annrep06

annrep06
Research Institute Leiden Observatory
(Onderzoekinstituut Sterrewacht Leiden)
Annual Report 2006
Sterrewacht Leiden
Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences
University of Leiden
Niels Bohrweg 2
2333 CA Leiden
Postbus 9513
2330 RA Leiden
The Netherlands
http://www.strw.leidenuniv.nl
Cover:
Images of LMC-N11:
ionized carbon (front cover) and optical (back cover)
N11 is the second major star-forming region in the
Large Magellanic Cloud. Optical images show
ionized gas (red H-alpha light) and the blue OB stars
ionizing them. Particularly notable is the shell of gas
around the rich LH 9 OB star association.
The northeastern quadrant of the shell around LH 9
can easily be recognized in a KAO image showing the
distribution of ionized carbon ([CII]). The ultraviolet
light from LH 9 causes CO in the molecular clouds
along the shell to break up into oxygen and carbon,
which is then ionized by the UV radiation. The image
thus shows the erosion of the starforming clouds,
putting an end to the process. The region depicted
here is one of the first targets for five-times sharper
imaging by ESA's Herschel space telescope, to be
launched in 2008.
An electronic version of this annual report is available on the web at
http://www.strw.leidenuniv.nl/research/annualreport.php?node=22
Production Annual Report 2006:
M. Franx, C. Gündisch, J. Lub, E. Scherpenzeel
Sterrewacht Leiden
Executive
(Directie Onderzoeksinstituut)
Director of Research P.T. de Zeeuw
Director of Education
F.P. Israel
Executive Secretary
J. Lub
Wetenschappelijk Directeur
Onderwijs Directeur
Secretaris Instituut
Supervisory Council
(Raad van toezicht)
Prof. Dr. H. van der Laan (Chair)
Dr. B. Baud
Prof. Dr. Ir. J.A.M. Bleeker
Prof. Dr. C.J. Oort
Prof. Dr. Ir. W. van Saarloos
Contents:
Part I
1
Chapter
1
1
3
Review of major events
2
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9.
2.10
2.11
2.12
Research
Solar System
Exoplanets
Protostars and Circumstellar Disks
Star Formation
Stars and Circumstellar Matter
Structure of the Milky Way
Nearby Galaxies
High Redshift Galaxies
Theoretical Studies
Raymond & Beverly Sackler Laboratory
Instrumentation
History of Science
9
9
10
11
16
20
22
23
36
41
44
50
53
CONTENTS
3
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
Education, popularization and social events
Education
Degrees Awarded in 2006
Courses and Teaching
Popularization and Media Contacts
The Leidsch Astronomisch Dispuut ‘F. Kaiser’
Vereniging van Oud-Sterrewachters
57
57
59
61
64
71
72
Part II
73
Appendix
73
I
Observatory staff December 31, 2006
75
Committee membership
Observatory Commitees
University Committees
83
83
86
III
Science policy functions
91
IV
Visiting scientists
101
Workshops, colloquia and lectures
Workshops andMeetings
Endowed lectures
Scientific colloquia
Student colloquia
105
105
107
108
110
VI
Participation in scientific meetings
113
VII
Observing sessions abroad
131
VIII
Working visits abroad
137
IX
Colloquia given outside Leiden
147
II
II.1
II.2
V
V.1
V.2
V.3
V.4
CONTENTS
X
X.1
X.2
X.3
X.4
X.5
Scientific publications
Ph.D. Theses and Books
Articles in Refereed Journals
Conference Papers, Review Articles , etc.
Astronomical Catalogues
Other Publications
155
155
156
176
191
191
Chapter
1
Review
of
major events
Chapter
Review
of
major events
1
This booklet describes the main events of 2006 at Sterrewacht Leiden. Our
department of about 20 permanent scientific staff, 30 postdoctoral fellows, 40
PhD students and 10 support staff together remain focussed on teaching,
research and outreach in astronomy.
As demonstrated below, the scientific productivity in 2006 was high, with
around 300 scientific publications involving sterrewacht members, 15 conferences, symposia and workshops organized in Leiden, and a steady stream
of visitors and colloquium speakers. The institute continues to score very
well in international competitions for observing time at space observatories
and on the ground, as well as for research grants. The department continues
to attract a steady stream of students for the BSc and MSc degrees, and into
the PhD programme.
There were many highlights in 2006.
In September a one-day symposium took place to honour Ingrid van
Houten, who turned 85. Ingrid has been associated with the institute for
nearly 50 years, hunting asteroids on photographic plates in the PalomarGreen survey. Many old friends from around the world came to make it a
special day, and heard Brian Marsden (Harvard/Smithsonian) give a special
colloquium dedicated to her work.
4
REVIEW OF MAJOR EVENTS
Another eminent Sterrewachter, Adriaan Blaauw, had his portrait
painted by Teun Roebroek, and the beautiful painting now hangs in a
prominent place in the Oort room.
A vibrant colloquium programme, run by Joop Schaye and Yuri Levin,
continued to bring a series of excellent astronomers to Leiden. The year's
Oort professor was Roger Blandford (Stanford), and he helped organize a
lively workshop on gravitational lensing at the Lorentz Center (14 more LC
astronomy workshops took place throughout the year). In december Chuck
Steidel (Pasadena) delivered the Sackler lecture and spent a week among us.
Many students become involved in observational programmes, and this
may require travel to distant places. This year this custom was taken to a
new extreme by several of our MSc students --- the ICES team --- who flew
in the ESA parabolic flight programme to perform microgravity experiments. They returned 'shaken, not stirred', and who knows, maybe there will
be another episode in '0(0)7'...
The summer saw, among many other conferences, the triannual General
Assembly of the International Astronomical Union (of which George Miley
was elected one of the Vice-Presidents), in Prague. Many Sterrewachters
attended, losing a planet along the way! Subsequently we lost many students as well, after a marathon session at the end of August during which
six people received their MSc in astronomy. Office space remains tight,
though.
Successful grant applications form a crucial component of the Sterrewacht's research funds. We were particularly proud that a total of four
awards from the NWO Vernieuwingsimpuls came our way: VIDI grants for
Joop Schaye and Yuri Levin, and VENI's for Clovis Hopman and Herma
Cuppen. Two EU networks in which Leiden plays a significant role were
also awarded, one for GAIA-related research, and one for gravitational
lensing surveys. Added to these successes came the important news that
funding for the national NOVA programme is to be continued until 2013 at
REVIEW OF MAJOR EVENTS
5
least. The future thus looks bright for astronomy in Leiden (and indeed, the
Netherlands as a whole).
In outreach, the evening lectures / telescope viewing nights at the old
Observatory building downtown drew big crowds, young and old --- the
enthusiastic organization of these events by Leiden promovendi and members of the Student Dispuut Kaiser, as well as the Werkgroep Leidse Sterrewacht, is an important part of our local outreach activities. As every year,
sterrewachters also participated in the National Science day, again hosting
many hundreds of visitors at the old Observatory. The UNAWE programme, which promotes exposure to the excitement of astronomy for
disadvantaged children throughout the world, received a direct grant from
the Ministry of OC&W, delivered in person by Minister Maria van der
Hoeven.
The year also saw the departure of many PhD students and postdocs,
most of whom have gone on to continue a career in astronomy elsewhere.
Also in the permanent staff there were a few changes. Two Sterrewachters
joined the permanent staff: Anthony Brown, whose work on the GAIA
mission will help to ensure a strong Leiden involvement once the satellite
flies in the 2010's, and Remko Stuik who runs the optics laboratory and is
involved in the ambitious MUSE instrument for the ESO VLT. The support
staff was strengthened with the appointment of Christine Gündisch who
will help with managing the increasingly complex grants and contracts that
the many projects we are involved in entail.
Andreas Quirrenbach left us after a 4-year stay to return to Germany as
director of the venerable Landessternwarte in Heidelberg. During his time in
Leiden Andreas started a number of high-profile instrumentation projects,
and happily several of these, which involved other Leiden staff as well, can
continue here.
REVIEW OF MAJOR EVENTS
6
At the end of the year it became known that our scientific director Tim de
Zeeuw had been selected to be the next Director General of the European
Southern Observatory, one of the pre-eminent astronomical organizations in
the world, starting in September 2007. This will make him the 4th Dutch
ESO DG (out of 7!), and also the 4th to have a strong Leiden connection. We
wish Tim well with the enormous challenge that comes with this prestigious
appointment.
As has become tradition, the year was closed with a fabulous Christmas
lunch to which everyone brought something typical of their own country.
The resulting culinary feast nicely summed up how wonderful it is to work
at such an internationally oriented institute.
We look forward to an even more successful 2007!
Koen Kuijken
Deputy Director
Chapter
2
Research
Chapter
Research
2
The research activities at Leiden Observatory span a very wide range,
from small bodies in the Solar System to reionisation of the Universe and
cosmology on the largest scales. This section aims to provide an overview of
active areas of research, and a summary of the principal results obtained in
2006. To get a sense of the sheer volume of work produced by Observatory
researchers, the reader is recommended to Appendix X, which gives a
complete list of material published in 2006.
2.1. Solar System
2.1.1. Minor Planets
Many new asteroids were identified, numbered, or named by I. van
Houten-Groeneveld, continuing the work by herself and her late husband,
C.J. van Houten. Definitive numbers were given to 236 of these objects by
the Minor Planet Center (Cambridge, USA) in 2006. 22 names were given to
minor planets discovered by the Van Houtens in 2006. Of particular interest
are: (10966) van der Hucht, (10968) Sterken, (10970) de Zeeuw, (10971) van
Dishoeck, (10950) Albertjansen, (10964) Degraaff, (10250) Hellahaasse,
(10251) Mulisch, (10969) Perryman, (10252) Heidigraf, (10658) Gretadevries,
which have been named after Belgian or Dutch famous people.
10
2.2. EXOPLANETS
2.1.2. Comets
Hogerheijde studied the volatile content of cometary nuclei, as probes of
the compositions of the young Solar System. Using the millimeter
interferometer of the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association at Hat Creek,
California, together with researchers from Berkeley, Caltech, and Illinois, in
2006 he investigated the presence of large molecules such as methanol,
methyl cyanide, ethanol, and methyl formate in the comae of comets
LINEAR (C/2002 T7) and NEAT (C/2001 Q4). These two comets show
distinct abundance patterns reminiscent of the differences found earlier
toward HaleBopp and Hyakutake. This indicates that comets can have very
different chemical compositions, probably linked to their location of
formation and thermal histories.
2.2. Exoplanets
2.2.1. Transisting Planets
Snellen continued his work on the detection and characterisation of
transiting extrasolar planets, in particular on near-infrared observations of
the primary and secondary eclipses. Measurements of planet OGLE-TR-113
using SOFI on the ESO New Technology Telescope were a great success,
resulting in unprecedented precisions of 1 millimag per 10 minutes. The
observations of the transit show a flat-bottomed light-curve indicative of a
significantly lower stellar limb darkening at near-infrared than at optical
wavelengths. The observations of the secondary eclipse result in a 3σ
detection of emission from the exoplanet at 0.17±0.05 per cent. If true, these
would constitute the first detection of direct emission from an extrasolar
planet from the ground, however, residual systematic errors make this
detection rather tentative.
2.2.2. SETI
Ollongren further extended his Lingua Cosmica, as before in
collaboration with the research group on Interstellar Message Construction
of the SETI Institute at Mountain View, California. Aristotelian logic was
2.3. PROTOSTARS AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS
11
embedded in the system. Results were reported at the 57th International
Astronautical Congress in Valencia.
2.3 Protostars and Circumstellar Disks
2.3.1. Characterizing Young Disks
In the deeply embedded stage of star formation, the young stellar object
(YSO) is surrounded by a dense envelope of gas and dust which is gradually
dispersed with time. A particularly interesting evolutionary phase is the
Class I stage, in which the disks are still young but the envelopes are largely
dispersed so that they no longer overwhelm the disk emission. Lommen,
van Dishoeck, Crapsi and Joergensen (CfA) started a program to use the
SubMillimeter Array (SMA) to determine the physical and chemical
characteristics of young disks for a set of Class I sources. Results for the first
two sources, IRS 63 and Elias 29 in Ophiuchus, reveal a large range in disk
properties, with disk masses from <0.006 to 0.05 MSun and Menv/Mdisk from
1 to 6. The latter values are clearly in between those of the Class 0 (>10) and
Class II (<1) stages. HCO+ 3-2 is detected, with position-velocity diagrams
indicative of Keplerian rotation. This allows an estimate of the stellar masses
at this early stage for the first time.
2.3.2. Testing Grain Surface Chemistry in Massive Hot
Cores
Bisschop, van Dishoeck, de Wachter and Joergensen (CfA) finalized their
JCMT submillimeter line survey toward 7 high-mass YSOs to search for
H2CO, CH3OH, CH2CO, CH3CHO, C2H5OH, HCOOH, HNCO and
NH2CHO. The aim was to establish the chemical origin of this set of complex
organic molecules which are thought to be produced by grain surface
chemistry. Based on their rotation diagrams, these molecules can be
classified as either cold (<100 K) or hot (>100 K), implying that complex
organics are present in at least two distinct regions. Furthermore, the
abundances of the hot oxygen-bearing species are correlated, as are those of
HNCO and NH2CHO. This is suggestive of chemical relationships within,
12
2.3. PROTOSTARS AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS
but not between, those two groups of molecules. The most likely explanation
for the observed constant abundance ratios is that the hot molecules are
“first generation” species that originate from solid-state chemistry. The
correlations between sources imply very similar conditions during their
formation or very similar doses of energetic processing. Bisschop and
collaborators have subsequently tested various proposed routes through
laboratory experiments of the hydrogenation of simple ices (see Section
Laboratory Astrophysics).
2.3.3. PAH vs. Large Grain Distribution in Disks
Geers, van Dishoeck, Merin, Oliveira, together with Pel (Groningen),
Pontoppidan (Caltech), Dullemond (Heidelberg) and Augereau (Grenoble)
obtained spatially resolved VLT-VISIR mid-infrared images of the disk
surrounding the young star IRS 48 in Ophiuchus. The disk exhibits a ringlike structure at 18.7 micron, and is dominated by very strong emission from
polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at shorter wavelengths (Figure
2.1). This allows a detailed study of the relative distributions of small and
large dust grains. The 18.7 micron ring peaks at a diameter of 110 AU, with a
gap of ~ 60 AU. In contrast, the PAH emission bands are centered on the
source and appear to fill the gap within the ring. The measured PAH line
strengths are 10-100x stronger than those typically measured for young M0
stars and can only be explained with a high PAH abundance and/or strong
excess optical/UV emission. The morphology of the images, combined with
the absence of a silicate emission feature, imply that the inner disk has been
cleared of micron-sized dust but with a significant population of PAHs
remaining. It is argued that the gap can be due to grain growth and settling
or to clearing by an unseen planetary or low-mass companion. IRS 48 may
represent a short-lived transitional phase from a classical to a weak-line T
Tauri star.
2.3. PROTOSTARS AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS
13
Figure 2.1: VLT-VISIR mid-infrared images of the disk around the young T
Tauri star IRS 48, showing strong centrally peaked PAH emission at 11.3 micron
as well as a 60 AU diameter gap devoid of large grains emitting at 19 micron.
The inserts show the PSF of a standard star. The 8-13 micron VISIR spectrum
with the strong PAH features is included (Geers et al.)
2.3.4. Spitzer Spectroscopy of Disks: [Ne II] and H2
Van Dishoeck and collaborators continued harvesting the scientific fruits
of the Spitzer Space Telescope ‘Cores to Disks’ (c2d) legacy project, led by
Evans (Texas). Many papers were completed, including presentation of the
IRAC and MIPS maps of the nearby molecular clouds. All reduced IRS
spectra were delivered to the Spitzer Science Center with extensive
documentation provided by Lahuis and Kessler-Silacci (Texas).
One of the spectroscopc highlights is a survey by Lahuis, van Dishoeck,
Blake, Pontoppidan (both Caltech), Evans and Kessler-Silacci of midinfrared gas-phase lines toward a sample of 76 circumstellar disks around
low mass pre-main sequence stars. [Ne II] and [Fe I] are detected for the first
time toward classical T Tauri stars in ~20 % respectively ~9 % of the c2d
sources. The observed [Ne II] line fluxes are consistent with X-ray irradiated
disks around stars with LX=1029-1031 erg s-1. [Fe I] is detected, but not [S I]
or [Fe II]. The [Fe I] detections indicate the presence of gas-rich disks with
masses of >0.1 MJup. No H2 0-0 S(0) and S(1) disk emission is detected, except
for S(1) toward one source. These data give upper limits on the warm
(T~100-200K) gas mass of a few Jovian masses, consistent with recent T
Tauri disk models which include gas heating by stellar radiation. Compact
disk emission of hot (T>~500K) gas is observed through the H2 0-0 S(2)
and/or S(3) lines toward ~8 % of our sources. These line fluxes are higher by
more than an order of magnitude than those predicted by recent disk
14
2.3. PROTOSTARS AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS
models, even when X-ray and excess UV radiation are included. Oblique
shocks of stellar winds interacting with the disk can explain many aspects of
the hot gas emission, but are inconsistent with the non-detection of [S I] and
[Fe II] lines.
2.3.5. Chemistry in Evolving Protoplanetary Disks
Jonkheid, van Dishoeck, Hogerheijde and Dullemond (Heidelberg)
explored the chemistry and gas temperature of evolving protoplanetary
disks with decreasing mass or dust settling, and tested the sensitivity of
various gas-phase tracers. The density and dust temperature profiles for a
range of disk models around a typical Herbig Ae star were used together
with 2-dimensional ultraviolet radiative transfer to calculate the chemistry
and gas temperature. The chemistry shows a strong correlation with disk
mass. Molecules that are easily photodissociated, like HCN, require high
densities and large extinctions before they can become abundant. The
products of photodissociation, like CN and C2H, become abundant in
models with lower masses. Dust settling mainly affects the gas temperature,
and thus high temperature tracers like the O and C+ fine structure lines. The
carbon chemistry is found to be very sensitive to the adopted PAH
abundance. The line ratios CO/13CO, CO/HCO+ and [O I] 63 /146 micron
can be used to distinguish between disks where dust growth and settling
takes place, and disks that undergo overall mass loss.
2.3.6. Molecular Excitation and Radiative Transfer Tool
The large quantity and high quality of modern radio and infrared line
observations require efficient modeling techniques to infer physical and
chemical parameters such as temperature, density, and molecular
abundances. Van der Tak (Groningen), Schoeier (Stockholm), Black (Onsala)
and van Dishoeck presented a computer program to calculate the intensities
of atomic and molecular lines produced in a uniform medium, based on
statistical equilibrium calculations involving collisional and radiative
processes and including radiation from background sources. Optical depth
effects are treated with an escape probability method. The program is
available on the World Wide Web and makes use of molecular data files
maintained in the Leiden Atomic and Molecular Database (LAMDA), which
2.3. PROTOSTARS AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS
15
will continue to be improved and expanded as part of the Dutch ALMA
ARC activities.
2.3.7. From Molecular Clouds to Stars and Planets
Hogerheijde studies the formation of stars and their planetary systems.
He focuses on observations at millimeter and infrared wavelengths, which
probe the cold gas and dust in star-forming regions and which can penetrate
the dense material surrounding young stars. Much of his research is
centered on the structure and composition of protoplanetary disks, but he
also studies the earlier phases such as prestellar cores and embedded young
stars (see 2.4.1), as well as ‘late’ phases represented by comets as left-overs
from the early Solar System (see 2.1.2). In his work he uses molecules and
dust to measure density, temperature, mass, and velocities, and employs
detailed radiative transfer methods to quantitatively interpret the
observations. Throughout this the chemical evolution is used to track the
evolution of the objects, which is possible because of the similarity of the
dynamical and chemical time scales involved. In his research, Hogerheijde
works with postdoc A. Crapsi, and graduate students C. Brinch, O. Panić,
and D. Salter, as well as several master's students (Martinez, van Weeren,
Schouten, and Kockx).
2.3.8. Warm Gas in a Protoplanetary Disk
Together with colleagues from Harvard, Michigan, and Caltech,
Hogerheijde reported the interferometric detection of the CO J=6-5 rotational
transition from the protoplanetary disk around the young star TW Hya
using the Submillimeter Array on Hawaii. At a distance of only 56 pc this
disk is the closest view available for a gas-rich disk still in the process of
forming a planetary system. Earlier studies of the thermal emission of the
dust already gave detailed insight into the structure of the disk, while
observations of lower rotational transitions of CO confirmed Keplerian
rotation in the disk. Surprisingly, the CO 6-5 line, which traces relatively
warm gas of 50-100 K, is significantly stronger than expected. We
16
2.4. STAR FORMATION
hypothesized that X-ray emission from TW Hya creates a hot layer at the
surface of the disk responsible for this excess emission, illustrating the
interaction between the stellar accretion-driven activity and the make-up of
the surrounding disk.
2.4 Star Formation
2.4.1. Deuterium-carrying Molecules in Prestellar Cores
Hogerheijde reported the detection of the molecular ion H2D+ in the
prestellar core Barnard 68 with the newly commissioned APEX telescope.
This ion has a groundstate transition emission line at a frequency of 372
GHz, near a strong atmospheric absorption band, and requires the clear
skies of Chajnantor for reliable observation (Fig. 2.2). The H2D+ ion fills an
essential role in interstellar chemistry: its non-deuterated counterpart, H3+,
originates via cosmic ray ionization of H2, and initiates much of the
chemical reactions inside dense and cold clouds. The reaction of H3+ with
HD (deuterated H2) produces the energetically slightly more favorable
H2D+. At the low temperatures of 10 K found inside prestellar cores, this
reaction strongly enhances the relative abundance of the H2D+ ion, and as a
consequence, of other deuterium-bearing species. These enhancements are
observed to be as large as 3-4 orders of magnitude. Accurate determination
of the H2D+ abundance is essential to understand this process and calibrate
chemical calculations. The prestellar core Barnard 68 is an ideal testbed for
this, because its density and temperature have been established with great
accuracy in the literature, allowing the observed line intensity to be
converted to a molecular abundance with great precision. From our APEX
observations we find that the H2D+ line strength and abundance are in
accordance with theoretical expectations, but also that better spectroscopic
constants are required from laboratory measurements to reach the necessary
accuracy.
2.4. STAR FORMATION
17
Figure 2.2: Detection spectrum of H2D+ 110-111 toward the prestellar core
Barnard 68, obtained during Science Verification of the newly commissioned
ESO/Max Planck/Sweden Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment telescope (APEX)
on Chajnantor, Chile. The top panel shows the H2D+ line. Panels b and c show
non-detections of N2H+ and H13CO+ toward the same position. Image from
Hogerheijde et al. (2006, A&A, 454, L59).
18
2.4. STAR FORMATION
Crapsi, together with Fontani (INAF), and collaborators, expanded the
study of the deuteration around protostars to higher masses, and tested
deuterium fractionation as a tool to identify the coldest and therefore earliest
stages of high-mass star formation. They observed N2D+, N2H+, C17O and
sub-millimeter continuum using the IRAM-30m and JCMT, and found that
in seven sources (out of ten) the [N2D+]/[N2H+] was enhanced by 3 orders
of magnitudes over the interstellar D/H ratio. These observations show that
the chemical properties of the clouds in which high-mass stars are born are
similar to their low-mass counterparts.
Together with colleagues from Harvard, Michigan, and Caltech,
Hogerheijde reported the interferometric detection of the CO J=6-5 rotational
transition from the protoplanetary disk around the young star TW Hya
using the Submillimeter Array on Hawaii. At a distance of only 56 pc this
disk is the closest view available for a gas-rich disk still in the process of
forming a planetary system. Earlier studies of the thermal emission of the
dust already gave detailed insight into the structure of the disk, while
observations of lower rotational transitions of CO confirmed Keplerian
rotation in the disk. Surprisingly, the CO 6-5 line, which traces relatively
warm gas of 50-100 K, is significantly stronger than expected. We
hypothesized that X-ray emission from TW Hya creates a hot layer at the
surface of the disk responsible for this excess emission, illustrating the
interaction between the stellar accretion-driven activity and the make-up of
the surrounding disk.
2.4.2. Massive Star Formation
The work of Van Langevelde, Hill and Torstensson focuses on high-mass
star formation regions. In particular, they are interested in the youngest
massive stars, as well as the prenatal environments in which these objects
form. Methanol masers are useful tools for identifying such regions and may
possibly used to characterize the evolutionary stage and kinematics of such
regions to very small scales.
Young massive stars form deeply embedded in their natal molecular
cloud, where they are optically obscured prior to main sequence evolution.
They form in clustered environments, on more rapid timescales and at
further distances than their lower mass counterparts. Consequently it is
2.4. STAR FORMATION
19
difficult to pinpoint the individual evolutionary stages of the evolution of a
massive star. However, young massive stars are often associated with radio
continuum emission; infrared emission; maser emission, in particular the
methanol variant; as well as (sub)millimetre continuum emission. The work
of these authors focused on star formation regions exhibiting signs of
methanol maser emission, one of the earliest evolutionary tracers of highmass stars.
Van Langevelde and Torstensson began a research project starting with
high resolution, astrometric, wide field VLBI imaging. Data from the
European VLBI Network can be used to pinpoint the location where
methanol is abundantly present and special excitation conditions prevail. A
number of nearby regions were observed and special processing tools were
developed to find the methanol signposts in the arcminute size fields with
mas resolution. The goal of the project is to characterize the radio and
(sub)mm signature of the young massive star at the origin of the methanol
maser. In collaboration with Bartkiewicz (Torun, Poland), images were made
of targets from a blind survey. In this study a unique ring shaped methanol
maser was discovered, which is being followed up with proper motion
observations and attempts to detect the central source. A common result is
that in sources where the central source can be found, the methanol maser is
typically found on 500 - 1000 AU scales.
Whilst Hill continued her work on a millimetre continuum sample
derived initially from radio continuum and methanol maser selected
sources. This program included analysing results from a spectral energy
distribution analysis of the source sample. The results indicate a sample of
millimetre continuum sources that are possibly indicative of the earliest
stages of massive star formation prior to the onset of methanol maser
emission. Analysis of this millimetre continuum sample, revealed it to have
a two-temperature distribution. The cooler sources in this sample are
interpreted as young, cool, star-less sources whilst the warmer sources are
thought to be the precursors of methanol masers and hence indicative of the
youngest massive stars.
20
2.5. STARS AND CIRCUMSTELLAR MATTER
2.4.3. Spitzer Observations of the Galactic Starburst
W49A
Bos and Brandl studied the HII region W49A, the highest concentrations
of young, massive protostars in our Galaxy. They investigated the physical
and chemical properties of the protostars via mid-IR spectroscopy. The most
massive sources reveal very different spectral properties, which describe
their evolutionary state. Amongst them in the most luminous water maser
source in our Galaxy, a heavily embedded protostar which shows
pronounced absorptions features of CO2 ice. The spectral signatures suggest
a self-shielded geometry, with a luminous central star which has started to
disperse its surrounding gas and dust envelope.
2.5 Stars and Circumstellar Matter
2.5.1. η Carinae, Wolf-Rayet stars
Van Genderen, Sterken (Brussels), Allen (New Zealand) and Walker
(New Zealand) used new and archived ground-based optical and NIR
(covering 35 yr) and space-based (HST) narrow-band photometry, in order
to document the morphological character of optical and NIR features
(amongst others a light peak followed by a eclipse-like dip) at seven
periastron passages of the highly eccentric supermassive binary η Carinae (P
= 5.54 yr), of the secular brightening 1952-1998, of the brightening episodes
after the 1997.9 and 2003.5 periastron passages, and of two types of UV
oscillations.
The light peaks (0m. 1) are not caused by a hot spot nor by a flare, but are
more likely the climax of the expansion phase of the primary due to tidal
forces. The dips (0m. 1) following the light peaks, can be explained by the
obscuration of the secondary's emitting circumstellar structure when it
enters the wind of the primary. The long-lasting deficit of each postperiastron L- and K-band radiation is explained by the model of Soker (2006)
and Akashi et al. (2006) involving the temporary annihilation of the wind by
the collapse of the colliding wind region onto the secondary.
2.5. STARS AND CIRCUMSTELLAR MATTER
21
The wavelength dependency of the rates of the slow secular brightening
of the circumstellar structure , the Homunculus, and of the fast brightenings
of the central star and Homunculus after the 1997.9 and 2003.5 events are
investigated. The brightenings can be interpreted as an extinction decrease
with an extinction law R~5.
The primary's luminosity was likely stable over the last 35 yr. The longterm UV oscillations (Balmer continuum radiation) are interpreted as
revolution-modulated H-emission variation in the equatorial plane, whereas
the short-term UV oscillations (a few 100 d) are probably due to stellar
pulsations.
Veijgen, van Genderen, van der Hucht (Utrecht, SRON) and Sterken
(Brussels) completed the investigation of the photometric behaviour of the
WC9-type Wolf-Rayet star WR 103 = HD 164270. Three different
photometric systems were used for the monitoring. The analysis of variance
technique was used to search for a periodicity, and the effective transmission
curves were constructed to investigate the influence of the strong emission
lines in each filter.
As the stellar pulsations of Wolf-Rayet stars have to propagate a long
way up to the thick wind layers from which we receive the continuum light
and the emission lines, it is comprehensible that light and line variations will
be usually difficult to analyze and that they often look not periodic at all.
That is presumably the reason that the light variations look stochastically.
The time scale hovered between a few hours up to a few days, and likely
even longer. The light amplitude ~0.1 magnitude and mainly due to
continuum variations. Small line emission variations of a few percent are
clearly detectable in the Strömgren filter due to the presence of a prominent
CIII emission line, which contributes about 50 % to the total flux in this filter.
This line emission variability is supposed to be caused by dense moving
clumps: small scale structures in the wind related to localized random
shocks, accelerated outward along radial trajectories. The size of the light
amplitude of WR 103, agrees with the theoretical and empirical expectation
that it should be larger than the light variations of WN-type stars, which are
less evolved and consequently more hydrogen abundant.
22
2.6. STRUCTURE OF THE MILKY WAY
2.6 Structure of the Milky Way
2.6.1 Galactic Magnetic Field Excitation of Galaxy
Nuclei by X-rays, UV Photons and Cosmic Rays
Schnitzeler and Katgert finished their work on the analysis of the
WENSS polarization data, and started working on the new multi-frequency
datasets. Faraday tomography of these datasets enables studying the
distribution of regions with synchrotron emission and Faraday rotation
along the line-of-sight. Schnitzeler has worked on a reduction pipeline for
these (large) datasets. The data Schnitzeler and Katgert have analysed in the
direction of the Galactic anticentre look promising, showing large variations
in Faraday depth with galactic position, and they have worked on
understanding the physical properties that are producing these effects.
2.6.2. Milky Way ‘Bulge’
Soto, Kuijken and Rich (UCLA) are constructing a model of the stellar
kinematics in the Milky Way bulge/bar. It is based on new measurements of
proper motions and radial velocities from HST and the VLT, respectively.
The VLT observations use an IFU to take spectra of very crowded star fields
in the bulge, from which stellar spectra are then extracted using the precise
position information that is measured on the HST images. Repeat HST
images separated by 3-5 years allow accurate proper motions (equivalent to
30km/s accuracy at the distance of the bulge) to be measured. A separate
analysis of a data set of K giants revealed a significant vertex deviation, a
clear signature of bar-like kinematics, in the metal-rich stars, and was
accepted for publication.
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
23
2.7 Nearby Galaxies
2.7.1. Distribution of Dark Matter
Kuijken works on the distribution of dark matter in the universe,
principally through analysis of stellar dynamics in galaxies, and
gravitational lensing. A significant portion of this work relies on purposebuilt instrumentation, viz. the Planetary Nebulae Spectrograph (PN.S) built
for the William Herschel Telescope, and the wide-field camera OmegaCAM
for the ESO VLT Survey Telescope.
With the PN.S team (Douglas, Arnaboldi, Capaccioli, Coccato, Freeman,
Gerhard, Merrifield, Napolitano, Noordermeer, Romanowsky) the study of
elliptical galaxy halos continued. The PN.S finds, and measures velocities
for, planetary nebulae (PNe) in external galaxies from a single observation.
