AGENDA

AGENDA
MiraCosta College
Academic Senate
Regular Meeting —October 16th, 2015
9:00am to 11:00am — Room OC1202
AGENDA
I.
Call to Order
II.
Persons Wishing to Address the Senate
III.
Changes to Agenda Order
IV.
Reports
A. Academic Senate President – Fino
B. College Superintendent/President – Cooke
C. Associate Faculty – Carlsson, Chirra, Pynes, Thomas, Warren
D. Classified Senate Council – Level
E. Accreditation – Fino
V.
Consent Calendar
A. Minutes of October 2nd Regular Meeting
B. Nomination of associate faculty member Leyenda Jacobson for SDSU CC Leaders
SDICCCA Recognition
VI.
Old Business
A. AP5050 Student Success and Support Program (formerly Matriculation) – Wojcik
Description: AP5050 was initially presented as a first read on 07Aug15. It was
subsequently updated at Student Success Committee. Attached is the change request
form and the redlined document.
B. Student Success and Support Program (SSSP) Plan – Wojcik
Description: This is the annual update to the SSSP plan, previously approved by the
academic senate in fall 2014. The goal of SSSP is to increase student access and success
by providing students with core SSSP services, including (1) orientation, (2) assessment
and placement, and (3) counseling, advising, and other education planning services, and
the support services necessary to assist them in achieving their educational goal and
declared course of study.
C. Student Equity Plan – Stewart/Schumacher
Description: The Student Equity Plan has some updates and changes and those will be
presented.
1
D. Student learning outcomes, faculty evaluations, and accreditation standards – Fino
Description: The recent (2014) update to accreditation standards has the following
language in standard 3.A.6: “The evaluation of faculty, academic administrators, and
other personnel directly responsible for student learning includes, as a component of
that evaluation, consideration of how these employees use the results of the assessment
of learning outcomes to improve teaching and learning.” The senate will need to
recommend a strategy to address this, which does overlap contract (i.e. working
conditions) issues.
VII.
New Business
A. Noncredit Student Success and Support Program (SSSP) Plan – Ilas
Description: The Noncredit SSSP plan is for services: (1) orientation; (2) assessment and
placement; (3) counseling, advising, preparation of the Noncredit Student Education Plan
(NSEP) and other education planning services; and (4) follow-up and other services.
B. Processes for non-tenure track, full-time faculty hiring – Fino
Description: Student Services will be hiring three non-tenure track counselors soon.
These positions are funded through SSSP funds; if the funding ends, these positions
would be terminated. If any of the counselors who occupied one of these three positions
ends up applying for and accepting a full-time tenure track position, they will not have
bumping rights and will receive years of service credit towards tenure. AAC considered
this issue on 09Oct15 and forwards the following statement: Given that this specific
hiring is out of the normal prioritization process AAC wants assurance that these nontenure track positions will not become permanent positions.
C. Resolution 15-02: Improvements to Basic Skills Initiative Reporting – Fino
Description: This resolution was drafted in response to required reporting for the Basic
Skills Initiative this fall. If the senate supports this resolution, it will go to the Area D
meeting for consideration.
D. Comparable degree title for the discipline of Library Science – Sipman
Description: AP7211.2 allows for disciplines to submit a comparable degree title form to
allow for blanket approvals of degree with language that is comparable but not exactly
the same as the ASCCC Discipline’s List. Submitted for your approval are forms for
Library Science.
E. Sabbatical Leave Reports – Hanada-Rogers
Description: Four sabbatical leave reports (Miller, Ramos, Reyes, and Thomford).
Sabbatical leave reports are reviewed to meet the following standards: (a)
Comprehensive, professional-quality reports that clearly communicate and document
the purpose, objectives, activities, and achievements of the sabbatical leave, (b)
alignment of applications and reports, (c) adequate documentation, (d) minimum
number of hours met, (e) writing reflects standard of profession.
2
VIII.
Closed Session Pursuant to Government Code §54957
A. Application for Faculty Equivalency to the Minimum Qualifications — Sipman
IX.
Reconvene from Closed Session—Report Actions Taken
A. Application for Faculty Equivalency to the Minimum Qualifications
X.
Future Agenda Items
A. Educational Master Plan Addendum
XI.
XII.
Council Commentary
Adjournment
3
Page |1
Academic Senate Meeting October 16nd 2015 Report
ACADEMIC SENATE PRESIDENT’S REPORT
MIRACOSTA ACADEMIC SENATE UPDATES
•
Fino attended the Fall 2015 ASCCC CTE Regional Meeting that focused, largely, on the recommendations that
came out of the Strong Workforce Task force. These recommendations span the following areas Student
Success, Career Pathways, Workforce Data & Outcomes, Curriculum, CTE Faculty, Regional Coordination, and
Funding. You can find more on this website.
o The group highly encouraged CTE faculty to consider statewide service in response to these
recommendations. For this service, or any another at the state-level, fill out this form.
ACADEMIC SENATE COMMITTEE UPDATES
•
None
UPCOMING EVENTS
•
•
•
•
ASCCC Area D Meeting
Saturday, October 24, 2015 - 10:00am to 3:00pm
Location: College of the Desert
Area D meeting to prepare for the Fall Plenary Session.
o Fino, Herrmann to attend
November 5 – 7: Fall Plenary Session at Irvine Marriott
o Fino, Benschop, Herrmann, Warren to attend, others?
January 14-15: CTE Curriculum Academy at the Napa Valley Marriott
o Simpson to attend, others?
January 21-23: Instructional Design and Innovation Institute (new ASCCC Institute) at the Riverside Convention
Center
STATEWIDE ACADEMIC SENATE UPDATES
•
FACULTY APPOINTMENT TO BOARD OF GOVERNORS: The Governor appoints members of the Community
College Board of Governors. As you may be aware, two faculty members serve on the Board of Governors,
serving staggered two-year terms. The Governor makes these faculty appointments from a list of
recommendations put forward by the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges. Applications are due
in mid-December and interested faculty would be wise to begin work on them now. You can contact Mike for
more details, including getting MiraCosta Academic Senate endorsement for your application.
Academic Senate Meeting
[Unofficial Minutes]
Progress Report 892
9:00 to 10:00am
October 2, 2015
Room OC1202
Members present: Mike Fino (president), Joanne Benschop, Tony Burman, Laura Carlsson, Joe
Chirra, Sunny Cooke (ex-officio), Susan Herrmann (president-elect), Jim Julius, Luke Lara, David
McField, Anthony Ongyod, Susan Pynes, Freddy Ramirez, Sue Simpson, Erin Thomas, Krista Warren
Members absent: Denise Stephenson (coordinating officer)
Others present: Mary Benard, Lesley Doig, Teresa Guinon, Thao Ha, Lisa Level, Dara Perales, Lilia
Vidal
I.
Call to Order – The meeting was called to order at 9:04am.
II.
Persons Wishing to Address the Senate – None.
III.
Changes to Agenda Order – None.
IV.
Reports
A. Academic Senate President – Mike Fino
• It was noted Susan Herrmann will join Fino at the Area D meeting.
• The ASCCC Executive Meeting is being held on the OC today.
• The CTE Academy will take place in Napa Valley during flex week 1/14-15/16.
B.
•
•
•
College Superintendent/President – Sunny Cooke
The Ed Plan Master Plan process is coming to an end.
The Facilities Master Plan will be updated.
A lot of information was brought back from our accreditation visit this week. We need to
schedule our accreditation visit which will take place during the first two weeks of October 2016.
Faculty leadership is needed here at that time.
C. Associate Faculty – Laura Carlsson, Joe Chirra, Susan Pynes, Erin Thomas, Krista Warren
• No report.
D. Classified Senate Council – Lisa Level
• CSC is looking for Fundraising ideas to create student scholarships.
• An email went out inviting everyone to the online gift basket option to benefit classified
scholarships. The deadline is November 2nd.
E. Accreditation – Mike Fino
• Charlie Ng is on site teams that are against the old standards and is on a team with the new
standards.
• The deadline was this past Wednesday with updates and revisions to the draft. The new draft
will be released in a week and needs examples of how we are meeting the standards.
V.
Consent Calendar
A. Minutes of September 4th Regular Meeting
B. Faculty committee assignments for 2015-2016
MSU (Ongyod / Julius) [McField was not present for the vote] to approve the consent calendar
as presented.
VI.
Old Business – None.
Academic Senate Meeting
DRAFT ~ October 2, 2015
VII.
Page 2 of 3
New Business
A. Salary Advancement Handbook – Lilia Vidal
• The Salary Advancement Committee (SAC) has recommended updates to their handbook for
senate consideration and approval.
• Vidal described the process of salary advancement and the role of the committee.
• SAC has added a specific deadline of March 15th in the SAC handbook as the date for all
applications to be submitted. It is then up to HR to determine when the applicant can advance
on the salary schedule. Additionally, the committee added language from the Sabbatical Leave
Handbook indicating that classes taken during sabbatical leave may be applied to salary
advancement.
• There are two different handbooks; one for full-time and one for associate faculty and it was
suggested that the two handbooks be blended for this process since they are the same.
• The question was also raised as to whether the handbook needs to clarify that classes need to
be taken at a US regionally accredited institution.
• It was agreed that Fino, Vidal, HR, and an AF representative will meet to discuss merging the
two handbooks into one and blending the requirements and processes for all faculty to move up
on the salary schedule. They will also look at the accredited issue.
• Existing applications are here for a first read but AS can suspend the rules to approve them
today. The caveat is that one of the applications has already been approved by the board
without going through the correct process.
B. Applications for Salary Advancement – Lilia Vidal
• Three applications for salary advancement will be presented for senate approval: Cordova,
Aguirre, and Kiyochi (two applications).
MSU (Ramirez / Ongyod) [McField was not present for the vote] to suspend the rules to vote
on the current four Salary Advancement applications.
MSU (Ramirez / Chirra) [McField was not present for the vote] to approve the four Salary
Advancement applications for Cordova, Aguirre, and Kiyochi (two applications).
C. Awards Subcommittee Selection Process – Luke Lara for Denise Stephenson
• Goals were discussed at a planning retreat on August 7th, 2015. The main goals were captured
in the Big Ideas but a general consensus towards streamlining processes prompted a central
theme of innovation, effectiveness, and efficiency.
• The Statewide Senate has recommended presenting awards to recognize our faculty.
• Luke Lara discussed what the process will look like. We will formalize the nomination process.
The committee will meet on 10/9 to make a formal recommendation for the SDICCA nomination
and will announce which AF member will be submitted for the honor at the next AS meeting
• On 11/10, there will be a program award nomination. Bridge to Success in the math program is
being considered. If there are other programs you would like to nominate, inform the committee.
• The Hayward award due is 12/30 and information about that will be sent out soon.
• It was noted that an application packet has to be submitted which takes a good deal of work so
it is ideal to coordinate this early. There are Senate representatives to put out the calls and
everyone has an opportunity to participate. Nominations may not always come to Senate for
approval. The next one will come as a consent item. We will trust in the committee to have
followed the process.
VIII.
Information
A. Learning Communities Program Emerging at MCC – Teresa Guinon
• A team of ten MiraCostans--interdisciplinary instructors, a counselor, and a dean--attended a
week-long boot camp for LCs at the National Institute on Learning Communities. They returned
with a two-year Action Plan that they will share with Senate. Since this program encompasses
departments and divisions, they feel it is important to notify and clarify from the start.
Academic Senate Meeting
DRAFT ~ October 2, 2015
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Page 3 of 3
We applied for the 2015 National / Summer Institute on Learning Communities at the Evergreen
State College with representation across disciplines.
There are three key elements for the MCC LC Program defined to include three components;
cohort, integrated curriculum, and partnerships with student services. The LCP includes
opportunities for developmental and transfer level students, as well as identified populations that
emerge from the data. When there are integrated assignments, students can see what they do;
it demonstrates that what they do in one class can be used in another class by linking skills
between classes. When student have more contact with student activities they will be more
connected to each other, campus, community and will be more successful.
There are ideas of thinking flexibly including Meta cognition, reflective writing, and problem
solving, thinking interdependently, and working as a team.
Models include opportunities for themed learning and pathways across general education
patterns and CTE and creating the themes that would be very appealing to that student
population. Sustainability is one theme from high school to MCC to the university.
This fall ’15 Lesley Doig and Dara Perales connected to create a learning community. They
want to see students realize their power and do something with it. They are brining ENGL 100 +
HIST 111 together.
When at the boot camp, they discussed if learning communities be just another band aid. They
intentionally looked at where LCs can be connected, supporting institutional goals, strategic
plans, Oceanside promise and other pathways, student success initiative, institutional SLOs.
Action Plan Steps include spreading the word; establish the program, implement PD, student
recruitment, develop learning community assessment tools. We have administrative support.
Questions were asked by Senate:
o Is the intent of faculty to cross visit classes?
o How is the role of counseling going to be elevated or modified from where it is now?
o Who will coordinate this program?
 They are in the process to have this in place by the spring.
o How do we bring associate faculty into the fold?
 This is on their radar and they will be meeting with others to ask those questions.
They want AF to be part of this. AF tend to be very motivated for innovations.
o Are other colleges doing this with online classes?
 Yes, there are online classes doing this as well.
 McClure and Tsuyuki will be doing a LC in the spring.
There are no limits to the possibilities of partnerships such as ceramics and physics.
Benard noted we see instruction and student services working together; wrapping the programs
and services around the needs and areas of interest of the students and future possibilities. This
starts with the counselors who will give ideas of what classes to take. As we create more
themes, our counselors can recommend ideas to students.
Fino thanked the committee for their good work and championing this process.
IX.
Future Agenda Items
• SSSP Plan
• Student Equity Plan
• Outcomes and Evaluation
X.
Council Commentary – None.
XI.
Adjournment – The meeting adjourned at 10:19am.
Dear Faculty Colleagues:
This year, we established a subcommittee of the Academic Senate to coordinate participation in and
nominations for faculty recognition at state, regional, and local levels.
I'd like to thank Luke Lara, Sue Simpson, Denise Stephenson (chair), and Erin Thomas for their willingness to
spearhead this effort for the year and for their most recent work.
Each year, the SDSU Community College Leaders Alumni Chapter recognizes faculty, staff, and administrators,
on a rotating basis, from the SDICCCA region. This year, they are recognizing associate faculty and have
asked for one nomination from each SDICCCA college.
The AS Awards subcommittee collected a total of 12 nominations and would like to
congratulate Leyenda Jacobson as the selected honoree for MiraCosta. The subcommittee had a rich field of
nominees who they would like to recognize for their amazing work with MCC students:
Abbas, Sam
Bryant, Gabriella
Doyle Bauer, Alexandria
Duarte-Braunstein, Karina
Foster, Eric
Moore, Josephine
Oberg, Anjeanette
Perez, Jason
Pitcher, Corrine
Warren, Krista
Zimmerman, Del
While the criteria differs, we'd like all nominees to know that this does not disqualify them from being
nominated for the Hayward Award which is available for state-wide nomination of an associate faculty member
from our district this year. We encourage these nominees to watch for an email next week from Denise
Stephenson about the Hayward Award and the nomination process.
Congratulations, Leyenda!
Mike
--
Michael Fino
Professor | Chair, Biotechnology
President, Academic Senate
MiraCosta College
One Barnard Drive, MS 8C
Oceanside, California 92056
p 760.757.2121.6499
www.miracosta.edu
10/12/2015
Change Request Form ­ Ap 5050­ Student Success and SUpport Program...
SharePoint
Newsfeed
OneDrive
Sites
Title
Ap 5050‐ Student Success and SUpport Program
Category
AP
Name
AP 5050 Matriculation ﴾Student Success and Support
Program﴿
Code
5050
BP/AP Type
Revision
Itemized Changes
Updated to inlcude the new SSSP services required‐ Added
​
Fino, Mike
Comprehensive SEP required for new students; deleted
Admission and application since they are no longer part of
SSSP direct services.
Added clarifying language to the SSSP Exemption to make it
clear that new students are required to complete
matriculation for priority enrollment. Changes are bolded
and tracked.
Rationale
SSSP requirements and qualifications were changed from the
​
Chancellor's office and these modifications clarify the
requirements for the students.
Co‐routed Docs Approval
Committee Approval
9/25/2015 Committee﴾s﴿
SSC
Council﴾s﴿
AS/Admin
Attachments
Draft AP 5050 4‐30‐15 ‐Changed.docx
Content Type: Item
Version: 3.0
Created at 9/25/2015 2:56 PM by
Wojcik, Alketa
Last modified at 9/30/2015 6:50 PM by
Close
Woolley, Chad
https://portal.miracosta.edu/Governance/bp_ap/Lists/BPAP%20Change%20Request/DispForm.aspx?ID=36&Source=https%3A%2F%2Fportal%2Emiracosta%…
1/1
ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE
5050: Matriculation Student Success and
Support Program
MiraCosta will offer to its students matriculation Student Success and Support Program (SSSP)
services including admitting, assessing, orienting, advising, counseling, and monitoring academic
progress specified in Title 5 matriculation Student Success and Support Program regulations of the
state of California: §51024, §58106, and §§55500 through 55534. The process of matriculation
Student Success and Support Program services brings the student and the district into agreement
regarding the student’s educational goal plan through the district’s established programs, policies,
and requirements.
Matriculation Student Success and Support Program services include, but are not limited to, all of
the following:
A. Processing of the application for admission.
BA. Orientation and pre-orientation services designed to provide students, on a timely basis,
information concerning campus procedures, academic expectations, financial assistance, and any
other appropriate matters.
B. Development of an abbreviated the Student Educational Plan and a comprehensive Student
Educational Plan by the end of the third term but no later than the completion of 15 degree
applicable units.
CC. Assessment and counseling upon enrollment, which shall include but not be limited to, all of the
following:
1. Administration of assessment instruments to determine student competency in
computational and language skills and to determine appropriate course placement..
2. Assistance to students in the identification of aptitudes, interests career, and educational
objectives goals, including but not limited to, associate of arts degrees, transfer for
baccalaureate degrees, and vocational certificates and licenses.
3. Evaluation of student study and learning skills.
4. Referral to specialized support services as needed, including but not limited to, federal,
state, and local financial assistance; health services; mental health services; campus
employment-placement services; extended-opportunity programs and services; campus
child-care services programs that teach English as a second language; and disabled student
services.
5. Counseling and advisement concerning course selection.
6. Post-enrollment evaluation of each student’s progress Follow-up services and required
advisement or counseling for students who are enrolled in remedial basic skills courses and
have not declared an educational objective as required, or who are on academic probation.
The district shall only use assessment instruments that have been specifically authorized by the
Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges.
Exemption from the Matriculation SSSP priority enrollment process
New students who complete orientation, advisement, math and English placement tests, and
an abbreviated Student Educational Plan receive priority enrollment. Administrative
Procedure 5055 provides information on priority enrollment. To Students who meet one of
the criteria below, can be excemptexempt from the fromt eh matriculation process but do
not receive priority enrollment:
To be exempt from the matriculation process at MiraCosta College, a student must meet one
of the following conditions:
A. The student was exempt during a previous semester.
B. The student has earned an associate or higher degree from an accredited institution.
C. The student has previously attended another college and/or indicated on the application for
admission one of the following as an educational goal:
1. Discover/formulate career interests, plans, and goals.
2. Prepare for a new career (acquire job skills).
3. Advance further in current job/career (update job skills).
4. Maintain certificate or license (e.g. nursing, real estate).
5. Personal interest; no intention to use credit for certificate, degree, or transfer.
6. Complete credits for high school diploma or GED.
Exemption from Assessment (Testing Only)
To be exempt from the assessment component of matriculation, a student must meet one of the
following conditions:
A. The student has completed the prerequisite course with a grade of C or higher (transcript or
grade report required) at another college for any math or English course(s) in which he/she wishes
to enroll.
