1 C G S

1 C G S
GETTING STARTED
CHAPTER
1
In This Chapter...
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–2
Conventions Used . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–3
DL205 System Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–4
Programming Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–7
DirectLOGIC™ Part Numbering System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–8
Quick Start for PLC Validation and Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–10
Steps to Designing a Successful System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–13
Chapter 1: Getting Started
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Introduction
1–2
The Purpose of this Manual
Thank you for purchasing our DL205 family of products. This manual shows you how to
install, program, and maintain the equipment. It also helps you understand how to interface
them to other devices in a control system.
This manual contains important information for personnel who will install DL205 PLCs and
components and for the PLC programmer. If you understand PLC systems, our manuals will
provide all the information you need to start and keep your system up and running.
Where to Begin
If you already understand PLCs please read Chapter 2, “Installation, Wiring, and
Specifications”, and proceed on to other chapters as needed. Keep this manual handy for
reference when you have questions. If you are a new DL205 customer, we suggest you read
this manual completely to understand the wide variety of features in the DL205 family of
products. We believe you will be pleasantly surprised with how much you can accomplish
with our products.
Supplemental Manuals
If you have purchased operator interfaces or DirectSOFT, you will need to supplement this
manual with the manuals that are written for these products.
Technical Support
We strive to make our manuals the best in the industry. We rely on your feedback to let us know
if we are reaching our goal. If you cannot find the solution to your particular application, or, if
for any reason you need technical assistance, please call us at:
770–844–4200
Our technical support group will work with you to answer your questions. They are available
Monday through Friday from 9:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. Eastern Time. We also encourage you to
visit our web site where you can find technical and non-technical information about our
products and our company.
http://www.automationdirect.com
If you have a comment, question or suggestion about any of our products, services, or manuals,
please fill out and return the ‘Suggestions’ card that was included with this manual.
DL205 User Manual, 4th Edition, Rev. B
Chapter 1: Getting Started
Conventions Used
When you see the “notepad” icon in the left–hand margin, the paragraph to its immediate
right will be a special note.
The word NOTE in boldface will mark the beginning of the text.
When you see the “exclamation mark” icon in the left–hand margin, the paragraph to its
immediate right will be a warning. This information could prevent injury, loss of property, or
even death (in extreme cases).
The word WARNING in boldface will mark the beginning of the text.
Key Topics for Each Chapter
The beginning of each chapter will list the key topics
that can be found in that chapter.
Getting Started
CHAPTER
1
In This Chapter...
General Information
.................................................................1-2
Specifications...........................................................................1-4
DL205 User Manual, 4th Edition, Rev. B
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DL205 System Components
1–4
The DL205 family is a versatile product line that provides a wide variety of features in an
extremely compact package. The CPUs are small, but offer many instructions normally only
found in larger, more expensive systems. The modular design also offers more flexibility in the
fast moving industry of control systems. The following is a summary of the major DL205
system components.
CPUs
There are four feature-enhanced CPUs in this product line, the DL230, DL240, DL250–1
and DL260. All CPUs include built-in communication ports. Each CPU offers a large
amount of program memory, a substantial instruction set and advanced diagnostics. The
DL250–1 features drum timers, floating–point math, 4 built-in PID loops with automatic
tuning and 2 bases of local expansion capability.
The DL260 features ASCII IN/OUT and extended MODBUS communications, table and
trigonometric instructions, 16 PID loops with autotuning and up to 4 bases of local
expansion. Details of these CPU features and more are covered in Chapter 3, CPU
Specifications and Operation.
Bases
Four base sizes are available: 3, 4, 6 and 9 slot. The DL205 PLCs use bases that can be
expanded. The part numbers for these bases end with –1. These bases have a connector for
local expansion located on the right end of the base. They can serve in local, local expansion
and remote I/O configurations. All bases include a built-in power supply. The bases with the
–1 suffix can replace existing bases without a suffix if expansion is required.