The ongoing survey typically yields 100-200 PNe per galaxy, mostly at large
radii from the center where their motions are dominated by the dark matter
halo potential. About ten galaxies now have good datasets. A highlight of
2006 was the completion of the analysis on NGC3379, an elliptical galaxy
with a curiously falling velocity dispersion. On the face of it the results
imply a rather light-weight dark matter halo around this galaxy, but
projection effects might conspire to hide most of the orbital motion in the
plane of the sky. A larger sample of galaxies is therefore needed in order to
integrate out over projection angles. Streamlined processing of the other
galaxies in the sample, as well as further data taking, is underway.
Falcón-Barroso, McDermid and de Zeeuw, together with Cappellari
(Leiden/Oxford) contributed to work lead by van de Ven
(Leiden/Princeton) on a study of the famous Einstein Cross gravitational
lens system. Using a combination of lensing and stellar dynamics, this study
addresses the dark-matter content and distribution of the lens galaxy. Initial
results show that dark matter does not dominate the central regions of
galaxies, and seems to be distributed in a similar way to the luminous
component, at least on kiloparsec scales.
Weijmans, Cappellari and Van Scherpenzeel observed the outskirts of
two elliptical galaxies (NGC 821 and NGC 3379) with the integral-field
spectrograph SAURON. The observations were pointed at 2, 3 and 4 half-
24
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
light radii. Aim of these observations is to obtain the line-of-sight velocity
distribution at these radii, needed to constrain the mass distributions of the
two galaxies, and establishing the presence of a dark matter halo. Previous
observations were plagued by bad weather conditions, though preliminary
results pointed at the presence of dark matter in NGC 3379. Reduction of
these new observations has started.
In addition to the observations described above, Weijmans and Gerssen
(Potsdam) observed the elliptical galaxy NGC 821 with the integral-field
spectrograph PPAK, which has a larger field of view than SAURON. The
spectrograph was pointed at 2.5 half-light radii, but due to bad weather
conditions, no useful data was obtained. Re-observations are scheduled for
2007.
Weijmans, together with Krajnovic (Oxford) analysed the velocity field
of E4 galaxy NGC 2974. The velocities were extracted from the ionised gas,
obtained with the integral-field spectrograph SAURON, and the neutral gas,
obtained with the VLA. They conclude that the galaxy is surrounded by a
halo of dark matter, and that this halo is consistent with an axisymmetric
shape.
Welles (Nijmegen) together with Weijmans, studied the Sa galaxy NGC
1056. He analysed the velocity field of both the ionised gas (obtained with
the integral-field spectrograph SAURON) and the neutral gas (obtained with
WSRT), and extracted a rotation curve. Preliminary results show that the
velocity remains high in the outer parts of the galaxy, indicating the
presence of a dark matter halo.
2.7.2. Weak Lensing
Weak gravitational lensing can be used to study the mass distribution
around galaxies, as well as on larger scales. With this in mind the KiDS
project was conceived, a large collaboration of 9 institutes in Europe (PI
Kuijken) which will map 1500 square degrees of sky in good seeing
conditions from Paranal with OmegaCAM on the VST. Unfortunately the
telescope construction was delayed, but this gave time for the development
of new techniques for accurate measurement of the lensing effect. Kuijken
published a method based on `shapelets', in which sources are described by
means of a set of orthogonal basis functions with nice mathematical
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
25
properties. He took part in the `Shear Testing Programme' (STEP) in which
different codes are compared in a series of blind tests, and the method fared
well (though there is room for improvement). Interestingly, nearly all
participants have been able to increase the accuracy of their codes as a result
of participation in this experiment.
From 2007 the KiDS project will benefit from Leiden's participation in a
European training network, ‘DUEL’, approved in 2006, which will fund a
PhD student and a postdoctoral fellow.
2.7.3. Molecules in Galaxy Nuclei
One of Israel's main research interests concerns the massive
concentrations of dense molecular gas frequently found in the central
regions of late-type galaxies. Before the evolution of such concentrations
(black hole infall, jet expulsion, starburst consumption etc) can be studied,
fundamental properties such as excitation and mass need to be determined.
Such information is provided by extensive observing programs of molecular
line emission from a range of species in various transitions, but usually not
in a direct manner. Interpretation of observed intensities in terms of physical
paramters requires the development of models that simulate the physcs of
such objects.
The nuclei of active galaxies harbor massive young stars, accreting black
holes, or both. In order to determine the physical conditions of the molecular
gas close to these sources of radiation, Meijerink, Spaans (Univ. of
Groningen) and Israel constructed numerical models. These models
determine both the thermal and the chemical balance of molecular gas
exposed to X-rays (XDR) and far-UV (PDR) radiation as a function of cloud
depth. They presented their results as a grid of XDR and PDR models
spanning a ranges in volume density, irradiation and column density, and
identified various line intensity ratios and combinations thereof as
diagnostic tools to differentiate between (volume) excitation by X-rays and
(surface) excitation by UV photons. Useful as such are the [SiII]/[CII] fine
structure line ratio, and the HCN/HCO+, HNC/HCN, and CN/HCN
molecular line ratios, as well as the higher CO J=N+1-N/CO 1-0, N>=1
molecular line ratios observable with the future HIFI/Herschel space
26
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
observatory. Column density ratios indicate that CH, CH+, NO, HOC+ and
HCO may also be good PDR/XDR discriminators.
In order to gauge the potential effect of cosmic rays on molecular gas
excitation in active galaxy centers, Meijerink, Spaans and Israel also
constructed PDR (UV-excitation) models with both `normal' and highly
elevated cosmic-ray intensities, and compare these to those obtained for
XDRs. They obtain larger high J (J>10) CO ratios in PDRs in the presence of
highly elevated cosmic ray emission, but these ratios are always exceeded by
the corresponding XDR ratios. They noted that neutral carbon to 13CO line
ratio are a reasonable tracer of enhanced cosmic ray fluxes in relatively lowdensity PDRs (n = 1000 cc). They founfd that the HCN/CO and
HCN/HCO+ molecular line ratios, when combined with high J CO emission
lines, do distinguish PDRs and XDRs under both low and high cosmic ray
irradiation conditions.
2.7.4. MIDI Observations of AGN
Jaffe continued his work on midInfrared interferometric observations of
AGNs with the VLTI instrument MIDI. The reduction of the large observing
program on NGC~1068 with the 8-m VLTI UTs is essentially complete and
shows that the disk is tilted with respect to the radio axis, an unexpected
result. Shorter baseline AT observations are planned to map the cooler dust
at larger radii, and the transition from the "obscuring torus" to the wind
driven Narrow Line regions.
The first interpretations of the Circinus galaxy and Cen A have been
published by Meisenheimer and Tristriam at MPIA Heidelberg, in
collaboration with Jaffe and Raban and Israel at Leiden. Circinus seems
quite similar to NGC 1068, by NGC 5128 is clearly different, dominated by
synchrotron emissioin rather than thermal dust. There appears to be a weak
dust disk however. Further MIDI observations are planned to characterize
the dust better, and a VISIR/VLBI/X-ray campaign is being planned to map
the dust structures by infrared reverberation mapping.
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
27
2.7.5. Cooling Flows
With Malcolm Bremer at Bristol Jaffe continued studies of the “cooler”
gas phases of cooling flow galaxies with deep VLT spectra (ISAAC and FOS)
and with Spitzer midIR spectra. These show that the molecular gas, with
temperatures of 300-2000 K is a significant energetic component of the gas
phase; its luminosity is comparable to that of the ionized gas at ~ 10000 K. It
is very difficult to keep this gas warm because of its rapid cooling rate. The
current reduction of the spectra indicate that heat sources in addition to
stellar or non-stellar photoionizing sources are needed. A new OIO,
Raymond Oonk is reducing integral field SINFONI spectra taken of three
clusters. New HST observations are scheduled to characterize the Far-UV
spectrum that is ionizing the HII gas, while Spitzer observations of highredshift galaxy forming regions are scheduled to see whether their spectra
agree with nearby cooling flows.
2.7.6. Starburst Galaxies
The research of Van der Werf and his group concentrates on dusty
starburst galaxies. Nearby starburst galaxies and ultraluminous infrared
galaxies (ULIRGs) are studied, as well as their more luminous counterparts
at high redshift, that are detected at infrared and (sub)millimetre
wavelengths.
Starbursts are spectacular phenomena, which represent episodes in the
evolution of galaxies characterized by the rapid conversion of gas into stars.
During such a phase the host galaxy rapidly evolves in stellar and gas
content, luminosity, colour, metallicity, and (often) morphology. The most
spectacular starbursts occur in ULIRGs, which form stars at a rate sufficient
to form a complete stellar population on a short timescale. While such
objects are rare locally, they are much more common at high redshift and
produce an important fraction of the cosmic energy output and star
formation rate at redshifts of 2 to 3. Such high-z ULIRGs are now routinely
detected as submillimetre galaxies (SMGs). The interest of the SMGs lies not
only in their prodigious star formation rates but also in the fact they are
likely forming a nuclear supermassive black hole; if this is correct, the now
well-documented relation between mass of the stellar spheroid and nuclear
black hole mass likely originates in the ULIRG phase.
28
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
In 2006, this work concentrated mostly on detailed observational studies
of nearby starburst galaxies using near- and mid-infrared ground-based
imaging and spectroscopy. This work is carried out by Snijders (mid-IR
observations with VISIR/VLT and Spitzer) and Vermaas (near-IR
observations with SINFONI/VLT) under supervision of Van der Werf.
While local starburst galaxies are not as luminous as their more extreme
high-z cousins, they can be studied in much greater detail and furnish
excellent local laboratories. A highlight of this work was the ground-based
mid-IR study of the Antennae (NGC4038/39) published by Snijders et al.
Ground-based mid-IR work has the enormous advantage over space-based
observations with Spitzer that much higher spatial resolution is obtained.
With VISIR at the VLT the diffraction limit of 0.3" at 10 microns is routinely
obtained, about a factor 100 better (in area) than Spitzer at the same
wavelength. This results in quantitatively different derived parameters. An
illustration is given in Fig. 2.3, which shows VISIR/VLT imaging of the two
most spectacular superstarclusters in the Antennae. The VISIR data resolve
the most spectacular (Eastern) cluster into several components, which are
embedded in a common envelope of PAH emission. The detection of strong
[SIV] line emission indicates substantial recent star formation in a highdensity environment, typical for compact HII regions in our Milky Way, but
here extended over at least 50 pc. Another remarkable result is the low
equivalent width of the PAH emission, which indicates that the PAH
emission is dominated by a diffuse component, not only and not directly
related to the most recent star formation.
Work on high-redshift starburst galaxies continued in 2006 with a
SINFONI study of the kinematics of infrared-selected high-z galaxies by Van
Starkenburg under supervision of Van der Werf, and with preparation of
future submillimetre surveys. Surveys for SMGs will receive a considerable
boost from the advent of the next generation of (sub)millimetre survey
camera's, and in particular SCUBA-2. Van der Werf is one of the 4 Principal
Investigators of the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey, the largest single
program ever scheduled on the JCMT, and the final field selection for this
survey was completed in 2006.
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
29
Fig. 2.3: Left panel: SoFI Ks band (2.16 micron) of the Antennae. The VISIR
slit is shown in white; North is up, and East is left. Right panel: VISIR [Ne II]
12.81 micron image of the overlap region, inserted: sources 1a and 1b in the [Ne
II] 12.81 micron filter with the contours of PAH 11.25 micron filter emission
overlaid.
2.7.7. Superstarclusters
Snijders and Van der Werf took a major step forward in the study of
massive young superstarclusters in nearby starburst galaxies by obtaining
high spatial resolution mid-infrared (10 and 20 μm) imaging and
spectroscopy with the new VISIR instrument at the ESO VLT. Comparison
with Spitzer spectra (through a larger slit) reveals very interesting
differences: the VISIR data reveal higher excitation, indicating that the VISIR
spectra zoom in on the youngest regions. Interestingly, the equivalent width
of PAH emission at 11.3 μm is much lower in the VISIR spectra. These
results show that VISIR begins to resolve the individual ionized and
molecular gas complexes that together make up the starburst.
2.7.8. Nearby Clusters of Galaxies
Katgert and Thomas (Enschede) studied the structural properties of
cluster galaxies of different morphological types. Using a large subset of the
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2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
galaxies in clusters from the ESO Nearby Abell Cluster Survey, they have
studied the relation between the morphological classification (according to
the standard procedures of expert visual classifiers) and the results of a
bulge-disk decomposition (using GIM2D) based on CCD-imaging data
obtained for the same galaxies. The expected correlation between
morphological type and bulge fraction is recovered, but the distributions of
bulge fraction for the different types show considerable overlap. E.g. a
sizable fraction of ellipticals shows an exponential disk component, while
the arly spirals can have sizable bulges. A comparison is made of the
properties of the disks of spirals in and outside of clusters, and a discussion
is given of the exponential components in elliptical galaxies.
Katgert and Biviano (Trieste) have studied the evidence for kinematical
and dynamical substructure in the clusters in the ESO Nearby Abell Cluster
Survey. They have devised a new method to quantify the probability that a
given galaxy finds itself in cold and/or moving group within its cluster. For
groups of neighbours (in projection) with varying size around each galaxy,
the probability that the observed configuration arises by change from a
smooth model is first calculated. This probability can subsequently be
translated into the likelyhood that the galaxy in question is indeed a member
of a cold and/or moving group, once the total number of galaxies in such
substructures has been derived. The results of this analysis are very
promising as the identification of substructures appears quite convincing.
2.7.9. The Infrared Properties of Blue Compact Dwarf
Galaxies
Together with collaborators at Cornell University Brandl investigated the
properties of a large sample of blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies. A central
question for these systems is how metallicity, the interstellar radiation field
(ISRF) and the abundance of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs,
small carbon-based dust grains) are related. While there is only a weak
anticorrelation between the hardness of the ISRF and the strength of the
PAH features a much stronger anticorrelation was found between the PAH
strength and the product of radiation hardness and the UV luminosity
density. They concluded that the PAH strength in BCD galaxies is
determined by a combination of PAH formation and destruction effects.
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
31
2.7.10. Starbursts at Low Metallicity
Beirao and Brandl analized IRS spectra of the nearby, low-metallicity
starburst galaxy NGC 5253. They studies the properties of the ISRF with
distance from the ionizing super star cluster out to 250 parsec, radially. Over
that distance, the radiation hardness drops by a factor four while the relative
strength of the PAH feature increases with distance, demonstrating the
counterbalance between radiation field and the presence of molecules in the
ISM. These results also demonstrate the importance of spatially resolved
mid-IR spectroscopy.
2.7.11. The SAURON Project
De Zeeuw, Van den Bosch, Cappellari, Falcón-Barroso, McDermid and
Weijmans are members or associates of the SAURON project: a survey of 72
nearby early-type galaxies using the innovative SAURON integral-field
spectrograph at the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope on La Palma. Started
in 1999, in collaboration with Davies (Oxford) and Bacon (Lyon), the
observations were completed in 2003, with ongoing analysis and follow-on
projects since then. By the end of 2006, the first eight major survey
publications were in print, with numerous additional related publications on
associated projects. A number of these were completed in 2006.
Falcón-Barroso, together with McDermid, and de Zeeuw contributed to
the study of the stellar populations analysis of the representative sample of
24 Sa galaxies part of the SAURON survey, lead by Peletier (Groningen).
They find that Sa galaxies on the average have slightly smaller Mgb and
Fe5015 line strengths than ellipticals and S0s, and higher Hβ values, but with
a much larger scatter. The absorption line maps show that many galaxies
contain some younger populations (<= 1 Gyr), distributed in small or large
inner discs, or in circumnuclear star forming rings. In many cases these
young stars are formed in circumnuclear mini-starbursts, which are
dominating the light in the centres of some of the early-type spirals. These
mini-starburst cause a considerable scatter in index-index diagrams, more
than is measured for early-type galaxies. Their results reveal that galactic
bulges in this type of galaxies are formed by at least 2 components: a thin,
disc-like component, often containing recent star formation, and another,
elliptical-like component, consisting of old stars and rotating more slowly,
32
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
dominating the light above the plane. This picture is able to explain in a
natural way the heterogeneous stellar populations and star formation
characteristics that are seen in detailed observations of early-type spiral
galaxies.
McDermid and Falcón -Barroso contributed to work lead by Ganda
(Groningen) looking at the two-dimensional absorption-line strengths of a
sample of late-type spiral galaxies in order to explore their stellar
populations and star-formation histories. The SAURON integral-field
spectrograph was used, together with techniques for separating the nebular
emission and stellar absorption lines and applying stellar population
models. As well as mapping the detailed stellar populations in this class of
galaxy for the first time, it was found that the dynamically more massive
spirals have older populations and shorter formation time-scales than the
less massive galaxies, which still have significant ongoing star-formation.
De Zeeuw, McDermid, Cappellari and Weijmans contributed to a followup survey lead by Morganti (Dwingeloo) looking at the HI content of a
subset of SAURON galaxies using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio
Telescope. Neutral hydrogen is detected in 70 % of these (field) galaxies,
showing a clear connection to the ionized gas observed in the central regions
with SAURON. A variety of HI morphologies was found, but surprisingly
little correlation with other galaxy properties, such as stellar populations
and dynamical structure. The occurrence and morphology of the gas
suggests, however, that early-type galaxies continue to build their mass up
to the present day.
Rusli, with supervision from McDermid, embarked on analysis of the
stellar populations in a small sample of early-type galaxies observed with
the OASIS integral-field spectrograph (WHT). This is part of a follow-up
survey of SAURON galaxies at higher spatial resolution using OASIS. The
data were reduced, and initial results show cases of embedded disks and
KDCs, and central stellar populations consistent with other work, in that
more massive galaxies have populations that are older, more metal
enhanced and more strongly over-abundant in alpha elements than lowermass systems.
Kroonenberg, with supervision from McDermid, conducted a study of
ionized gas in the central regions of early-type galaxies, using a small
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
33
sample of objects taken from the SAURON survey. This project combined
existing SAURON data of Hβ and [OIII] with new observations of the four
galaxies using the OASIS spectrograph to obtain Hα and [NII]. Ratios of
these emission lines were used as diagnostics of the ionization mechanism at
work. Initial results show that three of the four objects are consistent with
being LINERs. One object was found to exhibit a broad-line region that was
previously suspected, but not conclusively detected. In this object, the
emission becomes LINER-like away from the nucleus, showing that multiple
mechanisms are responsible for ionizing the gas.
Falcón-Barroso supervised the research projects of José Luis Cervanted
Rodríguez (a PhD student at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, visiting
the Sterrewacht Leiden under the EARA program) and Silvia Toonen (a
Masters student at the Sterrewacht Leiden on a 6-month research visit to the
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias with Prof. John Beckman). The first
project was dedicated to study the stellar populations of dwarf galaxies
using OASIS integral-field spectroscopy, while the second one is still
undergoing and has been designed to characterize the bar pattern speed and
luminosity-velocity dispersion relation for the HII regions in the spiral
galaxy NGC 6946, by means of Fabry-Perot Hα data.
2.7.12. The Atlas 3D Survey
McDermid, together with Emsellem (Lyon), Cappellari (Leiden/Oxford)
and Krajnovic (Oxford), successfully obtained long-term status for the
Atlas3D Survey: a new survey of early-type galaxies using the SAURON
spectrograph on the WHT. The collaboration includes co-investigators de
Zeeuw and Falcón-Barroso, as well as other Dutch and British collaborators.
Over three semesters (18 months) this large program will observe all earlytype galaxies within the local 40Mpc, and provide a complete census of
galaxy kinematic morphology, angular-momentum, gas content and stellar
populations over a broad range of galaxy mass and environment. This
project builds on the success of the SAURON Survey, and aims to establish
the detailed demographics of the local early-type galaxy population to
establish the mechanisms of their formation and evolution. First
observations will be made in early 2007, ending in Spring 2008, with first
results appearing next year.
34
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
2.7.13. Supermassive Black Holes
McDermid and de Zeeuw, together with Gebhardt (Texas) an Richstone
(Michigan), hosted a Lorentz workshop on the nuclei of galaxies, following
the success of a similar meeting two years before. Recent progress from
various groups was reported, including data from AO-assisted instruments
SINFONI and OASIS, and work from the SAURON group. Progress was
made on performing cross-comparisons between groups building dynamical
models, with three groups including Leiden agreeing to compare black hole
masses inferred from their dynamical models.
Work is ongoing by McDermid, Cappellari (Leiden/Oxford) and
Krajnovic (Oxford) on using AO-assisted integral-field spectroscopy to
derive accurate black hole masses in nearby early-type galaxies. The first
data using the SINFONI spectrograph at the VLT was obtained and
analysed, with initial results consistent with predictions from the wellknown relation between black hole mass and velocity dispersion.
2.7.14. Dynamical Models and Analytic Methods
Van den Bosch, Cappellari and de Zeeuw, together with van de Ven
(Princeton), continued development of the Schwarzschild orbit
superposition software for triaxial galaxies. This flexible and efficient
modeling technique uses orbital families to describe a galaxy, and can be
used to fit the observed light and kinematics of stellar systems in order to
derive the dynamical structure, mass-to-light ratio, viewing angle and mass
of the central black hole. This code, developed in Leiden, is the only existing
Schwarzschild code that can model galaxies with triaxial geometries,
allowing features such as photometric position angle twists and
kinematically decoupled components to be modelled with minimal
assumptions.
Building on the analytic framework developed previously by van de Ven,
van den Bosch lead the effort on describing this triaxial Schwarzschild code,
as well as presenting an application of the software to the complex elliptical
galaxy, NGC 4365. This galaxy is well known for its central kinematically
decoupled component, and its apparently prolate outer body. It was shown
that the software is able to reproduce the observed and intrinsic properties
of an analytic triaxial model, including a convincing recovery of the
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
35
distribution function itself. The application to NGC 4365 revealed the
surprising result that the galaxy is not (as may be assumed from the
observed kinematics) simply an oblate core rotating in a prolate system, but
in fact has a significant fraction of stars orbiting in extended, disk-like
components, which, when viewed in projection, appear as a compact core
embedded inside a prolate galaxy (see Figure 2.4).
Figure 2.4. The top row shows stellar rotation velocity. The bottom row
shows the fraction of the total number of stars contributing to the model at a
given position. Contours indicate the projected surface brightness of the
component associated to the velocity field, and the rectangular box indicates the
region covered by the fitted SAURON observations. The left column shows the
complete triaxial Schwarzschild model fitted to SAURON data of NGC 4365.
This model reproduces well the central decoupled component and overall
velocity structure of the galaxy. The next three columns show the major orbital
components populated in the model, indicating also to which orbital family they
belong. All three orbital components are extended across the whole galaxy, and
surprisingly the short axis orbits contribute 60% of the mass (split almost
equally between prograde and retrograde orbits), showing that the galaxy is
more complex than simply a prolate main body harboring a small decoupled
core.
36
2.8 HIGH REDSHIFT GALAXIES
2.8 High Redshift Galaxies
2.8.1. Faint Submillimeter Galaxies
A key result from the Ph.D. thesis of Knudsen (2004, now at MPIA) was
the discovery of triply-lensed submillimetre galaxy at z=2.516, behind the
cluster A2218. This galaxy is lensed by a factor of about 45, and would be too
faint to detect without lensing. However, its properties are of interest since
with its low intrinsic flux it is characteristic of the galaxies that make up the
bulk of the submillimetre background. Hence several follow-up observations
were carried out. Radio observations with the WSRT and the VLA were
carried out by Garrett (JIVE) in collaboration with Van der Werf and
Knudsen. All three images were detected, with an implied star formation
rate of about 500 Msunyr-1 and no evolution in the infrared-radio relation out
to z=2.5. The object was also observed in the CO(3–2) and CO(7–6) lines with
the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer by Kneib (Marseille),
incollaboration with Van der Werf and Knudsen. The velocity profile of the
CO(3–2) line displays a double-peak profile which is well fit by two
Gaussians with FWHM of 220 km s-1 and separated by 280 km s-1. The
implied dynamical mass is ~ 1.5 x 1010 Msun and an H2 gas mass of 4.5 x 109
Msun. This system is much less luminous and massive than other highredshift submillimetre galaxies studied to date, but it bears a close similarity
to similarly luminous, dusty starburst resulting from lower-mass mergers in
the local Universe.
2.8.2. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey
Recognizing the enormous potential of SCUBA-2, the successor of the
SCUBA 850μm camera at the JCMT, the JCMT Board has approved the
concept of large-scale community-wide legacy surveys with the JCMT in the
period from 2007. The most highly rated of these was the SCUBA-2
Cosmology Legacy Survey, with four Principal Investigators: Van der Werf
(Leiden), Smail (Durham), Dunlop (Edinburgh) and Halpern (Vancouver).
This survey, to be carried out from 2007 to 2009 will revolutionize
submillimetre cosmology by mapping 15 square degrees to the confusion
limit at 850 μm and 0.5 square degrees to the confusion limit at 450 μm. The
time allocation was 1220 hours, including 490 hours of the best quality
2.8 HIGH REDSHIFT GALAXIES
37
weather. It is clear that a project of this magnitude could never have been
achieved through the normal time allocation process.
2.8.3. Dynamics of High-redshift Galaxies
Van Starkenburg and Van der Werf continued their study of the
kinematics of high redshift galaxies using rest-frame optical emission lines.
They finished their analysis of a sample of z ~ 1.5 galaxies. A ~ 2 mag offset
from the local B band Tully-Fisher relation was found, with considarably
uncertainties due to ambiguities in velocity measurements and sample
selection effects.
They also did their first observations with SINFONI (the new nearinfrared integral field spectrograph of the VLT) and obtained a new sample
for the study of the kinematics of high redshift galaxies. Targets were z ~ 0.8
galaxies selected to be very suited for kinematical studies. Much effort was
invested in the accurate reconstruction of SINFONI's field of view.
2.8.4. Distant Radio Galaxies
Distant luminous radio galaxies are among the brightest known galaxies
in the early Universe and the likely progenitors of dominant cluster galaxies.
During 2006 Miley and Röttgering, Overzier and Intema at Leiden continued
using these objects as probes of the early Universe, together with a large
group of external collaborators.
A highlight of this work was the completion of Overzier’s PhD thesis in
May. Following a VLT Large Project on the environment of distant radio
galaxies, Overzier’s PhD thesis provided a detailed study of the protocluster
environments of several z > 2 radio galaxies with the Advanced Camera for
Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope, including objects at redshifts z = 4.1
and z = 5.2. The overdensities are consistent with the presence of
protoclusters around all the radio galaxies studied. The thesis relates the
observations to general scenarios for the formation and evolution of galaxy
clusters.
A second highlight was a spectacular deep image of the dominant galaxy
in a protocluster at z ~ 2.2 taken with the ACS on Hubble. This showed more
38
2.8 HIGH REDSHIFT GALAXIES
than 10 clumpy features, apparently star-forming satellite galaxies in the
process of merging with the progenitor of a dominant cluster galaxy, 11 Gyr
ago. The new image is the best demonstration so far that massive galaxies
assemble by merging of smaller objects in a hierarchical process. A striking
feature of the newly named “Spiderweb Galaxy” is the presence of several
faint linear galaxies within the merging structure. The dense environments
and fast galaxy motions at the centers of protoclusters may stimulate the
formation of these structures, which dominate the faint resolved galaxy
populations in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The new image provides a
unique testbed for simulations of forming dominant cluster galaxies.
Figure.2.5 The Spiderweb Galaxy - a forming massive galaxy at the centre of
a protocluster at z = 2.2. This ultra-deep image made with 19 orbits using the
ACS on the Hubble Space Telescope demonstrates the importance of
hierarchical merging processes in the formation and evolution of massive
galaxies. The black clumps are satellite galaxies that are merging with the
massive host galaxy – "flies" being captured by the spiderweb.
Contours of radio emission are shown in red and Ly α emission in blue. The
Ly α ionized gas halo extends over a size of ~ 200 kpc and is one of the largest
known objects in the Universe (Miley, Overzier et al. Astrophys. J. Letters, 650,
L29 – 32, 2006).
2.8 HIGH REDSHIFT GALAXIES
39
2.8.5. Evolution of Radio Galaxies
Binette, (Instituto de Astronomía, Mexico), Röttgering and others,
presented photoionization calculations for the spatially-extended absorbers
observed in front of the extended emission-line spectrum of two highredshift radio galaxies, 0943-242 (ze =2.922) and 0200+015 (ze =2.230), with
the aim of reproducing the absorber column ratio, N_CIV/N_HI. They
found that hot stars from a powerful starburst, or a metagalactic background
radiation in which stars dominate quasars, are equally successful in
reproducing the observed NCIV/NHI, assuming subsolar gas metallicities for
each absorber.
Dannerbaumer (Heidelberg), Daddi (NOAO, Tucson). Röttgering and
others carried out MAMBO 1.2 mm observations of five vigorous starburst
galaxies at z~2 and detected two. They advocate a scenario in which z~2
galaxies, after their rapid (sub)millimeter-bright phase that isopaque to
optical/UV light, evolve into a longer lasting phase of K-band-bright and
massive objects.
Intema and collabotators presented broad-band imaging with the Subaru
Telescope of a 25' × 25' field surrounding the radio galaxy TN J1338-1942 at
redshift z = 4.1. The field contains excesses of Lyman-α emitters (LAEs) and
Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) identified with a protocluster surrounding the
radio galaxy.
There are 874 candidate LBGs within this field, having redshifts in the
range z = 3.5-4.5. An examination of the brightest of these (with i' < 25.0)
shows that the most prominent concentration coincides with the previously
discovered protocluster.
Tasse, Röttgering, together with Cohen (NRL Washington) and
coworkers, present the observational results of a low frequency radio survey
of the XMM-LSS field using the Very Large Array at 74 and 325 MHz. This
survey will map out the locations of the extragalactic radio sources relative
to the large scale structure as traced by the X-ray emission. At 325 MHz we
have detected a region of diffuse radio emission which is a cluster halo or
relic candidate.
Valdés (Trieste, Italy), Ciardi (Munich, Germany), Ferrara (Trieste, Italy),
Johnston-Hollitt (Hobart, Australia) and Röttgering used numerical
simulations of cosmic reionization and radiative processes related to the HI
40
2.8 HIGH REDSHIFT GALAXIES
21-cm emission line to produce synthetic radio maps as seen by nextgeneration telescopes that will operate at low radio frequencies (e.g. the Low
Frequency Array, LOFAR). Two different scenarios, in which the end of
reionization occurs early (z~13) or late (z~ 8) depending on the initial mass
function (IMF) of the first stars and ionizing photon escape fraction, have
been explored. For each of these models we produce synthetic HI 21-cm
emission maps by convolving the simulation outputs with the provisional
LOFAR sampling function in the frequency range 76-140 MHz. If
reionization occurs late, LOFAR will be able to detect individual HI
structures on arcmin scales, emitting at a brightness temperature of ~35 mK
as a 3σ signal in about 1000 h of observing time.
2.8.6. Galaxy Evolution
Franx and collaborators studied the evolution of galaxies from z=7 to z=0,
based on a variety of search techniques. His work focusses on the properties
of massive galaxies at z=1.5-4, selected by near-IR imaging. This search
technique enables the construction of mass selected samples at this redshift
range, thereby providing a good census of the mass distribution of galaxies.
Van Dokkum, Franx, and collaborators studied the properties of a mass
selected sample at z=2-3 based on the MUSYC and FIRES surveys. They
found that intrinsically red galaxies, previously dubbed ‘DRGs’ for Distant
Red Galaxies, dominate the mass in galaxies at the massive end. Galaxies
found as Lyman Break galaxies are abundant, but contribute less. Massive
galaxies at z=2-3 have a wide range in properties.
Kriek, van Dokkum, Franx, and collaborators presented spectroscopy of
massive galaxies at z ~ 2.3, and they found that a considerable fraction (45
%) show no emission lines, and hence no evidence for (strong) star
formation. The sample is considered to be typical for high redshift, massive
galaxies, and the results indicate that the star formation rate is very low for a
considerable fraction of massive galaxies. The mechanism responsible for the
down turn in star formation still needs to be identified.
The quiescent galaxies identified above are only part of the population:
Webb, Franx, and collaborators studied the 24 μm fluxes of massive galaxies
at z=2-3, as measured by the Spitzer Space Telescope. Many of the DRGs
2.9 THEORETICAL STUDIES
41
identified in the field had strong fluxes, indicating high star formation rates.
