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Environmental and Social Report
2008
About the Cover
Environmental and Social Report
2008
The ceiling of Suzuka City Hall in Mie Prefecture, Japan is made of thin-film,
see-through solar modules that let in light like windows, creating an effect
similar to that of sunlight streaming through the leaves and branches of trees.
This creates a bright interior space that requires almost no artificial lighting,
making the facility energy-saving and energy-creating at the same time. Sharp
plans to expand its annual production capacity for thin-film solar cells from the
current 15 MW to 1,000 MW in the near future.
(Photograph reproduces appearance in clear weather)
Contents
Compiling This Report
Concept of CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・
A Message to People and the Earth ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・
Outline of the Sharp Group ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・
Management
Corporate Governance ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・
Compliance and Risk Management ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・
Information Security and Intellectual Property ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・
2
3
5
6
7
8
Special Feature
Aiming for a Low-Carbon Society
・・・・・・・・・
9
Further Evolution of the Super Green Factory
Building the Sakai Manufacturing Complex, a Production Model for a
Low-Carbon Society
Confronting the Challenge of Reducing the Costs of Solar Power
Generation and Expanding Production of Thin-Film Solar Cells
The “LCD” That Comes After the LCD—Aiming for the Ultimate in
Energy Efficiency and Minimal Resource Use
Aiming to Have Energy-Creating and Energy-Saving Products More
Than Balance Out Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Links to the Sharp Website
This report focuses on the main points of the Sharp Group’s
environmental and social activities. Actual examples and detailed
data can be found on Sharp’s website (http://sharp-world.com/
corporate/eco/report2008/). Items that are covered on the website
are listed nearby the articles with
where they are mentioned in
this report. Page 54 also lists the items covered on the website.
Web
Period and Items Covered
Special Focus
1 Further Expanding Plastic Recycling ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 15
2 Social Contribution Activities in China ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 17
3 Expanding the Range of Environmental Social
Contribution Activities ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 19
Sharp and the Environment
Advanced Measures for Environmental Conservation as
Management Policy ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・
Advancing Super Green Management ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・
Environmental Accounting ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・
How Business Activities Relate to the Environment ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・
Developing Super Green Technologies ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・
Creating Super Green Products and Devices ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・
Building Super Green Factories ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・
Curbing Greenhouse Gas Emissions ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・
Minimizing and Recycling Waste ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・
Effectively Managing Chemical Substances,
Conducting Risk Management ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・
Environmentally Conscious Logistics ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・
Developing Super Green Recycling ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・
Promoting Environmental Communication ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・
23
25
27
28
29
31
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
Sharp and Society
Objectives and Achievements in the Social Dimension of CSR ・・・
For Customers
Delivering Peace of Mind and Satisfaction to Every Customer ・・・・
For Business Partners
Mutual Prosperity with Suppliers and Dealers ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・
For Shareholders and Investors
Appropriate Return of Profits and Information Disclosure ・・・・・・・
For Employees
Creating a Fair, Positive, and Progressive Workplace ・・・・・・・・・・・・・
Creating a Safe and Secure Workplace ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・
For Local Communities
Social Contribution Activities as a Corporate Citizen・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
Period covered: Fiscal 2007 (April 2007 to March 2008)
However, some actual facts prior to this period, as well as
subsequent policies, objectives, and plans will also be included.
Coverage: Environmental and social aspects of Sharp Corporation
along with its domestic and overseas subsidiaries and affiliates.
Organizations covered: Sharp Corporation along with its domestic
and overseas subsidiaries and affiliates. Note that the scope of
environmental performance data contained in this report is as
follows:
Sites (companies) covered by environmental performance data:
Sharp Corporation and consolidated subsidiaries. Note that the
category “production sites (companies)” includes non-consolidated
subsidiaries and affiliated companies.
Production sites (companies)
Non-production sites (companies)
39 (17 domestic, 22 overseas)
34 (11 domestic, 23 overseas)
Referenced Guidelines
• Environmental Reporting Guidelines (2007 Version),
Ministry of the Environment, Japan
• Sustainability Reporting Guidelines Version 3.0 (Japanese),
Global Reporting Initiative (GRI)
• Environmental Accounting Guidelines 2005,
Ministry of the Environment, Japan
Scheduled Publication Date for Next Report
September 2009 (published annually since 1999)
Inquiries
41
43
45
Environmental Planning Department,
Environmental Protection Group
Tel: +81-6-6625-0438
Fax: +81-6-6625-0153
CSR Planning Department, CSR Promotion Group
Tel: +81-6-6625-1167
Fax: +81-6-6625-1274
22-22 Nagaike-cho, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8522, Japan
E-mail: [email protected]
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48
50
51
Third-Party Review・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 53
Information on Sharp’s Website・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 54
1
Organization
This Environmental and Social Report consists of four sections.
The Special Feature section introduces Sharp’s efforts, as the
frontrunner in energy-creating solar power and energy-saving LCD
technologies, to achieve a low-carbon society through technological
innovation.
The Special Focus section looks at three particularly interesting
examples from Sharp’s continuing environmental and social
contribution efforts.
The Sharp and the Environment section covers the policies,
objectives, and achievements of Sharp’s environmental efforts.
In Sharp and Society, Sharp reports on the goals it has set and
the progress it is making in the social dimension of CSR activities for
various stakeholders.
Web
GRI content index
Sites (companies) covered by environmental performance data
Calculation standards for environmental performance indices
Concept of CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility)
Sharp Contributes to Society Through Its
Manufacturing and Technology-Oriented
Business
“Make products that others want to imitate.” These
words, spoken by Sharp founder Tokuji Hayakawa,
embody Sharp’s management concept. As a
manufacturer, Sharp contributes to society by being the
first to make products that meet the needs of a new era.
Successive generations of Sharp leaders have, in their
own way, pursued this concept by making products that
contribute to society and in the process created a
corporation that is known and trusted by society.
In 1973, Sharp clarified the unchanging spirit of its
founder in the company’s business philosophy and
business creed. The business philosophy states that
Sharp aims for mutual prosperity with stakeholders—the
foundation of CSR today—by contributing to the culture,
benefits, and welfare of people throughout the world.
The business creed calls for “Sincerity and Creativity”
and all employees must hold to it and follow it in order
to realize the business philosophy.
This report details the many ways that Sharp is fulfilling
its CSR. Each of these efforts is an index for gauging
how well Sharp conducts business according to its core
belief of “Sincerity and Creativity.”
The goal that Sharp aims at through its CSR efforts is
nothing less than realizing the business philosophy
through business activities. Having a “gene of creativity”
since its foundation, Sharp will continue to propose
one-of-a-kind products and new lifestyles, as a
corporation that is trusted by all.
Business Philosophy
We do not seek merely to expand our business volume.
Rather, we are dedicated to the use of our unique, innovative
technology to contribute to the culture, benefits, and welfare of
people throughout the world.
It is the intention of our corporation to grow hand-in-hand with
our employees, encouraging and aiding them to reach their
full potential and improve their standard of living.
Our future prosperity is directly linked to the prosperity of our
customers, dealers, and shareholders… indeed,
the entire Sharp family.
Business Creed
Sharp Corporation is dedicated to two principal ideals:
“Sincerity and Creativity”
By committing ourselves to these ideals, we can derive
genuine satisfaction from our work, while making a
meaningful contribution to society.
Sincerity is a virtue fundamental to humanity...
always be sincere.
Harmony brings strength...
trust each other and work together.
Politeness is a merit...
always be courteous and respectful.
Creativity promotes progress...
remain constantly aware
of the need to innovate and improve.
Courage is the basis of a rewarding life...
accept every challenge with a positive attitude.
Achieve the tenets of the business philosophy by promoting “Sincerity and Creativity” in all business practices
Sharp’s Business Activities
Sales
Realization of Business Philosophy
Service
Production
Perspective of social contribution through business
activities
“Contribute to the culture, benefits, and welfare of
people throughout the world”
Business Creed
Dedicated to
two principal ideals
Planning
Sincerity and
Creativity
R&D
Design
Procurement
Perspective concerning employees
“It is the intention of our corporation to grow
hand-in-hand with our employees”
Perspective concerning stakeholders
“Prosperity is directly linked to the prosperity of the
entire Sharp family”
• The business creed is the central axis of all business activities.
• “Sincerity” means a working attitude mindful of what will offer genuinely useful solutions and happiness to everyone.
• “Creativity” means a working attitude not content with the way things are. An attitude which always seeks to add value, and to make efforts to innovate
and improve.
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
2
A Message to People and the Earth
As the Frontrunner in Solar Energy and LCDs,
Contributing to Achieving a Low-Carbon Society by
Working Toward Further Technological Innovations
Katsuhiko Machida
Chairman & CEO, Sharp Corporation
Mikio Katayama
President & COO, Sharp Corporation
Chairman Machida (left) and President Katayama
Two New Visions Looking Ahead to the 100th
Anniversary of Sharp’s Founding
According to reports from the IPCC (Intergovernmental
Panel on Climate Change) and the discussions at the G8
Heiligendamm Summit, a broad international consensus
is emerging that dealing with global warming is a critical
issue facing the world. Against this backdrop, the first
commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol finally began
this year.
This pressing situation demands a drastic
transformation in social structure—from a massconsumption society that since the Industrial Revolution
has depended on fossil resources, to a sustainable
low-carbon society focused on the use of renewable
energies.
In 2012, the final year of the first commitment period,
Sharp will celebrate the 100th anniversary of its
founding. As the company prepares to mark this
milestone at this critical turning point, Sharp has
explored anew the role that it should play in the coming
era and created two new corporate visions for the future.
One is “Realize a truly ubiquitous society*1 with the
world’s No. 1 LCDs.” And, the other is “Contribute to the
world through environment- and health-conscious
business, focusing on energy-saving and
energy-creating products.”
3
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
*1 A “ubiquitous society” is a concept of how, through the rapid
development of IT infrastructure, networks will always be accessible
to users; thus, the whole society will be connected.
As the Frontrunner in Solar Energy and
LCDs, Contributing to Achieving a
Low-Carbon Society
Guided by these two visions, Sharp is committed to
meeting the needs of this era through unique,
proprietary technologies of LCD and solar power
generation, two areas in which Sharp has stood as an
R&D leader for many years.
Energy-creating solar cells and energy-saving LCDs
are extremely effective technologies for coping with the
pressing problem of curbing global warming. As the
frontrunner in both these fields, Sharp will work to the
best of its ability to bring about a major evolution in
these technologies, assembled over many long years of
involvement, to achieve dramatic cost reductions for
solar cells and even greater energy efficiencies in LCDs,
and through these efforts to contribute to the
achievement of a low-carbon society.
In developing these technologies, in addition to
Sharp’s own efforts, the intention is to advance R&D on
a broad front through cooperation with industry,
government, and academia, and to consolidate these
results in the new manufacturing complex whose
construction is now underway in Sakai City, Osaka
Prefecture, Japan.
This manufacturing complex will be home to two
world-class production facilities—the world’s first LCD
panel plant to use 10th-generation glass substrates,
and one of the world’s largest thin-film solar cell plants,
with an annual production capacity of 1 GW.
Construction is proceeding on both facilities, with
operations slated to begin by March 2010. Sharp is also
inviting the participation of a number of industry-leading
companies across the spectrum of industrial fields, with
the aim of pooling collective wisdom and knowledge to
create a revolutionary new manufacturing system.
The intent is to make the Sakai site a model
manufacturing complex befitting the sustainable
low-carbon society of the 21st century, where products
featuring a high level of environmental performance will
be mass-produced by a production system having
extremely low impact on the environment.
Further Boosting the Level of Effort:
Aiming to Become an Environmentally
Advanced Company
Since fiscal 2004, strengthening its commitment to the
environment has been a basic management policy of
the Sharp Group.
Sharp has declared a medium-term corporate
objective of becoming an environmentally advanced
company and defined its corporate vision*2 as: Sharp’s
energy-creating and energy-saving products will more
than balance out Sharp’s greenhouse gas emissions. To
reach these goals, Sharp has deployed a Super Green
Strategy that aims to achieve the highest level of
environmental consciousness in all corporate activities.
Successes resulting from this strategy include
creating Super Green Technologies such as plant-based
resin paint, achieving development goals for Super
Green Products and Devices for the last three years in a
row, converting 10 of Sharp Corporation’s factories to
Super Green Factories and making all factories in Japan
and abroad Green Factories, and developing a
nationwide elementary school environmental education
program for Japan. These accomplishments have
garnered high praise from outside the company.
In the future, Sharp will be working to strengthen its
strategy and raise the level of its efforts aimed at
becoming an environmentally advanced company.
Particularly in factories, as the production of solar cells
and LCD TVs expands, Sharp will take up the challenge
of slashing absolute emissions of greenhouse gases and
waste at existing factories, as well as cutting current
emissions per production unit, with the aim of making its
corporate visions a reality as soon as possible.
*2 See page 14.
Fulfilling Corporate Social Responsibility
by Returning to the Roots of Its Founding
Sharp has consistently promoted CSR activities related
not only to the environment, but also in all business
processes, in order to contribute to creating a
sustainable society and gain an even higher level of trust
from the community.
Sharp has for some time taken a proactive stance in
its CSR activities, based on the concept of “Compliance
First.” In April 2008, a reorganization was instituted that
merged the CSR Promotion Department with the Legal
Affairs Division and placed this new CSR Promotion
Group under the control of the Executive Managing
Officer in charge of legal affairs and intellectual property.
Through these actions, Sharp will work to further
strengthen adherence to business ethics and
compliance with all regulations and laws. In addition,
Sharp will also push to systematically expand and
improve the structure and system for enhancing
customer satisfaction, particularly in ensuring product
safety, nurturing a diverse range of human resources,
and taking active steps to deploy CSR in the supply
chain.
On the occasion of celebrating the 100th
anniversary of its founding in 2012, Sharp will rededicate
itself to its business philosophy and its business creed
of “Sincerity and Creativity,” the roots of its founding,
and work company-wide to implement management
practices that remain faithful to these concepts. Going
forward, Sharp’s desire is to contribute to society
through its manufacturing and technological
competency, and to fulfill the social responsibility
expected of it.
We look forward to hearing your frank comments
and opinions.
June 2008
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
4
Outline of the Sharp Group
Sharp’s business activities comprise “Consumer/Information Products” that are actual consumer electronics and
information products, and “Electronic Components” that provide the key components of electronic products. By
undertaking the development of both key devices based on proprietary technologies and their application products,
Sharp aims to inspire and impress customers by bringing forth never-before-seen, one-of-a-kind products and
devices, and by pioneering new markets.
Corporate Profile
Name
Head Office
Representatives
Founded
Operations*1
Capital Stock*1
Number of Employees*2
Main Products (As of March 31, 2008)
Sharp Corporation
22-22, Nagaike-cho, Abeno-ku, Osaka, Japan
Katsuhiko Machida, Chairman & CEO
Mikio Katayama, President & COO
September 15, 1912
Manufacture and sales of audio-visual,
communication and information equipment,
home appliances, LSIs, LCDs, other
electronic components
204,675 million yen (rounded down to the
nearest million)
53,708 (29,954 in Japan; 23,754 overseas)
*1 As of March 31, 2008
*2 Sharp Corporation and its consolidated subsidiaries
Audio-visual and communication equipment
Mobile phones
AQUOS LCD color TV
LCD color TVs, color TVs, projectors, DVD recorders, DVD players, Blu-ray
Disc recorders, Blu-ray Disc players, 1-Bit digital audio products, facsimiles,
telephones, mobile phones, PHS (personal handy-phone system) terminals
Home appliances
■ Net sales, operating income, and net income
(consolidated)
Operating income, net income
(billions of yen)
Net sales (billions of yen)
3,600
240
3,417.7
3,127.7
3,000
2,797.1
2,539.8
151.0
2,400 2,257.2
186.5
200
183.6
163.7
160
121.6
1,800
76.8
1,200
101.9
101.7
88.6
120
Refrigerator
Information equipment
80
60.7
600
40
0
2003
Net sales
2004
2005
Operating income
2006
Electronic
components
33.1%
Other
electronic
components
8.3%
LSIs
4.8%
Overseas
Domestic
Other
53.5%
46.5%
6.0%
(%)
10
(billions of yen)
200
8.4
(%)
189.8 196.1 12
8.4
150 138.7 148.1
6.6
6.1
100
1/3.2-inch 5-megapixel CMOS
camera module
LCDs
Home appliances
7.3%
■ R&D expenditures
(consolidated)
8
LED driver IC
CCD/CMOS imagers, LSIs for LCDs, microcomputers, flash memory,
combination memory, analog ICs
■ Principal financial
performance indicators
(consolidated)
7.9
LSIs
Japan
46.5%
Europe
17.1%
The Americas
18.3%
8.9
Personal computers, personal mobile tools, mobile communications
handsets, electronic dictionaries, calculators, POS systems, handy data
terminals, electronic cash registers, LCD color monitors, information
displays, digital copier/printers, electrostatic copiers, supplies for copiers
and printers, software, FA equipment, ultrasonic cleaners
China
12.1%
Audio-visual
and
communication
equipment
46.8%
Information
equipment
12.8%
Digital full-color MFP
Electronic dictionary
■ Fiscal 2007 consolidated
net sales by region
(component ratio)
Consumer/
information products
66.9%
LCDs
20.0%
0
2007
(fiscal year)
Net income
■ Fiscal 2007 consolidated
net sales by product group
(component ratio)
6
Water Oven (superheated steam oven)
Refrigerators, superheated steam ovens, microwave ovens, air
conditioners, washing machines, vacuum cleaners, air purifiers,
dehumidifiers, humidifiers, electric heaters, small cooking appliances
5.8
5.5
Super-thin 2.2-inch LCD
System LCD with optical sensors
TFT LCD modules, Duty LCD modules, System LCD modules
154.3
9
6.1
Other electronic components
5.7
6
4
2
0
2.9
3.4
3.6
3.7
3.4
2003 2004 2005 2006 2007
0
(fiscal year)
ROE (return on equity)
ROA (return on assets)
Web Corporate information
Financial results
5
3
50
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
2003 2004 2005 2006 2007
(fiscal year)
R&D expenditures
Ratio to net sales
0
Residential polycrystalline photovoltaic modules
High-power blue-violet laser diode
Solar cells, components for satellite broadcasting, digital terrestrial
tuners, RF modules, network components, laser diodes, LEDs, optical
pickups, optical sensors, components for optical communication,
regulators, switching power supplies
Management
Corporate Governance
Sharp seeks to further strengthen the system for business processes, as well as ensure sound and transparent
management practices and firmly uphold the propriety of operational activities. Sharp has introduced the executive
officer system to work toward faster, more efficient decision-making, looking ahead to expanding the scale of
business in the future, and has also established and is promoting an internal control system. Thus, Sharp is
enhancing and expanding the governance system for the Sharp Group as a whole.
Actions in Fiscal 2007
Objectives
• Steady operation of the
internal control system
Objectives for Fiscal 2008
Achievements
• Improved the internal control system
based on the Basic Policy for Internal
Control
• Conducted internal control audits
(tests/evaluations)
• Constructed an IT system to support
operation of the internal control system
• Operation and assessment of the internal control system
• Improve the Basic Policy for Internal Control in conjunction with introducing the executive
officer system, etc.
• Put into practice on an ongoing basis various policies related to the internal control system
• Implement internal control assessment in conjunction with the start of the internal control
reporting system based on Japan’s Financial Instruments and Exchange Act
Concept of Corporate Governance:
Expanding and Improving the System
■ Internal control system
Shareholders and stakeholders
In an effort to further strengthen manufacturing and technological competency, Sharp is committed to making speedy
managerial decisions and to enhancing the quality of management.
Self-audit
Monitoring
Ensure business is carried
out appropriately
Support, guidance
Domestic/overseas subsidiaries
Business execution
Self-audit
Supervision,
creation of system of
internal control
Directors
Accounting/business audit
Auditors
Accounting auditors
In May 2006, the Board of Directors passed a resolution to
adopt a Basic Policy for Internal Control, as well as established
the Internal Control Committee as an advisory panel to the
Board of Directors. Through these actions, Sharp is advancing
measures such as developing relevant documentation,
conducting self audits and documenting compliance by
subsidiaries in Japan and overseas and by Sharp business
groups, implementing internal control audits by the Internal
Audit Division, and introducing an IT system to provide
operational support for internal control activities.
Business execution
Self-audit
Accounting audit
Based on Japan’s Companies Act and the Financial
Instruments and Exchange Act, which went into effect in May
2006, and September 2007, respectively, the Sharp Group is
improving its internal control system to ensure effective
governance of the entire group.
Business execution
Board of Corporate Auditors,
Corporate Auditors
Improving the Internal Control System
Functional groups
Accounting/
business audit
Sharp intends to further strengthen its current
Director/Corporate Auditor system, which allows management
and R&D and manufacturing divisions to work closely on
expanding business, to enhance corporate governance.
Business groups, sales
and marketing groups
Support, guidance
In addition, in July 2006, Sharp established the Advisory Board
to obtain a wide range of opinions and proposals from
knowledgeable outside experts from various fields to assist in
management decisions.
Ensure business is
carried out appropriately
Internal audit
In June 2008, Sharp introduced an executive officer system to
build an organization that can execute business processes
responsively and effectively.
President
Internal audit function: Internal Audit Division
Sharp’s business activities are clearly bounded by the
development, manufacture, and sales of products and devices.
Each area is highly specialized, yet there is strong interrelation
between them. When all directors who are each deeply versed
in these business areas consult with one another, they can
make speedy and unerring decisions. Sharp also believes that
clarifying the managerial responsibilities of each director
enhances reciprocal supervisory functions.
Appropriate disclosure, provision of information
Formulation/operation of internal control system
Internal control promotion function:
Internal Control Promotion Department
CSR Promotion Group
Formulation of basic policies of internal control,
creation and supervision of internal control system
Board of Directors
Deliberation and submitting of basic policies of
internal control system,
basic policies of internal audit and internal audit planning, etc.
Internal Control
Committee
Also, the Financial Instruments and Exchange Act requires
submission of internal control reports beginning in fiscal 2008.
Accordingly, Sharp will implement internal control assessments
and put appropriate information disclosure into practice this
fiscal year.
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
6
Management
Compliance and Risk Management
Business ethics and legal compliance are the minimum social responsibilities that any corporation must fulfill.
Under a system that closely coordinates CSR with risk management, Sharp is strongly committed to adhering to
business ethics and ensuring legal compliance.
Actions in Fiscal 2007
Objectives
• Improve compliance education
and training tools
• Created a compliance handbook (for
sales/service and device business divisions)
• Expand and improve compliance promotion policies and measures
• Strengthen the system to promote compliance
• Create a compliance handbook (common version)
• Create a BCM (business
continuity management)
system
• Implemented contingency training at
domestic production sites and nearby sales
bases (total of 16 bases)
• Developed BCPs (business continuity plans)
for business groups
• Expand and improve the BCM system
• Further strengthen the BCM promotion system for business groups
• Ongoing review and continuous improvement of BCPs
• Prepare for the occurrence of a new influenza pandemic
Raising Awareness of the Sharp Group
Charter of Corporate Behavior and the
Sharp Code of Conduct
In May 2005, to make legal compliance and business ethics top
priorities, Sharp revised its charter of conduct and divided it into
two documents: the Sharp Group Charter of Corporate
Behavior, the principles of Sharp’s corporate behavior; and the
Sharp Code of Conduct, the standards of conduct for all
directors and employees. These two documents apply to group
companies around the world as the common standards of the
Sharp Group.
Promoting CSR and BRM Activities
Sharp believes BRM (business risk management), like CSR, is
indispensable in business management because it eliminates
the risk of losses and legal violations, while at the same time
helping the company quickly adapt to changing business
environments. That is why the company pursues both CSR and
BRM activities.
Sharp holds meetings of the CSR/BRM Committee to discuss
and check progress, policies, and action plans for the entire
company. These meetings are attended by an Executive Vice
President (Chief Officer, General Administration) and all group
general managers of both the business groups and the
functional groups.
To strengthen this system, in April 2008 Sharp reorganized the
CSR Promotion Department, which had been responsible for
promoting CSR and BRM up to that point, and the Legal Affairs
Division and established a new CSR Promotion Group under
the control of the Executive Managing Officer in charge of legal
affairs and intellectual property.
Commitment to BCM
(Business Continuity Management)
Amid concerns that a disaster causing extensive damage, such
as a major earthquake, may strike, advancing a BCM program
committed to continuously improving policies to ensure the
safety of employees and their families, as well as upgrading
action plans for maintaining business operations and expediting
recovery, has become a critical aspect of CSR/BRM.
To cope with a large-scale earthquake that can be assumed
will occur in Japan, Sharp instituted earthquake preparedness
training, and developed and maintained BCPs (business
continuity plans), primarily for production groups, in fiscal 2007.
In fiscal 2008, Sharp will further strengthen the system to
promote BCM in all production groups, and will formulate
action plans, including at overseas bases, on the assumption
that a new influenza pandemic will occur, an event currently of
increasing concern worldwide.
7
Objectives for Fiscal 2008
Achievements
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
Strict Business Ethics and
Legal Compliance
In Japan, Sharp Corporation and its domestic subsidiaries have
appointed a Chief of Legal Affairs at each business group and
company to ensure that no laws, regulations, or social norms
are violated in the course of conducting business.
To raise legal awareness and ensure compliance with the law,
Sharp and its subsidiaries periodically hold wide-ranging
educational programs in Japan, including job-level-specific
training for directors, senior executives, managers, mid-career
employees and new employees, specialized training in specific
fields, and e-learning available for all employees. Sharp is also
working to upgrade and expand compliance manuals and
improve the convenience of access on its intranet to information on the law and company regulations.
Preventing Unlawful Grants and
Expenditures
The Group Charter of Corporate Behavior and the Code of
Conduct contain provisions that strictly prohibit any form of
corrupt behavior such as money extortion or bribery, and
require that donations be handled in a proper manner.
Sharp Corporation prevents illegal payoffs and improper
expenditures through a system of compulsory reviews by the
Donation Examination Committee in Japan to assess the
propriety of monetary disbursements such as donations and
contributions.
Consultation Hotline for Compliance Issues
Sharp Corporation and its domestic affiliated companies have a
hotline for reporting problems and providing counseling
services related to compliance issues. The hotline is open to
employees, temporary staff, and employees of business
partners, in line with the spirit of Japan’s Whistleblower
Protection Act. In addition, in October 2007, Sharp in Japan
set up a contact point outside the company at its legal
advisor’s office.
Sharp clearly stipulates that there will be no unfavorable
treatment or penalties against individuals who report compliance violations or seek consultation.
Web
Sharp Group Charter of Corporate Behavior (full text)
Sharp Code of Conduct (full text)
Sharp Group’s efforts to firmly establish CSR and BRM
CSR activities in domestic sales
Disaster risk management
Management
Information Security and Intellectual Property
Keeping pace with the development of IT infrastructure, companies must now take more responsibility than ever for
ensuring the security of information. Sharp is strengthening information management systems, improving the safety
of information infrastructure, and providing employees with comprehensive training on information management
and security. In addition, Sharp recognizes the importance of intellectual property and is managing this asset
rigorously and appropriately.
