Science SDC

Science SDC
OFFICE OF CURRICULUM, INSTRUCTION, & PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
MIDDLE SCHOOL COURSE OUTLINE
(Revised September 2011)
Department
Science
Course Title
Science 6
Abbreviation
Sci 6
Grade Level
Course Length
1 year
Co-requisites
Teacher Certification
5639
Course Code
6
Current placement in MM, ED, OI, DHH
Special Education program based on IEP
Special Education
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
The sixth grade SDC science course is designed specifically for the needs of students with
mild/moderate disabilities who are at the emergent, early, and intermediate levels of listening,
speaking, reading, and writing proficiency. Students in this course cover the essential content and
utilize the same basic textbook as their general education counterparts supplemented with
content-parallel materials at a simplified reading level. Additionally, primary language materials for
ELL students will be provided, when available and as needed, to facilitate the preview and review
of essential content. The course delivery varies in pacing, instructional methodology, and
supplemental materials. It is designed to provide depth versus breadth of the content standards,
and provide more modified content, comprehensible input, and literacy development in the content
area.
Sixth grade science is an integrated standards and laboratory based program. Students will
spend approximately forty percent (40%) or more of their class time on hands-on activities.
Introductory principles of earth, life, and physical sciences will be explored incorporating
constructivist methods of teaching. Science activities will be based on benchmark requirements
and will utilize the skills and techniques outlined in the Investigation and Experimentation Strand
of the Content Standards.
GOALS: (Student needs this course is intended to meet)
•
Students will learn all of the California State Standards for 6th Grade Science, which
emphasize Earth sciences. The use of well-designed, memorable experiences and the
application of scientific knowledge and methodology are essential in helping students achieve
appropriate comprehension of the content.
•
Students will improve their ability to learn independently by drawing generalizations from
science related articles, books, graphs, charts, and diagrams. Regular opportunities are
provided for students to clearly communicate their understanding through oral and written
explanations of science concepts.
•
Students will study the applications of science in everyday life to inspire them to consider
pursuing advanced studies in science and explore the wide variety of related career choices
available.
Science 6 SDC - Page 2
Academic Literacy In SDC Content-Area Classes:
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Completion of content courses is an essential requirement for students to receive a high school diploma.
Content area classes play an important role in developing and strengthening students’ progress towards reading, writing, listening
and speaking.
Students should be encouraged to expand their vocabulary and other language skills.
When content-area information and materials have been made comprehensible through instruction in the content area class,
special education students will progress through phases of developing academic literacy.
The students’ degrees of literacy will significantly affect the pace that students move through these phases.
The following are stages of literacy development and instructional components that will help teachers determine the appropriate
pathway for developing literacy.
Emergent. (Kinder – 2nd grade literacy level) Students have beginning literacy skills.
A student who exhibits some of the following behaviors may be considered an emergent reader:
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•
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decoding cvc, cvvc, cvce words
reads and writes 0-200 sight words
answers basic, literal comprehension questions (i.e, who, where)
writes using inventive or phonetic spelling, basic sight words
writes using simple sentences
begins most sentences with the same pattern (I…, My dog…)
uses few adjectives
writing is off topic or strays
Students progressing through this level will:
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•
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•
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participate in modified group/class projects, discussions and oral presentations with non-verbal responses (e.g., gestures, drawings, graphic
organizers) and/or single words or phrases with assistance (e.g., word walls, language structure walls).
begin to participate orally in some content area reading strategies (especially pre-reading, KWL, and anticipation guides presented orally), with
single words or phrases to analyze concepts from explicitly taught texts and other course reading materials.
respond to Curriculum Embedded Assessment prompts (read to them and clarified for them) non-verbally (e.g., graphic organizers with drawings)
and/or orally with single words or phrases.
begin to use the alphabet to write in teacher-guided learning logs, selected homework and interactive notebooks, and to organize and record
expository information on pictures, lists, charts and tables using single words or phrases.
understand the need for using modified test-taking strategies (using previously taught vocabulary) on the required district/state assessments, such
as, End of Course Exams (with alternate presentation and response), and STAR.
Early. (2nd – 3rd grade literacy level) Students have little or no academic proficiency and varying
levels of academic literacy skills and concepts. A student who exhibits some of the following
behaviors may be considered an early reader:
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reads cvc, cvvc, cvce words
decodes blends, diagraphs, multisyllabic words
reads and writes 200-300 sight words
answers literal comprehension questions (i.e., why, how) and is beginning to consciously use comprehension
strategies (predicting, rereading, summarizing, etc.)
writes using correct cvc, cvvc, cvce spelling, sight words, attempts multi-syllabic words
writes using simple sentences and attempts some complex sentences
is beginning to use descriptive language
writing is simple, on topic
Students progressing through this level will:
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•
•
•
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participate in group/class projects, discussions and presentations with non-verbal responses (e.g., gestures, drawings, graphic organizers, roleplaying) and/or oral or written single words, phrases and simple sentences with assistance (i.e., using the academic participation cards).
participate orally in some content area reading strategies (especially pre-reading, KWL, academic participation cards, anticipation guides) or write
using single words, phrases and/or simple sentences to analyze concepts from texts and other course reading materials.
respond to Curriculum Embedded Assessment prompts (read to them and clarified for them) non-verbally (e.g., graphic organizers with drawings)
and/or orally with single words, phrases and simple sentences in an outline format.
use writing in a variety of ways such as, but not limited to, guided class note-taking, learning logs, interactive notebooks, representing information
on pictures, lists, charts and tables using single words, phrases or simple sentences, and completing student handouts, selected homework, and
modified class projects.
understand the need for using test-taking strategies (using taught vocabulary) on the required district/state assessments, such as, End of Course
Exams (with alternate presentation and response), and STAR.
Science 6 SDC - Page 3
th
th
Intermediate. (4 – 5 grade literacy level) Students have some academic proficiency about
topics that have been explicitly taught to them. A student who exhibits some of the following
behaviors may be considered an intermediate reader:
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•
reads cvc, cvvc, cvce words, blends, and diagraphs
decodes multisyllabic words
reads and writes 400-500 sight words
answers literal and inferential comprehension questions and consciously uses comprehension strategies
(predicting, rereading, summarizing, etc.)
writes using correct cvc, cvvc, cvce spelling, sight words, most multi-syllabic words
writes using both simple and complex sentences
uses descriptive language
writing is on topic and interesting
Students progressing through this level will:
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•
•
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*
participate in group/class projects, discussions and presentations with simple sentences and many attempts at more complex sentences.
use content area reading strategies (especially pre-reading, KWL, academic participation cards, anticipation guides, Reciprocal Teaching and
Question/ Answer Relationships) to analyze concepts from taught texts and other course reading materials.
respond to Curriculum Embedded Assessment prompts (read to them and clarified for them) orally and with simple and some complex sentence
structures in at least three paragraphs.
use writing in a variety of ways such as, but not limited to, class note-taking, learning logs, interactive notebooks, response logs, and completing
student handouts, homework, and class projects.
understand the need for using test-taking strategies (using taught vocabulary) on the required district/state assessments, such as, End of Course
Exams (with alternate presentation and response), and STAR.
Should you have a student who is functioning higher than the above levels (i.e., fluent), it is
suggested that you hold an IEP and discuss alternate options such as RSP placement or
mainstreaming for content area instruction.
Science 6 SDC - Page 4
CONTEXT: CONTENT SCOPE AND SEQUENCE
6th
Physical Sciences
Earth Sciences
Life Sciences
Density (Qualitative) -------- (CA 8)
Energy
Temperature vs. Heat
Heat Transfer
Earth’s Layers
Plate Tectonics
Mountain Building
Earthquakes, Faults, and Epicenters
Volcanoes
California Geology
Mechanical & Chemical Weathering
Minerals ---------------------------------------- (LB)
Rock Cycle (Igneous, Metamorphic, and
Sedimentary Rocks) ------------ (LB)
Sun’s Effect on Weather
Convections
Solar Energy
Atmospheric Conditions
Natural Resources
Stratigraphy: Fossil Locations Rock (CA 7)
Geol. Timeline of Earth’s History -----(CA 7)
Formation of Fossils ----------------------(CA 7)
Methods of Dating Earth’s History ---(CA 7)
Food Chains / Food Webs
Ecosystems
Human Impacts on Ecosystems --------- (LB)
7th
8th
Six Designated Lessons from Project
ALERT Health Curriculum
Cell Similarities & Differentiation
Function of Cell Structures
Energy at the Cellular Level
Photosynthesis / Respiration
Mitosis
Genetics
DNA
RNA
Protein ----------------Sexual / Asexual Reproduction
Meiosis ----------------------------------------DNA, Genes, & Alleles
Dominant & Recessive Traits
Theory of Evolution
Natural Selection
Body Systems
Taxonomic Keys ----------------------------Kingdoms & Major Phyla -----------------Observing and Defining Motion
Forces and their Effects
Gravity’s Larges Scale Effects
Basic Atomic Theory
Periodic Table as a Tool
Metals, Non-metals, Inert Gases
Electrons beyond the Bohr Model
Ions and Isotopes
Physical & Chemical Properties
Element vs. Compound Properties
Chemical Bonding
Atoms and Ions Forming Solids
Phases and Molecular Motion
Chemical Formulas
Chemical Equations & Conservation
of Matter
Exothermic vs. Endothermic
Acids, Bases, and pH
Density & Buoyancy
Sound and Light Energy ------ (CA 7)
Galaxies and Stars
Life Cycles of Stars (Nebular Theory,
Novas, etc.)
Distances in Astronomy
Light Sources and Reflectors in the
Universe
Cosmology (Universe Origin) -------- (LB)
Solar System
(LB)
(LB)
(LB)
(LB)
Simple Machines
and the Human Body -------------(CA 7)
Blood Pressure and Heart Valves---(CA 7)
Organic Chem. / Biochem.
Three Designated Lessons from Project
ALERT Health Curriculum
Notes regarding non-aligned content:
(LB) => Long Beach specific content; not found in CA Science
Content Standards
(CA 7) => 7th grade content which has been moved to 6th or 8th grade
to accommodate reduced science instruction in 7th grade
(CA 8) => 8th grade content which should be presented qualitatively
in 6th grade to help explain convections and other Earth
science related content
Science 6 SDC - Page 5
CONTEXT: SKILLS SCOPE AND SEQUENCE
Investigation and Experimentation:
Scientific progress is made by asking meaningful questions and conducting careful investigations.
As a basis for understanding this concept and addressing the content in the other three strands,
students should develop their own questions and perform investigations. Students will:
6th
7a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
Develop a hypothesis.
Select and use appropriate tools and technology (including calculators, computers, balances,
spring scales, microscopes, and binoculars) to perform tests, collect data, and display data.
Construct appropriate graphs from data and develop qualitative statements about the
relationships between variables.
Communicate the steps and results from an investigation in written reports and oral
presentations.
Recognize whether evidence is consistent with a proposed explanation.
Read a topographic map and a geologic map for evidence provided on the maps and
construct and interpret a simple scale map.
Interpret events by sequence and time from natural phenomena (e.g., the relative ages of
rocks and intrusions).
Identify changes in natural phenomena over time without manipulating the phenomena (e.g., a
tree limb, a grove of trees, a stream, a hillslope).
7th
7a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Select and use appropriate tools and technology (including calculators, computers, balances,
spring scales, microscopes, and binoculars) to perform tests, collect data, and display data.
Utilize a variety of print and electronic resources (including the World Wide Web) to collect
information as evidence as part of a research project.
Communicate the logical connection among hypothesis, science concepts, tests conducted,
data collected, and conclusions drawn from the scientific evidence.
Construct scale models, maps and appropriately labeled diagrams to communicate scientific
knowledge (e.g., motion of Earth’s plates and cell structure).
Communicate the steps and results from an investigation in written reports and verbal
presentations.
8th
9a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
Plan and conduct a scientific investigation to test a hypothesis.
Evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of data.
Distinguish between variable and controlled parameters in a test.
Recognize the slope of the linear graph as the constant in the relationship y=kx and apply this
to interpret graphs constructed from data.
Construct appropriate graphs from data and develop quantitative statements about the
relationships between variables.
Apply simple mathematical relationships to determine one quantity given the other two
(including speed = distance/time, density = mass/volume, force = pressure x area,
volume=area x height).
Distinguish between linear and non-linear relationships on a graph of data.
Science 6 SDC - Page 6
CA CONTENT STANDARDS
Grade 6 Focus On Earth Science:
Plate Tectonics and Earth’s Structure
1. Plate tectonics accounts for important features of Earth’s surface and major geologic events. As a basis for
understanding this concept, students know …
a.
the fit of the continents, location of earthquakes, volcanoes, and midocean ridges, and the distribution of fossils, rock
types, and ancient climatic zones provide evidence for plate tectonics.
b.
the solid Earth is layered with cold, brittle lithosphere; hot, convecting mantle; and dense, metallic core.
c.
lithospheric plates that are the size of continents and oceans move at rates of centimeters per year in response to
movements in the mantle.
d.
earthquakes are sudden motions along breaks in the crust called faults, and volcanoes/fissures are locations where
magma reaches the surface.
e.
major geologic events, such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and mountain building result from plate motions.
f.
how to explain major features of California geology in terms of plate tectonics (including mountains, faults,
volcanoes).
g.
how to determine the epicenter of an earthquake and that the effects of an earthquake vary with its size, distance
from the epicenter, local geology, and the type of construction involved.
