Manual 1356 Models CAN Expansion Modules

Manual 1356 Models CAN Expansion Modules
Manual
Models 1356 & 1356P
CAN Expansion Modules
Curtis Instruments, Inc.
200 Kisco Avenue
Mt. Kisco, NY 10549
www.curtisinstruments.com
Read Instructions Carefully!
Specifications are subject to change without notice.
© 2015 Curtis Instruments, Inc. ® Curtis is a registered trademark of Curtis Instruments, Inc.
© The design and appearance of the products depicted herein are the copyright of Curtis Instruments, Inc.
53221, Rev A 10/2015
CONTENTS
CONTENTS
1. OVERVIEW ............................................................................. 1
2. INSTALLATION AND WIRING ........................................... 4
Mounting the Module......................................................... 4
Connections and Wiring Guidelines.................................... 6
Wiring: Basic Configuration............................................... 8
Wiring: Application Example............................................ 10
Input/Output Specifications............................................... 11
3. CANopen COMMUNICATIONS ......................................... 16
Minimum State Machine................................................... 16
NMT Messages ................................................................. 18
Emergency Messages ......................................................... 19
Heartbeat .......................................................................... 19
4 PDO COMMUNICATIONS ................................................ 20
5. SDO COMMUNICATIONS ................................................ 23
SDO Master Request (SDO-MOSI) ................................. 23
SDO 1356 /1356P Response (SDO-MISO) ..................... 24
Using an SDO to Map a PDO ......................................... 25
Types of SDO Objects ...................................................... 26
Communication Profile Objects ........................................ 26
Parameter Profile Objects .................................................. 33
Monitor Profile Objects .................................................... 38
6. DIAGNOSTICS & TROUBLESHOOTING ....................... 39
Troubleshooting................................................................. 40
Fault Log............................................................................ 41
7. SERIAL COMMUNICATIONS & PROGRAMMING ....... 42
Program Menus ................................................................ 42
Monitor Menus ................................................................. 48
Fault Menu ....................................................................... 50
Vehicle Design Considerations
b Programming Devices
c Specifications, 1356 /1356P CAN Expansion Module
appendix a
appendix
appendix
Curtis 1356 /1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
iii
FIGURES / TABLES
fig. 1:
fig. 2: fig. 3: fig. 4: .
FIGURES
Curtis 1356 /1356P CAN expansion module ........................... 1
Mounting dimensions, Curtis 1356 /1356P ............................. 4
Basic wiring diagram ................................................................ 8
Application example ............................................................... 10
TABLES
table 1: Connector pinout ................................................................... 6
table 2: Communication profile object dictionary ............................. 26
2a: Manufacturer’s status registers ..................................... 31
2b: Store parameter object ................................................ 31
2c: Restore default parameters object ................................ 32
table 3: Parameter profile object dictionary ........................................ 33
table 4: Monitor object dictionary ..................................................... 38
table 5: Troubleshooting chart ........................................................... 40
table 6: Programmer: program menus ................................................ 42
table 7: Programmer: monitor menus ................................................ 48
table C-1: Specifications, Curtis 1356 /1356P ..................................... C-1
iv
Curtis 1356 /1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
1 — OVERVIEW
1 OVERVIEW
The Curtis 1356 and 1356P are CAN expansion modules that provide simple,
flexible, and low-cost control of up to 18 I/O, two high-frequency driver outputs, one encoder input, and five analog inputs. These modules can be used
on electric vehicles and internal combustion engines.
The 1356 /1356P can extend the I/O capabilities of any Curtis VCL-driven
system and enhance systems that use Curtis AC controllers by providing additional I/O. These expansion modules have the flexibility to be used in many
applications, such as Mobile Elevating Work Platforms (MEWPs), electric
forklifts, aerial lifts, etc.
Two versions of the module are available. The 1356 is a PCBA, for which
customers develop their own case to provide environmental protection. The
1356P comes potted with a plastic tray that provides IP65 water and dust
immunity for its electronics.
Fig. 1 Curtis 1356 and
1356P CAN expansion
modules.
Features include:
3 11 active-high digital inputs
3 2 high-frequency driver outputs (1 amp and 3 amps), which can also be used
as active-high digital inputs
3 Closed loop constant current, constant voltage, or direct PWM control on each
output
3 5 analog inputs (0–15V), which can also be used as virtual digital inputs
with programmable thresholds
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
More Features +
1
1 — OVERVIEW
3 Analog inputs are selectable for resistive sensors (0–5 kΩ)
3 1 quadrature encoder input
3 Serial port for Curtis programmer or fault code display
3 CANopen communication port controlled by dynamic mapping
3 Regulated 5V and unregulated 12V current-limited power supplies
3 The output voltage and current of the 5V and 12V supplies can be monitored
3 Software and hardware watchdog circuits ensure proper software operation
3 IP65-rated protection for 1356P (exclusive of connectors)
3 Red and yellow status LEDs provide external monitoring.
DESCRIPTIONS OF KEY FEATURES
Active-High Digital Inputs
The 1356 /1356P has eleven digital inputs. Each input is digitally filtered to
eliminate switch “bounce” or noise in the signal. A power resistor pull-down
to B- at each input provides active high to B+.
High Frequency Driver Outputs
The 1356 /1356P contains two driver outputs. One can sink up to 1 amp
through an inductive or a resistive load; the other can sink up to 3 amps through
an inductive or a resistive load. Internal flyback diodes to B+ prevent voltage
spikes. High frequency PWM (16 kHz) provides smooth current to the load.
Constant Current or Voltage Outputs
The two driver outputs can work in Constant Current mode or in Constant
Voltage mode.
In Constant Current mode, the software runs a closed loop PI controller
to provide an average constant current. This current is commanded over PDO
as a 0–100% command based on the maximum current setting (set through a
Curtis programmer or an SDO).
Each output can also be programmed for Constant Voltage mode. In this
mode, the battery voltage is monitored and the PWM command is corrected
by a feed-forward controller to provide a constant average voltage commanded
over the PDO (a 0–100% command based on the maximum voltage setting).
In addition, each output can also be programmed to provide a directly
commanded PWM% output (Direct PWM mode) or shut off to be used as
an input (Active-High Digital Input Only mode).
Programmable Dither for Hydraulic Valves
Dither is a small variation in the command that keeps the seals of a proportional
valve oiled. This lubrication allows the valve to move freely for accurate PV
control. Dither is only active on drivers in Constant Current mode.
2
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
1 — OVERVIEW
Voltage Analog Inputs
The 1356 /1356P has five analog inputs that are scaled to read 0 – 15 volts. The
analog channels are read by a 12-bit ADC, resulting in about 3.66 millivolt
resolution. Independently adjustable filters ensure a smooth signal.
Resistive Sensor Inputs
Each analog input can be used with resistive sensors, such as RTDs (Resistive
Temperature Devices).
Virtual Digital Inputs
The five analog inputs are also sensed and decoded as if they were digital inputs.
A unique feature of these digital inputs is that the active high/low thresholds are
completely programmable. Thus, these inputs can be used with analog sensors
to detect conditions like over/under pressure, high/low level points, etc.
Encoder Interface
The 1356 /1356P has one quadrature encoder input, which shares with the
Analog 4–5 pins. The 1356 /1356P can detect an open fault on the encoder
input wire.
CAN Interface
The 1356 /1356P is CANopen compliant, responding to the standard NMT,
PDO, and SDO communications as well as the DS301-required identity and
standard objects. The Curtis CANopen extensions allow additional features,
such as OEM and User default configurations and time-stamped fault logging.
PDO Dynamic Mapping
The 1356 /1356P can receive two PDOs and respond with two PDOs. These
PDOs use dynamic mapping. All programmable parameters and viewable values
within the 1356 /1356P are accessible by SDOs or with a Curtis programmer.
Online Update
The 1356 /1356P has the ability to update its software through the serial port
(with Curtis 1309USB) or through the CANopen interface (with Peak-CAN
tools), using existing Curtis PC software tools.
Status LEDs
The 1356 has two fault LEDs (red and yellow) to clearly flash the fault code.
Both the 1356 and the 1356P can drive a single remote LED via the serial
port, to flash the fault code.
Familiarity with your Curtis 1356 /1356P module will help you install and operate
it properly. We encourage you to read this manual carefully. If you have questions,
please contact the Curtis office nearest you.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
3
2 — INSTALLATION & WIRING
2 INSTALLATION AND WIRING
MOUNTING THE MODULE
+
CAUTION
Fig. 2 Mounting
dimensions, Curtis 1356
and 1356P expansion
modules.
The outline and mounting hole dimensions for the modules are shown in Fig. 2.
The 1356P module should be mounted using two M4 screws.
The 1356 module requires the OEM to develop an appropriate case to
provide environmental protection. Mounting for the 1356 depends on the case.
Care should be taken to prevent contaminating the PCBA (1356) or
connector (1356P). In order to prevent external corrosion and leakage paths
from developing, the mounting location should be carefully chosen to keep
the module as clean and dry as possible.
1356
16.3
100.0
92.4
14.4 ±1.5
5X Ø3.50
60.7
3.8
3.8
1.60
70.0
62.4
STATUS
LEDs
1
13
J1 CONNECTOR
12
1 2
24
3 4
4XR3
J2 CONNECTOR
1356P
4xR8
2x Ø4.50
25.0
80.0
32.0
J1 CONNECTOR
J2 CONNECTOR
1
12
1
2
13
24
3
4
110.0
116.0
126.0
5.0
17.0
25.0
Dimensions in millimeters.
4
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
2 — INSTALLATION & WIRING
If the outputs will be used at or near their maximum ratings, it is recommended that the module be mounted to a good heatsinking surface, such
as an aluminum plate.
You will need to take steps during the design and development of your
end product to ensure that its EMC performance complies with applicable
regulations; suggestions are presented in Appendix A.
The 1356 /1356P contains ESD-sensitive components. Use appropriate
precautions in connecting, disconnecting, and handling the module. See installation suggestions in Appendix A for protecting the module from ESD damage.
+
CAUTION
Working on electrical systems is potentially dangerous. You should
protect yourself against uncontrolled operation, high current arcs, and
outgassing from lead acid batteries:
UNCONTROLLED OPERATION — Some conditions could cause the motor to
run out of control. Disconnect the motor or jack up the vehicle and get
the drive wheels off the ground before attempting any work on the motor
control circuitry.
HIGH CURRENT ARCS — Batteries can supply very high power, and arcing can
occur if they are short circuited. Always open the battery circuit before
working on the motor control circuit. Wear safety glasses, and use properly
insulated tools to prevent shorts.
— Charging or discharging generates hydrogen gas,
which can build up in and around the batteries. Follow the battery manufacturer’s safety recommendations. Wear safety glasses.
LEAD ACID BATTERIES
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
5
2 — INSTALLATION & WIRING: Low Current Connections
CONNECTIONS
The 1356 /1356P connections are made through 24-pin and 4-pin Molex
connectors. The mating plugs are Molex #39-01-2245 and #39-01-2045, and
the contact pins are #39-00-0059.
The individual pins are characterized in Tables 1 and 2.
24
23
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
4
3
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
2
1
J1
J2
Table 1 24-Pin Molex Connector Pin Assignment
pin
pin
name
Battery positive.
J1-13
B-
J1-2 Input/Output 1
Active High Digital Input1 &
High Power PWM Active Low
Output1.
J1-14 Input/Output 2
Active High Digital Input2 &
High Power PWM Active Low
Output2.
J1-3
Input 3
Active High Digital Input3.
J1-15
Input 4
Active High Digital Input4.
J1-4
Input 5
Active High Digital Input5.
J1-16
Input 6
Active High Digital Input6.
J1-5
Input 7
Active High Digital Input7.
J1-17
Input 8
Active High Digital Input8.
J1-6
Input 9
Active High Digital Input9.
J1-18
Input 10
Active High Digital Input10.
J1-7
Input 11
Active High Digital Input11.
J1-19
Input 12
Active High Digital Input12.
J1-8
Input 13
Active High Digital Input13.
J1-20
Analog Input 1
Voltage or Resistive Input1.
J1-9
Analog Input 2
Voltage or Resistive Input2.
J1-21
Analog Input 3
Voltage or Resistive Input3.
J1-10 Analog Input 4 / Encoder A
Voltage or Resistive Input4 &
Quadrature Encoder Input
Phase A.
J1-22 Analog Input 5 / Encoder B
Voltage or Resistive Input5 &
Quadrature Encoder Input
Phase B.
J1-11
CAN H
CAN Bus High
Communication Line.
J1-23
CAN L
CAN Bus Low
Communication Line.
J1-12+5V
Regulated Low Power +5V
Output.
J1-24
I/O GND
Input and Output Ground
Reference.
J1-1
name
description
B+
description
Battery negative.