Actions in Fiscal 2007
Objectives
• Extend self-checks and
assessments for maintaining
confidentiality and information
security to overseas bases
• Apply for and acquire Privacy
Mark certification in Japan
• Implemented self-checks and assessments
for maintaining confidentiality and
information security at main overseas bases
• Extend the self-check and assessment system for maintaining confidentiality
and information security to affiliated companies in Japan
• Developed the infrastructure for acquiring
Privacy Mark certification
• Implemented internal audits of departments that
handle personal information
• Implemented group training related to protecting
personal information at each business site
• Promote procedures to attain Privacy Mark certification
• Continuously implement internal audits related to protecting personal
information for departments that handle personal information
• Continuously implement education and awareness policies related to
protecting personal information for employees and others
System to Protect Personal Information
and Corporate Secrets
To protect personal information of customers and other
stakeholders as well as its own corporate secrets, Sharp
established the Information Security Promotion Department and
the Personal Information Protection Promotion Department in
2004, and is stepping up information security and personal
information protection.
Managers from all domestic group companies participate in
semi-annual meetings of the IT Infrastructure/Information
Security Committee (name changed in fiscal 2007), to ensure the
thoroughness of basic policies
and to check the implementation status of various action
plans. In addition, once a year,
Sharp provides e-learning
courses for all Sharp Group
employees in Japan.
In fiscal 2005, Sharp
Corporation introduced a
self-check and assessment
system, to be conducted by every business group in Japan, to
more effectively implement measures for information security and
protecting confidential information. In fiscal 2007, Sharp took
action to toughen self-checks and assessments related to IT
asset management, control of personal computers used by
outsourced personnel, and steps to be taken in case of
information system failures.
Screen shot of the e-learning program
In fiscal 2008, Sharp plans to raise the standards demanded of
each organization for self-checks and assessments even higher,
as well as extend them to all domestic affiliated companies.
To protect personal information, internal audits are conducted
once a year based on Audit Rules for Handling Personal
Information. Corrective measures are implemented in a timely
manner for any deficiencies uncovered.
In fiscal 2007, Sharp strengthened its education and awareness
efforts related to protecting personal information, including
holding group training sessions at each business establishment,
and disseminating education and awareness bulletins via Sharp’s
corporate intranet. The company also pressed ahead with
infrastructure development to qualify for the Privacy Mark, a
certification given to businesses that comply with the Japanese
Industrial Standard (JIS) for personal information protection.
In fiscal 2008, Sharp will continue its policies designed to
reinforce education and awareness, and advance the process to
attain Privacy Mark certification.
Web
Objectives for Fiscal 2008
Achievements
Basic Policy on Information Security
Basic Policy on Protecting Personal Information
System for information security and protection of
personal information in Japan
Privacy Mark-certified affiliated companies
Reinforcing Information Security Systems
at Overseas Bases
In 2006, Sharp further improved the level of security by launching
regional information security committees in the world’s four major
areas: Europe, the Americas, Asia, and China. In addition, each
base formulates and operates rules for information security
based on Sharp Japan’s Basic Policy on Information Security.
In fiscal 2007, Sharp introduced centralized management tools
(for automatically collecting PC-stored information and the like)
to develop and maintain permanent PC security measures at all
Sharp Group bases worldwide, and took measures to protect
critical data stored on servers. In addition, Sharp also
implemented self-checks and assessments related to maintaining confidentiality and information security at principal overseas
bases.
In fiscal 2008, Sharp will conduct security checks on all PCs and
servers, including those used at the branches and local offices of
overseas bases.
Protecting Intellectual Property
Sharp’s business and R&D strategies are interlinked with its
intellectual property assets, which are used to the fullest possible
advantage. At the same time, Sharp is firmly committed to
protecting its own intellectual property rights, while respecting
the intellectual property rights of others. Even though Sharp
regards discussion as the basis for resolving cases of infringement, it is the company’s policy to seek judgment from a third
party such as the courts when its intellectual property rights are
not respected.
By strengthening in-house rules, Sharp is also working to bolster
protection for trade secrets and to prevent unauthorized
disclosure of production technologies and manufacturing
know-how, particularly those that are unique or critically
important to Sharp.
Further, counterfeit Sharp-brand products have had a growing
impact in overseas markets in recent years, and Sharp is taking
measures to counter these imitations through cooperation with
industry groups and with
regulatory authorities taking
Business
Strategy
enforcement actions.
With regard to respect for
the intellectual property rights
Management
of others, Sharp is responding
by holding company-wide
Intellectual
Development
Property
conferences for persons
Strategy
Strategy
involved with patents and by
training of engineers.
Web
Incentives for employee inventions
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
8
Special Feature
Aiming for a Low-Carbon Society
Since its founding, Sharp has consistently focused its attention on swift responses to the needs of the time,
and through an ongoing program of unprecedented R&D, brought to market a series of products never before
seen in the world and products that become the mainstream of the next generation, while at the same time
directing its energies toward their widespread adoption worldwide.
Today, coping with global environmental concerns, including global warming, is regarded as a critical issue
facing all of humanity. In this light, it is Sharp’s intention to contribute to the creation of a low-carbon society by
working toward further technical innovations based on proprietary technologies accumulated over many long
years as the frontrunner in energy-creating solar cells and energy-saving LCDs.
This section presents an overview of Sharp’s environmental activities, starting with efforts at its plants.
The office building of the Environment Agency, UK
This eco-friendly building creates and saves energy. Sharp solar panels form eaves that provide
protection from the sun, reducing the amount of energy needed for air conditioning.
9
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
Special Feature
Aiming for a Low-Carbon Society
Further Evolution of the
Super Green Factory
Kameyama Plant (Kameyama City, Mie Prefecture, Japan)
All Plants Achieve Green Factory Status
“Make all 10 Sharp Corporation plants Super Green Factories
(SGFs), and all plants, including subsidiaries and affiliated
companies, in Japan and abroad, at least a Green Factory (GF)
by the end of fiscal 2007.”
In its fiscal 2004 basic management policy, Sharp declared a
medium-term corporate objective of becoming an environmentally advanced company, and established its corporate vision
as: Sharp’s energy-creating and energy-saving products will
more than balance out Sharp’s greenhouse gas emissions.
Sharp launched its Super Green Strategy with an eye toward
making these goals a reality.
The Super Green Strategy is an effort aimed at bringing the
ultimate in environmental consciousness to all corporate
activities, giving priority to five critical areas: management,
technologies, products and devices, factories, and recycling.
Sharp’s efforts at the factory level are symbolized by the
Kameyama Plant (Mie Prefecture, Japan), which became
operational in January 2004. From the initial planning stages,
Sharp established an all-encompassing, environmentally
conscious policy at the Kameyama Plant, a production facility
befitting an environmentally advanced company, and
introduced state-of-the-art equipment to protect the environment. Assessment and certification standards for SGFs, which
demand reductions in environmental impacts to the extreme,
were established in fiscal 2003, in tandem with the construction
of the Kameyama Plant. Sharp added certification standards
for GFs in fiscal 2004 based on these standards and, at the
same time, set a medium-term objective (see opening
paragraph above) that targeted fiscal 2007 as the year of
attainment. By setting the Kameyama Plant, the first SGF, as
the pinnacle, Sharp aimed to raise the level overall, through
applying these standards for reducing environmental impact in
factories and bringing the know-how to meet them to other
Sharp production facilities around the world.
This medium-term objective, which initially had been considered difficult to achieve, was reached by the Mie Plant
(production facility for LCD panels in Mie Prefecture, Japan) in
fiscal 2004. Sharp Manufacturing France S.A. (SMF; a
manufacturing subsidiary for office equipment) subsequently
achieved SGF status in fiscal 2005, the first overseas plant to
do so. Around this time, Sharp plants around the world worked
to leapfrog each other in meeting these standards. Today, six
overseas plants have attained SGF status—results that
exceeded expectations—and Sharp reached its medium-term
objective on schedule in fiscal 2007.
Launching SGF II—the Evolution of
Super Green Factories
In fiscal 2008, Sharp launched SGF II as a second-stage effort
targeting the 10 plants of Sharp Corporation. Under SGF II, 100
new points were added to the assessment items that had to be
met previously and that had a full score of 100. Now, the 200
points required to achieve a perfect score have been categorized into S, A, B, and C grades, which will enable plants to
gradually move up to a higher ranking as an SGF (see page 33).
Two new areas of emphasis have been added to the assessment. The first is an assessment of “soft” aspects, such as the
know-how to operate, manage, and maintain environmental
equipment. Even if the latest equipment were to be introduced,
the skills and expertise to master its operation are necessary to
derive the maximum performance and benefits, and this aspect
of the assessment accordingly concentrates on this area.
The other is absolute reductions in the level of greenhouse gas
emissions and the amount of waste discharged. Up to now, the
target of the assessment had been reducing emissions per
production unit so that, even if production had increased, it
was still possible to achieve a reduction in these values. SGF II
adds absolute reductions in emissions to this. Even though
Sharp offers products that feature high environmental
performance, such as solar cells and LCD TVs, the company
will not tolerate an absolute increase in the level of emissions
that would be expected to accompany production increases,
but conversely, will take up the challenge of the difficult
problem of reducing this level through continuous improvements in production efficiency.
Web
Kameyama Plant
Green Factories
SGF II Demands Human Abilities—A Strong
Sense of Purpose and Ingenuity in Thinking
Skill and expertise are required to master
environmental equipment and to get the most
out of it, but these are not something that can
be learned in a single day. One must learn
through a step-by-step process of trial and
error, while having a strong sense of purpose
and high environmental awareness. And
lowering environmental impact while
expanding production is not something that
can be achieved through conventional
thinking.
I really feel we have come to the stage where
the level of awareness and ingenuity in
thinking will be the factors that make the
difference in a factory.
Norio Sawai
General Manager
Environmental & Industrial
Safety Center
Environmental Protection
Group
Sharp Corporation
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
10
Special Feature
Aiming for a Low-Carbon Society
Building the Sakai
Manufacturing Complex,
a Production Model for a
Low-Carbon Society
Artist’s conception of Sakai Manufacturing Complex
(Sakai City, Osaka Prefecture, Japan)
The World’s First 10th-Generation LCD
Panel Plant and One of the World’s Largest
Thin-Film Solar Cell Plants on the Same Site
Sharp was among the first to become involved with energysaving LCD TVs and energy-creating solar cells, products
which will lead respectively to reductions in CO2 by supplanting
CRT TVs and thermal power generation. Demand for both is
expanding tremendously in all parts of the world, and to
respond to this burgeoning demand, Sharp is constructing a
new manufacturing complex in Sakai City, Osaka Prefecture,
Japan, as part of its efforts to contribute to achieving a
low-carbon society.
This manufacturing complex will be home to new LCD panel
and solar cell plants. Both facilities are scheduled to go into
operation by March 2010.
The LCD panel plant will be the first in the world to use
10th-generation glass substrates for the efficient manufacture
of LCD panels for large LCD TVs. In addition, the solar cell
plant will mass-produce thin-film solar cells. Its slated
production capacity of 1 GW (gigawatt) per year is one of the
largest in the world.
With its commitment to solar cells, energy-efficient products,
and environmentally friendly factories, Sharp, as the frontrunner,
whose aim is sustainable manufacturing and technological
competency, will make this manufacturing complex a model
manufacturing complex befitting a low-carbon society. That is,
Sharp will be introducing the latest environmental protection
equipment based on entirely new concepts, and on a scale
that far surpasses the Kameyama Plant.
In addition, Sharp is aiming to achieve vertical integration that
transcends the boundaries between companies, in which the
vertically integrated business model created at the Kameyama
Plant—from LCD panels to assembled LCD TV sets—is
extended further upstream in the supply chain. The result will
be reduced environmental impacts during distribution, of
course, but also greater efficiencies derived from unifying such
operations as production planning. Sharp is also planning the
joint management of supply and recovery of energy, process
gases, and chemical solutions, waste disposal, and recycling
systems, as well as the construction of highly efficient
production systems that will minimize environmental impacts.
Overview of the New Plants
Location: Sakaihama District, Sakai Ward, Sakai City, Osaka, Japan
Site area: 1.27 million m2
LCD Panel Plant
Main product: LCD panels for large LCD TVs in the
40-, 50- and 60-inch class
Glass substrate size: 10th generation (2,850 mm x 3,050 mm)
Input capacity: 72,000 substrates per month
(initial capacity at start of operations: 36,000 substrates per month)
Amount of investment: Approx. 380 billion yen
(including land acquisition costs)
Start of operations: By March 2010
Thin-Film Solar Cell Plant
Main product: Thin-film silicon solar cells
Glass substrate size: 1,000 mm x 1,400 mm
Plant size: 1 GW (gigawatt)
(initial capacity at phase one of operations: 480 MW)
Amount of investment: Approx. 72 billion yen
Start of operations: By March 2010
Bringing Together the Expertise to Build a
Highly Efficient Production System That
Minimizes Environmental Impacts
Sharp has set a goal for the Sakai Manufacturing Complex, to
build a revolutionary production system featuring extremely
high efficiency and extremely low environmental impact, by
marshaling the expertise gained from the participation by a
number of leading companies in various types of industry and
business.
For the LCD panel plant, Sharp will develop adjacent
infrastructure-related facilities and has invited several leading
manufacturers of materials such as glass substrates and color
filters. This proximity will work to improve productivity by
enabling shared infrastructure, including gas and electricity.
Sharp is also aiming to achieve new technological
breakthroughs by integrating the knowledge and know-how
developed through close cooperation with engineers from
material manufacturers who have superb technical capabilities.
In addition, the installation of new manufacturing equipment
developed jointly with Tokyo Electron Ltd., which uses large
glass substrates, will dramatically improve manufacturing
efficiency in the thin-film solar cell plant.
Plus, since April 2007, Sharp and the Graduate School of
Engineering, Osaka University have set up a joint research
course on next-generation environmentally conscious
production technologies, to develop innovative manufacturing
techniques for LCDs and solar cells. Through this program,
Sharp plans to conduct R&D and introduce basic technologies
that contribute to resource-saving, energy-efficient, and clean
manufacturing.
11
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
Special Feature
Aiming for a Low-Carbon Society
Confronting the Challenge
of Reducing the Costs of
Solar Power Generation and
Expanding Production of
Thin-Film Solar Cells
Reducing Costs Through Technological
Innovations to Expand the Use of Solar
Energy
Up to now, Sharp efforts have revolved around crystalline solar
cells, but amidst a global shortage and skyrocketing prices of
silicon feedstock, the company is strengthening development
of thin-film solar cells.
Even though thin-film solar cells have lower energy conversion
efficiency than crystalline types, they use only about 1% of the
amount of silicon and their production processes can readily be
shortened and made more efficient. These advantages are
expected to reduce the cost of solar power generation.
For this reason, Sharp will promote both crystalline and thin-film
solar cells but will focus on thin-film solar cell technology.
Energy conversion efficiency, regarded as the weak point for
thin-film cells, has reached 10% at the development level.
Sharp will augment its annual production capacity, currently at
15 MW per year, to 160 MW in October 2008, and is building a
480-MW production system as phase one of operations at the
new Sakai Plant. The company will also be building plants
overseas to put a global 1-GW production system in place.
As shown in the graphs to the right, forecasts by the European
Renewable Energy Council (EREC) predict a doubling of total
worldwide power demand from current levels by 2040. Of that,
approximately 25% will be covered by solar power generation,
until it accounts for 60 to 70% by 2100. In addition, a solar
power roadmap for the future from NEDO (New Energy and
Industrial Technology Development Organization, an
independent Japanese administrative agency) has set a firststage target of reducing the cost of solar power generation to
23 yen per kWh, on a par with oil-fired thermal power, by 2010.
Both will require technological innovations to accomplish.
Sharp is aiming to achieve a low-carbon society by taking up
the challenge to reach these targets, based on its wealth of
relevant technologies accumulated over the course of nearly
half a century.
(Photo reproduces appearance in clear weather)
Projected Global Electricity Demand
(TWh)
Primary Energy Estimates
40,000
Other
35,000
Total
36,346 TWh
9,113 TWh
Solar
thermal
25,000
(about 25%
of total)
Geothermal
20,000
55%
15,000
Wind
34%
10,000
5,000 19%
Solar thermal
Geothermal
Solar
photovoltaic
82%
30,000
Other
Renewable energy
Sharp first launched R&D on solar cells in 1959, and has
worked toward the widespread use and expansion of solar
energy for almost half a century. Sharp’s cumulative production
of solar cells over this time reached 2 GW by the end of 2007,
a world first, and accounts for about a quarter of the total
worldwide solar cell production of about 8 GW.
Thin-film, see-through solar modules used in skylights
(City Hall, Suzuka City, Mie Prefecture, Japan)
Solar
photovoltaic
Biomass
Small-scale
hydraulic
22%
Wind
Large-scale hydraulic
2001
2010
2020
2030
2040
2100
Biomass
Hydraulic
Year
Source: Created by Sharp based on Renewable Energy Scenario to 2040, published by the
European Renewable Energy Council, and reports of the German Advisory Council on
Global Change (WBGU)
Power Cost Targets for Solar Power Generation
Generating cost
(yen/kWh)
50.0
46 yen/kWh
40.0
Solar photovoltaic
30.0
23 yen/kWh
20.0
10.0
0
Oil-fired thermal
power
Oil-fired thermal
power cost
28 yen/kWh
14 yen/kWh
Nuclear power
cost
7 yen/kWh
Nuclear power
2007
2010
2020
2030
Year
Source: Created by Sharp based on PV Roadmap 2030 (PV2030), published by NEDO
Ensuring the Certain Success of
Thin-Film Solar Cells
I joined Sharp to develop solar cells, but when
I became involved in thin-film solar cells, no
one around me thought that they would ever
become a viable commercial product. Now, it
fills me with emotion to think that they have
grown into a full-scale business with the
launch of the Thin-Film PV Division.
What I want to express to people inside and
outside Sharp is the fact that we are serious.
We are determined to set up a 1-GW
production system worldwide. If we say we’re
going to do it, we will do it!
Yoshiyuki Nasuno
Assistant Manager
Technology
Development Department
Thin-Film PV Division
Solar Systems Group
Sharp Corporation
Web Solar power generation systems
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
12
Special Feature
Aiming for a Low-Carbon Society
The “LCD” That Comes After
the LCD—Aiming for the
Ultimate in Energy Efficiency
and Minimal Resource Use
Prototype LCD TV (computer-generated graphic)
The Ever-Evolving, Advanced
Environmental Performance of the
AQUOS LCD TV
Prototype LCD TV Featuring High
Resolution, Super-Thin Profile, and
Advanced Environmental Performance
Sharp has been working to evolve liquid crystal displays (LCDs)
and develop new applications for them ever since
commercializing the world’s first practical application for an
LCD as the display device in a compact electronic calculator in
1973. Features such as light weight, thin profile, and energy
efficiency inherent to LCDs led to their widespread use, initially
in mobile devices. Ultimately, the LCD TV emerged from this
evolution, first from monochrome alphanumeric displays to
graphics displays, and then to color-capable, full-motion video,
high-resolution, and large-screen displays. In January 2001, the
AQUOS made its debut as a television befitting the century of
the environment.
The AQUOS exemplifies Sharp’s Super Green Product concept
and symbolizes Sharp’s attitude toward environmentally
conscious product design.
Compared to CRT TVs, it delivers the performance one would
expect from an LCD TV, namely, energy efficiency, low resource
utilization with a thin profile and light weight, and long life with a
backlight lasting approximately 60,000 hours*1, as well as
making use of green materials wherever possible.
Looking ahead to a low-carbon society becoming a reality, and
at a time when energy efficiency in consumer electronics is
increasing in importance, Sharp has year after year consistently
improved the energy-saving performance of the AQUOS (see
below).
*1 A measure of the time until screen brightness declines by half under
continuous viewing in a room at 25°C with screen brightness in
Normal mode.
In August 2007, Sharp brought together the essence of its LCD
technologies accumulated over long years of experience in this
field and announced a prototype LCD TV that far surpassed
existing models in terms of image quality, thinness, and
environmental performance. This prototype features a design
with unprecedented, exceptional levels of performance,
including a thickness of 20 to 29 mm, contrast ratio of
100,000:1*2, color reproducibility of 150% of the NTSC color
gamut*3, power consumption of 140 kWh/year, and weight of
25 kg, all in a 50-inch class TV.
In addition to its superb image quality, the impact of a thickness
of just 20 mm and power consumption of about one-half of
existing LCD TVs was huge, and this development has
significantly expanded the potential for energy efficiency and
lower resource utilization in LCD TVs. If this prototype were to
become available as a commercial product, replacing a
conventional 32-inch CRT TV with this LCD TV in the 50-inch
class would cut power consumption by roughly half.
Sharp will push ahead to reduce power consumption in all its
products, particularly LCD TVs, through technological
innovations, and contribute to the achievement of a low-carbon
society.
*2 Indicates the brightness ratio between the darkest black and the
whitest white on the screen (with the figure for black set at “1” ). The
higher this value, the more vivid and vibrant colors appear, and the
clearer and more detailed the image quality on the screen.
*3 A numeric value indicating the percentage of area of the NTSC color
spectrum that can be reproduced. The higher this value, the more
vivid the primary colors (red, green, and blue) that can be
reproduced.
Web
Annual Power Consumption of 32V-Inch AQUOS LCD TVs
(kWh)
300
200
271
32C-HE1
32-inch
CRT TV
LC-32GD4
227
238
LC-32GD1
LC-32D10
135
154
LC-32BD1 147
LC-32GH1
100
0
LC-32GD6
200
1st
half
2000
2nd
1st
half
half
2003 2004
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
half
half
half
half
2005 2005 2006 2006
LC-32GH5
113
120
LC-32D30
2nd
1st
half
half
2007 2008
(Term; fiscal year)
13
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
AQUOS
Green Products
Superb Image Quality and a Super-Thin Profile
with Far and Away the Lowest Power
Consumption
In developing this new LCD TV, what we
valued most was image quality. The public
reaction to the super-thin profile was huge,
but that is a feature we adopted more to
make the beauty of the screen stand out.
Along with superb image quality, we
consistently sought to achieve power
consumption that was far and away the
lowest, even with a large screen.
I think this new LCD TV, which delivers
outstanding energy efficiency, that is, power
consumption about half that of a CRT TV,
even with a screen twice as large, is a product
that can contribute to the betterment of
society.
Tomohiko Yamamoto
Manager
A1255 Project Team
Corporate Research &
Development Group
Sharp Corporation
Special Feature
Aiming for a Low-Carbon Society
Aiming to Have Energy-Creating and Energy-Saving Products
More Than Balance Out Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Corporate Vision: Sharp’s Energy-Creating and Energy-Saving Products Will More Than
Balance Out Sharp’s Greenhouse Gas Emissions
By reducing the amount of greenhouse gases emitted as a result of Sharp’s worldwide business activities to the greatest extent possible, while at
the same time significantly increasing the magnitude of reductions in greenhouse gas emissions through customer use of Sharp energy-creating
solar cells and energy-saving products, the net reduction in greenhouse gases will more than balance out the level of emissions by fiscal 2010.
Greenhouse gas
emissions from
Sharp’s worldwide
business activities
(control)
CO2 emission reductions
through customer use of
Sharp solar cells and
energy-saving products
(expand)
For fiscal 2007, Sharp’s greenhouse gas emissions were approximately
1.76 million t-CO2*1. In contrast, the estimated amount of electrical
power generated in fiscal 2007 by solar cells manufactured by Sharp
during the 20-year period from fiscal 1987 to 2006 was approximately
1,870 GWh*2. This is equivalent to a reduction in greenhouse gas
emissions of approximately 0.77 million t-CO2*3. In addition, the amount
of reductions in greenhouse gas emissions from the effect of customer
use of energy-saving products was 0.60 million t-CO2*4.
Achieving Sharp’s Corporate Vision
Through Energy Creation and Energy
Saving
In August 2004, six months before the Kyoto Protocol went into
effect, Sharp set a corporate vision: “Sharp’s energy-creating
and energy-saving products will more than balance out Sharp’s
greenhouse gas emissions,” and set about to make this vision
a reality, focusing on its Super Green Strategy (see page 24).
Specifically, with its SGF/GF initiatives, Sharp seeks to control
to the greatest extent possible the amount of greenhouse
gases emitted during the course of business operations, while
at the same time, under the Super Green Product/Device
initiative, push ahead to reduce greenhouse gases through
customer use of Sharp’s energy-creating solar cells and
energy-saving products.
Balanced against the 1.76 million t-CO2 of emissions from
worldwide business activities is 1.37 million t-CO2, a
combination of emission reductions from customer use of solar
cells (0.77 million t-CO2) and energy-saving products (0.60
million t-CO2). The difference between the two is still 0.39
million t-CO2, but Sharp is further strengthening its efforts, with
the intent of achieving its vision of Sharp’s energy-creating and
energy-saving products more than balancing out its
greenhouse gas emissions before fiscal 2010.
Carbon-Neutral Living Through Energy Creation and
Energy Saving
Annual CO2 emissions per household in Japan: 3,500 kg-CO2*
CO2 ±0: Carbon neutral
Reduction in CO2
emissions from replacement
purchases of new energyefficient consumer electronics
Reduction in CO2
emissions from installation
of energy-creating solar
power generation systems
Reduction in CO2
CO2 emissions
* Calculated based on emissions of 174 million t-CO2 originating from energy
consumed by the residential sector in Japan in fiscal 2005, and a total
number of 49.6 million households.
*1 See page 34.
*2 Calculation based on a total of 1,780 MW of solar cells produced by Sharp in
the 20 years from fiscal 1987 to 2006. (Please visit Sharp’s website for detailed
calculation methods.)
*3 Calculated using the figure of 0.410 kg/kWh for CO2 emissions intensity
(emissions per kWh of electricity consumed), announced by the Federation of
Electric Power Companies of Japan (for fiscal 2006).
*4 Calculated based on reductions in power consumption in air conditioners, LCD
TVs, and refrigerators shipped in Japan derived from the following formula and
then using the conversion factor given in note 3 above (CO2 emissions intensity
for fiscal 2006): [Amount of reductions in power consumption] = ([average power
consumption for representative models for fiscal 1997 (kWh)] – [power
consumption for each model for fiscal 2007 (kWh)] x number of units sold for
replacement purchase purposes for each model (units)
Offering Carbon-Neutral Living Through
Energy Creation and Energy Saving
Sharp is proposing carbon-neutral living through
energy-creating solar cells and energy-saving consumer
electronics. If all of the energy needs of a home could be
covered by installing clean-energy residential solar power
generation systems, a carbon-neutral way of living could be
achieved that causes no warming of the Earth.
Sharp is contributing to bringing a low-carbon society into
reality by further strengthening the energy-creating
performance of its solar power generation systems and the
energy-saving performance of its consumer electronics, so that
carbon-neutral living will become a normal way of life.
Web
Corporate vision
Carbon-neutral living
Further Strengthening Energy Creation and
Energy Saving Aimed at Achieving a
Low-Carbon Society
As the frontrunner in energy-creating solar
cells and energy-saving LCD TVs, Sharp is
constantly working to innovate new
technologies based on the skills and
know-how accumulated over many years of
experience in these fields.
