REGULAR AGENDA REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN BOARD of DIRECTORS MEETING

REGULAR AGENDA REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN BOARD of DIRECTORS MEETING
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
BOARD of DIRECTORS MEETING
Wednesday, January 6, 2016
4:00 p.m.
REGULAR AGENDA
A.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
1. Board of Directors – January 6, 2016
(Opportunity for Introduction of Late Items)
(Opportunity for Introduction of Late Items – In Camera Agenda)
RECOMMENDATION 1
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That the Agenda of the January 6, 2016 regular meeting of the Board of Directors be
approved as presented.
B.
ADOPTION OF MINUTES
1. Board of Directors – December 9, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 2
Page 1
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That the minutes of the December 9, 2015 meeting of the Board of Directors be
adopted as circulated.
2. Committee of the Whole – December 9, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 3
Page 12
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That the minutes of the December 9, 2015 meeting of the Committee of the Whole be
adopted as circulated.
C.
DELEGATIONS
1. Agricultural Land Commission Application
RUECHEL, C. c/o TASSIE, P. [File No. 15-0431-E-ALR]
690 Highway 6, Electoral Area “E”
[See Item E.1]
Board of Directors Agenda – Regular
D.
UNFINISHED BUSINESS
E.
NEW BUSINESS
-2-
January 6, 2016
1. Agricultural Land Commission Application
RUECHEL, C. c/o TASSIE, P. [File No. 15-0431-E-ALR]
690 Highway 6, Electoral Area “E”
− Staff report dated November 13, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 4
Page 14
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That as recommended by the Electoral Area Advisory Committee, the application of
Charlotte Ruechel c/o Peter Tassie under Section 21(2) of the Agricultural Land
Commission Act to subdivide the property legally described as NW ¼, Sec 14, Twp
57, ODYD and located at 690 Highway 6, Electoral Area “E” be authorized for
submission to the Agricultural Land Commission.
2. Development Variance Permit Application
GAUDREAULT, J. [File No. 15-0483-D-DVP]
4050 Highway 6, Electoral Area “D”
− Staff report dated November 12, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 5
Page 25
(Part 26 – Special Voting – Includes Electoral Areas Only)
That as recommended by the Electoral Area Advisory Committee, a Development
Variance Permit be issued for the property legally described as Lot 1, District Lot 240,
ODYD, Plan 14744 and located at 4050 Highway 6, Electoral Area “D” to vary Section
406.1 of Zoning Bylaw No. 1888, 2003 to reduce the setback of an addition to a single
family dwelling to the centre line of Highway 6 from 37.5 m to 25.82 m as shown on
the site plan attached to and forming part of Planning Department Information Report
dated November 12, 2015.
3. Electoral Area “B” Advisory Planning Commission Appointments
− Staff report dated December 9, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 6
Page 37
(Part 26 – Special Voting – Includes Electoral Areas Only)
That pursuant to Section 8 of Advisory Planning Commission Bylaw No. 1748, 2002,
the following persons be reappointed to the Electoral Area “B” Advisory Planning
Commission for a two year term to expire on December 31, 2017:
•
•
Richard H. Butters; and
Bryan Ryley; and further,
Board of Directors Agenda – Regular
-3-
January 6, 2016
That pursuant to Section 8 of Advisory Planning Commission Bylaw No. 1748, 2002,
the following person be appointed to the Electoral Area “B” Advisory Planning
Commission for a two year term to expire on December 31, 2017:
•
Ed Columbus.
4. Electoral Area “C” Advisory Planning Commission Appointments
− Staff report dated December 2, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 7
Page 38
(Part 26 – Special Voting – Includes Electoral Areas Only)
That pursuant to Section 8 of Advisory Planning Commission Bylaw No. 1748, 2002,
the following persons be reappointed to the Electoral Area “C” Advisory Planning
Commission for a two year term to expire on December 31, 2017:
•
•
•
•
Cliff Day,
Ray Ivey,
Randy McDermid, and
Paul Williamson.
5. Electoral Area “D” Advisory Planning Commission Appointments
− Staff report dated December 9, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 8
Page 39
(Part 26 – Special Voting – Includes Electoral Areas Only)
That pursuant to Section 8 of Advisory Planning Commission Bylaw No. 1748, 2002,
the following persons be reappointed to the Electoral Area “D” Advisory Planning
Commission for a two year term to expire on December 31, 2017:
•
•
•
Joe Deuling,
Dennis Richardson; and
Melanie Wenzoski.
6. Electoral Area “E” Advisory Planning Commission Appointments
− Staff report dated December 2, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 9
Page 40
(Part 26 – Special Voting – Includes Electoral Areas Only)
That pursuant to Section 8 of Advisory Planning Commission Bylaw No. 1748, 2002,
the following persons be reappointed to the Electoral Area “E” Advisory Planning
Commission for a two year term to expire on December 31, 2017:
•
•
•
Ian Eggen,
Rodney Werner,
Clint Whitecotton; and further,
Board of Directors Agenda – Regular
-4-
January 6, 2016
That pursuant to Section 8 of Advisory Planning Commission Bylaw No. 1748, 2002,
the following person be appointed to the Electoral Area “E” Advisory Planning
Commission for a two year term to expire on December 31, 2017:
•
Lyndsay Myers.
7. Electoral Area “F” Advisory Planning Commission Appointment
− Staff report dated December 2, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 10
Page 41
(Part 26 – Special Voting – Includes Electoral Areas Only)
That pursuant to Section 8 of Advisory Planning Commission Bylaw No. 1748, 2002,
the following person be reappointed to the Electoral Area “F” Advisory Planning
Commission for a two year term to expire on December 31, 2017:
•
Dale Fennell.
8. Greater Vernon Cultural Plan – GVAC Workshop No. 9
− Staff report dated November 20, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 11
Page 42
(Customized Stakeholder Vote – Includes Coldstream, Vernon, Electoral Areas B and
C)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, the Greater
Vernon Cultural Plan include policy that both land and structure for any new purposebuilt Cultural Facility in Greater Vernon be owned by the Regional District of North
Okanagan.
RECOMMENDATION 12
(Customized Stakeholder Vote – Includes Coldstream, Vernon, Electoral Areas B and
C)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, staff be directed
to develop new and/or amended license agreements with the City of Vernon for the
following facilities:
-
3400 30 Street, Vernon, B.C.
That part of PID 010-862-927, Lot A, PL 39576 Sec. 34 TWP 9 ODYD
-
2704A Hwy 6, Vernon, B.C.
That part of BLK 31, Lots 4-7, Plan 327C ODYD
-
2704A Hwy 6, Vernon, B.C.
That part of PID 012-245-976, BLK A, Lot 6, Plan 327C Sec. 34 TWP 9 ODYD
-
3800 33 Street, Vernon, B.C.
PID 026-127-598, PL KAP76941, Lot 1, Sec. 3 TWP 8 ODYD
Board of Directors Agenda – Regular
-5-
January 6, 2016
RECOMMENDATION 13
(Customized Stakeholder Vote – Includes Coldstream, Vernon, Electoral Areas B and
C)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, staff be directed
to develop five-year operating and management agreements with not-for-profit
organizations for the management and operation of Regional District owned cultural
facilities; and further,
That the following general guidelines be used for drafting the operating and
management agreements with the not-for-profit organizations:
The Regional District:
-
will, at its own expense, be responsible for maintaining the structural
components of the building (i.e. the building envelope); subject to building
assessments and agreements with building owners regarding pre-existing
conditions.
-
will set aside an annual budget allocation for capital funding to be used for
facility replacement items, such as mechanical, electrical, plumbing and
flooring.
-
may provide funding to offset building occupancy costs associated with the
facility, including utilities; and,
-
will, at its own expense, be responsible for maintaining property insurance,
except for contents insurance, for Regional District owned facilities.
The not-for-profit organization will:
-
be responsible for the operation and programming of the facility in accordance
with the guidelines and expectations outlined in a multi-year operating and
management agreement; and
-
be responsible for the maintenance of the facility, including repair and
replacement required due to regular wear and tear,
with funding responsibilities to be negotiated as part of each operating and
management agreement.
RECOMMENDATION 14
(Customized Stakeholder Vote – Includes Coldstream, Vernon, Electoral Areas B and
C)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, the Regional
District follow the process for planning and development of new cultural facilities, as
outlined in the report dated November 20, 2015, and titled, Cultural Facilities
Workshop 9.
RECOMMENDATION 15
(Customized Stakeholder Vote – Includes Coldstream, Vernon, Electoral Areas B and
C)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, the Regional
District establish a Cultural Facility Reserve and set aside funds annually to support
major cultural facility enhancement or new cultural facilities.
Board of Directors Agenda – Regular
-6-
January 6, 2016
9. Request for Regional District Representative at Caetani Cultural Centre Society
Board of Directors
− Staff report dated November 10, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 16
Page 126
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, the request from
the Caetani Cultural Centre Society for a Regional District representative on the
Caetani Board of Directors be forwarded for discussion of inclusion in the Greater
Vernon Cultural Plan.
10. Audit Committee Terms of Reference
− Staff report dated December 8, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 17
Page 129
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That the Audit Committee Terms of Reference attached to the report dated December
8, 2015 re: Audit Committee Terms of Reference be endorsed.
F.
BUSINESS ARISING FROM DELEGATIONS
G.
REPORTS
1. Standing and Select Committees
RECOMMENDATION 18
Page 136
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That the minutes of the following meetings be received for information:
− Greater Vernon Advisory Committee – Special – December 8, 2015 (unadopted)
− Greater Vernon Advisory Committee – Regular – December 10, 2015 (unadopted)
− Electoral Area Advisory Committee – Regular – December 10, 2015 (unadopted)
2. External Committee Reports
3. Chief Administrative Officer’s Report
4. Chair’s Report
Board of Directors Agenda – Regular
H.
-7-
January 6, 2016
IN CAMERA
RECOMMENDATION 19
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That, pursuant to Section 92 of the Community Charter, the regular meeting of the Board
of Directors convene In Camera to deal with matters deemed closed to the public in
accordance with Section 90(1)(e) and (k) of the Community Charter.
I.
REPORT FROM IN CAMERA
J.
ADJOURNMENT
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item B.1
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
MINUTES of a REGULAR meeting of the BOARD of DIRECTORS of the REGIONAL DISTRICT
OF NORTH OKANAGAN held in the Boardroom at the Regional District Office on Wednesday,
December 9, 2015.
Members: Director R. Fairbairn
Director K. Acton
Director S. Fowler
Director D. Dirk
Director G. McCune
Director J. Brown
Director A. Mund
Director J. Cunningham
Director C. Lord
Director B. Quiring*
Director B. Fleming
Director M. Macnabb
Director H. Cameron
Director H. Halvorson
Electoral Area “D”
Village of Lumby
City of Armstrong
District of Coldstream
City of Enderby
Township of Spallumcheen
City of Vernon
City of Vernon
City of Vernon
City of Vernon
Electoral Area “B”
Electoral Area “C”
Electoral Area “E”
Electoral Area “F”
Staff:
D. Sewell
L. Mellott
R. Smailes
D. McTaggart
S. Banmen
P. Juniper
K. Pinkoski
C. Mazzotta
D. Danallanko*
T. Nelson
C. Howkins
Chief Administrative Officer
General Manager, Electoral Area Administration
General Manager, Planning and Building
General Manager, Engineering
General Manager, Finance
Deputy Corporate Officer
Manager, Parks
Information Services Manager
RDF Operations Manager
Community Development Coordinator
Senior Clerk, Corporate Services
Councillor G. Kiss
D. Ross
W. Pearce
Media and Public
District of Coldstream
Director, Recreation Services, City of Vernon
Chief Administrative Officer, City of Vernon
Also
Present:
* Denotes presence for part of meeting
CALL MEETING TO ORDER
The first Board Chair, John Baumbrough called the meeting to order at 4:02 p.m.
Page 1 of 146
Chair
Vice Chair
Board of Directors Minutes – Regular
-2-
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item B.1
December 9, 2015
ELECTION OF CHAIR / VICE CHAIR
Appointment of Chief Election Officer
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and Acton
That Paddy Juniper, Deputy Corporate Officer be appointed as the Chief Election Officer for the
Election of Chair and Vice Chair of the Board of Directors.
CARRIED
Appointment of Scrutineer
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and Acton
That Richard Rolke be appointed as the Scrutineer for the Election of Chair and Vice Chair of the
Board of Directors.
CARRIED
Election of Board of Directors Chair
The Deputy Corporate Officer called three times for nominations for the office of Chair of the
Board of Directors pursuant to the provisions of Section 792 of the Local Government Act.
Director Acton nominated Director Fairbairn. Director Fairbairn accepted the nomination.
Director Dirk nominated Director Cunningham. Director Cunningham accepted the nomination.
Voting by secret ballot was conducted. Director Fairbairn was declared elected Chair of the Board
of Directors.
Election of Board of Directors Vice Chair
The Deputy Corporate Officer called three times for nominations for the office of Vice Chair of the
Board of Directors pursuant to the provisions of Section 792 of the Local Government Act.
Director Halvorson nominated Director McCune. Director McCune declined the nomination.
Director Lord nominated Director Cunningham. Director Cunningham accepted the nomination.
Director Fowler nominated Director Acton. Director Acton accepted the nomination.
Voting by secret ballot was conducted. The Deputy Corporate Officer declared a tie vote and
voting by secret ballot was conducted a second time. The Deputy Corporate Officer declared a
tie vote for the second time and the election proceeded to a coin toss pursuant to Regional District
of North Okanagan Procedures Bylaw 2413. Director Acton was declared elected as Vice Chair
of the Board of Directors following the coin toss.
Destruction of Ballots
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and McCune
That the ballots for the election of Chair and Vice Chair for the Board of Directors be destroyed.
CARRIED
Page 2 of 146
Board of Directors Minutes – Regular
-3-
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item B.1
December 9, 2015
Director Fairbairn assumed the Chair.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
Board of Directors – December 9, 2015
The Deputy Corporate Officer advised that Recommendation 26 should be amended to read:
That the 2016 Regular Meeting Schedule of the Regional Growth Management Committee be
approved as follows:
Moved and seconded by Directors Fleming and Macnabb
That the Agenda of the December 9, 2015 regular meeting of the Board of Directors be approved
as amended.
CARRIED
ADOPTION OF MINUTES
Board of Directors – November 18, 2015
Moved and seconded by Directors Dirk and Acton
That the minutes of the November 18, 2015 meeting of the Board of Directors be adopted as
circulated.
CARRIED
Committee of the Whole – November 18, 2015
Moved and seconded by Directors Dirk and Acton
That the minutes of the November 18, 2015 meeting of the Committee of the Whole be adopted
as circulated.
CARRIED
Public Hearing [Bylaw 2690] – November 18, 2015
Moved and seconded by Directors Dirk and Acton
That the minutes of the November 18, 2015 Public Hearing [Bylaw 2690] of the Board of Directors
be adopted as circulated.
CARRIED
Public Hearing [Request to Modify Covenants KW5197 and LA35539] – November 18, 2015
Moved and seconded by Directors Dirk and Acton
That the minutes of the November 18, 2015 Public Hearing [Request to Modify Covenants
KW5197 and LA35539] of the Board of Directors be adopted as circulated.
CARRIED
Page 3 of 146
Board of Directors Minutes – Regular
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item B.1
December 9, 2015
DELEGATIONS
Director Quiring declared a conflict of interest stating that MQN is the architect of record on the
project and left the meeting.
Development Permit with Variances Application
Silver Star Resort Ltd. [File No. 15-0261-CSS-DP / 15-0268-CSS-DVP]
150 Main Street, Electoral Area “C”
No one was present to speak to the application.
Director Quiring returned to the meeting.
Liquor Licence Referral Application
The Saloon at Silver Star Ski Resort c/o J. Crockett [File No. 15-0428-CSS-LIQ]
148 Silver Lode Lane, Electoral Area “C”
No one was present to speak to the application.
NEW BUSINESS
Recycling and Disposal Facility Recycling Hours of Operation
Moved and seconded by Directors Dirk and Fleming
That Policy No. ENG-SW-002 [Regional Disposal Facility Hours and Days of Operation] be
amended to reflect a change to “Winter Hours” at the Greater Vernon Recycling and Disposal
Facility and the Armstrong/Spallumcheen Recycling and Disposal Facility to run from December
1 to February 28 annually starting in 2016; and further,
That the Greater Vernon Recycling and Disposal Facility and the Armstrong/Spallumcheen
Recycling and Disposal Facility open on Sunday, November 22, 2015 and Sunday, November
29, 2015 from 9:30am to 3:30pm at an additional cost of $5,000 to be funded from the Solid Waste
Management operating reserve; and further,
That Yard and Garden Waste at all Regional District Recycling and Disposal Facilities be
accepted free of charge year round; and further
That staff bring back a bylaw amendment and implementation strategy to offset the cost of
providing free yard waste.
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Cameron to amend the motion as follows:
That Policy No. ENG-SW-002 [Regional Disposal Facility Hours and Days of Operation] be
amended to reflect a change to “Winter Hours” at the Greater Vernon Recycling and Disposal
Facility and the Armstrong/Spallumcheen Recycling and Disposal Facility to run from December
1 to February 28 annually starting in 2016; and further,
That the Greater Vernon Recycling and Disposal Facility and the Armstrong/Spallumcheen
Recycling and Disposal Facility open on Sunday, November 22, 2015 and Sunday, November
29, 2015 from 9:30am to 3:30pm at an additional cost of $5,000 to be funded from the Solid Waste
Management operating reserve.
DEFEATED
Opposed: Directors Acton, Fowler, Mund, Quiring, Cunningham,
Halvorson, Dirk, McCune, Lord and Fleming
Page 4 of 146
Board of Directors Minutes – Regular
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item B.1
December 9, 2015
The main motion was voted on as follows:
That Policy No. ENG-SW-002 [Regional Disposal Facility Hours and Days of Operation] be
amended to reflect a change to “Winter Hours” at the Greater Vernon Recycling and Disposal
Facility and the Armstrong/Spallumcheen Recycling and Disposal Facility to run from December
1 to February 28 annually starting in 2016; and further,
That the Greater Vernon Recycling and Disposal Facility and the Armstrong/Spallumcheen
Recycling and Disposal Facility open on Sunday, November 22, 2015 and Sunday, November
29, 2015 from 9:30am to 3:30pm at an additional cost of $5,000 to be funded from the Solid Waste
Management operating reserve; and further,
That Yard and Garden Waste at all Regional District Recycling and Disposal Facilities be
accepted free of charge year round; and further,
That staff bring back a bylaw amendment and implementation strategy to offset the cost of
providing free yard waste.
CARRIED
Opposed: Directors Cameron, Macnabb and Brown
2016 Regional Solid Waste Budget Deliberations
Moved and seconded by Directors Cunningham and Lord
That the 2016 operating and capital budget for Regional Solid Waste Management (670) as
presented at the November 18, 2015 Committee of the Whole be approved as amended and
included within the Regional District of North Okanagan’s 2016 Financial Plan.
CARRIED
Bylaw 2701 – Municipal Solid Waste Management Amendment
Moved and seconded by Directors Cunningham and Acton
That Municipal Solid Waste Management Amendment Bylaw No. 2701, 2015 be given First,
Second and Third Readings.
CARRIED
Opposed: Directors Macnabb and Cameron
Moved and seconded by Directors Acton and Fleming
That Municipal Solid Waste Management Amendment Bylaw No. 2701, 2015 be Adopted.
CARRIED
Opposed: Directors Macnabb and Cameron
Moved and seconded by Directors Acton and Lord
That the 2016 Budget for Solid Waste Management (670) be amended to include the free yard
waste implementation strategy as outlined in the staff report dated November 27, 2015 re:
Municipal Solid Waste Management Amendment Bylaw No. 2701, 2015.
CARRIED
Opposed: Directors Macnabb and Cameron
Report of 2015 Vernon & District Multi-Use Facility Referendum Results
Moved and seconded by Directors Mund and Lord
That the Report of 2015 Vernon & District Multi-Use Facility Referendum Results dated December
1, 2015 be received for information.
CARRIED
Director Quiring declared a conflict of interest stating that MQN will be submitting a proposal on
the project and left the meeting.
Page 5 of 146
Board of Directors Minutes – Regular
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item B.1
December 9, 2015
Vernon & District Multi-Use Facility Expansion (Second Ice Sheet)
Moved and seconded by Directors Dirk and Fleming
That Vernon & District Multi-Use Facility Expansion Service Establishment Bylaw No. 2679, 2015
be Adopted.
CARRIED
Moved and seconded by Directors Cunningham and Lord
That Vernon & District Multi-Use Facility Expansion Loan Authorization Bylaw No. 2680, 2015 be
Adopted.
CARRIED
Moved and seconded by Directors Fleming and Cunningham
That Schedule “A” [Recreation Facilities and Related Properties] of the Greater Vernon
Recreation Facilities and Programming Service Agreement [Operations] be amended to add
“Vernon & Multi-Use Facility Expansion [Second Ice Sheet]” under the heading of “Multi-Use
Facility and Other”.
CARRIED
Director Quiring previously declared a conflict of interest stating that MQN is the architect of record
on the project.
Development Permit with Variances Application
Silver Star Ski Resort Ltd. [File No. 15-0261-CSS-DP / File No. 15-0268-CSS-DVP]
150 Main Street, Electoral Area “C”
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Brown
That a Development Permit with Variances be granted for the property legally described as Lot
A, District Lots 1355 and 5279, ODYD, Plan KAP76316 and located at 150 Main Street, Electoral
Area “C” subject to the following:
1. the dimensions and siting of the building addition to be constructed on the land be in general
accordance with the site plan and floor plans attached to the Planning Department report
dated November 26, 2015;
2. the exterior design and finish of the building addition to be constructed on the land be in
general accordance with the building elevation drawings attached to the Planning Department
report dated November 26, 2015;
3. the landscaping to be provided around the building addition be in general accordance with the
site plan attached to the Planning Department report dated November 26, 2015;
4. all roofing material must meet the Wildfire Hazard Guidelines of the Silver Star Official
Community Plan or the equivalent under the BC Building Code Class ‘B’ fire rating
requirements;
5. open areas around the proposed building be maintained to allow the passage of emergency
personnel and apparatus;
6. the addition be designed to ensure that snow shed from the roof will be retained on the subject
property and will not obstruct pedestrian access and egress from the proposed building;
7. an Encroachment Permit being issued by the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure to
allow for the stairs from the elevated boardwalk to project into the road right-of-way;
That upon consideration of input from adjacent landowners, a Development Permit with Variances
be issued for the property legally described as Lot A, District Lots 1355 and 5279, ODYD, Plan
Page 6 of 146
Board of Directors Minutes – Regular
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item B.1
December 9, 2015
KAP76316 and located at 150 Main Street, Electoral Area “C” to vary the following sections of the
Silver Star Zoning Bylaw No. 1926, 2004:
1. Section 401.10.a by reducing the exterior side yard setback associated with a building addition
from 3 m to 0 m;
2. Section 804.1.f by reducing the number of on-site parking spaces required for an office use
with a gross floor area of 314 m2 associated with a building addition from six (6) to zero (0);
3. Section 804.8 by reducing the number of on-site parking spaces required for an increase in
the seating capacity of food service and drinking place uses associated with a building addition
from five (5) to zero (0);
4. Section 804.5 by waiving the requirement to provide indoor parking stalls for two-thirds of all
required parking spaces associated with a building addition;
5. Section 805.2 by reducing the number of on-site loading spaces required for the commercial
uses associated with a building addition from one (1) to zero (0); and further,
That issuance of a Development Permit with Variances be withheld until the Regional District is
provided with a security deposit in the amount equal to 125% of the estimated cost of landscaping.
The estimate must be prepared by a qualified landscaping contractor.
CARRIED
Director Quiring returned to the meeting.
Liquor Licence Referral Application
The Saloon at Silver Star Ski Resort c/o J. Crockett [File No. 15-0428-CSS-LIQ]
148 Silver Lode Lane, Electoral Area “C”
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Fleming
That the Temporary Use Area Endorsement application submitted by Silver Star Ski Resort Ltd.
to extend the liquor licence activities of The Saloon to three outdoor areas at Silver Star Ski Resort
be supported; and further,
That the Liquor Control and Licensing Branch be advised that the views of residents were not
gathered as the Board of Directors deems that the potential for noise would likely not increase
beyond acceptable levels and nearby residents and the community in general would not be
negatively impacted.
CARRIED
Greater Vernon Cultural Plan – GVAC Workshop No. 8
Moved and seconded by Directors Cunningham and Quiring
That staff be directed to undertake discussions with the City of Vernon’s Administration regarding
the transfer of the Okanagan Boys and Girls Club to the City of Vernon with support being
incorporated into the Recreation and Programming Grant Service (063).
CARRIED
Moved and seconded by Directors Cunningham and Lord
That the Regional District will use the following guidelines for investing in new, repurposed or
expanded cultural facilities in Greater Vernon:
- New, repurposed or expanded spaces / facilities will be flexible and adaptable.
- New, repurposed or expanded spaces / facilities will be multi-purpose with a partnership
approach, and co-location of facilities will be considered.
- New, repurposed or expanded spaces / facilities will be located on public lands, wherever
possible, and located within the Vernon’s City Centre Neighbourhood Plan area, wherever
possible.
- A minimum unconditional contribution of 10% of the total project capital cost will come from
sources other than the Regional District.
Page 7 of 146
Board of Directors Minutes – Regular
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-8-
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item B.1
December 9, 2015
There will be demonstrated support from the community, justified by evidence of demand.
There will be a realistic plan for adequate, ongoing operating funding for the facility.
CARRIED
Farmer’s Market
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Cameron
That the Board of Directors be advised that the Regional Agricultural Advisory Committee
continues to advance and support local agriculture through venues such as the Vernon Farmer’s
Market.
CARRIED
Regional Agricultural Plan Priority Projects – Refined
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Fleming
That the Board of Directors be advised that the Regional Agricultural Advisory Committee support
being stewards of implementation of the Regional Agricultural Plan as outlined in Option B of
Appendix 1 of the Regional Agricultural Plan.
CARRIED
Ministry of Agriculture
Moved and seconded by Directors Dirk and Acton
That a letter be sent to the Minister of Agriculture with copies to MLA Eric Foster and MLA Greg
Kyllo regarding the need to fill the Regional Agrologist position which is currently vacant.
CARRIED
2016 Meeting Schedule – Board of Directors and Standing Committees
Moved and seconded by Directors Dirk and Cunningham
That the 2016 Regular Meeting Schedule of the Board of Directors be approved as follows:
Board of Directors (Wednesdays, 4:00 pm)
January 6, 2016
February 10, 2016
March 9, 2016
April 6, 2016
May 4, 2016
June 1, 2016
July 6, 2016
August 3, 2016
September 7, 2016
October 5, 2016
November 2, 2016
December 14, 2016
January 20, 2016
February 24, 2016
March 23 2016
April 20, 2016
May 18, 2016
June 15, 2016
July 20, 2016
August 17, 2016
September 21, 2016
October 19, 2016
November 16, 2016
CARRIED
Page 8 of 146
Board of Directors Minutes – Regular
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item B.1
December 9, 2015
Moved and seconded by Directors Dirk and Cunningham
That the 2016 Regular Meeting Schedule of the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee be approved
as follows:
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee (Thursdays, 8:00 am)
January 7, 2016
March 10, 2016
May 5, 2016
July 7, 2016
September 8, 2016
November 3, 2016
February 11, 2016
April 7, 2016
June 2, 2016
August 4, 2016
October 6, 2016
December 15, 2016
CARRIED
Moved and seconded by Directors Dirk and Cunningham
That the 2016 Regular Meeting Schedule of the Electoral Area Advisory Committee be approved
as follows:
Electoral Area Advisory Committee (Thursdays, 2:00 pm)
January 7, 2016
March 10, 2016
May 5, 2016
July 7, 2016
September 8, 2016
November 3, 2016
February 11, 2016
April 7, 2016
June 2, 2016
August 4, 2016
October 6, 2016
December 15, 2016
CARRIED
Moved and seconded by Directors Dirk and Cunningham
That the 2016 Meeting Schedule for regular meetings of the White Valley Parks, Recreation and
Culture Advisory Committee be approved as follows:
White Valley Parks, Recreation and Culture Advisory Committee (Thursdays, 9:00 am)
January 21, 2016
March 24, 2016
May 19, 2016
July 21, 2016
September 22, 2016
November 17, 2016
February 25, 2016
April 21, 2016
June 16, 2016
August 18, 2016
October 20, 2016
December 22, 2016
CARRIED
Page 9 of 146
Board of Directors Minutes – Regular
- 10 -
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item B.1
December 9, 2015
Moved and seconded by Directors Dirk and Cunningham
That the 2016 Regular Meeting Schedule of the Regional Growth Management Advisory
Committee be approved as follows:
Regional Growth Management Advisory Committee (Thursdays, 3:30 pm)
January 21, 2016
March 24, 2016
May 19, 2016
July 21, 2016
September 22, 2016
November 17, 2016
February 25, 2016
April 21, 2016
June 16, 2016
August 18, 2016
October 20, 2016
December 22, 2016
CARRIED
Moved and seconded by Directors Dirk and Cunningham
That the 2016 Regular Meeting Schedule of the Regional Agricultural Advisory Committee be
approved as follows:
Regional Agricultural Advisory Committee (Thursdays, 6:00 pm)
January 21, 2016
March 24, 2016
May 19, 2016
July 21, 2016
September 22, 2016
November 17, 2016
February 25, 2016
April 21, 2016
June 16, 2016
August 18, 2016
October 20, 2016
December 22, 2016
CARRIED
REPORTS
Director Quiring declared the following:
“I hereby disclose and report that I have entered into contracts with the Regional District of North
Okanagan for the pool envelope and reroofing for the Recreation Centre, Vernon Performing Arts
Centre lobby renovation and the renovation of the front of the Recreation Centre.
I have a pecuniary interest in these contracts because MQN is the architect for these contracts.
In the past I have not, and I will continue to refrain from: remaining in Board of Directors’ meetings
when this matter is under consideration, participating in Board discussions, voting, or attempting
to influence the vote or decisions regarding these matters.”
Standing and Select Committees
Moved and seconded by Directors Fleming and Quiring
That the minutes of the following meetings be received for information:
− Greater Vernon Advisory Committee – Special – November 12, 2015 (unadopted)
− Regional Agricultural Advisory Committee – Regular – November 19, 2015 (unadopted)
CARRIED
Page 10 of 146
Board of Directors Minutes – Regular
- 11 -
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item B.1
December 9, 2015
External Committee Reports
Directors provided updates for the following external committees:
– Okanagan Regional Library (ORL)
– Okanagan-Kootenay Sterile Insect Release (OKSIR)
– Okanagan Basin Water Board (OBWB)
– Fraser Basin Council (FBC)
Chair’s Report
The Chair reminded the Board of the Regional District of North Okanagan winter break hours.
IN CAMERA
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and Macnabb
That, pursuant to Section 92 of the Community Charter, the regular meeting of the Board of
Directors convene In Camera to deal with matters deemed closed to the public in accordance with
Section 90(1)(g) of the Community Charter.
CARRIED
The regular meeting of the Board of Directors adjourned to meet In Camera at 5:47 p.m.
The regular meeting of the Board of Directors reconvened at 6:28 p.m.
ADJOURNMENT
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 6:29 p.m.
CERTIFIED CORRECT
Chair
Rick Fairbairn
Deputy Corporate Officer
Paddy Juniper
Page 11 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item B.2
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
MINUTES of a REGULAR meeting of the COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE of the REGIONAL
DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN held in the Boardroom at the Regional District Office on
Wednesday, December 9, 2015.
Members: Director R. Fairbairn
Director K. Acton
Director S. Fowler
Director D. Dirk
Director G. McCune
Director A. Mund
Director J. Cunningham
Director C. Lord
Director B. Quiring
Director J. Brown
Director B. Fleming
Director M. Macnabb
Director H. Cameron
Director H. Halvorson
Electoral Area “D”
Village of Lumby
City of Armstrong
District of Coldstream
City of Enderby
City of Vernon
City of Vernon
City of Vernon
City of Vernon
Township of Spallumcheen
Electoral Area “B”
Electoral Area “C”
Electoral Area “E”
Electoral Area “F”
Staff:
D. Sewell
R. Smailes
K. Pinkoski
L. Frank
P. Juniper
Chief Administrative Officer
General Manager, Planning and Building
Manager, Parks
Regional Planning Projects Manager
Deputy Corporate Officer
Also
Present:
Alternate Director Pieper
P. McClean
Media and Public
City of Armstrong
Councillor, District of Coldstream
Chair
Vice Chair
CALL MEETING TO ORDER
The meeting was called to order at 3:00 p.m.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
Committee of the Whole – December 9, 2015
Moved and seconded by Directors Mund and Lord
That the Agenda of the December 9, 2015 regular meeting of the Committee of the Whole be
approved as presented.
CARRIED
Page 12 of 146
Committee of the Whole Minutes – Regular
-2-
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item B.2
December 9, 2015
NEW BUSINESS
Agricultural Land Commission (ALC)
The Chair introduced Frank Leonard, ALC Chair who proved an overview of the Agricultural Land
Commission.
ADJOURNMENT
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 3:52 p.m.
CERTIFIED CORRECT
Chair
Rick Fairbairn
Deputy Corporate Officer
Paddy Juniper
Page 13 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.1
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
Extract from the Minutes of a Meeting of the
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Held on
Thursday, December 10, 2015
Agricultural Land Commission Application
RUECHEL, C. c/o TASSIE, P. [File 15-0431-E-ALR]
690 Highway 6, Electoral Area “E”
That as recommended by the Electoral Area Advisory Committee the application of
Charlotte Ruechel c/o Peter Tassie under Section 21(2) of the Agricultural Land
Commission Act to subdivide the property legally described as NW ¼, Sec 14, Twp 57,
ODYD and located at 690 Highway 6, Electoral Area “E” be authorized for submission to
the Agricultural Land Commission.
Page 14 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.1
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
PLANNING DEPARTMENT
INFORMATION REPORT
APPLICATION UNDER SECTION 21(2) OF THE
AGRICULTURAL LAND COMMISSION ACT
DATE:
November 13, 2015
FILE NO.:
15-0431-E-ALR
APPLICANT:
Charlotte Ruechel c/o Peter Tassie
LEGAL DESCRIPTION:
NW ¼, Sec 14, Twp 57, ODYD
P.I.D.#:
010-523-880
CIVIC ADDRESS:
690 Highway 6
PROPERTY SIZE:
63.4 ha. (156.5 ac.)
SERVICING:
Well water and on-site septic sewage disposal
SOIL CLASSIFICATION:
Classes 2, 3 and 4
ZONING:
Large Holding (L.H) and Non-Urban (N.U)
O.C.P. DESIGNATION:
Agricultural
PROPOSAL:
Subdivision within the ALR to create one new lot
PLANNING DEPARTMENT RECOMMENDATION:
That the application of Charlotte Ruechel c/o Peter Tassie under Section 21(2) of the Agricultural
Land Commission Act to subdivide the property legally described as NW ¼, Sec 14, Twp 57,
ODYD and located at 690 Highway 6, Electoral Area “E” not be authorized for submission to the
Agricultural Land Commission.
BACKGROUND:
The subject application proposes to subdivide a 63.4 ha property located at 690 Highway 6 into
two (2) lots, including one lot on the west side of the highway that would be 8.7 ha in size and a
remainder lot on the opposite side of the highway that would be 52.7 ha. A 2 ha area would be
required for the dedication of Highway 6. As the property is located in the Agricultural Land
Reserve (ALR), approval under Section 21(2) of the Agricultural Land Commission (ALC) Act is
required in order to subdivide the property as proposed.
Page 15 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.1
Agricultural Land Commission Application
15-0431-E-ALR (Charlotte Ruechel c/o Peter Tassie)
Page 2
Site Context
The subject property is located in the Cherryville area on an undedicated portion of Highway 6
which passes through the property in a northwest-southeast direction dividing the property into
two parts. Dutchman Creek flows in a southwest-northeasterly direction through both the east
and west portions of the property and is described by the applicant as a year-round stream. The
parcel is served by a water licence on Dutchman Creek for both domestic and irrigation use.
Telus and BC Hydro facilities adjoining the highway are secured by statutory rights-of-way.
Ringle Road and South Fork Road intersect with Highway 6 at the northwest corner of the subject
property and the undedicated / unsurveyed route of South Fork Road runs east-west along the
north boundary of the property. Mitchell Road and Puckett Road intersect at the southwest corner
of the property. The unconstructed Mitchell Road right of way borders the south side of the
property lying west of Highway 6 while Campbell Road borders the south side of the property east
of Highway 6. From the southwest corner of the property Puckett Road curves to the northwest
before turning back and intersecting with Highway 6 along the west boundary of the subject
property.
To the east of Highway 6, a flat portion of the property is cleared and used as pasture and hayfield.
This area is accessed by an unpaved driveway connected to Highway 6 and contains an old
granary building. The land rises moderately to a partially treed knoll in the southeast portion of
the property.
To the west of Highway 6, the property is undulating and partially treed. This portion of the
property is developed with a house and a workshop, is used for grazing and is accessed by an
unpaved driveway connected to Highway 6. The water supply for the residence is from a well.
The owner of the subject property also owns two parcels to the north and a family member owns
a parcel to the northeast. The applicant notes that the four contiguous parcels totalling
approximately 243 ha (600 ac) have been operated as a farm by the owner since 1976.
The subject and surrounding properties are within the Agricultural Land Reserve. The subject
property is designated Agricultural in the Electoral Areas “D” and “E” Official Community Plan and
is zoned Large Holding (L.H) east of the highway and Non-Urban (N.U) west of the highway.
Parcels to the north and east are used for pasture and forage production and are designated
Agricultural and zoned Large Holding (L.H). Lands to the west and south are a mix of forested
and farmed properties designated Agricultural and Park and zoned Non-Urban (N.U) and
Community Park and Public Use (S.3). The lots to the west and south are approximately 3.6 ha
(10 ac) in size and were created as part of the 1909 “Richlands” subdivision.
The Proposal
The applicant reports that during the 1970s traffic on Highway 6 was not a hindrance to farming
activities involving both the east and west portions of the subject property. The applicant notes,
however, that in recent years crossing the highway with farm machinery and livestock has become
unsafe given the amount and speed of traffic and the heavy trucks which have difficulty slowing
down or stopping particularly when travelling in the northbound, downhill lane. The applicant
reports that given the hazards of crossing the highway “it is no longer possible” to farm the east
and west parts of the subject property as a single farm.
Page 16 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.1
Agricultural Land Commission Application
15-0431-E-ALR (Charlotte Ruechel c/o Peter Tassie)
Page 3
The applicant has applied for permission from the Agricultural Land Commission to subdivide off
the 8.7 ha portion of the subject property on the west side of Highway 6. A 2 ha area would be
required for the dedication of Highway 6. This would leave 52.7 ha as a remainder lot on the east
side of the highway. The applicant suggests that the proposed 8.7 ha lot west of the highway is
“suitable for subdivision into a farm lot and could easily be used for raising livestock or growing
vegetables”. If this application is approved by the ALC, a subdivision application would be
submitted to the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure. The following orthophoto of the
subject and surrounding properties was taken in 2007.
CROWN LAND
PARK
Agricultural Capability of the Subject Property
The Canada Land Inventory agricultural capability classification system groups land into seven
classes according to the land’s potential and limitations for agricultural use depending on soil and
climate characteristics. As the class numbers increase from Class 1 to 7, the range of crops
decreases. Associated with each class is a subclass that identifies limitations or special
management practices needed to improve the soil. The classification usually gives land two
ratings: unimproved and improved. Unimproved ratings describe the land in its native condition.
Improved ratings indicate the land’s potential once management practises have been
implemented, such as irrigation, stone removal or drainage.
Page 17 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.1
Agricultural Land Commission Application
15-0431-E-ALR (Charlotte Ruechel c/o Peter Tassie)
Page 4
Class 1 land is capable of producing the very widest range of crops. Soil and climate conditions
are optimum, resulting in easy management. Class 2 land is capable of producing a wide range
of crops. Minor restrictions of soil or climate may reduce capability but pose no major difficulties
in management. Class 3 land is capable of producing a fairly wide range of crops under good
management practices. Soil and/or climate limitations are somewhat restrictive. Class 4 land is
capable of a restricted range of crops. Soil and climate conditions require special management
considerations. Class 5 land is capable of producing cultivated perennial forage crops and
specially adapted crops. Soil and/or climate conditions severely limit capability. Class 6 land is
considered to be important in its natural state as grazing land and cannot be cultivated due to soil
and/or climate limitations. Class 7 lands have no capability for arable culture or sustained natural
grazing.
The southern portion of the property has an unimproved and improved rating of 70% Class 4 and
30% Class 3 with limitations related to adverse topography and undesirable soil structure. The
northern part of the property, including the northerly tip of the portion west of Highway 6, has an
unimproved and improved rating of Class 2 with limitations related to undesirable soil structure.
OFFICIAL COMMUNITY PLAN
The subject property is designated Agricultural in Schedule “A” of Official Community Plan Bylaw
No. 2485. The following OCP Agriculture policies are relevant to this application:
1) Agricultural lands are designated on OCP map Schedules B, B1 & B2 and are within the ALR
and the Agricultural Land Commission Act will take precedence;
2) Lands designated as Agricultural are intended to be used for agricultural purposes and
associated uses as allowed by the ALC and the Regional District. All uses and subdivision of
ALR land shall be in accordance with the ALC Act, Regulations, Orders and Policies;
3) The minimum parcel size for Agricultural lands shall be 30.5 ha. Large parcel sizes and
setbacks are encouraged and supported through the Zoning Bylaw regulations to minimize
the potential for land use conflicts and to support long term agricultural use consistent with
Agricultural Land Commission Act objectives;
4) Support the Agricultural Land Commission in its efforts to protect and enhance farmland.
Where land is in the ALR, minimum parcel sizes shall apply only when the land is:
a) excluded from the ALR; or
b) approved for subdivision within the ALR pursuant to the Agricultural Land Commission
Act, regulations thereto, or orders of the Commission; or
c) exempted by the Agricultural Land Commission Act, regulations thereto, or orders of the
Commission;
5) Encourage strategies that will see large agricultural land holdings retained and parcels
consolidated and operated as single agricultural operations rather than broken up as
individual land tenures with multiple ownership.
Transportation Policies
Highway 6 which is designated as a Major Road on Schedule “B2” of Official Community Plan
Bylaw No. 2485. The Official Community Plan Transportation policy which is relevant to this
application states that Major Roads shall have a minimum width of 25 m.
Page 18 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.1
Agricultural Land Commission Application
15-0431-E-ALR (Charlotte Ruechel c/o Peter Tassie)
Page 5
ZONING BYLAW
The subject property has dual zoning of Large Holding (L.H) east of Highway 6 and Non-Urban
(N.U) west of the highway.
The minimum lot size standard of the Large Holding (L.H) zone is 30.5 ha. Uses permitted in the
L.H zone include accessory farm sales, bed and breakfast uses, boarding house uses, fruit and
produce pickers’ cabins and work force housing units on lots 4 ha or larger, home occupations
uses, packing houses, wineries and cideries, single and two family dwellings, ancillary dwellings
and manufactured homes. The number of buildings allowed per lot in the L.H zone may not
exceed:
1) one single family dwelling or one two family dwelling or one manufactured home; and
2) for lands that are located within the ALR, additional single family dwellings shall not be
permitted unless the owner has first submitted an application to the ALC; and
3) one ancillary single family dwelling on land in and out of the ALR, subject to the dwelling not
exceeding a gross floor area of 75 m2 (807.3 ft2) exclusive of attached open carports and open
porches, shall not include a basement, shall not include habitable space in an attic, and shall
not be permitted on lots smaller than 2 ha (4.942 acres).
The minimum lot size standard of the Non-Urban (N.U) zone is 7.2 ha. Uses permitted in the N.U
zone are very similar to those permitted in the L.H zone however the minimum lot size standards
for additional single family dwellings are correspondingly reduced in keeping with the smaller
overall parcel size.
As proposed, rezoning would not be required to accommodate the proposed subdivision as the
proposed remainder lot (within the L.H zone) would be approximately 53 ha and the proposed
new lot to the west of the highway (within the N.U zone) would be approximately 8.7 ha.
PLANNING ANALYSIS:
The Planning Department recommends that this application not be supported as it is inconsistent
with the Agricultural Policies of the OCP which:
• encourage strategies that will see large agricultural land holdings retained and parcels
consolidated and operated as single agricultural entities rather than broken up as individual
land tenures with multiple ownership; and
• support the Agricultural Land Commission in its efforts to protect and enhance farmland.
Once the property is subdivided, a new residence, accessory buildings, driveway, landscaping
and other improvements may eventually be developed on the remainder parcel in a manner which
would permanently remove a portion of agricultural land from production. Although one new home
site may not, in itself, substantially impact agricultural productivity, approval of the request to
subdivide within the ALR could set a precedent that may lead other property owners to believe
that agricultural parcels in the area can be subdivided. This in turn could lead to additional
requests for subdivision within the ALR. The creation of smaller parcels in agricultural areas
incrementally diminishes the overall inventory of agricultural land and may also affect land values
by giving the impression that farm land can be subdivided. This may result in inflation of the value
of agricultural land making it more difficult for farmers to purchase.
Page 19 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.1
Agricultural Land Commission Application
15-0431-E-ALR (Charlotte Ruechel c/o Peter Tassie)
Page 6
It is acknowledged that crossing Highway 6 with farm equipment and particularly livestock could
be a potentially hazardous activity and the Planning Department respects the applicant’s
concerns. However, the applicant has explained that, on its own, the westerly portion of the
property could “easily be used for raising livestock or growing vegetables”. It could therefore be
argued that changes to farming practices could be undertaken to minimize the need to cross the
highway while still retaining the subject property as a single parcel.
It is also acknowledged that certain physical characteristics of the property are somewhat
conducive to subdivision. The proposed subdivision would meet the minimum parcel size of the
Large Holding (L.H) and Non-Urban (N.U) zones which apply to the subject property’s east and
west portions respectively and in this regard rezoning would not be required. In addition, through
the subdivision process, road dedications would be acquired along Highway 6 and other roadways
flanking the property.
Consolidation of land into larger parcels is seen as beneficial to agriculture. As the applicant also
owns two contiguous parcels immediately north of the subject property, options exist to undertake
a boundary adjustment subdivision which would result in a separate parcel west of the highway
and a larger parcel east of the highway, with no additional parcels being created. Alternatively,
the two contiguous parcels immediately north of the subject property could be consolidated.
Planning staff would be prepared to support such a boundary adjustment subdivision as
increasing the size of the proposed remainder lot or the adjacent properties to the north would
offset any detrimental impact of creating a separate 8.7 ha parcel on the west side of Highway 6.
Planning Department staff have discussed this alternative with the applicant however no changes
to the application have been proposed at this time.
SUMMARY:
This is an Agricultural Land Commission application to subdivide a 63.4 ha property located at
690 Highway 6 in Electoral Area “E”. Should this application be approved, the applicant proposes
to subdivide the property along the alignment of Highway 6 in order to create one new 8.7 ha lot
on the west side of the highway and a 52.7 ha lot on the east side of the highway. A 2 ha area
would be required for the dedication of Highway 6.
Planning staff do not recommend support of the application as it appears contrary to Official
Community Plan policies which support the protection of farmland, including the retention of large
agricultural parcels and the consolidation and operation of agricultural parcels as single
agricultural entities rather than broken up as individual land tenures with multiple ownership.
Staff would however recommend support of an amended application which would include
consolidation of the proposed 52.7 ha remainder lot with the adjacent property to the north which
is owned by the owner of the subject property. Alternatively, the applicant could consolidate the
two other properties owned by the owner of the subject property which are located to the north of
the subject property.
REFERRALS:
The application was referred for comments to the following:
1. Electoral Area “E” Director
Page 20 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.1
Page 21 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.1
ELECTORAL AREA "E"
AGRICULTURAL LAND COMMISSION APPLICATION
SUBJECT PROPERTY MAP
File:
Applicant:
Location:
15-0431-E-ALR
Charlotte Ruechel c/o Peter Tassie
690 Highway 6
Page 22 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.1
PL4N OF PROPOSED SUBOJYISION OF PART OF
NIY 1/4, SEC. 14, 1'0/YNSHIP 5~ OOYO.
SCAM.: 1:5000
SW 1/4 SEC. 23 TWP. 57
RINGLE ROAD
APPROX/MAT£ LOCA noN OF HIGHWA y PLOTTED
FROM NORTH OKANAGAN REGIONAL DISTRICT
MAPPING. TO BE SURVEYED 24m WIDE (2ha±).
=
REMAINDER NW 1/4
SEC.14 TWP. 57
8.lha±
,..,, J'I
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367.8±
CAMPBELL ROAD
MITCHELL ROAD
LOT 233
PLAN 663
LOT 238
239
PLAN 663
PREPARED FOR: CHARLOTTE RUECHEL
TASS/£ .t ASSOC/A TES
4646 BASE.owe
DATE: 10AUG15
Page 23 of 146
240
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.1
SKETCH PMN 1'0 ACCOJl'PANY APPIJCA:J'ION ro :J'HA'
ACRICUI,:J'U/Uf, MNO COJl'll'ISSION SHOITINC MNO
OITNA'O BY CHAJU01'1'A' RUA'CHA'I, IN RA'CARO ro
PROPOSED SUBO.IWSION O.F PARI' O.F NIT f/.t/, SIC. I.ti,
2'0/TNSHIP 57, OOYO.
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CHARLOTTE RUECHEI.
PIO 010-52.J-961
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CHARLOTTE RUECHEI.
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REN 52. 7ha:I:
CHARLOTTE RUECHEL
PROPOSED LOT 1
10. 7'ha:J: INCL. ROAD
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'"_·U=------1)1~___ ~~~--~--,----1.....1,_~--r~~t· -i --1-r --rrPREPARED FOR: CHARLOTTE RUECHEL
TASSIE • ASSOC/A TES
46460WNERSHIP.OWG DATE: 8SEP15
fil2E..
THIS PLAN IS BASED ON NORTH OKANAGAN
REGIONAL DISTRICT COMPOSITE MAPPING.
Page 24 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.2
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
PLANNING DEPARTMENT
INFORMATION REPORT
DEVELOPMENT VARIANCE PERMIT APPLICATION
DATE:
November 12, 2015
FILE NO.:
15-0483-D-DVP
APPLICANT:
Jason Gaudreault
LEGAL DESCRIPTION:
Lot 1, District Lot 240, ODYD, Plan 14744
P.I.D.#:
008-932-689
CIVIC ADDRESS:
4050 Highway 6
PROPERTY SIZE:
0.4 ha (1 acre)
SERVICING:
On-site water and septic sewage disposal
ZONING:
Non-Urban (N.U)
O.C.P. DESIGNATION:
Industrial / Major Road
PROPOSAL:
Construct an addition to a single family dwelling
PROPOSED VARIANCE:
Setback from the centre line of Highway 6
PLANNING DEPARTMENT RECOMMENDATION:
That upon consideration of input from adjacent landowners, a Development Variance Permit be
issued for the property legally described as Lot 1, District Lot 240, ODYD, Plan 14744 and located
at 4050 Highway 6, Electoral Area “D” to vary Section 406.1 of Zoning Bylaw No. 1888, 2003 to
reduce the setback of an addition to a single family dwelling to the centre line of Highway 6 from
37.5 m to 25.82 m as shown on the site plan attached to and forming part of Planning Department
Information Report dated November 12, 2015.
BACKGROUND:
This report relates to an application for a Development Variance Permit for the property located
at 4050 Highway 6. The owner of the subject property has started construction of an addition to
a single family dwelling without a Building Permit. The addition does not comply with the major
road (Highway 6) setback requirement of the Regional District Zoning Bylaw. The owner is
requesting a variance to this regulation through the subject application in order to obtain a Building
Permit to finish the partially constructed addition.
Page 25 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.2
Development Variance Permit Application
15-0483-D-DVP (Jason Gaudreault)
Page 2
Site Context
The subject property is located on the south side of Highway 6. A single family dwelling and
detached shop are located in the northeast quarter of the property. The property is accessed
from a driveway which connects to Highway 6 in the northwest corner of the property. The
driveway runs east adjacent to Highway 6 in a downward slope to the building site. There is a
decrease in elevation from the road to the building site.
The subject property and properties located to the east and south are zoned Non-Urban and are
designated as Industrial in the Electoral Areas “D” and “E” Official Community Plan. The property
to the west (Highway 6 Mini-storage) is zoned General Industrial (I.2) and designated Industrial
in the OCP. The properties to the north are zoned Large Holding, are designated as Agricultural
and Large Holding and are partially located in the Agricultural Land Reserve. The following
orthophoto of the subject and surrounding properties was taken in 2013.
The Proposal
The owner of the subject property has started construction of an addition to a single family
dwelling without a Building Permit. The proposed addition does not comply with the setback from
a major road (Highway 6) of the Regional District Zoning Bylaw which requires the building be
setback at least 37.5 m from the centre line of Highway 6. The applicant is requesting a variance
to this regulation through the subject application to allow the partially constructed addition to
remain in its current location which is setback 25.82 m from the centre line of Highway 6.
Page 26 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.2
Development Variance Permit Application
15-0483-D-DVP (Jason Gaudreault)
Page 3
The owner has demolished an existing portion of the single family dwelling and has started
construction of a one-storey addition on the east side of the remaining single family dwelling. The
proposed addition would have a footprint of 101.2 m2 and height of 5.79 m. The addition is
proposed to contain a master bedroom, second bedroom, laundry room and bathroom. The
addition is proposed to be constructed in line with the existing dwelling which is 26.21 m from the
centre line of Highway 6 and 12.24 m from the front property line adjacent to Highway 6. The
owner has indicated that the house was in need of repair and the additional space is required to
accommodate their family.
The owner has provided a letter of support from the neighbouring property to the west.
ZONING BYLAW:
The subject property is zoned Non-Urban (N.U). Uses permitted in the N.U zone include ancillary
single family dwellings, bed and breakfast use, boarding house use, community care facilities,
home occupation use, intensive agricultural use, limited resource use, manufactured homes,
public parks and playgrounds, single family dwellings, two family dwellings, veterinary clinics,
wineries and cideries, work force housing units and secondary suites.
Section 803.10.i of the Zoning Bylaw states that insofar as residential buildings are concerned,
where a lot of less than 0.5 hectares was existing at the effective date of this bylaw, the provisions
of the Residential Single Family (R.1) Zone of this bylaw shall apply.
The proposal as compared to the R.1 zone setback requirements is as follows:
CRITERIA
Setbacks (min.)
- Front
- Rear
- West Side
- East Side
- Centre line of Highway 6
PROPOSAL
ZONE REQUIREMENTS
12.34 m
35.22 m
46.51 m
4.17 m
25.82 m
7.5
7.5
2.0
2.0
37.5
Section 406.1 of the Zoning Bylaw states that all buildings and structures shall be provided with
a setback of not less than 30 m plus the required setback of the respective zone (7.5 m) measured
from the centre line of Highway 6.
ELECTORAL AREAS “D” AND “E” OFFICIAL COMMUNITY PLAN:
As noted above, the Electoral Area “D” and “E” OCP designates the land use of the subject
property as Industrial and designates Highway 6 as a Major Road. The following OCP Policies
are applicable to this application:
Transportation Policies
•
Major Roads are endorsed as the long term major routes for movement of traffic, and shall
have a minimum width of 25 m.
Page 27 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.2
Development Variance Permit Application
15-0483-D-DVP (Jason Gaudreault)
Page 4
PLANNING ANALYSIS:
The owner of the subject property has started construction of an addition to a single family
dwelling without a Building Permit. The addition does not comply with the major road (Highway
6) setback requirement of the Regional District Zoning Bylaw. The owner is requesting a variance
to this regulation through the subject application to obtain a Building Permit to finish the partially
constructed addition. The variance would reduce the required setback from 37.5 m to 25.82 m.
The building setback requirement associated with major roads is intended to provide sufficient
spatial separation between buildings and adjacent major roads and to ensure that the setback of
buildings do not limit the ability to improve or widen roads designated major roads.
The Planning Department recommends that the subject application be supported for the following
reasons:
• the proposed building addition would be setback from the centreline of Hwy 6 roughly the
same distance of the existing buildings. The Planning Department is not aware of there being
any problems with the existing setback of the building;
• it does not appear that the building addition would limit the ability to make improvements to
the portion of Hwy 6 which fronts the subject property. In this regard, it is noted that the
portion of Hwy 6 which fronts the subject property exceeds 30 m in width whereas the
Electoral Areas “D” and “E” Official Community Plan states that Major Roads shall have a
minimum width of 25 m. It is also noted that the Ministry of Transportation has no objections
to the proposed setback from Highway 6;
• the setback of the building complies with the front yard setback provision of the Zoning Bylaw;
• the Building Inspector and Fire Chief have no concerns with the proposed variance.
SUMMARY:
This report relates to an application for a Development Variance Permit related to the property
located at 4050 Highway 6. The owner of the subject property has started construction of an
addition to a single family dwelling without a Building Permit. The addition does not comply with
the major road (Highway 6) setback requirement of the Regional District Zoning Bylaw. The owner
is requesting a variance to this regulation through the subject application to obtain a Building
Permit to finish the partially constructed addition. The variance would reduce the required setback
from 37.5 m to 25.82 m. The Planning Department recommends that upon consideration of input
from adjacent land owners, the application receive favourable consideration as overall it does not
appear that the proposed setback variance would negatively impact the use and enjoyment of the
subject property or Highway 6 and the Ministry of Transportation has no objections to the
proposed setback from Highway 6.
REFERRAL COMMENTS:
The application was referred for comments to the following:
1. Electoral Area “D” Director
2. Electoral Area “D” Advisory Planning Commission
Page 28 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.2
Page 29 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.2
ELECTORAL AREA "D"
DEVELOPMENT VARIANCE PERMIT APPLICATION
SUBJECT PROPERTY MAP
File:
Applicant:
Location:
15-0483-D-DVP
Jason Gaudreault
4050 Highway 6
Page 30 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.2
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.3
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 0550.20.01.1
TO:
Board of Directors
FROM:
Ashley Bevan, Executive Assistant
DATE:
December 9, 2015
SUBJECT:
Electoral Area "B" Advisory Planning Commission
Reappointments
RECOMMENDATION:
That pursuant to Section 8 of Advisory Plann ing Comm ission Bylaw No. 1748, 2002, the following
persons be reappointed to the Electoral Area "B" Advisory Plann ing Commission for a two year term to
expire on December 31, 2017:
•
•
Richard H. Butters; and
Bryan Ryley; and further,
That pursuant to Section 8 of Advisory Planning Commission Bylaw No. 1748, 2002, the following
person be appointed to the Electoral Area "B" Advisory Planning Commission for a two year term to
expire on December 31, 2017:
•
Ed Columbus.
DISCUSSION:
Director Fleming has recommended that Richard H. Butters and Bryan Ryley be reappointed and Ed
Columbus be appointed to the Electoral Area "B" Advisory Planning Commission.
Section 8 of Advisory Planning Commission Bylaw No. 1748, 2002 requires that Advisory Planning
Commission Members be appointed by resolution of the Regional Board upon recommendation of the
Electoral Area Director.
Submitted by:
Endorsed by:
Rob: :w
General Manager, Planning and Building
Page 37 of 146
Officer
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.4
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No. : 0550.20.01 .2
TO:
Board of Directors
FROM:
Ashley Bevan, Executive Assistant
DATE:
December 2, 2015
SUBJECT:
Electoral Area "C" Advisory Planning Commission
Reappointments
RECOMMENDATION:
That pursuant to Section 8 of Advisory Planning Commission Bylaw No. 1748, 2002, the following
person be reappointed to the Electoral Area "C" Advisory Planning Commission for a two year term to
expire on December 31, 2017:
•
•
•
•
Cliff Day,
Ray Ivey,
Randy McDermid, and
Paul Williamson.
DISCUSSION:
Director Macnabb has recommended that Cliff Day, Ray Ivey, Randy McDerm id and Pau l Williamson
be reappointed to the Electoral Area "C" Advisory Planning Commission.
Section 8 of Advisory Planning Commission Bylaw No. 1748, 2002 requires that Advisory Planning
Commission Members be appointed by resolution of the Regional Board upon recommendation of the
Electoral Area Director.
Submitted by:
A~
Executive Assistant
Endorsed by:
Page 38 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.5
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 0550.20.01.3
TO:
Board of Directors
FROM:
Ashley Bevan, Executive Assistant
DATE:
December 9, 2015
SUBJECT:
Electoral Area "D" Advisory Planning Commission Reappointments
RECOMMENDATION:
That pursuant to Section 8 of Advisory Planning Commission Bylaw No. 1748, 2002, the following
person be reappointed to the Electoral Area "D" Advisory Planning Commission for a two year term to
expire on December 31, 2017:
•
•
•
Joe Deuling,
Dennis Richardson; and
Melanie Wenzoski.
DISCUSSION:
Director Fairbairn has recommended that Joe Deuling, Dennis Richardson and Melanie Wenzoski be
reappointed to the Electoral Area "D" Advisory Planning Comm ission.
Section 8 of Advisory Planning Commission Bylaw No. 1748, 2002 requires that Advisory Planning
Commission Members be appointed by resolution of the Regional Board upon recommendation of the
Electoral Area Director.
Submitted by:
Endorsed by:
~p
General Manager, Planning and Building
Page 39 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.6
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 0550.20.01.4
TO:
Board of Directors
FROM:
Ashley Bevan, Executive Assistant
DATE:
December 2, 2015
SUBJECT:
Electoral Area "E" Advisory Planning Commission Reappointments
RECOMMENDATION:
That pursuant to Section 8 of Advisory Planning Commission Bylaw No. 1748, 2002, the following
persons be reappointed to the Electoral Area "E" Advisory Planning Commission for a two year term to
expire on December 31, 2017:
•
•
•
Ian Eggen,
Rodney Werner,
Clint Whitecotton; and further
That pursuant to Section 8 of Advisory Planning Commission Bylaw No. 1748, 2002, the following
person be appointed to the Electoral Area "E" Advisory Planning Commission for a two year term to
expire on December 31, 2017:
•
Lyndsay Myers.
DISCUSSION:
Director Cameron has recommended that Ian Eggen, Rodney Werner and Clint Whitecotton be
reappointed and Lyndsay Myers be appointed to the Electoral Area "E" Advisory Planning Commission.
Section 8 of Advisory Planning Commission Bylaw No. 1748, 2002 requires that Advisory Planning
Commission Members be appointed by resolution of the Regional Board upon recommendation of the
Electoral Area Director.
.
Submitted by:
Ash ley Bev n
Executive As istant
Endorsed by:
~RPP
General Manager, Planning and Building
Page 40 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.7
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 0550.20.01 .5
TO:
Board of Directors
FROM:
Ashley Bevan, Executive Assistant
DATE:
December 2, 2015
SUBJECT:
Electoral Area "F" Advisory Planning Commission Reappointments
RECOMMENDATION:
That pursuant to Section 8 of Advisory Planning Commission Bylaw No. 1748, 2002, the following
persons be reappointed to the Electoral Area "F" Advisory Planning Commission for a two year term to
expire on December 31 , 2017:
•
Dale Fennell.
DISCUSSION:
Director Halvorson has recommended that Dale Fennell be reappointed to the Electoral Area "F"
Advisory Planning Commission.
Section 8 of Advisory Planning Commission Bylaw No. 1748, 2002 requires that Advisory Planning
Commission Members be appointed by resolution of the Regional Board upon recommendation of the
Electoral Area Director.
Submitted by:
Endorsed by:
; :prov_ed f r lnclu$ion:
Rob Smailes, MCIP, RPP
General Manager, Planning and Building
Page 41 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 5809.04/GVCulturalPlan
TO:
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
FROM:
Parks, Recreation and Culture
DATE:
November 20, 2015
SUBJECT:
Greater Vernon Cultural Plan – Cultural Facilities Workshop 9
RECOMMENDATIONS:
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, the following directions be provided to support the
development of the Greater Vernon Cultural Plan:
1. That the Regional District enters into new and/or amended license agreements with the City of
Vernon for the following facilities:

