01k7785
M
B
I
Netfinity 7000 M10
Hardware Information
Note
Before using this information and the product it supports, be sure to read the information in the “Legal and Safety
Information” section of this Server Library.
First Edition (September 1998)
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION PROVIDES THIS PUBLICATION “AS IS” WITHOUT WARRANTY OF
ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some jurisdictions do not allow disclaimer of express or
implied warranties in certain transactions, therefore, this statement may not apply to you.
This publication could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes are periodically made to the information
herein; these changes will be incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM may make improvements and/or changes in the
product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this publication at any time.
This publication was developed for products and services offered in the United States of America and the United Kingdom. It is
possible that this publication may contain reference to, or information about, IBM products (machines and programs), programming,
or services that are not announced in your country. Such references or information must not be construed to mean that IBM intends
to announce such IBM products, programming, or services in your country.
Requests for technical information about IBM products should be made to your IBM reseller or IBM marketing representative.
No part of this publication may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means without prior permission in writing from the
International Business Machines Corporation.
 Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 1998. All rights reserved.
Note to U.S. Government Users — Documentation related to restricted rights — Use, duplication or disclosure is subject to
restrictions set forth in GSA ADP Schedule Contract with IBM Corp.
Contents
Safety Information Statements
Lithium Battery Notice . . . . .
Laser Compliance Statements
About This Book . . . . .
How This Book is Organized
Notices Used in This Book
Related Publications . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 1. Introducing the IBM Netfinity 7000 M10
Features at a Glance
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What Your IBM Netfinity 7000 M10 Offers . . . . . .
Reliability, Availability, and Serviceability Features
.
Controls and Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Information LED Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Input/Output Connectors and Expansion Slots . . . .
Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 2. Arranging Your Workspace
Comfort
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Glare and Lighting . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Air Circulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electrical Outlets and Cable Lengths
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Chapter 3. Configuring Your Server . . . . .
Configuration Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . .
The Configuration/Setup Utility Program
Using the Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu
Configuring Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resolving Configuration Conflicts
. . . . . . . .
Using the SCSISelect Utility . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 4. Installing Options
. . . . . . .
Before You Begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electrical Safety
Handling Static-Sensitive Devices . . . . . .
System Reliability Considerations . . . . . .
Working Inside a Server with Power On . . .
Understanding the Netfinity 7000 M10 Design
Preparing to Install Options . . . . . . . . . .
Installing a Microprocessor Kit . . . . . . . .
Installing Memory-Module Kits . . . . . . . .
Working with Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Internal Drives . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing a Hot-Swap Power Supply . . . . .
Removing a Hot-Swap Power Supply . . . .
Replacing a Hot-Swap Fan Assembly . . . .
Completing the Installation . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting External Options . . . . . . . . .
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
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Chapter 5. Rack Installation . .
Before You Begin . . . . . . . . . .
Installing and Removing the Server
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Chapter 6. Solving Problems
. . . . . . . .
Diagnostic Tools Overview . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostic Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power-On Self-Test (POST) Messages . . . .
Power-On Self Test (POST) Beep Codes . . .
System Monitoring Messages . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostic Error Message Tables . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SCSI Messages
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Resolving Configuration Conflicts
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Identifying Problems through Status Indicators
Checking the System for Damage . . . . . . .
Replacing the Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 7. Server Records and Specifications . . . . . . . . . .
Record the Identification Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installed Device Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Jumper Positions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O Board Component Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Processor Board Component Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Processor Board Jumpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O Function Card Component Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O Function Card Jumpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Advanced System Management PCI Adapter Component Locations
Advanced System Management PCI Adapter Jumper . . . . . . . .
Memory Board Component Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SCSI Backplane Component Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SCSI Backplane Option Jumpers
Appendix A. I2O-Ready and S3 Video Modes
I2O-Ready Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unsupported S3 Video Modes . . . . . . . . . .
iv
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161
Glossary
Index
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79
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Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
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Tables
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
Memory Expansion
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Configurations for Memory Enhancement Features . . . . . .
Automatically Assigned SCSI IDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Serial Port Pin-Number Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parallel Port Pin-Number Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Video Port Pin-Number Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keyboard and Auxiliary-Device Port Pin-Number Assignments
68-Pin SCSI Port Pin-Number Assignments . . . . . . . . . .
USB Connector Pin-Number Assignments . . . . . . . . . . .
10/100 Ethernet Connector Pin-Number Assignments . . . .
RS 485 Bus Connector Pin-Number Assignments
. . . . . .
IBM Netfinity 7000 M10 Identification Numbers . . . . . . . .
Internal Drives and Devices
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External Drives and Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration/Setup Utility Program Defaults and Changes .
System Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Processor Board Jumpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O Board Jumpers
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Advanced System Management PCI Adapter Jumper . . . .
Backplane Option Jumper Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SCSI IDs for Hot-Swap Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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v
Safety Information Statements
Before installing this product, read the Safety Information.
Antes de instalar este produto, leia as Informações de Segurança.
Před instalací tohoto produktu si přečtěte příručku bezpečnostních instrukcí.
Læs sikkerhedsforskrifterne, før du installerer dette produkt.
Ennen kuin asennat tämän tuotteen, lue turvaohjeet kohdasta Safety Information.
Avant d'installer ce produit, lisez les consignes de sécurité.
Vor der Installation dieses Produkts die Sicherheitshinweise lesen.
Prima di installare questo prodotto, leggere le Informazioni sulla Sicurezza
Lees voordat u dit product installeert eerst de veiligheidsvoorschriften.
Les sikkerhetsinformasjonen (Safety Information) før du installerer dette produktet.
Antes de instalar este produto, leia as Informações sobre Segurança.
Pred inštaláciou tohto zariadenia si pečítaje Bezpečnostné predpisy.
Antes de instalar este producto lea la información de seguridad.
Läs säkerhetsinformationen innan du installerar den här produkten.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
vii
1
DANGER
To avoid a shock hazard, do not connect or disconnect any
cables or perform installation, maintenance, or reconfiguration
of this product during an electrical storm.
To avoid shock hazard:
– The power cord must be connected to a properly wired and
earthed receptacle.
– Any equipment to which this product will be attached must
also be connected to properly wired receptacles.
When possible, use one hand to connect or disconnect signal
cables to prevent a possible shock from touching two surfaces
with different electrical potentials.
Electrical current from power, telephone, and communications
cables is hazardous. To avoid shock hazard, connect and
disconnect cables as described following when installing,
moving, or opening covers of this product or attached devices.
To Connect
To Disconnect
1. Turn Everything OFF.
1. Turn Everything OFF.
2. First, attach all cables to devices.
2. First, remove power cord(s) from outlet.
3. Attach signal cables to receptacles.
3. Remove signal cables from receptacles.
4. Attach power cord(s) to outlet.
4. Remove all cables from devices.
5. Turn device ON.
NOTE: In the UK, by law, the telephone cable
must be connected after the power cord.
viii
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
NOTE: In the UK, the power cord must be
disconnected after the telephone cable.
Lithium Battery Notice
2
CAUTION:
When replacing the battery, use only IBM Part Number 33F8354 or an
equivalent type battery recommended by the manufacturer. If your
system has a module containing a lithium battery, replace it only with
the same module type made by the same manufacturer. The battery
contains lithium and can explode if not properly used, handled, or
disposed of.
Do not:
– Throw or immerse into water
– Heat to more than 100°C (212°F)
– Repair or disassemble
Dispose of the battery as required by local ordinances or regulations.
Safety Information Statements
ix
Laser Compliance Statements
Some IBM PC Server and Netfinity models are equipped from the factory with a
CD-ROM drive. CD-ROM drives are also sold separately as options. The
CD-ROM drive is a laser product. The CD-ROM drive is certified in the U.S. to
conform to the requirements of the Department of Health and Human Services 21
Code of Federal Regulations (DHHS 21 CFR) Subchapter J for Class 1 laser
products. Elsewhere, the drive is certified to conform to the requirements of the
International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 825 and CENELEC EN 60 825 for
Class 1 laser products.
3
CAUTION:
When a CD-ROM drive is installed, note the following.
Use of controls or adjustments or performance of procedures other
than those specified herein might result in hazardous radiation
exposure.
Removing the covers of the CD-ROM drive could result in exposure to
hazardous laser radiation. There are no serviceable parts inside the
CD-ROM drive. Do not remove the CD-ROM drive covers.
4
DANGER
Some CD-ROM drives contain an embedded Class 3A or Class
3B laser diode. Note the following.
Laser radiation when open. Do not stare into the beam, do not
view directly with optical instruments, and avoid direct
exposure to the beam.
x
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
How This Book Is Organized
About This Book
This book provides instructions for installing and removing server options and
configuring and troubleshooting your server. It also provides information to help
you solve simple problems that might occur.
How This Book is Organized
Chapter 1, “Introducing the IBM Netfinity 7000 M10,” describes the Netfinity 7000
M10 and provides an overview of the server's features.
Chapter 2, “Arranging Your Workspace,” contains information about arranging your
workspace.
Chapter 3, “Configuring Your Server,” describes how to use the
Configuration/Setup Utility program to configure your server. This chapter also
provides instructions for using various utility programs.
Chapter 4, “Installing Options,” contains instructions for installing and removing
options, such as memory, adapters, and internal drives. Instructions for connecting
external options are also included in this chapter.
Chapter 5, “Rack Installation,” contains information about installing your server in a
rack.
Chapter 6, “Solving Problems,” includes an overview of the diagnostic tools,
instructions for testing the server, lists of error messages, and troubleshooting
charts. This chapter also contains information about checking the server for
damage, and resolving configuration conflicts.
Chapter 7, “Server Records and Specifications,” provides a section to record and
update important information about your server, including serial numbers, key
number, and device records. Whenever you add options to your server, be sure to
update the information in these records. In addition to server records, this chapter
contains specifications. These specifications include product dimensions,
environmental operating requirements, component layouts, and jumper settings.
This chapter also describes jumper locations and contains instructions for changing
jumpers.
Appendix A, “I2O-Ready and S3 Video Modes,” contains the I2O-ready statement,
and information about unsupported S3 video modes.
A glossary and an index follow the appendix.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
xi
Related Publications
Notices Used in This Book
This book contains notices to highlight information or provide safety information:
Ÿ Notes
These notices provide important tips, guidance, or advice.
Ÿ Attention
These notices indicate possible damage to programs, devices, or data. An
attention notice is placed just before the instruction or situation in which
damage could occur.
Ÿ Caution
These notices indicate situations that can be potentially hazardous to you. A
caution notice is placed just before descriptions of potentially hazardous
procedure steps or situations.
Related Publications
The IBM Hardware Maintenance Manual Supplement is available for purchase. It
contains a parts catalog, error codes, and advanced diagnostic procedures. This
manual is intended for trained service technicians.
Additional publications are available for purchase from IBM. For a list of
publications available in your country:
Ÿ In the U.S., Canada, and Puerto Rico, call 1-800-879-2755.
Ÿ In all other countries, contact the IBM support organization that services your
area, your IBM marketing representative, or your IBM reseller.
xii
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Chapter 1. Introducing the IBM Netfinity 7000 M10
Thank you for your decision to purchase an IBM Netfinity 7000 M10. Your server is
a high-performance, symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) server. Your server is
designed to support multiple expansion units. It is ideally suited for networking
environments that require superior microprocessor performance, efficient memory
management, flexibility, and large amounts of reliable data storage.
Performance, ease of use, reliability, and expansion capabilities were key
considerations during the design of your server. These design features make it
possible for you to customize the system hardware to meet your needs today, while
providing flexible expansion capabilities for the future.
Your server comes with a three-year limited warranty, IBM ServerGuide CDs, and
IBM Start Up Support. For more information about the ServerGuide CDs, refer to
the “ServerGuide and Netfinity Manager Information” section of this Server Library.
For more information about IBM Start Up Support, refer to the “Getting Help
Information” section of this Server Library. Addresses on the World Wide Web
where you can obtain information about your server model and other IBM products
are also listed in the “Getting Help Information” section of this Server Library.
Note: The information label containing the serial number, machine type, model
number, and agencies marks is located at the rear of the server.
5
k32 kg (70.5 lbs)
k55 kg (121.2 lbs)
CAUTION:
Use safe lifting practices when lifting your machine.
Note: Most of the illustrations in this publication show a model of the Netfinity
7000 M10 with two power supplies. Some models come with one power
supply only.
This chapter contains:
Features at a Glance
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What Your IBM Netfinity 7000 M10 Offers . . . .
Reliability, Availability, and Serviceability Features
Controls and Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Information LED Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Input/Output Connectors and Expansion Slots . .
Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
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11
1
Features at a Glance
Features at a Glance
The following table summarizes the features of the Netfinity 7000 M10.
Microprocessor
Ÿ Intel Pentium II Xeon
microprocessor with MMX
technology
Ÿ 16 KB of level-1 cache
Ÿ 512 KB of level-2 cache (min.)
Ÿ Expandable to four microprocessors
Memory
Ÿ 128 MB (min.) of system memory,
expandable to 8 GB
Ÿ 50 ns, buffered, extended data output
(EDO), error correcting code (ECC)
Ÿ Maximum of 32 dual inline
memory-module (DIMM) sockets on
two memory boards
Diskette Drive
Ÿ Standard: One 3.5-inch, 1.44 MB
Hard Disk Drives
Ÿ Up to four hot-swap hard disk drives
supported
CD-ROM Drive
Ÿ Standard: Enhanced IDE
Redundant Cooling
Ÿ Four hot-swap fans
2
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Information Panel
Ÿ Two 16-character lines of status
information
Expansion Slots
Ÿ Five 64-bit hot-plug PCI slots
Ÿ Seven 32-bit hot-plug PCI slots
Expansion Bays
Ÿ Four slim-high (1-inch) or two
half-high (1.6-inch) hot-swap drive
bays
Ÿ One 5.25-inch removable-media
bay (CD-ROM drive preinstalled)
Upgradable Microcode
Ÿ BIOS, diagnostics, and
system-management processor
upgrades (when available) can
update EEPROM
Security Features
Ÿ Power-on and administrator
passwords
Ÿ Mountable in an optional secure
rack enclosure
Ÿ Selectable drive-startup
Ÿ Keyboard password
Ÿ Netfinity Advanced System
Management PCI Adapter security:
– User log-in password
– Read-only or read/write access
– Dial back
Integrated Functions
LED usability support
Two serial ports
Two universal serial bus (USB) ports
One parallel port
Mouse and keyboard ports
Netfinity Advanced System
Management PCI Adapter
Ÿ Two UltraSCSI connectors
Ÿ Video controller port compatible with:
– Super video graphics array
(SVGA)
– Video graphics adapter (VGA)
– 1 MB video memory
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Power Supply
400 W (115–230 V ac)
Automatic voltage-range selection
Built-in overload and surge protection
Automatic restart after a loss of
power
Ÿ Redundant power available with
optional power supply
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Predictive Failure Analysis (PFA)
Alerts
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Fans
Power Supplies
Memory
Hard disk drives
Microprocessors
What Your IBM Netfinity 7000 M10 Offers
What Your IBM Netfinity 7000 M10 Offers
The unique design of your server takes advantage of advancements in symmetric
multiprocessing (SMP), data storage, and memory management. Your server
combines:
Ÿ Impressive performance using an innovative approach to SMP
Your server supports up to four Intel Pentium II Xeon microprocessors. You
can install multiple microprocessors in your server to enhance performance and
provide SMP capability.
Ÿ Netfinity Advanced System Management PCI Adapter capabilities
Your server is shipped with a Netfinity Advanced System Management PCI
Adapter. With this adapter, in conjunction with the Netfinity Manager Advanced
System Management service capabilities of Netfinity Manager, you can locally
and remotely configure and monitor many features of your server. You can
configure system-management events ( such as POST, loader, and operating
system timeouts or critical temperature, voltage, and tamper alerts). If any of
these events occur, the Netfinity Advanced System Management PCI Adapter
can forward an alert to another resource:
– Another Netfinity Manager or other service-processor interface, through an
Ethernet network or serial connection
– A standard numeric pager
– An alphanumeric pager
You can dialout and directly access and control a remote Netfinity Advanced
System Management PCI Adapter.
In addition, you can remotely monitor, record, and replay all textual data
generated during power-on self-test (POST) on a remote server with a Netfinity
Advanced System Management PCI Adapter. While monitoring a remote
system during POST, you can enter keyboard commands that will be relayed to
the remote system.
Note: The Advanced System Management PCI Adapter is sometimes referred
to as the service processor.
Ÿ Large data-storage and hot-swap capabilities
All models of the server support up to four hot-swap hard disk drives. This
hot-swap feature enables you to remove and replace hard disk drives without
turning off the server.
Ÿ Hot-plug PCI adapter capabilities
Your server has twelve hot-plug slots for PCI adapters. With operating system
support, you can replace failing hot-plug PCI adapters without turning off the
server. In addition, you can add PCI adapters in these slots without turning off
the server, if this hot-add feature is supported by your operating system and
the PCI adapter.
Chapter 1. Introducing the IBM Netfinity 7000 M10
3
What Your IBM Netfinity 7000 M10 Offers
Ÿ Redundant cooling and power capabilities
The redundant cooling and hot-swap capabilities of the fans in your server
provide for continued operation if one of the fans fail. You can also replace a
failing fan without turning off the server.
Note: Replace a fan that has failed as soon as convenient to maintain the
redundant cooling capability of your server.
You can install an additional power supply to provide redundant power for the
server, or if you have an optional redundant power supply installed, replace a
failing power supply without turning off the server.
Ÿ Large system memory
The memory bus in your server supports up to 8 GB of system memory. The
memory controller provides error correcting code (ECC) support for up to 32
industry-standard, 3.3 V, 168-pin, single bank, 8-byte, dual in-line memory
modules.
Ÿ IBM ServerGuide CDs
The ServerGuide CDs included with IBM Netfinity servers provide programs to
help you set up your server and install the network operating system (NOS).
The ServerGuide program detects the hardware options installed, and provides
the correct configuration program and device drivers. In addition, the
ServerGuide CDs include a variety of application programs such as IBM Update
Connector to help keep your server BIOS and microcode updated, and IBM
Netfinity Manager for systems management.
For more information about the ServerGuide CDs, see the “ServerGuide and
Netfinity Manager Information” section of this Server Library.
Your server is designed to be cost-effective, powerful, and flexible. It uses
peripheral component interconnect (PCI) bus architectures to provide compatibility
with a wide range of existing hardware devices and software applications.
As always, your IBM server meets stringent worldwide certifications for power,
electromagnetic compatibility (EMC), and safety. Refer to the “Getting Help
Information” section of this Server Library for additional information.
4
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
RAS Features
Reliability, Availability, and Serviceability Features
Three of the most important features in server design are reliability, availability, and
serviceability (RAS). These factors help to ensure the integrity of the data stored
on your server; that your server is available when you want to use it; and that
should a failure occur, you can easily diagnose and repair the failure with minimal
inconvenience.
The following is an abbreviated list of the RAS features of your server.
these features are explained in later chapters of this book.
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
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1
Many of
Menu-driven system-configuration, SCSI-configuration, and diagnostic programs
Power-on self-test (POST)
Advanced System Management PCI Adapter (service processor)
Predictive failure analysis alerts
System auto-configuring from configuration menu
Remote system problem determination support
Power and temperature monitoring
Fault-resilient startup
Hot-swap drive bays
Support for hot-plug PCI adapters
Error codes and messages
System error logging
Upgradable BIOS, diagnostics processor code, and Advanced System
Management PCI Adapter processor code
Automatic restart after a power failure
Parity checking on the SCSI bus and the PCI bus
Error checking and correcting (ECC) memory
Redundant hot-swap power supply option
Redundant hot-swap cooling
Vital product data (VPD) on processor board, I/O board, I/O function card,
hot-swap SCSI subsystem, and other components
Information and system status panels
Worldwide service and support1
Service availability will vary by country. Response time will vary depending on the number and nature of incoming calls.
Chapter 1. Introducing the IBM Netfinity 7000 M10
5
Controls and Indicators
Controls and Indicators
The most commonly used controls and indicators on the front of the server appear
in the following illustration.
.1/ Scroll Button: Press this button to select an action to perform on a system
monitoring message; then, press the Enter button to perform the action. You
can select:
Ÿ Keep to retain the message on the information panel and enable the
system error light to continue to flash
Ÿ Remind to retain the message on the information panel and enable the
system error light to flash slowly
Ÿ Clear to clear the message from the information panel and enable the
system error light to stop flashing
.2/ Enter Button: Press this button to perform an action on system monitoring
messages that appear on the information panel.
.3/ Hard Disk Status Light: Each of the hot-swap drives has a Hard Disk Drive
Status light. When the amber light for a hard disk drive is lit continuously, the
drive has failed. When the light flashes slowly (one flash per second), the
drive is being rebuilt. When the light flashes rapidly (three flashes per
second), the controller is identifying the drive.
.4/ Hard Disk Activity Light: Each of the hot-swap drives has a Hard Disk
Activity light. When the green light for a hard disk drive is flashing, the drive
is being accessed.
.5/ CD-ROM Eject/Load Button: Press this button to eject or retract the
CD-ROM tray so that you can insert or remove a CD.
.6/ CD-ROM Drive In-Use Light: When this light is lit, the CD-ROM drive is
being accessed.
6
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Controls and Indicators
.7/ Diskette-Eject Button: Press this button to eject a diskette from the drive.
.8/ Diskette Drive In-Use Light: When this light is lit, the diskette drive is being
accessed.
.9/ Power Control Button: Press this button to manually turn the server on or
off.
6
CAUTION:
The Power Control button on the front of the server does not turn
off the electrical current supplied to the server. The server also
might have more than one power cord. To remove all electrical
current from the server, ensure that all power cords are
disconnected from the power source.
The server can be activated in several ways:
Ÿ You can turn the server on by pressing the Power Control button on the
front of the server.
Ÿ If the server is activated and a power failure occurs, the server will start
automatically if the automatic-restart-after-power-failure feature is selected
in the Configuration/Setup Utility program.
Ÿ The server can also be powered on by the Advanced System
Management PCI Adapter.
The server can be deactivated as follows:
Ÿ You can turn the server off by pressing the Power Control button on the
front of the server. Pressing the Power Control button starts an orderly
shutdown of the operating system, if this feature is supported by the
operating system, and places the server in standby mode.
Note: After turning off the server, wait at least five seconds before
pressing the Power Control button to power on the server again.
Ÿ Pressing and holding the Power Control button causes an immediate
shutdown of the server, and places the server in standby mode. This
feature can be used if the operating system hangs.
Ÿ Disconnecting the server power cord from the electrical outlet will shut off
all power to the server.
Note: Wait about 15 seconds after disconnecting the power cord for your
system to stop running. Watch for the System Power light on the
information LED panel to stop flashing.
.1ð/ Reset Button: Press this button to reset the system and run the power-on
self-test (POST).
.11/ Information LED Panel: The lights on this panel give status information for
your server. See “Information LED Panel” on page 8 for more information.
Chapter 1. Introducing the IBM Netfinity 7000 M10
7
Information LED Panel
The information LED panel on the front of the server contains status lights.
.1/ System Error Light: This amber light is lit when a system error occurs.
Information about the condition will display on the Information Panel.
.2/ Information Panel: System monitor information appears on this vacuum
fluorescent display (VFD). The Advanced System Management PCI Adapter
monitors system functions and generates the messages. See “System
Monitoring Messages” on page 108 for more information.
When the server is in standby mode (the system power supply is turned off
and AC current is present) the information panel can display system monitor
information.
.3/ System Power Light: When this light is lit, system power is present in the
server. When this light flashes, the server is in standby mode (the system
power supply is turned off and AC current is present). When this light is off, it
indicates either power supply failure or an AC power failure.
Attention: If this light is off, it does not mean there is no electrical current
present in the server. To remove all electrical current from the server, you
must unplug the server power cord from the electrical outlet.
.4/ SCSI Hard Disk Drive Activity Light: This green light is lit when there is
activity on a hard disk drive.
8
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Input/Output Connectors and Expansion Slots
Input/Output Connectors and Expansion Slots
The following illustration shows the expansion slots and the input/output connectors
(ports) on the rear of the server.
.1/ External Connector Knockout: Your server has an external connector
knockout that can be used when you install the token-ring service processor
option.
.2/ SCSI Connector: External SCSI devices attach here.
.3/ Serial A Connector: Serial signal cables for modems and other serial
devices connect here to the 9-pin serial port A connector. See “Devices and
I/O Ports” on page 19 for port assignment information. If you are using a
25-pin signal cable, you need a 9-pin-to-25-pin adapter cable.
.4/ 10/100 Ethernet Connector: This connector is to attach the Advanced
System Management PCI Adapter to a network hub for remote
communication.
Note: The 10/100 Ethernet connector cannot be accessed from the network
operating system. The connector is dedicated to connecting your
Advanced System Management PCI Adapter to an Ethernet network
through a service-processor interface, such as Netfinity Manager.
.5/ Serial B Connector: Serial signal cables for modems and other serial
devices connect here to the 9-pin serial port B connector. See “Devices and
I/O Ports” on page 19 for port assignment information. If you are using a
25-pin signal cable, you need a 9-pin-to-25-pin adapter cable.
.6/ Dual Serial Connector: This connector can be used to attach to a Y-cable
that is shipped with your server. This Y-cable can be used to attach to a
modem that is dedicated to communication with the Advanced System
Management PCI Adapter.
.7/ RS 485 Bus Connector: This connector is used to attach other compatible
service processors for remote access.
Chapter 1. Introducing the IBM Netfinity 7000 M10
9
Input/Output Connectors and Expansion Slots
.8/ Parallel Connector: A signal cable for a parallel device, such as a printer
connects here.
.9/ Video Connector: The monitor signal cable connects here.
.1ð/ Universal Serial Bus Connectors: You can attach I/O devices to these two
universal serial bus (USB) connectors. You need a 4-pin cable to connect
devices to USB 1 or 2. A hot-plug keyboard-and-mouse option can be cabled
or uncabled from the USB connectors without error or loss of service.
Note: If a standard (non-USB) keyboard is attached to the keyboard port, the
USB ports are disabled while the power-on self-test (POST) is running
and no USB devices will work during POST.
.11/ Power Supply Connector: The system power cord connects here.
.12/ Attention Lights for PCI Slots: Each PCI slot has an Attention light that is
visible from the rear of the server. An Attention light flashes approximately
once per second when it is on. The meaning of the Attention lights is defined
by your operating system. Refer to your operating-system documentation to
determine if the operating system supports hot-plug PCI adapters and, if so,
what the Attention lights indicate.
.13/ PCI Expansion Slots: Your server has seven 32-bit and five 64-bit
peripheral component interconnect (PCI) expansion slots. All PCI slots
support hot-plug PCI adapters.
You can install PCI adapters to provide communication, specialized graphics,
and sound. Many adapters provide bus-master capabilities, which enable the
adapters to perform operations without interrupting the system
microprocessors.
.14/ Keyboard Connector: The keyboard cable connects here.
.15/ Mouse Connector: The mouse cable connects here. This port sometimes is
called an auxiliary-device or pointing-device port.
Note: For pin assignments and other details about these connectors, see
“Connecting External Options” on page 72.
10
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Power Supplies
Power Supplies
The following illustration shows the power supplies in your server.
Note: Your server may differ slightly from the following illustration, depending on
your model.
.1/ Filler Panels: You can remove these filler panels to install additional power
supplies.
.2/ Hot-Swap Power Supplies: See “Installing a Hot-Swap Power Supply” on
page 63 for information on power supply requirements and for instructions on
installing additional power supplies.
.3/ Power-Supply Power Switch: This switch turns the power supply on and
off.
.4/ AC Power Light: This light provides status information about the power
supply. For normal operation, both the AC and DC Power lights should be
on. For any other combination of lights, see “Power Supply LEDs” on
page 124.
.5/ DC Power Light: This light provides status information about the power
supply. For normal operation, both the AC and DC Power lights should be
on. For any other combination of lights, see “Power Supply LEDs” on
page 124.
Chapter 1. Introducing the IBM Netfinity 7000 M10
11
Arranging Your Workspace
Chapter 2. Arranging Your Workspace
This chapter contains information about arranging your workspace.
To get the most from your server, arrange both the equipment you use and your
work area to suit your needs and the kind of work you do. Your comfort is of
foremost importance, but light sources, air circulation, and the location of electrical
outlets also can affect the way you arrange your workspace.
This chapter contains:
Comfort
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Glare and Lighting . . . . . . . . . .
Air Circulation . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electrical Outlets and Cable Lengths
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Comfort
Although no single working position is ideal for everyone, here are a few guidelines
to help you find a position that suits you best.
Sitting in the same position for a long time can cause fatigue. A good chair can
make a big difference. The backrest and seat should adjust independently and
provide good support. The seat should have a curved front to relieve pressure on
the thighs. Adjust the seat so that your thighs are parallel to the floor and your feet
are either flat on the floor or on a footrest.
When using the keyboard, keep your forearms parallel to the floor and your wrists
in a neutral, comfortable position. Try to keep a light touch on the keyboard and
your hands and fingers relaxed. You can change the angle of the keyboard for
maximum comfort by adjusting the position of the keyboard feet.
Viewing Distance
Lower
Back
Support
Seat
Height
Adjust the monitor so the top of the screen is at, or slightly below, eye level. Place
the monitor at a comfortable viewing distance, usually 51 to 61 cm (20 to 24 in.),
and position it so you can view it without having to twist your body. Also position
other equipment you use regularly, such as the telephone or a mouse, within easy
reach.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
13
Arranging Your Workspace
Glare and Lighting
Position the monitor to minimize glare and reflections from overhead lights,
windows, and other light sources. Even reflected light from shiny surfaces can
cause annoying reflections on your monitor screen. Place the monitor at right
angles to windows and other light sources, when possible. Reduce overhead
lighting, if necessary, by turning off lights or using lower wattage bulbs. If you
install the monitor near a window, use curtains or blinds to block the sunlight. You
might have to adjust the Brightness and Contrast controls on the monitor as the
room lighting changes throughout the day.
Where it is impossible to avoid reflections or to adjust the lighting, an antiglare filter
placed over the screen might be helpful. However, these filters might affect the
clarity of the image on the screen; try them only after you have exhausted other
methods of reducing glare.
Dust buildup compounds problems associated with glare. Remember to clean your
monitor screen periodically using a soft cloth moistened with a nonabrasive liquid
glass cleaner.
Air Circulation
Your server and monitor produce heat. Your server has one or more fans that pull
in fresh air and force out hot air. The monitor lets hot air escape through vents.
Blocking the air vents can cause overheating, which might result in a malfunction or
damage. Place the server and monitor so that nothing blocks the air vents. Leave
at least 305 mm (12 inches) of space at the front and rear of your server to allow
the server's cooling system to work properly.
Electrical Outlets and Cable Lengths
The location of electrical outlets and the length of power cords and cables that
connect to the monitor, printer, and other devices might determine the final
placement of your server.
When arranging your workspace:
Ÿ Avoid the use of extension cords. When possible, plug the server power cords
directly into electrical outlets.
Ÿ Keep power cords and cables neatly routed away from walkways and other
areas where they might get kicked accidentally.
For more information about power cords, refer to the “Getting Help Information”
section of this Server Library.
14
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Chapter 3. Configuring Your Server
This chapter provides information about the Configuration/Setup Utility program that
comes with your server.
The Configuration/Setup Utility program is part of the basic input/output system
(BIOS) that comes with your server. Using these programs, you can set the
system date and time, define input and output device parameters, and define
system security.
The ROM-based diagnostic program that comes with the server provides diagnostic
support for the system memory, disk drives, and other system components.
This chapter contains:
Configuration Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Configuration/Setup Utility Program
. . . .
Using the Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu
System Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Devices and I/O Ports
Date and Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Start Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Advanced Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Save Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Restore Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Load Default Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exit Setup
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Configuring Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .
Resolving Configuration Conflicts
Resolving Hardware Configuration Conflicts .
Resolving Software Configuration Conflicts .
Using the SCSISelect Utility . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the SCSISelect Utility . . . . . . . . .
SCSISelect Utility Choices . . . . . . . . . . .
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
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15
Configuration Overview
Configuration Overview
You play a key role in how your server allocates resources to organize and
interconnect hardware devices and software programs. This allocation process is
referred to as configuration. The steps required to configure your server depend on
the number and types of devices and programs that you install.
Your server supports PCI adapters and SCSI devices. Because of this flexibility,
you can choose from among many adapters and devices.
