scsiusgd
SCSI Hard Disk Drives
For IBM PCs
User's Guide
OPTIONS
by IBM
Note: If you are using this product in the United States, Canada, or Puerto Rico, be sure to read the SCSI Hard Disk Drive User’s Guide
Supplement before using this information and the product it supports.
For all other countries, the warranty terms and conditions applicable in the country of purchase are available from IBM or your reseller.
First Edition (January 1999)
The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any country where such provisions are inconsistent with local law: INTERNATIONAL
BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION PROVIDES THIS PUBLICATION “AS IS” WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
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at any time.
This publication was developed for products and services offered in the United States of America. IBM may not offer the products, services, or features discussed
in this document in other countries, and the information is subject to change without notice. Consult your local IBM representative for information on the
products, services, and features available in your area.
Requests for technical information about IBM products should be made to your IBM reseller or IBM marketing representative.
Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 1999. All rights reserved.
Note to U.S. Government Users — Documentation related to restricted rights — Use, duplication or disclosure is subject to restrictions set forth in GSA ADP
Schedule Contract with IBM Corp.
Contents
Safety: Read first
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Product registration
About this book
v
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Part 1: Quick Installation Guide
Part 2: User's Guide
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Product description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1
Before you begin . . . . . . .
Preparing for installation . . . .
Backing up files . . . . . . . .
Creating a system diskette . . .
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2-2
2-2
2-2
2-3
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2-4
Installing the drive
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Partitioning and formatting the drive . . . . . . . . . . .
Partitioning and formatting using Windows NT and NTFS . .
Partitioning and formatting using Windows 98 or Windows 95
and FAT32 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Partitioning and formatting using OS/2 and HPFS . . . . . .
Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
Partitioning and formatting using DOS or Windows 3.x and
FAT16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-13
Solving problems
2-16
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2-11
2-11
2-12
2-12
iii
Part 3: Appendixes
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Appendix A. Safety Information
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3-1
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3-11
3-11
3-12
3-12
Appendix C. Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trademarks
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3-13
3-13
Appendix B. Help and service information . .
Step 1: Problem solving . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 2: Preparing for the call . . . . . . . . . .
Step 3: Placing the call to IBM . . . . . . . . .
iv
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SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
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Safety: Read first
v
Product registration
About this book
Thank you for purchasing your new IBM Ultra2 SCSI hard drive.
Please take a few moments to register your product and provide us
with information that will help IBM to better serve you in the future.
Your feedback is valuable to us in developing products and services
that are important to you, as well as in developing better ways to
communicate with you. Register your option on the IBM Web site at:
This book contains user information for the IBM Ultra2 SCSI Hard
Disk Drive.
http://www.pc.ibm.com/register
IBM will send you information and updates on your registered product
unless you indicate on the Web site questionnaire that you do not want
to receive further information.
Part 1 contains quick installation instructions in the following
languages:
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
English
German
French
Spanish
Italian
Brazilian Portuguese
Japanese
Part 2 has more detailed user information and contains:
–
–
–
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IBM Ultra2 SCSI Hard Disk Drive product description
Preparation and handling instructions
Installation and configuration instructions
Problem-solving information
Part 3 contains safety, service, warranty, and notice information.
The illustrations in this publication might be slightly different from
your hardware.
vi
SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
Part 1: Quick Installation Guide
Part 1 contains the IBM Ultra2 SCSI Hard Disk Drive installation
instructions in abbreviated form. For a description of the hard disk
drive and more detailed information about how to install and use the
drive, see “Part 2: User's Guide” on page 2-1.
In addition to this book, this option package contains:
SCSI hard disk drive
Option jumpers
Mounting screws
SCSI Hard Disk Drive User’s Guide Supplement
Preparing to install the drive
SCSI Device
Tape Drive
0
CD-ROM Drive
1
High-density diskette drive
2
Removable hard drive
3
Third hard disk drive
4
Second hard disk drive
5
Startup hard disk drive
6
SCSI adapter
7
Additional hard disk drives
The following general instructions apply to IBM computers and to
most other computers. If you need more information, see the
documentation that comes with your computer.
1. Each SCSI device, including the SCSI adapter, must be assigned
a SCSI identification number (ID). Use the following table as a
guideline for selecting the ideal SCSI ID for your device:
Ideal SCSI ID
15 through 8
(decreasing order of
priority)
The information listed below provides additional guidelines for
setting SCSI IDs.
You cannot assign the same ID to multiple devices on the
same SCSI adapter.
The ID you assign to your new drive depends on the number
of SCSI devices connected to the SCSI adapter, the SCSI
IDs already assigned to those devices, and the maximum
number of IDs for your SCSI adapter.
Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
1-1
Assign the higher priority SCSI IDs (the highest priority is
normally 6) to devices, such as hard disk drives, that are
faster and are used the most. Assign lower priority SCSI ID
numbers to slower SCSI devices, such as CD-ROM drives
and tape drives. SCSI ID priorities are assigned by the SCSI
adapter.
Narrow SCSI devices (devices with 50-pin connectors) such
as high-density diskette drives, CD-ROM drives, smaller tape
drives and removable hard drives can only connect to the
wide bus using a 50/68-pin connector or through a separate
50-conductor cable. These narrow devices can only use
SCSI ID addresses 0 through 6. They must be assigned to
the lowest priority SCSI IDs available in that range.
electricity. Remove the drive from the static-protective bag and
handle the drive by the edges. Do not touch any exposed
components on the drive.
5. Set the SCSI ID for your drive by placing jumpers on the
appropriate drive jumper pins. See the diagram below for
information on SCSI ID jumper placement.
Note: The orientation of the jumper pins on the diagram might
be the reverse of the orientation of the jumper pins on
your drive. Be sure to refer to your SCSI Hard Disk
Drive User’s Guide Supplement to confirm the correct
jumper placement.
Binary Weight 1 2 4 8
SCSI ID 0 =
SCSI ID 1 =
SCSI ID 2 =
SCSI ID 3 =
SCSI ID 7 is normally reserved for the SCSI adapter.
Device
Priority Ranking
SCSI ID = 0
8
Most IBM computer systems ship with the SCSI adapter
preset to look to SCSI ID 6 for the startup drive that
contains your operating system.
SCSI ID = 1
7
SCSI ID = 2
6
SCSI ID = 3
5
SCSI ID = 4
4
Before you install the drive, determine which SCSI IDs are
already assigned to avoid assigning duplicate ID numbers.
SCSI ID = 5
3
SCSI ID = 6
2 - Highest Priority Device
SCSI ID = 7
1 - Reserved for Controller
2. If you are replacing an installed hard disk drive, make a backup
copy of the data from the drive you are replacing.
SCSI ID = 8
16 - Lowest Priority Device
SCSI ID = 9
15
SCSI ID = 10
14
3. Turn off all attached devices before turning off the computer.
Unplug the power cord for the computer; then open the computer.
SCSI ID = 11
13
SCSI ID = 12
12
SCSI ID = 13
11
4. Before opening the static-protective bag containing the drive,
touch the bag and your hand to an unpainted metal surface on the
computer for at least two seconds in order to discharge static
SCSI ID = 14
10
SCSI ID = 15
9
1-2
SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
Save any spare jumpers; you might need to change the SCSI ID
later. Refer to the SCSI Hard Disk Drive User’s Guide
Supplement to see if you can safely store spare jumpers on the
drive jumper pins.
6. Refer to the SCSI Hard Disk Drive User’s Guide Supplement to
determine if Auto Start (also called Auto Spinup or Motor Start)
is enabled on your drive jumper pins. If Auto Start is enabled,
this drive starts at once when the computer is turned on.
However, starting all drives simultaneously might overload the
computer power supply. If you want to sequence drive startup in
order to flatten the power peak required for drive startup, be sure
that Auto Start is not enabled. If Auto Start is not enabled, the
drive is prevented from starting until it receives the Start Unit
command from the SCSI adapter. Most SCSI adapters send the
Start Unit commands to the drives sequentially from SCSI ID 0 to
SCSI ID 15.
Note: If you are installing your drive in a server, be sure that
Auto Start is disabled.
On IBM computer systems, use the following instructions to
verify that the SCSI adapter will send the Start Unit command to
your drive.
a. Turn on your computer.
b. Press Ctrl+A at the SCSI Adapter Power-On Self-Test
(POST) screen.
c. Select Configure/View Host Adapter Settings and press
Enter.
d. Select SCSI Device Configurations and press Enter.
e. Be sure that yes is selected for Send Start Unit Command
under the SCSI ID assigned to your drive.
f. Press Esc twice to save changes.
g. Select Yes to exit Utilities.
For more information, consult your drive and power supply
specifications.
For more information about drive startup, see the documentation
that comes with your SCSI adapter.
7. A SCSI device chain is made up of one or more SCSI devices
connected by a SCSI cable to a SCSI adapter. To prevent signal
reflections on the interface cable, the SCSI device chain must be
terminated at both ends; there are no exceptions.
Termination is subject to the following guidelines:
Ultra2 SCSI drives do not provide termination.