Solar power generation will be extremely
useful in making a low-carbon society a reality,
and the completion of the Sakai Manufacturing Complex will mark a major milestone in
Sharp’s efforts to speed its widespread
adoption and use.
Hiroshi Morimoto
Executive Officer
Group General Manager
Environmental Protection
Group
Sharp Corporation
Four years have passed since Sharp declared
becoming an environmentally advanced
company as a medium-term corporate
objective, and its effects have begun to become apparent in every
aspect of corporate activities. Sharp will be strengthening its efforts in
the future to put this trend on a firm basis.
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
14
Special Focus 1
Further Expanding
Plastic Recycling
Sharp has developed and put into practical use new technologies that help increase the potential of
closed-loop material recycling,*1 which reuses plastic recovered from four kinds of home appliances (TVs,
air conditioners, refrigerators, and washing machines). Based on these technologies, Sharp is greatly
increasing the amount it recycles, with the goal of using 1,000 tons of recycled plastic in fiscal 2008.
*1 Repeated reuse of recovered plastic in the parts of new consumer electronics products
2
3
1
4
5
1 Recycled plastic pellets
2 Refrigerator with transport handles
made from recycled plastic
3 Washing machine with a bottom stand made from
recycled plastic
4 Recovered washing tub
5 Recycled washing tub
6 High-efficiency metal removal line (Kansai Recycling Systems)
Developing Technology to Recycle Plastic
Although large amounts of plastic are used in consumer
electronics, most of the plastic is disposed of as industrial
waste after use. In 1999, with the aim of recycling that
plastic, Sharp started developing the technology for
closed-loop material recycling. In 2001, when the Japanese
Law for Recycling of Specified Kinds of Home Appliances
(Home Appliance Recycling Law) was enacted, Sharp and
Kansai Recycling Systems Co., Ltd.*2 jointly put this
recycling technology to practical use. Since then, through a
series of technological advances and improvements to its
facilities, Sharp has steadily increased its use of recycled
plastic every year.
With the passage of more than six years since the
technology was first put into practical use, washing
machines equipped with tubs made from recycled plastic
are now being sent to plants for recycling. Tests conducted
on the washing tubs confirm that they possess the
15
6
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
properties needed for repeated recycling. These tubs are
once again being recycled into parts of new home
appliances.
New Technology to Increase
the Use of Recycled Plastic
The reuse of recovered plastic was previously limited to
components made from a single resin material; plastic with
metal parts and different types of resins still attached was
disposed of as industrial waste. In August 2007, Sharp
developed a technology to separate and recover high-purity
polypropylene (PP) from plastic components previously
subject to disposal, and recycle it into high-quality plastic.
By employing this technology, Sharp can greatly expand its
use of recycled plastic.
There are three significant aspects to the new technology.
First, the high-efficiency metal removal line newly set up at
Kansai Recycling Systems is based on a system in which
making it possible to reuse PP in the exterior components
of new home appliances. In fiscal 2007, Sharp used PP
developed through these technologies in refrigerator
transport handles and in the bottom stands of washing
machines. By further expanding the range of applications,
Sharp plans to increase its use of recycled plastic to 1,000
tons in fiscal 2008.
screws and other metal parts attached to recovered plastic
components are accurately detected and removed, and the
remaining plastic parts are placed into a crusher. Next,
high-purity PP separation and recovery technology enables
the recovery of PP in an almost 100% pure form from the
crushed plastic through wind-power sorting and
water-gravity separation. The third aspect involves plastic
pigmentation technology developed by Ube Industries, Ltd.
This proprietary technology for incorporating colored
pigments into recovered PP to which additives have been
mixed in after cleaning prevents impurities from being visible.
Sharp has already applied this closed-loop plastic material
recycling technology to the cabinets of LCD TVs*3 and to
plant-based plastic*4. Moreover, Sharp has developed and
put into practical use plant-based resin paint made from
corn*5. Thus, by expanding the use of environment-friendly
materials, which helps reduce the consumption of limited
fossil resources, Sharp is contributing to the creation of a
resource-recycling society.
Measures for Creating
a Resource-Recycling Society
To increase the use of recycled plastic, it is necessary not
only to expand the recovery of plastic but also to widen the
applications of recycled plastic. Through the high-efficiency
metal removal line and the high-purity PP separation and
recovery technology, Sharp has greatly increased its
recovery of recyclable plastic. Also, the plastic pigmentation
technology has expanded the range of applications by
*2 A consumer electronics recycling company established with
investment from Sharp Corporation, Mitsubishi Materials
Corporation, and five other electronics companies.
*3 See page 30.
*4 See page 30.
*5 Developed jointly with Kansai Paint Co., Ltd. See page 29.
■ Closed-loop plastic material recycling flow
Product use
(customer)
New consumer
electronics
Molding and assembly
of plastic parts
■ Use of recycled plastic
(t)
1,200
Disassembly
Material evaluation, evaluation of remaining lifetime,
moldability evaluation, physical properties evaluation,
review and determination of formula for improving properties
Expansion by new 1,000
(estimate)
technologies
1,000
Used consumer
electronics
Plastic parts
recovery
850
110
800
250
620
600
520
420
400
270
200
Pelletization
Product
design
Melting/
Mixing
Placing into
Cleaning
extrusion
with additives
crusher
Plastic pigmentation
High-purity PP separation
High-efficiency
technology
and recovery technology metal removal line
Evolving the Recycling Industry from
a Venous Industry to a Materials Industry,
to Create a Resource-Recycling Society
Our corporate vision is to be an advanced
resource-recycling company valuable for
humans and the Earth. To create a
resource-recycling society, it is important to
take on the challenge of conducting more
advanced recycling: closed-loop material
recycling is a prime example.
To further expand closed-loop material
recycling, we will cooperate with Sharp in
efforts to evolve the recycling industry from a
“venous” disposal/renewal industry to an
“arterial” materials industry.
Naoyuki Harada
Manager
Production Technology
Department
Kansai Recycling
Systems Co., Ltd.
0
Web
40
2001
80
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007 2008
(fiscal year)
Target and results of closed-loop
plastic material recycling
Waste Plastic Is
Domestically Produced Material
Plastic is made from oil. Our closed-loop
material recycling technology, however, enables
the production of plastic, while reducing the
use of oil. In the sense that waste plastic can
be substituted for oil in the production of
plastic, it can be called “domestically produced
material.”
To further expand closed-loop material
recycling for the effective use of waste plastic
as domestically produced material, we will
promote coordination among Kansai Recycling
Systems, our product divisions, and
subcontractors, and, with an eye toward
establishing a resource-recycling society, we
will work to create environmentally conscious
products.
Yohei Kawaguchi
Junior Manager
Green Product Development
Department
Environmental Protection
Group
Sharp Corporation
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
16
Special Focus 2
Environmental Forums and Sharp Charity
Foundation Mark Sharp’s Social Contribution
Activities in China
In response to growing concerns over environmental problems, and proposals from municipal
government officials in China, Sharp has been holding Environmental Forums to introduce global
environmental issues and the company’s environmental conservation efforts. Sharp has also been
contributing to local communities through the Sharp Charity Foundation.
2
1
4
1 Children in the area where the construction
of a Sharp Hope Primary School is planned
3
6
5
2 Scholarship recipients at Southeast University (Nanjing)
4 Presentation ceremony for the public welfare organization Project Hope
Environmental Forums Introduce
Sharp’s Efforts to Become
an Environmentally Advanced Company
Sharp has been holding environmental forums in cities
across China: Shanghai (May 2007), Beijing (September
2007), Guangzhou (March 2008), and Tianjin (May 2008).
The forums came about after Chinese journalists on a study
tour to the Kameyama Plant in Japan reported Sharp’s
environmental vision and conservation activities to
municipal government officials back in China. Sharp saw
this as an opportunity to launch a series of environmental
forums in major cities, with the cooperation of municipal
officials who take an interest in Sharp’s environmental
policies and measures.
17
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
3 Tree-planting by employees
5 6 Environmental forums
At the forums, Sharp used explanatory panels and videos
to introduce the measures the company takes in five
areas—technologies, products and devices, factories,
recycling, and management—all with the aim of becoming
an environmentally advanced company.
During the exchange of opinions after the presentations,
forum participants demonstrated a high level of concern
about environmental issues in China, as they asked
questions about the Japanese Home Appliance Recycling
Law, Sharp’s certification criteria for Super Green and
Green Factories, and the environmental measures taken at
Sharp’s factories in China.
Sharp Charity Foundation Grants
Scholarships and Supports
Public Institutions Through Donations
Sharp bases in China previously carried out social action
programs on an individual basis, but in 2006, Sharp
established the Sharp Charity Foundation in cooperation
with the Shanghai Charity Foundation to unify those
activities. Every year since then, Sharp’s eight production
and sales bases in China have donated to the fund for such
activities as granting scholarships, as well as donating
Sharp products to public institutions, and planting trees.
In fiscal 2007, Sharp engaged in a new form of social
contribution activity by holding charity auctions. AQUOS
LCD TVs used during the AQUOS Experience Tour, an
event to experience the TVs’ outstanding picture quality,
were auctioned off. Thanks to the participation of people
eager to make a contribution to society, proceeds totaling
500,000 yuan (approx. 7.5 million yen) went to Project
Hope, a public welfare organization that works to construct
schools in poverty-stricken areas of China. The proceeds
from Sharp will be used to build a Sharp Hope Primary
School in Chongqing and another in Anhui Province.
Forest Grows as Symbol of Friendship
Between China and Japan
In northwest China, desertification is advancing, and
damage from yellow sand is affecting the city of Tianjin and
surrounding areas. A desire to help protect China’s natural
environment spurred Sharp to start the Sharp China-Japan
Friendship Forest in Wuqing District of Tianjin City as a joint
effort between Sharp’s eight subsidiaries in China, China
Council for the Promotion of Environment and Forestry, and
the Wuqing Forestry Bureau of Tianjin City. The treeplanting activities carried out under this reforestation project
were funded by the Sharp Charity Foundation.
In fiscal 2007, about 7,400 poplar trees were planted in
about seven hectares of a reforestation area in Tianjin. The
project is intended to give rise to an approximately
27-hectare forest by 2010 that will serve as a windbreak
against drifting sand. This friendship forest is expected to
improve the living environment of local residents by
increasing the level of greening and reducing damage from
wind and dust storms, and it will be cultivated as a symbol
of friendship between the people of China and Japan.
Sharp will continue carrying out social contribution activities
through the Sharp Charity Foundation, with an eye to
contributing to Chinese society and gaining the support of
the local communities there.
Words from Stakeholders
It is said that a company is required to fulfill
its social responsibility. Sharp has established
the Sharp Charity Foundation and, through
this fund, is contributing to society and local
communities. It is admirable that Sharp
places as much importance on its social
contribution activities as it does on its core
business. I think that reflects far-reaching
insight on the part of Sharp executives.
Jin Zhaomin
Deputy Secretary-General
Shanghai Charity Foundation
I feel honored and I greatly appreciate that we
were chosen as one of the recipients of
AQUOS LCD TVs. Our patients can now relax
by watching TV. Inspired by Sharp’s activities,
we are also improving medical facilities at our
hospital step by step. I hope Sharp will carry
out this kind of social action program over the
long term.
Zhang Fuxing
Director of Hospital
Shanghai Pudong New Area
Jin Yang Community Medical Service Center
I feel greatly honored that our university
became a recipient of Sharp scholarships.
These activities by Sharp reflect Sharp’s
expectations for education in Shanghai and
are also a huge contribution. I hope that the
students who received the scholarships will
study hard and return the favor to society in
the future.
Zhang Mian
Teacher
College of Japanese Culture and Economy
Shanghai International Studies University
Tree-planting activities conducted under the
Sharp China-Japan Friendship Forest in
Wuqing District of Tianjin City have played a
big role in improving soil and the environment
and in reducing damage from yellow sand
affecting the Beijing and Tianjin areas.
Particularly in the period leading up to the
international sports festival in Beijing in 2008,
the tree-planting activities have served as a
model for environmental conservation activities
conducted by Chinese and foreign companies.
Meng Fanzhi
Secretary-General
China Council for the Promotion of Environment and Forestry
The Sharp scholarship is the sunshine
warming my heart. When I attended the
scholarship presentation ceremony, I was
overwhelmed with appreciation and emotion.
According to an old saying, “One must return
the favor of one drop of water by providing
gushing spring water.” Someday, I want to
return this favor to society with the
knowledge I will acquire.
Zhao Yifei
Junior Student
College of Japanese Culture and Economy
Shanghai International Studies University
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
18
Special Focus 3
Forests, Water, and Children—Expanding the
Range of Environmental Social Contribution
Activities
Sharp is developing environmental social contribution activities concerning forests, water, and children,
with the Sharp Green Club (SGC), a volunteer organization jointly established by Sharp and its labor
union, and the Environmental Education and Outreach Department of Sharp’s Environmental Protection
Group at the core of that movement. Through these activities, Sharp employees have become more
aware of the importance of the environment and of volunteering. In the future, Sharp will promote
coordination among individual activities with an eye to developing them on a global scale.
1
2
3
1 Environmental education at the Shanghai Japanese School
2 Fukuoka Sharp Takasu Forest 3 Water purification system at Moriya Pond
Green Beginnings: Sharp Green Club
and the Wakakusayama Green Campaign
Sharp’s company-wide environmental social contribution
activities in Japan date back to 1998, the start of the Green
Mind Campaign spearheaded by Sharp’s Environmental
Protection Group. That campaign consisted of the Zero
Waste and Zero Garbage campaigns, and Environmental
Citizen Activities that involved regular cleanups of the areas
around Sharp sites as well as employee participation in
cleanups of neighboring communities.
Reflecting the growing awareness that promoting social
contribution on a larger scale requires a core organization
that can serve the entire company, Sharp and its labor
union jointly established the Sharp Green Club (SGC) in
June 2003 as a volunteer organization. On July 26, 2003,
shortly after the club’s inauguration, SGC held its first
19
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
Wakakusayama Cleanup Campaign in Nara Prefecture,
Japan to commemorate the start of its full-scale
environmental social action programs. More than 1,200
Sharp employees from the Kansai area, their family
members and acquaintances, and subcontractor
employees turned out to help with landscape preservation
efforts at Wakakusayama and in the process became more
aware of the importance of environmental conservation and
volunteering.
To this day, SGC activities remain firmly rooted; in fiscal
2007, a total of 27,405 of the 31,600 Sharp Group
employees in Japan took part in SGC activities there. SGC
continues to raise awareness among Sharp employees by
providing them with opportunities to voluntarily contribute
to communities through environmental activities.
Regenerating the Natural
Environment Through Sharp Forests
Along with the Wakakusayama campaign, one of SGC’s
main activities is creating Sharp Forests in the areas
around Japan where Sharp bases and sales and service
offices are located. SGC started the first Sharp Forest in
Hachihonmatsu Yoshikawa (Hiroshima Prefecture) in 2004.
Under a basic concept of understanding the relationships
between forests, human beings, and other living creatures,
deepening those bonds, and fostering an environmentally
friendly mindset, the Sharp Forest initiative aims to
contribute to local communities through reforestation—
planting and cultivating new trees on the sites of depleted
forests—and to foster environmental awareness among
Sharp employees through contact with the natural
environment.
SGC expanded those activities to sales and service bases
in fiscal 2007, creating Sharp Forests in Takamatsu
(Kagawa Prefecture) and in Maebaru (Fukuoka Prefecture).
Although the sales and service bases in Takamatsu and
Maebaru are smaller than other Sharp bases, a large
number of people participated in the projects; employees
actively cooperated with local governments and residents
and enlisted the help of Sharp-affiliated dealers.
In fiscal 2007, Sharp made preparations for the creation of
Sharp Forests in Kameyama (Mie Prefecture) and in Naha
(Okinawa Prefecture). The addition of those two locations
will bring the number of Sharp Forests in Japan to 10.
Although the scale may be small—on average, the forests
cover an area of about two hectares—Sharp is committed
to carefully cultivating those forests through the
participation of employees, business partners, and people
from the local communities.
Web Sharp Forests
Applying Environmental Technologies
to Purify Reservoir Water
Closed bodies of water, such as reservoirs, are subject to
eutrophication, a form of environmental deterioration
brought on by organic components, nitrogen, and
phosphorus. In November 2007, Sharp’s Environmental
Education and Outreach Department combined charcoal
made through the superheated steam process developed
by Professor Miyatake from Osaka Prefecture University’s
Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, and
a micro-nano-bubble system driven by a Sharp solar
power generation system, to start up an experimental
water purification system at the city-owned Moriya Pond in
Sakai City (Osaka Prefecture), Japan.
The water purification campaign at Moriya Pond represents
a collaboration among industry, government, academia,
and private citizens, with ONE WORLD for Children, a
nonprofit organization promoting local revitalization through
environmental activities, acting as a liaison, and local
citizens, including members of the Moriya Pond Society,
playing a leading role.
Preserving Historical Areas of Asuka
In October 2006, to preserve historical areas
and make employees more aware of the
importance of the environment, we began
creating a wooded community park in Asuka
Village (Nara Prefecture, Japan) by improving
the condition of neglected rice terraces,
forests, and bamboo groves, setting up
birdhouses, and planting trees associated with
the Manyoshu (Anthology of Myriad Leaves), a
famous collection of early Japanese poetry. In
appreciation of our activities, Asuka Village
presented us with a certificate of gratitude
recognizing us for our distinguished services to
the village.
We will continue to enjoy working with
local residents to create forests, all the while
experiencing the surroundings described in the
anthology.
Shingo Takai
Department General Manager
General Affairs Department
Solar Systems Group
Sharp Corporation
SGC Wins Fiscal 2007
Nara Prefecture Environmental Merit Award
SGC received this award in recognition of its
regular contributions to local communities
through such initiatives as the Wakakusayama
Green Campaign carried out by more than 1,200
Sharp employees and their family members
every year, tree-planting and maintenance
activities at Sharp Green Club Asuka Forest and
at Tenri Kofun Sharp Forest, and cleanup
activities conducted around Sharp sites.
Striving for Local Revitalization,
Starting with Moriya Pond
With the aim of creating a social environment
that can give children hope for the future, we
began our activities in 2004 as a nonprofit
organization. Under the guidance of Professor
Miyatake from the Graduate School of Osaka
Prefecture University, we work once a month
with Sharp employees, local citizens, and
university students on activities to purify the
water of Moriya Pond. Our primary goal is to
start revitalizing the community, beginning with
the pond, by having citizens rebuild the local
environment with their own hands.
Kazumi Matsumoto
Representative Director
ONE WORLD for Children
Putting Nature-Friendly Technologies
to Work to Purify Water
Based on two environmental technologies—
activation of pond microorganisms through
micro-nano-bubbles using a solar power
generation system and adsorption of pond
organic matter using charcoal made with
superheated steam—we are purifying pond
water through an environmentally friendly
method.
Though it takes some time to purify the
water in a reservoir, we want to continue the
purification of Moriya Pond as a collaboration
among industry, government, academia, and
private citizens, and we hope to succeed in the
project as a new social business model for
solar power generation systems.
Shuichi Akatsuka
Assistant Department
General Manager
Environmental Education
and Outreach Department
Environmental Protection
Group
Sharp Corporation
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
20
Special Focus 3
Working with Weathercasters to
Take Environmental Education to
Elementary Schools Around Japan
Under the auspices of its Environmental Education and
Outreach Department, Sharp has been working with the
Weathercaster Network (WCN), a nonprofit organization of
weather forecasters in the Japanese media, since October
2006 to hold environmental education classes for fourth to
sixth graders at elementary schools around Japan. In their
presentations, Sharp and WCN explore one of two themes:
global warming and recycling or global warming and new
energy (solar power). To teach students about global
warming, WCN representatives explain familiar changes in
weather patterns and Sharp presenters called ECO
Navigators use experiments to introduce recycling or new
energy.
In fiscal 2007, more than 1,000 schools applied for the
program. Through a drawing, Sharp and WCN selected
537 of those schools to visit, giving about 37,000 students
a chance to take part in the program. To enable classes to
be held around the country, Sharp has appointed
employees from sales and service bases across Japan to
serve as ECO Navigators and has increased their number
from 280 to about 320 in fiscal 2007.
Sharp plans to present environmental education programs
at more than 500 schools in fiscal 2008. In Hokkaido,
Sharp contributed to the Hokkaido Toyako Summit
Preparation Council’s projects to support the July 2008 G8
Hokkaido Toyako Summit by covering summit-related
environmental topics at elementary schools there.
In the future, Sharp will try to help students understand the
fun of product making and the importance of the natural
environment, by expanding its program to include such
themes as eco-friendly manufacturing and familiar natural
environments.
Internationally, Sharp’s efforts to provide elementary school
students in China with environmental education on the
theme of recycling have begun by taking its program to a
Japanese school in Shanghai. Moreover, Sharp is
cooperating with local nonprofit organizations in the US
states of New Jersey and California to deliver environmental
education on solar power.
Sharp has been gradually widening the scope of its
activities related to forests, water, and children. And, with
an eye toward the future and based on a solid philosophy,
Sharp will make these activities into lasting, meaningful
ones. By also focusing attention on relationships, such as
those between forests and water and between forests and
children, Sharp will coordinate and fuse individual activities
to develop new ones for the future.
Improving the Global Environment
Lets Us Realize Our Dreams
We received several significant awards for our
environmental education classes last fiscal
year. I think we were able to accomplish all that
we did because of support from Sharp.
All human beings live with a dream. To realize
those dreams, we must improve the global
environment. With the help of Sharp again this
fiscal year, we will work to prevent global
warming, the biggest concern facing humanity.
Nobuyuki Hirai
Representative
Weathercaster Network
Sharp Wins Three Awards for
Elementary School Environmental Education
Sharp earned high praise for activities to raise awareness
about new energy and the prevention of global warming.
Partnership Prize
Partnership Awards
(sponsored by
Partnership
Support Center)
Agency of Natural
Resources and Energy
Director General’s Prize
Agency of Natural Resources
and Energy Director General’s
Prize
New Energy Award
(sponsored by New
Energy Foundation)
Energy-Related Public Relations
Commendation (sponsored by
Japan Productivity Center for
Socio-Economic Development)
Fostering Experts from Hokkaido
Who Can Help Solve
Global Environmental Problems
I have been surprised by how much children
know about environmental problems. They
flash their brilliant smiles in classes—my
experiences as a presenter have been
wonderful!
Since the G8 summit was held in Hokkaido
this year, the people here have become more
aware of the importance of the environment. I
hope that, by providing classes with enhanced
content, I can help the local community foster
children who can contribute to the solution of
global environmental problems.
Desire to Protect the Earth
Is a Universal Feeling
Hiroshi Sasaki
Sapporo ECO Navigator
Manager
Administration Department
Hokkaido Branch
Sharp Electronics Marketing
Corporation
In addition to elementary schools in Japan,
I have conducted classes at the Shanghai
Japanese School and at an international
school. Wherever I visited, children took part in
my class with a serious, enthusiastic attitude.
I believe that the desire to protect the earth is
universal. I will continue making presentations
that can be inspirational to children, who must
carry us into the future.
21
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
Elementary school environmental
Web education
Everybody’s an ECO fan
Satoe Saito
Junior Manager
Environmental Education and
Outreach Department
Environmental Protection Group
Sharp Corporation
Sharp and
the Environment
In Pursuit of Becoming an Environmentally
Advanced Corporate Group
Advanced Measures for Environmental Conservation as
Management Policy・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 23
Advancing Super Green Management ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 25
Environmental Accounting・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 27
How Business Activities Relate to the Environment ・・・・・・ 28
Developing Super Green Technologies ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 29
Creating Super Green Products and Devices・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 31
Building Super Green Factories ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 33
Curbing Greenhouse Gas Emissions ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 34
Minimizing and Recycling Waste・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 35
Effectively Managing Chemical Substances,
Conducting Risk Management・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 36
Environmentally Conscious Logistics・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 37
Developing Super Green Recycling ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 38
Promoting Environmental Communication ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 39
Sakai Manufacturing Complex
(artist’s conception of completed facilities)
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
22
Sharp and the Environment
In Pursuit of Becoming an Environmentally Advanced Corporate Group
Advanced Measures for Environmental
Conservation as Management Policy
In accordance with environmental guidelines established in line with Sharp’s Basic Environmental Philosophy, the
Sharp Group Charter of Corporate Behavior, and the Sharp Code of Conduct, Sharp is pursuing environmental
conservation in all aspects of its business activities. Since fiscal 2004, when the medium-term corporate objective
of becoming an environmentally advanced company was first set, Sharp has been promoting the Super Green
Strategy to achieve its corporate vision and to establish sustainable manufacturing systems.
The Sharp Group Charter of Corporate Behavior
Basic Environmental Philosophy
Creating an Environmentally Conscious Company
with Sincerity and Creativity
Contribution to Conservation of
the Global Environment
The Sharp Group will fulfill our responsibility for environmental conservation by
promoting the creation of proprietary technologies that contribute to protection of
the global environment, and by carrying out our product development and
business activities in an environmentally conscious manner.
Medium-Term Corporate Objective:
An Environmentally Advanced Company
Since fiscal 2004, Sharp has set forth the medium-term
corporate objective of becoming an environmentally advanced
company as its basic management policy, and has set its
corporate vision as “Sharp’s energy-creating and energy-saving
products will more than balance out Sharp’s greenhouse gas
emissions.” To achieve these goals, Sharp is globally
developing a Super Green Strategy that aims to maximize
environmental awareness.
The Sharp Code of Conduct
Contribution to Conservation of the Global Environment
1. To Conserve the Environment
2. To Develop Environmentally Conscious Products and Services, and Conduct
Our Business Operations in an Environmentally Conscious Manner
Web
Sharp Group Charter of Corporate Behavior (full text)
Sharp Code of Conduct (full text)
Stages
Themes
Major Objectives
Implement Sharp Environmental Management
System (S-EMS)
Acquire ISO 14001 certification
Main Objectives and
Fiscal 2007 Achievements
Environmental
Sustainability
Management
Environmental
management system
Conduct cross audits
In fiscal 2007, Sharp’s fourth year of pursuing the medium-term
corporate objective of becoming an environmentally advanced
company, Sharp began seeing results in a variety of areas.
With regard to environmental technologies, Sharp developed
and put into practical use new technologies for closed-loop
plastic material recycling, and also increased the use of
recycled plastic and expanded its applications to the exterior
components of home appliances. For its plant-based resin
paint, which it is continually developing new applications for,
Sharp was honored with the second Monodzukuri Nippon
Grand Award, and awarded the Prize for Industrial Technology
sponsored by the Japan Society of Colour Material.
Introduce the Green Office certification system
Establish 3R
technologies
Planning
and
Design
Manufacturing
Other significant results include the start of the Green Office
certification system, the reduction of discharge risks for
chemical substances placed under high-priority control, and
target-exceeding reductions of CO2 emissions associated with
distribution.
Sharp will further strengthen its policies related to becoming an
environmentally advanced company, and will establish a system
of sustainable manufacturing, with the top priority of
contributing to the creation of a low-carbon society.
Develop Green
Products
Develop Green
Devices
Also, for the third year in a row, Sharp’s products and devices
exceeded sales percentage targets for all four kinds of Green
Products and Green Devices.