Greater Vernon Museum and Archives
3400 30 Street, Vernon, B.C.
That part of PID 010-862-927, Lot A, PL 39576 Sec. 34 TWP 9 ODYD

Vernon Community Arts Centre
2704A Hwy 6, Vernon, B.C.
That part of BLK 31, Lots 4-7, Plan 327C ODYD

Okanagan Science Centre
2704A Hwy 6, Vernon, B.C.
That part of PID 012-245-976, BLK A, Lot 6, Plan 327C Sec. 34 TWP 9 ODYD

Vernon and District Performing Arts Centre
2704A Hwy 6, Vernon, B.C.
PID 026-127-598, PL KAP76941, Lot 1, Sec. 3 TWP 8 ODYD
and further;
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, the Regional District enter into five-year
operating and management agreements with not-for-profit organizations for the management and
operation of the above listed cultural facilities, which will be drafted using the following general
guidelines:
The Regional District will:

at its own expense, be responsible for maintaining the structural components of the
building (i.e. the building envelope);

set aside an annual budget allocation from which not-for-profit organizations, operating in
Regional District owned facilities, can apply for capital funding to be used for facility
replacement items, such as mechanical, electrical, plumbing and flooring.
Page 42 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
Report to: Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
From: Parks, Recreation and Culture
Re: Greater Vernon Cultural Plan – Workshop No. 9
File No.:5809.04
Date: November 20, 2015
Page 2 of 18

provide an annual grant to cultural organizations operating within Regional District owned
facilities, to offset building occupancy costs associated with the facility, including utilities;
and,

at its own expense, be responsible for maintaining property insurance, except for contents
insurance, for Regional District owned facilities.
The not-for-profit organization will:

be responsible for the operation and programming of the facility in accordance with the
guidelines and expectations outlined in a multi-year operating and management
agreement; and

be responsible for the maintenance of the facility, including repair and
required due to regular wear and tear,
replacement
with funding responsibilities to be negotiated as part of each operating and management
agreement.
2. That the Regional District follows the process for planning and development of new cultural
facilities, as outlined in the report dated November 20, 2015, and titled, Cultural Facilities
Workshop 9.
3. That the Regional District establish a Cultural Facility Reserve and set aside funds annually to
support major cultural facility enhancement or new cultural facilities.
BACKGROUND:
At their regular meeting held on June 18, 2015, the Board of Directors passed the following motion:
That, working within existing resources, the following direction be provided to support the
development of the Greater Vernon Cultural Implementation Plan:
The Regional District will only fund independent registered societies;
Any operating funding provided by the Regional District will have an operating agreement and/or
contract for services (multi-year) in place; and
The Regional District will provide facilities (not direct programming) for the following:
o Cultural Conservation and Exhibition
o Community Cultural Programming
At a special meeting of the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, held on November 17, 2015, a
recommendation was made to the Board to amend the following:
That, working within existing resources, the following direction be provided to support the
development of the Greater Vernon Cultural Implementation Plan:
The Regional District will only fund independent registered societies;
Any operating funding provided by the Regional District will have an operating agreement and/or
contract for services (multi-year) in place; and
Page 43 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
Report to: Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
From: Parks, Recreation and Culture
Re: Greater Vernon Cultural Plan – Workshop No. 9
File No.:5809.04
Date: November 20, 2015
Page 3 of 18
The Regional District will provide facilities (not direct programming) for the following owns facilities
that it provides for the following cultural purposes:
o
Cultural Conservation and Exhibition
o Community Cultural Programming
Also recommended to the Board at the special meeting of the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
were the following motions:
That the Regional District will use the following guidelines for investing in new, repurposed or
expanded cultural facilities in Greater Vernon:
- New, repurposed or expanded spaces / facilities will be flexible and adaptable.
- New, repurposed or expanded spaces / facilities will be multi-purpose with a partnership
approach, and co-location of facilities will be considered.
- New, repurposed or expanded spaces / facilities will be located on public lands, wherever
possible, and located within the Vernon’s City Centre Neighbourhood Plan area, wherever
possible.
- A minimum unconditional contribution of 10% of the total project capital cost will come from
sources other than the Regional District.
- There will be demonstrated support from the community, justified by evidence of demand.
- There will be a realistic plan for adequate, ongoing operating funding for the facility.
That staff be directed to take the necessary steps toward incorporating support for the Okanagan
Boys and Girls Club, in its entirety, into the Recreation and Programming Grant Service (063) and
responsibility be transferred to the City of Vernon.
The Committee also recommended that the Caetani Cultural Centre be contemplated as part of a
more comprehensive Greater Vernon Heritage Strategy, recommended as an action item in the draft
cultural plan. For the above reasons, the Caetani Cultural Centre and the Okanagan Boys and Girls
Club facilities are not discussed as part of this report.
Okanagan Science Centre
It is unique for a community of our size to have such a thriving Science Centre. The organization
does well at generating own-source revenue, and there was significant, positive community feedback
related to the Science Centre as a result of our public consultation. Annual visitation is approximately
20,000.
Science Centres are considered by the Government of Canada as a category of museum. In British
Columbia there are a few examples of Science Centres receiving funding from the local government,
including the Exploration Place in Prince George, and the Telus Science World in Vancouver.
In 2012, the Regional District provided a grant-in-aid of $32,500 to the Okanagan Science Centre due
to unexpected grant cuts. This funding has continued. Outlined in the terms of their lease, the
Science Centre is responsible for all maintenance and building occupancy costs for their facility, which
are approximately $30,000 per year (excluding major capital and repairs). The Science Centre has
made significant improvements in the last several years, including upgrades to the roof.
Page 44 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
Report to: Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
From: Parks, Recreation and Culture
Re: Greater Vernon Cultural Plan – Workshop No. 9
File No.:5809.04
Date: November 20, 2015
Page 4 of 18
DISCUSSION:
On the recommendation of the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, the Regional District agreed to
be the local government body that owns facilities which it provides for cultural programming in Greater
Vernon.
In order to align the delivery of our current facilities with this direction, the Regional District needs to
take the necessary steps toward ownership.
OWNERSHIP
Ownership - Status Quo
Freehold ownership of almost all of the existing cultural facilities is currently held by the City of
Vernon. These include the:


Greater Vernon Museum & Archives;
Vernon Community Arts Centre;


