2012 Annual Report (PDF 5.7MB)

2012 Annual Report (PDF 5.7MB)
university of tasmania
annual report
2012
Ingeniis Patuit Campus
The Field is Open to Talent
2 | Vision and Mission
3 | The Chancellor’s Message
5 | The Vice-Chancellor’s Message
7 | Division of the Chief Operating Officer
8 | 2012 at a Glance
14 | The Division of the Provost
25 | Division of Students and Education
32 | Division of Research
37 | Faculties and Institutes
47 | Advancement and Alumni
51 | Organisational Chart
52 | Financial Statements
91 | Alphabetical Index
92 | How to contact us
You can download the electronic version of this
document at: www.utas.edu.au/university-council
university of tasmania
annual report
2012
This is the report of the Council of the University of Tasmania approved by
resolution at its meeting on 22 May 2013.
To His Excellency
The Honourable Peter Underwood AC
Governor of Tasmania
May it please Your Excellency: The Council of the University of Tasmania, in
conformity with the provisions of the University of Tasmania Act 1992, has the honour
to report, for Your Excellency’s information, on the proceedings of the University for
2012 and to present the financial statement for that year.
Damian Bugg AM, QC
Chancellor
June 2013
2012 annual report | 1
U N I V E R S I T Y
O F
T A S M A N I A
MISSION
The University of Tasmania
continues a long tradition of
excellence and commitment
to free inquiry in the creation,
preservation, communication and
application of knowledge, and to
scholarship that is global in scope,
distinctive in its specialisations
and that reflects our Tasmanian
character. The University will
provide leadership within its
community, thereby contributing
to the cultural, economic and
social development of Tasmania.
VISION
The University of Tasmania will be
ranked among the top echelon of
research-led universities in Australia.
The University will be a world
leader in its specialist, thematic
areas and will be recognised for its
contribution to state, national and
international development. UTAS will
be characterised by its high-quality
academic community, its unique island
setting and its distinctive student
experience. UTAS graduates will be
prepared for life and careers in the
globalised society of the
twenty-first century.
2 | university of tasmania
CHANCELLOR’S
MESSAGE
1
2
As the University of Tasmania prepares to
celebrate its 125th anniversary in 2015, it is
undergoing a major transformation into
an entity equipped to meet the challenges
of operating in an increasingly globally
competitive environment.
MS2 image gallery
The new home of Nursing and Midwifery
1.The refurbished School of Nursing and
Midwifery at the Domain site
2.View from a helicopter of the MS2
construction site in mid-2012
Chancellor Damian Bugg AM, QC
2012 annual report | 3
Servicing the needs of the Tasmanian community will always
First and foremost was the recruitment from the University of
be our first priority but in order to do that in the 21st century
Melbourne of Professor Peter Rathjen to succeed Professor
we need to evolve by restructuring and injecting new blood
Daryl Le Grew as Vice-Chancellor in March 2011. We were
into the academic and professional arteries of this venerable
delighted to find someone of Peter Rathjen’s ability and
institution; by ensuring that we have a strong and flexible
reputation and have since been vindicated in our decision by
governance model; and by promoting vigorously the UTAS
his energetic and inclusive promotion of excellence in both
brand and reputation on the national and international stages.
teaching and research. Peter now has with him an excellent
Change must flow from the top and of course the University’s
governing body, the Council, must drive it. The Council
itself must adapt as well and, to that end, it enters 2013
senior management team and together they will, I am sure,
chart a successful path for this next phase of the University’s
evolution.
in a streamlined form, with a new Chancellor and Deputy
The other key appointment was of eminent Tasmanian
Chancellor at the helm.
Dr Michael Vertigan AC as Chair of the Australian Maritime
After six immensely satisfying years as Chancellor, and 11
years on Council, I presided over my last meeting in December.
It was also the swansong of long-serving Deputy Chancellor,
Rod Roberts, a Council member since 2000. The December
round of graduations, my last, was, once again, a time for
celebration and reflection on the role the University plays in
adding value and purpose to our talented student cohort.
It has been a privilege for me to serve on Council and since
2006 as Chancellor. When I was first asked to join Council, I
saw it as an opportunity to make a contribution to something
to which, as an alumnus, I felt a real debt.
I know my successor, former
premier Michael Field AC,
(pictured left) and the new Deputy
Chancellor, Harvey Gibson, both
College in January 2012. Dr Vertigan reinforced the important
role played by the Board in positioning the AMC as the leading
institution for maritime training and research in Australia.
He has also helped consolidate the integration of the AMC as
an institute of the University, a process begun in early 2008.
This year was the fifth and final year of integration, with the
Minister accepting the successful completion of that process
and indicating ongoing support for the College.
In summation – and I’ve said this before but it is worth
repeating – there are three things about the University
that I feel passionate about.
The first is that it is a lineball call on which is the most
important of our resources – our staff or our students. We are
privileged to have such high-quality staff at UTAS, and to have
such a bright and broad-ranging student cohort.
alumni of UTAS, have that same
Secondly, this university must provide the advantage of tertiary
sense of purpose and I wish them
education to as many young people in this State as possible.
all the very best as they meet the
Tasmania’s future is dependent upon the education of its
challenges facing the University
youth, particularly education to university level.
in the coming years.
Finally, the University, and therefore the greater Tasmanian
They head a new-look Council
community, has been fortunate that the people who have
following the passage through
volunteered to be involved with Council are dedicated
both houses of parliament late
and unified in seeking the best for the institution, its staff
in 2012 of amendments to the University of Tasmania Act 1992.
Those changes, stemming from a review that I conducted
in early 2011 into the size and composition of Council, have
involved a reduction in membership to between 10 and 14,
from the previous maximum of 18. This will allow the Council
to become more responsive to the day-to-day needs of a
and students.
I thank all members of Council, the Vice-Chancellor and
his senior management team, the staff and students of the
University for their outstanding contributions to the successful
year we have had.
university with five major campus locations.
June 2011 also saw the public launch of the new 10-year
strategic plan, Open to Talent, following its endorsement
by Council in March after a highly consultative period of
development.
Two significant appointments during my time as Chancellor
are a particular source of satisfaction for me, and for my
Damian Bugg AM, QC
fellow Council members.
Chancellor
4 | university of tasmania
VICECHANCELLOR’S
MESSAGE
1
2
3
I am pleased to report that 2012 was
a year of progress and success for
the University of Tasmania. With the
launch in June of our strategic plan,
Open to Talent, the University
embraced the importance of
building a world-class
university for Tasmania,
of creating opportunity
for our students and staff
and of actively engaging
nationally and
internationally.
imas site image gallery
1.The Prime Minister, the Hon. Julia Gillard,
visits the IMAS site
2.The Vice-Chancellor cuts a cake to mark
the official opening of a revamped Ref
in Sandy Bay
3.The MS2 site as it overlooks
Bathurst Street
Vice-Chancellor Professor Peter Rathjen
2012 annual report | 5
As we welcomed 29,000 students to study at UTAS during 2012,
curriculum that transcends geography. Nursing and Midwifery
we took pride in our accomplishments. Several indicators,
students moved into our original home on the Domain in
including the prestigious Academic Ranking of World
Hobart in renovated teaching spaces that balance the heritage
Universities, positioned us around 10 among Australian
of the site with cutting-edge technology. Our medical facilities
universities and in the top three per cent of universities in the
in the north were also enhanced through the refurbishment of
world for research excellence. We also enjoyed strengthened
the Launceston Clinical School.
th
performance in national competitive grants, where our
Australian Research Council and National Health and Medical
Research Council success nearly doubled historical levels. The
impact of this will be a higher research output and profile in
priority areas – forestry, aquaculture and broadband (Sense-T).
The success of a targeted approach to improving performance
was confirmed by a dramatic improvement in outcomes from
the Excellence in Research for Australia process, which saw
11 discipline areas at UTAS identified as national leaders.
Peer recognition of UTAS programs and teachers through the
national Office of Learning and Teaching, along with a number
of significant awards and grants, arguably identified us as the
finest teaching university in the country.
In Open to Talent we speak of the benefits that accompany
alignment of UTAS with the community, stating that UTAS is
a forum for ideas, debate and discussion, open to all members
of the community. The Inglis Clark Centre adopted a leading
role in catalysing debate across the island and, together with
our outreach programs, has brought Tasmanians in increasing
numbers into the University. 2012 saw strengthening of our
partnership with the Tasmanian Government, committing
to improved participation, research, internationalisation
and health. An historic memorandum of understanding with
the CSIRO identified specific opportunities in marine and
Antarctic research, forestry and ICT. Collaboration with an
increasing range of external organisations created opportunity,
Despite the unexpected introduction of caps on pre-degree
from large consortia in ACIPA and Sense-T, through to the
and postgraduate programs by the Australian Government,
individual-based projects that are the raw material of our
student numbers from Tasmania and from overseas continued
pleasing improvement with ARC Linkage grants.
to increase, extending the benefits of higher education to a
broader community. Overall student load increased by around
6.5 per cent, we achieved our highest ever enrolments in higher
degrees by research, and onshore international student load
increased by around 3.5 per cent – the latter in a market in
which many others are facing decline.
An expression of interest process saw more than 200 staff
elect to take the opportunity to pursue new paths away from
the University. We wish them well for the future. Looking
forward, we are set in 2013 to recruit up to 50 outstanding new
scholars from across the world. They will not only bring new
ideas and directions to the University and contribute to our
As we enter the second year of Open to Talent, we will continue
accomplishments, but they will also augment and enrich the
to seek ways to add vitality to the student experience and
intellectual and cultural life of our island.
fulfil our ambition to enhance the vibrancy of our campuses
through consolidating infrastructure, integrating learning and
research facilities, student accommodation and social spaces.
The year saw concerted effort, together with the Tasmania
University Union, to improve student facilities, such as oncampus catering, with the opening of the refurbished Lazenbys
and Refectory outlets in Hobart. Similar improvements
are scheduled in Launceston in 2013. The National Rental
Affordability Scheme (NRAS) initiative, with $120m to build
770 affordable student apartments, proceeded steadily, with
None of the above achievements would have been possible
without the solid support of the Chancellor and Council,
the Senior Executive team and our dedicated and talented
staff. I would like to thank the Chancellor, Mr Damian Bugg,
who stepped down at the end of 2012, and acknowledge the
commitment of the members of the University Council. I would
also like to welcome to the University the new Chancellor, Mr
Michael Field AC. We look forward to a productive and exciting
year in 2013.
the majority of these rooms planned for Burnie, Launceston
and Hobart in exciting CBD developments. These will be
undertaken in close collaboration with the city councils.
Investment in infrastructure provides a strong foundation for
Peter Rathjen
our future. Building of the Institute for Marine and Antarctic
Vice-Chancellor
Studies (IMAS) and Medical Science 2 (MS2) facilities in
Hobart continued. The successful bid to the Australian
Government for the $75 million Academy of Creative Industries
and Performing Arts (ACIPA) was announced in December;
this will enable connections across the State and with other
major cultural institutions worldwide, enabling us to deliver a
6 | university of tasmania
Division
of the Chief
Operating
Officer
1
2
3
2012 saw the progression of a number
of major initiatives designed either
to enhance the student experience
on-campus or to invigorate the civic
environment in Hobart, Launceston and
Burnie via new student
accommodation projects.
A University-wide change
program in the form of a
Professional Services
Review was also instigated.
Tasmanian tender winner for new accommodation
Graduation ceremonies in China
1.The Chancellor congratulates Zhou Zhou, who received
a University Medal for high achievement at the Shanghai
graduation ceremony
2.The upgraded Lazenby’s Bistro at the Sandy Bay campus
3.Members of the 2012 University Council, meeting at
Newnham, from left: Prof. John Williamson, Prof. Jim
Reid, Dr Sarah Jennings, Rod Roberts, Rhys Edwards,
Harvey Gibson, Harry Rolf, Damian Bugg, Brenda
Richardson, Paul Gregg, Prof. Peter Rathjen, Dr Vlastic
Broucek, Susan Chen, Dr Peter Davis and Pip Leedham
Chief Operating Officer David Clerk
2012 annual report | 7
2012 at a Glance
UNIVERSITY COUNCIL
Campuses
established under the University of Tasmania Act 1992. Under
The southern campus of UTAS is located on Churchill
Avenue, Sandy Bay. It is approximately 3 km from the centre
of Tasmania’s capital city, Hobart. The Newnham campus
(Launceston) includes the Australian Maritime College,
The Council is the governing body of the University,
that Act, the Council has responsibility for high-level strategic
direction, major financial planning, monitoring management
performance and compliance, staff appointments and the
allocation of funds.
an institute of UTAS, while the Inveresk campus hosts
The Act was amended in 2012 to make the functions and
Creative and Performing Arts and Architecture and Design.
structure of the Council consistent with contemporary
The Cradle Coast campus at Burnie is a growing campus
governance practices.
and is the north-west arm of the University.
Council delegates broad powers to the Vice-Chancellor (the
Faculties and Institutes
managerial and academic leader) to manage the operations of
Arts; Australian Maritime College; Business; Education;
The Vice-Chancellor, in turn, empowers other members of the
Health Science; Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies;
Law; Menzies Research Institute Tasmania; and Science,
Engineering and Technology.
Senior Management Team.
Council is advised by its committees (Audit & Risk, AMC
Integration, Built Environment & Infrastructure, Ceremonial
& Honorary Degrees, Finance, Investment (subcommittee of
Table 1: Statistics at a glance
Consolidated operating revenue
UTAS in conformity with agreed plans, principles and policies.
$545,147,000
All students 29,174
Male
12,165
Female
17,009
Undergraduates
22,757
Higher degree – research
1,265
Higher degree – coursework
5,152
Total student load (EFTSL)
FTE: All staff (including casuals)
17,114
2,711
Finance) and Nominations & Remuneration), its working parties,
and (in relation to academic matters) the Academic Senate.
PRINCIPAL ACTIVITIES
During the year, the principal continuing activities of the
consolidated entity consisted of:
• learning and teaching;
• research, knowledge transfer and research training;
• community engagement; and
• activities incidental to undertaking (a) to (c).
Persons:
Academic (excluding casuals)
1,206
While there were changes in the make-up and balance of these
Professional (excluding casuals)
1,505
activities, no significant changes in the nature of the activities
Financial Performance
of the consolidated entity occurred during the year.
During the year, the operating surplus for UTAS and its
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE
controlled entities was $39.4 million, with a consolidated
Total student enrolments in 2012 increased to 17,114 equivalent
operating result including capital funding of $34 million
and investment income of $31.7 million. Revenue from
student load (Commonwealth Grant Scheme and HECS)
and related grants increased to $217 million.
full-time students (EFTSL) – a 4% increase over 2011. In a
challenging environment, the international onshore load
component increased by 3.9%. However, while achieving growth
during the year, the level of growth in domestic Commonwealth-
The University has adopted long-term financial targets
supported places was below the University target.
in line with its strategic plan. On an annual basis, faculty,
Key revenue receipts in 2012 included:
institute and divisional plans and budgets form key
elements of the overall planning process.
The fiscal plan targets included an overall benchmark
•$217 million ($200 million in 2011) revenue relating to
Commonwealth-supported student places (including
HECS) and related grants;
operating result set at 6% of total revenue. This was
•$45.7 million ($45.0 million in 2011) fees from overseas students;
achieved for 2012 primarily due to strong investment return
• $34 million ($27 million in 2011) in capital income; and
and capital grants income.
• $31.7 million ($6 million in 2011) of investment income.
The net assets of the University and its controlled entities
With the lower than expected growth in Commonwealth-funded
have increased to $831 million, including property, plant
and equipment of $620 million and cash and investments
of $259 million.
load during the year, the revenue from Commonwealth-supported
student places fell below budget expectations. However, a strong
investment result and increased levels of capital income saw the
overall result increase above the budget target.
8 | university of tasmania
There was strong investment performance with the portfolio
and support, including a move to an alternative vendor who will
return of 13.35 per cent for 2012 compared with -1 per cent
prove both cost effective and more flexible. The Student Centre
in 2011. Performance was strong from both an income and
call centre was upgraded to meet improved industry standards
capital growth perspective and the portfolio grew to $227
and to achieve greater efficiencies and effectiveness.
million (2011 $198 million).
During 2012 the University received $34 million towards the
development of the Medical Science Precinct Stage 2 –
$15 million from the Tasmanian Government, $14.7 million
from the Health and Hospitals Fund and $4 million from
COMMERCIAL SERVICES AND
DEVELOPMENT
Enlivening our Campus
Atlantic Philanthropies.
UTAS, through its Commercial Services and Development
Employee-related expenses comprise 60 per cent of total
provision of world-class facilities and services to support all
University expenditure. During 2012 the University commenced
a change program to deliver a revitalised academic and
professional staff environment. The employee-related expenses
include costs for employees who separated under this change
program in 2012 as well as a provision for those with intentions
to exit in 2013 and onwards.
The University Operating Result for 2012 was $39.4 million
(consolidated) noting that this includes $34 million of capital
grants and $31.7 million of investment income and growth.
INVESTMENT IN INFORMATION
TECHNOLOGY
The Information and Communication Technology (ICT)
section, seeks to enhance the student experience through
aspects of campus life.
A major focus for 2012 was the implementation of a new
catering strategy under which UTAS became the first
Australian university to employ a master caterer to manage all
campus eateries.
In addition to improving food quality, range and value-formoney, the catering model has also delivered new venues
providing a diversity of dining styles and experiences. The first
venue to be upgraded was Lazenby’s Bistro at the Sandy Bay
campus. Formerly operated in traditional cafeteria fashion,
Lazenby’s now provides a sophisticated restaurant experience
for staff and students.
Strategic Plan developed during 2011 was further refined
Enlivening our Community
during 2012 to reflect the rapid evolutionary nature of ICT and
In late 2011 UTAS succeeded in obtaining funding under the
ensure technology continues to support institutional strategies
Australian Government’s National Rental Affordability Scheme
and directions. Key to this revision was the aim of continuing
(NRAS) for the construction of 770 self-contained student
the level of transparency over ICT investment, the linkage of
apartments. As the purpose of the scheme is to address a
this investment to initiatives and, in turn, the alignment of
national shortfall in affordable rental accommodation, a
these initiatives with the strategic directions of UTAS.
proportion of the UTAS apartments will be made available
Responsibility for overseeing and managing the ICT Strategic
specifically for low-income students.
Plan is within the domain of the Strategic ICT Committee.
The new single and double-occupancy apartments will
Information Technology Resources (ITR) underwent a
complement the mix of traditional college-style rooms and
significant process of workplace change to reposition itself
to more effectively provide services and support to the UTAS
share apartments already managed by UTAS and will provide
an option for increased independence and privacy.
community. The change has been focused on establishing the
During 2012 site selection for the apartment developments
appropriate portfolios and the review and revision of all staff
created the opportunity for mutually beneficial partnerships
positions into new roles and teams.
between UTAS and local government, while the estimated
We continued our active participation in a number of national
and international research programs such as the National
$120 million budget has been funded by the Australian
Government and UTAS, with State Government in-kind support.
eResearch Collaboration Tools and Resources (NeCTAR) and
The apartments will be constructed at UTAS sites across
Regional Data Storage Infrastructure (RDSI) programs of the
the State according to demand, with 180 apartments to be
Australian Government’s Super Science Initiative. RDSI will
located at the Newnham campus, 120 at Inveresk, 40 at West
provide over 500 terabytes of data storage for the research
Park (Burnie) and 430 in the Hobart CBD. It is anticipated that
community in early 2013. Funding for a NeCTAR node was
the urban locations of the apartments will foster increased
also approved for Tasmania and will be installed in 2013.
engagement between UTAS students and the community,
Several major projects continued in 2012 including the
introduction of a new Learning Management System, the new
thereby enriching the student experience and invigorating the
civic environment.
Library Management System, and ongoing improvements to the
UTAS web presence to deliver improved reliability, performance
2012 annual report | 9
HUMAN RESOURCES
WRS supported all relevant areas and employees with advice
Strategic Human Resources
and industrial disputes under relevant workplace relations
The strategic human resources (HR) initiatives and investment
for 2012 were closely linked with a number of organisational
reforms to support the objectives outlined in Open to Talent.
The development of a draft Our Talent: UTAS People and Culture
Strategy 2013-2016 was a significant step forward in providing a
comprehensive framework for Human Resource activities.
Performance and career development processes were
in respect of complaint handling, grievance management
legislation.
As the enterprise agreements that cover academic,
professional and English Language Centre staff nominally
expired on 1 July 2012, work commenced on enterprise
bargaining for new agreements. A notice of representational
rights was issued by UTAS during December, with
negotiations commencing shortly thereafter.
redesigned to focus on the need to support the introduction
Services and Systems
of academic performance expectations and to better align
The Services and Systems team was created as a result of
individual goals with the strategic goals of the University.
the restructure of the HR area. This team is focused on HR
The refreshed processes will ensure that staff at UTAS are
operations and leads a suite of initiatives, including:
engaged in conversations regarding performance and career
•development and roll out of an eRecruitment platform
development and that responsibilities and objectives are
clarified. New performance and career development resources
for staff and managers were launched in 2012, providing a
range of tools to support career development and promote
opportunities for learning and development. The introduction
of these processes and tools will support the establishment of
UTAS career frameworks for academic and professional staff.
The completion of an Equity and Diversity Review resulted
in a range of opportunities for the University. As part of
the University’s commitment to equity and diversity, the
position of Manager, Equity and Diversity to implement the
facilitating efficient candidate processing;
•integration of Payroll into HR and the transition to a single
pay run to remove duplicate tasks;
•creation of an HR business partner model enabling the
delivery of more complex services that better meet the
organisation’s needs;
•redesign of processes to enable the transition to electronic
processing; and
•production and trial of a series of reporting tools to allow
greater access to data.
recommendations of the review for both staff and students
Table 2: Human Resources Statistics
(as at 31 December 2012)
was created. A reinvigoration of the Aboriginal Employment
Strategy has also commenced.
The strategic HR team has also supported a number of change
FTE
2012
2011
2012
613
608
646
643
Professional
889
861
970
935
Total FTE continuing
1502
1469
1616
1578
Workplace Relations and Safety
Fixed-term appointments
2011
2012
2011
2012
The Workplace Relations and Safety (WRS) team continued to
Professional
work to support faculties, schools and institutes to continually
Total fixed-term
improve their workplace health and safety practice. WRS
Total
assisted in the development of a University-wide WRS strategy
Age
following a review by Professor David Caple.
Academic average age
47
47
–
–
The WRS team provided support and training to UTAS
Professional average age
44
44
–
–
employee safety representatives and assessed health and
Average age
safety progress through the use of the continuous self-
Gender
assessment (CSA) tool.
Female
A strategy to implement the reforms contained in the national
Male
Workplace Health and Safety Act 2012 was developed to ensure
Individual development including technical skills and change
management support has been an ongoing focus throughout
the year.
100
435
445
654
563
465
486
562
570
900
931
1126
1133
2402
2400
2742
2711
2011
2012 ROAD
2011
VIEW FROM BROOKS
2012
45
45
–
–
2011
2012
2011
2012
1264
1259
1506
1479
1138
1141
1236
1232
Length of service
– current position
2011
2012
2011
2012
Acadmic average
6.72
7.03
–
–
Professional average
6.62
6.82
–
–
50
40
30
20
10
presentations were provided.
LENGTH IN MILLIMETRES AT FULL SIZE
officers and workers and face-to-face legislation awareness
150
the designation of officers under that Act, revised training for
Academic
200
2011*
Academic
processes across UTAS on an individual and collective level.
Continuing appointments
Headcount
*The continuing and fixed-term appointment numbers for 2011 vary from those
reported in the 2011 Annual Report as a result of a more advanced reporting
capacity.
10 | university of tasmania
U T ANew
S N E student
WNHAM CA
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18 0Newnham
RESIDENCES
accommodation
for
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ROA
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BUIL DIN
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BUI
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PERGOLA AND COURTYARD
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CENTRAL ACCESS WALKWAY
BIN STORAGE
SERVICE ROAD
STAIR
EX IS
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LAUNDRY
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A concept sketch of the new NRAS-funded,
180-apartment student accommodation
project planned for the Newnham campus.
These initiatives, developed in collaboration with our clients,
the hub clients. Assisting the seven functional areas areas
have improved the services HR delivers by focusing our
(Human Resources, ITR, Financial Services, Marketing and
decisions and actions to enable results.
Communications, Student Services, Research Services and
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES REVIEW
The Professional Services Review project began in 2012 in
collaboration with PricewaterhouseCoopers to establish
project parameters and liaise with key stakeholders to scope
a large and complex program of change. An expression of
interest (EOI) program, enabling voluntary staff separations
and driven by Human Resources and the project team,
Commercial Services Development) to define and socialise
the service catalogues has proved to be an important step in
gaining clarity around the new model. The process has also
informed a number of organisational design elements that will
be encompassed in the operating model guide, a document
that has been created to give service areas and their clients an
in-depth framework to design and agree upon elements such
as prioritisation, governance and engagement models and
reinforce the importance of continuous improvement principles
initiated this process. Members of the project
team
also
COURTYARD VIEW ALONG CENTRAL WALKWAY
COURTYARD–PERSPECTIVE
and establishing a service delivery culture
a key aim of the
undertook a lengthy process to gain Australian Tax Office
registration for an early retirement scheme for academic
staff. These initiatives have made a significant contribution to
the financial health of UTAS and have enabled a significant
program of reinvestment to support the excellence agenda.
review.
In an effort to establish these principles and culture,
project leaders were assigned to 12 initiatives identified by
ISSUED TO / REVISION
REV
07/09/12 ISSUED FOR PLANNING APPROVAL
12/09/12 IMAGES CHANGED
DATE
A
B
PROJECT
PricewaterhouseCoopers to improve efficiencies and decrease1207 UTAS NEWNHA
STREET
duplication of effort across the seven functional areas. Each
Attention then turned to configuring the new operating model
of the initiative leaders worked closely with functional areas to
and, in turn, drafting and socialising formal change proposals
achieve key aims.
for the planned professional service hubs, with formal change
implemented for two out of six hubs and now with a third in
progress. This process has included the decision to move
ahead with a geographic location model for the hubs, and the
creation of a number of new, hub-based roles, to better service
82 Warwick Street Hobart
GPO Box 725 Hobart 7001 Austra
T 03 6231 9093 F 03 6231 90
email [email protected]
Through internal and external liaison with our stakeholders,
the Professional Services Review project will continue to
deliver and implement a University-wide change program
and have a highly productive 2013.
2012 annual report | 11
COUNCIL MEMBERSHIP
Members
These people were members of University Council during the
whole of 2012 (unless otherwise indicated) –
Chancellor (Ex Officio)
Mr Damian Bugg AM, QC
Mr Bugg has been Chancellor since October 2006 and has been
a member of the University Council since 2001.
3 members elected by Academic Staff
Professor Allan Canty
Professor Canty was a member of the University Council from
1 January 2011 until his resignation on his retirement from
UTAS on 4 September 2012.
Dr Sarah Jennings
Dr Sarah Jennings has been a member of the University
Council since 1 January 2011.
Professor Jim Reid
Professor Reid has been a member of the University Council
Vice-Chancellor and President (Ex Officio)
since 1 January 2003. He was also a member of Council from
Professor Peter Rathjen
1994 to 2001 as the Chair of Academic Senate.
Professor Rathjen has been Vice-Chancellor of the University
of Tasmania and member of the University Council since
28 March 2011.
1 member elected by General Staff
Chair of Academic Senate (Ex Officio)
Professor John Williamson
Professor Williamson has been a member of the University
Council since September 2001.
Mr Geoff Piggott
Mr Piggott was a member of the University Council from
1 January 2011 until his resignation on 12 September 2012.
Dr Vlasti Broucek
Dr Broucek has been a member of the University Council since
his election (on a recount of votes from the election conducted
4 members appointed by Minister for Education
in December 2010) on 14 September 2012.
Mr Rhys Edwards
Mr Edwards has been a member of the University Council
2 students appointed by the Council
since 1 January 2007.
Mr Saleh Bintalib
Mr Paul Gregg
Mr Gregg has been a member of the University Council since
1 January 2009.
Mrs Sue Chen
Mrs Chen has been a member of the University Council since
1 January 2012.
Mr Michael Field AC
Mr Field was appointed as a member of the University Council
on 16 July 2012.
Mr Bintalib was a member of the University Council from
1 January 2011 until his resignation on 10 August 2012.
Mr Harry Rolf
Mr Rolf has been a member of the University Council since
11 June 2010.
Secretary to Council
Ms Belinda Webster
COUNCIL COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP
4 members appointed by Council
Dr Peter Davis
Dr Davis has been a member of the University Council since
1 July 2005.
Mr Harvey Gibson
Mr Gibson has been a member of the University Council since
1 January 2009.
Mr Rod Roberts
1 January 2012 – 31 December 2012
The Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor are ex officio members of
every board, faculty and committee of the University, but are
listed here only for those committees normally attended.
AMC Integration Committee
Chair
Mr Damian Bugg AM, QC
Members
Mr Paul Gregg
Mr Roberts has been a member of the University Council since
19 November 1999.
Professor Peter Rathjen
Mr Robert Ruddick
Ms Phillipa Leedham
Professor Geoff Wilson
Ms Leedham has been a member of the University Council
since 1 January 2012.
Dr Michael Vertigan
1 member appointed by Council (Member with
International Experience)
reviewing and advising Council at least annually whether
Ms Brenda Richardson
Ms Richardson has been a member of the University Council
since 1 January 2005.
12 | university of tasmania
The AMC Integration Committee has responsibility for
the implementation of the integration is proceeding in
accordance with the Heads of Agreement; what action, if any,
is necessary to rectify implementation, where implementation
arrangements are inconsistent with the Heads of Agreement;
where such amendments are considered to be of benefit to
Finance Committee
AMC and UTAS, to recommend amendments to the Heads of
Chair
Mr Rod Roberts
Agreement; and to commission through the Vice-Chancellor
Members
Professor Peter Rathjen
Mr Harvey Gibson
Professor John Williamson
Mr Paul Gregg
and the Principal of AMC a substantial review during the fifth
year following integration to advise Council and the AMC
Board whether the vision and purpose of the integration of
AMC as an institute of UTAS are being achieved and, if not,
what action(s) should be taken to rectify this.
