SG Loop Groups w/ 1

SG Loop Groups w/ 1

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GALAXY HOW TO GUIDE

 

for

Schedule Propagation

Programming One-Minute Time Schedules

with the Loop Group Feature

 

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

System Galaxy Version 10.3

 

How to Program

One-Minute Schedules with Loop Groups

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

Information in this document is subject to change without notice.   

Therefore, no claims are made as to the accuracy or completeness of this document. 

2nd edition July 2013  Copyright © 2013  Galaxy Control Systems  All rights reserved  

Galaxy Control Systems 

3 North Main Street 

Walkersville MD 21793 

800.445.5560 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  www

.galaxysys.

com 

 

No part of this document may be reproduced, copied, adapted, or transmitted, in any form  or  by  any  means,  electronic  or  mechanical,  for  any  purpose,  without  the  express  written  consent  of  Galaxy  Control  Systems.    Copyright  protection  claims  include  all  forms  and  matters  of  copyrighted  material  and  information,  including  but  not  limited  to,  material  generated  from  the  software  programs,  which  are  displayed  on  the  screen  such  as  icons,  look and feel, etc. 

 

Trademarks 

Microsoft

®

, Windows

®

, Windows NT

®

, MSDE

®

 and SQL Server

®  are registered trademarks of 

Microsoft Corporation in the U.S. and other countries.  

 

 

 

 

Adobe

®

, Acrobat

®

 are registered trademarks of Adobe Systems Inc.  

This PDF is created with Adobe v9 or later.

 

Graphics and illustrations by Candace Roberts, SQA & Technical Writer.

 

 

Page 2 of 35

Table of Contents

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

Introduction to Managing Schedules with Loop Groups .......................................5

Managing Common Schedules using the Loop Group Update Option.......................................... 5

Managing Local Schedules without Loop Groups....................................................................... 5

Establishing ‘Best Practices’ ..................................................................................................... 6

What’s covered in this guide.................................................................................................... 6

The One‐Minute Schedule in a Nutshell.................................................................................... 7

COMPONENTS OF THE ONE‐MINUTE SCHEDULE ................................................................................................................ 7

Important Terminology used in this Guide ................................................................................ 7

Overall Requirements for 1‐Minute Time Schedules .................................................................. 9

SG HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS .......................................................................................................................................... 9

SYSTEM‐WIDE SOFTWARE SETTINGS ................................................................................................................................... 9

LOOP PROPERTY SETTINGS ................................................................................................................................................... 9

SCHEDULE PROGRAMMING.................................................................................................................................................. 9

SCHEDULE PROPAGATION ................................................................................................................................................. 10

ASSIGNING AND LOADING SCHEDULES ............................................................................................................................ 10

Planning & Best Practices for 1-min Schedules & Loop Group..........................11

Before Reading this Chapter …............................................................................................... 11

Concept for using 1‐Minute Time Schedules: .......................................................................... 12

UNDERSTANDING THE PARTS OF THE 1‐MINUTE SCHEDULE .......................................................................................... 12

STEP‐1: Planning & Creating Loop Groups: .............................................................................. 13

UNDERSTANDING THE PARTS OF THE 1‐MINUTE SCHEDULE .......................................................................................... 13

PART‐2: Planning & Creating Schedules (including Day Types & Time Periods): ......................... 15

Configuring Loop Groups and 1-min Time Schedules ........................................17

Before Reading this Chapter …............................................................................................... 17

STEP 1: Configuring the Loop to use One‐Minute Formatting: .................................................. 18

SETTING THE LOOP PROPERTIES TO USE 1‐MINUTE FORMAT: .................................................. 18

STEP 2: Assigning a Loop to a Loop Group: .............................................................................. 19

Page 3 of 35

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

CREATING LOOP GROUPS: ..................................................................................................... 19

STEP 3: Programming Day Types for the Calendar Year:........................................................... 20

UNDERSTANDING DAY TYPES:........................................................................................................................................... 20

Opening the 1‐Minute Schedules screens: ....................................................................................................................... 21

Programming a Day Type Name:....................................................................................................................................... 22

Assigning the Calendar Days using the Calendar Wizard: ............................................................................................... 23

Assigning the Calendar Days using the Calendar Tool: .................................................................................................... 24

DATE FINDER UTILITY – View All Unassigned (skipped) Days: ........................................................................................ 25

RELEASE ALL DATES UTILITY ‐ Releasing All Assigned Days from a Day Type: ............................................................... 26

REPORTING – View All Assigned Days by Day Type:........................................................................................................ 27

STEP 4: Programming the Time Periods: ................................................................................. 28

UNDERSTANDING TIME PERIODS:..................................................................................................................................... 28

Opening the 1‐Minute Schedules screens: ....................................................................................................................... 29

Creating a Time Period:...................................................................................................................................................... 30

 

 

 

 

STEP 5: Programming the Schedules:...................................................................................... 31

UNDERSTANDING SCHEDULE MAPPING:.......................................................................................................................... 31

Opening the 1‐Minute Schedules screens: ....................................................................................................................... 32

Creating the Schedules:...................................................................................................................................................... 33

Using Schedules in the System Programming screens .........................................34

About Assigning Schedule to an Access Groups: ...................................................................... 34

About Assigning Schedules to Doors, Inputs and other Hardware:............................................ 35

Page 4 of 35

 

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

Introduction to Managing Schedules with Loop Groups

 

 

    

   

This guide does not offer instructions about how to configure 15‐minute schedules. Fifteen‐minute  schedules are covered in the System Galaxy Software User Guide.  

 

   This guide explains how to use the Loop Group Update feature to propagate  with 1‐Minute 

Time Schedules to multiple loops simultaneously.  This feature is designed especially for large  systems that have multiple loops, or school systems that have multiple campuses. The ability to  propagate schedules eliminates the laborious task of configuring identical schedules on every  loop.  You can be sure all the loops have the exact same schedule.  Additionally, the feature  makes the ongoing task of maintaining schedules more efficient – however, great caution must  be taken to ensure that you are consistently updating the schedules in the same way.  