Vernon Public Art Gallery
Okanagan Science Centre
In some cases, the Regional District has some form or ownership over the properties, for example:
-
the Vernon Community Arts Centre is held under an existing license of occupation by the
Regional District (Greater Vernon Services Commission Parks and Recreation Licence of
Occupation Agreement Bylaw No. 1793, 2003);
-
the Vernon Public Art Gallery (VPAG) is held by the Regional District as a leasehold property,
with terms more similar to a traditional landlord/tenant agreement. As part of the lease
agreement, a monthly rental fee is paid in exchange for maintenance of the envelope and
mechanical/plumbing systems. This space was not included in the license of occupation
agreement because it was identified as a temporary space, rather than a purpose-built facility
like the Museum, or a repurposed facility like the arts centre, in addition to being a portion of a
larger facility that includes a parkade; and
-
the Vernon and District Performing Arts Centre is owned by the Regional District, yet located
on City of Vernon owned land that is held under an existing license of occupation by the
Regional District (Greater Vernon Services Commission Parks and Recreation Licence of
Occupation Agreement Bylaw No. 1793, 2003)
The Museum is owned by the City of Vernon, however it is not held under license of occupation. The
“Greater Vernon Parks and Recreation Operating Agreement Bylaw No. 712, 1978”, which contracted
the City of Vernon to operate and maintain the parks and recreation/culture facilities on behalf of the
Regional District, was amended to included the museum by the Greater Vernon Parks and Recreation
Operating Agreement Amendment Bylaw No. 809, 1988.
The Okanagan Science Centre (OSC) facility is also owned by the City of Vernon, and leased to the
Okanagan Science and Discovery Society. There is no rent paid, but the expectation in the
agreement is that the OSC operates and maintains the facility, in its entirety, at the Society’s expense.
Page 45 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
Report to: Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
From: Parks, Recreation and Culture
Re: Greater Vernon Cultural Plan – Workshop No. 9
File No.:5809.04
Date: November 20, 2015
Page 5 of 18
Ownership - Options
Fee Simple ownership
The City of Vernon could transfer freehold ownership of the cultural facilities and associated lands to
the Regional District. Each transfer agreement could include a reverter1 clause to restrict the use of
the land for the specified cultural purpose. Due to a variety of reasons, fee simple ownership may not
be the ideal option. In addition to significant survey costs, there may be subdivision related expenses,
and most of the facilities are also interconnected to other City of Vernon assets, such as the Museum
with the Civic Complex, and the arts centre to Polson Park.
Pursuant to Sections 24 and 26 of the Community Charter Notice, the City of Vernon would also be
required to give notice of its intention to sell municipal properties.
Registered lease
A step closer to fee simple would be a registered lease for the cultural facilities and associated lands
to the Regional District. Pursuant to Sections 24 and 26 of the Community Charter Notice, the City of
Vernon would be required to give notice of its intention to lease municipal properties, and the lease
would be registered on title. This may require some funding for survey fees associated with the
registration of the lease on title.
License agreement
The City of Vernon could provide a license of occupation for the cultural facilities and associated lands
to the Regional District. This is the status quo option for most facilities. Although the current license
agreement would need to be amended to reflect the recent parks restructuring, this would be a
relatively straight forward option and provide a good level of long-term certainty.
Recommendation 1 - Part A
That the Regional District enters into new and/or amended license agreements with the City of
Vernon for the following facilities:
Greater Vernon Museum and Archives
3400 30 Street, Vernon, B.C.
Part of: PID 010-862-927, Lot A, PL 39576 Sec. 34 TWP 9 ODYD, shown outlined on
Attachment A
Vernon Community Arts Centre
2704A Hwy 6, Vernon, B.C.
Part of: BLK 31, Lots 4-7, Plan 327C ODYD, shown outlined on Attachment B
Okanagan Science Centre
2704A Hwy 6, Vernon, B.C.
Part of: PID 012-245-976, BLK A, Lot 6, Plan 327C Sec. 34 TWP 9 ODYD, shown outlined on
Attachment C.
Vernon and District Performing Arts Centre
2704A Hwy 6, Vernon, B.C.
Part of: PID 026-127-598, PL KAP76941, Lot 1, Sec. 3 TWP 8 ODYD, shown outlined on
Attachment D.
1
Reverter, in the context of real property, means the return to the grantor of real property after all interests in the
property given to others have terminated.
Page 46 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
Report to: Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
From: Parks, Recreation and Culture
Re: Greater Vernon Cultural Plan – Workshop No. 9
File No.:5809.04
Date: November 20, 2015
Page 6 of 18
MAINTENANCE
Upon review of the other examples of cultural facilities around the province, it is very common to have
the local government maintaining the envelope of the local cultural facilities. In many cases local
government also provides support for the maintenance of the mechanical, electrical and plumbing
systems (MEP systems), and capital replacement items.
Best practice suggests that, whatever maintenance and replacement arrangements are made they
should be supported by a legal document that outlines roles and responsibilities, and a preventative
maintenance and replacement program should be in place. This can be done quite easily as part of
the operating and management agreement.
Maintenance/Capital Replacement - Status Quo
Currently, the maintenance and replacement program for each Greater Vernon cultural facility is quite
different. The Regional District plays a significant role in maintaining the Greater Vernon Museum
and Archives, including: the building envelope; the MEP systems; facility replacement items, such as
flooring and painting; and general maintenance (such as bulb replacement and furnace maintenance).
Recently the responsibility of providing janitorial services has been turned over to the operating
societies, however the Regional District still provides some janitorial supplies for the Museum.
In the case of the Vernon Community Arts Centre, the Regional District is responsible only for the
envelope, with all other maintenance items being the responsibility of the operating society as outlined
in their operating agreement. The Arts Centre has received occasional, one-off grants for various
capital replacement/improvement items, but the operating society undertakes the project
management, not the Regional District.
The Vernon Public Art Gallery is maintained as part of the lease agreement with the City of Vernon,
with the exception of any leasehold improvements. Leasehold improvements are maintained by the
operating society and insured by the Regional District. The society has received occasional, one-off
grants for interior facility (leasehold) improvements.
The Vernon and District Performing Arts Centre has explicit maintenance roles and responsibilities
outlined in their operating agreement. Summarized, the Regional District maintains the envelope,
MEP systems, and much of the major equipment replacement. In general, the society manages the
day-to-day and scheduled maintenance of equipment, and is responsible for equipment more closely
aligned with the programming of the facility.
The Okanagan Science Centre is responsible for the maintenance and capital replacement for their
entire facility as part of their lease agreement with the City of Vernon.
Maintenance – Options
If it is decided that some support for facility maintenance is within the role that the Regional District
sees itself playing, there are some opportunities for improvement on the current facility maintenance
programs.
Of course in some circumstances, like the Vernon Public Art Gallery, there would be no motivation to
change from the status quo, since maintenance is completed through a fee for service (by way of the
rent payment). There is some impetus, however, to have the responsibility of day-to-day facility
maintenance that is currently being provided by the Regional District, be taken up by the operating
society for the purpose of expedience and efficiency. Now that the Regional District no longer
employs a facilities manager it would be practical to share the responsibility of general facility
maintenance with the operating societies.
Page 47 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
Report to: Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
From: Parks, Recreation and Culture
Re: Greater Vernon Cultural Plan – Workshop No. 9
File No.:5809.04
Date: November 20, 2015
Page 7 of 18
It would generally be considered consistent with other communities if the Regional District maintained
the responsibility for the building envelope, which would include structural walls, foundation and roof.
The Regional District could also choose to provide some funding to the organizations to support the
maintenance of each of the cultural facilities it provides for cultural programming purposes. The
remainder of the cost of general maintenance would then default to the responsibility of the not-forprofit, with facility maintenance specifics being discussed and agreed upon as part of the operating
and management agreements.
Capital replacement for each facility should be planned for in a replacement program, and each year
the items can be assessed and either replaced, or pushed into a future year for replacement (if there
is anticipated life remaining). The oversight of these capital replacement items is most efficient when
it is the responsibility of the organization, however the Regional District can choose to provide some
funding to support these replacements.
There are a couple of options to consider for the execution of the above direction:
Building Envelope
It the Regional District agrees to maintain responsibility of the building envelopes, which includes
exterior walls, roof and foundation, of those facilities it owns and provides for the purposes of cultural
programming, it could choose to do this in a couple of different ways:
1. the Regional District could choose to fund and manage the envelope maintenance directly; or,
2. the Regional District could require that the not-for-profit organization manage the envelope
maintenance, with the Regional District just covering the expense.
If the Regional District manages the project directly, it could more easily control the scope, timing, and
quality of the project, allowing the Regional District’s to better manage its risk and liability, as well as
its budget. A limitation of this option is that the Regional District does not have the in-house technical
expertise, so each project would likely incur some additional expense to contract a qualified project
manager.
If the Regional District was to task the not-for-profit organization with managing the envelope
maintenance, it is likely that the oversight required to manage the Regional District’s risk, liability and
budget would be no less than if the Regional District was to manage the project directly. It is also
unlikely that the organization would have the on-staff technical expertise to oversee this project so,
similar to the Regional District managing the project, it is likely that there would be additional expense
to hire a qualified project manager.
Building Maintenance
Building maintenance, including the mechanical (heating/cooling), electrical and plumbing items are
relatively easy to incorporate into a preventative maintenance program. In fact, many companies offer
this regular scheduled maintenance as part of their service. These regular maintenance costs tend to
be reasonably consistent from year to year and the replacements can, for the most part, be
anticipated and budgeted quite accurately. Once established, running the maintenance program for
the facilities can require a relatively small amount of time.
It is important that the Regional District maintains a record of the regular maintenance that takes place
within the facilities, but who manages the work becomes less important as this type of work must be
completed by certified professionals. There would be some efficiencies gained if the not-for-profit
society was to manage this work, as they are regularly on-site and better able to coordinate access to
mechanical rooms, etc. They would also be more likely to solicit some work to be done, pro bono or at
reduced rates, by qualified volunteers.
Page 48 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
Report to: Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
From: Parks, Recreation and Culture
Re: Greater Vernon Cultural Plan – Workshop No. 9
File No.:5809.04
Date: November 20, 2015
Page 8 of 18
Unexpected mechanical, electrical or plumbing repairs are almost always time sensitive, as they can
directly affect the operation of the facility, and are understandably more challenging to budget for than
regular maintenance and replacement. Costs for unexpected repairs will vary year to year, however
they may offset expected expenses (for example, a boiler may break down, requiring earlier
replacement than the replacement program suggested). Given the typical urgency of these projects, it
would be most appropriate for the not-for-profit organization to be directly responsible for initiating and
managing this work.
In order for the Regional District to be able to budget for these expenses while aligning the authority of
managing the facility repairs and maintenance with the responsibility of operating the facility, it would
be appropriate for the Regional District to determine an appropriate annual amount for facility
maintenance costs, and provide that funding through a grant to the operating society. Checks and
balances, such as required procurement procedures and reporting obligations, can be put into place
to ensure the funds are being used appropriately and that the facility is being maintained. Any
procedures should be crafted carefully so as not to limit the organization from accessing pro bono
work where available and appropriate, as this is one of the strengths of a not-for-profit society.
Alternatively, the Regional District could assign the responsibility for funding and management of all
facility maintenance to the not-for-profit society, with appropriate reporting obligations around the
maintenance and repairs that are completed. This option would have significant implications on the
current operations of most of the cultural facilities, as most do not currently carry the financial
obligation of much of the facility maintenance. This approach may also introduce risk to the Regional
District, as regular and high quality maintenance is important for protection of the assets.
Capital Replacement
Capital replacement items within these facilities are typically related to mechanical, electrical or
plumbing, but can also include items like flooring, doors and windows. Currently the Regional District
provides funding for some capital replacement items of the Vernon and District Performing Arts
Centre, outlined in a detailed replacement schedule. The Regional District has also funded the capital
replacement of items at the Greater Vernon Museum and, to a lesser degree, the Vernon Community
Arts Centre. The capital replacement at the Art Gallery is the responsibility of the City of Vernon as
part of the terms of the lease agreement, and the Okanagan Science Centre has been responsible for
their own capital replacement funding and management.
One way to address the support for the capital maintenance of Regional District owned cultural
facilities is through an annual allocation in the budget that not-for-profit organizations, operating in
Regional District owned facilities, can apply for capital funding to be used for facility replacement
items, such as mechanical, electrical, plumbing and flooring. Using this format, the Regional District
can better manage its annual total budget, and can weigh capital replacement items against each
other using the criteria we currently apply to our current capital budget, as follows:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Health and safety
Protection/maintenance of existing assets
Items with a reasonable payback period
Items to meet long-term plans
5. Increased / improved service
6. Increased accessibility
7. Aesthetics
Proposed Capital Grant: Access to capital replacement funding would be provided through a grant
application process, with an intake in September and be brought forward for consideration during the
regular budget cycle. In addition to the above weighting scheme, those projects where the
organization would provide a reasonable portion of the costs, would be afforded a greater weight.
Page 49 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
Report to: Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
From: Parks, Recreation and Culture
Re: Greater Vernon Cultural Plan – Workshop No. 9
File No.:5809.04
Date: November 20, 2015
Page 9 of 18
Recommendation 1 – Part B
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, the Regional District enter into five-year
operating and management agreements with not-for-profit organizations for the management and
operation of the above listed cultural facilities, which will be drafted using the following general
guidelines:
The Regional District will:
- at its own expense, be responsible for maintaining the structural components of the
building (i.e. building envelope);
- set aside an annual budget allocation from which not-for-profit organizations,
operating in Regional District owned facilities, can apply for capital funding to be used
for facility replacement items, such as mechanical, electrical, plumbing and flooring.
The not-for-profit organization will:
- be responsible for the operation and programming of the facility in accordance with the
guidelines and expectations outlined in a multi-year operating and management
agreement; and
- be responsible for the maintenance of the facility, including repair and
replacement required due to regular wear and tear,
with funding responsibilities to be negotiated as part of each operating and management
agreement.
The next consideration in the provision of facilities is building occupancy costs.
BUILDING OCCUPANCY COSTS
For the purpose of this discussion, building occupancy costs will include utilities (hydro, gas), permits
(electrical, elevator, boiler, etc.), property taxes (if applicable), and property insurance.
Building Occupancy Costs – Status Quo
The Regional District currently funds all of the utility, insurance and permit costs associated with the
following Greater Vernon cultural facilities:


Vernon Public Art Gallery
Greater Vernon Museum and Archives


Vernon and District Performing Arts Centre
Vernon Community Arts Centre
For some of these facilities, the occupancy costs are paid directly by the Regional District, whereas
others have their costs paid indirectly through an earmarked “utilities grant” (as is the case with the
arts centre).
Page 50 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
Report to: Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
From: Parks, Recreation and Culture
Re: Greater Vernon Cultural Plan – Workshop No. 9
File No.:5809.04
Date: November 20, 2015
Page 10 of 18
Building Occupancy Costs – Options
If it is determined that building occupancy costs are to be considered part of the Regional District’s
investment in the “provision of cultural facilities”, the payment of the utilities could be reviewed and,
wherever possible, aligned with the operating organization. This structure provides incentive for
responsible and efficient use of water and energy by the operating organization. Some of the other
building occupancy costs, such as permits and building insurance, may be tied to ownership and have
less flexibility for adjustment. Either way, the roles and responsibilities for building occupancy should
be clearly outlined in the operating agreement.
Recommendation 1 – Part C
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, the Regional District enter into five-year
operating and management agreements with not-for-profit organizations for the management and
operation of the above listed cultural facilities, which will be drafted using the following general
guidelines:
The Regional District will:
- provide an annual grant to cultural organizations operating within Regional District owned
facilities, to offset building occupancy costs associated with the facility; and,
- at its own expense, be responsible for maintaining property insurance, except for contents
insurance, for Regional District owned facilities.
Okanagan Science Centre
If there is interest in continuing to support the Okanagan Science Centre, it would be consistent with
the current direction to provide funding to offset their building occupancy costs, as with the other
cultural organizations, and terminate the unrestricted annual operating grant.
The net annual cost to the Regional District, to provide both a grant to offset building occupancy costs
and a grant for general building maintenance, would be $39,000; a twenty percent increase from the
current $32,500 grant, following which the annual increase would be proposed at CPI.
It is also proposed that the Okanagan Science Centre would also be eligible to apply for funding to
support capital facility replacement expenses, in similar fashion to the other cultural organizations
operating in publicly-owned facilities.
Page 51 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
Report to: Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
From: Parks, Recreation and Culture
Re: Greater Vernon Cultural Plan – Workshop No. 9
FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:
File No.:5809.04
Date: November 20, 2015
Page 11 of 18
The overall cost implications for the first recommendation has very little impact on the on-going operating costs of the service. The projected
increase to both the building maintenance and building occupancy grants is proposed at CPI, which may fall shy of the actual costs due to
utility increases that are more than CPI. This may need to be a bit higher to help accommodate the variation between increased utility costs
and CPI, however the expectation is that the RDNO grant would not be directly tied to the actual costs, since that would not provide
incentive for efficient use.
2009
Actual
2010
Actual
2011
Actual
2012
Actual
2013
Actual
2014
Actual
Operating grant
1.5%
1.5%
1.5%
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
Budgeted Proposed Proposed Proposed Proposed Proposed
1.5%
Overall Cost Variation Resulting from workshop recommendations
2008
Actual
Occupancy Costs
1.5%
This graph does not include costs associated with building envelope maintenance or capital replacement, which were being collected at the
time of preparing this report. These projected cost impacts will be brought forward at the workshop.
$1,400,000
$1,200,000
$1,000,000
$800,000
$600,000
$400,000
$200,000
$0
2007
Actual
Building maintenace
Page 52 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
Report to: Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
From: Parks, Recreation and Culture
Re: Greater Vernon Cultural Plan – Workshop No. 9
File No.:5809.04
Date: November 20, 2015
Page 12 of 18
So, as described in the previous pages, we have started to envision our support for cultural services along a continuum, which has been
illustrated below.
With the Regional District’s greatest responsibility being the infrastructure component of the service, a framework for facility planning will
need to be established in order to provide consistency, transparency and sustainability to any new capital construction project.
Page 53 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
Report to: Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
From: Parks, Recreation and Culture
Re: Greater Vernon Cultural Plan – Workshop No. 9
File No.:5809.04
Date: November 20, 2015
Page 13 of 18
NEW FACILITIES
Early in January 2014, the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee was provided with a general process
for facility planning and development, which has been included as Attachment “H”. Following this staff
report, the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee embarked on the development of a Greater Vernon
Cultural Plan with the intention of capturing some of the community’s cultural facility gaps, and
identifying cultural facility trends.
With the level of Regional District support being greatest at the infrastructure end of the continuum,
the Regional District should develop a process that will provide clarity and transparency on how a new
facility would be contemplated, considered and ultimately constructed. As part of its provision of
cultural facilities, it would be appropriate for the Regional District to play a lead role in some key
aspects of planning and funding of major improvements to existing cultural facilities or new cultural
facilities. This allows the Regional District to ensure that the project adheres to general guidelines set
for new facilities, as well as ensuring that the project meets the needs of the community while being in
line with the economic realities within the community. Alternative options, such as leasing of facilities
should also be explored. If it is determined that a new facility is the appropriate options, the following
is a draft framework for facility planning:
FRAMEWORK FOR FACILITY PLANNING:
The following steps outline the proposed process for constructing new facilities, in this case cultural
facilities, which would extend to significant renovations.
1. Community needs assessment
The community needs will be identified by:

recommendations within an adopted Regional District planning document;

imminent facility failure / loss of access; and/or,

demonstrated evidence that regular programming demand has chronically exceeded the
facility capacity2 for several years.
In addition to one or more of the above triggers, there must be demonstrated on-going community
need that considers the impact that related trends may have on the past or future level of demand.
This may include trends such as population, demographics, program/service popularity, or
program/service delivery methods (i.e. certain services may be increasingly provided on-line; new
activities, which are increasing in popularity, require different types/amounts of spaces).
2. Cultural program plan
The cultural program plan is where we take our needs assessment and determine whether there
are other cultural organizations with facility needs that would have practical synergies, where colocation could be used to increase the use/value of a new facility/space. This may mean joint
occupancy, or it could just be regular rental/tenancy. This is also the point where a value-added
space(s) may be considered, such as the addition of a café or other complimentary service that
could be rented out for the generation of revenue to offset operating or construction costs.
2
Measures of facility capacity will vary by purpose, as standards are directly related to designated facility uses.
Page 54 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
Report to: Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
From: Parks, Recreation and Culture
Re: Greater Vernon Cultural Plan – Workshop No. 9
File No.:5809.04
Date: November 20, 2015
Page 14 of 18
3. Building program
Once we have clearly identified the purposes for which the facility will be built to address, we can
then start to design the facility to meet those purposes. In many cases there are standards and
best practices that can be used to help with this step, however the process must also be guided by
the financial reality of both constructing and operating the facility, since the design of the building
will have implications for both.
This step will likely be iterative and will require facilitation, particularly if there are multiple
stakeholders (which will almost always be the case).
4. Budget development
The financial plan for both the capital cost and the ongoing operating budget for the new facility
will depend on a combination of the cultural program plan and the building program. The cultural
program plan may include opportunities to generate revenue, which can be used to offset the
overall operating or construction costs of the facility (such as commercial rental revenue). This
additional square footage could also be included as part of a long-term growth plan, where the
cultural programming can move into the commercial rental space.
5. Financing Plan
A. Capital Construction Costs
The financing for the capital construction of a new facility may include a number of different
sources. As outlined in the endorsed guiding principles for new cultural facilities, a
minimum of 10% of the capital funding for any new cultural facility must come from sources
other than the Regional District (without conditions). These sources could be comprised of
any combination of the following:
Fundraising/private donations
Significant capital projects often have a capital campaign as part of the financing plan.
These campaigns are most often led by the not-for-profit organizations who will be
operating within the new facilities/spaces. The Regional District can issue income tax
receipts for donations.
As it is ultimately the Regional District who will own the new facility, and be responsible for
the on-going, sustainable and effective operation of it, any funding contributions should be
made without conditions.
Other government funding
There are often provincial or federal funding programs that support the new construction of
cultural facilities. These programs often have a significant cost-matching component,
frequently up to 50%-75%, and almost always have a maximum contribution cap.
Developer provided/amenity charges
Within some communities, density bonusing schemes have been used to acquire public
spaces in exchange for the approval of a development that has a higher density than would
otherwise be available under the zoning bylaw. For smaller developments, the
consideration received is often cash.
Amenity charges have become fairly common in Metro Vancouver, whereby the local
government collects a charge, similar to a development cost charge, as part of the
development approval process (subdivision and/or building permit). The charges are based
Page 55 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
Report to: Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
From: Parks, Recreation and Culture
Re: Greater Vernon Cultural Plan – Workshop No. 9
File No.:5809.04
Date: November 20, 2015
Page 15 of 18
on specific amenities and costs identified in a plan, and the charges are placed in a reserve
for future use.
Regional District funding (through a Greater Vernon service)
The Regional District has a few mechanisms that it can use to finance the construction of
new facilities.

Reserve fund
A fund that has money set aside annually for the purpose of funding the
construction of new cultural facilities.

