告示第173号で定められた電波暗室等の試験設備でご使用いただく。
実験局の免許を取得後ご使用いただく。
技術基準適合証明を取得後ご使用いただく。
なお、本製品は、上記の「ご使用にあたっての注意」を譲渡先、移転先に通知しない限り、譲渡、移転できないものとします。
上記を遵守頂けない場合は、電波法の罰則が適用される可能性があることをご留意ください。
日本テキサス・インスツルメンツ株式会社
東京都新宿区西新宿6丁目24番1号
西新宿三井ビル
http://www.tij.co.jp
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EVALUATION BOARD/KIT/MODULE (EVM)
WARNINGS, RESTRICTIONS AND DISCLAIMERS
For Feasibility Evaluation Only, in Laboratory/Development Environments. Unless otherwise indicated, this EVM is not a finished
electrical equipment and not intended for consumer use. It is intended solely for use for preliminary feasibility evaluation in
laboratory/development environments by technically qualified electronics experts who are familiar with the dangers and application risks
associated with handling electrical mechanical components, systems and subsystems. It should not be used as all or part of a finished end
product.
Your Sole Responsibility and Risk. You acknowledge, represent and agree that:
1.
2.
3.
4.
You have unique knowledge concerning Federal, State and local regulatory requirements (including but not limited to Food and Drug
Administration regulations, if applicable) which relate to your products and which relate to your use (and/or that of your employees,
affiliates, contractors or designees) of the EVM for evaluation, testing and other purposes.
You have full and exclusive responsibility to assure the safety and compliance of your products with all such laws and other applicable
regulatory requirements, and also to assure the safety of any activities to be conducted by you and/or your employees, affiliates,
contractors or designees, using the EVM. Further, you are responsible to assure that any interfaces (electronic and/or mechanical)
between the EVM and any human body are designed with suitable isolation and means to safely limit accessible leakage currents to
minimize the risk of electrical shock hazard.
Since the EVM is not a completed product, it may not meet all applicable regulatory and safety compliance standards (such as UL,
CSA, VDE, CE, RoHS and WEEE) which may normally be associated with similar items. You assume full responsibility to determine
and/or assure compliance with any such standards and related certifications as may be applicable. You will employ reasonable
safeguards to ensure that your use of the EVM will not result in any property damage, injury or death, even if the EVM should fail to
perform as described or expected.
You will take care of proper disposal and recycling of the EVM’s electronic components and packing materials.
Certain Instructions. It is important to operate this EVM within TI’s recommended specifications and environmental considerations per the
user guidelines. Exceeding the specified EVM ratings (including but not limited to input and output voltage, current, power, and
environmental ranges) may cause property damage, personal injury or death. If there are questions concerning these ratings please contact
a TI field representative prior to connecting interface electronics including input power and intended loads. Any loads applied outside of the
specified output range may result in unintended and/or inaccurate operation and/or possible permanent damage to the EVM and/or
interface electronics. Please consult the EVM User's Guide prior to connecting any load to the EVM output. If there is uncertainty as to the
load specification, please contact a TI field representative. During normal operation, some circuit components may have case temperatures
greater than 60°C as long as the input and output are maintained at a normal ambient operating temperature. These components include
but are not limited to linear regulators, switching transistors, pass transistors, and current sense resistors which can be identified using the
EVM schematic located in the EVM User's Guide. When placing measurement probes near these devices during normal operation, please
be aware that these devices may be very warm to the touch. As with all electronic evaluation tools, only qualified personnel knowledgeable
in electronic measurement and diagnostics normally found in development environments should use these EVMs.
Agreement to Defend, Indemnify and Hold Harmless. You agree to defend, indemnify and hold TI, its licensors and their representatives
harmless from and against any and all claims, damages, losses, expenses, costs and liabilities (collectively, "Claims") arising out of or in
connection with any use of the EVM that is not in accordance with the terms of the agreement. This obligation shall apply whether Claims
arise under law of tort or contract or any other legal theory, and even if the EVM fails to perform as described or expected.
Safety-Critical or Life-Critical Applications. If you intend to evaluate the components for possible use in safety critical applications (such
as life support) where a failure of the TI product would reasonably be expected to cause severe personal injury or death, such as devices
which are classified as FDA Class III or similar classification, then you must specifically notify TI of such intent and enter into a separate
Assurance and Indemnity Agreement.