Managing Common Schedules using the Loop Group Update Option 

 

   Schedule Propagation is basically the ability to automatically copy/update a common schedule  on multiple loops/clusters at the same time.  This means the operator will manually program the  schedule (day types and time periods) on the ‘home loop’; and the system will use the Loop 

Group Update option to automatically propagate the schedule to every target loop that is a  participating Loop Group Member.   

Managing Local Schedules without Loop Groups 

 

   The Loops will also have schedules (day types and time periods) that are not maintained by the 

Loop Group Update feature. For these schedules you will UNCHECK the loop group option before  you save your changes. 

 

Page 5 of 35

   

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

Establishing ‘Best Practices’ 

Establishing ‘best practices’ will make managing your schedules easier and avoid conflicts.  

 

Be sure to establish Best Practices like … 

 Designating a “home loop” that the programming of common schedules originate from 

 Designate a way to differentiate between your common schedules vs. local schedules (i.e. 

 

common day types and time periods vs. local day types and time periods) 

 Develop and adhere to consistent processes for planning, creating and maintaining  common schedules with the Loop Group feature. 

 Use good training and communication practices with operators who maintain schedules 

 Use naming and record‐keeping conventions that make it easy to identify the purpose of a  common schedule and where it is used. 

 Keep good records of your work. 

 Never attempt to use the propagation (loop groups) for exceptions and exclusions.  When  you need to temporarily alter a timing of doors and devices for a brief exception or  duration, you should consider using the Command Script feature and Command Scheduler.  

See the Guide for using Command Scripts and Action Scheduler for details. 

What’s covered in this guide 

 

 

 

 

This guide covers the following topics: 

 Planning of Loop Groups  

 Planning for Day Types 

 Creating Loop Groups 

 Assigning Loops to Loop Groups 

 Programming Day Types 

 Using the Calendar Tool to assign dates to a Day Type 

 Using the Calendar Wizard to assign dates to a Day Type 

 Finding unassigned dates and other related utilities 

 Programming 1‐minute Time Periods 

 Configuring 1‐minute Schedules (mapping day types to time periods) 

 Viewing Reports 

 Using (assigning) schedules throughout the system 

 

Page 6 of 35

 

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

The One‐Minute Schedule in a Nutshell 

 

 

The One‐minute Time Format provides the ability to create precision schedules in one‐minute increments.  

These schedules activate & deactivate at any minute of the day (i.e. 24‐hr cycle) based on the programming.   

 

COMPONENTS OF THE ONE‐MINUTE SCHEDULE 

 

In System Galaxy, the operator creates a One‐Minute Schedule by first building the components of the  schedule.  The components are [Day Types & Calendar Days] and [Time Periods].  Once you have built your  components, you must pair‐up, or map these components together in the Schedules tab.   

 

 

NOTE: After the operator has created the necessary schedules, they can be assigned to doors, hardware devices,  and card access privileges in their respective programming screens.  After the system programming is completed,  the operator must load the loop(s)/control panels with the schedules and new system programming. 

NOTE: If you are using Loop Groups to propagate schedules to multiple loops at the same time, then you must  have already  

assigned those Loops to a Loop Group Member option in the Loop Properties screen 

and you must enable the Loop Group Update option before saving the schedule or Day Type or Time 

Period.  See more detail on this in the Concepts and Planning chapter. 

 

 

 

Important Terminology used in this Guide 

TERM MEANING 

1‐minute format 

time format that allows schedules to work in ‘1‐minute increments’ (instead of  standard quarter‐hour increments) for all panels on a loop (a loop‐level setting). 

Page 7 of 35

 

 

TERM

15‐minute format 

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

MEANING 

time format that allows schedules to work in standard quarter‐hour increments. 

NOTE: see the System Galaxy Software User Guide for all instructions about  programming 15‐minute schedules and holidays. 

Command Scripts feature 

A feature that allows the Administrator to create lists of system commands that  temporarily override normal schedules. See Command Script User Guide for more. 

Common Schedule 

(see local schedule) 

Local Schedule 

The term ‘common schedules’ refers to any schedule that is propagated or multiple  loops have in common that is propagated and maintained by Loop Group updates.  

Ex: if three loops need their doors unlocked from 8a – 5p every day, then they have  common schedules (i.e. can use the Loop Group Update feature).   

The term ‘local schedule’ refers to any schedule (day type or time period) that is not  updated or maintained by Loop Group Updates (schedule propagation feature). 

Home Loop (source loop) 

The loop you are currently editing in a programming screen

. The Home Loop is  considered to be the programming source for the member loops.  

 

Loop (Loop/Cluster)  A Loop (or Cluster) is simply a group of controllers that use the same loop‐level  programming (settings & rules.  For example: all control panels within a loop will use  the same time format.  

Loop‐level Programming 

Any software feature/option/setting that applies to all control panels in a loop (i.e.  the Loop Properties; Schedules, Day Types, Time Periods, Access Groups, etc.). 

Loop Group 

Loop Group Member  option 

Loop Group Update  option 

Loop Properties  

Member Loop   (target  loop) 

Loop Group is a feature in the software that allows the operator to propagate 

(copy & update) common time schedules to multiple loops simultaneously. Once a  loop becomes a member of a Loop Group, it is subject to receive the changes that  are made from any other loop in the same group. 

The Loop Group Member option is a checkbox option found in the Loop Properties  screen. When checked, the loop is considered to be a member of the group. 

The Loop Group Update option is a checkbox option found in the schedule screens. 

When checked, changes will be propagated (copied) to all target member loops. 

The software programming screen where loop‐level settings are configured (i.e. 

Loop Groups, 1‐minute time format, etc).  These properties apply to all control  panels within the loop. 

Any loop that is a member of a Loop Group.  Member loops are target loops that  receive updates from the home loop when the Loop Group Update option is  enabled. 

Propagating  

(schedule propagation) 

Schedule, Day Type 

Propagating schedules means you are simultaneously copying the time schedule  programming of one loop to all loops that are members of the same Loop Group.   

Schedule, Time Period 

Schedule (mapping) 

Day Type is a component of a Time Schedule.  A Day Type allows the operator to  define which calendar days/dates are to be reserved (used) for use with a particular  time period. 