Table 2 4-Pin Molex Connector Pin Assignment
6
pin
name
description
J2-1
Serial Rx / LED Enable
Serial Receive / Status LED Enable.
J2-2
I/O GND
Input and Output Ground Reference.
J2-3
Serial Tx / LED Output
Serial Transmit / Status LED Output.
J2-4
+12V
Unregulated Low Power +12V Output.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
2 — INSTALLATION & WIRING: Low Current Connections
Wiring recommendations
Power (Pins J1-1 and J1-13)
The B+ and B- cables should be run close to each other between the module
and the battery. For best noise immunity the cables should not run across the
center section of the module.To prevent overheating these pins, the wire gauge
must be sufficient to carry the continuous and maximum loads that will be
seen at each pin.
Driver outputs (Pins J1-2 and J1-14)
The driver outputs produce high frequency (16 kHz) pulse waves that can
radiate RFI noise. The wire from the module to the load should be kept short
and routed with the return wire back to the module.
CAN bus (Pins J1-11 and J1-23)
It is recommended that the CAN wires be run as a twisted pair. However, many
successful applications at 125 kbit/s are run without twisting, simply using two
lines bundled in with the rest of the low current wiring. CAN wiring should
be kept away from the high current cables and cross it at right angles when
necessary. If the 1356 /1356P is at the end of the CAN bus, the bus needs to
be terminated by externally wiring a 120Ω ½W resistor across CAN High and
CAN Low (for those models that do not have a 120Ω terminal resistor between
CAN H and CAN L).
All other low current wiring
The remaining low current wiring should be run according to standard practices.
Running low current wiring next to the high current wiring should always be
avoided.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
7
2 — INSTALLATION & WIRING: Standard Wiring Diagram
WIRING: BASIC CONFIGURATION
A basic wiring diagram is shown in Fig. 3, and described below. The diagram
shows the standard power and battery connections, as well as some basic uses
for the inputs and outputs.
PROPORTIONAL
VALVE
J1-2
CONTACTOR
J1-14
J1-3
J1-15
J1-4
J1-16
J1-5
J1-17
J1-6
J1-18
J1-7
J1-19
SWITCH
J1-8
OUTPUT 1
J1-1
KEYSWITCH
REVERSE
POLARITY
PROTECTION
OUTPUT 2
INPUT 3
BATTERY
(12–80V)
INPUT 4
INPUT 5
J1-13
INPUT 6
INPUT 7
INPUT 8
CAN H
J1-11
CAN L
J1-23
+12V
TX
INPUT 9
RX
INPUT 10
I/O GND
CAN PORT
J2-4
4
J2-3
3
J2-1
1
J2-2
2
8
6
5
INPUT 11
SERIAL PORT
(4-pin Molex)
840
DISPLAY
INPUT 12
+5V
INPUT 13
ENCODER A
ENCODER B
ANALOG INPUT 1
ANALOG INPUT 2
ANALOG INPUT 3
I/O GND
J1-12
J1-10
ENCODER
J1-22
J1-20
J1-9
J1-21
J1-24
0–15V IN
RESISTIVE THROTTLE,
RTD, etc.
1356 / 1356P
Fig. 3 Basic wiring diagram, Curtis 1356 /1356P CAN expansion module.
Power Connection
The battery is connected to the module’s B+ pin though a fuse, a diode, and a
keyswitch. The fuse protects the wiring in the event of a short or failure. The
return path of the coils is also brought back to the B+ pin to utilize the flyback
diodes connected inside the module between B+ and each driver output.
The keyswitch is used to turn on the system. When the keyswitch is closed,
B+ goes high and the 1356 /1356P’s power supply brings up the module.
8
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
2 — INSTALLATION & WIRING: Standard Wiring Diagram
Driver Outputs
Each of the two driver outputs (Output 1, 2) is capable of driving a closed-loop
current-controlled proportional valve or a voltage-controlled contactor. Each
driver has independent mode, max, and dither settings.
These are high-power drivers. The internal impedance to ground will cause
leakage current to flow through the output even when the output driver is off.
This leakage current can be enough (>2 mA) to light high-efficiency LEDs.
In the wiring diagram, the output at J1-2 is shown driving a proportional
valve coil. This driver is programmed for Constant Current mode and would
have some Dither applied.
The second output, at J1-12, is driving a basic contactor coil. This output
is in the Constant Voltage mode and can be set to run at a lower voltage than
the nominal battery voltage.
Switch Inputs
All the inputs are used as Active High inputs (“On” when connected to B+).
In the wiring diagram, Input 13 (J1-8) is shown as an Active High input
switching to B+.
(Note that when Input/Output 1 or 2 is used as a switch input, its Operation Mode must be set to 0; see pages 33 and 45.)
Analog Inputs
Analog Input 3, at J1-21, is shown being used with an RTD. This requires
setting Analog Input 3’s Input Type parameter to 1 = Resistive input (see pages 34 and 43).
CAN Bus
The 1356 /1356P has an internal 1 kΩ bus termination resistor. This internal
impedance matches the system requirements for a mid-line connection or
short stub connection. The 1356 /1356P can communicate up to 1 Mbit/s on
a properly terminated/wired bus.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
9
2 — INSTALLATION & WIRING: Application Example
WIRING: Application Example
The wiring diagram in Fig. 4 provides an example of a fingertip joystick application for an electric forklift.
J1-12
REVERSE
POLARITY
KEYSWITCH PROTECTION
J1-1
+5V
ng
ri
we
Lo 2
/
p
tU
Lif
J1-3
1
INPUT 3
BATTERY
(12–80V)
6
5
J1-20
4
3
J1-15
ANALOG INPUT 1
J1-13
INPUT 4
+12V
n
ow
p/D
tU
Til
2
J1-4
1
TX
INPUT 5
RX
I/O GND
6
FINGERTIP JOYSTICKS
5
J1-9
4
3
t
igh
ft/R 2
e
ft L
hi
S
J1-16
J1-5
1
J2-4
4
J2-3
3
J2-1
1
J2-2
2
PROGRAMMER
ANALOG INPUT 2
OUTPUT 1
INPUT 6
J1-2
BUZZER
OUTPUT 2
INPUT 7
J1-14
WARNING LIGHT
6
5
J1-21
4
3
BW
W/ 2
F
ach
Re
J1-17
J1-6
1
ANALOG INPUT 3
INPUT 11
INPUT 12
INPUT 8
INPUT 13
INPUT 9
6
5
J1-10
4
3
J1-18
J1-24
ANALOG INPUT 4
ANALOG INPUT 5
J1-7
J1-19
FW
BW
J1-8
HORN PUSHBUTTON
J1-22
CURTIS AC
CONTROLLER
INPUT 10
I/O GND
CAN H
J1-11
CAN L
J1-23
1353
CAN
PORT
1356 / 1356P
Fig. 4 Application example, Curtis 1356 /1356P CAN expansion module.
10
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
2 — INSTALLATION & WIRING: I/O Signal Specifications
INPUT/OUTPUT SIGNAL SPECIFICATIONS
The input/output signals wired to the 24-pin connector can be grouped by type
as follows; their electrical characteristics are discussed below.
24
13
12
1
— digital inputs
— driver outputs
— analog inputs with virtual digital input
— encoder inputs
— serial port
— CAN Bus interface
— auxiliary power supplies.
Digital Inputs
The 1356 /1356P has eleven digital inputs. In addition, the two driver outputs
(Input/Output 1 and Input/Output 2) can be programmed as digital inputs (as
long as the drivers are off: i.e., no current, voltage, or PWM output). Each of
these digital inputs has a pull-down resistor to B-. This provides an active high
input (“On” when connected to B+). The side effect of this pull-down resistor is
that there is a small leakage current in the two driver outputs when the output
driver is Off. This leakage can be enough (>2 mA) to light high-efficiency LEDs.
signal name
Input/Output 1
Input/Output 2
Input 3
Input 4
Input 5
Input 6
Input 7
Input 8
Input 9
Input 10
Input 11
pin
DIGITAL INPUT SPECIFICATIONS
logic threshold
input impedance
J1-2
All models: 12 – 36V models:
J1-14 Low = 1.6 V
about 10 kΩ
J1-3
High = 4.0 V
36 – 80V models:
J1-15 about 47 kΩ
J1-4
J1-16
J1-5
J1-17
J1-6
J1-18
J1-7
Because Input/Output 1 and Input/Output 2 can also be used as driver
outputs, it is important to ensure that Operation Mode is set appropriately.
When they will be used as digital inputs, the Operation Mode parameter must
be set to 0 = Active High Digital Input (see pages 33 and 45). Otherwise, a
direct short from the battery through the internal driver FET will occur when
the input is switched high and the FET is turned on.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
11
2 — INSTALLATION & WIRING: I/O Signal Specifications
24
13
12
1
Driver Outputs
The 1356 /1356P contains two driver outputs. These outputs have all the
features necessary to drive proportional valves as well as many other inductive
and non-inductive loads. A variable amount of dither (fixed frequency command “jitter”) can be added to the PWM to prevent proportional valves from
sticking in place.
signal name
pin
DIGITAL OUTPUT SPECIFICATIONS
max current
impedance
frequency
12 – 36V models:
All models:
Input/Output 1 J1-2
3 A
10 kΩ
pulldown
to
B 16 kHz
0–100% duty cycle
36 – 80V models:
Input/Output 2 J1-14
1 A
47 kΩ pulldown to B-
The drivers can be set for Constant Current, Constant Voltage, or Direct PWM
control mode.
In Constant Current mode, the driver command of 0 to 100%
is interpreted as a current from 0 to the Max Output setting.
Internal current shunts are measured and fed back to a closed
loop PI controller to provide a steady current over changing
loads and supply voltages.
In Constant Voltage mode, the driver command of 0 to 100%
is interpreted as a voltage from 0 to Max Output. The battery
voltage is constantly monitored and fed back to a closed loop
PI controller to provide a steady voltage, compensating for
battery droop and discharge. If the command is higher than
the driver can output, the PWM will max out at 100%.
In Direct PWM mode, the driver command of 0 to 100% is
directly output on the driver.
Each driver is monitored and will detect a short in the load, a failed internal
driver FET, and/or an open in the load wiring. At near 0% and 100% PWM,
it is not possible to discern each fault and some faults will not be detected.
If the driver outputs are connected to inductive loads, the coil should
have a return line to the B+ pin of the 1356 /1356P. This connection provides
a path for the internal freewheel diodes to clamp the turn-off spike. Failure
to make this connection with inductive loads can cause permanent damage to
the 1356 /1356P as well as propagate failures of other electronics in the system
due to the high voltage spike caused when an inductive load turns off without
a freewheel path.
12
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
2 — INSTALLATION & WIRING: I/O Signal Specifications
24
13
12
1
Analog Inputs
The 1356 /1356P has five 0 – 15 V analog inputs. These inputs are scaled down
by 5.76, clamped to 3.3 V, and read by a 12-bit ADC internal to the MCU.
ANALOG INPUT SPECIFICATIONS
signal name
pin
voltage
input impedance
Analog
Analog
Analog
Analog
Analog
Input
Input
Input
Input
Input
1
2
3
4
5
J1-20 Nominal input voltage: J1-9 0 – 15 V
J1-21 Input maximum
J1-10 reverse voltage: -1.7 V J1-22
protected
voltage
range
Voltage Input Type:
about 21 kΩ
Resistance Input Type: -1 V to B+
about 1 kΩ
The maximum resistive input on each analog input is 7.5 kΩ. The resistive or
voltage type of analog input can be selected by a Curtis programmer (1313/1314)
or CAN SDO message.
These five analog inputs can also be used as digital inputs. A unique feature of these digital inputs is that the active high/low thresholds are completely
programmable. Thus, these inputs can be used with analog sensors to detect
conditions like over/under pressure, high/low level points, etc.
24
13
12
1
Encoder Inputs
Analog Inputs 4 and 5 can be configured as a quadrature encoder input (Encoder A and B). This standard quadrature encoder input accepts open collector
encoders with pull-up resistors in the 1356 /1356P module. The encoder can be
powered from the +5V supply (J1-12) or the +12V supply (J2-4) while using
the I/O GND (J1-24) as a common.
ENCODER INPUT SPECIFICATIONS
encoder
frequency
input
phase
pin
vth lo
vth hi
max
iimpedance
AJ1-10
2.2 V
15 kHz
1.0 V
BJ1-22
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
1 kΩ
(internal pull-up
to +4.4 V)
protected
voltage
range
-1 V to B+
13
2 — INSTALLATION & WIRING: I/O Signal Specifications
4
3
2
1
Serial Port
The Curtis 1313/1314 programmer or the Curtis Model 840 can be connected
to the 1356 /1356P’s serial port, J2.
SERIAL PORT SPECIFICATIONS
supported
signal name pin
protocol / devices
data rate
TXJ2-3 1313 Handheld Programmer,
As required,
1314 PC Programming Station, 9.6 to 56 kbit/s
RXJ2-1
Curtis 840 Display
protected
voltage
range
-0.3 V to 12 V
Power is provided through J2-4 (+12V) and J2-2 provides the I/O ground
reference.
When the 840 is connected to the serial port, it will alternately show
BDI, hour meter, and fault information.
The serial port can also be used as an external Status LED fault code display.
When the serial port is used for fault code display, a jumper must be added
between J2-1 and J2-4, and an LED is connected between J2-2 and J2-3.
24
13
12
1
14
2
4
1
3
CAN Bus Interface
The CAN bus interface will comply with CAN2.0B, active from 50 kbit/s to
1Mbit/s communication rate.
The 1356 /1356P will be terminated by an internal 1 kΩ resistor across
the CAN High and Low communication pins. This assumes a mid-truck connection (not end-of-line).
If a 1356 /1356P without terminal resistance (models ending in -4101
or -6101) is at the end of the CAN bus, the bus needs to be terminated by
externally wiring a 120 Ω, ½ W resistor across CAN High and CAN Low.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
2 — INSTALLATION & WIRING: I/O Signal Specifications
24
13
12
1
4
3
2
1
Auxiliary Power Supplies
The 1356 /1356P provides +12V and +5V auxiliary output power for low power circuits such as fingertip joysticks, electronic throttle, Curtis programmer,
Curtis 840 display, or remote I/O boards. The return line for these low power
circuits is I/O GND. The maximum total combined output current is 200 mA.
24
13
12
1
signal name
+12V
+5V
AUXILIARY POWER SUPPLY SPECIFICATIONS
pin
J2-4
J1-12
v out
12 V
5 V
v out tolerance
10 %
5 %
i out (max)
100 mA
100 mA
ripple/noise
2%
2%
Power
The power pins are each capable of carrying up to 9 A. Every application must
use B+ (J1-1) and B- (J1-13).
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
15
3 — CANopen COMMUNICATIONS
3 CANopen COMMUNICATIONS
The 1356 /1356P adheres to the industry standard CANopen communication
protocol and thus will easily connect into many CAN systems, including those
using the Curtis AC and Vehicle System controllers. Any CANopen-compatible
master can be programmed to control the 1356 /1356P.
The 1356 /1356P receives two incoming (MOSI) PDOs and responds with
two outgoing (MISO) PDOs. Dynamic mapping is available for the PDOs. All
programmable parameters and monitor parameters are accessible by standard
SDO transfer.
The time between incoming PDOs is monitored and if excessive, will
flag a fault. This allows the 1356 /1356P to know that the system is still under
master control. The 1356 /1356P also produces Heartbeat and Error messages,
which is the CiA-preferred safety and security method.
MINIMUM STATE MACHINE
The 1356 /1356P will run the CANopen minimum state machine as defined
by CiA. The CANopen minimum state machine has four defined states: Initialization, Pre-Operational, Operational, and Stopped.
Power-On
Reset
Reset
Module
Initialization
Reset
Communication
Transmit
Boot-up
Pre-Operational
Stopped
Operational
When the 1356 /1356P powers up, it goes to the Initialization state; this is
also known as the Boot-up state. No CAN communications from the 1356 /1356P
are transmitted in this state although the 1356 /1356P listens to the CAN bus.
When the 1356 /1356P has completed its startup and self-tests, it issues an initialization heartbeat message and automatically goes to the Pre-Operational state.
In the Pre-Operational state, the 1356 /1356P can receive and respond to
SDOs and NMT commands, and will send its heartbeat. It will not receive or
send PDOs (unless PDO-MISO cyclic transmitting is enabled). After receiving
an Operational State NMT command, the 1356 /1356P will enter the Operational state (full normal operation).
In the Operational state, the 1356 /1356P will start receiving and responding to PDOs and process all other necessary CANopen messages.
16
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
3 — CANopen COMMUNICATIONS
Baud Rates
The 1356 /1356P runs at one of the seven selectable baud rates: 50 kbit/s,
100 kbit/s, 125 kbit/s, 250 kbit/s, 500 kbit/s, 800 kbit/s, or 1 Mbit/s. The baud
rate can be changed by a Curtis programmer or by an SDO. Changes in the
baud rate require an NMT reset or KSI cycle.
CAN Node ID
The 1356 /1356P CAN node ID can be assigned from 1 to 127. It can be changed
by a Curtis programmer or by CAN SDO. The default CAN node ID for the
1356 /1356P is 19. The CAN node ID is used by CANopen to route messages
to the 1356 /1356P and to denote messages from the 1356 /1356P. The node
ID is part of the COB-ID and therefore also plays a part in message priority
and bus arbitration.Changes to the node ID require an NMT reset or KSI cycle.
Standard Message Identifiers
The standard message types are defined within a 4-bit field in the COB ID
(Communication OBject IDentification). Consequently, there are 16 possible
standard message types. The values for Curtis products are:
Generic Type
Message Identifier
NMT
EMERGENCY
PDO
SDO
HEARTBEAT
NMT
SYNC_ERR
PDO1_MISO
PDO1_MOSI
PDO2_MISO
PDO2_MOSI
SDO-MISO
SDO_MOSI
NODE
Value (binary – hex)
0000 – 0x0Xx
0001 – 0x1Xx
0011 – 0x3Xx
0100 – 0x4Xx
0101 – 0x5Xx
0110 – 0x6Xx
1011 – 0xBXx
1100 – 0xCXx
1110 – 0xEXx
These types and values comply with the CANopen spec and are used to invoke
standard transfer or information across the CAN bus.
Identifiers built using standard message types consist of three fields. The
four upper bits hold the message type. The Node ID is in the bottom 7 bits.
Below is the CANopen-compliant Curtis standard organization of the
COB-ID.
11
10
9
8
Message Type
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Node ID
NMT messages have the highest priority of the standard message types,
and the heartbeat has the lowest priority.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
17
3 — CANopen COMMUNICATIONS
NMT MESSAGES
NMT (Network Management Transmission) messages are the highest priority
message available. The NMT message puts the 1356 /1356P into a specific
Device State, as shown below. These messages have 2 bytes of data sent by the
master; the slave does not respond with any data to an NMT.
The Device State value can be queried over the CAN bus using an SDO.
The Device State value is also transmitted with each heartbeat message.
Value
0
4
5
127
Device State
Initialization (or “boot-up”)
StoppedXx
OperationalXx
Pre-OperationalXx
The NMT message identifier consists of the standard message type, NMT,
in the top four bits. The bottom seven bits must be set to zero.
The first data byte of the NMT command is the command specifier. The
1356 /1356P will respond to the following commands.
Value
0x01
0x02
0x80
0x81
0x82
Command Specifier
Enter the Operational state
Enter the Stopped stateXx
Enter the Pre-Operational statex
Reset the 1356 /1356P (warm boot)
Reset the CAN busXx
The second byte of the NMT command defines whether this NMT is for
all slaves on the bus (data byte = 0x00) or for a specific node (data byte = Node
ID of the 1356 /1356P).
18
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
3 — CANopen COMMUNICATIONS
EMERGENCY MESSAGES
Emergency messages are the second highest priority in CANopen and the
highest priority that a slave (like the 1356 /1356P) can transmit. To minimize
the number of times Emergency messages can be set, a minimum time between
messages can be programmed using a Curtis programmer or an SDO.
Data bytes 1 and 2 define the error category.
Data byte 3 is the CANopen-required error register. Curtis products define
this as 0x01 if there is a fault present and 0x00 when all faults are clear.
Data bytes 4 through 8 define the specific fault. The 1356 /1356P will
place the current 24-bit hour meter into data bytes 4 through 6.
Bytes 7 and 8 are not used by the 1356 /1356P and are always 0x0000.
The emergency message format indicating an error is shown below.
byte 1
Curtis
Code 0xFF
Error Code
byte 8
0x01
16-bit field
0x00
Hour Meter
HEARTBEAT
The Heartbeat message is a very low priority message, periodically sent by each
slave device on the bus. The Heartbeat message requires no response. Once the
1356 /1356P is in the Pre-Operational state, the Heartbeat message will be
issued continually until communication is stopped.
The Heartbeat message has only one data byte. The top bit is reserved and
should be set to zero. The bottom 7 bits hold the current NMT device state.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
19
4 — PDO COMMUNICATIONS
4 PDO COMMUNICATIONS
The PDO (Process Data Object) communication packets conserve bus bandwidth by bundling the values of a group of objects into a single message. The
1356 /1356P is controlled and monitored through four PDOs. PDO messages
have a medium priority and each PDO always carries 8 bytes of data. The content
of these PDOs can be dynamic mapped as Curtis AC motor controllers. For
PDO dynamic mapping information, please refer to Curtis document Generic
CANopen Implementation.
A PDO transfers 8 bytes of data across the CAN bus. Any given byte is
mapped to a single byte of a pre-defined CAN Object. Mapping can be done
statically as part of the system design, or it can be done “dynamically” by using SDO transfers. Dynamic mapping is implemented on the 1356 /1356P, as
described in Section 5: SDO Communications.
PDO-MISO messages can be transmitted either in Cyclic Transmission
mode or in standard Master/Slave mode.
The Cyclic Transmission mode allows the 1356 /1356P to periodically
transmit the PDO-MOSI at the programmed cycle rate. The cycle rates are adjustable via two parameters: TPDO1 Cycle Rate (for PDO1-MISO) and TPDO2
Cycle Rate (for PDO2-MISO). If the rate is set to 0, the Cyclic Transmission
mode will be disabled and only the standard Master/Slave mode will be available.
In standard Master/Slave mode, the 1356 /1356P requires the PDO-MOSI
to be cyclic from the master. The cycle time must be less than the programmed
PDO Timeout. If the PDO-MOSI is not received within the programmed
time, the 1356 /1356P will flag a PDO Timeout fault and disable all output
drivers. If the PDO Timeout parameter is set to 0, the PDO Timeout fault is
disabled and the 1356 /1356P will respond to any PDO incoming at any rate
without faulting.
The following tables describe the PDOs exchanged with default mapping.
PDO1-MOSI (received from the system master)
Byte 1
Byte 2
Byte 3
Byte 4
Byte 5
Byte 6
Byte 7
Byte 8
Output 1 Output 2
BDI [Reserved][Reserved][Reserved][Reserved][Reserved]
CommandCommand(0–100%)
PDO2-MOSI (received from the system master)
Byte 1
Byte 2
Byte 3
Byte 4
Byte 5
Byte 6
Byte 7
Byte 8
[Reserved][Reserved][Reserved][Reserved][Reserved][Reserved][Reserved][Reserved]
20
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
4 — PDO COMMUNICATIONS
PDO1-MISO (sent in response to the system master)
Byte 1
Byte 2
Byte 3
Byte 4
Byte 5
Byte 6
Byte 7
Byte 8
Input
Input
5 Virtual [Reserved]
AnalogAnalogAnalog Analog
1–89–13Inputs
(0)
Input 4 Input 4 Input 5
Input 5
StatusStatus VoltageVoltage Voltage Voltage
ValueValueValue Value
Low Byte High Byte Low Byte High Byte
PDO2-MISO (sent in response to the system master)
Byte 1
Byte 2
Byte 3
Byte 4
Byte 5
Byte 6
Byte 7
Byte 8
AnalogAnalogAnalogAnalogAnalogAnalog
[Reserved]
[Reserved]
Input 1 Input 1 Input 2 Input 2 Input 3 Input 3
(0)
(0)
VoltageVoltageVoltageVoltageVoltageVoltage
ValueValueValueValueValueValue
Low Byte High Byte Low Byte High Byte Low Byte High Byte
Output Command Bytes
The drivers are closed-loop controlled, either for current or voltage. This byte
sets the output command as a percent of the programmed output limit value:
0 – 255 = 0% – 100%.
BDI
The BDI value is a percent of the battery state of discharge: 0–100 = 0–100%;
this value is gotten from the CAN master.
Inputs 1–13 Status Bytes
The 1356 /1356P monitors the thirteen digital inputs. The status of these inputs
in default PDO-MISO mapping is as follows.
PDO1-MISO Byte 1
Bit7Bit6Bit5Bit4Bit3Bit2Bit1 Bit0
DigitalDigitalDigitalDigitalDigitalDigitalDigital Digital
Input8Input7Input6Input5Input4Input3Input2 Input1
StatusStatusStatusStatusStatusStatusStatus Status
PDO1-MISO Byte 2
Bit7Bit6Bit5Bit4Bit3Bit2Bit1 Bit0
[Reserved] (0) DigitalDigitalDigitalDigital Digital
Input13Input12Input11Input10 Input9
StatusStatusStatusStatus Status
A status of 1 (bit set) indicates that the input is active (pulled high to B+). The
upper three bits of Byte 2 are unused and set to 0.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
21
4 — PDO COMMUNICATIONS
Virtual Digital Inputs Byte
Each analog inputs also produce a “virtual” digital input response. The status
of the virtual digital inputs in default PDO-MISO mapping is as follows.
PDO1-MISO Byte 3
Bit7Bit6Bit5Bit4Bit3Bit2Bit1 Bit0
[Reserved] (0)
VirtualVirtualVirtualVirtual Virtual
Input5Input4Input3Input2 Input1
StatusStatusStatusStatus Status
If the input is above the programmed High Threshold, the bit will be set
to 1. If the input is below the programmed Low Threshold, it will be set to 0.
Otherwise, the bit will retain its previous state.
Analog Input High/Low Bytes
The voltage value of the five analog inputs is default mapped in the PDOMISOs. Each voltage value requires 2 bytes of the PDO packet.
For each analog input, if Resistive Input Type is enabled and the resistance
is mapped in PDO-MISOs, the value will be returned as ohms, up to 7.5 kΩ.
The value 0xFFFF is interpreted as infinity (wire open).
Encoder Input Bytes
When the Analog Input pair (Analog Input 4&5) is configured as encoder input, the relative PDO bytes will carry the pulse count, RPM value, or position
value of the encoder if they are mapped in PDO-MISOs. The encoder input
type can be configured as follows.
Pulse Count type
In this type, PDO will output the number of the encoder
pulses accumulated. The value is up to 229-1 or down to -229
at which point it will roll back to zero.
RPM type
In this type, PDO will send the RPM value (2 bytes, unit in
revolutions per minute).
Position type
In this type, PDO will send the position value (2 bytes, unit
in millimeters).
22
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
5 — SDO COMMUNICATIONS
5 SDO COMMUNICATIONS
CANopen uses Service Data Objects (SDOs) to change and view all internal
parameters, or “objects.” The SDO is an 8-byte packet that contains the address
and sub-address of the parameter in question, whether to read or write the
parameter, and the parameter data (if it is a write command). SDOs are sent
infrequently and have a low priority on the CAN bus.
SDOs are designed for sporadic and occasional use during normal runtime operation. There are two types of SDOs: expedited and block transfer.
The 1356 /1356P does not support large file uploads or downloads (using the
block transfer), so all the SDOs used by the 1356 /1356P are expedited SDOs.
The SDOs in the 1356 /1356P are used to set up and parameterize the
module. They are also used to retrieve basic module information (such as version or manufacture date), review the fault log, and monitor a few key internal
variables (mostly for system debug purposes).
SDO Master Request (SDO-MOSI)
An SDO transfer always starts with a request message from the master. Each
SDO request message consists of one control byte, a two-byte CAN Object
index, a one-byte CAN Object sub-index, and up to 4 bytes of valid data. This
format is CANopen compliant.
SDO-MOSI (received from the system master)
Byte 1
Byte 2
Byte 3
Byte 4
Byte 5
Byte 6
Byte 7
Byte 8
Control CAN ObjectSub-index
DataDataData Data
Index
The first byte contains R/W message control information.
Action
Byte 1
Value
Read
Write
0x42
0x22
The next two bytes hold the CAN Object index. The LSB of the index
appears first, in byte 2, and the MSB appears in byte 3. For example, if the index
is 0x3021, byte 2 holds the 0x21 and byte 3 holds the 0x30.
Byte 4 holds the CAN Object sub-index. When there is only one instance
of a parameter or value type, this value is 0. If there are several related parameters
or values, the sub-index is used.
The last four bytes hold the data to be transferred. In the case of a single-byte
transfer, the data is placed into byte 5, with bytes 6 through 8 being undefined
(set to 0). In the case of a 16-bit transfer, the lower 8 bits appear in byte 5 and
the upper 8 bits appear in byte 6; bytes 7 and 8 are undefined (set to 0). The
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
23
5 — SDO COMMUNICATIONS
case of a 32-bit transfer follows the same strategy, with the least significant byte
placed in data byte 5 and the most significant byte placed in data byte 8.
SDO 1356 /1356P Response (SDO-MISO)
An SDO request is always acknowledged with a response message from the
1356 /1356P. The 1356 /1356P can issue two kinds of response messages: a
normal response or, in case of an error in the request SDO, an Abort SDO
Transfer message.
SDO-MISO (sent by 1356 /1356P in response to the system master)
Byte 1
Control
Byte 2
Byte 3
Byte 4
Byte 5
Byte 6
Byte 7
Byte 8
CAN Object
Sub-index Data: either the requested Read values,
Index
or the actual Write values, or an error code
The first byte of the response contains an acknowledge code, which depends on the type of transfer that was initially requested.
Action
Byte 1
Value
Read Response
Write Acknowledge
Abort SDO
0x40
0x60
0x80
Data bytes 2, 3, and 4 hold the CAN Object index and sub-index of the
request SDO.
If the SDO is a read command, bytes 5 through 8 will be filled with the
requested values, with the LSB in byte 5 and the next least significant in byte 6
and so forth. All unused bytes are set to 0.
If the SDO is a write command, bytes 5 through 8 will return the actual
value written in bytes 5 – 8. In this way, if the 1356 /1356P needs to limit or
round-down the SDO write request, the master will know—because the return
value will be different than the sent value.
If the SDO-MOSI did not properly read or tried to access a parameter
improperly, an Abort SDO Transfer will be sent. Bytes 5 through 8 will be
filled with a 32-bit error code.
24
0x06020000 = Object does not exist
0x06010002 = Attempt to write to a read only object
0x06040041 = Object cannot be mapped.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
5 — SDO: Communication Profile Objects
USING AN SDO TO MAP A PDO
The following SDO format shows how to map an SDO to a PDO.
Byte 1
Byte 2
Byte 3
Byte 4
Request
WR
LSB
Index
MSB
Index
Sub-
Index
Byte 5
Byte 6
Byte 7
LSB IndexMSB Index Sub-index
of Object of Object of Object
Byte 8
Length
Byte 1 contains the request “Write” action, as described earlier.
Bytes 2 through 4 describe the PDO and the byte within the PDO that
is to be mapped. Bytes 2 and 3 hold the index indicating the PDO and Byte
4 holds the sub-index (range 1–8) indicating the PDO byte to be mapped.
Bytes 5 through 8 describe the object to be mapped; in other words; they
define the object that has the data that will be transmitted. The object index
comes first (least significant byte first), followed by the sub-index, followed by
the number of bits to be transferred (must be 8). Note that the sub-index here
is used to specify a particular byte within a multi-byte object.
For example, take a 32-bit object. To access the least significant byte of
a long word (32 bits), the sub-index should be set to 0. To access the most
significant byte of a long word (32 bits), the sub-index should be set to 3.
The SDO commands below show an example of mapping the encoder
pulse counts (32 bit, index=0x3190) to PDO1-MISO bytes 1–4.
Map the LSB byte to PDO1-MISO Byte 1
Byte 1
0x220x000x1A0x010x900x310x000x08
Byte 2
Byte 3
Byte 4
Byte 5
Byte 6
Byte 7
Byte 8
Map the second byte to PDO1-MISO Byte 2
Byte 1
0x220x000x1A0x020x900x310x010x08
Byte 2
Byte 3
Byte 4
Byte 5
Byte 6
Byte 7
Byte 8
Map the third byte to PDO1-MISO Byte 3
Byte 1
0x220x000x1A0x030x900x310x020x08
Byte 2
Byte 3
Byte 4
Byte 5
Byte 6
Byte 7
Byte 8
Map the MSB byte to PDO1-MISO Byte 4
Byte 1
0x220x000x1A0x040x900x310x030x08
Byte 2
Byte 3
Byte 4
Byte 5
Byte 6
Byte 7
Byte 8
In these SDO commands, bytes 2 and 3 hold the index of PDO1_MISO
mapping (0x1A00) and the sub-index in byte 4 shows the byte to be mapped.
Bytes 5 and 6 hold the object index (0x3190) and the sub-index in byte 7 shows
the byte in the 32-bit object to be mapped.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
25
5 — SDO: Communication Profile Objects
TYPES OF SDO OBJECTS
Three types of SDO objects are described in the following pages: Communications
Profile Objects, Programmable Parameter Objects, and Monitor Parameter Objects.
COMMUNICATION PROFILE OBJECTS
The Communication Profile Objects are shown below in Table 2.
Table 2 Communication Profile Object Dictionary
range
name
access index sub-index can value
description
Device Type
RO
0x1000
0x00
0x00000000 Predefined type of CAN module (I/O).
RO 0x1001
0x00 0 or 1
Error Register
= 0 if there are no errors
= 1 if there is an error
Manufacturer’s Status RO0x1002 0x00
Register 1
The value of the Status Register.
See Table 2a for more details.
2 bytes
RW 0x00 0x10
Fault Log
0x1003
(pre-defined error
field)
RO0x01-0x10
4 bytes
Length of this object. Clear fault log
by writing 0 into this address.
Contains an array of 16 fault code
and time stamps as reported by the
Emergency Message.
Node ID
RW 0x100B
0x00
0x01 – 0x7F
Node ID of this 1356 /1356P. This
Object is not part of the CANopen
mandatory dictionary. Must cycle
power or send an NMT Reset
1356 /1356P or NMT Reset CAN
for new ID to take full effect.
Store Parameters
RW 0x1010
0x00
4 bytes
1356 /1356P supports the mandatory
Save All Parameters sub-index. See
Table 2b for more details.
Restore Default
RW 0x1011
0x00
4 bytes Parameters
Controls normal, factory, or backup
restore. See Table 2c for more details.
0x00000080 11-bit Identifier of the Emergency
Emergency COB ID
RO 0x1014
0x00 –0x000000FF Message. Only the lowest 11 bits are
valid. All other bits must be 0.
0 – 1000 ms
Emergency Rate
RW 0x1015
0x00
0 – 1000
in 4ms steps
Heartbeat Rate
RW 0x1017
0x00
26
Sets the minimum time that must
elapse before another Emergency
Message can be sent by the
1356 /1356P. A setting of 0 disables
the Emergency Message.
0 – 1000 ms Sets the cyclic repetition rate of the
0 – 1000
Heartbeat Message.
in 4ms steps A setting of 0 disables the Heartbeat.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
5 — SDO: Communication Profile Objects
Table 2 Communication Profile Object Dictionary, cont’d
range
name
access index sub-index can value
description
RO 0x1018
0x00
0x06
RO
0x01
Length of this structure =
6 sub-indexes.
0x00004349 Curtis ID as defined by CiA.
0x054C1005
0x054C1006
RO 0x02
0x054C17D5
0x054C17D6
Identity Object
RO 0x034 bytes
Product code:
2 upper bytes = 1356 /1356P,
2 lower bytes = model number,
-4101, -4102, -6101, or -6102.
Hardware version is in byte 1,
Software version is in byte 2,
Build number version is in byte 3, .
Parameter block version is in byte 4.
RO
0x04
0 – 999999 Serial Number up to 999,999.
RO
0x05
1 – 99366
RO 0x06
Date Code up to 99, Dec 31.
A – Z
ASCII code of the manufacturer’s
0x41 – 0x5Alocation.
Objects describing the PDO Communications and Mapping Parameters
(Note: Each of these objects has dynamic mapping except Nominal Voltage.)
0x00
PDO1-MOSI
RO 0x1400
N/A
Parameters
0x01
Number of PDO1-MOSI
communication parameters.
0x00
PDO2-MOSI
RO 0x1401
N/A
Parameters
0x01
Number of PDO2-MOSI
communication parameters.
PDO1-MOSI Mapping RO 0x1600
0x00
Number of mapped application
objects in PDO1-MOSI.
N/A
COB-ID of PDO1-MOSI.
COB-ID of PDO2-MOSI.
PDO1-MOSI
RW 0x1600
0x01
N/A
Mapping 1st
PDO1-MOSI mapping for the 1st
application object to be mapped.
Default mapped to Driver1 command.
PDO1-MOSI
RW 0x1600
0x02
N/A
Mapping 2nd
PDO1-MOSI mapping for the 2nd
application object to be mapped.
Default mapped to Driver2 command.
PDO1-MOSI
RW 0x1600
0x03
N/A
Mapping 3rd
PDO1-MOSI mapping for the 3rd
application object to be mapped.
Default mapped to BDI.
PDO1-MOSI
RW 0x1600
0x04
N/A
Mapping 4th
PDO1-MOSI mapping for the 4th
application object to be mapped.
Not mapped in default.
PDO1-MOSI
RW 0x1600
0x05
N/A
Mapping 5th
PDO1-MOSI mapping for the 5th
application object to be mapped.
Not mapped in default.
PDO1-MOSI
RW 0x1600
0x06
N/A
Mapping 6th
PDO1-MOSI mapping for the 6th
application object to be mapped.
Not mapped in default.
PDO1-MOSI
RW 0x1600
0x07
N/A
Mapping 7th
PDO1-MOSI mapping for the 7th
application object to be mapped.
Not mapped in default.
PDO1-MOSI
RW 0x1600
0x08
N/A
Mapping 8th
PDO1-MOSI mapping for the 8th
application object to be mapped.
Not mapped in default.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
27
5 — SDO: Communication Profile Objects
Table 2 Communication Profile Object Dictionary, cont’d
range
name
access index sub-index can value
description
PDO2-MOSI Mapping RO 0x1601
0x00
N/A
PDO2-MOSI
RW 0x1601
0x01
N/A
Mapping 1st
PDO2-MOSI mapping for the 1st
application object to be mapped.
Not mapped in default.
PDO2-MOSI
RW 0x1601
0x02
N/A
Mapping 2nd
PDO2-MOSI mapping for the 2nd
application object to be mapped.
Not mapped in default.
PDO2-MOSI
RW 0x1601
0x03
N/A
Mapping 3rd
PDO2-MOSI mapping for the 3rd
application object to be mapped.
Not mapped in default.
PDO2-MOSI
RW 0x1601
0x04
N/A
Mapping 4th
PDO2-MOSI mapping for the 4th
application object to be mapped.
Not mapped in default.
PDO2-MOSI
RW 0x1601
0x05
N/A
Mapping 5th
PDO2-MOSI mapping for the 5th
application object to be mapped.
Not mapped in default.
PDO2-MOSI
RW 0x1601
0x06
N/A
Mapping 6th
PDO2-MOSI mapping for the 6th
application object to be mapped.
Not mapped in default.
PDO2-MOSI
RW 0x1601
0x07
N/A
Mapping 7th
PDO2-MOSI mapping for the 7th
application object to be mapped.
Not mapped in default.
PDO2-MOSI
RW 0x1601
0x08
N/A
Mapping 8th
PDO2-MOSI mapping for the 8th
application object to be mapped.
Not mapped in default.
0x00
PDO1-MISO
RO 0x1800
N/A
Parameters
0x01
Number of PDO1-MISO
communication parameters.
TPDO1 Cycle Rate
RW 0x1800
0x05
TPDO2 Cycle Rate
RW 0x1801
0x05
PDO1-MISO Mapping RO 0x1A00 0x00
COB-ID of PDO1-MISO
Periodic transmit rate of PDO1-MISO
0 – 1000 ms
(in 4ms steps). Setting to 0 will
0 – 1000
disable periodic transmit.
0x00
PDO2-MISO
RO 0x1801
N/A
Parameters
0x01
28
Number of mapped application
objects in PDO2-MOSI.
Number of PDO2-MISO
communication parameters.
COB-ID of PDO2-MISO
Periodic transmit rate of PDO2-MISO
0 – 1000 ms
(in 4ms steps). Setting to 0 will
0 – 1000
disable periodic transmit.
N/A
Number of mapped application
objects in PDO1-MISO.
PDO1-MISO
RW0x1A00 0x01
N/A
Mapping 1st
PDO1-MISO mapping for the 1st
application object to be mapped.
Default mapped to LSB byte of
Switch Input States.
PDO1-MISO
RW0x1A00 0x02
N/A
Mapping 2nd
PDO1-MISO mapping for the 2nd
application object to be mapped.
Default mapped to MSB byte of
Switch Input States.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
5 — SDO: Communication Profile Objects
Table 2 Communication Profile Object Dictionary, cont’d
range
name
access index sub-index can value
description
PDO1-MISO
RW0x1A00 0x03
N/A
Mapping 3rd
PDO1-MISO mapping for the 3rd
application object to be mapped.
Default mapped to LSB byte of
Virtual Digital Input States.
PDO1-MISO
RW0x1A00 0x04
N/A
Mapping 4th
PDO1-MISO mapping for the 4th
application object to be mapped.
Default mapped to MSB byte of
Virtual Digital Input States.
PDO1-MISO
RW0x1A00 0x05
N/A
Mapping 5th
PDO1-MISO mapping for the 5th
application object to be mapped.
Default mapped to LSB byte of
Analog4 Voltage Value.
PDO1-MISO
RW0x1A00 0x06
N/A
Mapping 6th
PDO1-MISO mapping for the 6th
application object to be mapped.
Default mapped to MSB byte of
Analog4 Voltage Value.
PDO1-MISO
RW0x1A00 0x07
N/A
Mapping 7th
PDO1-MISO mapping for the 7th
application object to be mapped.
Default mapped to LSB byte of
Analog5 Voltage Value.
PDO1-MISO
RW0x1A00 0x08
N/A
Mapping 8th
PDO1-MISO mapping for the 8th
application object to be mapped.
Default mapped to MSB byte of
Analog5 Voltage Value.
PDO2-MISO Mapping RO 0x1A01 0x00
Number of mapped application
objects in PDO2-MISO.
N/A
PDO2-MISO
RW0x1A01 0x01
N/A
Mapping 1st
PDO2-MISO mapping for the 1st
application object to be mapped
Default mapped to LSB byte of
Analog1 Voltage Value.
PDO2-MISO
RW0x1A01 0x02
N/A
Mapping 2nd
PDO2-MISO mapping for the 2nd
application object to be mapped
Default mapped to MSB byte of
Analog1 Voltage Value.
PDO2-MISO
RW0x1A01 0x03
N/A
Mapping 3rd
PDO2-MISO mapping for the 3rd
application object to be mapped
Default mapped to LSB byte of
Analog2 Voltage Value.
PDO2-MISO
RW0x1A01 0x04
N/A
Mapping 4th
PDO2-MISO mapping for the 4th
application object to be mapped
Default mapped to MSB byte of
Analog2 Voltage Value.
PDO2-MISO
RW0x1A01 0x05
N/A
Mapping 5th
PDO2-MISO mapping for the 5th
application object to be mapped
Default mapped to LSB byte of
Analog3 Voltage Value.
PDO2-MISO
RW0x1A01 0x06
N/A
Mapping 6th
PDO2-MISO mapping for the 6th
application object to be mapped
Default mapped to MSB byte of
Analog3 Voltage Value.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
29
5 — SDO: Communication Profile Objects
Table 2 Communication Profile Object Dictionary, cont’d
range
name
access index sub-index can value
description
PDO2-MISO
RW 0x1A01 0x07
N/A
Mapping 7th
PDO2-MISO mapping for the 7th
application object to be mapped
Not mapped in default.
PDO2-MISO
RW 0x1A01 0x08
N/A
Mapping 8th
PDO2-MISO mapping for the 8th
application object to be mapped
Not mapped in default.
Table 2 Column Definitions
Access: RO = Read Only access; RW = Read/Write access
Index: The CAN address that is used to access this object.
Sub-index: Some objects have several values associated with them.
In these cases, a Sub-index is used to access each part of the object.
Detail on the Manufacturer’s Status Register, Store Parameters, and Restore Parameters objects
is presented in Tables 2a, 2b, and 2c.
30
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
5 — SDO: Communication Profile Objects
Manufacturer’s Status Register
The Manufacturer’s Status Register reflects the present fault flags. Each fault
has its own bit in the Status Register. Unlike the LED Status of the Emergency
Message, which can only relay the highest priority fault, the 16-bit Status Register
will show all present faults. See Section 6: Diagnostics and Troubleshooting for
descriptions and probable causes of the faults.
Table 2a Manufacturer’s Status Register
BIT LOCATION
LSB: Bit 0
Bit 1
Bit 2
Bit 3
Bit 4
Bit 5
Bit 6
Bit 7
Bit 8
Bit 9
Bit 10
Bit 11
Bit 12
Bit 13
Bit 14
Bit 15
FAULT
Internal Fault
Flash Fault
5V Supply Fail
12V Supply Fail
External Supply Out of Range
EEPROM Fault
Encoder Fault
Analog Input Fault
Overvoltage
Undervoltage
Driver 1 Fault
Driver 2 Fault
Coil 2 Fault
Coil 2 Fault
PDO Timeout
CAN Bus Fault
Store Parameter Object
The 1356 /1356P has three parameter blocks: the Normal parameter block,
Back-up parameter block, and Factory parameter block. An SDO or 1313/1314
programmer Write operation will update the parameter in working RAM. All
parameters in working RAM will be saved to the Normal parameter block after
KSI cycle.
The text string “bkup” initiates a complete storage of all parameters to the
Backup parameter block.
Table 2b Store Parameter Object
Function Request Value
Access
BACK_UP_COMMAND
“bkup”
WO
0x70756B62
Description
Text string that commands all
parameters to be saved from
working RAM to the Backup
flash space. At first glance, the ASCII looks “backward.” This is because CANopen
defines that the LSB goes first and MSB is sent last. Therefore “bkup” (which is
data bytes 5, 6, 7, and 8) is written as “pukb” when converting it to hex (data
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
31
5 — SDO: Communication Profile Objects
bytes in proper descending order). Using the ASCII hex values for each character,
we get 0x70 (“p”), 0x75 (“u”), 0x6B (“k”), and 0x62 (“b”) for the final resultant
hex 4 byte number of 0x70756B62.
Restore Default Parameters
The Restore Default Parameters Object allows the 1356 /1356P to restore all
flash backed-up SDO objects to their Factory settings (hard-coded in software),
Back-up settings (stored in Back-up parameter block in flash), or Normal (stored
in Normal parameter block in flash). This object can also be used to restore
(reset) the hour meter value.
Writing a special text string to this object will initiate a restore to Factory,
Backup, or Normal settings for all SDO objects stored in flash. Once this object is
written to, the next KSI cycle will cause the system settings to be loaded from the
new desired location and put into the working RAM locations (Shadow RAM).
A Restore the Back-Up Settings command (“load”) will load the data
values from the Backup parameter block, place them in RAM, and overwrite
the Normal parameter block with them. Whatever changes were made to the
Normal parameter block will be lost. The Restore Default Parameters function
should be set to 0x02 (Restore Normal Settings) so that the 1356 /1356P will
restore from the Normal parameter block on the next reset or power cycle.
Table 2c Restore Default Parameters Object
Restore Default Parameters Function Write
String
Data
Read Back Description
Restore Factory Settings
“fact”
0
0x74636166
Restore all parameter values from built-in defaults. These
are hard-coded in the software.
Restore the Back-Up “load”
1
Settings
0x64616F6C
Restore all parameter values
from the Backup parameter
block. “load” is used to comply
with CANopen spec DS301.
Restore Normal Settings
Restore all parameter values
from the Normal parameter block.
“norm”
2
0x6D726F6E
Preset the Hour Meter
“hour” N/A
0x72756F68
Preset the hour meter to the
value loaded into the parameter
Preset Hour (0x3062).
On reception of the correct string, the 1356 /1356P will set a Restore flag
and confirm the SDO transmission. If a wrong string or unsupported command
is written, the 1356 /1356P will not set the Restore flag and responds with an
Abort SDO.
The hour meter has a special function to reset it. Writing the string “hour”
to this index will cause the 1356 /1356P to preset the hour meter to the value
saved in the Preset Hour parameter (0x3062). Note that only the hours can be
set to a programmed value; the minutes always will be reset to 0.
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Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
5 — SDO: Parameter Profile Objects
PARAMETER PROFILE OBJECTS
The Programmable Parameter Profile objects are shown in Table 3. All these
parameters, except for Nominal Voltage, have dynamic mapping.
parameter
Table 3 Parameter Profile Object Dictionary
sdo location
range
index
sub-index
can value
description
Driver1 Mode
0x3000
0x00
0 – 3, 5 – 7
Driver mode:
0 – 3, 5 – 7 0 = Active High Digital Input mode.
1 = Constant Current mode.
2 = Constant Voltage mode.
3 = Direct PWM mode.
5 = Constant Current mode, with open detection.
6 = Constant Voltage mode, with open detection.
7 = Direct PWM mode, with open detection.
Driver2 Mode
0x3001
0x00 See above.
Driver1 Current Limit
0x3002
0x00 0.00 – 3.00 A
0 – 300
Driver2 Current Limit
0x3003
0x00 See above.
See above.
Sets the maximum current output when the PDO
command is 100% (255), when operating in
Constant Current mode.
See above.
Driver1 PWM Limit
0x3004
0x00 0 – 100.0 %
0 – 1000
Sets the maximum PWM output when the PDO
command is 100% (255), when operating in
Direct PWM mode.
Driver2 PWM Limit
See above.
0x3005
0x00 Driver1 Voltage Limit
0x3006
0x00 Driver2 Voltage Limit
0x3007
0x00 See above.
0.0 – 36.0 V
0 – 360
(36V models)
0.0 – 80.0 V
0 – 800
(80V models)
See above.
Driver1 Dither Period
0x3008
0x00
4 – 200 ms
4 – 200
Driver2 Dither Period
0x3009
0x00 See above.
Sets the maximum voltage output when the PDO
command is 100% (255), when operating in
Constant Voltage mode.
See above.
Sets the time between dither pulses for each
output (in 2 ms steps). A dither period of 4 – 200 ms
provides a frequency range of 250 – 5 Hz.
Applicable only in Constant Current mode.
See above.
Driver1 Dither Amount
0x300A
0x00
0 – 500 mA
0 – 500
Sets the amount (+/-) of dither that will be
added/subtracted from the command
(in 10 mA steps). Applicable only in Constant
Current mode.
Driver2 Dither Amount
See above.
0x300B
0x00 Driver1 Kp
0x300C
0x00 Driver2 Kp
0x300D
0x00 Driver1 Ki
0x300E
0x00 Driver2 Ki
0x300F
0x00 Nominal Voltage
0x3010
0x00 See above.
0.1 – 100.0 %
1 – 1000
See above.
0.1 – 100.0 %
1 – 1000
See above.
Sets the proportional gain factor of the
PI current controller.
See above.
Sets the integral gain factor of the
PI current controller.
See above.
12.0V – 36.0V Sets the nominal battery voltage, which is used
120 – 360
in fault detection.
36.0V – 80.0V 1356 /1356P-4101&-4102: 12 V, 24V, 36V.
360 – 800 1356 /1356P-6101&-6102: 36 V, 48V, 60V, 72V, 80V.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
33
5 — SDO: Parameter Profile Objects
parameter
Table 3 Parameter Profile Object Dictionary, cont’d
sdo location
range
index
sub-index
can value
description
Analog Input Type
0x3011
0x00
0 – 31
Sets the input type on Analog 1 through 5.
0 – 31
LSB is for Analog 1 and next is for Analog 2, etc.
Upper three bits are not used.
Bit = 0, voltage input type.
Bit = 1, resistive input type.
Analog1 High Threshold 0x3020
0x00 0.0 – 15.0 V
0 – 150
Sets the threshold that the analog input must go
above to set the virtual digital input high.
Analog2 High Threshold
0x3021
0x00 See above.
See above.
Analog3 High Threshold
0x3022
0x00 See above.
See above.
Analog4 High Threshold
0x3023
0x00 See above.
See above.
Analog5 High Threshold
0x3024
0x00 See above.
See above.
Analog1 Low Threshold 0x3030
0x00 0.0 – 15.0 V
0 – 150
Sets the threshold that the analog input must go
below to set the virtual digital input low.
Analog2 Low Threshold
0x3031
0x00 See above.
See above.
Analog3 Low Threshold
0x3032
0x00 See above.
See above.
Analog4 Low Threshold
0x3033
0x00 See above.
See above.
Analog5 Low Threshold
0x3034
0x00 See above.
See above.
Analog1 Filter Gain
0x3040
0x00 128 s – 8 ms
1 – 16384
Sets the amount of filtering on the analog inputs.
Higher gains provide faster filtering. Filtering affects
the analog reading and the virtual digital input
responsiveness.
Analog2 Filter Gain
0x3041
0x00 See above.
See above.
Analog3 Filter Gain
0x3042
0x00 See above.
See above.
Analog4 Filter Gain
0x3043
0x00 See above.
See above.
Analog5 Filter Gain
0x3044
0x00 See above.
See above.
Digital1 Debounce Time
0x3050
0x00
8 – 1000 ms
8 – 1000
Sets the debounce time of the digital inputs in
milliseconds (in 8 ms steps)
Digital2 Debounce Time
0x3051
0x00 See above.
See above.
Digital3 Debounce Time
0x3052
0x00 See above.
See above.
Digital4 Debounce Time
0x3053
0x00 See above.
See above.
Digital5 Debounce Time
0x3054
0x00 See above.
See above.
Digital6 Debounce Time
0x3055
0x00 See above.
See above.
Digital7 Debounce Time
0x3056
0x00 See above.
See above.
Digital8 Debounce Time
0x3057
0x00 See above.
See above.
Digital9 Debounce Time
0x3058
0x00 See above.
See above.
Digital10 Debounce Time
0x3059
0x00 See above.
See above.
Digital11 Debounce Time
0x305A
0x00 See above.
See above.
Digital12 Debounce Time
0x305B
0x00 See above.
See above.
Digital13 Debounce Time
0x305C
0x00 See above.
See above.
34
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
5 — SDO: Parameter Profile Objects
parameter
Table 3 Parameter Profile Object Dictionary, cont’d
sdo location
range
index
sub-index
can value
description
CAN Baud Rate
0x3060
0x00
-2 – 4
Sets the CAN baud rate:
-2 – 4 -2 = 50 kbit/s.
-1 = 100 kbit/s.
0 = 125 kbit/s.
1 = 250 kbit/s.
2 = 500 kbit/s.
3 = 800 kbit/s.
4 = 1Mbit/s.
Resets to 125 kbit/s when over-range. Must cycle
KSI for new rate to take effect.
PDO Timeout
0x3061
0x00 0 – 1000 ms
0 – 1000
Sets the time interval (in 4 ms steps) within
which the PDO MOSI must be received or a fault
will be flagged.
A setting of zero disables the PDO timeout fault.
Preset Hour Meter
0x3062
0x00 Writing to this location will change the hours of
hour meter and reset the minutes to 0.
0 – 65535 h
0 – 65535
Encoder Type
0x3070
0x00
0 – 3
Encoder type:
0 – 3 0 = Encoder disabled.
1 = Pulse count type.
2 = RPM type.
3 = Position type.
Must cycle KSI for new setting to take effect.
Encoder Direction
0x3071
0x00
0, 1
Sets the positive direction:
0, 1 0 = Positive direction when phase A is ahead
of phase B.
1 = Positive direction when phase B is ahead
of phase A.
Pulses Per Meter
0x3072
0x00 0 – 65535
0 – 65535
This parameter should be set according to the
pulses per revolution and displacement per
revolution of the encoder.
pulses per revolution
Pulses Per Meter = displacement per revolution (unit m)
Pulse Per Revolution
0x3073
0x00 0 – 65535
0 – 65535
This parameter should be set according to the
encoder specification.
Must cycle KSI for new setting to take effect.
Encoder Reset
0x3088
0x00 Writing 1 to this index will immediately set the
encoder counter to zero.
0, 1
0, 1
Driver1 Command
0x3090
0x00 0 – 255
0 – 255
Driver2 Command
0x3091
0x00 BDI
0x3201
0x00 See above.
0 – 100
0 – 100
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
Driver output command 0 – 255 = 0% – 100%
of max output limit in applicable mode.
This command is valid only when mapped and
implemented by PDO-MOSI.
See above.
Displays BDI value (received from the master)
on the model 840.
35
5 — SDO: Parameter Profile Objects
Driver Proportional Gain / Driver Integral Gain
The 1356 /1356P uses a Proportional/Integral (PI) controller to minimize the
error between the command and the actual output in Constant Current mode
and Constant Voltage mode. The PI controller works with two parameters,
proportional gain (Kp) and integral gain (Ki). Normally, the default settings
of these gains are sufficient to control the load. However, there may be times
when they need to be adjusted to increase or decrease the responsiveness of
the 1356 /1356P.
If the 1356 /1356P over-reacts to changes in battery or load, lower these
gains. If it is too slow to react, increase them. If the gains are set too high, the
output may oscillate. Normally, the Proportional and Integral gains are increased
or decreased together. It is not recommended to have one gain very high while
the other is very low.
36
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
5 — SDO: Parameter Profile Objects
Analog Input Algorithms
The voltage range of the five analog inputs is 0–15V and is scaled as 0–4095.
The analog inputs are sampled after the driver output currents have been sampled. Each analog input is filtered by a single pole exponential filter. The Filter
Gain parameter is associated with the Timer Constant (TC) of the filter, which
indicates how long it takes the filter to respond to a step input and reach 63%
of the final value. It takes approximately 5 TCs before the filtered signal reaches
its full output. The table below provides a way to estimate filter response.
Step Input
FILTER VALUE
100%
Filtered Response
63%
TIME
Time
Constant
Exponential Filter Response
Setting
1
2
4
8
16
32
64
128
256
512
1024
2048
4096
8192
16384
TC
Time to 100%
64.s320.s
32.s160.s
16.s80.s
8.s40.s
4.s20.s
2.s10.s
1.s5.s
512.ms
2.5 s
256.ms
1.25 s
128.ms640.ms
64.ms320.ms
32.ms160.ms
16.ms80.ms
8.ms40.ms
4.ms20.ms
The analog input can be configured as voltage input type or as resistive input
type, using the Curtis programmer or an SDO. The value measured at the five
analog inputs can be mapped to the two MISO PDOs as filtered voltage (in
units of 0.01 V) or resistance (in units of ohms), depending on the setting of
the Analog Input Type parameter. In addition, the value can also be monitored
by the Curtis programmer.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
37
5 — SDO: Monitor Profile Objects
MONITOR PARAMETER PROFILE OBJECTS
The Monitor Parameter Profile Objects are shown in Table 4.
Table 4 Monitor Profile Object Dictionary
sdo location
range
index
sub-index
can value
description
parameter
Analog1 Resistor Value
0x3100
0x00
0 – 7500 Ω
0 – 7500
Resistive type analog input value.
Scale returned as 1 ohm per count.
See above.
See above.
Analog2 Resistor Value
0x3101
0x00 See above.
Analog4 Resistor Value
0x3103
0x00 See above.
Analog3 Resistor Value
Analog5 Resistor Value
0x3102
0x3104
0x00 0x00 Analog1 Voltage Value
0x3110
0x00
Analog2 Voltage Value
0x3111
0x00 0x3113
0x00 Analog3 Voltage Value
0x3112
Analog5 Voltage Value
0x3114
Analog4 Voltage Value
0x00 0x00 See above.
0.00 – 15.60 V
0 – 1560
See above.
See above.
See above.
See above.
See above.
See above.
See above.
Voltage type analog input value.
Scale returned as 0.01 volt per count.
See above.
See above.
See above.
See above.
0.0 – 120.0 V
0 – 1200
Voltage as read by the 1356 / 1356P.
0.00 – 3.00 A
0 – 300
Present current sunk by Driver 1.
Driver2 Current
0x3131
0x00
0.00 – 1.00 A
0 – 100
Present current sunk by Driver 2.
Total Driver Current
0x3132
0x00
0.00 – 4.00 A
0 – 400
Present current sunk by both drivers.
PWM1
0x3140
0x00
0.0 – 100.0 %
0 – 1000
Present PWM % of Driver 1.
See above.
Present PWM % of Driver 2.
Hour Meter
0x3150
0x00
0 – 65535 h
0 – 65535
Present value of the hour meter.
Switch Input Status
0x3160
0x00
0 – 0x1FFF
0 – 0x1FFF
Status of switch inputs (LSB for switch
Input 1: 1 = High, 0 = Low.
Virtual Digital Input Status
0x3170
0x00
0 – 0x1F
0 – 0x1F
Status of virtual switch inputs (LSB for
input 1: 1 = High, 0 = Low.
5V Voltage
0x3180
0x00
0.0 – 6.3 V
0 – 63
Voltage value of the +5V output.
12V Voltage
0x3181
0x00
0.0 – 16.0 V
0 – 160
Voltage value of the +12V output.
Ext Current
0x3182
0x00
0 – 250 mA
0 – 250
Total current on +5V and +12V
outputs.
Battery Voltage
0x3120
0x00
Driver1 Current
0x3130
0x00
PWM2
0x3141
0x00 -229 – 229-1
Pulse Count
0x3190
0x00
-229 – 229-1
Current encoder pulse count. Negative count indicates the
encoder is running in the reverse
direction of the zero position.
RPM
0x3191
0x00
Encoder RPM in revolutions per minute when encoder is configured
as RPM type.
Position
0x3192
0x00
38
0 – 65535 rpm
0 – 65535
Calculated position value according -32.768 – 32.767 m
to the pulse per meter when encoder
-32768 – 32767
is configured as Position type.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
6 — DIAGNOSTICS & TROUBLESHOOTING
6 DIAGNOSTICS AND TROUBLESHOOTING
When an error occurs in the 1356 /1356P, a fault message can be monitored
through the Curtis programmer. Meanwhile, an emergency message will be
produced on the CAN bus according to the CANopen standard. This message
will be sent once. When the fault clears, a No Fault emergency message will
be transmitted.