Mailing Address: Texas Instruments, Post Office Box 655303, Dallas, Texas 75265
Copyright © 2014, Texas Instruments Incorporated
IMPORTANT NOTICE
Texas Instruments Incorporated and its subsidiaries (TI) reserve the right to make corrections, enhancements, improvements and other
changes to its semiconductor products and services per JESD46, latest issue, and to discontinue any product or service per JESD48, latest
issue. Buyers should obtain the latest relevant information before placing orders and should verify that such information is current and
complete. All semiconductor products (also referred to herein as “components”) are sold subject to TI’s terms and conditions of sale
supplied at the time of order acknowledgment.
TI warrants performance of its components to the specifications applicable at the time of sale, in accordance with the warranty in TI’s terms
and conditions of sale of semiconductor products. Testing and other quality control techniques are used to the extent TI deems necessary
to support this warranty. Except where mandated by applicable law, testing of all parameters of each component is not necessarily
performed.
TI assumes no liability for applications assistance or the design of Buyers’ products. Buyers are responsible for their products and
applications using TI components. To minimize the risks associated with Buyers’ products and applications, Buyers should provide
adequate design and operating safeguards.
TI does not warrant or represent that any license, either express or implied, is granted under any patent right, copyright, mask work right, or
other intellectual property right relating to any combination, machine, or process in which TI components or services are used. Information
published by TI regarding third-party products or services does not constitute a license to use such products or services or a warranty or
endorsement thereof. Use of such information may require a license from a third party under the patents or other intellectual property of the
third party, or a license from TI under the patents or other intellectual property of TI.
Reproduction of significant portions of TI information in TI data books or data sheets is permissible only if reproduction is without alteration
and is accompanied by all associated warranties, conditions, limitations, and notices. TI is not responsible or liable for such altered
documentation. Information of third parties may be subject to additional restrictions.
Resale of TI components or services with statements different from or beyond the parameters stated by TI for that component or service
voids all express and any implied warranties for the associated TI component or service and is an unfair and deceptive business practice.
TI is not responsible or liable for any such statements.
Buyer acknowledges and agrees that it is solely responsible for compliance with all legal, regulatory and safety-related requirements
concerning its products, and any use of TI components in its applications, notwithstanding any applications-related information or support
that may be provided by TI. Buyer represents and agrees that it has all the necessary expertise to create and implement safeguards which
anticipate dangerous consequences of failures, monitor failures and their consequences, lessen the likelihood of failures that might cause
harm and take appropriate remedial actions. Buyer will fully indemnify TI and its representatives against any damages arising out of the use
of any TI components in safety-critical applications.
In some cases, TI components may be promoted specifically to facilitate safety-related applications. With such components, TI’s goal is to
help enable customers to design and create their own end-product solutions that meet applicable functional safety standards and
requirements. Nonetheless, such components are subject to these terms.
No TI components are authorized for use in FDA Class III (or similar life-critical medical equipment) unless authorized officers of the parties
have executed a special agreement specifically governing such use.
Only those TI components which TI has specifically designated as military grade or “enhanced plastic” are designed and intended for use in
military/aerospace applications or environments. Buyer acknowledges and agrees that any military or aerospace use of TI components
which have not been so designated is solely at the Buyer's risk, and that Buyer is solely responsible for compliance with all legal and
regulatory requirements in connection with such use.
TI has specifically designated certain components as meeting ISO/TS16949 requirements, mainly for automotive use. In any case of use of
non-designated products, TI will not be responsible for any failure to meet ISO/TS16949.
Products
Applications
Audio
www.ti.com/audio
Automotive and Transportation
www.ti.com/automotive
Amplifiers
amplifier.ti.com
Communications and Telecom
www.ti.com/communications
Data Converters
dataconverter.ti.com
Computers and Peripherals
www.ti.com/computers
DLP® Products
www.dlp.com
Consumer Electronics
www.ti.com/consumer-apps
DSP
dsp.ti.com
Energy and Lighting
www.ti.com/energy
Clocks and Timers
www.ti.com/clocks
Industrial
www.ti.com/industrial
Interface
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Medical
www.ti.com/medical
Logic
logic.ti.com
Security
www.ti.com/security
Power Mgmt
power.ti.com
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www.ti.com/space-avionics-defense
Microcontrollers
microcontroller.ti.com
Video and Imaging
www.ti.com/video
RFID
www.ti-rfid.com
OMAP Applications Processors
www.ti.com/omap
TI E2E Community
e2e.ti.com
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www.ti.com/wirelessconnectivity
Mailing Address: Texas Instruments, Post Office Box 655303, Dallas, Texas 75265
Copyright © 2014, Texas Instruments Incorporated
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