Time Period is a component of a Time Schedule that designates which minutes 

(during a 24‐hour span) are “active”(on) or “inactive”(off).   [ * per typical wiring ] 

Schedule maps (or pairs‐up) the Day Types (calendar days) with the Time Periods. 

Page 8 of 35

 

 

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

Overall Requirements for 1‐Minute Time Schedules 

SG HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS 

1.

You must have 635/600‐series Control Panels to support 1‐Minute Time Schedules and Loop Groups.  

 

2. You cannot mix 1‐minute format with 15‐minute format on the same loop/cluster.   

 

3. You must have 1‐minute format schedules on a separate loop if you are using both formats.    

SYSTEM‐WIDE SOFTWARE SETTINGS 

1. System Installation UPGRADES: you must run Part 1 of the software installation DVD to upgrade to the  latest .NET Framework. 

2. System Registration or Workstation Registration: There are no system registration requirements  pertaining to using Loop Groups or 1‐Minute Time Schedules. 

3. System Settings (Workstation Options): There are no pre‐configuration requirements in the system  settings screen for using Loop Group programming or 1‐Minute Time Schedules.  

LOOP PROPERTY SETTINGS 

4. You cannot mix the Sharing of time schedules with Loop Groups feature.   

5. The Loop Group feature is designed to work with 1‐minute schedules. 

6.

To enable 1‐minute format on a loop, you must set the [Time Schedule Format] field to ‘1‐Minute 

Time Format’ (in Loop Properties screen/Advanced tab).

 

7.

To make a loop a participating ‘common’ member of a Loop Group, you must enable (check) the Loop 

Group Member option in the Loops Properties screen/Loop Group Members tab.  

 

a.

To withdraw a loop from getting updates, the Loop Group Member option must be unchecked. 

 

b.

Enabling the Loop Group Member option causes the Loop Group Update option to appear in all  the schedule programming screens (inclu. day types & time periods) for the common loop(s).  

 

c.

The Loop Group Member option must be used in combination with the Loop Group Update 

option in order to actually copy or propagate schedules.

 

SCHEDULE PROGRAMMING 

8. You must create your Day Types and Time Periods before you can create your Schedules

9. You should reserve a block of your day types to be used for common schedules. There are 100 Day 

Types – for example use Day Types 1 through 30 for common schedules and holidays. Use the  remainder of the day types for independent scheduling.  If you can keep your common day types  together and not intermixed with independent day types it will make programming more organized. 

10. When building your day types, you must build the day types that uses (claim) the most days/dates 

first, then build the day types that claim/take the least days last. This is because day types steal the  days from pre‐existing day types when you pick a date range.  EX: build the workdays and weekends 

Page 9 of 35

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

first for the entire year using the date ranges.  Then build the day types for holidays or special days last. 

If you do Normal Days after Holidays then the system will steal days from the Holiday – the Holiday will  loose its days to the Normal Day. 

SCHEDULE PROPAGATION 

11.

To make a common schedule* propagate to all members of a Loop Group, the operator must enable 

(check) the Loop Group Update option at the local loop before saving the schedule* (this includes day  types  and time periods). 

 

a.

When unchecked the operator will only update the schedule at the local loop (i.e. the loop that  is being edited).

 

b. You must create Schedules (including time periods to the day types), before you can use them  in the system or at the panels. 

ASSIGNING AND LOADING SCHEDULES  

12. You must assign your schedules to Access Groups, doors, inputs, outputs, elevators or other devices  before they can be effective in the control panel.   

13. You must load Schedules to your control panels after all programming is done and before they are in  effect.  Once you load the schedules to the Loops/control panels the first time, the system should  update the panel when a schedule is edited.   

14. if your panels (hardware) or access groups do not seem to be obeying the schedules, check the  following: 

a. Verify that the Loop Group Member option is checked (or unchecked) for the loop in question if  the update was supposed to be propagated through the Loop Group function. 

b. Verify that the Loop Group Update option is checked (or unchecked) the Loop Group update  option as you desired BEFORE you save your changes in the following screens. 

Verify that you have assigned the correct calendar days to the Day Type as you intended. 

Verify you correctly configured the 1‐minute intervals of the Time Period you intended. 

Verify the correct Time Period is mapped to the correct Day Type in the Schedule screen. 

c. Cardholder:  Verify you have assigned  

the correct Schedule to the correct access group in Access Group Programming screen;  

the correct access group to the card/cardholder in the Cardholder screen; 

d. Doors/Readers: Verify you have assigned 

the correct Schedule to the correct door as you desired in the Reader Properties screen;  

e. Inputs/outputs and I/O Groups: Verify you have assigned … 

 the correct Schedule to the correct hardware device in the appropriate hardware Properties  screen;  

 

f. Load the loop/panel including schedules, access rules, cardholders, readers and other  hardware devices if you are not sure your changes went to the panel

Page 10 of 35

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

Planning & Best Practices for 1-min Schedules & Loop Group

 

   This chapter addresses the concepts of the 1

‐Minute Time Schedules

 and the 

Loop Group feature 

 

 

 

that allows the operator to copy common schedules to multiple loops/clusters at the same time. 

 

 

 

 

It is important to understand how the schedules work before you employ the LOOP GROUP feature. 

Before Reading this Chapter … 

 

Before reading this chapter you should  

 Review and familiarize yourself with the Terms & Definitions section  

 Review and familiarize yourself with the Requirements section found.   

 

 

 

It may be helpful to print those sections for reference while reading this chapter.   

Page 11 of 35

 

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

Concept for using 1‐Minute Time Schedules: 

 

Setting up these time schedules requires a few steps. The steps must be accomplished in sequence before the  schedules can take effect in the panels. Please see the Planning section to help you organize your  programming efforts. 

 

UNDERSTANDING THE PARTS OF THE 1‐MINUTE SCHEDULE 

There are 3 basic parts of the 1‐minute format: You will configure each part in sequence. 

Day Types (assign calendar dates ‐ basically date ranges) – day types are global to the entire loop, thus  and you can use day types in any schedule on the same loop.  See the following section on 

Understanding 

Day Types

 for details. 

Time Periods (1‐min intervals of a 24 hr. span) ‐ these can be mapped to any day type; and you can use  your time periods in any schedule on the same loop. See the following section on 

Understanding Time 

Periods 

for details. 