The Finance Committee monitors the financial activities of the
Audit and Risk Committee
matters, including: reviewing the University’s triennial budget;
Chair
Mr Harvey Gibson
MembersMr Rod Roberts (ex officio as Chair of Finance
Committee)
Mr Glenn Appleyard
Dr Sarah Jennings
Ms Heather McDonald (until 29 October 2012).
The Audit and Risk Committee has responsibility for the
Risk Management and Audit Assurance Charter, Internal
Audit Strategy and Plan and oversees the outsourcing of the
internal audit function. It submits the University’s audited
annual financial report to Council, receives and reviews the
internal audit reports and management responses, and reports
to Council on both internal and external audit matters. The
committee also oversees risk management monitoring and
reporting.
Built Environment and Infrastructure Committee
University and makes recommendations to Council on financial
overseeing the investment of University funds; advising
Council about levels of fees and charges imposed by the
University; and reviewing the University’s financial plan.
Investment Committee
Chair Mr Paul Gregg
Members
Mr David Clerk
Mr Rod Roberts
Mr Leigh Horne
The Investment Committee is a subcommittee of the Finance
Committee and assists the Finance Committee and Council in
managing the University’s investments.
Remuneration and Nominations Committee
Chair
Mr Damian Bugg AM, QC
Members
Mr Harvey Gibson
Professor Peter Rathjen
Mr Rod Roberts
Chair
Dr Peter Davis
Members
Professor Roger Fay
The Remuneration and Nominations Committee ensures the
Ms Susan Gough
strategic alignment of human resource management and
Ms Brenda Richardson
industrial negotiations with the University’s plan. It also
Mr Leigh Woolley
•determines policy for senior executive remuneration and
The Built Environment and Infrastructure Committee has
responsibility for considering, reviewing and advising Council
performance appraisal;
•determines the remuneration and the renewal of
on the development, approval and implementation of campus
contracts for senior executives, and considers reports on
framework plans; priorities for major capital works; strategic
remuneration of staff employed by entities created by the
asset management planning; preventative maintenance
University; and
program; buildings and grounds plans and design standards for
building works and landscaping.
Ceremonial and Honorary Degrees Committee
Chair
Mr Damian Bugg AM, QC
MembersMr Miles Hampton (Chair, UTAS Foundation)
until 28 August 2012
•calls for nominations, considers and makes
recommendations on the filling of all positions to which
Council is required to make appointments, including
Council itself (for which its membership is augmented by
the addition of members from government, industry and
the higher education sector) and its committees.
Mr Colin Jackson (Chair, UTAS Foundation) from
29 August 2012
Professor Peter Rathjen
Mr Rod Roberts
Dr Ashley Townsend (UTAS Alumni association)
Professor John Williamson
The Ceremonial and Honorary Degrees Committee makes
recommendations to Council for recognition by the University
of individuals and organisations, the naming of buildings or
facilities, graduation ceremonies and other ceremonial matters.
2012 annual report | 13
DIVISION OF
THE PROVOST
1
2
3
The Provost, Professor David Rich, is senior
deputy to the Vice-Chancellor and has
oversight of the University’s six faculties,
and campuses and regional development,
including the Cradle Coast campus. His
responsibilities also include community,
marketing, media and communications,
quality assurance and academic staff
matters, including profiling
and promotions.
Open Day 2012
The Tasmanian Moment? Real Options and
Opportunities for Tasmania’s Future
Frank, Fearless or Forgotten?
The Role of the Public Service Today
1. Second-year medical students
on top of Mt Lyell as part of the
Rural Communities Program
2. Sir Ian Kennedy speaks at a
Denison Debate
Provost Professor David Rich
14 | university of tasmania
3. O
rientation Week barbecue at
Newnham Campus
LIFTING PERFORMANCE TO ACHIEVE
OUR GOALS
identifies the requisite alignments of other policies and
Enhancing Faculty Performance
probation and promotion. Opening UTAS to Talent will continue
Throughout 2012 the Provost continued to work with the Deans
and their faculties as line manager of all six Deans and as chair
of the Planning, Performance and Review Committee (PPRC).
As well as monitoring performance, PPRC takes the lead role
in ensuring that faculty planning is aligned with the intent,
practices to support the pursuit of high performance across
the University, for example in the areas of recruitment,
to evolve as a key reference point for academic activity and
during 2013 the performance expectations will be expanded
to include other areas of academic activity.
Academic Staffing Profile
goals and aspirations of Open to Talent.
During 2012 UTAS launched a series of other initiatives
A key tool supporting the PPRC to assess and improve
to these is the Academic Re-profiling Project (ARP), led by
performance is the use of targeted reviews. The review
process, refined as part of the Quality Management Framework
during the preparations for the 2011 TEQSA Audit, has begun
to generate substantial change.
designed to help achieve the goals of Open to Talent. Central
the Provost, which supports Deans and Directors of institutes
in shaping their academic staff profiles to achieve their
respective strategic objectives. The ARP seeks to enhance
overall academic performance and reputation by ensuring that
During 2012 the PPRC completed the consultation phase
each area of the University has a staffing profile appropriate
of a review of the School of Computing and Information
to its circumstances and by providing an environment in which
Systems. As a result, a major curriculum change was agreed
individual academic careers can flourish.
during the year and work commenced to implement review
A key mechanism for achieving the latter was a new process
recommendations in the areas of research and staffing.
known as ‘Career Conversations’, whereby each in-scope
A review of the School of Management was completed and
UTAS academic staff member participates in a conversation
by December 2012 many of the recommendations were
being implemented. One key recommendation was the
transformation of the Faculty of Business into a single-school
faculty, with detailed consideration of this proposal under way
about their aspirations, performance expectations and career
development. The academic re-profiling framework guides the
conversations and the academic leaders engaged in the career
conversations received intensive training. The project team
at the end of the year.
also worked with Deans of faculties and Directors of institutes
The PPRC also invoked an external review of engineering
adjustments to the academic staff profile will be rolled out
education, research and community engagement across
the University. The review panel visited both the School of
to better plan their workforce profile needs. Resultant
over the next two to three years.
Engineering in Hobart and the National Centre for Maritime
Looking Forward
Engineering and Hydrodynamics (AMC) in Launceston and
Two further elements supporting the ARP were launched in
completed its report in December 2012.
December 2012. The first was a major recruitment project
As part of maximising our capacity to achieve the strong vision
designed to fill up to 50 new academic positions over the next
for the future outlined in Open to Talent, most faculties began
two years by attracting outstanding staff to areas of strategic
to review their internal structures and processes in earnest
need and opportunity. The second was a project to expand
during 2012. The Faculty of Arts is the most advanced in this
support for academic professional development under the
regard, with Council approving a change from 10 constituent
guidance of a steering group chaired by the Provost.
schools to three in late 2012. The School of Psychology
was successfully transferred from the Faculty of Science,
Engineering and Technology (SET) to the Faculty of Health
STAFF RECOGNITION
Science, and SET made good progress in developing plans
Distinguished Professors
for a more streamlined internal structure.
The title ‘Distinguished Professor’ is accorded to eminent
Enhancing Individual Academic Performance
professors of exceptional distinction who have made an
During 2012 UTAS renewed its focus on improving academic
the University of Tasmania. In 2012 the title of Distinguished
staff performance and supporting career development,
Professor was bestowed upon Professor Jeff Malpas, whose
identified as keys to achieving our goals in the University’s
many achievements include an international reputation in
strategic plan, Open to Talent.
research and scholarship as evidenced through research
At the heart of this renewed focus on academic staff has
been the development of Opening UTAS to Talent: the UTAS
Academic, which outlines performance expectations for
academic staff in research and learning and teaching, and
outstanding and sustained contribution in their field and to
grants and awards including an ARC Australian Professorial
Fellowship and the German Humboldt Research Fellowship.
As a ‘public intellectual’, Professor Malpas plays an ongoing
role through broadcasts, public lectures and workshops. His
2012 annual report | 15
research interests include: philosophical topography (place,
agencies matching Bookend’s private funding to help deliver
memory, identity, narrative); philosophical hermeneutics;
its various projects. For example, Bookend and the Department
phenomenology; post-Kantian German philosophy; ethics;
of Education have partnered to provide a $200,000 per year
philosophical methodology; philosophy of language; philosophy
program to work with disengaged high school students on
of history; philosophy of geography; and philosophy of art
research projects in the Tasmanian wilderness. In 2012 this
and architecture.
project directly engaged with over 2,000 primary and high
Distinguished Service Medal
school students in Tasmania, with more contributing online
In 2012 the Vice-Chancellor presented the Distinguished
groups from Darwin to Geraldton). Bookend also partnered
Service Medal to Professor Kate Warner. The Distinguished
with the Australian Geographic Society to provide a $50,000
Service Medal is awarded to an individual member of staff
summer scholarship program that allowed high achieving Year
who, over a sustained period, has provided meritorious and
12 students (and prospective UTAS students) to participate
distinguished service to the University. Since she joined
in helicopter surveys of the Tasmanian wilderness, collecting
the UTAS Law School in 1981, Professor Warner has made
climate change data alongside researchers. Due to Bookend’s
outstanding contributions to the goals of the University,
work, Australian Geographic increased the number of national
particularly in the areas of teaching and supervision, research
scholarship places from three to seven, with five of them
and scholarship, and academic leadership and administration,
allocated in Tasmania. Of the five scholarship students, four
including appointment as Dean of the Faculty of Law. She was
were graduates of prior Bookend programs, and two have gone
appointed as an inaugural Foundation Fellow of the Australian
on to win independent UTAS scholarships for their ongoing
Academy of Law and her research in criminal law, criminology
studies. All of this is important to Tasmania in combating local
and related areas has had great impact not only in Tasmania
problems with retention rates into higher education, as well as
and Australia but also internationally. This international
attracting interest from prospective students outside the State.
reputation is evidenced by her appointment as a Fellow of
All Souls College, Oxford, and her collaborative research
connections with the Max Planck Institute, Freiburg, Germany.
The Vice-Chancellor’s Awards for
Outstanding Community Engagement
2012 was the ninth year of awarding the Vice-Chancellor’s
Awards for Outstanding Community Engagement and the
continued level of interest and high calibre of nominations
illustrate the significant commitment to community
engagement from staff throughout the University. These
awards aim to recognise staff members (or teams of staff
members) who have made an outstanding contribution as
members of the University of Tasmania to community life
over the previous 12 months. The specific contributions can
include a wide range of community areas and can involve many
different activities on the part of the staff member (or team of
staff members). The 2012 award winners were:
(including participating interstate school and community
Professor Adrian Franklin from the School of Sociology
and Social Work received an award for his initiation, direction
and choreography of a major exhibition, The Research Life
of Arts Objects, during 2012. His vision was to engage the
community through showcasing the research work carried out
by schools within the UTAS Faculty of Arts. His method was
innovative: he identified and trained key researchers in each
school to curate an exhibit telling the story of a prominent
research project using objects that featured as the subject of
their inquiry. A total of 11 exhibits were created and displayed
in prominent places in the Arts Faculty, close to where the
researchers work. At the opening of the exhibition (presided
over by Professor Cassandra Pybus, University of Sydney)
guests from the community were invited to explore the exhibits
on display at the Morris Miller Library, the History and Classics
Museum, the Conservatorium of Music, the Entrepôt Gallery,
the Tasmanian School of Art and at a variety of schools in the
Humanities and Social Sciences buildings. The award also
The Bookend Trust (team award for staff in the School
served to honour Professor Franklin for his ongoing public role.
of Zoology: Dr Niall Doran, Associate Professor Alastair
He has completed seven series of ABC’s primetime show The
Richardson, Mr Andrew Hughes, Dr Regina Magierowski, Ms
Collectors, is a regular on ABC radio and has written a popular
Felicity Wilkinson, Ms Ninna Millikin and Mr Peter Harcourt).
weekly column in the Mercury since 2006.
Bookend is a not-for-profit education initiative that seeks
to inspire students and their communities with the positive
environmental careers they can build making the world a
better place. The Bookend Trust is a positive, philanthropic
environmental education initiative for the benefit of
Tasmanian school students and the community. The founders
of the program provide their own time and funds to run the
initiative. This has in turn inspired others, including UTAS
staff, to contribute their own time and money. From there,
the program snowballed, with businesses and government
16 | university of tasmania
Associate Professor Erica Bell from the University
Department of Rural Health received an award for her
consultancy projects for the Salvation Army (Tasmania)
over the past eight years. Projects such as the 2011 Safe
from the Start project have had a major impact on vulnerable
community groups in Tasmania and further afield. Safe from the
Start is an innovative and highly successful, evidence-based
early intervention project that aims to work therapeutically
with children aged up to five years who have been exposed to
family violence, abuse or trauma. The project was developed
in partnership with staff from Swinburne University, and
Dr John Greenhill won the inaugural award for his significant
academic research has been used to develop a unique,
and sustained contributions as University Associate in the
skills-based training resource tool kit, which is sold on a cost
School of Mathematics and Physics. A voluntary position
recovery basis, for social services workers. To date, 600 Safe
holder since his retirement from the (then) Department of
from the Start resource kits have been distributed nationally
Physics in the mid-1990s, Dr Greenhill has not only carried out
and in New Zealand, Canada and Singapore.
a significant international research program at the Mt Canopus
Mr Neil Haddon from the Tasmanian School of Art received
an award for his pro-active role in the Tasmanian arts
community program and his role as Chair of Contemporary Art
Spaces Tasmania. As an artist and academic, Neil Haddon’s
approach to community engagement is characterised broadly
by a concern to bring contemporary art to as wide an audience
as possible. Over the past several years he has been involved
in and led various community-focused activities that include
being: a founding member and Chair of the In-flight Artist
Run Gallery and Letitia Street Studios (a collective artist
studio complex); panel member, Arts Tasmania Grant Funding
Rounds (2002, 2003, 2006, 2008); judging art prizes (including
The Poimena Art Award, Launceston 2009; Tidal, City of
Devonport Art Award, 2011; City of Whyalla Art Prize, SA, 2011)
and donating artwork to the Theatre Royal Giving Program
Applause (Charity Auction), 2011 and the Tasmanian Museum
and Art Gallery fundraiser, 2010. Mr Haddon has also been an
artist-in-residence at Hobart College.
Observatory but has been manager and director of that facility.
He was also prime instigator of the new optical telescope
project at Bisdee Tier, which is aptly named the Greenhill
Observatory.
UTAS Visiting Fellows and Scholars Program
The Visiting Fellows and Scholars Program supports shortterm visits to UTAS by academics, scholars and other
eminent individuals, normally from outside Tasmania. The
program is designed to benefit areas or activities of strategic
priority for UTAS by, for example: strengthening academic
networks to underpin ongoing scholarly activity; achieving
scholarly outcomes (e.g. publications) in key areas, through
research leadership and collaborative research; enhancing
the professional development of UTAS staff through exposure
to teaching and learning leaders; enhancing educational
programs through collaborative teaching projects; and raising
the scholarly and public profile of UTAS. During 2012, 28 visitors
from 14 countries visited UTAS with support from this program.
Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Exceptional
Performance by Professional Staff
CRADLE COAST CAMPUS
The Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Exceptional Performance by
Governance, Administration and Marketing
Professional Staff recognises professional staff that make
an outstanding contribution to the University’s mission and
objectives through innovation or improvement in services
and/or sustained exceptional performance in an area or areas
In 2008 the Institute for Regional Development (IRD) received
$2 million funding through the federal government’s Diversity
and Structural Adjustment (DASA) fund for the New Regional
within the University. Two awards were made in 2012:
Campus project. The project, which concluded in 2012, revealed
Ms Karine Cadoret, research technician in the National
can maximise their impact, relevance and sustainability
Centre for Marine Conservation and Resource Sustainability
(Aquatic Animal Health Group), was recognised for her
sustained contribution to high quality research through her
efficient management of the Fish Health Laboratory.
a number of important insights about how regional campuses
in regional settings. Findings included the significance of
dedicated engagement/business development roles to catalyse
research and teaching partnerships, and the effectiveness of
the Knowledge Partnering approach, which was specifically
Ms Pamela Page, Faculty Officer (Learning and Teaching) in
commended by the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards
the Faculty of Education, was recognised for her exceptional
Agency (TEQSA) in its recent audit.
performance and innovation, which has led to improvement
Over the four years of the project a model was developed
in a number of key administrative processes, including the
development of new digital curriculum management systems.
by the IRD for generating regional partnerships that unlock
talent and create opportunities in north-west Tasmania and
Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Outstanding
Contributions by Voluntary Position Holders
other regions. This model combines a cutting edge regional
This inaugural award was offered in 2012. Voluntary position
ground results for both the region and the University.
holders make an important contribution to the work of the
University of Tasmania. The Vice-Chancellor’s Award for
Outstanding Contributions by Voluntary Position Holders is
designed to recognise sustained, outstanding contributions
made by individuals holding such positions. One award is
available annually.
development methodology (Knowledge Partnering) with an
operational process and governance model that deliver on-the-
Throughout 2012 the institute continued to partner with
others across the region and the University to develop and
deliver research and teaching initiatives relevant to regional
communities. The first Institute for Regional Development
Review, a community engagement document published in
early 2012, provides a snapshot of some of these activities.
2012 annual report | 17
One of the campus projects supported by DASA funding
was the two-year HERE marketing campaign. In 2012 the
campaign focused on innovative strategies to increase
participation from the north-west community in study,
research and campus events. Activities included sponsorship
of The Advocate’s iPhone and Android phone app, live
blogging on campus, advertising on The Advocate website
and development of videos featuring the student ‘heroes’
Participation Project
The CCC Participation Project continued and expanded
throughout 2012, including new schools and working with
younger students. The project increased students’ knowledge
and awareness of what university is and what it provides.
Ninety per cent of these students had no family members
who had attended university. featured in the HERE campaign.
Two hundred Year 7 north-west students participated in a
Courses and Course Development
occupations and their connection with university. More than 900
six-week career program learning about a wide range of
Enrolments continue to be strong in the Graduate Certificate
Year 10 students attended presentations about the opportunities
in Business offered through the IRD with participation from
that can come from studying at university. More than 300 Year
students employed in a wide range of sectors across the
10 students participated in a tour of the Cradle Coast campus.
region, most of whom have no history of university study.
Most had not previously visited a university campus.
A total of 113 students enrolled in the Graduate Certificate
in Business for 2012. Sixty-four students completed their
certificate in 2012 and a further five were sheduled to complete
in early January 2013. A number of graduates from the
graduate certificate are undertaking masters courses and
many more have expressed interest in doing so if they could be
assured of the availability of face-to-face units on the Cradle
Coast campus (CCC). Eight former Graduate Certificate in
Business students graduated with their Master of Business at
the December ceremony.
The IRD’s undergraduate program, the Bachelor of Regional
Resource Management, was reviewed in 2012. As a result of
this review, the decision was made to support the development
of a broader suite of applied science offerings on the Cradle
Coast campus. Workshops and discussions were held
with staff from the Faculty of Science, Engineering and
Technology and other faculties/institutes throughout 2012
In 2012 the IRD partnered with the Centre for University
Pathways and Partnerships, LINC Tasmania and the Tasmanian
Association of Community Houses on the project Developing
Lifelong Learning Brokers in Tasmanian Communities, which
has received a 2013 UTAS Community Engagement Grant.
Research
The campus has secured $100,000 funding to conduct an
applied research project titled Place-Based Workforce
Planning: West Coast Communities. The project, being
conducted by the IRD in partnership with the Department
of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations and the
Cradle Coast Authority, will work closely with West Coast
communities to build future workforce capabilities through
a tailored response to education and training needs for the
mining, aquaculture and hospitality/tourism sectors.
and initial proposals developed. In November the IRD hosted
As part of its community-engaged research program, the
an undergraduate course development workshop at the
IRD also provided research and evaluation support in 2012
CCC, bringing together 20 staff from faculties and schools
to a range of community-based projects including Jobs For
across the University to discuss opportunities to deliver more
Life (JLD Restorative and Whitelion Employment Program)
undergraduate study opportunities in the north-west.
and All aBoard – Building the Capacity of West Coast Youth
(Department of Health and Human Services, Zeehan
Neighbourhood House).
The campus also received a Rural and Regional Research
Grant (RRRG) from the Department of Regional Australia,
18 | university of tasmania
Local Government, Arts and Sport to conduct an applied
organised as part of the Emerging Issues in Regional
research project titled The Rise of New Manufacturing:
Development Unit, the annual Cradle Coast Postgraduate
Implications of Game Changing Approaches for Productivity
Research Conference, From Research to Practice, highlighting
and Skills Education and Training. The project will focus on
the policy and practice impacts of IRD research, and a
the manufacturing sector in north-west Tasmania and
workshop on Knowledge Partnering. Over 120 participants
Professor Janelle Allison has been invited to present the
attended the IRD events, which showcased eight of the 15 PhD
initial findings at a technology assessment (TA) conference
candidates presenting at the conference.
in Prague in March 2013.
IRD Applied Research
In 2012, IRD partnered with others to deliver a range of funded
research projects in north-west Tasmania, statewide and
nationally including:
• Social Enterprise and Local Government, a preliminary study
conducted in partnership with the Australian Centre of
Excellence in Local Government;
•
Exploring the understanding and intent of Tasmanian
The IRD also coordinates the Cradle Coast Cross-Boundary
Research Fund, a research development initiative for the
campus. Three new cross-boundary research projects were
seed-funded in 2012, led by emerging researchers from TIA
and the IRD with their community and industry partners.
COMMUNITY
The University’s position as the sole university in Tasmania
brings exceptional potential for engagement with the
economic, social, cultural and intellectual life of the
non-industrial private forest towards the adoption of forest
island and for connecting with national and international
certification, a study conducted in partnership with Private
networks. Accordingly, the University’s new strategic
Forestry Tasmania;
plan, Open to Talent, identifies ‘community’ as one of three
• Baptacare Orana – Future Options Study, conducted in
partnership with the University Department of Rural
Health for Baptacare;
• The rise of new manufacturing: implications of game
changing approaches for productivity and skills education
and training, a partnership with CSIRO funded by the
Department of Regional Australia, Local Government,
Arts and Sport; and
• Retirement Living: Informing Evidenced-based Policy, a
priorities, alongside ‘research’ and ‘students’. An important
consequence during 2012 has been preparation for the
development of a formal community engagement strategy
and plan.
As part of this preparation, in November the University
hosted a visit by Professor Pierre Viljoen, Pro Vice-Chancellor
(Community and Engagement) and Head of Campus, Mackay,
Central Queensland University. Professor Viljoen is Chair
of Engagement Australia and has a particular interest in
regional and sub-regional engagement. He met with the
study being conducted in partnership with the Local
Vice-Chancellor, Provost and other senior staff and led
Government Association of Tasmania.
three seminars for staff involved with engagement located
The IRD and its local partners are also part of the national
throughout the State. His visit contributes to the development
Resilient Regions Cooperative Research Centre (CRC) bid.
of an engagement agenda for UTAS in line with Open to Talent.
In 2012, IRD Director Robyn Eversole continued her
Supporting Engagement
international research through the Regional Development in
the Global South project, and as a response to this work was
invited to present the keynote address at the Chilean Regional
Studies Conference in November. Initial publications from
the project include an article on Knowledge Partnering in
the African context, co-authored with Kiros Hiruy (IRD PhD
candidate) for the international Community Development
Journal. Internationally, Professor Janelle Allison led the
development of a research partnership with the National
Fisheries Association in PNG to improve staff skills in
applied research.
Four new PhD candidates joined the IRD in 2012: two from the
north-west and two from overseas, bringing the total number
of regional development PhD candidates to 14 (including two
associate candidates).
The University offers competitive Community Engagement
Grants to support staff-led interactions between UTAS and
external individuals, community groups, professional bodies,
business and industry, schools, government agencies and
non-government organisations at the local, state, national
and international levels. In 2012 $60,000 was made available,
with up to $8,000 awarded per project. Nine projects were
awarded grants in the 2012 round and will provide significant
opportunity for the University to engage and interact with its
varied communities. The projects selected to receive support
in the 2012 round were:
•
Is There a Public and Stakeholder Concern about the Use
of Genetic Control Measures for Freshwater Pest Fish in
Tasmania led by Associate Professor John Purser from the
National Centre for Marine Conservation and Resource
The IRD hosted seven events for Cradle Coast campus
Sustainability aims to initiate public and stakeholder
Research Week 2012, including a public forum on the Tarkine
engagement with this issue by disseminating information,
2012 annual report | 19
seeking concerns and addressing potential and perceived
• COMET Community Engagement Tasmania: empowering
risks associated with potential genetic options for the
disadvantaged youth to understand key concepts of criminal
control of Gambusia and carp in Tasmania. The project will
law led by Dr Jeremy Prichard and Ms Charlotte Hunn from
be undertaken in collaboration with the Inland Fisheries
the School of Law aims to: empower disadvantaged youth
Service, Natural Resource Management (NRM) North and
by discussing common misconceptions about criminal law,
Tamar NRM, environmental NGOs and Parks and Wildlife
encompassing personal rights and obligations to others;
Service Tasmania.
and increase disadvantaged young people’s confidence
• Prevent Alcohol and Risk Related Trauma in Youth Tasmania
led by Ms Melanie Greenwood from the School of Nursing
and Midwifery will extend the P.A.R.T.Y. program – a oneday injury awareness and prevention program for youth
aged 15 years and older. The goal of the program is to
teach adolescents to recognise their injury risks and make
informed decisions to reduce them. The program originated
in Toronto, Canada, in 1986 and has expanded into over 100
sites around the world. P.A.R.T.Y. participants spend time
with staff in the emergency department, intensive care
unit, trauma wards and rehabilitation units of a hospital
getting an up-front, true life experience of the impact of
trauma on young lives. The project is being undertaken in
conjunction with the Royal Hobart Hospital.
•
Who needs Shakespeare? Poetry and Prose by Older
in the fairness of criminal law through the delivery of
targeted workshops at Colony 47’s Mara House. The project
will result in the establishment of a permanent UTAS Law
School student volunteer scheme and a best-practice
training package for volunteers.
•
The Curious Schools Project led by Dr Mary Ann Hunter
from the School of Education will provide an online public
platform and an associated exhibition of innovative arts
education practice by Tasmanian early childhood, primary
and secondary educators. The overarching purpose is to
engage collaboratively with the schools and early childhood
communities in Tasmania to make creativity (by teachers
and children) vibrant and visible. The project forms part
of an ongoing international partnership between UTAS
Faculty of Education and 2012 Fulbright Senior Specialist
Mr Arnold Aprill, Founder and Lead Consultant of Chicago
Tasmanians led by Associate Professor Rosemary
Arts Partnerships in Education (CAPE). The project will
Callingham from the School of Education will lead to the
involve seven Tasmanian community partners: six schools
publication of two small volumes of poetry and prose
and one early childhood service.
produced by poetry groups at two residential homes: Peace
Haven in Launceston and Presbyterian Homes at Legana.
Residents will continue to take part in regular poetry
workshops and the project is seen as a small-scale pilot
that has the potential to be further developed.
•
Outdoor Learning Spaces for Primary Schools: Prototype
at Trevallyn Primary School Launceston led by Dr Richard
Burnham from the School of Architecture and Design will
see a group of students design, assemble and install an
outdoor learning space adjacent to the garden at Trevallyn
Primary School. The space will incorporate shade, shelter,
storage and garden-related ‘accessories’. The project is
being undertaken in partnership with staff, students and
• Developing Lifelong Learning Brokers in Tasmanian
Communities led by Professor Sue Kilpatrick from the
Centre for University Pathways and Partnerships will
develop a model training program and resources for staff
and volunteers in key community organisations to enable
them to assist community members to plan their lifelong
learning journey.
• Sounds from the End of the World led by Dr Dave Carter
from the Conservatorium of Music partners with Music
Tasmania to leverage distinct Tasmanian performers and
help establish an online brand and presence for Tasmanian
music. The project will take the form of a 3-5 minute online
performance showcase in the style of Balcony TV and Shoot
parents from the school and capitalises on the growing
the Player, recorded on location around Hobart. Performers
importance of school gardens and their benefits.
will be paired with distinct visual and acoustic spaces
• Mathematical Pursuits led by Dr Tracey Muir from the
for each recording, for example: the Quarry, the Rosny
School of Mathematics and Physics aims to engage upper
primary school students in entertaining mathematics
education on a regular basis. The project targets 11-12
year olds with an interest in maths and will be delivered in
partnership with the Launceston Church Grammar School.
It is hoped that the project will mirror the success of the
science-based Double-Helix Club. Sessions will be held at
the Grammar school and the Queen Victoria Museum and
Art Gallery.
20 | university of tasmania
Barn, the Peacock Theatre, St David’s Cathedral and the
Conservatorium theatre. Ten performances will be produced
in 2013 and at the conclusion of filming these performances
will be compiled and promoted as free content to music TV
channels such as Foxtel’s Studio and free-to-air providers
including the ABC and SBS. This compilation will also be
used to promote Tasmanian music to delegates at national
music industry conferences such as Big Sound (QLD), Song
Summit (NSW) and Amplified (TAS).
Engagement with Communities
in the North
In an environment where increasing cultural diversity enriches
UTAS’ internal and external communities, the Launceston
Engagement and Development (LED) unit has embedded a
focus on building awareness, appreciation and celebration of
newcomers in all activities and relationships.
In formal relationships with chambers of commerce, local and
state government departments and key community groups,
LED is building recognition of the ‘values’ – social, cultural and
connections with cultural and social events such as Ten Days
on the Island, Junction Arts Festival, the Australian Regional
Tourism Conference and Harvest Market.
