Digi PC/4 16C550 Installation guide

Digi PC/4 16C550 Installation guide
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6400 Flying Cloud Drive
Eden Prairie, MN 55344
(612) 943-9020
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DigiBoard GmbH
Domkloster 1
50667 Köln
Germany
+49 221 920520
Installation
Guide
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X
Non-Intelligent Asynchronous
Serial Communications Boards
90029700A
DigiBoard® is a registered trademark of Digi International Inc. DigiWARE™,
PC/X™, MC/X™, PC/16™, PC/8™, PC/4™, MC/16™, MC/8™ and MC/4™
are trademarks of Digi International Inc. All other brand and product names are
the trademarks of their respective holders.
© Digi International Inc. 1994
All Rights Reserved
Digi International Inc.,
d. b. a. DigiBoard
6400 Flying Cloud Drive
Eden Prairie, MN 55344
Phone
FAX
BBS
(612) 943-9020
(612) 943-5398
(612) 943-0812
DigiBoard GmbH
Domkloster 1
50667 Köln
Germany
Phone
FAX
BBS
+49 221 920520
+49 221 9205210
+49 221 9205211
Information in this document is subject to change without notice and does not
represent a commitment on the part of DigiBoard.
DigiBoard provides this document “as is,” without warranty of any kind, either
expressed or implied, including, but not limited to, the particular purpose. DigiBoard may make improvements and/or changes in this manual or in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this manual at any time.
This product could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors.
Changes are periodically made to the information herein; these changes may be
incorporated in new editions of the publication.
Table of Contents
Certification Information.....................................................................................vii
The DigiBoard Bulletin Board System.............................................................. viii
Internet FTP Server ........................................................................................... viii
FaxBack Server.................................................................................................. viii
Technical Support.................................................................................................ix
Customer Service..................................................................................................ix
Device Driver Support..........................................................................................xi
Return Procedures................................................................................................xii
Introduction ...........................................................................................................1
Components....................................................................................................1
Installation .............................................................................................................2
PC/4 and PC/8 Boards....................................................................................3
Before you plug in the board. . ...............................................................3
Setting the I/O Port Addresses.........................................................4
Setting the Interrupt Status Register Address ..................................9
Setting the IRQ ..............................................................................10
Board Identification .......................................................................12
Daisy Chain Connectors P2 and P3 ...............................................13
Plugging in the Board............................................................................14
PC/16 Boards................................................................................................15
Before you plug in the board. . .............................................................15
I/O Port Addresses .........................................................................15
IRQ Selection.................................................................................18
Board Identification .......................................................................19
Daisy Chain Connector P3.............................................................20
Plugging in the Board............................................................................21
MC/X Boards ...............................................................................................22
Before you plug in the board. . ....................................................................22
Plugging in the Board...................................................................................24
Configuring the Board..................................................................................25
Connecting Peripherals.................................................................................29
Terminals and Printers ..........................................................................29
Software Handshaking (XON/XOFF) ...........................................29
Hardware Handshaking (Ready/Busy) ..........................................31
Modems.................................................................................................32
ALTPIN Modem Wiring (RJ-45 Versions) ...................................33
Contents
iii
RS-232 Cables and Connector Options ...............................................................34
Cables ...........................................................................................................34
Grounding .............................................................................................34
Environment..........................................................................................34
Capacitance vs. Length of Run .............................................................34
Connector Options........................................................................................35
DB-25 Connectors........................................................................................35
DB-25 Connector Options.....................................................................36
Quad and Octa Cable Option (DTE or DCE) ................................36
Quad and Octa Connector Boxes (DTE or DCE) ..........................37
DB-9 Connectors..........................................................................................38
RJ-45 Connectors .........................................................................................39
Modular Plugs .......................................................................................40
RJ-45 to DB-25 Conversion..................................................................41
Daisy Chaining PC/X Boards ..............................................................................43
PC/4 and PC/8 Boards..................................................................................43
PC/16 Boards................................................................................................47
Daisy Chain Cables ......................................................................................48
Using PC/X and MC/X Boards with MS-DOS Applications..............................49
PC/X Boards.................................................................................................49
MC/X Boards ...............................................................................................52
Programming Information ...................................................................................53
Enabling Interrupts .......................................................................................53
Using the Interrupt Status Register ..............................................................54
PC/4 and PC/8 .......................................................................................54
PC/16.....................................................................................................55
MC/X.....................................................................................................56
Specifications.......................................................................................................57
Index ....................................................................................................................63
iv
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
List of Figures
Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 5
Figure 6
Figure 7
Figure 8
Figure 9
Figure 10
Figure 11
Figure 12
Figure 13
Figure 14
Figure 15
Figure 16
Figure 17
Figure 18
Figure 19
Figure 20
Figure 21
Figure 22
Figure 23
Figure 24
Figure 25
Figure 26
Figure 27
Figure 28
PC/8 Board Layout ..........................................................................3
Breakdown of DIP Switches DS2-DS9 ...........................................4
Breakdown of DIP Switch DS1 .......................................................9
Board ID Jumper Settings for PC/4 and PC/8 Boards ...................12
Connectors P2 and P3 (Single Board Configuration) ....................13
PC/16 Board Layout ......................................................................15
PC/16 Board ID Jumper Settings...................................................19
PC/16 Daisy Chain Connector P3, with Jumper ............................20
Folding the Interface Cables ..........................................................21
MC/4 and MC/8 Board Layout ......................................................23
MC/16 Board Layout .....................................................................23
Simple Terminal/Printer Cable (DB-25) ...................................... 30
Simple Terminal/Printer Cable (RJ-45) ........................................ 30
Terminal/Printer Cable with DTR Handshaking (DB-25)............ 31
Terminal/Printer Cable with DTR Handshaking (RJ-45) ............. 31
Modem Cable................................................................................ 32
Full 10-Wire Modem Cable (RJ-45) .............................................32
8-Wire Modem Cable for use with ALTPIN Configuration......... 33
Octa Cable Assembly.....................................................................36
Eight-Port DB-25 Connector Box..................................................37
Eight-Port RJ-45 Connector Box ...................................................39
RJ-45 to DB-25 “Cable Leg”.........................................................41
Single Board System (PC/4, PC/8) ................................................44
Two Board System (PC/4, PC/8) ...................................................44
Three Board System (PC/4, PC/8) .................................................45
Four Board System (PC/4, PC/8)...................................................46
One Board System (PC/16)............................................................47
Two Board System (PC/16) ...........................................................47
Contents
v
List of Tables
Table 1
Table 2
Table 3
Table 4
Table 5
Table 6
Table 7
Table 8
Table 9
Table 10
Table 11
Table 12
vi
DIP Switch Settings for I/O Port Addresses ....................................5
IRQ Selection for PC/4 and PC/8 Boards ......................................11
Standard (DOS) PALs and their Associated I/O Addresses ..........16
Pick PALs and their Associated I/O Addresses.............................17
PC/16 IRQ Jumper Settings ...........................................................18
DB-25 Connector Pin Assignments ...............................................35
DB-25 Cable Options and Part Numbers.......................................36
Connector Box Options and Part Numbers....................................37
DB-9 Connector Pin Assignments .................................................38
DB-9 Quad and Octa Cable Options and Part Numbers................38
RJ-45 Connector Box Options .......................................................39
Cable Leg Options and Part Numbers ...........................................41
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
Certification Information
Radio Frequency Interference (RFI)
(FCC 15.105)
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for Class B digital
devices pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide
reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential environment. This
equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy, and if not installed
and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to
radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in
a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or
television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the
user is encouraged to try and correct the interference by one or more of the following
measures:
•
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
•
Increase the separation between the equipment and the receiver.
•
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the
receiver is connected.
•
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
Labeling Requirements
(FCC 15.19)
This device complies with Part 15 of FCC rules. Operation is subject to the following
two conditions: (1) this device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device
must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired
operation.
Modifications
(FCC 15.21)
Changes or modifications to this equipment not expressly approved by DigiBoard may
void the user’s authority to operate this equipment.
Cables
(FCC 15.27)
Shielded cables must be used to remain within the Class B limitations.
Canadian DOC Notice
This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class B limits for radio noise for digital apparatus set out in the Radio Interference Regulations of the Canadian Department of Communications.
Certification Information
vii
The DigiBoard Bulletin Board System
DigiBoard provides an electronic bulletin board service (BBS) for our
customers. This bulletin board provides general and technical information about
DigiBoard’s products.
The DigiBoard BBS allows users to download software drivers as soon as they
become available. There is also a feature to allow users with problems or
questions about DigiBoard products to leave messages to DigiBoard Technical
Support.
Using the DigiBoard BBS is easy. Simply dial (612) 943-0812 or (612) 9430549. The bulletin board accepts calls at 1200, 2400, 9600 and 14.4K baud.
V.32, HST 14.4, V.42 and V.42bis standards are supported, with full MNP class
1-5 error correction and data compression.
The recommended modem communications parameters are 8 bits, no parity and
one stop bit (8 N 1). Other settings may also work.
Download protocols include Zmodem, Xmodem, Ymodem, Kermit and others.
Internet FTP Server
DigiBoard has also set up an Anonymous FTP server for those with access to the
Internet network. The address is ftp.digibd.com (192.83.159.193).
Log in as anonymous, and enter your E-mail address when asked for a
password. Drivers and installation tips are located in the /drivers directory.
A text file, download.doc, gives information on uncompressing the files after
downloading. Tip: Be sure to enter “bin” before downloading, to ensure binary
transfer of files.