Shaping Earth’s Surface
2. Topography is reshaped by the weathering of rock and soil and by the transportation and deposition of
sediment. As a basis for understanding this concept, students know …
a.
water running downhill is the dominant process in shaping the landscape, including California’s landscape.
b.
rivers and streams are dynamic systems that erode and transport sediment, change course, and flood their banks in
natural and recurring patterns.
c.
beaches are dynamic systems in which sand is supplied by rivers and moved along the coast by wave action.
d.
earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, and floods change human and wildlife habitats.
Heat (Thermal Energy) (Physical Science)
3. Heat moves in a predictable flow from warmer objects to cooler objects until all the objects are at the same
temperature. As a basis for understanding this concept, students know …
a.
energy can be carried from one place to another by heat flow, or by waves including water waves, light and sound, or
by moving objects.
b.
when fuel is consumed, most of the energy released becomes heat energy.
c.
heat flows in solids by conduction (which involves no flow of matter) and in fluids by conduction and also by
convection (which involves flow of matter).
d.
heat energy is also transferred between objects by radiation; radiation can travel through space.
Energy in the Earth System
4. Many phenomena on Earth’s surface are affected by the transfer of energy through radiation and convection
currents. As a basis for understanding this concept, students know …
a.
the sun is the major source of energy for phenomena on the Earth’s surface, powering winds, ocean currents, and the
water cycle.
b.
solar energy reaches Earth through radiation, mostly in the form of visible light.
c.
heat from Earth's interior reaches the surface primarily through convection.
d.
convection currents distribute heat in the atmosphere and oceans.
e.
differences in pressure, heat, air movement, and humidity result in changes of weather.
Science 6 SDC - Page 7
Ecology (Life Science)
5. Organisms in ecosystems exchange energy and nutrients among themselves and with the environment.
As a basis for understanding this concept, students know …
a.
energy entering ecosystems as sunlight is transferred by producers into chemical energy through photosynthesis,
and then from organism to organism in food webs.
b.
over time, matter is transferred from one organism to others in the food web, and between organisms and the
physical environment. [LS10]
c.
populations of organisms can be categorized by the functions they serve in an ecosystem. [LS10]
d.
different kinds of organisms may play similar ecological roles in similar biomes.
e.
the number and types of organisms an ecosystem can support depends on the resources available and abiotic
factors, such as quantity of light and water, range of temperatures, and soil composition. [LS10]
Resources
6. Sources of energy and materials differ in amounts, distribution, usefulness, and the time required for their
formation. As a basis for understanding this concept, students know …
a.
the utility of energy sources is determined by factors that are involved in converting these sources to useful forms and
the consequences of the conversion process.
b.
different natural energy and material resources, including air, soil, rocks, minerals, petroleum, fresh water, wildlife,
and forests, and classify them as renewable or nonrenewable.
c.
natural origin of the materials used to make common objects.
Earth and Life History (Earth Science) (CA 7th Grade Standards)
7-4.Evidence from rocks allows us to understand the evolution of life on Earth. As the basis for understanding this
concept, students know …
a.
Earth processes today are similar to those that occurred in the past and slow geologic processes have large
cumulative effects over long periods of time.
b.
the history of life on Earth has been disrupted by major catastrophic events, such as major volcanic eruptions or the
impacts of asteroids.
c.
that the rock cycle includes the formation of new sediment and rocks and that rocks are often found in layers, with the
oldest generally on the bottom.
d.
that evidence from geologic layers and radioactive dating indicates Earth is approximately 4.6 billion years old and
that life on this planet has existed for more than 3 billion years.
e.
fossils provide evidence of how life and environmental conditions have changed
f.
how movements of the Earth’s continental and oceanic plates through time, with associated changes in climate and
geographical connections, have affected the past and present distribution of organisms.
g.
how to explain significant developments and extinctions of plant and animal life on the geologic time scale.
Investigation & Experimentation
7. Scientific progress is made by asking meaningful questions and conducting careful investigations. As a basis
for understanding this concept and addressing the content in the other three strands, students should develop
their own questions and perform investigations. Students will …
a.
develop a hypothesis.
b.
select and use appropriate tools and technology (including calculators, computers, balances, spring scales,
microscopes, and binoculars) to perform tests, collect data, and display data.
c.
construct appropriate graphs from data and develop qualitative statements about the relationships between variables.
[LS10]
d.
communicate the steps and results from an investigation in written reports and verbal presentations.
e.
recognize whether evidence is consistent with a proposed explanation. [LS10]
f.
read a topographic map and a geologic map for evidence provided on the maps, and construct and interpret a simple
scale map.
g.
interpret events by sequence and time from natural phenomena (e.g., relative ages of rocks and intrusions).
h.
identify changes in natural phenomena over time without manipulating the phenomena (e.g., a tree limb, a grove of
trees, a stream, a hillslope).
[CST] – Standards assessed on the California Standards Test
th
[LS10] – Standards assessed on the 10 grade NCLB Biology/Life Sciences Test
Science 6 SDC - Page 8
DISTRICT PERFORMANCE STANDARDS:
The Long Beach Unified School District has common assessments and assignments that are required for sixth grade
science. The Performance Standard Criteria are shown in the table below. The objective is to have all students
achieve at or above the Proficient Level and receive a C or better in the course. Performance level is determined by
the average of the assessments or assignments.
Science Performance Standard Criteria
Graded Student Work
Standards-Based Classroom
Assessments
Written Response / Lab Report /
OES
(6 point scale)
Written Response / Lab Report /
OES
(4 point scale)
End-Of-Course Exam
Not Proficient
Partial Proficient
Proficient
Average is a 1
or less than 60%
Average is a 2
or 60% - 69%
Average is a 3
or 70% - 84%
Advanced
Proficient
Average is a 4
or 85% - 100%
Less than 60%
60% - 69%
70% - 84%
85% - 100%
1-2
3
4
5-6
1
2
3
4
Less than 45%
45% - 59%
60% - 84%
85% - 100%
Science 6 SDC - Page 9
OUTLINE OF CONTENT AND RECOMMENDED TIME ALLOTMENT:
Time allocations are only suggestions and may be adjusted to suit school site curriculum plans and student needs. Content sequencing is
established to align with quarterly district assessments. Adjusting the sequencing can only be done within the established quarters.
SCIENCE 6
Ecology (Life Science)
5. Organisms in ecosystems exchange energy and nutrients among themselves and with the environment.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… populations of
organisms can be
categorized by the
functions they serve in
an ecosystem.
(5,c)
•
•
[LS10]
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: Food for Thought
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
(Framework, p. 98) Given a
random list of 4 or 5 plants and
8 to 10 consumers (primary,
secondary, and tertiary), pairs
of students organize the
organisms according to food
web order and ecological
function.
Construct an energy pyramid.
Outside the pyramid, include 1
or 2 decomposers, and 1 or 2
scavengers. Draw arrows
between members of the
pyramid to show the predation
sequence.
•
Focus on ES: Ch 12:1,
13:1
PH FoES, 19:1
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
ecosystem
scavengers
producers
decomposers
consumers
omnivores
tertiary
opportunistic
herbivore
food chain
carnivore
food web
predators
food pyramid
abiotic
biotic
photosynthetic microorganisms
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Venn Diagram: consumers vs.
producers
Flow Map: food webs / food chains
Tree Map: Consumers as
predators, scavengers, or
decomposers
SKILLS FOCUS:
Observing
Recognize whether evidence is
consistent with a proposed
explanation.
(I&E 7.e)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
• (Framework, p. 98) Given a random
list of 4 or 5 plants and 8 to 10
consumers (primary, secondary, and
tertiary), organize the organisms
according to food web order and
ecological function. Construct an
energy pyramid. Outside the pyramid,
include 1 or 2 decomposers, and 1 or
2 scavengers. Draw arrows between
members of the pyramid to show the
predation sequence.
• Focus on ES: 12:1, Launch Lab, “How
tangled is the life web?” p. 513
• Focus on ES: 12:1, Activity
(Abiotic/Biotic), p. 517 TE
• Focus on ES: 12:1, Activity (Soil
Observation), p. 521 TE
• Focus on ES: 12:1, Demo., “Air is
Real”, p. 522 TE
• Focus on ES: 12:1, Nat’l Geog.,
“Visualizing Biotic Factors”, p. 525
• Focus on ES: 12:1, Data Lab,
“Graphing Monthly Abiotic …”, p. 530
• Focus on ES: 13:1, Data Lab, “Can
you classify animals by diet?” p. 557
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Lab,
“Communities”, pp. 87-90
• Focus on ES: Ch 13 Transparencies
“What’s for dinner?”
“You are what you eat”
“A Vital Job”
• Teachers Domain: “Producers,
Consumers, Decomposers”
http://www.teachersdomain.org/
resources/tdc02/sci/life/oate/lp_
energyweb/index.html
• Enchanted Learning: “Food Chains
and Food Webs”
http://www.enchantedlearning.com/
subjects/foodchain/
4 Days
Students are assigned roles as
producers, consumers,
decomposers, etc. Using
string or yarn they connect to
one another to form a food
web and then a food chain.
•
Identify and define an
ecosystem as all the living and
nonliving things that interact in a
given area.
Classify organisms as
producers or consumers of
chemical energy.
Classify consumers as either
predators, scavengers, or
decomposers.
Identify consumers that fall
under more than one category:
o Omnivores consume both
plants and animals.
o Opportunistic consumers
act as both predators and
scavengers.
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Science 6 SDC - Page 10
Ecology (Life Science) (cont’d)
5. Organisms in ecosystems exchange energy and nutrients among themselves and with the environment.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… energy entering
ecosystems as sunlight
is transferred by
producers into chemical
energy through
photosynthesis, and
then from organism to
organism through food
webs.
(5,a)
… matter is transferred
over time from one
organism to others in
the food web and
between organisms and
the physical
environment.
(5,b)
•
•
•
[LS10]
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: Food for Thought
•
•
Focus on ES:
Ch 13:1-3
PH FoES, 19:1
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
photosynthetic microorganisms
hierarchy
protist
water cycle
eukaryotic
carbon cycle
protozoan
physical environment
nitrogen cycle
food web
food chain
secondary consumer
tertiary consumer
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Parallel Flow Maps: macroscopic
and microscopic food chains
Labeled carbon/oxygen and
nitrogen cycles showing the flow of
energy as well as matter
SKILLS FOCUS:
Classifying, predicting, modeling
Construct appropriate graphs from
data and develop qualitative
statements about the relationships
between variables.
(I&E 7.c)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
• Analyze owl pellets
• Focus on ES: 13:1, Launch Lab, “Can
you eat energy?’ p. 549
• Focus on ES: 13:1, Demo., “How
plants obtain CO2”, p. 553 TE
• Focus on ES: 13:2, Demo., “Food
Energy”, p. 561 TE
• Focus on ES: 13:2, Mini Lab, “energy
through an ecosystem?” p. 567
• Focus on ES: 13:3, Mini Lab, “Is your
soil rich in nitrogen?” p. 569
• Focus on ES: 13:3, Nat’l Geog.,
“Visualizing the Carbon Cycle”, p. 571
• Focus on ES: 13:3, Applying Math,
Percent of Nitrogen in soil”, p. 573
• Focus on ES: 13:3, Lab, “Is it primary,
secondary, or tertiary?” pp. 574-575
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Lab, “Exploring
Life in Pond Water”, pp. 83-86
• Focus on ES: Ch 12 Transparency,
“The sun’s effect on ecosystems”
• Focus on ES: Ch 13 Transparency,
“Nitrogen Cycle”
• AIMS Educational Foundation: Field
Detectives
• Iowa St. Univ.: “Food Chains and
Food Webs”
http://www.cyfernet.org/integrate/
iowa/schain.html
• McDougal Littell: animation showing
evidence of the carbon cycle
www.classzone.com/books/earth_
science/terc/navigation/home.cfm
Enter keycode ES0106
6 Days
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
Have groups of students do
research and create a diagram
showing the flow of energy
from the Sun through specific
photosynthetic microscopic
organisms, to larger
organisms, and finally to top
predators or humans. Include
some symbols to show that
most of the chemical energy at
each level is lost as heat.
Describe producers as plants
and photosynthetic
microorganisms that do not
need to consume other
organisms, but store chemical
energy from basic molecules
and light energy.
Diagram food chains and food
webs, starting with solar energy.
o Diagram a food chain
where plants are consumed
by primary consumers
(herbivores), which are
consumed by secondary
consumers (carnivores),
which are consumed by
tertiary consumers (toplevel predators).
Explain how energy and matter
are passed from one level to the
next in a food chain.
o Diagram and explain the
carbon cycle.
o Diagram and explain the
nitrogen cycle.
Describe ways that matter and
energy are exchanged with the
physical environment.
Depict the hierarchy of
consumers and the transfer and
loss of energy from herbivores
through secondary consumers
to the top carnivores in a food
web or energy pyramid.
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Science 6 SDC - Page 11
Ecology (Life Science) (cont’d)
5. Organisms in ecosystems exchange energy and nutrients among themselves and with the environment.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… different kinds of
organisms may play
similar ecological roles
in similar biomes. (5,d)
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: Home, Home on the
Biome
•
•
•
•
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
Groups of students prepare a
poster comparing and
contrasting two similar biomes
in different hemispheres.
Describe the various biomes
and locate them on a map or
globe.
Research biomes around the
world, which have similar
climate and availability of water.
Define the specific niche of
various organisms.
Compare organisms in widely
separated geographic locations,
but similar biomes, that fulfill the
same ecological roles.