Schedules ‐ where you map the appropriate Time Period to each Day Type. See the following section on 

Understanding Schedules 

for details. 

The following programming rules apply to schedules: 

 You must create Day‐Types* (calendar days) before you can “map” them to a schedule.  

 You must create Time‐Periods* (hours/mins) before you can “map” them to a schedule. 

 When you create the Schedule*, you must “map” the Time‐Periods (hours/mins) to the Day‐Types 

(calendar days).   TIP:  Use logical, descriptive names. 

 

 

 

 

(*) FOOTNOTE:  if you want your programming to be propagated to other loops, you must select the Loop Group 

Update option for the desired Loop Group.  Note: the target loops must be a member of the chosen Loop Group. 

IMPORTANT: Once a Schedule is created, it must be assigned ‐ either to an access group or to a hardware device (i.e. door  schedule, input, etc.).  After being assigned, the schedule must be loaded to the control panels on the loop’s .   

Page 12 of 35

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

STEP‐1: Planning & Creating Loop Groups: 

Note that “schedules” here‐in means any component of the schedule programming, i.e. the day types,  calendar dates, time periods, and schedule mapping. 

 

UNDERSTANDING THE PARTS OF THE 1‐MINUTE SCHEDULE 

1. Make a list of which loops/control panels will need common Day Types, Time Periods and Schedules.    

a. You can use schedules to arm and disarm inputs and motion sensors, unlock doors, control access groups 

(cardholder access), control I/O groups, etc. 

b. BEST PRACTICE: Establish a naming convention for your loops and clusters that will allow your hardware to  sort in the Hardware Tree as you desire.   

  Use logical & descriptive names for your loops and control panels – “Central High Exterior Doors”, 

West Side Camera I/O Groups.  

  Include the system ID of the loop/panel and its physical location if you find it helpful. The table  below is an example of how using a consistent naming convention will allow you to organize and  identify your hardware easily, both when viewed in the hardware tree and event screens as well as  on reports and logging. 

EXAMPLE 1 of a naming convention that will sort by purpose 

 

LOOP/CLUSTER NAME: Purpose (Location, ID) 

CONTROL PANEL NAME: Purpose ( ID, Location) 

Loop 01 – West High – Doors and Cameras 

“Doors – Exterior (pnl 01 Main Closet )”  

“Cameras – West side (pnl 02 IT Closet)” 

EXAMPLE 2 of a naming convention that will sort by logical panel ID 

 

LOOP/CLUSTER NAME: ID (Location, Purpose) 

CONTROL PANEL NAME: ID (Purpose, Location) 

 

Loop 01 –West High (Doors and Cameras) 

 “Pnl 01  Exterior Doors – Main Closet”  

 “Pnl 02 Camera I/O Groups – Main Closet”  

EXAMPLE 3 of a naming convention that will sort by alphabetical name of the Location 

LOOP/CLUSTER NAME: Location, ID, Purpose 

West High (Loop 01 – Doors and Cameras) 

CONTROL PANEL NAME: Location (ID, Purpose) 

 

 “Main Closet ‐ Pnl 01  Exterior Doors ”  

 “Main Closet ‐ Pnl 02 Camera I/O Groups “  

 

(*) NOTE:  if you want your programming to be propagated to other loops, you must select the Loop Group 

Update option for the desired Loop Group.  Note: the target loops must be a member of the chosen Loop Group. 

Page 13 of 35

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

Create the Loop Groups that will serve each group of loops.   

c. Assign each loop to a Loop Group as needed. 

 Multiple Loops will be assigned to each loop group – there is no limit to how many loops  can be assigned to each loop group. 

 It is possible to assign a loop to more than one loop group; however you should be very  careful when creating schedules (day types and time periods) for these Loop Groups in  order to avoid crushing your schedules when you do updates for multiple loop groups.  

d. Loop Group Membership is assigned in the Loop Properties screen. This is the intended and  advisable way to use Loop Groups. 

For example, in the Loop Properties screen … 

 

 ‘ All Schools’ group will serve every school in the county; 

  ‘All High Schools’ loop group will only serve the high schools;  

e. BEST PRACTICE: Make a table similar to the one shown, to organize/track your planning of  schedules .  It is most effective to put the table into an Access or Excel Spreadsheet (or relational  database that has an easy to manage user interface ‐ to maintain maximum integrity and control 

of relational rows. 

 Note: West High (loop 2) uses the same common schedules ( in red ink) which are propagated through the  same Loop Groups as loop 1

 Note: West High (loop 2) has a unique (uncommon) schedule for its Summer Bell Schedule which controls the  same exterior doors using the same Time Period but a different Day Type (i.e. set for summer week dates).   

 

 

 

TEMPLATE EXAMPLE of a Table that might help organize your Loop Group Planning: 

Loop Name & (ID#) 

(Loop 1) – Central High 

(Loop 2) – West High 

Loop Group Membership (ID#) 

All Schools group (04) 

All High Schools group (05) 

All Schools group (04) 

All High Schools group (05) 

No loop group needed for 

Summer Magnet Program

 

 

Schedule Name (ID#) that updates this Loop Group   Names of components / mapping 

1. Night Security schedule(ID 01)  / motion detectors 

(inputs) and camera i/o groups 

Day Type 01: Normal Week‐days 

Time Period 03: Cameras & MDs 

2. Normal Days Bell schedule (ID 02) (exterior doors) 

1. Night Security schedule(ID 01)  / motion detectors 

(inputs) and camera i/o groups 

Day Type 01: Normal Week‐days 

Time Period 03: Exterior Doors 

Day Type 01: Normal Week‐days 

Time Period 03: Cameras & MDs 

2. Normal Days Bell schedule (ID 02) (exterior doors) 

3. Summer Bell schedule (ID 02) (exterior doors) 

Day Type 01: Normal Week‐days 

Time Period 03: Exterior Doors 

Day Type 01: Summer Week‐days 

Time Period 03: Exterior Doors 

f. It is not advisable to have a schedule (or day type or time period) being updating by more than one 

Loop Group because this will eventually become too confusing to control.   

