HS Course Selection Guide

HS Course Selection Guide
HIGH SCHOOL
Course Selection Guide
2009-2010
This guide contains a listing of most of the regular
courses offered in the high schools of the Long
Beach Unified School District. A course matrix
(grid) begins each section indicating the projected
offerings at each high school. A description of the
courses follows the grid. All high schools offer all
required courses, however electives vary from site
to site. It is also possible that a school may offer a
course not included in this guide.
Long Beach Unified School District
Christopher J. Steinhauser, Superintendent of Schools
Published by
Office of Curriculum, Instruction & Professional Development
Table of
Contents
Section
Page
High School Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Graduation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Special Opportunities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Course Matrices and Descriptions
Business/Computer Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
English Language Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
English Language Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Foreign Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
General Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
History/Social Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Home Economics/Consumer Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Industrial/Technology Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Interdepartmental. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Military Training and Naval Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Physical Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Regional Occupational Program (ROP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Visual and Performing Arts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Regulations Prohibiting Discrimination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Table of Contents
High School Planner/Schedule of Courses
Student Name:___________________________________________________ Parent Signature:___________________________________________________
Career Interests: 1.________________________ 2.________________________ 3._______________________ ❍ Undecided _____________________
Post High School Plans:
❍
❍
❍
❍
University of California
California State University
Other four year college or university
Community college, academic
❍
❍
❍
❍
Community college, vocational/technical
Attend trade/business school
Apprenticeship training program
Work full-time/part time, no school
❍
❍
❍
❍
Military Service
Full time homemaker
Other plans
Undecided
Graduation Requirements
1. 220 semester periods of credit (including 150 from required courses). Required courses:
• English - (40 credits) - 1-2, 3-4, 5-6 and English 7-8 if you have not
passed CAHSEE or one of the approved 10 credit senior English
elective courses
• Modern World History, United States History, United States
Government and Economics - (30 credits)
• Biological/Life Science Course & Physical/Earth Science Course
or Integrated Science Courses - (20 credits)
• Mathematics - (20 credits) At least one course or a combination of two
courses must meet or exceed Algebra 1-2 if Algebra 1-2 was not
completed in grades 7 and 8.
• Health/Computer Applications I - (10 credits)
• Physical Education - 2 years - (20 credits)*
• Fine Arts or Foreign Language - 1 year - (10 credits)
• 70 additional elective credits - (70 credits) *
* Beginning with the class of 2011, students who do not pass the State Fitness Test in grade 9 or
10 will be required to take PE as an elective in grade 11 and 12 until they pass the exam.
2. Pass the California High School Exit Exam
3. Demonstrate computer literacy by successfully completing Intermediate Computers in middle school or Computer Applications I in
high school.
4. Pass Algebra 1-2
5. Complete a minimum of 40 hours of Service Learning
It is recommended that you consult with the high school of choice regarding course and credit requirements to graduate. Wilson Classical High School requires 280 semester periods of credit to graduate and the accelerated programs for high achieving students i.e. PACE,
QUEST, IB, Distinguished Scholars, etc., may also have additional course and credit requirements.
Graduates of Long Beach Unified School District must earn 220 semester periods of credit in grades 9-12 in order to graduate and receive a diploma. All students must successfully complete all required courses as noted and 70 additional elective semester periods of
credit. If a required class is not completed during the suggested grade level, be sure to include this class in another grade level.
Beginning with the class of 2006, all students must pass the California High School Exit Exam in order to receive a high school
diploma. See section on Graduation Requirements for more details.
10th grade
9th grade
1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
English
Science
Algebra/Math
P.E.
Health
Required/Elective
English
Science
Algebra/Math
P.E.
Technology
Required/Elective
English
Modern World History
Science
P.E.
Math
Required/Elective
English
Modern World History
Science
P.E.
Math
Required/Elective
Summer School
Summer School
11th grade
12th grade
1st semester
2nd semester
1st semester
2nd semester
English
U.S. History
Required/Elective
Required/Elective
Required/Elective
Required/Elective
English
U.S. History
Required/Elective
Required/Elective
Required/Elective
Required Elective
English
U.S. Government
Required/Elective
Required/Elective
Required/Elective
Required/Elective
English
Economics
Required/Elective
Required/Elective
Required/Elective
Required Elective
Summer School
The University of California and California State University systems have specific subject requirements for freshman admission. In addition, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) has initial eligibility requirements for students who wish to participate in post secondary athletics.
Please consult with your child’s counselor regarding these requirements as you plan your four years of high school.
High School Planner
University of California
& California State
University Subject
Area Requirements
Core Courses: NCAA Division I requires 16 core courses
as of August 1, 2008. This rule applies to any students
first entering any Division I college or university on or
after August 1, 2008. See the chart below for the breakdown of this 16 core-course requirement. NCAA Division II requires 14 core courses. See breakdown for
core-course requirements below. Please note that Division II will require 16 core courses beginning August 1,
2013.
The following sequence of 15 year-long high school
courses is required by the University of California and
California State University systems for high school students to be minimally eligible for admission. At least 7 of
the 15 courses must be taken in the last two years of high
school. These courses also illustrate the minimum level
of academic preparation students need to achieve in high
school to undertake university level work.
Division I
For the Class of 2008 and beyond
16 core courses
• 4 years of English
• 3 years of mathematics (Algebra 1 or higher)
• 2 years natural/physical science (1 year of lab
if offered by the high school)
• 1 year of additional English, mathematics, or
natural/physical science
These college entrance requirements, also referred to as
the “a-g” requirements, can be summarized as follows:
A History/Social Science - Two years required, including
one year of world history, cultures, and geography and one
year of U.S. history or one-half year of U.S. history and
one-half year of civics or American government.
B English - Four years of college preparatory English that
include frequent and regular writing, and reading of classic
and modern literature.
C Mathematics - Three years of college preparatory
mathematics that include the topics covered in
elementary and advanced algebra and two- and
three-dimensional geometry.
D Laboratory Science - Two years of laboratory science
providing fundamental knowledge in at least two of these
three disciplines: biology (which includes anatomy,
physiology, marine biology, etc.), chemistry, and physics or
three years of integrated science.
E Language Other Than English - Two years of the same
language other than English.
F Visual & Performing Arts - One year, including dance,
drama/theater, music, or visual art.
G College Preparatory Electives - In addition to those
courses required in "a-f" above, one year (two semesters) of
college preparatory electives are required, chosen from
advanced visual/performing arts, history/social science,
English, advanced mathematics, laboratory science, and
language other than English.
Students must complete all courses with a grade of “C” or
better.
NCAA Eligibility
ATHLETIC ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS
NCAA Initial Eligibility
Students who want to pursue athletics at any postsecondary institution must complete specific requirements.
The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) is
the athletic governing body for 1,280 colleges and universities. Their academic standards include high school
graduation, a "core" GPA, a target SAT or ACT score, successful completion of approved “core” courses and all
other college admissions requirements.
• 2 years social science
• 4 years of additional courses (from any area above,
foreign language or nondoctrinal religion/philosophy)
Division II
For the Class of 2005 through 2012
14 Core Courses
• 3 years of English
• 2 years of mathematics (Algebra I or higher)
• 2 years of natural/physical science (1 year of lab if
offered by the high school)
• 2 year of additional English, mathematics or
natural/physical science
• 2 years of social science
• 3 years of additional courses (from any area above,
foreign language or nondoctrinal religion/philosophy)
Division II
For the Class of 2013 and beyond
16 Core Courses
• 3 years of English
• 2 years of mathematics (Algebra I or higher)
• 2 years of natural/physical science
• 3 years of additional English, mathematics or
natural/physical science
• 2 years of social science
• 4 years of additional courses (from any area above,
foreign language or nondoctrinal religion/philosophy)
Grade Point Average
Only core courses are used in the calculation of the grade
point average for NCAA Initial Eligibility. Students must
receive a grade of “C” or better in all core courses. Be
sure to look at your high school’s list of NCAA-approved
core course on the Eligibility Center’s website to make
certain that courses being taken have been approved as
core course. The website is www.ncaaclearinghouse.net.
Please note that NCAA core course eligibility is also indicated after each course description in this guide.
It is the responsibility of the student to file for athletic
certification usually by the beginning of the senior year.
Any questions should be directed to the Head Counselor
at the school site, or contact NCAA at (877) 262-1492.
High School
Descriptions
THE COMPREHENSIVE HIGH SCHOOL
The high schools of the Long Beach Unified School District are four-year comprehensive high schools. This
means that they offer a wide range of subjects to meet
students’ greatly varying needs and interests. Comprehensive high schools are designed to prepare all students
to be effective American citizens, to help students who
plan to go to work immediately after high school to develop the skills and attitudes needed, and to prepare students who wish to go beyond high school for advanced
occupational and college training.
To provide the flexibility which adequately meets such
multiple needs, the high schools offer a wide range of
subjects beyond those required for high school graduation. They provide counseling and guidance services and
many opportunities for students to prepare for advanced
training in academic and in skilled and semi-skilled occupational fields
A small student body of approximately 250 students allows for personalized instruction from a dedicated faculty. Students are provided a challenging curriculum
that offers a comprehensive college preparatory selection of courses including honors English, and advanced
placement US History, Government, Spanish Language,
English Literature and Language, AB Calculus, and
Music Theory. A variety of elective classes are available
in visual arts, technology, industrial education, yearbook, and instrumental music. Because of Avalon’s K12 population, students interested in the exploring
teaching or teacher assistant programs have the opportunity to work with elementary, middle or high school
teachers. Other students who have part-time jobs are
enrolled in a work experience class. ELD and Special Education programs are available for English Language
Learners and special needs students. Other Student Support Services include personal and academic/college
counseling, substance abuse counseling, nursing services, peer mediation, Student Support Team (ASAP), and
a formalized faculty intervention program.
We have the AVID elective program to better prepare college-bound students. The AVID program develops rigorous study skills through direct instruction and older
age tutors. Students in AVID learn how to apply for
scholarships and have the opportunity to participate in
college visitations.
AVALON HIGH SCHOOL
P.O. Box 557
200 Falls Canyon Road, Avalon, CA 90704
Santa Catalina Island
(310) 510-0790
Avalon High School is part of a unique K-12 campus located in Avalon on beautiful Santa Catalina Island. The
school serves a community of 4,000 full time residents.
Catalina Island’s economy is primarily based on tourism,
hosting a million visitors a year. The Avalon administration and staff, parents, and community work closely
together to support the best possible learning opportunities for students. In the Spring of 2003, Avalon High
School was selected as a California Distinguished School.
Students attending Avalon High School have the opportunity to participate in a diverse extracurricular program.
Fourteen sports teams frequently travel to the mainland
to compete with other small high schools. An active
group of cheer and song leaders meet daily during tutorial and perform at pep assemblies and athletic events.
Our Channel Crossings Club promotes cultural awareness and diversity; an active drama club presents several
theatrical productions each year, and other students pursue their interests and/or leadership skills through a
dozen other organizations including the Rotary InteractSocial Action Club, Peer Mediation Club, Life Issues
Club, World Awareness Club, Art Club, Garden Club,
CSF, and Student Council.
High School Descriptions 1
ment courses. Beyond the academic challenge, University Scholars receive support through student advisory
groups, after-school tutorials, with university visits and
guest speakers. The mission of this program is to ensure
University Scholars are prepared for a successful transition to college.
SMALL LEARNING COMMUNITIES
JUAN RODRIGUEZ CABRILLO HIGH SCHOOL
2001 Santa Fe Avenue, Long Beach, CA 90810
(562) 951-7700
Cabrillo High School is an exciting place to learn.
A school on the MOVE, Cabrillo opened its doors for
the first time in September 1995. Its mission is to ensure
the educational success of all students by having high expectations, a commitment to excellence and a comprehensive program in which all students can learn and
become responsible, productive citizens of the 21st Century.
Our goal is to ensure that all students graduate with the
knowledge and skills necessary to make successful transitions to college and careers, through quality instruction
and curriculum opportunities.
The Cabrillo community recognizes that there are many
paths to success. In addition to all the courses that are
necessary to meet high school graduation and the “a-g”
college/university admittance requirements, Cabrillo’s
program includes three Specialized Programs, 4 Small
Learning Communities and numerous support and intervention programs for all students.
SPECIALIZED PROGRAMS
The Specialized Academy of Computer Media,
Arts and Animation (SACMAA) is designed for students who have a passion for the Visual and Performing
Art and Computer Media. The program allows students
to continually develop their skills within each of the three
strands: Computer Media: Animation, Graphic, Web Design; Visual Arts: Drawing & Painting, Three-Dimensional
Media; or Performing Arts: Music, Dance and Drama.
The Cabrillo Engineering & Design (CED) is designed for students who have an interest in math and science and want to be able to “Think, Create and Build”
like an engineer. The Cabrillo Engineering and Design
program infuses traditional mathematics and science
courses, with the 8-step model of the Engineering Design
Process. An academic GPA of 2.75 or higher and a “C” or
better in Pre-Algebra is recommended.
The University Scholars prepares Cabrillo’s brightest,
most academically driven students to sustain a 3.3 GPA
while taking a rigorous course of study, including several
selections of Accelerated, Honors, and Advanced Place-
Cabrillo Health Occupations and Careers (CHOC)
small learning community is committed to providing its
students with a rigorous academic program incorporating
the “a-g” requirements. CHOC students focus on exploring the world of high demand careers in health and
human services through guest speakers in the field, job
shadowing, conferencing opportunities and health and
science specific elective classes.
Cabrillo Academy of Business (CAB) is a small learning community with a focus on careers in global logistics
and supply chain management. Students will have handson experiences in this field inside and outside of the classroom. Through partnerships with local colleges and
businesses students will be exposed to the various pathways leading from Cabrillo to the world of global logistics and supply chain management.
Cabrillo Academy of Social Justice and Law
(CASJL) provides students with he opportunity to explore both past and present social issues, study criminal/civil law, law enforcement, government and human
relations. Students will develop leadership and organizational skills, along with cultural awareness through a variety of elective courses, field trips and guest speakers.
International Studies at Cabrillo (ISC) gives students opportunities to explore a variety of subjects with
an emphasis on global issues in business, the environment, hospitality and tourism. Academic courses will
focus on completing the “a-g” requirements as well as
electives in geography, finance, web design, and foreign
language in preparation for careers in a diverse world.
SPECIALIZED PROGRAMS AND SUPPORT PROGRAMS
Cabrillo’s Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) program provides the learning tools, support and confidence that will help students prepare to
enter and succeed in college. The AVID program teaches
students the organizational and learning strategies
needed to be successful in today’s world as well as challenging students to take rigorous classes with the needed
staff support to guarantee academic success.
There are numerous support and intervention programs for both students and parents in place to ensure
student success in meeting graduation requirements and
passing the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE).
CHS has a comprehensive counseling program that works
High School Descriptions 2
with both students and parents to develop a plan and
monitor the students meeting their goals. Cabrillo provides their English Language Learners a strong collaborative instructional program that ensures smooth
transitions as their English skills progress. Other student
support that Cabrillo offers their students are academic
assistance and classes for preparation of the CAHSEE and
SAT Test are available.
CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF MATHEMATICS
AND SCIENCE
1000 East Victoria Street, Carson, CA 90747
(310) 243-2025
The California Academy of Mathematics and Science is
a comprehensive four-year academic high school located
on the campus of California State University,
Dominguez Hills (CSUDH). The Academy’s mission is
to increase the nation’s pool of college graduates in the
fields of mathematics and science by offering an intensive college preparatory education to motivated high
school students. It serves a diverse student body of over
610 students, who earn transferable university credit in
grades 11 and 12 by taking tuition-free college courses at
CSUDH. Upon graduation, Academy students have completed an average of twenty-two university units. The
required curriculum at the Academy far exceeds the University of California (UC) admission requirements, and
nearly all students go on to four-year universities. The
Academy offers an excellent education for high school
students considering the fields of math and science as
well as engineering, medicine, and technology.
Outside the classroom, the Academy manages successful Mentor and Internship programs that are popular
with students. The mentor program matches student
protégés one-on-one with professionals in math, science,
engineering and technical fields for academic, career and
general support. The internship program typically
places students as interns in corporate and university settings each summer.
The Academy enrolls students from a consortium of
eleven school districts that encompass more than 625
square miles, including the Long Beach Unified School
District, the school’s founding district and fiscal agent.
Typically, the Academy receives approximately 900 applications for 165 openings. Interested students apply to
the Academy through their middle schools, only during
grade 8. Students submit an application that includes a
transcript of grades, essays, and teacher recommendations. Academy students and staff interview qualified applicants before final selections.
Program Highlights
The school’s location is on a university campus.
•
Juniors and seniors take university classes as part of
their elective program and have opportunities to do
research with university professors.
•
The school culture strongly supports students in obtaining college admissions. As part of their education, students visit Northern or Southern California
university campuses during their junior year. College admission staff actively recruits Academy students. More than 60 selective colleges and
universities make recruitment site visits to CAMS
each year.
•
Successful and active mentor and internship programs are in place.
•
CAMS’s smaller student body allows teachers to pay
special attention to students.
•
Students gain experience with real-world problem
solving that stresses group work and interdisciplinary projects.
•
CAMS has a diverse student body.
•
Math, Science and Engineering focus.
Who Is Most Likely to Be Accepted? Students who
demonstrate a strong interest in math and science;
earned grades of A’s and B’s in math and science classes;
achieved a minimum cumulative grade point average of
3.0 with all grades above C; have strong scores on standardized tests, and completed Algebra 1, Algebra 1-2, or
Algebra CD in middle school.
EDUCATIONAL PARTNERSHIP
HIGH SCHOOL
(562) 427-9766
The Educational Partnership High School (EPHS) is an
alternative education school that specializes in independent study for youths who have dropped out of, or
are at risk of dropping out of, a regular comprehensive
high school. This unique school uses contract independent study as the primary instructional strategy for
students who desire a high school education but are not
able to attend the traditional comprehensive high
school. Since its beginning in 1988, EPHS has expanded
from a single facility operation to one that has eight separate locations throughout the community.
The staff at EPHS has spent many years building a quality school that benefits students, parents and the community. The teachers have had ample experience in
motivating students in an alternative educational setting. EPHS offers educational opportunities for a vari-
High School Descriptions 3
ety of students, including those with disciplinary and attendance problems. The core curriculum meets State
standards and students use the same textbooks utilized
throughout the district. The pacing and instructional
delivery is individualized to meet each student’s special
needs. EPHS has also established ties with the Probation
Department, The Regional Occupational Program, Cal
Learn, Summer Youth Employment, Long Beach City
College and the Long Beach School for Adults.
JORDAN HIGH SCHOOL
6500 Atlantic Avenue, Long Beach, CA 90805
(562) 423-1471
David Starr Jordan High School serves an ethnically/culturally balanced neighborhood in North Long Beach
and a small section of Lakewood. Jordan is a model high
school of the future. Jordan staff, students, parents and
community business leaders have joined together to restructure and redefine the school.
A Jordan student should be a lifelong learner, a critical
thinker and problem solver, a proficient communicator
and a responsible member of society. In order to help
our students reach these goals Jordan offers specialized
courses of study that maximize a student’s strengths, talents, and interests. We invite you to think seriously
about participating in the challenging Secondary Specialized Programs and Small Learning Communities.
SPECIALIZED PROGRAMS
Architecture, Construction and Engineering
Technologies (ACE) offers a myriad of opportunities for
students interested in exploring the exciting world of architecture, construction and engineering. The ACE program will prepare students for the high demands and
challenges of conceptualizing, designing, building and
maintaining structures. All courses in the ACE Academy
meet the University of California “a-g” requirements while
preparing students for entry-level jobs, apprenticeships,
and post-secondary education. ACE provides a hands-on
curriculum, interactions with industry professionals and
field studies that make relevant connections between academics and industry.
International Baccalaureate (IB) - Secondary Specialized Program - IB offers talented university bound
students the opportunity to participate in an internationally renowned honors program. IB prepares students for
the rigors of university level coursework by challenging
them in advanced level classes in all the University of California approved subjects. IB students are afforded the opportunity to earn college credit by successfully passing IB
and AP exams. Colleges and universities throughout the
United States recognize IB as one of the best college
preparatory curriculums a high school student can participate in. Students should have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or
higher and have Content Standards Test scores of proficient or above.
Aspirations in Medical Services (AIMS) (2.0 Overall GPA required) AIMS Academy is a school-within-aschool program, which offers a challenging college
preparatory four-year academic program. It is for any
student who is interested in investigating the medical
field through academic and vocational education.
Through internships, guest speakers, and hands-on career investigations, AIMS students are able to experience
first hand the opportunities that exist in the medical
fields. AIMS Academy provides a close family-like atmosphere where students are provided the academic and
life skills necessary to set and achieve the goals that will
assist them in their future.
SMALL LEARNING COMMUNITIES
Panther International is a four-year program that
gives students the flexibility to explore their interests
through elective courses while addressing core requirements for high school graduation and college. Panther
Academy students are provided with identified classes,
AP/Honors courses, dedicated teachers, AVID strategies,
field trips, professional speakers, student recognition,
peer support, individual counseling, on-line grades, and
after-school tutoring. As members of a small learning
community, Panther Academy students and their teachers create an environment of trust and support that promotes academic success and lifelong learning.
Business and Entertainment School of Travel,
Trade and Tourism (BESTT) seeks to prepare students with skills focused on Global Travel and Tourism
in the areas of Computer Literacy, Finance, Accounting,
Sales/Marketing and Hospitality Management. BESTT
offers rigorous courses, preparation for UC, CSU and
Community College, and employment opportunities.
Excellence Through the Arts (ETA) Are you artistic? A creative thinker? Looking for a place to belong where it's an asset to be creative? Then you should look
into ETA at Jordan High School. This small learning
community offers 9th through 12th graders a community of teachers, students and staff who will support you
in your artistic endeavors and to be successful in your
core classes. There will be guest speakers, field trips, core
classes with fellow artistic students, internships and a
senior capstone project that will earn you a medallion
and prepare you for your post-secondary pursuits.
Whether your interest is art, dance, drama, or music,
ETA is the place for you
Jordan’s Media and Communication Learning
Community (JMAC) is a small learning community
High School Descriptions 4
that will prepare students for success in the 21st Century
by training them in technical as well as academic skills.
In addition to college preparatory classes, students learn
how to use the latest technology in graphic design, publishing, and video production. JMAC students learn to
create and produce the following: Cat’s Purr (Jordan’s
newspaper); Stylus (Jordan’s literary and art magazine);
JNET (Jordan’s news and video production); Graphic Design (state of the art computer digital art lab).
SUPPORT PROGRAMS
Advancement Via Individual Determination
(AVID) is an academic elective class for grades 9-12. The
AVID program is designed to help students prepare to
enter and succeed in four-year colleges and universities.
Many students with the potential to succeed in post-secondary education need extra academic assistance and
encouragement. AVID meets the needs of these students
by providing: academic preparation, study skills for college-level work, help in coping with college-prep curriculum, motivation for seeking a college education, and
career awareness. Students are also given the opportunity to tour many colleges and universities along with
meeting and listening to various college/career representatives.
Jordan Freshman Academy
171 W. Bort St., Long Beach, CA 90805
(562) 984-3710
• All students will take English, Reading, Science,
Algebra/Geometry, and P.E. Some students will take
an added math class otherwise they will be enrolled
in an elective such as Health, Computer Applications,
Drawing and Painting or Spanish.
• 3 X 3 Block Schedule
• Aims classes on the main campus.
• Special Programs will remain on the main campus
such as, Special Day Classes, ELD Classes, and AIMS.
LAKEWOOD HIGH SCHOOL
4400 Briercrest Avenue, Lakewood, CA 90713
(562) 425-1281
Today’s Lancers, Tomorrow’s Leaders
Lakewood High School offers a diverse curriculum that
addresses the needs of all students. Both high academic
courses, as well as intensive learning classes are provided. Additional AVID support is available. To ensure
every student succeeds, Lakewood High School applied
and received a million-dollar grant to create smaller
groups of students and teachers, called smaller learning
communities. Seven programs are currently in place. Information about each of these programs is listed below.
All ninth grade students will enroll in one of these special programs.
SPECIALIZED PROGRAMS
Applied Technology Magnet (ATM) -The ATM program is a technology based program that has been
around for approximately 15 years. This program is designed for students to increase their skills in technology,
as well as academics. The ATM program has both a professional (university bound) and technical pathway in
order to accommodate various ability levels and needs.
Students in the technical pathway take elective classes
leading to careers using current technology or continue
in post-secondary training programs. Students in the
professional pathway take technology-based career
classes, but also meet all requirements for entrance into
a four-year university program. The ATM program has a
strong team of teachers who have worked to incorporate
technology into all ATM classes. Students participate in
a variety of cross-curricular activities to enhance their
learning. And students also have various opportunities
outside of the classroom to enhance their education.
Merit Scholars Program - The Merit Scholars program is designated as a rigorous college preparatory program for gifted and talented students who seek a
pathway to a university. Students may only enter the
program in their freshman year, must be ready to begin
Algebra 1-2 or higher, and possess a 3.3 GPA. CST reading and math test scores need to be near the top quartile.
High School Descriptions 5
SMALL LEARNING COMMUNITIES
The Arts Academy is a program designed to allow students to express themselves, discover interests, develop
academic skills, and pursue career opportunities. The
academy is a community of learners that brings together
students, teachers and members of the community to
concentrate on drama, journalism, yearbook, art, ceramics, film, music, dance, and language acquisition. Students moving through The Arts SLC will be provided
with opportunities to enter Advanced Placement courses
in Art History, Music Appreciation, and Spanish. By the
end of their senior year, students from The Arts at Lakewood High School are prepared for UC/CSU, Art College,
Trade School, and/or the workplace.
G.L.O.B.E. (Global Leaders of Business Enterprise) is one of Lakewood’s smaller learning communities that are geared toward students who have an interest
in pursuing a career in various business-related fields.
Through classroom studies and outside work experience/internships, students will gain the knowledge in
business related fields and to further develop their skills
at a collegiate level emphasizing on global affairs. Even
if the student is not interested in business, we offer global
awareness and preparation for the “real world”.
HERO (Home Economics Related Occupations)
Started in the fall of 2003 as the first of the new SLC’s,
this academy focuses on three academic and career pathways, Culinary Arts, Fashion Design & Merchandising,
and Interior Design. The mission of the HERO academy
is to provide high-quality education in order to allow students to reach their full potential to become positive and
productive members of the work force and the community. This academy’s vision is to promote leadership and
career development, and focuses on teaching responsibility, and self-management. Students entering the academy take a survey course of all three subjects their
freshman year, and then choose one or more pathways as
a sophomore. By the end of their senior year, students
are prepared for UC/CSU, Community college, Trade
School, and/or the workplace.
Odyssey Academy is a creative and academically enriched program, for college bound students, which provides cross-curricular projects/field trips that are focused
on marine studies. Students need to be willing to take a
four-year college preparatory program leading to a pathway to college entrance and have a strong attendance
history.
LONG BEACH SCHOOL FOR ADULTS
3701 East Willow Street, Long Beach, CA 90815
(562) 595-8893
The Long Beach School for Adults provides a comprehensive educational program to meet the needs of the
adult community desiring to continue their education.
A wide variety of classes are offered in conveniently located areas of the Long Beach Unified School District.
Long Beach School for Adults is fully accredited by the
Western Association of Schools and Colleges.
High School Diploma Program
Transferring high school students who are deficient in
credit for graduation must meet one of the following criteria:
• be within two (2) months of their 18th birthday
• a second semester non-grad
• present proof of employment or verified child care
Concurrent Students
Several unique features of School for Adults allow students to start at virtually any time of the year in a number of programs. The Betty Outten Learning Center is a
high technology lab that offers courses to complete
diploma requirements. Teacher directed high school
diploma courses begin each quarter. There is also a comprehensive summer program.
High school students may attend at any time between
3:00 to 8:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Seniors
and juniors may concurrently enroll in adult school
classes offered after 3:00 p.m. Students should see their
high school counselor regarding this opportunity to
make up credits toward their high school diploma.
CAHSEE Prep
CAHSEE preparation classes are offered several times
during the school year. Please check our website
www.lbschools.net/lbsa for starting dates.
PALMS (Personal Achievement through Leadership, Merit and Service) is the academy of choices.
An enriched curriculum is available for PALMS students
to explore and develop skills that can take them to fouryear university, trade schools, or two-year certificate programs. The one underlying theme is the desire to work
with people. Many career opportunities abound for students who enjoy working with others. The fields of
medicine, education, fire science, and law enforcement
are just a few of the careers students might choose while
in PALMS.
High School Descriptions 6
ROBERT A. MILLIKAN HIGH SCHOOL
2800 Snowden Avenue, Long Beach, CA 90815
(562) 425-7441
Community of Musicians, Performers, Artists,
and Social Scientists (COMPASS) prepares students
for college by integrating core curriculum with the social sciences and the Arts. The program places an emphasis on standards-based instruction while helping
students to connect learning with real world situations.
All students enrolled in the COMPASS program are expected to enroll in the arts at Millikan High School (e.g.
dance, music, drama, photography, art) as well as work
together to help improve the greater Long Beach community through arts-based community service. An academic GPA of 2.25–2.75 or higher is recommended and
a strong commitment to the arts are commended.
SMALL LEARNING COMMUNITIES
Millikan High School (Located near El Dorado Park) is a
multicultural school whose members celebrate our
school’s rich diversity. We are proud of the fact that our
school truly reflects our city’s demographics. Wellknown throughout the community for high standards
and achievement in academics, Millikan is equally
proud of its extra-curricular activities program. The athletic, visual and performing arts programs, as well as
school interest clubs, provide opportunities for our students to have a well-rounded educational experience.
All incoming students select academies (smaller learning communities) to belong to based on their educational interests and choose to wear a uniform.
According to representatives from West Ed, we are considered a model in the state for the implementation of
Smaller Learning Communities, creating a safe haven
and sense of belonging for all students. Students and
parents feel a sense of academic challenge, confidence,
and security at Millikan.
SPECIALIZED PROGRAMS
Questioning, Understanding, Engaging, and Success through Technology (QUEST) students pursue
a pathway of honors and AP courses designed for gifted
students who want to excel, advance and complete academically with the best and brightest students in the nation. The accelerated curriculum is designed for GATE
students and offers the unique experience of a UC approved Senior Project class. The QUEST community of
students are high achievers and active participants in
extra and co-curricular activities including sports, the
arts, community service, ad student government. An academic GPA of 3.3 or higher is recommended.
Personal success through Empowerment, Academic achievement, Character education, and
Ethics in action academy (PEACE) engages students to learn through community service, field trips,
student government, mentoring, video conferencing,
and debates. PEACE students learn about leadership
through hands-on projects and real world experiences.
PEACE prepares students for real life after high school
and creates an environment that allows them to grow as
a person while giving to their community in significant
ways. An academic GPA of 2.75–3.3 or higher and a “C”
or better in Pre-Algebra in middle school is recommended.
Global Technology Academy is a four-year college
preparatory program emphasizing computer applications and technology that prepare the student for postsecondary and/or workplace skills. It engages the
students in the use of technology as a tool to research,
develop, organize and present information. This program lays the foundation for students to participate
comfortably in an increasingly technological society.
Generating Respect for the Earth, the Environment, and Nature (GREEN) is the environmental science academy. Through its environmental theme, the
academy prepares students to understand the issues facing our planet. Environmental topics are woven
throughout all core courses, students participate in local
environmental projects and attend two environmental/college field trips each year. GREEN students will be
eligible for university with all required courses for college admission and access to accelerated, honors and AP
classes in all subjects.
Scholastic Teams of English-Language Learners
for Academic Rigor (STELLER) is a small learning
community for students whose native language is other
than English. The focus is on developing English language skills in the areas of listening, speaking, reading,
and writing for English Learners at EL Levels 1, 2, 3 and
4. After acquiring English proficiency, students transition to other Millikan academies.
Millikan Business Academy (MBA) is a small learning community that promotes essential life skills and
college-preparedness with a particular emphasis on entrepreneurship, marketing, enterprise, and financial independence.
Students will learn sound business
practices and principles and develop and compile professional portfolios, gain essential technology skills, and
gain awareness of benefits of volunteerism.
SPECIAL SUPPORT PROGRAM
AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) Are you a self-motivated student? Is college in
your future? You might consider Millikan’s AVID program in addition to your smaller learning community. AVID
is a four-year elective class that focuses on many activities, such as college and cultural field trips, team build-
High School Descriptions 7
ing, group discussions and debates, and SAT preparation
projects. (2.4 + GPA required)
gram with an emphasis on international trade. The Pacific Rim Magnet program is a new four year magnet that
integrates the international business community with
academics.
Special Programs:
POLYTECHNIC HIGH SCHOOL
1600 Atlantic Avenue, Long Beach, CA 90813
(562) 591-0581
Long Beach Polytechnic High School celebrated its
115th Anniversary. The school’s long tradition of success in curricular and extra-curricular endeavors is a
source of pride for everyone who has had the opportunity to proclaim themselves as a “Poly Person.”
Poly’s reputation as a center of academic excellence is
well established. Each year, Poly students take more
than 1,000 Advanced Placement exams, and even more
impressively, they produce the highest passing rate in
the western United States.
Poly High School students are invited to enroll in one
of four academy programs. These four college preparatory academies emphasize business, the humanities,
communications, and math and science. All academies
provide a college preparatory “a-g” curriculum.
Poly’s extra-curricular program has been exceptional
since the school’s inception. The list of league, CIF and
state championships that have been won by Poly’s athletic teams is lengthy and legendary. In the past several
years, Poly has claimed CIF and State titles in football,
basketball, volleyball, soccer, track and cross country. In
addition, the California Coaches Association named Poly
as the California Athletic High School of the Century.
Success in non-athletic competition is equally impressive. During the past four years Poly has produced
groups in vocal music, instrumental music, cheerleading,
drama, speech, mock trial and Model United Nations
that have won regional, state and national honors. The
Grammy Signature Award named Poly one of the top ten
music programs in the United States.
Resource Specialist and Speech/Language Specialist services, as well as special class programs and a program for
at-risk students are provided for eligible students.
The school is made up of four academies and three Special Programs. The Program for Additional Curricular
Experiences (PACE) has been in existence since 1975 and
its graduates have been accepted at the country’s most
prestigious universities. The Center for International
Commerce (CIC) is also an extensive college prep pro-
Center for International Commerce (CIC): (3.3
minimum academic GPA and a minimum of “Proficient” in Language Arts and Math on the California
Standards Tests). CIC is an international studies honors
program that addresses the needs of the gifted, high
achieving students who are university bound. With a
proven 23 year track record, CIC offers students a challenging, seven class curriculum of accelerated, honors,
and AP classes. CIC takes great pride in its language program, offering Japanese and Chinese, languages more
commonly taught at the university level. CIC’s Japanese
language program is the largest program of its kind in
the continental United States.
Pacific Rim Academy (Pac RIM) – Through mentoring, internships, curriculum input, classroom speakers and field trips students are exposed to careers in
international trade and are not only prepared for college, but also for careers in our expanding global economy. The smaller class size promotes a family type of
atmosphere for students. Students also have the opportunity to take Japanese and Chinese in our new Language Lab.
Program of Additional Curricular Experiences
(PACE) – (3.50 minimum academic GPA OR a minimum
of one “Proficient” and one “Advanced” in Language
Arts and Math on the California Standards Tests). PACE
is a special program that has been in existence since
1975 and provides a rigorous academic curriculum for
700 students, grades 9-12. The PACE reputation for excellence is proven each year as PACE students take more
than 800 Advanced Placement Tests with a pass rate of
80 percent.
SMALL LEARNING COMMUNITIES
Beach Academy of Math and Science (BEACH) is
primarily a math and science academy. Students who
sign up for the Beach Academy should expect to take
math and science classes each year they are enrolled at
Poly. The core curriculum prepares students to enter
into 4-year universities and other institutions of higher
learning by emphasizing the roll of science and math in
today’s environment.
Medical and Professional Academy (MAP) is a college prep program that prepares students for professional
careers in business and medicine by offering a wide variety of elective courses, including Introduction to Sports
Medicine, Fitness and Nutrition, Pharmacy Technology,
Medical Assistant, Business Law, Hospital Health Services, and Small Business Management. Honors and AP
course are also available for qualified students.
Humanities Academy provides students with a lib-
High School Descriptions 8
eral arts education that challenges students academically. Each Humanities student will enroll in the AVID
elective class, designed to provide support for students in
their pursuit of qualifying for a four-year university.
Honors and AP classes are available and encouraged for
qualified students.
Media, Entertainment, Technology and Sports
(METS) academy focuses on careers that involve the entertainment, technology and sports businesses. METS
prepares students for careers and college. The Academy
offers a variety of sports, technology and entertainment
as well as offers Honors and AP classes.
POLY ACADEMY OF
ACHIEVERS AND LEADERS (PAAL)
16th Street, Long Beach, CA 90813
(562) 591-1381
Poly Academy of Achievers and Leaders (PAAL) is on our
satellite campus and provides 11th and 12th graders
with an opportunity to get caught up, earn credits toward a medallion, or even to graduate early to get a
jumpstart on their future goals. PAAL is also known as,
“A Human Relations Academy” because students attend
a daily Advisory period designed to teach positive group
relations and promote mutual respect.
WILL J. REID HIGH SCHOOL
2152 West Hill Street, Long Beach CA 90810
(562) 432-0227, extension 7900
Will J. Reid is an alternative high school in Long Beach
Unified School District. This continuation high school
program is designed for the student who has experienced the traditional, comprehensive high school and
has found it to be unsuccessful for him/her. The focus
of the Reid program is credit retrieval to get students
back on track for graduation. We offer smaller class sizes
on a smaller campus with ongoing support and encouragement from caring teachers and administrators. Students must be 16 years of age and entering the 11th
grade to attend continuation high school.
Our mission at Reid High School is to insure a safe, caring, nurturing and clean learning environment where
each student is challenged daily to meet high academic
and social standards by a team of dedicated professionals working in collaboration with parents and other
stakeholders.
EVENING HIGH SCHOOL
Late afternoon and early evening classes are available for
students in grades 10-12 at Cabrillo, Jordan, Lakewood,
Millikan, Poly, and Wilson.
The evening high school program is an opportunity for
students who are unable to schedule all of the courses
they would like to take during the day, who are credit
deficient, who may want to improve a grade, or need to
make up failed classes. All of the courses offered meet
graduation requirements.
Students interested in attending the Evening High
School program should contact the high school directly
or may call the Evening High School Office at (562) 9978317.
LONG BEACH RENAISSANCE
HIGH SCHOOL FOR THE ARTS
235 E. 8th Street, Long Beach, California 90813
(562) 901-1068 x7233
www.lbusd.k12.ca.us/renaissance/index.htm
Success is an Art
Long Beach Renaissance High School for the Arts provides a
dynamic and innovative education that embraces and
integrates arts, academics and technology with equity of
access for promising young performers and artists. Students seeking arts careers can use their creative gifts
while engaging in real life experiences that prepare them
for on-stage, front of the camera and behind the scenes
career opportunities.
SPECIALIZED CLASSES
The Renaissance Arts teachers know curriculum and
standards-based education. The faculty has developed
pilot classes unique to Renaissance. Introduction to
Scripting allows young writers a chance to take an English elective as early as the freshman year. Introduction to Video Production is available to ninth and
tenth grade students only at RHSA. Journalism is the
latest addition to the writing strand that links Scripting
and School Annual with Video Productions. Students
create, write, direct and produce projects. Costume
and Fashion Design was developed for visual arts students at Renaissance who become an integral component of the many performances. Other new electives
include: Advanced Costuming and Jazz Band.
OPEN TO ALL STUDENTS IN LBUSD
There is no attendance boundary and students must
apply. Eligible students receive pre-professional training
by a staff of exemplary artist-teachers and professional
guest teachers in all Dance genres, Theatre, Technical
Theatre, Stage and Screen Writing, Television Production, Music Technology, Vocal Music, Instrumental
Music, (Jazz Band, Piano, Guitar) Visual Arts and Design,
and Digital Art. For admission requirements and infor-
High School Descriptions 9
mation about the application process call (562) 9010168 x7233.
ACADEMICS CHALLENGE STUDENTS
Although the focus is on the arts, the curriculum and instruction at Renaissance will prepare students to meet the
requirements for admission to major universities including the UC and CSU campuses. Advanced Placement (AP)
classes are available. AP Calculus, AP Spanish Language
and AP Spanish Literature, AP English Literature, AP Biology and AP Chemistry, AP World History and AP Psychology, and of course, AP Studio Art and AP Art History
complete a rigorous education.
AVID
The mission of the Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) is to ensure that all students succeed in rigorous curriculum, increase their enrollment in four-year
universities, and become educated responsible participants and leaders in a democratic society. AVID is a regularly scheduled academic elective that is based on
writing as a tool of learning, the inquiry method, and
collaborative grouping. The three main components are
academic instructional support, tutorial and motivating
activities.
ACCESSIBLE TO STUDENTS AND FAMILIES
Renaissance Arts High School sits near stops for the
Metro Rail train and Long Beach Transit bus on the corner of Long Beach Boulevard and 8th Street. Students
and parents are welcomed on this small secure campus
minutes away from museums, galleries and performance
venues.
What’s so special about Renaissance?
•
Rigorous academic program with access to many
honors and AP classes
• Immediate opportunities for freshman to get involved in visual, performing, and writing arts classes
and events
•
Small student body of approximately 600 students
allowing for more personalized attention
•
Support programs such as AVID and many early interventions including specialized tutorials
•
Strong support from the arts community featuring
master classes and arts related field trips
•
Active Parent Council
WOODROW WILSON
CLASSICAL HIGH SCHOOL
4400 East Tenth Street, Long Beach, CA 90804
(562) 433-0481
Wilson Classical High School opened its doors in
1926. Wilson is a public four-year comprehensive high
school that features a rigorous academic program for all
students with high expectations for behavior and attendance. The program is designed to provide all students
with the academic preparation needed for college and
careers. Newsweek magazine’s June, 2008 ranking of
“America’s Best High Schools” lists Wilson among the
top 4 percent of U.S. high schools. Schools ranked by
Newsweek have the greatest number of students taking
Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate
tests, compared to the number of graduating seniors.
Graduates of these high schools save millions of dollars
in college tuition each year by earning college credit on
the Advanced Placement exams. Each school on the list
performed among the top four percent, or 452, of all
American high schools measured this way.
The student body of Wilson Classical High School is a
microcosm of this economically, socially, and ethnically
diverse community. This diversity, which drives campus
programs, is highlighted by a Hispanic plurality. The
2008-2009 school year will find approximately 4,400
students attending Wilson. Our ethnically diverse population is reflected in the following percentages: Hispanic (38), White (33), Black (13), Asian (10), Filipino
American (2), Pacific Islander (1), and American Indian
(1). We have approximately 1300 students who are
identified as English Language Learners (ELL) and Fluent English Proficient (FEP).
We are fully accredited by the Western Association of
Schools and Colleges. The size of the instructional faculty is 175, over 47% of which have earned Master's degrees or beyond. The teachers have an average of 13
years experience in education. The student-teacher ratio
is approximately 31:1. We have 13 school counselors
serving our 4,400 students at a ratio of approximately
375:1.
SPECIAL PROGRAM
Distinguished Scholars Program (Requirements
for admission are a 3.3 academic GPA in middle
school and review of the California Standards
tests: Minimum “proficiency” levels in language
arts, reading and math) – The Distinguished Scholar
Program challenges gifted and high achieving college
High School Descriptions 10
bound students to excel academically and personally. Its
goals are to produce articulate, dynamic, motivated
learners who will become tomorrow’s leaders; to foster
students’ creative and intellectual talents; and to improve critical thinking skills. At least three Advanced
Placement courses and Honors courses in English, Social
Studies and Science are required. Students may apply
using the standard district application.
ADDITIONAL OFFERINGS
Advanced Placement Classes – Wilson currently offers 22 AP classes: Art History, Studio Art, English Literature, English Language, German, French, Spanish
Literature, Spanish Language, Music Theory, Environmental Science, Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Psychology,
Economics/Government, World History, U.S. History,
Statistics and Calculus.
Performing and Visual Arts – Wilson’s outstanding
drama, dance, instrumental and vocal music departments provide many opportunities to showcase student
talent during the year. Wilson’s visual art classes include
AP Art History, AP Studio Art, Ceramics, Exploring Art,
3-D Art, Drawing & Painting and Computer Animation.
Technology – All students are required to be computer
literate. Numerous computer labs and computer/ internet access in all classrooms allow integration of technology in all subject areas. Beyond beginning level classes,
Wilson students may take Using New Media, Electronic
Publishing, Computer Diagnostics, Graphic Design,
Computer Programming, and Architectural Design/CAD.