You cannot end the SCSI chain with devices that use passive
termination, such as some CD-ROM drives, tape drives, and
optical drives.
Only one device, the device at the end of the SCSI cable, a
68-pin device, can be terminated.
If the SCSI cable is not self-terminating, 50-pin devices
connected by pin converters cannot be at the end of the
chain.
Part 1: Quick Installation Guide
1-3
Use the table below to determine a termination solution for your
drive.
Cabling Scenario
Termination Solution
Computer system with
self-terminating SCSI cable
Simply add the drive to the
system; the cable provides
termination.
Computer system with the last
SCSI device terminating the chain
Add the drive, but not at the end
of the chain; the last SCSI device
provides termination.
The drive will be the only device
on a single-drop cable
1. Obtain a Method inline
terminator.1
2. Attach the inline terminator
to the drive, then connect the
drive to the single-drop cable.
Note: Adding the inline
terminator will reduce the
maximum data transfer
speed to 40 MB/sec.
.
1
Installing the drive
Follow these instructions to install the drive. If you need more
information, see the documentation that comes with your computer.
1. Mount the drive in either a horizontal or vertical position. Use
the mounting screws in the option package, or the special screws
with grommets included in some computer systems, to secure the
hard disk drive into position. (Using other screws might damage
the drive.) If you are installing the hard disk drive in a 5.25-inch
bay, you will need 3.5-inch-to-5.25-inch conversion hardware (not
included) or a tray to mount the drive. You can purchase a
conversion kit (PN 70G8165) from your IBM reseller.
2. Connect the drive to a free SCSI interface cable connector.
The drive position on the SCSI cable is not related to the SCSI
ID you assign to the drive or to the drive letter assigned by your
operating system. For best signal quality, connect your first SCSI
device at the end connector opposite the SCSI adapter. If you are
installing more than one SCSI device, start at the first free
connector on the end opposite the adapter and work toward the
adapter.
You can purchase an inline active terminator, such as the Method DM6100-02-68 ADR, from Technical Cable Concepts, Inc. (1-800-832-2225 or
1-714-835-1081).
1-4
SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
3. Connect an available power-cable connector to the four-pin power
connector on the drive. Replace the computer cover and
reconnect any disconnected cables. Reconnect the ac power cord
to the computer and turn the computer on.
Partitioning and formatting the drive
The first time you start your computer after installing the new
drive, you might have to answer questions about the new
configuration or you might have to use the SCSI adapter utility
program to update the configuration.
Partitioning and formatting a hard disk drive erases all user data
on the drive.
If you installed the drive in an IBM server using Microsoft
Windows NT, open the Disk Administrator and follow the
on-screen instructions to configure your drive. If you are using
an operating system such as Novell or UNIX, see the
documentation that comes with your operating system.
Notes:
1. If you are installing the primary drive in a Micro Channel
computer, you might have to restore the IML or System Partition
using your Reference and Diagnostic Diskettes.
2. If you are installing a secondary drive in a Micro Channel
computer, you must configure the drive using your System
Partition or Reference Diskette. Refer to the documentation that
came with your operating system for more information about
Micro Channel requirements.
Attention
You must partition and format your drive before you can use it. If
you want to start your operating system from a hard disk drive (the
primary drive), the drive must have an active primary partition
(normally C). You can then use the remaining space on the disk for
an extended partition that you can divide into logical drives.
In most computers that have an IDE hard disk drive, you cannot
restart the computer from the SCSI hard disk drive. Normally, only
the primary partition on the IDE drive can be active (contains your
operating system and is used for startup) and only the active partition
can be used as the startup drive. If your SCSI hard disk drive
contains a primary partition, it must be inactive. If you are unsure
about restarting your computer from the SCSI hard disk drive, see the
documentation that comes with your computer and SCSI adapter.
Each operating system has unique directions for partitioning and
formatting a drive. Be sure to refer to the documentation that comes
with your operating system before continuing with the instructions
below for Windows NT, Windows 98 and 95, OS/2, and DOS and
Windows 3.x.
Part 1: Quick Installation Guide
1-5
Partitioning and formatting using Windows NT and
NTFS
Partitioning and formatting using Windows 98 or
Windows 95 and FAT32
If you added your drive to a computer that has Windows NT on an
existing drive, follow the instructions below to partition and format
your new SCSI drive using the NTFS (NT File System) convention.
See your operating system user’s guide for instructions on partitioning
and formatting a drive using Windows 98 or Windows 95.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Turn on your computer.
Click Start on the desktop.
Select Programs, Administrative Tools (Common).
Click the Disk Administrator icon.
Follow the screen prompts to partition and format an additional
hard disk drive.
If you installed your drive to a computer that had no existing drive,
follow the instructions below to partition and format your new SCSI
drive for the Windows NT operating system using NTFS.
1. Insert the first Windows NT installation diskette (Setup Disk #1)
in the diskette drive or insert the Windows NT installation
CD-ROM in the CD-ROM drive.
The latest releases of Microsoft operating systems, including Windows
98 and Windows 95 OSR2, have an option for a 32-bit file allocation
table called FAT32. FAT32 supports partitions as large as 2 TB2 and
cluster sizes of 4 KB3 for partitions up to 8 GB.4 If you have FAT32,
you will be able to prepare your drive without concern for partition
size limits or storage efficiency. To determine if you have FAT32
installed, select your existing drive under My Computer, and select
Properties. If FAT32 is installed, the General tab will display
FAT32 under the drive label.
If you have FAT16, partition your drive using instructions given in
“Partitioning and formatting using DOS or Windows 3.x and FAT16.”
2. Restart your computer.
3. Use instructions given in the Windows NT user’s guide to
partition and format your drive for Windows NT.
2
3
4
When referring to hard-disk-drive capacity, TB (terabyte) means 1 000 000 000 000 bytes; total user-accessible capacity may vary depending on operating system.
When referring to cluster sizes, KB (kilobyte) means 1 024 bytes.
When referring to hard-disk-drive-capacity, GB (gigabyte) means 1 000 000 000 bytes; total user-accessible capacity may vary depending on operating system.
1-6
SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
Partitioning and formatting using OS/2 and HPFS
If you are using OS/2, you can use the high performance file system
(HPFS) developed for OS/2, or the FAT16 file system, to partition an
additional drive. HPFS allocates files in 512-byte units, reducing lost
disk space. HPFS also creates large partitions and accommodates
large numbers of files more efficiently than FAT16 does. For
instructions on using FAT16 to partition a drive, go to “Partitioning
and formatting using DOS or Windows 3.x and FAT16.”
To prepare the new drive using OS/2:
1. Partition and format your new drive for OS/2 using the FAT16 or
HPFS file system, or both FAT16 and HPFS, using directions
given in the OS/2 User’s Guide.
Note: In larger capacity drives, the OS/2 operating system can
partition only up to the first 2.14 GB, or the first 1024 logical
cylinders, of the drive using the FAT file system. However, you
can partition the entire drive using the HPFS file system.
Since you cannot partition the entire capacity of the drive when
using FAT, you must use HPFS to partition the rest of the drive.
2. If you choose to make your new drive a boot drive, refer to your
OS/2 User’s Guide for information on installing OS/2 on your
new drive.
If you use the DOS-based Fixed Disk Setup Program (FDISK) utility
to partition your drive and you are using the maximum partition size
of 2.14 GB, you must enter the partition size as 2047 MB. (FDISK
uses the software industry binary-base number system where one
binary MB is 1 048 576 bytes.)
Partitioning and formatting using DOS or Windows
3.x and FAT16
The largest partition size that you can create using the 16-bit file
allocation table (FAT16) file is approximately 2.14 GB.
If you are installing a drive larger than 2.14 GB and you are using the
FAT16 convention, you must create multiple partitions.
To create multiple partitions:
Select a primary partition size and create the primary partition.
Create an extended logical partition using the remaining space on
the drive.
Create one or more logical drives in the extended partition.
If you are using FDISK to create partitions and logical drives and you
want to create the maximum size primary partition or logical drive
(2.14 GB), you must specify the size as 2047 MB. (FDISK uses the
software industry binary-base number system where one binary MB is
1 048 576 bytes.)
Note: If you are installing the hard disk drive that will contain
your primary partition, install the operating system as part of the
installation procedure.
Part 1: Quick Installation Guide
1-7
Preparing the primary drive for DOS or Windows 3.x
If you are installing the drive that will contain your operating system
(the primary drive), find your operating system installation diskettes
and insert the first operating system installation diskette into the
diskette drive (or insert the operating system installation CD if your
operating system is installed from the CD-ROM drive). Restart your
computer. The operating system screens lead you through partitioning
and formatting the drive.
After you create the primary partition, you can use the remaining disk
space for an extended partition. The operating system prompts you to
partition the free space during the installation process. Follow the
instructions on the screen to create one or more logical drives within
the extended partition.
Preparing a secondary drive for DOS or Windows 3.x
A secondary drive is any hard disk drive that does not contain the
active primary partition (the partition that contains your operating
system). Normally you allocate all of the disk space on a secondary
drive to an extended partition and then create logical drives in the
extended partition. For more information about creating partitions see
the documentation that comes with your operating system.