In general, the greater the number and variety of hardware devices and software
programs that you install in your server, the more you will have to interact with your
server and your devices to correctly configure your system.
Your server comes with the following hardware configuration programs:
Ÿ Configuration/Setup Utility
With the built-in Configuration/Setup Utility program, you can configure I/O
functions, such as serial and parallel port assignments; change interrupt
request (IRQ) settings; and change the startup sequence for drives that you
install. You also can use this program to set passwords for starting up the
server and accessing the Configuration/Setup Utility program.
Ÿ SCSISelect Utility
With the built-in SCSISelect Utility, you can configure the SCSI devices that
you attach to the SCSI controller. You can use SCSISelect to change default
values, resolve configuration conflicts, and perform a low-level format on a
SCSI hard disk drive.
Before installing a new device or program, read the documentation that comes with
it. Reading the instructions helps you to determine the steps required for
installation and configuration. The following actions are typically, but not always,
required to configure your server.
1. Run the Configuration/Setup Utility program and record the current
configuration settings.
2. Set jumpers or switches on server components.
See “Changing Jumper Positions” on page 140 and “I/O Function Card
Jumpers” on page 148.
3. Set jumpers or switches on the device.
See the device installation instructions.
4. Install the device in the server.
See Chapter 4, “Installing Options” on page 31.
5. Install software programs.
See the installation instructions that come with the software.
6. Resolve configuration conflicts.
See “Resolving Configuration Conflicts” on page 26.
16
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
The Configuration/Setup Utility Program
The Configuration/Setup Utility Program
For most configurations, the server will operate using the default system settings.
You need to change the settings only to resolve configuration conflicts or to enable
or change device functions (for example, defining diskette types, and so on).
When you want or need to change the default settings, the Configuration/Setup
Utility program provides a convenient way to display and change the settings.
After you run and exit from the Configuration/Setup Utility program, configuration
information is stored in electrically erasable programmable read-only memory
(EEPROM). While the server is off, the configuration information remains available
for the next system startup.
Always run the Configuration/Setup Utility program if you add, remove, or relocate
any hardware option, or if you receive an error message instructing you to do so.
Review this chapter and the information that comes with the option before making
changes. Also, record the current settings (see Chapter 7, “Server Records and
Specifications”) before making any changes.
To start the Configuration/Setup Utility program:
1. Turn on the server and watch the screen.
2. When the message Press F1 for Configuration/Setup appears, press F1.
Note: If you enter the power-on password and an administrator
(supervisor-level) password is also set, a limited version of the menu
appears. To see the full menu, you must restart the server and enter
the administrator password when you are prompted to enter a
password. See “System Security” on page 20 for additional
information.
The Configuration/Setup Utility main menu appears. For information about the
menu, see “Using the Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu” on page 18.
Note: When the message Press F2 for Diagnostics appears, press F2 to run
the diagnostics programs. For information about running the
diagnostics programs, see “Diagnostic Programs” on page 94.
Chapter 3. Configuring Your Server
17
Using the Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu
Using the Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu
From the Configuration/Setup Utility main menu, you can select settings that you
want to change. The Configuration/Setup Utility main menu is similar to the
following screen.
IBM SurePath Setup - © IBM Corporation
Configuration/Setup Utility
• System Summary
• System Information
• Devices and I/O Ports
• Date and Time
• System Security
• Start Options
• Advanced Setup
• Error Logs
Save Settings
Restore Settings
Load Default Settings
Exit Setup
<F1> Help
<Esc> Exit
< ↑ > < ↓ > Move
<Enter> Select
Pressing F1 displays Help information for a selected menu item.
Note: The choices on some menus might differ slightly, depending on the BIOS
version that comes with your server.
To change configuration settings:
1. Use the Up Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) key to highlight the menu item for the
configuration setting that you want to change; then, press Enter.
2. Use the Up Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) key to choose the appropriate setting
for the selected menu item; then, press Enter.
3. Repeat step 1 through step 2 for each setting that you want to change. Press
Esc to return to the Configuration/Setup Utility main menu.
4. After making changes, you can select:
Ÿ Save Settings to save the selected changes.
Ÿ Restore Settings to delete the changes and restore the previous settings.
Ÿ Load Default Settings to cancel the changes and restore the factory
settings.
Note: The Configuration/Setup Utility main menu selections do not save
settings, restore settings, or load default settings for the PCI Slot/Device
Information choice. To save settings, or restore settings for the PCI
Slot/Device Information choice, you must use the menu selections
available from the PCI Slot/Device Information choice.
5. To exit from the Configuration/Setup Utility main menu, select Exit Setup. If
you made any changes and did not save them with the Save Settings choice,
the system prompts you to save or discard the changes when you attempt to
exit from the Configuration/Setup Utility main menu.
18
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Using the Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu
System Summary
Select this choice to display configuration information, including the type and speed
of the microprocessors and amount of memory.
Changes that you make to configuration settings appear on this summary screen.
You cannot edit the fields.
The System Summary choice appears on the full Configuration/Setup Utility main
menu and on the limited Configuration/Setup Utility main menu.
System Information
Select this choice to display information about your Netfinity 7000 M10. Changes
that you make on other menus might appear on this summary screen. You cannot
edit any fields. The System Information choice appears only on the full
Configuration/Setup Utility main menu.
Product Data
Select this choice to view system information, such as the machine type and model,
the system serial number, and the revision level or issue date of the BIOS stored
on the flash electronically erasable programmable ROM (EEPROM).
System Card Data
Select this choice to view vital product data (VPD) for some server components.
Devices and I/O Ports
Software recognizes ports through their port assignments. Each port must have a
unique port assignment. The Configuration/Setup Utility program normally handles
this, but you might have special hardware or software that requires you to change
these assignments.
Select the Devices and I/O Ports choice to view or change the assignments for
devices and input/output ports.
You can add serial ports by installing a serial adapter in an expansion slot. See
the documentation that comes with the serial adapter for information about port
assignments.
You can configure the parallel port as bidirectional; that is, so that data can be both
read from and written to a device. In bidirectional mode, the server supports
Extended Capabilities Port (ECP) and Enhanced Parallel Port (EPP).
To display or change the assignments for devices, the serial ports, or parallel
port:
1. Select Devices and I/O Ports.
2. Select a device or port; use the Left Arrow (←) or Right Arrow (→) key to
advance through the settings.
The Devices and I/O Ports choice appears only on the full Configuration/Setup
Utility main menu.
Chapter 3. Configuring Your Server
19
Using the Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu
Notes:
1. When you configure the parallel port as bidirectional, use an IEEE
1284-compliant cable. The maximum length of the cable must not exceed 3
meters (9.8 feet).
2. The universal serial bus (USB) is configured automatically.
3. If you install a USB keyboard that has a mouse port, the USB keyboard
emulates a mouse and you will not be able to disable the mouse settings in the
Configuration/Setup Utility program.
Date and Time
Select this choice to set the system date and time.
The system time is in a 24-hour format: hour:minute:second.
The system date is in standard format for your country. For example, in the United
States, the format is MM/DD/YYYY (Month/Day/Year).
Select Date and Time; then, use the Left Arrow (←) or Right Arrow (→) key to
advance through each data field. Type the new information; the system saves the
information as you type it.
The Date and Time choice appears only on the full Configuration/Setup Utility main
menu.
System Security
To control access to the information in your server databases, you can implement
two levels of password protection. Implementing these security measures helps
you to ensure the integrity of the data and programs that are stored in your server.
Note: The default values for all security-related data fields are given in Table 15
on page 134.
After you set a power-on password, you can enable the unattended-start mode.
This locks the keyboard and mouse, but allows the system to start the operating
system. The keyboard and mouse remain locked until you enter the correct
password.
The System Security choice appears only on the full Configuration/Setup Utility
main menu.
After you set a power-on or administrator password, you must enter the password
when you turn on the server. (The passwords do not appear on the screen as you
type them.)
20
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Using the Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu
Type of Password
Results
No password set
Ÿ No password required to start the system.
Ÿ You can access all choices on the Configuration/Setup Utility
main menu.
Power-on password only
Ÿ You must enter the password to complete the system startup.
Ÿ You can access all choices on the Configuration/Setup Utility
main menu.
Administrator password only
Ÿ You must enter the password to complete the system startup.
Ÿ The Administrator password provides access to all choices on
the Configuration/Setup Utility main menu.
Administrator and power-on
password
You can enter either password to complete the system startup.
Ÿ The administrator password provides access to all choices on
the Configuration/Setup Utility main menu. You can set,
change, or delete both the administrator and power-on
passwords, and allow a power-on password to be changed by
the user.
Ÿ The power-on password provides access to a limited set of
choices on the Configuration/Setup Utility main menu. This
limited access might include changing or deleting the power-on
password.
Ÿ If you forget the power-on password, and the administrator
password has been set, use the administrator password at the
power-on password prompt; then, start the Configuration/Setup
Utility program and change the power-on password.
Using the Power-On Password Menu
When a power-on password is set, you must enter a password each time that you
start the system.
When a power-on password is set, POST does not complete until you enter the
password. If you forget the power-on password, you can regain access to the
server through one of the following methods:
Ÿ If an administrator password has been set, enter the administrator password at
the power-on prompt. (If necessary, see “Using the Administrator Password
Menu” on page 22 for details.) Start the Configuration/Setup Utility program
and change the power-on password as previously described in this section (see
steps 1 through 4 on page 22).
Ÿ You can change the position of the Password override jumper, as described in
“Changing Jumper Positions” on page 140.
Ÿ You can remove the battery as described in “Replacing the Battery” on
page 127 and then install the battery.
To set a power-on password:
1. Select Power-on Password from the System Security menu; then, press
Enter.
The Power-on Password menu appears.
2. Type the password in the Enter Power-on Password data field.
You can use any combination of up to seven characters (A–Z, a–z, and 0–9)
for your power-on password. Keep a record of your password in a secure
place.
Chapter 3. Configuring Your Server
21
Using the Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu
3. Move the cursor to the Enter Power-on Password Again data field and type
the password again.
Note: A message appears if the two passwords do not match. If this
happens, press Esc to cancel the request and return to the System
Security menu.
4. Select Change Power-on Password to save the new password; then, press
Enter.
To delete a power-on password:
1. Select Power-on Password from the System Security menu; then, press
Enter.
The Power-on Password menu appears.
2. Select Delete Power-on Password; then, press Enter.
3. A confirmation window appears. Press Enter to delete the power-on password.
Press Esc to cancel the request and return to the System Security menu.
To allow the system to start in unattended-start mode when a power-on
password is set:
1. Select Power-on Password from the System Security menu; then, press
Enter.
The Power-on Password screen appears.
2. Select Allow for unattended boot with password.
Press the Left Arrow (←) key or Right Arrow (→) key to toggle the entry to On.
Note: The Allow for unattended boot with password data field must be set
to On for the system to support locally or remotely scheduled system
shutdowns or restarts in unattended-start mode.
Using the Administrator Password Menu
The administrator password (sometimes called a supervisor-level password)
controls access to some features of the server, including the Configuration/Setup
Utility program.
Attention:
If an administrator password is set and then forgotten, it cannot be overridden
or removed. You must replace the I/O function card. See “Understanding the
Netfinity 7000 M10 Design” on page 36 for information on the I/O function card.
To set an administrator password:
1. Select Administrator Password from the System Security menu: then, press
Enter.
The Administrator Password menu appears.
2. Type the password in the Enter Administrator Password data field.
A password can contain any combination of up to seven alphanumeric
characters (A–Z, a–z, and 0–9). Keep a record of your password in a secure
place.
22
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Using the Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu
3. Move the cursor to the Enter Administrator Password Again data field and
type the password again.
Note: A message appears if the two passwords do not match. If this
happens, press Esc to cancel the request and return to the System
Security menu.
4. Select Change Administrator Password to save the new password; then,
press Enter. The password becomes effective immediately.
To delete an administrator password:
1. Select Administrator Password from the System Security menu; then, press
Enter.
The Administrator Password menu appears.
2. Select Delete Administrator Password; then, press Enter.
3. A confirmation window appears. Press Enter to delete the administrator
password. Press Esc to return to the System Security menu.
To enable a user to change the power-on password:
1. Select Administrator Password from the System Security menu; then, press
Enter.
The Administrator Password screen appears.
2. Select Power-on password changeable by user. Press the Left Arrow (←) or
Right Arrow (→) key to toggle the entry to Yes.
When this choice is enabled, System Security appears on the limited
Configuration/Setup Utility main menu. The System Security menu contains the
Power-on Password choice.
Start Options
Start options take effect when you start your server.
You can select keyboard operating characteristics, such as the keyboard speed.
You also can specify whether the keyboard number lock starts on or off. You also
can enable the server to run without a diskette drive or a monitor.
The server uses a startup sequence to determine the device from which the
operating system loads. For example, you can define a startup sequence that
checks for a startable diskette in the diskette drive, then checks the hard disk drive
in bay 1, and then checks a network adapter.
Attention: If the CD-ROM drive contains a startable CD, you must remove the CD
if you want to use a startup sequence that begins with a startable diskette.
You can enable a virus-detection test that checks for changes in the master boot
record at startup. You also can choose to run POST in the enhanced mode or the
quick mode.
Select Start Options; then, use the Left Arrow (←) or Right Arrow (→) key to
advance through each data field.
Chapter 3. Configuring Your Server
23
Using the Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu
The Start Options choice appears only on the full Configuration/Setup Utility main
menu.
Advanced Setup
Select Advanced Setup to change values for advanced hardware features, such
as cache control, and PCI configuration.
A warning message displays above the choices on this menu, to alert you that the
system might malfunction if these options are configured incorrectly. Follow the
instructions on the screen carefully.
Use the Left Arrow (←) or Right Arrow (→) key to scroll through each data field
after you select one of the setup options.
The Advanced Setup choice appears only on the full Configuration/Setup Utility
main menu.
ACPI Control
Select this choice to enable or disable the advanced configuration and
power-management interface (ACPI) in the BIOS. You can choose to change the
ACPI hardware signature or select an IRQ for ACPI. ACPI allows the operating
system to place some server components into a reduced-power state during
periods of low activity.
Cache Control
Select this choice to enable or disable the microprocessor cache. In addition, you
can define the microprocessor cache type as write-back (WB) or write-through
(WT). Selecting write-back mode will provide the maximum system performance.
You can also enable or disable video BIOS caching, and define buffers for video
and option ROM caching.
PCI Slot/Device Information
Select this choice to view and identify system resources used by PCI devices. PCI
devices automatically communicate with the server configuration information. This
usually results in automatic configuration of a PCI device. If a conflict does occur,
see “Resolving Configuration Conflicts” on page 26.
Use the Up Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) key to highlight the assignment that you
want to change and press Enter. Use the Left Arrow (←) or Right Arrow (→) key
to select from the list of available choices. An asterisk (*) indicates that more than
one device shares a slot. After making changes, you can select:
Ÿ Save Settings to save the selected changes.
Ÿ Restore Settings to delete the changes and restore the previous settings.
Note: You can use the menu selections to save settings or restore settings for the
PCI Slot/Device Information choice only. The Configuration/Setup Utility
main menu selections save settings, restore settings, or load default
settings for all other choices, but not the PCI Slot/Device Information choice.
Your server uses a rotational interrupt technique to configure PCI devices.
Because of this technique, you can install a variety of PCI devices that currently do
24
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Using the Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu
not support sharing of PCI interrupts (IRQs). Multiple-function PCI devices use
more than one interrupt.
Memory Settings
Select this choice to manually disable or enable a bank of memory.
If a memory error is detected during POST or memory configuration, the server can
automatically disable the failing memory bank and continue operating with reduced
memory capacity. If this occurs, you must manually enable the memory bank after
the problem is corrected. Select Memory Settings from the Advanced Setup
menu; then use the Up Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) key to highlight the bank that
you want to enable. Use the Left Arrow (←) or Right Arrow (→) key to select
Enable.
MPS Version Control
Select this choice to view and identify the multiprocessor specification (MPS) level.
Some versions of the IBM OS/2 operating system use 1.1 as the MPS level. The
default value is 1.4. Refer to the documentation that comes with your operating
system for more information.
Error Logs
Select Error Logs to choose to view either the POST error log or the system error
log.
POST Error Log
Select POST Error Log to view the three most recent error codes and messages
that the system generated during POST. You can clear the error log by selecting
Clear error logs.
System Error Log
Select System Error Log to view the system error log. The system error log
contains all the system, error, and warning messages that the system has
generated. You can use the Up Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) keys to to move
between pages in the system error log.
Save Settings
After you make configuration changes, review them to be sure that they contain the
correct information. If the information is correct, select Save Settings to save the
selected changes.
Restore Settings
After you make configuration changes, review them to be sure that they contain the
correct information. If the information is incorrect, or if you do not want to save
these changes, select Restore Settings to delete the changes and restore the
previous settings.
Chapter 3. Configuring Your Server
25
Resolving Configuration Conflicts
Load Default Settings
If you make configuration changes and then decide that you want to use default
values instead, select Load Default Settings to cancel the changes and restore
the factory settings. See “Installed Device Records” on page 132 for a listing of
the default configuration values.
Exit Setup
If you have made any changes, you will be asked if you want to save the changes
or exit without saving the changes.
Configuring Options
Before installing a new device or program, read the documentation that comes with
it. Reading the instructions helps you to determine the steps that are required for
installation and configuration. The following list provides a preview of the actions
that might be required to configure your server.
1. Run the Configuration/Setup Utility program and record the current
configuration settings.
See “The Configuration/Setup Utility Program” on page 17.
2. Set jumpers or switches on the server components.
See “Changing Jumper Positions” on page 140 and “I/O Function Card
Jumpers” on page 148.
3. Set jumpers or switches on the device.
See the instructions that come with the adapter.
4. Install the adapter in the server.
See “Working with Adapters” on page 49.
5. Install software programs.
See the installation instructions that come with the software.
6. Resolve configuration conflicts.
See “Resolving Configuration Conflicts.”
Resolving Configuration Conflicts
The resources used by your server consist of interrupt requests, direct memory
access, I/O ports addresses, and memory. This information is useful when a
resource configuration conflict occurs.
Conflicts in the configuration occur if:
Ÿ A device is installed that requires the same resource as another device. (For
example, a conflict occurs when two adapters try to write to the same address
space.)
Ÿ A device resource is changed (for example, changing jumper settings).
Ÿ A device function is changed (for example, assigning COM1 to two serial ports).
Ÿ A software program is installed that requires the same resource as a hardware
device.
26
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Resolving Configuration Conflicts
The steps required to resolve a configuration error are determined by the number
and variety of hardware devices and software programs that you install. If a
hardware configuration error is detected, a configuration error message appears
after the server completes POST and before the operating system is loaded. You
can bypass the error by pressing Esc while the error message is displayed.
The Configuration/Setup Utility program configures the system hardware and PCI
IRQs. The program does not consider the requirements of the operating system or
the application programs. See “Resolving Software Configuration Conflicts” for
additional information.
Resolving Hardware Configuration Conflicts
Use the following information to help resolve hardware configuration conflicts:
1. Run the Configuration/Setup Utility program to view and change resources
used by the system functions and the installed options. Record the current
settings before making any changes. (See “The Configuration/Setup Utility
Program” on page 17 for instructions.)
2. Determine which adapter or device is causing the conflict. (See Chapter 6,
“Solving Problems” for instructions.)
3. Change adapter jumpers or switches. Some devices use jumpers and switches
to define the system resources that the devices need. If the settings are
incorrect or set to use a resource that cannot be shared, a conflict occurs and
the device will remain deactivated by the configuration program.
4. Change system jumpers or switches. See “Changing Jumper Positions” on
page 140.
5. Remove the device or adapter. Some configurations are not supported. If you
must remove an adapter, see “Working with Adapters” on page 49.
Resolving Software Configuration Conflicts
The memory-address space and IRQs used by some hardware options might
conflict with addresses defined for use through application programs or the
expanded memory specification (EMS). (EMS is used only with DOS.)
If a conflict exists, one or more of the following conditions might exist:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
The system cannot load the operating system.
The system does not work.
An application program does not operate, or it returns an error.
Screen messages indicate a conflict exists.
To resolve conflicts, you can change the software or hardware configuration.
Note: Start the Configuration/Setup Utility program to view the addresses used by
your server functions. (See “The Configuration/Setup Utility Program” on
page 17 for instructions.)
The best way to resolve memory-address conflicts is to change the addresses used
by the application program or the device driver. You can use the
Configuration/Setup Utility program to change addresses.
Chapter 3. Configuring Your Server
27
Using the SCSISelect Utility
If a device driver is causing a memory-address conflict, refer to your
operating-system documentation or the documentation that comes with the device
drivers.
Using the SCSISelect Utility
Note: If your server has a RAID adapter installed, use the configuration method
supplied with the RAID adapter to view or change SCSI settings for
attached devices.
Your server comes with a menu-driven configuration utility, called SCSISelect, that
allows you to view and change SCSI settings.
You can use the SCSISelect Utility to:
Ÿ View and change the default SCSI IDs
Ÿ Verify and change configuration conflicts
Ÿ Perform a low-level format on a SCSI hard disk
Starting the SCSISelect Utility
You can access this program when you start the server. The SCSISelect prompt
appears after the IBM logo appears. Press Ctrl+A immediately after the
SCSISelect prompt appears:
<<< Press <CTRL><A> for SCSISelect Utility! >>>
Use the Up Arrow (↑) or Down Arrow (↓) key to move the highlight bar to the
various menu choices. Press Esc to return to the previous menu. Also, you can
press the F5 key to switch between color and monochrome modes (if your monitor
permits). To change the settings of the displayed items, follow the directions on the
screen. Then, press Enter.
SCSISelect Utility Choices
The following choices appear on the SCSISelect Utility menu:
Ÿ Configure/View Host Adapter Settings
Ÿ SCSI Disk Utilities
Configure/View Host Adapter Settings
To view or change the SCSI controller settings, select Configure/View Host
Adapter Settings and follow the directions on the screen.
Note: On the SCSISelect Utility menu, the SCSI controller is referred to as the
Host Adapter.
This menu has the following choices:
Ÿ Host Adapter SCSI ID
The default SCSI ID of the SCSI controller is 7. Do not change this value.
Ÿ SCSI Parity Checking
The default value is Enabled. Do not change this value.
Ÿ Host Adapter SCSI Termination
The default value is Automatic. Do not change this value.
28
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Using the SCSISelect Utility
Ÿ Boot Device Configuration
Select this choice to configure startable device parameters. Before you can
make updates, you must know the ID of the device whose parameters you
want to configure.
Ÿ SCSI Device Configuration
Select this choice to configure SCSI device parameters. Before you can make
updates, you must know the ID of the device whose parameters you want to
configure.
Note: When the Maximum Sync Transfer Rate is set to 40.0, this value
represents the transfer rate for UltraSCSI devices. When the Maximum
Sync Transfer Rate is set to 20.0, this value represents the transfer
rate for Fast SCSI devices.
Ÿ Advanced Configuration Options
Select this choice to view or change the settings for advanced configuration
options. These options include enabling support for large hard disk drives and
support for drives with UltraSCSI speed.
To reset the SCSI controller defaults, press F6; then, follow the directions on the
screen.
SCSI Disk Utilities
To see the IDs that are assigned to each SCSI device or to format a SCSI device,
select SCSI Disk Utilities from the SCSISelect Utility menu.
To use the utility, select a drive from the list. Read the screens carefully before
making a selection.
Note: If the following screen appears, you might have pressed Ctrl+A before the
selected drives were ready. Restart the server and watch the SCSISelect
messages as each drive spins up. After the drive that you want to view or
format spins up, press Ctrl+A.
à
ð
Unexpected SCSI Command Failure
Target SCSI ID:
4
SCSI CDB Sent:
ð3 ðð ðð ðð ðE ðð ð7 ðð ð2 ðð
Host Adapter Status:
ððh - No host adapter error
Target Status:
ð2h - Check condition
Sense Key:
ð2h - Not ready
+Sense Code:
ð4h
+Sense Code Qualifier:
ð2h
Press 'Esc' to continue.
á
ñ
Chapter 3. Configuring Your Server
29
Using the SCSISelect Utility
Performing a Low-Level Disk Format
You can use the Format Disk feature of the SCSISelect Utility to perform a
low-level format on a hard disk drive.
Depending on the hard disk drive capacity, the low-level format program could take
up to two hours.
When To Use the Low-Level Format Program
Use the Low-Level Format program:
Ÿ When you are installing software that requires a low-level format
Ÿ When you get recurring messages from the diagnostic tests directing you to run
the Low-Level Format program on the hard disk drive
Ÿ As a last resort before replacing a failing hard disk drive
Note: For information about backing up all of your files, see your operating-system
documentation.
Starting the Low-Level Format Program
Attention: The low-level format program erases all data and programs.
Note: If your server has a RAID adapter installed, refer to the RAID adapter
documentation for instructions for performing a low-level format on a hard
disk drive attached to the PCI RAID adapter.
1. If the hard disk is working, make a backup copy of all the files and programs on
the hard disk drive
2. Select Format Disk; then, follow the instructions on the screen.
Note: Hard disks normally contain more tracks than their stated capacity (to
allow for defective tracks). A message appears on the screen if the
defect limit is reached. If this happens, have the system serviced.
3. To install an operating system after the hard disk drive is formatted, follow the
instructions in the “ServerGuide and Netfinity Manager Information” section of
this Server Library.
30
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Chapter 4. Installing Options
This chapter provides instructions to help you add options to your server. Some
option-removal instructions are provided, in case you need to remove one option to
install another.
This chapter contains:
Before You Begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electrical Safety
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Handling Static-Sensitive Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Reliability Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working Inside a Server with Power On . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding the Netfinity 7000 M10 Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O Board and I/O Function Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Netfinity Advanced System Management PCI Adapter . . . . . . . . .
Preparing to Install Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Top Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Front Bezel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Front Access Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing a Microprocessor Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Memory-Module Kits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LEDs for PCI Slots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adapter Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing a Hot-Plug PCI Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing a Non-Hot-Plug PCI Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Verifying Compatibility between Network Adapters and Device Drivers
Installing Internal Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Internal Drive Bays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SCSI Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preinstallation Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing a Drive in a Hot-Swap Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Replacing a Drive in a Hot-Swap Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing a Hot-Swap Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a Hot-Swap Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Replacing a Hot-Swap Fan Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Completing the Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Top Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Front Access Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Front Bezel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating Device Records and Reconfiguring the Server
. . . . . . .
Connecting External Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting External SCSI Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Input/Output Ports and Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
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Before You Begin
Notes:
1. Review the power supply requirements described in “Installing a Hot-Swap
Power Supply” on page 63.
2. You do not need to turn off the server to install or replace hot-swap power
supplies, hot-swap fans, hot-swap drives, or hot-plug PCI adapters.
Ÿ Become familiar with the safety and handling guidelines specified under “Safety
Information Statements” on page vii, “Electrical Safety” on page 33 and
“Handling Static-Sensitive Devices” on page 34. These guidelines will help you
work safely while working with your server or options.
Ÿ If you upgrade your server by installing a RAID adapter, you must configure
your disk arrays after you install hard disk drives, as described in “Installing
Internal Drives” on page 58. In this case, follow the instructions in the RAID
adapter documentation after installing the drives. Then, return here to install
your remaining options, if applicable. See Chapter 3, “Configuring Your
Server” on page 15 for additional details about configuration, and a description
of your server utility programs.
Ÿ Make sure that you have an adequate number of properly grounded electrical
outlets for your server, monitor, and any other options that you intend to install.
Ÿ Place your server in a location that is dry. Rain or spilled liquids might damage
your server.
Ÿ Leave at least 305 mm (12 inches) of ventilated space at the front and rear of
the server to allow the server's cooling system to work properly.
Ÿ Have a supply of 1 MB and 2 MB, 3.5-inch diskettes available.
Ÿ Back up all important data before you make changes to disk drives.
Ÿ Have a small, flat-blade screwdriver available.
Ÿ The orange color on components or labels in your Netfinity 7000 M10 indicates
hot-plug components.
Ÿ For a list of supported options for the Netfinity 7000 M10, refer to
http://www.pc.ibm.com/us/compat/ on the World Wide Web.
32
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Electrical Safety
Electrical Safety
For your safety, do the following before removing the top cover:
Note: You do not need to turn off the server to install or replace hot-swap power
supplies, hot-swap fans, hot-swap drives, or hot-plug PCI adapters.
1. Except if you are installing or removing a hot-swap option, run the shutdown
procedure for the operating system. Turn off the server and any attached
devices, such as printers, monitors, and external drives.
2. If you are in the United Kingdom and have a modem or fax machine attached
to your server, you must disconnect the telephone line from the server before
unplugging any power cords (also known as power cables). When
reassembling your server, you must reconnect the telephone line after you plug
in the power cords.
3. Unplug all the power cords from electrical outlets.
4. Disconnect all communication cables from external receptacles.
5. Disconnect all cables and the power cord from the back of the server.
Note: Reconnect the cables or power cords only after you reassemble the
server and put the covers back on.
9
CAUTION:
Never remove the cover on a power supply or any part (power
backplane and AC box) that has the following label attached.
Hazardous voltage, current, and energy levels are present inside the
power supplies, power backplane, and AC box. There are no
serviceable parts inside the power supplies, power backplane, or AC
box. If you suspect a problem with one of these parts, contact an IBM
service technician.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
33
Handling Static-Sensitive Devices
Static electricity, though harmless to you, can seriously damage server components
or options.
Note: When you are adding an internal option, do not open the static-protective
package containing the option until you are instructed to do so.
When you handle options and other server components, take these precautions to
avoid damage from static electricity:
Ÿ Limit your movement. Movement can cause static electricity to build up around
you.
Ÿ Always handle components carefully. Handle adapters, the processor board,
and memory-module kits by the edges. Never touch any exposed circuitry.
Ÿ Prevent others from touching components.
Ÿ When you are installing a new option, touch the static-protective package
containing the option to a metal expansion-slot screw or other unpainted metal
surface on the server for at least two seconds. (This reduces static electricity
from the package and from your body.)
Ÿ When possible, remove the option and install it directly into the server without
setting the option down. When this is not possible, place the static-protective
package that the option comes in on a smooth, level surface and place the
option on it.
Ÿ Do not place the option on the server's covers or any metal surface.
System Reliability Considerations
To help ensure proper cooling and system reliability, make sure:
Ÿ Each of the drive bays has either a drive or a filler panel installed.
Ÿ Each of the power supply bays has either a power supply or a filler panel
installed.
Ÿ The top cover is in place during normal operation.
Ÿ The front access cover is in place during normal operation.
Ÿ There is at least 305 mm (12 inches) of ventilation space at the front and rear
of the server.
Ÿ The Power switch on the power supply is off before you remove a functional
power supply.
Ÿ Cables for optional adapters are routed according to the instructions provided
with the adapters.
Ÿ A fan that has failed is replaced as soon as convenient to help maintain the
redundant cooling capability.
34
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Working Inside a Server with Power On
Working Inside a Server with Power On
Your server is designed to operate safely while powered on with the top cover
removed. The server is designed to protect you and the server. Here are some
simple guidelines to follow when you work inside your server while the server is
powered on:
Ÿ Avoid loose-fitting clothing on your forearms. (Button the cuffs on long-sleeved
shirts before working inside the server; do not wear cufflinks while you are
working inside the server.)
Ÿ Do not allow your necktie or scarf to hang inside the server.
Ÿ Remove jewelry, such as bracelets and loose-fitting wrist watches.
Ÿ Remove items from your shirt pocket (such as pens and pencils) that could fall
into the server as you lean over it.
Ÿ Take care to avoid dropping any metallic objects, such as paper clips, hair pins,
or screws, into the server.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
35
Understanding the Netfinity 7000 M10 Design
Understanding the Netfinity 7000 M10 Design
The Netfinity 7000 M10 incorporates new design features and components.
I/O Board and I/O Function Card
The server replaces the system board with an I/O board and an I/O function card.
Together, the I/O board and the I/O function card provide the functionality of a
system board. This modular design improves serviceability and provides for a
compact design.
See “I/O Board Component Locations” on page 144 for a layout of the I/O board.
See “I/O Function Card Component Locations” on page 147 for a layout of the I/O
function card.
.1/ I/O function card
.2/ I/O board
36
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Preparing to Install Options
Netfinity Advanced System Management PCI Adapter
With a Netfinity Advanced System Management PCI Adapter, in conjunction with
Netfinity Manager, you can locally and remotely configure and monitor many
features of your server.