These galaxies contribute significantly to the overall star formation rate at
redshifts z=2-3.
Bouwens, Illingworth, Franx, and Blakeslee analyzed the luminosity
function of z=6 i-dropout galaxies in the fields with the deepest available
Hubble Space Telescope ACS imaging. 506 candidates were found, and the
luminosity function was determined. Significant evolution in the luminosity
function was found at the bright end, between z=3 and z=6. The star
formation rate density increases significantly between z=6 and z=3.
Labbé, Franx, and collaborators studied the mid-IR emission of z=7
galaxies, identified as z-dropout galaxies in the UDF. Two of the four
candidates were unambiguously detected with Spitzer, and hence their
reality was confirmed. Masses and ages were derived for these two galaxies.
Van der Wel, Franx, Wuyts, and collaborators compared dynamical
masses of early-type galaxies out to z=1, with those obtained by fitting
stellar population models to photometry. They found that stellar population
models can work well when fitted to the rest-frame optical photometry, but
that it does not work so well when fitted to rest-frame near-IR photometry.
Uncertainties in the modeling of the late stages of stellar evolution can
produce uncertainties in the obtained masses when the near-IR photometry
is used.
2.9.Theoretical Studies
2.9.1. Supermassive Black Holes and Compact Objects
Levin works on astrophysics of supermassive black holes (focusing on the
Galactic Center), and on astrophysics of neutron stars. The highlights for
2006 were:
1. Dynamics and star formation in the Galactic Center. Together with
Beloborodov (Columbia) and MPE infrared group led by Reinhard Genyel,
Levin has analyzed the properties of the 2 young star discs in the Galactic
Center: Paumard, et al., 2006, ApJ, 643, 1011, Beloborodov, Levin, et al., ApJ,
648, 405.
42
2.9 THEORETICAL STUDIES
The star discs were found to be confined to the central 1/2 parsec from
the supermassive black hole. This has decisively argued for the scenario in
which the young stars formed as a result of gravitational fragmentation of
the massive accretion disc several million years ago, as was orogonally
proposed by Levin and Beloborodov in 2003. Levin has also analyzed the
ejection of high-velocity stars from the galactic center by a hypothetical
Intermediate-Mass Black-hole (IMBH) companion to SgrA* (ApJ, 653, 1203).
He found that the stars get ejected in a burst who’s duration is comparable
to the dynamical-friction timescale in the SgrA* stellar cusp, i.e. several
million years. The clustering of the ejection times and directionality of the
ejection velocities map out the history if the IMBH inspirals. Therefore,
future observations of high-velocity stars are likely to constrain the presence
of the IMBH in the center of our Galaxy.
2. Magnetar oscillations. Levin has begun to develop the theory of
magnetar oscillations (MNRAS, 368, L35); the sequel to this work has been
completed and published in 2007. Levin found that magnetar oscillation
features reach dynamics due to interaction between the vibrational torsional
modes of the magnetar's crust and the Alfven waves in the magnetar's core.
This dynamics helps explain the Quasi-Periodic oscillations observed in the
X-ray light curves during several hundred seconds after the magnetar giant
flares. Levin's work offers a possibility of performing (albeit yet primitive)
asteroseismology of magnetars. In particular, the observed oscillations
strongly constrain the Alfven speed in the magnetar core.
2.9.2. Theory of Galaxy Formation
Simulating the formation and evolution of galaxies and the
intergalactic medium
Dalla Vecchia, Duffy, Haas, Schaye, and Wiersma, working together with
Springel (MPA), Theuns (Durham), and others, used the LOFAR correlator,
an IBM Bluegene/L computer, to run large-scale, cosmological,
hydrodynamical simulations. The simulations were run with the code
Gadget III, augmented with new modules for star formation, galactic winds,
chemodynamics, and cooling. They also wrote software for the analysis of
the simulations, including programs to do population synthesis and
visualization and codes for the creation of halo catalogues and absorption
2.9 THEORETICAL STUDIES
43
spectra. The simulations will be used to study the formation of galaxies and
the evolution of the intergalactic medium.
Radiative Transfer for Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations
Pawlik and Schaye have worked on the development of a module for the
transfer of ionizing radiation radiative in the Smoothed Particle
Hydrodynamics code Gadget. The method takes advantage of Gadget's
parallelization scheme and runs on distributed memory systems. It is
spatially adaptive and well-suited for problems with a large number of
sources.
The Importance of Local Sources of Radiation for Quasar Absorption
Line Systems
Schaye developed an analytic model for high column density quasar
absorption line systems. Assuming that they arise in the halos of galaxies,
the model can be used to predict the distribution of impact parameters,
luminosities and flux from the central sources. He showed that local
radiation, which is usually ignored, likely dominates over the ionizing
background radiation for systems rarer than Lyman limit systems. For
damped Lyman-alpha systems, the local radiation field has actually been
measured and is in excellent agreement with the model. He also showed that
consistency between observations of the UV background, the UV luminosity
density from galaxies, and the number density of Lyman limit systems
requires escape fractions of order 10 percent.
The Spatial Distribution of Metals in the Intergalactic Medium.
Schaye, together with Pieri (Laval University) and Aguirre (UC Santa
Cruz), studied the spatial distribution of heavy elements in the intergalactic
medium at redshift z~3. They carried out a detailed analysis of a highquality Keck/HIRES absorption spectrum of the quasar Q1422+231 and
found that within 600 km/s from strong C~IV absorbers, which are thought
to arise in the halos of galaxies, the abundance of carbon and oxygen is
significantly higher than for gas of the same density (i.e., with the same level
44
2.10 RAYMOND & BEVERLY SACKLER LABORATORY
of H I absorption) but in a random location. However, if the analysis was
restricted to the two thirds of the spectrum that are at least 600 km/s away
from any C~IV line strong enough to detect ambiguously, the metal-line
absorption was only slightly less strong than for the entire spectrum. This
suggests that while the metallicity is enhanced in regions close to galaxies,
the enrichment is likely to be much more widespread than their immediate
surroundings.
2.10. Raymond & Beverly Sackler
Laboratory
The research in the Sackler Laboratory for Astrophysics (SLA) at Leiden
Observatory contributes to our understanding of astrochemistry by
simulating inter- and circumstellar processes in state-of-the-art experiments
under laboratory controlled conditions. The results are interpreted in terms
of unambiguous physical-chemical models, providing input that is necessary
to calibrate astrochemical models, and in addition the work supports or
guides the analysis of observational data. The laboratory comprises six
experiments focusing both on solid state astrochemistry – CRYOPAD,
SURFRESIDE, CESSS and the HV-setup – and on the gas phase with a
special emphasis on the ‘radical universe’ – SPIRAS and LEXUS. The
experiments are performed in close collaboration with groups with expertise
in observations, modeling and theoretical simulations.
In 2006 the group consisted of one senior scientist, Harold Linnartz, two
postdocs, Guido Fuchs and Herma Cuppen, six PhD students, Suzanne
Bisschop, Sergio Ioppolo, Karin Öberg, Nadine Wehres, Harald Verbraak,
Jordy Bouwman, and two Greenberg Fellows, Kinsuk Acharyya (India) and
Zainab Awad (Egypt). The laboratory hosted Wiebke Ludwig as an
undergraduate student. Much of the research was done in close
collaboration with the in-house astrochemistry group of Ewine van
Dishoeck, who co-supervises several SLA PhD students and who is actively
involved in the ice projects.
A video tour through the laboratory with details on the experiments is
available from the homepage: http://www.strw.leidenuniv.nl/~lab.
2.10 RAYMOND & BEVERLY SACKLER LABORATORY
45
2.10.1. CRYOPAD – CRYOgenic Photo-product
Analysis Device
CRYOPAD routinely achieves ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions (~
5.10-11 mbar) in which interstellar ice analogs are grown with mono-layer
precision at temperatures as low as 14K. Sensitive detection techniques such
as temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and reflection absorption
infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) are used to study both spectroscopic and
thermal properties of pure, layered and mixed ices upon thermal- and
photoprocessing.
A series of detailed experiments on the desorption behaviour of CO and
CO/O2 ices by Fuchs and Acharyya have shown that the low molecular
oxygen abundances in space cannot be explained by a simple freeze out of
O2 on interstellar grains. The thermal properties of pure O2 and CO ices are
remarkably close and this means that the observation of substantial amounts
of gaseous CO excludes large amounts of frozen O2. The results have been
interpreted in terms of an empirical kinetic model that provides binding
energies and temperature dependent sticking probabilities for different ice
morphologies.
A long standing problem in interstellar chemistry is how molecules can
be maintained in the gas phase at the extremely low temperatures in space.
In very cold (< 10K) star and planet forming regions all molecules other than
H2 should stick on dust grains on timescales shorter than the cloud lifetimes,
yet these clouds are detected in the radio lines of gaseous CO. Several
desorption mechanisms have been proposed, but there is a general lack of
quantitative experimental data on such processes. Öberg and Awad have
initiated the first laboratory study under ultra-high vacuum conditions of
the photodesorption of pure CO ice and found that for a typical interstellar
radiation field (7-10.5 eV) the photodesorption rate amounts to as much as
3.10-3 molecules per VUV photon. This results shows that the role of CO
photodesorption in preventing total removal of molecules in the gas phase
has been strongly underestimated.
46
2.10 RAYMOND & BEVERLY SACKLER LABORATORY
2.10.2. SURFRESIDE – SURFace Reaction Simulation
Device
SURFRESIDE is another UHV setup in which TPD and RAIRS are used to
monitor reaction products formed in interstellar ices following atommolecule reactions. Fuchs, Bisschop and Ioppolo focused on hydrogenation
reactions and were able to prove that both formaldehyde and methanol are
formed upon H-atom bombardment of CO-ice via the reaction scheme CO
Æ H2CO Æ CH3OH. The experiments unambiguously show that interstellar
ices are involved in the formation of the more complex (saturated) species.
Accurate rate constants have been derived in dependence of a number of
physical parameters (ice morphology, thickness, temperature, atom-flux,
etc.) and the analysis of hydrogenation reactions starting from other ices
(e.g. CO2) is presently in progress.
In order to study also reactions with O-, N- and C-atoms a second atom
beam line has been designed in close collaboration with the ELD/FMD. This
line will be implemented in the course of 2007. The simultaneous
bombardment of interstellar ices with both H- and other atoms provides a
unique facility and will show to which extend catalytic reactions in
interstellar ices on dust grains play a role in the chemical evolution of the
universe.
2.10 RAYMOND & BEVERLY SACKLER LABORATORY
47
Figure 2.6: SURFRESIDE II. A recently constructed setup to study chemical
reactions in interstellar ices on grain dust equivalents. In 2006 a number of
hydrogenation reactions have been characterized that open the new field of
solid state astrochemistry.
2.10.3. CESSS – Cavity Enhanced Solid State
Spectrometer
In 2006 CESSS has been fully assembled by Bouwman and the system is
operational now. CESSS is a sensitive spectroscopic setup in which ices are
grown under high vacuum conditions and monitored using broad band
cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy. The technique extends interstellar
ice research from the infrared into the UV/VIS/NIR part of the
electromagnetic spectrum. The first test measurements show that the
detection of gas phase transitions in the highly reflection part of the cavity
48
2.10 RAYMOND & BEVERLY SACKLER LABORATORY
mirrors – covering typically 50–100 nm – is straight forward. The setup
allows sensitive spectroscopy over a large spectral range (200-1200 nm) with
a resolution of the order of 0.1 nm.
2.10.4. HV-Setup
Öberg, Bisschop, Awad, Bouwman and Ludwig used the HV-setup to
systematically study the infrared spectral properties of a number of
astrophysically relevant ice mixtures. Using Fourier transform infrared
spectroscopy the fundamental vibrational modes of a number of binary and
tertiary mixtures have been studied in transmission as function of ice
composition and ice temperature. Detailed results have been obtained for
H2O:CO2 and H2O:CO ices that have been used to understand why
astronomical observations of water ice result in deviating intensity ratios of
the H2O fundamentals. A comparison with the results found for mixtures
containing N2 and O2 provides a physical-chemical basis that explains
changes in band profiles, frequency shifts and intensity strengths.
Furthermore, HCOOH ices have been studied in mixtures with CH3OH, CO,
CO2 and H2O – species that are most likely involved in the formation
process of formic acied - and it was shown that tertiary mixtures may very
well explain astronomical data as observed by ISO and Spitzer.
2.10.5. SPIRAS – Supersonic Plasma InfraRed
Absorption Spectrometer
Many gas phase species observed in inter- and circumstellar matter are
open shell species, reflecting the radical character of the universe. SPIRAS,
operated by Verbraak, offers the unique possibility to study such species at
high resolution (< 100 MHz) in the infrared (3-10 μm) by combining
production modulation in a phase-sensitive detection scheme and
supersonically expanding planar plasma. The setup has been successfully
used to study molecular complexes in order to spectroscopically characterize
charge induced interactions. In collaboration with the University of Zürich a
systematic mass spectrometric study of cluster-ions (of potential
astrophysical interest) has been performed.
2.10 RAYMOND & BEVERLY SACKLER LABORATORY
49
In close collaboration with the Department for Molecular- and Laser
Physics (Radboud University Nijmegen) a special OPO laser system has
been implemented. Continuous cavity ring down spectroscopy has been
used to study molecular ions of astrophysical interest in direct absorption.
The experiments show that densities of the order of 1010-1011 rotationally
cold ions/cm3 are routinely produced in the plasma and that densities of the
order of 108-109 ions/cm3 are still detectable. Rovibrational transitions are
monitored with absolute frequency accuracy better than 0.001 cm-1.
2.10.6. LEXUS – Laser Excitation Setup of Unstable
Species
Wehres incorporated in the initial setup a special plasma source that is
capable of producing an intense hydrocarbon plasma. LEXUS is capable of
observing small amounts of gas after laser excitation using time gated
fluorescence spectroscopy. Test measurements on NO2 have been very
successful and show that the basic setup is fully operational. The extension
with the plasma source makes it possible to look for astrophysically relevant
radicals in emission. This experiment is performed in close collaboration
with Profs. Tielens / Spaans (Kapteyn Institute Groningen) and van Winckel
(University Leuven) and aims at identifying molecular carriers as observed
on top of the extended red emission in the Red Rectangle.
2.10.7. Monte Carlo simulations of Astrophysical
Processes
Cuppen has started her VENI position on ‘Monte Carlo simulation of ice
mantles’ on October 1st. In support of the laboratory work calculations have
been performed to simulate the thermal desorption behavior of interstellar
ice analogues as well as to derive chemical reactivity. A new concept of
continuous-time, random-walk Monte Carlo simulations is used. The
method is unique in the way that it allows simulations for time periods that
extend far beyond what is possible in the laboratory. The focus has been on
H2 and H2O formation.
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2.11 INSTRUMENTATION
2.11 Instrumentation
2.11.1. ALMA Regional Center Node
The user support for ALMA in Europe (ALMA Regional Center, ARC) is
organized through a distributed network of seven nodes: one central node at
ESO taking care of core functionalities, and six nodes throughout Europe
focussing on face-to-face user support as well as specific expertise areas.
With support from NOVA, the Netherlands is setting up one of these nodes
located at Leiden Observatory. Hogerheijde is coordinating the activities,
with help from Hill and Van der Tak (SRON Groningen). The activities are
overseen by a steering committee consisting of members of NOVA, SRON,
ASTRON, and JIVE. In 2006 Hill focused on an inventory of exisiting
software for the calibration and reduction of (sub)millimeter-wave
interferometric observations, with a special emphasis on the interoperability
of variou spackages. A web site describing the Netherlands node of the ARC
was set up by Hill and accessible from the pages of Leiden Observatory.
2.11.2. Gaia
Brown and Marrese are involved in the preparations for the data
processing for ESA's Gaia mission, scheduled for launch in 2011, which aims
at providing a stereoscopic census of the Milky Way galaxy by measuring
highly accurate astrometry (position, parallaxes and proper motions),
photometry and radial velocities for 1 billion stars and other objects to 20th
magnitude. The Gaia mission was fully approved by ESA's science
programme committee in early 2006 following the selection of EADSAstrium as the prime contractor for the design and building of the spacecraft
and payload. The EADS-Astrium design for Gaia contained significant
changes with respect to the previous baseline, especially for the photometric
instrument, which now uses low dispersion spectrophotometry with prisms
instead of photometric filters. As a consequence in 2006 a lot of effort went
into the optimization of the new design and the rethinking of the
photometric data processing. The main activities for 2006 were:
1) Brown and Marrese developed detailed simulations of the data
obtained with the new photometric instrument. These were used in the
optimization of the wavelength range and dispersion of the blue and red
2.11 INSTRUMENTATION
51
channel of the photometric instrument. The simulations have now been
incorporated into the Gaia project-wide simulation environment which will
be used to generate simulated mission data to support the development of
the data processing methods and algorithms.
2) Marrese performed a detailed study of the consequences of the new
design for the data collection in crowded regions on the sky. The results
were included in the optimization of the on-board data handling algorithms
for Gaia.
3) Brown put together a detailed overview of the many complications
that can be expected when processing (possibly overlapping) dispersed
images collected in time-delayed integration mode. This overview forms the
basis for the further development of the data processing algorithms for the
new photometric instrument of Gaia.
4) Within the Gaia project the Data Analysis Coordination Committee
(DACC) was set up which is tasked with defining and putting into place the
Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC). The work of the
DACC was finished by mid-2006 after which the DPAC was constituted. The
consortium consist of about 250 members throughout Europe. The DPAC
responded to ESA's announcement of opportunity for the data processing by
submitting a large proposal in December 2006. Brown was involved in the
writing thereof. The DPAC is expected to be formally recognized by ESA by
mid-2007.
2.11.3. MUSE and ASSIST
MUSE, the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer is a 2nd generation
instrument for the VLT, featuring Wide-Field, Adaptive Optics Assisted
Integral Field Spectroscopy. After its positive review and subsequent
approval by ESO in 2004, MUSE entered its Preliminary Design Phase with
its Kick-off meeting in January 2005. The MUSE consortium currently
consists of 7 insitutes and is lead by the Observatory of Lyon. NOVA, by
way of Leiden Observatory, is mainly involved in the interface between
MUSE and its Adaptive Optics system (GALACSI), the preparations for
scientific operation of MUSE - like the ETC and calibration of MUSE - and
the MUSE science team. MUSE is currently preparing for its Preliminary
Design Review.
52
2.11 INSTRUMENTATION
ASSIST, the Adaptive Secondary Setup and Instrument STimulator is the
test system for the VLT Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF) and will allow for
verification of the operation of the various hardware and software systems
for the AOF without the need for - sometimes long - on-sky testing. ASSIST,
as designed by Hallibert, Stuik and Vink, passed it Optical Preliminary
Design review by ESO in October 2006. Further interactions with the ESO
AOF team has led to further improvements in the design of ASSIST and
cleared the way to a more simplified design.
2.11.4. LOFAR
The LOFAR project has made significant progress. The first LOFAR core
station (CS1) was constructed in the fields of Exloo during the summer of
2006. 96 low band antennas have been distributed over 4 station locations; 48
antennas were placed in a central field and the remaining was distributed
over 3 stations yielding a variety of baselines of up to 450 metres. The set-up
was chosen to enable performance tests of a single station at full bandwidth
and to emulate a small test version of a LOFAR-type interferometer with 24
micro-stations at reduced bandwidth. The LOFAR prototype station CS1
started operations at the beginning of October 2006. After 3 month of hard
work, the entire imaging pipeline had all its main software elements in
place. Beams are formed at the station level and transported to the Bluegene
correlator through an optical fiber network and subsequently visibilities
were produced.
With the arrivals of Amitesh Omar, Oleksandr Usov and Ilse van Bemmel
early October, the Leiden survey group has now reached a certain critical
mass. Although Ilse van Bemmel formally works for the SKA project, the
work she is doing to understand the calibratebility of the SKA telescope is
directly applicable to LOFAR. With a working version of the BDSM, the new
software package to find and characterise radio sources, our efforts for the
imaging pipeline are progressing well. A large WSRT proposal was accepted
to do a deep and wide survey at 1400 MHz of several famous survey fields.
The first data was taken at the end of 2006 and was of high quality. A similar
proposal was submitted to the GMRT to survey similar sized regions at
610MHz. Apart from the scientific aims, a major goal of these surveys is to
test whether our pipeline is able to handle large image data sets.
2.11 INSTRUMENTATION
53
Huib Intema continued his work on implementation of a scheme to
correct for ionospheric phase disturbances on low frequency radio data. This
scheme is a simplified version of the LOFAR Calibration framework
(Noordam 2006), implemented using ParselTongue, the Python interface to
classical AIPS. From a GMRT 150 MHz data set on Abell 2256, he made
movies to compare the effects of different phase calibration techniques.
2.12 History of Science
Van Delft holds an appointment of one day a week as associate professor
in the history of science located at Leiden Observatory. His research in 2006
focussed on two themes. The first one was the foundation of the Association
Internationale du Froid (International Association of Refrigeration) in the
period 1908-1909. A publication will appear in the journal Centaurus. The
second topic was the history of the Leiden Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory
during World War II.
Chapter
3
Education,
popularization
and social events
Chapter
Education,
popularization
and social events
3
3.1. Education
3.1.1. Organisation
Education and training of students is a major priority of Leiden
Observatory. In 2006, 24 freshmen started their studies in astronomy, and 12
students started their second bachelor year. The total number of students
registered at the Observatory was 89, including Bachelors, Masters, and oldstyle doctoral students. Several students from Delft Technical University
(from the applied physics and aerospace departments) took courses of the
Leiden astronomy curriculum as part of the requirements for a minor in
astronomy.
A major effort was mounted (Israel) to collect a variety of information for
inclusion in the socalled ‘Self-Evaluation Report’, produced by the Faculty of
Mathematics and Sciences in preparation of the site visit by the committee
charged with the evaluation of all aspects of education within the Faculty.
This visit, originally planned for October, was postponed to January 2007
Three staff members acted (part-time) as study advisers. Snellen was the
freshman-student adviser and he also coordinated the various activities.
directed at secondary school students, such as pre-university college and
LappTop courses, open days, guest lectures etc. Kuijken was study adviser
58
3.1. EDUCATION
for the remainder of the Bachelor programme. Röttgering took over as
master programme study advisor from Le Poole, starting October 1.
Administrative support was provided by Drost and Gerstel.
In addition to regular counseling by the student advisor, incoming
students were assigned to small groups meeting at regular intervals with a
staff member (Schaye and Linnartz) and senior student mentors. As the
evaluation of the first year of freshman student tutoring by senior students
(Hoogeboom, van Uitert, Brill, van de Voort and Siero) was very positive, it
was decided to continue this activity on a regular basis. In the tutor
program, physics and astronomy students are provided, on a voluntary but
regular basis, with coaching by senior students.
As part of the introductory astronomy course, students were taken to the
Artis Planetarium in Amsterdam on October 6 for a lesson in coordinate
systems, time and constellations in the sky (van der Werf). As part of the
second-year training in practical astronomy, eleven honors students were
offered the opportunity to take part in a specially arranged observing trip to
the Isaac-Newton-Telescope on La Palma, Canary Islands (Snellen, Le
Poole).
At the end of the year, there were 19 master students, nine of them from
outside The Netherlands. In 2006, 11 students began their master study,
whereas two obtained their degree. Starting this year, each master student
now has his or her individually tailored study plan.
The astronomy curriculum is monitored by the ‘Opleidingscommissie’
(education committee), which advises the Director of Education on all
relevant matters. Katgert resigned the chair by the summer, and was
replaced by Van der Werf. Other members are Icke, Schaye, Intema and
Damen, as well as Toonen (replaced by van Riet for most of the year), de
Valk, van den Broek, Straatman and Langelaan for the student body. Under
the authority of the Opleidingscomissie, a lecture course monitoring system
(SRS) was started, in which designated students provide feedback to
lecturers during and after the course.
The quality of curriculum and exams is guarded by the
‘Examencommissie’ (Exam Committee) where Lub took the chair from
Israel, who remained member of the committee, as well as Groenen
(physics), Hogerheijde and Van der Werf.
3.2. DEGREES AWARDED IN 2006
59
Admission to the master-curriculum for students without a BSc in
astronomy from a Netherlands university requires a recommendation by the
‘Toelatingscommissie’ (admissions committee) chaired by Franx and having
Israel, Kuijken and Röttgering as members.
3.2. Degrees awarded in 2006
3.2.1. Ph.D. degrees
A total of five graduate students successfully defended their Ph.D. theses
in 2006 and were duly awarded their Ph. D. degree: They are:
Inge L. ten Kate
January 26
Titel thesis:
Thesis advisor
Organics on Mars
Pascale Ehrenfreund
Roderick Overzier
May 30
Titel thesis:
Thesis advisor
Emergence of cosmic structures around distant
radio galaxies and quasars
George Miley
Bastiaan J. Jonkheid
June 28
Titel thesis:
Thesis advisor
Chemistry in Evolving Protoplanetary Disks
Ewine van Dishoeck
Sijme-Jan Paardekoper
September 28
Titel thesis:
Thesis advisor
Growing and Moving Planets in Disks
Vincent Icke
Rowin Meijerink
November 8
Titel thesis:
Thesis advisor
Models of the ISM in Galaxy Centers
Frank Israel
60
3.2. DEGREES AWARDED IN 2006
3.2.2. Master’s degrees (Doctoraal diploma’s)
The following 14 students were awarded Master’s/Doctoral degrees in
2006:
Name
Marieke van Duin
Rogier Ensing
Franco Maschietto
Guido Kosters
Sirach Franssen
Demerese Salter *
Chaparro Molano *
Stefan van Dongen
Eveline Helder
Jan-Pieter Paardekooper
Sebastiaan Veijgen
Date
Jan 31
Feb 28
Feb 28
May 30
Jun 27
Jun 27
Aug 29
Aug 29
Aug 29
Aug 29
Aug 29
Paul Verburg
Dave van Eijck
Evelyn de Wachter
Aug 29
Oct 31
Oct 31
* naar MSc curriculum
Present Position
NWO
TNO
Ph.D. candidate, Leiden Observatory
ESTEC
Teacher Grammar School
Ph.D. candidate, Leiden Observatory
onbekend
Software company
Ph.D candidate, Utrecht Observatory
Ph.D. candidate, Leiden Observatory
Computer staff member,
Airport Schiphol
onbekend
onbekend
Ph.D. candidate, Universität Wien
3.3. COURSES AND TEACHING
61
3.2.3. Bachelor’s degrees
A total of 9 students obtained their Bachelor's degree:
Name
Floor Jan Roduner
Silvia Toonen
Caroline Bovée
Annemarie Hagenaars
Jasper H.J. Lukkezen
Hester Schouten
Maarten Zwetsloot
Louk Rademaker
Bas Nefs
Date
Feb 24
Feb 24
Aug 25
Aug 25
Aug 25
Aug 25
Aug 25
Sep 29
Dec 20
3.3 Courses and teaching
3.3.1. Courses tought by Observatory staff curriculum
2006 - 2007
Elementary courses:
Semester
1
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
5-6
6
7-10
Course title
Introduction astrophysics
Astronomy lab 1
Stars
Modern astronomical research
Astronomy lab 2
Galaxies and cosmology
Observational techniques 1
Radiative processes
Bachelor research project
Introduction observatory
Student colloquium
Teacher
K. Kuijken
P.P. van der Werf
J. Lub
B. Brandl
I. Snellen
M. Franx
R.S. Le Poole
M.R. Hogerheijde
W.J. Jaffe
E.R. Deul
J. Lub
62
3.3. COURSES AND TEACHING
Advanced Courses (Keuzevakken; semesters 7, 8, 9, 10):
Formation of Stars and Planets
Active galaxy nuclei
Cosmology
Radio astronomy and techniques
Interferometry (interacademial lecture
course)
Astronomical Spectroscopy
E.F. van Dishoeck
H.J.A. Röttgering
V. Icke
R.T. Schilizzi
H.V.J. Linnartz
Pre University Program
The Pre University College is a Leiden University program aimed to
introduce talented 5th and 6th grade high-school students to university
studies. It includes courses in several disciplines within the university,
including astronomy. During 2006 eight students participated in the
astronomy program. This was given by Miley and Snellen. The course
concentrated on radio astronomy and on the new LOFAR radio telescope
presently being built in the north of the Netherlands. The course consisted of
3 half-day sessions with lectures and practical work and a whole day
excursion to the Westerbork radio telescope and the Research and
Development Department of the ASTRON Foundation at Dwingeloo.
Subsequently, the students prepared and delivered a presentation on
LOFAR.
LAPP-Top, the Leiden Advanced Pre-University Program for Top
Students, is aimed at enthusiastic and ambitious 5th and 6th grade highschool students. Candidates are selected on the basis of their high-school
performances and their enthusiasm to participate. The LAPP-Top students
have taken part in 6 to 8 meetings from January till May, following the
program of their own choice.
The Sterrewacht has been participating in the LAPP-TOP program since
its start in 2001. In that pilot year five students participated, in 2002/2003
six, in 2003/2004 eleven, in 2004/2005 thirty-three, in 2005/2006 seventeen
and in 2006/2007 twenty-seven.
The astronomy LAPP-TOP program was developed by Van der Werf
from 2002 onward. Since 2005 the project is coordinated by Snellen. In eight
sessions the following subjects were treated:
3.3. COURSES AND TEACHING
Extrasolar planets
The Milky Way and other galaxies
Practicum: distances in the Universe
Gas and Radiation
Quasars, black holes and active galactic nuclei
Practicum: The black hole in the center of our
Milky Way
Cosmology
Excursion to the radio telescopes in
Westerbork and Dwingeloo
63
I. Snellen
J. Schaye
V. Icke
H. Röttgering
P. Katgert
After successfully completing the program participants have been
awarded with a certificate from the University of Leiden. High-school
students are allowed to use this project as part of their final exams.
Other Courses:
Israel gave, for the last time, his annual lecture course ‘Astronomy’ at
Delft Technical University, for about 50 students in the departments of
aerospace and applied physics.
Icke and Van Ruitenbeek (Physics) organized an interdisciplinary course
‘Living Universe’ first-year students, concerning life in the universe. Several
Sterrewacht staff (van Dishoeck, Icke, Israel) lectured in this series.
64
3.4. POPULARIZATION AND MEDIA CONTACTS
3.4. Popularization and Media Contacts
3.4.1. Organisation
Astronomy has a strong appeal to the general public, and is well
represented in the media. Our staff, PhD students and undergraduate
students spend considerable time and effort to explain the exciting results of
astronomy to the general public, in the form of lectures, press releases and
newspaper articles, courses, public days at the old observatory, and
television and radio programmes. These efforts are very successful every
year, and help to make young high school students enthusiastic about
science in general, and astronomy in particular. They play a very important
role in maintaining the student inflow, and in keeping Leiden Observatory
known throughout the country.
3.4.2. Public Lectures and Media Interviews
Bisschop
‘Astrochemie van Waarnemingen to experimenten’ (Public lecture: Weer- en
Sterrenkundige Kring Zaanstreek, Jan 26)
Idem (Public lecture: Stichting Weer- en Sterrenkunde Eemsmond, May 24)
Brown
‘Gaia - Een stereoscopische kaart van de Melkweg’ (KNVWS Heerlen; Feb 18)
‘Gaia - Een stereoscopische kaart van de Melkweg’ (KNVWS Enschede; Mar 14)
‘Gaia - Een stereoscopische kaart van de Melkweg’ (KNVWS 's Hertogenbosch;
Oct 18)
Cuppen
‘Grillige stofdeeltjes als katalysator van ruimte-ijs’ (Nieuwsbrief Universiteit
Leiden; Oct 24)
‘Veel wetenschappers dansen de Argentijnse Tango’ (interview in Carp*
magazine, Nov 1)
3.4. POPULARIZATION AND MEDIA CONTACTS
65
Damen
‘Sterrenstelsels in het verre heelal’ (Public lecture KNVWS Delft; Jan 17)
‘idem’ (Public lecture KNVWS Almere; Jan 24)
van Delft
‘Nobele hoofden: de big science van Heike Kamerlingh Onnes’ (Ministerie van
OCenW, Jan 18, Den Haag)
‘Dat mag in de krant’ (gastcollege Academische Jaarprijs, Apr 20, Eindhoven)
‘Idem’ (college in de serie Wetenschap en Samenleving, Sep 29, Leiden).