The following example uses the FDISK and FORMAT commands to
partition and format an extended partition on a secondary hard disk
drive.
1. At the DOS prompt, type fdisk and press Enter.
1-8
SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
2. FDISK displays the current fixed-disk drive message, containing
the current fixed-disk drive number, above the FDISK menu. The
fixed-disk drive number is not associated with the logical drive
letters assigned by FDISK. Check the current fixed disk drive
number to be sure that you partition the correct hard disk drive.
The default current fixed disk drive is the fixed disk drive
containing the active primary partition (drive C). To change the
fixed disk drive number for the secondary drive:
a. Select Change current fixed disk from the FDISK menu.
b. Select the new drive number from the drive list.
c. Return to the FDISK menu.
3. Select Create DOS partition or Logical DOS Drive and press
Enter.
4. Select Create Extended DOS Partition and press Enter. The
default size is the remaining space on the drive. You must accept
the default size to use the full capacity of your drive.
5. The Create Logical DOS Drive(s) in the Extended DOS Partition
screen displays. Follow the instructions on the screen to create
one or more logical drives within the extended partition.
6. When you are finished press ESC to return from FDISK.
7. When you are prompted, restart your computer and format your
logical drives.
8. To format a logical drive, type format x: (where x is the logical
drive letter assigned by FDISK) at the DOS prompt and press
Enter.
Quick Installation (Translate)
Part 1 contains the IBM Ultra2 SCSI Hard Disk Drive installation
instructions in abbreviated form.
In addition to this book, this option package contains:
SCSI hard disk drive
Option jumpers
Mounting screws
SCSI Hard Disk Drive User’s Guide Supplement
Preparing to install the drive
The following general instructions apply to IBM computers and to
most other computers. If you need more information, see the
documentation that comes with your computer.
1. Each SCSI device, including the SCSI adapter, must be assigned
a SCSI identification number (ID). Use the following table as a
guideline for selecting the ideal SCSI ID for your device:
SCSI Device
Ideal SCSI ID
Tape Drive
0
CD-ROM Drive
1
High-density diskette drive
2
Removable hard drive
3
Third hard disk drive
4
Second hard disk drive
5
Startup hard disk drive
6
SCSI adapter
7
Additional hard disk drives
15 through 8
(decreasing order of
priority)
The information listed below provides additional guidelines for
setting SCSI IDs.
You cannot assign the same ID to multiple devices on the
same SCSI adapter.
The ID you assign to your new drive depends on the number
of SCSI devices connected to the SCSI adapter, the SCSI
IDs already assigned to those devices, and the maximum
number of IDs for your SCSI adapter.
SCSI ID 7 is normally reserved for the SCSI adapter.
Assign the higher priority SCSI IDs (the highest priority is
normally 6) to devices, such as hard disk drives, that are
Part 1: Quick Installation Guide
1-9
Narrow SCSI devices (devices with 50-pin connectors) such
as high-density diskette drives, CD-ROM drives, smaller tape
drives and removable hard drives can only connect to the
wide bus using a 50/68-pin connector or through a separate
50-conductor cable. These narrow devices can only use
SCSI ID addresses 0 through 6. They must be assigned to
the lowest priority SCSI IDs available in that range.
5. Set the SCSI ID for your drive by placing jumpers on the
appropriate drive jumper pins. See the diagram below for
information on SCSI ID jumper placement.
Note: The orientation of the jumper pins on the diagram might
be the reverse of the orientation of the jumper pins on
your drive. Be sure to refer to your SCSI Hard Disk
Drive User’s Guide Supplement to confirm the correct
jumper placement.
Binary Weight 1 2 4 8
SCSI ID 0 =
SCSI ID 1 =
SCSI ID 2 =
SCSI ID 3 =
faster and are used the most. Assign lower priority SCSI ID
numbers to slower SCSI devices, such as CD-ROM drives
and tape drives. SCSI ID priorities are assigned by the SCSI
adapter.
Device
Priority Ranking
SCSI ID = 0
8
Most IBM computer systems ship with the SCSI adapter
preset to look to SCSI ID 6 for the startup drive that
contains your operating system.
SCSI ID = 1
7
SCSI ID = 2
6
SCSI ID = 3
5
SCSI ID = 4
4
Before you install the drive, determine which SCSI IDs are
already assigned to avoid assigning duplicate ID numbers.
SCSI ID = 5
3
SCSI ID = 6
2 - Highest Priority Device
SCSI ID = 7
1 - Reserved for Controller
2. If you are replacing an installed hard disk drive, make a backup
copy of the data from the drive you are replacing.
SCSI ID = 8
16 - Lowest Priority Device
SCSI ID = 9
15
SCSI ID = 10
14
3. Turn off all attached devices before turning off the computer.
Unplug the power cord for the computer; then open the computer.
SCSI ID = 11
13
SCSI ID = 12
12
SCSI ID = 13
11
4. Before opening the static-protective bag containing the drive,
touch the bag and your hand to an unpainted metal surface on the
computer for at least two seconds in order to discharge static
electricity. Remove the drive from the static-protective bag and
handle the drive by the edges. Do not touch any exposed
components on the drive.
SCSI ID = 14
10
SCSI ID = 15
9
1-10
SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
Save any spare jumpers; you might need to change the SCSI ID
later. Refer to the SCSI Hard Disk Drive User’s Guide
Supplement to see if you can safely store spare jumpers on the
drive jumper pins.
6. Refer to the SCSI Hard Disk Drive User’s Guide Supplement to
determine if Auto Start (also called Auto Spinup or Motor Start)
is enabled on your drive jumper pins. If Auto Start is enabled,
this drive starts at once when the computer is turned on.
However, starting all drives simultaneously might overload the
computer power supply. If you want to sequence drive startup in
order to flatten the power peak required for drive startup, be sure
that Auto Start is not enabled. If Auto Start is not enabled, the
drive is prevented from starting until it receives the Start Unit
command from the SCSI adapter. Most SCSI adapters send the
Start Unit commands to the drives sequentially from SCSI ID 0 to
SCSI ID 15.
Note: If you are installing your drive in a server, be sure that
Auto Start is disabled.
On IBM computer systems, use the following instructions to
verify that the SCSI adapter will send the Start Unit command to
your drive.
a. Turn on your computer.
b. Press Ctrl+A at the SCSI Adapter Power-On Self-Test
(POST) screen.
c. Select Configure/View Host Adapter Settings and press
Enter.
d. Select SCSI Device Configurations and press Enter.
e. Be sure that yes is selected for Send Start Unit Command
under the SCSI ID assigned to your drive.
f. Press Esc twice to save changes.
g. Select Yes to exit Utilities.
For more information, consult your drive and power supply
specifications.
For more information about drive startup, see the documentation
that comes with your SCSI adapter.
7. A SCSI device chain is made up of one or more SCSI devices
connected by a SCSI cable to a SCSI adapter. To prevent signal
reflections on the interface cable, the SCSI device chain must be
terminated at both ends; there are no exceptions.
Termination is subject to the following guidelines:
Ultra2 SCSI drives do not provide termination.
You cannot end the SCSI chain with devices that use passive
termination, such as some CD-ROM drives, tape drives, and
optical drives.
Only one device, the device at the end of the SCSI cable, a
68-pin device, can be terminated.
If the SCSI cable is not self-terminating, 50-pin devices
connected by pin converters cannot be at the end of the
chain.
Part 1: Quick Installation Guide
1-11
Use the table below to determine a termination solution for your
drive.
Cabling Scenario
Termination Solution
Computer system with
self-terminating SCSI cable
Simply add the drive to the
system; the cable provides
termination.
Computer system with the last
SCSI device terminating the chain
Add the drive, but not at the end
of the chain; the last SCSI device
provides termination.
The drive will be the only device
on a single-drop cable
1. Obtain a Method inline
terminator.5
2. Attach the inline terminator
to the drive, then connect the
drive to the single-drop cable.
Note: Adding the inline
terminator will reduce the
maximum data transfer
speed to 40 MB/sec.
.
5
Installing the drive
Follow these instructions to install the drive. If you need more
information, see the documentation that comes with your computer.
1. Mount the drive in either a horizontal or vertical position. Use
the mounting screws in the option package, or the special screws
with grommets included in some computer systems, to secure the
hard disk drive into position. (Using other screws might damage
the drive.) If you are installing the hard disk drive in a 5.25-inch
bay, you will need 3.5-inch-to-5.25-inch conversion hardware (not
included) or a tray to mount the drive. You can purchase a
conversion kit (PN 70G8165) from your IBM reseller.
2. Connect the drive to a free SCSI interface cable connector.
The drive position on the SCSI cable is not related to the SCSI
ID you assign to the drive or to the drive letter assigned by your
operating system. For best signal quality, connect your first SCSI
device at the end connector opposite the SCSI adapter. If you are
installing more than one SCSI device, start at the first free
connector on the end opposite the adapter and work toward the
adapter.