FaxBack Server
Manuals and technical information can also be obtained by FAX. To use the
FaxBack server, simply call (612) 943-0573 on a touch tone phone.
viii
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
Technical Support
At DigiBoard, we are proud of our products, and support them. Our dealers and
distributors are fully trained on our product line, so that they can help you on a
technical level should assistance be needed.
Your first level of support is your DigiBoard dealer, the place where you purchased your PC/X or MC/X board. Your dealer has the training to help you
with any installation questions or difficulties you might have.
If you still experience difficulties (after contacting your first level of support),
DigiBoard has a staff of Technical Support Specialists that can assist you. They
can be reached at (612) 943-0578. In Europe, call +49 221 920520. FAX
numbers are: (612) 943-0579 (USA) and +49 221 9205210 (Europe).
When you call DigiBoard Technical Support, please call from a position where
you can operate your system. Also, please fill out the form on the opposite page
before calling, so your Technical Support representative can have a clear picture
of your system and any potential conflicts between devices.
DigiBoard Technical Support can also be reached via Internet E-mail. Please
send correspondences to [email protected], and include your voice and
FAX phone numbers.
Before calling Tech Support, be sure to run the user
diagnostics, UD-STD.EXE, in the \DIAGS directory of the
Windows, OS/2 and FOSSIL driver diskette (provided with
the board). Refer to USER-STD.TXT and the help screens
in the UD-STD.EXE for instructions.
Customer Service
DigiBoard also has a staff of Customer Service representatives to help you with
software and documentation update requests, as well as Returned Merchandise
Authorizations (RMAs) in case you need to return your board to DigiBoard for
repair (see page xii). They can be reached at (612) 943-0577.
DigiBoard Customer Service can also be reached via Internet E-mail. Please
send correspondences to [email protected], and include your voice
and FAX phone numbers.
Technical Support and Customer Service
ix
Technical Support Information
Please assist your Technical Support representative by filling in the following information.
Serial number of your PC/X or MC/X board: _______________ PAL #s (PC/16) U46: ________ U58: ________
Make, model and clock speed of your computer: ___________________________________________________
How much RAM does your computer have? _____ MB
Hard disk controller: Type: ___________
Memory addressed at: _______
I/O port used:
____ IRQ: _____
LAN card:
Type: ___________
Memory addressed at: _______
I/O port used:
____ IRQ: _____
Other:
Type: ___________
Memory addressed at: _______
I/O port used:
____ IRQ: _____
Operating system: _________________
Version: __________________
DigiBoard device driver version: __________
Device Driver Support
This product is shipped with device drivers for some of the most commonly used
operating systems. Other device drivers may be available, however, and may be
obtained, free of charge, from DigiBoard. For information on availability, and to
order additional drivers, please contact DigiBoard Customer Service or dial in to
the DigiBoard BBS.
Device Driver Support
xi
Return Procedures
All DigiBoard products have a five-year parts and labor warranty, and we are
ultimately responsible for any defective parts, according to the limits specified in
the warranty. However, many of the reported problems are due to factors other
than defects in the product itself. To save you time and possibly additional cost,
DigiBoard asks that you first try to resolve any difficulties by contacting our
Technical Support representatives at (612) 943-0578.
Be sure to have the serial number of your board at hand
before calling Technical Support.
Returns should be directed to the dealer or distributor from whom you purchased
the product. If you need to return your PC/X or MC/X board to DigiBoard for
repair, it is first necessary to obtain an RMA (Returned Merchandise Authorization) number from DigiBoard, by speaking to a DigiBoard Customer Service
representative. Authorized returns should be shipped to DigiBoard, 10000 West
76th Street, Eden Prairie, MN 55344. The RMA number should appear on the
shipping carton, on or near the address label.
Products received without an RMA number clearly marked
on the outside of the package will be returned, unopened, to
the sender
xii
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
Introduction
This Installation Guide covers the installation and configuration of the
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X asynchronous serial communications boards for ISA
and Micro Channel personal computers (“ISA” stands for Industry Standard
Architecture, and includes IBM AT and compatible computers, and
80386/80486/Pentium based computers that employ the ISA bus.; Micro
Channel computers include most PS/2 computers).
In addition to the board itself (hardware), you may also need to install device
driver software for your operating system, so that programs can communicate
with the board. Device driver installation instructions are in separate manuals,
included with the software diskette(s).
Components
The carton in which your PC/X or MC/X board was shipped should contain the
following items:
•
PC/X or MC/X board
•
Installation Guide (this book)
•
One or more software packets containing device driver diskettes and
manuals
Introduction
1
Installation
PC/X and MC/X boards contain static-sensitive components.
Always touch a grounded surface to discharge static
electricity before handling the circuit board.
The procedures for installing the boards in the PC/X and MC/X families begin
on the pages listed below:
PC/4 and PC/8 .......................................................................................................3
PC/16 ...................................................................................................................15
MC/4, MC/8 and MC/16 .....................................................................................22
2
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
PC/4 and PC/8 Boards
This section provides instructions for installing and configuring PC/4 and PC/8
boards in ISA computers. These include IBM AT and compatible computers,
and 80386/80486/Pentium based computers that employ the ISA (Industry
Standard Architecture) bus.
Instructions for installing PC/16 boards begin on page 15.
Instructions for installing MC/4 and MC/8 boards (in Micro Channel computers)
begin on page 22.
Before you plug in the board. . .
Write down the serial number of the board in the form on page x. You will
need it if you have to contact DigiBoard regarding the product.
Figure 1
Serial
Number
PC/8 Board Layout
Jumpers
J1-J10
Daisy Chain Plugs
P2 and P3
DBI A/N 30000354
REV
S/N
U25 (Channel 1) U26 (Channel 3) U27 (Channel 5) U28 (Channel 7)
U33 (Channel 2) U34 (Channel 4) U35 (Channel 6) U36 (Channel 8)
DS1
DS2
DS3
DS4
DS5
DS6
DIP Switches
DS7
DS8
DS9
Jumpers
J85-J90
There are a number of DIP switches and jumpers which must be set prior to
installing the board in your computer. The DIP switches are used to set the I/O
port addresses of the individual asynchronous serial channels and the Interrupt
Status Register address. The jumpers are used to select the IRQ (Interrupt
Request) line(s) and the board ID number. Consult your software manual for the
recommended settings for these parameters.
Installation
3
Setting the I/O Port Addresses
Each port on the PC/X board has its own unique I/O port address, which points
to the first of eight I/O registers which are used by that port. DIP switches DS2DS9 determine the I/O address of ports 1 through 8, respectively (on PC/4
boards, DS6-DS9 are absent).
Each port can be set to any hexadecimal address from 000h to 3F8h (PC/X I/O
addresses must always end with 0 or 8). The breakdown of the DIP switches is
shown in Figure 2, below.
Figure 2
Breakdown of DIP Switches DS2-DS9
MSB
LSB
00xx xxxx x000
Port
Enable/Disable
The switches form a binary representation of the I/O address; note that the two
most significant bits (MSB) and the three least significant bits (LSB) are always
0. Thus, switches 1 and 2 set the first hex digit of the address to 0-3, switches 3
through 6 set the second digit to 0-F, and switch 7 sets the third digit to 0 or 8.
Switch 8 enables (ON) or disables (OFF) the port.
Table 1, on the following pages, gives the DIP switch settings for all possible
addresses from 000h to 3F8h.
4
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
Table 1
DIP Switch Settings for I/O Port Addresses
I/O
SW-1
SW-2
SW-3
SW-4
SW-5
SW-6
SW-7
SW-8
000h
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
008h
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
010h
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
018h
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
020h
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
028h
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
030h
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
038h
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
040h
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
048h
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
050h
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
058h
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
060h
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
068h
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
070h
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
078h
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
080h
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
088h
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
090h
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
098h
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
0A0h
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
0A8h
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
0B0h
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
0B8h
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
0C0h
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
0C8h
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
0D0h
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
0D8h
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
0E0h
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
0E8h
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
0F0h
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
0F8h
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
Note: Addresses below 100h are not recommended—these addresses may be reserved by your
system. See following pages for more addresses.
Installation
5
6
I/O
SW-1
SW-2
SW-3
SW-4
SW-5
SW-6
SW-7
SW-8
100h
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
108h
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
110h
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
118h
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
120h
ON
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
128h
ON
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
130h
ON
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
138h
ON
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
140h
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
148h
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
150h
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
158h
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
160h
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
168h
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
170h
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
178h
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
180h
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
188h
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
190h
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
198h
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
1A0h
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
1A8h
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
1B0h
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
1B8h
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
1C0h
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
1C8h
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
1D0h
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
1D8h
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
1E0h
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
1E8h
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
1F0h
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
1F8h
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
I/O
SW-1
SW-2
SW-3
SW-4
SW-5
SW-6
SW-7
SW-8
200h
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
208h
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
210h
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
218h
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
220h
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
228h
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
230h
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
238h
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
240h
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
248h
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
250h
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
258h
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
260h
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
268h
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
270h
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
278h
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
280h
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
288h
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
290h
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
298h
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
2A0h
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
2A8h
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
2B0h
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
2B8h
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
2C0h
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
2C8h
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
2D0h
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
2D8h
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
2E0h
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
2E8h
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
2F0h
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
2F8h
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
continued on next page
Installation
7
8
I/O
SW-1
SW-2
SW-3
SW-4
SW-5
SW-6
SW-7
SW-8
300h
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
308h
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
310h
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
318h
OFF
OFF
ON
320h
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
328h
OFF
OFF
330h
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
338h
OFF
OFF
340h
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
348h
OFF
350h
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
358h
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
360h
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
368h
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
370h
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
378h
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
380h
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
388h
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
390h
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
398h
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
3A0h
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
3A8h
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
3B0h
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
3B8h
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
3C0h
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
3C8h
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
3D0h
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
3D8h
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
3E0h
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
3E8h
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
3F0h
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
3F8h
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
Setting the Interrupt Status Register Address
PC/X boards have a special Interrupt Status register, which permits all ports on a
board (or up to four boards, if they are daisy chained together; see Daisy
Chaining PC/X Boards, on page 43) to operate efficiently with a single IRQ line.