B. The student has taken an approved assessment test that can be used to meet the prerequisite
for math or English course(s) in which he/she wishes to enroll.
Exempt students are not required to participate in the matriculation process, but are encouraged to
do so. Exempted students do not earn early enrollment privileges.
Opt-Out Provision
Students have the right to challenge or appeal any step in the matriculation process by contacting
the Dean of Counseling and Special ServicesStudent Support. To challenge a course
prerequisite or co-requisite, students must contact the Admissions and Records Office on either
campus. Students may refuse to participate in any matriculation service; however, refusal will not
entitle students to early-enrollment privileges or to waive course prerequisites or co-requisites.
Students are responsible for expressing broad educational intent upon admission and for declaring
a specific educational goal by the time fifteen (15) semester units have been completed. Students
are also responsible for attending class, completing assignments, arranging counseling
appointments, and maintaining progress toward educational goals.
MiraCosta Community College District
Effective Date: 11/3/09
References: Education Code §§78210 et seq.
Title 5 §55500 et seq.
Page x of x
STUDENT SUCCESS AND
SUPPORT (SSSP) PLAN
1
SSSP PLAN
 GOAL - Increase student access and success
 FOCUS – Provide core services for all first time students
 Core Services include: Orientation, Assessment,
Advisement, Follow-up services for at-risk students
 REQUIRED – Annual plan submitted to the Chancellor's
Office by October 30th.
 First credit SSSP plan submitted in October 2014
 Advisory Committee
 ALLOCATIONS – CCCCO funded and institutional match
required
 Credit SSSP (2014-2015) - $1.79 million
 Credit SSSP (2015-2016) – Estimated $2.4 million
2
CREDIT SSSP PLAN 2014-2015

Student Interaction
 Face-to-face focused orientations –
Welcome Days
 Mobile Counseling – Meeting students
where they are
 Counselor in Testing Center
 Workshops for at-risk students

Communication
 Created communication plan
 Proactive and positive communication with
students
 Student videos
 Banners
 Technology




3
MyEdPlan
Online orientation module
Matriculation activity guide
IContact
CREDIT SSSP PLAN 2014-2015


4
Research
 New research analyst
 Matriculated students and their
success
 Probation and dismissal
 Probation reasons
Programs and Processes
 Bridge to Success in Math
Program
 Reviewed and changed business
practices
 Administrative Procedure
changes
 Student support specialists in
Counseling
 Professional development
Initial term on probation
n=3,184
1 term later n=2,467
40% remain on probation
2 terms later n=1,707
25% on Probation/Dismissal
CREDIT SSSP PLAN 2015-2016

Student Interaction
 Ecap changes
 Open house
 Early alert
 Pilot with Blackboard analytics
 Student support specialists

Communication
 Positive communication - momentum
points
 Early communication based on student
input
 Increase participation in core services
 Technology




5
Transfer credit
College scheduler
COMMGen
E-Forms
CREDIT SSSP PLAN 2015-2016
6

Assessment
 Multiple measures
 Placement tests for high school
students
 Scale Bridge to Math Success
Program

Integration
 Focus on at-risk students - basic
skills
 AtD inquiry and research
 System changes
CREDIT SSSP PLAN 2015-2016 ALLOCATIONS


7
Technology
 Transfer credit
 Early alert
 E-Forms
 COMMGen consultant
 PeopleSoft consultant
 Software licensing (Ilinx, Icontact,
SARS, etc.)
 Tablets, scanners, computers
Staff
 Student support specialists (4)
 Full-time counselors (3)
 Associate counselors – General and
Career (5 FTEF)
 Programmer (1)
 Evaluators (2)
 Secretary (0.5)
 Program aide for testing
 Instructional aides for Bridge to Math



Success
Communication coordinator (0.2)
Coaches/Advisors (TBD)
Release of existing staff with SSSP
funds
 Other




Professional development
Supplies/printing/advertising
Conferences
Research/Focus groups/surveys
QUESTIONS?
8
Credit Student Success and Support Program Plan (SSSP) Plan
Executive Summary
The Student Success and Support Program (SSSP) plan is an annual plan submitted to the Chancellor’s
Office that addresses services and programs provided to students in the areas of orientation,
assessment for placement, counseling, advising, and other education planning services, and follow-up
for at-risk students. For the purposes of the SSSP plan, students at-risk are identified as students who
are basic skills, on probation, disqualified, or have not yet declared a major.
Specifically the SSSP plan requires that colleges:
•
•
•
•
Provide at least an abbreviated student education plan (SEP) to all entering students with a
priority focus on students who enroll to earn degrees, career technical certificates, transfer
preparation, or career advancement.
Provide orientation, assessment for placement, and counseling, advising, and other education
planning services to all first-time students 1.
Provide students with any assistance needed to define their course of study and develop a
comprehensive SEP by the end of the third term but no later than completion of 15 units.
Provide follow-up services to at-risk (students enrolled in basic skills courses, students who have
not identified an education goal or course of study, or students on academic or progress
probation).
The credit 2014-2015 SSSP plan submitted to the Chancellor’s Office on October 30, 2014, focused on
programs and services that MiraCosta College provided to all SSSP students.
Through SSSP funds, the college worked diligently in 2014-2015 to evaluate the SSSP services that were
already in place and put a plan together that had as a focus student success through face to face
orientations, additional counseling services, degree audit (MyEdPlan), and workshops for students at
risk.
Specifically, the college accomplished several activities and program enhancements to meet the needs
of the students. Below is a selected list of such activities.
1
Created an enhanced in-person focused orientation sessions through a three-day “Welcome
Days” event for both spring 2015 and fall 2015.
Updated the online orientation module.
Implemented an online checklist Matriculation Activity Guide to help students meet the
requirement of the matriculation process.
Developed a communication plan to reach out to students in weekly basis with information on
services and deadlines.
Added a counselor the Testing Center to assist students immediately after getting their
placement results.
Increased the sessions offered for the Bridge to Math Success program.
A first-time student is defined as a student who enrolls at the college for the first time, excluding students who
transferred from another institution of higher education, and concurrently enrolled high school students.
-
Provided student advisors to assist new students with acclamation to the student life.
Implemented the Degree Audit, MyEdPlan, to assist students and counselors in developing an
education plan and tracking progress.
Provided Mobile Counseling where counselors were placed at “hotspots” locations throughout
the campus to assist students.
Hired additional SSSP counselors to meet the requirement of providing all new students with an
education plan.
Completing hiring of Student Support Specialists for Counseling Department to move from dropin counseling to drop-in advising.
Hired a Research Analyst for SSSP and Equity plans and conducted studies of students at-risk and
studied and evaluated matriculation services.
Based on the studies conducted, changed communication with students on probation and
disqualification.
Added workshops for students at-risk.
Provided additional career counseling workshops and services to “undecided” students.
Started the process of changing Administrative Procedures and Board Policy on students at-risk.
Provided significant professional development opportunities for counselors and staff in the
education plans training, student success workshops and conferences, MBTI and STRONG
Interest Inventory training, etc.
The new credit 2015-2016 SSSP plan is due at the Chancellor’s office on October 30, 2015 and is
currently being developed through the SSSP Advisory Group and Student Success Committee. The plan
will focus on additional technology upgrades and improvements for student matriculation and
interventions for students at risk. In addition to continuing the programs and services developed in the
2014-2015 plan, the new plan will also focus on:
-
Evaluating placement tests and proposing changes that are based on research and multiple
measures.
Scaling Bridge to Success in Math Program to include students who withdraw from Math
courses.
Developing an “Open House” day for all students to attend focused workshops, meet faculty and
staff, and get services that are essential to their success prior to the start of the semester.
Acquiring and implementing a transfer degree audit system to make MyEdPlan fully functional.
Implementing College Scheduler, a software designed to help students select courses based on
their education plan and life activities and schedule.
Continuing refining the Communication Plan to the students to include reaching out to students
who have successfully completed momentum points through their first year at MiraCosta and
up to their graduation.
Working with the Faculty Director of Online Education to use Blackboard analytics for basic skills
classes to reach out to students at-risk and have peer advisors work with the students.
Creating an early-alert program for students at-risk, including career and goal setting and
workshops for students on probation and academic disqualification.
Continuing inquiring and researching student behaviors and college experience to change
programs and services that best address students’ needs.
Through all the plans, the goal of the institution is to create integration of plans and systematic changes
that will increase student success and help students in meeting their goals.
Credit
Student Success and Support Program Plan
2015-16
District: MiraCosta Community College District
College: MiraCosta College
Report Due by
Friday, October 30, 2015
Email PDF of completed plan to:
[email protected]
and
Mail signature page with original signatures to:
Patty Falero, Student Services and Special Programs Division
California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office
1102 Q Street, Suite 4554
Sacramento, CA 95811-6549
College: _MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
Instructions for Completion of the College
Student Success and Support Program Plan
I N TROD U C T I ON
The purpose of the credit Student Success and Support Program (SSSP) Plan is to outline and
document how the college will provide SSSP services to credit students 1. The goal of this program is
to increase student access and success by providing students with core SSSP services to assist them in
achieving their educational and career goals.
More specifically, colleges are to:
• Provide at least an abbreviated student education plan (SEP) to all entering students with a
priority focus on students who enroll to earn degrees, career technical certificates, transfer
preparation, or career advancement.
• Provide orientation, assessment for placement, and counseling, advising, and other education
planning services to all first-time students 2.
• Provide students with any assistance needed to define their course of study and develop a
comprehensive SEP by the end of the third term but no later than completion of 15 units.
• Provide follow-up services to at-risk (students enrolled in basic skills courses, students who
have not identified an education goal or course of study, or students on academic or progress
probation).
I N ST RU C TI ON S A N D G U I D E LI N E S
Please carefully review these instructions and resources, including the SSSP Handbook, relevant
sections of the Education Code and title 5 regulations before completing the program plan.
The program plan is set up as a Word document. As you enter your responses below each question,
the document will expand to accommodate the information provided. Colleges are to use the
template as provided. When complete, also save the document as a PDF file and email it as an
attachment to [email protected] with the name of the college and “SSSP Credit Program Plan” in
the subject line. Mail the signature page with the original signatures, along with the separate Budget
Plan signature page, by the due date (Oct. 30th).
The program plan is to be submitted on an annual basis 3. When writing the program plan, assume
that the reader knows nothing about your program and will have only your document to understand
the delivery of program services and resources needed for implementation. Be sure to include input
from faculty, staff, administrators and students in the development of this plan (per title 5,
§55510[b]).
All state-funded SSSP services, procedures, and staff activities must be described in the program
plan. Section 78211.5(b) of the Education Code permits districts and colleges to expend these
categorical funds only on SSSP activities approved by the Chancellor. Please be sure all expenditures
1 Colleges
operating SSSP programs for noncredit students must prepare a separate noncredit plan.
A first-time student is defined as a student who enrolls at the college for the first time, excluding students who
transferred from another institution of higher education, and concurrently enrolled high school students.
3
The program plan is now required on an annual basis due to new SSSP requirements focusing funding on core services,
changes related to priority enrollment, mandatory core services, and the significant increases in funding in 2013-14, 201415 and 2015-16. As implementation and funding stabilizes, this requirement may be revisited.
2
College: _MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
are consistent with the SSSP Funding Guidelines or your plan may not be approved. The information
provided and the funding source should be clearly indicated in the plan narrative and correspond
with expenditures listed in the Budget Plan. In districts with more than one college, the college
program plan must also address any portion of the college’s allocation expended by the district. The
program and budget plans will also be compared with the colleges’ credit SSSP Year-End Expenditure
Report to monitor for consistency. Note that SSSP funds may not be used to supplant general or
state categorical (restricted) funds currently expended on SSSP activities. Any services provided
should supplement--not supplant--any services provided to students currently participating in college
categorical programs and any other federal, state, and local programs.
The SSSP Plan is divided into six sections. The Budget Plan is a separate document.
I. Program Plan Signature Page
II. Planning & Core Services
A. Planning
B. Orientation
C. Assessment for Placement
D. Counseling, Advising, and Other Education Planning Services
E. Follow-up for At-Risk Students
F. Other SSSP/Match Expenditures
III. Policies
A. Exemption Policy
B. Appeal Policies
C. Prerequisite and Corequisite Procedures
IV. Professional Development
V. Attachments
Links to program resources are provided below to assist with the development of your SSSP Plan.
R ESOURCES
 Seymour-Campbell Student Success Act of 2012
 California Code of Regulations
 Chancellor’s Office Student Equity web page
 Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges
 Chancellor's Office Basic Skills website
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
SECTION I. STUDENT SUCCESS AND SUPPORT PROGRAM PLAN SIGNATURE PAGE
College Name: MiraCosta College
____________________
District Name: MiraCosta Community College District__________________________________
We certify that funds requested herein will be expended in accordance with the provisions of
Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 55500) of Division 6 of title 5 of the California Code of
Regulations and California Education Code sections 78210-78219.
Signature of College SSSP Coordinator: ______________________________________________
Name: Alketa Wojcik
Date: ___________
Signature of the SSSP Supervising Administrator
or Chief Student Services Officer: __________________________________________________
Name: Dick Robertson _________________________________________ Date: ____________
Signature of the Chief Instructional Officer: __________________________________________
Name: Mary Benard ___________________________________________ Date: ____________
Signature of College Academic Senate President: _____________________________________
Name: Mike Fino ______________________________________________ Date: ____________
Signature of College President: ____________________________________________________
Name: Sunita Cooke ___________________________________________ Date: ____________
Contact information for person preparing the plan:
Name: Alketa Wojcik
Title: Dean, Student Support
Email: [email protected]_ Phone: (760) 795-6893
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
SECTION II. PLANNING & CORE SERVICES
Directions: Please provide a brief but thorough answer to each of the following questions
relating to how your college is meeting the requirements to provide core services under title 5,
section 55531. Do not include extraneous information outside the scope of SSSP. Projected
expenditures should correspond to items listed in the Budget Plan. Answers should be entered
in the document below each question.
A. Planning
1. a. Describe the planning process for updating the 2015-16 SSSP Plan.
In the past year, MiraCosta College has focused on the process of integrating student
initiatives that will have a larger impact on increasing student success. In order for the
integration to take place, all student initiative plans were moved under the Student Success
Committee. The Student Success Committee is an institutional governance committee with
representation from all constituencies, including students.
Immediately upon submission of the SSSP plan in 2014, the college started working on
projects and activities identified on the plan but also evaluating current processes and
policies to see what we needed to change for the upcoming plan. The student services
division held monthly meetings with all staff and administrators to get input on how we can
best serve our SSSP students and what we needed to change. That input was collected and
reviewed through the Student Services Council and values and goals were created for the
division that focused on putting students first.
Also, the hire of the Research Analyst through SSSP, allowed the institution to conduct
evaluation and studies on matriculation services and students at risk (see more on specific
studies under the Research section of this plan). The findings of the studies were shared in
multiple venues, including FLEX professional development workshops for faculty,
department chairs meeting, deans meeting, student services council, and staff meetings.
Input was received at these meetings on the impact of services on student success and the
focus as an institution to improve the college experience for the students. In August, for All
College Day, the college had a forum with all faculty and staff discussing students at risk
(basic skills students) and our commitment as a college to be ready for our students in a
way that is not focused on student deficiencies.
Upon the release of the 2015-2016 SSSP Plan template, a draft was created based on the
input received in the past academic year. The SSSP Advisory Committee and Student
Success Committee reviewed and advised on the focus of the plan and activities for this
academic year and recommended approval. The plan was also presented at the Academic
Senate, Budget and Planning Committee, and Administrative Council.
The focus of the development of the SSSP plan has been to continuously work in evaluating
and improving matriculation services for the students and create systemic changes that will
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
help change the college experience for the students at all SSSP momentum points. This
focus has included input from faculty, staff, students and administrators and upon
submission of the plan, the college will continue to dialogue on continuous improvement of
SSSP services.
b. What factors were considered in making adjustments and/or changes for 2015-16?
One of the main factors in the changes and updates to the SSSP plan was the goal of
creating systemic changes and technology upgrades that will serve students in the years to
come. The focus was not on hiring more people but on what is needed to change and staff
and technology appropriate for that change.
The other factor for change was the focus more on research and effective practices. As
discussed in the Research section of the plan, there were great efforts aimed at learning
more about the SSSP students, their behaviors, and their college experience. Based on that
research and additional research that will be continued this year, procedures and policies
are being changed that help students succeed.
Communication was another factor that the college focused its efforts. A communication
plan was created to determine how we can communicate with the students, when do we
communicate, and what information is important to communicate with them. The Student
Services division acquired an email software system that tracks the communication and
followed the communication plan to contact students weekly with important deadlines and
information. The division also created marketing materials that focused on the six success
factors of the RP Research and created student videos to communicate to students those
factors.
Lastly, the factor considered for this plan was to further integrate all state initiatives that
encompasses the strengths of each plan and use those strength to create a larger impact in
the overall success of the student population. Considering these factors, the goals the
college will strive to achieve through this plan are:
-
Increase by 15% all first-time nonexempt degree- and transfer-seeking students that
will receive orientation services through online and focused face-to-face orientations
(as compared to 2013-2014).
Increase by 10% all students with 15 or more degree applicable units that will identify a
major and a comprehensive SEP will be developed in MyEdPlan (as compared to 20132014).
Administrative Procedures and Board Policies will be updated to reflect student
development models that include interventions for students at risk and alignment with
BOG and other federally mandated probation policies.
Evaluate placement and assessment scores and make changes that align with research
and effective practices related to multiple measures as provided by the state initiative
and local research.
College: MiraCosta College
-
-
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
Scale up workshops and support for students taking placement tests to better prepare
them for the test.
Using the 2013-2014 numbers as a baseline, increase SEPs and Counseling and advising
support for the students by at least 15 percent.
Based on student focus groups and research, identify programs and projects that will
create a better matriculation experience for the students, including development of an
“Open House” event to provide matriculation and face-to-face services to new students
right before the semester.
In collaboration with Career Services, provide students with the tools of identifying a
major.
With input from faculty and staff, develop a more appropriate early-alert system for
students at risk.
Improve the communication plan for the students to alert and inform them of services
and important deadlines.
Continue to improve technology through tools and access to provide students with
information they need to make decisions on their matriculation process, education
plan, and support services.
Through these goals, the college, by the end of spring 2018 will strive to increase the
persistence of students by 8%, decrease students on probation and academic
disqualification by 10%, and increase the success rate of SSSP students (as compared to
new students in fall 2013) by 5 percent.
c. In multi-college districts, describe how services are coordinated among the colleges.