You can purchase an inline active terminator, such as the Method DM6100-02-68 ADR, from Technical Cable Concepts, Inc. (1-800-832-2225 or
1-714-835-1081).
1-12
SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
3. Connect an available power-cable connector to the four-pin power
connector on the drive. Replace the computer cover and
reconnect any disconnected cables. Reconnect the ac power cord
to the computer and turn the computer on.
Partitioning and formatting the drive
The first time you start your computer after installing the new
drive, you might have to answer questions about the new
configuration or you might have to use the SCSI adapter utility
program to update the configuration.
Partitioning and formatting a hard disk drive erases all user data
on the drive.
If you installed the drive in an IBM server using Microsoft
Windows NT, open the Disk Administrator and follow the
on-screen instructions to configure your drive. If you are using
an operating system such as Novell or UNIX, see the
documentation that comes with your operating system.
Notes:
1. If you are installing the primary drive in a Micro Channel
computer, you might have to restore the IML or System Partition
using your Reference and Diagnostic Diskettes.
2. If you are installing a secondary drive in a Micro Channel
computer, you must configure the drive using your System
Partition or Reference Diskette. Refer to the documentation that
came with your operating system for more information about
Micro Channel requirements.
Attention
You must partition and format your drive before you can use it. If
you want to start your operating system from a hard disk drive (the
primary drive), the drive must have an active primary partition
(normally C). You can then use the remaining space on the disk for
an extended partition that you can divide into logical drives.
In most computers that have an IDE hard disk drive, you cannot
restart the computer from the SCSI hard disk drive. Normally, only
the primary partition on the IDE drive can be active (contains your
operating system and is used for startup) and only the active partition
can be used as the startup drive. If your SCSI hard disk drive
contains a primary partition, it must be inactive. If you are unsure
about restarting your computer from the SCSI hard disk drive, see the
documentation that comes with your computer and SCSI adapter.
Each operating system has unique directions for partitioning and
formatting a drive. Be sure to refer to the documentation that comes
with your operating system before continuing with the instructions
below for Windows NT, Windows 98 and 95, OS/2, and DOS and
Windows 3.x.
Part 1: Quick Installation Guide
1-13
Partitioning and formatting using Windows NT and
NTFS
Partitioning and formatting using Windows 98 or
Windows 95 and FAT32
If you added your drive to a computer that has Windows NT on an
existing drive, follow the instructions below to partition and format
your new SCSI drive using the NTFS (NT File System) convention.
See your operating system user’s guide for instructions on partitioning
and formatting a drive using Windows 98 or Windows 95.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Turn on your computer.
Click Start on the desktop.
Select Programs, Administrative Tools (Common).
Click the Disk Administrator icon.
Follow the screen prompts to partition and format an additional
hard disk drive.
If you installed your drive to a computer that had no existing drive,
follow the instructions below to partition and format your new SCSI
drive for the Windows NT operating system using NTFS.
1. Insert the first Windows NT installation diskette (Setup Disk #1)
in the diskette drive or insert the Windows NT installation
CD-ROM in the CD-ROM drive.
The latest releases of Microsoft operating systems, including Windows
98 and Windows 95 OSR2, have an option for a 32-bit file allocation
table called FAT32. FAT32 supports partitions as large as 2 TB6 and
cluster sizes of 4 KB7 for partitions up to 8 GB.8 If you have FAT32,
you will be able to prepare your drive without concern for partition
size limits or storage efficiency. To determine if you have FAT32
installed, select your existing drive under My Computer, and select
Properties. If FAT32 is installed, the General tab will display
FAT32 under the drive label.
If you have FAT16, partition your drive using instructions given in
“Partitioning and formatting using DOS or Windows 3.x and FAT16.”
2. Restart your computer.
3. Use instructions given in the Windows NT user’s guide to
partition and format your drive for Windows NT.
6
7
8
When referring to hard-disk-drive capacity, TB (terabyte) means 1 000 000 000 000 bytes; total user-accessible capacity may vary depending on operating system.
When referring to cluster sizes, KB (kilobyte) means 1 024 bytes.
When referring to hard-disk-drive-capacity, GB (gigabyte) means 1 000 000 000 bytes; total user-accessible capacity may vary depending on operating system.
1-14
SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
Partitioning and formatting using OS/2 and HPFS
If you are using OS/2, you can use the high performance file system
(HPFS) developed for OS/2, or the FAT16 file system, to partition an
additional drive. HPFS allocates files in 512-byte units, reducing lost
disk space. HPFS also creates large partitions and accommodates
large numbers of files more efficiently than FAT16 does. For
instructions on using FAT16 to partition a drive, go to “Partitioning
and formatting using DOS or Windows 3.x and FAT16.”
To prepare the new drive using OS/2:
1. Partition and format your new drive for OS/2 using the FAT16 or
HPFS file system, or both FAT16 and HPFS, using directions
given in the OS/2 User’s Guide.
Note: In larger capacity drives, the OS/2 operating system can
partition only up to the first 2.14 GB, or the first 1024 logical
cylinders, of the drive using the FAT file system. However, you
can partition the entire drive using the HPFS file system.
Since you cannot partition the entire capacity of the drive when
using FAT, you must use HPFS to partition the rest of the drive.
2. If you choose to make your new drive a boot drive, refer to your
OS/2 User’s Guide for information on installing OS/2 on your
new drive.
If you use the DOS-based Fixed Disk Setup Program (FDISK) utility
to partition your drive and you are using the maximum partition size
of 2.14 GB, you must enter the partition size as 2047 MB. (FDISK
uses the software industry binary-base number system where one
binary MB is 1 048 576 bytes.)
Partitioning and formatting using DOS or Windows
3.x and FAT16
The largest partition size that you can create using the 16-bit file
allocation table (FAT16) file is approximately 2.14 GB.
If you are installing a drive larger than 2.14 GB and you are using the
FAT16 convention, you must create multiple partitions.
To create multiple partitions:
Select a primary partition size and create the primary partition.
Create an extended logical partition using the remaining space on
the drive.
Create one or more logical drives in the extended partition.
If you are using FDISK to create partitions and logical drives and you
want to create the maximum size primary partition or logical drive
(2.14 GB), you must specify the size as 2047 MB. (FDISK uses the
software industry binary-base number system where one binary MB is
1 048 576 bytes.)
Note: If you are installing the hard disk drive that will contain
your primary partition, install the operating system as part of the
installation procedure.
Part 1: Quick Installation Guide
1-15
Preparing the primary drive for DOS or Windows 3.x
If you are installing the drive that will contain your operating system
(the primary drive), find your operating system installation diskettes
and insert the first operating system installation diskette into the
diskette drive (or insert the operating system installation CD if your
operating system is installed from the CD-ROM drive). Restart your
computer. The operating system screens lead you through partitioning
and formatting the drive.
After you create the primary partition, you can use the remaining disk
space for an extended partition. The operating system prompts you to
partition the free space during the installation process. Follow the
instructions on the screen to create one or more logical drives within
the extended partition.
Preparing a secondary drive for DOS or Windows 3.x
A secondary drive is any hard disk drive that does not contain the
active primary partition (the partition that contains your operating
system). Normally you allocate all of the disk space on a secondary
drive to an extended partition and then create logical drives in the
extended partition. For more information about creating partitions see
the documentation that comes with your operating system.
The following example uses the FDISK and FORMAT commands to
partition and format an extended partition on a secondary hard disk
drive.
1. At the DOS prompt, type fdisk and press Enter.
1-16
SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
2. FDISK displays the current fixed-disk drive message, containing
the current fixed-disk drive number, above the FDISK menu. The
fixed-disk drive number is not associated with the logical drive
letters assigned by FDISK. Check the current fixed disk drive
number to be sure that you partition the correct hard disk drive.
The default current fixed disk drive is the fixed disk drive
containing the active primary partition (drive C). To change the
fixed disk drive number for the secondary drive:
a. Select Change current fixed disk from the FDISK menu.
b. Select the new drive number from the drive list.
c. Return to the FDISK menu.
3. Select Create DOS partition or Logical DOS Drive and press
Enter.
4. Select Create Extended DOS Partition and press Enter. The
default size is the remaining space on the drive. You must accept
the default size to use the full capacity of your drive.
5. The Create Logical DOS Drive(s) in the Extended DOS Partition
screen displays. Follow the instructions on the screen to create
one or more logical drives within the extended partition.
6. When you are finished press ESC to return from FDISK.
7. When you are prompted, restart your computer and format your
logical drives.
8. To format a logical drive, type format x: (where x is the logical
drive letter assigned by FDISK) at the DOS prompt and press
Enter.
Product registration
Thank you for purchasing your new IBM Ultra2 SCSI hard drive.
Please take a few moments to register your product and provide us
with information that will help IBM to better serve you in the future.
Your feedback is valuable to us in developing products and services
that are important to you, as well as in developing better ways to
communicate with you. Register your option on the IBM Web site at:
http://www.pc.ibm.com/register
IBM will send you information and updates on your registered product
unless you indicate on the Web site questionnaire that you do not want
to receive further information.