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Focus on ES: Ch 12:2,
13:2
PH FoES, 19:3-4, 18:3
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
biome
niche
role
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Tree Map: Biomes
Venn Diagram: organisms and
their ecological roles in two similar
biomes
SKILLS FOCUS:
Inferring, observing, researching
Develop a hypothesis.
(I&E 7.a)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
• Focus on ES: 12:2, Activity (Biomes),
p. 533 TE
• Focus on ES: 12:2, Activity (Fox
comparison), p. 533 TE
• Focus on ES: 12:2, Mini Lab, “How
many organisms live here?” p. 534
• Focus on ES: 12:2, Activity (Museum
exhibit), p. 535 TE
• Focus on ES: 12:2, Demo., “Niches”,
p. 536 TE
• Focus on ES: 13:2, Mini Lab, “What
do they eat …?” p. 564
• Focus on ES: Ch 12 Transparency,
“Biomes”
• Discovery: “Unique Plants of the
Biomes” (activity),
http://school.discovery.com/lesson
plans/programs/plantsofthebiomes/
• Ariz. St. Univ: “Biomes: Webquest”,
http://coe.west.asu.edu/students/
dmatousek/webquest.htm
8 Days
Communicate the steps and
results from an investigation in
written reports and oral
presentations.
(I&E 7.d)
Science 6 SDC - Page 12
Ecology (Life Science) (cont’d)
5. Organisms in ecosystems exchange energy and nutrients among themselves and with the environment.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… the number and types
of organisms an
ecosystem can support
depends on the
resources available and
on abiotic factors, such
as quantities of light and
water, a range of
temperatures, and soil
composition.
(5,e)
[LS10]
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: Home, Home on the
Biome
•
•
•
•
Explain how the richness of
plant growth (the base of the
energy pyramid) controls the
diversity of life in an ecosystem.
Describe how abiotic factors
control plant growth.
Compare and contrast
temperate and tropical
environments to deserts and
polar tundra for the number of
organisms they support.
Show how the number of edible
plants in an ecosystem
influences the number of plant
eating animals.
Analyze the relationship
between the number of
predators in a system to the
number of prey.
Focus on ES: Ch 12:1
PH FoES, 18:1-3, 10:3,
13:2-3, 19:4, 20:3
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
solar radiation
photosynthesis
predator
water cycle
humus
prey
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Flow Map: interaction of biotic and
abiotic factors supporting an
ecosystem
Cycle Map: food chain showing
recycling of organic matter
SKILLS FOCUS:
Observing, classifying, measuring,
inferring, constructing data tables
Identify changes in natural
phenomena over time without
manipulating the phenomena.
(I&E 7.h)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
• Focus on ES: 12:1, Demo., “Model
Ecosystems”, p. 516 TE
• Focus on ES: 12:1, Demo.,
“Ecosystems”, p. 521 TE
• Focus on ES: 12:1, Demo., “Rain
Shadow”, p. 527 TE
• Focus on ES: 12:1, Demo., “Plant
Environments”, p. 528 TE
• Focus on ES: 12:1, Applying Math,
“Changing soil pH”, p. 531
• Focus on ES: 12:2, Lab, “Counting
Species”, pp. 538-539
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Lab, “Changes in
Predator and Prey …”, pp. 79-82
• Focus on ES: Ch 12 Transparency,
“Interactions of Life”
• PBS: “The Wolf and the Moose”
http://www.pbs.org/edens/denali/
mooswolf.htm
• ThinkQuest: “Biomes—Living
Worlds”
http://library.thinkquest.org/C0113340/
text/biomes/biomes.tundra.plants.
growing_period.html
5 Days
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
Pairs of students create a
collage showing the
“Goldilocks” effect in
ecosystems: where sunlight
and water are found in
combinations of large
amounts, moderate amounts,
and scarce amounts.
Students explain how plant
growth is affected and how the
plant growth affects animal
populations.
•
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Science 6 SDC - Page 13
Ecology (Life Science) (cont’d)
5. Organisms in ecosystems exchange energy and nutrients among themselves and with the environment.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
* … that humans are part
of and have a responsibility
towards ecosystems.
(LBUSD)
•
•
•
•
Recognize that human
population is an integral part of
an ecosystem.
Identify imbalances within a
variety of ecosystems.
Identify both positive and
negative ways in which human
populations and natural events
can affect ecosystems.
List ways in which human
populations may be affected by
imbalances in their
environment.
Indicate how the actions of
individuals may help to solve
environmental problems.
Focus on ES:
Ch 12:1-2
PH FoES, Ch 20
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
imbalance
integral
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Tree Map: human activities and
their ecologically harmful and
helpful effects.
SKILLS FOCUS:
Construct appropriate graphs from
data and develop qualitative
statements about the relationships
between variables.
(I&E 7.c)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
• Focus on ES: 12:1, Launch Lab, “How
tangled is the life web?” p. 513
• Focus on ES: 12:1, Content
Background, “Real-World Connection
(Temp. and Env.)”, p. 518 TE
• Focus on ES: 12:1, Writing in Science
(Pollution), p. 522 TE
• Focus on ES: 12:2 , Science &
Society, “Recovering Threatened
Species”, p. 541
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Lab, “Human
Impact on the Env.”, pp. 91-94
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Lab, “A survey of
your own environment”, pp. 117-118
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Lab, “A salty
situation”, pp. 125-128
• GEMS: Environmental Detectives
• Focus on ES: Ch 12 Transparencies,
“The Dead Zone”
“Is there a great happy swamp?”
• Nat’l Geog.: “Saved by a shark”
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xp
editions/lessons/07/g68/noaashark.
html
• Discovery: “Water, water everywhere?”
http://school.discovery.com/lesson
plans/activities/watereverywhere/
End District Quarter 1 Exam Material
4 Days
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
OES:
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
Pairs of students research a
local environmental problem
and the steps which have
been taken to address the
problem. Issues may include
auto emissions, sewage
treatment, landfills, farming
technology, water resource
use, etc.
•
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Science 6 SDC - Page 14
Resources
6. Sources of energy and materials differ in amounts, distribution, usefulness, and the time required for their
formation.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… the utility of energy
sources is determined
by factors that are
involved in converting
these sources to useful
forms and the
consequences of the
conversion process.
(6,a)
•
•
•
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: Fueling Around
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
Groups of students prepare a
visual of their choosing to
show the monetary and
environmental costs of an
energy resource, and the
benefits people receive from
the energy source.
•
•
•
Focus on ES: 9:1,2,3
14:2,3
PH FoES, 11: 4, 12:2,
13:4, 14:2, 17:4, 21:1-4
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
energy source
nuclear
fission
conversion
monetary
non-monetary
environmental
consequence
cost-effective
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Word Web: energy sources
Tree Map: energy sources – pros
and cons
SKILLS FOCUS:
Making models, predicting,
applying, evaluating
Construct appropriate graphs from
data and develop qualitative
statements about the relationships
between variables.
(I&E 7.c)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
• Focus on ES: 14:2, Demo, “Oil &
Natural Gas Deposits”, p. 597 TE
• Focus on ES: 14:2, Nat’l Geog.,
“Visualizing Solar Energy”, p. 603
• Focus on ES: 14:2, Mini-Lab, “…
make the sun work for you?”, p. 606
• Focus on ES: 14:3, Demo, “Hybrid
Gas Mileage”, p. 609 TE
• Focus on ES: 14:3, Data Lab, “Do all
vehicles … fuels from oil?”, p. 614
• Focus on ES: 14:3, Applying Math,
”Energy Usage”, p. 615
• Focus on ES: 14:3, Design your own
lab, “Become an Energy Expert”,
pp. 616-617
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Lab, “Efficiency
of Fossil Fuels”, pp. 95-97
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Lab, “Using
Biomass”, pp. 99-101
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Inquiry Activity,
“Lemon Power”, pp. 105-106
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Inquiry Activity,
“The Effects of Acid Precipitation”,
pp. 111-112
• Focus on ES: Ch 10 Transparency
“Oil Disaster”
• Focus on ES: Ch 14 Transparencies
“Earth’s Energy”
“Energy Usage”
“Conserving Resources”
• PEAK.org: “Energy Challenge Game”
www.peakstudents.org/game/ ,
• Dept. of Energy: Energy Facts
www.eia.doe.gov/kids/energyfacts/
index.html
• Dept. of Energy: Energy Labels
www.eia.doe.gov/kids/classactivities/
energyguidelabels_int.pdf
• NEED.org: Infobooks
www.need.org/energyinfobooks.php
4 Days
Identify the energy sources
which current technologies
enable us to use: oil, natural
gas, non-fossil fuels (e.g.,
hydrogen and ethanol), solar,
nuclear, wind, and wave.
List the uses for energy in
society (i.e., heat, light, and
transportation).
Explain why there are different
monetary costs involved in
harnessing different forms of
energy.
Compare the expense and
efficiency of various sources of
energy for particular uses.
Describe the non-monetary,
environmental costs of various
energy sources.
Evaluate the usefulness of
energy sources by how easily
they can be converted to useful
forms of energy, their depletion
rate, and their monetary and
non-monetary costs.
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Science 6 SDC - Page 15
Resources (cont’d)
6. Sources of energy and materials differ in amounts, distribution, usefulness, and the time required for their
formation.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… different natural
energy and material
resources, including air,
soil, rocks, minerals,
petroleum, fresh water,
wildlife, and forests, and
know how to classify
them as renewable or
nonrenewable.
(6,b)
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
Students identify pictures of
energy resources as either
renewable or nonrenewable.
In groups, students present
ideas about how some
nonrenewable resources can
be conserved or made partially
renewable through recycling
efforts.
•
•
List material and energy
resources.
Categorize resources as
renewable or nonrenewable
based on the time and process
needed to create the resource.
Compare and contrast present
and expected future uses of
renewable and nonrenewable
resources.
Focus on ES: Ch 3:2,3
9:1, 10:4, 14:1,2,3
Focus on ES, 4:2, 5:2,3&5,
7:3, 9:1, 11:1-3, 14:2,
and 20:1-3
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
renewable
nonrenewable
finite
extraction (mining)
processing (smelting)
hydroelectric
geothermal
biomass
fusion
geologic cycle
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
T Chart: renewable and
nonrenewable resources
SKILLS FOCUS:
Inferring, observing classifying,
making models
Develop a hypothesis.
(I&E 7.a)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
• Focus on ES: 14:1, Data Lab, “How
old is that tree?”, p. 590
• Focus on ES: 14:1. Demo, “Wasting
Water”, p. 593 TE
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Inquiry Activity,
“A Survey of your own Environment”,
pp. 117-118
• Focus on ES: Ch 14 Transparencies
“Water Power”
“Earth’s Energy and Mineral Resources”
• PEAK.org: Renewable vs. Nonrenewable
www.peakstudents.org/energy_tips_
renewable.asp
4 Days
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: Fueling Around
CR: Oils Well that Ends Well
•
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Science 6 SDC - Page 16
Resources (cont’d)
6. Sources of energy and materials differ in amounts, distribution, usefulness, and the time required for their
formation.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… natural origin of the
materials used to make
common objects. (6,c)
•
•
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: Oils Well that Ends Well
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
In pairs, students analyze
various food and material
items. They then create a
visual of their choice to show
the final item and its original
material sources.
•
•
Focus on ES: Ch 2:2,
3:3 and 14:1,2,3
PH FoES, 4:3, 20:4, and
21:1
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
natural
synthetic
goods
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Tree Map: Samples of common
items broken into their material
components and the sources or
those materials.
SKILLS FOCUS:
Observing, inferring
Communicate the steps and
results from an investigation in
written reports and oral
presentations.
(I&E 7.d)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
• Focus on ES: Ch 14, Launch Lab,
“Where did that come from?”, p. 585
• Focus on ES: 14:3, Mini-Lab, “Is it
made from plants or plastic?”, p. 608
• Focus on ES: Ch 14 Transparency,
“For a Big Payoff”
• Mineral Information Institute:
Common Minerals and their Uses
www.mii.org/commonminerals.html#Al
• McDougal Littell: common objects
made of minerals
www.classzone.com/books/earth_
science/terc/navigation/home.cfm
Enter keycode ES0505
• Geol. Soc. of America: What Earth
Materials are in My Subaru?
www.geosociety.org/educate/Lesson
Plans/Earth_Materials_in_Subaru.pdf
• Geol. Soc. of America: Toothpaste
with a Twist
www.geosociety.org/educate/Lesson
PLans/ToothpasteTwist.pdf
4 Days
Make a list of common objects
in the classroom or at home.
Analyze these items and
determine the materials used to
manufacture it. For example, a
pencil contains wood, paints,
metal, a rubber or plastic
eraser, and a “lead” made from
a mixture of clay and graphite.
Research the natural origins of
each material, for instance,
plastics and synthetic materials
that are derived from oil.
Classify the materials as
renewable or nonrenewable.
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Science 6 SDC - Page 17
Heat (Thermal Energy) (Physical Science)
3. Heat moves in a predictable flow from warmer objects to cooler objects until all the objects are at the same
temperature.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… energy can be carried
from one place to
another by heat flow or
by waves, including
water, light, and sound,
or by moving objects.
(3,a)
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: A Burning Question
•
•
•
•
•
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
In small groups, students
create a molecular role-play to
model the difference between
the concepts of temperature
and heat flow.
In pairs, students create
illustrations of ways to both
enhance and dampen the
effects of light, sound, and
heat energy in a room. For
each idea, they should explain
how it affects the waves
carrying the energy.
Focus on ES: 3:1,2,3
PH FoES, 1:2, 2:2, 12:1,
and 15:1-2
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
temperature
caloric
thermal energy infrared
heat
kinetic energy
electromagnetic waves
potential energy heat flow
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Triple Venn Diagram: heat vs.
temperature vs. thermal energy
Tree Map: heat transfer
Venn Diagram: Celsius and
Fahrenheit temperature scales.
SKILLS FOCUS:
Select and use appropriate tools
and technology to perform tests,
collect data, and display data.
(I&E 7.b)
Recognize whether evidence is
consistent with a proposed
explanation.
(I&E 7.e)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
• Compare the feel of room
temperature wood or plastic to metal.
The metal “seems” colder because it
conducts heat energy better (heat
leaves your hand quicker).
• Tuning forks: listening to the sound,
vibrating in water
• Focus on ES: Ch 3 Launch Lab, “How
cold is it?”, p. 121
• Focus on ES: 3:1, Nat’l Geog.,
“Visualizing Kinetic Energy”, p. 125
• Focus on ES: 3:1, Demo, “Differences
in Kinetic Energy”, p. 126 TE
• Focus on ES: 3:1, Mini-Lab, “How
deep is the crater?”, p. 127
• Focus on ES: 3:2, Use Models,
p. 132 TE
• Focus on ES: 3:2, Applying Math,
“Thermal Expansion”, p. 138
• Focus on ES: 3:3, Demo, “Particle
Movement”, p. 139 TE
• Focus on ES: 3:3, Data Lab, “How are
temperature scales related?”, p. 144
• Focus on ES: Ch 3 Transparencies
“They’ve Got Potential”
“Nuclear Reactor”
“Cosmic Impact”
“How a Refrigerator Works”
“Full of Hot Air”
“Forced Air System”
• Caltech: “Heat vs. Temp”,
coolcosmos.ipac.Caltech.edu//cosmic
_classroom/light_lessons/thermal/
differ.html
• Discover.com: Sound Waves
school.discovery.com/lessonplans/
programs/soundwaves/
• AskERIC: “Understanding Waves”
www.reachoutmichigan.org/funexperi
ments/quick/eric/waves.html
3 Days
Students use features
advertised to enhance car
safety and show how they
reduce (or prevent) the energy
of a crash getting to the
passengers.
•
Read thermometers.
Distinguish between heat and
temperature.
Explain that transfer of energy
from object to object is the
result of difference in
temperature.
Demonstrate heat flow.
Demonstrate how waves are
able to carry energy from place
to place without net movement
of matter.
o waves of water
o sound waves – vibrating
objects cause other objects
to vibrate, such as
eardrums
o light waves
(electromagnetic waves),
for instance, from the sun to
the Earth
Show that moving objects also
carry energy.
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Science 6 SDC - Page 18
Heat (Thermal Energy) (Physical Science) (cont’d)
3. Heat moves in a predictable flow from warmer objects to cooler objects until all the objects are at the same
temperature.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… that when fuel is
consumed, most of the
energy released
becomes heat energy.
(3,b)
•
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: A Burning Question
•
•
Focus on ES, Ch 3:2
PH FoES, 21:1-4
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
fuel
consumed
waste products
friction
bonds
work
transformed
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Flow Map: what happens when
stored chemical energy is released
SKILLS FOCUS:
Observation
Develop a hypothesis.
(I&E 7.a)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
• Strike a large kitchen match as a
demonstration.
• Light a candle as an analogy to the
way a car’s fuel combines with
oxygen to produce heat and light as
byproducts. (Framework, p. 93)
• Rub hands together to produce
frictional heat to show work.
• Focus on ES: 3:2, Demo, “Energy
Transformations”, p. 135 TE
• Focus on ES: 3:2, Mini-Lab, “Heating
by Friction”, p. 136
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 LAB, “Using
Biomass”, pp. 99-107
• PBS: “Peanut Calorimetry Lab”,
www.pbs.org/safarchive/4_class/45_
pguides/pguide_502/4552_truth.html#
act2
2 Days
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
Groups of students role-play
fuel molecules (i.e., 8 students
to form an eight carbon octane
molecule in gasoline, or 6
students to represent a six
carbon sugar in food) and
show how breaking bonds
releases the energy that
creates heat, and perhaps
light, and is used for work to
move things or generate
electricity.
•
Demonstrate how fuel provides
energy.
Explain that fuel is a form of
stored energy that is released to
provide heat, light, electricity, or
motion.
Show by experiment that the
energy released when fuel
burns comes from the chemical
bonds.
Describe how burning fuel is
used to do work and how much
of that work tends to be
transformed into heat.
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Science 6 SDC - Page 19
Density and Buoyancy (Grade 8 CA Standard)
8. All objects experience a buoyant force when immersed in a fluid.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… density is mass per
QUALITATIVE ONLY
unit volume.
(8,a) • Explain that density is the
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
PT: Density Rocks!
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
Fill a large beaker (1 L or
larger) with dry rice. Before
class, push a ping-pong ball
down into the rice. In class,
place a large steel ball bearing
on top and shake. In pairs,
have students explain why the
ball bearing sinks and the pingpong ball pops up and give an
analogy from their experience.
•
•
Do not take time to make
measurements and
calculate densities. This
will be done in 8th grade.
Focus on ES, 2:2, 3:4
PH FoES, 3:3
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
mass
volume
density
fluid
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Circle Map: density Use two
different colors to indicate pre- and
post-instruction ideas.
Tree Map: density
SKILLS FOCUS:
Observing, predicting
Recognize whether evidence is
consistent with a proposed
explanation.
(I&E 7.e)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
• Focus on ES: 2:2, Demo., “Density”,
p. 91 TE
• Focus on ES: 4:3, Science Concepts,
“What is density?” p. 187 TE
• Focus on ES: 10:2, Mini Lab,
“Different densities?” p. 433
• Focus on PS: Launch Lab, “Can you
push … under water?” p. 127
• Focus on PS: 3:1, Use Models
(Density), p. 132 TE
• Focus on PS: 3:2, Activity (Pressure
and Buoyancy), p. 141 TE
• Focus on PS: 3:3, Demo.,
“Differences in Densities”, p. 151 TE
• Focus on PS: 4-in-1 Lab: “Floating in
Fresh & Ocean Water”, pp. 21-22
• Focus on PS: 4-in-1 Lab: “The Case
of the Sabotaged …”, pp. 109-112
• Focus on PS: Mini Lab, “Do cold
things float?” p. 155
• Focus on PS: 10:2, Mini Lab,
“Different Densities”, p. 433
• Focus on PS: Ch 3 Transparencies,
“Up or Down?”
“Density Table”
“Buoyancy”
• Demonstration: Place an unopened
can of coke and diet coke in an
aquarium with water to observe
density.
• Demonstration: Give a variety of
objects to students to make
predictions about density and then
place in a beaker of water to observe.
• Demonstration: Place grapes in salt
water and fresh water to observe
density (ex. Dead Sea vs. swimming
pool)
• GEMS: Discovering Density
• Virtual Chembook (Density
demonstrations)
http://www.elmhurst.edu/~chm/
vchembook/124Adensityliq.html
• Nat’l Geog. (virtual lab),
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xp
editions/lessons/14/g68/trythisoil.html
4 Days
Using diagrams, have students
predict and explain which will
float higher: a ship in warm
water, or the same ship in cold
water. Also predict whether a
warm piece of wood or a cold
piece of wood will float higher
in the same temperature
water. Students need to make
the connection that by heating,
a given amount of matter will
spread out and become less
dense.
•
amount of matter (mass) in a
given volume.
Show that density of an object
can change with temperature.
Define fluids as matter with
molecules that are free to move,
such as liquids and gases.
Make justified predictions about
whether objects or substances
will float or sink in a given fluid.
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Science 6 SDC - Page 20
Heat (Thermal Energy) (Physical Science) (cont’d)
3. Heat moves in a predictable flow from warmer objects to cooler objects until all the objects are at the same
temperature.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… heat flows in solids by
conduction (which
involves no flow of
matter) and in fluids by
conduction and
convection (which
involves flow of matter).
(3,c)
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: A Burning Question
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
Groups of students report on
real life examples of
convection and conduction.
•
Demonstrate conduction and
convection as methods of
transferring heat.
Explain the difference between
conduction and convection.
Focus on ES, Ch 2:3,
3:4 and 9:2
PH FoES, 1:2, 15:2
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
conduction
atoms
convection
molecules
kinetic molecular theory
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Venn Diagram: conduction and
convection
SKILLS FOCUS:
Observation
Develop a hypothesis.
(I&E 7.a)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
• Demonstrate conduction using a
metal rod with a paper handle.
(Framework, p. 93)
• Demonstrate convection using a heat
resistant beaker, water, shredded
paper, and a heat source.
(Framework, p. 94)
• Focus on ES: 3:4, Mini-Lab, “Is metal
a good conductor?”, p. 146
• Focus on ES: 3:4, Mini-Lab, “…
convection current”, p. 148
• Focus on ES: 3:4, Demo, “Convection
in the air”, p. 149 TE
• Focus on ES: 3:4, Lab, “Create a
Thermos”, pp. 152-153
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Forensics, “Fact
or Fraud?”, pp. 137-140
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1, Probeware,
“Thermal Conductivity”, pp. 167-169
• Exploratorium: “Convection Current”
www.exploratorium.edu/snacks/
convection_currents.html
• Cal Tech: ”How does heat travel?”
http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu//
cosmic_classroom/light_lessons/
thermal/transfer.html
• Cal Tech: ”Measuring Temperature”
http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu//
cosmic_classroom/light_lessons/
thermal/measure.html
2 Days
Pairs of students explain how
these processes relate to the
Earth’s interior using a visual
or demonstration of their
choice.
•
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Science 6 SDC - Page 21
Heat (Thermal Energy) (Physical Science) (cont’d)
3. Heat moves in a predictable flow from warmer objects to cooler objects until all the objects are at the same
temperature.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… heat energy is also
transferred between
objects by radiation
(radiation can travel
through space).
(3,d)
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: A Burning Question
Pairs of students design
and/or build a solar oven.
•
Demonstrate radiation as a
method of transferring heat.
Explain how energy is
transferred from the Sun to the
Earth by radiation.
Focus on ES:
Ch 3:1,2,4 & 9:1,2,3
PH FoES, 1:2, 15:2
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
radiation
emission
absorption
conductor
insulator
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Tree Map: conduction, convection,
and radiation (Include types of
energy carried by each.)
SKILLS FOCUS:
Develop a hypothesis
(I&E 7.a)
Communicate the steps and
results from an investigation in
written reports and verbal
presentations.
(I&E 7.d)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
• Focus on ES: 9:1, Demo, “Radiant
Heat”, p. 385 TE
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 LAB, “Observing
Radiation”, pp. 13-15
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 LAB, “Venus The Greenhouse Effect”, pp. 17-20
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Inquiry Activity,
“The Greenhouse Effect on Venus”,
pp. 113-114
• Focus on ES: Ch 3 Transparencies
“The Sun’s Radiant Energies”
“Conduction, Convection,
Radiation”
• Focus on ES: Ch 9 Transparency
“Energy Transfer”
• Science Rocks! (Meredith Middle
School): “Heat Transfer Demo Lab”
http://www.mmscrusaders.com/
newscirocks/wethrweb/heat2.htm
2 Days
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
Students create a Triple Venn
Diagram of conduction,
convection, and radiation to
sum up the three types of heat
transfer.
•
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Science 6 SDC - Page 22
Energy in the Earth System
4. Many phenomena on the Earth’s surface are affected by the transfer of energy through radiation and
convection currents.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… the sun is the major
source of energy for
phenomena on Earth’s
surface, it powers winds,
ocean currents, and the
water cycle.
(4,a)
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
PT: Seasons Have Reasons
In pairs, draw a diagram of
photosynthesis with labels and
explanations of each step of
the process.
In pairs, students put arrows
and labels on a diagram of the
water cycle, and then explain
their diagram to the class.
•
•
•
•
•
Use evidence to show that solar
radiation penetrates the
atmosphere to heat the air,
oceans, and land.
Draw diagrams showing how
sunlight strikes the ground at
different angles depending on
the season and latitude and
explain what effects this has.
Describe how the Sun makes
life possible on Earth.
Explain that photosynthesis
converts solar energy to stored
energy.
Illustrate the H2O cycle with
labels.
Explain how solar energy drives
the H2O cycle.
Focus on ES: Ch. 9:1,
9:3, 10:2, 11:1, 12:1
PH FoES, Ch 9:3, 12:4,
15:1,3, 17:1
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
solar radiation
latitude
photosynthesis
water cycle
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Flow Chart: photosynthesis from
solar energy to plants as a food
source
Flow Chart: water cycle
Tree Map: the Sun (energy
source) to winds, ocean currents,
and the water cycle
SKILLS FOCUS:
Inferring, observing
Develop a hypothesis.
(I&E 7.a)
Recognize whether evidence is
consistent with a proposed
explanation.
