Educational Services Tx86 Series Cartridge Tape Subsystem Owner’s Manual

Educational Services Tx86 Series Cartridge Tape Subsystem Owner’s Manual
Educational Services
Tx86 Series
Cartridge Tape Subsystem
Owner’s Manual
EK–OTX86–OM–001
Digital Equipment Corporation
First Edition, July 1992
The information in this document is subject to change without notice and should not be construed as a
commitment by Digital Equipment Corporation. Digital Equipment Corporation assumes no responsibility
for any errors that may appear in this document.
Copyright © Digital Equipment Corporation 1992
All Rights Reserved.
Printed in U.S.A.
The following are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation: BASIC, CompacTape, DECdirect,
DECmailer, DECservice, DSSI, InfoServer, KFQSA, MicroVAX, MicroVAX II, SERVICenter, TF, TK, TZ,
ULTRIX, VAX, VAX 4000, VAX 6000, VAXserver, VMS, and the DIGITAL logo.
Contents
About This Manual
1
About the Tx86 Cartridge Tape Subsystem
In This Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tx86 Cartridge Tape Subsystem
Data Tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cartridge Compatibility . . . . . . .
Cleaning Tape . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Related Documents . . . . . . . . .
2
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1–1
1–2
1–7
1–9
1–11
1–13
1–14
4
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2–1
2–2
2–7
2–9
2–11
2–12
2–13
2–15
In This Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Common Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3–1
3–2
3–4
Operating the Tx86 Subsystem
In This Chapter . . . . . . . . . .
Indicators and Controls . . . . .
Cartridge Write-Protect Switch
Loading a Cartridge . . . . . . .
Using a Cartridge . . . . . . . . .
Using the CleaningTape III . .
Unloading a Cartridge . . . . . .
Preserving Cartridges . . . . . .
3
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...
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Solving Problems
Running Local Programs on the TF86 Subsystem
In This Chapter
...........................................
4–1
Contents–iii
Using the TF86 PARAMS Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the TF86 DIRECT and HISTRY Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the TF86 DRVEXR and DRVTST Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4–3
4–11
4–13
Appendix A Tx86 Subsystem Specifications
Appendix B Standard VMS Commands
Using the Subsystem Efficiently . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tape Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B–1
B–2
Appendix C Using the TZ86 Subsystem with the ULTRIX Operating
System
In this Appendix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding the TZ86 to your ULTRIX system . . .
Getting Maximum Capacity and Performance
Using ULTRIX Tape Commands . . . . . . . . .
...
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C–1
C–2
C–8
C–12
Service Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D–1
Appendix D Digital Services
Index
Tables
1–1
C–1
C–2
C–3
C–4
C–5
C–6
C–7
TZ867 VMS Restrictions . . .
Determining the Tape Name
ULTRIX System Utilities . . . .
Common tar Options . . . . . .
Common dump Options . . . .
Common restore Options . .
Common dd Options . . . . . .
Common ltf Options . . . . . .
Contents–iv
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1–4
C–3
C–12
C–13
C–14
C–15
C–16
C–17
C–8
C–9
Common mt Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Common cpio Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C–18
C–19
Contents–v
TF86 FCC NOTICE
The equipment described in this manual generates, uses, and may emit radio frequency energy. The
equipment has been type tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A computing device pursuant
to Part 15 of FCC Rules, which are designed to provide reasonable protection against such radio frequency
interference when operated in a commercial environment. Operation of this equipment in a residential area
may cause interference, in which case the user at his own expense may be required to take measures to
correct the interference.
TZ86 FCC NOTICE
The equipment described in this manual has been certified to comply with the limits for a Class B computing
device, pursuant to Part 15 of FCC Rules. Only peripherals (computer input/output devices, terminals,
printers, etcetera) certified to comply with the Class B limits may be attached to this computer. Operation
with noncertified peripherals may result in interference to radio and television reception. This equipment
generates and uses radio frequency energy and if not installed and used properly, that is, in strict accordance
with the manufacturer’s instructions, may cause interference to radio and television reception. It has been
type tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B computing device in accordance with the
specifications in Part 15 of FCC Rules, which are designed to provide reasonable protection against such
interference in a residential installation. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a
particular installation. If this equipment does cause interference to radio or television reception, which can
be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference
by one or more of the following measures:
—
Reorient the receiving antenna.
—
Move the computer away from the receiver.
—
Plug the computer into a different outlet so that computer and receiver are on different branch circuits.
If necessary, the user should consult the dealer or an experienced radio/television technician for additional
suggestions. The user may find the following booklet prepared by the Federal Communications Commission
helpful: How to Identify and Resolve Radio-TV Interference Problems. This booklet is available from the US
Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402, Stock No. 004–000–00398–5.
The tabletop unit must be used with a shielded data cable.
Für Bundesrepublik Deutschland
For Federal Republic of Germany
Pour la République féderale d’Allemagne
Bescheinigung des Herstellers/Importeurs:
Hiermit wird bescheinigt, daß die Einrichtung in Übereinstimmung mit den Bestimmungen der DBPVerfügung 1046/84, Amtsblatt Nr. 163/1984, und Grenzwertklasse "B" der VDE0871, funkentstört ist.
Der Deutschen Bundespost (DBP) wurde das Inverkehrbringen dieses Gerätes angezeigt und die
Berechtigung zur Überprüfung der Serie auf Einhaltung der Bestimmungen eingeräumt.
Betreiberhinweis:
Wir sind verpflichtet, Sie auf folgende Fakten hinzuweisen (DBP-Verfügung 1046/84, §2, Abschnitt 5):
Das Gerät wurde funktechnisch sorgfältig entstört und geprüft. Beim Zusammenschalten mit anderen
EDV- Geräten können im ungünstigsten Fall Funkstörungen entstehen, die dann im Einzelnen zusätzliche
Funkentstörungs- Maßnahmen durch den Benutzer erfordern.
Externe Datenkabel:
Sollte ein Austausch der von Digital spezifizierten Datenkabel nötig werden, muß der Betreiber für eine
einwandfreie Funkentstörung sicherstellen, daß Austauschkabel im Aufbau und Abschirmqualität dem
Digital Originalkabel entsprechen.
About This Manual
Purpose
This manual introduces the Tx86 series of cartridge tape
subsystems and describes the operating procedures.
Intended
Audience
This manual is intended for the TF86 or TZ86 subsystem owner.
Chapter 1
‘‘About the Tx86 Cartridge Tape Subsystem’’ briefly describes
the TF86 and TZ86 cartridge tape subsystems. This chapter
describes the CompacTape III and CleaningTape III cartridges,
and lists supplies and related documents.
Chapter 2
‘‘Operating the Tx86 Subsystem’’ shows the indicators and
controls on the Tx86 subsystem and explains their use. This
chapter provides a step-by-step explanation of how to operate
and clean a TK86 drive.
Chapter 3
‘‘Solving Problems’’ explains how to identify and resolve
problems with your subsystem. This chapter provides
symptoms and lists the most likely causes of problems.
Continued on next page
ix
About This Manual, Continued
Chapter 4
‘‘Running Local Programs on the TF86 Subsystem’’ describes
how to access and run the PARAMS, DIRECT, HISTRY,
DRVEXR, and DRVTST local programs on the TF86 subsystem.
Appendix A
‘‘Tx86 Subsystem Specifications’’ provides a specification listing
for the TF86 and the TZ86.
Appendix B
‘‘Standard VMS Commands’’ describes how to use standard
VMS operating system commands with your Tx86 cartridge
tape subsystem for optimum operating efficiency.
Appendix C
‘‘Using the TZ86 Subsystem with the ULTRIX Operating
System’’ describes how to add the TZ86 subsystem to your
ULTRIX operating system, how to get maximum capacity and
performance from the TZ86 subsystem, and using various
ULTRIX commands to save information on the TZ86 subsystem.
Appendix D
‘‘Digital Services’’ lists the services Digital Equipment
Corporation provides its customers.
Convention
The term Tx86 refers to the TF86 and TZ86 series of cartridge
tape subsystems.
Continued on next page
x
Chapter 1
About the Tx86 Cartridge Tape Subsystem
In This Chapter
Introduction
This chapter gives an overview of the Tx86 cartridge tape
subsystem.
Contents
Chapter 1 includes the following topics:
Topic
Page
Tx86 Cartridge Tape Subsystem
Data Tape
Cartridge Compatibility
Cleaning Tape
Supplies
Related Documents
1–2
1–7
1–9
1–11
1–13
1–14
1–1
Tx86 Cartridge Tape Subsystem
Tx86
Description
The Tx86 series of cartridge tape subsystems are used primarily
as backup storage devices and as devices for loading software
onto Digital computer systems.
The Tx86 comes embedded in a system enclosure or in a
tabletop enclosure with its own power supply. The Tx86 is
available in these variations:
TF86, for systems using the DSSI bus
TZ86, for systems using the SCSI bus
Basic
Components
The Tx86 subsystem consists of the following basic components:
TF86 Subsystem
TZ86 Subsystem
TK86 tape drive
TK86 tape drive
DSSI controller module
SCSI controller module
The TK86 drive is a streaming tape drive that can store up to
6.0 GB of data on a CompacTape III cartridge.
The Tx86 subsystem connects to the computer system through
the controller module, which is responsible for initiating
commands to the TK86 drive.
