qb3at205

qb3at205
IBM Network Station
Using IBM Network Station Manager
V2R1, September 2000
To view or print the latest update, go to http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs
SC41-0690-00
IBM Network Station
Using IBM Network Station Manager
V2R1, September 2000
To view or print the latest update, go to http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs
SC41-0690-00
Note
Before using this information and the product it supports, be sure to read the information in “Appendix F. Notices” on
page 99.
This edition applies to version 2, release 1, modification 0 of IBM Network Station Manager (product number
5648-C07) and to all subsequent releases and modifications until otherwise indicated in new editions.
© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 1999. All rights reserved.
US Government Users Restricted Rights – Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule Contract
with IBM Corp.
Contents
v
Who should read this book . . . . . . . . . v
Information available on the World Wide Web . . . v
Related information . . . . . . . . . . . . v
How to send your comments . . . . . . . . vi
Chapter 1. Logging in to your IBM
Network Station . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Getting started. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Roam function . . . . . . . . .
Initial desktop folders and applications . . . .
Host Access folder . . . . . . . . . .
Netscape Communicator . . . . . . . .
Network Station Manager . . . . . . .
Extras folder . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tool Kit. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Desktop logoff, help, and lock screen functions
Managing your desktop applications . . . . .
Understanding printer datastreams . . . . .
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9
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16
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Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network
Station Manager program. . . . . . . 21
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Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Network Station Manager program flow . . .
Who can use the IBM Network Station Manager
program? . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with IBM Network Station Manager
program preference selections . . . . . . .
Starting the IBM Network Station Manager program
Examples of working with the IBM Network Station
Manager program Setup Tasks . . . . . . . .
Setting the administrator password . . . . .
Configuring a custom folder. . . . . . . .
Adding an application to a folder . . . . . .
Adding the Calibration Tools application to a
folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving an application to a different folder . . .
Automatically starting applications on your
Network Station desktop . . . . . . . . .
Configuring a Network Station for light pen or
touch screen devices . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the 5250 Emulator application for
use on the Network Station . . . . . . . .
Configuring the Netscape Communicator
browser for Java . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disabling the Network Station screen saver. . .
Controlling color on your Network Station
desktop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Automatically updating the boot code . . . .
Overriding the Network Station boot setting . .
Updating the Domain Name Server (DNS)
configuration on the Network Station. . . . .
Configuring a local program for all users . . .
Configuring a remote program for all users. . .
Configuring an ICA connection to a PC server. .
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
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48
50
52
Allowing private user updates of ICA connection
entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Java for the Network Station . . .
Including system, group, or user preferences in a
kiosk profile . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the IBM Network Station Manager
program to enable the touchscreen daemon. . .
Configuring a local area network-attached printer
Configuring a Network Station-attached printer
for other users . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Time Zone (TZ) Environment Variable
Accessing and using How To Help . . . . .
56
59
59
59
60
61
62
64
Chapter 3. Working With the IBM
Network Station Setup Utility and the
NS Boot Utility . . . . . . . . . . . 65
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Type 8361 (Series 300) and Type 8362 (Series 1000)
Accessing the IBM Network Station setup utility
IBM Network Station setup utility tasks . . .
The NS Boot utility for Series 2200 and Series 2800
thin clients . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Identifying the NS Boot version . . . . .
Updating the NS Boot utility version on a Series
2200 or 2800 thin client . . . . . . . .
Updating the NS Boot utility version of several
thin clients . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the NS Boot utility . . . . . . . .
NS Boot utility tasks . . . . . . . . .
65
65
. 66
. 75
. 75
. 76
. 76
. 77
. 78
Appendix A. Problem resolution . . . . 83
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Appendix B. Using special characters
in the Optional Parameters field . . . . 87
Operators . . .
Reserved words .
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Appendix C. Using TN3270E display
support and printer support . . . . . 89
Configuring persistent 3270 LU session names. . .
Valid types of -DISPLAY_NAME parameters . .
Configuring printers with the IBM Network Station
Manager program . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring TN3270E general printer support . . .
Configuring TN3270E application-specific printer
support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
89
89
91
91
92
Appendix D. Updating the NS Boot
version H2033190 (03/31/99) . . . . . 93
Selecting the operating system for the Network
Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Updating the H2033190 (03/31/99) NS Boot version
from NVRAM settings. . . . . . . . . . . 94
iii
Updating the H2033190 (03/31/99) NS Boot version
from a DHCP server . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Appendix F. Notices . . . . . . . . . 99
Appendix E. Resetting the Series 2800
(Type 8364) Network Station to the NS
Boot utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
iv
Using IBM Network Station Manager
Trademarks .
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. 101
Who should read this book
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Note: Be careful not to confuse the V2R1 IBM Network Station Manager program
with the V2R1 IBM NetVista Thin Client Manager Operations Utility. While
both programs enable you to manage IBM Network Station and IBM
NetVista thin clients remotely, these programs differ in the following ways:
v These programs enable you to manage different types of thin clients.
v These programs can only be installed on specific server platforms.
v These programs support different thin client management tasks.
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Information available on the World Wide Web
You can obtain the latest version of this book on the World Wide Web from the
following URL: http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs This is the same URL that is printed
on the cover of this book.
Related information
The following information is available for the IBM Network Station Manager
product:
Information name
Information description
Installing IBM Network Station
Manager for AS/400, SC41-0684
Describes the installation and simple configuration of an
AS/400 Network Station environment. It is shipped with
the IBM Network Station Manager licensed program.
Updates to this information are at
http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs.
Installing IBM Network Station
Manager for RS/6000, SC41-0685
Describes the installation and simple configuration of an
RS/6000 Network Station environment. It is shipped
with the IBM Network Station Manager licensed
program. Updates to this information are at
http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs.
Installing IBM Network Station
Manager for Windows NT, SC41-0688
Describes the installation and simple configuration of a
Windows NT Network Station environment. It is shipped
with the IBM Network Station Manager licensed
program. Updates to this information are at
http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs.
Using IBM Network Station Manager,
SC41-0690
Describes the basic tasks for managing user desktops
through the IBM Network Station Manager program. It
is shipped with the IBM Network Station Manager
licensed program. Updates to this information are at
http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs.
IBM Network Station Advanced
Information
Describes tasks and information beyond a basic
installation and configuration of your Network Station
environment. This information is only available at
http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
v
Information name
Information description
IBM Network Station Manager help text Describes the basic how-to tasks for configuring your
Network Station desktop appearance. This information is
availble by clicking the help icon in the IBM Network
Station Manager program.
Desktop help
Describes how to use and operate the Network Station
desktop. This information is available by clicking the
help icon in the lower right of the Network Station
desktop.
How to send your comments
Your feedback is important in helping to provide the most accurate and
high-quality information. If you have any comments about this book or any other
documentation, fill out the readers’ comment form at the back of this book.
v If you prefer to send comments by mail, use the readers’ comment form with the
address that is printed on the back. If you are mailing a readers’ comment form
from a country other than the United States, you can give the form to the local
IBM branch office or IBM representative for postage-paid mailing.
v If
–
–
v If
–
you prefer to send comments by FAX, use either of the following numbers:
United States and Canada: 1-800-937-3430
Other countries: 1-507-253-5192
you prefer to send comments electronically, use this network ID:
IBMMAIL, to IBMMAIL(USIB56RZ)
– [email protected]
Be sure to include the following:
v The name of the book.
v The publication number of the book.
v The page number or topic to which your comment applies.
vi
Using IBM Network Station Manager
Chapter 1. Logging in to your IBM Network Station
Getting started. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Using the Roam function . . . . . . . . . . 1
Initial desktop folders and applications . . . . . 2
Host Access folder . . . . . . . . . . . 3
5250 Emulator . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
3270 Emulator . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
VT Emulator . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
ICA Remote Application Manager . . . . . 7
Understanding software combinations . . . . 9
Netscape Communicator . . . . . . . . . 9
Netscape Communicator supported URL types 10
Netscape Communicator supported
commands and helper applications . . . . 11
Network Station Manager . . . . . . . . 11
Extras folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
File Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
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Text Editor . . . . . . . . . . .
Paint . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calculator . . . . . . . . . . . .
Video Player . . . . . . . . . . .
Audio Player . . . . . . . . . . .
RealPlayer . . . . . . . . . . . .
JMF 1.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tool Kit. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calibration Tools . . . . . . . . .
Advanced Diagnostics . . . . . . . .
Print Monitor. . . . . . . . . . .
Desktop logoff, help, and lock screen functions
Managing your desktop applications . . . . .
Understanding printer datastreams . . . . .
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Getting started
After you power on your IBM Network Station thin client (hereafter referred to as
Network Station), the IBM Network Station Login screen appears (see Figure 1).
You can log in by typing your username and password in the appropriate fields.
Figure 1. IBM Network Station Login screen
Using the Roam function
Roam allows a user to log in to a server other than the server that is displayed on
the IBM Network Station Login screen.
Notes:
1. The User ID and password are subject to the same length restrictions that are
found on the boot server. If your boot server is an AS/400, for example, and
you wish to roam to a Windows NT server, your User ID cannot be more than
10 characters long. This is a length restriction that exists on the AS/400 boot
server.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
1
2. You can only roam to servers that are at IBM Network Station Manager Version
2 Release 1. You can not roam to a Version 1 server.
To log in to a server other than the server name that is displayed on the IBM
Network Station Login screen, take the following steps:
1. Click Roam, a prompt for a network address appears (see Figure 2).
2. For the server where your user account is established, type:
v The name of the server
v The Internet Protocol (IP) address, or
v The system name.
Click OK.
3. Enter your Username and Password on the IBM Network Station Login
screen, and click OK.
Figure 2. Network Address Screen used for roaming
For more information about roaming, and working with multiple servers, see IBM
Network Station Advanced Information at the following website:
http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs
Initial desktop folders and applications
The folders and applications that are discussed in this chapter are pre-configured
and shipped by IBM. You can find these folders and applications on the Network
Station desktop launch bar. The launch bar is located on the left side of the
Network Station desktop (see Figure 3 on page 3).
2
Using IBM Network Station Manager
Figure 3. Network Station desktop
You can change the launch bar location of folders, and the applications and
contents of a particular folder by using the IBM Network Station Manager
program. See “Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program” on
page 21 for more information. The following desktop folders and applications are
pre-configured and shipped by IBM:
v Host Access folder
v Netscape application
v Network Station Manager program
v Extras folder
v Tool Kit folder
Host Access folder
The Host Access folder contains applications that give users access to different
hosts through emulation sessions or, in the case of ICA, a direct connection. The
following applications are contained in the Host Access folder:
v 5250 Emulator
v 3270 Emulator
v VT Emulator
v ICA Remote Application Manager
5250 Emulator
Chapter 1. Logging in to your IBM Network Station
3
The 5250 Emulator application provides access to AS/400 systems. You can
configure 5250 sessions by using the Network Station Manager program. If you
configure the 5250 session to autostart, a 5250 session appears on your Network
Station immediately after login (see Figure 4).
5250 emulation provides AS/400 system users with greater function than they
normally receive if they use nonprogrammable work stations (NWS) to access the
system. Additional function is available by clicking various pulldown options from
the 5250 menu bar. Pulldown options allow users to quickly access 5250 emulation
functions. Functions such as multi-session support, font selection, screen printing,
and on-line help information are examples of some pulldown options available
from the 5250 menu bar.
Figure 4. 5250 session display
Locate the 5250 Emulator icon in the Host Access folder to start a new 5250
session (see Figure 5 on page 5).
4
Using IBM Network Station Manager
Figure 5. New 5250 session dialog box
Note: You can use the system name or the IP address of the system to connect to
or start a session.
The sign-on screen may take a few moments to display, depending on the volume
of network traffic.
You can access on-line help for the 5250 Emulator or your AS/400 session by
clicking Help from the session window. Accessing the 5250 emulation on-line help
provides more information about how to make each of these 5250 emulation
functions work. To access help for AS/400, sign on to the AS/400 and press F1.
3270 Emulator
The 3270 Emulator application provides access to System/390 systems. You can
configure 3270 sessions by using the Network Station Manager program.
3270 emulation provides System/390 system users with greater function than they
normally receive if they use nonprogrammable work stations (NWS) to access the
system. Additional function is available by clicking various pulldown options from
the 3270 menu bar. Pulldown options allow users to quickly access 3270 emulation
functions. Functions such as multi-session support, font selection, screen printing,
and on-line help information are examples of some pulldown options available
from the 3270 menu bar.
If you configure the 3270 session to autostart, a 3270 session appears immediately
after login (see Figure 6 on page 6).
Chapter 1. Logging in to your IBM Network Station
5
Figure 6. 3270 Session display
Locate the 3270 Emulator icon in the Host Access folder to open a New 3270
Session window (see Figure 7).
Figure 7. New 3270 Session dialog box
Note: You can use the system name or IP address to log on.
The sign-on screen may take a few moments to display, depending on the volume
of network traffic.
You can access on-line help for the 3270 Emulator or your System/390 session by
clicking Help.
6
Using IBM Network Station Manager
Accessing the 3270 emulator on-line help provides more information about how to
make each of these 3270 emulation functions work.
VT Emulator
The VT Emulator application provides access to RS/6000 systems. You can
configure VT emulation sessions by using the Network Station Manager program.
VT emulation provides RS/6000 system users with greater function than they
normally receive if they use nonprogrammable work stations (NWS) to access the
system. Additional function is available by clicking various pulldown options from
the VT emulator Menu bar.
Pulldown options allow users to quickly access VT emulator functions. Pulldowns
are available to allow you to quickly access VT emulator functions. Functions such
as Reset, Trace Log, and Print Screen are examples of some pulldown options
available from the VT emulator menu bar.
If the VT Emulator session is configured to autostart, a VT Emulator session
appears immediately after login.
Click the VT Emulator icon, located in the Host Access folder, to open a New VT
Emulator Session window (see Figure 8).
Figure 8. VT Emulator Dialog Box
Note: You can use the system name or IP address to log on.
The sign-on screen may take a few moments to display, depending on the volume
of network traffic.
You can access on-line help for the VT Emulator or your AIX session by clicking
Help.
Accessing the VT emulator on-line help provides more information about how to
make each of these emulation functions work.
ICA Remote Application Manager
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The ICA Remote Application Manager provides access to one or more
ICA-configured PC servers that support ICA (Independent Computing
Chapter 1. Logging in to your IBM Network Station
7
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Architecture). The ICA Remote Application Manager works with PC servers that
have WinFrame or MetaFrame installed. You can configure the presentation of each
session by using the Network Station Manager program.
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The ICA Remote Application Manager allows you to create new connection
definitions, or edit the definitions of existing connections. You can configure new
ICA connections from your desktop by using the IBM Network Station Manager
program.
If you configure the ICA Client session to autostart, the ICA Remote Application
Manager will appear immediately after login. Otherwise, click the ICA Remote
Application Manager application, located in the Host Access folder (see Figure 9).
Figure 9. ICA Client Session display
The ICA Remote Application Manager program presents PC server connection
entries. You can select one of the PC server connection entries to open an ICA
Client window, which displays the available PC server choices.
When the user selects a PC server, the ICA client program starts on the Network
Station. The ICA client program then connects to the requested PC server. After the
user logs onto the PC server, the Windows-based application specified for that
connection starts. The list of PC servers from which the user may select is created
two ways:
1. The system administrator can create ICA connection entries by using the IBM
Network Station program. You can add, change, or remove ICA connection
entries by selecting Applications—>ICA Remote Application Manager from
the Setup Tasks menu of the IBM Network Station Manager program. The ICA
connection entries created by the system administrator with the ICA Remote
Application Manager program are stored in a Network Station Manager profile.
2. If the system administrator allows private user updates, then the user can add,
change, or remove their own private connection entries. Users can also use the
ICA Remote Application Manager program; however, users access this program
from their Network Station desktop. They do not use the IBM Network Station
Manager program interface.
Note: Private users connection entries are stored in the home directory of the
user. These are not stored in a Network Station Manager profile.
8
Using IBM Network Station Manager
The sign-on screen can take a few moments to display, depending on the volume
of network traffic.
You can allow users to configure their own ICA connections with the IBM Network
Station Manager program. See “Configuring an ICA connection to a PC server” on
page 52, and “Allowing private user updates of ICA connection entries” on page 56
for additional information.
Understanding software combinations
Citrix is a company that supplies software products. The products come bundled
with Windows NT 3.51 and Windows NT 4.0, and allow you to load a Windows
NT desktop session from the server onto your IBM Network Station. You can
access your Windows-based applications with the Windows NT session. The
following items are Citrix software products:
v Citrix WinFrame
Citrix WinFrame is a bundled combination of WinFrame and ICA. You use Citrix
WinFrame with Windows NT 3.51 as a Windows application server. You can
order WinFrame from Citrix. When you order WinFrame 1.7, you receive
Windows NT 3.51 with WinFrame built on to it. See the Citrix WinFrame
manual to configure your printers.
v Citrix MetaFrame
MetaFrame is a bundled combination of MetaFrame and ICA. You can order
MetaFrame software separately and install it on the Windows NT 4.0 Terminal
Server Edition (TSE). See the Citrix MetaFrame manual to configure your
printers.
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For more information relating to PC servers, you can go to the following Web sites:
v WinFrame and MetaFrame — http://www.citrix.com
v WinCenter — http://www.ncd.com
v Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition — http://www.microsoft.com
Netscape Communicator
The Netscape icon provides access to the Netscape Communicator application.
The Netscape Communicator application provides you with a browser session
capable of reaching the Internet, or your local Intranet.
The Netscape Communicator application appears on your desktop when you click
the Netscape icon (see Figure 10 on page 10).
Chapter 1. Logging in to your IBM Network Station
9
Figure 10. Netscape Communicator
You can configure the appearance and function of Netscape by using the IBM
Network Station Manager program. See “Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network
Station Manager program” on page 21 for additional information. Select
Applications—>Netscape from the Setup Tasks menu of the IBM Network Station
Manager program, and configure the following features or settings of the Netscape
Communicator application:
v Proxy configurations
v
v
v
v
Java applets (enable or disable running Java applets)
Mail server type
Java Classpaths (Internet Foundation Classes, IIOP, JavaScript Debugger, LDAP)
Java heap, stack, and Native code size
Netscape Communicator supported URL types
Netscape Communicator supports the following URL types:
Table 1. Netscape Communicator supported URL types
10
URL type
Description
http://
Hypertext transfer protocol
https://
Hypertext transfer protocol through SSL
ftp://
File transfer protocol
news://
NNTP protocol
snews://
NNTP protocol through SSL
news:
Default news server
ldap://
Lightweight directory access protocol
gopher://
Gopher protocol
telnet://
Launches telnet helper application
javascript:
Runs JavaScript statements
mocha:
Runs JavaScript statements
pop3://
Post office protocol
Using IBM Network Station Manager
Table 1. Netscape Communicator supported URL types (continued)
URL type
Description
addbook:
Adds vCard entries to the Communicator address book
about:
Netscape internal URLs
file://
Local file system access
mailbox:
Mail folder access
imap://
Internet Message Access Protocol
Netscape Communicator supported commands and helper
applications
Netscape Communicator supports the following commands and helper
applications:
Helper Application or
Command
Description
Java Plug-in
The Java Plug-in allows Netscape to use the IBM JVM
(Java Virtual Machine) instead of the default JVM that is
shipped with Netscape
xpdf
xpdf is a viewer for Portable Document Format (PDF)
files (also called ’Acrobat’ files, because of the Adobe
Acrobat PDF software).
Note: xpdf was designed to create postscript files, but
cannot spool data to a printer.
