CLW0764

CLW0764

Site No. 75: MCXS Basketball

Problem:

Court Site

Disposal of drums, possibly containing training agents dissolved vicinity in solvents, of the site. may contaminate groundwater in the

Three potabLe water wells (Pump

House Nos. S-TC-1251,

106, and 203) and/or a pond containing be affected. water treatment plant filter backwash water may

Goal:

ADDroach:

Wells:

Determine specific groundwater location is contaminated migrated toward wells or pond. of buried drums and whether and if contamination has

Survey site using geophysical specific surrounding locations location techniques of drums.

Install to identify monitoring wells drums, approximately to identify

100-200 plume movement feet and quantify from drum contaminant existing concentrations. wells.

SampLe backwash pond and

Install 4 monitoring wells in shallow aquifer.

SamDles:

Freauency:

Analyses:

Sample each well and backwash pond.

Sample twice, separated by at least 3 months.

Analyze Zor RCXA groundwater

(GWCI) and benzene. contamination indicators

CLW

0000000764

Site No. 74:

Mess Hall Grease Pit Area

Problem: Disposal of drummed wastes and possibly other wastes including pesticides may contaminate potable water well (Pump House No. 654). and PCSs groundwater near

Goal:

Approach:

Determine whether groundwater contamination and if migration of contaminants toward well has occurred has occurred.

Lnstall three monitoring wells between grease pit/drum burial area and existing well. Install between pest control area and existing potable well and verify screened depth. one monitoring well.

Sample well

Wells:

Samples:

Frequency:

Analyses:

Install 4 wells and screen to sample both the upper and lower portions of the unconfined aquifer.

Sample all five wells.

Sample twice, separated by 2-3 months.

Analyze for RCRA groundwater contamination

(GWCI) and organochlorine pesticides, indicators to include PCBs.

:

Site No. 76:

MCAS

Curtis Road Site

Problem:

Buried drums, possibly containing contaminate groundwater training in the vicinity water wells (Pump House Nos. 106 and 203). agents, may of two potable

Goal:

Determine specific location groundwater is contaminated wells has occurred; of buried drums and if and whether migration tcward

Approach:

Wells:

Survey site using geophysical specific location of drums. techniques

Install to identify monitoring wells surrounding locations drums, to identify approximately 100-200 plume movement feet and quantify from drum contaminant concentrations.

Sampie existing wells.

Install 3 monitoring wells in shallow aquifer.

Samples:

Frequency:

Analyses:

Sample each well.

Sample twice, separated by at least 3'months.

Analyze for RCRA groundwater

(G'WI) and benzene. contamination indicators

CLW

0000000766

0000000767

SECTION 5. BACKGROUND

5.1 GENE'RAL. Marine Corps Base (MCB) Camp Lejeune is on the coastal plain in Onslow County, North Carolina. The facility covers approximately flows

170 square miles and is bisected by the New River, which in a generally southeasterly direction. estuary before entering the Atlantic Ocean.

This system forms a large

Eleven miles of Atlantic

Camp Lejeune. The western shoreline and northeastern form the eastern boundaries are U.S. boundary

17 and of

State Road 24, respectively. northern boundary. The complex

Jacksonville, has a roughly

North Carolina, triangular acts as the outline. geographical

Development at the Camp Lejeune complex is primarily locations under the jurisdiction in five of the Base Command.

They include Camp Geiger, Montf'ord Point, Mainside, Courthouse Bay, and the

Rifle Range area. Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) New River, a heli- copter base, is's separate command on the west side of the New River.

There are also two Outlying Landing Fiel.ds (0LF.s) under control of MCAS

New River.

These are Helicopter Outlying Landing Field (HOLF) Oak Grove, approximately 25 miles to the north, and OLF Camp Davis, 10 miles to the southwest (NAVFACENGCOM, 1975). station.

Presently,

North of the base, 2,672 acres have been used for the air in the past, training for fixed-wing aircraft was carried out. oniy helicopter training occurs here. longer

North of Camp Lejeune is HOLF Oak Grove.

The field is no active and is under caretaker status.

The property has some camping groups. helicopter facilities

Lnfreauent landings. and occasionally is used for recreation by scouting use is also made for ground troop exercises and

HOLF Oak Grove is on 976 acres in eastern Jones county. k'ithin 15 miles of Camp Lejeune are three large, .publicly owned tracts of ?and-- Croatan National Forest, Hofmann Forest, and Camp Davis

Forest. Because of the low eievations in the coastal plain, wetlands form significanr exploited acreage. by agricultural

2iOWlIlg

These areas, and silvicultural to some extent, interests. have 'been

There is a concern on a sL and national level that these ecosystems, unique to the coastal plain, require a protected status to survive.

For the most part, remaining land use is agriculturai. crops are soybeans, small grains, and tobacco.

Typical and s'nellfish

Productive industries. estuaries along the coast support commercial finfish

Increased leisure time has boosted tourism and enlarged resort regional economy. residential areas.

This, in turn, has srimulateci the

CL

0000000768

there are

According to the most recent master plan (NAVFACENGCOM, 19751, two major corridors of developable land in the area.

These extend south from New Bern along U.S.

17 and U.S. 58, and from Swansboro northwest to Jacksonville and Richlands along Routes 24 and 258.

The principal activities. economic base is MCS Camp Lejeune

More than 46,000 military and associated personnel are stationed military at the base, and more than 110,000 peoplti are either employed or are eligibie for supporr (NAVFACENGCOM, 1975). '

5.2

Amphibious

HISTORY. Site selection

Training for

Base" was made in

"The World's the 1940s.

Most Complete

Construction of the camp began in 1941 after extensive honor of Lieutenant General John

A. land acquisirion

Lejeune, and was named in

USMC (Odell, 1970).

"' harvested

During construction, from the reservation.

9 million board feet of timber were in 1944, a sawmill with a daily capacity of 10,000 board feet was being operated by base maintenance personnel.

The sawmill closed in 1954, when lumber needs were filled by contract.

Construction major functions of the base started were centered.

As the on Hadnot facility.grew

Point, where and developed, the

Hadnor. Point became crowded with maintenance and industrial acrivicies.

The problem led to the creation other present and potential of a masrer problems, pian that addressed these and

During World War II,

Camp Lejeune was used as a training. to prepare Marines for combat.

This has been a continuing function area gf the

World faciliry

War II,

.during the Korean and Vietnam the camp was designated confiicts,

Toward the end of as a home base for the Second

Marine have

Division. been stationed

Since that time,

Fleer Marine Force (FE') units also here as tenant commands.

Courthouse

3y 1945, construczion

Bay areas was comolete, in rhe Xonrford

?oinr, Camp Geiger, and

Monrford Doinf, originaily des ignared for :raini.ng of troops, now is used for Xarine Cor?s Service Supporz

Schools. tactical in the 19409, recent recruits training af Camp Geiger.

This from Parris pracrice

Island received has 'been ciisconrinued, however. is still

Courthouse Bay hosts amphibious the si:e of housing commissioned training, personnel. while Paradise

Noncommissioned

Point housing is provided in Tarawa Terrace I and II, Midway Park, and other designared areas. personnel ijoulevard

The U.S. Naval Hospital opened in 1943 and has served military during World War II and t'ne Korean War.

In addition, rhe hospital provides medical services and their dependents.

It for once operated all assigned as a 500-bed milifarp unit, personnel bur has become obsolete, and a new medical center is under construction along ijrewsrer

(~~AVFACENGCDM,

1975).

XC&S New River was set up as a separate command in 1951. thar time, ir was called 3ererfield loinr, bur the name wa.s ctianged to

0000000769

.

E

MPKA L :.

WIND

PA-I-TERN

I

I

I t

I

X OF WIND GDMING FROM

1NDICATED DIRECTION s-s OVER 14 MPH-

NDS 3 m 14 M?H

MPH OR LESS

J F M

AVERAGE MONTHLY TEMPERATURE

A M J J A S 0 N D

AVERAGE MONTHLY RAINFALL

C

FIGURE 5-l

0000000770

ReGional Climatic Conditions in the Viciniry of MCI3 Camp Lejeune

‘T

New River in 1968. In 1942, three new runways were added and the station came under the jurisdiction of MCAS Cherry Point.

During this time, a

PBJ squadron was based here and the facility training (NAVFACENGCOM, 1975). During was also used for glider the Korean War, it was used as a helicopter training base and for touch-and-go

(Natural Resource lYanagement Plan, 1975). training for jet fighters

In 1968, Marine Corps Outlying Landing Field (MCOLF) Oak Grove was placed under the jurisdiction as a helicopter of MCAS New River.

The field was used base and renamed HOLF Oak Grove.

During World War II, the field was under the command of MCAS Cherry Point.

At the end of that war, all structures were destroyed with the exception of the runways.

5.3

PHYSICAL FEATURES.

5.3.1 Climatology.

MCB Camp 'iejeune

The North Carolina coastal plain area in which is located is influenced by uild winrers.

Summers are humid with typically more than 50 inches elevated temperatures. per year. Potenrial varies from 34 to 36 inches of rainfall

Rainfall evapotranspiration equi.:alenr usually per year averages in the region

(Narklmas,

1980). Winter and summer are the usual wet seasons. Temperature ranges are reported to be 33°F to 53°F during

January and 71°F to 88°F in July

(Odell, 1970).

Winds during while north-northwest ihe warm seasons are generally winds predominate in winter. south-southwesteriy

There is a relatively long growing season of 230 days.

A summary of regional climatic conditions is shown in Figure 5-1.

5.3.2

Of

Topography and Surface Drainage.

The generally flat topography the Camp Lejeune compiex is typicai of the seaward porzions of L'he

North Carolina coastal plain. Elevations on the base vary from sea level to 72 feet above ssi; however, the elevarion of most of Camp Lejeune is beiween 20 and 40 feet above msl. The coast is guarded by a 200- fo

500-foor-wide barrier island complex. Elevations of the dune field'on ihe barrier islands range from 10 to 40 feet above msi.

Drainage at Camp

Lejeune is predominately toward the New River, although areas near the coast drain direceiy toward the Atlantic Ocean through the Intracoastal

Waterway.

In developed areas, natural drainage has been changed by drainage ditches, storm sewers, and extensive concrete and asp‘halr areas.

Drainage sub-basins for Hadnot Point area and ,\lCAS New River are shown in

Figures 5-2 and 5-3, respecrively.

Most sites evaiuated in this stludy are in these two areas.

Approximately 70 percent of Camp Lejeune is in the broad, flat interstream areas (Atlantic Division, Bureau of Yards and DociCs, 1965).

Drainage here is poor, and the soils are often wet.

Flooding is a potential ihe upper i2aChes problem for base areas wi:hin the iOO-year iiIilFCS floodplain.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has mapped the of LOO-year floodplain at Camp L2jeune at 7.0 feet above msl .

02 the New River

(

:JSi*dr21

Xesource Xanagemenr 31an

. .

1975).

The elevation of the lOO-year floodplain is 11.0 feez above msl on the open coast. increases downstream and

5.3.3 Geology. The geology of the Atlantic graphic province is typically a seaward-thickening

Coastal Plain physio- wedge of sediments

(Figures 5-4 and 5-5) on a basement complex of igneous and metamorphic rock similar province. to that at the surface in the Piedmont physiographic sediments of the coastal plain vary in age from Cretaceous to

Recent and consist of layers of sand, silt, clay, marl, limes tone, and dolostone.