Continued on next page
1–2
Tx86 Cartridge Tape Subsystem, Continued
Basic
Components
(continued)
VMS Support
Depending on your host system configuration, the SCSI
controller module comes as one of the following two options:
This controller option. . .
For this SCSI cable. . .
Single-ended
6-meter (19-foot), maximum
length, single-ended cable
(ANSI SCSI standard)
Differential
Longer differential SCSI cables
with better noise immunity
The TF86 is supported as a generic device (unknown device
type) by version 5.4-2 or later of the VMS operating system.
The TZ86 is supported by various VMS versions with certain
restrictions (Table 1–1):
Continued on next page
1–3
Tx86 Cartridge Tape Subsystem, Continued
Table 1–1 TZ867 VMS Restrictions
VMS
Version
Restrictions1
<5.3
X
5.3
1,2,3
5.4
1,2,3
5.4-1
2,3
5.4-2
2,3
5.4-3
3
5.5
3
5.5-1
3
1 KEY
X = Not Supported
1 = VMS SHOW DEVICE command indicates "generic SCSI tape" and
ERROR LOGGING indicates "GENERIC MK SUBSYSTEM". This has
little impact on most applications.
2 = Standalone BACKUP not supported. You cannot create a standalone
BACKUP tape.
3 = Writing COMPACTAPE III media with TK85 format is not supported,
since VMS does not support density select on the TZ86.
Continued on next page
1–4
Tx86 Cartridge Tape Subsystem, Continued
Performance
Consideration
The VMS backup performance rate of your Tx86 subsystem can
depend on your system processor. For example:
Connecting directly to an embedded bus adapter on such
systems as the VAX 4000, VAX 6000, VAXstation 3100-30,
-40, -80, or InfoServer 150 (TZ86 only) provides optimum
performance.
Connecting to a MicroVAX/VAXserver 3xxx (Q–bus) system
with a KZQSA adapter can reduce the rate of performance
but does not limit the high capacity of data storage that
your Tx86 has.
Required Load
Device
The TF86, when connected to a KFQSA adapter installed
in a MicroVAX II or MicroVAX/VAXserver 3xxx system, does
not support booting of VMS or MicroVAX Diagnostic Monitor
(MDM) software. An additional load device is needed to boot
this software.
Continued on next page
1–5
Tx86 Cartridge Tape Subsystem, Continued
Decals
The Tx86 subsystem ships with decals including the
appropriate language of the country to which the subsystem
has been shipped. The decals adhere to the cartridge insert
/release handle and the indicator panel (see Tx86 Front Panel).
The tabletop TZ86 also has a decal for the switchpack on the
rear panel.
Tx86 Front
Panel
The following diagram shows the front panel of the Tx86
cartridge tape subsystem:
se
U
ed
g
e
ct
in
in
at dle
n
te te
e
e a pe per an
ri ro
ap Us Cle Ta
W P
O H
T
Text is 8pt on 8pt
Rt,z,-45
TK85 is TI med (ti) 12pt
t
ad
gh
Lo
Li
o
T
t
ai his
t
W
n
pe
O dle pe
a
T
an
H
rt
se his
t
In
se
lo e
C dl
an
H
R
d
oa
n
nl
to
U
ut t
o
B gh
T
i
ss L
re
P t
is
ai
th
W
n
pe
pe
O dle Ta
an ve
o
em
H
U
nl
oa
d
CARTRIDGE INSERT/RELEASE HANDLE
SHR-X0056G-91
1–6
Data Tape
CompacTape III
Description
-inch square, dark gray, plastic
The CompacTape III is a 4
cartridge containing 1200 feet of
-inch magnetic, metal
particle (MP) tape.
Cartridge
Packaging
Your CompacTape III is supplied with a:
Set of slide-in labels for cartridges
Cartridge handling information sheet
Reading and
Writing Data
The TK86 drive writes 56 pairs of tracks—112 tracks in all—on
the CompacTape III. The drive reads and writes data in a twotrack parallel, serpentine fashion, traveling the entire length of
tape on two tracks (at about 100 inches per second). The drive
then steps the head and reverses tape direction and continues
to read/write on the next two tracks.
Write-Protecting
Data
The CompacTape III cartridge has a write-protect switch
to prevent accidental erasure of data (see CompacTape III
Diagram). When the switch is moved to the left and the small
orange rectangle is visible, data cannot be written to the tape.
Beneath the orange rectangle is an arrow over two lines on the
write-protect switch. The arrow over the two lines symbolizes
data cannot be written to the tape.
Continued on next page
1–7
Data Tape, Continued
Write-Protecting
Data
(continued)
On the right side of the write-protect switch is another symbol,
an arrow over one line. The symbol indicates if the writeprotect switch is moved to the right, data can be written to the
tape.
CompacTape III
Diagram
The following diagram shows the CompacTape III cartridge and
its write-protect switch:
ORANGE
INDICATOR
TM
m
Co
pa
cT
e
ap
III
WRITEPROTECT
SWITCH
WRITEENABLED
WRITEPROTECTED
SHR_X1020C_89
1–8
Cartridge Compatibility
Comparison
of Read/Write
Ability
The following table shows cartridge compatibility with the
TK86 drive:
Cartridge Type
Selecting
Density with
TF86
Read/Write Ability in
the TK86
CompacTape III (TK85)
Read/write in 85 Mode
(48 tracks, 2.6 GBF)
CompacTape III (TK86)
Read/write in 86 Mode
(112 tracks, 6.0 GBF)
CompacTape III (Blank)
Read/write in 86 Mode
(112 tracks, 6.0 GBF)
Operating system support of density selection is not yet
available. The TK86 tape drive defaults to using TK86 format
(high density) for all writes from Beginning of Tape (BOT).
When you append data to the tape cartridge, the current media
density is used.
For information on selecting density using the TZ86 subsystem
with the ULTRIX operating system, see Appendix C.
To write in TK85 format (low density) on a TF86 subsystem,
you can use the PARAMS utility on VMS systems to modify a
new DUP Parameter named FORCEDENSITY. An explanation
of FORCEDENSITY is in the next section.
Continued on next page
1–9
Cartridge Compatibility, Continued
Using the
FORCEDENSITY
Parameter
For explanation on starting PARAMS to use the
FORCEDENSITY parameter, see Chapter 4.
The DUP parameter FORCEDENSITY controls how a TF86
subsystem determines what density to use when writing from
BOT.
FORCEDENSITY has the following possible values:
0 = automatic, as selected by the host
1 = low (TK85) density regardless of host selection
2 = high (TK86) density regardless of host selection
The factory setting is 2 for the FORCEDENSITY parameter.
Under this setting, the TK86 tape drive will always reformat
the tape to TK86 format on a WRITE-FROM-BOT.
Users wanting to write TK85 format must:
Load a tape written in TK85 format and do APPEND
operations
or
Change the value of FORCEDENSITY to 1 and then
WRITE from BOT.
CAUTION
Be sure to change the value of FORCEDENSITY
back to 2 after you have finished desired tape
operations.
1–10
Cleaning Tape
CleaningTape
III Description
-inch square, light yellow, plastic
The CleaningTape III is a 4
cartridge containing 1200 feet of
-inch, cleaning tape. See
Chapter 2 for information on using the CleaningTape III.
Cartridge
Packaging
Your CleaningTape III is supplied with a:
Slide-in label that has 20 boxes, each for marking a check
after cartridge use (see Cartridge Expiration)
Cartridge handling information sheet
Cartridge
Expiration
You can use the CleaningTape III cartridge approximately 20
times before it expires. The word expire does not pertain to an
expiration date. Expire means no cleaning area is left on the
tape.
To record the number of uses, mark a check in one box on the
cartridge label after each cleaning. After the final use, discard
the cleaning tape cartridge.
Continued on next page
1–11
Cleaning Tape, Continued
CleaningTape
III Diagram
The following diagram shows the CleaningTape III:
TM
ea
Cl
nin
gT
e
ap
III
SHR_X1020E_89
1–12
Supplies
Cartridges
Provided
One CompacTape III cartridge and one CleaningTape III
cartridge ship with the Tx86 subsystem.
How To Order
You can order additional cartridges by contacting your Digital
sales representative or by calling Digital’s DECdirect ordering
service at 1–800–DIGITAL.
The following table lists cartridges with order numbers for the
Tx86 subsystem:
Order Number
Description
TK85–HC
CleaningTape III cleaning cartridge
TK85K–01
CompacTape III data cartridge
TK85K–07
CompacTape III data cartridge (quantity, 7)
TK85K–A0
CompacTape III data cartridge (quantity,
1008)
1–13
Related Documents
For More
Information
1–14
The following documents provide more information on the Tx86
subsystem:
Order Number
Title
AA–Z407B–TE
VAX/VMS Backup Utility Reference
Manual
AI–Y506B–TE
Guide to VAX/VMS Disk and Magnetic
Tape Operations
AA–Z424A–TE
VAX/VMS Mount Utility Reference
Manual
EK–TX867–OM
Tx867 Series Magazine Tape Subsystem
Owner’s Manual
EK–OTK86–RC
Tx86 Tape Drive Operator’s Reference
Card
Chapter 2
Operating the Tx86 Subsystem
In This Chapter
Introduction
This chapter describes operating procedures for the Tx86
subsystem.