 If great care is taken, it might be safe to use the Loop Group feature to initially propagate a schedule  for the purpose of cloning it other loops, withdrawing it when finished. 

  but you must make sure you are not overwriting the wrong schedules. 

Page 14 of 35

 

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

PART‐2: Planning & Creating Schedules (including Day Types & Time Periods): 

2. You must determine which Day Types you need to configure. This means you will decide which days of the week  will be associated with a day type (i.e.. workdays, weekends or holidays). Day Types are Loop specific. See 

Understanding Day Types in Part‐2 for more details. 

a. BEST PRACTICE: Designate which loop will serve as your “HOME LOOP” OR “LOCAL LOOP” – this  should be the same as the HOME / LOCAL LOOPs designated to serve your Loop Groups. 

b. BEST PRACTICE: the system allows only 100 day types per loop, but keep in mind that you can use  a day type in more than one schedule. The diagram below shows how Day Type 01 “Regular Days”  is used in the Lobby Doors Schedule and in the Lobby Sensors schedule.   

 

:

 

 

c. BEST PRACTICE: remember when assigning the calendar days to the day types, you MUST begin  

with the majority days first – see examples for clarification on build sequence: 

1. normal week days =  Monday thru Friday during the school session;  

2. normal week‐end days = Saturdays and Sundays during the school session; 

3. Summer School Weekdays =  during summer school 

4. Summer Weekends = during summer season; 

5. CLOSED/Holidays = Columbus Day, Christmas, Martin Luther King Day (dates that the  school will be closed during the school session; 

6. Teacher In‐Service Days = dates that teachers will be given access, but students entries will  be locked; 

Page 15 of 35

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

 

3. You must plan which Time Periods each day type will use. This means you will decide which hours/minutes will be  active or inactive in a 24‐hour period (e.g. 8‐5, shifts, etc.). See Understanding Time Periods in Part‐3 for more 

details.  

4. You must decide how you will map Day Types and Time Periods in each schedule. When mapping a schedule you  can use any of the time periods with any day type as needed. 

Example 1 shows a Day Type in more than one Schedule with different Time Periods.  

Lobby Doors schedule uses 

Workdays

 day type with 

Regular 8‐5

 time period. 

Lobby Sensor schedule uses 

Workdays

 day type with 

Always On

 time period

Example 2 shows a Time Period mapped to more than Day Type.   

This can be done in the same schedule or different schedules in the Loop. 

Lobby Doors schedule uses 

Regular 8‐5

 time period for 

Make‐up

 day type. 

Lobby Sensor schedule uses a 

Regular 8‐5

 time period for 

Regular day

 type

 

Page 16 of 35

 

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

Configuring Loop Groups and 1-min Time Schedules

 

 

 

   This chapter addresses the concepts of the 1

‐Minute Time Schedules

 and the 

Loop Group feature  that allows the operator to copy common schedules to multiple loops/clusters at the same time. 

 

 

Before Reading this Chapter … 

 

 

Before reading this chapter you should  

 Review and familiarize yourself with the Terms & Definitions section in chapter 1  

 Read the Requirements section  in chapter 1 

 Carefully Read the planning section in Chapter 2 and determine how you will plan your administration  of loop groups and time schedules 

It may be helpful to print those sections for reference while reading this chapter.   

Page 17 of 35

 

 

 

 

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

STEP 1: Configuring the Loop to use One‐Minute Formatting:  

 

You must configure the Loop to use 1‐Minute format in the Loop/Cluster Properties screen. 

 

The following rules apply to the Loop: 

 the 1 minute time format to applies to all panels on the loop 

 all panels in the same loop must use 1‐minute schedules 

 remember, you cannot mix 1‐minute schedules with 15‐minute schedules – if you have 15‐minute  schedules you wish to keep using you must do one of the following…  a. keep the panels using 15‐min schedules on a different loop 

(508i must use 15‐minute format; 600‐series  panels can use either)

  b. replicate/recreate compatible schedules under the 1‐minute schema to meet needs 

(this applies to 

600‐series panels)

 

 

SETTING THE LOOP PROPERTIES TO USE 1‐MINUTE FORMAT: 

1. Open the Loop Programming screen for the 600 Loop you want to configure (you can do this by right‐clicking  the Loop Name and selecting the Properties option from the context menu).  

2. Make sure you have chosen the correct loop and that it is set to 600 type 

3. click the EDIT button 

4. Select the ‘Advanced tab’ 

5. Choose the 1‐Minute Interval format option in the Schedule Format droplist 

 

6. Click APPLY to save changes 

 

Page 18 of 35

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

STEP 2: Assigning a Loop to a Loop Group:  

 

You must create the Loop Groups and assign the Members in the Loop/Cluster Properties screen.   

 

The following rules apply to the Loop: 

 The loop must be a 600 type loop 

 Loop Group names should be unique and descriptive 

 

CREATING LOOP GROUPS: 

7. Open the Loop Programming screen for the 600 Loop you want to configure (you can do this by right‐clicking  the Loop Name and selecting the Properties option from the context menu).  

8. Make sure you have chosen the correct loop and that it is set to 600 type 

9. click the EDIT button 

10. select the Available Loop Groups tab 

11. Double‐click inside the Loop Group Member list box to create a new Loop Group 

12. Assign  the loop you are currently editing to a Loop Group by “checking” the Loop Group Member option;  also check/assign any other Loop Groups this loop should be a member of. 

 

13. Click APPLY to save changes 

 

 

 

NOTE: “CHECKED” groups appear in the schedules tabs for this loop. When ‘checked’ this loop can be updated with  scheduling changes made from any member loop. “unchecked” groups are not available for this loop’s scheduling  screens.   

Page 19 of 35

 

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

STEP 3: Programming Day Types for the Calendar Year:  

 

The Day Types Programming screen allows you to assign calendar days to a day type.  Before you program Day 

 

Types you should have a clear understanding of how they work. 

UNDERSTANDING DAY TYPES:  

A Day Type is simply the kind of days that are used in a time schedule (i.e. workdays, holidays, etc.).  All the days of the  year that need the same time schedule should be assigned to the same day type. In this way you will divide all the  calendar days between the different day types you need (i.e. weekdays, week ends, holidays, half days, etc.). 

You will use the Calendar Tool or the Calendar Wizard to select and assign the days you need to each day type.   