I/O Configuration
The DL230 and DL240 CPUs can support up to 256 local I/O points. The DL250–1 can
support up to 768 local I/O points with up to two expansion bases. The DL260 can support
up to 1280 local I/O points with up to four expansion bases. These points can be assigned as
input or output points. The DL240, DL250–1 and DL260 systems can also be expanded by
adding remote I/O points. The DL250–1 and DL260 provide a built–in master for remote
I/O networks. The I/O configurations are explained in Chapter 4, System Design and
Configuration. I/O Modules
I/O Modules
The DL205 has some of the most powerful modules in the industry. A complete range of
discrete modules which support 24 VDC, 110/220 VAC and up to 10A relay outputs (subject
to derating) are offered. The analog modules provide 12 and 16 bit resolution and several
selections of input and output signal ranges (including bipolar). Several specialty and
communications modules are also available.
DL205 User Manual, 4th Edition, Rev. B
Chapter 1: Getting Started
DL205 System Diagrams
Machine
Control
Packaging
Conveyors
Simple Motion Control
Elevators
Flexible solutions in one package
High-speed counting (up to 100 KHz)
Pulse train output (up to 50KHz
High–speed Edge timing
Handheld
Programmer
DL240
DL260 with H2–CTRIO(2) High Speed I/O Module
Stepper Motor
Pulse
Output
RS232C
(max.50ft/16.2m)
Programming or
Computer Interface
Local I/O Expansion
Programming or
Computer Interface
Simple programming
through the RLL Program
Drive
Amplifier
Networking
Operator Interface
DCM
Handheld Programmer
RS232C
(max.50ft/16.2m)
DL240
DL250–1 or DL260
RS232C
(max.50ft/16.2m)
(max.
6.5ft / 2m)
DL305
RS232/422
Convertor
RS232/422
Convertor
DL205 User Manual, 4th Edition, Rev. B
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Getting Started
The diagram below shows the major components and configurations of the DL205 system.
The next two pages show specific components for building your system.
1–5
1–6
Chapter 1: Getting Started
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Direct LOGIC DL205 Family
DC INPUT
8pt 12–24 VDC
16pt 24 VDC
32pt 24 VDC
32pt 5–15 VDC
DC OUTPUT
4pt 12–24 VDC
8pt 12–24 VDC
16pt 12–24 VDC
2 Commons
32pt 12–24 VDC
4 Commons
AC INPUT
8pt 110 VAC
16pt 110 VAC
AC OUTPUT
8pt 18–220 VAC
12pt 18–110 VAC
2 commons
RELAY OUTPUT
4pt 5–30 VDC
5–240VAC
8pt 5–30 VDC
5 –240 VAC
12pt 5–30VDC
5–240VAC
(isolated pts.module
available)
CPUs
DL230 – 2.0K Built-in EEPROM Memory
DL240 – 2.5K Built-in EEPROM Memory
DL250–1 – 7.6K Built-in Flash Memory
DL260 – 15.8K Built-in Flash Memory
BASES
3 Slot Base, 110/220VAC, 24VDC
4 Slot Base, 110/220VAC, 24VDC
6 Slot Base, 110/220VAC, 24VDC, 125 VDC
9 Slot Base, 110/220VAC, 24VDC, 125 VDC
SPECIALTY MODULES
High Speed Counters
CPU Slot Controllers
Remote Masters
Remote Slaves
Communications
Temperature Input
Filler Module
PROGRAMMING
Handheld Programmer
with Built-in RLL PLUS
Direct SOFT Programming
for Windows
DL205 User Manual, 4th Edition, Rev. B
ANALOG
4CH INPUT
8CH INPUT
2CH OUTPUT
8CH OUTPUT
4 IN/2 OUT
8 IN/4 OUT
Chapter 1: Getting Started
Programming Methods
There are two programming methods available for the DL205 CPUs, RLL (Relay Ladder
Logic) and RLLPLUS (Stage Programming). Both the DirectSOFT5 programming package and
the handheld programmer support RLL and Stage.
DirectSOFT Programming for Windows.