Note: You must have the Advanced System Management PCI Adapter installed
for proper operation of your server and to use the system-management
functions the adapter provides.
For more information:
Ÿ See “What Your IBM Netfinity 7000 M10 Offers” on page 3 for an overview of
the functions and features
Ÿ See “Connecting External Options” on page 72 for a detailed description of the
connectors
Ÿ See “Advanced System Management PCI Adapter Component Locations” on
page 149 for a layout showing the component locations
Ÿ Refer to the “Advanced System Management Information” section of this Server
Library for installation, startup, and operating instructions
Preparing to Install Options
Before you begin:
Read “Electrical Safety” on page 33, “Handling Static-Sensitive Devices” on
page 34, and “Working Inside a Server with Power On” on page 35.
Note: You do not need to turn the server off to install or replace hot-swap power
supplies, hot-swap fans, hot-swap drives, or hot-plug PCI adapters.
If you are:
Ÿ Installing or removing a hot-plug PCI adapter, go to “Working with Adapters” on
page 49.
Ÿ Installing or replacing a hot-swap hard disk drive, go to “Installing Internal
Drives” on page 58.
Ÿ Installing a hot-swap power supply, go to “Installing a Hot-Swap Power Supply”
on page 63.
Ÿ Removing a hot-swap power supply, go to “Removing a Hot-Swap Power
Supply” on page 65.
Ÿ Replacing a hot-swap fan, go to “Replacing a Hot-Swap Fan Assembly” on
page 67.
Ÿ Installing or removing an option not listed in the preceding list, continue with the
following steps.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
37
Preparing to Install Options
1. Remove all media (diskettes, CDs, optical discs, or tapes) from the drives; then,
turn off the server and all attached options.
6
CAUTION:
The Power Control button on the front of the server does not turn
off the electrical current supplied to the server. The server also
might have more than one power cord. To remove all electrical
current from the server, ensure that all power cords are
disconnected from the power source.
2. If you have a modem or fax machine attached to the server, disconnect the
telephone line from the wall outlet.
3. Unplug all power cords (cables) from electrical outlets.
4. Note the location of the remaining cables and cords; then disconnect them from
the back of the server.
10
CAUTION:
Electrical current from power, telephone, and communication
cables can be hazardous. To avoid personal injury or equipment
damage, disconnect the attached power cords, telecommunications
systems, networks, and modems before you open the server
covers, unless instructed otherwise in the installation and
configuration procedures.
38
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Removing the Top Cover
Removing the Top Cover
Refer to the following illustration while you perform the steps in this procedure.
Before you begin:
Read “Electrical Safety” on page 33 and “Handling Static-Sensitive Devices” on
page 34.
To remove the server top cover:
1. Except if you are installing or removing a hot-swap option, run the shutdown
procedure for the operating system, turn off the server and all attached devices,
and disconnect all external cables and power cords (see “Preparing to Install
Options” on page 37).
2. Loosen the two thumbscrews .1/ on the back edge of the top cover.
3. Slide the top cover .2/ slightly toward the rear of the server; the cover will stop
after about 25 mm (1 inch). Lift the cover off the server and set the cover
aside.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
39
Removing the Front Bezel
Removing the Front Bezel
Refer to the following illustration while you perform the steps in this procedure.
Before you begin:
Read “Electrical Safety” on page 33 and “Handling Static-Sensitive Devices” on
page 34.
To remove the front bezel:
1. Press on the tabs at the top edge of the bezel .1/.
2. Pivot the top of the bezel slightly away from the server and remove the bezel
from the server.
40
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Removing the Front Access Cover
Removing the Front Access Cover
Refer to the following illustration while you perform the steps in this procedure.
Before you begin:
Read “Electrical Safety” on page 33 and “Handling Static-Sensitive Devices” on
page 34.
To remove the server front access cover:
1. Run the shutdown procedure for the operating system. Turn off the server and
peripheral devices and disconnect all external cables and power cords (see
“Preparing to Install Options” on page 37); then remove the front bezel (see
“Removing the Front Bezel” on page 40).
2. Turn the two quarter-turn fasteners .1/ on the top edge of the front access
cover .2/ to the unlocked position .3/. Pivot the top of the front access cover
away from the server and remove the cover from the server.
Attention: For correct cooling and airflow, install the front access cover before
turning on the server. Operating the server with the front access cover removed
might damage server components.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
41
Installing a Microprocessor Kit
Installing a Microprocessor Kit
Your server comes with one microprocessor installed on the processor board.
When you install one or more additional microprocessor kits, your server can
operate as a symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) server. With SMP, certain operating
systems and application programs can distribute the processing load among the
microprocessors. This enhances performance for database and point-of-sale
applications, integrated manufacturing solutions, and other applications.
Before you begin:
Ÿ Read “Electrical Safety” on page 33 and “Handling Static-Sensitive Devices”
on page 34.
Ÿ Thoroughly review the documentation that comes with the microprocessor,
so that you can determine whether you need to update the server’s basic
input/output system (BIOS). The latest level of BIOS for your server is
available through the World Wide Web and the IBM Bulletin Board System
(BBS). Refer to the “Getting Help Information” section of this Server Library
for the appropriate World Wide Web addresses and bulletin-board telephone
numbers.
Ÿ Obtain an SMP-capable operating system (optional). For a list of supported
operating systems, see http://www.pc.ibm.com/us/compat/ on the World
Wide Web.
Notes:
1. The illustrations in this section might differ slightly from your hardware.
2. To ensure proper server operation, when you install a new or additional
microprocessor, use microprocessors with the same cache size as those of the
currently installed microprocessor.
3. If you replace the microprocessor in your server with a microprocessor with a
different speed; be sure to set the Microprocessor Core Frequency Selection
jumper block correctly. (See “Processor Board Jumpers” on page 146 for more
information.)
4. If you install additional microprocessors, be sure to set the Microprocessor Core
Frequency Selection jumper block for the slowest speed microprocessor
installed in your server. (See “Processor Board Jumpers” on page 146 for
more information.)
5. To maintain signal quality and system reliability, either a microprocessor or the
microprocessor terminator card must be installed in microprocessor socket 4. A
microprocessor must be installed in microprocessor socket 1.
42
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Installing a Microprocessor Kit
Refer to the following illustration while you perform the steps in this section.
.. .
.. .
.1/ Memory board latches
.2/ Optional microprocessor
.3/ Latches
.4/ Microprocessor retention bracket
.5/ VRM retention bracket
.6/ VRMs for optional microprocessor
.7/ Guides
.8/ Microprocessor terminator card
.9/ VRMs for installed microprocessor
.1ð/ Installed microprocessor
To install an additional microprocessor kit:
1. Run the shutdown procedure for the operating system. Turn off the server and
peripheral devices and disconnect all external cables and power cords (see
“Preparing to Install Options” on page 37); then remove the front bezel (see
“Removing the Front Bezel” on page 40), and the front access cover (see
“Removing the Front Access Cover” on page 41).
2. Remove the memory board from memory board socket 1:
a. Pull the memory board latches .1/ so they rotate to a 90-degree angle
from the memory board.
b. Grasp the two latches and carefully pull the memory board from the server.
c. Put the memory board aside on a flat, static-protective surface.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
43
Installing a Microprocessor Kit
3. Remove the microprocessor retention bracket.4/:
a. Remove the shipping screw from the microprocessor retention bracket.
b. Grasp the bracket handle and pull downwards firmly to detach the bracket
from the server.
c. Pivot the bracket to a 90-degree angle from the processor board.
d. Remove the bracket from the server.
4. Determine the microprocessor socket in which you want to install the new
microprocessor.
Note: Your server comes with a microprocessor installed in socket 1. Install a
second microprocessor in socket 2, a third microprocessor in socket 3,
and a fourth microprocessor in socket 4.
5. If you are adding a fourth microprocessor, remove the microprocessor
terminator card .8/:
Note: To maintain signal quality and system reliability, a microprocessor or the
microprocessor terminator card must be installed in microprocessor
socket 4.
a. Pull the microprocessor terminator card latches so they rotate to a
90-degree angle from the microprocessor terminator card.
b. Grasp the two latches and carefully pull the microprocessor terminator card
from the server.
c. Store the microprocessor terminator card in a safe place.
6. Install the two voltage regulator modules (VRM) .6/ included in the
microprocessor kit.
a. Refer to the label in front of the processor board inside the server for the
location of the VRM sockets.
Note: Install the VRMs for a second microprocessor in VRM sockets 2a
and 2b. Install the VRMs for a third microprocessor in VRM sockets
3a and 3b. Install the VRMs for a fourth microprocessor in VRM
sockets 4a and 4b.
b. Lift on the VRM retention bracket .5/ to detach the bracket from the
chassis.
c. Carefully remove the bracket from the server.
d. Install the VRMs in the VRM sockets.
e. Install the VRM retention bracket.
Note: When correctly installed, the bracket holds the VRMs securely in
place and does not move or shift.
44
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Installing a Microprocessor Kit
7. Install the microprocessor:
a. Touch the static-protective package containing the new microprocessor to
any unpainted metal surface on the server; then, remove the
microprocessor from the package.
b. Insert the microprocessor into the guides .7/ and gently press the
microprocessor into the socket. When correctly inserted, the
microprocessor heat sink faces to the left.
Attention: Make sure the microprocessor is oriented and aligned correctly
before you try to press it into the socket.
c. Push the latches .3/ until they close and lock in place.
8. Install the microprocessor retention bracket:
a. Insert the bottom edge of the bracket in the matching openings in the guide
support.
b. Rotate the bracket over the microprocessors.
c. Grasp the bracket handle and press the bracket firmly into place. Insert
both tabs on the bracket in the matching openings on the server chassis.
Note: When correctly installed, the bracket holds the microprocessors
securely in place and does not move or shift.
9. Install the memory board:
a. Insert the memory board into the guides and gently press the memory
board into the socket.
Attention: When you install the memory board in the server, be sure that
it is completely and correctly seated in the connector before you apply force
to close the latches. Incomplete insertion might cause damage to server
components.
b. Push the memory board latches .1/ until they close and lock in place.
10. If you have other options to install or remove, do so now; otherwise, go to
“Completing the Installation” on page 69.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
45
Installing Memory-Module Kits
Installing Memory-Module Kits
Adding memory to your server is an easy way to make programs run faster. You
can increase the amount of memory in your server by installing options called
memory-module kits. Each kit contains four industry-standard, dual inline memory
modules (DIMMs). Your server uses 50 ns, 168-pin, error correction code (ECC),
DIMMs.
Notes:
1. The memory module sizes available for your server are 32 MB, 64 MB,
128 MB, and 256 MB. At a minimum, your server requires 128 MB memory
modules in bank 1.
2. The preinstalled memory board contains banks 1–4. The optional memory
board contains banks 5–8. Install additional memory in bank 2; then, bank 3,
and continue in numeric sequence.
3. All the DIMMs installed in a bank must be the same size and speed, but each
bank can have different sized DIMMs installed.
4. Your server comes with one memory board and one terminator board
preinstalled. The memory board contains four banks arranged in 16 DIMM
connectors and supports 4-way memory interleaving.
You can replace the terminator board with an optional memory board
containing an additional 16 DIMM connectors. To obtain an optional memory
board, contact an IBM reseller or IBM marketing representative.
5. Installing or removing memory modules changes the configuration of the server.
Therefore, after installing or removing a DIMM, save the new configuration
information in the Configuration/Setup Utility program. When you restart the
server, the system displays a message indicating that the memory configuration
has changed. Start the Configuration/Setup Utility program and select Save
Settings. See “Using the Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu” on page 18
for more information.
6. Consider the memory expansion that is available with the DIMM size you are
installing.
Table 1. Memory Expansion
DIMM Size
16 Connectors
(1 Card)
32 Connectors
(2 Cards)
32 MB
512 MB
1 GB
64 MB
1 GB
2 GB
128 MB
2 GB
4 GB
256 MB
4 GB
8 GB1
1 Requires greater than 32-bit operating system memory support, or device driver support.
46
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Installing Memory-Module Kits
Your server provides two features that increase memory access speed: address bit
permuting (ABP) and card-to-card (C2C).
Notes:
1. BIOS automatically enables ABP, C2C, or ABP and C2C together, depending
on the memory configuration.
2. ABP can function without replacing the terminator board with an optional
memory board. C2C provides better performance but requires DIMMs in both
memory boards. C2C and ABP together provide the best performance.
Table 2. Configurations for Memory Enhancement Features
Memory Enhancement
Configuration
2-Way ABP
Same size memory in banks:
1
3
5
7
4-Way ABP
and
and
and
and
2
4 (if populated)
6 (if populated)
8 (if populated)
Same size memory in banks:
1, 2, 3, and 4
5, 6, 7, and 8 (if populated)
C2C only
Same size memory in banks:
1
2
3
4
C2C and 2-Way ABP
and
and
and
and
5
6 (if populated)
7 (if populated)
8 (if populated)
Same size memory in banks:
1, 2, 5, and 6
3, 4, 7, and 8 (if populated)
C2C and 4-Way ABP
Same size memory in all banks
Refer to this illustration while you perform the steps in this procedure.
.1/ Latches
.2/ Retaining clips
.3/ DIMM
Chapter 4. Installing Options
47
Installing Memory-Module Kits
Before you begin:
Ÿ Read “Electrical Safety” on page 33 and “Handling Static-Sensitive Devices”
on page 34.
Ÿ Read the documentation that comes with your option.
To install a memory module:
1. Run the shutdown procedure for the operating system. Turn off the server and
peripheral devices and disconnect all external cables and power cords (see
“Preparing to Install Options” on page 37); then remove the front bezel (see
“Removing the Front Bezel” on page 40), and the front access cover (see
“Removing the Front Access Cover” on page 41).
2. Remove the memory board from the server:
a. Pull the latches .1/ so they rotate to a 90-degree angle from the memory
board.
b. Grasp the two latches and carefully pull the memory board from the server.
c. Place the memory board connector-side up on a flat, static-protective
surface.
3. Touch the static-protective package containing the memory-module kit to any
unpainted metal surface on the server. Then, remove the memory module from
the package.
4. Install the memory module:
Attention: To avoid breaking the retaining clips or damaging the
memory-module connectors, handle the clips gently.
a. Turn the memory module (DIMM) .3/ so that the pins align correctly with
the connector.
b. Insert the DIMM into the connector by pressing on one edge of the DIMM
and then on the other edge of the DIMM. Be sure to press straight into the
connector.
c. Repeat the preceding step to make sure the DIMM is seated correctly.
d. Make sure the retaining clips .2/ are in the closed position.
e. If a gap exists between the DIMM and the retaining clips, the DIMM has not
been properly installed. In this case, open the retaining clips and remove
the DIMM; then, reinsert the DIMM.
f. Repeat these steps for each memory module that you install.
48
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Working with Adapters
5. Reinstall the memory board:
a. Insert the memory board into the guides and gently press the memory
board into the socket.
Attention: When you install the memory board in the server, be sure that
it is completely and correctly seated in the connector before you apply force
to close the latches. Incomplete insertion might cause damage to server
components.
b. Push the latches .1/ until they close and lock in place.
6. If you have other options to install or remove, do so now; otherwise, go to
“Completing the Installation” on page 69.
Working with Adapters
You can add adapters to extend the capabilities and power of your server. Many
adapters provide bus-master capabilities, which enable the adapters to perform
operations without interrupting the server's microprocessors.
You add adapters to the expansion connectors, called slots, on the I/O board of
your server. All slots are peripheral component interconnect (PCI) expansion slots.
Your server supports up to 12 adapters in the PCI slots.
You can install a new PCI adapter or replace an existing PCI adapter with the
same type of adapter without turning the server power off and restarting the
system. These slots are called hot-pluggable PCI slots. They are also referred to
as hot-plug PCI slots.
A PCI adapter comes with built-in identification and configuration specifications (set
in memory on the device) that provide installation information to the server during
startup. This information is read by the input/output (I/O) bus and interpreted by
the server BIOS. The BIOS routines automatically configure the adapter around
the resources already in use by other devices.
Your server comes with a video controller. This video controller is an integrated
component on the I/O function card. The integrated video controller has super
video graphics array (SVGA) technology.
The integrated video controller is not removable. If you want to disable this
controller and use a video adapter instead, you can install a video adapter in an
expansion slot. When you install a PCI video adapter, the server BIOS
automatically disables the integrated video controller.
The integrated video controller has 1 MB of video memory. The integrated video
controller supports the following screen resolutions:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
640 × 480 pels with up to 65,536 colors
800 × 600 pels with up to 65,536 colors
1024 × 768 pels with up to 256 colors
1152 × 864 pels with up to 256 colors
Chapter 4. Installing Options
49
Working with Adapters
The following illustration shows the location of the expansion slots and other
components referred to in these steps.
.1/
.2/
.3/
.4/
.5/
.6/
I/O function card slot
Power LEDs
Attention LEDs for PCI slots
Hot-plug 32-bit PCI slots 11–12 (bus C)
Hot-plug 32-bit PCI slots 6–10 (bus B)
Hot-plug 64-bit PCI slots 1–5 (bus A)
LEDs for PCI Slots
Each PCI slot has three lights associated with it — two Attention lights and one
Power On light.
Ÿ Power On Light: This light is on when the PCI slot is active and has power.
Do not add or remove an adapter from the PCI slot when the Power On light is
on. When this light is off, the PCI slot is inactive and has no power applied.
You can install or remove an adapter when the Power On light is off. Refer to
your operating system documentation to determine if it supports hot-plug PCI
adapters.
Ÿ Attention Lights: Each PCI slot has two Attention lights: one that is visible
from the rear of the server and one that is visible inside the server. (The lights
have the same meaning; they are duplicated to be visible from outside or inside
the server.) An Attention light flashes approximately once per second when it
is on. The meaning of the Attention lights is defined by your operating system.
Refer to your operating system documentation to determine if it supports
hot-plug PCI adapters and, if so, what the Attention lights indicate.
50
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Working with Adapters
Adapter Considerations
Before you continue with the adapter-installation procedure:
Ÿ Review and follow the instructions that come with the adapter and your
operating system in addition to the instructions given in this chapter. If you
need to change the switch or jumper settings on your adapter, follow the
instructions that come with the adapter documentation.
Ÿ You can install full-length PCI adapters in all PCI expansion slots.
Ÿ Your server supports only 5.0 V dc PCI adapters.
Ÿ Your server uses a rotational interrupt technique to configure PCI adapters.
This technique enables you to install a variety of PCI adapters that currently do
not support sharing of PCI interrupts.
Ÿ For a list of compatible RAID adapters, and installation requirements, refer to
http://www.pc.ibm.com/us/compat/ on the World Wide Web. If you install a
RAID adapter, configure the adapter using the RAID adapter documentation.
Ÿ The I/O function card slot can support only the I/O function card. It is not an
expansion slot.
Ÿ The system-management adapter slot can only support the Advanced System
Management PCI Adapter. It is not an expansion slot.
Attention: You must have the Advanced System Management PCI Adapter
installed for proper operation of your server and to use the
system-management functions the adapter provides. See “Understanding the
Netfinity 7000 M10 Design” on page 36 for more information about the
Advanced System Management PCI Adapter.
Ÿ Your server has three 33 MHz PCI buses.
– PCI slots 11 and 12 are on PCI bus C (bus numbers 0 and 1, with bus
numbers 2 and 3 reserved for adapters that require bus number
assignments).
– PCI slots 6–10 are on PCI bus B (bus number 4, with bus number 5–9
reserved for adapters that require bus number assignments).
– PCI slots 1–5 are on PCI bus A (bus number 10, with bus numbers 11–15
reserved for adapters that require bus number assignments).
Ÿ You can install 32-bit adapters in 64-bit slots and 64-bit adapters in 32-bit slots.
Ÿ Spread the installation of high speed adapters, such as 66 MHz Ethernet
adapters, between the three PCI buses to optimize performance.
Configuring Adapters
PCI devices automatically communicate with the server configuration information.
This usually results in automatic configuration of a PCI device. From the
Configuration/Setup Utility program, you can select available resources for the
adapter that you are installing. If a conflict does occur, see “Resolving
Configuration Conflicts” on page 26.
Refer to the documentation that comes with the adapter for information about
required system resources. Then, make the appropriate jumper or switch settings
on the adapter.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
51
Working with Adapters
Installing a Hot-Plug PCI Adapter
This section gives the procedure for installing a hot-plug PCI adapter. If you want
to remove a hot-plug adapter, reverse the steps. If your operating system supports
hot-replace PCI adapters, you can replace a failing hot-plug PCI adapter with a new
adapter of the same type without turning off power to the server. If your operating
system and adapter also support the hot-add feature, you can install a new adapter
without turning off the power to the server.
Note: You do not need to turn the server off to install or remove a hot-plug PCI
adapter.
Before you begin:
Ÿ Read “Electrical Safety” on page 33, “Handling Static-Sensitive Devices” on
page 34, and “Working Inside a Server with Power On” on page 35.
Ÿ Read the documentation that comes with your adapter for any special
requirements or restrictions.
Ÿ Read the documentation that comes with your operating system.
Attention:
Do not remove a hot-plug adapter before performing the
operating-system-defined procedure for disabling the hot-plug PCI slot that
contains the adapter. Failure to do so might cause your system to lock up.
Refer to your operating system documentation.
52
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Working with Adapters
Refer to the following illustrations while you perform the steps in this procedure.
.1/
.2/
.3/
.4/
.5/
.6/
Tab
Adapter retention latch
Expansion slot cover
Attention light
Power light
Plastic divider
Chapter 4. Installing Options
53
Working with Adapters
.1/
.2/
.7/
.8/
54
Tab
Adapter retention latch
Adapter
Adapter retention latch
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Working with Adapters
To install a hot-plug PCI adapter:
1. Remove the top cover (see “Removing the Top Cover” on page 39).
2. Determine which expansion slot you will use for the adapter.
Note: Check the instructions that come with the adapter for any requirements
or restrictions.
3. Disable the PCI slot from your operating system. (Refer to the documentation
that comes with your operating system for information about disabling a
hot-plug PCI slot.)
Attention: Make sure the Power On light .5/ for the expansion slot is off
before you continue with the next step. Failure to do so might cause your
system to lock up.
4. Remove the expansion-slot cover.3/:
a. Rotate the adapter retention latch .2/.
b. Lift the tab .1/ covering the top of the expansion-slot cover .3/ and
remove the expansion-slot cover from the server. Store it in a safe place
for future use.
Attention: Expansion-slot covers must be installed on all vacant slots.
This maintains the electromagnetic-emissions characteristics of the system
and ensures proper cooling of system components.
5. Refer to the documentation that comes with your adapter for any cabling
instructions. It might be easier for you to route any cables before you install
the adapter.
6. Remove the adapter from the static-protective package.
Note: Avoid touching the components and gold-edge connectors on the
adapter.
7. Place the adapter, component-side up, on a flat, static-protective surface.
8. Set any jumpers or switches as described by the adapter manufacturer.
9. Install the adapter:
a. Carefully grasp the adapter .7/ by its top edge or upper corners, and align
it with the expansion slot on the I/O board.
b. Press the adapter firmly into the expansion slot.
Attention: When you install an adapter in the server, be sure that it is
completely and correctly seated in the connector. Incomplete insertion
might cause damage to server components or the adapter.
c. Lower the tab .1/ over the adapter. Rotate the adapter retention latch .2/
until it snaps in place.
Note: The expansion slot also has an adapter retention latch .8/ at the
opposite end of the slot. To remove the adapter, push the adapter
retention latch away from the adapter until the top edge of the
adapter is past the latch.
10. Connect any cables to the adapter.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
55
Working with Adapters
11. Enable the PCI slot from your operating system. Make sure the Power On light
.5/ for the PCI slot is on.
12. If you have other options to install or remove, do so now; otherwise, go to
“Completing the Installation” on page 69.
Installing a Non-Hot-Plug PCI Adapter
This section gives the procedures for installing a non-hot-plug adapter. If you want
to remove a non-hot-plug adapter, reverse the steps.
Before you begin:
Ÿ Read “Electrical Safety” on page 33 and “Handling Static-Sensitive Devices”
on page 34.
Ÿ Read the documentation that comes with your adapter for any special
requirements or restrictions.
Refer to the illustrations in “Installing a Hot-Plug PCI Adapter” on page 52 while
you perform the steps in this procedure.
To install a non-hot-plug PCI adapter:
1. Run the shutdown procedure for the operating system. Turn off the server and
peripheral devices and disconnect all external cables and power cords (see
“Preparing to Install Options” on page 37); then remove the top cover (see
“Removing the Top Cover” on page 39).
2. Determine which expansion slot you will use for the adapter.
Note: Check the instructions that come with the adapter for any requirements
or restrictions.
3. Remove the expansion-slot cover.3/:
a. See the illustrations in “Installing a Hot-Plug PCI Adapter” on page 52 for
operation of the adapter retention latch on the end of the slot near the rear
of the server.
b. Rotate the adapter retention latch .2/.
c. Lift the tab .1/ covering the top of the expansion-slot cover and remove the
expansion-slot cover from the server. Store it in a safe place for future
use.
Attention: Expansion-slot covers must be installed on all vacant slots.
This maintains the electromagnetic-emissions characteristics of the system
and ensures proper cooling of system components.
4. Refer to the documentation that comes with your adapter for any cabling
instructions. It might be easier for you to route any cables before you install
the adapter.
5. Remove the adapter from the static-protective package.
Note: Avoid touching the components and gold-edge connectors on the
adapter.
6. Place the adapter, component-side up, on a flat, static-protective surface.
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Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Working with Adapters
7. Set any jumpers or switches as described by the adapter manufacturer.
8. Install the adapter:
a. Carefully grasp the adapter .7/ by its top edge or upper corners, and align
it with the expansion slot on the I/O board.
b. Press the adapter firmly into the expansion slot.
Attention: When you install an adapter in the server, be sure that it is
completely and correctly seated in the connector before you apply power.
Incomplete insertion might cause damage to server components or the
adapter.
c. Refer to the illustration in “Installing a Hot-Plug PCI Adapter” on page 52
for operation of the adapter retention latch on the end of the slot near the
rear of the server.
d. Lower the tab over the adapter. Rotate the adapter retention latch until it
snaps in place.
e. Connect any cables to the adapter.
9. If you have other options to install or remove, do so now; otherwise, go to
“Completing the Installation” on page 69.
Verifying Compatibility between Network Adapters and Device Drivers
Your server supports several types of network adapters. If you are having trouble
with the installation or operation of a network adapter or network operating system,
ensure that the network-adapter device driver supports multiple processors. Refer
to your network-adapter documentation for additional information about adapter
compatibility requirements.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
57
Installing Internal Drives
Installing Internal Drives
Different types of drives allow your system to read multiple types of media and
store more data. Several types of drives are available, such as:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Diskette
Hard disk
CD-ROM
Tape
Internal Drive Bays
Internal drives are installed in bays. Your server comes with one 3.5-inch, 1.44 MB
diskette drive and one CD-ROM drive.
Diskette
Drive Bay
Hot-Swap Bays
Removable
Media Bays
Bay 1
Bay 2
Bay 3
Bay 4
CD-ROM
Drive Bay
Your server contains hardware that lets you replace a failed hard disk drive without
turning off the server. Therefore, you have the advantage of continuing to operate
your system while a hard disk drive is removed or installed. These drives are
known as hot-swappable drives. They are also referred to as hot-swap drives.
Each hot-swap drive bay has two indicator lights on the front of the server (see
“Controls and Indicators” on page 6). If the amber Hard Disk Status light for a
drive is lit continuously, that individual drive is defective and needs to be replaced.
When the Hard Disk Status light indicates a faulty drive, you can replace a
hot-swap drive without turning off the server.
Each hot-swap drive that you plan to install must have a hot-swap-drive tray
attached. The drive must have a single connector attachment (SCA) connector.
Hot-swap-drive trays come with the hot-swap drives.
Ÿ Your server comes with a preinstalled 3.5-inch, 1.44 MB diskette drive and a
preinstalled IDE CD-ROM drive.
Ÿ The Netfinity 7000 M10 supports one diskette drive only.
Ÿ Your server supports four slim-high (1-inch) or two half-high (1.6-inch), 3.5-inch
hot-swap hard disk drives in the hot-swap bays.
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Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Installing Internal Drives
Ÿ The hot-swap bays connect to a SCSI backplane. This backplane is the
printed circuit board behind the bay. The backplane supports up to four hard
disk drives.
Ÿ The diskette drive uses 1 MB and 2 MB diskettes. For optimum use, format
1 MB diskettes to 720 KB and format 2 MB diskettes to 1.44 MB.
SCSI Drives
Some drives have a special design called small computer system interface, or
SCSI. This design allows you to attach multiple drives to a single SCSI connector.
Notes:
1. Any information about SCSI drives also applies to other SCSI devices, such as
tape drives.
2. If you plan to install both internal and external SCSI devices, you must follow
the instructions in “Connecting External Options” on page 72, in addition to the
instructions in this section.
A 16-bit (wide) SCSI cable connects the hot-swap backplane to one channel of the
integrated SCSI controller on the I/O function card.
SCSI IDs
Each SCSI device that is connected to an individual integrated SCSI controller
needs a unique identification (ID) so that the controller can identify the devices and
ensure that different devices do not attempt to transfer data at the same time. (The
integrated SCSI controllers operate independently.) If you need to set IDs for SCSI
devices, refer to the instructions that come with those devices.
Your server automatically sets SCSI IDs for hot-swap hard disk drives, according to
the jumper settings on the SCSI backplane. The server uses the hard disk drive
SCSI IDs to send status information to the indicator lights above each hot-swap
bay.
Note: Do not set the SCSI ID jumpers on hard disk drives.
The SCSI backplane in the server supports up to four hot-swap drives. Table 3
shows the default SCSI IDs that the backplane assigns for hot-swap hard disk
drives.
Table 3. Automatically Assigned SCSI IDs
Bay
1
2
3
4
ID
0
1
2
3
Note: The default SCSI ID for the SCSI backplane is 14. The default SCSI ID for each SCSI
controller is 7.
You can change the default IDs of the drives by changing the jumper settings on
the SCSI backplane. See “SCSI Backplane Option Jumpers” on page 152. A
simplified layout of the SCSI backplane is shown in “SCSI Backplane Component
Locations” on page 151.
The processing sequence for SCSI devices is set through the SCSISelect Utility
program. The default sequence proceeds from the lowest SCSI ID to the highest
(0 to 6, then 8 to 15).
Chapter 4. Installing Options
59
Installing Internal Drives
Termination
The devices at both ends of the SCSI bus must be terminated. If you attach SCSI
devices (internal or external), you must terminate the last device in the chain. The
SCSI cable that comes in your server (connected to the SCSI backplane) is
terminated.
All the hot-swap drives in your server have automatic termination.
Refer to the information that comes with the SCSI device for instructions about
setting device jumpers or switches that control termination.
Preinstallation Steps
Before you install drives in your server, verify that you have all the cables and any
other equipment specified in the documentation that comes with the internal drive.
You might also need to perform certain preinstallation activities. Some of the steps
are required only during the initial installation of an option.
1. Choose the bay in which you want to install the drive.
2. Check the instructions that come with the drive to see if you need to set any
switches or jumpers on the drive. Remove any SCSI ID jumpers from the
drive.
3. To install the drive, go to “Installing a Drive in a Hot-Swap Bay.”
Installing a Drive in a Hot-Swap Bay
The bays on the right front of the server support hot-swap drives only.
Note: You do not have to turn off the server to install hot-swap drives in these
bays. However, you must turn off the server when performing any steps
that involve installing or removing cables.
Before you begin:
Ÿ Read “Electrical Safety” on page 33 and “Handling Static-Sensitive Devices”
on page 34.
Ÿ Read the documentation that comes with your drive.
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Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Installing Internal Drives
Refer to the following illustration while you perform the steps in this procedure.
.1/ Filler panel
.2/ Hot-swap hard disk drive
.3/ Drive tray handle (open position)
To install a drive in a hot-swap bay:
1. Determine the bay in which you want to install the drive.
2. Remove the filler panel .1/ from the empty hot-swap bay by inserting your
finger into the depression at the left side of the filler panel and pulling it away
from the server.
3. Install the hard disk drive .2/ in the hot-swap bay:
a. Ensure the tray handle .3/ is open (that is, perpendicular to the drive).
b. Align the drive/tray assembly so that it engages the guide rails in the bay.
c. Gently push the drive assembly into the bay until the drive connects to the
backplane.
d. Push the tray handle to the right until it locks.