Long-term borrowing
Long-term borrowing is done through the Municipal Finance Authority, and must
be approved through elector assent, such as referendum or alternate approval.
Page 56 of 146
2026
$1,314,000
$18,700,000
$8,231,000
2031
$1,861,000
$26,500,000
$17,016,000
File No.:5809.04
Date: November 20, 2015
Page 16 of 18
2036
$2,293,000
$32,600,000
$29,090,000
Page 57 of 146
Report to: Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
From: Parks, Recreation and Culture
Re: Greater Vernon Cultural Plan – Workshop No. 9
2021
$1,189,000
$16,900,000
$1,231,000
*assuming entire debt servicing / reserve contribution capacity is put into reserves, with a 2% rate of return CAPACITY Annual Debt Servicing Capacity / Reserve Contribution Equivalent LT Borrowing (of debt servicing capacity) Cumulative Reserve Fund Balance* One important issue to examine when considering the use of long-term borrowing for capital construction costs is the implication on annual property
taxes. In order to consider and mitigate this impact, the current debt servicing schedule can be examined to look for appropriate timing and funding
amounts for facility reserve contributions, as well as timing and debt servicing capacity for borrowing. The following graph helps to visualize this
capacity, as of today. This analysis includes existing and approved Greater Vernon Parks, Recreation and Culture debt issues. It does not include
the outstanding debt issues of other services.
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
Report to: Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
From: Parks, Recreation and Culture
Re: Greater Vernon Cultural Plan – Workshop No. 9
File No.:5809.04
Date: November 20, 2015
Page 17 of 18
The grey area shown in the previous graph indicates financial capacity that could be used without
increasing the annual tax requisition. One strategy for facility planning would include using this
available margin (or a portion of it) to determine an annual reserve contribution amount that would be
set aside in a cultural facilities reserve fund. This fund could then be used to help offset the total
borrowing that may be required to construct a new facility in the future. Borrowing could also be timed
with relief years, as shown in the graph in years 2021 and 2031, providing a greater margin of
financial capacity.
Recommendation 3
That the Regional District establishes a Cultural Facility Reserve and set aside funds annually to
support major cultural facility enhancement or new cultural facilities.
B. Operating Costs
The projected operating costs for new facilities must be thoroughly researched and
realistically budgeted. The sources of the operating funding will depend on a variety of
factors, including:

The final building program.
Facility design will impact operation efficiency and utility costs. Co-location of amenities
may provide an opportunity for savings through economies of scale on things like
janitorial and administration.

The services/programming that is provided at the facility.
Activities may dictate operating costs, and some more than others; for example,
eligibility for a Category A facility requires a prescribed level of staffing.

Potential for fees and charges revenue.
This could include revenue such as programming fees or facility rental.

Eligibility for other grant funding.
For cultural organizations, these typically include grants from BC Gaming and BC Arts
Council, however there are many other funders who will provide one-time funding for
various projects rather than general operating funding.