‘Science in the Newspaper’ (aio-school statistische fysica van de
gecondenseerde materie, May 18, Driebergen)
‘Beelden van bèta’s: Faust, Frankenstein, nerd’ (Eurekalezing op de NWOmanifestatie ‘Bessensap’, May 23, Amsterdam)
‘Wetenschap in de krant’ (gastcollege in het kader van de cursus
wetenschapscommunicatie van Jos van den Broek, Sep 12, Leiden)
‘Willem de Sitter en Albert Einstein over kosmologie’ (lunchlezing Leidsche
Flesch, Dec 6, Leiden).
‘Fit to print: science in the newspaper’ (fysisch colloquium Radboud
Universiteit, Dec 12, Nijmegen).
van Dishoeck
‘Van moleculen tot planeten’ (Avondlezing, IMM Symposium, Nijmegen, May
1)
’Water in het Heelal’(NVWS Symposium, Utrecht, Oct 7)
‘Succes is een medaille met twee zijden’ (Gebraden duiven vliegen niet,
Universiteit Leiden, p.70-71)
‘Interviewreeks Spinozapremie Laureaten’ (Universiteit Twente,
www.Natuurkunde.nl)
‘Kraamkamers aan de hemel’ (Interview NRC, 4 jun)
‘Origin of life’ (Nobel Symposium 133 press release, Södertuna Swedish
newspaper, Jun 12)
Haas
‘Stervorming ‘in clusters’ (JWG; several times)
‘Sterrenstelsels’ (JWG; several times‘)
‘Botsende sterrenstelsels’ (JWG Jongerenkamp; July)
‘Kosmologie en de vorming van structuur in het heelal’ (JWG; Dec 29)
66
3.4. POPULARIZATION AND MEDIA CONTACTS
‘Afstanden in het heelal’ (JWG; Aug 15)
‘Een maximale massa voor sterrenhopen?’ (JWG; Aug 18)
‘De VLT en de toekomst’ (KNVWS Wega, Tilburg; Jan 14)
Tours through public observatory Sonnenborgh, (Utrecht; several times)
Symposium ‘Planeten’ (JWG; Feb 11)
Astronomical youth holiday ‘Sirenekamp’ (Aug 12-20)
Hekker
Teaching IMC weekend school (3x)
Kaiser lecture Exo-planets (Leiden, May 25)
Idem Kaiser price awared (Leiden, Sep 23)
Hogerheijde
‘De vorming van sterren en planeten’ (gastles VWO; Jan 19)
‘Idem’ (Feb 10)
‘Idem’ (Apr 20)
‘Idem’ (May 24)
‘Waarnemingen van de vorming van sterren en planeten’ (publiekslezing, Mar 8)
‘Idem’ (Nov 28)
Hopman
‘Raadselachtige zwarte gaten’ (nieuwsbrief Leiden, 21 nov)
Icke
‘Eenzame opsluiting’ (concertgebouw Tijdgenoten inleiding, Jan 23)
‘Symmetry’ (Leidsche Flesch interview, Jan 26)
‘Op de achterkant van een oude envelop’ (Verwijs Den Haag, Jan 28)
‘Zwarte gaten interview’ (Debbie van der Plas, Jan 30)
‘Interview quantummechanica’ (Simon Vroegop, Feb 10)
‘Interview Pre-University College’ (Feb 13)
‘Kosmologie en leven’ (HOVO Ollongren, Feb 14)
‘Homo Universalis’ (Brussel, Feb 16)
‘Op de achterkant van een oude envelop’ (Boekh. Donner Rotterdam, Mar 12)
‘Op de achterkant van een oude envelop’, (Van Liere Eindhoven, Mar 14)
‘Niks relatief’ (Mougins, Werner Kerbosch, Mar 16)
Comenius: ‘Oerknal en deeltjes’, (Kerckebosch Zeist, Mar 17)
3.4. POPULARIZATION AND MEDIA CONTACTS
Weekendschool Zuidoost (Mar 19)
‘Donkere materie: ons kind en het Heelal’ (Kohnstamm Lezing, Amsterdam,
Mar 24)
Weekendschool West, (Apr 2)
Interview AD over Huygens (JH Bakker, Apr 6)
Interview Leven! Magazine (B. de Haas, Apr 7)
‘Blunders’ (Vraaggesprek Teleac Hoe?Zo!, Apr 10)
‘Leven in het Heelal’ (ANW interview, Van den Hoven, Apr 11)
‘Bevroren ganzeveer’ (Hofwijck, Christiaan Lezing, Apr 13)
‘Alle kunde is sterrenkunde’ (College Open Dag Faculteit; Apr 21)
‘Antropisch principe’ (Interview Sjoerd & Iris (scholieren), Apr 25)
‘Christiaan Huytgens, il Galileo Olandese’ (Linde College, Oude Sterrewacht
Mei 16)
Telef. interview Florine Koning (Jun 19)
Marathon Interview VPRO, DeSmet (Jul 4)
Interview Nolet (Aug 23)
‘The next five years of radiation hydrodynamics’ (Sterrewachtdag, Sep 7)
‘Precisie-kosmologie’ (Volkssterrewacht Copernicus, Overveen, Sep 27)
‘Verlichtingen’ (Afscheid leraar Berger, Almelo, Oct 6)
‘Energie’ (Wetenschapsdag, Oct 22)
‘Niks relatief’ (PTA/Nemo, “Vliegende Hollanders”, Nov 15)
‘Relativiteit vanaf Huygens tot voorbij Einstein’ (Volksuniversiteit Haarlem,
Nov 15)
‘Het Heelal als leermeester’ (Comenius, Warnsborn (Arnhem), Nov 17)
‘Huygens, de Nederlandse Galilei’ (Cleveringa Lezing, Haarlem, Nov 22
‘De geschminkte wetenschapper’ (VSenV/FLA, Dec 15)
‘The sound of stars’ (Kon.Conservatorium, Dec 19)
Israel
‘Manen en ringen van Pluto’ (Hoezo? Teleac Radio; Feb 23)
‘Mars’ (Space Expo, Noordwijk; May 21)
‘Alumnilezing Leidsche Flesch’ (Leiden; Jun 23)
‘Stumbling through the Universe’ (ESTEC, Noordwijk; Oct 26)
‘Pluto en de 7 dwergen’ (Leidsche Flesch, Leiden; Nov 3)
‘Stof van Komeet Wild’ (Teleac Radio 5; Dec 15)
67
68
3.4. POPULARIZATION AND MEDIA CONTACTS
Katgert
‘Terugkijken naar de Oerknal’ (Chr. Gymnasium Utrecht; Mar 3)
‘Idem’ (Schravelant College Schiedam; Apr 13)
‘Het Uitdijend Heelal’ (College Het Loo Voorburg; Mar 13)
Kuijken
Teleac Kettingvraag (Radio; Apr 7)
Interview BNR Nieuwsradio (Radio; Aug 23)
Linnartz
Observatory representative press releases. Press releases 2006:
- Honderden jonge sterrenstelsels aan de rand van het heelal ontdekt
- Stoelendans van planeten
- Stellaire geboortebeperking in het jonge heelal
- Leidse bevolking stemt over lot Pluto
- Bewustwording heelal brengt kinderen verder
- Spiderweb galaxy slokt melkwegstelsels op
- Studenten onderzoeken planeetvorming in vallend vliegtuig
- Galactische radiatoren bepalen eigenschappen van sterrenstelsels
Lommen
‘Powers of Ten/Machten van tien’ (popular talk at Old Observatory; Apr 12)
‘Idem’ (popular talk at Old Observatory; May 16)
‘Dying stars/Stervende sterren’ (popular talk at Old Observatory; Apr 26)
‘Afstanden in de sterrenkunde’ (popular talk during Open Day; November 24)
Miley
‘LOFAR’ (Leids Natuurkundig Gezelschap; Nov 18)
‘LOFAR’ (Avro Network Television; Oct 23)
Molster
Live interview, Wereld omroep (Oct 24)
Live interview, Radio 2 Ontbijtradio (Oct 26)
Interview NOVA Online News (Oct 28)
3.4. POPULARIZATION AND MEDIA CONTACTS
69
Ollongren
‘Leven in het Heelal’ (course, Snellius Building, Leiden, feb–apr 2006)
University (Hoger Onderwijs voor Ouderen)
Soeterbeeck Programma ‘Het Onbegrensde Intellect’ (Radboud Universiteit
Nijmegen):
‘Astrobiologie’14 nov, Tilburg;
‘Idem’ 16 nov, Zwolle;
‘Idem’ 22 nov, ’s-Hertogenbosch
Röttgering
‘Van de Big Bang tot het leven in het heelal’ (Cleveringa Lezing, Leeuwarden,
Nov 26)
Salter
‘Experimenteren in de ultieme achtbaan: Leidse studenten verliezen tijdelijk hun
gewicht’ (Interview Leidsch Dagblad, Newspaper; Mar 9)
‘Sterrenkunde Studeren: Zweverige wetenschap’ (Interview NOVA Online
Astronomy Promotional Video, released Sept 12)
‘Studenten onderzoeken planeetvorming in vallend vliegtuig’ (Press Release
SRON/NOVA, Oct 23)
‘Ontdek planeetvorming in 20 seconden’ (Press Release Leiden University, Oct
24)
‘Parabolic flight video footage’ (News item TV Noord, Oct 30)
Schaye
‘Onze Melkweg en Andere Sterrenstelsels’ (lecture Volksuniversiteit Eindhoven;
April 27)
‘Licht op intergalactische wolken’ (WETENSCHAP - Mare 33, 15 juni 2006,
artikel geschreven door journalist B. Braun)
Interview Hoezo Radio (Radio; Oct 6)
70
3.4. POPULARIZATION AND MEDIA CONTACTS
Smit
‘Licht van Gewicht: Gravitationele Lenzen en Donkere Materie’ (Popular Lecture
KNWVS Amsterdam; Oct 24)
‘Idem’ (Popular Lecture KNWVS Leiden; Nov 14)
Snijders
‘De geboorte van een ster’ (Kaiser, public lecture; Jan 25)
‘Machten van tien’ (lecture Rotary; Jan 31)
‘Idem’ (lecture IMC weekendschool; March 19)
‘Idem’ (lecture Vrije School; March 20)
‘Idem’ (lecture; July 9)
‘Extreme stervorming in starburst stelsels’ (lecture LWSK; Feb 21)
‘Idem’ (lecture VWS Noord-Drenthe; Sept 8)
‘Reis door het zonnestelsel’ (lecture IMC weekendschool; March 12)
‘Gevaren in de ruimte’ (lecture IMC weekendschool; March 26)
‘Botsende sterrenstelsels’ (lecture JWG; July 30)
Vermaas
‘Gebruik je energie in de sterrenkunde’ (Wetenweek Lecture, Sterrewacht
Almere; Oct 24)
Visser
‘Astrochemie: Van interstellaire stofwolken tot leven’ (Publieks-sterrenwacht
Schothorst, Amersfoort; Apr 12)
Weijmans
‘Donkere materie’ (KNVWS Overveen; Jan 19)
‘Idem’ (KNVWS Midden-Limburg; Jan 22)
‘Idem’ (KNVWS Amersfoort; Oct 18)
‘Idem’ (KNVWS Den Haag; Oct 20)
‘Idem’ (KNVWS Oostzaan; Nov 30)
‘Idem’ (KNVWS Eindhoven; Dec 14)
‘Dood van een ster’ (Kinderlezing L.A.D. Kaiser; Feb 16)
‘Idem’ (Gastles Corbuloschool, Zoeterwoude; May 22)
‘Wat doet een sterrenkundige?’ (Gastles Da Vinci College, Leiden; Mar 14)
‘Sterrenstelsels’ (JWG, Leiden; Sep 24)
3.6 VERENIGING VAN OUD-STERREWACHTERS
71
‘Idem’ (A.S.V. Prometheus, Leiden; Nov 29)
‘Nabije Melkwegstelsels’ (KNVWS Zuid-Limburg; Dec 9)
van der Werf
‘Generaasjes’ (Interview Omrop Fryslan; TV; Jan)
Wuyts
‘Tot de Grenzen van het Heelal’ (Public Lecture KNVWS 't Gooi; Sep 15)
‘Idem’ (Public Lecture Sterrewacht Vesta Zaandam; Mar 30)
de Zeeuw
‘De Sterrewacht’ (Reunisten Visser 't Hooft Lyceum, Jun 17)
3.5 The Leidsch Astronomisch Dispuut ‘F. Kaiser’
Looking back over the activities Kaiser organized in the year 2006, it
seemed as if providing drinks and food for its members were the core
business of our Dispuut. The Dispuut organized a new years drink, a movie
night (with foods and drinks), a dinner for members, a beginning of the
academic year drink and a drink when the board changed. However, the
year 2006 was also marked by - as of yet - the last series of public lectures
and the winning of the Kaiser award for the organization of these public
lectures.
These lectures were given by PhD students from the observatory. Leonie
Snijders was the first to give a very successful lecture on the live of stars
aimed at a very young audience. In total 110 people came to the old
observatory to see Snijders' talk and visit the telescopes. A month later,
Anne-Marie Weijmans gave a follow-up talk, for a somewhat older
audience. The next talk had the title "Black Holes: Nature's Biggest
Monsters" and was presented by David Raban. Dave Lommen followed up
with a more advanced talk on dying stars. The last talk was by Saskia
Hekkers, who talked about exo-planets. We are glad we had such excellent
speakers which managed to attract and entertain large audiences. The
72
3.6 VERENIGING VAN OUD-STERREWACHTERS
climax of this series came in september 2006. The entire Kaiser board was
awarded the Kaiser price for organizing these talks.
As the new academic year started, the Kaiser board decided to change
course. With a rapidly decreasing number of members, it was decided to do
no more talks, no more tours but rather revert to the roots: the students. As
such, talks for the students were organised, in addition to drinks, movie
nights and an observing night (which had to be cancelled).
3.6 Vereniging van Oud-Sterrewachters
The ‘Vereniging van Oud-Sterrewachters’ (VO-S; http://www.vo-s.nl/)
is the official association of Sterrewacht/Observatory (ex-) affiliates. It has
been in existence for over 10 years now and has seen another active year. As
usual, the 145 members were offered a variety of activities. These included a
social drink prior to the Oort Lecture, and an annual meeting. This year, the
annual meeting was held in Leiden and involved among others a visit of the
Thysiana Library. At the meeting, the ‘Kaiserprijs’ was awarded to the
astronomy-student association L.A.D. ‘F. Kaiser’ for the successful
organisation of an astronomy popularization event. VO-S members also
received a newsletter with Sterrewacht news and were offered an electronic
member dictionary.
Appendix
I
Observatory staff
December 31,2006
Appendix
Observatory staff
December 31, 2006
I
Names, e-mail addresses, room numbers, and telephone numbers of all
current personnel can be found on the Sterrewacht website:
http://www.strw.leidenuniv.nl/people
Telephone extensions should always be preceded by (071) 527 … (from inside
The Netherlands) or by +31-71-527 … (from abroad)
Full Professors:
E.F. van Dishoeck
M. Franx
V. Icke
F.P. Israel
K. Kuijken
G.K. Miley (KNAW)
P.T. de Zeeuw
Full Professors by Special Appointments:
M.A.Th.M. de Graauw
(SRON Groningen, for J.H. Oort Fund)
M.A.C. Perryman
(ESTEC, for Leiden University Fund)
H.A. Quirrenbach
(Landessternwarte Heidelberg, Faculty W&N)
R.T. Schilizzi
(ISPO, Faculty W&N)
R.P.W. Visser
(UU(0.5)/UL(0.5), Teyler’s Professor)
76
APPENDIX I. OBSERVATORY STAFF DECEMBER 31, 2006
Associate Professors and Assistant Professors / Tenured Staff
B.R. Brandl
H. Linnartz
A. Brown
J. Lub
D. van Delft (0.0) *
R.S. Le Poole
M. Hogerheijde
H.J.A. Röttgering
W.J. Jaffe
J.Schaye
R Katgert
I.A.G. Snellen
H.J. van Langevelde (0.0) **
R. Stuik
Y. Levin
P.P. van der Werf
NOVA office
P.T. de Zeeuw
W.H.W.M.Boland
T. Brouwer
K. Groen
director
adjunct director
financial controller (0.2)
management assistant
Management Support and Secretaries
J.C. Drost
C.C. Gündisch
K. Groen
A. van der Tang
B. de Kanter (voluntary)
L. van der Veld
Computer staff
E.R. Deul
D. J. Jansen
T. Bot
A. Vos
Visiting Scientists
M.J. Betlem
R. Blandford (J.H. Oort Foundation)
P. Ehrenfreund (LIC)
M. Jourdain de Muizon
J.K. Katgert-Merkelijn
Emeriti
A. Blaauw (also: Groningen)
W.B. Burton
A.M. van Genderen
H.J. Habing
I. van Houten-Groeneveld
manager, computer group
scientific programmer
programmer
programmer
M. Spaans (RUG)
R. Stark (NWO)
D. Stinebring (Oberlin College)
J.A. Stüwe
K.K. Kwee
K.H. Libbenga
A. Ollongren
C. van Schooneveld
J. Tinbergen
* Director Boerhaave Museum; ** Staff, JIVE, Dwingeloo
APPENDIX I. OBSERVATORY STAFF DECEMBER 31, 2006
77
Postdocs and Project Personnel
S.J.T. Bottinelli
H. Cuppen
A. Crapsi
C. DallaVecchia
J. Falćon Barroso
G. Fuchs
B. Groves
P. Hallibert
N. Hatch
C. Hopman
V. Joergens
R. Köhler
NWO
NWO, VENI
EU/NWO, VIDI
EU-EXT
EU
NOVA, Sackler
UL
NOVA Muse
UL, KNAW
NWO, VENI
EU Marie Curie
NWO, VICI
P. Marrese
R.J. Mathar
R. McDermid
B. Merin Martin
C.J. Ödman
A. Omar
N.M. Ramanujam
J.P. Reunanen
O. Usov
I. van Bemmel
R. Williams
NWO, GAIA
NWO, VICI
NOVA, Glass
Spanje/Spinoza
KNAW
NWO
NOVA, LOFAR
NOVA Sinfoni
UL, SNN LOFAR
UL, EU SKADS
NWO
Ph.D. Students
S. Albrecht
P. Beirao
S. Bisschop
R. van den Bosch
J. Bouwman *
C. Brinch
M. Damen
V. Geers
M. Haas *
S. Hekker
H. Intema
S. Ioppolo *
T. van Kempen
M. Kriek
F. Lahuis (SRON Groningen)
D.J.P. Lommen
F. Maschietto *
E. Micelotta
K.I. Öberg
J.-P. Paardekoper *
O. Panić
1,9,10
1
1,2
3
8
5
1,2
4
1,10
2,6
2
3,4
3
4,7
2
3
5
5
2
3,12
A.H. Pawlik
F. Petrignani
D. Raban
J. Ritzerveld
D. Salter *
D.H.F.M. Schnitzeler
D.M. Smit
L. Snijders
M.H.Soto Vicencio
K. Torstensson *
L. van Starkenburg (0.8)
E.N. Taylor
H.E. Verbraak
L. Vermaas *
R.Visser
N.deVries
N. Wehres *
A. Weijmans
R. Wiersma
S.E.R. Wuyts
5
7
3
3
1
3
3
1
1
12
1,2
3
8
2
4
1
12
3
11
3
Funding notes:
1. funded by Leiden University; 2. funding through NOVA program; 3. funded by
NWO, via Leiden University; 4. funding from Spinoza award; 5. funding from EU
EARA MC network; 6. funding from KNAW; 7. funding by SRON; 8. employed by
FOM; 9. funded by NOVA2 OPTICON; 10. funded from VICI Quirrenbach; 11.
funded from EU Excellence grant.
* denotes employment for only part of the year - see section staff changes.
78
APPENDIX I. OBSERVATORY STAFF DECEMBER 31, 2006
Senior Students (MSc doctoraal curriculum)
N.J.C.P.Baars
M. van den Berg
R. Berkhout
C.C. Bonnett
A. Bos
M.P. den Brok
S.Y. Brown
E.E. Caris alias Reynders
B. Clauvvens
B. van Dam
A. Farzinnia
N. ter Haar
M. Hamelink
G. van Hal
P. Herfst
B. Holl
M.van Hoven
S. de Kievit
T.D.J. Kindt
A.C. Kockx
A.L Kroonenberg
E.J.W. de Mooij
S.V. Nefs
J.B.R. Oonk
S. Ophof
M. Peters
M. van Riet
FJ. Roduner
E.T. van Scherpenzeel
H. Schouten
W.R Spaan
R. Tan
S. Toonen
E. van Uitert
F. van de Voort
R. van Weeren
S.H. Welles
A.N.M. Westmaas
M. Zwetsloot
Msc Students (new curriculum)
T.L. Astraatmadja
A. Jeeson Daniel
A.-M. Madigan
J.M. Martinez Galarza
I. Oliveira (Martins e)
O. Rakic
S. Rusli
L. Stirbat
H. Zeballos Pinto
Bsc Students
T. Boekholt
S. van den Broek
R. van der Burg
M. de Hoon (Delft)
D. Geerts
W. de Pons
I.R. Rosenbrand
J. van de Sande
W.C. Schrier
J.A.P. Severijnen
D. Szomoru
C.H.M. de Valk
A.W. de Vries
F. Vuijsje
Note:
BSc students listed are only those doing a research project.
APPENDIX I. OBSERVATORY STAFF DECEMBER 31, 2006
Staff changes in 2006
Name (funded by)
O.I.L. Asvany (NWO)
I. van Bemmel (UL, EU SKADS)
R. Blandford (UL, J.H. Oort Fonds)
S.J.T. Bottinelli (NWO)
J. Bouwman (FOM)
M. Cappellari (NWO, VENI)
H. Cuppen (NWO, VENI)
D. van Delft (UL, 0.2)
B. Groves (UL)
C.C. Gündisch (UL)
M. Haas (UL)
N. Hatch (UL, KNAW)
C. Hopman (NWO, VENI)
H. Intema (UL, KNAW)
H. Intema (UL, NOVA)
S. Ioppolo (UL, NOVA)
B. Jonkheid
V. Joergens (EU, Marie Curie)
I.L. ten Kate (NWO, Vernieuwingsimpuls)
J. Katgert-Merkelijn (UL)
R. Köhler (NWO, VICI)
F. Maschietto (NWO)
R. Mathar (NWO, VICI)
R. Mathar (UL, NOVA)
R. Mathar (NWO, VICI)
R. Meijerink (UL)
B Merin Martin (Spanje / Spinoza)
A. Omar (NWO)
R. Overzier
J.-P. Paardekoper (UL, NOVA)
S.-J. Paardekoper (UL)
O. Panic (NWO VIDI)
O. Panic (EU Molecular Universe)
H.A. Quirrenbach (UL, NOVA)
S. Reffert-Frink (NWO VICI)
D. Salter (UL)
start
01-10-2006
10-04-2006
01-10-2006
01-02-2006
01-10-2006
01-11-2006
01-06-2006
06-06-2006
01-10-2006
01-08-2006
01-07-2006
01-09-2006
01-04-2006
01-06-2006
01-09-2006
01-10-2006
01-10-2006
01-09-2006
15-08-2006
15-08-2006
end
01-07-2006
13-04-2006
31-08-2006
31-08-2006
30-06-2006
30-06-2006
01-04-2006
26-01-2006 (LIC)
31-12-2006
30-10-2006
30-05-2006
31-08-2006
09-11-2006
31-07-2006
01-09-2006
14-08-2006
01-04-2006
31-03-2006
79
80
APPENDIX I. OBSERVATORY STAFF DECEMBER 31, 2006
Staff changes in 2006 (continued)
A. van der Tang (UL)
K.J.E. Torstensson (EU, JIVE)
K.H. Tran (UL, NOVA)
O. Usov (UL, SNN LOFAR)
L. Vermaas (UL, NOVA)
R. Vink (UL, NOVA)
T.M.A. Webb (NWO, VENI)
N. Wehres (EU Molec. Universe, Groningen)
R. Williams (NWO)
P. Woitke (UL)
01-01-2007
01-09-2006
19-10-2006
01-02-2006
01-03-2006
01-09-2006
30-11-2006
31-08-2006
15-01-2006
30-10-2006
Appendix
II
Committee
membership
Appendix
Committee
membership
II
II.1. Observatory Committees
(As on december 31, 2006)
Directorate
(Directie onderzoekinstituut)
P.T. de Zeeuw (director of research)
F.P. Israel (director of education)
J. Lub (institute manager)
Observatory management team
(Management Team Sterrewacht)
P.T. de Zeeuw (chair)
E.R. Deul
K. Groen (minutes)
C.C. Gündisch
F.P. Israel
K.H. Kuijken
J. Lub
Oversight council
H. van der Laan (chair)
B. Baud
J.A.M. Bleeker
C.J. Oort
W. van Saarloos
Research committee
(Onderzoek-commissie OZ)
K.H. Kuijken (chair)
A.G.A. Brown
W. Jaffe
P. Katgert
P.P. van der Werf
84
APPENDIX II. COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP
Research institute scientific council
(Wetenschappelijke raad onderzoekinstituut)
B. Brandl
R.S. Le Poole
A.G.A. Brown
Y. Levin
P.T. de Zeeuw
H.V.J. Linnartz
E.R. Deul
J. Lub
M. Franx
G.K. Miley
M. Hogerheijde
H.J.A. Röttgering
V. Icke
J. Schaye
F.P. Israel
I. Snellen
W.J. Jaffe
R. Stuik
P. Katgert
P.P. van der Werf
K.H. Kuijken
E.F. van Dishoeck
Institute council
(Instituutsraad)
E. Deul (chair)
J. Drost
F.P. Israel
W.J. Jaffe
E. van Scherpenzeel
M. Smit
Astronomy education committee
(Opleidingscommissie OC)
P.P. van der Werf (chair)
M.C. Damen
J.C. Drost (minutes)
M. Franx
A.J.C.P. Hagenaars
V. Icke
H.T. Intema
R. Leijssen
J.B.R. Oonk
H. Röttgering
J. Schaye
S. Toonen
S. van den Broek
Oort scholarship committee
M. Franx (chair)
F.P. Israel
H. Röttgering
Mayo Greenberg prize committee
G. Miley (chair)
E.F. van Dishoeck
H. Linnartz
J. Lub
MSc admission advisory committee
M. Franx (chair)
F.P. Israel
R.S. Le Poole (until October 1)
H.J. Röttgering (after October 1)
APPENDIX II. COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP
Astronomy board of examiners
(Examencommissie)
F.P. Israel (chair until September 1)
J. Lub (chair after September 1)
E. Groenen (Physics)
K.H. Kuijken
P.P. van der Werf
Graduate student review committee
(Commissie studievoortgang promovendi)
W. Boland
K.H. Kuijken
B. Brandl
J. Schaye
Computer committee
S. Bisschop
B. Brandl
A.G.A. Brown
M. Cappellari
K. Groen
S.-J. Paardekooper
P. v.d. Werf
Library committee
W.J. Jaffe (chair)
F.P. Israel
J. Lub
Public outreach committee
F.P. Israel (chair)
V. Icke
M. Damen
T. van Kempen
N. de Vries
Social committee
T.A. van Kempen (chair)
A.G.A. Brown
E. Caris alias Reynders
K. Groen
I.A.G. Snellen
85
APPENDIX II. COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP
86
II.2. Membership of University
Committees
(As on december 31, 2006)
Brandl
Member, Research institute scientific council
Member, Graduate student review committee
Member, Computer committee
van Dishoeck
Chair, Faculty Research Committee (WECO)
Member, Raad van Toezicht, Leiden Institute of Physics (LION)
Member, Lorentz Center Astronomy Board
Franx
Member, Astronomy Education Committee
Member, Msc admission committee
Chair, Oort Scholarship committee
Director, Leids Kerkhoven--Bosscha Foundation
Director, Leids Sterrewacht Foundation
Director, Jan Hendrik Oort Foundation
Hogerheijde
Member, Observatory Research Committee
Member, Board of Directors, Leids Kerkhoven-Bosscha Fonds
Member, Board of Directors, Leids Sterrewacht Fonds
Member, Board of Directors, Jan Hendrik Oort Foundation
Israel
Member, Committee of Education Directors, School of Sciences
Member, Board of Graduate School, School of Sciences
APPENDIX II. COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP
87
Jaffe
Member, Observatory Research Committee
Chairman, Observatory Scientific Council (Wetenschappelijk Raad)
Kriek
Member, committee for public outreach
Kuijken
Member, Faculty Research Committee (WECO)
Chair, Observatory Research Committee
Chair, PhD review Committee
Member, Observatory Management Team
Study Advisor, Astronomy BSc students
Member, Astronomy Education Committee
Member, Astronomy MSc Admissions Committee
Member, Lorentz Center Astronomy Programme Board
Member, International Center Board
Linnartz
Observatory representative national science day
Observatory representative press releases
Member, Mayo Greenberg fellowship selection committee
Member, FMD/ELD user committee
Ollongren
Member, Leiden University Committee ‘Hoger Onderwijs voor Ouderen’
(HOVO, Courses at university level for Seniors)
Röttgering
Member, Education committee
Schaye
Co-chair, Colloquia committee (with Yuri Levin)
Chair, Website committee
Member, Graduate student review committee
Member, Astronomy education committee
Member, Oort scholarship committee
Member, Faculty research committee
88
APPENDIX II. COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP
van der Werf
Chairman, Education Committee Astronomy
Member, Joint Education Committee Physics and Astronomy
Member, Research Committee
Member, Examination Committee
Organist of the Academy Auditorium
de Zeeuw
Member, Advisory Committee Lorentz Professor
Member, Advisory Committee Kloosterman Professor
Member, Board of Directors, Leids Kerkhoven Bosscha Fonds
Member, Board of Directors, Leids Sterrewacht Fonds
Member, Board of Directors, Oort Foundation
Appendix
III
Science
policy
functions
III
Appendix
Science
policy
functions
Brandl
PI, concept study of MIDIR (ELT mid-IR instrument)
Deputy Co-PI, European JWST-MIRI consortium
Instrument Scientist, MIRI
Chair, MIRI SMO subsystem CDR
Member, MIRI DGA subsystem CDR
Member, Spitzer Time Allocation Committee
Member, NL-PC (Dutch observing program committee)
Deputy workpackage manager, ELT Design Study WP11000 (Instrumentation)
Member, ESO ELT Instrument Working Group
Co-Investigator, Spitzer-IRS
Co-Investigator, PHARO camera (Palomar 200")
Co-Investigator, WIRC camera (Palomar 200")
Member, OPTICON Key technologies working group
Brown
Member, IAU Commissions 8, 37
Member, Gaia Science Team
Member, Gaia coordination unit 5 ‘Photometric processing’ management team
Member, Gaia Data Analysis Coordination Committee
Member, EU Marie-Curie RTN European Leadership in Space Astrometry
(ELSA)
van Delft
Member, jury Eurekaprijs 2006
Member, jury Prijs van Wetenschap en Maatschappij
Member, Commissie Wetenschapsgeschiedenis KNAW
Member, Commissie ‘Duizend Meesterwerken’
92
APPENDIX III. SCIENCE POLCY FUNCTIONS
Member, board Gewina, Nederlands Genootschap voor de Geschiedenis van de
Geneeskunde, Wiskunde, Natuurwetenschappen en Techniek.
van Dishoeck
Associate Editor, Annual Reviews of Astronomy & Astrophysics
Member, ALMA Board
Member, SRON Board
Co-PI, European JWST-MIRI consortium
Member, MPIA-Heidelberg Fachbeirat
Member, Visiting Committee Astronomy Department of Harvard University
Member, SMA Advisory Committee
Member, ESO-CRIRES Science Team
Member, Herschel-HIFI Science team
Chair, IAU Working Group on Astrochemistry
Member, IAU Commission 14, working group on ‘molecular data’
Coordinator, Herschel-HIFI WISH Key Program
Coordinator, NOVA network II on ‘Birth and Death of Stars and Planets’
Coordinator, Dutch node EU-PLANET network
Member, Scientific Organising Committee, Nobel symposium on ‘Cosmic
Chemistry’
Member, Scientific Organising Committee, ALMA workshop on ‘Complex
Molecules in Space’
Member, Search committee Wykeham Professor of Physics, Oxford University
Member, PhD committee P. Stäuber, ETH
Member, PhD committee A. Isella, University of Milan
Member, PhD committee S. Bottinelli, University of Grenoble
Franx
Member, Advanced Camera for Surveys Science Team
Member, Nova Board
Member, Sinfoni Science Team
Member, ESO-Omegacam science team
Chair, MUSE science team
Member, JWST-NIRSPEC science team
Member, JWST Science Working Group
Chair, ESO-ELT Science Working Group
Member, ESO-ELT Science and Engineering Core Working Group
Chair, NL-PC Allocation Committee
Organizer, Science Meeting in Lorentz Center
APPENDIX III. SCIENCE POLCY FUNCTIONS
93
Hogerheijde
Member, ALMA European Science Advisory Committee
Member, ALMA Science Integrated Project Team
Member, Netherlands Program Committee
Member, ALMA Regional Center Coordinating Committee
Project scientist for CHAMP+/Netherlands
Member, ESO OPC, period 78
Member, ESO OPC and chair panel C2, period 79
Member, NWO VENI selection committee
Hopman
Member, LISA Science Requirement Document
Israel
Member, NWO Selection Committee for VIDI Awards
Member, IAU Comissions 28, 40 and 51
Member, Science Team Herschel-HIFI
Member, Science Team JWST-MIRI
Member, Science Team APEX-Champ+
Member, Editorial Board Europhysics News
Jaffe
Director, NEVEC
Member, IAU Commission 40, 28
Chairman, ESO User's Committee
Member ESO Contact Committee
Member FITS Working Group
Katgert
Secretary/Treasurer, Leids Kerkhoven-Bosscha Fonds
Secretary/Treasurer, Leids Sterrewacht Fonds
Secretary/Treasurer, Jan Hendrik Oort Fonds
Kuijken
Member, ASTRON Board
Member, NOVA Instrument Steering Committee
Member, ESO KMOS Instrument Science Team
Member, Board Pastoor Schmeits Fund
Member, Board Kapteyn Fund
Member, Board EARA
Member, Search Committee ASTRON General Director
Member, Search Committee astronomy professor Radbout University Nijmegen
94
APPENDIX III. SCIENCE POLCY FUNCTIONS
Member, NWO Advisory Committee Astronomy
External Member, Faculty of Natural Sciences tenure review commitee,
University of Groningen
External member, FWO-Vlaanderen Physics and Astronomy Grants Committee
Principal Investigator, NOVA OmegaCAM instrumentation project
Principal Investigator, ESO KiDS Public Survey
Co-investigator, ESO VIKING Public Survey
Co-investigator, Planetary Nebulae Spectrograph project
Chair, LOC and SOC, Oort workshop
Member, NWO STARE programme jury
Deputy network coordinator, EU 6th Framework Programme Research Training
Network ‘DUEL’
Local coordinator, EU 6th Framework Programme Research Training Network
‘SISCO’
Member, board EU 6th Framework RTD Project Astro-WISE
van Langevelde
Member, ESO STC
Chair, ESO VLTI overview committee
Member, ESO contactcommissie
Member, LOFAR international calibration review committee
Member, LOFAR DCLA review committee
Member, NOVA Instrumentation Steering Committee
Member, NOVA onderwijscommissie
Member, RadioNet Executive Board
Member, ESTRELA board
Member, EXPReS Management Team
PI, ALBUS project
PI, FABRIC project
Linnartz
Workgroup leader FOM group FOM-L-027
Workgroup leader FP6 RTN program ‘The Molecular Universe’
Member, FOM-NWO working group ‘AMO/COMOP’
Member, CW-NWO working group ‘Spectroscopy and Theory’
Member/Chairman, NWO Rubicon grant allocation committee.