N/A
d. Briefly describe how the plan and services are coordinated with the student equity
plan and other district/campus plans (e.g., categorical programs) and efforts including
accreditation, self-study, educational master plans, strategic plans, Institutional
Effectiveness, the Basic Skills Initiative, Adult Education (Assembly Bill 86), and
departmental program review.
Last year, the college steered the BSI, SSSP, Noncredit SSSP and Equity plan to the Student
Success Committee. The Committee has representatives from all constituents, including
students and its goal is to ensure that the efforts of each plan are integrated to achieve
scalable results in student success. Based on this change, the college was able to look at
programs and projects needed to improve student success and determine goals that address
the plans.
Also, in spring 2015, the college join the Achieving the Dream Initiative. The Achieving the
Dream Initiative focuses on reform movement for student success in higher education,
dedicated to community college student success and completion. The main goal of the college
in joining this initiative was to create systemic changes to integrate and align the existing
initiatives and increase student success, especially with a focus on equity. SSSP, BSI, and
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
Equity plans all have basic skills students in common and the college has committed to
focusing on basic skills as the group of students that we want to learn more about and change
the college experience to meet their needs.
2. Describe the college’s student profile.
In Fall 2014, MiraCosta College had a credit enrollment of 14,715 and in Spring 2015 there
were 14,773 credit students. In Fall 2014, just over 56% of MiraCosta’s credit students
were female, with approximately 45% of all students being Hispanic or White females. A
third of the credit student body at MiraCosta is Hispanic/Latino and 70% of Hispanic/Latino
students are under the ages of 25. This is compared to just over 43% of Black/AfricanAmerican Students being under the age of 25. The average age of credit students at
MiraCosta is 26. Just over 30% of students identify as First-Time students, 15% as
Returning, and 52% as Continuing. In Fall 2014, MiraCosta enrolled 753 active and veteran
military and an additional 462 Military dependents. Nearly 75% of students enrolled at
MiraCosta identify an educational goal of completing an Associate’s Degree or transferring
to a 4-year institution, with another 3% identifying certificate completion as their goal.
Seven percent of students are undecided in their educational goal.
Across ethnic groups, Black/African-American and Pacific Islander students have the rates
of Degree/transfer goal (83% and 86%). Females are less likely to be Degree/Transfer
seekers than their male counterparts. With the exception of students under the age of 18,
the rate of Degree/Transfer-seeking decreases as age increases. Students under 18 are
twice as likely to be undecided in their educational goal than their older peers. Tables 1-3
show the detailed breakdown of Fall 2014 student characteristics.
Table 1. Fall 2014 Demographic Characteristics*
Ethnicity
Female
Male
Asian
57.0
42.4
Black/African-American
52.4
47.4
Hispanic/Latino
58.5
41.4
Native American/Alaska Native
60.4
39.6
Pacific Islander/Native Hawaiian
54.3
45.7
Two or More
55.8
44.1
White
54.7
45.1
Other/Unknown
59.0
40.1
Age Groups
Under 18
60.8
39.0
18-24
53.3
46.6
25-29
55.0
44.9
30-39
60.2
39.6
40-49
72.6
26.6
Unknown
0.6
0.2
0.1
0.0
0.0
0.1
0.1
1.0
0.2
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.8
Overall Ethnicity
7.4
3.4
33.7
0.3
0.5
7.0
45.7
2.1
Overall Age
3.2
59.8
16.0
11.0
5.2
College: MiraCosta College
50+
Overall Gender
District: MiraCosta Community College District
67.7
56.3
32.0
43.6
Table 2. Fall 2014 Student Ethnicity and Age Group
Ethnicity
Under 18 18-24
Asian
4.8
57.9
Black/African-American
1.0
41.8
Hispanic/Latino
3.2
66.4
Native American/Alaska Native
4.2
45.8
Pacific Islander/Native Hawaiian
1.4
60.0
Two or More
4.0
62.4
White
2.8
56.0
Other/Unknown
5.5
66.8
0.3
0.2
25-29
14.0
20.9
15.9
16.7
11.4
17.9
16.0
10.4
Table 3. Educational Goal by Demographic Characteristics
Educational Goal
Degree/Transfer Certificate
page ______ of ______
4.8
100.0
30-39
13.1
17.1
9.1
16.7
15.7
10.1
11.9
8.1
40-49
6.7
8.8
3.4
8.3
2.9
3.0
6.4
5.2
Undecided
50+
3.5
10.4
2.0
8.3
8.6
2.5
6.9
4.8
Other**
Female
72.9
3.0
6.8
17.4
Male
77.5
2.7
6.4
13.4
Ethnicity
Asian
72.1
3.3
5.0
19.6
Black/African-American
82.5
3.6
4.8
9.2
Hispanic/Latino
79.2
2.6
6.4
11.8
Native American/Alaska Native
75.0
4.2
6.3
14.6
Pacific Islander/Native Hawaiian 85.7
1.4
4.3
8.6
Two or More
78.4
3.2
5.3
13.1
White
70.9
2.9
7.4
18.9
Other/Unknown
74.6
2.0
7.8
15.6
Age Group
Under 18
48.1
0.4
14.2
37.3
18-24
82.8
1.4
6.2
9.6
25-29
72.4
3.7
5.0
18.9
30-39
67.6
4.3
6.7
21.4
40-49
56.5
8.2
8.1
27.3
50+
37.6
9.8
11.2
41.4
Overall Educational Goal
74.8
2.8
6.6
15.7
*Credit students only
**Other includes formulate, prepare, advance, or maintain career skills, educational
development, basic skills, GED, non-credit work, and 4-year college student meeting
university requirements
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
Analysis of SSSP service completion targets first-term, degree/certificate/transfer-seeking,
credit students enrolled in at least .5 units. Selection criteria includes students who, in Fall
2014, met the following characteristics in MiraCosta’s MIS data files (N=3,152):
1. Self-identified as a First-term student (SB15) in Fall 2014
2. Have no record of enrollment at MiraCosta in the last year
3. Have a Headcount Status of A, B, C, D, or E (STD7)
4. Have an Education Goal of A, B, C, E, or M(SB14)
5. Attempted more than 0 units, locally (SB18)
Tables 4 and 5 provide a snapshot of the characteristics of the target population.
Table 4. First-term credit students by educational goal in Fall 2014
Educational Goal
Count
% Completing at least 1
% Completing all 4 SSSP
SSSP Service
services
Degree/Transfer
2,692
92.1
63.2
Certificate
98
82.7
50.5
Undecided
362
82.3
52.5
Total
3,152
90.1
61.6
Table 5. First-term credit student demographics by educational goal in Fall 2014.
Gender
Degree/Certificate-Seeking
Undecided
Female
52.0
56.9
Male
47.8
42.0
Ethnicity
7.6
4.7
Asian
3.4
1.7
Black/African-American
34.1
41.2
Hispanic
.4
.3
American Indian/Alaska Native
.3
Pacific Islander/Native Hawaiian .6
7.9
3.6
Two or More
43.8
46.1
White
2.2
2.2
Unknown/Not Reported
Age
57.1
49.2
Under 20
26
30.8
20-24
9.4
8.9
25-29
7.5
11.1
30 and up
3. Describe any partnerships among colleges or with high school districts, workforce
agencies, or other community partners that assist with providing core services to new
students.
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
The college collaborates very closely with all feeding high school districts and input is received
from those districts in improving matriculation services for their students. The college has had
a student ambassador program for over 20 years where student ambassadors visit high schools
in the area on a weekly basis to help students with application and matriculation information.
Matriculation services are provided to high school students either on site, as is the case with
the Adult High School students in the Noncredit program, or they are brought to campus.
Currently the college does not have other partnerships with organizations outside of the
institution that provide core services at those organizations. The noncredit SSSP plan for the
college discusses their collaboration with agencies and school districts that provide core
services.
B. Orientation
1. Were adjustments made to your orientation process based on outcomes from your 201415 program plan?
Adjustments were made to the orientation process based on our outcomes from the 2014-15
program plan. Additional services included the implementation of enhanced in-person focused
orientation sessions provided during our “Welcome Days” event that took place over the
course of three days, the week prior to the start of the semester. These sessions were held in
Spring 2015 and Fall 2015 and they will be updated and scaled to provide more focused
orientations for students that need further information to succeed. The sessions were created
based on student input and included topics on the orientation checklist as well as topics
specific to student education goal, undecided, financial aid, setting goals, etc. The sessions
were evaluated and changes and additions will be considered for the upcoming year. Also, a
planning group is designing an “Open House” geared toward new students and students at risk
that will include matriculation services, information for parents and students, meeting faculty,
and attending workshops important for their success prior to the beginning of the semester.
The online orientation module was also updated. A Matriculation Activity Guide was
implemented which integrates with our Student Information System (PeopleSoft) to provide
students with an online checklist to assist students with the matriculation process. The college
will continue to evaluate the online orientation and balance the need for access to orientation
online with the need for face-to-face focused orientations.
2. a. How many students were provided orientation services in 2014-15?
Table 6 indicates the number of students from the cohort who received Orientation services.
Students were only counted in the first term in which they completed the service.
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
Table 6. Orientation Services Received Fall 2014 First-Term Cohort
Spring 2015
Orientation Service
Count
Enrollment
Enrolled
1,492
Service Received in
Not Enrolled
794
Fall2014
Enrolled
76
Service Received in
Spring 2015
Not Enrolled
Enrolled
350
No Service Received
Not Enrolled
440
page ______ of ______
Percent of those
Directed
47.3
25.2
2.4
11.1
14.0
*Credit students only
b. What percentage of the target population does this represent?
74.9% of the Fall 2014 First-Term cohort received Orientation services within their first 2
terms.
c. What steps are you taking to reduce any unmet need or to ensure student
participation?
Priority enrollment is dependent on students completing the orientation so the college,
through the SSSP communication plan, is working on communicating directly with students
about the importance of completing orientation in a timely matter to take advantage of
priority enrollment. Also, the implementation of the Matriculation Activity Guide will help
the students to check what they are missing online. The college has also brought in a
consultant to work on COMMGen communication to automatically alert students who have
not completed matriculation and review and change the message that is sent to students.
3. a. Are orientation services offered online?
Yes, the college provides the orientation online and is available year-around.
b. Identify any technology used to provide orientation, including any commercial or inhouse products in use or under development, and annual subscription or staff support
requirements.
The 2014-2015 plan addressed the development of a better online orientation through
Cynosure. Unfortunately, due to inadequate response and services from the Cynosure
contractor, the college moved away from that platform. The college is currently offering the
orientation through self service option on PeopleSoft which also with the review and quiz
of the information, automatically updates the student matriculation checklist.
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
The college will review options this coming year that other colleges have used to provide a
more interactive online orientation and determine on whether the current option is
preferred by the students or whether to move to a different Platform.
In addition, the college is updating and using PeopleSoft Activity Guides for information to
students on matriculation services. The division of student services also purchased IContact software to track communication with students and SARS is used for appointments
for orientation and advisement. ILINX for document storing is also being upgraded and
College Scheduler software was purchased to assist students in their course scheduling
based on their education plan.
The staff supporting orientation includes a programmer analyst, functional support analyst,
a counselor and the SSSP staff coordinator. The face-to-face orientations are supported by
the SSSP specialist, SSSP counselor, SSSP staff coordinator and peer advisors.
Due to the short-term nature of some of the technical upgrades, consultants were hired
and will be hired to provide the technological changes and review business practices.
4. Identify the topics covered in orientation. Include those topics mandated by title 5
section 55521 and any additional information, policies and/or procedures that the college
or district determines necessary to include in a comprehensive orientation.
The accessibility of the online orientation provides students the opportunity to complete it
at any time and at any location. The orientation complies with section 508 of the
Rehabilitation Act and ADA standards.
As per Title 5, section 55521, the online orientation currently includes information on:
• Catalog and class schedule
o Academic policies
o Rights and responsibilities
o Enrollment procedures and process
• Requisites and advisories
• Important calendar dates
• Time management
• Student services
o Financial aid
o Tutoring services
o Campus virtual tours
o Student activities
o Athletics
o Other student support services
• Higher education degree options
o Academic degrees and certificates
o Transfer preparation
College: MiraCosta College
•
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
Steps to matriculate
o Students who take the online orientation are required to take a quiz and pass it
with a score of 100% before they are given credit for orientation.
In the upcoming year, additional information on career and goal setting will be included in both
online orientation and face-to-face orientations.
5. Complete the chart below outlining the staff associated with orientation and the source
used to fund the position. These staff listed below should match those in your budget
plan. Additional lines may be added.
# of
FTE
0.3
0.2
0.4
2
Title
Role
Funding Source (SSSP/Match/GF)
Coordinator of
Student Success and
Testing
Dean, Student Support
Outreach Coordinator
Coordinate orientation activities
SSSP/Match
Oversee budget and staff
Coordinate outreach and orientation in
HS
Assist with all orientations by helping
students check-in and provide peer
advising during enrollment workshops
Conduct orientation and reach out to
students to complete the process
Analyst for Orientation development,
ILinx, SARS, College Scheduler
CommGen development, SARS system,
ILinx
Provide secretarial support for
orientation services
Maintain the communication plan and
develop weekly communication to the
students
Review online orientation script; assign
counselors and other staff to in-person
orientations
Collaborate with counselors to develop,
plan, and deliver orientation program to
veterans
Deliver in-person orientation sessions
SSSP/Match
Match
0.5
Student
ambassadors/Peer
Advisors
Student Support
Specialist
Programmer
0.5
Functional Specialist
0.2
Secretary
0.1
Communication
coordinator
0.2
Counseling
Department Chair
0.2
Veterans Coordinator
1
Counselors
1
SSSP/Match
SSSP
SSSP/Match
SSSP/Match
SSSP/Match
SSSP
SSSP/Match
Match
SSSP/Match
6. Complete the chart below outlining all other orientation related expenditures, including the
direct cost to purchase, develop or maintain technology tools specifically for orientation
services. These expenditures should correspond to those in your budget plan. Additional
lines may be added.
Budget Code
4000
Expenditure Title/Description
Supplies and
Funding Source (SSSP/Match/GF)
SSSP/Match
Amount
$36000
College: MiraCosta College
5000
6000
District: MiraCosta Community College District
Materials/Printing/Hospitality for SSSP
orientations
Professional development/Consulting/
Conference Travel/
Mileage/Transportation
Equipment/Contract Software
page ______ of ______
SSSP/Match
$92000
SSSP/Match
$28000
C. Assessment for Placement
1. Were adjustments made to your assessment for placement process and/or procedures
based on outcomes from your 2014-15 plan?
Adjustments made to the college’s assessment for placement process included the college
moving from using an outdated windows based platform to an updated web-based platform
for assessment into English and ESL courses which enabled the college to provide English and
ESL assessment testing to distance education students.
Adjustments made to the placement procedures included on-the-spot score entry to allow
students immediate enrollment access to courses requiring English/ESL and/or Math
prerequisites.
Based on the demand and high student interest in seeing a counselor immediately after taking
an assessment, counseling hours in the assessment office were increased to meet student
need.
Additional hours were added to the assessment sessions offered at the Community Learning
Center location as well as the other two campus locations. Placement procedures were
changed to strongly encourage review prior to taking both assessments, and review workshops
were developed and implemented.
Two years ago, through the Basic Skills Initiative, the college had started the implementation of
the Bridge to Success in Math Program and due to its high success rates, the program was
scaled up and moved to the SSSP plan to meet the student demand. The goal of the program is
to help students who need to brush up on their math skills through an intensive week-long
workshop and upon successfully completing the program, students retake the Math
Assessment and have a high probability of improving their math course placement so that they
can enroll in the next level math course. The institution will continue to scale this program to
include students who withdraw from basic skills math courses to have them participate in the
workshops and stay on track to complete the math sequence in a timely manner.
a. How many students were provided assessment services in 2014-15?
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
Table 7 indicates the number of students from the cohort who received Assessment services.
Students were only counted in the first term in which they completed the service.
Table 7. Assessment Services Received Fall 2014 First-Term Cohort
Spring 2015
Assessment Service
Count
Enrollment
Enrolled
1,672
Service Received in
Not Enrolled
1,019
Fall2014
Enrolled
82
Service Received in
Spring 2015
Not Enrolled
Enrolled
164
No Service Received
Not Enrolled
215
Percent of those
Directed
53.0
32.3
2.6
5.2
6.8
b. What percentage of the target population does this represent?
87.9% of the Fall 2014 First-Term cohort received Assessment services within their first 2
terms.
c. What steps are you taking to reduce any unmet need or to ensure student
participation?
The college implemented several automated communications using PeopleSoft 3C Engine
to target students missing an assessment and provided information for providing
assessment alternatives in order to ensure student participation and reduce unmet need.
Also, additional hours were added to the assessment sessions offered at the Community
Learning Center location as well as the other two campus locations.
2. Give a brief and specific overview of the assessment process. Include a description of the
test preparation that is available.
Assessment is offered to students year round on a drop-in basis. Students are eligible to
complete the assessments or submit alternative assessments once an application has been
submitted. The type of test preparation available for the math assessment is a booklet
comprised of sample questions and answers, which are organized by the topics covered on
each level of the math assessment (pre-algebra, elementary algebra, intermediate algebra,
and pre-calculus).
The type of test preparation available for the English and/or ESL assessment is available
directly from the ACT, Inc. Compass website and provides sample questions and answers
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
for each module of the English and ESL assessment. This information is available both in
print in the Testing Services office and online on the Testing Services webpage.
Students are informed about test-preparation materials via the class schedule, college
catalog, Testing Services webpage and office staff, Math Learning Center, bookstore,
counseling offices, and faculty.
Students may take each level of the assessments a maximum of two times in their lifetime,
but they are required to wait 24 hours between their first and second attempt. Although
there are no conditions that must be met before being allowed to take the test again,
students are encouraged to review before attempting to retake their assessment(s).
The college has no policies in place for the expiration of placement, so a student’s test
scores are valid for his or her lifetime.
3. a. Identify any assessment test(s) used for placement into English, mathematics, and ESL
courses. Provide specific information about any second-party tests, including the versions
and forms used.
The assessment test used for placement into English and ESL courses is the web based
eCOMPASS version published by ACT, Inc. The math assessment used for placement is the
paper/pencil MDTP, developed by The California State University and University of
California. The paper/pencil math assessment is provided in four different levels: PreAlgebra (Test Code AR 50/86), Elementary Algebra (Test Code EA50C86), Intermediate
Algebra (Test Code IA45C86), and Pre-Calculus (Test Code PC40C86). All assessments are
provided in person individually during year-round drop-in hours as well as in group
settings when the college provides outreach to district high schools.
b. When were tests approved by the CCCCO and what type of approval was granted?
The ACT COMPASS Second Party Instrument for ESL was approved for use by the
Chancellor’s office in July 2001 and was approved for use for Reading and Writing by the
Chancellor’s office in July 2013.
c. When were disproportionate impact and consequential validity studies last completed?
Both disproportionate impact and consequential validity studies were completed in the
spring 2015 semester.
4. a. What multiple measures are used?
b. How they are integrated into the assessment system (as part of an algorithm included
in the test scoring process, applied by counselors, etc.)?
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
c. Do these measures meet the multiple measures requirement per title 5, sections 55502
and 55522?