The DL205 can be programmed with one of the most advanced programming packages in
the industry ––DirectSOFT5. DirectSOFT5 is a Windows-based software package that
supports many Windows features you already know, such as cut and paste between
applications, point and click editing, viewing and editing multiple application programs at
the same time, etc. DirectSOFT5 universally supports the DirectLOGIC CPU families. This
means you can use the same DirectSOFT5 package to program DL05, DL06, DL105,
DL205, DL305, DL405 or any new CPUs we may add to our product line. There is a
separate manual that discusses the DirectSOFT5 programming software which is included
with your software package.
Handheld Programmer
All DL205 CPUs have a built-in programming port for use with the handheld programmer
(D2–HPP). The handheld programmer can be used to create, modify and debug your
application program. A separate manual that discusses the DL205 Handheld Programmer is
available.
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DirectLOGIC™ Part Numbering System
1–8
As you examine this manual, you will notice there are many different products available.
Sometimes it is difficult to remember the specifications for any given product. However, if
you take a few minutes to understand the numbering system, it may save you some time and
confusion. The charts below show how the part numbering systems work for each product
category. Part numbers for accessory items such as cables, batteries, memory cartridges, etc.,
are typically an abbreviation of the description for the item.
CPUs
Specialty CPUs
DL05/06 Product family
DL105 Product family
DL205 Product family
DL305 Product family
DL405 Product family
D0/F0
D1/F1
D2/F2
D3/F3
D4/F4
Class of CPU / Abbreviation
230...,330...,430...
Denotes a differentiation between
similar modules
–1, –2, –3, –4
D4–
440DC
–1
D3–
05B
DC
D4–
16
N
D
2
D3–
16
N
D
2
Bases
DL205 Product family
DL305 Product family
DL405 Product family
D2/F2
D3/F3
D4/F4
Number of slots
Type of Base
##B
DC or empty
Discrete I/O
DL05/06 Product family
DL205 Product family
DL305 Product family
DL405 Product family
D0/F0
D2/F2
D3/F3
D4/F4
Number of points
04/08/12/16/32/64
Input
N
Output
T
Combination
AC
C
A
DC
D
Either
E
Relay
Current Sinking
R
1
Current Sourcing
2
Current Sinking/Sourcing
High Current
3
H
Isolation
S
Fast I/O
Denotes a differentiation between
similar modules
F
–1, –2, –3, –4
DL205 User Manual, 4th Edition, Rev. B
F
–1
Chapter 1: Getting Started
1–8
Analog I/O
F3–
DL05/06 Product family
D0/F0
DL205 Product family
D2/F2
DL305 Product family
D3/F3
DL405 Product family
Number of channels
D4/F4
02/04/08/16
Input (Analog to Digital)
AD
Output (Digital to Analog)
DA
Combination
Isolated
AND
S
Denotes a differentiation between
Similar modules
–1, –2, –3, –4
Communication and Networking
Special I/O and Devices
04
AD
S
–1
Alternate example of Analog I/O
using abbreviations
F3–
08
THM
D4–
DCM
DCM (Data Communication Module)
D3–
HSC
D3–
HPP
HSC (High Speed Counter)
HPP (RLL PLUS Handheld Programmer)
F4–
CP
Programming
DL205 Product family
D2/F2
DL305 Product family
D3/F3
DL405 Product family
D4/F4
Name Abbreviation
see example
CoProcessors and ASCII BASIC Modules
DL205 Product family
D2/F2
DL305 Product family
D3/F3
DL405 Product family
D4/F4
CoProcessor
CP
ASCII BASIC
AB
64K memory
64
128K memory
128
512K memory
Radio modem
512
R
Telephone modem
T
–n
note: –n indicates thermocouple type
such as: J, K, T, R, S or E
128
– R
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DL205 User Manual, 4th Edition, Rev. B
1–9
Chapter 1: Getting Started
Quick Start for PLC Validation and Programming
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If you have experience using PLCs, or want to setup a quick example, this section is what you
want to use. This example is not intended to explain everything needed to start-up your
system. It is only intended to provide a general picture of what is needed to get your system
powered-up.