Editor, Comments on Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (part of Phys.
Scripta)
APPENDIX III. SCIENCE POLCY FUNCTIONS
95
Miley
Vice President, International Astronomical Union
Chair, International Universe Awareness Steering Committee
Chair, LOFAR Research Management Committee
Member, LOFAR Astronomy research Committee
Member, Board of Governors of the LOFAR Foundation
Member, National Radio Astronomy Observatory Visiting Committee
Member, Max Planck Institut fur Radioastronomie Fachbeirat
Member, Hubble Space Telescope Time Allocation Committee
Member, Search Committee for Director of Nuffield Radio Astronomy
Laboratories, Jodrell Bank, University of Manchester
Member, Search Committee for Director of the ASTRON Foundation
Member, Board EU SKADS Project
Ollongren
Member Permanent SETI Study Group, International Astronautical Academy
(IAA)
Member IAU, Commissions 7, 33 and 51
Founding member European Astronomical Society (EAS)
Röttgering
Member, Dutch Joint Aperture Synthesis Team (DJAST)
Member, Mid-Infrared interferometric instrument for VLTI (MIDI) Science Team
Member, NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder Science Working group (TPF-SW)
Member, ESA's Terrestrial Exo-Planet Science Advisory Team (Te-SAT)
Chair, LOFAR's Astronomy Research Committee
Principle Investigator, Development and commissioning of LOFAR for
Astronomy (DCLA)
Member, Development and commissioning of LOFAR for Astronomy (DCLA)
management team
Member, LOFAR Research Management Committee (RMC)
Member, Omegacam Science team
Member, XMM Large Scale Structure Consortium
Member, SOC of EU funded graduate school “Active Galactic Nuclei at the
highest angular resolutions: Theory and Observations”
member, SOC conference “Astrophysics in the LOFAR Era'”
Member, Curatorium of the professorship at Leiden University “Experimental
Astroparticle physics”.
96
APPENDIX III. SCIENCE POLCY FUNCTIONS
Schaye
Member of the executive committee, Virgo Consortium
Member, LOFAR epoch of reionization science team
Member, MUSE science team
Member, EDGE science team
Member, ISSI team on Non-virialized X-ray components in clusters of galaxies.
Member, National research initiative e-science
Member, SOC IAU Symposium 244: ‘Dark Galaxies and Lost Baryons’
PI, Marie Curie Excellence Team
PI, OWLS collaboration
Chair, SOC and LOC of the Lorentz Center workshop ‘Computational
Cosmology’
NL-representative, Euro-VO Data Center Alliance, Theoretical astrophysics
Expert Group
Tran
Member, ESO OPC May 2006
Weijmans
Member, National Education Committee Astronomy (LOCNOC)
van der Werf
Member, JCMT Board
Member, JCMT Survey Oversight Committee (JSOC)
Principal Investigator, SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey
Principal Investigator, NOVA components of SINFONI
Co-investigator, HIFI
Member, European Instrument for SPICA (ESI) study team
Member, Far-InfraRed Interferometer (FIRI) study team
Member, VISIR Science Team
Member, JWST-MIRI European Science Team
Member, MIDIR Study Team
Member, NWO VIDI grant allocation panel
de Zeeuw
co-chair, SOC of Lorentz Center Workshop on Nuclei of Galaxies
Member, Scientific Advisory Board of New Astronomy
Member, MUSE Executive Board
Member, OPTICON Board
Member, National Committee Astronomy
Member, Steering Committee ELT Design Study
Member, ESO Council
APPENDIX III. SCIENCE POLCY FUNCTIONS
Member, KNAW
Chair, ESO Scientific Strategy Working Group
Chair, ESO Contact Committee
Chair, Space Telescope Institute Council
Leiden University Member Representative to AURA
Member, AURA Board of Directors
Member, ESA Space Science Advisory Committee
Chair, Science Vision Working Group, EU--ASTRONET
Director, Netherlands Research School for Astronomy, NOVA
97
Appendix
IV
Visiting
scientists
Name
J.A. Peacock
Y. Mellier
P. Schneider
M. Radovich
R. Silvotti
R. Saglia
E. Valentijn
Dates
Jan 20
Jan 20
Jan 20
Jan 20
Jan 20
Jan 20
Jan 20
A. van der Wel
K. Gebhardt
S. Doty
R. Morganti
A. Monachesi
I. Kamp
P. Dayal
M. Hoeft
R.J. Wilman
J.L. Cervantes
R. Morganti
R.D. Blandford
M. Elitzur
M. Mac Low
Jan 30 - Feb 1
Feb 2-3
Feb 7 - Apr 30
Feb 14
Feb 21-22
Mar 6-12
Mar 9-11
Mar 14-17
Mar 20-22
Mar - May
Apr 3
Apr 10-13
Apr 24-28
May 4
B. Matthews
P. van Dokkum
May 12-15
May 29-31
Appendix
Visiting
scientists
IV
Institute
Edinburgh, UK
IAP, Paris, France
Argelander-Institut, Bonn, Germany
Naples, Italy
Naples, Italy
MPE, Garching, Germany
Kapteyn Institute, Groningen,
Netherlands
Johns Hopkins University, USA
University of Texas, USA
Denison University, USA
ASTRON, Dwingeloo, Netherlands
La Plata Observatory, Argentina
Space Telescope Science Institute, USA
Sussex University, UK
University of Bremen, Germany
Durham University, UK
IAC Tenerife, Spain
ASTRON, Dwingeloo, Netherlands
Stanford, USA
University of Kentucky, USA
American Museum of Natural History,
USA
Herzberg Inst. for Astrophysics, Canada
Yale University, USA
102
APPENDIX IV. VISITING SCIENTISTS
G.A. Blake
N. FörsterSchreiber
S. Bertone
A. Biviano
K. Shapiro
M. Maier
D. Richstone
K. Gebhardt
R.D. Blandford
A.K.Y. Ngai
Jun 8-10 & 16-17
Jun 12-14
Caltech, USA
MPE, Garching, Germany
Jun 19-26
Jul 15-22
Jul 17 - Aug 7
Jul 18-31
Jul 20-22
Jul 20 - Aug 11
Jul 24 - Aug 5
Jul 26 - Sep 15
Sussex University, UK
Osservatorio Astronomico, Trieste, Italy
Berkeley, USA
University of Oxford, UK
University of Michigan, USA
University of Texas, USA
Stanford, USA
Radboud University Nijmegen,
Netherlands
Gemini Observatory, Hawaii USA
Johns Hopkins University, USA
University of Bristol, UK
Institut d'astrophysique de Paris, France
Strathclyde University, UK
Strathclyde University, UK
Strathclyde University, UK
University of Groningen, Netherlands
TU Braunschweig, Germany
TU Braunschweig, Germany
Oberlin College, USA
Sussex University, UK
INASAN, Moskau, Moscow, Russia
ATNF Sydney, Australia
National Center for Radio Astrophysics,
India
Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, UK
Lick Observatory, USA
UCLA, USA
University of Zurich, Switzerland
Observatoire de Lyon, France
University of Oxford, UK
University of Oxford, UK
Oxford, UK
Cambridge, UK
University of Groningen, Netherlands
B. Miller
A. van der Wel
M. Bremer
R. Jacques
H.J. Fraser
J.A. Noble
S. Baillie
G. van der Wolk
D. Heisselmann
M. Kraus
D. Hemberger
S. Bertone
M Kirsanova
S. Longmore
I. Ch.
Chenakkod
W. Thi
G. Illingworth
R.M. Rich
S. Weinmann
E. Emsellem
D. Krajnovic
M. Cappellari
D. Smith
M. Freitag
A. Blaauw
Aug 1-5
Aug 1-11
Aug 7-11
Aug 8-18
Aug 14-19
Aug 14-19
Aug 14-19
Aug 21-22
Aug 28-29
Aug 28-29
Sep 4 - Nov 11
Sep 18-22
Sep 20 - Dec 20
Oct 9-12
Oct 16-20
Oct 16-27
Oct 30 - Nov 1
Nov 4-7
Nov 14-16
Nov 23-24
Nov 23-24
Nov 23-24
Nov 28-29
Dec 5
Dec 19
Appendix
V
Workshops,
lectures,
and colloquia
in Leiden
Appendix
Workshops,
lectures and
colloquia in Leiden
V
V.1. Workshops
The workshops were held in the Lorentz Center, an international center which
coordinates and hosts workshops in the sciences. In 2006 the Leiden
astronomers contributed to the following workshops there:
February 20 - 23
Herschel Key Program
T. de Graauw, M. Griffin, P. Harvey, F.P. Helmich, G. Pilbratt, A. Poglitsch,
X. Tielens
February 28 - March 1
NIRspec Science meeting
M. Franx
March 6 - 10
The World a Jigsaw:
Tessellations in the Sciences
R. van de Weygaert, V. Icke, G. Vegter, J. Ritzerveld
April 3 - 7
Key Programs of the HIFI Consortium
X. Tielens, T. de Graauw, F.P. Helmich
April 7
Leidse Natuurkunde Middag
H. Buisman, M. Franx, E. Groenen, F. Israel
106
APPENDIX V. WORKSHOPS, LECTURES AND COLLOQUIA
July 24 - 28
Galactic Nuclei
K. Gebhardt, D.O. Richstone, R.M. McDermid, P.T. de Zeeuw
July 31 - August 4
Gravitational Lensing (Oort workshop)
R. Blandford, K.H. Kuijken, L.V.E. Koopmans, Y. Mellier, P. Schneider
September 4 - 9
Laboratory Cosmology
A. Achúcarro, A.C. Davis, G. Pickett, G. Volovik
October 9 - 13
Universe Awareness
C. Madsen, G.K. Miley, C. Odman, C. Scorza de Appl
October 24 - 27
From Brown Dwarfs to Planets: Chemistry and Cloud Formation
M. Fridlund, Ch. Helling, T. Guillot, P. Hauschildt, M.S. Marley, D. Stam, H.
Rauer
November 6 - 10
Dissecting the Milky Way
A. Helmi, H.W. Rix
November 13 - 17
Studies of Infrared Selected Galaxies
M. Franx
November 20 - 24
Astrowise
E. Valentijn, E. Deul
November 27 - December 1
Perspectives on Scientific Practice from Science and the Science Studies
D. van Delft, J.W. McAllister, R.P.W. Visser
December 6 - 8
Molecular databases for Herschel, ALMA and SOFIA
J.C. Cernicharo, E. Caux, Th. de Graauw, X. Tielens
APPENDIX V. WORKSHOPS, LECTURES AND COLLOQUIA
107
Galactic Nuclei
http://www.lorentzcenter.nl/lc/web/2006/207/info.php3?wsid=207
During July 24-28th, McDermid and de Zeeuw, together with Richstone
(Michigan) and Gebhardt (Austin), co-organized a workshop on the nuclei of
‘normal’ early-type galaxies. This workshop brought together key members of
two international research teams: the European “SAURON” team, and the
American “NUKER” team; to discuss the latest developments in the field of
galaxy nuclei, dynamical modeling of galaxies, and galaxy structure and
evolution. In addition, key collaborators of these teams were also invited to
broaden the discussion topics, which ranged from black-hole mass scaling
relations, to massive galaxy formation in clusters. Several collaborative projects
were started between the teams, including a joint program using the Gemini
telescope to study massive black holes in galaxy centers. Sharing of data and
cross-checking of results and methods were initiated, and a number of
manuscripts in preparation were shared between the groups, triggering
feedback and discussion. These interactions have lead to several joint observing
proposals, and collaboration on papers now in progress.
V.2. Endowed Lectures
Date
Speaker (affiliation)
Title
Apr 12
Roger Blandford (KIPAC)
Dec 6
Charles Steidel (Caltech)
Exploring the Distant Universe with
Gravitational Telescopes (Oort lecture)
Galaxy Formation: What are we
missing? (Sackler Lecture)
V.3. Scientific Colloquia
Date
Speaker (affiliation)
Title
Jan 12
Inge Loes ten Kate
(Leiden University)
Conny Aerts (Katholieke
Universiteit Leuven)
Laboratory studies of organic material
under simulated martian conditions
Asteroseismology: from the Sun to Stars
Jan 19
108
APPENDIX V. WORKSHOPS, LECTURES AND COLLOQUIA
Jan 26
Feb 2
Andrea Ferrara (SISSA)
Karl Gebhardt
(University of Texas)
Feb 9
Feb 16
Wim Hermsen (SRON)
Eline Tolstoy
(Rijksuniversiteit Groningen)
Juergen Blum (Technische
Universität zu Braunschweig)
John Faulkner
(UC Santa Cruz and
Sternwarte München)
Andreas Quirrenbach
(Sterrewacht Leiden)
Matthias Hoeft (International
University Bremen)
Hans van der Marel
(TU Delft)
Kim-Vy Tran
(Sterrewacht Leiden &
Center for Astrophysics)
Stephen Shectman (Carnegie)
Simon Jeffery
(Armagh Observatory)
Moshe Elitzur
(University of Kentucky &
LAOG, Grenoble)
Mordecai-Mark Mac Low
(American Museum of
Natural History)
Roderik Overzier
(Sterrewacht Leiden)
Daniel Schaerer
(Observatoire de Geneve)
Sijme-Jan Paardekooper
(Sterrewacht Leiden)
Bastiaan Jonkheid
(Sterrewacht Leiden)
Nicholas Walton (Institute of
Astronomy, Cambridge)
Gustavo Bruzual
(CIDA, Venezuela)
Feb 22
Mar 2
Mar 9
Mar 16
Mar 23
Mar 30
Apr 6
Apr 20
Apr 27
May 4
May 18
Jun 1
Jun 8
Jun 15
Jun 22
Jun 29
First Stars and the Cosmic Dawn
Black Holes of All Masses:
Understanding the Fundamental
Correlations
Science High Lights from INTEGRAL
Chemo-dynamics of dwarf spheroidal
galaxies
Planet Formation in the Laboratory
Standing on the shoulders of dwarfs:
How and why stars become red giants
Direct and Indirect Detection of
Extrasolar Planets
The radio signature of structure
formation shock
Galileo
The Origin of Early-Type Galaxies in
Rich Clusters
The Giant Magellan Telescope
Evolution and Pulsations of Extreme
Helium Stars
The AGN obscuring torus - end of the
"bagel" paradigm?
Control of Star Formation in Galaxies
by Gravitational Instability and
Supersonic Turbulence
Protoclusters
High redshift lensed galaxies observed
with the VLT, HST and Spitzer
Growing and Moving Planets in Disks
Chemistry in Evolving Protoplanetary
Disks
Virtual Observatory (TBD)
Stellar Population Models at High
Spectral Resolution
APPENDIX V. WORKSHOPS, LECTURES AND COLLOQUIA
Jul 25
Jul 28
Sep 7
Sep 14
Sep 21
Sep 29
Oct 5
Oct 12
Roger Blandford
(Kavli Institute)
Roger Blandford
(Kavli Institute)
Richard Manchester (ATNF)
Søren Larsen
(Universiteit van Utrecht)
Shri Kulkarni (Caltech)
Willy Kley (Tübingen)
Robert Kennicutt
(Cambridge)
Wim Ubachs (Vrije
Universiteit Amsterdam)
Oct 19
Rowin Meijerink
(Sterrewacht Leiden)
Oct 26
Jean-Pierre Lebreton
(ESA)
Nov 2
Rob Ivison
(Edinburgh/Hertfordshire)
Ken Freeman (ANU)
Ian Bonell
(St. Andrews)
Nov 9
Nov 16
Nov 23
Ravi Sheth (Upenn)
Nov 30
Rachel Somerville
(MPIA)
Dec 14
Stephane Udry
(Geneva)
109
B1608+656: a case study in
gravitational lensing
The future of strong lensing
Pulsars and Gravity
Star Clusters as Building Blocks of
Galaxies
An Explosion of Cosmic Explosions
Evolution of Extrasolar Planetary
Systems
Nearby Galaxies as Revealed by the
Spitzer Space Telescope
Precision Spectroscopy of H2 and a
Possible Variation of mpme over
Cosmological Time
Models of the Interstellar Medium in
Galaxy Center
(PhD thesis colloquium)
The Cassini-Huygens Mission around
Saturn: Lifting Titan's veil after
Huygens landing
Submm Cosmology: Witnessing the
Formation of Elliptical Galaxies
The Dynamical History of the Galaxy
Star Formation: From Molecular
Clouds To Stellar Masses
(NOVA colloquium)
The Halo Model of Large Scale
Structure (NOVA colloquium)
Mass Assembly and Downsizing:
Hierarchical Models Confront
Observations (NOVA colloquium)
Radial-Velocity Planet Search: Fruitful
Past and Bright Future
110
APPENDIX V. WORKSHOPS, LECTURES AND COLLOQUIA
V.4. Student Colloquia
Date
Speaker (affiliation)
Title
Jan 23
Marieke van Duin
Feb 21
Rogier Ensing
Mar 22
Franco Maschietto
Apr 4
Dave van Eijck
May 15
Guido Kosters
Jun 26
Demerese Salter
Aug 15
Aug 15
Aug 16
Paul Verburg
Eveline Helder
Sebastiaan Veijgen
Aug 16
Jan-Pieter Paardekooper
Aug 18
German Chaparro
Aug 18
Oct 20
Oct 31
Stefan van Dongen
Evelyn de Wachter
Arno Kockx
Nov 13
Raymond Oonk
Massive star formation in W49A N
Confirmed HL 427
Over de Verhandelingen van het
Koninklijk Magnetisch en
Meteorologisch Observatorium te
Batavia, 1911-1949
Sampling the world with point
processes
Concept study for ARTEMIS. A
Revolutionary TEchnique for MidInfrared Surveys
H2 emission from the central region of
the merger galaxy NGC 6240
The Evolutions State of Embedded Lada
Class I Young Stellar Objects in the rho
Ophiuchus Dark Cloud
Radiating Planetary Nebulae
Gas orbits in a barred galaxy
Wolf-Rayet stars: The variability of
WR 103
Leiden Hydrodynamics with SimpleX
Radiative Transfer
Capture of young fly-by stars by a
cluster of stellar-mass black holes
around the supermassive black hole
at SgrA*
Stacking analysis of 2 < z < 3.5 galaxies
Silicon Solar Cells
Gravitational Lensing And The Mass
Distribution In Abell 1689
Compact Galaxies in the Submm
Appendix
VI
Participation
in scientific
meetings
Appendix
Participation
in scientific
meetings
VI
Albrecht
SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation, Orlando, Florida ,
USA; May 24 - 31
‘10-micron interferometry of the disk and wind of the massive young star
MWC349A’
Observation and Data Reduction with the Very Large Telescope
Interferometer, Goutelas, France; June 5 - 16
Beirao
Studying Galaxy Evolution with Spitzer and Herschel (Agios Nicolaos,
Greece; May 28-June 2)
'Spitzer-IRS Spectroscopy of the Central Region of M82’
IPAC Symposium (Pasadena, USA; Oct 3-5)
'Spitzer-IRS Spectroscopy of the Central Region of M82’
Bisschop
Complex Molecules in space present status with ALMA (Mols, Denmark;
May 8-11)
‘Testing grain-surface chemistry through observations’
Brandl
SPIE Conference on Telescopes and Instrumentation (Orlando, Florida;
May 23-31)
‘MIDIR/T-OWL, the thermal/mid-IR Instrument for the E-ELT’
ULIRG Workshop (Cornell/Ithaca, USA; Jun 17-22)
‘Spitzer-IRS Spectroscopy of Starburst Galaxies’
IAU General Assembly (Prague, Czechia; Aug 13-19)
114
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
Toward the E-ELT (Marseille, France; Nov 26-Dec 1)
Brinch
Disks2006 (Vidago, Portugal; Sep 18-23)
‘High Resolution Imaging of L1489 IRS. A Protoplanetary Disk in Formation?’
PLANETS meeting (Heidelberg, Germany; 25-28)
‘Probing Disk Formation with Molecular Lines’
ALMA2006 (Madrid, Spain; Nov 13-17)
‘High Resolution Imaging of L1489 IRS. A Protoplanetary Disk in Formation?’
Brown
Gaia Coordination Unit 3 'Core Processing' meeting (Heidelberg,
Germany, Feb 23-24)
Gaia Coordination Unit 8 'Astrophysical Parameters' meeting (Nice,
France, Mar 16-17)
‘Details of the new photometric instrument’
Gaia Coordination Unit 4 'Object Processing' meeting (Brussels, Belgium,
Apr 3-5)
‘Details of the new photometric instrument’
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Ameland, Netherlands,
May 10-12)
‘Gaia: the new EADS-Astrium design and plans for data processing’
Gaia joint Coordination Unit 2 'Simulations' and CU5 'Photometric
Processing' meeting (Barcelona, Spain, June 6-9)
‘Multi-colour photometry with dispersed images in the new Gaia design’
XXVIth IAU General Assembly (Prague, Czech Republic, Aug 21-25)
‘Gaia - Taking the Galactic Census: Where are we now? (Commission 8)’
‘Gaia - Taking the Galactic Census (Gaia fringe meeting)’
Gaia Coordination Unit 5 'Photometric Processing' meeting (Cambridge,
United Kingdom, Sep 25-26)
Gaia Initial Data Treatment meeting (Barcelona, Spain, Oct 16-17)
‘Initial data treatment and CU5’
Lorentz Center workshop: Dissecting the Milky Way (Leiden,
Netherlands, Nov 6-10)
‘Gaia - Taking the Galactic Census'
Gaia Coordination Unit 5 'Photometric Processing' calibration meeting
(Barcelona, Spain, Dec 13-14)
‘CU5 and Initial Data Treatment/ Intermediate Data Update’
‘BP/RP wavelength calibration’
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
115
Cuppen
Molecular databases for Herschel, ALMA and SOFIA (Leiden, Dec 6-8)
‘Monte Carlo Studies of Surface Chemistry’
Dalla Vecchia
Virgo Meeting (Nottingham, United Kingdom; Jun 07-09)
‘OWLS project: star formation history’
Heating vs. Cooling in Galaxies and Clusters of Galaxies (Garching,
Germany; Aug 06-11)
Damen
Cosmic Frontiers (Durham, UK, Jul 31 - Aug 4)
IAU General Assembly (Prague, Czech Republic, Aug 14-24)
Studies of Infrared Selected Galaxies (Leiden, Nov 13-17)
van Dishoeck
Astrobiology Science Conference (Washington, USA; Mar 26-28)
‘Chemistry in star- and planet-forming regions: ice cold and steaming hot’
(invited talk)
Molecules in Space, American Chemical Society (Atlanta, USA;
Mar 28-31)
‘The physical and chemical structure of protostellar envelopes: ice cold and
steaming hot’ (invited talk)
Spitzer ‘Cores to Disks’ IRS Legacy Team Meeting (Austin, USA;
Apr 2-4)
‘Overview of Spitzer c2d IRS results’
Herschel-HIFI Water in Star-Forming Regions KP Meeting (Leiden,
Netherlands; Apr 6-7)
‘Water observations of low-mass protostars; meeting summary’
Chemical Evolution of the Universe (St. Jacut, France; Apr 24-26)
‘Photoprocesses in protoplanetary disks’ (invited paper)
Complex Molecules in Space (Fuglsoe, Denmark; May 8-11)
‘ALMA and chemistry surveys’ (invited review)
Spitzer ‘Cores to Disks’ Legacy Team Meeting (Flagstaff, USA;
May 14-21)
‘Overview of Spitzer c2d IRS results’
Highlights in Astrochemistry and Astrobiology (Heidelberg, Germany;
May 29)
‘Astrochemical evolution from low-mass YSOs to protoplanetary disks’
116
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
The Planet-Disc Connection (Cambridge, UK; Jul 19-21)
‘Spitzer spectroscopy of transitional disks in the c2d legacy survey’
(invited talk)
IAU XXVI General Assembly (Prague, Czech Republic; Aug 15-22)
‘Solid-state data needs for infrared astronomy’
From Dust to Planetesimals (Ringberg, Germany; Sep 11-12)
‘Spitzer spectroscopy of dust in disks’ (invited review)
Massive star formation: a meeting honoring Malcolm Walmsley
(Bonn, Germany; Oct 23)
EU-PLANET Network Meeting
(Heidelberg, Germany; Oct 25-28)
‘Overview of Spitzer-IRS results from the c2d legacy program’
Science with ALMA: a New Era for Astrophysics
(Madrid, Spain; Nov 8-11)
‘Star formation with ALMA’ (invited review)
Molecular Databases for Herschel, ALMA and SOFIA
(Leiden, Netherlands; Dec 6-8)
van Delft
Museum Boerhaave en (modern) verzamelen (Bergen aan Zee,
Netherlands; May 16-17)
Perspectives on Scientific Practice from Science and the Science Studies
(Lorentz Center Leiden, Netherlands; Nov 27-Dec 1)
Franx
ESO ELT-Science Working Group (Garching, Germany; Jan 16-17)
ESO ELT-Science Working Group (Garching, Germany; Feb 17)
ESO ELT-SWG and ELT-ESE (Garching, Germany; Mar 21-23)
Muse science team (Lyon, France; Mar 6-7)
Galaxies and Structures through Cosmic Times (Venice, Italy; Mar 27-29)
ELT-ESE (Garching, Germany; Apr 21)
ESO ELT-SWG and ELT-ESE (Garching, Germany; Apr 27-28)
UDS team meeting (Nottingham, UK; Jun 15-16)
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (Cambridge, USA;
Jul 28 - August 19)
VISTA survey meeting (Edinburgh, UK; Jun 20-21)
JWST Science Working Group (Montreal, Canada; Jun 27-29)
New Cosmology Results from the Spitzer Space Telescope, IAU-JD15
(Prague, Czech Republic; Aug 21-23)
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
117
Galaxy Evolution across the Hubble Time IAU 235 (Prague, Czech
Republic;
Aug 16-18)
ESO ELT-ESE meeting (Garching, Germany; Sep 13-15)
ESO ELT-SWG meeting (Garching, Germany; Sep 20-21)
ACS Science Team meeting (Jackson Hole, USA; Sep 24-30)
ESO ELT-SWG and Instrument working group meeting (Garching,
Germany; Oct 4-5)
JWST Science Working Group (Goddard, USA; Oct 23-24)
Yale University (New Haven, USA; Oct 25-26)
Nirspec Science Team (Paris, France; Nov 2-3)
Towards the European ELT (Marseille, France; Nov 28-December 1)
Fuchs
NASA Astrophysics workshop (Las Vegas, NV, USA; Feb 14-16)
Faraday Discussion 133 (St.Jacut de la Mer, France; Apr 24-26)
Molecular Database for Herschel, AlMA and Sofia (Lorentz Center,
Leiden, The Netherlands, Dec 6-8)
Geers
ISM-CSM meeting (Amsterdam, Netherlands; Mar 15)
c2d IRS team meeting (Austin, USA; Apr 2-7)
IoA Conference: Planet-Disc connection (Cambridge, UK; Jul 17-21)
‘PAHs in circumstellar disks around T Tauri stars’
Ringberg Workshop: From Dust to Planetesimals (Ringberg, Germany;
Sep 11-15)
‘PAHs in T Tauri Disks’
Workshop: Physical processes in circumstellar disks around young stars
(Vidago, Portugal; Sep 18-22)
‘PAHs in circumstellar disks around T Tauri stars’
ISM-CSM meeting (Leiden, Netherlands; Oct 10)
‘PAHs in T Tauri Disks’
Haas
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Ameland, The Netherlands;
May 10-12)
‘A maximum star cluster mass in the disk of M51’
118
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
Mass loss from stars and the evolution of stellar clusters (Lunteren,
Netherlands; May 29 - Jun 1)
‘Variation of the cluster luminosity function across the disk of M51’
NOVA Fall School (Dwingeloo, Netherlands, Oct 9-13)
Hekker
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Ameland, Netherlands;
May 10-12)
‘Analysis of line profile variations of pulsating red giants’
Exo-planets (Geneva, Swiss; Jun 28-30)
SOHO 18/ GONG 2006/ HelAs 1 Beyond the spherical sun (Sheffield,
Great Britain; Aug 7-11)
‘A line profile analysis of the pulsating red giant star Epsilon Ophiuchi (G9.5III)’
Cool stars conference (Pasadena, United States; Nov 6-10
‘Can star spots mimic the long term sinusoidal radial velocity variations in
observed red giants?’