Khmer Language Program – Khmer speakers are able
to become literate in their native language. This program
is unique in California.
Literacy Program – Students experiencing reading difficulties take both English and reading classes.
AVID – The AVID program provides a rigorous curriculum focusing on access and equity for students with college potential. Students are clustered in a core of classes
where the emphasis is on developing skills leading to
success in college. The profile of the AVID student is one
with a GPA of 2.0-3.5, average to high test scores and has
the desire and determination to attend college. Students
are required to attend an additional elective class and
lunchtime tutoring.
High School Descriptions 11
12
Graduation
Requirements
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
All students who graduate from a high school of the
Long Beach Unified School District must have met the
following requirements.
Algebra Requirement: Students must successfully
complete the equivalent of Algebra 1-2 to meet this requirement if Algebra 1-2 was not completed in grades 7
and 8.
California High School Exit Exam: Beginning with
the Class of 2006, all students receiving a high school
diploma must pass a state-administered exit examination. Students who do not pass the exit examination
will not receive a diploma even if they have met all other
graduation requirements. Pursuant to Assembly Bill 2
of the 2009-10 Fourth Extraordinary Session (ABX4 2)
(Chapter 2, Statues of 2009), which enacted California
Education Code Section 60852.3 commencing with the
2009-10 school year, an eligible pupil with a disability is
not required to pass the CAHSEE as a condition of receiving a diploma of graduation or as a condition of
graduation from high school. Pupils with disabilities
will continue to take the CAHSEE in grade 10 for purposes of fulfilling the requirements of the federal No
Child Left Behind Act of 2001. This exemption shall last
until the State Board of Education either implements an
alternative means for students with disabilities to
demonstrate achievement in the standards measured by
the CAHSEE or determines that an alternative means assessment to the CAHSEE is not feasible and reinstates the
CAHSEE as a graduation requirement for students with
disabilities.
they will be required to take a PE elective in grades 11
and 12. Passing the physical performance test is not a
graduation requirement.
Service Learning: Beginning with the class of 2007,
all students must complete 40 hours of service learning/community service, to fulfill the high school graduation requirement. Students are encouraged to complete
the majority of the hours by the end of their sophomore
year. Additional service learning/community service information can be found on the district and individual
high school web sites and in the Career Centers at each
high school.
Credit Requirement: Currently, every student must
earn a total of 220 semester periods of credit in grades 9
through 12 in order to graduate and receive a high
school diploma. In grades 9 through 12, these credits
will includes:
1. Required Courses (all students) -150 credits
3. Other Electives 70 credits Total- 220 credits
Students must receive at least a "D" to receive credit for
high school graduation.
Specific Course Requirements: Every student is required to earn credit as indicated in the following
courses in grades 9-12:
English: 40 semester periods of credit in English 1-2,
3-4, 5-6, and English 7-8 if the student has not passed
CAHSEE or one of the approved 10 credit Senior English
elective courses.
Each high school offers CAHSEE preparation courses.
See your counselor for more information.
History/Social Science: 30 semester periods of credit
in Modern World History, United States History, United
States Government, and Economics.
Technology Proficiency: Beginning with the class of
2008, all students must demonstrate computer proficiency by successfully completing Intermediate Computers in middle school, Computer Applications I in
high school or passing the Computer Proficiency Exam.
Mathematics: 20 credits in mathematics with at least
one course or a combination of two courses that meet
or exceed Algebra 1-2 if Algebra 1-2 was not completed
in grades 7 and 8.
Physical Education Requirement: Beginning with
the class of 2011, students are required to earn 20 credits of Physical Education in grades 9 and 10. Students
have the right to take four years of PE, however if they
choose to opt out of PE in grades 11 and 12 they must
pass five out of six areas of the state physical performance test to receive an exemption. This physical performance test will be offered annually starting in 9th
grade. If students do not pass the five out of six areas,
Physical Education: 20 semester periods of credit in
grades 9 and 10. Students must pass five out of six areas
of the state physical performance test to receive an exemption for PE in grades 11 and 12.
Science: 20 semester periods of credit: 10 credits in biological/life and 10 credits in physical/earth; or 20 credits in integrated science.
Health Education: 5 semester periods of credit in
grades 9 or 10.
Graduation Requirements 13
Fine Arts or Foreign Language: 10 semester periods
of credit; all foreign language courses and most one year
courses in Art and Music will satisfy this requirement.
Technology: 5 semester periods of credit in Computer
Applications I if Intermediate Computers was not successfully completed in middle school.
Electives: 70 semester credits of approved electives.
In summary, a student must earn 220 semester
periods in grades 9 through 12 to graduate, including these required courses:
Course
Algebra
English 1-2
General Studies:
Health Education
Computer Applications 1
Physical Education
English 3-4
Modern World History 1-2
Physical Education
English 5-6
United States History
English (required or elective)
United States Government
Economics
Fine Arts or Foreign Language
Mathematics
Science
Grade
9
9
9
9
9
10
10
10
11
11
12
12
12
9-12
9-12
9-12
Semester Credits
10
10
5
5
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
5
5
10
10-20
20
Support for Meeting High School Graduation
Requirements: As required by state law, the district
will provide remedial instruction or other types of appropriate support to students who have not met district
and state graduation requirements. In addition, alternative means for meeting course requirements will be considered when appropriate.
High School Academic Initiative: Ninth grade students who on multiple indicators are determined at-risk
of not passing the California High School Exit Exam
(CAHSEE) will be 1) enrolled in a one to two-period literacy intervention course and/or stretch algebra (Algebra AB-first year of a two-year course) during the regular
school day, 2) enrolled in an extra period to receive supplemental support in mathematics to insure proficiency
in algebra, and 3) be required to attend summer school
immediately following the ninth grade where they will
receive support to assist them in achieving proficiency in
reading and mathematics standards on the California
High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE).
Tenth grade students who on multiple indicators are determined at risk of not passing the California High
School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) will be enrolled in a one to
two-period literacy intervention course and/or stretch
algebra (Algebra CD-second year of a two-year course)
program during the regular school day.
Eleventh and twelfth grade students who have not passed
CAHSEE will receive individualized counseling and will
be advised of the CAHSEE intervention options which
may include coursework during the school day, as well as
after school, summer and Saturday tutorial sessions.
Assembly Bill 347 requires districts to offer students who
have failed one or both parts of the CAHSEE at the end of
12th grade the opportunity to receive intensive support
and assistance for two years following the completion of
12th grade. Long Beach Unified School District has implemented and is implementing the following to meet
the objectives of AB 347: Enrollment in CAHSEE classes
in Evening High School, EPHS, or the Adult School.
Special education students who are diploma-bound and
have not passed CAHSEE may also attend a district-provided computer lab staffed by a special education
teacher.
CREDITS
Definition of Credit: Students receive credit based on
the number of courses taken each year. Successful completion of year courses earn ten (10) credits, semester
courses earn five (5) credits, and quarter courses earn two
and one-half (2.5) credits. Students are generally required
to take six courses per semester. Therefore, most students
earn an average of sixty (60) credits per year.
Basis for Credit: Credit in any course is based upon
satisfactory participation in the activities of the classroom, satisfactory achievement in the subject, satisfactory educational growth, and satisfactory attendance.
Graduation After Seven Semesters of Attendance:
Students with a grade point average of 3.0 or better may
graduate from high school after completing seven semesters of high school attendance, provided that they have
met all requirements at the end of grade 11. A petition
must be filed with the head counselor and have the approval of the parents and principal.
Credit from Other Institutions: Transferable credits coming from any school outside of the Long Beach
Unified School District may not exceed a maximum of
70 credits per year or 20 credits in summer school.
Credit from non-accredited private schools/programs
must by approved by an ad hoc Committee on Credits
(maximum of five credits per semester course; ten credits per two-semester course).
Private School Foreign Language Instruction: Students may receive a maximum of ten semester periods of
credit for satisfactory completion of foreign language
courses taken at approved private language schools.
Credit will be awarded for courses which are not offered
in the Long Beach Unified School District; e.g., Greek, Hebrew. Official transcripts or other equivalent documents
must be submitted to the counseling office of the high
school in order to establish credit allowance.
Work Experience Education: Work experience education is a partnership between community and
school, providing opportunities for juniors and seniors
16 years of age or older to discover their career interests
and aptitudes by doing "real" work. The business community becomes the classroom.
The maximum number of semester periods of credit allowable for work experience is 40. Summer school work
experience, maximum of 10 credits, is counted as part
of the credit maximum.
Graduation Requirements 14
Credit for Courses Being Repeated: Students may
receive credit only once. Students receiving at least a
grade of D and repeating a course receive a grade but no
credit for the second course. Students repeating a course
they have failed will receive both grade and credit provided they pass the course a second time.
Credit from a Community College or University:
Students may enroll in a college course if it is for (1) enrichment in either scholastic or vocational work or (2) if
the student is participating in American Field Service as
an exchange student and must complete U.S. requirements before leaving. Any student who failed a course
or who wishes to improve a grade is not eligible and
should not earn credit by this means nor may students
take courses by this means that are courses required for
graduation. Upon successful completion of the course,
credit will be applied toward high school graduation at
the rate of 3 1/3 (three and one-third) semester periods
for each credit earned in college. Students must acquire
principal approval, have a "B" average, and complete the
application process prior to enrolling. For further information and an application packet, students should see
their high school guidance counselor.
Credit for Independent Study: Except for the offcampus study program, District high schools will grant
credit for independent study to a maximum of ten semester periods per year toward course requirements for
graduation under conditions approved by the District,
provided that students meet the requirements established
by district standards. The schools will grant additional
credits for independent study in elective subjects. Cumulative records will carry the notation "Independent
Study" plus the name of the course for all such courses,
plus the amount of credit earned. Interested students
may obtain details from the school counseling office.
Incoming Senior Transfer Students: It is the policy of the Long Beach Unified School District not to
grant a diploma to a student who enters a local high
school later than the fourth week of the final semester of
the school year. Instead, grades earned in a school in
this district are sent to the student's previous school, and
the diploma is issued by the previous school.
Seniors transferring to Long Beach schools will have
their credits checked and their graduation applications
reviewed as soon as transcripts are available.
Class Withdrawal: The following guidelines are used
at every high school in the Long Beach Unified School
District:
Withdrawals during the first four weeks of a semester (first
20 days) – Student receives no credit and no grade. No
record is made on the student’s Cumulative Record. A
student may drop a class by bringing a note signed by
the parent requesting the program change to his/her
counselor. For students withdrawing from the school,
no record of enrollment is made other than dates of entrance and withdrawal.
Withdrawals during the middle weeks of a semester – Student receives no credit and no grade. Any class dropped
after the fourth week of a semester requires the approval
of a student’s parent and counselor. Any student who
drops a class after the six (6) week drop period will receive an "F" on his/her semester report card for that class.
Students withdrawing from the school receive the grade
that has been earned up to the date of withdrawal. The
grade is recorded and the receiving school will determine credit status.
Withdrawals during the last four weeks of a semester (last 20
days) – Student receives a grade of "F" (unless moving on
to another school) and the date of withdrawal is also
recorded on the student’s Cumulative Record. No credit
given unless granted by school. If illness warrants a grade
of Incomplete, the student will be expected to complete
the remaining work to receive an official grade by the end
of the following quarter. A grade of "F" will be given
should the incomplete not be cleared. Students withdrawing from the school receive the grade that has been
earned up to the date of withdrawal. The grade is recorded
and the receiving school will determine credit status.
Students and their parents are counseled on the benefits
of remaining in a course for the duration of the semester. The student’s continued participation in the course
may increase his/her opportunity for success when the
course is retaken. Required courses must be repeated regardless of whether a student withdraws or receives a
grade of "F". Thus the additional knowledge gained from
remaining in the course is helpful.
Transfer Grades: See school counselor for policies regarding transfer grades.
Changes in Program: At the time of course selection
and again at preregistration in August, students are provided counseling regarding the choice of elective subjects. It is therefore expected that they will continue
with such choices through the semester. Requests for
changes based on likes or dislikes of teacher or class
members are not acceptable. In those few cases where
extreme conditions exist, a change may be approved.
Unless and until such a permit is issued, the original program must be followed, and any absence occurring without a permit will be considered a truancy and treated
accordingly.
GRADES
Grade Points: Grade points are used in determining
scholarship excellence and rank in class. Points are
earned as follows: A = 4 points, B = 3 points, C = 2
points, D = 1 point, F = 0 point
Honors level courses [i.e., Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB) and regular honors) may
be awarded extra points by the college/university.
Grades in physical education, military science, and naval
science are not included in computation of academic
grade point average, except for co-curricular eligibility
purposes.
Meaning of Grades: Academic Subject Grades: A = superior (90-100%); B = above average (80-89%); C = average (70-79%); D = barely passing (60-69%); F = failure
Graduation Requirements 15
(0-59%) NC = no credit; I = incomplete; P = passing (in
designated pass-fail courses); PR = passing-rest (in
Adapted Physical Education).
Conduct Grades: E = excellent; S = satisfactory; N = needs
to improve; U = unsatisfactory.
A grade of "C", sometimes expressed as "average," represents the middle mark in a normal distribution. It is also
the most frequently assigned mark, being given to approximately 40 percent of students in required courses.
A grade of no credit (NC) may be given only with the
principal’s approval, and only under the following circumstance: when failure to complete the work of a
course is due to an excused absence so late in the semester that there is not sufficient time in which to make
up the work. It is also used when a student is new to the
district and their records are not available.
Grades given at mid-semester cover work done from the
beginning of the semester to the date of the report.
Grades given at the end of the semester cover work done
for the entire semester.
Grades of "D" in academic subjects are not accepted by
colleges or universities as meeting specific subject requirements.
Grade Point Averaging: Grade point average is calculated by taking all of the grades that a student has
earned, which in turn is translated into a numerical figure. That figure is divided by the number of courses that
the student took and the GPA is computed.
Grade Point Averaging example:
English: A (4 pts)
PE: C (2 pts)
Physical Science: C (2 pts) Algebra: D (1 pt)
Spanish: B (3 pts.)
Health: F (0 pts)
12 points divided by
6 classes = 2.0 GPA
Students have both a total GPA and an academic GPA.
The total GPA takes into account every course that the
student has taken. The academic GPA does not count
physical education (including Military/Naval Training)
or courses in which the student serves as an aide or assistant. It is also important to note that there are no
extra points given for Honors or Advanced Placement
courses in the Long Beach Unified School District.
Many colleges and universities choose to weigh grades
during the admission process. Whether students are
given extra points at that time or not, these advanced
courses are important to take if attending a postsecondary institution is a future goal.
Eligibility Requirements for Participation in
Extracurricular and Co-Curricular Activities:
Extracurricular and co-curricular activities enrich the education and social development and experiences of students. These activities neither replace nor interfere with
the prescribed course of study. Extracurricular activities
are not part of the regular school curriculum, are not
graded, do not offer credit and do not take place during
classroom time. Co-curricular activities are programs
that may be associated with the curriculum in a regular
classroom. To be eligible to participate or represent the
school in extracurricular and/or co-curricular activities,
students must demonstrate satisfactory progress in the
previous grading period including but not limited to (a)
maintenance of a minimum of 2.0 grade point average
on a 4.0 scale. A “C” average shall not be considered a
2.0 equivalency, (2) maintenance of minimum progress
toward meeting high school graduation requirements.
Classes taken during the summer session will be credited
to the grade point average of the immediately preceding
semester for eligibility purposes. In the event an
extra/co-curricular activity is conducted during the summer, and the student has no summer school grades to
consider, a student’s eligibility status will be determined
by the grade point average or truancy record at the end
of the immediately preceding semester. Students must
be in attendance at least 1/2 the school day of the
extra/co-curricular activity to be eligible to participate
on the day of the activity. If the activity falls on a nonschool day, the student must have attended the last regular scheduled full day of school to be eligible to
participate in the activity on the non-school day unless
the student has a legitimate excuse arranged at least 24
hours before the activity.
Unsatisfactory Achievement: When it becomes evident to a teacher that a pupil is failing a course (less
than a grade of "C"), a written report will be provided to
the student and parent. This notice of failing/unsatisfactory work is issued to warn the student that extra effort is needed in order to pass the course. It must be sent
no later than the fourteenth week of the semester.
Also, at any time during the school year, a teacher may
contact a parent by telephone, note, or arranged conference for the purpose of discussing a student’s progress
and to suggest how the student may improve.
Withholding Grades, Diplomas and/or Transcripts: Education Code 48904b states that any school
district or private school whose real or personal property
has been willfully cut, defaced, or otherwise injured may,
after affording the pupil his or her due process rights,
withhold the grades, diploma, and transcripts of the
pupil responsible for the damage until the pupil or the
pupil’s parent or guardian has paid for the damages.
This code has been amended to provide for the withholding of grades, diplomas, or transcripts if a student
fails to return borrowed school property upon demand
from school authorities.
Changing a Final Grade: Per California Education
Code 49066, a grade given to a student for any course of
instruction shall be final and can only be changed by
the teacher who gave the grade. In addition, "no grade
of a pupil participating in physical education may be adversely affected due to the fact that the pupil does not
wear standardized physical education apparel where the
failure to dress arises from circumstances beyond the
control of the pupil." Should an issue arise concerning
a grade, the school principal should be contacted, only
after the issue has been discussed with the teacher and
no resolution was achieved. A grade change must be initiated and completed within one semester of when the
student receives the disputed grade.
Graduation Requirements 16
Special Opportunities
All schools offer special opportunities to meet the needs
of all students. The opportunities that are available to all
students are noted below.
SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES
Advanced Placement (AP)
The goal of the Advanced Placement Program is to enable students to rise to college level challenges in high
school, receive both high school and college credit for
their accomplishments, and enter higher education well
prepared for its demands (and often reducing tuition
costs). AP offers high school students an opportunity to
develop their strengths by experiencing the academic
rigor of college, fostering self-motivation, confidence, responsibility and self-reliance. College students who take
AP courses in high school consistently out-perform nonAP college students academically both in the next course
and in the long term. On completion of an Advanced
Placement course, students take an examination administered and evaluated by the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB). Parents pay the cost of this
examination or in some cases students may apply for fee
waivers.
Many colleges and universities now grant course credit
for acceptable scores on Advanced Placement Examinations. Every college establishes for itself what constitutes
an acceptable score. Each student and his/her parents
are responsible for determining the policy of the college
of their choice concerning Advanced Placement and for
submitting the student’s test results to the college for
consideration. The most successful students are awarded
and recognized as State and National AP Scholars.
In establishing course content and in selecting appropriate textbooks for Advanced Placement courses, the
District follows recommendations of the CEEB, which
develops the course examinations. The district furnishes
these special college textbooks free of charge for use by
Advanced Placement students; the only cost to students
and their parents is the cost of course examinations (approximately $80 each) as mentioned above. There is an
AP test fee waiver available for qualified students. The
school’s Counseling Office can provide the details.
International Baccalaureate (IB)
The International Baccalaureate (IB) Program is a two
year rigorous academic curriculum. The IB Program
prepares students for advanced placement in college
and if qualified (through a battery of tests, completion
of an extended essay, a creativity-action-service project, and Theory of Knowledge) students will receive a
special diploma from the International Baccalaureate
Program.
Accelerated Courses
Accelerated courses provide a foundation for students
who intend to move into Honors or AP classes in their
junior or senior year or who want an advanced course of
study in an area where an honors or AP course is not
available. Students are required to meet all the standards
of the regular course and to explore the course content in
depth and at an accelerated pace. College level supplemental materials are available to enrich the curriculum
and students are instructed in the skills and strategies
which allow comprehension of complicated text.
Honors Program
Honors courses offered at all of the District’s high
schools are intended to challenge academically talented
students. These courses, represented in both the core
and some elective strands, are certified and offered in
grades eleven and twelve. Honors classes are equivalent
to lower level college courses. Due to their rigorous curricular demands, these courses may be recognized like
AP courses by the University of California system.
AVID
AVID is an elective course of study taught within the regular school day. It is a program for those students who
could make it in a challenging curriculum if they had
support. One of the goals is to place students into accelerated, honors, and AP classes as they are ready. This
program provides the structure, support, and motivation
to succeed in high school as well as college.
PROGRAMS FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE
LEARNERS
There are numerous programs offered in the Long Beach
Unified School District for students who are non-native
speakers of English. These programs and services are delivered according to each student’s individual language
needs assessment to guarantee full access to the core curriculum.
The program options that are provided to these students
will include instruction in core classes being delivered
in English in a sheltered environment with or without
primary language support and instruction being provided in mainstream classes in English. All English Language Learners will receive English Language
Development at the appropriate level and may receive
supplemental reading instruction as needed.
In addition, students in all of these programs are eligible
to enroll in literature based classes that are offered in the
primary languages of Spanish and Khmer.
Special Opportunities 17
SPECIAL EDUCATION
The Long Beach Unified School District offers a full
range of special education programs and related services.
"Special Education" consists of (1) specially designed instruction to meet the unique needs of individuals with
exceptional needs whose educational needs cannot be
met with modification of the regular instruction program and (2) related services that may be needed to assist these individuals to benefit from specially designed
instruction. Eligible students, who have learning, communication, physical, mental and/ or emotional disabilities, are provided programs and services as
determined by their individualized education programs
(IEP). Three basic placement options are provided for
these students:
1. Related Services (RS), including speech
and language
2. Resource Specialist Program (RSP)
3. Special Day Classes (SDC)
Each special education student has an IEP that specifies
the placement and services to be provided and the frequency and duration of these services. The IEP, that
must be reviewed annually, is written by the IEP team.
The IEP team consists of and must include the parent/guardian, student, special education teacher, general
education teacher, administrator/ designee and related
services staff serving the student. The Office of Special
Education is available to assist in the IEP planning
process and in implementing the students’ IEPs, as
needed.
Students placed in RS and RSP are served primarily
through their general education teachers. Direct instruction and cooperative planning between the general
education classroom teacher and the RS and RSP staff
enable the students to successfully participate in all subjects in a general education setting. RS services may be
provided either on a pull-out basis or through a collaborative model in which the RS staff works within the
general education classroom, collaborating with the general education teacher.
Middle and High School RSP services are delivered
through a support class. Students will be instructed by
general education teachers in their core classes and supported through their enrollment in Strategies For Success, instructed by the RSP teachers. A portion of this
course is designed to center on school behaviors, such
as note-taking, organizational skills, study skills, and accessing core textbooks. The remainder of this course will
focus on supporting students in their content area
classes. During this time, RSP teachers will pre-teach, reteach and review concepts, model and teach strategies
that give students tools to access and successfully complete the work required of them in the general education classes.
Special Day Classes are provided for pupils of similar educational needs significant enough that they require special education instruction for a majority of the school
day. Students in a SDC receive the majority of their instruction from special education teachers and may also
be served by RS staff when indicated on the IEP. SDC
students may be included in general education classes
(mainstreamed) as determined by the IEP team. For selected students, services may continue through the
school year of their 21st birthday. Many students in special day classes complete individualized courses of study
and receive certificates of completion.
Vocational skills training may be provided through the
general education program or specially-designed vocational education which includes on-campus and offcampus job training. Physical education options may
include general physical education, modified/ developmental physical education, specially-designed physical
education, adapted physical education, or a combination of these services.
An Individualized Transition Plan (ITP) is developed for
all special education students 14 years and older, as a
part of the IEP process. For purposes of transition planning, the IEP team discusses post-high school options in
the following areas: residential/domestic, transportation/mobility needs, vocational choices, recreation/
leisure activities, post-secondary academic opportunities, outside agency support. The IEP team establishes
appropriate goals and objectives to assist the student in
making a smooth transition from school to post-school
environments. Outside agency referrals include the State
Department of Rehabilitation, Harbor Regional Center,
Long Beach School for Adults and Long Beach City College.
Diplomas, Certificates of Completion, and Certificates of Educational Achievement for Special
Education Students: Pursuant to Education Code
51412
No diploma, certificate, or other document, except transcripts and letters of recommendation, shall be conferred
on a pupil as evidence of completion of a prescribed
course of study or training, or of satisfactory attendance,
unless such pupil has met the standards of proficiency in
basic skills prescribed by the governing board of the high
school district, or equivalent thereof, pursuant to Article
2.5 (commencing with Section 51215) of Chapter 2.
I. For special education students, the following
procedures shall apply:
A. Students who meet graduation requirements, (i.e.,
units of credit, CAHSEE - See page 19, service
learning, etc.) with or without modifications, shall
be granted a diploma. Acceptable
accommodations and modifications are available
for district and state exams.
B. Students whose IEP’s document a non diploma
track (Certificate of Educational Achievement)
shall receive a Certificate of Educational
Achievement.
II. The discussion of these options (diploma versus
certificate of completion) should begin as early as
middle school and continue each year thereafter.
The special education teacher will have previous
Special Opportunities 18
standardized achievement test scores and present
levels of performance to support his/her
recommendation to the parent. Academic (diploma)
versus applied academic (certificate of educational
achievement) curriculum will be explained to the
parent. Vocational, community-based instruction,
and mobility training will be emphasized for nondiploma bound students.
III. Students whose parents agree with the decision to
pursue a certificate of educational achievement are
not required to continue in school until 22 years of
age. The student may receive his/her letter of recommendation when the IEP team, including the parent,
determines that it is appropriate for the student to terminate his/her K-12 educational program. This decision will be arrived at through the transition planning
process.
IV. All students receiving either a diploma or a certificate
of educational achievement will be able to participate
in all graduation ceremonies and senior functions.
V. All students receiving a certificate of educational
achievement will:
1. Participate in an individualized course of
instruction, including a transition plan to address
vocational objectives, employment, community
training, mobility instruction, and applied
academics.
2 Be referred to the Department of Rehabilitation,
if appropriate.
3. Be able to apply to a community college.
VI. Certificate of completion will be awarded to students
meeting all District graduation requirements but were
not able to pass CAHSEE.
Board of Education either implements an alternative
means for students with disabilities to demonstrate
achievement in the standards measured by the CAHSEE
or determines that an alternative means assessment to
the CAHSEE is not feasible and reinstates the CAHSEE as
a graduation requirement for students with disabilities.
CALIFORNIA HIGH SCHOOL EXAM
PREPARATION AND INTERVENTIONS
State laws require that districts provide support and resources to assist students who have not passed the CAHSEE. Assembly Bill 1802 authorizes the California
Department of Education to allocate money to purchase
materials for students who have not passed the California High School Exit Exam. All juniors and seniors in
the Long Beach Unified School District who have not
passed the CAHSEE are being offered CAHSEE Intensive
Instruction and Services using these funds.
State law requires students in California public schools to
pass the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) to
receive a high school diploma. Education Code sections
60850 and 68051 authorized the development and implementation of the exam. The purpose of the CAHSEE
is to improve student achievement in high school and
make sure students who graduate from high school can
demonstrate competency in English Language Arts and
Mathematics.
Beginning with the Class of 2006, all students receiving a
high school diploma must pass a state-administered exit
exam. Students who do not pass the exit examination
will not receive a diploma even if they have met all other
graduation requirements. Pursuant to Assembly Bill 2 or
the 2009-10 Fourth Extraordinary Session (ABX4 2)
(Chapter 2, Statues of 2009), which enacted California Education Code Section 60852.3 commencing with the
2009-10 school year, an eligible pupil with a disability is
not required to pass the CAHSEE as a condition of receiving a diploma of graduation or as a condition of graduation from high school. Pupils with disabilities will
continue to take the CAHSEE in grade 10 for purposes of
fulfilling the requirements of the federal No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. This exemption shall last until the State
The CAHSEE is divided into two parts: English Language
Arts and Mathematics. The questions address important
state content standards that a High School Exit Examination Standards Panel, appointed by the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, felt students should
master to graduate from high school. The English Language Arts section addresses state content standards
through Grade 10. It consists of multiple-choice questions and a writing task. The reading portion of the
exam covers vocabulary, informational reading, and
reading literature. The mathematics portion of the test
addresses state standards from Grades 6 through 8, including algebra. It consists of multiple-choice questions
that cover number sense, algebra and functions, measurement and geometry, and probability and statistics.
Support and Resources to Help Students Pass the
CAHSEE
Students who do not pass the CAHSEE in tenth grade
have two additional opportunities to retake the exam
during eleventh grade and up to three opportunities in
twelfth grade. Only the part(s) not passed must be taken
again. In addition, school districts are required by law to
provide supplemental instruction aligned to state academic content standards for students who do not pass
the exam.
Students in LBUSD high schools that have not passed
both sections of the California High School Exit Exam
(CAHSEE) by the end of tenth grade are provided one or
more of the following services as juniors and seniors:
• CAHSEE Summer School Classes
• Tutorial (Before, Lunch, After School)
• Classroom CAHSEE Preparation Materials
• Additional Counselor Support
• CAHSEE Math Classes
• CAHSEE English Classes
• Remedial Reading Classes
• Academic Uprise Tutoring
• California Prep Study Guides
• Specialized English Learner Support
Additional resources are being provided on an individual
school basis and may vary from site to site. They may
include:
Special Opportunities 19
Specific Tutoring:
• One on One (Avalon, Lakewood, Poly, Renaissance)
• Saturday (Cabrillo, Jordan, Poly, Reid, Renaissance)
• Peer Tutors (CAMS)
• College Aides (Cabrillo, Lakewood)
• Computer-based Skills (Cabrillo, Wilson)
• TestTools Software (Jordan, Millikan)
• Princeton Review (Avalon, CAMS, Cabrillo, Jordan, Millikan, Poly)
• Kaplan Advantage (EPHS, Reid)
Intensive Services for Special Education Students
In addition to having access to all general education
services, courses and resources to support CAHSEE,
diploma-bound students in Special Education Programs
have acess to the following remedial interventions:
Resource Specialist Programs:
• Strategies for Success (SFS) Course (grades 10, 11, 12)
• Intensive Reading Clinic (as determined by IEP teams)
• Revolution CAHSEE Prep web-based and consumable texts (grades 11
and 12 only)
• ALEKS Mathematics web-based program varied by site
Special Day Class Programs:
• Core English and Mathematics Courses aligned to Grade Level and offgrade level standards
• Content-Specific Intervention Courses aligned to off-grade level
standards and the CAHSEE for English Language Arts, Reading
Development, and Mathematics
• Supplemental texts: Meeting the Challenge, 2002, Globe Fearon (for
ELA and Mathematics)
• Revolution CAHSEE Prep web-based and consumable texts (grades 11
and 12 only)
Assistance Past 12th Grade
Assembly Bill 347 requires districts to offer students who
have failed one or both parts o the CAHSEE at the end of
12th grade the opportunity to receive intensive support
and assistance for two years following the completion of
12th grade. Long Beach Unified School District has implemented and is implementing the following to meet
the objectives of AB 347: Enrollment in CAHSEE classes
in Evening High School, EPHS, or the Adult School.
Special education students who are diploma-bound and
have not passed CAHSEE may attend a district-provided
computer lab staffed by a special education teacher.
For more information please contact your school counselor.
Special Opportunities 20
Course Matrices
& Descriptions
Course Matrices and Descriptions 21
22
Course Descriptions
Business/Computer
Education
CODE
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
•
Accounting 1-2
1201
•
•
Accounting 3-4
1203
•
•
Computer Applications 1
1343
•
Computer Applications 2
1345
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
MHS
PHS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1348
1361
Computer Programming 3-4
1362
Computer Science A AP
3067
International Business
1245
•
International Marketing
1240
•CIC
Sales and Marketing 1-2
1315
•
•
Sales and Marketing 3-4
1317
•
•
2696
1357
www.publishing 2
1354
•
Course offered
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
WHS
•
Computer Programming 1-2
Using New Media
RHS
•
Computer Applications 3-4
www.publishing 1
RHSA
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Avalon High School
Cabrillo High School
California Academy of Math & Science
David Starr Jordan High School
Lakewood High School
Business/Computer Education 23
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
Robert A. Millikan High School
Polytechnic High School
Renaissance High School for the Arts
Will J. Reid High School
Woodrow Wilson Classical High School
B
usiness/computer education classes provide basic
training in the skills needed for employment at the
entry level. In addition to preparation for a variety of career occupations, business students also receive instruction in the basic skills and work ethics. These classes are
useful to students who intend to follow careers in business and to others who need a general knowledge of
business practices in an increasingly complex, computeroriented world.
BUSINESS COURSES
Accounting 1-2
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
____________________________
1201
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
Accounting 1-2 provides a general view of the accounting field. Practice is provided in recording business
transactions in a variety of small business organization
situations. Emphasis is placed on a single proprietorship.
Accounting 2 is practical application of the fundamental bookkeeping and accounting principles studied during the first semester. Practice is provided in keeping
complete sets of books; journals, ledgers, work sheets,
and financial statements are included. Transactions
using papers commonly found in business offices are
recorded in practice sets. The course covers control accounts and financial papers (work sheets, balance sheets,
income statements).
Accounting 3-4____________________________
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
1203
2 semesters
10, 11, 12
Accounting 1-2
Accounting 3-4 explores business data processing. Computer and manual procedures commonly used and the
applications of each method to business activities are
emphasized. Partnership and corporation accounting is
stressed. Special accounting procedures for using the
combination journal and for handling bad debts, depreciation, accruals, and deferrals are introduced. The accounting systems and procedures presented earlier in the
course are expanded through the use of computers and
calculators.
COMPUTER COURSES
__________
Computer Applications 1__________
1343
Computer Applications 1 SDAIE
_____
Computer Applications 1 SDAIE/PLS
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
1344
1368
1 semester
9-12
None
This course is designed to bring students to a basic level
of proficiency in applying computer technology in the
educational setting. Emphasis will be placed on filemanagement and appropriate technology use in a network environment. Students will be introduced to
fundamental computer concepts, beginning keyboarding skills, PowerPoint, word-processing, multi-media
presentations, Internet applications and spreadsheets.
Special attention will be devoted to legal issues, copyright law, and safety. Application of technology in the
workplace will be emphasized.
This course is required for high school graduation.
Computer Applications 2
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
_________
1345
1 semester
9-12
Computer Applications I or placement by
assessment
This course provides additional computer experience for
students who have been introduced to basic computer
literacy skills. Students will problem-solve and create
word processing documents, spreadsheets and databases.
They will become familiar with digital media and Digital publishing as well as software to create graphic presentations incorporating all phases of their learning.
This presentation will be related to an occupational application of choice.
Computer Applications 3-4
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
_____
1348
2 semesters
10-12
Computer Applications 1-2
This course offers students the opportunity to develop
advanced computer skills that will enable them to be
productive/employable citizens in the Information Age.
This course builds upon the computer knowledge and
experience obtained by students in their first year. This
course will give students the ability to fully integrate
business software applications, mirroring today’s dynamic and ever-changing competitive workplace.
In this course students will learn advanced computer
skills in word processing, database, spreadsheets, PowerPoint, internet and become familiar with digital media
and electronic publishing.
Business/Computer Education 24
Computer Programming 1-2 __1361
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10-12
Algebra 1-2 with a “C” or better
ing activities with the heavy concentration on the ability
of applying their learning techniques to the industry.
International Marketing___________ 1240
This course is designed to enable students to develop
skills in the use of the computer and peripheral equipment by using the computer as a tool to enhance the
study of mathematics. It increases the occupational opportunities for students who have mathematical ability
but who may not be majoring in mathematics. It includes a study of programming techniques, computer
languages, and computer applications.
Length of Course:
1 semester
Grade Level Options: 9-12
Prerequisite:
None
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
This introduction to the world marketplace provides students with a global view of international commerce including job and career opportunities, marketing concepts
and the local international business community. Students
will study the free enterprise system entrepreneurship, personal and time management, motivation and leadership
development. Trips to the Port of Long Beach and the harbor are included.
Computer Programming 3-4__1362
Sales and Marketing 1-2, 3-4 __ 1315/1317
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11-12
Computer Programming 1-2 with a “C”
or better
This course will provide an introduction to the C++ language. The course covers the programming methodology with an emphasis on problem solving, algorithm
development, data structures and typical C++ applications.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
Computer Science A AP
____________
3067
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 10-12
Prerequisite:
Computer Programming 1-2 or
permission of instructor
The content of Computer Science A emphasizes object
oriented programming methodology with an emphasis
on problem solving and algorithm development. It is
the equivalent of a college level semester course in Computer Science. It also covers the study of data structures,
design and abstraction. The course emphasizes the design issues that make programs understandable, adaptable and reusable.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
International Business________________ 1245
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9-12
Prerequisite:
Acceptance as 10th grader to
Pac Rim Academy
This course is devoted to the study of marketing fundamentals, principles and practices with the emphasis on
business in both the international and domestic environment. Students will learn concepts pertaining to market-
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2-4 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
This course, taken along with Sales and Marketing Cooperative, is designed to develop special skills in advertising services, apparel and accessories, finance and
credit, food marketing and services, merchandising, petroleum marketing, real estate, and starting your own
business. It is also helpful for college-bound students
who may have an occupational interest in marketing
or merchandising.
Sales and Marketing
Cooperative___________________________________ 1319
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2-4 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Concurrent enrollment in Sales and
Marketing 1-2 or 3-4
This course is designed to give on-the-job experience
and to provide students informational feedback and related instruction while developing special skills in the
distributive fields. It is especially helpful to those students who wish to work part-time while attending
school.
Using New Media__________________________ 2696
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
1 semester
9-12
Computer Application 1 or 2 or
placement by assessment
This course is designed for students with advanced computer skills as a semester class. The class is project based
which includes activities for designing and creating digital video, sound, animation and web pages. The class
will provide appropriate hardware and software and include application that support students’ ability to create
and optimize new media.
Business/Computer Education 25
World Wide Web Publishing 1
__________________________________________________________
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
1357
1 semester
9-12
Computer Applications 1 with a grade
of C or better
This course offers students the opportunity to develop
computer skills that will enable them to be productive
citizens in the Information Age. Students will be challenged to synthesize web pages that present data and
multimedia on the web. As a junior or senior project,
students will collaborate in the creation of web sites that
will improve educational content on the web. Careers in
web design and publishing will be explored as part of
the coursework.
World Wide Web Publishing 2
__________________________________________________________
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
1354
1 semester
9-12
World Wide Web Publishing 1
This course offers students the opportunity to enhance
the web publishing skills learned in World Wide Web
Publishing 1. Students will learn scripting, advanced
web technologies, and interactive databases as well as
vector graphics and animation. Careers in web design
and publishing will be explored as part of the coursework.
Business/Computer Education 26
Course Descriptions
English
Language Arts
Courses Meeting English Graduation Credit
COURSE
CODE
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
English 1-2
1401
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
1-2
Accelerated
1403
–English
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
English 3-4
1408
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
–English 3-4 Accelerated
1407
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
1410
English 5-6
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
5-6
Honors
1411
–English
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
English 7-8
1412
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Bible as Literature
1414
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
British Literature
1415
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
–British Literature Accelerated
1419
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Comparative Literature of Western
1416
•
Civilization 1-2
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
–Comparative Literature of Western
1418
•
Civilization 1-2 Accelerted
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Contemporary World Literature
1420
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
English Language and Composition (AP)
1428
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
English
Literature
and
Composition
(AP)
1413
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
English IB HL1
1436
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
English IB HL2
1437
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Film Analysis 1-2
1425
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Literture
and
Communications
1426
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Multicultural Literature
1442
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
–Multicultural Literature Accelerated
1448
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Rhetoric and Composition
1423
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Courses Meeting the English Elective Credits
COURSE
CODE
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
Advanced Elements of Expository Text
1522
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Advanced Journalism: Editing, Design
and Management
1464
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Creative
Writing
1-2
1451
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Creative Writing 3-4
1452
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Elements
of
Journalism
1459
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Elements of Oral Communication
1511
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Forensics:
Argumentation
and
Debate
1515
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Introduction to Scriptwriting
1432
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Intermediate
Scriptwriting
1438
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Journalism: Production and Management
1461
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Speech Communications: Analysis and
1513
•
•
•
Applications
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
English Language Arts 27
Reading Intervention Courses Approved for English Elective Credit
COURSE
CODE
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
1440
Fast Track 1-2
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Track
I
SDC
1440
Fast
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
1441
Fast Track 3-4
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Reading
Clinic
1578
Intensive
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
1597
Language I
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Language
I
SDC
5760
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
1585
Language II
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Language
II
AB
1584
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
1676
Language II CD
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Language
II
SDC
5768
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
5760
Language III SDC
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Language
III
AB
SDC
5118
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
5119
Language III CD SDC
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Literacy
Workshop
1-2
1595
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Literacy Workshop 3-4
1581
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Theater
1422
Reader’s
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
•
Course offered
AHS
CHS
CAM
JHS
LHS
Avalon High School
Cabrillo High School
California Academy of Math & Science
David Starr Jordan High School
Lakewood High School
English Language Arts 28
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
Robert A. Millikan High School
Polytechnic High School
Renaissance High School for the Arts
Will J. Reid High School
Woodrow Wilson Classical High School
Integrated Language Arts
English 3-4
English 1-2
__________________________________
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
1401
(**English 1-2 SDC __________________________________ 5415)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
___________________________________
1408
(**English 3-4 SDC __________________________________ 5419)
** Courses do not meet NCAA or UC
requirement.
2 semesters
9
None
Students pursue a balanced, integrated standards-based
program of literature and language study. Students will
develop strategies to construct meaning from and interact thoughtfully with all genres of literature and nonfiction texts with an emphasis on non-fiction and
informational texts. Writing activities are extensions of
experiences developed through these interactions with
texts, and students will use process writing activities in
a variety of genres including persuasive, expository, narrative, and response to literature. Students also receive
instruction in the conventions of written language, reading strategies, effective oral communication and research
techniques. Emphasis will be placed on preparation for
the successful completion of the state mandated California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE), which is a requirement for high school graduation.
2 semesters
10
English 1-2
Students will continue to pursue a balanced, integrated
standards-based program of literature and language
study. Students will develop strategies to construct meaning from and interact thoughtfully with all genres of literature and non-fiction texts with an emphasis on
informational texts. Writing activities are informed by
interactions with texts, and students will continue to use
writing process activities as they compose persuasive, expository, narrative, response to literature and research essays and papers. Students will also complete the first
steps toward satisfying their Service Learning writing requirement. As well, students will continue to receive instruction in the conventions of written language, reading
strategies, effective oral communication and research
techniques. Emphasis will be placed on preparation for
the successful completion of the state mandated California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE), which is a requirement for high school graduation.
This course is required for high school graduation.
This course will meet the “b” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
This course is required for high school graduation.
NCAA Approved
This course will meet the “b” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
English 3-4 Accelerated______________ 1407
NCAA Approved
English 1-2 Accelerated _____________ 1403
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9
None
Students pursue a balanced, integrated standards-based
program of literature and language studies, which is accelerated, enriched and differentiated and designed to
prepare the for AP courses. Students will develop strategies to construct meaning and interact thoughtfully
with all genres of literature, preparing them for college
level work. Students will write analytical, persuasive, expository, narrative/autobiographical and reflective essays.
Students also receive instruction in the
conventions of written language and effective oral communication, and research techniques. A comprehensive
final will be given at the end of the course.
This course will meet the "b" entrance requirement for the University of
California and the California State University systems.
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10
English 1-2
Students will continue to pursue a balanced, integrated
standards-based program of literature and language studies, which is accelerated, enriched and differentiated and
designed to prepare them for AP courses. Students will
develop strategies to construct meaning from and interact thoughtfully with all genres of literature and nonfiction texts.
Writing activities are informed by
interaction with texts, and students will continue to use
writing process activities as they compose argumentative, expository, narrative, response to literature, literary
analysis, and research essays and papers. Students will
also continue to receive instruction in the conventions
of written language, reading strategies, effective oral
communication and research techniques. A comprehensive final will be given at the end of this course.
This course will meet the "b" entrance requirement for the University of
California and the California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
NCAA Approved
English 5-6
____________________________________
1410
_________________________________
5421)
(**English 5-6 SDC
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11
English 3-4
Students will engage in a variety of standards-based academic and creative writing tasks which connect both
English Language Arts 29
fiction and non-fiction to their life experiences. Students
will use writing process activities in a variety of genres:
persuasive, expository, narrative, reflective and literary
analysis. Students also receive instruction in the conventions of written language and effective oral communication in order to meet or exceed the language arts
objectives. Students engage in a close reading and exploration of themes found in American literature and
the American experience through a balanced integrated
program of non-fiction, literature and language study.
Students read and respond to historically and/or culturally significant American fiction and non-fiction works
tracing the development of American writing from the
colonial period to present day. To maintain the Writing
Standards Assessment Portfolio students will continue
to maintain their collection of works demonstrating
growth in both conventions and rhetoric.
This course is required for high school graduation.