(I&E 7.e)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
• Focus on ES: 9:1, Demo., “Radiant
Heat”, p. 385 TE
• Focus on ES: 9:1, Demo., “Intensity”,
p. 386 TE
• Focus on ES: 11:1, Launch Lab, “How
does water move …?” p. 465
• Focus on ES: 11:1, Demo., “Molecular
Movement”, p. 469 TE
• Focus on ES: 11:1, Activity (Cloud
Formation), p. 471 TE
• Focus on ES: 11:1, Nat’l Geog.,
“Visualizing the Water Cycle”, p. 473
• Focus on ES: 11:2, Demo., (Tilt of
Earth & seasons), p. 479 TE
• Focus on ES: 12:1, Demo., “Rain
Shadow”, pg. 527 TE
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Lab, “Photosynth.
and sunlight”, pp. 67-70
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Lab, “Carbon
Dioxide and Earth Temps”, pp. 75-78
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Lab, “A Trip
Around the World”, pp. 115-116
• Focus on ES: Ch 9 Transparencies,
“Energy for Life”
“The Water Cycle”
• Focus on ES: Ch 11 Transparency,
“A Lovely Planet”
• NASA: “Seasons & Angle of sunlight”
http://www-spof.gsfc.nasa.gov/
stargaze/Sseason.htm
• NOAA: Water Cycle activity
http://www.srh.noaa.gov/srh/jetstream
/atmos/ll_sweatin.htm
6 Days
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
After observations of how the
angle of light hitting the Earth’s
surface changes at different
latitudes (p. 538 activity), have
groups of students write
paragraphs or create collages
of pictures showing how the
angle of light affects daily life
at different latitudes. Try a
combination paragraph/collage
if using heterogeneous student
groups, or separate the
assignments if using
homogeneous groups.
•
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Science 6 SDC - Page 23
Energy in the Earth System (cont’d)
4. Many phenomena on the Earth’s surface are affected by the transfer of energy through radiation and
convection currents.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… solar energy reaches
Earth through radiation,
mostly in the form of
visible light.
(4,b)
•
•
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: Why is the Sky Blue?
•
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
In pairs, draw two examples of
solar radiation on construction
paper, including explanations.
Have the pairs explain their
examples to the class before
displaying them.
•
Focus on ES: Ch. 9:1
PH FoES: 15:1
Connections
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
infrared
transparent
ultraviolet
opaque
visible
scatter
spectrum
absorb
electromagnetic
atmospheric constituents
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Circle Map: radiation
Triple Venn Diagram: visible light,
infrared radiation, ultraviolet
radiation
Circle Map: “Why is the sky blue?”
using two different colors to show
before and after instruction ideas.
Be sure to cross out ideas that
turned out to be fallacies after
instruction.
SKILLS FOCUS:
Observing
Develop a hypothesis.
In pairs, draw and label the
electromagnetic spectrum.
Include explanations of three
types of radiation, their effects,
and how atmospheric
constituents absorb them.
In pairs, write and explanation
with illustrations to show why
the sky is blue and the Sun is
yellow.
Appx
Time
(I&E 7.a)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
• Focus on ES: 9:1, Mini Lab, “Why is
the sky blue?” p. 391
• Focus on ES: 9, Lab, “Water and
Sand Temperatures”, pp. 410-411
• Focus on ES: Ch 3 Transparencies,
“The Sun’s Radiant Energies”
“Conduction, Convection and Radiation”
• Focus on ES: Ch 9 Transparencies
“Heat Transfer”
“Energy Transfer”
• SMRC / LBAOP: “Watershed” Out-ofthe-Box Science Kit for checkout
• NASA: “Why is the sky blue?”
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/en/kids/
misrsky/misr_sky.shtml
• Exploratorium: “Blue Sky”
http://www.exploratorium.edu/snacks/
blue_sky.html
3 Days
In small groups, make up a
mnemonic to help memorize
all of the colors in visible
spectrum in order. Then have
students quiz one another.
•
Describe solar radiation and
demonstrate its energy through
observation and
experimentation.
Explain and interpret a diagram
of the electromagnetic
spectrum.
Distinguish long and short wave
radiation and how they are
absorbed to different amounts
by atmospheric constituents.
Explain that the sky appears
blue and the Sun yellow
because the atmosphere
scatters blue light more than
yellow.
Describe visible light, infrared
light, ultraviolet light and their
effects.
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Science 6 SDC - Page 24
Energy in the Earth System (cont’d)
4. Many phenomena on the Earth’s surface are affected by the transfer of energy through radiation and
convection currents.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… convection currents
distribute heat in the
atmosphere and
oceans.
(4,d)
•
•
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
PT: California Breeze
•
•
Focus on ES: Ch. 9:23, 10:2, 10:4, 11:3-4
PH FoES: 12:4, 15:2-3,
17:1
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
current
distribute
topography
deflect
Coriolis Effect
convection current
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Diagram of day and night air
currents over coastlines
Flow Map: Solar energy to
convection currents to air currents
to ocean currents
SKILLS FOCUS:
Read a topographic map and a
geologic map for evidence
provided on the maps and
construct and interpret a simple
scale map.
(I&E 7.f)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
• Investigate atmospheric convection
currents using smoke chimney or fog
chamber. (Framework p. 96)
• Observe water droplets (condensing
steam) as they exit a boiling teakettle.
(Framework p. 96)
• Investigate convection currents in
liquid. (Framework p. 96)
• Focus on ES: 9:1, Launch Lab, “Does
temperature affect air density?” p. 379
• Focus on ES: 9:2, Mini Lab, “How do
clouds form from convection
currents?” pp. 395
• Focus on ES: 9:3, Dem., “Convection
Currents”, p. 403 TE
• Focus on ES: 9:3, Nat’l Geog.,
“Visualizing Global Winds”, p. 407
• Focus on ES: 9:3, Data Lab, “Is it
windy here?” p. 408
• Focus on ES:10:1, Launch Lab, “Will
hot water sink?” p. 421
• Focus on ES: 10:2, Mini Lab,
“Different Densities?” p. 433
• Focus on ES: 10:2, Activity (Coriolis
Effect), p. 432 TE
• Focus on ES: 10:4, Demo., (California
Current), p. 448 TE
• Focus on ES: 10:4, Data Lab, “How
many whales …?” p. 450
• Focus on ES: 11:3, Mini Lab, “How
does latitude affect the angle of
sunlight?” p. 485
• Focus on ES: 11:4, Demo.,
“Differential Heating”, p. 493 TE
• Focus on ES: Ch 9 Transparency,
“Coriolis Effect”
• GEMS: Ocean Currents
• NOAA: National Oceanic &
Atmospheric Administration
http://www.noaa.gov/
End District Quarter 2 Exam Material
3 Days
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
Using weather web sites, have
groups of students research
average temperatures in
Fargo, North Dakota and
Paris, France. (Paris is
actually a little farther north
than Fargo.) Also, have other
student groups compare
ocean temperatures of the
Pacific off of San Diego to the
Atlantic off of Charleston,
South Carolina. By looking at
maps of global wind and
ocean currents, have students
explain why the differences
exist.
Diagram the convection
currents for air over a coastline
caused by unequal heating over
land and ocean.
Explain how this unequal
heating causes both wind and
ocean currents.
Explain how wind and air
currents are deflected by the
geography of the land and the
rotation of the Earth.
Cite evidence proving that these
currents carry heat energy from
place to place (i.e., coastal cool
temperatures, the Gulf Stream
warming western Europe.)
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Science 6 SDC - Page 25
Plate Tectonics and Earth’s Structure (cont’d)
1. Plate tectonics accounts for important features of Earth’s surface and major geologic events.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… the solid Earth is
layered with cold, brittle
lithosphere; hot,
convecting mantle; and
dense, metallic core.
(1,b)
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: A Moving Experience
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
In pairs, students make an
appropriately scaled, labeled
poster or collage of Earth’s
interior.
•
•
•
Describe the Earth’s interior
structure:
o cold, brittle lithosphere
o “plastic” upper mantle region
called the asthenosphere
o hot, convecting mantle
o dense, metallic core.
Create an appropriately scaled,
cross-section diagram of the
Earth with temperature, density,
composition, and physical state
labeled for each layer.
Explain that scientists have
learned about the Earth’s
structure by studying how
earthquake waves move reflect
inside the Earth.
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Focus on ES, Ch 2:3,
4:3, and 5:2
PH FoES, Ch 1:1,2
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
crust
mantle
core
lithosphere
geologist
asthenosphere
convection currents
density
heat flow
composition
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Tree Map: Earth’s interior
KWL Chart: What do you know
about the Earth?
SKILLS FOCUS:
Drawing to scale
Communicate the steps and
results from an investigation in
written reports and oral
presentations.
(I&E 7.d)
Recognize whether evidence is
consistent with a proposed
explanation.
(I&E 7.e)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
5 Days
• Focus on ES: Ch 2, Helping You
Prepare, Demo., p. 74D TE
• Focus on ES: 2:3, Demo.,
“Structures”, p.103
• Focus on ES: 2:3, Mini-Lab, “How can
you describe …?”, p.103
• Focus on ES: 2:3, Science Concepts,
“Activity”, p.104 TE
• Focus on ES: 2:3, Design Your Own
Lab, “Model and Invent: Earth’s
Layers”, p.110-111
• Focus on ES: 4:3, Demo., “Rigid
Crust & Molten Mantle”, p.187 TE
• Focus on ES: 4:3, Applying Math,
“Percentage of Minerals and Rocks in
the Lithosphere”, p.195
• Focus on ES: Ch 3 Transparencies,
“Mountain of Ash”
“Seismic Wave Speeds”
• UC San Diego: “Earth Like a
Puzzle”,
http://sio.ucsd.edu/voyager/earth_
puzzle/look_beneath.html
• Purdue Univ.: “Journey to the
`Center of the Earth”,
web.ics.purdue.edu/~braile/edumod/
journey/journey.htm
• USGS: “The Interior of the Earth”,
pubs.usgs.gov/gip/interior/
Science 6 SDC - Page 26
Plate Tectonics and Earth’s Structure (cont’d)
1. Plate tectonics accounts for important features of Earth’s surface and major geologic events.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… lithospheric plates
that are the size of
continents and oceans
move at rates of
centimeters per year in
response to movements
in the mantle.
(1,c)
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: A Moving Experience
Do the same for a convergent
boundary.
•
•
Explain that the Earth’s
lithosphere is broken up into
oceanic and continental plates.
Describe how hot rising magma
and relatively cooler sinking
magma in the Earth create
convection currents that push
the tectonic plates.
Explain that the tectonic plates
move at about the same speed
that fingernails grow.
Focus on ES: 4:3, 5:1
PH FoES, Ch 1:5
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
lithospheric plates
oceanic plate
continental plate
continental plate
convection
density
tectonic plates
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Venn Diagram: continental and
oceanic plates
SKILLS FOCUS:
Applying prior knowledge
Develop a hypothesis.
(I&E 7.a)
Select and use appropriate tools
and technology to perform tests,
collect data, and display data.
(I&E 7.b)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
• Focus on ES: Ch 4, Design Your Own
Lab: “Use the Internet: Inferring
Plate Tectonic Activity”, p.196-197
• Focus on ES: 5:1, Applying Math,
“Speed of Lithospheric Plates”, p.222
• Focus on ES: 5:1, Additional Activity,
p.222 TE
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 LAB, “How do
Continental Plates move?”, p.25-27
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1Lab, “Rena’s
Folly”, pp.133-136
• Focus on ES: Ch 4 Transparency,
“Plates of the Lithosphere”
• HartRAO: Intro to Plate Tectonics
www.hartrao.ac.za/geodesy/tectonics.
html
• McDougal Littell: “Animation of plate
movement predicted for the future”,
www.classzone.com/books/earth_
science/terc/navigation/home.cfm
Enter keycode ES0807
3 Days
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
Given a cross-section diagram
of the Earth’s crust from North
America, across the midAtlantic ridge, to Europe, have
students draw arrows in the
magma showing how
convection currents must be
moving to cause the
(divergent) plate movement
above.
•
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Science 6 SDC - Page 27
Plate Tectonics and Earth’s Structure (cont’d)
1. Plate tectonics accounts for important features of Earth’s surface and major geologic events.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… the fit of the
continents, location of
earthquakes, volcanoes,
and midocean ridges,
and the distribution of
fossils, rock types, and
ancient climatic zones
provide evidence for
plate tectonics.
(1,a)
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: A Moving Experience
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
In pairs, using a physical map
of regions on Earth (showing
ocean floor topography when
appropriate), students label
areas of continental drift
showing the direction of
movement and listing evidence
to look for which would prove
continental drift. (These could
include plant/animal fossils,
landforms, magnetic alignment
of rocks, age of rocks, and
shapes of landmasses.)
•
•
•
Describe the theory of
continental drift and give
evidence from landforms, fossils
and climates.
Describe how the existence of
midocean ridges provides
further evidence for plate
tectonics.
Cite general evidence that when
plates move, landforms are
generated along plate
boundaries.
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Focus on ES, Ch 4:1,
2, 5:2, 10:1, 4
PH FoES, Ch 1:3,4 & Ch 2
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
Pangaea
continental drift
climate
fossil
mid-ocean ridge
geothermal
plate tectonics
volcano
sea floor spreading
faults
earthquakes
topography
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Tree Map: Evidences of Plate
Tectonics
SKILLS FOCUS:
Observing, giving evidence
Interpret events by sequence and
time from natural phenomena.