   

The following rules apply to Day Types: 

 Every day of the year must be assigned to a Day Type to be used in a schedule. 

 There are 16 Day Types available for per Loop – you must assign all the calendar dates in the upcoming year  to the Day Types in order to have schedule coverage. 

 The days/dates in a day type can be contiguous or non‐contiguous dates. 

 A specific date (individual day) can only be assigned to one Day Type at a time.  For example. You assign all 

Mondays thru Fridays to a “Week Day” day type. Then assign a date such as July 4 th

 to a “Holidays” day  type.  If July 4 th

 falls on a weekday (m‐f), then that date is removed from the “Week Day” day type and  assigned to “Holidays” day type.  

 Calendar days are distinct dates – this means that if you assign July 4 th

 2009 to the “Holiday” day type,  then you do not have July 4 th

 of 2010 assigned also. To add it, you must advance the Calendar Function to  the 7/4/2010 date and select that day. 

 

 

TIP: 

 

Program the day types that use the most or majority of days first, like weekdays. Work your way down  to the day types that use the least days, like holidays.

 

   

 

Examples of Day Type configurations for various customers:  

 

Business Day Types 

Day Type 01 “Work Day” – Mon‐Fri from Jan to Dec 2009 

  Retail Day Types 

 

Day Type 01 “Regular Day” – Mon‐Thu from Jan to Dec 2009 

Day Type 02 “Week End” – Sat‐Sun from Jan to Dec 2009  Day Type 02 “Long Day” – Fri‐Sat from Jan to Dec 2009 

Day Type 03 “Holidays” – Closed dates for year 2009  Day Type 03 “Sunday” – Sunday hours for year 2009 

Day Type 04 “Holidays” – Closed dates for year 2009 

School Day Types 

Day Type 01 “Regular Attendance” – Mon‐Fri year 2009 

Day Type 02 “Early Dismissal” – any dates assigned  2009 

Day Type 03 “Closed” – Sat‐Sun year 2009 

Day Type 04 “Sat School” –Saturday make‐up dates 2009 

Day Type 05 “Holidays” – Closed dates for year 2009 

  Seasonal Swimming Pool Hours 

 

Day Type 01 “weekly off season” – Mon‐Thu; Jan/May;Sep/Dec 

Day Type 02 “weekend off season” – Fri‐Sat; Jan/May;Sep/Dec 

Day Type 03 “weekly Summer” – Mon‐Thu; Jun/July/Aug 

 

Day Type 04 “weekend Summer” – Fri‐Sat; Jun/July/Aug 

Page 20 of 35

 

 

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

Opening the 1‐Minute Schedules screens:  

1. Open the 1‐Minute Schedules Programming screens: 

Select Configure > Schedules > Time Schedules from the Menu 

or Click on the CLOCK icon button on the Galaxy toolbar.

 

2. Select the correct loop from the Loop droplist to show the 1‐Minute programming screens.  

If you see 15‐Minute programming screens, then you have selected a loop that is 500i‐series or you  have not set your Loop’s properties to use the 1‐minute format (see Part‐1). 

 

Page 21 of 35

 

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

 

Programming a Day Type Name:  

3. select the ‘Day Types & Calendar’ tab  

4. click the Edit Day Types button.  

5. Enter the descriptive Name of the Day Type.  You can add Notes to explain the purpose of the day type and  which date ranges it affects. 

 

 

6. click OK button to save the Day Type name and notes 

 

 

NOTE: remember to check the desired Loop Group Update option to propagate you programming BEFORE you  save/apply changes. You can go ahead and assign your calendar dates before saving so the whole thing is saved at  one time. 

NOTE: if you want to withdraw a loop from getting Loop Group updates, you must uncheck it in the Loop Properties 

screen.   

Page 22 of 35

 

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

Assigning the Calendar Days using the Calendar Wizard:  

The Calendar Wizard will help you configure large spans of time in a situation where the same days of the week  are usually assigned to one day type (e.g. workdays = M/T/W/TH/F).   

You can use the interactive Calendar object also (described in the next section) for individual, distinct dates –  such as holidays or irregularly occurring dates. 

7. click the Build Calendar Helper/ Wizard button to open the calendar wizard 

8. the correct Loop Name and Day Type must be selected 

9. check (click) the days of the week that will be affected by the intended schedule 

10. select the Start Date and End Date for the date range/year desired 

11. click the Build Calendar Now button to assign the dates to the Day Type  

12. click CLOSE and then CHECK or UNCHECK any Loop Group Update options as needed 

13. click the [Save Dates & Day Types] button to save changes before programming the next day type. 

NOTE: repeat steps 7 thru 13 as needed to build your day types. 

 

 

NOTE: you must click the [BUILD] button to build the dates and you also must [SAVE DAY TYPES AND DATES] before  you select another day type to program or you will lose your changes.  This can steal dates from other day types so 

be sure you follow correct order – see the planning section. 

NOTE: to withdraw a loop from the Loop Group Update, you must uncheck it in the Loop Properties screen. As long  as it is a member it will receive updates.   

 

 

  

NOTE: YOU MAY WANT TO DESIGNATE A CERTAIN SEGMENT OR BLOCK OF DAY TYPES TO BE USED FOR COMMON 

SCHEDULES OR CLONING – FOR EXAMPLE 1 THRU 30. USE YOUR OWN DESCRESSION ON HOW TO DO THIS.   

Page 23 of 35

 

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

Assigning the Calendar Days using the Calendar Tool:  

The previous section described how to use the Calendar Wizard to assign dates/days to a day type, which is  the typical method for assigning the vast majority of dates by date range.  However, you can also add calendar 

  days (distinct dates) to a Day Type using the Calendar Tool.   

 

14. select/highlight the Day Type you wish to add dates to in the list view on the left side. 

15. use the calendar 

[<< | <]

 and

 [> | >>] 

controls to move to the Month desired; or click on the name  heading of the calendar to open a dialog that lets you change months and years. 

16. right‐click the days you want to add to (or release from) your selected Day Type; you will notice that the  date will become selected (yellow) or deselected (return to its prior color) as you toggle your mouse clicks. 

