a DSP Microcomputer ADSP-2191M

a DSP Microcomputer ADSP-2191M
a
DSP Microcomputer
ADSP-2191M
PERFORMANCE FEATURES
6.25 ns Instruction Cycle Time, for up to 160 MIPS
Sustained Performance
ADSP-218x Family Code Compatible with the Same
Easy to Use Algebraic Syntax
Single-Cycle Instruction Execution
Single-Cycle Context Switch between Two Sets of Computation and Memory Instructions
Instruction Cache Allows Dual Operand Fetches in Every
Instruction Cycle
Multifunction Instructions
Pipelined Architecture Supports Efficient Code
Execution
Architectural Enhancements for Compiled C and C++
Code Efficiency
Architectural Enhancements beyond ADSP-218x Family
are Supported with Instruction Set Extensions for
Added Registers, and Peripherals
Flexible Power Management with User-Selectable
Power-Down and Idle Modes
FUNCTIONAL BLOCK DIAGRAM
ADSP-219x
DSP CORE
24 BIT
ADDRESS
DATA
24 BIT
ADDRESS
DATA
16 BIT
DATA
ADDRESS
16 BIT
DATA
ADDRESS
CACHE
64 ⴛ 24-BIT
DAG1
4 ⴛ 4 ⴛ 16
DAG2
4 ⴛ 4 ⴛ 16
BLOCK0
FOUR INDEPENDENT BLOCKS
BLOCK1
BLOCK2
BLOCK3
INTERNAL MEMORY
JTAG
6
TEST &
EMULATION
PROGRAM
SEQUENCER
EXTERNAL PORT
24
PM ADDRESS BUS
I/O ADDRESS
DM ADDRESS BUS
22
18
ADDR BUS
MUX
24
24
DMA
CONNECT
PM DATA BUS
DMA ADDRESS
24
DMA DATA
24
PX
DM DATA BUS
DATA BUS
MUX
16
16
I/O DATA
DATA
REGISTER
FILE
I/O PROCESSOR
24
INPUT
REGISTERS
HOST PORT
I/O REGISTERS
(MEMORY-MAPPED)
RESULT
REGISTERS
MULT
16
16 ⴛ 16-BIT
BARREL
SHIFTER
ALU
CONTROL
STATUS
BUFFERS
18
DMA
CONTROLLER
SERIAL PORTS
(3)
6
SPI PORTS
(2)
2
UART PORT
(1)
3
SYSTEM INTERRUPT CONTROLLER
PROGRAMMABLE
FLAGS (16)
TIMERS (3)
REV. A
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reliable. However, no responsibility is assumed by Analog Devices for its
use, nor for any infringements of patents or other rights of third parties that
may result from its use. No license is granted by implication or otherwise
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© Analog Devices, Inc., 2002
ADSP-2191M
INTEGRATION FEATURES
160K Bytes On-Chip RAM Configured as 32K Words 24-Bit
Memory RAM and 32K Words 16-Bit Memory RAM
Dual-Purpose 24-Bit Memory for Both Instruction and
Data Storage
Independent ALU, Multiplier/Accumulator, and Barrel
Shifter Computational Units with Dual 40-Bit
Accumulators
Unified Memory Space Allows Flexible Address Generation, Using Two Independent DAG Units
Powerful Program Sequencer Provides Zero-Overhead
Looping and Conditional Instruction Execution
Enhanced Interrupt Controller Enables Programming of
Interrupt Priorities and Nesting Modes
TABLE OF CONTENTS
GENERAL DESCRIPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
DSP Core Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
DSP Peripherals Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Memory Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Interrupts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
DMA Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Host Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
DSP Serial Ports (SPORTs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
UART Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
Programmable Flag (PFx) Pins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
Low Power Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
Clock Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
Booting Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
Bus Request and Bus Grant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
Instruction Set Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Development Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Additional Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
PIN FUNCTION DESCRIPTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
SPECIFICATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
ABSOLUTE MAXIMUM RATINGS . . . . . . . . . . .19
ESD SENSITIVITY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Power Dissipation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
TIMING SPECIFICATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
Output Drive Currents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
Power Dissipation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
Test Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
Environmental Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
144-Lead LQFP Pinout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
144-Lead Mini-BGA Pinout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
OUTLINE DIMENSIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
ORDERING GUIDE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Revision History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
SYSTEM INTERFACE FEATURES
Host Port with DMA Capability for Glueless 8- or 16-Bit
Host Interface
16-Bit External Memory Interface for up to 16M Words of
Addressable Memory Space
Three Full-Duplex Multichannel Serial Ports, with
Support for H.100 and up to 128 TDM Channels with
A-Law and ␮-Law Companding Optimized for Telecommunications Systems
Two SPI-Compatible Ports with DMA Support
UART Port with DMA Support
16 General-Purpose I/O Pins with Integrated Interrupt
Support
Three Programmable Interval Timers with PWM
Generation, PWM Capture/Pulsewidth Measurement,
and External Event Counter Capabilities
Up to 11 DMA Channels Can Be Active at Any Given Time
for High I/O Throughput
On-Chip Boot ROM for Automatic Booting from External
8- or 16-Bit Host Device, SPI ROM, or UART with
Autobaud Detection
Programmable PLL Supports 1ⴛ to 32ⴛ Input Frequency
Multiplication and Can Be Altered during Runtime
IEEE JTAG Standard 1149.1 Test Access Port Supports
On-Chip Emulation and System Debugging
2.5 V Internal Operation and 3.3 V I/O
144-Lead LQFP and 144-Ball Mini-BGA Packages
–2–
REV. A
ADSP-2191M
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
uses an algebraic syntax for ease of coding and readability. A
comprehensive set of development tools supports program
development.
The ADSP-2191M DSP is a single-chip microcomputer
optimized for digital signal processing (DSP) and other high
speed numeric processing applications.
The functional block diagram on Page 1 shows the architecture
of the ADSP-219x core. It contains three independent computational units: the ALU, the multiplier/accumulator (MAC), and
the shifter. The computational units process 16-bit data from the
register file and have provisions to support multiprecision computations. The ALU performs a standard set of arithmetic and
logic operations; division primitives are also supported. The
MAC performs single-cycle multiply, multiply/add, and multiply/subtract operations. The MAC has two 40-bit accumulators,
which help with overflow. The shifter performs logical and arithmetic shifts, normalization, denormalization, and derive
exponent operations. The shifter can be used to efficiently
implement numeric format control, including multiword and
block floating-point representations.
The ADSP-2191M combines the ADSP-219x family base
architecture (three computational units, two data address generators, and a program sequencer) with three serial ports, two
SPI-compatible ports, one UART port, a DMA controller, three
programmable timers, general-purpose Programmable Flag
pins, extensive interrupt capabilities, and on-chip program and
data memory spaces.
The ADSP-2191M architecture is code-compatible with DSPs
of the ADSP-218x family. Although the architectures are
compatible, the ADSP-2191M architecture has a number of
enhancements over the ADSP-218x architecture. The enhancements to computational units, data address generators, and
program sequencer make the ADSP-2191M more flexible and
even easier to program.
Register-usage rules influence placement of input and results
within the computational units. For most operations, the computational units’ data registers act as a data register file,
permitting any input or result register to provide input to any unit
for a computation. For feedback operations, the computational
units let the output (result) of any unit be input to any unit on
the next cycle. For conditional or multifunction instructions,
there are restrictions on which data registers may provide inputs
or receive results from each computational unit. For more information, see the ADSP-219x DSP Instruction Set Reference.
Indirect addressing options provide addressing flexibility—
premodify with no update, pre- and post-modify by an immediate
8-bit, two’s-complement value and base address registers for
easier implementation of circular buffering.
The ADSP-2191M integrates 64K words of on-chip memory
configured as 32K words (24-bit) of program RAM, and
32K words (16-bit) of data RAM. Power-down circuitry is also
provided to reduce power consumption. The ADSP-2191M is
available in 144-lead LQFP and 144-ball mini-BGA packages.
A powerful program sequencer controls the flow of instruction
execution. The sequencer supports conditional jumps, subroutine calls, and low interrupt overhead. With internal loop
counters and loop stacks, the ADSP-2191M executes looped
code with zero overhead; no explicit jump instructions are
required to maintain loops.
Fabricated in a high speed, low power, CMOS process, the
ADSP-2191M operates with a 6.25 ns instruction cycle time
(160 MIPS). All instructions, except single-word instructions,
execute in one processor.
The ADSP-2191M’s flexible architecture and comprehensive
instruction set support multiple operations in parallel. For
example, in one processor cycle, the ADSP-2191M can:
Two data address generators (DAGs) provide addresses for
simultaneous dual operand fetches (from data memory and
program memory). Each DAG maintains and updates four
16-bit address pointers. Whenever the pointer is used to access
data (indirect addressing), it is pre- or post-modified by the value
of one of four possible modify registers. A length value and base
address may be associated with each pointer to implement
automatic modulo addressing for circular buffers. Page registers
in the DAGs allow circular addressing within 64K-word boundaries of each of the 256 memory pages, but these buffers may not
cross page boundaries. Secondary registers duplicate all the
primary registers in the DAGs; switching between primary and
secondary registers provides a fast context switch.
• Generate an address for the next instruction fetch
• Fetch the next instruction
• Perform one or two data moves
• Update one or two data address pointers
• Perform a computational operation
These operations take place while the processor continues to:
• Receive and transmit data through two serial ports
• Receive and/or transmit data from a Host
• Receive or transmit data through the UART
• Receive or transmit data over two SPI ports
Efficient data transfer in the core is achieved with the use of
internal buses:
• Access external memory through the external memory
interface
• Program Memory Address (PMA) Bus
• Decrement the timers
• Program Memory Data (PMD) Bus
DSP Core Architecture
• Data Memory Address (DMA) Bus
• Data Memory Data (DMD) Bus
The ADSP-2191M instruction set provides flexible data moves
and multifunction (one or two data moves with a computation)
instructions. Every single-word instruction can be executed in a
single processor cycle. The ADSP-2191M assembly language
REV. A
• DMA Address Bus
• DMA Data Bus
–3–
ADSP-2191M
The two address buses (PMA and DMA) share a single external
address bus, allowing memory to be expanded off-chip, and the
two data buses (PMD and DMD) share a single external data
bus. Boot memory space and I/O memory space also share the
external buses.
ADSP-2191M
XTAL
(OPTIONAL)
ADDR21–0
DATA15–8
DATA15–8
DATA7–0
DATA7–0
TMR2–0
CLOCK
MULTIPLY
AND
RANGE
MS3–0
CS
MSEL6–0/PF6–0
RD
OE
DF/PF7
WR
WE
ACK
ACK
BYPASS
BOOT
AND OP
MODE
CONTROL
BMODE1–0
OPMODE
DSP Peripherals Architecture
DATA
TIMER
OUT OR
CAPTURE
Program memory can store both instructions and data, permitting the ADSP-2191M to fetch two operands in a single cycle,
one from program memory and one from data memory. The
DSP’s dual memory buses also let the ADSP-219x core fetch an
operand from data memory and the next instruction from
program memory in a single cycle.
CLKOUT
ADDR21–0
CLKIN
ADDRESS
CLOCK
OR
CRYSTAL
EXTERNAL
MEMORY
ADDR21–0
SPORT0
The functional block diagram on Page 1 shows the DSP’s
on-chip peripherals, which include the external memory interface, Host port, serial ports, SPI-compatible ports, UART port,
JTAG test and emulation port, timers, flags, and interrupt controller. These on-chip peripherals can connect to off-chip devices
as shown in Figure 1.
DATA15–8
TCLK0
DATA7–0
TFS0
SERIAL
DEVICE
BMS
DT0
(OPTIONAL)
OE
RFS0
WE
ACK
BR
SPORT1
BG
TCLK1
BGH
TFS1
SERIAL
DEVICE
(OPTIONAL)
RCLK1
DATA15–8
DATA7–0
IOMS
WE
TCLK2/SCK0
TFS2/MOSI0
CS
OE
SPORT2
SPI0
ACK
DT2/MISO0
HOST
PROCESSOR
RCLK2/SCK1
(OPTIONAL)
RFS2/MOSI1
DR2/MISO1
(OPTIONAL)
SPI1
HAD15–0
HA16
UART
DEVICE
(OPTIONAL)
ADDR15–0/
DATA15–0
ADDR16
HCMS
CS0
RXD
HCIOMS
CS1
TXD
HRD
RD
HWR
WR
HACK
ACK
HALE
ALE
UART
RESET
6
JTAG
The memory DMA controller lets the ADSP-2191M move data
and instructions from between memory spaces: internal-to-external, internal-to-internal, and external-to-external. On-chip
peripherals can also use this controller for DMA transfers.
(OPTIONAL)
ADDR17–0
DR1
SERIAL
DEVICE
EXTERNAL
I/O MEMORY
DT1
RFS1
The ADSP-2191M also has an external memory interface that is
shared by the DSP’s core, the DMA controller, and DMA
capable peripherals, which include the UART, SPORT0,
SPORT1, SPORT2, SPI0, SPI1, and the Host port. The external
port consists of a 16-bit data bus, a 22-bit address bus, and
control signals. The data bus is configurable to provide an 8- or
16-bit interface to external memory. Support for word packing
lets the DSP access 16- or 24-bit words from external memory
regardless of the external data bus width. When configured for
an 8-bit interface, the unused eight lines provide eight programmable, bidirectional general-purpose Programmable Flag lines,
six of which can be mapped to software condition signals.
CS
RCLK0
DR0
The ADSP-2191M has a 16-bit Host port with DMA capability
that lets external Hosts access on-chip memory. This 24-pin
parallel port consists of a 16-pin multiplexed data/address bus
and provides a lowservice overhead data move capability. Configurable for 8 or 16 bits, this port provides a glueless interface
to a wide variety of 8- and 16-bit microcontrollers. Two
chip-selects provide Hosts access to the DSP’s entire memory
map. The DSP is bootable through this port.
BOOT
MEMORY
(OPTIONAL)
HACK_P
Figure 1. System Diagram
of operation. Each serial port can transmit or receive an internal
or external, programmable serial clock and frame syncs. Each
serial port supports 128-channel Time Division Multiplexing.
The ADSP-2191M can respond to up to seventeen interrupts at
any given time: three internal (stack, emulator kernel, and
power-down), two external (emulator and reset), and twelve userdefined (peripherals) interrupts. The programmer assigns a
peripheral to one of the 12 user-defined interrupts. The priority
of each peripheral for interrupt service is determined by these
assignments.
The ADSP-2191M provides up to sixteen general-purpose I/O
pins, which are programmable as either inputs or outputs. Eight
of these pins are dedicated-general purpose Programmable Flag
pins. The other eight of them are multifunctional pins, acting as
general-purpose I/O pins when the DSP connects to an 8-bit
external data bus and acting as the upper eight data pins when
the DSP connects to a 16-bit external data bus. These Programmable Flag pins can implement edge- or level-sensitive
interrupts, some of which can be used to base the execution of
conditional instructions.
There are three serial ports on the ADSP-2191M that provide a
complete synchronous, full-duplex serial interface. This interface
includes optional companding in hardware as well as a wide
variety of framed or frameless data transmit and receive modes
–4–
REV. A
ADSP-2191M
Three programmable interval timers generate periodic interrupts. Each timer can be independently set to operate in one of
three modes:
pulsewidth register. A single status register supports all three
timers. A bit in each timer’s configuration register enables or
disables the corresponding timer independently of the others.
• Pulse Waveform Generation mode
Memory Architecture
• Pulsewidth Count/Capture mode
The ADSP-2191M DSP provides 64K words of on-chip SRAM
memory. This memory is divided into four 16K blocks located
on memory Page 0 in the DSP’s memory map. In addition to the
internal and external memory space, the ADSP-2191M can
address two additional and separate off-chip memory spaces: I/O
space and boot space.
• External Event Watchdog mode
Each timer has one bidirectional pin and four registers that
implement its mode of operation: A 7-bit configuration register,
a 32-bit count register, a 32-bit period register, and a 32-bit
64K WORD
MEMORY
PAGES
INTERNAL
MEMORY
LOGICAL
ADDRESS
RESERVED
0xFF FFFF
0xFF 0400
BOOT ROM, 24-BIT
0xFF 03FF
0xFF 0000
PAGE 255
PAGES 192–254
LOWER PAGE BOUNDARIES
ARE CONFIGURABLE FOR
BANKS OF EXTERNAL MEMORY.