The Love Launceston – City of Learning partnership continues
to drive its campaign to attract more students to study in
Launceston. The partnership has grown to incorporate the
Launceston City Council, Cityprom, Launceston Chamber of
Commerce, The Examiner newspaper, Scotch Oakburn College,
Tasmanian Broadcasters, UTAS, the Australian Maritime
College (AMC) and the Tamar Valley Tourism Association.
economic – that ‘out-of-town’ staff and students bring to the
UTAS shared its facilities with over 100 community and
region. LED is encouraging community initiatives to increase
capacity building organisations and, by doing so, brought
the warmth of welcome received by students: to ensure they
thousands of local people to campuses, many for their
are safe, their spiritual and dietary needs are catered for and
first time. Events varied: high level and formal strategic
respected and local businesses engage in understanding and
planning sessions, multicultural fun days, lectures, sporting
responding to new markets.
games, political meetings, Film Society films, professional
More overt activities included events like Harmony Day,
development training, art exhibitions, and more.
Amnesty International film nights, World Vision’s One Just
To build links with business and industry, and to promote
World, school and general public forums, public lectures and
Master of Business Administration and business programs,
debates designed to bring the topic of diversity into community
LED hosted events on campus for the Northern Young
conversations.
Professionals Network, Launceston and Tasmanian Chambers
Less obvious, but vital, has been the behind-the-scenes work
with local authorities and groups that can impact the quality
of Commerce, the Australian Institute of Company Directors
and the Tasmanian Leaders Program.
of student lifestyle. LED represents UTAS on the Launceston
More than 50 organisations and 140 individuals visited
Safer Communities Partnership, a collaboration involving
the Human Interface Technology Lab (HITLab) to explore
Tasmania Police, Launceston City Council, Launceston
opportunities for technology-associated economic and social
Chamber of Commerce, Cityprom, the Education Department
development opportunities. The HITLab also continued
and a range of community and youth support groups.
to stimulate statewide interest from schools that have
LED provides opportunities for students to engage in
formal and informal activities enhancing lifestyle, building
students eager to understand associated opportunities
for interdisciplinary study.
employability skills and creating links to potential employees.
In partnership with UTAS Alumni, LED presented the lively
Some of these activities are coordinated through the
2012 The Jury’s Out! debating series to capacity audiences, and
Community Friends and Networks Program, others are
generated lively debate on the topical issues of video media
via direct business links and partnerships, and some via
violence and civil disobedience.
Harmony Day architecture students at Inveresk
2012 annual report | 21
‘Engagement’ has many meanings within a university context.
at the Cradle Coast campus. The campus also sponsored
In Launceston it is about building and nurturing relationships
Prof Shergold’s keynote address to the regional service
that yield mutual benefits; of facilitating two-way discussion
providers’ Linking Up Conference in partnership with the
and understanding and creating an environment where
Burnie City Council.
community members become advocates of UTAS and
participation in higher education.
• CCC Artists-in-Residence
Now in its third year, the UTAS Cradle Coast campus
While many formal relationships yield tangible results in terms
AIR program attracted 15 applications that were of
of enrolments, scholarship support, internships, research
high quality both in terms of academic background
partnerships and the like, many ‘grass-roots’ relationships are
and artistic credibility, but more importantly there were
about building mutual understanding and creating a better
exciting, relevant ideas offering good outcomes for
experience for UTAS students and staff.
campus-community engagement. This year’s winners were
Engagement with communities
in the North-West
Sydney-based artists Heidi Axelsen and Hugo Moline,
Community engagement activities during 2012 centred on a
and functions of the mill and how the concept of ‘the mill’
range of partnered initiatives delivered through the Institute
presents itself in other parts of the landscape.
for Regional Development (IRD). Events focused on regional
capacity building through education, community approaches
to alternative energy, social finance, entrepreneurship and
advanced manufacturing.
This year’s cultural program at the UTAS Cradle Coast
campus included nine art exhibitions in a range of mediums
featuring the talents of Tasmanian artists, students and the
2012 CCC artists-in-residence. The exhibition openings were
well attended with a good mix of campus students, staff, the
arts community and broader community. The depth and scope
of artistic talent secured for the exhibitions program has
firmly secured the Atrium Gallery as a legitimate and soughtafter exhibition space in the north-west region and further
afield. The exhibition program has attracted extensive media
coverage throughout the year, with regular half-page features
whose exhibition, Shifting Infrastructure, documented the
demolition of the Burnie pulp mill, exploring the stories
Engagement with Communities in the South
Inglis Clark Centre for Civil Society
The Inglis Clark Centre for Civil Society plays a leading
role in the University’s thought leadership and community
engagement activities. It has three major functions: to lead
democratic conversation in Tasmania and beyond, focusing on
civil society; to deliver consultancy and advisory services that
build capacity in civil society, in Tasmania and beyond; and to
develop collaborations between the University of Tasmania
and agenda-setters in government, business and industry,
philanthropy and the non-government sector, in Tasmania and
beyond. Inglis Clark Centre highlights of 2012 were:
•Centre director Associate Professor Natasha Cica secured
in The Advocate’s Saturday arts page, coverage on ABC
a partnership in May 2012 between Griffith REVIEW and
television/radio and print media for 2012 artists-in-residence,
UTAS for delivery of Tasmania – The Tipping Point? in early
social media coverage and within UTAS publications.
2013, a Tasmanian-themed issue of the journal, co-edited by
2012 highlights included:
Associate Professor Cica and Professor Julianne Schultz AM;
•
Manufuturing Tasmania: Göran Roos conference and
industry roundtables
As part of the Enterprise Connect Workshop, Industry
•The centre secured project funding, delivered project
design, negotiated programming and compliance and
commissioned works from Tasmanian designer/makers
Intelligence & Networking (WIIN) grants, the campus
for THINKtent, to be delivered as part of Ten Days on the
hosted a regional workshop titled ManuFuturing: New
Island arts festival in 2013;
thinking for a high value manufacturing future. International
advanced manufacturing expert Professor Göran Roos was
the keynote speaker at this two-day event attracting 120
participants. Other presenters included Elphinstone/William
Adams Group Executive Chairman Dale Elphinstone and
Managing Director Advanced Manufacturing Cooperative
•In collaboration with the Faculty of Law and the UTAS
Foundation, the centre delivered the second annual Sandy
Duncanson Social Justice Lecture at the University of
Tasmania, by Associate Professor Andrea Durbach;
•The centre director delivered a public lecture, Children in
Research Centre Bruce Grey, with presentations by
Immigration Detention – What Are Our Responsibilities as
Tasmanian designers, processors and manufacturers.
Australians? in Darwin in August 2012 at the invitation of
• Social Finance and Innovation: Professor Peter Shergold
The Macquarie Group Foundation Professor at the
Centre for Social Impact at UNSW, and Chancellor of the
the Northern Territory Anti-Discrimination Commissioner,
supported by The Northern Institute at Charles Darwin
University and the Northern Territory Human Rights Council;
University of Western Sydney, Peter Shergold participated
•The centre director delivered keynote presentations and
in a roundtable discussion on social finance and innovation
speeches at the launch of the Shackleton Leadership
22 | university of tasmania
Epic Roundtable in Sydney, the Communities in Control
conference in Melbourne, ANZ College of Psychiatrists
annual conference, Tasmanian Leaders program, ViceChancellor’s Leaders’ Retreat at UTAS, Vice-Chancellor’s
Leadership Program at UTAS, MBBS program at UTAS,
Glenorchy City Council education forum, Hobart City
Council, Tasmania Recovery from Eating Disorders
fundraising dinner, launch of The Collegiate Institute,
Women Chiefs of Enterprise, Handmark Gallery, Breath of
Fresh Air film festival, the Launceston Club, and the launch
of Island 130: Tasmania Now;
•The centre hosted a visit to UTAS from Professor Sir Ian
Kennedy, currently Chair of the Independent Parliamentary
Standards Commission in the United Kingdom, as a
Visiting Fellow at the University of Tasmania in March
2012. The visit included public events, media appearances
and private briefings for Tasmanian parliamentarians,
senior bureaucrats, health care and legal professionals.
Emphases were on public sector probity and leadership,
and the roles and responsibility of university-based
Simon Crean launches Sense-T at the Josef Chromy Winery
educators and of clinicians and managers within the
health care sector;
•The Inglis Clark Centre delivered two Denison Debates
in 2012, broadcast on the UTAS website. The first was
Frank, Fearless or Forgotten? The Role of Public Service
Today, with Professor Sir Ian Kennedy, Rhys Edwards and
Media coverage highlights for 2012 included:
•The Prime Minister’s visit to the Hobart waterfront site of the
new home of the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies;
•Launceston and Hobart launches of the Sense-T project,
Professor David Adams in March 2012. The second was
a world-first online sensor network set to drive economic,
The Tasmanian Moment? Real Options and Opportunities
social and environmental benefits for Tasmania. Both
for Tasmania’s Future, featuring George Megalogenis,
featured the Minister for Regional Australia, Regional
Professor Janelle Allison, Rodney Croome and Jan Davis
Development and Local Government, and the Arts,
in September 2012.
Simon Crean;
MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS
Communications and Media
The Communications and Media Office capped an
extraordinary year in building the profile and reputation of
the University with media coverage valued at more than $30
million. In the final quarter alone coverage totalled more than
$12 million – by comparison, the total value of coverage for the
•Researchers at Menzies Research Institute Tasmania,
working with UK-based Dr Elizabeth Murchison, using
genome sequencing to trace the origin of the facial tumour
disease affecting Tasmanian devils to a single female;
•The School of Mathematics and Physics’ role in the
servicing of the International Space Station following the
history-making Dragon spacecraft mission by SpaceX;
•Professor Paolo de Souza’s role in the discovery of
whole of 2011 was $8.5 million.
conclusive proof that water once flowed on the Martian
More than 200 media releases were issued during 2012, with
surface and the renewed interest in his NASA links with
a focus on increasing our reach nationally and internationally.
Efforts to encourage academic staff to contribute original
the successful descent of the rover, Curiosity;
•UTAS leading the establishment of a statewide Academy
material to The Conversation website, of which UTAS is a
of Creative Industries and Performing Arts (ACIPA),
financial partner, began to pay dividends in the second half
leveraging Tasmania’s artistic acumen and the advances in
of the year.
technology offered by the National Broadband Network;
Four issues of Research to Reality, 10 issues of Unitas, two
issues of Alumni News and the 2011 Annual Report were
•The Tasmanian Law Reform Institute’s release of its final
report on the legal framework in Tasmania, which governs
produced by the small Communications and Media team.
the practice of non-therapeutic male circumcision, and other
Media management challenges were thrown up by the two
reports including Sexual Offences Against Young People and
staffing reviews and the Arts Faculty restructure.
Protecting the Anonymity of Victims of Sexual Crimes;
2012 annual report | 23
•Professor David Bowman’s provocative proposal that
elephants be introduced to the outback in a bid to control
invasive gamba grass; and
•Professor Chris Johnson’s multi-institutional team
shedding light on the mysterious extinction of Australia’s
remarkable megafauna.
Student Recruitment and Marketing
2012 saw UTAS continuing its extensive program of student
recruitment activity, comprising school outreach programs
delivered in collaboration with faculties and institutes;
a comprehensive schedule of local and interstate events
and expos; customer relationship management within the
corporate and government sectors; targeted mature age
promotions; prospective student liaison; and an integrated
marketing campaign.
The ‘UTAS Futures’ program was delivered in 23 Tasmanian
senior secondary schools to around 5,470 students, while the
‘Experience UTAS Outreach Program’ covered more than 100
events across 63 schools. The UTAS High Achiever Program
for Year 11 and 12 students saw 60 students taking part – an
increase from 46 students in 2011 and 37 in 2010.
Open Day 2012 saw a change in format, with the event being
held on one day in Hobart, Launceston and on the Cradle
Coast. There was also an increased focus on engagement
activities, which saw more than 7,000 people attending Open
Day across the State.
As part of regular recruitment activities, UTAS courses were
again showcased at a range of career expos and tertiary
study events in Brisbane, Melbourne, Sydney, Adelaide and
regional Victoria. UTAS also hosted the annual Career Advisor
Symposium, with Tasmanian and interstate career counsellors
attending.
The marketing team continued to promote the University and
its courses through a wide variety of channels including press,
television, cinema, radio, online and live events, as well as
continuing the tradition of appearing in publications such as
the Good Universities Guide, the Job Guide and other career
directories.
The University’s social media strategy showed a positive
return, with steady increases in the number of stakeholders
choosing to engage with the University through sites such as
Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.
New initiatives through the year included use of new software
to deliver marketing messages, as well as sponsorship of
media apps for smartphones and tablets.
Marketing and recruitment activity throughout the year
combined to drive an increase of 74 per cent in the number
of enquiries handled through the University Information
Centre in 2012.
24 | university of tasmania
Events and Protocol
In 2012 the Events and Protocol unit transferred into the
Office of Marketing and Communications. The team delivered
an impressive range of events during the year: 24 graduation
ceremonies including interstate and international ceremonies,
over 41 named lectures and public forums, numerous
corporate events and dinners and many smaller networking
and community partnership receptions, forums and events.
Improved communication regarding events and more focused
targeting of potential audiences saw an increase in attendance
at most events compared with 2011, with more than 6,500
community members attending public lectures and forums.
Further developments in this space are planned for 2013. The
unit also continued to oversee the Cultural Activities program.
The Events and Protocol unit provided support to numerous
faculty, institute and school events in 2012 in addition to
partnering with external organisations, including the Royal
Society of Tasmania, the Australian College of Educators,
the Australian Red Cross, the Department of Foreign Affairs
and Trade, the Tasmanian Climate Change Office, the Evatt
Foundation, the Australian-American Fulbright Commission,
the Association of Landscape Architects of Australia and the
Australian Institute of Physics.
DIVISION OF
STUDENTS AND
EDUCATION
1
2
A Strategic Plan for Learning and Teaching
was developed for implementation from
2012, describing the University’s
strategic approach to the core
business of education over
the coming years.
UTAS recognised for excellence in education
Passion and commitment of staff is celebrated
1. Winner of the Team Award for Contributions to
Student Learning (annual Awards for Excellence),
the Bookend Trust
Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Students
and Education) Professor David Sadler
2. OLT citation recipient Associate Professor
Greg Dicinoski
2012 annual report | 25
Strategic Plan
The key purposes of the Divisional Strategic Plan are to:
•Communicate an inspiring vision for learning and teaching
appropriate to the needs of all UTAS students and staff;
•Ensure our approach to learning and teaching is framed
•Office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor
(Students & Education).
COURSE DEVELOPMENT
As the only university in the State, UTAS has a comprehensive
course profile and seeks to capitalise on its unique Tasmanian
by, and in selected areas leads, national and international
identity by providing distinctive courses aligned with the
initiatives;
University’s focus areas and the State’s perceived educational
•Act as an integral component of the University Strategic
Plan and support wider University strategic priorities; and
•Act as a framework for subsidiary plans and policies
through which the strategic goals in learning and teaching
will be realised.
Key strategic initiatives associated with learning and teaching
and the student experience that the University progressed in
2012 included:
•Refreshing the UTAS curriculum, including the
development of course level learning outcomes and
internationalisation of the curriculum;
•Development of academic standards via the University
Standards and LTAS @ UTAS projects;
•Improved processes for reward and recognition to
needs. The following new courses were approved during 2012
for introduction in 2012 or 2013:
•Master, Graduate Diploma and Graduate Certificate
of Applied Science (Specialisation);
• Master and Graduate Diploma of Public Health;
•Graduate Certificate in Evidence-Based
Complementary Medicine;
• Bachelor of Applied Science (Nautical Science);
•Bachelor of Biotechnology and Medical Research
with Honours;
• Bachelor of Educational Studies;
•Bachelor of Exercise Physiology (Professional Honours);
• Bachelor of Health (Professional Honours);
encourage and celebrate excellence, through involvement
• Bachelor of Marine and Antarctic Science;
with the national Office for Learning and Teaching
• Bachelor of Musical Arts;
(OLT) and the development of Learning and Teaching
• Bachelor of Pharmacy with Professional Honours;
Performance Expectations;
•The development of a Student Experience Plan and the
introduction of a Student Experience Committee;
•Introduction of a new student feedback system known as
eVALUate;
•Advanced Diploma of Applied Science (Maritime
Operations – Nautical);
•Advanced Diploma of Applied Science (Maritime
Operations – Engineering); and
• Diploma of Aviation Studies.
•New approaches to Technology Enhanced Learning and
Teaching, including open educational resources and
massive open online courses (MOOCs); and
•Systems development, including new student management,
learning management, and library management systems.
The Division of Students and Education implemented a new
structure in 2012 that: reflects the fact that students are at
the centre of what we do, and that learning and teaching
at UTAS forms part of a whole organisational commitment
TASMANIAN INSTITUTE OF LEARNING
AND TEACHING (TILT)
In 2012 TILT continued to provide leadership and support for
the advancement of learning and teaching at UTAS through:
• coordination of award, grant and fellowship programs;
•development of policy, standards and services, and quality
assurance;
to the enhancement of the student experience; enables the
• provision of workshops and programs;
achievement of the strategic vision set out in the Strategic
• contribution to scholarship;
Plan for Learning and Teaching; and supports an increased
• management of University-level projects;
focus on new approaches to academic standards, technology
enhanced learning, education for sustainable development,
and open educational resources.
The 2012 structure for the division comprised six sections:
• Student Centre;
•exploration and evaluation of learning technologies
with staff; and
• collaboration with other providers.
TILT hosted the successful Higher Education Research and
Development Society of Australasia (HERDSA) conference
•Centre for University Pathways and Partnerships (CUPP);
in July 2012, which brought over 300 delegates to Hobart.
• Tasmanian Institute of Learning and Teaching (TILT);
The Institute also developed a number of resources and led
•Library;
workshops associated with the progressive implementation
• International Marketing and Recruitment; and
26 | university of tasmania
of the new Desire2Learn Learning Management System.
LEARNING AND TEACHING GRANTS
AND AWARDS
UTAS won eight national grants through the Department
of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary
Education’s Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT) in
2012: two as lead institution and six as a partner institution
(see Table 3). This is in addition to the successful projects still
under way from the 2011 and 2010 grant rounds.
Table 3: Successful 2012 Office for Learning and Teaching Grant Submissions
UTAS role
Grant type
Project title
Partner
Seed
In the Beginning: Renewing the First Year Curriculum for Social Sciences and
Humanities in the context of discipline threshold standards
Partner
Seed
Practice to academy transition
Partner
Strategic Priority
Academic Workforce 2020: Framing a national agenda for professionalising
university teaching
Partner
Leadership
A Web-based Nutrition Competency Implementation Toolkit (WNCIT) for entry-level
medical courses
Lead
Innovation and
Development
Development of mathematics pathways for VET students to articulate to related higher
education courses
Partner
Innovation and
Development
School-based pedagogies and partnerships in primary science teacher education
Partner
Innovation and
Development
Assessing Final Year Engineering Projects (FYEPs): Ensuring Learning and Teaching
Standards and AQF8 Outcomes
Lead
Extension
Embedding the Science Threshold Learning Outcomes in Australian Science Degrees
The University also received funding from the United Kingdom
Higher Education Academy to support a benchmarking project
on reward and recognition in partnership with the universities
of Newcastle upon Tyne, Leicester and Wollongong.
UTAS submitted 10 award applications for OLT Australian
Awards for University Teaching in 2012. Of these, University
staff were awarded three Citations for Outstanding
Contribution to Student Learning, an Award for Programs that
Enhance Learning, and an Award for Teaching Excellence
(see Table 4).
This is a comprehensive performance across all the main
Four members of the Maths Education Team,
winner of one of 10 Awards for Teaching Excellence
categories of OLT awards and grants.
Table 4: 2012 UTAS Winners of Office for Learning and Teaching Citations and Awards
Recipient
Citation
Associate Professor
For a sustained commitment to the introduction and use of flexible learning methodologies
and improved research-derived undergraduate laboratory student experiences
Greg Dicinoski
Dr Andrew Seen
For commitment to the development and delivery of programs that encourage interest,
foster pathways and promote success in the study of science by regional students
Associate Professor Justin Walls
For sustained leadership in the design and implementation of curricula and supporting
instructional materials in the area of health science
Awardees
Award
P3 – the Patient Partner Program
Award for Programs that Enhance Learning
The Maths Education Team
Award for Teaching Excellence
2012 annual report | 27
SPECIALIST PROGRAMS
Table 7: High Achiever Program
University Preparation Program (UPP)
2011
2012
The University Preparation Program (UPP) provides a pathway
Number of students
49
57
by which students may return to study or obtain additional
Number of unit enrolments
91
141
support. UPP continued to grow in 2012, with 1,544 enrolments
Number of participating colleges
13
14
statewide representing a growth in student numbers of 64 per
Number of units offered
92
102
cent (see Table 5).
University College Program
Table 5: UPP Results Summary
The University College Program aims to engage Year 11 and
2010
2011
2012
12 students with tertiary study and to provide opportunities
Total Enrolments
664
939
1544
to extend and reward talented and hard working students.
Total Students
303
340
420
85
110
191
Retention rate
61%
62%
53%
Pass (or higher) rate of
65%
80%
80%
Total EFTSL
Through the University College Program, Tasmanian senior
secondary school students may study units at UTAS at the
same time or in addition to their TCE studies (see Table 8).
Table 8: University College Program
completing students
2011
2012
Diploma of University Studies
Number of students
684
847
Three Diplomas of University Studies in Arts, Education and
Number of unit enrolments
814
932
Science were introduced in 2012, with 892 enrolments. The
Number of participating colleges
19
19
diploma is a pathway program designed for applicants who
Number of units offered
26
22
do not meet entry requirements for their chosen degree or for
those who want a more supported or graded introduction to
UniStart
their studies.
UniStart is UTAS’ academic skills orientation and development
English Language Centre
program, and is open to all domestic students commencing
The UTAS English Language Centre offers a variety of English
award-winning transition program runs for five days prior to
language teaching programs to assist students to improve their
semesters one and two, and has steadily increased with 1,409
English to qualify for further study and to enhance their job
undergraduate students completing UniStart in 2012. The
prospects (see Table 6).
program delivered 10 face-to-face offerings during the year
degree-level study. The Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT)
across the Hobart, Launceston, Cradle Coast, Darlinghurst and
Table 6: English Language Centre
Enrolments 2012
Program
Rozelle campuses. The distance delivery of UniStart, launched
in 2008, has also experienced rapid growth, with 548 students
Enrolments
completing the program in 2012. UniStart attracts a diverse
Foundation Studies
62
cohort of students from across discipline areas. Student
Direct Entry Academic Program
283
feedback from UniStart continues to rate the program very
Pathway English
511
highly, particularly with respect to providing students with a
Study tours/short courses (subset of all
Pathway English students)
130
High Achiever Program
The UTAS High Achiever Program provides high-achieving
Tasmanian senior secondary school students with the
opportunity to enrol in university units to complement and
extend their Tasmanian Certificate of Education (TCE) or
International Baccalaureate studies. The program continues
to be popular, with growth in terms of enrolling students,
participating colleges, and unit offerings (see Table 7).
clear understanding of the academic skills and expectations
required for success, and in addition the early opportunity it
provides for peer connections.
PASS
The PASS (Peer Assisted Study Sessions) program provides
students with weekly non-remedial, unit-specific study
sessions across 60 first-year units. The PASS program is the
University’s premier peer learning program. In 2012, PASS
supported 60 first-year units and was on offer to 3,921 students
studying across all Tasmanian campuses. PASS sessions are
led by high-achieving senior students who act as role models
and who are trained to provide an optimal collaborative
learning environment for all first-year students. In 2012, 48
PASS leaders offered over 90 sessions each week resulting in
28 | university of tasmania
over 12,589 contact hours with students. In 2012, UTAS was
Table 9: Destinations of 2011
University of Tasmania graduates
one of only two institutions in the Australasia region to have its
leaders shortlisted in all three categories of the National PASS
2011 graduates
Leader Awards.
STUDENT EXPERIENCE
UG
%
PG
%
Vice-Chancellor’s Leadership Award
Full-time employment
39.95
52.04
Part-time employment
34.24
28.60
The Vice-Chancellor’s Leadership Award (VCLA) is for
Seeking employment
33.29
30.06
students in final and penultimate years and aims to strengthen
Not working / not seeking work
14.93
8.97
a student’s character, work ethic, community awareness,
Enrolled in further study
30.70
22.47
leadership and employability. The breakdown of the student
demographic indicates the program has appeal to a diverse
Of undergraduate respondents who were seeking full-time
range of ages, disciplines and cultural backgrounds, and
employment at the time of completing the survey:
students view this as a strong element of the program.
• 21.69 per cent were in full-time employment;
The VCLA program is delivered across a 10-month period
• 46.99 per cent were in part-time employment; and
and consists of three program components: a series of six
seminars, 40 hours of volunteer work, and a phased process
• 30.84 per cent were not working.
of self-reflection.
The median salary reported by UTAS undergraduate
Student Experience Committee
(mean=$66,134) compared with $50,180 (mean=$52,809) for
respondents employed full-time across Australia was $57,965
2012 saw the establishment of a Student Experience
those employed in Tasmania.
Committee of Academic Senate to ‘provide advice and
Of postgraduate respondents who were seeking full-time
recommendations on the development, implementation
employment at the time of completing the survey:
and review of strategies, policies and initiatives to address
• 24.91 per cent were in full-time employment;
the needs of students and enhance the student experience
• 39.78 per cent were in part-time employment; and
at UTAS’. The Student Experience Committee and its subcommittees have significant student representation and
input. During August, students were invited to participate in
the We are ALL ears – make the most of YOUR student voice
consultative forum in Campbell Town. Opened by Professor
• 34.57 per cent were not working.
The median salary for postgraduate respondents employed
full-time across Australia was $80,000 (mean=$85,851)
compared with $70,000 (mean=$72,864) for those employed
David Sadler, this extra-curricular activity was attended by
in Tasmania.
students on a voluntary basis demonstrating a commitment to
Student Satisfaction
engage and influence strategic directions at UTAS. Students
were appreciative of the opportunity to come together to
discuss ‘bigger picture’ matters and strongly articulated the
The Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) complements the
Graduate Destination Survey by asking graduate respondents
desire for more of this type of activity.
from undergraduate and postgraduate (by coursework)
Graduate Outcomes – Graduate
Destination Survey
(strongly disagree) to five (strongly agree). Graduate Careers
Graduate outcomes have been sourced from the Graduate
Destination Survey (GDS) sent to all 2011 graduates as
part of the Australian Graduate Survey. The total number of
courses to rate aspects of their course on a scale from one
Australia produces indicators of responses in terms of
satisfaction on each of three scales: Good Teaching, Generic
Skills and Overall Satisfaction. The data can then be used
for benchmarking against national averages or selected
respondents, including those having completed a research
benchmark partners.
higher degree, was 2,403, corresponding to a response rate of
UTAS graduates continue to rate the University favourably, with
51.39 per cent. The number of graduates from undergraduate
the CEQ ratings for UTAS 2011 graduates comparable to those
courses was 1,485 and the number of graduates from
received from 2010 graduates (see Table 10 over). The data also
postgraduate (coursework and research) courses was 918.
indicate that there is no significant gender difference in the
reported experiences of UTAS students. Of the 2,691 graduates
who responded to the CEQ satisfaction item, 2,192 (81.5 per
cent) rated their overall satisfaction as agree or strongly agree.
2012 annual report | 29
Table 10: Average score on key CEQ scales
(on 1–5 range) – for all respondents for the past
five years
CEQ Scale
Good
teaching
Generic
skills
Overall
satisfaction
students represent 22 per cent of the total student load and
UTAS hosts students from over 100 countries. The increase
in enrolments is both pleasing and commendable, given
continued strength of the Australian dollar, changes to the
Gender
2007 2008 2009
2010 2011
Females
3.6
3.5
3.7
3.7
3.7
program, and an increasingly competitive international
Males
3.6
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.7
student market.
All students 3.6
3.5
3.7
3.7
3.7
Females
3.8
3.7
3.9
3.9
3.9
Transnational Education (TNE)
Males
3.8
3.8
3.9
4.0
3.9
TNE programs allow students to study a UTAS degree in
All students 3.8
3.7
3.9
3.9
3.9
their home country. UTAS delivered four TNE programs in
Females
3.9
3.8
3.9
4.0
4.0
Males
3.8
3.8
3.9
4.0
4.0
All students 3.8
3.8
3.9
4.0
4.0
Department of Immigration and Citizenship’s student visa
partnership with universities/colleges in China, Malaysia
and Hong Kong in 2012.
In agreement with respective partners, UTAS has decided
not to renew two agreements at the conclusion of their
GLOBAL ENGAGEMENT
current contracts: the Bachelor of Laws at Kolej Damansara
The University entered a period of renewed commitment
to global engagement and internationalisation during 2012.
Professor Peter Frappell was appointed as the University’s
Utama (Malaysia) and the Bachelor of Computing at Zheijiang
University of Technology (China). Transitional arrangements
are in place to support current students.
first Pro Vice-Chancellor (Global Engagement), heading up the
The University is currently exploring a number of potential
new Global Engagement Strategy Unit. A global dimension
partnerships where opportunities exist for value-added
was embedded into Open to Talent, with the aim being to
TNE arrangements including joint research collaboration
internationalise education and research as key priorities for
and increased transfer of students onshore for a significant
UTAS and also for the economic development of the State.
component of their studies.
Work is under way to establish and strengthen existing
international research networks to ensure our position as a
Student Mobility
world-class, research-led university. Partnerships are being
UTAS has more than 70 formal exchange agreements with
developed with the State Government and a range of other
institutions in 30 countries. These agreements provide the
external bodies in relation to international education.
opportunity for UTAS students to have an international
International Education
experience recognised as part of their formal study and
The number of international students studying on-campus in
The University’s exchange agreements also provide for
Hobart and Launceston grew to 3,484 in 2012, representing
international students from Asia, Europe and the Americas
an increase of 5.2 per cent over 2011 (See Table 11). Including
to study for one or two semesters with UTAS, contributing
transnational education program enrolments, international
to an internationalised experience for all students.
4000
return to Tasmania with a broadened view of the world.