This course will meet the “b” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
English 5-6 (Honors) ___________________ 1411
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11
English 3-4
Students will engage in a variety of standards-based academic reading and writing tasks. Students will demonstrate proficiency in a variety of rhetorical modes:
narration, exposition, argumentation/persuasion and
description to produce texts of at least 1,500 words. Students will engage in a close reading and exploration of
themes found in American literature and the American
experience through a rigorous, integrated program
which balances non-fiction, literature and language
study. Students will analyze historically and/or culturally significant American works tracing the development
of American writing from the colonial period to present
day. To maintain the Writing Standards Assessment
Portfolio students will continue to maintain their collection of works demonstrating excellence in both conventions and rhetoric. This course adheres to the
rigorous UC requirements for an honors course and includes a comprehensive end of course exam.
This course will meet the “b” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
English 7-8
____________________________________
1412
_________________________________
5624)
(**English 7-8 SDC
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
12
Has not passed CAHSEE
Students engage in close reading of nonfiction and fiction texts as a catalyst to engage in intensive practice of
the writing process. They will compose autobiographical/biographical narratives, persuasive essays, responses
to literature, reflective essays as well as job and college
applications and an academic resume. Students will
continue to work on editing skills in order to reinforce
the conventions of standard edited English. When possible, students will learn to use technology to support
drafting, editing, and research skills.
This course will meet the “b” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
English Language and
Composition (AP) ______________________ 1428
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Co/Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11, 12
English 5-6
The AP English Language and Composition course is designed to help students become skilled readers of prose
written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical
contexts and to become skilled writers who can compose
for a variety of purposes. By their writing and reading in
this course, students should become aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects, as well as the way generic
conventions and the resources of language contribute to
effective writing.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This course will meet the “b” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
English IB HL 1
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
_____________________________
1436
2 semesters
11
English 3-4 Accelerated or teacher
permission
English IB HL I is an International Baccalaureate literature course which promotes oral and written communication skills, respect for the literary heritage of the
student’s first language, while providing complimentary international perspectives through the study of
World Literature. The course encourages students to see
literary works as products of art and their authors as
craftsmen whose methods of production can be analyzed in a variety of ways on a number of levels. This is
achieved through the emphasis placed on exploring the
means used by different authors to convey their subjects
in the works studied. It is further reinforced by the comparative framework emphasized for the study of these
works in all parts of the program. The course strives to
enrich the international awareness of IB students and
develop in them the attitudes of tolerance, empathy, and
a genuine respect for perspectives different from their
own.
This course will meet the “b” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
English Language Arts 30
English IB HL 2
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
____________________________
1437
2 semesters
12
English IB HL 1
British Literature 1-2__________________ 1415
British Literature 1-2
(Accelerated) ________________________________1419
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11, 12
None
English IB HL II is an International Baccalaureate literature course which promotes oral and written communication skills, respect for the literary heritage of the
student’s first language, while providing complimentary
international perspectives through the study of World
Literature. The course encourages students to see literary works as products of art and their authors as craftsmen whose methods of production can be analyzed in a
variety of ways on a number of levels. This is achieved
through the emphasis placed on exploring the means
used by different authors to convey their subjects in the
works studied. It is further reinforced by the comparative framework emphasized for the study of these works
in all parts of the program. The course strives to enrich
the international awareness of IB students and develop
in them the attitudes of tolerance, empathy, and a genuine respect for perspectives different from their own.
This survey of British literature introduces students to
the creative written record of the ideas of English speaking people. As they study the works of major British
writers, students more fully understand their country’s
heritage of freedom and belief in the worth of the individual. The course emphasizes application of language
skills to reading, speaking, and writing assignments on a
college-preparatory level. Literature study is chronological, beginning with the Anglo-Saxon period and continuing through the literature of contemporary Britain.
Readings form the basis for a composition program
which provides practice in writing critical papers about
literary works and topics.
This course will meet the “b” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
This course will meet the “b” or “g” entrance requirements for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Literature
Bible as Literature 1-2________________ 1414
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11, 12
None
Students will interpret Biblical allusions in literature by
developing a firm foundation in Old and New Testament
stories. Students will read the King James Version, which
is recognized as one of the monuments of modern English literature, and do historical and comparative studies
of the text. Students will use writing process activities in
a variety of genres: persuasive, expository, narrative, reflective and literary analysis. Students also receive instruction in the conventions of written language and
effective oral communication in order to meet or exceed
the language arts objectives. Students engage in a close
reading and exploration of themes found in biblical literature through a balanced integrated program of nonfiction, literature and language study. Students read and
analyze historically and/or culturally significant biblical
stories tracing the development of American and British
masterpieces in their light. To maintain the Writing
Standards Assessment Portfolio students will continue
to maintain their collection of works demonstrating
growth in both conventions and rhetoric. Students will
demonstrate their mastery of essential multi-media programs through Power Point peer teaching units and webbased research projects.
This course will meet the “b” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Comparative Literature of
Western Civilization____________________ 1416
Comparative Literature of
Western Civilization 1-2 ACC____1418
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11, 12
None
Through class discussion of the readings and through
creative individual and group projects, students interpret great ideas of the Western world in the matrix of
history and apply them to their own lives. The readings
take in a wide spectrum of thought and interpretation,
reaching from the ancient to the modern world.
This course will meet the “b” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
English Literature/Composition
(AP) ________________________________________________ 1413
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Co/Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11-12
English 5-6
Advanced Placement Literature and Composition is a
college level course which engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature.
Through the close reading of selected texts, students
deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their
readers. Students consider a work’s structure, style, and
themes, as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use
of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone.
The course includes intensive study of representative
works from various genres and periods from the six-
English Language Arts 31
teenth to the twentieth century, concentrating on works
of recognized literary merit. In addition to considering a
work’s literary artistry, students consider the social and historical values it reflects and embodies. Careful attention
to both textual detail and historical context should provide a foundation for interpretation, whatever critical perspectives are brought to bear on the literary works studied.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This course will meet the “b” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and the California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Film Analysis 1-2
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
_________________________
1425
2 semesters
12
English 1-2, 3-4 & 5-6
This course is designed to help college preparatory students understand the basic language of film, develop analytic skills, and explore the historical development of
visual media. Students actively apply analytical skills
used with literature to analyze films, viewing films actively, rather than as passive bystanders. The course explores the relationship of film to specific works of
literature and the effectiveness of films as literature. Students will demonstrate proficiency in analysis of film
through oral and written formats by writing and presenting comparisons of novels and stories to film adaptations, writing expository essays and responses to
various essays about film, and writing reviews of films.
Good writing skills and regular homework are required.
This course will meet the “b” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and the California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Literature and Communications
_________________________________________________________
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
1426
2 semesters
9-12
None
Students will engage in a variety of California Content
Standards-based learning experiences and tasks. Students will learn theories foundational to the communication discipline including, but not limited to, historical
communication, policy and Lincoln-Douglas debate formats and mass communication dynamics. Furthermore,
students will engage in full process writing activities in
the following areas: persuasive, research, reflective, narrative, expository, and literary analysis. Students will
also read established and respected literature from a variety of genres. Students will prepare and deliver full
process oral presentations of a persuasive, informative,
poetic, dramatic and impromptu nature while also participating in critique and analysis of content extended.
Finally, students will continue to maintain the Writing
Standards and Assessment Portfolio with work that reflects the rigor necessary for college-level English and
Communication Studies courses.
Multicultural Literature ____________ 1442
Multicultural Literature ACC____ 1448
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
1-2 semesters
11, 12
None
Multicultural Literature provides students with an opportunity to come to some basic understanding of their
own culture and the culture of others in order to promote more understanding of our multicultural society.
Students will read and respond to diverse writers and
genres reflecting contemporary America. They will compare and contrast attitudes, values, customs, and traditions expressed in these literary works, exploring what is
universal for all cultures as well as the unique experiences of individual cultures. Students will analyze and
discuss such themes as tolerance, prejudice, racism, etc.
in a historical, contemporary, and political context.
Each semester they will research a focus question about
a culture of their choice (possibly a culture they identify
with and one they want to know more about).
This course will meet the “b” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and the California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Rhetoric and Composition
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
_______
1423
2 semesters
12
Has passed CAHSEE
This one-year rhetoric and composition course is for college bound seniors to enable them to read and write academic prose effectively and strategically and to increase
their mastery of academic language. This rigorous course
is built around in-depth studies of various expository, analytic, or argumentative writings on non-literary topics
and the rhetorical analysis of lengthier non-fiction and
fiction genres, such as autobiography, biography, novel,
and drama. Pivotal to the curriculum is the deepening of
students’ critical reading, writing and thinking skills
about both expository and literary prose with the emphasis on fostering their ability to argue and extend their
understanding of complex material in writing. Students
will be expected to engage in depth with diverse and
challenging material in writing. In addition, they will be
expected to increase their awareness and application of
the techniques employed by authors. They will read
closely to examine relationships between and author’s argument or theme and his or her audience and purpose,
to analyze the impact of structural and rhetorical strategies, and to examine the social, political, and philosophical assumptions that underlie the text. Assessment will
be both oral and written.
This course will meet the “b” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and the California State University Systems.
NCAA Approved
This course will meet the “b” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and the California State University Systems.
NCAA Approved
English Language Arts 32
LANGUAGE ARTS ELECTIVES
Advanced Elements of Expository
Text__________________________________________________ 1522
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-11
Basic or proficient on the CST English
Test
This course is designed to improve the reading skills of
students who test at or above grade level proficiency but
struggle with comprehension of non-fiction text, including expository, biographical and functional text.
Emphasis is on increasing students’ reading comprehension strategies, reading vocabulary, and metacognitive strategies for reading informational text
(non-fiction) with comprehension and fluency. A variety of genres and content area texts will be used to supplement the course text.
Creative Writing 1-2
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Students will implement the writing process to explore
and create effective writing. Writing is viewed as a
means of expression, a means of communication, and a
highly intellectual activity. Each participant is a writer
and an artist in a community of writers which serves as
a sounding board, editor, audience, etc. Each writer will
choose one genre on which to focus her/his primary
body of work, through a series of instructor and studentgenerated exercises, each writer will explore a variety of
other genres.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and the California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Creative Writing 3-4
NCAA Approved
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10-12
Elements of Journalism and English 1-2
with a grade of “B” or better, Advisor’s
Approval
Advanced Journalism: Editing, Design & Management is
a two-semester course, combining the high-level critical
thinking, reading and writing skills of print journalism
with the artistic, creative and aesthetic skills of the visual and graphic arts. Students master the writing and
editing of the most common forms of journalistic stories; read and analyze relevant literature through expository writing; learn and practice the basics of design and
layout; analyze and evaluate images based on a set of
given values; learn communication, management, and
evaluation skills for individuals and small teams; use of
state-of-the-art word processing and design software;
and demonstrate knowledge and understanding of ethical responsibilities and communications law. This
course will sharpen students’ thinking and expression,
widen their experience with people and communication, provide an environment for self-directed learning
and give them confidence in their ability to see their creative ideas to completion.
This course will meet the "g" entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
1451
1-2 semesters
10, 11, 12
None
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and the California State University systems.
Advanced Journalism: Editing,
Design & Management_______________ 1464
__________________
__________________
1452
1-2 semesters
11, 12
Creative Writing 1-2and/or English 5-6
(Honors)
Students refine their literary skills through in-depth
analysis of quality short stories, journalism, poetry, and
drama, as they prepare and polish manuscripts suitable
for submission for publication.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and the California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Elements of Journalism______________ 1459
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
1-2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
The course includes a study of modern newspapers, the
history of journalism in the United States, newspaper organization, analysis of news, the effects of propaganda,
and news gathering and writing. In the second semester, students focus upon a study of the physical makeup
of a newspaper and the production of a cub edition.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and the California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Elements of
Oral Communication___________________ 1511
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
This course provides skills in all aspects of speech communication that are essential in helping students prepare
for success in the world of work, higher education and
forensic competitions. Students study the fundamentals
of and participate in various, real-life situations/projects
within the following units of instruction: essential eleEnglish Language Arts 33
ments of communication; ethics in communication;
speaking and listening; one to one-interpersonal communication; group discussion; public communication;
mass communication: radio and television; argumentation and debate; interviewing; student congress/parliamentary procedure; and public speaking workshop.
Students
rehearse
their
proficiencies
by
performing/demonstrating for other classes, PTA, and
local businesses and organizations. The students' presentations are critiqued/evaluated by other students, outside
school audiences, and the teacher.
This course will meet the “g" entrance requirement for the University
of California and the California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Forensics: Argumentation/
Debate____________________________________________ 1515
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10, 11, 12
Previous Speech Communication course
This course is intended for students who are interested
in learning the basic principles of argumentation and
reasoning, including presentation skills, research skills,
critical thinking and analysis, the nature of evidence and
proofs, value debate, policy debate, and student congress. Students are expected to participate in debates and
other exercises in argumentation and reasoning. In addition, students learn to critically analyze what they
read, hear, see and write.
This course will meet the “g" entrance requirement for the University
of California and the California State University systems.
Introduction to
Scriptwriting_________________________________ 1432
Length of course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
9-10
None
Introduction to Scriptwriting 1-2 will introduce students
to writing for the stage, screen, and television. They
will learn about the historical background of the theater
and the “Golden Age” of television. Students will understand script structures and be able to adapt them to
stage, television, and the screen, utilizing correct English conventions. They will write and perform scenes
for the stage, radio, and television. They will also write
and perform a commercial. They will develop interviewing skills and apply interviewing techniques in a
broadcast forum. Students will also investigate the possible career options in the media.
Intermediate Scriptwriting_______ 1438
Length of course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
10-11
Scriptwriting 1-2
Intermediate Scriptwriting will build on skills learned in
Introduction to Scriptwriting. Students will write extended pieces for the stage, in addition to learning to
write for films. Intermediate Scriptwriting will review
the concepts and skills learned in Introduction to
Scriptwriting. Students will also analyze, learn vocabulary, and script formatting for film. Students will investigate the possible career options in the media.
Journalism: Production/
Management_________________________________ 1461
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
1-2 semesters
10, 11, 12
Journalism 1-2
Students learn about newspaper production through
publication of the school paper. The course offers instruction and practice in copy writing and editing;
proofreading; writing of features stories, editorials, and
human interest stories; critical reviews of plays, books,
and motion pictures; headline writing; page makeup;
and business management, including advertising.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and the California State University systems.
Speech Communication: Analysis
& Application________________________________ 1513
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
1 semester
Open to recommended students who
wish to participate in a workshop for
Speakers Bureau participants.
Elements of Oral Communication
This course includes in-depth instructional elements in
oral communication. This course builds upon the essential elements of oral communication by preparing
students for higher levels of analysis and discussion.
This study focuses on interpersonal and public speaking,
debate, group presentation, competitive speaking and alternative delivery styles. This course is designed to improve all aspects of students abilities to speak, read, write
and listen.
This course will meet the “g" entrance requirement for the University
of California and the California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
READING INTERVENTIONS
Fast Track 1-2
Length of course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
______________________________
1440
2 Semesters
9-12
None
Fast Track 1 is a high school reading intervention course
designed to improve the reading comprehension skills
of high school students who have high decoding skills
but who have not yet become grade-level readers. Emphasis is upon increasing students’ reading comprehension strategies, application of flexible decoding
strategies, reading vocabulary, and metacognitive strategies for reading both narrative and informational text
English Language Arts 34
with comprehension and fluency. This class is to be
taken as a single block elective.
ficiency in the English Language Arts Standards including those assessed on the CAHSEE.
Fast Track 1 SDC
Intensive Reading Clinic_____________ 1578
Length of course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
__________________________
5772
2 Semesters
10-12
IEP placement in a Special Day Class,
student must be on a diploma bound
track, and student must have completed
the Reading Development LANGUAGE!
series (I-III) or be decoding and comprehending at approximately 5th-6th grade
level.
Fast Track 1 SDC is a course designed to improve the
reading comprehension skills of high school students
enrolled in a Special Day Class who 1) are diploma
bound, 2) have completed the LANGUAGE! Reading intervention series (LANGUAGE! I, II, and III) and 3) have
not yet become grade level readers. Emphasis is upon
increasing students’ reading comprehension strategies,
application of flexible decoding strategies, reading vocabulary, and metacognitive strategies for reading both
narrative and informational text with comprehension
and fluency. The teacher of this course demonstrates
and models for students the application of comprehension strategies and the use of reasoning involved in locating specific information and applying the
information to a given task.
Fast Track 3-4
Length of course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
______________________________
1441
2 Semesters
9-12
None
Fast Track 2 is a high school reading intervention course
designed to improve the reading comprehension skills
of high school students who have high decoding skills
but who have not yet become grade-level readers. Emphasis is upon increasing students’ reading comprehension strategies, application of flexible decoding
strategies, reading vocabulary, and metacognitive strategies for reading both narrative and informational text
with comprehension and fluency. This class is to be
taken as a single block elective.
High Point I DHH
Length of course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
________________________
5770
2 Semesters
9-12
Students must be enrolled in a Special
Day Class (SDC): DHH and must be
learning to sign.
High Point I DHH is an intensive course of communicative and academic English Instruction. The course is designed for students enrolled in an SDC:DHH program.
Students may have varying levels of academic proficiency in their primary languages as measured by the
KENDL. Students enrolled in this course are at Levels 07 on the Kendall Conversational Proficiency Level (KPL)
and use sign language as the primary mode of communication. Some students who are fluent signers may still
be learning to read English. The course goals and objectives are based on the California ELD Standards:
Grades 9-12, Early Intermediate Level. The California
ELD Standards follow a linguistic pathway towards pro-
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Credits:
2 semesters
9-12
Counselor referral
Double Period/20 credits
This intensive, two-period course addresses the needs of
the most at risk adolescent students reading below a 4th
- 5th grade level who have language processing problems
which interfere with decoding the printed page and understanding what they read. Emphasis is on helping students acquire literacy by developing phonemic
awareness, symbol imagery, and concept imagery
through the use of LiPS® and Visualizing and Verbalizing® programs.
NOTE: The Long Beach Unified School District is NOT
Lindamood-Bell Learning Processes nor is it affiliated
with, certified, endorsed, licensed, monitored or sponsored by Lindamood-Bell, Nanci Bell, Phyllis Lindamood, or Pat Lindamood. Lindamood-Bell—an
international organization creating and implementing
unique instructional methods and programs for quality
intervention to advance language and literacy—in no
way endorses or monitors the services provided by the
Long Beach Unified School District.
Literacy Workshop 1-2_______________ 1595
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Credits:
2 semesters
9
None
10
Literacy Workshop 1-2, a balanced literacy program emphasizing developmental reading instruction, is designed specifically for students at the Strategic
Intervention level, who typically are without serious
learning disabilities and are reading no more than two to
three grades below their current grade level. Students enrolled in this course are typically reading between a mid
5th and end of 6th grade reading level of fiction and
nonfiction text and score at the Below Basic level on the
CST. Emphasis is upon increasing students’ reading
comprehension strategies, application of flexible decoding strategies, reading vocabulary, and metacognitive
strategies for reading both narrative and informational
text with comprehension and fluency. Areas of focus are
those critical to adolescent reading improvement: acquisition and practice of essential reading comprehension strategies; vocabulary development and reading
fluency/speed.
Literacy Workshop 3-4_______________ 1581
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Credits:
2 semesters
10-12
None
10
Literacy Workshop 3-4, a balanced literacy program emphasizing developmental reading instruction, is designed
specifically for students without serious learning disabil-
English Language Arts 35
ities who are reading two or more grades below their current grade level. Students enrolled in this course are typically reading between a mid 6th and end of 7th grade
reading level of fiction and nonfiction text and score at
the Below Basic level on the CST. Emphasis is upon increasing students’ reading comprehension strategies, application of flexible decoding strategies, reading
vocabulary, and metacognitive strategies for reading both
narrative and informational text with comprehension
and fluency. Areas of focus are those critical to adolescent reading improvement: motivation, guided and independent reading, acquisition and practice of essential
reading comprehension strategies.
LANGUAGE! I_________________________________ 1597
(Language! I SDC_________________________________ 5760)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
Double period/20 credits
9-12
Students have been diagnosed at the
intensive intervention level and working
on below grade level content standards.
Initially, high school students may be
placed into LANGUAGE! as recommended based on CST scores, possible
Gray Oral Reading (GORT) scores, one
or more of the LANGUAGE! assessments
and teacher observation. Placement
into Level 1 is determined by administration of the LANGUAGE! encoding and
decoding assessments. If the students
score within Units 1-18 on either of the
LANGUAGE! subtests, he/she is
recommended for Level 1.
LANGUAGE! I is a language arts intervention course designed for high school students who have difficulties in
phonemic awareness, single word decoding, spelling,
writing and literal comprehension, that usually reflects
insufficient phonological processing. This course uses
LANGUAGE!, a sequential, balanced literacy program emphasizing developmental reading instruction. Its emphasis is on building the foundations of phonemic
awareness, vocabulary development, comprehension,
text reading, and word recognition and writing, while
reading texts with readability levels of Primer-3.5. This
course offers the flexibility of placement into an alternate
course at the semester, based upon individual achievement of the student. Students who qualify in units 1-18
of Level 1 will begin the course of study at Level 1.
LANGUAGE! II________________________________ 1585
(Language! II SDC__________________________________ 5768)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
Double period/20 credits
9-11
Students have been diagnosed at the
intensive intervention level and working
on below grade level content standards.
Initially, high school students may be
placed into LANGUAGE! as recommended based on CST scores, possible
Gray Oral Reading (GORT) scores, one
or more of the LANGUAGE! assessments
and teacher observation. Placement
into Level 2 is determined by administration of the LANGUAGE! encoding and
decoding assessments. If the students
score within Units 19-36 on either of
the LANGUAGE! subtests, he/she is
recommended for Level 2.
LANGUAGE! II is a language arts course designed for students who have insufficient phonological processing
and need linguistic support in phonology, morphology,
semantics, and syntax. Encoding and decoding concepts are still an important component, but at this level,
students expand and build literal and interpretive comprehension strategies along with composing and analyzing written language. This course uses LANGUAGE!,
a sequential, balanced literacy program emphasizing developmental reading instruction. Its emphasis is on
word study, spelling, vocabulary development, comprehension, and writing, while reading texts with readability level of 3.3-6. This course offers the flexibility of
placement into an alternate course at the semester, based
upon individual achievement of the student. Students
who qualify in units 19-36 of Level 2 will begin the
course of study at Level 2.
LANGUAGE! II AB__________________________ 1584
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
Single period/10 credits
9-11
Students have been diagnosed at the
intensive intervention level and working
on below grade level content standards.
Initially, high school students may be
placed into II AB as recommended
based on CST scores, possible Gray Oral
Reading (GORT), and one or more of
the LANGUAGE! assessments as well as
teacher observation. Placement into
LANGUAGE! II AB is determined by
administration of the LANGUAGE! encoding/decoding assessments. If the
student scores within Units 13-24 on
any of the LANGUAGE! subtests, he/she
is recommended for LANGUAGE! II AB
(Books C and D)
LANGUAGE! II AB is a language arts course designed for
high school students who have difficulties in phonemic
awareness, decoding, spelling, writing and literal comprehension, which usually reflects insufficient phonological processing. During this course, students master
consonant blends, and begin working with syllabication
and morphological principals as well as interpretive comprehension strategies. This course uses LANGUAGE!, a
sequential, balanced literacy program emphasizing developmental reading instruction. Its emphasis is building the foundations of phonemic awareness, vocabulary
development, comprehension, text reading, word recognition, and writing while reading texts with readability
levels of 2.6 to 4.5. This course offers the flexibility of
placement into an alternate course at the semester, based
upon individual achievement of the student. Students
who qualify in units 13-24 will begin the course of study
at Level 1, Book C, Unit 13.
English Language Arts 36
LANGUAGE! II CD__________________________ 1676
LANGUAGE! III AB SDC _________________ 5118
Length of Course:
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
Single period/10 credits
9-11
Students have been diagnosed at the
intensive intervention level and working
on below grade level content standards.
Initially, high school students may be
placed into LANGUAGE! II CD as recommended based on CST scores, possible
Gray Oral Reading (GORT), and one or
more of the LANGUAGE! assessments as
well as teacher observation. Placement
into LANGUAGE! II CD is determined by
administration of the LANGUAGE! encoding/decoding assessments. If the
student scores within Units 25-36 on
any of the LANGUAGE! subtests, he/she
is recommended for LANGUAGE! II CD
(Books E, Unit 25)
LANGUAGE! II CD is a language arts course designed for
high school students who have the foundations of reading in place and are decoding and spelling multi-syllabic
words, expanding and building literal and interpretive
comprehension strategies and using various writing
strategies to develop cohesive compositions. This course
uses LANGUAGE!, a sequential, balanced literacy program
emphasizing developmental reading instruction. Its emphasis is on expanding vocabulary development, spelling,
comprehension, fluent text reading, word recognition,
and writing while reading texts with readability levels of
4.6-6.0. This course offers the flexibility of placement
into an alternate course at the semester, based upon individual achievement of the student. Students who qualify in units 25-26 of LANGUAGE! II CD will begin the
course of study at Level II, Book E, Unit 25.
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
LANGUAGE! III AB is a language arts course designed for
students in special day classes who have intermediate
reading and writing skills but who are learning to apply
higher order comprehension strategies (i.e., interpretive,
analytical) to text, expand creativity and depth to wellwritten, cohesive compositions and who are learning to
apply advanced spelling rules. This course uses LANGUAGE!, a sequential balanced literacy program emphasizing developmental reading instruction. Its emphasis is
on developing advanced comprehension skills and compositions, while reading texts with readability levels of
6.0-9.0, as measured by the Degrees of Reading Power
(DRP). This course offers the flexibility of placement into
an alternate LANGUAGE! course at the quarter or semester, based on individual performance of the student.
LANGUAGE! III CD SDC _________________ 5119
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
LANGUAGE! III SDC ________________________ 5763
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
Double Period/20 Credits
9-11
Students have been diagnosed at the
intensive intervention level. Students
have completed LANGUAGE! I and/or
LANGUAGE! II. Placement into
LANGUAGE! III is determined by administration of the LANGUAGE! encoding/
decoding assessments. If the student
scores within Units 37-54 on any of the
LANGUAGE! subtests, he/she is
recommended for LANGUAGE! III
LANGUAGE! III is a language arts course designed for students in special day classes who have intermediate reading and writing skills but who are learning to apply
higher order comprehension strategies (i.e., interpretive,
analytical) to text, expand creativity and depth to wellwritten, cohesive compositions and who are learning to
apply advanced spelling rules. This course uses LANGUAGE!, a sequential balanced literacy program emphasizing developmental reading instruction. Its emphasis is
on developing advanced comprehension skills and compositions, while reading texts with readability levels of
6.0-9.0, as measured by the Degrees of Reading Power
(DRP). This course offers the flexibility of placement into
an alternate LANGUAGE! course at the quarter or semester, based on individual performance of the students.
2 semesters
Single Period/10 Credits
9-10
Students have been diagnosed at the
intensive intervention level. Students
have completed LANGUAGE! I and/or
LANGUAGE! II. Placement into
LANGUAGE! III AB is determined by
administration of the LANGUAGE!
encoding/decoding/grammar assessments. If the student scores within Units
37-45 on any of the LANGUAGE!
subtests, he/she is recommended for
LANGUAGE! III AB
2 semesters
Single Period/10 Credits
9-10
Students have been diagnosed at the
intensive intervention level. Students
have completed LANGUAGE! III CD and/
or LANGUAGE! II. Placement is determined by administration of the
LANGUAGE! encoding/decoding/
grammar assessments. If the student
scores within Units 46-54 on any of the
LANGUAGE! subtests, he/she is recommended for LANGUAGE! III CD
LANGUAGE! III CD is a language arts course designed for
students in special day classes who have intermediate
reading and writing skills but who are learning to apply
higher order comprehension strategies (i.e., interpretive,
analytical) to text, expand creativity and depth to wellwritten, cohesive compositions and who are learning to
apply advanced spelling rules. This course uses LANGUAGE!, a sequential balanced literacy program emphasizing developmental reading instruction. Its emphasis is
on developing advanced comprehension skills and composition, while reading texts with readability levels of
6.0-9.0, as measured by the Degrees of Reading Power
(DRP). This course offers the flexibility of placement into
an alternate LANGUAGE! course at the quarter or semester, based on individual performance of the student.
English Language Arts 37
Reader’s Theater
Length of course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
__________________________
1422
2 Semesters
9
None
Reading Development-Readers’ Theater, a balanced literacy program emphasizing developmental reading instruction through performance-based activities is
designed specifically for students without serious learning disabilities who are reading two or more grades
below their current grade level. Students enrolled in
this course are typically reading between a 4th and end
of 6th grade reading level of fiction and nonfiction text
and score at the Below Basic level on the CST. Emphasis is upon increasing students’ reading comprehension
strategies, reading vocabulary, increasing fluency, creative expression, improving both listening and speaking skills, and metacognitive strategies for reading both
narrative and expository text with comprehension and
fluency. Students also learn essential elements of literature such as character, plot, setting, and structure while
practicing social and collaborative skills. Increased attendance, motivation, and achievement through the
integration of the arts and academics is also anticipated. The U.S. Department of Education publication
"Put Reading First" states: "Readers’ Theatre provides
readers with a legitimate reason to reread text and to
practice fluency". It also improves sight-word vocabulary, reading comprehension, provides opportunities to
interpret dialogue and communicate meaning, increases awareness and appreciation of plays as a form of
literature (Carrick, 2000). Readers Theater helps develop appreciation for literature and drama and motivates students to read and write.
English Language Arts 38
Course Descriptions
English Language
Development
COURSE
CODE
English Language Develop. English I
1701
English Language Develop. English II
1703
English Language Develop. English III
1705
English Language Develop. English IV
1719
English Language Develop, Reading I
1602
English Language Develop, Reading II
1604
English Language develop, Reading III
1617
•
Course offered
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
AHS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CHS
CAMS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
JHS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
LHS
Avalon High School
Cabrillo High School
California Academy of Math & Science
David Starr Jordan High School
Lakewood High School
English Language Development 39
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
MHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
PHS
RHSA
RHS
Robert A. Millikan High School
Polytechnic High School
Renaissance High School for the Arts
Will J. Reid High School
Woodrow Wilson Classical High School
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
WHS
These courses are designed for limited English proficient
high school students who enter the district with:
• no English proficiency but a substantial academic
education in their home country
• no English proficiency and no/little academic
education in their home country
• some English proficiency and substantial
academic education in their home country
• moderate English proficiency but no/little
academic education in their home country
English Language Development
English I__________________________________________ 1701
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-12
Designated as English Language Learner
(ELL) and diagnosed as having
Beginning proficiency in listening,
speaking, reading and writing English.
This course is designed for students who display oral
English fluency at the Beginning level and no/little literacy skills in English. The course is guided by the Beginning and Early Intermediate proficiency benchmarks
in the CA ELD Standards. Reading and writing activities
are based on comprehensible oral communication about
contextualized, functional and academic course content
which includes higher-level thinking skills. Reading and
writing focus on linguistically appropriate developmental aspects of grammatical/ spelling/pronunciation accuracy.
English Language Development
English II__________________________________________ 1703
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-12
Designated as an English Language
Learner (ELL) and has either: (1) passed
ELD I and /or (2) been diagnosed as
having Early Intermediate proficiency in
listening/ speaking, reading and writing
in English.
This course is designed for students who display English
fluency at the Early Intermediate level in
listening/speaking, reading and writing. The course is
guided by the Intermediate proficiency benchmarks in
the CA ELD Standards. Intensive oral, reading and writing activities are based on comprehensible, contextualized, familiar and unfamiliar academic course content.
Reading and writing focus on accelerating progress in
linguistically appropriate development aspects of grammatical/spelling/ pronunciation accuracy.
English Language Development
English III ______________________________________ 1705
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-12
Designated as an English Language
Learner (ELL) and has either:
(1) passed ELD II and/or (2) been
diagnosed as having Intermediate
proficiency in listening/speaking, reading
and writing in English.
This course is designed for students who display English
fluency at the Intermediate level in listening/speaking,
reading and writing. The course is guided by the Early
Advanced proficiency benchmarks in the CA ELD Standards. Intensive oral, reading and writing activities
focus on accelerating progress in linguistically appropriate developmental aspects of grammatical/spelling/pronunciation accuracy.
English Language Development
English IV________________________________________ 1719
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-12
Designated as an English Language
Learner (ELL) and has either (1) passed
high school ELD III and/or (2) been
diagnosed as having Early Advanced
English proficiency in listening/speaking,
reading and writing.
Students increasingly pursue a balanced integrated program of literature and language study. The course is
guided by the Advanced CA ELD Standards and the 9th
grade ELA Standards. In literature, which includes the
novel, short story, poetry, drama and non-fiction, students use essential strategies and skills to construct
meaning and respond thoughtfully as they learn about
themselves and others through their reading. Many
writing activities are extensions of experiences developed through reading literary works and make use of
writing process activities in a variety of domains including expository, reflective essay and persuasive essay. Students also receive intensive instruction in the
conventions of written language, effective oral communication, and grammar.
This course will meet the “b” or “g” entrance requirement for the
University of California and the California State University systems.
English Language Development 40
English Language Development
Reading I_________________________________________1602
English Language Development
Reading III______________________________________1617
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-12
Designated as an English Language
Learner (ELL) and diagnosed as having
Beginning proficiency in listening,
speaking, reading and writing in English.
The ELD Reading I class is designed for high school English Language Learners (ELLs) who are at the Beginning
level of English proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing. These students are concurrently enrolled in an ELD English I. This course is guided by the
Early Intermediate CA ELD Reading Standards and includes exposure to a wide variety of genre linguistically
accessible to ELLs at this level. The emphasis is on improving English literacy skills and expanding students’
oral and reading command of English phonemic awareness, vocabulary and sentence structure.
The ELD Reading III class is designed for high school
English Language Learners (ELLs) who are at the Intermediate level of English proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing. These students are
concurrently enrolled in an ELD English III class. This
course is guided by the Early Advanced CA ELD Reading Standards and includes exposure to a wide variety
of genre linguistically accessible to ELLs at this level.
The emphasis is on improving academic literacy skills
to prepare students for success in grade-level courses.
English Language Development
Reading II_______________________________________1604
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-12
Designated as an English Language
Learner (ELL) and diagnosed as having
Intermediate proficiency in
listening, speaking, reading and
writing in English.
2 semesters
9-12
Designated as an English Language
Learner (ELL) and diagnosed as having
Early Intermediate proficiency in
listening, speaking, reading and
writing in English.
The ELD Reading II class is designed for high school English Language Learners (ELLs) who are at the Early Intermediate level of English proficiency in listening,
speaking, reading and writing. These students are concurrently enrolled in an ELD English II. This course is
guided by the Intermediate CA ELD Reading Standards
and includes exposure to a wide variety of genre linguistically accessible to ELLs at this level. The emphasis
is on improving English literacy skills and expanding
students’ oral and reading command of English phonemic awareness, vocabulary and sentence structure.
English Language Development 41
42
Course Descriptions
Foreign
Language
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
CODE
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
American Sign Language 1-2
1937
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
American Sign Language 3-4
1938
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Sign
Language
5-6
1939
American
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CHINESE
CODE
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
1
1768
Chinese
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Chinese 2
1769
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Chinese
1-2
1750
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Chinese 3-4
1751
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Chinese
5-6
1752
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Chinese 7-8
1753
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Chinese
Language
and
Culture
(AP)
1754
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
FRENCH
CODE
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
French 1-2
1801
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
French 3-4
1803
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
French 5-6
1805
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
French 7-8
1807
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
French Language AP
1809
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
GERMAN
CODE
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
German 1-2
1811
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
German 3-4
1813
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
German 5-6
1815
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
German 7-8
1817
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
German Language AP
1819
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
ITALIAN
CODE
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Italian 1-2
1890
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Italian 3-4
1892
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Italian 5-6
1894
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Italian 7-8
1896
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
JAPANESE
CODE
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Japanese 1
1767
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Japanese 2
1755
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Japanese 1-2
1760
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Japanese 3-4
1761
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Japanese 5-6
1762
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Japanese 5-6 Honors
1764
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Japanese 7-8
1763
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Japanese Language and Culture (AP)
1765
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Foreign Language 43
CODE
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
KHMER
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
1886
Khmer for Khmer Speakers 1-2
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
1887
Khmer for Khmer Speakers 3-4
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
1888
Khmer for Khmer Speakers 5-6
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
1889
Khmer for Khmer Speakers 7-8
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
SPANISH
CODE
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
1-2
1831
Spanish
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Spanish 3-4
1832
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Spanish
5-6
1833
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
1845
Spanish 5-6 Honors
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
IB
SL
1820
Spanish
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Spanish 7-8
•
•
•
1834
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
IB
HL
2
1822
Spanish
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Spanish Language AP
1847
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Literature
AP
1848
Spanish
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
1838
Spanish for Spanish Speakers 1-2
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
for
Spanish
Speakers
3-4
1839
Spanish
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Spanish for Spanish Speakers 5-6
1840
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
•
Course offered
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
Avalon High School
Cabrillo High School
California Academy of Math & Science
David Starr Jordan High School
Lakewood High School
Foreign Language 44
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
Robert A. Millikan High School
Polytechnic High School
Renaissance High School for the Arts
Will J. Reid High School
Woodrow Wilson Classical High School
All foreign languages that are offered for at
least two semesters will satisfy the graduation requirement for foreign language.
American Sign Language 1-2
___
1937
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Teacher’s approval
American Sign Language (ASL) 1-2 is an intensive introduction to ASL emphasizing communicative-based listening, speaking, reading, and writing in ASL. The
emphasis is on the rudiments of the receptive and productive skills of ASL and awareness of Deaf culture, famous people who are Deaf, and hearing loss. The course
goals and objectives are based on the Stage I of the World
Language Content Standards for California Public Schools
(2009). A minimum of two years of “a – g” approved foreign language credit in the same language is required for
admission to most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State
University systems. Not all private or out-or-state colleges/universities
will accept ASL as meeting the foreign language requirement.
NCAA Approved
American Sign Language 3-4___ 1938
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
American Sign Language 1-2
American Sign Language (ASL) 3-4 reinforces, expands
and refines the rudimentary receptive and productive
skills of ASL and awareness of Deaf culture and hearing
loss learned in ASL 1-2. The course goals and objectives
are based on Stages I and II of the World Language Content Standards for California Public Schools (2009). A minimum of two years of “a – g” approved foreign language
credit in the same language is required for admission to
most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will met the “e” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State
University systems. Not all private or out-of-state colleges/universities
will accept ASL as meeting the foreign language requirement.
NCAA Approved
American Sign Language 5-6___ 1939
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 10-12
Prerequisite:
A grade of “C” or better in American Sign
Language 3-4
American Sign Language (ASL) 5-6 reinforces, expands
and refines the receptive and productive skills of ASL,
awareness of Deaf culture, and hearing loss learned in
ASL 3-4. Also, students begin to develop skills in interpreting. The course goals and objectives are based on
Stages II and III of the World Language Content Standards
for California Public Schools (2009). A minimum of two
years of “a – g” approved foreign language credit in the
same language is required for admission to most fouryear colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will met the “e” or
“g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems. Not all private or out-of-state colleges/universities will accept ASL as meeting the foreign language
requirement.
Chinese 1________________________________________ 1768
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
None
Chinese 1 is the first year of an expanded, interactive introduction to Mandarin Chinese emphasizing fundamental communicative-based listening, speaking,
reading and writing, and the rudiments of the Chinese
speaking cultures. By the end of the second semester,
students will begin to develop accurate pronunciation
of most Chinese phonemes, communicate in predictable
daily interactions, and ask and answer simple questions
on an ever-growing variety of life topics. They will learn
to read pinyin, the most commonly used Romanization
system for Standard Mandarin. They will also be able to
read 75 Chinese characters and write 50 of them using
proper stroke order in short sentences. Students will also
broaden their understanding of the historical and cultural aspects of the Chinese-speaking cultures through
research, presentations, guest speakers, and various cultural opportunities. They will also be introduced to the
numerous careers in which people knowing Chinese are
highly sought after.
Chinese 2________________________________________ 1769
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Chinese 1
Chinese 2 is the second year of an expanded, interactive
introduction to Mandarin Chinese emphasizing fundamental communicative-based listening, speaking, reading, writing and the rudiments of Chinese speaking
cultures. By the end of the second semester, students
will develop accurate pronunciation, communicate in
predictable daily interactions, and ask and answer simple questions on an ever-growing variety of daily topics.
They will be able to read at least 150 Chinese characters
and write 80% of the characters using proper stroke
order in short sentences. Students will also broaden
their understanding of the historical and cultural aspects
of the Chinese-speaking cultures through research, presentations, guest speakers, and various cultural opportunities. They will also research careers in which people
knowing Chinese are highly sought after.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State
University systems.
Foreign Language 45
Chinese 1-2____________________________________ 1750
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
None
Chinese 1-2 is a comprehensive introduction to Mandarin Chinese emphasizing fundamental communicative-based competencies, grammar, orthography, and
Chinese-language cultures. Students will actively learn
to understand, speak, read and write simple questions
and sentences on a variety of familiar topics in Chinese
by the end of the second semester. The course goals and
objectives are based on Stage I of the World Language
Content Standards for California Public Schools (2009). A
minimum of two years of “a – g” approved foreign language credit in the same language is required for admission to most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State
University systems.
NCAA Approved
Chinese 3-4___________________________________ 1751
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Chinese 1-2 with a “C ”or better
Chinese 3-4 continues and expands on the communicative-based competencies, grammar, orthography, and
Chinese-language cultures learned in Chinese 1-2. Students will actively learn to understand, speak and write
in extended discourse on familiar topics in Mandarin
Chinese using an increasing variety of grammatical
structures. They will also read simple texts written in
Chinese. The course goals and objectives are based on
Stages I and II of the World Language Content Standards for
California Public Schools (2009). A minimum of two years
of “a – g” approved foreign language credit in the same
language is required for admission to most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State
University systems.
NCAA Approved
Chinese 5-6____________________________________ 1752
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Chinese 3-4 with a “C ”or better
Chinese 5-6 continues to expand and refine students’
communicative-based listening, speaking, reading, writing competencies from Chinese 1-2 and 3-4. Students
will use increasingly complex grammar and orthography
with improving accuracy and read a variety of authentic
texts in Mandarin Chinese. Students will also deepen
their understanding of the history, literature and arts of
Chinese-language cultures. The course goals and objectives are based on Stages II and III of the World Language
Content Standards for California Public Schools (2009). A
minimum of two years of “a – g” approved foreign language credit in the same language is required for admission to most four-year colleges.
This course Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the
“e” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and
California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Chinese 7-8___________________________________ 1753
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Chinese 5-6 with a “C ”or better
Chinese 7-8 continues to expand and refine students’
communicative-based listening, speaking, reading, and
writing competencies from Chinese 1-2, 3-4, and 5-6.
Students will use increasingly complex grammar with
improving accuracy and read a variety of authentic texts.
Students will also deepen their understanding of the history, literature and arts of Chinese-language cultures.
The course goals and objectives are based on Stage III
and parts of Stage IV of the World Language Content Standards for California Public Schools (2009). A minimum of
two years of “a – g” approved foreign language credit in
the same language is required for admission to most
four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” or
“g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Chinese Language/
Culture (AP)__________________________________ 1754
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 11-12
Prerequisite:
Grade of ‘A’ in Chinese 5-6 or heritage
background per placement test
The AP Chinese Language and Culture course is designed to be comparable to fourth semester (or the
equivalent) college courses in Mandarin Chinese. The
AP course interweaves language and contemporary culture learning with ample exposure to authentic materials of the target language. It prepares students to
demonstrate advanced levels of Chinese proficiency
across the three communicative modes (interpersonal,
interpretive, and presentational) and the five goal areas
(communication, cultures, connections, comparisons,
and communities) as outlined in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century. Its aim is to
provide students with ongoing and varied opportunities
to further develop their proficiencies across the full
range of language skills within a cultural frame of reference reflective of the richness of Chinese Language and
culture.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” or
“g” entranced requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
Foreign Language 46
French 1-2_____________________________________ 1801
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
None
French 1-2 is a comprehensive introduction to French
emphasizing fundamental communicative-based competencies, grammar, and French-language cultures. Students will actively learn to understand, speak, read and
write simple questions and sentences on a variety of familiar topics in French by the end of the second semester. The course goals and objectives are based on Stage I
of the World Language Content Standards for California
Public Schools (2009). A minimum of two years of “a – g”
approved foreign language credit in the same language
is required for admission to most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State
University systems.
NCAA Approved
French 3-4_____________________________________ 1803
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
French 1-2 with a “C” or better
French 3-4 continues and expands on the communicative-based competencies, grammar, and French-language
cultures learned in French 1-2. Students will actively
learn to understand, speak, and write in extended discourse on familiar topics using an increasing variety of
grammatical structures. They will also read simple texts
written in French. The course goals and objectives are
based on Stages I and II of the World Language Content
Standards for California Public Schools (2009). A minimum of two years of “a – g” approved foreign language
credit in the same language is required for admission to
most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State
University systems.
NCAA Approved
French 5-6_____________________________________ 1805
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
French 3-4 with a “C” or better
French 5-6 continues to expand and refine students’
communicative-based listening, speaking, reading, writing competencies from French 1-2 and 3-4. Students
will use increasingly complex grammar with improving
accuracy and read a variety of authentic texts. Students
will also deepen their understanding of the history, literature and arts of French-language cultures. The course
goals and objectives are based on Stages II and III of the
World Language Content Standards for California Public
Schools (2009). Students who perform exceptionally well
in this course may be recommended for Advanced Placement French Language class. A minimum of two years
of “a – g” approved foreign language credit in the same
language is required for admission to most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” or
“g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
French 7-8_____________________________________ 1807
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
French 5-6 with a “C” or better
French 7-8 continues to expand and refine students’
communicative-based listening, speaking, reading, writing competencies from French 1-2, 3-4, and 5-6. Entering students need extended time to be proficient enough
to succeed in the Advanced Placement French Language
class. Students will use increasingly complex grammar
with improving accuracy and read a variety of authentic
texts. Students will also deepen their understanding of
the history, literature and arts of French-language cultures. The course goals and objectives are based on Stage
III and some of Stage IV of the World Language Content
Standards for California Public Schools (2009). Students
who perform well in this course may be recommended
for Advanced Placement French Language. A minimum
of two years of “a – g” approved foreign language credit
in the same language is required for admission to most
four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” or
“g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
French Language AP___________________ 1809
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 11-12
Prerequisite:
French 5-6 or 7-8 with a “C” or better
AP French Language is an advanced curriculum which
provides students with a learning experience equivalent
to that of a third-year college course in French. The
course provides frequent opportunities for students to
integrate the listening, speaking, reading and writing
through the use of authentic materials representing a variety of types of discourse, topics and registers. Extensive
training in the organization and writing of compositions
is an integral component. Teachers and students use
French almost exclusively. The course goals and objectives are based on Stage IV of the World Language Content
Standards for California Public Schools (2009). A minimum of two years of “a – g” approved foreign language
credit in the same language is required for admission to
most four-year colleges.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” or
“g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Foreign Language 47
German 1-2___________________________________ 1811
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Recommended Prerequisite: None
German 1-2 is a comprehensive introduction to German
emphasizing fundamental communicative-based competencies, grammar, and German-language cultures.
Students will actively learn to understand, speak, read
and write simple questions and sentences on a variety
of familiar topics in German by the end of the second semester. The course goals and objectives are based on
Stage I of the World Language Content Standards for California Public Schools (2009). A minimum of two years of
“a – g” approved foreign language credit in the same language is required for admission to most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State
University systems.
NCAA Approved
German 3-4___________________________________ 1813
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
German 1-2 with a “C” or better
German 3-4 continues and expands on the communicative-based competencies, grammar, and Germanlanguage cultures learned in German 1-2. Students will
actively learn to understand, speak, and write in extended discourse on familiar topics using an increasing
variety of grammatical structures. They will also read
simple texts written in German. The course goals and
objectives are based on Stages I and II of the World Language Content Standards for California Public Schools
(2009). A minimum of two years of “a – g” approved foreign language credit in the same language is required for
admission to most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State
University systems.
NCAA Approved
German 5-6___________________________________ 1815
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
German 3-4 with a “C” or better
German 5-6 continues to expand and refine students’
communicative-based listening, speaking, reading, writing competencies from German 1-2 and 3-4. Students
will use increasingly complex grammar with improving
accuracy and read a variety of authentic texts. Students
will also deepen their understanding of the history, literature and arts of German-language cultures. The
course goals and objectives are based on Stages II and III
of the World Language Content Standards for California
Public Schools (2009). Students who perform exceptionally well in this course may be recommended for Ad-
vanced Placement German Language class. A minimum
of two years of “a – g” approved foreign language credit
in the same language is required for admission to most
four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” or
"g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
German 7-8___________________________________ 1817
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
German 5-6 with a “C” or better
German 7-8 continues to expand and refine students’
communicative-based listening, speaking, reading, writing competencies from German 1-2, 3-4, and 5-6. Entering students need extended time to be proficient
enough to succeed in the Advanced Placement German
Language class. Students will use increasingly complex
grammar with improving accuracy and read a variety of
authentic texts. Students will also deepen their understanding of the history, literature and arts of Germanlanguage cultures. The course goals and objectives are
based on Stage III and some of Stage IV of the World Language Content Standards for California Public Schools
(2009). Students who perform well in this course may be
recommended for Advanced Placement German Language class. A minimum of two years of “a – g” approved foreign language credit in the same language is
required for admission to most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” or
“g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
German Language (AP)______________ 1819
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 10-12
Prerequisite:
German 5-6 or 7-8 with a “C” or better
AP German Language is an advanced curriculum which
provides students with a learning experience equivalent
to that of a third-year college course in German. The
course provides frequent opportunities for students to
integrate the listening, speaking, reading and writing
through the use of authentic materials representing a variety of types of discourse, topics, and registers. Extensive training in the organization and writing of
compositions is an integral component. Teachers and
students use German almost exclusively. The course
goals and objectives are based on Stage IV of the World
Language Content Standards for California Public Schools
(2009). A minimum of two years of “a – g” approved foreign language credit in the same language is required for
admission to most four-year colleges.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” or
“g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Foreign Language 48
Italian 1-2_______________________________________1890
fornia State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
None
Italian 1-2 is a comprehensive introduction to Italian
emphasizing fundamental communicative-based competencies, grammar, and Italian-language culture. Students will actively learn to understand, speak, read and
write simple questions and sentences on a variety of familiar topics in Italian by the end of the second semester. The course goals and objectives are based on Stage I
of the World Language Content Standards for California
Public Schools (2009). A minimum of two years of “a – g”
approved foreign language credit in the same language
is required for admission to most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the "e" entrance requirement for the University of California and the California
State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Italian 3-4_______________________________________1892
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Italian 1-2 with a “C” or better
Italian 3-4 continues and expands on the communicative-based competencies, grammar, and Italian -language
culture learned in Italian 1-2. Students will actively
learn to understand, speak, and write in extended discourse on familiar topics using an increasing variety of
grammatical structures. They will also read simple texts
written in Italian. The course goals and objectives are
based on Stages I and II of the World Language Content
Standards for California Public Schools (2009). A minimum of two years of “a – g” approved foreign language
credit in the same language is required for admission to
most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the "e" entrance requirement for the University of California and the California
State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Italian 5-6_______________________________________1894
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Italian 3-4 with a “C” or better
Italian 5-6 continues to expand and refine students’
communicative-based listening, speaking, reading, writing competencies from Italian 1-2 and 3-4. Students will
use increasingly complex grammar with improving accuracy and read a variety of authentic texts. Students
will also deepen their understanding of the history, literature and arts of Italian -language culture. The course
goals and objectives are based on Stages II and III of the
World Language Content Standards for California Public
Schools (2009). A minimum of two years of “a – g” approved foreign language credit in the same language is
required for admission to most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the "e" or
"g" entrance requirement for the University of California and the Cali-
Italian 7-8_______________________________________1896
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9-12
Prerequisite:
A grade of “C” or better in Italian 5 – 6
Italian 7-8 is an intensive course emphasizing a rigorous
application and expansion of vocabulary acquisition,
fluency, aural and written comprehension, sophistication of expression, and understanding of deepening aspects of the cultures of the Italian-speaking world.
Students will augment their ability to perform all the
functions developed in the Italian 5-6 with increasing
accuracy using increasingly complex text and contexts.
The course goals and objectives are based on Stage III
and parts of Stage IV of the World Language Content Standards for California Public Schools (2009). A minimum of
two years of “a – g” approved foreign language credit in
the same language is required for admission to most
four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the "e" or
"g" entrance requirement for the University of California and the California State University systems.
Japanese 1______________________________________ 1767
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
None
Japanese 1 is the first year of an expanded, interactive
introduction to Japanese emphasizing fundamental
communicative-based listening, speaking, reading, writing, and the rudiments of the Japansese-speaking cultures. By the end of the second semester, students will
actively learn accurate pronunciation, communicate in
predictable daily interactions, and begin to ask and answer simple questions on a variety of daily life topics.
They will understand the purpose of the three writing
systems of Japanese and be able to read, pronounce, and
begin to write hiragana using proper stroke order. In addition, they will be exposed to selected kanji which are
commonly used in everyday life, especially the classroom. Students will also begin to understand the key
historical and cultural aspects of the Japanese culture
through research, presentation and various cultural opportunities. Finally, students will be introduced to the
numerous careers in which people knowing Japanese are
highly sought after.
Japanese 2______________________________________ 1755
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Japanese 1 with a “C” or higher
Japanese 2 is the second year of an expanded, highly interactive introduction to Japanese, empasizing fundamental communicative-based listening, speaking, reading
and writing on an ever growing variety of daily life topics. Students will also begin their understanding of the
historical and cultural aspects of the Japanese-speaking
Foreign Language 49
culture through research, presentations, guest speakers,
and various cultural opportunities. In addition, they will
also be introduced to the numerous careers in which people knowing Japanese are highly sought after.
Japanese 1-2_________________________________ 1760
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
None
Japanese 1-2 is a comprehensive introduction to Japanese emphasizing fundamental communicative-based
competencies, grammar, orthography, and Japanese-language culture. Students will actively learn to understand, speak, read and write simple questions and
sentences on a variety of familiar topics in Japanese by
the end of the second semester. The course goals and objectives are based on Stage I of the World Language Content Standards for California Public Schools (2009). A
minimum of two years of “a – g” approved foreign language credit in the same language is required for admission to most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State
University systems.
NCAA Approved
Japanese 3-4_________________________________ 1761
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Japanese 1-2 with a “C” or better
Japanese 3-4 continues and expands on the communicative-based competencies, grammar, and Japanese language culture learned in Japanese 1-2. Students will
actively learn to understand, speak, and write in extended discourse on familiar topics using an increasing
variety of grammatical structures. They will also read
simple texts written in Japanese. The course goals and
objectives are based on Stages I and II of the World Language Content Standards for California Public Schools
(2009). A minimum of two years of “a – g” approved foreign language credit in the same language is required for
admission to most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State
University systems.
NCAA Approved
Japanese 5-6_________________________________ 1762
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Japanese 3-4 with a “C” or better
Japanese 5-6 continues to expand and refine students’
communicative-based listening, speaking, reading, writing competencies from Japanese 1-2 and 3-4. Students
will use increasingly complex grammar with improving
accuracy and read a variety of authentic texts. Students
will also deepen their understanding of the history, literature and arts of Japanese -language culture. The
course goals and objectives are based on Stages II and III
of the World Language Content Standards for California
Public Schools (2009). A minimum of two years of “a – g”
approved foreign language credit in the same language
is required for admission to most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” or
“g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Japanese 5-6 (Honors)________________ 1764
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9-12
Prerequisite:
A grade of ‘A’ in Japanese 3 – 4 and
teacher recommendation
Japanese 5-6 Honors is an accelerated course which uses
a college-level text and is conducted almost exclusively
in Japanese. The course provides students with in-depth
critical thinking, readings from a variety of authentic
text, frequent writing experiences (many timed), a rigorous pace, and a comprehensive final examination.
Students will also use increasingly complex grammar
with improving accuracy and deepen their understanding of the history, literature, and life-styles of Japaneselanguage culture. The course goals and objectives are
founded on Stages III and IV of the World Language Content Standards for California Public Schools (2009), the
ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines (for Interpersonal, Interpretive, and Presentational communication), and the competencies targeted in the College Board course
description for AP Japanese and Culture. Several assignments are evaluated using the AP Japanese Language and
Culture 2007 Scoring Guidelines from College Board.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” or
“g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Japanese 7-8_________________________________ 1763
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Japanese 5-6 or teacher’s approval
Japanese 7-8 continues to expand and refine students’
communicative-based listening, speaking, reading, writing competencies from Japanese 1-2, 3-4, and 5-6. Students will use increasingly complex grammar with
improving accuracy and read a variety of authentic texts.
Students will also deepen their understanding of the history, literature and arts of Japanese-language culture.
The course goals and objectives are based on Stage III
and some of Stage IV of the World Language Content Standards for California Public Schools (2009). A minimum of
two years of “a – g” approved foreign language credit in
the same language is required for admission to most
four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” or
“g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Foreign Language 50
Japanese Language/Culture
(AP)_________________________________________________ 1765
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9-12
Prerequisite:
A grade of ‘A’ in Japanese 3 – 4 and
teacher recommendation
AP Japanese Language and Culture supports students as
they develop the productive, receptive, and cultural
skills necessary to communicate with native speakers of
Japanese. Students will develop the productive, receptive, and cultural skills necessary to communicate with
native speakers of Japanese. They will develop an expanded ability to communicate in a culturally appropriate manner and in an increasingly widening context as
well as develop an understanding of the Japanese culture including understanding traditional Japanese arts,
customs, festivals, geography, and history at a deep and
rich level. This course is designed to be comparable to
college/university courses that represent the point at
which students complete approximately 300 hours of
college level classroom instruction.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” or
“g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Khmer for Khmer Speakers 1-2__1886
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Native speaker of Khmer
ifornia Public Schools (2009). A minimum of two years of
“a – g” approved foreign language credit in the same language is required for admission to most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State
University systems.
NCAA Approved
Khmer for Khmer Speakers 5-6_ 1888
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Khmer for Khmer Speakers 3-4
with a “C” or better
Khmer for Khmer Speakers 5-6 is an intensive course for
students with conversational fluency and advanced academic skills in Khmer. Students study increasingly difficult academic Khmer listening, speaking, reading,
writing, and literature of the Khmer-speaking culture.
The course goals and objectives are based on Stage IV of
the World Language Content Standards for California Public Schools (2009). A minimum of two years of “a – g”
approved foreign language credit in the same language
is required for admission to most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” or
“g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Khmer for Khmer Speakers 7-8_ 1889
Khmer for Khmer Speakers 1-2 is an intensive course for
students with conversational fluency and beginning academic skills in Khmer. Students begin to develop academic Khmer proficiency in listening, speaking, reading,
writing, literature, and key cultural aspects from the entire Khmer-speaking world. The course goals and objectives are based on Stage II of the World Language Content
Standards for California Public Schools (2009). A minimum of two years of “a – g” approved foreign language
credit in the same language is required for admission to
most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State
University systems.
NCAA Approved
Khmer for Khmer Speakers 3-4__1887
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Khmer for Khmer Speakers 1-2 with a
“C” or better
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9-12
Prerequisite:
Native oral fluency in Khmer; successful
completion of Khmer 5-6 or recomendation based on placement assessment
Khmer for Khmer Speakers 7-8 continues to expand and
refine students’ communicative-based listening, speaking, reading, writing competencies from Khmer for
Khmer Speakers 1-2, 3-4, and 5-6. Students will use increasingly complex grammar with improving accuracy
and read a variety of authentic texts. Students will also
deepen their understanding of the history, literature and
arts of the Khmer-speaking culture. The course goals
and objectives are based on Stage III and parts of Stage IV
of the World Language Content Standards for California
Public Schools (2009). A minimum of two years of “a – g”
approved foreign language credit in the same language
is required for admission to most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” or
“g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Khmer for Khmer Speakers 3-4 is an intensive course for
students with conversational fluency and intermediate
academic literacy skills in Khmer. Students study increasingly difficult academic Khmer listening, speaking,
reading, writing, and literature of the Khmer-speaking
culture. The course goals and objectives are based on
Stage III of the World Language Content Standards for CalForeign Language 51
Spanish IB HL 2____________________________ 1822
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 12
Prerequisite:
AP Spanish Literature
International Baccalaureate (IB) Higher Level (HL) is an
advanced curriculum which provides students with a
learning experience equivalent to that of a third year introduction to Spanish literature college course. Students
read, discuss and analyze critically in Spanish representative works of Peninsular and Latin American literature
through class discussion and essay writing. These works
include prose, poetry, and drama from different periods
with a consideration of their cultural context. Teachers
and students use Spanish almost exclusively. The course
goals and objectives are based on Stage V of the World
Language Content Standards for California Public Schools
(2009). A minimum of two years of “a – g” approved foreign language credit in the same language is required for
admission to most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” or
“g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Spanish IB SL_________________________________ 1820
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 11 - 12
Prerequisite:
Spanish 5-6
International Baccalaureate (IB) Stand Level (SL) covers
the equivalent of a third-year college course in advanced
Spanish composition and conversation. The course offers frequent opportunities for students to integrate the
listening, speaking, reading and writing through the use
of authentic materials representing a variety of types of
discourse, topics and registers. Extensive training in the
organization and writing of compositions is an integral
component. Teachers and students use Spanish almost
exclusively. The course goals and objectives are based
on Stage IV of the World Language Content Standards for
California Public Schools (2009). A minimum of two years
of “a – g” approved foreign language credit in the same
language is required for admission to most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” or
“g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Spanish 1-2___________________________________ 1831
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
None
This is a comprehensive introduction to Spanish emphasizing fundamental communicative-based competencies, grammar, and Spanish-language cultures.
Students will actively learn to understand, speak, read
and write simple questions and sentences on a variety
of familiar topics in Spanish by the end of the second
semester. The course goals and objectives are based on
Stage I of the World Language Content Standards for California Public Schools (2009). A minimum of two years of
“a – g” approved foreign language credit in the same language is required for admission to most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State
University systems.
NCAA Approved
Spanish 3-4_____________________________________ 1832
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Spanish 1-2 with a “C” or better
Spanish 3-4 continues and expands on the communicative-based competencies, grammar, and Spanish-language cultures learned in Spanish 1-2. Students will
actively learn to understand, speak, and write in extended discourse on familiar topics using an increasing
variety of grammatical structures. They will also read
simple texts written in Spanish. The course goals and objectives are based on Stages I and II of the World Language Content Standards for California Public Schools
(2009). A minimum of two years of “a – g” approved foreign language credit in the same language is required for
admission to most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State
University systems.
NCAA Approved
Spanish 5-6____________________________________ 1833
Spanish 5-6 Honors______________________1845
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Spanish 3-4 with a “C” or better
Spanish 5-6 continues to expand and refine students’
communicative-based listening, speaking, reading, writing competencies from Spanish 1-2 and 3-4. Students
will use increasingly complex grammar with improving
accuracy and read a variety of authentic texts. Students
will also deepen their understanding of the history, literature and arts of Spanish-language cultures. The
course goals and objectives are based on Stages II and III
of the World Language Content Standards for California
Public Schools (2009). Students who perform exceptionally well in this course may be recommended for Advanced Placement Spanish Language class. A minimum
of two years of “a – g” approved foreign language credit
in the same language is required for admission to most
four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” or
“g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Foreign Language 52
Spanish 7-8____________________________________ 1834
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Spanish 5-6 with a “C” or better
Spanish 7-8 continues to expand and refine students’
communicative-based listening, speaking, reading, writing competencies from Spanish 1-2, 3-4, and 5-6. Entering students need extended time to be proficient
enough to succeed in the Advanced Placement Spanish
Language class. Students will use increasingly complex
grammar with improving accuracy and read a variety of
authentic texts. Students will also deepen their understanding of the history, literature and arts of Spanishlanguage cultures. The course goals and objectives are
based on Stage III and some of Stage IV of the World Language Content Standards for California Public Schools
(2009). Students who perform well in this course may be
recommended for Advanced Placement Spanish Language class. A minimum of two years of “a – g” approved foreign language credit in the same language is
required for admission to most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” or
“g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Spanish Language AP__________________ 1847
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 11-12
Prerequisite:
Spanish 5-6 or 7-8 with a “C” or better
AP Spanish Language is an advanced curriculum which
provides students with a learning experience equivalent
to that of a third-year college course in Spanish. The
course offers frequent opportunities for students to integrate the listening, speaking, reading and writing
through the use of authentic materials representing a variety of types of discourse, topics, and registers. Extensive training in the organization and writing of
compositions is an integral component. Teachers and
students use Spanish almost exclusively. The course
goals and objectives are based on Stage IV of the World
Language Content Standards for California Public Schools
(2009). A minimum of two years of “a – g” approved foreign language credit in the same language is required for
admission to most four-year colleges.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” or
“g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Spanish Literature AP_________________ 1848
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 11-12
Prerequisite:
Spanish 5-6 or 7-8 with a “C” or better,
or well-educated bilingual background.
AP Spanish Literature is an advanced curriculum which
provides students with a learning experience equivalent
to that of a third-year introduction to Spanish literature
college course. Students read, discuss and analyze critically in Spanish representative works of Peninsular and
Latin American literature through class discussion and
essay writing. These works include prose, poetry, and
drama from different periods with a consideration of
their cultural context. Teachers and students use Spanish almost exclusively. The course goals and objectives
are based on Stage V of the World Language Content Standards for California Public Schools (2009). A minimum of
two years of “a – g” approved foreign language credit in
the same language is required for admission to most
four-year colleges.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” or
“g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Spanish for Spanish
Speakers 1-2__________________________________ 1838
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Native speaker of Spanish or teacher
recommendation for Dual Immersion
students
Spanish for Spanish Speakers 1-2 is an intensive course
for students with conversational fluency and beginning
academic skills in Spanish. Students begin to develop
academic Spanish proficiency in listening, speaking,
reading, writing, literature, and key cultural aspects from
the entire Spanish-speaking world. The course goals and
objectives are based on Stage II of the World Language
Content Standards for California Public Schools (2009). Academic literacy skills studied in this course align competences assessed on the English Language Arts portion
of the California High School Exit Examination. A minimum of two years of “a – g” approved foreign language
credit in the same language is required for admission to
most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State
University systems.
NCAA Approved
Spanish for Spanish
Speakers 3-4__________________________________ 1839
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Spanish for Spanish Speakers 1-2 with a
“C” or better
Spanish for Spanish Speakers 3-4 is an intensive course
for students with conversational fluency and intermediate academic literacy skills in Spanish. Students study
increasingly difficult academic Spanish listening, speaking, reading, writing, and literature from throughout the
Foreign Language 53
Spanish-speaking world. The course goals and objectives
are based on Stage III of the World Language Content Standards for California Public Schools (2009). The academic
literacy skills studied in this course closely align with
competences assessed on the English Language Arts portion of the California High School Exit Examination.
Students who perform exceptionally well in this course
may be recommended to take the Advance Placement
Spanish Literature class and the Advanced Placement
Spanish Language Exam. A minimum of two years of “a
– g” approved foreign language credit in the same language is required for admission to most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” or
“g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Spanish for Spanish
Speakers 5-6_________________________________ 1840
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Options: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Spanish for Spanish Speakers 3-4
with a “C” or better
Spanish for Spanish Speakers 5-6 is an intensive course
for students with conversational fluency and advanced
academic skills in Spanish. Students study increasingly
difficult academic Spanish listening, speaking, reading,
writing, and literature from throughout the Spanishspeaking world. The course goals and objectives are
based on Stage IV of the World Language Content Standards for California Public Schools (2009). The academic
literacy skills studied in this course closely align with the
competences assessed on the English Language Arts portion of the California High School Exit Examination.
Students who perform well in this course may be recommended to take the Advanced Placement Spanish Literature class and The Advanced Placement Spanish
Language Exam. A minimum of two years of “a – g” approved foreign language credit in the same language is
required for admission to most four-year colleges.
This Language Other Than English (LOTE) course will meet the “e” or
“g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Foreign Language 54
Course Descriptions
General
Studies
COURSES
•
CODE
AHS
CHS
Driver Education (General)
2010
•
•
Exploring Health, Occupations
& Careers
2017
Health Education
2001
-Health SDAIE
2003
-Health SDAIE/PLS
2016
Course offered
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
•
•
•
•
•
•
RHSA
RHS
WHS
•
•
•
•
•
•
Avalon High School
Cabrillo High School
California Academy of Math & Science
David Starr Jordan High School
Lakewood High School
General Studies 55
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
•
•
•
Robert A. Millikan High School
Polytechnic High School
Renaissance High School for the Arts
Will J. Reid High School
Woodrow Wilson Classical High School
Driver Education (General)______ 2010
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Recommended Prerequisite:
Attendance:
9 weeks
9, 10
None
30 hours (minimum)
This classroom course in driver education is designed to
give students a knowledge of the Vehicle Code of California and of the other laws relating to the operation of
motor vehicles. The course stresses positive attitudes,
observation skills, and defensive driving habits contributing to traffic and pedestrian safety. The problem of
drunk driving as the major cause of traffic fatalities is
also stressed. Upon successful completion of the course,
students are issued a Certificate of Completion of Driver
Education (Classroom), which is required for licensing
prior to age 18.
Exploring Health
Occupations & Careers______________2017
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-12
None
The Introduction to Health Occupations and Careers is
a springboard to career pathways which will prepare students for certification programs, Associates Arts degrees,
Bachelors of Science degrees and post-graduate studies
in medical and health professions. This course is designed to give the students the opportunity to explore
various health occupations and careers that are available
in the medical/health industry and to develop the skills
that are necessary to ensure a successfull transition into
a selected field of study. In addition to an extensive career search that provides students information regarding
educational requirements, job descriptions, wages, benefits and employment outlook, the course will focus on
building effective communication skills that are needed
within the industry.
__________________________
Health Education
2001
_____________________________
Health Ed. SDAIE
2003
________________________
Health Ed. SDAIE/PLS
2016
_____________________
(Health Education SDC
5342)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
1 semester
9, 10, 11
None
This course is designed to assist students to obtain accurate information, develop lifelong positive attitudes and
behaviors, and make wise decisions related to their personal health. Study will include personal and community health; mental, emotional and social health; injury
prevention and safety; nutriton and physial activity; alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs; growth, development
and sexual health. Central themes are the acceptance
of personal responsibility for lifelong health, respect for
and promotion of the health of others, an understanding of the process of growth and development, and infored use of health-related information, products and
services.
This course is required for graduation.
General Studies 56
Course Descriptions
History–
Social Science
Courses Meeting History/Social Science Graduation Credit
COURSE
CODE
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
2271
Modern World History
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
–Modern
World
History
Accelerated
2272
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
2277
–Modern World History SDAIE
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
–Modern
World
History
SDAIE/PLS
2278
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Modern World History International
2275
Negotiations
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
World History (AP)
2270
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
European
History
(AP)
2281
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
History of Europe IB SL2
2220
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
United States History
2253
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
–United States History Honors
2255
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
–United States History SDAIE
2257
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
–United States History SDAIE/PLS
2258
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
United
States
History
(AP)
2259
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Economics
2311
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
–Economics Accelerated
2360
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
–Economics
SDAIE
2313
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
–Economics SDAIE/PLS
2316
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Economics: Macro (AP)
2363
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Economics: Micro (AP)
2365
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Global
Economics
1243
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Economics Negotiations
2314
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
United States Government
2241
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
–United States Government Accelerated
2239
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
–United
States
Government
SDAIE
2249
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
–United States Government SDAIE/PLS
2237
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Government
and
Politics:
United
States
(AP)
2245
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Government and Politics: Comparative (AP)
2261
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
•
Course offered
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
Avalon High School
Cabrillo High School
California Academy of Math & Science
David Starr Jordan High School
Lakewood High School
History-Social Science 57
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
Robert A. Millikan High School
Polytechnic High School
Renaissance High School for the Arts
Will J. Reid High School
Woodrow Wilson Classical High School
Courses Meeting History/Social Science Elective Credits
COURSE
CODE
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
2201
Asian Studies
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
World
History
2269
Atlantic
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
2205
Black History
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
History
2265
California
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Criminal and Civil Law
2207
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Conflict
and
Resolution
in
America
2215
Culture,
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Current Affairs
2209
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
2326
Geography
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Human Geography (AP)
2324
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Business
and
Economics
2320
International
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
International Law
2364
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Relations
2252
International
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Introduction to Anthropology
2203
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
to
Psychology
2227
Introduction
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
2131
Introduction to Social Justice
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Introduction
to
Sociology
2231
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
2217
Latino Studies
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Philosophy
IB
SL
2221
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Psychology (AP)
2225
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
History-Social Science 58
** Courses do not meet NCAA or UC requirements.
California History________________________ 2265
Asian Studies
Length of Course:
1 semester
Grade Level Option: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
None
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
_______________________________
2201
1 semester
10, 11, 12
None
The course is designed to cover the history, economics,
politics, culture and literature of all of the nations of East
Asia, north and south, from 1,000 BC to the present. Students will learn to place themselves in another cultural
setting and will become aware of the world beyond their
immediate surroundings.
The general objective for this class is for students to gain
a fundamental understanding of their own state’s history. Students will become familiar with the geographic,
historical, cultural, political, and economic elements of
California. They should learn to make reasoned decisions and evaluations of current California issues.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirements for the University
of California and California State University systems.
This course will meet the" a" or "g" entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
NCAA Approved
Government & Politics:
Comparative (AP) _______________________ 2261
Atlantic World History
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
______________
2269
2 semesters
9-11
None
The general theme of the course is the "Atlantic World,"
the region of the world connected with the Atlantic
Ocean from circa AD 1400-1825. During this era, European explorers created trade networks with the peoples
of West Africa and planted colonies throughout the
Americas. Each semester has a different focus. The first
semester deals with this four hundred-year span chronologically. It first considers each region prior to contact.
Then it turns to the period of contact when Europeans,
Africans, and Native Americans encountered one another, exchanged a variety of commodities, and engaged
in conflict with one another. The final era is the creation
and development of a range of settlements in the Americas. The second semester focuses on the entire period
from a broadly thematic and comparative perspective.
Units include political, social, and cultural comparisons.
The course concludes with a comparison of various revolutions in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.
This course will meet the" a" or "g" entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Black History________________________________ 2205
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
1 semester
9, 10, 11, 12
None
1 semester
11-12
None
This course provides a comparative study of political systems/governments. Students will get a critical perspective on the making of various governments including
political science theory and methodology. Students will
develop the knowledge necessary to successfully complete the Advanced Placement Exam.
Students who pass the AP Exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This course will meet the “a” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Criminal and Civil Law_______________ 2207
Length of Course:
1 semester
Grade Level Option: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
None
This course is designed to introduce students to the
American legal system. Included are basic legal
terminology, criminal and civil legal processes and
the concept of justice (distributive, corrective, and
procedural). The concept of privacy will also be
examined and balanced against the needs of society.
Finally, the students will use various skills and
intellectual tools in the analysis of landmark cases
and contemporary or possible future legal issues.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
The course presents an overview of the black experience
in the United States from the African background to
today. Students become familiar with some of the contributions of black Americans to a pluralistic American
society. The class also studies such topics as the fight
against bondage, the role of Blacks in the building of the
nation, and the civil rights movement.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
NCAA Approved
Culture, Conflict, and Resolution
in America ____________________________________ 2155
Length of Course:
1 semester
Grade Level Option: 10-12
Prerequisite:
None
Students will study the nature of culture and race and
the historical basis for current racial and ethnic conflict
History-Social Science 59
in the United States. Students will employ this knowledge to proactively address similar issues on their
school’s campus and in their communities.
Economics: Micro (AP)_______________ 2365
Current Affairs_____________________________ 2209
AP Microeconomics is a one-semester course that focuses
on how economic decisions are made by individuals,
firms, and organizational structures. Supply and demand analysis is developed to demonstrate how market
prices are determined, how those prices determine an
economy’s allocation of goods and services, how factors
of production are allocated in the production process,
and how goods and services are distributed throughout
the economy. Students evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of economic decision makers by using the concepts of efficiency and equity. They also analyze and
evaluate the effects of government intervention. Emphasis is placed on reasoned logical argument so that we
can use economics as a method and model for decision
making.
Length of Course:
1 semester
Grade Level Option: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
None
Making extensive and intensive use of newspapers and
news magazines, students employ problem-solving techniques needed to locate information, categorize data, and
state and support conclusions. In so doing, they learn to
evaluate, analytically, what they read and hear.
NCAA Approved
Economics______________________________________
2311
_____________________________
Economics Accelerated
2360
Economics SDAIE_____________________________________ 2313
**Economics SDAIE/PLS_____________________________ 2316
(**Economics SDC___________________________________ 5006)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
1 semester
12
None
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
1 semester
11-12
None
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
The general objective of a high school economics course is
for students to master fundamental economic concepts,
appreciate how the main concepts of economics relate to
each other and understand the structure of economic systems. Students will use economic concepts in a reasoned,
careful manner in dealing with personal, community, national and global economic issues. They will use measurement concepts and methods such as tables, charts,
graphs, ratios, percentages and index numbers to understand and interpret relevant data. They should learn to
make reasoned decisions on economics issues as citizens,
workers, consumers, business owners, managers and
members of civic groups.
This course is required for graduation.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
European History (AP)_______________ 2281
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Option: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
None
Advanced Placement European History is intended to
provide the student with an understanding of the development of Western culture and institutions, with particular emphasis on the period after 1450. The course
offers numerous opportunities for coordination with
other existing courses.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
NCAA Approved
This course will meet the “a” or “g” requirement for the University of
California and California State University systems.
This course may fulfill the graduation requirement for Modern World
History.
Economics: Macro (AP)_______________ 2363
NCAA Approved
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
Geography_____________________________________ 2326
1 semester
11-12
None
AP Macroeconomics emphasizes economic principles as
applied to the economy as a whole. Lessons include an
analysis of national income and its components, economic indicators, inflation and unemployment, money
and banking, stabilization policies, and the United States
and world trade.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Length of Course:
1 semester
Grade Level Option: 9-12
Prerequisite:
None
Geography is a vast subject, encompassing the world.
This course will provide students with a framework to
study the Earth and suggest questions to help them explore our planet. Students will study the five themes of
Geography as well as the National Geography Standards.
The themes serve as content organizers and the standards identify the specific subject matter, skills, and perspective the students should master.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
History-Social Science 60
Global Economics________________________ 1243
Human Geography (AP)____________ 2324
Length of Course:
1 semester
Grade Level Option: 10 (CIC only)
Prerequisite:
None
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Option: 11-12
Prerequisite:
None
This course is devoted to the study of the operations and
institutions of global economics systems with an emphasis on the basic principles of consumption, exchange
of goods and services, and distribution of income. Students will also learn the concepts that enable consumers
to understand the broad picture of global economic activity and its impact on the domestic market place.
AP Human Geography is a year-long course designed to
meet or exceed the experience of an introductory one-semester college human geography course. The purpose of
the course is to utilize geographic processes to systematically study and understand spatial patterns that are evident in the world in which we live.
This course meets the graduation requirement for Economics.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
This course will meet the “a” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
NCAA Approved
History of Europe IB HL 2__________ 2220
Philosophy IB SL___________________________ 2221
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Option: 12
Prerequisite:
US History AP
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Option: 11-12
Prerequisite:
None
The history of Europe is a requirement of the International Baccalaureate Program. It is a two-year course, as
part of the international program, which requires an indepth study of modern world history. The History of Europe is built around the existing AP United States History
course of the 11th grade and the senior year provides a
concentrated view of the 19th and 20th century European History. Six topics are investigated during this
course: Topic #1, The Causes, Practices and Effects of
War; Topic #2, Nationalist and Independent Movements, de-colonization and challenges facing new states;
Topic #3, The Rise and Rule of Single-party States; Topic
#4, Peace and Cooperation: International Organizations
and Multi-party States; Topic #5, The Cold War, Topic
#6, The State and its Relationship with Religion and Minorities. Students are recommended to study 2-3 of the
topics through selection of case studies drawn from different regions. Students will be expected to present historical explanations from an international perspective
and teaching will be provided by a holistic approach
with political, social, economical, cultural and gender issues integrated into the study of each topic when appropriate. This is further reinforced with two (2) research
papers: 1st an extended essay of 4,000 words max. –
which is to be reviewed and graded internationally; 2nd
an internal essay of 2,000 words max. – that will graded
on site and samples are sent to international reviewers.
Both of these papers are done by the first semester of the
senior year of study.
Philosophy investigates the nature of philosophical
thought. While no canonical definition can be advanced, the subject as a distinctive discipline critiques
human knowledge and experience; attempts to make explicit the principles on which knowledge is constructed
and the values on which human actions are based; recognizes that principles, values, actions and their justification are problematic; has a method consisting chiefly
of conceptual analysis and deals with problems through
the construction of rational argument that requires the
student to engage in dialogue with others.
This course will meet the “a” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
International Business &
Economics______________________________________ 2320
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10, 11, 12
None
The International Business and Economics course is designed to provide students with an in-depth understanding of international business and global trade. Students
will develop knowledge in the cultural, social, political,
legal and economic factors and conditions which interact to create the international business environment.
Concepts covered include economic systems, resources,
industries, technology, balance of payments and foreign
exchange. In addition, the key concepts of cultural and
social factors such as: language, education, religion, values
and customs, and social relationships will be examined
as related to conducting business in a global economy.
Furthermore, studies will include foreign government
structures, political stability and government policies toward business.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
History-Social Science 61
International Law________________________ 2364
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Option: 10-12
Prerequisite:
None
NCAA Approved
It is hoped that students will gain some perspective
about the ebb and flow throughout history of individual
and national attempts to bring some stability and predictability to international relations through international law. The materials of the course will challenge
students to use all of the knowledge and information
they have accumulated in their previous social studies
courses to interpret, analyze, and understand the issues
presented.
NCAA Approved
International Relations______________ 2252
Length of Course:
1 semester
Grade Level Option: 10-12
Prerequisite:
None
Students will focus on the workings of the government
especially as it relates to international, political and economic relations under the U.S. constitution. Major issues of the day will be studied as to how they affect the
interactions of citizens, their governments and nations
of the world. A comparison of world government will
also be surveyed.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Introduction to Anthropology__2203
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
1 semester
9, 10, 11, 12
None
This course introduces students to the study of mankind
from two basic viewpoints—biological and cultural. Emphasis is upon the comparative study of cultures of different groups of people—their social, religious,
economic, linguistic, and artistic development.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Introduction to Psychology
_______
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
2227
1 semester
9, 10, 11, 12
None
Students study such topics as influences of heredity
and environment on personality and behavior, steps
in problem solving, principles of learning, patterns
of human behavior, and bases of mental health. They
examine case studies to help relate psychology to live
situations. Students become familiar with basic concepts of psychology through reading, lectures, motion
pictures, guest speakers, and small and large group discussions.
Introduction to Social Justice___2131
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-12
None
In this course, students will explore how self and group
identities shape individual perception and communities.
Through demographic study of local communities, they
will understand how inequity is manifested in public
policy that affects different target populations. Students
will learn about key moments in the collective history of
Southern California as case studies in circumstances
leading to civil disobedience and civil unrest. Students
will learn skills to proactively address issues of Social Justice, focusing on effective group and inter-group communication and organizing, service learning, critique of
media, research, manipulation of statistics, and meaningful reflection.
Introduction to Sociology
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
________
2231
1 semester
9, 10, 11, 12
None
This course is designed to introduce students to the
kinds of questions sociologists ask about society and
to some contrasting approaches to reaching conclusions.
The
course,
which
deals
with
selected
social concepts significant to students, is designed to
involve them in exploring these concepts. Concepts
include socialization, institutions, social stratification,
changes in social order.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Latino Studies_______________________________ 2217
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9, 10,11,12
None
In this course, students will examine the role of Hispanics in the United States and the history of Hispanics in the
Americas. The course begins with the study of pre-Colombian culture, followed by the Conquest and colonialism.
The 19th century focuses on the evolving and sometimes
volatile relationship between the U.S. and Mexico. The
20th century focuses on Hispanics and their political, social and economic role in the U.S. Literature, poetry, art,
music and film will also be used. Students will be involved
in a variety of activities throughout the course, such as debates, conducting an oral history and a research project.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
History-Social Science 62
Modern World History_______________
2271
_____________
Modern World History Accelerated
2272
Modern World History SDAIE_____________________ 2277
**Modern World History SDAIE/PLS____________ 2278
(**Modern World History SDC__________________ 5511)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10
None
This history/social science course examines the major
turning points of the modern world from approximately
1750 to the present. Components of this class include:
Historical Linkage, the French Revolution, the Industrial
Revolution, the Rise of Imperialism and Colonialism,
World War I, Totalitarianism, World War II and Nationalism. Students should develop an understanding of the
historic as well as the contemporary geographic, social,
political and economic consequences of the various
areas and problems they review.
This course is required for graduation.
This course will meet the “a” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Modern World History/
International Negotiations_______ 2275
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-12
None
This history/social science course examines the major
turning points of the modern world from approximately
1750 to the present. Components of this class include:
Historical Linkage, the French Revolution, the Industrial
Revolution, the Rise of Imperialism and Colonialism,
World War I, Totalitarianism, World War II and Nationalism. Students should develop an understanding of the
historic as well as the contemporary geographic, social,
political and economic consequences of the various
areas and problems they review. The International Negotiations portion of the course is designed to have students study a foreign country in the areas of economics,
government, environment, human rights, health, defense and women’s issues. They use "real" world problems to implement their learning using computers that
are networked with other schools in California, Oregon
and Arizona.
This course will meet the “a” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
and emotion, developmental psychology, personality,
testing and individual differences, abnormal psychology,
treatment of psychological disorders, and social psychology.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
United States Government________
2241
________
United States Government Accelerated
2239
United States Government SDAIE ______________ 2249
**United States Government SDAIE/PLS ______ 2237
(**United States Government SDC______________ 5005)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
1 semester
12
None
In this course, students apply knowledge gained in previous years of study to pursue a deeper understanding of
the institutions of American Government. In addition,
they draw on their studies of World and American history and geography and other societies to compare differences and similarities in world governmental systems
today. This course is the culmination of history/social
sciences classes to prepare students to solve society's
problems, to understand and to participate in the governmental process, and to be a responsible citizen of the
United States and the world.
This course is required for graduation.
This course will meet the “a” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Government and Politics: US (AP)
__________________________________________________________
Length of Course:
1 semester
Grade Level Option: 12
Prerequisite:
None
2245
This course provides students an understanding of the
democratic process in America in contrast to other forms
of government. Students will develop the knowledge
and skills necessary to prepare them to successfully complete the Advanced Placement tests.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This course will meet the “a” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
Psychology (AP)___________________________ 2225
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11, 12
None
NCAA Approved
This course meets the Government requirement for graduation.
This advanced placement course introduces the discipline of psychology through an examination of its history, methods, and approaches. Units of study include
biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception,
states of consciousness, learning, cognition, motivation
History-Social Science 63
United States Government/_______ 2241
Economics/Negotiations____________ 2314
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Option: 12
Prerequisite:
None
This course combines the district’s U.S. Government and
Economics curriculum into a year long course complemented with the integration of International Negotiations. Students pursue a deeper understanding of the
institutions of American Government, master fundamental economic concepts, gain an appreciation of how
the main concepts of economics relate to each other and
understand the structure of economic systems. In addition, students study a foreign country in the areas of economics, government, environment, human rights,
health, defense and women’s issues and use "real" world
problems to implement their learning using computers
that are networked with other schools in California, Oregon and Arizona.
This course will meet the “a” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
This course may fulfill the United States Government and Economics
graduation requirement.
Both course codes must be used.
NCAA Approved
_________________
United States History
2253
____________________
United States History Honors
2255
United States History SDAIE______________________ 2257
**United States History SDAIE/PLS______________ 2258
(**United States History SDC_____________________ 5717)
United States History (AP)________ 2259
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Option: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:
Parent’s permission
The course is intended to provide an introduction to
U.S. History. Each section is structured to provide students with the knowledge and skills to prepare them for
the Advanced Placement test in U.S. World History.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This course will meet the “a” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
This course may fulfill the United States History graduation requirement.
NCAA Approved
World History (AP)______________________ 2270
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10-12
None
The purpose of the AP World History course is to develop
greater understanding of the evolution of global
processes and contacts, in interaction with different
types of human societies. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual
knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. The course
highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as
comparisons among major societies.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This course will meet the “a” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
Length of Course:
2 semesters
Grade Level Option: 11
Prerequisite:
None
The year begins with a review of the settlement of the
colonies and the American Revolution, to westward expansion, the Civil War and Reconstruction. This should
provide the students with a connection to their past
learning. Students will then examine the major turning
points in American History from the Industrial Revolution through the twentieth century. Emphasis should
be placed on the expanding role of the federal government and the federal courts; the balance of power between the right of the individual and states rights; and
the continuing struggle between minority rights and
majority power. Importance should also be placed on
the emergence of a modern corporate economy, the impact of technology on American society and culture, the
movements toward equal rights for racial minorities and
women, and the role of the United States as a major
world power.
This course may fulfill the Modern World History graduation requirement.