BOUNDARIES SHOWN ARE
BANK SIZES AT RESET.
MEMORY SELECTS (MS)
FOR PORTIONS OF THE
MEMORY MAP APPEAR
WITH THE SELECTED
MEMORY.
BANK3
(MS3)
0xC0 0000
PAGES 128–191
BANK2
(MS2)
EXTERNAL
MEMORY
(16-BIT)
0x80 0000
PAGES 64–127
BANK1
(MS1)
BOOT MEMORY
16-BIT
(BMS)
64K WORD
0x40 0000
PAGES 1–63
LOGICAL
ADDRESS
1K WORD
PAGES 8–255
0xFE FFFF
1K WORD
PAGES 0–7
LOGICAL
ADDRESS
PAGES 1–254
BANK0
(MS0)
0xFF 3FF
0x01 0000
0x01 0000
INTERNAL
MEMORY
I/O MEMORY
16-BIT
BLOCK3, 16-BIT
0x00 C000
BLOCK2, 16-BIT
0x00 8000
PAGE 0
BLOCK1, 24-BIT
0x00 4000
BLOCK0, 24-BIT
0x00 0000
EXTERNAL
(IOMS)
INTERNAL
0x08 000
0x07 3FF
0x00 000
8-BIT 10-BIT
Figure 2. Memory Map
As shown in Figure 2, the DSP’s two internal memory blocks
populate all of Page 0. The entire DSP memory map consists of
256 pages (Pages 0−255), and each page is 64K words long.
External memory space consists of four memory banks (banks
0–3) and supports a wide variety of SRAM memory devices. Each
bank is selectable using the memory select pins (MS3–0) and has
configurable page boundaries, waitstates, and waitstate modes.
The 1K word of on-chip boot-ROM populates the top of
Page 255 while the remaining 254 pages are addressable off-chip.
I/O memory pages differ from external memory pages in that I/O
pages are 1K word long, and the external I/O pages have their
own select pin (IOMS). Pages 0–7 of I/O memory space reside
on-chip and contain the configuration registers for the peripherals. Both the core and DMA-capable peripherals can access the
DSP’s entire memory map.
different mechanisms to generate a 24-bit address for each bus.
The DSP has three functions that support access to the full
memory map.
• The DAGs generate 24-bit addresses for data fetches from
the entire DSP memory address range. Because DAG
index (address) registers are 16 bits wide and hold the
lower 16 bits of the address, each of the DAGs has its own
8-bit page register (DMPGx) to hold the most significant
eight address bits. Before a DAG generates an address,
the program must set the DAG’s DMPGx register to the
appropriate memory page.
• The Program Sequencer generates the addresses for
instruction fetches. For relative addressing instructions,
the program sequencer bases addresses for relative jumps,
calls, and loops on the 24-bit Program Counter (PC). In
direct addressing instructions (two-word instructions),
Internal (On-Chip) Memory
The ADSP-2191M’s unified program and data memory space
consists of 16M locations that are accessible through two 24-bit
address buses, the PMA and DMA buses. The DSP uses slightly
REV. A
–5–
ADSP-2191M
the instruction provides an immediate 24-bit address
value. The PC allows linear addressing of the full 24-bit
address range.
8-bit I/O page (IOPG) register and a 10-bit immediate value
supplied in the instruction. Both the ADSP-219x core and a Host
(through the Host Port Interface) can access I/O memory space.
• For indirect jumps and calls that use a 16-bit DAG
address register for part of the branch address, the
Program Sequencer relies on an 8-bit Indirect Jump page
(IJPG) register to supply the most significant eight
address bits. Before a cross page jump or call, the program
must set the program sequencer’s IJPG register to the
appropriate memory page.
Boot Memory Space
Boot memory space consists of one off-chip bank with 63 pages.
The BMS memory bank pin selects boot memory space. Both
the ADSP-219x core and DMA-capable peripherals can access
the DSP’s off-chip boot memory space. After reset, the DSP
always starts executing instructions from the on-chip boot ROM.
Depending on the boot configuration, the boot ROM code can
start booting the DSP from boot memory. For more information,
see “Booting Modes” on Page 11.
The ADSP-2191M has 1K word of on-chip ROM that holds
boot routines. If peripheral booting is selected, the DSP starts
executing instructions from the on-chip boot ROM, which starts
the boot process from the selected peripheral. For more information, see “Booting Modes” on Page 11. The on-chip boot ROM
is located on Page 255 in the DSP’s memory space map.
Interrupts
The interrupt controller lets the DSP respond to 17 interrupts
with minimum overhead. The controller implements an interrupt
priority scheme as shown in Table 1. Applications can use the
unassigned slots for software and peripheral interrupts.
External (Off-Chip) Memory
Each of the ADSP-2191M’s off-chip memory spaces has a
separate control register, so applications can configure unique
access parameters for each space. The access parameters include
read and write wait counts, waitstate completion mode, I/O clock
divide ratio, write hold time extension, strobe polarity, and data
bus width. The core clock and peripheral clock ratios influence
the external memory access strobe widths. For more information,
see “Clock Signals” on Page 11. The off-chip memory
spaces are:
• I/O memory space (IOMS pin)
Table 2 shows the ID and priority at reset of each of the peripheral interrupts. To assign the peripheral interrupts a different
priority, applications write the new priority to their corresponding control bits (determined by their ID) in the Interrupt Priority
Control register. The peripheral interrupt’s position in the
IMASK and IRPTL register and its vector address depend on its
priority level, as shown in Table 1. Because the IMASK and
IRPTL registers are limited to 16 bits, any peripheral interrupts
assigned a priority level of 11 are aliased to the lowest priority bit
position (15) in these registers and share vector address
0x00 01E0.
• Boot memory space (BMS pin)
Table 1. Interrupt Priorities/Addresses
• External memory space (MS3–0 pins)
All of these off-chip memory spaces are accessible through the
External Port, which can be configured for data widths of
8 or 16 bits.
Interrupt
Emulator (NMI)—
Highest Priority
Reset (NMI)
Power-Down (NMI)
Loop and PC Stack
Emulation Kernel
User Assigned Interrupt
User Assigned Interrupt
User Assigned Interrupt
User Assigned Interrupt
User Assigned Interrupt
User Assigned Interrupt
User Assigned Interrupt
User Assigned Interrupt
User Assigned Interrupt
User Assigned Interrupt
User Assigned Interrupt
User Assigned Interrupt—
Lowest Priority
External Memory Space
External memory space consists of four memory banks. These
banks can contain a configurable number of 64K word pages. At
reset, the page boundaries for external memory have Bank0
containing Pages 1−63, Bank1 containing Pages 64−127, Bank2
containing Pages 128−191, and Bank3 that contains Pages
192−254. The MS3–0 memory bank pins select Banks 3–0,
respectively. The external memory interface is byte-addressable
and decodes the 8 MSBs of the DSP program address to select
one of the four banks. Both the ADSP-219x core and DMA-capable peripherals can access the DSP’s external memory space.
I/O Memory Space
The ADSP-2191M supports an additional external memory
called I/O memory space. This space is designed to support
simple connections to peripherals (such as data converters and
external registers) or to bus interface ASIC data registers. I/O
space supports a total of 256K locations. The first 8K addresses
are reserved for on-chip peripherals. The upper 248K addresses
are available for external peripheral devices. The DSP’s instruction set provides instructions for accessing I/O space. These
instructions use an 18-bit address that is assembled from an
IMASK/
IRPTL
Vector
Address1
NA
NA
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
0x00 0000
0x00 0020
0x00 0040
0x00 0060
0x00 0080
0x00 00A0
0x00 00C0
0x00 00E0
0x00 0100
0x00 0120
0x00 0140
0x00 0160
0x00 0180
0x00 01A0
0x00 01C0
0x00 01E0
1These
interrupt vectors start at address 0x10000 when the DSP is in
“no-boot,” run from external memory mode.
–6–
REV. A
ADSP-2191M
Table 2. Peripheral Interrupts and Priority at Reset
Interrupt
ID
Reset
Priority
Slave DMA/Host Port Interface
SPORT0 Receive
SPORT0 Transmit
SPORT1 Receive
SPORT1 Transmit
SPORT2 Receive/SPI0
SPORT2 Transmit/SPI1
UART Receive
UART Transmit
Timer 0
Timer 1
Timer 2
Programmable Flag A (any PFx)
Programmable Flag B (any PFx)
Memory DMA port
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
11
11
11
The following instructions globally enable or disable interrupt
servicing, regardless of the state of IMASK.
ENA INT;
DIS INT;
At reset, interrupt servicing is disabled.
For quick servicing of interrupts, a secondary set of DAG and
computational registers exist. Switching between the primary
and secondary registers lets programs quickly service interrupts,
while preserving the DSP’s state.
DMA Controller
The ADSP-2191M has a DMA controller that supports
automated data transfers with minimal overhead for the DSP
core. Cycle stealing DMA transfers can occur between the
ADSP-2191M’s internal memory and any of its DMA-capable
peripherals. Additionally, DMA transfers can be accomplished
between any of the DMA-capable peripherals and external
devices connected to the external memory interface. DMA-capable peripherals include the Host port, SPORTs, SPI ports, and
UART. Each individual DMA-capable peripheral has a dedicated
DMA channel. To describe each DMA sequence, the DMA controller uses a set of parameters—called a DMA descriptor. When
successive DMA sequences are needed, these DMA descriptors
can be linked or chained together, so the completion of one DMA
sequence auto-initiates and starts the next sequence. DMA
sequences do not contend for bus access with the DSP core;
instead DMAs “steal” cycles to access memory.
Interrupt routines can either be nested with higher priority interrupts taking precedence or processed sequentially. Interrupts can
be masked or unmasked with the IMASK register. Individual
interrupt requests are logically ANDed with the bits in IMASK;
the highest priority unmasked interrupt is then selected. The
emulation, power-down, and reset interrupts are nonmaskable
with the IMASK register, but software can use the DIS INT
instruction to mask the power-down interrupt.
All DMA transfers use the DMA bus shown in the functional
block diagram on Page 1. Because all of the peripherals use the
same bus, arbitration for DMA bus access is needed. The arbitration for DMA bus access appears in Table 4.
The Interrupt Control (ICNTL) register controls interrupt
nesting and enables or disables interrupts globally.
The general-purpose Programmable Flag (PFx) pins can be configured as outputs, can implement software interrupts, and (as
inputs) can implement hardware interrupts. Programmable Flag
pin interrupts can be configured for level-sensitive, single
edge-sensitive, or dual edge-sensitive operation.
Table 4. I/O Bus Arbitration Priority
Table 3. Interrupt Control (ICNTL) Register Bits
Bit
Description
0–3
4
5
6
7
8–9
10
11
12–15
Reserved
Interrupt Nesting Enable
Global Interrupt Enable
Reserved
MAC-Biased Rounding Enable
Reserved
PC Stack Interrupt Enable
Loop Stack Interrupt Enable
Reserved
DMA Bus Master
Arbitration Priority
SPORT0 Receive DMA
SPORT1 Receive DMA
SPORT2 Receive DMA
SPORT0 Transmit DMA
SPORT1 Transmit DMA
SPORT2 Transmit DMA
SPI0 Receive/Transmit DMA
SPI1 Receive/Transmit DMA
UART Receive DMA
UART Transmit DMA
Host Port DMA
Memory DMA
0—Highest
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11—Lowest
Host Port
The ADSP-2191M’s Host port functions as a slave on the
external bus of an external Host. The Host port interface lets a
Host read from or write to the DSP’s memory space, boot space,
or internal I/O space. Examples of Hosts include external microcontrollers, microprocessors, or ASICs.
The IRPTL register is used to force and clear interrupts. Onchip stacks preserve the processor status and are automatically
maintained during interrupt handling. To support interrupt,
loop, and subroutine nesting, the PC stack is 33 levels deep, the
loop stack is eight levels deep, and the status stack is 16 levels
deep. To prevent stack overflow, the PC stack can generate a
stack-level interrupt if the PC stack falls below three locations full
or rises above 28 locations full.
REV. A
The Host port is a multiplexed address and data bus that provides
both an 8-bit and a 16-bit data path and operates using an asynchronous transmission protocol. Through this port, an off-chip
–7–
ADSP-2191M
Host can directly access the DSP’s entire memory space map,
boot memory space, and internal I/O space. To access the DSP’s
internal memory space, a Host steals one cycle per access from
the DSP. A Host access to the DSP’s external memory uses the
external port interface and does not stall (or steal cycles from)
the DSP’s core. Because a Host can access internal I/O memory
space, a Host can control any of the DSP’s I/O mapped
peripherals.
The functional modes selected by HPCR [7:6] are as follows
(assuming active high signal):
• ACK Mode—Acknowledge is active on strobes; HACK
goes high from the leading edge of the strobe to indicate
when the access can complete. After the Host samples the
HACK active, it can complete the access by removing the
strobe.The Host port then removes the HACK.
• Ready Mode—Ready active on strobes, goes low to insert
waitstate during the access.If the Host port cannot
complete the access, it deasserts the HACK/READY line.
In this case, the Host has to extend the access by keeping
the strobe asserted. When the Host samples the HACK
asserted, it can then proceed and complete the access by
deasserting the strobe.
The Host port is most efficient when using the DSP as a slave
and uses DMA to automate the incrementing of addresses for
these accesses. In this case, an address does not have to be transferred from the Host for every data transfer.
Host Port Acknowledge (HACK) Modes
The Host port supports a number of modes (or protocols) for
generating a HACK output for the host. The host selects ACK
or Ready modes using the HACK_P and HACK pins. The Host
port also supports two modes for address control: Address Latch
Enable (ALE) and Address Cycle Control (ACC) modes. The
DSP auto-detects ALE versus ACC mode from the HALE and
HWR inputs.
While in Address Cycle Control (ACC) mode and the ACK or
Ready acknowledge modes, the HACK is returned active for any
address cycle.
Host Port Chip Selects
There are two chip-select signals associated with the Host port:
HCMS and HCIOMS. The Host Chip Memory Select (HCMS)
lets the Host select the DSP and directly access the DSP’s internal/external memory space or boot memory space. The Host
Chip I/O Memory Select (HCIOMS) lets the Host select the
DSP and directly access the DSP’s internal I/O memory space.
The Host port HACK signal polarity is selected (only at reset) as
active high or active low, depending on the value driven on the
HACK_P pin.The HACK polarity is stored into the Host port
configuration register as a read only bit.
The DSP uses HACK to indicate to the Host when to complete
an access. For a read transaction, a Host can proceed and
complete an access when valid data is present in the read buffer
and the Host port is not busy doing a write. For a write transactions, a Host can complete an access when the write buffer is not
full and the Host port is not busy doing a write.
Two mode bits in the Host Port configuration register HPCR
[7:6] define the functionality of the HACK line. HPCR6 is initialized at reset based on the values driven on HACK and
HACK_P pins (shown in Table 5); HPCR7 is always cleared (0)
at reset. HPCR [7:6] can be modified after reset by a write access
to the Host port configuration register.
Before starting a direct access, the Host configures Host port
interface registers, specifying the width of external data bus
(8- or 16-bit) and the target address page (in the IJPG register).
The DSP generates the needed memory select signals during the
access, based on the target address. The Host port interface
combines the data from one, two, or three consecutive Host
accesses (up to one 24-bit value) into a single DMA bus access
to prefetch Host direct reads or to post direct writes. During
assembly of larger words, the Host port interface asserts ACK for
each byte access that does not start a read or complete a write.
Otherwise, the Host port interface asserts ACK when it has
completed the memory access successfully.
Table 5. Host Port Acknowledge Mode Selection
DSP Serial Ports (SPORTs)
Values Driven At
Reset
HPCR [7:6]
Initial Values
HACK_P
HACK
Bit 7
Bit 6
Acknowledge
Mode
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
Ready Mode
ACK Mode
ACK Mode
Ready Mode
The ADSP-2191M incorporates three complete synchronous
serial ports (SPORT0, SPORT1, and SPORT2) for serial and
multiprocessor communications. The SPORTs support the
following features:
• Bidirectional operation—each SPORT has independent
transmit and receive pins.
• Double-buffered transmit and receive ports—each port
has a data register for transferring data words to and from
memory and shift registers for shifting data in and out of
the data registers.
• Clocking—each transmit and receive port can either use
an external serial clock (40 MHz) or generate its own, in
frequencies ranging from 19 Hz to 40 MHz.
• Word length—each SPORT supports serial data words
from 3 to 16 bits in length transferred in Big Endian
(MSB) or Little Endian (LSB) format.
–8–
REV. A
ADSP-2191M
• Framing—each transmit and receive port can run with or
without frame sync signals for each data word. Frame sync
signals can be generated internally or externally, active
high or low, and with either of two pulsewidths and early
or late frame sync.
During transfers, the SPI ports simultaneously transmit and
receive by serially shifting data in and out on their two serial data
lines. The serial clock line synchronizes the shifting and sampling
of data on the two serial data lines.
UART Port
• Companding in hardware—each SPORT can perform
A-law or µ-law companding according to ITU recommendation G.711. Companding can be selected on the
transmit and/or receive channel of the SPORT without
additional latencies.
The UART port provides a simplified UART interface to another
peripheral or Host. It performs full duplex, asynchronous
transfers of serial data. Options for the UART include support
for 5–8 data bits; 1 or 2 stop bits; and none, even, or odd parity.
The UART port supports two modes of operation:
• DMA operations with single-cycle overhead—each
SPORT can automatically receive and transmit multiple
buffers of memory data, one data word each DSP cycle.
Either the DSP’s core or a Host processor can link or chain
sequences of DMA transfers between a SPORT and
memory. The chained DMA can be dynamically allocated
and updated through the DMA descriptors (DMA
transfer parameters) that set up the chain.
• Programmed I/O
The DSP’s core sends or receives data by writing or
reading I/O-mapped THR or RBR registers, respectively.
The data is double-buffered on both transmit and receive.
• DMA (direct memory access)
The DMA controller transfers both transmit and receive
data. This reduces the number and frequency of interrupts required to transfer data to and from memory. The
UART has two dedicated DMA channels. These DMA
channels have lower priority than most DMA channels
because of their relatively low service rates.
• Interrupts—each transmit and receive port generates an
interrupt upon completing the transfer of a data word or
after transferring an entire data buffer or buffers through
DMA.
• Multichannel capability—each SPORT supports the
H.100 standard.
The UART’s baud rate (see following equation for UART clock
rate calculation), serial data format, error code generation and
status, and interrupts are programmable:
Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) Ports
The DSP has two SPI-compatible ports that enable the DSP to
communicate with multiple SPI-compatible devices. These ports
are multiplexed with SPORT2, so either SPORT2 or the SPI
ports are active, depending on the state of the OPMODE pin
during hardware reset.
• Supported bit rates range from 9.5 bits to 5M bits per
second (80 MHz peripheral clock).
The SPI interface uses three pins for transferring data: two data
pins (Master Output-Slave Input, MOSIx, and Master
Input-Slave Output, MISOx) and a clock pin (Serial Clock,
SCKx). Two SPI chip select input pins (SPISSx) let other SPI
devices select the DSP, and fourteen SPI chip select output pins
(SPIxSEL7–1) let the DSP select other SPI devices. The SPI
select pins are reconfigured Programmable Flag pins. Using
these pins, the SPI ports provide a full duplex, synchronous serial
interface, which supports both master and slave modes and multimaster environments.
The timers can be used to provide a hardware-assisted autobaud
detection mechanism for the UART interface.
• Supported data formats are 7- to 12-bit frames.
• Transmit and receive status can be configured to generate
maskable interrupts to the DSP’s core.
HCLK
UART Clock Rate = -----------------16 × D
Where D is the programmable divisor = 1 to 65536.
Programmable Flag (PFx) Pins
The ADSP-2191M has 16 bidirectional, general-purpose I/O,
Programmable Flag (PF15–0) pins. The PF7–0 pins are
dedicated to general-purpose I/O. The PF15–8 pins serve either
as general-purpose I/O pins (if the DSP is connected to an 8-bit
external data bus) or serve as DATA15–8 lines (if the DSP is
connected to a 16-bit external data bus). The Programmable Flag
pins have special functions for clock multiplier selection and for
SPI port operation. For more information, see Serial Peripheral
Each SPI port’s baud rate and clock phase/polarities are programmable (see equation below for SPI clock rate calculation), and
each has an integrated DMA controller, configurable to support
both transmit and receive data streams. The SPI’s DMA controller can only service unidirectional accesses at any given time.
HCLK
SPI Clock Rate = -------------------------------------2 × SPIBAUD
REV. A
–9–
ADSP-2191M
Interface (SPI) Ports on Page 9 and Clock Signals on Page 11.
Ten memory-mapped registers control operation of the Programmable Flag pins:
• Flag Direction register
Specifies the direction of each individual PFx pin as input
or output.
Power-Down Core Mode
When the ADSP-2191M is in Power-Down Core mode, the DSP
core clock is off, but the DSP retains the contents of the pipeline
and keeps the PLL running. The peripheral bus keeps running,
letting the peripherals receive data.
• Flag Control and Status registers
Specify the value to drive on each individual PFx output
pin. As input, software can predicate instruction
execution on the value of individual PFx input pins
captured in this register. One register sets bits, and one
register clears bits.
To enter Power-Down Core mode, the DSP executes an IDLE
instruction after performing the following tasks:
• Enter a power-down interrupt service routine
• Flag Interrupt Mask registers
• Check for pending interrupts and I/O service routines
• Clear (= 0) the PDWN bit in the PLLCTL register
Enable and disable each individual PFx pin to function
as an interrupt to the DSP’s core. One register sets bits to
enable interrupt function, and one register clears bits to
disable interrupt function. Input PFx pins function as
hardware interrupts, and output PFx pins function as
software interrupts—latching in the IMASK and IRPTL
registers.
• Clear (= 0) the STOPALL bit in the PLLCTL register
• Set (= 1) the STOPCK bit in the PLLCTL register
To exit Power-Down Core mode, the DSP responds to an
interrupt and (after two cycles of latency) resumes executing
instructions with the instruction after the IDLE.
• Flag Interrupt Polarity register
Power-Down Core/Peripherals Mode
Specifies the polarity (active high or low) for interrupt
sensitivity on each individual PFx pin.
• Flag Sensitivity registers
Specify whether individual PFx pins are level- or
edge-sensitive and specify—if edge-sensitive—whether
just the rising edge or both the rising and falling edges of
the signal are significant. One register selects the type of
sensitivity, and one register selects which edges are significant for edge-sensitivity.
The ADSP-2191M has four low power options that significantly
reduce the power dissipation when the device operates under
standby conditions. To enter any of these modes, the DSP
executes an IDLE instruction. The ADSP-2191M uses configuration of the PDWN, STOPCK, and STOPALL bits in the
PLLCTL register to select between the low power modes as the
DSP executes the IDLE. Depending on the mode, an IDLE shuts
off clocks to different parts of the DSP in the different modes.
The low power modes are:
• Power-Down Core
• Power-Down Core/Peripherals
When the ADSP-2191M is in Power-Down Core/Peripherals
mode, the DSP core clock and peripheral bus clock are off, but
the DSP keeps the PLL running. The DSP does not retain the
contents of the instruction pipeline.The peripheral bus is
stopped, so the peripherals cannot receive data.
To enter Power-Down Core/Peripherals mode, the DSP executes
an IDLE instruction after performing the following tasks:
• Enter a power-down interrupt service routine
• Check for pending interrupts and I/O service routines
• Clear (= 0) the PDWN bit in the PLLCTL register
Low Power Operation
• Idle
To enter Idle mode, the DSP can execute the IDLE instruction
anywhere in code. To exit Idle mode, the DSP responds to an
interrupt and (after two cycles of latency) resumes executing
instructions with the instruction after the IDLE.
• Set (= 1) the STOPALL bit in the PLLCTL register
To exit Power-Down Core/Peripherals mode, the DSP responds
to a wake-up event and (after five to six cycles of latency) resumes
executing instructions with the instruction after the IDLE.
Power-Down All Mode
When the ADSP-2191M is in Power-Down All mode, the DSP
core clock, the peripheral clock, and the PLL are all stopped. The
DSP does not retain the contents of the instruction pipeline. The
peripheral bus is stopped, so the peripherals cannot receive data.
To enter Power-Down All mode, the DSP executes an IDLE
instruction after performing the following tasks:
• Power-Down All
• Enter a power-down interrupt service routine
Idle Mode
• Set (= 1) the PDWN bit in the PLLCTL register
When the ADSP-2191M is in Idle mode, the DSP core stops
executing instructions, retains the contents of the instruction
pipeline, and waits for an interrupt. The core clock and peripheral
clock continue running.
• Check for pending interrupts and I/O service routines
To exit Power-Down Core/Peripherals mode, the DSP responds
to an interrupt and (after 500 cycles to restabilize the PLL)
resumes executing instructions with the instruction after
the IDLE.
–10–
REV. A
ADSP-2191M
Clock Signals
1M⍀
The ADSP-2191M can be clocked by a crystal oscillator or a
buffered, shaped clock derived from an external clock oscillator.
If a crystal oscillator is used, the crystal should be connected
across the CLKIN and XTAL pins, with two capacitors and a
1 MΩ shunt resistor connected as shown in Figure 3. Capacitor
values are dependent on crystal type and should be specified by
the crystal manufacturer. A parallel-resonant, fundamental frequency, microprocessor-grade crystal should be used for this
configuration.
25MHz
CLKIN
XTAL
CLKOUT
MSEL0 (PF0)
VDD
VDD
ADSP-2196M
MSEL1 (PF1)
MSEL2 (PF2)
If a buffered, shaped clock is used, this external clock connects
to the DSP’s CLKIN pin. CLKIN input cannot be halted,
changed, or operated below the specified frequency during
normal operation. When an external clock is used, the XTAL
input must be left unconnected.
RUNTIME
PF PIN I/O
MSEL3 (PF3)
MSEL4 (PF4)
The DSP provides a user-programmable 1ⴛ to 32ⴛ multiplication of the input clock, including some fractional values, to
support 128 external to internal (DSP core) clock ratios. The
MSEL6–0, BYPASS, and DF pins decide the PLL multiplication
factor at reset. At runtime, the multiplication factor can be controlled in software. The combination of pullup and pull-down
resistors in Figure 3 sets up a core clock ratio of 6:1, which
produces a 150 MHz core clock from the 25 MHz input. For
other clock multiplier settings, see the ADSP-219x/ADSP-2191
DSP Hardware Reference.
MSEL5 (PF5)
MSEL6 (PF6)
DF (PF7)
BYPASS
RESET
SOURCE
THE PULL-UP/PULL-DOWN
RESISTORS ON THE MSEL,
DF, AND BYPASS PINS
SELECT THE CORE CLOCK
RATIO.
HERE, THE SELECTION (6:1)
AND 25MHz INPUT CLOCK
PRODUCE A 150MHz CORE
CLOCK.
RESET
The peripheral clock is supplied to the CLKOUT pin.
All on-chip peripherals for the ADSP-2191M operate at the rate
set by the peripheral clock. The peripheral clock is either equal
to the core clock rate or one-half the DSP core clock rate. This
selection is controlled by the IOSEL bit in the PLLCTL register.
The maximum core clock is 160 MHz and the maximum peripheral clock is 80 MHz—the combination of the input clock and
core/peripheral clock ratios may not exceed these limits.
Reset
The RESET signal initiates a master reset of the ADSP-2191M.
The RESET signal must be asserted during the powerup
sequence to assure proper initialization. RESET during initial
powerup must be held long enough to allow the internal clock to
stabilize.
The powerup sequence is defined as the total time required for
the crystal oscillator circuit to stabilize after a valid VDD is applied
to the processor, and for the internal phase-locked loop (PLL) to
lock onto the specific crystal frequency. A minimum of 100 µs
ensures that the PLL has locked, but does not include the crystal
oscillator start-up time. During this powerup sequence the
RESET signal should be held low. On any subsequent resets, the
RESET signal must meet the minimum pulsewidth specification, tWRST.
The RESET input contains some hysteresis. If using an RC
circuit to generate your RESET signal, the circuit should use an
external Schmidt trigger.
REV. A
Figure 3. External Crystal Connections
The master reset sets all internal stack pointers to the empty stack
condition, masks all interrupts, and resets all registers to their
default values (where applicable). When RESET is released, if
there is no pending bus request and the chip is configured for
booting, the boot-loading sequence is performed. Program
control jumps to the location of the on-chip boot ROM
(0xFF 0000).
Power Supplies
The ADSP-2191M has separate power supply connections for
the internal (VDDINT) and external (VDDEXT) power supplies. The
internal supply must meet the 2.5 V requirement. The external
supply must be connected to a 3.3 V supply. All external supply
pins must be connected to the same supply.
Power-Up Sequence
Power up together the two supplies VDDEXT and VDDINT. If they
cannot be powered up together, power up the internal (core)
supply first (powering up the core supply first reduces the risk of
latchup events.
Booting Modes
The ADSP-2191M has five mechanisms (listed in Table 6) for
automatically loading internal program memory after reset. Two
no-boot modes are also supported.
–11–
ADSP-2191M
BMODE0
BMODE1
OPMODE
Table 6. Select Boot Mode (OPMODE, BMODE1, and
BMODE0)
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
Function
Execute from external memory 16 bits
(No Boot)
Boot from EPROM
Boot from Host
Reserved
Execute from external memory 8 bits
(No Boot)
Boot from UART
Boot from SPI, up to 4K bits
Boot from SPI, >4K bits up to
512K bits
The OPMODE, BMODE1, and BMODE0 pins, sampled
during hardware reset, and three bits in the Reset Configuration
Register implement these modes:
• Execute from memory external 16 bits—The memory
boot routine located in boot ROM memory space
executes a boot-stream-formatted program located at
address 0x010000 of boot memory space, packing 16-bit
external data into 24-bit internal data. The External Port
Interface is configured for the default clock multiplier
(128) and read waitstates (7).
• Boot from EPROM—The EPROM boot routine located
in boot ROM memory space fetches a boot-stream-formatted program located at physical address 0x00 0000 of
boot memory space, packing 8- or 16-bit external data
into 24-bit internal data. The External Port Interface is
configured for the default clock multiplier (32) and read
waitstates (7).
• Boot from Host—The (8- or 16-bit) Host downloads a
boot-stream-formatted program to internal or external
memory. The Host’s boot routine is located in internal
ROM memory space and uses the top 16 locations of
Page 0 program memory and the top 272 locations of
Page 0 data memory.
The internal boot ROM sets semaphore A (an IO register
within the Host port) and then polls until the semaphore
is reset. Once detected, the internal boot ROM will remap
the interrupt vector table to Page 0 internal memory and
jump to address 0x00 0000 internal memory. From the
point of view of the host interface, an external host has
full control of the DSP’s memory map. The Host has the
freedom to directly write internal memory, external
memory, and internal I/O memory space. The DSP core
execution is held off until the Host clears the semaphore
register. This strategy allows the maximum flexibility for
the Host to boot in the program and data code, by leaving
it up to the programmer.
• Execute from memory external 8 bits (No Boot)—
Execution starts from Page 1 of external memory space,
packing either 8- or 16-bit external data into 24-bit
internal data. The External Port Interface is configured for the default clock multiplier (128) and read
waitstates (7).
• Boot from UART—Using an autobaud handshake
sequence, a boot-stream-formatted program is downloaded by the Host. The Host agent selects a baud rate
within the UART’s clocking capabilities. After a hardware
reset, the DSP’s UART expects a 0xAA character (eight
bits data, one start bit, one stop bit, no parity bit) on the
RXD pin to determine the bit rate; and then replies with
an OK string. Once the host receives this OK it downloads
the boot stream without further handshake.The UART
boot routine is located in internal ROM memory space
and uses the top 16 locations of Page 0 program memory
and the top 272 locations of Page 0 data memory.