‘A line profile analysis of the pulsating red giant star Epsilon Ophiuchi (G9.5III)’
Hill
Fifth IRAM Millimeter Interferometry School (Grenoble, France; Oct 2-6)
Workshop on Measurement of Atmospheric Water Vapour: Theory,
Techniques, Astronomical and Geodetic Applications (Wettzell /
Hoellenstein, Germany; Oct 9-11)
Science with ALMA: a new era for astrophysics (Madrid, Spain;
Nov 13-17)
‘Profiling young massive stars’
Hogerheijde
Spitzer Legacy team “Cores to Disks” IRS team meeting (Austin TX,
USA; Apr 1-5)
Herschel/HIFI Key program meeting (Leiden, Netherlands; Apr 6-7)
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Ameland, Netherlands;
May 10-12)
Disks 2006 (Vidago, Portugal; Sep 17-23)
Hopman
Galactic Center Workshop 2006 (Bad-Honnef, Germany; Apr 18-22)
‘Resonant Relaxation near the Massive Black Hole in the Galactic Center’
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
119
6th International LISA Symposium (Goddard Space Flight Center
Greenbelt, Maryland, USA, Jun 19-23)
‘Astrophysics of extreme mass ratio inspiral sources’
LISA [email protected] (Golm, Germany, Sep 18-22)
‘The astrophysics of EMRIs’
Icke
Workshop Tessellations (Lorentz Centre, Leiden, Netherlands; Mrt 6-9)
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Ameland, The Netherlands; May
10-12)
‘The sound of a tessellated star’
Red Rectangle Conference (Charlottesville, USA; May 22-25)
‘Shock Shapes and Toroidal Obstructions’
VU Conferentie ‘Fast & Slow’ (Nov 23)
‘Hoe lang duurt een ontdekking?’
Science and greasepaint (Lorentz Centre, Leiden, Netherlands; Nov 30)
Israel
Workshop on Dwarf Galaxies as Astrophysical and Cosmological
Probes (Schloss Ringberg, Tegernsee, Germany; Mar 12-17)
Invited Review: ‘Cold Dust in Dwarf Galaxies’
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Ameland, Netherlands;
May 10-12)
Large Astronomical Infrastructures at CONCORDIA, prospects and
constraints for Antarctic optical/IR Astronomy (Roscoff, France;
Oct 16-19)
Invited Review: ‘Modern Views of the Magellanic Clouds’
Jaffe
Director, NEVEC
Member, IAU Commission 40, 28
Chairman, ESO User's Committee
Member ESO Contact Committee
Member FITS Working Group
120
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
Koehler
IAU Symp. No. 240, ‘Binary Stars as Critical Tools and Tests in
Contemporary Astrophysics’, IAU General Assembly (Prague, Czech
Republic, Aug 21-26)
Two contributions:
‘Binary Stars in the Orion Nebula Cluster’
‘The Orbit of T Tauri South’
Kriek
Galaxies and Structures Through Cosmic Times (Venice, Italy; Mar 26-31)
‘Spectroscopic Confirmation of Evolved Galaxies at z~2.5’
Cosmic Frontiers (Durham, UK; Jul 31 - Aug 4)
‘Suppressed Star Formation in Massive z~2.5 Galaxies’
Galaxy Evolution across the Hubble Time (IAU S235) (Prague, Czech
Rep., Aug 14-17)
‘Spectroscopic Identification of Massive z~2.5 Galaxies with Strongly Suppressed
Star Formation’
Massive Galaxies over Cosmic Time 2 (Tucson (AZ), USA; Nov 1-3)
‘AGNs and Suppressed Star Formation in Massive z~2.5 Galaxies’
Kuijken
Galaxies and Structures through Cosmic Times - Mapping the Universe
(Venice, Italy; Mar 27 - 31)
‘KiDS: Mapping the universe with weak lensing’
Cosmology, Galaxy Formation and Astroparticle Physics on the Pathway
to the SKA (Oxford, UK;Apr 10-12)
‘Weak Lensing on the Pathway to SKA’
Euro Science Open Forum 2006 (Munich, Germany; Jul 18 - 19)
‘Studying dark energy with light rays’
IAU General Assembly, Joint Discussion on Virtual Observatory
(Prague, Czech Republic, Aug 14-19)
Large Surveys and the VO Gravitational Lensing KITP Study
Programme (KITP, Santa Barbara, USA, Oct 2-20)
‘KiDS: Studying Dark Matter and Dark Energy with Light Rays’
van Langevelde
RadioNet FP7 brainstorm, (Volterra, Italy; Apr 20)
‘Proposals for JRA's on algorithm and software development’
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
121
Next Generation Correlator workshop (Groningen, Netherlands;
Jun 27-29)
‘FABRIC, a pilot study of distributed correlation’
EVN symposium (Torun, Poland; Sep 26-29)
‘Data processing software for Radio Astronomy’
ALMA Science symposium (Madrid, Spain; Nov 13-17)
Linnartz
CW meeting 'Spectroscopy and theory' (Lunteren, Netherlands, Jan)
Dutch inter/circumstellar matter meeting (Amsterdam, Netherlands,
Mar)
Faraday Discussions 'Chemical evolution of the universe' (St. Jacut,
France, Apr)
Carbon in space meeting (Menaggio, Italy, May)
Nobel symposium on cosmic chemistry and molecular astrophysics
(Soedertuna, Sweden, Jun)
1st international workshop on infrared plasma spectroscopy (Greifswald,
Germany, Jun)
Cavity ring down user meeting (Cork, Ireland, Sep)
Dutch inter/circumstellar matter meeting (Leiden, Netherlands, Oct)
Molecular databases for Herschel, ALMA and SOFIA (Leiden,
Netherlands, Dec)
Lommen
IoA Conference 2006: The Planet-Disc Connection (Cambridge,
United Kingdom; Jul 17-21)
‘Observing grain growth in protoplanetary disks’
Disks2006 (Vidago, Portugal; Sep 18-23)
‘SMA observations of Elias 29 and IRS 63: two of Class I, not two of a kind’
Fifth IRAM Interferometry School (Grenoble, France; Oct 2-6)
‘SMA observations of Elias 29 and IRS 63: two of Class I, not two of a kind’
McDermid
Fine-Tuning Stellar Population Models (Lorentz Centre, Leiden,
Netherlands; Jun 26-30)
‘Young Nuclei in Early-Type Galaxies’
Fate of Gas in Galaxies (Dwingeloo, Netherlands; Jul 12-14)
‘Connecting stars and ionised gas with integral-field spectroscopy’
122
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
IAU General Assembly (Prague, Czech Republic; Aug 21-26
‘Stellar Populations of Kinematically Decoupled Cores in E/S0 Galaxies’
Stellar Populations as Building Blocks of Galaxies (La Palma, Spain;
Dec 10-16)
‘Kinematically and Chemically Decoupled Cores in E/S0 Galaxies with SAURON
and OASIS’
Miley
Second Universe Awareness Workshop (Lorentz Center, Leiden;
Oct 9-13)
‘Universe Awareness, an international inspirational programme for
disadvantaged children’
IAU General Assembly (Prague, Czech Republic; Aug 21-26)
‘Universe Awareness, an international inspirational programme for
disadvantaged children’
Oberg
Faraday Discussions 133: Chemical Evolution of the Universe (Abbaye
de St Jacut, France; Apr 24-26)
Young Researchers' meeting on Astrochemistry (London, UK; Sep 21)
‘Is interstellar ice dirty - and does it matter?’
Oliveira
EU Planet Network (Heidelberg, Germany; Oct 26-27)
Omar
MeqTree Workshop 2006 (Dwingeloo, Netherlands; Oct 16-27)
Overzier
The fate of gas in galaxies (Dwingeloo, Netherlands; Jul 12-14)
‘The formation of brightest cluster galaxies’
Panic
Complex Molecules in Space - Present status and prospects with ALMA,
(Aarhus, Denmark; May 8-11)
Summer school on Molecular Astrophysics (Ile de Berder, France;
Aug 28-Sep 1)
Disks2006: Workshop on Physical Processes in Circumstellar Disks
around Young Stars (Vidago, Portugal; 18-23 Sep)
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
123
‘The disk around HD169142 resolved in 13CO/C18O J=2-1 lines using the SMA’
Fifth IRAM Millimeter Interferometry School (Grenoble, France; Oct 2-6)
‘The disk around HD169142 resolved in 13CO/C18O J=2-1 lines using the SMA’
Science with ALMA: a new era for Astrophysics (Madrid, Spain; 13-17
Nov)
‘The disk around HD169142 resolved in 13CO/C18O J=2-1 lines using the SMA’
Pawlik
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Ameland, Netherlands,
May 10-12)
Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics (Trieste, Italy, Jul 10-21)
NOVA Fall School (Dwingeloo, Netherlands, Oct 9-13)
Röttgering
LOFAR workshop (Cambridge, UK; Feb 9)
‘Extragalactic surveys with LOFAR’
Darwin science team meeting (Estec, Noordwijk, Netherlands, Apr 3-4)
SKA conference (Oxford, UK Apr 11-12)
‘LOFAR - Opening up a new window on the Universe’
TPF science working group meeting (Washington, USA, May 7-9)
TPF science working group meeting (Boulder, USA, Sept 21-22)
LOFAR calibration review (Groningen, Netherlands, Nov 5-7)
Darwin/TPF workshop (Pasadena, USA, Nov 8-12)
‘General astrophysics with Darwin/TPF’
Fires workshop (Leiden, Nov 13-17)
Darwin science team meeting (Estec, Noordwijk, Netherlands, Dec 7-8)
Salter
ISM/CSM Meeting (Amsterdam, Netherlands; Mar 15)
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Ameland, Netherlands; May
10-12)
'The Evolutionary State of Embedded Class I YSOs in rho Ophiuchus' (Poster)
ISM/CSM Meeting (Leiden, Netherlands; Oct 10)
Schaye
MUSE Science team meeting (Lyon, France; Mar 7-8)
‘Simulations of Lyman alpha and absorption line systems’
The Scientific Requirements for Estremo/WFXRT (Bologna, Italy;
May 4-5)
‘What can we learn from the WHIM? (invited)’
124
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
Virgo Collaboration Meeting (Nottingham, U.K.; Jun 7-9)
‘The OWLS project’
The First Stars and Evolution of the Early Universe (Seattle, USA; Jul 3-7)
Non-virialized X-ray Components in Clusters of Galaxies (Bern,
Switzerland; Oct 30 - Nov 3)
‘Simulating the WHIM (invited)’
The Kennicutt-Schmidt Law (San Diego, USA; Dec 18-19)
van Scherpenzeel
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Ameland, Netherlands;
May 10-12)
Schnitzeler
IGPS annual meeting (Calgary, Canada; May 28-30)
‘The WENSS and Dwingeloo surveys and the Galactic magnetic field’
(oral presentation)
Turbulence in the magnetized interstellar medium (Perm, Russia;
Sep 6-8)
Idem
Smit
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Ameland, Netherlands;
May 10-12)
‘Light Weighed: Weak Lensing with KIDS’
Statistical Challenges in Modern Astronomy IV (State College, USA;
Jun 6-15)
Gravitational Lensing (Oort Workshop) (Leiden, Netherlands;
Jul 31 - Aug 4)
Astronomical Image Processing Workshop (Dubrovnik, Croatia; Sep 4-8)
AstroWISE Workshop (Leiden, Netherlands; Nov 20-24)
Snijders
IAU General Assembly (Prague, Czech Republic; Aug 14-23)
IAU S237: Triggered Star Formation in a Turbulent ISM (Prague,
Czech Republic; Aug 1-18)
IAU JD14: Modeling Dense Stellar Systems (Prague, Czech Republic;
Aug 22-23)
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
125
Stuik
SPIE conference on Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation 2006Advancements in Adaptive Optics II (Orlando, USA; May 24-31)
‘ASSIST: The Adaptive Secondary Setup and Instrument Stimulator’
SPIE conference on Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation 2006Advancements in Adaptive Optics II (Orlando, USA; May 24-31)
‘HORATIO: The Leiden High-Order Adaptive Optics Testbed’
Towards the European ELT (Marseille, France; Nov 26 - Dec1)
Taylor
Cosmic Frontiers (Cardiff, England; Jul 31-Aug 4)
‘The Emergence of the Red Sequence at z~1.5’ (Poster)
IAU General Assembly (Prague, Czech; Aug 14-25)
‘On Star Formation and Dark Galaxies’
Torstensson
Tenth Summer Synthesis Imaging Workshop (Albuquerque, NM, USA;
Jun 13-20)
8th EVN Symposium 2006 (Torun, Poland; Sep 26-29)
NOVA Fall School 2006 (Dwingeloo, Netherlands; Oct 9-13)
Tran
Cosmic Frontiers (Durham, UK; Jul 31 - Aug 04)
‘A Keck Spectroscopic Survey of MS1054: Assembling the Red Sequence’
Vermaas
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Ameland, Netherlands;
May 10-12)
Dust and gas in ULIRGs (Cornell, USA; Jun 19-22)
NOVA Fall School (Dwingeloo, Netherlands; Oct 9-13)
‘Starburst galaxies and ULIRGs in Near Infrared’
Visser
Chemistry of Planets (Glasgow, Scotland; Jan 5-6)
ISM/CSM Meeting (Amsterdam, Netherlands; Mar 15)
Faraday Discussion 133: Chemical Evolution of the Universe (St. Jacut de
la Mer, France; Apr 24-26)
Modeling Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Circumstellar Disks:
Chemistry and IR Emission Disks 2006 (Vidago, Portugal; Sep 18-23)
126
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
Modeling Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Circumstellar Disks:
Chemistry and IR Emission PLANET Network meeting (Heidelberg,
Germany; Oct 26-27)
de Vries
The Role of Black Holes in Galaxy Formation and Evolution (Potsdam,
Germany; Sep 10-13)
Weijmans
SAURON team meeting (Oxford, UK; Jan 11-13)
VADER team meeting (Garching, Germany; Feb 3-5)
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Ameland, Netherlands;
May 10-12)
SAURON team meeting (Garching, Germany; May 16-18)
The Fate of the Gas in Galaxies (Dwingeloo, Netherlands; Jul 12-14)
‘Dark matter in NGC 2974: mapping the gas from 100pc to 10kpc scales’
Galactic Nuclei (Leiden, Netherlands; Jul 24-28)
IAU General Assembly (Prague, Tsjech Republic; Aug 14-25)
‘Dark matter in NGC 2974: from 100pc to 10kpc scales’
van der Werf
‘Gas and dust in ULIRGs’ (Ithaca, USA; Jun 19-22)
Wiersma
Nederlands Astronomen Conferentie (Ameland, Netherlands, May 10-12)
CHEMODYNAMICS: From first stars to local galaxies (Lyon, France,
Jul 10-14)
Kingston in Kingston: From Stars to Halos (Kingston, Canada, Jul 17-21)
Wuyts
Galaxy Evolution with Spitzer and Herschel (Agios Nikolaos, Crete;
May 28 - Jun 2)
Cosmic Frontiers (Durham, UK; Jul 31 - Aug 4)
de Zeeuw
OPTICON FP7 Planning Meeting (Edinburgh, Scotland; Jun 22-23)
‘Developing a Science Vision for Europe’
IAU General Assembly (Prague, Czech Republic; Aug 11-25)
‘Developing a Science Vision for Europe’
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
127
‘Concluding Remarks JD13: Exploiting Large Scale Surveys for Galactic
Astronomy’
Lorentz Center Workshop on Nuclei of Galaxies; (Leiden, Netherlands,
Jul 24-28
Lorentz Center Workshop on Dissecting the Milky Way; (Leiden,
Netherlands, Nov 6-10)
‘What of we had all GAIA data tomorrow?’
Appendix
VII
Observing
sessions
abroad
Albrecht
ESO (Paranal Observatory, Chile; Aug 9-16)
Bottinelli
eSMA:SMA/JCMT/CSO (Mauna Kea, USA; Dec 12-13)
GBT (Green Bank, USA; Dec 26-Jan 8)
Brinch
Submillimeter Array (Mauna Kea, USA; Feb 14-21)
Geers
VLT-ISAAC & VISIR (Paranal, Chile; Apr 17-19)
VLT-VISIR (Paranal, Chile; May 3-8)
Hekker
IAC, TNG (La Palma, Spain; Jan 9)
Lick Observatory, CAT (San Jose, USA; Feb 20-25)
Lick Observatory, CAT (San Jose, USA; Apr 28 - May 3)
IAC, TNG (La Palma, Spain; May 17)
Lick Observatory, CAT (San Jose, USA; Aug 19-24)
Lick Observatory, CAT (San Jose, USA; Nov 13-18)
Israel
IRAM 30 m Telescope (Granada, Spain; Jul 4-10)
Jaffe
Cerro Paranal (Paranal, Chile, Sep 10-11)
VII
Appendix
Observing
sessions
abroad
132
APPENDIX VII. OBSERVING SESSIONS ABROAD
Kriek
Gemini-South (Pachon, Chile; Jan 17-21)
Gemini-South (Pachon, Chile; Feb 21-25)
VLT (Paranal, Chile; Mar 1-3)
Gemini-South (Pachon, Chile; Dec 15-19)
van Langevelde
eSMA, JCMT (Mauna Kea, Hawaii USA.; Dec 16-17)
Lommen
SMA (Mauna Kea, USA; Oct 27-31)
eSMA (Mauna Kea, USA; Nov 7-8)
McDermid
WHT (La Palma, Spain; May 27 - Jun )
Miley
(Paranal, Chile; Nov 17-28)
Oliveira
Roque de los Muchachos Observatory 4.2m WHT (La Palma, Spain; May 4-5)
Roque de los Muchachos Observatory 3.58m TNG (La Palma, Spain; Jun 29 Jul 1)
Panic
Submillimeter Array (Mauna Kea, Big Island, Hawaii, USA; Oct 30-Nov 06)
Röttgering
GMRT (Pune, India, Jan 10-18)
WHT (La Palma, Spain, Dec 12-17)
Salter
ESA's Zero-G Airbus A300 Microgravity Laboratory, 45th Parabolic Flight
Campaign (Bordeaux, France; Oct 16-18)
van Scherpenzeel
Observatorio del Roque de Muchachos 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope (La
Palma; Sep 13-23)
van Starkenburg
Observatory 1 (Paranal, Chile; Apr 17-18)
APPENDIX VII. OBSERVING SESSIONS ABROAD
Torstensson
eSMA (Hilo, HI, USA; Dec 12-13)
JCMT (Hilo, HI, USA; Dec 15-18)
Tran
Magellan Observatory (La Serena, Chile; Feb 26 - Mar 1)
Visser
ESO-Very Large Telescope (Paranal, Chile; May 3-8)
Weijmans
William Herschel Telescope (La Palma, Spain; Feb 24-27)
Isaac Newton Telescope (La Palma, Spain; Apr 6-11)
William Herschel Telescope (La Palma, Spain; Sep 15-22)
3.5m Telescope (Calar Alto, Spain; Dec 22-26)
van der Werf
ESO (Paranal, Chile; Apr 7)
ESO (Paranal, Chile; Apr 17-18)
ESO (Paranal, Chile; Aug 15)
133
Appendix
VIII
Working
visits
abroad
Appendix
Working
visits
abroad
VIII
Albrecht
MPI für Astronomie (Heidelberg, Germany; Nov 27 - Dec 02 )
Beirao
Spitzer Science Center (Pasadena, USA; Jul 5-Dec 22)
Bottinelli
JCMT (Hilo, USA; Dec 8-11, 14-20)
Institute for Astronomy (Honolulu, USA; Dec 21-22)
Brandl
Observatoire de Geneve (Geneva, Switzerland; Feb 28 - Mar 2)
Spitzer Science Center (Pasadena, USA; Apr 26-29)
MIRI EC meeting (Copenhagen, Denmark; May 3-5)
IRS Team Meeting (Cornell/Ithaca, USA; Jun 22-24)
MIRI Software Meeting (Leuven, Belgium; Jul 17-19)
MIRI EC meeting (Madrid, Spain; Sep 25-28)
ELT DS Progress Meeting (Garching, Germany; Nov 8-9)
Brinch
Institut D'Astrophysique de Paris (Paris, France; Jan 15-29)
Institut D'Astrophysique de Paris (Paris, France; Jun 8-10)
Damen
Carnegie Observatories (Pasadena, USA; Apr 24 - May 7 )
Yale University (New Haven, USA; Apr 3-24)
Carnegie Observatories (Pasadena, USA; Dec 9-20)
138
APPENDIX VIII: WORKING VISITS ABROAD
van Dishoeck
ESO (Garching, Germany; Jan 20)
University of Oxford (Oxford, UK; Feb 17)
Kyoto University (Kyoto, Japan; Mar 22)
University of Texas (Austin, USA; Apr 1-4)
Harvard Center for Astrophysics (Cambridge, USA; Apr 19-21)
Danish National Space Center (Copenhagen, Denmark; May 4)
Arizona State University (Flagstaff, USA; May 14-21)
MPI für Astronomie (Heidelberg, Germany; May 29)
Goddard Space Flight Center (Washington, USA; Jun 2)
ETH (Zürich, Switzerland; Jun 30)
Institute of Astronomy (Cambridge, UK; Jul 20-21)
Stockholm University (Stockholm, Sweden; Sep 13)
MPI für Radioastronomie (Bonn, Germany; Sep 26)
CSIC (Madrid, Spain; Sep 27-29)
LAOG (Grenoble, France; Oct 18)
MPI für Radioastronomie (Bonn, Germany; Oct 23)
CSIC (Madrid, Spain; Nov 13-17)
University of Milan (Milan, Italy; Dec 13)
University of Bologna (Bologna, Italy; Dec 14)
Franx
MPIA (Heidelberg, Germany; Feb 22-23)
Yale University (New Haven, USA, Apr 8-14)
Yale University (New Haven, USA; May 10-13)
University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, USA, May 13-18)
MPIA (Heidelberg, Germany; Dec 11-13)
Geers
University of Texas, Austin (Austin, USA; Apr 21-28)
MPI für Astronomie (Heidelberg, Germany; Jun 20-23)
Haas
International Space Science Institute (Bern, Switzerland; Apr 3-9)
Hill
MPI für Radioastronomie (Bonn, Germany; Sep 26)
MPI für Radioastronomie (Bonn, Germany; Dec 13-15)
Hopman
Weizmann Inst. of Science (Rehovot, Israel; Sep 27 - Oct 9)
APPENDIX VIII: WORKING VISITS ABROAD
Israel
MPI für Radioastronomie (Bonn, Germany, Sep 26)
Editorial Board European Physics News (Stresa, Italy, Oct 21)
Jaffe
MPI für Radioastronomie (Bonn, Germany, Jan 11-12)
ESO (Garching Germany, Jan 25-27)
Observatoire de Nice, (Nice, France, Feb 6-7)
MPI für Astronomie (Heidelberg, Germany, Mar 12-13)
ESO (Garching Germany Apr 2-4)
MPI für Radioastronomie (Bonn, Germany, Apr 4-6)
Observatoire de Nice, (Nice, France, Nov 16-17)
MPI für Astronomie (Heidelberg, Germany, Nov 23-24)
Katgert
Osservatorio Astronomico (Trieste, Italy; Mar 5-13)
Osservatorio Astronomico (Trieste, Italy; Nov 22-Dec 1)
Koehler
ESO (Garching, Germany; Feb 14-16)
MPI für Astronomie (Heidelberg, Germany; Mar 13)
ESO (Garching, Germany; May 18-19)
ZAH, Landessternwarte Koenigstuhl (Heidelberg, Germany; Jun 7-8)
ZAH, Landessternwarte Koenigstuhl (Heidelberg, Germany; Jul 13)
MPI für Astronomie (Heidelberg, Germany; Sep 8)
Kriek
Yale University (New Haven (CT), USA; Jan 1-14)
Yale University (New Haven (CT), USA; Jan 22 - Feb 19)
Yale University (New Haven (CT), USA; Jun 5 - Jul 15)
Yale University (New Haven (CT), USA; Oct 15-29)
Kuijken
IAP (Paris, France; Feb 12-13)
MPE (Garching, Germany; Nov 27-28)
van Langevelde
MPI für Radioastronomie (Bonn, Germany; Mar 6-7)
ESO (Garching, Germany; Apr 6-7)
ESO (Garching, Germany; May 11)
PSNC (Poznan, Poland; Sep 25)
Torun Observatory (Torun, Poland; Sep 29)
139
140
APPENDIX VIII: WORKING VISITS ABROAD
ESO (Garching, Germany; Oct 23-24)
Joint Astronomy Centre (Hilo, Hawaii USA; Dec 6-18)
Linnartz
Institut für Nieder-Temperatur Plasmaphysik Greifswald (Greifswald,
Germany, Jun)
University College Cork (Cork, Ireland, Sep)
Astronomical Institute, University Leuven (Leuven, Belgium, Dec)
Lommen
Center for Astrophysics (Cambridge, USA; Oct 17-23)
Joint Astronomy Centre (Hilo, USA; Nov 8-9)
McDermid
SAURON Team Meeting (Oxford, UK; Jan 11-13)
MUSE Science Team Meeting (Lyon, France; Mar 8)
MUSE Busy Week (Lyon, France; May 8-12)
SAURON Team Meeting (Garching, Germany; May 22-26)
Miley
ESO (Vitacura, Chile (Visiting Scientist); Feb 10)
ESO (Garching, Germany (Universe Awareness Committee); Feb 10)
MPI für Radioastronomie Fachbeirat (Bonn, Germany, Jan 30 - Feb 1)
NRAO Visiting Committee (Charlottesville, Va, USA; Feb 4-11)
NRAO Visiting Committee (Socorro, NM, USA; Feb 27 - Mar 4)
Space Telescope Science Institute (Baltimore, USA; Mar 16-24)
Universe Awareness ISC (Heidelberg University, Germany; April 4--5)
NRAO Visiting Committee (Charlottesville, Va, USA; Apr 16 - 20)
IAU Executive Committee (Prague Czech Republic; Aug 21-26)
ACS Science Team (Conference Center, Jackson Hole, USA; Sep 25-27)
ACS Science Team (JHU Baltimore, USA; Sep 27-29)
Oliveira
MPI für Astronomie (Heidelberg, Germany; Oct 30-31)
Overzier
MPI für Astronomie (Heidelberg, Germany; Feb 13-14)
MPA (Garching, Germany; May 6-13)
Panic
California Institute of Technology (Pasadena, California, USA; Nov 8-11)
APPENDIX VIII: WORKING VISITS ABROAD
141
Röttgering
Institute d'Astrophysique (Paris, France, Feb 28)
Caltech (Pasadena, USA, June 1 - Oct 1)
EU (Brussel, Belgium, Oct 27)
MPI (Heidelberg, Germany, Nov 24)
Salter
Technical University of Braunschweig, Institute for Geophysics and
Extraterrestrial Physics (Braunschweig, Germany; Aug 1 - Oct 15)
Smit
Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (Santiago de Chile, Chile; Nov 28 Dec 15)
Snijders
Observatoire de Geneve (Geneve, Switzerland; Feb 28 - Mar 3)
Institute for Astronomy (Honolulu, USA; Apr 7 - May 11)
Institute for Astronomy (Honolulu, USA; Nov 20 - Dec 15)
Stuik
ESO (Garching, Germany; Jan 19-20)
ESO (Garching, Germany; Feb 15-16)
ESO (Garching, Germany; Feb 22-23)
Observatoire de Lyon (Lyon, France; Mar 6-7)
Astrophysical Institute of Potsdam (Potsdam, Mar 8-10)
MPI für Astronomie (Heidelberg, Germany; Mar 23-24)
Observatoire de Paris (Paris, France; Mar 28-Apr 1)
ESO (Garching, Germany; Apr 27-28)
Observatoire de Lyon (Lyon, France; May 8-12)
ESO (Garching, Germany; May 18-19)
ESO (Garching, Germany; Jul 6-7)
ING (Santa Cruz de La Palma, Spain; Oct 19-22)
ESO (Garching, Germany; Oct 25-26)
ESO (Garching, Germany; Nov 22-23)
Observatoire de Marseille (Marseille, France; Dec 10-12)
Taylor
MPI für Astronomie (Heidelberg, Germany; Feb 22 - Mar 2)
Yale University (New Haven, USA; May 4-23)
Universidad de Chile (Santiago, Chile; May 23 - June 6)
142
APPENDIX VIII: WORKING VISITS ABROAD
Tran
Swinburne (Melbourne, Australia; Dec 9-12
Visser R.
MPI für Astronomie (Heidelberg, Germany; Aug 16-17)
Weijmans
Oxford University (Oxford, UK; Apr 24-28)
Van der Werf
MPI für Extraterrestrische Physik (Garching, Germany; Jan 9-10)
Observatoire de Geneve (Geneva, Switzerland; Mar 1-3)
ESO (Santiago, Chile; Apr 8-14)
MPI für Radioastronomie (Bonn, Germany; Sep 26)
Unversitätszentrum Univ. Innsbruck (Obergurgl, Austria; Oct 24-26)
Joint Astronomy Center (Hilo, Hawii, USA; Nov 28-29)
Institute for Computational Cosmology (Durham, UK; Dec 15)
Wuyts
Yale University (New Haven, USA; Apr 7-15)
Carnegie Observatories (Pasadena, USA; May 1-20)
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (Cambridge, USA; Aug 6-26)
de Zeeuw
CNRS (Paris, France; Jan 10)
University of Oxford (Oxford, UK; Jan 11-13)
Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale (Orsay, France; Jan 18)
ESA (Paris, France; Jan 19)
ESO (Garching, Germany; Jan 24)
STScI (Baltimore MD, USA; Feb 4-7)
Steward Observatory (Tucson, AZ, USA; Feb 16-17)
Large Binocular Telescope (Mt Graham, AZ, USA; Feb 18)
Ministry of Science (Berne, Switzerland; Feb 27-28)
ESO (Garching, Germany; Apr 5)
STScI (Baltimore MD, USA; Apr 25)
AURA (Bethesda, MD, USA; Apr 26-29)
ESA (Paris, France; May 3-4)
ESO (Garching, Germany; May 16-18)
ESO (Garching, Germany; Jun 6-7)
Royal Observatory (Edinburgh, UK; Jun 22-23)
ESO (Garching, Germany; Jul 20)
STScI (Baltimore MD, USA; Sep 10-12)
APPENDIX VIII: WORKING VISITS ABROAD
Montana State University (Bozeman, MT, USA; Sep 13-16)
Institut d'Astrophysique (Paris, France; Sep 20)
ISSI (Berne, Switzerland; Oct 18-19)
STScI (Baltimore MD, USA; Oct 30/Nov 1)
Astron. Dept. Univ. of Texas (Austin TX, USA; Nov 12-18)
Astronomy Department (Leuven, Belgium; Nov 24)
AURA (Washington, USA; Dec 11)
STScI (Baltimore MD, USA; Dec 12-13)
143
Appendix
IX
Colloquia
given
outside Leiden
Appendix
Colloquia
given
outside Leiden
IX
Beirao
Star Formation, PAH, and Molecular Excitation in Starbursts: Arp 143 and M82
Spitzer Science Center, Pasadena, USA; Dec 19
Brandl
Star Formation in Galaxies
NOVA Fall School, Dwingeloo, Netherlands, Oct 11-13
Brinch
Modeling the L1489 IRS disk using a molecular excitation and radiative transfer
method,
SAO - Hawaii, Hilo, USA; Feb 20
van Dishoeck
‘From Molecules to Planets’
Physics Department, Oxford, UK; Feb 17
Idem
Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Sep 13
‘Spitzer Observations of Gas and Dust in Star- and Planet-forming Regions: Ice Cold
and Steaming Hot’
University of Kyoto, Kyoto, Japan; Mar 22
Idem
Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, USA; Jun 2
Idem
ESTEC, Noordwijk, Netherlands; Jun 23
‘Chemistry in Evolving Protoplanetary Disks’
University of Texas, Austin, USA; Apr 4
148
APPENDIX IX. COLLOQUIA GIVEN OUTSIDE LEIDEN
‘From Molecules to Planets: Lindsay award lecture’
Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, USA; Jun 2
‘Recent Results in Star- and Planet Formation: from Spitzer to ALMA’
University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy; Dec 14
Fuchs
Complex molecule formation on interstellar dust surfaces
Grosses Physikalisches Kolloquium, University of Cologne, Germany, Nov 21
Geers
PAHs in T Tauri Disks
University of Texas, Austin, USA; Apr 21
Hekker
Red giant star
Nijmegen, Netherlands; Feb 8
Hill
Examining the Evolutionary Sequence of Massive Star Formation
MPI für Radioastronomie, Bonn, Germany; Dec 14
Icke
Colloquium ‘Radiation Hydrodynamics’ en workshop ‘Practical Hydrodynamics’
IAC, La Palma, Spain; Feb 19-22
‘What if dark matter and dark energy exist?’