Other sources of regular revenue.
A good example of this is an endowment fund. Although there is some variability to
the annual rates of return due to interest rate fluctuations, endowment funds are a good
way of providing an additional long-term source of operating funding, and many
communities (including Vancouver) are requiring that an endowment fund be
established as part of the process for constructing any new cultural facility.
When designing the operating budget plan, each of these potential funding sources should be
considered and accessed wherever possible.
Recommendation 2
That the Regional District follows the process for planning and development of major cultural facility
enhancement or new cultural facilities, as outlined in the report dated November 20, 2015, and
titled, Cultural Facilities Workshop 9.
Page 58 of 146
Report to: Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
From: Parks, Recreation and Culture
Re: Greater Vernon Cultural Plan - Workshop No. 9
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
File No.:5809.04
Date: November 20, 2015
Page 18of18
ATTACHMENTS:
Attachments listed below have been hyper/inked in electronic version of report.
Facility Maps
Attachment A
Attachment B
Attachment C
Attachment D
Greater Vernon Museum and Archives
Vernon Community Arts Centre
Okanagan Science Centre
Vernon and District Performing Arts Centre
Resource Documents:
Attachment E
Attachment F
Attachment G
Attachment H
Attachment I
Submitted by:
Survey of BC Cultural Facilities, 2015 (updated)
Greater Vernon Cultural Plan: Policy Directions Document
Facility Development 101 White Pages
Facility Development Process (excerpt from staff report, January 2014)
Excerpt-Standards for Member Libraries within Alberta's Regional Library Syst.
Approved, for Inclusion:
Page 59 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
58.5
NAD_1983_UTM_Zone_11N
© Regional District of North Okanagan
0
58.5 Meters
Greater Vernon Museum and Archives
29.26
1: 1,152
THIS MAP IS NOT TO BE USED FOR NAVIGATION
This map is a user generated static output from an Internet mapping site and
is for reference only. Data layers that appear on this map may or may not be
accurate, current, or otherwise reliable.
Date and TIme Printed: 11/20/2015 11:50 AM
Legend
Evacuation Alert
Notifications
Evacuation Order
Evacuation Order Rescinded - Area remains on Alert
Fire Boundary
Fire Perimeter
TWP_RGE_LINE
Trailer Rd
Trailer Lot
Swamp
Stream
Strata Rd
Strata Lot
River
Lot Lines
Lease Lot
LD_DL_LS
Hooks
Creeks
Prop_SRW
LUC
GV Parks RW
Utility RW
Roadway RW
Railway RW
GVW RW
Gas RW
Electrical RW
Easement RW
Area B CAD Lines
Notes
Water Body
Int Bdry
Des Area Bdry
IR Bdry
Page 60 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
58.5
NAD_1983_UTM_Zone_11N
© Regional District of North Okanagan
0
58.5 Meters
Vernon Community Art Centre
29.26
1: 1,152
THIS MAP IS NOT TO BE USED FOR NAVIGATION
This map is a user generated static output from an Internet mapping site and
is for reference only. Data layers that appear on this map may or may not be
accurate, current, or otherwise reliable.
Date and TIme Printed: 11/20/2015 11:46 AM
Legend
Evacuation Alert
Notifications
Evacuation Order
Evacuation Order Rescinded - Area remains on Alert
Fire Boundary
Page 61 of 146
Fire Perimeter
IR Bdry
Des Area Bdry
Int Bdry
Water Body
TWP_RGE_LINE
Trailer Rd
Trailer Lot
Swamp
Stream
Strata Rd
Strata Lot
River
Lot Lines
Lease Lot
LD_DL_LS
Hooks
Creeks
Prop_SRW
LUC
GV Parks RW
Utility RW
Roadway RW
Railway RW
GVW RW
Gas RW
Electrical RW
Easement RW
Area B CAD Lines
Notes
Return to Table of Contents- Attachments
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
58.5
NAD_1983_UTM_Zone_11N
© Regional District of North Okanagan
0
29.26
Okanagan Science Centre
58.5 Meters
1: 1,152
THIS MAP IS NOT TO BE USED FOR NAVIGATION
This map is a user generated static output from an Internet mapping site and
is for reference only. Data layers that appear on this map may or may not be
accurate, current, or otherwise reliable.
Date and TIme Printed: 11/20/2015 11:48 AM
Legend
Evacuation Alert
Notifications
Evacuation Order
Evacuation Order Rescinded - Area remains on Alert
Fire Boundary
Page 62 of 146
Fire Perimeter
IR Bdry
Des Area Bdry
Int Bdry
Water Body
TWP_RGE_LINE
Trailer Rd
Trailer Lot
Swamp
Stream
Strata Rd
Strata Lot
River
Lot Lines
Lease Lot
LD_DL_LS
Hooks
Creeks
Prop_SRW
LUC
GV Parks RW
Utility RW
Roadway RW
Railway RW
GVW RW
Gas RW
Electrical RW
Easement RW
Area B CAD Lines
Notes
Return to Table of Contents- Attachments
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
58.5
NAD_1983_UTM_Zone_11N
© Regional District of North Okanagan
0
58.5 Meters
1: 1,152
Vernon and District Performing Arts Centre
29.26
THIS MAP IS NOT TO BE USED FOR NAVIGATION
This map is a user generated static output from an Internet mapping site and
is for reference only. Data layers that appear on this map may or may not be
accurate, current, or otherwise reliable.
Date and TIme Printed: 11/20/2015 11:55 AM
Legend
Evacuation Alert
Notifications
Evacuation Order
Evacuation Order Rescinded - Area remains on Alert
Fire Boundary
Page 63 of 146
Fire Perimeter
IR Bdry
Des Area Bdry
Int Bdry
Water Body
TWP_RGE_LINE
Trailer Rd
Trailer Lot
Swamp
Stream
Strata Rd
Strata Lot
River
Lot Lines
Lease Lot
LD_DL_LS
Hooks
Creeks
Prop_SRW
LUC
GV Parks RW
Utility RW
Roadway RW
Railway RW
GVW RW
Gas RW
Electrical RW
Easement RW
Area B CAD Lines
Notes
Return to Table of Contents- Attachments
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
FACILITY
The Kamloops public art gallery is a purpose‐built facility constructed in 1998.
Part of the Coast Collective Arts Centre, which offers a gallery, gift shop, art classes and cultural events City of Courtenay
No
City of Coquitlam
NFP Society
City of Coquitlam
No
City of Vernon
NFP Society
City of Vernon
No
unknown
NFP Society
City of Kamloops
Yes
1996
City of Kelowna
Yes
NFP Society
Private lease
No
265,000
City of Vernon (plumbing, mechanical) Gallery for lessee fixtures
Service Agreement
337,848 from the City of Kamloops
1.2 Million
unknown
Yes ‐ lease and funding
480000
900000
Yes
Less than 3% comes from grants
200,000
Paid a janitor to come in once a week to maintain the space, which includes 6 bathrooms
250000
Evergreen Society
177,625
City of Vernon for purpose of art gallery. No agreement with Society ‐ lease or 100000
Yes ‐ lease agreement in place. Funding agreement is reviewed annually.
1 of 2
Return to Table of Contents - Attachments
Survey of BC Art Galleries ‐ 2015
Greater Vernon's public art gallery is located in a repurposed retail space beneath a City‐owned parkade.
55,086
Langford/Colwood/View Royal
The Comox Valley Art Gallery is located in a repurposed fire hall. The Campbell River and District Art Gallery is located in a Centennial building that was purpose‐built for a museum. The building is now occupied by both the art gallery and the communities visitors centre.
117,312
Kelowna
The Reach Gallery and Museum is a purpose‐built facility that is operated by a Society under a fee for service agreement with the City of Abbotsford. The Reach is 20,000 square feet in size.
98,754
Kamloops The Langford public art gallery serves the communities of Langord, Colwood and View Royal. It is currently located in a heritage building just outside of town, however the Coastal Collective has chosen to move to a new, purpose‐
built locations as part of a new hotel and conference centre. The new facility is being fully‐funded by a corporate partner.
58,584
Greater Vernon
The Kelowna Art Gallery is a Canadian public art gallery located in Kelowna, British Columbia founded in 1976. The gallery has become a leading public art gallery serving the central Okanagan region. The gallery was incorporated as a not‐for‐profit charitable society in 1977. The current facility was constructed in 1998.
The Chilliwack Art Gallery is located within the Chilliwack Cultural Centre, which also includes two unique performance venues, music instruction studios, arts and crafts studios, meeting rooms and offices, and is the new home to the Chilliwack Academy of Music. Other partners in the project include the Chilliwack Visual Artists Association and the Chilliwack Players Guild.
126,840
Coquitlam
Coqutlam's public art gallery is included in the Evergreen Cultural Centre, in addition to: a rehearsal studio; meeting rooms; and a 250‐seat, flexible black box theatre. The theatre offers both traditional proscenium‐style seating, as well as flat‐floor capabilities through a retractable seating system and state‐of‐
the‐art lighting, audio, and rigging systems.
Chilliwack Art Gallery
55,213
Comox Valley (Courtenay, Comox, Comox Valley A & B)
The building features a 6,100 square foot exhibition hall; large reception area (suitable for entertaining); archives; multi‐purpose studio; two community exhibition spaces; art collection storage; and museum artefact collection storage.
Campbell River Art Gallery
92,308
Chilliwack
Langford Art Gallery
Cambell River
Kelowna Art Gallery
Reach Gallery and Museum
36,096
Kamloops Art Gallery
Abbotsford
Vernon Public Art Gallery
170,191
Evergreen Cultural Centre
Community
Single purpose
The Evergreen Cultural Centre includes a blackbox theatre; art programming space; tourism information centre; and chamber of commerce.
City of Chilliwack
NFP Society
6200
NFP Society (Programmed by the Chilliwack Visual Artists Association)
54.460
Single purpose
Single purpose
unknown
1996
Repurposed retail space located beneath a parkade.
Yes ‐ includes Visitors Centre
Repurposed in 2005
unknown
City of Chilliwack
No
28,000
by donation
10,000 to 12,000 at core site plus 4,000 additional per year at satellite gift shop and summer Artist‐in‐Residence program in collaboration with Parks Canada
6200
$5 general admission
16,000
by donation
Greater Vernon Cultural Plan
Page 64 of 146
Comox Valley Art Gallery
Population served
Multi‐Use / Description
Part of a cultural theatre that includes two theatres, dance studios and art centre space (clay, fabric, etc)
4430
136.388
NFP Society
Gallery and Museum. Shared exhibition space.
2012
4500
3000
2500
211.161
2015
1967
105.831
3000
16000
2900
80.235
1828
1999
2008
27.083
1478
20,853
20,000
80.341
1500
1998
117.515
6,000
City of Campbell River
Year Constructed
Square Footage
GALLERY TOTAL
Square Footage
EXHIBITION
Square Footage
PER/1000 NFP Society
Chilliwack Arts & Cultural Centre Society which has a Management, Operating, and Maintenance Agreement with the City of Chilliwack To Operate the facility as a whole
Local government
City of Abbotsford
275000
City of Campbell River
No
City of Abbotsford
City of Abbotsford
Operated By
Maintenance
EXTERIOR
870,000
Yes
Maintenance
INTERIOR
625,000
Ownership
Operating Budget
Fee for service agreement
Category A Designation
Local Gov Grant
No
Coast Collective Art Centre
Agreement
23,000
by donation
No
Annual Attendance
?
55000
General Admission
Regional District of North Okanagan
OPERATION
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
The ACT Arts Centre includes the ACT Art Gallery and serves the Maple Ridge and Pitt Meadows communities.
The Nanaimo Art Gallery is located at 150 Commercial Street in downtown Nanaimo, and includes a programming space, called ART Lab, that provides hands‐on learning for all ages (opened in 2014). They recently (2015) relocated from their purpose‐built location at Vancouver Island University, and has recently completed phase one of a three phase facility improvement. The New Media Gallery is located within the Anvil Centre, on the third floor. The Anvil Centre is also home to 18,000 sq ft of conference space; 364 seat theatre; New Westminster Museum and Archives; a community arts space; and the Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame.
The vision was to have the conference centre revenue offset the costs of the cultural operations, and so far it has helped. Costs associated with utilities and insurance is wrapped into the larger budget for the facility.
The Two Rivers Gallery is the major art gallery in the Central Interior of British Columbia, and serves a larger region. The facility was built for a cost of $5.2 million, with $1.25 million raised through art gallery Capital Campaign.
Survey of BC Art Galleries ‐ 2015
The Richmond art gallery is located wtihin the Richmond Cultural Centre.
The Art Gallery of Grand Prairie is the second largest in all of Alberta, and is part of the Montrose Cultural Centre, which also includes the public library and a coffee house. It underwent an expansion and improvements following a roof failure, and reopened in 2013. The institution receives funding from three levels of local government.
The Red Deer Museum + Art Gallery helps visitors learn about the people, history, and culture of Central Alberta. Founded in 1973, they house more than 85 000 objects, including an extensive collection of textiles and clothing, First Nations, and Inuit art. They feature local and international exhibitions throughout the year.
90,564
Red Deer, AB
MAG ‐ Red Deer Museum & Art Gallery
Grande Prairie, AB
Art Gallery of Grande Prairie
Richmond
Richmond Art Gallery
Prince George
Two Rivers Gallery
New Westminster
New Media Art Gallery
Nanaimo
Nanaimo Art Gallery
Maple Ridge (and Pitt Meadows)
Located in the historic Banque d’Hochelaga building, the Art Gallery of St Albert features contemporary and community exhibitions, brought to life with public programs and events. Education programs offer visual arts opportunities for thousands of children, youth and adults throughout the year.
Art Gallery of St Albert
St Albert, AB
2 of 2
Page 65 of 146
The ACT Arts Centre
Community
73,556
Museum and art gallery
190,473
Part of the Montrose Cultural Centre, which includes the public library, the art gallery and a coffee house.
91,879
Facility includes public library; museum; archives and arts centre.
65,967
Single‐purpose
98,021
Facility includes gallery, museum; conference centre; theatre and programming space.
94,252
Facility includes five other tenants who rent for their organizational (not programming) space: symphony; dance; archives; theatre one; and BC Boys Choir.
Population served
Multi‐Use / Description
Includes two theatres, art gallery and and arts centre. Arts Programs are also provided for the region and these classes have different fees per class or session. ACT Presents series have different ticket prices. Additionally the venue rents out various spaces including two theatre’s which of course have various rental rates. Our renters then charge admission to their events.
1975 ‐ last improvement in 1994?
18000
2013
16000
2000
4000
Phase one of a three phase capital improvement plan in 2015 (repurpose). 0.000
exhibition occupies about 5,000 square feet. Right now we are using about 1,000 2003
1800
13000
City of Grande Prairie
244.712
0.000
0.000
Yes
7 full‐time employees; 3 part‐time employees; 5 summer students
Red Deer and District Museum Society
and the Museum Society is responsible for daily maintenance 2600
They have designed to the Category A designation but no conservator…they hire out.
NFP Society
Contract with the City of Red Deer
174.142
No
City of Grande Prairie
1.2 Million
Museum staff. Major capital items are covered with a capital maintenance budget
2000
City of Nanaimo
NFP Society
City of Grande Prairie
40.808
No
City of Prince George
950000
19.098
City of Maple Ridge
City of Nanaimo
NFP Society
Society but the city does much of the work on the HVAC system then bills the gallery for labour and supplies
1400
NFP Society (arts council)
1300000
Year Constructed
Square Footage
GALLERY TOTAL
Square Footage
EXHIBITION
Square Footage
PER/1000 Ownership
Category A Designation
City of Maple Ridge
550000
Mechanical ‐ City of Nanaimo; interior ‐ NFP Society
Yes
District Museum Society owns the collection
Operated By
Maintenance
EXTERIOR
106,000
NFP Society (arts council)
385000
Yes ‐ agreement with all three funding partners
2014 ‐ 15,000
Yes
Maintenance
INTERIOR
City
Operating Budget
460000
Lease agreement with City of Prince George
16000
They abolished admission charges in February of 2014, but they do charge fees for special programs
Receive grants from Alberta Lotteries and the Alberta Museums Association. They receive a Fee for Service Grant from the City of Red Deer for operating expenses. They are not eligible for other City grants
Yes ‐ 10 year co‐management agreement
30000
No
NA
38160
which they pay rent but are reimbursed as part of their funding agreement.
22000
$7.50/adult
120000 (with CPI increase)
Agreement
7942
by donation
Local Gov Grant
Annual Attendance
Free
Greater Vernon Cultural Plan
General Admission
Regional District of North Okanagan
Return to Table of Contents - Attachments
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
FACILITY
The Reach Gallery and Museum is a purpose‐built facility that is operated by a Society under a fee for service agreement with the City of Abbotsford. The Reach is 20,000 square feet in size and features a 6,100 square foot exhibition hall; large reception area (suitable for entertaining); archives; multi‐purpose studio; two community exhibition spaces; art collection storage; and museum artefact collection storage.
The Museum at Campbell River a purpose‐built facility that is located on a seven‐acre wooded site, with commanding view of Discovery Passage (an active shipping lane running between Campbell River and Quadra Island). The forested site offers excellent opportunities for outdoor activities, displays and interpretation.
The Chilliwack Museum housed in the City’s former City Hall building while the object storage and Chilliwack Archives are housed in a municipally owned structure three blocks from the museum. The Museum and Archives are governed by the Chilliwack Museum and Historical Society. Founded in 1982 as part of the Air Force Indoctrination School, the Comox Air Force Museum was accredited as a stand‐alone Canadian Forces Museum and officially opened its doors to the public on 12 September 1987. Survey of BC Museums ‐ 2015
When the Mackin House is not in use as a Museum, it is made available to local civic, school, cultural and not‐for‐
profit community groups for meetings, programs, and events of an educational, recreational, social or cultural nature.
The Courtenay and District Museum was established in 1961 as a non‐
profit organization with the mandate to collect, preserve and interpret natural and cultural heritage of the Comox Valley region. Greater Vernon's museum and archives is located in downtown Vernon in a centennial building as part of the civic complex. The Kamloops Museum and Archives is a purpose built facility, constructed in 1998. It has Category A designation, and although it does not currently charge general admission, they are transitioning to an entry fee by 2016.
Various renovations were undertaken at the Okanagan Heritage Museum in 2001 to make room for the Kelowna Public Archives and the Ursula Surtees Conservation Laboratory. Today, the Okanagan Heritage Museum is undergoing an exciting and extensive renovation of its exhibitions that will bring a new level of engagement with the public.
Okanagan Heritage Museum
117,312
Kelowna
Kamloops Museum & Archives
98,754
Kamloops Greater Vernon Museum & Archives
58,584
Greater Vernon
Courtenay & District
Museum & Paleontology Centre
58,584
Courtenay and District
Mackin House Museum
126,840
Coquitlam
Comox Air Force Museum
55,213
Comox Valley (Courtenay, Comox, Comox Valley A & Chilliwack Museum and Archives
92,308
Chilliwack
Museum at Campbell River
Campbell River
1996
24000
204.5826514
Return to Table of Contents - Attachments
1 of 2
Page 66 of 146
Reach Gallery and Museum
36,096
7000
212.6496142
No
Abbotsford
1998 (repurposed)
No
170,191
No, purpose built
1967
Yes, Museum and Science Centre
12000
No, repurposed in early 1990,s
3200
19907
Has a library with related material
1942
No
16000
Purpose built in 1994
21000
1994
Multi‐Use / Description
20000
3000
2008
3000
Square Footage
TOTAL
8700
City of kelowna
Yes
City of Kamloops
Society
204.8340844
City of Vernon
City of Kamloops
No
City of Coquitlam
Charity Org
25.2286345
Federal
NFP Society
City of Kelowna (exterior)
289.7868256
City of Chilliwack
Royal Canadian Air Force (Fed Gov)
City of Kamloops
No
21000
Community
0
Population served
0
NFP Society
Regional District of North Okanagan
Yes
City of Coquitlam
491,000
491,000
15000
By recommended donation $3 per adult $1 per child
NA
Federal
City of Courtenay
Year Constructed
6000
Yes
581.7819149
City of Campbell River
No
City of Abbotsford
NFP Society
117.5150272
Ownership
NFP Society
Category A Designation
Operated By
City of Abbotsford
Square Footage
EXHIBITION
Square Footage
PER/1000
Maintenance
EXTERIOR
Regional District of North Okanagan
270,000
This varies: society pays for day‐to‐day maintenance, cleaning and minor cosmetic repairs/ upgrades (e.g. painting, improvements to the sound system) but the city supports major repairs and maintenance (e.g. work on the HVAC system, leaks, etc.).
247,000
Maintenance
INTERIOR
Federal
Building costs include all 19 Wing buildings. $25,000 to $35,000 spent per year on display upgrades. Assoication contributes $15,000/yr for program manager 12000
870,000
No
Operating Budget
3600
185000
No
237,400
10000
by donation averaging $3 per person
No
No
23,000
625,000
Fee for service agreement
No
Greater Vernon Cultural Plan
Local Gov Grant
Annual Attendance
Agreement
General Admission
Regional District of North Okanagan
OPERATION
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
The Langley Centennial Museum, located in the historic village of Fort Langley, is owned and operated by the Township of Langley. The museum opened in 1958. After more than 50 years of offering exhibits, programs, and other cultural and heritage services, we continue to grow and expand our role in the Township of Langley. The museum is housed in the former Manager’s home for Port Haney Brick & Tile. The museum features First Nations prehistory, history of settlement and prominent families of historic Maple Ridge and a world‐
class model railway diorama of the Port Haney area.
In 2008, the Nanaimo Museum was relocated into a purpose‐built space as part of the Vancouver Island Coference Centre.
the New Westminster Museum and Archives is located within the Anvil Centre, which includes the New Media Gallery, conference space, theatres and studio space.
There are also two satellite museums.
The Richmond art gallery is located wtihin the Richmond Cultural Centre.
Survey of BC Museums ‐ 2015
The Exploration Place Museum + Science Centre is owned and operated by the Fraser‐Fort George Museum Society, a non‐profit society and registered charity. The Exploration Place was opened in 2001 with funding from the Regional District of Fraser‐Fort George, The Government of Canada, Canfor Corporation, and The Government of British Columbia. The Red Deer Museum and Art Gallery
MAG ‐ Red Deer Museum & Art Gallery
90,564
Red Deer
Richmond Museum
190,473
Richmond
The Exploration Place
Prince George
New Westminster Museum and Archives
91,879
Nanaimo Museum & Archives
65,967
New Westminster
Maple Ridge Museum & Community Archives
98,021
Nanaimo
1975
30,000 ‐ 8,000 is used for City of Red Deer archives a separate organization from the Museum
#VALUE!
10,000 square feet (permanent exhibition occupies about 5,000 square feet. Right now we are using about 1,000 square feet from the temporary exhibitions space for collection storage
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Page 67 of 146
Langley Centennial Museum
94,252
Maple Ridge (and Pitt Meadows)
0
gallery and museum
Langley
23,000
250.3292374
Roughly half of the total space is exhibit space with an additional 4500 sq feet in classroom and atrium space
Yes to 1981 standards
Cultural Centre with library, art gallery and arts centre
55,086
2000's
Anvil Centre, with gallery, conference space, theatres and studios
Community
163.2303282
8000
16,000
2008
Purpose built with part of a conference centre, with a retail component
Population served
No ‐ repuprosed in 1980's
Yes
Museum ‐ Science Centre and Childcare /Preschool all operated by the Museum
1981 ‐ in 2001 doubled square footage Gallery and museum
12000
Multi‐Use / Description
0
1958, with renos in 1070's and 1980's 0
Year Constructed
Square Footage
TOTAL
3500
217.8411938
No, but working on it
Square Footage
EXHIBITION
Square Footage
PER/1000
Category A Designation
City of Nanaimo
Registered Canadian Charity and BC Society (Fraser‐Fort George Museum Society) Red Deer and District Museum Society
The city is responsible for major capital and the Museum Society is responsible for daily maintenance Yes
The City of Red Deer. The Red Deer & District Museum Society owns the collection
Township of Langley
Society
Museum ‐ major repairs Regional District
Museum staff. Major capital items are covered with a capital maintenance budget
1,616,500
Regional District
Ownership
Township of Langley
City of Nanaimo (exterior), Society (interior)
Museum ‐ major repairs Regional District
City of New Westminster
Operated By
Langley
Society
City of Richmond
Maintenance
EXTERIOR
General cleaning is done by janitorial contractor, building maintenance is done by another department of the Township of Langley
650,000
2014 ‐ 15,000
They abolished admission charges in February of 2014, but they do charge fees for special programs
Contract with the City of Red Deer
Receive grants from Alberta Lotteries and the Alberta Museums Association. They receive a Fee for Service Grant from the City of Red Deer for operating expenses. They are not eligible for other City grants
1.2 Million
Maintenance
INTERIOR
500,000
Greater Vernon Cultural Plan
Yes and you can purchase memberships as well
They have rotating 5 year funding agreements with the Regional District
70,000 onsite and 30,000‐45,000 offsite and online
Operating Budget
45000
38% of annual operating budget comes from the Regional District of Fraser Fort George (2015 ‐ $620,000)
Yes
320000
45000
$2 Adults, $1.75 senior/youth
375,000
NA
by donation
Local Gov Grant
Agreement
Annual Attendance
General Admission
Regional District of North Okanagan
Return to Table of Contents - Attachments
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
kari huhtala + associates
POLICY DIRECTIONS
Return to Table of Contents -Attachments
Page 68 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
TABLE OF CONTENTS
GREATER VERNON CULTURAL PLAN | 2015 - 2025
MACKIE LAKE HOUSE (FOUNDATION)
Page 69 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
1. INTRODUCTION
1.1 What is Culture? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1.2 Why Culture Matters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.3 Culture in Greater Vernon . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.4 The Historical Role of the RDNO . . . . . . . .
5
2. PL AN OVERVIEW + PROCESS
2.1 Plan Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7
2.2 Issues and Opportunities . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
3. VISION + GUIDING PRINCIPLES
3.1Vision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
3.2 Guiding Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
4. PL AN STRATEGIES
4.1 Cultural Leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
4.2 Cultural Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
4.3 Cultural Places and Spaces . . . . . . . . . . .31
4.4 Cultural Narrative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
5. MOVING AHEAD - PL AN IMPLEMENTATION
KARI HUHTALA + ASSOCIATES | CITYSPACES CONSULTING LTD. | 2015 - 2025 | GREATER VERNON CULTURAL PLAN
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page 70 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
1. INTRODUCTION
1.1
What is Culture?
1.2
Why Culture Matters
1.3
Culture in Greater Vernon
1.4
The Historical Role of RDNO
GREATER VERNON CULTURAL PLAN | 2015 - 2025
VERNON & DISTRICT PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE
Page 71 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
The purpose of the Cultural Plan for Greater Vernon is to:
•
Articulate a sustainable, authentic, long-term vision for cultural vitality in Greater Vernon
•
Identify possibilities for connections and partnerships between and among cultural organizations and
other stakeholders
•
Present opportunities for collaboration among the Regional District of North Okanagan, the City of Vernon
and the District of Coldstream
•
Provide policy directions, as well as considerations for Plan implementation.
1.1 What is Culture?
Culture in Greater Vernon is the interaction between the community’s values, atmosphere or feel, education,
creativity, and the cultural assets of it’s places and the people who live or have lived there.
VALUES
MACKIE LAKE HOUSE (FOUNDATION)
Memories, stories, ideas, and
beliefs that are cherished and
preserved for present and
future generations.
ATMOSPHERE
VERNON & DISTRICT PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE
Feelings we get from a place,
the activity, and the energy
that spills out onto the street,
or the active culture of a place
that is experienced in local
shops, restaurants, public
places & spaces.
CREATIVITY
VERNON PUBLIC ART GALLERY
Experiences of excellence
and creative expression that
is conveyed and created
through artist talent in theatres,
studios, community programs
and spaces, and galleries, to
name a few.
Every community has values, atmosphere and creative talent, and it is the characteristics and interplay
between these elements that make a place distinctive from other communities.
KARI HUHTALA + ASSOCIATES | CITYSPACES CONSULTING LTD. | 2015 - 2025 | GREATER VERNON CULTURAL PLAN |
1. INTRODUCTION
Page 72 of 146
1
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
1.2 Why Culture Matters
Culture and Quality of Life
Culture enriches people’s day-to-day lives, sometimes in intangible ways. Culture provides enjoyment and
appreciation of all creative endeavours, and through culture, the community shares its stories and history,
and is able to learn about itself and others. Culture includes the richness of knowledge about an area’s social
history, and the wonders of the natural world.
A successful community is one that is responsive to the needs of all its residents for the varied experiences
that go under the heading “culture.” This can include enjoying a live jazz performance and participating in a
public debate about books; glass-blowing at a community art centre and quiet contemplation of a masterpiece
in a gallery; dance classes for children and birding groups for seniors; and so on.
Cultural spaces and places help foster the development of community identity and a pride of place that not
only attracts and retains residents, but also create interesting and engaging cultural experiences for visitors
to the community. Greater Vernon’s cultural spaces and places give it a welcoming, charming and unique
character that residents and visitors alike recognize as a place they can create, perform, exhibit, learn, engage
and be entertained.
Culture can also enhance quality of life through special cultural events, festivals, and performances, of which
Greater Vernon enjoys many over the course of the year. Like Greater Vernon’s cultural places, these events
provide opportunities for residents to gather socially and celebrate the culture and diversity of the community
by showcasing local cultural resources and artistic talent to both residents and visitors.
“Greater Vernon’s culture is
vital, rich, alive – keep it up!”
~ Public input received at Sunshine Festival
2
| GREATER VERNON CULTURAL PLAN | 2015 - 2025 | CITYSPACES CONSULTING LTD. | KARI HUHTALA + ASSOCIATES
Page 73 of 146
1. INTRODUCTION
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
The Economic Benefits of Culture
The economic contribution of artists, artisans, creators and the many other participants in the emerging
creative economy is very significant. When their impact on the retail sector, tourism, culinary, hospitality,
travel and many other key elements of the Greater Vernon economy are included, the creative economy is a
multi-million dollar part of the local economy that has significant and rapid growth potential to add to local
jobs and improve our prosperity as a major community in the Okanagan region and province.
Today, a vibrant art and cultural sector is crucial to attracting and retaining a talented labor force, creating an
environment favourable to innovation, attracting investment and promoting tourism. The rich and distinctive
cultures of large cities such as Vancouver, Seattle, Calgary and Toronto, and smaller communities such as
Tofino, Whistler, Osoyoos and Kelowna are not so much evidence of these communities’ economic prosperity
as they are factors that give rise to it.
Municipalities that adopt culture as an economic engine have gained positive economic benefits for their
communities. Cultural industries create job growth, turn commonplace communities into desired destinations,
generate interconnections between arts and business, invigorate urban areas, entice skilled workers, and
create spin-off industries.
Greater Vernon’s economic base is diverse, including natural resources, agriculture, retail, military, and
manufacturing, and increasingly, creative and knowledge-based industry dependent on skilled creative
professionals.
Greater Vernon is well positioned to benefit from integrated cultural planning because the community already
offers a quality lifestyle that is the desire of many other cities and is becoming more and more appealing. The
community has a growing wealth of cultural assets that can leveraged to attract creative people in many fields
to live, work and invest in Greater Vernon.
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1.3 Culture in Greater Vernon
Greater Vernon is home to many organizations that together create a rich diversity of culture, which includes
artist organizations, performance venues, museums, galleries, historic buildings and sites, nature clubs, and
festivals. Some of Greater Vernon’s key cultural assets include facilities and organizations that provide a wide
range of cultural programs to the community. This (by no means complete) list includes:
4
•
Allan Brooks Nature Centre
•
Arts Council of the North Okanagan
•
Caetani Cultural Centre
•
Gallery Vertigo
•
Greater Vernon Museum and Archives
•
Mackie Lake House
•
North Okanagan Chapter Federation of Canadian Artists
•
Okanagan Science Centre
•
Vernon Film Society
•
Okanagan Symphony Orchestra
•
O’Keefe Ranch
•
Powerhouse Theatre
•
Vernon Community Arts Centre
•
Vernon Community Music School
•
Vernon and District Performing Arts Centre
•
Vernon Camera Club
•
Vernon Jazz Club
•
Vernon Public Art Gallery
•
Vernon Public Library
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CAETANI CULTURAL CENTRE, LANTERN WORKSHOP
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1.4 The Historical Role of the RDNO
The Regional District of North Okanagan provides cultural services to the Greater Vernon area, as set out by
a service establishment bylaw (Greater Vernon Parks, Recreation and Culture Service Conversion and Service
Establishment Bylaw No. 1648, 2000). This Bylaw defines the scope of the Regional District’s role in providing
cultural services by determining the types of cultural services and organizations it will support, as well as
identifying how these services and organizations will be supported.
The cultural functions and/or facilities included in the Bylaw are: Museum; Art Gallery; Boys and Girls Club;
Arts Council; Caetani House; and Cultural grants; Literacy and Youth Initiatives Society of the North Okanagan
(Teen Junction). Over the years, the provision for “cultural grants” has allowed other groups and services not
specified within the bylaw to be eligible for funding.
The RDNO supports these organizations and/or the services provided by these organizations through
operating grants, as well as grants-in-aid. The RDNO also offers a project grants program, which provides
funding to non-profit organizations for a variety of types of projects, including festivals, events, and capital
improvements. Additionally, cultural Services in Greater Vernon are supported by the equivalent of a 0.8 FTE
(full-time employee), which is currently split between three employees with the RDNO.
The RDNO dedicated annual funding of $2 million to support Greater Vernon cultural facilities and organizations
in 2014, including for major and minor capital improvements/maintenance (based on an annual estimate), as well
as the debt payments associated with the capital investment of the Performing Arts Centre. This amounted is $36
per capita, a very respectable standard for a community of its size.