Step 1: Unpack the DL205 Equipment
Unpack the DL205 equipment and verify you have the parts necessary to build this
demonstration system. The minimum parts needed are as follows:
• Base
• CPU
• A discrete input module such as a D2–16ND3–2 DC or a F2–08SIM input simulator module
• A discrete output module such as a D2–16TD1–2 DC
• *Power cord
• *Hook up wire
• *One or more toggle switches (if not using the input simulator module)
• *A screwdriver, blade or Phillips type
*These items are not supplied with your PLC.
You will need at least one of the following programming options:
• DirectSOFT5 Programming Software, DirectSOFT5 Manual, and a programming cable
(connects the CPU to a personal computer), or
• D2–HPP Handheld Programmer and the Handheld Programmer Manual.
DL205 User Manual, 4th Edition, Rev. B
Chapter 1: Getting Started
Step 2: Install the CPU and I/O Modules
Insert the CPU and I/O into the base. The CPU
must be inserted into the first slot of the base
(next to the power supply).
• Each unit has a plastic retaining clip at the top and
bottom. Slide the retainer clips to the out position
before installing the module.
• With the unit square to the base, slide it in using
the upper and lower guides.
Retaining Clips
CPU must reside in first slot!
• Gently push the unit back until it is firmly seated in the backplane.
• Secure the unit to the base by pushing in the retainer clips.
Placement of discrete, analog and relay modules are not critical and may go in any slot in any
base, however for this example, install the output module in the slot next to the CPU and the
input module in the next. Limiting factors for other types of modules are discussed in
Chapter 4, System Design and Configuration. You must also make sure you do not exceed
the power budget for each base in your system configuration. Power budgeting is also
discussed in Chapter 4.
Step 3: Remove Terminal Strip Access Cover
Remove the terminal strip cover. It is a small
strip of clear plastic that is located on the base
power supply.
Lift off
Step 4: Add I/O Simulation
To finish this quick start exercise or study other examples in this manual, you will need to
install an input simulator module (or wire an input switch as shown below), and add an
output module. Using an input simulator is the quickest way to get physical inputs for
checking out the system or a new program. To monitor output status, any discrete output
module will work.
Toggle switch
Output
Module
Input
Module
Wire the switches or other field devices prior to applying power to the system to ensure a
point is not accidentally turned on during the wiring operation. This example uses DC input
and output modules. Wire the input module, X0, to the toggle switch and 24VDC auxiliary
power supply on the CPU terminal strip as shown. Chapter 2, Installation, Wiring, and
Specifications provides a list of I/O wiring guidelines.
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Step 5: Connect the Power Wiring
Connect the wires as shown. Observe all precautions
stated earlier in this manual. For details on wiring see
Chapter 2 Installation, Wiring, and Specifications.
When the wiring is complete, replace the CPU and
module covers. Do not apply power at this time.
Line
Neutral
Ground
Step 6: Connect the Programmer
Either connect the programming cable connected to
a computer loaded with DirectSOFT Programming
Software or a D2-HPP Handheld Programmer
(comes with programming cable) to the top port of
the CPU.
Step 7: Switch On the System Power
Apply power to the system and ensure the PWR
indicator on the CPU is on. If not, remove power
from the system, check all wiring and refer to the troubleshooting section in Chapter 9 for
assistance.
Step 8: Enter the Program
Slide the switch on the CPU to the STOP position (250–1 / 260 only) and then back to the
TERM position. This puts the CPU in the program mode and allows access to the CPU
program. Edit a DirectSOFT program using the relay ladder diagram below and load it into
the PLC. If using an HPP, the PGM indicator should be illuminated on the HPP. Enter the
following keystrokes on the HPP:
NOTE: It is not necessary for you to configure the I/O for this system since the DL205 CPUs automatically
examine any installed modules and establish the correct configuration.