The fault log is accessed by SDO reads of the Standard Object at Index
0x1003. Reading the Fault Log Length sub-index 0x00 will return a value of 16
(the depth of the fault log). Reading from the sub-index 1 though 16 (0x01 – 0x10)
will return the faults plus time stamps in order from newest to oldest. The fault
log can be cleared by writing 0 to the Fault Log Length object (sub-index 0x00).
Additionally, the highest priority fault code will be flashed on the red
and yellow status LEDs. The red LED enumerates the digit place and the yellow LED enumerates the value. For example, a code 23 would be displayed as
one red flash, followed by two yellow flashes, followed by two red flashes and
finished with three yellow flashes. The 1356 /1356P’s two LEDs will display
this repeating pattern:
red
yellow
(first digit)
(2)
✱
✲ ✲
red
✱✱
yellow
✲ ✲ ✲
(second digit)(3)
The fault codes are listed in the troubleshooting chart (Table 5).
During normal operation, the yellow LED flashes continuously.
On power-up, the integrity of the code stored in memory is automatically
tested. If the software is found to be corrupted, the red Status LED will flash
rapidly.
The flash code can also be flashed on a single remote LED connected to the
serial port. For example, a code 23 would be displayed as two flashes, followed
by a 500 ms delay, and finished with three flashes. The 1356 /1356P will repeat
this pattern at 1 second intervals.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
39
6 — DIAGNOSTICS & TROUBLESHOOTING
Table 5 TROUBLESHOOTING CHART
CODEFAULT
DESCRIPTION
EFFECT
RECOVERY
Fast
Red
Corrupt Code
1356 /1356P in corrupted state. LED
1356 /1356P in Fault
state.
11 Internal Fault
Encryption failure.
1356 /1356P in Stopped Requires repair and ATS test.
state.
12 Flash Fault
Flash did not properly write or Checksum did not match.
All outputs stopped.
21 Over Voltage
22 Under Voltage
Battery over limit.
All outputs stopped.
Limit = (Nominal Voltage * 1.25) + 5V. Battery returns to normal
range for >1 second.
Battery under limit.
Limit = (Nominal Voltage * 0.7)
- 5V when Nominal Voltage ≥24V. All outputs stopped.
Limit = (Nominal Voltage * 0.7)
- 0.6V when Nominal Voltage =12V.
Battery returns to normal
range for >1 second.
Driver 1 is in overcurrent (>3.5 amps). Output on the faulted
driver stopped. Driver 2 is in overcurrent (>1.5 amps).
Send a 0% PDO command
to the faulted driver.
34 Coil2 Fault
Driver 1 output pin is low when driver
is Off. This implies the pin has been
left open.
Output on the faulted
Driver 2 output pin is low when driver driver not functional. is Off. This implies the pin has been
left open
Driver pin is reconnected.
41 PDO Timeout
PDO from master has not been received within the time-out period.
31 Driver1 Fault
32 Driver2 Fault
33 Coil1 Fault
Requires repair or new
software download.
Write to failed location and
cycle KSI.
All drivers disabled New PDO received within
and commands cleared. proper timing.
1356 /1356P in Stopped NMT received, or bus
42 CAN Bus Fault
Too many CAN bus errors detected.
reception & transmission
state. restored.
43 Encoder Fault
Encoder wire open.
44 EEPROM Fault
The EEPROM did not properly write. None.
Write to failed location.
45 Analog Input
Fault
51 5V Supply Fail
52 12V Supply Fail
53 External Supply
Out of Range
Analog input exceeds 15.5V (voltage None.
input) or 7.5kΩ (resistance input). Bring analog input within
range.
External load impedance on +5V Supply is too low.
None.
Bring voltage within range.
External load impedance on +12V Supply is too low.
None.
Bring voltage within range.
40
Encoder count stopped. Cycle KSI.
External load on +5V and +12V
None.
exceeds 200 mA.
Bring external supply current
within range.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
6 — DIAGNOSTICS & TROUBLESHOOTING
FAULT LOG
The 1356 /1356P stores the last 16 faults with a time-stamp. The Fault Log is
stored in non-volatile memory with the last fault always at the top of the log
and the oldest fault at the end. If the buffer is full when a new fault occurs,
the oldest fault is pushed of the log, the previous faults all move down, and the
newest fault is placed at the top.
The Fault Log is accessed by SDO reads of the Standard Object at Index
0x1003 (called the Pre-defined Error Field in DS301). Reading the Fault Log
Length sub-index 0x00 will return a value of 16 (the depth of the fault log).
Reading from the sub-index 1 though 16 (0x01 – 0x10) will return the faults
plus time stamps in order from newest to oldest.
Faults are stored in the Fault Log as 32-bit data fields in this format:
Byte5Byte6Byte7Byte8
Fault Code
Fault
FFh
Hour LSB
Hour MSB
Time Stamp
The first byte is the fault code; see Table 5. The next byte simply indicates a
fault and is consistent with the Emergency Message. If the SDO read of a fault
log sub-index returns a 0 in the fault data, the fault log is clear at that location,
and no fault was recorded.
The time-stamp uses the internal 16-bit running hour meter. If several
error messages have occurred within one hour, the order of the fault messages
will indicate which came first.
The Fault Log can be cleared by writing 0 to the Fault Log Length object
(sub-index 0x00). After clearing, all the data bytes in sub-indexes 0x01 through
0x10 will be 0.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
41
7 — PROGRAMMING MENUS
7 SERIAL COMMUNICATIONS & PROGRAMMING
The 1356 /1356P implements the ESP protocol and can support the Curtis
handheld 1313 programmers and the 1314 PC programming station. In addition, it also supports the Curtis 840 Spyglass display.
The Curtis programmer can be used to adjust the programmable parameters, to read various monitored values, and to access fault information.
Program Menus
The programmable parameters are arranged in hierarchical menus, as shown
in Table 6.
Table 6 Program Menus: 1313 /1314 Programmer
ANALOG INPUT .......................... p. 43
DRIVER OUTPUT ........................ p. 45
—Input Type
—Analog1
—Driver1
—High Threshold
—Output Max
—Filter Gain
—Operation Mode
—Current Limit
—Analog2 (same)
—PWM Limit
—Analog4 (same)
—Period
—Low Threshold
—Voltage Limit
—Analog3 (same)
—Dither
—Analog5 (same)
—Amount
DIGITAL INPUT ............................ p.43
—Kp
—Input1 Debounce Time
—Input13 Debounce Time
...
ENCODER INPUT ......................... p.44
—Encoder Type
—Pulse Per Meter
—Pulse Per Revolution
—Swap Direction
—Reset
—PI
—Ki
—Driver2 (same)
CAN INTERFACE ......................... p. 46
—Baud Rate
—Heartbeat Rate
—Node ID
—PDO Timeout
—Emergency Rate
—TPDO1 Cycle Rate
—TPDO2 Cycle Rate
CONFIGURATION ........................ p. 47
—Nominal Voltage
—Restore Type
42
—Preset Hour
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
7 — PROGRAMMER: PROGRAM MENUS
ANALOG INPUT PROGRAM MENU *
PARAMETER
ALLOWABLE
RANGE
DESCRIPTION
0, 1
Selects the analog type:
0 = Voltage type input.
1 = Resistive type input.
Input Type
High Threshold
0.0 – 15.0 V
Sets the threshold the analog input must go above
to set the virtual digital input High.
Low Threshold
0.0 – 15.0 V
Sets the threshold the analog input must go below
to set the virtual digital input Low.
1 – 16384
Sets the amount of filtering on the input.
Higher gains provide faster filtering. Filtering affects
the analog reading and the virtual digital input
responsiveness.
Filter Gain
* This menu is repeated for Analog Inputs 1 – 5.
DIGITAL INPUT PROGRAM MENU
PARAMETER
ALLOWABLE
RANGE
DESCRIPTION
Input1 Debounce Time
8 – 1000 ms
Sets the debounce time of Digital
Input 1 in 8ms steps.
Input2 Debounce Time
8 – 1000 ms
Sets the debounce time of Digital
Input 2 in 8ms steps.
. . .
Input13 Debounce Time
8 – 1000 ms
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
Sets the debounce time of Digital
Input 13 in 8ms steps.
43
7 — PROGRAMMER: PROGRAM MENUS
ENCODER PROGRAM MENU
PARAMETER
Encoder Type
ALLOWABLE
RANGE
DESCRIPTION
0 – 3
Selects the encoder type:
0 = Encoder disabled.
1 = Pulse count type.
2 = RPM type.
3 = Position type.
Must cycle KSI for new encoder type
to take effect.
4 Pulse Per Meter
0 – 65535
This parameter should be set according to the
pulses per revolution and displacement per
revolution of the encoder:
pulses per revolution
Pulse Per Meter = displacement
per revolution (unit m)
Pulse Per Revolution
0 – 65535
Swap Direction
Reset
44
0, 1
0
This parameter should be set according to the
encoder specification. Must cycle KSI for new
setting to take effect.
Sets the positive phase direction:
0 = Positive phase when phase A is
ahead of phase B
1 = Positive phase when phase B is
ahead of Phase A.
Must cycle KSI for new setting to take effect.
Sets the encoder counter to zero.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
7 — PROGRAMMER: PROGRAM MENUS
DRIVER OUTPUT PROGRAM MENU *
PARAMETER
Operation Mode
ALLOWABLE
RANGE
DESCRIPTION
0 – 3, 5 – 7
Selects the driver operation mode:
0 = Active High Digital Input mode.
1 = Constant Current mode.
2 = Constant Voltage mode.
3 = Direct PWM mode.
5 = Constant Current mode (with open detection).
6 = Constant Voltage mode (with open detection).
7 = Direct PWM mode (with open detection).
Current Limit
0.00 – 3.00 A
(Driver 1)
0.00 – 1.00 A
(Driver 2)
Sets the maximum current output when the PDO
command is 100%; applicable only when the driver
is operating in Constant Current mode.
Voltage Limit
0.0 – 36.0 V
(36V models)
0.0 – 80.0 V
(80V models)
Sets the maximum voltage output when the PDO
command is 100%; applicable only when the driver
is operating in Constant Voltage mode.
PWM Limit
0.0 – 100.0 %
Sets the maximum PWM output when the driver
is operating in Direct PWM mode.
Dither Period
4 – 200 ms
Sets the time between dither pulses (in 2 ms steps).
A dither period of 4 – 200 ms provides a frequency
range of 250 – 5 Hz.
Dither Amount
0 – 500 mA
Sets the amount (+/-) of dither that will be
added/subtracted from the command
(in 10 mA steps).
Kp
0.1 – 100.0 %
Sets the proportional gain factor of the PI current
controller.
Ki
0.1 – 100.0 %
Sets the integral gain factor of the PI current
controller.
* This menu is repeated for Drivers 1 and 2.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
45
7 — PROGRAMMER: PROGRAM MENUS
CAN INTERFACE PROGRAM MENU
PARAMETER
Baud Rate
Node ID
ALLOWABLE
RANGE
DESCRIPTION
-2 – 4
Sets the CAN baud rate:
-2 = 50 kbit/s.
-1 = 100 kbit/s.
0 = 125 kbit/s.
1 = 250 kbit/s.
2 = 500 kbit/s.
3 = 800 kbit/s.
4 = 1 Mbit/s.
Must cycle KSI or send an NMT Reset for the new
rate to take effect.
1 – 127
Sets the Node ID for the 1356 /1356P.
Must cycle KSI or send an NMT Reset 1356 /1356P
or an NMT Reset CAN for the new ID to take full
effect.
Heartbeat Rate
0 – 1000 ms Sets the cyclic repetition rate of the heartbeat
message, in 4 ms steps. Setting this parameter
to zero disables the heartbeat.
PDO Timeout
0 – 1000 ms Sets the time interval, in 4 ms steps, within which
the PDO-MOSI must be received. If the interval
is longer than this set interval, a fault is flagged.
Setting this parameter to zero disables the
PDO timeout fault.
Emergency Rate
0 – 1000 ms Sets the minimum time, in 4ms steps, the time
that must elapse before the 1356 /1356P can send
another emergency message. Setting this parameter
to zero disables the emergency message.
TPDO1 Cycle Rate 0 – 1000 ms Sets the periodic transmit rate of the PDO1 MISO,
in 4 ms steps. Setting this parameter to zero disables
the PDO1 MISO periodic transmission and PDO1
MISO replies to the PDO1 MOSI in Master/Slave
mode.
TPDO2 Cycle Rate 0 – 1000 ms Sets the periodic transmit rate of the PDO2 MISO,
in 4 ms steps. Setting this parameter to zero disables
the PDO2 MISO periodic transmission and PDO2
MISO replies to the PDO2 MOSI in Master/Slave
mode.