If the first character of the postscript output file name is a
| (pipe), xpdf will pipe postscript data to a command,
instead of creating a file.
To print to the first parallel port, specify the following for
the output filename: |lpr -PPARALLEL1.
xterm
xterm provides an X windows session.
ncaudio
ncaudio is an audio player application that supports the
following audio file types extensions: aif, aiff, aifc, au, and
wav.
realaudio
realaudio is an audio player application that supports
rpm audio file extensions.
ncedit
ncedit is a text editor application that supports the
following text file extensions: rtf and rtx.
ncxanim
ncxanim is a video player application that supports the
following video file extensions: mpeg, mpg, mpe, avi, qt,
mov, movie.
rvplayer
rvplayer is a video application that supports the swf
video file extension.
Network Station Manager
Chapter 1. Logging in to your IBM Network Station
11
The Network Station Manager icon provides access to the Network Station
Manager program. IBM pre-configures the icon to launch the Network Station
Manager program on your user configuration server.
You can use the Network Station Manager program to build your Network Station
desktop and customize your folders and applications.
After you click the Network Station Manager icon and authenticate your userid,
the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program appears (see
Figure 11).
Figure 11. IBM Network Station Manager program
Access the Network Station Manager program when you want to make changes to
Network Station user desktops. You can configure applications, change application
settings, create environment variables, and customize folders and applications for
the launch bar with this application.
To learn more about the Network Station Manager program, refer to “Chapter 2.
Using the IBM Network Station Manager program” on page 21.
Extras folder
The Extras folder contains icons that give you access to a variety of specialized
applications. You can access the following applications from the Extras folder:
12
Using IBM Network Station Manager
v
v
v
v
v
File Manager
Text Editor
Calendar
RealPlayer
Calculator
v Paint
v Audio Player
v Video Player
File Manager
You can access the File Manager application from the Extras folder. The Network
Station File Manager allows you to view, organize, and manage your personal
folders and files.
Note: You must store audio and video files in the following directory for users to
access them from the Network Station:
v /userbase/home/"username"/registry/documents where "username" is the
User ID of the user.
Files that are stored in the home directory, or public_html directory of a user
will not be accessible with the File Manager application.
The File Manager on-line help provides information on the following topics:
v Managing file manager windows
v Managing folders (creating, renaming, deleting, moving)
v Managing files (renaming, deleting, editing, moving, sending)
Text Editor
You can access the Text Editor application from the Extras folder.
The Text Editor on-line help provides information on the following tasks:
v Creating files
v Opening files
v Saving files
v Formatting text
v Inserting images
v Creating links
v Manage files (renaming, deleting, editing, moving, sending)
Paint
Chapter 1. Logging in to your IBM Network Station
13
You can access the Paint application from the Extras folder. The Paint application
allows you to work with images and graphics.
The Paint application on-line help provides information on the following tasks:
v Managing files and folders
v Using the Colors Palette
v Changing graphic views
v
v
v
v
Changing image sizes
Using paint tools
Using text tools
Using cut, copy, paste within the application
Calendar
You can access the Calendar application from the Extras folder. The Calendar
application allows you to manage your personal calendar.
The Calendar application on-line help provides information on:
v
v
v
v
Using the To Do list
Using an Events list (single event or repeating events)
Appointment list
Printing your calendar
Calculator
You can access the Calculator application from the Extras folder. The Calculator
application allows you to perform mathematical operations.
Video Player
You can access the Video Player application from the Extras folder. The Video
Player allows you to play video files on your desktop.
Note: You must store audio and video files in the following directory for users to
access them from the Network Station:
v /userbase/home/"username"/registry/documents where "username" is the
User ID of the user.
Files that are stored in the home directory, or public_html directory of a user
will not be accessible with the File Manager application.
The Video Player on-line help provides information on the following topics:
v Supported video file types (AVI, MPEG, QuickTime)
v How to play a file
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
v Volume control
v Finding and correcting problems
Audio Player
You can access the Audio Player application from the Extras folder. The Audio
Player allows you to play or record audio files from your desktop.
Note: You must store audio and video files in the following directory for users to
access them from the Network Station:
v /userbase/home/"username"/registry/documents where "username" is the
User ID of the user.
Files that are stored in the home directory, or public_html directory of a user
will not be accessible with the File Manager application.
The Audio Player on-line help provides information on the following topics:
v Supported audio file types (AU, WAV, AIF, Real Audio 3.0)
v Loading a file
v Volume control
v Fast-forward
v Record.
v Finding and correcting problems
RealPlayer
You can access the RealPlayer application from the Extras folder.
Note: Version V2R1 supports RealPlayer Version 5.0.
The RealPlayer application allows you to play video and audio files from your
desktop. This application supports AVI, MPEG, and QuickTime video file types.
The RealPlayer application on-line help provides information on the following
topics:
v Loading a file
v Volume control
v Fast-forwarding
v Finding and correcting problems
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JMF 1.1
PTF4 of the V2R1 IBM Network Station Manager program includes the Java Media
Framework 1.1 application. JMF 1.1 allows you to view and listen to video and
audio files from your desktop. JMF 1.1 supports AVI, QT, MPG, and MOV (2.0)
video file types, and WAV, AU, AIFF, and MPG audio file types.
Chapter 1. Logging in to your IBM Network Station
15
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To add this application to the Extras folder on the Network Station desktop, see
the example, “Adding an application to a folder” on page 33. You can also add JMF
support to your Netscape Communicator browser from the IBM Network Station
Manager program. See “Configuring the Netscape Communicator browser for
Java” on page 40.
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If you would like to learn more about programming Java applications and
incorporating JMF 1.1 in them, browse the http://javasoft.com web site for Java
Media Framework, listed under the Products and APIs link.
Tool Kit
The Tool Kit folder contains applications that give you access to diagnostic and
service tools. The Tool Kit folder contains the following applications:
v Calibration Tools
v Advanced Diagnostics
v Print Monitor
Calibration Tools
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The Calibration Tools application allows you to calibrate touch screens or light
pens that are connected to the Network Station. The Calibration Tools icon can
only appear on a Network Station desktop when you have configured the
workstation settings of that Network Station for touch screens or light pens.
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There are two ways that you can configure the workstation settings for Network
Stations, and enable the Calibration Tools icon to appear on the Network Station
desktop:
1. You can use the IBM Network Station Manager program to configure one
Network Station at a time so that the Calibration Tools icon appears on the
Network Station desktop (see “Configuring a Network Station for light pen or
touch screen devices” on page 39).
2. You can use the command line utility to configure more than one Network
Station at a time so that the Calibration Tools icon appears on the Network
Station desktop. For more information about the command line utility, see IBM
Network Station Advanced Information at the following website:
http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs
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Advanced Diagnostics
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The Advanced Diagnostics icon provides access to the Advanced Diagnostics
application, which you can access from the Tool Kit folder.
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
Advanced Diagnostics allows you to run commands to monitor and diagnose
problems with your Network Station. The following are Advanced Diagnostics
commands:
v - arp (address resolution display and control)
The arp program displays and changes the Internet-to-Ethernet address
conversion tables that are used by the address resolution protocol (arp(4)).
With no flags, the program displays the current ARP entry for host name. You
can specify the host by name or by number, using Internet dot notation.
v -iostat
iostat command monitors system input and output device loading by observing
the time the physical disks are active in relation to their average transfer rates.
The iostat command generates reports that you can use to change system
configuration to better balance the input and output load between physical
disks.
v -netstat
The netstat command symbolically displays the contents of various
network-related data structures for active connections. The Interval parameter,
specified in seconds, continuously displays information regarding packet traffic
on the configured network interfaces. The Interval parameter takes no flags.
The System parameter specifies the memory that is used by the current kernel.
Unless you are looking at a file of the contents of main or auxiliary storage, the
System parameter should be /unix.
v -nfsstat
The nfsstat command shows statistical information pertaining to the ability of a
client or server to receive calls. You can also use this command to reset this
statistical information to 0 (zero). If you receive no flags, the default is nfsstat
-csnr. With this option, the command shows everything, but resets nothing.
v -pstat
The pstat command is a non-interactive form of the crash command. pstat
interprets the contents of the various system tables and writes it to standard
output. You must have root user or system group authority to run the pstat
command.
v -traceroute
The traceroute command tries to trace the route that an IP packet follows to an
Internet host by launching UDP probe packets with a small maximum time-to-live
(Max_ttl variable). Then the traceroute command listens for an ICMP
TIME_EXCEEDED response from gateways along the way. Probes are started with a
Max_ttl value of one hop, which is increased one hop at a time until an ICMP
PORT_UNREACHABLE message is returned. The ICMP PORT_UNREACHABLE message
indicates either that the host has been located or that the command has reached
the maximum number of hops allowed.
Note: The traceroute command is intended for use in network testing,
measurement, and management. It should be used primarily for manual
fault isolation. Because of the load it imposes on the network, the
traceroute command should not be used during normal operations or
from automated scripts.
v -vmstat
The vmstat command reports statistics about processes, virtual storage, disks,
traps, and central processing unit (CPU) activity. Reports generated by the
vmstat command can be used to balance system load activity.
Chapter 1. Logging in to your IBM Network Station
17
If the vmstat command is called without flags, the report contains a summary of
the virtual memory activity since system startup. If the -f flag is specified, the
vmstat command reports the number of forks since system startup. The
PhysicalVolume parameter specifies the name of the physical volume.
Print Monitor
You can access the Print Monitor application from the Tool Kit folder. Figure 12
appears after clicking the Print Monitor icon.
Figure 12. Print Monitor
The Print Monitor application allows you to control printing operations. You can
view, move, and cancel print jobs on selected printers. The Print Monitor on-line
help provides additional information.
Desktop logoff, help, and lock screen functions
You can log off, access desktop help, and lock your screen by clicking on the
following icons:
Note: You can configure these icons from the IBM Network Station Manager
program. Configuration options include the ability to remove them from the
desktop.
The logoff icon prompts you for logoff confirmation when clicked.
The Help icon provides access to the desktop help information.
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
The lock icon prompts you for lock screen confirmation when clicked.
Managing your desktop applications
The design of your Network Station desktop, quantity, and location of folders and
applications is controlled by the IBM Network Station Manager program. This
program provides a browser-based graphical interface, allowing you to determine
the configuration for all Network Station users, groups of users, or individual
users.
See “Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program” on page 21 for
more detailed information.
Understanding printer datastreams
It is important that you know the datastreams which your default applications
(those applications that are shipped with the IBM Network Station Manager
licensed program) produce. Knowing which datastream each application produces
allows you to choose a printer capable of processing and printing the files that
your applications create. Table 2 shows the supported datastreams for each
application.
Table 2. Applications and Datastreams
Desktop Location and
Default Application Name
PostScript
Datastream
PCL Datastream
ASCII Datastream
Host Access - 5250 Session
X
X
X
Host Access - 3270 Session
X
X
X
Host Access - Windows-based
Applications
X
Host Access - VT Emulation
X
X
X
On Launch Bar - Netscape
Communicator
X
Extras - File Manager
X
Extras - Text Editor
X
Extras - Calendar
X
Extras - Paint
X
You can use the IBM Network Station Manager program to administer printers for
your Network Station users.
“Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program” on page 21
provides the following examples of using printers from a Network Station:
1. “Configuring a local area network-attached printer” on page 60.
2. “Configuring a Network Station-attached printer for other users” on page 61.
Chapter 1. Logging in to your IBM Network Station
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program
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Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Network Station Manager program flow . . .
Who can use the IBM Network Station Manager
program? . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System administrators . . . . . . . . .
Individual users . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with IBM Network Station Manager
program preference selections . . . . . . .
Additive preference selections . . . . . .
Working with workstation preference
selections . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the IBM Network Station Manager program
Examples of working with the IBM Network Station
Manager program Setup Tasks . . . . . . . .
Setting the administrator password . . . . .
Configuring a custom folder. . . . . . . .
Adding an application to a folder . . . . . .
Adding the Calibration Tools application to a
folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving an application to a different folder . . .
Automatically starting applications on your
Network Station desktop . . . . . . . . .
Configuring a Network Station for light pen or
touch screen devices . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the 5250 Emulator application for
use on the Network Station . . . . . . . .
Configuring the Netscape Communicator
browser for Java . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disabling the Network Station screen saver. . .
Controlling color on your Network Station
desktop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the desktop theme function of the
Desktop Display Setup Task . . . . . . .
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Using the pop-up menu accessible from your
Network Station desktop . . . . . . . .
Using the Screen saver setting in the
Workstations function of the Hardware Setup
Task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Desktop background setting in the
Workstations function of the Hardware Setup
Task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Automatically updating the boot code . . . .
Overriding the Network Station boot setting . .
Updating the Domain Name Server (DNS)
configuration on the Network Station. . . . .
Configuring a local program for all users . . .
Configuring a remote program for all users. . .
Setting up an AIX session icon on the desktop
launch bar . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring an ICA connection to a PC server. .
Defining an ICA connection entry . . . . .
Connecting to local printers with the ICA
Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Carrying out ICA load balancing . . . . .
Allowing private user updates of ICA connection
entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Java for the Network Station . . .
Including system, group, or user preferences in a
kiosk profile . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the IBM Network Station Manager
program to enable the touchscreen daemon. . .
Configuring a local area network-attached printer
Configuring a Network Station-attached printer
for other users . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Time Zone (TZ) Environment Variable
Accessing and using How To Help . . . . .
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Overview
The IBM Network Station Manager program is a browser-based application that
you can use to perform the following tasks:
v To construct the launch bar for the Network Station desktop:
You use the Desktop->Launch Bar function of the application to configure the
types and number of folders and applications. Figure 3 on page 3 shows the
IBM-shipped Network Station launch bar and desktop.
v To configure settings for:
– The System - All IBM Network Station thin clients or all Network Station
users.
– A Group - A group of Network Station users.
– A User - A specific Network Station user.
– A Workstation - A specific Network Station.
v To configure or customize specific setup tasks:
– Hardware, such as workstations and printers.
– Applications, such as 5250 sessions, Netscape Communicator, or locally or
remotely configured programs.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
21
– Desktop look and content, such as font size, icon placement, and desktop
background.
– Environment and Administration, such as network settings such as proxies, as
well as language settings for messages and menus.
Note: Be careful not to confuse the V2R1 IBM Network Station Manager program
with the V2R1 IBM NetVista Thin Client Manager Operations Utility. While
both programs enable you to manage IBM Network Station and IBM
NetVista thin clients remotely, these programs differ in the following ways:
v These programs enable you to manage different types of thin clients.
v These programs can only be installed on specific server platforms.
v These programs support different thin client management tasks.
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Refer to Figure 13 on page 23 to view the main screen of the IBM Network Station
Manager program. The frame at the left of the screen contains the Setup Tasks
menu. Setup tasks are selected functions of various applications that you can
manage from the IBM Network Station Manager program.
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Examples of tasks you can perform from the IBM Network Station Manager
program include:
v Configuring printers (under Hardware).
v Customizing a 5250 session (under Applications).
v Changing font size for icons and menus (under Desktop—>Display).
v Configuring folders and applications for the Network Station desktop (under
Desktop—>Launch Bar).
v Adding mount points for the Network Station thin clients (under
Environment—>Network).
Note: All of these examples are configurable.
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
Figure 13. Network Station Manager program main screen
See Figure 14 on page 24 for an expanded list of setup tasks that you can manage
with the IBM Network Station Manager program.
Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program
23
Figure 14. Setup tasks supported by the IBM Network Station Manager program
IBM Network Station Manager program flow
See Figure 15 on page 25 for a view of the IBM Network Station Manager program
flow. Figure 15 on page 25 highlights the differences between the preference
selections and setup tasks with which a system administrator and user can work.
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
Figure 15. IBM Network Station Manager program layout
Who can use the IBM Network Station Manager program?
Both system administrators and users can access and use the IBM Network Station
Manager program (see Figure 15). The special authorities defined on the host
server determine the level of function available to users.
On an AS/400, for example, system administrators must have special authorities
(SPCAUT (*SECADM and *ALLOBJ) authority). Other users should have a level of
authority less than *SECADM and *ALLOBJ.
Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program
25
Windows NT users must be in the NSMUser group. Windows NT administrators
must be in the NSMAdmin group in addition to the NSMUser group.
For RS/6000, users must have a userid on the same server that the IBM Network
Station Manager program is installed. Administrators must be either root or a
member of the NSMAdmin group.
System administrators
System administrators have full access to the IBM Network Station Manager
program. System administrators can work at system-wide levels, or for a specific
group, user, or workstation. For example, an administrator could specify that all
Network Station users have one 5250 emulation session available, and that one
particular user could have an additional 5250 emulation session.
For information about how to sign on to the IBM Network Station Manager
program, see “Starting the IBM Network Station Manager program” on page 29.
Figure 16 shows the screen a system administrator sees after signing onto the IBM
Network Station Manager program. Notice the range of functions that are
presented in the Setup Tasks menu.
Note: The appearance of this screen varies, depending on the browser you are
using.
Figure 16. System administrator level
Figure 17 on page 27 compares these functions to the range of functions that are
available to users.
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
Individual users
Users can also have access to the IBM Network Station Manager program.
However, the functions that a user can work with are limited.
Figure 17 shows the screen that a user would see after signing on to the IBM
Network Station Manager program. Notice the range of functions that are
presented in the Setup Tasks menu.
Figure 17. User level
The flexibility of the IBM Network Station Manager program allows broad
system-wide settings management by the administrator, and individual settings
management by the user.
Working with IBM Network Station Manager program
preference selections
The IBM-supplied preference selections are the default selections that are
supported by the IBM Network Station Manager program. For example, the
IBM-supplied default preference selection for mouse button configuration is
right-handed.
You can not change IBM-supplied preference selections. You can override
IBM-supplied preference selections by using the IBM Network Station Manager
program feature of System or User level preference selections.
There are four levels of preference selection:
Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program
27
v System-level preference selections. You can use system-level preference
selections to change settings for all users or all workstations. System preference
selections take precedence over IBM-supplied preference selections.
v Group preference selections. You can use group preference selections to change
settings for all users that are in a specific group. Group preference selections
take precedence over system-wide preference selections and IBM-supplied
preference selections.
v User preference selections. You can use user preference selections to change
settings for an individual user. User preference selections take precedence over
IBM-supplied, system-wide, and group preference selections.
v Workstation preference selections. You can use workstation preference
selections to change settings for workstations. Workstation preference selections
take precedence over IBM-supplied and System-level preference selections.
Additive preference selections
Settings work differently in the Launch Bar function of the Setup Tasks menu. For
applications that are configured using the launch bar function, the IBM-supplied,
System-specified, and User-specified preference selections are cumulative. The
Environment variables are slightly different. For the same environment variable,
the value set at the user level takes precedence over the value set at the system or
IBM-supplied levels. The values for a given environment variable are not additive
there are two variables at the system level: IBM-supplied, and System-level, with
one variable at the user level.
For example, every Network Station user has one 5250 session specified as the
IBM-supplied default. (You can find the 5250 session in the Host Access folder on
the Network Station desktop.) If the administrator used the System-wide
preference level to assign all users an additional 5250 session, then all users would
have two 5250 sessions available. If the administrator then used the User
preference level to assign USERXYZ another 5250 session, then USERXYZ would have
three 5250 sessions. The origin of these sessions would be one each from
IBM-supplied, System-level, and User-level preference selection.