When any port requires servicing, the board generates an interrupt, and the
Interrupt Status register identifies which port requires attention. In this way,
software does not have to poll all of the ports to locate the one that generated the
interrupt request.
The Interrupt Status register occupies two bytes on the computer’s I/O bus, and
its address is defined by DIP switch DS1 on the PC/X board. DS1 is a ten
position switch, the breakdown of which is shown in Figure 3.
Figure 3
Breakdown of DIP Switch DS1
MSB
LSB
00xx xxxx x000
Port
Enable/Disable
The I/O port address for the Interrupt Status register is set by switches 1-7, in the
same way as the I/O port addresses for the individual channels on the board (see
Setting the I/O Port Address, on page 4). Note that switches 8 and 9 should
always be in the ON position.
Switch 10 enables (ON) or disables (OFF) the Interrupt Status register.
Installation
9
Setting the IRQ
PC/4 and PC/8 boards support one or two IRQ (Interrupt Request) lines per
board. If two interrupts are used, one must be ODD (IRQ 3, 5 or 7) and the
other must be EVEN (IRQ 2, 4 or 6).
Select the interrupt(s) to be used by placing a jumper on J85, J86 or J87 for IRQ
3, 5 or 7, respectively, and/or J88, J89 or J90 for IRQ 6, 4 or 2, respectively.
Now assign each channel to either the ODD or EVEN interrupt by placing
jumpers on J1-J8: for the ODD interrupt, jumper pins 1 and 2 (the top two pins);
for the EVEN interrupt, jumper pins 2 and 3 (the bottom two pins). J1-J8
correspond to ports 1-8, respectively.
Finally, make sure that jumpers J9 and J10 are installed on pins 2 and 3 (the
bottom two pins). This sets the board number to 0. All boards must be set to
number 0 unless they are daisy chained to other PC/X boards .
Individual PC/X boards must each be assigned a unique
IRQ, which must not be used by any other device in your
system, including other PC/X boards, unless the PC/X
boards are daisy chained together (see Daisy Chaining
PC/X boards, on page 43).
Dual interrupt capability is provided to facilitate emulation
of standard ports COM1-COM4, which use IRQs 3 and 4
(see the section on MS-DOS applications, beginning on
page 49).
If you are not emulating standard COM ports, use one IRQ
line; performance is not affected, and you’ll have more
IRQs available for other devices.
Some common sources of contention for IRQs are:
IRQ2:
IRQ3:
IRQ4:
IRQ5:
IRQ6:
IRQ7:
10
EGA adapters (if present)
Standard COM2 & COM4 ports (if present)
Standard COM1 & COM3 ports (if present)
LPT2 (Second parallel printer port) (if present)
Floppy disk controller
LPT1 (First parallel printer port) (if present)
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
Table 2 below shows the required jumper placement for setting all ports for
operation with each of the six supported interrupts. The last entry of the table
shows how to set the first port for IRQ4, and the remaining ports for IRQ3 (see
the note on the previous page).
Table 2
IRQ
IRQ Selection for PC/4 and PC/8 Boards
J85-J90
J1-J10
J1
J3
J5
J7
J9
1
2
J85 J86 J87
J88 J89 J90
2
3
J2
J1
J4
J3
J6
J5
J8
J7
J10
J9
1
3
J85 J86 J87
J88 J89 J90
2
3
J2
J1
J4
J3
J6
J5
J8
J7
J10
J9
1
4
J85 J86 J87
J88 J89 J90
2
3
J2
J1
J4
J3
J6
J5
J8
J7
J10
J9
1
5
J85 J86 J87
J88 J89 J90
2
3
J2
J1
J4
J3
J6
J5
J8
J7
J10
J9
1
6
J85 J86 J87
J88 J89 J90
2
3
J2
J1
J4
J3
J6
J5
J8
J7
J10
J9
1
7
J85 J86 J87
J88 J89 J90
2
3
J2
J1
J4
J3
J6
J5
J8
J7
J10
J9
1
3&4
J85 J86 J87
J88 J89 J90
2
3
J2
J4
J6
J8
J10
PC/4 boards do not have jumpers J5-J8.
Installation
11
Board Identification
Jumpers J9 and J10 (see Figure 1) are used to set the PC/8 and PC/4 boards’ ID
number (0-3) when multiple boards are daisy chained together (see Daisy
Chaining PC/X Boards, on page 43). The default Board ID is 0; this should be
changed only for the second, third and fourth boards in a daisy chained
configuration.
Figure 4
Board ID Jumper Settings for PC/4 and PC/8 Boards
Board 0:
Board 1:
J9
J9
1
1
2
2
3
3
J10
J10
Board 2:
Board 3:
J9
J9
1
1
2
2
3
3
J10
12
J10
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
Daisy Chain Connectors P2 and P3
In the upper right-hand corner of the PC/4 or PC/8 board are two connectors, P2
and P3 (see Figure 1). When multiple boards are daisy chained together (see
Daisy Chaining PC/X Boards, on page 43), a daisy chain cable links the boards
so that they can share a single IRQ line. For single board installations, a jumper
must be placed across pins 2 and 3 (the middle two pins) of P2 when an ODD
interrupt is selected, P3 when an EVEN interrupt is selected, and both P2 and P3
if ODD and EVEN interrupts are selected. PC/X boards are shipped with both
jumpers installed, and the usual practice is to leave them both in place, even if
you are only using one interrupt. See Figure 5, below.
Figure 5
Connectors P2 and P3 (Single Board Configuration)
P2
Installation
P3
13
Plugging in the Board
Now you are ready to install the PC/X board in your computer. Follow these
steps:
1.
Turn off your computer’s power and remove the cover (refer to your computer’s manual for instructions on cover removal and option board installation and cautions).
2.
Locate an available slot (8 or 16 bit) in your computer and remove the slot
plate.
3.
Plug the PC/X board into the slot and screw the endplate to the computer
chassis (use the screw you removed from the slot plate). The endplate must
to be screwed in to the computer chassis to remain in compliance with Part
15 of the FCC rules for class B operation.
4.
Install the interface cable assembly or connector box (see Connector Options, on page 35) on the PC/X board by mating the female 78-pin connector
on the assembly to the male 78-pin connector on the end of the PC/X board.
Be sure that the plug is completely installed—it may be a snug fit.
HINT: If you have difficulty plugging in the DB-78 connector, try loosening
the screw in the endplate—the connector may not be exactly centered in the
slot in the back of the computer. Be sure to re-tighten the endplate screw
once the DB-78 connector is securely attached.
IMPORTANT! Use only the DigiBoard-supplied shielded cable assemblies or connector boxes to remain in compliance with FCC limits for
Class B operation.
5.
14
Replace your computer’s cover.
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
PC/16 Boards
Before you plug in the board. . .
Write down the serial number of the board in the form on page x. You will
need it if you have to contact DigiBoard regarding the board. Also write
down the part numbers of the PAL chips in sockets U46 and U58 (see Figure
6); it is essential to know these part numbers so you can determine what I/O
port addresses correspond to each of the ports on the board.
Figure 6
PC/16 Board Layout
UARTs
Connectors
P1
U1 (Channel 1)
U2 (Channel 5)
U3 (Channel 9)
U4 (Channel 13)
U5 (Channel 2)
U6 (Channel 6)
U7 (Channel 10)
U8 (Channel 14)
U19 (Channel 3)
U20 (Channel 7) U21 (Channel 11) U22 (Channel 15)
U33 (Channel 4)
U34 (Channel 8) U35 (Channel 12) U36 (Channel 16)
P2
P3
U46
U58
DBI A/N 30000604 REV
PAL Chips
U46 and U58
S/N
Serial
Number
Jumpers
J1-J7
I/O Port Addresses
The PC/16 board’s I/O port addresses are not set by DIP switches. Instead, the
addresses are “hard coded” in two PAL (Programmable Array Logic) chips on
the board. The PALs are plugged into sockets at locations U46 and U58 (see
Figure 6). The part numbers of the PALs can be used to identify the I/O
addresses that are used by a particular PC/16 board.
Since the PC/16 board’s I/O addresses are hard coded, they
cannot be changed in the event of conflict with another
device in your system. These conflicts are very rare, but if
one should occur, you will need to change the I/O port used
by the other device to an address that is not being used by
the PC/16 board(s). Tables 3 and 4 on the following pages
show the addresses coded in the PC/16 boards’ PALs.
Installation
15
There are two main sets of PALs available for PC/16 boards: Standard (for MSDOS, OS/2, Windows, etc.) and Pick (for the Pick operating system). These
main sets contain two pairs of PALs—one for Board 0 and one for Board 1.
If two PC/16 boards are to be installed in the same
computer, they must have different PAL sets, or I/O address
conflicts will occur. See Tables 3 and 4 for the appropriate
part numbers for Board 0 and Board 1 PALs.