(I&E 7.g)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
10 Days
• Focus on ES: Ch 2 Launch Lab, “How
can you model landscapes?”, p. 75
• Focus on ES: Ch 4 Launch Lab, “Can
you put it back together?”, p. 163
• Focus on ES: 4:1, Demo., “Breakup of
Pangaea”, p. 167
• Focus on ES: 4:1, Practice Skills,
“Reconstruct”, p. 168
• Focus on ES: 4:1. Demo., “Similar
Organisms found …”, p. 169
• Focus on ES: 4:1, Mini-Lab, “Drifting
Continents”, p. 172
• Focus on ES: 4:2, Nat’l Geog.,
“Vis’ing Mid-Ocean Ridges”, p. 177
• Focus on ES: 4:2, Demo., “Identify”,
p. 178
• Focus on ES: 4:2, Practice Skills,
“Model the Seafloor”, p. 179
• Focus on ES: 4:2, Demo., “Drilling for
Samples”, p. 180
• Focus on ES: 4:2, Data Lab, “How
fast does seafloor spread?”, p. 182
• Focus on ES: 10:1, Demo., “Model
Echo Sounding”, p. 426
• Focus on ES: 10:1, Data Lab, “How
… read a bathymetric map?”, p. 428
• Focus on ES: 10:4, Lab, “Mapping the
Ocean Floor”, pp. 454-455
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Lab, “Charting
the Ocean Floor”, pp. 5-7
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Lab,
Concretions”, pp. 9-10
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Lab,
“Paleogeographic Mapping”, pp. 29-32
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Lab, Earth’s
Plates”, p. 33-37
• Focus on ES: 4:1, Transparency
“A Cold Dig”
• Focus on ES: Ch 4 Transparencies,
“Continental Drift and Fossils”
“Let Go of Pressure”
“Ocean Basin
• McDougal Littell: Animation of the
breakup of Pangaea
www.classzone.com/books/earth_
science/terc/navigation/home.cfm
Enter keycode ES3005
• Moorland School: “Plate tectonics”,
www.moorlandschool.co.uk/earth/
tectonic.htm
• USGS: “Historical Perspective”
http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/dynamic/
historical.html
• NASA: “Evidence Supporting
Continental Drift”
http://kids.earth.nasa.gov/archive/pan
gaea/evidence.html
Science 6 SDC - Page 28
Plate Tectonics and Earth’s Structure (cont’d)
1. Plate tectonics accounts for important features of Earth’s surface and major geologic events.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… earthquakes are
sudden motions along
breaks in the crust
called faults, and
volcanoes / fissures are
locations where magma
reaches the surface.
(1,d)
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: A Moving Experience
CR: California on the Move
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
Stay & Stray Activity: In pairs,
students create a poster of
one of the different types of
volcanoes and types of faults.
Student (experts) then take
turns teaching each other the
key facts.
•
•
•
•
Describe the type of faults.
Explain why faults form.
Explain the different ways that
magma can reach the Earth’s
surface.
Describe types of volcanoes
and how they form.
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Focus on ES: 5:1, 6:1
and 7:1,2,3
PH FoES, Ch 2:1 & 3:2,3
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
fault
earthquake
stress
fissures
volcano
magma
lava
seismic
ring of fire
crater
magma chamber
cone
shield
composite
eruption
molten
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Table: listing Type of Fault,
Example, and Cause
Multiflow Diagram: Earthquakes
SKILLS FOCUS:
Observation
Recognize whether evidence is
consistent with a proposed
explanation.
(I&E 7.e)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
5 Days
• Focus on ES: Ch 5 Launch Lab, “How
do objects deform?”, p. 207
• Focus on ES: 5:1, Demo., “Rock
Stretch”, p. 211
• Focus on ES: 5:1, Demo, “Normal
and Reverse Faults”, p. 213
• Focus on ES: 5:1, Mini-Lab, “How
can you model movement of a fault?”,
p. 214
• Focus on ES: Ch 6 Launch Lab,
“Rocks Stretch”, p. 243
• Focus on ES: 6:1, Demo, “Model
Elastic Strain”, p. 247
• Focus on ES: Ch 7 Launch Lab, “How
did these rocks form?”,
p. 291
• Focus on ES: 7:1, Demo, “Model
Magma Movement”, p. 295
• Focus on ES: 7:1, Mini-Lab, “How do
volcanoes form?”,
p. 300
• Focus on ES: 7:2, Demo, “Model”,
p. 303
• Focus on ES: 7:2, National
Geographic, “Visualizing Lava”, p. 306
• Focus on ES: 7:2, Data Lab, “Model
structures of volcanoes”, p. 312
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 LAB,
“Earthquakes”, pp. 45-47
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 LAB, “Volcanic
Eruptions”, pp. 49-52
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 LAB, “Volcanic
Preservation”, pp. 53-54
• IRIS: fault motion animations
http://www.iris.edu/gifs/animations/fau
lts.htm
• NASA Space Grant: “Volcano
World”, http://volcano.und.edu/
• McDougal Littell: “Examine
animations of fault motion”,
www.classzone.com/books/earth_
science/terc/navigation/home.cfm
Enter keycode ES1103
Science 6 SDC - Page 29
Plate Tectonics and Earth’s Structure (cont’d)
1. Plate tectonics accounts for important features of Earth’s surface and major geologic events.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… major geologic
events, such as
earthquakes, volcanic
eruptions, and mountain
building result from plate
motions.
(1,e)
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: A Moving Experience
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
Identify Pacific Plate
boundaries by plotting
locations of earthquakes and
volcanoes on a world map
using iris.edu. Have students
note the pattern outlining the
Ring of Fire. Explain the
causes and surface effects of
these.
•
•
•
•
•
Explain how the theory of plate
tectonics accounts for the
formation, movement, colliding,
and subduction of earth’s
plates.
Describe how various plate
movements explain
earthquakes, volcanic eruptions,
and mountain-building.
Plot the locations of major
earthquakes and volcanic
eruptions for the last 10 to 100
years on a large map using the
internet or various library
resources.
Describe that tectonic events
form a “ring” that outlines the
Pacific plate and that there is a
Hawaiian “hot spot”.
List landforms likely to be
associated with plate
boundaries (i.e., mountain
ranges, ocean trenches, and
volcanic island arcs).
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Focus on ES: Ch 2:1,
5:1,2 6:1 7:1, 3 10:4
PH FoES, Ch 1:5, 2,
3:1, and 13:1
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
convergent boundary
subduction collision
ring of fire
volcano
island arc
hot spot
trench
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Flow Map: Plate movements to
faults to earthquakes, volcanoes,
and landforms
SKILLS FOCUS:
Mapping, interpreting
Recognize whether evidence is
consistent with a proposed
explanation.
(I&E 7.e)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
4 Days
• Focus on ES: 2:1, Demo, “Model
landforms”, p. 79
• Focus on ES: 2:1, Data Lab, “How do
mountains vary in shape?”, p. 85
• Focus on ES:5:1, National
Geographic, “Visualizing Rift Valleys”,
p. 217
• Focus on ES:5:1, Demo, “Density”,
p. 219
• Focus on ES: 5:2, Data Lab, “How do
landforms define plate boundaries?”,
p. 227
• Focus on ES: 5:2, Design your own
Lab, “Earthquake Depths and Plate
Boundaries”, pp. 228-229
• Focus on ES: 6:1, Mini-Lab,
“Modeling earthquakes and Plate
tectonics”, p. 250
• Focus on ES:7:3, Applying Math,
“Finding Range”, p. 319
• Focus on ES:7:3, LAB, “Use the
Internet: The Ring of Fire”, p. 320-321
• Focus on ES:4-in-1 LAB, “Earth’s
Plates - PART C”, p. 33-37
• Focus on ES: Ch 1 Transparencies,
“Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes”
“Volcanic Mountain Structure"
• Focus on ES: Ch 5 Transparencies,
“Plate Movement”
“Faults”
• Focus on ES: Ch 7 Transparencies,
“River Ablaze”
“Volcanoes and Hot Spots”
“Volcanoes”
• Focus on ES: Ch 10 Transparencies,
“Water, Water, Everywhere”
“The Ocean Floor”
“California Coast”
• IRIS: “Seismic Monitor”,
http://www.iris.edu/seismon/
• USGS: “Plate Motions”,
http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/dynamic/
understanding.html
• McDougal Littell: animations of plate
boundary processes
www.classzone.com/books/earth_
science/terc/navigation/home.cfm
Enter keycode ES0804
• McDougal Littell: animation of
volcanism at a subduction zone
www.classzone.com/books/earth_
science/terc/navigation/home.cfm
Enter keycode ES0902
• McDougal Littell: animation of the
Himalayas forming
www.classzone.com/books/earth_
science/terc/navigation/home.cfm
Enter keycode ES1105
Science 6 SDC - Page 30
Plate Tectonics and Earth’s Structure (cont’d)
1. Plate tectonics accounts for important features of Earth’s surface and major geologic events.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… how to determine the
epicenter of an
earthquake and that the
effects of an earthquake
vary with its size,
distance from the
epicenter, local geology,
and the type of
construction involved.
(1,g)
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: A Moving Experience
CR: California on the Move
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
Given P and S wave data for
three seismic stations,
students are able to triangulate
the location of a hypothetical
earthquake epicenter.
Pairs of students make an
illustrated earthquake safety
kit checklist.
Given a square of jello, 10
toothpicks, and 10 minimarshmallows, pairs of
students create earthquakeproof structures. Compare
these to building code
regulations.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Describe how the energy waves
of an earthquake travel through
Earth.
Identify and describe the
different P and S seismic
waves.
Model seismic waves through
the use of a spring.
Calculate the velocities of Pand S-waves using a spring.
Compare Richter and Mercalli
scales used to measure
earthquake intensity.
Determine the epicenter of an
earthquake through using the
method of triangulation.
Describe construction methods
that improve the ability of
buildings to withstand the
effects of earthquakes.
Focus on ES,
Ch 6:2,3,4
PH FoES, Ch 2:2,3
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
epicenter
magnitude
focus
amplitude
seismography
intensity
primary wave (P wave)
secondary wave (S wave)
vibration
triangulation
velocity
rupture
Richter scale
liquifaction
Mercalli scale
brittle
compression
flexible
tension
shearing
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
T Chart: Earthquake Safety – Safe
vs. Unsafe
SKILLS FOCUS:
Construct appropriate graphs from data
and develop qualitative statements about
the relationships between variables.
(I&E 7.c)
Interpret events by sequence and time
from natural phenomena.
(I&E 7.g)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
• Focus on ES: 6:2, Mini-Lab,
“Modeling P and S waves”, p. 256
• Focus on ES: 6:2, Applying Math,
“Speeds of seismic waves”, p. 259
• Focus on ES: 6:3, Demo,
“Seismograph”, p. 263
• Focus on ES: 6:3, Data Lab, “…
earthquake’s epicenter?”, pp. 268-269
• Focus on ES: 6:4, Nat’l Geog.,
“Visualizing Tsunamis”, p. 273
• Focus on ES: 6:4, Demo, “Model
structures”, p. 275
• Focus on ES: 6:4, Demo, “Earthquake
safety”, p. 277
• Focus on ES: 6:4, Data Lab, “… areas
at risk for earthquakes?, p. 279
• Focus on ES: 6:4, Design your own
lab, “Preparing for an earthquake”,
pp. 280-281
• Focus on ES: 4-in 1 Lab, “Using the
modified Mercalli scale to locate an
epicenter”, p. 39-43
• Focus on ES: 4-in 1 Probeware,
“Measuring Earthquakes”, pp. 159161
• Focus on ES: Ch 6 Transparencies
“Earthquake Activity” “Seismic Waves”
“Earthquake Intensity” “Earthquakes””
“Surface Waves”
“A Beautiful Detector
• USGS: Latest Quake Info
http://quake.wr.usgs.gov/recent/index.
html
• USGS: “Earthquakes”
http://earthquake.usgs.gov/
• McDougal Littell: “Observe
animations of earthquake waves”,
www.classzone.com/books/earth_
science/terc/navigation/home.cfm
Enter keycode ES1002
• McDougal Littell: “Observe P and S
waves through Earth’s interior”,
www.classzone.com/books/earth_
science/terc/navigation/home.cfm
Enter keycode ES1009
End District Quarter 3 Exam Material
7 Days
In small groups, students will
answer a series of “What if? ”
earthquake situation
questions on index cards.
Students rotate the cards until
they have answered all the
questions.
•
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Science 6 SDC - Page 31
Shaping Earth’s Surface
2. Topography is reshaped by the weathering of rock and soil and by the transportation and deposition of
sediment.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… water running
downhill is the dominant
process in shaping the
landscape, including
California’s landscape.
(2,a)
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: Wasting Away
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
Pairs of students design a way
to separate small, medium,
and large soil particles using
wind or water.
Students match appropriate
key vocabulary words to cards
showing erosion landforms.
Students perform GEMS:
“River Cutters” assessment
after about six guided trials.
After observing their stream
table, students record the
types of erosion and
landscape formations over
time.
•
•
•
•
•
Explain the concepts of
weathering, erosion and
deposition and relate them to
landscape formations.
Model transportation and
deposition of sediment.
Demonstrate that different sizes
of sediments settle at different
rates.
Describe the effects of moving
water.
Describe the effects and cite
examples of wind and glacial
erosion.
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Focus on ES, Ch 1:1-2
2:1, 8:1-3
PH FoES, Ch 7:1,
8:1-4 10:1
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
chemical weathering
mechanical weathering
erosion
deposition glaciers
sediment settling
landscape
topography
mass wasting
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Tree Map: wind, water, and glacier
erosion
SKILLS FOCUS:
Read a topographic map and a
geologic map for evidence provided on
the maps and construct and interpret a
simple scale map.