X0
Handheld Program Keystrokes
B
$
STR
GX
OUT
1
C
2
Y0
ENT
ENT
END
After entering the example program put the CPU in the RUN mode with DirectSOFT or
after entering the program using the HPP, slide the switch from the TERM position to the
RUN position and back to TERM. The RUN indicator on the CPU will come on indicating
the CPU has entered the run mode. If not repeat Step 8 insuring the program is entered
properly or refer to the troubleshooting guide in chapter 9.
During Run mode operation, the output status indicator “0” on the output module should
reflect the switch status. When the switch is on the output should be on.
DL205 User Manual, 4th Edition, Rev. B
Chapter 1: Getting Started
Steps to Designing a Successful System
Step 1: Review the Installation Guidelines
Always make safety your first priority in any system
application. Chapter 2 provides several guidelines that will
help provide a safer, more reliable system. This chapter also
includes wiring guidelines for the various system
components.
Step 2: Understand the CPU Setup Procedures
The CPU is the heart of your automation system and is
explained in Chapter 3. Make sure you take time to
understand the various features and setup requirements.
Step 3: Understand the I/O System
Configurations
It is important to understand how your local
I/O system can be configured. It is also
important to understand how the system
Power Budget is calculated. This can affect
your I/O placement and/or configuration
options. See Chapter 4 for more information.
16pt
Input
X0
X17
8pt
Input
X20
X27
Step 4: Determine the I/O Module Specifications and
Wiring Characteristics
There are many different I/O modules available with the DL205
system. Chapter 2 provides the specifications and wiring diagrams
for the discrete I/O modules.
NOTE: Analog and specialty modules have their own manuals and are not included in this manual.
Step 5: Understand the System Operation
Before you begin to enter a program, it is very helpful to
understand how the DL205 system processes information.
This involves not only program execution steps, but also
involves the various modes of operation and memory layout
characteristics. See Chapter 3 for more information.
Power up
Initialize hardware
Check I/O module
config. and verify
DL205 User Manual, 4th Edition, Rev. B
8pt
Output
Y0
Y7
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Chapter 1: Getting Started
Step 6: Review the Programming Concepts
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The DL205 provides four main approaches to solving the application program, including the
PID loop task depicted in the next figure.
• RLL diagram style programming is the best tool for solving boolean logic and general CPU register/
accumulator manipulation. It includes dozens of instructions, which will augment drums, stages
and loops.
• The DL250-1 and DL260 have four timer/event drum types, each with up to 16 steps. They offer
both time and/or event-based step transitions. Drums are best for a repetitive process based on a
single series of steps.
• Stage programming, called RLLPLUS, is based on state-transition diagrams. Stages divide the ladder
program into sections which correspond to the states in a flow chart of your process.
• The DL260 PID loop operation uses setup tables to configure 16 loops. The DL250-1 PID loop
operation uses setup to configure 4 loops. Features include: auto tuning, alarms, SP ramp/soak
generation and more.
Standard RLL Programming
(see Chapter 5)
X0
Timer/Event Drum Sequencer
(see Chapter 6)
LDD
V1076
CMPD
K309482
SP62
Y0
OUT
Stage Programming
(see Chapter 7)
Push–UP
PID Loop Operation
(see Chapter 8)
RAISE
SP
+
DOWN
LIGHT
UP
k?
PID
Process
–
PV
LOWER
Push–
DOWN
Step 7: Choose the Instructions
Once you have installed the system and understand
the theory of operation, you can choose from one
of the most powerful instruction sets available.
Step 8: Understand the Maintenance and
Troubleshooting Procedures
Equipment failures can occur at any time. Switches
fail, batteries need to be replaced, etc. In most
cases, the majority of the troubleshooting and
maintenance time is spent trying to locate the
problem. The DL205 system has many built-in
features that help you quickly identify problems.
Refer to Chapter 9 for diagnostics.
DL205 User Manual, 4th Edition, Rev. B
TMR
T1
K30
CNT CT3
K10
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