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1. INTRODUCTION
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2. PLAN PROCESS + DEVELOPMENT
2.1
Plan Process
2.2
Issues and Opportunities
6
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GALLERY VERTIGO NORTH OKANAGAN ARTISTS ALTERNATIVE
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2.1 Plan Process
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee & Steering
Team Workshops
The Cultural Plan has been developed with ongoing input and over-sight
from the RDNO Cultural Services staff, the Greater Vernon Advisory
Committee (GVAC), and a project Steering Committee – a twenty-four
member body representing the cultural sector, business community, and
the RDNO. Beginning in June 2014, both these groups met five times
– roughly once a month. Through this process, the groups were able
to help identify key issues and opportunities, and develop a vision and
guiding principles, as well as draft policy directions.
CANADA DAY EVENT
Public Consultation
The Plan has also been informed by ongoing input from the public.
Over the course of the project, RDNO Community Development
Coordinator attended, along with members of the Steering Team, eleven
separate public events in Greater Vernon with a pop-up Cultural Plan
display and information booth and interactive feedback poster board.
This highly effective form of direct outreach helped raise the profile
of the Plan in the community and generated hundreds of individual
comments on cultural issues and opportunities. This direct outreach
was supplemented by a questionnaire which was placed in the Greater
Vernon Parks and Leisure Guide, and an online questionnaire which was
available on the RDNO website.
CIVIC SOUNDS EVENT
SUNSHINE FEST EVENT
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2. PLAN PROCESS + DEVELOPMENT
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Cultural Plan Public Outreach - Events Attended and Number of Attendees (estimated)
JUNE 21, 2014
SUNSHINE FESTIVAL
ON 30TH AVE
6,500ATTENDEES
JULY 1, 2014
CANADA DAY
AT POLSON PARK
4,500ATTENDEES
JULY 18, 2014
DVA AVENUE MARKET
ON 30TH AVE
AUGUST 20, 2014
JAMMIN’ IN JUSTICE PARK
800 ATTENDEES
100 ATTENDEES
AUGUST 21, 2014
CIVIC SOUNDS
500 ATTENDEES
AUGUST 23, 2014
RIOT ON THE ROOF
450 ATTENDEES
15,080
SEPTEMBER 12, 2014
COLDSTREAM FARMERS MARKET
150 ATTENDEES
SEPTEMBER 12, 2014
BRASS IN THE GRASS
AT MACKIE LAKE HOUSE
100 ATTENDEES
SEPTEMBER 25, 2014
VERNON FARMERS MARKET
SEPTEMBER 26, 2014
BOOK SMACK AT THE VERNON &
DISTRICT PERFORMING ARTS
CENTRE
SEPTEMBER 28, 2014
GREATER VERNON RIVERS DAY
CELEBRATION
8
ED
TOTAL ESTIMAT
S
EE
ND
EVENT ATTE
1,700ATTENDEES
80
ATTENDEES
200 ATTENDEES
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2. PLAN PROCESS + DEVELOPMENT
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2.2 Issues and Opportunities
2.2.1 Greater Vernon Advisory Committee and Steering
Team
The Greater Vernon Advisory Committee (GVAC), and Steering Team helped identify key issues and
opportunities to be addressed by the Plan. These were as follows:
1. Review RDNO’s approach to cultural funding
Both RDNO representatives, as well as members of the cultural community have noted issues with the
mechanics of how the RDNO funds cultural services. While the current regulations and policies do provide
some direction on how cultural services should be funded, they have also been interpreted in different ways
over the years. This has led to a situation where neither the RDNO nor the cultural community has the desired
level of certainty over which cultural organizations are eligible for certain types of funding, and at what funding
levels and expectations. The Plan should provide recommendations for how the RDNO can make improvements
to its current approach that will provide greater clarity for both the decision-makers as well as potential
funding applicants.
2. Establish priority facility needs
Steering Team and GVAC members have noted the need for a clearer and criteria-based decisionmaking process for establishing funding priorities for new cultural facilities. This process should take into
consideration the spacial needs of the community for cultural programming, as well as the existing spacial
capacity that may be available, and the financial capacity of the community.
3. Provide greater stability in funding
For the most part, the RDNO provides funding on a year-to-year basis. Short term funding provides maximum
flexibility and reduces risk to the RDNO. On the other hand, longer term funding such as through a multi-year
funding agreement, provides the facility operator with greater security of tenure, which can assist in obtaining
private financing. It can also provide greater budgeting security to the RDNO.
4. Improve community access to publicly-owned and funded resources
Many publicly funded facilities and spaces are not fully accessible to non-profit groups. The situation, by
comparison, is better with recreation facilities, which offer subsidized rates for youth participants, for example.
Also, onerous fees and insurance requirements can act as a barrier to small groups looking to organize arts
and cultural events in local parks.
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5. Foster collaboration and partnerships
The Plan should identify ways to foster cultural collaboration. In the case of collaboration among cultural
groups, this might include making it easier for groups to share space, equipment, and information. There are
several good examples of collaboration between the cultural community and government, but this could be
broadened. The Plan should also facilitate collaboration between business and cultural groups. Additionally,
the Plan should explore the feasibility of collaborative efforts to:
•
Better incorporate the arts into the education system
•
Provide opportunities for involvement in arts and culture as part of health / mental health programs
•
Include agricultural and environmental issues into the Plan
•
Encourage greater ethnic diversity and First Nations inclusion in cultural events
6. Help make information related to culture more accessible
Greater Vernon needs a one-stop source of information on all things to do with culture: upcoming events,
programs, and cultural organizations. While there are many sources of information, no one source is recognized
by the community as being adequately comprehensive and up-to-date.
7. Promote and strengthen the local cultural scene to help attract new
residents and visitors to Greater Vernon
It is recognized that a community’s cultural amenities are an important determinant in attracting new residents
and visitors, and that attracting new residents and visitors is an important component of an economic
development strategy. The Plan should identify ways for Greater Vernon to promote its existing cultural
amenities in order to help grow the local tourism sector as well as attract new residents.
10
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8. Make Greater Vernon more culturally vibrant
Some participants, both on the Steering Team as well as the public, feel that Greater Vernon is lacking in
cultural vitality. The scope of what it means to improve the local cultural scene in general is admittedly broad,
but there are many potential initiatives and ideas that may warrant investigation as part of the Plan.
Some ideas offered by members of the Steering Team include:
Create an
artist bank
Provide opportunities
for youth to engage
in arts and culture
Provide or facilitate
special arts events
Provide supp
ort for
arts program
ming
in recreation
Incorporate art
into the functioning of
local government
Provide oppo
rtunities
for intergen
era
interaction a tional
nd learning
ate
Recognize and celebr
successes
Encourage more
creative placemaking
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2. PLAN PROCESS + DEVELOPMENT
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2.2.2
Public Input
Over the course of the project, public input was gathered in three ways:
•
An in-person Post-it Note feedback board, which was hosted by RDNO staff and Steering Team
representatives at eleven public events between June and September 2014
•
A questionnaire in the Greater Vernon Parks and Leisure Guide
•
A questionnaire on Greater Vernon Cultural Plan website
These each asked a variety of questions, which were designed to help identify issues and gaps as well as
the opportunities, and appreciated elements of culture in Greater Vernon. The following table presents the
questions that were posed to the public. As respondents were, in many cases, free to complete as many or as
few questions as they liked, we have counted the number of responses to individual questions, not completed
questionnaires.
Questions asked in the Post-it Boards and questionnaire: “When it comes to culture…”
“Greater Vernon needs ...”
130 RESPONSES
“The cultural facility I frequent most is ...”
64 RESPONSES
“It would be great if Greater Vernon had ...”
62 RESPONSES
“I wish everyone in Greater Vernon knew about ...”
42 RESPONSES
“The best thing about Greater Vernon’s cultural scene is ...”
58 RESPONSES
COLDSTREAM MARKET
12
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2. PLAN PROCESS + DEVELOPMENT
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Results of Public Input
The following tables show the most common responses to each of the questions. Responses shown are those
that were given by at least 5% of respondents.
1. When it comes to culture, Greater Vernon needs ...
More venues for performing arts, especially live music
16%
More special events/ festivals
16%
More cultural facilities and activities for youth
14%
A new art gallery
13%
A more vibrant downtown/cultural district
9%
A new/expanded museum
6%
2. It would be great if Greater Vernon had ...
More special events/festivals
15%
A more vibrant downtown/cultural district
11%
More venues for live music / theatre
10%
VERNON MARKET
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3. The cultural facility I frequent the most is ...
Vernon and District Performing Arts Centre
30%
Library
9%
Towne Theatre
8%
Powerhouse Theatre
6%
Museum
5%
4. I wish everyone in Greater Vernon knew about ...
Greater Vernon’s local music scene
19%
The Vernon Public Art Gallery, and its need for more space
14%
5. The best thing about Greater Vernon’s cultural scene is ...
Its variety and high quality
19%
Its outdoor culture
14%
Its live music scene
10%
The Vernon and District Performing Arts Centre
10%
Library
5%
MACKIE LAKE HOUSE
14
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2. PLAN PROCESS + DEVELOPMENT
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Key Findings
1. A need for a variety of new or expanded cultural spaces and places
Public perception of cultural needs and gaps in Greater Vernon was tested through the following two
questions: “When it comes to culture, Greater Vernon needs…” and “It would be great if Greater Vernon had…”
The results of the responses to these two questions shows that the Greater Vernon public would like to see a
number of additional or improved cultural facilities and/or districts, with the priorities being:
•
More venues for performing arts, especially live music
•
More cultural places and activities for youth
•
A new art gallery
•
A more vibrant downtown/public realm
•
A new/expanded museum
2. A desire for more special cultural events
The responses to the questions “When it comes to culture, Greater Vernon needs…” and “It would be great if
Greater Vernon had…” indicate that the public would like to see more public special events, such as festivals
and live performances.
3. An appreciation for Greater Vernon’s cultural assets
The questions: “The cultural facility I frequent most is…”, “I wish everyone in Greater Vernon knew about…”,
and “The best thing about Greater Vernon’s cultural scene is…” were posed in order to gauge the public’s
preferences for particular cultural facilities, programs and activities. These questions found that the public
is greatly appreciative of Greater Vernon’s overall variety and quality of culture, noting particularly its music
scene, outdoor culture, and the Vernon and District Performing Arts Centre.
RIOT ON THE ROOF
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2. PLAN PROCESS + DEVELOPMENT
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3. VISION + GUIDING PRINCIPLES
3.1
Vision
3.2
Guiding Principles
16
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3.1Vision
The following vision statement captures the culture planning process community input and will guide future
cultural initiatives and actions:
We see a community where:
Greater Vernon’s culture is a measure of our daily lives; a reflection of our historical roots and present diversity;
and a recognition that our community and cultural vitality rises from our creative spirit.
MACKIE LAKE HOUSE (FOUNDATION)
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3. VISION + GUIDING PRINCIPLES
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3.2Guiding Principles
The Guiding Principles are values and perspectives which reflect the Vision and inform the Goals and
Strategies of the Plan. They function as a filter through which all Goals and Strategies are considered.
Embrace accessibility, inclusivity and diversity
Ensure that cultural learning opportunities, resources and activities are embraced and fostered, and are
accessible regardless of age groups, physical abilities, ethnicity and socioeconomic households.
Promote innovation and creativity
Seize opportunities to encourage creativity and innovation to build a culturally vibrant community that attract
skilled creative professionals to live and work in Greater Vernon.
Encourage collaboration and communication
Foster collaboration between and among citizens, cultural organizations, local government, educational
institutions, and the business and tourism sector.
Build on strengths and support new initiatives
Enhance and enrich Greater Vernon’s existing cultural facilities and programs, while also supporting new
initiatives.
Recognize culture’s role in promoting economic vitality
Acknowledge that culture is a driving force to economic vibrancy, where the community’s uniqueness and
cultural contributions are celebrated in order to help bring Greater Vernon to the world and the world to
Greater Vernon.
Celebrate history of yesterday, today and tomorrow
Collect, preserve and display Greater Vernon’s cultural heritage, while promoting creativity, supporting wider
educational efforts, and fostering innovation.
Be accountable and fiscally responsible
Ensure cultural sustainability for future generations is in harmony with the community’s economic health, social
equity and environmental responsibility that include continuous monitoring and accountability, and provide
guidance on the fair allocation of public resources.
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RIOT ON THE ROOF
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3. VISION + GUIDING PRINCIPLES
19
RIOT ON THE ROOF
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4. PLAN STRATEGIES
4.1
Cultural Leadership
4.2
Cultural Capacity
4.3
Cultural Places and Spaces
4.4
Cultural Narrative
20
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The following policy directions have been identified in four cultural development areas to assist in achieving
the Plan’s vision and suggest possible actions that will help to implement the plan. These categories are:
1. Cultural Leadership
2. Cultural Capacity
3. Cultural Places and Spaces
4. Cultural Narrative
4.1. CULTURAL LEADERSHIP
The role of local government is to support the community through the facilitation of resources and
knowledge and the provision of experience of civic administration to generate cultural vitality.
Greater Vernon has the opportunity to produce a distinctive cultural offering that enriches the cultural
experience of residents and visitors alike. The Regional District of North Okanagan, City of Vernon and District
of Coldstream cannot do this alone, but can provide leadership.
Draft Policy Directions
4.1.1
Intergovernmental and community implementation
Support a collaborative intergovernmental and community approach to implementing
recommendations of the Greater Vernon Cultural Plan, while clearly identifying and adhering
to roles and responsibilities.
CONSIDERATIONS AND POTENTIAL STRATEGIES:
• Establish effective connections between cultural planning and other local
planning processes: community, social, environmental, transportation, and
economic planning.
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4. PLAN STRATEGIES
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4.1.2
Implementation advisory team
Establish a Cultural Plan implementation advisory team to build collaboration between RDNO
and its key cultural, business and community partners with a regular reporting relationship to the
Board of Directors through the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee.
CONSIDERATIONS AND POTENTIAL STRATEGIES:
• Prepare an implementation advisory team terms of reference to advise the RDNO,
City of Vernon and District Coldstream Councils on a wide range of cultural policies,
issues and initiatives to be taken in the implementation of the cultural plan.
4.1.3
Ad hoc community forums
Convene issue-based community forums when needed, continuing input and engagement related
to actions and initiatives set out in the Cultural Plan.
CONSIDERATIONS AND POTENTIAL STRATEGIES:
• When necessary, bring together stakeholders and community members to work
as a focus group that can provide more detailed information to support the
implementation of the Plan.
• Provide and support regular networking opportunities, educational workshops,
forums, etc. to support cultural organizations, creative cultural workers and
professionals, and community volunteers.
22
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4.1.4
Scope of RDNO cultural services
Review the cultural services that are being delivered by the Regional District and support
multi-year funding agreements with organizations responsible for delivering those services.
CONSIDERATIONS AND POTENTIAL STRATEGIES:
• Review the organizations listed in the Bylaw, and ensure services being delivered
align with the Regional District’s Greater Vernon service scope and mandate;
• With consideration to identified gaps, look at adjusting the scope of service, and
associated bylaws, where appropriate;
• Work with service partners to secure multi-year funding agreements.
4.1.5
Criteria-based decision-making process
Develop a process (e.g., criteria-based evaluation matrix) for ensuring that the cultural services
being delivered by the Regional District are meeting current and future community objectives and
needs.
CONSIDERATIONS AND POTENTIAL STRATEGIES:
• Develop a set of criteria to provide a consistent and transparent assessment of
annual community and project grants.
4.1.6
Annual project funding allocation
Continue to provide an annual funding allotment to be available to eligible community based nonprofit arts and cultural organizations, through an annual application process, to provide
an avenue for support for special projects, events, festivals or small capital.
CONSIDERATIONS AND POTENTIAL STRATEGIES:
• Consider accepting grant applications more than once a year.
• Conduct a review of the cultural grant process and current funding criteria, to
continue to support the development of a thriving, resilient and diverse cultural
sector, and related initiatives in creating a vibrant healthy and sustainable
community.
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4.1.7
Cultural asset inventory
Maintain an inventory of community cultural assets and resources (such as facilities,
organizations, events/festivals, etc). This inventory will assist in the on-going identification of
needs and opportunities for investing in cultural development.
CONSIDERATIONS AND POTENTIAL STRATEGIES:
• Continue to maintain the cultural inventory on an annual basis (e.g. web based,
phone app, cultural calendar, etc.).
• Work with local government-funded cultural organizations and facilities to develop
a standardized format for data collection which may include:
»»
»»
»»
»»
»»
»»
»»
4.1.8
Number and type of programs and services provided
For facilities, usage hours in proportion to available hours
Volume of membership and facility, event and program attendance/participation
Demographic information about attendees/participants
Private and public funding obtained in proportion to local government funding provided
Volunteer activity
Images, video and other documentation
Plan monitoring and reporting
Prepare an annual report to RDNO Board of Directors outlining the progress made on
implementing the plan’s goals and strategies.
CONSIDERATIONS AND POTENTIAL STRATEGIES:
• Prepare a cultural report card to highlight accomplishments achieved reflecting the
goals of the cultural plan.
24
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4.2. Cultural Capacity
Helping build capacity of a cultural organization helps improve its ability to achieve its mission and
sustain itself over time.
When capacity building is successful, it strengthens a cultural organization’s ability to fulfill its mission,
and helps the organizations to have a positive impact on lives and communities.
Draft Policy Directions
4.2.1
Economic development.
Explore opportunities to grow Greater Vernon’s cultural assets to contribute to the local economy.
4.2.2
Cultural business development.
Coordinate with local organizations, such as the Downtown Vernon Association, Chamber of
Commerce and Community Futures, to offer business development and skills training to cultural
entrepreneurs and non-profits.
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4.2.3
Cultural non-profit development.
Support building stronger leadership and organizational capacity among non-profit arts and
cultural organizations (e.g. leadership and organizational challenges, questions of board
governance, volunteer management, quality fundraising and sponsorships, audience, etc.).
CONSIDERATIONS AND POTENTIAL STRATEGIES:
• Support collaboration between community organizations in the delivery of cultural
programs and services
• Provide and support regular networking opportunities, educational workshops,
forums, etc. to support cultural organizations and creative cultural workers and
professionals (including online opportunities)
• Create a Greater Vernon “Creative Network” to link all community arts and cultural
organizations with creative, innovative, knowledge-based industries for learning,
networking and collaborative opportunities
• Work with Community Futures to provide skills development training, eg, SharEd
Program
• Continue to work cooperatively with Greater Vernon arts and cultural organizations
and others to provide affordable professional development and learning
opportunities which will enhance capacity and sustainability for non-profit
organizations in the cultural sector.
• Support collective initiatives by cultural organizations to:
»» Identify and create opportunities for cultural and recreational organizations to support
and enhance each other’s projects and programs for the greater benefit of all.
»» Share various operational and administrative functions (i.e. research, marketing,
fundraising, administration and technology).
»» Assist in inventory and supplement technical assistance opportunities for the staffs and
boards of cultural organizations and artists to create coordinated and ongoing options
for quality professional development.
»» Assist community organizations research and/or develop selected materials and tools;
provide an online home for these resources.
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January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
4.2.4
Private sector funding.
Help provide information on the availability of private sector funding initiatives and programs
aimed at supporting creativity and culture (e.g. incentive matching and sponsorships
programs, etc.).
CONSIDERATIONS AND POTENTIAL STRATEGIES:
• Work collaboratively with the Chamber of Commerce and Downtown Vernon
Association to link the objectives in this plan with those of the business community.
• Investigate the merits of setting up a Vernon Business for the Arts Program to
support, partner and sponsor arts and cultural related programs, street markets,
festivals and events.
• Work with the Chamber of Commerce and Downtown Vernon Association to
enhance connectivity between the community cultural sector and high-tech
creative and creative cultural industries, local young professionals and business
investors that may inform creative cultural cluster development strategies, support
mechanisms and collaborative or collective approaches in the arts.
• Encourage the participation of business leaders in arts and cultural governance
and leadership (such as boards of directors for non-profit cultural organizations
and groups).
• Work with Tourism Vernon to:
»» Support research which will measure cultural tourism and visitor spending;
»» Clarify the working and strategic relationship between Greater Vernon cultural services
and Tourism Vernon to ensure that objectives and outcomes are, as much as possible,
mutually beneficial;
»» Develop strategies to identify, develop and promote Greater Vernon’s unique cultural
assets and identity, including heritage, festivals and events.
• Ensure official local government gifts to visiting dignitaries are made by local
artists or reflect local heritage.
• Work in consultation with community stakeholders, develop a cultural investment
strategy that combines and leverages municipal investment with private sector
support and other revenue streams.
• Consider tax incentives for new, start-up creative and/or cultural businesses in the
downtown core (make use of the Revitalization Area Tax Exemption from the Local
Government Act)
• Consider processes and criteria by which the local government could serve as
a facilitator to enable cultural organizations to access other funding sources for
cultural infrastructure projects.
KARI HUHTALA + ASSOCIATES | CITYSPACES CONSULTING LTD. | 2015 - 2025 | GREATER VERNON CULTURAL PLAN |
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4.2.5
Senior government funding.
Promote the use of provincial and federal government and other funding initiatives and programs
aimed at supporting creativity and culture.
CONSIDERATIONS AND POTENTIAL STRATEGIES:
• Advocate for the provincial and federal governments to sustain and support culture
in our community through appropriate levels of investment in local arts, heritage
and culture.
4.2.6
Special events.
Support cultural festivals and special events (i.e. connected to unique history, traditions, and
tourism events), making special efforts to provide events for youth and seniors, and at various
times throughout the year.
CONSIDERATIONS AND POTENTIAL STRATEGIES:
• Work in partnership with local media and cultural stakeholders, devise strategies
to deliver coordinated communication which tells the story of Greater Vernon’s
rich local culture in a compelling way that will encourage more support and
participation.
• With leadership from local organizations:
»» Support an annual ‘Cultural Crawl’ event to drive visitation to cultural facilities,
programs, and historic places.
»» Increase opportunities for engagement and free or low-cost participation by children,
youth, youth-at-risk, First Nations and other underserved populations in cultural
programs and events.
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
4.2.7
Cultural Heritage Strategy.
Work with the City of Vernon, the District of Coldstream, Okanagan First Nations, and RDNO in
preparing a cultural heritage strategy around built heritage, collection of moveable artifacts and
archives, and intangible heritage and community stories.
CONSIDERATIONS AND POTENTIAL STRATEGIES:
• Examine best practices experiences from other communities on the development
of a cultural heritage plan for Greater Vernon.
• Establish a budget and invite potential cultural heritage consultants to engage in
the development of a cultural heritage strategy.
• Initiate wayfinding and interpretive signage programs in the community to highlight
interesting historic buildings, places and stories of Greater Vernon’s historic past.
• Through grants and partnerships, encourage and support the creation and
distribution of heritage brochures/maps which will provide information for residents
and visitors about heritage conservation areas, sites and other features of interest.
4.2.8
Cultural events calendar.
Identify a sustainable way to consolidate and support an inclusive community programs and
event calendar, along with an outreach and awareness building campaign to encourage the widest
possible range of community groups to contribute to the calendar (e.g. online, kiosk, app, etc.).
CONSIDERATIONS AND POTENTIAL STRATEGIES:
• Partner with Tourism Vernon to develop a Greater Vernon Cultural Events Calendar
(web based cultural calendar, phone app, centrally based kiosks, etc.).
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4.2.9
Supporting youth engagement in culture.
Strengthen and expand youth engagement in culture (e.g. through schools, at-risk youth outreach
programs, apprenticeships with individual artists, young entrepreneurs and creative professionals,
cultural organizations, annual youth cultural event, intergenerational art programs, etc.).
CONSIDERATIONS AND POTENTIAL STRATEGIES:
• Strengthen linkages and information exchange with educational institutions offering
academic and technical curriculum in arts, culture and business, including: Centre
for Arts & Technology (CATO), UBC Okanagan and Okanagan College.
• Involve Greater Vernon’s formal education leaders (e.g., school principals, district
superintendent, school board members and other education decision-makers) to:
»» Share information, solutions and best practices, strengthen networks and develop a
shared vision and goals,
»» Offer students the benefits of an education that fully includes the arts;
»» Provide information to strengthen the opportunities for arts related professional
development for Pre K-12 teachers,
»» Develop more effective and expanded ways to bring cultural experiences to school
children, and
»» Coordinate research and joint creative industry initiatives with local schools and other
educational institutions.
4.2.10
Okanagan First Nations.
Liaison with and encourage the Okanagan First Nations to participate as part of Vernon’s cultural
scene and present their stories, cultural traditions and artists’ work within the Greater Vernon
community.
CONSIDERATIONS AND POTENTIAL STRATEGIES:
• Work with Okanagan First Nations to protect culturally significant natural resources
and places (e.g. cedars, culturally modified trees).
• Encourage Okanagan First Nations to participate in Plan Implementation.
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4.2.11
Neighbourhood culture projects.
Explore opportunities to support individuals and informal groups to organize and deliver
neighbourhood-scale community building projects.
CONSIDERATIONS AND POTENTIAL STRATEGIES:
• Rationale is to provide opportunity for informal groups/individuals (in contrast
to formal non-profit societies) to access RDNO support in a clear and transparent
way.
• Initiate the development of community based artwork projects that support
neighbourhood cultural development (e.g., a community gathering place, a walking
route, a story or a historic significant place, etc.
4.3. Cultural Places and Spaces
Great places support and enhance Greater Vernon’s cultural vitality.
It is in an enviable position of having an assembly of cultural heritage resources and facilities that remains
relevant, meaningful, and useful to the community. There are opportunities that the local government, in
partnership with its community partners, can maintain and create great places and support cultural vitality in
the downtown, across and between communities, and out into rural areas.
Draft Policy Directions
4.3.1
Cultural facility planning.
Identify the gaps in the community’s cultural facilities and spaces through a strategic plan
program that establishes criteria and process for investing, adapting or developing accessible
cultural facilities.
CONSIDERATIONS AND POTENTIAL STRATEGIES:
• Review and share information about best practice models for the development
and operation of live/work and shared spaces in other cities and assess, over
time, whether a formal feasibility study should be conducted for development of
such a facility in Greater Vernon.
• Identify opportunities for cultural space development and use during review of
development applications.
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
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4.3.2
Cultural use of publicly owned facilities.
Support the use of publicly owned facilities for cultural special events (e.g., festivals, markets)
and temporary uses (e.g., performance venues, programming space, gallery space, artist studios).
CONSIDERATIONS AND POTENTIAL STRATEGIES:
• Review City of Vernon and District of Coldstream bylaws and policies to help
remove barriers to the use of publicly owned facilities
• When planning new public facilities, work with event user groups to help identify
key design considerations
• Explore opportunities to make under-utilized publicly owned properties available
for temporary cultural use
• Develop a shared use agreement with School District 22
4.3.3
Publicly owned cultural facilities.
Establish a capital development model/process for the Regional District to fund and construct
new publicly owned cultural facilities, or adapt existing publicly-owned cultural facilities.
4.3.4
Non-profit cultural organizations.
Collaborate with non-profit cultural organizations in Greater Vernon to help find solutions to
current and future cultural service space needs.
Considerations and potential strategies:
• Work with community partners, gather information about unmet cultural space
needs in the community and the types of barriers which are being encountered (i.e.
cost, location, availability, municipal bylaws and regulations. etc.).
• Share information about space needs with the private sector and other agencies
and, through communication and policy, encourage their support in making space
available.
• Support community-led efforts to share space and services. Examples from other
cities may provide additional inspiration and information.
• Compile an inventory and map of existing publicly-owned buildings which may be
appropriate for community cultural use, including developing criteria and models
by which available municipal owned building and/or spaces can be offered to the
community in a fair and equitable manner.
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
4.3.5
Culturally vibrant and connected public realm.
Support continuing efforts to enhance outdoor areas where concentrations of cultural resources
exist in the community.
Considerations and potential strategies:
• Develop a “cultural tour” program and promote at Vernon Visitor Centre and
elsewhere (e.g. downtown revitalization, heritage preservation, public art
development, wayfinding and signage, public performance spaces, etc.)
• Work with the City of Vernon in coordinating downtown revitalization efforts to
support and enhance cultural development
4.3.6
Natural areas as cultural assets.
Celebrate and promote Greater Vernon’s natural resources that are valued cultural assets
Considerations and potential strategies:
• Recognize and celebrate Greater Vernon’s unique landscape (i.e. festivals, building
and infrastructure designs, street banner themes, etc.).
• Encourage an ethic of sustainability to protect and enhance the area’s unique
natural resources.
• Work with Okanagan First Nations to protect culturally significant natural resources
and places.
• Provide resources (skills, learning, tools) to community outdoor recreation
groups in order that they can protect natural spaces and conserve use of natural
resources. Could include information, signage, and promotional efforts.
4.3.7
Public art.
Support the development and implementation of an integrated public art program with established
policies supporting public art as an essential dimension of Greater Vernon’s commitments to
place-making and enhancement of the public realm.
Considerations and potential strategies:
• Support the City of Vernon and the District of Coldstream in preparing a Public Art
Program and Guidelines.
• Work with Electoral Areas “B” and “C” to establish an appropriate program and