Table 11: International students studying
on-campus in Hobart and Launceston
3500
3000
2500
2000
1500
Source: University of Tasmania MIRU data as at 17 December
2012. The figures include all enrolments in award programs
offered on UTAS Hobart and Launceston campuses and exclude
enrolments in English Language, Foundation Studies, Study
Tours and Short Course programs offered through the English
Language Centre, CUPP.
1000
500
0
2008
2009
30 | university of tasmania
2010
2011
2012
Based on an installation by Dr Brigita Ozolins, two areas of the Carrington Smith Art Library at the School of Art
have become rich, warm and lively backdrops to comfortable seating areas
LIBRARY
Staff and students were provided with 24/7 access to the
Launceston Campus Library from September in response to
client feedback and as a result of the success of 24/7 access
to the Morris Miller Library in Sandy Bay, the Cradle Coast
Campus Library and the Launceston Learning Hub.
•Almost 58,000 clients used the Morris Miller Library in
The Library assumed a leading role in the Tasmanian Research
eData Directory Service (TReDDS) project. Funded by the
Australian National Data Service (ANDS), the project will
establish a metadata management service for Tasmanian
research data and create a service that describes key elements
of a diverse range of data stores held by Tasmanian research
entities. This directory service will interface to national metadata
unstaffed hours, an average of 172 visits per night or over
stores and hence provide a more extensive and coherent
1200 visits per week.
discovery service to research data held within the State.
•Close to 8,000 clients used the Launceston Campus
Library in unstaffed hours in the period from September
to December 2012.
The depth of the Library’s e-journal collection was enhanced
by the purchase of a number of online backsets covering a
range of disciplines, from a variety of publishers. The Library
also completed two noteworthy digitisation projects:
•The 100 most often accessed hardcopy UTAS higher
degree theses, and
•The Royal Society of Tasmania Papers and Proceedings
1849-2009.
Digitisation of these unique and important resources will vastly
improve their discoverability and access locally, nationally and
internationally.
The new Millennium library management system offers an improved service
to staff and students
2012 annual report | 31
Divison of
Research
1
2
3
UTAS aspires to be ranked among the top
echelon of research-led universities in
Australia and to be a world leader in its
specialist areas. In 2012 UTAS researchers
made exceptional contributions to the
achievement of our aspirations, creating
new ideas and new knowledge,
contributing to future prosperity
via innovative approaches to the
issues impacting our society
and environment.
Research excellence places UTAS among the best
1. Dr Jessica Walker from the Australian Maritime
College (AMC) is working with Hydro Tasmania to
combat slime in water pipelines and canals
2. Professor Sergey Shabala and PhD candidate Suresh
Panta, from the UTAS School of Agricultural Science,
assessing plant responses to salinity
Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research)
Professor Paddy Nixon
32 | university of tasmania
3. The AMC’s Dr Christopher Bolch (centre) is working
with Spring Bay Seafoods’ Sereena Ashlin and Bryce
Daly to improve critical problem points in blue mussel
hatchery rearing
EXCELLENCE IN RESEARCH FOR
AUSTRALIA (ERA) 2012
Research Developments
National Centre for Future Forest Industries
The ERA is a national assessment of research quality, first
The National Centre for Future Forest Industries (NCFFI) has
undertaken in 2010 with a second iteration in 2012. UTAS
been established with $2.5 million in funding to drive research,
improved the number of research disciplines, performing
well above world standard from 3 in 2010 to 9 in the 2012 ERA
exercise (see Table 12). The areas scoring a 5 (Well Above
development, innovation, extension and training for the benefit
of future Australian forest and forest products industries. The
focus of the Centre will be on new markets and opportunities,
World Standard) were:
the future of sustainable production and manufacturing
• Analytical Chemistry;
techniques, complementary areas of economic growth such
•Geology;
as global provenance technologies and logistics, and the socio-
•Oceanography;
•Ecology;
economic models that underpin future industries.
• Evolutionary Biology;
Additionally, NCFFI is intrinsically aligned with priority
• Plant Biology;
developments in Tasmania, in particular the link between the
• Agriculture, Land and Farm Management;
Tasmanian Sensor Network (Sense-T) and the formation of
• Forestry Sciences; and
a university centre focused on place-based understanding
• Clinical Sciences.
of social change and economic futures. The development
In addition, the following two disciplines rated the highest for
of this centre is also the focus of a unique memorandum of
the discipline in Australia:
our collective research capacity in Tasmania around three
• Fisheries Sciences, and
priority areas: Forestry, Information and Communication
• Journalism and Professional Writing.
Technologies, and Marine and Antarctic Science.
Table 12: UTAS 2012 ERA results summary
(2010 comparison)
Rating
5
Well Above World Standard
4
understanding between CSIRO and UTAS that aims to double
2010
Experimental Aquaculture Facility
2012
Australian fisheries production in 2008/09 was valued at
3
4%
9
13%
$2.2 billion, with Tasmania’s share at 23%, or $500 million.
Above World Standard
13
17%
15
21%
Salmon accounted for $323 million, representing 37% of total
3
World Standard
37
49%
27
38%
Australian aquaculture and 15% of total fisheries production.
2
Below World Standard
16
21%
19
26%
In Tasmania the salmon industry has 1,100 direct and 3,800
1
Well Below World Standard
6
8%
2
3%
Total submitted
n/a
Total not assessed
75
72
104
106
indirect employees, mostly in rural areas. The salmon industry,
in conjunction with the Tasmanian Government, is developing
a strategy to double current production by 2030. Fulfilling
this strategy sustainably requires significantly enhanced
research capacity. UTAS established the Institute for Marine
Research funding
and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) in 2010 to build a world-leading
National Health and Medical Research
Council (NHMRC) Funding
marine and Antarctic research institute in synergy with
The University was awarded $9.5 million in NHMRC grants
Marine Research Collaboration Agreement through which
and fellowships, an increase of 180 per cent on 2011. This result
IMAS delivers research and extension products to advance
ranked UTAS ninth nationally.
the Tasmanian and other Australian aquaculture and fishing
Australian Research Council (ARC) Funding
industries.
The University was awarded $6.5 million in ARC Discovery,
DECRA and LIEF grants in the November 2012 round, up from
$4.1 million in the 2011 round, an increase of 57 per cent.
Australian Research and Development (R&D)
Corporations
The University was awarded grants totalling $3.6 million from
the Fisheries R&D Corporation, the Grains R&D Corporation,
the Grape and Wine R&D Corporation, the Rural Industries
R&D Corporation and Horticulture Australia Ltd.
CSIRO, the Australian Antarctic Division and other agencies.
The University and State Government have a Sustainable
The establishment of a controlled environment experimental
aquaculture facility, supported by $2.5 million of Australian
Government funds and matched by partner contributions,
will provide the essential research capability to both the local
and national industries and communities. This facility will
be an essential component of the plan to double production
capability in Tasmania.
Sense-T
A ground-breaking $3.6 million project headed up by a UTAS
team led by Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) Professor Paddy
Nixon, the Sense-T data sensor network will utilise the National
2012 annual report | 33
Broadband Network rollout in Tasmania to integrate historical,
letters in the alphabet. Prof’s Phonics, being sold worldwide
spatial and real-time data and make it available through the
through iTunes, provides children with an iPad/iPhone screen
web to the community. Over the next five years sensors will be
full of engaging illustrations of items starting with the same
deployed across the island, measuring many aspects of activity,
sound. This app was designed for Australian readers, whereas
including energy, carbon, water, population and transport flow.
other phonics apps often use American accents and words.
Existing sensor networks will be federated into this single, large-
Programs like this have a long-lasting impact on the academic
scale system. Viticulture, the oyster and abalone industries,
progress of children who have come into formal schooling with
e-health, meteorology and carbon capture are just a handful
poor early reading experiences.
of the areas likely to benefit from such a network.
MilliSpotTM
UTAS/CSIRO agreement
MilliSpotTM is a porous polymer-based material invented by
A long-standing successful research partner with the
Professor Emily Hilder of the Australian Centre for Research
University, the CSIRO signed a new memorandum of
on Separation Science (ACROSS), which enables blood to be
understanding with UTAS in 2012. Both parties have signalled
tested with a pinprick of blood (rather than a vial of blood) with
a commitment to expand Tasmania’s research capacity, initially
greater ease and sensitivity than other absorbent materials. The
in the areas of marine and Antarctic studies, information and
benefits are that tests require less blood, which makes it easier
communication technologies and forestry. The two institutions
to test children who have less blood and as the blood is dried
are already involved in research projects investigating changes
it is less hazardous, which makes it safer to test for diseases
to ecosystems in the waters off the East Coast, the transport
such as HIV. This exciting new invention is progressing through
of carbon dioxide to the sub-Antarctic depths and testing
the stages of being granted a patent and the research team is
monitoring strategies for marine reserve management.
working to prepare it for a global market launch.
National Indigenous Researchers Hub
Mars had water
UTAS will be the first of eight collaborating universities to
A huge ancient impact crater has yielded evidence that water
host a hub of a new national Indigenous researchers network.
once existed on Mars. A team which included the University’s
Associate Professor Maggie Walter (School of Social Sciences,
Professor Paulo de Souza from the Human Interface
UTAS) is Deputy Director of the new National Indigenous
Technology Laboratory (HITLab) published the finding
Research and Knowledges Network (NIRAKN) and will lead
that gypsum, a key geological indicator of water, had been
the Indigenous Sociology and Knowledges node. The new
discovered on the edge of a crater by the rover Opportunity,
network has been awarded $3.2 million by the Australian
after travelling 33 kilometres over seven years to the site.
Research Council and will comprise 44 participants from 21
Grass roots growth
universities. It aims are to deliver capacity-building initiatives,
networks and support to Indigenous researchers across a
range of disciplines in Indigenous sociology, law, health and
history, politics and culture.
Redmap
A project that helps the community record unusual fish and
marine creatures in Tasmanian waters will expand Australiawide. Redmap (Range Extension Database and Mapping
Project), a joint project between the Institute for Marine and
Antarctic Studies and a number of other universities, allows
the community to record on an interactive website the fish and
marine species that may be extending their range in response
to changes in the marine environment such as warming seas.
Funding of $300,000 from the federal government’s Inspiring
Australia initiative will fund, among other benefits, the
continued development of a smartphone app to make it easier
for fishers, boaters and divers to log sightings and photos
of uncommon species (instantly mapped on IMAS’
Redmap website).
Reading app
A new iPad app developed by a team from the Faculty of
Education assists early readers to decode the sounds of the
34 | university of tasmania
Researchers from the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture, Eric
Hall and Dr Rowan Smith, have developed a new selection of
grass and clover species that will survive drier times and areas
with harsher climates and assist in eliminating re-sowing costs
and more easily supporting the stock numbers required. It will
improve the ability to feed more stock in the beef and dairy
industries in drier areas. There is worldwide interest in the new
grass varieties and the seed stock is even being sold to New
Zealand, reversing the usual one-way traffic of seed from that
country.
Good Practice Framework for Research
Training
The University of Tasmania has been working in partnership
with Edith Cowan University on the development of a Higher
Degree Research (HDR) Good Practice Framework (OLT
funded project). Nine dimensions in research training have
been identified and have been endorsed by the Deans and
Directors of Graduate Studies. The Chair of the Higher
Education Standards Panel, Professor Alan Robson, met
with representatives from UTAS and Edith Cowan late
in 2012 to consider using the framework for benchmarking
across the sector.
HIGHER DEGREE BY RESEARCH (HDR)
Graduates continued to contribute to the strengthening of UTAS’
research profile in 2012 with a 30 per cent increase in HDR
commencements. Of those new commencers, nearly half are
international students. The Graduate Research Office’s focus on
supporting students through to completion is paying dividends,
with completions up by 13 per cent on 2011.
•At the end of 2012, UTAS had 1,132 candidates enrolled,
including 653 full-time, 313 part-time, 68 suspended, and
98 with thesis submitted, pending examination.
•315 HDR candidates commenced in 2012, an increase of
30 per cent on the previous year.
•42 per cent of these new candidates were international
students.
•There were 204 completions, comprising 166 PhDs, 32 masters
and six professional doctorates.
•The average completion time for a research PhD completed
in 2012 was 3.9 years; and 2.6 years for a research masters.
HIGHER EDUCATION RESEARCH DATA
COLLECTION (HERDC)
Prof Emily Hilder is the inventor of a porous polymer-based
material for blood testing
The University reports to the Australian Government annually on
research activity for the previous year, with 2011 data reported in
2012. The time series data are shown in Table 13.
•Total income increased by 5.8 per cent, and UTAS maintained
10th position nationally on this measure (Table 13).
•2011 saw a significant improvement in the important area of
Category 1 research income, regaining its percentage of total
UTAS income lost in the previous two years (Figure 1).
Table 13: 2011 Higher Education Research Data Collection (HERDC)
Research Income
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
Australian Competitive Grants (Cat 1)
$28,981,099
$33,549,701
$26,400,322
$27,342,389
$34,967,435
Other Public Sector Funding (Cat 2)
$16,889,565
$17,139,359
$18,834,064
$20,482,618
$18,526,227
Industry & Other (Cat 3)
$11,223,520
$13,022,675
$15,625,006
$19,126,791
$18,255,290
$6,624,607
$6,897,498
$6,988,697
$8,482,014
$7,643,817
$63,718,790
$70,609,233
$67,848,090
$75,433,811
$79,392,769
CRC (Cat 4)
Total
Research Publications Journal Articles
555.08
588.09
602.61
575.11
701.32
Conferences
137.59
136.45
128.65
118.6
117.42
Chapters
102.68
76.1
92.41
68.82
105.88
Books
12.08
18.42
10.03
10.83
19.46
Total
807.43
819.06
833.7
773.36
944.08
815
816
786
738
129
140
192
217
RHD Load
Total
RHD Completions
Total
2012 annual report | 35
is a return to expected levels. UTAS has 2.3 per cent of
•Total weighted publication increased by 25 per cent, our
highest recorded result to date. This result improved our
completions nationally, compared with 2.9 per cent in the
national ranking to 21 (Figure 2).
previous year.
•Higher than usual completions in the 2009-10 period also
•2011 HDR student completions fell by 17 per cent to 180.
This decline was expected following a concerted program
contributed to a drop in HDR load to 541, down 7.5 per cent.
in 2008 and 2009 to manage to completion long-term
Nationally, completions increased by 7 per cent and load by
candidates. The success of this program drove up our
3 per cent.
completions for 2009 and 2010 (Figure 3) and the 2011 result
Figure 1 – UTAS income by category
80
70
$ Million
60
CRC
50
Total Industry
and Other Funding
40
30
Total Other Public
Sector Funding
20
10
0
Australian
Competitive Grants
2000
2001
2001
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
Figure 2 – Publication growth (indexed 2001 = 1.0)
2.4
Go8
2.2
2.0
National
(excl Go8, UTAS)
1.8
National
1.6
UTAS
1.4
1.2
1.0
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
Figure 3 – UTAS higher degree by research completions and load
250
800
Load - High cost
700
200
600
500
150
400
100
300
200
50
100
0
2004
2005
36 | university of tasmania
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
0
Load - Low cost
Completions
FACULTIES
AND
INSTITUTES
1
2
3
Awards and grants from the Australian
Government’s Office for Learning and
Teaching in 2012 further enhanced UTAS’
leadership in education in Australia.
Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA)
results rated research by our faculties and
institutes as world-standard or better
in 16 broad fields.
New director welcomed to Menzies Research Institute
World-class arts development for Tasmania
1. Dr Penny Edmonds, recipient of the first ARC Future
Fellowship to be hosted by Arts
2. MBA (Agricultural Innovation) scholarship winner
Brett Hall
3. Professor Chris Johnson has investigated the
extinction of Australia’s megafauna
4
4. Assoc Prof Ruth Fielding-Barnsley shows young reader
Laura Hayes the basics of learning phonics with the
new iPad app Profs’ Phonics
2012 annual report | 37
FACULTY OF ARTS
The Faculty of Arts brings together 13 academic programs.
During 2012 these were restructured from 10 schools into
three:
•The School of Humanities, comprising: Aboriginal
July. Once completed, the $75.2 million project will enable the
relocation of the University’s Conservatorium of Music while
leveraging the existing artistic expertise of the Faculty to
deliver a state-of-the-art education facility supporting creative
industries including performing arts, new media, events
management and digital technologies. Students will be able
Studies; Asian Languages and Studies; English; European
to access programs across the State including the Inveresk
Languages and Studies; History and Classics; and
Cultural Precinct in Launceston, the UTAS School of Visual
Philosophy and Gender Studies;
and Performing Arts along with the School of Architecture
•School of Social Sciences, comprising: Journalism, Media
and Design.
and Communications; Politics and International Relations;
During 2012 the Faculty initiated a curriculum review centred
Sociology and Criminology; and Social Work; and
on student learning outcomes and clearer articulation of the
•Tasmanian College of the Arts, comprising: Art; Music;
and Theatre.
The faculty restructure also involved renewing the faculty
leadership team, with the external appointments of two new
Heads of School and internal appointments of new Heads and
Associate Deans to commence in 2013. The restructure better
aligns the Faculty’s research and teaching, promotes academic
collaboration, and provides a better student experience.
The Faculty of Arts reinforced its status as one of Australia’s
leading university faculties with significant research
achievements across all disciplines.
rationale for the curriculum. This will allow for a more detailed
review of specific units during 2013.
The Faculty’s activities extend well into the community. The
art, music and theatre programs, in particular, regularly hold
exhibitions, concerts and performances that bring the best
of creative arts to the Tasmanian community. In addition,
they have developed programs that create opportunities for
Tasmanian school students to engage in music and art either
on campus or in their schools. Members of the Faculty serve on
state and national government bodies, such as the Tasmanian
Arts Advisory Board, National Enabling Technology Strategy
Stakeholder Advisory Council and the Australian Health
Key among these was the successful Australian Research
Ethics Committee. Recognising the role of Arts academics
Council (ARC) Future Fellowship awards for Professor Keith
in contributing to public debate, they regularly present (and
Jacobs (Social Sciences) and Dr Elle Leane (Humanities) and
organise) public lectures on topics ranging from classical
the awarding of a $3.2 million ARC Special Research Initiative
archaeology through to climate change and the global economy.
for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Research Network
and the National Indigenous Research and Knowledges
Network (see page 34 for more detail).
In July 2012 the Faculty mourned the passing of Emeritus
Professor Vincent McGrath, former Head of School (Visual
and Performing Arts). For more than three decades Professor
In addition, arts academics were awarded four new ARC
McGrath was a leading presence of the University in northern
Discovery Grants, and one ARC Linkage Grant. Arts
Tasmania, having played a significant role in developing the
researchers continue to engage in collaborative research
cultural precinct at Inveresk.
with state and commonwealth governments and industry
securing more than $1 million in contract research funding.
FACULTY OF BUSINESS
Research undertaken in the Faculty again demonstrated its
The Faculty of Business is proud to be a provider of world-class
quality through the 2012 ARC Excellence for Research (ERA) in
Australia ratings, with all 2 rated Fields of Research related to
arts programs being rated as at or above world standard and
two 4 rated Fields of Research – Journalism and Professional
Writing and Historical Studies – rated as above world
standard.
teaching, learning and research and offers undergraduate and
postgraduate programs at the Tasmanian campuses, as well
as programs in Sydney, China and Malaysia. The Faculty is
committed to extending the boundaries of business education
through the development of a stimulating, challenging and
rewarding teaching environment, inclusive of traditional and
The Faculty continues to attract a diverse range of students
emerging technologies and enriched by diversity. It offers
undertaking courses in humanities, social sciences, creative and
flexible degree structures and a wide spectrum of business
performing arts, with 2,848 EFTSL (equivalent full-time student
knowledge areas, which enables students to tailor a degree
load) in 2012, including 97 honours students, 176 postgraduate
to suit their interests and career aspirations as well as
students and 154 higher degree by research candidates. In
structure their study around their professional and personal
addition, 171 international students studied in Arts.
commitments.
In December the University secured $37 million in federal
In the postgraduate arena, the Faculty’s newest MBA
funding from the competitive Education Investment Fund
(Agricultural Innovation) program welcomed its first cohort
(EIF) Regional Priorities Round for the statewide Academy of
of students. The degree is a joint initiative of the Faculty
Creative Industries and Performing Arts. This was in addition
of Business, the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture (TIA)
to a $15.2 million commitment from the State Government in
and the State Government who provided 10 scholarships
38 | university of tasmania
as part of their Economic Development Plan. This program
Australia. The revisions responded to comments from a
combines management skills and qualifications with those
number of reviewers and the report is awaiting release by the
in the specific field of Agricultural Innovation, but is also
Australian Government.
available in other areas of speciality including Corporate
Governance; Environmental Management and Planning;
Heritage Management; Human Resource Management;
Regional Innovation; and Tourism Management. The Faculty
also continued its commitment to regional education and
development through the delivery of the popular Graduate
Certificate of Business on the Cradle Coast campus and
offered the new MBA Start program in Launceston. Designed
for people with work experience, but in need of additional
knowledge and skills, the MBA Start provides the perfect
pathway into the full MBA.
The Faculty of Business continued its strong engagement
with the Tasmanian community, providing innovative learning
opportunities and university experience to primary and
secondary students. For the second year the Faculty, in
conjunction with the Mat Goggin Foundation, hosted Camp
Communiversity for Young Entrepreneurs. In another exciting
venture the Faculty of Business together with the Australian
Maritime College hosted the NEXTgen Business Team
Challenge. In addition, the School of Economics and Finance
program, Finance in Primary Schools, continued to grow. This
community outreach activity takes academics into primary
In another innovative industry-inspired initiative the Faculty
school classrooms to teach basic financial literacy tools
of Business constituted a new institute in 2012 to further
concerning money, financial institutions and risk and return.
its strategic partnerships with health service organisations
around Australia. The Master and Doctor of Health Services
Management are the newest in the stable of postgraduate
Other highlights for the Faculty of Business included:
•Graduations and celebrations in Shanghai, Kuwait
degrees offered by the Faculty through the Australian Institute
and Hong Kong for our offshore students in partner
of Health Services Management and are an excellent example
universities. Another five-year teaching and research
of university–industry collaboration.
partnership agreement was signed with Shanghai Ocean
In the undergraduate area the Faculty works hard to provide
educational experiences and opportunities that will prepare
Fisheries University (SOU);
•Trialling a trimester system in Hobart whereby students
students for future accomplishment. One of these areas is the
fast-track their studies by enrolling in units over a ‘third’
Corporate Internship Program. This unique program enables
semester during the traditional summer break.
students to apply their learning and gain practical experience
in real-world situations and businesses, and potentially leads
to employment opportunities. Forty-six students undertook an
internship as part of their studies in 2012 and interned with
companies as diverse as MONA and Country Club Tasmania,
festivals such as Soundscape and Ten Days on the Island,
as well as local and state government departments around
Tasmania.
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
In the QS World Rankings of universities and their faculties the
Faculty of Education, out of some 700 universities worldwide,
achieved an international reputation in the band of 101-150
against its peers. This places the Faculty of Education in the
top 15 to 20 per cent of all teacher education and educational
studies institutions in the world. In the Excellence for Research
The Faculty continued to expand and improve its profile
for ERA results the Faculty achieved a world rating of 3 in the
in research excellence through publication and grants.
specialisation category and a national average rating across
Professor Dungey from the School of Economics and Finance
the other categories.
was successful in obtaining an Australian Research Council
In 2012 Dr Karen Swabey, who has held the position
Discovery Grant for Detecting Financial Contagion Using
High Frequency Data ($471,000), as well as a grant from the
Centre for International Finance and Regulation for Detecting
Systemically Important Risk ($225,000), both for 2013-2015. Dr
Alexandre Dimitriev was awarded a DECRA for his project,
Understanding the effects of sovereign default risk on economic
fluctuations in open economies ($375,000). Professors Miles
and Grimmer from the School of Management, in collaboration
with Deakin University were awarded a Deakin University
Centre for Sustainable and Responsible Organisations
(CSaRO) grant for Internalising environmental costs using
lifecycle pricing, the data from which will be collected in the
US and combined with existing Australian data using a UTAS
REGS grant. The Australian Innovation Research Centre
(AIRC) submitted a revised final report, Diversifying Tasmania’s
Economy: Analysis and Options, to Regional Development
of academic coordinator, was appointed to the position
of Deputy Head of School.
In 2012 students in the Faculty of Education completed 11
higher degrees by research (eight PhDs, two EdDs and
one MEd [Research]). Under the leadership and guidance
of Associate Dean (Research), Associate Professor Kim
Beswick, the Faculty held its second Research Summer. This
program provides activities designed to develop networks
among students and academic staff, facilitate supervisor/
student interaction and joint publications, and provide a
range of research workshops for both staff and students.
The program covers almost every stage of the research
process and is aimed at helping all researchers to make
important advances in their work and fostering motivation
and inspiration.
2012 annual report | 39
Faculty of Education academic staff produced 42 refereed
journal articles, 27 refereed conference papers, 16 book
FACULTY OF HEALTH SCIENCE
chapters and two monographs in 2012. The Faculty’s annual
In 2012 the Dean of the Faculty of Health Science, Professor
book launch was held on August 30 where guest speaker,
Raymond Playford, returned to the United Kingdom and
Senator Christine Milne, officially launched and celebrated
Professor Denise Fassett, then Deputy Dean, was appointed
seven books authored and/or edited by staff during 2011/12.
Acting Dean. Professor James Vickers was appointed to the
A particular research success was the development of a new
iPhone/iPad app, Profs’ Phonics, by Professor Ian Hay and
Associate Professor Ruth Fielding-Barnsley as a result of their
research into how children learn to read. The Department of
Education Secretary, Mr Colin Petitt, officially launched the app
in March at the Goodwood Primary School in Hobart. The launch
gained good media coverage to lift the profile of the Faculty and
University. The application is available through iTunes.
position of Acting Deputy Dean and was re-appointed to the
position of Head of School of Medicine for 2013-2015. Professor
Vickers is also co-director of the Wicking Dementia Research
and Education Centre. Professor Isabelle Ellis was Acting
Head of the School of Nursing and Midwifery throughout
2012 and held this position until the appointment of Professor
Steven Campbell in January 2013. Another significant
appointment for the Faculty of Health Science was the
appointment of Professor Justin Walls as full-time Associate
Research grants awarded to the Faculty of Education in 2012
Dean, Learning and Teaching. Professor Dominic Geraghty was
included:
appointed on a fractional basis to the position of Deputy Dean,
•A University Learning and Teaching Committee (ULTC)
Teaching Development Grant ($7,000) awarded to the Maths
Graduate Research for UTAS. Professor Geraghty will provide
operational leadership in graduate research.
Team, led by Associate Professor Rosemary Callingham.
The move of the School of Psychology from the Faculty
Their project is Developing Lecturer Pedagogical Content
of Science, Engineering and Technology to the Faculty of
Knowledge through Focussed Professional Conversations;
Health Science was confirmed and initiated during 2012,
•A ULTC Teaching Development Grant ($3,000) awarded to
for completion in 2013.
Dr Sharon Pittaway (lead researcher) and her team. Their
A number of exciting capital works developments within the
project is Student engagement community of practice: A
Faculty of Health Science occurred in 2012, including:
learning conversation approach;
•An Australian Research Council Discovery Grant ($181,000
over three years) was awarded to Associate Professor
•The opening of the Launceston Clinical School by the
Prime Minister, Julia Gillard. Based in the Launceston
Integrated Care Centre, adjacent to the Launceston
Rosemary Callingham and her team, comprising Associate
Professor Helen Chick, Associate Professor Kim Beswick,
Professor Tom Nicholson (external) and Professor Ian Hay.
Their project is Powerful knowledge: mapping out standards
of teachers’ knowledge for teaching mathematics and
English to achieve the goals of the curriculum.
In 2012 Dr Tim Moss, won a scholarship offered by UTAS to
attend the 2013 Tasmanian Leaders Program. In addition the
Faculty is sponsoring the Teaching Excellence Award within
the Southern Cross Young Achievers Awards. Its patron is
the Hon. Lara Giddings, Premier of Tasmania, and the award
is open to young Tasmanian teachers who make a positive
contribution to youth and their community. In addition, faculty
officer Pamela Page received a Vice-Chancellor’s Award for
Exceptional Performance by a professional staff member
and the Faculty of Education Maths Team received an award
for teaching excellence in the 2012 Australian Awards for
University Teaching. This award is hosted and supported by
the Office for Learning and Teaching and the award includes
national recognition and $25,000.
In 2012 the Faculty of Education was enriched by visits from
four international academics: Professor Tom Nicholson from
Massey University in New Zealand, Professor David Berliner
from Arizona State University, and Dr Tom Potter and Dr Teresa
Socha from Lakehead University in Canada.
40 | university of tasmania
MBA (Agricultural Innovation) scholarship winner Anthony Brandsema
General Hospital, the school’s site further enhances the
•The Patient Partner Program (P3) led by the Launceston
University’s presence in Launceston and the Faculty’s
Clinical School received an Office for Learning and Teaching
connectivity to the Launceston General Hospital;
Award for programs that enhance learning. Since 2005, the P3
• The Medical Science 2 building, on the edge of Hobart’s
CBD, made great strides towards completion;
•Significant renovations to the Medical Science 1 building
commenced, with both buildings having a completion date
of April 2013; and
•A new home for the School of Nursing and Midwifery was
established on the Hobart Domain, the original UTAS
home. The new SNM building will form part of a much
broader UTAS presence on the Domain which will, over
time, include significant renovations to the historically
significant Domain House.
Growth in research output in the Faculty of Health Science
was achieved across a number of areas, including publications
and research higher degree commencement and completion
figures. In collaboration with the Menzies Research Institute
Tasmania the Faculty gained an Australian Research Council
Discovery Grant to continue research in to Tasmanian devil
program has provided a learning platform for senior medical
students to acquire and develop patient-centred consulting
skills by engaging with more than 370 volunteer patients;
•Associate Professor Erica Bell received the ViceChancellor’s Award for Outstanding Community
Engagement, recognising her research into, and national
implementation of, an intervention for small children
exposed to domestic violence;
•Dr Rosanne Guijt, of the School of Pharmacy, won the
prestigious Young Tall Poppy Science Award for her work
developing and manufacturing Lab on a Chip systems, with
applications ranging from chemical and pharmaceutical
analysis to agriculture and cell culture analysis; and
•Mr Benjamin Hunn, a final-year medical student, was
awarded the Tasmanian Rhodes Scholarship.