Sharp has achieved the medium-term objective it set in fiscal
2004 of upgrading all 10 Sharp Corporation factories to Super
Green Factories, as well as upgrading all other domestic and
overseas Sharp Group factories, including those of subsidiaries
and affiliates, to Green Factories or higher. Specifically, it has
exceeded both domestic and overseas targets in terms of
reducing greenhouse gases, and waste has decreased by
double-digit percentages at overseas production sites for three
years in a row. However, these reductions were all achieved per
production unit, and Sharp will aim to reduce the absolute
amount of emissions at existing factories in the future.
Build Integrated Management System (IMS)*1
Logistics
Promote closed-loop plastic material recycling
Establish LCD TV recycling technology
Increase Green Seal Products’ share
of net sales in Japan*2
Increase Super Green Products’ share
of net sales in Japan
Increase Green Devices’ share of net sales*3
Increase Super Green Devices’ share
of net sales
Convert factories
to Green Factories
Build Green Factories (GF) and
Super Green Factories (SGF)
Curb greenhouse
gas emissions
Reduce CO2 emissions (per production unit)
Reduce and
recycle waste
Reduce amount of waste discharged
(per production unit)
Reduce risk from
harmful chemicals
Reduce discharge risk of chemicals under
high-priority control
Reduce distributionrelated CO2 emissions
Shift to environmentally friendly modes
of transport
Reduce CO2 emissions
Recycling
Recycle used
products
Enhance and improve recycling systems
*1 The Integrated Management System is a system that simultaneously reduces environmental
impact and improves quality.
*2 The sales ratio of Green Seal Products includes sales of Super Green Products.
*3 The sales ratio of Green Devices includes sales of Super Green Devices.
23
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
Corporate Vision: Sharp’s Energy-Creating and
Energy-Saving Products Will More Than Balance Out
Sharp’s Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Super Green Strategy: Aiming to Become an
Environmentally Advanced Company
CO2 emission reductions
through customer use
of Sharp solar cells and
energy-saving products
(expand)
Greenhouse gas emissions
from Sharp’s worldwide
business activities
(control)
SGP/D Super Green
Products and Devices
Develop unique environmental
technologies that contribute to
environmental conservation
SGR Super Green
Recycling
By reducing the amount of greenhouse gases emitted as a result of
Sharp’s worldwide business activities to the greatest extent possible, while
at the same time significantly increasing the magnitude of reductions in
greenhouse gas emissions through customer use of Sharp energy-creating
solar cells and energy-saving products, the net reduction in greenhouse
gases will more than balance out the level of emissions by fiscal 2010.
Recycle used products to
promote reuse of resources
Create products and
devices with high
environmental performance
SGP/D
SGT
SGF
SGR
SGM Super Green
Management
SGF Super Green
Factories
Develop environmentally
conscious factories that
can be trusted by local
communities
SGM
Enhance environmental
sustainability management
For details, see page 14.
Self Evaluation
Fiscal 2007 Objectives
: Achieved more than targeted
: Achieved as targeted
Fiscal 2007 Achievements
: Achieved more than 80% of initial target
: Achieved less than 80% of initial target
Self
Evaluation
Fiscal 2008 Objectives
Fiscal 2010 Objectives
Introduce S-EMS at 22 overseas
production sites
Introduced S-EMS at 22 overseas
production sites
○
ー
ー
Complete certification at all overseas
non-production consolidated subsidiaries
Completed certification at all overseas
non-production consolidated subsidiaries
○
ー
ー
Build IMS at 6 domestic production
sites in total
Built IMS at 4 domestic production
sites in total
Conduct cross audits at
10 overseas production sites in total
Conducted at 12 overseas production
sites in total
Introduce trial runs of Green Office certification
system at domestic non-production sites
Build IMS at 5 domestic and
5 overseas production sites in total
Build IMS at 5 domestic and 12
overseas production sites in total
◎
Conduct at 15 overseas production
sites in total
Conduct at 22 overseas production
sites in total
Total of 17 domestic non-production
sites certified
◎
Certify 30 domestic non-production
sites in total
Certify 56 domestic non-production
sites in total
Use 800 tons of recycled
plastic in new products
Used approx. 850 tons
◎
Use 1,000 tons
Use 1,400 tons
Conduct experimental study of
LCD TV recycling technology
Identified problems in LCD TV recycling
and formulated solutions
○
Complete proof-of-concept
experiments for LCD TV recycling
Construct LCD TV recycling line
(fiscal 2009 objective)
Green Seal Products account
for 90% or more of net sales
Approx. 95%
◎
90% or more
90% or more
Super Green Products account for 50%
or more of net sales
Approx. 60%
◎
55% or more
60% or more
Green Devices account for 75%
or more of net sales
Approx. 84%
◎
80% or more
90% or more
Super Green Devices account for 15%
or more of net sales
Approx. 21%
◎
20% or more
20% or more
All 10 Sharp Corporation production sites SGF
All SGF
○
Put new SGF II policies in place
All business sites grade A or higher
(fiscal 2012 objective)
All 7 domestic production sites
(subsidiaries/affiliates) GF or higher
All GF
○
2 SGF; all others GF
All business sites grade B or higher
(fiscal 2012 objective)
All 22 overseas production sites
(subsidiaries/affiliates) GF or higher
All GF or higher
(6 SGF and 16 GF)
○
9 SGF; all others GF
All business sites grade B or higher
(fiscal 2012 objective)
Japan (10 Sharp Corporation production sites):
Product sites: Reduce by 2% from previous
fiscal year (every fiscal year)
Device sites: Reduce by 5% from previous
fiscal year (every fiscal year)
Reduced by approx. 15% from
previous fiscal year
Reduced by approx. 7% from
previous fiscal year
◎
Reduce by 2% from previous
fiscal year (every fiscal year)
Reduce by 5% from
previous fiscal year (every fiscal year)
Japan: Reduce CO2 emissions per
adjusted production unit*4 by 35%
compared to fiscal 1990 levels at all
production sites (average for fiscal
2008 to 2012)
Overseas: Reduce by 2% from previous fiscal
year at all production sites (every fiscal year)
Reduced by approx. 10% from previous
fiscal year
◎
Japan: Reduce amount of waste discharged
per production unit by 3% from previous
fiscal year (every fiscal year)
Increased by approx. 14% from previous
fiscal year
Overseas: Reduce amount of waste, etc.
discharged*5 per production unit by 2% from
previous fiscal year (every fiscal year)
Reduced by approx. 10% from
previous fiscal year
◎
Reduce by 2% from previous fiscal year (every fiscal year)
Reduce discharge risk at Sharp Corporation
production sites in Japan by 60% compared
to fiscal 2003
Reduced by 75% compared to fiscal 2003
◎
Formulate new policy for management
of chemical substances
See
page(s)
25・26
15・16
30
31・32
33
34
Reduce by 2% from previous fiscal year (every fiscal year)
Reduce by 3% from previous fiscal year (every fiscal year)
35
Set in place new policy for
management of chemical substances
(fiscal 2012 objective)
Shift to environmentally friendly modes of transport
20,619 containers
Domestic railway cargo transport
(container transport): 15,600 containers
◎
Reduce CO2 emissions per sales unit*6
by at least 1% from previous fiscal year by
Sharp Group in Japan
Reduced by 14% from previous fiscal year
◎
Reduce by 1% from previous fiscal year (every fiscal year)
Respond to increased number of items
requiring recycling
Developed recycling technology for
flat-panel (LCD) TVs (completed technical
studies at laboratory level)
○
Build recycling system for flat-panel
(LCD) TVs
36
ー
37
Implement recycling system for
flat-panel (LCD) TVs
(fiscal 2009 objective)
38
*4 Per adjusted production unit (t-CO2/100 million yen) = CO2 emissions (t-CO2) ÷ {production output (100 million yen) ÷ domestic corporate price index
(electrical and electronic equipment) determined by the Bank of Japan}
*5 Amount of waste, etc. discharged = Amount of waste discharged + amount of valuable resources
*6 CO2 emissions per sales unit (t-CO2/100 million yen) = CO2 emissions (t-CO2) ÷ net sales (100 million yen)
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
24
Advanced Measures for Environmental Conservation as Management Policy
SGT Super Green
Technologies
Sharp and the Environment
In Pursuit of Becoming an Environmentally Advanced Corporate Group
Advancing Super Green Management
Sharp’s system for advancing environmental sustainability management is centered on the Environmental
Protection Group. Under this system, Sharp is continuously making efforts to strengthen environmental
sustainability management and raise employees’ environmental awareness by building an Integrated Management
System that is incorporated into a strategic management system and by implementing environmental education
programs.
Objectives for Fiscal 2007
Achievements for Fiscal 2007
Objectives for Fiscal 2008
Objectives for Fiscal 2010
Introduce S-EMS at 22 overseas
production sites
Introduced S-EMS at 22
overseas production sites
──
──
Complete ISO 14001 certification at all
overseas non-production consolidated
subsidiaries
Completed ISO 14001 certification
at all overseas non-production
consolidated subsidiaries
──
──
Build Integrated Management System at
6 domestic production sites in total
Built Integrated Management
System at 4 domestic production
sites in total
Build Integrated Management
System at 5 domestic and
5 overseas production sites in total
Build Integrated Management
System at 5 domestic and
12 overseas production sites in total
Conduct cross audits at 10 overseas
production sites in total
Conducted cross audits at 12
overseas production sites in total
Conduct cross audits at 15
overseas production sites in total
Conduct cross audits at
22 overseas production sites in total
Introduce trial runs of the Green Office
certification system at domestic
non-production sites
A total of 17 domestic
non-production sites
Green Office certified
Certify 30 Green Office
domestic non-production
sites in total
Certify 56 Green Office
domestic non-production
sites in total
Environmental Sustainability Management
Centered on the Environmental Protection Group
Under the aegis of the Environmental Protection
Group, which plays a key role in Sharp’s
environmental sustainability management, Sharp
holds biannual General Global Environmental
Conferences. The conferences discuss and set
environmental guidelines, strategies, and objectives
for all Sharp Group companies. Sharp also hosts
Company-Wide GP (Green Product) and GF (Green
Factory) Conferences on a nearly bimonthly basis to
discuss specific environmental measures concerning
products and plants.
Also, at regional environmental conferences held in
four world regions, participants gain a deeper
understanding of environmental guidelines,
strategies, and objectives, as well as discuss specific
themes and case reports from each site.
■ Sharp Group’s environmental sustainability management
Management Strategy Conference
Chaired by the President
General Global Environmental Conference
Chaired by the Environmental Protection Group General Manager
Company-Wide GP/GF Conference
Chaired by the Environmental Protection
Group General Manager
• Company-Wide
Product VOC
Measures Workgroup
• REACH Measures
Project Team
With the Environmental Protection Group playing a
central role, managers and departments in charge of
environmental matters at all sites are working closely
together to put Sharp’s environmentally advanced
policies into practice.
• Company-Wide
Special Safety
Management
Committee
Pan-American
Environmental
Conference
Pan-European
Environmental
Conference
Asia
Environmental
Conference
China
Environmental
Conference
Environmental
conferences
at each
subsidiary
Environmental
conferences
at each
subsidiary
Environmental
conferences
at each
subsidiary
Environmental
conferences
at each
subsidiary
• Site VOC Measures
Workgroup
• Risk Communicator
Liaison Committee
Environmental conferences/
committees at all domestic sites
(companies)
Integrated Management System Incorporated into the eS-SEM Strategic Management System
Sharp has put in place a proprietary environmental management
system (S-EMS*1) aimed at reinforcing environmental legal
compliance and improving environmental activities. For products
and services, Sharp has introduced its Quality Management
System (QMS) to carry out thorough quality control, further
improve quality, and raise customer satisfaction levels.
In fiscal 2006, the previously separate S-EMS and QMS were
merged into the Integrated Management System, which has
been incorporated into Sharp’s original strategic management
system (eS-SEM*2). The Integrated Management System has
been adopted at the Hiroshima Plant and the Yao Plant.
Through total optimization, the Integrated Management System
has allowed problem solving to become easier and
management to become more precise and efficient. In fiscal
2007, the Integrated Management System was also
implemented at plants in Tochigi and Mihara, and in fiscal 2008
Sharp looks to continue spreading the system throughout
domestic sites and begin overseas implementation.
■ Structure of Integrated Management System
Partial optimization
Management
eS-SEM
Total optimization
Quality
QMS
Environment
S-EMS
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
Quality
QMS
Environment
S-EMS
*1 S-EMS (Sharp Environmental Management System): Sharp’s original
environmental management system based on ISO 14001 plus an
additional 49 original criteria.
*2 eS-SEM (e-Sharp Strategic Enterprise Management): Sharp’s original
strategic management system based on the balanced scorecard concept.
Web ISO 14001-certified sites (companies)
25
Management
eS-SEM
■ Green Office certification standards
Evaluation criteria
Evaluation points
Adherence to
environmental laws
• Adherence to laws
• The conditions of compliance as evaluated
by internal and external audits
Reduction of environmental
impact through work specific
to each business division
• Selling of environmentally conscious products
• Improvement of employee skills
This certification recognizes an office as a Green Office if it
follows eight designated evaluation criteria, such as
“Adherence to environmental laws” and “Prevention of global
warming.” By establishing specific numerical goals and
quantifying the degree to which those goals are met, Sharp is
working to “visualize” the results of its environmental efforts in
the office.
Prevention of global warming
• Energy-saving efforts
• Introduction of eco-cars
Waste management
• Promotion of zero discharge to landfill
• Introduction of electronic manifestos
Green purchasing, etc.
• Reduction of paper usage
• Promotion of green purchasing
Environmental maintenance
in the workplace
• Operational management of facilities and
equipment
• Management of waste storage facilities
This system resulted in 17 out of 56 offices attaining
certification in fiscal 2007. Sharp plans to expand the
certification to include a wider variety of workplaces and pursue
certification of overseas non-production sites as well.
Implementation of
environmental education
• Achievement ratio of education programs
• Acquisition of S-EMS auditors
Environmental social action
programs
• Implementation of community activities
• Support of environmental education programs
at elementary schools
Given the importance of applying environmental measures to
the office, Sharp introduced the Green Office certification
system at non-production sites in Japan in fiscal 2007 as a
complement to the S-EMS.
Conducting Cross Auditing Overseas
To augment internal audits being done on a per-site basis, in
fiscal 2001 Sharp initiated cross audits in which multiple sites in
Japan audit each other. Cross audits were introduced overseas
in fiscal 2006.
Cross audits were introduced with the goal of raising the
proficiency of internal auditors and improving audits. Sharp is
seeing big results from the auditors exchanging their
wide-ranging know-how through mutual study and
development, and also expanding their knowledge and
enriching their personal network.
In fiscal 2007, six audit sites in China, three in Malaysia, two in
Indonesia, and one in the Philippines were added to the audits
already taking place in Japan. Future plans involve setting up
more cross audits at sites
in Southeast Asia, Europe,
and North America.
Advancing Super Green Management
Introducing Green Office Certification
Stepping Up Environmental Education
and Training
Sharp offers systematic environmental education and training,
divided into Master, Expert, and General courses.
In fiscal 2007, Sharp held Environmental Master training for
environmental officers at each plant. The training took place five
times at four sites in Japan, and also at six sites in China and
three sites in Malaysia. The training included lectures and group
discussions about themes closely connected to business, such
as environmental strategies, adherence to laws, environmental
facilities, energy savings, waste disposal, and management of
chemicals.
Also, a new environmental ISO trainer program was added to
the Expert course for people who train S-EMS auditors.
Web Environmental education
■ Environmental education and training system
Master
Cross audit at SREC in Malaysia
■ Cross audits of S-EMS operations between sites
Site A
Audit
Site B
Audit
Site C
Audit
Environmental
Master
training
(Japan and overseas)
Expert
• Integrated MS auditor training
• S-EMS auditor training
(domestic non-production sites
and overseas production sites)
NEW • Environmental ISO trainer
program
• Environmental legislative
control training
• Recycling training
• SGC leader training
• Basic environmental
General • Company-wide
training
environmental training
• New employee training
(e-learning)
• New section chief training
All domestic and
• Overseas assigned employee training
overseas employees
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
26
Sharp and the Environment
In Pursuit of Becoming an Environmentally Advanced Corporate Group
Advancing Super Green Management
Environmental Accounting
Sharp introduced environmental accounting in fiscal 1999 to provide a quantitative assessment of the costs and benefit of its environmental
conservation activities, and has applied the results to environmental sustainability management. Beginning in fiscal 2005, Sharp adopted a
disclosure format that follows the Environmental Accounting Guidelines 2005 published by the Japanese Ministry of the Environment.
Environmental conservation costs
Economic benefits
Due to the reporting of environmental investment in research and
development departments that started in fiscal 2007, investment in
environmental conservation increased to approximately 3.6 billion
yen, up 16% compared to the previous fiscal year. As production
increased, environmental conservation expenditures rose to
approximately 20.3 billion yen, up 32% over the previous fiscal
year, due to the increase of waste disposal fees and the costs
associated with controlling greenhouse gas emissions.
As a result of reporting the effects of reusing cartridges for
copiers starting in fiscal 2007, actual benefit increased by 50%
compared to the previous fiscal year, to 6.5 billion yen. In
addition, Sharp provided environmental education for fourth
through sixth grade students at 537 elementary schools in
Japan, exceeding the initial target of 500 schools.
Classification of Environmental Conservation Activities
( ): Category based on Environmental Accounting Guidelines 2005,
Ministry of the Environment
Environmental
Conservation Costs
(Unit: ¥ million)
Description of Major Activities Investment Expenses
Planning and Design
(R&D)
• R&D on solar power
generation systems
• Promote closed-loop
recycling of plastic materials
• R&D on basic environmental
technologies
• R&D on plant-based resin
paint
Estimated
Benefit
–
–
Environmental Conservation Effects
Estimated
Benefit
Physical Effects
Promote environmental sustainability management
43
(10)
1,840
(1,509)
Number of employees
with environmental
education
Minimize and
recycle waste
(recycle resources)
• Reduce waste discharge
and recycle waste into
valuable resources
• Recycle water
Prevent
pollution
(prevent pollution)
• Install scrubbers
• Introduce exhaust gas
treatment systems
2,385
(2,005)
–
43,638
(35,129)
(Unit: ¥ million)
Green Seal products’ share of net sales
95.1%
–
Super Green products’ share of net sales
59.5%
–
1,870 GWh
39,270
0.77 million t-CO2
1,848
115 GWh
2,407
47 thousand t-CO2
113
Total amount of power generated by
solar power generation systems
CO2 emissions reduced by solar power
generation systems
Electric power saved from energy-saving
products
CO2 emissions reduced by energy-saving
products
Greenhouse gas emissions reduced by controlling electricity and fuel consumption
1,679
(1,027)
2,263
(1,568)
2,386
(2,018)
1,372
(1,121)
•
26
8,334
(5,044)
2,368
(2,288)
–
99 thousand t-CO2
237
PFC emissions reduced
473 thousand GWPt
1,135
Waste recycled
Recycled and reused water
1,358
(1,908)
5,369
(5,150)
–
–
16
29
32
(Unit: ¥ million)
CO2 emissions reduced
Waste recycled or sent for appropriate disposal
19
(135)
12
10
•
201 thousand tons
–
19,032 km3
–
11
33
∼
Manufacturing
Reduce greenhouse
gas emissions
(global environmental
conservation)
452
(–)
25
–
–
–
125
504
450
Master
Expert
General
Supply environmentally conscious products
• Introduce PFC abatement systems
• Install solar power
generation systems
• Introduce energy-saving
equipment
See
page(s)
∼
• Operation of environmental
management system
• Promote environmental
sustainability management
• Environmental education activities
Actual
Benefit
∼
Environmental
Sustainability
Management
(management activities)
Economic
Benefit
(Unit: ¥ million)
Observe environmental laws and regulations
Prevent air/water pollution and noise/vibration
Promote risk management
Chemical substances properly managed and their discharge reduced
Reduce risk of soil contamination
36
Collection, recycling, and proper disposal of used products
23 tons
–
3,375 tons
–
43,097 tons
–
Used PCs recycled
Recycling/Logistics
(upstream/downstream)
Social Responsibility
• Promote collection,
recycling, and proper
disposal of used products
8
(0)
15
(12)
1,757
(24)
–
(7)
Used copiers recycled
Used home appliances (4 categories) recycled
Environmental burden during distribution reduced
• Expand social contribution
activities
–
44
(49)
–
–
20,619 containers
–
Number of low-pollution vehicles introduced
132
–
Number of employees who attended
SGC activities
Number of schools where environmental
education was provided
Total
3,559
(3,080)
20,250
(15,337)
6,511
(4,330)
45,010
(36,257)
–
Total 27,405
Total 537
–
–
38
51
•
52
Note: Figures in parentheses below entries represent actual values from the previous
fiscal year.
Explanation of terminology
Sites covered
Environmental conservation costs
Overhead costs, personnel expenses, and investment associated with environmental conservation activities,
in addition to attendant depreciation.
A total of 16 sites (and companies) in Japan fall within the scope
of environmental accounting: Sharp Corporation sites at Tochigi,
Yao, Hiroshima, Nara, Katsuragi, Fukuyama, Mie, Tenri, Mihara,
Kameyama and Toyama, Sharp’s head office, the Tanabe office,
Sharp Manufacturing Systems Corporation, Sharp Niigata
Electronics Corporation, and Sharp Yonago Corporation.
Economic benefit
Contributions to society and to the company, which result from environmental conservation activities,
expressed in monetary units.
Actual benefit:
Economic effects that can be assessed directly in monetary terms, such as cost savings from
energy-saving efforts and use of recycled water, as well as profits from the sale of valuable resources.
Estimated benefit: Sharp Corporation uses the following terms to convert the economic effects of reduced greenhouse
gas emissions and electricity savings from the use of solar power generation and energy-saving products
into equivalent monetary amounts.
(1) Reduced greenhouse gas emissions converted into equivalent monetary amounts: 2,400 yen/t-CO2.
(2) Electricity savings converted into equivalent monetary amounts: Unit cost of electricity: 21 yen/kWh.
27
•
(Unit: ¥ million)
Railway cargo transport (container transport)
Environmental social contributions
37
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
Period covered
April 1, 2007 to March 31, 2008
Referenced guidelines
Environmental Accounting Guidelines 2005 published by
the Ministry of the Environment, Japan
How Business Activities Relate to the Environment
INPUT
Electricity
Total
2,565 million kWh
Japan
2,203 million kWh
Overseas 362 million kWh
LPG
Total
15,419 tons
Japan
13,148 tons
Overseas 2,271 tons
City gas
Total
80.811 million m3
Japan
77.391 million m3
Overseas 3.420 million m3
Heavy oil, kerosene,
gas oil, gasoline
Total
10,428 kl
Japan
8,104 kl
Overseas 2,324 kl
PFCs purchased
OUTPUT
Flow of Sharp
Group business
activities
Energy consumption 29,529 TJ *1
Japan 5.11 million GWPt-CO2*2
Chemical substances
(PRTR) handled
Japan 12,920 tons
Water consumed
Total
16.140 million m3
Japan 13.727 million m3
Overseas 2.412 million m3
Technological
development,
planning, design
Materials
procurement
Advancing Super Green Management
Sharp uses numerical values to accurately assess the relationship between its business activities and the environment, and uses them
to promote environmental sustainability management. By making use of these current values at all stages of business activities to
create proposals for policy measures and to analyze and evaluate the results, Sharp is aiming to effectively reduce the impact it has on
the environment.
CO2 emissions
Total
1.439 million t-CO2
Japan
1.119 million t-CO2
Overseas 0.319 million t-CO2
PFC emissions
Japan
0.322 million GWPt-CO2
SOx emissions
Japan 9.9 tons
NOx emissions
Japan 135.5 tons
Drainage
(production sites only)
Total
12.306 million m3
Japan
10.171 million m3
Overseas 2.136 million m3
COD
Japan 14.9 tons
(chemical oxygen demand)
Nitrogen discharged
Japan 104.8 tons
Phosphorous discharged Japan 1.4 tons
Manufacture
Recycled into new products, reused as new parts, closed-loop material recycling, etc.
Packaging materials
Other
uses
Japan 31,073 tons
Final landfill disposal
8.3 tons
Chemical substances (PRTR) Japan Released
Transferred 645.9 tons
released and transferred
Resources consumed Global
0.583 million tons*3
Logistics
Japan
Vehicle fuel
616,128 GJ
Energy consumption
Product use
Energy consumption
(
Global
25,884 TJ*4
Electricity
2,652 million kWh
Japan 11.6 tons
)
CO2 emissions
Japan 42,101 t-CO2
Volume of transport
Japan 185,502
thousand ton-km
CO2 reductions
Global
0.162 million t-CO2 *5
(396 million kWh)
CO2 emissions
Global
1.09 million t-CO2 *4
RECYCLE
Material recycling
Amount of used home appliances
(4 kinds) recycled into new home
appliances (4 kinds)
Japan
43,097 tons
TVs
12,576 tons
Air conditioners
6,901 tons
Refrigerators
13,696 tons
Washing machines 9,924 tons
Amount of recycled copiers
Japan 3,375 tons
Amount of recycled PCs
Japan 23 tons
Recycling
Weight of which that
was not recycled into
new products or
materials, or reused
Japan 9,060 tons
(four home appliances,
PCs, copiers)
Amount of closed-loop material
recycling of plastic
Japan 850 tons*6
*1 TJ (terajoule) = 1012 Joules
*2 GWP (global warming potential) is a measure of how much a given amount of
greenhouse gas will contribute to global warming, expressed relative to an
equivalent mass of CO2.
*3 Total weight of products in the 13 major categories shipped in fiscal 2007
(estimate), plus waste, etc. discharged from production sites.
*4 Estimate of annual energy used and amount of CO2 emitted by products in the
12 major categories shipped in fiscal 2007. Calculation based on each product’s
energy consumption rate.
*5 Amount of power generated (kWh) annually by Sharp solar cells shipped in fiscal
2007, plus CO2 emissions reduction (t-CO2).
*6 For details, see page 16.
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
28
Sharp and the Environment
In Pursuit of Becoming an Environmentally Advanced Corporate Group
Developing Super Green Technologies
To realize the corporate vision of Sharp’s energy-creating and energy-saving products more than balancing out its
greenhouse gas emissions, the development of superior environmental technologies is an essential factor in the
performance of products and devices, together with the reduction of environmental impact during production. That
is why Sharp is developing critically important environmental technologies as “one-of-a-kind” environmental
technologies, in line with its strategy for company-wide technology development.
Objectives for Fiscal 2007
Achievements for Fiscal 2007
Objectives for Fiscal 2008
Objectives for Fiscal 2010
Promote closed-loop plastic material
recycling; use 800 tons of recycled plastic in
new products
Approx. 850 tons of recycled
plastic used in new products
Use 1,000 tons of recycled
plastic in new products
Use 1,400 tons of recycled
plastic in new products
Conduct experimental study of LCD TV recycling
technology
Identified problems in LCD
TV recycling and formulated
solutions
Complete proof-of-concept
experiments for LCD TV recycling
Construct an LCD TV recycling
line (fiscal 2009 objective)
Developing One-of-a-Kind Environmental
Technologies
■ One-of-a-kind technological development fields that give
birth to Super Green Technologies
Friendly to the Earth
Sharp aims to raise the environmental performance of its
products and devices, lower the environmental impact of its
plants, and use resources with greater efficiency by advancing
the following four areas of environmental technology: energy
saving and energy creation, effective use of resources, safety and
peace of mind, and health and comfort.