Table 3
Standard (DOS) PALs and their Associated I/O Addresses
Board 0
Board 1
PAL #40000246 (U58)
PAL #40000247 (U46)
PAL #40000248 (U58)
PAL #40000249 (U46)
Port
I/O Address
Port
I/O Address
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
Status Register
100h
108h
110h
118h
120h
128h
130h
138h
148h
150h
158h
160h
168h
170h
178h
180h
140h
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
Status Register
188h
190h
198h
208h
210h
218h
220h
228h
230h
238h
240h
248h
250h
258h
260h
268h
140h
16
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
Table 4
Pick PALs and their Associated I/O Addresses
Board 0
Board 1
PAL #40000238 (U58)
PAL #40000239 (U46)
PAL #40000240 (U58)
PAL #40000241 (U46)
Port
I/O Address
Port
I/O Address
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
Status Register
130h
138h
140h
148h
150h
158h
160h
168h
1B0h
1B8h
1C0h
1C8h
1D0h
1D8h
1E0h
1E8h
188h
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
Status Register
230h
238h
240h
248h
250h
258h
260h
268h
2B0h
2B8h
2C0h
2C8h
2D0h
2D8h
2E0h
2E8h
289h
Installation
17
IRQ Selection
The PC/16 board can be configured to use one of six IRQ (Interrupt Request)
lines: IRQ2, IRQ3, IRQ4, IRQ5, IRQ6 or IRQ7. Jumpers J1-J6 (see Figure 6)
determine which IRQ the board will use. To set the IRQ for the PC/16 board,
place a jumper across the appropriate pair of pins, as shown in Table 5, below.
J1
J2
J3
J4
J5
J6
IRQ4 - J3 Jumpered
IRQ5 - J4 Jumpered
J1
J2
J3
J4
J5
J6
IRQ3 - J2 Jumpered
J1
J2
J3
J4
J5
J6
IRQ2 - J1 Jumpered
J1
J2
J3
J4
J5
J6
J1
J2
J3
J4
J5
J6
PC/16 IRQ Jumper Settings
J1
J2
J3
J4
J5
J6
Table 5
IRQ6 - J5 Jumpered
IRQ7 - J6 Jumpered
The IRQ selected for the PC/16 board must be unique, and may not be shared
with any other device in the system, with one exception: two PC/16 boards may
share the same IRQ, if the boards are “daisy chained” together (see Daisy
Chaining PC/X Boards, on page 43).
18
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
Some common sources of contention for IRQs are:
IRQ2:
IRQ3:
IRQ4:
IRQ5:
IRQ6:
IRQ7:
EGA adapters (if present)
Standard COM2 & COM4 ports (if present)
Standard COM1 & COM3 ports (if present)
LPT2 (Second parallel printer port) (if present)
Floppy disk controller
LPT1 (First parallel printer port) (if present)
Board Identification
Jumper J7 (see Figure 6) is used to set the PC/16 board’s ID number (0 or 1)
when two boards are daisy chained together (see Daisy Chaining PC/X Boards,
on page 43). The default Board ID is 0; this should be changed to 1 only for the
second board in a daisy chained pair of boards.
J7
PC/16 Board ID Jumper Settings
J7
Figure 7
Board 0: Pins 1 and 2 Connected
Board 1: Pins 2 and 3 Connected
Installation
19
Daisy Chain Connector P3
In the upper right-hand corner of the PC/16 board is a connector, P3 (see Figure
6). When two boards are daisy chained together (see Daisy Chaining PC/X
Boards, on page 43), the daisy chain cable is connected between connector P3 of
Board 0 and connector P3 of Board 1. In all other cases, the two pins of P3 must
be jumpered together as shown in Figure 8, below:
Figure 8
20
PC/16 Daisy Chain Connector P3, with Jumper
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
Plugging in the Board
Once you have set all of the jumpers and noted the PAL part numbers (and the
board’s serial number!) you are ready to install the PC/16 board in your
computer.
1.
Locate a vacant full length eight or sixteen bit (XT or AT) slot in your
computer and remove the end plate (save the screw).
2.
Fold the cables from the RJ-45 connector box so that they line up with
connectors P1 and P2 on the top edge of the board as shown in Figure 9.
Figure 9
Folding the Interface Cables
P1
P2
P3
Digi
P9 P10
3.
Feed the cables through the open slot in the back of the computer.
4.
Plug the board into the selected I/O slot in the computer. Use the screw you
removed in Step 1 to secure the board to the computer chassis. The endplate
must to be screwed in to the computer chassis to remain in compliance with
Part 15 of the FCC rules for class B operation.
5.
Screw the connector box to the end plate of the PC/16 board.
6.
Plug the connector box ribbon cables into connectors P1 and P2 on the top
of the board.
Installation
21
MC/X Boards
This section provides instructions for installing and configuring MC/4, MC/8
and MC/16 boards in Micro Channel computers. These boards are for use with
IBM PS/2 and compatible computers which use Micro Channel bus architecture.
Instructions for installing PC/X boards (in ISA computers) begin on page 3.
Before you plug in the board. . .
Write down the serial number of the board in the form on page x. You will
need it if you have to contact DigiBoard regarding the board.
Make sure you have the following items at hand:
•
Working copy of your IBM Reference Diskette (don’t use the original—it
should be write-protected and stored in a safe place)
•
ADF (Adapter Description Files) diskette (supplied with the board)
If you are installing a MC/16 board, remove the cover from the connector “tail”
(replace the cover after the board has been installed in the computer).
22
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
Figure 10
MC/4 and MC/8 Board Layout
Jumper J1
Endplate
S/N
U18 (Channel 8) U22 (Channel 5)
REV
U19 (Channel 7) U23 (Channel 6)
DBI A/N 30001474
U20 (Channel 3) U24 (Channel 2)
U21 (Channel 1) U25 (Channel 4)
Serial Number
Fork
Figure 11
DBI A/N 30001474
MC/16 Board Layout
REV
S/N
Serial Number
Fork
MC/X boards contain static-sensitive components. Always
touch a grounded surface to discharge static electricity
before handling the circuit board.
Installation
23
Plugging in the Board
Now you are ready to install the MC/X board in your computer. Follow these
steps:
1.
Turn off your computer’s power and remove the cover (refer to your
computer’s manual for instructions on cover removal and option board installation and cautions).
2.
Locate an available Micro Channel slot in your computer and remove the
external slot plate (you will need to loosen the thumbscrew to do this). If
you are installing an MC/16 board, also make sure that there is at least six
inches of clearance behind the computer for the RJ-45 connector tail.
3.
Plug the MC/X board into the Micro Channel slot, making sure that the
“fork” is in position under the endplate thumbscrew. Tighten the thumbscrew.
4.
(MC/16 only) Be sure to replace the cover on the connector tail. This is
required in order to remain in compliance with Part 15 of the FCC rules for
Class B operation.
5.
Replace your computer’s cover.
24
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
Configuring the Board
After the MC/X board has been physically installed in your machine, you need
to configure the board for operation in your system. This is done by running the
configuration program on the IBM Reference Diskette. Follow these steps:
1.
Insert your working copy of the IBM Reference Diskette into your boot
drive (Drive A) and turn on the computer’s power. Expect an error message—the MC/X board won’t be found in the configuration file at this point.
2.
Select “Copy an Option Diskette” from the main menu. Follow the
instructions given on your computer screen for copying ADF files onto your
Reference Diskette. The name of the ADF file for MC/4 and MC/8 boards
is @6FE5.ADF. The ADF file for MC/16 boards is @6FE4.ADF.
3.
Select “Set Configuration” from the main menu. Then select “Change
Configuration” from the Set Configuration menu. The screen will now
display the configuration of the system. Use the <Page UP> and <Page
Down> keys to scroll through the configuration until you see the entry for
the slot into which you have plugged the MC/X board. There are three
parameters which can be set: I/O Port Address, Com2 Status and Interrupt
Select.
To change a parameter, use the arrow keys to highlight the item you wish to
change, then press the <F5> and <F6> function keys to cycle through the
available settings for that parameter.
When you have set all three parameters to the desired values, press <F10>
to save the changes, then press <F3> to exit.
Installation
25
The following options are available:
MC/4, MC/8 I/O Port Address:
0xDB80 → 0xDBC0
DB80h DB88h DB90h DB98h
DBA0h DBA8h DBB0h DBB8h
Status Register: DBC0h
0xDC00 → 0xDC40
DC00h DC08h DC10h DC18h
DC20h DC28h DC30h DC38h
Status Register: DC40h
0xBB80 → 0xBBC0
BB80h BB88h BB90h BB98h
BBA0h BBA8h BBB0h BBB8h
Status Register: BBC0h
0xBC00 → 0xBC40
BC00h BC08h BC10h BC18h
BC20h BC28h BC30h BC38h
Status Register: BC40h
0xAB80 → 0xABC0
AB80h AB88h AB90h AB98h
ABA0h ABA8h ABB0h ABB8h
Status Register: ABC0h
0xAC00 → 0xAC40
AC00h AC08h AC10h AC18h
AC20h AC28h AC30h AC38h
Status Register: AC40h
0xCB80 → 0xCBC0
CB80h CB88h CB90h CB98h
CBA0h CBA8h CBB0h CBB8h
Status Register: CBC0h
If you are installing an MC/4 board, only the first four addresses in each list
are pertinent.
26
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
MC/16 I/O Port Address:
0x3000 → 0x307F
3000h 3008h
3040h 3048h
3010h
3050h
3018h
3058h
3020h
3060h
3028h
3068h
3030h
3070h
3038h
3078h.
0x4000 → 0x407F
4000h 4008h
4040h 4048h
4010h
4050h
4018h
4058h
4020h
4060h
4028h
4068h
4030h
4070h
4038h
4078h
0x4100 → 0x417F
4100h 4108h
4140h 4148h
4110h
4150h
4118h
4158h
4120h
4160h
4128h
4168h
4130h
4170h
4138h
4178h
0x4200 → 0x427F
4200h 4208h
4240h 4248h
4210h
4250h
4218h
4258h
4220h
4260h
4228h
4268h
4230h
4270h
4238h
4278h
0x4300 → 0x437F
4300h 4308h
4340h 4348h
4310h
4350h
4318h
4358h
4320h
4360h
4328h
4368h
4330h
4370h
4338h
4378h
0x5000 → 0x507F
5000h 5008h
5040h 5048h
5010h
5050h
5018h
5058h
5020h
5060h
5028h
5068h
5030h
5070h
5038h
5078h
0x6000 → 0x607F
6000h 6008h
6040h 6048h
6010h
6050h
6018h
6058h
6020h
6060h
6028h
6068h
6030h
6070h
6038h
6078h
0x7000 → 0x707F
7000h 7008h
7040h 7048h
7010h
7050h
7018h
7058h
7020h
7060h
7028h
7068h
7030h
7070h
7038h
7078h
MC/16 Status Register Address:
0x3080 → 0x3081
0x4080 → 0x4081
0x4180 → 0x4181
0x4280 → 0x4281
0x4380 → 0x4381
0x5080 → 0x5081
0x6080 → 0x6081
Installation
27
Com2 Status:
When Com2 Status is enabled, the first port on the MC/X board is given an
I/O port address of 2F8h and assigned to interrupt IRQ3, regardless of the
settings of the other parameters. This makes the first port look like a
standard COM2 port. If your machine already has a COM2 serial port,
there will be address and interrupt conflicts between the two devices.
Interrupt Vectors:
IRQ 3, 5, 7, 10, 11, 12, 15 or None (IRQ disabled).
Make a note of the UART Address Range and the Interrupt Select. You
will need this information when setting up device drivers. Also verify that
“Com2 Status” is set to “Disabled”. If it is not, you can change it by
selecting the “Set Configuration” menu.
4.
28
Remove the Reference Diskette from the drive and reboot your machine.
This time you should get no error message.
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
Connecting Peripherals
This section provides information on the most common peripheral connection
schemes for terminals, printers and modems. See RS-232 Serial Interface, beginning on page 34, for a more comprehensive discussion of serial interface options.
When connecting peripheral devices to the PC/X or MC/X
board, be sure to turn off the power to both the host
computer and the peripheral device.
Terminals and Printers
Software Handshaking (XON/XOFF)
In most cases, serial terminals and printers need only a “three-wire” connection.
All DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X device driver software supports XON/XOFF
(software) handshaking, so the only signal lines necessary are Transmitted Data
(TxD), Received Data (RxD) and Signal Ground (SG). It may be necessary to
disable DCD (Data Carrier Detect) sensing through a software command—see
your DigiBoard device driver software manual for instructions. Cables must be
shielded to remain in compliance with FCC certification requirements, and the
shield should be connected to Chassis Ground (GND) at both ends of the cable
run.
A simple cable for connecting a terminal or a printer to a PC/X or MC/X board
is shown in Figure 12 (DB-25 versions) and Figure 13 (RJ-45 versions).
Installation
29
Figure 12
Simple Terminal/Printer Cable (DB-25)
DB-25 Female
Signal Pin
(
DB-25 Male
Pin Signal
GND Shell
2
TxD
3
RxD
4
RTS
5
CTS
6
DSR
7
SG
8
DCD
20
DTR
22
RI
Cable Shield)
Figure 13
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
20
22
GND
TxD
RxD
RTS
CTS
DSR
SG
DCD
DTR
RI
Simple Terminal/Printer Cable (RJ-45)
RJ-11 - 4 Pin
Signal Pin
GND
TxD
RxD
SG
(
1
2
3
4
DB-25 Male
Pin Signal
1
3
2
7
GND
RxD
TxD
SG
Cable Shield)
The cables shown in Figures 12 and 13 are three-wire null modem cables—that
is, Transmitted Data on one end of the cable is connected to Received Data at the
other end, and vice versa.
DB-25 Equipped Boards:
The male DB-25 end can be plugged directly into most serial terminals and
printers without any adapters. The female DB-25 end plugs directly into one of
the DB-25 connectors on the fan out cable or connector box assembly.
RJ-45 Equipped Boards:
The male DB-25 end can be plugged directly into most serial terminals and
printers without any adapters. The RJ-11 plug fits in the center of the PC/X or
MC/X board’s RJ-45 jack.
30
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
Hardware Handshaking (Ready/Busy)
Most terminals and printers use Data Terminal Ready (DTR) for Ready/Busy
hardware handshaking. The cables below support this method (see note on the
following page).
Figure 14
Terminal/Printer Cable with DTR Handshaking (DB-25)
DB-25 Female
Signal Pin
(
Figure 15
DB-25 Male
Pin Signal
GND Shell
2
TxD
3
RxD
4
RTS
5
CTS
6
DSR
7
SG
8
DCD
20
DTR
22
RI
Cable Shield)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
20
22
GND
TxD
RxD
RTS
CTS
DSR
SG
DCD
DTR
RI
Terminal/Printer Cable with DTR Handshaking (RJ-45)
RJ-45 - 8 Pin
Signal Pin
DSR
RTS
GND
TxD
RxD
SG
CTS
DTR
(
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
DB-25 Male
Pin Signal
4
5
1
3
2
7
20
RTS
CTS
GND
RxD
TxD
SG
DTR
Cable Shield)
Some Okidata printers use a control signal on pin 11, called
Supervisory Send Data (SSD) instead of DTR. In this case,
simply connect CTS on the RJ-45 side to pin 11 of the DB25, instead of pin 20.
Other printer manufacturers may use different methods of
flow control. Consult your printer’s documentation for specific wiring requirements.
Installation
31
Modems
DB-25 Versions
Use a standard “straight-through” cable (see Figure 16) to connect a modem to
one of the DB-25 connectors on the fan out cable or connector box.
Figure 16
Modem Cable (DB-25)
DB-25 Female
Signal Pin
DB-25 Male
Pin Signal
GND Shell
2
TxD
3
RxD
4
RTS
5
CTS
6
DSR
7
SG
8
DCD
20
DTR
22
RI
Cable Shield)
(
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
20
22
GND
TxD
RxD
RTS
CTS
DSR
SG
DCD
DTR
RI
RJ-45 Versions
The simplest way to connect a modem to a board with RJ-45 connectors is to use
RJ-45 to DB-25 “Cable Legs”, available from DigiBoard (see page 41 for a
description and part numbers). These adapters use 10-pin RJ-45 plugs, and
therefore provide full modem support (Ring Indicator and Data Carrier Detect
are only available on 10-pin RJ-45 connectors).
If you wish to build your own modem cables, follow the diagram in Figure 17.
Figure 17
Full 10-Wire Modem Cable (RJ-45)
RJ-45 - 10 Pin
Signal Pin
RI
DSR
RTS
GND
TxD
RxD
SG
CTS
DTR
DCD
(
32
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
DB-25 Male
Pin
22
8
4
1
2
3
7
5
20
6
Signal
RI
DSR
RTS
GND
TxD
RxD
SG
CTS
DTR
DCD
Cable Shield)
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
ALTPIN Modem Wiring (RJ-45 Versions)
10-pin RJ-45 plugs may be difficult to obtain in the retail market; therefore,
DigiBoard device driver software incorporates an optional feature called ALTPIN, which swaps the logical functions of DSR (Data Set Ready) with DCD
(Data Carrier Detect). When ALTPIN is enabled (see your device driver software reference manual for instructions), DCD becomes available on pin 1 of an
8-pin RJ-45 connector (equivalent to pin 2 of a 10-pin connector).
If you wish to build an 8-wire modem cable for the PC/X or MC/X board, use an
8-pin RJ-45 plug wired as follows:
Figure 18
8-Wire Modem Cable for use with ALTPIN Configuration
RJ-45 - 8 Pin
DB-25 Male
Signal Pin
Pin Signal
(
Installation
1
DCD
2
RTS
3
GND
4
TxD
5
RxD
6
SG
7
CTS
8
DTR
Cable Shield)
8
4
1
2
3
7
5
20
DCD
RTS
GND
TxD
RxD
SG
CTS
DTR
33
RS-232 Cables and Connector Options
Cables
RS-232 serial interface cables should be shielded, low-capacitance cables, ideally designed specifically for serial data transmission.
Grounding
The shield should be grounded at both ends of the cable. Chassis Ground—
available on the shell of DigiBoard’s DB-25 and DB-9 connectors, and pin 4 of
our 10-pin RJ-45 connector, is ideal for this purpose.
Environment
While good shielding provides reasonable protection against “noise” (ElectroMagnetic Interference, or EMI), cables should still be routed away from noise
sources wherever possible. Avoid laying cables in close proximity to transformers, generators, motors, fluorescent lights, etc.
Capacitance vs. Length of Run
The total capacitance of a cable affects the integrity of transmitted data. As a
rule of thumb, the total capacitance of a cable (including the connectors) should
not exceed 2500 pF. Serial interface cable is usually rated in pico Farads per
foot. Therefore, if a cable has a capacitance of 50 pF/ft, and the connectors are
100 pF each, the maximum recommended cable length is 46 feet. If the cable is
rated at 12.5 pF/ft, the maximum recommended cable length is 184 feet, and 5
pF/ft cable can be run up to 460 feet.
In situations where low-capacitance cable is unavailable, or very long cable runs
are required, “short-haul” modems, available from suppliers such as Black Box,
can be used to increase the effective range of the RS-232 interface. Short-haul
modems are similar to standard modems, except that they are connected directly
to each other via a cable instead of going through a telephone circuit. NOTE—
Use only externally-powered short-haul modems with DigiBoard products.
34
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
Connector Options
A variety of connector types are available. Four and eight port PC/X and MC/X
boards can be set up with DB-25 connectors (male or female, DTE or DCE
wiring), DB-9 connectors (male or female, DTE wiring) or 10-pin RJ-45 jacks.
NOTE: PC/16 and MC/16 boards are available only with RJ-45 connectors.
The following pages give the part numbers and wiring information for the
various connector types.
DB-25 Connectors
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X boards can be configured with DB-25 connectors in
any of four configurations: DTE male, DTE female, DCE male or DCE female.
The pin assignments for the DB-25 connectors follow the usual conventions for
RS-232 wiring.
Table 6
DB-25 Connector Pin Assignments
Signal
Description
DTE Use
DCE Use
Pin #
GND
Chassis Ground
N/A
N/A
Shell
TxD
Transmitted Data
Output
Input
2
RxD
Received Data
Input
Output
3
RTS
Request to Send
Output
Input
4
CTS
Clear to Send
Input
Output
5
DSR
Data Set Ready
Input
Output
6
SG
Signal Ground
reference
reference
7
DCD
Data Carrier Detect
Input
Output
8
DTR
Data Terminal Ready
Output
Input
20
RI
Ring Indicator
Input
Output
22
It should be noted that the DCE configuration is equivalent to a DTE connector
plus a fully-wired null modem adapter. Thus, DCD (Data Carrier Detect) and
DSR (Data Set Ready) are wired together internally and carry the DTE
equivalent of DTR (Data Terminal Ready). For this reason, DCE cables cannot
be used with modems.
RS-232 Cable and Connector Options
35
DB-25 Connector Options
DB-25 connectors are available in two styles: a quad or octa cable assembly, or a
connector box assembly. Either style may be ordered with male or female DB25 connectors, configured as DTE or DCE devices.
Quad and Octa Cable Option (DTE or DCE)
Figure 19 shows the eight-port cable assembly, and Table 7 gives the part numbers of the available configurations.
Figure 19
Octa-Cable Assembly
Table 7
DB-25 Cable Options and Part Numbers
DTE Quad
DCE Quad
DTE Octa
DCE Octa
DB-25 Male
76000008
76000007
76000021
76000020
DB-25 Female
76000006
76000005
76000019
76000018
36
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
Quad and Octa Connector Boxes (DTE or DCE)
Figure 20
Eight-Port DB-25 Connector Box
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Digi Board
Table 8
Connector Box Options and Part Numbers
DTE Quad
DCE Quad
DTE Octa
DCE Octa
DB-25 Male
76000030
76000028
76000031
76000029
DB-25 Female
76000026
76000024
76000027
76000025
RS-232 Cable and Connector Options
37
DB-9 Connectors
PC/X and MC/X boards can be configured with male or female DB-9 connectors
(DTE wiring only).
Table 9
DB-9 Connector Pin Assignments
Signal
Description
Direction
Pin #
GND
Chassis Ground
N/A
Shell
DCD
Data Carrier Detect
Input
1
TxD
Transmitted Data
Output
3
RxD
Received Data
Input
2
DTR
Data Terminal Ready
Output
4
SG
Signal Ground
reference
5
DSR
Data Set Ready
Input
6
RTS
Request to Send
Output
7
CTS
Clear to Send
Input
8
RI
Ring Indicator
Input
9
DB-9 connectors are available only in the quad or octa cable “fan-out” configuration (see Figure 19, on page 36).
Table 10
38
DB-9 Quad and Octa Cable Options and Part Numbers
Quad DTE
Octa DTE
DB-9 Male
76000003
76000015
DB-9 Female
76000001
76000013
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
RJ-45 Connectors
PC/X and MC/X boards can be configured with 10-pin RJ-45 modular jacks.
These accept plastic snap-in plugs like the ones used for connecting telephones.
They are less bulky and more convenient to use than the DB-25, but have not
undergone the standardization rigors that have been applied to the larger DB-25
connectors. Figure 21 shows the eight-port RJ-45 connector block, and Table 11
gives the applicable part numbers.
Figure 21
Eight-Port RJ-45 Connector Box
P1
P2
P3
P4
oa
Digi B
P8
Table 11
P7
rd
P6
P5
RJ-45 Connector Box Options
RJ-45
Quad
Octa
76000038
76000033
RS-232 Cable and Connector Options
39
Modular Plugs
There are four types of modular plugs that can be used with DigiBoard’s RJ-45
10-pin jack. These are the 4 or 6-pin RJ-11 plugs, and the 8 or 10-pin RJ-45
plugs.
The 8 and 10-pin RJ-45 plugs are the same physical size, but the 10-pin version
has one additional wire at each end of the row of contacts. Thus pins 1-8 of an
8-pin RJ-45 directly correspond to pins 2-9 of a 10-pin RJ-45 connector.
Similarly, the two RJ-11 plugs have the same physical dimensions, but the 6-pin
version has an extra pin at each end. The RJ-11 plugs are physically smaller
than RJ-45 plugs, but are designed so that they fit into the center of an RJ-45
jack. In this way, the four pins closest to the center of any size connector will
always carry the same signals as the middle four pins of any other connector.
The contacts of a 6-pin RJ-11 connector correspond directly to the middle six
pins of an 8 or 10-pin RJ-45 connector, and so on.
40
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
RJ-45 to DB-25 Conversion
Since most RS-232 devices are equipped with DB-25 connectors, it is necessary
to buy or build an adapter to transfer the signals to a DB-25 plug. The most
simple and direct approach is to purchase ready-made “Cable Legs” from a
DigiBoard dealer or distributor. These are made with a full 10-pin RJ-45 plug
(which can be difficult to obtain in the retail market), connected via a two or
four foot cable to a DTE-configured DB-25 plug.
Figure 22
RJ-45 to DB-25 “Cable Leg”
RJ-45 - 10 Pin
DB-25
Pin
Signal
Shell
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
20
22
Chassis Ground
TxD
RxD
RTS
CTS
DSR
Signal Ground
DCD
DTR
RI
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Table 12
Signal
RI
DSR
RTS
Chassis Ground
TxD
RxD
Signal Ground
CTS
DTR
DCD
Cable Leg Options and Part Numbers
DB-25 Male
DB-25 Female
DB-9 Male
24 Inch Cables
61020024
61030024
61070024
48 Inch Cables
61020048
61030048
N/A
RS-232 Cable and Connector Options
41
The pin configuration of the DB-25 connector on the Cable Leg is identical to
that of the DB-25 connectors on the standard DigiBoard DTE octa cable, and
provides full modem control.
Since the cable leg’s DB-25 connector is configured for DTE, you need a null
modem cable or adapter for terminals and printers. See Figure 12 on page 30,
and Figure 14 on page 31 for null modem configurations that can be used with
cable legs.
If you don’t need full modem control, you can use one of the many
commercially available RJ-45 to DB-25 adapters. These have both an 8-pin RJ45 jack and a DB-25 plug in a housing no larger than that found on a standard
DB-25 plug. The plug and jack are connected within the housing by jumpers
which may be installed by the end-user in any desired configuration.
42
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
Daisy Chaining PC/X Boards
PC/4 and PC/8 Boards
In some operating systems, such as MS-DOS and Pick, it is possible, or even
necessary, to “daisy chain” multiple PC/X boards together on one or two
interrupts. This, in effect, makes the entire group of boards appear to the system
as one board. This may be done with up to four PC/4 and/or PC/8 boards, and
with two PC/16 boards.
The PC/X board has an interrupt sequencer which cycles through each of the
ports on the board, looking for an active interrupt request. When it finds one, it
stops cycling, activates the interrupt request line for that port and waits for the
interrupt to be serviced by the host computer. Once the interrupt has been
handled, the sequencer starts up again and continues in this manner until the last
port is polled. At this point the sequencer’s counter is reset and a token output is
sent to pin 2 of either P-2 (for odd-numbered interrupts) or P-3 (for evennumbered interrupts). In a single-board system, this token passes through a
jumper shunt and back into pin 3 of the same connector, and restarts the interrupt
sequencer’s polling cycle. In a multi-board system, the signal passes through the
daisy-chain cable to pin 3 of the same connector of the next board in sequence.
Pin 2 of the last board is connected to pin 3 of the first board, closing the loop.
In this manner, all ports of all boards are polled in each cycle.
When multiple boards will be sharing interrupt request lines, the interrupt status
registers of each board MUST be set to the same address (set by the 10-position
switch bank DS-1). When reading the status port to find the particular channel
generating an interrupt, the ODD interrupt is checked at the address selected on
DS-1, and the EVEN interrupt is checked at that address plus 1. Thus, if the
status register is addressed at 140h (the default setting), the ODD interrupt status
is found at address 140h and the EVEN interrupt status is found at 141h.
The status port reflects the board number in bits 3 and 4 as a binary number
between 0 and 3. Bits 0, 1 and 2 contain a binary number between 0 and 7
indicating the number of the channel that needs servicing. Thus, if the status
port contains 16h, or 00010110 binary, the third board (board #2) has an
interrupt pending on channel 6 (or the 7th physical port—remember that the first
board or port is number 0). If no interrupt is pending, the status port will contain
FFh (all bits set to 1).
Daisy Chaining PC/X Boards
43
If more than one interrupt is pending, the status port will reflect the first one.
Once that interrupt has been serviced, the next one in numerical sequence will
appear in the status port. Therefore, by reading the status port until it comes up
FFh, all pending interrupts will have been serviced.
The following figures show the necessary wiring for one to four boards (a single
board system is shown for completeness). Note that if only one interrupt is used
(which is recommended, since no performance improvement will be seen by
using two), only one set of cables is needed: install cables on connector P2 for
ODD interrupts, or P3 for even interrupts.
Figure 23
Single Board System (PC/4, PC/8)
J9
Board #0
P2
Odd Interrupts
P3
1
Even Interrupts
2
1
1
3
J10
Figure 24
Two Board System (PC/4, PC/8)
J9
Board #1
P2
Odd Interrupts
P3
1
Even Interrupts
2
1
1
3
J10
J9
Board #0
P2
Odd Interrupts
P3
1
Even Interrupts
2
1
1
3
J10
44
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
Figure 25
Three Board System (PC/4, PC/8)
J9
Board #2
P2
Odd Interrupts
P3
1
Even Interrupts
2
1
1
3
J10
J9
Board #1
P2
Odd Interrupts
P3
1
Even Interrupts
2
1
1
3
J10
J9
Board #0
P2
Odd Interrupts
P3
1
Even Interrupts
2
1
1
3
J10
Daisy Chaining PC/X Boards
45
Figure 26
Four Board System (PC/4, PC/8)
J9
Board #3
P2
Odd Interrupts
P3
1
Even Interrupts
2
1
1
3
J10
J9
Board #2
P2
Odd Interrupts
P3
1
Even Interrupts
2
1
1
3
J10
J9
Board #1
P2
Odd Interrupts
P3
1
Even Interrupts
2
1
1
3
J10
J9
Board #0
P2
Odd Interrupts
P3
1
Even Interrupts
2
1
1
3
J10
46
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
PC/16 Boards
PC/16 boards function similarly to PC/4 and PC/8 boards, with some minor
differences: only two boards may be daisy chained together; since only one
interrupt is supported, there is only one daisy chain connector (P3); and both
boards must have the correct PALs (e.g. DOS Board 0 and DOS Board 1, or
Pick Board 0 and Pick Board 1; see page 16).
Figure 27
One Board System (PC/16)
Board #0
3
2
P3
1
Figure 28
J7
J6
1
Two Board System (PC/16)
Board #1
3
2
P3
1
J7
J6
1
Board #0
3
2
P3
1
Daisy Chaining PC/X Boards
J7
J6
1
47
Daisy Chain Cables
You can make your own cables as shown in the diagrams, or ready-made cables
may be purchased through your DigiBoard dealer or distributor. The part
numbers for the cables are:
PC/4, PC/8:
For Two Boards:
For Three Boards:
For Four Boards:
60000186
60000196
60000197
PC/16:
For Two Boards:
60000268
48
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
Using PC/X and MC/X Boards
with MS-DOS Applications
PC/X Boards
MS-DOS application programs generally communicate with COM ports by
directly accessing the UARTs via their I/O ports. Since these programs control
the I/O hardware directly, no device driver is required. Some programs allow
the user to specify the I/O port address and IRQ (Interrupt Request) line for each
port, while others are able to use only the standard PC COM ports COM1 and
COM2 (some applications can also use COM3 and COM4).
To use a DigiBoard PC/4 or PC/8 board with applications that allow the user to
specify the I/O port address and IRQ line for each port, set the DIP switches and
jumpers for addresses and IRQs that are not used by any other device in the
system, then configure the application for the same addresses and IRQs (use the
application’s setup program or configuration screens).
To use a DigiBoard PC/4 or PC/8 board with MS-DOS applications that can
reference only standard PC COM ports, the board must be set up to emulate
these ports. To do this, set the DIP switches and jumpers on the board so that
the first two (or four) ports on the board have the same I/O addresses and
interrupts as the standard PC COM ports, as shown below.
COM Port
I/O Address
IRQ
COM1
3F8h
4
COM2
2F8h
3
COM3
3E8h
4
COM4
2E8h
3
When using a PC/X board to emulate standard PC COM
ports, existing COM ports must be removed or completely
disabled.
PC/16 boards cannot be configured to emulate standard PC
COM ports.
Using PC/X and MC/X Boards with MS-DOS Applications
49
To use a PC/8 or PC/4 board to emulate COM1 and COM2, set the switches and
jumpers as shown below (PC/4 boards have only five banks of switches, DS1DS5).
DS1: Status port
set to 140h:
DS2: Port 1 set
to 3F8h
Select both IRQ3 and IRQ4 by
installing jumpers on J85 and J89:
J85 J86 J87
J88 J89 J90
DS3: Port 2 set
to 2F8h:
DS4: Port 3 set
to 100h:
Set even interrupts for the first port,
odd interrupts for the remaining
ports:
J1
J3
J5
J7
J9
1
DS5: Port 4 set
to 108h:
2
3
J2
J4
J6
J8
J10
DS6: Port 5 set
to 110h:
DS7 Port 6 set
to 118h:
Install jumpers on both P2 and P3:
DS8: Port 7 set
to 120h:
P2
P3
DS9: Port 8 set
to 128h:
In this configuration, the first two ports emulate COM1 (3F8h, IRQ4) and
COM2 (2F8h, IRQ3). The remaining ports are set to I/O addresses 100h-128h,
and use IRQ3; these ports are available to software that allows COM ports to be
specified by I/O address and IRQ.
50
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
To use a PC/8 or PC/4 board to emulate COM1 through COM4, set the switches
and jumpers as shown below (PC/4 boards have only five banks of switches,
DS1-DS5).
DS1: Status port
set to 140h:
DS2: Port 1 set
to 3F8h
Select both IRQ3 and IRQ4 by
installing jumpers on J85 and J89:
J85 J86 J87
J88 J89 J90
DS3: Port 2 set
to 2F8h:
DS4: Port 3 set
to 3E8h:
Set even interrupts for the first and
third ports, odd interrupts for the
remaining ports:
J1
J3
J5
J7
J9
1
DS5: Port 4 set
to 2E8h:
2
3
J2
J4
J6
J8
J10
DS6: Port 5 set
to 100h:
DS7: Port 6 set
to 108h:
Install jumpers on both P2 and P3:
DS8: Port 7 set
to 110h:
P2
P3
DS9: Port 8 set
for 118h:
In this configuration, the first two ports emulate COM1 (3F8h, IRQ4), COM2
(2F8h, IRQ3), COM3 (3E8h, IRQ4) and COM4 (2E8h, IRQ3). The remaining
ports are set to I/O addresses 100h-118h, and use IRQ3; these ports are available
to software that allows COM ports to be specified by I/O address and IRQ.
Using PC/X and MC/X Boards with MS-DOS Applications
51
MC/X Boards
MC/X boards have a feature that allows the first port to act like COM2. This is
set during configuration with the IBM setup disk (see page 28). When Com2
Status is enabled, the first port on the board is assigned I/O address 2F8h and
IRQ 3. The remainder of the ports are unaffected.
If your machine has a built-in or installed COM2 port, it
must be disabled or removed if Com2 Status is enabled on
the MC/X board. Failure to do this will result in I/O and
interrupt conflicts between the two devices.
Similarly, only one MC/X board may have Com2 Status
enabled.
52
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
Programming Information
Programming for PC/X and MC/X boards is very similar to programming for a
standard COM port. The boards use 16C450 or 16C550 (optional) UARTs,
which are directly accessible on your computer’s I/O bus.
Enabling Interrupts
When initializing the UARTs to enable interrupts, one extra step is necessary in
addition to setting the appropriate bits in the UART’s Interrupt Enable Register:
the OUT2 bit in the Modem Control Register must also be set (to logic 1). The
INTRPT output line is gated to the interrupt sequencer by the OUT2 line. If
OUT2 is not set, the UART will generate an interrupt, but the board will not
recognize it and it won’t be passed to your computer.
Programming Information
53
Using the Interrupt Status Register
PC/X and MC/X boards have an Interrupt Status Register (ISR) to streamline
interrupt handling. When the board requests an interrupt, the software can look
at the ISR to see which port caused the interrupt, instead of having to poll each
UART. This can save a lot of processor time when a large number of ports is
involved. The ISR also supports daisy chaining of PC/X boards so that up to 32
asynchronous serial ports can use the same interrupt (see Daisy Chaining PC/X
Boards, on page 43).
PC/4 and PC/8
The interrupt hardware on PC compatibles is edge triggered. This means that
normally only one device may use a given IRQ line (if a second device raised an
interrupt on the same line before the first one was serviced, no rising edge would
be sensed, and the interrupt would not be detected). PC/X boards provide a
method of placing up to four boards on a single IRQ line by daisy chaining the
interrupts from board to board (see Daisy Chaining PC/X Boards on page 43).
In this way all the boards appear as one device to the host computer.