46
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
7 — PROGRAMMER: PROGRAM MENUS
CONFIGURATION PROGRAM MENU
ALLOWABLE
PARAMETER RANGE
DESCRIPTION
Nominal
1 – 3
Sets the nominal voltage, which is used in fault
(36V models)detection.
Voltage
3 – 7 1 = 12 V.
(80V models) 2 = 24 V.
3 = 36 V.
4 = 48 V.
5 = 60 V.
6 = 72 V.
7 = 80 V.
Preset Hour
0 – 65535 h
Presets hours of the hour meter and resets the minutes
to zero.
Restore Type
1, 2
This parameter is used to select the source of the
parameters when the 1356 /1356P is powered on.
1 = Load parameters from Back-up parameter block.
2 = Load parameters from Normal parameter block.
The default value for this parameter is 2. When it is
programmed to 1, the 1356 /1356P will load all backup
parameters after cycling KSI, and then the Restore Type
value will reset to 2.
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
47
7 — PROGRAMMER: MONITOR MENUS
Monitor Menus
Through its monitor menus, the Curtis programmer provides access to real-time
data during vehicle operation. This information is helpful during diagnostics
and troubleshooting, and also while adjusting programmable parameters.
The monitored variables are arranged in hierarchical menus, as shown
in Table 7.
Table 7 Monitor Menus: 1313 /1314 Programmer
DRIVER OUTPUT ........................ p. 49
DIGITAL INPUT ........................... p. 49
—Driver1
—Input1
—PWM
—Input13
—Current
—Driver2 (same)
—Total Current
ANALOG INPUT .......................... p. 49
—Analog1
...
ENCODER INPUT ........................ p. 50
—Pulse Counts
—RPM
—Position
—Voltage
—Resistance
POWER SUPPLY OUTPUT ............ p. 50
—Analog2 (same)
—12V
—Virtual Digital
—Analog3 (same)
—Analog4 (same)
—Analog5 (same)
—5V
—EXT Current
BATTERY VOLTAGE ..................... p. 50
HOUR METER ............................. p. 50
—Hours
—Minutes
48
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
7 — PROGRAMMER: MONITOR MENUS
DRIVER OUTPUT MONITOR MENU
PARAMETER
ALLOWABLE
RANGE
DESCRIPTION
Driver1 Current
0.00 – 3.50 A
Current sunk by Driver 1.
Driver1 PWM
0.0 – 100.0 %
PWM % of Driver 1.
Driver2 Current
0.00 – 1.50 A
Current sunk by Driver 2.
Driver2 PWM
0.0 – 100.0 %
PWM % of Driver 2.
Total Current
0.00 – 5.00 A
Total current of both drivers.
ANALOG INPUT MONITOR MENU *
PARAMETER
ALLOWABLE
RANGE
DESCRIPTION
Voltage
0.0 – 15.6 V
For modules that are configured as voltage input
type, this variable displays the input voltage value.
Resistance
0 – 7500 Ω
For modules that are configured as resistive input
type, this variable displays the input resistance value.
Virtual Digital
Off, On
Virtual digital input state.
* This menu is repeated for Analog Inputs 1 – 5.
DIGITAL INPUT MONITOR MENU
PARAMETER
ALLOWABLE
RANGE
DESCRIPTION
Input1
Off, On
Input state of Digital Input 1.
Input2
Off, On
Input state of Digital Input 2.
. . .
Input13
Off, On
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
Input state of Digital Input 13.
49
7 — PROGRAMMER: MONITOR MENUS
ENCODER MONITOR MENU
PARAMETER
ALLOWABLE
RANGE
DESCRIPTION
29 – 2 29-1
Pulse Counts-2 4 0 – 65535 rpm
RPM
Position
-32.768 – 32.767 m
Current encoder pulse counts.
Negative counts indicate the encoder is running
in the reverse direction of the zero position.
Displays RPM, when the encoder type
is configured as RPM mode.
Displays position, when the encoder type
is configured as Position mode.
Negative counts indicate the encoder ia running
in the reverse direction of the zero position.
POWER SUPPLY OUTPUT MONITOR MENU
PARAMETER
ALLOWABLE
RANGE
DESCRIPTION
+5V 0.0 – 6.3 V
Voltage of the +5V output.
+12V 0.0 – 16.0 V
Voltage of the +12V output.
EXT Current
0 – 250 mA
Combined current of the external +12V and +5V
power supplies.
BATTERY VOLTAGE MONITOR MENU
PARAMETER
Battery Voltage
ALLOWABLE
RANGE
DESCRIPTION
0.0 – 120.0 V
Voltage of the battery.
HOUR METER MONITOR MENU
PARAMETER
Hours
Minutes
ALLOWABLE
RANGE
DESCRIPTION
0 – 65535 h
0 – 59 min
Present hours of the hour meter. The hour meter
runs all the time the 1356 /1356P is powered on.
Present minutes of the hour meter.
Fault Menu
The Curtis programmer provides a convenient way to access fault information;
see Section 6: Faults and Diagnostics. The programmer displays the faults by
name. It displays all faults that are currently set and also a history of all the
faults that have been set since the history log was last cleared.
50
Curtis 1356/1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
APPENDIX A: EMC & ESD DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
APPENDIX A
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY (EMC)
Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) encompasses two areas: emissions and
immunity. Emissions are radio frequency (RF) energy generated by a product.
This energy has the potential to interfere with communications systems such
as radio, television, cellular phones, dispatching, aircraft, etc. Immunity is the
ability of a product to operate normally in the presence of RF energy. EMC
is ultimately a system design issue. Part of the EMC performance is designed
into or inherent in each component; another part is designed into or inherent
in end product characteristics such as shielding, wiring, and layout; and, finally,
a portion is a function of the interactions between all these parts. The design
techniques presented below can enhance EMC performance in products that
use Curtis control products.
Emissions
Signals with high frequency content can produce significant emissions if connected to a large enough radiating area (created by long wires spaced far apart).
PWM drivers can contribute to RF emissions. Pulse width modulated square
waves with fast rise and fall times are rich in harmonics. (Note: PWM drivers
at 100% do not contribute to emissions.) The impact of these switching waveforms can be minimized by making the wires from the controller to the load as
short as possible and by placing the load drive and return wires near each other.
For applications requiring very low emissions, the solution may involve
enclosing the system, interconnect wires and loads together in one shielded
box. Emissions can also couple to battery supply leads and circuit wires outside the box, so ferrite beads near the controller may also be required on these
unshielded wires in some applications. It is best to keep the noisy signals as far
as possible from sensitive wires.
Immunity
Immunity to radiated electric fields can be improved either by reducing overall
circuit sensitivity or by keeping undesired signals away from this circuitry. The
controller circuitry itself cannot be made less sensitive, since it must accurately
detect and process low level signals from sensors such as the throttle potentiometer. Thus immunity is generally achieved by preventing the external RF
energy from coupling into sensitive circuitry. This RF energy can get into the
controller circuitry via conducted paths and radiated paths. Conducted paths
are created by the wires connected to the controller. These wires act as antennas
and the amount of RF energy coupled into them is generally proportional to
their length. The RF voltages and currents induced in each wire are applied to
the controller pin to which the wire is connected.
Curtis 1356 /1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
A-1
APPENDIX A: EMC & ESD DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
The Curtis 1356 /1356P includes bypass capacitors on the printed circuit board’s sensitive input signals to reduce the impact of this RF energy on
the internal circuitry. In some applications, additional filtering in the form of
ferrite beads may also be required on various wires to achieve desired performance levels. A full metal enclosure can also improve immunity by shielding
the 1356 /1356P from outside RF energy.
ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE (ESD)
Curtis products, like most modern electronic devices, contain ESD-sensitive
components, and it is therefore necessary to protect them from ESD (electrostatic
discharge) damage. Most of the product’s signal connections have protection
for moderate ESD events, but must be protected from damage if higher levels
exist in a particular application.
ESD immunity is achieved either by providing sufficient distance between conductors and the ESD source so that a discharge will not occur, or by
providing an intentional path for the discharge current such that the circuit
is isolated from the electric and magnetic fields produced by the discharge. In
general the guidelines presented above for increasing radiated immunity will
also provide increased ESD immunity.
It is usually easier to prevent the discharge from occurring than to divert
the current path. A fundamental technique for ESD prevention is to provide
adequately thick insulation between all metal conductors and the outside environment so that the voltage gradient does not exceed the threshold required for
a discharge to occur. If the current diversion approach is used, all exposed metal
components must be grounded. The shielded enclosure, if properly grounded,
can be used to divert the discharge current; it should be noted that the location
of holes and seams can have a significant impact on ESD suppression. If the
enclosure is not grounded, the path of the discharge current becomes more
complex and less predictable, especially if holes and seams are involved. Some
experimentation may be required to optimize the selection and placement of
holes, wires, and grounding paths. Careful attention must be paid to the control
panel design so that it can tolerate a static discharge. MOV, transorbs, or other
devices can be placed between B- and offending wires, plates, and touch points
if ESD shock cannot be otherwise avoided.
A-2
Curtis 1356 /1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
APPENDIX B: PROGRAMMING DEVICES
APPENDIX B
PROGRAMMING DEVICES
Curtis programmers provide programming, diagnostic, and test capabilities for
the 1356 /1356P. The power for operating the programmer is supplied by the
host 1356 /1356P via a 4-pin connector. When the programmer powers up, it
gathers information from the 1356 /1356P.
Two types of programming devices are available: the 1314 PC Programming Station and the 1313 handheld programmer. The Programming Station
has the advantage of a large, easily read screen; on the other hand, the handheld
programmer has the advantage of being more portable and hence convenient
for making adjustments in the field.
Both programmers are available in User, Service, Dealer, and OEM versions. Each programmer can perform the actions available at its own level and
the levels below that—a User-access programmer can operate at only the User
level, whereas an OEM programmer has full access.
PC PROGRAMMING STATION (1314)
The Programming Station is an MS-Windows 32-bit application that runs on
a standard Windows PC. Instructions for using the Programming Station are
included with the software.
HANDHELD PROGRAMMER (1313)
The 1313 handheld programmer is functionally equivalent to the PC Programming Station; operating instructions are provided in the 1313 manual.
This programmer replaces the 1311, an earlier model with fewer functions.
PROGRAMMER FUNCTIONS
Programmer functions include:
Parameter adjustment — provides access to the individual programmable pa-
rameters.
Monitoring — presents real-time values during vehicle operation; these include
all inputs and outputs.
Diagnostics and troubleshooting — presents diagnostic information, and also a
means to clear the fault history file.
Programming — allows you to save/restore custom parameter settings.
Favorites — allows you to create shortcuts to your frequently-used adjustable
parameters and monitor variables.
Curtis 1356 /1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
B-1
APPENDIX C: SPECIFICATIONS
APPENDIX C
SPECIFICATIONS
Table C-1 SPECIFICATIONS: 1356 / 1356P MODULE
Nominal input voltage
12 – 36 V, 36 – 80 V
Storage ambient temperature range
Operating ambient temp. range
-40°C to 85°C (-40°F to 185°F)
-40°C to 50°C (-40°F to 122°F)
Voltage limits
Nominal voltage range
Overvoltage cutoff
Undervoltage cutoff
12–36V models
8.5–40 V
> 50 V
<7.5 V
36–80V models
25–100 V
>105 V
< 20 V
Enclosure protection rating
1356P only: IP65 water/dust immunity (for
electronics)
Weight1356:
0.05 kg
1356P:
0.14 kg
Dimensions (L× W×H)
EMC
Designed to the requirements of EN 12895: 2000, Industrial Trucks
Electromagnetic Compatibility.
Safety
Designed to the requirements of:
EN ISO13849-1: 2006 Safety of Machinery, Safety-related Parts
of Control System, Part 1,
and EN 1175-1:1998+A1: 2010 Safety of Industrial Trucks,
Electrical Requirements, Part 1.
MODEL NUMBER
VOLTAGE (volts)
1356-4101
1356-4102
12 – 36 V
12 – 36 V
No terminal resistor between CAN H and CAN L
120 Ω terminal resistor between CAN H and CAN L
1356-6101
1356-6102
36 – 80 V
36 – 80 V
No terminal resistor between CAN H and CAN L
120 Ω terminal resistor between CAN H and CAN L
1356P-4101
1356P-4102
12 – 36 V
12 – 36 V
No terminal resistor between CAN H and CAN L
120 Ω terminal resistor between CAN H and CAN L
1356P-6101
1356P-6102
36 – 80 V
36 – 80 V
No terminal resistor between CAN H and CAN L
120 Ω terminal resistor between CAN H and CAN L
C-1
1356:100 × 70 × 16.3 mm
1356P:126 × 80 × 25 mm
DESCRIPTION
Curtis 1356 /1356P CAN Expansion Module Manual, Rev. A
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