A mantle of Pleistocene and Recent sands and clays commo,nly covers the older sediments of the area. IBeneath this mantle is a belted subcrop pat.tern with Cretaceous sediments nearest the surface in the west and progressively younger sediments nearest land surface toward the coast

(Figure 5-6).

Although the sedimentary sequence is approximately 1,400 to

1,700 feet thick beneath MC3 Camp Lejeune, only the uppermost 300 feet are pertinent to ,the purpose of this report because these strata contain the important water-bearing rocks at MC3 Camp Lejeune.

The Eocene Castle Hayne Limes.tone consists of shell limestone, marl, calcareous sand, and clay.

In Onslow County, the Castle Hayne varies in thickness from approximately

Rocks of Oligocene age unconformably

100 feet overlie to more than 200 feet. the Czstie Hayne.

These sediments consist of fossiliferous and are equivalent to the Trent limestone,

Formation calcareous according sand, to recent and ciay correlation charts (Saum et al., 1979).

--

Oligocene age vary in the from anproximately

SUbSUrfaCe

40 feet of OnSiOw to more than

County, TOCkS

200 feet ihick

Of

(3rown et al.,

19-72). --

The Yorktown Tonnation overiies band east and south of Jacksonville. This the Oligocene unit consists and ourcrops of lenses of in a sand, clay, marl, and iimestone. considered iate Xiocene, but the

The Yarktown latest correlation

Formation charrs has long tieen

(3aum et ai.,

1979) date iE in the Pliocene. stratigraphic

Pleistocene units band of sediments. and Recent sands and clavs mantle the older in most of the study

These sediments area and form the most seaward were deposited in Pleistocene and

Recent rime, -dhen the rerreat of continental glaciers raised sea levels.

5.3.4 hydrology.

5.3.4.1

Surface Water.

The dominant surface water feature at XC3 Camp

Lejeune is the New River. It receives drainage from most of the base.

The New River is short, with a course of qproximareiy central coastal plain of Norrh Carolina.

50 niles

Over most of its course, on the the

New River is confined to a relatively narrow c‘nannel entrenched in the

Eocene and Oligocene dramaricaily as it limestones. flows across

Sourh less of Jacksonviile, resistant

Lhe rive- a

- sands, clays, and marls

0000000774

5-i

+20(1

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500

1000

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1500

I I

1 PLEISTOCENE

915 MILES

1

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III

CAMP LEJEUNE

I i

I

I

1

I

I

OLIGOCENE

I

I

2

.

.

,100

I

LlOCENE

IIOCENE

500

.,^ . .

7000

VIRGINIA

NORTH CARO:lNk

CAMP LEJEUNE

LOCATION MAP

\

1500

\

\

2000

\

\

2500

\

3000

\

2.500

\

4000

CRETACEOUS

AND LATE

JURASSIC

UNIT H

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200,

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86.3 MILES

I

CAMP ILEJEUNE

II

I

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400

500

. .

.--- ------

VlRClNtA

NORTH CAROLINA

-----m---_ c-!!

1200

1400

7500

1600

1700

CAMP LEJEUNE

LOCATION

MAP

FIGURE S-5

GeoioGic Cross Section From Cumberland

County, N.C. to [email protected]@ c&&fl

,

Consultlnc

SOURCE:

BROWN. ET AL.. 1972

5-wonmen7cl in(;ineen onb 5ci’enirr~

(Burnette, 1977). At MCB Camp Lejeune, the New River flows in a southerly direction and empties into &he Atlantic Ocean through the New

River Inlet. Several small coastal creeks drain the area of MCB Camp

Lejeune creeks that flow is not into drained by the New River the Intracoastal and its tributaries.

These

Waterway, which is connected to the

Atlantic Ocean by Bear Inlet, Brown's Inlet, and the New River Inlet.

Wilder et al. (1978) state the standard streamflow measurements employed by the U.S.

Geological Survey are not applicable in low- gradient, tidal conditions.

This is probably why streamflow in the New

River below Jacksonville has not been determined. The tides at New River

Inlet have .a normal range of 3.0 feet and a spring range of 3.6 feet

(U.S. Department of Commerce, 1979). The tidal range diminishes upstream to approximately 1 foot at Jacksonville (Howard, 1982). The flood tidal prism entering the New River Inlet in one tidal cycle was determined to be approximately 2.35 x lo5 ft3 (aurnette, 1977).

The average annual runoff of the MCB Camp Lejeune area has not been determined; however,

Craven and Carteret Counties', to the northeast, have an average annual runoff of approximately 18 inches.

The ground- water.contribution to runoff in the same area northeast of MCS Camp

Lejeune is estimated as 65 percent of total runoff (Wilder et al., i978).

The water in the New River at MCB Camp Lejeune is brackish, shallow, and warm.

Salinity is largely a funciion of distance from the ocean and rainfall. At Jacksonville, the New River may reach salinities of 10 parts per thousand (ppt> during extended periods of low rainfall.

However, near the New River Inlet, saiinity in the river is usually equivalent to that become significantly of sea water (35 ppt).

Salinities near the iniet lower only during heavy rains (Burnette, 1977).

Water quality criteria for surface waters in North Carolina have been published under Tic! e 15 of the

North

Carolina Administrative

Code.

The New River at MCB Camp Lejeune fails into two classifications

(Figure 5-7). Classification a: MC5 Camp Lejeune.

SC applies to three areas of the New River

The best usage of Class SC waters is "fishing, secondary recreation, and any other usage except primary recreation or for market pur?oses." The rest of she New River at XCB Camp

Lejeune is Class SA, the highest estuarine classification.

The best usage of Class other

SA waters usage specified is "shellfishing for mari<et nurposes and any by the SB .or SC classification.

;1

-

5.3.4.2 Groundwater. The uppen;lost 300 feet of sediments at :YCB Camp

Lejeune is the source of fresh water for the base.

Brackish water is usually found deeper than 300 feet below msl (Shiver, 1982).

In general, the aquifer system consists of a water table aauifer and one or more semi-confined aquifers.

Confining beds lie between the two aquifer systems and between the layers of :he semi-confined in the local hydiOgeOl0gy result from the complex aquifers. de?ositional the area.

Variations

‘history of

0000000778

5- 11

SC

ESTUARlNE WATERS NOT SUlTED FOR

SA

BODY CONTACT SPORTS OR

COMMERCIAL SHELLFISHING

ESTUARINE WATERS SUITED FOR

COMMERCIAL SHELLFiSHING

FIGURE 5-7

!Vater Quality Classifications ior the New iiiver at MC3 Camp Lgjeune

SOURCE: NORTH CAROLINA DEPARTMENT

Consultlno

OF NATURAL

Envtronmenral

RESOURCES;

Enalneers

1977 !

I cna Sc:enw!i

The uppermost hydrogeologic unit, the water table aquifer, extends from land surface to the first confining bed. This aquifer consists of sand, silt, limestone, and small amounts of clay.

These sediments are usually Pliocene and younger.

The water table aquifer is recharged when rainfall seeps into the ground of saturation and percolates into the zone of saturat:on.

Depth is 10 feet or less at MCB Camp Lejeune (Atlantic to the zone

Division,

Bureau of Yards and Docks, 1965): Groundwater in the water table (aquifer generally flows from upland areas toward stream valleys where it dis- charges to srr-face water.

In interstream areas, some groundwater will flow from the water table aquifer to the first semiconfined aquifer as recharge, given the semiconfined favorable hydraulic gradient and geology.

Recharge of aquifer may be expressed using Darcy's Law (Freeze and

Cherry, 1979) as:

Q= hl - h2 k A m where:

Q = Quantity of recharge per unit time, hl = Hydraulic h2 = Hydraulic head in the water head in the semiconfined m = Thickness of the confining table bed, aquifer, aquifer, k = Hydraulic conductivity of the confining

A = Area for which recharge is calculated. bed, and

From this, i: may be seen that groundwater will flow from the upper aquifer to the lower aquifer only if the hydraulic water table aquifer is greater than the hydraulic head in the head in the semiconfined the confining aquifer. The thickness and lower hydraulic conductivity bed retard the flow of water between the two aquifers. of

The semiconfined aquifer is composed of limestone and ca:Lcarous sands of the Eocene Castle ~Hayne Limestone, the Oligocene Trent Forma- tion, and in some places, sand and limestone of ihe Pliocene Yorktown

Formation.

Regional groundwater flow in the semiconfined aquifer is toward ihe southeast.

The regional wells that penetrate this aquifer. flow is altered locaiiy by pumping

Narkunas (1980) reported that transmissivity aquifer in the central coasta17plain

6,100 feet'/cjay to 12,100 feet-/day. of North Carolina of the limestone varied from

Storage varied from 2.6 x 10

-3 t0

7.4 x lo-'. Specific capacity of wells at MCB Camp Lejeune was reported as 5 to 10 gallons per minute per foot of drawdown (gpm/f,t) in

1960 (LeGrand, 1960). Recent data indicate that the specific the wells tapping the semiconfined aquifer at :MCB Camp Lejeune capacity var,ies of from less than 3 gpm/ft to approximately 20 gpm/ft.

The confining units, where present, consist of clay, sandy ciay, silty clay, and occasionally dense limes tone. These units occur as discontinuous lenses and may be present at anv depth. A comparison of the logs for Well Nos. HP-513 and HP-616 (Appendix C> shows a redul

33

OoOooOo780

5-13

in the thickness of the confining bed from 27 feet to 6 feet in less than

2,000 feet. Many of the well logs for the base indicate that the con- fining units are either thin or ab.sent. Wells in these areas withdraw at least some water from the water table aquifer.

5.3.4.3 function

Migration of both

Potential. water movement

Pollutant potential migration and chemical potential and/or is a physical interactions of specific

Regarding :he latter, contaminants with various contaminants specific environments. can move greater or lesser distances contaminants depending upon such factors as: chemical reactions and soils or strata; physical trapping between of contaminants in strata densities voids; characteristics stratification and surface water of specific caused by differences or groundwater contaminants densities; among other between and, factors. contaminant solubility

Because these factors are site-specific, they cannot be discussed in detail in this background section. However, general characteristics possible water movement and its effect on contaminant transport are discussed. of

There are three potential first case, contaminants migration pathways may be carried at MC3 Camp Lejeune. off-base drainage to the New Xiver and its tributaries. are in groundwater.

Contaminants entering by surface

The other the water table water

In the two pathways aquifer may then migrate to surface water, or :hey may migrate down into ihe semiconfined aquifer.

Surface water drainage is most rapid in the developed areas of the base where natural drainage has been modifed by ditches, sewers, and extensive most likely areas to be transported of asphalt directly and concrete. storm

Contaminants are to surface drainage during periods of 'heavy rainfall. throug'n groundwater,

At other except times, ln areas transport adjacent is likely to surface

:o be to and streams.

The vat 2 r tab ?e aquifer is highly susceptible because it is composed predominantly of permeabie

'to contamination materials at the earth surface. If a site is near a surface -water feature, water table aquifer can be expected to move horizontally zone of discharge at the groundwater/surface water contaminants in the and toward the interface. drainage), in the interstream the horizontal areas component

(i.e., of flow relativeiy will still distant from surface tend to follow the topography, the water conditions but under some circumstances table depend aquifer on: il> to the semiconfined a hydraulic a vertical gradient flow may develop r limestone aquifer.