YELLOW BLOCKS = dates you are selecting (adding or stealing) for the currently selected Day Type 

WHITE BLOCKS =  dates that are CURRENTLY UNASSIGNED (have not been assigned to any Day Type);  

PURPLE BLOCKS = dates that are ASSIGNED to the CURRENTLY SELECTED DAY TYPE 

BLUE BLOCKS = dates that are CURRENTLY ASSIGNED to ANOTHER Day Types;  

IMPORTANT: 

IF you select a blue block and make it a yellow block, you are stealing it from the Day Type it 

belongs to.  To avoid stealing a blue block date, simply click on it again and allow the block to return to blue. 

Yellow blocks will be added to your selected Day Type when you click [Save Dates …]. 

NOTE: You do not have to select continuous or contiguous dates. You can select various days/dates in one month  and advance to the next month and select more non‐contiguous dates.  When you click the save button, all dates  will be saved in every month you selected. 

17. click the SAVE DATES & DAY TYPES button to save and assign the days to the day types. 

 

 

 

IMPORTANT:  

any unassigned days within the year will default to Day Type 1. 

IMPORTANT:  

System Galaxy loads 365 days to the panel.  That means 365 days from the current date when load occurs.  

If you did not assign days that far in advance they will default to day type 1. 

Page 24 of 35

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

DATE FINDER UTILITY – View All Unassigned (skipped) Days:  

The Unassigned Dates Finder utility allows the operator to find and capture skipped dates and assign  them to the correct Day Type.   

 

The utility queries the all dates that are unassigned for the next 365 days from today’s date (PC time).  

1. Click the

 [ View All Unassigned Dates ]

 button in the main Day Type screen.  The list view will be  populated with all the unassigned dates for the next 365 days. 

2.

Select the desired Day Type from the droplist that you wish to assign dates to

 

3.

Click (check) the individual dates you wish to assign.  Unchecked dates remain unassigned.  

  a.

TIP: use the [Select All] button to select every date and then uncheck the few dates you wish to  exclude

  b.

TIP: Uses the [Clear All] button clear all check and refresh you programming.

 

4.

Click the [ Assign Selected Dates to Day Type ] to assign the dates to a day type

 

IMPORTANT:  

any unassigned days within the year will default to Day Type 1. 

IMPORTANT:  

if the dates you are assigning must be propagated to other loops, you must enable the Loop Group 

Update options in the main Day Types screen before you click the [SAVE DATES  & DAY TYPES] button in main screen. 

 

 

Page 25 of 35

 

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

RELEASE ALL DATES UTILITY ‐ Releasing All Assigned Days from a Day Type:  

 

You can release all assigned days from a Day Type. This is useful if you want to free up a Day Type or just to 

  refresh or start over with your programming.  

 

1. Select/Highlight the Day Type  

2. Click the [Release All Dates for Day Types] button. 

3. A dialog box will appear asking for confirmation that you truly want to release the dates.   

4. Click YES if you want to release all the dates that are assigned to your selected Day Types. Changes are  permanent. You must rebuild the Day Type if you mistakenly release dates from the wrong one. 

 

NOTE: that releasing dates only takes effect on local loop.  It does not propagate to member loops even if the 

Loop Group Update option is enabled/checked.   

NOTE: if you are unsure whether you wish to release all dates, you can run the View All Assigned dates report  and review the list of dates assigned to the Day Type. 

 

 

Page 26 of 35

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

 

 

REPORTING – View All Assigned Days by Day Type:  

You can use this report to determine which dates are assigned to each Day Type per Loop.   

 This report is pulled by date range. The date range is printed under the title. 

 This report can be large if the Day Type selected has a lot of dates assigned to it. 

 Dates are listed in chronological order and are grouped by Loop. 

 

 

 

   

Page 27 of 35

 

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

STEP 4: Programming the Time Periods:  

 

The Time Periods Programming screen allows you to configure the active and inactive intervals of a given time 

  period.   

UNDERSTANDING TIME PERIODS: 

 

Time Periods are the 1‐minute intervals that the schedule will be ‘active’ or ‘inactive’ during a 24‐hour span.   

There are 1, 440 minutes in a 24‐hour span. 

The following rules apply to Time Periods: 

 There are 254 programmable Time Periods per Loop. You can assign your Time Periods to any schedule or  day type that you make within the Loop.  You can map either of these to any day type within a schedule. 

 There are 2 reserved Time Periods per Loop.  “Always Active” and “Never Active”.  These cannot be altered  but can be used as often as you like. You can map either of these to any day type within a schedule. 

 You can map only one period to a day type at a time, but you can use a time period for more than one day  type. 

 Green segments are considered active or on.  Typically the system would be installed and configured to  mean unlocked or accessible for doors. For inputs the relationship to armed and disarmed is based on how  the relay is wired Normally Open or Normally Closed. 

 Red segments are considered inactive or off 

Page 28 of 35

 

 

 

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

 

Opening the 1‐Minute Schedules screens:  

1. Open the 1‐Minute Schedules Programming screens: 

Select Configure > Schedules > Time Schedules from the Menu 

or Click on the CLOCK icon button on the Galaxy toolbar.

2. Select the correct loop from the Loop droplist to show the 1‐Minute screens.  

 If you see 15‐Minute programming screens, then you have selected a loop that is 500i‐series or you  have not set your Loop’s properties to use the 1‐minute format. 

 

 

Page 29 of 35

 

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

Creating a Time Period:  

3. select the ‘Time Periods’ tab  

4. select the desired Loop Name if it is not already selected 

5. click the [Add New Time Period] button 

6. enter a descriptive and unique name for the time period (e.g “Day Shift 8a to 5p” might be needed to map  to the “Workdays” day type.  Also, enter any descriptive notes about the schedule (e.g. “for entrance”). 

7. use the left and right mouse buttons to set the intervals. Green is (active/on) or Red is (inactive/off) . 

8. Check or uncheck any Loop Group Update options as needed to propagate or clone periods to other loops 

9. click the [SAVE TIME PERIOD] button to save the Time Period 

 

 

TIP: 

 

double‐clicking a row of time intervals with the left‐mouse button will turn on the whole row of minutes. 

TIP:

 double‐clicking a row of time intervals with the right‐mouse button will turn off the whole row of minutes.  