NCAA Approved
This course will meet the “a” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
History-Social Science 64
Course Descriptions
Home Economics/
Consumer Education
COURSE
Code
Advanced Foods
2403
Family Living & Parenting
2418
Fashion, Textiles & Apparel
2426
Food Science 1-2
2411
Foods and Nutrition
Hero (Home Economics
Related Occupations)
Housing & Interior Design
CAM
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
•
•
2401
•
•
2495
•
2421
2414
Parent and Child
2423
Course offered
CHS
•
Life Management
(formerly Teen Living)
•
AHS
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
•
•
•
Avalon High School
Cabrillo High School
California Academy of Math & Science
David Starr Jordan High School
Lakewood High School
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
Home Economics/Consumer Educaton 65
Robert A. Millikan High School
Polytechnic High School
Renaissance High School for the Arts
Will J. Reid High School
Woodrow Wilson Classical High School
Advanced Foods___________________________ 2403
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
1 semester
9, 10, 11, 12
Foods & Nutrition, Teen Living, or
Teacher’s Approval
An advanced course which provides experiences to
develop further skills in planning, preparing, and
serving appetizing meals for the family and for special
occasions. Special emphasis is given to the study of nutrition; efficient management of time, energy, and
money; preparing for special occasions. Laboratory experiences include regional American and foreign foods
and microwave cooking.
Family Living and Parenting
____
2418
(Former title: Effective Living)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
1 or 2 Semesters
11, 12
None
Family Living and Parenting is an advanced comprehensive class designed to help students manage and balance the demands of personal home and work life.
Laboratory experiences are included.
Fashion, Textiles, and Apparel__2426
Home Economics Related__________ 2495
Occupations (HERO) Foundations
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
9
None
HERO Foundations is an introduction to the study of
the disciplines in the HERO Academy and equips students will essential skills for high school. The course
provides a solid foundation for further study in Culinary Arts, Interior Design, and Fashion Design. This
course provided rigorous instruction that integrates
Housing and Interior Design____ 2421
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
1 or 2 Semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
This course centers on the identification and selection
of housing. It includes study of personal and family
housing needs; housing alternatives; costs; relationship
to the environment; furniture selection; problems of furnishing and decorating the small apartment; principles
of color, line, and design; intelligent consumer practices;
home management. Projects may include furniture refinishing, time/motion studies, appliance demonstration,
and
basic
home
repairs.
(Former title: Clothing Selection & Construction)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
Life Management_________________________ 2414
(Former title: Teen Living)
This is a laboratory course which includes selection, construction, coordination, and care of clothing.
Food Science 1-2
__________________________
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2411
2 Semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
In Food Science, students use the scientific method to
study the biological and chemical basis of nutrition and
food preparation, preservation, and processing. The emphasis is on the physical and chemical changes and reactions that occur during food handling. Students will
develop laboratory, writing, and reasoning skills through
measuring, recording data, graphing, predicting and
evaluating lab results, and writing lab reports. The
course may also include food laboratory experiences.
Foods and Nutrition
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
____________________
2401
2 Semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
This survey course covers the function of food, nutrition
basics, meal planning, food preparation, and consumer
shopping. Laboratory experiences are included.
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
9, 10
None
Life Management is an introductory, comprehensive
class designed to help students prepare for managing
and balancing personal, home and school life. It addresses self awareness, self-esteem, decision-making, personal and financial management, and interpersonal
relationships. It also includes an exploration of career
opportunities in Home Economics, Careers, and Technology.
Parent and Child__________________________ 2423
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
10, 11, 12, or Teacher’s Approval
None
This course focuses on readiness for parenthood, including mate selection and responsible financial planning. Prenatal and infant care, diet, routines and
guidance of the young child, basic growth and behavior
patterns, play and selection of equipment, nursery
schools, and activities for preschool youngsters are explored. The course also includes study of the school-age
child and adolescent, and harmonious communication
in the family.
Home Economics/Consumer Educaton 66
Course Descriptions
Industrial/Technology
Education
COURSES
Code
AHS
CHS CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Advanced Computer Graphics 1-2
6320
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
6321
Advanced Computer Graphics 3-4
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
2601
Architectural Design 1-2
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Architectural Design 3-4
2603
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Architectural Design 5-6
2605
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Auto Mechanics 1-2
2609
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
2611
Auto Mechanics 3-4
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
2612
Auto Mechanics 5-6
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Automotive and Transportation Technology
2680
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CISCO Networking 1-2
2671
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CISCO Networking 3-4
2673
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Computer Diagnostics
2686
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Design and Fabrication 1-2
6332
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Design and Fabrication 3-4
6334
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Digital Design 101
2712
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Drafting Technology 1-2
6308
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Electronics 1-2
2615
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Electronics 3-4
2617
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Electronics 5-6
2618
•
__________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________
Engineering Core 1-2
2702
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Engineering Technology
2708
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Graphic Arts 1-2
2623
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Graphic Arts 3-4
2625
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Graphic Arts 5-6
2626
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Graphic Design and Printmaking
2639
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Interactive Multimedia
2668
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Introduction to Drafting/Computer Graphics 6318
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Introduction to Engineering
2716
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Macintosh Education/Computer Graphics
6316
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Tech Challenge Electronics
2620
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Technology Core
2659
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Video Production 1-2
2637
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Woods 1-2
2645
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Woods 3-4
2647
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Woods 5-6
2648
•
Course offered
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
Avalon High School
Cabrillo High School
California Academy of Math & Science
David Starr Jordan High School
Lakewood High School
Industrial/Technology Education 67
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
Robert A. Millikan High School
Polytechnic High School
Renaissance High School for the Arts
Will J. Reid High School
Woodrow Wilson Classical High School
Advanced Computer Graphics 1-2
Architectural Design 5-6____________ 2605
__________________________________________________________
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
6320
2 semesters
10, 11, 12
1 semester of Computer Graphics
2 semesters
11, 12
Architectural Design 1-2, 3-4
This course is designed for students interested in continuing their study into computer graphics. It will give
students an indepth study into topics in the areas of
computer assisted design, 3D animation graphics, graphics programming and Web graphic design.
This course covers functional aspects of architectural
drafting, stressing current practice in the field of domestic architecture. Drafting room procedure is followed with reference to handbooks, drafting room
manuals, tables, and other reference materials. Architectural problems are developed in detail from preliminary sketch to complete set of working drawings.
Independent study is emphasized at this level of work.
Advanced Computer Graphics 3-4
This course meets the fine arts graduation requirement.
__________________________________________________________
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
6321
2 semesters
11, 12
1 semester of Advanced Computer
Graphics 1-2
A full year course designed for students interested in
continuing their study into Computer Graphics. This
course is designed to give students an in-depth study
into topics in the areas of Computer Aided Design, 3-D
animation graphics, graphics programming and Web
graphics design.
Architectural Design 1-2____________ 2601
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10, 11, 12
None
Students learn basic drafting and design skills necessary
to prepare preliminary architectural drawings for a single-story wood frame residence. A study of architectural
symbols, lettering, wood framing, career opportunities,
area and room design, interior elevations, and color is
included. This class may provide both computer assisted
drafting (CAD) instruction and traditional drawing
board, t-square, paper and pencil drafting instruction.
Please check with the instructor for more details concerning the extent of CAD instruction within the class.
This course will meet the “f” entrance requirement for the University of
California and California State University systems and the fine arts
graduation requirement.
Architectural Design 3-4____________ 2603
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10, 11, 12
Architectural Design 1-2
This course builds on the experiences of Architectural
Design 1-2. Students design and develop a set of working drawings for a single-story residence. Areas of study
include: plot and roof plan, foundation plan, floor plan,
interior and exterior elevations, electrical plan, schedules, details, and computer-aided design/drafting.
This course will meet the “f” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems and the
fine arts graduation requirement.
Auto Mechanics 1-2_____________________ 2609
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
Emphasis is on consumer values, such as buying, caring
for, and making minor adjustments and repairs on automobiles. This course, emphasizing theory and handson shop work, includes (1) a study of the various
principles, designs, and construction of large and small
internal combustion engines, and their components; (2)
the automobile chassis and devices related to it; and (3)
the theory, operation, maintenance, adjustment, and repair of the support systems of an automobile.
Auto Mechanics 3-4_____________________ 2611
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10, 11, 12
Auto Mechanics 1-2
Major attention is placed on the practical application of
electrical, hydraulic, and mechanical automotive principles. Students increase proficiency in the use of automotive service tools and equipment. Emphasis is placed
on maintenance and on making automobile adjustments and repairs. “Live jobs” are utilized in the instructional program.
Auto Mechanics 5-6_____________________ 2612
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11, 12
Auto Mechanics 3-4
Emphasis is on occupational training. Students gain a
depth of understanding of related technical information.
They develop employment-level skill in the use of automotive tools and equipment. Specialization is permitted
in one of the following: engine rebuilding mechanic, engine tune-up mechanic, auto electric technician, brake
and alignment mechanic, power train and chassis mechanic, service station attendant, and motor vehicle
emission control installer/adjuster.
Industrial/Technology Education 68
Automotive and Transportation
Technology ___________________________________2680
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Algebra, computer experience,
Electronics 1-2
This course enables students to achieve understanding
of fundamental physical processes and critical thinking
skills as they apply to automobiles and transportation
through laboratory-based experiences as well as classroom instruction. This course emphasizes theory and
hands-on lab work including 1) a study of the various
principles, designs and construction of large and small
internal combustion engines and their drive trains and
components; 2) the automobile chassis and devices relating to it; 3) the theory, operation, maintenance, adjustment, and repair of the support systems of an
automobile, and 4) metallurgy, origins of materials, and
space. The course presents a practical approach to the
physical/earth sciences. A final project is required in the
second semester.
This course meets the physical science graduation requirement.
NCAA approved.
CISCO Networking 1-2________________2671
CISCO Networking 3-4________________2673
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-12
CISCO 3-4 requires satisfactory
completion of the 1-2 class.
The 1-2 course is designed to give the students basic experiences in Web Page Design and Computer Networking. The student will learn about the foundations for
creating a website using elements, production tools, preproduction and layout and design. It will include Computing Basics, Networking Fundamentals, Local Area
Networks, Electronics and Signals, category 5 cabling
and Home Networking.
The 3-4 course is designed to give the students basic IT
Essentials and Computer Networking. The IT Essentials
section will give the student experiences in how Computers Work, Electronics, Operating System Fundamentals, Windows 9x Operating Systems, Multimedia
Capabilities and Troubleshooting PC Hardware and Software.
Computer Diagnostics_________________2686
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
Students in this course examine many aspects of the
computer. They explore all of the hardware components,
add on peripherals, maintenance, operating systems and
more. In this course, students will work towards A+ certification while studying related careers and opportunities.
Design and Fabrication 1-2
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
_______
6332
2 semesters
10, 11, 12
None
Students will learn the basic materials and processes used
in the design and construction of products made from
modern wood and plastic-based raw materials. They will
learn basic design concepts, production planning, and
construction/manufacturing methods. Classroom activities will include cooperative projects involving interdisciplinary teamwork. Students will be encouraged to
design and construct “interdisciplinary” projects, (i.e.
build stereo speakers with electronics students).
Design and Fabrication 3-4
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
_______
6334
2 semesters
10, 11, 12
Design and Fabrication 1-2
Students will work with advanced materials and
processes while learning modern design and management techniques. The class will be run as a “mock” company with students role playing various positions. The
“Company” will be given a product to design, will determine a production plan and will create a quality product that is delivered on schedule.
Digital Design 101______________________ 2712
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11-12
Algebra 1-2 and Electronics 1-2 with
a “B” or better
This course presents the foundation of basic elements
employed in the design of electronic digital systems as
used in communications, control systems and computers. The use of logic and physics concepts and electronic
tools and components will be used to design, apply and
implement digital logic circuits. This course will serve as
the foundation for students pursuing careers in electrical, computer engineering and related fields. The material will be presented in a sequential manner and class
time will be divided between lectures and labs, 50% for
each.
Drafting Technology 1-2____________ 6308
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-12
None
This class is an introductory course into the exciting
world of graphic representation within the manufacturing field. Students learn how ideas are turned into drawings so that those ideas can be manufactured. This class
is a must for anyone thinking about becoming an engineer or manufacturing technologist.
Industrial/Technology Education 69
Electronics 1-2______________________________ 2615
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
Students study basic principles of electricity and electronics. They learn composition and functions of various electronic systems and subsystems and the general
operating principles and applications of each. Testing
procedures will be learned through the use of skill trainers and test equipment as modern as the equipment
being used in industry. This course lays the groundwork
for advanced work in electronics technology. This
course addresses the Physical Science Content Standards
only. Earth Science Standards, normally covered in a
Physical Science course, are not addressed in this class.
turing. A prerequisite for this course is completion of algebra and a computer applications course or demonstration of computer literacy to the instructor.
Engineering Technology
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
____________
2708
2 semesters
10-11
Engineering Graphics 1-2
Fundamental concepts of computer-aided design/drafting
(CADD) are introduced. In this course, students learn to
operate the system and different types of software and
equipment actually used by industry today. This class integrates theories, practices, and skills learned in mathematics and Principles of Engineering 1-2.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
Electronics 3-4______________________________ 2617
NCAA approved.
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Graphic Arts 1-2___________________________ 2623
2 semesters
10, 11, 12
Electronics 1-2
Study of theory and experiences in the laboratory give
students a thorough understanding of direct current, alternating current, semiconductors, and advanced electronic circuits. New components and circuits are
introduced as students progress. Emphasis is on use of
testing equipment. This course addresses the Physical
Science Content Standards only. Earth Science Standards, normally covered in a Physical Science course, are
not addressed in this class.
Electronics 5-6______________________________ 2618
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11, 12
Electronics 1-2 and/or 3-4
Provides students with opportunities to work on appropriate laboratory projects involving amplitude modulated (AM) and frequency modulated (FM) broadcast
receivers, television receivers, and high fidelity music
systems. This course addresses the Physical Science Content Standards only. Earth Science Standards, normally
covered in a Physical Science course, are not addressed in
this class.
Engineering Core 1-2___________________ 2702
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10
Algebra 1-2 with minimum grade of
“C” and Computer Applications with a
minimum grade of “B”
Engineering Core is designed to introduce the students
to powerful, motivating high tech modules used
throughout the field of engineering. Using a hands-on
approach, the students will integrate math and science
with technology for the applications used in engineering
covered, but not limited to: mechanical, electrical, structural, architectural, civil, transportation and manufac-
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
Most of what we learn, we learn through our eyes.
Therefore, visual communication skills, coupled with
computer proficiency are vital in the 21st century. This
class covers the fundamentals of graphic design, electronic imagery, offset printing, screen-process printing,
and finishing operations. Students will create cameraready graphic artwork using software titles such as
Adobe PageMaker® and PhotoShop®. Students will
learn: elements of art and principles of design; reproduction methods, including offset and screen printing;
layout and design techniques; platemaking; operating
the offset press; screen printing; and post-production operations. Typical projects will include screen-printed Tshirts, stickers, business cards, memo pads, greeting
cards and posters. Students will also be informed about
industry trends, postsecondary education, and career opportunities with further training.
Graphic Arts 3-4___________________________ 2625
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10, 11, 12
Graphic Arts 1-2
For students with previous experience in Graphics, this
course continues to develop proficiency in the use of
graphics software, and adds the production of multiple
color graphics and printed projects. Emphasis is placed
on understanding and appreciating good design, designing and creating material to be printed, multi-color
screen printing, page layout, and a knowledge of vocational possibilities in the graphic arts.
Industrial/Technology Education 70
Graphic Arts 5-6___________________________ 2626
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10-12
Graphic Arts 1-2 and/or 3-4
Building on skills learned in previous graphics courses,
Graphic Arts 5-6 provides foundational skills for entrylevel employment in the graphics industry. The course
stresses development of skills in the use of digital imaging technology such as scanners, digital cameras, and
color inkjet and laser printers; offset printing; screen
printing, and finishing. As well as personal student
projects, students will work on production printing jobs
to be used within the school community.
Graphic Design and Printmaking
__________________________________________________________
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2639
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
In this course, students will visually express their original creativity and develop and showcase their ability to
communicate ideas through a variety of graphic media.
Students learn the basics of graphic design in preparation of original art combining typography, page layout,
and integrated graphic elements. Instruction will be
given in the following areas: elements of art and principles of design; mechanical and computer design methods; printmaking; finishing of graphic products; and
historical and cultural development of graphics and the
printing industry. The course will give the students confidence in organizing ideas, creating meaning in their
original work, and the ability to work ideas into new and
useful creations.
This course meets the high school graduation requirement for fine arts
and the “f” or “g” requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
Interactive Multimedia______________ 2668
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10-12
None
Students will design and program projects on the computer which are interactive; i.e. the user of the finished
project will determine which elements of the project
they view and hear, and in what order. These media elements will include text, graphic images, sound, video,
and animation.
Introduction to Drafting/
Computer Graphics_____________________ 6318
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9, (10, 11, 12)
None
Students will build skills using application software for:
desktop publishing, computer art and animation, computer aided design, telecommunications, networking
and computer generated simulations. Intro to Drafting
students learn basic skills and techniques used in the
mechanical and architectural drafting industry. Using
current drafting equipment, students produce sketches
and multi-view architectural drawings.
Introduction to Engineering_____ 2716
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-10
Concurrent enrollment in Algebra 1-2
or Algebra AB
Introduction to Engineering is a physical science course
targeted to 9th and 10th grade students interested in an
engineering career. Because engineering is a field of
many disciplines, the course will address those physics
concepts which are universal to all disciplines. These
concepts include: force, work, rate of change, energy, amplifiers and controllers. Connections and applications
will be made to the engineering disciplines of: mechanical, civil, mineral and mining, industrial, manufacturing,
electrical, computer, optical, acoustical, aerospace, chemical, metallurgy, materials and ceramics.
This course will meet the "g" entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
Macintosh Education/
Computer Graphics_____________________ 6316
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-12
None
Macintosh Education will introduce students to the
Graphic User Interface of the Macintosh Computer, and
provide necessary computer literacy skills. No computer
experience is required, but keyboarding skills are recommended. Students will learn the history and workings of the computer. In addition, students will learn
word processing skills necessary to produce college level
writing projects. Computer Graphics surveys a variety of
topics within the discipline of computer graphics. Students will complete projects in the areas of 2D computer
aided design, 3D animations graphics, distributive computing, graphics programming and computer simulations
Tech Challenge - Electronics______ 2620
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-11
None
Skillbuilding in fundamental mathematics, application
of logic concepts, career exploration, benchmarks of
computer familiarity, and elective activities in a career
subject (electronics). Emphasizes work habits, skill proficiencies required for technical careers, and development of attitudes supportive of success. Course is
intended to motivate students to pursue further studies
in technology and to provide a means of raising math
scores for those who receive Grade-Level Equivalent
scores below 9th grade on the STAR MathTM computeradaptive placement exam.
Industrial/Technology Education 71
Technology Core__________________________ 2659
Woods 5-6_____________________________________ 2648
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
1-2 semesters
9-12
None
Students work in pairs using a set of self-directed instructions that guide the student through a series of
learning activities. Some of the activities in this program
include desk top publishing, computer assisted drafting,
audio and video production, plastics, small engine technology, computer applications, robotics, biomedical,
and electronics. Students rotate from one activity to the
next every eight days, changing partners with each rotation. Emphasis is on exploration. As a result of participation in this class, the student will be able to make
more informed career, occupational, and educational decisions. This class is highly recommended for 9th
graders.
The course provides development of skill in use of hand
tools, woodworking machinery, furniture and cabinet
making, carpentry, and pattern making. New methods
of construction, new tools, wood carving, inlaying, veneering, and modern finishes are introduced. Emphasis
is placed on use of jigs, fixtures, and other devices. Students are acquainted with related trades and occupations.
Video Production 1-2__________________ 2637
Video Production 3-4__________________ 2638
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11-12
A grade of “C” or better in English and
Keyboarding class OR permission of
instructor
Video Production is designed as a Technology elective to
instruct students in using video as a form of creativity
and communication. The emphasis of the course will
be on learning and using the technical, verbal and written skills necessary to produce viable video projects; utilization of these tools and skills contributing to possible
future careers in media production.
Woods 1-2_____________________________________ 2645
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
Fundamental hand tool skills and processes are emphasized with an introduction to portable power tools and
woodworking machine processes. Students plan and develop useful objects; learn to know common woods,
their characteristics, and uses; do simple finishing on
wood projects; learn to sharpen and care for tools.
Woods 3-4_____________________________________ 2647
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10, 11, 12
Woods 3-4
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Woods 1-2
This course develops accuracy in layout and practice
of skills previously acquired. New skills and processes on
woodworking machines, simple machine setups, planning, good proportion and design, detailing and laying
out work, and figuring costs are emphasized as projects
are made. Application of stain, filler, shellac, oil, wax, varnish, and other special finishes are also included.
Industrial/Technology Education 72
Course Descriptions
Interdepartmental
CODE
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
STUDENT SUPPORT
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
2836
AVID 9
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
10
2837
AVID
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
AVID 11
2802
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
AVID Peer Tutor
•
•
•
2803
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Advancement Via Individual Determination
(AVID) Senior Seminar
2807
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Study Lab
7135
•
•
•
•
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
STUDENT ACTIVITY
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Academic Decathlon
0900
•
•
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Advanced Journalism: Edit, Dsgn., Mgmt.
•
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
School Annual 1-2, 3-4
2833/2834
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Student Council
2800
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
STUDENT SERVICE
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Exploring Teaching 1-2, 3-4
2804/2806
•
•
•
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Laboratory Assistant
2851
•
•
•
•
•
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Library/Media Education
2801
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Office Assistant
2815
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Peer Assistance Training
2853
•
•
•
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Teacher Assistant, Elementary School
2816
•
•
•
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Teacher Assistant, High School
2818
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
WORKFORCE PREPARATION
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Community Service
2809/2810
•
•
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
General Work Experience (REG)
4601
•
•
•
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Pathways to Success 1-2/3-4
5344/5346
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
School to Career Internship
8525
•
•
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
INTERDISCIPLINARY
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Introduction to Philosophy
•
Course offered
2300
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
•
Avalon High School
Cabrillo High School
California Academy of Math & Science
David Starr Jordan High School
Lakewood High School
Interdepartmental 73
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
Robert A. Millikan High School
Polytechnic High School
Renaissance High School for the Arts
Will J. Reid High School
Woodrow Wilson Classical High School
STUDENT SUPPORT
Advancement Via Individual
Determination (AVID) 11___________2802
Advancement Via Individual
Determination (AVID) 9_____________2836
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9
None although participation in middle
school AVID is useful
This AVID elective course is designed for students with a
2.0-3.5 GPA who have a desire to go to college. AVID
students are concurrently enrolled in regular or accelerated English, mathematics (algebra AB, CD or 1/2), history, and foreign language courses that meet “a–g”
requirements, students learn strategies to enhance success in college preparatory course work. Students work
individually, as well as in tutor-led collaborative groups.
The following concepts are emphasized in the AVID 9
elective: Cornell note taking, effective writing and reading to learn strategies, speaking and listening presentation, test-taking strategies, binder organization and
character development. In addition, the course includes
activities designed to motivate students to pursue a college education as a post-secondary pathway. AVID students are expected to maintain grades of a C or higher in
all courses in order to meet four year college entrance requirements.
Advancement Via Individual
Determination (AVID) 10___________2837
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10
AVID 9 is recommended
This AVID elective course is designed for students with a
2.0-3.5 GPA and who have a desire to attend college.
AVID students concurrently enroll in regular or accelerated English, mathematics (algebra CD or algebra 1/2 or
higher), history, and foreign language courses that meet
“a–g” requirements, students learn strategies to enhance
success in college preparatory corse work. Students work
individually, as well as in tutor-facilitated collaborative
groups. The following concepts are emphasized in the
AVID 10 elective: Cornell note taking, effective writing
and reading to learn strategies, binder organization and
character development. In addition, the course includes
activities designed to motivate students to pursue a college education as a post-secondary pathway. AVID students are expected to maintain grades of a C or higher in
all courses in order to meet four year college entrance requirements.
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11
AVID 10 is recommended
The 11th grade AVID elective is designed to prepare students in an academic context for entrance into a four
year college or university with an emphasis on analytical writing, preparation for college entrance and placement tests, college study skills and test taking, oral
presentation skills, note taking and research. Students
enrolled in AVID 11 are required to complete weekly
timed writings and participate in analytical discourses
in all subjects. In addition, students are required to
make oral presentations to the class on topics related to
career searches, college entrance, current events and issues, and social concerns. AVID 11 features college student tutors who lead discussions and analysis of
academic subjects in which the students are enrolled.
Students in this course, working with the college tutors,
are expected to participate in and eventually act as moderators for Socratic Seminars. These discussions move
beyond didactic instruction and support students in
gaining multiple perspectives in texts, supporting arguments with clear and concise evidence while developing
critical thinking skills necessary for success in college.
The focus of the junior year is the survey of 8-10 recognized leaders from a variety of fields of study. Individually and in study teams, students will explore the
historical period in which the leader lived, the social issues they addressed, and their contributions to society.
Students will be expected to read and write extensively
throughout the process, including participation in a variety of collaborative discussion and response groups.
this preliminary research survey will culminate in an
end-of-year essay in which students explain and provide
evidence for choosing a particular leader to study in
greater depth. The level of reading, writing, inquiry, discussion and analysis experienced in the junior year will
serve as the foundation for in depth research to be introduced and completed as a final project in the senior
year.
Advancement Via Individual
Determination (AVID) Peer
Tutor ______________________________________________ 2803
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11-12
3.0 + GPA, Completed Geometry with at
least a B, Application, Approval of AVID
Coordinator, AP experience recommended, and student must agree to
attend tutor training
This course provides students with the opportunity to
explore the teaching profession, to strengthen their content knowledge, to gain a service learning experience involving the support of their peers and school, to mentor
younger students, and to acquire certification that may
Interdepartmental 74
extend their association with AVID tutoring beyond
high school. AVID Peer tutors will provide tutorial support to students enrolled in middle school or high
school AVID elective classes. Tutors are trained to apply
AVID strategies and materials with their students, to
work with AVID students individually and in cooperative groups, to support them building a strong learning
foundation in all core content areas, and to assist students with understanding rigorous curriculum.
and registering for college placement exams. Though
these topics have been discussed before in AVID 11, students are expected to take a much more active part in
their own learning this year in preparation for their transition to college.
This course will meet the "g" entrance requirement for the University of
California and California State University systems
Study Lab_______________________________________ 7135
AVID Senior Seminar___________________ 2807
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
12
AVID 11 and concurrently enrolled in at
least one Honors, AP or IB Course or in a
college transferable course accepted by
UCCSU
The AVID Senior Seminar is the capstone class for AVID
seniors. The course is designed for those students who
elect to take a course that prepares them for the rigor required for college work. Students will engage in higher
levels of WIC-R (writing, inquiry, collaboration and reading) strategies than expected in prior years of AVID.
These higher-level thinking, reading, writing and oral
language skills are needed to prepare students for the
level of work required to produce a culminating research
project at the end of the senior year. The focus of the
curriculum is based on four skills identified as essential
to academic success in college: analyzing a prompt or
academic task, selective and purpose-driven reading, focused note-taking, and integrating sources into texts.
This course is organized around the theme of “Leadership as a Catalyst for Change in Society.” Students
study, in depth, exceptional leaders in contemporary society, and examine the effect these individuals have had
on culture, politics, education, history, science, and the
arts. The course requireds that students read essays,
speeches, articles and letters by these leaders, as well as
at least one full-length work by the leader or about the
leader.
In addition, each student is required to conduct a research project that is presented at the culmination of the
year. The project requires that students examine a particular leader’s life and accomplishments in relation to
the student’s own possible career goals and aspirations.
In addition to the academic focus of the AVID Senior
Seminar, there are college bound activities, methodologies and tasks that should be achieved during the junior
and senior year. Support of materials are in development and will be divided into four semesters surrounding the topics of Testing, Preparation, Exploration and
Fit and Finances.
Throughout the senior year, the Seminar Instructor
serves as a conduit to colleges and universities as well as
to academic departments on campus or at colleges. The
instructor assists students in applying for college, obtaining financial aide packages and campus housing,
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-12
Student’s GPA has fallen below a 2.0
for the previous two semesters
This course is designed for high school students who are
struggling academically. The course offers support in the
following areas: study skills (including note taking, materials organization, time management, test taking
strategies, reading with a purpose, improving memory,
and understanding the writing process), communicating effectively, accepting responsibility, setting and
achieving goals, and problem solving. Short, daily instruction in these specific areas is combined with a supervised study lab during which students work quietly
on achieving the key content standards in the core academic classes: math, science, English and social studies.
STUDENT ACTIVITY
Academic Decathlon___________________ 0900
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-12
None
The objective of the Academic Decathlon course is to
hone students’ academic skills in a variety of curricular
areas, in preparation for their local, state and national
competitions. Competitions consist of: seven written
tests, a speech event, an interview, an essay, and the
"Super-Quiz" relay event. Students will prepare for these
competitions by mastering thematically related content
in seven academic disciplines, including Language & Literature, Economics, Mathematics, Science, Music, Art
and one alternating "Super Quiz" topic that is chosen
each year by USAD, the national Academic Decathlon
organization. In addition to accumulating and committing to memory information about these disciplines, students will also learn to make prepared and impromptu
speeches, write essays and to conduct themselves properly in an interview. The culminating event of the course
is the Los Angeles County Academic Decathlon competition, at which schools from all over Los Angeles
County send teams to compete against each other in the
10 academic events. The top schools at the county level
move on to the state competition. Students will learn to
work as a team, in order to prepare for and excel at the
competitions.
Interdepartmental 75
School Annual 1-2________________________ 2833
Library/Media Education___________ 2801
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Prerequisite:
2-4 semesters
Open only to students selected by the
advisor
None
The preparation, publication, and distribution of the
school annual is done in this class.
Maximum credit ten semester periods, except for the editor and a limited number of other staff members as recommended by the advisor.
Maximum credit with such recommendations and with the approval of
a counselor is 20 semester periods (4 semesters).
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Librarian’s and counselor’s approval
This course is designed to help students extend their
knowledge of the resources of a library/media center in
areas of print and nonprint materials. Students will become familiar with library tools and media equipment.
They will participate in performance of the
library/media routines, such as processing, circulation,
shelving, inventory, operation, and utilization of equipment.
School Annual 3-4________________________ 2834
Office Assistant
See above.
Student Council____________________________ 2800
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2-4 semesters
Open to elected and appointed officers
of the student body, class presidents
and presidents of school clubs
None
Training and practical experience in organizing and administering activities connected with student body functions.
Exploring Teaching 1-2, 3-4
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2804,2806
2-4 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
Exploring Teaching provides an opportunity for interested high school students to be introduced to the teaching profession through instruction in the theory and
practice of teaching and actual teaching experience in
elementary and/or middle schools. Students participating in this class will have a “head start” in developing
the knowledge and skills necessary to become successful
teachers.
Laboratory Assistant__________________ 2851
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
1-2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Teacher’s and counselor’s
approval and one year of lab science
Practical laboratory experiences in the preparation and
maintenance of laboratory materials. The student assists
the teacher in setting up the equipment for class laboratory work and demonstrations.
2815
1-2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
One course in business education or
counselor’s approval
Office assistants are assigned to work in various school
offices. They learn filing systems, do typing and/or duplicating tasks, answer telephones, take messages, and
acquire general office work experience.
Peer Assistance Training
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
STUDENT SERVICE
__________________________________________________
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
__________________________
__________
2853
1-2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
In this course, students receive information and training that will enable them to assist their peers to deal
with topics such as peer pressure, alcohol, tobacco, personal loss, stress, depression, dating, conflict resolution,
and crisis intervention. Students learn to handle problems thoughtfully and are given techniques for directing needy students to appropriate adult resources.
Teacher Assistant, Elementary
School______________________________________________ 2816
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
12
Approval of parents, counselor,
and principal
The course provides students who plan to be teachers a
firsthand opportunity to explore their interest in elementary teaching. Students are assigned duty at the elementary school nearest their home for one hour daily at
the end of their high school day. While there, they assist
teachers by working with small reading groups, correcting mathematics and reading papers, preparing bulletin
boards, reading stories to children, etc.
Interdepartmental 76
Teacher Assistant,
High School _________________________________ 2818
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
1-2 semesters
10, 11, 12
Approval of counselor and teacher
required and completion of one
course in the teacher’s dept.
The course provides students opportunities to assist
classroom teachers with duplicating tasks, grading papers, filing, keeping records, and preparing bulletin
boards and instructional materials.
WORKFORCE PREPARATION
Community Service (Semester)_____2809
Community Service (Year)____________2810
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
1-2 semesters
12
None
This course allows students to serve in a community
agency. The community service must be performed during 6th, 7th, or 8th periods. They report to the agency
five days per week, and report for one zero period weekly
to their coordinating teacher. The student will select
his/her own agency which must meet evaluative criteria, including: 1) it must provide a public service or a
career pathway; 2) there must be a specific on-site supervisor daily; 3) the service is not compensated; 4) the
site and type of service must be approved by the teacher.
General Work Experience (Reg)
___________________________________________________________
4601
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
1-2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
16 years of age or older
____________
Pathways to Success 1-2 ____________
5344
Pathways to Success 3-4
5346
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11-12
IEP indicates SDC placement other than
M/S and Certificate of Education
Achievement bound. Mandatory for all
SDC Certificate of Educational Achievement. Can be an elective for diploma
bound SDC and selected RSP students.
This course is designed to guide non M/S SDC students
earning a Certificate of Educational Achievement
through the necessary steps to prepare for transition
from school to adult life. Students will focus on skills to
help them access the world of work and their community while developing increased independence.
Through investigation of personal strengths, aptitudes,
values and occupational information, students will explore available realistic post-secondary options (community college, competitive employment, supported
employment, on-the-job training, military) and opportunities in the community. SCAN skills (Secretary’s
Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills) will be a
focus of this course as students relate classroom activities
to skills of effective employees. To facilitate a successful
transition, students will investigate and practice self-advocacy skills to enhance their ability to make decisions,
create solutions and appropriately communicate their
personal information, strengths, opinions, needs and
goals. Along with the career education component, they
will investigate options for self-support and understand
other fmajor components of adult life (housing, recreation, money management, education, and community
involvement). They will be encouraged to actively participate in their individual education Plan (IEP) meeting
and help design and Individualized Transition Plan (IP)
that reflects their goals for the future.
School to Career Internship______8525
General Work Experience education is a combination of
related instruction and paid part-time employment designed to assist the student in acquiring desirable work
habits and attitudes. The paid employment need not be
related to the student’s career goal. The purpose of the
course is to assist students in becoming productive, responsible individuals through employment experiences.
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
1 semester
11-12
None
High School Juniors and/or Seniors will participate in
workplace internships with local Long Beach businesses
where they will experience the world of work. Concurrently, students will be enrolled in a class where they will
work through a curriculum designed to support the
workplace experience. The internship requires that students: (1) work on a work site 4 days/week and (2) attend a workability class 1 day/week. The course
curriculum will teach workplace readiness skills. Placement of students into worksites will attempt to consider,
where possible, student interest, abilities, and skills.
Oversight of the worksite experience will be the responsibility of the School-to-Career Office.
Interdepartmental 77
INTERDISCIPLINARY
Introduction to Philosophy
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
_____
2300
2 semesters
10-12
None
Introduction to Philosophy is a one year humanities elective course which seeks to teach students how to develop
philosophical reasoning in order to think, talk, and write
about issues of social justice. The use of philosophical
text, magazines, newspapers, art, music and literature
will stimulate lively conversation and spirited debate.
The course will present an introduction to the major
areas of philosophical study. The course will be divided
into four sections: (1) Overview Of Argument, (2) Introduction To Philosophical Inquiry, (3) Overview Of Areas
In Philosophy, and (4) Exploration Of Topics In Depth.
In each section, students will explore key philosophical
questions and some answers that have attained historical
significance. Students will be encouraged to clarify their
own intuitive views, to critically evaluate the historical
answers, and to create a reasoned or logical consensus.
NOTE: The course classroom goals are to foster criticalthinking about the above sections, not to transmit particular belief about them.
This course will meet the "g" entrance requirement for the University of
California and California State University systems.
Interdepartmental 78
Course Descriptions
Mathematics
COURSE
CODE
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
3023
Accelerated Geometry
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Algebra
AB/CD
3037/3010
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Algebra 1-2
3004
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Mathematics
PLATO
CAHSEE
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CAHSEE Math Prep
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
3073
Calculus A/B (AP)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Calculus
B/C
(AP)
3075
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
3002
Career Mathematics
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Finite Math
3150
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Functions, Statistics & Trigonometry
3069
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Geometry
AB/CD
3028/3042
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Geometry 1-2
3035
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Mathematics
IB
SL
3172
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Mathematical Studies IB SL
3078
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Interactive
Mathematics
Program
1-2
3152
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Interactive Mathematics Program 3-4
3153
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Interactive Mathematics Program 5-6
3154
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Interactive Mathematics Program 7-8
3155
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Intermediate
Algebra
1-2
3045
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Intermediate Algebra Accelerated
3047
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Intermediate
Algebra/Trigonometry
Acc
3051
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
PreAlgebra SDC
5607
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Precalculus
3057
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Precalculus (Honors)
3053
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Precalculus with Trigonometry
3055
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Statistics (AP)
3071
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Algebra ABCD
3058
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Geometry ABCD
3167
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
•
Course offered
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
Avalon High School
Cabrillo High School
California Academy of Math & Science
David Starr Jordan High School
Lakewood High School
Mathematics 79
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
Robert A. Millikan High School
Polytechnic High School
Renaissance High School for the Arts
Will J. Reid High School
Woodrow Wilson Classical High School
Each math course offered will satisfy one of
the two years of mathematics required for
graduation, unless otherwise noted.
**These courses do not meet the NCAA or UC
Requirements.
Accelerated Geometry 1-2_________ 3023
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
9, 10
“B” or better in Algebra 1-2 or
equivalent course
real world applications is used in the course.
This course is required for graduation.
This course will meet the “c” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Calculus A/B (AP)_________________________ 3073
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
11, 12
“C” or better in Pre Calculus 1-2, or
Pre Calculus/Trigonometry
This course uses a basic philosophy of a guided discovery
approach with an emphasis on theory and requires the
higher level thinking skills such as analysis. The content
and application of the course goes beyond the basic
geometry course to develop knowledge of the fundamental structure of mathematics and logical thinking.
This course consists of a full year of work in calculus and
related topics comparable to courses in colleges and universities. The course includes the study of elementary
functions and introductory calculus, placing primary
emphasis on an intuitive understanding of the concepts
of differential and integral calculus and on experience
with its basic techniques and applications.
This course will meet the “c” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
NCAA Approved
This course will meet the “c” or “g” entrance requirement for the
University of California and California State University systems.
Algebra AB/CD___________________ 3007/3010
Algebra AB/CD SDAIE_______________________ 3016/3020
Algebra AB/CD SDAIE/PLS_________________ 3062/3074
(**Algebra AB _______________________________________ 5741)
(**Algebra CD _______________________________________ 5742)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
4 Semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
The course content of this four semester class is the same
as Algebra 1-2. The delivery system has been changed to
provide extra time for students to meet the course objectives. Students must pass all four semesters to meet
the algebra requirement.
This two year course will meet one year of the “c” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University
systems upon completion of Algebra CD with a “C” or better.
NCAA Approved
The entire two year sequence of Algebra ABCD satisfies two years of
the mathematics graduation requirement.
Algebra 1-2____________________________________
3004
___________________________________
Algebra 1-2 SDAIE
3011
Algebra 1-2 SDAIE/PLS_____________________________ 3054
Algebra ABCD (Two periods)_____________________ 3058
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
“C” or better in Pre-Algebra
This course is an introduction to the language and
applications of algebra and development of the real
number system. It covers variable and mathematical sentences, equations, problem solving, inequalities, polynomials, special products and factoring, graphs,
functions, quadratic equations, statistics and probability. An emphasis on modeling algebra concepts used in
NCAA Approved
Calculus B/C (AP)_________________________ 3075
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
11, 12
Calculus AP or equivalent
This course is intended for students who have a thorough knowledge of analytic geometry and elementary
functions in addition to college preparatory algebra,
geometry and trigonometry. Considerably more extensive than Calculus A/B, it is an intensive full year course
in the calculus of functions of a single variable and includes
topics
such
as
infinite
series.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This course will meet the “c” or “g” entrance requirement for the
University of California and California State University
NCAA Approved
Career Mathematics____________________ 3002
Career Mathematics SDC____________________________ 5412
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
10, 11, 12
None
This course is designed to help students develop appropriate consumer and career mathematical skills. Course
content will cover such topics as review of basic operations, ratio, percent, equations, measurements, and
many consumer topics. It will also include test-taking
strategies.
This course will meet the math graduation requirement
Mathematics 80
Finite Math____________________________________ 3150
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11-12
“C” or better in Intermediate Algebra
This course is a one year program in advanced mathematics. It is comparable to the Finite Mathematics courses
taught at the college level. The course is designed for students as a senior level mathematics course. It is recommended for students who plan to pursue a college major
that does not require calculus and the higher levels of
mathematics.
This course will meet the “c” or “g” entrance requirement for the
University of California and California State University Systems
Functions, Statistics and
Trigonometry _______________________________ 3069
2 Semesters
10, 11, 12
A grade of “C” or better in Intermediate
Algebra
In this course, students learn to use graphing calculators
and computers. Functions, statistics and trigonometry are
integrated and reality oriented. Reading and problem solving are emphasized. Concepts covered include inequality,
distance with coordinates, infinity, rate of change, sequence, function, limit, maximum-minimum, and summation notation which are all concepts in calculus.
This course will meet the “c” or “g” entrance requirement for the
University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Geometry AB/CD_________________ 3038/3042
Geometry AB/CD SDAIE____________________ 3176/3177
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Geometry 1-2 SDAIE_________________________________ 3036
Geometry 1-2 SDAIE/PLS_________________________ 3032
Geometry ABCD (Two periods)____________________3167
(**Geometry 1-2 SDC _______________________________5335)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
“C” or better in Algebra 1-2 or
Algebra CD
This course studies lines, planes, space, angles, curves,
and associated figures. Basic ideas introduced through
concepts of sets of points. Extensions to three dimensions included. Coordinate geometry is introduced.
This course will meet the “c” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University Systems.
NCAA Approved
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Geometry 1-2________________________________ 3035
4 Semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
“C” or better in Algebra 1-2 or
Algebra CD
The course content for this class is the same as Geometry 1-2. The delivery system has been changed to provide extra time for students to meet course objectives.
Students must fulfill all four semesters to meet university
entrance requirements.
This two year course will meet one year of the “c” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University
Systems.
NCAA Approved
Mathematics IB SL_______________________ 3172
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11-12
Precalculus
This course caters to students who already possess knowledge of basic mathematical concepts, and who are
equipped with the skills needed to apply simple mathematical techniques correctly. The majority of these students will expect to need a sound mathematical
background as they prepare for future studies in subjects
such as chemistry, economics, psychology and business
administration.
The course focuses on introducing important mathematical concepts through the development of mathematical
techniques. The intention is to introduce students to
these concepts in a comprehensible and coherent way,
rather than insisting on mathematical rigor. Students
should whenever possible apply the mathematical knowledge they have acquired to solve realistic problems set in
an appropriate context.
The internally assessed component, the portfolio, offers
students a framework for developing independence in
their mathematical learning by engaging in mathematical
investigation and mathematical modeling. Students are
provided with opportunities to take a considered approach
to these activities and to explore different ways of approaching a problem. The portfolio also allows students to
work without the time constraints of a written examination and to develop the skills they need for communicating mathematical ideas.
NCAA Approved
This course will meet the “c” or “g” entrance requirement for the
University of California and California State University Systems
The entire two year sequence of Geometry ABCD satisfies two years
of the high school mathematics graduation requirement.
NCAA Approved
Mathematics 81
Mathematical Studies IB SL_______ 3078
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11-12
Intermediate Algebra or PreCalculus/Trig with a “C” or better
International Baccalaureate (IB) Mathematical Studies is a
course of study which concentrates on using mathematics in contexts related as far as possible to other curriculum subjects, to common general world occurrences or to
topics that relate to home or work situations. This course
has a unique feature, a project, which is an individual
piece of research and writing undertaken by the student
during the one year course, guided and supervised by the
teacher. It provides the opportunity for a student to pursue a mathematical investigation of a subject, hobby, or
interest of his/her choice using skills learned before and
during the IB Mathematical Studies course. The topics of
this course include those such as probability, statistics and
functions which have very practical uses and can be studied in more depth, if and when the need arises.
This course will meet the "c" or "g" entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Interactive Mathematics
Program 1-2 _________________________________ 3152
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
2 semesters
9
Interactive Math Program 1-2 is the first year of a fouryear integrated math. Topics are drawn from algebra, (including use of variables, ratios and proportions, graphing,
solving equations and systems of equations), geometry,
(including angles, similarity; right triangle trigonometry),
probability and statistics, (including calculating probabilities, expected value, planning and carrying out experiments, normal curves, simulations) and logic (including
developing logical arguments, counter-examples, developing algorithms.) Generally, topics taught in a given year
are reviewed and extended through the curriculum of subsequent years.
NCAA Approved
Interactive Mathematics
Program 3-4 _________________________________ 3153
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
2 semesters
9, 10
Interactive Mathematics Program 3-4 is the second year of
a four- year integrated math program. The curriculum was
developed to embody the vision of the NCTM Standards.
The course uses a problem-centered approach to explore
secondary school mathematics. Topics are drawn from algebra, geometry, statistics, probability, discrete math, and
trigonometry. Generally, topics taught in a given year are
reviewed and extended through the curriculum of subsequent years.
Interactive Mathematics
Program 5-6 _________________________________ 3154
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
2 semesters
10, 11
Interactive Mathematics Program 5-6 is the third year of a
four- year integrated math program. The curriculum was
developed to embody the vision of the NCTM Standards.
The course uses a problem-centered approach to explore
secondary school mathematics. Topics are drawn from algebra, geometry, statistics, probability, discrete math, precalculus, and trigonometry. Generally, topics taught in a
given year are reviewed and extended through the curriculum of subsequent years.
This course will meet the “c” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University Systems
NCAA Approved
Interactive Mathematics
Program 7-8 _________________________________ 3155
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
2 semesters
11, 12
Interactive Mathematics 7-8 is the fourth year of a fouryear integrated math program that satisfies the a-g requirements of the University of California.
The
curriculum was developed to embody the vision of the
NCTM Standards. The course uses a problem-centered approach to explore secondary school mathematics. Topics
are drawn from algebra, geometry, statistics, probability,
discrete math, precalculus, and trigonometry. Generally,
topics taught in a given year include those being reviewed
and extended from previous years as well as new topics.
This course will meet the “c” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University Systems
NCAA Approved
Intermediate Algebra 1-2__________ 3045
Intermediate Algebra 1-2 Accelerated_________ 3047
Intermediate Algebra SDAIE______________________ 3049
Intermediate Algebra SDAIE/PLS________________ 3052
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
“C” or better in Algebra 1-2
and Geometry 1-2
Reviews elementary algebra with increased emphasis
on math models from real world applications.
Language and symbolism are advanced to meet the
needs of mathematical ideas and concepts. The
content includes such topics as relations and
functions, quadratic equations, theory of equations,
matrices, transformations, logarithms, polynomials,
polynomial equations, sequences, and series.
This course will meet the “c” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University Systems.
NCAA Approved
This course will meet the “c” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University Systems
NCAA Approved
Mathematics 82
Intermediate Algebra/Trig
Accelerated____________________________________ 3051
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
10-12
“C” or better in Algebra 1-2 and
Geometry 1-2
This course intends to replace a traditional 3 semester
sequence of two semesters of Algebra II and one semester of Trigonometry with a two semester course covering
the same traditional material. The course reviews elementary algebra with increased emphasis on the properties of number systems, functions, structure, and
proof. Language and symbolism are advanced to meet
the needs of new mathematical ideas and concepts. The
content includes such topics as relations and functions,
quadratic equations, theory of equation, logarithms, and
trigonometry.
This course will meet the "c" or "g" entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Precalculus ___________________________________ 3057
Precalculus Honors _____________________ 3053
Length of Course:
2 Semesters
Grade Level Options:
9-12 (Precalculus) 11-12 (Honors)
Prerequisite:
“C” or better in Int. Algebra; Honor: “B”
or better in Intermediate Algebra
The course reviews and unifies mathematical experience
and acts as a transition from secondary to higher mathematics. Topics include analytic geometry, circular and
special functions, theory of equations, matrices, the derivative and the integral. The Honors section of this
course expands the depth and complexity of the content and requires students to complete a comprehensive
final exam.
This course will meet the “c” or “g” entrance requirement for University of California and California State University State.
NCAA Approved
Pre-Algebra 9 SDC________________________ 5607
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
9
IEP
The foundation for this course is the California Mathematics Content Standards. The course continues and extends a study of fundamental operations with the system
of rational numbers. Concepts of algebra, discrete mathematics, functions and patterns, geometry, logic, numbers and probability and statistics are included.
Attention is given to pre-algebra skills, geometric construction, volume, ratio, proportion, percent and coordinate graphing. Mathematical development is written
in more formal style with each step requiring justification.
This course does not meet the two-year math graduation requirement. This course is for math elective credit.
Precalculus with Trigonometry_ 3055
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
11-12
“C” or better in Int. Algebra or
Int. Algebra and Trigonometry 1-2
This course reviews and unifies mathematical experiences and acts as a transition from secondary to higher
mathematics. Topics include analytic geometry, circular
and special functions, theory of equations, matrices, the
derivative, and trigonometry.
This course will meet the “c” or “g” entrance requirement for the
University of California and California State University Systems.
NCAA Approved
Statistics (AP)_______________________________ 3071
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
11, 12
“C” or better in Intermediate Algebra
In this course, students will analyze data in four frameworks: descriptive patterns, both one-and two-variable;
planning for reliable data production; anticipating patterns by probability principles; and applying to a wider
world through inferential methods. This course is the
equivalent of a college introductory statistics course.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This course will meet the “c” or “g” entrance requirement for the
University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Pre-Algebra 9 SDC is designed specifically for the needs
of students with mild/moderate disabilities who are at
the emergent, early and intermediate levels of listening,
speaking, reading and writing proficiency. Students in
this course cover the essential content and utilize the
same basic textbook as their general education counterparts supplemented with content-parallel materials at a
simplified reading level. Additionally, primary language
materials will be provided for ELL students, when available and as needed, to facilitate the preview and review
of essential content. The course delivery varies in pacing, instructional methodology, and supplemental materials. It is designed to provide depth versus breadth of
the content standards, and provide more modified content, comprehensible input and literacy development in
the content area.
Mathematics 83
84
Course Descriptions
Military Science and
Naval Science
Note: Courses do not satisfy course credit graduation requirements in Science or Physical Education. Students
may be eligible for Exemption from the PE course credit requirement if they participate in all fitness related
competitions which supplement this course. See instructor.
Military Science (Leadership
Education and Training)
Military
Military
Military
Military
Science
Science
Science
Science
1-2_____________ 3218
3-4 ____________ 3219
5-6 ____________ 3220
7-8 ____________ 3221
(Army Junior Reserve Officer Training)
Length of Course:
2-8 Semesters
Location of Course:
Jordan, Millikan, Poly
Intro. to Leadership, Education and Training 1-2
Intermediate Leadership, Education & Training 3-4
Applied Leadership, Education and Training 5-6
Advanced Leadership, Education and Training 7-8
General Statement: The program is conducted by
retired army officers and noncommissioned officers employed as instructors by the school district. All Military
Science instructors are certificated teachers.
Enrollment: Enrollment in Military Science is open
to students of both sexes who are citizens of the United
States, of good moral character, physically fit, and not
less than 14 years of age. Students wishing to enroll may
apply to a school counselor or the military instructor at
their high school campus. Enrollment in the high
school ROTC program does not obligate a student to any
present or future military service.
Course of Instruction: Military Science (Leadership, Education and Training) is a combination of classroom
study and practical application which includes such subjects as Introduction to ROTC and the Army; Hygiene
and First Aid; Map Reading and Orienteering; Weapons
Safety and Marksmanship; Methods of Instruction; Battalion Organization; the U.S. Army, People, Places, and
Times; Leadership; and Drill. Stressed throughout the
course is the development of leadership, individual responsibility, self-discipline, self-confidence, and physical fitness.
Required Activities: Students are expected to participate
in public performances, such as parades
and school-sponsored activities. Therefore, each student
must sign, together with a parent, a written
statement as follows:
“I have been informed that it is mandatory that all
students in Military Science classes shall participate in rehearsals, public performances, and all
school activities in which these classes properly
function. I understand that if I fail to comply, the
following penalties may be invoked by the
instructor:
1.
2.
3.
4.
My grade may be lowered.
I may be disenrolled.
My program may be changed.
I may not receive awards
given by the student body.
Students are required to wear the prescribed uniform
at least one day per week as scheduled by the instructor.
Credit: Students receive elective credit for Military Science. Students who successfully complete the three-year
Army JROTC program will receive bonus points toward
award of military scholarship and academy appointments.
The student who has completed Army JROTC and
volunteers for active duty in the military service after
high school may be considered for accelerated
enlisted promotion.
Special Teams: Each school forms special teams, such as
color guard, honor guard, precision drill teams, and rifle
teams. Varsity and junior varsity letters may be awarded.
All units participate in local parades and similar public
appearances. The drill teams participate in numerous
competitions throughout the school year. The rifle
teams participate in local, state, and national competitions.
Military Science and Naval Science 85
Naval Science 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-8
________________________________
Naval Drill
3222/3223/3224/3225
3215
___________________________________________
(Navy Junior Reserve Officer Training)
Length of Course:
2-8 semesters
Location of Course:
Lakewood, Wilson, Cabrillo
General Statement: The program is conducted by retired naval officers and senior enlisted petty officers who
are certificated and employed as instructors by the
school district.
Enrollment: Enrollment in Naval Science is open to
students of both sexes who are citizens of the United
States, of good moral character, physically fit, and
be enrolled in grades 9-12. Non-citizens may be enrolled
as special students. They may participate in school-approved NJROTC activities, be called Naval Cadets, wear
the uniform, participate as cadet officers, and go on field
trips to military installations. Enrollment in NJROTC
incurs no present or future service obligation.
Course of Instruction: Naval Science is a program of academic study which is patterned after that contained in
the NROTC College Scholarship Program. It includes such
subjects as a Naval Orientation and Seapower, Oceanography, Meteorology, Navigation, Seamanship, Astronomy,
Relative Motion, Elementary Communica-tions, Elements
of Naval Machinery, Introduction to Naval Weapons, Behavioral Management, Leadership, and Moral Guidance.
In addition to classroom instruction, a portion of the
course includes military drill, orientation to command,
physical fitness, first aid, and military formations and ceremonies.
Volunteer Activities: Students are encouraged to participate in public performances, such as parades and
school-sponsored activities. Each student must sign, together with parent, a written statement as follows:
Uniforms and Equipment: Uniforms (identical to those
worn by Naval Academy Midshipmen), textbooks, and associated training equipment are furnished to students
without cost. Students are responsible for the proper
maintenance of uniforms. Students are required to return
all items in good condition upon leaving the program.
Failure to do so wil result in the student being placed on
the school’s fine list.
Special Teams: The NJROTC units organize special
teams, such as precision drill team, rifle teams, honor
guard, and color guard. Varsity and junior varsity letters are awarded. All units participate in local parades
and similar public appearances. The rifle team participates in local, state, and national competitions.
Shipboard Cruises, Field Trips, Basic Training: Afloat,
underway, and dockside training cruises aboard navy
fleet ships and field trips to naval bases and other components of the shore establishment are conducted
throughout the school year and during the summer
months. Basic Training is conducted at various commands, during the spring vacation and other time periods on a voluntary basis. All cadets are encouraged to
take advantage of these additional education opportunities.
Naval
Academy
and
College
Scholarships:
Enrollment in Naval Science affords students the
opportunity to compete for nominations from the
NROTC programs and for appointment to the Naval
Academy. Similarly, completion of the four-year course
of study prepares students for the Navy Scholarship Program (NROTC). The “Certificate of Completion”
awarded for a successful three-year NJROTC Program
may entitle a student to enlist in any branch of the
armed forces at an advanced pay grade, selection of job
opportunity, and service school guarantee.
“I have been informed that it is encouraged that all
students in Naval Science classes shall participate
in rehearsals, public performances, and all school
activities in which these classes properly function.
I understand that if I choose not to participate in
the activities, the following actions may be taken by
the instructor:
1.
2.
3.
4.
My grade may be lowered.
I may be disenrolled.
My program may be changed.
I may not receive awards given by the
student body.
Required Activities: Students are required to wear the
prescribed uniform at least one day per week as scheduled by the instructor. Students must also participate in
weekly physical training exercises.
Credit: Students will receive elective credit for Naval
Science 1-2, 3-4, 5-6 and 7-8.
Military Science and Naval Science 86
Course Descriptions
Physical Education
GRADUATION CREDIT COURSES
Codes
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
Kinesiology/Physical Education 9 Intro
3704
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
3709
Kinesiology/Physical Education Personal Fitness
•
•
•
•
•
Emphasis Intro
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
PE 9: Dance Emphasis
3693
•
•
•
•
•
•
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Education
10
Advanced
3707
Kinesiology/Physical
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
3712
Kinesiology/Physical Education Personal Fitness
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Emphasis Advanced
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
PE 10: Dance Emphasis
3694
•
•
•
•
•
•
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
3690
PE: Drill Team Emphasis
•
•
•
•
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
PE:
Spirit
Leaders
Emphasis
3691
•
•
•
•
•
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
PE: Adaptive
5250
•
•
•
•
•
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
ELECTIVE CREDIT COURSES
Codes AHS
CHS
CAM
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS RHSA
RHS
WHS
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Aerobics
3713
•
•
•
•
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Basketball Fitness
3719
•
•
•
•
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Drill
Team
3686
•
•
•
•
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Fitness and Conditioning
3714
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Independent
Study
PE
3692
•
•
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Introduction to Latin Dance
3722
•
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Introduction to Yoga
3715
•
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Soccer Fitness
3716
•
•
•
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Spirit Leaders
3684
•
•
•
•
•
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Weight Training 1-2
3717
•
•
•
•
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Weight
Training
3-4
3718
•
•
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
•
Course offered
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
Avalon High School
Cabrillo High School
California Academy of Math & Science
David Starr Jordan High School
Lakewood High School
Physical Education 87
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
Robert A. Millikan High School
Polytechnic High School
Renaissance High School for the Arts
Will J. Reid High School
Woodrow Wilson Classical High School
All students must take at least two years of Physical Education in high school to fulfill the requirement for high
school graduation. Twenty credits in grades 9-12 are required for graduation. A variety of courses are included
in the program, accommodating wide ranges of abilities.
All classes are open to students of both sexes. Students
must take the first year of Physical Education in ninth
grade. Beginning with the ninth grade class of 20072008, legislation requires students to continue to take
Physical Education every year if they do not meet the
passing of criteria of 5 out of 6 Healthy Fitness Zones on
the state mandated physical fitness test administered in
the ninth grade. Students who pass the state mandated
fitness test in ninth grade must take the second of the
two year requirement any time during grades 10 -12, and
it is recommended that they complete their second required year in tenth grade. A variety of elective Physical
Education courses are available to students who have
completed the two years of required Physical Education.
The physical education program is designed to articulate
the knowledge, skills, and confidence students need to
maintain meaningful physical activity throughout their
lifetime. For identified Special Education students, these
goals may best be attained in adapted physical education classes.
Uniforms
Students are required to change from street clothing to
appropriate physical education apparel for activity
classes. The recommended basic uniform includes:
Shoes:
Socks:
Clothes:
rubber-soled athletic shoes
sweat socks
athletic shorts and tee shirt
Approved physical education apparel may be purchased
from the school or local merchants. All clothing should
be marked with the student’s name. Either indelible ink
or embroidery is acceptable. During cold weather the
student may wear a warm-up suit. During aquatics
units, students will need swimwear.
General Requirements
In accordance with district policy, all students must participate in the physical education activity assigned for
their class. Grades are based on the student’s progress
toward meeting the physical education standards. The
three overarching standards are: students demonstrate
knowledge of and competency in motor skills, movement patterns, and strategies needed to perform a variety of physical activities; students achieve a level of
physical fitness for health and performance while
demonstrating knowledge of fitness concepts, principles,
and strategies; and students demonstrate knowledge of
psychological and sociological concepts, principles, and
strategies that apply to the learning and performance of
physical activity.
Demonstrated proficiency in swimming is a requirement
unless the student is excused by a doctor for physical or
psychological reasons. Other concerns should be
brought to the attention of the principal. This requirement shall be fulfilled by participation in one or more
swimming units and by passing a swimming proficiency
test in the 10th grade.
Further instructions concerning participation in the program are posted in the locker room. Each student is expected to be familiar with these instructions.
Required Courses
At least two years of Physical Education are required for
all high school students. Students must take their first
year of required Physical Education in ninth grade.
Ninth grade students who do not pass (as defined above)
the state mandated fitness tests must take the second
year required Physical Education course in tenth grade.
Although students who pass the fitness test in ninth
grade may take their second year of required Physical Education any year during grades 10 to 12, it is recommended that they take their second year in tenth grade.
Students who do not pass the fitness tests in ninth grade
must continue to take physical education every year
until they pass the test.
The LBUSD required first and second year Physical Education courses, Introduction to Kinesiology and Physical Education and Advanced Kinesiology and Physical Education,
provide the foundation for high school instruction. In
those courses, students develop proficiency in their
movement skills, expand their capabilities for independent learning, and examine practices that allow
sound decision making to enhance successful participation in movement activities. The California Code of
Regulations, Title 5, Section 10060, and Education Code
section 3352(b)(7) list eight content areas for high
school Physical Education. These eight content areas are
included in LBUSD’s ninth and tenth grade required
courses. These content areas provide a wide variety of
physical activities necessary to develop the skills and
knowledge essential to the individual for the selection
of lifetime pursuits. The eight required content areas
are: effects of physical activity upon dynamic health;
mechanics of body movement; aquatics; gymnastics and
tumbling; individual and dual sports; rhythms and
dance; team sports; and combatives (self defense). Descriptions of the two choices in each grade for the required courses follow.
Introduction to Kinesiology & Physical Education (9th Grade)
or Introduction to Kinesiology & Physical Education, Personal
Fitness Emphasis (9th Grade) This course is designed to
give students the opportunity to learn through a comprehensive sequentially planned Kinesiology and Physical Education program in accordance with the state
framework. Students will be empowered to make
choices, meet challenges and develop positive behaviors
in fitness, wellness and movement activity for a lifetime.
Emphasis is placed on students developing a personalized fitness program for a healthy life-style. Units of in-
Physical Education 88
struction include: Orientation to kinesiology and physical education, social skills and cooperative activities, fitness (including fitness technology), team sports,
gymnastics, rhythmic movement, aquatics, and personal
safety/self defense.
Advanced Kinesiology & Physical Education (10th Grade) or
Advanced Kinesiology & Physical Education, Personal Fitness
Emphasis (10th Grade) This course is designed to give students the opportunity to learn through a comprehensive
sequentially planned Kinesiology and Physical Education
program in accordance with the state framework. Students will be empowered to make choices, meet challenges and develop positive behaviors in fitness, wellness
and movement activity for a lifetime. Emphasis is placed
on students analyzing skills for effective movement.
Units of instruction include: introduction to advanced
kinesiology and physical education, social skills and cooperative activities, fitness (including fitness technology), biomechanics, individual and dual sports, dance,
outdoor education, and aquatics. (Some schools may
offer self defense in the 10th grade instead of 9th grade.)
Junior and Senior Elective Courses
Juniors and seniors may select from electives which give
major emphasis in one activity or take a course which
combines a number of activities, according to student
interests and abilities and the teaching facilities available. Content is progressive from the freshman and
sophomore courses. Instruction emphasizes the values
of carry-over activities to lifelong physical activity and
wellness. The electives are scheduled at individual
schools according to availability of facilities and personnel, and to student interest. See the table for electives offered at each school.
Juniors and seniors who do not pass the State Physical
Fitness Test in grades 9 or 10 will be required to include
one of the approved physical education electives in their
schedules each year until they pass the exam.
The Long Beach Unified School District attempts to provide safe conditions in the schools in order to protect students from injury. The District, however, does not carry
insurance to cover medical or hospital costs in case of accident to students. The County Counsel, an ex-officio
legal advisor of the District, has ruled that use of school
funds for this purpose is illegal.
Physical Fitness Tests
All 9th grade students are required by state mandate to
take the California Physical Fitness test, a criterion-referenced test, which measures the student’s progress toward
achieving the Healthy Fitness Zone in the five components of health-related fitness: cardiorespiratory endurance; muscular strength; muscular endurance;
flexibility; and body composition.
Students who do not meet the State Standards in five of
the six Healthy Fitness Zones on the 9th grade test will be
required to continue taking a physical education course
each year until they pass the exam.
PE Exemption—School Sponsored
Interscholastic Athletic Program
Each high school offers a wide variety of competitive athletic teams. Students may only participate in the school’s
competitive athletic teams with the approval of the instructor/coach. A student is exempted from the physical
education requirement as a member of a school sponsored
interscholastic athletic team during the time the class is
assigned to the sport. When the team is not actively engaged in the seasonal sport, each student must meet the
regular physical education requirements.
Part of the eligibility requirement for athletics includes a
physical examination and at least a "C" average for the previous report card period.
The interscholastic sports offered in the Long Beach Unified School District are:
Adapted Physical Education
Adapted Physical Education is open to eligible students
in all grades if assigned by the Office of Special Education. Remedial exercises, games, and other appropriate
physical education activities designed to improve bodily
functions and body mechanics are provided or activities
adapted to the needs of students who can not participate in a more vigorous program. A rest program is approved if prescribed by a student’s family physician
and/or the physician/inspector in charge.
Accident Insurance Requirement
Students may carry accident insurance at a very nominal
rate if their parents wish them to do so. Parents wishing
to purchase either athletic or non-athletic insurance for
their children may secure information about it through
the principal’s office.
Badminton
Basketball
Baseball
Cross Country
Football
Golf
Gymnastics
Soccer
Softball
Surfing
Swimming
Tennis
Track
Volleyball
Waterpolo
Wrestling
Lacrosse (Avalon only)
Crew (Starting Spring Semester
PE Exemption—JROTC Fitness Competition
Ninth and tenth grade students enrolled in JROTC who
participate in all JROTC fitness related competitions commencing the 2009-10 school year will be eligible for a PE
exemption with the approval of the Board of Education. If
Physical Education 89
a student does not pass the State Fitness Test by the end of
Grade 10, the student will no longer be eligible for the PE
exemption and will have to take a PE elective course in
11th and 12th grade until he/she passes the Fitness Test.
If the student is interested in continuing in the JROTC program, the student will need to take the course for elective
credit.
3201
3202
3205
3206
Military Science 1-2
Military Science 3-4
Military Science 5-6
Military Science 7-8
3209
3210
3213
3214
Naval Science 1-2
Naval Science 3-4
Naval Science 5-6
Naval Science 7-8
COURSES MEETING THE
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
GRADUATION REQUIREMENT
Introduction to Kinesiology/
Physical Education _____________________ 3704
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9
None
This course is designed to give students the opportunity
to learn through a comprehensive sequentially planned
Kinesiology and Physical Education program in accordance with the California Content Standards for Physical Education. Students will be empowered to make
choices, meet challenges and develop positive behaviors
in fitness, wellness and movement activity for a lifetime.
Emphasis is placed on students analyzing skills for effective movement. Units of instruction include: introduction to kinesiology and physical education with
personal fitness emphasis, fitness concepts and techniques, cardiorespiratory endurance training, nutrition,
individual activities, aquatics, rhythms and dance, and
dual activities.
Introduction
to
KPE/Personal
Fitness Emphasis _________________________ 3709
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9
None
This course is designed to give students the opportunity
to learn through a comprehensive sequentially planned
Kinesiology and Physical Education program in accordance with the California Model Content Standards for
Physical Education. Students will be empowered to
make choices, meet challenges and develop positive behaviors in fitness, wellness and movement activity for a
lifetime. Emphasis is placed on students developing a
personalized fitness program for a healthy lifestyle.
Units of instruction include: introduction to kinesiology
and physical education, fitness (including fitness technology), individual and dual activities, rhythms/dance
and aquatics.
Advanced Kinesiology/
Physical Education ______________________3707
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10, 11, 12
Introduction to Kinesiology/Physical
Education or other first year required
P.E. Course
This course is designed to give students the opportunity
to learn through a comprehensive sequentially planned
Kinesiology and Physical Education program aligned
with the California Model Content Standards for Physical Education. Students will be empowered to make
choices, meet challenges and develop positive behaviors
in fitness, wellness and movement activity for a lifetime.
Physical Education 90
Emphasis is placed on students analyzing skills for effective movement. Units of instruction include: introduction to advanced kinesiology and physical education,
fitness (including fitness technology), team activities,
gymnastics/tumbling, aquatics and combatives.
Advanced KPE, Personal Fitness
Emphasis _______________________________________ 3712
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10, 11, 12
Introduction to Kinesiology/Physical
Education or other first year required
P.E. Course
This course is designed to give students the opportunity
to learn through a comprehensive sequentially planned
Kinesiology and Physical Education program aligned with
the California Model Content Standards for Physical Education. Students will be empowered to make choices,
meet challenges and develop positive behaviors in fitness,
wellness and movement activity for a lifetime. Emphasis
is placed on students developing a personalized fitness
program for a healthy lifestyle. Units of instruction include: introduction to kinesiology and physical education
with personal fitness emphasis, personal fitness concepts
and techniques, cardiorespiratory endurance training, nutrition, team activities, combatives, tumbling/gymnastics,
and aquatics.
Physical Education 9:
Dance Emphasis __________________________ 3693
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-12
Audition and instructor’s approval
This course is designed to give students the opportunity
to learn through a comprehensive sequentially planned
Kinesiology and Physical Education program aligned with
the California Model Content Standards for Physical Education. Students will be empowered to make choices,
meet challenges and develop positive behaviors in fitness,
wellness and movement activity for a lifetime. Emphasis
is placed on rhythms and dance and students analyzing
skills for effective movement. Units of instruction include
modern, ballet, and jazz dance, introduction to kinesiology and physical educations with personal fitness emphasis, fitness concepts and techniques, cardiorespiratory
endurance training, nutrition, aquatic and individual and
dual activities. Additionally, this course helps students
learn the beginning skills of dance while improving their
technique, poise, self-confidence, and creative ability. Students will choreograph and dance in class presentations.
Physical Education 10:
Dance Emphasis __________________________ 3694
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10-12
Audition and instructor’s approval
This course is designed to give students the opportunity
to learn through a comprehensive sequentially planned
Kinesiology and Physical Education program aligned with
the California Model Content Standards for Physical Education. Students will be empowered to make choices,
meet challenges and develop positive behaviors in fitness,
wellness and movement activity for a lifetime. Emphasis
is placed on dance and on students developing a personalized fitness program for a healthy lifestyle. Units of instruction include the intermediate skills of dance
(including technique, poise, self-confidence, creativity,
choreography, and productions), introduction to kinesiology and physical education with personal fitness emphasis; personal fitness concepts; cardiorespiratory
training; nutrition; team activities; combatives; and tumbling/gymnastics.
Physical Education:
Drill Team Emphasis
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
__________________
3690
2 semesters
9-12
None
This course is designed to give students the opportunity
to learn through a comprehensive sequentially planned
Kinesiology and Physical Education program aligned with
the California Model Content Standards for Physical Education. Students will be empowered to make choices,
meet challenges and develop positive behaviors in fitness,
wellness and movement activity for a lifetime. Emphasis
is placed on physical fitness, drill team skills, rhythms,
dance, and tumbling. Units of instruction include: introduction to kinesiology and physical education with
rhythms, dance and fitness emphasis, fitness concepts and
techniques, cardiorespiratory endurance training, nutrition, individual activities, aquatics, rhythms and dance
and dual activities.
Physical Education:
Spirit Leaders Emphasis
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
____________
3691
2 semesters
9-12
None
This course is designed to give students the opportunity
to learn through a comprehensive sequentially planned
Kinesiology and Physical Education program aligned with
the California Model Content Standards for Physical Education. Students will be empowered to make choices,
meet challenges and develop positive behaviors in fitness,
wellness and movement activity for a lifetime. Emphasis
is placed on physical fitness, spirit leader/cheerleading,
rhythms, dance, and tumbling. Units of instruction include: introduction to kinesiology and physical education
Physical Education 91
with rhythms, dance and fitness emphasis, fitness concepts and techniques, cardiorespiratory endurance training, nutrition, individual activities, aquatics, rhythms and
dance and dual activities.
Physical Education
Special Education Adaptive
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
_____
5250
2 semesters
9-12
Student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) indicates placement in APE
Adapted physical education classes emphasize developmental and adapted skills. Class activities, which are individualized, include a diversified program of
developmental, gross motor, sensory/perceptual motor,
physical and health fitness, and recreational/leisure skills,
as well as seasonal sports.
Drill Team
______________________________________
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
This elective physical education course is designed to give
students the opportunity to learn and develop fundamental and advanced skills and techniques or drill team
activities, as well ass the appropriate team building, conditioning and preparations for safe participation in drill
team training, practices, performances and competitions.
With emphasis on safety, students will learn beginning to
intermediate drill team progressions and the techniques
to safely participate in drill team activities. Students will
learn, practice, and perform routines with and without
music, and cheers and chants for offense and defense for
cheering at games and in competitions.
Fitness and Conditioning
ELECTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Aerobics
________________________________________
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
3713
2 semesters
9-12
Pass second year of high school physical
education
This course is designed to give students the opportunity
to learn aerobic dance routines and training techniques
used for achieving optimal physical fitness. Students will
benefit from comprehensive weight training and cardiorespiratory endurance activities. Students will learn basic
aerobic steps as well as simple and complex aerobic dance
combinations. Course includes both lecture and activity
sessions. Students will be empowered to make wise
choices, meet challenges, and develop positive behaviors
in fitness, wellness, and movement activity for a lifetime.
Basketball and Fitness__________________ 3719
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11-12
Pass second year of high school physical
education
This elective physical education course is designed to give
students the opportunity to learn and develop fundamental and advanced skills and strategies of team activities, as will as fitness concepts and conditioning
techniques used or achieving and maintaining optimal
physical fitness. Students will benefit from comprehensive team activities and cardio respiratory activities. Students will learn basic fundamentals and advanced
techniques of a team activity/activities, aerobic training,
and overall fitness training and conditioning. Course includes both lecture and activity sessions. Students will be
empowered to make wise choices, meet challenges, and
develop positive behaviors in team activities, aerobic fitness, wellness, and movement activity for lifetime.
3686
2 semesters
11-12
Pass second year of high school physical
education
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
_________
3714
2 semesters
11-12
Pass second year of high school physical
education
This course is designed to give students the opportunity
to learn fitness concepts and conditioning techniques
used for obtaining optimal physical fitness. Students will
benefit from comprehensive weight training and cardiorespiratory endurance activities. Students will learn the
basic fundamentals of strength training, aerobic training,
and overall fitness training and conditioning. Course includes both lecture and activity sessions. Students will be
empowered to make wise choices, meet challenges, and
develop positive behaviors in fitness, wellness, and movement activity for a lifetime.
Introduction to Latin Dance ______ 3722
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11-12
2 years of Physical Education
This course is designed to teach students the basic elements of Latin Dance. Students will analyze dance’s role
in improving and maintaining one’s health related physical fitness and then incorporate dance activities into their
personal fitness program/plan. Students will learn basic
steps as well as complex combinations in Merengue, Salsa,
Bachata, and the Cha Cha. For each dance, the students
will learn the historical and geographical roots, the music
and the instruments associated with each one. This course
will help students learn the skills of dance while improving their technique, poise, self-confidence and creative
ability as well as deepening their understanding of and appreciation for the rich and colorful heritage that each
dance represents. As a course involving couples’ dances,
it will allow students to develop an understanding of the
social etiquette involved in couples dancing.
Physical Education 92
Introduction to Yoga
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
_________________
3715
2 semesters
9-12
Pass second year of high school physical
education
This course is designed to introduce students, safely and
accessibly, to the basic postures, breathing techniques, and
relaxation methods of yoga. Students will begin to experience the benefits of stretching, moving, and breathing
freely as they relieve built up stress, learn to relax, and ultimately get more out of day-to-day life. The aim of this
course is to promote vibrant health and to tap the body’s
latent energy reserves.
Soccer Fitness
_______________________________
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
1 semester
11-12
Pass second year of high school physical
education
3716
Weight Training 1-2 __________________ 3717
Weight Training 3-4 __________________ 3718
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
This course is designed to give students the opportunity to
learn weight training concepts and techniques used for obtaining optimal physical fitness. Students will benefit from
comprehensive weight training and cardiorespiratory endurance activities. Students will learn the basic fundamentals of weight training, strength training, aerobic
training, and overall fitness training and conditioning.
Course includes both lecture and activity sessions. Students will be empowered to make wise choices, meet challenges, and develop positive behaviors in fitness, wellness,
and movement activity for a lifetime.
This elective physical education course is designed to give
students the opportunity to learn and develop fundamental and advanced skills and strategies of soccer activities, as
well as fitness concepts and conditioning techniques used
for achieving and maintaining optimal physical fitness.
Students will benefit from comprehensive team activities
and cardio respiratory activities. Students will learn basic
fundaments and advanced techniques of soccer, aerobic
training, and overall fitness training and conditioning.
Course includes both lecture and activity sessions. Students
will be empowered to make wise choices, meet challenges,
and develop positive behaviors in team activities, aerobic
fitness, wellness, and movement activity for a lifetime.
Spirit Leaders
_______________________________
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11-12
Pass second year of high school physical
education
2 semesters
11-12
Pass second year of high school physical
education
3684
This elective physical education course is designed to give
students the opportunity to learn and develop fundamental and advanced skills and techniques for spirit/cheer activities, as well as the appropriate conditioning and
preparations for safe participation in cheer and spirit training, practices performances and competitions. With an
emphasis on safety, students will learn beginning to intermediate student, jump and tumbling progressions and the
techniques to safely participate in cheer/spirit activities.
Students will learn band dances, and cheers and chants for
offense and defense for cheering at games and in competitions.
Physical Education 93
94
Course Descriptions
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BUSINESS AND MARKETING
AH
S
Regional Occupational
Program
Clerical/Office Occupations
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Computer Business Applications
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Cooperative Retail & Service Careers
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Retail Merchandising & Sales
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Small
Business
Management
•
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Virtual Enterprise
•
•
•
•
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
HEALTH & MEDICINE
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Hospital Health Services
•
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Medical Occupations, Intro. to
•
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Medical Assistant, Administrative/Clinical
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Medical Billing
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Medical/Clerical Careers
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Medical
Core
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Medical
Terminology
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Nurse Assistant
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
*Pharmacy
Technology
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CONSUMER & HUMAN SERVICES
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Business Career Internship
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Careers with Children
•
•
•
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Cooperative
Food
Services
•
•
•
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Cosmetology
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Culinary Arts 1-2
•
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Culinary
Arts
3
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Law Enforcement
•
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
School Age Care/Recreation Aide
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
INDUSTRY & TECHNOLOGY
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Animal Care 1-2
•
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Animal Care 3-4
•
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Auto Collision Repair 1-2
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Auto Collision Repair 3-4
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
*Careers in Auto Collision Repair, Intro to
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Construction
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Graphic Design
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Landscape/Floral Occupations
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Landscape/Plant Technician
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Sports Turf
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Television/Media Production 1-2
•
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
•
Course offered
AHS Avalon High School
CHS Cabrillo High School
Emerson
John Wesley
JHS Jordan High School
LHS
MHS
PHS
WHS
Lakewood High School
Millikan High School
Poly High School
Wilson High School
ROP 95
T
he Regional Occupational Program (ROP) is a public education service that provides practical,
hands-on career preparation through a well-established series of programs. Community based workplace
learning in local business and industry is offered in
many classes. Every course offers a unit on employment
seeking skills which includes the job application, resume
and interview preparation.
The ROP is designed to respond to the changing needs of
business and industry and to serve the communities of
Long Beach, Signal Hill, and Lakewood.
The purpose of the ROP is to provide high quality vocational programs to prepare high school age youth and
adults for full- or part-time employment, for advanced
training and for higher education. Counseling and guidance, community-based training, job placement and
basic skills reinforcement are additional benefits of the
program. Priority enrollment is given to high school
seniors and juniors.
BUSINESS AND MARKETING
1-2 Semesters
11,12, Adult
Keyboarding or typing knowledge
10-15 per semester
This course offers classroom training in computerized
basic office skills. Course offers cross training for multiple office positions that meet current employment and
self-employment requirements. This course can lead to
an apprenticeship program with the school district or a
local business. When taken concurrently with Computer
Business Applications, a certificate demonstrating successful classroom and school-site based training may be
applicable as six-month work experience for an Intermediate Office Assistant position with the Long Beach
Unified School District.
Computer Business Applications
(Internship)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options
Prerequisite:
Credit:
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options
Prerequisite:
Credit:
1-2 Semesters
11, 12
Currently employed in a retail
position—high school students only
10-15 per semester
Related instruction in commercial retail services includes
work ethics, labor laws, terminology, tools and equipment, job growth, customer service and problem solving. All students must be employed before entering this
class or be actively employed within two weeks of enrollment in any retail service business for a minimum of
fifteen (15) hours per week. First class meeting is on
the first Friday of the semester
Retail Merchandising & Sales
(Internship)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
1-2 Semesters
11, 12
High school students only
10-15 per semester
This course covers the retail and fashion industry with
classroom and hands-on experience in selling techniques, visual display, wardrobe planning, and communication skills. The student will acquire job seeking skills
and experience in training as a salesperson, stock clerk
and/or a customer service representative. Students
MUST meet industry standards that include attendance
and dress code.
Clerical Office Occupations
(Internship)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Credit:
Cooperative Retail & Services
Careers (Work Experience)
1-2 Semesters
11, 12, Adult
Keyboarding or typing knowledge
10 per semester
Small Business Management
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
1-2 Semesters
11, 12
High school students only
5 per semester
Students will learn how to create and manage a small
business from start up through operation. Topics include business plans, marketing strategies, financial resources, accounting information, legal aspects and
personnel relations. This course will also discuss computer and software applications used in operating a
small business. Learn to be your own boss!
Virtual Enterprise
This course offers classroom computer training in Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Access. This is a
self-paced, hands-on course leading to a Certificate of
Completion upon successful completion of classroom
training. This course may be taken concurrently with
Clerical/Office Occupations to qualify you for on-thejob apprenticeship opportunities, if both courses are successfully completed, a certificate demonstrating
successful classroom and school-site bases training may
be applicable as six-month work experience for an Intermediate Office Assistant position with the Long Beach
Unified School district.
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
1-2 Semesters
11, 12
High school students only
5 or 10 per semester
This course teaches students the principles of starting
and operating a business through an online business
simulation. Students perform all the tasks of running a
business by conducting transactions with other virtual
enterprises throughout the world via the internet. Students also learn skills by interacting with real local business partners and attending virtual enterprise trade fairs.
This course meets the “g” entrance requirement for the University of
California and California State University Systems.
ROP 96
HEALTH AND MEDICAL
Medical Billing
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
Hospital Health Services
(Internship)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
1-2 Semesters
11, 12
CPR card will be required at some
hospital placements. High school
students only.
10 per semester
This course provides training for entry-level positions in
hospital support services and clerical areas. Included is
classroom instruction and on-the-job training at local
hospitals and health care facilities. Requirements include
good attendance habits. All students must show proof
of Measles, Mumps and Rubella and have a TB clearance
dated within the past 6 (six) months on the first day of
class. To earn Life Science credit, students must complete
both semesters. Wilson courses are available to high
school students only; all students must wear Wilson uniforms. Block 5-6 Wilson course will require additional
hours during internship.
Medical Occupations,
Introduction to
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
1-2 Semesters
11, 12
High School students only
5 per semester
This course prepares students for a variety of medical career offerings while exploring specific career choices.
Specific topics include medical terminology, infection
control, universal precautions, safety, interpersonal relationships, anatomy and physiology, health careers,
and the legal and ethical issues of being a health care
worker. For classes at Jordan, the first semester covers Introduction to Medical Occupations and the second semester covers Medical Terminology. This class offers
classroom instruction only. Upon completion of 2 semesters with a “C” or better, a Certificate of Participation is awarded.
Medical Assistant, Administration
& Clinical (Internship)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
1 Semester
12, Adult
High School senior or older
5 per semester
This course prepares students with the knowledge, attitudes, and entry-level skill for employment in the field
of insurance billing and/or coding. Upon successful
completion of this course the student can carry out duties required for entry level positions, such as Insurance
Biller, CPT and D coder and Insurance Claims Processor
with an insurance company, medical office or hospital.
Basic medical terminology is helpful for this course.
Medical Clerical Careers
(Internship)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
1-2 Semesters
11, 12, Adult
Basic typing skills and a CPR card will
be required at some hospital placements
10 per semester
This course prepares students for entry-level medical secretary positions. Course includes classroom instruction
and on-the-job experience at local hospitals and clinics.
Students who opt to take two semesters will have an opportunity to specialize in one of the following areas: admissions clerk, medical records clerk, or medical
receptionist. Students must show proof of recent physical examination, TB clearance dated within the past 6
months by first day of class and proof of MMR prior to
on-the-job experience.
Medical Core
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
1 Quarter
12, Adult
Must be at least 18 years of age or in
the last semester before high school
graduation. Goodwill class enrolls
through Goodwill only.
5 per quarter
This course includes (but is not limited to) anatomy and
physiology, basic medical workplace skills, and introduction to body systems. Students successfully completing this course will have priority enrollment for a LBUSD
ROP medical class of your choice.
Medical Terminology
1 Semester
Adults only
Adults only
25 per semester
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
This course prepares students to work as a medical assistant in: doctor’s offices, clinics, health agencies, hospitals and health maintenance organizations. Course
covers administrative and clinical skills. Clinical experience times TBA. Students must show proof of physical
examination and have a TB clearance dated within the
past 6 months. Varicella titer and Measles Mumps and
Rubella titer required. Hepatitis B vaccine highly recommended. CPR for Healthcare Provider highly recommended.
Course Credit:
1-2 Semesters
11,12
High school students only. Must have a
2.5 GPA or higher
5 per semester
This course helps prepare students to work in a variety of
medical careers. Introduction to basic principles of medical terminology and vocabulary needed to work in the
healthcare field with emphasis on spelling, pronunciation, abbreviations and definition of medical terms.
Comprehensive medical vocabulary will be related to
the body systems and medical specialties. Upon completion of 2 semesters with a “C” or better, a Certificate
of Participation is awarded.
ROP 97
Nursing Assistant (Internship)
with an option for Home Health Aide
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
1 Quarter
12, Adult
Successful completion of Hospital Health
Services (high school) or Medical Core
(adults) class required for students with
no medical training/education. All
students must have a valid social security card. Successful completion of basic
reading/comprehension test is required.
Students must have a valid social
security card.
25 per quarter
Articulated units may be earned towards LVN/RN programs at Long Beach City College (LBCC). Due to this
class being impacted, high school students must successfully complete the Hospital Health Services course
and adults must successfully complete the Medical Core
course. Individuals with experience in the medical field
and/or have taken classes related to the Individuals with
convictions other than a minor traffic violation must
have a criminal clearance before registering in this class
(contact the instructors at (562) 492-6612 for more information).
Optional: Home Health Aide training is offered in conjunction with this class; class hours for Home Health
Aide are Monday thru Friday, 12:00 - 1:00 p.m. Home
Health Aide students must purchase an additional textbook and workbook. Call the ROP office for more enrollment information.
Pharmacy Technology (Internship)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
2 Semesters
12
High school students only
15 per semester
Through classroom instruction and workplace experiences, students will develop a knowledge and understanding of practice settings, standards, laws and ethics,
identification of drugs, calculation of dosages, record
keeping techniques, and the packaging and labeling of
pharmaceutical products. Course content is aligned
with national Pharmacy Technician Certification Board
examination competencies.
for entry-level business support positions. Also, leadership, career development, and workplace success skills
will be taught.
Careers with Children (Internship)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
This course introduces students to careers in teaching,
pediatrics, social work, psychology and other careers
with children and families. Students can begin a career
path by exploring a variety of opportunities in child-related occupations. Classroom instruction includes principles of child development, guidance techniques,
age-appropriate curriculum, communication skills, lesson preparation, technology and career planning. Students will participate in an internship at a childcare,
preschool, or elementary school setting. Upon completion of two semesters a certificate of completion can be
earned, and 4-8 units at LBCC in Early Childhood Education.
Cooperative Food Services (Work
Experience)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
Cosmetology
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
4 Semesters
12
High school students only with 800
hours completed in 11th grade
15 per semester
Students will prepare for the State of California Cosmetologist license and jobs as beauty operators, hair stylists, manicurists and beauty instructors. Attendance on
Saturday is required. No class on Monday. Coursework
includes practical work and theory studies which are
both required to qualify to take the California State
Board of Cosmetology examination.
Business Career Internship
(Internship)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
1-3 Semesters
11, 12
High school students only
10-15 per semester
Related instruction in commercial food services includes
work ethics, labor laws, terminology, tools and equipment, job growth, customer service and problem solving. All students must be employed before entering this
class or be actively employed within two weeks of enrollment in any food service business for a minimum of
fifteen (15) hours per week.
Course Credit:
CONSUMER & HUMAN SERVICES
1-2 Semesters
11, 12, Adult
Proof of negative TB test for student
over 18 prior to internship
10-15 per semester
1-2 Semesters
11, 12
Must have a 2.0 GPA, high school
students only
10 per semester
This course provides high school students with on-thejob internship opportunities at a variety of Long Beach
area businesses. Emphasis will be in preparing students
ROP 98
mesters, students may earn a Certificate of Completion
and/or 3 units from LBCC in Child Development.
Culinary Arts 1-2 (Internship)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
1-2 Semesters
11, 12
High school students only
10-15 per semester
INDUSTRY & TECHNOLOGY
This course provides the foundations for employment in
food service including hotels, restaurants, airline, cruise
ships, and private catering. Course covers international
food preparation, use of industrial food preparation
equipment, management and employability skills. Students must show proof of a negative TB test dated within
the past year before being placed at site. For courses 8342
and 8343, up to 15 high school credits per semester can
be earned. Upon completion of two semesters of this
course, 11.5 college units can be earned.
Culinary Arts 3
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
1-2 Semesters
11, 12, Adult
None
5 per semester
Law Enforcement
1-2 Semesters
11, 12
High school students only
5 per semester
1-2 Semesters
11, 12
High school students only
10 per semester
This class offers instruction in animal behavior, disease,
safety, nutrition, handling and vocabulary regarding animals and breed identification. Training will be available
in public and private animal care facilities. Students
must complete two (2) semesters to earn a Certificate of
Completion.
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
1-2 Semesters
11, 12
High school students only
15 per semester
This class offers advanced instruction in animal behavior,
disease, safety, nutrition, handling and vocabulary regarding animals and breed identification. Training will be
available in public and private animal care facilities. Students must complete two (2) semesters to earn a Certificate of Completion.
Auto Collision Repair 1-2
The ROP Law Enforcement Class prepares students for the
transition from school to the real life criminal justice system. Students will learn how to take reports, handle simple investigations, and how to respond to citizens
needing law enforcement assistance. Classroom instruction and working with local law enforcement agencies
will help students to develop a professional attitude,
which can lead to an exciting and challenging career
.
School Age Care/Recreation Aide
(Internship)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
Animal Care 3-4 (Internship)
This one semester class focuses on the techniques used
in the Professional Pastry Kitchen. The advanced culinary students will enhance their skills in preparing
many desserts including the classics and new art form.
Pastry doughs, creams sauces, breads, cakes, pies and
chocolate are the focus of this exciting course.
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
Animal Care 1-2 (Internship)
1-2 Semesters
11, 12
High school students only
5 per semester
This course prepares students to work with children in
after school programs at elementary schools, child development centers, private schools, parks, and recreation
centers. The course covers principles in school age development, effective guidance, discipline, techniques in
tutoring, games and recreational activities. Students will
meet for class instruction the first 6 weeks and after
placement in internships, students will meet 1 day each
week for approximately 11⁄2 hours in class and spend 31⁄2
hours in internship. After successful completion of 2 se-
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
1-2 Semesters
11, 12
High school students only
10 per semester
The Auto Collision Repair and Painting class prepares
the student for work in autobody repair shops, dealerships, insurance companies, parts departments, detail
shops and paint retail sales. All the technical areas of collision repair and painting are covered including sanding, masking, dent repair, MIG/oxyacetylene welding,
hand and power tool usage, priming, painting, spraygun
usage, replacing bolt on panels (doors/fenders), glass and
door trim repair, detailing and color match fundamentals. Key areas of the Inter Industry Conference on Auto
Collision Repair course are included. Attendance, punctuality, organization and teamwork are encouraged.
Auto Collision Repair 3-4
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
1-2 Semesters
11, 12
High school students only
10 per semester
The Auto Collision Repair and Painting class prepares
the student for work in autobody repair shops, dealerships, insurance companies, parts departments, detail
ROP 99
shops and paint retail sales. All the technical areas of collision repair and painting are covered including sanding, masking, dent repair, MIG/oxyacetylene welding,
hand and power tool usage, priming, painting, spraygun
usage, replacing bolt on panels (doors/fenders), glass and
door trim repair, detailing and color match fundamentals. Key areas of the Inter Industry Conference on Auto
Collision Repair course are included. Attendance, punctuality, organization and teamwork are encouraged.
Second year students do several overall paint jobs as well
as formulating and mixing paint. Other skill areas include welding in panels, advanced dent repair methods,
advanced painting techniques as well as career opportunities and placement assistance.
Careers in Auto Collision Repair,
Introduction to
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
1 Semester
11, 12
High school students only
5 per semester
The introduction to careers in auto collision repair and
painting class introduces the student to work in auto
body repair shops, dealerships, insurance companies,
parts departments, detail shops, and paint retail sales
and prepares students for the auto collision repair class.
This class covers the fundamental areas: vehicle construction, collision repair, damage analysis, estimate
writing, technical aspects of painting, and career opportunities in the automotive field.
Landscape/Floral Occupations (Internship)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
Learning opportunities include landscape installation,
plant production and floral basics. Student training sites
include retail and wholesale nurseries, parks, gardens,
and florist shops. Two semesters of this class provide one
semester credit in Life Science or Physical Science credit.
This course articulates with LBCC horticulture program.
Landscape/Plant Technician
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
Sports Turf
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
1-2 Semesters
11, 12
High school students only
5 per semester
This course will provide entry-level training in framing,
electrical and plumbing. Students will acquire knowledge in use, care and upkeep of equipment. Attendance
will play a major part in a student successfully completing this course. A safety test must be passed prior to operation of equipment.
Graphic Design
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
1-2 Semesters
11, 12, Adult
Basic computer skills recommended
5 per semester
Students receive training in graphic design including
computer graphics, graphic design principles and computer typography. Students can learn design and layout
skills, photographic manipulation, and vector based
drawing skills. Skills in Adobe Creative Suite 2 programs
including InDesign, Illustrator and Photoshop can also
be developed. A certificate of completion may be given
upon successful completion of the class.
1-2 Semesters
11, 12
None
5 per semester
This course is designed to prepare students for work in
retail and wholesale nurseries, landscape maintenance
companies, parks and related industries. Course will
cover skills associated with maintaining plants in retail
and wholesale outlets and learning to start your own
business in the maintenance of commercial and residential landscapes.
Construction
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
1-2 Semesters
11, 12, Adult
None
10 per semester
1-2 Semesters
11, 12
Strong desire to pursue career in
equipment operation, high school
students only
5 per semester
Use, maintenance and operation of heavy and light
equipment will be emphasized such as tractors and lawn
mowers. The many careers in this field will be explored.
Television/Media Production 1-2
(Internship)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options
Prerequisite:
Course Credit:
1-2 Semesters
11, 12
High school students only
10 per semester
This course prepares students for entry-level positions in
the broadcast industry. Course covers aspects of video
and audio production. Areas covered include: writing for
television, studio setup, lighting, camera, audio and
props. Students will produce a variety of video formats
including commercial, talk/variety, news, and music
videos. Students will participate in the production of student-produced television programs.
ROP 100
Course Descriptions
Science
BIOLOGICAL/LIFE COURSES
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
Anatomy & Physiology
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Anatomy & Physiology (Honors)
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Biology 1
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Biology 2
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Biology 1-2
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Biology Accelerated
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Biology (AP)
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Biomedical Research
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Forensic Science
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Biology IB HL 1
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Biology IB HL 2
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Life Science 1-2
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Marine Biology 1-2
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Marine Biology Accelerated
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Zoology
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
PHYSICAL/EARTH COURSES
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Automotive and Transportation Technology
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Chemistry 1-2
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Chemistry 1-2 (Honors)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Chemistry 3-4
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Chemistry (AP)
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Earth Science 1-2
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Environmental Science
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Environmental Science (AP)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Geology
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Chemistry IB HL 1
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Chemistry IB HL 2
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Introduction to Digital Circuits & Robotics
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Introduction to Engineering
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Laboratory Earth Science 1-2
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Laboratory Physical Science 1-2
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Physical Oceanography
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Physical Science 1-2
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Physics 1-2
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Physics 1-2 (Honors)
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Physics “B” (AP)
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Physics “C” (AP)
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
PLTW: Introduction to Engineering Design
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
PLTW: Principles of Engineering
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
PLTW: Digital Electronics
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
PLTW: Computer Integrated Manufacturing
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
PLTW: Engineering Design & Development
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Principles of Engineering 1-2
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Directed Research in Science
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
•
Course offered
IB Int’l. Bac.
Biotechnology
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
Avalon High School
Cabrillo High School
California Academy of Math & Science
David Starr Jordan High School
Lakewood High School
Science 101
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
Robert A. Millikan High School
Polytechnic High School
Renaissance High School for the Arts
Will J. Reid High School
Woodrow Wilson Classical High School
Each science course offered will satisfy one of
the two years of Science (biological/life
and/or physical/earth) required for graduation, unless otherwise noted.
**Courses do not meet NCAA or UC requirements.
BIOLOGICAL/LIFE SCIENCES
Anatomy and Physiology ______________ 3813
Anatomy and Physiology (Honors)__________________ 3815
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisites:
2 Semesters
10, 11, 12
A grade of “C” or better in Biology,
SSC 5-6 or teacher recommendation
(Honors requires science grade of “B” and
science teacher recommendation.)
This course is a study of the structures and functions of
the human body, and their interrelationships. Content
is built around major biological concepts which include:
historical perspectives, mathematical and analytical
skills, and interdisciplinary approaches to discovery.
Concepts are reinforced with a strong emphasis on laboratory experiences, outside research, and the integration of all sciences. Dissection of preserved organisms is
part of the laboratory experience. The honors level
course differs from the regular course by having both a
greater breadth of topics and greater depth of coverage
of the content.
These courses will meet the “d” or “g” entrance requirement for the
University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Honors credit may not be available for Grades 9&10
Biology 2_________________________________________ 3864
Biology 2 SDAIE ______________________________________ 3866
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
This course is the 2nd year of the Biology 1-2 sequence
which studies the origins, structures, functions, reproduction, growth, development, interactions and behaviors of living things. Content is built around major
biological concepts which include: historical perspectives, mathematical and analytical skills, and interdisciplinary approaches to discovery. The major biological
concepts explored include the classification of organisms, cell structure and function, the change and diversification of organisms, ecosystems and their
interactions, and the influence of humankind on ecosystems. Concepts are reinforced with a strong emphasis on
laboratory experiences and the integration of all sciences. Applications of concepts to society, individuals,
and technology are included.
This course will meet one semester of the "d" or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University
systems.
NCAA Approved – .5 CR/YR Max
Biology 1-2_____________________________________ 3801
Biology 1-2 ACCESS __________________________________ 3800
Biology Accelerated ________________________________ 3803
Biology 1-2 SDAIE __________________________________ 3802
**Biology 1-2 SDAIE/PLS __________________________ 3816
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Biology 1_________________________________________3860
Biology 1 SDAIE ______________________________________ 3862
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
9-12
Algebra 1-2 or AB (can be concurrently
enrolled)
This course is the first year of a two year course that studies the origins, structures, functions, reproduction,
growth, development, interactions and behaviors of living things. Content is built around major biological
concepts which include: historical perspectives, mathematical and analytical skills, and interdisciplinary approaches to discovery. The major biological concepts
explored include the classification of organisms, cell
structure and function, the change and diversification
of organisms, ecosystems and their interactions, and the
influence of humankind on ecosystems. Concepts are reinforced with a strong emphasis on laboratory experiences and the integration of all sciences. Applications of
concepts to society, individuals, and technology are included.
This course will meet one semester of the "d" or "g" entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University
systems.
NCAA Approved – .5 CR/YR Max
2 Semesters
9-12
Algebra 1-2 or CD (can be concurrently
enrolled) with a C or better, and
Biology I
2 Semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Algebra 1-2 or Algebra CD (can be
taken concurrently), or Science teacher
recommendation (Accelerated requires
Algebra completed with a “C” or better.
This course is a study of the origins, structures, functions,
reproduction, growth, development, interactions and behaviors of living things. Content is built around major
biological concepts which include: historical perspectives, mathematical and analytical skills, and interdisciplinary approaches to discovery. The major biological
concepts explored include the classification of organisms,
cell structure and function, the change and diversification of organisms, ecosystems and their interactions, and
the influence of humankind on ecosystems. Concepts are
reinforced with a strong emphasis on laboratory experiences and the integration of all sciences. Applications of
concepts to society, individuals, and technology are included. The accelerated level course differs from the regular course by having both a greater breadth of topics
and greater depth of coverage of the content. It also utilizes a college level textbook to help facilitate these differences.
This course will meet the “d” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
This course is also available as a four semester course (2 semesters Biology 1, 2 semesters Biology 2)
Science 102
Biology (AP)_________________________________ 3807
Biomedical Research___________________ 3799
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
10, 11, 12
Biology 1-2 with a “B” or better &
parents permission, Chemistry
recommended
This course studies the conceptual framework, knowledge, and analytical skills to develop student understanding of the rapidly changing science of biology. The
four areas emphasized are molecular and cellular biology; genetics and evolution; organismal and population
biology; and laboratory work.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This course will meet the “d” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Biology IB HL 1______________________________ 3861
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
11
Biology 1-2 and Chemistry 1-2 with a
“C” or better
An upper level biology course which is part of the International Baccalaureate Program that studies concepts of
biology, such as: cells, the chemistry of life, genetics,
ecology, evolution, human health and physiology. Concepts learned during the course will be applied in the
laboratory setting and through the completion of activities. This course will prepare students to take the IB Biology exam at the higher level.
This course will meet the "d" or "g" entrance requirements for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Biology IB HL 2______________________________ 3863
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
12
IB Biology HL I with a “C” or better
An upper level biology course which is part of the International Baccalaureate Program that studies extended
topics in general biology. Students will study, in detail
the following topics: nucleic acids and proteins, cell respiration and photosynthesis, genetics, human reproduction, the immune system, the physiology of the
nervous system and excretion, as well as plant science.
Students will perform laboratories and activities based
on the content. This course prepares students to take the
IB Biology exam.
This course will meet the "d" or "g" entrance requirements for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
2 Semesters
12
Lab Physical Science, Biology, Honors
Chemistry 1-2, Algebra 1-2, or
Algebra CD, Geometry 1-2 with a “C” or
better.
Biomedical Research is a course offered, by application,
to twelve exceptional science students in their senior
year. The current shortage of physicians entering biomedical research in this country has reached crisis proportion, and the National Institutes of Health are
promoting various educational efforts to remedy the
problem. This course, which represents a joint effort by
the General Clinical Research Centers of Cedars-Sinai
and Harbor-UCLA Medical Centers and Long Beach
Polytechnic High School, is designed to provide a meaningful and multifaceted introduction to the field of clinical, biomedical research to high school students who
might, through early exposure, be influenced to direct
their career efforts toward clinical research. The course
strongly supports and extends the entire first strand of
LBUSD Science Standards, Investigation and Experimentation. Both didactic and clinical components are
incorporated into the curriculum, which spans two semesters. The didactic component includes such topics
as bio-statistics, ethical considerations in research,
human subject safety requirements, and public health
issues. The clinical component involves the placement
of teams of two students, or “buddy teams,” with a
physician researcher/ mentor who is currently working
on National Institutes of Health-funded research protocols. Once weekly the students will travel to the hospital site to work with the mentors on the protocol. At the
program’s culmination, the students will prepare and
present a professional quality poster (or PowerPoint) explaining their protocol to a group of research physicians,
the school site administrator and teacher, members of
the Cedars-Sinai Volunteer Office, Office of Research
from Cedars, and other interested staff.
This course will meet the “d” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
Forensic Science____________________________ 4062
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
11, 12
Biology or Chemistry with a “C” or
better, or science teacher
recommendation
Forensic Science is the application of science to the law.
This course is designed for students interested in learning the theoretical science concepts pertaining to forensic science. This course will be a laboratory class
involving scientific investigations using microscopy,
chromatography, comparative analysis techniques, electrophoresis, spot tests, qualitative analysis, mass comparisons, density analysis, and other qualitative and
quantitative examinations.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Science 103
Life Science 1-2_____________________________
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
Meets the Life Science graduation requirement
Marine Biology 1-2_______________________ 3809
Marine Biology 1-2 Accelerated______________ 3811
Marine Biology Access___________________________ 3812
2 Semesters
10, 11, 12
Biology 1-2 with a “C” or better, or
science teacher recommendation
(Accelerated requires a grade of “B” or
better and science teacher
recommendation.)
These courses of study include physical oceanography,
marine ecology, evolution of marine species, and marine
flora and fauna. In addition to familiarizing students
with the features of the marine environment which is
an integral part of Southern California, this course helps
to acquaint students with the ecology of other marine
ecosystems, and occupational opportunities present in
the field of marine biology and oceanography. Dissection of preserved organisms, field research, and scientific
reporting are all part of the laboratory experience. The
accelerated level course differs from the regular course
by having both a greater breadth of topics and greater
depth of coverage of the content.
These courses will meet the “d” or “g” entrance requirement for the
University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Zoology________________________________________ 3842
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
11, 12
Biology 1-2 with a “C” or better, or
science teacher recommendation
Students in this course study animal classification, ecology, anatomy, and physiology. The unity and diversity
of animal life and the complimentary of structure and
function are basic themes. Dissection of preserved organisms is part of the laboratory experience.
This course will meet the “d” or “g” requirement for the University of
California and California State University Systems.
NCAA Approved
**Automotive and Transportation
Technology
This course studies basic life forms. Students recognize
the interdependence of living organisms and the importance of maintaining a balance in nature. Students
develop awareness of growing technological advances
and possible career choices. Understanding is enhanced
by involving students in the inquiry approach. Laboratory activities are used whenever possible.
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
PHYSICAL/EARTH SCIENCES
4001
**Life Science SDAIE ________________________________ 4003
**Life Science SDAIE/PLS __________________________ 4005
(**Life Science SDC_________________________________ 5000)
___________________________________
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2680
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Algebra 1-2 or Algebra CD, computer
experience, Electronics 1-2
This course enables students to achieve understanding
of fundamental physical processes and critical thinking
skills as they apply to automobiles and transportation
through laboratory-based experiences as well as classroom instruction. This course emphasizes theory and
hands-on lab work including 1) a study of the various
principles, designs and construction of large and small
internal combustion engines and their drive trains and
components; 2) the automobile chassis and devices relating to it; 3) the theory, operation, maintenance, adjustment, and repair of the support systems of an
automobile, and 4) metallurgy, origins of materials, and
space. The course presents a practical approach to the
physical/earth sciences. A final project is required in the
second semester.
Meets Physical Earth Science graduation requirement
Chemistry 1-2________________________________ 3831
Chemistry 1-2 SDAIE_____________________________ 3836
Chemistry 1-2 Access____________________________ 3830
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
10, 11, 12
Algebra 1-2 or Algebra CD with a “C” or
better or science teacher
recommendation
This course studies fundamental chemical concepts,
such as atomic theory, the mole, energy relationships,
oxidation-reduction, chemical bonding, equilibrium, periodicity, solutions, and acids-bases. Unifying principles
are developed through experiments and observations in
the laboratory. Applications of concepts to society, individuals, and technology are also included.
This course will meet the “d” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Chemistry 1-2 (Honors)______________ 3832
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
10, 11, 12
Algebra 1-2 or Algebra CD and
Geometry 1-2 with a “B” or better
and concurrent enrollment in 3rd
year math
In Chemistry 1-2 Honors, the same concepts will be
covered as in Chemistry 1-2, but in greater depth and
will be supplemented by additional laboratory experiences using more advanced instrumentation and tech-
Science 104
nology. Also, in Chemistry 1-2 Honors, there is a greater
emphasis on mathematical formulation of principles,
and the application of mathematical interpretation of
chemistry concepts. A college level textbook and supplemental materials facilitate these differences.
This course will meet the “d” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
This course will meet the "d" or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Earth Science 1-2__________________________ 4008
Earth Science SDC_________________________________ 5411
Chemistry (AP)_____________________________ 3835
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
completes the preparation for students to take the IB
Chemistry exam.
2 Semesters
10, 11, 12
Chemistry 1-2 with a grade of “C” or
better or science teacher
recommendation
This course provides the conceptual basis, content
knowledge and methodological skills for understanding
the theoretical aspects of general chemistry. Topics such
as the structure of matter, kinetic theory of gases, chemical equilibria, chemical kinetics, and the basic concepts
of thermodynamics are presented in-depth.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This course will meet the “d” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
9-12
None
Earth Science 1-2 is laboratory-based approach to the
California High School Earth Science Content Standards.
Students should spend approximately forty percent
(40%) of their class time engaged in hands-on activities.
Introductory principles of astronomy and earth sciences
will be explored, including the solar system, cosmology,
plate tectonics, energy, biogeochemical cycles, the atmosphere, and California geology. Constructivist methods of teaching are employed to ensure the best possible
comprehension and retention of science concepts. Science activities will be based on the California Science
Content Standards as delineated in the California Science Framework and will apply the skills and techniques
outlined in the Investigation and Experimentation
Strand of the Content Standards.
Meets Physical/Earth Science graduation requirements
Chemistry IB HL 1
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
___________________________
3824
2 Semesters
11
Biology 1-2 and Chemistry 1-2 with a
“B” or better or science teacher
recommendation
This course is an upper level chemistry course which is
part of the International Baccalaureate Program that
covers general chemistry procedures and terms, stoichiometry, atomic theory, periodicity, bonding, states of
matter, energetics, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases,
oxidation/reduction, and organic chemistry. This course
prepares students to take the IB Chemistry exam at a
higher level.
Environmental Science (AP) ______ 4030
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
10-12
Biology and Algebra 1-2 or CD with a
“C” or better and a UC “g” or “d” level
course in physical or earth sciences
The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to
provide students with the scientific principles, concepts,
and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world; to identify and analyze
environmental problems both natural and humanmade; to evaluate the relative risks associated with these
problems; and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.
This course will meet the "d" or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nations colleges and universities.
NCAA Approved
This course will meet “d” or "g" entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
Chemistry IB HL 2___________________________ 3822
NCAA Approved
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
12
IB Chemistry HLI with a “C” or better
This course is an upper level chemistry course which is
part of the International Baccalaureate Program that
covers stoichiometry, atomic theory, periodicity, bonding states of matter, energetics, kinetics, equilibrium,
acids and bases, oxidation/reduction, organic chemistry,
human biochemistry, and medicines/ drugs. This course
Environmental Science _______________ 4031
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
11-12
Biology and Algebra 1-2 or CD with a
“C” or better and a course in physical or
earth sciences
This Environmental Science course is a standards-based
study of the relationship between humans and the world
in which we live. It is a multidisciplinary science that is
Science 105
based on the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of
the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and
to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or
preventing them.
This course will meet "g" entrance requirement for the University of
California and California State University systems.
Geology
___________________________________________
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
4064
2 Semesters
10-12
Previous science course with a “C” or
better, or science teacher
recommendation
This course studies the basic principles of physical and
historical geology. Students participate in lab intensive
instruction that emphasizes local, regional and global
geologic features. The students develop an awareness of
the importance of the Earth Sciences to society and are
exposed to many possible geologic career opportunities.
This course will meet the "g" entrance requirement for the University of
California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Introduction to Digital Circuits
and Robotics ___________________________________ 2713
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
11-12
Algebra 1-2 or Algebra CD and
Electronics 1-2 with a “B” or better
This course presents the foundation of physics, math,
logic, and material science concepts employed in the design, manufacture, and implementation of electronic
digital systems as used in micro-controllers, control systems and computers and their economic impact on the
“wealth” of the nation. The use of physics, math logic
and material science concepts are used to design, construct and implement digital logic circuits. This course
will serve as an introductory foundation for students
pursuing careers in math, science, engineering and related fields. The material will be presented in a serial
manner, the sequence of concepts will build upon the
previously presented. Class time and grade will be divided between lectures and labs, 50% for each.
ested in an engineering career. Because engineering is
a field of many disciplines, the course will address
those physics concepts which are universal to all disciplines. These concepts include: force, work, rate of
change, energy, amplifiers and controllers. Connections and applications will be made to the engineering
disciplines of: mechanical, civil, mineral and mining,
industrial, manufacturing, electrical, computer, optical,
acoustical, aerospace, chemical, metallurgy, materials
and ceramics.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
Introduction to Engineering
Science ___________________________________________ 2717
Length of course:
2 Semesters
Grade Level Option:
9
Prerequisite:
Algebra 1-2 or Algebra CD
This interdisciplinary course teaches hands-on physical
science, mechanics, electronics, computers, and engineering design. Engineering related coverage of material from the following physical science areas:
astronomy and optics, electromagnetic spectrum, electricity and magnetism, forces and motion, thermofluid systems, and materials science. Basic mechanical
devices (levers, gears, pulleys, springs, etc.) and linkages are mathematically described and examined in lab
work. An introduction to basic electronics is given and
students learn to breadboard practical circuits. A computer for every student, networked together, allows for
computer delivered instruction, simulations, engineering application training, and introductory programming lessons. Students get an introduction to the
design process and technical project documentation.
They participate in design teams to brainstorm, design
and build a hardware project (e.g., a rocket launch
complex, including: two multiple-rail launch stands,
an electrical launch control box, and tools for predicting and measuring rocket maximum altitude). Students develop technical team management skill while
preparing a professional presentation of their final design package to be given to an outside audience of college engineering students.
This course meets the “g” requirement for the University of California
and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
This course will meet the "g" entrance requirement for the University of
California and California State University systems.
Laboratory Earth Science 1-2__________4009
Introduction to Engineering _________ 2716
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Length of course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
9-10
Algebra 1-2 or Algebra AB (can be
concurrently enrolled)
Introduction to Engineering is a physical science
course targeted to 9th and 10th grade students inter-
Laboratory Earth Science 1-2 SDAIE____________ 4006
Laboratory Earth Science SDAIE/PLS____________ 4025
2 Semesters
9-12
Previous science and Algebra 1-2 or
Algebra CD (can be concurrent) with a
“C” or better, or science teacher
recommendation
Laboratory Earth Science 1-2 is laboratory-based approach to the California High School Earth Science Content Standards. Students should spend approximately
Science 106
fifty percent (50%) of their class time engaged in investigative activities. Introductory principles of astronomy
and Earth sciences will be explored in detail, including
the solar system, cosmology, plate tectonics, energy, biogeochemical cycles, the atmosphere, and California geology. Students will evaluate evidence from experiments
and technology used by scientists to understand the nature of the universe and the Earth. They will also explore how basic interactions of matter and energy
control global activity in the atmosphere, hydrosphere,
lithosphere, and biosphere. Constructivist methods of
teaching are employed to ensure the best possible comprehension and retention of science concepts. Science
activities will be based on the California Science Content Standards as delineated in the California Science
Framework and will apply the skills and techniques outlined in the Investigation and Experimentation Strand
of the Content Standards.
Physical Science 1-2_____________________ 4011
Physical Science 1-2 SDAIE_________________________ 4013
Physical Science 1-2 SDAIE/PLS___________________ 4010
(**Physical Science 1-2 SDC_______________________ 5012)
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
This course studies the characteristics and utilization of
matter and energy, the composition and uses of common materials, forces and motion, and the expanding
field of space technology. Included are studies of the
earth’s history, natural features, climate, astronomy, and
oceanography. Students develop awareness of growing
technological advances and possible career choices. Understanding is enhanced by involving students in the inquiry approach. Laboratory activities are used whenever
possible.
Meets the Physical/Earth Science graduation requirement
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Physics 1-2_____________________________________ 3841
Physics 1-2 Honors__________________________________ 3837
Laboratory Physical Science __________ 4015
Laboratory Physical Science ACC __ 4014
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Previous science and Algebra 1-2 or
Algebra CD (can be concurrent) with a
“C” or better, or science teacher
recommendation
This course is designed to meet the needs of students
who are strong in science, yet seek preparation for chemistry or physics coursework. It enables students to
achieve understanding of the most fundamental physical processes and scientific thought through laboratorybased experiences as well as classroom instruction. The
content emphasizes conceptual physics, chemistry, and
geoscience that relates to everyday life. Application of
these areas to technology and social concerns are also
included. The course represents a practical, rather than
theoretical approach to the physical sciences.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Physical Oceanography_______________ 4026
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
10, 11, 12
Previous science and Algebra 1-2 or
Algebra CD (can be concurrent) with a
“C” or better, or science teacher
recommendation
Students study the earth and ocean basins, waves and
tides, physical and chemical properties of seawater,
oceanic circulation, and ocean transportation. This
course also helps to acquaint students with the occupational opportunities present in the marine sciences and
related fields.
This course will meet the “d” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
10, 11, 12
Algebra 1-2 or Algebra CD and
Geometry 1-2 with a “C” or better, or
science teacher recommendation.
Honors requires a “B” or better.
This course is a standards-based study of fundamental
physics concepts, such as measurement, calculation, and
graphing in kinematics and dynamics, propagation and
conservation of energy and momentum, gravitation and
orbital mechanics, heat and thermodynamics, waves,
optics, electromagnetic phenomena, and relativity and
quantum physics. Emphasis is placed on the utilization
of mathematical, analytical, data acquisition, graphical,
and communication skills as well as interdisciplinary approaches to discovery. Concepts and skills are reinforced
by a strong emphasis on hands-on laboratory experiences and the integration of other branches of science.
Applications to society, individuals, and the utilization
of technology are included. Physics fulfills both the
physical science high school graduation requirement
and the UC/CSU "d" laboratory science requirement. A
course in the biological sciences is also needed to complete the minimum graduation requirement for high
school.
This course will meet the “d” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Physics “B” AP________________________________ 3839
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
11, 12
Algebra 1-2 or Algebra CD, Geometry
1-2, and Intermediate Algebra with
grades of “B” or better
This course covers a comprehensive list of topics from
both classical and modern physics at a college freshman
level in preparation for the Advanced Placement Exam.
A knowledge of algebra and basic trigonometry is re-
NCAA Approved
Science 107
quired; the basic ideas of calculus may be introduced in
connection with physical concepts, such as acceleration
and work. Understanding of the basic principles involved and ability to apply these principles in the solution of problems are major goals of the course.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This course will meet the “d” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Physics “C”: Mechanics AP__________ 3840
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
11, 12
Calculus or concurrent enrollment
This course provides the conceptual basis, content
knowledge, and methodological skills for understanding
the theoretical and analytical aspects of general physics.
Emphasis is on mechanics and/or electricity and magnetism in preparation for the AP Physics C Examination.
Other topics can include kinetic theory and thermodynamics, waves and optics, and modern physics.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This course will meet the “d” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Physics “C”: Electricity &
Magnetism AP______________________________ 3843
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
11, 12
Calculus or concurrent enrollment
AP Physics C is a national calculus-based course in
physics. This course is equivalent to the pre-engineering
introductory Physics course for the university students.
The emphasis is on understanding of the concepts and
skills and using concepts and formulae to solve problems. Laboratory work is an integral part of this course.
Students engage in inquiry-based activities to develop
their understanding of the material of the course. Students work together in small groups to solve problems.
Students present solutions to the class.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This course will meet the “d” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Principles of __________________________________ 3898
Engineering 1-2
Length of course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
11-12
Intermediate Algebra 1-2 and
Chemistry with a “B” or better
This course surveys the major areas of engineering including civil, mechanical, electrical and chemical.
It brings math, science and technology together and enhances general technological/scientific literacy. Students will focus on applied chemistry and physics
throughout the course. A major emphasis will be placed
on hands on laboratory discovery of principles and practices and data collection and interpretation. In addition
to the major engineering concepts, the course will emphasize technology/ society interaction, design and
ethics.
This course will meet the “d” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
PLTW: Introduction to
Engineering Design ____________________ 2501
Length of course:
2 Semesters
Grade Level Option:
9-12
Prerequisite:
None
Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Introduction to Engineering Design course includes the following topics: introductory design, student portfolio development,
sketching and visualization, geometric relationships,
modeling, assembly modeling, model analysis and verification, model documentation, presentation, production, and marketing.
These units represent a
comprehensive introduction to the field of engineering
design using computer aided design (CAD) tools.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
PLTW: Principles of
Engineering ________________________________ 2632
Length of course:
2 Semesters
Grade Level Option:
9-12
Prerequisite:
None
Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Principles of Engineering
course includes the following topics: definitions and
types of engineering, communication and documentation, design process, engineering systems, statics and
strengths of materials, materials and strength of materials, engineering for reliability, and kinematics. These
topics represent a comprehensive introduction to the
field of engineering.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Science 108
PLTW: Digital Electronics
_________
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
PLTW: Computer Integrated
Manufacturing _____________________________
Length of course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
INTEGRATED SCIENCE
2507
Length of course:
2 Semesters
Grade Level Option:
10-12
Prerequisite:
None
Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Digital Electronics course
includes the following topics: electronics fundamentals,
number systems, logic gates, Boolean algebra, combinational circuit design, binary addition, flip-flops, shift registers and counters, logic families and microprocessors.
These topics represent a comprehensive introduction to
the field of digital electronics.
2 Semesters
10-12
PLTW Intro. to Eng. Design and
PLTW Prin. of Eng.
Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Computer Integrated Manufacturing is an industry specialized course that enhances computer modeling skills by applying principles
of robotics and automation to the creation of models of
three-dimensional designs.
This course will meet the “g” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Directed Research in Science_____ 4060
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
This course is designed for students seeking experiences
in science-related study outside the normal confines of
a regular science classroom. Students will participate in
extracurricular activities outside the school day, such as
National Science Bowl, National Science Olympiad, District and County Science Fairs, LACOE Environmental
Science Day, etc. Students design and conduct scientific
experiments with the guidance of the instructor using a
variety of resources such as university libraries, interviews with working scientists and other professionals,
Internet research, etc. Students also research career opportunities in the sciences and related fields. This course
provides in-depth study of selected topics which may
not be covered in the normal course of science study.
Students engage in a college-style seminar format where
they present and defend their research to their peers and
have an opportunity to listen to constructive criticism
and amend their projects. This course encourages longterm study and research and therefore may be repeated
for up to 20 units in high school, but this will be exceptional and only with the permission of the instructor.
The average student will earn approximately 2.5 per semester and the maximum per semester will be 5.
PLTW: Engineering Design
and Development________________________ 2509
Length of course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 Semesters
11-12
Completion or current enrollment in a
life or physical science course and/or
permission of instructor
2 Semesters
11-12
PLTW Intro. to Eng. Design and
PLTW Prin. of Eng.
Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Engineering Design and
Development is a capstone course designed to draw
upon the sum of the student’s knowledge and skills acquired in previous PLTW courses.
This course will meet the “d” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
NCAA Approved
Science 109
110
Course Descriptions
Visual/
Performing Arts
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
DANCE
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Ballet Folklorico
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Dance 1-2 (Beginning Dance)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Dance 3-4 (Intermed. Dance 1-2)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Dance 5-6 (Intermed. Dance 3-4)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Dance 7-8 (Intermed. Dance 5-6)
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Dance 9-10 (Adv. Mod. Dance 1-2)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
GENERAL
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
MUSIC
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Exploring Music
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Music Theory (AP)
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MUSIC - INSTRUMENTAL
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Advanced
Chamber
Orchestra
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Band 1-2, 3-8
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Guitar 1-2
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Guitar 3-8
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Instruments
1-2,
3-4
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Intermediate String Orchestra
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Jazz Band 1-2, 3-8
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Orchestra 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-8
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Piano
1-2
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Piano 3-8
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Steel Drums
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Symphonic Winds 1-2, 3-8
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MUSIC - VOCAL
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Cecilian Singers 1-2, 3-8
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Chorus 1-2
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Chorus 3-8
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Concert Choir 1-2
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Concert Choir 3-4
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Concert Choir 5-6
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Concert Choir 7-8
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
International Choir
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Studio/Vocal Jazz Singers 1-2
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Studio/Vocal Jazz Singers 3-4
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Studio/Vocal Jazz Singers 5-6
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Studio/Vocal Jazz Singers 7-8
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Varsity Chorale 1-2, 3-8
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Vocal Ensemble/Chamber Singers 1-2,
3-8
•
Visual/Performing Arts 111
•
•
•
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
THEATRE ARTS
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Advanced Theater Arts
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Cinema 1-2
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Theater Arts IB HL
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Improvisation for the Theater 1-2
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Intermediate Theater Arts
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Introduction to Theater Arts
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Intro. to Video Production 1-2, 3-4
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Play Production
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Production Stage Crew 1-6
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Stage Technology
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
VISUAL ARTS
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Advanced Costume Design
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Architectural Design 1-2
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Architectural
Design
3-4,
5-6
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Art and Animation 1-2
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Art and Animation 3-4
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Art History (AP)
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Ceramics
1-6
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Digital Art and Imaging
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Digital Filmmaking
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Drawing/Painting 1-2
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Drawing/Painting
3-4
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Drawing/Painting 5-8
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Exploring Art 1-2
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Film IB HL 1
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Film
IB
HL
2
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Graphic Design and Printmaking
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Introduction to Costume Design
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Visual Art IB SL
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Photography
1-2
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Photography 3-4
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Studio Art: Drawing AP
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Studio Art: 2D Design Portfolio AP
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Studio Art: 3D Design Portfolio AP
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Three Dimensional Art 1-2
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Three Dimensional Art 3-8
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
•
Course offered
IB Int’l. Bac.
Biotechnology
AHS
CHS
CAMS
JHS
LHS
Avalon High School
Cabrillo High School
California Academy of Math & Science
David Starr Jordan High School
Lakewood High School
Visual/Performing Arts 112
MHS
PHS
RHSA
RHS
WHS
Robert A. Millikan High School
Polytechnic High School
Renaissance High School for the Arts
Will J. Reid High School
Woodrow Wilson Classical High School
Each visual/performing arts course that is offered will satisfy the graduation requirement
for fine arts, unless otherwise noted.
Ballet Folklorico____________________________3480
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
This course is designed to teach students the cultural
dances of Mexico and other Latin countries, their historical, geographical, and mythological roots, the significance of the costumes and music and the instrument
associated with each one. This course will help students
learn the skills of dance while improving their technique, poise, self-confidence and creative ability as well
as deepening their understanding of and appreciation
for the rich and colorful heritage that each dance represents.
This course will meet the “f” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
Dance 1-2
______________________________________
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
3483
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Teacher’s approval
This course helps students learn the beginning skills of
dance while improving their techniques, poise, self-confidence, and creative ability. Students will choreograph
and dance in class presentations.
These courses meet the “f” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
Dance 3-4 ______________________________________ 3484
Dance 5-6 _______________________________________3485
Dance 7-8 ______________________________________ 3486
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Teacher’s approval
This course helps students learn the advanced skills of
dance while improving their techniques, poise, self-confidence, and creative ability. Students will choreograph
and dance in a school production.
DANCE
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
Dance 9-10____________________________________ 3487
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Audition and Teacher’s approval
These courses help students learn the intermediate and
advanced skills of dance while improving their techniques, poise, self-confidence, and creative ability. Students will choreograph and dance in school
productions. Students will also demonstrate development and refinement of skills needed to create dances
with coherence and aesthetic unity.
These courses meet the “f” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
This course will meet the “f” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
MUSIC - GENERAL
Exploring Music____________________________ 3390
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Approval of Instructor
Exploring Music is a course designed to increase the
nonperformer’s understanding and enjoyment of music.
This course is based on the California Visual and Performing Arts Content Standards, emphasizing an understanding of the elements and structure of music.
Recordings, videos, films, and live concerts are used to
study the music of cultures and periods. Although no
previous technical knowledge of music is required, the
instructor’s approval is needed for admission.
Music Theory (AP)________________________ 3392
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Music reading ability is recommended
Music Theory is a course designed for to develop the
ability to recognize, understand, and describe the basic
materials and processes of music. Students will extend
their technical skills involved in music reading, analyzing, score analysis, arranging, and composing. Students
will develop skills with melodic and harmonic analysis
to be used to manipulate musical materials for their own
creative activities. California Visual and Performing Arts
Standards—Advanced are infused throughout the
course.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This course will meet the “f” or “g” entrance requirement for the
University of California and California State University systems.
MUSIC - INSTRUMENTAL
Advanced Chamber Orchestra__ 3458
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-12
Approval of instructor
Advanced Chamber Orchestra is a course for advanced
string students with extensive training and experience.
Students study and perform a variety of orchestra and
chamber music from different historical periods. StuVisual/Performing Arts 113
dents continue their development of technique, musicianship, as well as personal practice habits and performance etiquette. Standard orchestral compositions
are studied for performance at special school events such
as assemblies, plays and musical theater productions,
and at concerts and festivals. Students also study and
perform chamber music in small ensembles. Students
borrowing school instruments are expected to insure
them. Rehearsals and performance outside of class time
are required. California Visual and Performing Arts Standards are infused throughout the course.
This course will meet the “f” or “g” entrance requirement for the
University of California and California State University systems.
Band 1-2_________________________________________ 3429
Band 3-8 ________________________________________3430
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2-8 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Teacher’s approval
Band is a course for students who have had previous experience in playing an instrument. Emphasis in this
course is given to the students’ development of technique and musicianship. Standard band compositions
are studied for performance at special school events such
as assemblies, athletic contests, and at parades, concerts,
and festivals. Students borrowing school instruments
are expected to insure them. Rehearsals and performances outside of class time are required. California Visual and Performing Arts Standards are infused
throughout the course.
Band 1-2 will meet the “f” entrance requirement for the University of
California and California State University systems.
Band 3-4, 5-6, 7-8 will meet the “f” or “g” entrance requirement for
the University of California and California State University systems.
Guitar 1-2______________________________________ 3477
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Teacher’s approval
Guitar is a course for students with no previous experience or training on the guitar. The course addresses all
five strands of the California Visual and Performing Arts
Content Standards. The emphasis of this course is on
the development of basic guitar techniques, music reading skills, comprehension of the fundamentals of music
theory and harmony, as well as the development of personal practice habits and performance etiquette. Having a guitar at home is not required; students have
adequate class time to practice independently on school
instruments.
This course meets the “f” entrance requirement for the University of
California and California State University systems.
Guitar 3-8______________________________________ 3479
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
3-8 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Teacher’s approval
Guitar 3-8 is a course for students with previous formal
training on the guitar. Students entering Guitar 3-8
should be able to read and play at a minimum advanced
elementary level. The emphasis of this course is on the
further development of basic guitar technique, music
reading skills, comprehension of more advanced music
theory and harmony concepts, and the further development of personal practice habits and performance etiquette. In addition, students will continue to explore
improvisatory playing and the interpretation of a “leadsheet.” The course addresses all five strands of the California Visual and Performing Arts Content Standards.
Having a guitar at home is not required, but at this level
access to a guitar outside of school is helpful. Students
have a large amount of classtime to practice independently on school instruments.
This course meets the “f” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
Instruments 1-2____________________________ 3466
Instruments 3-4____________________________ 3467
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
Instruments is a course designed for students who wish
to learn to play string, woodwind, brass, or percussion
instruments. The emphasis of this course is on the development of proper playing techniques, theory, musicianship, and ensemble playing. The California Visual
and Performing Arts Content Standards are infused
throughout the course. Students who do not own an instrument may borrow one from the school with the understanding that the borrower insures the instrument.
Each school may specialize in a particular instrument.
Instruments 1-2 meets the “f” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
Instruments 3-4 meets the “f” or “g” entrance requirement for the
University of California and California State University systems.
Intermediate String
Orchestra_______________________________________ 3456
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-12
Approval of instructor
Intermediate String Orchestra is a course students who
have had some previous training and experience in playing a stringed instrument. The emphasis of this course
is on the development of individual technique and musicianship in order to prepare the student to progress to
one of the more advanced lasses. The California Visual
and Performing Arts Content Standards are infused
throughout this course. The Intermediate Orchestra may
perform at special school events such as assemblies,
plays and musical theater productions, and at concerts
Visual/Performing Arts 114
and festivals. Students borrowing school instruments
are expected to insure them. Rehearsals and performance outside of class time are required.
Intermediate String Orchestra meets the “f” or “g ”entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University
systems.
Jazz Band 1-2________________________________ 3443
Jazz Band 3-8_________________________________ 3444
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2-8 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Concurrent enrollment in Band
or Orchestra and Teacher’s approval
Jazz Band is a course for experienced instrumentalists
who wish to study and perform jazz compositions. The
emphasis of this course is on the development of individual techniques, musicianship, performance skills, improvisational techniques, and stylistic interpretations, as
well as the development of personal practice habits and
performance etiquette. The California Visual and performing Arts Content Standards are infused throughout
this course. The Jazz Band my perform at school, civic
functions and festivals. Students borrowing school instruments are expected to insure them. Rehearsals and
performances outside of class time are required.
Jazz Band 1-2 will meet the “f” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
Jazz Band 3-8 will meet the “f” or “g ”entrance requirement for the
University of California and California State University systems.
Orchestra 1-2________________________________ 3451
Orchestra 3-4_________________________________ 3452
Orchestra 5-6_________________________________ 3453
Orchestra 7-8_________________________________ 3454
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2-8 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Teacher’s approval
Orchestra is a course for students with previous instrumental training and experience. The emphasis of this
course is given to the students’ development of technique, musicianship, as well as the development of personal practice habits and performance etiquette.
Standard orchestral compositions are studied for performance at special school events such as assemblies,
plays, and musical theatre productions and at concerts
and festivals. The California Visual and Performing Arts
Content Standards ae infused throughout this course.
Students borrowing school instruments are expected to
insure them. Rehearsals and performances outside of
class time are required.
Orchestra 1-2 will meet the “f” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
Orchestra 3-8 will meet the “f” or “g” entrance requirement for the
University of California and California State University systems.
Piano 1-2_______________________________________ 3473
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Teacher’s approval
Piano 1-2 is a course for students with no previous experience or training on the piano. The emphasis of this
course is on the development of basic piano techniques,
music reading skills, comprehension of the fundamentals of music theory and harmony, as well as the development of personal practice habits and performance
etiquette. The California Visual and Performing Arts
Content Standards are infused throughout the course.
Having a piano at home is not required; students have
adequate class time to practice independently on school
instruments.
This course meets the “f” entrance requirement for the University of
California and California State University systems.
Piano 3-8_______________________________________ 3475
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
3-8 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Teacher’s approval
Piano 3-8 is a course for students with previous training
on the piano. Students entering Piano 3-8 should be
able to read and play at a minimum advanced elementary level. The emphasis of this course is on the further
development of basic traditional piano technique, music
reading skills, comprehension of more advanced music
theory and harmony, and the further development of
personal practice habits and performance etiquette. In
addition, students will continue to explore improvisatory playing and the interpretation of a “lead-sheet.”
The California Visual and Performing Arts Content Standards are infused throughout the course. Having a keyboard at home is not required, but at this level access to
a keyboard outside of school is helpful. Students have a
large amount of classtime to practice independently on
school instruments.
Meets the “f” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
Steel Drum Band_________________________ 3311
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-12
1 year of High School Music or by
audition
This course is designed for students to develop and refine their ability to read, play, improvise and compose
music on steel drums. Immersed in all aspects of music,
they transcribe songs, sight-read accurately and expressively, and analyze music as to musical elements, techniques and use of form. They perform by themselves
and in ensembles a more complex repertoire of music
with accuracy and artistry. Students will also study musicians and the historical aspects and music developed
in various cultures and time periods. The California Visual and Performing Arts Content Standards are infused
Visual/Performing Arts 115
throughout the course. Rehearsals and performances
outside of class time are required.
This course meets the “f” entrance requirement for the University of
California and California State University systems.
Symphonic Winds 1-2_____________________ 3463
Symphonic Winds 3-8_____________________ 3464
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2-8 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Freshman and sophomores will be
admitted in exceptional cases only
Audition with teacher’s approval
Symphonic Winds is a course for advanced wind and
percussion players with previous successful band or orchestra experience. The emphasis of this course is given
to the students’ development of technique, musicianship, as well as the development of personal practice
habits and performance etiquette. This ensemble studies advanced symphonic music of all styles, and comprises the wind and percussion sections of the school
orchestra. The California Visual and Performing Arts
Content Standards are infused throughout the course.
Students borrowing school instruments are expected to
insure them. Rehearsals and performance outside of
class time are required.
Symphonic Winds 1-2 will meet the “f” entrance requirement for the
University of California and California State University systems.
Symphonic Winds 3-8 will meet the “f” or “g” entrance requirement
for the University of California and California State University
systems.
Chorus Voice 1-2___________________________3413
Chorus Voice 3-8___________________________3414
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Chorus is a course for the study and performance of
standard choral repertory selected from many periods
and styles arranged for soprano, alto, tenor, and bass.
The emphasis of this course is on the development of
the singing voice, the ability to sing in harmony, music
reading skills, musicianship, ensemble skills, as well as
the development of personal practice habits and performance etiquette. The California Visual and Performing Arts Content Standards are infused throughout this
course. The Chorus performs at school and community
events, concerts, and participates in festivals. Rehearsals
and performances outside of class time are required.
Chorus Voice 1-2 will meet the “f” entrance requirement of the University of California and California State University systems.
Chorus Voice 3-4 will meet the “f” or “g” entrance requirement of
the University of California and California State University systems.
Concert Choir 1-2 _________________________3417
Concert Choir 3-4__________________________3418
Concert Choir 5-6 _________________________3420
Concert Choir 7-8__________________________3421
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
MUSIC - VOCAL
Cecilian Singers 1-2______________________3400
Cecilian Singers 3-8______________________3401
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2-6 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Teacher’s approval glee or other choral
group experience desirable.
Cecilian Singers is a course designed for the study and
performance of advanced glee repertory selected from
many periods and styles arranged for soprano, second
soprano, and alto voices. Students refine their ensemble
skills, technique, musicianship and music reading skills,
as well as continue the refinement of personal practice
habits and performance etiquette. The California Visual
and Performing Arts Content Standards are infused
throughout this course. This ensemble performs for
school and community events, concerts, and participates in festivals. Rehearsals and performance outside of
class time are required.
Cecilian Singers 1-2 will meet the “f” entrance requirement for the
University of California and California State University systems.
Cecilian Singers 3-8 will meet the “f” or “g” entrance requirement
for the University of California and California State University systems.
2-4 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Teacher’s approval. No previous glee
experience required.
2-8 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12 (Freshmen will be
admitted only in exceptional cases)
Audition with teacher’s approval
Concert Choir is a course designed for experienced
choral singers who study and perform advanced choral
repertory selected from many periods and styles
arranged for soprano, alto, tenor, and bass. Students refine their ensemble skills, technique, musicianship and
music reading skills, as well as continue the refinement
of personal practice habits and performance etiquette.
The California Visual and Performing Arts Content Standards are infused throughout this course. This ensemble
performs for school and community events, concerts,
and participates in festivals. Rehearsals and performances outside of class time are required.
Concert Choir 1-2 will meet the “f” entrance requirement for the
University of California and California State University systems.
Concert Choir 3-8 will meet the “f” or “g” entrance requirement for
the University of California and California State University systems.
International Choir______________________3394
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Teacher’s approval
International Choir is a course designed for intermediate
and advanced singers who study and perform multicultural repertory selected from many periods and styles
arranged for any voicing of soprano, alto, tenor, and
bass. The emphasis in this course is on the development
of the singing voice, music reading skills, musicianship,
Visual/Performing Arts 116
ensemble singing, as well as the development of personal practice habits and performance etiquette. The
California Visual and Performing Arts Content Standards
are infused throughout this course. This ensemble performs at school, concerts, and serves as a vocal outreach
to various organizations in the community.
International Choir meets “f” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
Vocal Ensemble/
Chamber Singers 1-2___________________3422
Vocal Ensemble/
Chamber Singers 3-8___________________3423
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Studio/Vocal
Studio/Vocal
Studio/Vocal
Studio/Vocal
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Jazz
Jazz
Jazz
Jazz
Singers
Singers
Singers
Singers
1-2____3402
3-4____3404
5-6____3406
7-8____3407
2-8 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12 (Freshmen and
sophomores will be admitted in
exceptional cases only
Teacher’s approval
Studio Jazz Singers is a course designed for advanced vocalists who wish to study and perform vocal jazz literature arranged for soprano, alto, tenor, and bass. Students
refine their ensemble skills, select timbres and styles appropriate to each jazz selection, and study chord progressions and improvisation. The California Visual and
Performing Arts Content Standards are infused throughout this course. The Jazz Singers perform at school and
community events and participate in festivals. Many rehearsals and performances outside of school time are required.
2-8 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
(Freshmen and sophomores will be
admitted only in exceptional cases)
Teacher’s approval
Vocal Ensemble/Chamber Singers is a course designed
for advanced choral singers who study and perform
technically difficult choral music from varied styles and
periods arranged for soprano, alto, tenor, and bass. Students refine their ensemble skills, technique, musicianship and music reading skills, as well as continue the
refinement of personal practice habits and performance
etiquette. The California Visual and Performing Arts
Content Standards are infused throughout this course.
This ensemble performs for school and community
events, concerts, and participates in festivals. Rehearsals
and performances outside of class time are required.
Vocal Ensemble 1-2 will meet the “f” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
Vocal Ensemble 3-8 will meet the “f” or “g” entrance requirement for
the University of California and California State University systems.
THEATER ARTS
Studio/Vocal Jazz Singers 1-2 will meet the “f” entrance requirement
for the University of California and California State University systems.
Advanced Theatre Arts
Studio/Vocal Jazz Singers 3-8 will meet the “f” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
Varsity Chorale 1-2_______________________3396
Varsity Chorale 3-8_______________________3397
This course utilizes students’ strengths in acting and expands their repertoire of skills into the areas of writing
and directing. Historical studies of theatrical materials
are emphasized. Play production concepts, the study of
dramatic structure and style and the audition process are
integral pieces of this course.
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2-8 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Admission by tryout only
Varsity Chorale is a singing group which studies and performs standard glee repertory selected from many periods and styles, and is arranged for tenor, baritone, and
bass. The emphasis of this course is on the development
of the singing voice, the ability to sing in harmony,
music reading skills, musicianship, ensemble skills, as
well as the development of personal practice habits and
performance etiquette. The California Visual and Performing Arts Content Standards are infused throughout
this course. The Chorale performs at school and community events, concerts, and participates in festivals. Rehearsals and performances outside of class time are
required.
Varsity Chorale 1-2 will meet the “f” entrance requirement for the
University of California and California State University systems.
Varsity Chorale 3-8 will meet the “f” or “g” entrance requirement for
the University of California and California State University systems.
_____________
3356
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Intermediate Theatre Arts with a grade
of “B” or better and the teacher’s
approval
This course will meet the “f” or “g” entrance requirement for the
University of California and California State University systems.
Cinema 1-2_____________________________________ 1049
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-12
None
Cinema is a course in which students will study filmmaking as an art form from its earliest beginnings
through modern times. Students will study and learn to
appreciate the historical and cultural significance of the
advance of film as an art medium in the modern world.
Students will study and learn to appreciate acting techniques and the filming techniques of directors that create the art medium of film, as well as studying the
individual significance of each director and film in the
context of the historical progression of film art. Students
will study and compare the films of each era with other
Visual/Performing Arts 117
films of that genre or time, learning to ascertain and appreciate cinematic techniques. Students will study the
different genres and types of film, comparing and contrasting them with foreign films and directors. Students
will also apply their knowledge of film by creating and
acting in their own films, following various stages of film
production, such as scriptwriting, storyboarding, and application of film techniques in production. (Parental permission will be needed for selected films.)
dents learn to work productively as part of an ensemble.
These courses meet the “f” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
This course is designed to introduce students to the
world of theatre arts. Exercises to build self-esteem, trust
and empathy are integrated with the technical aspects
of drama. Basic stage terms are taught, vocal and movement exercises as well as writing activities are incorporated. Students learn the art as an audience member as
well as a performer.
Theater Arts IB HL
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
_______________________
6795
1-8 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Acceptance in the IB Magnet or at least
1 yr experience in theatrical studies and
instructor’s approval
This course is taught in a workshop format. Emphasis is
placed on projects that include all aspects of theatre
studies. Students will apply their skills during rehearsals,
performances, critical evaluations and historical studies
of dramatic literature. Each year of study focuses on different periods of the development of world theatre.
This course will meet the “f” or “g” entrance requirement of the University of California and California State University systems.
Introduction to Theater Arts_____3353
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
This course will meet the “f” entrance requirement of the University
of California and California State University systems.
Introduction to
Video Production 1-2
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
This course will meet the “f” or “g” entrance requirement of the University of California and California State University systems.
Improvisation for the
Theatre 1-2 ___________________________________6682
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-12
One year of Theater Arts, Acting
Experience or consent of instructor
This course is designed for students interested in careers
in acting. Students will learn the fundamentals of acting
by participating in a variety of short improvisations,
which consist of short form unrelated scenes; long form
improvisations, in which the scenes are interrelated in
such a way as to form a long narrative, and improvisation games in which the performers attempt to create a
comprehensible scene while conforming to certain specified and restrictive rules. Improvisation is one of the
primary tools used in actor training, and students will
practice the basic theories of acting while developing ensemble, mime and movement, vocal, and rehearsal and
performance skills.
Intermediate Theater Arts
_________
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
3355
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Introduction to Theatre Arts with a
grade of “B” or better and the
teacher’s approval.
This course provides the opportunity to strengthen basic
skills of voice and movement, play analysis and interpretation, and performance. Students will acquire an understanding of demands of theatre production. Exploring
career possibilities is accomplished through projects. Stu-
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None.
_________________
6696
2 semesters
9-10
A grade of “C” or better in Computer
Operations, Theater Arts or consent of
instructor
Introduction to Video Production is designed to teach
students to demonstrate and apply knowledge and skills
in the video production process to performance, oral
and written critical evaluations and hands on equipment operation in pre production, production and post
production. The course will teach students to write
scripts, utilize vocabulary, and operate technical equipment. Also, students will plan, create and edit video
projects, as well as investigate careers in the television
and industry.
Play Production_____________________________3341
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11, 12
Advanced Theatre Arts with a grade of
“B” or better or the teachers approval
This course is designed to spotlight the talents of the student dedicated to theatre arts. The extent of their skills,
ability and extensive training is showcased in seasonal
play productions. Students will leave this class ready to
participate in a variety of theatre settings.
This course will meet the “f” entrance requirement of the University
of California and California State University systems.
Production Stage Crew 1-6________6685
Length of Course:
Grade Level Option:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10, 11, 12
1 semester of Stagecraft and instructor’s
approval
This course is taught in a workshop format. It is designed
to provide students with the opportunity to practice the
basic theories of technical theatre and their application
Visual/Performing Arts 118
through rehearsal and performances. Students will be required to design all on and off campus productions.
This course does not meet the graduation requirement for Fine Arts.
Stage Technology ____________________________1495
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2-6 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Teacher’s approval
cerning the extent of CAD instruction within the class.
This course will meet the “f” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems and the fine arts
graduation requirement.
Architectural Design 3-4____________ 2603
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10, 11, 12
Architectural Design 1-2
Students enrolled in this class have an opportunity to
learn all of the aspects of theatrical stage production
such as: lighting, sound, color theory, design and construction of scenery, audio technology and theatre management. Students in this class are responsible for all
aspects of theatre management and staging for production at the site. Maximum credit 20 semester periods except for stage manager, assistant stage manager, and
chief electrician. Maximum credit for these students, 30
semester periods. They must have the recommendation
of the teacher and the approval of the counselor to receive the additional credit.
This course builds on the experiences of Architectural
Design 1-2. Students design and develop a set of working drawings for a single-story residence. Areas of study
inlude: plot and roof plan, foundation plan, floor plan,
interior and exterior elevations, electrical plan, schedules details, and computer-aided design/drafting.
This course does not meet the graduation requirement for Fine Arts.
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
VISUAL ARTS
Advanced Costume Design_________ 1033
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Introduction to Costume Design, consent
of instructor
This course is a follow-up to the Introduction to Costume Design course. It is the next level for students who
wish to further develop their knowledge and akills in the
fields of costume and fashion design. Emphasis in this
course is placed on designing and creating the costumes
for all school productions. Students will further develop
skills in fashion illustration and design in order to
achieve an advanced level of proficiency. Students will
refine their technical skills in costume patterning and
garment construction necessary to create a variety of
costumes for stage productions.
Advanced Costume Design will meet the “f” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University
systems.
Architectural Design 1-2____________ 2601
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10, 11, 12
None
Students learn basic drafting and design skills necessary
to prepare preliminary architectural drawings for a single-story wood frame residence. A study of architectural
symbols, lettering, wood framing, career opportunities,
area and room design, interior elevations, and color is
included. This class may provide both computer assisted
drafting (CAD) instruction and traditional drawing
board, t-square, paper and pencil drafting instruction.
Please check with the instructor for more details con-
This course will meet the “f” or “g” entrance requirement for the
University of California and California State University systems and
the fine arts graduation requirement.
Architectural Design 5-6____________ 2605
2 semesters
10, 11, 12
Architectural Design 1-2, 3-4
This course covers functional aspects of architectural
drafting, stressing current practice in the field of domestic architecture. Drafting room procedure is followed with reference to handbooks, drafting room
manuals, tables, and other reference materials. Architectural problems are developed in detail from preliminary sketch to complete set of working drawings.
Independent study is emphasized at this level of work.
This course will meets the fine arts graduation requirement.
Art & Animation 1-2____________________ 1044
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10, 11, 12
Computer Applications
and/or Art & Imaging
This class will introduce students to the fundamentals,
history and evolution of animation. Students will learn
basic drawing skills, techniques for character design, the
nature of movement, sequential thinking, storytelling
and background development techniques. Students will
learn basic drawing skills, techniques for character design, the nature of movement, sequential thinking, storytelling and background development techniques.
Students will also learn perspective, composition, computer basics and applications. The State Visual Arts Content Standards are integrated into the curriculum.
This course will meet the “f” requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
Visual/Performing Arts 119
Art & Animation 3-4____________________ 1045
glazing nd using stains and oxides, and firing principles
used in the kilns. The world history of ceramic art is explored. State Visual Arts Content Standards are integrated into the curriculum.
This class continues the progress developed in Art and
Animation 1-2 by having students produce more complex animations. Students will focus on advanced computer animation programs and their application on the
Internet. Students will also learn how computer animators rely on a drawing skill-set and tradition animation
techniques to make professional animations.
Ceramics 3-6 will meet the “f” or “g” entrance requirement for the
University of California and California State University systems.
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10-12
Art & Animation 1-2
Art History (AP)____________________________ 1021
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11, 12
Teacher approval
This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to examine the artistic heritage of man from
Paleolithic period to the twenty-first century. It is a survey class of western and non-western civilizations, with
an emphasis on the art, religion, history, science and
achievements of each society. Students learn to look at
artworks critically and analyze what they see. This
course includes college level writing assignments. The
State Visual Arts Content Standards are integrated into
the curriculum.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This course will meet the “f” or “g” requirement for the University of
California and California State University systems.
Ceramics 1-2___________________________________1026
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
Ceramics is an exploration of objects made of clay and
fired in a kiln to a permanent form. Fabrication methods such as pinching, coiling, slab and throwing are explored. Technical skills, design, decoration and glazing
of clay are developed while creating works of art with
clay. Historical overview and ancient traditions of clay
are also incorporated in class projects. State Visual Arts
Content Standards are integrated into the curriculum.
Ceramics 1-2 will meet the “f” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
Ceramics 3-4/5-6__________________1086/1088
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
4 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
Advanced Ceramics focuses on applying the skills
learned in the beginning class with an emphasis on
sculpture. Students work on developing a body of work,
which shows their understanding of the media in depth.
Students are exposed to the potter’s wheel; wedging,
centering, opening, pulling up, nd trimming. Students
also explore different decorating techniques, such as
Digital Art & Imaging________________ 1046
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Drawing & Painting 1-2
In this class, students explore visual problem solving
skills, creative expression, and communication through
the computer. Digital imaging skills are taught using
Photoshop and Illustrator programs. Historic periods
and artists are compared and contrasted through reading, writing and computer based activities. State Visual
Arts Content Standards are infused in the course.
This course meets the “f” entrance requirement for the University of
California and California State University systems.
Digital Film Making____________________ 1048
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10, 11, 12
Computer Applications
or similar course
In this class students produce their own digital films,
gaining an understanding of filmmaking from conception to exhibition. Students will develop their aesthetic
perception skills by discussing and writing about various
film genres. They will use their creative expression and
problem solving skills by making their own films, and
analyze film’s historical development through history.
Aesthetic valuing through class critiques will be used in
all stages of the production process. State Visual Content Standards are integrated into the curriculum.
Drawing/Painting 1-2________________ 1005
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
This course develops a foundation in drawing and painting through the five components of the Visual Arts Content Standards. Using a variety of media; pencils, charcoal,
pastels, ink, watercolor and tempera paint, students explore different techniques and methods to express themselves. Students learn about the elements and principles
of art, as well as perspective, color theory, aesthetic valuing, art careers and art history throughout the year. Students begin to compile portfolios of their artwork.
This course meets the “f” entrance requirement for the University of
California and California State University systems.
Visual/Performing Arts 120
Drawing/Painting 3-4_________________ 1006
Film IB HL 1____________________________________ 3345
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10, 11, 12
Drawing and Painting 1-2 with a “B”
or better or permission of the instructor
This course continues to build on the skills and techniques learned in drawing and painting 1-2. Students
explore in more depth aesthetic valuing, art history and
art careers, while continuing to compile their portfolios.
Emphasis on understanding and using the elements and
principles of art are stressed. The students start to develop a personal style through experimenting with various media, researching artists and art styles, observing
nature, and using different art techniques.
This course will meet the “f” or “g” requirement for the University of
California and California State University systems.
Drawing/Painting 5-6/7-8_ 1007/1008
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2-4 semesters
11, 12
Drawing and Painting 1-2, 3-4 with a
grade of “B” or better, or instructor’s
permission
This course continues to build on skills and techniques
learned in drawing and painting 3-4. Through visual
problem solving, researching various art styles and
schools, experimenting with techniques, and drawing
from observation and imagination, students continue to
develop a personal style in the visual arts. Art careers and
colleges are explored in depth and an art portfolio should
be completed by the end of the year.
Drawing/Painting 5-6 and 7-8 will meet the “f” or “g” requirement
for the University of California and California State University systems.
Exploring Art________________________________ 1033
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-12
None
The major emphasis of this course is to provide a foundation of visual arts concepts and to explore the concepts intellectually and experientially. Students will use
and experience a variety of two and three dimensional
art medias, as well as define and use appropriate art vocabulary. Students will also explore selected art forms
from diverse cultures and time periods. This course is
intended to develop an appreciations of visual arts in addition to developing technical skills. The five components of the State Visual Arts Content Standards are
integrated into the curriculum throughout the year.
This course will meet the “f” entrance requirement for the University
of California and California State University systems.
2 semesters
11-12
IB candidate or drama/video teacher
recommendation
Through the study of film texts and exercises in filmmaking and analysis, this Film IB HL 1 introduces film
history, theory and student film production. This course
aims to develop students’ skills so they begin to interpret film texts and practice making their own film texts.
Through this course, students will be introduced to internationalism within the world of film and to learn
about the theories and ideas from the points of view of
different individuals, nations and culture. Students will
then utilize this learning in the creation of their own
films and through this they will develop the organizational and technical skills needed to express themselves
creatively in film.
This course meets the “f” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
Film IB HL 2____________________________________ 3349
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11-12
IB candidate or drama/video teacher
recommendation
After a year’s study in the basics of film appreciation and
creation, the Film IB HL 2 course further explores film
history, theory and expands student film production.
This course aims to refine students’ skills so they become
adept in both interpreting and making film texts.
Through this course, students will develop an appreciation of internationalism within the world of film and to
consider the theories and ideas from the points of view
of different individuals, nations and cultures. Students
will then use this understanding in the creation of their
own films and through this they will develop the organizational and technical skills needed to express themselves creatively in film.
This course meets the “f” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
Graphic Design and
Printmaking___________________________________2639
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
None
In this course students will communicate ideas through
a variety of graphic media by learning the basics of
graphic design using typography, printmaking techniques, page layouts, storyboards and computer applications.
Students will use various printmaking
processes; silkscreen, linoleum block, hand cut stencil,
paper stencil, photographic stencil, and digital photography to reproduce graphic images. Students will study
a variety of graphic design styles and methods to gain
an understanding of the historical and cultural signifi-
Visual/Performing Arts 121
cance of these methods. Aesthetic valuing, and careers in
graphic art are introduced. The State Visual Arts Content Standards are integrated into the curriculum
throughout the course.
This course meets the “f” entrance requirement for the University of
California and California State University systems.
Introduction to
Costume Design___________________________ 1022
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9-12
None
This one-year course introduces students to the field
of costume design. Students will develop skills in
fashion illustration and design in order to effectively
illustrate a fashion or costume concept. Emphasis is
placed on research of the historical costume periods
and specific theatrical genres, as well as units on the
principles and elements of design, color theory, textiles and the application of these concepts to the design process. Students will also develop the technical
skills in costume patterning and garment construction necessary to create costumes for stage productions.
This course will meet the “f” requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
Photography 1-2__________________________ 1028
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10, 11, 12
Drawing & Painting 1-2 or
permission of instructor
Students will explore the elements and principles of art
as they apply to the art of photography. Fundamental
photographic techniques using various types of cameras
are introduced. The students learn basic camera use
darkroom techniques, composition, lighting, portraiture
and value through the lens. Photography history, aesthetic valuing, and careers in photography are introduced.
State Visual Arts Content Standards are
integrated into the curriculum.
This course will meet the “f” requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
Photography 3-4__________________________ 1030
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
10, 11, 12
Photography 1-2
This course provides advanced photographic techniques
using a 35mm camera and black and white enlarger. Advanced techniques in composition, lighting, portraiture
and critical analysis will be highlighted. Techniques introduced will include medium format and view cameras,
synchronized flash, color printing and alternative process
printing. Further visual heritage and theories of aesthetic
valuing will be stressed.
_______________________________________
AP Studio Art Courses are for students who are
seriously interested in the practical experience of art.
These courses are not based on written exams; instead
students submit portfolios for evaluation at the end of
the school year. Course content is college level planned
for the highly motivated student interested in the serious study of the visual arts. Students will make creative
and systematic investigations of formal and conceptual
issues: make art as an ongoing process that involves the
students in informd and critical decision making; gain
technical skills; learn the functions of the visual arts and
encourage students to become independent thinkers
who will contribute to their culture through the making
of their art. AP courses should address three major concerns: a sense of quality in a student’s work; the student’s
concentration on a particular visual interest or problem;
and the student’s need for breadth of experience in the
formal, technical and expressive means of the artist.
Studio Art: Drawing (AP)___________ 1023
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11, 12
Teacher approval
The drawing portfolio is designed to address a very broad
interpretation of drawing issues and media. Light and
shade, line quality, rendering of form, composition, surface manipulation, and illusion of depth are drawing issues that can be addressed through a variety of means,
which could include painting, printmaking, mixed
media, etc. Abstract, observational, and inventive works
may demonstrate drawing competence. Mastery of
drawing should be apparent in the composition, concept, and execution of the artwork reflected in three areas
of concern: quality, concentration, and breadth.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This course will meet the “f” or “g” requirement for the University of
California and California State University systems.
Studio Art: 2-D Design
Portfolio (AP)_______________________________ 1029
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11, 12
Teacher approval
This 2-D desi portfolio is intended to address two-dimensional design issues. Design involves purposeful decision making about how to use the elements and
principles of art in and integrative way. Students are
asked to demonstrate mastery of 2-D design through any
two-dimensional medium or proces, including but not
limited to graphic design, digital imaging, photography,
collage, fabric design, weaving, illustration, painting and
printmaking. Studio Art 2-D requires submissions in
three distinct sections: quality, concentration and
This course will meet the “f” or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
Visual/Performing Arts 122
breadth. Any two-dimensional medium may be used for
this portfolio.
Three Dimensional Art 3-8
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
This course will meet the “f” or “g” requirement for the University of
California and California State University systems.
Studio Art: 3-D Design
Portfolio (AP)_______________________________ 1031
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11, 12
Teacher approval
This 3-D desi portfolio is intended to address sculptural
issues. Students are asked to demonstrate their understanding of design principles as they relate to depth and
space. Design involves purposeful decision making
about using the elements and principles of art in an integrative way. Students must demonstrate mastery of 3D design through any three-dimensional approach,
including, but not limited to figurative or non-figurative
sculpture, architectural models, metal work, ceramics,
and three-dimensional fiber arts. Content, style, and
process are completely open. Whatever direction the student chooses, the work should address such issues as
mass, volume, and form.
Any three-dimensional
medium may be used for this portfolio. Mastery of 3-D
design should be apparent the composition, concept,
and execution of the artwork reflected in three areas of
concern: quality, concentrations, and breadth.
Students who pass the AP exam have the opportunity to earn credit or
advanced standing at most of the nation’s colleges and universities.
This course will meet the “f” or “g” requirement for the University of
California and California State University systems.
_______________________________________
Three Dimensional Art 1-2________ 1010
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
9, 10, 11, 12
Drawing and Painting 1-2 or permission of
instructor
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of
sculpture and 3-D design. Students are asked to demonstrate their understanding of design principles as they relate to mass, volume, shape and space. Students use
materials such as wood, paper, clay, metal, plastic, plaster, fabric and fiber, to create figurative or non-figurative
sculpture, metal work, ceramics, and three-dimensional
fiber arts. Historical periods, art movements, artists and
career paths are studied through research, writings and
studio activities. the State Visual Arts Content Standards
are integrated into the curriculum throughout the
course.
__________________________________________
1011/1012/1013
2-6 semesters
10, 11, 12
Three Dimen. Art 1-2, 3-4 with a “B” or
better, or permission of instructor
These courses extend and build on the exploration of
three dimensional design presented in the preceding sections. Projects and design processes introduced proceed
in complexity producing developed works showing command of media and social/historical connections. Critical thinking skills are developed through research,
discussion, creative expression, and the exploration of
cultural context. Writing components could include aesthetic valuing, criticism, interpretations, judgments, and
analysis of works by students/historical artists/movements/periods.
Three Dimensional Art 3-4, 5-6, 6-7 will meet the “f” or “g” entrance
requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
Visual Arts IB SL ____________________________ 1020
Length of Course:
Grade Level Options:
Prerequisite:
2 semesters
11-12
Drawing and Painting 1-2
In the LBUSD, Visual Arts IB Standard Level is an elective
course of the International Baccalaureate Program. The
International Baccalaureate Visual Arts program is an art
course, which promotes written communication and research skills, respect for the art and culture of the student, the influence of the culture in which they live,
while exploring a wide range of other cultural influences
through the study of art history and a wide range of techniques and materials. The Studio Art program encourages
students to see art works critically. Aesthetic Valuing is a
method of critiquing artworks in four categories. This is
achieved through the description of an art piece, analysis of its art elements and arts principles used, an interpretation by researching the artist and explaining what
they think the artist was trying to achieve in the art
piece, and judgment in which they are able to express an
opinion about the art work. The Visual Arts studio art
program strives to enrich the international and cultural
awareness of IB students and develop in them the appreciation of a wide variety of art styles, techniques, and
different cultures through theme based research, museum trips, artist interviews, journaling, and creating experimental studio artworks of their own to create a
portfolio. This course includes college level written assignments.
This course will meet the "f" or “g” entrance requirement for the University of California and California State University systems.
This course includes college level writing assignments.
This course meets the “f” entrance requirement for the University of
California and California State University systems.
Visual/Performing Arts 123
124
Index of
Courses Offered
COURSE TITLE
PAGE NO.
Academic Decathlon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75
Accelerated Geometry 1-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80
Accounting 1-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Accounting 3-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Advanced Chamber Orchestra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Advanced Computer Graphics 1-2, 3-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68
Advanced Costume Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
Advanced Elements of Expository Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
Advanced Foods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66
Advanced Journalism: Editing, Design & Management . . . . . . . . . . .33
Advanced Kinesiology/Physical Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90
Advanced KPE/ Personal Fitness Emphasis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91
Advanced Theater Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) 9, 10, 11 . . . . . .74
Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) Peer Tutor . . . . .74
Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) Senior Seminar .75
Aerobics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92
Algebra 1-2, Algebra 1-2 SDAIE/SDAIE/PLS Algebra ABCD . . . . . . . . .80
Algebra AB/CD, Algebra AB/CD SDAIE, Algebra AB/CD SDAIE/PLS . .80
American Sign Language 1-2, 3-4, 5-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Anatomy and Physiology, Anatomy Physiology Honors . . . . . . . . .102
Animal Care 1-2, 3-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
Architectural Design 1-2, 3-4, 5-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119, 120
Art & Animation 1-2, 3-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Art History AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Asian Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Atlantic World History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Auto Collision Repair 1-2, 3-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
Auto Mechanics 1-2, 3-4, 5-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68
Automotive and Transportation Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69, 104
Ballet Folklorico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Band 1-2, 3-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
Basketball and Fitness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92
Bible as Literature 1-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
Biology 1, Biology 1 SDAIE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
Biology 2, Biology 2 SDAIE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
Biology 1-2, Biology Acc., Biology 1-2 SDAIE,
Biology 1-2 SDAIE/PLS, Biology 1-2 Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
Biology AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Biology IB HL 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Biology IB HL 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Biomedical Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Black History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
British Literature 1-2 (Accelerated) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
British Literature 1-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
Business Career Internship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Calculus A/B AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80
Calculus B/C AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80
California History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Career Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80
Careers in Auto Collision Repair, Intro. to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Careers with Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Cecilian Singers 1-2, 3-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
Ceramics 1-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Chemistry 1-2, Chemistry 1-2 SDAIE, Chemistry 1-2 Access . . . . . .104
Chemistry 1-2 Honors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104
COURSE TITLE
PAGE NO.
Chemistry AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
Chemistry IB HL 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
Chemistry IB HL 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
Chinese 1, Chinese 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Chinese 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Chinese Language/Culture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Chorus Voice 1-2, 3-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
Cinema 1 and 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
CISCO Networking 1-2, 3-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69
Clerical Office Occupations 1-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96
Community Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
Comparitive Literature of Western Civilization &
Comparitive Literature of Western Civilization 1-2 ACC . . . . . . . . .31
Computer Applications 1, Computer Applications SDAIE,
Computer Applications SDAIE/PLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Computer Applications 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Computer Applications 3-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Computer Business Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96
Computer Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69
Computer Programming 1-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
Computer Programming 3-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
Computer Science A AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
Concert Choir 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Cooperative Food Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Cooperative Retail and Services Careers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96
Cosmetology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Creative Writing 1-2, Creative Writing 3-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
Criminal and Civil Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Culinary Arts 1-2, 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
Culture, Conflict, and Resolution in America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Current Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
Dance 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-8, 9-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Design and Fabrication 1-2, 3-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69
Digital Art & Imaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Digital Design 101 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69
Digital Film Making . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Directed Research in Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
Drafting Technology 1-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69
Drawing/Painting 1-2, 3-4, 5-6/7-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120, 121
Drill Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92
Driver Education (General) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
Earth Science 1-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
Economics: Macro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
Economics: Micro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
Economics, Economics Accelerated, Economics SDAIE, Economics
SDAIE/PLS, Economics SDC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Electronics 1-2, 3-4, 5-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70
Elements of Journalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
Elements of Oral Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
Engineering Core 1-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70
Engineering Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70
English 1-2 Accelerated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
English 1-2, English 1-2 SDC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
English 3-4 Accelerated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
English 3-4, English 3-4 SDC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
Index 125
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PAGE NO.
English 5-6 Honors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
English 5-6, English 5-6 SDC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
English 7-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
English IB HL 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
English IB HL 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
English Language and Composition (AP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
English Language Development English I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
English Language Development English II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
English Language Development English III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
English Language Development English IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
English Language Development Reading I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
English Language Development Reading II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
English Language Development Reading III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
English Literature/Composition AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
Environmental Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
Environmental Science AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
European History AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
Exploring Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Exploring Health Occupations & Careers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
Exploring Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Exploring Teaching 1-2, 3-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
Family Living and Parenting (Former title: Effective Living) . . . . . . .66
Fashion, Textiles, and Apparel (Former title: Clothing Selection
& Construction) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66
Fast Track 1-2, Fast Track 3-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34, 35
Fast Track 1 SDC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
Film Analysis 1-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
Film IB HL 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Film IB HL 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Finite Math . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81
Fitness and Coordination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92
Food Science 1-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66
Foods and Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66
Forensic Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Forensics: Argumentation/Debate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
French 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
French Language AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
Functions, Statistics and Trigonometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81
General Work Experience (Reg) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77
Geology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
Geography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
Geometry 1-2, Geometry 1-2 SDAIE, Geometry 1-2 SDAIE/PLS
Geometry SDC, Geometry ABCD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81
Geometry AB/CD, Geometry AB/CD SDAIE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81
German 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
German Language AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Global Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
Government & Politics: Comparitive AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Government & Politics: United States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
Graphic Arts 1-2, 3-4, 5-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70, 71
Graphic Design and Printmaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71, 121
Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Guitar 1-2, 3-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
Health Education, Health Education SDAIE/SDAIE/PLS,
Health Education SDC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
High Point I DHH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
History of Europe IB HL 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
Home Economics Related Occupations Core (HERO) . . . . . . . . . . . . .66
Hospital Health Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97
Housing and Interior Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66
Human Geography AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
Improvisation for the Theatre 1-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
Instruments 1-2, 3-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
Intensive Reading Clinic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
Interactive Mathematics Program 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82
Interactive Multimedia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71
COURSE TITLE
PAGE NO.
Intermediate Algebra 1-2, Intermediate Algebra 1-2 Accelerated,
Intermediate Algebra 1-2 SDAIE/SDAIE/PLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82
Intermediate Algebra/Trig Accelerated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83
Intermediate String Orchestra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
Intermediate Scriptwriting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
Intermediate Theater Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
International Business & Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
International Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
International Choir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
International Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
International Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
International Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
Introduction to Anthropology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
Introduction to Costume Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122
Introduction to Digital Circuits and Robotics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
Introduction to Drafting/Computer Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71
Introduction to Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71, 106
Introduction to Engineering Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
Introduction to Kinesiology/Physical Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90
Introduction to KPE/Personal Fitness Emphasis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90
Introduction to Latin Dance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92
Introduction to Philosophy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
Introduction to Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
Introduction to Scriptwriting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
Introduction to Social Justice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
Introduction to Sociology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
Introduction to Theater Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
Introduction to Video Production 1-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
Introduction to Yoga . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93
Italian 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
Japanese 1, Japanese 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
Japanese 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
Japanese 5-6 Honors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
Japanese Language/Culture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
Jazz Band 1-2, 3-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Journalism: Production/Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
Khmer for Khmer Speakers 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
Laboratory Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
Laboratory Earth Science 1-2, Laboratory Earth Science 1-2 SDAIE,
Laboratory Earth Science 1-2 SDAIE/PLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
Laboratory Physical Science 1-2,
Laboratory Physical Science Accelerated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
Landscape/Floral Occupations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Landscape/Plant Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
LANGUAGE! I, LANGUAGE! I SDC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
LANGUAGE! II, LANGUAGE! II SDC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
LANGUAGE! II AB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
LANGUAGE! II CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
LANGUAGE! III, LANGUAGE! III SDC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
LANGUAGE! III AB SDC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
LANGUAGE! III CD SDC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
Latino Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
Law Enforcement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
Library/Media Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
Life Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66
Life Science 1-2, Life Science SDAIE, Life Science SDAIE/PLS
Life Science 1-2 SDC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
Literacy Workshop 1-2, Literacy Workshop 3-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
Literature and Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
Macintosh Education/Computer Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71
Marine Biology 1-2, Marine Biology 1-2 Accelerated,
Marine Biology Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104
Mathematical Studies IB SL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82
Mathematics IB SL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81
Medical Assistant, Administrative & Clinical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97
Medical Billing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97
Index 126
COURSE TITLE
PAGE NO.
Medical Core . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97
Medical Occupations, Intro. To . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97
Medical Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97
Medical/Clerical Careers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97
Military Science (Leadership Education and Training) 1-8 . . . . . . . . .85
Modern World History, Modern World History Accelerated,
Modern World History SDAIE, Modern World History SDAIE/PLS,
Modern World History SDC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
Modern World History/International Negotiations . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
Multicultural Literature, Multicultural Literature Accelerated . . . . . .32
Music Theory AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Naval Science 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86
Nursing Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Office Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
Orchestra 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Pathways to Success 1-2, 3-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77
Parent and Child . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66
Peer Assistance Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
Pharmacy Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Philosophy IB SL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
Photography 1-2, 3-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122
Physical Education 9: Dance Emphasis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91
Physical Education 10: Dance Emphasis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91
Physical Education: Drill Team Emphasis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91
Physical Education: Spirit Leader Emphasis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91
Physical Education Special Education Adaptive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92
Physical Oceanography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
Physical Science 1-2, Physical Science 1-2 SDAIE,
Physical Science 1-2 SDAIE/PLS, Physical Science 1-2 SDC . . . . . .107
Physics “B” AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
Physics “C”: Mechanics AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108
Physics “C”: Electricity and Magnetism AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108
Physics 1-2, Physics 1-2 Honors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
Piano 1-2, 3-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Play Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
PLTW: Intro. to Engineering Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108
PLTW: Principles of Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108
PLTW: Digital Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
PLTW: Computer Integrated Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
PLTW: Engineering Design and Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
Precalculus with Trigonometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83
Precalculus, Precalculus Honors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83
Principles of Engineering 1-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108
Production Stage Crew 1-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
Psychology AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
Reader’s Theater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
Regulations Prohibiting Discrimination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131
Retail Merchandising & Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96
Rhetoric and Composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
Sales and Marketing 1-2, 3-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
Sales and Marketing Cooperative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
School Age Care/Recreation Aide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
School Annual 1-2, 3-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
School to Career Internship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77
Small Business Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96
Soccer Fitness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93
Spanish IB HL 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
Spanish 1-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
Spanish IB SL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
Spanish 3-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
Spanish 5-6, Spanish 5-6 Honors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
Spanish 7-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Spanish for Spanish Speakers 1-2, 3-4, 5-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53, 54
Spanish Language AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Spanish Literature AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
COURSE TITLE
PAGE NO.
Speech Communication: Analysis & Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
Spirit Leaders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93
Sports Turf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Stage Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
Statistics AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83
Steel Drum Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Student Council . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
Studio Art: Drawing AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122
Studio Art: Design Portfolio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122
Studio Art: 3-D Design Portfolio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123
Studio/Vocal Jazz Singers 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
Study Lab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75
Symphonic Winds 1-2, 3-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
Teacher Assistant, Elementary School, Teacher Assistant,
High School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76, 77
Tech Challenge – Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71
Technology Core . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72
Television/Media Production 1-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Theatre Arts IB HL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
Three Dimensional Art 1-2, 3-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123
United States Government, United States Government Accelerated,
United States Government SDAIE, , United States Government . . . .
SDAIE/PLS, United States Government SDC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
United States Government/Economics/Negotiations . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
United States History, United States History Honors,
United States History AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
United States History SDAIE, United States History SDAIE/PLS,
United States History SDC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
Using New Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
Varsity Choral 1-2, 3-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
Video Production 1-2, 3-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72
Virtual Enterprise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96
Visual Arts IB SL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123
Vocal Ensemble/Chamber Singers 1-2, 3-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
Weight Training 1-2, 3-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93
Woods 1-2, 3-4, 5-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72
World History AP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
World Wide Web Publishing 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
World Wide Web Publishing 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
Zoology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104
Index 127
128
Regulations
Prohibiting
Discrimination
The Long Beach Unified School District is committed to providing equal opportunities for students in all
educational programs and activities which it conducts. Equality of opportunity in all programs and practices is a fundamental goal of the District.
The Federal Regulations implementing Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education
Amendments of 1972, and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (nondiscrimination on the basis
of handicap) are the controlling legislation. They require equality of opportunity in educational programs.
For students this means that educational programs and activities must be free from policies and practices
which discriminate on the basis of sex, handicap, race, color or national origin.
District programs, policies and activities are continually evaluated and, when necessary, modified to ensure equality of opportunity for all persons. The policy of affording equal opportunities to all persons is
specific to vocational education.
Although Title IX covers employment, the basic purpose of this communication is to inform students, parents and employees about how the regulations apply to the local school program. Schools have been
evaluating their policies and practices in terms of Title VI, Title IX, and Section 504, and many programs
have already been revised in keeping with the new regulations.
Students and parents are encouraged to assist the schools in efforts to eliminate discrimination from all
educational programs.
If a student wishes more information, has a grievance or a concern about the implementation of these
laws, the following procedure should be used:
Communicate directly with the site administrator in charge. If the requested information is not provided
or the matter is not resolved, refer to the Channels for Student Communication for appropriate steps.
Requests for permission to reproduce any portion of this publication should be addressed to the:
Long Beach Unified School District
Office of Curriculum, Instruction and Professional Development
1515 Hughes Way, Long Beach, CA 90810
Regulations Prohibiting Discrimination 129
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