These from the water table aquifer hydraulic toward the semiconfined conductivity known at X3 of confining

Camp Lejeune. aauifer, units. and (2) on the :hickness and

These factors are not well

What is known is that conditions vary with locations. unlikeiy. hydrogeology

In some areas, contamination of lower aquifers is very

For example, at Georgetown, near the Camp Geiger area, the tends to prevent mlgrac1on of water from the&&& @[email protected] 0

7

aquifer to the deeper aquifer (Division of Environmental

Management,

1979).

This is because and the hydraulic the confining zone is approximately

50 fee:. thick gradient is from the limestone aquifer toward the water table aquifer.

These same conditions all, of MCB Camp iejeune. may be present in parts, bum not protection

Variability of the confining of the semiconfined limestone units decreases aquifer. assura.nce

Furthermore, of although rhe hydraulic gradient between the water table and semiconfined is unknown at MCB Camp Lejeune, large-scale withdrawals aquifers of groundwater necessary to supply the base with water may have produced an overall decline increase of presshre the potential in the semiconfined for contaminant aquifer.

This would tend f:o movement to the deeper aqiiiizer.

Another possible factor affecting planr have indicated :hat there is no inventory are closure details available. groundwater quelity at MC3

Camp Lejeune is the condition

FiOperiy of abandoned wells. If 2 well is not: sealed when abandoned, it may become a pathway for con:aminants.

Conversations with personnel a: base maintenance and the water treatment of abandoned weils nor

5.4

BIOLOGICAL FEATURES. Tiie three forest areas surrounding

Lejeune--Croataa, 'riofmann, and Camp Davis-- provide extensive wildlife

Camp habitat. Animal life includes deer, black bear, turkey, squirrel, quail, rabbiis, raccoons, muskrat, mink, and otter. mars‘nes, and pocosins provide

'nzbitat for

The creeks, bays, swamps, many types of birds, including egrets, fiv

I catchers peregrine falcons,

, woodpeckers, and osprey. hawks,

Reptiies woodcocks, include owls, alligators, bald turt eagles, lt:s, and snakes. fish

Several species of the latter group are venemous. Freshwater in t'ne streams and lakes of the forests include largemouth bass, redbreast catfis'n. and s'hortleaf sunfish, 'bluegill, c'nain pickerel, warmout‘n,

Trees found in the forests inciude loblolly, pines; sweet gum, tupelo gum, yellow-popiar, yellow pond, longleaf, oak, perch, red and maple, sweet bay, and loblolly generaily 2 s'nrub undersrory bay.

In the pocosin wetlands: of evergreen and deciduous species. rhere is

Several unusual plant species also can be found, including dews, and Venus flytraps (Richardson, 1981; Yong, pircher plants,

1982; k‘ilson, sun-

1982).

T'he Camp Lejeune complex is predominantly large amounfs of softwood (shortleaf, longleaf, tree coverer;, pond, 2nd primarii?; with

IObiOliy pines) and substantial stands of hardwood species.

Timber- producing areas are under even-aged management with the exception of those along major streams'and in swamps. Tnese areas are managed 1-o provide both wiidlife habitat and erosion control. Smaller areas are managed for the benefit of endangered as the red-cockaded woodpecker, or threatened wildlife species such

Of Camp Lejeune's 112,000 acres, more than 60,000 are under' forestry management. At ihe forests' borders are severai, shrubs, vines, and 'herbs.

Acidic soils host carnivorous species plants, of inciud- ing pitcher plan:s, sundews, and Venus flytraps. Fore. f manageme

CL

5-15

provides natural wood produc:ion, beauty, soil increased wildlife protection, prevention protection plan, 1975). of endangered wildlife popuiations, of stream enhancement pollution, and species (Naturai Eiesource Management of the United

Wildlife

States management at Camp Lejeune is based on guidelines

Forest Sentice Wildlife Management Handbook.

Upland in game species .(inciuding quail, turkey, deer, and waterfowl) black bear, are' abundant gray squirrel, fox and are considered squirrel, in the wildlife management program. There is an attempt to coordinate forest and wildlife providing clearings, management. Wildlife a variety of habitats, small-game roads, and plantings strips, of shrub management is accomplished inciuding wildlife and fruit forests, food plots, trees which perennial planted produce ir grass forest edible part by access seeds and fruits. Figure 5-8 presents the locations fisii ponds, wildlife openings, and small-game of wiidfife plots within food the plots,

14 wild- life units of the compiex (Natural Resource Management Plan, 1975;

NAVFACENGCOM, 1975). terrestrial

5.4.1 habitat

Ecosystems discussed

(or upland), wetland, in this report will be broken into and aquatic communities.

Terrestrial Ecosvstems. Camp Lejeune contains four upland types (Natural Resource Management Dlan, 1975).

These are:

1. Longleaf pine,

2. Lobloliy pine,

3. Loblollp

4. Oak/hickory. pine/hardwood, and

5.4.1.i Longleaf Pine. Longleaf is the principal pine species and occurs on higner upland sites. along with red bay, holly,

Turkey, and black blackjack, post, gum? are the associated and willow species. oaks,

Gallberry, yaupon, low-bush huckieberry, titi, and chinquapin are also common in the understory. and sawgrass.

Quail and fox

Herbaceous squirrel species include are common in this teaberry, habitat ferns, and wild turkey find this forest type quite conducive for nesting and brooding range.

5.4.1.2 LO'DlOilV Pine.

LOblOliy pine is the main timber stand of the area and many now grow on oid farm homesteads.

Persimmon, black cherry, red cedar, holly, dogwood, and scrub oak are common, while huckleberry, chinquapin, gailberry, beauty-berry, and wax myrtle make up t'ne unders r'ory. Weeds and herbaceous plants include pokeweed, ragweed, smartweed, beggarweed, and partridge pea.

Deer, turkey, gray squirrel, and quail are common in this forest 'type, especially provided or prescribed if ciearings are burning is done to improve food and cover for the above species.

5.4.1.3 LOblOliV ?ine/Hardwood.

,”

This mixed forest occurs above the hardwoods and just below the pure stands of loblolly pine. Sweet g black cherry, red cedar, holly, while high bush huckleberry, sweet gallberry, bay, and dogwood and wax myrtle trees corn are common,

0 0

7

8 3

. . unciersiory. Weeds and herbaceous plants include panic grass, broomsedge, pokeweed, par:ridge pea, and beggarweeci. Gray squirrel, deer, and other sma?i mammals are common here.

The habitat is also conducive to wild turkey.

5 .4.1.4

OaklHickorv.

This association streams and creeks below the loblolly/hardwood is frequently stands found along and above the bot- tomland hardwoods. species. Black,

White post:, oak and southern chestnut, 'scrub red oak are the oak; yellow poplar, principal sweet gum, black gum, persimmon, black cherry, maple, and dogwood also are common.

Blueberry, chinquapin, and beauty-berry make up the understory.

Herbaceous plants include ferns, teaberry, paspalums, and sedges.

Wildlife frequently observed in this habitat inciude gray squirrel, turkey, deer, and wood duck. Black bears are also found here. wild

5.4.2 from those coastal

.Wetland bordering estuaries.

Ecosystems. freshwater

Wetlands found in the coastal plain vary streams and ponds to salt marshes along

The most unusual wetland system is the pocosin, which has been referred pocosin originates hill." pressions. to as a shrub bog by Christensen (1979). The term from an Aigonquin Indian name meaning "swamp on a

Pocosins initially develop as wetlands formed in basins or de-

The wetlands expand beyond the physical boundaries of the depression as the peat retains water. above the groundwater, with peat acting

Eventually, as a reservoir, the wetland expands holding water by caoillaritv above the level of the main groundwater mass (Moore and

Bellamy, 1974).

According to Richardson (19811, these evergreen shrub bogs comprise more than 50 percent of North Carolina's freshwater wetlands.

Typically, these systems cover thousands of acres, are isolated other water bodies, and periodically are subject to Fe from

Much of :he pocosin ‘habitat in North Carolina is gradually cutting or drainage with subsequent agricultural for being example, pocosins covered more ihan

2.2 million'acres, lost deveiopment. to timber but

In 1962, by 1979, only 695,000 resulted acres in changes remained undisturbed. of hvdrologic aquatic systems (Richardson, 1981). regime,

Destruction and nutrient of pocosins has export to other

A shrub understory pocosin'vegeration. with scattered

The most common species emergent trees is pond Fine. dominates

Other species inciude Atlantic whiie cedar, lobiolly sweet bay, and loblolly bay (Christensen and longieaf et al., pine,

1981.) red maple,

The characteristics of pocosin fauna are less well understood than those of the plant community. Wilbur (1981) notes that pocosins serve wildiife species two ways: They are habitat for endemic species, but 2iSO are refuge for those species which once ranged widely, are confined because of habitat destruction. but now

Endemics include two ver:ebrates, the pine barrens treefrog and the spotted turtle. V small species mammals and reptiles pocosins. as white-tailed also are endemic to the pocosins. sue deer and black bear also find refuge in‘ihe

QOOOOOP-7

Weiland ecosystems on the Camp Lejeune compiex can be separated into five habitat types (Natural Resource Management Plan, 19753.

1.

Pond pine or pocosin,,

2.

Sweet gum/water oak/cypress and tupelo,

3. Sweet bay/swamp black gum and red maple,

4.

Tidal marshes, and

5.

Coastal beaches.

5.4.2.1

Pond Pine. This habitat. (commonly known as pocosin or upland swamp) 1s dominated by pond pine with Atlantic longleaf pine, red maple, sweet bay, and loblolly stated above. Understory white cedar, bay also plant species include greenbriar, iob10’li.y presen:t cyrilla, as and fetter bush, and sheep laurel. Associated marsh and aquatic plants include mosses, ferns, pitcher plants, sundews, and Venus fiytraps.

Animals which can be frequently observed here include deer and black bear. ?ocosins provide excellent are seldom disturbed by humans. escape cover

The presence for bear because of pocosin-type pocosins habitat at

Camp Lejeune is primarily responsible for the continued existence of black bear in the area. Hany of the pocosins on the base are overgrown with brush and pine species that would be unprofitable to harvest.

Sweet Gum/Water Oak/Cvpress and Tupelo. This habitat i:s found in the rich? moist bottomlands along streams and rivers and extends to the marine shore1 ine.

Cypress dominate if water is present most of the year, while gums dominate if water availability is seasonal. Kaple, black gum, hawthor'h, sweet bay, red bay, and elm along with hornbeam, holly, and mulberry are also frequently present. Buckieberry, gr'ape, and palmetto make up the understory,

(including woodcocks) are commonly

Deer, found bear, in this turkey, type and waterfowl

05

'habitat.'

5.4.2.3 Sweet Bay/Swamp Black Gum and Bed Maple.

As the name implies, sweet bay or swamp black gum and red maple are :‘ne dominant tree ispecies in i'his floodpiain

Greenbrier, frequently habitat. rattan-vine,

Swamp tupelo, ash, found in this are2 include waterfowl, and elm mink, are also grape, and rose make up t'he understory. otter,

'presen:.

Pauna raccoon, deer, bear, and gray squirrel.

5.4.2.4 Tidai Marshes. on MCB Camp iejeune

The tidal marsh at the mouth of the New River is one of the -'

. .

North Caro lina coastal areas relatively free from filling or other man-made changes. Vegeta- tion consists of marsh and aquatic plants such as algae, cattails, saltgrass, cordgrass, bulrush, and spikerush.

This habitat generously provides alligators, wildlife with raccoons, food and cover. and river otter

Migratory waterfowl, are frequently shorebirds, seen wit'hin itii is habitat type.