The PC/X board has an interrupt sequencer which cycles through each of the
ports on the board, looking for an active interrupt request. When it finds one, it
stops cycling, activates the interrupt request line for that port and waits for the
interrupt to be serviced by the host computer. Once the interrupt has been
handled, the sequencer starts up again and continues in this manner until the last
port is polled. At this point the sequencer’s counter is reset and a token output is
sent to pin 2 of either P-2 (for odd numbered interrupts) or P-3 (for even
numbered interrupts). In a single-board system, this token passes through a
jumper shunt and back into pin 3 of the appropriate connector, and restarts the
interrupt sequencer’s polling cycle. In a multi-board system, the signal passes
through the daisy chain cable to pin 3 of the corresponding connector of the next
board in sequence. Pin 2 of the last board is connected to pin 3 of the first
board, closing the loop. In this manner, all ports of all boards are polled in each
cycle.
When multiple boards will be sharing interrupt request lines, the interrupt status
registers of each board MUST be at the same address (set by the 10-position
switch bank DS-1). When reading the status port to find the particular channel
generating an interrupt, the ODD interrupt is checked at the address selected on
DS-1, and the EVEN interrupt is checked at that address plus 1. Thus, if the
status register is addressed at 140h, the ODD interrupt status is found at address
140h and the EVEN interrupt status is found at 141h.
54
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
The status port reflects the board number in bits 3 and 4 as a binary number
between 0 and 3. Bits 0, 1 and 2 contain a binary number between 0 and 7
indicating the number of the channel that needs servicing. Thus, if the status port
contains 16h, or 00010110 binary, the third board (board #2) has an interrupt
pending on channel 6 (or the 7th physical port—remember that the 1st board or
port is number 0). If no interrupt is pending, the status port will contain FFh, or
all 1s.
If more than one interrupt is pending, the status port will reflect the first one.
Once that interrupt has been serviced, the next one in numerical sequence will
appear in the status port. Therefore, by reading the status port until it comes up
FFh, all pending interrupts will be serviced. If the interrupt service routine is
exited before all interrupts have been cleared, a new interrupt will be generated
as soon as interrupts have been reenabled.
PC/16
PC/16 boards look like two PC/8 boards daisy chained together. Therefore the
first eight ports appear to be on Board 0, and the other eight appear to be on
Board 1. If two PC/16 boards are daisy chained together, the second board
appears as boards 2 and 3.
Programming Information
55
MC/X
Unlike ISA interrupt hardware (which is edge triggered), Micro Channel
interrupt hardware is level sensitive. This allows multiple boards to share an
interrupt line, which eliminates the necessity of daisy chaining boards. The
MC/X Interrupt Status Register (ISR) is a 16 bit register that simultaneously
reflects ALL pending interrupts for that board. The ISR is bit-mapped so that
each bit represents one port on the board. Bit #0 = Port #1, etc. If no interrupts
are pending, the ISR contains all zeroes. If multiple boards are using one
interrupt, the software must check the ISR for each board in turn to be certain
that all interrupts are serviced. When no more interrupts are pending, the ISRs
will all be 00 and the IRQ line will drop.
56
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
Specifications
PC/4
Power requirements
+5 VDC ±5%:
+12 VDC ±5%:
-12 VDC ±5%:
1.0 Amps max.
55 mA max.
80 mA max.
Board dimensions
Length:
Width:
Height:
Weight:
13.1 inches
0.5 inches
4.2 inches
1.0 pounds
Operating environment
Ambient temperature:
Relative humidity:
Air movement:
Altitude:
Specifications
10° C to 55° C
5% to 90%
30 CFM forced
0 to 12,000 feet
57
PC/8
Power requirements
+5 VDC ±5%:
+12 VDC ±5%:
-12 VDC ±5%:
1.2 Amps max.
110 mA max.
160 mA max.
Board dimensions
Length:
Width:
Height:
Weight:
13.1 inches
0.5 inches
4.2 inches
1.0 pounds
Operating environment
Ambient temperature:
Relative humidity:
Air movement:
Altitude:
58
10° C to 55° C
5% to 90%
30 CFM forced
0 to 12,000 feet
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
PC/16
Power requirements
+5 VDC ±5%:
+12 VDC ±5%:
-12 VDC ±5%:
1.8 Amps max.
130 mA max.
130 mA max.
Board dimensions
Length:
Width:
Height:
Weight:
13.1 inches
0.5 inches
4.2 inches
0.75 pounds
Operating environment
Ambient temperature:
Relative humidity:
Air movement:
Altitude:
Specifications
10° C to 55° C
5% to 90%
30 CFM forced
0 to 12,000 feet
59
MC/4
Power requirements
+5 VDC ±5%:
+12 VDC ±5%:
-12 VDC ±5%:
1.5 Amps max.
50 mA max.
20 mA max.
Board dimensions
Length:
Width:
Height:
Weight:
11.5 inches
0.6 inches
3.5 inches
0.75 pounds
Operating environment
Ambient temperature:
Relative humidity:
Air movement:
Altitude:
60
10° C to 55° C
5% to 90%
30 CFM forced
0 to 12,000 feet
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
MC/8
Power requirements
+5 VDC ±5%:
+12 VDC ±5%:
-12 VDC ±5%:
1.5 Amps max.
50 mA max.
20 mA max.
Board dimensions
Length:
Width:
Height:
Weight:
11.5 inches
0.6 inches
3.5 inches
0.75 pounds
Operating environment
Ambient temperature:
Relative humidity:
Air movement:
Altitude:
Specifications
10° C to 55° C
5% to 90%
30 CFM forced
0 to 12,000 feet
61
MC/16
Power requirements
+5 VDC ±5%:
+12 VDC ±5%:
-12 VDC ±5%:
1.5 Amps max.
50 mA max.
20 mA max.
Board dimensions
Length:
Width:
Height:
Weight:
11.5 inches (16.8 inches with RJ-45 connector)
0.6 inches
3.5 inches
0.75 pounds
Operating environment
Ambient temperature:
Relative humidity:
Air movement:
Altitude:
62
10° C to 55° C
5% to 90%
30 CFM forced
0 to 12,000 feet
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
Index
Adapter Description Files, 25
ADF files, 25
ALTPIN, 33
BBS (DigiBoard), viii
Board ID
PC/16, 19
PC/8, PC/4, 12
Bulletin Board, viii
Cable configuration
RS-232 peripherals, 29, 30, 31,
32
Cable leg
RJ-45 to DB-25, 41
Part numbers, 41
Cable legs, 32
Cables
Capacitance, 34
Environment, 34
Grounding, 34
RS-232, 34
COM Port Emulation, 49
Com2 Status, 28, 52
Configuration
MC/X, 25
Connector Box
DB-25
Part numbers, 37
Connector box
DB-25, 37
Connector options, 35-57
DB-25, 35-37
DB-9, 38
RJ-45, 39-57
Part numbers, 39
Connectors
RJ-11
4 pin, 40
6 pin, 40
Index
RJ-45
10 pin, 40
8 pin, 40
Contention
IRQ, 10
Converting RJ-45 to DB-25, 41
Customer Assistance, ix
Customer Service, ix
Daisy Chain Cables, 48
Daisy Chaining
PC/16, 47
PC/8, PC/4, 43
DB-25 connectors, 30, 31, 32, 3537
Device driver support, xi
DigiBoard BBS, viii
DIP switches, 4
DOC/FCC information, vii
E-Mail addresses, ix
FCC/DOC information, vii
Flow control, 29, 31
DTR, 31
Hardware, 31
Ready/Busy, 31
Software, 29
Handshaking, 29, 31
DTR, 31
Hardware, 31
Ready/Busy, 31
Software, 29
I/O port address
MC/X, 26
PC/16, 15
PC/8, PC/4, 4
Installation
MC/X, 22
PC/16, 15
PC/8, PC/4, 3
63
Interference, RFI, vii
Interrupt Status Register, 54
Switch setting, 9
Interrupt Status Register address
MC/X, 26
Interrupts
Enabling, 53
IRQ
Contention, 10
Jumper settings
PC/8, PC/4, 11
MC/X, 28
PC/16, 18
PC/8, PC/4, 10
MC/16
Specifications, 62
MC/4
Specifications, 60
MC/8
Specifications, 61
MC/X
Com2 Status, 28
Configuration, 25
I/O port address, 26
Installation, 22
Interrupt Status Register
address, 26
IRQ, 28
Modems, 32
Modular plugs, 40
MS-DOS Applications, 49
Octa cable
DB-25, 36
Part numbers, 36
DB-9, 38
Part numbers, 38
PALs
PC/16
DOS, 16
Pick, 17
PC/16
Board ID, 19
Daisy Chaining, 47
I/O port address, 15
IRQ, 18
64
PALs
DOS, 16
Pick, 17
Specifications, 59
PC/16 installation, 15
PC/4
Specifications, 57
PC/8
Specifications, 58
PC/8, PC/4
Board ID, 12
Daisy Chaining, 43
Dip switches, 4
I/O port address, 4
Interrupt Status Register
Switch setting, 9
IRQ, 10
IRQ jumper settings, 11
PC/8, PC/4 installation, 3
Peripherals
Connecting, 29
Pin assignments
DB-25, vi, 35
DB-9, 38
Quad cable
DB-25, 36
Part numbers, 36
DB-9, 38
Part numbers, 38
Reference diskette, 22, 25
Return Procedures, xii
RJ-11 plugs, 40
RJ-45 connectors, 30, 31, 32, 33
RJ-45 plugs, 40
RMA, xii
Specifications
MC/16, 62
MC/4, 60
MC/8, 61
PC/16, 59
PC/4, 57
PC/8, 58
Technical Support, ix
XON/XOFF, 29
DigiBoard PC/X and MC/X Serial Communications Boards
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