Product service and warranty information
For technical support, support hours, and warranty terms and
conditions, see the enclosed inserts, or contact your IBM reseller or
IBM marketing representative.
Part 1: Quick Installation Guide
1-17
1-18
SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
Part 2: User's Guide
Product description
Your SCSI hard disk drive is a new Ultra2 SCSI device that uses
low-voltage differential (LVD) signal transmission that can accelerate
data transfer speed and lengthen a SCSI device chain. Ultra2 SCSI
devices, working only with other Ultra2 SCSI devices on a SCSI
device chain, provide a maximum instantaneous data transfer rate of
80 MB/sec. You can also connect up to 16 Ultra2 SCSI devices
together on a SCSI device cable that can be as long as 12 meters.
Ultra2 SCSI drives also have single-ended transceivers which allow
the drives to work with single-ended SCSI devices. However, when
an Ultra2 SCSI drive is connected with single-ended devices on a
SCSI device chain, the maximum data transfer rate is reduced to 40
MB/sec, and the maximum SCSI cable length for the device chain is
reduced to 3 meters when less than four devices are on the chain or
1.5 meters when four or more devices are on the chain.
Your Ultra2 SCSI drive meets the Small Computer System Interface
(SCSI) standard set by the American National Standards Institute
(ANSI), and can be installed only in a computer that uses the SCSI
architecture.
Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
You can configure your new SCSI hard disk drive in any of the
following ways:
Single-drive configuration
–
To add a hard disk drive to a computer
–
To replace an installed hard disk drive
Multiple-drive configuration
–
To operate with installed IDE hard disk drives
–
To operate with installed SCSI hard disk drives
In addition to this book, this option package contains:
SCSI hard disk drive
Option jumpers
Mounting screws
SCSI Hard Disk Drive User’s Guide Supplement
Contact your place of purchase if any parts are missing or damaged.
Be sure to retain your proof of purchase; it might be required to
receive warranty service.
2-1
Before you begin
If you are installing the SCSI hard disk drive in a disk-array system,
do not use these installation instructions. See the instructions that
come with the disk-array system.
Preparing for installation
To install the SCSI hard disk drive you need the following:
Documentation
The documentation that comes with your computer, SCSI adapter,
and operating system.
SCSI adapter and SCSI cable
Your computer must have a SCSI adapter and a SCSI cable with an
available interface connector. If you are not sure about your
computer interface type, see the documentation that comes with
your computer.
Drive mounting location
The hard disk drive you are installing is designed for a 3.5-inch
bay, but it can be adapted to fit into a 5.25-inch bay.
To mount the hard disk drive in a 5.25-inch bay, you will need to
attach 3.5-inch-to-5.25-inch conversion hardware (not included).
You can purchase a conversion kit (PN 70G8165) from your IBM
reseller. You might need flat-blade and Phillips-head screwdrivers
to install the drive.
Some installations also require mounting rails or other special
hardware in addition to the conversion hardware.
2-2
SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
Software
An operating system such as:
Windows NT
Windows 98
Windows 95
Windows 3.x
OS/2
DOS 5.0 or later
If you are installing the hard disk drive as the primary drive (startup
drive) in a Micro Channel computer, you will need the Reference
Diskette and Diagnostic Diskette for your computer.
Backing up files
If you are replacing an installed hard disk drive, make a backup copy
of the data from the drive that you are replacing.
You can use the XCOPY program to copy groups of files, including
directories and subdirectories, from one drive to another. If the
destination already contains a file or directory with the same name,
XCOPY prompts you for a decision about overwriting the file. If you
need more information about XCOPY or backing up your hard disk
drive, see “Copying files to your new primary drive” on page 2-15, or
the documentation that comes with your operating system.
Creating a system diskette
If your computer will not restart, you might be able to recover by
using a System Diskette. The System Diskette allows you to recover
if you cannot restart (boot) your computer from a previously installed
hard disk drive, and you do not have a backup diskette. When you
restart your computer, the Basic Input/Output System (BIOS) checks
the diskette drive for a System Diskette before it checks the primary
partition on the hard disk drive.
The System Diskette contains the minimum set of files needed to start
your computer. In addition to the minimum set of files , you might
want to copy other useful files to the System Diskette, such as FDISK,
FORMAT, XCOPY, CHKDSK, and MEM.
To create a System Diskette for DOS:
1. Insert a blank diskette into drive A.
2. At the DOS prompt, type format a: /s. The /s parameter creates
the System Diskette.
3. Follow the on-screen instructions.
4. When the format process completes, copy the FDISK.COM,
FORMAT.COM, DISKCOPY.EXE, CHKDSK.COM, and
MEM.EXE utility programs from the DOS directory to the
diskette.
To create a System Diskette for Windows 98 or Windows 95:
1. Click Start from the main screen.
2. Select Settings; click Control Panel.
3. From the Control Panel screen, double-click Add/Remove
Programs.
4. Select the Startup Disk tab; follow the instructions on the screen.
To create Utility (System) Diskettes for OS/2:
1. Double-click OS/2 System on your Desktop.
2. Double-click System Setup.
3. Double-click Create Utility Diskettes. The Create Utility
Diskettes screen displays.
4. Follow the instructions on the screen. OS/2 creates three Utility
Diskettes.
You can also create the Utility Diskettes from the OS/2 CD-ROM by
running cdinst.cmd from the file directory.
Part 2: User's Guide
2-3
For more information on setting SCSI IDs, use the following
guidelines.
Installing the drive
These instructions are general guidelines for installing the IBM Ultra2
SCSI Hard Disk Drive in most computers. For specific information,
see the documentation that comes with your computer.
Step 1. Selecting a SCSI ID
Each SCSI device, including the SCSI adapter, must be assigned a
SCSI identification number (ID). Use the following table as a
guideline for selecting the ideal SCSI ID for your device:
SCSI Device
Ideal SCSI ID
Tape Drive
0
CD-ROM
1
High-density diskette drive
2
Removable hard drive
3
Third hard disk drive
4
Second hard disk drive
5
Startup hard disk drive
6
SCSI adapter
Additional hard disk drives
2-4
7
15 through 8
(decreasing order of
priority)
SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
You cannot assign the same ID to multiple devices on the same
SCSI adapter.
The ID you assign to your new drive depends on the number of
SCSI devices connected to the SCSI adapter, the SCSI IDs
already assigned to those devices, and the maximum number of
IDs for your SCSI adapter.
SCSI ID 7 is normally reserved for the SCSI adapter.
Assign the higher priority SCSI IDs (the highest priority is
normally 6) to devices, such as hard disk drives, that are faster
and are used the most. Assign lower priority SCSI ID numbers
to slower SCSI devices, such as CD-ROM drives and tape drives.
SCSI ID priorities are assigned by the SCSI adapter.
Narrow SCSI devices (devices with 50-pin connectors) such as
high-density diskette drives, CD-ROM drives, smaller tape drives
and removable hard drives can only connect to the wide bus using
a 50/68-pin connector, or through a separate 50-conductor cable.
These narrow devices can only use SCSI ID addresses 0 through
6. They must be assigned to the lowest priority SCSI ID’s
available in that range.
Most IBM computer systems ship with the SCSI adapter preset to
look to SCSI ID 6 for the startup drive that contains your
operating system.
Before you install the drive, determine which SCSI IDs are
already assigned to avoid assigning duplicate ID numbers.
Step 2. Opening the computer
Step 4. Setting the SCSI ID for the drive
Turn off the computer and unplug the power cords for the computer
and all attached devices. Open the computer. For specific information
on opening your computer see the documentation that comes with your
computer.
Set the SCSI ID for your drive by placing jumpers on the appropriate
drive jumper pins. See your SCSI Hard Disk Drive User’s Guide
Supplement and the diagram below for information on SCSI ID jumper
placement.
Note: The orientation of the jumper pins on the diagram might be the
reverse of the orientation of the jumper pins on your drive. Be
sure to use the SCSI Hard Disk Drive User’s Guide Supplement
to confirm the correct jumper placement.
If you are replacing your primary hard disk drive, read “Copying files
to your new primary drive” on page 2-15 before you disconnect the
old drive.
SCSI ID 0 =
SCSI ID 1 =
SCSI ID 2 =
SCSI ID 3 =
Binary Weight 1 2 4 8
Step 3. Unpacking the drive
Use the following procedure to unpack and handle the drive. To
prevent damage to the drive, limit handling to a minimum.
1. Before opening the static-protective bag containing the drive,
touch the bag and your hand to an unpainted metal surface on the
computer for at least two seconds.
2. Remove the drive from the static-protective bag and handle it by
the edges. Do not touch any exposed components on the drive.
3. If you must put the drive down, place the static-protective bag on
a flat padded surface, such as a magazine, and place the drive on
the bag with the component side facing up.