guidelines if there is interest in establishing public art in their areas.
KARI HUHTALA + ASSOCIATES | CITYSPACES CONSULTING LTD. | 2015 - 2025 | GREATER VERNON CULTURAL PLAN |
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
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4.4. Cultural Narrative
By valuing arts and culture endeavours, the community can develop strategies that allow all long-time
residents, urban and rural residents, newcomers and visitors to share their compelling and distinctive stories
with each other and the world.
Draft Policy Directions
4.4.1
Cultural asset map.
Maintain a GIS-based map of cultural facilities, both publicly and privately owned.
Considerations and potential strategies:
»» Incorporate a cultural asset map layer to RDNO, City of Vernon and District of
Coldstream’s GIS mapping program and update it on an annual basis.
4.4.2
Celebration of cultural icons and success stories.
Communicate cultural success stories to build the profile of the local cultural sector, inspire
people and organizations, and attract new businesses, residents and visitors to Greater Vernon.
Considerations and potential strategies:
»» Institute an Arts and Cultural Awards, a high-profile annual community-wide event
where awards are presented by the RDNO Board of Directors to award winners in a
number of categories (e.g. sponsorship and funded by local businesses, individuals and
organizations, and recipients selected through a juried process).
»» Profile cultural “icons” (past and present) and images of cultural life in Greater Vernon
(e.g. interesting and important people and stories affiliated with the community).
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
4.4.3
Greater Vernon’s cultural brand and marketing.
Support the development of a Greater Vernon cultural brand and coordinated marketing initiative
that makes use of a range of different communications channels (e.g. support awareness and
audience development), complimenting what each organization is already doing.
Considerations and potential strategies:
»» Work with Tourism Vernon and the City of Vernon Economic Development department
to encourage the use of quality of life factors, such as arts, cultural and heritage as key
marketing tools
4.4.4
Public presentation of culture.
Showcase artworks, artefacts, performances and stories in and outside of public buildings and
facilities.
Considerations and potential strategies:
»» Promote Greater Vernon’s powerful historical narrative, built heritage and natural
heritage features into a strategy for telling community stories to each other and to the
world.
»» Work to use local government services and facilities, to foster and support innovative
cultural experiences, past and present stories, and temporary artistic installations.
»» Develop a program and plan to invest in the interpretation of the RDNO, City of Vernon
and District of Coldstream buildings and the artifacts it contains as a showcase for
certain artworks, artifacts and stories.
KARI HUHTALA + ASSOCIATES | CITYSPACES CONSULTING LTD. | 2015 - 2025 | GREATER VERNON CULTURAL PLAN |
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
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5. MOVING AHEAD PLAN IMPLEMENTATION
36
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GALLERY VERTIGO NORTH OKANAGAN ARTISTS ALTERNATIVE, YOUTH DRUMMING
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The next phase of the Greater Vernon Cultural Plan will be the development of an Implementation Plan.
This Implementation Plan will identify:
•
Responsibility: Who will be taking the lead role in implementing a specific strategy and any internal or
external partners who will be involved;
•
Priority actions: Recommended actions for immediate and near-term implementation; and
•
Time Frame: A ten-year schedule for completing each strategy or action.
•
Financial implications: rough budget estimates associated with action items within the implementation
plan, where feasible.
KARI HUHTALA + ASSOCIATES | CITYSPACES CONSULTING LTD. | 2015 - 2025 | GREATER VERNON CULTURAL PLAN |
5. MOVING AHEAD - PLAN IMPLEMENTATION
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
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January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
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ª$SFBUJWF$JUZ/FUXPSL
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
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Page 113 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
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Page 114 of 146
ª$SFBUJWF$JUZ/FUXPSL
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
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Page 119 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
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Page 120 of 146
ª$SFBUJWF$JUZ/FUXPSL
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
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Page 121 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
FACILITY DEVELOPMENT PROCESS (from January 2014 GVAC meeting):
Below are the steps for facility development that are considered best practices. This framework would apply for any type
of facility development, be it recreation or culture.
Step 1.
Development of an arts and culture master plan, with a facility strategic plan component (typically 10
year), which should include:
o
an inventory of existing assets (in the case of culture, assets would include everything from performance venues
to meeting rooms, as well as organizations and service providers);
o
a needs assessment, which would be determined through consultation with community organizations,
stakeholder groups, and community surveys. Standard benchmarks would also be considered to give context
to the list of identified needs (for example: a community should have 1 library for every X residents), as would
local participation/growth trends;
o
long-term cultural goals for the community.
The capital priorities that are outlined in the plan should not be considered in isolation, but against
other priority capital projects within the department and the community.
Step 2.
Plan a facility that can meet the priority needs
o
Clearly outline what community needs the facility is going to meet (as determined through the process above),
looking at opportunities to address the needs of multiple organizations.
o
Clearly determine who the facility is for: who will own it; who will run it; who will use it (primary users and other
potential secondary users).
o
Conduct an organizational capacity assessment of the organization that will be managing the facility, including
leadership capacity, adaptive capacity, management capacity and operational capacity. It is important to make
sure that the organization(s) will have the capacity to manage the new facility, which may be significantly more
than they are currently responsible for.
o
Develop a building program: what are the “must have’s” (climate control, good acoustics, Category “A” of the
Moveable Cultural Properties Program), then itemize the spaces/rooms needed in the facility; making sure each
is defendable in the budgeting process.
o
Locate an appropriate site for the new facility. In order to align the objectives of the project with a suitable site,
site selection criterion must be established. For example: how much space is needed to build the ideal facility?
Where should it be located in the community? What amenities should be nearby?
o
Develop a business plan with an operating budget (including realistic revenue potential) and funding strategy
(will there be an endowment fund? Is there agreement and commitment to additional support from local
government?).
o
Once the site is determined, hire an architect and a cost consultant to develop a conceptual design and
preliminary construction cost estimates to support the capital campaign. As cultural facilities are often
specialized, it is important to engage specialists in this field.
o
Conduct a community benefits analysis (economic impact study). Although this is not a necessary step, it is
helpful to have this information for the capital campaign.
Step 3.
Project Funding Strategy/Capital Campaign (Referendum)
o
Develop a funding strategy. This would include construction cost source (referendum, grants?) as well as
operating cost sources (local government, own-source revenue, endowment fund?)
o
If the decision is made to fund all or part of the project through a long-term loan through the Municipal Finance
Authority (requiring a referendum), best practice suggests a four to six month timeline. The legislative
component of the process requires a minimum of sixty to eighty days, however there is a planning process and
a necessary public education component that should start at least a couple of months previous.
o
If the construction costs and operation of the facility are being funded by the Regional District, consideration
must be given to who the participants of the service will be. There may be value in establishing a separate
service for the construction of a new facility, as demonstrated through the new services established when the
Vernon and District Performing Arts Centre and Kal Tire Place (Multi-Use facility) were built.
In order to hold a successful capital campaign there are three prerequisites:
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146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
1. A demonstrated need – this would be established through the development of a master plan, the facility strategic
plan and the detailed facility planning. In the case of a referendum to support long-term borrowing, there will be
many questions from the public throughout the lead-up to the voting day, and having completed the necessary
planning will ensure that the RDNO staff and community advocates are adequately prepared to answer the public’s
questions.
2. Strong and capable leadership – although Regional District staff can help with the public education component, a
campaign needs to have community-driven leadership.
3. Favourable economic conditions – there are advantages to a strong economy, such as more public willingness to
consider donations/additional tax for new infrastructure. There are also advantages to a recovering economy, such
as low interest rates and opportunities for job creation/economic development stimulus. When considering the
economic condition, it is also important to consider other recent or impending financial requirements, both within
the department as well as within other departments or jurisdictions.
Step 4.
Facility Construction - This step has not been given significant consideration for the purposes of this report.
Page 123 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
Facilities
Library facility standards are based on the library’s mission statement and service goals. The facility is
designed with community needs in mind and arises from a community needs assessment. Ideally, library
facilities are flexible, functional, attractive and adaptable.
The library should be located near business, municipal or recreational areas to provide greatest
accessibility to users. The library must have an exterior sign identifying the facility as a library, and
adequate parking for vehicles and bicycles. It should have a separate entrance if the library is housed in a
shared facility. The facility must comply with federal, provincial and local building codes and safety
regulations. Barrier-free physical access for the disabled is required for new library buildings and
desirable for existing structures.
The interior of the library should provide adequate space to meet service, operation and storage needs,
including collection space, space to meet technology needs, and seating space. There should be
adequate provision for current and future electrical, data and telephone connections, controlled
temperatures and humidity for the benefit of users and staff as well as the protection of library property,
and adequate interior and exterior lighting in all areas. Libraries less than 20,000 sq. ft. should ideally be
located on a single level. The most efficient space is open and square or rectangular rather than being
irregular in shape.
Major service factors to consider in developing a facility plan are: collection size, use of technology, adult
and children’s programming, seating, and meeting room space. Architectural formulas for space
allocation are used to determine actual facility size and design.
The following rules of thumb have been used to determine facility size by major components:
Collection space
1 square foot for every 10 volumes/items
(111 volumes per sq. m.)
User space
30 square feet (2.7 sq. m.) per user space @ 5 user
spaces per 1,000 population
Staff space
150 square feet (13.9 sq. m.) per staff member
Public-access computer work space
25 sq. ft. (2.3 sq. m.) per workstation
Meeting room space
10 sq. ft. (0.9 sq. m.) per seat
Programming space
10 sq. ft. (0.9 sq. m.) per child
Washrooms, janitorial, mechanical, etc.
Multipurpose rooms
25% of net space
based on community service and program objectives
Return to Table of Contents -Attachments
Standards for Member Libraries within Alberta’s Regional Library Systems
Page 124 of 146
page 5
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.8
Standards for Facilities
Population
Essential
Enhanced
Excellent
Up to 600
850 sq. ft.
79 sq. m.
850 sq. ft.
79 sq. m.
850 sq. ft.
79 sq. m.
601 - 1,200
950 sq. ft.
88 sq. m.
1,050 sq. ft.
98 sq. m.
1,150 sq. ft.
107 sq. m.
1,201 - 3,000
1,500 sq. ft.
139 sq. m.
2,500 sq. ft.
232 sq. m.
3,200 sq. ft.
297 sq. m.
3,001 - 5,000
3,200 sq. ft.
297 sq. m.
3,600 sq. ft.
334 sq. m.
4,300 sq. ft.
399 sq. m.
5,001 - 10,000
5,200 sq. ft.
483 sq. m.
6,900 sq. ft.
641 sq. m.
8,500 sq. ft.
790 sq. m.
10,001 - 20,000
9,500 sq. ft
883 sq. m.
13,000 sq. ft
1,207 sq. m.
16,000 sq. ft
1,486 sq. m.
20,001 +
15,000 sq. ft.
1,394 sq. m.
17,000 sq. ft.
1,579 sq. m.
19,000 sq. ft.
1,765 sq. m.
To convert square feet to square meters, multiply square feet x .0929
Essential – provides basic library service
Enhanced – builds on the essential service
Excellent – the highest level of service
Standards for Member Libraries within Alberta’s Regional Library Systems
Page 125 of 146
page 6
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.9
REG IONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 7762 .15
TO :
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
FROM:
Parks, Recreation and Culture
DATE:
November 10, 2015
SUBJECT:
Request for Regional District Representative at Gaetani Cultural Centre
Society Board of Directors
RECOMM ENDATION:
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, the request from the Gaetani Cultural Centre
Society for a Regional District representative on the Board of Directors be forwarded for consideration
of inclusion in the Greater Vernon Cultural Plan .
DI SCUSS ION:
The Gaetani Cultural Centre Society (Society) has requested that a representative from the Regional
District Board of Directors be appointed to attend the Society's regular board meetings (Attachment
"A") . The intent of the request is to encourage and facilitate more regular discussion and knowledge
sharing between the Society and the Regional District.
The Regional District currently provides various levels and types of support to a number of not-for-profit
organizations, both in Greater Vernon and in the broader North Okanagan area. As part of the Greater
Vernon Parks, Recreation and Culture service (060), there is one circumstance where a Regional
District representative sits on an organization's Board of Directors (in a non-voting capacity), and that
is in the case of the Greater Vernon Museum and Archives . This is a unique circumstance, in that a
Regional District bylaw delegates the board appointment.
There would definitely be a benefit to having a jurisdictionally appropriate Regional District
representative(s) attend some of the not-for-profit organization board meetings of those organizations
in Greater Vernon who receive Regional District support. However, in order to do this thoughtfully and
equitably, this should be considered in the broader context of the Greater Vernon Cultural Plan. There
may also be other options to achieve the same objectives that should be explored.
Page 126 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.9
Report to : Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
From : Parks, Recreation and Culture
Re : Request for Regional District Rep at Caetani Cultural Centre Society Board of Directors
Endorsed by:
s~--~~~
General Manager, Finance
Page 127 of 146
File No.: 7762 .15
Date: November 15, 2015
Page 2 of 2
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.9
Attachment "A"
AETANI
CENTRE
Art Making • Life Shaping
3401 Pleasant Valley Road, Vernon, BC
VIT 4L4
250-275-.1525
www.caetani.ca
October 29, 2015
Tannis Nelson
Community Development Coordinator
Parks, Recreation and Culture
Regional District of North Okanagan
9848 Aberdeen Road
Coldstream, BC
V1B 2K9
Re: RDNO Representative Request for Gaetani Board
Dear Ms. Nelson,
As one of the five groups under the cultural bylaw for Greater Vernon, the board ,
of directors of the Gaetani Cultural Centre Society would like to request possible
representation on our board by a member of the Parks, Recreation and Culture
RDNO committee.
We feel that it would be of great benefit to have representation on a regular basis
to facilitate discussion and would welcome their input, as the Gaetani Centre
moves forward on Its' new heritage and community organizational transitions and
initiatives.
Thank you for your attention in this matter. We look forward to hearing from you.
Regards,
I
a j {}i_{)_ ~
Angelika Jaeger
President
Gaetani Cultural Centre Society Board
Page 128 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.10
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.10
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.10
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.10
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.10
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.10
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item E.10
Page 135 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item G.1a
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
MINUTES of a SPECIAL meeting of the GREATER VERNON ADVISORY COMMITTEE of the
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN held in the Boardroom at the Regional District
Office on Tuesday, December 8, 2015.
Members:
Director J. Cunningham
Alternate Director J. Garlick
Director D. Dirk
Director B. Fleming
Director M. Macnabb
Director C. Lord*
Director A. Mund
City of Vernon
District of Coldstream
District of Coldstream
Electoral Area “B”
Electoral Area "C"
City of Vernon
City of Vernon
Staff:
D. Sewell*
D. McTaggart*
S. Banmen
T. Nelson
K. Pinkoski*
H. Roseberry
Chief Administrative Officer
General Manager, Engineering
General Manager, Finance
Community Development Coordinator
Manager, Parks
Clerk, Parks, Recreation and Culture
Also Present: Director R. Fairbairn*
Councillor G. Taylor*
Public
Electoral Area “D”
District of Coldstream
Chair
Vice Chair
Board Chair
* Denotes presence for part of meeting
CALL MEETING TO ORDER
The meeting was called to order at 8:02 a.m.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA - AMENDED
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee – December 8, 2015
Moved and seconded by Director Mund and Alternate Director Garlick
That the Amended Agenda of the December 8, 2015 Greater Vernon Advisory Committee Special
meeting be approved as presented.
CARRIED
Page 136 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item G.1a
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
Minutes – Special
-2-
December 8, 2015
NEW BUSINESS
Greater Vernon Cultural Plan – GVAC Workshop No.9
Moved and seconded by Director Fleming and Alternate Director Garlick
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, that the Greater Vernon Cultural Plan include
policy that both land and structure for any new purpose-built Cultural Facility in Greater Vernon
be owned by the Regional District of North Okanagan.
CARRIED
Director Lord left the meeting at 9:35 a.m.
Director Lord rejoined the meeting at 9:37 a.m.
Moved and seconded by Alternate Director Garlick and Director Dirk
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, the Regional District enters into new and/or
amended license agreements with the City of Vernon for the following facilities:
-
3400 30 Street, Vernon, B.C.
That part of PID 010-862-927, Lot A, PL 39576 Sec. 34 TWP 9 ODYD
-
2704A Hwy 6, Vernon, B.C.
That part of BLK 31, Lots 4-7, Plan 327C ODYD
-
2704A Hwy 6, Vernon, B.C.
That part of PID 012-245-976, BLK A, Lot 6, Plan 327C Sec. 34 TWP 9 ODYD
-
3800 33 Street, Vernon, B.C.
PID 026-127-598, PL KAP76941, Lot 1, Sec. 3 TWP 8 ODYD
CARRIED
Moved and seconded by Director Mund and Alternate Director Garlick
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, the Regional District enter into five-year
operating and management agreements with not-for-profit organizations for the management and
operation of Regional District owned cultural facilities; and further,
That the following general guidelines be used for drafting the operating and management
agreements with the not-for-profit organizations:
The Regional District:
-
will, at its own expense, be responsible for maintaining the structural components of the
building (i.e. the building envelope); subject to building assessments and agreements with
building owners regarding pre-existing conditions.
-
will set aside an annual budget allocation for capital funding to be used for facility
replacement items, such as mechanical, electrical, plumbing and flooring.
-
may provide funding to offset building occupancy costs associated with the facility,
including utilities; and,
Page 137 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item G.1a
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
Minutes – Special
-
-3-
December 8, 2015
will, at its own expense, be responsible for maintaining property insurance, except for
contents insurance, for Regional District owned facilities.
The not-for-profit organization will:
-
be responsible for the operation and programming of the facility in accordance with the
guidelines and expectations outlined in a multi-year operating and management
agreement; and
-
be responsible for the maintenance of the facility, including repair and replacement
required due to regular wear and tear,
with funding responsibilities to be negotiated as part of each operating and management
agreement.
CARRIED
Moved and seconded by Alternate Director Garlick and Director Mund
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, the Regional District follow the process for
planning and development of new cultural facilities, as outlined in the report dated November 20,
2015, and titled, Cultural Facilities Workshop 9.
CARRIED
Moved and seconded by Alternate Director Garlick and Director Mund
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, the Regional District establish a Cultural
Facility Reserve and set aside funds annually to support major cultural facility enhancement or
new cultural facilities.
CARRIED
ADJOURNMENT
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 10:23 a.m.
CERTIFIED CORRECT
Chair
Juliette Cunningham
Chief Administrative Officer
David Sewell
Page 138 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item G.1b
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
MINUTES of a REGULAR meeting of the GREATER VERNON ADVISORY COMMITTEE of the
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN held in the Boardroom at the Regional District
Office on Thursday, December 10, 2015.
Members:
Director J. Cunningham
Director D. Dirk
Councillor G. Kiss
Director B. Fleming
Director M. Macnabb
Alternate Director B. Spiers
Director A. Mund
T. Osborn
City of Vernon
District of Coldstream
District of Coldstream
Electoral Area “B”
Electoral Area "C"
City of Vernon
City of Vernon
Agricultural Representative
Staff:
D. Sewell
D. McTaggart
S. Banmen
*T. Nelson
K. Pinkoski
P. Juniper
Z. Marcolin
L. Schrauwen
Chief Administrative Officer
General Manager, Engineering
General Manager, Finance
Community Development Coordinator
Manager, Parks
Deputy Corporate Officer
Manager, Greater Vernon Water
Executive Assistant, Engineering
Also Present: *Director R. Fairbairn
Councillor P. McClean
Councillor G. Taylor
J. Kidston
Media and Public
Chair
Electoral Area “D”
Board Chair
District of Coldstream
District of Coldstream
Alternate Agricultural Representative
* Denotes presence for part of meeting
CALL MEETING TO ORDER
The meeting was called to order at 8:00 a.m.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee – December 10, 2015
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Mund
That the Agenda of the December 10, 2015 Greater Vernon Advisory Committee meeting be
approved with the following addition:
In Camera – Item A.2 – Section 90(1)(g)
CARRIED
Page 139 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item G.1b
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-2-
December 10, 2015
ADOPTION OF MINUTES
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee – Special
Moved and seconded by Agricultural Representative Osborn and Director Macnabb
That the minutes of the following Greater Vernon Advisory Committee Special meetings be
adopted as circulated:
− October 29, 2015
− November 12, 2015
CARRIED
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee – November 5, 2015
Moved and seconded by Directors Fleming and Mund
That the November 5, 2015 minutes of the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee meeting be
adopted as circulated.
CARRIED
DELEGATIONS
Greater Vernon Pickleball Committee (FRIESEN, Don) and Greater Vernon Tennis
Association (WHITE, Marsha)
Don Friesen, Greater Vernon Pickleball Committee, and Loren Guenette, Greater Vernon Tennis
Association, provided a presentation requesting that the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
consider including the construction of two (2) separate facilities for multiple pickleball and tennis
courts at Marshall Field in the Parks, Recreation and Culture Capital Budget (060).
Okanagan Summer Festival Society (BOND, Diane) and Okanagan College (COYLE, Alan)
Diane Bond, Okanagan Summer Festival Society, and Alan Coyle, Okanagan College, provided
a presentation regarding a proposal for constructing an amphitheatre at Okanagan College.
NEW BUSINESS
Request for Regional District Representative at Caetani Cultural Centre Society Board of
Directors
A motion relating to the request for a Regional District representative on the Caetani Cultural
Centre Society Board of Directors was moved and seconded by Directors Dirk and Macnabb.
After debate and housekeeping amendments, the following motion was voted on:
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, the request from the Caetani Cultural Centre
Society for a Regional District representative on the Caetani Board of Directors be forwarded for
discussion of inclusion in the Greater Vernon Cultural Plan.
CARRIED
Page 140 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item G.1b
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-3-
December 10, 2015
Water Meter Improvement Program Communications Strategy
Moved and seconded by Director Macnabb and Agricultural Representative Osborn
That the report dated November 30, 2015 from the Manager - Greater Vernon Water regarding
the Water Meter Improvement Program communications strategy be received for information.
CARRIED
Greater Vernon Water Rates and Fees Structure
Councillor Kiss provided a presentation regarding an alternate Greater Vernon Water rates
structure with Alternate Director Spiers providing additional information.
Moved and seconded by Councillor Kiss and Alternate Director Spiers
That the presentation from Councillor Kiss and information from Alternate Director Spiers
regarding an alternate Greater Vernon Water (GVW) rates structure be received for information
and included in the 2016 GVW rates discussion.
CARRIED
Opposed: Directors Macnabb and Fleming
REPORTS
Greater Vernon Water 2012 Master Water Plan Stakeholder Advisory Committee Meeting
Minutes
Moved and seconded by Director Macnabb and Alternate Director Spiers
That the minutes of the November 19, 2015 Greater Vernon Water 2012 Master Water Plan
Stakeholder Advisory Committee meeting be received for information.
CARRIED
Chair’s Report
The Committee was advised that the Request for Proposal (RFP) for the Vernon and District
Performing Arts Centre Lobby Bar Extension has been cancelled due to high cost submissions;
therefore, the scope of the project is currently being evaluated. The Committee requested that
staff investigate posting the award of RFP’s/tenders on the Regional District of North Okanagan
website.
IN CAMERA
Moved and seconded by Directors Dirk and Fleming
That, pursuant to Section 92 of the Community Charter, the regular meeting of the Greater Vernon
Advisory Committee convene In Camera to deal with matters deemed closed to the public in
accordance with Section 90(1)(g) of the Community Charter.
CARRIED
ADJOURNMENT
The regular meeting of the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee adjourned to meet In Camera at
9:53: a.m.
Page 141 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item G.1b
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-4-
December 10, 2015
The regular meeting of the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee reconvened at 11:07 a.m.
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 11:07 a.m.
CERTIFIED CORRECT
Chair
Juliette Cunningham
Deputy Corporate Officer
Paddy Juniper
Page 142 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item G.1c
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
MINUTES of a REGULAR meeting of the ELECTORAL AREA ADVISORY COMMITTEE of the
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN held in the Boardroom at the Regional District
Office on Thursday, December 10, 2015.
Members: Director B. Fleming
Director M. Macnabb
Director R. Fairbairn*
Director H. Cameron
Director H. Halvorson
Electoral Area “B”
Electoral Area “C”
Electoral Area “D”
Electoral Area “E”
Electoral Area “F”
Chair
Vice Chair
Staff:
L. Mellott
R. Smailes
G. Routley*
L. Frank*
S. Banmen*
C. Elley
General Manager, Electoral Area Administration
General Manager, Planning and Building
Deputy Planning Manager
Regional Planning Projects Manager
General Manager, Finance
Clerk, Electoral Area Administration
Also
Present:
RCMP
R. Morgan
Regional Crime Prevention Coordinator
City of Vernon
Media and Public
* Denotes presence for part of meeting
CALL MEETING TO ORDER
The meeting was called to order at 2:00 p.m.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
Regular Agenda – December 10, 2015
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Halvorson
That the Agenda of the December 10, 2015 Electoral Area Advisory Committee meeting be
approved with the following additions:
– Item E.4 - Gateway Signage.
– In Camera Item - 90(I)(k)
CARRIED
ADOPTION OF MINUTES
Electoral Area Advisory Committee – November 5, 2015
Moved and seconded by Directors Cameron and Macnabb
That the minutes of the November 5, 2015 Electoral Area Advisory Committee Meeting be
adopted as circulated.
CARRIED
Page 143 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item G.1c
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-2-
December 10, 2015
DELEGATIONS
Vernon / North Okanagan Detachment – Policing Third Quarter Report
The RCMP provided an update on activities undertaken over the third quarter (2015).
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and Macnabb
That the Third Quarter reports dated November 5, 2015 from the Vernon / North Okanagan
Detachment – Municipal and Rural Policing and the Third Quarter report from the Victims
Assistance Program be received for information.
CARRIED
Vernon / North Okanagan Safe Communities Unit
The Regional Crime Prevention Coordinator provided an update on activities he has undertaken
over the past month.
Moved and seconded by Directors Fairbairn and Cameron
That the report dated November 30, 2015 from the Vernon / North Okanagan Detachment – Safe
Communities Unit be received for information.
CARRIED
Development Variance Permit Application
GAUDREAULT, J. [File 15-0483-D-DVP]
No one was present to speak to the application.
NEW BUSINESS
Agricultural Land Commission Application
RUECHEL, C. c/o TASSIE, P. [File 15-0431-E-ALR]
690 Highway 6, Electoral Area “E”
Moved and seconded by Directors Cameron and Fairbairn
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, the application of Charlotte Ruechel c/o Peter
Tassie under Section 21(2) of the Agricultural Land Commission Act to subdivide the property
legally described as NW ¼, Sec 14, Twp 57, ODYD and located at 690 Highway 6, Electoral Area
“E” be authorized for submission to the Agricultural Land Commission.
CARRIED
Development Variance Permit Application
GAUDREAULT, J. [File 15-0483-D-DVP]
4050 Highway 6, Electoral Area “D”
Moved and seconded by Directors Fairbairn and Halvorson
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, a Development Variance Permit be issued for
the property legally described as Lot 1, District Lot 240, ODYD, Plan 14744 and located at 4050
Highway 6, Electoral Area “D” to vary Section 406.1 of Zoning Bylaw No. 1888, 2003 to reduce
the setback of an addition to a single family dwelling to the centre line of Highway 6 from 37.5 m
to 25.82 m as shown on the site plan attached to and forming part of Planning Department
Information Report dated November 12, 2015.
CARRIED
Page 144 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item G.1c
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-3-
December 10, 2015
BC Timber Sales Notification Process
Moved and seconded by Directors Cameron and Macnabb
That the letter received from BC Timber Sales dated September 21, 2015 be received for
information.
CARRIED
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and Cameron
That Miles Howard (BC Timber Sales) be invited to attend as a delegation to an Electoral Area
Advisory Committee meeting to provide information on the following:
• Mapping
• Water Licences
• Geotechnical
• Environmental Studies
• Hydrologist Reports
CARRIED
Moved and seconded by Directors Cameron and Fairbairn
That a letter be sent to the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations requesting
geotechnical reports and compliance and enforcement reports regarding the April 20, 2012 Sugar
Lake mudslide.
CARRIED
Gateway Signage
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Cameron
That a letter be sent to the City of Vernon advising that the request from the City of Vernon for
funding to assist in the costs associated with demolition of the existing gateway signage is
declined.
CARRIED
REPORTS
Advisory Planning Commission Meetings
Moved and seconded by Directors Cameron and Halvorson
That the minutes of the following Advisory Planning Commission meetings be received for
information:
− Electoral Area “C” – Meeting of November 25, 2015
− Electoral Area “D” – Meeting of November 24, 2015
− Electoral Area “E” – Meeting of November 23, 2015
CARRIED
Page 145 of 146
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
January 6, 2016 - Item G.1c
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-4-
December 10, 2015
Building Inspections Statistical Reports
Moved and seconded by Directors Cameron and Fairbairn
That the October 2015 Building Inspections Statistical Reports and the November 2015 Building
Inspection Revenue Reports be received for information.
CARRIED
General Manager’s Report
The General Manager, Electoral Area Administration provided an update on the following matters:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Referendum
Safe Communities Coordinator position
2016 Budgets
SILGA – Call for Resolutions
Conservation Officer Service
LGLA Respectful Leadership Conference
IN CAMERA
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and Macnabb
That, pursuant to Section 92 of the Community Charter, the regular meeting of the Electoral Area
Advisory Committee convene In Camera to deal with matters deemed closed to the public in
accordance with Section 90(1)(f), (i) and (k) of the Community Charter.
CARRIED
The regular meeting of the Electoral Area Advisory Committee adjourned to meet In Camera at
3:40 p.m.
ADJOURNMENT
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 4:20 p.m.
CERTIFIED CORRECT
Chair
Bob Fleming
General Manager
Leah Mellott
Page 146 of 146
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