(I&E 7.f)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
7 Days
• Focus on ES: 1:1, Launch Lab, “How
might you map …” p. 45
• Focus on ES: 1:1, Demo. (Lat. and
Long.), p. 51 TE
• Focus on ES: 1:2, Nat’l Geog.,
Visualizing Topography, p. 57
• Focus on ES: 1:2, Data Lab, “How does
a landscape change over time?” p. 62
• Focus on ES: 1:2, Lab, “Mapping a
Race Route”, pp. 64-65
• Focus on ES: Reference Handbook,
“Topographic Map Symbols”, p. 673
• Focus on ES: 8:1, Launch Lab, “Set in
Stone?”, p. 331
• Focus on ES: 8:1, Activity
(Weathering), p. 336 TE
• Focus on ES: 8:1, Mini Lab, “Water
and Weathering”, p. 338
• Focus on ES: 8:1, Demo., “Soil
Formation”, p. 338 TE
• Focus on ES: 8:2, Demo., “Beach
Deposition”, p. 349 TE
• Focus on ES: 8:3, Demo., “Glacier
Deposition”, p. 355 TE
• Focus on ES: 8:3, Mini Lab, “Will it
slump, or will it creep?” p. 362
• Focus on ES: 8:3, Lab, “Stream
Sediment”, pp. 364-365
• Demonstration: Place varying
sizes/types of sediment in a jar, shake
the jar, and observe rate of settling.
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Lab,
“Determining Latitude”, pp. 1-4
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Lab, “Charting
the Ocean Floor”, pp. 5-8
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Lab, “Mass
Movements”, pp. 55-56
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Lab, “Modeling a
Glacier”, pp. 57-58
• Focus on ES: Ch 1 Transparencies,
“Latitude and Longitude”
“Map Reading”
• Focus on ES: Ch 8 Transparencies,
“Going, Going…”
“Types of Weathering”
“Avalanche”
• Geology Online: “Weathering and
Erosion”
http://geologyonline.museum.state.il.
us/tools/lessons/6.3/lesson.html
• USGS: “Glacial Striations”
http://education.usgs.gov/schoolyard/
glacialstriations.html
• USGS: “27 ideas for teaching with
Topographic Maps”
http://education.usgs.gov/common/
lessons/teaching_with_topographic_
maps.html
Science 6 SDC - Page 32
Shaping Earth’s Surface (cont’d)
2. Topography is reshaped by the weathering of rock and soil and by the transportation and deposition of
sediment.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… rivers and streams
are dynamic systems
that erode, transport
sediment, change
course, and flood their
banks in natural and
recurring patterns. (2,b)
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: Wasting Away
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
Pairs of students respond to
the “Inquiry Challenge” in
Focus on ES, p. 245
•
•
•
•
•
Explain how water erosion is the
primary factor responsible for
shaping Earth’s land surface.
Describe some of the land
features formed by water
erosion.
Explain how sediment enters
rivers and streams.
List the factors that effect
water’s ability to erode and
carry sediment.
Explain why a river may change
its course over time.
Describe conditions that cause
floods and describe how floods
can be controlled.
Focus on ES, Ch. 2:1,
8:2-3
PH FoES, Ch 8:1,2, 3
Ch 16: 3
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
energy
volume
flow
flood
stream bank
oxbow lake
sediment
bedrock
slope
valley
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Flow Map: river changes over time
and the reasons for the changes
Tree Map: three ways streams
carry sediment
SKILLS FOCUS:
Communicate the steps and
results from an investigation in
written reports and oral
presentations.
(I&E 7.d)
LABS / DEMOS:
• GEMS: River Cutters
• Focus on ES: 8:2, Demo., “Levees”,
p. 347 TE
• Focus on ES: 8:2, Activity (Hurricane
Katrina), p. 348 TE
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Lab, “Where is
the money?” pp. 121-124
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 Lab, “What
happened to the wild stream?” pp. 129-132
• Focus on ES: Ch 8 Transparencies,
“Take the Long Way Home”
“Mississippi River Watershed”
• Nat’l Geog. (virtual lab), “Rain: Friend
or Foe?”,
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xp
editions/lessons/07/g68/rain.html
• Nat’l Geog. (activity), “Delving into
the Grand Canyon”
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xp
editions/lessons/07/g68/canyon68.
html
5 Days
In small groups, students plan
ways to control floods (sand
bags, dams, river diversion,
etc.).
•
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Science 6 SDC - Page 33
Earth and Life History (Earth Science) (Grade 7 CA Standard)
4. Evidence from rocks allows us to understand the evolution of life on Earth. As the basis for understanding
this concept.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… Earth processes
today are similar to
those that occurred in
the past and slow
geologic processes
have large cumulative
effects over long periods
of time.
(7-4,a)
(Refer to standard 1 to review
continental drift and plate
tectonics.)
•
•
•
•
Define the principle of
uniformitarianism. (According to
this principle, the laws of nature do not
change over time. Therefore, the same
processes that shaped the earth in the
past are still at work today).
Define the principle of
superposition. (The principle of
superposition states that younger rock
layers are formed on top of older rock
layers. This principle is the basis for
most relative age dating of fossils).
Describe continental drift and
give evidence for it (model the
process).
Explain the theory of plate
tectonics.
Describe the relationship
between the fossil records and
geologic history.
Focus on LS, Ch 7:1
PH FoLS, Ch. 6:1, 2, 5
PH FoES, Ch 1:3, 5
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
continental drift
Pangaea
uniformitarianism plate tectonics
superposition
fossil record
sedimentary rock
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Flow Map: geologic time scale with
examples of organisms
SKILLS FOCUS:
Inferring, organizing
Communicate the logical
connection among hypothesis,
science concepts, tests conducted,
data collected, and conclusions
drawn from the scientific evidence.
(I&E 7.c)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
• Use hand motions to simulate plate
movement.
• Focus on LS: 7:1, Launch Lab, “What
is Earth’s surface like?” p. 281
• Focus on LS: 7:1, Activity (Layering
and Superposition), p. 290 TE
• Focus on LS: 7:1, Mini Lab, “How
does Earth change …?”, p. 292
• Focus on LS: 4-in-1 Lab: “Principle of
Superposition”, pp. 37-39
• Focus on ES: Ch 1 Transparency,
“Geologic Mapping”
• Focus on LS: Ch 7 Transparencies,
“Older than the Hills”
“Rock Cycle”
• GEMS: Life Through Time
• The Paleontology Portal:
http://www.paleoportal.org/
• USGS: Educational Resources for
Paleontology,
http://geology.er.usgs.gov/paleo/
eduinfo.shtml
• Glencoe: “The Fossils of Antarctica”
http://www.glencoe.com/sites/
common_assets/science/webquests/
fossils.html#task
3 Days
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: Lights Out
CR: Sands of Time
:
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
Students create color-coded
posters showing different
layers of rocks. Given 10
sample fossils, students glue
them into the appropriate
layers and use this poster to
explain the law of
superposition.
•
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Science 6 SDC - Page 34
Earth and Life History (Earth Science) (Grade 7 CA Standard)
(cont’d)
4. Evidence from rocks allows us to understand the evolution of life on Earth. As the basis for understanding
this concept.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… the history of life on
Earth has been
disrupted by major
catastrophic events,
such as major volcanic
eruptions or the impacts
of asteroids. (7-4,b)
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: Lights Out
•
Discuss that though rare,
catastrophic events have had a
significant effect on the shaping
of Earth’s surface and on the
evolutionary development of life.
Describe the immediate effects
of catastrophic events such as a
large meteor impact or major
volcanic eruption (both of which
cause the injection of large
amounts of fine-grained particle
matter into the atmosphere,
which may cause immediate
regional and global
consequences for climate and
short and long-term changes in
habitat).
Focus on LS, Ch 8:1-3
PH FoLS, Ch 6:5
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
catastrophe
volcano
effect
climate
catastrophic
meteor
consequence
atmosphere
habitat
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Venn Diagram: effects of volcanic
eruptions and asteroid impacts
SKILLS FOCUS:
Comparing, contrasting, observing
Utilize a variety of print and
electronic resources (including the
World Wide Web) to collect
information as evidence as part of
a research project.
(I&E 7.b)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
• Allow students to observe and
describe volcanic ash, focusing on its
fine particulate nature.
• Focus on LS: 8:1, Demo., “ Permian
Extinction”, p. 319 TE
• Focus on LS: 8:1, Use Models
(Asteroid Impact), p. 322 TE
• Focus on LS: 8:1, Data Lab, “Which
organisms return first …?”, p. 324
• Focus on LS: Ch 8 Transparency,
“Bad for Pompeii, Good for
Archaeology”
• McDougal Littell: animation of an
asteroid impact … Cretaceous Period
www.classzone.com/books/earth_
science/terc/navigation/home.cfm
Enter keycode ES3006
• Enchanted Learning: “Geologic
Time Scale”
http://www.enchantedlearning.com/
subjects/Geologictime.html
• PBS: “What killed the dinosaurs?”
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/evolution/
extinction/dinosaurs/index.html
3 Days
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
In groups, students discuss
and create a plan for what we
might do if there were a major,
catastrophic event such as a
meteor or major volcanic
eruption. They should address
the question, “How would life
change?”
•
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Science 6 SDC - Page 35
Earth and Life History (Earth Science) (Grade 7 CA Standard)
(cont’d)
4. Evidence from rocks allows us to understand the evolution of life on Earth. As the basis for understanding
this concept.
Standards and
Assessments
“Students know…”
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
• Define sediment as a
… the rock cycle
combination of organic and
includes the formation of
inorganic materials (rock and
new sediment and rocks
mineral fragments, various
and that rocks are often
dissolved ions, and biological
found in layers, with the
debris).
oldest generally on the
• Diagram how sediment is
bottom. (7-4,c)
transported and deposited to
[Note: This standard extends the
introduction of superposition in
standard 7-4a and reviews
erosion and deposition concepts
from standards 2a-d.]
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
Teacher creates fossil
columns by pouring four
different colors of plaster into
cups with a different “fossil” in
each layer (i.e., peanut, paper
clip, eggshell, chicken bone).
Students act as
paleontologists by excavating
the fossils, drawing a diagram
of where each fossil was
discovered, and drawing
conclusions about what events
took place and in what
sequence.
Focus on LS: Ch. 6:1,
7:1
Focus on LS: 6.1, 2
Connections
Appx
Time
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
sediment
inorganic
ions
abrasion
superposition
erosion
organic
minerals
debris
relative age
acid rain
lithification / lithify
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Flow Map: sediment to
sedimentary rock
Venn Diagram: comparing
sediment samples (sand, silt, clay,
garden soil)
SKILLS FOCUS:
Comparing, contrasting
Communicate the logical
connection among hypothesis,
science concepts, tests conducted,
data collected, and conclusions
drawn from the scientific evidence.
(I&E 7.c)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
• Focus on LS: 7:1, Activity (Clast
Shape), p. 286 TE
• Focus on LS: 7:1, Activity (Sediment
Sorting), p. 287 TE
• Focus on LS: 7:1, Demonstration,
“Sediment Sorting”, p. 289 TE
• Focus on LS: 7:2, Lab, “Erosion
Stoppers”, pp. 302-303
• USGS: “Rock Stories”
http://education.usgs.gov/schoolyard/
RockActivity.html
• Sci. Net Links: “How Sedimentary
Rocks are formed”
http://www.sciencenetlinks.com/
lessons.cfm?Grade=6-8&
BenchmarkID=4&DocID=174
2 Days
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: Lights Out
CR: Sands of Time
form new sedimentary rock.
• Describe the formation of
sediment as due to physical
processes (abrasion and
freezing and thawing cycles)
and chemical processes (acid
rain and oxygen which results in
the formation of new types of
minerals).
• Determine the relative ages of
rock layers using the principle of
superposition (include crosscutting and inclusions).
• Describe how the biological
portion of accumulated
sediment may be fossilized and
preserved to provide a partial
record of organisms from the
source area.
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Science 6 SDC - Page 36
Earth and Life History (Earth Science) (Grade 7 CA Standard)
(cont’d)
4. Evidence from rocks allows us to understand the evolution of life on Earth. As the basis for understanding
this concept.
Standards and
Assessments
Task Analysis
“Students are able to …”
“Students know…”
… fossils provide
evidence of how life and
environmental
conditions have
changed. (7-4,e)
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: Lights Out
CR: Sands of Time
… how to explain
significant developments
and extinctions of plant
and animal life on the
geologic time scale.
(7-4,g)
DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:
CR: Lights Out
Focus on LS: 6:1,
and 8:1,2,3
PH FoLS: 6:1,2,4,5
(per 180
days)
KEY VOCABULARY:
index fossils
environment
uniformitarianism
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
T Chart: environmental conditions
today and 100 million years ago
SKILLS FOCUS:
Comparing, contrasting, inferring
Communicate the logical
connection among hypothesis,
science concepts, tests conducted,
data collected, and conclusions
drawn from the scientific evidence.
(I&E 7.c)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
• Focus on ES: 4-in-1 LAB, “Index
Fossils”, pp. 21-23
• Focus on LS: 6:1, Mini Lab, How do
Fossils Form?”, p. 249
• Focus on LS: 6:1, Demo, “Share
Fossils”, p. 245 TE
• Focus on LS: 6:1, Demo, “Fossilized
or Not?”, p. 247 TE
• Focus on LS: 6:1, Demo, “Env’l Info.
from Fossils”, p. 249 TE
• Focus on LS:8:2, Mini Lab, “What
makes the best fossils?”, p. 327
• Focus on LS:8:3, Mini Lab, “What
happened here?, p. 340
• McDougal Littell: “Observe how
fossils can form”
www.classzone.com/books/earth_
science/terc/navigation/home.cfm
Enter keycode ES2901
•
List the gradual changes that life
has undergone during the history
of Earth (i.e. organisms adapt to
slowly changing environments,
evolution of new species, and
extinction of species).