5.4.2.5 Coastal Beaches. Coastal beaches along the

Intraco2sEal

'Ljaterway and aiong the Outer Banks of XB Camp Lejeune are used for recreation and to house a small military

Marines also

COndUCi beach assault training command unit maneuvers on the beach. from company-site units to combined 2nd Division, Force TrooDs, and Yarine Air Wing units.

OoOOoOO786

These exercises involve the use of heavy equipment including Amphibious

Tractors (A?TRACs). tracked vehicles

Training are peni.t:ed regulations presently restric: where heavy to cross the dunes.

These restrictions are intended to protect the ecologically sensitive coastal barrier dunes.

The vegetation along the beaches inciudes trees (live oak anti red cedar), woody plants (greenbrier, yaupon, holly, wax myrtie, and palmetto), weeds and herbs (sea oats, beachgrass, butterfly pen, Virginia and creeper, swamp mallow, and passion flower). the coastal beaches are generally serve as buffers

Although low in value in comparison to most game species, to the mainland and provide habitat to other types for many shorebirds. they

5.4.3 Aauatic Ecosvstems.

Aquatic ecosystems on MCB Camp Lejeune consist of smali lakes, the New River estuary, numerous tributary creeks, and part

Of the Intracoastal saltwater

Waierway. rl. wide variety fish species live here.

A number of freshwater of freshwater and ponds are under management to produce optimum yields and ensure continued harvest of desirable fish species (Natural Resource Management Plan, 1975).

Principal freshwater game fish species in t'he ponds, creeks, and the New River include largemouth bass, bluegill, warmouth, pumpkinseed, yellow perch, redfin pickerel, c‘hannel catfish.

The New River estuary redear jack is used extensively sunfish, pickerel, for shell- and fishing, especialiy in the bays and protected areas of the river such as

Stone iTlay, Traps Bay, and Ellis Cove.

- Lejeune.

The Intracoastal

As it passes

Waterway cuts the southeast edge of MCB Camp between the mainland and the barrier waterway carries a 'heavy flow of private pleasure boats &ring islands, the t'ne s;lmmer and a steady flow of commercial barges year-round.

;-ate r fish is found in the Intracoastai Waterway

A variety of Sal&- and in the Atlantic

Ocean adjacent spot, croaker,

Shellfish, to the base. whiting, represented drum,

These ’ mackeral, by OySferS, taroon, marlin, scallops, flounder, weakfish, bluefish, and sailfish. and clams, are also abundan:

{Naturai Resource Management Plan,

1975; NAVFACENGCOM, 1975).

This part of the North Carolina coast is within the Aiiantic flyway and many species of migrating birds pass through the region. habitats are used by migrating birds, and local species of shorebirds also employ the marsh areas as a nursery,

Area recreational

Intracoastai

The long-r ange management plan for KB Camp Lejeune calls for improvements and increased

Waterway for the wildlife access along observer and photographer as the game hunter and fisherman (NAVFACENGCOM, 1975). the New River and as well

Regionally, the area is important because of the marine fisheries laboratory.

Research

Institute is aiso near Beaufort.

The University of North Carolina of Marine Sciences and the State of North Carolina Depar of resource.

At nearby Seaufort,

The National Marine Fisheries

Natural Resources Division

Duke Universi:y has a marine

Senrice Center for Menhaden of Harine Fisheries are in >Iorehead _

i.L;.L

Rare, Threatened, or Endangered Species.

Carolina consists of approximateiy 3,4liU

The flora tax2 of vascular of Korth plants. The vertebrate fauna of over 865 species and subspecies includes

2Uc; freshwater fish, 78 amphibians, 79 repti!es, 225 breeding and

175 winter and transient birds, 80 nonmarine mammals, and 28 pelagic or offshore mammals (Cooper, 1977). Of these organisms, 26 have been desig- nated as endangered or threatened by the State of North Carolina and

25 are listed by the federai government as endangered or threatened for

North Carolina agriculture

(Table is currently

5-l). The North Carolina Department of

(19t12j reviewing additionai on the state endangered and threatened plant list. plants for inclusion

Table 5-2 presents

14 additional proposed tax2 2nd tax2 under review which are known KO occur in Carteret, Craven, Jones, or Onslow Counties.

North Carolina' s sensitive species on the Camp Lejeune

The presence complex is of described in Table 5-3.

The Natu ral Resources and Environmental Affairs (KREA) Division of MCB Camp iejeune,

Carolina Wildlife the U.S. Fish

Resource and Wildlife

Commission

Service, have entered into and the tiorth an agreement the protec: LOT! of endangered 2nd threatened species that might inhabit for

MCB Camp Lejeune. preservation

2nd

Iiabitats protection base's fOieSt and wildlife are main:ained of rare management at MC5 Camp Lejeune

2nd endanger ed species programs. Full through protection for i.s the the provided to such species 2nd criticai pians to prevent or mitigate adverse habita: effects is designated of station in management activities.

As part of the rare and 'endangered species management program, special emphasis is placed on habitat and sightings of allig2tors, osprey, bald eagles: cougars, dusky seaside sp2rrows, and red-cockaded wood peciteis . Tin e red-cockaded woodpecker is present in pine fores::s on

F!CZ? Camp Lejeune as noted in Table 5-3. This smsli woodpecker subsists on insects and is important in controlling insect pests which 2ttack pine trees. Xesting c2vit ies used by these birds are usually in overmarure pine trees -with red-heart disease. in some coionies, a11 the c2vity trees 2ie within 300 feet of eac'n other, but in other colonies, t‘ney may be

0.5 mile woodpecker ap2rt colonies

(Hooper et al., on Camp Lejeune

1980). Numerous red-cockaded have been mapped and marked (Natural

Resource Management

Plan,

1975). T'nese areas are shown in Figure 5-9.

Table 5-l. State and Feierd Stams of Sensitive Sprig for North Caroiina

Scientific ‘tkne

Chxtm~&w

Nxth

~Caroiina*

Feckrzll

Fefis ccxrolor cougar

Trichecius rmnatus

[email protected] saialis

Eu!daem glacialis

3alaenopter-a physaius

Megaptera mvaeangliae

Balaenoptera borealis

Eastemcmgar

Florida manatee

Gray hat

Inciianah

&ltiic

Finbzcktiak ri.gixt &ale

I-bmback whaie

Sei'tiale

Fake peregrinus anam

Faico peregxinus tundrius

Jiai iaeizus l.eucoa2pk.i~

Vennivon~i4ahnarIii

Derrh.i.ca icirtladii

Pelecams occickhalis caoiinensis

Picuiks borealis

F-ISH

Acqxsser brevirostrun liybopsis I.Irmaci.la lE?lX.ES

Alligator mississippiersis

Cheionia q&s

Eretn~tiiys tiricata kpi&CM.yS lcpmvii

Democh.elys coriazea

CareCta caretta herican peregrine falcon

Artic pxegrine faicon

Ed3 eade

Babman's w&k

Kirtlard's wari,kr

Eastern b=ux~ pelican

Rfe-coc~ wocdpeckr

52zzmnose smrgeon spot5l-l chb

Arterican allig2itm

Greenturtle

Hawicsbill turtie

Kemp's ridiey turtle

Jkatk~ic turtle

Lcggeerreaci turtie c

T

Ssaion ciarki narxahala

PLRii hgiit2ria 2scicuLata

~kfi5oniamrzma

N30niay lard snaii f=

Erdangereci ini T=Threatened. sources : * ?arker, 2. ard L. Dixm, 1983.

? U.S. F ish ati Wildlife k-vice, 1980.

T

E c’

E

E

I:

E

E r

T

E

00 0 o o 0 8 7

8’9

‘fable 5-2, l’rn~xxml I’rttr~t~~I Plant 1,ist lor NorLh Carol i 113

OlG lm4

~X.Jtt i W

I,ist ing Oily ‘llnse ‘Taxa K~ima~ to Cccur in Cxteret, Crnvcil, Jot-m, or

Catex cha~mIIli i

(:yswptet-is teilrbzsseeis is i,ysi1mlii3 as~-x!rulaeEolia

Sol

0

63i:imn itliJg0 VI~I-11a tJtric!Jlnria oi ivacea,

‘I’axa IhrJer Review

Aescl~yncr~eiie virginica

Ipibnilea

IIlJsci pIJia aIthrInJali5

&xl frey’s sarrlwo~t

Carol ina sp 113CInwrlr

I1.i vcJbo11lc

Sen9 it ive joi.tit-veLcli

VeIlJs Elytrap sdrec.tl ft!i~ll

Jmose watemilfoil

Ekx~ntaiJi sweet pitcller-plant

.Jo~ies

Carteret, Craven

Chts low

Crami

Ctavelr, .Joncs

Cart eret , Craven,

JOIlcs , als low

Carteret, Craven

Catteret , Ctaven,

Ct-avcn. ols low h-y, kll-1 sady weds

OIJtC t-<pS ad rodsidm ad 1~23 s .

I,i.ole s inks, pals, ad. prris

Slnub begs arrl savantdls in tie CGIS tal plain

Sava~~~wlis, pm5 iris, pine bar-rem flalwonls, ml dTr\lb t,cxs

, pine

Shal. Iow, rcid pixtis with pll of 3 to 5

Craven

Cadet-et, Craven

Jonm , 01s low

Rivehanks, sw;.xiq)s, ad t kin1 mtsIm in tie cmstal plain

Wet, sardy di tclies, poccs itls , savaIlIl;dls, aId OlX?Il bCg IIU~illS ad pine hit-rers

IbCOS i.CLS ,

SmlrlIltl\s,

Sav;::::d:s

E

E

I

PP

P P pp

T

E

E-

E

T

T

X-E

..

Ta‘ble 5-3. Comments on Sensit ive Species Regarding Occurrence Zithin

Study Area (Camp Lejeune Complex)

Species

MAMMALS

Eastern cougar

Florida manatee

Gray bat

Indiana bat

Atlantic rig'ht whale

Finback whale

Humpback whale

Sei whale

BIEQS

American peregrine

Arctic peregrine

Bald eagle

' Bachman's warbler

Kirtland's warbier falcon falcon

Eastern brown pelican

Red-cockaded woodpecker

FISH

Shortnose sturgeon

Spot fin chub

REPTILES

American alligaior

Green

Hawksbill tu" AL le turtle

Kemp's ridley turtle

Leatherback turtle

Loggerhead tur:le

MOLLTJSKS

Noonday land snail

Comment

Possible transient

1974 but not seen since

Study area is northern extreme of summer range

Not in area

Not in area

Possible migrant offshore

Possible migrant offshore

Possible migrant offshore

Possible migrant offshore

Possible

Possible

Not reported or seen

Possible migrant but nor observed

Possible migrant but not reporred

Reporred in area

Frequent in area with known nesting areas

Not observed

Not in, are2

Routinely but

Not in area

Bunched

Mountain arrowhead golden heather

Not in area

Not in area

SOUiCeS :

?eterson, 1982.

Cooper, 1977.

Parker and Dixon, 1980. not recently observed common

Known nesting sites along coast

Possible migrant offshore

Dossi-nie migrant offshore

?ossi'bie migrant offshore

Known nesting sites along coast

ONSLOW BEAW

-

I water

FIGURES-9

Red-Cockaded Woodpecker Colony Areas at MCB Camp Lejeune

CL ml00000792 and Air Research. II-X.

SOURCE: PETERSON, 1982

Consulting Envhonmenfal ErQneers ond Scientists

I

SECTION 6. ACTIVITY FINDINGS

6.1 INTRODUCTION. Section 6 summarizes base activities and operations

Emphasis inventory which may involve potentiai is placed on past practices. environmental contamination.