Device
Priority Ranking
SCSI ID = 0
8
SCSI ID = 1
7
SCSI ID = 2
6
SCSI ID = 3
5
SCSI ID = 4
4
SCSI ID = 5
3
SCSI ID = 6
2 - Highest Priority Device
SCSI ID = 7
1 - Reserved for Controller
SCSI ID = 8
16 - Lowest Priority Device
SCSI ID = 9
15
SCSI ID = 10
14
SCSI ID = 11
13
SCSI ID = 12
12
SCSI ID = 13
11
SCSI ID = 14
10
SCSI ID = 15
9
Part 2: User's Guide
2-5
Save any spare jumpers; you might have to change the SCSI ID.
Refer to the SCSI Hard Disk Drive User’s Guide Supplement to see if
you can safely store spare jumpers on the drive jumper pins.
Step 5. Determining whether to disable Auto Start or
Auto Spinup
Note: Be sure that Auto Start is disabled when you are installing
the hard disk drive in an IBM PC server.
Refer to the SCSI Hard Disk Drive User’s Guide Supplement to
determine if Auto Start (also called Auto Spinup or Motor Start) is
enabled on your drive jumper pins. If Auto Start is enabled, this
attached drive starts at once when the computer is turned on.
However, starting two or more drives simultaneously might overload
the computer power supply. If you want to sequence drive startup in
order to flatten the power peak required for drive startup, be sure that
Auto Start is not enabled. If Auto Start is not enabled, the drive is
prevented from starting until it receives the Start Unit command from
the SCSI adapter. Most SCSI adapters send the Start Unit commands
to the drives sequentially from SCSI ID 0 to SCSI ID 15.
On IBM computer systems, you must use the following instructions to
verify that the SCSI adapter will send the Start Unit command to your
drive.
1. Turn on your computer.
2. Press Ctrl+A at the SCSI Adapter Power-On Self-Test (POST)
screen.
2-6
SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
3. Select Configure/View Host Adapter Settings and press Enter.
4. Select SCSI Device Configurations and press Enter.
5. Be sure that yes is selected for Send Start Unit Command under
the SCSI ID assigned to your drive.
6. Press Esc twice to save changes.
7. Select Yes to exit Utilities.
For more information, consult your drive and power supply
specifications.
For more information about drive startup, see the documentation that
comes with your SCSI adapter.
For SCSI adapters that do not send the Start Unit command, see the
documentation that comes with your SCSI adapter.
Installing other jumpers
Spindle Sync, Parity Disable, Write Protect, Auto Start Delay, Disable
Unit Attention, and other jumper positions that might be on the drive
jumper block are not needed for most installations.
Step 6. Terminating the SCSI chain
Note: Do not confuse termination power with device termination.
The SCSI adapter normally supplies termination power and the
SCSI device terminates the chain. For more information about
termination power, see the documentation that comes with your
SCSI adapter.
A SCSI device chain is made up of one or more SCSI devices
connected by a SCSI cable to a SCSI adapter. To prevent signal
reflections on the SCSI cable, the SCSI device chain must be
terminated with active terminators at both ends; there are no
exceptions.
Termination is also subject to the following guidelines:
Ultra2 SCSI drives do not provide termination.
Be sure to terminate only the ends of the SCSI chain. For
example, the last device and the SCSI adapter 1 shown in the
diagram below must be terminated.
1
Remove any terminators or terminating jumpers on devices in the
middle of the chain.
In the diagram below, the SCSI adapter 1 is in the middle of
the chain and is not terminated.
1
You cannot end the SCSI chain with devices that use passive
termination, such as some CD-ROM drives, tape drives, and
optical drives.
Only one device, the device at the end of the SCSI cable, a
68-pin device, can be terminated.
If the SCSI cable is not self-terminating, 50-pin devices
connected by pin converters cannot be at the end of the chain.
If the hard disk drive in an external enclosure needs termination,
plug an external terminator into the free connector on the
enclosure at the end of the chain. Do not also install a
termination jumper on the device inside the enclosure.
Part 2: User's Guide
2-7
Use the table below to determine a termination solution for your drive.
Cabling Scenario
Termination Solution
Computer system with
self-terminating SCSI cable
Simply add the drive to the
system; the cable provides
termination.
Computer system with the last
SCSI device terminating the chain
Add the drive, but not at the end
of the chain; the last SCSI device
provides termination.
The drive will be the only device
on a single-drop cable
1. Obtain a Method inline
terminator.9
2. Attach the inline terminator
to the drive, and connect the
drive to the single-drop cable.
Step 7. Preparing the drive for a 5.25-inch bay
Attention: Use the mounting screws that come with the drive to
attach the brackets to the drive. Using the wrong size screws
might damage the drive.
To install the drive in a 5.25-inch bay:
1. Attach a pair of 3.5-inch to 5.25-inch expansion brackets (not
included in this option package), as shown in the illustration.
Note: Adding the inline
terminator will reduce the
maximum data transfer
speed to 40 MB/sec.
.
9
You can purchase an inline active terminator, such as the Method DM6100-02-68 ADR, from Technical Cable Concepts, Inc. (1-800-832-2225 or
1-714-835-1081).
2-8
SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
You can use a 3.5-inch-to-5.25-inch conversion tray (not
included) instead of the brackets. You can purchase the
conversion tray (IBM PN 70G8165) from your IBM reseller.
Refer to the documentation that comes with the conversion tray
kit for instructions on attaching the tray.
2. Some computers require special hard disk drive mounting
hardware to ensure that the drive fits securely into the bay.
Contact your computer dealer or refer to the documentation that
comes with your computer if you need specialized mounting
hardware or more information.
Step 8. Mounting the drive in the bay
Step 9. Attaching the cables to the drive
The connector on one end of the internal SCSI cable connects to the
hard disk drive and the other end connects to the SCSI adapter. For
the best signal quality, use the free device connector that gives you the
maximum amount of cable between the drive and the SCSI adapter.
The SCSI adapter can be on the system board or it can be installed in
an expansion slot.
1. Locate a free device connector on the SCSI cable. One end of
the SCSI cable connects to the SCSI adapter and the other end
has connectors for attaching multiple SCSI devices.
To mount the drive in a horizontal or a vertical bay:
1. Slide the drive into the bay.
2. Align the drive-bay screw holes with the threaded holes in the
drive housing (or bracket).
3. Use the mounting screws in the option package or the special
screws with grommets provided with some IBM computer
systems; using other screws might damage the drive. Thread the
screws to loosely attach the drive to the bay. Usually two screws
are used on each side. Some installations use the screw holes on
the bottom (circuit board side) of the drive.
4. Check the drive alignment and tighten the screws. Do not
overtighten.
2. Attach an available connector on the SCSI cable to the connector
on the hard disk drive, as shown.
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If you are connecting your new drive to a SCSI adapter that has
68-pin D-shell connectors, the connector is narrower at the top
and will fit only one way.
Attention: Do not force the power connector into the drive. If
the connector does not seat using reasonable pressure, turn it
around and try again.
3. Find an unattached power connector coming from the computer
power supply and attach it to the four-pin dc power connector on
the back of the drive, as shown.
If all power cables are in use, purchase a dc Y-connector
(available at most electronic stores) and split a connection to
make room for more devices.
Step 10. Closing the computer
To complete the hardware section of the drive installation:
1. Be sure that the hard disk drive is securely mounted and the
connectors are firmly attached.
2. Be sure the cables do not interfere with the computer cover and
do not block the power-supply fan blades or air-flow paths.
3. Reinstall the computer cover.
4. Reconnect all devices.
5. Check your keyboard, mouse, and monitor for loose connections.
6. Plug all power cords into electrical outlets.
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SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
The first time you restart your computer after installing the new drive,
you might have to use the SCSI adapter utility program to update the
configuration information.
Notes:
1. If you are installing the primary drive in a Micro Channel
computer, you might have to restore the IML or System
Partition using your Reference and Diagnostic Diskettes.
2. If you are installing a secondary drive in a Micro Channel
computer, you must configure the drive using your System
Partition or Reference Diskette.
Refer to your operating system documentation for more
information about Micro Channel requirements.
Partitioning and formatting the drive
Attention
Partitioning and formatting a hard disk drive erases all user data
on the drive.
You must partition and format the hard disk drive before you can use
it. If you want to start your operating system from the drive (primary
drive), the drive must have an active primary partition (normally C).
You can use the remaining space on the drive for an extended partition
that you can divide into logical drives.
In most computers that have an IDE hard disk drive, you cannot
restart the computer from the SCSI hard disk drive. Normally, only
the primary partition on the IDE drive can be active (contains your
operating system and is used for startup) and only the active partition
can be used as the startup drive. If your SCSI hard disk drive
contains a primary partition, it must be inactive. If you are unsure
about restarting your computer from the SCSI hard disk drive, see the
documentation that comes with your computer and SCSI adapter.
Each operating system has unique directions for partitioning and
formatting a drive. Be sure to refer to the documentation that comes
with your operating system before continuing with the instructions
below for Windows NT, Windows 98 and 95, OS/2, and DOS and
Windows 3.x.
Partitioning and formatting using Windows NT and
NTFS
If you added your drive to a computer that has Windows NT on an
existing drive, follow the instructions below to partition and format
your new SCSI drive using the NTFS (NT File System) convention.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Turn on your computer.