4. Check the hard disk drive status indicators to verify that the hard disk drives
are operating properly. See “Identifying Problems through Status Indicators” on
page 123 for details.
Note: If your server has a RAID adapter installed, refer to the RAID adapter
documentation for details about configuration requirements. Record the
configuration information in the appropriate tables in “Installed Device
Records” on page 132.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
61
Installing Internal Drives
Replacing a Drive in a Hot-Swap Bay
Note: You do not have to turn off the server to remove a drive from a hot-swap
bay.
If the amber Hard Disk Status light for a drive is lit continuously, that individual
drive is defective and needs to be replaced.
Attention:
1. Before you hot-swap a drive, make sure it is defective. If you partially or
completely remove a good drive instead of a defective one, your server might
lose valuable data. If your server has a RAID adapter installed and you
assigned RAID level 1 or 5 to the logical drives in your disk array, make sure
the drive is defective. However, the RAID adapter can rebuild the data that you
need, provided that certain conditions are met. Refer to the RAID adapter
documentation for further details.
2. To avoid damage to a hard disk drive, DO NOT remove the drive from the
hot-swap bay until it has had time to spin down (approximately 30 seconds).
Handle the drive gently.
Before you begin:
Ÿ Read “Electrical Safety” on page 33 and “Handling Static-Sensitive Devices”
on page 34.
Ÿ Read the documentation that comes with your drive.
Ÿ Prepare the drive for installation (see “Preinstallation Steps” on page 60).
To replace a drive in a hot-swap bay:
Refer to the illustration in “Installing a Drive in a Hot-Swap Bay” on page 60 while
you perform the steps in this procedure.
1. Remove the defective hard disk drive .2/ by pressing on the lock to release the
handle .3/, placing the handle in the open position (perpendicular to the drive),
and pulling the hot-swap tray from the bay.
2. Install the hard disk drive in the hot-swap bay:
a. Ensure the tray handle is open (that is, perpendicular to the drive).
b. Align the drive/tray assembly so that it engages the guide rails in the bay.
c. Push the drive assembly into the bay until the drive connects to the
backplane.
d. Push the tray handle to the right until it locks.
3. Check the hard disk drive status indicators to verify that the hard disk drives
are operating properly. See “Identifying Problems through Status Indicators” on
page 123 for details.
62
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Installing a Hot-Swap Power Supply
Installing a Hot-Swap Power Supply
Notes:
1. If your server comes with one power supply, install a second power supply if
you install one or more of the following:
Ÿ Two microprocessors (For some microprocessors, a second power supply
is required with the first additional microprocessor you install. For more
information, contact an IBM reseller or IBM marketing representative.)
Ÿ Optional memory board
Ÿ Six or more PCI adapters
2. If a second power supply is not a requirement, a second power supply provides
redundancy.
3. If a second power supply is a requirement, or if your server comes with two
power supplies, a third power supply provides redundancy.
After you install a power supply, check the power-supply status indicators to verify
that the power supply is operating properly. See “Power Supply LEDs” on
page 124 for details.
Note: You do not need to turn off the power to the server to install hot-swap
power supplies.
9
CAUTION:
Never remove the cover on a power supply or any part (power
backplane and AC box) that has the following label attached.
Hazardous voltage, current, and energy levels are present inside the
power supplies, power backplane, and AC box. There are no
serviceable parts inside the power supplies, power backplane, or AC
box. If you suspect a problem with one of these parts, contact an IBM
service technician.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
63
Installing a Hot-Swap Power Supply
Refer to the following illustration while performing the steps in this procedure.
Note: Your server may differ slightly from the following illustration, depending on
your model.
.1/
.2/
.3/
.4/
Screws
Filler panel
Power supply
Handle
9
CAUTION:
Never remove the cover on a power supply or any part (power
backplane and AC box) that has the following label attached.
Hazardous voltage, current, and energy levels are present inside
the power supplies, power backplane, and AC box. There are no
serviceable parts inside the power supplies, power backplane, or
AC box. If you suspect a problem with one of these parts, contact
an IBM service technician.
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Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Removing a Hot-Swap Power Supply
To add a power supply:
Note: It is not necessary to turn the Power switch on the power supply off
when you are installing a hot-swap power supply.
Attention: To help ensure system reliability when you install an additional
power supply, install the power supply in the left-most empty power supply bay
(as viewed from the back of the server).
1. Remove the filler panel .2/:
a. Remove the screws .1/ from the filler panel.
b. Remove the filler panel from the power-supply bay and save it and the
screws for future use.
Note: During normal operation, be sure that each power-supply bay has
either a power supply or filler panel installed for proper cooling.
2. Remove any shipping screws from the power supply.
Note: You do not need to replace the shipping screws.
3. Place the handle .4/ on the power supply .3/ in the open position, and slide
the power supply into the chassis.
4. Close the handle on the power supply to seat the power supply in the bay.
5. Make sure the Power switch on the power supply is in the On position.
6. Verify that the DC Power light and AC Power light on the power supply are lit,
indicating that the power supply is operating correctly.
Removing a Hot-Swap Power Supply
Refer to “Installing a Hot-Swap Power Supply” on page 63 for information on power
supply requirements. Each power supply has two status indicators; see “Power
Supply LEDs” on page 124 for information about the status indicators.
Refer to the illustration in “Installing a Hot-Swap Power Supply” on page 63 while
you perform the steps in this procedure.
9
CAUTION:
Never remove the cover on a power supply or any part (power
backplane and AC box) that has the following label attached.
Hazardous voltage, current, and energy levels are present inside the
power supplies, power backplane, and AC box. There are no
serviceable parts inside the power supplies, power backplane, or AC
box. If you suspect a problem with one of these parts, contact an IBM
service technician.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
65
Removing a Hot-Swap Power Supply
To remove a hot-swap power supply:
1. If your server has only two functioning power supplies, turn off the server and
peripheral devices (see “Preparing to Install Options” on page 37); otherwise,
go to the next step.
Attention: Before removing a functional power supply, set the Power switch
on the power supply to the Off position.
2. Set the Power switch on the power supply that you are removing to the Off
position.
3. Remove the power supply:
a. Remove any shipping screws from the power supply.
Note: You do not need to replace the shipping screws.
b. Pull the handle on the power supply; then, slide the power supply out of the
chassis.
Note: During normal operation, be sure that each power-supply bay has
either a power supply or filler panel installed for proper cooling.
4. If you are not installing a replacement power supply, install a power-supply filler
panel .2/; then go to step 5.
If you are replacing the power supply:
a. Place the handle .4/ on the power supply in the open position, and slide
the power supply into the chassis.
b. Close the handle on the power supply to seat the power supply in the bay.
c. Make sure the Power switch on the power supply is in the On position.
d. Verify that the AC Power light and DC Power light are lit, indicating that the
power supply is operating correctly.
5. If you have other options to install or remove, do so now; otherwise, go to
“Completing the Installation” on page 69.
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Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Replacing a Hot-Swap Fan Assembly
Replacing a Hot-Swap Fan Assembly
Your server comes with two hot-swap fan assemblies in the front access cover and
two hot-swap fan assemblies behind the hot-swap drive bays.
Notes:
1. You do not need to turn off the power to the server to replace a fan assembly.
2. Replace a fan assembly that has failed as soon as convenient to maintain the
redundant cooling capability.
To replace a hot-swap fan assembly:
11
CAUTION:
The power cable to the fan should be disconnected whenever the fan
assembly is not installed in the server; otherwise, the fan might start
turning while you are holding it and the fan blades could injure your
fingers.
1. Determine which fan assembly you will replace.
Ÿ To replace a fan assembly behind the hot-swap drive bays, go to step 2.
Ÿ To replace a fan assembly in the front access cover, go to step 7 on
page 68.
2. To replace a fan assembly behind the hot-swap drive bays, remove the top
cover (see “Removing the Top Cover” on page 39).
Chapter 4. Installing Options
67
Replacing a Hot-Swap Fan Assembly
3. Pull on the fastener .1/ and remove the fan assembly from the server.
4. Insert the replacement fan assembly in the server. Align the bottom edge of
the fan assembly with the matching openings in the server chassis.
5. When you have the fan assembly correctly seated, press on the fastener to
secure the fan assembly in the server.
Note: The power cable engages and the fan blades begin to spin when you
correctly seat the fan assembly in the chassis.
6. If you have other options to install or remove, do so now; otherwise, go to
“Completing the Installation” on page 69.
7. To replace a fan assembly in the front access cover, remove the front bezel
(see “Removing the Front Bezel” on page 40).
8. Pull on the fastener and remove the fan assembly .1/ from the front access
cover.
9. Insert the replacement fan assembly in the front access cover. Align the
bottom edge of the fan assembly .2/ with the matching openings in the front
access cover.
10. When you have the fan assembly correctly seated, press on the fastener to
secure the fan assembly.
Note: The power cable engages and the fan blades begin to spin when you
correctly seat the fan assembly.
11. If you have other options to install or remove, do so now; otherwise, go to
“Completing the Installation” on page 69.
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Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Completing the Installation
Completing the Installation
Depending on the options you have installed, you must reinstall the top cover, the
front access cover, and the front bezel to complete the installation. You must also
reconnect all the cables that you disconnected in “Preparing to Install Options” on
page 37, and, for certain options, run the Configuration/Setup Utility program.
Follow the instructions in this section.
Installing the Top Cover
To install the server top cover:
1. Before installing a cover, check that all cables, adapters, and other components
are installed and seated correctly and that you have not left tools or loose parts
inside the server.
2. Lower the cover .2/ with the rear edge of the cover about 25 mm (1 inch) back
from the rear edge of the server.
3. Slide the cover forward.
4. Tighten the two thumbscrews .1/ on the back edge of the cover.
5. If you disconnected any cables from the back of the server, reconnect the
cables; then, plug the power cord into a properly grounded electrical outlet.
Notes:
a. If you are in the United Kingdom and have a modem or fax machine
attached to your server, reconnect the telephone line after you plug in the
power cords.
b. If necessary, see “Input/Output Connectors and Expansion Slots” on
page 9 for connector locations.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
69
Completing the Installation
Installing the Front Access Cover
To install the server front access cover:
1. Insert the bottom edge of the cover .2/ in the matching openings in the server
chassis.
2. Pivot the top of the cover into place and turn the quarter-turn fasteners .1/ to
the closed position .3/.
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Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Installing the Front Bezel
To install the front bezel:
1. Insert the bottom edge of the bezel in the matching openings in the server
chassis.
2. Pivot the top of the bezel until the latches snap into place.
Updating Device Records and Reconfiguring the Server
When you start your server for the first time after you add or remove an internal
option or an external SCSI device, you might see a message telling you that the
configuration has changed.
Some options have device drivers that you need to install. Refer to the
documentation that comes with your option for information about installing any
required device drivers.
If you have installed a new microprocessor, you might want to upgrade your
operating system. Refer to the “ServerGuide and Netfinity Manager Information”
section of this Server Library.
Run the Configuration/Setup Utility program to save the new configuration
information. See Chapter 3, “Configuring Your Server” on page 15.
Record your updated device and configuration information in the appropriate tables
in “Installed Device Records” on page 132.
Chapter 4. Installing Options
71
Connecting External Options
Connecting External Options
Before you begin:
Ÿ Read “Electrical Safety” on page 33 and “Handling Static-Sensitive Devices”
on page 34.
Ÿ Read the documentation that comes with your options.
Connecting External SCSI Devices
You can attach a SCSI storage expansion enclosure to your server.
Cabling Requirements
If you plan to install external SCSI devices, you must order additional SCSI cables.
These cables must have the proper connectors for the SCSI external connector and
the external devices. To select and order the correct cables for use with external
devices, contact your IBM reseller or IBM marketing representative.
Refer to the information provided with your adapter to determine the number of
internal and external connectors, channels, and SCSI devices that the adapter
supports.
For information about the maximum length of SCSI cable between the terminated
ends of the cable, see ANSI SCSI Standards:
Ÿ X3.131-1986 (SCSI)
Ÿ X3.131-1994 (SCSI-2)
Ÿ X3T10/1071D
Adhering to these standards ensures that your server operates properly.
Setting SCSI IDs for External Devices
Each SCSI device that is connected to a SCSI controller must have a unique SCSI
ID, so that the SCSI controller can identify the devices and ensure that different
devices do not attempt to transfer data at the same time. SCSI devices that are
connected to different SCSI controllers can have duplicate SCSI IDs. Refer to
“SCSI IDs” on page 59 and to the instructions that come with the SCSI devices for
more information about setting a SCSI ID.
Installing External Devices
To attach an external device:
1. Run the shutdown procedure for the operating system. Turn off the server and
all attached devices.
2. Follow the instructions that come with the option to prepare it for installation
and to connect it to the server.
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Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Connecting External Options
Input/Output Ports and Connectors
The input/output (I/O) connectors are for attaching external devices, such as
printers, keyboards, and displays, to your server. The I/O connectors on your
server include:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Two
One
One
One
One
One
Two
One
One
One
serial-port connectors
parallel-port connector
video-port connector
keyboard-port connector
auxiliary-device-port connector
external UltraSCSI-port connector
USB-port connectors
10/100 Ethernet port connector
dual serial-port connector
RS 485 bus connector
Refer to the illustration in “Input/Output Connectors and Expansion Slots” on
page 9 for the locations of the connectors.
Serial Port
Your server comes with two serial ports. (Refer to “Input/Output Connectors and
Expansion Slots” on page 9 for the locations of the connectors.) These ports are
used to communicate with printers, plotters, external modems, scanners, and
auxiliary terminals. You can also use these ports to transfer data between
computers.
Serial ports transfer data one bit at a time, using direct memory access (DMA).
DMA is a method of transferring data between I/O devices and system memory
without intervention by the system microprocessor.
Serial ports can transfer data asynchronously, which means that they can transmit
any number of characters at any time, with no restriction on the duration of the
pauses between characters.
The serial ports can transmit and receive data and commands at rates of from 300
bits per second up to 345 600 bits per second. To use a serial port at 345 600 bits
per second, you need a shielded serial cable. For information about this cable,
contact your IBM marketing representative or your IBM authorized reseller.
Each serial port has a 9-pin, male D-shell connector on the back of the server. The
pin-number assignments of this connector conform to the industry standard.
5
1
6
9
Chapter 4. Installing Options
73
Connecting External Options
The following table shows the pin-number assignments for the serial-port
connectors.
Table 4. Serial Port Pin-Number Assignments
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
1
2
3
4
5
Data carrier detect
Receive data
Transmit data
Data terminal ready
Signal ground
6
7
8
9
Data set ready
Request to send
Clear to send
Ring indicator
When you turn on your server, the POST routine assigns the serial ports to specific
communication port addresses.
Some application programs use only certain ports, and some modems are designed
for use only at certain communication port addresses. You might need to use the
Configuration/Setup Utility program to change communication port address
assignments to resolve conflicts.
Parallel Port
The parallel port usually is used to communicate with printers, and transfers data
one byte at a time using DMA. The parallel port has a 25-pin, female D-shell
connector on the back of your server. (Refer to “Input/Output Connectors and
Expansion Slots” on page 9 for the location of the connector.)
1
13
25
14
The following table shows the pin-number assignments for the parallel-port
connector.
Table 5. Parallel Port Pin-Number Assignments
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
STROBE
Data 0
Data 1
Data 2
Data 3
Data 4
Data 5
Data 6
Data 7
-ACK
BUSY
PE (paper end)
SLCT (select)
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
-AUTO FEED XT
-ERROR
-INIT
-SLCT IN
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
When you turn on your server, the POST routine assigns the parallel port a specific
port address. You can change the parallel-port assignment by using the
Configuration/Setup Utility program.
74
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Connecting External Options
Video Port
The I/O function card in your server has one SVGA video port. This port is used to
attach a video monitor. The video port has a 15-pin analog connector on the back
of the server. (Refer to “Input/Output Connectors and Expansion Slots” on page 9
for the location of the connector.)
5
1
10
6
15
11
The following table shows the pin-number assignments for the video connector.
Table 6. Video Port Pin-Number Assignments
Pin
Signal
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Red
Green or monochrome
Blue
Not connected
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Not connected
Ground
Not connected
Not connected
Horizontal synchronization (Hsync)
Vertical synchronization (Vsync)
Not connected
Keyboard and Auxiliary-Device Ports
The I/O function card has one keyboard port and one auxiliary-device port that
supports a mouse or other pointing device. (Refer to “Input/Output Connectors and
Expansion Slots” on page 9 for the locations of the connectors.)
6
5
4
3
2
1
The following table shows the pin-number assignments for the connectors used by
the keyboard and auxiliary-device ports.
Table 7. Keyboard and Auxiliary-Device Port Pin-Number Assignments
Pin
Signal
1
2
3
4
5
6
Data
Not connected
Ground
+5 V dc
Clock
Not connected
Chapter 4. Installing Options
75
Connecting External Options
UltraSCSI Ports
Your server has two UltraSCSI bus-master controllers on the I/O function card; one
supports internal devices and the other is connected to an external connector for
support of external devices. Each controller supports up to 15 SCSI devices. You
can use the 68-pin, SCSI connectors for these controllers to expand the capabilities
of your server by attaching different types of SCSI devices, such as drives or
printers.
Table 8 shows the pin-number assignments for the 68-pin SCSI connectors.
Table 8. 68-Pin SCSI Port Pin-Number Assignments
76
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
+Term power
+Term power
Reserved
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
Ground
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
Data 12
Data 13
Data 14
Data 15
Data P1
Data 0
Data 1
Data 2
Data 3
Data 4
Data 5
Data 6
Data 7
Data P0
Ground
Ground
+Term power
+Term power
Reserved
Ground
-Attention
Ground
-Busy
-Acknowledge
-Reset
-Message
-Select
-Control/Data
-Request
-Input/Output
Data 8
Data 9
Data 10
Data 11
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Connecting External Options
Universal Serial Bus Ports
The I/O board in your Netfinity 7000 M10 contains two universal serial bus (USB)
ports. Each USB port has an external connector on the rear on the server for
attaching devices that previously used serial, parallel, keyboard, mouse, and game
ports.
USB is an emerging serial interface standard for telephony and multimedia devices.
USB technology uses Plug and Play to determine what device is attached to the
connector. Each USB device is accessed by a unique USB address. A device
called a hub is used to convert the USB port into multiple attachment points. A hub
has multiple ports where devices can be attached. USB provides 12
megabits-per-second (Mbps) data transfer rate with a maximum of 63 devices and
a maximum signal distance of 5 meters (16 ft.) per data segment.
Note: If more than one USB device is to be attached, the device must be
connected to a hub.
Table 9 shows the pin-number assignments for the USB connectors.
Table 9. USB Connector Pin-Number Assignments
Pin
Signal
1
2
3
4
VCC
−Data
+Data
Ground
10/100 Ethernet Port
The Advanced System Management PCI Adapter contains a 10/100 Ethernet
controller. The Ethernet controller has an external RJ-45 connector that is used
with category 3, 4, or 5 unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) cable. The connector
enables your Advanced System Management PCI Adapter to attach to an Ethernet
network for remote communication.
Notes:
1. The 10/100 Ethernet port cannot be accessed from the network operating
system. The connector is dedicated to connecting your Advanced System
Management PCI Adapter to an Ethernet network through a service-processor
interface, such as Netfinity Manager.
2. The 100BASE-TX Fast Ethernet standard requires that the cabling in the
network is Category 5 or higher.
Table 10 on page 78 shows the pin-number assignments for the RJ-45 connector.
These assignments apply to both 10BASE-T and 100BASE-TX devices.
10BASE-T or 100 BASE-TX
UTP Cable
1
2
Pins
RJ-45 Modular Plug Connector
3
6
Chapter 4. Installing Options
77
Connecting External Options
Table 10. 10/100 Ethernet Connector Pin-Number Assignments
Pin
Signal
Pin
Signal
1
2
3
4
Transmit data+
Transmit data−
Receive data+
Reserved
5
6
7
8
Reserved
Receive data−
Reserved
Reserved
Dual Serial Port
The Advanced System Management PCI Adapter contains a dual serial port. The
port has an external connector that can be used to attach to a Y-cable that is
shipped with your server. The serial connectors on the Y-cable and the pin-number
assignments are the same as for the system serial ports. This Y-cable can be
used to attach to a modem that is dedicated to communication with the Advanced
System Management PCI Adapter.
You can obtain a listing of compatible modems and related information by
accessing the following address: http://www.pc.ibm.com/us/compat/ on the World
Wide Web.
RS 485 Bus Port
The Advanced System Management PCI Adapter contains an RS 485 port. The
port has an external connector that must be attached to an optional Y-cable that
provides for chaining other compatible service processors for remote access. To
obtain an optional Y-cable, contact an IBM reseller or IBM marketing
representative.
The following table shows the pin-number assignments for the connectors used by
the RS 485 bus port.
Table 11. RS 485 Bus Connector Pin-Number Assignments
78
Pin
Signal
1
2
3
4
5
6
Term power
+ Input
− Input
+ Output
− Output
Ground
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Before You Begin
Chapter 5. Rack Installation
This chapter provides instructions for installing a server in a rack and for removing
a server from a rack.
This chapter contains:
Before You Begin . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing and Removing the Server
Preparing the Rack . . . . . . . .
Installing the Server in the Rack
Removing the Server from a Rack
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
79
80
80
85
88
Your server comes with all the rack installation hardware. Review the
preinstallation information in “Before You Begin”; then, continue with “Installing and
Removing the Server” on page 80.
5
k32 kg (70.5 lbs)
k55 kg (121.2 lbs)
CAUTION:
Use safe lifting practices when lifting your machine.
Before You Begin
Ÿ You will need the following items:
– An assortment of small screwdrivers
– 8-inch adjustable wrench or pliers
Some of the installation procedures require four people.
Ÿ Before you begin to install your server in the rack, review the safety and
handling guidelines specified under “Safety Information Statements” on
page vii, and “Electrical Safety” on page 33. These guidelines will help you
work safely while working with your server and options.
Ÿ To ensure rack stability, plan the installation of servers in the rack starting from
the bottom. For more information, refer to the IBM Netfinity Rack Configurator
program provided with the ServerGuide CDs.
Ÿ Review the documentation that comes with your rack enclosure for safety or
cabling considerations. Ensure that your planned installation is within the rack
guidelines for heat generation, electrical requirements, air flow, and mechanical
loading.
Ÿ Verify that the rack can meet the operating parameters, as detailed in
“Specifications” on page 139.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
79
Installing and Removing the Server
Installing and Removing the Server
During the installation procedure, you must install parts on the rack and the server.
This process can be divided into two parts:
Ÿ Preparing the rack
Ÿ Installing the server in the rack
Preparing the Rack
5
k32 kg (70.5 lbs)
k55 kg (121.2 lbs)
CAUTION:
Use safe lifting practices when lifting your machine.
In this section, you will use the following parts:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
80
IBM installation template
Two slide-bracket assemblies
One cable-management arm
One server bracket (for attaching the cable-management arm to the server)
Four lift handles
Sixteen long screws (M6 by 16 mm)
Eight short screws (M4 by 8 mm)
Six cage nuts
Four nut bars
Two hex nuts (M6)
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Installing and Removing the Server
Attention: To ensure rack stability, plan the installation of servers in the rack
starting from the bottom.
To attach the mounting hardware to the rack:
1. Remove the rack front door. Refer to the rack documentation for instructions.
2. Mark the positions of the slide-bracket assemblies, bezel brackets, and the
cable-management arm on the rack:
a. Position the installation template on the front mounting rails on the rack,
aligning the holes.
b. Mark the holes for the slide-bracket assemblies and bezel brackets.
c. Move the template to the same U level at the rear of the server and mark
the locations for the slide-bracket assemblies and cable-management arm.
d. Install the six cage nuts at the locations marked on the mounting rails for
the cable-management arm and bezel brackets.
3. Attach a slide-bracket assembly to the front of the rack:
a. Position the slide-bracket assembly behind the mounting rail so that the
slides will extend out from the front of the rack.
Notes:
1) Get another person to help you attach the slide-bracket assemblies to
the rack.
2) The slide-bracket assemblies can be installed on either the left or right
side of the rack.
3) Refer to the illustrations for examples of the proper alignment of the
slide-bracket assemblies.
Chapter 5. Rack Installation
81
Installing and Removing the Server
b. If necessary, loosen the screws at the rear of the slide-bracket assembly
and adjust the length of the slide bracket to fit the mounting rail. Tighten
the screws.
Screws
c. Position a nut bar behind the slide-bracket assembly.
d. Insert two screws (M6 by 16 mm) through the mounting rail, slide-bracket
assembly, and nut bar. Do not tighten the screws.
82
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Installing and Removing the Server
4. Attach the slide-bracket assembly to the rear of the rack:
a. Position the slide-bracket assembly inside the mounting rail.
b. Position a nut bar behind the slide-bracket assembly.
c. Insert two screws (M6 by 16 mm) through the mounting rail, slide-bracket
assembly, and nut bar. Do not tighten the screws.
5. Attach the other slide-bracket assembly to the front and rear of the rack.
6. Push the slide-bracket assemblies to the outermost positions on the rack.
7. Tighten all screws to secure both slide-bracket assemblies. If you are using a
torque screwdriver, use the following torque setting:
8–11 Nm (70.8–97.0 in/lbs).
Chapter 5. Rack Installation
83
Installing and Removing the Server
8. Attach the cable-management arm to the rear of the rack:
a. Position the cable-management arm bracket on the outside of the mounting
rail.
b. Insert two screws (M6 by 16 mm) through the cable-management arm
bracket, mounting rail, and cage nuts. Tighten the screws.
c. Position the server bracket on the cable-management arm.
d. Insert two screws (M6 by 16 mm) through the cable-management arm and
the server bracket. Tighten the screws.
84
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Installing and Removing the Server
Installing the Server in the Rack
In this section, you will use eight screws (M4 by 8 mm) and four screws (M6 by
16 mm).
To install the server in the rack:
1. Fully extend the slide-bracket assemblies until they lock.
2. Install the four lift handles on the sides of the server.
a. Press in on the sides of the lift handle near the tabs and insert the handle
tabs into the slots on the sides of the server.
b. Move the handle up in the slots so that the hooked part of each tab is
inside the server. Release the pressure on the sides of the handle.
c. Install the remaining three lift handles.
5
k32 kg (70.5 lbs)
k55 kg (121.2 lbs)
CAUTION:
Use safe lifting practices when lifting your machine.
3. Lift and position the server so that the bayonet slots on the server are above
the bayonets on the slide-bracket assemblies.
4. Lower the server and slip the bayonets into the bayonet slots.
Chapter 5. Rack Installation
85
Installing and Removing the Server
5. Remove the four lift handles from the sides of the server:
a. Grasp the lift handle and press in on the sides of the lift handle near the
tabs until the tabs touch the inside edges of the slots.
b. Move the handle down in the slots so that the hooked parts of the tabs
clear the top edges of the slots; then, pull the handle away from the server.
c. Remove the remaining three handles. Store the handles in a safe place.
6. Insert four screws (M4 by 8 mm) through one slide-bracket assembly and
server side. Tighten the screws. Repeat this step for the other slide-bracket
assembly on the opposite side of the server. This secures the server.
Note: When the drawer is fully extended, safety latches on the slide-brackets
lock into place. To release the safety latch, press the latch on each
side of the rack.
7. Press the safety latches and slide the drawer about halfway into the rack.
86
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Installing and Removing the Server
8. Attach the cable-management arm to the server using the captive screws.
9. Attach the monitor, keyboard, and power cables to the corresponding
connectors on the server. Refer to the rack documentation for instructions.
10. Attach the cables to the cable-management arm using cable ties.
11. Secure the server in the rack:
a. Slide the drawer into the rack.
b. Secure the server to both sides of the rack by inserting two screws (M6 by
16 mm) through the bezel brackets, mounting rails, and cage nuts.
Note: Depending on your model, the bezel brackets might have only one
screw hole for attaching the server to the rack.
12. Install the rack front door.
13. To complete the installation, refer to the documentation that comes with the
rack.
Chapter 5. Rack Installation
87
Removing the Server from a Rack
Removing the Server from a Rack
Before you begin
Ÿ Read “Electrical Safety” on page 33 and “Handling Static-Sensitive Devices”
on page 34.
Ÿ Turn off the server.
Ÿ Follow any additional installation and safety instructions that come with the
rack.
To remove the server from a rack:
1. If you have a modem or fax machine attached to the server, disconnect the
telephone line from the electrical outlet and the server.
Note: If you are in the United Kingdom, you must perform this step before
disconnecting the power cord.
2. Disconnect all cables and power cords from the rear of the server.
3. Disconnect all power cords from the rack.
4. Remove the screws from the bezel brackets on each side of the front bezel.
Set them aside for later use.
5. Slide the server about halfway out of the rack.
6. Loosen the captive screws that secure the cable-management arm.
7. Fully extend the slide-bracket assemblies until they lock.
8. Remove the screws that attach the server to each slide-bracket assembly.
5
k32 kg (70.5 lbs)
k55 kg (121.2 lbs)
CAUTION:
Use safe lifting practices when lifting your machine.
88
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Removing the Server from a Rack
9. Install the four lift handles on the sides of the server.
a. Press in on the sides of the lift handle near the tabs and insert the handle
tabs into the slots on the sides of the server.
b. Move the handle up in the slots so that the hooked part of each tab is
inside the server. Release the pressure on the sides of the handle.
c. Install the remaining three lift handles.
10. Lift the server from the slide bracket assemblies and place the server on a flat,
nonconductive surface.
Chapter 5. Rack Installation
89
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
Server problems can be caused by hardware, software, or a user error. An
example of a user error is pressing the wrong key on the keyboard. You can check
server hardware by using the diagnostic programs and other information in this
chapter.
This chapter contains:
Diagnostic Tools Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostic Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power-On Self Test (POST) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
POST Beep Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Error Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option Diskettes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostic Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running Diagnostic Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing the Test Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power-On Self-Test (POST) Messages . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power-On Self Test (POST) Beep Codes . . . . . . . . . . .
POST Beep Code Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
POST Beep Code Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Monitoring Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostic Error Message Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Failed Diagnostic Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Failed Diagnostic Messages That Prevent Proper Testing
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SCSI Messages
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resolving Configuration Conflicts
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Software Configuration Setup . . . . . . . .
Changing the Hardware Configuration Setup . . . . . . .
Identifying Problems through Status Indicators . . . . . . . .
Power Supply LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Component Status Indicators
. . . . . . . . . . .
Checking the System for Damage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
After Dropping It . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
After Spilling Liquid on It . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Replacing the Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
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91
Diagnostic Tools Overview
Diagnostic Tools Overview
The following tools are available to help identify and resolve hardware-related
problems:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Diagnostic programs
Power-on self-test (POST)
POST beep codes
Error messages
Troubleshooting charts
System error log
Option diskettes
Diagnostic Programs
The server diagnostic programs are stored on electrically erasable programmable
read-only memory (EEPROM). These programs are the primary method of testing
the major components of your server and some external devices.
Also, if you cannot determine whether a problem is caused by the hardware or by
the software, you can run the diagnostic programs to confirm that the hardware is
working properly.
Note: When you run the diagnostic programs, a single problem might cause
several error messages. When this occurs, work to correct the cause of the
first error message. After the cause of the first error message is corrected,
the other error messages might not occur the next time you run the test.
Power-On Self Test (POST)
When you turn on the server, it performs a series of tests to check the operation of
server components and some of the options installed in the server. This series of
tests is called the power-on self-test or POST.
POST does the following:
Ÿ Checks the operation of some basic I/O function card, processor board, and I/O
board operations
Ÿ Checks the memory
Ÿ Compares the current server configuration with the stored server configuration
information
Ÿ Configures PCI adapters
Ÿ Starts the video operation
Ÿ Verifies that drives (such as the diskette, CD-ROM, and hard disk drives) are
connected properly
If you have a power-on password or administrator password set, you must type the
password and press Enter before POST will continue.
While the memory is being tested, the amount of available memory appears on the
screen. These numbers advance as the server progresses through POST and the
final number that appears on the screen represents the total amount of memory
available. If POST finishes without detecting any problems, a single beep sounds
and the first screen of your operating system or application program appears.
92
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Diagnostic Tools Overview
If POST detects a problem, more than one beep sounds and an error message
appears on your screen.
Note: A single problem might cause several error messages. When this occurs,
work to correct the cause of the first error message. After the cause of the
first error message is corrected, the other error messages usually will not
occur the next time you run the test.
POST Beep Codes
POST generates beep codes to indicate successful completion or the detection of a
problem.
Ÿ One beep indicates the successful completion of POST.
Ÿ More than one beep indicates that POST detected a problem. For more
information, see “Power-On Self Test (POST) Beep Codes” on page 105.
Error Messages
Error messages indicate that a problem exists; they are not intended to be used to
identify a failing part. Troubleshooting and servicing of complex problems indicated
by error messages should be performed by trained service personnel.
Hardware error messages that occur can be text, numeric, or both. Messages
generated by your software generally are text messages, but they also can be
numeric.
POST Error Messages
POST error messages occur during startup when POST finds a problem with the
hardware or detects a change in the hardware configuration. For more information,
see “Power-On Self-Test (POST) Messages” on page 96.
System Monitoring Messages
System monitoring messages occur as the Advanced System Management PCI
Adapter monitors critical system functions. For more information, see “System
Monitoring Messages” on page 108.
Diagnostic Error Messages
Diagnostic error messages occur when a test finds a problem with the server
hardware. These error messages are alphanumeric and they are saved in the Test
Log. For more information, see “Viewing the Test Log” on page 95.
Software-Generated Error Messages
These messages occur if a problem or conflict is found by an application program,
the operating system, or both. Messages are generally text messages, but they
also can be numeric. For information about these error messages, refer to the
documentation that comes with your software.
Troubleshooting Charts
The charts under “Troubleshooting” on page 117 list symptoms of problems (for
example, a symptom might be “The mouse or pointing device does not work.”),
along with steps to correct the problems.
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
93
Diagnostic Programs
System Error Log
The system error log contains all error and warning messages issued during POST
and all system status messages from the Advanced System Management PCI
Adapter (service processor). See “System Error Log” on page 25 for information
about how to view the system error log.
Option Diskettes
An optional device or adapter can come with an Option Diskette. Option Diskettes
usually contain option-specific diagnostic test programs or configuration files.
If your optional device or adapter comes with an Option Diskette, follow the
instructions that come with the option. Different instructions apply depending on
whether the Option Diskette is startable or not.
Diagnostic Programs
This section includes useful information about running the diagnostic programs.
These programs are designed to test the IBM Netfinity 7000 M10. If you want to
test a non-IBM product, refer to the information that comes with that product.
Notes:
1. When you run the diagnostic programs, a single problem might cause several
error messages. When this occurs, work to correct the cause of the first error
message. After the cause of the first error message is corrected, the other
error messages usually will not occur the next time you run the test.
2. You can also run the diagnostic programs remotely with the Advanced System
Management PCI Adapter in conjunction with the Advanced System
Management service capabilities of Netfinity Manager, a terminal program, or a
web browser. Refer to the “Advanced System Management Information”
section of this Server Library for more information.
Running Diagnostic Programs
While you are running the diagnostic programs, pressing F1 displays help
information. Pressing F1 from within a help screen provides a help index from
which you can select different categories. Pressing Esc closes the Help window
and returns to running the diagnostic programs.
Notes:
1. To run the diagnostic programs, you must start the server with the highest level
password.
That is, if you enter the power-on password and an administrator password is
set, you cannot run the programs. You can only view the error messages in
the Test Log.
You must enter the administrator password to run the diagnostic programs.
2. If the server stops during testing and you cannot continue, restart the server
and try running the diagnostic programs again. If the problem persists, have
the system serviced.
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3. If the diagnostic tests do not find a problem but the problem persists during
normal operations, see “Troubleshooting” on page 117 and look for the
problem symptom.
4. You might have to install a wrap connector on your active parallel or serial port
to obtain accurate test results for these ports. If you do not have a wrap
connector, contact your IBM reseller or IBM marketing representative.
5. You might need a scratch diskette to obtain accurate test results when testing
the diskette drive.
6. The keyboard and mouse (pointing device) tests assume that a keyboard and
mouse are attached to the server.
To start the diagnostic programs:
1. Turn on the server and watch the screen.
If the server is turned on already, shut down your operating system and restart
the server.
2. When the message F2 for Diagnostics appears, press F2.
If a power-on password or administrator password is set, the server prompts
you for it. Type in the appropriate password; then, press Enter.
The Diagnostic Programs screen appears.
3. Select either Extended or Basic from the top of the screen.
4. Select the test you want to run from the list that appears; then, follow the
instructions on the screen.
When the tests have completed, you can view the Test Log by selecting Utility
from the top of the screen.
Also, you can view server configuration information (such as system
configuration, memory contents, interrupt request (IRQ) use, direct memory
access (DMA) use, device drivers, and so on) by selecting Hardware Info from
the top of the screen.
If the hardware checks out OK but the problem persists during normal server
operations, a software error might be the cause. If you suspect a software
problem, refer to the information that comes with the software package.
Viewing the Test Log
If you are already running the diagnostic programs, continue with step 3 on
page 96 in this procedure.
To view the Test Log:
1. Turn on the server and watch the screen.
If the server is turned on already, shut down your operating system and restart
the server.
2. When the message F2 for Diagnostics appears, press F2.
If a power-on password or administrator password is set, the server prompts
you for it. Type in the appropriate password; then, press Enter.
The Diagnostic Programs screen appears.
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3. Select Utility from the top of the screen.
4. Select View Test Log from the list that appears; then, follow instructions on the
screen.
Power-On Self-Test (POST) Messages
The following table shows error messages that can appear on the screen during the
power-on self-test (POST).
Notes:
1. In addition to the actions given for the messages, see “Troubleshooting” on
page 117 for general troubleshooting activities.
2. The actions for some of the messages require you to run the
Configuration/Setup Utility program. For information about using the
Configuration/Setup Utility program, see “Using the Configuration/Setup Utility
Main Menu” on page 18.
3. If a password prompt appears with a POST message, type the administrator or
power-on password; then, press Enter.
POST Message
062
Description
The server failed to load the operating system on three consecutive attempts.
All caches are disabled. This can be caused by repeatedly turning the server on
and then off or resetting the server.
Action: Start the Configuration/Setup Utility program and verify that all settings are
correct. (See Chapter 3, “Configuring Your Server” on page 15.) Use the Cache
Control selection in the Advanced Setup menu of the Configuration/Setup Utility
program to enable the caches. (See “Advanced Setup” on page 24.)
If the problem persists, have the system serviced. When the problem is corrected,
make sure to enable the caches.
101
102
An error occurred during the I/O function card, I/O board, and microprocessor test.
106
An error occurred during the I/O function card and microprocessor test.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Action: Have the system serviced.
114
An adapter read-only memory (ROM) error occurred.
Action: Remove the adapters. If you can start the server without the adapters
installed, reinstall each adapter one at a time and retest after each is reinstalled.
When an adapter fails, replace it.
If you cannot isolate and correct the problem, have the system serviced.
129
An error was detected in the L1 cache of a microprocessor.
Action:
1. If you just installed a microprocessor, verify that the microprocessor is installed
and seated correctly.
2. If the problem persists, run the diagnostic program for the microprocessors.
Ÿ If the tests fail, replace the microprocessor.
Ÿ If the microprocessor tests do not fail, have the system serviced.
3. Review the error logs in the Configuration/Setup Utility program for information
on the microprocessor error.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
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POST Message
151
Description
A real-time clock (RTC) error occurred.
Action: Have the system serviced.
161
The real-time clock battery has failed.
Action: Have the system serviced or replace the battery yourself. For additional
information, see “Replacing the Battery” on page 127 and “Lithium Battery Notice”
on page ix before you attempt to change the battery.
You can use the server until you replace the battery. However, you must run the
Configuration/Setup Utility program and set the time and date and other custom
settings each time you turn on the server.
162
A change in device configuration occurred. This error occurs under one or more of
the following conditions:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
A new device has been installed.
A device has been moved to a different location or cable connection.
A device has been removed or disconnected from a cable.
A device is failing and is no longer recognized by the server as being installed.
An external device is not turned on.
An invalid checksum is detected in the battery-backed memory.
Action: Verify that all external devices are turned on. You must turn on external
devices before turning on the server.
If you did not add, remove, or change the location of a device, a device is probably
failing. Running the diagnostic test programs might isolate the failing device, but
you must have the system serviced.
163
The time of day has not been set.
Action: Set the correct date and time. If the date and time are set correctly and
saved, but the 163 error message reappears, have the system serviced.
The server can be used until the system is serviced, but any application programs
that use the date and time will be affected.
164
A change in the memory configuration occurred. This message might appear after
you add or remove memory.
Note: The server can be used with decreased memory capacity.
Action:
1. If POST error message 289 also occurred, follow the instructions for that error
message first.
2. If you have installed or removed memory, run the Configuration/Setup Utility
program; then, exit, saving the new configuration settings. For information
about using the Configuration/Setup Utility program, see “Using the
Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu” on page 18.
If the message appears again, shut down the server, reseat the memory
modules, and restart the server.
3. Review the error logs in the Configuration/Setup Utility program for information
on the memory error.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
175
A vital product data (VPD) error occurred.
Action: Check to see if the error logs in the Configuration/Setup Utility program
provide additional information on the error.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
176
177
178
A security hardware error occurred.
Action: Check for indications that someone has tampered with the server. If no
one has tampered with the server, have the system serviced.
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POST Messages
POST Message
184
Description
The power-on password information stored in your server has been removed.
Action: From the Configuration/Setup Utility main menu, select System Security.
Then, follow the instructions on the screen. For information about using the
Configuration/Setup Utility program, see “Using the Configuration/Setup Utility Main
Menu” on page 18.
If this information cannot be restored, have the system serviced.
185
A power failure damaged the stored information about the drive-startup sequence.
Action: From the Configuration/Setup Utility main menu, select Start Options;
then, follow the instructions on the screen. For information about using the
Configuration/Setup Utility program, see “Using the Configuration/Setup Utility Main
Menu” on page 18.
If this information cannot be restored, have the system serviced.
186
An I/O function card, I/O board, or hardware error occurred.
Action: Check to see if the error logs in the Configuration/Setup Utility program
provide additional information on the error.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
187
The VPD serial number is not set.
Action: The system serial number is set in the VPD EEPROM at the time of
manufacturing. If the I/O function card has been replaced, the system serial number
will be invalid and must be set. From the main menu of the Configuration/Setup
Utility program, select System Information; then, select Product Data. If the
problem persists, have the system serviced.
188
A vital product data (VPD) error occurred.
Action: Check to see if the error logs in the Configuration/Setup Utility program
provide additional information on the error.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
189
An attempt has been made to access the server with invalid passwords. After three
incorrect attempts, the server locks up; that is, the logon data fields are no longer
available to the user.
201
An error occurred during the memory controller test. This error can be caused by:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Incorrectly installed memory
A failing memory module
A processor-board problem
An I/O function card problem
An I/O board problem
Action:
1. If you just installed memory, see “Installing Memory-Module Kits” on page 46 to
verify that the new memory is correct for your server. Verify that the memory
modules are seated correctly and installed in groups of four.
2. If the problem persists, check to see if the system has isolated the problem to a
memory module:
Ÿ Check the memory module status LEDs next to the memory sockets on the
processor board (see “Memory Board Component Locations” on page 150).
If a memory module status LED is on, run the diagnostic program for the
module indicated by the LED.
Ÿ If the tests fail, replace the DIMM. If the problem persists after you replace
the DIMM, have the system serviced.
Ÿ If the memory tests do not fail, have the system serviced.
3. Review the error logs in the Configuration/Setup Utility program for information
on the memory error.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
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POST Message
229
Description
An error was detected in the L2 cache of one of the microprocessors.
Action:
1. If you just installed a microprocessor, verify that the microprocessor is installed
and seated correctly.
2. If the problem persists, check to see if the system has isolated the problem to a
memory module:
Ÿ Check the memory module status LEDs next to the memory sockets on the
processor board (see “Memory Board Component Locations” on page 150).
If a memory module status LED is on, run the diagnostic program for the
module indicated by the LED.
Ÿ Run the diagnostic program for the microprocessors. If the tests fail,
replace the microprocessor.
Ÿ If the microprocessor tests do not fail, have the system serviced.
Ÿ Review the error logs in the Configuration/Setup Utility program for
information on the microprocessor error.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
289
An error occurred during POST memory tests and a failing DIMM was disabled.
Note: The server can be used with decreased memory.
Action:
1. If you just installed memory, see “Installing Memory-Module Kits” on page 46 to
verify that the new memory is correct for your server. Verify that the memory
modules are installed and seated correctly.
2. Check to see if the error logs in the Configuration/Setup Utility program provide
additional information on the error.
3. If the problem persists, replace the failing DIMM.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
301
303
An error occurred during the keyboard and keyboard controller test. These error
messages also might be accompanied by continuous beeping.
Action:
1. If you have just connected a new mouse or other pointing device, turn off the
server and disconnect that device. Wait at least five seconds, and then turn on
the server. If the error message goes away, replace the device.
2. Ensure that:
a. Nothing is resting on the keyboard and pressing a key.
b. No key is stuck.
c. The keyboard cable is connected correctly to the keyboard and to the
correct connector on the server.
3. Attach another keyboard to the keyboard connector.
4. Running the diagnostic tests can isolate the server component that failed, but
you must have your system serviced. If the error message remains, have the
keyboard, cable, and system serviced.
604
An error occurred during a diskette drive test.
Action:
1. Verify that the Configuration/Setup Utility program correctly reflects the type of
diskette drive that you have installed.
2. Run the diagnostic tests. If the diagnostic tests fail, have the system serviced.
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POST Messages
POST Message
662
Description
A diskette drive configuration error occurred.
Action: If you removed a diskette drive, make sure that the diskette drive setting is
correct in the Configuration/Setup Utility program. If the setting is not correct,
change it. For information about using the Configuration/Setup Utility program, see
“Using the Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu” on page 18.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
962
A parallel port configuration error occurred.
Action: If you changed a hardware option, make sure that the parallel port setting
is correct in the Configuration/Setup Utility program. If the setting is not correct,
change it. For information about using the Configuration/Setup Utility program, see
“Using the Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu” on page 18.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
11xx
An error occurred during the I/O function card, I/O board, and serial port test.
Action: If you have a modem, serial printer, or other serial device attached to your
server, verify that the serial cable is connected correctly. If it is, use the following
procedure:
1. Turn off the server.
2. Disconnect the serial cable from the serial port.
3. Wait five seconds; then, turn on the server.
If the POST error message does not reappear, either the serial cable or the device
is probably failing. See the documentation that comes with the serial device for
additional testing information.
If the POST error message reappears, have the system serviced.
1162
The serial port configuration conflicts with another device in the system.
Action:
1. Make sure the IRQ and I/O port assignments needed by the serial port are
available. (See Chapter 3, “Configuring Your Server” on page 15.)
2. If all interrupts are being used by adapters, you might need to remove an
adapter to make an interrupt available to the serial port, or force other adapters
to share an interrupt. For information about removing adapters, see “Working
with Adapters” on page 49. For information about setting interrupts, see
Chapter 3, “Configuring Your Server.”
1800
A PCI adapter has requested a hardware interrupt that is not available.
Action:
1. Make sure that the PCI adapter and all other adapters are set correctly in the
Configuration/Setup Utility program. If the interrupt resource settings are not
correct, change the settings. For information about using the
Configuration/Setup Utility program, see “Using the Configuration/Setup Utility
Main Menu” on page 18.
2. If all interrupts are being used by other adapters, you might need to remove an
adapter to make an interrupt available to the PCI adapter, or force other
adapters to share an interrupt. For information about removing adapters, see
“Working with Adapters” on page 49. For information about setting interrupts,
see “PCI Slot/Device Information” on page 24.
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POST Message
1801
Description
A PCI adapter has requested memory resources that are not available.
Action:
1. Make sure that the PCI adapter and all other adapters are set correctly in the
Configuration/Setup Utility program. If the memory resource settings are not
correct, change the settings. For information about using the
Configuration/Setup Utility program, see “Using the Configuration/Setup Utility
Main Menu” on page 18.
2. If all memory resources are being used, you might need to remove an adapter
to make memory available to the PCI adapter. For information about removing
adapters, see “Working with Adapters” on page 49. Disabling the adapter BIOS
on the adapter might correct the error. Refer to the documentation provided
with the adapter.
1802
A PCI adapter has requested an I/O address that is not available, or the PCI
adapter might be defective.
Action:
1. Make sure that the I/O address for the PCI adapter and all other adapters are
set correctly in the Configuration/Setup Utility program. For information about
using the Configuration/Setup Utility program, see “Using the
Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu” on page 18.
2. If the I/O port resource settings are correct, the PCI adapter might be defective.
Have the system serviced.
1803
A PCI adapter has requested a memory address that is not available, or the PCI
adapter might be defective.
Action:
1. Make sure that the memory address for all other adapters are set correctly in
the Configuration/Setup Utility program. If the memory resource settings are not
correct, change the settings. For information about using the
Configuration/Setup Utility program, see “Using the Configuration/Setup Utility
Main Menu” on page 18.
2. If the memory resource settings are correct, the PCI adapter might be defective.
Have the system serviced.
1804
A PCI adapter has requested a memory address that is not available.
Action: If all memory addresses are being used, you might need to remove an
adapter to make memory address space available to the PCI adapter. For
information about removing adapters, see “Working with Adapters” on page 49.
Disabling the adapter BIOS on the adapter might correct the error. Refer to the
documentation provided with the adapter.
1805
A PCI adapter ROM error occurred.
Action: Remove the PCI adapters. If you can start the server without the
adapters, reinstall each adapter one at a time and retest after each is reinstalled.
When an adapter fails, replace it.
If you cannot isolate and correct the problem, have the system serviced.
1806
A PCI-to-PCI bridge error occurred. More than one PCI bus tried to access memory
below 1 MB.
Action: Remove the PCI adapter that has the PCI bridge. If you can start the
server without the adapter, reinstall and retest the adapter. If the adapter fails,
replace it.
If you cannot isolate and correct the problem, have the system serviced.
1808
An unsupported PCI device is installed.
The latch on a hot-plug PCI slot might have been opened while the slot was active
or the optical switch for the slot might be defective.
Action: Shut down the server, ensure the latches on the hot-plug PCI slots are
closed and locked; then, restart the server.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
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POST Messages
POST Message
1962
Description
No valid startup devices were found. The system cannot find the startup drive or
operating system.
Action: Be sure that the drive you want to start from is in the startup sequence.
1. Select Start Options from the Configuration/Setup Utility main menu. (See
Chapter 3, “Configuring Your Server” on page 15.) If you are unable to set the
startup sequence, have the system serviced.
2. Check the list of startup devices in the Startup device data fields. Is the drive
you want to start from in the startup sequence?
Yes Exit from this screen; then select Exit Setup to exit the
Configuration/Setup Utility main menu. Go to step 3.
No
Follow the instructions on the screen to add the drive; then save the
changes and exit the Configuration/Setup Utility main menu. Restart the
server.
3. Is an operating system installed?
Yes Turn off the server. Go to step 4.
No
Install the operating system; follow your operating system instructions to
shut down and restart the server.
4. During server startup, watch for messages indicating a hardware problem.
If the same error message appears, have the system serviced.
2400
An error occurred during the video controller test. This error can be caused by a
failing monitor, a failing I/O function card, or, if a video adapter is installed, a failing
video adapter.
Action: Verify that the monitor is connected correctly to the video connector. If the
monitor is connected correctly, have the system serviced.
2462
A video memory configuration error occurred.
Action:
1. Make sure that the monitor cables are correctly and securely connected to the
server.
2. If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
5962
An IDE CD-ROM configuration error occurred.
Action: Check the signal and power cable connections to the CD-ROM drive. See
“I/O Board Component Locations” on page 144 for the locations of the cable
connectors.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
8603
An error occurred during the mouse (pointing device) and mouse (pointing device)
controller test. This error can be caused by the addition or removal of a mouse, or
by a failing I/O function card.
Note: This error also can occur if electrical power was lost for a very brief period
and then restored. In this case, turn off the server for at least five seconds,
and then turn it back on.
Action: Ensure that the keyboard and mouse (pointing device) are attached to the
correct connectors. (See “Input/Output Connectors and Expansion Slots” on
page 9.) If they are connected correctly, use the following procedure:
1. Turn off the server.
2. Disconnect the mouse from the server.
3. Turn on the server.
If the POST error message does not reappear, the mouse is probably failing. See
the documentation that comes with the mouse for additional testing information. If
the problem remains, have the mouse (pointing device) serviced.
If the POST error message reappears, run the diagnostic tests to isolate the
problem. If the diagnostic tests do not find a problem and the POST error message
remains, have the system serviced.
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POST Message
00019501
Description
Processor 1 is not functioning.
Action: Replace the microprocessor.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
00019502
Processor 2 is not functioning.
Action: Replace the microprocessor.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
00019503
Processor 3 is not functioning.
Action: Replace the microprocessor.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
00019504
Processor 4 is not functioning.
Action: Replace the microprocessor.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
00019701
Processor 1 failed the built-in self test.
Action: Replace the microprocessor.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
00019702
Processor 2 failed the built-in self-test.
Action: Replace the microprocessor.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
00019703
Processor 3 failed the built-in self test.
Action: Replace the microprocessor.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
00019704
Processor 4 failed the built-in self-test.
Action: Replace the microprocessor.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
01298001
No update data for processor 1.
Action: Update the system BIOS to a level that supports the microprocessors
installed in the server. Refer to the “Getting Help Information” section of this Server
Library for information about obtaining updates from the World Wide Web.
01298002
No update data for processor 2.
Action: Update the system BIOS to a level that supports the microprocessors
installed in the server. Refer to the “Getting Help Information” section of this Server
Library for information about obtaining updates from the World Wide Web.
01298003
No update data for processor 3.
Action: Update the system BIOS to a level that supports the microprocessors
installed in the server. Refer to the “Getting Help Information” section of this Server
Library for information about obtaining updates from the World Wide Web.
01298004
No update data for processor 4.
Action: Update the system BIOS to a level that supports the microprocessors
installed in the server. Refer to the “Getting Help Information” section of this Server
Library for information about obtaining updates from the World Wide Web.
01298101
Invalid update data for processor 1.
Action: Update the system BIOS to a level that supports the microprocessors
installed in the server. Refer to the “Getting Help Information” section of this Server
Library for information about obtaining updates from the World Wide Web.
01298102
Invalid update data for processor 2.
Action: Update the system BIOS to a level that supports the microprocessors
installed in the server. Refer to the “Getting Help Information” section of this Server
Library for information about obtaining updates from the World Wide Web.
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POST Messages
POST Message
01298103
Description
Invalid update data for processor 3.
Action: Update the system BIOS to a level that supports the microprocessors
installed in the server. Refer to the “Getting Help Information” section of this Server
Library for information about obtaining updates from the World Wide Web.
01298104
Invalid update data for processor 4.
Action: Update the system BIOS to a level that supports the microprocessors
installed in the server. Refer to the “Getting Help Information” section of this Server
Library for information about obtaining updates from the World Wide Web.
I9990301
A hard disk drive error occurred.
Action: Have the system serviced.
I9990305
POST could not find an operating system.
Action: Install an operating system. If you have already installed the operating
system, check the drive startup sequence (see “Start Options” on page 23). If the
drive sequence is correct, run the diagnostic tests to verify that the hard disk drive is
functioning correctly. If there is a problem with the hard disk drive (such as a bad
sector), you might have to reinstall the operating system.
If you cannot reinstall the operating system, have the system serviced.
I9990605
AC power has been restored.
Action: No action is required. This message occurs each time AC power is
restored to the server after an AC power loss.
Other Numbers
POST found an error.
Action: Follow the instructions on the screen.
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POST Beep Codes
Power-On Self Test (POST) Beep Codes
The successful completion of POST is indicated by one beep and the appearance
of the first screen of your operating system or application program. More than one
beep indicates that POST detected an error.
Beep codes are sounded in a series of beeps. For example, a 1–2–4 beep code
sounds like one beep, a pause, two consecutive beeps, another pause, and four
more consecutive beeps.
POST Beep Code Descriptions
The following list contains more detailed descriptions of the possible types of beeps
that your server might emit.
No beeps
If no beep occurs after your server successfully completes POST (that is,
after the System POST Complete (OK) light on the information LED panel is
illuminated), have the system serviced.
Continuous beep
This indicates that your startup microprocessor has failed, or the I/O function
card, processor board, I/O board, or speaker subsystem might contain a
failing component. If the system continues through POST with no errors,
have the system serviced. If no video appears, the startup processor has
failed; replace the startup processor.
One short beep
If one beep occurs after your server successfully completes POST (that is,
after the System POST Complete (OK) light on the information LED panel is
illuminated), then POST has no configuration or functional errors to report.
One beep also occurs after your server completes POST if you enter an
incorrect power-on password.
Two short beeps
This beep combination indicates that POST encountered an error. The
Configuration/Setup Utility program will display additional information; follow
the instructions displayed. See “Power-On Self-Test (POST) Messages” on
page 96 for explanations of any POST error messages.
Three short beeps
This beep combination indicates a system memory error. This combination
occurs only if the video BIOS cannot display the error message. Replace
the failing memory module.
Repeating short beeps
This beep combination indicates that your I/O function card, processor board,
or I/O board might contain a failing component; your keyboard might be
defective; or a key on the keyboard might be stuck.
Ensure that:
1. Nothing is resting on the keyboard and pressing a key.
2. No key is stuck.
3. The keyboard cable is connected correctly to the keyboard and to the
correct connector on the server.
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POST Beep Codes
Running the diagnostic tests can isolate the server component that failed,
but you must have your system serviced. If the beep code repeats, have the
keyboard, cable, and system serviced.
Note: If you have just connected a new mouse or other pointing device,
turn off the server and disconnect that device. Wait at least five
seconds, and then, turn on the server. If the beep code repeats,
replace the device.
One long and one short beep
This beep combination indicates that POST encountered an error on a video
adapter. Have the system serviced if the integrated video adapter on the I/O
function card is being used. If an optional video adapter is being used,
replace the failing video adapter.
One long and two short beeps
This beep combination indicates that a video I/O adapter ROM is not
readable, or the video subsystem is defective. If you hear this beep
combination twice, both the I/O function card and an optional video adapter
have failed the test. This beep combination might also indicate that the I/O
function card, processor board, or I/O board contains a failing component.
One long and three short beeps
This beep combination indicates that the video subsystem has not detected
a monitor connection to the server. Ensure that the monitor is connected to
the server. If the problem persists, replace the monitor.
Two long and two short beeps
This beep combination indicates that POST does not support the optional
video adapter. This beep combination occurs when a video adapter is
installed that is incompatible with your server. Replace the optional video
adapter with one that is supported by the server or use the integrated video
controller on the I/O function card.
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Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
POST Beep Codes
POST Beep Code Table
Beep Code
Description
1-1-2
1-1-3
1-1-4
1-2-1
1-2-2
1-2-3
1-4-3
2-1-1
2-1-2
2-1-3
2-1-4
2-2-1
2-2-2
2-2-3
2-2-4
2-3-1
2-3-2
2-3-3
2-3-4
2-4-1
3-1-1
3-1-2
3-1-3
3-1-4
3-2-1
3-2-2
3-2-3
3-2-4
Microprocessor register test has failed.
CMOS write/read test has failed.
BIOS ROM checksum has failed.
Programmable-interval-timer test has failed.
DMA initialization has failed.
DMA page register write/read test has failed.
Interrupt vector loading test has failed.
Secondary DMA register test has failed.
Primary DMA register test has failed.
Primary interrupt-mask register test has failed.
Secondary interrupt-mask register test has failed.
Interrupt vector loading has failed.
Keyboard controller test has failed.
CMOS power failure and checksum checks have failed.
CMOS configuration information validation has failed.
Screen initialization has failed.
Screen memory test has failed.
Screen retrace tests have failed.
Search for video ROM has failed.
Screen test indicates the screen is inoperable.
Timer tick interrupt test has failed.
Interval timer channel 2 test has failed.
RAM test has failed above address hex 0FFFF.
Time-of-day clock test has failed.
Serial port test has failed.
Parallel port test has failed.
Math coprocessor test has failed.
Comparison of CMOS memory size against actual has failed.
Action: Have the system serviced.
1-2-4
1-3-1
1-3-2
3-3-1
RAM refresh verification has failed.
First 64 KB RAM test has failed.
First 64 KB RAM parity test has failed.
A memory size mismatch has occurred.
Action: Reseat the memory modules. If the problem persists, have the system
serviced.
3-3-2
Critical Advanced System Management PCI Adapter bus error.
Action: Disconnect the server from all electrical sources, wait for 30 seconds, and
reconnect the server to the electrical sources. If the Processor Error LED (CR2 top)
lights continuously, have your system serviced. (See “Advanced System
Management PCI Adapter Component Locations” on page 149 for the location of
the Processor Error LED.)
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107
System Monitoring Messages
System Monitoring Messages
The following table shows the system monitoring messages that can appear on the
information panel. The Advanced System Management PCI Adapter monitors
critical system functions and generates the messages.
Notes:
1. In addition to the actions given for the messages, see “Troubleshooting” on
page 117 for general troubleshooting activities that might help you resolve an
error.
2. Refer to the “Advanced System Management Information” section of this Server
Library for information about the system monitoring functions of the Advanced
System Management PCI Adapter.
Code
Message
Description
00
Post Fail
Errors detected that prevent the system from successfully
completing POST.
Action: Review the error logs in the Configuration/Setup Utility
program for information on the error.
01
Post Warn
Errors detected in POST that allow the system to complete POST
(for example, a memory sizing configuration error).
Action: Review the error logs in the Configuration/Setup Utility
program for information on the error.
08
App Fail
An application has failed.
Action: Review the error logs in the Configuration/Setup Utility
program for information on the error.
09
App Warning
An application has issued a warning message.
Action: Review the error logs in the Configuration/Setup Utility
program for information on the error.
10
Boot Fail
The network operating system failed to load.
Action: Restart the server. If the problem persists, review the
error logs in the Configuration/Setup Utility program for information
on the error.
18
OS Hang
A network operating system error occurred.
Action: Restart the server.
20
Log Full
The system error log is full.
Action: Review the error logs in the Configuration/Setup Utility
program and clear error logs.
80
Over Temp
A monitored temperature is above the normal range.
Action:
1. Make sure all four fans are functioning properly and air
intakes are clear.
2. Make sure the room temperature is within normal limits.
3. If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
85
Over Volt
A monitored power source exceeds the threshold value.
Action: Review the error logs in the Configuration/Setup Utility
program for information on the error.
86
Under Volt
A monitored power source is below the threshold value.
Action: Review the error logs in the Configuration/Setup Utility
program for information on the error.
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Code
Message
Description
9x
Power
Power supply failure, where x is the power supply identifier.
98
Power Fail
A failure occurred in the power supply system.
Action: Replace the power supply.
Action: Review the error logs in the Configuration/Setup Utility
program for information on the error.
A0
Fan x Fail
A fan has failed, where x is the fan identifier.
Action: Replace the fan.
B0
Intrusion
The intrusion-detection switches have been set.
Action: Check that the covers are attached correctly. Then,
verify that there has been an intrusion.
B8
Display Fail
The information panel has failed.
Action: Check the cable connections to the front panel.
C0
SMI Error
A critical error has occurred.
Action: Review the error logs in the Configuration/Setup Utility
program for information on the error.
C1
Memory Fail
A double-bit ECC system memory error has occurred.
Action: Review the error logs in the Configuration/Setup Utility
program for information on the error.
Diagnostic Error Message Tables
Error messages indicate that a problem exists; they are not intended to be used to
identify a failing part. Troubleshooting and servicing of complex problems indicated
by error messages should be performed by trained service personnel.
Sometimes the first error to occur causes additional errors. In this case, the server
displays more than one error message. Always follow the suggested action
instructions for the first error message that appears.
Note: In addition to the actions given for the messages, see “Troubleshooting” on
page 117 for general troubleshooting activities.
The following pages contain the error codes that you might receive in the diagnostic
program detailed test log and summary log when running the diagnostic programs
for your Netfinity 7000 M10.