At the end of the section is an of all waste disposal sites which includes site descriptions.

Information is more detailed for sites requiring confirmation.

Throughout the activities and operations summaries, the reader is referred site to specific descriptions sites for more information.

In these instances, at the end of this section should be consulted.

6.2

OPERATIONS, ORDNANCE. Because ordnance operations at Marine

Corps Base (MCB) Camp Lejeune are carefully public health or environmental concern controlled, about past disposal there is little practices.

For that

Lejeune reason, only was established an overview as a training of this function is presented.

Camp center before World War II and has retained and tank this training characteristic feature.

Numerous activities, to amphibious operations, require su.bstantial from infantry amounts of ordnance each year.

No manufacturing or load and pack operations occur on the base.

All ordnance is shipped in and stored on the facility.

Types of ordnance range from small arms ammunition to rockets, artillery, and mortar rounds.

Principal magazine storage is in the

Frenchs Creek area, while smaller storage areas exist in other des$ignated places on the base.

No repor: during this study. of spills or accidents were discovered ordnance

There is evidence that, on a nonroutine, was buried at the Camp Geiger landfill irregular near the trailer basis, park some

(Site No. 41). Reports indicate that some mortar shells were placed. in dumpsters and ultimately taken to the landfill. once found at t‘nat site and subsequently buried

A case of grenades t'here. was

A 105mm cannon shell apparently blew up while being buried there. This suggests that care 'be tdken wiien cl-; or boring at Site No. 41. i3ecause of the training mission, a substantial, amount of land has been designated as firing ranges and impact areas.

There impact zones, called G-10, N-2, and K-2, for high explosives. are three

Locations

Of t'nese zones are as follows:

1.

G-10 Impact Area--PWDM 1, D5-6.

2. X-2 Impact Area--Extends east from the junction of

Gridiine

Creek Inlet,

94 and Onslow Beach along the beach line to Bear and then along Bear Creek to a point 400 yards north of the Intracoastal

400 yards north of a parallel

Waterway, and thence on a line to the Intracoastal Waterway to Gridline 94.

Ordnance from aircraft

Brown's Island. will impact on

3.

K-2 impact Area--PWDM 1, D3/E3.

The

New

River bisects MCB Camp Lejeune and splits

G-10 and K-2 into east and west sections. impact

N-2 is southeast of G-l borders the Atlantic.

.

Lsiand.

A bombing range known as BT-3 has been established at Brown's

This property is 7 miles southwest of Swansboro, North Carolina.

The island, aircraft explosive referred to as the Brown's Island Target Complex, is used by for target runs with ordnance not to exceed an-equivalent net weight of 250 pounds TNT.

The target complex also receives high trajectory artillery rounds.

There are two Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) areas on the base near the impact zones.

They are G-4 for the east and K-326 for the west side of the camp. They are used to dispose of inert, unserviceable, or dud ordnance.

Ordnance is rcut'inely collected by skilled EOD personnel and disposed of by burning less than or elecrrically

1 pound. exploding.

There is no significant residual chemical propellant waste generated or incompletely by this activity. At ' burned munition compounds may remain, but amounts are typically

6.3 OPEMTIONS; NONORI)NANCE.

5.3.1 Introduction and Summarv.

?lost waste material the support and maintenance functions utilities and other essential services of the base. is necessitated is generated

Decentralization by the by of

170-square- mile land area.

For instance, vehicle maintenance out at several places.

Past generation of hazardous functions waste are carried is primarily result of maintenance-type activities.

Only light industrial activity has taken place. a be generated az many places.

Map set

In a facility indicates the size of MCB Camp Lejeune: the following

For instance, the 1979 Facility numbers'of facilities: hazardous waste may

Development

1. Vehicle maintenance (except ramps and racks)--45 to

3

50 buildings,

Vehicle/aircraft racks/ramns--85 to 90 buildings

10 buildings.

- ,

3. Other maintenance--lo to 15 buildings,

4. Fuel related operations-- approximately

5.

Maintenance shops--- PpproxLmattlp

50 buildings,

20 buildings, and

6. Other snops--approximately

The actual numbei within buildings of shops is probably greater since individual are not distinguished in these numbers. shops

Because this investigation is conducted within finite military resources, priorities must be established. types of subsiances potentially involved, or organization, provided and level of information in this reporz on these ac:ivities

Priority intensity criteria or size include of activity available.

Xore information assigned higher priorities. is

Another important factor relating to information reported in this section gathered many snops during is on-site interviews and actlv:ties. judgment.

Observed circumstances indicate minimal contamination

In these instances, priority ident Ffying and gathering information regarding other and information potential was given disposal sites, t at rather productivity than gathering detailed information on activity, at what appeared to be lower priori:v activi' history,

Liao and

0 0 0 0 0 a 9 q

:

5 .3.3.4 only buildings adjacent around Buiidings with 500 designations to the buildings.

Maintenance were standing. activities

Artillery was parked took place in and

571, 574, 576, 598, and 599. No information was obtained

Old 10th Regiment. regarding wastes

This group occupied the "1800" area when generated by this occupied b,v the 2nd Combat Engineers Battalion. regiment. The area is now

5 .3.3. 5

2nd Combat Engineers Battalion. This battalion is presently the "1800" area.

Routine maintenance of small combat vehicles takes place in Buildings contamination

574, 576, were observed. and 598. No significant areas of in

6.3.3.6

Znd, 6th, and 10th Regiments. secti,ons of the supply and industrial

These regiments use several area.

Buildings 1205, 1206, 1310,

1405, 1406, 1502, 1503, 1601, 1604, 1605, 1607, 1711, 1739, 1750, 1755,

1760, 1775, and 1780 are used for maintenance of small combat vehi.cles.

Except for the 1700 area, many of these buildings were constructed in the early 1940s and early 1950s. The area is urban with most surfaces paved.

Spills indications and other disposal of significant activities contamination may have occurred. were found.

However, no

6.3.3.7

Geiger. parking creek

8th Marine Regiment. T'nis regiment occupies a portion of Camp

Combat vehicles are maintained at Building TC-952. Large paved areas slope has received eastward runoff to a tributarv

POL from the iots. of Brinson Creek.

This small

There was evidence of dumping near the creek but no significant contamination was observed.

6.3.4 Fire Fighting Acrivities. Tresently, there are Two fire fighting training burn pits aL MCE Camp Lejeune.

One site used by :ne

MCR Camp Lejeune Fire Department is located south of Bearhead Creek and b'etween Holcomb Boulevard and Piney Green Road (see Site No. 9).

Tie ot'her is located near the end of Runway 5 at MCAS New River (see Sire

NO.

54) and has been used for crash crew training. initially unlined.

Both pits were contaminated

The fire department pit was first used in 1961 using water-

JP-4 and JP-5. bottom of the pit. Tne wafer

The fuel laver sat on top of a water was not treated after layer in the the training exercises were compieted. This iit was lined in the late 1960s. Porn

1965 to 1971, approximately 30,000 gaI./yr was burned at this pit. current use is now about 5,000 gal/yr.

Tne

The Crash Crew Training Area at MCAS New River was used in the mid-1950s.

Originally, training was on the ground and surrounded by a berm. Later, a pit was used which was lined in 1975. MCAS New River drainage ditches were reported to carry "Protien" fire fighting foam toward Southwest

Creek during or after practice exercises. area is about i.5 acres. Based on a present annual

T'ne affected usage of 15,000 gai- ions of POL, approximately been used at this site.

0.5 million

?$ost of these gallons of t'nese were burned,

3,000 to 4,000 gallons may have soaked into the soil. but compounds as many as

'have

6.3.5

Naval Field Research Laboratorv.

From 1947 to 1976, the Naval

Research Laboratory was located in the area of the present Pest Control

Shop

(Building K-37, see Site Nos. 19 and 20). Activities at the laboratory studies included using radionuclides on small animals.

(Iodine 131) for metabolic

These actions are not believed to have produced any lasting hazardous waste contamination (see Section 6.4).

6.3.6 plant

Creosote

(Buiiding 776;

Plant.

Site

During 1951 and 1952, a saw mill anti creosote

No. 3) 'manufactured railroad ties. This activity was located about 800 feet east of Building 613 (pump house and

We 11 No. 13), on the opposite side of Holcomb Boulevard and the railroad tracks. Logs were cut into ties w'hich were then placed in a chamber and pressure-treated with hot creosote.

Creosote was used directly from a railr oad tank car.

Creosote remaining in the pressure chamber at the end of the treatment cycie was saved

FOi later use. There were no reports of any creosote waste heat the creosote. generation. Oil-burning boilers provided steam to

The ties were used to build a railroad from Camp Lejeune to

Cherry: Point, North Carolina,

Upon completion of the railroad, and plant were sold and removed from Camp Lejeune.

All that the mii! remained at the time of this IAS site visit were concrete pads and the boiler chimney.

An inspection of the area did not reveal any indication creoso:e or other wastes of concern. of environmental beiow.

Lltilitv Operations. Utiiity operations have influenced issues at the base.

Power, s:eam,, and water are discussed

Waste disposal is discussed in Section 6.5

Power fOi the base is supplied by

Carolina

Company with all lines above ground.

Maintenance

Tower and Ligh: of the system is per- formed 'by the company, althoug'h transformer leakage within the systems is a concern of base environmental

PC3 contamination.

Transformer affairs personnel because of potential storage is temporar y and is now carried

011; with proper environmental controls.

Presently, transformers are s:ored in Storage Lot l&O, between Ash Street and Sneads Perry Road on designated as a hazardous waste Center Road Extension. storage area.

Historically, anti 203. One incident

It is currently transformers of leaky

55-gallon were stored at Storage drums of transformer oil

Lots near

201 i3uilding 1502 was reported.

The problem was dealt with by disposing the drums at Site No. 74 and the area near Building

1502 is believed of to be cleaned up.

(Refer to description additional information.) of Site Nos. 6, 21, and 74 for

The steam plant at Hadnot Point can produce 480,000 pounds of sream per hour and supplies the French Creek area as well as mainside.

Steam is used for heating and cleaning of equipment. of coa: are stored near this facility.

The area

Substantial is identified

So. 26. This is a currently operating site and NACI? confirmation amounts as Site is not reauired.

However, berms to prevent coal pile runoff wrre not not

' ' s one alierations to runoff con trol mav be warranted.

The current plan Lndicates that increased demand will be placed on the system in the

future. As many as 45,000 tons of coal are used per year. fly a:sh has been disposed of on base for many years. (Refer to Site No. 24 for additional waste disposal information.) a potential

Groundwater is the potable supply. source of contamination, but rather

This is significant, as a potential not as receptor.

Strategically located wells provide water to eight treatment plants within penetrate the military complex.

GeneralLy, wells are deep enough to at Least one impervious layer. The Hadnot point plant !serves

French Creek, Tarawa Terrace, and iBerkeley Manor. Storage is in elevated tanks with a total capacity of 1.4 million gallons.

Table 6-1 presents characteristics of the water treatment plants. concern

The drinking water system at the Rifle Range area 'has been a because of elevated wells to the chemical landfil! trihalomethane

(Site

('IXM) leveis

No. 69). This and proximiiy concern for impacts of of Site No. 69 exists despite the fact that THM levels at other places are also somewhat high. For example, note Sampies 14, 15, and 15 in

Table 6-3.