The English and ESL assessment uses two multiple measures to determine a student’s
placement: writing score (grammar and usage on ESL test) and self-reported high school
GPA.
The math assessment uses four multiple measures to determine a student’s placement:
self-reported GPA, the last math class completed, the recency of the last math class
completed, and the score earned in the selected math test.
The multiple measures used on the assessments are part of an algorithm included in the
test-scoring process.
Other measures the college uses to place students into courses are per Administrative
Procedure 4260: Prerequisites and Corequisites, where students are placed into courses by
meeting the appropriate prerequisites.
As the college increases the research capacity for more studies in placement tests and
multiple measures, discussions are taking place with the English and Math departments on
the effectiveness of the current placement tests and the opportunities for change. Also, the
college is updated regularly on the research and information provided from the advisory
group of the statewide initiative. Based on local research, the college has also started the
conversation with the English Placement Advisory Committee to consider other local
multiple measures for English placement test.
5. Describe the policy on the acceptance of student assessment scores and placement
results from colleges within a multi-college district, from colleges outside of the district,
or from adult education programs.
MiraCosta College accepts all California Community College assessment scores and
placement results.
The college accepts the Early Assessment Program (EAP) result of “college ready” to
exempt students from the college placement test in English as well as math. In addition,
the college accepts the Advanced Placement Program calculus test (AB or BC) with a score
of three or higher as well as the CLEP in mathematics with a score of 50 or higher to
exempt students from the college placement test in math.
MiraCosta College also uses the Advanced Placement Program language or literature test
with a score of three or higher and the International Baccalaureate Higher Level English
Exam with a score of five or higher to exempt students from the college placement test in
English.
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
6. How are the policies and practices on re-takes and recency made available to students?
Policies regarding retakes are available on the Testing Services webpage as well as at the
time of testing. All college policies and administrative procedures are also available online
at MiraCosta’s website. The college has no policies in place for the expiration of
placement, so a student’s test scores are valid for his or her lifetime.
7. Complete the chart below outlining the staff associated with assessment for placement and
the source used to fund the positon. These staff listed below should match those in your
budget plan. Additional lines may be added.
# of
FTE
0.7
Title
Role
Funding Source (SSSP/Match/GF)
3
Program Aides
1
Student Ambassadors
0.3
Research Analyst
0.2
Secretary
1
0.4
Instructional Aides
Bridget to Math
Coordinators
Coordinate Testing Services and
supervise placement testing
Oversee budget, staff and department
Support placement test activities for new
students
Provide counseling in the Testing Office
to students completing the placement
tests
Provide assessment and proctoring
services support and all MCC locations
Assist with placement test information in
HS
Conduct studies on multiple measures for
placement tests and provide data on
students who take the tests
Provide secretarial support for placement
testing
Bridge to Math workshop aides
Coordinate workshops for Bridge to Math
students to prepare them for placement
tests
SSSP/Match
1
Coordinator of Student
Success and Testing
Dean, Student Support
Student Support
Specialist
Counselor
0.2
1
SSSP/Match
SSSP
SSSP
Match/SSSP
Match
SSSP
SSSP
SSSP
SSSP
8. Complete the chart below outlining all other assessment for placement related
expenditures, including the direct cost to purchase, develop or maintain technology tools
specifically for assessment for placement services. These expenditures should correspond
to those in your budget plan. Additional lines may be added.
Budget Code
4000
5000
Expenditure Title/Description
Testing units/Supplies and Printing
Materials/Hospitality for SSSP
activities
Professional Development/Conference
Travel/ Consultant for Multiple
Funding Source (SSSP/Match/GF)
SSSP/Match
Amount
$15000
SSSP/Match
$8500
College: MiraCosta College
6000
District: MiraCosta Community College District
Measure studies/Transportation
Equipment (computers) for placement
tests
SSSP/Match
page ______ of ______
$17000
D. Counseling, Advising, and Other Education Planning Services
1. Were adjustments made to your counseling services process and/or procedures based on
outcomes from your 2014-15 plan?
With the onboarding of Student Support Specialists for Counseling (SSSC’s), the college was
able to redefine the approach to drop-in counseling with a new drop-in advising model.
Students will first be screened and assisted by the SSSC’s and then be seen by a counselor if
necessary. This new model allows for quicker access to counselors and more efficient
appointment referrals.
A new on-ground Probation workshop was also created base on research done on students on
probation and a survey sent to all students who were on probation to ascertain what would
help them be successful.
The Counseling department increased their visibility on campus by providing mobile counseling
in designated “hotspots,” which is a continuation of the successful mobile counseling listed in
the previous plan. This also includes the increase of counseling in the Testing Center.
Counselors have also been engaged in the Welcome Days and enrollment sessions for new
students, which was implemented this past year with the SSSP plan. The implementation of
DegreeWorks (MyEdPlan) has also influenced some changes in the services, including increased
use of technical hardware (additional monitors, tablets, etc.) to provide in person and mobile
counseling.
Due to the unsuccessful launch of Cynosure, the college will now rely primarily on MyEdPlan
for creating abbreviated education plans with students. Because of the SSSP focus on providing
career guidance to undecided at-risk students, a proposal was submitted to create a new
course that is structured to provide greater career development support for students along
with college success skills that will be offered for the first time in fall 2016.
Lastly, several professional development opportunities were provided for counselors to
enhance their counseling skills, including MBTI and STRONG Interest Inventory introductory
training, education plan training, and MyEdPlan software training.
2. a. How many students were provided counseling, advising and education planning
services in 2014-15?
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
Table 8 indicates the number of students from the cohort who received
counseling/advising services. Students were only counted in the first term in which they
completed the service.
Table 8. Counseling/Advising Services Received Fall 2014 First-Term Cohort
Counseling/Advising Spring 2015
Percent of those
Count
Service
Enrollment
Directed
Enrolled
1,517
48.1
Service Received in
Not Enrolled
823
26.1
Fall2014
Enrolled
175
5.6
Service Received in
Spring 2015
Not Enrolled
Enrolled
226
7.2
No Service Received
Not Enrolled
411
13.0
Table 9 indicates the number of students from the cohort who received Education Planning
services. Students were only counted in the first term in which they completed the service.
Table 9. Education Planning Services Received Fall 2014 First-Term Cohort
Education Planning
Spring 2015
Percent of those
Count
Service
Enrollment
Directed
Enrolled
1,518
48.2
Service Received in
Not Enrolled
752
23.9
Fall2014
Enrolled
199
6.3
Service Received in
Spring 2015
Not Enrolled
Enrolled
201
6.4
No Service Received
Not Enrolled
482
15.3
b. What percentage of the target population does this represent?
79.8% of the Fall 2014 First-Term cohort received Counseling/Advising services within their
first 2 terms.
78.4% of the Fall 2014 First-Term cohort received Education Planning services within their
first 2 terms.
c. What steps are you taking to reduce any unmet need or to ensure student
participation?
The college implemented automated communications using PeopleSoft 3C Engine to target
students missing counseling, advising and educational plans in order to ensure student
participation and reduce unmet need.
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
3. a. Describe the service delivery methods (in person, workshops, FTES generating course,
etc.).
The Counseling department offers 45-minute appointments (in person or phone), 15minute drop-ins, one hour group advisement workshops (in person and online), one hour
probation workshops (in person and online), online advising (asynchronous), mobile
counseling (counselors stationed around campus in “hotspots” during peak periods), two
three-unit general education counseling courses (COUN 100 and 110), and three one-unit
counseling courses (COUN 101, 103, and 105).
b. Is drop-in counseling available or are appointments required?
Yes, 15-minute drop-ins are offered throughout the year. During non-peak periods, the
department usually offers drop-ins from 9am - 12pm and 4pm-5:30pm. During peak periods,
drop-ins are offered from 9am – 6pm. With the new SSSC hires, the Counseling department is
able to provide a new advising model, where students are assisted first by a SSSC and then by a
drop-in counselor or additional service if needed. This has greatly reduced the amount of wait
time during peak periods. For example, students may wait up to 1.5 hours to see a counselor
during a peak period, only to ask a question that could have been answered in five minutes. As
for appointments, 45-minute appointments are offered throughout the year. Appointments
are required to create a comprehensive education plan. Abbreviated education plans can be
created during a drop-in.
c. What is the average wait time for an appointment and drop-in counseling?
The average wait-time for an appointment during the peak period is 2.5 weeks. The
average wait-time for an appointment during the non-peak period is one week. The
average wait-time for a drop-in during the peak period was 1.5 hours until a new advising
model was implemented as discussed above. The average wait-time for a drop-in during
the non-peak period was 30 minutes. Now the average wait-time for a drop-in is 15-20
minutes during the peak period.
4. a. Describe the type of assistance provided to students to develop an abbreviated student
education plan and the scope and content of the plan.
Students receive an abbreviated education plan during either a drop-in or full appointment.
MyEdPlan is being used now to create a 1-2 semester education plan, which students can
access 24/7 through their student account.
b. Describe the type of assistance provided to students to develop a comprehensive
education plan and the scope and content of the plan.
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
Students receive a comprehensive education plan during a full appointment once the
counselor has 1) assessed the student’s goals (i.e., major/degree/certificate/transfer), 2)
provided career counseling if necessary, and 3) all prior coursework has been evaluated by
an evaluator or a counselor (depends on the prior coursework). MyEdPlan is being used
now to create a comprehensive semester education plan and degree audit, which students
can access 24/7 through their student account. In some cases, a paper education plan is
created. Until a fully integrated system is in place to evaluate prior-college coursework and
have the coursework displayed into MyEdPlan’s degree audit function the college will need
to maintain paper education plans in some instances.
5. Identify any technology tools used for, or in support of, counseling, advising and other
education planning services, such as an education planning tool or degree audit system.
Currently the college uses or is in the process of fully implementing these technology tools:
MyEdPlan, SURF, ILINX, Assist.org, College Scheduler, SARS, iConnect, Scansnap scanners,
Samsung galaxy tablets, 2nd monitor.
With the permission of the Chancellor’s office to use SSSP funds, the college is also in the
process of implementing the transfer credit module in PeopleSoft so it will pull in
transferred coursework from external institutions into the MyEdPlan program. . Also, the
college has hired a consultant to help with COMMGen communication and self-service
screens through PeopleSoft to keep students focused and on track.
6. Complete the chart below outlining the staff associated with counseling, advising and
education planning services and the source used to fund the position. These staff listed
below should match those in your budget plan. Additional lines may be added.
# of
FTE
0.6
0.6
15
Title
Role
Dean, Counseling and
Student Development
Counseling Supervisor
Oversee counseling services, budget
and staff
Supervise counseling staff and
specialist and manage counseling
schedule
Provide advising, educational plans and
follow-up services to students
1.5
Counselors (general
counseling/transfer
center/international
students/veterans/athletic)
Student Support Specialists
1.5
Secretary
0.3
Research Analyst
Provide advising and schedule
recommendation to students
Provide secretarial support to
Counseling departments
Provide research and data on student
Funding Source
(SSSP/Match/GF)
SSSP/Match
SSSP
SSSP/Match
SSSP
SSSP/Match
SSSP
College: MiraCosta College
0.7
Functional Specialist
1
Programmer
5
Evaluators
0.2
Peer advisors
3
Secretary clerk
0.1
Communication
coordinator
District: MiraCosta Community College District
success
Provide technical support for SARS,
Degree Works, College Scheduler
Provide programming support for Ilinx,
SARS, Degree Works, Transfer Credit
Provide evaluation services for students
and support degree works in education
plan development
Assist with advising and follow up
services for students
Provide secretarial support for
counseling services
Provide communication to students on
education plans and deadlines
page ______ of ______
SSSP/Match
SSSP/Match
SSSP/Match
SSSP
SSSP/Match
SSSP
7. Complete the chart below outlining all other counseling, advising and education planning
related expenditures, including the direct cost to purchase, develop or maintain technology
tools specifically for these services. These expenditures should correspond to those in your
budget plan. Additional lines may be added.
Budget
Code
4000
5000
6000
Expenditure Title/Description
Funding Source (SSSP/Match/GF)
Amount
Printing/Supplies/Advertising/Hospitality
Consulting/Professional
Development/Travel/License
Software/License Renewal/
Computers/Monitor/Tablets/Scanners
Contract Services
SSSP/Match
SSSP/Match
$13000
$98000
SSSP/Match
$60000
E. Follow-Up for At-Risk Students
1. Were adjustments made to your follow-up services and/or procedures based on outcomes from
your 2014-15 plan?
The research analyst hired through the SSSP plan conducted extensive quantitative and qualitative
research on students at risk. The campus community learned more about those students and made
changes and continues to develop programs and projects to meet the needs.
Because of the research findings, Counseling, Admission and Records, Financial Aid, and other
department staff got together to evaluate the process of notifying and assisting students on probation
and disqualification and enhanced the services that are provided to these students. The notification
letter sent via email to students on probation and disqualification was changed to have a more
positive tone and directed these at-risk students to the appropriate support services rather than
simply informing them of the status. A survey for their input was also included in the notification
letter. The Counseling Department worked closely with Admissions and Records to communicate the
importance of attending the newly developed in-person probation workshop that was based on the
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
survey results that students on probation provided. These one hour workshops are in addition to the
current online probation workshop. E-SARS was used to register students for these workshops, which
allowed the department to track their attendance and provide additional follow-up services. Students
on dismissal were sent a letter inviting them to make a full-appointment with a counselor.
The Career Center increased the number of associate counselors providing drop-in career counseling.
During the Welcome Days events, one day was designated specifically for undecided students, where
career counseling was heavily emphasized. The career counselor created and presented workshops for
undecided students to take throughout the semester. Based on her experience during the first year,
the workshop format for undecided students was expanded to offer a three workshop sequence
rather than one workshop and to award students who complete the three workshops a “career
success certificate.” The three workshops offered in the series are: Discover Your Career Interests,
Explore Majors & Careers, and Develop Your Action Plan.
The Counseling department is working more closely with other departments, such as Financial Aid to
coordinate staffing and services. For example, it would be important to have enough appointments set
aside for students needing a Satisfactory Academic Progress appeal meeting with a counselor
immediately following the announcement to students from Financial Aid. Presentations continue to be
given to Basic Skills English, ESL, and math classrooms, regarding counseling services.
2. a. How many students were provided follow-up services in 2014-15?
Table 10 indicates the number of students from the cohort who received Follow-up
services. Students were only counted in the first term in which they completed the
service.
Table 10. Follow-up Services Received Fall 2014 First-Term Cohort
Spring 2015
Follow-Up Service
Count
Enrollment
Enrolled
258
Service Received in
Not Enrolled
132
Fall2014
Enrolled
455
Service Received in
Spring 2015
Not Enrolled
Enrolled
1,205
No Service Received
Not Enrolled
1,102
Percent of those
Directed
8.2
4.2
14.4
38.2
35.0
Additional follow-up services provided by the Career Center to undecided students include:
- Individual career counseling appointments: 305
- Classroom presentations and students attending: 9 presentations to 180 students
- Students attending workshops: 26
b. What percentage of the target population does this represent?
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
26.8% of the Fall 2014 First-Term cohort received Follow-up Services during the first 2 terms at
MiraCosta.
c. What steps are you taking to reduce any unmet need or to ensure student participation?
In spring 2015, the college joined Achieving the Dream Initiative. Achieving the Dream Initiative
focuses on reform movement for student success in higher education, dedicated to community
college student success and completion. The main goal of the college in joining this initiative was
to create systemic changes to integrate and align the existing initiatives and increase student
success, especially for basic skills students and other students at risk. SSSP, BSI, and Equity plan all
have basic skills students in common and the college has committed to focusing on basic skills as
the group of students that we want to learn more about and change the college experience to
meet their needs. Focus groups are being held in October 2015 and quantitative and qualitative
data are being evaluated to create a plan that will address increasing student participation and
success.
In spring 2016, in collaboration with the Faculty Director of Online Education, a pilot will be
implemented that uses Blackboard analytics to identify at-risk students through their loging in (or
lack of logging in) behaviors. With the use of SSSP funds, peer advisors and coaches will be hired to
contact those students and direct them to student services or other resources that will help them
be successful in class.
The steps taken to reduce the unmet need for undecided students include: creating and marketing
“undecided major” workshops and offering them every week during the open enrollment period.
Additionally, in collaboration with the SSSP staff coordinator, emails are sent to undecided
students to notify them of career counseling services and workshops.
Finally, administrative procedures and board policies are being reviewed and revised to address
requirements for the students on probation and disqualification that better enhance student
success. They are also being reviewed to align, when possible, probation and disqualification with
BOG and federal financial aid requirements.
3. a. What types of follow-up services are available to at-risk students?
In addition to counseling appointments and many student success workshops, the college has a
very successful tutoring program available to all students, and specific tutoring services for
students at risk that are enrolled in basic skills courses. Not sure but maybe add Food
pantry/Health services personal counseling and mental health?
b. How and when are students notified of these services?
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
Through the SSSP plan, the college focused on developing a communication plan for the students.
The Public Information Office had conducted a study (not from SSSP funds) on how students want
to receive information from the college and that input was considered in the development of the
communication plan. Also, a consultant was hired to review and rewrite the information on
matriculation and student services provided in the course schedule to be easier to read and
clearer. iContact was purchased to communicate more regularly with students and track that
communication to evaluate the effectiveness of the information. A weekly newsletter is now sent
to the students via iContact with information on student services, deadlines, and activities
available for that week.
Information on counseling and other student services is also available on line and through the
catalog and class schedule. Students are also notified through classroom presentations. The SSSP
coordinator works with the counseling department chair to target at-risk students with targeted
interventions, such as the probation workshops.
c. Describe the service delivery method (in groups, workshops, etc.) and any technology tools
used.
Computers, iContact, student videos for undecided students, Early alert program (to be
determined), and PeopleSoft.
d. Are instructional faculty involved in monitoring student progress? Do they participate in early
alert systems?
The studies conducted on students at risk were shared with faculty through FLEX professional
development activities and department meetings. Faculty have a vested interest in knowing more
about students at risk (hence the focus for Achieving the Dream).
The current early-alert system at the college is not widely utilized. In discussions with faculty on
the reasons for its’ lack of use, it has become clear that there is a need for creating a fullydeveloped system that identifies students at risk prior to students dropping or failing courses. The
college is in the process of identifying better alert systems and developing a response for the
students who are identified as at risk.
4. Complete the chart below outlining the staff providing follow-up services and the source used to
fund the position. These staff listed below should match those in your budget plan. Additional
lines may be added.
# of
FTE
2
Title
Role
Funding Source (SSSP/Match/GF)
Career Counselors
SSSP/Match
0.3
Dean of Counseling
Provide career assessment,
interpretation, counseling, and
workshops to at-risk students.