Contents
Chapter 2 includes the following topics:
Topic
Page
Indicators and Controls
Cartridge Write-Protect Switch
Loading a Cartridge
Using a Cartridge
Using the CleaningTape III
Unloading a Cartridge
Preserving Cartridges
2–2
2–7
2–9
2–11
2–12
2–13
2–15
2–1
Indicators and Controls
Description of
Indicators and
Controls
The Tx86 subsystem has the following indicators and controls
for operating the subsystem (see Diagram of Indicators and
Controls):
Indicators
Write Protected indicator
Tape in Use indicator
Use Cleaning Tape indicator
Operate Handle indicator
Beeper
Controls
Unload button
Cartridge insert/release handle
Continued on next page
2–2
Indicators and Controls, Continued
Diagram of
Indicators and
Controls
The following diagram shows the Tx86 controls and indicators:
ORANGE
YELLOW
ORANGE
GREEN
se
U
ed
g
e
n
ct
in
at dle
ni
te te
e
e a pe per an
ri ro
ap Us Cle Ta
W P
O H
T
Text is 8pt on 8pt
Rt,z,-45
TK85 is TI med (ti) 12pt
t
ad
gh
Lo
Li
o
T
t
ai his
t
W
n
pe
O dle pe
a
an t T
H
r
se his
t
In
se
lo e
C dl
an
H
R
d
oa
n
nl
to
U
ut t
o
B gh
T
i
ss L
re
P t
ai his
t
W
n
pe
pe
O dle Ta
an ve
o
em
H
U
nl
oa
d
CARTRIDGE INSERT/RELEASE HANDLE
SHR-X0056H-91
Continued on next page
2–3
Indicators and Controls, Continued
Power-on
Self-test
(POST)
When you turn on system power, the drive performs the poweron self-test (POST). The sequence of events is:
1. The indicators turn on sequentially, from top to bottom.
2. All four indicators turn on simultaneously for approximately
three seconds.
3. The green Operate Handle indicator and the two orange
indicators turn off.
4. The yellow Tape in Use indicator blinks.
5. If no cartridge is loaded, the green Operate Handle
indicator turns on and the beeper sounds.
Continued on next page
2–4
Indicators and Controls, Continued
Use this table to determine the subsystem’s operating condition:
Interpreting
the Indicators
Indicator
Label
Color
State
Operating Condition
Write Protected
Orange
On
Off
Tape is write-protected.
Tape is write-enabled.
Tape in Use
Yellow
Blinking
On
Tape is moving.
Tape is loaded; ready for use.
Use Cleaning Tape
Orange
On
Drive head needs cleaning, or the tape is bad. See
Using the CleaningTape III in this chapter.
Remains on after
you unload the
cleaning tape
Cleaning tape attempted to clean the drive head, but
the tape expired, so cleaning was not done.
After cleaning,
turns on again
when you reload
the data cartridge
Problem data cartridge. Try another cartridge.
Off
Cleaning is complete, or cleaning is unnecessary.
Operate Handle
Green
On
Off
Okay to operate the cartridge/insert release handle.
Do not operate the cartridge insert/release handle.
All four indicators
–
On
Power-on self-test is in progress.
Blinking
An error has occurred. See Chapter 3, Solving
Problems.
Continued on next page
2–5
Indicators and Controls, Continued
Beeper
A beeper sounds when you can operate the cartridge insert
/release handle. When you hear the beep, the green light is on.
Unload Button
The Unload button rewinds the tape and unloads the tape from
the drive back into the cartridge. The tape must be completely
rewound and unloaded into the cartridge before you remove the
cartridge from the drive. Depending on tape position, an unload
operation may take from 10 seconds to 4 minutes.
Cartridge
Insert/Release
Handle
Operate the cartridge insert/release handle to load a cartridge
or to eject a cartridge only when the Operate Handle indicator
is on, and after the momentary beep sounds. The handle
lifts to the open position and lowers to the closed position.
See Loading a Cartridge and Unloading a Cartridge for the
operating procedures.
2–6
Cartridge Write-Protect Switch
Positioning
the Switch
Before loading the CompacTape III into the drive, position the
write-protect switch on the front of the cartridge. The switch
can move to the left so that the cartridge is write-protected, or
to the right so that the cartridge is write-enabled (see Diagram
of the Switch).
Diagram of the
Switch
The following diagram shows the write-protect switch on the
CompacTape III:
ORANGE
INDICATOR
TM
C
p
om
ac
Ta
III
pe
WRITEPROTECT
SWITCH
WRITEENABLED
WRITEPROTECTED
SHR_X1020C_89
Continued on next page
2–7
Cartridge Write-Protect Switch, Continued
Data
Protection
The following table describes what happens to data protection
when you move the write-protect switch:
If you move the write-protect switch
before loading the cartridge. . .
Then. . .
To the left on the cartridge, the tape is
write-protected, with the orange indicator
showing
You cannot write data to the tape.
To the right on the cartridge, the tape is
write-enabled
You can write data to the tape (if it is
not software write-protected).
If you move the write-protect switch
during operation. . .
Then. . .
From the write-protected position to the
write-enabled position
The tape becomes write-enabled after
a variable amount of time (on order of
seconds).
From the write-enabled position to the
write-protected position
The tape becomes write-protected after
a variable amount of time (on order of
seconds).
2–8
Loading a Cartridge
Steps To
Follow
The directions for loading a cartridge into and unloading a
cartridge from the drive are printed on the front of the drive.
The following are more detailed steps for loading a cartridge
(see Diagram of Cartridge Loading):
1. When the green light is on steadily, pull the cartridge
insert/release handle open.
2. Insert the cartridge.
3. Push the cartridge into the drive.
4. Push the handle closed.
The green light turns off and the yellow light blinks to show
the tape is loading. When the tape is at the beginning-of-tape
(BOT) marker, the yellow light turns on steadily. The tape is
now ready for use.
Continued on next page
2–9
Loading a Cartridge, Continued
Diagram of
Cartridge
Loading
The following diagram shows how to load a cartridge into the
drive:
1
2
3
4
SHR-0256-87
SHR_X1093_89_CPG
2–10
Using a Cartridge
Tape in Use
Whenever the yellow light is on steadily, the tape is ready to
use. When the tape is being read, written, or rewound, the
yellow light blinks.
Things To
Note During
Cartridge Use
Use the following table to determine what is happening during
cartridge use:
If. . .
Then. . .
The yellow light is
on steadily
A cartridge is loaded, but the tape is not moving. This condition
can mean that no application is communicating with the
controller, or that the application is communicating but is
not delivering commands for tape motion.
The yellow light
blinks irregularly
A read or write is in progress.
The yellow light
blinks regularly
The tape is loading, unloading, or rewinding.
The green light
turns on and the
beeper sounds
The tape is unloaded.
All four lights blink
An error has occurred during operation. See Chapter 3, Solving
Problems.
2–11
Using the CleaningTape III
When To Use
If the Use Cleaning Tape indicator turns on (see Diagram
of Indicators and Controls), the drive head needs cleaning
or the tape is bad (see Problem Data Cartridge). Use the
CleaningTape III. Follow the instructions in this chapter for
loading a cartridge into the drive. When cleaning is complete,
the beeper sounds for you to remove the CleaningTape III.
If a particular cartridge causes the Use Cleaning Tape indicator
to turn on frequently, it is suggested this cartridge be backed
up on another, and then discarded. A damaged cartridge may
cause unnecessary use of the CleaningTape III.
Problem Data
Cartridge
If the Use Cleaning Tape indicator turns on after you clean the
drive head and reload your data cartridge, your data cartridge
may be causing the problem. Try another data cartridge, and
if the Use Cleaning Tape indicator turns on again, call Digital
Services.
Expired
Cleaning Tape
If the Use Cleaning Tape indicator is on after you load the
CleaningTape III, then cleaning has not been done and the
cartridge is expired. Replace the cleaning cartridge.
The CleaningTape III expires after approximately 20 uses.
2–12
Unloading a Cartridge
Steps To
Follow
Follow these steps to unload a cartridge from the drive (see
Diagram of Cartridge Unloading):
1. Press the Unload button (or issue the appropriate system
software command). The yellow Tape in Use indicator
blinks as the tape rewinds.
2. When the green light turns on (the beeper also sounds),
pull the cartridge insert/release handle open to eject the
cartridge.
3. Remove the cartridge.
4. Push the handle closed.
CAUTIONS
Cartridges must be removed from the drive before
host system power is turned off. Failure to remove
a cartridge can result in cartridge and drive damage.
To prolong the life of your cartridge, return the
cartridge to its plastic case when you remove the
cartridge from the drive.
Continued on next page
2–13
Unloading a Cartridge, Continued
Diagram of
Cartridge
Unloading
The following diagram shows how to unload a cartridge from
the drive:
1
2
3
4
SHR-0257-87
SHR_X1049_89_CPG
2–14
Preserving Cartridges
Guidelines
For longer life of recorded or unrecorded cartridges, store
cartridges in a clean environment with the following conditions:
Do not drop or bang the cartridge. Doing so can displace
the tape leader, making the cartridge unusable and possibly
damaging the drive.
Keep tape cartridges out of direct sunlight and away from
heaters and other heat sources.
Store tape cartridges in temperatures between 10°C and
40°C (50°F to 104°F). For longer cartridge life, always
store the cartridge in its plastic container and in room
environment conditions of 72°F ± 7°F (22°C± 4°C).
If the tape cartridge has been exposed to heat or cold
extremes, stabilize the cartridge at room temperature for
the same amount of time it was exposed—up to 24 hours.
Do not place cartridges near electromagnetic interference
sources, such as terminals, motors, and video or X-ray
equipment. Data on the tape can be altered.
Store tape cartridges in a dust-free environment where
the relative humidity is between 20% and 80%. For longer
cartridge life, store the cartridge at 40% ± 20% relative
humidity.
Place an identification label only in the slide-in slot on the
front of the cartridge.
2–15
Chapter 3
Solving Problems
In This Chapter
Introduction
This chapter describes what to do if you have drive or tape
problems.
Contents
Chapter 3 describes the following topics:
Topic
Page
Common Errors
Inspections
3–2
3–4
3–1
Common Errors
Avoiding
Basic
Problems
You can avoid some errors by following these guidelines:
Use the correct cartridge type. See Cartridge Compatibility
in Chapter 1.
Care for your cartridges according to the guidelines in
Preserving Cartridges , Chapter 2.
Make sure the cartridge leader and the drive leader are in
their correct positions. See Inspections in this chapter.
Unload the cartridge before powering down the system.
Error
Influences
If an error does occur during subsystem operation, you may be
able to correct the error yourself. Factors influencing errors
include:
Defective media
Dirty drive head
Operator or user errors
Incorrect backup commands
See Finding Solutions in this chapter for information on
detecting and correcting these errors.
Continued on next page
3–2
Common Errors, Continued
Finding
Solutions
Use the following table to interpret error symptoms, determine
their causes, and take corrective action:
Symptom
Probable Cause
Possible Correction
Failure to mount or
read/write with new
or used cartridge
Bad cartridge
Retry with another cartridge.
Dirty drive head
Use CleaningTape III.
VMS INITIALIZE
command fails with
parity error
Tape calibration
failed
Try another cartridge.
Green light is on and
tape does not move
(yellow light stays on,
does not blink)
Cartridge load error
Inspect the cartridge for a
mispositioned leader (see Diagram
of Cartridge Leader in this chapter).
Replace the cartridge if its leader is
mispositioned.
Inspect the drive for a damaged,
misplaced, or unhooked leader (see
Diagrams of Drive Leader in this
chapter). Call Digital Services if
the drive leader is not in the correct
location.
All four lights
blinking
Drive failed selftest or detected a
hard error during
operation
Try to clear the error by pressing the
Unload button. If the error does not
clear (the tape does not rewind and
unload and the four lights blink), you
have a hardware failure. Call Digital
Services.
3–3
Inspections
Checking the
Cartridge
Leader
Before you use a tape cartridge, be sure the tape leader is in
the same position as the one in Diagram of Cartridge Leader.
Lift the door lock with your thumb and open the small door to
expose the leader.
CAUTIONS
Do not touch the exposed magnetic tape.
If the tape leader is not in the correct position, do
not try to fix it. Use another cartridge instead.
Diagram of
Cartridge
Leader
The following diagram shows the correct position of the
cartridge leader:
CARTRIDGE
LEADER
DOOR LOCK
(RELEASE BY LIFTING
DOOR LOCK WITH THUMB)
SHR-0002-86
SHR_X1027_89_CPG
Continued on next page
3–4
Inspections, Continued
Checking the
Drive Leader
Compare the leader inside your drive with those shown in
Diagrams of Drive Leader. If the leader is unhooked, misplaced,
or damaged, call Digital Services. Do not try to fix the leader.
Diagrams of
Drive Leader
The following diagram shows the location of the leader inside
the drive:
TAKEUP
LEADER
NOTCH IN
LEADER
BUCKLING
LINK
se
U
ed
e
ng
ct
in
at le
ni
te te
e
e a e
er nd
ri ro
ap Us Cle ap Op Ha
W P
T
T
U
nl
oa
d
CARTRIDGE INSERT/RELEASE
HANDLE (DOWN)
SHR-0249-87
SHR_X1028G_91_CPG
Continued on next page
3–5
Inspections, Continued
Diagrams of
Drive Leader
(continued)
The following diagram shows the correct and incorrect locations
of the drive leader:
TAKEUP
LEADER
BUCKLING
LINK
CORRECT
LOCATION
OF LEADER
ACCEPTABLE
LEADER
UNHOOKED
UNACCEPTABLE
TAKEUP
LEADER
NOTCH
LEADER
DISPLACED
ABOVE
LINK
SHR-0249-87
SHR_X1028F_91_CPG
3–6
Chapter 4
Running Local Programs
on the TF86 Subsystem
In This Chapter
Introduction
This chapter shows you how to use the following local programs
that reside in read-only memory (ROM) on the TF86 subsystem:
PARAMS allows you to modify parameters for your TF86.
DIRECT provides a directory of available local programs.
HISTRY displays information about the TF86.
DRVEXR exercises the tape drive and displays statistics
after successful completion.
DRVTST verifies the correct functioning of drive hardware.
Continued on next page
4–1
In This Chapter, Continued
Contents
Intended
Audience
4–2
Chapter 4 includes the following topics:
Topic
Page
Using the TF86 PARAMS Program
Using the TF86 DIRECT and HISTRY Utilities
Using the TF86 DRVEXR and DRVTST Programs
4–3
4–11
4–13
This chapter is for TF86 users only.
Using the TF86 PARAMS Program
About
PARAMS
PARAMS can be executed while the tape is controlled by
another application. PARAMS is used only to access and
change controller parameters.
When you execute PARAMS, communications between the host
system and the TF86 subsystem are through the diagnostic
utilities protocol (DUP). When you exit PARAMS, control is
returned to the operating system.
Starting
PARAMS
After defining a symbol node name to be the node name
parameter for your drive, access PARAMS with the DCL
command. The following example shows the sequence of
commands to start PARAMS. These commands are for the
VMS operating system, version 5.4-2 or later.
$ SHOW CLUSTER
View of Cluster from system ID 18582 node: DROVIM 7-SEP-1992 11:47:03
----------------------------|
SYSTEMS
|MEMBERS |
|---------------------------|
|NODE
| SOFTWARE | STATUS |
|-------|----------|--------|
|DROVIM | VMS V5.3 | MEMBER |
|GEAR
| RFX V103 |
|
|LIBRY | RFX V103 |
|
|TF86
| TFX V004 |
|
|CANDY | VMS V5.3 | MEMBER |
|BOLTS | VMS V5.3 | MEMBER |
----------------------------$ SET HOST/DUP/SERVER=MSCP$DUP/TASK=PARAMS TF86
Continued on next page
4–3
Using the TF86 PARAMS Program, Continued
Starting
PARAMS
(continued)
Note that you can determine the node name by executing the
SHOW CLUSTER command. Also note that, after TASK=, you
append PARAMS to execute the PARAMS program.
NOTE
The node name is the name of the tape device.
The node name is derived from the subsystem’s
serial number, unless you already reassigned the
node name through PARAMS. A drive received from
the factory has a unique drive serial number and,
therefore, a unique node name.
Once you invoke PARAMS through the SET HOST/DUP
command, the screen displays the following prompt:
PARAMS>
The PARAMS> prompt indicates that you have accessed the
PARAMS program.
Unit Off-Line
Message
If, when using the SET HOST/DUP command, you receive the
error message:
Unit offline
you might have forgotten to load the FYDRIVER program.
(Loading FYDRIVER a second time will not cause any problem.)
Load FYDRIVER as follows:
$ MCR SYSGEN
(to access SYSGEN)
$ SYSGEN> LOAD FYDRIVER
(to load FYDRIVER, prerequisite
to using diagnostics)
$ SYSGEN> CON FYA0/NOADAP
(to configure FYDRIVER)
$ SYSGEN> EXIT
Continued on next page
4–4
Using the TF86 PARAMS Program, Continued
Changing the
Node Name
You may want to change the default node name to something
you can recognize more easily than the node name the system
created. If you decide to change the node name, you should be
aware of the following:
It is preferable to change the node name only once—when
the device is first installed into your VMS system. Digital
Services representatives know how to change the node
name and avoid the error and additional system reboot
described in this section.
If you change the node name after the subsystem has been
correctly recognized by VMS, VMS will not recognize the
new subsystem node name when you exit PARAMS.
That is, if you execute the DCL command, SHOW
CLUSTER, you will not see the subsystem’s new node
name in your table. If you try to use the subsystem, all
applications will get errors indicating the subsystem is not
present. To avoid problems, reboot VMS. Then, you can use
the subsystem with its new node name.
PARAMS
Functions
At the PARAMS> prompt, you can use the following commands:
Use. . .
To. . .
HELP
SHOW /ALL
SHOW parameter
SET parameter
WRITE
EXIT
Display a list of available commands and usage format
Display all subsystem parameters
Display a specific parameter
Set a parameter
Save changes permanently in EEROM
Exit from PARAMS
Continued on next page
4–5
Using the TF86 PARAMS Program, Continued
SHOW
Command
Use the SHOW command to display the settings of the
subsystem parameters. The SHOW command has two formats:
SHOW /ALL
SHOW parameter
To list all parameters, type:
PARAMS> SHOW /ALL
The list of parameters is long but includes five that you might
want to change. In the following example, each row shows the
parameter’s name, the parameter’s current value, the factoryset default value, the acceptable minimum and maximum
values, and the format for representing the values:
Parameter
Current
Default
Minimum
Maximum
UNITNUM
FORCEUNIT
NODENAME
FORCENAME
SYSTEMID
0
1
0
1
0
0
255
1
0
1
"T8DBBB
"
0
420000F00002
"TF85
"
0
Radix
Decimal
Decimal
Ascii
Decimal
Quad
To display a specific parameter, type:
PARAMS> SHOW systemid
Parameter
SYSTEMID
Current
420000F00002
Default
Minimum
Maximum
Radix
Quad
Continued on next page
4–6
Using the TF86 PARAMS Program, Continued
SHOW
Command
(continued)
The following table defines the five parameters:
Parameter
Definition
UNITNUM
TMSCP unit number.