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109
The format for the codes is:
fff-ttt-iii-date-cc-text message
where:
fff
is the three-digit function code that indicates the function being tested
when the error occurred. For example, function code 089 is for the
microprocessor.
ttt
is the three-digit failure code that indicates the exact test failure that
was encountered. (These codes are for trained service personnel and
are not listed.)
iii
is the three-digit device ID. (These codes are for trained service
personnel and are not listed.)
date
is the date that the diagnostic test was run and the error recorded.
cc
is the check digit that is used to verify the validity of the information.
text message is a message that the diagnostic program generates that indicates
the reason for the problem. More information about the text message
follows.
Text Messages
The text message format is:
Function Name:
Result (test-specific string)
where:
Function Name is the name of the function being tested when the error occurred.
This corresponds to the function code (fff) given in the previous list.
Result
can be one of the following:
Passed
This result occurs when the diagnostic test completes
without any errors.
Failed
This result occurs when the diagnostic test discovers an
error.
Aborted
This result occurs when the user ends the diagnostic test
before it is complete.
Warning This result occurs when a possible problem is reported
during the diagnostic test, such as when a device that is to
be tested is not installed.
Test-Specific String is additional information that can be used to analyze the
diagnostic problem.
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Failed Diagnostic Messages
The following tables display the primary hardware failure messages that the
diagnostic programs might display.
Function: Core System Messages (001)
Result
Test-Specific String
Failed
Processor board, I/O function card, or I/O board.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Function: Video System Messages (005)
Result
Test-Specific String
Failed
Processor board, I/O function card, or I/O board.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Function: Serial Port Messages (011)
Result
Failed
Test-Specific String
Built-in serial port on I/O function card.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Function: Parallel Port Messages (014)
Result
Failed
Test-Specific String
Built-in parallel port on I/O function card.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Function: USB Port Interface Messages (015)
Result
Test-Specific String
Failed
I/O function card or I/O board.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Function: PCI Interface Messages (020)
Result
Test-Specific String
Failed
Tab on PCI Hot Swap slot #xx has failed.
Where xx represents a hot-plug PCI slot number.
Action: Make sure the tab and latch on hot-plug PCI slot xx are closed correctly.
Note: For normal operation, the Power LED for the hot-plug PCI slot will be on and
the Attention LEDs will be off.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
Failed
I/O function card or I/O board.
Action: Have the system serviced.
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111
Function: SCSI Interface Messages (030)
Result
Test-Specific String
Failed
Internal SCSI interface.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Function: RAID Messages (035)
Result
Test-Specific String
Failed
RAID adapter.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Failed
RAID adapter; indicates POST error.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Failed
RAID adapter; testing drive in bay #1, SCSI ID 0.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Failed
RAID adapter; testing drive in bay #2, SCSI ID 1.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Failed
RAID adapter; testing drive in bay #3, SCSI ID 2.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Failed
RAID adapter; testing drive in bay #4, SCSI ID 3.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Function: Power Supply Messages (075)
Result
Test-Specific String
Failed
Voltage sensed by the system is out of range.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Function: Microprocessor Error Messages (089)
Result
Test-Specific String
Failed
Microprocessor in socket number xx.
Where xx represents a microprocessor socket.
Action:
1. Reseat the microprocessor.
2. If the problem persists, replace the microprocessor.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
Function: Advanced System Management PCI Adapter Messages
(165)
Result
Failed
Test-Specific String
Advanced System Management PCI Adapter.
Action: Have the system serviced.
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Function: Thermal System Messages (175)
Result
Test-Specific String
Failed
Fan #1
Action: Replace fan 1.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
Failed
Fan #2
Action: Replace fan 2.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
Failed
Fan #3
Action: Replace fan 3.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
Failed
Fan #4
Action: Replace fan 4.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
Failed
Temperature sensed on processor board is out of range.
Action: If one of the fans has failed, replace the fan.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
Function: Status Display Messages (180)
Result
Failed
Test-Specific String
Information LED panel.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Failed
LED on I/O board.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Failed
LED on processor board.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Failed
LED on hot-swap SCSI backplane.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Function: System Memory Messages (201)
Result
Test-Specific String
Failed
DIMM location Jxx
Where xx represents a DIMM socket.
Action:
1. Reseat the DIMM in DIMM socket Jxx.
2. If the problem persists, replace the DIMM.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
113
Function: System Cache Messages (202)
Result
Test-Specific String
Failed
Microprocessor in socket number xx.
Where xx represents a microprocessor socket.
Action:
1. Reseat the microprocessor.
2. If the problem persists, replace the microprocessor.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
Function: Diskette Drive Messages (206)
Result
Failed
Test-Specific String
Internal diskette drive bay.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Function: CD-ROM Messages (215)
Result
Test-Specific String
Failed
I/O function card or I/O board.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Function: Hard Disk Drive Messages (217)
Result
Test-Specific String
Failed
BIOS bay #1.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Failed
BIOS bay #2.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Failed
BIOS bay #3.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Failed
BIOS bay #4.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Function: Keyboard Messages (301)
Result
Failed
Test-Specific String
An I/O function card keyboard test failed.
Action:
1. Replace the keyboard.
2. If the problem persists, replace the keyboard cable.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
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Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Function: Pointing Device (Mouse) Messages (302)
Result
Test-Specific String
Failed
An I/O function card pointing device test failed.
Action: Replace the pointing device (mouse).
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
Failed Diagnostic Messages That Prevent Proper Testing
The following tables display failures that occur during diagnostic testing that prevent
proper testing of the hardware.
Function: Microprocessor Messages (089)
Result
Test-Specific String
Failed
Test setup error: Microprocessor in socket number xx is installed but not functioning;
check system error log.
Where xx represents a microprocessor socket.
Action:
1. Update the BIOS. Refer to the “Getting Help Information” section of this Server
Library for information about obtaining updates.
2. If the problem persists, replace the microprocessor and run the microprocessor
diagnostic program again.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
Failed
Test setup error: Invalid microprocessor in socket number xx or BIOS setup
problem.
Where xx represents a microprocessor socket.
Action:
1. Update the BIOS. Refer to the “Getting Help Information” section of this Server
Library for information about obtaining updates.
2. If the problem persists, replace the microprocessor and run the microprocessor
diagnostic program again.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
Warning
Test setup error: Microprocessor not installed in socket number xx or BIOS setup
problem.
Where xx represents a microprocessor socket.
Action:
1. Verify that the microprocessor is installed and seated correctly.
2. If the problem persists, update the BIOS. Refer to the “Getting Help
Information” section of this Server Library for information about obtaining
updates.
3. If the problem persists, replace the microprocessor and run the microprocessor
diagnostic program again.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
115
Function: System Memory Messages (201)
Result
Test-Specific String
Failed
Test setup error: Damaged DMI BIOS, information in BIOS is not as expected.
Action: Update the BIOS. Refer to the “Getting Help Information” section of this
Server Library for information about obtaining updates.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
Failed
Test setup error: Unknown hardware problem associated with microprocessor in
socket number xx.
Where xx represents a microprocessor socket.
Action:
1. Update the BIOS and run the diagnostic program again. Refer to the “Getting
Help Information” section of this Server Library for information about obtaining
updates.
2. If the problem persists, replace the microprocessor.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
Failed
Test setup error: Damaged BIOS in ROM.
Action: Update the BIOS. Refer to the “Getting Help Information” section of this
Server Library for information about obtaining updates.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
Function: System Cache Messages (202)
Result
Test-Specific String
Failed
Test setup error: No L2 cache detected on microprocessor socket xx or BIOS setup
problem.
Where xx represents a microprocessor socket.
Action:
1. Update the BIOS and run the diagnostic program again. Refer to the “Getting
Help Information” section of this Server Library for information about obtaining
updates.
2. If the problem persists, replace the microprocessor.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
Warning
Test setup error: Cache is disabled. Use system setup to enable before retrying the
test.
Action: Use the Cache Control selection in the Advanced Setup menu of the
Configuration/Setup Utility program to enable the cache. (See “Advanced Setup” on
page 24.)
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
Failed
Test setup error: Damaged DMI BIOS. Information in BIOS is not as expected.
Action: Update the BIOS. Refer to the “Getting Help Information” section of this
Server Library for information about obtaining updates.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
Failed
Test setup error: BIOS cannot access VPD information.
Action: Update the BIOS. Refer to the “Getting Help Information” section of this
Server Library for information about obtaining updates.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
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Troubleshooting
Result
Test-Specific String
Failed
Test setup error: Unknown hardware problem associated with microprocessor in
socket number xx.
Where xx represents a microprocessor socket.
Action:
1. Update the BIOS. Refer to the “Getting Help Information” section of this Server
Library for information about obtaining updates.
2. If the problem persists, replace the microprocessor and run the diagnostic
program again.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
Failed
Test setup error: Cannot allocate memory due to unknown memory problem.
Action: Have the system serviced.
Troubleshooting
You can use the troubleshooting charts in this section to find solutions to problems
that have definite symptoms.
Do the following before using the troubleshooting charts:
1. Check to make sure that all cables and cords are securely connected to the
rear of the server and to attached options.
2. Remove any software or device that you just installed.
3. Run any diagnostic tests that come with the options you have installed.
4. Run the server diagnostic tests.
5. Check to see if the system error logs in the Configuration/Setup Utility program
provide additional information on the error.
6. Reinstall the new software or new device.
7. Refer to http://www3.pc.ibm.com/support on the World Wide Web for answers
to frequently asked questions, technical updates, BIOS updates, updates to
device drivers, and many other sources of technical support.
8. If the error persists, use the troubleshooting charts. Look for the symptom in
the left column of the chart. Instructions and probable solutions to the problem
are in the right column.
Note: If you cannot find the problem in the troubleshooting charts, go to “Running
Diagnostic Programs” on page 94 to test the server. If you have run the
diagnostic test programs or if running the tests does not reveal the problem,
have the system serviced.
CD-ROM Drive
Problems
The CD is not working
properly.
Action
Clean the CD by wiping it with a soft, lint-free cloth, from the center of the
CD to the outer edge. Do not clean in a circular pattern. This can cause
loss of data.
If this does not correct the problem, clean the optical-head lens. Discs for
cleaning the lens are available from your place of purchase.
CD-ROM drive tray not
working
The server must be turned on. If the system is on and the tray does not
eject, insert the end of a paper clip into the small hole (to the left of the
tray eject/load button) on the front of the CD-ROM drive.
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
117
Troubleshooting
CD-ROM Drive
Problems
Action
CD-ROM drive not
recognized
Use the Configuration/Setup Utility program to verify that the CD-ROM
drive is enabled.
Diskette Drive
Problems
Action
Diskette Drive In-Use
light stays on, or the
system bypasses the
diskette drive.
If there is a diskette in the drive, verify that:
1. The diskette is good and not damaged. (Try another diskette if you
have one.)
2. The diskette is inserted correctly (label up and metal-shutter end first)
in the drive.
3. The diskette contains the necessary files to start the system.
4. The system is not in unattended-start mode (see “System Security” on
page 20).
5. The diskette drive is enabled. Check the drive startup sequence
setting in the Configuration/Setup Utility program (see “Start Options”
on page 23).
6. Your software program is OK (see the Software Problems
troubleshooting chart provided later in this section).
7. Your drive startup sequence is set correctly (see “Start Options” on
page 23).
If the Diskette Drive In-Use light stays on, or the system continues to
bypass the diskette drive, have the system serviced.
Monitor Self-Tests
Action
Some IBM monitors have their own self-tests. If you suspect a problem
with your monitor, refer to the information that comes with the monitor for
adjusting and testing instructions.
If you still cannot find the problem, have the monitor and system serviced.
Monitor Problems
Action
Wavy, unreadable,
rolling, distorted screen,
or screen jitter.
Verify that the correct device driver is properly installed.
If the monitor self-tests show that the monitor is OK, consider the location
of the monitor. Magnetic fields around other devices (such as
transformers, appliances, fluorescent lights, and other monitors) can
cause screen jitter or wavy, unreadable, rolling, or distorted screen
images. If this happens, turn off the monitor. (Moving a color monitor
while it is turned on might cause screen discoloration.) Then move the
device and the monitor at least 305 mm (12 in.) apart. Turn on the
monitor.
Notes:
1. The distance between monitors and diskette drives should be
at least 76 mm (3 in.) to prevent diskette drive read/write
errors.
2. Non-IBM monitor cables might cause unpredictable problems.
3. An enhanced monitor cable with additional shielding is
available for the 9521 and 9527 monitors. See your IBM
reseller or IBM marketing representative for information about
the enhanced monitor cable.
If the problem recurs, have the monitor and system serviced.
The monitor works when
you turn on the system,
but goes blank when you
start some application
programs.
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Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Verify that the primary monitor cable is connected to the video port.
Be sure you installed the necessary drivers for the application.
Troubleshooting
Monitor Problems
Action
Blank screen
Verify that:
1. The server power cord is plugged into the server and a working
electrical outlet.
2. The monitor power cord is plugged into the monitor and a working
electrical outlet.
3. The monitor is turned on and the Brightness and Contrast controls are
adjusted correctly.
4. The monitor signal cable is connected to the correct connector on the
system.
If the items above are correct and the screen remains blank, have the
system serviced.
Only the cursor appears.
Have the system serviced.
Wrong characters appear
on the screen.
Have the system serviced.
General Problems
Action
Problems such as
indicator lights not
working.
Have the system serviced.
System continuously
restarts.
Run the diagnostic programs. If the problem recurs, have the system
serviced.
Server does not respond
to the Power On or Reset
button.
Unattended-start mode might be enabled; enter the user password to
disable unattended-start mode and try again (see “System Security” on
page 20).
If the server still does not respond, have the system serviced.
Intermittent Problems
Action
A problem occurs only
occasionally and is
difficult to detect.
Verify that:
1. All cables and cords are securely connected to the rear of the system
and to attached options.
2. The last external device in each SCSI chain is terminated correctly.
(See “SCSI Drives” on page 59 for more information about SCSI
termination.)
If the items above are correct, have the system serviced.
Keyboard, Mouse,
or PointingDevice Problems
All or some keys on the
keyboard do not work.
Action
Do the following:
1. Verify that the keyboard cable is properly connected to the system
and that the system and the monitor are turned on.
2. Attach another keyboard to the keyboard connector.
If the problem persists, have the system serviced.
The mouse or pointing
device does not work.
Do the following:
1. Verify that the mouse or pointing-device cable is securely connected.
2. Verify that the device drivers are installed correctly.
3. Attach another mouse or pointing device to the pointing-device port.
Note: The pointing-device port is also known as the auxiliary-device port
or mouse port.
If the problem recurs, have the system and the device serviced.
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
119
Troubleshooting
Memory Problems
Action
The amount of memory
displayed is less than the
amount of memory
installed.
Verify that:
1. The memory modules and memory boards are seated properly.
2. You have installed the correct type of memory (see “Installing
Memory-Module Kits” on page 46).
3. If you changed the memory, you updated the memory configuration
with the Configuration/Setup Utility program. For information about
updating the configuration, see “Using the Configuration/Setup Utility
Main Menu” on page 18.
If the above items are correct, run the memory diagnostic program.
The system might have detected a bad memory module and
automatically reallocated memory to enable you to continue to
operate. If the memory tests fail, have the system serviced or replace
the failing DIMM.
Option Problems
Action
An IBM option that was
just installed does not
work.
Verify that:
1. The option is designed for your server. For a list of supported
options, refer to http://www.pc.ibm.com/us/compat/ on the World Wide
Web.
2. You followed the installation instructions that were supplied with the
option.
3. The option is installed correctly.
4. You have not loosened any other installed options or cables.
5. You updated the configuration information. Whenever you change the
memory or an option, you must update the configuration by running
the Configuration/Setup Utility program (see “Using the
Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu” on page 18).
If all of the above items are correct, start the diagnostic programs. If the
diagnostic programs find no problem, have the system and the option
serviced.
An IBM option that used
to work does not work
now.
Verify that all of the option hardware and cable connections are secure.
If the option comes with its own test instructions, use those instructions to
test the option.
If the items above are correct and the test programs found no problem,
have the system and the option serviced.
If the failing option is a SCSI option, verify that:
1. The cables for all external SCSI options are connected correctly.
2. The last option in each SCSI chain, or the end of the SCSI cable, is
terminated correctly. (See “Termination” on page 60 for more
information on SCSI termination.)
3. All external SCSI options are turned on. External SCSI options must
be turned on before the system is turned on.
If the problem recurs, have the system serviced.
Parallel Port Problems
Action
The number of parallel
ports displayed is less
than the number of
parallel ports installed.
Verify that:
1. Each port is assigned a unique address.
2. The parallel-port adapter, if you installed one, is seated properly.
If the items above are correct, have the system serviced.
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Troubleshooting
Serial Port Problems
Action
The number of serial
ports displayed is less
than the number of serial
ports installed.
Verify that:
1. Each port is assigned a unique address.
2. The serial-port adapter, if you installed one, is seated properly.
If the items above are correct, have the system serviced.
Universal Serial Bus
(USB) Port Problems
The number of serial
buses displayed is less
than the number of serial
buses installed.
Action
Verify that:
1. Each bus is assigned a unique address.
2. The serial-port adapter, if you installed one, is seated properly.
If the items above are correct, have the system serviced.
A USB device does not
work.
Verify that:
1. You are not trying to use a USB device during POST if you have a
standard (non-USB) keyboard attached to the keyboard port.
Note: If a standard (non-USB) keyboard is attached to the keyboard
port, then the USB is disabled and no USB device will work
during POST.
2. The correct USB device driver is installed.
If the problem still persists, have the system serviced.
Printer Problems
Action
The printer does not
work.
Verify that:
1. The printer is turned on and is online.
2. The printer signal cable is connected to the correct serial or parallel
port on the system. (For the location of the serial and parallel ports,
see “Input/Output Connectors and Expansion Slots” on page 9.)
Note: Non-IBM printer cables might cause unpredictable problems.
3. You have assigned the printer port correctly in your operating system
or application program.
4. You have assigned the printer port correctly using the
Configuration/Setup Utility program.
If the items above are correct and the printer still does not work, run the
tests described in the manual that comes with your printer. If the tests
show the printer is OK, have the system serviced.
Expansion Enclosure
Problems
The SCSI expansion
enclosure used to work,
but does not now work.
Action
Verify that all of the SCSI expansion enclosure hardware and cable
connections are secure.
Verify that:
1. The cables for all external SCSI options are connected correctly.
2. The last option in each SCSI chain, or the end of the SCSI cable, is
terminated correctly. (See “Termination” on page 60 for more
information on SCSI termination.)
3. Any external SCSI option is turned on. You must turn on an external
SCSI option before turning on the server.
For more information, see your SCSI and expansion enclosure
documentation.
If the SCSI expansion enclosure comes with its own test instructions, use
those instructions to test it. In addition, test the power supply.
If the items above are correct and the test programs found no problem,
have the server and SCSI expansion enclosure serviced.
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
121
SCSI Messages
Software Problem
Action
Suspected software
problem
To determine if problems are caused by the software, verify that:
1. Your system has the minimum memory requirements needed to use
the software. Refer to the information supplied with the software to
verify memory requirements.
Note: If you have just installed an adapter or memory, you might
have a memory address conflict (see “Resolving Configuration
Conflicts” on page 26).
2. The software is designed to operate on your system.
3. Other software works on your system.
4. The software you are using works on another system.
If you received any error messages when using the software program,
refer to the information supplied with the software for a description of the
messages and solutions to the problem.
If the items above are correct and the problem remains, contact your
place of purchase or service technician for help.
Advanced System
Management PCI
Adapter Problems
Action
The Advanced System
Management PCI
Adapter is not working
properly
Disconnect the server from all electrical sources, wait for 30 seconds, and
reconnect the server to the electrical sources. If the Processor Error LED
(CR2 top) lights continuously, have your system serviced. (See
“Advanced System Management PCI Adapter Component Locations” on
page 149 for the location of the Processor Error LED.)
SCSI Messages
The following table lists messages that reflect problems with the SCSI controller or
a SCSI device.
Note: If your server does not have a hard disk drive, ignore any message that
indicates that the BIOS is not installed.
You will get these messages only when running the SCSISelect Utility. For more
information, see the documentation that comes with the SCSISelect Utility.
SCSI Messages
Description
All
One or more of the following might be causing the problem.
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
A failing SCSI device (adapter, drive, controller)
An improper SCSI configuration
Duplicate SCSI IDs in the same SCSI chain
An improperly installed SCSI terminator
A defective SCSI terminator
An improperly installed cable
A defective cable
Action:
Verify that:
Ÿ The external SCSI devices are turned on. External SCSI devices
must be turned on before the system.
Ÿ The cables for all external SCSI devices are connected correctly.
Ÿ The last device in each SCSI chain is terminated correctly. (See
“SCSI Drives” on page 59 for more SCSI chain information.)
Ÿ The SCSI devices are configured correctly.
If the above are correct, run the diagnostic programs for additional information
about the failing device. If the error recurs, have the system serviced.
122
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Identifying Problems through Status Indicators
Resolving Configuration Conflicts
The Configuration/Setup Utility program configures only the server hardware. It
does not consider the requirements of the operating system or the application
programs. For these reasons, memory-address configuration conflicts might occur.
Changing the Software Configuration Setup
The best way to resolve memory-address conflicts is to change the software
configuration by changing the addresses that the EMS device driver defined. The
SVGA video memory occupies 32 Kb
(1 Kb = approximately 1000 bits) of space in the hex C0000 to C7FFF EMS
memory area. EMS device drivers must use addresses different from those
assigned to video read-only memory (ROM). You can use the Configuration/Setup
Utility program to view or change the current setting for video ROM. For
information about using the Configuration/Setup Utility program, see “Using the
Configuration/Setup Utility Main Menu” on page 18.
Changing the Hardware Configuration Setup
An alternative way to resolve memory-address conflicts is to change the address of
the conflicting hardware option.
Identifying Problems through Status Indicators
Your server has status indicators to help you identify problems with some server
components. Status indicators are located on the following components:
Ÿ Hard disk drive trays
For more information, see “Controls and Indicators” on page 6.
Ÿ Power supplies
For more information, see “Power Supply LEDs” on page 124.
Ÿ I/O board
For more information, see “Installing a Hot-Plug PCI Adapter” on page 52.
Ÿ Front panel
For more information, see “Information LED Panel” on page 8.
Ÿ Rear panel
For more information, see “Input/Output Connectors and Expansion Slots” on
page 9.
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
123
Identifying Problems through Status Indicators
Power Supply LEDs
The AC and DC Power LEDs on the power supplies provide status information
about the power supplies. See “Power Supplies” on page 11 for the location of the
LEDs.
The following table describes the AC and DC Power LEDs.
AC Power LED
DC Power LED
Description and Action
On
On
The power supply is on and operating
correctly.
On
Off
There is a DC power problem.
Possible causes:
1. The Power Control button on the
front of the server is in the Off
position (the DC Power LEDs on
all the power supplies are off).
Action: Press the Power Control
button to start the server.
2. The Power switch on the power
supply is in the Off position.
Action: Turn the Power switch to
the On position.
3. The power supply has failed (the
DC Power LED on at least one of
the power supplies is on).
Action: Replace the power
supply.
If the problem persists, have the
system serviced.
Off
Off
There is an AC power problem.
Possible causes:
1. There is no AC power to the
power supply.
Action: Verify that:
Ÿ The power cord is properly
connected to the server.
Ÿ The power outlet functions
properly.
2. The power supply has failed.
Action: Replace the power
supply.
If the problem persists, have the
system serviced.
124
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Identifying Problems through Status Indicators
System Component Status Indicators
Status indicators on the I/O board, processor board, memory board, and the
Advanced System Management PCI Adapter can help identify problems. The
indicators are lit during POST to ensure the indicators operate. After POST
completes, the indicators show the status of the component.
For the location of the status indicators, see “Processor Board Component
Locations” on page 145, “Memory Board Component Locations” on page 150, “I/O
Board Component Locations” on page 144, and “Advanced System Management
PCI Adapter Component Locations” on page 149.
Processor Board LEDs
Indicator
Description
Microprocessor
Bus Activity
LED
If activity on the microprocessor bus is present, the indicator for the slot is lit.
Microprocessor
VRM Status
LED
If a microprocessor voltage regulator module (VRM) is present and has failed,
the indicator for the slot is lit.
Microprocessor
Termination
LED
If proper termination of the microprocessor slots is present, the indicator is lit.
ERR 0 and
ERR 1 LEDs
Reserved.
Memory Board LED
Indicator
Description
Memory Module
Status LED
If a memory module is present and has failed, the indicator for the slot is lit.
I/O Board LEDs
Indicator
Description
Power On LED
If power to a PCI slot is present, the indicator for the slot is lit.
Attention LED
Your operating system defines the meaning of this indicator. Refer to your
operating system documentation for more information.
Advanced System Management PCI Adapter LEDs
Indicator
Description
Power On LED
If power to the Advanced System Management PCI Adapter is present, the
indicator is lit.
Processor Error
LED
If the processor on the Advanced System Management PCI Adapter has
failed, the indicator is lit.
Ethernet Activity
LED
If the Ethernet controller on the Advanced System Management PCI Adapter
is transmitting data or receiving data, the indicator is lit.
Ethernet Link
LED
If an active link to the Ethernet controller on the Advanced System
Management PCI Adapter is present, the indicator is lit.
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
125
Checking the System for Damage
Checking the System for Damage
This section provides instructions on what to do if your server might be damaged.
After Dropping It
Look for loose cables and obvious damage. If any cables are loose, reconnect
them securely. If there is obvious damage to the server, have it serviced.
If you see no damage, turn on the server. If it works correctly, the server probably
did not suffer any damage.
Attention: Observe all electrostatic precautions listed in this book to avoid
damage to your server.
If the server does not work correctly, turn it off and check the adapters and memory
modules to ensure that they are connected correctly. Go to “Electrical Safety” on
page 33 and follow the instructions for opening your server; then, reseat all
adapters and memory modules.
If the server still does not work correctly, run the diagnostic tests from diagnostic
utility menu. For information about running tests, see “Running Diagnostic
Programs” on page 94.
After Spilling Liquid on It
If liquid gets on the keyboard:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Turn off the server.
Unplug the keyboard from the back of the server.
Turn the keyboard upside down to drain excess liquid.
Dry off the keyboard with a lint-free cloth.
After the keyboard is completely dry, plug it in and turn on the server. If it does not
work correctly, have the keyboard serviced.
If liquid gets inside the monitor:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Turn off the monitor.
Turn off the server.
Unplug the monitor from the server and the electrical outlet.
Have the monitor serviced immediately.
If liquid gets inside the server:
1. Turn off the server and all attached devices.
2. Unplug the server from the electrical outlet and all attached devices.
3. Have the server serviced immediately.
126
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Replacing the Battery
Replacing the Battery
IBM has designed this product with your safety in mind. The lithium battery must
be handled correctly to avoid possible danger. If you replace the battery, you must
adhere to the following instructions.
2
CAUTION:
When replacing the battery, use only IBM Part Number 33F8354 or an
equivalent type battery recommended by the manufacturer. If your
system has a module containing a lithium battery, replace it only with
the same module type made by the same manufacturer. The battery
contains lithium and can explode if not properly used, handled, or
disposed of.
Do not:
– Throw or immerse into water
– Heat to more than 100°C (212°F)
– Repair or disassemble
Dispose of the battery as required by local ordinances or regulations.
Note: In the U.S., please call 1-800-IBM-4333 for information about battery
disposal.
If you replace the original lithium battery with a heavy-metal battery or a battery
with heavy-metal components, be aware of the following environmental
consideration. Batteries and accumulators that contain heavy metals must not be
disposed of with normal domestic waste. They will be taken back free of charge by
the manufacturer, distributor, or representative, to be recycled or disposed of in a
proper manner.
To order replacement batteries, call 1-800-388-7080 within the United States, and
1-800-465-7999 or 1-800-465-6666 within Canada. Outside the U.S. and Canada,
call your IBM reseller or IBM marketing representative.
Before you begin, be sure you have:
Ÿ Read “Electrical Safety” on page 33 and “Handling Static-Sensitive Devices”
on page 34.
Ÿ Followed any special handling and installation instructions supplied with the
replacement battery.
Note: After you replace the battery, you must reconfigure your server and reset
the system date and time.
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
127
Replacing the Battery
To replace the battery:
1. Turn off the server and peripheral devices and disconnect all external cables
and power cords (see “Preparing to Install Options” on page 37); then remove
the top cover (see “Removing the Top Cover” on page 39).
2. Remove the I/O function card from the server:
a. Refer to the following illustration while you perform the steps in this
procedure.
b. Disconnect the cables .1/ from the I/O function card .2/. Note carefully
where each cable is connected before you remove it.
c. Remove the two screws .2/ located on the metal connector plate inside the
server.
d. Carefully grasp the I/O function card by its top edge and pull the I/O
function card out of the server.
e. Place the I/O function card connector-side up on a flat, static-protective
surface.
3. Locate the battery on the I/O function card (see “I/O Function Card Component
Locations” on page 147).
128
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Replacing the Battery
4. Remove the battery:
a. Use one finger to lift the battery clip over the battery.
b. Use one finger to slightly slide the battery toward the rear of the I/O
function card. The spring mechanism behind the battery will push it out
toward you as you slide it forward.
c. Use your thumb and index finger to pull the battery from under the battery
clip.
d. Ensure that the battery clip is touching the base of the battery socket by
pressing gently on the clip.
5. Insert the new battery:
a. Tilt the battery so that you can insert it into the front of the socket, under
the battery clip.
b. As you slide it under the battery clip, press the battery down into the
socket.
6. Install the I/O function card:
a. Carefully grasp the I/O function card by its top edge, and insert the tabs
.3/ on the bottom edge of the metal connector plate in the matching
openings on the server back panel.
b. Align the I/O function card with the guide on the opposite end of the
adapter and the slot on the I/O board.
c. Press the I/O function card firmly into the slot.
Attention: When you install the I/O function card in the server, be sure
that it is completely and correctly seated. Incomplete insertion might cause
damage to server components.
d. Insert the two screws you removed in step 2c on page 128.
e. Connect the cables you disconnected in step 2b on page 128.
Chapter 6. Solving Problems
129
Replacing the Battery
7. Reinstall the top cover and complete the installation (see “Completing the
Installation” on page 69).
Note: You will have to wait approximately 20 seconds after you plug the
power cord of your server into an electrical outlet for the Power Control
button to become active.
8. Start the Configuration/Setup Utility program and reset configuration parameters
as needed.
Ÿ To reset the system date and time, go to “Date and Time” on page 20.
Ÿ To reset the power-on password, go to “Using the Power-On Password
Menu” on page 21.
Ÿ To reconfigure your server, follow the instructions given in “The
Configuration/Setup Utility Program” on page 17 (all models).
130
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Server Records and Specifications
Chapter 7. Server Records and Specifications
Whenever you add options to your server, be sure to update the information in this
chapter. Accurate, up-to-date records make it easier to add other options and, if
the need should arise, to report a hardware problem.
In addition to server records, this chapter contains specifications. These
specifications include product dimensions, environmental operating requirements,
component layouts, and jumper settings.
This chapter contains:
Record the Identification Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installed Device Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Jumper Positions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O Board Component Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Processor Board Component Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Processor Board Jumpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O Function Card Component Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O Function Card Jumpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Advanced System Management PCI Adapter Component Locations
Advanced System Management PCI Adapter Jumper . . . . . . . .
Memory Board Component Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SCSI Backplane Component Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SCSI Backplane Option Jumpers
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . .
132
132
139
140
144
145
146
147
148
149
149
150
151
152
131
Device Records
Record the Identification Numbers
Record and retain the following information.
Table 12. IBM Netfinity 7000 M10 Identification Numbers
Product Name
IBM Netfinity 7000 M10
Machine Type
8680
Model
Serial Number
Key Serial Number
The server serial number and other identification numbers are located on a label at
the front of the server behind the front bezel.
Installed Device Records
Use the following tables to keep a record of the options installed in, or attached to,
your system. You can also record your system default configuration settings. This
information can be helpful when you install additional options in your server or if
you ever need to have your server serviced. Copy these tables before recording
information in them, in case you need extra space to write new values later, when
you update your system configuration.
Note: If necessary, you can also refer to the board layouts contained in this
chapter.
132
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Device Records
Table 13. Internal Drives and Devices
Location
Drive or Device Description
Diskette Drive Bay
CD-ROM Drive Bay
Bay 1
Bay 2
Bay 3
Bay 4
Table 14. External Drives and Devices
SCSI ID
Drive or Device Description
Chapter 7. Server Records and Specifications
133
Device Records
Table 15 (Page 1 of 4). Configuration/Setup Utility Program Defaults and Changes
Option
System Summary
Processor 11
Processor 21
Processor 31
Processor 41
Processor Speed
Math Coprocessor
System Memory
Processor 1 Cache Size
Processor 2 Cache Size
Processor 3 Cache Size
Processor 4 Cache Size
System ROM
Diskette Drive A
Primary Master Device
Mouse
1 All microprocessors must have the
System Memory Type
System Information
Product Data
Machine Type/Model
Flash EEPROM Revision Level
System Board Identifier
System Serial Number
BIOS Date
BIOS Revision Number
SP ROM Date
SP ROM Revision Level
Diagnostics Revision Level
Diagnostics Date
Diagnostics Version
ServeRAID BIOS Version
Change VPD Machine/Model
Type
System Card Data
Model
Submodel
System Serial
Planar
FRU Number
Unique Number
Mfg ID
Processor
FRU Number
Unique Number
Mfg ID
DASD Backplane
FRU Number
Unique Number
Mfg ID
Power Backplane
FRU Number
Unique Number
Mfg ID
134
Default Value
New Value
Intel Pentium II Xeon
Internal
F000h — FFFFh
1.44 MB 3.5-inch diskette drive
[ CD-ROM ]
[ Installed ]
same cache size and type, and the same clock speed.
[ EDO RAM ]
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Additional Information
Device Records
Table 15 (Page 2 of 4). Configuration/Setup Utility Program Defaults and Changes
Option
Power Supply #1
FRU Number
Unique Number
Mfg ID
Power Supply #2
FRU Number
Unique Number
Mfg ID
Devices and I/O Ports
Serial Port A
Serial Port B
Parallel Port
Parallel Port Mode
Parallel Port IRQ
Parallel Port DMA
Mouse
Diskette Controller
Diskette Drive A
Video
Video Controller
Video Memory
Primary IDE Channel
Primary Master Device
Device Type
Size
Transfer Selection
Transfer Mode
LBA Mode
System Security
Power-On Password
Allow for Unattended
Boot with Password
Administrator Password
Power-on Password
Changeable by User
Start Options
Keyboard NumLock State
Keyboard Speed
Disketteless Operation
Displayless Operation
Keyboardless Operation Mode
First Startup Device
Second Startup Device
Third Startup Device
Fourth Startup Device
Power On Self Test
Virus Detection2
2The Virus Detection test checks for
Default Value
New Value
Additional Information
[ Port 3F8, IRQ 4 ]
[ Port 2F8, IRQ 3 ]
[ Port 378 ]
[ Standard ]
[ IRQ 7 ]
None
[ Installed ]
[ Enabled ]
1.44 MB 3.5-inch
S3 Incorporated
1024 KB
[ Enabled ]
[
[
[
[
[
CD-ROM ]
650 MB ]
Autoconfigure ]
PIO Mode 3 ]
Supported ]
[ On ]
[ No ]
[ On ]
[ Fast ]
[ Disabled ]
[ Disabled ]
[ Disabled ]
[ CD-ROM ]
[ Diskette Drive 0 ]
[ Disabled ]
[ Disabled ]
[ Quick ]
[ Disabled ]
changes to the boot sector.
Chapter 7. Server Records and Specifications
135
Device Records
Table 15 (Page 3 of 4). Configuration/Setup Utility Program Defaults and Changes
Option
Default Value
New Value
Additional Information
Advanced Setup
ACPI Control
ACPI BIOS
[ Enabled ]
ACPI Hardware Signature
[ Auto-configure ]
Cache Control
Processor Cache Type
[ Write-Back ]
Processor 1 Cache State
[ Enabled ]
Processor 1 Cache Size
512 KB
Processor 2 Cache State
[ Enabled ]
Processor 2 Cache Size
0 KB
Processor 3 Cache State
[ Enabled ]
Processor 3 Cache Size
0 KB
Processor 4 Cache State
[ Enabled ]
Processor 4 Cache Size
0 KB
PCI Slot/Device Information3
Slot 00
Latency Timer
IO Decode
Memory Decode
Bus Decode
Slot 01
Latency Timer
IO Decode
Memory Decode
Bus Decode
Slot 02
Latency Timer
IO Decode
Memory Decode
Bus Decode
Slot 03
Latency Timer
IO Decode
Memory Decode
Bus Decode
Slot 04
Latency Timer
IO Decode
Memory Decode
Bus Decode
Slot 05
Latency Timer
IO Decode
Memory Decode
Bus Decode
Slot 06
Latency Timer
IO Decode
Memory Decode
Bus Decode
Slot 07
Latency Timer
IO Decode
Memory Decode
Bus Decode
3 Before setting values, review “Resolving Configuration Conflicts” on page 26 and follow the instructions for avoiding
configuration conflicts.
136
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Device Records
Table 15 (Page 4 of 4). Configuration/Setup Utility Program Defaults and Changes
Option
Default Value
New Value
Additional Information
Slot 08
Latency Timer
IO Decode
Memory Decode
Bus Decode
Slot 09
Latency Timer
IO Decode
Memory Decode
Bus Decode
Slot 10
Latency Timer
IO Decode
Memory Decode
Bus Decode
Slot 11
Latency Timer
IO Decode
Memory Decode
Bus Decode
Slot 12
Latency Timer
IO Decode
Memory Decode
Bus Decode
Memory Settings
Card1: Bank1
[ Bank Is Enabled ]
Card1: Bank2
[ Bank Is Enabled ]
Card1: Bank3
[ Bank Is Enabled ]
Card1: Bank4
[ Bank Is Enabled ]
Card2: Bank14
[ Bank Is Enabled ]
Card2: Bank24
[ Bank Is Enabled ]
Card2: Bank34
[ Bank Is Enabled ]
Card2: Bank44
[ Bank Is Enabled ]
4 Available only with an optional memory board installed.
MPS Version
[ 1.4 ]
Chapter 7. Server Records and Specifications
137
Device Records
Record the system memory (DIMMs) installed in your server in the following table.
Table 16. System Memory
Memory Connector
DIMM Kit Size
Bank 1 (J4, J8, J12, J16)
32 MB Ø 64 MB Ø 128 MB Ø 256 MB Ø
Bank 2 (J3, J7, J11, J15)
32 MB Ø 64 MB Ø 128 MB Ø 256 MB Ø
Bank 3 (J2, J6, J10, J14)
32 MB Ø 64 MB Ø 128 MB Ø 256 MB Ø
Bank 4 (J1, J5, J9, J13)
32 MB Ø 64 MB Ø 128 MB Ø 256 MB Ø
Bank 5 (J4, J8, J12, J16)1
32 MB Ø 64 MB Ø 128 MB Ø 256 MB Ø
Bank 6 (J3, J7, J11, J15)1
32 MB Ø 64 MB Ø 128 MB Ø 256 MB Ø
Bank 7 (J2, J6, J10, J14)1
32 MB Ø 64 MB Ø 128 MB Ø 256 MB Ø
Bank 8 (J1, J5, J9, J13)1
32 MB Ø 64 MB Ø 128 MB Ø 256 MB Ø
Total Memory
1 Available only with an optional memory board installed.
138
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Additional Information
Specifications
The following table contains the specifications for the Netfinity 7000 M10.
Size
Environment
Ÿ Depth: 650 mm (25.6 in.)
Ÿ Height: 489 mm (19.25 in.)
(11 U)
Ÿ Width: 440 mm (17.3 in.)
Weight
Ÿ Unpacked, minimum configuration:
39 kg (85 lb.)
Ÿ Unpacked, maximum configuration:
70.31 kg (155 lb.)
Electrical Input
Ÿ Sine-wave input (50± or 60± Hz)
is required
Ÿ Input voltage
– Low range
- Minimum: 90 V ac
- Maximum: 137 V ac
– High range
- Minimum: 180 V ac
- Maximum: 265 V ac
– Input kilovolt-amperes (KVA)
approximately
- Minimum configuration as
shipped: 0.2 KVA
- Maximum configuration:
0.78 KVA
Acoustical Noise Emissions Values
Ÿ Air temperature
– System on: 10° to 35° C
(50° to 95° F)
Altitude: 0 to 914 m (3000 ft.)
– System on: 10° to 32° C
(50° to 89.6° F)
Altitude: 914 m (3000 ft.) to
2133 m (7000 ft.)
– System off: 10° to 43° C
(50° to 110° F)
Maximum altitude: 2133 m
(7000 ft.)
Ÿ Humidity
– System off:
8% to 80%; maximum wetbulb
27° C (80.6° F)
Ÿ Altitude: 0 to 2133 m (0 to 7000
ft.)
Ÿ Tested to 20 KV
Immunity
These levels are measured in
controlled acoustical environments
according to the American National
Standards Institute (ANSI) procedure
S12.10 and ISO 7779, and are
reported in accordance with ISO 9296.
The declared sound power levels
indicate an upper limit, below which a
large portion of machines operate.
Heat Output
– System on:
8% to 80%; maximum wetbulb
23° C (73.4° F)
Electrostatic Discharge
Ÿ Declared (upper limit) sound power
levels:
– 6.5 bels operating
– 6.5 bels idle
Ÿ Approximate heat output in
British thermal units (Btu) per hour:
– Minimum configuration: 1024
Btu
– Maximum configuration: 2662
Btu
Safety Standards
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
UL 1950
CSA C22.2 No. 950-M93
EN 60950 and countries deviations
IEC 950
NOM-019
Ÿ Verified to comply with
EN 50082-2
Chapter 7. Server Records and Specifications
139
Changing Jumper Positions
Changing Jumper Positions
Jumpers located on the I/O function card and processor board help you to
customize the way your server operates.
Your I/O function card and processor board contain two-pin and three-pin jumper
blocks. In some cases, groups of jumpers might combine to define a function.
Before you begin:
Read “Electrical Safety” on page 33 and “Handling Static-Sensitive Devices” on
page 34.
To change a jumper position:
1. Remove the server top cover or front access cover, depending on the location
of the jumper (see “Preparing to Install Options” on page 37).
2. If the jumper is located on the I/O function card, remove the I/O function card
from the server:
a. Refer to the following illustration while you perform the steps in this
procedure.
b. Disconnect the cables .1/ from the I/O function card .2/. Note carefully
where each cable is connected before you remove it.
c. Remove the two screws .4/ located on the metal connector plate inside the
server.
d. Carefully grasp the I/O function card by its top edge and pull the I/O
function card out of the server.
e. Place the I/O function card connector-side up on a flat, static-protective
surface.
140
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Changing Jumper Positions
3. Locate the jumper:
Ÿ To change a two-pin jumper block, go to “Two-Pin Jumper Blocks.”
Ÿ To change a three-pin jumper block, go to “Three-Pin Jumper Blocks” on
page 142.
Two-Pin Jumper Blocks
Covering both pins with a jumper defines one function of the jumper block. To
change the function of the jumper block, cover one pin only or remove the jumper
entirely.
The following illustration identifies pins 1 and 2 on a two-pin jumper block.
2
1
To change the jumper position on a two-pin jumper block:
1. Lift the jumper straight off the block and then do one of the following:
Ÿ Align the holes in the bottom of the jumper with the two pins on the pin
block, and then slide the jumper carefully onto these pins.
Ÿ Align one of the holes in the bottom of the jumper with one of the pins on
the pin block, and then slide the jumper carefully onto that pin only.
Chapter 7. Server Records and Specifications
141
Changing Jumper Positions
2. If you removed the I/O function card, install it:
a. Refer to the illustration in step 2a on page 140 while you perform the steps
in this procedure.
b. Carefully grasp the I/O function card by its top edge, and insert the tabs
.3/ on the bottom edge of the metal connector plate into the matching
openings on the server back panel.
c. Align the I/O function card with the guide on the opposite end of the
adapter and the slot on the I/O board.
d. Press the I/O function card firmly into the slot.
Attention: When you install the I/O function card in the server, be sure
that it is completely and correctly seated. Incomplete insertion might cause
damage to server components.
e. Insert the two screws you removed in step 2c on page 140.
f. Connect the cables you disconnected in step 2b on page 140.
3. Reinstall the server top cover or front access cover and connect the cables
(see “Completing the Installation” on page 69).
Three-Pin Jumper Blocks
With the three-pin jumper blocks, each jumper covers two of the three pins on a pin
block. You can position the jumper to fit over the center pin and either of the other
two pins.
The following illustration identifies pins 1, 2, and 3 on a three-pin jumper block:
3
2
1
To change the jumper position on a three-pin jumper block:
1. Lift the jumper straight off the pin block.
2. Align the holes in the bottom of the jumper with the center pin and the pin that
was not covered previously.
3. Slide the jumper fully onto these pins.
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Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Changing Jumper Positions
4. If you removed the I/O function card, install it:
a. Refer to the illustration in step 2a on page 140 while you perform the steps
in this procedure.
b. Carefully grasp the I/O function card by its top edge, and insert the tabs
.3/ on the bottom edge of the metal connector plate into the matching
openings on the back panel.
c. Align the I/O function card with the guide on the opposite end of the
adapter and the slot on the I/O board.
d. Press the I/O function card firmly into the slot.
Attention: When you install the I/O function card in the server, be sure
that it is completely and correctly seated. Incomplete insertion might cause
damage to server components.
e. Insert the two screws you removed in step 2c on page 140.
f. Connect the cables you disconnected in step 2b on page 140.
5. Reinstall the server top cover or front access cover and connect the cables
(see “Completing the Installation” on page 69).
Chapter 7. Server Records and Specifications
143
I/O Board Component Locations
A simplified layout of the I/O board is shown in the following illustration.
.1/ IDE connector
.2/ System-management adapter slot
.3/ USB 1 and USB 2 port connectors
.4/ I/O function card slot
.5/ Hot-plug 32-bit PCI slots 11–12 (bus C)
.6/ Hot-plug 32-bit PCI slots 6–10 (bus B)
.7/ Hot-plug 64-bit PCI slots 1–5 (bus A)
.8/ Attention LED for PCI slot
.9/ Attention LED for PCI slot
.1ð/ Power LED for PCI slot
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Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Processor Board Component Locations
A simplified layout of the processor board is shown in the following illustration.
.1/ Memory board slot 1 connector (primary slot)
.2/ Memory board slot 2 connector (secondary slot)
.3/ Microprocessor core frequency selection jumper block (J43–J46)
.4/ ERR 0 and ERR 1 LEDs
.5/ Microprocessor voltage-regulator connectors for microprocessor 4
.6/ Microprocessor voltage-regulator connectors for microprocessor 3
.7/ Microprocessor termination LED
.8/ Microprocessor voltage-regulator connectors for microprocessor 2
.9/ Microprocessor voltage-regulator connectors for microprocessor 1
.1ð/ Microprocessor voltage-regulator LEDs
.11/ Microprocessor bus activity LED for microprocessor 4
.12/ Microprocessor bus activity LED for microprocessor 3
.13/ Microprocessor bus activity LED for microprocessor 2
.14/ Microprocessor bus activity LED for microprocessor 1
.15/ Power backplane connector
.16/ Microprocessor 1 socket
.17/ Microprocessor 2 socket
.18/ Microprocessor 3 socket
.19/ Microprocessor 4 socket
.2ð/ I/O board connector
Chapter 7. Server Records and Specifications
145
Processor Board Jumpers
Processor Board Jumpers
Table 17 describes the jumpers on the processor board. The highlighted numbers
in the table correspond to the highlighted numbers on the illustration in “Processor
Board Component Locations” on page 145.
Notes:
1. Turn off the server, and disconnect the power cord before moving any jumpers.
2. Be sure the microprocessor bus-to-core ratio is set correctly. For example, if
you have a 450 MHz microprocessor installed and the system bus speed is 100
MHz (the default), be sure that the jumpers are set to a bus-to-core ratio of 4.5
(450/100). Refer to jumpers J43–J46 in Table 17.
3. Be sure to set the Microprocessor Core Frequency Selection jumper block for
the slowest speed microprocessor installed in your server. For example, if your
server has a 400 MHz microprocessor installed and you install three 450 MHz
microprocessors, set the Microprocessor Core Frequency Selection jumper
block for the 400 MHz microprocessor.
MHz denotes internal clock speed of the microprocessor only; other factors also
affect application performance.
Attention: If the microprocessor bus-to-core ratio is incorrect, board components
will overheat and component damage might occur. Be sure that the
microprocessor bus-to-core ratio jumper is properly set.
Table 17. Processor Board Jumpers
Jumper Name
Description
.3/ Microprocessor core
frequency selection (J43–J46)
The default core/bus fraction is 4.0 (400/100 MHz). Jumpers are
installed on pins 1 and 2 of J43 and J46, and jumpers are
installed on pins 2 and 3 of J44 and J45.
For the core/bus fraction 4.5 (450/100 MHz), the jumpers are
installed on J44, J45, and J46, and a jumper is installed on pins
2 and 3 of J43.
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Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
I/O Function Card Component Locations
The following simplified layout of the I/O function card identifies the components.
.1/ External SCSI connector (channel A)
.2/ Battery
.3/ Internal SCSI connector (channel B)
.4/ Operator panel connector
.5/ Diskette drive connector
.6/ Password override jumper (J17)
.7/ Flash page swap jumper (J16)
.8/ Parallel port connector
.9/ Video port connector (The video port connector is behind the parallel port
connector)
.1ð/ Serial port A and B connectors
.11/ Keyboard and mouse connectors (The keyboard connector is behind the
mouse connector)
.12/ Advanced System Management PCI Adapter connector
Chapter 7. Server Records and Specifications
147
I/O Function Card Jumpers
I/O Function Card Jumpers
Table 18 describes the jumpers on the I/O function card. The highlighted numbers
in the table correspond to the highlighted numbers on the illustration in “I/O
Function Card Component Locations” on page 147.
Note: Turn off the server, and disconnect the power cord before moving any
jumpers.
Table 18. I/O Board Jumpers
Jumper Name
Description
.6/ J17 Power on password
override
Changing the position of this jumper bypasses the power-on
password check. You do not need to move the jumper back to
the default position after the password is overridden.
Changing the position of this jumper does not affect the
administrator password check if an administrator password is
set.
.7/ J16 Flash page swap
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Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
The default position is a jumper installed on pins 2 and 3.
Changing the position of this jumper will change which of the two
pages of flash ROM is used when the system is started.
Advanced System Management PCI Adapter Jumper
Advanced System Management PCI Adapter Component Locations
The following simplified layout of the Advanced System Management PCI Adapter
identifies the components.
.1/ 10/100 Ethernet port connector
.2/ Dual serial port connector
.3/ RS 485 bus connector
.4/ External power supply connector
.5/ PCMCIA token ring connector
.6/ Power on LED (CR2 bottom)
.7/ Processor error LED (CR2 top)
.8/ Ethernet activity LED (CR3 bottom)
.9/ Ethernet link LED (CR3 top)
.1ð/ I/O function card connector
.11/ Reserved J9
Advanced System Management PCI Adapter Jumper
Table 19 describes the jumper on the Advanced System Management PCI
Adapter. The highlighted number in the table corresponds to the highlighted
number on the illustration in “Advanced System Management PCI Adapter
Component Locations.”
Note: Turn off the server, and disconnect the power cord before moving any
jumpers.
Table 19. Advanced System Management PCI Adapter Jumper
Jumper Name
Description
.11/
J9 Reserved
Chapter 7. Server Records and Specifications
149
Memory Board Component Locations
The following simplified layout of the memory board identifies the components.
.1/ DIMM error LEDs
.2/ DIMM connectors
.3/ Processor board connector
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Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
SCSI Backplane Component Locations
The following simplified layout of the SCSI backplane identifies the components.
Refer to this figure when you set the jumpers on the backplane.
.1/
.2/
.3/
.4/
.5/
Wide (16-bit) SCSI connector
Option jumper block (J10)
SCSI hot-swap drive connectors (on opposite side of backplane)
Repeater card connector
Power connector
Chapter 7. Server Records and Specifications
151
SCSI Backplane Option Jumpers
The option jumper block on the SCSI backplane defines the SCSI IDs for hot-swap
drives.
Table 20 summarizes the settings for the SCSI backplane option jumper block
(J10).
Table 20. Backplane Option Jumper Block
Pins
Description
1–2
Reserved.
3–4
Reserved
5–6
Placing a jumper on these two pins enables SCSI IDs 8–15.
7–8
Reserved.
9–10
Reserved.
11–12
Placing a jumper on these two pins reverses the SCSI IDs on the
backplane.
Note: The default is no jumpers installed on the J10 jumper block.
Table 21 shows the SCSI IDs that you can use for hot-swap drives.
Table 21. SCSI IDs for Hot-Swap Drives
J10 Pins
5–6
J10 Pins
11–12
Bay 1
Bay 2
Bay 3
Bay 4
No jumper1
No jumper1
0
1
2
3
No jumper
Jumper
5
4
3
2
Jumper
No jumper
13
12
11
10
Jumper2
Jumper2
-
-
-
-
Notes:
1. This is the default jumper setting.
2. This combination is not supported.
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Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Appendix A. I2O-Ready and S3 Video Modes
This appendix contains the I2O-ready statement, and information about
unsupported S3 video modes.
I2O-Ready Statement
The Netfinity 7000 M10 is intended to support I2O deep adapters as listed in the
ServerProven program. Refer to http://www.pc.ibm.com/us/compat/ on the World
Wide Web for information on the ServerProven program. A deep adapter is a PCI
card that has an embedded IOP (input/output processor). For the deep adapter to
function correctly, the following items are needed:
Ÿ An operating system vendor-provided OSM (operating system service module)
that supports the class of adapter (such as, storage) that is being installed in
the server.
Ÿ A PCI card vendor-provided HDM (hardware device module).
Unsupported S3 Video Modes
The S3 VGA BIOS does not directly support display modes hex 1F and hex 10 (15
and 16). When using DOS or an OS/2 DOS session in the modes, the last two
lines of text will be unviewable. The 8X14TSR.EXE program is available on the
Netfinity World Wide Web site to restore full visibility for DOS applications requiring
these modes.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
153
Glossary
This glossary includes terms and definitions from the
following publications.
The American National Dictionary for Information
Systems, ANSI X3.172-1990, copyright 1990 by the
American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Copies
may be purchased from the American National
Standards Institute, 11 West 42 Street, New York, NY
10036. Definitions are identified by the symbol (A).
application program. (1) A program that is specific to
the solution of an application problem. Synonymous
with application software. (T) (2) A program written for
or by a user that applies to the user's work, such as a
program that does inventory control or payroll. (3) A
program used to connect and communicate with
stations on a network, enabling users to perform
application-oriented activities.
architecture. See computer architecture.
The ANSI/EIA Standard 440-A: Fiber Optic
Terminology. Copies may be purchased from the
Electronic Industries Association, 2001 Pennsylvania
Avenue, N.W., Washington DC 20006. Definitions are
identified by the symbol (E).
The Information Technology Vocabulary, developed by
Subcommittee 1, Joint Technical Committee 1, of the
International Organization for Standardization and the
International Electrotechnical Commission (ISO/IEC
JTC1/SC1). These definitions are identified by the
symbol (I). Definitions from draft international
standards, committee drafts, and working papers being
developed by ISO/IEC JTC1/SC1 are identified by the
symbol (T), indicating that final agreement has not yet
been reached among the participating National Bodies
of SC1.
A
adapter. A printed circuit board that modifies the
system unit to allow it to operate in a particular way.
address. (1) A value that identifies a register or a
particular part of storage. The value is represented by
one or more characters. (2) The location in the storage
of a computer where data is stored. (3) To refer to a
specific storage location by specifying the value that
identifies the location.
analog. (1) Pertaining to data consisting of
continuously variable physical quantities. (T)
(2) Contrast with digital, discrete.
ANSI. American National Standards Institute. An
organization consisting of producers, consumers, and
general interest groups, that establishes the procedures
by which accredited organizations create and maintain
voluntary industry standards in the United States.
application. The use to which an information
processing system is put; for example, a payroll
application, an airline reservation application, a network
application.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
ASCII. American National Standard Code for
Information Interchange.
AWG. American Wire Gauge.
B
backplane. In personal computers, a printed circuit
board that sets the SCSI ID and termination for
hot-swap hard disk drives.
back up. To copy information, usually to diskette or
tape, for safekeeping.
backup. Pertaining to a system, device, file, or facility
that can be used in the event of a malfunction or loss of
data.
bank. An aggregation of similar devices, such as
single inline memory modules, connected to each other
and used cooperatively.
baud rate. In remote communications, the
transmission rate that is synonymous with signal events.
The baud rate is usually expressed in bits per second.
BBS. Bulletin board system.
BIOS (Basic Input/Output System). Code that
controls basic hardware operations such as interactions
with diskette drives, hard disk drives, and the keyboard.
bit. Either of the digits 0 or 1 when used in the binary
numeration system. Synonymous with binary digit. (T)
buffer. (1) A routine or storage used to compensate
for a difference in rate of flow of data, or time of
occurrence of events, when transferring data from one
device to another. (A) (2) A portion of storage used to
hold input or output data temporarily.
bus. One or more conductors used for transmitting
signals, data, or power. See also address bus and data
bus.
155
bus master. A device or subsystem that controls data
transfers between itself and a subordinate.
byte. A string that consists of a number of bits, usually
8, that are treated as a unit and represent a character.
cycle. (1) An interval of space or time in which one
set of events or phenomena is completed. (A) (2) A
complete vibration, electric oscillation, or alternation of
current.
D
C
DASD. Direct access storage device.
cable. The physical medium for transmitting signals; it
includes copper conductors and optical fibers.
cache. A buffer storage that contains frequently
accessed instructions and data; it is used to reduce
access time.
CD-ROM. Compact disc read only memory.
High-capacity read-only memory in the form of an
optically read compact disc. See also CD.
client. A functional unit that receives shared services
from a server. (T)
clock. A device that generates periodic, accurately
spaced signals used for purposes such as timing,
regulation of the operations of a processor, or
generation of interrupts. (T)
data. (1) A re-interpretable representation of
information in a formalized manner suitable for
communication, interpretation, or processing.
Operations can be performed upon data by humans or
by automatic means. (T) (2) Any representations such
as characters or analog quantities to which meaning is
or might be assigned. (A)
device. A mechanical, electrical, or electronic piece of
equipment designed to serve a special purpose or
perform a special function.
device driver. A file that contains the code needed to
use an attached device.
diagnostic. Pertaining to the detection and isolation of
errors in programs and faults in equipment.
code. A collection of instructions that is in a form that
can be read and processed by a computer.
digital. (1) Pertaining to data in the form of digits. (A)
(2) Contrast with analog.
compatibility. The capability of a hardware or
software component to conform to the interface
requirements of a given computer without adversely
affecting its functions.
DIMM. Dual inline memory module.
configuration. The manner in which the hardware and
software of an information processing system are
organized and interconnected. (T)
configure. To set up a computer for operation by
describing to the system the devices, optional features,
and programs installed in the computer.
connector. An electrical part used to join two or more
other electrical parts. (Contrast with port.)
control. The determination of the time and order in
which the parts of a computer and the devices that
contain those parts perform the input, processing,
storage, and output functions.
controller. A device that coordinates and controls the
operation of one or more input/output devices, such as
workstations, and synchronizes the operation of such
devices with the operation of the system as a whole.
direct access storage device (DASD). A
nonvolatile-storage device, such as a diskette drive,
hard disk drive, or CD-ROM drive, in which access time
is effectively independent of the location of the data on
the storage medium.
direct memory access (DMA). The transfer of data
between memory and input/output devices without
microprocessor intervention.
disk array. Two or more hard disks interconnected to
increase security, performance, or reliability.
diskette. A small magnetic disk enclosed in a jacket.
(T)
diskette drive. The mechanism used to seek, read,
and write data on diskettes. It can be installed in, or
attached to, a computer.
display. A component capable of displaying
information on a viewing surface; for example, a
cathode ray tube or a gas panel.
DMA. Direct memory access.
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Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
E
ECC. Error correcting code.
ECP. Extended Capability Port
EEPROM. Electrically erasable programmable
read-only memory.
EISA. Extended industry standard architecture.
electrically erasable programmable read-only
memory (EEPROM). EPROM that can be
reprogrammed while it is in the computer.
EPP. Enhanced Parallel Port
extended industry standard architecture (EISA). An
expansion bus architecture used in a network server
that provides compatibility among hardware
components.
F
file. A named set of records stored or processed as a
unit. (T)
flash memory. See electrically erasable
programmable read-only memory (EEPROM).
frame. (1) A data structure that consists of fields,
predetermined by a protocol, for the transmission of
user data and control data. The composition of a
frame, especially the number and types of fields, may
vary according to the type of protocol. (T)
G
GB. Gigabyte.
gigabyte. (1) For processor storage and real and
virtual memory, 230 or 1 073 741 824 bytes. (2) For disk
storage capacity, 1 000 000 KB. (3) For transmission
rates, 1 000 000 000 bytes.
hardware. (1) All or part of the physical components
of an information processing system, such as
computers or peripheral devices. (T) (2) The
equipment, as opposed to the programming, of a
computer. (3) Contrast with software.
universal serial bus (USB). A serial interface
standard for telephony and multimedia connections to
personal computers.
hot plug. Refers to a hardware component that can be
installed or removed without disturbing the operation of
any other resource which is not connected to, or
dependant on, this component.
hot swap. (1) Refers to a hardware component that
can be removed and replaced without disturbing the
operation of any other resource which is not connected
to, or dependant on, this component.
I
input/output. Pertaining to a device, process, or
channel involved in data input, data output, or both.
instruction. A statement that specifies an operation to
be performed by a microprocessor, and that identifies
data involved in the operation.
I/O. Input/output.
I/O board. In the system unit, a circuit board that
provides adapter slots, and an interface for the
processor board to the I/O function card and the
Advanced System Management PCI Adapter. The I/O
function card and I/O board together replace the system
board.
I/O function card. In the system unit, a circuit board
connected to the I/O board that supports a variety of
basic system devices, such as a keyboard or a mouse,
and provides other basic system functions. The I/O
function card and I/O board together replace the system
board.
IRQ. Interrupt request.
H
ISA. Industry standard architecture
hard disk. A rigid magnetic disk such as the internal
disks used in the system units of personal-computer
systems and in external hard disk drives.
J
hard disk drive. A disk drive that reads and writes
data on rigid disks and can be installed in or connected
to a computer.
jumper. A connector between two pins on a network
adapter that enables or disables an adapter option,
feature, or parameter value.
Glossary
157
L
N
LED. Light-emitting diode.
nanosecond (ns). One thousand millionth (10−9) of a
second.
load. To bring all or part of a computer program into
memory from auxiliary storage so that the computer can
run the program.
logical. (1) Pertaining to content or meaning as
opposed to location or actual implementation. (A)
(2) Pertaining to a view or description of data that does
not depend on the characteristics of the computer
system or the physical storage. (A) (3) Contrast with
physical. (A)
network. (1) An arrangement of nodes and connecting
branches. (T) (2) A configuration of data processing
devices and software connected for information
interchange.
nonvolatile. (1) Pertaining to a storage device whose
contents are not lost when power is cut off. (T)
(2) Contrast with volatile.
ns. Nanosecond.
LUN. Logical unit number.
O
M
OBI. Options by IBM.
math coprocessor. In personal-computer systems, a
microprocessor that supplements the operations of the
system microprocessor, enabling the computer to
perform complex mathematical operations in parallel
with other operations.
MB. Megabyte
megabyte. (1) For processor storage and real and
virtual memory, 220 or 1 048 576 bytes. (2) For disk
storage capacity and transmission rates, 1 000 000
bytes.
memory. Addressable storage space in the computer
that is used for temporary storage of instructions and
data while a program is running, or for permanent
storage of microcode. Contrast with auxiliary storage.
menu. A list of options displayed to the user by a data
processing system, from which the user can select an
action to be initiated. (T)
microprocessor. A processor whose elements have
been miniaturized into one or a few integrated circuits.
(T)
modem (modulator/demodulator). (1) A functional
unit that modulates and demodulates signals. One of
the functions of a modem is to enable digital data to be
transmitted over analog transmission facilities. (T) (A)
(2) A device that converts digital data from a computer
to an analog signal that can be transmitted on a
telecommunication line, and converts the analog signal
received to data for the computer.
operating system. Software that controls the
execution of programs and that may provide services
such as resource allocation, scheduling, input/output
control, and data management. Although operating
systems are predominantly software, partial hardware
implementations are possible. (T)
P
pack. Two or more hard disks interconnected to
increase security, performance, or reliability. Commonly
referred to as a disk array.
packet. In data communication, a sequence of binary
digits, including data and control signals, that is
transmitted and switched as a composite whole. The
data, control signals, and possibly error control
information are arranged in a specific format. (I)
parallel port. An access point through which a
computer transmits or receives data that consists of
several bits sent simultaneously on separate wires.