Click Start on the desktop.
Select Programs, Administrative Tools (Common).
Click the Disk Administrator icon.
Follow the screen prompts to partition and format an additional
hard disk drive.
If you installed your drive to a computer that had no existing drive,
follow the instructions below to partition and format your new SCSI
drive for the Windows NT operating system using NTFS.
1. Insert the first Windows NT installation diskette (Setup Disk #1)
in the diskette drive or insert the Windows NT installation
CD-ROM in the CD-ROM drive.
2. Restart your computer.
3. Use instructions given in the Windows NT user’s guide to
partition and format your drive for Windows NT.
Part 2: User's Guide
2-11
Partitioning and formatting using Windows 98 or
Windows 95 and FAT32
See your operating system user’s guide for instructions on partitioning
and formatting a drive using Windows 98 or Windows 95.
The latest releases of Microsoft operating systems, including Windows
98 and Windows 95 OSR2, have an option for a 32-bit file allocation
table called FAT32. FAT32 supports partitions as large as 2 TB10 and
cluster sizes of 4 KB3 for partitions up to 8 GB.12 If you have FAT32,
you will be able to prepare your drive without concern for partition
size limits or storage efficiency. To determine if you have FAT32
installed, select your existing drive under My Computer, and select
Properties. If FAT32 is installed, the General tab will display
FAT32 under the drive label.
If you have FAT 16, partition your drive using instructions given in
“Partitioning and formatting using DOS or Windows 3.x and FAT16”
on page 2-13.
Partitioning and formatting using OS/2 and HPFS
If you are using OS/2, you can use the high performance file system
(HPFS) developed for OS/2, instead of the FAT16 file system, to
partition an additional drive. HPFS allocates files in 512-byte units,
reducing lost disk space. HPFS also creates large partitions and
accommodates large numbers of files more efficiently than FAT16
does. For information on partitioning a drive using FAT16, go to
“Partitioning and formatting using DOS or Windows 3.x and FAT16”
on page 2-13.
To prepare the new drive using OS/2:
1. Partition and format your new drive for OS/2 using the FAT16 or
HPFS file system, or both FAT16 and HPFS, using directions
given in the OS/2 User’s Guide.
Note: In larger capacity drives, the OS/2 operating system can
partition only up to the first 2.14 GB, or the first 1024 logical
cylinders, of the drive using the FAT file system. However, you
can partition the entire drive using the HPFS file system.
Since you cannot partition the entire capacity of the drive when
using FAT, you must use HPFS to partition the rest of the drive.
When referring to hard-disk-drive capacity, TB (terrabyte) means 1 000 000 000 000 bytes; total user-accessible capacity may vary depending on operating system.
When referring to cluster sizes, KB (kilobyte) means 1 024 bytes.
12 When referring to hard-disk-drive-capacity, GB (gigabyte) means 1 000 000 000 bytes; total user-accessible capacity may vary depending on operating system.
10
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SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
For more information on partition size limits for FAT16, see
“Selecting a primary partition or logical drive size” on page 2-13.
2. If you choose to make your new drive a boot drive, refer to your
OS/2 User’s Guide for information on installing OS/2 on your
new drive.
If you use the DOS-based Fixed Disk Setup Program (FDISK) utility
to partition your drive and you are using the maximum partition size
of 2.14 GB, you must enter the partition size as 2047 MB. (FDISK
uses the software industry binary-base number system where one
binary MB is 1 048 576 bytes.)
Partitioning and formatting using DOS or Windows
3.x and FAT16
The largest partition size that you can create using the 16-bit file
allocation table (FAT16) file is approximately 2.14 GB.
If you are installing a drive larger than 2.14 GB and you are using the
FAT16 convention, you must create multiple partitions.
To create multiple partitions:
(2.14 GB), you must specify the size as 2047 MB. (FDISK uses the
software industry binary-base number system where one binary MB is
1 048 576 bytes.)
Note: If you are installing the hard disk drive that will contain
your primary partition, install the operating system as part of the
installation procedure.
Selecting a primary partition or logical drive size
Base your partitions and partition sizes on how you use your
computer.
Use a larger partition size for the convenience of having many
files in one directory structure or for large databases.
A smaller partition size makes better use of space if you have a
large number of small files, such as text files.
FDISK assigns space on a hard disk drive in clusters. A cluster is the
smallest unit of space on the drive that your operating system, using
FAT conventions, can address. The operating system assigns a file to
one or more clusters. Even a very small file uses a full cluster.
Select a primary partition size and create the primary partition.
Create an extended logical partition using the remaining space on
the drive.
Create one or more logical drives in the extended partition.
If you are using FDISK to create partitions and logical drives and you
want to create the maximum size primary partition or logical drive
Part 2: User's Guide
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The following table shows how the cluster size is incremented as the
partition size increases.
Partition Size
Cluster Size (FAT16)
0 MB - 16MB
4 KB
16 MB - 128 MB
2 KB
128 MB - 256 MB
4 KB
256 MB - 512 MB
8 KB
512 MB - 1 GB
16 KB
1 GB - 2 GB
32 KB
These examples illustrate how partition size relates to data storage
efficiency.
If you create a 2.14 GB partition (2047 binary MB), each disk
cluster is 32 KB. (In binary notation, KB means 1 024 bytes.) A
one KB file uses one cluster (32 KB) of disk space.
If the partition size is 1.00 GB (977 binary MB), the cluster size
is 16 KB. A one KB file uses one cluster (16 KB) of disk space.
A normal mix of application and data files can include thousands of
different-sized files. If you replace your disk drive with a larger
capacity drive, normally you will create a larger primary partition or
logical drive on the new device. When you copy files from a smaller
to a larger partition, the same files might take surprisingly more disk
space. The increase in disk space for the same files is caused by the
increase in cluster size.
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SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
Preparing the primary drive for DOS or Windows 3.x
If you are installing the drive that will contain your operating system
(the primary drive), find your operating system installation diskettes
and insert the first operating system installation diskette into the
diskette drive (or insert the operating system installation CD if your
operating system is installed from the CD-ROM drive). Restart your
computer. The operating system screens lead you through partitioning
and formatting the drive.
After creating the primary partition, you can use the remaining disk
space for an extended partition. Follow the instructions on the screen
to create one or more logical drives within the extended partition.
Preparing a secondary drive for DOS or Windows 3.x
A secondary drive is any hard disk drive that does not contain the
active primary partition (the partition that contains your operating
system). Normally you allocate all of the disk space on a secondary
drive to an extended partition and then create logical drives in the
extended partition. For more information about creating partitions see
the documentation that comes with your operating system.
The following example uses the FDISK and FORMAT commands to
partition and format an extended partition on a secondary hard disk
drive.
1. At the DOS prompt, type fdisk and press Enter.
2. FDISK displays the current fixed-disk drive message, containing
the current fixed-disk drive number, above the FDISK menu. The
fixed-disk drive number is not associated with the logical drive
letters assigned by FDISK. Check the current fixed disk drive
number to be sure that you partition the correct hard disk drive.
The default current fixed disk drive is the fixed disk drive
containing the active primary partition (drive C). To change the
fixed disk drive number for the secondary drive:
a. Select Change current fixed disk from the FDISK menu.
b. Select the new drive number from the drive list.
c. Return to the FDISK menu.
3. Select Create DOS partition or Logical DOS Drive and press
Enter.
4. Select Create Extended DOS Partition and press Enter. The
default size is the remaining space on the drive. You must accept
the default size to use the full capacity of your drive.
5. The Create Logical DOS Drive(s) in the Extended DOS Partition
screen displays. Follow the instructions on the screen to create
one or more logical drives within the extended partition.
6. When you are finished, press ESC to return from the FDISK
menu.
7. When you are prompted, restart your computer and format your
logical drives.
8. To format a logical drive, type format x: (where x is the logical
drive letter assigned by FDISK) at the DOS prompt and press
Enter.
Copying files to your new primary drive
Note: This procedure is included as an alternate method for
transferring files from one hard disk drive to another. If you are
not sure about your operating system configuration parameters or
about applications or files that might be open do not use this
procedure.
If you are replacing your primary drive, you can install your operating
system and other applications on your new primary drive. As an
alternative, you can use the following procedure to copy your installed
operating system and applications from your old primary drive to your
new primary drive.
1. Leave your existing primary hard disk drive installed and install
your new drive as a second drive.
2. Use FDISK to create a primary partition on the new drive. You
can have only one active primary partition on the computer so
this will be an inactive primary partition.
3. Exit FDISK and restart your computer. FDISK assigns a drive
letter to the inactive partition. Use the FORMAT command to
format the new drive.
4. Use XCOPY to copy directories and files from the C drive to
your inactive primary partition on the new drive. For information
about XCOPY options, see the documentation that comes with
your operating system. Before you run XCOPY, close all other
applications including Windows. If an active application locks
data files, the files might not be copied.