Test wells have been placed around the landfill groundwater characteristics. Table 6-2 shows THM levels io mo:nitor in treated water at the Rifle Range.

Strategies chlorination procedures are being to reduce evaluated

THM ievels now (1982). such as changes

Source in of TW precursors is not known, bui groundwater monitoring chemicai landfi

11 is continuing.

THM levels related at 4L locations to the at

Camp

Lejeune are shown in Table 6-3.

Three one-time sampies (see Samples 14,

15, and 16) contained total

THM at or greater than the 100 ppb EPA

(annual average) drinking water Limit. various locations,

However, sources

'LHM precursors of precursors obviously may or may not exist be at related to p2Si hazardous material disposal. In fat:, origins of precursors may not be related to any human activity matter or algae).

(e.g., detrltai

6.3.8

Radar Eouioment Operations. At XCAS New River, metaLlic mercury was drained from delav lines at the radar sire and buried without containmeni. The radar uniis

- were Located near the Photo Lab, i3uiiding 804 (Siie No. 48). This took'place from the mid-1950s to the mid-1960s at 2 rate of about

1 gallon per year.

6.3.9 Pest Control Shop.

The control of nuisance organisms

Sil

Camp

Lejeune has been ihe mission of an activity called, at various times,

Malaria Control, Insect Vector Control,

Building 712 (Site No. 2) housed this and ?est activity

Control Shop. from 1945 to !958.

Insecticides and herbicides were stored and mixed at this site until the activit y moved to Building 1105.

At Building 1105, the administrative and storage functions were accomolished w'ni?e the mixing of chemicals was performed in the southeast portion of Lot 140 (Site No. 21). In I977, this shop moved to Building PT-37 where it presently is Located. herbicides

For a Listing of the names and quantities used by ihis activity,

Equipment washing without containment and treatment of insecticides of the resu

I::Lil

CL and see Site Nos. 2 and 21 in Section

' 7 wasrewater

1~25 common practice at both Auiiding 712 and Storage Lot 149.

0000000797

Table G-1. Water Treamerr: af ?CB Caq Lejeune

Warer hunt Plant

Building Capacity Approx. msy Flow i-iadra Point

Iblcallb Ballward*

Tarawa Temacet

Air Static cap Jciinson?

Kifie Range

CcurrbeBa]SM onsiow Bed-l

I3320

670

T-33 x5-1 10

+168

WBi

BE-190

?iieL3

5 ‘Iugd

2rgd

1 %d

3.5 ugd

0.75 mgd

0.6 [email protected]

0.6 Ilgd

025 mgd

3.1 mgd

1.5 tc 2rfgd

1-e lqd

0.2s KEgd

0.25 ngd

0.5 xrgd

0.15 to 0.2 mgd

*'Ihere are piam toecard fke Holcnrb Bcul.e& planz's cayciq to 5qd. i Scbiuied for eliminazion.

* Schechied for expansion to 1 mgd cqacity.

5mr:e: i&R, 1982.

Treatinxc

Line

L&e

Lime

-LirfE

Zalite

Zeolite

Zslite

Zhite

Tabls h-2. Total Trihalomethane Values in Treated Water at Rifle Range,

MCB Camp Lejeune, 1981 and 1982

Date

.Sample No. Tota! THM (ppb)

1981

8/20

B/20

8/20

8/20

9/21

9/24

9/24

9124

10/28 lo/28

10128

10/28

12/30

12/30

12/30

12/30

1982 i/28 l/28 l/28 l/28

3/18

3/18

3/18

3/18

467

468

469

470

542

5b3

544

545

552

553

554

555

567

568

569

570

572

573

57L

575

577

578

579

580

\

Note:

Source:

Data s‘hown are to demonstrate levels and range of TFX encountered.

LAETNAVFACZNGCOK, 1982.

100

100

98

98

L’

43

40

44

105

99

104

103 b9

53

5.1

55

6 3

57

71

63

32 h7

58

--- . -

-----I---

1

2

3

Tn rawn

Terrace

81dg. TT-60,

TT

ElemcnLary

Scliool.

I, Ffa in

Ila I. 1 Plc n

’ s Room

Sitlk

I

1

1

4

5

0 fi* u

0

0

0

Q

00

0

0

Knox

Trf3i ler

I’ a c k n1ctg.

TT-2453,

‘KY Exchange Gas

Lad ies St at ion’s

Room

J3ldg. T’F-35,

Sewage Plant ‘6

Off ice Sink

Jlldg. E-23,

Sewage I,i Et

Station

I

1

3

4

4

--

5

4

4

3

3

3

3

1

---

-I

4

2.

2

2

<1

2

2

.-----

II

10

I 0

7

IO

12

7

0

9

10

1 1

12

0

’ ‘0

0

0

0

0

0

GO

0

111dfJ. w-625, s t e nr11 P 1 a I1 L ,

Jla Lh coon1 S i ok

No r1t fo c d

Point

JIldg. N-120, nrnnch CJ.ini,c,

Ele n ’ s ROOIII

ElOllL ford

PO i 11 t

JIldg.

M-136,

Sewage Plant

Sink

BLdg. M-23 I.,

JlOf), First Floor

~lcn ’ s Ram

14 C! w

River

2

3

3

4

<I

4

4

4

15

21

<I

2

2

2

2 0

28

<I

<I

<I

<l

5

11

2

9

9

10

5 1.

73

-----------

:i;lillp

No.

1 e

I 4

17

18

19

0

0

0

2 0

0

0

15

16

0 m3

Locat ion

JJl.dp,. AS-4025,

Dnrracks lbom,

Rec.

Da~lirooln

Sink

Bldg. 710,

Officer’s

Gnlly Sink

Club

15

15 i)ldg. 4022,

Fire Stntion,

Dldg. 1915,

Cot f Corlrse, t+rl .(J l,ockt!r

I~c3orn

Illfig. lhzrkeley

5400,

Flnuor

Eleinerltary

Schoo 1.) Ha i ti

Ila 1 1 ISat room

22

24

20

I--__-_----

JIromci ich Loro-

Illetllane

28

25

9

I I

13

45

37

2

Urorno form

32

‘I’0 1. a 1 ‘I’1 I Pi”

_---

120

22 99

<I

<I

<I

33

30

35

was rewater at Storage Lot 140 was estimated to 'be about 350 gzlions overland discharge per week !NAVFACENCCOM, FY1977). Spillage during of the mixing process occurred at Building 712 and possibly occurred at

Storage Lot 140. Soil samples taken around Building 712 after :his IAS team site visi: have s‘hown DDT residues at levels up to 0.75 percent, a dry weight basis (see Table 2-l). on

Building

(now relocated).

712 most recently

Building has been used as a day-care

1105 now houses Roads and Grounds center

Department,

Storage and handling procedures at'Buiiding 1105 were reported to be adequate to prevent any large spills and to insure a current safe working environment. Any pesticide solution no: consumed during the day it was prepared was saved for later use.

6 .?.lO Dry Cleaning Shop.

Although there are many laundry distribu- tion centers located within Camp Lejeune and MCAS New River, ali dry cleaning is perf ormed in Building 25.

This laundry facility has been ar the same location since 1943. The solvent used for dry cleaning was changed in 1970 from a petroleum based solvent to perchloroethvlene

(tetrachioroethene). per year.

Current consumption rate is approximately 34 tons

Solvent losses are reported to occur only as a resuit of evaooration distillation. filters during the drv cycle.

Therefore:* little or are dried at high temperatures

Solvent is reclaimed by filtration no wastes have been generated. and

Spen: while any vavors are vented into the solvenr storage tank. After drying, spent filters sent to the landfill. are bagged and

6.3.11

Preparation, Preservation, anti Packaging Shops.

6.3.11.1 %C3 Shop Stores Sranc'n. The Preparation,

Packaging (D, P, and P) Shop is responsible for

Preservation, rendering equipment and and mareriais ready for storage and shipment or for rendering items operar ional from storage. Located in Building such stored

909 at iiadno: Point, this shop is be transported presently accountable for packaging hazardous materials to io :he Defense

Properry Disposal Office (DPDO), or other storage iocarions. Prior to 1977

, rLnse water fiCYlD this facility

(300 gal/week in 1977) was discharged by sform sewer inro Beaver Dam

Creek. The shop last used the degreaser Trichloroethylene (TCE) in

1978.

6.3.11.2

Buildings

ZdFSSG, 2d Supplv Bartalion.

The degreaser TCE was used in

901 and 14Oi by the Harine 2nd Force Service Supporr Group

(2dFSSG) to degrease of TCZ were contained engines at various times.

Approximately 440 gallons in a tank. In 1976 or 1977, this TCE tank was drained and the solvent sent to DPDO.

No information spills, leaks, or discharges from the tank. was found regarding

6.3.12 stripper finishes

Furniture

Base Maintenance

(contained

(i.e.,

R,epair Shoos.

The Furniture is located in'Building in an approximately

1409.

550 gallon

Repair

This vat)

Shop operated shop used paint to remove by lacquer and varnish).

The vat was emptied irregul every 1 to 4 months.

The paini stripper was placed in 55-gallon drums,

0000000806

,

transported to the industrial onto the ground but not burned. area fly ash dump (Site No. 24), and poured

Special Services operates a furniture

Geiger in Building TC-609.

This facility repair facility has been in operation least 1968.

Only small amounts of wastes are generated. at Camp since at

6.3.13 Paint

Shops.

Three paint shops are located in the Hadnoc Point area. The Base Maintenance Paint Shop (Building 1202) used an estimated

9 tons of painr per year in 1980; .similarly,

(Building 908) used 1 ton and the Hobby Paint the Central

Shop (Building

Paint Shop

1103) used

2 tons.

Building

Tne Rase Maintenance

1202 at least since

Paint pre-1951

Shop has been located and probably since in

&he building was constructed in 1942.

As a matter of long standing shop policy, oil-based paint of all colors has been saved, combined, and the resulting used. It has been reported that starting in 1964, about gray paint then

20 to 40 galions of oil-based paint were disposed of at the Xadnot Point

Burn Dump (see

Site No. 28) every other week.

Some of this paint was burned.

It is not known when this practice ceased. Thinning solvents are rarely used.

6.3.14

Photographic been identified

Laboratories. at Camp iejeune. by the 2nd Marine respectively, for

Division, photographic uses.

Six photographic

In 1968, Buildings and Headquarters facilities have

11 and 27 we're used and Service Battalion,

The Sanitary Zngineering

FV 1977) identified Building

Survey

54 (originally for PY 1977 (NAvFAcENGCONM, a mess hall buili in 1943) as a photo lab generating containing acetic acid,

300 to 400 gallons sodium sulfite, per week of wastewater and ferric cyanide. It further described the Naval Regional Medical Center Hospital

300 gallons pe r week of DhotograDhic wastes containing as generating hvdroquinone,

200 to alkali,

?ublrc and silver

Affairs nitrate.

The photo lab in Building 3b2, presentiy

Office., produced 1.5 gallons per day of wastes containing hydroouinone and methylaminophenol sulfate. the

(i)uFiding

The Administration Office and Photographic Laboratory

804 at MCAS ,"r‘ew River) was built in 1955.

This laboratory presentlv month to a sanitary reclamation. discharges past about

50 gallons of developers and stop bath per sewer. waste

Fix bath disposal solution quantities is sent to DPDO for are presumed similar to current ones. Discharge is expected to have been to sewers and not to landfills.