Contrast with serial port.
PCI. Peripheral component interconnect.
performance. One of the two major factors, together
with facility, on which the total productivity of a system
depends. Performance is largely determined by a
combination of throughput, response time, and
availability.
PFA. Predictive Failure Analysis
physical. (1) Pertaining to actual implementation or
location as opposed to conceptual content or meaning.
(A) (2) Contrast with logical. (A)
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Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
pin. One of the conducting contacts of an electrical
connector.
of repeatedly producing a display image on a display
surface so that the image remains visible.
port. An access point for data entry or exit. (Contrast
with connector.)
register. (1) An integrated circuit that contains 8, 16,
or 32 storage locations, each of which can store 1 bit of
binary data. See also binary. (2) An area that stores
binary data while it is being processed by the computer.
POST. Power-on self-test.
repeater. A device used to amplify or reshape signals.
power-on self-test (POST). A series of diagnostic
tests that are run automatically by a device when the
power is turned on.
processing. The performance of logical operations
and calculations on data, including temporary retention
of data in microprocessor storage while the data is
being operated on.
processor. A functional unit that interprets and
executes instructions. A processor consists of at least
an instruction control unit and an arithmetic and logic
unit. (T) See microprocessor and central processing
unit.
program. (1) A sequence of instructions that a
computer can interpret and execute. (2) To design,
write, modify, and test computer programs. (I) (A)
resolution. In video monitors, a measure of the
sharpness of an image, expressed as the number of
lines and columns on the monitor screen or the number
of pels per unit of area.
ROM. Read-only memory.
S
SCSI. Small computer system interface.
segment. A section of cable between components or
devices. A segment may consist of a single patch
cable, several patch cables that are connected, or a
combination of building cable and patch cables that are
connected.
prompt. A visual or audible message sent by a
program to request the user's response. (T)
serial port. An access point through which a computer
transmits or receives data, one bit at a time. Contrast
with parallel port.
R
server. (1) A functional unit that provides shared
services to workstations over a network. (2) In a
network, a data station that provides facilities to other
stations.
RAID. Redundant array of independent disks.
RAM. Random access memory.
random access memory (RAM). (1) A storage device
in which data can be written and read. (2) A storage
device into which data is written and from which data is
read in a nonsequential manner.
RAS. Reliability, availability, and serviceability.
read. To acquire or interpret data from a storage
device, from a data medium, or from another source.
slot. (1) A position in a device used for removable
storage media. (2) One of several receptacles in the
rear panel of the system unit into which a user can
install an adapter.
small computer system interface (SCSI). A standard
input/output interface used by personal computers.
SMP. symmetric multiprocessing.
socket. A receptacle for a microchip.
read-only memory (ROM). Memory in which stored
data cannot be modified by the user except under
special conditions. See also EEPROM, EPROM, and
PROM.
record. (1) A set of data treated as a unit. (2) A set
of one or more related data items grouped for
processing.
refresh. (1) To recharge a memory location in volatile
memory with an electric current so that it retains a state
or binary value. (2) In computer graphics, the process
software. (1) All or part of the programs, procedures,
rules, and associated documentation of a computer.
Software is an intellectual creation that is independent
of the medium on which it is recorded. (2) Contrast
with hardware.
SPP. Standard Parallel Port
startup sequence. In personal computers, the order
that the computer uses to search the direct access
storage devices for an operating system.
Glossary
159
storage. A functional unit into which data can be
placed, in which it can be retained, and from which it
can be retrieved.
subsystem. In computers, a secondary or subordinate
system, usually capable of operating independently of a
controlling system, and usually having a single purpose,
such as displaying video or reading from and writing to
hard disks. A subsystem can be integrated into the
system board or on an adapter.
SVGA. Super video graphics array.
T
transaction. An exchange between a workstation and
another device that accomplishes a particular action or
result.
transmit. To send information from one place for
reception elsewhere. (A)
U
symmetric multiprocessing. In personal-computer
systems, a multiprocessing design that enables two or
more microprocessors to run concurrently and work
independently, with each microprocessor capable of
performing any task.
utility program. (1) A computer program in general
support of computer processes; for example, a
diagnostic program, a trace program, a sort program.
(2) A program designed to perform an everyday task
such as copying data from one storage device to
another.
system board. In a system unit, the main circuit board
that supports a variety of basic system devices, such as
a keyboard or a mouse, and provides other basic
system functions.
V
system unit. In personal-computer systems, the part
of the computer that contains the processor circuitry,
read-only memory (ROM), random access memory
(RAM), and the I/O channel.
VFD. Vacuum fluorescent display.
VRM. Voltage regulator module.
W
workstation. (1) A functional unit at which a user
works. A workstation often has some processing
capability. (2) A terminal or microcomputer, usually one
that is connected to a mainframe or to a network, at
which a user can perform applications.
write. To make a permanent or transient recording of
data in a storage device or on a data medium.
160
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
Index
Numerics
1-800 telephone assistance 127
100BASE-TX transceiver 77
10BASE-T transceiver 77
16-bit devices
cable required 59, 72
connector on SCSI backplane 59
SCSI IDs supported 59
25-pin parallel port 2, 9
9-pin serial port 2, 9
9-pin-to-25-pin adapter 9
A
about this book xi
AC box 33
AC power light 11
access cover, removing 41
accessing
Configuration/Setup Utility program 17, 22
SCSISelect Utility 28
acoustical noise emission values 139
ACPI 24
activity light, hard disk drive 6
adapters
Advanced System Management PCI Adapter
automatic configuration 49
bus-master 49
compatibility 2, 51
considerations 51
deactivated 27
hot-plug 49
installation sequence 26
installing 49, 52, 56
locations 49, 134
PCI deep adapters 153
PCI slots 134
requirements 49
starting from 23
using, with external devices 72
video 49, 123
adding
adapter 49, 52, 56
external option 72
hot-swap fan assembly 67
internal drive 58, 59
memory 46
microprocessor kit 42
power supply 63
address
COM port 74
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
2, 149
address (continued)
parallel port 74
USB 77
adjusting
chair 13
controls 14
lighting 14
monitor 13
administrator password
deleting 23
features 20
forgotten 22
purpose 22
setting 22
advanced setup
ACPI control 24
cache control 24
memory settings 25
MPS version control 25
PCI slot/device information 24
Advanced System Management PCI Adapter
See Netfinity Advanced System Management PCI
Adapter
advantages of product 1, 58
air circulation
around server 13, 14
rack guidelines 79
air temperature range 139
air vents 14
allocating system resources 24
altitude, maximum 139
antiglare filter 14
architecture, PCI 24, 49
arranging workspace 13
attention LEDs for hot-plug PCI slots 50
automatic configuration, PCI devices 49
auxiliary-device connector 9
B
back view 9
backing up all files 30
backplane
power 33
SCSI
connections to bays
IDs 59
jumpers 152
layout 151
banks, memory 46
battery
disposal ix, 127
59
161
battery (continued)
failure error message 97
handling precautions ix, 127
heavy metal 127
installing 129
location 129
ordering replacements 127
removing 129
replacing 127
baud rate cable requirements 77
bays
drive types and sizes 58, 59
expansion 58
hot-swap drive installation 60
identification 58
installing drives 58, 60
internal drive locations 58, 59, 133
preinstalled CD-ROM drive 58
beep codes
description 105
during POST 93, 105
list 107
table 107
before you begin 13, 32
bezels
installing the front bezel 71
removing 40
BIOS (basic input/output system)
adapter configuration 51
flash page swap jumper 147
updates 117
blank screen 118
boot
See startup
bus master
adapters 49
capability 9
bus number assignments 51
bypassing power-on password 21
C
cables
category 5 77
connector on SCSI backplane 59
connectors on I/O function card 147
dual serial port y-cable 78
for bidirectional parallel ports 20
lengths 14
maximum lengths for SCSI devices 72
removing ix, 33, 38
requirements for attaching external devices
safety ix
SCSI 72
cache
control 24
162
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
72
cache (continued)
level-2 size 2
cache control 24
calculating maximum SCSI cable lengths 72
card
See adapters
category 5 cables 77
caution
battery handling ix, 127
handling static-sensitive devices 34
laser compliance statement x
lifting the server 1
removing covers 33, 41
removing wrong disk drive 62
CD-ROM drive
eject button 6
in-use light 6
laser compliance statement x
locations 58
preinstalled 58
sizes 59
CD-ROMs
cleaning 117
problems 117, 118
chair adjustments 13
changing
configuration settings 18
hardware configuration 123
jumper positions 140
memory addresses 27
port assignments 19, 74
SCSI controller settings 28
software configuration 123
termination on SCSI devices 60
channels, SCSI 72
circulation, air 14
cleaning the monitor 14
clock
internal clock speed 42
real-time 97
comfort 13
communication
modem and fax requirements for the United
Kingdom 33, 69
requirements ix
communication port 74
compatibility
adapter 49, 51
video controller 2
completing the installation 69
configuration
adapter conflicts 123
adapter installation sequence 26
adapter locations 134
automatic, for PCI devices 49
changing hardware 123
configuration (continued)
changing software 123
Configuration/Setup Utility program 17
conflicts 26, 123
default settings
device records 134
load default settings 26
device change 97
device records 134
EEPROM 17
errors 17
hardware change 109
memory change 97
memory-address conflicts 123
option conflicts 123
peripheral component interconnect (PCI) 24
power-on self-test (POST) 16
restoring 18, 25
universal serial bus (USB) 20
utility programs 16
Configuration/Setup Utility program
administrator password 22
configuring devices 19
configuring I/O ports 19
controlling access to 22
defining system security 20
main menu 18
power-on password 21
setting date and time 20
setting passwords 20, 22
starting 17
configure/view host adapter settings 28
configuring your server 16, 71
conflicts, configuration 26, 123
connecting
adapters 49
cables
requirements for external devices 72
safety requirements vii, 69
external options 72
internal drives, all bays 58
telephone line 69
connectors
10/100 Ethernet 77
68-pin SCSI 76
auxiliary device 75
descriptions 9
device records 134
dual serial 78
expansion slots 49
external SCSI 76
input/output locations 9, 73
internal SCSI 76
keyboard 2, 9, 75
list of 2
memory 46, 47
connectors (continued)
monitor 2, 9
mouse 2, 9
on Advanced System Management PCI
Adapter 149
on I/O function card 148
parallel device 2, 9, 135
parallel port 74
pointing device 2, 9
printer 9
rear view of server 9
RS 485 bus 78
SCSI
cable requirements 59
description 9
invalid 122
rules for using 72
serial device 2, 9
serial port 73
universal serial bus (USB) 9, 77
video 9, 75
considerations
cable requirements 72
environmental 127
hot-swap fan 67
installing
adapters 51
external SCSI devices 72
internal drives 58
memory-module kits 46
microprocessor kit 42
power supply 63
controller
Ethernet 77
SCSI 28
video 123
controls
front panel 6
server 6
cover
installing the front access cover 70
installing the top cover 69
removing the front access cover 41
removing the top cover 39
customer assistance
error messages 93
ordering publications xii
telephone numbers xii
D
damaged system
dropped 126
spilled liquid 126
DASD (direct access storage device)
backplane 59
Index
163
date and time 20
date, setting 20
DC power light 11
deactivated adapters 27
deep adapters 153
default
configuration values 134
settings, default 26
values for Configuration/Setup Utility program
defective hard disk drive 62
definition of terms, glossary 155
deleting administrator password 23
deleting power-on password 21, 22
description
drive 58
hot-swap drive 58
integrated video controller 49
SCSI IDs 59
design considerations 1, 36
device
adapter locations 134
configuration error 97
drivers 57
external 72
failing 120
locations 133
number supported 72
port assignments 19
preinstalled 58
records 134
resources 24
SCSI 59
startup sequence 23
static-sensitive, handling 34
device drivers
for network adapters 57
options 71
software conflicts 27
viewing 95
device records, updating 71
diagnosing server problems 117
diagnostic
description, test programs 92
error messages 93
POST (power-on self-test) 92
POST beep codes 93
tools overview 92
diagnostic log, viewing 95
diagnostic utility programs
equipment 95
error messages 109
messages, error 109
running 94
starting 94
disabling hot-plug PCI slot 52
164
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
134
disconnecting
cables ix
before installing options 38
electrical safety requirements 33
hot-swap drives 62
power supply 65
telephone line 38
disk utility, SCSI 29
diskette drives
eject button 6
in-use light 7
preinstalled 58
problems 26, 118
sizes 59
display
See monitor
disposing of batteries ix, 127
DMA (direct memory access)
resources 24
system resources 51
drawer installation
See rack
drive
bays 58
description 58
full-high 58
half-high 58
hot-swap 58
identification 58
installation hardware for 58
installation requirements 58
installing hot-swap 60
location
by drive type 59
device records 133
illustration 58
preinstalled 58
removing a hot-swap 62
SCSI 59, 60
setting switches and jumpers 60
sizes 58
status indicators 6
types 58
dropped server 126
dual inline memory module (DIMM)
See memory-module kits
E
eject switch
CD-ROM 6
diskette drive 6
electrical
safety ix
electrical input 139
electrical outlets 14
electrical safety 33
enhanced parallel port (EPP) 19
environmental considerations 127
environmental specifications 139
error logs 25
error messages
Advanced System Management PCI Adapter
diagnostic (165) 112
battery failure 97
CD-ROM diagnostic (215) 114
core system diagnostic (001) 111
description 93
device configuration 97
diagnostic 93, 109
diskette drive diagnostic (206) 114
error logs 25
ethernet diagnostic (301) 114
ethernet diagnostic (302) 115
hard disk drive diagnostic (217) 114
memory configuration 97
microprocessor diagnostic (089) 112, 115
numeric 96
parallel port diagnostic (014) 111
PCI interface diagnostic (020) 111
POST 96
POST messages 93
power supply diagnostic (075) 112
RAID diagnostic (035) 112
SCSI interface diagnostic (030) 112
serial port diagnostic (011) 111
software-generated 93
status display diagnostic (180) 113
system cache diagnostic (202) 114, 116
system memory diagnostic (201) 113, 116
system monitoring 108
system monitoring messages 93
thermal system diagnostic (175) 113
types 93
USB port interface diagnostic (015) 111
video system diagnostic (005) 111
exiting from the Configuration/Setup Utility
program 18, 26
expansion bays 58
expansion slots
adapter locations 134
description 49
hot-plug PCI adapter installation 52
location 9
non-hot-plug PCI adapter installation 56
extended capabilities port (ECP) 19
extended data output (EDO) memory 2
extension cords 14
external
device records 133, 134
options, connecting 72
external (continued)
SCSI 9
SCSI cable
maximum lengths 72
using 72
SCSI connector 72
SCSI device IDs 72
views 9, 58
F
failed hard disk drive 62
fans
hot-swap 67
problems 119
replacing 67
fatigue 13
features
administrator password 22
at a glance 2
front view 58
hot-swap drives 58
internal 133, 134
PCI, configuring 24
rear view 9
records 132
fixed disk
See hard disk drives
flash page swap jumper 147
forgotten administrator password 22
forgotten power-on password 21
format, low-level 30
formatting drives 30
front bezel, removing 40
front panel controls 6
front view 58
full-high drives 58
G
general information
before installing options 32
before you begin 13
controls 6
expansion bays 58
input/output connectors 9
installing drives 58
status indicators 8
general problems 119
glare 14
glossary 155
guidelines for working inside the server
35
Index
165
H
half-high drives 58
handling
static-sensitive devices 34
hard disk drive activity light 8
hard disk drives
activity light 6
arrays, reconfiguring after installing 61
consequences of removing wrong drive 62
fault light 6
hot-swap 58
ID, SCSI 59
installing 60
low-level format 30
preinstalled 58
removing 62
replacing 62
SCSI 60
sizes 58, 59
status indicators 6
types 58
hardfile
See hard disk drives
hardware installation 60
heat output 139
heavy-metal batteries 127
help
See customer assistance
highlights 1
hot-plug PCI adapters 49
hot-plug PCI slot LEDs 50
hot-swap fan 67
hot-swap power supply 63
hot-swappable drives
advantage 58
description 58
installing 58
LEDs 62
removing 62
replacing 62
hot-swappable fans
See fans
humidity range 139
I
I/O board
adapter slots 49
function 36
layout 144
location 36
I/O board data 19
I/O function card
battery failure 97
function 36
166
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
I/O function card (continued)
jumper locations 148
location 36
removing 128, 140
I/O ports 19, 24
auxiliary-device port 75
keyboard port 75
mouse port 75
parallel port 74
SCSI port 76
serial port 73
video port 75
I2O-ready statement 153
IBM service center
See telephone numbers, IBM
identification numbers 132
in-use lights 118, 119
indicator lights
CD-ROM in-use 6
diskette drive in-use 6
hard disk drive activity 8
hard disk drive status 8
SCSI hard disk drive activity 8
system error 8
system power 8
input/output (I/O) connectors
See connectors
installation
completing 69
preparation 32
problems 120
requirements 58
installing
adapters 49, 52, 56
battery 129
cables 69
cover 69
external options 72
front access cover 70
front bezel 71
hard disk drives 60
hot-swap drives 58
hot-swap fan 67
internal drives
considerations 58
general information 58
hot-swap 60
locations 58
SCSI 59
types and sizes for each bay
internal options 31
memory-module kits 46
microprocessor kit 42
optional devices 94
power supply 63
SCSI drives 60
59
installing (continued)
top cover 69
integrated video controller 49
intermittent problems 119
internal
device records 133, 134
drives
considerations 58
installing (all bays) 58
installing (general information) 58
installing (hot-swap) 60
locations 58, 59
removing (hot-swap) 62
replacing (hot-swap) 62
SCSI 59
sizes 58, 59
maximum SCSI cable lengths 72
options, installed 134
preinstalled 58
setting jumpers 60
interrupt 24
interrupt levels, assigning (PCI) 24
interrupt request (IRQ)
recording serial 135
introduction 1
J
jumper
backplane requirements 59
changing 140
flash page swap 147
microprocessor core frequency selection
on Advanced System Management PCI
Adapter 149
on I/O function card 147, 148
on internal drives 60
on processor board 145
K
keyboard
angle of 13
arm and wrist position 13
connector 2, 9, 75
number lock 23
port 9, 75
problems 119
speed 23
keyboardless operation 135
kits, memory module 134
145
LEDs (light-emitting diode)
attention lights for hot-plug PCI slots 50
for hot-swap drives 62
on Advanced System Management PCI
Adapter 149
power lights for hot-plug PCI slots 50
SCSI hard disk drive activity light 8
status indicators 6, 8
system error light 8
system power 8
lifting the server, caution 1
lighting 14
lights
hard disk drive status 6
hot-plug PCI slot attention 50
hot-plug PCI slot power 50
not working 119
power-supply status 11
SCSI hard disk drive activity 8
status indicators 6, 8
system error 8
system power 8
system status 8
liquid spilled on server 126
load default settings 26
locations
adapters 49
Advanced System Management PCI Adapter
jumpers 149
battery 129
bays 58
devices 133
drives 133
expansion slots 49
features 9, 58
I/O board 36
I/O function card jumpers 148
internal drives 58
jumper blocks on processor board 145
jumpers 146
memory 46
processor board jumpers 146
server identification numbers 132
server records 133—134
system power light 8
termination 60
loss of data 62
low-level format
backing up files 30
overview 30
using 30
when to use 30
L
laser compliance statement
x
Index
167
M
main menu, Configuration/Setup Utility program 18
maximum SCSI cable lengths 72
mechanical loading, rack 79
media types 59
memory
address conflicts 123
bank 46
board 46
configuration error 97
default 2
device records 134
list of features 2
resources 24
specifications 46
terminator board 46
memory settings 25
memory-module kits
compatibility requirements 46
connector locations 46
installing 46
purpose 46
sizes 46
speed 46
menus
Configuration/Setup Utility program 18
configure/view host adapter settings 28
SCSI disk utilities 29
SCSISelect Utility 28
messages
Advanced System Management PCI Adapter
diagnostic (165) 112
battery failure 97
CD-ROM diagnostic (215) 114
core system diagnostic (001) 111
device configuration error 97
diagnostic 109
diskette drive diagnostic (206) 114
error 109
ethernet diagnostic (301) 114
ethernet diagnostic (302) 115
hard disk drive diagnostic (217) 114
memory configuration error 97
microprocessor diagnostic (089) 112, 115
parallel port diagnostic (014) 111
PCI interface diagnostic (020) 111
POST 96
power supply diagnostic (075) 112
RAID diagnostic (035) 112
SCSI 122
SCSI interface diagnostic (030) 112
serial port diagnostic (011) 111
status display diagnostic (180) 113
system cache diagnostic (202) 114, 116
system memory diagnostic (201) 113, 116
168
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
messages (continued)
system monitoring 108
thermal system diagnostic (175) 113
USB port interface diagnostic (015) 111
video system diagnostic (005) 111
microprocessor
clock speed 42
installing 42
jumper block 145
microprocessor core frequency selection jumper
block 145
model features 2
model number 132
modem 74
monitor
adjusting of 13
blank screen 118
connector 2, 9
controller 49
distorted screen 118
dusting of 14
jittering screen 118
placement of 14
problems 118
rolling screen 118
self-tests 118
signal cable 9
wavy screen 118
mouse
connector 2, 9, 75
port 75
problems 119
moving the server 1
MPS version control 25
multiple function PCI adapters 24
N
Netfinity Advanced System Management PCI Adapter
description 37
layout 149
LEDs 125
overview 3
system monitoring messages 108
troubleshooting 122
network
adapter, starting from 23
adapters
See your network-adapter documentation
noise emission values 139
nonremovable media 58, 59
notices
battery ix
laser compliance statement x
safety information vii, ix, 33
O
occasional problems 119
office space, arranging 13
option diskettes
copying 94
description 94
options
configuring 26
device records 134
external, connecting 72
installation preparation 37
installation problems 120
installing 31
internal
adapter 49
drives 58
memory-module kits 46
locations 133, 134
PCI, configuring 24
problem 120
SCSISelect Utility 28
ordering
microprocessor kit 42
publications xii
replacement batteries 127
SCSI cable 72
output ports 9
overview
adapter installation considerations
adapters 49
diagnostic programs 92, 94
diagnostic tools 92
electrical safety 33
hot-swap fan 67
installing
external options 72
internal drives 58
microprocessors 42
internal options 31
POST (power-on self-test) 92
power supply 63
preparing to install options 37
problems, solving 91
server features 2
solving problems 91
troubleshooting charts 93
P
parallel port
assignment 19
bidirectional 19
configuration 19, 135
connector 74
enhanced parallel port (EPP)
19
51
parallel port (continued)
extended capabilities port (ECP) 19
feature 2
location 9
port 74
problems 120
parameters, default configuration 134
part numbers
publications xii
serial 132
password
administrator 20, 22
forgotten administrator 22
general information 20
not set 20
override jumper block 147
power-on 21
setting 22
PCI (peripheral component interconnect) architecture
adapter configuration 26
assigning interrupt levels 24
deep adapters 153
features and options 24
installation 52, 56
slot numbers 144
peripheral component interconnect (PCI) architecture
See PCI (peripheral component interconnect)
architecture
phone numbers
See telephone numbers, IBM
pin assignments
10/100 Ethernet port 77
auxiliary-device port 75, 78
dual serial port 78
keyboard port 75, 78
parallel port 74
RS 485 bus 78
SCSI port 76
serial port 74
universal serial bus (USB) 77
video port 75
planning workspace 13
pointing device
See mouse
ports, input/output
See also connectors
10/100 Ethernet 9
assignments, changing 19
dual serial 9
keyboard 9
monitor 9
mouse 9
parallel 9
printer 9
RS 485 bus 9
SCSI 9, 72
Index
169
ports, input/output (continued)
serial 9
universal serial bus 9
USB 9
video 9
POST
See power-on self-test (POST)
power
AC power light 11
backplane 33
connectors 9
control button 7
DC power light 11
good light 11
supplies 11
switch on power supply 11, 64, 66
power control button 7
power cord
lengths 14
location 14
power LED for hot-plug PCI slot 50
power supply
features 2
hot-swap 63, 65
indicators 124
installing 63
removing 65
power-on
hot-swap drives 58
light 8
power control button 7
power-on password
bypassing 21
changing 21
deleting 22
features 20
forgotten 21
on boot 21
setting or changing 21
power-on self-test (POST)
battery failure 97
beep codes 93, 105
during configuration 16
enhanced 23
error logs 25
error messages 96
forgotten power-on password 21
message table 96
overview 92
quick mode 23
table, message 96
precautions
electrical safety vii
handling static-sensitive devices 34
system reliability 34
working inside the server 35
170
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
predictive failure analysis 2
preface xi
preinstalled devices 58
preparing
for installation 32
for setup 32
internal drives for installation 60
to install
external options 72
options 37
to remove internal drives 62
printer
port 9
problems 121
SCSI 59
privileged-access password
See administrator password
problems, solving
configuration conflicts 123
diagnostic programs 92
diagnostic tools 92
error messages 93
fan 119
intermittent 119
keyboard 119
memory problem 120
monitor 118
occasional 119
only the cursor appears 118
option 120
overview 91
parallel port 120
POST (power-on self-test) 92
POST beep codes 93
printer 121
running diagnostic programs 94
screen jitter 118
serial port 121
software 122
starting diagnostic programs 94
SVGA 118
tests 92
troubleshooting charts 93, 117
processor
See microprocessor
processor board
jumper blocks 145
jumpers 146
layout 145
memory connectors 46
microprocessor sockets 42
processor board data 19
product
advantages 1, 58
identification numbers 132
internal and external options 134
product (continued)
name 132
product data 19
programs
advanced diagnostic
low-level format 30
protecting
data 22
the server 32
publications
ordering xii
part numbers xii
related xii
S
30
R
rack
installing the server 85
preparing the server 80
removing the server 88
RAS
See reliability, availability, and serviceability
read-only memory (ROM)
See ROM (read-only memory)
rear view 9
reconfiguring your server 71
records, device 132
reducing glare 14
related publications xii
removing
administrator password 23
battery 129
front access cover 41
front bezel 40
hard disk drives 62
power supply 65
power-on password 21, 22
server cables 33, 38
top cover 39
wrong disk drive, consequences of 62
removing the front bezel 40
replacement batteries, ordering 127
replacing
hot-swap fan 67
hot-swap power supply 63
requirements for terminating SCSI devices 60
reset button 7
resources, allocating 24
restore settings 25
RJ-45 port 77
ROM (read-only memory)
address conflicts 123
S3 video modes, unsupported 153
safety requirements
battery handling ix, 127
electrical ix, 33
handling static-sensitive devices 34
laser compliance statement x
save settings 25
scanners, SCSI 59
screen filter 14
screen, blank 118
screens
Configuration/Setup Utility main menu 18
SCSI disk utilities 29
SCSI (small computer system interface)
68-pin port 76
backplane layout 151
cable requirements 59, 72
connector 9
controller
location 76
rules for using 72
description 59
devices 58, 59, 72
disk utilities 29
drives
external 72
location 58
termination 60
failing 120
internal device port 76
low-level disk format 30
maximum SCSI cable lengths 72
messages 122
problems 122
purpose 59
SCSI IDs
assignments 72
description 59
device records 133
for devices 59
purpose 59
viewing 29
termination requirements 60
SCSI hard disk drive activity light 8
SCSISelect Utility program
low-level disk format 30
menu description
configure/view host adapter settings 28
SCSI Disk Utilities 29
starting 28
using 28
security procedures
See also password
general information 2
Index
171
security procedures (continued)
list of features 2
power-on password 21
self-tests, internal 92
sequence for installing adapters 26
serial number 132
serial port
address 135
assignment 19
bus, universal 2
connector 73
feature 2
location 9
pin assignments 73
problems 121
universal bus 20
server
adding drives 58
adding memory 46
advantages 58
consequences of removing wrong disk drive
controls 6
cover
installing 69, 70
removing 39, 41
design features 36
disk arrays and configuration 61
external options 72
features at a glance 2
identification numbers 132
illustrated views
front 58
rear 9
installing drives 58, 60
internal options 46, 49
PCI expansion slots 49
preparing, for installation of options 37
problems 94
records 133, 134
removing drives 62
replacing drives 62
security, passwords 20, 22
startup options 23
server damage 126
ServerGuide CDs 4
service, warranty
See telephone numbers, IBM
setting
administrator password 22
jumpers 140
passwords 20, 22
power-on password 21
SCSI IDs 72
switches and jumpers 60
Setup program
See Configuration/Setup Utility program
172
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
62
sine-wave input 139
size of server 139
sizes
internal drives 58, 59
memory 46
slots, expansion 9
software
error 93, 122
specifications, Netfinity 7000 M10 139
speed
keyboard 23
memory 46
spilled liquid on server 126
start options
enhanced POST 23
keyboard speed 23
number lock 23
startup sequence 23
starting
Configuration/Setup Utility program 17
SCSISelect Utility 28
startup
drive 23
password 21
sequence 23
static-sensitive devices, handling 34
status indicators
CD-ROM in-use light 6
diskette drive in-use light 6
hard disk drive activity light 8
hard disk drive status light 8
SCSI hard disk drive activity light 8
system error light 8
system power light 8
storage devices 58
storage expansion enclosure 72
summary of features 2
super video graphics array (SVGA)
address conflicts 123
controller 2
integrated controller 49
supervisor password
See administrator password
supplies, power 11
SVGA video controller 75
switches
See also jumper
power control 7
power on/off 7
power switch on power supply 11, 64, 66
reset 7
symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) 3, 42
system card data 19
system error light 8
system error log 94
system information 19
system monitoring messages 108
system power light 8
system resources 24, 51
system security menu
administrator password 22
power-on password 21
system summary 19
T
tape drives, sizes 59
technical directory, publications
See telephone numbers, IBM
telephone line
requirements for the United Kingdom ix
telephone line requirements for the United
Kingdom 33, 69
telephone numbers, IBM
ordering batteries 127
ordering publications xii
termination 60
terminator card, microprocessor 43
terminator memory board 46
terms, glossary of 155
test log, viewing 95
testing
error messages 93
monitor 118
overview 92
POST (power-on self-test) 92
POST beep codes 93
programs
description 92
running 94
starting 94
three-pin jumper blocks 142
time, setting 20
tools 32, 79
top cover
installing 69
removing 39
transmit and receive data 73
troubleshooting
charts 117
diskette drive problems 118
general problems 119
keyboard problems 119
monitor problems 118
monitor self-tests 118
mouse problems 119
option problems 120
overview 93
parallel port problems 120
pointing-device problems 119
printer problems 121
troubleshooting (continued)
serial port problems 121
software problems 122
two-pin jumper blocks 141
types of media 59
U
unattended startup with password 22
unattended-start mode
and power-on password 20
and system startup 22
definition 20
United Kingdom's telephone line requirements 33, 69
United Kingdom safety information ix
United Kingdom telephone line requirements ix
United States safety information ix
universal serial bus (USB)
See USB (universal serial bus)
unknown power-on password
bypassing 21
changing 21
removing 22
updating device records 71
updating server configuration 26
upgrading the microprocessor 42
USB (universal serial bus)
configuration 20
connectors 2, 20, 77
utility programs
configuration 16
Configuration/Setup Utility program 17
diagnostic programs 94
SCSI disk 29
SCSISelect 28
V
venting of hot air 14
video
See also monitor
adapter location 49, 51
adapter requirements 49
connector 2, 9, 75
controller 2
drivers, installing
port 75
ROM address conflicts 123
SVGA 49
video modes, unsupported S3 153
view
diagnostic log 95
front 58
rear 9
SCSI controller settings 28
SCSI IDs 29
Index
173
view (continued)
test log 95
viewing the diagnostic log 95
viewing the test log 95
virus checking 23
voltage input 139
voltage regulator module, microprocessor
43
W
weight of server 139
welcome 1
work area, arranging 13
wrap connector 95
write-back, microprocessor cache 24
write-through, microprocessor cache 24
174
Netfinity 7000 M10 Hardware Information
IBM

Part Number: 01K7785
Printed in U.S.A.
September 1998
ð1K7785
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