Energy saving/
energy creation
Effective
use of resources
(non-fossil resources/
high-level recycling)
One-of-a-kind
environmental
technologies
Under the theme of “Friendly to People, Friendly to the Earth,”
Sharp recognizes the most important technologies in these areas
as one-of-a-kind environmental technologies, and develops them
based on a company-wide technology development strategy.
The unique technologies evolving from these developments are
what Sharp calls Super Green Technologies.
Safety and peace
of mind
Health and
comfort
Friendly to People
Web Environmental technologies
Development and Application of
Plant-Based Resin Paint
Sharp and Kansai Paint Co., Ltd. jointly developed a
plant-based resin paint made from corn and began using it in
March 2006. Since the CO2 that was absorbed during the
process of growing the corn cancels out the CO2 emitted when
the plant-based resin paint is incinerated, this material helps
curb global warming and reduces the environmental impact.
Sharp will expand the usage of this paint and further improve its
performance (adhesive properties and hardness) and appearance
(sheen and color variations) for use on home appliances.
*1 LC-52GX3W/46GX3W/42GX3W/37GX3W,
LC-52GX4W/46GX4W/42GX4W/37GX4W,
LC-52EX5/46EX5/42EX5/37EX5
In fiscal 2006, Sharp and Kansai Paint succeeded in the
development and application of a new type of plant-based resin
paint that dries in only half the time and has a simplified painting
process. Sharp further improved the durability of the paint in
fiscal 2007 and is using it on stands of AQUOS LCD TVs*1.
Stand painted with
plant-based resin paint
LC-52EX5
Sharp Wins Two Prizes for
Plant-Based Resin Paint
■ Carbon cycle for plant-based resin paint
Recognized for Excellence at the 2nd Monodzukuri Nippon
Grand Award (from the Japanese Ministry of Economy,
Trade and Industry)
Modified starch
Plant-based resin paint
Sharp was recognized for its
technology enabling the
transition from the use of
fossil-based resources to the
use of renewable plant-based
resources in its products.
Painted onto parts
CO2
Incineration after
product disposal
Cornstarch
Corn powder
29
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
Corn
CO2 absorbed through
photosynthesis
Prize for Industrial Technology from
the Japan Society of Colour Material
Sharp was recognized for outstanding contributions to the
development of the color-material-related industry by the
Japan Society of Colour Material, Japan’s only academic
society for color
materials (pigments,
paints, printing inks,
etc.).
Sharp is striving to reduce, as much as possible, its use of
fossil-resource-based plastic, which is made from petroleum.
One of the actions Sharp is taking is to shift to plant-based
plastic.
In fiscal 2006, Sharp developed a technology to blend
plant-based plastic (made from corn) with general plastic
(polypropylene, polystyrene, etc). And by adding durability to
the plant-based plastic, it can withstand the closed-loop
material recycling process.
This technology was used for desktop mobile phone holders
that went on sale in Japan in June 2007. Sharp aims to use
this technology in LCD TVs and home appliances at the earliest
possible date.
■ Products that use plant-based plastic
Desktop holder for SH705i/SH705iII
mobile phones by NTT DoCoMo, Inc.
■ Recycling of plant-based plastic
General
plastic
Polylactic acid (PLA)
Starch (Raw materials: corn, potatoes, etc.)
Closed-Loop Plastic Material Recycling for
LCD TV Cabinets
The AQUOS LCD TV is a product that symbolizes Sharp’s
philosophy on environmentally conscious design. In addition to
offering energy efficiency and resource savings, AQUOS LCD
TVs use environmentally conscious materials wherever
possible.
Sharp developed a material for LCD TV cabinets that excels in
both durability and recyclability and started using it in AQUOS
LCD TVs*2 in fiscal 2006. These cabinets, which can be
recycled through the closed-loop material recycling process
and reused in new products, represent a new means of
contributing to the decreased usage of fossil-based resources.
Sharp continued to develop this technology in fiscal 2007 by
improving the material’s moldability and used it in more AQUOS
models*3.
Developing Super Green Technologies
Technology for Using Plant-Based Plastic
Desktop holder for SoftBank 921SH
mobile phones by SoftBank Mobile Corp.
Resource recycling
Pellets (a blend of PLA
and general plastic)
Products
Molded into
parts
LCD TV Recycling Technology
Sharp worked until fiscal 2006 on the formulation of guidelines
for LCD panel recycling and the development of a technology
for recovering and recycling the rare metal indium*4. In fiscal
2007, Sharp disassembled LCD TVs of all sizes to identify any
problems in the disassembly process.
Incorporating the knowledge it has gained through these
disassemblies, Sharp will design a safe, efficient disassembly
line. Sharp plans to initiate full-fledged recycling of LCD TVs in
the near future and is steadily advancing the development of
relevant technologies.
*4 A wet-process recovery technology employing acid
(developed jointly with Aqua Tech Co. Ltd.)
Sharp plans to use this material on a wider scope of products
as it continues to improve the material’s properties.
*2 LC-52RX1W/46RX1W/42RX1W
*3 LC-52GX3W/46GX3W/42GX3W,
LC-52GX4W/46GX4W/42GX4W,
LC-52GX35/46GX35/52GX45/46GX45,
LC-52EX5/46EX5/42EX5
An experimental LCD TV
disassembly
LC-52GX3W
LCD TV cabinet that can
be recycled in the closed-loop
material recycling process
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
30
Sharp and the Environment
In Pursuit of Becoming an Environmentally Advanced Corporate Group
Creating Super Green Products and Devices
Sharp establishes increasingly higher objectives as it revises its guidelines every year in making ever more strict
assessment standards, all with the goal of continuously improving the environmental performance of products and
devices. As a result, in fiscal 2007 Sharp achieved its goals to increase the percentage of net sales accounted for
by Green Seal Products, Super Green Products, Green Devices, and Super Green Devices.
Objectives for Fiscal 2007
Achievements for Fiscal 2007
Objectives for Fiscal 2008
Objectives for Fiscal 2010
Green Seal Products account for 90% or more of net sales in Japan
Approx. 95%
90% or more
90% or more
Super Green Products account for 50% or more of net sales in Japan
Approx. 60%
55% or more
60% or more
Green Devices account for 75% or more of net sales
Approx. 84%
80% or more
90% or more
Super Green Devices account for 15% or more of net sales
Approx. 21%
20% or more
20% or more
Make All Products Green Products
Sharp calls its environmentally conscious products Green
Products. In 1998, it formulated the Green Product Guidelines,
which define development and design guidelines in line with
seven concepts*1. The guidelines are used at all design and
production sites in Japan and overseas.
As the first step in developing Green Products, during the
planning stage, Sharp sets specific objectives according to the
Green Product Standard Sheet, which is designed to assess all
aspects of environmental consciousness. Secondly, in the trial
manufacture and mass production stages, Sharp determines
how well the actual product has met its objectives.
All new products in fiscal 2007 met the assessment criteria
necessary to be designated as Green Products.
*1 The seven Green Product concepts are 1) energy saving, 2) resource
saving, 3) safety, 4) recyclability, 5) use of recycled materials,
6) long-life usability, and 7) ease of disassembly
■ Ratio of Green Seal Products and Super Green Products
to net sales in Japan
(%)
Green Seal Products
100
87
80
60
40
74
65
54
90
85
80
90
60
49
50
35
20
0
95
93
10
5
2004
2003
Actual results
30
55
50
Super Green Products
20
2005
2006
2007
Target
2008
(fiscal year)
Data for Super Green Products in fiscal 2004
is for the 2nd half of the year only.
Case
Reports
Super Green Products
Web Green Products
LCD TV (LC-46XJ1)
164% achievement rate of 2008 energy-saving standard
Certification of Green Seal Products
and Super Green Products in Japan
Since 1998, Sharp has been certifying products for Japan that
offer a particularly high level of environmental performance as
Green Seal Products. In 2004, it began certifying Green Seal
Products with the highest possible levels of environmental
performance as Super Green Products.
In fiscal 2007, Sharp surpassed its goals for both Green Seal
Products and Super Green Products as a percentage of total
sales. In the coming years, Sharp plans to raise these
percentages even higher.
■ Sharp’s concept of environmentally conscious products
Super
Green
Products
Improved
Improved
Green Products
Environmentally conscious products based on
seven concepts (judged by how well they meet
the objectives of the Green Product Sheet)
31
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
*2 As of January 24, 2008 for digital full-HD LCD TVs sold in Japan.
Refrigerator/Freezer with HC Refrigerant (SJ-HD50P)
102% achievement rate of 2010 energy-saving standard
• Five-star rating after multilevel assessments based
on Japan’s energy-saving labeling system (560
kWh/year)
• With the use of HC refrigerant, the impact on
global warming is approx. one four-hundredth that
of the previously used CFC substitute (R134a)
• Parts are made of plastic recycled through
closed-loop material recycling technology
Digital Full-Color MFP (MX-7001N)
Green Seal Products
that are extremely
environmentally conscious
Green Seal Products
Green Products that offer particularly
high levels of environmental
performance
• Five-star rating after multilevel
assessments based on Japan’s
energy-saving labeling system
(215 kWh/year)
• Industry’s thinnest*2 profile at
only 34.4 mm (at the thinnest part)
• Cabinet is made of halogen-free resin
Green Seal
(Sharp’s own
environmental label)
• Newly developed Mycrostoner reduces
toner consumption by approx. 30%*3
• Fax standby power consumption is less
than 1W*4
• Complies with Japan’s Law on
Promoting Green Purchasing
*3 As compared to Sharp’s previous model
(AR-C262FP) when in color mode.
*4 Fax-reception mode when power is off
(fax function is optional).
Sharp calls its environmentally conscious devices Green
Devices. To define guidelines for development and design
based on seven concepts*5, Sharp established the Green
Device Guidelines, which it began applying in 2004. In 2005, it
began certifying Green Devices with the highest possible levels
of environmental performance as Super Green Devices.
As the first step in developing Green Devices, Sharp sets
specific objectives during the planning stage according to the
Green Device Standard Sheet, which is designed to assess all
aspects of environmental performance. Secondly, in the trial
manufacture and mass production stages, Sharp determines
how well the actual device has met its objectives.
In fiscal 2007, both Green Devices and Super Green Devices
exceeded their sales ratio targets. In the coming years, Sharp
plans to raise these figures even higher.
*5 The seven Green Device concepts are 1) energy saving,
2) recyclability, 3) resource saving, 4) green materials, 5) long life,
6) packaging, and 7) information disclosure
Case
Report
Development of Worldwide Comprehensive
Product Environmental Evaluation System
Creating Super Green Products and Devices
Certification of Green Devices
and Super Green Devices
In April 2006, Sharp began using the Comprehensive Product
Environmental Evaluation System in order to promote even
stricter adherence to environmental regulations and greater
environmental awareness in designing products. This system
consolidates company-wide product environmental data and is
being used in all domestic product and device groups. In 2007,
all overseas design and development bases also began using
the system.
This system contains all of Sharp’s accumulated successes in
developing and assessing environmentally conscious products
and devices, as well as its know-how of life cycle assessment
(LCA). It enables Sharp to make the product development
process more efficient, place design knowledge and
development data under centralized management, and
standardize the LCA method.
In fiscal 2008, Sharp plans to upgrade the system to meet the
EuP Directive*10.
*10 The EuP Directive is a framework for setting requirements
concerning the environmentally conscious design of energy-using
products.
Super Green Device
Tuner module for receiving One-Seg digital terrestrial
broadcasts (VA3A5JZ912)
• The smallest, thinnest package size in the industry*6:
7.3 x 7.3 x 1.25 mm (45% smaller volume
than previous model*7)
• One of the lowest power consumption rates
in the industry*6: 85 mW*8
*6 As of June 12, 2007 (Sharp survey).
*7 Sharp’s VA35JZ9910.
*8 Average power consumption rate when in
low consumption current mode.
Web Green Devices
Reducing VOCs in Products
Sharp is working to make its products safer by reducing their
VOC*9 emissions. With the establishment of a large-scale VOC
testing laboratory in fiscal 2007, it is now possible for all Sharp
products for the Japanese market to undergo VOC evaluations.
Sharp is promoting the cross-sectional development of
low-VOC products by holding low-VOC product development
training for approximately 50 engineers from each business
group.
Sharp plans to continually push forward with developing
low-VOC products.
*9 VOC (volatile organic
compounds) are said to
cause multiple chemical
syndrome and/or sick
building syndrome.
Web LCA data for major products
Green Procurement
In 2000, Sharp established the Green Procurement Guidelines
and began joint efforts with suppliers to ensure that parts and
materials are environmentally conscious.
Beginning in 2003, Sharp investigated chemical substance
content, as stipulated by the Japan Green Procurement Survey
Standardization Initiative (JGPSSI), and took measures toward
eliminating RoHS-designated substances*11. Sharp was in
complete compliance with the RoHS Directive for all products
for the European market and for all new products (except those
for certain regions) by the end of fiscal 2005.
In fiscal 2007, in line with the Green Procurement Guidelines
and the Survey Manual for Chemical Substances in Parts and
Materials, both of which were revised in 2005, Sharp
conducted an online survey of domestic and overseas
suppliers. In addition, Sharp began construction of a system to
meet the REACH*12 regulation and completed the registration
protocol.
Sharp will complete its system for meeting the REACH
regulation in fiscal 2008 as it plans to raise the level of its
management of chemicals contained in its products.
*11 An EU directive on the “Restriction on the use of certain Hazardous
Substances,” RoHS prohibits the use of lead, mercury, cadmium,
hexavalent chromium, polybrominated biphenyl (PBB), and
polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) in electrical and electronic
equipment entering the EU market after July 1, 2006.
*12 REACH is a new regulation on the Registration, Evaluation, and
Authorization of Chemicals produced in and imported into the EU.
Web Green Procurement Guidelines
Low-VOC product development training
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
32
Sharp and the Environment
In Pursuit of Becoming an Environmentally Advanced Corporate Group
Building Super Green Factories
Applying its own unique criteria and standards, Sharp certifies a factory with a high level of environmental
consciousness as a Green Factory (GF), and a factory with an extremely high level of environmental consciousness
as a Super Green Factory (SGF). Sharp achieved its medium-term plan to convert all domestic and overseas Sharp
Group production sites into Green Factories or higher by the end of fiscal 2007.
Objectives for Fiscal 2007
Objectives for Fiscal 2008
Objectives for Fiscal 2012
All SGF
Put new SGF II policies in place
All business sites
grade A or higher
All 7 domestic production sites
(subsidiaries/affiliates) GF or higher
All GF
2 SGF; all others GF
All business sites
grade B or higher
All 22 overseas production sites
(subsidiaries/affiliates) GF or higher
All GF or higher
(6 SGF and 16 GF)
9 SGF; all others GF
All business sites
grade B or higher
All 10 Sharp Corporation
production sites SGF
Achievements for Fiscal 2007
A New Initiative for
Super Green Factories
Upgrading All Plants to
Green Factories
At Sharp, a factory must achieve a high degree of
environmental performance to earn the designation of Green
Factory. The basic policies and operational know-how for
achieving Green Factory status have been formulated in line
with 10 concepts*1 in the Green Factory Guidelines. These
guidelines were introduced at all domestic production sites
from fiscal 1999 onward and at all overseas production sites
from fiscal 2001 onward.
Beginning in fiscal 2008, Sharp will launch an effort to develop
Super Green Factories that have an even higher level of
environmental performance. SGF II is a new initiative that adds
an assessment of “soft” aspects, such as the know-how to
operate and maintain environmental equipment, and focuses
on achieving absolute reductions in the level of greenhouse
gases emitted and the amount of waste discharged.
Starting in fiscal 2003, Sharp established assessment criteria
for Green Factories and Super Green Factories and launched
efforts to award in-house certification.
■ SGF II system
SGFII system
200 points
Grade S
Previous
SGF/GF
system
*1 The 10 GF concepts are 1) greenhouse gases, 2) energy, 3) waste,
4) resources, 5) chemical substances, 6) atmosphere/water/soil,
7) harmony with nature, 8) harmony with the community,
9) environmental awareness, and 10) information disclosure
Improved
180 points
Grade A
Grade B
Improved
Super
Green Factory
Web Green Factories
160 points
140 points
Grade C
90 points
Green Factory
All Sharp Corporation Plants
Achieve Super Green Factory Status
*2 Tochigi Plant (Yaita City, Tochigi Prefecture), Mihara Plant
(Mihara City, Hiroshima Prefecture), Fukuyama Plant (Fukuyama City,
Hiroshima Prefecture), Katsuragi Plant (Katsuragi City, Nara
Prefecture), and Tenri Plant (Tenri City, Nara Prefecture)
*3 Sharp-Roxy Electronics Corporation (M) Sdn. Bhd. (SREC) (Malaysia),
Nanjing Sharp Electronics Co., Ltd. (NSEC) (China), and Sharp
Manufacturing (Thailand) Co., Ltd. (SMTL) (Thailand)
Web Environmental data on Sharp production sites
33
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
30
points
Reductions in
the release of
chemical substances
• PRTR atmospheric emissions
• PRTR water emissions
• Sulfoxides produced by combustion
• Elimination of all noxious odors
26
points
Appropriate
disposal of
industrial waste
• Zero discharge to landfill
• Confirmation of appropriate disposal
• Recycling waste as valuable resources
14
points
Reductions in
the consumption
of industrial water
• Use of rain and condensate water
• Recovery of production rinse water
9
points
Monitoring
and safety
• Disaster and fire prevention measures
for hazardous materials
• Special safety measures
• Adoption of central monitoring measures
21
points
Absolute reduction
in greenhouse gas
emissions
• Percentage reduction
in total emissions
40
points
Absolute reduction
in waste discharged
• Percentage reduction in
total waste discharged
30
points
Environmental
equipment
• Equipment replacement
• Maintenance management
10
points
Equipment other
than environmental
equipment
• Equipment replacement
• Maintenance management
10
points
• Assign points for each
item disclosed
10
points
Reduction of
environmental
impacts and
contribution to
management
Safety
measures
Information disclosure
100 points
Reductions in
greenhouse gas
emissions per
production unit
Total
200 points
• Reductions in PFC gases, etc.
• Promotion of variable supply
control systems
• Recovery and recycling of waste heat
• Introduction of a cogeneration system
• Introduction of high-efficiency equipment
• Introduction of new energy sources
• Continued reductions in emissions per
production unit
• Implementation of managerial
decision-making standards
Assessment Sub
weighting total
100 points
In fiscal 2007, the fourth year since introducing the assessment
certification system, an additional five domestic plants*2 and
three overseas plants*3 achieved Super Green Factory status,
enabling Sharp to achieve its medium-term objective of making
all 10 Sharp Corporation plants Super Green Factories and all
domestic and overseas Sharp Group plants Green Factories or
higher.
Environmental performance criteria
SGF I (partially revised performance criteria from previous SGF system)
For new plants, environmental assessments are begun in the
early planning stages to ensure that these facilities will attain
high levels of environmental performance, with the ultimate aim
of achieving Super Green Factory status. Existing plants will
realize high environmental performance by gradually upgrading
their environmental capabilities.
■ SGF II quantified environmental performance criteria
and assessment weighting (total score: 200)
Additional performance criteria for SGF II
Sharp uses unique, quantified environmental performance
criteria to assess and approve a plant for certification. A plant
must score 70 or more points out of a possible 100 in the
assessment process to earn Green Factory certification, and
score 90 or more points to achieve Super Green Factory
certification.
70 points
Sharp and the Environment
In Pursuit of Becoming an Environmentally Advanced Corporate Group
Curbing Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Sharp is taking active measures to curb greenhouse gas emissions resulting from its business activities. Sharp is
reducing CO2 emissions through the introduction of cogeneration systems and energy-efficient equipment, the
installation of solar power generation systems, and the meticulous implementation of energy-saving activities at
plants and offices. At the same time, Sharp is also reducing emissions of greenhouse gases such as PFCs*1 by
installing abatement systems and adopting replacement gases with lower global warming potential.
Objectives for Fiscal 2007
Achievements for Fiscal 2007
• Reduced by approx. 15% from
previous fiscal year
• Reduced by approx. 7% from
previous fiscal year
• Reduced by approx. 10% from
previous fiscal year
Objectives for Every Fiscal Year
Medium-Term Objectives
Building Super Green Factories / Curbing Greenhouse Gas Emissions
CO2 emissions per production unit*2
• Domestic product sites:
Reduce by 2% from previous fiscal year
• Domestic device sites:
Reduce by 5% from previous fiscal year
• All overseas production sites:
Reduce by 2% from previous fiscal year
CO2 emissions per adjusted production unit*3
• All domestic production sites: Reduce by 35%
compared to fiscal 1990 levels
(average for fiscal 2008 to 2012)
• Reduce by 2% from previous
fiscal year
• Reduce by 5% from previous
fiscal year
• Reduce by 2% from previous
fiscal year
Domestic sites include only the business sites of Sharp Corporation. Overseas sites include Sharp subsidiaries and affiliated companies.
To provide a rational way to evaluate the effect of controlling greenhouse gas emissions, Sharp utilizes an index referred to as “per production unit.”
*1 A general term for perfluorocarbon gases such as CF4 (carbon tetrafluoride), C2F6 (carbon hexafluoride), and the like, which are greenhouse gases.
*2 Per production unit (t-CO2/100 million yen) = CO2 emissions (t-CO2) ÷ production output (100 million yen)
*3 Per adjusted production unit (t-CO2/100 million yen) = CO2 emissions (t-CO2) ÷ {production output (100 million yen) ÷ domestic corporate price index (electrical and electronic equipment)
determined by the Bank of Japan}
Sharp Group Activities to Control
Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Controlling CO2 Emissions at
Domestic Production Sites
In fiscal 2007, the Sharp Group reduced its greenhouse gas
emissions per production unit by approximately 10% compared
to the previous fiscal year. In addition, even in the face of
expanding production output, the Group kept growth in total
emissions to approximately 5% over the previous fiscal year by
implementing a variety of energy-saving measures and by
reducing PFC emissions through the installation of additional
abatement systems.
Although production is expected to expand in the future, Sharp
will continue to work to curb greenhouse gas emissions by
implementing further energy-saving measures. For PFCs, this
will be achieved by providing abatement systems on all
emission sources at new factories, particularly the Sakai Plant,
and making a concerted effort to reduce emissions through
proper operation and management.
54.3
56.5
550
1,000
1,544
428
343
242
322
338
500
0
2003
835
2004
CO2 emissions (Japan)
959
400
1,119
1,073
450
633
805
822
3.7
4.1
5.2
4.5
20
24
24
35
23
2003
2004
CO2 emissions (overseas)
2006
2007
0
(fiscal year)
PFC emissions
Emissions per production unit are calculated from production-related emissions.
Emissions from the Toyama Plant were included beginning in April 2006.
Prior to fiscal 2005, values for global warming potential were taken from the IPCC’s
Second Assessment Report (SAR). For fiscal 2006 and later, the values used were
taken from the IPCC’s Third Assessment Report (TAR). Sharp’s PFC emissions for
fiscal 2006 would have been 351 (thousand t-CO2) when calculated using the value
for global warming potential from the SAR.
Reductions in greenhouse gases
Data on greenhouse gases
35
2005
CO2 emissions (products)
39.3
911
40
20
3.8
34
2006
2007
0
(fiscal year)
CO2 emissions (devices)
Emissions per production unit (devices)
Emissions per production unit (products)
2005
41.7
33.7
200
Emissions per production unit
Web
44.5
40.3
0
60.2
60
474
195
690
600
40
220
64.6
58.0
59.7
42.0
46.9
857
65.7
656
60
100
80
319
272
Per production unit (t-CO2/100 million yen)
945
1,761
1,683
63.4
1,435
CO2 emissions (thousand t-CO2)
1,000
800
80
1,483
■ Amount of CO2 emissions and emissions per production unit by
business category for Sharp Corporation production sites in Japan
Per production unit (t-CO2/100 million yen)
2,000
1,500
Sharp will continue working aggressively to reduce CO2
emissions through the installation of energy-efficient equipment,
switching to alternate fuels, and expanded use of solar power
generation systems.
840
■ Amount of Sharp Group’s greenhouse gas emissions
and emissions per production unit
Greenhouse gas emissions (thousand t-CO2)
Sharp’s company-wide efforts to implement further
energy-saving measures and improve production efficiency in
fiscal 2007 have yielded results at domestic production sites,
with CO2 emissions per production unit reduced by
approximately 6% from the previous fiscal year.
Emissions per production unit (company-wide)
Starting in fiscal 2005, these figures represent total CO2 emissions from all divisions
of production sites, excluding basic research.
Emissions from the Toyama Plant were included beginning in April 2006.
■ CO2 emissions per adjusted production unit for
Sharp Corporation production sites in Japan
Fiscal year
1990
2006
2007
Emissions per adjusted production unit
(t-CO2/100 million yen)
32.2
19.8
17.9
Fiscal 1990 comparison
100
61
56
■ Self-generated electricity output at
Sharp Corporation production sites in Japan
*4
Fiscal year
Self-generated electricity output
(millions of kWh)
2005
2006
2007
158
246
287
*4 Electricity generated by on-site cogeneration systems, solar power
generation systems, and fuel cell systems.
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
34
Sharp and the Environment
In Pursuit of Becoming an Environmentally Advanced Corporate Group
Minimizing and Recycling Waste
Sharp has been working to bring down its total amount of waste discharged*1 and to recycle as much of its waste
as possible. As a result, domestic production sites (including subsidiaries and affiliated companies) have achieved
zero discharge to landfill*2 for seven consecutive years. Sharp will keep up its efforts to continue zero discharge to
landfill and reduce waste discharge. In addition, Sharp is focusing on recycling wastewater and restricting the
amount of water utilized.
Objectives for Fiscal 2007
Achievements for Fiscal 2007
Objectives for Every Fiscal Year
Amount of waste discharged per production unit at domestic plants
(including subsidiaries and affiliated companies):
• Reduce by 3% from previous fiscal year
Increased by approx. 14% from
previous fiscal year
Reduce by approx. 3% from
previous fiscal year
Amount of waste, etc. discharged*3 per production unit at overseas production sites
(including subsidiaries and affiliated companies):
• Reduce by 2% from previous fiscal year
Reduced by approx.
10% from previous fiscal year
Reduce by approx. 2% from
previous fiscal year
*1 Amount of waste discharged = Amount of industrial waste discharged + amount of general waste discharged from business activities
*2 Sharp defines “zero discharge to landfill” as a final landfill disposal rate of less than 0.5%.
Final landfill disposal rate (%) = Amount of landfill disposal / amount of waste, etc. discharged (amount of waste discharged + amount of valuable resources) x 100
In fiscal 2005, to make the definition of zero discharge to landfill more rigorous, Sharp changed the denominator from “total amount of waste generated” to the lower
“amount of waste, etc. discharged (amount of waste discharged + amount of valuable resources)”.