Fysica2006, NNV Leiden, Netherlands, Apr 28
‘Wat is waarheid?’
Symposium Marie Curie, Nijmegen, Netherlands; May 17
‘Bernard’s Cosmic Stories’
Valencia, Spain; Jun 26-30
‘Relativiteit vanaf Huygens tot voorbij Einstein’
Opening Studium Generale TUEindhoven, Netherlands; Sep 6
‘De toekomst van het Heelal’
Toekomst in het Groot, UvA, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Sep 13
‘Tessellations in the Universe’
Colloquium wiskunde, TUDelft (Abdoel), Delft, Netherlands; Oct 10
‘What if dark matter and energy exist?’
Vereniging Technische Fysica, Kronig Lezing TUDelft, Netherlands; Nov 29
‘Voids in the Universe’
KNAW Workshop, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Dec 12-15
SARA Superdag, Astrophysical radiation hydrodynamics; Dec 14
APPENDIX IX. COLLOQUIA GIVEN OUTSIDE LEIDEN
Kriek
‘Clues on Massive Galaxy Formation at z~2.5 from NIR spectroscopy’
STScI, Baltimore (MD), USA; Oct 19
Idem
Caltech, Pasadena (CA), USA; Nov 27
Idem
UCSC, Santa Cruz (CA), USA; Nov 29
Idem
Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena (CA), USA; Dec 1
Idem
UCB, Berkeley (CA), USA; Dec 4
Idem
Princeton University, Princeton (NJ), USA; Dec 6
Idem
CfA, Cambridge (MA), USA; Dec 7
Idem
Gemini Observatory Southern Operations Center, La Serena, Chile;
Dec 14
Kuijken
‘Weak Lensing with KiDS’
MPE, Garching, Germany; May 9
‘KiDS: Studying Dark Matter and Dark Energy with Light Rays’
UCLA, Los Angeles, USA; Oct 11
Lommen
‘Studying the disks in young stellar objects with mm interferometry CfA’
Cambridge, USA; October 8
Idem
JAC, Hilo, USA; November 8
McDermid
‘SAURON's View on the Realm of the Nebulae’
Kapteyn Institute, Groningen, Netherlands; Dec 9
Miley
‘Universe Awareness, an international inspirational programme for disadvantaged
children’
Vliegende Hollanders. Science and Technology Summit 2006, Amsterdam,
Netherlands, Nov 15
149
150
APPENDIX IX. COLLOQUIA GIVEN OUTSIDE LEIDEN
Overzier
‘Touring the large-scale structure from z=1 to z=6 with HST/ACS’
MPIA, Heidelberg, Germany; Feb 14
‘HST/ACS observations of clusters and cluster progenitors at z=1-6’,
MPA, Garching, Germany; May 12
Röttgering
‘LOFAR: opening a window on the low frequency universe’
Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK, Feb 1
Idem
University of Bristol, Bristol, UK, Feb 2
Idem
Durham University, Durham, UK, March 20
‘LOFAR: A new low-frequency radio telescope. New directions for studies of powerful
radio galaxies as probes of distant proto-clusters’
NRAO, Socorro, New Mexico, Aug 29
Idem
NOAO/Steward Observatory, Aug 31
Idem
Arizona State University, Phoenix, USA, Sep 1
Idem
Carnegy Observatory, Pasadena, USA, Sep 12
Idem
Caltech, Pasadena, Sep 27
Schaye
‘The Chemical Enrichment of the Intergalactic Medium’
Department of Astronomy, Nijmegen, Netherlands; Nov 27
Idem
Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, Paris, France; Dec 8
Smit
‘Weak Lensing with KIDS’
Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago de Chile, Chile; Dec 12
Snijders
‘Young star clusters under the microscope: ground-based mid-infrared observations of
the Antennae galaxies’
IPAC, Pasadena, USA, Nov 15
Idem
UCLA, Los Angeles, USA, Nov 16
APPENDIX IX. COLLOQUIA GIVEN OUTSIDE LEIDEN
Idem
Carnegie, Pasadena, USA, Nov 17
Idem
IfA, Honolulu, USA, Dec 8
Stuik
‘Adaptive Optics: Heroes of Might and Magic’
UVA, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Sep 22
Tran
‘The Origin of Early-type Galaxies in Rich Clusters’
Kapteyn Institute, Groningen, The Netherlands; Jan 30
‘Stellar Assembly and Galaxy Evolution in the Distant Universe’
Astronomy Dept., University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Mar 8
‘Galaxy Cluster Assembly and the Origin of Early-type Members’
Astrophysics Sub-Dept., University of Oxford, Jun 6
‘Cosmic Collisions: Forming the Most Massive Galaxies in the Universe’
Physics Dept., Virginia Tech, Sep 1
van der Werf
Starburst galaxies at low and high redshift, ESO, Santiago, Chile; Apr 13
Wuyts
‘Red Galaxies at z~2.5’
NOAO, Tucson, USA; Dec 1
‘Idem’
Spitzer Science Center, Pasadena, USA; Dec 5
‘Idem’
Yale, New Haven, USA; Dec 8
‘Idem’
CfA, Cambridge, USA; Dec 12
‘Idem’
STScI, Baltimore, USA; Dec 14
de Zeeuw
‘SAURON & The Fossil Record of Galaxy Formation’
Radboud Universiteit, Nijmegen, Netherlands; Mar 11
‘Idem’
Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, USA; Sep 15
‘Idem’
Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, Leuven, Belgium; Nov 24
151
Appendix
X
Scientific
publications
Appendix
Scientific
publications
X
X.1. Ph.D. Theses and Books
A. Blaauw and P. Katgert (ed.), Twee illustere theeplanters en het Leids
Kerkhoven-Bosscha Fonds, 2006.
B. Jonkheid, Chemistry in evolving protoplanetary disks, Ph.D. thesis, Leiden
University, June 2006.
I.L. ten Kate, Organics on Mars, Ph.D. thesis, Leiden University, January 2006.
P. Katgert, Ed., Twee illustere theeplanters en het Leids Kerkhoven-Bosscha
Fonds
J.C. Mather, H.A. MacEwen, T. de Graauw, and W. M. Mattheus (eds.), Space
Telescopes and Instrumentation I: Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter.
Proceedings of the SPIE, Volume 6265, July 2006.
R. Meijerink, Models of the ISM in Galaxy Centers, Ph.D. thesis, Leiden
University, November 2006.
R. Overzier, Emergence of cosmic structures around distant radio galaxies
and quasars, Ph.D. thesis, Leiden University, May 2006.
S.-J. Paardekoper, Growing and moving planets in disks, Ph.D. thesis, Leiden
University, September 2006.
D. Queloz, S. Udry, M. Mayor,W. Benz, P. Cassen, T. Guillot, and A.
Quirrenbach (eds.), Extrasolar planets, 2006.
156
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S. Solte and H. Linnartz (eds.), Special Issue: CAMOP-MOLEC XV, 2006.
X.2. Articles in Refereed Journals
J. M. Alcalá, L. Spezzi, A. Frasca, E. Covino, A. Porras, B. Merín, and P. Persi,
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S. Andersson, A. Al-Halabi, G.J. Kroes and E.F. van Dishoeck,
Photodissociation of water ice, J. Chem. Phys., 124, 064715-1--14
L. Armus, J. Bernard-Salas, H. W. W. Spoon, J. A. Marshall, V. Charmandaris,
S. J. U. Higdon, V. Desai, L. Hao, H. I. Teplitz, D. Devost, B. R. Brandl, B. T.
Soifer, and J. R. Houck, Detection of the Buried Active Galactic Nucleus in
NGC 6240 with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope,
Astrophys. J. 640, 204–210.
J.-C. Augereau and H. Beust, On the AU Microscopii debris disk. Density
profiles, grain properties, and dust dynamics, Astron. Astrophys. 455, 987–999.
H. Baumgardt, C. Hopman, S. Portegies Zwart, and J. Makino, Tidal capture
of stars by intermediate-mass black holes, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 372,
467–478.
P. Beirão, B. R. Brandl, D. Devost, J. D. Smith, L. Hao, and J. R. Houck,
Spatially Resolved Spitzer Spectroscopy of the Starburst Nucleus in NGC
5253, Astrophys. J. Lett. 643, L1–L4.
A. M. Beloborodov, Y. Levin, F. Eisenhauer, R. Genzel, T. Paumard, S.
Gillessen, and T. Ott, Clockwise Stellar Disk and the Dark Mass in the Galactic
Center, Astrophys. J. 648, 405–410.
L. Binette, R. J. Wilman, M. Villar-Mart´ın, R. A. E. Fosbury, M. J. Jarvis, and
H. J. A. Röttgering, Ionization of large-scale absorbing haloes and feedback
events from high-redshift radio galaxies, Astron. Astrophys. 459, 31–42.
S. E. Bisschop, H. J. Fraser, K. I. Öberg, E. F. van Dishoeck, and S.
Schlemmer, Desorption rates and sticking coefficients for CO and N2
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157
J. P. Blakeslee, B. P. Holden, M. Franx, P. Rosati, R. J. Bouwens, R. Demarco,
H. C. Ford, N. L. Homeier, G. D. Illingworth, M. J. Jee, S. Mei, F. Menanteau,
G. R. Meurer, M. Postman, and K.-V. H. Tran, Clusters at Half Hubble Time:
Galaxy Structure and Colors in RX J0152.7-1357 and MS 1054-03, Astrophys. J.
644, 30–53.
J. A. D. L. Blommaert, M. A. T. Groenewegen, K. Okumura, S. Ganesh, A.
Omont, J. Cami, I. S. Glass, H. J. Habing, M. Schultheis, G. Simon, and J. T.
van Loon, ISO mid-infrared spectroscopy of Galactic Bulge AGB stars, Astron.
Astrophys. 460, 555–563.
R. van den Bosch, P.T. de Zeeuw, K. Gebhardt, E. Noyola, and G. van de
Ven, The Dynamical Mass-to-Light Ratio Profile and Distance of the Globular
Cluster M15, Astrophys. J. 641, 852–861.
T. L. Bourke, P. C. Myers, N. J. Evans, II, M. M. Dunham, J. Kauffmann,
Y. L. Shirley, A. Crapsi, C. H. Young, T. L. Huard, T. Y. Brooke, N. Chapman,
L. Cieza, C. W. Lee, P. Teuben, and Z. Wahhaj, The Spitzer C2D Survey
of Nearby Dense Cores. II. Discovery of a Low-Luminosity Object in the
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R. J. Bouwens, G. D. Illingworth, J. P. Blakeslee, and M. Franx, Galaxies at
z ~ 6: The UV Luminosity Function and Luminosity Density from 506 HUDF,
HUDF Parallel ACS Field, and GOODS i-Dropouts, Astrophys. J. 653, 53–85.
B. R. Brandl, J. Bernard-Salas, H. W. W. Spoon, D. Devost, G. C. Sloan, S.
Guilles, Y. Wu, J. R. Houck, D. W. Weedman, L. Armus, P. N. Appleton, B. T.
Soifer, V. Charmandaris, L. Hao, J. A. M. S. J. Higdon, and T. L. Herter, The
Mid-Infrared Properties of Starburst Galaxies from Spitzer-IRS Spectroscopy,
Astrophys. J. 653, 1129–1144.
W. van Breugel, W. de Vries, S. Croft, C. De Breuck, M. Dopita, G.Miley,
M. Reuland, and H. Röttgering, High redshift Ly_ halos, Astronomische
Nachrichten 327, 175–179.
C. Broeg, V. Joergens, M. Fernández, D. Husar, T. Hearty, M. Ammler, and
R. Neuhäuser, Rotational periods of T Tauri stars in Taurus-Auriga, south of
Taurus-Auriga, and in MBM12, Astron. Astrophys. 450, 1135–1148.
F. A. van Broekhuizen, I. M. N. Groot, H. J. Fraser, E. F. van Dishoeck, and
S. Schlemmer, Infrared spectroscopy of solid CO-CO2 mixtures and layers,
Astron. Astrophys. 451, 723–731.
158
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M. H. Brookes, P. N. Best, R. Rengelink, and H. J. A. Röttgering, CENSORS:
A Combined EIS-NVSS Survey of Radio Sources - II. Infrared imaging and the
K-z relation, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 366, 1265–1288.
A. G. de Bruyn, P. Katgert, M. Haverkorn, and D. H. F. M. Schnitzeler, Radio
polarization and RM structure at high Galactic latitudes, Astronomische
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B. A. Buckalew, H. A. Kobulnicky, J. M. Darnel, E. Polomski, R. D. Gehrz, R.
M. Humphreys, C. E. Woodward, J. L. Hinz, C. W. Engelbracht, K. D. Gordon,
K. Misselt, P. G. Pérez-González, G. H. Rieke, S. P. Willner, M. L. Ashby, P.
Barmby, M. A. Pahre, T. L. Roellig, N. Devereux, J. T. Loon, and B. Brandl,
Understanding Radio-selected Thermal Sources in M33: Ultraviolet, Optical,
Near-Infrared, Spitzer Mid-Infrared, and Radio Observations, Astrophys. J.
Suppl. Ser. 162, 329–345.
L. M. Buson, M. Cappellari, E. M. Corsini, E. V. Held, J. Lim, and A. Pizzella,
NGC 7679: an anomalous, composite Seyfert 1 galaxy whose X-ray luminous
AGN vanishes at optical wavelengths, Astron. Astrophys. 447, 441–451.
M. Cappellari, R. Bacon, M. Bureau, M. C. Damen, R. L. Davies, P. T. de
Zeeuw, E. Emsellem, J. Falcón-Barroso, D. Krajnović, H. Kuntschner, R. M.
McDermid, R. F. Peletier, M. Sarzi, R. C. E. van den Bosch, and G. van de
Ven, The SAURON project - IV. The mass-to-light ratio, the virial mass
estimator and the Fundamental Plane of elliptical and lenticular galaxies,
Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 366, 1126–1150.
J. Cernicharo, J. R. Goicoechea, F. Daniel, M. R. Lerate, M. J. Barlow, B. M.
Swinyard, E. F. van Dishoeck, T. L. Lim, S. Viti, and J. Yates, The Water Vapor
Abundance in Orion KL Outflows, Astrophys. J. Lett. 649, L33–L36.
M.-R. L. Cioni, L. Girardi, P. Marigo, and H. J. Habing, AGB stars in the
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Astrophys. 448, 77–91.
M.-R. L. Cioni, L. Girardi, P. Marigo, and H. J. Habing, AGB stars in the
Magellanic Clouds. III. The rate of star formation across the Small Magellanic
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M.-R. L. Cioni, L. Girardi, P. Marigo, and H. J. Habing, Erratum: AGB stars
in the Magellanic Clouds. II. The rate of star formation across the LMC, Astron.
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APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
159
W. D. Cotton, W. Vlemmings, B. Mennesson, G. Perrin, V. Coudé Du Foresto,
G. Chagnon, P. J. Diamond, H. J. van Langevelde, E. Bakker, S. Ridgway, H.
Mc Allister, W. Traub, and S. Ragland, Further VLBA observations of SiO
masers toward Mira variable stars, Astron. Astrophys. 456, 339–350.
M. J. Cruz, M. J. Jarvis, K. M. Blundell, S. Rawlings, S. Croft, H.-R. Klöckner,
R. J. McLure, C. Simpson, T. A. Targett, and C. J. Willott, The 6C** sample of
steep-spectrum radio sources - I. Radio data, near-infrared imaging and
optical spectroscopy, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 373, 1531–1562.
H. Dannerbauer, E. Daddi, M. Onodera, X. Kong, H. Röttgering, N. Arimoto,
M. Brusa, A. Cimatti, J. Kurk, M. D. Lehnert, M. Mignoli, and A. Renzini,
MAMBO 1.2 mm Observations of BzK-selected Star-forming Galaxies at z ~ 2,
Astrophys. J. Lett. 637, L5–L8.
P. Deroo, H. van Winckel, M. Min, L. B. F. M. Waters, T. Verhoelst, W. Jaffe,
S. Morel, F. Paresce, A. Richichi, P. Stee, and M. Wittkowski, Resolving the
compact dusty discs around binary post-AGB stars using N-band
interferometry, Astron. Astrophys. 450, 181–192.
E. F. van Dishoeck, Chemistry in low-mass protostellar and protoplanetary
regions, Proc. Nat. Ac. Sci., 103, 12249-12256
E. F. van Dishoeck, B. Jonkheid and M.C. van Hemert, Photoprocesses in
protoplanetary disks, Faraday Discussions, 133, 231-243
P. G. van Dokkum, R. Quadri, D. Marchesini, G. Rudnick, M. Franx, E.
Gawiser, D. Herrera, S. Wuyts, P. Lira, I. Labbé, J. Maza, G. D. Illingworth,
N. M. Förster Schreiber, M. Kriek, H.-W. Rix, E. N. Taylor, S. Toft, T. Webb,
and S. K. Yi, The Space Density and Colors of Massive Galaxies at 2 < z < 3:
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M. A. Dopita, M. Reuland, B. Groves, H. Röttgering, and W. van Breugel,
AGN or starburst powered? Untangling the pan-spectral SEDs of the highredshift radio galaxies and sub-mm galaxies, Astronomische Nachrichten 327,
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S. D. Doty, E. F. van Dishoeck, and J. C. Tan, Astrochemical confirmation of
the rapid evolution of massive YSOs and explanation for the inferred ages of
hot cores, Astron. Astrophys. 454, L5–L8.
S. Dye, S. A. Eales, M. L. N. Ashby, J.-S. Huang, T. M. A. Webb, P. Barmby, S.
Lilly, M. Brodwin, H. McCracken, E. Egami, and G. G. Fazio, An Investigation
of the Submillimeter Background Radiation Using SCUBA and Spitzer,
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J. Falcón-Barroso, R. Bacon, M. Bureau, M. Cappellari, R. L. Davies, P. T. de
Zeeuw, E. Emsellem, K. Fathi, D. Krajnović, H. Kuntschner, R. M. McDermid,
R. F. Peletier, and M. Sarzi, The SAURON project - VII. Integral-field
absorption and emission-line kinematics of 24 spiral galaxy bulges, Monthly
Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 369, 529–566.
J. Falcón-Barroso, M. Sarzi, R. Bacon, M. Bureau, M. Cappellari, R. L. Davies,
E. Emsellem, K. Fathi, D. Krajnović, H. Kuntschner, R. M. McDermid, R. F.
Peletier, and T. de Zeeuw, Morphology and kinematics of the ionised gas in
earlytype galaxies, New Astronomy Review 49, 515–520.
D. J. E. Floyd, R. Laing, M. Chiaberge, E. Perlman, W. Sparks, D. Macchetto, J.
Madrid, D. Axon, C. P. O’Dea, S. Baum, A. Quillen, G. Miley, and A. Capetti,
An Optical-Infrared Jet in 3C 133, Astrophys. J. 643, 660–666.
F. Fontani, P. Caselli, A. Crapsi, R. Cesaroni, S. Molinari, L. Testi, and J. Brand,
Searching for massive pre-stellar cores through observations of N2H+ and
N2D+, Astron. Astrophys. 460, 709–720.
N. M. Förster Schreiber, M. Franx, I. Labbé, G. Rudnick, P. G. van Dokkum,
G. D. Illingworth, K. Kuijken, A. F. M. Moorwood, H.-W. Rix, H. Röttgering,
and P. van der Werf, Faint Infrared Extragalactic Survey: Data and Source
Catalog of the MS 1054-03 Field, Astron. J. 131, 1891–1913.
G.W. Fuchs, K. Acharyya, S.E Bisschop, K.I. Öberg, F. van Broekhuizen,
H.J. Fraser, S. Schlemmer, E.F. van Dishoeck, and H. Linnartz, Comparative
studies of O2 and N2 in pure, mixed and layered CO ices, Faraday Discussion
133, 331.
K. Ganda, J. Falcón-Barroso, R. F. Peletier, M. Cappellari, E. Emsellem, R. M.
McDermid, P. T. de Zeeuw, and C. M. Carollo, Late-type galaxies observed
with SAURON: two-dimensional stellar and emission-line kinematics of 18
spirals, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 367, 46–78.
J. R. C. Garry, I. Loes Ten Kate, Z. Martins, P. Nørnberg, and P. Ehrenfreund,
Analysis and survival of amino acids in Martian regolith analogs, Meteoritics
and Planetary Science 41, 391–405.
E. Gawiser, P. G. van Dokkum, C. Gronwall, R. Ciardullo, G. A. Blanc, F. J.
Castander, J. Feldmeier, H. Francke, M. Franx, L. Haberzettl, D. Herrera, T.
Hickey, L. Infante, P. Lira, J. Maza, R. Quadri, A. Richardson, K. Schawinski,
M. Schirmer, E. N. Taylor, E. Treister, C. M. Urry, and S. N. Virani, The
Physical Nature of Lyα-emitting Galaxies at z=3.1, Astrophys. J. Lett. 642, L13–
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161
E. Gawiser, P. G. van Dokkum, D. Herrera, J. Maza, F. J. Castander, L. Infante,
P. Lira, R. Quadri, R. Toner, E. Treister, C. M. Urry, M. Altmann, R. Assef, D.
Christlein, P. S. Coppi, M. F. Durán, M. Franx, G. Galaz, L. Huerta, C. Liu, S.
López, R. Méndez, D. C. Moore, M. Rubio, M. T. Ruiz, S. Toft, and S. K. Yi, The
Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC): Survey Design and Deep
Public UBVRIz’ Images and Catalogs of the Extended Hubble Deep FieldSouth, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 162, 1–19.
V. C. Geers, J.-C. Augereau, K. M. Pontoppidan, C. P. Dullemond, R. Visser,
J. E. Kessler-Silacci, N. J. Evans, II, E. F. van Dishoeck, G. A. Blake, A. C. A.
Boogert, J. M. Brown, F. Lahuis, and B. Merín, C2D Spitzer-IRS spectra of
disks around T Tauri stars. II. PAH emission features, Astron. Astrophys. 459,
545–556.
A.M. van Genderen, A.F. Jones, C. Sterken, Light variations of alpha Cygni
variables in the Magellanic Clouds, Journal of Astronomical Data 12, 4, pp. 1-23
A.M. van Genderen, C. Sterken, W.H. Allen, W.S.G. Walker, An overview of
the photometric events, trends and brightenings of η Carinae, Journal of
Astronomical Data, 12, 3, pp. 1-41
A. Gijsbertsen, H. Linnartz, and S. Stolte, Parity-dependent rotational
rainbows in D2-NO and He-NO differential collision cross sections, J. of Chem.
Phys. 125, 133112.
A. Gijsbertsen, H. Linnartz, C.A. Taatjes, and S. Stolte, Quantum interference
as the source of steric asymmetry and parity propensity rules in NO-rare gas
inelastic scattering, J. of American Chem. Soc. 128, 8777–8789.
D. A. Golimowski, D. R. Ardila, J. E. Krist, M. Clampin, H. C. Ford, G. D.
Illingworth, F. Bartko, N. Benítez, J. P. Blakeslee, R. J. Bouwens, L. D. Bradley,
T. J. Broadhurst, R. A. Brown, C. J. Burrows, E. S. Cheng, N. J. G. Cross, R.
Demarco, P. D. Feldman, M. Franx, T. Goto, C. Gronwall, G. F. Hartig, B. P.
Holden, N. L. Homeier, L. Infante, M. J. Jee, R. A. Kimble, M. P. Lesser, A. R.
Martel, S. Mei, F. Menanteau, G. R. Meurer, G. K. Miley, V. Motta, M.
Postman, P. Rosati, M. Sirianni, W. B. Sparks, H. D. Tran, Z. I. Tsvetanov, R. L.
White, W. Zheng, and A. W. Zirm, Hubble Space Telescope ACS Multiband
Coronagraphic Imaging of the Debris Disk around β Pictoris, Astron. J. 131,
3109–3130.
H. J. Habing, M. N. Sevenster, M. Messineo, G. van de Ven, and K. Kuijken,
The distribution of maser stars in the inner Milky Way: the effect of a weak,
rotating bar, Astron. Astrophys. 458, 151–162.
162
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
C. Halliday, D. Carter, T. J. Bridges, Z. C. Jackson, M. I. Wilkinson, D. P.
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N. Häring-Neumayer, M. Cappellari, H.-W. Rix, M. Hartung, M. A. Prieto,
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P. M. Harvey, N. Chapman, S.-P. Lai, N. J. Evans, II, L. E. Allen, J. K.
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S. Hekker, S. Reffert, A. Quirrenbach, D. S. Mitchell, D. A. Fischer, G. W.
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C. Helling, W.-F. Thi, P. Woitke, and M. Fridlund, Detectability of dirty dust
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M. R. Hogerheijde, P. Caselli, M. Emprechtinger, F. F. S. van der Tak, J. Alves,
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N. L. Homeier, S. Mei, J. P. Blakeslee, M. Postman, B. Holden, H. C. Ford, L. D.
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T. L. Huard, P. C. Myers, D. C. Murphy, L. J. Crews, C. J. Lada, T. L. Bourke,
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I. T. Iliev, B. Ciardi, M. A. Alvarez, A. Maselli, A. Ferrara, N. Y. Gnedin,
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I. T. Iliev, G. Mellema, U.-L. Pen, H. Merz, P. R. Shapiro, and M. A. Alvarez,
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I. T. Iliev, U.-L. Pen, J. Richard Bond, G. Mellema, and P. R. Shapiro, kSZ from
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H. T. Intema, B. P. Venemans, J. D. Kurk, M. Ouchi, T. Kodama, H. J. A.
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F. P. Israel, R. P. J. Tilanus, and F. Baas, CI and CO in the center of M 51,
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V. Joergens, Radial velocity survey for planes and brown dwarf companions
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J. T. A. de Jong, L. M. Widrow, P. Cseresnjes, K. Kuijken, A. P. S. Crotts,
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C. Jordi, E. Høg, A. G. A. Brown, L. Lindegren, C. A. L. Bailer-Jones, J. M.
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J. K. Jørgensen, P. M. Harvey, N. J. Evans, II, T. L. Huard, L. E. Allen, A.
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J. K. Jørgensen, D. Johnstone, E. F. van Dishoeck, and S. D. Doty, The effect
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Astrophys. 449, 609–619.
J.-L. Josset, S. Beauvivre, P. Cerroni, M. C. de Sanctis, P. Pinet, S. Chevrel,
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D. D. Kelson, G. D. Illingworth, M. Franx, and P. G. van Dokkum, Line
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T. A. van Kempen, M. R. Hogerheijde, E. F. van Dishoeck, R. Güsten, P.
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J. Kessler-Silacci, J.-C. Augereau, C. P. Dullemond, V. Geers, F. Lahuis, N. J.
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K. K. Knudsen, V. E. Barnard, P. P. van der Werf, P. Vielva, J.-P. Kneib, A. W.
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R. Köhler, M.G. Petr-Gotzens, M.J. McCaughrean, Mark J.J. Bouvier, G.
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M. Kriek, P. G. van Dokkum, M. Franx, N. M. Förster Schreiber, E. Gawiser,
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M. Kriek, P.G. van Dokkum, M. Franx, R. Quadri, E. Gawiser, D. Herrera,
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K. Kuijken, Shears from shapelets, Astron. Astrophys. 456, 827–838.
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I. Labbé, R. Bouwens, G. D. Illingworth, and M. Franx, Spitzer IRAC
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F. Lahuis, E. F. van Dishoeck, A. C. A. Boogert, K. M. Pontoppidan, G. A.
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S. Laine, J. K. Kotilainen, J. Reunanen, S. D. Ryder, and R. Beck, Examining
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J. Larkin, M. Barczys, A. Krabbe, S. Adkins, T. Aliado, P. Amico, G. Brims, R.
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D.-H. Lee, I.-S. Yuk, H. Jin, K.-I. Seon, J. Edelstein, E. J. Korpela, J. Adolfo, K.W. Min, K.-S. Ryu, J.-H. Shinn, and E. F. van Dishoeck, Diffuse Far-Ultraviolet
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J. P. Madrid, M. Chiaberge, D. Floyd, W. B. Sparks, D. Macchetto, G. K. Miley,
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M. Matsuura, O. Chesneau, A. A. Zijlstra, W. Jaffe, L. B. F. M. Waters, J. A.
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B. C. Matthews, M. R. Hogerheijde, J. K. Jørgensen, and E. A. Bergin, The
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R. M. McDermid, R. Bacon, H. Kuntschner, E. Emsellem, K. L. Shapiro, M.
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R. M.McDermid, E. Emsellem, K. L. Shapiro, R. Bacon, M. Bureau, M.
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P. McDonald, U. Seljak, S. Burles, D. J. Schlegel, D. H. Weinberg, R. Cen, D.
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R. J. McLure, M. J. Jarvis, T. A. Targett, J. S. Dunlop, and P. N. Best, On the
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S. Mei, J. P. Blakeslee, S. A. Stanford, B. P. Holden, P. Rosati, V. Strazzullo, N.
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S. Mei, B. P. Holden, J. P. Blakeslee, P. Rosati, M. Postman, M. J. Jee, A.
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R. Meijerink, M. Spaans, and F. P. Israel, Irradiated ISM: Discriminating
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G. Mellema, S. J. Arthur, W. J. Henney, I. T. Iliev, and P. R. Shapiro,
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G. Mellema, I. T. Iliev, M. A. Alvarez, and P. R. Shapiro, C2-ray: A new
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G. Mellema, I. T. Iliev, U.-L. Pen, and P. R. Shapiro, Simulating cosmic
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H. R. Merrett, M. R. Merrifield, N. G. Douglas, K. Kuijken, A. J. Romanowsky,
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M. Messineo, M. Petr-Gotzens, K. M. Menten, F. Schuller, and H. J. Habing,
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G.K. Miley, R.A. Overzier, A.W. Zirm, H. C. Ford, J. Kurk, L. Pentericci,
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R. Morganti, P.T. de Zeeuw, T.A. Oosterloo, R.M. McDermid, D. Krajnović,
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nearby elliptical and lenticular galaxies: the continuing formation of early-type
galaxies, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc., 371, 157-169
L.F. Olsen, J.-M. Miralles, L. da Costa, C. Benoist, B. Vandame, R. Rengelink,
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R.A. Overzier, HST/ACS observations of Lyman-break galaxies and Lyα
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R.A. Overzier, R.J. Bouwens, G.D. Illingworth, and M. Franx, Clustering of
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R.A. Overzier, G.K. Miley, R.J. Bouwens, N.J.G. Cross, A.W. Zirm,
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G.D. Illingworth, A.R. Martel, H.J.A. Röttgering, B. Venemans, D.R. Ardila,
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Golimowski, T. Goto, C. Gronwall, B. Holden, N. Homeier, L. Infante, R.A.
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P. Rosati, M. Sirianni, W.B. Sparks, H.D. Tran, Z.I. Tsvetanov, R.L. White, and
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S.-J. Paardekooper and G. Mellema, Dust flow in gas disks in the presence of
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D.L. Padgett, L. Cieza, K.R. Stapelfeldt, N.J. II Evans, D. Koerner, A. Sargent,
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McDermid, R. F. Peletier, M. Sarzi, R.C.E. van den Bosch, G. van de Ven,
Dark Matter in the Central Regions of Early Type Galaxies, EAS Publications
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P. Cerroni, M.C. de Sanctis, J.-L. Josset, S. Beauvivre, D. Koschny, P. Pinet, S.
Chevrel, Y. Langevin, M.A. Barucci, P. Plancke, M. Almeida, B.A. Hofmann,
K. Muinonen, V. Shevchenko, Y. Shkuratov, P. Ehrenfreund, B.H. Foing,
Preliminary Analysis of Colour Information from AMIE on Smart-1, 37th
Annual Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (S. Mackwell and E.
Stansbery, eds.), March 2006, p. 1831.