FORCEUNIT
Determines whether the UNITNUM value or DSSI node ID is
used to identify the TMSCP unit. If you clear FORCEUNIT,
then you should also assign UNITNUM to the desired value.
UNITNUM means nothing when FORCEUNIT = 1.
1 — Uses the DSSI node ID.
0 — Uses the TMSCP unit number parameter value.
NODENAME
Node name for the TF86 subsystem.1 Enter a 6-character
name. (The factory setting is a unique string derived from the
subsystem serial number.)
FORCENAME
1 — Uses a ‘‘canned’’ node name: TF86x, where x = A through
H, depending on the DSSI node number value (0 through 7,
respectively).1
0 — Uses the value set in NODENAME.
SYSTEMID
DSSI controller module’s 48-bit (hex) system ID. It is
recommended that you never change this value; it uniquely
identifies your drive.
1 If
you intend to change either NODENAME or FORCENAME, the system will not recognize the drive as
available until you reboot the VMS operation system.
Continued on next page
4–7
Using the TF86 PARAMS Program, Continued
SET
Command
Use the SET command to change parameters that you can list
with the SHOW command.
Syntax for the SET command is:
SET parameter value
In this example, parameter is the name of the parameter to be
set and value is the value you want assigned to the parameter.
CAUTION
The controller module does range validation
checking on each parameter. However, it is not
guaranteed all combinations of settings will result
in correct controller module operation.
Parameters changed are not actually effective until you execute
a WRITE command, described in the next section. If you
forget to issue a WRITE command and try to EXIT, a warning
message displays, telling you the parameter was modified but
not written.
NOTE
If you request changing some parameters, the
system will warn you that it must reset the
controller to accept the changes. Details are in
the EXIT Command section of this chapter.
Continued on next page
4–8
Using the TF86 PARAMS Program, Continued
WRITE
Command
Use the WRITE command to save, in nonvolatile memory,
the changes you made using the SET command. The WRITE
command is similar to the VMS SYSGEN WRITE command.
The syntax is WRITE at the PARAMS> prompt. The program’s
response depends on which parameters you changed. If the
change is allowed without resetting the controller, the response
is merely the PARAMS> prompt.
In the following example, the response requires user action:
PARAMS> SET NODENAME TAPE1
PARAMS> SET UNITNUM 18
PARAMS> WRITE
Changing NODENAME and UNITNUM each requires a reset
(initialization) of the controller. PARAMS asks:
Changes require controller initialization, ok? [Y/(N)] Y
CAUTION
Answering YES aborts the controller’s current
application, if any, and saves the parameters. Your
changes take effect immediately and program
control returns to the DCL command prompt.
To avoid aborting the current application, answer
NO. If you answer NO, all parameters changed using
SET since the previous successfully completed
WRITE command are ignored. You are returned to
the PARAMS> prompt. See the next section, EXIT
Command.
The above example sets the TF86 subsystem’s node name to
TAPE1, and the TMSCP unit number to 18. Executing WRITE
and answering YES to the controller initialization question
saves the node name and unit number in EEROM and resets
the controller.
Continued on next page
4–9
Using the TF86 PARAMS Program, Continued
EXIT
Command
Typing the EXIT command, at the PARAMS> prompt, ends the
PARAMS program, and the word Completed appears on your
screen.
NOTE
To exit from questions during the local program
dialogue, type Ctrl/C , Ctrl/Z , or Ctrl/Y . In this case,
your latest changes will be ignored.
The following table describes what happens when you use the
EXIT command:
If you. . .
Then the. . .
Did not SET a
parameter
EXIT succeeds immediately.
SET parameters
and forgot to
execute WRITE
EXIT is ignored and you are advised:
Parameter modified but not written. Still exit? [Y/(N)]
If you answer YES, the system EXITS
and returns to the DCL prompt. Your
modifications are not saved.
If you answer NO, the system returns
to the PARAMS> prompt. To save your
modifications, enter WRITE at the
prompt, and then EXIT.
SET parameters
and executed
WRITE
4–10
System EXITS and returns to the DCL
prompt.
Using the TF86 DIRECT and HISTRY Utilities
Starting
DIRECT and
HISTRY
To start DIRECT or HISTRY, use the same procedure for
starting PARAMS, but alter the value of /TASK in the SET
HOST/DUP command:
/TASK=DIRECT
or
/TASK=HISTRY
The following example shows the SET HOST/DUP command
with DIRECT or HISTRY as the task:
$ SET HOST/DUP/SERVER=MSCP$DUP/TASK=DIRECT nodename
$ SET HOST/DUP/SERVER=MSCP$DUP/TASK=HISTRY nodename
Using DIRECT AND HISTRY requires no further user
interaction.
About DIRECT
The DIRECT utility provides a directory of the diagnostic and
utility programs resident in the TF86 subsystem. An example
of a DIRECT display follows:
DIRECT V1.0 D
HISTRY V1.0 D
PARAMS V1.0 D
DRVEXR V1.0 SD
DRVTST V1.0 SD
LDRTST V1.0 SD
Completed
Continued on next page
4–11
Using the TF86 DIRECT and HISTRY Utilities, Continued
The HISTRY utility displays information about the history
of the TF86 subsystem. An example of the HISTRY display
follows:
About HISTRY
TF86
DSSI: TF86A5 /3 (DIPs)
Controller:
S#: EN03000193
HW: 000/PCB-rev:A000
Bt: 120/42DA8D6A (23-JAN-1991 15:00:47)
Cd: V004/8DC18611 (1-SEP-1992 3:47:36)
EE: 086.016 TD: 002
Drive:
S#: EN04500420
HW: 000/A000
Cd: 064/935C
EE: 001/E826
Loader (S/H/M): 000/000/000
Power on Hours: 1281
Power Cycles:
31
Completed
Using the example above, the following list describes some of
the information you see when you run HISTRY:
Reflects your device’s node name. The DSSI node name is
encoded from the controller serial number. The /3 (DIPs)
indicates that the DSSI node ID for this device is 3.
The serial number for the controller board.
The revision number of the controller software.
4–12
The serial number for the tape drive.
Using the TF86 DRVEXR and DRVTST Programs
DRVEXR
Program
The DRVEXR program exercises the tape drive. It is an
intensive data transfer test and indicates the overall integrity
of the drive. The following example shows the SET HOST/DUP
command with DRVEXR as the task:
$ SET HOST/DUP/SERVER=MSCP$DUP/TASK=DRVEXR nodename
An example of a DRVEXR display follows:
Write/read anywhere on medium? [1=Yes/(0=No)] 1
User Data will be corrupted. Proceed? [1=Yes/(0=No)] 1
Test Time in Minutes [(10) - 100] 10
Minutes to Complete: 10
Data Compares enabled. DIAGNOSTIC TAG parameters used.
Stat Report
Test Name: DRVEXR, Pass 1
Random Seed:
1042247360
Byte Count:
0
Pattern Number:
Data Errors:
Read
Retries:
0
ECC:
1
Hard:
0
Data Compare Errors:
Mispositions:
Kbytes Written:
9
Write
0
0
0
0
191478
Read:
94895
Test Passed
NOTE
The DRVEXR program prompts you for an execution
time. The DRVTST program displays a specific
execution time.
Continued on next page
4–13
Using the TF86 DRVEXR and DRVTST Programs, Continued
DRVTST
Program
The DRVTST program is a pass/fail test that invokes a
comprehensive test of the drive hardware. A Test Complete
message or a fatal error message appears when the test is
complete.
The following example shows the SET HOST/DUP command
with DRVTST as the task:
$ SET HOST/DUP/SERVER=MSCP$DUP/TASK=DRVTST nodename
An example of a DRVTST display follows:
Write/read anywhere on medium? [1=Yes/(0=No)] 1
User Data will be corrupted. Proceed? [1=Yes/(0=No)] 1
Minutes to Complete: 5
Data Compares enabled. DIAGNOSTIC TAG parameters used.
Tape Mark Enc.
At LEOT
Tape Mark Enc.
Long Gap Found
Test Passed
4–14
Appendix A
Tx86 Subsystem Specifications
Mode of
Operation
The Tx86 subsystem operates in a streaming mode with a
maximum transfer rate (at tape) of 800 kilobytes/s, formatted.
Media
The specified media for the TF86 subsystem is 1/2 in
(12.77 mm) unformatted magnetic tape with the following
characteristics:
Track density = 224 tracks/in (112 tracks)
Bit density = 42,500 bits/in
Number of tracks = 112
Tape speed = 100 in/s
Track format = Two-track parallel, serpentine recording
Cartridge capacity = Up to 6.0 GB, formatted
Power
Consumption
The TF86 subsystem consumes 56 W maximum.
The TZ86 subsystem consumes 40 W maximum.