6.3.15 associated

Other Industrial Trade Shops. Other general trade shops are with routine base maintenance functions. The Plaster and

Masonry Shop is located in Ruilding 1304 while Building following shops:

Electric, Metal Working, Plumbing

1202 houses and Fieating,

:he

Refrigeration materials construction and Air used by these functions

Conditioning, shops are consumed during that they and Carpenter. perform.

Generally, the the repal _ and

! L

The metal refuse collection

system has been in use at Camp Lejeune for several decades and eliminated so-lid metal disposal problems.

Tne Metal tjorking Shop is primarily

2 metal-forming operations.

DPDO and rareiy faciiity

The Electric without pickling has disposed

Shop sends or similar metal re-working any accumulated of any motor winding transformer varnish. oil to

The Plumbing

.and Heating Shop used "Sizzle" discontinued to unclog indoor drain pipes but has since the use of this product which was probably a caus=ic cleaning in Building agent.

The Carpenter

1409 in 1951 before

Shop was united moving to its with present the Upholstery location.

Shop

6.3.16 disposal

Fuel-Related are significant

Operations. activities

Fuel related storage, dispensing, to environmental and contamina- tion issues. One principai tank farm, for gasoline and diesel fuei, is located in the Hadnot Point area.

Here, fuel is transferred into tank trucks and transported to smaller dispensing facilities on base.

In the past I this operation has resulted environment via leaks (see Section in the release

6.5, Material of POL compounds

Storage) or spills to the ffom tank trucks (e.g., refer to Site No. 64).

Prompt action in the past has, by and large, prevented serious contamination from major spills.

6.4 O?ER.ATIONS, RADIOLDGICXL. The Naval Research Laboratory is near the present Pest Control Shop.

Activities at the laboratory included using radionuclides

Approximately for metabolic

100 dogs were disposed studies of in a small on small area near animals. the building. In November 1980, strontium site

90 beta buttons were found while grading a parking contaminated i:ems lot near the building. were recovered.

The area was surveyed, and

Soil samples were obtained and the site was cleaned of radioactive substances.

?ive 55-gallon‘drums of soi i and animal residues were collected aiong with 499 'beta bUttOnS

(400 microcuries per button).

Laboratory, potential

Iodine 131 was used in metabolic studies at the Naval Research because Iodine 131 has a half-life for r esidual radiological coniamination of only is nil.

8 days,

6.5 activities

Haterials radiological

?WERIAL STORAGE.

Responsibility resis wirh the supply organizations of interest include POL, pesticides, substances. for support of the facility of the various commands. chemicals, and

Central stores located in the supply and industrial area of

.iiadnot Point receive all incoming supplies for the Camn Lejeune complex.

The group gives suppor: to the 2dFSSG as well as to other tenant commands on the base. The central stores group handles all commodities such as ammunition, inspects stores all fuels, shop stores, and food. materials that enter the base.

In addition, the group

There is also a materials management unit which is responsijlz for waste storage and shipment declaration from the base to proper receiving facilities.

Following that a given material. is waste, t'nis group stores and transports Lt.

The ?,P, and ? group certifies that the material is a DPDO to move.

00 0 Q

throughout

Storage of oils, fuels, and other lubricants the base.

The Environmental Engineering is scattered

Survey FY80 Update, while addressing wastewater treatment needs, identified 69 waste oil systems, 46 grease racks, 50 POL storage areas, 144 fuel tanks, and

9 fueling areas.

Under the present plan, POL are stored with adequate environmental safeguards; large fuel tanks or tank farms have earthen berms to contain spills.

Other POL products in cans or drums are *stored on fenced concrete pads. Historically, there was no awareness of the hazards associated with these compounds and containment measures were minor or did not exist.

In the past, there have been leaks in fuel tanks or underground lines.

When the break or leak is minor, there may be a considerable line leakage, time before entering surrounding soils.

For example, tank farms at Hadnot ?oint,

MCAS New River, and Camp Geiger have experienced losses through tank or

These detection, events sometimes resulting have prompted an awareness in a large amount by base personnel of contamination problems associated with underground pipelines.

Construction of aboveground lines has been one control measure at the JP

Fuel Farm (Site

No.

45).

Refer to Site Nos. 22, 35, and 45 for detailed descriptions of various fuel storage problems.

Generaliy, POL contamination can be grouped as spillage of unused POL of a defined type or spillage/disposal unknown type or types. When POL at a spill site of waste POL of an can be identified as a single type of organic mixture, like Mogas or JP-4, the areas of concern may be limited to one or a few specific categories. These categories may be limited to such areas as: tainting of fish and shellfish and odor problems in potable water; migration of lead, flesh; lead compounds, taste and potential receptors; struction carcinogens (e.g., benzene) to human or environmental fire and/or explosion hazards; and problems at building sites. con- complicated

Situations dealing with waste POL are potentially because many different rypes of wastes more may have been com- bined, including toxic and 'hazardous organic substances. Additionally, waste

IDOtOi oil alone has been known to. contain some heavy metals and phenolics. Phenolic compounds are known to taint fish flesh and, when chlorinated in water treatment systems, to cause taste and odor prcblems at concentrations near 2 parts per billion.

Consequently, waste PGL sites may require more extensive analytical investigations what wastes are presen: and thereby better define the specific to determine areas of concern.

Hazardous chemicals are now segregated and stored in accordance with federal regulations health. Chemicals to minimize such as solvents risk to environment are now stored and to human on concrete pads which are fenced. spill.

There is adequate protection against runoff in case of a

Laboratory pesticides

Pesticides currently

(see Secrion 6.3.9). are stored a: the fOlTlei

From 1943 to approximately were stored in Building 712; this building day-care center from the early 1960s until mid-1982.

Naval Res was

1958, used s"'4fyp~810 as a

0 0

pesticides were moved :o Building 1105, where they remained until

Stored in Building 1105 were chiorinated hydrocarbons

!?77. such as DDT anti

Chlordane and Dursban. as well as Diazinon, Malathion, Lindane, Mirex, 2,4-D, Dalapon,

In the hazardous materials storage area (Building TP-452) YTF! was being stored below antifreeze spilled

(ethylene glycol').

The liquid eirher or was released in some manner and contacred the HTH.

Combustion resulted and the entire facility burned in 1977. This is an example of storage involved which was improperly from putting these planned or without knowledge of the hazard two substances in close proximity.

Paint stored here was also consumed in the fire.

6.6 WASTE DISPOSAL OPERATIONS.

6.6.1 Sewage Treatment. treated throughout the complex.

Liquid sanitary wastes are conventionally

Because of the large surface area, sewage treatment plants (STPs) must be located in various 2reas. At

Hadnot Point, gravity and force mains convey waste to 2 secondary trickling filter plant capable of treating 8 mgd.

This plant, originally serving iiadnot Point, has been extended :o Paradise Point, French Creek, and :he Berkeley

Hanor housing area.

Courthouse Bay houses the Engineer's

PLmphibious Tractor battalion. Sewage treatment

School and the is at the

Second secondary level using lime

0.5 mgd. as a pH COnir01. The design capacity of the piant is treatment

MCAS New River and nearby Camp Geiger at one time had separate plants, each capable of providing secondary treatment. The

Camp

Geiger plant has been upgraded

Des;gn capacity of this facility is

2nd now also

1.4 mgd. serves the air station.

6.6.2 Solid Wastes 2nd PO5 Disnosal. Solid waste disposal base complex has been on Land in the past. ?ast practice in the has not been well regulated, subs:ances, and unauthorized disposal some of which were hazardous. sites were used

A chronology for many of principal

-waste disposal areas is given in Figure 6-l.

The ,originaL base waste disposal site (prior to 1950) was off Holcomb Boulevard across from

Storage Lot 203 (See Site No. 10). The site was a borrow pit used for disposal of construction debris.

Following construction, w'nich began in

1941, disposal areas were located near individual activiiies (see Site

Nos. 1, 7, 10, 13, 15, 16, 19, 24,

25, 36, 37, LO, 42, 43, LA, b6, 55,

57, 61, 62, 63, 65, and 68).

As a result, simultaneously.

In the early 197Os, a central a number of sites were active landfill (Site

No.

29) was established landfills io receive wastes from the entire complex while other were gradually phased out.

One possible exception is the

Chemical Dump in the Iiir'le Range are2 (Site No. 69) at which disposal continued.

A 1977 report by SCS Engineers shows that ?iCB Camp Lejeu generates 664 tons of solid waste per week, or approximateiy 95 to

.

TIME IN YEARS

Montlord Porn! Dumo lSllC 15) fSurlace1

6

\

Monflord Pant Dump. lSr1e 161 /Eurnl

A

I

_----w-v

INo Burnmgi t

Midway Park Dumo

--~Tll, l/ (fiur-yl

Gmp Geqr (Trailer

Hiurn and bury,

Park 1 Dump (Site 4 1 I t

--

Ceiqer Area (STP) Dump (Site 36)

--- iBurn and Buryl t

Site 29 I (Bury I t t

STP and WTP

-.-----------a

-------Mm

Rifle Range Dump (Site 61 I

IBWYI

Enoincer Area Dump (Site E51

(Burni t

Industrial Arca Fly Ash Dump [Sire 2rl

LsurlaceJ (Fly Ash Only1

Miscellaneous

ISuriace

Small and Burn

Dumn; and Guryi

Rifle Ranr+e Chemtcal

LbUV I

Dump ISite 691 t t

INo Burnmqi

1 v

1

+ DPDO

I

TIME

LEGEND

JJDGED

PERIOD FROM

RELIABLE

DATA

TIME PERlOD ESTIMATED

-----

FROM UNCONFIRMED DATA

OR

-- -

ARROWS

ROUTING

INDICATE WASTE

AS SITES CLOSED

ClRCLE DENOTES

PORTlONS OF BASE

PRlNClPAL

USING

RESPECTIVE DUMP/LANDFILL

0

NOTE: convenient

Thesa sites ware created as disporai locations for adjacent disposal the developed sites ciosed, areas. effected deveioped

As rhese refusa from area was re-routed as indicared by rha arrows. e

I

1 i

I

I

FIGURE 6-7

Chronology of Solid Waste Disposal Sites and Waste

Routing t iSTarer and Air Research. inc.

Consultin at Camp Lejeune, N.C.

Environmenrol krgineers and Scientis?~

1

d‘3V. l-he

The composit industrial waste commercial industrial ion is similar contains wastes to municipal nonhazardous from similar waste materials activities. in other communities. and is typical cf

In addition to solid wastes, base nersonnel have estimated

-;

197Os, about 5 percent of the waste oils (and other that

POL) was disposed of at landfills while the remainder was spread on roadways or poured down storm drains.

Other l.iquid wastes disposed of at these scattered disposal sites include solvents and some paints that may have been burned or allowed to seep through the other wastes.

The Rifle Range Chemical Dump (Site No. 69) was set aside in about 1950 to receive toxic waste materials, icept of types of wastes, amounts, and position

A complere of burial. inveniory

These was records have been lost, but according estimated wood

50 barrels preservative of DDT, other compounds, to a former base safety officer, training pesticides, trichloroethylene an sludge, agents (like Iltear gas"), and PCBs

(some in sealed cement septic tanks) were buried here. Tne surface area is about 6 acres and the volume o f disDosed materials may be as high as

93,000 cubic varcis.

Tnis site was closed in 1978. Storage Lot 1U? and

Ruilding P-451 storage areas. are currently designated as long-term hazardous waste

Before

2 pollution control program was implemented in the early

197os, it *was common to spread wasie oils and other POT, marerials on road surfaces for dust control. As many as 1,400 gallons per week were disposed of in this way. There are five sites (Nos. 5, 3i, 33, 34, and 56) which are noted for this type of disposal.