• Boot from SPI, up to 4K bits—The SPI0 port uses the
SPI0SEL1 (reconfigured PF2) output pin to select a
single serial EEPROM device, submits a read command
at address 0x00, and begins clocking consecutive data into
internal or external memory. Use only SPI-compatible
EEPROMs of ≤ 4K bit (12-bit address range). The SPI0
boot routine located in internal ROM memory space
executes a boot-stream-formatted program, using the top
16 locations of Page 0 program memory and the top 272
locations of Page 0 data memory. The SPI boot configuration is SPIBAUD0=60 (decimal), CPHA=1,
CPOL=1, 8-bit data, and MSB first.
• Boot from SPI, from >4K bits to 512K bits—The SPI0
port uses the SPI0SEL1 (re-configured PF2) output pin
to select a single serial EEPROM device, submits a read
command at address 0x00, and begins clocking consecutive data into internal or external memory. Use only
SPI-compatible EEPROMs of ≥ 4K bit (16-bit address
range). The SPI0 boot routine, located in internal ROM
memory space, executes a boot-stream-formatted
program, using the top 16 locations of Page 0 program
memory and the top 272 locations of Page 0 data memory.
As indicated in Table 6, the OPMODE pin has a dual role, acting
as a boot mode select during reset and determining SPORT or
SPI operation at runtime. If the OPMODE pin at reset is the
opposite of what is needed in an application during runtime, the
application needs to set the OPMODE bit appropriately during
runtime prior to using the corresponding peripheral.
Bus Request and Bus Grant
The ADSP-2191M can relinquish control of the data and address buses to an external device. When the external device
requires access to the bus, it asserts the bus request (BR) signal.
The (BR) signal is arbitrated with core and peripheral requests.
External Bus requests have the lowest priority. If no other internal
request is pending, the external bus request will be granted.
–12–
REV. A
ADSP-2191M
Development Tools
Because of synchronizer and arbitration delays, bus grants will
be provided with a minimum of three peripheral clock delays.
ADSP-2191M DSPs will respond to the bus grant by:
The ADSP-2191M is supported with a complete set of software
and hardware development tools, including Analog Devices
emulators and VisualDSP++® development environment. The
same emulator hardware that supports other ADSP-219x DSPs,
also fully emulates the ADSP-2191M.
• Three-stating the data and address buses and the MS3–0,
BMS, IOMS, RD, and WR output drivers.
• Asserting the bus grant (BG) signal.
The ADSP-2191M will halt program execution if the bus is
granted to an external device and an instruction fetch or data
read/write request is made to external general-purpose or peripheral memory spaces. If an instruction requires two external
memory read accesses, bus requests will not be granted between
the two accesses. If an instruction requires an external memory
read and an external memory write access, the bus may be
granted between the two accesses. The external memory
interface can be configured so that the core will have exclusive
use of the interface. DMA and Bus Requests will be granted.
When the external device releases BR, the DSP releases BG and
continues program execution from the point at which it stopped.
• Compiled ADSP-219x C/C++ code efficiency—the
compiler has been developed for efficient translation of
C/C++ code to ADSP-219x assembly. The DSP has
architectural features that improve the efficiency of
compiled C/C++ code.
• ADSP-218x family code compatibility—The assembler
has legacy features to ease the conversion of existing
ADSP-218x applications to the ADSP-219x.
The bus request feature operates at all times, even while the DSP
is booting and RESET is active.
The ADSP-2191M asserts the BGH pin when it is ready to start
another external port access, but is held off because the bus was
previously granted. This mechanism can be extended to define
more complex arbitration protocols for implementing more
elaborate multimaster systems.
Debugging both C/C++ and assembly programs with the VisualDSP++ debugger, programmers can:
• View mixed C/C++ and assembly code (interleaved
source and object information)
• Insert break points
Instruction Set Description
• Set conditional breakpoints on registers, memory, and
stacks
The ADSP-2191M assembly language instruction set has an
algebraic syntax that was designed for ease of coding and readability. The assembly language, which takes full advantage of the
processor’s unique architecture, offers the following benefits:
• Trace instruction execution
• ADSP-219x assembly language syntax is a superset of and
source-code-compatible (except for two data registers
and DAG base address registers) with ADSP-218x family
syntax. It may be necessary to restructure ADSP-218x
programs to accommodate the ADSP-2191M’s unified
memory space and to conform to its interrupt vector map.
• The algebraic syntax eliminates the need to remember
cryptic assembler mnemonics. For example, a typical
arithmetic add instruction, such as AR = AX0 + AY0,
resembles a simple equation.
• Perform linear or statistical profiling of program
execution
• Fill, dump, and graphically plot the contents of memory
• Source level debugging
• Create custom debugger windows
The VisualDSP++ IDE lets programmers define and manage
DSP software development. Its dialog boxes and property pages
let programmers configure and manage all of the ADSP-219x
development tools, including the syntax highlighting in the VisualDSP++ editor. This capability permits:
• Control how the development tools process inputs and
generate outputs.
• Every instruction, but two, assembles into a single, 24-bit
word that can execute in a single instruction cycle. The
exceptions are two dual word instructions. One writes 16or 24-bit immediate data to memory, and the other is an
absolute jump/call with the 24-bit address specified in the
instruction.
• Maintain a one-to-one correspondence with the tool’s
command line switches.
• Multifunction instructions allow parallel execution of an
arithmetic, MAC, or shift instruction with up to two
fetches or one write to processor memory space during a
single instruction cycle.
• Program flow instructions support a wider variety of conditional and unconditional jumps/calls and a larger set of
conditions on which to base execution of conditional
instructions.
REV. A
The VisualDSP++ project management environment lets programmers develop and debug an application. This environment
includes an easy-to-use assembler that is based on an algebraic
syntax; an archiver (librarian/library builder), a linker, a loader,
a cycle-accurate instruction-level simulator, a C/C++ compiler,
and a C/C++ run-time library that includes DSP and mathematical functions. Two key points for these tools are:
Analog Devices DSP emulators use the IEEE 1149.1 JTAG test
access port of the ADSP-2191M processor to monitor and
control the target board processor during emulation. The
emulator provides full-speed emulation, allowing inspection and
modification of memory, registers, and processor stacks. Nonintrusive in-circuit emulation is assured by the use of the processor’s
JTAG interface—the emulator does not affect target system
loading or timing.
–13–
ADSP-2191M
In addition to the software and hardware development tools
available from Analog Devices, third parties provide a wide range
of tools supporting the ADSP-219x processor family. Hardware
tools include ADSP-219x PC plug-in cards. Third party software
tools include DSP libraries, real-time operating systems, and
block diagram design tools.
As can be seen in Figure 4, there are two sets of signals on the
header. There are the standard JTAG signals TMS, TCK, TDI,
TDO, TRST, and EMU used for emulation purposes (via an
emulator). There are also secondary JTAG signals BTMS,
BTCK, BTDI, and BTRST that are optionally used for
board-level (boundary scan) testing.
Designing an Emulator-Compatible DSP Board
(Target)
When the emulator is not connected to this header, place jumpers
across BTMS, BTCK, BTRST, and BTDI as shown in Figure 5.
This holds the JTAG signals in the correct state to allow the DSP
to run free. Remove all the jumpers when connecting the
emulator to the JTAG header.
The White Mountain DSP (Product Line of Analog Devices,
Inc.) family of emulators are tools that every DSP developer
needs to test and debug hardware and software systems. Analog
Devices has supplied an IEEE 1149.1 JTAG Test Access Port
(TAP) on each JTAG DSP. The emulator uses the TAP to access
the internal features of the DSP, allowing the developer to load
code, set breakpoints, observe variables, observe memory, and
examine registers. The DSP must be halted to send data and
commands, but once an operation has been completed by the
emulator, the DSP system is set running at full speed with no
impact on system timing.
GND
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
KEY (NO PIN)
EMU
4
6
TMS
7
8
BTCK
BTRST
TCK
9
10
11
12
BTDI
GND
EMU
GND
5
The emulator interface to an Analog Devices JTAG DSP is a
14-pin header, as shown in Figure 4. The customer must supply
this header on the target board in order to communicate with the
emulator. The interface consists of a standard dual row 0.025"
square post header, set on 0.1" ⴛ 0.1" spacing, with a minimum
post length of 0.235". Pin 3 is the key position used to prevent
the pod from being inserted backwards. This pin must be clipped
on the target board.
1
3
BTMS
Target Board Header
GND
2
KEY (NO PIN)
To use these emulators, the target’s design must include the
interface between an Analog Devices JTAG DSP and the
emulation header on a custom DSP target board.
Also, the clearance (length, width, and height) around the header
must be considered. Leave a clearance of at least 0.15" and 0.10"
around the length and width of the header, and reserve a height
clearance to attach and detach the pod connector.
1
TRST
TDI
13
14
TDO
TOP VIEW
Figure 5. JTAG Target Board Connector with No Local
Boundary Scan
JTAG Emulator Pod Connector
Figure 6 details the dimensions of the JTAG pod connector at the
14-pin target end. Figure 7 displays the keep-out area for a target
board header. The keep-out area allows the pod connector to
properly seat onto the target board header. This board area
should contain no components (chips, resistors, capacitors, etc.).
The dimensions are referenced to the center of the 0.25" square
post pin.
GND
TMS
BTMS
BTCK
TCK
BTRST
TRST
0.64"
11
12
BTDI
TDI
13
14
GND
TDO
0.88"
TOP VIEW
0.24"
Figure 4. JTAG Target Board Connector for JTAG
Equipped Analog Devices DSP (Jumpers in Place)
Figure 6. JTAG Pod Connector Dimensions
–14–
REV. A
ADSP-2191M
Additional Information
0.10"
0.15"
Figure 7. JTAG Pod Connector Keep-Out Area
Design-for-Emulation Circuit Information
For details on target board design issues including: single
processor connections, multiprocessor scan chains, signal buffering, signal termination, and emulator pod logic, see the EE-68:
Analog Devices JTAG Emulation Technical Reference on the Analog
Devices website (www.analog.com)—use site search on
“EE-68.” This document is updated regularly to keep pace with
improvements to emulator support.
This data sheet provides a general overview of the ADSP-2191M
architecture and functionality. For detailed information on the
core architecture of the ADSP-219x family, refer to the
ADSP-219x/ADSP-2191 DSP Hardware Reference. For details on
the instruction set, refer to the ADSP-219x Instruction Set
Reference.
PIN FUNCTION DESCRIPTIONS
ADSP-2191M pin definitions are listed in Table 7. All
ADSP-2191M inputs are asynchronous and can be asserted
asynchronously to CLKIN (or to TCK for TRST).
Tie or pull unused inputs to VDDEXT or GND, except for
ADDR21–0, DATA15–0, PF7-0, and inputs that have internal
pull-up or pull-down resistors (TRST, BMODE0, BMODE1,
OPMODE, BYPASS, TCK, TMS, TDI, and RESET)—these
pins can be left floating. These pins have a logic-level hold circuit
that prevents input from floating internally.
The following symbols appear in the Type column of Table 7: G
= Ground, I = Input, O = Output, P = Power Supply, and T =
Three-State.
Table 7. Pin Function Descriptions
Pin
Type
Function
A21–0
D7–0
D15
/PF15
/SPI1SEL7
D14
/PF14
/SPI0SEL7
D13
/PF12
/SPI1SEL6
D12
/PF12
/SPI0SEL6
D11
/PF11
/SPI1SEL5
D10
/PF10
/SPI0SEL5
D9
/PF9
/SPI1SEL4
D8
/PF8
/SPI0SEL4
PF7
/SPI1SEL3
/DF
PF6
/SPI0SEL3
/MSEL6
O/T
I/O/T
I/O/T
I/O
I
I/O/T
I/O
I
I/O/T
I/O
I
I/O/T
I/O
I
I/O/T
I/O
I
I/O/T
I/O
I
I/O/T
I/O
I
I/O/T
I/O
I
I/O/T
I
I
I/O/T
I
I
External Port Address Bus
External Port Data Bus, least significant 8 bits
Data 15 (if 16-bit external bus)/Programmable Flags 15 (if 8-bit external bus)/SPI1 Slave
Select output 7 (if 8-bit external bus, when SPI1 enabled)
REV. A
Data 14 (if 16-bit external bus)/Programmable Flags 14 (if 8-bit external bus)/SPI0 Slave
Select output 7 (if 8-bit external bus, when SPI0 enabled)
Data 13 (if 16-bit external bus)/Programmable Flags 13 (if 8-bit external bus)/SPI1 Slave
Select output 6 (if 8-bit external bus, when SPI1 enabled)
Data 12 (if 16-bit external bus)/Programmable Flags 12 (if 8-bit external bus)/SPI0 Slave
Select output 6 (if 8-bit external bus, when SPI0 enabled)
Data 11 (if 16-bit external bus)/Programmable Flags 11 (if 8-bit external bus)/SPI1 Slave
Select output 5 (if 8-bit external bus, when SPI1 enabled)
Data 10 (if 16-bit external bus)/Programmable Flags 10 (if 8-bit external bus)/SPI0 Slave
Select output 5 (if 8-bit external bus, when SPI0 enabled)
Data 9 (if 16-bit external bus)/Programmable Flags 9 (if 8-bit external bus)/SPI1 Slave Select
output 4 (if 8-bit external bus, when SPI1 enabled)
Data 8 (if 16-bit external bus)/Programmable Flags 8 (if 8-bit external bus)/SPI0 Slave Select
output 4 (if 8-bit external bus, when SPI0 enabled)
Programmable Flags 7/SPI1 Slave Select output 3 (when SPI0 enabled)/Divisor Frequency
(divisor select for PLL input during boot)
Programmable Flags 6/SPI0 Slave Select output 3 (when SPI0 enabled)/Multiplier Select 6
(during boot)
–15–
ADSP-2191M
Table 7. Pin Function Descriptions (continued)
Pin
Type
Function
PF5
/SPI1SEL2
/MSEL5
PF4
/SPI0SEL2
/MSEL4
PF3
/SPI1SEL1
/MSEL3
PF2
/SPI0SEL1
/MSEL2
PF1
/SPISS1
/MSEL1
PF0
/SPISS0
/MSEL0
RD
WR
ACK
BMS
IOMS
MS3–0
BR
BG
BGH
HAD15–0
HA16
HACK_P
HRD
HWR
HACK
HALE
HCMS
HCIOMS
CLKIN
XTAL
BMODE1–0
OPMODE
CLKOUT
BYPASS
RCLK1–0
RCLK2/SCK1
RFS1–0
RFS2/MOSI1
TCLK1–0
TCLK2/SCK0
TFS1–0
TFS2/MOSI0
DR1–0
DR2/MISO1
DT1–0
DT2/MISO0
I/O/T
I
I
I/O/T
I
I
I/O/T
I
I
I/O/T
I
I
I/O/T
I
I
I/O/T
I
I
O/T
O/T
I
O/T
O/T
O/T
I
O
O
I/O/T
I
I
I
I
O
I
I
I
I
O
I
I
O
I
I/O/T
I/O/T
I/O/T
I/O/T
I/O/T
I/O/T
I/O/T
I/O/T
I/T
I/O/T
O/T
I/O/T
Programmable Flags 5/SPI1 Slave Select output 2 (when SPI0 enabled)/Multiplier Select 5
(during boot)
Programmable Flags 4/SPI0 Slave Select output 2 (when SPI0 enabled)/Multiplier Select 4
(during boot)
Programmable Flags 3/SPI1 Slave Select output 1 (when SPI0 enabled)/Multiplier Select 3
(during boot)
Programmable Flags 2/SPI0 Slave Select output 1 (when SPI0 enabled)/Multiplier Select 2
(during boot)
Programmable Flags 1/SPI1 Slave Select input (when SPI1 enabled)/Multiplier Select 1
(during boot)
Programmable Flags 0/SPI0 Slave Select input (when SPI0 enabled)/Multiplier Select 0
(during boot)
External Port Read Strobe
External Port Write Strobe
External Port Access Ready Acknowledge
External Port Boot Space Select
External Port IO Space Select
External Port Memory Space Selects
External Port Bus Request
External Port Bus Grant
External Port Bus Grant Hang
Host Port Multiplexed Address and Data Bus
Host Port MSB of Address Bus
Host Port ACK Polarity
Host Port Read Strobe
Host Port Write Strobe
Host Port Access Ready Acknowledge
Host Port Address Latch Strobe or Address Cycle Control
Host Port Internal Memory–Internal I/O Memory–Boot Memory Select
Host Port Internal I/O Memory Select
Clock Input/Oscillator Input
Oscillator Output
Boot Mode 1–0. The BMODE1 and BMODE0 pins have 85 kΩ internal pull-up resistors.