• Provide examples of organisms
that support the principle of
uniformitarianism (i.e.
photosynthetic cyanobacteria,
a.k.a. blue-green algae).
• Prove whether the principle of
uniformitarianism is consistent
over the history of the Earth by
researching evidence, such as:
o Early Earth was very different
from today as little oxygen was
present in the atmosphere.
o There was no ozone layer in
the early stratosphere.
o Earliest life was anaerobic.
o Earth’s history has been
punctuated by catastrophic
events such as mass
extinctions and the Cambrian
explosion.
Appx
Time
Focus on LS, 8:1,2,3
PH FoLS, Ch 6:4,5
KEY VOCABULARY:
environment
organisms
anaerobic
ozone layer
photosynthetic cyanobacteria
(blue-green algae)
GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:
Time Line: Students’ life history
SKILLS FOCUS:
Interpreting data, making models
Construct scale models
appropriately labeled diagrams to
communicate scientific knowledge
(I&E 7.d)
LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:
• Focus on LS: 4-in1-Lab, “Modeling
Geographic Isolation”, pp. 49-50
• Focus on LS: 6:3, Nat’l Geog.:
“Vis’ing Geographic Isolation”, p. 258
• Focus on LS: 4-in-1 Lab, “Looking at
the Geologic Timescale”, pp. 45-48
• Focus on LS: 8:3, Demo., “Geologic
Timescale”, p. 337 TE
• Focus on LS: 8:3, Lab, “ …CA …
Over Geologic Time”, pp. 342-343
• USGS: “Our changing continent “
http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/continents
Health education from Project ALERT lessons 1-6 are optional.
Materials and training are available through the Health Curriculum Office (Ext 2967).
7 Days
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
Create a class geologic
timeline using the scale 1 mm
= 1 milion years. Students are
given pictures of organisms
with a time period and glue the
pictures to the correct location
in time.
Describe how fossils provide
evidence of the environments and
types of life that existed in the
past (environmental changes are
reflected by the classes of
organisms that evolved during the
period of environmental change).
• Describe how geologists use the
principle of uniformitarianism to
exam fossil evidence, noting
changes in organism types over
time (ancient animals that exhibit
the same shell shape and
thickness of modern clams
probably lived in the same type of
environment).
Connections
3 Days
MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:
Pairs of students compare
fossils of ancient organisms to
similar modern organisms
using a Venn diagram. Then,
they report to the class on their
hypothesis about how
differences in environmental
conditions might account for
the differences in organisms.
•
Adopted
Textbook
Correlation(s)
Science 6 SDC - Page 37
APPLICATION OF COURSE CONTENT: Career Connections
Related Major Skills & Characteristics – objective observation, careful measurement, curiosity,
problem solving, organizational skills, numerical reasoning, ability to analyze & interpret data, critical
thinking, reading comprehension, concise and accurate communication skills, computer literacy, logical
thinking, team skills, testing skills, practical safety awareness, evidence evaluating
Related Careers – Students who continue in the sciences can prepare for the following careers:
Aeronautical Engineer
(Rocket Scientist)
Agricultural Ecologist
Analytical Chemist
Aquatic Microbial Ecologist
Astronomer
Automotive Engineer
Biochemist
Biologist
Biotechnologist
Botanist
Cell Biologist
Chemical Engineer
Electrical Engineer
Energy
Fire Fighter
Geologist
Geneticist
Immunologist
Marine Biologist
Materials Scientist
Medical Researcher
Meteorologist
Microbiologist
Mining Geologist
National Park Ranger
Neurobiologist
Nuclear Physicist
Nurse
Paleontologist
Pathologist
Pediatrician
Petroleum Geologist
Pharmacist
Physician
Physicist
Physiologist
Professor
Quality Control Specialist
Radiologist
Refrigeration Technician
Science Fiction Writer
Seismologist
Teacher
Technical Editor
Veterinarian
Virologist
Wildlife Ecologist
METHODS:
Lesson Design & Delivery: Teachers will incorporate these components of lesson design during direct
instruction and inquiry activities. The order of components is flexible, depending on the teacher’s vision for the
individual lesson. For instance, the objective and purpose, while present in the teacher’s lesson plan, are not made
known to the students at the beginning of an inquiry lesson.
Anticipatory Set
Objective
Essential
Standard Reference
Elements of
Purpose
Input
Effective
Modeling
Instruction
Check for Understanding
Model for Lesson Design Guided Practice
Using Task Analysis
Closure
Independent Practice
Some components may occur once in a lesson, but others will recur many times. Checking for understanding occurs
continually; input, modeling, guided practice and closure may occur several times. There may even be more than one
anticipatory set when more than one content piece is introduced.
Active Participation: Teachers will incorporate the principles of active participation and specific strategies to
ensure consistent, simultaneous involvement of the minds of all learners in the classroom. Teachers should include
both covert and overt active participation strategies, incorporating cooperative learning structures and brain research.
Some of the possible active participation strategies include:
OVERT
(Oral)
COVERT
•
•
•
•
Recall
Imagine
Observe
Consider
•
•
•
•
•
•
Pair/Share
Idea Wave
Choral Response
Give One, Get One
Socratic Seminar
Cooperative Discussion
Groups (i.e.Talking Chips,
Gambit Chips)
OVERT
(Written)
•
•
•
•
•
Restate in Journals / Notes
Response Boards
Graphic Organizers
Folded Paper
Ticket Out of Class
OVERT
(Gestures)
•
•
•
•
Hand Signals
Model with Manipulatives
Stand up/ Sit down
Point to Examples
Science 6 SDC - Page 38
Baldridge Quality Tools: Students can become more positively involved in their education through goal setting,
self-assessment, and data tracking and analysis by making use of the following strategies:
BALDRIDGE TOOL
PURPOSES
Affinity Diagram
Flowchart
Force Field Diagram
Issues / Ideas Bin
– finding consensus, organizing complex information
– describing a process, planning a project, identifying problem steps in a process
– identifying obstacles, finding causes and solutions to problems
– handling individual questions/requests without stopping a group activity, providing
anonymous input, obtaining diverse input in specific areas.
– tracking goals and actual results
– tracking improvement efforts, identifying opportunities for change, finding out what’s
working and what’s not working in a process, procedure, activity, etc.
– displaying trends for goal setting
Data Folder
Plus / Delta
Class Data Graphs
Learning styles and learning challenges of your students may be addressed by implementing
combinations of the following:
Reading Strategies in Science
‰
‰
‰
‰
‰
‰
‰
‰
Learning Logs
Pre-teaching
Vocabulary
Pre-reading
Text Structures
Trail Markers
Reciprocal Teaching
Functional Text
SDAIE Strategies for English
Learners
Differentiation for Advanced
Learners
‰
‰
‰
‰
‰
‰
‰
Curriculum Compacting
Tiered Assignments
Flexible Grouping
Acceleration
Depth and Complexity
Independent Study
‰
‰
‰
Current Events
Peer Teaching
Guest Speakers
‰
‰
‰
‰
‰
‰
‰
‰
Tapping/Building Prior
Knowledge (Graphic
Organizers, Schema)
Grouping Strategies
Multiple Intelligences
Adapt the Text
Interactive Learning
(Manipulatives, Visuals)
Acquisition Levels
Language Sensitivity
Lower the Affective Filter
(including Processing Time)
Home/School Connection
(including Cultural Aspects)
Significant, Proven Science Strategies for ALL Science Students
‰
‰
‰
Hands-On Labs
Inquiry Activities
Written/Oral Presentations
‰
‰
‰
Short/Long-term projects
Essential Questions
Summarization
Please note that these strategies often overlap and should not be limited to specifically defined courses or student populations.
MATERIALS:
Basic Textbook and Supplementary Materials: Focus on Earth Science,
Glencoe © 2007
eguidance.com web site for exploring careers
safety equipment: goggles, latex gloves, fire extinguisher
glassware: flasks, beakers, test tubes, etc.
measuring devices: triple beam balance, rulers, volumetric containers
chemical reagents
microscopes, microviewers, hand lenses, dissection equipment
appropriate technology
™ Many items are available through Science/Math Resource Center (SMRC).
Science 6 SDC - Page 39
RESOURCES:
Documents
‰ Science Framework: .............. http://www.cde.ca.gov/re/pn/fd/documents/scienceframework.pdf
[or find it posted in sections at the LBUSD Science Office website]
‰
‰
‰
‰
‰
‰
CST / NCLB Test Blueprints: ............................ http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/sr/blueprints.asp
CST Reference Sheets: ...................................... http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/sr/cstsciref.asp
CST Released Test Questions ............................ http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/sr/css05rtq.asp
National Science Standards: .................... http://www.nap.edu/readingroom/books/nses/html/
Science Safety Handbook for CA Public Schools (1999)
can be ordered from the CDE at .................................... http://www.cde.ca.gov/re/pn/rc/
LBUSD Approved Chemicals List, Chemical Hygiene Plan, and Science Fair Resources:
http://www.lbusd.k12.ca.us/Main_Offices/Curriculum/Areas/Science/teacher_resources.cfm
District Offices
‰ Science Curriculum Office
o
‰
Science / Math Resource Center (SMRC)
o
‰
‰
(562) 997-8000 (ext. 2965)
o
o
wood shop / lumber room
copying, enlarging, and laminating
(562) 997-8000 (ext. 7145)
videos for check out to fit the curriculum (see your librarian for current catalogs)
district TV channels programming
Program Assistance for
(562) 997-8000 (ext. 8031)
Language Minority Students
technical assistance and professional development for English Language Development (ELD) and Specially
Designed Academic Instruction In English (SDAIE)
assistance in the implementation and maintenance of programs addressing the needs of English Language
Learners (ELLs)
PALMS Office
o
o
‰
standards-based instructional materials
content integrated instructional materials
monthly theme-based literacy
supplements for science
Office of Multimedia Services (OMS)
o
o
(562) 997-8000 (ext. 2964)
hands-on materials, consumable material orders, alternative standards-based curriculum packets
Instructional Materials Workshop (IMW)
o
o
o
‰
(562) 997-8000 (ext. 2963)
K-12 science standards, curriculum, professional development, science fair
Health Curriculum Office
o
(562) 997-8000 (ext. 2967)
curriculum and training for mandated health content
EVALUATION: Student achievement in this course will be measured using multiple assessment tools.
Assessments will be used for diagnosing student understanding before instruction, monitoring student learning during
instruction, and evaluating student understanding after instruction.
Special Education Accommodations: Students must participate in assessments using the accommodations
documented on their IEP. Accommodations for classroom and district assessment should be closely linked to the
same accommodations that are given in classroom instruction. Common accommodations used in science are:
•
•
•
•
Read aloud- read science questions, excerpts etc. aloud to the student to ensure you are assessing the
student’s knowledge in science and not in decoding/reading.
Oral Response- allow the student to orally respond to questions that would otherwise require a written
answer to ensure you are assessing the student’s knowledge in science and not in decoding/reading.
Extended time: This accommodation is often misused. Students require this accommodation when, in
instruction, they struggle to complete a task or an assessment. If students are given additional time and
still not completing the assessment because they are unable to do the work- this is not a valid use of
extended time. Extended time allows students longer processing time, or additional time to physically
write the answers etc.
Other accommodations: any other accommodations documented in the IEP should be allowed during
instruction and assessment. Accommodations are what helps the student access the curriculum.
Science 6 SDC - Page 40
SUGGESTED EVALUATION TOOLS:
Source
District Developed
Assessments
Glencoe Science:
Focus on Earth Science
Teacher Developed
Assessments
Diagnose
Monitor
Open-Ended Science
Performance Task
Grade Level Pretest
Reading Essentials: Before You Read
Launch Labs
New Vocabulary
Accessing Prior Knowledge Activities
Pre-quiz
Pre-Test
Vocab. Knowledge Rating
Reading Check questions
Science Notebook, “Summarize It”
Lesson Review: Summarize, Using
Vocabulary, Understanding Main Ideas,
Applying Science
Reading Essentials: Think it Over,
Reading Check, Picture This
Applying Math
Foldables
Active Folders
Mini Lab and Lab
Standards Review
Warm-Up
Quiz
Proving Behavior
Lab
SUGGESTED GRADE WEIGHTING:
(with some possible examples)
1. Assessment
o
o
o
o
o
2. Homework
o
o
o
o
o
~30%
objective tests including comprehensive finals
performance tasks (rubric scored)
open-ended questions (rubric scored)
portfolios
student self-evaluations
not more than 10%
discovery assignments
assignments reinforcing class lesson
essays
organization
research
3. Labs
o
o
~20%
lab reports
active participation
4. Projects
o
o
~20%
science fair projects
research-based reports and projects
5. Classwork
o
o
o
o
~20%
note taking skills
organization skills
oral presentations
individual and group projects and assessments
STANDARD GRADING SCALE:
Advanced Proficient A 90 – 100%
B 80 – 89%
Proficient
C 70 – 79%
D 60 – 69%
Partial Proficient
F
0 – 59%
Not Proficient
..........................................................................................................................................
...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
..........................................................................................................................................
Submitted by:
Eric Brundin (K. Feeley, D. Van Divort)
School:
Science Office
Date:
5/27/08
Revised Board Date:
10/4/11
Evaluate
End of Course Exam
Open Ended Science
Standards Assessment
Performance Assessment
Sci Activities for Adv.
Learners
Chapter & Unit Tests
Rubric Scored Projects,
Labs, and Writings
Open-ended Prompts
Chapter / Unit Test
Practicum
Semester Final Exam
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