Provide oversight of counseling services
SSSP/Match
College: MiraCosta College
and Student
Development
Director, Career
Services
Peer Advisors
0.3
1.5
2
7
Student Support
Specialist
Counselors
0.3
Programmer
0.5
Systems Analyst
0.4
Research Analyst
0.4
Counseling Supervisor
0.8
Secretary
1
Coaches/Advisors
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
for follow-up students
Provide department oversight for
services for undecided students
Assist with helping at-risk students in
participating in workshops and services
dedicated for at-risk students
Provide advising and workshops to at-risk
students
Provide follow-up counseling and
workshops to at-risk students
Provide programming support for early
alert software
Provide functional technical support for
the early alert program
Provide research and studies on students
at-risk
Coordinate follow-up services and
workshops for students at risk
Provide secretarial support for follow up
services
Provide coaching and advising to
students identified through the early
alert system
Match
SSSP
SSSP
SSSP/Match
SSSP/Match
SSSP
SSSP
SSSP/Match
SSSP
5. Complete the chart below outlining all other follow-up services related expenditures, including
the direct cost to purchase, develop or maintain technology tools specifically for these services.
These expenditures should correspond to those included in your budget plan. Additional lines
may be added.
Budget
Code
4000
5000
6000
Expenditure Title/Description
Printing/Supplies/Hospitality/Travel/
Professional
development/Training/Conference
travel/Mileage/Software Contract
Contract services for early
alert/Software/Computers/Tablets/Scanners
Funding Source
(SSSP/Match/GF)
SSSP/Match
SSSP/Match
Amount
SSSP/Match
$320000
$11000
$68000
F. Other SSSP/Match Expenditures
1. Describe any institutional research directly related to the provision and/or evaluation of SSSP
services. List any related expenditures in the table below. These expenditures should correspond
to those in your budget plan.
A Research Analyst was hired and funded, in part, by SSSP funds to conduct an ongoing evaluation
of MiraCosta’s SSSP services as well as other efforts as they relate to student success. In Spring
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
2015 a comprehensive analysis of core SSSP services was conducted looking at a Fall 2014 cohort
of first-time students. The study explored the characteristics of the students receiving SSSP
services in Fall 2014 as well as an analysis of key academic outcomes including unit completion
rate, GPA and enrollment behaviors. The evaluation included a full report as well as interactive
graphs to be displayed and used throughout campus.
The evaluation methodology employed a series of independent samples, t-tests, and one-way
ANOVA’s to determine mean differences across group, bivariate correlations, and regression. The
number and type of core SSSP services was recorded for each student and utilized as input
variables for the study. The following outcome variables were compared: unit completion rate,
degree-applicable units earned, and GPA. An initial analysis was completed to determine whether
the number and type of services completed is related to the 3 outcome variables (i.e. Do students
who receive all 4 services perform better than those who don’t?). Additional analyses were
completed to determine if these relationships and mean effects remain true across each gender
and ethnic group. Following this, the researcher conducted a comparison of enrollment behaviors
and outcomes in English and Math. Students were categorized based on the number of core SSSP
services they received and compared across groups regarding whether they: 1. Enrolled in Math, 2.
Successfully Completed Math 3. Enrolled in English and 4. Successfully completed English.
Findings were presented at division-wide meetings as well as made available on our website. The
full report was circulated to key personnel on campus for continued dialogue regarding
improvement and continued evaluation.
In order to better understand who our students on probation are, a snapshot of all students on
Probation or Dismissal between Spring 2011 and Fall 2014 was developed. Students were
disaggregated by gender, age, ethnicity, DSPS status, BOG Fee Waiver recipient status, and EFC
value. For this study a Fee Waiver Recipient is anyone with a Financial Aid Award Type of BA, B1,
B2, B3, BB, BC, F1, F2, F3, F4, or F5. This allowed us to identify high risk populations for Probation
and/or Dismissal and begin to identify interventions for these groups.
Additionally, staff, faculty, and administrators wanted to learn more about how the probation
process affects student success and specifically how it affects pertinence. To determine the
likelihood at which students persist on probation and/or move into dismissal a cohort analysis was
conducted. Cohorts were developed based on a students’ initial term (during the reporting period)
on probation. All students on probation in the cohort term and either in 1. Good Standing or 2. Not
Enrolled in the previous term were included in the cohort. Cohorts were developed for each term
between Fall 2011 and Fall 2013. Cohorts were tracked for 2 additional terms (excluding Summer)
to determine the likelihood that students’ probation status persists into the 2nd term and
devolves into a Dismissal/Disqualification status in the 3rd term. Additionally, persistence in
enrollment was tracked. Results were disaggregated by gender, age, ethnicity, DSPS status, BOG
Fee Waiver recipient status, and EFC value. Demographic Intersections were identified to
determine subgroups that are most at risk for losing financial assistance based on probation
and/or dismissal status and to begin developing interventions.
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
Findings from both aspects of the study were used in revising Board Policies and Administrative
Policies as well as in the development of early interventions for students on probation.
Budget
Code
4000
Expenditure Title/Description
Supplies/Materials/Advertisement/Hospitality
related to research (focus groups)
Professional development/Conference
travel/Consultant
Computers/Scanners
5000
6000
Funding Source
(SSSP/Match/GF)
SSSP/Match
Amount
SSSP
$11000
SSSP
$4500
$12000
2. List any match expenditures not previously accounted for in the plan. These expenditures may
include Admissions and Records, Transfer and Articulation Services, Career Services, Institutional
Research (unrelated to SSSP), instructionally funded tutoring and supplemental instruction costs
for at-risk students. These expenditures should correspond to those in your budget plan.
Budget Code
Expenditure Title/Description
Funding Source
Amount
SECTION III. POLICIES
A. Exemption Policy
1. Provide a description of the college or district’s adopted criteria and process for
exempting students from SSSP-required services in accordance with title 5 section 55532.
To be exempt from the matriculation process at MiraCosta College, a student must meet
one of the following conditions:
1. The student was exempt during a previous semester.
2. The student has earned an associate or higher degree from an accredited
institution.
3. The student has previously attended another college and indicated on the
application for admission one of the following as an educational goal:
• Discover/formulate career interests, plans, goals
• Prepare for a new career (i.e., acquire job skills)
• Advance further in current job/career (i.e., update job skills)
• Maintain certificate or license (e.g., nursing, real estate)
• Personal interest; no intention to use credit for certificate, degree, or transfer
College: MiraCosta College
•
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
Complete credits for high school diploma or GED.
Exemption from matriculation does not automatically give students priority enrollment
privileges. Exempted students who want priority enrollment are encouraged to
participate in the matriculation process.
2. What percentage of your student population is exempt (list by category)?
.6% of first-term, degree/certificate/transfer-seeking, credit students in Fall 2014 are
indicated as exempt from the SSSP-required services.
3.3% of all students in their first term at MiraCosta in Fall 2014 (N=4,069) were indicated as
exempt from SSSP required services
B. Appeal Policies
Describe the college’s student appeal policies and procedures. If these policies are posted on
the college’s website, also provide the link below.
The College’s policies on appeal appear in our Administrative procedures.
Policies for appealing loss of priority:
http://www.miracosta.edu/officeofthepresident/board/downloads/5055APStudentEnrollmentPriorities-Effective4-6-10Revised5-14-129-9-14.pdf
Students may appeal the loss of enrollment priority when the loss is due to extenuating
circumstances or when a student with a disability applied for but did not receive a reasonable
accommodation in a timely manner. Extenuating circumstances are verified cases of accidents,
illnesses, or other circumstances beyond the student’s control. Students who have
demonstrated significant academic improvement may also appeal the loss of priorityenrollment status. Significant academic improvement is defined as achieving no less than the
minimum grade-point average and progress standard established in Administrative Procedure
4250, Probation, Disqualification, and Readmission. The dean of counseling and student
development or his/her designee will determine the appeal in his/her sole discretion.
C. Prerequisite and Corequisites Procedures
Provide a description of the college’s procedures for establishing and reviewing prerequisites
and corequisites in accordance with title 5 section 55003 and procedures for considering
student challenges. If these policies are posted on the college’s website, also provide the link
below.
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
Board Policy 4260:
The superintendent/president is authorized to establish prerequisites, corequisites, and
advisories on recommended preparation for courses in the curriculum. All such prerequisites,
corequisites, and advisories shall be established in accordance with the standards set out in
Title 5. Any prerequisites, corequisites, or advisories shall be necessary and appropriate for
achieving the purpose for which they are established. The procedures shall include a way in
which a prerequisite or corequisite may be challenged by a student on grounds permitted by
law. Prerequisites, corequisites, and advisories shall be identified in district publications
available to students.
Link: http://www.miracosta.edu/officeofthepresident/board/downloads/4260BPPrerequisitesandCorequisites-Adopted4-20-10.pdf
Administrative Procedure 4260:
ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE 4260: Prerequisite and Corequisites
The faculty in the discipline or, if the college has no faculty member in the discipline, the
faculty in the department are responsible for approving courses and establishing their
associated prerequisites/corequisites as separate actions. The approval of a prerequisite or
corequisite must be based on the determination that it is an appropriate and rational measure
of a student's readiness to enter a degree- applicable credit course or program.
Determinations about prerequisites and corequisites shall be made only on a course-by course
or program-by-program basis, including those establishing communication and computational
skill requirements (per Title 5 §55003(a) and (j), respectively). By August 1 of each year,
MiraCosta College will report to the Chancellor’s Office the prerequisites and corequisites that
were established during the prior academic year. The report will specify the level of scrutiny
used to determine whether the prerequisite or corequisite was necessary and appropriate for
achieving the purpose for which it was established (per Title 5 §55003(i)).
Courses for which prerequisites or corequisites are established will be taught by a qualified
instructor and in accordance with the course outline, particularly those aspects of the course
outline that are the basis for justifying the establishment of the prerequisite or corequisite (per
Title 5 §55003(b)(2) and (3)). The college shall identify prerequisites, corequisites, and
advisories on recommended preparation in the college catalog, each semester’s schedule of
courses, and the course outline of any course for which they are established (per Title 5
§55003(h)).
Establishing Prerequisites and Corequisites
In order to establish a prerequisite or corequisite, the prerequisite or corequisite must be
determined to be necessary and appropriate for achieving the purpose for which it is being
established (per Title 5 §55003(b)(1)). Necessary and appropriate shall be understood to mean
reasonably needed to achieve the purpose that it purports to serve; absolute necessity is not
required (per Title 5 §55000(h)).
Prerequisites and corequisites may be established only for any of the following
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
purposes (per Title 5 §55003(d)):
A. The prerequisite or corequisite is expressly required or expressly authorized by
statute or regulation.
B. The prerequisite will assure that a student has the skills, concepts, and/or information that is
presupposed in terms of the course or program for which it is being established, such that a
student who has not met the prerequisite is highly unlikely to receive a satisfactory grade in
the course (or at least one course within the program) for which the prerequisite is being
established.
C. The corequisite course will assure that a student acquires the necessary skills, concepts,
and/or information, such that a student who has not enrolled in the corequisite is highly
unlikely to receive a satisfactory grade in the course or program for which the corequisite is
being established.
D. The prerequisite or corequisite is necessary to protect the health or safety of a student or
the health and safety of others.
Levels of Scrutiny
The levels of scrutiny required for establishing prerequisites, corequisites, and advisories on
recommended preparation are content review or content review with statistical validation (per
Title 5 §55003(a)).
A. Content review is a rigorous, systematic process conducted by discipline faculty that
identifies the necessary and appropriate body of knowledge or skills students need either to
possess prior to enrolling in a course or to acquire through simultaneous enrollment in a
corequisite course (per Title 5 §55000(c)). At a minimum, content review shall include the
following (per ASCCC):
1. Careful review of the course outline of record (COR) for the target course
2. Review of syllabi, sample exams, assignments, instructional materials, and grading
criteria for the target course
3. Using the CORs of both the target and proposed prerequisite course, identification of
required skills/knowledge students must have prior to enrolling in the target course and
matching those skills/knowledge to the proposed prerequisite course
4. Documentation that verifies the above steps were taken
B. Statistical validation is a compilation of data according to sound research practices that
shows a student is highly unlikely to succeed in the course unless the student has met the
proposed prerequisite or corequisite (per Title 5 §55003(f)). When this level of scrutiny is used,
the college shall follow the guidelines specified in Title 5 §55003(g).
Exemptions from Scrutiny
A prerequisite or corequisite shall be exempt from scrutiny if it satisfies any of the
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
following criteria (per Title 5 §55003(e)):
A. It is required by statute or regulation.
B. It is part of a closely related lecture-laboratory course pairing within a discipline.
C. It is required by four-year institutions.
D. Baccalaureate institutions will not grant credit for a course unless it has the particular
communication or computation skill prerequisite.
Curriculum Review Process
The Courses and Programs Curriculum Committee (CPCC) Committee is responsible for the
curriculum review process, and its membership is determined in a manner that is mutually
agreeable to the college administration and the academic senate [per Title 5 §55002(a)(1)].
C&P reviews and approves the establishment of prerequisites, corequisites, and advisories on
recommended preparation only upon the recommendation of the academic senate except that
the academic senate may delegate this task to CPCC without forfeiting its rights or
responsibilities under Title 5 §§53200-53204.
When content review is used to establish prerequisites or corequisites in reading, written
expression, or mathematics for degree-applicable courses not in a sequence, CPCC will do all of
the following:
A. Provide training to CPCC members on the establishment of corequisites/prerequisites.
B. Inform faculty about the regulations regarding the establishment of corequisites/
prerequisites using content review.
C. Direct faculty to the Office of Institutional Research to do the following: (a) identify courses
that may increase the likelihood of student success with the establishment of a prerequisite or
corequisite; (b) prioritize which courses should be considered for the establishment of new
corequisites or prerequisites; (c) monitor if any disproportionate impact may occur based on
the establishment of a prerequisite or corequisite.
D. Assure through communication with the Office of Instruction that prerequisite courses,
corequisite courses, and courses that do not require prerequisites or corequisites, whether
basic skills or degree-applicable courses, are reasonably available.
Standards for Approval of Prerequisites and Corequisites.
CPCC will review the course outline to determine if a student would be highly unlikely to
receive a satisfactory grade unless the student has knowledge or skills not taught in the
course. CPCC will also review the course outline to determine if success in the course is
dependent upon communication or computation skills, in which case the course shall require
as prerequisites or corequisites eligibility for enrollment in associate degree credit courses in
English and/or mathematics, respectively (per Title 5 §55002(a)(2)(D) and (E)). If a course
requires precollegiate skills in reading, written expression, or mathematics, MiraCosta College
will do the following (per Title 5 §55003(l)):
A. Ensure these courses and sections are offered with reasonable frequency
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
B. Monitor progress on student equity in accordance with Title 5 §54220 as follows:
1. The college will conduct an evaluation to determine if the prerequisite has a
disproportionate impact on student success.
2. Where there is disproportionate impact on any group of students, the college will, in
consultation with the Chancellor, develop and implement a plan setting forth the steps
the district will take to correct the disproportionate impact.
Periodic Review of Prerequisites and Corequisites.
Using an appropriate level of scrutiny, MiraCosta College will review all established CTE
course and program prerequisites, corequisites, and advisories every two years to ensure they
remain necessary and appropriate; all other established course and program prerequisites,
corequisites, and advisories will be reviewed every six years (per Title 5 §55003(b)(4)).
Challenging Corequisites and Prerequisites
Whenever a corequisite course is established, sufficient sections shall be offered to reasonably
accommodate all students who are required to take the corequisite. A corequisite shall be
waived when space in the corequisite course is not available (per Title 5 §55003(m)).
A student may challenge any prerequisite or corequisite by submitting a challenge form at the
time of registration to the Admissions and Records Office. The student will be enrolled in the
requested class if space is available. The department whose course prerequisite is being
challenged will review the challenge, and the student will be notified of the department’s
decision within five working days per AP 5052. If the challenge is denied, the student will be
dropped from the class and refunded all applicable fees (per Title 5 §55003(o)).
Grounds for challenge are as follows (per Title 5 §55003(p)):
A. The prerequisite or corequisite has not been established in accordance with the district’s
process for establishing prerequisites and corequisites
B. The prerequisite or corequisite is in violation of Title 5 §55003
C. The prerequisite or corequisite is either unlawfully discriminatory or is being applied in an
unlawfully discriminatory manner
D. The student has the knowledge or ability to succeed in the course or program despite not
meeting the prerequisite or corequisite
E. The student will be subject to undue delay in attaining the goal of his or her educational plan
because the prerequisite or corequisite course has not been made reasonably available.
Grounds for challenge are as follows (per Title 5 §55003(p)):
A. The prerequisite or corequisite has not been established in accordance with the district’s
process for establishing prerequisites and corequisites
B. The prerequisite or corequisite is in violation of Title 5 §55003
C. The prerequisite or corequisite is either unlawfully discriminatory or is being applied in an
unlawfully discriminatory manner*
D. The student has the knowledge or ability to succeed in the course or program despite not
meeting the prerequisite or corequisite
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
E. The student will be subject to undue delay in attaining the goal of his or her educational plan
because the prerequisite or corequisite course has not been made reasonably available.
*In the case of a challenge that the prerequisite or corequisite is either unlawfully
discriminatory or is being applied in an unlawfully discriminatory manner (see C above), the
district shall promptly advise the student that he or she may file a formal complaint of unlawful
discrimination pursuant to Title 5, subchapter 5 (commencing with section 59300) of chapter
10 of the division. If the student elects to proceed with the challenge, completion of the
challenge procedure shall be deemed to constitute an informal complaint pursuant to section
59327.
SECTION IV. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Describe plans for faculty and staff professional development related to implementation of
SSSP.
MiraCosta College is very focused on professional development for faculty and staff, therefore
in the implementation of the SSSP plan, professional development is evaluated and provided
for a successful implementation. This past year, several professional development
opportunities were provided for counselors and staff to enhance their counseling skills,
including MBTI and STRONG Interest Inventory introductory training, education plan training,
and MyEdPlan software training.
This coming year the college is focusing on Achieving the Dream in helping at-risk students so
additional professional development is necessary for staff and faculty to help students
succeed. Also, counselors will continue the MBTI training to help undecided students select a
major and goal. The institution will also provide support for professional development for
faculty to assist at-risk students with early alert and intervention methods and have faculty and
staff participate in conference sessions and training such as Student Success Conference and
DREAM Conference.
SECTION V. ATTACHMENTS
The following attachments are required:
Attachment A, Student Success and Support Program Plan Participants. Please complete the
form below of all individuals with their job title, who were involved with creating the SSSP Plan.
Attachment B, Organizational Chart. Please attach a copy of your colleges’ organization chart
and highlight the Student Success and Support Program Coordinator’s position. Please include
all positions that work directly in the program providing SSSP services, including those listed in
College: MiraCosta College
District: MiraCosta Community College District
page ______ of ______
the narrative above. If your district has a district SSSP Coordinator in addition to the college
SSSP Coordinator, or other district staff included in your plan, please attach a copy of the
district organization chart and highlight the district SSSP Coordinator's position (if it is not
identified as such on the chart).
Attachment C, SSSP Advisory Committee. Attach a list of the members of the college's SSSP
Advisory Committee. This can be a list of individuals and their positions or simply the positions.
If the committee is chaired by someone other than the SSSP Coordinator, please highlight the
chair on the list of members, and identify the correct name of the committee, (advisory
committee, coordinating council, steering committee, etc.). If the committee has standing or
formalized subcommittees (e.g., SEP, orientation, budget, training, etc.), please list those also.