Continued on next page
A–1
Tx86 Subsystem Specifications
Power
Requirements
The TF86 subsystem has the following power requirements:
12 V
5% @ 1.6 A (2.6 A surge), 75 mV ripple peak-to-peak
+5 V
5% @ 4.5 A, 75 mV ripple peak-to-peak
The TZ86 subsystem has the following power requirements:
12 V
5% @ 1.2 A (1.5 A surge), 75 mV ripple peak-to-peak
+5 V
5% @ 3.5 A, 75 mV ripple peak-to-peak
Continued on next page
A–2
Appendix B
Standard VMS Commands
Using the Subsystem Efficiently
Introduction
This section identifies guidelines that you should follow to use
the Tx86 subsystem effectively with your host application. To
take best advantage of the subsystem’s efficient processing
abilities, you must use certain qualifiers with the MOUNT and
BACKUP commands. This appendix describes those qualifiers
and their appropriate values.
Guidelines
For efficient operation of the TF86 or the TZ86 subsystem:
Choose a large record size when mounting a tape. The
value, 65534, is recommended.
Do not use the COPY command to save more than 9,999
files onto the tape.
The TF86 subsystem has an additional consideration for
operating efficiency:
Be aware that the TF86 subsystem uses a default
FORCECACHING parameter that enables the DSSI
controller to cache write data to the drive. (See the
discussion in TF86 FORCECACHING with the MOUNT
Command.)
B–1
Tape Commands
Introduction
The Tx86 cartridge tape subsystem uses the standard magnetic
tape commands that can be invoked under VMS operating
system, version 5.4-2 or later.
This section discusses the following VMS commands used to
operate the Tx86 subsystem:
For More
Information
For this command. . .
See page. . .
ALLOCATE
INITIALIZE
MOUNT
BACKUP
COPY
DISMOUNT
DEALLOCATE
B–3
B–3
B–4
B–5
B–6
B–6
B–6
This appendix is a reference only; it does not include all the
details that may be involved in using VMS commands.
For more information about VMS commands and command
files, see the VAX/VMS Guide to Using Command Procedures
(AA–H782B–TE), VAX/VMS Command Language User’s Guide
(AA–DO23C–TE), or the VMS System Manager’s Guide.
Continued on next page
B–2
Tape Commands, Continued
Using the
ALLOCATE
Command
The ALLOCATE command provides exclusive access to a
device and optionally establishes a logical name for that device.
Once you have allocated a device, other users cannot access that
device until you explicitly DEALLOCATE it, or until you log
out. Use the following format to allocate the Tx86 subsystem:
$ ALLOCATE device_name: [logical name]
For example, to allocate the Tx86 subsystem for your use and
assign it to the logical name TAPE1, do the following:
$ ALLOCATE MIA0: TAPE1
Using the
INITIALIZE
Command
CAUTION
Be sure to use a scratch tape before initializing;
otherwise, any data on the tape will be destroyed.
Use the INITIALIZE command to specify the device name, and
write a volume name to the magnetic tape volume loaded into
the TK86 tape drive. The tape must be write-enabled for the
initializing operation. Use the following format:
$ INITIALIZE device_name: [volume label]
As an example, to initialize the device TAPE1 and assign the
volume name GMB001, type the following:
$ INITIALIZE MIA0: GMB001
For the initialization to succeed, the cartridge must not have
been mounted (with the MOUNT command).
For detailed information regarding volume names and magnetic
tape operations, see the Guide to VAX/VMS Disk and Magnetic
Tape Operations (AA–M539A–TE).
Continued on next page
B–3
Tape Commands, Continued
Using the
MOUNT
Command
The MOUNT command lets you make a magnetic tape volume
available for processing. It loads the tape with the protection
set according to the write-protect switch on the cartridge.
Use the following format to mount a tape with the Tx86
subsystem:
$ MOUNT/FOREIGN/CACHE=TAPE_DATA device_name: [volume label]
[logical name]
As an example, to make TAPE1 available for processing, type
the following:
$ MOUNT/FOREIGN/CACHE=TAPE_DATA MIA0: GMB001 TAPE1
The screen displays a message:
%MOUNT-I-MOUNTED, GMB001 mounted on MIA0:
You must use the /FOREIGN qualifier when you are performing
BACKUP commands. Do not use it when you are performing
COPY commands.
Continued on next page
B–4
Tape Commands, Continued
TF86
FORCECACHING
with the
MOUNT
Command
The TF86 DSSI controller has a parameter, accessible through
the DUP PARAMS utility, that controls whether tape caching is
done. This parameter is called FORCECACHING. Its default
value is 1, which means that the controller always caches—even
if you specify /NOCACHE with the MOUNT command, unless
you also specify /READ_CHECK or /WRITE_CHECK.
You can modify FORCECACHING to value 0, which allows the
subsystem to honor the various means the application program
has to specify that commands not be cached.
CAUTION
Setting FORCECACHING to 0 and specifying
/NOCACHE with the MOUNT command can result in
significant subsystem performance degredation.
For more information, see the VAX/VMS Mount Utility
Reference Manual (AA–Z424A–TE).
Using the
BACKUP
Command
The BACKUP command provides protection against file volume
corruption by creating backup copies.
Use the following format to back up a file:
$ BACKUP/BLOCK=65534/ignore=(label) source:*.* tape:file.name
You can also back up lists of files and entire volumes.
See your system manuals before deciding on qualifiers for use
with the BACKUP command. For detailed information about
BACKUP and other VMS tape commands, see the VAX/VMS
Backup Utility Reference Manual (AA–Z407B–TE).
Continued on next page
B–5
Tape Commands, Continued
Using the
COPY
Command
Use the COPY command, with the Tx86 subsystem, to copy
files from tape.
In the following example, the MOUNT command requests that
the volume labeled GMB001 be mounted on the drive at MIA0
and assigns the logical name TAPE1.
The COPY command uses the logical name TAPE1 for the input
file specification. All files on MIA0 are copied to the current
default disk and directory. The files keep their original file
names and file types.
$ MOUNT MIA0: GMB001 TAPE1:
$ COPY TAPE1:*.* *.*
NOTE
Using the COPY command to move multiple files
may not achieve optimum performance. Check with
your system manager for more information.
Using the
DISMOUNT
Command
The DISMOUNT command cancels the previous MOUNT
command, makes the unit unavailable for processing, and
unloads the tape:
$ DISMOUNT logical_name or device_name:
Using the
DEALLOCATE
Command
The DEALLOCATE command cancels the previous
ALLOCATE command and makes the unit available for other
users. The following is an example of the command:
$ DEALLOCATE MIA0: or TAPE1
B–6
Appendix C
Using the TZ86 Subsystem with
the ULTRIX Operating System
In this Appendix
Introduction
This appendix is intended for those using the TZ86 tape
subsystem with the ULTRIX operating system.
This section includes:
Adding the TZ86 subsystem to your ULTRIX system
Tips on getting maximum capacity and performance
Using various ULTRIX commands to save information on
the TZ86 subsystem
C–1
Adding the TZ86 to your ULTRIX system
Setting the
SCSI ID
Before connecting the TZ86 subsystem to the SCSI bus:
1. Locate the SCSI ID switches at the rear of the TZ86
subsystem.
2. Ensure the SCSI ID (target ID) number for the TZ86 is
unique. The recommended ID is 5. Use SCSI ID 5 only if
no other device on the bus has SCSI ID 5.
3. Ensure all other devices on the SCSI bus have unique SCSI
IDs.
Connecting
the TZ86 to
ULTRIX
To connect the TZ86 subsystem to the ULTRIX system:
1. Physically connect the TZ86 cable(s) to the ULTRIX system.
2. Ensure an entry for the TZ86 subsystem is specified in the
ULTRIX system configuration file. If you have to modify
your configuration file by adding an entry, then you must
build a new kernel and reboot the system. This is explained
in this section.
3. Create logical device names for your TZ86 subsystem,
explained in this section.
Checking
the ULTRIX
Configuration
File
Locate the ULTRIX system’s configuration file. It should be
in the /usr/sys/conf directory under the mips or VAX system
subdirectory.
The configuration file name is the same as the system name
and must contain an entry for the TZ86 subsystem.
Continued on next page
C–2
Adding the TZ86 to your ULTRIX system, Continued
Creating an
Entry
If...
Then...
An entry does not exist,
You need to create an entry in
the configuration file.
An entry already exists,
You do not need to change the
configuration file.
An entry has the following format:
tape name at controller device#
An example entry for Bus 0, SCSI ID 5:
tape tz5 at sii0 drive 5
To create an entry in the configuration file:
1. Refer to Table C–1 to determine the name according to your
SCSI target ID and your bus number. Usually, users have
one bus, Bus 0. Find the name, listed under the Bus 0 or
Bus 1 column.
For example: The name for SCSI Target ID 5, Bus 0 is tz5.
Table C–1 Determining the Tape Name
SCSI Target ID
0
Bus 0
Bus 1
tz0
tz8
Continued on next page
C–3
Adding the TZ86 to your ULTRIX system, Continued
Table C–1 (Continued) Determining the Tape Name
SCSI Target ID
Bus 0
Bus 1
1
tz1
tz9
2
tz2
tz10
3
tz3
tz11
4
tz4
tz12
5
tz5
tz13
6
tz6
tz14
7
tz7
tz15
2. Determine the name of the controller to which the TZ86
subsystem is connected.
3. Include the word tape, name, controller, and the device# in
the entry.
Continued on next page
C–4
Adding the TZ86 to your ULTRIX system, Continued
Building
Kernel,
Rebooting
System
$
$
$
$
If you added an entry to your configuration file, you must
rebuild the kernel and reboot the system. Be sure to save the
original kernel before rebooting the system.
For example:
/etc/doconfig
mv /vmunix /vmunix.old
mv new_kernel_name /vmunix
/etc/shutdown -r now
(this creates a new kernel)
(save the old kernel)
(move the new kernel to the root directory)
(reboot the system)
Continued on next page
C–5
Adding the TZ86 to your ULTRIX system, Continued
Creating
Logical Device
Names
Use the MAKEDEV command located in the /dev directory to
create logical device names.
For example:
$ cd /dev
$ MAKEDEV tz5
leads to some or all of the following logical device names:
/dev/nrmt0l
/dev/nrmt0h
/dev/rmt0l
/dev/rmt0h
/dev/rmt0m
/dev/nrmt0m
/dev/rmt0a
/dev/nrmt0a
mt (in the middle of the logical name) means magnetic tape
device.
nr means no rewind when the utility completes. Use the
no rewind option when more than one operation is being
performed to the same tape.
r means rewind when the utility completes.
0 is the logical unit number.
Continued on next page
C–6
Adding the TZ86 to your ULTRIX system, Continued
Creating
Logical
Device Names
(continued)
l means low density.
h means high density.
m means medium density.
a means auxiliary density.
NOTE
Since the TZ86 is a high density tape subsystem,
be sure to use the logical device names including
h. The only exception is if modifications are made
to allow selection of TK85 density for writing via the
low density device entry. See the Selecting Density
section in this appendix.
C–7
Getting Maximum Capacity and Performance
Introduction
The TZ86 subsystem:
Can store up to 6.0 GB of data per tape cartridge
Run at peak streaming rates of 800 KB/s
This section explains how to maximize the functions of the
TZ86 subsystem.
Getting
Maximum
Storage
Capacity
To get maximum storage capacity:
Use block sizes that are integral multiples of 4,096 bytes, such
as 4k, 8k, 12k, 16k, and so forth. It is recommended you use
larger block sizes of 16k, 24k, or 32k, which:
Allow more efficient data processing by the host and on the
SCSI bus
Maximize capacity
Some utilities and commands default to using block sizes that
cause lower capacity and I/O rates. For example:
If you use a 512 byte block size (this is the dd command’s
default), you will be able to fit only about 740 MB of data
on the tape.
If you use the recommended block sizes, this tape has a
potential of 6.0 GB capacity.
Most utilities used for tape I/O let you select the block size
through command line switches.
NOTE
If you are not using ULTRIX V4.2a or later, with the
latest Common Access Method (CAM) software kit
installed, you have a tape file length limit of 2.1 GB.
Continued on next page
C–8
Getting Maximum Capacity and Performance, Continued
With striping or disk array techniques or when
running the tar command to backup multiple file
systems, you need to note the 2.1 GB limit. Plan
backups so that a tar or dump set does not exceed
the 2.1 GB limit. However, you can store multiple
save sets on the same cartridge.
Maximizing
Performance
To handle bursts of data, the TZ86 subsystem has 512 KB of
cache memory. This minimizes repositioning and keeps I/O
rates as high as the host can handle, up to 800 KB/s.
If a non-optimal block size is used, the possible average I/O rate
is limited. The recommended block sizes are: 16k, 24k, or 32k.
You can use larger block sizes of 36k, 40k, and so forth, but
performance increase is unlikely.
Other factors that can limit performance:
Data fragmentation on disks
Overusing the I/O channel bandwidth
Processing speed and host CPU loads
Memory size
Continued on next page
C–9
Getting Maximum Capacity and Performance, Continued
Selecting
Density
As explained in Chapter 1, density selection for write operations
is not supported by ULTRIX at the time of this printing.
However, if the CAM software is installed, you can:
Modify the /sys/data/cam_data.c file to recognize the TZ86
Assign the write densities selected by the host
The TK85 density is SEQ_42500_BPI (17h) and the TK86
density is 18h (no symbol is defined for this new media
format). Changing the cam_data.c file should only be done by
experienced users. You must rebuild the kernel to incorporate
the changes. (See the configuration guidelines earlier in
this appendix. Check the CAM software documentation for
information about adding new devices.)
To allow density selection from the shell level:
1. Edit the /sys/data/cam_data.c file. Ensure a copy of the
original is preserved and can be restored if necessary.
2. Make a copy of the TZ85’s density table (tz85_dens) found
in /sys/data/cam_data.c. In this copy:
Change the TZ85 references to TZ86
Change the density code from SEQ_42500_BPI to 0x18
for all the subentries in the new density table, except
for the minor 00 (rmtxl) subentry.
This allows device rmtxl entries to select TK85 format
and the others (rmtxm, rmtxh, rmtxa) to select TK86
format.
Continued on next page
C–10
Getting Maximum Capacity and Performance, Continued
Selecting
Density
(continued)
3. Make a copy of the entry in the device descriptor
information table for the TZ85 (search for DEV_TZ85) and
change:
TZ85 to TZ86 in the comment and in the "DEC----TZ85" string (underscores indicate five spaces)
DEV_TZ85 to the string: "TZ86"
&tz85_dens to &tz86_dens
4. Save the current kernel, build a new kernel, and reboot
with the new kernel.
C–11
Using ULTRIX Tape Commands
Introduction
This section describes ULTRIX commands used to operate the
TZ86 subsystem:
Table C–2 ULTRIX System Utilities
For this command. . .
See page. . .
tar
dump
restore
dd
ltf
mt
cpio
C-11
C-12
C-13
C-14
C-15
C-16
C-17
The TZ86 subsystem uses standard magnetic tape commands to
do backup and restore operations. The tar and
dump/restore commands are used most often.
Using the tar
Command
The tar command, which operates on files and directories,
writes and reads tapes. The tar utility uses the specified block
size or defaults to 10k byte block sizes. The default block size
results in a 16% decrease of maximum capacity and I/O rates.
Table C–3 lists the options you can use with the
tar command.
Continued on next page
C–12
Using ULTRIX Tape Commands, Continued
Table C–3 Common tar Options
Option
b
c
f
r
t
u
v
x
Meaning
Block size in bytes (n)
Block size in kilobytes (nk)
nb = n x 512 bytes in a block
Create tape, writes from beginning
Tape device argument to follow
Append to the end of the tape
Table of contents of tape
Backup all new or modified files from last backup
Verbose
Extract from tape (read)
The following examples show command lines with the tar
command to:
Write a file to tape:
$ tar -cf /dev/rmt0h
filename
-b 64k
Read a file from tape to your current directory:
$ tar -fx /dev/rmt1h
Using the
dump
Command
filename
To use the dump command, you need system privileges. This
command lets you write an entire file system to tape. Ensure
that the current directory is not within the file system being
backed up, except when backing up from the root directory.
The dump command uses 10k byte block sizes. A 16%
reduction in capacity and I/O rates can result from using
these block sizes.
Continued on next page
C–13
Using ULTRIX Tape Commands, Continued
Table C–4 lists the options you can use with the
dump command.
Table C–4 Common dump Options
Option Meaning
d
f
n
s
u
0-9
Tape density in bits per inch
Tape device
Notify all privileged accounts, the
status of dump
Size of tape in feet
Update the /etc/dumpdates file
with the date
Dump level
Recommended
Value
42500
57600
The following examples show command lines with the
dump command:
$ dump 0dsf 42500 57600 /dev/rmt0h /dev/rrz1a
$ dump unsf 42500 57600 /dev/rmt0h /usr/users
Dump level 0 is the highest and dumps the whole file system.
Dump level 9 is the lowest. All files, modified since the last
dump of the same or lower dump level, are dumped.
Using the
restore
Command
The restore command reads a tape that is backed up with
the dump command. The restore command can read a file, a
directory, or the entire tape.
The restore command uses 10k byte block sizes. A 16%
reduction in capacity and I/O rates can result from using
these block sizes.
Continued on next page
C–14
Using ULTRIX Tape Commands, Continued
Table C–5 lists the options you can use with the
restore command.
Table C–5 Common restore Options
Option Meaning
f
r
i
v
x
Tape device
Read everything from tape
Interactive
Verbose
Extract
The following example shows a command line with the
restore command:
$ restore -xvf filename
Using the dd
Command
Use the dd command to perform a device-to-device copy. The
copy is done by file or by image, depending on the specification
of the input or output device files.
Disks have two types of device files, image and block:
If the disk image file (/dev/rrxxx) is used, performance is
faster.
If the disk block file (/dev/rxxx) is used, it is easier to
retrieve a single file later.
The dd command uses the specified block size, or if none is
given, a default of 512 bytes. An 87% reduction in capacity and
performance can result from using the default block size. It is
important to specify a more optimal block size.
Continued on next page
C–15
Using ULTRIX Tape Commands, Continued
Table C–6 lists the options you can use with the
dd command.
Table C–6 Common dd Options
Recommended
Value
Option Meaning
if
of
bs
ibs
obs
Input file
Output file
Input and output block size (bytes)
Input block size (bytes)
Output block size (bytes)
32768
32768 for tape
32768 for tape
The following examples show command lines with the
dd command to:
Write to tape with the block device file:
$ dd if=/dev/rz1a of=/dev/rmt1h bs=32768
Write to tape with the image device file:
$ dd if=/dev/rrz1a of=/dev/rmt1h bs=32768
Read a tape:
$ dd if=/dev/rmt1h of=/dev/rz1a ibs=32768
Using the ltf
Command
Use the ltf command to write and read ANSI tapes. This
command operates on files and directories and uses the
specified block size. Otherwise, the command defaults to 2,048
byte blocks, resulting in a 50% decrease of capacity and I/O
rates.
Continued on next page
C–16
Using ULTRIX Tape Commands, Continued
Table C–7 lists the options you can use with the ltf command.
Table C–7 Common ltf Options
Option
B
c
f
u
t
v
x
Meaning
Specify a block size to use
Create tape, writes from beginning
Tape device argument to follow
Backup all new or modified files from last backup
Table of contents of tape
Verbose
Extract from tape (read)
The following examples show command lines with the ltf
command to:
Write a file to tape:
$ ltf -cf /dev/rmt0h
filename
-B 16k
Read a file from tape to your current directory:
$ ltf -fx /dev/rmt1h
Using the mt
Command
filename
The mt (magnetic tape) command allows you to give certain
commands to the tape drive.
Table C–8 lists the options you can use with the mt command.
Continued on next page
C–17
Using ULTRIX Tape Commands, Continued
Table C–8 Common mt Options
Option
Meaning
eof
bsf
bsr
fsf
fsr
offline
rewind
status
Write file mark(s)
Backward space file(s)
Backward space record(s)
Forward space file(s)
Forward space record(s)
Unload the tape
Rewind to the beginning of medium
Obtain information from the drive
The following examples show command lines with the
mt command to:
Get the status of a drive:
$ mt -f /dev/rmt0h status
Rewind the default drive:
$ mt rewind
Write two file marks to the default drive:
$ mt eof 2
Using the cpio
Command
The cpio command allows you to save files and directories on
tape and other media and retrieve these files.
Table C–9 lists the options you can use with the
cpio command.
Continued on next page
C–18
Using ULTRIX Tape Commands, Continued
Table C–9 Common cpio Options
Option
c
d
i
o
t
v
Meaning
Write or read header information in ASCII character
form
Create directories as needed
Copy in
Copy out
Table of contents of tape
Verbose
The following examples show command lines with the cpio
command to:
Write to tape all files and subdirectories from your current
directory:
$ find . -print | cpio
-ocv >
/dev/rmt0h
List all files and subdirectories that are on the tape:
$ cpio -ictv <
/dev/rmt0h
Retrieve all files and subdirectories from the tape:
$ cpio -icdv < /dev/rmt0h
Retrieve selective files from the tape:
$ cpio -icv <
’filename’ < /dev/rmt0h
C–19
Appendix D
Digital Services
Service Plans
Introduction
Digital Equipment Corporation offers a range of flexible service
plans.
On-Site
Service
On-site service offers the convenience of service at your site
and insurance against unplanned repair bills. For a monthly
fee, you receive personal service from our service specialists.
Within a few hours, the specialist is dispatched to your site
with equipment and parts to give you fast and dependable
maintenance.
BASIC Service
BASIC service offers full coverage from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
Monday through Friday. Options are available to extend
your coverage to 12-, 16-, or 24-hour periods, and to include
Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays. Under the basic service
plan, all parts, materials, and labor are covered in full.
Continued on next page
D–1
Service Plans, Continued
DECservice
Plan
The DECservice plan offers a premium, on-site service for
producing committed response to remedial service requests
made during contracted hours of coverage. Remedial
maintenance will be performed continuously until the
problem is resolved, which makes this service ideal for
customers requiring maximum service performance. Under
the DECservice plan, all parts, materials, and labor are covered
in full.
Carry-In
Service
Carry-in service offers fast, personalized response, and the
ability to plan your maintenance costs for a smaller monthly
fee than on-site service. When you bring your unit to one of
160 Digital SERVICenters worldwide, factory-trained personnel
repair your unit within 2 days. This service is available on
selected terminals and systems. Digital SERVICenters are open
during normal business hours, Monday through Friday.
DECmailer
Service
DECmailer service offers expert repair at a per use charge.
This service is designed for users who have the technical
resources to troubleshoot, identify, and isolate the module
causing the problem. Mail the faulty module to our Customer
Returns Center where the module is repaired and mailed back
to you within 5 days.
Per Call
Service
Per call service offers a maintenance program on a
noncontractual, time-and-materials-cost basis. It is appropriate
for customers who have to perform first-line maintenance, but
may occasionally need in-depth support from Digital Services.
D–2
Index
A
Adding the TZ86
ULTRIX system, C–2
ALLOCATE, B–3
B
BACKUP, B–5
/BLOCK=65534, B–5
Beeper, 2–6
C
Cartridge
loading a, 2–9
preserving, 2–15
unloading a, 2–13
using a, 2–11
Cartridge care
acclimatization, 2–15
guidelines, 2–15
handling, 2–15
labeling, 2–15
storage, 2–15
Cartridge compatibility
read/write ability, 1–9
Cartridge insert/release handle
when to operate, 2–6
Cartridge leader
how to inspect, 3–4
Cartridges provided, 1–13
Checking configuration file
ULTRIX, C–2
CleaningTape III
description, 1–11
diagram, 1–12
expiration, 1–11, 2–12
how to order, 1–13
label, 1–11
packaging, 1–11
when to use, 2–12
CompacTape III
description, 1–7
diagram, 1–8
how to order, 1–13
packaging, 1–7
positioning the write-protect switch, 2–7
reading and writing data on, 1–7
write-protecting data on, 1–7
Connecting the TZ86
ULTRIX system, C–2
Controls
cartridge insert/release handle, 2–6
diagram, 2–3
Unload button, 2–6
COPY, B–6
Creating an Entry
ULTRIX, C–3
Creating logical device names
ULTRIX, C–6
D
Data protection, 2–8
Decals, on the Tx86 subsystem, 1–6
Density selecting, ULTRIX, C–10
Density, selecting
TF86, 1–9
Index–1
Diagnostic utilities protocol (DUP), 4–3
Diagnostics, local
DIRECT utility, 4–11
DRVEXR program, 4–13
DRVTST program, 4–14
HISTRY program, 4–12
Diagram
cartridge leader, 3–4
CleaningTape III, 1–12
CompacTape III, 1–8
drive leader, 3–5
indicators and controls, 2–3
loading a cartrige, 2–10
Tx86 front panel, 1–6
unloading a cartridge, 2–14
write-protect switch, 2–7
Digital repair services
BASIC service, D–1
carry-in service, D–2
DECmailer service, D–2
DECservice plan, D–2
on-site service, D–1
per call service, D–2
DIRECT utility, 4–11
DISMOUNT, B–6
Drive leader
how to inspect, 3–5
DRVEXR program, 4–13
DRVTST program, 4–14
F
FORCECACHING, B–5
FYDRIVER, 4–4
G
Getting maximum storage capacity
ULTRIX, C–8
H
HISTRY program, 4–12
I
Indicators
all four blinking, 2–5, 3–3
all four on, 2–5
beeper, 2–6
diagram, 2–3
how to interpret, 2–5
Operate Handle, 2–5
Tape in Use, 2–5
Use Cleaning Tape, 2–5
Write Protected, 2–5
INITIALIZE, B–3
E
L
Error message
SET HOST/DUP, 4–4
Errors
avoiding, 3–2
causes, 3–3
correcting, 3–3
influences, 3–2
symptoms, 3–3
Loading a cartrige
diagram to follow, 2–10
steps to follow, 2–9
Local programs, 4–1
Index–2
M
Maximizing performance
ULTRIX, C–9
Maximum capacity and performance
ULTRIX, C–8
MOUNT, B–4
/CACHE=TAPE_DATA, B–4
/FOREIGN, B–4
O
Operate Handle indicator
off, 2–5
on, 2–5
Operating efficiency
guidelines, B–1
Operating procedures, 2–1
P
PARAMS, 4–1
EXIT, 4–10
SET, 4–8
SHOW, 4–6
WRITE, 4–9
PARAMS prompt, 4–4
POST, 2–4
Problem resolution, 3–1
Procedures, operating, 2–1
Product description, 1–2
basic components, 1–2
Tx86 diagram, 1–6
R
Rebooting system
ULTRIX, C–5
Related documents, 1–14
Repair services, D–1
S
SET HOST/DUP, 4–3
error message, 4–4
Solving problems, 3–1
Specifications, A–1
Subsystem parameters
displaying, setting, saving, 4–5
T
Tape cartridge
CleaningTape III, 1–11
CompacTape III, 1–7
leader inspection, 3–4
Tape in Use indicator
blinking, 2–5
on, 2–5
U
ULTRIX, C–1
cpio command, C–18
dd command, C–15
density selecting, C–10
dump command, C–13
dump levels, C–14
ltf command, C–16
mt command, C–17
restore command, C–14
tar command, C–12
ULTRIX backup and commands, C–12
ULTRIX system tape commands, C–12
Unload button, 2–6
Unloading a cartridge
diagram to follow, 2–14
steps to follow, 2–13
Use Cleaning Tape indicator
off, 2–5
on, 2–5
Using a cartrige, 2–11
Index–3
V
W
VMS
commands, B–2
logical device name, B–3, B–6
Write Protected indicator
off, 2–5
on, 2–5
Write-protect switch
diagram, 2–7
MOUNT command, B–4
positioning, 2–7
write-enabling, 2–8
write-protecting, 2–8
Index–4
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