Working with workstation preference selections
You can identify each Network Station by TCP/IP host name, MAC address, or IP
address. Select only one of these methods of identification when saving
workstation preference selections for a Network Station. This helps you to avoid
possible workstation preference overrides.
v Using DNS. If you enter the TCP/IP host name, it must match the hostname
that is given to the client exactly (DNS is case-sensitive). BOOTP or DHCP tells
each Network Station their hostname. Only include the hostname option that is
specified on the Network Station’s client statement in BOOTP or DHCP.
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v IP address. You must type IP addresses as dotted decimals (for example,
9.1.2.3).
v MAC address. You must type MAC addresses that are separated by colons (for
example, 00:00:E5:80:7C:8F).
MAC addresses are case sensitive on the RS/6000 server.
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Tips on identifying or referring to your Network Station: Following are some
tips for addressing your Network Station:
IP addressing
You can use the IP address when you are starting the Network Station
through NVRAM, BOOTP, or DHCP. When you use the IBM Setup Utility
or the NS Boot utility, you can type the IP address you configured using
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
DHCP, BOOTP, or NVRAM. However, be aware that the Network Station
IP address may change on every boot if you use the dynamic addressing
feature of DHCP.
TCP/IP hostname
You can use the TCP/IP host name when you are starting the Network
Station through BOOTP or DHCP. Type the hostname you configured into
DHCP or BOOTP. You can replace a Network Station and maintain the
previous Network Station configuration values by performing the
following tasks:
v Using the TCP/IP hostname or IP address.
v Setting up the new Network Station with the hostname or IP address of
the previous Network Station.
MAC address
You can use the MAC address when you are starting the Network Station
through NVRAM, BOOTP, or DHCP. Each Network Station has a
permanent MAC address that does not change even if you reconfigure
your network. The MAC address only changes if you decide to reprogram
it on the Network Station. You can find the MAC address of your Network
Station by using the IBM Setup Utility or the NS Boot Utility. See
“Chapter 3. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility and the
NS Boot Utility” on page 65 for more information.
Using the workstation browse function: Click Workstation Browse to see a list
of all workstations configured using the IBM Network Station Manager program.
You can also add and configure new workstations within the Workstation Browse
function.
Starting the IBM Network Station Manager program
To best understand and learn how the IBM Network Station Manager program
works, you should sign on and follow the examples in this chapter.
To start working with the IBM Network Station Manager program, power on your
Network Station. Click the Network Station Manager icon from the launch bar on
your Network Station desktop. See Figure 18.
Figure 18. IBM Network Station Manager program
Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program
29
Note: You can also use the following Web browsers to sign on to the IBM Network
Station Manager program:
v Netscape Communicator 4.5 or later.
v Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.0 or later
Type http://yourservername/networkstationv2/admin in the URL field of
your browser.
An IBM Network Station Manager program sign on screen appears:
Note: This is the sign on screen for an AS/400 server. The sign-on screen for the
IBM Network Station Manager program depends on the type of server from
which you are accessing the program.
Figure 19. Sign on screen
Type your user ID and password, and click Sign on.
The main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program appears (see
Figure 16 on page 26).
Examples of working with the IBM Network Station Manager program
Setup Tasks
Note: You must be a system administrator to work with these examples. See
“System administrators” on page 26 for more information.
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
Figure 20. Main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program
Figure 20 shows the Set Preference Selection window and Setup Tasks menu.
To get started with any example:
__ 1. Choose the level of preference you want to work with from Set Preference
Level list.
__ 2. Choose the setup task you want to work with from the Setup Tasks menu.
__ 3. Choose the function you want to configure.
Notes:
1. You may want to use your own user ID when working with these examples
and learning how to use this program. To do this, select the User preference
selection, and type your user ID in the input field.
2. To see the changes you make using the IBM Network Station Manager
program, you must logoff and then logon to your Network Station. Some
changes, such as hardware changes, require you to restart the thin client.
Setting the administrator password
You control access to the IBM Setup utility or the NS Boot utility with the
administrator password. You may not want users to have access to these utilities.
You can use these utilities to manually configure such things as your boot server,
boot file server, language type, and monitor resolution. See “Chapter 3. Working
With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility and the NS Boot Utility” on page 65
for more information.
__ 1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection System.
Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program
31
__ 2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Hardware—>Workstations.
__ 3. Scroll to Workstation Management Settings.
__ 4. Type the password, contact person, and workstation location information
into the appropriate fields (see Figure 21).
Figure 21. Setting the administrator password
__ 5. Click Save to keep your changes.
Password control to the IBM Setup Utility or the NS Boot utility is now in
place.
Configuring a custom folder
You can configure or create custom folders, name them, and place them in any
position on the desktop using the IBM Network Station Manager program. You can
also place folders inside existing folders.
__ 1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection User, and type your User ID.
__ 2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Desktop—>Launch Bar.
The Launch Bar Settings screen appears.
__ 3. In the Launch Bar Content list, select any existing folder or application.
The Custom folder you are configuring appears after the folder or
application that you highlighted.
The folder appears at the end of the Launch Bar Content list if you do not
specify placement.
__ 4. In the Folders list, click Custom.
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
This action highlights Custom (see Figure 22).
Figure 22. Configuring a custom folder using the Launch Bar Setup Task
__ 5. Click Add to place the Custom folder in the Launch Bar Content list.
In this example the Custom folder name is 5250 Accounting.
__ 6. To complete the folder configuration, click Save.
The next time you log on to your Network Station, you can locate this folder
on the Network Station launch bar.
Adding an application to a folder
Note: You can put applications in any folder, or directly on the Network Station
launch bar.
In this example, you add the Calculator application to the 5250 Accounting folder.
__ 1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection User, and type your User ID.
__ 2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Desktop—>Launch Bar.
The Launch Bar Settings screen appears.
__ 3. In the Launch Bar Content list, select the 5250 Accounting folder.
Selecting this folder means that the Calculator application resides in the 5250
Accounting folder on the Network Station launch bar.
__ 4. In the Applications list, select the Calculator application and then click Add
(see Figure 23 on page 34).
Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program
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Figure 23. Adding applications to folders using the Launch Bar Setup Task
__ 5. Click Save to keep your changes.
The next time you log on to your Network Station, you can locate this
application in the 5250 Accounting folder on the Network Station launch
bar.
Adding the Calibration Tools application to a folder
__ 1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection User, and type your User ID.
__ 2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Desktop—>Launch Bar.
The Launch Bar Settings screen appears.
__ 3. In the Launch Bar Content list, select the Tool Kit folder.
When you select this folder, you are indicating that you want the
Calibration Tools application to be accessible from the Tool Kit folder on
the launch bar.
__ 4. In the Applications list, select the Calibration Tools application and then
click Add (see Figure 24 on page 35).
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
Figure 24. Adding the Calibration Tools application to your desktop
__ 5. Click Save to keep your changes.
Perform the following procedure to see the Calibration Tools icon on your
desktop:
1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selectionWorkstation and type your User ID.
2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Hardware—>Workstations.
The Workstations screen appears.
3. Scroll to Monitor Settings.
4. Click the appropriate selection, either Touch screen, or Light pen.
5. Click Save to keep your changes.
The next time you log in to your Network Station, you will see the Calibration
Tools icon on your desktop in the Tool Kit folder.
Moving an application to a different folder
You can move applications from one folder to another. This example explains how
to move the calculator application from the Extras folder to the Tool Kit folder.
Note: When you are using the IBM Network Station Manager program at the User
level, you cannot move System level applications. An asterisk (*) beside the
application name indicates applications that are at the System level. Perform
the following example from the System level:
__ 1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection System, and type your User ID.
__ 2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Desktop—>Launch Bar.
The Launch Bar Settings screen appears.
__ 3. In the Launch Bar Content list, select Extras—>Calculator (see Figure 25 on
page 36).
Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program
35
Figure 25. Moving an application from one folder to another - part one
__ 4. Click Move Down until the Calculator application is in the Tool Kit folder
(see Figure 26 on page 37).
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
Figure 26. Moving an application from one folder to another - part two
__ 5. Click Save to keep your changes.
The next time you log in to your Network Station, the Calculator
application will be in the Tool Kit folder.
Automatically starting applications on your Network Station
desktop
You can start applications automatically on your Network Station desktop.
You must place the application inside the IBM-supplied Startup folder. You can
place any number of applications in the Startup folder.
This example explains how to place the calendar application in the Startup folder.
When you first log on to your Network Station, your calendar starts automatically.
__ 1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection User, and type your User ID.
__ 2. From Setup Tasks menu, click Desktop—>Launch Bar.
The Launch Bar Settings screen appears.
__ 3. In the Launch Bar Content list, select Startup (see Figure 27 on page 38).
Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program
37
Figure 27. Automatically starting an application — part one
__ 4. In the Applications list, select Calendar (see Figure 28 on page 39).
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
Figure 28. Automatically starting an application — part two
__ 5. Click Add to place the Calendar application in the Startup folder.
__ 6. Click Save to keep your changes.
The next time you log in to your Network Station, the Calendar application
will automatically start on the desktop.
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Configuring a Network Station for light pen or touch screen
devices
You can add light pens and touch screens to the workstation configuration for one
Network Station at a time, using the IBM Network Station Manager program. The
Calibration Tools icon appears on the Network Station desktop when you
configure a Network Station for light pen or touch screen devices.
1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection Workstation.
2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Hardware—>Workstations.
3. Select a light pen or touch screen option from the Monitor Settings menu.
4. Click Save to change the workstation configuration settings.
The Calibration Tools icon appears on the desktop of the workstation that you
configured for a light pen or touch screen device the next time a user powers
on the workstation.
Configuring the 5250 Emulator application for use on the
Network Station
You can configure applications by using the launch bar function of the IBM
Network Station Manager program.
Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program
39
This example shows how to configure the 5250 emulator application and place it in
the Host Access folder.
Note: You can put applications in any folder, or directly on the Network Station
launch bar.
__ 1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection System.
__ 2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Desktop—>Launch Bar.
The Launch Bar Settings screen appears.
__ 3. In the Host Access folder, highlight the 5250 Emulator.
__ 4. Click Edit to edit the application (see Figure 29).
Figure 29. Completing the 5250 Edit screen
__ 5. Type a name for the application that you will remember (MY5250, for
example) in the Icon label field.
__ 6. Type the IP address or name of the system (AS400APP, for example) in the
AS/400 system field.
The AS/400 system field identifies which AS/400 to which you want to
connect. This value can be an IP address or the name of the system
(AS400APP in this example).
__ 7. Click OK—>Save to accept and save your configuration.
The next time you log on your Network Station, locate the 5250 Emulator
application that is named AS400APP. It appears in the Host Access folder on
your Network Station desktop launch bar.
Configuring the Netscape Communicator browser for Java
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You can configure the Netscape Communicator browser for Java from the IBM
Network Station Manager program.
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This example shows how to set the user-defined classpath for Java applications in
the Netscape configuration.
__ 1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection User.
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You can also perform this procedure from the System or Group preference
selections.
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
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__ 2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Applications—>Netscape
Communicator.
__ 3. In the main IBM Network Station Manager window, scroll to the Netscape
Java classpath options heading.
You can configure the Netscape browser for Java by selecting from the
pre-defined classpath check boxes, or you can enter a user-defined classpath.
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__ 4. To enable the Netscape browser to support the Java Media Framework 1.1
application (JMF 1.1), enter the following classpath in the text field:
$JAVA_HOME/lib/jmf.jar
__ 5. Click Save.
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Disabling the Network Station screen saver
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This example explains how to disable the Network Station screen saver from the
IBM Network Station Manager program.
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Note: You can disable the Network Station screen saver for multiple workstations
by using the command line utility. For more information about the
command line utility, see IBM Network Station Advanced Information at the
following website: http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs
1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection Workstation.
2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Hardware—>Workstations.
3. Deselect the Default (10 Minutes) setting box for the screen saver under the
Monitor Settings options.
4. Set the Minutes before screen saver turns on value to zero (0).
5. Click Save.
The screen saver will not activate at the workstation once a user restarts, or
powers on the workstation.
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Controlling color on your Network Station desktop
You can control the color of your Network Station desktop several ways:
v The Desktop theme setting of the Desktop Display Setup Task.
v The pop-up menu accessible from your Network Station desktop, if it is enabled.
v The desktop background setting in the Workstations function of the Hardware
Setup Task.
There is a relationship between these functions. The value that you specify for
desktop background in the Workstations function of the Hardware Setup Task
takes precedence over any value specified in the Desktop theme function.
The color theme that you select from the desktop pop-up menu has precedence
over the desktop background in the Workstations function of the Hardware Setup
Task and the Desktop theme function.
The theme you select changes only the launch bar background color if you have
changed the default settings in either of the following functions:
v The desktop theme setting of the Desktop Display Setup Task.
v The desktop background setting in the Workstations function of the Hardware
Setup Task.
Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program
41
Using the desktop theme function of the Desktop Display Setup
Task
__ 1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection System.
__ 2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Desktop—>Display.
The Desktop Display Settings screen appears.
__ 3. Scroll forward to Desktop themes.
__ 4. In the Desktop themes selection list, select Water Drops (see Figure 30).
Figure 30. Selecting a background color using Color themes in the Desktop Display settings
from Setup Tasks
__ 5. Click Save to keep your changes.
The next time you log on to your Network Station, your background will be
the Water Drops image.
Using the pop-up menu accessible from your Network Station
desktop
You can change the color theme of your desktop and launch bar by using the
pop-up menu on the Network Station desktop to select a color theme.
Note: The theme you select changes only the launch bar background color if you
have changed the default settings in either of the following functions:
v The desktop background setting in the Workstations function of the
Hardware setup task.
v The Desktop theme setting of the Desktop Display setup task.
__ 1. From the Network Station desktop, click the left or right mouse button.
The desktop pop-up menu appears.
__ 2. Locate and select Color themes.
__ 3. Select a color theme of your choice from the Select Color Theme list (see
Figure 31 on page 43).
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
Figure 31. Selecting a color theme using the Network Station’s desktop pop-up menu
The color theme selection is applied immediately.
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Using the Screen saver setting in the Workstations function of
the Hardware Setup Task
This example uses a custom file for the desktop screensaver setting. The custom
file name for this example is new.xbm.
1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection System.
Note: If you perform this procedure at the System level, all Network Stations
within the system will share the same screen saver. To set the screen
saver for a single Network Station, make your preference selection
Workstation.
2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Hardware—>Workstations.
The Workstation Settings screen appears.
3. Scroll to the Monitor Settings heading and locate the Screen saver field.
4. Select the Custom screen saver path radial button, and type
/usr/local/nc/boot/login/new.xbm in the text field, substituting your custom
screen saver file name for new.xbm.
You can select custom background images that are stored in the
/usr/local/nc/boot/login/ directory, and that are in XWindows bit format
(.xbm).
5. Click Save to keep your changes.
The next time you log on to your Network Station, your background will be
the image that is contained in the custom file that is named new.xbm.
Using the Desktop background setting in the Workstations
function of the Hardware Setup Task
You can control the background color by accessing the Workstations function of
the Hardware setup task.
This example uses a custom file for the desktop background setting. The custom
file name is BACKGROUND1_OUR_LOGO. The background color is light gray. The
foreground color is spring green.
__ 1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection System.
__ 2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Hardware—>Workstations.
The Workstation Settings screen appears.
__ 3. Scroll forward to Monitor Settings and locate the Desktop background
field.
Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program
43
__ 4. In the custom background image path field, type
/usr/local/nc/boot/login/BACKGROUND1_OUR_LOGO, and select light gray
from the background color list. Select spring green from the foreground
color list.
You can select custom background images that are stored in the
/usr/local/nc/boot/login/ directory, and that are in XWindows pixel
format (.xpm).
__ 5. Click Save to keep your changes.
The next time you log on to your Network Station, your background will be
the image that is contained in the custom file that is named
BACKGROUND1_OUR_LOGO.
The gray color and the spring green color are applicable to the background
and foreground of the active window (decorations around the active
window).
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Automatically updating the boot code
You can update your Network Station boot code to ensure that the boot code on
your Network Station matches the boot code on the boot server. Updating the boot
code can also provide access to the latest function of the IBM Network Station
Manager licensed program.
You may want to alert your users that a warning message appears on their
workstation during the boot code update. The warning indicates not to power off
the workstation during the update.
Attention: Powering off a Network Station while updating boot code can cause
damage to Network Station hardware.
You must type Y (yes) to complete the boot code update.
__ 1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection System.
__ 2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Hardware—>Workstations.
__ 3. Scroll to Boot Parameters.
__ 4. Click the Update boot code that is installed on the boot server—>Update
(see Figure 32 on page 45).
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
Figure 32. Update to boot code installed on the boot server
__ 5. Click Save to keep your changes.
Network Station thin clients on the network receive the newest level of boot
code the next time they start from the network.
Overriding the Network Station boot setting
You can override the boot setting for your Network Station. This allows you to
specify a different method of receiving the boot code.
__ 1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection System.
__ 2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Hardware—>Workstations.
__ 3. Scroll to Boot Parameters—>Enable Boot using BOOTP or DHCP (see
Figure 33 on page 46).
Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program
45
Figure 33. Overriding the Network Station boot setting
__ 4. Choose the method you would like to use to override the Network Station
boot setting. The possible choices are:
Default from workstation
v If you select Default from workstation, and you have Network
Stations that are machine type 8361 or 8362, the value set in the IBM
Network Station Setup Utility under the Set Network Parameters task
determines the boot configuration. The value can be either Network, or
NVRAM. See “Type 8361 (Series 300) and Type 8362 (Series 1000)” on
page 65 for additional information.
v If you select Default from workstation, and you have Network
Stations that are machine type 8363 or 8364, the value set in the NS
Boot utility under the Configure network settings task determines
the boot configuration. The values that are set in the NS Boot Utility
determine the boot configuration. Look in the Change IP address
settings. The network priorities are BOOTP, DHCP, and NVRAM.
See “The NS Boot utility for Series 2200 and Series 2800 thin clients”
on page 75 for additional information.
Yes
v If you have Network Stations that are machine type 8361 or 8362,
selecting this choice indicates that Network is the boot method. You
can either start DHCP or BOOTP, depending on your configurations
in the IBM Network Station Setup Utility.
v If you have Network Stations that are machine type 8363 or 8364,
selecting this choice indicates that the Network priority can be
DHCP, BOOTP, or Local (NVRAM). You can also set the priority
preferences for all three.
No
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
v Network Stations that are type 8361 and 8362 boot from the server
that is specified in the Boot Host IP Address field of the Set Network
Parameters screen in the setup utility. Selecting No means that the
boot method is NVRAM.
v Type 8363 and type 8364 Network Station thin clients boot from the
server that is specified in the NS Boot utility. You need to configure
your Local (NVRAM) network parameters in the Configure network
settings menu if you select the No option. You can specify the boot
file server in the Boot file server IP address field, located in the
Change boot file server settings menu.
__ 5. Click Save to apply the change.
Updating the Domain Name Server (DNS) configuration on the
Network Station
IBM Network Stations take their DNS configuration (domain name, domain name
server, and host table) from the start-up Host server. If the DNS configuration
changes (for example, you add or delete servers or IBM Network Stations), you
should update the IBM Network Station DNS configuration.
This setting has a checkbox field that, if checked, performs an update of the IBM
Network Station Manager program DNS information.
If you choose to perform the DNS update, you will update the IBM Network
Station Manager program DNS information with the host server configuration for
domain name, domain name server, and host table.
To update the DNS information:
__ 1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection System.
__ 2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Hardware—>Workstations.
__ 3. Scroll to Domain Name Server.
__ 4. Click the Update Network Station Manager DNS file check box (see
Figure 34 on page 48).
Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program
47
Figure 34. Updating the domain name server (DNS) information
__ 5. Click Save to apply the change.
Your Network Station DNS information updates the next time you restart
the Network Station.