Part 2: User's Guide
2-15
5. Open FDISK and display the current drive partitioning
information. Select the current startup partition drive number and
make this partition inactive (you no longer can restart from this
partition).
Select the new drive number and make its primary partition
active.
Solving problems
Using the information in this section, you might be able to solve the
problem yourself or gather information that you can pass to the service
representative when you make your call.
Your computer or hard disk drive does not operate correctly.
6. Press ESC to exit FDISK. Restart your computer when
prompted.
7. Turn off your computer and disconnect the power cord. Open up
the computer and set the SCSI ID for the new drive to the ID
your SCSI adapter requires for the primary drive, for example,
SCSI ID 0 or 6. To avoid duplicate SCSI IDs for the two drives,
remove the original startup drive or change the SCSI ID of the
original drive.
8. Close the computer, reconnect the power cord, and restart the
computer. The computer starts from the primary partition on the
new drive.
If files are not copied correctly from your old drive, your computer
might not start correctly. If this happens you must reinstall your
operating system on the new drive. For more information, see the
documentation that comes with your operating system.
Check the drive to ensure that all power and signal cables are
securely attached.
Check the SCSI-ID jumper setting. No two SCSI devices can
have the same SCSI ID. This includes the SCSI adapter.
Be sure that the last device or cable terminator terminates the
SCSI cable. There must be a terminator or a terminating
device at the end of the SCSI cable. You must terminate
both internal and external SCSI cables. Remove any
terminators on devices that are not at the end of the cable.
If you are installing the drive in an IBM PC Server, be sure
that auto-start is not active.
Turn off all attached devices before turning off the computer.
Unplug the computer power cord. Remove the drive. Check
for bent or misaligned pins. If there are no problems,
reinstall the drive.
Your computer does not configure the hard disk drive correctly.
Most configuration problems are caused by incorrect
termination or incorrect SCSI ID configuration. If multiple
SCSI devices are attached, disconnect all other SCSI devices
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SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
on the chain. Assign the highest priority SCSI ID available
(6) to the drive and terminate the drive. Try to detect the
drive using your SCSI adapter utility program.
–
If you have just installed a SCSI adapter and you are now
installing the SCSI hard disk drive, your SCSI adapter must
be correctly configured before you can activate the drive. To
configure the adapter, you might need to know the available
I/O addresses, IRQs, and ROM addresses. If you are unable
to configure your adapter, you will not be able to use your
SCSI device. If you need more information about
configuring your adapter, see the documentation that came
with your computer or SCSI adapter.
Older SCSI devices might not support synchronous data
transfer. If you have an older SCSI drive, CD-ROM drive, or
tape drive in your computer, erratic operation or other
problems might occur during asynchronous data transfer. If
problems occur, remove the other drives on the cable and
retry the operation. If this does not solve the problem, try
using your SCSI adapter utility to select asynchronous data
transfer for use with your SCSI adapter.
Termination power must be applied to the SCSI bus. This is
not the same as signal termination. If your adapter does not
supply termination power, power must be supplied by a
device on the SCSI bus. Multiple devices can supply
termination power to the bus, but only one device can
terminate the SCSI chain.
Use the following cable length guidelines for attaching your
new SCSI drive to an existing UltraSCSI chain.
–
SCSI-2 and Ultra SCSI device cables should not exceed
3 meters (9 ft 10 in).
–
If more than four devices are on the SCSI bus, the
maximum cable length should not exceed 1.5 meters (4
ft 11 in).
The total length of cable for a chain comprised of only
Ultra2 SCSI devices must be less than or equal to 12
meters (39 ft 4 in).
If you are attaching an UltraSCSI device in an external
enclosure and the faster data transfer rate does not work, use
your Ultra SCSI adapter utility to disable the faster data
transfer rate.
Check for a jumper in the auto-start position. When you install a
jumper on the auto-start pins, the hard disk drive motor starts
when the computer is turned on. When the auto-start position is
open the drive must receive a start command from the SCSI
adapter before it can spinup. Some computers expect the drive to
be spinning and do not wait for a command from the SCSI
adapter. Also, you might have to select additional settings on your
SCSI adapter.
If you need more information, see the documentation that comes
with your operating system and SCSI adapter.
Part 2: User's Guide
2-17
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SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
Part 3: Appendixes
Appendix A.
Safety Information
Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
3-1
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SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
Part 3: Appendixes
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3-4
SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
Part 3: Appendixes
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Part 3: Appendixes
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SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
Part 3: Appendixes
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SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
Appendix B.
Help and service information
Before calling IBM technical support, try to solve the problem
problem yourself by using the information in “Solving problems” on
page 2-16. If you are unable to solve the problem yourself, this
section contains information on how to reach your IBM technical
support representative.
If you have questions about your new Options by IBM product, or
require technical assistance, visit the IBM Personal Computing Support
Web site at http://www.pc.ibm.com/support. For information about
IBM, IBM PC products, or Options by IBM visit the IBM Personal
Computing Web site at http://www.pc.ibm.com. Additionally, you can
receive information from the IBM Automated Fax system at
1-800-426-3395 (in Canada, 1-800-465-3299), or from the Personal
Systems Group Bulletin Board System (PSG BBS) at 1-919-517-0001.
You can also get help and information through the IBM PC
HelpCenter, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Response time may
vary depending on the number and nature of the calls received.
Marketing, installation, and configuration support through the
HelpCenter will be withdrawn or made available for a fee, at IBM’s
discretion, 90 days after the option has been withdrawn from
marketing. Additional support offerings, including step-by-step
installation assistance, are available for a nominal fee.
installed in an IBM computer, you might be entitled to service at your
location. Your technical support representative can help you
determine the best alternative.
Step 1: Problem solving
You may be able to solve the problem yourself. Before calling the
HelpCenter, please prepare for the call by following these steps:
1. If you are having installation or configuration problems, refer to
the detailed sections on installation found in this manual.
2. Visit the Personal Computing Support Web site specific to the
model of option you have purchased. Updated installation
instructions, hints and tips, or updated system-specific notes are
often published in this section. You might find that later device
drivers are available that will improve the performance and
compatibility for your new option.
If you are installing this option in an IBM computer, also visit the
applicable support Web page for that computer model. These
pages might also contain useful hints and tips related to
installation of this option and might refer to BIOS or
device-driver updates required for your computer model. If you
are installing the option in a non-IBM computer, refer to the
manufacturer’s Web site.
3. Check all cabling to be sure that it is correct as shown in this
manual.
During the warranty period, assistance for replacement or exchange of
defective components is available. In addition, if your IBM option is
Part 3: Appendixes
3-11
Step 2: Preparing for the call
To assist the technical support representative, have available as much
of the following information as possible:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Option name
Option part number
Proof of purchase
Computer manufacturer, model, serial number (if IBM), and
manual
5. Exact wording of the error message (if any)
6. Description of the problem
7. Hardware and software configuration information for your system
If possible, be at your computer. Your technical support representative
might want to guide you through the problem during the call.
Step 3: Placing the call to IBM
If you call 90 days or more after the date of withdrawal or after your
warranty has expired, you might be charged a fee.
For the support telephone number and support hours by country, refer
to the following table or to the enclosed technical support insert. If
the number is not provided, contact your IBM reseller or IBM
marketing representative.
Support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week
Canada
1-800-565-3344
U.S.A. / Puerto Rico
1-800-772-2227
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SCSI Hard Disk Drives for IBM PCs User’s Guide
Additional Technical Support Resources
Online technical support is available during the life of your product.
Online assistance can be obtained through the Personal Computing
Support Web site, the PSG Electronic Bulletin Board System, and the
IBM Automated Fax System.
Online Technical Support
IBM Personal Computing Support
Web Site
http://www.pc.ibm.com/support
IBM PSG BBS
1-919-517-0001
IBM Automated Fax System
1-800-426-3395
1-800-465-3299 (in Canada)
Appendix C.
Notices
References in this publication to IBM products, programs, or services do not
imply that IBM intends to make these available in all countries in which IBM
operates. Any reference to an IBM product, program, or service is not intended
to state or imply that only that IBM product, program, or service may be used.
Subject to IBM’s valid intellectual property or other legally protectable rights,
any functionally equivalent product, program, or service may be used instead of
the IBM product, program, or service. The evaluation and verification of
operation in conjunction with other products, except those expressly designated
by IBM, are the responsibility of the user.
Trademarks
The following terms are trademarks of the IBM Corporation in the United
States or other countries or both:
HelpCenter
Micro Channel
IBM
OS/2
UNIX is a registered trademark in the United States and other countries
licensed exclusively through X/Open Company Limited.
Microsoft, Windows, and Windows NT are registered trademarks of Microsoft
Corporation.
Other company, product, and service names may be trademarks or service
marks of others.
IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter in
this document. The furnishing of this document does not give you any license
to these patents. You can send license inquiries, in writing, to:
IBM Director of Licensing
IBM Corporation
North Castle Drive
Armonk, NY 10504-1785
U.S.A.
Part 3: Appendixes
3-13
IBM
Part Number: 37L1336
Printed in U.S.A.
37L1336
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