A D D I T I ON A L I N FORM A TI ON
Questions regarding the development of the college SSSP Plan may be directed to:
Mia Keeley
California Community College Chancellor's Office
[email protected]
(916) 323-5953
STUDENT EQUITY PLAN
2015-2018
Executive Summary
The Student Equity Plan assesses outcomes in what the Board of Governors policy on student
equity has defined as five key success indicators: access, course completion, ESL and basic skills
completion, degree and certificate completion, and transfer. Specifically, the indicators are
defined as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
Access: The percentage of each population group that is enrolled compared to that group’s
representation in the adult population within the community served. This percentage is
frequently calculated as a participation rate.
Course Completion: The ratio of the number of credit courses that students, by population
group, successfully complete (A, B, C, or P) compared to the number of courses in which
students in that group are enrolled on the census day of the Fall term.
ESL and Basic Skills Completion: The ratio of the number of students by population group
who successfully complete the related degree-applicable course within 6 years after having
begun the ESL or Basic Skills sequence.
Degree and Certificate Completion: The ratio of the number of students who complete at
least 6 units and attempt at least 1 math or English course by population group and
subsequently receive a degree or certificate within 6 years of starting to the number of
students in that group with a goal of degree or certificate completion.
Transfer: The ratio of the number of students by population group who transfer or become
transfer-prepared, to the number of students in that group with a goal of transfer.
Target populations are identified through an analysis of indicator data for the following
subgroups: ethnicity, gender, age, disability status, economically disadvantaged, veterans, and
foster youth (Title 5, §54220). In 2014 the MiraCosta College Student Equity Committee
convened to develop a three-year plan tied to statewide allocated funds ($437,000). To
determine disproportionate impact, MiraCosta College employed the Proportionality Equity
Index established by the University of Southern California Center for Urban Education to measure
a specific group’s proportion of all students who reached a given successful outcome compared
to that group’s proportion of the starting cohort. Any indexes below a 1.0 were identified as a
possible disproportionate impact. Signature activities from the plan’s inaugural year that
demonstrated a high level of success include:
•
•
•
•
•
GEAR UP for College! Summer Program: yielding a 97% success rate for 57 enrolled high school
students in summer Communication 101 courses
Pathways to 21st Century Careers: promoting college awareness and a college going culture at
local Title I schools, over 180 5th grade students participated in a careers research project to
develop lyrics to songs that through partnerships with MiraCosta College Recording Arts students
produced several performances at promotion ceremonies and at a MiraCosta College gala in the
concert hall
Samoan Cultural Festival: part of a series of city-wide events in July, MiraCosta College served as
the host kickoff event with over 500 participants celebrating Samoan culture on campus
Alignment of Academic Success and Equity programs (Puente, RAFFY, FYE, and Umoja) through
the hiring of a Student Services Coordinator serving all programs
Hiring of a Director of Student Equity to oversee equity efforts
Due to revisions of the plan template and additional reporting requirements from the Statewide
Chancellor’s Office, an updated 2015-2018 plan was required to improve academic outcomes for
targeted groups. The revision presented an opportunity to look at updated data as well as
revamp goals to focus on enhancing current efforts that have proved to have high success for
target groups in addition to establishing new ones. In addition to the Proportionality Equity
Index, this year’s plan utilizes a new metric, Percentage Point Gap, as an additional tool for
determining disproportionate impact for all indicators except Access. Percentage Point Gap
analysis compares each disaggregated subgroups’ “success rates” with the success rates of the
overall group. A negative gap indicates the focal group is below average and may be experiencing
disproportionate impact. Acknowledging institutional responsibility to ensure success for all
MiraCosta College students, this plan represents the college's ongoing commitment toward
removing barriers and creating pathways to student success.
The success indicators addressed in this Student Equity Plan reflect essential findings including: target groups, equity index/PPG,
goal and goal year, and activities:
SUCCESS
INDICATOR
TARGET GROUPS
ACCESS
Veterans (.53
equity index)
Native
Hawaiian/Pacific
Islander
Economically
Disadvantaged
(.13 equity index)
EQUITY
INDEX
PERCENTAGE
POINT GAP
GOAL & GOAL
YEAR
.53
Increase index to
.65 by 2018
.83
Increase index to
.95 by 2018
.13
Increase index to
.25 by 2018
COURSE
ESL/BASIC SKILLS
COMPLETION COMPLETION
LGBTQIA
Males
Black/AfricanAmerican
Hispanic/Latino
Intensify outreach to veteran students, veterans’
organizations, and veterans’ service centers to improve
transition to college
Strengthen outreach to Native Hawaiian Pacific Islander
(NHPI) communities, particularly in the northern part of
the district.
Create a program that connects economically
disadvantaged students from Title I schools to MiraCosta
College
Investigate the extent of LGBTQIA access gaps through
survey analysis, snowball sampling, and focus groups
and develop targeted outreach tactics based on findings.
.98
2.4% below
average
Reduce gap to 1% Focus expanded efforts in Umoja and Puente towards
by 2018
male students
.89
8.7% below
average
Reduce gap to 3% Expand the Umoja Program to offer students enhanced
by 2018
support services.
.94
4.0% below
average
Reduce gap to 2% Expand the Puente Project to offer students enhanced
by 2018
support services
5.9% below
Avg.
Reduce gap to 2% Pilot alternative placement in ESL/English utilizing high
by 2018
school transcripts
.2% below
average
Eliminate gap by
2018
ESL
.8
Males
ACTIVITIES
Math
1.0
Scale the Bridge to Success program to serve all basic
skills math students
Males of Color
TRANSFER
DEGREE &
CERTIFICATE
COMPLETION
(Asian
Black/AfricanAmerican
Filipino
Hispanic/Latino
Native
American/Alaska
Native
Pacific
Islander/Native
Hawaiian)
English
.8
(aggrega
6.3% below
average
te)
4.0% below
average
Scale accelerated English courses to assist students with
basic skills English course completion and progression
Reduce gap to 3%
by 2018
Implement best practices for embedded and intrusive
counseling/advising in pre-transfer courses
Math
Reduce gap to 2%
by 2018
.9
2.5% below
average
Males
Alaskan
Native/Native
American
Hispanic/Latino
Black/AfricanAmerican
Native
Hawaiian/Pacific
Islander
.9
.3
.9
.9
.7
Reduce gap to
1.25% by 2018
16.6% below
average
7.5% below
average
7.1% below
average
15.6% below
average
Implement institution-wide professional development
opportunities for instructional faculty, particularly those
teaching basic skills math and English courses, to learn
about key strategies teaching men of color
Providing counseling services for students outside of
traditional office setting including providing intrusive
mobile counseling at highly populated student areas on
campus.
Create a professional development conference to learn
about, evaluate, and adopt effective practices when it
comes to addressing degree and certification
completion by male students.
Develop a research agenda and conduct relevant
qualitative and quantitative research to further assess
gaps in equity for men.
Develop a cultural club for Alaskan Native/Native
Reduce gap to 8%
American students that is connected to
by 2018
counseling/advising
Reduce gap to 3% Expand the Puente Project to offer students enhanced
by 2018
support services
Eliminate gap by
Expand the Umoja Program to offer students enhanced
2018
support services.
Create a community based cohort program that
Reduce gap to 5%
increases transfer and transfer velocity for NHPI
by 2018
students
Detailed in the activities implementation plan section, identified activities were based on
researched effective practices and data demonstrating successful programs that could be
enhanced at MiraCosta College. Also detailed are methods of evaluation for each activity to
continually assess progress towards the identified goal and goal year. Activities are aligned with
current strategies identified through the Student Success and Support Program, Basic Skills
Initiative, and Achieving the Dream initiative.
The college has moved toward institutionalizing work around Student Equity by incorporating it
as one of three foci of the Student Success Committee, part of the college’s governance
structure. This ensures that work around Student Equity is integrated with the other two foci,
the Basic Skills Initiative and Student Success and Support Program. Dialogue will be ongoing
with regular evaluation of goals and activities designed to ultimately improve student success at
MiraCosta College. The college identifies issues related to student diversity and equity as a
priority through Board Policy and Administrative Procedure 5300 "Student Equity” and is in the
process of adopting the following Equity and Inclusion statement for the college:
MiraCosta College is committed to providing a strong, supportive, and authentic environment
where difference is valued, respected, encouraged, and honored; where all faculty, staff, and
students experience a sense of belonging and the freedom to express themselves, and where
their experiences are recognized and valued.
MiraCosta College strives to be a model for equity and inclusion. The college is committed to
providing opportunities for engagement both across the campus and within the communities
the college serves. The college seeks to remove barriers to learning, participation, and success,
with a focus on changing procedures and practices that disproportionately affect certain
groups.
Anchored in a culture of evidence, MiraCosta promotes increased awareness and appreciation
of individual, collective, and intersecting identities within our diverse society and acknowledges
that different students learn in different and unique ways.
Resources are budgeted through the college’s general fund, categorical programs, and grantfunded program focused on addressing student equity. Additionally, allocated monies from the
California State Legislature will be utilized to implement identified goals and activities in this
plan.
Noncredit
Student Success and Support Program Plan
2015-16
Report Due Postmarked By
Friday
October 30, 2015
Email PDF of completed plan to:
[email protected]
and
Mail signature page with original signatures to:
Patty Falero, Student Services and Special Programs Division
California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office
1102 Q Street, Suite 4554
Sacramento, CA 95811-6549
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 1
SECTION I. SIGNATURE PAGE
College/Noncredit Adult Education Program: _MiraCosta College Community Education___
District Name: ____MiraCosta Community College District_______________________
We certify that noncredit SSSP funds will be expended in accordance with the provisions of
Chapter 2 (commencing with section 55500) of Division 6 of title 5 of the California Code of
Regulations and the SSSP Funding Guidelines.
_Shannon Ilas, Interim Noncredit SSSP Coordinator________________________________
Noncredit SSSP Director/Coordinator (Typed Name/Title and Signature)
Phone:_760.757.2121 ext. 8753____ Email: [email protected]
Date: ______________
_Nikki Schaper, Ed.D., Interim Dean, Behavioral Sciences, History and Community Education
Noncredit SSSP Supervising Administrator (Typed Name/Title and Signature)
Phone:760.795.8701____________Email:[email protected]_____Date: _________
_Charlie Ng__________________________________________________ Date: _________
Chief Business Officer (Typed Name and Signature)
_Miki Fino___________________________________________________ Date: _________
Academic Senate President (Typed Name and Signature)
_Sunita Cooke________________________________________________ Date: _________
Chief Executive Officer (Typed Name and Signature)
Contact information for person preparing the plan:
Name: _Shannon Ilas_______________________ Title: Interim Noncredit SSSP Coordinator
Email: [email protected]_____________________ Phone: _760-7572121 ext 8753
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 2
SECTION II. NONCREDIT STUDENT SUCCESS AND SUPPORT PROGRAM SERVICES
Directions: Describe the approach your college or noncredit adult education program is
taking to meet its responsibilities under title 5 for the following noncredit SSSP services: (1)
orientation; (2) assessment and placement; (3) counseling, advising, preparation of the
Noncredit Student Education Plan (NSEP) and other education planning services; and (4)
follow-up and other services. Please provide concise responses for each numbered item
listed in each section. As you enter your responses, the document will expand to
accommodate the information provided. Please refer to the SSSP Handbook for more
information on title 5 requirements.
You must report projected expenditures related to these items in the budget plan. Include all
staff costs (salaries and benefits) for each position and the direct cost to purchase, develop or
maintain technology tools specifically for all core services detailed below.
IIa.
Core Services
i.
Orientation
Title 5, section 55521, requires orientation to include the topics listed below. Any orientation
that does not include the topics listed in title 5 is not eligible for SSSP funding. General
outreach activities are also not eligible for this funding.
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
Academic expectations and progress standards pursuant to section 55031.
Maintaining registration priority pursuant to section 58108.
Prerequisite or co-requisite challenge process pursuant to section 55003.
Description of available programs, support services, and campus facilities, and how
they can be accessed.
Academic calendar and important timeline.
Registration and costs related to attendance.
Available education planning services.
Other issues, policies, and procedures determined necessary to provide a
comprehensive orientation to students.
1. Give a brief and specific overview of your orientation services or plans for
developing and implementing these services.
MiraCosta College provides different orientation sessions for its various programs, depending
on program needs. This section outlines the different programs, provides a brief overview of
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 3
current orientation procedures, and summarizes plans for examining or implementing
changes in these services.
Adult High School (AHS)
Once students have completed an application (online or in-person), they are required to
attend an in-person orientation. The orientation PowerPoint presentation includes information
on courses available, fees for books and parking, academic and support services, the
different methods for earning adult high school credits, the steps to transfer to higher
education, and other campus policies and procedures. The presentation also is available on
the AHS website. A comprehensive online orientation is currently being developed, with the
goal of implementing this online option in fall of 2016. As part of matriculation, the new
student orientation is offered during registration week prior to the beginning of each of the five
terms. The orientation complies with section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act and ADA
standards.
English as a Second Language (ESL)
The orientation process includes completing an application in person or online, listening to a
presentation about the noncredit ESL program, taking the placement test, and being placed
into one of seven levels of ESL instruction. The whole process takes approximately 2.5
hours. The orientation presentation informs students about classes, support services such as
tutoring and counseling, options for further education after completion of the noncredit ESL
program, and general campus policies and procedures. The presentation is available on the
ESL website for future reference. The college is in the process of making its website and
online orientation more visible and user-friendly; as such, improvements will include audio
support, a translation tool, and ADA-compliant access to information.
Short-Term Vocational
Students interested in noncredit Cisco Academy courses apply online or in person. In-person
orientation occurs during the first class meeting. A more formalized orientation, which will be
compliant with Title V, is being developed for use in fall 2016.
2. Describe the student audience and estimate the number to be served.
The MiraCosta Community College District includes Oceanside, Carlsbad, La Costa,
Encinitas, Olivenhain, Rancho Santa Fe, Cardiff by the Sea, Solana Beach, Del Mar, and
Carmel Valley. The student population in the noncredit program is approximately 3,500.
The total 2014-2015 unduplicated enrollment was 2,969 with an average enrollment of 3,460
from 2010 to spring 2015. In 2014-2015, a majority (66%) of students were female and 44%
of students were classified as Hispanic/Latino, with the next largest classification of student
MiraCosta Community College District 4
MiraCosta College
race being White (38%). Also in 2014-2015, 30% of students were 29 years of age and
younger and 29% of students were 65 years and older.
Programs discussed in this document take place primarily at the MiraCosta College
Community Learning Center (CLC), a 7.8-acre campus located in the urban hub of downtown
Oceanside. The CLC is approximately seven miles from the MiraCosta College Oceanside
campus and approximately 16 miles from the MiraCosta College San Elijo campus; both the
Oceanside and San Elijo campuses house the majority of the college’s credit classes and
programs.
Figure 1: Enrollment (2010-2015)
Unduplicated
Fall
Overall
Head-count
Fall
2010
Fall
2011
Spring
Overall
Annual
Overall
Spring
2011
2010-2011
4,494
Spring
2012
2011-2012
3,284
Fall
2012
2,265
Spring
2013
2,337
2012-2013
3,344
Fall
2013
2,216
Spring
2014
2,255
2013-2014
3,212
Fall
2014
2,060
Spring
2015
2,085
2014-2015
2,969
Annual
Overall
Figure 2: Total Program Enrollments (2010-2015)
Program
Enrollment
Fall
Overall
Spring
Overall
Fall
2010
Spring
2011
2010-2011
10,577
Fall
2011
Spring
2012
2011-2012
7,558
Fall
2012
3,617
Spring
2013
3,739
2012-2013
7,356
Fall
2013
3,590
Spring
2014
3,803
2013-2014
7,394
MiraCosta Community College District 5
MiraCosta College
Fall
2014
3,335
Spring
2015
3,379
Figure 3: Enrollments by Program (2014-2015)
Program
Fall 2014
Spring 2015
Adult High School
683
687
ESL
823
767
Noncredit (Other)
1280
1272
Vocational
244
297
Figure 4: Student Age (2014-2015)
Age
Overall
17 and Under
2%
18-20
10%
21-24
9%
25-29
9%
30-34
9%
35-39
6%
40-44
6%
45-54
11%
55-64
10%
65 and Over
29%
Figure 5: Student Gender (2014-2015)
Gender
Overall
Female
66%
2014-2015
6,714
MiraCosta Community College District 6
MiraCosta College
Male
34%
Figure 6: Student Ethnicity (2014-2015)
Ethnicity
Overall
Black or African American
3%
American Indian or Alaska Native
0%
Asian
10%
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 0%
Hispanic / Latino
44%
Two or More Races
1%
Unknown
4%
White
38%
The target audience for the noncredit Student Success and Support Program (SSSP) Plan
are new incoming, non-exempt MiraCosta College students. Based on the past three years of
enrollment numbers, the college expects to serve an estimate of 1500 new noncredit
students in an academic year.
3. Describe the delivery methods (in groups, in person, online, etc.) and activities that
will be provided.
Currently, orientations for all programs are conducted in groups during registration and
separated by program (AHS and ESL), or on the first day of class (Cisco). Counselors
provide the AHS presentation and ESL faculty provide the ESL presentation. However, in
order to provide more integrated service, counselors will begin providing the ESL orientation
in spring 2016. This will create familiarity and a consistent message across programs.
MiraCosta College Continuing Education programs are developing new, interactive online
orientations, which will cover all of the policies and procedures required by title 5 section
55521. According to the Noncredit Survey, conducted in spring 2015, students stated they
would like more guidance and support during the registration process. In response, during
fall 2015 orientation, student ambassadors and faculty were present to greet students,
answer questions, and provide refreshments while students waited for counseling
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 7
appointments. The intent of this change was to establish a welcoming, encouraging
atmosphere.In spring 2016 student ambassadors will be on hand the first day of class to help
students find classes as well. Noncredit programs will also look into providing professional
development opportunities for support staff, faculty, and student ambassadors involved in
orientation.
4. Describe any partnerships among colleges or with high school districts, workforce
agencies, or other community partners that assist with providing orientation.
As members of the Coastal North County Adult Education Consortium (CNCAEC), MiraCosta
College personnel meet regularly with San Dieguito Union High School District (SDUHSD)
administrators. The college worked very closely with SDUHSD to identify and communicate
with potential students and to coordinate student access to matriculation at Sunset High
School in Encinitas. The college anticipates that, as it expands classes pursuant to the adult
education block grant (AEBG) regional plan, it will also expand matriculation services
proportionately. In addition, an outreach team has identified six area community centers and
has been working diligently with each center to provide information about MiraCosta
College’s programs. Attendance has already increased due to these outreach efforts.
5. Include at what point in the enrollment process orientation is provided.
New student orientation is offered during registration week, prior to the beginning of each of
the five terms. Faculty and staff conducted a noncredit survey and gap analysis, which
indicated a need for on-demand testing and orientation. Once online orientation modules
have been developed, those modules will be available to students 24 hours a day, thus
encouraging student access and reducing the overflow of students during peak registration
times. Students will be able to watch the orientation before coming for assessment or during
the registration process. The noncredit research analyst will be conducting further focus
groups to highlight best practices and further determine students’ needs.
AHS
For AHS students, the enrollment process begins with an application, followed by
assessment, orientation, and then counseling. Orientation is mandatory: Students must
complete orientation before they can see a counselor or enroll in courses. Efforts are
underway to examine the order and timing of the enrollment process to maximize
effectiveness and better meet student needs.