*3 Amount of waste, etc. discharged = Amount of waste discharged + amount of valuable resources
Domestic Production Sites Achieve Zero Discharge to Landfill for Seven Years in a Row, Overseas
Sites See Major Improvement in Reduction of Amount of Waste, etc. Discharged per Production Unit
Thanks to all-out efforts to recycle waste at domestic production
sites (including subsidiaries and affiliated companies), the final
landfill disposal rate was less than 0.01% in fiscal 2007, giving
Sharp zero discharge to landfill for the seventh consecutive year.
Sharp also further intensified efforts to upgrade more of its
overseas production sites to Green Factories, achieving an
approximately 10% reduction, compared to the previous fiscal
year, in amount of discharge per production unit, including
waste and valuable resources recovered from waste. This was
the third consecutive year of double-digit drops in the
■ Amount of waste, etc. discharged
(per production unit) by the Sharp Group
(thousand tons)
Per production unit (ton/100 million yen)
250
41
200
150
159
5.8
197
35
6.1
248
10
8
6.4
100
126
207
2
0
0
Japan
2006
Overseas
2007
(fiscal year)
Per production unit
Figures include non-production sites.
Figures include the Toyama Plant from April 2006.
Web
150
■ Amount of waste, etc. discharged
(per production unit) from overseas
production sites
(thousand tons)
Per production unit (ton/100 million yen)
200
202
5.3
200
8
6
150
6
6.7
25
121
16
4.3
4
100
50
2
50
0
0
0
2005
Waste discharged
132
2006
2007
(fiscal year)
Per production unit
Valuable resources
Recycling Water
■ Amount of water used by
the Sharp Group
20
15
As a result of thorough recovery and recycling of water,
particularly at the Kameyama and Mie plants, the amount
of water that was reused increased by approximately 12%
over the previous fiscal year. Therefore, even though
production increased, the overall amount of water used
throughout the Sharp Group remained the same as for the
previous fiscal year. Looking ahead, Sharp will continue to
focus on making effective use of water.
0.3
16.0
2.0
0.3
16.4
0.3
16.1
2.2
2.3
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
2
32
34
2005
2006
40
0
2007
(fiscal year)
Per production unit
Waste, etc. discharged
■ Amount of water recycled at
domestic and overseas production
sites, and recycling rate at
domestic production sites
(%)
(million m3)
20
17.3
0.04
15
0.05
14.0
10
50.5
5
13.9
17.2
2005
2006
55.2
19.3
80
0.09
58.7
60
10
13.7
13.9
13.5
40
5
0
2005
2006
2007
(fiscal year)
Production sites (Japan)
35
4
3.1
Figures include subsidiaries and affiliated companies.
Figures include the Toyama Plant from April 2006.
Waste reduction
Data on waste
Effective water usage
Data on water usage
3.4
172
(million m3)
Web
Per production unit (ton/100 million yen)
8
30
157 5.9
105
4
50
2005
(thousand tons)
100
162
Following the plan of reducing the amount of waste discharge
beginning in fiscal 2008 after levels peaked in fiscal 2007,
Sharp is promoting the limitation and reduction of waste and
aiming for an overall reduction in waste discharge.
■ Amount of waste discharged (per
production unit) and valuable resources
at domestic production sites
6
33
percentage, marking continuation of major reductions.
However, in fiscal 2007, the total amount of discharge,
including waste and valuable resources recovered from waste,
by the Sharp Group increased by approximately 26% over the
previous fiscal year owing to increases in production volume.
Production sites
(overseas)
Non-production sites (Japan and overseas)
Figures include subsidiaries and affiliated companies.
0
Reused water (Japan)
Reuse rate (Japan)
19.2
2007
20
0
(fiscal year)
Reused water
(overseas)
Figures include subsidiaries and affiliated companies.
Sharp and the Environment
In Pursuit of Becoming an Environmentally Advanced Corporate Group
Effectively Managing Chemical Substances,
Conducting Risk Management
Sharp ensures the unified control and management of consumption and discharge of all chemical substances
through its chemical substance management system. Sharp also promotes the preferential reduction of chemical
substances placed under high-priority control and of those having greater impact on human health by conducting
risk assessment. Sharp also discloses information on environmental risks and promotes good communication with
local communities.
Achievements for Fiscal 2007
Sharp Corporation production
sites in Japan
• Reduce discharge risk*1
by 60% compared to fiscal 2003
Reduced by 75%
compared to fiscal 2003
Objectives for Fiscal 2012
Objectives for Fiscal 2008
Formulate a new policy for management
of chemical substances
• Switch from downstream to upstream
management and to line-specific management
Set in place the new policy for
management of chemical substances
*1 Discharge risk: Total of all numerical values assigned to each chemical substance released into the atmosphere.
Values are calculated as per: Discharged amount (concentration at site boundary) x Risk to human health coefficient
Effective Management
of Chemical Substances
Sharp conducts rigorous preliminary audits based on the C-PA
system*2 and the process assessment system*3 to determine the
environmental, safety, and health effects of new chemical
substances and handling equipment. In addition, Sharp
implements regular education and training and conducts
across-the-board safety audits to prevent accidents and reduce
environmental impact.
■ Destinations of PRTR-listed chemical substances in Japan
Discharge to water areas (0.05%)
*2 C-PA system: A system to conduct assessments on the harmful effects
of chemical substances in use.
*3 Process assessment system: A system to conduct preliminary
assessments on the safety of equipment handling chemical substances.
*4 S-CMS: Sharp Chemical Management System
*5 VOC: Volatile organic compounds
*6 PRTR: Pollutant Release and Transfer Register. A system to collect and
publicize data, such as the amount of harmful chemicals discharged and
transferred.
Reducing Chemical Substance
Emissions and Discharge Risks
Of the chemical substances covered by the PRTR Law, the
number of chemicals handled in quantities greater than 500 kg
in fiscal 2007 at all domestic production sites amounted to 17
substances or 12,920 tons (up 44% over the previous fiscal
year). Although the use of PRTR chemicals increased as a
result of business expansion, emissions fell by 67% from the
previous fiscal year to 8.3 tons due to the use of alternative
substances and the installation of abatement systems to
reduce designated chemicals.
In fiscal 2004, Sharp introduced an approach to risk
assessment that evaluates every type of chemical discharged
and began taking measures for the preferential reduction of
chemical substances having a greater impact on human health.
In fiscal 2007, discharge risks were reduced around 75% from
fiscal 2003.
In addition, Sharp is steadily advancing the reduction of VOC
discharge by following the objectives of the industry’s voluntary
action plan based on the Amendment of the Air Pollution
Control Law in Japan.
Web
Consumption (0.30%)
Discharge into atmosphere (0.01%)
Treatment
(27.07%)
Sharp centrally manages the quantities of chemical substances
handled and discharged at domestic production sites by utilizing
S-CMS*4 and other systems concerning chemical substance
usage.
Sharp is promoting discharge reduction and proper
management of chemicals such as VOCs*5 and high-priority
management substances (460 substance groups consisting of
the 354 substance groups covered by the PRTR*6 Law plus 106
additional substance groups, including hazardous air pollutants).
Transfer to waste (4.90%)
Transfer to sewers (0.03%)
Recycle
(67.63%)
■ Chemical substances discharged in large amounts
into the atmosphere and water areas in Japan
Fiscal 2007 Proportion
Main chemical substances discharge (kg)
(%)
Compared to
Fiscal 2006
previous
discharge (kg)
fiscal year (%)
Hydrogen fluoride &
its water-soluble salts
6,835
82.1
74.5
9,175
2-Aminoethanol
1,153
13.9
66.2
1,743
Xylene
134
1.6
19.3
694
Others
202
2.4
25.5
791
8,324
100.0
67.1
12,403
Total
Risk Communication
and Information Disclosure
Sharp regularly and actively discloses environmental risk
information associated with business activities by means of
periodic Sharp Festivals and the publication of site reports at
each site. Sharp has also placed specially educated Risk
Communicators at all Sharp Corporation sites to promote
mutual understanding and communication between the
company, its neighboring residents, and the local government.
A survey conducted in 1998 on soil and groundwater identified
chlorine solvent pollution within Sharp Corporation’s Nara, Yao,
Tenri, and Katsuragi sites. With the exception of Nara, all sites
have reduced contamination levels below those of the
environmental standard via biotechnology. Sharp is continuing
purification at the Nara site in order to reduce its contamination
levels below those of the environmental standard, and regularly
notifies government authorities and residents of the cleanup
progress.
Data on chemical substance management
Data on the atmosphere and water quality
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
36
Minimizing and Recycling Waste / Effectively Managing Chemical Substances, Conducting Risk Management
Objectives for Fiscal 2007
Sharp and the Environment
In Pursuit of Becoming an Environmentally Advanced Corporate Group
Environmentally Conscious Logistics
In cooperation with shipping contractors, Sharp is creating a system to accurately assess environmental impacts in
distribution. In Japan, the Sharp Group as a whole is promoting initiatives to optimize transport methods and load
efficiency. Sharp is also working to further reduce environmental impacts in distribution by setting a goal of slashing
annual CO2 emissions per sales unit*1 by at least 1%, a mandate for certain shippers specified under Japan’s
revised Law Concerning the Rational Use of Energy.
Achievements for Fiscal 2007
Objectives for Fiscal 2007
Shift to environmentally friendly modes of transport
Domestic railway cargo transport (container transport)*2:
15,600 containers
20,619 containers
Reduce CO2 emissions per sales unit by at least 1%
from previous fiscal year by the Sharp Group in Japan
Reduced by 14% from
previous fiscal year
Objectives for Every Fiscal Year
—
Reduce by 1% from previous fiscal year
*1 CO2 emissions per sales unit (t-CO2/100 million yen) = CO2 emissions (t-CO2) ÷ net sales (100 million yen)
*2 Calculated based on 5-ton containers.
Energy Conservation Law Committee
Assesses Environmental Impacts
in All Areas of Distribution in Japan
In fiscal 2005, Sharp established the Committee for
Compliance with the Energy Conservation Law as a Shipper.
The committee assesses the environmental impacts of
distribution and logistics in the areas of product sales,
procurement and production, waste disposal, and parts*3, and
works to strengthen energy-saving measures in distribution
across the Sharp Group.
Although only Sharp Corporation and its consolidated
subsidiary, Sharp Electronics Marketing Corporation, are
designated as specified shippers (shippers with large transport
volume) under Japan’s revised Law Concerning the Rational
Use of Energy, Sharp has declared an objective of achieving an
annual reduction in CO2 emissions per sales unit of 1% or
greater, a mandate for specified shippers under the law, for all
members of the Sharp Group in Japan, including consolidated
subsidiaries not so designated, and will promote energy-saving
measures to reach this objective.
In fiscal 2007, the amount of cargo transported by Sharp
Group companies in Japan (total weight by cargo category [t] x
transport distance [km]) was approximately 185.5 million
ton-kilometers (down 4% from the previous fiscal year). CO2
emissions were 42,101 t-CO2 (down 6% from the previous
fiscal year), and CO2 emissions per sales unit were 1.23
t-CO2/100 million yen (down 14% from the previous fiscal year).
Sharp will continue expanding its energy-saving efforts, such as
shifting to environmentally friendly modes of transport and
improving transport and load efficiencies.
Shifting to Environmentally Friendly
Modes of Transport in Japan
In Japan, Sharp is shifting from conventional trucking to more
environmentally friendly transportation modes, such as rail and
ships. In fiscal 2007, Sharp shipped 20,619 containers by
railway freight transport (up 36% over the previous fiscal year).
For actively expanding the use of rail transport, Sharp’s West
Japan Logistics Center won the Excellent Shipper in Shifting
Transportation Mode award (four years in a row) and a 2007
Commendation for Outstanding Railway Shippers.
In the future, Sharp will work to expand the shift in transport
modes and switch from air cargo to high-speed ocean vessels.
■ Sharp Group’s railway container shipments in Japan
(rail container units)
25,000
20,619
20,000
15,117
15,000
10,000
9,240
11,556
6,924
5,000
0
2003
2004
2005
Rail container units
2006
2007
(fiscal year)
*3 Distribution of parts used for after-sales service, such as repair and
maintenance of products.
Web Data on distribution
Environmentally Conscious
Distribution Worldwide
■ System to promote energy savings in distribution
Committee for Compliance with
the Energy Conservation Law as a Shipper
Chairperson: Environmental Protection
Group General Manager
Office
Corporate
Procurement Center
(procurement
and production
distribution)
Global Logistics
Center
(product sales
distribution)
CS
Promotion Group
(parts distribution)
Environmental
Protection Group
(waste disposal
logistics)
In the US, Sharp Electronics Corporation (SEC), Sharp’s sales
subsidiary, participates in the SmartWay Transport Program*4.
Of the total volume of products distributed by SEC, the weight
of freight that complied with this program increased from 33%
in 2005 to 98% in 2007. SEC is also working to promote wider
participation in this program through logistics-related lectures.
In 2007, at the second annual awards ceremony sponsored by
the Environmental
Protection Agency, the
SmartWay Transportation
Partnership honored SEC
with an excellence award
for these activities, the first
company to win this award
two years in a row.
Accepting the award of excellence for the second
year in a row
*4 SmartWay Transport Program: A joint effort by the US Environmental
Protection Agency and industry to promote environmentally conscious
shipping and distribution.
37
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
Sharp and the Environment
In Pursuit of Becoming an Environmentally Advanced Corporate Group
Developing Super Green Recycling
Sharp is working to expand recycling of products that have reached the end of their service life based on three
concepts: 1) improve the recycling rate and aim for zero landfill disposal, 2) improve the efficiency of the recycling
system to reduce recycling costs, and 3) incorporate recycling technologies into the development and design of
products.
Achievements for Fiscal 2007
Objectives for Fiscal 2007
Respond to the increased number
of items requiring recycling
Recycling Four Kinds
of Home Appliances in Japan
(Air Conditioners, TVs, Refrigerators,
and Washing Machines)
Objectives for Fiscal 2008
Objectives for Fiscal 2009
Build a recycling system
for flat-panel (LCD) TVs
Implement recycling system
for flat-panel (LCD) TVs
Kansai Recycling Systems Reaches
the 5-Million Mark in Total Recycled Units
Sharp is constructing a highly efficient recycling system by
collaborating with five other consumer electronics companies*1
to operate 190 designated sites for picking up old appliances
as well as 18 recycling plants in Japan.
In March 2008, Kansai Recycling Systems Co., Ltd., a consumer
electronics recycling company created with investment by Sharp
Corporation, Mitsubishi Materials Corporation, and five other
companies*1, reached the 5-million mark in total recycled units.
In fiscal 2007, four types of home appliances designated under
the Japanese Home Appliance Recycling Law—about 1.38
million units in total (up 5% over the previous fiscal year)—were
recovered and about 1.37 million units were recycled. The
processing rates in the recycling plants satisfied the legal
standard for all four kinds of appliances.
The main facility of the company (in Hirakata City, Osaka
Prefecture, Japan) began full operation in April 2001, to recycle the
four types of used home appliances. A second plant began
operations in December 2006 (Iga City, Mie Prefecture, Japan),
exclusively to recycle TVs, and features an integrated, start-to-finish
recycling line—from disassembling the TV sets to refining glass
cullet*2. Together, these two plants represent a comprehensive
system to advance recycling of consumer electronics.
In the future, Sharp will work to continuously improve its
system in response to changes, such as an increase in the
volume of target products collected, and will work to further
improve the recycling rate.
By strengthening the collaboration between the recycling plants
and Sharp’s design and production divisions, Sharp will push
ahead to develop new recycling technologies and easy-to-recycle
environmentally conscious products.
*1 Five collaborating companies: Fujitsu General Ltd., Hitachi
Appliances, Inc., Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Sanyo Electric Co.,
Ltd., Sony Corporation (in alphabetical order)
*2 Cullet is granulated glass from crushed CRTs (TV picture tubes). In the
recycling process, contaminants are carefully removed from the glass to
convert it into a nearly pure raw material suitable for use in a variety of
applications.
■ Sharp Corporation’s recycled units for the four home
appliances
(thousands of units)
1,400
1,200
1,159
1,000
352
800
600
400
200
0
275
1,299
1,245
388
366
298
294
376
399
408
156
2003
186
2004
205
Air conditioners
TVs
2005
Refrigerators
1,313
382
300
1,370
367
318
■ Kansai Recycling Systems’ recycled units
for the four home appliances
Total (thousands of units)
(thousands of units)
800
600
400
444
499
187
2006
186
2007
(fiscal year)
5,034
1,000
200
0
797
744
189
181
184
192
1,740
229
150
2003
Air conditioners
TVs
2,537
819
197
4,185 829
3,356
190
846
203
193
188
187
249
253
266
296
167
2004
179
172
2006
170
2007
2005
Refrigerators
Washing machines
Washing machines
5,000
4,000
3,000
2,000
1,000
0
(fiscal year)
Total of four home
appliances
Reusing and Recycling Copiers in Japan
Recycling PCs in Japan
In compliance with the Japanese Law for Promotion of
Effective Utilization of Resources, Sharp is recycling businessand home-use PCs.
For home-use PCs, the PC industry is working with Japan
Post Service Co., Ltd. in a collection system in operation at
more than 20,000 post offices around Japan.
In fiscal 2007, recovered and recycled PCs amounted to
approximately 5,300 business- and home-use desktop and
notebook PCs (up 23% over the previous fiscal year) and
about 2,000 monitors (up 3% over the previous fiscal year).
Web Information on PC recycling
Collected used copiers with minor deterioration are
remanufactured: after being inspected, they are disassembled
into unit parts, and the parts cleaned and thoroughly tested
before being returned to the production line. New parts are also
added to guarantee performance and quality equal to new
products.
In fiscal 2007, approximately 41,000 copiers (up 24% over the
previous fiscal year) were recovered, and remanufactured or
recycled. Models not targeted for reuse are dismantled and
sorted by type of component material to facilitate recycling.
Approximately 781,000 toner cartridges (up 12% over the
previous fiscal year) were recovered, and about 270,000
remanufactured toner cartridges (up 8% over the previous fiscal
year) were shipped.
Web Data on recycling of used products
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
38
Environmentally Conscious Logistics / Developing Super Green Recycling
Developed recycling technology
for flat-panel (LCD) TVs
(completed technical studies at the laboratory level)
Sharp and the Environment
In Pursuit of Becoming an Environmentally Advanced Corporate Group
Promoting Environmental Communication
To enhance environmental communication with its wide range of stakeholders, Sharp discloses environmental
information through exhibitions and various media, including Environmental and Social Reports, websites,
and newspaper ads. Each Sharp site also endeavors to promote dialogue on environmental topics with local
communities by sponsoring various events and holding factory tours.
Environmental and Social Report, Website
on Social and Environmental Activities
Every year since 1999, Sharp has issued an annual report on
its environmental activities. Starting with the 2005 edition, the
report was expanded to include the social aspects of Sharp’s
business activities. Accordingly, the title was changed to the
Environmental and Social Report.
The 2007 edition of the Environmental and Social Report won
an award of excellence for environmental reports at the 11th
Environmental Communication Awards in Japan backed by
Nikkei Inc. and cosponsored by the Ministry of the Environment
and the Global Environmental Forum (GEF).
In addition to using articles from the Environmental and Social
Report, Sharp’s website presents more specialized content
with examples of specific activities and detailed data on
environmental impact.
Sharp Environmental and
Social Report 2007
(Japanese, English,
and Chinese editions)
Advertising and Commercials
To share its environmental message and goals with a wider
audience, Sharp creates TV and newspaper ads. Using the
slogan “Let’s Go Ecology Class with Sharp,” the ads for Japan
highlight Sharp’s environmentally supportive activities.
In fiscal 2007, Sharp produced a TV commercial showing the
UK Environment Agency, which uses a Sharp solar power
generation system. This commercial emphasized the
importance of not only thinking about environmental
conservation, but also putting it into practice, and won an
award for excellence in the environmental TV commercial
category of the 11th Environmental
Communication Awards in Japan.
Newspaper ad
TV commercial
Environmental Forums
To more widely disseminate information on its initiatives on
behalf of the environment, Sharp has been holding
environmental forums for journalists and the general public. In
fiscal 2007, Sharp held seven such forums in Japan and in
cities in China, including Beijing and Shanghai.
Sharp Environmental
Brochure
(Japanese, English,
and German editions)
Website for Sharp’s social
and environmental activities:
<http://sharp-world.com/corporate/eco/>
Exhibitions
Sharp introduces its environmental activities to the public
through participation in domestic and international trade fairs
and exhibitions.
In Japan, Sharp participated in the Ecolife Fair 2007, where it
demonstrated how solar power generation can help curb
global warming. Sharp also took part in the Eco Products 2007
exhibition, and this year, under the slogan “Carbon-Neutral
Living Through Energy Creation and Energy Saving,”
introduced its environment-related activities and technologies,
as well as environmentally friendly products.
At IFA 2007, held in Berlin, Germany, Sharp exhibited its
super-thin LCD TV, which features dramatically lower energy
consumption than existing models.
The Shanghai Environmental Forum was attended by
government officials, and presented Sharp’s environmental
efforts in China. Additional sessions were held to exchange
opinions and introduce environmental policies in China. This
platform was fruitful in deepening the understanding of both
parties on these issues.
Sharp is planning to hold
these forums in a variety of
locations around the world
during fiscal 2008 as well.
Environmental Forum held in
Shanghai in May 2007
Exchanges with Stakeholders
To enhance communication with its wide range of
stakeholders, Sharp holds factory tours and other events.
The Advanced Development
and Planning Center (Nara
Prefecture, Japan) invited local
government officials to visit its
site. The lively discussions
with the visitors gave Sharp
some interesting new ideas for
future environmental and CSR
efforts.
Informal gathering with local
government officials
Eco Products 2007
39
IFA 2007
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
Web Exchanges with local communities
Sharp and Society
In Pursuit of Becoming a Corporate Group
Trusted by Society
Objectives and Achievements
in the Social Dimension of CSR ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 41
For Customers
Delivering Peace of Mind
and Satisfaction to Every Customer ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 43
For Business Partners
Mutual Prosperity with Suppliers and Dealers ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 45
For Shareholders and Investors
Appropriate Return of Profits and Information Disclosure ・・・・・ 47
For Employees
Creating a Fair, Positive, and Progressive Workplace・・・・・・・・・・・ 48
Creating a Safe and Secure Workplace ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 50
For Local Communities
Social Contribution Activities as a Corporate Citizen
Environmental education class, held in cooperation with the Weathercaster Network nonprofit organization,
at an elementary school in Japan. For details, see page 21.
・
・
・
・
・
・
・
・
・
・
・
51
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
40
Sharp and Society
In Pursuit of Becoming a Corporate Group Trusted by Society
Objectives and Achievements in the
Social Dimension of CSR
Sharp has established the Sharp Group Charter of Corporate Behavior and the Sharp Code of Conduct as standards of
conduct serving to fulfill Sharp’s business philosophy and business creed, which are the origins of the Sharp Group’s
CSR. Based on the Group Charter of Corporate Behavior and the Code of Conduct, Sharp sets major social themes and
targets within the framework of CSR, and develops various initiatives, while promoting ongoing efforts for improvement.
Promoting CSR Efforts
in the Social Dimension
Field
To promote CSR efforts in the social dimension, Sharp
develops initiatives ranging from the company-wide level to the
department level.
On the management level, Sharp established the CSR/BRM*1
Committee to hold discussions on basic policy directions and
measures related to CSR and risk management, which are then
deployed company wide.
Important Themes
Improve, operate, and assess internal control system
Practice compliance in business
Management
Each functional group and head office department implements
the measures discussed and determined by the CSR/BRM
Committee across the entire company, and each business
group sets and promotes action items specific to that group.
Strengthen business risk management
Strengthen measures for maintaining confidentiality and
information security
Strengthen personal information protection system
On the level of departments and employees, CSR is put into
practice through measures broken down into specific duties.
CSR is also implemented through participation in R-CATS*2
small-group activities and the Sharp Green Club (environmental
social contribution activities).
Secure quality and safety
*1 BRM: Business risk management
*2 R-CATS: Revolution Creative Action Teams
For Customers
Create products that are easier to use
CSR Through R-CATS Small-Group Activities
R-CATS are small-group activities carried out not only by
production and quality departments, but also by all work
specialties and departments—from product planning and
technology departments, to sales/marketing, procurement
and administrative departments. Employees at all work
sites in Japan and overseas set themes related to CSR to
tackle common problems encountered during routine
work activities, and then work together as a team to find
solutions and put them into practice.
Improve customer satisfaction
For Business
Partners
Promote CSR across entire supply chain
For Shareholders
and Investors
Improve communication with shareholders and investors
In fiscal 2007, more than 40,000 employees across the
entire Sharp Group participated in R-CATS activities and
became involved in CSR activities from the perspective of
their individual workplaces.
Strengthen human resource development
Develop company-wide affirmative action for women
Overall CSR Efforts in the
Social Dimension for Fiscal 2007
Examples of Sharp’s distinctive efforts in the social dimension
of CSR are introduced in the Special Focus section (pages 17
and 18: social contribution activities in China, pages 19 to 21:
expanding environmental social contribution activities [Sharp
Forests, purification of reservoir water, and elementary school
environmental education]).
For Employees
Promote occupational safety and health
In fiscal 2007, in addition to these efforts, Sharp achieved
results in promoting initiatives such as putting in place and
operating systems to improve quality (see page 44 Topics
“Sharp Ranked No. 1 Overall in Quality Management”).
In the future, Sharp will work proactively to incorporate these
CSR initiatives into operational processes so that they function
as a management system enabling regular progress
assessments of such measures, as well as the identification of
emerging problems and the implementation of further
improvements in this area.
41
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
For Local
Communities
Expand and diversify social contribution activities
Self Evaluation ◎: Results exceeded objectives ○: Results nearly met objectives △: Certain results were accomplished
Objectives
• Steady operation of internal control
system
Actions for Fiscal 2007
Achievements
Objectives for Fiscal 2008
See
page(s)
○
• Operation and assessment of internal control system
• Improve Basic Policy for Internal Control in conjunction with
introducing executive officer system, etc.
• Put into practice on an ongoing basis various policies related to
internal control system
• Implement internal control assessment in conjunction with start of
internal control reporting system based on Japan’s Financial
Instruments and Exchange Act
6
• Improve compliance education and
training tools
• Created compliance handbook (for sales/service and device
business divisions)
△
• Expand and improve compliance promotion policies and measures
• Strengthen system to promote compliance
• Create compliance handbook (common version)
7
• Create BCM (business continuity
management) system
• Implemented contingency training at domestic production
sites and nearby sales bases (total of 16 bases)
• Developed BCPs (business continuity plans) for business
groups
○
• Expand and improve BCM system
• Further strengthen BCM promotion system for business groups
• Ongoing review and continuous improvement of BCPs
• Prepare for occurrence of new influenza pandemic
7
website
• Extend self-checks and assessments
for maintaining confidentiality and
information security to overseas bases
• Implemented self-checks and assessments for maintaining
confidentiality and information security at main overseas
bases
○
• Extend self-check and assessment system for maintaining
confidentiality and information security to affiliated companies in Japan
• Apply for and acquire Privacy Mark
certification in Japan
• Developed infrastructure for acquiring Privacy Mark certification
• Implemented internal audits of departments that handle
personal information
• Implemented group training related to protecting personal
information at each business site
△
8
• Promote procedures to attain Privacy Mark certification
website
• Continuously implement internal audits related to protecting personal
information for departments that handle personal information
• Continuously implement education and awareness policies related
to protecting personal information for employees and others
• Further improve quality in early
stages of product making (planning
and design)
• Achieved better product quality and reliability and shorter
evaluation cycle by expanding application of design
parameters for development and design process
• Strengthened analysis system by assigning more failure
analysis technicians (currently 53 more than previous year)
• Issued revised version of Company-Wide Technical Safety
Standards (14th edition) and promoted product making in
line with strengthened standards
○
• Reinforce design quality and product safety through use of statistical
methods and tools
• Expand number of design parameter applications for development
43
and planning process
website
• Update and strengthen Company-Wide Technical Safety Standards
• Promote inter-company sharing of technical analysis capabilities
• Introduce more universal design
products
• 109 models of 19 products recognized as universal design
home appliances by Association for Electric Home
Appliances in Japan
• Implemented product improvements based on usability test
results and analysis of customer feedback
○
• Improve products by taking on customer’s point of view and introduce
more universal design products
• Activate Voice of the Customer (VOC) program to incorporate
customer feedback into product making
43
• Improve phone call reception rate to • Phone call reception rate increased by 10.7 points over
previous year as result of improvement efforts, including
achieve higher ranking in customer
predicting number of inquiries and raising level of customer
satisfaction surveys of inquiry
assistance agents’ response skills
response skills
○
• Pursue “no customer waiting” responsiveness and faster, more
reliable service
• Reorganize reception system during peak times to improve
consistency of phone call reception rate
• Implement ongoing training in response techniques for customer
assistance agents
• Strengthen efforts to improve percentage of repairs that can be
completed in one visit
44
• Improve supply chain CSR
measures
• Constructed online response system for CSR Procurement
Survey and conducted surveys targeting major suppliers in
Japan
○
• Expand implementation of supply chain CSR measures overseas
• Expand CSR Procurement Survey to local suppliers serving
Sharp’s overseas bases
45
website
• Improve information disclosure to
shareholders and investors
• Renewed contents of investor relations website
○
• Improve information disclosure to shareholders and investors and
respond to diversified needs of investors
• Expand number of regions overseas hosting IR meetings
• Hold explanation sessions for individual investors
47
website
• Promote continual development of
diversified human resources and
capabilities to deal with changes in
business environment
• Developed global human resource development system, the
Global Mid-Level Professional Human Resource
Development Program (GMP Program)
• Promoted career development rotations for engineers
○
• Promote cultivation of managerial personnel to support development
of global business
• Promote GMP Program
• Promote continuation of Corporate
Affirmative Action for Women
Strategy Program and consider
additions to it
• Expand and diversify systems for
supporting balance between work
and family
• 22.3% of female employees held junior manager
(semi-managerial) positions (up 5% from 2005 when Corporate
Affirmative Action for Women Strategy Program was initiated);
48 women were at management level (27 more than in 2005)
• Initiated consideration of diversity management (strategy for
utilizing employee diversity)
• Implemented partial salary and new benefits for childcare
leave (started April 2008)
• Strengthen industrial accident risk
• Conducted safety and health inspections at 10 major
reduction activities
domestic plants
• Improve safety and health awareness • Promoted major bimonthly theme-based targets (six themes
of newly assigned temporary staff
in total)
• Provided safety and health education for newly assigned
and employees of subcontractors
temporary staff and employees of subcontractors at each site
stationed inside Sharp sites in Japan
• Strengthen efforts to promote
mental health care
• Distributed handbook to all employees
• Set up counseling system through outside medical service
institute
• Carried out mental health training for all employees
• Carried out stress checks for all employees
• Strengthen measures against
lifestyle diseases
• Achieved periodic physical checkup rate of 99.9%
• Promoted weight-loss programs for employees with
metabolic syndrome
• Promoted company-wide fitness programs
• Promoted company-wide walking programs such as team
walking
Japan:
• Create Sharp Forests at 10 or more
locations
• Provide environmental education at
500 elementary schools for the year
• Expand local social contribution
activities at sales and service bases
Overseas:
• Expand activities centered on Sharp
Charity Foundation in China
• Develop network for social
contribution activities at overseas
bases
• Created Sharp Forests at 10 locations
• Provided environmental education at 537 elementary
schools
• Total of 12,836 people participated in 572 local social
contribution activities at 85 bases
• In China, provided scholarships (about 180 people at 11
universities), donated Sharp products (about 150 air
purifiers to approx. 60 public hospitals), planted trees to
control drifting sand and dust in Tianjin, and carried out
beautification campaigns in areas near Sharp bases
• Developed network to gather information on environmentally
related social contribution activities from overseas bases
△
• Promote diversity management
• Introduce and develop program to utilize diversity of female,
physically or mentally challenged, and elderly employees, and
non-Japanese employees in Japan
○
• Strengthen industrial accident risk reduction activities
• Conduct regular safety and health inspections at 11 major
domestic plants
• Continue with preparations for introduction of occupational safety
and health management system
○
• Continue strengthening efforts to promote mental health care
• Expand support system for employees taking or returning from
medical leave due to mental health reasons
• Continue to carry out stress checks for all employees
○
• Continue strengthening measures against lifestyle diseases
• Attain 100% participation in periodic physical checkups (including
special health exams)
• Strengthen guidance for employees with metabolic syndrome
(improving exercise, diet, and smoking habits)
◎
Japan:
• Continue Sharp Forest activities
• Provide environmental education for at least 500 elementary
schools for the year
• Continue local social contribution activities at all Sharp sales and
service bases
Overseas:
• Continue activities centered on Sharp Charity Foundation in China
• Expand environmental education in overseas regions
Objectives and Achievements in the Social Dimension of CSR
• Improved internal control system based on Basic Policy for
Internal Control
• Conducted internal control audits (tests/evaluations)
• Constructed IT system to support operation of internal
control system
Self
Evaluation
48
49
website
50
50
website
50
website
17・18・19
20・21・
51・52
website
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
42
Sharp and Society
In Pursuit of Becoming a Corporate Group Trusted by Society
For Customers
Delivering Peace of Mind and Satisfaction
to Every Customer
In order to create user-friendly products, Sharp is applying customer feedback from the Customer Assistance
Center toward product improvements. Sharp pursues customer satisfaction by supplying products and services
that customers can always rely on.
Actions in Fiscal 2007
Objectives
• Further improve quality in
the early stages of
product making (planning
and design)
• Reinforce design quality and product safety through the use of
• Achieved better product quality and reliability and a shorter
statistical methods and tools
evaluation cycle by expanding application of design parameters for
• Expand the number of design parameter applications for the
the development and design process
development and planning process
• Strengthened the analysis system by assigning more failure analysis
• Update and strengthen Company-Wide Technical Safety
technicians (currently 53 more than the previous year)
Standards
• Issued a revised version of Company-Wide Technical Safety
• Promote inter-company sharing of technical analysis capabilities
Standards (14th edition) and promoted product making in line with the
strengthened standards
• Introduce more universal
design products
• 109 models of 19 products recognized as universal design home
appliances by the Association for Electric Home Appliances in Japan
• Implemented product improvements based on usability test results
and analysis of customer feedback
• Improve products by taking on the customer’s point of view and
introduce more universal design products
• Activate the Voice of the Customer (VOC) program to
incorporate customer feedback into product making
• Improve the phone call
reception rate to achieve
a higher ranking in
customer satisfaction
surveys of inquiry
response skills
• The phone call reception rate increased by 10.7 points over the
previous year as a result of improvement efforts, including predicting
the number of inquiries and raising the level of customer assistance
agents’ response skills
• Pursue “no customer waiting” responsiveness and faster, more
reliable service
• Reorganize the reception system during peak times to improve
the consistency of the phone call reception rate
• Implement ongoing training in response techniques for
customer assistance agents
• Strengthen efforts to improve the percentage of repairs that
can be completed in one visit
Basic Stance and Vision on
Customer Satisfaction and Quality
Along with responding in a timely manner to changes in the
social situation and revisions to laws pertaining to product
safety, Sharp will continue to increase its efforts at offering
products that customers can use with peace of mind.
Quality Philosophy
To respond to society’s needs and make products that satisfy our
customers, we keep the slogan “Quality First” in mind at all times.
Displayed at every Sharp
site as a company-wide
slogan for quality
Quality First in Heart and Mind
Web
Quality guarantee system
ISO 9001-certified sites (companies)
Efforts to Ensure Product Safety
At Sharp, product safety is based on adherence to the safety
standards, laws, and regulations of every country. Sharp’s own
uniquely strict Company-Wide Technical Safety Standards are
revised annually, especially concerning issues such as
incombustible material usage and abnormal motion detection.
Moreover, the Sharp Group has established a voluntary action
plan on product safety. It specifies: 1) the Sharp Voluntary
Product Safety Action Policy, 2) the product safety promotion
system, 3) efforts for ensuring the safety of products, and 4)
response to accidents with products. In addition, in fiscal 2007
the Product Safety Promotion Center was established to further
improve safety efforts.
■ Improved product from fiscal 2007
As simple as a VCR, but even easier to use
Easy recording and playback of HD programs
The easy-to-use,
simple remote control
LC-42DS3-W
Automatically ends recording
when the program is over
One-touch
recording
One-touch
timer
recording
Select a program
from the EPG and
press one button to
timer-record that program
43
Objectives for Fiscal 2008
Achievements
Creating Products That Are Easier to Use
In order to develop products that customers can feel comfortable
using, Sharp conducts monitor and usability tests and actively
reflects customers’ voices in its product planning.
In fiscal 2007, Sharp ran these tests for LCD TVs and DVD/Blu-ray
Disc recorders. For products that are currently on the market, the
rate of customer calls to the Customer Assistance Center was
quantified (by calculating the cumulative number of calls per
cumulative unit sales). By comparing the rate of calls with that of
previous models, Sharp can pinpoint which models require
improvement and can conduct more precise analysis.
Through such ongoing efforts, Sharp has created products
following universal design standards, and as of June 2008, 109
models of 19 products have been recognized as universal design
home appliances by the Association for Electric Home Appliances
in Japan.
To continue this trend in the future, Sharp is incorporating the
customer’s point of view as it looks ahead to creating products
that are better than ever.
■ Universal design product from fiscal 2007
Look, touch, and understand Digital MFP MX-7001N
The MX-7001N itself (the control panel, internal parts, etc.) and its instruction manual are designed
so they can be recognized by people with varying kinds of color vision.
The MX-7001N has been certified for Color Universal Design (CUD) from the Color Universal Design
Organization (CUDO), a nonprofit organization in Japan.
BD-AV10-W
Large, easy-to-see, touch-screen
LCD control panel
One-touch
playback
Easy-to-push
operating
buttons
Starts playback
from where
it ended last time
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
MX-7001N
Instruction manual
No. 1 in Customer Satisfaction;
After-Sales Service Activities
In fiscal 2007, Sharp established a service parts pre-order
system. When a request for repairs is received by 6:00 p.m.,
the necessary parts are shipped immediately and will arrive at
the appropriate service center anywhere in Japan the next
morning before 9:00 a.m. Later that day, the parts are used in
repairing products. This system has increased the number of
repairs that can be completed in only one visit and is making
customers happier. Using the know-how that is being
accumulated through this system, Sharp aims to increase the
rate of “hits” (instances when exactly the right part is ordered)
in the future.
In addition, a full-time system for next-day complete repair
service for large AQUOS LCD TVs has been set up at 39
service centers across Japan. After the repairs are completed,
Sharp makes follow-up calls to customers that are yielding
positive feedback.
Sharp plans to continue raising the standard of customer
satisfaction in a variety of ways.
In the event that a Sharp product is found to be responsible for
injury to customers or for damage to property, Sharp will
disclose relevant information immediately in newspapers and
via its website. Sharp also has contact points to directly receive
inquiries from customers and is striving to keep quality
problems to an absolute minimum.
For Customers
Guided by the goal of becoming No. 1 in customer satisfaction,
Sharp is advancing customer service innovation activities in an
effort to provide faster, more effective after-sales service that
customers can always rely on.
Active Disclosure of Quality Information
During fiscal 2007, Sharp notified customers as below,
providing free-of-charge inspection and repair services. Sharp
also continually updates important product safety information
on its website.
• LCD TVs for the Oceania market (May 2007)
In response to the risk of electric shock from some 42-inch LCD TVs sold in
Australia and New Zealand, Sharp announced free-of-charge inspections and
repair service.
• Residential solar power generation system (December 2007)
In response to the risk of color alteration and/or burnout for the connecting
section of some indoor power conditioners, Sharp announced free-of-charge
inspections and repair service.
TOPICS
Sharp Ranked No. 1 Overall in Quality Management
Hospitality Is the Motto
of the Customer Assistance Center
From the first consultation with a potential customer to a
request for repairs after purchase, Sharp’s Customer
Assistance Center responds to customer needs with hospitality
in mind. While always taking the customer’s point of view,
Sharp’s greatest mission is to provide products customers feel
good using.
In order to achieve this goal, Sharp is training the people who
have direct contact with customers: the customer assistance
agents. Sharp’s agents are receiving training in the
fundamentals of response skills, as well as technical product
knowledge, in order to improve the quality of service they
provide. With this training, agents are better able to foster a
customer satisfaction-oriented mindset and improve their skills
of accurately assessing customer needs and providing the best
possible solutions to problems.
Sharp is working to create easy-to-use, high-quality products
that reduce the inconvenience of customers having to call the
Customer Assistance Center. Feedback from customers is
transmitted accurately to those in charge of product
development within the appropriate divisions, and regular
meetings are held to exchange ideas and opinions with the aim
of making product
improvements.
Sharp will continue to
satisfy customers and fulfill
expectations by always
keeping the customer’s
point of view in mind.
Sharp took first place in the third Quality Management Ranking Survey
(sponsored by the Union of Japanese Scientists and Engineers and
cosponsored by Nikkei Inc.). The survey evaluates and quantifies efforts
such putting in place and operating systems to improve quality.
Evaluated areas include management conditions of departments
responsible for quality, human resource development, and customer
inquiry response measures.
Sharp ranked especially high in the proliferation and promotion of quality
improvements. The company was highly rated for recognizing quality
innovations in its regular awards system and for creating the Quality
Engineer System*, an intra-company certification system for quality
control ability.
Sharp’s activities were
introduced at a lecture on
the survey at a later date.
* Quality Engineer System: This
program was initiated in October
2005 to educate and support
quality technicians. At the end of
April 2008, 9,426 employees
had been certified at the
beginner or intermediate level.
Quality Management Ranking Survey lecture
Training Call Center Leaders from Shanghai
Sharp is reinforcing the operation of its call centers in the Americas,
Europe, China, and the rest of Asia in response to growing worldwide
AQUOS sales.
In fiscal 2007, three call center leaders from Sharp Electronics Sales
(China) Co., Ltd. (SESC) came to the Customer Assistance Center in
Japan and learned how to improve their responsiveness and apply
customer feedback towards product making. On the final day, the
trainees said the training had changed their outlook and they confidently
proclaimed that
they would return
home and improve
the Shanghai call
center.
(From left) SESC call center leaders
Mr. Ding, Ms. Hu, and Ms. Wei
Customer Assistance Center
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
44
Sharp and Society
In Pursuit of Becoming a Corporate Group Trusted by Society
For Business Partners
Mutual Prosperity with Suppliers and Dealers
Sharp conducts its procurement activities on the basis of fair evaluation, ensuring that all companies are provided
with equal opportunities. Sharp is building relationships of cooperation and trust with business partners through
dialogue that deepens mutual understanding. It is also Sharp’s belief that CSR activities should apply to the entire
supply chain, including its business partners.
Actions in Fiscal 2007
Objectives
• Improve supply chain
CSR measures
• Constructed an online response system for the CSR
Procurement Survey and conducted surveys targeting major
suppliers in Japan
Equal Opportunity and Fair Evaluation
for All Domestic and Overseas Suppliers
With production activities around the world, Sharp procures
parts, materials, and equipment based on the concept of
providing equal opportunities to all domestic and overseas
suppliers. It also fairly evaluates whether the procurement
meets Sharp’s requirements for quality, standards, and
performance.
Sharp has stipulated Basic Purchasing Principles that clearly
define the fundamentals of impartial and fair purchasing and
that promote the development of cooperation and trust with
business partners. Sharp thus pursues a prosperous
coexistence with its business partners.
Web
Objectives for Fiscal 2008
Achievements
Sharp Basic Purchasing Principles
• Expand implementation of supply chain CSR measures overseas
• Expand CSR Procurement Survey to local suppliers serving Sharp’s
overseas bases
Approaching CSR Together with Suppliers
Sharp is promoting a variety of measures based on the
concept of approaching CSR in concert with suppliers.
In fiscal 2004, Sharp first began to hold briefing sessions and
seminars related to CSR on themes such as labor, health and
safety management, and environmental conservation, targeting
senior management of major suppliers as well as persons in
charge at subcontractor companies engaged in production and
other work at Sharp sites in Japan.
In addition, to enable suppliers to check their own CSR efforts
at the international level, Sharp added its own content to the
Supply-Chain CSR Deployment Guidebook issued by JEITA
(Japan Electronics and Information Technology Industries
Association) and created the Sharp Supply-Chain CSR
Deployment Guidebook.
Making CSR a Common Goal
Across the Entire Supply Chain
In fulfilling its social responsibility in business activities as a
manufacturer, Sharp must go beyond its group companies and
include the network of business partners encompassing the
entire supply chain.
Consequently, in 2004 and 2005, Sharp revised its Basic
Purchasing Principles, which it had originally established in
1990, to include important requirements for suppliers, such as
environmental conservation, compliance with laws and
regulations, ensuring the security of confidential information,
and promoting CSR activities.
Entire company
Business and Purchasing Policies Explanation
Meeting (once a year)
Business groups
Supplier meeting (semi-annually)
• Explanation of industrial and
product trends
• Explanation of business plans
• Open exchange of opinions
Purchasing staff
Buyers from each parts category
exchange opinions and information
with business partners
on a daily basis.
Close communication and mutual understanding
Sharp will continue to fulfill CSR across the entire supply chain
by constantly checking to see that its basic principles and
requirements meet the needs of society, including respect for
the law and social norms, and environmental conservation.
Business partners
Sharp Supply-Chain CSR
Deployment Guidebook
(Japanese, English,
and Chinese editions)
• Contents of Sharp Supply-Chain CSR Deployment Guidebook
I. Human Rights and Labor II. Occupational Health and Safety
III. Environment IV. Fair Trading V. Product Quality and Safety
VI. Information Security VII. Contribution to Society
Since May 2007, this guidebook has been distributed to about
1,400 of Sharp’s major suppliers in Japan, with a request that
they use it to step up their efforts on items related to CSR.
To promote the CSR Procurement Survey, which provides
Sharp with the results of self-checks based on this guidebook,
Sharp has also constructed an online response system to
enable suppliers to use the Internet to enter their answers.
Sharp has held briefing sessions targeting suppliers, particularly
subcontractors, to request their understanding of and
cooperation in Sharp’s CSR initiatives, and launched the CSR
Procurement Survey in January 2008.
Depending on the status of a supplier’s CSR efforts gleaned
through their answers to the survey, Sharp will also request that
the supplier take the necessary steps to improve their efforts.
In fiscal 2008, Sharp plans to extend the CSR Procurement
Survey to suppliers in locations serving Sharp’s overseas
bases.
Web Sharp Supply-Chain CSR Deployment Guidebook
45
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
Response to the Subcontract Act
Regarding compliance checks, since 2002, Sharp’s Corporate
Procurement Center has conducted regular audits of all
domestic business groups once a year.
In fiscal 2007, as a new initiative, Sharp began cross audits in
which purchasing staff for each business group conduct an
internal audit of other business groups. As a result, awareness
of compliance with the Subcontract Act by all purchasing staff
rose even higher, and at the same time, this initiative worked to
promote the exchange of information on the status of
compliance efforts among all business groups.
Regarding in-house education, Sharp also set up in March
2008 a Subcontract Act training system on its intranet to raise
awareness and improve knowledge among staff belonging to
purchasing and subcontractor supervision departments. This
system, with a “one question a day” format, allows study
sessions that take only a short time, and it is receiving favorable
reviews.
Sharp will continue its efforts in fiscal 2008 by expanding the
range of departments subject to compliance checks and
in-house education to include, for example, engineering
departments.
Online Subcontract
Act training system
The user selects an answer
to a question. If the answer
is correct, an explanation is
displayed. If the answer is
incorrect, the same question
is posed again in the days
that follow until the answer
selected is the correct
answer.
As dealers work to promote the sale of energy-efficient
products and spread the knowledge of energy conservation to
ordinary households, Sharp has been providing those dealers
assistance via routine sales activities such as presenting ideas
for in-store displays and planning exhibitions of environmentally
conscious products, to help facilitate understanding of the
benefits of energy-efficient products among consumers.
For Business Partners
To comply with the Act Against Delay in Payment of
Subcontract Proceeds, etc. to Subcontractors (the
Subcontract Act), which protects the interests of
subcontractors in Japan, Sharp is strengthening its measures
for compliance checks and in-house education.
Assisting Dealers in Their Efforts
Toward the Environment
In fiscal 2007, under a commendation system entitled Dealer of
Excellence in Promoting Energy-Efficient Products sponsored
by the Energy Conservation Center, Japan, 55 dealers in
regions where Sharp personnel provided assistance received
certification as Dealer of Excellence.
In addition, from among those dealers, five also won various
other awards, including the Environment Minister’s Prize, the
Agency for Natural Resources and Energy Director-General’s
Prize, and the Energy Conservation Center Chairman’s Prize.
Words from the Winner of the Environment
Minister’s Prize
The salesperson from Sharp introduced us to examples of other
dealers who had been certified as Dealers of Excellence, and so we
felt we needed to promote our sales activities from the standpoint
of environmental conservation. Our efforts to do just that led to us
winning this prize.
We were surprised at the solemnity of the award ceremony, which
was held at Tokyo Big Sight. We were also featured prominently in
our local newspaper and we received a great response from our
customers. We really have a sense of the significance of this award.
Receiving this award has
given us encouragement,
and we want to put even
more energy into advising
customers and showing
them how to use
consumer electronics in a
way that effectively saves
energy and resources.
Owners of Fukuoka Shoten,
a Sharp dealer in Iwate Prefecture
(winner of the Environment
Minister’s Prize)
Web
Words from an award-winning dealer
OVERSEAS TOPICS
Global Suppliers Conference in Malaysia
Participation in Reverse Trade Fairs
Aggressively Promotes Local Procurement
The Malaysia Global Suppliers Conference was held in Kuala Lumpur
in October 2007, with the participation of some 230 people from 161
suppliers. At this conference, Sharp executives in charge of
procurement explained Sharp’s policies as well as plans to expand
local procurement. Then each base in Malaysia introduced business
plans for the last half of 2007. Lastly, Sharp requested the
cooperation of participants in ensuring a stable supply of parts and
materials.
A reverse trade fair is the opposite of a traditional trade show where
manufacturers have booths that exhibit things for sale. Instead,
manufacturers display parts and materials they want to procure
locally, in an effort to seek new suppliers.
In addition, the executives in
charge of CSR promotion
described the CSR activities of the
Sharp Group, and asked the
suppliers to aggressively promote
efforts toward CSR.
Malaysia Global Suppliers Conference
Sharp has exhibited at the International Sourcing Fair (Shanghai,
China) every year since 2005. The number of visitors to this trade fair
is increasing every year, and it represents a good opportunity to
advance global procurement. This
year, the Sharp booth featured a
hands-on exhibit of sample parts
and materials greater in number
and more varied than ever.
Business discussions proceeded
easily, and Sharp received many
inquiries about sourcing pressed,
machined, and molded items.
Sharp’s booth
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
46
Sharp and Society
In Pursuit of Becoming a Corporate Group Trusted by Society
For Shareholders and Investors
Appropriate Return of Profits
and Information Disclosure
One of the most important management principles for Sharp is to return a portion of profits to shareholders. By
providing prompt, accurate, and wide-ranging information, Sharp is promoting communication with shareholders
and investors in Japan and overseas, and the valuable feedback of these stakeholders is regularly relayed to Sharp
management for future improvements.
Actions in Fiscal 2007
Objectives
Objectives for Fiscal 2008
Achievements
• Improve information disclosure to
shareholders and investors
• Renewed contents of the investor relations
website
• Improve information disclosure to shareholders and investors and respond
to the diversified needs of investors
• Expand the number of regions overseas hosting IR meetings
• Hold explanation sessions for individual investors
Basic Policies
Concerning Profit Sharing
Sharp considers distributing profits to shareholders to be one
of the most important management issues. While maintaining
consistently stable dividend payouts, and while considering its
consolidated business performance, financial situation, and
future business development in a careful and comprehensive
manner, Sharp implements a set of policies to return profits to
its shareholders, such as increasing the amount of periodic
dividends.
Communication with Individual Investors
In addition to enhancing the contents of the investor relations
website in fiscal 2007, Sharp has improved the site’s search
capability and viewability. Sharp also held explanation sessions
for salespeople in charge of individual investors at securities
companies and participated in various seminars, where the
company explained its business results and strategies and held
question-and-answer sessions.
Annual dividends in fiscal 2007 were 28 yen per share, which
marked an increase for the eighth consecutive period. Sharp
will strive to return its profits to shareholders, aiming for a
dividend payout ratio of 30%, on a consolidated basis, in the
future.
Through future IR activities, Sharp will continue to make sure a
broad range of individual investors fully understand the
condition of the company’s business.
Sharp uses internal reserve funds for investment in future
growth fields, the development of uniquely featured products
and proprietary devices, overseas business development, and
environmental protection.
■ Net income per share (consolidated) and cash dividends
per share
(fiscal year)
Net income
Cash dividends
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
55.37
70.04
80.85
93.25
93.17
18
20
22
26
28
(yen)
Active Investor Relations
Sharp is striving to disclose a wide range of information in a
timely and accurate manner by proactively engaging in
communication with shareholders and investors through
domestic and overseas IR activities.
Sharp is continuing to go beyond its legal obligation to supply
certain designated information by actively disclosing additional
information about its businesses, as well as its management
policies and strategies.
Communication with Institutional Investors and Analysts
In fiscal 2007, Sharp was actively engaged in individual
interviews and meetings with institutional investors and analysts
in Japan and overseas. Sharp also held quarterly financial
results announcements, hosted factory tours, participated in
conferences sponsored by securities companies, and hosted
business strategy briefings with the participation of Sharp’s
management.
Sharp is also improving the content of its Japanese and English
investor relations websites and working to assure that there is
no information gap between Japan and overseas.
47
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
General Shareholders’ Meetings
Sharp strives to create an environment that enables
shareholders to exercise voting rights at the ordinary general
meeting of shareholders: efforts include holding the meetings
earlier than most Japanese companies, allowing shareholders
to exercise voting rights by computers and mobile phones,
participating in a platform for electronic voting rights for
institutional investors, and posting English notices about the
meetings on the website.
In June 2007, Sharp began using a larger venue, where its new
products were on display, so that as many shareholders as
possible could attend. Sharp is also enhancing information
disclosure by making public the events of shareholders’
meetings by posting video on the website the day after the
meetings for a certain period of time.
Web Investor relations
SRI (Socially Responsible Investment)*
As of June 2008, Sharp was one of the stocks chosen for the
following SRI indices:
• FTSE4Good Global Index (UK); March 2008
• Ethibel Sustainability Index (Belgium)
• Morningstar Socially Responsible Investment Index (Japan);
September 2007
• KLD Global Climate 100 Index (US); May 2007
* SRI: Investment in companies
that fulfill not only their financial
obligations but their
environmental and social
responsibilities as well.
Sharp and Society
In Pursuit of Becoming a Corporate Group Trusted by Society
For Employees
Creating a Fair, Positive,
and Progressive Workplace
Sharp stresses the importance of basic human rights and personal dignity, provides opportunities to enthusiastic
employees, and fosters the diverse abilities of all employees. Sharp is also promoting a workplace that utilizes
employees’ diversity, and is cultivating a system that supports employees in maintaining a healthy balance between
their work and home lives.
Actions in Fiscal 2007
Objectives
Objectives for Fiscal 2008
Achievements
• Developed a global human resource development system, the
Global Mid-Level Professional Human Resource Development
Program (GMP Program)
• Promoted career development rotations for engineers
• Promote the cultivation of managerial personnel to
support the development of global business
• Promote the GMP Program
• Promote the continuation of the
Corporate Affirmative Action for Women
Strategy Program and consider
additions to it
• Expand and diversify systems for
supporting the balance between work
and family
• 22.3% of female employees held junior manager (semi-managerial)
positions (up 5% from 2005 when the Corporate Affirmative Action
for Women Strategy Program was initiated); 48 women were at the
management level (27 more than in 2005)
• Initiated consideration of diversity management (strategy for
utilizing employee diversity)
• Implemented partial salary and new benefits for childcare leave
(started April 2008)
• Promote diversity management
• Introduce and develop a program to utilize the
diversity of female, physically or mentally
challenged and elderly employees, and
non-Japanese employees in Japan
Basic HR (Human Resources) Policy
For the mutual growth of both the company and employees’
happiness, Sharp upholds the following principles.
• Implement a corporate-asset-oriented management strategy,
which values the experience and technical skills of each
employee
• Carry out flexible personnel placement with a focus on “putting
the right employee in the right position,” based on performance
and ability, without favor or partiality
• Provide support so that each employee can deepen their
expertise, as well as obtain knowledge and skills in a broad range
Basic Human Rights and Personal Dignity
Personnel, Education, and Training Systems
That Value Employee Initiative and Diversity
Sharp Corporation systematically conducts human resource
development, and has introduced a variety of personnel,
education, and training systems (as shown below) that value
the initiative and diversity of each employee and help them
develop their individuality, motivation, and creativity.
In fiscal 2008, Sharp Corporation plans to implement the GMP
(Global Mid-Level Professional Human Resource Development)
Program to further foster mid-level personnel who can engage
in on-site global business development activities.
Next-generation human resource development systems
• Leadership program, Challenge course
The Sharp Group Charter of Corporate Behavior and the Sharp
Code of Conduct stipulate the corporate policy and guiding
principles for executives and employees regarding protecting
basic human rights and personal dignity, such as the
prohibition of both child and forced labor.
To promote these values, human rights seminars are held every
year at each Sharp domestic site. At overseas bases, Sharp is
making efforts to prevent the occurrence of human rights
problems, in accordance with relevant local laws and
regulations.
• MOT (management of technology) program
• Master system
Systems for bringing out individual ability and motivation
• Personnel declaration/career development system,
career development rotation
• Recruitment entry system
• Corporate Affirmative Action for Women Strategy Program
• SHINE program (for fostering young global employees)
Education, training, and self-development support systems
• Seminars classified by function and specialized field
• Correspondence course, Essential course
• Step-up campaign (qualification acquisition encouragement plan)
Good Labor-Management Relationship
Through Dialogue
Web Personnel, education, and training systems
Sharp respects employees’ right to organize and right of
collective bargaining based on the laws in each country and
region, and promotes amicable, trusting relationships with labor
unions.
In Japan, Sharp has monthly labor-management meetings:
these include the Central Labor-Management Council, which
involves top executives from both sides, and local
labor-management meetings at each site, where opinions are
exchanged on the business environment and
labor-management issues.
In Europe, Sharp has held European Works Council meetings
every year since 1997.
Corporate Affirmative Action for Women Strategy Program training female leaders
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
48
For Shareholders and Investors / For Employees
• Promote continual development of
diversified human resources and
capabilities to deal with changes in the
business environment
Sharp and Society
In Pursuit of Becoming a Corporate Group Trusted by Society
For Employees
Creating a Fair, Positive, and Progressive Workplace
Employing the Physically
and Mentally Challenged and the Elderly
Sharp Corporation remains committed to actively employing the
physically and mentally challenged and creating a worker-friendly
environment. In fiscal 2007, Sharp Corporation’s physically and
mentally challenged employment rate was 2.02%.
Sharp’s efforts for the employment of the physically and mentally
challenged have a long history. In 1950, Sharp incorporated a
separate factory and named it the Tokusen Metal Limited
Partnership, to help rehabilitate blinded war veterans. Today, its
successor, Sharp Tokusen Industry Co., is making efforts as a
special subsidiary to increase the special-needs employment level.
In employment of the elderly, those employees who have reached
the mandatory retirement age of 60 can request reemployment
with Sharp Corporation (until the age when they start receiving
public pension).
■ Physically and mentally challenged employment rate
in Japan
Efforts Supporting a Work/Family Balance
Sharp Corporation is also systematically expanding various
systems supporting the balance between work and family. In
April 2007 Sharp Corporation was certified by the Japanese
Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare as a company that
achieved the action plan of the Law Concerning the Promotion
of Measures for Supporting Next-Generation Development.
In addition to the existing support systems, in fiscal 2007 Sharp
decided to pay employee salaries for the first ten days of
childcare leave, and also set up a new system of financial
support covering
The next-generation
childcare leave
certification mark
(these new
(nicknamed Kurumin)
shows that the company is
measures took effect
certified by the Ministry of
Health, Labour and Welfare.
in April 2008).
Web Systems to support work and family
(%)
2.5
2.0
1.5
1.83
2.00
1.91
2.02
2.02
1.80
1.46
1.49
1.46
1.52
1.55
1.0
0.5
0.0
2003
Sharp Corporation
2004
2005
Rate mandated by law
2006
2007
(year)
Average of all private-sector firms
From Affirmative Action
to Promoting Diversity
Sharp’s ongoing affirmative action efforts over the past three
years have generated positive results in terms of creating an
environment where female employees can excel. Sharp hopes
to expand on this success with its Company-Wide Diversity
Promotion Campaign, initiated in fiscal 2008 for the physically
and mentally challenged, the elderly, and non-Japanese
employees in Japan. Sharp is aiming to fulfill its one-of-a-kind
business potential by making full use of the diversity of its
employees.
Note: Averages of all private-sector firms are based on a survey by the Japanese Ministry of Heath,
Labour and Welfare.
Company-Wide Affirmative Action
for Women*1 Promotion Campaign
In October 2004, as the first step in its diversity management*2
program, Sharp Corporation established a team in charge of
expanding opportunities for women within the Human
Resources Group and began the Company-Wide Affirmative
Action for Women Promotion Campaign.
The Corporate Affirmative Action for Women Strategy Program
was started in June 2005. Since that time it has defined
measures to be implemented, as well as targets, regarding
matters such as the expansion of job fields for female
employees and the promotion of women to managerial posts.
Inter-departmental and inter-company collaboration has yielded
results such as a wider range of areas where women can play
important roles, increases in the percentage of female junior
managers (semi-managerial positions), and a greater number of
female managers.
*1 Affirmative action for women: A voluntary company effort that seeks to redress
discrimination against women in employment and ensure equal opportunities
(stipulated under the Law for Equal Employment Opportunity for Men and Women
in Japan).
*2 Diversity management (strategy for utilizing employee diversity) accepts the ideas
and values of employees with diverse backgrounds (with regard to gender, age, or
nationality) without being influenced by previous corporate or social standards.
It is a strategy for promoting company growth and the personal satisfaction of
employees by responding with rapidity and flexibility to changes in the business
environment. (Taken from the Diversity Work Rule Study Group Report of the
Japan Federation of Employers’ Associations)
Web Corporate Affirmative Action for Women Strategy Program
49
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
OVERSEAS TOPICS
Promoting a Safe Workplace with the Basic Principles
of Compliance and Supporting Employee Growth
Increasing awareness of employee rights and social standing is
accompanying China’s rapid economic development. In response
to these social changes, the Employment Contract Law to protect
employee rights went into effect on January 1, 2008.
To assure that it does not infringe upon any of the employee rights
secured in the new law, Sharp assembled a project team including
a core of personnel managers from Sharp Group companies in
China. The team responded to the new Chinese law by focusing on
the basic principles of compliance and supporting employee
growth. In order to assure a safe workplace, Sharp revised its labor
regulations and made sure the new regulations were adopted at all
Sharp companies in China before the new law took effect.
In addition, major decisions affecting the treatment of employees
are being made in a democratic way. Self-management for
employees is now mandatory under the new law. Therefore, Sharp
and the labor unions
cooperated to establish the
Employee Representative
Assembly run by and for
employees. Sharp supports and
respects the Employee
Representative Assembly as a
more democratic process in
Wuxi Sharp Electronic Components Co., Ltd.
(WSEC) employees at the first Employee
company management.
Representative Assembly
Web Personnel data
Sharp and Society
In Pursuit of Becoming a Corporate Group Trusted by Society
For Employees
Creating a Safe and Secure Workplace
In order to create a work environment where all employees can work safely and maintain good mental and physical
health, Sharp carries out various activities based on theme-based targets for each month and is expanding
education to raise awareness about safety and health. Sharp has also formulated the Healthy Sharp 21 program to
support improving the health of employees as well as their families.
Actions in Fiscal 2007
Objectives
Objectives for Fiscal 2008
Achievements
• Conducted safety and health inspections at 10 major
domestic plants
• Promoted major bimonthly theme-based targets (six themes
in total)
• Provided safety and health education for newly assigned
temporary staff and employees of subcontractors at each site
• Strengthen industrial accident risk reduction activities
• Conduct regular safety and health inspections at 11
major domestic plants
• Continue with preparations for the introduction of an
occupational safety and health management system
• Strengthen efforts to promote mental
health care
• Distributed a handbook to all employees
• Set up a counseling system through an outside medical
service institute
• Carried out mental health training for all employees
• Carried out stress checks for all employees
• Continue strengthening efforts to promote mental health
care
• Expand the support system for employees taking or
returning from medical leave due to mental health reasons
• Continue to carry out stress checks for all employees
• Strengthen measures against lifestyle
diseases
• Continue strengthening measures against lifestyle diseases
• Achieved periodic physical checkup rate of 99.9%
• Attain 100% participation in periodic physical checkups
• Promoted weight-loss programs for employees with metabolic
(including special health exams)
syndrome
• Strengthen guidance for employees with metabolic
• Promoted company-wide fitness programs
syndrome (improving exercise, diet, and smoking habits)
• Promoted company-wide walking programs such as team walking
Labor and Management Discuss
and Promote Safety and Health
Health Promotion for Employees
and Their Families
Sharp Corporation has established the Basic Philosophy and the
Safety and Health Principles in the area of safety and health.
Every year, the company formulates specific objectives and action
plans with the goal of totally eliminating industrial accidents.
Sharp created Healthy Sharp 21, a comprehensive
health-promotion program in Japan for employees and their
families that includes voluntary fitness programs to prevent or
remedy lifestyle diseases.
Every two months, Sharp Corporation also holds Central Safety
and Health Committee meetings that bring Sharp and the labor
union together. Participants confirm the status of company-wide
safety and health efforts and share valuable information. The
Central Safety and Health Committee members have also
assembled a team that conducts safety and health inspections at
each plant.
Sharp also gives employees periodic physical checkups, with
99.9% of all employees in Japan undergoing these checkups in
fiscal 2007. There is also active follow-up for employees who
are screened for further medical examinations in the form of
reexaminations and health guidance.
In addition, each site plans and carries out various activities
based on monthly labor-management safety and health
committee meetings. And since fiscal 2006, each site has held
monthly safety and health meetings with subcontractors’ site
managers to further improve the safety and health of their
employees stationed inside Sharp sites.
At Sharp Corporation, the annual rate of industrial accidents per
thousand employees (resulting in a leave of absence lasting at
least four days) was 0.17 in 2007. Sharp’s rate continually remains
well below the national average for the manufacturing industry.
In the future, Sharp will work to address the latent risk of accidents
and implement proactive safety measures to prevent or reduce
accidents. To do so, Sharp will build an occupational safety and
health management system, based on the Plan-Do-Check-Act
(PDCA) cycle, that promotes safety and health activities in an
organizational and voluntary way. Sharp aims to have this system
in place at all production sites within three years, as it pursues its
ongoing goal of creating a safe and comfortable workplace.
■ Annual industrial accident rates in Japan
(per thousand employees)
(%)
4.0
3.5
3.0
3.4
3.4
2.6
2.5
2.5
3.3
3.2
2.4
2.4
1.5
1.0
0.0
0.17
2003
0.47
2004
0.30
2005
0.13
2006
In fiscal 2008, the Japanese government began a policy of
special health exams and health guidance to help people avoid
or treat metabolic syndrome. In line with this policy, Sharp will
create programs in Japan that encourage employees to make
lifestyle changes involving diet, exercise, and smoking, and to
raise their awareness of health self-management.
Mental Health Care
In order to help its employees prevent and deal with mental
illnesses at an early stage and support their smooth return from
medical leave, Sharp Corporation has developed a counseling
system involving medical specialists, company counselors, and
an outside medical service institute. To promote correct
awareness of mental health, the company also conducts
various training and awareness activities.
Also, as part of periodic health checkups, Sharp Corporation
carries out mental stress checkups on all employees (based on
self-diagnosis, 97.1% participation rate). For employees who
have been found to have high stress levels, the company
provides training to enhance their capacity for
self-management and gives one-on-one counseling through
company physicians and counselors.
In fiscal 2007, Sharp distributed a mental health handbook,
expanded in-house mental health counseling, and
strengthened consultation using outside medical service
institutes.
2.0
0.5
For Employees
• Strengthen industrial accident risk
reduction activities
• Improve safety and health awareness
of newly assigned temporary staff and
employees of subcontractors
stationed inside Sharp sites in Japan
0.17
Sharp also plans on continuing to expand the support system
for employees taking or returning from medical leave due to
mental health reasons.
2007
(year)
Manufacturing industry average
All-industry average
Sharp Corporation
Note: Averages for all industries and the manufacturing industry are based on a survey by
the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare.
Web Health and safety data
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
50
Sharp and Society
In Pursuit of Becoming a Corporate Group Trusted by Society
For Local Communities
Social Contribution Activities
as a Corporate Citizen
With the Sharp Green Club (SGC) acting as the umbrella organization, Sharp conducts community-based activities
that contribute to society in Japan and overseas. Since fiscal 2004, Sharp has also been creating Sharp Forests all
around Japan in areas where Sharp bases and sales offices are located.
Actions in Fiscal 2007
Objectives
Japan:
• Create Sharp Forests at 10 or more locations
• Provide environmental education at 500
elementary schools for the year
• Expand local social contribution activities at
sales and service bases
Overseas:
• Expand activities centered on the Sharp Charity
Foundation in China
• Develop a network for social contribution
activities at overseas bases
• Created Sharp Forests at 10 locations
• Provided environmental education at 537 elementary schools
• A total of 12,836 people participated in 572 local social
contribution activities at 85 bases
• Continue Sharp Forest activities
• Provide environmental education for at least
500 elementary schools for the year
• Continue local social contribution activities at
all Sharp sales and service bases
• In China, provided scholarships (about 180 people at 11 universities), • Continue activities centered on the Sharp
donated Sharp products (about 150 air purifiers to approx. 60 public
Charity Foundation in China
hospitals), planted trees to control drifting sand and dust in Tianjin,
• Expand environmental education in overseas
and carried out beautification campaigns in areas near Sharp bases
regions
• Developed a network to gather information on environmentally
related social contribution activities from overseas bases
Sharp Green Club (SGC) Expands
Social Contribution Activities
Leave Systems
to Support Social Contribution Activities
In June 2003 in Japan, Sharp and its labor union jointly established
the Sharp Green Club (SGC) as an organization to plan and
manage a variety of social contribution activities (mainly volunteer
environmental activities).
To raise awareness and support the participation of employees
in voluntary social contribution activities, Sharp Corporation in
Japan has introduced a volunteer leave system and a
multipurpose leave system.
SGC promotes various activities such as cleanup campaigns and
tree-planting activities in local areas, with the aim of providing
employees with opportunities to contribute to communities by
participating in activities with local citizens, while becoming more
aware of the importance of the environment and volunteering.
In fiscal 2007, a total of 27,405 employees participated in SGC
activities.
Under the volunteer leave system, employees can take up to
a one-year leave from work to engage in volunteer activities
that constitute a significant contribution to society. Under the
multipurpose leave system, employees can receive eight days
of extra paid leave per year to help out in the local community,
care for ill, elderly, or mentally or physically challenged family
members, or perform other socially valuable activities.
Since 2001, the Fukuyama Plant has been participating in
beautification campaigns around the area. This year, as part of the
49th Annual Fukuyama Public Health Rally, the efforts of employees
won high ratings and garnered a letter of thanks from local
authorities as “a local organization or group who has had an impact
on environmental beautification, particularly in support of cleanup
activities.”
One of the main activities of SGC is to create Sharp Forests in
areas near Sharp bases and sales offices around Japan. In fiscal
2007, SGC added the Sharp Kagawa Forest and the Fukuoka
Sharp Takasu Forest to its roster, and also made preparations to
establish new forests in Kameyama and Okinawa. Altogether, SGC
has developed Sharp Forests in 10 locations nationwide.
In Nara Prefecture, SGC has been involved in ongoing activities to
preserve the environment of the SGC Asuka Forest since 2006.
These efforts have been greatly appreciated, and the local Asuka
Village administration presented Sharp with a certificate of gratitude
recognizing Sharp for its distinguished services to the area.
Approximately 160 Students
Accepted for Internships
Sharp Corporation has an internship program in Japan that
gives university students on-the-job training to support their
career development.
In fiscal 2007, the company accepted about 100 liberal arts
students into its business internship programs and about
60 science and technology students in its technical internship
programs.
Cosponsoring the Asian Pacific Awards
Sharp will continue to work closely with local communities to put
energy into activities to protect the environment.
The Asian Pacific Awards (sponsored by Mainichi Newspapers
Co. and Asian Affairs Research Council) honor distinguished
published works on topics such as politics, economics,
diplomacy, and culture in the Asia-Pacific region. Sharp has
been a cosponsor since the start of these awards in 1989, as
part of efforts to contribute to development in the Asia-Pacific
region. The commendation ceremony of the 19th Asian Pacific
Awards was held in November 2007.
Sharp Green Club Asuka Forest
19th Asian Pacific Awards ceremony
Individual overseas sites have also carried out a variety of activities,
such as tree-planting, cleanups in local communities, and
environmental education classes at schools.
Web Sharp Forests
51
Objectives for Fiscal 2008
Achievements
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
Local Social Contribution Activities in Japan and Overseas
For Local Communities
■ Activities in Support of Local Communities
In addition to participating in various campaigns in cooperation with local
crime prevention associations and traffic safety associations, Sharp is
deepening exchanges with local communities by sponsoring programs
such as summer festivals and sports and cultural events.
Each year, Sharp sites take part in various events. The Sharp head office
distributes and mounts protective mesh covers on bicycle baskets as
part of a campaign to prevent opportunistic theft (bag-snatching), the
Nara Plant cosponsors the National Goldfish Scooping Competition, and
the Advanced Development and Planning Center in Tenri, Nara,
cosponsors the Yamabiko Concert.
■ Contributing to Community Beautification Campaigns
(SEMEX/Mexico)
In October 2007, Sharp Electrónica Mexico S.A. de C.V. (SEMEX) held
its Beach Cleanup Day at El Bebé Beach in Rosarito, Baja California.
Approximately 340 employees and their families and friends participated
in the event.
The event saw the participation of officials of the municipality, who
provided heavy equipment and machinery to haul away the accumulated
trash. The Red Cross also assisted with stand-by emergency units and
the help of staff members. With the support of these groups,
participants collected nearly 14 tons of garbage.
■ Environmental Classes at Eco Art Festa Osaka
■ Invitation to Local Children (SATL/Thailand)
The Eco Art Festa Osaka is an event held to nurture creative talent and
awaken environmental awareness in individuals, as part of the city of
Osaka’s efforts to build a creative urban community.
In Thailand, the second Saturday in January is Children’s Day. This day
celebrates their healthy growth and development with a variety of fun
events.
At this event in November 2007, Sharp held classes on the environment
aimed at parents and children selected from those who responded to a
public announcement. Sharp employees served as teachers/lecturers.
The class was held while cruising Osaka Bay on board a public relations
boat operated by the Port of Osaka. This class presented a good
opportunity to deepen the understanding of Sharp’s efforts toward the
environment through discussions of topics such as recycling, solar
power, and LEDs.
On January 12, 2008, Sharp Appliances (Thailand) Ltd. (SATL)
celebrated Children’s Day by inviting local children to play games and
receive gifts of sweet treats and school supplies.
■ Support for Youth Environmental Awareness Program
(SEGA/Germany)
Sharp Electronics Germany
and Austria (SEGA) is
supporting a project called
“Pupils Become Climate
Observers” put forward by
the German Institute for
Weather and Climate
Communication. The first
meteorological station was
completed at a
comprehensive school in
the city of Hamburg, where
SEGA is located. Under this
project, by the end of 2008,
a total of 10 meteorological
stations will have been built
at Hamburg-area schools.
■ Participating in Community Flower Planting
In July 2007, Sharp staff from its Utsunomiya Building, a sales and
service base, participated in an event to transplant cosmos flower
seedlings along the Cosmos Road, a bicycle path that runs along the
Tagawa River, which flows through the city of Utsunomiya. This activity
has been conducted by a branch of the Utsunomiya River Protection
Association since 1996, and Sharp has been participating since 2004.
About 30 employees and their families joined in this activity.
Web Local social contribution activities
This project is an
opportunity to generate
interest in climate issues
among the younger
generation, which SEGA
expects could lead to
Hamburg becoming a
model city for environmental
protection.
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
52
Third-Party Review
53
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
Information on Sharp’s Website
Additional information related to this Environmental and Social Report can be found on Sharp’s website at:
http://sharp-world.com/corporate/eco/report2008/
The contents of the website are subject to update, revision, and deletion without prior notice.
Information on the website
See page(s)
in the report
Compiling This Report
GRI content index
Sites (companies) covered by environmental performance data
Calculation standards for environmental performance indices
1
Concept of CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility)
−
Environmental and Social Report Contents
2
A Message to People and the Earth
−
Outline of the Sharp Group
Corporate information
Financial results
5
Corporate Governance
−
6
Compliance and Risk Management
Sharp Group Charter of Corporate Behavior (full text)
Sharp Code of Conduct (full text)
Sharp’s Group efforts to firmly establish CSR and BRM
CSR activities in domestic sales
Disaster risk management
7
Information Security and Intellectual Property
Basic Policy on Information Security
Basic Policy on Protecting Personal Information
System for information security and protection of personal
information in Japan
Privacy Mark-certified affiliated companies
Incentives for employee inventions
8
Management
Special Feature Aiming for a Low-Carbon Society
Further Evolution of the Super Green Factory
Building the Sakai Manufacturing Complex, a Production Model for a Low-Carbon Society
Confronting the Challenge of Reducing the Costs of Solar Power Generation and
Expanding Production of Thin-Film Solar Cells
The “LCD” That Comes After the LCD—Aiming for the Ultimate in Energy Efficiency
and Minimal Resource Use
Aiming to Have Energy-Creating and Energy-Saving Products More Than Balance Out
Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Special Focus
Sharp and the
Environment
Sharp and Society
−
3・4
Kameyama Plant
Green Factories
Solar power generation systems
AQUOS
Green Products
Corporate vision
Carbon-neutral living
9‒14
1 Further Expanding Plastic Recycling
Target and results of closed-loop plastic material recycling
15・16
2 Social Contribution Activities in China
−
17・18
3 Expanding the Range of Environmental Social Contribution
Activities
Sharp Forests
Elementary school environmental education
Everybody’s an ECO fan
19‒21
Advanced Measures for Environmental Conservation as
Management Policy
Sharp Group Charter of Corporate Behavior (full text)
Sharp Code of Conduct (full text)
23・24
Advancing Super Green Management
ISO 14001-certified sites (companies)
Environmental education
25・26
Environmental Accounting
−
How Business Activities Relate to the Environment
−
Developing Super Green Technologies
Environmental technologies
29・30
Creating Super Green Products and Devices
Green Products
Green Devices
LCA data for major products
Green Procurement Guidelines
31・32
Building Super Green Factories
Green Factories
Environmental data on Sharp production sites
33
Curbing Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Reductions in greenhouse gases
Data on greenhouse gases
34
Minimizing and Recycling Waste
Waste reduction
Data on waste
Effective water usage
Data on water usage
35
Effectively Managing Chemical Substances,
Conducting Risk Management
Data on chemical substance management
Data on the atmosphere and water quality
36
Environmentally Conscious Logistics
Data on distribution
37
Developing Super Green Recycling
Information on PC recycling
Data on recycling of used products
38
27
28
39
Promoting Environmental Communication
Exchanges with local communities
Objectives and Achievements in the Social Dimension of CSR
−
41・42
For Customers
Delivering Peace of Mind and
Satisfaction to Every Customer
Quality guarantee system
ISO 9001-certified sites (companies)
43・44
For Business Partners
Mutual Prosperity with Suppliers
and Dealers
Sharp Basic Purchasing Principles
Sharp Supply-Chain CSR Deployment Guidebook
Words from an award-winning dealer
45・46
For Shareholders and
Investors
Appropriate Return of Profits and
Information Disclosure
Investor relations
For Employees
Personnel, education, and training systems
Corporate Affirmative Action for Women Strategy Program
Creating a Fair, Positive, and
Systems to support work and family
Progressive Workplace
Personnel data
Creating a Safe and Secure Workplace Health and safety data
For Local Communities
Social Contribution Activities
as a Corporate Citizen
47
Sharp Forests
Local social contribution activities
48・49
50
51・52
Environmental/social history and awards
−
Sharp Environmental and Social Report 2008
54
This report has been certified for Color Universal Design, a user-oriented
design system developed in consideration of people with various types of
color vision, to allow information to be accurately conveyed to as many
individuals as possible. The system was developed by the Color Universal
Design Organization (CUDO), a nonprofit organization in Japan.
22-22 Nagaike-cho, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8522, Japan
Phone: +81-6-6621-1221
http://www.sharp.co.jp/
Printed with VOC (volatile organic
compound)-free ink
Published July 2008
Printed in Japan
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