C. Cunningham, E. Atad-Ettadgui, R. Bacon, B. Brandl, J.-G. Cuby, G. Dalton,
W. Dent, S. D'Odorico, I. Egan, C. Evans, F. Hammer, N. Hubin, P. Jagourel,
M. Kasper, F. Kerber, R. Lenzen, I. Montilla, G. Moretto, S. Morris, L. Pasquini,
E. Prieto, A. Quirrenbach, M. Redfern, O. Ryan, M. Strachan, C. Verinaud,
ELT instrument concepts: impact on telescope and adaptive optics design,
Groundbased and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy. Edited by
McLean, Ian S.; Iye, Masanori. Proceedings of the SPIE, Volume 6269, pp.
62691R (2006)., July 2006.
M. Dehn, C. Helling, P. Woitke, and P. Hauschildt, The influence of
convective energy transport on dust formation in brown dwarf atmospheres,
IAU Symposium, August 2006.
D. van Delft, A Coffee-Cup Full of Helium, The Low Countries 14, 293–295.
D. van Delft, Albert Einstein in Leiden, Physics Today, April, 57–62.
D. van Delft, Een venster uit de Kaukasus, De Gids, 528–532.
D. van Delft, Een zevenhoek te Isfahan, NRC Handelsblad, 2 september.
D. van Delft, En daarom haten zij mij, De Gids, 1010–1019.
D. van Delft, Laat maar schuiven, NRC Handelsblad, xx november.
D. van Delft, Leiden: het Kamerling Onnes Laboratorium, Plaatsen van
herinnering; Nederland in de negentiende eeuw (J. Bank and M. Mathijsen,
eds.), 2006, pp. 376–387.
D. van Delft, The Blue-Collar Boys: The School of InstrumentMakers at the
Leiden Physics Laboratory of Heike Kamerling Onnes, Who Needs Scientific
Instruments? (B. Grob and H. Hooijmaijers, eds.), 2006, pp. 151–158.
E. F. van Dishoeck, Inaugural Article by a Recently Elected Academy
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E.F. van Dishoeck, K. Acharyya, A. Al-Halabi, S. Andersson, S.E. Bisschop,
F.A. van Broekhuizen, H.J. Fraser, G. Fuchs, G.J. Kroes, K.I. Öberg, S.
Schlemmer, and H. Linnartz, Spectroscopy and Processing of Interstellar Ice
Analogs, AIP Conf. Proc. 855: Astrochemistry - From Laboratory Studies to
Astronomical Observations (R. I. Kaiser, P. Bernath, Y. Osamura, S. Petrie, and
A. M. Mebel, eds.), September 2006, pp. 113–121.
M.A. Dopita, M. Reuland, B. Groves, H. Röttgering and W. van Breugel: 2006,
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P. Ehrenfreund, J. Garry, I. Ten Kate, P. Norberg, and K. van Sluis, Mars
simulations relevant to planetary protection, 36t, The Advanced
CamerAssembly, 2006, p. 583.
R. Fassbender, J. Stegmaier, A.-M.Weijmans, S. Köstner, A. Kruselburger,
C. Diethart, P. Fertl, E. Valiante, M. Hayes, P. Schuecker, and G. Hasinger,
VADER: a satellite mission concept for high precision dark energy studies,
Space Telescopes and Instrumentation II: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray. Edited
by Turner, Martin J. L.; Hasinger, Günther. Proceedings of the SPIE, Volume
6266, pp. 626632 (2006). (M. J. L. Turner and G. Hasinger, eds.), July 2006.
D.J.E. Floyd, M. Chiaberge, E. Perlman, W.B. Sparks, D. Macchetto, J. Madrid,
S. Baum, C.P. O’Dea, D. Axon, A. Quillen, A. Capetti, and G. Miley, OpticalInfrared Jets From The HST 3CR SNAP Programs, IAU Symposium, August
2006.
D.J.E. Floyd, M. Chiaberge, W.B. Sparks, D. Macchetto, J. Madrid, S. Baum,
C.P. O’Dea, D.J. Axon, A. Quillen, E. Perlman, G. Miley, A. Capetti, and S.
Tinarelli, A Near-Infrared View Of The 3CR: Properties Of Host And Nuclei,
IAU Symposium, August 2006.
H. Ford, G. Illingworth, F. Bartko, N. Benitez, R. Bouwens, L. Bradley, T.
Broadhurst, D. Coe, R. Demarco, M. Franx, B. Frye, B. Holden, N. Homeier,
L. Infante, M. Jee, A. Martel, S. Mei, F. Menanteau, G. Miley, V. Motta, M.
Postman, A. van der Wel, P. Rosati, R. White, K. Zekser, A. Zirm, and W.
Zheng, The ACS IDT Investigation of the Evolution of Galaxies and Clusters
of Galaxies from z ~ 0.2 to z ~ 7, IAU Symposium, August 2006.
B.L. Frye, N. Benitez, D. Coe, H. Ford, D. Bowen, G. Illingworth,
P. Guhathakurta, M. Franx, and ACS Science Team, The Advanced Camera
Galaxy Redshift Survey, American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts,
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G.W. Fuchs, K. Acharyya, S.E. Bisschop, K.I. Öberg, F.A. van Broekhuizen,
H.J. Fraser, S. Schlemmer, E.F. van Dishoeck, H. Linnartz, Laboratory
experiments on interstellar ice analogs: The sticking and desorption of small
physisorbed molecules, Proceedings of the 2006 NASA workshop on
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D.A. García-Hernández, P. García-Lario, B. Plez, A. Manchado, F. D’Antona,
J. Lub, and H. Habing, Observational constraints on s-process nucleosynthesis
in massive galactic O-rich AGB stars., Memorie della Societa Astronomica
Italiana 77, 967.
M. Gieles, S.S. Larsen, M.R. Haas, R.A. Scheepmaker, N. Bastian: The
Maximum Mass of Star Clusters, Globular Clusters: Guides to Galaxies,
March 6-10. astro-ph/0604578
C.A. Grady, G. Schneider, K. Hamaguchi, M. Sitko, W. Carpenter, K. Collins,
G. Williger, B. Woodgate, R. Petre, J. Nuth, III, D. Hines, T. Henning, A.
Quirrenbach, F. Menard, and D. Wilner, Young Vega and Altair Analogs:
Rotationally-Enhanced Activity in HD 169142 and HD 135344, American
Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts, December 2006, p. 219.08.
M.R. Haas, M. Gieles, R.A. Scheepmaker, S.S. Larsen, H.J.G.L.M. Lamers,
N. Bastian, Variation of the cluster luminosity function across the disk of M51,
"Mass loss from stars and the evolution of stellar clusters, Proc. of a workshop
held in honor of Henny Lamers, May 29 - June 1. astro-ph/0609018
P. Hallibert, R. Arsenault, B. Delabre, S. Esposito, N. Hubin, A. Quirrenbach,
A. Riccardi, S. Stroebele, R. Stuik, and R. Vink, Optical design for the
adaptive secondary setup and instrument stimulator (ASSIST), Current
Developments in Lens Design and Optical Engineering VII. Edited by
Mouroulis, Pantazis Z.; Smith, Warren J.; Johnson, R. Barry. Proceedings of the
SPIE, Volume 6288, pp. 62880C (2006), August 2006.
S. Hekker, C. Aerts, J. de Ridder, and F. Carrier, A line profile analysis of the
pulsating red giant star Ophiuchi (G9.5III), ESA SP-624: Proceedings of SOHO
18/GONG 2006/HELAS I, Beyond the spherical Sun, October 2006.
S. Hekker, S. Reffert, A. Quirrenbach, Radial velocity variations in K giants:
planets or pulsations? JENAM proceedings, Distant Worlds, 121
E. F. Helin, I. van Houten-Groeneveld, K. J. Lawrence, T. Gehrels, K.
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C. Helling and P.Woitke, Time-dependent modelling of oxygen-rich dust
formation, Pre-Solar Grains as Astrophysical Tools, 26th meeting of the IAU,
Joint Discussion 11, 21 August 2006, Prague, Czech Republic, JD11, 13 11.
M.D. Hicks, E.F. Helin, I. van Houten-Groeneveld, E. Bowell, J. Kavelaars,
P. Nicholson, B. Gladman, V. Carruba, P. Benavidez, C. Chan, T. Gehrels,
K.J. Lawrence, C.S. Shoemaker, E.M. Shoemaker, and D.H. Levy, Minor Planet
Observations [675 Palomar Mountain], Minor Planet Circulars 5615, 12.
M.D. Hicks, I. van Houten-Groeneveld, E. Bowell, T. Gehrels, E.M.
Shoemaker, C.S. Shoemaker, D.H. Levy, B.A. Skiff, C.J. van Houten, and
A. Wisse, Minor Planet Observations [675 Palomar Mountain], Minor Planet
Circulars 5810, 6.
M.D. Hicks, I. van Houten-Groeneveld, E. Bowell, J. Kavelaars, M. Hicks,
T. Gehrels, C.S. Shoemaker, E.M. Shoemaker, P. Nicholson, B. Gladman,
J.-L. Margot, P. Benavidez, C. Chan, C.J. van Houten, and A. Wisse, Minor
Planet Observations [675 Palomar Mountain], Minor Planet Circulars 5711, 7.
T.-M. Ho, R. Schulz, J. Stuewe, C. Erd, D. Martin, T. Oosterbroek, and P.
Verhoeve, Observations Of The Fragments Of Comet 73p/ Schwassmannwachmann 3 From Esa’s Ogs Telescope, AAS/Division for Planetary Sciences
Meeting Abstracts, September 2006, p. 06.03.
M. Hogerheijde, The ALMA Design Reference Science Plan, The Messenger
123, 20.
C. Hopman, Astrophysics of extreme mass ratio inspiral sources, astroph/0608460 (6th International LISA Symposium)
C. Hopman, T. Alexander, Resonant Relaxation near the Massive Black Hole
in the Galactic Center, JPhCS, 54, 32
K. Isaak, P. Papadopoulos and P.P. van der Werf, First detections of CO(6-5)
and CO(4-3) in ULIRGs: Warm dense molecular gas in Mrk231, 2006,
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O. Iwert, D. Baade, A. Balestra, A. Baruffolo, A. Bortolussi, F. Christen, C.
Cumani, S. Deiries, M. Downing, C. Geimer, G. Hess, J. Hess, K. Kuijken,
J. Lizon, B. Muschielok, H. Nicklas, R. Reiss, J. Reyes, A. Silber, J. Thillerup,
and E. Valentijn, The OmegaCAM 16K x 16K CCD detector system for the ESO
VLT Survey Telescope (VST), High Energy, Optical, and Infrared Detectors for
Astronomy II. Edited by Dorn, David A.; Holland, Andrew D. Proceedings of
the SPIE, Volume 6276, pp. 62760A (2006), July 2006.
J.-L. Josset, S. Beauvivre, P. Cerroni, M.C. de Sanctis, P. Pinet, S. Chevrel,
Y. Langevin, M.A. Barucci, P. Plancke, D. Koschny, M. Almeida, Z. Sodnik,
S. Mancuso, B.A. Hofmann, K. Muinonen, V. Shevchenko, Y. Shkuratov,
P. Ehrenfreund, and B.H. Foing, SMART-1/AMIE Camera System, 37th
Annual Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (S. Mackwell and E.
Stansbery, eds.), March 2006, p. 1847.
M. Kettenis, H.J. van Langevelde, C. Reynolds, W.D. Cotton, ParselTongue:
AIPS Talking Python, ADASS XV, ASP Conf series, 2005 eds C. Gabriel,
C. Arviset, D. Ponz, E. Solano, p497
R. Köhler and T. Ratzka, The Orbit of T Tauri South, In: Binary Stars as
Critical Tools and Tests in Contemporary Astrophysics, proceedings of IAU
Symp. No. 240, held Aug 22-25, 2006 in Prague, Czech Republic, eds. W.
Hartkopf, E. Guinan & P. Harmanec
R. Köhler, M.G. Petr-Gotzens, M.J. McCaughrean, J. Bouvier, G. Duchêne,
A. Quirrenbach, and H. Zinnecker, Binary Stars in the Orion Nebula Cluster,
In: Binary Stars as Critical Tools and Tests in Contemporary Astrophysics,
proceedings of IAU Symp. No. 240, held Aug 22-25, 2006 in Prague, Czech
Republic, eds. W. Hartkopf, E. Guinan & P. Harmanec
M.B.N. Kouwenhoven, A.G.A. Brown, S.F. Portegies Zwart, and L. Kaper,
Finding the Primordial Binary Population in Sco OB2: on the interpretation of
binary star observations, IAU Symposium, August 2006.
M.T. Kriek, P.G. van Dokkum, and M. Franx, Spectral confirmation of old
galaxies at z ~ 2.5, IAU Symposium, August 2006.
K. Kuijken, Large Surveys and the VO, The Virtual Observatory in Action:
New Science, New Technology, and Next Generation Facilities, 26th meeting
of the IAU, Special Session 3, 17-18, 21-22 August, 2006 in Prague, Czech
Republic, SPS3, 2 3.
K. Kuijken, Lensing with KIDS, KITP Program: Applications of Gravitational
Lensing: Unique Insights into Galaxy Formation and Evolution, October 2006.
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I. F. Labbé, R. Bouwens, G. Illingworth, and M. Franx, Spitzer IRAC
confirmation of z850-dropout galaxies in the UDF: stellar masses and ages at
z=7, IAU Symposium, August 2006.
I. F. Labbé, R. Bouwens, G. Illingworth, and M. Franx, Spitzer/IRAC
Confirmation of z850-dropout Galaxies in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field: Stellar
Masses and Ages at z=7, American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts,
December 2006, p. 132.02.
S. Lagarde, B. Lopez, P. Antonelli, U. Beckman, J. Behrend, Y. Bresson, O.
Chesneau, M. Dugué, A. Glazenborg, U. Graser, K.H. Hofmann, W. Jaffe,
Ch. Leinert, F. Millour, J.L. Menut, R.G. Petrov, T. Ratzka, G. Weigelt, S. Wolf,
P. Abraham, C. Connot, T. Henning, M. Heininger, Y. Hugues, S. Kraus, W.
Laun, A. Matter, U. Neumann, E. Nussbaum, A. Neidzielski, L. Mosoni, S.
Robbe-Dubois, A. Roussel, D. Schertl, F. Vakili, K. Wagner, and L.B.F.M.
Waters, MATISSE: a four beams combiner in the mid-infrared for the VLTI,
Advances in Stellar Interferometry. Edited by Monnier, John D.; Schöller,
Markus; Danchi, William C.. Proceedings of the SPIE, Volume 6268, pp.
62683M (2006), July 2006.
H.J. van Langevelde, A. Szomoru, H. Verkouter, M. Kettenis, B. Kramer,
F.P. Olnon, J. Anderson, M.A. Garrett, Transforming the way VLBI is done,
ADASS XV, ASP Conf series, eds C. Gabriel, C. Arviset, D. Ponz, E. Solano,
p. 649
J. Larkin, M. Barczys, A. Krabbe, S. Adkins, T. Aliado, P. Amico, G. Brims, R.
Campbell, J. Canfield, T. Gasaway, A. Honey, C. Iserlohe, C. Johnson, E. Kress,
D. LaFreniere, J. Lyke, K. Magnone, N. Magnone, M. McElwain, J. Moon, A.
Quirrenbach, G. Skulason, I. Song, M. Spencer, J. Weiss, and S. Wright,
OSIRIS: a diffraction limited integral field spectrograph for Keck, Groundbased and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy. Edited by McLean, Ian S.;
Iye, Masanori. Proceedings of the SPIE, Volume 6269, pp. 62691A (2006), July
2006
R. Lenzen, B. Brandl, and W. Brandner, The science case for exoplanets and
star formation using mid-IR instrumentation at the OWL telescope, IAU
Symposium (P. Whitelock, M. Dennefeld, and B. Leibundgut, eds.), 2006,
pp. 329–333.
R. Lenzen, B. Brandl, W. Brandner, G. Finger, A. Glasse, H.-U. Käufl, and L.
Venema, Observational capabilities and technical solutions of a thermal and
MIR instrument at E-ELT, Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for
Astronomy. Edited by McLean, Ian S.; Iye, Masanori. Proceedings of the SPIE,
Volume 6269, pp. 626952 (2006), July 2006.
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185
B. Lopez, S. Wolf, S. Lagarde, P. Abraham, P. Antonelli, J.C. Augereau,
U. Beckman, J. Behrend, N. Berruyer, Y. Bresson, O. Chesneau, J.M. Clausse,
C. Connot, K. Demyk, W.C. Danchi, M. Dugué, S. Flament, A. Glazenborg,
U. Graser, T. Henning, K.H. Hofmann, M. Heininger, Y. Hugues, W. Jaffe,
S. Jankov, S. Kraus, W. Laun, C. Leinert, H. Linz, P. Mathias, K. Meisenheimer,
A. Matter, J. L. Menut, F. Millour, U. Neumann, E. Nussbaum, A. Niedzielski,
L. Mosonic, R. Petrov, T. Ratzka, S. Robbe-Dubois, A. Roussel, D. Schertl, F.-X.
Schmider, B. Stecklum, E. Thiebaut, F. Vakili, K. Wagner, L.B.F.M. Waters, and
G. Weigelt, MATISSE: perspective of imaging in the mid-infrared at the VLTI,
Advances in Stellar Interferometry. Edited by Monnier, John D.; Schöller,
Markus; Danchi, William C. Proceedings of the SPIE, Volume 6268, pp. 62680Z
(2006), July 2006.
F. Lykou and H.J.A. Röttgering, Correlation of DARWIN mission star
catalogue with radio source surveys, AIP Conf. Proc. 848: Recent Advances in
Astronomy and Astrophysics (N. Solomos, ed.), August 2006, pp. 399–401.
S.T. Maddison, D. Lommen, C. Wright, T. Bourke, J. Jorgensen, E. van
Dishoeck, M. Burton, A. Hughes, and D. Wilner, Observing Grain Growth in
Protoplanetary Disks, American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts,
December 2006, p. 10.10.
R.J. Mathar, Wide-band and Air Dispersion Effecting the ABCD Algorithm of
Phase-Recovery in Long-Baseline Interferometry, astro-ph/0605304
R.J. Mathar, Spherical Trigonometry of the Projected Baseline Angle, astroph/0608273
R.J. Mathar, Refractive Index of Humid Air in the Infrared: Model Fits,
physics/0610256
M. Matsuura, O. Chesneau, A.A. Zijlstra, W. Jaffe, L.B.F.M. Waters, J.A. Yates,
E. Lagadec, and T.M. Gledhill, High spatial resolution observations of OH
231.8+4.2, IAU Symposium (M. J. Barlow and R. H. Méndez, eds.), 2006, pp.
457– 458.
B.C. Matthews, M. Hogerheijde, and E. Bergin, A Molecular Line Study of the
Recently Discovered Class 0 Source Barnard 1-c, Astronomical Society of the
Pacific Conference Series (D. C. Backer, J. M. Moran, and J. L. Turner, eds.),
December 2006, p. 266.
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R. McDermid, E. Emsellem, K. L. Shapiro, R. Bacon, M. Bureau,
M. Cappellari, R. L. Davies, P. T. de Zeeuw, J. Falcon-Barroso, D. Krajnovic,
H. Kuntschner, R. F. Peletier, and M. Sarzi, Kinematically and Chemically
Decoupled Cores in E/S0 Galaxies with SAURON and OASIS, IAU
Symposium, August 2006.
R. McDermid, Young Kinematically Decoupled Components in Early-Type
Galaxies, Science Perspectives for 3D Spectroscopy, eds. M. Kissler-Patig,
M. M. Roth and J. R. Walsh, ESO Astrophysics Symposia
H. Merrett, M. Merrifield, K. Kuijken, A. Romanowsky, N. Douglas, N.
Napolitano, M. Arnaboldi, M. Capaccioli, K. Freeman, O. Gerhard, D. Carter,
N. W. Evans, M. Wilkinson, C. Halliday, and T. Bridges, Mapping the Stellar
Dynamics of M31, Planetary Nebulae Beyond the Milky Way (L. Stanghellini,
J. R. Walsh, and N. G. Douglas, eds.), 2006, p. 281.
N. R. Napolitano, A. J. Romanowsky, M. Capaccioli, K. Kuijken, M. R.
Merrifield, N. G. Douglas, M. Arnaboldi, K. C. Freeman, and O. Gerhard,
Planetary Nebulae as Dynamical Tracers: Mass-to-Light-Ratio Gradients in
Early-Type Galaxies, Planetary Nebulae Beyond the Milky Way (L.
Stanghellini, J. R. Walsh, and N. G. Douglas, eds.), 2006, p. 324.
C. J. Ödman, C. Scorza, G. K. Miley, and C. Madsen, Universe Awareness .
An inspirational programme for economically disadvantaged young children.,
Memorie della Societa Astronomica Italiana 77, 1014.
A. Ollongren, Large-size Message Construction for ETI, Aristotelian
Syllogisms in LINCOS, paper IAC06-A4.1.02, 57th International Astronautical
Congress 2006, Valencia, Spain
H. Perets, C. Hopman, Alexander, Massive perturbers in the galactic center,
Hopman & Alexander, JPhCS,54, 293
A. Poglitsch, T. de Graauw, M. Griffin, G. Pilbratt, O.H. Bauer, T. Phillips, J.
Stutzki, B. Swinyard, L. Vigroux, and C. Waelkens, The Herschel far-infrared
and submillimetre space observatory, 36th COSPAR Scientific Assembly, 2006,
p. 215.
K. Pontoppidan, New results from Spitzer IRS - compact sources, 36th
COSPAR Scientific Assembly, 2006, p. 3741.
F. Puech, S. Leveque, M. Sarazin, and R.J. Mathar, Temperature and humidity
environmental conditions in the VLTI, Advances in Stellar Interferometry.
Edited by Monnier, John D.; Schöller, Markus; Danchi, William C. Proceedings
of the SPIE, Volume 6268, pp. 626840 (2006), July 2006.
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A. Quirrenbach, Detection and characterization of extrasolar planets, Saas-Fee
Advanced Course 31: Extrasolar planets (D. Queloz, S. Udry, M. Mayor, W.
Benz, P. Cassen, T. Guillot, and A. Quirrenbach, eds.), 2006, pp. 1–242.
A. Quirrenbach, Direct detection of exoplanets - science and techniques, IAU
Symposium (P. Whitelock, M. Dennefeld, and B. Leibundgut, eds.), 2006, pp.
109–118.
A. Quirrenbach, S. Albrecht, and R. N. Tubbs, VLTI-MIDI observations of
MWC349A, ASP Proceedings 355, Stars with the B[e] Phenomenon, 239-245
A. Quirrenbach, Black Holes: From Stars to Galaxies - Across the Range of
Masses, Proc. IAU 232, Direct detection of expolanets: science and techniques,
109-118
S. Reffert, A. Quirrenbach, S. Hekker, D.S. Mitchell, D.A. Fischer, G.W.
Marcy, R.P. Butler, Multiplicity in a complete sample of giant stars. Binary
stars as critical tools and tests in contemporary astrophysics, IAU 240, 143
S. Reffert, D. Segransan, R. Launhardt, T. Henning, D. Queloz, A.
Quirrenbach, F. Pepe, J. Setiawan, and P. Weise, The PRIMA astrometric
planet search: goals and prospects, Advances in Stellar Interferometry. Edited
by Monnier, John D.; Schöller, Markus; Danchi, William C.. Proceedings of the
SPIE, Volume 6268, pp. 626846 (2006)., July 2006.
S. Reffert, A. Quirrenbach, D.S. Mitchell, A. Albrecht, S. Hekker, D.A. Fischer,
G.W. Marcy, R.P. Butler, Precise radial velocities of giant stars. II. Pollux and
its planetary companion, AJ 2006, 652, 661
M. Richter, M. A. Bitner, J. H. Lacy, D. T. Jaffe, T. K. Greathouse, G. A. Blake,
A. C. Boogert, J. S. Carr, T. Currie, U. Gorti, G. J. Herczeg, D. Hollenbach, S. J.
Kenyon, C. Knez, F. Lahuis, J. Najita, and S. Redfield, Pure Rotational H2
Emission from GSS 30 IRS 1, American Astronomical Society Meeting
Abstracts, December 2006, p. 219.07.
Röttgering, H. J. A.: 2006, The Granada workshop on High Redshift Radio
Galaxies: An overview, Astronomische Nachrichten 327, 118
R. Rutten, M. Blanken, R. McDermid, T. Gregory, P. Jolley, T. Morris, R.
Myers, J. Pragt, T. Schoenmaker, R. Stuik and G. Talbot, Prospects for the
GLAS Rayleigh laser beacon on the 4.2m WHT, New Astron. Rev. 49 (10-12),
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J. Schaye, Metals in the intergalactic medium, IAU Symposium (P. Whitelock,
M. Dennefeld, and B. Leibundgut, eds.), 2006, pp. 313–317.
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Lamers: The radii of thousands of star clusters in M51 with HST/ACS,
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S. Ströbele, R. Arsenault, D. Bonaccini Calia, R. D. Conzelmann, B. Delabre, R.
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A. Szomoru, H.J. van Langevelde, H. Verkouter, M. Kettenis, B. Kramer,
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E. N. Taylor, M. Franx, P. G. van Dokkum, and E. Gawiser, On the Emergence
of the Red Galaxy Sequence, IAU Symposium, August 2006.
E. N. Taylor and R. L. Webster, On Star Formation and the Non-Existence of
Dark Galaxies, IAU Symposium, August 2006.
K. Tran, Galaxy-Galaxy Merging in Intermediate Redshift Clusters, IAU
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K. Tran: A Keck Spectroscopic Survey of MS~1054--03: Assembling the Red
Sequence, Contribution to Cosmic Frontiers Conference, Durham, UK
K.R.W. Tristram, K. Meisenheimer, and W. Jaffe, Mapping the Circumstellar
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C. Tubiana, H. Boehnhardt, L. Barrera, J. L. Ortiz, G. Schwehm, R. Schulz, and
J. Stuewe, Characterization of physical parameters of the ROSETTA target
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W.H.T. Vlemmings, H.J. van Langevelde, P.J. Diamond, Magnetic fields
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A. van der Wel, M. Franx, P. G. van Dokkum, H.-W. Rix, G. D. Illingworth,
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H.R. Merrett, M.R. Merrifield, N.G. Douglas, K. Kuijken, A.J. Romanowsky,
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L. F. Olsen, J.-M. Miralles, L. da Costa, C. Benoist, B. Vandame, R. Rengelink,
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X.5. Other Publications
L. Armus, J. Bernard-Salas, H. W. W. Spoon, J. A. Marshall, V. Charmandaris,
S. J. U. Higdon, V. Desai, L. Hao, H. I. Teplitz, D. Devost, B. R. Brandl, B.T.
Soifer, J.R. Houck, Detection of the Buried Active Galactic Nucleus in NGC
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P. Beirão, B.R. Brandl, D. Devost, J.D. Smith, L. Hao, J.R. Houck, Spatially
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L. Binette, R.J. Wilman, M. Villar-Martín, R.A.E. Fosbury, M. J. Jarvis, and
H.J.A. Röttgering: 2006, Ionization of large-scale absorbing haloes and
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S.E. Bisschop, H.J Fraser, K.I. Öberg, E.F. van Dishoeck, S. Schlemmer,
Desorption rates and sticking coefficients for CO and N2 interstellar ices,
Astronomy and Astrophysics 449, 1297-1309
J.P. Blakeslee, B.P. Holden, M. Franx, P. Rosati, R.J. Bouwens, R. Demarco,
H.C. Ford, N.L. Homeier, G.D. Illingworth, M.J. Jee, S. Mei, F. Menanteau,
G.R. Meurer, M. Postman, and Kim-Vy H. Tran,‘Clusters at Half Hubble
Time: Galaxy Structure and Colors in RX J0152.7-1357 and MS 1054-03’, ApJ
(2006), 644, 30
B. Brandl, J. Bernard-Salas, H.W.W. Spoon, D. Devost, G.C. Sloan, S. Guilles,
Y. Wu, J.R. Houck, D.W. Weedman, L. Armus, P.N. Appleton, B.T. Soifer,
V. Charmandaris, L. Hao, J.A. Higdon, S.J. Marshall, T.L. Herter, The MidInfrared Properties of Starburst Galaxies from Spitzer-IRS Spectroscopy, ApJ,
653, 1129-1144
M.H. Brookes, P.N. Best, R. Rengelink and H.J.A. Röttgering, CENSORS: A
Combined EIS-NVSS Survey of Radio Sources - II. Infrared imaging and the Kz relation, MNRAS 366, 1265
B.A. Buckalew, H.A. Kobulnicky, J.M. Darnel, E. Polomski, R.D. Gehrz,
R.M. Humphreys, C.E. Woodward, J.L. Hinz, C.W. Engelbracht, K.D. Gordon,
K. Misselt, P.G. Pérez-González, G.H. Rieke, S.P. Willner, M.L. Ashby,
P. Barmby, M.A. Pahre, T.L. Roellig, N. Devereux, J.T. Loon, B. Brandl,
Understanding Radio-selected Thermal Sources in M33: Ultraviolet, Optical,
Near-Infrared, Spitzer Mid-Infrared, and Radio Observations, ApJS, 162, 329345
H. Dannerbauer, E. Daddi, M. Onodera, X. Kong, H. Röttgering, N. Arimoto,
M. Brusa, A. Cimatti, J. Kurk, M. D. Lehnert, M. Mignoli, M., and A. Renzini,
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D. van Delft, The Blue-Collar Boys: The School of Instrument Makers at the
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D. van Delft, Leiden: het Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratorium, In: Jan Bank en
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D. van Delft, A Coffee-Cup Full of Helium, The Low Countries 14 (2006) 293295.
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D. van Delft, En daarom haten zij mij, De Gids, december 2006, 1010-1019
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G.D. Illingworth, K. Kuijken, A.F.M. Moorwood, H.-W. Rix, H. Röttgering,
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Catalog of the MS 1054-03 Field, AJ 131, 1891
G. W. Fuchs, K. Acharyya, S. E. Bisschop, K. I. Öberg, F. A. van Broekhuizen,
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V. Geers et al., C2D Spitzer-IRS spectra of disks around T Tauri stars. II. PAH
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A. Gijsbertsen, S. Stolte, H. Linnartz, C.A. Taatjes, Quantum interference as
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A. Gijsbertsen, H. Linnartz, S. Stolte, Parity dependent rotational rainbows in
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194
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C. Hopman, D. Guetta, E. Waxman, S. Portegies Zwart, The Redshift
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H.T. Intema, B P. Venemans, J D. Kurk, M. Ouchi, T. Kodama, H J A.
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R.A. Overzier, R J. Bouwens, N.J.G. Cross, B. Venemans, G.K. Miley, A.W.
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Bartko, L.D. Bradley, T.J. Broadhurst, D. Coe, P.D. Feldman, M. Franx, D.A.
Golimowski, T. Goto, C. Gronwall, B. Holden, N. Homeier, L. Infante, R.A.
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G. Rudnick, I. Labbé, N.M. Förster-Schreiber, S. Wuyts, M. Franx, K. Finlator,
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P. van der Werf and P.G. van Dokkum: 2006, Measuring the Average
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L. Snijders, P. P. van der Werf, B. R. Brandl, S. Mengel, D. Schaerer, Z. Wang,
Subarcsecond Resolution Mid-Infrared Observations of Super Star Clusters in
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Garmire, G.G. Pavlov, A Chandra ACIS Study of 30 Doradus. I. Superbubbles
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I. Trujillo, N.M. Förster-Schreiber, G. Rudnick, M. Barden, M. Franx, H.-W.
Rix, J.A.R. Caldwell, D.H. McIntosh, S. Toft, B. Häussler, A. Zirm, P.G. van
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Werf and L. van Starkenburg: 2006, The Size Evolution of Galaxies since z~3:
Combining SDSS, GEMS, and FIRES, ApJ 650, 18
M. Valdés, B. Ciardi, A. Ferrara, M. Johnston-Hollitt and H. Röttgering: 2006,
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H. Verbraak, M. Snels, P. Botschwina, H. Linnartz, Fermi interaction between
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E.A. Volkers, M.C. Koudijzer, A. Vredenborg, J. Bulthuis, S. Stolte,
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E.A. Volkers, J. Bulthuis, S. Stolte, R. Jost, H. Linnartz, High resolution
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Y. Wu, V. Charmandaris, L. Hao, B.R. Brandl, J. Bernard-Salas, H.W.W.
Spoon, J.R. Houck, Mid-Infrared Properties of Low-Metallicity Blue Compact
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