Operating Mode. The OPMODE pin has a 85 kΩ internal pull-up resistor.
Clock Output
Phase-Lock-Loop (PLL) Bypass Mode. The BYPASS pin has a 85 kΩ internal pull-up resistor.
SPORT1–0 Receive Clock
SPORT2 Receive Clock/SPI1 Serial Clock
SPORT1–0 Receive Frame Sync
SPORT2 Receive Frame Sync/SPI1 Master-Output, Slave-Input Data
SPORT1–0 Transmit Clock
SPORT2 Transmit Clock/SPI0 Serial Clock
SPORT1–0 Transmit Frame Sync
SPORT2 Transmit Frame Sync/SPI0 Master-Output, Slave-Input Data
SPORT1–0 Serial Data Receive
SPORT2 Serial Data Receive/SPI1 Master-Input, Slave-Output Data
SPORT1–0 Serial Data Transmit
SPORT2 Serial Data Transmit/SPI0 Master-Input, Slave-Output Data
–16–
REV. A
ADSP-2191M
Table 7. Pin Function Descriptions (continued)
Pin
Type
Function
TMR2–0
RXD
TXD
RESET
I/O/T
I
O
I
TCK
I
TMS
I
TDI
I
TDO
TRST
O
I
EMU
O
VDDINT
VDDEXT
GND
NC
P
P
G
Timer Output or Capture
UART Serial Receive Data
UART Serial Transmit Data
Processor Reset. Resets the ADSP-2191M to a known state and begins execution at the
program memory location specified by the hardware reset vector address. The RESET input
must be asserted (low) at powerup. The RESET pin has an 85 kΩ internal pull-up resistor.
Test Clock (JTAG). Provides a clock for JTAG boundary scan. The TCK pin has an 85 kΩ
internal pull-up resistor.
Test Mode Select (JTAG). Used to control the test state machine. The TMS pin has an 85 kΩ
internal pull-up resistor.
Test Data Input (JTAG). Provides serial data for the boundary scan logic. The TDI pin has a
85 kΩ internal pull-up resistor.
Test Data Output (JTAG). Serial scan output of the boundary scan path.
Test Reset (JTAG). Resets the test state machine. TRST must be asserted (pulsed low) after
powerup or held low for proper operation of the ADSP-2191M. The TRST pin has a 65 kΩ
internal pull-down resistor.
Emulation Status (JTAG). Must be connected to the ADSP-2191M emulator target board
connector only.
Core Power Supply. Nominally 2.5 V dc and supplies the DSP’s core processor. (four pins)
I/O Power Supply. Nominally 3.3 V dc. (nine pins)
Power Supply Return. (twelve pins)
Do Not Connect. Reserved pins that must be left open and unconnected.
REV. A
–17–
ADSP-2191M
SPECIFICATIONS
RECOMMENDED OPERATING CONDITIONS
Parameter
VDDINT
Test Conditions
VIH
Internal (Core) Supply
Voltage
External (I/O) Supply
Voltage
High Level Input Voltage
VIL
Low Level Input Voltage
TAMB
Ambient Operating
Temperature
VDDEXT
@ VDDINT = max,
VDDEXT = max
@ VDDINT = min,
VDDEXT = min
K Grade (Commercial)
B Grade (Industrial)
Min
Max
Min
Max
Unit
2.37
2.63
2.37
2.63
V
2.97
3.6
2.97
3.6
V
2.0
VDDEXT +0.3
2.0
VDDEXT +0.3
V
–0.3
+0.8
–0.3
+0.8
V
0
70
–40
+85
ºC
Specifications subject to change without notice.
ELECTRICAL CHARACTERISTICS
K and B Grades
Parameter
1
VOH
High Level Output Voltage
VOL
Low Level Output Voltage1
IIH
High Level Input Current2, 3
IIL
Low Level Input Current3, 4
IIHP
High Level Input Current5
IILP
Low Level Input Current4
IOZH
Three-State Leakage Current5
IOZL
Three-State Leakage Current6
CIN
Input Capacitance6, 7
Test Conditions
Min
@ VDDEXT = min,
IOH = –0.5 mA
@ VDDEXT = min,
IOL = 2.0 mA
@ VDDEXT = max,
VIN = VDD max
@ VDDEXT = max,
VIN = 0 V
@ VDDEXT = max,
VIN = VDD max
@ VDDEXT = max,
VIN = 0 V
@ VDDEXT = max,
VIN = VDD max
@ VDDEXT = max,
VIN = 0 V
fIN = 1 MHz,
TCASE = 25°C,
VIN = 2.5 V
2.4
Typ
Max
Unit
V
0.4
V
10
µA
10
µA
30
100
µA
20
70
µA
10
µA
10
µA
8
pF
Specifications subject to change without notice.
1Applies
to output and bidirectional pins: DATA15–0, ADDR21–0, HAD15–0, MS3–0, IOMS, RD, WR, CLKOUT, HACK, PF7–0, TMR2–0, BGH,
BG, DT0, DT1, DT2/MISO0, TCLK0, TCLK1, TCLK2/SCK0, RCLK0, RCLK1, RCLK2/SCK1, TFS0, TFS1, TFS2/MOSI0, RFS0, RFS1,
RFS2/MOSI1, BMS, TDO, TXD, EMU, DR2/MISO1.
2
Applies to input pins: ACK, BR, HCMS, HCIOMS, HA16, HALE, HRD, HWR, CLKIN, DR0, DR1, RXD, HACK_P.
3
Applies to input pins with internal pull-ups: BMODE0, BMODE1, OPMODE, BYPASS, TCK, TMS, TDI, RESET.
4Applies to input pin with internal pull-down: TRST.
5Applies to three-statable pins: DATA15–0, ADDR21–0, MS3–0, RD, WR, PF7–0, BMS, IOMS, TFSx, RFSx, TDO, EMU, TCLKx, RCLKx, DTx,
HAD15–0, TMR2–0.
6Applies to all signal pins.
7Guaranteed, but not tested.
–18–
REV. A
ADSP-2191M
ABSOLUTE MAXIMUM RATINGS
VDDINT Internal (Core) Supply Voltage1 . . . –0.3 V to +3.0 V
VDDEXT External (I/O) Supply Voltage . . . . –0.3 V to +4.6 V
VIL–VIH Input Voltage . . . . . . . . . . –0.5 V to VDDEXT +0.5 V
VOL–VOH Output Voltage Swing. . . –0.5 V to VDDEXT +0.5 V
TSTORE Storage Temperature Range . . . . . .–65ºC to +150ºC
TLEAD Lead Temperature of ST-144 (5 seconds) . . . . 185ºC
1Stresses
greater than those listed above may cause permanent damage to the
device. These are stress ratings only; functional operation of the device at these
or any other conditions greater than those indicated in the operational sections
of this specification is not implied. Exposure to absolute maximum rating
conditions for extended periods may affect device reliability.
ESD SENSITIVITY
CAUTION
ESD (electrostatic discharge) sensitive device. Electrostatic charges as high as 4000 V
readily accumulate on the human body and test equipment and can discharge without
detection. Although the ADSP-2191M features proprietary ESD protection circuitry,
permanent damage may occur on devices subjected to high energy electrostatic
discharges. Therefore, proper ESD precautions are recommended to avoid performance degradation or loss of functionality.
Power Dissipation
Using the operation-versus-current information in Table 8, designers can estimate the ADSP-2191M’s internal power supply (VDDINT)
input current for a specific application, according to the formula for IDDINT calculation beneath Table 8. For calculation of external
supply current and total supply current, see Power Dissipation on Page 40.
Table 8. Operation Types Versus Input Current
K-Grade
IDDINT(mA) CCLK = 160 MHz
Core
B-Grade
IDDINT(mA)1 CCLK = 140 MHz
Peripheral
Core
Peripheral
Activity
Typ1
Max2
Typ1
Max2
Typ1
Max2
Typ1
Max2
Power Down3
Idle 14
Idle 25
Typical6
Peak7
100 µA
1
1
184
215
600 µA
2
2
210
240
0
5
60
60
60
50 µA
8
70
70
70
100 µA
1
1
165
195
500 µA
2
2
185
210
0
4
55
55
55
50 µA
7
62
62
62
1
Test conditions: VDDINT= 2.50 V; HCLK (peripheral clock) frequency = CCLK/2 (core clock/2) frequency; TAMB = 25ºC.
conditions: VDDINT= 2.65 V; HCLK (peripheral clock) frequency = CCLK/2 (core clock/2) frequency; TAMB = 25ºC.
3PLL, Core, peripheral clocks, and CLKIN are disabled.
4PLL is enabled and Core and peripheral clocks are disabled.
5Core CLK is disabled and peripheral clock is enabled.
6All instructions execute from internal memory. 50% of the instructions are repeat MACs with dual operand addressing, with changing data fetched using
a linear address sequence. 50% of the instructions are type 3 instructions.
7All instructions execute from internal memory. 100% of the instructions are MACs with dual operand addressing, with changing data fetched using a linear
address sequence.
2Test
I DDINT = ( %Typical × I DDINT-TYPICAL ) + ( %Idle × I DDINT-IDLE ) + ( %Power Down × I DDINT-PWRDWN )
REV. A
–19–
ADSP-2191M
TIMING SPECIFICATIONS
This section contains timing information for the DSP’s external
signals. Use the exact information given. Do not attempt to derive
parameters from the addition or subtraction of other information.
While addition or subtraction would yield meaningful results for
an individual device, the values given in this data sheet reflect
statistical variations and worst cases. Consequently, parameters
cannot be added meaningfully to derive longer times.
Timing requirements apply to signals that are controlled by
circuitry external to the processor, such as the data input for a
read operation.Timing requirements guarantee that the
processor operates correctly with other devices.
Clock In and Clock Out Cycle Timing
Switching characteristics specify how the processor changes its
signals. No control is possible over this timing; circuitry external
to the processor must be designed for compatibility with these
signal characteristics. Switching characteristics indicate what the
processor will do in a given circumstance. Switching characteristics can also be used to ensure that any timing requirement of
a device connected to the processor (such as memory) is satisfied.
Table 9 and Figure 8 describe clock and reset operations. Combinations of CLKIN and clock multipliers must not select
core/peripheral clocks in excess of 160/80 MHz for commercial
grade and 140/70 MHz for industrial grade, when the peripheral
clock rate is one-half the core clock rate. If the peripheral clock
rate is equal to the core clock rate, the maximum peripheral clock
rate is 80 MHz for both commercial and industrial grade parts.
The peripheral clock is supplied to the CLKOUT pins.
When changing from bypass mode to PLL mode, allow 512
HCLK cycles for the PLL to stabilize.
Table 9. Clock In and Clock Out Cycle Timing
Parameter
Min
Max
Unit
Switching Characteristics
tCKOD
CLKOUT Delay from CLKIN
tCKO
CLKOUT Period1
0
12.5
5.8
ns
ns
10
4.5
4.5
200tCLKOUT
40
1000
200
ns
ns
ns
ns
µs
ns
ns
ns
Timing Requirements
CLKIN Period2, 3
tCK
tCKL
CLKIN Low Pulse
tCKH
CLKIN High Pulse
tWRST
RESET Asserted Pulsewidth Low
tMSS
MSELx/BYPASS Stable Before RESET Deasserted Setup
tMSH
MSELx/BYPASS Stable After RESET Deasserted Hold
MSELx/BYPASS Stable After RESET Asserted
tMSD
tPFD
Flag Output Disable Time After RESET Asserted
200
10
1CLKOUT
jitter can be as great as 8 ns when CLKOUT frequency is less than 20 MHz. For frequencies greater than 20 MHz, jitter is less than 1 ns.
clock multiplier mode and MSEL6–0 set for 1:1 (or CLKIN = CCLK), tCK = tCCLK.
3In bypass mode, t
CK = tCCLK.
2In
tCK
CLKIN
tCKL
tCDD
tWRST
RESET
tPFD
tMSD
tMSS
tMSH
MSEL6–0
BYPASS
DF
tCKOD
tCKO
CLKOUT
Figure 8. Clock In and Clock Out Cycle Timing
–20–
REV. A
ADSP-2191M
Programmable Flags Cycle Timing
Table 10 and Figure 9 describe Programmable Flag operations.
Table 10. Programmable Flags Cycle Timing
Parameter
Min
Switching Characteristics
tDFO
Flag Output Delay with Respect to CLKOUT
tHFO
Flag Output Hold After CLKOUT High
Timing Requirement
tHFI
Flag Input Hold is Asynchronous
Max
Unit
7
6
ns
ns
3
ns
CLKOUT
tDFO
tHFO
PF
(OUTPUT)
FLAG OUTPUT
tHFI
PF
(INPUT)
FLAG INPUT
Figure 9. Programmable Flags Cycle Timing
Timer PWM_OUT Cycle Timing
Table 11 and Figure 10 describe timer expired operations. The
input signal is asynchronous in “width capture mode” and has
an absolute maximum input frequency of 40 MHz.
Table 11. Timer PWM_OUT Cycle Timing
Parameter
Min
Max
Unit
Switching Characteristic
tHTO
Timer Pulsewidth Output1
12.5
(232 –1) cycles
ns
1The
minimum time for tHTO is one cycle, and the maximum time for tHTO equals (232 –1) cycles.
HCLK
tHTO
PWM_OUT
Figure 10. Timer PWM_OUT Cycle Timing
REV. A
–21–
ADSP-2191M
External Port Write Cycle Timing
Table 12 and Figure 11 describe external port write operations.
The external port lets systems extend read/write accesses in three
ways: waitstates, ACK input, and combined waitstates and ACK.
To add waits with ACK, the DSP must see ACK low at the rising
edge of EMI clock. ACK low causes the DSP to wait, and the
DSP requires two EMI clock cycles after ACK goes high to finish
the access. For more information, see the External Port chapter
in the ADSP-219x/ADSP-2191 DSP Hardware Reference.
Table 12. External Port Write Cycle Timing
Parameter1, 2
Min
Switching Characteristics
Chip Select Asserted to WR Asserted Delay
tCSWS
tAWS
Address Valid to WR Setup and Delay
tWSCS
WR Deasserted to Chip Select Deasserted
tWSA
WR Deasserted to Address Invalid
tWW
WR Strobe Pulsewidth
tCDA
WR to Data Enable Access Delay
WR to Data Disable Access Delay
tCDD
tDSW
Data Valid to WR Deasserted Setup
tDHW
WR Deasserted to Data Invalid Hold Time; E_WHC4
tDHW
WR Deasserted to Data Invalid Hold Time; E_WHC4
tWWR
WR Deasserted to WR, RD Asserted
Timing Requirements
ACK Strobe Pulsewidth
tAKW
tDWSAK
ACK Delay from WR Low
Max
0.5tHCLK –4
0.5tHCLK –3
0.5tHCLK –4
0.5tHCLK –3
tHCLK –2+W3
0.5tHCLK –3
tHCLK +1+W3
3.4
tHCLK +3.4
tHCLK
12.5
0
0
0.5tHCLK +4
tHCLK +7+W3
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
1t
HCLK is the peripheral clock period.
2These are timing parameters that are
based on worst-case operating conditions.
= (number of waitstates specified in wait register) ⴛ tHCLK.
4Write hold cycle–memory select control registers (MS ⴛ CTL).
3W
tC S W S
tW S C S
M S3–0
IO M S
BMS
A21–0
tW W
tA W S
tW S A
WR
tD W S A K
tW W R
tA K W
AC K
tC D D
tC D A
tD S W
tD H W
D15–0
RD
Figure 11. External Port Write Cycle Timing
–22–
REV. A
ADSP-2191M
External Port Read Cycle Timing
Table 13 and Figure 12 describe external port read operations.
For additional information on the ACK signal, see the discussion
on Page 22.
Table 13. External Port Read Cycle Timing
Parameter1, 2
Min
Switching Characteristics
Chip Select Asserted to RD Asserted Delay
tCSRS
tARS
Address Valid to RD Setup and Delay
tRSCS
RD Deasserted to Chip Select Deasserted Setup
tRW
RD Strobe Pulsewidth
tRSA
RD Deasserted to Address Invalid Setup
tRWR
RD Deasserted to WR, RD Asserted
0.5tHCLK –3
0.5tHCLK –3
0.5tHCLK –2
tHCLK –2+W3
0.5tHCLK –2
tHCLK
Timing Requirements
tAKW
ACK Strobe Pulsewidth
tRDA
RD Asserted to Data Access Setup
tADA
Address Valid to Data Access Setup
tSDA
Chip Select Asserted to Data Access Setup
tSD
Data Valid to RD Deasserted Setup
tHRD
RD Deasserted to Data Invalid Hold
ACK Delay from RD Low
tDRSAK
Max
tHCLK
1t
HCLK is the peripheral clock period.
2These are timing parameters that are
3W
based on worst-case operating conditions.
= (number of waitstates specified in wait register) ⴛ tHCLK.
MS3--0
IOMS
BMS
tRSCS
tCSRS
A21–0
tRW
tARS
tRSA
RD
tDRSAK
tRWR
tAKW
ACK
tCDA
tSD
D15–0
tRDA
tADA
tSDA
WR
Figure 12. External Port Read Cycle Timing
REV. A
–23–
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
tHCLK –4+W3
tHCLK +W3
tHCLK +W3
7
0
0
tH R D
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ADSP-2191M
External Port Bus Request and Grant Cycle Timing
Table 14 and Figure 13 describe external port bus request and
bus grant operations.
Table 14. External Port Bus Request and Grant Cycle Timing
Parameter1, 2
Min
Max
Unit
Switching Characteristics
CLKOUT High to xMS, Address, and RD/WR Disable
tSD
tSE
CLKOUT Low to xMS, Address, and RD/WR Enable
tDBG
CLKOUT High to BG Asserted Setup
tEBG
CLKOUT High to BG Deasserted Hold Time
tDBH
CLKOUT High to BGH Asserted Setup
tEBH
CLKOUT High to BGH Deasserted Hold Time
0
0
0
0
0
0.5tHCLK +1
4
4
4
4
4
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
Timing Requirements
BR Asserted to CLKOUT High Setup
tBS
tBH
CLKOUT High to BR Deasserted Hold Time
4.6
0
ns
ns
1t
HCLK is the peripheral clock period.
2These are timing parameters that are
based on worst-case operating conditions.
CLKOUT
tBS
tBH
BR
tSD
tSE
tSD
tSE
tSD
tSE
MS3--0
IOMS
BMS
A21–0
WR
RD
tDBG
tEBG
tDBH
tEBH
BG
BGH
Figure 13. External Port Bus Request and Grant Cycle Timing
–24–
REV. A
ADSP-2191M
Host Port ALE Mode Write Cycle Timing
Table 15 and Figure 14 describe Host port write operations in
Address Latch Enable (ALE) mode. For more information on
ACK, Ready, ALE, and ACC mode selection, see the Host port
modes description on Page 8.
Table 15. Host Port ALE Mode Write Cycle Timing
Parameter
Switching Characteristics
tWHKS1
HWR Asserted to HACK Asserted (Setup, ACK Mode) First
Byte
HWR Asserted to HACK Asserted (Setup, ACK Mode)2
tWHKS2
HWR Deasserted to HACK Deasserted (Hold, ACK Mode)
tWHKH
tWHS
HWR Asserted to HACK Asserted (Setup, Ready Mode)
tWHH
HWR Asserted to HACK Deasserted (Hold, Ready Mode)
First Byte
Timing Requirements
HCMS or HCIOMS Asserted to HALE Asserted
tCSAL
tALPW
HALE Asserted Pulsewidth
tALCSW
HALE Deasserted to HCMS or HCIOMS Deasserted
HWR Deasserted to HCMS or HCIOMS Deasserted
tWCSW
tALW
HALE Deasserted to HWR Asserted
tWCS
HWR Deasserted (After Last Byte) to HCMS or
HCIOMS Deasserted (Ready for Next Write)
tHKWD
HACK Asserted to HWR Deasserted (Hold, ACK Mode)
Address Valid to HALE Deasserted (Setup)
tAALS
tALAH
HALE Deasserted to Address Invalid (Hold)
tDWS
Data Valid to HWR Deasserted (Setup)
tWDH
HWR Deasserted to Data Invalid (Hold)
1t
Min
Max
Unit
10
5tHCLK +tNH1
ns
0
10
10
10
5tHCLK +tNH1
ns
ns
ns
ns
0
4
1
0
1
0
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
1.5
2
4
4
1
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
NH are peripheral bus latencies (nⴛt HCLK); these are internal DSP latencies related to the number of peripheral DMAs attempting to access DSP memory
at the same time.
2Measurement is for
the second, third, or fourth byte of a host write transaction. The quantity of bytes to complete a host write transaction is dependent on
the data bus size (8 or 16 bits) and the data type (16 or 24 bits).
REV. A
–25–
ADSP-2191M
HCMS
HIO MS
tA LC SW
tA LPW
t CS A L
tW C SW
HALE
t WC S
tA LW
HWR
t H KW D
t WH K S
t WH K H
HACK
(ACK
MODE )
HACK EACH BYTE
tW H H
tWH S
HACK
(READY
MODE )
HACK FIRS T BY TE
tA LA H
t D WS
tAA LS
HAD15–0
HA16
t WD H
ADDRE SS
VALID
DATA
VALID
DATA
V ALI D
START
FIRST WORD
FI RS T
BY TE
LAST
BY TE
ADDRESS
V ALID
S TART
NEX T WORD
Figure 14. Host Port ALE Mode Write Cycle Timing
–26–
REV. A
ADSP-2191M
Host Port ACC Mode Write Cycle Timing
Table 16 and Figure 15 describe Host port write operations in
Address Cycle Control (ACC) mode. For more information on
ACK, Ready, ALE, and ACC mode selection, see the Host port
modes description on Page 8.
Table 16. Host Port ACC Mode Write Cycle Timing
Parameter
Switching Characteristics
tWHKS1
HWR Asserted to HACK Asserted (ACK Mode) First Byte
tWHKS2
HWR Asserted to HACK Asserted (Setup, ACK Mode)2
tWHKH
HWR Deasserted to HACK Deasserted (Hold, ACK Mode)
tWHS
HWR Asserted to HACK Asserted (Setup, Ready Mode)
HWR Asserted to HACK Deasserted (Hold, Ready Mode)
tWHH
First Byte
HWR Asserted to HACK Asserted (Setup) During Address
tWSHKS
Latch
HWR Deasserted to HACK Deasserted (Hold) During
tWHHKH
Address Latch
Timing Requirements
HWR Asserted to HALE Deasserted (Delay)
tWAL
tCSAL
HCMS or HCIOMS Asserted to HALE Asserted (Delay)
tALCS
HALE Deasserted to Optional HCMS or HCIOMS
Deasserted
HWR Deasserted to HCMS or HCIOMS Deasserted
tWCSW
tALW
HALE Asserted to HWR Asserted
tCSW
HCMS or HCIOMS Asserted to HWR Asserted
tWCS
HWR Deasserted (After Last Byte) to HCMS or
HCIOMS Deasserted (Ready for Next Write)
HALE Deasserted to HWR Asserted
tALEW
tHKWD
HACK Asserted to HWR Deasserted (Hold, ACK Mode)
tADW
Address Valid to HWR Asserted (Setup)
tWAD
HWR Deasserted to Address Invalid (Hold)
Data Valid to HWR Deasserted (Setup)
tDWS
tWDH
HWR Deasserted to Data Invalid (Hold)
tHKWAL
HACK Asserted to HWR Deasserted (Hold) During Address
Latch2
1t
2
Min
Max
Unit
10
5tHCLK +tNH1
12
10
10
5tHCLK +tNH1
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
10
ns
10
ns
0
1.5
0
1
ns
ns
ns
0
0.5
0
0
ns
ns
ns
ns
1
1.5
3
3
2
2
2
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
NH are peripheral bus latencies (nⴛtHCLK); these are internal DSP latencies related to the number of peripheral DMAs attempting to access DSP memory
at the same time.
Measurement is for the second, third, or fourth byte of a host write transaction. The quantity of bytes to complete a host write transaction is dependent
on the data bus size (8 or 16 bits) and the data type (16 or 24 bits).
REV. A
–27–
ADSP-2191M
HCMS
HIOMS
tA L CS
tC SA L
tWC SW
tWA L
HALE
tC SW
tA LW
tWC S
t ALE W
HWR
tH K WD
tH KW A L
HACK
(ACK
MO DE)
tWH K H
tWS H KS
tWH K S
HACK EACH BYT E
t WHH K H
tW H H
tWH S
HACK
(READY
MO DE)
HACK FI RST BYTE
tWA D
tA D W
HAD15–0
HA16
tD WS
t WD H
ADDRESS
VALID
DATA
VALID
DATA
VALID
ADDRESS
VALID
START
FIRST WORD
FIRST
BYTE
LAST
BYTE
START
NEXT WORD
Figure 15. Host Port ACC Mode Write Cycle Timing
–28–
REV. A
ADSP-2191M
Host Port ALE Mode Read Cycle Timing
Table 17 and Figure 16 describe Host port read operations in
Address Latch Enable (ALE) mode. For more information on
ACK, Ready, ALE, and ACC mode selection, see the Host port
modes description on Page 8.
Table 17. Host Port ALE Mode Read Cycle Timing
Parameter
Switching Characteristics
tRHKS1
HRD Asserted to HACK Asserted (ACK Mode) First Byte
tRHKS2
HRD Asserted to HACK Asserted (Setup, ACK Mode)2
tRHKH
HRD Deasserted to HACK Deasserted (Hold, ACK Mode)
tRHS
HRD Asserted to HACK Asserted (Setup, Ready Mode)
HRD Asserted to HACK Deasserted (Hold, Ready Mode)
tRHH
First Byte
HRD Deasserted to Data Invalid (Hold)
tRDH
tRDD
HRD Deasserted to Data Disable
Timing Requirements
HCMS or HCIOMS Asserted to HALE Asserted (Delay)
tCSAL
tALCS
HALE Deasserted to Optional HCMS or HCIOMS
Deasserted
HRD Deasserted to HCMS or HCIOMS Deasserted
tRCSW
tALR
HALE Deasserted to HRD Asserted
tRCS
HRD Deasserted (After Last Byte) to HCMS or
HCIOMS Deasserted (Ready for Next Read)
HALE Asserted Pulsewidth
tALPW
tHKRD
HACK Asserted to HRD Deasserted (Hold, ACK Mode)
tAALS
Address Valid to HALE Deasserted (Setup)
tALAH
HALE Deasserted to Address Invalid (Hold)
1t
Min
Max
Unit
12tHCLK
15tHCLK +tNH1
12
10
10
15tHCLK +tNH1
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
10
ns
ns
12tHCLK
1
0
1
ns
ns
0
5
0
ns
ns
ns
4
1.5
2
4
ns
ns
ns
ns
are peripheral bus latencies (n ⴛtHCLK); these are internal DSP latencies related to the number of peripherals attempting to access DSP memory at
the same time.
2Measurement is for the second, third, or fourth byte of a host read transaction. The quantity of bytes to complete a host read transaction is dependent on
the data bus size (8 or 16 bits) and the data type (16 or 24 bits).
NH
REV. A
–29–
ADSP-2191M
HCMS
HIO MS
t ALC S
tC S AL
tR C S W
HAL E
tA LP W
tR C S
tAL R
HRD
t RH K S
HACK
(ACK
MODE)
t HK R D
tR H K H
HACK FOR EACH BYTE
t RH H
t RH S
HA CK
(READY
MO DE)
HACK FIRST BYTE
tA L A H
tA A L S
HAD15–0
HA16
tR D H
tR D D
ADDRESS
VALID
DATA
VALID
DATA
VALID
ADDRESS
VALID
START
FI RST WO RD
FIRST
BYTE
LAST
BYTE
START
NEXT WORD
Figure 16. Host Port ALE Mode Read Cycle Timing
–30–
REV. A
ADSP-2191M
Host Port ACC Mode Read Cycle Timing
Table 18 and Figure 17 describe Host port read operations in
Address Cycle Control (ACC) mode. For more information on
ACK, Ready, ALE, and ACC mode selection, see the Host port
modes description on Page 8.
Table 18. Host Port ACC Mode Read Cycle Timing
Parameter
Switching Characteristics
tRHKS1
HRD Asserted to HACK Asserted (ACK Mode) First Byte
tRHKS2
HRD Asserted to HACK Asserted (Setup, ACK Mode)2
tRHKH
HRD Deasserted to HACK Deasserted (Hold, ACK Mode)
tRHS
HRD Asserted to HACK Asserted (Setup, Ready Mode)
HRD Asserted to HACK Deasserted (Hold, Ready Mode)
tRHH
First Byte
HRD Deasserted to Data Invalid (Hold)
tRDH
HWR Asserted to HACK Asserted (Setup) During Address
tWSHKS
Latch
HWR Deasserted to HACK Deasserted (Hold) During
tWHHKH
Address Latch
HRD Deasserted to Data Disable
tRDD
Timing Requirements
HCMS or HCIOMS Asserted to HALE Asserted (Delay)
tCSAL
tALCS
HALE Deasserted to Optional HCMS or HCIOMS
Deasserted
HRD Deasserted to HCMS or HCIOMS Deasserted
tRCSW
HALE Asserted to HWR Asserted
tALW
tALER
HALE Deasserted to HWR Asserted
tCSR
HCMS or HCIOMS Asserted to HRD Asserted
tRCS
HRD Deasserted (After Last Byte) to HCMS or
HCIOMS Deasserted (Ready for Next Read)
HWR Deasserted to HALE Deasserted (Delay)
tWAL
tHKRD
HACK Asserted to HRD Deasserted (Hold, ACK Mode)
tADW
Address Valid to HWR Deasserted (Setup)
tWAD
HWR Deasserted to Address Invalid (Hold)
tHKWAL
HACK Asserted to HWR Deasserted (Hold) During Address
Latch2
1t
Min
Max
Unit
12tHCLK
15tHCLK +tNH1
10
10
10
15tHCLK +tNH1
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
10
ns
ns
10
ns
10
ns
12tHCLK
1
0
1
ns
ns
0
0.5
1
0
0
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
2.5
1.5
2
1
2
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
are peripheral bus latencies (n ⴛtHCLK); these are internal DSP latencies related to the number of peripherals attempting to access DSP memory at
the same time.
2Measurement is for the second, third, or fourth byte of a host read transaction. The quantity of bytes to complete a host read transaction is dependent on
the data bus size (8 or 16 bits) and the data type (16 or 24 bits).
NH
REV. A
–31–
ADSP-2191M
HCMS
HIO MS
t ALC S
tC S A L
t RC S W
HALE
t WA L
t t R CS
tA LW
HWR
tC S R
t ALE R
HRD
t HK W AL
t H K RD
t R H KS
HACK
(ACK
MODE )
t R HK H
t WSH K S
HACK EACH BYTE
t WH H KH
tR H H
t RHS
HACK
(READY
MODE )
HACK FIRS T BY TE
HAD15–0
HA16
t RDH
t WA D
tA D W
tR D D
ADDRE SS
VALID
DATA
V ALID
DATA
V ALID
ADDRE SS
VALID
START
FI RS T WORD
FIRS T
BY TE
L AST
BY TE
START
NE XT WORD
Figure 17. Host Port ACC Mode Read Cycle Timing
–32–
REV. A
ADSP-2191M
Serial Ports
Table 19 and Figure 18 describe SPORT transmit and receive
operations, while Figure 19 and Figure 20 describe SPORT
Frame Sync operations.
Table 19. Serial Ports1, 2
Parameter
Min
External Clock Timing Requirements
TFS/RFS Setup Before TCLK/RCLK3
tSFSE
tHFSE
TFS/RFS Hold After TCLK/RCLK3
tSDRE
Receive Data Setup Before RCLK3
tHDRE
Receive Data Hold After RCLK3
tSCLKW
TCLK/RCLK Width
tSCLK
TCLK/RCLK Period
4
4
1.5
4
0.5tHCLK –1
2tHCLK
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
Internal Clock Timing Requirements
TFS Setup Before TCLK4; RFS Setup Before RCLK3
tSFSI
tHFSI
TFS/RFS Hold After TCLK/RCLK3
tSDRI
Receive Data Setup Before RCLK3
tHDRI
Receive Data Hold After RCLK3
4
3
2
5
ns
ns
ns
ns
External or Internal Clock Switching Characteristics
TFS/RFS Delay After TCLK/RCLK (Internally
tDFSE
Generated FS)4
TFS/RFS Hold After TCLK/RCLK (Internally
tHOFSE
Generated FS)4
14
3
External Clock Switching Characteristics
Transmit Data Delay After TCLK4
tDDTE
Transmit Data Hold After TCLK4
tHDTE
4
Internal Clock Switching Characteristics
Transmit Data Delay After TCLK4
tDDTI
tHDTI
Transmit Data Hold After TCLK4
tSCLKIW
TCLK/RCLK Width
4
0.5tHCLK –3.5
Enable and Three-State5 Switching Characteristics
tDTENE
Data Enable from External TCLK4
tDDTTE
Data Disable from External TCLK4
tDTENI
Data Enable from Internal TCLK4
Data Disable from External TCLK4
tDDTTI
0
0
External Late Frame Sync Switching Characteristics
Data Delay from Late External TFS with MCE=1, MFD=06, 7
tDDTLFSE
tDTENLFSE
Data Enable from Late FS or MCE=1, MFD=06, 7
3.5
1To
Max
Unit
ns
ns
13.4
ns
ns
13.4
0.5tHCLK +2.5
ns
ns
ns
12.1
13
13
12
ns
ns
ns
ns
10.5
ns
ns
determine whether communication is possible between two devices at clock speed n, the following specifications must be confirmed: 1) frame sync delay
and frame sync setup-and-hold, 2) data delay and data setup-and-hold, and 3) SCLK width.
2Word selected timing for I2S mode is the same as TFS/RFS timing (normal framing only).
3Referenced to sample edge.
4Referenced to drive edge.
5Only applies to SPORT0/1.
6MCE=1, TFS enable, and TFS valid follow t
DDTENFS and tDDTLFSE.
7If external RFSD/TFS setup to RCLK/TCLK>0.5t
LSCK, tDDTLSCK and tDTENLSCK apply; otherwise tDDTLFSE and tDTENLFS apply.
REV. A
–33–
ADSP-2191M
DATA RECEIVE-INTERNAL CLOCK
DATA RECEIVE-EXTERNAL CLOCK
SAMPLE
EDGE
DRIVE
EDGE
DRIVE
EDGE
SAMPLE
EDGE
tSCLKIW
tSCLKW
RCLK
RCLK
tDFSE
tHOFSE
tSFSI
tDFSE
tHOFSE
tHFSI
RFS
tSFSE
tHFSE
tSDRE
tHDRE
RFS
tSDRI
tHDRI
DR
DR
NOTE: EITHER THE RISING EDGE OR FALLING EDGE OF RCLK OR TCLK CAN BE USED AS THE ACTIVE SAMPLING EDGE.
DATA TRANSMIT-INTERNAL CLOCK
DATA TRANSMIT-EXTERNAL CLOCK
SAMPLE
EDGE
DRIVE
EDGE
DRIVE
EDGE
SAMPLE
EDGE
tSCLKIW
tSCLKW
TCLK
TCLK
tDFSE
tHOFSE
tSFSI
tDFSE
tHOFSE
tHFSI
TFS
tSFSE
tHFSE
TFS
tHDTI
tDDTI
tHDTE
tDDTE
DT
DT
NOTE: EITHER THE RISING EDGE OR FALLING EDGE OF RCLK OR TCLK CAN BE USED AS THE ACTIVE SAMPLING EDGE.
DRIVE
EDGE
DRIVE
EDGE
TCLK (EXT)
TFS (“LATE,” EXT.)
TCLK/RCLK
tDDTEN
tDDTTE
DT
DRIVE
EDGE
TCLK (INT)
TFS (“LATE,” INT.)
DRIVE
EDGE
TCLK/RCLK
tDDTIN
tDDTTI
DT
Figure 18. Serial Ports
–34–
REV. A
ADSP-2191M
EXTERNAL RFS WITH MCE = 1, MFD = 0
DRIVE
SAMPLE
DRIVE
RCLK
tHOSFSE/ I
tSFSE/ I
RFS
tDDTE/ I
tHDTE/ I
tDTENLFSE
DT
1ST BIT
2ND BIT
tDDTLFSE
LATE EXTERNAL TFS
DRIVE
SAMPLE
DRIVE
TCLK
tHOSFSE/ I
tSFSE / I
TFS
tDDTE / I
tHDTE/ I
tDTENLFSE
1ST BIT
DT
2ND BIT
tDDTLFSE
Figure 19. Serial Ports—External Late Frame Sync (Frame Sync Setup > 0.5tSCLK)
EXTERNAL RFS WITH MCE = 1, MFD = 0
DRIVE
SAMPLE
DRIVE
RCLK
tSFSE/ I
tHOFSE/ I
RFS
tDDTE / I
tHDTE/ I
tDTENLFSE
1ST BIT
DT
2ND BIT
tDDTLFSE
LATE EXTERNAL TFS
DRIVE
SAMPLE
DRIVE
TCLK
tHOFSE/ I
tSFSE/ I
TFS
tDDTE/ I
tHDTE/ I
tDTENLFSE
1ST BIT
DT
2ND BIT
tDDTLFSE
Figure 20. Serial Ports—External Late Frame Sync (Frame Sync Setup < 0.5tHCLK)
REV. A
–35–
ADSP-2191M
Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) Port—Master Timing
Table 20 and Figure 21 describe SPI port master operations.
Table 20. Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) Port—Master Timing
Parameter
Min
Switching Characteristics
tSDSCIM
SPIxSEL Low to First SCLK edge (x=0 or 1)
tSPICHM
Serial Clock High Period
Serial Clock Low Period
tSPICLM
tSPICLK
Serial Clock Period
tHDSM
Last SCLK Edge to SPIxSEL High (x=0 or 1)
tSPITDM
Sequential Transfer Delay
tDDSPID
SCLK Edge to Data Output Valid (Data Out Delay)
tHDSPID
SCLK Edge to Data Output Invalid (Data Out Hold)
2tHCLK –3
2tHCLK –3
2tHCLK –3
4tHCLK –1
2tHCLK –3
2tHCLK –2
0
0
Timing Requirements
Data Input Valid to SCLK Edge (Data Input Setup)
tSSPID
tHSPID
SCLK Sampling Edge to Data Input Invalid (Data In Hold)
8
1
Max
Unit
6
5
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
tSPICHM
SPIxSEL
(OUTPUT)
(x = 0 or 1)
tSDSCIM
tHDSM
tSPICLK
tSPICLM
tSPITDM
SCLK
(CPOL = 0)
(OUTPUT)
tSPICLM
tSPICHM
SCLK
(CPOL = 1)
(OUTPUT)
tDDSPID
MOSI
(OUTPUT)
tHDSPID
MSB
tSSPID
CPHA = 1
LSB
tHSPID
MISO
(INPUT)
tSSPID
MSB
VALID
LSB
VALID
tDDSPID
MOSI
(OUTPUT)
CPHA = 0
MISO
(INPUT)
tHDSPID
MSB
tSSPID
tHSPID
LSB
tHSPID
MSB
VALID
LSB
VALID
Figure 21. Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) Port—Master Timing
–36–
REV. A
ADSP-2191M
Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) Port—Slave Timing
Table 21 and Figure 22 describe SPI port slave operations.
Table 21. Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) Port—Slave Timing
Parameter
Min
Max
Unit
Switching Characteristics
tDSOE
SPISS Assertion to Data Out Active
tDSDHI
SPISS Deassertion to Data High Impedance
tDDSPID
SCLK Edge to Data Out Valid (Data Out Delay)
tHDSPID
SCLK Edge to Data Out Invalid (Data Out Hold)
0
0
0
0
8
10
10
10
ns
ns
ns
ns
Timing Requirements
Serial Clock High Period
tSPICHS
tSPICLS
Serial Clock Low Period
tSPICLK
Serial Clock Period
tHDS
Last SPICLK Edge to SPISS Not Asserted
tSPITDS
Sequential Transfer Delay
tSDSCI
SPISS Assertion to First SPICLK Edge
Data Input Valid to SCLK Edge (Data Input Setup)
tSSPID
tHSPID
SCLK Sampling Edge to Data Input Invalid (Data In Hold)
2tHCLK
2tHCLK
4tHCLK
2tHCLK
2tHCLK +4
2tHCLK
1.6
2.4
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
SPISS
(INPUT)
tSPICHS
tSPICLS
tSPICLS
tSDSCI
tSPICHS
tSPICLK
tHDS
SCLK
(CPOL = 0)
(INPUT)
SCLK
(CPOL = 1)
(INPUT)
tDSOE
tDDSPID
MISO
(OUTPUT)
CPHA = 1
tDSOE
MISO
(OUTPUT)
tDSDHI
LSB
tSSPID
tHSPID
tHSPID
LSB
VALID
MSB
VALID
tDDSPID
tDSDHI
LSB
MSB
CPHA = 0
MOSI
(INPUT)
tDDSPID
MSB
tSSPID
MOSI
(INPUT)
tHDSPID
tSSPID
MSB
VALID
tHSPID
LSB
VALID
Figure 22. Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) Port—Slave Timing
REV. A
–37–
tSPITDS
ADSP-2191M
Universal Asynchronous Receiver-Transmitter (UART)
Port—Receive and Transmit Timing
Figure 23 describes UART port receive and transmit operations.
The maximum baud rate is HCLK/16. As shown in Figure 23
there is some latency between the generation internal UART
interrupts and the external data operations. These latencies are
negligible at the data transmission rates for the UART.
HCLK
(SAMPLE
CLOCK)
DATA(5–8)
RXD
STOP
RECEIVE
INTERNAL
UART RECEIVE
INTERRUPT
UART RECEIVE BIT SET BY DATA STOP;
CLEARED BY FIFO READ
START
DATA(5–8)
TXD
TRANSMIT
STOP (1–2)
AS DATA
WRITTEN TO
BUFFER
INTERNAL
UART TRANSMIT
INTERRUPT
UART TRANSMIT BIT SET BY PROGRAM;
CLEARED BY WRITE TO TRANSMIT
Figure 23. UART Port—Receive and Transmit Timing
–38–
REV. A
ADSP-2191M
JTAG Test And Emulation Port Timing
Table 22 and Figure 24 describe JTAG port operations.
Table 22. JTAG Port Timing
Parameter
Min
Max
Unit
Switching Characteristics
tDTDO
TDO Delay from TCK Low
tDSYS
System Outputs Delay After TCK Low1
0
8
22
ns
ns
4
4
4
5
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
Timing Requirements
TCK Period
tTCK
tSTAP
TDI, TMS Setup Before TCK High
tHTAP
TDI, TMS Hold After TCK High
System Inputs Setup Before TCK Low2
tSSYS
tHSYS
System Inputs Hold After TCK Low2
tTRSTW
TRST Pulsewidth3
20
4tTCK
1System Outputs = DATA15–0, ADDR21–0, MS3–0, RD, WR, ACK, CLKOUT, BG, PF7–0, TIMEXP, DT0, DT1, TCLK0, TCLK1, RCLK0, RCLK1,
TFS0, TFS1, RFS0, RFS1, BMS.
2System Inputs = DATA15–0, ADDR21–0, RD, WR, ACK, BR, BG, PF7–0, DR0, DR1, TCLK0, TCLK1, RCLK0, RCLK1, TFS0, TFS1, RFS0, RFS1,
CLKIN, RESET.
MHz max.
350
tTCK
TCK
tSTAP
tHTA P
TMS
TDI
tDTDO
TDO
tSSYS
SYSTEM
INPUTS
tDSYS
SYSTEM
OUTPUTS
Figure 24. JTAG Port Timing
REV. A
–39–
tHSYS
ADSP-2191M
Output Drive Currents
Figure 25 shows typical I-V characteristics for the output drivers
of the ADSP-2191M. The curves represent the current drive
capability of the output drivers as a function of output voltage.
The external component of total power dissipation is caused by
the switching of output pins. Its magnitude depends on:
• Number of output pins that switch during each cycle (O)
• The maximum frequency at which they can switch (f)
• Their load capacitance (C)
60
VDDEXT = 3.3V @ + 25°C
40
SOURCE (VDDEXT ) CURRENT – mA
• Their voltage swing (VDD)
VDDEXT = 3.65V @ – 40°C
VOH
and is calculated by the formula below.
20
2
OUTPUT CURRENT
P EXT = O × C × V DD × f
0
VDDEXT = 3.0V @ + 85°C
–20
VDDEXT = 3.0V @ + 85°C
VOL
–40
VDDEXT = 3.3V @ + 25°C
–60
VDDEXT = 3.65V @ – 40°C
–80
INPUT CURRENT
–100
0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
SOURCE (VDDEXT) VOLTAGE – V
3.5
4.0
The load capacitance includes the processor’s package capacitance (CIN). The switching frequency includes driving the load
high and then back low. Address and data pins can drive high and
low at a maximum rate of 1/(2tCK). The write strobe can switch
every cycle at a frequency of 1/tCK. Select pins switch at 1/(2tCK),
but selects can switch on each cycle. For example, estimate PEXT
with the following assumptions:
• A system with one bank of external data memory—asynchronous RAM (16-bit)
Figure 25. Typical Drive Currents
• One 64Kⴛ16 RAM chip is used with a load of 10 pF
Power Dissipation
Total power dissipation has two components, one due to internal
circuitry and one due to the switching of external output drivers.
Internal power dissipation is dependent on the instruction
execution sequence and the data operands involved.
• Maximum peripheral speed CCLK = 80 MHz, HCLK =
80 MHz
• External data memory writes occur every other cycle, a
rate of 1/(4tHCLK), with 50% of the pins switching
• The bus cycle time is 80 MHz (tHCLK = 12.5 ns)
The PEXT equation is calculated for each class of pins that can
drive as shown in Table 23.
Table 23. PEXT Calculation Example
Pin Type
# of Pins
% Switching
ⴛC
ⴛf
ⴛ VDD2
= PEXT
Address
MSx
WR
Data
CLKOUT
15
1
1
16
1
50
0
—
50
—
10 pF
10 pF
10 pF
10 pF
10 pF
ⴛ20 MHz
ⴛ20 MHz
ⴛ40 MHz
ⴛ20 MHz
ⴛ80 MHz
ⴛ10.9 V
ⴛ10.9 V
ⴛ10.9 V
ⴛ10.9 V
ⴛ10.9 V
= 0.01635 W
= 0.0 W
= 0.00436 W
= 0.01744 W
= 0.00872 W
PEXT =0.04687 W
A typical power consumption can now be calculated for these
conditions by adding a typical internal power dissipation with the
following formula.
P TOTAL = P EXT + P INT
Where:
• PEXT is from Table 23
• PINT is IDDINT ⴛ 2.5 V, using the calculation IDDINT listed
in Power Dissipation on Page 19.
Note that the conditions causing a worst-case PEXT are different
from those causing a worst-case PINT. Maximum PINT cannot
occur while 100% of the output pins are switching from all ones
to all zeros. Note also that it is not common for an application to
have 100% or even 50% of the outputs switching simultaneously.
Test Conditions
The DSP is tested for output enable, disable, and hold time.
Output Disable Time
Output pins are considered to be disabled when they stop driving,
go into a high impedance state, and start to decay from their
output high or low voltage. The time for the voltage on the bus
to decay by –V is dependent on the capacitive load, CL and the
load current, IL. This decay time can be approximated by the
equation below.
–40–
REV. A
ADSP-2191M
t DECAY
output has reached a specified high or low trip point, as shown
in the Output Enable/Disable diagram (Figure 26). If multiple
pins (such as the data bus) are enabled, the measurement value
is that of the first pin to start driving.
C L ∆V
= --------------IL
The output disable time tDIS is the difference between tMEASURED
and tDECAY as shown in Figure 26. The time tMEASURED is the
interval from when the reference signal switches to when the
output voltage decays –V from the measured output high or
output low voltage. The tDECAY is calculated with test loads CL
and IL, and with –V equal to 0.5 V.
REFERENCE
SIGNAL
tMEASURED
tENA
tDIS
VOH (MEASURED)
VOH (MEASURED) – ⌬V 2.0V
VOL (MEASURED) + ⌬V 1.0V
VOL (MEASURED)
tDECAY
OUTPUT STARTS
DRIVING
OUTPUT STOPS
DRIVING
HIGH IMPEDANCE STATE.
TEST CONDITIONS CAUSE THIS VOLTAGE
TO BE APPROXIMATELY 1.5V
Example System Hold Time Calculation
To determine the data output hold time in a particular system,
first calculate tDECAY using the equation at Output Disable Time
on Page 40. Choose –V to be the difference between the
ADSP-2191M’s output voltage and the input threshold for the
device requiring the hold time. A typical –V will be 0.4 V. CL is
the total bus capacitance (per data line), and IL is the total leakage
or three-state current (per data line). The hold time will be tDECAY
plus the minimum disable time (i.e., tDATRWH for the
write cycle).
Capacitive Loading
Output delays and holds are based on standard capacitive loads:
50 pF on all pins (see Figure 30). The delay and hold specifications given should be derated by a factor of 1.5 ns/50 pF for loads
other than the nominal value of 50 pF. Figure 28 and Figure 29
show how output rise time varies with capacitance. These figures
also show graphically how output delays and holds vary with load
capacitance. (Note that this graph or derating does not apply to
output disable delays; see Output Disable Time on Page 40.) The
graphs in these figures may not be linear outside the ranges
shown.
Figure 26. Output Enable/Disable
RISE AND FALL TIMES – ns (10% – 90%)
40
IOL
TO
OUTPUT
PIN
1.5V
50pF
IOH
30
RISE TIME
20
FALL TIME
10
0
0
Figure 27. Equivalent Device Loading for AC
Measurements (Includes All Fixtures)
INPUT
OR
O UTPUT
50
100
150
200
250
LOAD CAPACITANCE – pF
Figure 29. Typical Output Rise Time (10%-90%,
VDDEXT = Minimum at Maximum Ambient Operating
Temperature) vs. Load Capacitance
1.5V
1.5V
Environmental Conditions
Figure 28. Voltage Reference Levels for AC
Measurements (Except Output Enable/Disable)
Output Enable Time
Output pins are considered to be enabled when they have made
a transition from a high impedance state to when they start
driving. The output enable time tENA is the interval from when a
reference signal reaches a high or low voltage level to when the
REV. A
The thermal characteristics in which the DSP is operating
influence performance.
Thermal Characteristics
The ADSP-2191M comes in a 144-lead LQFP or 144-lead Ball
Grid Array (mini-BGA) package. The ADSP-2191M is specified
for an ambient temperature (TAMB) as calculated using the
formula below.
–41–
ADSP-2191M
T AMB = T CASE – PD × θ CA
OUTPUT DELAY OR HOLD – ns
30
Where:
20
• TAMB = Ambient temperature (measured near top surface
of package)
• PD = Power dissipation in W (this value depends upon
the specific application; a method for calculating PD is
shown under Power Dissipation).
10
• θCA = Value from Table 24.
0
• For the LQFP package: θJC = 0.96°C/W
For the mini-BGA package: θJC = 8.4°C/W
– 10
0
50
100
150
200
250
LOAD CAPACITANCE – pF
Table 24. θCA Values
Airflow
(Linear Ft./Min.)
Airflow
(Meters/Second)
LQFP:
θCA (°C/W)
Mini-BGA:
θCA (°C/W)
Figure 30. Typical Output Delay or Hold vs. Load
Capacitance (at Maximum Case Temperature)
To ensure that the TAMB data sheet specification is not exceeded,
a heatsink and/or an air flow source may be used. A heatsink
should be attached to the ground plane (as close as possible to
the thermal pathways) with a thermal adhesive.
–42–
0
100
200
400
600
0
0.5
1
2
3
44.3
41.4
38.5
35.3
32.1
26
24
22
20.9
19.8
REV. A
ADSP-2191M
144-Lead LQFP Pinout
Table 25 lists the LQFP pinout by signal name. Table 26 lists
the LQFP pinout by pin.
Table 25. 144-Lead LQFP Pins (Alphabetically by Signal)
Signal
Pin
No.
Signal
Pin
No.
Signal
Pin
No.
Signal
Pin
No.
A0
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
A10
A11
A12
A13
A14
A15
A16
A17
A18
A19
A20
A21
ACK
BG
BGH
BMODE0
BMODE1
BMS
BR
84
85
86
87
88
89
91
92
93
95
96
97
98
99
101
102
103
104
106
107
108
109
120
111
110
70
71
113
112
BYPASS
CLKIN
CLKOUT
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
D8
D9
D10
D11
D12
D13
D14
D15
DR0
DR1
DR2
DT0
DT1
DT2
EMU
GND
GND
GND
72
132
130
123
124
125
126
128
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
144
1
2
60
67
49
56
64
46
81
5
16
29
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
HA16
HACK
HACK_P
HAD0
HAD1
HAD2
HAD3
HAD4
HAD5
HAD6
HAD7
HAD8
HAD9
HAD10
HAD11
HAD12
HAD13
HAD14
HAD15
HALE
33
54
55
77
80
94
105
129
134
23
26
24
3
4
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
14
15
17
18
20
21
22
30
HCMS
HCIOMS
HRD
HWR
IOMS
MS0
MS1
MS2
MS3
OPMODE
PF0
PF1
PF2
PF3
PF4
PF5
PF6
PF7
RCLK0
RCLK1
RCLK2
RD
RESET
RFS0
RFS1
RFS2
RXD
TCK
TCLK0
27
28
31
32
114
115
116
117
119
83
34
35
36
37
38
39
41
42
61
68
50
122
73
62
69
51
52
78
57
REV. A
–43–
Signal
Pin
No.
TCLK1
TCLK2
TDI
TDO
TFS0
TFS1
TFS2
TMR0
TMR1
TMR2
TMS
TRST
TXD
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDINT
VDDINT
VDDINT
VDDINT
WR
XTAL
65
47
75
74
59
66
48
43
44
45
76
79
53
13
25
40
63
90
100
118
131
143
19
58
82
127
121
133
ADSP-2191M
Table 26. 144-Lead LQFP Pins (Numerically by Pin Number)
Pin
No.
Signal
Pin
No.
Signal
Pin
No.
Signal
Pin
No.
Signal
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
D14
D15
HAD0
HAD1
GND
HAD2
HAD3
HAD4
HAD5
HAD6
HAD7
HAD8
VDDEXT
HAD9
HAD10
GND
HAD11
HAD12
VDDINT
HAD13
HAD14
HAD15
HA16
HACK_P
VDDEXT
HACK
HCMS
HCIOMS
GND
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
HALE
HRD
HWR
GND
PF0
PF1
PF2
PF3
PF4
PF5
VDDEXT
PF6
PF7
TMR0
TMR1
TMR2
DT2
TCLK2
TFS2
DR2
RCLK2
RFS2
RXD
TXD
GND
GND
DT0
TCLK0
VDDINT
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
TFS0
DR0
RCLK0
RFS0
VDDEXT
DT1
TCLK1
TFS1
DR1
RCLK1
RFS1
BMODE0
BMODE1
BYPASS
RESET
TDO
TDI
TMS
GND
TCK
TRST
GND
EMU
VDDINT
OPMODE
A0
A1
A2
A3
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
A4
A5
VDDEXT
A6
A7
A8
GND
A9
A10
A11
A12
A13
VDDEXT
A14
A15
A16
A17
GND
A18
A19
A20
A21
BGH
BG
BR
BMS
IOMS
MS0
MS1
–44–
Pin
No.
Signal
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
MS2
VDDEXT
MS3
ACK
WR
RD
D0
D1
D2
D3
VDDINT
D4
GND
CLKOUT
VDDEXT
CLKIN
XTAL
GND
D5
D6
D7
D8
D9
D10
D11
D12
VDDEXT
D13
REV. A
ADSP-2191M
144-Lead Mini-BGA Pinout
Table 27 lists the mini-BGA pinout by signal name. Table 28
lists the mini-BGA pinout by ball number.
Table 27. 144-Lead Mini-BGA Pins (Alphabetically by Signal)
Signal
Ball
No.
Signal
Ball
No.
Signal
Ball
No.
Signal
Ball
No.
A0
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
A10
A11
A12
A13
A14
A15
A16
A17
A18
A19
A20
A21
ACK
BG
BGH
BMODE0
BMODE1
BMS
BR
J11
H9
H10
G12
H11
G10
F12
G11
F10
F11
E12
E11
E10
E9
D11
D10
D12
C11
C12
B12
B11
A11
A8
C10
B10
L10
L9
A10
B9
BYPASS
CLKIN
CLKOUT
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
D8
D9
D10
D11
D12
D13
D14
D15
DR0
DR1
DR2
DT0
DT1
DT2
EMU
GND
GND
GND
M11
A5
C6
D7
A7
C7
A6
B7
A4
C5
B5
D5
A3
C4
B4
C3
A2
B1
B2
L7
K9
L5
H6
L8
H4
J10
A1
A12
E7
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
HACK
HACK_P
HAD0
HAD1
HAD2
HAD3
HAD4
HAD5
HAD6
HAD7
HAD8
HAD9
HAD10
HAD11
HAD12
HAD13
HAD14
HAD15
HA16
F7
F8
F9
G4
G5
G6
H5
L6
M1
M12
H3
G1
C1
B3
C2
D1
D4
D3
D2
E1
E4
E2
F1
E3
F2
G2
F3
G3
H2
HALE
HCIOMS
HCMS
HRD
HWR
IOMS
MS0
MS1
MS2
MS3
OPMODE
PF0
PF1
PF2
PF3
PF4
PF5
PF6
PF7
RCLK0
RCLK1
RCLK2
RD
RESET
RFS0
RFS1
RFS2
RXD
TCK
J1
J3
H1
J2
K2
E8
D9
A9
C9
D8
H12
K1
L1
M2
L2
M3
L3
K3
M4
K7
J9
J5
B8
L12
K8
M10
M6
K6
K11
REV. A
–45–
Signal
Ball
No.
TCLK0
TCLK1
TCLK2
TDI
TDO
TFS0
TFS1
TFS2
TMR0
TMR1
TMR2
TMS
TRST
TXD
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDINT
VDDINT
VDDINT
VDDINT
WR
XTAL
J6
M9
K5
K12
L11
M8
J8
M5
K4
L4
J4
K10
J12
M7
E5
E6
F5
F6
G7
G8
H7
H8
D6
F4
G9
J7
C8
B6
ADSP-2191M
Table 28. 144-Lead Mini-BGA Pins (Numerically by Ball Number)
Ball
No.
Signal
Ball
No.
Signal
Ball
No.
Signal
Ball
No.
Signal
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
A10
A11
A12
B1
B2
B3
B4
B5
B6
B7
B8
B9
B10
B11
B12
C1
C2
C3
C4
C5
GND
D13
D9
D5
CLKIN
D3
D1
ACK
MS1
BMS
A21
GND
D14
D15
HAD1
D11
D7
XTAL
D4
RD
BR
BGH
A20
A19
HAD0
HAD2
D12
D10
D6
C6
C7
C8
C9
C10
C11
C12
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
D8
D9
D10
D11
D12
E1
E2
E3
E4
E5
E6
E7
E8
E9
E10
CLKOUT
D2
WR
MS2
BG
A17
A18
HAD3
HAD6
HAD5
HAD4
D8
VDDINT
D0
MS3
MS0
A15
A14
A16
HAD7
HAD9
HAD11
HAD8
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
GND
IOMS
A13
A12
E11
E12
F1
F2
F3
F4
F5
F6
F7
F8
F9
F10
F11
F12
G1
G2
G3
G4
G5
G6
G7
G8
G9
G10
G11
G12
H1
H2
H3
A11
A10
HAD10
HAD12
HAD14
VDDINT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
GND
GND
GND
A8
A9
A6
HACK_P
HAD13
HAD15
GND
GND
GND
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDINT
A5
A7
A3
HCMS
HA16
HACK
H4
H5
H6
H7
H8
H9
H10
H11
H12
J1
J2
J3
J4
J5
J6
J7
J8
J9
J10
J11
J12
K1
K2
K3
K4
K5
K6
K7
K8
DT2
GND
DT0
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
A1
A2
A4
OPMODE
HALE
HRD
HCIOMS
TMR2
RCLK2
TCLK0
VDDINT
TFS1
RCLK1
EMU
A0
TRST
PF0
HWR
PF6
TMR0
TCLK2
RXD
RCLK0
RFS0
–46–
Ball
No.
Signal
K9
K10
K11
K12
L1
L2
L3
L4
L5
L6
L7
L8
L9
L10
L11
L12
M1
M2
M3
M4
M5
M6
M7
M8
M9
M10
M11
M12
DR1
TMS
TCK
TDI
PF1
PF3
PF5
TMR1
DR2
GND
DR0
DT1
BMODE1
BMODE0
TDO
RESET
GND
PF2
PF4
PF7
TFS2
RFS2
TXD
TFS0
TCLK1
RFS1
BYPASS
GND
REV. A
ADSP-2191M
OUTLINE DIMENSIONS
144-Lead Metric Thin Plastic Quad Flatpack [LQFP]
(ST-144)
22.00 BSC SQ
20.00 BSC SQ
109
144
108
1
PIN 1 INDICATOR
0.50
BSC
TYP
(LEAD
PITCH)
0.27
0.22 TYP
0.17
SEATING
PLANE
0.08 MAX (LEAD
COPLANARITY)
0.15
0.05
0.75
0.60
0.45
1.45
1.40
1.35
73
36
72
37
1.60 MAX
DETAIL A
DETAIL A
TOP VIEW (PINS DOWN)
NOTES:
1. DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS AND COMPLY WITH JEDEC STANDARD MS-026-BFB.
2. ACTUAL POSITION OF EACH LEAD IS WITHIN 0.08 OF ITS
IDEAL POSITION, WHEN MEASURED IN THE LATERAL DIRECTION.
3. CENTER DIMENSIONS ARE NOMINAL.
144-Ball Mini-BGA [PBGA]
(CA-144-2)
10.00 BSC SQ
12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
J
K
L
M
PIN A1 INDICATOR
8.80
BSC
SQ
0.80
BSC
(BALL
PITCH)
BOTTOM VIEW
TOP VIEW
1.70
MAX
DETAIL A
0.85
MIN
0.25
MIN
NOTES:
1. DIMENSIONS ARE IN MILLIMETERS AND COMPLY
WITH JEDEC STANDARD MO-205-AC.
2. ACTUAL POSITION OF THE BALL GRID IS
WITHIN 0.15 OF ITS IDEAL POSITION, RELATIVE TO
THE PACKAGE EDGES.
0.55
0.50
0.45
(BALL
DIAMETER)
3. ACTUAL POSITION OF EACH BALL IS WITHIN 0.08 OF
ITS IDEAL POSITION, RELATIVE TO THE BALL GRID.
DETAIL A
4. CENTER DIMENSIONS ARE NOMINAL.
REV. A
–47–
SEATING
PLANE
0.10 MAX (BALL
COPLANARITY)
ADSP-2191M
ORDERING GUIDE
Part Number1, 2
Ambient Temperature Range
Instruction
Rate (MHz)
Package
Description
Operating Voltage
ADSP-2191MKST-160
ADSP-2191MBST-140
ADSP-2191MKCA-160
ADSP-2191MBCA-140
0ºC to 70ºC
–40ºC to +85ºC
0ºC to 70ºC
–40ºC to +85ºC
160
140
160
140
144-Lead LQFP
144-Lead LQFP
144-Ball Mini-BGA
144-Ball Mini-BGA
2.5 Int./3.3 Ext. V
2.5 Int./3.3 Ext. V
2.5 Int./3.3 Ext. V
2.5 Int./3.3 Ext. V
2CA
= Plastic Thin Quad Flatpack (LQFP).
= Mini Ball Grid Array (PBGA)
Revision History
Location
Page
C02936–0–7/02(A)
1ST
PRINTED IN U.S.A.
7/02—Changed from Rev. 0 to Rev. A
Changes to formatting only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Global
–48–
REV. A
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