Wastes were collected the from various maintenance shops on the station year.

There was no regulated collection at intervals practice, throughout and substantial quantities were flushed to drains that emptied into the New River.

Some characteristics of the waste oil currently generated are presented In Tabie 6-L. The data show significant as lead (376 mg/l> and zinc (475 mg/l>.

Cadmium, levels copper, of metals chromium, such and

'barium were also at elevated levels. Amounts of volatile organic compounds were found in the parts-per-billion except ion of phenols

(20 mg/l). Tnese data

(ppb) emphasize range with the the potential contamination

Ii which could result from improper disposal of waste oils. is recognized that pas: practice in many vehicie maintenance shops allowed oil to seep into the soil on site and cause contamination. generally has been stopped and current (1982) controls regulate collection and proper disposal of these materials.

This

6.6.3 report,

“Chemical and Training Agent Disnosal.

FOXY the purpose of this a chemical agent is defined as a chemical that is capable of producing lethal or damaging effect s on humans and which exists solely for that potential use. Chemical agents differ from training agents in that the latter are authorized a chemical environment. Training for use in training agents produce people to function irritating/incapa in

.

Table 5-4. Constituents in ilaste Oil, %CB CamD Le jeune,

196 !

Component

Antimony

Arsenic

Aarium

Beryllium

Cadmium

Chromium

Copper

Lead

Mercury

Nickel

Selenium

Silver

Thallium

Zinc

Toluene l,!-Dichloroethane

Phenol

Source: LANTNAVFACENGCOM, 1981.

Concentration co.02

<0.002

1.08

<0.005

1.88

0.16

4.&4

376.0

(0.002

0.36

<0.002

0.16 co.1

475.0

0.012

0.004

20

(mg/l)

0000000813

efEects at low concentrations concentrations. (Definitions

Force, 1975). and are no: lethal adapted except from Departments at much higher of Army and Air

Information obtained from various sources indicates that some tvpe of chemical warfare training

Lejeune.

Information has not been has always found been present to conclusively at Camp indicate whether or not chemical agents were prese.nt on-base. which conclusively indicates whether,

Information is also if present in large quantities, lacking these agents were present in forms.strictly usable as training aids or as stores for chemical warfare use.

Supporting the argument of chemical agent presence is the fact that, in the earlv 1?5Os, adequate storage facilities supply of chemical agen:s did exist on-base. to maintain

One unconfirmed report a of phosgene observations vials being tend found on-base to add credibility and other details to this supposition. of eyewitness

(These reports will be presented later in this section.)

The argument against chemical agent presence is supported by the fact that, historically, the development and storage of chemical agents has been assigned to the Army and Air

Force with minimal Marine

Corps involvement.

Also, there is only a small probability that domestic or captured chemical agents were returned to Camp Lejeune from overseas war zones. with training

Yost reported observations agent disnosal. Training solids over areas used for training of tlgasIt disposal agents were sometimes spread as exercises. Disposal are consistent of large ouanti:ies of these training wouid not disverse properly) train.ing mission. agents (e.g., drums of wet material would be consistent with the that

Camp Lejeune

To summarize the "chemical agent presence question," there is litrf e evidence construed supporting as evidence :hat it.

1 arge present or disposed of on-base.

However , absence of information quantities cannot be of chemicai agents were never

The remaining porr ions of this section w.ill present a summary of the salient details and observations reported by former and current base employees regarding "gas" disposal assist in the identification operations. of the disposed material

Data that might are presented.

.,

. . . . :

.<

. ._

,:.:

. . .

.;

.

.

2

.

'., . was found.

Only one unconfirmed

Recollections report of a chemical of an interviewed staff agent at Camp Lejeune member were thai in

1958 OL 1959, during construction

Road, a bulldozer operator uncovered o f Air

Station some glass housing ampules north or vials. of Curtis

“o0th the operator and his supervisor smelled an odor of "new-mown hay."

Subkequencly, the area was cieared to a depth of 18 inches and a total of eight broken or intac: vials were found. The staff member beiieved the vials had been "sent awav" and were determined to contain phosgene

However2 no written documen:ation or other verbal reports of this

inc iden: were found. The reported odor is consistent phosgene. with the odor of

It is believed that i f these vials did indeed contain phosgene, they were most likely training aids for troop education.

Three other incidences of "gas" burials 'have been identified

(see Site Nos. 69, 75, and 76). .Tnese usually involved reports of

Marines being present, sometimes with protective usually exercised during unloading from trucks clothing. and placement

Care was in pits to ensure the integrity of 55-gallon drums and possibly 5-gallon cans. Some drums were rusty, while others were in good condition. Drums were painted various colors. than drums filled with oil.

Some drums were described as being much lighter

Ai one of these incidents, some drums broiie open, releasing yellow or brown liquid that appeared like fuel oil but was not fuel oil. a

No distinctive odor was reported. was worn by the delivery

No protective and unloading personnel. equipment or clothing

The color and appear- ance are similar to various chemical agents, i.e., distilled mustard gas, nitrogen mustards, and lewisite.

Tne lack of a distinctive been due to t‘he fact that these agents have vapor densities odor may have

5 to '7 times greater pit. than air and vapors may have been confined to the bottom of the

Despite these similarities; it is unlikely that such material would be handled by personnel without any protective

However, this does not conclusively chemicals were present. eliminate equipment the possibility or clothing. that these dissolved

ChiOrOpiCria

These three drum disposal incidences vrobably involved {disposal agents, most probably chloroacetophenone (CN), as a

SOiici Or in one or more solvents. and chloroform,

CR dissolved in chloroform, or in carbon tetrachloride in and benzene becomes the different training agents CNC, CNS, and CSB, respectively.

The most probable liq,uid training another training agent, agent o-chlorobenzylidene would have been CNC. malonitrile (CS),

CN

'Oi may have been present in the "much lighter than oil" drums. CS was developed around the time of the Korean War and replaced CN, which was developed in

1915. Both CS and C?? have similar bulk densities (CS is about 0.25 g/cc>, and both were stored and handled in 55-gallon drums.

6.7

SITES.

6.7.1 identified

ZepOriS.

Introduction.

Tnese show limited topography near sites.

A total at MCB Camp Lejeune, of 76 waste disposal

?ICAS New River, sites have been and HOLF Oak Grove, Tne sites 2re listed in Table 6-5, and are located on maps ,included with :his section.

For many sites, photographs have been included with the site information regarding foliage, land use, and

The confirmation to these sites.

A total study ranking of 54 sites system were judged

(model) not has been a to require fu consideration. These sites include 12 at ?ICXS New River, 3 at HOLF Oak

0000000815

Grove, anti 35 at ?lCP, Camp iejeune.

Five 3C;I.S New River plus iejeune sites have been judged to require further assessment.

17 EC3 Camp

These judgments were based on factors such as type of waste material and po:entiai for migration.

Summaries given in Table 6-5. of pertinent information concerning a?1 sites are

6.7.2 Sites Reouiring Confirmation.

The 22 sites requiring confirmation are described on individual forms in this section. remaining 54 sites excluded from further consideration

The are described

Section 6.7.3 using similar, but abridged, forms. in

Tabie 6-5. Discosal Sites at kap Lejeune CorrpleXn

Site x0.

Site

Description

Dates used

Material

Depsitei

Public krks lkveloprent Map

Sheet and Coordinates

3

L

5

6*

7

8

10

11

12

13

14

French Creek Liquids

Disposa! Area

Late 1940s to mid-1970s vaste battery acid, IQL

11 C7/D7

Four Nursery/Dar

Center (Bldg. 712)

!9G-1958

Varicxls pesticides

5, Klo

Old Creosote Plant

*Saw-nil1 F?oad Cm- strudtion Debris D..rnp

?iney Green Poad

Sioraqe tits 201 & 203

Tarawa Terrace TI

1951-1952 Trash , general debris

Axhalt, old bricks, ani cement liliumm

Waste oil for dust control

19&&s-present Hetals, DE, Pzss

1972

Construction debris, SIP filter _, sand, household trash

Flame-&le Storage Ware-

Current

Abuse bldg. T’P451 b TP452

Flzmxbles

5, Eli-12/011-12

5, Nl4-1.5/014-15

6, I-3

‘ire

?it

Fighting Training

1960s-?resent

JFF, J?-5, solvents

6, ‘X3/U

Origiiial i32se Ihip Pre1950

6,

GLJS

?est Contra i ,%op

-Zxplosive Ordnance

Disposal

Golf

Ixn?p

Coarse Cxstruction

Si:e

Knox

Area

Pimp-Rap

17 tint ford Point Area

Rip+L?.p

19761982

-kly

1%

1973

!?68-

1960s

15 tint ford Point DJID,

194&19%

194%1958 iO* tintford Point Burn iknp, 195%-1972

1958-1972

Unknwn

Pesticide storage, beta buttons, an&al carcasses with lcw-ievel radiation

Bro!-zn concrete and asphalt

10, “10

Ordnance burned or exploded,

20, G9 colored sxxkes, kite phos~ons

Clippings, aspnali branches, sans

7, GE-!.3

3, L16--1.7/x1017

Litter, asphalt, STP sad

2, I-B-10 kbage , waste oils,

Concrete mbble asbestos 3, Nll-112

2, 33/D?

Table i%5. Dismsal Sites a.~ Camq Lejeune Ampler" (Cmtinu4 Page 2 of

5)

Site so.

Site

Description

Da.tes used

Material

Depited public Wor'ks

Developrex !lap

Sheet and Coordinates

18

19

15

25

27

Watkins Village

X2val Sesearch IA3 lh-rp

&se Incinerator

(E) Site

Coal Storqe Area

Xmzl :%s'i)itEii ?;rea

197619’8

1?55-1960

2G Naval Research Lab

Incinerator

21* l-Yans fom-er storage

Lot 140

23-k

23

Industrial

1105

Area Tank Fam

&ads and Grounds, Bldg.

1956-1960 l?SO-?resent

1979

1957-1950

2w

29

3rP

31

32

Imiustriai

Are2

Fly Ash m

%driot Poinr 'tin m

3ase Sanitary Lardfill sneads Ftxry F33azwuel

Tank Sludge Area

Fqinefzin~

64R2ngeiioad

FYench Creel!

Stock2g.e

Construction materials and Axis

Radioactive cattiated ahd.s, mpty tanks, mtals

Shue ash, debris scrzp

PZB spill, oil

DDT, transfornar

Fuel (iti)

10, Jl5

Pesticide, herbicide storage 10, J15

. i972-

ADrox. lOgo

Fly ash 2nd chiers~ Vii sludge, ZI? sltige, cm- structim debis

1940-!W

Piesent

1970- unknm

1*1971

1972-?resent

1970

Coal storage mff

Concrete, granite +-rap erosion cmtrol

Solid wstes, iIKiUStiiZ1 wastes based

, c"Z.rb~~ paint trash,

Garbaee, construction debriG, general trash

Sluge fran fuel storqe tank, tetraethyl lead and related cmpwnds bste oils oii- i950- early 1970s

1973-1979 tip-rap dumper!

7, Kl

10, ~lO/FlO

10, 30

10, 115

10, Ia-ii/?lih-17

10, IJ.2

10, -5

10, Ql3- L&/?J"lli

11, Al2&12-!3/C12-13/

D13

18, G12

2o;'G7-8/w3/Il-7/

Jl-5

11, wG3-4-P

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