FACULTY OF LAW
facial tumour disease ($380,000 over three years). In addition,
2012 confirmed the Law Faculty’s strong research standing:
the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre and
our ranking improved to above world standard in the 2012
National Health and Medical Research Centre for Research
Excellence in Research for Australia and now sits among
Excellence for Chronic Respiratory Disease and Lung Ageing
Group of Eight universities. The QS World University
(‘Breathe Well’) moved from the Menzies Research Institute
Rankings were also positive, placing the Faculty in the top
Tasmania into the School of Medicine. The movement of
12 law schools in Australia and the top 200 internationally.
these key research areas into the Faculty provides a strong
The Faculty achieved strong research outputs in a range of
foundation upon which to build future research success.
journals including contributions to Science, British Journal of
Other major developments in 2012 included:
•$3 million of renewed funding over five years for the
Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre,
provided by the JO and JR Wicking Trust (ANZ Trustees);
• Two significant programs within the Wicking Centre: firstly,
Criminology, Public Law and the Medical Law Review. Dr Jeremy
Prichard was awarded the 2012 Taylor and Francis Prize for
the best paper by a new researcher by the Higher Education
Research and Development Society of Australasia. Professor
Kate Warner secured ARC Discovery Grant funding to use
jurors to gauge informed public opinion on sentencing, to
the Associate Degree in Dementia Care commenced,
better inform policy makers and judicial officers. Professor Jan
attracting 180 students in its first intake. Secondly, the
McDonald secured a grant from the National Climate Change
Teaching Aged Care Facility Program was rolled out
Adaptation Research Facility for her project, Supporting
with financial support of $1.52 million from Teaching and
evidence-based adaptation decision-making in Tasmania.
Research Aged Care Facilities, of the Department of
The Faculty of Law’s research expertise has been recognised
Health and Ageing, and funding from industry partners;
•Funding of $1 million was secured for the development
in national and state committee appointments: Professor
Dianne Nicol has been appointed to an expert panel to
of the Academic Health Science Precinct. The virtual
review pharmaceutical patenting in Australia; Distinguished
‘precinct’ will bring together the Faculty with the Royal
Professor Don Chalmers was appointed chair of the
Hobart Hospital, the Menzies Research Institute Tasmania
Independent Advisory Panel for the Australian Breast Cancer
and Tasmanian health service providers to collaborate
Tissue Bank; Professor Jan McDonald was appointed to the
across the areas of teaching, training and research;
Tasmanian Climate Action Council, and Professor Margaret
•The University Department of Rural Health collaborated
with the universities of Adelaide and Western Australian
on a successful bid for an Australian Primary Health
Care Research Institute Centre of Research Excellence in
primary oral health care ($2.5 million over four years). The
researchers will work to improve primary oral health care
for disadvantaged Australians;
Otlowski was appointed to two of the National Health and
Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Principal Committees for
the 2012-2014 triennium (Australian Health Ethics Committee
and the Human Genetics Advisory Committee). Distinguished
Professor Don Chalmers was also selected for the NHMRC’s
High Achievers in Health and Medical Research Project for
his significant contribution to health and medical research in
Australia and internationally.
2012 annual report | 41
Student participation in the Law Faculty’s community
engagement and social justice activities has continued. The
Student Legal Service transitioned from a referral service
FACULTY OF SCIENCE,
Engineering and TECHNOLOGY
to a legal advice service under the mentorship of other
The Faculty of Science, Engineering andTechnology (SET)
community legal service providers. There has also been strong
celebrated a number of achievements and milestones in 2012.
engagement by law students in the Mental Health Tribunal
Advocacy Training program.
In the 2012 Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) ratings
the Faculty of SET had seven of the nine 5-point ratings for
Members of the Faculty have been recognised for their
UTAS within the following disciplines: analytical chemistry;
teaching excellence. Dr Brendan Gogarty and Anja Hilkemeijer
geology; ecology; evolutionary biology; plant biology; forestry
have received the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Outstanding
sciences; agriculture, land and farm management. The
Contribution to Teaching and Learning for Constitutional Law
University also has 15 areas performing above world-standard
2, and Dr Jeremy Prichard and Associate Professor Rick Snell
(a 4 rating) with the Faculty of SET scoring nine of these
were fourth and fifth respectively in the top 10 lecturers at
areas including: Astronomical and Space Sciences; Organic
UTAS for the UniJobs Lecturer of the Year Award.
Chemistry; Environmental Science and Management; Fisheries
Postgraduate students have also enjoyed success: PhD
Sciences; and Horticultural Production.
candidate Kate Cashman was the winner of the 2012 UTAS
The Faculty was successful in the extremely competitive,
3MT (Three-Minute Thesis) competition, organised by
Australian Research Council Linkage Projects Round 2 for
Graduate Research and represented UTAS in the Trans-
funding commencing in 2012. Staff received four out of the
Tasman Competition. PhD candidate Meg Good was awarded
$10,000 by the organisation Voiceless to conduct an Animal
Law Conference.
The Faculty of Law has continued a high level of community
six grants awarded to UTAS, with a total value of just over
$1.5 million:
•
Shellie, and Associate Professor Greg Dicinoski
engagement within Tasmania and beyond. The Tasmanian
(Chemistry), with Associate Professor Roman Szucs,
Law Reform Institute released a number of reports including
Mr Christopher Pohl, and Dr John Dolan, Rapid method
Sexual Offences Against Young People and Non-Therapeutic
development in pharmaceutical analysis using quality-by-
Male Circumcision. Associate Professor Rick Snell was
design principles ($542,000);
engaged by the Commonwealth Secretariat and the
Government of Tonga to undertake a consultancy to help
P
rofessor Paul Haddad, Associate Professor Robert
•Dr Trevor Lewis and Professor Brian Yates (Chemistry),
develop a Freedom of Information policy for the Kingdom
with Dr Desmond Richardson, Dr Michael Higgins, and
of Tonga. Associate Professor Richard Herr was invited to
Dr Paul Molino, Colloid interactions and extraction in
serve as a Commonwealth Parliamentary Association (CPA)
sustainable, water efficient paper manufacture ($340,000);
Resource Person for the 23rd CPA Seminar held in Samoa.
The six-day event was the longest seminar in the history of
this professional development program and included MPs
from Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, North America and Oceania.
The Faculty hosted a number of public lectures including the
annual Sandy Duncanson Social Justice Lecture given by
Andrea Durbach, Deputy Sex Discrimination Commissioner
•
P
rofessor Brad Potts, Associate Professor Rene
Vaillancourt, and Dr Julianne O’Reilly-Wapstra (Plant
Science), Providing a genetic framework to enhance the
success and benefits from forest restoration and carbon
plantings in rural landscapes ($501,000); and
•Professor Sergey Shabala, Associate Professor Meixue
of the Australian Human Rights Commission; a lecture by
Zhou, and Dr Lana Shabala (Agricultural Science/TIA),
Professor George Williams AO, Anthony Mason Professor in
Developing molecular and physiological markers for
Constitutional Law at UNSW, on the constitutionality of same-
marker-assisted barley breeding for waterlogging tolerance
sex marriage legislation in Tasmania; a public lecture by US
($132,000).
Judge Marvine Garbis of the Maryland District Court and the
Honourable Peter Heery AM, QC former justice of the Federal
Court of Australia on the use of injunctions in patent cases.
Dr Stanislav Shabala and Dr Jeremy Sumner (School of
Mathematics and Physics) were presented with Discovery
Early Career Researcher Awards and Professor Emily Hilder
Important 2102 highlights for the Faculty of Law were the
(School of Chemistry) was awarded the LCGC Emerging
award to Professor Kate Warner, Director of the Tasmania Law
Leader in Chromatography Award. Dr Sue Baker (Plant
Reform Institute, of the UTAS Distinguished Service Medal for
Science) and Dr Jessica Watson (Engineering, now with
which she received a silver medallion and a $25,000 grant; and
the AMC) were each recipients of prestigious Fulbright
Professor Dianne Nicol’s appointment as Chair of Academic
Scholarships in 2012. Dr Baker spent three and a half months in
Senate: the first elected female Chair of Academic Senate and
the USA evaluating the benefits of retention forestry practices
the first Chair from Law.
for biodiversity conservation. Dr Watson will spend one year in
the USA working on renewable energy using ocean tides.
42 | university of tasmania
•Maths and Physics – Ross Turner, Associate Professor
Simon Ellingsen, Dr Stanislav Shabala, Jay Blanchard,
Dr Jim Lovell, Dr Jamie McCallum et al., published in The
Astrophysical Journal Letters, the premier rapid publication
journal in the field;
•Plant Science – Professor David Bowman published a
paper in Nature magazine entitled Conservation: Bring
elephants to Australia? This resulted in a high hit rate on the
web and multiple international media interviews;
•Psychology – The School of Psychology received an ARC
DECRA awarded to Dr Mark Hinder for his project, Brain
connectivity during movement planning and execution
in younger and older adults. Successful grants for
Australian Rotary Health ($45,000) and from the National
Health and Medical Research Council Project Grant
(NHMRC: $1,041,601) were also awarded to project teams
collaborating with Dr Raimondo Bruno;
Distinguished Service Medal winner Professor Kate Warner, Director of the
Tasmanian Law Reform Institute
Highlights from SET schools and research centres include:
•Agricultural Science/Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture
•Zoology – Professor Chris Johnson and his colleagues
published The aftermath of megafaunal extinction:
ecosystem transformation in Pleistocene Australia
in Science magazine. The team used a 130,000-year
environmental record to help resolve the cause and
(TIA) – the Australian Centre for International Agricultural
reconstruct the ecological consequence of extinction
Research will fund a new TIA livestock project for Vietnam
of Australia’s megafauna.
starting in mid-2013. The project will be led by Dr David
Parsons and has funding of $1 million;
•Architecture and Design – The Castle project was awarded
AUSTRALIAN MARITIME COLLEGE
In 2012 the Australian Maritime College (AMC) cemented
$79, 950 by the Tasmanian Community Fund in order to
its position as the national centre for maritime training,
prototype a mobile production facility for the assembly
education and research with a series of initiatives designed to
of Castle micro-dwellings to be deployed into regional
achieve a consistent national framework in seafarer training.
centres for the purpose of employment training and the
These initiatives included a major program restructure – with
manufacture of emergency accommodation;
enrolments opening in 2013 for three new seafaring degrees
•Chemistry/Australian Centre for Research on Separation
and a new diploma.
Science (ACROSS) – Professor Paul Haddad won the
AMC’s new seafaring program format provides training
American Chemical Society (ACS) Chromatography Award,
across the vocational education and training (VET) sector
an honour given to scientists at the peak of their profession;
and now, for the first time, also at a bachelor level. The higher
•Computing and Information Systems – 2012 was dedicated
to implementing the recommendations of the recent review,
including modifications to the degrees offered;
•Earth Science/Centre for Excellence in Ore Deposits – A
team led by Professors David Cooke and Bruce Gemmell
received the inaugural AMIRA International Award for
Geoscience Research Excellence;
•Engineering – The Bachelor of Engineering (Biomedical)
education pathway offers a Bachelor of Applied Science
(Nautical Science) and a Bachelor of Applied Science (Marine
Engineering). Each of these degree courses is approved
by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) and
incorporates deck and engineering certificates of competency
respectively. The new programs also have nested advanced
diploma level courses. A new shore-based degree, the Bachelor
of Applied Science (Maritime Operations), is also offered with
five specialisations designed for those who wish to work in a
specialisation was approved. Engineering education was
range of ship/shore interface positions within government or
under review and many of the recommended changes will
ports and shipping companies.
be implemented in 2013;
•Geography and Environmental Studies – Professor
The three new bachelor degrees will be delivered via four study
blocks per year, allowing for student intakes in January, April,
Matthew King, Future Fellow in Polar Geodesy in the School
June and September, and providing flexibility for both students
of Geography and Environmental Studies, was awarded
and their sponsors. Students following the VET pathway can
the American Geophysical Union’s Geodesy Section
undertake a Diploma of Transport and Distribution (Maritime
Award for 2012;
2012 annual report | 43
Operations) to become a deck or engineer watchkeeper. These
students will then be eligible for credit towards the bachelor
degree to undertake the next level of studies.
The restructure took place after in-depth consultation with
industry and government, and offers clearly defined training
pathways for those wishing to enter the seafaring industry.
INSTITUTE FOR MARINE AND
ANTARCTIC STUDIES (IMAS)
In 2012 Professor Mike Coffin, who has led IMAS as Executive
Director since 2011, was joined by Professor Richard Coleman
as Deputy Director and Associate Director of Research, adding
critical expertise and experience to the IMAS senior leadership
AMC’s role in producing more highly skilled seafarer graduates
team. Support services were bolstered with the recruitment of
will help to significantly improve the competitiveness of the
finance and administration, operations and communications,
Australian maritime sector at a time of fundamental reform.
outreach, and marketing managers. The IMAS Strategic Plan
In July, AMC joined forces with Challenger Institute of
2012-2017 was endorsed by the IMAS Board in October and
Technology (WA) and Hunter TAFE (NSW) to raise the profile of
publicly launched in November.
seafarer training and support national shipping policy reform.
A memorandum of understanding was signed to further
strengthen and develop cooperation in maritime education,
training and research. This agreement is expected to have farreaching benefits for students, the shipping industry and the
Australian Government.
The 2012 Australian Research Council Excellence in Research
for Australia (ERA) evaluation resulted in two of IMAS’ primary
fields of research, Oceanography and Ecology, achieving
maximum ratings of 5 for outstanding performance well above
world standard. Fisheries Sciences (including aquaculture)
gained a rating of 4 for performance above world standard,
Other significant achievements for the AMC include:
which was the highest score in the country. These ERA results
•The Research Higher Degree Hub was opened, providing
confirm the international standard of IMAS research, with
study space and facilities for HDR candidates based on
the Newnham campus;
•A new-look research report, Shore to Sea, was launched
in August, showcasing the diverse research undertaken
at AMC;
•AMC hosted national and international experts in the field
of fluid mechanics at the 18th Australasian Fluid Mechanics
Conference in December, attracting 250 delegates from
Australasia and from as far afield as Europe and the
United States;
•Engineering lecturer Dr Jessica Walker was awarded
the prestigious 2012 Fulbright Tasmania Scholarship for
research into the renewable energy technology, tidal power;
•Researchers teamed up with specialist lighting
UTAS being the only university to receive an ERA 5 ranking
in oceanography for both ERA 2010 and ERA 2012.
Construction of the IMAS building on the Hobart waterfront
advanced steadily, with Prime Minister Julia Gillard visiting
the building site in January. The building is on schedule for
completion and occupation by the end of 2013. To further boost
fisheries and aquaculture research and education at IMAS, the
Australian Government announced substantial core support
for a new experimental aquaculture facility at IMAS-Taroona,
allocating $2.5 million for the new infrastructure.
In August, UTAS and CSIRO formalised their collaboration
with the signing of a memorandum of understanding,
committing both parties to expand Tasmania’s research
capability in marine and Antarctic studies. In the same
collaborative vein, following the signing of a collaboration
manufacturer Energy Options International Pty Ltd (EOI
deed with the Australian Antarctic Division, the division and
P/L) to reduce the capture of unwanted fish in prawn
IMAS joined forces in 2012 to offer a new PhD Program in
trawls. The AMC team will specify, engineer and test
Quantitative Antarctic Science. Continuing its commitment
new hardware designed by EOI P/L;
to collaboration with the wider community IMAS formed a
•Researchers took part in a raking trial of Launceston’s
Tamar River, exploring ranking as an alternative to dredging
to improve the amenity of the river;
•A pilot group from the Melbourne Metropolitan Fire Service
completed specialist training at the Survival Centre,
learning maritime search and rescue techniques and how
to access vessels in hostile conditions. The organisation
trained 110 officers at AMC’s facilities during 2012; and
•The AMC Board held a lunch with key stakeholders from
the maritime industry at the Mission to Seafarers in
Melbourne which, among others, included senior members
from the Port of Melbourne, Farstad Shipping, ASP Ship
Management and the Transport and Logistics Skills Council.
44 | university of tasmania
new partnership with the not-for-profit organisation Wild Mob,
which provides youth and student groups the opportunity
to learn and work on meaningful environmental projects in
remote and iconic Australian destinations.
IMAS continued its strong performance in attracting
external research funding. In 2012 the Fisheries Research and
Development Corporation supported IMAS research through:
•Dr Jayson Semmens, Professor Colin Buxton, Associate
Professors Stephen Battaglene and Caleb Gardner, Dr
Quinn Fitzgibbon, and Dr Craig Mundy in collaboration with
Fishwell Consulting, Origin Energy, and Curtin University
were awarded $900,000 for Assessing the impact of marine
seismic surveys on southeast Australian fisheries;
•Drs Catriona Macleod and Jeff Ross, in collaboration with
CSIRO, received $750,000 for INFORMD Stage 2: Riskbased tools supporting consultation, planning and adaptive
management for aquaculture and other multiple-uses of the
coastal waters of southern Tasmania.
IMAS was highly successful in the 2012 Australian Research
Council (ARC) Discovery Project and Linkage Infrastructure,
Equipment and Facilities rounds, attracting almost 25% of
funds awarded to UTAS and totalling almost $3 million.
Grants included:
•Dr Zanna Chase ($706,045) for Southern Ocean oxygen
variability since the last glacial maximum;
•Dr Elizabeth Leane ($578,387) for Integrating the humanities
into Antarctic studies. Dr Leane’s Future Fellowship will be
divided between IMAS and the Faculty of Arts;
•Associate Professor Neil Holbrook (€1 million) from the
European Union (led by the Stockholm Environment
Institute and University of the Sunshine Coast) for Climate
change adaptation and water governance: reconciling food
security, renewable energy and the provision of multiple
ecosystem services;
•Darden, the world’s largest full-service restaurant
company, invested $900,000 in IMAS research to ensure
sustainable production of seafood;
Professor Mike Coffin launches the IMAS Strategic Plan
•Professor Nathan Bindoff (as Director of the Tasmanian
Partnership for Advanced Computing) led a successful
•Professor Chris Carter, with researchers from the
Research Cloud proposal through the $47 million federal
Australian Institute of Marine Science, the CSIRO
government initiative NeCTAR (National eResearch
Food Futures Flagship and Deakin University, won the
Collaboration Tools and Resources). Up to $900,000 will be
Aquaculture Science Research Award at the inaugural
allocated to establish a Tasmanian Research Cloud Node
Australasian Aquaculture Awards for Fish Oil Replacement
and $1.3 million for a Marine Virtual Laboratory.
in Australian Aquafeed;
Other highlights for IMAS in 2012 included:
•Dr Andrew Bowie was selected as the Winner in Physical
Sciences for the Scopus Young Researchers Award 2012;
•Professor Gustaaf Hallegraeff was awarded a ViceChancellor’s Award for Outstanding Contributions to
Research and Research Training;
•Dr Rick Stuart-Smith received a 2012 Tasmanian Young Tall
Poppy Science Award for co-founding the highly successful
Reef Life Survey (RLS) program;
•Dr Stuart-Smith and Professor Graham Edgar convened
•Dr Cedric Simon received top honours at the prestigious
2012 Science and Innovation Awards for Young People in
Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry for research into the
nutritional condition of rock lobsters;
•IMAS PhD student Emma Flukes was awarded the Hydro
Tasmania Environment Award in the Southern Cross Young
Achiever Awards;
•
Australia and the Antarctic Treaty System: 50 Years of
Influence, edited by Professors Marcus Haward of IMAS
and Tom Griffiths of the Australian National University, was
named joint winner in the category of Tertiary Scholarly
the Human Impacts on Global Marine Biodiversity workshop
Resource in the Australian Educational Publishing Awards
on Maria Island in November. Twenty international
2012;
researchers from Argentina, Canada, Canary Islands,
Chile, Galapagos Islands, Indonesia, New Zealand, South
Africa, UK and USA, as well as 14 UTAS staff and students
participated in the two-week workshop;
•The tracking of southern elephant seals inspired an
unusual collaboration between scientists and musicians,
culminating in a Hobart concert in April.
2012 annual report | 45
MENZIES RESEARCH INSTITUTE
TASMANIA
The past 12 months were a landmark year for the Menzies
Research Institute Tasmania, with a new Director, a new
facility and outstanding grant successes.
Professor Tom Marwick
joined Menzies as the new
Director in October from
the Cleveland Clinic in the
United States. Professor
Marwick has a long and
genes that may play a role in adding to the risk of Alzheimer’s
disease in older people up to 20 years before clinical
symptoms become apparent, as published in Nature Genetics;
•The National Institutes of Health (USA) named research
involving Menzies researchers, published in the New
England Journal of Medicine, as one of two major advances
in cardiovascular epidemiology for 2012. This study showed
that childhood obesity does not permanently increase
cardiovascular risk if obesity in adulthood is avoided;
•Menzies researchers found the Tasmanian devil facial
distinguished career in
tumour disease is a relatively stable cancer and has fewer
cardiovascular health and
mutations than some human cancers. This study, published
research and an interest
in Cell, indicates that cancers do not need to be unstable in
in population health. His
order to become transmissible;
immediate focus was
to reorganise research
activity around five major
themes: the major diseases
affecting the Tasmanian
community.
Menzies’ staff and students
moved into the $90 million
New Menzies Director Professor
Tom Marwick meets the media
•Menzies scientists were involved in the discovery of new
Medical Science 2 building
in late 2012, which doubles
laboratory space and
provides an integrated, state-of-the-art clinical research facility.
•In an international collaborative study, Menzies researchers
uncovered two molecules in human platelets that work
together to kill malaria. The findings, published in Science,
revealed that the two molecules work in combination to kill
the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum. This finding
will help scientists to develop new vaccines and therapies;
•Menzies researchers were involved in an osteoporosis
study published in Nature Genetics that detailed the
discovery of numerous genes underlying the risk of
osteoporosis. This is the first time that such a large number
of genes have been found associated with fracture risk.
The building is the first educational building in Tasmania to
In 2012, Menzies unveiled Tasmania’s first ‘moving laboratory’,
achieve a 5-star Green Star rating for environmental design by
the Tasmanian BioBus. The BioBus has been equipped as a
the Green Building Council of Australia.
mobile laboratory and clinical room and will provide people
2012 was the most successful research funding year in
across Tasmania with the opportunity to participate in clinical
Menzies’ 24-year history. In October, Menzies secured
research trials.
$10.3 million from 16 competitive research grants through
Collaboration plays an important role at Menzies and in 2012 a
the NHMRC and the ARC to carry out new research projects
commencing in 2013.
Significant achievements included:
•A new link was found between multiple sclerosis treatment
and vitamin D, published in Neurology. The study suggests
new partnership between Menzies and China’s Anhui Medical
University (AMU) was established. A scholarship program
has since been introduced that will enable AMU postgraduate
students to come to Menzies to undertake their PhD studies
from 2013.
that one of the main treatments for MS may also increase
Students continued to play a key role in the Institute’s research
the amount of vitamin D patients receive from sun
activity in 2012. There were 70 students enrolled in 2012,
exposure. The team has now launched a world-first clinical
including 54 HDR students. One PhD student, Laura Laslett,
trial testing whether vitamin D can prevent MS in those at
was a named author on two papers on the global burden of
risk of developing the disease; disease, published in The Lancet. The findings emphasise the
•Dr Fay Johnston showed that smoke from landscape fires
worldwide evolution of disease burden from communicable to
is an important contributor to deaths worldwide, and that
non-communicable disease, with distinct regional patterns of
reducing smoke emissions can potentially slow global
disease burden, life expectancy and disability. Other notable
warming and loss of biodiversity. This research pointed to
student achievements included Ben Hunn receiving the 2013
health benefits arising from interventions to reduce wood
Tasmanian Rhodes Scholarship. Ben undertook his honours
burning in Launceston;
year at Menzies. He will attend Oxford University in 2013 to
undertake his PhD studies into Alzheimer’s disease.
46 | university of tasmania
advancement
and alumni
1
2
3
The UTAS Foundation is the fundraising
arm of the University, managed by the UTAS
Advancement Office. Our activities help to
ensure UTAS remains a vibrant institution
and a leader in education that produces
quality graduates and research
connected to businesses and
industries not only in Tasmania
but also across Australia
and the world.
Launceston Foundation dinner
Hobart Foundation dinner
1. The mid-year graduation ceremony in Launceston
– the Chancellor, Damian Bugg, and Bachelor of
Nursing graduate Erin Michaels with baby Miah
2. Procession of scholarship recipients at the
Hobart Foundation dinner
UTAS Foundation Chair Colin Jackson OAM
3. Foundation Graduate Award recipients Brodie
Neill (left) and Simon Hollingsworth with the
Vice-Chancellor, Professor Peter Rathjen
2012 annual report | 47
UNIVERSITY OF TASMANIA
FOUNDATION
Membership Program
The Foundation assists the University to achieve its mission
the year by 48 members (or 6%) from 780 members in 2011 to
and strategic objectives by working with our alumni and
828 members in 2012, comprising the following categories:
friends to receive, accept, manage, and allocate gifts. An
Table 14: Financial membership as at 31 December 2012
independent board of directors governs the Foundation, and
Vice-Chancellor’s Circle
the Director of Advancement fulfils the role of CEO of the
Patrons
Foundation, managing the day-to-day operations.
Total financial membership of the Foundation increased over
Corporate Patrons
12
60
102
The UTAS Foundation enjoys Australian Taxation Office
Benefactors
endorsement as an income tax-exempt charity and a deductible
Corporate Benefactors
32
Fellows
83
gift recipient.
6
The Foundation’s fundraising priorities during 2012 were:
Corporate Fellows
125
• scholarships through the UTAS Scholarships Program;
Members
256
• the Annual Appeal;
Corporate Members
152
• the Menzies Research Institute Stage II Campaign;
Total
828
• the Save the Tasmanian Devil Appeal; and
• a number of smaller specific appeals.
In 2012 the Foundation continued its support for the University,
due to the very generous support of our donors. The financial
performance for the year was pleasing, with donation and
bequest income of $8.19 million.
The Bequests Program
The Bequests Program is a vital activity that provides
significant support to the University over the long term. During
2012 only a small amount of bequest income was realised, but
ongoing efforts in managing the program are an investment
that will manifest benefits to the University as bequests are
The Foundation distributed $6.93 million of funds in support of
realised, often many years into the future. The Bequests
University programs, which was an increase of $1.77 million on
Program continues to work with friends of the University who
the 2011 distribution.
are considering a gift and the number of bequest pledges has
Foundation Dinners
continued to grow.
During the first half of 2012, the UTAS Foundation hosted
Appeals Program
dinners in Hobart, Launceston and Burnie celebrating the
The Foundation is responsible for endorsing and facilitating
generosity and support of donors during 2011 and the 2012
all official fundraising activities of the University. A number of
scholarship recipients. More than 700 UTAS alumni, friends,
ongoing and new appeals were managed in 2012.
staff and scholars attended the three events.
The Annual Appeal is our annual fundraising request to our
The Hobart event in March was at Wrest Point, and 450 guests
alumni and friends to support the University. The appeal aims
recognised international furniture designer Brodie Neill and
to establish a long-term culture of giving within the UTAS
the Chief Executive of the Australian Sports Commission,
alumni and friends community. The 2012 appeal was launched
Simon Hollingsworth, who were both honoured with UTAS
in May and by the end of December had raised $59,305 of the
Foundation Graduate Awards.
$132,250 target. The number of donors to the appeal at the end
The following month in Launceston at the Grand Chancellor,
of December was 251, compared with 263 in 2011. Fundraising
Professor Rupert Maclean was awarded the UTAS
for the current appeal continues until April 2013.
Distinguished Alumni Award before more than 200 guests.
The Menzies Research Institute Tasmania Stage II
Professor Maclean is a former UTAS student and world-
Campaign seeks to raise support to complete the stage
renowned educator, author and lecturer.
two facility of the Menzies Research Institute Tasmania. The
The Burnie dinner, held in June, celebrated the University’s
remaining $20 million of the $90 million project is in the form
unique place in the community, its ongoing investment in the
of a Challenge Grant, whereby The Atlantic Philanthropies has
region, and the increasing support of local organisations and
pledged $10 million and will assist the University raising $5
individuals who provide scholarships to north-west students.
million in Australian philanthropy. The State Government has
pledged another $5 million on a dollar-for-dollar raised basis.
At the end of 2012 $3.67 million had been raised towards the
$5 million target.
48 | university of tasmania
The Save the Tasmanian Devil Appeal is the official
fundraising arm of the Save the Tasmanian Devil Program and
is vital in raising funds to assist in the response to Tasmanian
devil facial tumour disease (DFTD). As a partnership between
the state and federal governments and UTAS, the Foundation
has been coordinating the appeal since 2004. In 2012, $382,000
was raised through the appeal, and $454,000 was awarded in
two funding rounds for devil research grants, devil management
project grants, and devil community project grants.
Support for Scholarships and Research
ALUMNI
UTAS Alumni has enjoyed great success this year with an
extensive events program, increased communications, and the
passing of the revised Alumni Ordinance, put forward by the
Alumni Committee and approved by UTAS Council in August.
A more broad-ranging UTAS alumni family now includes UTAS
staff members of three years, past and present, and a new
category of ‘student alumni’ – students who have successfully
completed one year at the University and also overseas
exchange students who have spent a semester at UTAS.
A vital part of the Foundation’s function is securing and
Building on the success of last year’s event program, there
managing support for scholarships and research at the
has again been a strong focus on events in 2012 with a variety
University. In 2012 the Foundation distributed $2.93 million
of formats and locations to suit our alumni. A total of 2,843
for these activities. This is a slight decrease compared with
alumni and friends attended 36 events, including debates and
2011 where the Foundation distributed $3.16 million to support
panel discussions in Launceston, Melbourne and Brisbane
UTAS scholarship and research. In addition to supporting
where alumni heard speakers on topics that both entertained
scholarships and research, the Foundation also distributed
and engaged. Our Canberra dinner was fully subscribed with
$4 million to the University in support of the Medical Sciences
more than 50 alumni and guests again enjoying the beautiful
Building Campaign, which pleasingly was a $2 million increase
surroundings of Lake Burley Griffin while listening to after-
on the 2011 distribution.
dinner speaker, UTAS alumnus and 2012 Foundation Graduate
Directors
Award winner Simon Hollingsworth, CEO of the Australian
Sports Commission.
The Directors of the University of Tasmania Foundation Board
Reunions were held for Surveying, Legal Practice and
at 31 December 2012 were: Mr Colin Jackson OAM (Chair),
residential college Jane Franklin Hall, with another at John
Dr Megan Cavanagh-Russell, Mr Stuart Clues, Mr David Clerk
Fisher College. Once again alumni in Hobart were treated to an
(UTAS Chief Operating Officer), Dr Christine Mucha, Professor
evening at the Cascade Brewery with dancing to the music of
Peter Rathjen (UTAS Vice-Chancellor) and Mr James Walker.
the 1980s Uni Bar favourites, The Giant Hamsters.
Two non-voting members also served on the Board:
Links to our international alumni were strengthened with
Mr Gerald Loughran (President of UTAS Foundation
280 alumni attending events in Hong Kong, Bangkok, Kuala
Governors) and Professor Robert Menary OAM (representing
Lumpur, Sabah and Singapore, coinciding with the Vice-
University Council).
Chancellor’s trade mission to South-East Asia in early
November. In Tasmania we continued to encourage our
Table 15: Summary of key performance areas for the Foundation, 2012 compared with 2011 results
2011
$ Million
2012
$ Million
Donations and bequests
7.59
8.18
UTAS contributions
1.63
1.09
Dividends and interest
0.11
0.34
Other income
0.09
0.13
(0.33)
3.92
3.16
2.93
Menzies Stage II Building Campaign
2.00
4.00
Other expenses
1.07
0.89
Net Operating Result
2.86
5.84
Total funds managed by Foundation at EOY
33.8
39.6
Performance Area
Income
Investment income/(loss)
Expenditure
Funding support for UTAS programs (including scholarships, research,
teaching and facilities)
2012 annual report | 49
1
international alumni to keep in touch at our International
2
Graduands Receptions in Hobart in August and December,
prior to graduation ceremonies.
Our commitment to communicating with UTAS alumni has
continued to grow. This is evident in our online presence both
on our new-look website, with over 10,000 visits and 38,312 page
views in 2012, and through social media, including Facebook
and LinkedIn which are popular across a range of age groups
and all manner of professions. Our Alumni eNews, distributed
monthly to more than 30,000 alumni, remains an important
communication tool about events, short courses, postgraduate
courses and UTAS news.
Continuously improving to the way in which we hold
information on our Raisers Edge database continued
throughout 2012 and its management remains a priority within
the Advancement Office. The number of alumni records in the
database totals 90,000, with ‘good addresses’ for nearly
60,000 of those.
A highlight of every year is the presentation of the
Distinguished Alumni Award at a Foundation dinner. 2012
saw the award go to Professor Rupert Maclean, a lifelong
educator, with a highly distinguished 20-year international
career with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and
Cultural Organisation (UNESCO). Professor Maclean received
his award in recognition of his distinguished community and
professional service to the University.
The Career Mentoring Program continues to grow in success,
as alumni mentors support student mentees through this joint
Further opportunities to engage volunteer alumni to mentor
1. At the end of WW2 UTAS dispatched newly trained teachers to educate the next
generation after they gained degrees at the Domain campus. Now all living at
Glenara Lakes near Launceston are from left, Stan Payne, Tony McCormack,
Faith Layton (seated), Terry Childs, Geoffrey Sharman and Ava Newman
students will be actively pursued in the coming years.
2. The 2012 Jane Franklin reunion – from left, Jo Rann, Jenny Gabbedy and Brett Cox
UTAS Careers Office and Advancement Office collaboration.
50 | university of tasmania
2012 annual report | 51
The University of Tasmania
is a member of these cooperative
research centres (CRCs):
• Antarctic Climate and
Ecosystems CRC
• Optimising Ore Extraction CRC
• CRC for Forestry
• Australian Seafood CRC
• Bushfire CRC
Menzies Research Institute
Tasmania
Institute for Marine &
Antarctic Studies
AMC Search
Australian Maritime College
Policy Advice
Management
Accountability
Centre for Legal
Studies
Tasmanian Law
Reform Institute
Architecture & Design
Geography &
Environmental Studies
Engineering
Earth Sciences (Geology)
inc CODES
Computing &
Information Systems
Chemistry
Agricultural Science
Centre for Law
& Genetics
Science, Engineering
& Technology
Law
Law
Visual &
Performing Arts
Tasmanian
School of Art
TILES: Tasmanian Institute of Law Enforcement Studies
TIA: Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture
PICSE: Primary Industry Centre for Science Education
CREPS: Centre for Renewable Energy and Power Systems
CSAW: Centre for Sustainable Architecture with Wood
CODES: Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Ore Deposits
ACROSS: Australian Centre for Research on Separation Science
University Farm
TIA
PICSE
CSAW
CREPS
Centre for Environment
ACROSS
Zoology
Psychology
Office of the
Vice-Chancellor
Launceston
Engagement &
Development
Cradle Coast
Campus
Web Presence
Cultural Activities
Quality
Strategic
Human
Resources
National Student
Recruitment
Media &
Communications
Inglis Clark
Centre for Civil
Society
Marketing
Campus
Development
Community
Engagement
Events & Protocol
Academic &
Strategic Planning
& Performance
Provost
Research
Performance
& Analysis
– Funding
– Ethics & Integrity
Office of Research
Services
English Language Centre
Graduate Research
Office
Awards, Grants and
Fellowships Office
Tasmanian Institute of
Learning and Teaching
Student Centre
Library
International Marketing
and Recruitment Office
Centre for University
Pathways and
Partnerships
Student Evaluation,
Review & Reporting Unit
Service Delivery
Risk Management
& Audit Assurance
Human Resources
Governance & Legal
Information
Technology
Resources
Financial Services
Commercial Services
& Development
Advancement Office
Chief Operating
Officer
Chief
Information
Officer
Executive Director
(Strategic Projects)
Executive
Director,
Human
Resources
DVC
(Students & Education)
Chief
Financial
Officer
Chief Operating
Officer
Council Secretariat
Nominations & Remuneration Committee
Investment Committee
Finance Committee
Ceremonial & Honorary Degrees Committee
Built Environment Committee
Audit & Risk Committee
Integrated
Marine Observing
System
Central Science
Laboratory
DVC
(Research)
Pro Vice-Chancellor
(Global Engagement)
Deputy Vice-Chancellor
(Research)
Executive Director
Marketing & Communications
Plant Science
Rural Health
Rural Clinical
School
Pharmacy
Nursing &
Midwifery
Medicine
Human Life
Sciences
Health Science
Deans
Sociology &
Social Work
Education
Education
CEOs
University Institutes
Deputy Vice-Chancellor
(Students & Education)
Vice-Chancellor
Mathematics & Physics
Australian
Innovation
Research Centre
Management
Economics
& Finance
Accounting
& Corporate
Governance
Business
Provost
Pro Vice-Chancellor
(Regional Development)
Senior Executive
Riawunna Centre
Philosophy
History & Classics
Government
English, Journalism
& European
Languages
Conservatorium
of Music
Asian Languages
& Studies
Arts
Chair: Academic Senate
Senior Management Team
COUNCIL
organisational chart
Planning Unit
Executive Director
(Strategy)
Executive
Director,
Corporate
Services
university of tasmania
financial statements
2012
52 | university of tasmania
Five-Year summary
ended 31 December 2012 – university
2012
2011
$’000
%
176,745
33.2
58,367
11.0
116,329
31,110
$’000
2010
2009
2008
%
$’000
%
$’000
%
$’000
%
166,617
35.4
183,432
38.5
152,386
34.5
144,093
38.1
51,480
11.0
50,092
10.5
49,714
11.3
43,111
11.4
21.8
119,747
25.5
107,854
22.6
102,706
23.3
97,030
25.7
5.8
17,578
3.7
12,946
2.7
17,881
4.1
19,512
5.2
9,349
1.8
9,263
2.0
9,176
1.9
8,563
1.9
6,433
1.7
Fees and charges
64,577
12.1
60,132
12.8
54,578
11.5
53,013
12.0
49,304
13.0
Investment income
28,322
5.3
6,310
1.3
13,429
2.8
24,013
5.4
(21,702)
-5.7
Consultancy and contract research
30,626
5.8
23,291
5.0
27,756
5.8
20,884
4.7
18,599
4.9
Other revenue
17,117
3.2
15,690
3.3
17,239
3.6
11,975
2.7
21,751
5.8
532,542
100.0
470,108
100.0
476,502
100.0
441,135
100.0
378,131
100.0
Academic salary costs
163,865
32.8
144,882
32.2
135,208
32.1
118,719
30.6
115,460
31.4
Non-academic salary costs
135,128
27.1
116,530
25.9
107,527
25.5
99,811
25.7
94,117
25.6
Depreciation and amortisation
22,149
4.4
20,084
4.5
19,703
4.7
17,703
4.6
16,732
4.5
Repairs and maintenance
16,380
3.3
16,362
3.6
14,417
3.4
18,006
4.6
16,509
4.5
917
0.2
73
0.0
124
0.0
INCOME
Australian Government assistance
Australian Government grants
HECS-HELP & FEE-HELP
Scholarships and research
State Government grants
HECS-HELP student payments
TOTAL INCOME
EXPENDITURE
Bad and doubtful debts
(39)
0.0
(27)
0.0
Other expenses
160,438
32.2
151,770
33.7
144,426
34.3
133,967
34.5
124,979
34.0
TOTAL EXPENDITURE
498,877
100.0
449,701
100.0
421,405
100.0
388,167
100.0
367,770
100.0
OPERATING RESULT
33,665
20,407
55,097
52,968
10,361
KEY RATIOS
1. Financial stability and liquidity
– Current ratio
– Net cash balances
– Net assets
0.6
1.4
1.7
1.5
1.5
21,417
69,289
70,322
59,177
56,984
790,308
756,643
746,318
651,273
597,732
226,461
206,642
190,068
195,663
187,644
18,000
20,718
52,632
15,000
5,993
2. Revenue
– Australian Government grants
including HECS
– Australian Government
capital grants
– Scholarships and research
116,329
119,747
107,854
102,706
97,030
– Other University income
171,752
123,001
125,948
127,766
87,464
532,542
470,108
476,502
441,135
378,131
43%
44%
40%
44%
50%
12,552
11,716
11,623
10,785
10,215
18,042
17,638
16,353
18,142
18,369
TOTAL UNIVERSITY INCOME
Australian Government operating grants
including HECS as a % of total income
Commonwealth funded students
(full-time equivalents) *
Average Commonwealth recurrent grant
* Source: UTAS Statistics – DIIRSTE Operating Grant Load (excluding research higher degree students)
2012 annual report | 53
Five-Year summary
ended 31 December 2012 – consolidated
2012
2011
$’000
%
176,745
32.4
58,367
10.7
116,329
31,110
$’000
2010
2009
2008
%
$’000
%
$’000
%
$’000
%
166,617
34.8
183,432
37.7
152,386
33.7
144,093
37.7
51,480
10.8
50,092
10.3
49,714
11.0
43,111
11.3
21.3
119,747
25.0
107,854
22.2
102,706
22.7
97,030
25.4
5.7
17,578
3.7
12,946
2.7
17,881
4.0
19,512
5.1
INCOME
Australian Government assistance
Australian Government grants
HECS-HELP & FEE-HELP
Scholarships and research
State Government grants
HECS-HELP student payments
9,349
1.7
9,263
1.9
9,176
1.9
8,563
1.9
6,433
1.7
Fees and charges
64,577
11.8
60,132
12.6
54,168
11.1
53,380
11.8
49,513
13.0
Investment income
31,744
5.8
5,335
1.1
14,335
2.9
27,654
6.1
(24,298)
-6.4
Consultancy and contract research
31,780
5.8
24,673
5.2
27,066
5.6
20,760
4.6
18,266
4.8
Other revenue
25,146
4.6
23,937
5.0
27,427
5.6
19,624
4.3
28,465
7.4
545,147
100.0
478,762
100.0
486,496
100.0
452,668
100.0
382,125
100.0
Academic salary costs
164,578
32.5
145,594
32.0
135,856
31.8
119,363
30.3
116,139
31.0
Non-academic salary costs
136,759
27.0
118,127
26.0
109,227
25.6
101,557
25.7
96,365
25.7
Depreciation and amortisation
22,316
4.4
20,256
4.5
19,828
4.6
17,777
4.5
16,810
4.5
Repairs and maintenance
16,406
3.2
16,393
3.6
14,431
3.4
18,010
4.6
16,592
4.4
TOTAL INCOME
EXPENDITURE
917
0.2
73
0.0
124
0.0
Other expenses
Bad and doubtful debts
164,749
32.6
154,731
34.0
148,017
34.6
137,837
34.9
128,933
34.4
TOTAL EXPENDITURE
505,725
100.0
455,174
100.0
427,483
100.0
394,505
100.0
374,818
100.0
OPERATING RESULT
(39)
0.0
(21)
39,422
23,588
59,013
58,163
7,307
0.7
1.5
1.8
1.7
1.7
KEY RATIOS
1. Financial stability and liquidity
– Current ratio
– Net cash balances
– Net assets
31,369
78,825
77,569
68,478
67,175
830,764
791,342
777,836
678,875
620,712
Economic entity – consolidated income and expenditure 2012
Investment income 6%
Consultancy and
contract research 6 %
State Government grants 6%
Academic salary costs 33%
Repairs and maintenance 3%
Depreciation
and amortisation 4%
Other revenue 4%
Fees and charges 12%
Other expenses 33%
HECS-HELP and
FEE-HELP including
student payments 12%
Australian Government grants including research 54%
54 | university of tasmania
Non-academic salary costs 27%
0.0
STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
for the year ended 31 December 2012
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
Notes
Parent Entity
(University)
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
REVENUE FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS
Australian Government financial assistance
Australian Government grants
2.1
293,074
286,364
293,074
286,364
HELP – Australian Government payments
2.1
58,367
51,480
58,367
51,480
Tasmanian Government financial assistance
2.2
31,110
17,578
31,110
17,578
9,349
9,263
9,349
9,263
Fees and charges
2.3
64,577
60,132
64,577
60,132
Investment revenue and income
2.4
31,744
5,335
28,322
6,310
Contract research
2.5
31,780
24,673
30,626
23,291
Other revenue and income
2.6
23,125
24,293
15,096
16,046
543,126
479,118
530,521
470,464
HECS-HELP – student payments
Deferred government superannuation contributions
3.1, 21(b)
Total revenue from continuing operations
2,021
(356)
2,021
(356)
545,147
478,762
532,542
470,108
EXPENSES FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS
Employee related expenses
3.1
301,337
263,721
298,993
261,412
Depreciation and amortisation
3.2
22,316
20,256
22,149
20,084
Repairs and maintenance
3.3
16,406
16,393
16,380
16,362
Impairment of assets
3.4
917
73
917
73
Deferred superannuation expense
Other expenses
3.1, 21(b)
3.5
Total expenses from continuing operations
2,021
2,021
(356)
155,087
158,417
152,126
505,725
455,174
498,877
449,701
505,725
455,174
498,877
449,701
23,588
33,665
20,407
Result
14
39,422
Gain/(loss) on revaluation of land, buildings and leasehold
improvements
14
–
Total comprehensive income attributable
to the University of Tasmania
(356)
162,728
39,422
(10,082)
13,506
–
33,665
(10,082)
10,325
This statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
2012 annual report | 55
statement of financial position
as at 31 December 2012
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
Parent Entity
(University)
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
4
31,369
78,825
21,417
69,289
Notes
CURRENT ASSETS
Cash and cash equivalents
Receivables
5
22,087
18,881
21,363
17,925
Inventories
6
920
967
920
967
Other non-financial assets
7
5,062
3,904
5,043
3,885
59,438
102,577
48,743
92,066
Total current assets
NON-CURRENT ASSETS
Receivables
5
10,527
8,521
10,527
8,521
Investments
8
227,683
198,868
197,593
174,715
9
619,839
558,691
618,660
557,511
10
28,888
18,902
28,888
18,902
Total non-current assets
886,937
784,982
855,668
759,649
Total assets
946,375
887,559
904,411
851,715
Property, plant and equipment
Intangible assets
CURRENT LIABILITIES
Payables
11
16,209
14,084
15,731
13,732
Provisions
12
52,261
36,423
51,868
36,126
Other liabilities
13
14,166
18,021
13,551
17,549
82,636
68,528
81,150
67,407
Total current liabilities
NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES
Provisions
12
32,975
27,689
32,953
27,665
32,975
27,689
32,953
27,665
Total liabilities
115,611
96,217
114,103
95,072
Net assets
830,764
791,342
790,308
756,643
Total non-current liabilities
EQUITY
Reserves
14
269,395
269,395
269,261
269,261
Retained surpluses
14
561,369
521,947
521,047
487,382
830,764
791,342
790,308
756,643
Total equity
This statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
56 | university of tasmania
Statement of changes in equity
for the year ended 31 December 2012
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
Notes
Total equity at the beginning of the year
Parent Entity
(University)
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
791,342
777,836
756,643
746,318
Result
14
39,422
23,588
33,665
20,407
Revaluation of land, buildings and leasehold improvements
14
–
Total equity at the end of the year
830,764
(10,082)
791,342
–
790,308
(10,082)
756,643
This statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
2012 annual report | 57
Statement of cash flows
for the year ended 31 December 2012
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
Notes
Parent Entity
(University)
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
Inflows
(Outflows)
Inflows
(Outflows)
Inflows
(Outflows)
Inflows
(Outflows)
317,060
310,642
317,060
310,642
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Australian government grants
OS-HELP (net)
Superannuation supplementation
Tasmanian Government
HECS-HELP – student payments
15
(181)
15
(181)
760
739
760
739
34,221
19,336
34,221
19,336
9,349
9,263
9,349
9,263
58,857
59,729
58,482
59,050
Dividends received
7,524
17,349
8,516
18,252
Interest received
5,077
6,717
663
6,789
Fees and charges
Other receipts
Payments to suppliers and employees (inclusive of GST)
Net cash inflow (outflow) from operating activities
18(b)
75,721
64,134
66,100
54,552
(483,493)
(438,764)
(476,594)
(432,813)
25,091
48,964
18,572
45,629
34,381
27,202
34,381
27,202
1,414
649
1,407
649
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Capital grants
Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment
Payments for property, plant and equipment
Payments for intangibles
Payments for investments
Proceeds on disposal of investments
Sundry loans advanced
Movement in bonds held
(85,106)
(59,488)
(84,933)
(59,378)
(9,986)
(9,708)
(9,986)
(9,708)
(115,020)
(31,590)
(109,083)
(77,466)
102,291
23,164
102,291
69,976
–
1,500
–
1,500
58
Movement in monies held on behalf of CRCs
(579)
Net cash inflow (outflow) from investing activities
(72,547)
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES
–
Net increase/(decrease) in cash held
(47,456)
Cash at beginning of reporting period
78,825
31,369
Cash at end of reporting period
18(a)
This statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
58 | university of tasmania
4
559
(47,708)
–
1,256
58
(579)
(66,444)
–
4
559
(46,662)
–
(47,872)
(1,033)
77,569
69,289
70,322
78,825
21,417
69,289
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
1.SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT
ACCOUNTING POLICIES
The purchase method of accounting is used to account for
the acquisition of controlled entities (refer to Note 1(f)).
The principal accounting policies adopted in the
preparation of the financial report are set out below. These
policies have been consistently applied to all the years
presented, unless otherwise stated. The financial report
includes separate financial statements for the University
of Tasmania (University) as an individual entity and the
consolidated entity consisting of the University and its
controlled entities.
The financial statements for the consolidated entity
include all controlled entities, with all inter-entity
balances and transactions eliminated on consolidation.
(a) Basis of preparation
This financial report is a general purpose financial report
that has been prepared on an accrual basis in accordance
with:
•the University of Tasmania Act 1992;
•
Australian Accounting Standards;
•
Higher Education Support Act 2003 (Financial
Statement Guidelines).
Compliance with the Australian Accounting Standards
(AAS) may not result in compliance with International
Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), as the AAS
include requirements and options available to not-forprofit organisations that are inconsistent with IFRS.
The University is considered to be not-for-profit and has
adopted some accounting policies under AAS that do not
comply with IFRS.
Historical cost convention
The financial statements are prepared under the
historical cost convention, as modified by the revaluation
of financial assets and liabilities (including derivative
instruments) at fair value through profit or loss, and
revaluations of land, buildings, leasehold improvements
and works of art and cultural collections.
(b) Principles of consolidation
The consolidated financial statements incorporate the
assets and liabilities of all controlled entities of the
University (parent entity) as at 31 December 2012 and
the results of all controlled entities for the year then
ended. The University and its controlled entities together
are referred to in this financial report as the Group or
consolidated entity.
A controlled entity is any entity controlled by the
University of Tasmania. Control exists where the
University has the capacity to control decision making
in relation to the financial and operating policies of
another entity so that the other entity operates with
the University to achieve University objectives. A list of
controlled entities is contained in Note 17 to the financial
statements.
(c) Revenue recognition
Australian Government operating grants received under
the Higher Education Funding Act 1988, and revenues
received from other government sources, are recognised
as revenue at the time of receipt.
A liability is recognised where unspent grant monies are
required to be refunded to the funding body.
Interest revenue is recognised on a proportional basis
taking into account the interest rates applicable to the
financial assets.
Dividend revenue is recognised when the right to receive
a dividend has been established.
Donations and bequests are recognised when the right to
receive the funds has been established.
Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised upon the
delivery of goods to customers.
Revenue from the rendering of a service is recognised
upon the delivery of the service to the customers.
All revenue is stated net of the amount of goods and
services tax (GST).
(d) Foreign currency translation
Functional and presentation currency
Items included in the financial statements are measured
using the currency of the primary economic environment
in which the entity operates (‘the functional currency’).
The consolidated financial statements are presented in
Australian dollars, which is the University’s functional and
presentation currency.
Transactions and balances
Transactions made using foreign currency are converted
into Australian currency at market exchange rates
applicable at the date of the transaction. Amounts
payable or receivable in foreign currencies at balance
date are converted into Australian currency at market
exchange rates at balance date. Currency conversion
gains and losses are included in the operating result for
the year.
(e) Tax status
Income tax
The University does not provide for Australian income tax
as it is exempt from income tax in accordance with the
provisions of Division 50 of the Income Tax Assessment
Act 1997.
2012 annual report | 59
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
Fringe benefits tax
The University is liable to pay fringe benefits tax, and this
is included in the statement of comprehensive income.
Goods and services tax (GST)
Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the
amount of GST, except where the amount of GST incurred
is not recoverable from the Australian Tax Office (ATO). In
these circumstances the GST is recognised as part of the
cost of acquisition of the asset or as part of the expense.
Receivables and payables are stated with the amount of
GST included.
The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to,
the ATO is included as a current asset or liability in the
statement of financial position.
Cash flows are included in the statement of cash flows
on a gross basis. The GST components of cash flows
arising from investing and financing activities which are
recoverable from, or payable to, the ATO are classified as
operating cash flows.
(i)Receivables
All receivables are recognised initially at fair value
and subsequently measured at amortised cost, less
provision for impairment. Receivables are typically due
for settlement no more than 30 days from the date of
recognition.
The collection of receivables is reviewed on an ongoing
basis. Debts known to be uncollectible are written off. A
provision for impaired receivables is established where
there is evidence the University will not be able to collect
all amounts due according to the original terms of the
receivable. The amount of any movement in the provision
is recognised in the statement of comprehensive income,
with the balance of the provision recognised in the
statement of financial position.
(j)Inventories
Inventories are valued at the lower of cost or net realisable
value. Cost is assigned on a weighted average basis.
Stocks are valued on a first-in first-out basis.
(f) Acquisitions of assets
(k) Investments and other financial assets
The purchase method of accounting is used to account
for all acquisitions of assets (including business
combinations) regardless of whether equity instruments
or other assets are acquired. Cost is measured as the fair
value of the assets given or liabilities incurred or assumed
at the date of exchange, plus costs directly attributable to
the acquisition.
The University’s investments are measured at either fair
value (at ex-distribution prices) through profit or loss,
where changes in fair value are taken to the statement
of comprehensive income, or at cost.
(g) Impairment of assets
Assets that have an indefinite useful life are not subject
to amortisation or depreciation and are tested annually
for impairment. Assets that are subject to amortisation
or depreciation are reviewed for impairment whenever
events or changes in circumstances indicate that the
carrying amount may not be recoverable. An impairment
loss is recognised for the amount by which the asset’s
carrying amount exceeds its recoverable amount, except
to the extent that the write-down can be debited to an
asset revaluation reserve applicable to that class of asset.
The recoverable amount is the higher of an asset’s fair
value less costs to sell, and value in use.
(h) Cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents includes cash on hand,
deposits held at call with financial institutions, and other
short-term highly liquid investments with maturities of
three months or less that are readily convertible to known
amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant
risk of changes in value.
The University currently classifies its financial assets
in the following categories – investments (comprising
financial assets at fair value through profit or loss, or
financial assets at cost), derivative financial instruments,
and loans and receivables. The classification depends
on the purpose for which the financial assets were
acquired. Management determines the classification of
its investments at initial recognition and re-evaluates this
designation at each reporting date.
Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss
This category relates to those assets designated at fair
value through profit or loss on initial recognition. The
policy of management is to designate a financial asset in
this category if there exists the possibility it will be sold in
the short term or the asset is subject to frequent changes
in fair value.
These assets comprise investment and trust funds – the
University’s investments are managed as pooled funds by
a number of independent portfolio managers. Funds are
invested in cash deposits, Australian equities, overseas
equities, fixed interest securities and property trusts
under an approved investment policy. The majority of
specific-purpose endowments received by the Group to
fund research activities, scholarships and prizes are also
managed in this pooled investment fund.
Investments are initially recognised at cost, and
subsequently carried at fair value.
60 | university of tasmania
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
Financial assets at cost
Asset
Class
Investment in subsidiaries, and unlisted shares are
carried at cost, and reviewed annually for impairment.
Derivative financial instruments
The University enters into derivative financial
instruments, namely forward exchange contracts, from
time to time to hedge its foreign currency risk exposures.
Derivatives are recognised initially at fair value and
attributable transaction costs are recognised in the profit
or loss when incurred. Subsequent to initial recognition,
forward exchange contracts are measured at fair value.
Hedge accounting is not applied, and changes in fair
value are recognised in the profit or loss as part of foreign
currency gains and losses.
The fair value of forward exchange contracts is based
on measuring the difference between the contractual
forward price and the current forward price.
Valuation
basis
Property (land,
buildings and
leasehold
improvements)
Fair Value
Freehold land,
buildings and leasehold
improvements were
revalued on 31 December
2010 by independent
valuers Messrs Jim
Parmeter, Bernard Smith
and Tim Fleming from
Herron Todd White.
Plant and
equipment
Cost
All plant and equipment
items with a cost equal to
or exceeding $10,000 have
been capitalised.
Library
Cost
Works of art
Fair Value
Loans and receivables
Loans and receivables are non-derivative financial
assets with fixed or determinable payments that are
not quoted in an active market. They arise when the
University provides money, goods or services directly to
a debtor with no intention of selling the receivable. They
are included in current assets, except for those with
maturities greater than 12 months after the statement of
financial position date which are classified as non-current
assets. Loans and receivables are included in receivables
in the statement of financial position.
The University assesses at each balance date whether
there is objective evidence that a receivable is impaired.
(l) Work in progress
Capital work in progress represents the cost associated
with the construction of buildings and other projects of
a capital nature, which have not reached their date of
practical completion.
Intangibles work in progress represents the cost
associated with the development of software that
has not been completed.
(m)Property, plant and equipment
Land and buildings are shown at fair value based on
periodic valuations by external independent valuers, less
subsequent depreciation for buildings. Any accumulated
depreciation at the date of revaluation is eliminated
against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the net
amount is restated to the revalued amount of the asset.
Other classes of property, plant and equipment are stated
at cost or fair value less depreciation. The valuation
methodology adopted for asset classes is as follows:
Detail
A valuation of the works
of art was undertaken
in 2010 by independent
valuer Ms Rosanna
Cameron.
Revaluations are made with sufficient regularity to ensure
that the carrying amount of land, buildings, and works
of art does not differ materially from their fair value at
reporting date.
The depreciable amount of all property, plant and
equipment including buildings, but excluding freehold land
and works of art and cultural collections, is depreciated
on a straight-line basis over their useful lives to the Group
commencing from the time the asset is held ready for use.
Depreciation rates applicable during 2012 are as follows:
Asset Class
Buildings and leasehold improvements
Plant and equipment
Library collections
2.5%
5% – 33%
5%
Leasehold improvements are depreciated over the shorter
of either the unexpired period of the lease
or the estimated useful lives of the improvements.
Useful lives of assets are reviewed on an annual basis.
Where land, buildings, leasehold improvements or works
of art and cultural collections are subject to revaluation,
any increment or decrement is taken to the asset
revaluation reserve.
Gains and losses on disposals are determined by
comparing proceeds with carrying amount. These are
included in the statement of comprehensive income.
2012 annual report | 61
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
(n) Intangible assets
Intangible assets that are acquired, developed or
constructed by the Group are stated at cost less
accumulated amortisation and impairment losses.
Employee contributory superannuation funds exist to
provide benefits for the Group’s employees and their
dependants on retirement, disability or death of the
employee. The contributions made to these funds by the
University are recorded as an expense in the statement
of comprehensive income. Further details are provided in
Note 21.
Subsequent expenditure on capitalised intangible assets
is capitalised only when it increases the future economic
benefits embodied in the specific asset to which it relates.
All other expenditure is expensed as incurred.
Where intangible assets have a definite useful
life, amortisation is charged to the statement of
comprehensive income on a straight-line basis over the
estimated useful life. Amortisation commences from the
date they are available for use. The estimated useful lives
are as follows:
Right of use
(Australian Academic Research Network) 15 years
Core Business Systems Software
10 – 15 years
Other minor software applications
3 years
(o)Payables
These amounts represent liabilities for goods and services
provided to the Group prior to the end of the year which
are unpaid. The amounts are unsecured, are recognised at
cost and are normally settled within 30 days.
(p) Employee benefits and on-costs
Wages and salaries, and sick leave
Liabilities for wages and salaries are recognised as
payables in respect of employees’ services up to the
reporting date. Sick leave entitlements provided to the
employees of the Group are non-vesting and are based on a
cumulative sick leave system. Costs for non-accumulating
sick leave are recognised when the leave is taken.
Annual leave
Liabilities for annual leave for all employees are
recognised and measured as the amount unpaid at
the reporting date at current pay rates in respect of
employees’ service up to that date. Related on-costs
are included in the provision.
Long service leave
The liability for long service leave for all employees is
measured as the present value of the estimated future
payments to be made in respect of services provided up
to the reporting date. Consideration is given to future
increases in salary levels, experience of employee
departures and periods of service. Related on-costs are
included in the provision. Expected future payments are
discounted using market yields on government bonds at
the reporting date.
62 | university of tasmania
Superannuation
(q)Provisions
A provision for restructuring is recognised when the
Group has approved a detailed and formal restructuring
plan, and the restructuring has either commenced or
been announced.
(r) Leases
Leases of property, plant and equipment where the Group,
as lessee, has substantially all the risks and rewards
of ownership are classified as finance leases. Finance
leases are capitalised at the lease’s inception at the lower
of the fair value of the leased property and the present
value of the minimum lease payments. Lease payments
for operating leases, where substantially all the risks
and benefits remain with the lessor, are charged to the
statement of comprehensive income on a straight-line
basis over the period of the lease.
(s)Joint venture and collaborative agreements
The University participates in six cooperative research
centres. The University interests are not considered
material, and expenditure incurred by the University
as a result of its participation is expensed.
(t) Rounding of amounts
Amounts in the financial statements are rounded to the
nearest $1,000.
(u) Judgements and assumptions
In the application of the accounting policies disclosed in
this note, management is required to make judgements,
estimates and assumptions about carrying values of
assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from
other sources. The estimates and associated assumptions
are based on historical experience and various other
factors that are believed to be reasonable under the
circumstances, the results of which form the basis
of making the judgements. Actual results may differ
from these estimates. The estimates and underlying
assumptions are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Revisions
to accounting estimates are recognised in the period in
which the estimate is revised if the revision affects only
that period, or in the period of the revision and future
periods if the revision affects both current and future
periods.
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
The areas involving a high degree of judgement or
complexity, or where assumptions and estimates are
significant to the financial statements, are the investment
portfolio, superannuation provision, long service leave
provision, restructure provision and the valuation,
depreciation and amortisation of property, plant and
equipment and intangibles.
(v)Changes in accounting policies and impacts of
new accounting standards
There were no material changes in accounting policies for
the year ended 31 December 2012.
The following standards, amendments to standards and
interpretations were available for early adoption but have
not been applied in preparing this financial report.
AASB 9 Financial Instruments includes requirements for
the classification and measurement of financial assets
and will become mandatory for the Group at 31 December
2015. Due to the review and change in accounting policy
of the University’s investments during 2010, AASB 9 is
not expected to have a significant impact on the Group’s
financial statements.
AASB 1053 Application of Tiers of Australian Accounting
Standards establishes two tiers of reporting requirements.
Tier 2 comprises the recognition, measurement and
presentation of the Australian Accounting Standards
(Tier 1) and reduced disclosures corresponding to those
requirements. AASB 1053 will become mandatory for the
Group’s 31 December 2013 financial statements and is
not expected to have a significant impact on the Group’s
financial statements, as the Group’s financial statements
are expected to continue to meet the requirements of Tier 1.
2012 annual report | 63
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
2. REVENUE FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS
Notes
Parent Entity
(University)
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
2.1 A
ustralian Government financial assistance
including HECS-HELP and other Australian
Government loan programs
(a)
Commonwealth Grant Scheme and other grants
Commonwealth Grant Scheme
19.1
147,917
133,010
147,917
133,010
Indigenous Support Program
19.1
989
989
989
989
Partnership and Participation Program
19.1
4,788
3,314
4,788
3,314
Disability Support Program
19.1
234
182
234
182
National Institutes
19.1
4,165
4,919
4,165
4,919
Capital Development Pool
19.1
–
2,718
–
2,718
Diversity and Structural Adjustment Fund
19.1
–
3,298
–
3,298
Transitional Cost Program
19.1
16
187
16
187
Promotion of Excellence in Learning and Teaching
19.1
287
–
287
–
Reward Funding
19.1
Total Commonwealth Grants Scheme and other grants
(b)
349
–
158,745
148,617
HECS-HELP
19.2
56,824
50,483
56,824
50,483
FEE-HELP
19.2
1,001
997
1,001
997
SA-HELP
19.2
542
–
542
–
58,367
51,480
58,367
51,480
4,539
5,585
4,539
Scholarships
Australian Postgraduate Awards
19.3
5,585
International Postgraduate Research Scholarships
19.3
484
461
484
461
Commonwealth Education Costs Scholarships
19.3
317
1,212
317
1,212
Commonwealth Accommodation Scholarships
19.3
312
3,188
312
3,188
Indigenous Access Scholarships
19.3
Total scholarships
(d)
–
148,617
Higher Education Loan Programs
Total Higher Education Loan Programs
(c)
349
158,745
183
35
183
35
6,881
9,435
6,881
9,435
DIISRTE research
Joint Research Engagement Program
19.4
8,467
8,091
8,467
8,091
Sustainable Research Excellence in Universities
19.4
2,861
2,664
2,861
2,664
Research Training Scheme
19.4
15,177
14,249
15,177
14,249
Research Infrastructure Block Grants
19.4
4,837
5,554
4,837
5,554
31,342
30,558
31,342
30,558
Total DIISRTE research grants
64 | university of tasmania
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
2. REVENUE FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS
(continued)
(e)
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
Notes
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
19.5
18,000
18,000
18,000
18,000
18,000
18,000
18,000
18,000
19.6
4,053
4,397
4,053
4,397
Fellowships
19.6
3,774
2,888
3,774
2,888
Early Career Researcher Award
19.6
276
–
276
–
8,103
7,285
8,103
7,285
Other capital funding
Education Investment Fund
Total other capital funding
(f)
Parent Entity
(University)
Australian Research Council
(i) Discovery
Project
Total Discovery
(ii) Linkages
Infrastructure
19.6
630
515
630
515
Projects
19.6
2,148
2,564
2,148
2,564
2,778
3,079
2,778
3,079
Total Linkages
(iii) Centres
Centres
19.6
Total Centres
Total ARC
(g)
2,966
2,856
2,966
2,856
2,966
2,856
2,966
2,856
13,847
13,220
13,847
13,220
5,499
7,089
5,499
7,089
Other Australian Government financial assistance
Non-capital
National Health & Medical Research Council
Australian Government Research (non-ARC)
27,936
22,811
27,936
22,811
Australian Government (non-research)
15,203
18,920
15,203
18,920
Other Australian Government Income
Total non-capital
921
214
921
214
49,559
49,034
49,559
49,034
Capital
14,700
17,500
14,700
17,500
Total capital
Health and Hospitals Fund
14,700
17,500
14,700
17,500
Total other Australian Government financial assistance
64,259
66,534
64,259
66,534
351,441
337,844
351,441
337,844
293,074
286,364
293,074
286,364
56,824
50,483
56,824
50,483
1,001
997
1,001
997
542
–
542
–
351,441
337,844
351,441
337,844
158,745
148,617
158,745
148,617
58,367
51,480
58,367
51,480
6,881
9,435
6,881
9,435
DIIRSTE research
31,342
30,558
31,342
30,558
Other capital funding
18,000
18,000
18,000
18,000
7,285
Total Australian Government financial assistance
Reconciliation
Australian Government grants
HECS-HELP payments
FEE-HELP payments
SA-HELP
19.9
Total Australian Government financial assistance
(h)
Australian Government grants received – cash basis
CGS and other DIIRSTE grants
Higher Education Loan Programs
Scholarships
ARC grants – Discovery
8,103
7,285
8,103
ARC grants – Linkages
2,778
3,079
2,778
3,079
ARC grants – Centres
2,966
2,856
2,966
2,856
Other Australian Government grants
Total Australian Government grants received – cash
basis
64,259
66,534
64,259
66,534
351,441
337,844
351,441
337,844
OS-HELP (Net)
19.7
15
(181)
15
Superannuation supplementation
19.8
760
739
760
739
352,216
338,402
352,216
338,402
Total Australian Government funding received – cash basis
(181)
2012 annual report | 65
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
2.REVENUE FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS
(continued)
Parent Entity
(University)
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies
3,154
4,736
3,154
4,736
Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture
5,082
5,561
5,082
5,561
977
962
977
962
6,897
2,819
6,897
2,819
16,110
14,078
16,110
14,078
15,000
–
15,000
–
–
3,500
–
3,500
Notes
2.2 Tasmanian Government financial assistance
Non-capital
Menzies Research Institute
Other State Government income
Total non-capital
Capital
Menzies Stage 2 Development
Domain House Heritage Maintenance and Management Plan
2.3
Total capital
15,000
3,500
15,000
3,500
Total Tasmanian Government financial assistance
31,110
17,578
31,110
17,578
45,749
45,015
45,749
45,015
1,460
1,359
1,460
1,359
47,209
46,374
47,209
46,374
Student services fees from students
1,159
–
1,159
–
Accommodation charges
9,729
8,632
9,729
8,632
Other
6,480
5,126
6,480
5,126
Total other fees and charges
17,368
13,758
17,368
13,758
Total fees and charges
64,577
60,132
64,577
60,132
5,247
7,331
833
7,403
10,411
18,870
11,403
19,773
5,808
(10,566)
5,808
(10,566)
Unrealised gains/(losses)
10,278
(10,300)
10,278
(10,300)
Total investment revenue and income
31,744
5,335
28,322
6,310
14,461
Fees and charges
Course fees and charges
Fee-paying overseas students
Fee-paying domestic postgraduate students
Total course fees and charges
Other fees and charges
2.4
Investment revenue and income
Interest
Dividends
Realised gains/(losses)
2.5
Contract research
Industry and other research
18,875
14,461
18,875
Research consultancies
1,471
832
1,471
832
Research donations and bequests
6,444
4,249
5,290
2,867
Industry support to Linkage projects
Industry support to other Commonwealth research
Industry support to research centres
Total contract research
2.6
619
604
619
604
4,146
4,185
4,146
4,185
225
342
225
342
31,780
24,673
30,626
23,291
3,482
6,276
1,085
3,966
Other revenue and income
Donations and bequests
Scholarships and prizes
308
407
308
407
Contract revenue (other than consultancy and contract research)
8,085
7,335
5,636
4,424
Sale of goods
3,028
2,812
3,028
2,812
Miscellaneous income
Total other revenue and income
66 | university of tasmania
8,222
7,463
5,039
4,437
23,125
24,293
15,096
16,046
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
3. EXPENSES FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS
3.1
Notes
Parent Entity
(University)
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
111,110
104,068
110,505
103,461
691
723
691
723
17,954
16,798
17,874
16,722
Employee related expenses
Academic
Salaries
Contribution to superannuation and pension schemes:
Emerging costs
Funded
Provisions for future emerging costs
(685)
Payroll tax
8,330
Workers’ compensation
(383)
7,759
(685)
8,306
(383)
7,733
468
393
464
390
Long service leave expense
3,392
3,698
3,392
3,698
Annual leave
8,103
9,052
8,103
9,052
11,586
–
11,586
–
3,629
3,486
3,629
3,486
164,578
145,594
163,865
144,882
94,683
86,385
93,474
85,181
Restructuring costs
Other expenses
Total academic
Non-academic
Salaries
Contribution to superannuation and pension schemes:
Emerging costs
Funded
Provisions for future emerging costs
471
456
471
13,057
14,181
12,905
(561)
Payroll tax
(314)
(561)
(314)
6,987
6,309
6,939
6,258
354
299
346
292
Long service leave expense
2,431
2,849
2,350
2,791
Annual leave
7,092
8,125
6,967
8,000
Restructuring costs
9,839
–
9,839
–
Other expenses
1,137
946
1,137
946
Total non-academic
136,759
118,127
135,128
116,530
Total employee benefits and on-costs
301,337
263,721
298,993
261,412
Workers’ compensation
Deferred superannuation expense
21(b)
Total employee related expenses, including deferred
government employee benefits for superannuation
3.2
456
14,341
2,021
(356)
2,021
(356)
303,358
263,365
301,014
261,056
Depreciation and amortisation
Depreciation
Buildings
9
9,141
8,347
9,141
8,347
Plant and equipment
9
8,225
7,403
8,058
7,231
Library collections
9
2,937
2,999
2,937
2,999
9
723
795
723
795
10
1,290
712
1,290
712
22,316
20,256
22,149
20,084
Repairs and maintenance
16,406
16,393
16,380
16,362
Total repairs and maintenance
16,406
16,393
16,380
16,362
Debtors
917
73
917
73
Total impairment of assets
917
73
917
73
Amortisation
Leasehold improvements
Intangibles
Total depreciation and amortisation
3.3 Repairs and maintenance
3.4 Impairment of assets
2012 annual report | 67
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
3.EXPENSES FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS
(continued)
3.5
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
Notes
Parent Entity
(University)
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
Other expenses
Scholarships and prizes
21,458
20,671
19,641
20,402
Non-capitalised equipment
9,251
9,979
9,246
9,918
Public relations and marketing
7,227
7,443
6,959
7,235
Telecommunications
3,685
4,944
3,665
4,907
Travel and staff development
14,981
15,878
14,624
15,546
Consumables
10,908
10,354
10,677
10,092
Loss/(gain) on sale of property, plant and equipment
228
(16)
228
(16)
Office administration
3,986
4,367
3,873
4,256
Information technology operating costs
4,471
4,032
4,456
4,004
56
156
56
156
Consultancy and advisory services
18,327
15,401
17,387
14,417
Research sub-contractors
31,810
27,378
31,810
27,378
Conjoints, secondments and employment agency costs
4,373
3,365
4,373
3,365
Books, serials and online subscriptions
4,585
3,701
4,585
3,701
Electricity and heating fuel
6,178
5,982
6,120
5,924
Cleaning
5,041
5,035
4,979
4,967
Security
2,441
2,219
2,441
2,219
Property and building operating costs
Loss/(gain) from foreign exchange transactions
1,510
1,320
1,466
1,320
Council and director fees
505
454
503
453
Audit fees – external
260
223
242
212
Audit fees – internal
550
394
550
394
Operating lease payments
3,489
2,662
3,489
2,662
Insurance
1,994
1,895
1,958
1,860
New appointment expenses
1,060
1,306
1,058
1,304
Other
Total other expenses
68 | university of tasmania
4,354
5,944
4,031
5,450
162,728
155,087
158,417
152,126
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
Notes
4.
Parent Entity
(University)
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
Current
Cash at bank and on hand
2,572
10,278
2,412
3,997
28,797
68,547
19,005
65,292
31,369
78,825
21,417
69,289
Balances as above
31,369
78,825
21,417
69,289
Balance per the statement of cash flows
31,369
78,825
21,417
69,289
Debtors
18,818
14,134
18,152
13,185
Less provision for impaired receivables
(1,088)
Short-term deposits and bills
Total cash and cash equivalents
(a)
Reconciliation to cash at the end of the year
The above figures are reconciled to cash at the end of the year
as shown in the statement of cash flows as follows:
(b)
Cash at bank and on hand
Cash on hand is non-interest bearing.
Cash at bank accounts are bearing floating interest rates
between 2.50% and 4.20% (2011: 3.75% and 4.60%)
(c)
Short-term deposits and bills
The deposits are bearing floating interest rates between
3.50% and 5.87%. (2011: 4.75% and 6.20%).
These deposits have an average maturity of 90 days.
5.
RECEIVABLES
Current
(176)
(1,088)
(176)
17,730
13,958
17,064
13,009
757
742
757
742
3,115
2,361
3,057
2,354
485
1,820
485
1,820
22,087
18,881
21,363
17,925
10,227
8,221
10,227
8,221
300
300
300
300
10,527
8,521
10,527
8,521
32,614
27,402
31,890
26,446
Current
920
967
920
967
Total inventories
920
967
920
967
Deferred government contribution for superannuation
21(b)
Accrued revenue
GST
Non-current
Deferred government contribution for superannuation
Sundry loans and advances
Total receivables
6.
21(b)
INVENTORIES
2012 annual report | 69
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
7. OTHER NON-FINANCIAL ASSETS
Notes
Parent Entity
(University)
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
5,062
3,904
5,043
3,885
5,062
3,904
5,043
3,885
760
760
760
760
226,922
198,107
193,298
170,420
1
1
1
1
Current
Prepayments
Total other non-financial assets
8.
INVESTMENTS
Non–current
At fair value through profit and loss:
Trust investments
Investment funds *
At cost:
Shares – unlisted
Investment in subsidiaries (AMC Search Limited)
–
–
3,534
3,534
227,683
198,868
197,593
174,715
Australian equities
78,786
50,492
67,112
42,136
Overseas equities
24,438
39,150
20,817
32,671
Australian property
12,202
17,219
10,394
14,370
4,637
6,874
3,950
5,736
Australian fixed interest
63,155
21,319
53,797
17,791
Overseas fixed interest
30,358
32,246
25,860
26,909
Total investments
17
* Investment funds are held predominantly in a managed
portfolio and cash management accounts.
The funds comprise:
International property
Cash and cash equivalents
Total investment funds
70 | university of tasmania
13,346
30,807
11,368
30,807
226,922
198,107
193,298
170,420
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
(a) Economic Entity (Consolidated) – $’000
9.PROPERTY, PLANT
AND EQUIPMENT
Notes
Land
Buildings
Capital
WIP
Leasehold
Improvements
Plant &
Equipment
Library
Works
of Art
Total
At 1 January 2011
At cost –
At valuation
60,762 Accumulated depreciation
– – 325,343
32,150 – 83,941 58,950 – 175,041
424,180
– 30,516 – – 7,559 – – (46,402)
(22,645)
– Net book amount
60,762 325,343 32,150 30,516 37,539 36,305 7,559 530,174
30,516 37,539 36,305 7,559 530,174
55,944
– (69,047)
Year ended 31 December 2011
Opening net book amount
60,762 Add: additions
7,983 2,996 33,342 – 10,355 1,225 43 Add: transfers from capital works in progress
– 17,950 (16,165)
462 555 – – 2,802
Add: revaluation increment/(decrement)
14
– – (2,802)
– – – – (2,802)
Less: disposals
– – – – (468)
(136)
– (604)
Less: impairments
14
– – – (7,280)
– – – (7,280)
Balance 31 December
68,745 346,289 46,525 23,698 47,981 37,394 7,602 Less: depreciation charge
– (8,346)
– (795)
(7,403)
(2,999)
– Closing net book amount
68,745 337,943 46,525 22,903 40,578 34,395 7,602 558,691
46,525 – 90,762 58,239 – 195,526
453,614
3.2
325,343 32,150 578,234
(19,543)
At 31 December 2011
At cost
– – At valuation
68,745 346,289 – 30,978 – – 7,602 Accumulated depreciation
– (8,346)
– (8,075)
(50,184)
(23,844)
– Net book amount
68,745 337,943 46,525 22,903 40,578 34,395 7,602 558,691
(90,449)
Year ended 31 December 2012
Opening net book amount
68,745 337,943 46,525 22,903 40,578 34,395 7,602 558,691
Add: additions
– 2,017 73,760 – 6,886 1,036 132 83,831
Add: transfers from capital works in progress
– 73,472 (92,353)
10,820 8,061 – – Less: disposals
(635)
(482)
– – (506)
(34)
–
Less: impairments
– – – – – – – –
Balance 31 December
68,110 412,950 27,932 33,723 55,019 35,397 7,734 640,865
Less: depreciation charge
3.2
– (9,141)
– (723)
(8,225)
(2,937)
– Closing net book amount
68,110 403,809 27,932 33,000 46,794 32,460 7,734 –
(1,657)
(21,026)
619,839
At 31 December 2012
At cost
– – 27,932 – 103,723 58,226 – 189,881 At valuation
68,110 421,296 – 41,798 – – 7,734 538,938
– (8,798)
(56,929)
(25,766)
Net book amount
68,110 403,809 27,932 Accumulated depreciation and impairment
– (17,487)
33,000 46,794 32,460 – (108,980)
7,734 619,839
2012 annual report | 71
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
(b) Parent Entity (University) – $’000
9.PROPERTY, PLANT AND
EQUIPMENT (continued)
Notes
Land
Buildings
Capital
WIP
Leasehold
Improvements
Library
Works
of Art
Total
At 1 January 2011
At cost
– – 32,150 – At valuation
60,762 325,343 – 30,516 Accumulated depreciation
– – – – Net book amount
60,762 325,343 32,150 30,516 Plant &
Equipment
82,247 58,950 – 173,347
– – 7,559 424,180
(45,950)
(22,645)
– 36,297 36,305 7,559 528,932
(68,595)
Year ended 31 December 2011
Opening net book amount
60,762 325,343 32,150 30,516 36,297 36,305 7,559 528,932
Add: additions
7,983 2,996 33,342 – 10,264 1,225 43 55,853
Add: transfers from capital works in progress
– 17,950 (16,165)
462 555 – – 2,802
Add: revaluation increment/(decrement)
14
– – (2,802)
– – – – (2,802)
Less: disposals
– – – – (487)
(136)
– (623)
Less: impairments
14
– – – (7,280)
– – – (7,280)
Balance 31 December
68,745 346,289 46,525 23,698 46,629 37,394 7,602 Less: depreciation charge
3.2
– (8,346)
– (795)
(7,231)
(2,999)
– Closing net book amount
68,745 337,943 46,525 22,903 39,398 34,395 7,602 557,511
576,882
(19,371)
At 31 December 2011
At cost
– – 46,525 – 89,131 58,239 – 193,895
At valuation
68,745 346,289 – 23,698 – – 7,602 446,334
Accumulated depreciation
– (8,346)
– (795)
(49,733)
(23,844)
– Net book amount
68,745 337,943 46,525 22,903 39,398 34,395 7,602 557,511
Year ended 31 December 2012
22,903 39,398 34,395 7,602 557,511
337,943 46,525 (82,718)
Opening net book amount
68,745 Add: additions
– 2,017 73,760 – 6,720 1,036 132 83,665
Add: transfers from capital works in progress
– 73,472 (92,353)
10,820 8,061 – – –
Less: disposals
(635)
(482)
– – (506)
(34)
– Balance 31 December
68,110 412,950 27,932 33,723 53,673 35,397 7,734 Less: depreciation charge
3.2
– (9,141)
– (723)
(8,058)
(2,937)
– Closing net book amount
68,110 403,809 27,932 33,000 45,615 32,460 7,734 618,660
(1,657)
639,519
(20,859)
At 31 December 2012
At cost
– – 27,932 – 102,026 58,226 – 188,184
At valuation
68,110 421,278 – 41,798 – – 7,734 538,920
Accumulated depreciation and impairment
– (17,469)
– (8,798)
(56,411)
(25,766)
Net book amount
68,110 403,809 27,932 33,000 45,615 32,460 – (108,444)
7,734 618,660
(c) Valuations of land, buildings and leasehold improvements
An independent valuation of the University’s land, buildings and leasehold improvements was performed by Messrs Jim Parmeter, Bernard
Smith and Tim Fleming of Herron Todd White during 2010. The valuation was performed to determine fair value in accordance with AASB 116
Property, Plant and Equipment.
The fair value of campus properties was determined by employing the depreciated replacement cost approach. Non-campus properties have
been valued using the Active and Liquid market approach.
An independent valuation of the University’s works of art was performed by Ms Rosanna Cameron during 2010. Works of art were valued by
comparing selling prices of present pieces by the same artist.
72 | university of tasmania
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
Parent Entity
(University)
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
18,902
9,194
18,902
9,194
Additions
8,029
4,297
8,029
4,297
Additions to intangibles work in progress
3,260
6,123
3,260
6,123
10. INTANGIBLE ASSETS
Notes
Year Ended 31 December 2012
Opening net book amount
Disposals
(13)
–
(712)
(13)
(1,290)
–
Amortisation charge
(1,290)
Closing net book amount
28,888
18,902
28,888
18,902
(712)
17,524
9,531
17,524
9,531
At 31 December 2012
Cost
Accumulated amortisation and impairment
(2,797)
(1,530)
(2,797)
(1,530)
Intangibles work in progress
14,161
10,901
14,161
10,901
Net book amount
28,888
18,902
28,888
18,902
16,139
14,029
15,661
13,677
11. PAYABLES
Current
Creditors and accruals
OS-HELP liability to Australian Government
70
55
70
55
16,209
14,084
15,731
13,732
Annual leave
17,454
14,947
17,268
14,775
Long service leave
20,872
19,471
20,665
19,346
Restructuring costs
12,102
–
12,102
–
Total payables
12. PROVISIONS
Current
Defined benefit obligation
21(b)
1,833
2,005
1,833
2,005
52,261
36,423
51,868
36,126
10,411
10,167
10,389
10,143
Non-current
Long service leave
Restructuring costs
Defined benefit obligation
Total provisions
(1) A
nnual leave liabilities above include the following
non-employee on-costs
(2) L
ong service leave liabilities above include the following
non-employee on-costs
21(b)
4,095
–
4,095
–
18,469
17,522
18,469
17,522
32,975
27,689
32,953
27,665
85,236
64,112
84,821
63,791
934
942
920
929
1,957
2,041
1,940
2,030
7,792
11,126
7,177
10,654
13. OTHER LIABILITIES
Current
Revenue in advance
Bonds and deposits held
Monies held on behalf of cooperative research centres (CRCs)
Total other liabilities
713
655
713
655
5,661
6,240
5,661
6,240
14,166
18,021
13,551
17,549
2012 annual report | 73
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
14. EQUITY
Notes
Parent Entity
(University)
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
269,395
279,477
269,261
279,343
Reserves
Asset Revaluation Reserve
Balance at end of previous year
Add: revaluation increment (decrement) on buildings
9
–
(2,802)
–
(2,802)
Add: revaluation increment (decrement) on leasehold
improvements
9
–
(7,280)
–
(7,280)
Balance at end of year
269,395
269,395
269,261
269,261
123,032
99,870
89,235
67,782
Restricted funds
The statement of comprehensive income combines a number of
funds which, under granting conditions, cannot be utilised for
general purpose expenditure.
Trust funds – donations for endowments and specified purposes
such as prizes and scholarships.
Other restricted funds – specific research grants, consultancies
and other contract funds.
Balance at end of previous year as previously reported
Reclassifications*
Revised opening balances
Current year movements
Restricted funds balance (included in retained surplus)
2,891
17,560
2,891
18,710
125,923
117,430
92,126
86,492
12,285
5,602
6,445
2,743
138,208
123,032
98,571
89,235
521,947
498,359
487,382
466,975
39,422
23,588
33,665
20,407
561,369
521,947
521,047
487,382
* During 2011 and 2012, the University has undertaken significant
changes to reporting structures. As a result, a number of funding
classifications have changed resulting in additional funds
classified as restricted.
Retained surplus
Balance at end of previous year
Result
Total retained surplus
Key components of the result
The following reconciliation highlights some key components
of the University result.
Result from core activities
Movements in contracts excluding interest and capital
Investment income (interest and dividends)
Realised gains/(losses) on investments
(5,465)
3,434
(5,518)
(814)
11,245
27,176
5,808
(10,566)
Unrealised gains/(losses) on investments
10,278
(10,300)
Capital income
34,381
27,202
CGS and HECS adjustments
(2,870)
(4,231)
2010 leave provision adjustments
Restructure costs
Result as per statement of comprehensive income
74 | university of tasmania
–
(23,146)
33,665
(2,542)
–
20,407
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
Parent Entity
(University)
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
40,670
58,644
40,670
58,644
40,670
58,644
40,670
58,644
Within one year
420
399
420
399
Later than one year but not later than five years
333
522
333
522
15. COMMITMENTS FOR EXPENDITURE
Notes
Capital expenditure commitments
Contracted but not provided for and payable not later
than one year
Total capital expenditure commitments
Capital expenditure commitments include contracts for the following
significant building works: $27.8m for IMAS, $7.7m for Menzies Stage 2,
$1.3m for UDRH Newnham Campus and $1.1m for Creative Arts.
Lease commitments
Operating leases
Commitments in relation to property and equipment leases
contracted for at the reporting date but not recognised as
liabilities, payable:
Later than five years
Total lease commitments
981
945
981
945
1,734
1,866
1,734
1,866
16. CONTINGENT ASSETS AND LIABILITIES
The consolidated entity had no contingent assets and liabilities
at 31 December 2012.
Ownership Interest
2012
%
2011
%
University of Tasmania Foundation Inc.
The University Foundation is an incorporated association that acts as trustee for the University of Tasmania
Foundation Trust. It raises money to endow scholarships, support research and build resources, while
developing links between the University, industry and the community.
100
100
AMC Search Limited
AMC Search is a company limited by guarantee which provides maritime training and consulting services.
100
100
–
–
100
100
17. CONTROLLED ENTITIES
Consolidated Entities
The University is the parent entity or ultimate parent entity of the following entities
which are all incorporated in Australia.
UTASAT Pty Ltd
UTASAT Pty Ltd is a trustee company acting as trustee for UTAS Asset Trust, a fixed trust that distributes all
net income derived from the commercialisation of the University’s intellectual property to the University as
sole beneficiary. The University consolidates UTASAT Pty Ltd as it owns more than half of the voting power of
the company and therefore satisfies the definition of control in AASB 127 Consolidated and Separate Financial
Statements.
TasTherapeutics Pty Ltd
TasTherapeutics Pty Ltd is an inactive company limited by shares which was originally set up for the
commercialisation of research activity.
2012 annual report | 75
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
18. NOTES TO THE STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS
Parent Entity
(University)
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
(a) Reconciliation of Cash
or the purposes of the statement of cash flows, the University considers cash
F
to include cash on hand, short-term deposits at call and investments in money
market instruments, net of outstanding bank overdrafts. Cash at the end of the
reporting period, as shown in the statement of cash flows, is reconciled to the
related items in the statement of financial position as follows:
Cash at bank and on hand
2,572
10,278
2,412
3,997
28,797
68,547
19,005
65,292
31,369
78,825
21,417
69,289
39,422
23,588
33,665
20,407
Capital grants
(34,381)
(27,202)
(34,381)
(27,202)
Depreciation
22,316
20,256
22,149
20,084
Short-term deposits and bills
(b) Reconciliation of net cash used in operating activities to result
Result
(Profit)/ Loss on sale of property, plant and equipment
Movement in realised/unrealised (gains)/losses on investments
228
(16)
228
(16)
(16,086)
20,866
(16,086)
20,866
(5,370)
(3,754)
(5,653)
(4,226)
Change in assets and liabilities
(Increase)/decrease in receivables
(Decrease)/increase in provision for impaired receivables
(Increase)/decrease in inventories
(Increase)/decrease in accrued revenue
(Increase)/decrease in prepayments
(Decrease)/increase in payables
(Decrease)/increase in employee entitlements
912
47
(754)
(1,158)
(2)
(230)
(1,886)
630
912
47
(703)
(1,158)
(2)
(230)
(1,912)
637
2,125
6,854
1,999
7,517
21,124
6,912
21,030
6,894
(Decrease)/increase in revenue in advance
(3,334)
2,948
(3,477)
2,812
Net cash provided or used by operating activities
25,091
48,964
18,572
45,629
8,000
8,000
8,000
8,000
Financing arrangements
The consolidated and parent entities have access to the following lines of credit:
Mastercard facility
Total facility
Utilised at reporting date
Not utilised at reporting date
76 | university of tasmania
–
–
–
–
8,000
8,000
8,000
8,000
2011
$’000
19.2Higher Education Loan Programs
(excluding OS–HELP)
Cash payable/(receivable) at beginning of year
Financial assistance received in cash during the
reporting period
Cash available for the period
Revenue earned
Cash payable/(receivable) at end of year
2011
$’000
Indigenous
Support Program
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
Partnership and
Participation
Program
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
Disability
Support Program
2012
$’000
UNIVERSITY ONLY
2011
$’000
Workplace
Productivity
Program
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
Learning &
Teaching
Performance
Fund
2012
$’000
Capital
Development Pool
Diversity and
Structural
Adjustment Fund
Transitional Cost
Program
Promotion of
Excellence in
Learning &Teaching
Reward
Funding
–
–
56,824 50,483 1,001 56,824 50,483 1,001 (56,824)(50,483) (1,001)
–
–
–
–
997 997 (997)
–
–
542 542 (542)
–
–
–
–
– 58,367 51,480
– 58,367 51,480
– (58,367)(51,480)
–
–
–
–
HECS–HELPFEE–HELP SA–HELP
Total
4,165 4,919 –
2,718 –
3,298 16 187 287 –
349 –
–– – ––– –– ––– –
4,165 4,919 –
2,718 –
3,298 16 187 287 –
349 –
–
–
3,085 409 1,724 3,923 –
–
–
–
–
–
4,165 4,919 3,085 3,127 1,724 7,221 16 187 287 –
349 –
(4,165) (4,919) (3,085)
(42) (1,683) (5,497)
(16)
(187)
–
–
(349)
–
–
–
–
3,085 41 1,724 –
–
287 –
–
–
National
Institutes
147,917 133,010 989 989
4,788 3,314 234 182 –
–
–
–
–– – ––– –– ––– –
147,917 133,010 989 989 4,788 3,314 234 182 –
–
–
–
–
–
(93)
(212)
–
–
(2)
(8)
–
43 6
33
147,917 133,010 896 777 4,788 3,314 232 174 –
43 6
33
(147,917) (133,010)
(874)
(870) (4,788) (3,314)
(260)
(176)
–
(43)
(1)
(27)
–
–
22 (93)
–
–
(28)
(2)
–
–
5
6
Commonwealth
Grant Scheme
2012
$’000
Total
Financial assistance received in cash during
reporting period
158,745 148,617
Net accrual adjustments
–
–
Revenue for the period
158,745 148,617
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
4,720 4,188
Funds available for the period
163,465 152,805
Less expenses including accrued expenses
(163,138) (148,085)
Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
327 4,720
Financial assistance received in cash during
reporting period
Net accrual adjustments
Revenue for the period
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
Funds available for the period
Less expenses including accrued expenses
Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
Financial assistance received in cash during
reporting period
Net accrual adjustments
Revenue for the period
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
Funds available for the period
Less expenses including accrued expenses
Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
19.1DIIRSTE – CGS and other
DIIRSTE grants
AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT
FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
19.ACQUITTAL OF
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
2012 annual report | 77
78 | university of tasmania
Financial assistance received in cash during
reporting period
Net accrual adjustments
Revenue for the period
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
Funds available for the period
Less expenses including accrued expenses
Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
2011
$’000
2011
$’000
International
Postgraduate
Research
Scholarships
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
Commonwealth
Education Costs
Scholarships
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
Commonwealth
Accommodation
Scholarships
2012
$’000
Financial assistance received in cash during
reporting period
Net accrual adjustments
Revenue for the period
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
Funds available for the period
Less expenses including accrued expenses
Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
19.5 Other capital funding
2011
$’000
Indigenous
Access
Scholarships
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
Indigenous Staff
Scholarships
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
Total
2012
$’000
Sustainable
Research
Excellence
Program
Research
Training
Scheme
Systemic
Infrastructure
Initiative
Research
Infrastructure
Block Grant
–
–
–
159 159 (48)
111 Total
– 31,342 30,558
–
–
196
– 31,342 30,754
219 159 23
219 31,501 30,777
(60) (31,390) (30,618)
159 111 159
Commercialisation
Training Scheme
8,467 8,091 2,861 2,664 15,177 14,249 –
–
4,837 5,554
–– – ––– –
196 ––
8,467 8,091 2,861 2,664 15,177 14,249 –
196 4,837 5,554
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(196)
–
–
8,467 8,091 2,861 2,664 15,177 14,249 –
–
4,837 5,554
(8,467) (8,091) (2,861) (2,664) (15,177) (14,249)
–
–
(4,837) (5,554)
–– – ––– –– ––
Joint
Research
Engagement
Program
5,585 4,539 484 461 317 1,212 312 3,188 183 35 –
–
6,881 9,435
–– – ––– –– ––– –– –
5,585 4,539 484 461 317 1,212 312 3,188 183 35 –
–
6,881 9,435
558 672 (4)
(51)
548 30 1,296 (8)
–
38 5
5 2,403 686
6,143 5,211 480 410 865 1,242 1,608 3,180 183 73 5
5 9,284 10,121
(5,943) (4,653)
(430)
(414)
(342)
(694)
(725) (1,884)
(72)
(73)
(5)
– (7,517) (7,718)
200 558 50 (4)
523 548 883 1,296 111 –
–
5 1,767 2,403
Australian
Postgraduate
Awards
2012
$’000
UNIVERSITY ONLY
18,000 18,000 1,740 2,417 19,740 20,417 59,013 52,640 78,753 73,057 (35,007) (14,044)
43,746 59,013 Education
Investment
Fund
–
–
–
4,917 4,917 (4,904)
13 Total
– 18,000 18,000
–
1,740 2,417
– 19,740 20,417
6,067 63,930 58,707
6,067 83,670 79,124
(1,150) (39,911) (15,194)
4,917 43,759 63,930
Teaching and
Learning Capital
Fund
The reported surplus for the Commercialisation Training Scheme ($0.111m) for 2012 is expected to be rolled over for future use by DIISRTE.
Financial assistance received in cash
during reporting period
Net accrual adjustments
Revenue for the period
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
Funds available for the period
Less expenses including accrued expenses
Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
Financial assistance received in cash during
reporting period
Net accrual adjustments
Revenue for the period
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
Funds available for the period
Less expenses including accrued expenses
Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
19.4DIIRSTE research
19.3 Scholarships
19.ACQUITTAL OF AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT
FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE (continued)
notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2012
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
19.ACQUITTAL OF AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT
FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE (continued)
19.6 Australian Research Council grants
(a) Discovery
Financial assistance received in cash during
reporting period
Net accrual adjustments
Revenue for the period
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
Funds available for the period
Less expenses including accrued expenses
Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
UNIVERSITY ONLY
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
Projects
4,053 40 4,093 2,098 6,191 (3,914)
2,277 630 –
630 535 1,165 (427)
738 4,397 373 4,770 1,794 6,564 (4,466)
2,098 515 839 1,354 (235)
1,119 (584)
535 Centres of
Excellence
(c) Centres
Financial assistance received in cash
during reporting period
Net accrual adjustments
Revenue for the period
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
Funds available for the period
Less expenses including accrued expenses
Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
Early Career
Researcher
Award
2,888 41 2,929 682 3,611 (2,113)
1,498 International
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
2011
$’000
–
1
1
(1)
–
–
–
276 –
276 –
276 (152)
124 2011
$’000
Total
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Projects
2,148 989 3,137 2,712 5,849 (4,105)
1,744 2012
$’000
8,103 47 8,150 3,596 11,746 (6,502)
5,244 7,285
414
7,699
2,476
10,175
(6,579)
3,596
Total
2,564 570 3,134 3,484 6,618 (3,906)
2,712 2,778 989 3,767 3,247 7,014 (4,532)
2,482 3,079
1,410
4,489
3,248
7,737
(4,490)
3,247
Total
2,966 10 2,976 442 3,418 (2,622)
796 2,856 35 2,891 716 3,607 (3,165)
442 352
(337)
15 55 70 269
(450)
(181)
236
55
760 760
(19)
741 (741)
–
739
739
2
741
(760)
(19)
2,966 10 2,976 442 3,418 (2,622)
796 2,856
35
2,891
716
3,607
(3,165)
442
19.8 Superannuation supplementation
Cash received during the reporting period
Cash available
Cash surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
Cash available for the reporting period
Contributions to specified defined benefit funds
Cash surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
3,774 7
3,781 1,498 5,279 (2,436)
2,843 2012
$’000
19.7OS–HELP
Cash received during the reporting period
Cash spent during the reporting period
Net cash received
Cash surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
Cash surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
2011
$’000
Fellowships
Infrastructure
(b) Linkages
Financial assistance received in cash during
reporting period
Net accrual adjustments
Revenue for the period
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
Funds available for the period
Less expenses including accrued expenses
Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
2012
$’000
19.9 Student Services and Amenities fee
Unspent/(overspent) revenue from previous period
SA–HELP revenue earned
Student Services fees direct from students
Total revenue expendable in period
Student Services expenses during period
Unspent/(overspent) Student Services revenue
–
542 1,159 1,701 (806)
895
–
–
–
–
–
–
2012 annual report | 79
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
20.FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT
The Group’s activities expose it to a variety of financial risks, as follows:
Credit risk
The maximum exposure to credit risk on financial assets of the consolidated entity, excluding investments, relates to receivables which are
exposed to the risk of financial loss due to the other party to the contract failing to discharge a financial obligation. The maximum credit
risk exposure in relation to receivables is the carrying amount less the provision for impairment. The consolidated entity is not materially
exposed to any individual or group. Accounts receivable credit terms are 30 days.
Foreign currency risk
Amounts payable or receivable in foreign currencies at balance date are converted into Australian currency at market exchange rates at
balance date. Currency conversion gains and losses are included in the operating result for the year.
Liquidity risk
Liquidity risk is the risk that the University will not be able to meet its financial obligations as they fall due. The University’s approach to
managing liquidity is to ensure that it will always have sufficient liquidity to meet its liabilities when they fall due.
Interest rate risk
The consolidated entity’s exposure to interest rate risk is set out in the following table. The table also details the fair values of financial
assets and liabilities. Exposures arise predominantly from assets and liabilities bearing variable interest rates as the consolidated entity
intends to hold fixed rate assets and liabilities to maturity.
Non
interest
bearing
31 December 2012
Floating
Over 1
year to 5
years
1 year or
less
More than
5 years
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Carrying
amount
as per
statement
of financial
position
Fair
value
$’000
$’000
$’000
Financial assets
Cash and cash equivalents
–
2,572
28,797
–
–
31,369
31,369
Receivables
32,314
–
–
–
300
32,614
32,614
Investments
1
134,169
–
93,513
–
227,683
227,683
32,315
136,741
28,797
93,513
300
291,666
291,666
Payables
16,209
–
–
–
–
16,209
16,209
Other liabilities
14,166
–
–
–
–
14,166
14,166
Total financial liabilities
30,375
–
–
–
–
30,375
30,375
–
10,278
68,547
–
–
78,825
78,825
27,102
–
–
–
300
27,402
27,402
Total financial assets
Financial liabilities
31 December 2011
Financial assets
Cash and cash equivalents
Receivables
Investments
1
145,302
–
53,565
–
198,868
198,868
27,103
155,580
68,547
53,565
300
305,095
305,095
Payables
14,084
–
–
–
–
14,084
14,084
Other liabilities
18,021
–
–
–
–
18,021
18,021
Total financial liabilities
32,105
–
–
–
–
32,105
32,105
Total financial assets
Financial liabilities
80 | university of tasmania
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
20.FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT (continued)
Market risk
Investments mainly comprise investments in managed investment funds. The Investment Fund has a prudent longer-term investment
strategy with a growth-style portfolio including equities. It is acknowledged there may be short-term fluctuations in asset values from time
to time with such a strategy. The possibility of a negative return is approximately one year in seven. Historical trends for such a strategy
indicate that, with reasonable probability, unrealised losses will be recovered in the short to medium term.
The managers place a great deal of emphasis on risk management and constantly examine the risk and return profiles of the portfolios in
terms of both asset allocation and the active management of each asset class within the portfolio. This ensures a well-diversified portfolio
of assets, which has proven successful in adding value in an environment of risk aversion and falling equity markets.
The University’s investment policy has established benchmarks for the portfolio. During 2012 the following benchmarks applied: Australian
equities 35.0% (actual at 31 December 2012: 33.5%); overseas equities 10.0% (10.3%); Australian property 7.5% (6.2%); international property
2.5% (2.0%); Australian fixed interest 30.0% (28.0%); overseas fixed Interest 10.0% (10.3%) and cash and cash equivalents 5.0% (9.7%).
Summarised sensitivity analysis
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Interest Rate Risk
-0.5%
+0.5%
Impact
on Result
$’000
Other Price Risk
-10%
Carrying
Amount
Impact
on Result
Impact
on Equity
Cash and cash equivalents
31,369
(157)
(157)
Receivables
32,614
n/a
n/a
Investments
227,683
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Total financial assets
291,666
(157)
(157)
157
157
Payables
16,209
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Other liabilities
14,166
n/a
n/a
n/a
Total financial liabilities
30,375
–
–
–
31 December 2012
$’000
+10%
Impact
on Equity
Impact
on Result
Impact
on Equity
Impact
on Result
Impact
on Equity
157
157
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
(22,768)
(22,768)
22,768
22,768
(22,768)
(22,768)
22,768
22,768
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
–
–
–
–
–
Financial assets
Financial liabilities
Interest Rate Risk
-1.5%
Other Price Risk
1.5%
-10%
+10%
Carrying
Amount
Impact
on Result
Impact
on Equity
Impact
on Result
Impact
on Equity
Impact
on Result
Impact
on Equity
Impact
on Result
Impact
on Equity
78,825
(1,182)
(1,182)
1,182
1,182
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Receivables
27,402
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Investments
198,868
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
(19,887)
(19,887)
19,887
19,887
Total financial assets
305,095
(1,182)
(1,182)
1,182
1,182
(19,887)
(19,887)
19,887
19,887
Payables
14,084
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Other liabilities
18,021
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Total financial liabilities
32,105
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
31 December 2011
Financial assets
Cash and cash equivalents
Financial liabilities
Method and underlying assumptions of the sensitivity analysis:
1. The variation in interest rate risk takes into account interest rate movements during 2012 and future expectations
2. A variation range of +/- 10% is estimated for other price risk based on investment returns over the past three years
and recent volatility in financial markets.
3. The University’s foreign exchange risk is considered minimal.
2012 annual report | 81
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
20.FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT (continued)
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
Cash and cash equivalents
31,369
78,825
Loans and receivables
32,614
27,402
227,682
198,867
1
1
291,666
305,095
Financial liabilities at amortised cost
30,375
32,105
Total
30,375
32,105
Categories of financial assets and liabilities
Financial assets
Financial assets at fair value through profit and loss
Available-for-sale financial assets
Total
Financial liabilities
Net fair values of financial assets and liabilities
The fair values disclosed below are all level 1 in the fair value hierarchy under AASB 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures
as they are calculated using quoted prices in active markets. There are no level 2 or level 3 financial assets or liabilities.
Investments
82 | university of tasmania
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
227,682
198,867
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
21. SUPERANNUATION COMMITMENTS
(a) Schemes operational and open to membership
i) UniSuper Limited
The majority of University staff are members of schemes and plans administered and managed by UniSuper Limited.
UniSuper offers eligible members the choice of two schemes known as the Defined Benefit Division (DBD) and Accumulation Super.
The UniSuper Defined Benefit Division (DBD) is a defined benefit plan under Superannuation Law but, as a result of amendments to
Clause 34 of the UniSuper Trust Deed, a defined contribution plan under Accounting Standard AASB 119 Employee Benefits.
Accumulation Super is a cash accumulation productivity scheme.
(b) Schemes closed to future membership
The University of Tasmania Staff Superannuation and Additional Benefits Scheme was closed on 31 December 1982 and wound up. Two
aspects of the scheme remain, the lump sum compensation benefits scheme and the supplementary pension scheme.
i) Lump Sum Compensation Benefits
As part of the winding up of the University of Tasmania Staff Superannuation & Additional Benefits Scheme it was agreed with
members that staff transferring contributions to SSAU would be compensated at retirement. The calculation of compensation is
formula based and consistent with terms determined by Council in 1982. Compensation is adjusted in line with movements in the
Consumer Price Index. It is financed on an emerging cost basis and charged against operating funds.
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
25
25
Liabilities recognised in the statement of financial position
Total liability – current
ii) Supplementary Pension Scheme Liability
The University has a liability in respect of pensions paid, being supplementary pensions being paid and reversionary pensions which
may become payable to spouses in the future. This is a closed scheme.
The actuarial report of 31 December 2012 prepared by Brian Bendzulla of Bendzulla Actuarial Pty Ltd states the University’s liability as:
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
2010
$’000
2009
$’000
2008
$’000
Total liability
9,293
10,539
11,237
11,935
14,147
Current
1,051
1,238
1,282
1,318
1,347
Non-current
8,242
9,301
9,955
10,617
12,800
9,293
10,539
11,237
11,935
14,147
Liabilities recognised in the statement of financial position
Principal actuarial assumptions
%
%
Discount rate
3.00
5.50
Inflation (pensions)
3.00
4.00
iii) Retirement Benefits Fund
The University has a liability in respect of a small number of staff who transferred from the Tasmanian College of Advanced Education
and who are members of the State Government scheme, the Retirement Benefits Fund.
An arrangement exists between the Australian Government and the State Government to meet the unfunded liability for the
University’s beneficiaries of the Retirement Benefits Fund on an emerging cost basis. Accordingly the liability of $10.984m
(2011: $8.963m) is recognised in the statement of financial position and the right to re-imbursement from the Commonwealth
is recorded as an asset.
The RBF is a defined benefit fund which pays lump sum and pension benefits to members upon retirement (most of which are
calculated as a multiple of the member’s final average salary).
2012 annual report | 83
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
In an actuarial report prepared by David Knox of Mercer, the University’s liability (as at 30 June 2012) is stated as:
21. SUPERANNUATION COMMITMENTS (continued)
(b) Schemes closed to future membership (continued)
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
Liabilities recognised in the statement of financial position
Defined benefit obligations
12,715
10,868
Fair value of plan assets
(1,731)
(1,905)
Net liability
10,984
8,963
757
742
Current
Non-current
10,227
8,221
Movement for the year -$2,021,000 per note 3.1
10,984
8,963
8,963
9,319
Movements in the net liability for defined benefit obligations recognised
in the statement of financial position
Net liability for defined benefit obligations
Contributions received
Expense/(gain) recognised in the income statement
(916)
(722)
2,937
366
10,984
8,963
19
38
571
675
(133)
(254)
Expense recognised in the income statement
Employer service cost
Interest cost
Expected return on plan assets
Recognised actuarial losses/(gains)
2,480
(93)
Expense/(gain) recognised
2,937
366
%
%
Discount rate
3.45
5.50
Expected rate of return on plan assets
7.50
7.50
Expected salary increase rate
3.50
4.50
Expected rate of increase compulsory preserved amounts
3.75
4.50
Expected pension increase rate
2.50
2.50
Australian equities
29
25
Overseas equities
18
22
Principal actuarial assumptions
The expected return on plan assets (net of tax) has been based on the expected
long-term returns for each of the major asset classes in which the Plan invests.
Plan assets
Fixed income
12
13
Property
33
19
Alternatives/Other
5
18
Cash
3
3
100
100
84 | university of tasmania
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
21. SUPERANNUATION COMMITMENTS (continued)
(b) Schemes closed to future membership (continued)
Historical information
Present value of defined benefit obligation
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
2010
$’000
2009
$’000
2008
$’000
12,715
10,868
13,287
13,265
13,344
Fair value of plan assets
1,731
1,905
3,968
4,036
4,529
(Surplus)/deficit in plan
10,984
8,963
9,319
9,229
8,815
2
1,620
(77)
471
587
(1,572)
(160)
551
(490)
Experience adjustments (gain)/loss – plan assets
Experience adjustments (gain)/loss – plan liabilities
378
Funded status of defined benefit obligations
The entire defined benefit obligation arises from the RBF, which is a partly funded defined benefit scheme.
The above information represents the material disclosures required by AASB 119.
After considering materiality, further detailed reconciliations have not been included because their inclusion
does not enhance the information already reported.
22. KEY MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL AND RELATED PARTY DISCLOSURES
Remuneration of Council members
The Council is the governing body of the University.
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
Parent Entity
(University)
2012
No.
2011
No.
2012
No.
2011
No.
$0 to $9,999
1
1
1
1
$10,000 to $19,999
3
5
3
5
$20,000 to $29,999
5
3
5
3
$40,000 to $49,999
1
1
1
1
$60,000 to $69,999
–
1
–
1
$70,000 to $79,999
1
–
1
–
11
11
11
11
he number of external Council members where remuneration
T
(including salary, superannuation and other benefits) for the reporting
period was paid within bands of $10,000 were:
Aggregate remuneration of Council members
$282,583
$256,842
$282,583
$256,842
2012 annual report | 85
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
22. KEY MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL AND RELATED PARTY DISCLOSURES (continued)
Remuneration of executive officers
he number of executive positions where the total remuneration (including salary,
T
superannuation and other benefits) for the reporting period exceeded $200,000
within bands of $10,000 were:
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
Parent Entity
(University)
2012
No.
2011
No.
2012
No.
2011
No.
$200,000 to $209,999
-
1
-
1
$220,000 to $229,999
1
2
1
2
$230,000 to $239,999
2
-
2
-
$240,000 to $249,999
1
3
1
3
$250,000 to $259,999
1
1
1
1
$260,000 to $269,999
1
-
1
-
$270,000 to $279,999
1
1
1
1
$290,000 to $299,999
1
-
1
-
$310,000 to $319,999
-
1
-
1
$320,000 to $329,999
1
-
1
-
$340,000 to $349,999
1
-
1
-
$360,000 to $369,999
-
1
-
1
$370,000 to $379,999
-
1
-
1
$390,000 to $399,999
1
-
1
-
$410,000 to $419,999
-
1
-
1
$550,000 to $559,999
1
-
1
-
12
12
12
12
Aggregate remuneration of executives
$3,640,400
$3,387,262
$3,640,400
$3,387,262
‘Executives’ are defined as including the Vice-Chancellor, Provost, Deputy Vice-Chancellors, Pro Vice-Chancellors, Deans,
the Chief Operating Officer and Executive Directors.
Other transactions with key management personnel
All transactions with members of Council or their related entities are conducted at arm’s length: at normal market prices and on normal
commercial terms.
The following activity occurred during 2012:
• Mr Damian Bugg AM QC is Chair of the Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens Board – 2012: $9,445 (2011: $6,252)
• Dr Peter Davis is Chief Executive Officer of Aurora Energy Pty Ltd – 2012: $5.8m (2011: $7.6m)
• Mr Rhys Edwards is Secretary of the Department of Premier & Cabinet – 2012: $106,513 (2011: $92,446)
• Mr Harvey Gibson is a partner with Wise, Lord & Ferguson – 2012: $30,643 (2011: $34,021)
• Mr Rod Roberts is a Director of Webster Limited and Tassal Group Limited – 2012: Nil (2011: $360)
86 | university of tasmania
notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 December 2012
23.REMUNERATION OF AUDITORS
During the year the following fees were paid for services provided
to the University by the auditor and non-related audit firms:
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
Parent Entity
(University)
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
2012
$’000
2011
$’000
Fees paid to the Tasmanian Audit Office for the audit of the financial statements
123
120
112
104
Total remuneration for audit services
123
120
112
104
KPMG
208
229
208
229
Deloitte
200
185
200
185
Assurance Pty Ltd
72
–
72
–
Moore Stephens
55
–
55
–
Mercer Consulting
41
–
41
–
Australian Association of Social Workers
29
–
29
–
Tasmanian Audit Office
12
–
12
–
Enclave Project Delivery Pty Ltd
8
–
8
–
Australian Institute of Medical Scientists
8
–
8
–
Engineers Australia
6
–
6
–
McGrathNichol Advisory
5
–
5
–
Audit services
Assurance services
Fees paid to other firms for internal audit, audit of grant monies and
other assurance services:
Ausmeat
2
–
2
–
Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency
–
81
–
81
Aus–Qual Pty Ltd
–
1
–
1
Grant Thorton
Total remuneration for assurance services
–
1
–
1
646
497
646
497
24.EVENTS OCCURRING AFTER THE BALANCE SHEET DATE
No significant events have occurred.
2012 annual report | 87
Management certificate
for the year ended 31 December 2012
Statement by principal accounting officer
Statement by the chancellor and the vice-chancellor
88 | university of tasmania
2012 annual report | 89
90 | university of tasmania
alphabetical index
Alumni.................................................................................... 49
Arts, Faculty of...................................................................... 38
Australian Maritime College ................................................ 43
Business, Faculty of............................................................... 38
Chancellor ............................................................................ 3-4
Community Engagement...................................................19-23
Council Membership.............................................................. 12
Council Committees..........................................................12-13
Cradle Coast Campus ......................................................17-18
Education, Faculty of ........................................................39-40
Financial Performance ............................................................ 8
Financial Statements............................................................. 52
Foundation (UTAS) ...........................................................48-49
Global Engagement ............................................................... 30
Governance and Operations ............................................. 7-13
Health Science, Faculty of ................................................40-41
Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies .....................44-45
Law, Faculty of ...................................................................41-42
Library .................................................................................... 31
Marketing and Communications ......................................23-24
Menzies Research Institute Tasmania.................................. 46
Organisational Chart ............................................................ 51
Professional Services Review ............................................. 11
Provost, Division of the ....................................................14-24
Research and Research Training.......................................32-36
Science, Engineering & Technology .................................42-43
Student Experience ...........................................................29-30
Students and Education, the Division of..........................25-31
Vice-Chancellor ................................................................... 5-6
2012 annual report | 91
How to contact us
General enquiries
Telephone: (03) 6226 2999
International: +61 3 6226 2999
Fax: (03) 6226 2018
Postal Address
University of Tasmania
Private Bag 51
Hobart TAS 7001
World Wide Web Access
www.utas.edu.au
Main Campuses
Hobart
Churchill Avenue, Sandy Bay
Hobart TAS 7005
Private Bag 51, Hobart TAS 7001
Telephone: (03) 6226 2999
Launceston
Newnham Drive, Newnham
Launceston TAS 7250
Locked Bag 1351, Launceston TAS 7250
Telephone: (03) 6324 3999
Cradle Coast
16-20 Mooreville Road
Burnie TAS 7320
PO Box 3502, Burnie TAS 7320
Telephone: (03) 6430 4999
Campuses, Institutes
and Clinical Schools
Northern and North-West Tasmania
Anne O’Byrne Centre – Rural Health
Locked Bag 1372
Launceston TAS 7250
Telephone: (03) 6324 4000
Australian Maritime College
Locked Bag 1399
Launceston TAS 7250
Telephone: (03) 6335 4711
92 | university of tasmania
Inveresk Campus
Launceston Campus
University of Tasmania
Locked Bag 1362
Launceston TAS 7250
Telephone: (03) 6324 4400
Launceston Clinical School
School of Medicine
Level 2, Launceston General Hospital
Charles Street
Launceston TAS 7250
Telephone: (03) 6348 8792
North West Rural Clinical School
PO Box 3513
Burnie TAS 7320
Telephone: (03) 6430 4550
Southern Tasmania
Southern Tasmania
Centre for the Arts
University of Tasmania
Private Bag 57
Hobart TAS 7001
Telephone: (03) 6226 4300
Clinical School
University of Tasmania
Private Bag 68
Hobart TAS 7001
Telephone: (03) 6226 4757
Conservatorium of Music
University of Tasmania
Private Bag 63
Hobart TAS 7001
Telephone: (03) 6226 7314
Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies
University of Tasmania
Private Bag 129
Hobart TAS 7001
Telephone: (03) 6226 6379
Menzies Research Institute Tasmania
Medical Science 1
University of Tasmania
Private Bag 23
Hobart TAS 7001
Telephone: (03) 6226 7700
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