TIP:

 You can also use the SHIFT key in tandem with single‐clicking on a minute‐cell to select a range of minutes.  To do  this simply click (activate or deactivate) the first minute in your range, then hold the SHIFT key down while you  click the last minute in your range.  All the minutes in between will activate or deactivate according to  whether you used the left or right mouse button. 

.

 

 

NOTE: remember to check the desired Loop Group Update option to propagate you programming BEFORE you  save/apply changes. Complete all programming before saving. 

NOTE: deleting a time period will not propagate to member loops even if the Loop Group Update is checked 

 

NOTE: to withdraw a loop from the Loop Group Update, you must uncheck it in the Loop Properties screen. As long as it is  a member it will receive updates.   

Page 30 of 35

STEP 5: Programming the Schedules:  

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

 

The Schedules Programming screen allows you to map the time periods to the day types as needed for each  schedule.   

UNDERSTANDING SCHEDULE MAPPING: 

Schedules have up to 16 Day Types available based on your programming in the previous steps.  Any schedule you  create will rely on the same 16 day types that the whole loop uses.  When you map a time period to a day type, you  are telling the schedule how to behave on that day type.     

For your door schedules, you may want the doors use a time period that unlocks from 8 ‐ 5 on regular workdays (m‐f).  

But you might want to have motion sensors in the lobby remain active all the time even on regular workdays.  Thus,  you will map a different time period to the Workdays day type in the Sensor schedule than you did in the Door  schedule. 

 

The following rules apply to Time Periods: 

There are 256 programmable Time Periods per Loop. 

 

You can use your Time Periods in any schedule in the same loop

 

You can map your Time Periods to any Day Type in the same schedule.

 

Example 1 shows how a day type is used in two different schedules on the same loop. 

 

Example 2 shows a time period is mapped to two different day types in the same schedule. 

 

Page 31 of 35

 

 

  

 

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

 

Opening the 1‐Minute Schedules screens:  

1. Open the 1‐Minute Schedules Programming screens: 

Select Configure > Schedules > Time Schedules from the Menu 

or Click on the CLOCK icon button on the Galaxy toolbar.

 

2. Select the correct loop from the Loop droplist to show the 1‐Minute screens.  

 If you see 15‐Minute programming screens, then you have selected a loop that is 500i‐series or you  have not set your Loop’s properties to use the 1‐minute format. 

 

Page 32 of 35

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

 

Creating the Schedules:  

1. select the ‘Schedules’ tab  

2. select the desired Loop Name if it is not already selected 

3. click the Add New button 

4. enter a descriptive and unique name for the Schedule (e.g “Lobby Doors” ).   

 

Note: this is the schedule name you will see and use throughout the system programming screens. 

5. click the Time Period droplist that is inside the Mapping listview object.  Choose the period you want used  for each Day Type in this schedule. 

 

6. Check or uncheck any Loop Group Update options as needed to propagate or clone schedules 

7. click the APPLY button to save the Schedule 

 

 

NOTE: 

 See the Main Software Manual for how to assign schedules to the Access Groups and doors, I/O Groups,  inputs and outputs, elevators, etc.  

 

NOTE: 

 See the Main Software Manual for how to Load all schedules to the panels.  

   

 

 

 

 

Page 33 of 35

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

Using Schedules in the System Programming screens

 

 

   This chapter briefly covers how you will use 

Schedules

 in the system programming screens.

 

The  schedules created in the last chapter must be assigned to access groups and cardholders in order  for access cards to work properly

.

 

About Assigning Schedule to an Access Groups:  

 

 

The Access Group Programming screen allows you to choose the schedule you want to use for each access group. 

Open the Access Groups window(Menu Bar – Configure/Cards/Access Groups) 

Dependencies:  Schedules must be created first; otherwise, only the built‐in schedules (ALWAYS and NEVER) are  available. 

1. Pick a loop from the [Loop] droplist. 

2. Click [Add New] button. 

3. Type in a descriptive name for the group. 

4. Pick (highlight) the desired readers and Click on the [>>] button to move the readers. 

Note: The [>>] button moves all the ports over to authorized.  Also, you can hold the <Ctrl> key on the  keyboard while you select/highlight the reader ports you want.  Then user can click the [ >> ] button on the  screen to move all the selected readers at once. 

5. Select a schedule for as prompted:  Pick a schedule name from the droplist.   

Note: If the [Use this schedule for all readers] option is “CHECKED”, then this schedule will apply to all chosen  readers in this Access Group.  User can apply schedules individually by “unchecking” this option.  Then the  software will prompt user through picking each reader’s schedule individually. 

6. Click [Apply] button to save. 

 

 

NOTE: see the main Software User Guide, chapter 7 for information on adding schedules to access groups and access profiles

NOTE: ACCESS GROUPS must be assigned to a cardholder before they are in use.  Refer to the Software User Guide for cardholder  programming details.  Remember you may need to load your loops once your programming is completed. 

NOTE: see the main Software User Guide, chapter 5 for detailed information on loading data to your loops

Page 34 of 35

Programming One-minute Schedules with Loop Groups

About Assigning Schedules to Doors, Inputs and other Hardware:  

 

 

 

   The schedules created in the last chapter must be assigned to hardware (doors, inputs, outputs,  i/o groups) in order for the hardware to function properly. 

 

 

 

 

The Reader Programming screen allows you to set the schedule you want to use for various scheduling options. 

Likewise the Inputs and Outputs and I/O Groups also allow schedules to be used in various ways. 

 The Schedule name you created in the Schedule Mapping tab is the name that shows up in the droplist of  any option that uses a schedule to control the door or reader.   

 

 

 

Because these programming screens are so complex, you must use the Software User Guide for this part of the  programming. 

 

Chapter 9 of the Software User Guide covers all the hardware programming as well as the features that can use 

 

  schedules. 

Chapter 5 of the User Guide covers loading your data after it is programmed.  Once all initial programming is  loaded to a panel, the system will automatically update minor changes to these screens when you save your 

 

 

  changes in the screen.  If you have concerns that your changes did not load due to network traffic, you can always  load your panels as needed. 

Page 35 of 35

Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement

Table of contents