Configuring a local program for all users
You can make programs that are stored on your local server available to Network
Station users.
Assume that you want to provide all Network Station users with a folder that
contains games. This example shows how to configure the game that is named
Minesweeper as a local program.
__ 1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection System.
__ 2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Desktop—>Launch Bar.
The Launch Bar Settings screen appears.
__ 3. In the Launch Bar Content list, locate and highlight the last folder or
application.
The new Games folder appears directly below the last folder or application
that you clicked.
__ 4. In the Folders list, click Custom—>Add.
The Folder edit window appears.
__ 5. Type the name Games in the input field and click OK.
The Games folder is now the last entry in the Launch Bar Contents list.
__ 6. Click Move Down until the Games folder is left-justified in the Launch
Bar Contents list.
__ 7. From the Applications list, click Local Program—>Add.
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
The Local Program application appears in the Games folder (see Figure 35).
The Local Program Icon edit window appears (see Figure 36).
Figure 35. Configuring a local program for all users - part one
Figure 36. Configuring a local program for all users - part two
__ 8. Type Minesweeper in the Icon label field.
__ 9. Type application/native module in the Application type field.
__ 10. Type /usr/bin/minesweeper in the Program to run field.
The Program to run field points to the location of the program.
__ 11. Enter the X/Windows class for the program into the X/Windows class
name field.
This enables the active icon features that indicate the that program is
running on the desktop.
__ 12. Click More to specify the following program attributes:
v Minimum memory needed to start application.
v Application priority when memory is low.
v Restrict application to a single window.
v Save window size.
v Save window position.
Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program
49
__ 13. Click OK—>OK—>Save to apply and save the configuration information.
The next time you log on to your Network Station you can locate the
Games folder on the Network Station launch bar. The Minesweeper
application now appears in the Games folder.
Configuring a remote program for all users
You can make programs that are stored on other remote servers available to
Network Station users.
Assume that you want to provide all Network Station users with a folder that
contains remote programs. This example shows how to configure a remote
application and place the application in a folder that is named Remote
Applications. This example uses Lotus Notes as the remote application.
__ 1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection System.
__ 2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Desktop—>Launch Bar.
The Launch Bar Settings screen appears.
__ 3. In the Launch Bar Content list, locate and highlight the last folder or
application.
The new Remote Applications folder appears below the last folder or
application you clicked.
__ 4. In the Folders list, click Custom—>Add.
The Folder edit window appears.
__ 5. Type Remote Applications in the input field and click OK.
The Remote Applications folder is now the last entry in the Launch Bar
Content list.
__ 6. Click Move Down to make the Remote Applications folder left-justified in
the Launch Bar Content list.
__ 7. In the Applications list, click Remote Program—>Add.
The Remote Program application now appears in the Remote Applications
folder (see Figure 37).
Figure 37. Configuring a remote program for all users - part one
The Remote Program edit window appears (see Figure 38 on page 51).
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
Figure 38. Configuring a remote program for all users - part two
__ 8. Type Lotus Notes in the Icon label field.
__ 9. Type NOTES_SERVER in the Remote host field.
__ 10. Type /usr/local/bin/notes45 in the Program to run field.
The Program to run field points to the location of the program on the
remote host.
__ 11. Type -display $IPADDRESS in the Optional parameters field.
The -display parameter instructs the remote host to open the Lotus Notes
program on the Network Station from which the program was called.
__ 12. Enter the X11 class for the program into the X11 class field.
This enables the active icon features that indicate that the program is
running on the desktop.
__ 13. Click More to specify the following program attributes:
v Minimum memory needed to start application.
v Application priority when memory is low.
v Restrict application to a single window.
v Save window size.
v Save window position.
__ 14. Click OK—>OK—>Save to apply and save the configuration information.
The next time you log on to your Network Station you can locate the
Remote Application folder on the Network Station launch bar. The Lotus
Notes application will be in the Remote Application folder.
Setting up an AIX session icon on the desktop launch bar
If you are interested in how to set up an AIX session icon to display on the
desktop launch bar, using the Network Station Manager program, the procedure is
maintained on the IBM website. To locate the procedure for Setting up an AIX
session icon, follow these steps:
1. Go to the following URL: http://www.ibm.com/nc
2. Select your country from the pull-down menu, and then click Go.
3. Click Support.
4. Type V2R1 AIX session icon in the search bar, and then click Go.
Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program
51
5. Select the link, NSM V2R1 - Setting up an AIX session icon, from the search
results.
Configuring an ICA connection to a PC server
Note: Independent Computing Architecture (ICA) is a general-purpose
presentation services protocol. You can use ICA to access Microsoft
Windows-based applications from Network Station thin clients.
The ICA Remote Application Manager uses ICA connection entries to create the list
of PC servers from which the user may select. To start the ICA Remote Application
Manager, select the ICA Remote Application Manager from the Host Access
folder on the Network Station desktop. To create ICA connection entries, complete
the following steps:
__ 1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection System.
__ 2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Applications—>ICA Remote Application
Manager.
The ICA Remote Application Manager settings screen appears.
__ 3. Click Add.
The ICA Connection Entry Settings screen appears (see Figure 39).
Figure 39. Configuring an ICA connection entry - part one
__ 4. Type the information in the fields of the ICA Connection Entry Settings
screen. See Figure 39.
Icon label
This label identifies this ICA connection on the Network Station
desktop launch bar (Host Access—>Icon label).
Windows host
Type either the IP address or the host name of the PC server you
want to launch the Windows-based application.
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
Application
The Application field determines which application runs when the
user logs onto the PC server. The possible values are:
Windows desktop
The Windows desktop is the application that runs when the
user logs onto the PC server.
Name Identifies a specific application that is run when the user
logs onto the PC server.
Note: If any backslash (\) characters are used in the name
field you need to use two (2). If your program needs
to use 2 backslashes (\\), you must enter 4
backslashes. For example, to use an application that is
located in the Program Files directory, you would
specify \\Program Files\\Application.exe to identify
the application. For more information regarding
special characters in optional parameter fields, see
Chapter 8 of the IBM Network Station Advanced
Information at the following website:
http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs
Windows logon
Select the Logon type you want to use. This example uses Manual.
The Manual logon type indicates that the ICA connection launches
at the Network Station, and prompts the user for a User ID and
password.
__ 5. Click OK to apply the change.
The ICA Remote Application Manager Settings screen appears (see
Figure 40).
Figure 40. Configuring an ICA connection entry - part two
Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program
53
Notice that the ICA session you configured (NT-Accounting) is present in
the ICA Remote Application Manager Settings window.
__ 6. Click Save to apply the change.
Defining an ICA connection entry
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Perform the following steps to define a currently existing ICA connection entry:
1. From the ICA Remote Application Manager window, click Entry—>New.
The Properties dialog box displays.
2. Edit the Description text field to describe the connection definition.
3. Select either a connection to a Server, or to a Published Application.
4. Select a server or published application from the drop-down list.
5. To log in as a specific user, complete the Username, Domain, and Password
text fields.
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6. Click OK to complete a connection definition with the properties that you have
specified.
The ICA Remote Application Manager window displays the connection
definition that you created.
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Connecting to local printers with the ICA Client
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Automatic connection: Using the IBM Network Station Manager program (NSM),
local printers need only be set up once to enable automatic connection to ICA
sessions.
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In order to automatically connect printers during the ICA logon, two things need
to happen. First, the ICA client needs to be able to provide the ICA server with the
Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition (Windows NT TSE) printer driver
name for each of the Network Station printers. And second, the Windows NT TSE
printer driver must be installed on the ICA server.
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You can use the Printer Wizard on the ICA server to find the correct printer driver
name. The Network Station ICA client takes the Windows NT TSE printer driver
name from the NSM description field of the printer. The printer driver name is
entered into the description field via the NSM printer configuration screens.
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Note: This is the server printer driver name that you want to use. Write this name
down. This exact name will be entered via NSM into the description field of
the printer that you are configuring.
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Once the printer driver name has been added via NSM and the Network Station in
question has been rebooted, users can log in to the ICA server and bring up the
Control Panel—>Printers window to see the automatically created printers. If
users cannot see the printers, they should bring up the Programs—>MetaFrame
Tools—>Client Printer Configuration screen and ensure that the data they entered
was correct and available to the ICA server.
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Steps for determining the correct Windows NT TSE printer driver name:
1. On the ICA server computer, click Start, click Settings, and then click Printers.
2. Double-click the Add Printer icon, select My Computer, and then click Next.
3. In the Available Ports list box, select LPT1, and then click Next.
With the ICA Client you can print to any spooled printer available from your IBM
Network Station. Such printers might be connected to the parallel port or the serial
port. Printers can be connected automatically or manually.
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
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4. In the left pane, select the Manufacturer of the printer you have installed on
your Network Station.
5. In the right pane, scroll to the model of the Printer you want the terminal
server to load as the printer driver.
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Manual connection: Manual connections to local printers must be done each time
an ICA session is established.
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To print to a local printer in WinFrame:
1. In the Main program group double-click the Print Manager icon.
In the Printer Manager window you should see an icon, or open dialog box,
for a network printer with a name similar to workstation#printer where
workstation is the IBM Network Station name, and printer is the IBM
Network Station name for the printer.
2. If no client printer is available, select Connect to Printer? from the Printer
menu.
3. Double-click the Client Network icon in the Shared Printer list.
4. Double-click the Client icon.
5. Select the client printer icon, which will have a name similar to
workstation#printer, and click OK.
6. If you want this printer to be your default printer select it in the Default menu
at the top of the Printers window.
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To print to a local printer in MetaFrame:
1. Click Start on the taskbar, point to Settings, then click Printers on the
submenu.
In the Printers window you should see an icon for a network printer with a
name similar to workstation#printer, where workstation is the IBM Network
Station name, and printer is the IBM Network Station name for the printer.
2. If no client printer is available, double-click the Add Printer icon in the
Printers window to run the Add Printer Wizard.
3. Click the Network printer server then click Next.
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4. Double-click Client Network, and double-click Client.
5. Select the printer from the list displayed, and click OK.
Spooled printers available on the IBM Network Station have a name similar to
workstation#printer.
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6. If you want this printer to be your default printer, click Yes then click Next.
7. Click Finish to complete the process.
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Note: The ICA Client printer support is not bi-directional; printers cannot answer
or originate messages.
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Carrying out ICA load balancing
You can accomplish load balancing by specifying the -lb parameter in the
Additional parameters field of the Local (ICA) Client Session configuration.
Configure this parameter by clicking Setup Tasks—>Applications—>ICA Remote
Application Manager from the IBM Network Station Manager program.
Load balancing provides the client access to a quantity or ″farm″ of PC servers in a
PC server network. The load balancing function determines which PC server is
Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program
55
doing the least amount of work. When the ICA client that requests an application
is served, the client receives the request from the PC server that is performing the
least amount of work.
Allowing private user updates of ICA connection entries
You can use the IBM Network Station Manager program to allow users to
configure their own ICA connection entries.
This example shows the steps you must perform using the IBM Network Station
Manager program and the steps the user must perform on the Network Station.
__ 1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection System.
__ 2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Desktop—>Launch Bar.
__ 3. Locate the ICA Remote Application Manager application.
Look in the Launch Bar Content list. It appears as an entry under the Host
Access folder.
You can add the ICA Remote Application Manager to the Host Access
folder if it is not in the Launch Bar Contents list.
__ 4. Select Launch Bar Content—>ICA Remote Application Manager, and click
Edit.
__ 5. Complete the ICA Remote Application Manager Icon screen (see
Figure 41).
Note: For information regarding special characters in optional parameter
fields, see Chapter 8 of the IBM Network Station Advanced Information
at the following website: http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs
You can allow private user updates by clicking the option on the ICA
Remote Application Manager Icon screen.
Figure 41. Updating the ICA Remote Application Manager Icon screen
__ 6. Click OK—>Save to apply and save the change.
You have completed the steps necessary to allow users to update or create
their own ICA connections.
__ 7. Continue with this example. The Network Station performs the remainder
of the steps.
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
__ 8. From the Network Station launch bar, click the Host Access folder.
__ 9. Select the ICA Remote Application Manager application.
The ICA Client window displays (see Figure 42).
Figure 42. Updating the ICA Client
__ 10. From the ICA Client window, click Entry—>New.
The Properties dialog box displays. Use the Properties dialog box to
configure a new ICA connection (see Figure 43 on page 58).
Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program
57
Figure 43. Configuring the ICA Client Properties window
__ 11. Complete the Description field. This example uses Spanner as the
description name.
__ 12. Complete the Server field. This example uses Spanner-WF17 to identify the
server name.
__ 13. Complete the Username, Domain, and Password fields if you do not want
to be prompted for this information every time you launch this session.
This is an optional step.
Note: You must have a user ID and password on the server for which you
want to create an ICA connection.
__ 14. Click OK to create an ICA connection definition that contains the
properties you have specified.
__ 15. From the Network Station desktop launch bar, click the Host Access folder.
__ 16. Click the ICA Remote Application Manager application.
The ICA Client window displays with the connection you previously
created (see Figure 44 on page 59).
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
Figure 44. Updated ICA Client window
__ 17. Open the connection. There are several ways to open the ICA connection:
v You can double click the ICA connection description.
v You can select the name of the connection definition and then choose
Connect from the Entry menu.
v You can select the name of the connection definition, and click Connect
(see Figure 45).
Figure 45. ICA Client Connect button
Configuring Java for the Network Station
For information about configuring Java applications and applets, see IBM Network
Station Advanced Information at the following website: http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs
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Including system, group, or user preferences in a kiosk profile
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PTF6 of the V2R1 IBM Network Station Manager program allows you to create
kiosk profiles that include system, group, or user preferences. For more
information, see IBM Network Station Advanced Information at the following website:
http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs
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Using the IBM Network Station Manager program to enable
the touchscreen daemon
You can use the IBM Network Station Manager program to enable the touchscreen
daemon for workstations with touchscreen devices attached. This example assumes
that you have already connected a touchscreen monitor to a workstation.
1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection Workstation.
2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Hardware—>Workstations—>Monitor
Settings.
3. Specify the touchscreen device for your workstation.
4. Click Save and return.
Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program
59
You can also start the touch daemon from the command line utility. For more
information, see IBM Network Station Advanced Information at the following website:
http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs
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Configuring a local area network-attached printer
Local Area Network (LAN)-attached printers are printers not necessarily attached
to a Network Station or other devices. They typically have their own host name or
IP address and have their own (direct) LAN connection.
__ 1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection System.
__ 2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Hardware—>Printers.
__ 3. Scroll to Printer List. You must define LAN-attached printers as remote
printers. Therefore, scroll to the Remote Printer Server section. Fill out the
Remote Printer Server section with the following information:
Server name
The Host name or IP address of the LAN-attached printer.
Queue Name
The name of the queue associated with the LAN-attached printer.
Some LAN-attached printers require queues for their configuration, and
some LAN-attached printers do not. If the LAN-attached printer has a
queue name associated with it, place that name in the Queue Name
field. Leave the Queue Name field blank if you do not have a queue
associated with the LAN-attached printer.
When you make print requests, the Print Selector List displays the
queue name. The Print Selector List displays the @ sign that is followed
by either the host name or the IP address. If you did not use a queue
name the Print Selector List displays a @ sign followed by the IP
address. For example, in the queue name field you could see @
10.1.12.34.
Stream Type
The type of printer data stream the LAN-attached printer supports.
Description
You can type anything in this field. Important information to put in the
Description field could be the physical location of the printer (see
Figure 46 on page 61).
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
Figure 46. Configuring a LAN-attached printer
__ 4. Click Save to apply the change.
When you type information in the Remote Print Server section, that information
constructs fields in the Print Selector List. The Print Selector List appears when
users request a print action. The Queue Name and Description fields are the most
useful fields. You can use the Queue Name to identify the print queue and the IP
address. Description can be anything you typed in when configuring the printer.
The physical location of the printer may be something users need to know.
Configuring a Network Station-attached printer for other users
Complete the following steps to configure a Network Station-attached printer:
__ 1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection System.
__ 2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Hardware—>Printers.
__ 3. Scroll to Printer List. Your Network Station-attached printer is considered a
remote printer for all users that are not working on the Network Station the
printer is attached to. Therefore, scroll to the Remote Print Server section,
and fill out the following information:
Server name
Type the Host name or IP address of the Network Station to which the
printer is attached.
Queue Name
Type the name of the queue that is associated with the Network
Station-attached printer.
Stream Type
Type the type of printer data stream the Network Station-attached
printer supports.
Description
You can type anything in this field. Important information to put in the
Description field could be the physical location of the printer.
Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program
61
You can configure a Network Station-attached printer. See Figure 47.
Figure 47. Configuring a Network Station-attached printer as a remote printer for other users
In the example where a locally-attached printer is configured as a remote
printer for other users, you must pay close attention to the following:
Queue name field
On locally attached printers the Queue name is, by default, either
PARALLEL1, or SERIAL1. When you configure a locally attached printer for
others use, the Print Selector list contains a queue name of either
PARALLEL1 or SERIAL1 for that printer. The resulting Print Selector lists
for a user could then contain two Queue name entries, each reading
PARALLEL1.
Description field
In this example, where a user Print Selector list could have two
identical queue name entries, the Description field can determine which
printer to choose.
__ 4. Click Save to apply the change.
Setting the Time Zone (TZ) Environment Variable
Setting the TZ environment variable is important when working across multiple
time zones. It is particularly important if you use Java applications.
Note the following requirements:
v Be sure to notice the upper and lower case characters when setting the TZ
environment variable (this application is case-sensitive).
v You must set the time zone value on your server correctly.
v You must use standard time variables, not daylight savings variables (for
example, Central Standard Time (CST) not Central Daylight Time (CDT).
Complete the following steps to set the TZ environment variable:
__ 1. From the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program, make
your preference selection System.
__ 2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Environment—>General.
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
__ 3. The Environment Variables screen appears (see Figure 48).
Figure 48. Setting the time zone (TZ) environment variable
__ 4. Complete the following fields:
Environment variable
Type TZ. TZ means time zone.
Value
Type US/Central. This indicates Central Standard Time. Following are
other possible values for the TZ environment variable:
Value
GMT
Hours from Greenwich
Mean Time (GMT)
0
Europe/Paris
+1
Europe/Helsinki
+2
Europe/Warsaw
+3
Europe/Moscow
+4
Asia/Karachi
+5
Asia/Dacca
+6
Asia/Jakarta
+7
Hongkong
+8
Japan
+9
Australia/Victoria
+0
etc/GMT+11
+11
NZ
+12
US/Aleutian
-11
US/Alaska
-10
Canada/Pacific
-9
US/Pacific
-8
US/Mountain
-7
Chapter 2. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program
63
Value
Hours from Greenwich
Mean Time (GMT)
US/Central
-6
US/Eastern
-5
Canada/Atlantic
-4
Canada/Newfoundland
-3.5
Brazil/West
-3
etc/GMT-2
-2
etc/GMT-1
-1
__ 5. Click Save to apply the change.
Accessing and using How To Help
The IBM Network Station Manager program contains a How To help category.
The How To category is organized by the tasks you can perform while using the
IBM Network Station Manager program. For example, it contains instructions
about how to create 5250 sessions, change the content of your Network Station
desktop launch bar, and configure Netscape Communicator sessions.
You can access How To help by clicking Help at any time.
64
Using IBM Network Station Manager
Chapter 3. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility
and the NS Boot Utility
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Type 8361 (Series 300) and Type 8362 (Series 1000)
Accessing the IBM Network Station setup utility
IBM Network Station setup utility tasks . . .
Setting monitor resolution . . . . . .
Working with the blanking pedestal . . .
Selecting the startup language . . . . .
Selecting a keyboard language . . . . .
Using verbose diagnostic messages . . .
Working with MAC addresses . . . . .
Resetting an IBM Network Station to the
factory defaults . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing the boot PROM version of an IBM
Network Station . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring an IBM Network Station to boot
from the network setting . . . . . . .
Configuring an IBM Network Station to boot
from the NVRAM setting . . . . . . .
The NS Boot utility for Series 2200 and Series 2800
thin clients . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Identifying the NS Boot version . . . . . .
Updating the NS Boot utility version on a Series
2200 or 2800 thin client . . . . . . . . .
Updating the NS Boot utility version of several
thin clients . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the NS Boot utility . . . . . . . . .
NS Boot utility tasks . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the language setting of the NS Boot
utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting a keyboard language . . . . . .
Setting the display resolution . . . . . .
Configuring a thin client to boot from Local
(NVRAM) settings . . . . . . . . . .
Displaying hardware information . . . . .
Displaying the boot log . . . . . . . .
Enabling verbose diagnostic messages . . .
Working with Service Aids . . . . . . .
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The type of Network Station hardware you have determines the setup utility that
you have:
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v IBM Network Station Machine Type 8361, models 110 and 210 (Series 300); and
Machine Type 8362 (Series 1000) both have the IBM Network Station Setup
Utility. See “Type 8361 (Series 300) and Type 8362 (Series 1000)” for more
information regarding this utility.
v Network Station Machine Types 8363 (Series 2200) and 8364 (Series 2800) have
the IBM Network Station NS Boot utility. See “The NS Boot utility for Series
2200 and Series 2800 thin clients” on page 75 for more information regarding this
utility.
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Type 8361 (Series 300) and Type 8362 (Series 1000)
This section contains information about using the Setup Utility of the IBM
Network Station. The Setup Utility menu allows you to View or Set (change)
configuration settings that relate to a particular Network Station. The Setup Utility
is primarily a tool for administrators to find and correct problems on the network.
You can use the IBM Network Station Manager program to restrict a user’s
privileges in the Setup Utility. See “Setting the administrator password” on page 31
for more information.
Accessing the IBM Network Station setup utility
Access the Setup Utility by carrying out the following steps:
1. Power on the Network Station.
2. When the NS0500 Search for Host System message appears on the black screen,
press the Escape key.
3. If password control is active, you must enter the case-sensitive administrator
password.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
65
Note: You can specify the administrator password through the IBM Network
Station Manager program in the Hardware setup tasks under
Miscellaneous Settings.
The following screen appears:
SCRN02
F2
F3
F4
F5
F6
F7
=
=
=
=
=
=
IBM Network Station
Setup Utility
View Hardware Configuration
Set Network Parameters
Set Boot Parameters
Set Configuration Parameters
Set Monitor Parameters
Set Language Parameters
F10 = Set Verbose Diagnostic Messages Disabled
Enter=Reboot
Notes:
1. If the administrator has not set the password in the IBM Network Station
Manager program, any user can access the configuration settings in the IBM
Setup Utility.
2. If you attempt the password three times without success, you can only view
the hardware configuration.
3. If you changed the administrator password by using IBM Network Station
Manager program, you must start the Network Station to the Login window.
This enables the new administrator password at the system unit.
Users who are granted limited access by the administrator in IBM Network Station
Manager do not see the complete screen shown above. They see only the first
option, which only allows viewing the hardware configuration.
IBM Network Station setup utility tasks
You can find information about Setup Utility tasks in Table 3 and Table 4 on
page 67, in the instructions which follow, or in both sources.
Table 3 and Table 4 on page 67 divide Setup Utility tasks into two categories: Tasks
that deal with configuration settings and tasks that deal with appearances. The
tables point you to the steps you need to take to perform each task. You can reach
many of the required screens simply by pressing one key, and many of the tasks
consist of a single keystroke. When the task is more complicated or bears
explanation, the tables direct you to the text-based instructions in the remainder of
the chapter.
Note: For specific instructions about configuring a Network Station to start from
NVRAM settings, refer to “Configuring an IBM Network Station to boot
from the NVRAM setting” on page 71.
Table 3. Common Configuration Tasks in Setup Utility
Configuration Item
To View
To Set
Network Station IP Address
F3, select NVRAM.
F3, select NVRAM.
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Using IBM Network Station Manager
Table 3. Common Configuration Tasks in Setup Utility (continued)
Configuration Item
To View
To Set
Subnet Mask
F3, select NVRAM.
F3, select NVRAM.
Default MAC Address
See “Finding the Default MAC
Address” on page 69.
N/A.
User-configurable MAC Address
See “Viewing the
user-configurable MAC address”
on page 70.
See “Specifying a
user-configurable MAC address”
on page 70.
Gateway IP Address
F3, select NVRAM.
F3, select NVRAM.
IP Addressed From (Is NVRAM or a
Network setting being used to boot?)
F3.
F3.
Table 4. Common Appearance Tasks in Setup Utility
Appearance Item
To View
To Set
Keyboard Language
F7.
F7. See “Selecting a keyboard
language” on page 68.
Monitor Resolution
F6.
F6. See “Setting monitor
resolution”.
Verbose Diagnostic Messages (activity and
messages displayed during boot)
F10.
F10. See “Using verbose
diagnostic messages” on page 68.
Blanking Pedestal
F6.
See “Working with the blanking
pedestal”.
Setting monitor resolution
You can change the resolution of the monitor that is attached to a Network Station
to improve a screen image that is not clear.
Attention: Setting a resolution that is not supported by your monitor can
permanently damage the monitor.
Note: For the best video image, you should power on the monitor before you start
the logic unit.
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by powering on the Network Station and pressing
the Escape key after the NS0500 Search for Host System message displays
during system startup.
__ 2. Press the F6 key.
__ 3. Press the F2 key.
__ 4. Select a new monitor resolution by using the Up and Down arrow keys.
__ 5. After selecting your resolution, press Enter.
__ 6. Test the resolution by pressing Enter again. A properly resolved monitor
clearly displays the resolution setting in the center of a full-screen grid.
Working with the blanking pedestal
The Blanking Pedestal allows you to increase the contrast between black and white
on your monitor. To activate the Blanking Pedestal, carry out the following
instructions:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by pressing the Escape key after the NS0500 Search
for Host System message displays during system startup.
__ 2. Press F6.
Chapter 3. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility and the NS Boot Utility
67
__ 3. Press the F9 key to enable or disable the Blanking Pedestal. The F9 key acts
as a toggle switch.
Once you have enabled the Blanking Pedestal, your display changes immediately.
Selecting the startup language
The first time you start a Network Station, a screen prompts you to select a Startup
Language. The Startup Language is the language that the Network Station uses in
its own interface. For example, the screens that you see in the Setup Utility appear
in the language that you select. The Startup Language is not the same as the
keyboard language or the language that the IBM Network Station Manager
interface uses. For information about setting the keyboard language for a Network
Station, see “Selecting a keyboard language”.
To change the Startup Language after the first time the Network Station is started,
complete the following steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by pressing the Escape key after the NS0500 Search
for Host System message displays during system startup.
__ 2. Press F7, Set Language Parameters.
__ 3. Press F3, Select Startup Language.
__ 4. Select the language of your choice.
__ 5. Press Enter. The language that you see on screen changes immediately.
Selecting a keyboard language
Warning: You should use the IBM Network Station Manager program to change
keyboard languages. If you change the language in the Setup Utility, you
might specify a different language than what is in the IBM Network
Station Manager. The value in the IBM Network Station Manager
overrides any value in the Setup Utility.
You can select a keyboard language to use with this Network Station. Selecting a
different language changes the mapping of keys. You can cause a different
character to display when a certain key is pressed, when you change the mapping
of the keys on a keyboard.
To select a keyboard language, carry out the following steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by powering on the Network Station and pressing
the Escape key after the NS0500 Search for Host System message displays
during the startup process.
__ 2. In the main Setup Utility screen, press the F7 key.
__ 3. Press the F2 key to select a keyboard language.
__ 4. Use the Up and Down arrow keys to select a language from the options
displayed.
__ 5. Press Enter to save your selection.
Using verbose diagnostic messages
You have the choice of whether or not to monitor boot activity from the boot host
on an individual Network Station. When you enable Verbose Diagnostic Messages
in the Setup Utility, messages appear on the monitor during the boot process as
files that are loaded.
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by powering on the Network Station and pressing
the Escape key after the NS0500 Search for Host System message displays
during the startup process.
68
Using IBM Network Station Manager
__ 2. Press the F10 key to change the status of Verbose Diagnostic Messages. The
F10 key acts as a toggle switch. Verbose Diagnostic Messages are currently
disabled when the display reads ″F10 = Set Verbose Diagnostic Messages
Disabled.″ When the display reads, ″F10 = Set Verbose Diagnostic Messages
Enabled, Verbose Diagnostic Messages are currently enabled.
Working with MAC addresses
You use a MAC address (which is an alpha-numeric value) to identify a computer.
Network Stations can have two kinds of MAC addresses: Default MAC addresses,
and user-configurable MAC addresses.
Default MAC addresses: The default MAC address is a unique identifier that
corresponds permanently to a particular Network Station. The Network Station
receives its default MAC address in the factory where the machine is
manufactured. The default MAC address does not change, even when you specify
a user-configurable MAC address.
Finding the Default MAC Address: On a new Network Station which has no
user-configurable MAC address, you can view the default MAC address in the
Setup Utility. To do so, carry out the following steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by pressing the Escape key after the Search for Host
System message displays during the startup process.
__ 2. Press the F2 key to view the MAC address.
Note: Remember, that the default MAC address will only appear here if no
user-configurable MAC address is active. See “Recovering the default
MAC address” for information about recovering the default MAC
address once you have specified a user-configurable MAC address.
Recovering the default MAC address: Once you have entered a user-configurable
MAC address, you can reset the MAC address to the default by carrying out the
following steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by restarting the Network Station and pressing the
Escape key after the Search for Host System message displays during system
startup.
__ 2. In the Setup Utility, press Control+Alt+Shift+F1.
__ 3. On the command line, type the following command: ma default.
__ 4. To return to the Setup Utility, type SE and press the Enter key or type RS to
restart the Network Station.
User-Configurable MAC addresses: You may wish to configure your own MAC
addresses for Network Stations. You can create a sequence of identifiers that has
meaning to you as an administrator by configuring your own MAC addresses.
Your own MAC addresses will be more memorable than the randomly produced
default MAC addresses that reside in the Network Stations.
You do not permanently delete or overwrite the default MAC address when you
configure a MAC address. You can retrieve it from the memory of the Network
Station at any time. For instructions about how to reset the default MAC address,
see “Recovering the default MAC address”.
If you are using DHCP in your network to dynamically allocate IP addresses, you
should not configure your own MAC addresses. User-configurable MAC addresses
Chapter 3. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility and the NS Boot Utility
69
are most useful for the kind of tracking and close administrative scrutiny that are
usually associated with small, static, stable networks.
The user-configurable MAC address must follow the conventions of the default
MAC address. It must consist of 12 digits, in pairs that are sectioned off by colons.
When you create a user-configurable address, you can use the numbers 0 through
9 and the letters A through F.
The first digit in the MAC address must always be 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, C, D, E, or F.
After the first digit, you may enter any values you wish, as long as they follow
these conventions.
Specifying a user-configurable MAC address:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by restarting the Network Station and pressing the
Escape key after the Search for Host System message displays during system
startup.
__ 2. In the Setup Utility, press Control+Alt+Shift+F1.
__ 3. On a Network Station command line, type the following command: ma
XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX, where XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX is your user-configurable
MAC address.
__ 4. To return to the Setup Utility, type SE and press the Enter key or type RS to
restart the Network Station.
Viewing the user-configurable MAC address: You can view the active MAC address
on an IBM Network Station by carrying out the following steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by restarting the Network Station and pressing the
Escape key after the Search for Host System message displays during system
startup.
__ 2.
__ 3.
__ 4.
__ 5.
In the Setup Utility, press Control+Alt+Shift+F1.
On a Network Station command line, type the following command: ma.
Press Enter.
To return to the Setup Utility, type se and press Enter.
Resetting an IBM Network Station to the factory defaults
Even if you have already configured your Network Station, you may wish to clear
all of the settings and restore the factory defaults. To do this, carry out the
following steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by restarting the Network Station and pressing the
Escape key after the Search for Host System message displays.
__ 2. In the Setup Utility, press Ctrl+Alt+Shift+F1.
__ 3. Type nv to enter the NVRAM utility. Press Enter.
__ 4.
__ 5.
__ 6.
__ 7.
__ 8.
70
Type l to load the default values. Press Enter.
Type s to save the new values. Press Enter.
Type y to verify that you want to save the values. Press Enter.
Type q to quit the NVRAM utility.
To return to the Setup Utility, type se and press Enter.
Using IBM Network Station Manager
Viewing the boot PROM version of an IBM Network Station
You may want to ensure that you have a certain version of boot PROM (that is
also called the boot monitor) loaded on your Network Station. You can learn what
version you have currently installed on your Network Station by carrying out the
following steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by powering on the Network Station and pressing
the Escape key after the Search for Host System message displays.
__ 2. Press F2, View Hardware Configuration.
The Boot Monitor version appears as the third categorized item. The Boot Monitor
version is the same thing as the boot PROM version.
Configuring an IBM Network Station to boot from the network
setting
For your Network Stations to boot using BOOTP or DHCP, you must set each logic
unit to Network in the Setup Utility. Network is the factory default setting. You can
also set this value in the IBM Network Station Manager. For more information
about setting boot preferences in the IBM Network Station Manager, see
“Overriding the Network Station boot setting” on page 45. To change or verify the
Network Station’s boot setting, carry out the following steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by powering on the Network Station and pressing
the Escape key after the Search for Host System message displays during the
startup process.
__ 2. Press F3, Set Network Parameters.
__ 3. On the line IP Addressed from, use the right and left arrow keys to highlight
Network.
__ 4. Once you have highlighted Network on the IP Addressed from line, you must
configure the following parameters:
v DHCP IP Addressing Order
v BOOTP IP Addressing Order
Choose whether you want DHCP or BOOTP to be the primary boot method
of this Network Station. If you want to use both DHCP and BOOTP, type 1
next to your first choice and 2 next to your second choice. If you want to
use only one boot method, type 1 beside your selection. Type D for
″Disabled″ beside the method that you do not want to use.
__ 5. If you have an Ethernet Network Station, choose the appropriate Ethernet
standard for your network.
__ 6. Press Enter to save your changes.
__ 7. Your individual Network Station is now ready to boot using the Network
setting. However, you must make sure that you have configured your server
to process boot requests from BOOTP or DHCP clients. To configure your
server to use BOOTP or DHCP, refer to your platform-specific installation
chapter of this book.
Configuring an IBM Network Station to boot from the NVRAM
setting
This section contains information about setting up a Network Station to boot from
the NVRAM setting.
Note: If you make an error during the following procedure, recover the default
information that you have overwritten by pressing F11.
Chapter 3. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility and the NS Boot Utility
71
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by powering on the Network Station and pressing
the Escape key after the Search for Host System message displays during the
startup process.
__ 2. Press F3, Set Network Parameters.
__ 3. On the line IP Addressed from, use the right and left arrow keys to highlight
NVRAM.
__ 4. On the lines beneath IP Addressed from, fill in the requested information
concerning your network’s topology. Refer to your network topology
diagram for your network’s configuration information.
Notes:
a. To replace existing text, you must backspace to delete the text and then
type your values. You cannot type over existing values.
b. Do not press Enter at the end of a line. Instead, use the arrow keys to
move from one line to the next. Press Enter only when you are finished
with the whole screen.
Table 5. Boot and Configuration Parameters for NVRAM Booting
Configuration Item
Description
Example
Network Station IP Address
The IP address for this individual
IBM Network Station.
192.168.1.2
First Boot Host IP Address
The IP address of the primary server
that you will use to boot this
Network Station.
192.168.1.4
Second Boot Host IP Address
The server that you will use to boot
this IBM Network Station should the
first boot host fail. If you have no
backup server, you may enter the
value 0.0.0.0 or the same IP address
as that of the first boot host.
0.0.0.0
Third Boot Host IP Address
The server that you will use to boot
this individual Network Station
should the first and second boot
hosts fail. If you have no third boot
host, you may enter 0.0.0.0 or the
same IP address as that of your first
or second boot host.
0.0.0.0
First Configuration Host IP Address
The IP address of the server from
which the Network Station
downloads its workstation
configuration information. This may
or may not be the same server as the
boot host. If you do not want to
specify a separate configuration host,
you may enter 0.0.0.0 or the IP
address of the boot host.
0.0.0.0
Second Configuration Host IP
Address
The IP address of the configuration
host that you want the Network
Station to use should the first
configuration host fail. If you do not
want to specify a second
configuration host, you may enter
0.0.0.0 or the IP address of the first
configuration host.
0.0.0.0
72
Using IBM Network Station Manager
Table 5. Boot and Configuration Parameters for NVRAM Booting (continued)
Configuration Item
Description
Example
Gateway IP Address
The IP address of the principle router 192.168.1.1
of the Network Station’s network.
Subnet Mask
255.255.255.0
Broadcast IP Address
The broadcast IP address is the
192.168.1.255
address that is used to communicate
with every host on the network. For
Class C networks whose subnet mask
is 255.255.255.0, the broadcast address
is the first three portions of the
network address with 255 in the final
portion.
__ 5. Press Enter to save your changes.
__ 6. You must now specify the proper paths for the Network Station to follow
to reach its boot and configuration files. From the Setup Utility main
screen, press F4, Set Boot Parameters. Go to the next step for information
about what parameters to enter.
__ 7. Specify the boot parameters that are explained in Table 6. Make sure that
you use forward slashes, as indicated in the table. If you use backslashes,
the Network Station may not boot. Type in the values that are specified for
your platform.
Notes
v Directory, file, and protocol values are case-sensitive.
v You can access the default values for the AS/400 platform by
deleting the ones that appear on the screen and then pressing Enter.
The proper values take effect even though they do not appear on
screen.
Table 6. Boot Parameters for NVRAM Booting
Boot
Parameter
Description
Boot File
The file that contains
OS/400
the operating system for
AIX
the Network Station.
Windows NT
Boot
Directory
Platform
The path that the
OS/400
Network Station uses to
AIX
access the Boot File in
Windows NT
the base code server.
Type this value
kernel.300 (for Series 300 type-models 8361-110 and 8361-210)
kernel.1000 (for Series 1000 types 8362)
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStationV2/ppc/
/usr/NetworkStationV2/prodbase/ppc/
/NetworkStationV2/prodbase/ppc/
__ 8. Specify the Boot Host Protocol
In the Set Boot Parameters display, you can specify the order of the boot
protocols for the Network Station. The supported protocols are:
v TFTP
v NFS
v Local
Use the numbers 1 through 3 for the boot host protocol order or use a D to
disable the protocol. The Local boot host protocol is for booting from a
Chapter 3. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility and the NS Boot Utility
73
flash card only. The Network Station will attempt to use the first protocol,
and if unsuccessful, it will attempt to use the next if specified.
__ 9. Press Enter to save your changes.
Note: If you have made a mistake and you want to recover the default
boot parameter values, backspace over the current values and restart
the Network Station.