ESL
For ESL students, the process is similar to AHS orientation. The only difference is ESL
students first complete the application, then listen to orientation, take an assessment test,
and are placed into classes.
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 8
Short-Term Vocational
For Short-Term Vocational classes, orientation takes place on the first day of class.
6. Include information on awareness and prevention programs on campus sexual
violence consistent with requirements of the federal Clery Act and the Violence
Against Women Act.
The college has developed an annual educational campaign consisting of presentations;
educational materials distributed during new student and employee orientations, respectively;
and district-wide events. The events have primarily taken place on the credit campuses, but
plans are underway to extend events, services, and training to the CLC. For example,
instructors received information during department meetings about resources and upcoming
events for fall 2015. Information is also distributed at college hour and students have been
invited to participate in various awareness events throughout campus.
A sexual assault awareness steering committee has convened at the request of Sheri Wright,
director of HR and Title IX coordinator. This steering committee is composed of faculty, staff,
administration, and students who collaboratively plan district-wide awareness events and
workshops for the 2015-2016 academic year. In addition to planning awareness events, the
college is also developing sexual assault educational materials for campus-wide faculty use.
Furthermore, campus police provide rape aggression defense training.
MiraCosta College has also developed the Campus Assessment, Response and Evaluation
(CARE) program. The CARE team takes proactive approaches to maintaining a safe campus
environment and otherwise helping students succeed. The CARE program’s mission is to
provide a systematic response to students whose behavior is perceived as harmful to
themselves, to others, or to the community. While MiraCosta College does provide students
limited mental health services, with appropriate referrals, the college also provides students
with additional mental health intervention and services.
The college has purchased a student discipline software management system (Maxient),
which has allowed for rapid reporting and accurate recording of incidents that occur at any
MiraCosta Community College District site.
7. Describe any commercial technology or in-house products, as well as any annual
subscriptions or other requirements for these products. Be sure to include these
items in the table below.
For data reporting purposes, MiraCosta College noncredit programs use SARS to record
adult high school orientations. The college plans to add orientation data for ESL by spring
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 9
2016 and Short-Term Vocational by fall 2016. All orientation and registration documents are
stored in student files, but, beginning fall 2015, these documents will be scanned and
uploaded to iLINX, a cloud-based program that will allow staff and counselors to access the
student’s information at any time. In addition, iContact, a cloud-based email program, is used
to send important reminders about deadlines and upcoming events to current students.
8. List all staff costs in the table below for each position providing these services. List
any other orientation-related expenditures that are included and clearly cross
referenced in your noncredit SSSP budget plan.
See the Chancellor's Office Budget and Accounting Manual for more detail on expenditure
codes. Indicate if the items listed are paid for with SSSP funds or match. You may add
additional rows as necessary.
9. Identify the staff providing or supporting orientation services and provide a brief,
one-sentence statement of their role in orientation. Please add rows as necessary.
Title
Dean of Behavioral
Sciences, History &
Community Education,
Instruction
Coordinator, Noncredit
Student Success and
Student Support
Noncredit Counselors
ESL Faculty
Noncredit Support
Supervisor
Support Staff
Instructional Aides
Research Analyst
Systems Analyst
Role
Plans, assigns, and provides administrative support in testing
and enrollment processes
Coordinates and facilitates SSSP activities, schedules and
supports counselors for orientation
Delivers in-person adult high school orientation sessions and is
responsible for adult high school orientation script; uses SARS to
record data
Delivers in-person ESL orientation sessions and is responsible
for ESL orientation script
Plans and oversees support staff during registration and
orientation activities
Assists with check in, transcript evaluation (AHS), scanning, and
registration
Assists with logistical implementation of registration sessions
Conducts research to determine best practices for orientation
Works with Office of Institutional Effectiveness to create data
dashboard and generate reports
MiraCosta College
ii.
MiraCosta Community College District 10
Assessment and Placement
1. Give a brief and specific overview of the assessment process for noncredit
students. Include a description of the test preparation that is available.
Adult High School (AHS)
Currently, AHS students are informed that they will take a reading comprehension test during
registration sessions, and the Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE) is identified in the
Community Education Bulletin. Free, web-based TABE test preparation resources are also
listed on the Testing Services and AHS home pages.
AHS students begin the TABE test as a group and then wait for results. The test is timed (50
minutes); students with a verified disability or ESL-related needs are given 75 minutes to
complete the test. Once the testing session has finished, support staff score the Scantron
tests. Students meet with counselors to discuss the results and are placed appropriately into
classes.
English as a Second Language (ESL)
At ESL orientation/registration sessions, students are told they will take a listening and
reading test to determine their placement into a class that best meets their needs. Students
have as much time as they need to take the test, but all students hear the audio at the same
time for the listening portion. After students complete the test, it is scored, and students meet
with a faculty member who provides them with their placement information (level, classroom
number). While the college does not provide test preparation, CASAS sample test items are
available online at https://www.casas.org/product-overviews/curriculum-managementinstruction/sample-test-items. The ESL department plans to include this information on its
website and in the online orientation. The CASAS tests include at least two practice
questions to orient students to the test. If their educational goals include acquiring their adult
high school diploma or GED, students in ESL Level 7, the transitions course, have the
opportunity to take the TABE, the AHS placement test, during week 7 of each 8-week term.
Short-Term Vocational
There is no formal placement testing required. Students may select courses online or in
person.
2. Describe the student audience, including an estimate of the annual number of
students to be assessed and a description of who is required to be assessed.
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 11
MiraCosta College anticipates that approximately 500 AHS and 1000 ESL new students will
need to be assessed each academic year.
3. Identify any assessment test(s) used for placement into English, mathematics, and
ESL courses or any other noncredit course or program. Provide specific
information about any second-party tests, including the versions and forms used.
Describe which tests and services are offered online, in person, individually or in
groups, etc., and indicate when tests were approved by the CCCCO and what type
of approval was granted. Indicate when disproportionate impact and consequential
validity studies were completed.
Adult High School (AHS)
Students interested in the AHS diploma take the TABE and must earn a minimum score of
516 to enroll in AHS. Testing Center proctors from the MiraCosta College Oceanside campus
administer the TABE at the Community Learning Center. Students take only the reading
comprehension portion of the exam in the paper-and-pencil format. TABE testing takes place
shortly before the start of each term, and there are approximately 20 group testing sessions
per year. Students with scores between 426 and 515 are directed to Adult Basic Education
(ABE) courses. AHS students may also take the MiraCosta College placement test
(COMPASS) to determine college preparedness and placement within the AHS program and
college programs. COMPASS testing takes place at the CLC six to ten times per year;
students may also obtain a referral from a noncredit counselor to take the test at the
MiraCosta College Oceanside campus, if the Oceanside campus offers more suitable
appointment times that fit a particular student’s needs.
With the intent of examining assessment processes and decreasing wait times for counseling
appointments, the college is beginning to explore options for implementing online or e-testing
adaptive testing. Furthermore, through a gap analysis of the current needs for noncredit
programs, the Noncredit SSSP Advisory Committee plans to convert a classroom space into
a testing center. At this time, neither on-demand testing nor adaptive testing is available to
students participating in assessment tests; as such, students who are unable to attend during
registration week must wait the full eight weeks of the term before taking the test. This is a
significant barrier to student success. Therefore, dedicated space, equipment, materials and
personnel to create a new testing center will give students greater access to assessment
services. The Noncredit SSSP Advisory Committee will work with student services to develop
and implement the creation of such a center.
No disproportionate impact or consequential validity studies have been completed for the
TABE assessment tool. To fulfill the requirement to use a California Community College
Chancellor’s Office-approved assessment tool, AHS will be converting to the CASAS 80
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 12
appraisal test by spring 2016. CASAS was approved in 2014 and is in probationary status.
CASAS completed disproportionate impact or consequential validity studies and submitted
the results when the Chancellor’s Office approved the test for use.
Disproportionate impact, consequential validity and cut score studies are conducted by the
larger college on the required three-year cycle for Compass ESL, Compass English, and four
levels of the MDTP mathematics assessment. While noncredit (and specifically AHS)
students are not at the center of these studies, they are included. Limited information on this
can be obtained through the district’s Office of Institutional Effectiveness.
English as a Second Language (ESL)
The MiraCosta College Noncredit ESL program uses the CASAS 20 appraisal placement
instrument. CASAS testing is conducted during each of the five annual group registration
sessions, and pre- and post-test scores are collected during the first and seventh weeks of
each term. ESL students will begin taking the CASAS Appraisal Form 80 in spring 2016. ESL
faculty are researching the use of etesting for their students and will possibly offer that as an
option in the near future.
Short-Term Vocational
An assessment test is not used for placement.
4. Describe what multiple measures are used, how they are integrated into the
assessment system (as part of an algorithm included in the test scoring process,
applied by counselors, used on their own without a test, etc.) and how they meet
the multiple measures requirement per title 5, sections 55502 and 55522.
Adult High School (AHS)
AHS students take only the reading comprehension portion of the TABE; these test results
combine with other multiple measures to determine AHS class placement. The multiple
measures used include, but are not limited to: high school transcripts, work experience, years
reported since the student last attended an academic program, and other information shared
with the counselor during the counseling/advising session.
As stated in response to question number three of this document’s previous section, students
must score above 516 on the TABE to be eligible for AHS. Because this assessment
measures only reading and not mathematics or writing ability, students self-report on many
other multiple measures before being advised on English and math courses. These reports
and multiple measures, however, are also used to place students in appropriate classes in all
other AHS disciplines.
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 13
Finally, in some cases, and based on these multiple measures, AHS students may be
advised to take credit classes, which will enable them to meet their diploma, personal, and/or
career goals. These multiple measures are also applied when counselors assist students with
education planning in general and, more specifically, the selection of other courses.
This method of advising and use of multiple measures will be revisited when the AHS
changes assessment tools.
English as a Second Language (ESL)
In noncredit ESL, the cut scores provided by CASAS for both the reading and listening
portions of the CASAS Appraisal test are used.
Short-Term Vocational
Because the Short-Term Vocational Program does not use an assessment, this question
does not apply.
5. Describe the policy on the acceptance of student assessment scores and
placement results from colleges within a multi-college district, from colleges
outside of the district, or from adult education programs.
Adult High School (AHS)
Currently, the AHS program does not accept assessment scores or other placement results
from outside programs as a means for placement within AHS. AHS Students who have
outside assessments scores may have them included in their student file, but all incoming
students are required to take the program’s assessment test before they can enroll in
courses.
As the program re-evaluates the current assessment tool and moves towards use of the
CASAS 80 appraisal test, cut scores will need to be determined and correlation with other
assessment tools should be examined in an effort to make the matriculation process more
seamless for students moving from one noncredit program to another, or from one noncredit
credit program to a credit program. Outside assessments scores that may be considered for
acceptance into the program are: Reading and/or writing scores from other programs, college
readiness assessment tools used at the K-12s (EAP exams, for example), placement test
results from other community colleges, and/or GED test results in English.
English as a Second Language (ESL)
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 14
For ESL, the college requires new students to take the CASAS placement instrument and
does not accept placement results from other colleges or adult education programs.
6. How are the policies and practices on re-takes and recency made available to
students?
Adult High School (AHS)
Incoming AHS students who do not earn a TABE score of 516 may retake the test one
additional time during the same registration cycle. If they do not earn at least a scored of 516
on the second attempt, they may retest during a subsequent registration cycle, but will be
advised to enroll in ABE 90 (Reading) or ABE 94 (Writing). The TABE is administered at the
end of each term in both ABE courses, regardless of the number of times students have
taken the course. There are two versions of the test, which instructors alternate from term to
term.
Students who have discontinued enrolling in AHS classes for four consecutive terms (one
year) may opt to retake the TABE test for placement, but this is not currently required. If a
student has not enrolled in AHS classes for more than two years and reading scores are
available, that student is not required to retake the assessment test.
English as a Second Language (ESL)
In noncredit ESL, students who have discontinued taking classes for longer than one year
may re-take the CASAS placement test.
7. Describe any additional commercial technology or in-house products used for
assessment and placement, as well as any annual subscriptions or other
requirements for these products. Be sure to include these items in the table below.
Students use a Scantron sheet for TABE appraisal. The results are scanned and shared with
the students. MiraCosta College is looking into online testing with the CASAS Appraisal 80.
8. List all staff costs in the table below for each position providing these services. List any
other assessment-related expenditures that are included and clearly cross referenced in
your noncredit SSSP budget plan. Indicate if the items listed are paid for with SSSP funds
or match. You may add additional rows as necessary.
9. Identify the staff providing or supporting assessment services and provide a brief,
one-sentence statement of their role. Please add rows as necessary.
MiraCosta College
Title
Dean of Behavioral
Sciences, History &
Community Education,
Instruction
Coordinator, Noncredit
Student Success and
Student Support
A & R supervisor
Program aide
Instructional aides
Research analyst
Systems analyst
iii.
1.
MiraCosta Community College District 15
Role
Plans, assigns, and provides administrative support in testing
and enrollment processes.
Coordinates and facilitates SSSP activities, schedules and
supports counselors for orientation
Plans and oversees support staff during registration and
orientation activities
Provides assessment and proctoring services support, rotating
between campus locations
Provides assessment and proctoring support during peak testing
periods
Conducts research to determine best practices for orientation
Works with Office of Institutional Effectiveness to create
noncredit data dashboard and generate reports
Counseling, Advising, and Student Education Planning
Give a brief and specific overview of the process and service delivery methods for
noncredit students for:
● Counseling
● Advising
● Development of the Noncredit Student Education Plan (NSEP) 1.
Counseling and Advising
Abbreviated student education plans (NSEP) are created during the initial AHS student
counseling/advising session. These initial plans are one term long and include the basic
courses deemed appropriate for moving the student toward his or her academic goals.
Currently, support staff maintain hard copies of NSEPs for AHS students; however, plans are
underway to utilize myEdPlan, which will electronically store and provide counselors with
easy access to AHS plans during follow-up counseling appointments. This will also allow
1
The Noncredit Student Education Plan (NSEP) is designed specifically for nonexempt, noncredit
students who enroll to earn diplomas or career technical certificates, enhance skills, maintain a
certificate or license, or participate in career pathways. This plan is distinguished from the
comprehensive and abbreviated plans provided to credit students; however, it is currently accounted
for as a comprehensive plan under element SS01 in the MIS.
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 16
counselors to plan for more than one term and map out a clear pathway for students to
graduate. In addition, ESL, AHS faculty, counselors, and Admissions and Records will work
together to create a Registration Readiness Checklist on SURF, which will assist students
with the matriculation process.
Counseling
Individual Appointments
During individual appointments, counselors provide support and guidance in areas such as
personal counseling, time management, decision making, and stress management.
Counselors also work with students to explore career options, identify related degree and
certificate programs, and set educational and career goals. Counselors refer students to
other support services, when appropriate. Counselors also assist students with paperwork
such as graduation applications, petitions, and transfer process material. When students are
ready to transition to credit, counselors guide students through the credit program application
and assessment process.
Individual appointment data is stored in the SARS appointment database. Through e-mail
messages and faculty announcements, AHS, ESL Level 7, and Short-Term Vocational
students are prompted to schedule an appointment with a counselor to manage or prepare
for the following: course registration, transfer planning, and academic standing. Currently,
students are able to make appointments in-person or by phone.
Online Advising
Online advising is currently offered to AHS students and is accessed through the AHS home
page. This service will be expanded when links are added to the ESL and Short-Term
Vocational home pages. Current and prospective students can email any noncredit counselor
independent of the counseling department’s home pages.
Development of the Noncredit Student Education Plan (NSEP)
Adult High School (AHA)
The noncredit counseling department is researching methods to create the NSEP. Currently,
counselors use the Progress Evaluation Form (AHS students only), which may include any
credit earned at an outside institution; this process helps to determine the course of study
required to earn a high school diploma. A more comprehensive form is being developed. One
option being reviewed is My Edplan, which would electronically outline specific objectives and
responsibilities for the student and the counselor and, thus, increase accountability of both
parties. The NSEP is used to guide each student in course planning, track the student’s
progress through coursework completion, and facilitate referrals to appropriate support
services.
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 17
English as a Second Language (ESL)
ESL students are placed in classes for a term and informally set goals as class exercises, but
a formal NSEP will be developed.
Short-Term Vocational
Short-Term vocational students are given the sequence of courses needed for their
certificates, but a more formalized NSEP will be developed.
2.
Describe the student audience and estimate the number to be provided services.
Based on the past three years of enrollment numbers, the college expects to serve an
average of 1,500 new noncredit students in an academic year.
3.
Describe any partnerships among colleges, high school districts, adult education
programs, workforce agencies, or other community partners that assist with
counseling, advising or education planning.
All counseling, advising, and education planning takes place within MiraCosta College
departments and facilities. As part of its membership in an adult education consortium,
however, MiraCosta College has contracted with BW Research, an outside agency that
provides data on regional labor markets and employer needs. As such, the college considers
this data when programs are being planned and implemented. Conducted in 2015, a
noncredit student survey identified a need for peer mentors trained to assist students as they
transition to credit and career training programs. Noncredit faculty will work with student
ambassadors to identify noncredit program graduates who might be appropriate for the peer
mentor role. In addition, faculty in credit and noncredit departments have expressed an
interest in working together so that students can successfully bridge from one program to
another.
4.
Describe at what points in the student’s academic pathway these services are
provided.
Adult High School (AHS)
Advisement and counseling occurs before each term and as needed by students during the
term. Also during the term, noncredit counselors offer workshops on education planning and
career search techniques.
English as a Second Language (ESL)
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 18
During each new student orientation, all ESL students receive information on educational and
employment pathways. In addition, in ESL Level 6, ESL Level 7, and Vocational ESL, students
receive more detailed guidance on educational and employment pathways. The noncredit
counseling department is creating a means to provide all students formalized individual
noncredit education plans; these plans will be discussed with students when they meet with
their counselors during the orientation/registration process.
Short-Term Vocational
Currently, MiraCosta College does not track student course completion for Cisco or other
computer courses, but the college is working on a means to track student progress. Counseling
and workshops are available to any Cisco student requesting additional career assistance.
Describe the adequacy of student access to counseling and advising services.
Indicate whether appointments are required and the average wait time for an
appointment and for drop-in counseling, if it is available.
5.
Appointments are required for all students. If a counselor is available at the time the student
is making the appointment, the student can be added to the counselor’s schedule and seen
right away. Appointments can often be made for the same day or within the next few days. A
counselor is available during most hours of operation, from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Monday
through Thursday.
According to feedback received from students and counselors alike, however, appointments
longer than 15 minutes are often needed. The need for intake training has been identified,
and procedures are being developed so front office staff can determine the length of the
appointment needed and schedule it accordingly. Thirty-minute appointments, 15-minute
appointments, and drop-in appointments may be made available, depending on what options
will better meet student needs.
Describe any use of academic or paraprofessional advising.
6.
Noncredit counselors also provide academic and career counseling. The student’s needs are
assessed and, based on the student’s interests, the counselor guides them as appropriate.
7.
Describe any additional commercial technology or in-house products used for
support of counseling, advising, NSEP development and other education planning
services, such as scheduling or degree audit, as well as any annual subscriptions
or other requirements for these products. Be sure to include these items in the
table below.