__ 10. Press F5, Set Configuration Parameters.
__ 11. Enter your network’s configuration information by using Table 7.
Table 7. Configuration Parameters for NVRAM Booting
Configuration
Parameter
Description
Configuration file The name of the file
that contains the
Network Station’s
configuration
information.
Platform
Type this value
OS/400
If this field is empty, the Network Station searches for a
configuration file based on its TCP/IP host name, IP
address or MAC address. If you do not plan to
configure a Network Station individually then you
should enter allusers.nsm. This causes the Network
Station to read the standard configuration file without
taking extra time to search for its individual file.
AIX
NT
First
Configuration
Directory
Second
Configuration
Directory
Configuration
Host Protocol
74
OS/400
The path name that
the configuration host
AIX
uses to locate the
configuration file of
Windows NT
the Network Station.
The path name that
the second
configuration host
uses to locate the
configuration file of
the Network Station.
If you have not
configured a second
configuration host,
you may leave this
line blank.
/usr/NetworkStationV2/userbase/profiles/
/NetworkStationV2/userbase/profiles/
OS/400
/QIBM/UserData/NetworkStationV2/profiles/
AIX
/usr/NetworkStationV2/userbase/profiles/
Windows NT
/NetworkStationV2/userbase/profiles/
The protocol that the OS/400
Network Station uses
to access its
configuration files
from the configuration
host. Use the left and
right arrow keys to
AIX
change the host
protocols. The
available protocols are
NFS, RFS/400, Local,
Default, and TFTP.
Note: You can also
specify a second
Windows NT
Configuration Host
Protocol. The Network
Station will use the
second host protocol
if the first host
protocol fails.
Using IBM Network Station Manager
/QIBM/UserData/NetworkStationV2/profiles/
First: TFTP
First: NFS
First: NFS
__ 12. Press Enter to save your changes.
__ 13. If you have not yet done so, you must install the IBM Network Station
Manager software on the servers in your network. Refer to your platform’s
installation chapter of this book for instructions.
End of Procedure.
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The NS Boot utility for Series 2200 and Series 2800 thin clients
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This section contains information about using the NS Boot utility of the IBM
Network Station thin client (hereafter referred to as thin client). The NS Boot utility
enables you to View or Set client-side configuration settings at the thin client. The
NS Boot utility communicates with network servers, and downloads the IBM
Network Station Manager program.
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You can use the NS Boot utility to find and correct thin client configuration issues
that affect the way a thin client accesses the network. You can restrict thin client
user privileges in the NS Boot utility by using the IBM Network Station Manager
program. See “Setting the administrator password” on page 31 for more
information.
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Updating to the latest NS Boot version ensures that you are able to use the latest
functions in the NS Boot utility. See “Identifying the NS Boot version” to find out
what version your workstation is currently at.
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Note: PTF6 of the V2R1 IBM Network Station Manager program offers a major
update to the NS Boot utility which separates functions into simple and
advanced menus.
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Identifying the NS Boot version
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You can distinguish the NS Boot version of your thin client the following two
ways:
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Note: Verbose diagnostic mode must be enabled to see this display (see
“Enabling verbose diagnostic messages” on page 80).
v Power on the thin client, and look for the Bxxxxxxx (MM/DD/YY) or Hxxxxxxx
(MM/DD/YY) version that is indicated during the startup sequence of the thin
client. If you have a Series 2200 thin client, you will see the Bxxxxxxx
(MM/DD/YY) version. If you have a Series 2800 thin client, you will see the
Hxxxxxxx (MM/DD/YY) version.
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v Enter the NS Boot utility and select the Display hardware information option
from the menu:
1. Power on the thin client.
2. Enter the NS Boot utility by pressing Esc during the startup sequence.
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Note: If a system administrator has enabled the password control from the
IBM Network Station Manager program, you must enter the
case-sensitive administrator password. You can specify the
administrator password through the IBM Network Station Manager
program in the Setup Tasks menu, by clicking
Hardware—>Miscellaneous Settings.
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Update your thin client to the latest NS Boot version by performing one of the
following procedures:
Chapter 3. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility and the NS Boot Utility
75
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To update the NS Boot version of thin clients with NS Boot version H2033190
(03/31/99), see “Appendix D. Updating the NS Boot version H2033190
(03/31/99)” on page 93.
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To update the NS Boot version of thin clients that are at any other NS Boot
version, see “Updating the NS Boot utility version on a Series 2200 or 2800 thin
client”.
Updating the NS Boot utility version on a Series 2200 or 2800
thin client
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You can use this procedure to update the NS Boot version from an IBM Network
Station Manager server. This procedure requires you to perform steps from the thin
client location.
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Note: This procedure does not apply to thin clients that have NS Boot version
H2033190 (03/31/99). You must follow a different update procedure for thin
clients that have NS Boot version H2033190 (03/31/99). See “Appendix D.
Updating the NS Boot version H2033190 (03/31/99)” on page 93 for more
information.
1. Select Configure network settings from the NS Boot Main Menu, and press
Enter.
2. Type the IP address of the boot file server in the appropriate field.
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3. Cycle through the Boot file server directory and file name, until you have
selected the empty field.
4. Refer to the following table and type the correct path for your server platform
in the empty Boot file server directory and file name field:
||
For this platform: Type this path:
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AS/400
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStationV2/x86/proms/<bflash.xxxx>
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Windows NT
/NetworkStationV2/prodbase/x86/proms/<bflash.xxxx>
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RS/6000
/usr/NetworkStationV2/prodbase/x86/proms/<bflash.xxxx>
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Where <bflash.xxxx> = bflash.2200 for Series 2200 (Machine Type 8363), and bflash.2800 for
Series 2800 (Machine Type 8364).
5. If you are not sure what protocol your server is configured for, select TFTP as
your primary Boot file server protocol.
6. Press F3 to save your changes.
7. Restart the thin client to complete the NS Boot version update.
Updating the NS Boot utility version of several thin clients
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You can use this procedure to update the NS Boot version of more than one thin
client from an IBM Network Station Manager server. This procedure requires you
to perform steps from the IBM Network Station Manager program. To update the
NS Boot version of a single thin client, see “Updating the NS Boot utility version
on a Series 2200 or 2800 thin client”.
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Note: This procedure does not apply to thin clients that have NS Boot version
H2033190 (03/31/99). You must follow a different update procedure for thin
clients that have NS Boot version H2033190 (03/31/99). See “Appendix D.
Updating the NS Boot version H2033190 (03/31/99)” on page 93 for more
information.
76
Using IBM Network Station Manager
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Using the NS Boot utility
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This information does not apply to thin clients that have a NS Boot utility version
earlier than B3041900 (MM/DD/YY) or H3041900 (MM/DD/YY) version that is
indicated during the startup sequence of the thin client (see “Identifying the NS
Boot version” on page 75). If you have a Series 2200 thin client, you will see the
B3041900 (MM/DD/YY) version. If you have a Series 2800 thin client, you will see
the H3041900 (MM/DD/YY) version.
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To access the NS Boot utility, perform the following steps:
1. Power on the thin client.
2. Enter the NS Boot utility by pressing Esc during the startup sequence.
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Note: If a system administrator has enabled the password control from the IBM
Network Station Manager program, you must enter the case-sensitive
administrator password. You can specify the administrator password
through the IBM Network Station Manager program in the Setup Tasks
menu, by clicking Hardware—>Miscellaneous Settings.
A screen similar to the following appears:
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||
MENU03
IBM Network Station
NS Boot Main Menu
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Notes:
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1. If a system administrator has not set the password in the IBM Network Station
Manager program, any user can access the configuration settings in the NS
Boot utility.
2. If a user fails to enter the correct password three times, they can view the NS
Boot utility, but they cannot make any configuration changes.
3. If a system administrator changed the administrator password by using IBM
Network Station Manager program, a user must power on the thin client and
wait for the Login window to appear. This enables the new administrator
password at the thin client.
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System administrators can limit user access from the IBM Network Station
Manager program. If this occurs, users may not see the complete menu shown
above. They may only be able to view the hardware information and boot log.
Change language setting
Change keyboard setting
Change display settings
Configure network settings
Change boot file server settings
Change workstation configuration server settings
Change authentication server settings
Display hardware information
Display boot log
Change verbose diagnostic setting
Service aids
Enter=Continue F10=Reboot IBM Network Station
Chapter 3. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility and the NS Boot Utility
77
NS Boot utility tasks
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You can perform the following tasks from both the simple menu, and the
advanced menu in the NS Boot utility:
v “Selecting a keyboard language” on page 78.
v “Setting the display resolution” on page 78.
v “Configuring a thin client to boot from Local (NVRAM) settings” on page 79.
v “Displaying hardware information” on page 79.
v “Displaying the boot log” on page 80.
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You can only perform the following tasks from the advanced menu in the NS Boot
utility:
v “Changing the language setting of the NS Boot utility” on page 78.
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v “Enabling verbose diagnostic messages” on page 80.
v “Changing the local MAC address” on page 80.
v “Loading the factory defaults” on page 81.
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Changing the language setting of the NS Boot utility
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__ 2. Press F5 to enter the advanced configuration mode.
__ 3. Select Change language setting.
__ 4. Press Enter.
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__ 5. Select a language.
__ 6. Press Enter to save your changes, and exit the menu.
|
Notes:
1. The thin client stays in the advanced configuration mode until you switch back
to the simple configuration mode.
2. When you choose the simple configuration option from the advanced
configuration menu, you lose any advanced configurations that you have made.
__ 1. Enter the NS Boot utility by powering on the thin client and pressing Esc
during the startup sequence.
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Selecting a keyboard language
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__ 1. Enter the NS Boot utility by powering on the thin client and pressing Esc
during the startup sequence.
__ 2. Select Change keyboard setting, and press Enter.
__ 3. Select your keyboard language.
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__ 4. Press Enter to save your changes, and exit the menu.
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Setting the display resolution
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Attention: Setting a resolution that is not supported by your monitor can
permanently damage the monitor.
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Note: For the best video image, power on the monitor before you start the logic
unit.
You can change the resolution of the monitor that is attached to a thin client to
improve a screen image that is not clear.
__ 1. Enter the NS Boot utility by powering on the thin client and pressing Esc
during the startup sequence.
__ 2. Select Change display settings and press Enter
__ 3. Select Color palette.
78
Using IBM Network Station Manager
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__ 4.
__ 5.
__ 6.
__ 7.
Select your setting.
Select Resolution and frequency.
Select your setting.
Press Enter to begin a screen test.
a. If the test screen displayed correctly, press Enter to save your settings.
b. If the test screen did not display correctly, press F12 to restore the
previous settings.
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Configuring a thin client to boot from Local (NVRAM) settings
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Configure the following NS Boot utility fields correctly for a successful NVRAM
boot:
v Set Local (NVRAM) to First in the Network priority field. You can select a
boot method priority (first, second, and third) for the thin client to follow during
startup.
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Note: Only one boot option can be set to First at a time. Disable DHCP and
BOOTP if you do not want them to be prioritized.
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Depending on your selections in the Network priority field of the menu, you
can have up to four menus of parameters to configure. Some configuration
parameters are optional and do not require configuration.
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1. Enter the NS Boot utility by powering on the thin client and pressing Esc
during the startup sequence.
2. Select the Configure network settings menu and press Enter.
v Enter the thin client IP Address in the appropriate field on menu 1 of 4.
v Enter the Gateway IP Address in the appropriate field on menu 1 of 4.
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v Enter the Subnet mask in the appropriate field on menu 1 of 4.
v Enter at least one boot file server IP address in the appropriate fields on menu 2
of 4.
v Refer to the following table when selecting the correct boot file server directory
and file name on menu 2 of 4:
||
For this platform: Select this choice:
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AS/400
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStationV2/x86/<kernel.xxxx>
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Windows NT
/NetworkStationV2/prodbase/x86/<kernel.xxxx>
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RS/6000
/usr/NetworkStationV2/prodbase/x86/<kernel.xxxx>
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Where <kernel.xxxx> = kernel.2200 for Series 2200 (Type 8363) and kernel.2800 for Series
2800 (machine 8364).
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v Press F3 to save your Local (NVRAM) configurations, and return to the NS Boot
Main Menu.
Displaying hardware information
To display the hardware information for your thin client, perform the following
procedure:
__ 1. Enter the NS Boot utility by powering on the thin client and pressing Esc
during the startup sequence.
__ 2. Select Display hardware information, and press Enter.
Chapter 3. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility and the NS Boot Utility
79
Displaying the boot log
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The boot log is a collection of all information and error messages that are
generated by the NS Boot utility during the current thin client startup sequence.
Displaying the boot log allows you to identify and resolve configuration issues and
network issues. To display the boot log, perform the following procedure:
__ 1. Enter the NS Boot utility by powering on the thin client and pressing Esc
during the startup sequence.
__ 2. Select Display boot log, and press Enter.
You can page through the boot log by pressing Enter.
Enabling verbose diagnostic messages
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You can enable and disable the display of verbose diagnostic messages on your
thin client display. The default setting is Disabled. When the verbose diagnostic
messages are disabled, an image representing the communication between the thin
client and a server displays during the thin client startup sequence.
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When you change the verbose diagnostic setting to Enabled, informational and
error messages display during the thin client startup sequence.
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Note: The verbose diagnostic messages save to the boot log, regardless of the
verbose diagnostic setting.
__ 3. Select Change verbose diagnostic setting, and press Enter.
__ 4. Enable the verbose diagnostic mode.
|
__ 5. Press Enter to save your changes, and exit the menu.
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Notes:
|
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Working with Service Aids
|
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v Change the NS Boot themes setting.
v Load the factory defaults (see “Loading the factory defaults” on page 81).
|
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Note: You need to enter the advanced configuration mode of the NS Boot utility, if
you want to work with the Service Aids menu. Press Esc during the startup
sequence, and then press F5 to enter the advanced configuration mode.
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Changing the local MAC address: You can configure this option from the Service
Aids menu. To change the local MAC address, perform the following procedure:
__ 1. Enter the NS Boot utility by powering on the thin client and pressing Esc
during the startup sequence.
__ 2. Press F5 to enter the advanced configuration mode.
__ 1. Enter the NS Boot utility by powering on the thin client and pressing Esc
during the startup sequence.
__ 2. Press F5 to enter the advanced configuration mode.
1. The thin client stays in the advanced configuration mode until you switch back
to the simple configuration mode.
2. When you choose the simple configuration option from the advanced
configuration menu, you lose any advanced configurations that you have made.
You can perform the following procedures from the Service Aids menu:
v Change firmware support (Series 2800 only).
v Change local MAC address (see “Changing the local MAC address”).
v Change the fast boot setting.
v Change the retry settings.
80
Using IBM Network Station Manager
Select Service aids, and press Enter.
Select Change local MAC address, and press Enter.
Under Enable local MAC address, select Enabled.
Under Local MAC address, type the local MAC address in the form of
00:00:00:00:00:00, and press Enter.
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__ 3.
__ 4.
__ 5.
__ 6.
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Notes:
1. The thin client stays in the advanced configuration mode until you switch back
to the simple configuration mode.
|
|
2. When you choose the simple configuration option from the advanced
configuration menu, you lose any advanced configurations that you have made.
|
Loading the factory defaults:
|
|
Note: This procedure removes any configuration settings that exist on the thin
client, and resets the hardware to factory settings.
|
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__ 1. Enter the NS Boot utility by powering on the thin client and pressing Esc
during the startup sequence.
|
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|
__ 2. Press F5 to enter the advanced configuration mode.
__ 3. Select Service aids.
__ 4. Press Enter.
|
__ 5. Select Load factory defaults, and press Enter.
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Chapter 3. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility and the NS Boot Utility
81
82
Using IBM Network Station Manager
Appendix A. Problem resolution
The following information presents some symptoms that you may encounter with
the IBM Network Station Manager program, and the NS Boot utility. Look for the
symptoms that you are experiencing in the following table, and perform the
suggested actions.
You can also refer to the information that ships with the Network Station hardware
for information about resolving Network Station hardware problems.
Go to the following website for the most recent updates to this, and other Network
Station information: http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs
Symptom
What you should do
Display is blank or screen image is
unreadable.
Check the monitor resolution setting in the
Setup Utility or NS Boot utility.
The Network Station appears to stop
responding after displaying the IBM
Loading wallpaper.
Try selecting a lower screen resolution.
You see no icons on your Network Station
desktop.
Verify that the user preferences exist, and
are correctly specified on the user
configuration server.
The workstation preferences that you set for
a particular Network Station are not taking
effect.
There are three possible identities for each
Network Station that you can set preferences
for:
v The Host Name.
v The IP Address.
v The MAC Address.
If you set preferences for more than one
identity for a particular Network Station, the
preference settings can conflict and appear
not to take effect.
Verify that you have only set preferences for
one Network Station identity (the IP
Address, for example).
Text arguments do not appear as you type
them, when you are defining additional
parameters for applications in the IBM
Network Station Manager program.
For example, a multiple word argument is
broken into several arguments, even after
you have placed the argument inside
quotation marks.
Ensure that you escape special characters
that you include in text arguments by typing
a backwards slash ( \ ) before them.
Special characters to escape with a
backwards slash include : \ ; & ) ( |
> < * ? [ ]
x +
-
@ !
'
(space)
\ indicates that the character immediately
after it has no special meaning.
You cannot disable the screen saver on a
Network Station.
See “Disabling the Network Station screen
saver” on page 41.
Error codes
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
83
Symptom
What you should do
You receive an NCS3001 or NCS3008 error
code while trying to log in.
Verify that the login service is started on
your authentication server.
You receive the NCW3502 error code,
indicating that a process was terminated
because of low memory.
Perform the following procedure to verify
that your Network Stations have enough
memory to run your applications:
1. Go to http://www.ibm.com/nc/
2. In the left pane, click Support.
3. In the Search field, type Memory
Requirements.
You can also configure your application
priorities:
1. From the IBM Network Station Manager
program, click Desktop—>Launch Bar.
2. Select the application that you want to
configure and click Edit.
3. Click More and configure the application
priority settings.
You receive the NSB80509 error code while
trying to boot from the server.
Verify that NFS is enabled in the NS Boot
utility, and that the NFS service is started on
the server.
You receive the NSB83509 error code while
trying to boot from the server.
Verify that TFTP is enabled in the NS Boot
utility, and that the TFTP and NFS services
are started on the server.
You receive the NSB83589 error code while
trying to boot from the server.
Verify that the BOOTP boot option is
enabled and configured correctly in the NS
Boot utility, and that the BOOTP and DNS
services are started on the server.
You receive the NSB71000 error code while
trying to boot from the server.
Verify that the DHCP boot option is enabled
and configured correctly in the NS Boot
utility, and that the DHCP service is started
on the server.
Messages
You receive an NFS or RFS message
indicating a failure.
Verify that the following statements are true:
v The IP address and path are correct in
your NVRAM, DHCP, or BOOTP
configuration.
v The server is up and ready (on an
AS/400, this means that the QSERVER
subsystem is up, the QPWFSERVSD job is in
SELW, and the STRTCPSVR *TFTP (TFTP
server) us up.
v On RS/6000 servers and Windows NT
servers, ensure that the NFS server is
running with the proper exports.
You receive a message indicating No file
system for ne0.
Verify that your base code server is running
by performing the following tasks:
v Try to contact the server by using the ping
command.
v Check your DHCP, BOOTP, or NVRAM
configuration in the NS Boot utility.
84
Using IBM Network Station Manager
Symptom
What you should do
You receive the Failed to boot error
message.
Verify that the DHCP or BOOTP server is
started.
You receive the ICMP destination
unreachable error message.
Verify that the TFTP or NFS server is
started. If you are using NVRAM, verify that
TFTP and NFS are set correctly in the NS
Boot utility.
You receive the ERROR_PARSE_RESULTS or
ERROR_BAD_CLIENTerror message while
updating the flash image in the IBM
Network Station Manager program.
Increase the timeout on the HTTP server.
From a 5250 session (AS/400 example):
1. Type CFGTCPHTTP at the command
line and press Enter.
2. Select option 2 from the menu and press
Enter.
3. Press Enter to select the default
configuration name (CONFIG); or, select a
different configuration name if you know
the name of a specific HTTP server
configuration being used.
4. Scroll down the file and remove any
HTTP directives beginning with the
words InputTimeout, OutputTimeout, and
ScriptTimeout.
5. Insert the following directives by typing
13 on any line:
v InputTimeout 20 mins
v OutputTimeout 20 mins
v ScriptTimeout 20 mins
6. Press F3 to exit the utility.
7. If this does not solve the problem,
increase the timeout values.
Appendix A. Problem resolution
85
86
Using IBM Network Station Manager
|
|
|
Appendix B. Using special characters in the Optional
Parameters field
|
|
|
When you are working with the Optional Parameters field in the IBM Network
Station Manager program, it is important to be aware of special characters and
how they can be interpreted by the program during processing.
|
|
|
|
|
|
For example, spaces between words in an optional parameter entry that is not
enclosed in quotation marks (single quotes, double quotes, or backslashes) are
considered by the IBM Network Station Manager program to be parameter
separator fields during processing. There are other special characters that you
should also enclose in quotation marks when you use them in Optional Parameter
entries. They can include the following:
|
|
Operators
|
There are two types of operators:
||
Control operators:
&
&&
(
)
;
;;
|
||
<newline>
|
|
|
Redirection
operators:
<
>
>|
<<
>>
<&
>&
<<-
<>
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
Notes:
1. If you use a backslash character in any input fields, you need to use two
backslashes ( \\ ). If you need to use two backslashes ( \\ ) in your parameter,
then you must type four backslashes ( \\\\ ) in order for the parameter to
process correctly. The extra backslash is required because one backslash is
removed during the processing of the command. A backslash preserves the
literal meaning of the following character, with the exception of <newline>. A
backslash preceding a <newline> is treated as a line continuation.
2. Enclosing characters in single quotes preserves the literal meaning of all the
enclosed characters — with the exception of single quotes. Therefore, it is not
possible to put single-quotes in a single-quoted string and expect the parameter
to process correctly.
3. Enclosing characters within double quotes preserves the literal meaning of all
enclosed characters except dollarsign ( $ ), backquote ( ’ ), and backslash ( \ ).
If you put a backslash inside double quotation marks, it only quotes the dollar
sign ( $ ), single quote ( ’ ), double quote ( ″ ), backslash ( \ ), and <newline>.
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
Reserved words
Reserved words are words that have special meaning in the IBM Network Station
Manager program, and are recognized both at the beginning of a line, and after a
control operator. The following reserved words can have special meaning in the
IBM Network Station program:
||
!
elif
fi
while
case
|
else
for
then
{
}
|
|
do
done
until
if
esac
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
87
88
Using IBM Network Station Manager
|
Appendix C. Using TN3270E display support and printer
support
TN3270E support provides:
v Persistent 3270 logical unit (LU) session names.
v General printer support that is not connected to specific application programs.
v Application-dependent printer support.
Configuring persistent 3270 LU session names
You can specify the virtual LU display name for 3270 sessions from the IBM
Network Station Manager program.
The -DISPLAY_NAME parameter options:
v Allow user access to the 3270 applications that are authorized for the user
display LU name.
v Limit application access to specifically named Network Stations.
v Provide enhanced 3270 application security.
v Control the number of 3270 sessions that can be started on the target
System/390.
v Associate a 3270 application printer with a specific 3270 session.
Complete the following steps to configure persistent 3270 LU session names:
__ 1. Start the IBM Network Station Manager program.
From the Setup Tasks menu, click Desktop—>Launch Bar.
Select the Startup folder from the Launch Bar Content list.
Highlight the 3270 Emulator in the Applications menu, and click Add.
Highlight the 3270 Emulator in the Launch Bar Content menu, and click
Move Up, until the 3270 Emulator appears in the Startup folder.
__ 6. Click Edit to configure the 3270 Emulator application.
__ 7. Type the label you want to appear on the icon in the Icon Label field (the
default label is 3270 Emulator).
__ 2.
__ 3.
__ 4.
__ 5.
__ 8. Type the name or IP address of the host in the System/390 field.
__ 9. Type the following parameters and values in the Other Parameters field:
-DISPLAY_NAME
See “Valid types of -DISPLAY_NAME parameters” to view possible
values you can use with the -DISPLAY_NAME parameter.
-DISPLAY_NAME and the parameter value are case sensitive. You must
type them in upper-case.
Valid types of -DISPLAY_NAME parameters
Following are valid types of -DISPLAY_NAME parameters:
Note: The first five -DISPLAY_NAME parameter types associate the user with the IBM
Network Station in use.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
89
The last two -DISPLAY_NAME parameter types depend on the IBM Network
Station hardware.
″XXXXXX″
Where XXXXXX is a 2 through 8 upper-case character name of the 3270
session. You must use quotes with the parameter. The user only has a
single session.
″XXXXXXX+n″
″XXXXXXX+n″ allows the user to start n 3270 sessions, where n is a
number from 1 through 9. The LU session name is the 2 through 7
character name XXXXXXX followed by a number.
For example:
-DISPLAY_NAME "DCLNEA+5"
"DCLNEA+5" allows the user to have up to five 3270 sessions with session
names of DCLNEA1, DCLNEA2, DCLNEA3, DCLNEA4, and DCLNEA5.
″XXXXXX YYYYYY ZZZZZZ ″
″XXXXXX YYYYYY ZZZZZZ ″ allows an attempt to launch one of multiple
3270 sessions (three for this example) with the specified names. You must
use the quotes. A single space separates names. The maximum number of
names is limited by the size of the Other parameters field (256 characters).
TN3270E support attempts to provide a 3270 session that is based on the
first parameter value (XXXXXX in this example). If that 3270 session is not
available, the next parameter value is tried (YYYYYY in this example).
Only one 3270 session defined as a -DISPLAY_NAME parameter value starts.
USE_USER_ID
USE_USER_ID allows the user to start a single 3270 session where the LU
session name is the same as the user’s User ID (2 through 8 characters).
USE_USER_ID+n
USE_USER_ID+n allows the user to start n 3270 sessions. N is a number from
1 through 9. The LU session name is the same as the user’s Network
Station User ID (7 characters maximum) with the number ’n’ that is added
to the end. For example: USE_USER_ID+4 and a User ID of JUAN would
have session names of JUAN1, JUAN2, JUAN3, and JUAN4.
TN3270E support does not automatically start each session as represented
by the value that is assigned to n. You can click the 3270 Menu bar button
on the Network Station four times to start each of the four 3270 sessions.
USE_MAC_ADDRESS
USE_MAC_ADDRESS allows the user to start a single 3270 session where the
session name is created starting with an alpha character. The alpha
character indicates the type of communication card. T for token ring; X for
Twinax; and E for Ethernet — followed by the lower three bytes of the
media access control (MAC) address. You can see the MAC address from
the IBM Network Station ″View Hardware Configuration″ (boot monitor)
screen. For example: USE_MAC_ADDRESS with a token ring Network Station
and MAC address of 00.00.E5.68.D5.99 would result in a session name of
T68D599.
USE_MAC_ADDRESS+n
USE_MAC_ADDRESS+n allows the user to start n 3270 sessions where the
session name is created as above but with n appended to the end. For
90
Using IBM Network Station Manager
example: USE_MAC_ADDRESS+3 with a token ring Network Station and MAC
address of 00.00.E5.68.D5.99 would result in session names of T68D5991,
T68D5992, and T68D5993.
Configuring printers with the IBM Network Station Manager program
You must use the IBM Network Station Manager program to configure printers for
use with the TN3270E print support. For printers that are locally attached to a
Network Station, the configuration is already done. Queues named PARALLEL1
and SERIAL1 already exist. You can configure remotely attached printers by
completing the following steps to access the printer configuration support:
__ 1. Start the IBM Network Station Manager program.
__ 2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Hardware—>Printers.
__ 3. Scroll down to Remote printer server.
__ 4. Type in the name or IP address of the remote printer server.
__ 5. Type in the queue name that is associated with the printer you want to use.
Note: You will use the queue name when configuring printer support for
TN3270E support. You also need to remember which type case
(upper-case or lower-case) you used.
After you have completed the IBM Network Station Manager program printer
configuration, you can continue with the following configurations:
v Configuring TN3270E General Printer Support.
v Configuring TN3270E Application-Specific Printer Support.
Configuring TN3270E general printer support
TN3270E general printer support allows you to configure an association of specific
printers with specific 3270 sessions. The following procedure assumes that you are
updating an existing 3270 launch bar entry:
__ 1. Start the IBM Network Station Manager program.
__ 2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Desktop—>Launch Bar.
__ 3. Highlight the 3270 Emulator application in the Launch Bar Content click
Edit.
__ 4. Enter the appropriate parameters in the Other parameters field:
-PRINTER_GENERAL XXXXXX
Where XXXXXX is the parameter value and is the queue name of
the printer as defined in the IBM Network Station Manager
program. The queue name must be typed in the same case (upper or
lower) that you used in the IBM Network Station Manager program.
You must type -PRINTER_GENERAL in upper-case. No quotation marks
are necessary when there is only one parameter value.
-PRINTER_NAME YYYYYY
Where YYYYY is the value for this parameter and is the name of
one or more printer LU names that you want to make available to
this 3270 session.
You must type -PRINTER_NAME and the parameter value in
upper-case.
See “Valid types of -DISPLAY_NAME parameters” on page 89 for a
list of values that are used with the -PRINTER_NAME parameter.
Appendix C. Using TN3270E display support and printer support
91
The following example shows a correct entry in the Other parameters field:
-PRINTER_GENERAL hpqueue -PRINTER_NAME POSTSCRIPT1
These parameter values make the following results possible:
v The printer associated with hpqueue.
v The printer that is named POSTSCRIPT1.
v The 3270 display session.
Configuring TN3270E application-specific printer support
TN3270E application-specific printer support allows you to configure an
association of specific applications, printers, and 3270 sessions. The applications
themselves must have built in programming support to point to specific printers
and 3270 sessions. The following procedure assumes that you are updating an
existing 3270 launch bar entry:
__ 1. Start the IBM Network Station Manager program.
__ 2. From the Setup Tasks menu, click Desktop—>Launch Bar.
__ 3. Highlight the 3270 Emulator application in the Launch Bar Content click
Edit.
__ 4. Enter the appropriate parameters in the Other parameters field:
-PRINTER_APP
You must type this paramter -PRINTER_APP in upper-case letters.
The parameter value is the queue name of the printer as defined in
the IBM Network Station Manager program. The queue name must
be typed in the same case (upper or lower) that you used in the IBM
Network Station Manager program.
-DISPLAY_NAME
The value for this parameter is the name of one or more display LU
names on which you want to allow certain applications to run.
You must type -DISPLAY_NAME and the parameter value in
upper-case..
-DISPLAY_NAME is an optional parameter. However, you probably
want to use this parameter most of the time to identify the 3270
display to the application program.
You can get the names of these displays from your System/390
administrator.
See “Valid types of -DISPLAY_NAME parameters” on page 89 for a
list of values that you can use with the -DISPLAY_NAME parameter.
The following example shows an optional entry in Other parameters field:
-PRINTER_APP hpqueue -DISPLAY_NAME "D3270PJL D3270MAP"
The user gets either display D3270PJL or display D3270MAP.
If the display LU session D3270PJL is available when the command runs, the user
gets a display session to D3270PJL. The physical printer hpqueue is associated with
D3270PJL.
If D3270PJL is not available, display session D3270MAP is used, and the physical
printer hpqueue is associated with D3270MAP.
92
Using IBM Network Station Manager
Appendix D. Updating the NS Boot version H2033190
(03/31/99)
Important
You can find the latest updates to this procedure by reading Running V2R1
on Series 2800 in the latest V2R1 information on the web:
1. Go to http://www.ibm.com/nc/
2. In the left frame, click Support.
3. In the Search field, type Running V2R1 on Series 2800.
For Windows NT, you can also refer to Running V2R1 on Series 2800 in the
readme.txt file on the IBM Network Station Manager CD.
For RS/6000, you can also refer to Running V2R1 on Series 2800 in the
README file on the IBM Network Station Manager CD.
You can update the H2033190 (03/31/99) NS Boot version by booting the Series
2800 (Type 8364) Network Station (hereafter referred to as the Series 2800 Network
Station) from a DHCP server that has been properly configured for the IBM
Network Station, or manually by configuring the NVRAM settings.
Both of these update methods may require you to select the operating system for
the Network Station. Once you have selected the operating system for the Network
Station, you can update the NS Boot version.
Selecting the operating system for the Network Station
1. The Network Station may display the Select Operating System menu the first
time you power on the Network Station:
Select Operating System
1. WSOD
2. Other
3. Auto
Select the Other option by pressing 2 immediately after the Select Operating
System screen displays.
Notes:
a. If you selected the WSOD option by mistake, perform the procedure in
“Appendix E. Resetting the Series 2800 (Type 8364) Network Station to the
NS Boot utility” on page 97.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
93
b. If you selected the Auto option by mistake, restart the Network Station and
continue with step 1 on page 93.
2. If you do not see the Select Operating System screen, restart the Network
Station and wait for the IBM logo to display:
v If the IBM logo displays in the upper left corner of the screen, press Esc
during the startup sequence and continue with step 3.
v If the IBM logo displays in the upper right corner of the screen, press F1
during the startup sequence.
A password prompt displays if you press F1 before the Network Station
completes the power-on sequence. If no password prompt displays, restart
the Network Station and repeat this step.
Once the password prompt displays, continue with step 3 of the procedure
“Appendix E. Resetting the Series 2800 (Type 8364) Network Station to the
NS Boot utility” on page 97.
3. If you are using NVRAM settings to boot your Network Station, continue with
the procedure, “Updating the H2033190 (03/31/99) NS Boot version from
NVRAM settings”.
If you are booting from a DHCP server, continue with the procedure,
“Updating the H2033190 (03/31/99) NS Boot version from a DHCP server” on
page 95.
Updating the H2033190 (03/31/99) NS Boot version from NVRAM
settings
1. From the Network Computer Setup Utility screen, press F3 to select the Set
Network Parameters option:
SCRN02
F2
F3
F4
Network Computer
Setup Utility
= View Hardware Configuration
= Set Network Parameters
= Set Boot Parameters
Return=Reboot
2. Highlight NVRAM and enter the following configuration values in the
appropriate fields:
v The IBM Network Station IP Address.
v The Boot Host IP address.
v The Gateway IP Address.
3.
4.
5.
6.
94
v The Subnet mask.
Press Enter to save your configuration.
Press F4 to select the Set Boot Parameters option.
Type bflash.2800 in the Boot File field.
Refer to the following table, and type the correct path for your server platform
in the Boot Directory field:
Using IBM Network Station Manager
For this platform: Type this path:
AS/400
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStationV2/x86/proms/
Windows NT
/NetworkStationV2/prodbase/x86/proms/
RS/6000
/usr/NetworkStationV2/prodbase/x86/proms/
7. If you configured your server for the TFTP protocol, select TFTP as your
primary Boot file server protocol.
8. If you configured your server for the NFS protocol, select NFS as your
primary Boot file server protocol.
If you are using the NFS protocol, do not add a forward slash ( / ) at the
beginning of the option 67 path. For example, type
usr/NetworkStationV2/prodbase/x86/proms/ for an RS/6000 server.
9. Press Enter to save your configuration.
The Network Station returns to the Network Computer Setup Utility menu.
10. Press Enter.
The Network Station restarts and prompts you to change the language setting.
You have completed the update of the H2033190 (03/31/99) NS Boot version,
using NVRAM settings. See “Using the NS Boot utility” on page 77.
Updating the H2033190 (03/31/99) NS Boot version from a DHCP server
This procedure updates the H2033190 (03/31/99) NS Boot version on Series 2800
Network Stations from a DHCP server. You need to perform these steps in addition
to the normal DHCP configurations that are required for the Series 2800 Network
Station to boot from your DHCP server.
Note: If you do not have Series 2800 Network Stations at the H2033190 (03/31/99)
NS Boot version that boot from your DHCP server, you should not perform
this procedure.
1. Add the following class to your DHCP configuration: IBM Network Station
This class applies to, and can only be recognized by Series 2800 Network
Stations with the H2033190 (03/31/99) NS Boot version.
2. Include options 66, 67, and 211 within the IBM Network Station class, with the
following values:
For this
option:
On this
platform:
Type this value:
66
All platforms
The IP address of the server that the IBM Network Station
Manager program is installed on, in string format: d.d.d.d
67
AS/400
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStationV2/x86/proms/bflash.2800
Windows NT
/NetworkStationV2/prodbase/x86/proms/bflash.2800
RS/6000
/usr/NetworkStationV2/prodbase/x86/proms/bflash.2800
All platforms
If you configured your server for the TFTP protocol, type tftp
for this option.
211
If you configured your server for the NFS protocol, type nfs
for this option, and do not add a forward slash ( / ) at the
beginning of the option 67 path. For example:
usr/NetworkStationV2/prodbase/x86/proms/bflash.2800
Appendix D. Updating the NS Boot version H2033190 (03/31/99)
95
Notes:
a. Ensure that other class settings do not override your class settings. For
example, setting option 67 at the client level overrides an option 67 setting
at the global level.
b. You may need to add other DHCP options to your DHCP configuration. For
example, you may need to add the gateway and subnet mask options, if
they have not been added at the global or subnet level.
3. Once you have updated all of the Series 2800 Network Stations from the
H2033190 (03/31/99) NS Boot version, you can remove the IBM Network
Station class and the included options from your DHCP server. Updated
Network Stations do not recognize the IBM Network Station class.
You have completed the update of the H2033190 (03/31/99) NS Boot version,
using a DHCP server. See “Using the NS Boot utility” on page 77.
96
Using IBM Network Station Manager
Appendix E. Resetting the Series 2800 (Type 8364) Network
Station to the NS Boot utility
This procedure explains how to return to the NS Boot code after you have selected
WSOD for your Network Station operating system. To return to the Select
Operating System menu after you have chosen the WSOD selection, perform the
following procedure:
1. Restart the Network Station.
2. Press F1 during the startup sequence.
3. When you see the prompt for the administrator password, enter IBMNCD.
4. Select the Start Options menu from the Configuration/Setup Utility menu
and press Enter.
5. Scroll down to the Firmware Selection field.
6. Using the left arrow keys and the right arrow keys, select the Other
Operating Systems option.
7. Press Esc to exit the Start Options menu.
8. Press Esc to exit the Configuration/Setup Utility menu.
9. Highlight the Yes, save and exit the Setup Utility option, and press Enter to
save and exit the Setup Utility.
The Network Station automatically restarts.
10. Press Esc, and continue with step 3 on page 94.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
97
98
Using IBM Network Station Manager
Appendix F. Notices
This information was developed for products and services offered in the U.S.A.
IBM may not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this document in
other countries. Consult your local IBM representative for information on the
products and services currently available in your area. Any reference to an IBM
product, program, or service is not intended to state or imply that only that IBM
product, program, or service may be used. Any functionally equivalent product,
program, or service that does not infringe any IBM intellectual property right may
be used instead. However, it is the user’s responsibility to evaluate and verify the
operation of any non-IBM product, program, or service.
IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter
described in this document. The furnishing of this document does not give you
any license to these patents. You can send license inquiries, in writing, to:
IBM Director of Licensing
IBM Corporation
North Castle Drive
Armonk, NY 10504-1785
U.S.A.
For license inquiries regarding double-byte (DBCS) information, contact the IBM
Intellectual Property Department in your country or send inquiries, in writing, to:
IBM World Trade Asia Corporation
Licensing
2-31 Roppongi 3-chome, Minato-ku
Tokyo 106, Japan
The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any other
country where such provisions are inconsistent with local law:
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION PROVIDES THIS
PUBLICATION “AS IS” WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER
EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OF NON-INFRINGEMENT, MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS
FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow disclaimer of express or
implied warranties in certain transactions, therefore, this statement may not apply
to you.
This information could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors.
Changes are periodically made to the information herein; these changes will be
incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM may make improvements
and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this
publication at any time without notice.
Any references in this information to non-IBM Web sites are provided for
convenience only and do not in any manner serve as an endorsement of those Web
sites. The materials at those Web sites are not part of the materials for this IBM
product and use of those Web sites is at your own risk.
Licensees of this program who wish to have information about it for the purpose
of enabling: (i) the exchange of information between independently created
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
99
programs and other programs (including this one) and (ii) the mutual use of the
information which has been exchanged, should contact:
IBM Corporation
Software Interoperability Coordinator
3605 Highway 52 N
Rochester, MN 55901-7829
U.S.A.
Such information may be available, subject to appropriate terms and conditions,
including in some cases, payment of a fee.
The licensed program described in this information and all licensed material
available for it are provided by IBM under terms of the IBM Customer Agreement,
IBM International Program License Agreement, or any equivalent agreement
between us.
Any performance data contained herein was determined in a controlled
environment. Therefore, the results obtained in other operating environments may
vary significantly. Some measurements may have been made on development-level
systems and there is no guarantee that these measurements will be the same on
generally available systems. Furthermore, some measurement may have been
estimated through extrapolation. Actual results may vary. Users of this document
should verify the applicable data for their specific environment.
Information concerning non-IBM products was obtained from the suppliers of
those products, their published announcements or other publicly available sources.
IBM has not tested those products and cannot confirm the accuracy of
performance, compatibility or any other claims related to non-IBM products.
Questions on the capabilities of non-IBM products should be addressed to the
suppliers of those products.
All statements regarding IBM’s future direction or intent are subject to change or
withdrawal without notice, and represent goals and objectives only.
This information is for planning purposes only. The information herein is subject to
change before the products described become available.
This information contains examples of data and reports used in daily business
operations. To illustrate them as completely as possible, the examples include the
names of individuals, companies, brands, and products. All of these names are
fictitious and any similarity to the names and addresses used by an actual business
enterprise is entirely coincidental.
COPYRIGHT LICENSE:
This information contains sample application programs in source language, which
illustrates programming techniques on various operating platforms. You may copy,
modify, and distribute these sample programs in any form without payment to
IBM, for the purposes of developing, using, marketing or distributing application
programs conforming to the application programming interface for the operating
platform for which the sample programs are written. These examples have not
been thoroughly tested under all conditions. IBM, therefore, cannot guarantee or
imply reliability, serviceability, or function of these programs. You may copy,
modify, and distribute these sample programs in any form without payment to
IBM for the purposes of developing, using, marketing, or distributing application
programs conforming to IBM’s application programming interfaces.
100
Using IBM Network Station Manager
Trademarks
The following terms are trademarks of International Business Machines
Corporation in the United States, or other countries, or both:
AIX
Application System/400
AS/400
Client Access
DB2
eNetwork
IBM
IBM Network Station
InfoColor
Information Assistant
InfoPrint
IPDS
Micro Channel
MVS
NetView
NetVisxta
Network Station
On-Demand Server
OpenEdition
Operating System/400
OS/390
OS/400
RS/6000
S/390
System/390
VM/ESA
400
Lotus is a trademark of Lotus Development Corporation in the United States and
other countries.
Tivoli is a trademark of Tivoli Systems Inc. in the United States and other
countries.
Microsoft, Windows, Windows NT, and the Windows logo are trademarks of
Microsoft Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both.
Java and all Java-based trademarks are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. in the
United States, other countries, or both.
UNIX is a registered trademark in the United States and other countries licensed
exclusively through The Open Group.
Other company, product, and service names may be trademarks or service marks
of others.
Appendix F. Notices
101
102
Using IBM Network Station Manager
Index
Numerics
3270
emulator 5
LU session names, Configuring
persistent 89
printer datastreams 19
5250
configuring emulator for use on the
Network Station 39
emulator 3
printer datastreams 19
8361
(Series 300) and Type 8362 (Series
1000), Type 65
8362
(Series 1000), Type 8361 (Series 300)
and Type 65
8363
(Series 2200) and Type 8364 (Series
2800), Type 75
8364
(Series 2800), Type 8363 (Series 2200)
and Type 75
A
accessing and using How To Help 64
accessing the IBM Network Station setup
utility 65
adding the Calibration Tools application
to a folder 34
additive preference selections 28
address, changing the local MAC 80
addresses, default MAC 69
addresses, user-configurable MAC 69
addresses, working with MAC 69
administrator password, setting the 31
administrators, system 26
advanced diagnostics 16
AIX session icon on the desktop launch
bar, Setting up an 51
allowing private user updates of ICA
connection entries 56
application
adding the calibration tools
application to a folder 34
for use on the Network Station,
configuring the 5250 emulator 39
moving to a different folder 35
printer datastreams 19
to a folder, adding an 33
application, multimedia java 15
application manager, ICA remote 7
application-specific printer support,
configuring TN3270E 92
applications
automatically starting on your
Network Station desktop 37
managing your desktop 19
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
applications (continued)
Netscape Communicator supported
commands and helper 11
applications, initial desktop folders
and 2
audio player 15
automatic connection 54
automatically starting applications on
your Network Station desktop 37
automatically updating the boot code 44
B
background setting
in the Workstations function of the
Hardware Setup Task 43
boot
from NVRAM 71
from the network 71
PROM
viewing the version 71
boot code
automatically updating the 44
boot log, displaying the 80
boot setting, overriding the Network
Station 45
Boot version, Identifying the NS 75
browse function, using the
workstation 29
browser
configuring the Netscape
Communicator for Java 40
C
calculator 14
calendar 14
calibration tools 16
adding the application to a folder 34
carrying out ICA load balancing 55
changing the language setting of the NS
Boot utility 78
changing the local MAC address 80
color on your Network Station desktop,
controlling 41
commands and helper applications,
Netscape Communicator supported 11
comments, how to send your vi
Communicator, Netscape 9
configuration on the Network Station,
updating the Domain Name Server
(DNS) 47
configuring
a custom folder 32
a local area network-attached
printer 60
a local program for all users 48
a Network Station-attached printer for
other users 61
configuring (continued)
a Network Station for light pen or
touch screen devices 39
a remote program for all users 50
an IBM Network Station to boot from
Local (NVRAM) settings 79
an IBM Network Station to boot from
the network setting 71
an IBM Network Station to boot from
the NVRAM setting 71
an ICA connection to a PC server 52
Java for the Network Station 59
persistent 3270 LU session names 89
printers with the IBM Network
Station Manager program 91
the 5250 emulator application for use
on the Network Station 39
TN3270E application-specific printer
support 92
TN3270E general printer support 91
connection
automatic 54
manual 55
connection entry, defining an ICA 54
custom folder, configuring a 32
D
datastreams, understanding printer 19
default MAC addresses 69
defaults
loading the factory 81
desktop
applications, managing your 19
automatically starting applications on
your Network Station 37
background setting 43
controlling color on your Network
Station 41
logoff, help, and lock screen
functions 18
using the pop-up menu accessible
from your Network Station 42
desktop folders and applications,
initial 2
desktop launch bar
setting up an AIX session icon on
the 51
desktop theme function of the desktop
display setup task, using the 42
devices
configuring a Network Station for
light pen or touch screen 39
DHCP server
updating the H2033190 (03/31/99) NS
Boot version from a 95
diagnostic messages
enabling verbose 80
diagnostics, advanced 16
disabling the Network Station screen
saver 41
103
display resolution, setting the 78
display support and printer support,
using TN3270E 89
displaying hardware information 79
displaying the boot log 80
DNS
updating the configuration on the
Network Station 47
Domain Name Server (DNS)
configuration on the Network Station,
updating the 47
E
editor
text 13
emulator
3270 5
5250 3
VT 7
enabling verbose diagnostic
messages 80
entry
defining an ICA connection 54
Examples
of working with the IBM Network
Station Manager program Setup
Tasks 30
extras folder 12
F
factory defaults, loading the 81
factory defaults, resetting a Network
Station to the 70
file manager 13
folder
adding an application to a 33
adding the calibration tools
application to a 34
configuring a custom 32
extras 12
host access 3
moving an application to a
different 35
folders
applications and initial desktop 2
function
using the workstation browse 29
functions
desktop logoff, help, and lock
screen 18
G
Gateway IP address
setting in Setup Utility 67
viewing in Setup Utility 67
getting started 1
H
hardware information, displaying 79
104
Using IBM Network Station Manager
Hardware Setup Task
using the Desktop background setting
in the Workstations function of
the 43
help, accessing and using how to 64
helper applications, Netscape
Communicator supported commands
and 11
host access folder 3
how to
configure a Network Station to boot
from the Network setting 71
configure a Network Station to boot
from the NVRAM setting 71
recover the default MAC address 69
reset a Network Station to the factory
defaults 70
select a keyboard language 68
select a startup language 68
set the Gateway IP address in Setup
Utility 67
set the monitor resolution 67
set the Network Station IP
address 66
set the subnet mask in Setup
Utility 67
specify a user-configurable MAC
address 70
use verbose diagnostic messages 68
view a user-configurable MAC
address 70
view the Boot PROM version of a
Network Station 71
view the default MAC address 69
view the Gateway IP address in Setup
Utility 67
view the Network Station’s IP
address 66
view the subnet mask in Setup
Utility 67
work with the blanking pedestal 67
work with the NS Boot utility 75
How To Help
accessing and using 64
I
IBM Network Station
NS Boot tasks 78
setup utility, accessing the 65
IBM Network Station Manager
configuring printers with the
program 91
program, starting the 29
program preference selections,
working with 27
program Setup Tasks, Examples of
working with the 30
IBM Network Station Manager program
Who can use the 25
IBM Network Station Manager program
flow 24
IBM Network Station setup utility
tasks 66
ICA
connection entry, defining an 54
remote application manager 7
ICA Client
connecting to local printers with
the 54
ICA connection entries, allowing private
user updates of 56
ICA connection to a PC server,
configuring an 52
ICA load balancing, carrying out 55
icon
on the desktop launch bar, Setting up
an AIX session 51
identifying or referring to your Network
Station, tips on 28
identifying the NS Boot version 75
iInformation available on the World Wide
Web v
individual users 27
information
related v
information, displaying hardware 79
J
Java
configuring the Netscape
Communicator browser for 40
Java for the Network Station
configuring 59
Java Media Framework 1.1 15
JMF 1.1 15
enable the Netscape browser to
support 40
K
keyboard language, selecting 68
keyboard language, selecting a 78
kiosk profile
including system, group, or user
preferences in a 59
kit, tool 16
L
language
keyboard, setting 68
startup, selecting 68
language, selecting a keyboard 78
language setting of the NS Boot utility,
changing the 78
launch bar
setting up an AIX session icon on the
desktop 51
light pen
configuring a Network Station for 39
light pen or touch screen devices
configuring a Network Station for 39
load balancing, carrying out ICA 55
loading the factory defaults 81
Local (NVRAM) settings
configuring an IBM Network Station
to boot from 79
local MAC address, changing the 80
local printers
with the ICA Client, connecting to 54
lock screen functions, desktop logoff,
help, and 18
logging in to your IBM Network
Station 1
logoff, help, and lock screen functions,
desktop 18
LU session names, configuring persistent
3270 89
M
MAC address
changing the local 80
recovering the default MAC
address 69
specifying a user-configurable MAC
address 70
viewing a user-configurable MAC
address 70
viewing the default MAC address 69
MAC addresses, default 69
MAC addresses, user-configurable 69
MAC addresses, working with 69
manager
file 13
ICA remote application 7
Manager
Network Station 11
managing your desktop applications 19
manual connection 55
manually updating the NS Boot code 76
messages
enabling verbose diagnostic 80
monitor
setting resolution 67
working with the blanking
pedestal 67
monitor, print 18
moving an application to a different
folder 35
multimedia java application 15
N
names, configuring persistent 3270 LU
session 89
Netscape Communicator 9
printer datastreams 19
supported commands and helper
applications 11
supported URL types 10
Netscape Communicator browser
configuring for Java 40
network-attached printer, configuring a
local area 60
Network Station
boot setting, overriding the 45
configuring Java for the 59
desktop, using the pop-up menu
accessible from your 42
IP address, setting 66
IP address, viewing 66
logging in to your IBM 1
NS Boot tasks 78
selecting the operating system for
the 93
Network Station (continued)
setup utility tasks, IBM 66
tips on identifying or referring to
your 28
updating the Domain Name Server
(DNS) configuration on the 47
Network Station desktop
controlling color 41
Network Station Manager 11
program, starting the IBM 29
program flow 24
program preference selections,
working with IBM 27
program Setup Tasks, Examples of
working with the IBM 30
Network Station Manager program, using
the 21
NS Boot
changing the language setting of the
utility 78
identifying the version 75
manually updating the boot
version 76
tasks, IBM Network Station 78
using the utility 77
utility, resetting the Series 2800 (Type
8364) Network Station to the 97
version from a DHCP server,
Updating the H2033190
(03/31/99) 95
version from NVRAM settings,
updating the H2033190
(03/31/99) 94
version H2033190 (03/31/99),
updating the 93
NS Boot utility
working with 75
NS Boot Utility
working with the 65
NVRAM
how to boot from 71
O
operating system for the Network Station,
selecting the 93
overriding the Network Station boot
setting 45
overview
IBM Network Station Manager
program 21
P
paint 13
parameters
valid types of -DISPLAY_NAME 89
password
setting the administrator 31
PC server
configuring an ICA connection to
a 52
PCL datastream 19
persistent 3270 LU session names,
configuring 89
player
audio 15
video 14
PostScript datastream 19
preference selections
additive 28
working with IBM Network Station
Manager program 27
working with workstation 28
print monitor 18
printer
configuring a local area
network-attached 60
datastreams 19
for other users, configuring a Network
Station-attached 61
support, configuring TN3270E
application-specific 92
support, configuring TN3270E
general 91
printer support
using TN3270E display support
and 89
printers
with the IBM Network Station
Manager program, configuring 91
with the ICA Client, connecting to
local 54
private user updates of ICA connection
entries, allowing 56
problem resolution 83
program
configuring printers with the IBM
Network Station Manager 91
starting the IBM Network Station
Manager 29
who can use the IBM Network Station
Manager 25
program flow, IBM Network Station
Manager 24
program preference selections
working with IBM Network Station
Manager 27
R
RealPlayer 15
referring to your Network Station, tips on
identifying or 28
related information v
remote application manager, ICA 7
resetting the Series 2800 (Type 8364)
Network Station to the NS Boot
utility 97
resolution, problem 83
resolution, setting the display 78
roam function
using the 1
S
screen devices
configuring a Network Station for
light pen or touch 39
screen saver
disabling the Network Station 41
Index
105
Screen saver setting in the Workstations
function of the Hardware Setup Task,
Using the 43
selecting a keyboard language 78
selecting the operating system for the
Network Station 93
selections
additive preference 28
working with IBM Network Station
Manager program preference 27
working with workstation
preference 28
server
configuring an ICA connection to a
PC 52
updating the H2033190 (03/31/99) NS
Boot version from a DHCP 95
service aids, working with 80
session icon on the desktop launch bar,
Setting up an AIX 51
session names, configuring persistent
3270 LU 89
setting the administrator password 31
setting the display resolution 78
setting the Time Zone (TZ) environment
variable 62
setup task
using the desktop theme function of
the desktop display 42
Setup Task
using the desktop background setting
in the Workstations function of the
Hardware 43
using the Screen saver setting in the
Workstations function of the
Hardware 43
Setup Tasks
Examples of working with the IBM
Network Station Manager
program 30
setup utility
accessing the IBM Network
Station 65
Setup Utility
working with the IBM Network
Station 65
setup utility tasks, IBM Network
Station 66
software combinations, understanding 9
solving problems 83
starting applications on your Network
Station desktop, automatically 37
starting the IBM Network Station
Manager program 29
startup language, selecting 68
subnet mask
setting in Setup Utility 67
viewing in Setup Utility 67
support
configuring TN3270E
application-specific printer 92
configuring TN3270E general
printer 91
supported commands and helper
applications, Netscape
Communicator 11
106
Using IBM Network Station Manager
supported URL types, Netscape
Communicator 10
system
administrators 26
T
Task
using the Screen saver setting in the
Workstations function of the
Hardware Setup 43
tasks
Examples of working with the IBM
Network Station Manager program
setup 30
IBM Network Station NS Boot 78
IBM Network Station setup utility 66
text editor 13
the Desktop background setting in the
Workstations function of the Hardware
Setup Task, Using 43
Time Zone (TZ) environment variable,
Setting the 62
tips
on identifying or referring to your
Network Station 28
TN3270E application-specific printer
support, configuring 92
TN3270E display support and printer
support, using 89
TN3270E general printer support,
configuring 91
tool kit 16
tools
calibration 16
touch screen devices
configuring a Network Station for
light pen or 39
troubleshooting 83
Type 8361
(Series 300) and Type 8362 (Series
1000) 65
Type 8362
(Series 1000), Type 8361 (Series 300)
and 65
Type 8363
(Series 2200) and Type 8364 (Series
2800) 75
Type 8364
(Series 2800), Type 8363 (Series 2200)
and 75
Network Station to the NS Boot
utility, resetting the Series 2800 97
U
understanding
software combinations 9
updating
the boot code, automatically 44
the Domain Name Server (DNS)
configuration on the Network
Station 47
the H2033190 (03/31/99) NS Boot
version from a DHCP server 95
updating (continued)
the H2033190 (03/31/99) NS Boot
version from NVRAM settings 94
the NS Boot code, manually 76
the NS Boot version H2033190
(03/31/99) 93
URL types, Netscape Communicator
supported 10
user-configurable MAC addresses 69
users
configuring a local program for
all 48
configuring a Network
Station-attached printer for
other 61
configuring a remote program for
all 50
individual 27
using
the desktop theme function of the
desktop display setup task 42
the IBM Network Station Manager
program 21
the pop-up menu accessible from your
Network Station desktop 42
the Roam function 1
the workstation browse function 29
Using the Desktop background setting in
the Workstations function of the
Hardware Setup Task 43
utility
accessing the IBM Network Station
setup 65
V
variable
setting the Time Zone (TZ)
environment 62
verbose diagnostic messages,
enabling 80
verbose diagnostic messages, using 68
version, Identifying the NS Boot 75
video player 14
VT emulator 7
W
Web
information available on the World
Wide v
who should read this book v
workstation browse function, using
the 29
workstation preference selections,
working with 28
Workstations function of the Hardware
Setup Task
using the Screen saver setting in
the 43
World Wide Web
information available on the v
Readers’ Comments — We’d Like to Hear from You
IBM Network Station
Using IBM Network Station Manager
V2R1, September 2000
To view or print the latest update, go to http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs
Publication No. SC41-0690-00
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