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 19
MiraCosta College noncredit support staff use ScanSnap to scan student records that include
but are not limited to applications, add cards into ILINX so that student records of this sort are
viewable by college staff. Transfer credit would continue to be posted to a student's record
manually, although the college is exploring using the waiver option in My Edplan to record the
transfer credits into the auditing software. Scanners also allow educational plans for ESL and
Short-Term Vocational students to be uploaded to iLINX, which would make these plans
universally available to counselors and staff. In addition, plans are underway to scan all
student records so information can be stored electronically and, therefore, always available to
current and former students; this access is especially important for students considered “atrisk,” who might stop attending school for personal reasons, but return at some point to
complete their education. Currently, SARS is not able to capture ESL student data, but the
implementing this option is in progress and will be available before the end of the year.
8.
List all staff costs in the table below for each position providing these services. List
any other related expenditures that are included and clearly cross referenced in
your noncredit SSSP budget plan. Indicate if the items listed are paid for with SSSP
funds or match. You may add additional rows as necessary.
9.
Identify the staff providing or supporting follow-up services and provide a brief,
one-sentence statement of their role. Please add rows as necessary.
Title
Dean of Behavioral
Sciences, History &
Community Education,
Instruction
Noncredit counselors
Coordinator, Noncredit
Student Success and
Student Support
Noncredit Support
Manager
Support staff
Transcript evaluators
Research analyst
Role
Plans, assigns, and provides administrative support in
follow-up services
Guide and support students
Coordinates and facilitates SSSP activities, including
counseling schedules and training
Manages support staff assignments and ensures proper
training for counselor scheduling
Schedules appointments for counselors, answers questions,
advises students regarding available courses
Evaluate transcripts and assign credits for adult high school
students
Provides data and cohort studies to identify various issues
and facilitates appropriate support services
MiraCosta Community College District 20
MiraCosta College
Systems analyst
Works with Office of Institutional Effectiveness to create
data dashboard and generate reports
iv. Follow-Up Services
1.
Give a brief and specific overview of the process for noncredit students for
follow-up services in accordance with title 5, section 55525.
To best transition students between programs, into academic programs, and to employment
that best meets student needs, the college utilizes and implements these follow-up services,
in accordance with title 5, section 55525:
Current Follow-Up Strategies
A calendar has been created and shared with all credit and noncredit departments to promote
outreach, workshops, and events that benefit noncredit students. Noncredit counselors are
responsible for individual follow up appointments with students and student success
workshops throughout the term. Counselors visit each AHS class and ESL Levels 6 and 7 at
the beginning of each term to encourage students to utilize all resources available to them.
The following are examples of Noncredit Counseling follow-up strategies:
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
Schedule of Events
College Connections Event
Bimonthly newsletter
Career and Training Expo
Experience MiraCosta
ecap (matriculation in a day)
Classroom presentations
Monthly student success workshops
Monthly college placement testing at the CLC
A credit counselor is now available to assist students interested in transitioning from
noncredit to credit courses.
Additionally, existing programs like those listed above place the most emphasis on
transitioning students from AHS to MiraCosta College credit programs. These pathways are
important and efforts are clearly representative of the college’s overall institutional goal to
transition more students from noncredit to credit programs. However, these pathways also
indicate that existing efforts need expansion to be more inclusive of all stakeholders in the
district, and new programs and efforts aimed at pathways and transitions are needed to
support the remaining educational pathways. In other words, to better meet the needs of
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 21
adult education learners across the district, more programs and more inclusive efforts are
needed.
2.
Describe the student audience and estimate the number to be served. Note that
noncredit at-risk students meeting the definition provided by title 5 are those
enrolled in basic skills courses or students who have not identified an education
goal and course of study.
Title 5 defines “at-risk” to mean students who are enrolled in basic skills courses, students
who have not identified an educational goal or course of study, or students who, based on
equity data, are disproportionately impacted. The estimated number of “at-risk” noncredit
students to be served is 3,500.
3.
Include an estimate of the annual number of students to be provided these
services, and the process to identify them.
All ABE, AHS and ESL students are basic skills students. Approximately 3,500 students are
identified through the assessment and advising process.
4.
Describe the strategies for addressing the needs of these students, including:
● Types of services available.
● Strategies for providing these services to assist students in selecting an
education goal and course of study, and how the services are provided (online,
in groups, etc.).
An events calendar shows available workshops and events. The events are also advertised
using iContact (sends email reminders to students), website ads and social media. Types of
services include:
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
Individual counseling
Classroom presentations
Tutoring
Workshops on time management
Study tips
Career research
Library usage
Transferring to a four-year university
Financial aid
Interview tips
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 22
Group workshops and presentations are designed to increase college and career readiness.
Workshops are not currently offered online, but students are given online resources for
career research. The Counseling Department, however, is looking into possibly videotaping
workshops and creating an online repository for students to access the workshops at any
time. A workgroup composed of faculty and counselors will also review other delivery
methods and make recommendations to the Advisory Committee later in the fall.
DSPS services are available on request, but students must go to the Oceanside credit
campus for these services. DSPS has offered to pilot having counselors attend assessment
sessions; as such, if requested, students can receive immediate services. Other support
services such as EOPS and financial aid, will be invited to increase their presence at the
Community Learning Center. This will help increase student success and provide access to
services intended to help noncredit students matriculate. In addition, faculty would like to
create a pamphlet that answers questions most frequently asked during counseling and
follow-up sessions.
Adult High School (AHS)
Students can access online tutoring through the college website. MiraCosta College
participates in the Western eTutoring Consortium of colleges and universities, which provides
live and email-based tutoring support in various subjects. Although the tutoring is not specific
to noncredit students, they can receive tutoring support online for the following subjects:
●
●
●
●
●
Biology
Chemistry
Economics
Math (developmental through trigonometry)
Microsoft Office
All students can receive one-on-one tutoring support as well as assistance in the learning lab,
where students can work on and receive help with homework. Writing coaches also support
students, working closely with AHS English classes on particular assignments throughout the
term.
English as a Second Language (ESL)
In addition to receiving help from tutors and writing coaches, ESL students can access
English language programs and additional grammar, listening, and reading practice in the
learning lab. Writing coaches work closely with the higher level classes as well. The ESL
department is creating an online resource warehouse to also offer further student support.
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 23
Short-Term Vocational
Students in the Cisco Academy can receive additional assistance during their lab time.
Students in the basic computer skills courses can visit the learning lab for assistance with
classroom projects.
5. Include any commercial technology or in-house products used for follow-up. Be
sure to include these items in the table below.
● Career assessment and resources (online tutorials, presentations, and
materials)
● Online tutoring and academic support
Noncredit counselors use the following career assessment resources:
●
●
●
●
Eureka.org
Careercruising.com
etutoring
MiraCosta College Library database of vocational biographies: Thousand of interviews
with people in unique professions
● Assist.org: Information on four-year college transfer requirements and an “explore
majors link” that can connect students to the CSU and UC campus website pages for
each of their majors
● “What can I do with a major in…” https://careers.ucsd.edu/majors/contents/main.shtml
● ONET- Career assessments, information on in-demand occupations and industries:
http://www.mynextmove.org/
6. List all staff costs in the table below for each position providing follow-up services.
List any other follow-up-related expenditures that are included and clearly cross
referenced in your noncredit SSSP budget plan.
7. Identify the staff providing or supporting follow-up services and provide a brief,
one-sentence statement of their role. Please add rows as necessary.
Title
Dean of Behavioral Sciences,
History & Community
Education, Instruction
Counselors
Coordinator, Noncredit
Role
Provides follow-up services administrative support
Provide follow-up counseling and workshops to ABE,
AHS, and ESL students
Coordinates and facilitates SSSP activities, including
MiraCosta Community College District 24
MiraCosta College
Student Success and Student
Support
A & R supervisor
Support Staff
Research analyst
Systems analyst
Student ambassadors
IIb.
follow-up services and workshops for ABE, AHS, and
ESL students
Manages support staff as they assist counselors with
follow-up activities
Assist with outreach, answer questions, support
counselors
Provides data and cohort studies to identify various
issues and facilitates appropriate support services
Works with Office of Institutional Effectiveness to create
data dashboard and generate reports
Assist with follow up events
Additional Match Expenditures
List any match expenditures not previously accounted for in this plan. These expenditures
may include Admissions and Records, Transfer and Articulation services, Career Services,
institutional research (unrelated to SSSP), institutionally funded tutoring, and supplemental
instruction costs for at-risk students. Ensure that expenditures are clearly cross referenced in
the budget plan.
SECTION III. POLICIES
i.
Exemption Policy
Provide your institution’s policy for exempting noncredit students from participation in the
required services listed in title 5, section 55520 consistent with the requirements of section
55532.
To be exempt from the noncredit matriculation process at MiraCosta College, a student must
meet one of the following conditions:
1. The student previously took MiraCosta noncredit courses.
2. The student has previously attended another college and completed the college level
English course.
3. The student has indicated that their educational goal is of personal interest and,
therefore, the student has no intention to apply for a certificate, degree, or transfer.
ii.
Appeal Policies
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 25
Briefly describe the student appeal policies and procedures required under title 5, section
55534 (e.g., priority enrollment, prerequisites, corequisites, etc.) and explain how students
can access them.
A student is not considered exempt unless they meet the criteria listed above.
At this time, MiraCosta College’s noncredit programs are working to formalize the appeal
process. Students who feel they do not require matriculation and do not meet the
exemptions above may talk to the counselors and request an exemption. The explanation
should provide justification as to why the district should set aside the requirement. The
counselor will determine the validity of the request and notify the student of any lifting of
enrollment restrictions. If further determination is needed, the request may be forwarded to
the Adult High School Department Chair for review.
iii. Prerequisite Procedures
Provide a brief description of the procedures for establishing and periodically reviewing
prerequisites in accordance with title 5, section 55003 and procedures for considering student
challenges.
TABE is used for placement and by spring 2016, the CASAS 80 Appraisal will be used. If a
student has taken classes at another high school or college, these courses may be used to
satisfy the requirements for the high school diploma.
In accordance with title 5, section 55003, and Board Policy and Administrative Procedure
4260, the procedures for establishing prerequisites, corequisites, and advisories are
addressed through Administrative Procedure 4260. This procedure addresses the process of
establishing prerequisites and corequisites, the levels of scrutiny, exemptions from scrutiny,
the curriculum review process, standards for approval of prerequisites and corequisites, and
the periodic review of and challenges to prerequisites and corequisites.
SECTION IV. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Briefly describe plans for faculty and staff professional development related to implementation
of noncredit SSSP.
MiraCosta College continues to plan activities and workshops that involve the college in
SSSP services. These activities include:
● Counselor training on education plans and other SSSP services
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 26
● Conference attendance, such as the Student Success Conference organized by the
Research and Planning Group
● Training retreat on studies and best practices for Student Services staff
● Campus-wide communication campaign on SSSP services
● Workshops and activities on student service and instructional service collaborations
SECTION V. INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH
Briefly describe the types of institutional research that will be provided that directly relates to
the provision or evaluation of noncredit SSSP services.
To be proactive in providing SSSP services to students, MiraCosta College is focusing its
research on best practices as recommended by the Research and Planning Group. An
interim researcher is conducting research on:
●
Best practices that can be shared with faculty and staff involved in delivering SSSP
programs
●
Enrollment tracking that analyzes cohort-based data over four years to compare reenrollment, retention, and unit completion, based on educational trajectory (prior noncredit
students compared to general credit students)
●
The impact of prior educational experiences on assessment and placement systems and
course taking patterns
●
The impact of assessment test cut scores and multiple measures on student progress
toward educational goals
●
Evaluation of registration and orientation programs and their ability to promote knowledge
of the institution and its support services
●
Tracking particular student cohorts to understand the impact of placement systems on the
attainment of educational goals
●
Evaluation of the success of follow-up services and interventions designed to assist
course completion and promotion
●
Analysis of counseling visits and the value they add to a student’s attainment of
successful course and program outcomes
●
Analysis of staffing and service delivery patterns that documents, in a multivariate context,
the important role that counselors play in key success metrics (i.e., the student-tocounselor ratio or counseling visits per year as independent variables that may have
contributed to course or program success)
●
Research assistance on developing a list of key performance indicators that can be used
to track the success of support programs
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 27
●
Tracking and evaluating students’ progress towards achieving stated educational goals
based on the information from students’ noncredit education plans
●
Analysis of patterns of course success, with data disaggregated by ethnicity, gender,
disability, and age
SECTION VI. PLAN COORDINATION
Coordination with Credit SSSP Plan, Student Equity Plan, Basic Skills Initiative and
Other Institutional Planning Efforts
Briefly describe how the plan and services are coordinated with the credit SSSP plan,
student equity plan and other district/campus plans (e.g., categorical programs) and
efforts including accreditation, self-study, educational master plans, strategic plans,
Institutional Effectiveness, the Basic Skills Initiative, Adult Education, and
departmental program review.
To assure collaboration among all the campus and statewide plans, the noncredit SSSP
Advisory Committee and Student Success Committee include cross-members from each
committee. Also, regular updates and presentations are made to each of the committees as
well as to the Academic Senate and Board of Trustees to assure the SSSP Plan aligns with
the Equity Plan, accreditation self-evaluation, Strategic Plan, and Basic Skills Initiative Plan.
A presentation to the Board of Trustees will be given in October 2015 to discuss how all the
plans align and work toward student success.
SECTION VII. ATTACHMENTS
Please provide a list of attachments to the noncredit SSSP plan and a one-sentence
description of each attachment, if the title is not self-explanatory.
The following attachments are required:
Attachment A, Noncredit SSSP Plan Participants. Please attach a listing of all individuals with
their job titles, who were involved with creating the plan.
Attachment B, SSSP Organizational Chart. Please attach a copy of your SSSP organizational
chart and highlight the noncredit SSSP coordinator’s position. Please include all positions
included in your noncredit SSSP plan and also include any district-level positions if funded
out of SSSP. Include district level positions in your plan narrative and budget, as the district
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 28
will not have its own reporting structure. The colleges within the district will each include the
prorated portion of the salary and benefits.
If your district has a district noncredit SSSP coordinator, please attach a copy of the district
Student Services organization chart, and highlight the district coordinator's position (if it is not
identified as such on the chart).
Attachment C, Noncredit SSSP Advisory Committee. Attach a list of the members of your
noncredit SSSP advisory committee and their positions. If noncredit SSSP is addressed by
the college’s SSSP committee, please include information from that group.
Attachment D, Other (optional). Additional attachments may include noncredit SSSP forms or
templates to illustrate responses. You may also submit links to any relevant documents,
handbooks, manuals or similar materials that your district/campus has developed as
noncredit SSSP materials.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Questions regarding the development and submission of the noncredit SSSP plan may be
directed to: [email protected]
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 29
Attachment A
Noncredit SSSP Plan Participants
Title 5 Section 55510 (11)(b) requires that the plan "be developed in consultation with
representatives of the academic senate, students, administrators, and staff with appropriate
expertise." Please list the persons and their stakeholder group (e.g., Student Senate,
Academic Senate, Curriculum Committee, etc.), of the individuals who participated in the
development and writing of this plan. Add more pages as needed.
Name
Title
Stakeholder Group
Nikki Schaper
Interim Dean, Behavioral Sciences,
History and Community Education
Administration
Alketa Wojcik
Dean, Admissions and Student Support
Administration
Arti Dua
SSSP Counselor
Faculty
Denise Plante
Noncredit Counselor
Faculty
Paris Peck
Counselor
Faculty
Juana Reyes
ASG Vice President, Community
Learning Center
Student
Lisa Menuck
Coordinator, Testing Services
Classified Staff
Mario Valente
Dean, Academic Information Services
Administration
Connie Wilbur
Director, DSPS
Faculty
Steve Wezniak
Noncredit Math Instructor
Faculty
Mike Fino
President, Academic Senate
Academic Senate
Kimberly Coutts
Research Analyst
Classified Administrator
Jane Sparks
Interim Director, Admissions and
Records
Classified Administrator
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 30
Mary Benard
Vice President, Instruction
Administrator
Maria Lopez
Noncredit Support Supervisor
Classified Staff
Donna Davis
Faculty Director, Career Studies and
Services
Faculty
Angela
Senigaglia
AHS Department Chair
Faculty
Kristi Reyes
Noncredit ESL Department Chair
Faculty
Ruth Gay
Noncredit ESL Faculty
Faculty
Silvia Martinez
Instructional Aide
Classified
Nora Kenney
Interim Research Analyst
Classified Staff
Shannon Ilas
Interim Noncredit SSSP Coordinator
Classified Staff
Jon Fuzell
Instructional Aide, TASC Coordinator
Classified Staff
Gail Baughman
Chair, Curriculum Committee
Curriculum Committee
Al Taccone
Dean, Career and Technical Education
Administrator
Mike Kirby
Chair, Short Term Vocational
Faculty
Krista Warren
Chair, Other Noncredit, AEGB
Coordinator
Faculty
MiraCosta Community College District 31
MiraCosta College
Attachment C
Noncredit SSSP Advisory Committee
Nikki Schaper, Dean Community Services
Lisa Menuck, Credit SSSP Coordinator
Maria Lopez, Noncredit Support Supervisor
Silvia Martinez, Data Specialist
Angela Senigaglia, AHS Chair
Arti Dua, Counselor
Mike Kirby, Short-Term Vocational Chair
Kristi Reyes, ESL chair
Shannon Ilas, Interim Noncredit SSSP Coordinator
MiraCosta College
MiraCosta Community College District 32
RESOURCES
➢ Senate Bill 1456
➢ California Code of Regulations, Online
➢ Student Success and Support Program Handbook
➢ MIS Data Element Dictionary
➢ Student Success and Support Program Student Equity Plan
➢ Program and Course Approval Handbook
➢ Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges
➢ Chancellor's Office Basic Skills website
Improvements to Basic Skills Initiative Reporting
Whereas, the California Community College 2015-16 Basic Skills Initiative Annual Expenditure
Plan Submission mandated an entire section of analysis for cohort comparison with a z-test, an
inference-based statistical technique;
Whereas, the z-test allows for estimates and hypothesis testing about a population using data
sampled from the population and yet basic skills data for any college represents its entire
population of basic skills students and is not a sample;
Whereas, there are many forms of analysis more appropriate for basic skills student data,
including the Basic Skills Progress Tracker and other quantitative and qualitative descriptive
techniques; and
Whereas, the California Community College 2015-16 Basic Skills Initiative Annual Expenditure
Plan Submission requires a significant effort to produce, including the review and approval of
the Chief Executive Officer, Chief Academic Officer, Chief Business Officer, College Academic
Senate President, and Basic Skills Coordinator from each college receiving funding under the
initiative;
Resolved, That the analysis of a college’s basic skills data with a z-test is meaningless and its
mandated inclusion represents too many wasted hours of staff, administration, and faculty time
throughout the California Community College system;
Resolved, That the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges work with the
Chancellor's Office to remove inappropriate inferential statistics from college basic skills
reporting and encourage other valid forms of quantitative and qualitative data analysis towards
demonstration of student and program performance in basic skills and the impact of state funds.
Contact: Mike Fino, MiraCosta College
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement