Guidelines for Working with Homeless, Runaway and Sexually Exploited Youth

Guidelines for Working with Homeless, Runaway and Sexually Exploited Youth
Safe Harbors Youth Intervention Project
Guidelines for Working with Homeless,
Runaway and Sexually Exploited Youth
Developed and Implemented in Ramsey County, Minnesota
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 1
The Safe Harbors Youth Intervention Project
(SHYIP) Protocol Guidelines
In May 2006 the Minnesota Legislature awarded Ramsey County funds to implement the Safe Harbors Youth Intervention Project
(SHYIP). This pilot project convened to address the needs of homeless,
runaway or truant youth in Ramsey County who have been sexually
exploited. Specifically, SHYIPs purpose is to promote closer coordination and better communication among all agencies who serve the target population defined above. In doing so, it is hoped that services will
improve; leading to youth having access the services they need to thrive.
The SHYIP model focuses on intervention and prevention methods
as reflected in multidisciplinary Protocol Guidelines. These materials
were developed collaboratively, with each section intended to be used
across disciplines to increase awareness and understanding of the
services available. In addition to the discipline specific Protocol
Guidelines, the following material contains sections on prevention
and support including information on cultural considerations, positive youth development, support for friends and family, consent and
confidentiality laws, and resources for youth and providers. The
SHYIP model has implications for implementation and potential
for replication across the state.
It is hoped that these Protocol Guidelines will become an integral part
of the work of all agencies who serve the SHYIP target population.
A special thank you goes out to all who worked on, and will work with,
these Protocol Guidelines.
Published by:
Guidelines for reproduction and copyrights
of this document.
This document was written to provide further education and ensure
all professionals can begin to provide comprehensive, multicultural
services to youth. This document can be shared and distributed with
others, and your agency, provided you share this document in its full
entirety of its printed information. This document may not be
incorporated into other printed or electronic materials. If you would like
additional copies, wish to adapt this material other than what is printed
here, or have questions about the printed material, please send requests
and questions to [email protected]
2009 Partners for Violence Prevention, All rights reserved.
Partners for Violence Prevention
Saint Paul, Minnesota
Phone: (651) 241-5862
Email: [email protected]
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
Partners for Violence Prevention (PVP) was founded in 1996 to reduce
the impact and incidence of violence on youth and families. It began
in response to a community need to promote safe neighborhoods and
provide effective intervention and prevention alternatives. PVP’s
unique collaborative strategy has provided the basis for its success
and in May 2004, PVP earned its’ 501(c) 3 non-profit status. Since its
inception, PVP has acted as an innovative service provider and a
pivotal bridging point in violence prevention for youth, programming
for over 70 health care and social service agencies, law enforcement
agencies, schools, businesses, churches, and other community
organizations. PVP is regarded as a local and national model for
replication in other communities, school and neighborhoods.
pg 2
Safe Harbors Youth Intervention Project
Page 5
SHYIP
Participating Agencies / 4
Background and Approach / 6
Page 7
Cultural Considerations (Standalone Copies Available) / 8
Positive Youth Development / 44
General
Support
General Support
Support For Family and Friends (Brochures Available) / 51
Page 56
Advocacy / 57
Ramsey County Juvenile Delinquency / 75
Ramsey County Human Services Children’s Mental Health / 84
Law Enforcement / 64
Ramsey County Attorney’s Office / 76
Ramsey County Human Services Children’s Crisis Response / 85
Medical Assessments / 68
Ramsey County Human Services / 79
Schools / 87
Ramsey County Community Corrections / 72
Ramsey County Human Services Foster/Shelter Placement / 80
Shelter & Drop-In Centers / 90
Ramsey County Juvenile Detention Center / 74
Ramsey County Child Protection / 82
Street Outreach / 93
Page 111
Resources for Providers / 113
Resources for Youth: The Our Guide (Standalone Copies Available) / 177
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 3
Resources
SHYIP Resources
Page 97
Consent &
Confidentiality
Consent and Confidentiality
Discipline Specific
Protocol Guidelines
Discipline Specific Protocol Guidelines
SHYIP Participating Agencies
Ain Dah Yung (Our Home) Center
Minnesota Office of Justice Programs
American Indian Family Center
Mounds View Schools
Southern Minnesota Regional
Legal Services
Booth Brown House
Neighborhood House
Saint Anthony Police Department
Breaking Free Inc.
North Saint Paul Police Department
Saint Paul Indians In Action Group
Casa de Esperanza
Partners for Violence Prevention
Saint Paul Public Schools
Center for Victims of Torture
Planned Parenthood
Saint Paul Youth Services
Comunidades Latinas Unidas
En Servicio (CLUES)
Project Pathfinder
Saint Paul Ramsey County Department
of Public Health
College of St. Catherine
Ramsey County Commissioner,
Dist. 6
District 202/Street Works
Domestic Abuse Project
Face To Face
Family Tree Clinic
Freeport West Inc./Streetworks
Collaborative
Ramsey County Attorney’s Office
Ramsey County Community
Corrections
Ramsey County Human Services
Department:
Child Protection
Girl Scouts of St. Croix Valley
Children’s Mental Health
Health Start
Delinquency
Hmong American Partnership
Foster Care
Mercy Hospital
Ramsey County Juvenile Probation
Midwest Children’s Resource Center
Ramsey County Sheriff’s Department
Minnesota Coalition Against
Sexual Assault
Regions Hospital
Minnesota Department of Health
Minnesota Department of Human
Services
Minnesota Indian Women’s Sexual
Assault Coalition
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
Saint Johns and Josephs Hospital
Sexual Assault Forensic Examiner
(SAFE) Program
SafeZone
Sexual Offence Services of Ramsey County
pg 4
Saint Paul Domestic Abuse
Intervention Project
Saint Paul Police Department
StreetWorks Collaborative
The Bridge
United & Children’s Hospitals’
Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner
(SANE) Program
Wilder Foundation
Women of Nations-Eagle’s Nest
YMCA CLIMB Program
Youth Link
T
(
Safe Harbors Youth Intervention Project
SHYIP
Participating Agencies / 4
Background and Approach / 6
The Safe Harbors Youth Intervention Project
(SHYIP) Protocol Guidelines
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 5
SHYIP Background and Approach
Background on Protocol
Guideline Development
A Multidisciplinary Approach
To understand the needs and challenges of serving homeless,
runaway, and sexually exploited youth, SHYIP members have
reviewed research reports, Census Bureau, and other available
statistics, and conducted interviews with youth and focus groups
with service providers. These key findings were reported in the
SHYIP Community Needs Assessment (copies available at
www.partnersforviolenceprevention.org),
which
informed
the Guidelines’ development.
• There are not enough adequate shelter services in Ramsey
County to respond to the target population.
• Lack of communication and continuity between agencies
limits services provided.
• For services to be effective, trust and rapport must be devel
oped with youth.
• Education for parents/guardians and service providers
is essential.
• Untold numbers of sexually traumatized runaway or home less youth do not engage available resources.
• There is a profound need for culturally relevant services.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 6
The Protocol Guidelines offered in this document represent an
effort to compile best practices from multiple disciplines working
with homeless and runaway youth who have been or are at risk
to be sexually exploited. Contents of every section, including
the Cultural Considerations section, have been developed and informed by members from the disciplines and cultures represented.
This process involved extensive involvement to present, review,
discuss, and revise based on the collective knowledge of
participating members.
The SHYIP Protocol Guidelines are intended to help multiple
disciplines effectively serve runaway, homeless and sexually
exploited youth. While it is essential that professionals understand
their own guidelines thoroughly, it is also essential that all
disciplines have a competent working knowledge of other
agencies’ guidelines and services. Therefore, it is expected that
the SHYIP Protocol Guidelines will be used as an opportunity
for collaboration, communication, and streamlining of services and
resources available for youth.
The Safe Harbors Youth Intervention Project
(SHYIP) Protocol Guidelines
Cultural Considerations (Standalone Copies Available) / 8
Positive Youth Development / 45
Support For Family and Friends (Brochures Available) / 49
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 7
General
Support
General Support
Cultural Considerations
Cultural Considerations
The cultural considerations content has been developed thanks to the commitment,
dedication and significant work of following agencies and SHYIP representatives.
Ain Dah Yung
American Indian Family Center
Breaking Free
Casa de Esperanza
Center for Victims of Torture
Comunidades Latinas Unidas En Servicio (CLUES)
District 202
Face to Face/SafeZone
Face to Face Counseling Clinic
Family Tree
Freeport West Inc./Streetworks Collaborative
Girl Scouts of St. Croix Valley
Hmong American Partnership
Minnesota Coalition Against Sexual Assault
Minnesota Indian Women’s Sexual Assault Coalition
Neighborhood House
Partners for Violence Prevention
Planned Parenthood
Ramsey County Attorney’s Office
Ramsey County Human Services
Saint Paul Indians In Action Group
Saint Paul Intervention Project
Saint Paul Ramsey County Department of Public Health
Sexual Offense Services of Ramsey County
Susan Raffo, Independent Representative
Tribal Law & Policy
YMCA CLIMB Program
Youthlink
Compiled by:
Ashley M. Gulden, M.A.
Safe Harbors Youth Intervention Project
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
Published by:
Partners for Violence Prevention
Saint Paul, Minnesota
Partners for Violence Prevention (PVP) was founded in 1996
to reduce the impact and incidence of violence on youth and
families. It began in response to a community need to promote
safe neighborhoods and provide effective intervention and
prevention alternatives. PVP’s unique collaborative strategy has
provided the basis for its success and in May 2004, PVP earned
its’ 501(c) 3 non-profit status. Since its inception, PVP has acted
as an innovative service provider and a pivotal bridging point in
violence prevention for youth, programming for over 70 health
care and social service agencies, law enforcement agencies,
schools, businesses, churches, and other community organizations.
PVP is regarded as a local and national model for replication in
other communities, school and neighborhoods.
Guidelines for reproduction
and copyrights of this document:
This document was written to provide further education and ensure
all professionals can begin to provide comprehensive, multicultural
services to youth. This document can be shared and distributed with
others, and your agency, provided you share this document in its full
entirety of its printed information. This document may not be
incorporated into other printed or electronic materials. If you would
like additional copies, wish to adapt this material other than what is
printed here, or have questions about the printed material, please
send requests and questions to:
[email protected]
2009 Partners for Violence Prevention, All rights reserved.
pg 8
10
General Youth Considerations
11
African American Youth Considerations
13
American Indian/Alaskan Native Youth Considerations
17
Cognitive and Developmentally Disabled Youth Considerations
21
Deaf and Hard of Hearing Youth Considerations
23
Hmong Youth Considerations
25
Homeless Youth Considerations
29
Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender/Queer/Questioning (LGBTQQ) Youth Considerations
32
Latino/Hispanic Youth Considerations
36
Male Youth Considerations
38
Somali Youth Considerations
40
Suggested Reading for Further Information
43
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 9
General Support:
Cultural Considerations
Introduction to Cultural Considerations
Cultural Considerations Table of Contents
Cultural Considerations Table of Contents
Cultural Considerations: Introduction
Introduction to Cultural Considerations
Dedicated to helping providers understand youth from diverse
cultures, the Safe Harbors Youth Intervention Project (SHYIP)
created the following cultural considerations. This section is to
be used by multiple disciplines to help professionals gain cultural
sensitivity when working with youth.
to their work, followed by the most pertinent considerations
applicable to each system (medical, law enforcement, legal,
schools). It is expected that all professionals will read, become
familiar with and employ these considerations when working with
youth.
It is recognized that culture is neither a blueprint nor an identity,
but rather individuals carry with them multiple cultural preferences and traditions within our multicultural society (Fontes, 2005).
Because individuals carry multi-faceted identities with them
at all times, peoples’ culture is unique to their experiences. As
a result, our culture not only influences our views, but also how
we relate to those whom we encounter.
For optimal effectiveness, these considerations are to be
incorporated into all levels of professional practice and service
delivery from policy making to administration to each individual
community of service providers. In doing so, these cultural
considerations will assist professionals as they grow in their
capacity to value diversity, manage the dynamics of differences,
acquire cultural knowledge and adapt to the multiple contexts
of each youth’s experiences.
Professionals must understand and accept the complexities of
culture as something that is ever changing and continuously
being revised. The development of cultural competence is an
on-going practice that evolves over time and requires professionals to consciously seek unfamiliar experiences so they may better
understand, value, and appreciate diverse cultural interactions
and settings. It is hoped that all individuals and agencies will
aspire to achieve understanding, appreciation, and respect of
cultural differences and similarities in an effort to better serve and
understand the populations with whom they work.
Aspiring to be considerate, sensitive and competent is the ultimate goal for professionals using SHYIP’s Cultural Consideration guide. The information presented here is specific to cultural
communities and reflects input from a multidisciplinary team.
The composition of this team was made up of active representatives
and reviewers from each community discussed. The considerations
begin with general considerations for all professionals to apply
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 10
Ultimately, it is intended that professionals using the SHYIP
Protocol Guidelines will reference the cultural consideration
section frequently and use it to develop and grow their personal
and professional cultural competence.
The following are recommendations developed by the SHYIP team and community
members for working with all youth, regardless of their identified cultural community.
Basic Concerns Youth May Experience:
• Feeling that they lack credibility and will not be believed
• Fears regarding their immigration status, including timeline
of residence (Illegal/Legal status of family)
• Complications because youth are already in the system due
to truancy, runaway, prior victimization, probation, etc.
• Fear of getting someone else in trouble if a report is made
• Threats of harm if the youth reports the assault
• Fear of caregiver finding out and reacting negatively
to youth’s victimizations, truancy or running away
• Lack of trust in authority figures
• Lack of hope in the system based on previous circumstances
• Does not label incident as sexual assault
• Self-blame and self destructive behaviors
• Illegal behavior (drinking, drug use etc.)
• Fear of being lectured for behavior
Culturally Related Considerations
for all Youth:
• Youth may fear their family/community discovering what
happened. Often youth fear ostracism, family retaliation
and may not have the support of family. Be sure to provide
an advocate for youth regardless of parental involvement.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
• Many communities do not use eye contact when in
conversation with others; this is a cultural practice of
respect for elders/adults and should not be considered a
form of disrespect or not paying attention.
• Not all females will shake hands with someone of the
opposite sex. (In some cultures, neither females nor males
will shake hands).
• Family and community remain important across cultures.
Youth will often avoid telling parents/caregivers what has
occurred or avoid reporting due to not wanting to be shamed
or bring shame upon the family.
• Many communities will nod their head in respect with the
intention of “I hear you.” Many times nodding one’s head
is misinterpreted as “you’re agreeing with me or you understand
me.” Therefore, be sure to ask for a verbal response before
making decisions.
• Youth may have faced racism in the legal system, police,
court, and in hospitals. Be sensitive about how reluctant
youth are to go to these places and always give youth an
option to have an advocate.
• Regardless of age or cultural community the youth belongs
to, these factors do not imply that service providers should
talk to them in slower English or louder, as this minimizes
one’s abilities and intelligence.
11
pg 11
General Support:
Cultural Considerations
The following is a short list of concerns many youth identify
during a crisis situation. If left unaddressed, they will likely
grow into barriers of service. These concerns include:
• Regardless of how openly sexual violence is discussed
within communities, rape and sexual violence is not a
cultural practice or culturally accepted for any culture.
Cultural Considerations: General Youth Considerations
General Youth Considerations
General Youth Considerations
Cultural Considerations: General Youth Considerations
• Avoid stereotyping and making assumptions about identity,
appearances, race or class.
• Always establish rapport with youth and never give up on youth, even if the youth has a negative/harsh attitude towards
the professional.
• Many youth and families have trust in the legal system. When a youth chooses to report, there is an implication that
the case will be charged and prosecuted. When cases are not
charged or prosecuted, youth are often re-victimized within
the family and community for what appears to be lying about
the incident.
• When using an interpreter, pay attention to what the interpreter
says and watch body language. Not all interpreters relay the
correct information and some may add their own opinions
while interpreting which is unacceptable.
*Always use certified interpreters.
*Never use family members or children as interpreters.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
12
pg 12
The following are recommendations developed by African American
community members as well as participating members involved with SHYIP.
General Considerations:
African Americans are not monolithic people. They are a richly
diverse population, spanning the spectrum of lifestyles and interests,
education and income levels, and religious background. However, the unique legacy of slavery, racism, sexism and economic
oppression continues to influence the lives of contemporary African
Americans. Although working with young African American
males and females is a complex process with much more than
can be contained here, the following points should be taken in consideration:
• The brutal history of African Americans still resonates
with contemporary African Americans and has left a sense
of distrust for many systems including law enforcement, the
courts, school systems and health care.
*Many African Americans from all backgrounds still do
not trust institutions that are “white male” driven largely
because of the institutionalized racism that exists within
these structures.
• Many Black families are fractured because of poverty and
the ills associated with poverty (e.g. unemployment, health
care, childcare). When poverty is socialized within the family
structures, young African American males or females might
experience a lack of direction and isolation.
• For many African American youth there are immediate and
extended families that are support systems.
• In African American communities, the church is often an
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
• Today’s pop culture perpetuates images of young black
males that are sexually dominate and young black females
that are exotic gold diggers. This leads to perceptions that
young males are overly sexual and young females are
un-rapable. These stereotypes do not represent the majority
of black youth, but must be recognized as contributors to
their self-identity.
• Many young African Americans have incorporated Hip-hop
and Rap as part of their culture along with many other
young mainstream Americans. This diverse musical genre
can be used for good and bad, but must be noted as an
important form of expression among youth.
• Most rapes in the African American community are
intra-racial, black on black. Fear that a young victim will be
labeled a traitor to his/her race for raising the awareness of
black on black rape may prevent reporting.
• A belief in the African American culture is that females
have to be strong and protect their men. As a result of this
cultural belief, black females may be reluctant to identify
their perpetrator.
• Always treat African Americans as individuals, not as the
problem the youth comes to you with, or by the trauma that
he/she has experienced.
• Recognize that a person who has experienced adversity and
feels beat down by life still has pride. As a result, do not act
like you are superior, or treat the youth as less intelligent
because of his/her current situation.
pg 13
13
General Support:
Cultural Considerations
“Blacks have a 375 year history on this continent: 245 involving
slavery, 100+ years involving legalized discrimination and only
30 years involving anything else.” Historian – Roger Wilkins
extension of family and can be a major contributor to
supporting youth.
Cultural Considerations: African American Youth
African American Youth
African American Youth
• Do not assume a youth’s race by their skin color; always
ask how the youth identifies his/her race.
• As a Caucasian man, avoid calling African American males,
“boy” as this is disrespectful.
Cultural Considerations: African American Youth
• If youth use slang words such as “baby daddy” or “baby
mama,” professionals should avoid referring to a father or
mother in those words at all cases.
• Do not make assumptions about whether a youth is involved
in a gang because of the way he/she dresses.
• African American male youth relate to African American
men. If possible, attempt to provide support/assistance in
partnership with African American men on staff.
Law Enforcement Considerations:
• Historically, and in contemporary times, many African
Americans have had negative experiences with law
enforcement personnel (i.e. racial profiling).
• Because of past experiences and current fears associated
with reporting a sexual assault (i.e. embarrassment, shame
and disbelief), law enforcement professionals may find some
African American youth “acting out” by displaying poor
eye contact, showing anger or disrespect.
• Young Black gay males are a highly marginalized community
and may be hesitant to report a sexual assault because they
fear blame, disbelief or intolerance.
• Young Black females fear validating negative societal images
of Black males or turning Black perpetrators over to the
legal system.
• Remember that Black youth may have been raised to fear
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 14
the police and as a result their actions may or may not
appear to be disrespectful.
• If an African American young female or male makes the
decision to report the rape, there may be a concern that once
the rape has been reported nothing will happen to bring the
perpetrator to justice. An explanation is needed to help
youth understand how both law enforcement and the legal
system will work on their behalf. Equally important is the
discussion of the limitations of law enforcement and the
legal system.
Court System Considerations:
All children deserve to be treated fairly, regardless of race or
ethnicity. Policy makers, police officials, officers of the court and
corrections must work together to remove racial inequities from the
juvenile court system.
It is the perception within African American communities that
court systems may not always give fair assessment of cases
presented. The following are facts law enforcement and court
officials should be aware of:
• African American youth comprise 15.4% of the national
youth population.
• The arrest rate among African American youth (ages 10-17)
is nearly twice the rate of their white peers.
• African American youth are 1.4 times more likely to be
detained than their white peers due to racial profiling
(DWB – Driving While Black). Among all racial groups,
whites are the least likely to be detained.
• Nationwide, one of every three young black males is in
prison, on probation or on parole.
• Nearly 60% of young offenders serving time in adult state
prison are African American, although African Americans
comprise only 15.4% of the youth population.
Although there are limited statistics specific to Black young
females who end up in the court systems, the following general
information should be considered when working with a sexually
abused female:
• Young victims have most likely experienced physical,
emotional and sexual abuse in conjunction with overall
family problems. They may suffer from physical and mental
disorders and/or endure academic failure.
• Forty to 73% of girls in the juvenile court system have been
physically abused. In United States population, 26% of
teenaged girls report physical abuse.
• Young females are three times more likely than boys to
be sexually abused. This leads to increased mental health
disorders, truancy, prostitution and sexual violence, as well
as other destructive behaviors that impact young women
for the rest of their lives.
Medical System Considerations:
A disproportionate number of African Americans live with serious
diseases and health conditions. Some of our youth are afflicted
with diabetes, hypertension and obesity; therefore sexual violence
can further compromise the mental, emotional and physical well
being of youth.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
• Like all young males, the young heterosexual black male
victim may be at an age where there may be confusion or
questions about his sexuality; therefore, there may be hesitation
to complete an examination.
• Respect the needs of the youth (e.g. a young black male may
be uncomfortable with a female forensic nurse).
School System Considerations:
School professionals are aware that urban education is viewed today as failing in its major goal of educating students, especially
those students characterized as people of color, including African
American and Hispanic students. Among people of color, African
American males are affected most adversely. The following points
may not appear to have a relationship to sexual abuse; however, as
discussed earlier in this document most rapes are intra-racial. It
is considered by many that African American males experience
school adversity and hardship.
• Research has shown that when Black male students are
compared to other students by gender and race they
consistently rank lowest in academic achievement, have the
worst attendance record, are suspended and expelled the
most often, are most likely to drop out of school, and most
often fail to graduate from high school or to earn a GED.
• Black males are characterized as having more health
problems and mortality rates at a younger age than any
other group in the United States.
15
pg 15
General Support:
Cultural Considerations
• Although people of color make up one-third of the total
United States youth population, they make up nearly two thirds of the young offenders behind bars.
• To enhance a youth’s sense of safety, medical professionals
should explain invasive procedures.
Cultural Considerations: African American Youth
African American Youth
African American Youth
• The ills that plague Black males are not completely the
responsibility of the public schools, but are a responsibility
of society as a whole. However, the public schools have
potential to play a major role in addressing the problems
of Black male students.
Cultural Considerations: African American Youth
*The more the Black male is suspended from school,
the more opportunity he has to bond with the street and
to develop a pattern of school truancy. Poor school
attendance leads to more contact with juvenile court and
for some Black males, this may begin a journey away
from school and towards jail for many wrong behaviors
including sexual assault.
• Schools struggle with many problems associated with size,
diverse populations, and financial concerns; however, schools
have a major responsibility for developing and implementing
programs to prevent failure of all children.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 16
The following are recommendations developed by Ramsey County Urban American Indian/Alaskan
Native community members as well as participating members involved with SHYIP.
General Considerations:
• Avoid assumptions and generalizations that all American
Indians/Alaskan Natives are the same. There are 562 federally
recognized tribes in the United States and several tribes
exist without Federal recognition.
• Avoid believing the statement, “What works for the majority,
works for all.”
• Indian communities are small and everyone tends to know
every individual. This impacts the long standing issue of
sexual exploitation/assault. Fortunately, as with other
communities, the topic of sexual exploitation is becoming
more openly acknowledged and discussed.
• Take time to allow for silence and be respectful to youth;
avoid interrupting youth, talking too much and talking in a
loud voice. Also, refrain from being directive, aggressive,
or intrusive as all of these tactics contributes to intimidation.
• American Indians/Alaskan Natives have a strong rule to
“respect your elders.” As with other communities, it is
difficult for a youth to publicly seek help if the perpetrator
was an adult/family member.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
• Unspoken rules, such as: “Do not turn on your own community”
may prevent youth from seeking services or reporting violence.
• It is very offensive to make assumptions about American
Indians/Alaskan Natives’ spiritual practices or beliefs. As
with traditions, customs and experiences, individual’s
spirituality is diverse.
• Recognize that because of the generations of forced
assimilation into the dominant society, some American
Indians/Alaskan Natives are unfamiliar with the traditional
practices of their Nations. Don’t assume youth know of,
have access to, or want these resources.
• Refrain from criticizing practices that are not the same as
what you believe or choose.
• Avoid saying, “Color doesn’t matter to me” or “Some of my
best friends are Native.” This will not impress youth, and
may even jeopardize the relationship.
• Some youth are going to be more quiet than others, don’t
mistake quietness for being shy or a disability. Accordingly,
youth who avoid making eye contact is not necessarily an
indication of something further to investigate.
• According to the Department of Justice, 86% of sexual
assaults on American Indians/Alaskan Natives are
perpetrated by non-American Indians. This often creates
barriers related to reporting.
• Recognize that American Indians/Alaskan Natives
come in all colors and/or have varied knowledge and
experience with their own cultures.
pg 17
17
General Support:
Cultural Considerations
Colonization by the United States government resulted in historical trauma and racism for American Indians/Alaskan Native. As
with any community who has withstood such experiences, generations of urban American Indians may have developed a complex
mistrust of service providers, law enforcement, etc. It is important
to recognize this historical context, even if the youth does not. Be
mindful that it may take time to establish trust and rapport with
American Indian/Alaskan Native individuals. Some general considerations to include:
• Recognize that a non-American Indian/Alaskan Native may
need to earn the trust of an individual who has been victimized.
Take the time to build a relationship and earn trust.
Cultural Considerations: American Indian/Alaskan Native Youth
American Indian/Alaskan Native Youth
Cultural Considerations: American Indian/Alaskan Native Youth
American Indian/Alaskan Native Youth
• As a professional working with this community, it is
important to be patient. Let individuals have time to think
and process.
• Avoid making assumptions about the family layout (aunties,
grandmas, extended family etc.). Extended families are
often primary caretakers of youth, but not always. Also, it
is important to understand the concept of customary
adoption within American Indians/Alaskan Natives
communities.
• Be aware that family is often both urban and reservation.
Frequently, American Indians/Alaskan Natives travel back
and forth, so that support, safety, and resources may be
located with both, neither, or one or the other. Every
individual is different.
• Recognize that some youth have accelerated responsibility
within the family structure such as helping with childcare,
cooking, cleaning, etc.
• Alcohol and drugs impact all communities. Despite
statistical cultural disparities, do not assume alcohol
or drugs are in any way related to a youth’s experiences.
• Recognize that speaking original languages are valued and
lineages are valued as well.
• It is also important to remember that American Indians/
Alaskan Natives view culture as a form of healing and a
way of life.
• Understand the importance of family. As protocol/rules
permit, it may be extremely important and helpful for the
youth to have a family member(s) allowed to be present
during the police interview, medical examinations, etc.
School System Considerations:
• Generally, the western-model oriented educational system
alienates American Indian/Alaskan Native youth.
• Institutional racism and judgment continue to impact
American Indians/Alaskan Natives experiences.
• Boarding Schools have devastated individuals by forcefully
taking American Indian/Alaskan Native children from their
families. During this time, individuals were generally
abused physically, sexually, emotionally and spiritually for
American Indians/Alaskan Natives’ culture and traditions
(i.e. American Indians were beaten for speaking their
language). Identities were dismantled as American Indians/
Alaskan Natives were forced to assimilate into mainstream
Christian culture.
*Although this was decades ago, it is extremely important
to acknowledge this devastation because it is relevant to
American Indians/Alaskan Natives identities. The culture
continues to heal.
• A lack of American Indians/Alaskan Natives’ history is an
ingrained part of the United States educational curriculum
which makes it difficult for youth to connect school to life.
Law Enforcement and Medical
System Considerations:
• Do not assume that a youth’s reaction (be it highly emotional
or unemotional) means that the youth is ignorant or fabricating
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
the crime committed against them. Their response may be a
sign of fear, respect, intimidation, or distrust.
pg 18
*The history and contributions to this country are not
accurately reflected in the textbooks.
*As with all youth, American Indian/Alaskan Native
youth’s learning styles are not the same.
• Generally, American Indians/Alaskan Natives are not
acknowledged for the positive contributions they make to
the community; rather, American Indians/Alaskan Natives
are frequently publicly exploited.
• American Indian/Alaskan Native individual’s worldviews
are not the same.
Homelessness and American
Indian/Alaskan Native Youth:
• Be aware that immediate and extended families are both
extremely important to American Indian/Alaskan Native.
*Because there is little difference between immediate and
extended family, if youth are staying with someone, they
may not consider themselves homeless.
Important information regarding the ICWA
– Indian Child Welfare Act, PL 95-608:
What is the Indian Child Welfare Act?
• The Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) is a federal law
that was passed in 1978.
• ICWA sets out rules that state courts have to follow in certain
child custody cases involving Indian children. Under state
law, courts must follow these rules.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
• The rules are designed to keep Indian children connected to
their families and tribes. Maintaining this connection serves
the best interests of Indian children and also promotes the
stability and security of Indian tribes and families.
• One important way ICWA helps to keep children connected
to their families and tribes is by requiring social service
agencies to make special efforts to keep Indian families
together. These agencies must provide services that reflect
the current social and cultural standards of the family’s
Indian community.
• A high number of Indian children were being removed from
their families by state courts and county social services
agencies and put in non-Indian homes and institutions.
These rules apply in cases where Indian children are being
taken away from their parents or Indian custodians.
• Often, state and county officials did not understand, ignored,
or rejected the cultural or social customs of the child’s
tribal community.
When does the Indian Child Welfare Act apply to youth?
ICWA applies to child custody cases where an Indian child is being
taken away from a parent or Indian custodian, or where parental
rights are being “terminated” (ended). These include:
• Foster care “placements” (placing a child in the custody
of foster parents)
• Child Protective Services removal
• Guardianships (in juvenile court and probate court) and
adoptions (in juvenile court and family court)
19
pg 19
General Support:
Cultural Considerations
t
*Often American Indians/Alaskan Natives’ are stereotyped
and portrayed as historical figures from the past or some thing related to Thanksgiving, wars, or casinos.
Cultural Considerations: American Indian/Alaskan Native Youth
r
American Indian/Alaskan Native Youth
Cultural Considerations: American Indian/Alaskan Native Youth
American Indian/Alaskan Native Youth
• Certain juvenile court cases (for example, truancy cases)
• ICWA does not apply to custody cases between parents
who are divorced or are getting divorced
What defines an American Indian Child?
• An American Indian child is one under the age of 18, who
is either enrolled in a federally recognized tribe or eligible
for enrollment in a federally recognized tribe;
• If the state has reason to believe that the child is American
Indian, the court has a duty to discover their tribal identity;
• The State must notify the tribe immediately; notice to
parents, tribe, and Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) notification
Under ICWA, what rights does the Indian child’s tribe have?
• The tribe has a right to participate in custody cases of its
Indian children.
• The tribe can “exercise” (use) “tribal jurisdiction.” (The
term “jurisdiction” refers to which court – tribal
or state – has the right to hear a case. Whether the tribe has
jurisdiction may depend on whether the child lives on or off
the reservation.)
*NOTE: Jurisdiction is a very complicated subject.
Contact proper authorities if you have questions about the
jurisdiction of your custody case.
• The tribe has the right to be notified about the child
custody case.
• The tribe has the right to ask for up to 20 more days to get
ready for a hearing.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 20
• The tribe has the right to ask that the case be moved to
tribal court.
• The tribe has the right to deny your request that the case
be moved to tribal court.
• The tribe has the right to look at the documents about the
case that the court has on file.
• The tribe has the right to see records kept by the State on
the placement of tribal children.
• The tribe has the right to apply certain tribal laws or customs
to the custody case. These include laws that define “Indian
custodian” or “extended family,” for example.
• The tribe has the right to disagree with ICWA’s placement
preferences and to tell the court where the tribe thinks it
would be best for the Indian child to live.
• Tribes have all the same rights about getting proper notice
from the court that you do, including the right to ask for
invalidation.
• Notice to the tribe must be sent to the tribal chairperson
or other representative that the tribe chooses.
The following are recommendations developed by professionals who provide services to Cognitive and Developmentally
Disabled community members as well as developed by participating members involved with SHYIP.
General Considerations:
• Youth with disabilities are at an increased risk for abuse
because of their vulnerabilities as compared to the general
population and are more likely to be victims of crime.
• Youth with disabilities need additional support and will
typically have difficulty accessing appropriate services.
Guiding youth throughout the referral process is essential.
• When youth report abuse, investigations are triaged through
the county child protection agency. Because of jurisdiction
problems, multiple caretakers and displacement, charges may
not be reported and/or investigated.
• Youth with disabilities rarely report either abuse or
assault because of:
*A lack of trust for authority figures
*The assumption they will not be believed when telling their
story
*Disabilities act as a barrier for youth to acknowledge the
abuse
• Most likely the abuse will be someone well known to the
youth (family member or caregiver.) Safety should always
be assessed before transporting youth back home to a
caregiver or another family member.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
• Feelings of isolation and withdrawal because of special
needs may make youth more vulnerable to manipulation as
a result of increased desire for attention and affection.
• Youth are more vulnerable to abuse in the community
because they may be unable to make safe decisions and may
lack self-protective skills.
Frequent Characteristics of Youth with
Cognitive/Mental and Physical Developmental Disabilities include:
• Youth are educated to be compliant and responsive to
authority figures.
• Youth are dependent on support from long-term caregivers
and/or several caregivers.
• Youth may be looked upon as being asexual and are often
not provided with general sex education and/or denied
recognition of their sexuality as it may be delayed in onset.
• They may be viewed negatively by society and labeled as
“bad,” or “different.”
• It is important to be aware of any behavior changes seen
in youth.
pg 21
Support
• Reports from youth with disabilities may be construed as
false and not believed because of their lack of creditability
(based on their physical and cognitive abilities).
• Youth sometimes lack the ability to know the difference
between care and abuse, especially when abuse does not
cause physical harm.
21
General Support:
Cultural Considerations
• Youth may have difficulty communicating that abuse has
occurred and may appear frustrated with their inability to
communicate words verbally.
• Developmental delays (cognitive, psychological or physical)
may interfere with the understanding of what is happening
in abusive situations.
General
Cultural Considerations:
Cognitive/Developmentally Disabled Youth
Cognitive and Developmentally Disabled Youth
• Professionals should assess whether the youth is cognitively
or developmentally delayed. Knowing whether the youth is
developmentally/cognitively delayed may be critical to the
charging decision, may constitute a separate offense and
will assist prosecution, courts and law enforcement. If the
youth is cognitively or developmentally delayed, attempt to
document the level of youth’s functioning. The following
questions are appropriate to ask a parent, guardian or school
official to assess the youth’s functioning:
*Are youth’s cognitive/developmental challenges obvious
and, if so, in what way?
*Has youth been evaluated recently? If so, by whom? (Copy
should be attached to police reports).
*How well does this youth conceptualize abstract questions?
*What is the youth’s chronological age vs. developmental
age?
*What is the difference between youth’s developmental
age and age of consent?
Depending on level of abilities it may be necessary to individualize
the approach, these suggestions may be helpful; however, they can
be demeaning to the person as well.
• Speak slowly and clearly; use simple language.
• Use visuals (draw pictures, make outlines)
• Present one concept at a time
• Ask for feedback by youth to ensure clear comprehension
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 22
General
Support
Cultural Considerations: Cognitive/Developmentally Disabled Youth
Cognitive and Developmentally Disabled Youth
The following are recommendations developed by Deaf and Hard of Hearing
community members as well as participating members involved with SHYIP.
Guidelines and Steps to
Using Interpreter Services:
To obtain a certified ASL interpreter call 651-224-6548.
• Do not allow “signers,”—people who are not certified to
interpret, regardless if they know sign language, interpreters
must be certified.
• Do not use children or any family members to interpret.
• Do not wear sunglasses.
• Attempt to get an interpreter of the same sex as the deaf/hard
of hearing person for the best situation for youth.
Guidelines for interacting with an interpreter:
• Have the interpreter stand next to you facing the deaf/hard
of hearing person.
• Face the deaf/hard of hearing person, not the interpreter.
• Give the deaf/hard of hearing person direct eye contact—
avoid looking at or watching the interpreter.
• While the deaf person will mostly likely watch the
interpreter, she/he also will have eye contact with you
and want a relationship with you.
• Speak directly to the deaf/hard of hearing person as if
you would a hearing person. Direct questions at the deaf/
hard of hearing person (i.e. “How are you feeling?”).
Avoid directing questions at the interpreter (i.e. “Tell her…”
“Ask her…”)
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
• Have deaf/hard of hearing person face away from the light
(from windows, flashing lights, and computer screens) or
other distractions.
If you absolutely cannot get an Interpreter:
• Avoid using computers or writing on paper. When a deaf/
hard of hearing person is in crisis, their English and typing
skills become impaired.
• Attempt to locate a Video Relay Services (VRS), which
enables a person with hearing disabilities who use ASL to
communicate with voice telephone users through video
equipment.
• Video Relay Services (VRS) is more efficient and effective
than a TTY machine for a deaf/hard of hearing individual to
express what has happened to them.
• As the very last communication option when working with
a youth with hearing disabilities, it is an option to use a
computer to type back and forth or pen/paper, however
please use the following considerations if method is used:
*Remember English is a second language for individuals
with hearing disabilities. Keep written sentences short and
use simple words. Instead of, “Did s/he assault you?” it is
better to say, “Did s/he hurt you?”
*During a crisis situation, youth will have difficulty
trying to explain their experience/situation through
a TTY, a computer or writing their words onto paper.
Be patient and understanding during this process.
23
pg 23
General Support:
Cultural Considerations
• Only use certified American Sign Language (ASL) inter
preters (call 651-224-6548)
• Make sure the room is well lit and free from any distractions.
Support
General guidelines for choosing interpreter services:
General
Cultural Considerations:
Deaf and Hard of Hearing Youth
Deaf and Hard of Hearing Youth
Deaf and Hard of Hearing Youth
*Avoid using lip-reading as the method for communication,
even if the deaf/hard of hearing individual states it is okay.
General Considerations:
• Youth expect providers to display signs of impatience upon
learning the youth’s communication limitations.
• More than likely, the perpetrator plays an integral role in the
survivor’s daily life and is an acquaintance to the survivor.
Safety of youth should be assessed.
• When deaf individuals report sexual assault, they encounter
stereotypes about being a sexual assault victim and deaf.
• Many deaf victims of sexual assault perceive a lack of
support within the deaf community, particularly if the
perpetrator is also deaf.
• There is a lack of trust using interpreters; victims of sexual
assault believe they cannot rely on interpreters to accurately
represent their words and experiences.
• Avoid becoming frustrated, differences in hearing abilities
are not visible and providers should suspend judgment and
build awareness that we all have different abilities.
• Youth who are deaf and/or hard of hearing that also are
homeless and/or live in shelters, face additional challenges
such as not hearing a perpetrator behind them, not hearing
fire alarms, etc. Building a safety plan with youth is
extremely important.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 24
Law Enforcement System Considerations:
G
• If outside and squad cars are visible to the person with
hearing disabilities, do not attempt to talk to the deaf person
while the squad car’s lights are flashing or when there are
other outside distractions. The flashing lights should be
turned off and a quiet room to take the police report should
be found.
• There is often a fear that the perpetrators words will be
taken over the victim’s report.
General
Support
Cultural Considerations: Deaf and Hard of Hearing Youth
*A small percentage of deaf people read lips well, but only
30 percent of what is said is visible on the lips and may be
especially difficult to understand in stressful situations.
• The deaf community recognizes law enforcement as a
resource; however, reporting sexual assault rarely happens
because of frustration communicating with first responders
(911 dispatch) and fear of stigmas related to victimization.
• Be aware that if a police officer yells, “stop,” a deaf/hard of
hearing youth may not see nor hear them and can easily be
misinterpreted as defiant behavior. Do not punish deaf/hard
of hearing youth for their hearing abilities.
Medical System Considerations:
• It is important to view deaf/hard of hearing individuals as
members of a linguistic and cultural community. This may
challenge the medical model which focuses on an individual.
• Recognize the difference in communication of deaf
individuals. Some may be comfortable with lip reading
and writing; other may prefer or only use ASL.
M
e
• Rape and sexual violence are typically not discussed within
the Hmong culture; however, just because it is not discussed,
does not mean that rape or abuse is culturally accepted or a
cultural practice.
• Youth may have fears about their family/community hearing
about the crime that occurred. Many Hmong youth may fear
ostracism and family retaliation despite the circumstances
of the event. Especially if youth do not have the support of
their family, an advocate is extremely valuable during their
process.
• Hmong youth may have faced racism within the different
social systems (i.e. with the police, legal system and in
hospitals.) Be cautious about how reluctant youth are to go
to these places. Provide or be an advocate assisting them
throughout processes involving these systems.
• Avoid making assumptions, generalizations, or stereotypes
about all Asian youth being the same. For example, a
common stereotype is that all urban Asian youth are
involved in gang activities. This is hurtful to the youth’s
identity formation and social expectations.
• Avoid talking to youth with slower English or talking louder
because they are Hmong; this is demeaning even if the
youth’s English is not as fluent as others.
Medical System Considerations:
*Although Hmong youth may be fluent in English, youth
may not understand English medical terminology. Some
words do not translate and comprehension of medical
terminology often is not clearly understood.
• There are not Hmong words for all the Sexually Transmitted
Infections (STI):
* If medical personnel are discussing information/preventative
precautions about sexually transmitted infections, always
clarify that youth understand that she/he does not have a
deathly disease and explain if each infection is curable
or incurable.
• Be sensitive when talking about body parts:
*Keep in mind that Hmong words for private body parts
are more graphic than English words;
*Find and use an interpreter that knows the under-tone
language for body parts and is comfortable with other
medical terms.
• Communicate and discuss with youth the process of the
evidentiary exam, what is likely to happen. Talk with youth
throughout the process of the exam:
*Many times when a victim does not speak English,
the examiners avoid talking with them, making the exam
more unbearable and uncomfortable.
• While some grant specifications are focused on services for
the Hmong community, youth have the right to decline the exam.
• Keep in mind that not all Hmong youth will need an
interpreter. However, always give the option of having
an interpreter.
• The uses of contraceptives are not always favorable in the
Hmong community, particularly with parents/caregivers;
allow youth to make their own decisions about reproductive
health.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 25
25
General Support:
Cultural Considerations
e
General Considerations:
Support
s
s
The following are recommendations developed by Hmong community
members as well as participating members involved with SHYIP.
General
Cultural Considerations:
Hmong Youth
h
Hmong Youth
Hmong Youth
Law Enforcement System Considerations:
• Typically, Hmong youth experience racism and assumptions
that youth are associated with gangs. When youth sense that
they are being falsely judged, they may not want to cooperate
with law enforcement.
Cultural Considerations: Hmong Youth
*Avoid assumptions that runaway youth are affiliated with
gangs, and/or are running away from gangs; also, do not
assume a youth was sexually assaulted by a gang member
as this may or may not be the case.
• Police should use appropriate words in regards to sexuality.
Use sensitivity when talking about youth’s sexuality; Hmong
words for private body parts are more graphic than English
words.
*For example, be sensitive and do not force youth to use
particular words to describe where they were penetrated
if they are not comfortable and refuse to use graphic
language to describe what occurred.
• If youth does not speak English, it is imperative that Law
Enforcement attempts to get an interpreter of the same
gender as the youth.
• Be sure to ask youth if they would be most comfortable
with a male or female officer to make the report.
• Interview youth alone and not in the presence of any
family members (perpetrator’s or youth’s).
• Inform youth there are Hmong advocates from advocacy
offices that they can speak to and assist them through
this process.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 26
*Make sure the advocate understands both the law and
Hmong culture, especially how these may conflict
with each other.
*Find advocates or advocacy agencies you know and
trust before a situation arises when you need one.
• Explain law enforcement procedures and each stage of
the process. Youth will want to know how the youth
individually, and their family will or will not be affected
by the process.
• Never assume home is the safest place, regardless of
status of an arrest.
• Before a youth is returned home after they have been
picked up for running away:
*Assess the safety of home
*Discuss where they
returning them home
were
living/staying
before
*Discuss all places where youth typically run
*Assess reasons why youth left home
• Youth and their families trust the legal system and hope
all cases will be charged and sentenced after a sexual
assault. When youth choose to report, the expectation is that
their life will return to normal. It is important to note that in
circumstances when the case is not charged or prosecuted,
youth often are ostracized by the community and re-victimized.
Court System Considerations:
• Be mindful that it is always the victim’s choice in how the
case is resolved. Be mindful that not all victim(s) will want
his/her case to be resolved within the Clan system. Moreover,
not all cases that enter the criminal justice system are
appropriate to be resolved within the Clan system.
• Keep in mind, despite if the victim was born and raised
in the United States, he/she may want to use the clan system
to resolve their case. Also, youth may want to use both the
Clans in the community and law enforcement to resolve the
issue regarding the criminal case.
• Keep in mind that within the Clan system, everything is
solved quickly; whereas, in the mainstream criminal system
it may take months to a year for a case to be resolved.
School System Considerations:
• Depending on circumstances, Hmong youth may be more
likely to share information with Hmong school personnel,
because they understand the culture.
• Sometimes Hmong girls may be forced to marry their
boyfriend or the perpetrator to not bring shame onto the
family after an assault has occurred.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
27
pg 27
General Support:
Cultural Considerations
*Be mindful that there is not a legal system in the Hmong
culture; therefore, the American Criminal Justice System
is something new to Hmong individuals, young and old.
• If the youth is truant from school, language and communication
may become a barrier. As a result of language barriers for
some caregivers/parents—youth may tell parents/caregivers
that they are going to school, when in fact there is no school
(holidays, school vacations, etc.) and youth meet up with
friends, boyfriends, etc. Or vice versa, youth will tell
parents there is “no school today,” when in actuality there
is school; as a result, youth typically develop a truancy
problem that parents are unaware exists.
Support
• Build trust and rapport with the youth and explain the
American Criminal Justice System. Hmong people may
or may not be familiar with system procedures and what
is likely to occur throughout the legal process.
• Hmong parents may not understand the school rules
for “un-excused” absence and may keep the youth home
to baby-sit.
General
Cultural Considerations:
Hmong Youth
Hmong Youth
Homeless Youth
The following are recommendations developed by homeless community
advocates as well as participating community members involved with SHYIP.
need. It is important not to make assumptions regarding the family
life or support systems a young person has or does not have.
The Diversity and Subgroups
Among Homeless Youth:
Cultural Considerations: Homeless Youth
There are a number of youth, both urban and suburban, who are
difficult to identify as homeless. They may not consider themselves
homeless when they are living couch to couch, week by week,
or even day by day with kin or friends. Variations of homelessness exist. Some youth who live with friends, neighbors and their
parents do so because these figures do not care especially if
the youth stays “out of their hair.” Some youth stay with family
members who may provide them with basic essentials including
food, clothing, and money, but the youth does not truly have a
“home.”
Other groups of youth are escaping danger and may be relying
on friends to secretly “hide” them and provide shelter.
Another population of youth are homeless because they have
been shoved out or thrown away. These youth often come from
families who are fed up with a youth’s behavior, (independent and
resistant, smoking marijuana, not attending school, etc.) or they
come from families that are living in poverty, overcrowded, and
can’t feed them because there are too many other small children
to feed. Youth in these situations are not receiving the support they
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 28
Among homeless populations there are a growing number of
documented and undocumented immigrant youth. This population experiences the stress of acclimation to a new culture and
generational differences. Adults and elders of immigrant populations
often struggle with English, while their children become proficient
in a new language in school. This can create tension and role
reversal because children and youth are in the role of an interpreter for the family. Some cultural traditions practiced in former
immigrant nations are also illegal in the United States, female genital circumcision, early marriage, etc.
General
Support
There are many sub-group populations of homeless youth and
the definitions are changing while systems which serve or should
serve these youth may not be aware of their existence. The numbers of homeless youth enrolled in schools continues to rise with
inadequate services available. Moreover, while there are still youth
living in the public eye, under bridges, in vehicles, “squatting” in abandoned buildings or “camping” out of doors, many homeless youth
remain invisible.
Young immigrants may refuse to continue cultural traditions
such as choosing to wear different attire in their search to become
“American”, or to blend. Therefore a rift can develop between
youth and parents. If a young person acts “out” of cultural
tradition, a parent may banish the young person from the
family and cultural comfort, i.e. extended family, community.
These issues coupled with poverty and “starting over” that
immigrants also struggle with, cause homelessness among
immigrant youth populations. Many youth, who are undocumented drop-out of school because they see no future, they know
they cannot go on to higher learning opportunities. As a result,
the stress of streets can “pull” at a youth who already endures
hopelessness.
General Considerations:
• Explain to youth their information will be kept confidential;
however, always explain mandated reporting laws before
any disclosure by youth.
• Begin the interview and/or intake session by asking if they
prefer the door open or closed.
• Homeless youth often have issues around trust, because
of prior relationships when trust has been broken. Be sincere
and patient to allow trust to develop. When trust is gained
youth will be able to disclose information that is relevant
in working with them.
*Begin the intake session by asking them informal
questions (how they are doing) and ask if they need
anything (water, food, etc.).
• Many members of the homeless community have been
abused emotionally, sexually and/or physically. When
asking about these sensitive issues, it is imperative to read
body language. They may verbalize in one way, but their
body language may express something different. Note any
inconsistencies and come back to it later.
• When asking questions, be direct with youth. Ask the
question upfront and constantly remind her/him that the
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
• Offer referrals as information that they can use at their
leisure. Do not demand or suggest what they ‘need’ to do.
• Do not generalize. Each person has her/his own story and
is diverse. When doing an intake with a youth, read each
question as if you have never read it before. The youth may
feel you are insincere if you appear to know the answers
before they give you an answer.
• Always ask if there is anything else you can provide that
you haven’t already mentioned.
• Homeless and at-risk youth may not identify as being
sexually exploited.
*When asked where they live its important to ask about
the living situation. A youth may say they’re living with
“a friend.” Be sure to explore the youth’s living situation.
Ask, “What is the age of “your friend”? What other
people are living in the apartment, home, etc.?” All
professionals should follow this line of inquiry.
29
pg 29
General Support:
Cultural Considerations
• Always explain to youth that they have the right to refuse
to answer any questions.
• Do not coerce or force youth to do anything. Pressuring
a youth to disclose information is very detrimental. Many
youth often rebel after being told what to do simply because
systems already dictate the things that youth do not have
control over in their lives. Hence, allowing youth to have
options and choices builds the relationship between youth
and service provider.
Support
• Avoid defining homelessness for youth. Ask open-ended
questions such as, “Where did you sleep last night?” “Do
you feel safe where you’re staying?” A youth may be sleeping
in a friend’s garage and not consider herself/himself homeless.
answers that they give will be kept confidential and that
you are trying to determine what services they
would most benefit from.
General
Cultural Considerations:
Homeless Youth
Homeless Youth
Homeless Youth
Advocacy Considerations:
Cultural Considerations: Homeless Youth
• Do not disclose any facts about the youth’s life that they
have not given you permission to disclose or signed a
“Release of Information Form”.
• Teach youth how to advocate for themselves. Make initial
contacts to advocate for homeless youth and then model
how a youth can advocate and speak to providers to obtain
services.
• Advocate from a strength based perspective. Homeless
youth may have multiple needs, but they bring a lot of skills
to the process; it is important to recognize the strengths they
have gained from their life experiences and empower the youth.
Medical System Considerations:
• Never make the assumption that one will recognize a
homeless youth by dress code, attitude, or stance. Homeless
youth come in all sizes and shapes and often are dressed
like all other youth, even if it’s the only clothing they own.
Maintaining an image is extremely important for their
positive self-identity. Be aware that homeless youth may be
reluctant to disclose a full medical history and information
when questioned and examined. They may be concerned
that their family will learn about a visit to a physician or
emergency room and may not desire contact. Or they may
be concerned that information they share will show up on a
family insurance policy. However, youth will often disclose
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 30
personal issues to a doctor or a nurse, more than
any other service provider; this is a great opportunity for
medical professionals to learn what is really occurring in
the life of a young homeless person.
• Check youth out for cuts, scars, skin infections, needle
marks, etc. Homeless youth who live in alternate spaces (i.e. homeless camps, squats, or abandoned buildings), may
have increased skin problems. They also may have a history
of self-injurious behavior such as cutting, utilizing needles,
lack of hygiene care or scars from accidents. Keep information
available about the needle exchange program in Minnesota,
one resource is Access Works to refer youth who are not
ready to stop injecting drugs.
General
Support
• When advocating for homeless youth, remember that
other service providers may not understand what the history
and experiences of a homeless youth have been. Be prepared
to educate other professionals.
• Always ask for a sexual risk history and have a conversation
about risk-reduction, Sexually Transmitted Infections and
Diseases (STI’s and STD’s). Offer youth safer sex supplies
and give them follow-up refer to agencies where they can
continue to access safer sex supplies and information.
Because sexual abuse and exploitation among homeless
females and males is common, it must always be included
in medical intakes.
• Attention must be paid to respiratory health. Homeless
youth often have respiratory conditions due to smoking,
exposure to weather and chemicals, or childhood illnesses.
• Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in homeless populations is
more common than has been recognized; consider TBI
when examining a homeless youth.
• Homeless and at-risk youth may not identify as being
sexually exploited.
School System Considerations:
• Never assume by a youth’s attire that they are or are
not homeless.
• School professionals should be educated about homeless
youth and warnings signs that a youth in school may be
homeless and/or exploited.
• Keep an updated referrals list and resources that will
be helpful to youth.
• Avoid labeling and generalizing youth’s experiences after
they have been exploited and/or are homeless.
• Be sensitive and familiar with the family compositions
and avoid assumptions of a youth’s family.
• Be sensitive to Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgendered/Queer/
Questioning (LGBTQQ) youth. (See Cultural Considerations
for LGBTQQ youth)
• Be aware of familial issues and whether or not it is safe
or unsafe to return a youth to “home,” or the place youth
is staying.
• Provide youth with resources and referrals based on a
youth’s specific needs. Only provide information about
the resources/referrals that you know to be true.
• Understand and be familiar with LGBTQQ youth.
Understand the dynamics of this population and know the
correct language for referring to this population. There is
overlap between homelessness and LGBTQQ youth; avoid
making assumptions based on preconceived notions and
stereotypes.
• To build trust and rapport with law enforcement and the
legal system, use comprehensive questioning and non generalized language (i.e. parent(s) rather than mom &
dad).
• Individuals within the court system have tremendous power
over youth; always treat youth with respect and dignity
even though they may look, act or behave differently than
the service provider.
Law Enforcement, Legal System and Juvenile Correction Systems Considerations:
• Be sensitive to youth and avoid judgments towards youth,
avoid generalizing and making assumptions about their
experiences. Rather than assuming, always ask the questions
directly to the youth.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
29
pg 31
31
General Support:
Cultural Considerations
• Watch and take notice of concerning body language
while interacting with youth.
• Take into consideration prior history, prior victimizations,
family history, etc.
Support
• Be sensitive and aware of a youth’s current and past
relationships. Take note of their socialization patterns
including their level of isolation with peers at school and
attachment.
General
Cultural Considerations:
Homeless Youth
Homeless Youth
Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender/Queer/
Questioning (LGBTQQ) Youth
The following are recommendations developed by Lesbian/Bisexual/Transgender/Queer/Questioning
community advocates as well as participating members involved with SHYIP.
General Considerations:
Cultural Considerations: LGBTQQ Youth
• Regardless of the shelter or Transitional Living Program
(TLP) youth should be allowed to self-define their gender.
This means specifically asking the youth: “What are the
most comfortable sleeping arrangements for you?” “Do you
want a male or female space to sleep, or a private place to
sleep (as available for transgender youth)?”
*Always allow youth respect, dignity and safety in choosing
gender specific sleeping arrangements.
*Before placing youth in a safe shelter, be aware of how
the staff responds to a Transgender youth, make sure it
is in a respectful and safe atmosphere.
• It is respectful to LGBTQQ youth to have non-gender
specific bathrooms in public spaces.
• Have clarity around the diversity of family. Recognize that
youth might come from queer/LGBTQQ families themselves.
• Some LGBTQQ youth may feel safer living on the street
than entering a shelter due to fear of harassment by peers
or inexperienced shelter staff.
• Be sensitive and use respectful pronouns. Ask youth how/
what gender pronoun they identify with, along with the
name they prefer to be called.
• Allow youth to identify who they are and how they identify.
If you do not know, always ask.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 32
Advocacy Considerations:
General
Support
• Avoid making assumptions about gender and/or about the
kinds of relationships/families individuals are involved with;
specifically, avoid generalizing that all youth are heterosexual.
• All personnel can learn to be allies for LGBTQQ youth
by leading by example, i.e. if there is a transgender student,
use their preferred pronoun and name. This also applies
across all professionals who seek to be resources for all youth.
• Some youth who have been assaulted by a same sex partner
may be concerned about not being taken seriously by
professionals. Youth may be concerned that others will
believe that males cannot be raped or that an assault by a
partner is “mutual” since they are both men and can protect
themselves.
• A person may not wish to be open about an assault if it
will somehow involve coming out about gender identity
or sexual orientation. Get consent from the individual
person before assuming it is okay to share their personal
information (sexual identity/orientation) with any other
providers or family members.
• Unlike many youth who come from families where
discrimination and harassment are shared experiences,
(i.e. racial discrimination), a person who is LGBTQQ will
face discrimination or harassment but they may not have
the support of their families.
• LGBTQQ youth may have multiple identities with which
their sexual orientation or gender identities intersect. It is
helpful to consider these intersections when advocating for
youth.
• Before providing referrals to youth, determine if the
referrals are LGBTQQ friendly and safe.
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*Always use inclusive language.
*Avoid making assumptions that someone is male or
female, gay or straight and always ask questions openly.
“Are you dating someone,” “How do you identify your
gender?” “Where do your parents live”, etc.
• Transgender youth may resist being seen naked. Many
transgender people do not relate comfortably to their
genitals and may deny to themselves that they exist.
*Transgender youth may be uncomfortable if they feel their
medical provider is deciding their gender based on their
genitals.
• Discretion should be used when calling the person from the
lobby for an appointment. If you are aware a person is
transgender, it is most respectful to walk up to them and say
it is their turn rather than call their legal name from across
the room, thereby “outing them” or causing them to feel unsafe.
• If you ask if a female is sexually active and she says she is,
do not assume she is referring to heterosexual vaginal sex.
• A person who is transgender also has a sexual orientation
and can be gay, lesbian, or bi-sexual, etc. Gender identity,
not biology, will likely determine how a person identifies
his or her sexual orientation. For example, a person born
biologically male who identifies as female and is attracted
to males will likely consider herself to be heterosexual.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
• Be a resource for medical needs rather than a provider who
is going to attempt to solve youth’s problems.
• Incorporate intake and assessment forms that are gender
inclusive to the medical setting.
• Provide sexual health education, sexually transmitted
infections/disease education, mental health support – never
assume the youth is straight or only has heterosexual sex/
relationships. If a youth identifies as “straight,” don’t assume
they only have heterosexual sex, etc.
• Medical providers must remain non-judgmental and use a
“Harm Reduction” approach to youth who choose to continue
in sex-work.
• Provide safe sex supplies to youth or provide a referral to a
clinic that can supply this.
• Provide affordable health care and all other basic needs and
services youth need in places that are LGBTQQ friendly
and safe.
*If the first response medical clinic is not affordable to the
specific youth’s needs, provide them with referrals that
would assist them best for the immediate and long-term
medical needs.
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pg 33
General Support:
Cultural Considerations
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• Many youth may not feel comfortable disclosing about
sexual behavior unless a clear non-judging stance has been
taken. Asking, “Have you been sexually involved with
males, females or both,” can be a nonjudgmental approach.
• Assess the situation of homeless youth/LGBTQQ youth;
meet youth where they are and avoid making decisions
about what you, as a professional, believe is best.
Support
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Medical System Considerations:
General
Cultural Considerations:
LGBTQQ Youth
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Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender/Queer/
Questioning (LGBTQQ) Youth
Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender/Queer/
Questioning (LGBTQQ) Youth
Law Enforcement System Considerations:
Cultural Considerations: LGBTQQ Youth
• Many transgender youth have identification that does not
match their gender expression and are therefore very
concerned about interacting with systems/people that may
be confront them about this inconsistency (airports, public
restrooms, reporting assault, etc).
• It is very important to remember that homeless
LGBTQQ youth need safer places to stay (places
are LGBTQQ friendly and where youth feel safe
welcome). When placing youth, be sure youth
comfortable at the safe place to ensure they will
at the secured safe place.
and
that
and
feel
stay
• Be sensitive and educated on the diversity of the LGBTQQ
community.
*It is common for service providers and law enforcement
to have opposing goals, having someone within law
enforcement to lead this effort is ideal.
• As law enforcement asks questions about family, be aware
that families come in a variety of arrangements. For example,
some youth have two moms/dads for parents; hence the
question “Where do your mom and dad live” is alienating.
It is better to ask youth, “Where does your family live,”
or “Where do your parents live?”
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 34
Legal System Considerations:
General
Support
• Law enforcement will encounter homeless and LGBTQQ
youth under many circumstances which law enforcement
deem dangerous and unsafe for youth. It is best to build a
relationship with youth before attempting to “save” the
youth, being a resource for youth is most helpful short and
long-term.
• Comprehensive questioning and non-generalized language
(parent(s) rather than mom & dad, or assuming sexual
orientation) will allow youth to build trust and rapport.
• Many transgender people have documents that have
discrepancies between legal name and gender marker
and gender presentation. It is best to inquire about these
privately to have questions clarified. Limit your questions
only to what is necessary rather than to satisfy curiosity.
Juvenile Corrections
System Considerations:
• Transgender youth are often placed in settings based on
biological features rather than identity. Any person who
does not conform to gender norms may be at significant
risk of being re-victimized in locked settings. To avoid
re-victimizing youth:
*Be conscious around issues of sleeping arrangements,
showers/bathrooms and changing areas. Provide private
and separate areas as needed.
• Some LGBTQQ youth are forced to stay in detention longer
than needed due to inability of workers to locate safe
placement settings in foster care or group homes.
• Individuals within the court system have tremendous power
over youth; always treat youth with respect and dignity
even though they may look, act or behave differently than
the service provider.
School System Considerations:
• Be sure both students and staff are clear on harassment
policies; in addition, anti-harassment polices should always
be enforced (teasing, taunting, etc.).
• Always allow students private changing areas in school
locker rooms.
• Encourage staff support for both LGBTQQ support groups
and Gay-Straight Alliances (GSA), and an awareness of the
difference between these groups (a confidential support
group just for LGBTQQ groups vs. a GSA which is more
of an activist/activity group).
35
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 35
General Support:
Cultural Considerations
Support
• Within each school, clearly identify “safe staff.” This can
be done with stickers, signs, etc. placed outside of staff
doors/offices. Safe staff members are known to be staff
members LGBTQQ students can talk with about issues.
General
Cultural Considerations:
LGBTQQ Youth
Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender/Queer/
Questioning (LGBTQQ) Youth
Latino/Hispanic Youth
The following are recommendations developed by Latino/Hispanic community
members as well as participating members involved with SHYIP.
• Latinos are not a monolithic ethnic group. Latinos can be
documented or undocumented immigrants from different
countries with different cultural traditions. They can belong
to families that have lived in the United States for many
generations. Some may claim English as their native language,
others may claim Spanish as their native language, and yet
others may be native speakers of a variety of indigenous
languages.
• Even if youth appear to speak English, ask if she/he would
prefer to have an interpreter. Hire only certified interpreters.
Do not use family members, particularly children, to interpret.
When using an interpreter:
*Face the victim, not the interpreter.
*Speak in first or second person. Ask: “What is your name?”
Instead of saying: “Ask her what her name is.”
• Understand the importance of the family. It is extremely
important to let the victim decide if she/he wants to inform
her/his family of the sexual assault. Ask if she/he would
like someone from the family to be present while making
a police report, evidentiary exams, counseling, etc. It is her/
his choice to have someone present.
• Be informed about the special challenges faced by
immigrants (racism, language barriers, sexism, cultural
differences, immigration status, etc.). Remember, abuse
is not a characteristic of the Latino culture, it can occur
in every culture.
• Some Latino youth will make less eye contact or touch
each other more in normal conversation, but others will not.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 36
Legal/Law Enforcement System
Considerations:
• Survivors of sexual assault may often believe that it is their
fault. Youth may choose not to discuss the assault with their
family because they don’t want to scare, dishonor or worry
their family, or because of religious beliefs.
General
Support
Cultural Considerations: Latino/Hispanic Youth
General Considerations:
• Youth who are immigrants may not report a sexual assault
due to fear of immigration problems or deportation. They
often distrust the legal system and may not know how to
ask for help because of their fears. Likewise, a perpetrator’s
immigration status may impact the youth’s decision to report.
Most youth do not want their families/partners to be deported.
They just want the abuse to stop.
• It may be difficult for a Latino survivor of sexual assault to
seek help because of a past experience with distrust and
discrimination with the system. Be aware of how these
biases may affect communication with law enforcement,
and provide reassurance of the confidentiality and safety
of the interaction.
• In some Latin American countries, sexual assault and/or
domestic violence are not viewed as a crime. In others,
sexual assault survivors regularly appear alongside the
perpetrator in the local media. In many Latin American
countries, photos of the suspected or convicted perpetrators
appear on the news. Sometimes the victim’s picture may
appear alongside it, or as part of the news piece. This may
interfere with the victim’s desire to report as a result of his/
her identity being “public”.
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• Always talk to youth and take police report alone and
without family members or friends present, regardless of
whom the youth states she is with.
Medical System Considerations:
• For many Latinos, questions related to sexuality are a
delicate topic, and youth should be asked if she/he will
prefer a female or male person to do the examination, make
the police report, etc. or in the presence of a person the
youth trusts.
• If the youth is truant from school, language and communication
may become a barrier for parents and school personnel.
*For example, youth may tell parents/caregivers that they
are going to school when there is no school because of
language barriers (and instead are going to a friend’s
house/boyfriend, shopping mall, etc.).
*Latino parents may not understand the school rules for
“un-excused” absence and may keep the youth home to
baby-sit for the family.
• Be aware that when youth go to a clinic or hospital the
perpetrator may accompany her/him. Be sure that regardless
of whom youth says she/he is with (friend, partner, brother,
etc.) that medical personnel see her/him alone.
School System Considerations:
• School personnel should consider that youth do not want to
confirm abuse, exploitation, or assault to authority figures
because of experiences where disclosure immediately follows
schools informing parents and/or guardians.
*Sensitivity and discussion of confidentiality and mandated
reporting should always be discussed with youth.
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SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 37
General Support:
Cultural Considerations
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*Inform youth of their rights their rights as minors. This
will help youth understand the importance of making a
report to the proper authorities or to be seen at the hospital.
*Informing Latino youth and parents/guardians of minor
consent laws is helpful for families who are unfamiliar
with confidentiality laws.
Support
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*It is important to explain to youth how sexual assault and
domestic violence are addressed in the United States
Criminal Justice System.
General
Cultural Considerations:
Latino/Hispanic Youth
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Latino/Hispanic Youth
Male Youth
The following are recommendations developed by male youth
advocates as well as participating members involved with SHYIP.
Introduction to Male Youth:
Cultural Considerations: Male Youth
There has been a bias in our culture against recognizing the
sexual assault of boys and men as prevalent and abusive. Because
of this bias, there has been a belief that boys and men do not
experience abuse and do not suffer from the same negative impact of sexual assault that girls or women do. Today this bias is
changing; many states are beginning to recognize that sexual assault of males is a problem. Research shows that one out of six boys
will have been assaulted by the age of 16. Unfortunately, experts
believe too many cases still go unreported.
Recent statistics suggest that 75% of sexual predators are male
and 25% are female. Sexual abuse by women of children and
teens is a subject most parents and caregivers are not familiar with. Female sexual predators go unreported because of lack
of awareness by the public. As recently as 10 years ago, it was
a common assumption that females did not or could not sexually abuse children or youth. As a result, as many as 86% of the
victims of female sexual predators are not believed, and therefore,
the crimes may go unreported and might not get prosecuted.
Many of the considerations stated in the document “Youth
Considerations” are applicable to male youth. However, because
male victims often face different issues there are additional
considerations that should be taken in to account. Following is
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 38
General Considerations:
• Boys are more likely than girls to be sexually abused by
strangers or by authority figures in organizations such as
schools, the church or athletic programs.
General
Support
The identification of sexual assaults committed against males is
a recently recognized phenomenon. Previous to the feminist efforts of the last 30 years, resulting in much more comprehensive
laws and growing public awareness, rape was the only “sex crime”
recognized by law. Only males could be charged with rape and
females were the only victims recognized by law.
list of general considerations along with a suggested list of
considerations when working with male youth:
• The feeling of denial is most common after a male youth
has been sexually assaulted. The reasons behind denial
include:
*A worry that people will not believe him
*A fear that the perpetrator may punish him for
reporting the crime
*Inability to view himself as a victim of a crime
*Reluctance to face all potential changes in him that
may result from acknowledging what has happened
• Mistaken attitudes including the perception that men/boys
cannot be forced into sex makes it difficult for a man or boy
who has experienced sexual assault to cope with the event,
leaving him feeling isolated, ashamed and feeling “less of
a man.”
• Erection or ejaculation during a sexual assault does happen.
Reassure the youth that a physical arousal has nothing to do
with sexual desires or consent. Physical contact or stress can
make physiological responses occur.
• For male youth, sexual assault typically causes confusion
or questioning about one’s sexuality. Reassure the youth that
his sexuality is unlikely to have changed as a result of being sexually assaulted.
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• When male youth are in a medical setting, don’t assume that
youth want a same sex provider; always ask if youth prefer
to have male or female medical provider.
• Be aware of the following fears and concerns a young male
victim may have when seeking services:
• Youth respond differently to being sexually assaulted. Some
may respond to their feelings of shame, guilt, or anger by
punishing themselves with self-destructive behavior.
*Being labeled as gay.
• As a coping behavior, some youth may begin using drugs
or alcohol. There may be signs of increased aggressive
behavior or becoming increasingly agitated with friends,
family and partners.
* Stigma associated with the myth that “males are not victims.”
• Many youth may pull away from relationships and family
making them more isolated.
*The assumption that, especially if he is gay, he will not
be believed or supported.
*Concern for being treated with shame, blame or intolerance
by law enforcement or the medical profession.
*Loss of security, sense of self and “innocence.”
Working with Male Youth:
• When working with young males, try to build rapport.
Appropriately expressing personal feelings and allowing
boys to appropriately express theirs will build better
relationships.
• It is best to engage youth with contemporary mediums
that they identify interest in. For example, you could use
a well know movie that highlights challenges, obstacles
and achievements in life.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
39
pg 39
General Support:
Cultural Considerations
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• Gay youth tend to hesitate reporting a sexual assault due to
fears of blame or intolerance by police or medical personnel.
As a result, gay youth might not seek out legal protection
and medical care following the assault.
• For many young men, appearing “soft,” too permissive,
or inconsistent will inhibit your interaction and progress
toward healthy relationship-building. Establish clear
guidelines and consequences that are logical, clear, and
understandable. These should be discussed from the
beginning of your interaction with the youth so that they
are aware of what they are expected to be accountable to
in the future.
Support
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• For homosexual youth, many blame themselves because
of their sexuality. This self – blame often adds another layer
of problematic thoughts for professionals to assess.
General
Cultural Considerations:
Male Youth
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Male Youth
Somali Youth
The following are recommendations developed by Somali community
members as well as participating members involved with SHYIP.
Who Are Somali People?
Somalia is located eastern Africa, bordering the Gulf of Aden and
the Indian Ocean, east of Ethiopia. Due to the collapse of the 1991
Somali government and subsequent civil war, thousands of Somalis
immigrated to this country as either refugees or political asylees.
An estimated 50,000 Somalis have made Minnesota their home
because of economic opportunities. It is very important for one to
know the following key elements about this community:
• Language: The spoken language is Somali with regional
variations.
Cultural Considerations: Somali Youth
• Social Structure: Based on family and clan group.
• Religion: The majority of Somalis (99%) are Muslim
Sunnis. Being a Muslim means declaring (Shahadah) that
there is only one God and Mohammed is his messenger.
General Considerations:
• Shaking hands with the opposite sex is not a common
practice in the Somali culture. It is best to not shake hands
unless one is first extended to you.
• Physical contact between men and women in public is avoided.
• Somalis sometimes use sweeping hands and arm gestures
to make a point or express a feeling.
• The American way of using the index finger to call someone
to come towards you is offensive to Somalis. It is a sign of
disrespect.
• To show respect, young people avoid looking adults in the eye.
• Indirect speech and humor is used as a way of saving face
and overcoming embarrassment.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
• In the traditional household, the father is the head of the
household; however, due to the civil war in Somalia, many
young people are now raised by single mothers.
pg 40
• One of the important pillars of Islam includes praying five
times a day. It is good practice to offer youth a place to pray
during prayer times. Do not to be offended if someone
requests prayer time.
• Another important pillar of Islam is fasting during the
month of Ramadan. The start and end dates of Ramadan
change every year because it is based on the lunar year.
A person who might be fasting during Ramadan is not
allowed to eat or drink from dawn to dusk.
• In the Muslim religion, drinking alcohol and consuming
products containing pork is prohibited. Do not offer Somalis
alcoholic beverages. Youth who drink alcohol or use drugs
might not want anyone to find out because in addition to
being illegal, using alcohol and drugs are not culturally
accepted behaviors.
• As with other religions, in the Muslim religion, rape is a
serious offense and carries serious consequences. There is a
stigma associated with rape, which often prevents victims to
come forward with their stories.
• Avoid making judgments based on a Somali youth’s attire.
Generally, Somali women wear a head scarf and prefer to
cover their entire body. This is something required by their
religion and is part of their culture and tradition. Youth may
choose to dress less traditionally and more mainstream
(urban or pop culture attire) without approving or disapproving
his/her entire culture and religion.
Medical System Considerations:
• Somali youth might not know how to cooperate with law
enforcement.
• Although it is an unlawful act, female circumcision is a
common practice. Be mindful when examining young
women who might have been circumcised and focus on the
issue at hand.
• Youth might not be comfortable to share their sexual or
medical history with strangers including medical professionals.
Providers should explain why the discussion is important,
how it might help the victim, the issue of confidentiality,
right to choose services, as well as available resources.
• During physical examination, females might not be comfortable
to be with male doctors or interpreters. Ask ahead if they
prefer female or male doctors or interpreters.
• Youth might not want their parents or relatives to find out
what has happened to them for fear of shaming family
members or fear of bringing family members to court.
• Youth might not want to go back to their immediate family.
Let youth know their rights and of any community resources
that are available to them.
• Youth might prefer living with extended family rather than
a foster family or shelter.
• Youth might be suffering from mental health issues or
substance abuse in addition to being sexually abused. If a
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
Law Enforcement System Considerations:
• Somali youth hang out to be together but are rarely gang
affiliated. It is a cultural norm for friends to congregate
in social groups.
• Let youth know about available community resources and
provide interpreter services if language is a barrier; be sure
to ask youth if they would be most comfortable with a male
or female interpreter.
• Do not make assumptions or stereotypes; rather, ask questions
if you are not sure about something related to the youth and/
or the Somali community.
• Many Somalis fear dogs and get upset if touched by dogs or
chased by one. It is best to keep dogs away from them when
seeking their trust or cooperation.
Court System Considerations:
• Explain to youth and family the way the court system works,
as they will most likely not be familiar with the system.
• Provide interpreters if language is a barrier. Ask youth what
gender of interpreter they are most comfortable being with
throughout the court process.
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pg 41
General Support:
Cultural Considerations
youth has substance abuse or mental health issues, inform
them of available treatment and support services he/she
can access.
Support
• Avoid making judgments based on a Somali youth’s verbal
language skills. Some youth learn to speak English before
they develop sufficient reading, vocabulary, and comprehension
skills.
General
Cultural Considerations:
Somali Youth
Somali Youth
Somali Youth
• Economic disparities often do not allow for equal
representation under the law. Let families know if they
are eligible for legal assistance and inform families and
youth of their rights.
• Only with the family and/or youth’s consent, connect with
Somali community leaders for assistance if culture is a
barrier.
Cultural Considerations: Somali Youth
• With permission of the youth, find out if there are local
restorative justice programs that are available to youth.
• Be aware that the entire family and community might
appear in court and expect you to explain the facts of the
case. Give families and relatives an explanation of what you
can realistically and legally share with them.
School System Considerations:
• If you are communicating with youth or parents and
language is a barrier, provide an interpreter and seek
additional services from school liaisons and advocates.
• Explain confidentiality and mandated reporting laws and
appropriate conduct to youth and family before any
problems arise.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 42
General
Support
• Clearly explain to families and youth the meaning, the
purpose and the consequences of criminal no contact
orders and other legal actions.
Amherst H. Wilder Foundation: Wilder Research. Research on Homeless Youth,
Race and Culture and Troubled Youth: http://www.wilder.org
Minnesota Runaway and Homeless Youth Act: http://mnrunawayandhomelessyouthact.com/
Sue, D. (2004) Counseling the Culturally Diverse (4th ed.). New York: John Wiley & Sons.
The Center for Victims of Torture Resource website for culture
competency reading: http://www.cvt.org/main.php/ResourceCenter
The National Child Traumatic Stress Network: http://www.nctsnet.org
Ungar, M. (2005). Handbook for working with children and youth. Pathways
to resilience across cultures and contexts. California: Sage Publications.
43
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 43
General Support:
Cultural Considerations
Minnesota Office of Justice Programs (OJP) “Snapshots on Minnesota Youth.”
(2007). http://www.ojp.state.mn.us/newsletters/Snapshots/2007-09.htm
Support
Fontes, L.A. (2005). Child abuse and culture. Working with diverse families.
New York: Guilford Press.
General
Cultural Considerations:
Suggested Reading for Further Information
Suggested Reading for Further Information
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 44
Strengthening Prevention Strategies: Theory and Practice
of Effective Youth Development
Compiled by Theresa Dolezal, MA
Part one of the information provided is intended to encourage best
practices among professionals who work with youth.
Part two of the information provided involves general suggestions
for family and friends when interacting with youth.
A key premise of positive youth development suggests that when
working with sexually exploited homeless/runaway youth, professionals
must consider the youth’s unique life circumstances and focus on their
capabilities, strengths, and developmental needs (See Cultural Considerations for information on youth culture). Within positive youth development approaches, public health agencies suggest a harm reduction
model. Harm reduction recognizes that some people will inevitably engage in high risk behavior and that it may not be possible to eliminate
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 45
General Support:
Positive Youth Development
Positive youth development efforts intend to promote health and wellness and prevent problems from developing. This is often expressed
in terms of promoting protective factors and decreasing risk factors.
Protective factors for all youth include events, interactions, circumstances
and experiences that nurture their life goals, helping youth choose
behaviors that do not compromise their health and safety. It is hoped
that supporting youth will promote resiliency while decreasing risk
factors, which may include events, circumstances and factors that
limit the likelihood of healthy development including exposure to interpersonal violence, economic poverty, and inadequate housing options. In the context of SHYIP, professionals can promote protective
factors in the daily interactions with youth by structuring services,
systems, and support that will help youth develop skills and gain the
resources they need to thrive and face the myriad challenges they
encounter.
Regardless of history, social status or life experiences, all youth have
hopes, dreams, talents, and skills that can be developed or crushed as
life is full of adversarial experiences. As professionals from multiple
disciplines interact with sexually exploited homeless/runaway youth,
there are many opportunities to help generate protective factors and
decrease risk factors associated with sexual abuse and exploitation.
The following approaches offer information on strategies found to
strengthen youth’s protective factors.
Support
The Safe Harbors Youth Intervention Project (SHYIP) seeks a
multi-disciplinary approach to prevention by identifying and supporting prevention strategies that help professionals, family members, and
communities provide opportunities and spaces for sexually exploited
homeless/runaway youth to thrive. The following section contains
information and points to consider about positive youth development as
a strategy for interacting with youth.
these behaviors completely; however, it suggests that it is possible to
reduce the harm done by addressing the conditions associated with the
risky behavior and a process that meets the youth “where they are at.”
General
Positive Youth Development:
Strengthening Prevention Strategies
Positive Youth Development
Youth Development Programs are:
• Youth Centered staff and activities centered on engaging
youth’s diverse talents, skills, and interests. These activities
build on their strengths and involving youth to engage in
planning and decision-making that ultimately build
empowerment.
• Knowledge Centered – activities will involve an array of
activities, including music, sports, clubs, theater/dance and
community service. This acquired knowledge and experience
will build a range of real life skills that provide opportunities
to connect with a wide array of adult and peer mentors in the
future.
• Care Centered – youth are provided safe space to build
trusting relationships.
Youth Development Seeks to Build the
Following Competencies:
• Social competencies, such as work and family life skills,
problem-solving skills, and communication skills;
• Moral competencies, such as personal values and ethics,
a sense of responsibility and citizenship (including
participation in civic life and community service);
• Emotional competencies, such as a sense of personal
identity, self-confidence, autonomy, and the ability to resist
negative peer pressure;
• Physical competencies, such as physical conditioning and
endurance, and an appreciation for and strategies to achieve
lifelong physical health and fitness; and
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 46
• Cognitive competencies, such as knowledge, reasoning
ability, creativity, a lifelong commitment to learning and
achievement, and self determination.
Premises of Youth Development:
General
Support
Positive Youth Development: Strengthening Prevention Strategies
Strengthening Prevention Strategies:
Theory and Practice of Effective Youth Development
• Focus on assets and strengths, not problems. Provide youth
with praise and assistance through programs that find
solutions and address the real or human needs of their lives.
• Young people should participate in designing the program
and its activities. This will help the youth develop a sense
of accountability and connection to the program, agency,
or community.
• Programs should involve committed, trusted and knowledgeable
adults. Professionals should enjoy mentoring and helping
youth.
• Successful youth development requires community
partnerships. This requires professionals to join youth to
advocate that youth are community resources, not “trouble
makers” or causes of dysfunction in society.
To Help Young People Develop, the Following Opportunities are Needed:
• The opportunity to develop self-worth and an ability to
contribute through meaningful interactions;
• The opportunity for independence and control over one’s
life through guided experimentation and boundary setting
to discover self and an enjoyment of life;
• The opportunity to build close and significant relationships
with peers and at least one adult;
• The opportunity to gain competency and mastery through
experiences being active in nature, expressing themselves
creatively, and interacting with multiple generations.
attitudes, and behaviors that will assure future well-being.
For example, sexual health, decreasing substance use, good
nutrition, and a better understanding of the consequences of
risky behaviors.
2. Personal/Social Skills – Intrapersonal skills – the ability to
understand ones own emotions, practice self-discipline, and set
personal boundaries and goals. Interpersonal skills – working
with others, developing and sustaining friendships through
cooperation, empathy, and negotiation, and developing
judgment skills and coping systems.
3. Knowledge – Reasoning, and Creativity – A broad base of
knowledge and an ability to appreciate and demonstrate
creative expression. Good oral, written and problem-solving
skills and an ability to learn. Interest in life-long learning
and achieving.
4. Vocational Awareness – A broad understanding of life options
and the steps to take in making choices. Adequate preparation
for work and family life and an understanding of the value
and purpose of family, work, and leisure.
5. Citizenship – Understanding national, community, and racial,
ethnic, or cultural group history and values. Desire to be
ethical and to be involved in efforts that contribute to the
broader good.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 47
General Support:
Positive Youth Development
• The opportunity to belong and have membership through
active participation in a variety of programs and activities;
Support
• The opportunity for safety and structure through open
and non-judgmental discussions about values with safe,
trusting adults;
Five Outcomes of Positive Youth
Development:
1. Health – Good current health status and evidence of knowledge,
General
Positive Youth Development:
Strengthening Prevention Strategies
Strengthening Prevention Strategies:
Theory and Practice of Effective Youth Development
Positive Youth Development
Positive Youth Development
Recommended Strategies for Family and Friends Interacting with Youth
For runaway prevention to be useful, it must begin before problems arise. As youth mature into adolescence, adults are encouraged to acknowledge and support the adjustment to a new stage
in life. This may mean empathizing with the youth’s experiences
and considering situations from his or her viewpoint. Parent/caregivers should also share their feelings as a parent/caregiver and make
clear their expectations from the youth. An open environment for
sharing feelings encourages youth come to an adult sooner if they
have problems. If it seems that a youth might run away, it’s important
to confront the situation right away. Expressing concern and offering to listen if the youth needs to talk are good first steps. It’s
important to make clear to the youth that the parent/caregivers
do not want the youth to run away. The National Runaway
Switchboard (NRS) is also available 24 hours a day, seven days
a week, as a resource for parents or youth in this difficult situation
(1-800-runaway). NRS can provide safe options for youth considering
running or already on the street.
• Read, watch TV or movies, and surf the internet together.
This offers adults a chance to start conversations about their
own values and opinions.
General Recommendations to Help Build
Healthy Relationships:
• Encourage youth to get involved in fun, safe, fulfilling
activities. Help youth to identify their strengths, talents, and
interests and encourage them to volunteer in the community,
join a youth group, or participate in arts, sports or school
activities.
• Spend time with children and teens. Shared experiences
build relationships based on affection and trust that form
the basis for future communication.
• Eat together. Meals offer the opportunity to talk about the
day’s events and to grow closer. Use the time for conversation,
not confrontation.
• Be present within the home as much as you can. Adult
supervision is not always possible, however adults remind
youth that they are accountable, offers opportunities to
connect, and demonstrates adult interest in their lives.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 48
• If you have a computer, put it in a centralized location in the
home. This provides accountability to adults and opens
communication between youth and adults.
• Exercise or play sports together. Shared experiences create
important connections as young people develop.
• Get involved in community service with your kids. Modeling
good experiences and behaviors of community involvement
will not only provide a good example but will also create
connections and increased relationships to each other.
• Help youth gain a sense of self-confidence. By offering
praise for jobs well done and emphasizing the things youth
do right develop the ability to navigate the world. If youth
fall short, adults can suggest ways to improve by providing
alternative scenarios, not criticism.
Tips for Healthy Interactions with Youth:
• Pay Attention – Listen when youth are talking with you.
Ask questions and provide feedback in conversations
interesting to the youth.
• Give Respect – Acknowledge and support youth’s struggle
to grow and mature.
Recommended Strategies for Family and Friends Interacting with Youth
• Understand Youth Perspective – Try to empathize with
the youth’s experiences and struggles.
• Create Responsibility – Give youth choices, not direct
orders. Help youth understand the consequences of their
actions.
• Administer Positive Praise – Be specific about praise and
reward good behavior and positive decisions, especially
when you recognize the choice was difficult.
• Avoid Hassling – Asking too many questions often shuts
off information and closes conversation.
• Avoid Always Giving the Answers – Youth must learn to
reason and think critically so that they are able to find their
own answers or solutions to problems when they need to.
• Use Team Work – Work together to lay out the problems
and find mutually agreeable solutions. Make sure the youth
understands the problem and reasons for the solutions.
• Identify Clear Boundaries and Expectations – Clearly
establish and communicate with youth about what is and
what is not acceptable and expected of them. Discuss
immediate and long term consequences of not following
expectations and rules based on what is fully expected.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
• Teach me that getting up to go to school every day, on time,
is important by supporting my attendance and welcoming me.
• Teach me to be the kind of person other people will respect
by setting clear boundaries and expectations.
• Teach me to be fair and consistent by being fair and
consistent with me.
• Teach me to listen and value other people’s opinions by
listening to me and valuing my opinions.
• Teach me to behave well by modeling appropriate behavior.
• Teach me that there are consequences for inappropriate
behavior.
• Teach me not to engage in risky behaviors by modeling
healthy choices.
• Teach me that profanity and violence are unacceptable
by paying attention to what I watch, listen to and view
on the internet.
• Teach me to do my best by expecting me to do my best.
• Teach me to love learning by reading with me.
• Teach me that the community values me by providing
safe places for me to study and play and work after school.
pg 49
General Support:
Positive Youth Development
• Openly Discuss Feelings – When adults share their thoughts
and feelings, youth know it is safe to share their own feelings
when they need to.
• Teach me the value of community by providing opportunities
for me to contribute.
Support
• Allow Youth to Make Mistakes – Everyone makes
mistakes; youth must learn to cope with mistakes in positive
and healthy ways. This can occur by normalizing mistakes.
Advice from Youth:
General
Positive Youth Development
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Positive Youth Development
Positive Youth Development
Recommended Strategies for Family and Friends Interacting with Youth
Questions to Help Youth Considering Running Think Through Their Decision:
• Are there benefits to staying at home?
• What else can you do to improve your home situation
before you leave?
• What would need to change at home to enable you to stay?
• What makes running away unsafe?
• How do you plan to survive on your own?
• Who is a safe person you can count on to help you?
Do they know they are your safe person?
• Have you thought out a plan to run? If so, what is your plan?
• Who will you call if you end up in trouble?
Positive Youth Development
• What are your other options?
• If you run and then return home, what may happen?
Signs a Teen Might be Thinking of Running
Away From Home:
• Changes in behaviors or patterns: Youth who suddenly
stop eating or begin to overeat, sleep all day or never sleep,
spend all their time with friends or never want to leave their
room. Sudden mood swings mean youth are unsettled and
restless. Youth may be coping in an unhealthy way to stress
or distressing situations.
• Rebellious behavior: Dropping grades, truancy, breaking
rules at home, and picking fights are all symptoms that your
child is having problems.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 50
General
Support
• Why are you running?
• Disclosure of intentions to run away: Some youth will hint
that they want to run away and some will outright threaten
their family with running. Sometimes their family will hear
rumors through friends, school, or other parents that their
child is thinking of leaving home.
• Accumulation of money and possessions: To survive, run
aways need money and resources. Some runaways prepare
for their run by slowly withdrawing cash from their savings
accounts. Keeping a bag or backpack of clothes in the closet
might mean they are waiting to make a quick escape.
• Confront your suspicions right away. Clearly and calmly let
youth know you are concerned about them and their behavior
makes you afraid they might run away from home. Invite
them to talk with you or someone else about what is troubling
them and be supportive of finding positive ways of coping
with their stress. Let them know you don’t want them to run
away and you’re committed to helping the family work
things out. If youth’s intent is on running away, give them
the phone number of the National Runaway Switchboard
(NRS) so that they can find safe options while out on their
own (1-800-runaway). Tell them they can also use the NRS
to stay in touch with you even if they choose not to stay
at home.
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Center for Youth Development and Policy Research.
A New Vision: Promoting Youth Development,
Testimony of Karen Johnson
(Youth in the US who were identified as runaway/throwaway in a 1999
by the National Incidence Studies of Missing, Abducted, Runaway and
Throwaway Children (NISMART) study with 1,682,900 youth)
Pittman,before the House Select Committee on
Children, Youth and Families, September 30, 1991
• Experiences of physical or sexual abuse at home in the
year prior to leaving and/or fear of abuse upon return
(350,400, 21%)
• Substance dependency (317,800, 19%)
• In the company of someone abusing drugs (302,100, 18%)
Making the Case: Community Foundations and Youth
Development , Bonnie Politz, Senior Program Officer,
Academy for Educational Development
• Extremely young, 13 years old or younger (305,300, 18%)
Center for Youth Development & Policy Research,
Foundations for Change, 1996, Second Edition
• Using hard drugs (292,000, 17%)
The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children
www.missingkids.com
• Presence in a place where criminal activity occurs
(256,900, 12%)
Works Referenced:
The National Runaway Switchboard. (2008).
More runaway prevention tips for parents
http://www.1800runaway.org/pub_mat/tips1.html
The recommendations found in the present document have been
compiled from literature, brochures, and experts working in the
field of positive youth development. These include:
The National Runaway Switchboard (2008).
Signs my Teen Might be Thinking of Running Away.
http://www.1800runaway.org/pub_mat/signs.html
Advocates for Youth, 2008
www.advocatesforyouth.org
Advocates for Youth. August, 2001.
www.advocatesforyouth.org
National Runaway Switchboard (NRS). (2008) What can
a parent do to prevent their child from running away.
http://www.1800runaway.org/sourcebook/contents.html#f
The National Collaboration for Youth, Yonger
Americans Act Policy Proposal, 2000
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
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General Support:
Positive Youth Development
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The Most Frequent Characteristics that
Place Runaway/Throwaway Youth in
Danger:
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Recommended Strategies for Family and Friends Interacting with Youth
General
Positive Youth Development
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Positive Youth Development
Support for Family and Friends Section
Considerations for When a Young Person Runs Away from Home
The experience of running away can be frightening for youth, their families and/or friends. The primary goal of this section is to assist families
and friends to consider the necessary steps when looking for help locating a youth who has run away. The following information was integrated based on the recommendations of professionals working in medical,
outreach, law enforcement, and prosecution fields.
law enforcement and professionals with necessary information, ask a
family member or friend to help and support you through this process
as it may be difficult. The situations leading up to a youth running away
may involve complicated dynamics, including, but not limited to: incidents of racial discrimination toward the youth, experiences with interpersonal violence, familial conflict about a youth’s peer group and
social behaviors, and a youth adopting nontraditional behaviors that are
unsanctioned or rejected by their previous support system .
It is important to consider that there are differences between
‘missing children’ and ‘runaway children.’ A missing child is someone
who is taken from their home or family against their will (i.e. abducted
or wandering). A runaway youth is someone who has intentionally left
home, often fleeing from a negative situation or having been coerced
to leave. While some suggestions are universal, approaches to locate
and help runaway youth versus missing children are different. For more
information on what to do when a loved one is missing call the
National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC) on their
toll-free telephone number: 1-800-THE-LOST (1-800-843-5678) or visit
www.missingkids.com.
Given the potential complications, it may not be the best solution for
the youth or the family member(s) to have the youth return home.
While families and friends want to know their loved one is safe, the
situation the young person ran from cannot be overlooked. It is of
utmost importance that when a youth returns, the problems that
prompted them to leave must be addressed and resolved—solutions
should be agreed upon by both guardian/caregiver/parent as well as
by the youth. An interim placement should be considered when
appropriate to offer the family an opportunity to work on solving larger
problems and come up with long-term options. Please refer to the
SHYIP community resources if counseling or further support is desired.
Support for Family and Friends
Compiled by Theresa Dolezal, MA
To help locate and return a running youth to safety, it is important for
families and friends to remain calm and rational, thinking clearly and
logically about where the youth might be and the reasons why he or
she might have run away may be helpful. Despite your emotions and
reactions to the situation, it is best to stay calm. Although locating the
youth immediately may seem difficult, it is critical that every attempt
possible is made to find them before they are recruited to use and/or
engage in drugs, alcohol, crime, sexual exploitation, pornography,
and/or prostitution for survival.
When a youth runs, many people may feel guilty, depressed, anxious
or even paralyzed by fear. However, it is important to be candid and
direct with law enforcement and outreach professionals concerning the
circumstances that may have led a youth to run. If you cannot provide
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 52
Immediate Action with Law Enforcement:
• Contact law enforcement and make a report to the police.
• If your local law-enforcement agency will not enter
information about the youth into NCIC’s databases, the
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) will. The Missing
Children Act of 1982 mandates information to be entered.
Contact your nearest FBI field office for help. Regardless
of what you are told, there is no law requiring a waiting
period for reporting a youth missing to law enforcement
or for entry into NCIC.
Immediate Action with Community, Friends
and Family:
• Go to the young person’s school and talk with all of their
teachers and school staff. Ask if they have noticed any
unusual behavior and who the young person hangs out
with/talks with/associates with.
• Contact the young person’s friends. Ask if they have ANY
information about the youth’s whereabouts, and give them
your number in case they hear from the youth. Reassure the
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
• Check with the youth’s friends, partner/girlfriend/boyfriend,
school, neighbors, relatives, or anyone else who may know
of or have clues about his/her whereabouts. Ask them to
notify you if they hear from her/him. If the youth has a
computer and other online devices, they should be checked
as a source of leads or other information concerning
individuals she/he may have been in communication with.
It may shed light on a planned meeting between the missing
youth and someone he or she “met” online or discussed
plans with in chat rooms, instant messenger, Myspace and
Facebook accounts, etc.
• When appropriate, have posters or flyers made (see following
example for what to include). Place them in store windows,
and distribute them to truck stops, youth-oriented businesses
(e.g. drop-in centers, local hang outs, to street outreach
agencies, etc.), hospitals, treatment centers, law-enforcement
agencies, and local spots the youth may frequent.
• Circulate flyers, pictures, and information about the youth
with local Outreach Workers and shelters (see resource
section for sample flyer and contact information).
• Call or visit several local spots that the youth may frequent.
Also, check with area hospitals and treatment centers. If she
or he was employed, call the employer or coworkers.
• Ask friends, family and immediate contacts when the last
time she/he saw the youth and if the youth said anything
that may lead to where the youth has run to.
pg 53
General Support:
Support for Family & Friends
• Provide law enforcement and street outreach workers with
a recent photograph of the youth. Please see community
resources for a list of street outreach workers.
youth’s friends that the youth on the run is NOT IN
TROUBLE but that you want them to be safe and you are
worried about their endangerment. Provide youth’s friends
with resources that will help this location process if they
seem willing and able.
Support
• Request that the youth’s name and identifying information
be immediately entered into the National Crime Information
Center (NCIC) Missing Person File, a national law enforcement
database that will pick up their information if she/he is
found anywhere in the state. Please be aware that this
information will not give the youth a criminal record with
law enforcement, but will only assist in his or her safe return.
General
Support for Family and
Friends
Support for Family and Friends
Support for Family and Friends
On-going Searches and Follow-up:
• Identify a “safe” person/place for the youth to stay with if
they are not willing or able at this time to stay at home.
Have this person in mind so that if the youth contacts you,
you are able to suggest it as an option. This person must be
a “safe” person in from the youth’s perspective too. Make
sure the person know he/she is the designated safe person.
Support for Family and Friends
• Use all available technologies to assist in the search. For
instance, outgoing messages can be left and others on your
answering machine, with an answering service, and/or on
voice mail. You may consider wanting to keep your telephone
number free at all times, explore the possibility of getting
a second telephone line to be used as a facsimile line, a
connection to an online service/the Internet, and/or as an
additional telephone line.
• Telephone calling features such as Call Trace, Caller ID,
and Call Return may help in your search. Check with your
service provider to see if these calling features are available
in your area and if any additional features are available to
assist in your search. If you cannot afford these available
technologies to help this process, you should contact local
service agencies that support families and youth for
emergency funds and/or financial support. It never hurts to
ask for extra support.
• Search for leading information in the youth’s room, school
locker, journal, notes, letters, computer files, electronic mail,
current and past telephone bills, bank account, automatic teller-machine (ATM) transactions, and credit-card bills.
Check with the motor vehicle licensing and registration
bureau within your state, and other states, if the youth is
of age to drive.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 54
• If youth have bank account/credit card, attempt to get bank
statements to potentially track any recent activity.
• If the youth utilizes networking and social websites such as
myspace.com, facebook.com, ask a youth’s friend to see
their webpage to see any online activity and/or conversations
that may lead to his/her location or information about the
situation.
If the Youth Contacts You But Is Unwilling to
Come Home:
• It is important to show love and concern for the youth,
not anger or fear despite adverse feelings you may have.
Remember the goal is to help work through problems and
have him or her return home, not shame or scold the youth
for running.
• Encourage the youth to contact a local runaway shelter
or the National Runaway Switchboard (NRS) at
1-800-621-4000 for assistance and support.
• Ask if you can stay in touch with the youth. Suggest setting
specific plans with a form of contact (telephone number,
mailing address, electronic mail).
• Always ask if the youth is safe. Determine level of safety
plan based on their response. If the youth is not safe, it is
best to contact law enforcement in regards to their contact
for assistance.
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• Be prepared to make changes. If no changes are made to
make the situation better, the youth is likely to run again.
• Most importantly, when the youth returns, try to resolve the
problems in the child’s life, especially those that involve
the family, which prompted him or her to leave home in the
first place.
• If you are unable to address the family problems effectively,
seek the assistance of a licensed counselor or helping
professional. Families can contact the local department of
social services (usually by county), family services, or other
public or private agencies that help families. Members of the
clergy, school personnel, or the law-enforcement community
can also direct you to available services and resources. If
possible, make counseling or support arrangements before
the young person returns. It may be helpful to have the
services readily available to be immediately accessed upon
his/her return.
• Remember that it may be necessary for a youth to go to a
temporary residence or runaway shelter while the family
works toward resolving its problems. A licensed counselor
or professional can help you make this decision if it feels
difficult.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
Building the Foundation for a Healthy Teen
& Family/Kinship Relationship
• Spend time with children and teens. Shared experiences
build relationships based on affection and trust that forms
the basis for future communication.
• Eat together. Meals offer the opportunity to talk about the
day’s events and to grow closer. Use the time for conversation,
not confrontation.
• Read, watch TV or movies, and surf the internet together.
• Get involved in community service with your kids.
• Exercise or play sports together.
• Help teens gain a sense of self-confidence. Offer praise for
jobs well done and emphasize the things your children do
right. If they fall short, suggest ways to improve; avoid
criticism and work to empower them to try again.
• Encourage your teens to get involved in fun, safe, fulfilling
activities. Help your children to identify their strengths,
talents, and interests and encourage them to volunteer in the
community, join a youth group, or participate in arts, sports
or school activities.
pg 55
General Support:
Support for Family & Friends
o
• Remember to show care and concern for his or her safety
and well-being—not anger or fear. If you react with anger,
youth may feel unwanted and unloved and run away again.
Make sure s/he understands that you care about what
happens to him or her.
• Promptly notify law enforcement, the state clearinghouse,
National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC),
the National Runaway Switchboard (NRS), or anyone
else who may have assisted you about the return of the
youth. If the youth has been away for an extended period of
time, a complete medical examination is needed when he or
she returns home including tests for sexually transmitted
diseases and an assessment of mental health concerns may
also be helpful depending on experiences and circumstances
of being away.
Support
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Tips for Families When a Runaway Youth
Returns Home
General
Support for Family and
Friends
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Support for Family and Friends
Support for Family and Friends
Prevention Efforts: Considerations for
Friends and Family
• Give Respect – Acknowledge and support youth’s struggle
to grow and mature.
• Understanding Youth – Try to empathize with what youth
may be going through.
• Avoid Lectures – Everyone responds favorably to clear
information and direction.
• Avoid Labels – Labels will only confuse the real issues that
you wish to address.
Support for Family and Friends
• Be Open – When adults share their feelings, youth know
it’s safe to share their own.
• Create Responsibility – Give youth choices, not orders.
Help them understand the consequences of their actions
and model this behavior.
• Administer Positive Praise – Be specific and give praise to
reward good behavior and good choices.
• Stop Hassling – Asking too many questions often shuts off
information and creates frustration for all people involved.
• Avoid Always Giving Answers – You want youth to be able
to find their own answers or solutions to problems. Play
“what if” to help them develop problem-solving skills and
natural consequences to situations.
• Use Team Work – Work together to lay out the problems
and find mutually agreeable solutions.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 56
General
Support
• Pay Attention – Listen when youth are talking with you and
engage in conversations based on their interests.
The Safe Harbors Youth Intervention Project
(SHYIP) Protocol Guidelines
Advocacy / 58
Ramsey County Juvenile Delinquency / 76
Ramsey County Human Services Children’s Mental Health / 85
Law Enforcement / 65
Ramsey County Attorney’s Office / 77
Ramsey County Human Services Children’s Crisis Response / 86
Medical Assessments / 69
Ramsey County Human Services / 80
Schools / 88
Ramsey County Community Corrections / 73
Ramsey County Human Services Foster/Shelter Placement / 81
Shelter & Drop-In Centers / 91
Ramsey County Juvenile Detention Center / 75
Ramsey County Child Protection / 83
Street Outreach / 94
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 57
Discipline Specific
Protocol Guidelines
Discipline Specific Protocol Guidelines
Advocacy
Services and support by advocates are person-centered and based
on individual’s defined needs. An advocate’s role includes informing
youth of their rights as a survivor of crime and as a minor. Youth
have the right to privacy and confidential information; mandatory reporting should always be discussed with youth before disclosure. The role of an advocate is to provide support, guidance, and
advocacy; and to provide appropriate information and referrals
to the survivor of a sexual assault.
Advocates recognize that sexual violence has secondary influences
on family, friends and partners. The advocate also provides advocacy
to secondary victims. Services provided by each agency may vary
based on cultural differences and staff limitations. Please see the
Cultural Considerations section of the SHYIP Protocol Guidelines
when working with diverse cultural communities.
First Response with Youth
The first response and contact with youth requires warmth,
empathy and concern. An effective advocate will:
• Ask, “How can I help?”
• Assess need for culturally specific advocate or interpretive
services.
• Assure and tell youth you believe her/him.
• Be open and nonjudgmental in attitude and approach.
Advocacy
• Be sensitive to the issues and dynamics of youth.
• Be honest and not make promises s/he cannot keep.
• Discuss mandated reporting and how that applies to youth.
(See Consent and Confidentiality Section)
• Reinforce youth’s decision to call advocate’s office/youth
agency.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 58
• Accept youth’s reactions to violence. Everyone responds
differently to stress and/or crisis.
• Be a good listener. Silence is okay. Let youth talk at her/his
own pace.
• Address safety:
*Where is the perpetrator?
*Is the youth safe right now? Where are they? Is home a
safe place for youth?
*Assess ongoing safety issues (shelter, home security, etc).
• Help identify options and choices for next steps and how to
proceed to best help them.
• Discuss referrals; help youth in connecting with resources.
• Provide information regarding reporting to law enforcement
and assist with the reporting process and address concerns.
(See Reporting below)
• Address medical needs (Sexually Transmitted Infections
(STI) and pregnancy testing, birth control options, medical
follow-up).
• Provide/offer ongoing crisis and in-person counseling,
information referrals, support groups, and financial
assistance as needed.
• Support decisions made by youth and if safety is a concern,
it is okay to state, “I am concerned for your safety.”
Advocacy in Schools
Initial contact with youth victimized by sexual violence in a
school setting is usually done through a school staff member
(e.g., Guidance Counselor, Social Worker, Nurse or Teacher).
If the school staff calls an advocate to come and meet the
student after disclosure, the advocate will:
• Define their role to the school staff.
*Ask to speak with student before going to the school.
*Only go to school with permission of the student.
*Ask school staff to arrange meeting according to
schedule of student.
• Offer the option of meeting the student at advocacy office.
As an advocate for the student at the school, an advocate will:
• Arrange with staff for a private place to talk with the student.
• Ask the student if they want an interpreter, parent/guardian,
caregiver or close friend present with the advocate.
• Define their role and explain confidentiality in addition to
mandated reporting laws (i.e. the student should be clear as
to what is confidential and what facts are reported to
appropriate agencies.)
• Ask the student to share her/his story and begin where the
student is most comfortable. They may want to share the
entire story or small/general details. Avoid asking detailed
questions, unless qualified or required to do so.
• Give the student information, resources and referrals so that
they can make their own decision based on their needs.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
• Follow mandated reporting laws and the laws of confidentiality.
• Ask if youth would like follow-up assistance:
*Assist youth in connecting with provided resources and
referrals.
*Explain the depth of advocacy services.
Advocacy with Youth in the Legal System
When working with youth involved with the legal system, youth
need to understand the legal process to make informed decisions
about her/his criminal case.
Basic concerns youth encounter when working with the
legal system:
• Already in the system—truancy, runaway, probation.
• Threats of harm if they report.
• Fear of getting someone else in trouble.
• Fear that they won’t be believed.
• Lack of trust in authority figures.
• Assault occurred doing something illegal, e.g., while using
drugs or drinking alcohol.
• Fear of parents finding out.
Considerations for reporting to Law Enforcement:
• Assess the needs for interpreter or other culturally specific
concerns. (Refer to Cultural Considerations).
• If a delayed report is requested, give phone number for law
enforcement. (See Resources).
pg 59
Discipline Specific
Protocol Guidelines
• Ask if the student would like an advocate to come to
their school:
• Discuss a safety plan with student based on individual
circumstances.
Advocacy
Advocacy
Advocacy
• Advocates can support youth through the reporting process,
and where appropriate, will coordinate efforts with other
agencies.
• Inform youth that a report can always be made, even if
delayed:
*Discuss the pro/cons. Examples: A benefit to reporting
the crime is the report against suspected perpetrator will
be on file for any future assaults perpetrator commits,
reparations typically would like evidence of police
report, giving power back to youth, etc. Delayed reporting
typically results in a lack of evidence for prosecution, etc.
• Inform youth what information police will need for investigation:
report, any evidence, etc.
• Offer to provide support during the report. As jurisdiction
permits, youth can make the report at police station and/or
advocate’s office.
• Be with youth during interviews and appointments when
requested.
• Assist youth in getting information about the status of the
case (including case number).
• Provide ongoing support, advocacy and information during
investigation procedures.
Advocacy
• Provide assistance with any civil matters (Order For
Protection (OFP), Harassment Restraining Order, etc.)
Role of Advocate when Arrest Has Been Made:
• Provide youth with information regarding the process for
obtaining offender’s case status (arrest, charged, not
charged, incarceration status, release date, etc.).
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 60
• If immigration status is a concern, pursue options with INS
(Immigration and Naturalization Service) only at youth’s
request.
Role of Advocate if Case is Charged:
• Facilitate communication between youth and Victim
Witness Advocate if one is assigned to the case, as requested
by youth. (See County Attorney’s Office for more information).
• Accompany youth to hearings, meetings with prosecuting
attorney, Victim Witness staff and others requested by youth.
• Assist youth in communicating safety concerns regarding
conditions of offender release.
• Attend trial during youth’s testimony or other testimony if
requested by the youth.
• Privileged communication (between advocate and youth)
means the advocate may not be called to testify.
• Provide ongoing support as needed throughout the process.
• As applicable, ensure there is an interpreter that the youth
is comfortable with for all hearings and meetings.
• Refer to MN State Laws for Victim Rights: Website for information:
http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/ovc/publications/infores/vrs.htm
Role of Advocacy during Sentencing Procedures:
• Facilitate communication between youth and Victim
Witness Advocate assigned to case, as requested by youth.
• Assist youth with victim impact statement as needed.
• Accompany youth to sentencing hearing as requested.
Role of Advocacy Post-Sentencing:
• Be available to respond to youth’s ongoing needs and to
inform youth about issues such as restraining order options,
reparations and civil litigation.
• Offer non-system related services, which may include
individual counseling, support groups, 24-hour hotlines
access and referrals to other community services. (See
Community Resources).
Role of Advocacy When the Case is Not Charged:
• At youth’s request, contact charging attorney for information
on the final decision and find out why they choose not to
charge the case.
• Accompany youth to meet with prosecuting attorney to
discuss non-charging decisions.
• Provide continuing support services and advocacy as needed.
• Address current and future safety concerns.
Advocacy with Parents/Guardians and/or
Caregivers
• To explain the advocate’s role as a mandated reporter and
make certain they are aware of this role and the boundaries
of confidentiality.
• Listen to needs and assess safety; offer resources available.
• To prevent dual roles to parent/caregiver and youth, two
advocates may be needed when working with families (one
advocate for youth; one advocate for parent(s)/caregiver(s)).
• Remind parents/caregivers that youth have the right not to
share/tell parents about details of assault or any other
information if youth chooses to keep it private.
Tips for working with parents/guardians/caregivers:
• Encourage parents/caregivers to empower youth by encouraging
the youth to make their own choices – – and respect these
choices as the parent/caregiver.
• Caution parents/caregivers not to sympathize with the
abuser or take sides with abuser/assailant.
• Caution against shaming the youth for what occurred.
• Be sensitive towards parents as they may have one child
abusing their other child; parents may feel conflicted as to
how to help both children (both victim and child that
committed the crime).
An advocate’s role is to provide adequate information to the
parent(s) so they can support the youth who has been sexually
assaulted/sexually exploited. Youth have the right not to share
or tell parents/caregivers what has happened.
• Consult Minnesota Minor Consent Laws. (See Consent and
Confidentiality Section)
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 61
Discipline Specific
Protocol Guidelines
• If a youth feels their case is not resolved, support youth
to talk, or to schedule a meeting with the investigator.
Always support youth’s decision to ask the investigator to
send it back to county attorney for a second look at the case.
When talking to parents, guardians or caregivers regarding a youth
who has disclosed a sexual assault, make certain:
Advocacy
Advocacy
Advocacy
Advocacy in Medical Settings
When providing services to Sexual Assault/ Exploitation
victims in an Emergency Room, the advocate will:
• Check in with triage nurse/front desk, show hospital badge
and introduce themself.
• Check in with primary nurse regarding information needed
before seeing the client.
• If sexual assault nurse examiner is not there, verify with
the hospital that the nurse has been called.
• Introduce themself to the client, the nurse and law enforcement.
• If youth is not in a private room, be sure to obtain a private
room from the primary nurse.
• Explain advocacy role to youth and any secondary victims
present.
• Confirm with youth that he/she wants to speak with the
advocate.
• Explain Confidentiality and Mandating Reporting Laws.
(See Consent and Confidentiality Section)
• Address any concerns about ER procedures and evidentiary
exam (as applicable):
Advocacy
*Explain that evidentiary exam can be completed without
reporting to the police.
• Determine if there is a need for culturally appropriate
services (advocate, interpreter):
*Be sure youth is comfortable with provided interpreter
(gender, any cultural relationships, language line being
used, etc.) (See Cultural Considerations)
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 62
• Give information regarding Emergency Department services
and other options (community clinics with sliding fee scales,
STI and pregnancy testing, medical follow-up, legal
considerations).
• Provide emotional support, validation of feelings and
address any concerns.
• Check in with anyone waiting for youth after assisting
the youth.
*With permission from the youth, speak with secondary
victims that are present as they are experiencing emotional
feelings because of this crime. Assure the youth that no
personal confidential information will be shared with the
secondary victim (caregiver, partner, guardian) without
their consent.
Considerations during the Evidentiary Exam
• It is the youth’s choice whether to have an advocate present
during the exam.
• If in the room, advocate should stand at the head of the table.
• Continue to provide support and validation.
Discharge of patient or admission
• Assure youth has a safe place to go (home, shelter):
*Address transportation home, as available, provide cab
for transportation to safe place.
*Assess immediate and any long-term safety needs, as well
as the youth’s support system (friends and family) they
can talk to when they leave the hospital.
• Ask youth if they would like a follow-up call from
advocate’s office.
• Assist youth with prescriptions if necessary.
• Offer referrals as needed.
• Assist in securing change of clothes for youth if necessary.
• Remember advocate is not legally responsible for the minor,
even under circumstances of homelessness.
• Assist in securing change of clothes for youth as necessary.
• Assure youth has transportation home, cab to safe place
as necessary.
• Offer referrals as needed. (See Community Resources for
listing of referrals).
Advocate Role at Medical Clinic other than Emergency Room
Meet with secondary victims if appropriate:
• Check in with front desk and introduce yourself.
• Check in with primary nurse.
• Primary nurse will provide a room where to have a private
conversation with youth.
• Explain advocacy role to youth.
• Explain to youth that she/he has the choice whether or not
to speak with an advocate or have one present.
• Explain the medical exam is the youths choice, no one
can/will make them do something they do not want to do.
• Explain confidentiality and Mandatory Reporting Laws.
(See Consent and Confidentiality Section)
• Provide emotional support, validation of feelings and
address youth’s concerns.
• Address immediate and long-term safety needs and identify
the youth’s support system (friends/family).
• Explain advocate’s role.
• Provide emotional support, validation of feelings.
• Explain confidentiality and Mandated Reporting Laws.
• Address any concerns parents/caregivers/guardians may
have at this time.
Considerations in all medical settings:
• Provide youth with information regarding reporting and
address youth’s concerns. (See Advocacy – Legal)
• If youth are reluctant to report the crime due to outstanding
warrants under youth’s name, assure the youth that Law
Enforcement will not enforce any prior existing warrant(s).
The police officer who takes the report on a sexual assault
will not pursue any outstanding warrants at that time, nor
will the police officer follow-up with the youth for any out
standing warrants. It is the responsibility of Law Enforcement
to take the report as a victim/witness of the crime and not to
arrest the youth due to prior existing warrants.
• Ask youth if she/he would like a follow-up call from
advocate’s office.
• Be sure youth understand personal information is confidential
and youth have the right to refuse or consent to evidentiary
exam, STI preventative treatment and pregnancy prevention.
(See Consent and Confidentiality Section)
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 63
• Assist youth with prescriptions as needed.
Discipline Specific
Protocol Guidelines
• Primary nurse should introduce advocate to client (as well
as to parents, guardians, other significant adults that may
be present).
Advocacy
Advocacy
Advocacy
• Ask youth if there is anyone the advocate should call
while youth is at medical setting.
• Spend time with youth when hospital personnel are not
available.
• Ask youth if there is anything you can get for her/him to
make them more comfortable. (Avoid offering food or drink
until the medical staff has had the opportunity to speak to
the youth about the assault. If youth is requesting food or
drink explain the reason for waiting.)
• Address the youth’s cost concerns: evidentiary costs are
covered; any additional costs should be discussed with the
medical staff.
*Some medical settings may need to see youth’s
insurance cards.
Advocacy
• If there is any reason to believe that youth has psychiatric
problems and should be assessed (e.g., suicidal tendencies)
consult SHYIP Protocol Guidelines for Law Enforcement.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 64
While the following information was compiled and developed
by officers from the Saint Paul Police Department, the content is relevant and appropriate to be used by officers throughout
Ramsey and surrounding counties. These are SHYIP Protocol
Guidelines from the Saint Paul Police Department’s...
• Vice Unit,
• Missing Persons-Juvenile Unit.
• Family & Sexual Violence Unit, and
Also, each unit has identified the opportunities to share information
with each other as well as the following professionals:
• Saint Paul Police Department Gang Unit
• Ramsey County Attorney’s Office
• Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC)
• Metro Gang & Drug Strike Force Task Force
• Ramsey County Human Services – Child Protection
• Ramsey County Human Services – Juvenile Corrections,
Delinquency
1. Why did you leave home?
3. Who have you been staying with while away from home?
2. How long have you been away from home?
4. Has anyone hurt you or tried to hurt you while you were
away from home?
5. Has anyone touched you in a way you did not like?
If so, who? Describe the incident.
6. Did you get injured or have any health issues that you
need to see a doctor or nurse for?
7. Are you ever afraid at home? If yes, why? Will you be safe
at home? Use a 1 – 10 scale to quantify safe feelings –
1 not safe to 10 being very safe at home.
8. Do you have someone you can talk to at home or school?
9. Do you drink or do drugs?
10. Are you a gang member or do you associate with gang
members?
• Suburban Police and Sheriffs
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 65
Discipline Specific
Protocol Guidelines
The Protocol Guidelines are divided into sections by unit, based on
the unique focus of each unit.
All Saint Paul Police officers are to ask these 10 questions,
and report the responses of juveniles with whom they
come into contact:
Law Enforcement
Law Enforcement
Law Enforcement
Vice Unit Protocol Guidelines
Prostitution arrests are made through the following avenues:
• Found in field
• Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC)
• Other SPPD Units (Family & Sexual Violence, Missing
Persons, other) and area law enforcement agencies
• Service Provider reports (e.g., Breaking Free)
• Midwest Children’s Resource Center (MCRC) report
The Vice Unit arrests all parties engaged in prostitution*:
• the person procuring sexual services, if apprehended on-site
• the person promoting prostitution
• the prostitute/person being prostituted
* All prostituted persons are referred to Breaking Free for follow-up care
Arrested persons are processed in one of the following ways:
Juvenile prostitution victims:
• Released pending further investigation
Law Enforcement
• Secured at the Juvenile Detention Center for 24-48 hours
when necessary to protect them for their own safety
• May be released pending further investigation
• May be held for court appearance
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 66
Family & Sexual Violence Unit Protocol
Guidelines
The Family & Sexual Violence Unit becomes involved through
the following avenues:
• SPPD Incident Report initiated by street officer
• MCRC or other medical facility calling or faxing data reports
• Other SPPD Units and area law enforcement agencies
• Ramsey County Human Services Child Protection and their
mandated cross-reporting
*MCRC interviews youth age 12 and under in cases of
stranger sexual abuse, and age 18 and under in cases
of family sexual abuse/assault; a hospital-based sexual
assault nurse examiner may also be involved in cases of
sexual assault
If you have any question about a potential sex crime, contact
the SPPD Family & Sexual Violence Unit first, at 651-266-5685.
They will forward case information to other relevant agencies, e.g.,
ICAC, Minnesota Gang & Drug Task Force, etc.
The Unit responds by:
• Initiating a SPPD Case # if not done already
• Adding information to existing SPPD Case #
Sex Crimes Investigators will:
• Obtain all necessary statements by the person or agency
who reported the incident
• Document the chain of disclosure of the crime
• Obtain and/or review evidence, and any physical corroboration.
* Ask victim(s) to sign a medical release for medical information.
*Determine if search warrants/consent to search need to
be done.
• Determine if there are any witnesses and if they need to
be interviewed
• Interview the suspect if applicable
See Cultural Considerations section for information relevant
to juvenile’s own culture.
The Unit investigates the case with several possible outcomes
including:
• Transfer case to other SPPD Unit if appropriate, re:
crossover charges
The Unit may also refer to the following service agencies
for victims:
• MCRC or Regions for SANE examination (victims under
age 12 referred to MCRC; over 12 referred to hospital)
• SOS, for victim advocacy and referral to additional service
providers
• Minnesota Crime Reparations Board – for compensation for
other medical costs, medications, prophylaxis, or other
expenses related to sexual assault
• Shelter services
• Insufficient evidence to pursue prosecution (pended with
the ability to reopen the case if further information or
victim cooperation changes)
• Charges filed, juvenile cases handled in concert with
Ramsey County Attorney’s Office
*Case may also be worked in coordination with
RCHS-Child Protection
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 67
Discipline Specific
Protocol Guidelines
*Ensure chain of evidence is completed.
• Case may also be worked in coordination with RCHS-Child
Protection, and whether or not charges are filed, alternatives,
safety plans, etc., may be coordinated
Law Enforcement
Law Enforcement
Law Enforcement
Missing Persons – Juvenile Unit Protocol
Guidelines
Missing Persons Unit receives reports about missing juveniles
through the following avenues:
• Day/Business hours:
*Schools
*Medical Institutions
*Shelters
*Parent, guardian, other adult, family members
• After 4pm:
*Staff report from Records Unit: 651-266-5700
Upon receiving missing juvenile report, Missing Persons
officers will:
• Investigate and attempt to locate missing individuals,
based on priority criteria.
• Have missing person’s data entered into NCIC database.
Law Enforcement
With information obtained from the ten questions, and other
information gathered, Missing Persons will:
• Return juvenile to home, if s/he is unharmed and has no
outstanding warrants
• Bring juvenile to shelter, if home is dangerous or parent/
guardian will not allow the juvenile in the home, or if there
are other extenuating circumstances
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 68
• Bring juvenile to the Juvenile Detention Center, when
warranted
*JDC then engages RCHS in juvenile’s case
• Forward relevant information to Ramsey County Child
Protection or MCRC for follow-up
Teens that run away from a home/shelter or are homeless are at
high risk for sexual exploitation and health concerns. These youth
frequently face multiple cultural challenges and it is important
to consider their specialized health care needs including language and cultural barriers to seeking care. If you are working
with a youth from a culture or ethnic background that you are not
familiar with, it is imperative that you read the “Cultural
Consideration” section of this book.
1. Where are you living and who are you living with?
2. Do you feel safe where you are currently living?
3. Has anyone tried to hurt you while you were away from home?
4. Why did you leave home?
5. Were you ever afraid at home? If yes, why? Would you be
safe going back home? Use a 1 – 10 scale to quantify safe
feelings – 1 not safe to 10 being very safe at home.
6. Has anyone inside or outside your family touched you in a
way you did not like? If so, who? Describe the incident.
7. Do you drink or do drugs? If so, how often and how
much?
8. Do you ever trade sex for money, food, drugs, gifts, or a place to live?
9. Have you ever cut or intentionally hurt yourself?
10. Have you ever thought about killing yourself?
Emergency Department Quick Screen for
At-Risk Teens
Teens that run away from a home/shelter or are homeless are at
high risk for sexual exploitation and health concerns. The following
ten questions should be asked to identify and assess the acute
health care needs of homeless or runaway youth who have been,
or may have been, sexually exploited. Referral to appropriate
services is imperative in order to more fully address ongoing health
care needs in this population.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 69
Discipline Specific
Protocol Guidelines
In this section, the following questions are categorized based on
the core areas that should be covered within an assessment being
completed to identify and assess the health care needs of truant,
runaway of homeless youth. Many of these youth have been – or
are at high risk for being – sexually exploited. If the full set of
questions is unable to be completed, it is imperative that the teen
is referred to appropriate services. Also, many teens will give answers to these questions that indicate they require further care and
intervention. Please see the Youth and Provider Resource Sections
in this book for culturally appropriate responses to the above referral needs.
Medical Assessments
Medical Health Assessments
Medical Health Assessments
Psychosocial Assessment
Mental Health Assessment:
1. How would you describe your mood?
3. Have you ever cut or intentionally hurt yourself?
5. Have you ever thought of hurting someone else?
1. Where are you living?
2. Who are you living with?
3. What language are you most comfortable communicating
with?
• What language do you speak with your family?
• What language do you speak with your friends?
4. How, if at all, do you feel connected to your cultural heritage?
6. Who are your friends? Are any of your friends in a gang?
5. If you had a problem, who could you turn to for help?
7. Do you attend school?
• If yes, is there any adult you can talk to in school?
• How often do you miss or skip school?
Medical Assessments
8. Do you leave home without permission (run away)? Have
you ever left home and your parent/guardian did not know
where you were?
• If yes, where do you go?
• What are you feeling when you leave home? What is it
like for you when you are away from home? What do
you think will happen if you go home?
9. Where do you go when you need medical care?
10. Do you or have you ever had a therapist/counselor
(voluntary/mandated)?
11. What resources (if any) have you used to get help?
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
4. Have you ever thought about killing yourself?
6. Do you have access to a gun?
Chemical Dependency Assessment:
1. How often are you using tobacco (smoking, chewing)?
• How many packs per day?
• If yes, where do you attend?
2. Have you ever felt so discouraged or hopeless that you
wondered if life was worthwhile?
pg 70
2. In the last 12 months, how often have you used any alco
holic beverages (daily, weekly, monthly, NA)?
• How much do you generally drink at one time?
• In the last two weeks, how many times have you had 5
or more drinks in a row?
3. Which other drugs have you tried or are you using? By
other drugs, we mean drugs that are taken for non-med
ical reasons such as marijuana, cocaine/crack, sedatives,
heroin, metham phetamine (meth, crystal), MDMA (ecsta
sy), LSD (acid), used other peoples prescription drugs, or
sniffed/huffed glue/gases or contents of spray cans?
• How often in the past year?
• How often in the last 30 days?
4. Have you tried to cut down your use of tobacco/alcohol/
drugs on your own but been unable to do so?
5. Have you found that you had to use a lot more alcohol or
other drugs than before to get the same effect?
6. Has your alcohol or other drug use hurt relationships with
your friends or family?
Abuse Assessment:
1. Have you ever been the victim of (physical, emotional, or
sexual/date rape) violence on a date?
• If yes, and there are physical marks refer to MCRC at
Children’s Hospital ER.
3. Has any adult or older person outside or inside the family
ever touched you sexually or forced you to touch them
sexually?
• If yes (to any of the above), who have you told?
• If yes, has this happened in the last 72 hours?
After assessment, refer to MCRC (651)220-6750, at Children’s
Hospital ER if abuse was intra-familiar or the perpetrator is an
authority figure (teacher, pastor, therapist). All youth less than 13
years old should be referred to MCRC.
After assessment, refer to ER of choice if abuse was extra-familial
or the teen is 13 years old or older. Intra-familial abuse victims up
to but not including age 18 should be referred to MCRC.
4. Do you ever trade sex for money, food, drugs, gifts, or a
place to live?
• If yes, refer to MCRC. MCRC to contact SOS.
5. Do you feel safe where you are currently living?
6. What do you need to feel safe?
Sexuality Assessment:
1. Have you ever had sex (vaginal/anal/oral)? Have you been
sexually active in the last 6 months?
• If yes, with boys, with girls, or with both sexes?
2. How many sexual partners have you had (in last month, in last
year, ever)?
3. What methods of contraception have you used?
4. The last time you had sex did you or your partner use a
condom?
After assessment, refer non-acute sexual abuse (event happened
more than 72 hours ago) to MCRC. MCRC to coordinate with SOS
for advocacy.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 71
Discipline Specific
Protocol Guidelines
2. Has any adult or older person ever hit you so hard or so
often that you had marks or were afraid of that person?
MCRC or the teen’s primary medical provider should provide
follow-up care after an acute sexual assault. Follow-up care consists
of access to reproductive health care, on-going testing for sexually
transmitted infections, mental health assessments, and connection to appropriate mental health services. The acute care provider
(SANE, ER provider, etc) should obtain a release of information
from teen and call MCRC to set up the appointment.
Medical Assessments
Medical Health Assessments
Medical Health Assessments
Intervention:
1. Obtain a pregnancy test.
2. Screen for sexually transmitted infection(s); (gonorrhea,
Chlamydia, HIV, syphilis, and hepatitis).
3. Both barrier and hormonal contraception should be
offered/taught.
Nutrition Assessment:
1. At the present time, do you think you are….underweight,
about the right weight, or overweight?
2. Do you ever eat so much in a short period of time that you feel
out of control (binge-eating) or vomit after eating?
3. Do you know where you are getting your next meal?
Cultural
Considerations
Suggestions to
help engage
See SHYIP Resource Sections for important contact information for
Medical and Mental Health.
Medical Assessments
Resources
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
This diagram represents information found in the Protocol Guidelines that may
help you assess and refer a youth.
pg 72
The following Protocol Guidelines represent guidelines generated
by Community Corrections, the Juvenile Detention Center and the
Juvenile Delinquency Unit. Although these units work together in
the justice system, they are distinct in terms of how and why homeless or runaway youth who have been or are at risk for being sexually exploited enter and are served.
Ramsey County Community Corrections
• The Probation Officer Report shall include a summary of
the damages to the victim and the victim’s recommenda
tion for disposition. To obtain this information, the probation
officer shall make a good faith effort to contact the victim
or his/her legal guardian by telephone or by mail.
• If the victim is not available or does not respond, the
probation officer will contact the Ramsey County Attorney’s
Office victim-witness advocate.
• If there is an advocate working with the victim, contact can
be established through the advocate.
• When the victim does not speak or read English, contact
will be made in the victim’s primary language.
• Victims will be informed of timing issues: Specifically, to
have victim information included in the Probation Officer’s
Report, it must be received ten (10) days prior to the
disposition date.
• Victims or their legal guardians may be provided with
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
• A note will be made in the Probation Officer Report of any
advocacy organizations providing service to the victim.
• Victims or their legal guardians will receive information
regarding the adjudicated offense, the right to object to the
proposed disposition, the right to request restitution, the
right to be present at sentencing, and the range of sentencing options available.
Community Supervision
Ramsey County Community Corrections will provide the following services for victims:
• Ascertain the identity and location of the victim(s) and
make a good faith effort to contact the victim or the victim’s
legal guardian.
• Contact will be made with victims in the victim’s language
when he or she does not speak or read English.
• Probation officers will notify victims or their legal guardians
of any relevant conditions of probation related to the offender.
• If the victim is not available, provide the information to the
Ramsey County Attorney’s office victim-witness advocate
and request that it be forwarded to the victim.
• In the case of victims who do not want their phone number
and address given out, the probation officer will send
the victim his/her name and telephone number through the
victim advocate.
• Once contact is established, the probation officer will
provide the following information to the victim or to the
victim’s legal guardian:
pg 73
Discipline Specific
Protocol Guidelines
The Probation Officers Report During the time the probation officer report (investigation) is being completed, Ramsey County
Community Corrections will provide information and services to
victims. These include:
information about appropriate services.
Ramsey County Community Corrections
ay
Ramsey County Community Corrections
Ramsey County Community Corrections
*Probation Officer’s name and telephone number
*The status of any “no contact” orders that may exist
*The status of restitution if ordered
*Explain the procedures for the victim to obtain timely
enforcement of no contact orders (call 911 first; notify
Corrections later).
Ramsey County Community Corrections
• Monitor “no contact orders” between the offender and
victim when those orders are issued.
• If restitution is ordered, the payment schedule or structure
will be incorporated into the probation conditions, and the
offender’s obligation to pay restitution to the victim will
continue through the term of the probation.
• Determine if the victim desires notification of the offender’s
release/ relocation; the identity of the supervising agent; or
provision of services.
• If needed, contact the appropriate victim advocacy program
in the originating jurisdiction for assistance
• For victims attempting to contact an offender’s probation
officer, call Ramsey County Community Corrections main
number at 651-266-5300
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 74
Youth entering into the Juvenile Detention Center (JDC):
• Youth are brought to the JDC either by the police departments,
the deputies or by probation. If youth are at risk of harming
themselves or others, youth can be held and detained.
Following are reasons for admitting youth to the JDC:
*a new charge or a warrant and/or on an initial offense;
*a violation of conditions of probation; status offense – i.e.
runaway – ONLY if they are in danger of harming
themselves; or
• A Risk Assessment Instrument (RAI) is completed on every
youth brought in on a new offense. This tool measures threat
to community and likelihood of appearing in Court and/or
the likelihood to offend in the community. In addition to the
RAI, basic health questions as well as mental health
questions are asked in regards to hurting themselves or
others. Based on assessment, youth may be released to an
alternative housing facility, admitted, or released home.
Assessment of Needs and Services while at the Juvenile Detention Center:
• JDC staff completes a health assessment with youth which
directly asks questions about violence, sexual abuse or
victimization and sexual activity.
• Courts may request a mental health screening to
assess trauma and significant mental health concerns. This tool
may be also offered to children who are detained 5 days or
more, with parent’s permission.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
• While at the JDC, youth may receive health care, mental
health, chemical dependency or other therapeutic services
as court-ordered or arranged.
• Within the JDC, services are provided by:
*Correctional Workers and Correctional Aides
*Public Health for nursing services
* Saint Paul Public School Teachers and School Social Worker
*Contracted Mental Health professionals
Services Provided while at the Juvenile Detention Center:
• The JDC does not provide long term services. Youth may be
passed into correctional system or released with no further
obligation. If youth are found not guilty services are completed.
• JDC attempts to locate a parent/guardian or ward of the
state to notify parents when their children are here and
allow visiting during specified times.
• JDC is mandated to notify both the victim and the detaining
authority when a youth is released after being charged with
a crime of violence.
Runaway youth who enter the Juvenile Court System, may be directed
to the RCHS-JDU).
pg 75
Discipline Specific
Protocol Guidelines
*if a youth is found and determined to be in a dangerous
situation.
• If youth are with the JDC for 5 days or more a case plan is
developed to identify youth’s cultural and emotional needs
while at the detention center.
Ramsey County Juvenile Detention Center
Ramsey County Juvenile Detention Center
Ramsey County Community Human Services Juvenile Detention Unit
Ramsey County Community Human Services
Juvenile Detention Unit
Juvenile Delinquency Unit may employ any of these assessment
tools to identify youth’s needs:
• JDU assessment varies depending on each child; however,
JDU will assess the following:
*Child Safety, well-being of child, individual need for
services, mental health, chemical/substance abuse
• The JDU provides youth assessment to determine if youth
need additional services through the following tools:
*Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument (MAYSI)—
is a mental heath screening form we use to determine
whether or not a client would benefit from additional services.
*Psychological Evaluation
*Chemical Health Assessment
*Probation Officer Report (POR).
Services Provided to Youth after Assessment by JDU:
• After the assessment, referrals to appropriate community
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 76
agencies and programs are coordinated for youth. These
services may include: Children’s Mental Health, Child
Protective Services and referrals to MCRC. Also, mental
health referrals may include: psychologists, psychiatrists,
anger management, individual and/or family therapy, etc.
• Long Term Services Include:
*Case management
*Coordination of services
*Supervision
Responsibility to Youth:
• Juvenile Delinquency Unit will provide ongoing community
contacts with youth as needed through case management.
• JDU will make every effort to communicate with youth
and/or parent/guardian in their primary language and be
sensitive to cultural considerations.
The goal of the Ramsey County Attorney’s Office in sexual
assault cases is to serve the people of Ramsey County and to pro-
tect public safety by vigorous and just prosecution of juveniles and
adults who commit sexual assault in the county; to provide compassionate support and assistance to victims of sexual assault; and
to collaborate with other agencies in the county that investigate or
supervise offenders, or provide services to victims.
In the case of juvenile prosecution, the goal of the Ramsey County
Attorney’s Office is also to reduce juvenile delinquency by developing individual responsibility for lawful behavior while recognizing the unique characteristics and needs of children, including rehabilitation.
• Sexual penetration however slight
• Sexual contact (intentional touching by the defendant of
another’s intimate parts, or the clothing over the intimate
parts for sexual or aggressive purposes; may also include
inducing or coercing a child to touch the defendant’s
intimate parts)
• Sexual contact or penetration of a child by an older child or
an adult if the statutory age difference and/or significant
relationship or position of authority exists
• Masturbation or lewd exhibition in the presence of child
under 16
• Incest
• Sexual exploitation of: clients by therapists or clergy;
inmates or persons under correctional supervision by corrections
• Marital rape
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
employee, contractor or volunteer; or vulnerable adults by
special transportation service provider
• Possession or dissemination of child pornography, prostitution
or use of a child in a sexual exhibition or performance
• Criminal sexual predatory conduct or any other crime
charged by this office which contains, in whole or in part,
a sexual motivation or goal
• Sex trafficking
This document is a supplemental piece to the Full Ramsey County
Attorney’s Office (RCAO) Sexual Assault Protocol available from
the RCAO upon request.
When working with sexual office cases, consider the following:
Legal Consent
• Children under age 13 cannot consent to sexual activity.
• Children who are at least 13 but less than 16 years old
cannot consent to sexual activity with individuals who are
significantly older than they are (see statutes for specific
provisions), who are in a position of authority over them or
who have a significant relationship with them.
• Consent is not a defense for children over 16 but under 18 if
the perpetrator has either a significant relationship (generally,
familial) to the child or is more than 48 months older than
the child and in a position of authority over the child.
• Regardless of the age of the victim, in cases involving
sexual exploitation by therapists or clergy, correctional
pg 77
Discipline Specific
Protocol Guidelines
For purposes of these Protocol Guidelines, “Sexual Assault”
includes any of the following acts, or any attempt to commit
these acts, involving a person who does not consent or who
cannot consent to:
Ramsey County Attorney’s Office
Ramsey County Attorney’s Office
Ramsey County Attorney’s Office
workers or special transportation service providers, consent
is not a defense.
• A person who is asleep, unconscious or involuntarily
intoxicated also cannot consent.
Prosecution Policies: Role of Charging Attorney
• Promptly make decision to charge or decline;
• Request additional investigation if needed;
• Communicate charging decision to appropriate parties (i.e.
Investigating Officer, Advocates, Youth/Victim, Midwest
Childrens Resource Center)
• Review custody status, determine if a warrant is needed;
Ramsey County Attorney’s Office
• Recommend bail, conditions of release terms and No
Contact Order if appropriate;
• Ensure DNA and other forensic testing is being done;
• Make referral to Victim/Witness Division
• Avoid delay. A youth who has experienced sexual assault is
likely to desire resolution as soon as possible
• Observe victim’s rights in the process of case disposition.
• Coordinate with other RCAO divisions relevant to the victim.
Trial Procedures: Preparation, Trial, and Sentencing
• For preparation, trial proceedings, and sentencing, follow
professional best practices.
*See Full Ramsey County Attorney’s Office Sexual Assault
Protocol available from the RCAO upon request.
• Notify youth/victim of various trial outcomes as relevant
• Review all physical and testimonial evidence
• Make required legal disclosures
• Order transcripts of audio or video interviews for evidence
(i.e. MCRC videos).
Prosecution Policies: Pretrial
• Subpoena and disclose all witnesses, including chain of
custody witnesses.
• Caseload and assignment of cases should be specialized and
respectful of the victim-intensive nature of these cases,
including sensitivity of youth culture.
• Determine whether expert witnesses are relevant and obtain
their interviews.
• Involve victim-witness advocates to help provide support
and monitor the needs of the youth throughout the case.
• Prepare the youth/victim for trial, including explicit
preparation for the sexual detail that will be used.
*See Youth Culture section of the Cultural Considerations
section for tips on how to interact with youth
• Collaborate with investigators to obtain all available
corroborative evidence.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 78
• Make motions for the admission or limitation of evidence.
• Prepare for and conduct any needed pre-trial evidentiary
hearings.
• Locate, meet with, and determine appropriate use of other
witnesses (i.e. medical and scientific experts).
• Young people need reassurance and explanation. Be
prepared to answer youth/victims questions and concerns.
Coordination within the County Attorney’s Office
• Once attorneys are informed that an active case exists in
another Division, the attorneys shall ensure that the following
information is exchanged:
*Whether criminal or delinquency charges have been
brought or a CHIPS petition filed;
*Dates of upcoming hearings;
*The existence of a No Contact Order or an Order for
Protection
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 79
Discipline Specific
Protocol Guidelines
• When a criminal or delinquency prosecution case involving a youth-victim has been initiated, the assigned attorney shall
contact the Child Protection Unit of the Human Services Division
to determine if there is an active child protection case, in which
case the Prosecution Division of the Ramsey County Attorneys Office will take steps to ensure that information is exchanged across
divisions.
Ramsey County Attorney’s Office
Ramsey County Attorney’s Office
Ramsey County Human Services
The mission of Ramsey County Human Services is to enhance
the quality of life for the people of Ramsey County by providing
resources to meet basic human needs, assuring protection for the
vulnerable, and assisting in achieving self-sufficiency, all in the
most cost-effective manner. The primary groups RCHS works
with are: children and families, low income and homeless, elderly
and physically disabled, chemically dependent, mentally ill, and
developmentally disabled. RCHS provides a wide range of
programs and services in the areas of public assistance, employment support, day care, social services, child and adult protection
and clinical counseling.
Ramsey County Human Services
Following are Protocol Guidelines relative to runaway/homeless
youth who are or are at risk for being sexually exploited: Foster/
Shelter Placement, Child Protection, Children’s Mental Health, and
Children’s Crisis Response.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 80
How youth are referred for foster/shelter placement
• In order for youth (up to age 18; up to age 21 with a court
order) to receive emergency shelter placement, a referral
must be made by one of the following:
*Ramsey County workers
Shelter Options
• Ramsey County contracts for emergency shelter services
with:
*8 foster homes
*City police officers
*4 shelter facilities: Arlington House, Booth Brown House,
Bush Children’s Treatment Center, Ain Dah Yung (Our
Home) Center
*Emergency social services
Assessment and placement process
*Ramsey County deputies
• Circumstances of youth referrals:
*Youth are placed by police or county workers for safety
issues, parent’s arrests or hospitalizations, because of a
mental health crisis, delinquency, or as a result of abuse/
neglect
*Youth are placed as detention alternative by JDC while
waiting for court hearing. This option is used when the
youth is found to be low risk based on assessment.
• Shelter placement services may be denied for the following
reasons:
• To be placed, a shelter coordinator conducts brief assessment
by phone with referring worker or police officer to determine
appropriate placement.
*Prior to placement, youth under age 12 will have a
physical exam at Children’s Hospital. Medical assessments
for kids of all ages with signs of abuse or illness.
*Shelter homes receive information about youth – age,
why placed, condition, status, other needs.
* Children are provided with clothing, food, safety and shelter.
*Youth is not a Ramsey County resident
*Workers may be involved to help meet children’s needs,
such as medical appointments, counseling, mental health
services, visitation.
*No placement authority for child (no 72-hour hold, custody,
or voluntary placement)
• Shelter placement stays are typically up to 30 days. Longer
stays may occur under extenuating circumstances.
*Youth is at risk of harming self or others
Once a youth is placed in a shelter
• Workers are responsible for placement after emergency
shelter stay; many children are returned home to parents or
family members.
• Foster/Shelter placement services end when the shelter
stay ends
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 81
Discipline Specific
Protocol Guidelines
*JDC staff
Ramsey County Human Services Foster/Shelter Placement
Ramsey County Human Services
Foster/Shelter Placement
Ramsey County Human Services
Foster/Shelter Placement
Ramsey County Human Services Foster/Shelter Placement
Interaction with Parents
• County workers set up visits between parents and children,
provide children and families with case plans to encourage
parents and children to work on individual and family goals.
• Parents receive referrals to services that address the reason
for the child’s placement.
• Youth may be contacted by their parents by phone or by
visits away from foster home, as approved by county worker.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 82
Only a small percent of youth in Child Protection are among the
SHYIP target population.
How youth enter the Child Protection system:
• Child Protection Intake screeners (4) receive reports of
children and youth up to age 18 who may have been abused
or neglected.
*M – F, 8am – 5pm: 651-266-4500
*Evenings-weekends-holidays: 651-266-4500
• Reports that meet Child Protection criteria are assigned to
a child protection worker who will conduct an in-person
Family Assessment or Investigation, depending on the
seriousness of the allegations.
• The worker has 5 days to make face-to-face contact with
the child and primary caregiver, and 24 hours if the report
alleges substantial child endangerment; the assessment/
investigation must be completed within 45 days.
• There is a Family Assessment Response (FAR) track which
is an alternative for families in which the maltreatment
report does not allege substantial child endangerment. FAR
does not include a determination as to whether child mal
treatment occurred, but does determine the need for services
to address the safety of family members and risk of
subsequent maltreatment.
• An investigation must be used when reports involve
substantial child endangerment and for reports of maltreatment
in facilities or in other high-risk situations. It includes fact
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
gathering related to the current safety of a child and risk of
subsequent maltreatment. A determination of whether
maltreatment occurred is made when there is a preponderance
of evidence.
Services provided post-assessment
• Assessment results are discussed with the child/youth and
parent(s), a safety plan is developed, and future services are
determined. If the Indian Child Welfare Act is applicable,
then tribal notification and involvement in services and case
planning is solicited.
• The family is referred to Child Protection Program for
ongoing monitoring and case management by a Child
Protection worker. Services attempt to be culturally
appropriate (see Cultural Considerations Section) and include:
*Therapy/counseling
*Chemical health assessment
*Urinalysis
*Residential treatment
*Foster care
*Parenting Support
Working together to provide care
• Child Protection works with a variety of agencies and
groups to help connect youth to the services they need.
These connections include Ramsey County services as well
as community-based and tribal services.
pg 83
Discipline Specific
Protocol Guidelines
The assessment process:
Ramsey County Human Services Child Protection
Ramsey County Human Services
Child Protection
Ramsey County Human Services
Child Protection
Ongoing services for youth
• If youth have behavioral issues that need to be addressed,
referrals may be made to residential treatment, delinquency
placement or foster care.
Ramsey County Human Services Child Protection
• Once the presenting Child Protection issue is resolved, the
case is closed. If the youth is in foster care for a year, a
permanency recommendation will be made to the court.
Enforcement of Responsibility
• For a child/youth/family to receive continued support from
the Child Protection system, a level of cooperation, achievement
of safety, stability and child well-being must be established.
*If in Juvenile Court, the presiding judge weighs all
recommendations and determines whether to order
continued involvement with Child Protection.
*If an Indian tribe intervenes, they are involved throughout
the life of the case.
Interaction with Parents
• Child Protection workers interact with parents during the
assessment/ investigation to develop a safety plan and
identify needed services. The focus is on parenting behavior
and its effects on the child/youth (see Positive Youth
Development section).
• In ongoing case management, the worker will develop a case
plan with the parent(s) and youth that identifies needs and
culturally-specific service areas to be addressed.
• In intake, the typical parent/agency involvement is one interview.
Once in the Child Protection Program, contact is expected
to be monthly, face-to-face, as long as the case is open.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 84
Children’s Mental Health services provide short – and long-term
case management for youth ages 3 to 21 if in school and up to age
18 if not in school. It will also refer cases to Adult Mental Health
services when youth age-out of the Children’s program. Children’s
Mental Health may also co-case manage with RCHS Delinquency.
Intake
• Referrals are made to Children’s Mental Health by any of
the following:
• The areas assessed include: the child’s mental health, the
family, strengths and areas of concern, services needed, and
resources.
How youth are referred
*Parents
*Hospitals
*Therapists
*Other professionals
Services are offered on “open enrollment” basis.
Qualification process
• An “Initial Response Team” of mental health professionals
screens referrals to qualify youth for services.
• To qualify for services, a diagnostic assessment must
indicate that a youth is severely emotionally disturbed and
in need of case management and have or applied for MA,
PMAP, Minnesota Care or TEFRA.
• CMH workers help parents with paperwork and access to
above qualifying programs.
• Once a young person is qualified, the response team reviews
and triages cases, determines needs and makes referrals as
appropriate.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
Assessment
• The assessment results determine what services are needed:
therapy, medication, respite etc. and whether the case will be
referred to long term case management.
• Referrals are made to community agencies for counseling,
therapy, and/or other services.
Interaction with parents
• Parents must be part of the development of and approve
proposed treatment plan.
• Children’s Mental Health workers will assist with making
appointments, Individualized Education Plans (IEPs),
medical issues, social service needs etc.
• Children’s Mental Health workers meet with youth and/or
parents once or twice a month to assess youth and families
disposition.
• Services and support for parents include counseling,
emergency social needs funding, triaging for additional
referrals, and other assistance as necessary.
pg 85
Discipline Specific
Protocol Guidelines
*Schools
• Contact for intake is made within 5 working days; a face-to face is then scheduled for intake, usually at the child’s home.
The number to begin the intake process is 651-266-4500
Ramsey County Human Services Children’s Mental Health
Ramsey County Human Services
Children’s Mental Health
Ramsey County Human Services Children’s Crsis Response (CCR)
Ramsey County Human Services
Children’s Crisis Response (CCR)
Children’s Mental Health Children’s Crisis Response (CCR)
provides services to any family residing within Ramsey County
that is experiencing a crisis with a child/youth between the ages
of 0 to 21 if in school and up to age 18 if not in school and
residing with parent/guardian. Insurance is billed when available,
but is not required for crisis services. CCR provides help when
and where clients need it. CCR is a live phone and in-person
crisis response team. Call 651-774-7000.
CCR is available:
• 24 hours per day
• 365 days per year
• Behavioral Challenges
*Others Professionals
Scheduling a crisis appointment:
• Ramsey County residents experiencing a crisis with a child/
youth can call Children’s Crisis Response at (651) 774-7000
to request Crisis Services.
*Scheduling a crisis appointment at the time designated
by the caller
*Instructing the caller to seek more immediate help by
calling 911 whenever there is imminent danger to self or
others, especially if weapons are involved or
• Family Conflict
• Assessment/Referral
How youth are referred:
• Referrals are made to Children’s Crisis response by
any of the following:
*Case Managers
*Hospital Emergency Departments
*Hospital Sub-Acute Unit
*Parent/Legal guardian/Foster Parents
*Police
*RCHS Delinquency
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
*Youth
*Immediate site visit (30-60 minutes)
CCR can help with:
• Children’s Mental Health Crisis
*Sexual Offense Services (SOS)
• Children’s Crisis Response will ask the caller to state the
presenting crisis and will respond by:
• 7 days a week
*Schools
pg 86
*Advising an immediate visit to the emergency room
(recommended by insurance) when a child/youth is
suicidal with a clear plan
*Providing appropriate resources requested by the caller
to meet the needs of the caller
What We Do:
• Initial Crisis Response:
*Crisis intervention
*Conflict de-escalation
*Assist with “next step” planning
*Safety evaluation
*Mental health and mental status assessment
• Crisis Stabilization:
*Short-term counseling
*Transition to ongoing support/ treatment
*Connection to community based resources
Children’s Crisis Response Culturally Specific Services
• Somali Children’s Crisis Response Line (The Center for
Somali and Children Services) provides culturally specific
crisis services to Somali, Oromo, and other Eastern African
immigrant populations
Children’s Crisis Response Staff
• Children’s Crisis Response Staff is comprised of both
Licensed Mental Health Professionals and Mental Health
Practitioners.
• In addition to clinical supervision, Children’s Crisis
Response Staff are supported by daily psychiatric case review.
• Hmong and Spanish speaking staff
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 87
Discipline Specific
Protocol Guidelines
*Further assessment of mental health issues
Ramsey County Human Services Children’s Crisis Response (CCR)
Ramsey County Human Services
Children’s Crisis Response (CCR)
Schools
For the 2005-06 school year, Saint Paul School District reported
5,742, or 32%, of junior and senior high school students as “habitual truants.” (Habitual truants are defined as those who were absent for any part of the day on more than seven days.) According
to the Minnesota Student Survey, Ramsey County data (administered to students in 6th, 9th, and 12th grades in 2004), four percent
of 12th grade girls and boys self-reported skipping school 6 to 10
times during the previous 30 days.
• Chemical use and/or abuse
• Depression and/or withdrawal
Indicators of Homelessness, Runaways and
Sexual Exploitation Among Students
• Lack of records, such as birth certificate, immunization
record, incomplete records
The following are possible symptoms and/or indicators that
may indicate homeless, runaway and/or sexual exploitation status among students. These indicators may occur simultaneously.
Also, this list is not to be considered comprehensive; but rather
as a starting point of early warning signs. Further questioning
should be pursued on behalf of the student based on these and
other observed indicators. Know your resources and school’s
policies around reporting. Child abuse is a mandated report.
Refer to Consent and Confidentiality Section and the Cultural Consideration Section for more information. Regardless of
circumstances, these indicators warrant further exploration of
needs for support services.
Schools
• “Acting out” behavior, or behavior below/above
chronological age; Attention getting behaviors
• Erratic attendance in schools
• Fear or anger responses to people that once were okay
• Fire setting
• Low income hotel address on enrollment form
• Poor self-image
• Poor grooming or clothing that draws attention
• Recurrent physical complaints
• Regression
• Running away
• Self-mutilation (cutting, burning, etc.)
• Sleep disorders and/or nightmares
• Statements from student, such as, “We’ve been having a
hard time lately,” or, “It’s a new address, I cannot remember
it,” or, “My family has moved a lot and I am staying with
friends until we find a place.”
• Caregiver seems unaware of attendance problems
• Bedwetting/soiling and/or soiling themselves
• Eating Disorders
• Attendance in multiple schools
• Adult level of sexual knowledge/acting out sexually
• Chronic hunger or tiredness; or lack of appetite
• Student who seems confused when asked about that last
school attended
• Change in behavior and/or academic performance
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 88
• Suicidal thoughts and/or actions
• Truancy
Schools
Schools
The following Protocol Guidelines serve as a tool regarding
ways to approach and react to the student.
• Reassure student they have done the right thing by telling
and assure student it is not his/her fault.
To set the stage for a safe secure environment, school staff is
encouraged to use the following guidelines:
• Tell the student it is okay to talk about what has happened.
• Suggested questions may be:
Everyone has a personal responsibility for reducing the risk of
violence. We must take steps to maintain order, demonstrate
mutual respect and caring for one another, and ensure that
children who are troubled get the help they need.
• Learn students’ names and use them.
• Be visible to students so they recognize you face and feel
your presence within the school; create an open door policy
with students.
• Discuss an array of topics with students (sexual violence,
prevention drug/alcohol use, homelessness, etc). Assure the
student that you are a safe person to share information with
and that you will not think or feel differently about him/
her if the student chooses to share negative experiences that
have occurred. This builds rapport with students. Know the
Mandated Reporting Guidelines; make sure to let youth
know what you are mandated to report if they tell you.
• Hang posters up in offices that talk about sexual exploitation,
what to do if thinking of running away and information on
homelessness.
If a student discloses information:
• Remain calm. An intense reaction may lead the student to
think he/she has done something wrong, or to regret disclosing.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
• If it becomes clear there is a reportable incident, be careful
not to ask questions that should be pursued through law
enforcement (who, what, where, when, why—detailed
questions). It is not your role to investigate.
*Are you safe?
*Who has hurt you and when?
*I am sorry to hear this information, how have you
been coping?
• Students may need to hear that sometimes even good people
do bad things.
• Empower the student for their disclosure and commend
them for their courage. Remember that by disclosing
information, the student has taken a courageous step.
• Documentation is essential by any staff that learns specific
information about a particular student and incident.
Consider the following regarding interacting with students:
After initial disclosure, the best way to help with the healing
process after sexual exploitation or issues of running away or
homelessness is to provide an environment where the student
can regain their balance and sense of control.
pg 89
Discipline Specific
Protocol Guidelines
• Be approachable and available to students, encourage
students to talk with you if they have problems, whether
with friends, family, other teachers, or staff.
• Explain to the student you are a mandated reporter and
make certain the student is aware of this role and what that
specifically means; in addition, discuss the limits of
confidentiality. See Mandated Reporting Appendix.
Schools
• Listen and reassure the student she/he is not responsible for
what happened, regardless of what they were doing at the
time. You may, at a later time, want to discuss any problematic
behaviors that can increase his/her risk of sexual violence.
• Help the student identify others who can be trusted to
provide a safe environment and confidentiality. Discuss
confidentiality laws with the student. Remind the student
to be careful with whom they choose to share information
(with exception of mandated reporting, no one else needs
to know).
• Concentration can be difficult after sexual exploitation and
during periods of homelessness. Explain to the student these
are common reactions and explain that these difficulties will
diminish overtime.
• Hypersensitivity and mood swings are common responses to
sexual exploitation; these students need your patience and
understanding.
Schools
• Be aware this issue could be a barrier to the student’s
performance in class. Teachers may need to know in general
terms that a student is experiencing crises. However, discuss
with youth before talking with teacher or other school staff
about the student’s situation.
• Sexual violence can also cause fear of places or situations
that once were okay. Students may need to develop a safety
plan that may include having someone with them and/
or identifying someone they can call if they need to. Make
sure this identified “safe person” understands they are the
designated person for this youth. Anticipatory guidance and
planning may decrease the trauma as well as its devastating
effects.
• Sexual assault is not a mandated report unless the assailant
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 90
is in a position of authority (e.g., family member, teacher, coach,
counselor, etc.). See Mandated Reporting Laws in Appendix
Consider the following to create a safe environment for staff
and students:
Staff, students, families, and community members are important in
creating a safe school environment. Well functioning safe schools
foster learning and socially appropriate behaviors. Social emotional
learning needs to be embedded in the core curricula of the
schools. Effective schools:
• Involve families in meaningful ways.
• Emphasize positive relationships among students and staff.
• Develop links to the community.
• Discuss safety issues openly.
• Treat students with equal respect.
• Create ways for students to share their concerns and to
receive information, options and support.
• Help students feel safe in expressing their feelings.
• Offer extended day programs for students.
• Understand the complexity of issues with which youth struggle.
• Have a system in place for referring students who are
suspected of being physically or sexually abused or assaulted.
• Assist students in making the transitions to adult life and the
workplace.
When working with a homeless youth whom you suspect have
been sexually exploited, consider the following:
9. The youth’s chronological age may not match his/her
developmental age. Keep this in mind when framing the
questions asked.
10. It is important to be in tune with your client. Read between
the lines and be aware of your personal assumptions.
Remember, to reach the youth and achieve desired results, your
interaction must be relationship-focused. The best interest of the
youth should be the number one priority. Support real outcomes
for youth and help the youth realize their own strengths and abilities
to meet their goals and use their own resources. Please use the intake questions as a guide and always ask for more information and
elaborate.
1. Be respectful of where the youth is coming from.
Demographics
3. Be willing to listen and take what they say seriously.
2. Do not make assumptions or judgments
4. Be responsive and reliable by listening and ensuring that you
have heard accurately.
5. Be honest about the services that you can offer and what you
know is available (always keep all promises made to the youth!).
6. Use a strengths-based approach and harm reduction
philosophy (See Positive Youth Development section of the
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines).
7. Refer back to the Cultural Considerations section for cultural
specific information.
8. Understand that youth may not understand that they are being
sexually exploited.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
• What is your name?
• How old are you? What is your birth date?
• Do you go by any other names?
• Do you have a number that you can be reached at?
• What is your primary language?
• Which race/ethnic group to you identify as yours?
• How do you identify your gender? (Male, female, transgender/
transsexual, queer, questioning, other)
Housing/Support Network
• Where did you sleep last night?
• Who is your legal guardian?
• Where are you staying and with whom? (Be sure to specifically
identify and define this person)
pg 91
Discipline Specific
Protocol Guidelines
Many youth who runaway or are thrown out of their homes have
been physically or sexually abused or neglected. Childhood abuse
increases the risk for later victimization on the street. Physical
abuse is associated with elevated risk of assaults for runaway and
homeless youth, while sexual abuse is associated with higher risk
of rape for runaway and homeless youth. The following are questions that can be used to assess if a youth has been sexually exploited and the status of their housing situation. If the youth indicates
that they need further resources, please see the resource directory
that follows. If a more extensive directory is needed, please refer to
the Resources section in this book.
Shelter and Drop-In Centers
Shelter and Drop-In Centers
Shelter and Drop-In Centers
• Who is your closest family member?
• Is there anyone we can contact in case of an emergency?
• Have you ever had an out-of-home placement?
• Do you have a safe person you can turn to for help?
• Does that person know they are “your” safe or special
person?
• What/who are the other support systems in your life?
Shelter and Drop-In Centers
• What are reasons for not being able to stay with your family
or for seeking shelter?
Education
• Are you currently attending school?
• What is the last grade you completed?
• Do you like school?
• If not attending, would you like help getting back into
school or getting your GED?
• What was the last school you attended? Where? When?
Personal/Family Health
*Examples: kicked out of home, ran away from home,
physical, sexual or emotional abuse at home, caregiver
moved away, came out LGBTQQ, unsafe environment,
drug/alcohol use at home, death of a caregiver, parent
cannot afford care or abandoned, left home voluntarily,
parent in an institutional setting, youth is pregnant, etc.
• How would you rate your current health? (Excellent, Fair,
Good, Poor)
• Is there anyone in your family who has a serious illness or
whose health you are worried about?
• Does your family have a hard time paying rent/bills?
• Where were you staying in the last six months?
• Do you have a safe place to stay tonight and for this week?
• Do you need referrals to shelters?
• If living alone, when did you become independent?
• Where did you spend most of your life or growing up?
• What communities, neighborhoods, hangouts, school etc.
do you participate in?
• Do you want help returning home or locating a safe friend,
adult or relative?
• Are you working or receiving any financial assistance?
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 92
• Do you have any questions or concerns about your health?
• Are you pregnant now or a father-to-be?
• Are you a parent?
• Have you ever been pregnant?
Sexuality
• When was the last time you had anal, oral or vaginal sex?
• How old were you the first time you had sex?
• Are you practicing safe sex? How often? (All the time,
Sometimes, Never)
• Do you need birth control or condoms?
• Are you attracted to males, females or both?
• How do you identify your sexual orientation? (Heterosexual,
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Questioning/unsure, Don’t want to
answer, Not known)
• Is anyone emotionally or physically hurting you or are you
afraid that they might?
Mental Health
• How many people have you had sex with in the past six
months, 12 months?
• How are you feeling today? Can you describe your mood?
• Is the medication prescribed? Do you have enough medication?
• Have you ever made a suicide attempt?
• To your knowledge, have you ever felt pressure to have sex?
• Have you ever engaged in any type of sexual activity that
would be considered commercial sex? (Stripping, Dancing,
Posing, Phone Sex, Escort Service)
• Have you exchanged sex for things such as food, shelter,
clothing, drugs, alcohol, etc.?
• Have you ever been coerced (threatened, talked or tricked)
into having sex when you didn’t really want to? How about
when you were drinking or using drugs? (Pharming,
Inhaling, Snorting, Shooting Up)
• Has anyone ever taken pictures or video of you naked or
having sex? If so, was it posted on the internet?
• Have you ever put personal information or pictures on the
internet?
• Have you ever been diagnosed for an emotional condition?
(Bi-polar, depression, etc.)
• Are you currently taking any medications regularly for
mood, behavior or sleep?
• Have you ever had suicidal thoughts?
• Are you currently having suicidal thoughts or plans?
• Have you ever tried to hurt yourself on purpose? (Cut, Burn)
• What would you change about your life?
Based on the answers to the above questions, providers should assist clients in finding appropriate resource using the resource sections
of the SHYIP Protocol Guidelines. For general assistance call
StreetWorks at 612-252-2735.
• Do you know how to identify an unsafe situation?
• Do you know how to identify an unsafe person?
• Have you ever been sexually abused? * Refer to Mandated
Reporting guidelines if youth answers yes.
• How old were you?
• Was it reported? What happened after it was reported?
• Can you tell me what happened?
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 93
Discipline Specific
Protocol Guidelines
• To your knowledge, have you ever had a sexually transmitted
infection?
Shelter and Drop-In Centers
Shelter and Drop-In Centers
Street Outreach
Street Outreach, also referred to as Streetwork, or Street-based services, brings services to homeless populations in street and community environments through non-judgmental engagement. It is
one form of outreach, which is a large category that includes such
services as Meals on Wheels, Visiting Medical Personnel, Community Center work, Religious Proselytizing and Street Outreach
work.
Street Outreach
All Street Outreach workers must be trained in several skill areas.
Those who target youth populations need to be educated and sensitive to issues such as: Youth Culture, Homeless Culture, Boundaries and Ethics, Outreach Methodology, Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual,
Transgender, Queer, and Questioning Youth, (LGBTQQ) Safety
Protocols, Mental Health Issues, Disability, Sexually Exploited
Youth, Case Management, and Sexually Transmitted Infections
and Diseases. In the metro area, Street Outreach Workers carry
the StreetWorks “Greenbag”. The Greenbag is filled with supplies
for basic needs, hygiene items, socks, t-shirts and underwear, bus
tokens, etc. An individual who carries a Greenbag has had approximately four to six weeks of on-street training with experienced outreach workers and three, two-hour in-house training sessions with
StreetWorks staff. A Greenbag carrier is known by youth to be a
safe person to approach.
Homeless youth populations are extremely diverse, but have many
issues in common including abuse histories, foster care placement,
involvement in the legal system, immigrant status, mental health
diagnosis (or lack of), and mistrust of mainstream culture and services.
When working in street environments, outreach workers
conduct themselves using the following guidelines:
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 94
General Considerations
• How well they know the environment/s where outreach
will occur.
• Training available from outreach professionals.
• Their skill level in approaching and engaging strangers.
• How they/their organization define homelessness.
• Resources to offer youth.
• Supplies needed for outreach?
Environment/Geography
• Assess the area/s where outreach will be conducted by
driving/walking through several times at different times of
the day or night.
• Observe activities in the area, bus stops, drug traffic, sex
work, residential, business, gathering spots such as parks,
community centers, or corner streets.
• Introduce themselves to business and community members
and clarify their purpose.
• Meet with police personnel in the area they’ll be working in.
• Identify and meet with any other providers in the community.
• Talk to youth who they already know if they are from the
area.
• Go and visit all of the youth programs that will be resources,
get to know staff in these programs, assess the program for
atmosphere, rules, space, cleanliness and accessibility.
Safety Protocol
• Always work in teams of two when in street environments.
• Know their partner’s full name and emergency contact
person’s telephone number.
• Ask their partner if they have any specific health related
concerns (asthma, diabetes, etc.)
• Have a “red code” word or short phrase that means Leave
the area now!
• When exposed to an episode of violence, street fight,
observing a weapon, gang activity etc., leave the area
immediately. If an outreach worker witnesses a violent
crime, they should walk away and call 911 to report the
incidence.
• Never interfere with a police officer and another person.
If they witness inappropriate behavior by police personnel,
they will write down the name and number of the badge
and make a report.
Approach
• Be prepared by having a business card in their hand when
approaching a person; consider how they will introduce/
identify themselves and their partners and their purpose/
services.
• Ask for the person’s name after introducing themselves.
• Have a short opener statement prepared, “Hi, my name is
_________, and I am an outreach worker with _________.
Do you have a minute? I just want to let you know about
some services for youth.”
• Never chase anybody down the street! Look for an opportunity
when people are standing still, waiting for a bus, hanging
out by a corner store, etc.
• Don’t personalize! If a youth doesn’t want to talk, assume it
is not about the street outreach worker; it’s about what the
youth feels at the time.
• Always leave the encounter with a positive message, “Take
care!” or “Thanks for your time!” or “It was nice meeting
you!”
• Always point to the number on their business card where the
youth can reach them or another person for crisis services.
Engagement
• Engagement is more difficult than approach. Introductions
and giving out a business card are not difficult, but engagement
is another level and critical in building relationships.
• Youth will often ask questions about employment and
housing, so be prepared with resources, shelter numbers,
transitional living programs, agencies that assist youth in
writing resumes, computer access, case management assistance,
job programs and educational resources.
• Tell the youth what their outreach hours are, and what
neighborhoods they are working consistently with.
• Be friendly and sincere.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 95
Discipline Specific
Protocol Guidelines
• When approaching youth, one person should start the
conversation, while the outreach partner continues to ob
serve the environment, or “watches the partner’s back.”
Violent events can happen quickly in street environments.
Be prepared.
Street Outreach
Street Outreach
Street Outreach
• Ask if they know about their program or services, or if they
visit any youth programs regularly. I if so, ask who they
know or who their case manager is.
Following are considerations for other professionals who work
with homeless youth:
Referrals and Resources
• Street Youth often dress like all youth, do not assume a
youth is or is not homeless by attire.
• Keep a list of referral resources with them at all times when
conducting outreach services.
• Visit as many referral sites as possible to meet with staff and
get a feeling for the atmosphere. Before sending a youth
somewhere, consider how friendly it would feel to that youth?
• Ask agencies to explain their philosophy in working with
youth to help determine if and/or how they would make a
good resource.
• KNOW WHAT IS AVAILABLE! Know who can go where,
when, for how long, what the youth can expect, and any
other useful information.
Advocacy
• Be prepared to educate other systems staff about homeless
youth experiences.
Street Outreach
• Make their role clear to the youth: advocates provide sup
port services and are not a representative of the legal system.
• When advocating for a youth, ask the youth what you can
divulge about their life. Ask the youth to sign a release of
information to speak with other agencies/systems about
him or her.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 96
Medical Considerations
• If a youth is wearing unwashed or tattered clothing, do not
assume that they want different clothing; many youth who
are traveling or squatting may be attached to what they
wear. This population of youth often wears layers of
clothing, even in the warmer seasons.
• Watch out for cuts, burns, bruises and skin infections; homeless
youth may not have access to hygiene needs or the ability to
treat minor or major wounds. Self-injurious behavior may
also be occurring in a homeless youth.
• Discuss sexual activity non-judgmentally. Offer testing for
STI’s/STD’s, even if that isn’t the reason the youth came to
the emergency room, clinic, or scheduled appointment.
Law Enforcement Considerations
• Law enforcement will encounter street youth under many
circumstances which may be deemed dangerous and unsafe
for youth. For example, youth may be living in abandoned
and unsafe settings (e.g., under bridges, in caves near the
river, in cars or trucks/vans, sleeping in doorways or stair
wells and in parks). It is helpful to the youth if law enforcement
officers do not assume that the youth was safer in there
traditional home environment. Many youth are on the street
and/or in unsafe places because of severe abuse in their home.
• It is helpful if officers question the youth about safety issues
regarding their familial environment before returning them
automatically. Please remember that youth are reluctant to
admit that they have been abused. Even severely abused
children and youth can be protective of their abusers.
• Read the body language of the youth, this can be more
informative than some answers youth give.
• Do not make assumptions about a youth’s activity without
getting the whole story. For example, just because they are
on University Avenue late at night does not mean they’ve
broken a law.
• Be culturally aware and sensitive to all youth (see Cultural
Consideration Section).
School Considerations
• It is important not to assume that because a youth is coming
to school that they are not homeless or street-involved.
• Do not assume by the youth’s attire that they are, or are not,
homeless.
that makes the youth feel uneasy or unsafe? If so, share your
concern in a non-judgmental way. For example, “I am
concerned about where you are staying and want to be sure
everything is okay?”
• Make certain you know who the school’s “Homeless Youth”
liaison is where the youth is enrolled.
• Homeless and street engaged youth often know one another.
If you know a youth is homeless and enrolled in school,
consider that their friendships and relationships may be with
other youth who are also homeless or street identified.
However, do not judge a youth by their friendships.
As professionals working with outreach workers, it is important to
keep in mind that Street Outreach is a uniquely specialized profession and not just “shelter work outside.” Because young people
are in street environments, capable providers must also be there.
Individuals entering the street outreach field must become highly
skilled to be successful in reaching these youth.. The most successful outreach occurs when providers have the ability to form relationships with youth, and have services in place for young people
when they are ready to make new choices in their lives.
Outreach workers welcome working with all other providers to
connect youth with appropriate services. Outreach workers have a
wealth of information to share that could help other providers regarding the experiences street youth are currently having, and how
the youth came to be living on the street.
• Ask where and with whom they are staying. Be certain these
inquiries are not accusations.
For more information on outreach in the Metro area, call
the StreetWorks Collaborative at 612.252.2735 or visit
StreetWorksmn.org.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 97
• Ask questions about the environment they are staying in.
Is there anything from what you know of the environment
Discipline Specific
Protocol Guidelines
• Ask the youth if there is a friend or relative where they can
stay that is safe. However, do not assume that if a youth tells
you they are staying with a friend, that the “friend” is safe.
Ask more questions! For example, find out how old the
friend is? How long have they known them? Is there any
thing that makes you uncomfortable about the friend’s
environment? Where do they sleep at their friend’s house?
Street Outreach
Street Outreach
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 98
The Safe Harbors Youth Intervention Project
(SHYIP) Protocol Guidelines
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
Consent &
Confidentiality
Consent and Confidentiality
pg 99
Consent and Confidentiality Section
Note:
What follows is taken with permission from the content of: Consent & Confidentiality: Providing Medical and Mental Health
Services to Minors in Minnesota – Legal Guidelines for Professionals (Revised 2002). Online copies available at:
http://www.hcmc.org/depts/documents/ConsentConfidBr.pd
Consent & Confidentiality
Thanks to the following people who provided significant assistance in
revising the document: Kathie Amble, Millie Casperson, Nancy Mayer
Gosz, Kathy Knight, Ann Russell, and Jann Wesley.
Providing Medical and Mental Health Care
Services to Minors in Minnesota
Legal Guidelines for Professionals
Thanks to Julia Joseph-DiCaprio and Martha Driscoll of Hennepin
County Medical Center Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Health
for their assistance in the distribution of this booklet.
Prepared by:
Maggie Dexheimer Pharris PhD, RN, MPH
The original design and formatting of this document was done by Elizabeth M. Saewyc with support by Project #MCJ-279185 from the Maternal
and Child Health Bureau (Title V, Social Security Act) Health Resources
and Service Administration, Department of Health and Human Services.
Nursing Department, College of St. Catherine
Emergency Department, Hennepin County Medical Center
Karen Shannon MSW
Consent and Confidentiality
Minneapolis Public Schools
Copyright 1996, 1998, and 2002. Department of Pediatrics,
Hennepin County Medical Center on behalf of the Hennepin County
Board of Commissioners:
JoAnn Johnson MD, MPH
Teenage Medical Service
Children’s Hospitals and Clinics
Gail Dorfman
Published by:
Randy Johnson
Hennepin County Medical Center
Public Relations Department
Minneapolis, Minnesota
October 1996, August 1998
Revised April 2002
Peter McLauglin
Mike Opat
Penny Steele
Mark Stenglein
Persons who have used this booklet previously should note that there are three significant changes in the 2002 version; specifically in mental health admissions, the criminal sexual conduct statute, and institutional abuse.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
Thanks to the following people who provided significant assistance in
preparing the original document: Marjorie Ankel, Dana Barr, Arletha
Blanks, Gail Chang Bohr, Rhonda Simpson Brown, Jayne Curry, Gary
Debele, Abigail English, DavidFisher, Ellie Griffith, Shari Grote, Cheryl
Gustafson, Adele Hoffman, Margie Hogan, Jill Kempthorne, Abby Kirshner, Barbara Klatt, Liz Myhre, Chuck Oberg, Ann Russell, Renee Sieving, Gary Sigman, Kathy Simmelink, Kristen Teipel, Wright Walling,
and Jay Wilkinson.
pg 100
Mary Tambornino
102
Definition of Terms and Concepts
103
Key Sources of Legal Authority
103
Key Legal Concepts
103
Exceptions to Parental Consent
103
Status of Minor
104
Category of Care
105
Confidentiality
107
Parental Notification and Financial Responsibility
107
Minor Consent Algorithm
108
Sexual Abuse and Sexual Assault
109
Sexual Abuse/Sexual Assault Reporting Algorithm
111
References
112
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 101
Consent &
Confidentiality
Introduction
Consent and Confidentiality Table of Contents
Consent and Confidentiality Table of Contents
Introduction
This document was developed to provide a brief review of the
laws that guide the provision of health care to minors in the state of
Minnesota. It is intended to:
• Encourage providers to become knowledgeable about
the legal parameters of minor consent,
• Discuss the legal parameters of confidentiality as they
pertain to the care of minors, and
Consent and Confidentiality Introduction
• Differentiate between the mandated reporting of sexual
abuse and the voluntary reporting of sexual assault.
Facilitating collaborative decision-making between a minor
and her or his parent regarding health care should be the goal of
practitioners. This goal, though often achieved without difficulty,
may at times be problematic. Given the brevity of this document,
it is impossible to elaborate on all aspects of decision-making or
to propose categorical answers for each clinical dilemma faced
by health care providers. However, this document does outline
the legal aspects of a framework within which responsible
decisions can be made. Practitioners should also be guided by
an assessment of 1) the adolescent’s cognitive, physical, social, and emotional development, and 2) the extent to which the
adolescent needs and has access to supportive adults who will
assist in making important decisions. Ultimately, it is this assessment
along with the ethical principles of our various professions as
well as an understanding of basic legal principles that guide our
provision of care to minors.
This document is not intended as legal advice or consultation in
regard to providing health care to minors. Specific questions regarding interpretation or application of these guidelines should be
referred to an attorney. Lastly, since law is an expression of public
policy, it changes and evolves over time. This document is cur-
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 102
rent at the time of publication. Information about statutes may be
obtained from the Minnesota Attorney General’s office at (651)
296-6196. Text of Minnesota Statutes and the most recent session
changes can be accessed on the Internet through: http://www.leg.
state.mn.us/leg/statutes.htm.
We hope this document will enhance understanding of basic legal concepts regarding minor consent and confidentiality. This
understanding, along with knowledge of adolescent development,
family systems, and professional ethical principles, is intended to
assist practitioners in keeping the best interest of their patients as
their primary motivation in decisions related to the provision of
care.
Key Sources of Legal Authority
1. Diagnosis
What are the types of law that govern the provision of health
care to minor patients?
2. Nature and purpose of proposed treatment
3. Risks and consequences of proposed treatment
• Statutes:
4. Probability that treatment will be successful
• Court Decisions:
6. Prognosis if treatment is not given
• Regulations:
• Confidentiality: The principle of confidentiality limits the
disclosure of medical and mental health care information
and protects the privacy of the patient.
*Law as determined and written by a legislative body, such
as Congress or the Minnesota State Legislature.
5. Feasible treatment alternatives and have the ability to
make a voluntary choice among the alternatives
*Law as determined by a court. This law is based on
judicial decisions, i.e., how a court has ruled in previous
similar situations. Generally, this law prevails if there is
no applicable statute.
• Parental Consent: The traditional requirement that a parent
give consent for treatment of a minor child. Parental rights
is a time-honored principle that parents have the right to
make decisions for their children while they are minors.
Key Legal Concepts
What are the important legal terms that provide the basis for
understanding the laws that govern the provision of health
care to minor patients?
• Minor: Individual under 18 years of age.
• Consent: With regard to medical and mental health care,
this is generally defined as informed consent. The following
criteria must be fulfilled to meet the requirement of
informed consent.
The patient must be informed of and able to understand:
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
Exceptions to Parental Consent
Is parental consent always necessary to provide medical
or mental health care to minors?
• Yes, unless certain exceptions can be applied. These exceptions
are based primarily on two mechanisms:
1. Statutory Law
2. Court Decisions
Based on statutory law and court decisions, what are the two
broad areas of exception regarding parental consent?
• The two broad areas of exception are:
1. Status of the minor, or
2. Category of care provided
pg 103
Consent &
Confidentiality
*An implemental interpretation of a statute having the
force of law which is issued by an executive body.
(Example: regulations issued by the Minnesota
Department of Health or by the U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services.)
Key Sources / Key Legal Concepts / Exceptions to Parental Consent
Consent and Confidentiality
Consent and Confidentiality
Status of Minor
1. Minor is 15 years of age or older.
What are the two exceptions to parental consent based
on status of the minor?
3. Proposed treatment is for the minor’s benefit.
• Emancipated Minor: In Minnesota there is no procedural
court process by which a minor can be designated an
emancipated minor” with full rights and privileges of adult
status. However, there are state statues that “emancipate” the
following categories of minors for purposes of giving
consent for health care. No other consent is required
regardless of age.
1.Minor living separate and apart from parents or guardian
(with or without consent, regardless of duration) who is
managing her or his own financial affairs. [Minn. Stat.
§144.341]
Status of a Minor
2.Minor who has married. [Minn. Stat. §144.342]
3.Minor who has borne a child. [Minn. Stat.§144.342]
Mature Minor: The concept of “mature minor” is based
on principles and prior decisions of a court. Although
there is no specific precedent in Minnesota case law
related to application of the “mature minor” concept, there
is significant case law from other states supporting practitioners
who elect to provide care under this doctrine. If the
mature minor doctrine is employed, the minor must be
judged capable of giving informed consent. It applies where:
2. Minor is able to give informed consent.
4. Proposed treatment is deemed necessary.
5. Proposed treatment does not involve complex, high-risk
medical procedures or complex, high-risk surgery.
What is the risk of liability for providing care under the “mature minor” doctrine?
• Careful searches have found no reported cases of a physician
being successfully sued for failure to obtain parental consent
when providing non-negligent treatment to a mature minor
[AMA 1994, Morrissey et al. 1986, English 1990].
If it turns out that a minor did not have legal authority to
give consent, is a medical or mental health provider
protected from liability?
• Yes, if the medical or mental health care provider relies in
good faith on a minor’s claim of ability to give effective
consent, concluding therefrom that the minor’s consent is
valid. [Minn. Stat. §144.345]
*no other exceptions to parental consent apply, and
*parental involvement is impractical or problematic.
• It is generally accepted that the risk of liability for treating
a “mature minor” is negligible if all of the following criteria
are met:
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 104
41
What are the categories of medical, mental, and other health
services for which a minor may give her or his own consent in
the state of Minnesota?
5. Abortion*
1. Emergency care*
• the abortion is authorized in writing by those entitled to
notice as stated above; or
Under Minnesota law a minor may consent to certain categories of
care. These categories are:
(*A minimum age is not specified in the statutes.)
Risk to the minor’s life or health is of such a nature that treatment
should be given without delay and requiring consent would delay
or deny treatment. [Minn. Stat. §144.344]
2. Pregnancy-related care*
Any minor may give effective consent for medical, mental, and
other health services to determine the presence of or to treat
pregnancy and conditions associated with pregnancy. [Minn.
Stat. §144.343(1)]
No abortion shall be performed upon an unemancipated minor until at least 48 hours after written notice has been delivered to both
of the minor’s parents or her guardians. Notification of one parent
is sufficient if the other parent cannot be located through reasonably diligent effort. No notification is required if:
• the attending physician certifies that the abortion is necessary
to prevent the minor’s death and there is insufficient time
to provide notice; or
• the pregnant minor declares that she is the victim of sexual
abuse, neglect, or physical abuse. Notice of that declaration
shall be made to the proper authorities.
Any minor may give effective consent for medical, mental, and
other health services to determine the presence of or to treat
conditions associated with sexually transmitted diseases. [Minn.
Stat. §144.343(1)]
• the abortion without notification is in the best interest of the
pregnant minor.
4. Contraceptive care*
The practice of giving contraceptives to minors without parental
consent by physicians is not criminal conduct [Op. Atty. Gen. 494B-39, 8/25/72]. In practical application this extends to nurse practitioners and others with prescriptive authority.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
• the pregnant minor is mature and capable of giving
informed consent for the abortion; or
[Minn. Stat. §144.343, Hodgson v. Minnesota, 110 S.Ct. 2926]
6. Alcohol and other drug abuse*
Any minor may give effective consent for medical, mental, and
other health services to determine the presence of or to treat
alcohol and other drug abuse. [Minn. Stat. §144.343(1)]
pg 105
Consent &
Confidentiality
3. Sexually transmitted disease* (STD)
If a pregnant minor elects not to allow the notification of one or
both of her parents or guardian, she may petition the court for a
waiver of notification. The judge shall authorize a physician to perform the abortion if the judge determines that:
Category of Care: Medical & Mental Health Care
Category of Care: Medical & Mental Health Care
Category of Care: Medical & Mental Health Care
Category of Care: Medical & Mental Health Care
A minor consenting for inpatient chemical dependency treatment
has the right to leave the facility within 72 hours (exclusive of
Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays) after submitting a written request to the head of the treatment facility, unless legal petition has been filed for commitment. The treatment facility must
inform the minor of this right in writing at the time of admission.
[Minn. Stat. §253B.04]
7. Inpatient mental health services
A minor 16 years of age or older may request to be admitted to
a treatment facility for observation, evaluation, diagnosis, care,
and treatment. A minor consenting for admission has a right to
leave the facility within 12 hours of submitting a written request
to the head of the treatment facility, unless an emergency hold has
been placed on the minor or a legal petition has been filed for commitment. The treatment facility must inform the minor of this right in
writing at the time of admission. [Minn. Stat. §253B.04]
Can a parent or guardian admit a minor to a mental health
or chemical dependency treatment facility on an informal
(voluntary) basis without the minor’s consent?
If the minor is under 16 years of age, the consent of a parent or
guardian alone is sufficient to admit the minor to a chemical dependency or mental health treatment facility if it is determined by
independent examination that there is reasonable evidence the proposed patient is:
• mentally ill, mentally retarded, or chemically dependent, and
• suitable for treatment [Minn Stat §253B.04].
If a minor is 16 or 17 years of age and refuses to consent
personally to admission, he or she may be admitted as a patient for
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 106
mental illness or chemical dependency treatment with the consent
of a parent or legal guardian if it is determined by an independent
examination that there is reasonable evidence that the proposed patient is chemically dependent or has a mental illness and is suitable
for treatment. [Minn Stat. §253B.04]
Under what circumstances can a minor be admitted to a
mental health or chemical dependency treatment facility
on a formal (involuntary) basis?
Any minor may be transported on a “transportation hold” to a treatment facility by a peace or health officer if the officer has reason to
believe that the minor is:
• mentally ill, mentally retarded, or chemically dependent, and
• in danger of causing injury to self or others if not immediately
detained.
An examiner of the treatment facility can place the minor on a
72-hour emergency hold with the consent of the head of the
treatment facility if:
• the examiner has examined the minor in the last 15 days,
• the examiner believes the person is mentally ill, mentally
retarded, or chemically dependent and in danger of causing
injury to self or others if not immediately detained, and
• an order of the court cannot be obtained in time to prevent
the anticipated injury.
A minor may be held up to 72 hours after admission (exclusive of
Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays). To hold a minor for more
than 72 hours after admission, a court petition for commitment
must be filed. [Minn. Stat. §253B.05]
Confidentiality
Parental Notification
Are health care providers obligated to provide confidentiality
to minors who give consent for their own care?
If a minor has consented for her or his own care, is there any
circumstance under which a clinician can break confidence
and inform the minor’s parents of the care given?
Yes, the minor alone may authorize release of medical and mental
health care information in situations where the minor has given
her or his consent for care. [Minn. Stat. §144.335] This statute
assumes the minor received services pursuant to Minnesota
Statute §144.341-347 (see pages 6 – 9).
Are health care providers obligated to provide minors’
health records to parents upon request?
Not if the minor consented to treatment under Minnesota
§144.341-347. Under these circumstances, Minnesota law does
not authorize release of medical and mental health records to anyone other than the minor. [Minn. Stat. §144.335]
Financial Responsibility
Who is financially responsible for the cost of services when a
minor consents for her or his own care?
The minor assumes financial responsibility for health care
services when she or he consents for health care services.
[Minn. Stat. §144.347]
There is no assurance that an itemized billing statement or
hospital bill will not be sent to the person who holds the insurance
policy (i.e. the parent or guardian of the minor). Third-party
payors differ and providers should inform themselves regarding
payor policy on explanation of benefit notification. Health care
providers should be familiar with policies regarding itemized
statements sent out by third-party payors or individual health
care facilities in order to inform the minor whether confidentiality
can be maintained.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 107
Consent &
Confidentiality
Can health care providers assure confidentiality to minors
consenting for their care under Minnesota Statute
§144.341-343 when third-party payors are involved?
Minnesota Statute §144.346 states that a medical professional may
inform the minor’s parent or guardian of any treatment given or
needed when, in the professional’s judgment, failure to inform the
parent or guardian would seriously jeopardize the health of the
minor.
Confidentiality / Parental Notification / Financial Responsibility
Consent and Confidentiality
Minor Consent Algorithm
Minor Consent Algorithm
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 108
What is the difference between sexual abuse and sexual assault?
Many people confuse the terms sexual abuse and sexual assault.
The distinction between the two is the relationship of the offender to the minor and the fact that health care professionals are
mandated to report sexual abuse.
• It is a case of sexual abuse if the offender is responsible for
the minor’s care, is in a position of authority over the minor,
or has a significant relationship to the minor.
• It is a case of sexual assault if the offender is a stranger or
does not meet the criteria for sexual abuse as listed above.
What is the definition of position of authority?
What is the definition of significant relationship?
Significant relationship is defined as a relative by blood, marriage,
or adoption, or an adult who resides intermittently or regularly in
the same dwelling as the minor. [Minn. Stat. §609.341]
What are the circumstances in which a health care provider is
mandated to report sexual contact?
When the sexual contact falls within the child abuse/sexual abuse
reporting statute [Minn. Stat. §626.556]. This statute states a
report is mandated when the sexual contact took place within
the past three years and:
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
• was with a person who is responsible for the minor’s care,
• was with a person who is in a position of authority over
the minor,
• was with a person who has a significant relationship to the
minor, or
• is an indication of parental/responsible person neglect.
If an adolescent was sexually assaulted but does not want to file
a police report, is the provider mandated to report the assault?
No. While filing a police report in the case of sexual assault is
important for protection of the public, it is not mandated by law
unless it falls within the state’s child abuse/sexual abuse reporting
statute (as cited above).
If an adolescent reveals having consensual sex with someone
considerably older than she or he, is the health care provider
mandated to report this as statutory rape?
No, even though the sexual contact between a minor and an older
individual may constitute criminal sexual conduct (see page 16);
health care providers are not mandated to report unless the sexual
contact also falls within the child abuse/sexual abuse reporting
statute (as cited above).
What actions constitute criminal sexual conduct?
In Minnesota, criminal sexual conduct ranges from first to fourth
degree [Minn. Stat. §609.341-345]. The degree of severity varies according to the age of the victim, the cognitive and physical
capacity of the victim, the nature of the sexual contact, the age difference between the offender and the minor victim, and whether
force or coercion was used.
pg 109
Consent &
Confidentiality
Position of authority includes but is not limited to any person who
is a parent or acting in the place of a parent and is charged with any
of a parent’s rights, duties or responsibilities to a child; or a person who is charged with any duty or responsibility for the health,
welfare, or supervision of a child, either independently or through
another, no matter how brief, at the time of the act. [Minn. Stat.
§609.341]
Sexual Abuse and Assault
Sexual Abuse and Sexual Assault
Sexual Abuse and Sexual Assault
In addition to those actions that mandate a child abuse/sexual abuse
report, other actions constituting criminal sexual conduct in the
first to fourth degree (the degree dependent on the variables listed
in the previous paragraph) include any of the following:
• sexual contact or penetration and the minor is less than
13 years of age,
• sexual contact and the offender has reason to know that the
person is mentally impaired, mentally incapacitated, or
physically helpless,
• sexual penetration and the minor is at least 13 but less than
16 and the offender is more than 24 months older,
• sexual contact and the minor is at least 13 but less than 16
and the offender is more than 48 months older,
• sexual contact and the offender uses force, coercion, or
threat of injury, or
Sexual Abuse and Assault
• nonconsensual sexual contact.
Although the above actions constitute criminal sexual conduct, they
do not meet the criteria of a mandated report unless the offender is
responsible for the minor’s care, the offender has a significant relationship to the minor, the offender is in a position of authority over
the minor, or the action was the result of parental neglect or neglect
of a responsible person/agency.
If a provider has reason to believe a minor has been a victim
of criminal sexual conduct in a licensed facility, is the provider mandated to file a report?
It depends upon the relationship of the offender to the victim
and the circumstances under which the event occurred.
A report must be filed with law enforcement or the appropriate
state licensing agency if:
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 110
• the offender is an employee or representative of the licensed
facility, or
• the sexual contact is an indication of failure to protect on
the part of the licensed facility, and
• the criminal sexual conduct occurred within the past 3 years.
For criminal sexual conduct meeting the above criteria in schools,
reports are called to the Department of Families, Children and
Learning (651-582-8546). In licensed health care facilities, reports are called to the State of Minnesota Health Facilities Complaints division (651-215-8713). The local county welfare agency is
responsible for assessing or investigating allegations of maltreatment
in child foster care, family child care, legally unlicensed child care,
and in juvenile correctional facilities located in the county.
Reports must be called in within 24 hours and followed by a
written report within 72 hours, exclusive of weekends and
holidays. Written reports must identify the child, any person
believed to be responsible for the abuse or neglect (if known),
the nature and extent of the abuse or neglect, and the name and address of the reporter [Minn Stat. §626.556].
pg 111
Consent &
Confidentiality
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
Sexual Abuse/Sexual Assault Reporting Algorithm
Sexual Abuse/Sexual Assault
Reporting Algorithm
References
References
Consent and Confidentiality
American Medical Association (1994). Guidelines
for Adolescent Preventive Services (GAPS):
Recommendations and Rationale. Chicago, IL: AMA.
Legal Guidelines for Professionals, Revised 2002
Consent and Confidentiality References
English, A. (1990). Treating adolescents: Legal and
ethical considerations. Medical Clinics of North
America, 74, 1097-1111.
English, A; Matthews, M; Extavour, K; Palamountain,
C; & Yang, J. (1995). State Minor Consent Statues:
A Summary, Cincinnati, OH: Center for Continuing
Education in Adolescent Health.
Morrissey, J; Hofmann, A; & Thorpe, J. (1986). Consent
and Confidentiality in the Health Care of Children
and Adolescents: A Legal Guide. New York: The Free
Press.
Sigman, G. & O’Connor, C. (1991). Exploration for
physicians of the mature minor doctrine. Journal
of Pediatrics, 119, 520-525.
Wildey, L. (1994). Basic Concepts in Identifying the
Health Needs of Adolescents. Ohio: Center for
Continuing Education in Adolescent Health.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 112
The Safe Harbors Youth Intervention Project
(SHYIP) Protocol Guidelines
Resources for Providers / 114
Resources for Youth: The Our Guide (Standalone Copies Available) / 180
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 113
SHYIP
Resources
SHYIP Resources
SHYIP Resource Guide
W
S
Resource Rationale
The SHYIP Resource Section has been divided into two sections:
A Youth Oriented Section and a Provider Oriented Section.
The youth section is a reproduction of content from the Our
Guide: Resource for Young Adults in the Twin Cities. Standalone copies of the Our Guide can be obtained by contacting
Streetworks at 612-252-2735 or www.streetworksmn.org
The Provider Oriented Section is a combination of resources
gathered by the SHYIP during the Inventory of Existing
Services and the Sexual Offence Services resource manual.
SHYIP Resources for Providers
Depending on the nature of the situation and the services needed,
individual providers should determine which section will be most
useful. The sections are meant to complement each other, and both
are useful when working with homeless runaway youth at risk for
sexual exploitation.
Special thanks to the Streetworks Collaborative for the content
of the Youth Oriented Section from the Our Guide: Resource
for Young Adults in the Twin Cities, and Ashley M. Gulden for
compiling the content of the Provider Resource Section.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
Y
C
M
S
B
A
Y
M
L
C
A
F
C
C
V
S
B
P
C
pg 114
116
Self Help Resources
123
Youth Shelter
125
Community Service Agencies
126
Medical Resources
128
Sexually Transmitted Disease Testing Referrals
132
Birth Control and Pregnancy Options
134
Abortion Services
136
Youth Mental Health and Other Youth Programs
137
Male Adult Survivors
141
Law Enforcement and Legal Services
142
County Based Services
147
Adult Shelter/Housing
149
Financial, Rental and Emergency Assistance Referrals
152
Child Abuse Victims
155
Child Abuse/Neglect Reporting
157
Vulnerable Adult and Mental Illness Referrals
158
Sexual Harassment & Exploitation Reports
160
Battered Women/Domestic Violence Services
161
Prostitution and Sex Trafficking Survivors
166
Culturally Specific Services and Resources
168
African and African American Community Resources
168
Asian and Asian American Community Resources
169
Deaf/Hard of Hearing Community Resources
170
Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual/Transgender/Queer/Questioning (LGBTQQ) Community Resources
173
Jewish Community Resources
175
Latina/o Community Resources
176
Native American/Alaskan Native Community Resources
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 115
178
1
2
3
5
7
10
13
15
36
346
245
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
When a Youth Needs to Talk With Someone
SHYIP Resources for Providers Table of Contents
Table of Contents
4
23
When a Youth Needs to Talk to Someone
When a Youth Needs to Talk to Someone
Acute Psychiatric Services
Children’s Crisis Response
PH: 612-873-3161
WEB: www.hcmc.org/depts/psych/cic.htm
WHO: Anyone in crisis; adolescent (up to 18 yrs)
and adult program
WHAT: They provide a 24-hour walk-in crisis intervention
and treatment of behavioral emergencies; Crisis
intervention phone service for assessment, information,
and referral for psychiatric emergencies.
WHERE:701 Park Ave South, Minneapolis
WHEN: Immediate services are 24 hours; adolescent
program hours are Mon/Tues/Wed 8am – 5pm;
Thurs noon – 5pm; Fri Closed
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: If you are under 18, parents have
access to your records and you will be transferred to the
adolescent program.
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: WHEN:
RA.I.N.N (Rape Abuse Incest National Network)
PH: 800-656-4673 (HOPE)
WEB: www.rainn.org
WHO: Anyone
WHAT: Connects caller to closest rape crisis center in
their area. Provides free, safe and confidential
support and information
WHEN: 24 Hours
Aurora Center for Advocacy and Education
PH: WEB:
WHO: WHAT:
1-800-656-4673
www1.umn.edu/aurora/
Victims of sexual violence
Provides crisis intervention and advocacy to
victims of sexual and domestic violence,
harassment and stalking
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 116
651-774-7000 (24 hours)
www.co.ramsey.mn.us/hs/ChildrenMentalHealth.html
Youth 0-18 yrs
Provides crisis support, intervention,
de-escalation, and mobile services for youth who
are dealing with mental health or family issues.
24 hours
Ramsey County Mental Health Center,
Crisis Center for Adults
PH: 651-266-7900 (24 hours)
WEB: www.co.ramsey.mn.us/hs/mhc/AdultMentalHealth.htm
WHO: Ages 18 and older
WHAT: Crisis support and intervention for adults suffering
from mental illness and that are a danger to
themselves or others. Outreach also available
WHEN: 24 hours
Regions Hospital Crisis Program
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: NOTE: 651-254-1000 (24 hours)
www.regionshospital.com
18 yrs and older
24 hour mental heath intake through emergency
room. No adolescent inpatient psychiatric beds.
United Hospital is the only hospital in Saint Paul
that has adolescent inpatient psychiatric beds.
Access Program
PH:
WHO: WHAT: 651-228-9544 (24 hours)
651-228-4713 (non-emergencies)
Ages 18 and older
Provides outreach to persons experiencing
chronic, persistent mental illness, chemical
dependency and/or homelessness.
Carver and Scott County Crisis Line
PH: 952-442-7601
WEB: www.co.scott.mn.us
WHO: Carver and Scott county residents
WHAT: To reach Social workers 24-hours a day.
WHEN: 24 hours
Dakota County Crisis Response
PH:
WEB:
WHO:
WHAT: 952-891-7171
www.co.dakota.mn.us
Dakota county residents
A 24 hour crisis line
Washington County Crisis Line
651-777-4455
www.co.washington.mn.us
Washington County residents
A 24 hour crisis line
Chrysalis
PH: 612-871-0118
612-824-2780 TTY
WEB: www.chrysaliswomen.org
WHO: 18 yrs and older
WHAT: Group and individual counseling and therapy,
legal clinic, chemical dependency, couples/
uncoupling, adult survivors, support groups,
general information and referrals.
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Childcare may be available,
must call to arrange.
C.L.U.E.S. (Communidades Latinas
Unidas En Servicio)
PH: Office: 612-746-3500
Crisis Line: 612-746-3537
WEB: www.clues.org
WHO: Culturally appropriate for the Spanish speaking
community.
WHAT: Individual, family and group counseling in Spanish
and English.
WHERE:720 East Lake Street, Minneapolis
Catholic Charities
PH: 651-215-2209 (Intake Line)
WEB: www.ccspm.org
WHO: Anyone
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 117
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: WHAT: Individual, family and group counseling and
therapy. Nondenominational services.
WHERE:Call for nearest location, multiple locations
throughout metro.
When a Youth Needs to Talk to Someone
When a Youth Needs to Talk to Someone
When a Youth Needs to Talk to Someone
Jewish Family Service
Phyllis Wheatley Community Center
PH:
WHO:
WHAT: FEE: PH:
WHO: WHAT: 651-698-0767
Culturally appropriate services for Jewish clients
Counseling, family life education, services and
case management for elderly, resettlement and
training services.
Sliding fee scale
Ramsey County Mental Health Clinic
When a Youth Needs to Talk to Someone
Lutheran Social Services
PH: 612-879-5320 (Intake Line)
WHO: Ages 3 to 90 yrs of age
WHAT: Individual, family and couples counseling.
Nondenominational services.
WHERE:Call intake line for nearest location, multiple
locations in metro area.
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Sliding fee scale and insurance
accepted.
Mental Health Resources, Inc.
PH:
WHO: WHAT: 651-266-7890 (Intake Line)
Adults recovering from mental illness
Counseling services for Ramsey, Hennepin and
Dakota County. Intake through Ramsey County
Mental Health Services
National Teen Dating Abuse Hotline
PH:
WEB:
WHAT: 1-866-331-9474
1-866-331-8453 TTY
www.loveisrespect.org
Information, resources, hotline, online live chat
rooms for teens
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
612-638-0700
Culturally appropriate for African American
community
Counseling, classes, nursery, after school
program, information and referrals.
pg 118
PH:
WHAT: 651-266-7999 General
651-266-7960 Intake
651-266-7900 Crisis
Counseling available for wide variety of issues
including, physical and sexual abuse, depression,
anxiety, transitions, etc.
Southwest Family Services
PH: 612-825-4407 Intake for all locations
WHO: Anyone
WHAT: Individual, couples and family therapy.
WHERE:Call intake line for nearest location, multiple
metro locations.
Walk-In Counseling Center
PH: 612-870-0565
WEB: www.walkin.org
WHO: 18 yrs and older
WHAT: Individual, couples and family short term
counseling and crisis intervention.
WHERE:2421 Chicago Ave, Minneapolis
WHEN: Call for hours, day or evening
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Services are free; donations
accepted. Childcare usually available, walk-in okay for
1st session with therapist.
Wilder Child Guidance Clinic
PH:
WHO: WHAT: 651-642-4001
Children and families
Counseling for child victims of abuse and
their families.
White Bear Areas Community
Counseling Center
PH:
WHO: WHAT:
FEE: 651-429-8544
Residents of White Bear Lake, White Bear
Township, Vadnais Heights, Birchwood, and
Mahtomedi ONLY.
Individual, couples, family and group counseling.
Psychiatric services and parenting classes.
Sliding fee scale.
Family Service
PH:
WHO:
WHAT:
FEE: 651-635-0095
Anyone
Individual, family and group counseling and
therapy services.
Sliding fee scale.
Family & Children’s Service
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
Project Pathfinder, Inc.
PH: 651 – 644-8515
WEB: www.projectpathfinder.org
WHO: Children under age 18 with sexual behavior
problems or who have been sexually abused.
Adolescents and adults who have engaged in
harmful or abusive sexual behaviors.
WHAT: Provides evaluation, individual, family and group
counseling programs, both short and long term
to individuals who have committed sexually
abusive behaviors. Also provides services to
children who have been sexually abused and their
families.
WHEN: Monday through Friday. To make an appointment
call 651-644-8515, ask for intake.
WHERE:1821 University Ave. West N385, Saint Paul
FEE: Vary according to services provided.
pg 119
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
PH: 612-339-9101
WEB: www.famchildserv.org/
WHO: Individuals, families and children
WHAT: Counseling and Support Groups
WHERE:4123 East Lake Street Minneapolis MN;
414 S. 8th Street Minneapolis;
6900 78th Avenue N Brooklyn Park,
9201 E. Bloomington Freeway, Suite Q, Bloomington
WHEN: Downtown: Wed until 8pm
Lake Street: Mon/Tues/Thurs until 8pm
Brooklyn Park: Mon/Tues/Wed until 8pm
Thurs until 5pm, Fri until 4pm
Bloomington: Mon/Wed until 8pm
Tues/Thurs until 5pm. Staff is also
available evenings and weekends.
Call 612-339-9101.
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Services offered on sliding fee
scale; may need to be 18 yrs. of age to been seen without
parent/guardian permission.
When a Youth Needs to Talk to Someone
When a Youth Needs to Talk to Someone
When a Youth Needs to Talk to Someone
La Familia Guidance Center, Inc.
When a Youth Needs to Talk to Someone
PH: 651-221-0913
WEB: www.lafamiliaguidance.org
WHO: Youth, families and adults
WHAT: Mental health counseling; youth intervention;
parent and family counseling
WHERE:155 S. Wabasha Street Suite #120, Saint Paul and
2217 Nicollet Avenue South in Minneapolis
LANGUAGE: Fluent in Spanish and English; has
multicultural mental health clinic
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Must have insurance; agency
works to keep children in the family.
Lao Family Community of Minnesota, Inc.
PH: 651-221-0069
WEB: www.laofamily.org
WHO: Youth and Families
WHAT: Offers culturally-specific education and support
to youth and families to help them cope with the
particular social and cultural issues that affect
them. Provides case management
WHERE:320 University Ave East, Saint Paul
LANUAGE: Hmong and English
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: This agency is education based,
and does not provide crisis work or intervention
Neighborhood Involvement Program (N.I.P.)
Community Counseling Clinic
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT:
612-374-4601
www.neighborhoodinvolve.org
Women, men 18 yrs and older; may see youth
(age 17) with parental consent
Mental health supportive counseling; GLBTQ friendly
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 120
WHERE:2431 Hennepin Ave South, Minneapolis
WHEN: Mon-Thurs: 8:30am – 8pm; Friday 8:30am – 5pm
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Counseling based on sliding
fee scale based on income
Neighborhood Involvement Program –
Youth Program
PH: 612-276-1522
WEB: www.neighborhoodinvolve.org
WHO: Youth, up to 18 yrs.
WHAT: After school programs; summer programs;
children’s mental health counseling
WHERE: 3333 North 4th St, Minneapolis
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Need parental or guardian
consent for services; services based on sliding fee and
income of family.
Neighborhood Involvement Program (N.I.P.)
Community Clinic
PH: 612-374-4089
WEB: www.neighborhoodinvolve.org
WHO: Women, men and children of all ages by appointment.
Must be uninsured for services and fees are based
on income level.
WHAT: Primary medical care; STI and pregnancy testing;
HIV testing; GYN exams and services; dental
exams and filings.
WHERE:2431 Hennepin Ave South, Minneapolis
WHEN: Mon-Thurs: 9am – 5pm and 6pm – 8:30pm
Friday 9am-5pm
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Medical and dental services
based on sliding fee scale and only provide services to
uninsured individuals and families.
Rape and Sexual Abuse Center,
Neighborhood Involvement Program
PH: 612-825-4357
WEB: www.neighborhoodinvolve.org/rsac
WHO: Youth, men and women who have been sexually
abused, assaulted, raped or sexually harassed;
any victim of sexual violence
WHAT: 24 hour crisis line; mental health counseling;
supportive confidential services
WHERE:2431 Hennepin Ave, Minneapolis
WHEN: Mon-Fri 9am – 5pm; evening appointments
available, 24 hour crisis line
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: all phone services are free and
confidential; mental health counseling is based on sliding
fee scale
Sexual Offense Services of Ramsey County
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
PH: 612-871-5111
WEB: www.sexualviolencecenter.org
WHO: Anyone a victim of sexual violence
WHAT: Rape crisis program that provides support,
crisis counseling, support groups, referrals
WHERE:3757 Fremont Ave. North, Minneapolis
WHEN: 24 hour crisis line; call anytime 612-871-5111
Jewish Family and Children’s Services of
Minneapolis
PH: 952-546-0616
WEB: www.jfcsmpls.org
WHO: Children and Families
WHAT: Support groups; emergency financial services;
counseling services; teen and adult programs
WHEN: Mon/Thurs 8:30am – 5:30pm;
Tues/Wed: 8:30am – 8pm; Fri 8:30am – 4pm
WHERE:13100 Wayzata Blvd, Minnetonka
BUS: On bus line, see website for bus route
Saint Paul Intervention Project
PH: 651-645-2824
WEB: www.stpaulintervention.org
WHO: Victims of domestic violence
WHAT: 24 hour response and service to victims of
domestic violence, including youth
WHERE: 1509 Marshall Ave, Saint Paul
pg 121
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
PH: 651-643-3006 (24 hour)
651-643-3022 (business line)
WEB: www.ramsey.mn.us/ph/yas/sos.htm
WHO: Anyone (primary or secondary) that is a victim of
sexual violence
WHAT: Crisis supportive counseling for victims, friends
and families that are affected by sexual violence;
advocacy, referrals, emergency services,
medical outreach to Regions Hospital, support
groups, 24 hour crisis line
WHERE:1619 Dayton Ave Suite #201, Saint Paul
WHEN: 24 hour crisis line; office open 8:30am – 5pm,
24 hour medical outreach
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: All services are free and
confidential
Sexual Violence Center
When a Youth Needs to Talk to Someone
When a Youth Needs to Talk to Someone
When a Youth Needs to Talk to Someone
When a Youth Needs to Talk to Someone
Stop It Now! Minnesota,
Prevention of Child Abuse
PH: 651-644-8515
1-888-773-8368
WEB: www.stopitnow.org
WHO: Anyone who has concerns about their own, or
someone else’s behavior towards children.
WHAT: Provides information and resources for anyone
with any concerns about their own or someone
else’s behavior towards children, including: adults
who are having sexual thoughts towards children,
or have sexually abused a child ; parents concerned
about their child’s sexual behavior; parents
concerned about someone’s behavior towards
their child; and adults who care about someone
whose sexual behavior concerns them. The agency
works to keep kids safe.
WHERE:821 University Ave. West, Suite N385,
Saint Paul, MN 55104
WHEN: Mon-Fri 8am – 5pm
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 122
Adults Recovering From
Incest Anonymous (ARIA)
PH: 763-591-5916
WHO: Incest Survivors 18 yrs and older
WHAT: 12 step style support group for female adult
survivors of incest.
WHEN: Call number and leave a message for someone
to call you back.
Al-ANON & ALATEEN
PH:
WHO: WHAT: 651-771-2208 Saint Paul
952-920-3961 Saint Louis Park/Minneapolis
Primary and secondary people affected by
alcoholism by self or family member. Both adult
and teen support groups, call for more information.
Support groups for alcoholism
Alcoholics Anonymous
PH: 651-227-5502 Info on all Saint Paul area meetings
952-922-0880 Info on Minneapolis area meetings
Anita Bendickson and Mary Brandl
Self Defense and Personal Safety Courses
PH: 612-729-4621
PH: 651-647-4621—answering service
WHAT: Assistance to people with emotional/living
problems, mild or severe.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
PH: 612-729-7233
WHO: women or Transgender only
WHAT: Self defense courses
Institute on Black Chemical Abuse;
African American Family Services
PH:
WHO: WHAT: 612-238-2365
Culturally appropriate for African Americans;
Saint Paul or Minneapolis residents
Assistance coping with family pressure, anger
management, chemical substance use and other
resources.
Parent Warmline – Program of
Children’s Hospital and Clinic
PH: 612-813-6336
WHAT: Support and response to questions about child
development.
Prevent Child Abuse Minnesota
PH:
WHO:
WHAT: pg 123
651-523-0099
1-800-621-6322
Parents, caregivers or guardians
Self help for parents concerned about abusive
behavior towards their children. Promotes
positive parenting and healthy families.
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
Emotions Anonymous
Feminist Eclectic Marital Arts (FEMA)
Self Help Resources
Self Help Resources
Self Help Resources
Resources for Child Caring
PH:
WHO: WHAT: WHEN:
651-641-0305
Parents, caregivers or guardians
Childcare information and referrals.
Offers child care sliding fee program for eligible
families.
Mon-Fri 8:30am – 5pm
Survivors of Incest Anonymous (SIA)
PH: 651-291-0211
National Association to Prevent Sexual
Abuse of Children (NAPAC)
651-215-9913
Anyone
Support for survivors of sexual abuse, their
families and supporters, including peer
counseling, support groups, information
and referrals.
Self Help Resources
PH:
WHO: WHAT: SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 124
Arlington House
Home Free Shelter
PH: 651-771-3040
WEB: www.arlington-house.org
WHO: Ages 11-17.
WHAT: Emergency shelter for Ramsey County (as well as
other counties as space permits) adolescents for
up to 90 days. 24-hour services and counseling
services.
WHERE:712 East Larpenteur Ave, Saint Paul
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Adolescents must be referred by
county Social Service departments, Community
Corrections and Law Enforcement; therefore, you must
have a social service agency call 651-771-7504 or
651-774-3701 for admission to the shelter.
PH: 763 – 559-4945
WEB: www.homefreeprograms.org
WHO: Women and their children
WHAT: Emergency shelter for domestic violence; all
services are free
WHERE:3405 East Medicine Lake Blvd, Plymouth, MN
WHEN: 24 hour services
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Must be involved in a domestic
abuse relationship or part of violent family and must be 18
years or older.
Youth Shelter
Youth Shelter
Booth Brown House (BBH)
PH: 651-646-2601
WEB: www.thesalarmy.com/bbh.htm
WHO: The Foyer Program, a transitional living program
for 16-25 year-olds and a Girls Shelter program
for 11-17 year-olds
WHAT: Emergency shelter. Counseling and Case
Management
WHERE:1471 Como Ave. West, Saint Paul
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Must be sober and willing to
participate in counseling and consultation.
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 125
Community Services Agencies
Family & Children’s Service
WHERE: 1375 Saint Paul Ave, Saint Paul
PH: 612-339-9101
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: All GLBTQ and teen inquiries
are confidential
WEB: http://www.famchildserv.org/
WHO: Individuals, families and children
WHAT: Counseling and Support Groups
Community Services Agencies
WHERE:4123 East Lake Street, Minneapolis;
414 S. 8th Street, Minneapolis;
6900 78th Avenue N, Brooklyn Park,
9201 E. Bloomington Freeway, Suite Q, Bloomington
WHEN: Downtown: Wed until 8pm
Lake Street: Mon/Tues/Thurs until 8pm
Brooklyn Park: Mon/Tues/Wed until 8pm
Thurs until 5pm, Fri until 4pm
Bloomington: Mon/Wed until 8pm
Tues/Thurs until 5pm. Staff is also
available evenings and weekends.
Call 612-339-9101.
Minnesota Coalition Against Sexual Assault
(MNCASA)
PH: 651-209-9993
WEB: www.mncasa.org
WHO: Service Providers for information
WHAT: Assist local programs in providing state of the art
advocacy and prevention programming and to
affect public perception and policy in relation to
sexual assault.
WHERE:`161 Saint Anthony Ave Suite #1001, Saint Paul
WHEN: Business hours
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Services offered on sliding fee
scale; may need to be 18 yrs. of age to been seen without
parent/guardian permission.
Partners for Violence Prevention
PH: 651-241-8529
WEB: www.partnersforviolenceprevention.org
Jewish Community Center
WHO: Collaborates with schools and social service
agencies to educate, train and provide prevention
opportunities for youth and families.
PH: 651-698-0751
WEB: www.stpauljcc.org
WHO: Teens and Adults
WHAT: Community programs; teen “lounge” – drop in
center; GLBTQ teen support group; childcare and
fitness
WHEN: Teen Lounge: Mon-Thurs 6pm – 7pm;
Sun 1pm – 5pm; GLBTQ support group is ongoing
call for next meeting date
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 126
WHAT: Is a critical link for families, health care, and
community organizations to develop and nurture
a culture of peace in St. Paul and surrounding
communities through collaboration and the
provision of education and resources.
WHERE:340 Walnut Street, Saint Paul
Pillsbury United Communities, Pillsbury
House
PH: 612-302-3400
WEB: www.puc-mn.org
WHO: Provides assistance to low income individuals
and families as well as new immigrants to the
United States
WHAT: Agency has 12 locations, including neighborhood
centers, housing projects and employment and
training center
Community Services Agencies
Community Services Agencies
WHERE: 1201 37th Avenue North, Minneapolis
Sexual Offense Services of Ramsey County
PH: 651-643-3006 (24 hour)
651-643-3022 (business line)
WEB: www.ramsey.mn.us/ph/yas/sos.htm
WHO: Anyone (primary or secondary) that is victim of
sexual violence
WHAT:
Crisis supportive counseling for victims, friends
and families that are affected by sexual violence;
advocacy, referrals, emergency services,
medical outreach to Regions Hospital, support
groups, 24 hour crisis line
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
WHERE:1619 Dayton Ave Suite #201, Saint Paul
WHEN: 24 hour crisis line; office open 8:30am – 5pm,
24 hour medical outreach
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: All services are free and
confidential
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 127
Medical Resources
Children’s Hospital
PH: 651-220-6911 (Emergency Room) 24 hours
WEB: www.childrensmn.org
WHO: Children 12 yrs. and younger
WHAT: Emergency medical needs and sexual abuse
evidentiary exams for children 12 yrs and younger
WHEN: 24 hours
WHERE:345 Smith Street, Saint Paul
Medical Resources
Community University Health
Care Center (CUHCC)
PH: 612-638-0700
WEB: www.ahc.umn.edu/CUHCC/
WHO: Anyone in need of medical services
WHAT: Primary medical care, mental health and dental
and legal services
LANGUAGE: Cambodian; English; Hmong; Laotian;
Somali; Spanish; and Vietnamese.
WHERE:2001 Bloomington Ave South, Minneapolis
WHEN: Mon-Fri 8am – 5pm; Walk-ins welcome!
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: If you are under 18, parents have
access to your records. Fees based on sliding fee scale
and have community programs to help with fees.
BUS: 2, 14 and 24 bus lines and within walking distance
of the Franklin Station Stop on the Hiawatha Light
Rail and the 19 and 8 bus lines.
Family Medical Center,
Hennepin County Medical Center
PH: 612-545-9000
WEB: www.hcmc.org/depts/fmc.htm
WHO: Anyone
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 128
WHAT: Affordable medical care, physical exams,
pregnancy care, family planning, interpreters
available, WIC program, social services and
brief counseling.
Midwest Children’s Resource Center (MCRC)
PH: 651-220-6750
WEB: www.childrensmn.org
WHO: Children/teens from 0 – 17 years old.
WHAT: Provides care for children/teens for all forms of
intrafamial abuse (sexual, physical, and severe
nutritional neglect) and provides care for all
non-acute, extra-familial sexual assault for
children/teens age 0 – 17 years old. Agency
provides forensic interviews for teens who have
been sexually exploited. These appointments need
to be scheduled during office hours. MCRC sees
all acute sexual assaults to children 12 years old
and under, there is no appointment needed. MCRC
has a number of counseling groups for sexually
abused teens, including: violence prevention
program, teen empowerment group for young
runaways, cognitive behavior therapy group, and
individual therapy. Therapy groups are free.
MCRC provides comprehensive health assessments
for runaways. Parental/Guardian permission is
required, care is confidential.
WHEN: A nurse case manager is on-call to answer
questions 24 hours per day. Direct care for
intrafamial abuse is available 24 hours per day.
However, when possible, an appointment should
be made. Appointments need to be scheduled
during office hours.
WHERE:347 Smith Street, Saint Paul (Garden view Medical
Building, Suite 401)
FEE: Insurance is billed when available and there is
also a sliding scale fee.
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Parental permission is needed
for all of the therapy groups.
Family Tree Clinic
PH: 651-645-0478
WEB: www.familytreeclinic.org
WHO: Teens, men and women
WHAT: Sliding fee based medical and reproductive health
services; STI testing; free birth control and family
planning; annual exams; UTI and infection
treatment; same day appointments
WHEN: Mon/Wed 8:30am – 8:30pm;
Tues/Thurs: 8:30am – 5pm; Closed Fri
LANGUAGE: ASL and interpreter services
WHERE: 1619 Dayton Ave, Saint Paul
Regions ER Crisis Program
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
PH: 651-254-1611
651-254-5000
WEB: www.regionshospital.com
WHO: Youth 13 yrs. or older and adults who have been
a victim of sexual violence.
WHAT: Crisis intervention, advocacy, resources and
sexual assault evidentiary exams
WHERE:640 Jackson Street, Saint Paul
WHEN: 24 hour services
LANGUAGE: Staff spoken language interpreters are
available weekdays in Cambodian/Khmer, Hmong, Oromo/
Amharic, Somali, Spanish, and Vietnamese. Interpreters
are available in other languages or after hours over the
telephone or through a contracted agency. ASL interpretation
is provided 24 hours.
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: The county which the crime
occurred in (Ramsey, Hennepin, etc.) will PAY for the
costs of the exam; not the county in which you reside.
The evidentiary exam will be free; however, not the costs
of injuries or further medical care.
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
PH: 651-254-1000
WEB: www.regionshospital.com
WHO: Anyone in crisis age 18 and over.
WHAT: Crisis intervention and referrals
WHERE:640 Jackson Street, Saint Paul
WHEN: 24 hour services
LANGUAGE: Staff spoken language interpreters are
available weekdays in Cambodian/Khmer, Hmong,
Oromo/Amharic, Somali, Spanish, and Vietnamese.
Interpreters are available in other languages or after hours
over the telephone or through a contracted agency. ASL
interpretation is provided 24 hours.
Regions Hospital Sexual Assault Nurse
Examiner Program (SANE)
Medical Resources
Medical Resources
pg 129
Medical Resources
Sexual Assault Forensic
Examiner Program (SAFE)
Fremont Community Health Services
Medical Resources
PH: 952-892-2714 Office voicemail
WHO: 12 years and older
WHAT: Medical, evidentiary exams after a sexual assault/
abuse or rape has occurred
WHERE:201 East Nicollet Blvd, Burnsville, MN
WHEN: 24 hour services, including:
Fairview Ridges Hospital: 952-892-2021
Lakeview Hospital: 651-439-5330
Regina Medical Center: 651-480-4280
St. John’s Hospital: 651-232-7348
St. Joseph’s Hospital: 651-232-3348
Woodwinds Hospital: 651-232-0348
LANGUAGE: Staff spoken language interpreters are
available in person and over the phone. All arrangements
will be made as requested.
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: The county in which the crime
occurred in (Ramsey, Hennepin, etc.) will PAY for the costs
of the exam; not the county in which you reside. The
evidentiary exam will be free; however, not the costs of
injuries or further medical care.
Southside Community Health Services
PH: 612-822-3186
WEB: www.southsidechs.org
WHO: All ages
WHAT: medical services, STI screening; mental health
counseling; separate women’s clinic and men’s clinic;
pregnancy testing; eye clinic; dental clinic; teen check-ups
WHERE:4730 Chicago Ave. South, Minneapolis
WHEN: 8am – 5:30pm
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 130
PH: 612-588-9411
WEB: www.fremonthealth.org
WHO: Teens and adults
WHAT: Cost effective medical services including: STI
testing, annual exams, immunizations; adult and
pediatric care; minor surgical procedures
WHERE:3300 Fremont Ave, Minneapolis
LANUAGE: Competent service delivery through a skilled
team of bilingual and bicultural provider staff, bilingual
patient advocates as well as language interpreters.
Health Start Clinics
PH: 651-312-1995
WHAT: Medical services for youth, located in several
Saint Paul public schools
Teen Age Medical Services (TAMS)
PH: 612-813-6125
WEB: www.teenhealth411.org/
WHO: 11-25 yrs. of age
WHAT: General medical services, pregnancy testing,
STI testing, emergency contraception; mental
health counseling, family planning, treatment of
injuries; immunizations, etc.
WHERE:2425 Chicago Ave. South, Minneapolis
WHEN: 8:30am – 5pm
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Youth under 18 yrs will receive
confidential medical care under Minors Consent Law;
Youth over age 18 are guaranteed confidential services.
Medical Resources
Medical Resources
University of Minnesota Youth
& AIDS Projects
PH: 612-627-6820
WEB: www.yapmn.com
WHO: 13-25 yrs.
WHAT: Has programming to prevent transmission of HIV
to and from high-risk youth and to provide care to youth
and families living with HIV infection. Supportive
counseling; support groups; GLBTQ friendly and has
support groups; HIV testing
WHERE:428 Oak Grove Street, Minneapolis
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 131
Sexually Transmitted Disease Testing Referrals
Sexually Transmitted Disease Testing Referrals
Room 111 of the Ramsey County
Department of Public Health
PH: 651-266-1352
WEB: www.health.state.mn.us/divs/idepc/
diseases/hiv/testingsites.html#Room111
WHO: Anyone
WHAT: Walk-in or by appointment STI/STD and HIV
testing, treatment and prevention.
WHERE:555 Cedar Ave, Saint Paul
WHEN: Mon/Tues/Wed 8:30am – 11am & 1pm – 3:30pm;
Thurs 8:30am – noon & 4pm – 6pm;
Fri 8:30am – noon
HOW: Walk in for specific treatment or testing
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Donation is requested in place of
fee, but not required. Come early otherwise wait could be
several hours. Minors do not have to be accompanied and
parents do not have to be notified.
planning; annual exams; UTI and infection
treatment; same day appointments
WHEN: Mon/Wed 8:30am – 8:30pm;
Tues/Thurs: 8:30 a.m. – 5pm, Closed Fri
LANGUAGE: ASL and interpreter services
WHERE: 1619 Dayton Ave, Saint Paul
Fremont Community Health Services
612-588-9411; www.fremonthealth.org
WHO: Teens and adults
WHAT: Cost effective medical services including: STI
testing, annual exams, immunizations; adult and
pediatric care; minor surgical procedures
WHERE:3300 Fremont Ave, Minneapolis
LANUAGE: competent service delivery through a skilled
team of bilingual and bicultural provider staff, bilingual
patient advocates as well as language interpreters.
Family Planning & STD Hotline
HealthStart Clinics
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: WHEN:
PH:
WHO:
WHAT: 651-645-9360 (Metro)
1-800-78-FACTS
www.stdhotline.state.mn.us
Anyone
Free and confidential information about STDs,
birth control, clinic referrals
Call Mon-Fri 8am – 10pm; Sat 9am – 3pm;
Sun noon-4pm
Family Tree Clinic
651-645-0478; www.familytreeclinic.org
WHO: Teens, men and women
WHAT: Sliding fee based medical and reproductive health
services; STI testing; free birth control and family
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 132
651-772-9757
Youth of all ages
Healthstart clinics are in Saint Paul high school
and junior highs; has a Saint Paul central clinic
MN AIDS Project (MAP) AIDS Line
PH: 612-373-AIDS (2437) Metro area
1-800-248-AIDS
612-373-2465 TTY Metro
1-888-820-2437 TTY Out of State
WEB: www.mnaidsproject.org
WHO: Anyone
WHAT: Information about AIDS, HIV, etc.
LANGUAGE: Available in English, Hmong, Russian,
Somali and Vietnamese
Planned Parenthood of M.N., N.D., S.D.
PH: 651-698-2406 (Highland Park)
WEB: www.plannedparenthood.org/mn-nd-sd
WHAT: STD and HIV testing, full reproductive health
services.
WHERE:Multiple metropolitan locations, call for
information, location and to make an appointment
Southside Community Health Services
PH: 612-822-3186
WEB: www.southsidechs.org
WHO: All ages
WHAT: medical services, STI screening; mental health
counseling; separate women’s clinic and men’s
clinic; pregnancy testing; eye clinic; dental clinic;
teen check-ups
WHERE:4730 Chicago Ave. South, Minneapolis
WHEN: 8:00am-5:30pm
University of Minnesota Youth & AIDS Projects
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
PH: 612-813-6125
WEB: www.teenhealth411.org/
WHO: 11-25 yrs. of age
WHAT: General medical services, pregnancy testing,
STI testing, emergency contraception; mental health
counseling, family planning, treatment of injuries;
immunizations, etc.
WHERE: 2425 Chicago Ave. South, Minneapolis
WHEN: 8:30am – 5pm
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Youth under 18 yrs will receive
confidential medical care under Minors Consent Law;
Youth over age 18 are guaranteed confidential services.
West Side Community Health Services
(La Clinica)
PH: 651-222-1816
WEB: www.westsidechs.org
WHAT: STD and HIV testing, pre-natal care
and family planning
WHERE:153 Cesar Chevaz Street, Saint Paul
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
PH: 612-627-6820
WEB: www.yapmn.com
WHO: 13-25 yrs.
WHAT: has programming to prevent transmission of HIV
to and from high-risk youth and to provide care to youth
and families living with HIV infection. Supportive
counseling; support groups; GLBTQ friendly and has
support groups; HIV testing
WHERE: 428 Oak Grove Street, Minneapolis
Teen Age Medical Services (TAMS)
Sexually Transmitted Disease Testing Referrals
Sexually Transmitted Disease Testing Referrals
pg 133
Birth Control and Pregnancy Options
Abortions or prenatal care and delivery may be paid for
by the MN Crime Victims Reparation Board in cases of
reported sexual assaults. If victim has insurance, she must
use her insurance first before reparations would help.
Call reparations board for more information: 651-201-7300
(metro); Out of state: 1-888-622-8799; TTY: 651-205-4827
Children’s Home Society of MN
Birth Control and Pregnancy Options
PH: 651-646-6393
WEB: www.chsfs.org
WHAT: Pregnancy counseling, crisis nursery, foster
homes and adoption services.
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Crisis nursery is free
Emergency Contraception Hotline
PH: 1-888-NOT-2-LATE (888-668-2-5283)
Family Tree Clinic
PH: 651-645-0478
WEB: www.familytreeclinic.org
WHO Teens, men and women
WHAT: Sliding fee based medical and reproductive health
services; STI testing; free birth control and family
planning; annual exams; UTI and infection
treatment; same day appointments
WHEN: Mon/Wed 8:30am – 8:30pm;
Tues/Thurs 8:30am – 5pm, Closed Friday
LANGUAGE: ASL and interpreter services
WHERE:1619 Dayton Ave, Saint Paul
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 134
Ramsey County Department
of Public Health
PH: 651-266-1272
WEB: www.co.ramsey.mn.us
WHAT: Family planning and women’s health services
WHERE:555 Cedar Street, Saint Paul
Family Medical Center,
Hennepin County Medical Center
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: 612-545-9000
www.hcmc.org/depts/fmc.htm
Anyone
Affordable medical care, physical exams,
pregnancy care, family planning, interpreters
available, WIC program, social services and brief
counseling.
Midwest Health Center for Women
PH: 612-332-2311 or 1-800-998-6075;
WEB: www.midwesthealthcenter.org
WHO: Women
WHAT: OB/GYN care, emergency contraception, abortion
information, low cost birth control, and STD
treatment. Fee negotiation possible when
pregnancy is the result of reported sexual assault.
WHERE:33 South 5th Street, Minneapolis
Planned Parenthood of M.N., N.D., S.D.
PH: 651-698-2406 (Highland Park)
WEB: www.plannedparenthood.org/mn-nd-sd
WHAT: STD and HIV testing, full reproductive health
services.
WHERE:Multiple metropolitan locations, call for information,
location and to make an appointment
Birth Control and Pregnancy Options
Birth Control and Pregnancy Options
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 135
Abortion Services
Meadowbrook Women’s Clinic
Pro-Choice Resources
PH: 612-376-7708
WEB: www.meadowbrookclinic.com
WHAT: Abortion information (not counseling). Some fee
negotiation possible—have staff or victim contact
the Clinic Administrator
WHERE:825 S. 8th St. #1018, Minneapolis
PH: 612-825-8270
1-888-439-0124 (toll free)
WEB: www.prochoiceresources.org
WHO: Anyone
WHAT: Provides sexuality education and financial
assistance for abortions.
WHERE:250 3rd Ave North, Minneapolis
WHEN: Business hours, but call until you reach someone
LANGUAGE: English and Spanish speaking staff
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Assistance is usually available
through no-interest loans for part or the total cost.
Note: For minors, full grants may be available
Midwest Health Center for Women
PH: 612-332-2311 or 1-800-998-6075
WEB: www.midwesthealthcenter.org
WHAT: OB/GYN care, emergency contraception, abortion
information, low cost birth control, and STD treatment.
Fee negotiation possible when pregnancy is the result of
reported sexual assault.
WHERE:33 South 5th Street, Minneapolis
Abortion Services
Planned Parenthood of M.N., N.D., S.D.
PH: 651-698-2406 (Highland Park)
WEB: www.plannedparenthood.org/mn-nd-sd
WHAT: STD and HIV testing, full reproductive health
services and abortion services at the Highland
Park clinic. Abortion information and planning.
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Very limited fee negotiation
possible.
Robbinsdale Clinic
PH: 763-533-2534
WEB: www.robbinsdaleclinic.com
WHAT: Abortion information and services
WHERE:3819 W Broadway Ave, Robbinsdale, MN
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 136
Regions Hospital – GYN Special
Services Clinic
PH: 651-254-9091 (call to schedule)
WEB: www.regionshospital.com
WHO: Anyone
WHAT: Abortions through 21 weeks 6 days gestation
WHERE:640 Jackson Street, Saint Paul
WHEN: Call the office M-F 8AM – 3:30 PM
FEE: Insurance is billed, or abortion is prepaid if no
insurance (there may be financial assistance
available – talk directly to clinic for information)
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: No age restrictions, but there
are laws governing parental notification. On occasion the
clinic will help the teen through the process of judicial
bypass if they are unable to talk to their parents.
Children’s Crisis Response
Family and Children’s Service
PH: 651-774-7000 (24 hours)
WEB: www.co.ramsey.mn.us/hs/ChildrenMentalHealth.htm
WHO: Youth ages 0-18 yrs.
WHAT: 24 hour intervention services—will go to youth and
family’s homes to provide services for youth in
coping with mental health/family issues. Provides
crisis de-escalation, safety assessment, referrals
and services to youth and their families.
LANGUAGE: Staff available in Hmong, Spanish and English
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: District 202
PH: 612-871-5559
WEB: www.dist202.org
WHO: GLBT youth and under 21 yrs
WHAT: Coffee shop, social events, groups, programming
for youth and supportive friends
WHERE:1601 Nicollet Ave. South, Minneapolis
Face to Face
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
Neighborhood Involvement Program
Youth Program
PH: 612-276-1522
WEB: www.neighborhoodinvolve.org
WHO: Youth, up to 18 yrs.
WHAT: After school programs; summer programs;
children’s mental health counseling
WHERE:3333 North 4th Street, Minneapolis
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Need parental or guardian
consent for services; services based on sliding fee and
income of family.
TeenPRIDE (Family and Children’s Services)
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: pg 137
612-728-2062
1-888-PRIDE-99 Toll free
http://familychildrenservice.nonprofitoffice.com
Women ages 13-18
Counseling, advocacy, referrals to women teens.
24 crisis line that accepts collect calls. Free
services, support groups, transportation to those
who are at risk for sexual exploitation and/or who
have been sexually exploited or victims of
prostitution.
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
PH: 651-772-5555
WEB: www.face2face.org
WHO: Ages 12-23 yrs.
WHAT: Counseling, therapy, and support groups for
adolescents and their families. Also provides
specialized services to Hmong girls through girls’
empowerment groups. Onsite medical clinic,
program for pregnant young women/young moms,
charter schools. Face to face also runs SafeZone
for homeless youth.
WHERE:1165 Arcade, Saint Paul
FEE: Sliding fee scale
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Must begin services between
ages of 12 to 23 yrs and then may continue until age 27 yrs.
612-339-9101
www.familychildrenservice.nonprofitoffice.com
Youth and families
Provides counseling and therapy services for
children, youth and families. GLBT and community
specific services, also services available for
survivors of physical, sexual and emotional abuse.
Youth Mental Health/Other Youth Programs
Youth Mental Health and Other Youth Programs
Youth Mental Health and Other Youth Programs
WHERE: Support groups are held at
Mondays from 5:00-7:00 pm at Project Offstreets
(41 N 12th Street in Minneapolis) Tuesdays from
5:00-7:00 at the Lake Street Branch (4123 East
Lake Street)
HOW: Call 24 hour line; drop in
WHEN: Lake Street Open: Mon/Tues/Thurs 8am – 8pm
Wed/Fri 8am – 4:30pm
Storefront Group
GLBT KidsLine
Youth Mental Health/Other Youth Programs
PH: 1-877-452-8543
Northwest Youth and Family Services
PH: 651-486-3808
WEB: www.nyfs.org
WHO: Ages 5 to 18 yrs of age and youth’s families
WHAT: Youth based services in Roseville, Mounds View
and Shoreview areas, call for locations nearest you.
Agency provides individual services to youth and
parents; services to youth include, summer camp,
counseling, employment help and resources.
WHERE:3490 Lexington Ave. North, Shoreview, MN
180 Degrees, Inc. Boys and Girls
Resiliency Mentoring Program
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: 651-772-5562
www.180degrees.org
Youth between 9-17 yrs of age.
Program works in collaboration with social
workers, probation, and families to provided
mentoring services for adolescent females and
males involved with Children’s Mental Health, Child
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
Protection, Probation, and other Social Services
Programs. This strength based program offers
groups and one-on-one mentoring for both male and female adolescents and provides a safe place for them to address their needs, develop their own
identity, and build self-esteem.
WHERE:1165 Arcade Street, Saint Paul
pg 138
PH: 612-861-1675
WEB: www.storefront.org/
WHO: Anyone
WHAT: Youth and family counseling, support and
referrals. Programs with schools.
WHERE:6425 Nicollet Ave, Richfield MN
People Serving People
PH: 612.332.4500
WEB: www.peopleservingpeople.org
WHO: Children ages 3-17
WHAT: Educational programs, family programs and child
development programs. Agency primarily serves
homeless families and has many resources for
homelessness.
WHERE:614 South Third Street, Minneapolis
Teens Alone
Amherst Wilder Foundation
PH: 952-988-8338
WEB: www.teensalone.org
WHO: Anyone
WHAT: Free confidential crisis line, counseling, support
and referrals. Primary serve West Suburban areas
of Minneapolis/Saint Paul. Anyone can call.
WHERE:915 Main Street, Hopkins MN
HOW: Call hotline: 952-988-TEEN
WHEN: Monday-Friday 8am-5pm
PH: 651-280-2000
WEB: www.wilder.org
WHO: Youth ages 5-18 yrs. In addition works with
families. GLBTQ friendly
WHAT: Provides residential therapeutic treatment, works
with foster care, and works with youth in schools.
WHERE:451 Lexington Parkway North, Saint Paul
LANGUAGE: Wilder provides language interpretation
services as needed
Volunteers of America
Saint Paul Youth Services
PH: 763-753-7310 Anoka
763-225-4052 (Mental Health) Golden Valley
WEB: www.voamn.org
WHO: Children and adolescents age 0-21
WHAT: Mental health services, case management, services
for deaf/hard of hearing, residential treatment,
therapy, family services, referrals, mentoring
programs, school programs, programs for families.
WHEN: Call to schedule: Mon-Fri 8am – 6pm,
Clinic appointments are flexible.
WHERE:Anoka Office:
22426 St. Francis Boulevard, Anoka MN 55303;
Golden Valley Office:
5905 Golden Valley Road, Golden Valley MN 55422
FEE: Fees for mental health services are reimbursable
by Medical Assistance, third party insurance
payers and contractual agreements with counties.
PH: 651-771-1301
WEB: www.spys.org
WHO: All youth, under the age of 18
WHAT: 24 hour crisis response from mental health
counselors; court diversion programs; community
education; behavior education
WHERE:2100 Wilson Ave, Saint Paul
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 139
Youth Mental Health/Other Youth Programs
Youth Mental Health and Other Youth Programs
Youth Service Bureau, Stillwater
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
PH: 651-439-8800
WEB: www.ysb.net
WHO: Washington county youth and their families
WHAT: Individual and family counseling; primarily youth
focused problems, parent education, crisis
intervention; educational and diversion groups.
WHEN: Call during daytime hours, Monday through Friday
WHERE:101 Pine St West, Stillwater MN 55082
Youth Mental Health and Other Youth Programs
Youth Service Bureau, Forest Lake
PH: 651-464-3685
WEB: www.ysblakesarea.org
WHO: Youth and their families
WHAT: Individual and family counseling; primarily youth
focused problems.
WHEN: Call during daytime hours, Mon-Fri
WHERE:244 Lake St North, Forest Lake MN 55025
Youth Mental Health/Other Youth Programs
Wilder Child Guidance Clinic
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: 651-642-4001
www.wilder.org/clinic
Children and families
Counseling for child victims of abuse
and their families.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 140
John Driggs, Licensed Therapist
PH:
WHO:
WHAT: FEE: 651-699-4573
Adult and adolescent male victims and also
works with male offenders
Individual and group counseling/therapy
Sliding fee scale
Men’s Center
PH:
WHO:
WHAT: 612-822-5892
Adult male victims of sexual violence
Individual and group counseling. Offers male
Survivors of Sexual Assault support group.
Mic Hunter
PH:
WHO: Rape and Sexual Abuse Center,
Neighborhood Involvement Program
PH: 612-825-4357
WEB: www.neighborhoodinvolve.org/rsac
WHO: Youth, men and women who have been sexually
abused, assaulted, raped or sexually harassed;
any victim of sexual violence
WHAT: 24 hour crisis line; mental health counseling;
supportive confidential services
WHERE:2431 Hennepin Ave, Minneapolis
WHEN: Mon-Fri 9am – 5pm;
evening appointments available, 24 hour crisis line
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: all phone services are free and
confidential; mental health counseling is based on sliding
fee scale.
Male Adult Services
Male Adult Survivors
651-224-4335
18 yrs and older; Adult survivors of sexual violence
Individual, couples and group therapy for adult
survivors and also provides chemical dependency/
abuse treatment.
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 141
Law Enforcement and Other Legal Services
For any sexual assaults that have recently happened, (within the last 24 hours) and if you need immediate assistance
from police, always dial 911.
Law Enforcement:
Anoka County Police Department
PH: 763-427-1212 Anoka, Non-Emergeny
Carver County Police Department
PH:
PH:
FOR: 651-266-9333 General Law Enforcement Center
Information to confirm service delivery of harassment
restraining orders and order for protections.
651-767-0640 Twenty-Four Hour Dispatch
Arden Hills, Falcon Heights, Gem Lake,
Lauderdale, Little Canada, North Oaks,
Shoreview, Vadnais Heights
Roseville Police Department
PH: 952-361-1231 Chaska, Non-Emergency
Law Enforcement and Other Legal Services
Ramsey County Sheriff Department
PH: 651-792-7008
WEB: www.ci.roseville.mn.us
WHO: Anyone in need of police support or assistance
WHAT: 24 hour response from Roseville police
WHERE:2660 Civic Center Drive, Roseville MN
Saint Paul or Minneapolis Police 911
Dakota County Police Department
PH: 651-437-4211 Hastings, Non-Emergency
Maplewood Police Department
PH: 651-777-8191
Saint Paul Police Department
Minneapolis Police Department
PH: 911
651-291-1111 for non-emergency, delayed reports
PH: 612-348-2345, Non-Emergency
Mounds View Police Department
Saint Paul Sex Crimes Unit
PH: 651-484-9155
PH: 651-266-5685 For cases that have been reported
and assigned to an investigator.
New Brighton Police Department
PH: 651-767-0640
Washington County Sheriff
North Saint Paul Police Department
PH: 651-439-9381 Stillwater
PH: 651-747-2406
WEB: www.ci.north-saint-paul.mn.us/
WHO: For anyone who needs information on crimes
and/or in need of law enforcement assistance
WHERE:2400 Margaret Street, North Saint Paul
White Bear Lake Police Department
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 142
PH: 651-429-8511
Other Legal Services:
Chrysalis Law Clinic
Anoka County Community Corrections
PH: 612-871-0118 TTY
612-824-2780
WEB: www.chrysaliswomen.org
WHO: Women
WHAT: Offers one half hour of legal advice from attorneys
on a sliding fee scale. Specializes with family issues such
as divorce and/or domestic violence; assists with filing
Order For Protection reports.
PH: 763-712-2900
WEB: www.co.anoka.mn.us/v2_dept/comm-corr/index.asp
WHO: Anyone needing information about criminal,
probation or court services that are within Anoka
County facilities.
WHAT: For assistance with probation, information on
criminal cases in Anoka County and listings of
incarcerated individuals in Anoka County facilities.
WHERE:325 East Main Street Anoka MN and various
Anoka County juvenile and adult locations.
WHEN: Mon-Fri 8am – 5pm
Battered Women’s Legal Advocacy Project
PH:
WHO:
WHAT: 612-343-9842 Local
1-800-313-2666 MN wide
Any women
Team of attorneys providing legal assistance and
advocacy for women who are battered. The
project has an “Immigrant Initiative” that assists
battered immigrant women and children with
issues of legal status, immigrant rights, Visas, etc.
City of Minneapolis, Human Resources
PH:
WHO: WHAT:
612-673-2282 Minneapolis
651-266-8550
Anyone
Investigates and resolves complaints of
discrimination brought against the City of Minneapolis
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: 612-282-6256
1-800-247-0390
www.dps.state.mn.us
Anyone
Investigates victim’s right violations
Domestic Abuse Project, Ramsey County
PH: 651-266-5130
WHO: Anyone in need of protection to ensure their safety.
WHAT: Orders For Protection and Harassment Restraining
Orders.
WHEN: Call to make an appointment. Mon-Fri
daytime hours.
WHERE:25th West 7th Street, Saint Paul;
located inside the Juvenile Detention Center
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Harassment Restraining Orders
cost a large amount of money; some agencies will assist
with the fee. Order For Protection (OFP) do not cost money
but the victim must have a relationship with (mother, father,
partner, sibling) the person who is harassing or threatening the victim.
pg 143
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
Affirmative Action Division
Crime Victims Justice Unit
Law Enforcement and Other Legal Services
Law Enforcement and Other Legal Services
Law Enforcement and Other Legal Services
General Crime Victim Services
Legal Aid of Hennepin County
PH:
WEB:
WHO:
WHAT: PH: 612-334-5970
612-332-1441
WEB: www.midmnlegal.org
WHO: Anyone over 18 yrs.
WHAT: Legal services for low-income people.
WHERE:430 1st Avenue N, Suite 300 Downtown
Minneapolis Office, Call for other locations
WHEN: Hours Mon-Fri 9:30am – 11:30am & 1:30pm – 3:30pm
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Always call before going
612-340-5400 (24 hour services)
www.ojp.state.mn.us
Support for victims of crime
Crisis counseling, advocacy, court advocacy,
financial assistance
Law Enforcement and Other Legal Services
Hennepin County Attorney’s Office Victim/
Witness Program
PH: 612-348-5561
WHO: Victims/witness of crime who will be a part of the
criminal justice system.
WHAT: Advocacy, support and referrals. Ensures victim’s
rights throughout the legal process.
Hennepin County Bar Association
PH: 612-752-6666
WHO: Anyone
WHAT: Information and lawyer referrals for residents
in Hennepin County
Immigrant Law Center of MN
PH: 651-641-1011
WEB: www.immigrantlawcentermn.org
WHO: All individuals of any nationality; primarily serves
immigrants
WHAT: Provides help with citizenship, immigration,
violence against women, legal information for
low-income individuals
WHERE:450 North Syndicate Street Suite 175
Saint Paul, 55104
WHEN: Mon-Thurs business hours
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 144
Legal Services (SMRLS)
PH: 651-222-4731
WEB: www.hbci.com
WHO: Must be 18, or have parental consent
WHAT: Legal services for low-income people of Ramsey
County
WHERE:66 East Third Street, Suite 204, Winona MN
WHEN: 9am-12noon and 1pm-3pm
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Must call number to complete
a screening before assistance is provided.
Minnesota Department of Corrections
PH: 651-361-7200
WHAT: To find the status of a convicted person held
in the state prison system
Minnesota Department of Human Rights
PH: 1-800-657-3704
WEB: www.humanrights.state.mn.us
WHO: Anyone
WHAT: Investigates complaints of discrimination
LANGUAGE: Bilingual and ASL interpreters available
Minnesota Department of Public Safety
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: 651-296-4544
www.dps.state.mn.us
Anyone
Provides protection to people and property in MN
through prevention, regulation, enforcement,
information, and service
Minnesota Law Help
WEB: LawHelpMN.org
WHO: Anyone
WHAT: Online legal information, guidance and attorney
referrals for low income MN residents.
Minnesota Office of Crime Victim Ombudsman
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: 1-800-247-0390
www.ojp.state.mn.us
Any crime victim
Provides advice about crime victim rights and
criminal justice procedure. Helps victims with
reparations and financial assistance as a victim
of crime.
Minnesota Office of Crime Victims
Reparations Board
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
PH: 651-201-7300
WEB: www.ojp.state.mn.us
WHO: Minnesota crime victims
WHAT: Providing resources to reduce crime in Minnesota
and to assist crime victims.
WHERE:4 44 Cedar Street Suite #100, Saint Paul
Mujeres Unidas (Women United)
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: 218-236-9884 Moorhead MN
www.mujeresunidaswomenunited.org
Chicana/Latina women, particularly single mothers
Information and referrals, advocacy and support
working with law enforcement, legal information.
Neighborhood Justice Center, Inc.
PH: 651-222-4703
WEB: www.njcinc.org
WHO: Anyone in Ramsey, Washington and Dakota counties.
WHAT: Provides criminal defense and referrals, serving
low income and minority populations in Ramsey,
Washington and Dakota counties.
Ramsey County Adult Detention Center
and Workhouse
PH:
pg 145
651-266-9352
651-266-9350 General Information
651-266-1400 Workhouse
For public information on someone
who is in jail or the workhouse
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
PH: 651-201-7300
651-205-4827 TTY for deaf
WEB: www.ojp.state.mn.us/MCCVS/
WHO: Any victim of crime
WHAT: Will provide financial assistance for expenses
to victims as a result of crime
WHERE:Bremer Tower, Suite 2300, 445 Minnesota Street, MN
Minnesota Office of Justice Programs,
Dept. of Public Safety
Law Enforcement and Other Legal Services
Law Enforcement and Other Legal Services
Law Enforcement and Other Legal Services
Ramsey County Bar Association
Tel-Law
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT:
PH: 612-752-6699 Voicemail
WHO: Anyone
WHAT: Free recorded general legal information.
651-224-1775 or 651-222
ramseybar.org
Anyone
Information an lawyer referrals for
residents of Ramsey County
Victim/Witness Program
PH: 651-266-2300
WHAT: For pubic information on someone on probation,
parole or being held in county prison system.
PH:
WHO: WHAT: Saint Paul City Attorney, Criminal Division
VineLink
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: WEB: vinelink.com
WHAT: Online current status of offenders
Law Enforcement and Other Legal Services
Ramsey County Probation/Parole
651-266-8740
www.stpaul.gov
Anyone looking for information on Gross
Misdemeanors and Misdemeanors only
For information regarding cases that have been
reported and charged.
Saint Paul Intervention Project
PH: 651-645-2824
WEB: www.stpaulintervention.org
WHO: Victims of domestic violence
WHAT: 24 hour response and service to victims of
domestic violence, including youth
WHERE: 1509 Marshall Ave, Saint Paul
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 146
651-266-3222
Victims/witness of crime who will be a part of
the criminal justice system.
Advocacy, support and referrals. Support and
counseling.
Carver County Public Health
Ramsey County Human Services
PH: 952-361-1329
WEB: www.co.carver.mn.us
WHO: Anyone looking for resources (emergency
services, emergency financial resources) who
has relations in Carver County
WHAT: Emergency services
WHEN: Mon-Fri 8am – 5pm
WHERE:600 East 4th Street, Chaska MN
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Most likely need to be 18 yrs
old to receive services
PH: 651-266-4444
WEB: www.co.ramsey.mn.us
WHAT: For emergency assistance in regards to housing
(rental or owned homes)
WHERE: 160 East Kellogg Blvd, Saint Paul
WHEN: Daytime hours, Monday-Friday
Hennepin County, Children and Family Services
PH:
WHAT: 612-348-4111
Child protection, social services for teen parents,
mental health services, emergency social services;
Spanish speaking staff available.
Ramsey County Department of Public Health
PH: 651-266-1263
WEB: www.co.ramsey.mn.us
WHERE:555 Cedar Street, Saint Paul
Ramsey County Depart. of Public
Health Teen Parent Program
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
Sexual Offense Services of Ramsey County
PH: 651-643-3006 (24 hour)
651-643-3022 (Business Line)
WEB: www.ramsey.mn.us/ph/yas/sos.htm
WHO: Anyone that is victim of sexual violence
WHAT: crisis supportive counseling for victims, friends
and families that are affected by sexual violence;
advocacy, referrals, emergency services,
medical outreach to Regions Hospital, support
groups, 24 hour crisis line
WHERE: 1619 Dayton Ave Suite #201, Saint Paul
WHEN: 24 hour crisis line, 24 hour medical outreach
Office hrs 8:30am – 5pm
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: All services are free and
confidential
Minnesota Department of Health
PH: 651-201-3627
WEB: www.health.state.mn.us/youth
WHO: Resources for teens and adults
WHAT: Information for youth, adolescents and adults
regarding general public health information and
current topics related to youth development
WHERE: 85 East 7th Place, Saint Paul
pg 147
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
PH: 651-266-2400
WEB: www.co.ramsey.mn.us
WHERE:1670 Beam Ave #101, Maplewood MN
County Based Services
County Based Services
County Based Services
Crisis Nurseries
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: 651-641-1300
www.crisisnursery.org
Residents of Ramsey, Dakota and Washington
Counties
Provides help for parents with children under age
12 yrs. Short term child care, call for information.
Services are free.
Greater Minneapolis Crisis Nursery
763-591-0100
www.crisisnursery.org
Emergency child care for children through age 6,
up to 72 hours at a time, up to 30 days within
one year.
County Based Services
PH:
WEB:
WHAT: SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 148
Ascension Place
Emergency Social Services
PH: 612-588-0861
WEB: www.ascensionplace.org
WHO: 18 yrs and older
WHAT: Sober transitional housing for women in
Minneapolis. Appropriate for women experiencing
mental health problems, domestic violence, or
chemical dependency. This shelter does not take
children.
WHEN: 24 hour shelter, must call before you go.
Chemical and substance free shelter.
WHERE: 1803 Bryant Ave North, Minneapolis
PH: 651-291-6795
WHO: 18 yrs and older
WHAT: Food, shelter, and other assistance after 5pm
and weekends
WHEN: Call this number Mon-Fri 5pm – 8pm
and all day on weekends
Theresa Living Center
(Caroline Family Services)
PH: 651-772-1344
WHO: 18 yrs and older
WHAT: Program for single parent families. Will help find
housing and provides on going support and
assistance to families in the program.
WHERE: 1526 6th St E, Saint Paul
Catholic Charities
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
Ethel Gordon Community Center
PH: 651-222-3838 (24 hours)
WHO: Homeless women, both single and with children.
WHAT: Agency provides emergency, temporary, safe,
sober housing for homeless single women and
women with children. Program assists residents
with becoming self-sufficient and finding housing.
WHEN: Call number 24 hours for assistance
WHERE: 148 Bates Ave, St Paul
Families Moving Forward
PH: 612-529-2185
WEB: www.familiesmovingforward.org
WHO: Homeless families and adults
WHAT: Emergency and transitional housing, advocacy
for homeless families; faith based organization.
WHERE: 1808 Emerson Ave N, Minneapolis
Family Place Shelter, Catholic Charities
PH: 651-225-9357
WEB: www.ccspm.org
WHO: Adults and families
WHAT: Emergency 30-day shelter for women.
WHERE: 244 East 10th Street, Saint Paul
pg 149
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
PH: 612-664-8500
WEB: www.ccspm.org
WHO: Children, adults and families.
WHAT: Provides emergency food shelf, homeless shelter,
physical and mental health care and help for
children in crisis.
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Agency most likely will not provide shelter assistance to youth.
Adult Shelter/Housing
Adult Shelter/Housing
Adult Shelter/Housing
Hennepin County Assistance
Mary’s Place, Sharing and Caring Hands
PH: 612-348-9410
WEB: www.co.hennepin.mn.us
WHO: 18 yrs and older
WHAT: Assists adult individuals in obtaining shelter and
emergency assistance in Hennepin County and
surrounding areas.
WHEN: Call this number between 7:30am – 5pm
PH: 612-338-4640
WEB: www.sharingandcaringhands.org
WHO: Families with two or more children in Minneapolis
WHAT: Emergency shelter for families in Minneapolis
WHEN: Call Monday-Thursday 8:30am-4pm
Hewitt House, People Incorporated
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: Adult Shelter/Housing
PH: 651-645-9779—24 Intake
WEB: www.peopleincorporated.org
WHO: Adults in mental health crisis
WHAT: Provides short term (1-5 days) shelter for adults
experiencing mental health crisis. Referral needed
from an ER or Ramsey County Mental Health
Crisis Intake.
WHEN: Call 24 hours
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Must have referral from hospital
or crisis intake line, must be sober, and must call intake
line before being admitted.
Mary Hall, Catholic Charities
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: 651-227-2637
www.ccspm.org
18 yrs and older;
Emergency Shelter for Men only; provides
transitional housing and single room occupancy
housing for women and men.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 150
Mortgage Foreclosure Prevention Program
651-266-6626
www.hocmn.org
18 yrs and older
Assistance for mortgage problems in
Ramsey County
Neighborhood House
PH: 651-789-2500
WEB: www.neighb.org/default.asp
WHO: 18 yrs and older
WHAT: Assistance with basic needs like clothing, diapers,
furniture and other essentials.
LANGUAGE: Assistance available in Hmong, English,
Somali and Spanish
People Serving People
PH: 612-332-4500
WEB: www.peopleservingpeople.org
WHO: 18 yrs and older
WHAT: Emergency housing for families with children,
some transitional housing; provides food, clothing,
daily necessities.
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: If unable to pay for services,
a voucher from Hennepin County Emergency Assistance
is required.
Rose Center
PH: 651-690-0625
WEB: www.mnhomelesscoalition.org
WHO: Single women ages 18-24 years
WHAT: Low cost, transitional housing for single
women working or who are in school.
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Maximum stay is two years.
Simpson Women’s Shelter;
Community Emergency Services
PH: 612-870-1330 after 5pm
612-874-8683 Main office
WEB: www.simpsonhousing.org
WHO: Women and families
WHAT: Emergency shelter in the Twin Cities serving
homeless single women and families.
WHEN: Call numbers for more information anytime
Saint Paul Public Housing
Agency – Rental Office
PH: 651-298-5158
WEB: www.stpaulpha.org/agcyplan.html
WHO: Elderly, handicapped and disabled, singles
and families
WHAT: Public housing applications and placement;
will take applications
WHEN: 8am – 4:30pm
WHERE: 555 N. Wabasha Street Suite 400, Saint Paul
Adult Shelter/Housing
Adult Shelter/Housing
Saint Stephen’s Shelter
PH: 612-874-9292
WEB: www.ststephensmpls.org
WHO: Adult males
WHAT: Emergency shelter; has 40 beds for men
WHERE: 2211 Clinton Ave, Minneapolis
St. Anne’s Place
PH: 612-521-2128
WEB: www.mnhomelesscoalition.org
WHO: Adult families in Hennepin County
WHAT: Emergency shelter for residents of
Hennepin County
WHERE: 634 Russell Ave. N, Minneapolis
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 151
Financial, Rental and Emergency
Assistance Referrals
Minnesota Crime Victims
Reparations Board
Neighborhood House
Financial/Rental/Emergency Assistance
PH: 651-201-7344
1-888-622-8799;
WEB: www.ojp.state.mn.us
WHO: Victims of as a result of a reported crime
WHAT: Financial assistance for expenses to victims
of crime.
WHEN: Call during business hours
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO/CALL: Will not cover moving
expenses/rent. Processing claims may take up to 4 months,
unless the need is urgent.
General Crime Victim Services
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: 612-340-5400 (24 hour services)
www.ojp.state.mn.us
Support for victims of crime
Crisis counseling, advocacy, court advocacy,
financial assistance
612-664-8500
www.ccspm.org
Individuals and families
Provides emergency services including, food,
shelter, homeless shelter, physical and mental
health care, and help for children in crisis.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
Community Stabilization Project
PH: 651-642-0102
WEB: www.hppinc.org
WHO: 18 yrs and older; must be a resident of Saint
Paul, MN
WHAT: Emergency rental assistance for residents in Saint
Paul. Funds are available on first come basis
beginning the 1st of every month
WHEN: Call at 8am the 1st of every month for rental
assistance, or leaving a voicemail the night
before is recommended.
Council for Crime and Justice
Catholic Charities
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: PH: 651-789-2500
WEB: www.neighb.org
WHO: Anyone
WHAT: Childcare center, emergency assistance, food
shelf and referrals.
LANGUAGE: English, Hmong, Somali and Spanish
pg 152
PH: 612-348-7874
WEB: www.crimeandjustice.org
WHO: For general crime victims
WHAT: Provides some financial assistance and emergency
lock changes are available. Does not typically
assist with expenses related to Domestic Violence.
May assist with rent or moving expenses in
general crime, like homicide; not sexual or
domestic violence.
WHERE: 822 S 3rd St # 100, Minneapolis
Emergency Assistance
Ramsey County Human Services
Keystone Community Services
Midway Family Center
PH: 651-266-4444
WEB: www.co.ramsey.mn.us/hs/financialassistance
WHO: 18 yrs and older
WHAT: General financial assistance for rent or other
expenses.
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Must make an appointment and
meet with someone for a screen/intake person. Individuals
may access this money only one time per year. Time period
to receive assistance may vary with urgency of situation.
PH: 651.645.0349
WEB: www.keystonecommunityservices.org
WHO: Only the following Saint Paul zip codes: 55108,
55114 and part of 55104 (west of Lexington)
WHAT: Emergency rental assistance for residents in
parts of Saint Paul.
WHERE: 2000 St. Anthony Ave, St. Paul
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Call to schedule an appointment.
Emergency Social Services
PH: 651-291-6795
WHO: 18 yrs and older
WHAT: Food, shelter, and other assistance after 5pm
and weekends
WHEN: Call this number after 5pm-8pm Mon-Friday and all
day on weekends
Emergency Assistance
Hennepin County Human Services
Pillsbury United Communities
Pillsbury House
PH: 612-302-3400
WEB: www.puc-mn.org
WHO: Provides assistance to low income individuals and
families as well as new immigrants to the United
States
WHAT: Agency has 12 locations, including neighborhood
centers, housing projects and employment and
training center
WHERE: 1201 37th Avenue North, Minneapolis
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
PH: 612-596-1300
WEB: www.co.hennepin.mn.us
WHO: 18 yrs and older
WHAT: General financial assistance for rent or other
expenses
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Individuals may access this
money only one time per year. Time period to receive
assistance may vary with urgency of situation.
Financial/Rental/Emergency Assistance
Financial, Rental and Emergency
Assistance Referrals
pg 153
Financial, Rental and Emergency
Assistance Referrals
Sharing and Caring Hands
The Salvation Army, East Side
PH: 612-338-4640
WEB: www.sharingandcaringhands.org
WHO: Individuals meeting low income, poverty line
WHAT: Financial assistance available for expenses due to
poverty, need, etc. Also provides meals, shelter, etc.
WHERE: 525 N. 7th Street, Minneapolis
WHEN: Mon-Thurs 10am – 11:30am and 1:30pm – 3:30pm
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Must wait in line and ask Mary
Jo directly for funds. Mary Jo is able to receive requests
10am – 11:30am and 1:30pm – 3:30pm Mon-Thurs.
PH: 651-776-2653
WEB: www.usc.salvationarmy.org
WHO: Saint Paul zip codes: 55101 and 55106 ONLY
WHAT: Emergency rental assistance
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Must call to schedule an appointment
Financial/Rental/Emergency Assistance
Sexual Offense Services of Ramsey County
PH: 651-643-3006
WEB: www.ramsey.mn.us/ph/yas/sos.htm
WHO: Victims of crime
WHAT: Financial assistance to help meet victim’s needs,
amount depends on funds available. Victim can
speak with staff during business hours for assistance.
WHEN: 8:30am-5:00pm Monday-Friday
Saint Paul Urban League
PH: 651-291-0504
WEB: www.spul.org
WHO: Saint Paul residents in the following zip codes:
55101, 55102, 55103 and 55104 (east of Lexington)
WHAT: Emergency rental assistance
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Must call to schedule an appointment
WHERE:401 Selby Avenue, Saint Paul
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 154
The Salvation Army, West 7th
PH: 651-224-6946
WEB: www.usc.salvationarmy.org
WHO: Saint Paul zip codes: 55102 (West of Kellogg)
55105 and 55107 ONLY
WHAT: Emergency rental assistance
WHERE: 401 West 7th Street, Saint Paul
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Must call to schedule an appointment
Midwest Children’s Resource Center (MCRC)
Catholic Charities
PH: 651-220-6750
WEB: www.childrensmn.org
WHO: Children/teens from 0 – 17 years old.
WHAT: Provides care for children/teens for all forms of
intrafamial abuse (sexual, physical, and severe
nutritional neglect) and provides care for all non acute, extra-familial sexual assault for children/
teens age 0 – 17 years old. This agency provides
specialized forensic interviews for teens that have
been sexually exploited. These appointments need
to be scheduled during office hours. MCRC sees
all acute sexual assaults to children 12 years old
and under, there is no appointment needed. MCRC
has a number of counseling groups for sexually
abused teens, which include, violence prevention
program, teen empowerment group for young
runaways, cognitive behavior therapy group, and
individual therapy. The therapy groups are free.
MCRC provides comprehensive health assessments
for runaways. Parental/Guardian permission is
required but all care is confidential.
WHEN: A nurse case manager is on-call to answer
questions 24 hours per day. Direct care for
intrafamial abuse is available 24 hours per day.
However, when possible, an appointment should
be made. Appointments need to be scheduled
during office hours.
WHERE: 347 Smith Street Saint Paul (Garden view
Medical Building, Suite 401)
FEE: Insurance is billed when available and there
is also a sliding scale fee.
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Parental permission is needed
for all of the therapy groups.
PH: 612-664-8500
WEB: www.ccspm.org
WHO: Children, adults and families.
WHAT: Provides emergency food shelf, homeless shelter,
physical and mental health care and help for
children in crisis.
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Agency most likely will not
provide shelter assistance to youth.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 155
Child Abuse Victims
Child Abuse Victims
Children’s Crisis Response
PH: 651-774-7000 (24 hours)
WEB: www.co.ramsey.mn.us/hs/ChildrenMentalHealth.htm
WHO: Youth 0-18 yrs
WHAT: Provides crisis support, intervention, de-escalation,
and mobile services for youth who are dealing with
mental health or family issues.
WHEN: 24 hours
Children’s Home Crisis Nursery
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
PH: 651-641-1300
WEB: www.chsfs.org
WHO: Residents with children under the age of 12 in
Ramsey, Dakota or Washington County
WHAT: Provides help for parents with children under
the age of 12 yrs. Short-term childcare, call for information
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Crisis nursery is free
Child Abuse Victims
Cornerhouse
PH: 612-813-8300
WEB: www.cornerhousemn.org
WHO: Must be referred from Child Protection or
Police
WHAT: Provides child abuse assessment for
Hennepin County
WHERE: 2502 10th Ave South Minneapolis, MN
Face to Face Counseling Center
PH: 651-772-5555
WEB: www.face2face.org
WHO: Ages 12-23 yrs.
WHAT: Counseling, therapy, and support groups for
adolescents and their families.
WHERE:1165 Arcade Saint Paul
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Must begin services between
ages of 12 to 23 yrs and then may continue until age 27 yrs.
Child Abuse Victims
Family Service
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: FEE:
651-635-0095
www.chsfs.org
Anyone
Individual, family and group counseling and
therapy services.
Sliding fee scale
Greater Minneapolis Crisis Nursery
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: 763-591-0100 (24 hours)
www.crisisnursery.org
Residents of Hennepin County
Emergency child care for children through age
6, up to 72 hours at a time, up to 30 days within
one year. Services are free.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 156
Hennepin County
Children and Family Services
PH:
WEB:
WHAT: 612-348-4111
www.co.hennepin.mn.us
Child protection, social services for teen parents,
mental health services, emergency social services
Ramsey County Mental Health Clinic
PH:
WEB:
WHAT: 651-266-7999
651-266-7960 Intake
651-266-7900 Crisis
www.co.ramsey.mn.us
Counseling available for abused children and
their families
Wilder Child Guidance Clinic
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: 651-642-4001
www.wilder.org/clinic
Children and families
Counseling for child victims of abuse and
their families.
Violence Prevention and Intervention
Services – Wilder Child & Family Services
PH:
WHO: WHAT: 651-287-2400
Abused Children and families
Provides counseling and therapy services to
abused children and their families. Anger
management and domestic abuse counseling
for both victims and perpetrators.
Hennepin County Child Protection
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: 612-348-3552 (24 hours)
www.co.hennepin.mn.us
Anyone who would like to make a report,
individuals, professionals and mandated reporters.
County agency receiving reports of abuse or
neglect of children. Assesses families for services.
Ramsey County Child Protection
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: 651-266-4500 (24 hours)
www.co.ramsey.mn.us
Anyone who would like to make a report,
individuals, professionals and mandated reporters.
County agency receiving reports of abuse or
neglect of children. Assesses families for services.
Stop It Now! Minnesota
Prevention of Child Abuse
PH: 651-644-8515 or 1-888-773-8368
WEB: www.stopitnow.org
WHO: Anyone who has concerns about their own,
or someone else’s behavior towards children.
WHAT: Provides information and resources for anyone
with any concerns about their own or someone
else’s behavior towards children, including: adults
who are having sexual thoughts towards children,
or have sexually abused a child ; parents
concerned about their child’s sexual behavior;
parents concerned about someone’s behavior
towards their child; and adults who care about
someone whose sexual behavior concerns them.
The agency works to keep kids safe.
WHERE: 821 University Ave. West, Suite N385
St. Paul
WHEN: Mon-Fri 8am – 5pm
Child Abuse/Neglect Reporting
Child Abuse/Neglect Reporting
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 157
Vulnerable Adult/Adult Mental Illness
Mental Health Association of Minnesota
PH: 612-331-6840
WEB: www.mentalhealthmn.org
WHAT: Community ed. and advocacy for people with
mental illness
WHERE: 2021 East Hennepin Ave, Minneapolis
Vulnerable Adult/Adult Mental Illness
Ramsey County Mental Health Center
Crisis Center for Adults
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: 651-266-7900 (24 hours)
www.co.ramsey.mn.us/hs/mhc/AdultMentalHealth.htm
Ages 18 and older
24 hour crisis support and intervention for adults
suffering from mental illness and that are a danger
to themselves or others. Outreach also available
612-331-6840
www.mentalhealthmn.org
Support groups for people with mental illness
and their families.
PH:
WHO: WHAT: 651-228-9544 (24 hours)
651-228-4713 (non-emergencies)
Ages 18 and older
Provides outreach to persons experiencing
chronic, persistent mental illness, chemical
dependency and/or homelessness.
Acute Psychiatric Services
651-254-1000 (24 hours)
www.regionshospital.com
18 yrs and older
24 hour mental heath intake through emergency
department.
National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI)
PH: 651-645-2948
WEB: www.namimn.org
WHAT: Pubic policy, advocacy, education and support
groups for people with mental illness and for their families,
information and referrals.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
PH:
WEB:
WHAT: Access Program
Regions Hospital Crisis Program
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: REACH—Mental Health Association of
Ramsey County
PH: 612-873-3161
WEB: www.hcmc.org/depts/psych/cic.htm
WHO: Anyone in crisis; adolescent (up to 18 yrs) and
adult program
WHAT: They provide a 24-hour walk-in crisis intervention
and treatment of behavioral emergencies; Crisis
intervention phone service for assessment,
information, and referral for psychiatric emergencies.
WHERE:701 Park Ave South, Minneapolis
WHEN: Immediate services are 24 hours; adolescent
program hours are Mon/Tues/Wed 8am – 5pm;
Thurs noon – 5pm; Fri Closed
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: If you are under 18, parents have
access to your records and you will be transferred to the
adolescent program.
Vulnerable Adult Neglect Reporting
pg 158
Vulnerable Adult Neglect Reporting
Ramsey County Adult Protection
PH:
WEB:
WHO: 651-266-4012 M-F day hours
651-291-6795 nights and weekends
www.co.ramsey.mn.us
Anyone who would like to make a report of
abuse or neglect of a vulnerable adult.
Hennepin County Adult Protection
PH:
WEB:
WHO: 612-348-8526 (24 hours)
www.co.hennepin.mn.us
Anyone who would like to make a report of abuse
or neglect of a vulnerable adult.
Vulnerable Adult/Adult Mental Illness
Vulnerable Adult/Adult Mental Illness
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 159
Sexual Harassment Reporting
and Exploitation Reports
Sexual Harassment Reporting
Exploitation
Federal Equal Employment Opportunity
Commission (EEOC)
Board of Psychology
PH:
WEB:
WHAT: 612-335-4040 Voice
612-335-4045 TTY
www.eeoc.gov
Filing sexual harassment reports and information
Sexual Harassment & Exploitation
Minnesota Department of Human Rights
PH: 651-296-5663
1-800-657-3703
WEB: www.humanrights.state.mn.us
WHO: Anyone
WHAT: Sexual harassment reports and other
discrimination reports.
WHEN: Mon – Fri 8am – 4:30pm
LANGUAGE: Phone assistance in English,
Hmong and Spanish.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
PH: 612-617-2230
Call to file a sexual exploitation report
against a licensed psychologist.
MN Board of Medical Practice
PH: 612-617-2130
Call to file a sexual report against psychiatrist
and other physicians
MN Board of Nursing
PH: 612-617-2270
Call to file a sexual exploitation report against a nurse.
MN Board of Social Work
PH: 612-617-2100
612-617-2166 Fax
Sexual exploitation complaints against licensed social
workers. Not all social works need or have state licenses.
MN Office of Mental Health Practice
PH: 612-617-2105
Sexual exploitation complaints against unlicensed
mental health professionals.
pg 160
Asian Women United of Minnesota
National Domestic Abuse Hotline
PH: 612-724-8823 (24 hours)
WEB: www.awum.org
WHO: Asian women and their families
WHAT: Shelter, advocacy, information and domestic
violence services for Asian women and their
children.
LANGUAGE: Hmong, Vietnamese, Japanese and
Cambodian languages spoken by staff.
PH:
WHAT: Battered Women’s Legal Advocacy Project
PH: 612-343-9842 (metro)
1-800-313-2666
WEB: www.bwlap.org
WHO: Anyone in need of legal advice or services
WHAT: Staff of attorneys provide legal assistance
and advocacy.
WHERE: 1611 Park Ave Suite 2 Minneapolis, MN
Chrysalis Law Clinic
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
Day One Center
PH:
WEB:
WHAT:
1-866-223-1111 (24 hours)
www.dayonecenter.com
Allows clients to make a single call to access
shelter availability for all domestic violence shelter
throughout the state of Minnesota. The number
connects to the MN Crisis Line and they are able
to access the Day One Center if unable to place
them elsewhere.
Domestic Abuse and Harassment
Office, Ramsey County
PH: 651-266-5130
WEB: www.mncourts.gov/district/2/?page=45
WHO: Anyone who needs to file an Order for Protection
and Harassment Restraining Order
WHAT: Office for filling Order for Protection and
Harassment Restraining Orders. Call to make
an appointment.
WHEN: Open Monday-Friday, 8am-4:30pm
Domestic Abuse Project
PH: 612-874-7063
WEB: www.mndap.org
WHO: For battered women and offenders
WHAT: Legal advocacy in court, counseling programs
for batters and victims.
WHERE:
204 West Franklin Avenue, Minneapolis
pg 161
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
PH: 612-871-0118 TTY
612-824-2780
WEB: www.chrysaliswomen.org
WHO: 18 yrs and older
WHAT: Legal assistance for women, call to schedule
an appointment
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Childcare may be available,
must call to arrange.
1-800-799-7233
1-800-787-3224 TTY
National number that provides support,
information and referrals.
Battered Women/Domestic Violence/Shelter
Battered Women/Domestic Violence
Services/Shelter
Battered Women/Domestic Violence
Services/Shelter
Domestic Abuse and Harassment
Office, Hennepin County
Tubman Family Alliance
Battered Women/Domestic Violence/Shelter
PH: 651-348-5073
WEB: www.mncourts.gov/
WHO: Anyone who needs to file an Order for
Protection and Harassment Restraining Order
WHAT: Office for filling Order for Protection and
Harassment Restraining Orders. Call to make
an appointment.
WHEN: Open Monday-Friday, daytime hours
Minnesota Coalition for Battered Women
PH: 651-646-6177
WEB: www.mcbw.org
WHO: Survivors of domestic violence
WHAT: Survivors network, information and referral.
WHEN: 8:30am-4:30pm Monday through Friday
Minnesota Crisis Line for Battered Women
PH:
WHO: WHAT: 651-646-0994 Business line
651-222-5836 (24 hours) Women of Nations line
Women
24 hour crisis intervention and counseling,
provides shelter space information and locations
of shelters, information on lesbian battering.
Saint Paul Intervention Project
PH: 651-645-2824
WEB: www.stpaulintervention.org
WHO: Victims of domestic violence
WHAT: 24 hour response and service to victims of
domestic violence, including youth
WHERE: 1509 Marshall Ave. Saint Paul, MN
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 162
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: 651-770-8544 West Administration
612-825-3333 West location
651-770-0777 East (24 hours)
612-825-0000 West (24 hours)
612-821-4754 TTY
www.harriettubman.org
Battered women
Provides legal advocacy, information, counseling
services and referrals. Services for survivors and
offenders. Tubman Family Alliance runs multiple
shelters, call for locations. Also has a legal
department within one or more locations.
Women’s Rural Advocacy Program
(WRAP) Marshall, MN
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: 507-532-9532 Business Line
507-532-2350 (24 hours)
1-800-639-2350 (24 hours)
www.letswrap.com
Women
Advocacy and safe housing for women of
domestic violence. Services Lincoln, Lyon,
Murray, Redwood and Yellow Medicine counties.
Battered Woman Shelters
Day One Center
PH: 1-866-223-1111 (24 hours)
WEB: www.dayonecenter.com
Allows clients to make a single call to access shelter
availability for all domestic violence shelter throughout the
state of Minnesota. The number connects to the MN Crisis
Line and they are able to access the Day One Center if
unable to place them elsewhere.
Hennepin County Assistance
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: 612-348-9410 (Families)
612-348-3007 (For singles with no children)
www.co.hennepin.mn.us
Hennepin County residents
Assists residents in obtaining shelter in Hennepin
County and local areas. Must meet eligibility
requirements, call for requirements.
Alexandra House
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
PH: 651-772-1611 (24 hours)
651-772-1723 (Business)
WEB: www.casadeesperanza.org
WHO: Culturally appropriate for Latinas, however
services available to all women and children.
WHAT: Shelter with Spanish-English bilingual staff.
Provides certain legal, housing, employment and
domestic violence advocacy exclusively to the
Latina community.
WHERE:1515 East Lake Street, Minneapolis
Cornerstone
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: 952-884-0330 (24 hours)
952-884-0376 (Business)
www.cornerstonemn.org
Women and their children
Shelter in Bloomington, MN; provides shelter,
information and referrals.
Dwelling Place
PH: 651-776-4805
WEB: www.thedwellingplaceshelter.org
WHO: Battered women and their children
WHAT: Christian based shelter and ministry for battered
women and their children, call to complete intake.
WHEN: Call Monday-Friday for intake, 9am-5pm
Women’s Legal Advocate, Inc.
PH: 651-227-8284 (24 hours)
WHO: Women and children, Ramsey County
WHAT: Provides shelter to women and their children
pg 163
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
PH: 763-780-2330 (24 hours)
763-780-2332 (Business)
WEB: www.alexandrahouse.org
WHO: Women and Children
WHAT: Domestic abuse shelter for women, shelter in
Blaine (Anoka County).
WHERE:10065 3rd St NE Blaine, MN 55434
Casa de Esperanza (House of Hope)
Battered Women/Domestic Violence/Shelter
Battered Women/Domestic Violence
Services/Shelter
Battered Women/Domestic Violence
Services/Shelter
Harriet Tubman, Tubman Family Alliance
Battered Women/Domestic Violence/Shelter
PH: 612-825-0000 (24 hours)
612-821-4754 TTY
WEB: www.harriettubman.org
WHO: Battered women
WHAT: Provides legal advocacy, information, counseling
services and referrals. Services for survivors and offenders. Tubman Family Alliance runs multiple shelters, call for
locations and services.
Home Free
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: 763-559-4945 (24 Hours)
763-545-7080 (business)
www.homefreeprograms.org
Women of Hennepin County
Plymouth based domestic violence shelter;
support groups for immigrant women, moms with
children who have witnessed domestic violence,
women’s empowerment group.
Sojourner Project, Inc.
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: 952-933-7422 (24 hours)
952-933-7433
www.sojournerproject.org
Women and children
Shelter in Hopkins (Hennepin County).
Shelter and advocacy for women and children
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 164
Asian Women United
(House of Peace Shelter)
PH: 612-724-8823 (24 hours)
WEB: www.awum.org
WHO: Anyone, but culturally appropriate for Asian and
Asian American women.
WHAT: Provides shelter, advocacy, information and
domestic violence services for Asian women
and their children.
LANGUAGE: Hmong, Vietnamese, Japanese and
Cambodian languages are spoken by staff.
Women of Nations—Eagles Nest
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: 651-222-5836 (24 hours)
www.women-of-nations.org
Culturally appropriate for Native American/
Alaskan Native women, but services available
to all women and children
Provides temporary shelter and legal advocacy
for women who have experienced domestic
violence, sexual violence and women who have
been prostituted.
Lewis House, Community Action Council
PH: 651-452-7288 (24 hours)
1-800-336-7233
WEB: www.communityactioncouncil.org
WHO: Women and children, primarily serves
Dakota County
WHAT: Provides shelter, counseling, case management,
legal and employment assistance to battered
women. Offers support groups. Also has a sexual
assault service program in the shelter.
WHERE: Eagan MN
Anne Pierce Rogers Home,
Tubman Family Alliance
PH:
WEB:
WHAT: 651-770-0777 (24 hours)
651-768-0216 (24 hour shelter line)
www.harriettubman.org
Saint Paul Park, Washington County shelter to
women and children
Lewis House, Community Action Council
Womansafe Center, Hope Center
PH: 800-607-2330 (24 Hours)
507-332-0882 (Business)
WEB: www.hopecentermn.org
WHO: For battered women in, or wanting to be in a safe
place. Located in Faribault, MN
WHAT: Battered women’s program, outreach and sexual
assault services.
WHERE: 303 1st Avenue NE, Faribault MN 55021
PH: 651-437-1291 (24 hours)
WEB: www.communityactioncouncil.org
WHO: Women and children, primarily serves Dakota
County
WHAT: Provides shelter, counseling, case management,
legal and employment assistance to battered
women. Offers support groups.
WHERE: Hastings MN
Battered Women/Domestic Violence/Shelter
Battered Women/Domestic Violence
Services/Shelter
Hill Home, Tubman Family Alliance
PH:
WEB:
WHAT: 651-770-0777 (24 hours)
651-653-6305 (business line)
www.harriettubman.org
Lake Elmo, Washington County shelter to
women and children
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 165
Prostitution and Sex Trafficking Survivors
Prostitution and Sex Trafficking Survivors
Breaking Free
Adults Saving Kids
PH: 651-645-6557
WEB: www.breakingfree.net
WHO: Prostituted women and girls
WHAT: Agency fights commercial sexual exploitation
through direct services to prostituted women and
girls, community education on prostitution as
systematic violence, case management, support
groups, housing, mentorship programs,
community court and “school for johns” Will soon
be starting a transitional housing program.
WHERE: 770 University Ave Saint Paul
PH: 612-872-0684
WEB: www.adultssavingkids.org
WHO: Professional educational outreach program.
WHAT: Presentations about commercial sexual
exploitation in prostitution, stripping and
pornography. No direct services.
WHERE: 1901 Portland Ave, Minneapolis
PRIDE and TeenPRIDE
(Family and Children’s Services)
PH: 612-728-2062
1-888-PRIDE-99 Toll free
WEB: www.familychildrenservice.nonprofitoffice.com
WHO: Women ages 13-18
WHAT: Counseling & advocacy to women teens. 24
crisis line that accepts collect calls. Free services,
support groups, transportation to those who are
at risk for sexual exploitation and/or who have
been sexually exploited or victims of prostitution.
Can assist with housing, both teen and adults.
WHERE: Support groups are held at Mondays from
5pm – 7pm at Project Off streets:
41 N 12th Street in Minneapolis
Tuesdays from 5pm – 7pm at the Lake Street Branch:
4123 East Lake Street
HOW: Call 24 hour line; drop in
WHEN: Lake Street Hours
Mon/Tues/Thurs 8am – 8pm
Wed/Fri 8am – 4:30pm
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 166
Project Pathfinder, Inc.
PH: 651 – 644-8515
WEB: www.projectpathfinder.org
WHO: Program for men who have paid for sex with
prostitutes and want to stop. Self referred or
referred by the criminal justice system.
WHAT: Intervention Program – For Men Who Use
Prostitutes. A brief group based program that
provides information and brief therapy for men
who have been arrested or who have engaged in
sex with prostitutes and want to stop.
WHEN: Mon-Fri... To make an appointment call
651-644-8515, ask for “Intervention Program” intake.
WHERE: 1821 University Ave. West N385, Saint Paul
FEE: $500 for 6 sessions.
Volunteers of America Women’s
Recovery Center
PH: 612-721-6327
WEB: www.voamn.org
WHO: Prostituted women and teens who also have
chemical dependency issues
WHERE: North Oaks MN
WHAT: 90 day residential program by referral only, for
women who have been used in prostitution who
are also dealing with chemical dependency
programs, trauma, mental illness, etc.
WHEN: Mon-Fri 8am – 4:30pm
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Residential program by referral
only from corrections or Rule 25.
Prostitution and Sex Trafficking Survivors
Prostitution and Sex Trafficking Survivors
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 167
Culturally Specific Services and Resources: African and African American
African and African American
Community Resources
Phyllis Wheatley Community Center
PH: 612-374-4342
WEB: www.pwccenter.org
WHO: Culturally appropriate for African American and
African community
WHAT: Counseling, classes, nursery, after school
program, information and referrals.
WHERE: 1301 10th Ave North, Minneapolis
African American Family Services
PH: 612-813-0782
WEB: www.aafs.net
WHO: Culturally appropriate for African American
adults and adolescents
WHAT: Adult and adolescents; domestic violence and
anger management support groups for women
and men, services to both victims and abusers,
and provides free individual therapy.
WHERE: 1041 Selby Ave, Saint Paul
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
Community University Health Care
Center (CUHCC)
PH: 612-638-0700
WEB: www.ahc.umn.edu/CUHCC/
WHO: Anyone in need of medical services
WHAT: Primary medical care, mental health and dental
and legal services
LANGUAGE: Cambodian; English; Hmong; Laotian;
Somali; Spanish; and Vietnamese.
WHERE: 2001 Bloomington Ave South, Minneapolis
BUS: 2, 14 and 24 bus lines and within walking distance
of the Franklin Station Stop on the Hiawatha Light
Rail and the 19 and 8 bus lines.
WHEN: Mon – Fri 8am – 5pm; Walk-ins welcome!
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: If you are under 18, parents have
access to your records. Fees based on sliding fee scale
and have community programs to help with fees.
Thad Wilderson & Associates
PH: 651-225-8997
WHO: Culturally appropriate for African and African
Americans.
WHAT: Provides individual, general therapy for Ramsey
County residents. Case managers are onsite.
WHERE: 475 University Ave, Saint Paul
pg 168
Asian Women United of Minnesota
(House of Peace Shelter)
PH: 612-724-8823
WEB: www.awum.org
WHO: Anyone, but culturally appropriate for Asian and
Asian American women.
WHAT: Provides shelter, advocacy, information and
domestic violence services for Asian women
and their children.
LANGUAGE: Hmong, Vietnamese, Japanese and
Cambodian languages are spoken by staff.
Community University Health Care Center
(CUHCC)
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
PH:
WHO: WHAT: FEE: 651-343-5929
Culturally appropriate services for Hmong
individuals and families
Mana Vue offers individual, couple and family
therapy in English and in Hmong.
Accepts self pay, medical assistance and some
HMOs. Sliding fee scale is available.
Lao Family and Community of Minnesota
PH: 651-221-0069; www.laofamily.org
WHAT: Employment assistance, legal advice, counseling
services and support for women and senior
citizens.
WHERE: 320 University Ave W, St Paul
Southeast Asian Refugee Community Home
PH: 612-673-9388
WHO: Asian refugees individual and families
WHAT: General social services agency, offering
counseling services, victim services, employment
assistance, youth prevention program, childcare
program and juvenile delinquency assistance
for families
WHERE: 1113 E Franklin Ave, Minneapolis
pg 169
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
PH: 612-638-0700
WEB: www.ahc.umn.edu/CUHCC/
WHO: Anyone in need of medical services
WHAT: Primary medical care, mental health and dental
and legal services
LANGUAGE: Cambodian; English; Hmong; Laotian; Somali;
Spanish; and Vietnamese.
WHERE: 2001 Bloomington Ave South Minneapolis
WHEN: Mon – Fri 8am – 5pm; Walk-ins welcome!
BUS: 2, 14 and 24 bus lines and within walking distance
of the Franklin Station Stop on the Hiawatha Light
Rail and the 19 and 8 bus lines.
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: If you are under 18, parents have
access to your records. Fees based on sliding fee scale
and have community programs to help with fees.
Hmong American Family Counseling Services
Culturally Specific Services and Resources: Asian and Asian American
Asian and Asian American
Community Resources
Culturally Specific Services and Resources: Deaf/Hard of Hearing
Deaf and Hard of Hearing
Community Resources
Sexual Offense Services of Ramsey County
PH: 651-643-3006 (24 hours)
WEB: www.ramsey.mn.us/ph/yas/sos.htm
WHO: Anyone (primary or secondary) that is a victim
of sexual violence
WHAT: Crisis supportive counseling for victims, friends
and families that are affected by sexual violence;
advocacy, referrals, emergency services, medical
outreach to Regions Hospital, support groups, 24
hour crisis line; services using a TTY and MN relay
service for deaf and hard of hearing victims
WHERE: 1619 Dayton Ave Suite #201, Saint Paul
WHEN: 24 hour crisis line; office open 8:30am – 5pm,
24 hour medical outreach
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: All services are free and
confidential
Emergency On-Call Sign Language
Interpreters
PH:
WHAT: FEE: 651-224-6548 (24 hours)
24 hour services to deaf and hard of hearing
individuals.
Billing information is provided on call after
determination of where and for how long an
interpreter is needed.
Communication Services for the Deaf (CSD)
PH:
WHO: 651-297-6700 (Metro, voice & TTY business line)
877-456-7589 (MN wide, voice, & TTY)
651-224-6548 (Metro, voice & TTY, 24 hours)
Culturally appropriate services for deaf and hard
of hearing individuals and refugees.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 170
WHAT: Information, referrals, social services, domestic
violence programming and interpreting services.
Also have a refugee service, adult education,
recreation and other programs. Emergency
on-call interpreters for medical, legal and
advocacy services.
Deaf and Hard of Hearing Social Services
PH:
WEB:
WHAT:
651-297-1316-Voice
1-888-206-6513 TTY
www.dhs.state.mn.us
Information and referrals to deaf and hard
of hearing persons.
National Crisis Line for the Deaf
PH: 1-800-380-3323 (24 Hours) Toll Free, TTY, Voice
WHAT: A database for the deaf and hearing individuals
to find resources and service providers.
Disability Awareness Project
PH: 651-646-6177 Voice/TTY
651-646-0994 Voice/TTY for metro shelter crisis line
WHAT: Provides information to disabled women about
domestic violence. Emphasis on access and
education for women with hearing loss.
Family Tree Clinic
PH: 651-645-0478 Voice
651-379-1458 TTY
WEB: www.familytreeclinic.org
WHO: Teens, men and women
WHAT: Sliding fee based medical and reproductive
health services; STI testing; free birth control and
family planning; annual exams; UTI and infection
treatment; same day appointments. Also provides
medical services and educational programs
(health/sexuality education, family planning) to
the Deaf, Deaf/Blind and Hard of Hearing
community. Health education programs are free.
WHEN: Mon/Wed 8:30am – 8:30pm;
Tues/Thurs 8:30am – 5pm; Closed Fri
LANGUAGE: ASL and interpreter services
WHERE: 1619 Dayton Ave, Saint Paul
ASL Interpreting Services at
Dynamic Communications
PH: 763-478-8963 Voice
763-478-3093 TTY/Fax
WEB: www.aslis.com
WHAT: Information and referrals to deaf and hard
of hearing persons.
WHERE: 6517 Hunter Road Corcoran, MN 55340
PH:
WEB:
WHO: Minnesota Chemical Dependency Program
PH: 612-273-4402 Voice/TTY
WEB: www.mncddeaf.org
WHO: Deaf/Hard of hearing individuals in need of
chemical dependency treatment.
WHAT: Individualized in-patient chemical dependency
treatment program designed for individuals
who are deaf or hard of hearing.
WHERE: 2450 Riverside Avenue South, Minneapolis
Minnesota Relay Service
PH:
WEB:
WHAT: 651-254-4786 Voice/TTY
651-254-1888 TTY
www.regionshospital.com
Anyone in need of specialized mental health
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 171
711 (24 hours)
1-800-627-3529 TTY (use this number
if you have any problems with #711)
www.state.mn.us/portal/mn/jsp/content.do?id=536881376&agency=Commerce
Provides voice and TTY relay for hearing and
hearing impaired people to communicate via
telephone. No fee except for long distance relay call.
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
Health and Wellness Program
Regions Hospital
treatment, specifically the deaf/hard of hearing
community.
WHAT: Consultation services provided on chemical
dependency treatment. Comprehensive mental
health services for children and adults Individual,
couple, family and groups available. Inpatient (18
yrs and older) and Outpatient services (all ages).
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Individuals seeking services for
inpatient MUST be 18 yrs or older; outpatient services are
for all ages.
Culturally Specific Services and Resources: Deaf/Hard of Hearing
Deaf and Hard of Hearing
Community Resources
Culturally Specific Services and Resources: Deaf/Hard of Hearing
Deaf and Hard of Hearing
Community Resources
Volunteers of America
PH: 763-753-7310 Anoka
763-225-4052 Golden Valley (Mental Health)
WEB: www.voamn.org
Ask for Karen Otis, Program Assistant: 1-866-400-8229
(toll-free voice) or 763-225-4064 (voice), email address:
[email protected]
WHO: Children, adolescents ages 0-22 who are deaf,
blind or hard of hearing who experience significant
difficulty due to emotional or behavioral problems,
and their families.
WHAT: Mental health services, including therapy, case
management, residential treatment, family
services, group therapy, skill building and parent
support groups.
WHEN: Call to schedule: Mon-Fri 8am to 6pm
Clinic appointments are flexible.
WHERE: Anoka Office:
22426 St. Francis Boulevard, Anoka MN 55303
Golden Valley Office:
5905 Golden Valley Road, Golden Valley MN 55422
FEE: Fees for mental health services are reimbursable
by Medical Assistance, third party insurance
payers and contractual agreements with counties.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 172
Chrysalis
PH: 612-871-0118
612-824-2780 TTY
WEB: www.chrysaliswomen.org
WHO: 18 yrs and older
WHAT: Group and individual counseling and therapy, legal
clinic, chemical dependency, couples/uncoupling,
adult survivors, support groups, general information
and referrals.
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Childcare may be available, must
call to arrange.
District 202
PH: 612-871-5559
WEB: www.dist202.org
WHO: GLBT youth and under 21 yrs
WHAT: Coffee shop, social events, groups, programming
for youth and supportive friends
WHERE: 1601 Nicollet Ave. S., Minneapolis MN
Community University Health Care Center
(CUHCC)
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
GLBT Kids Line
PH: 1-877-452-8543
TeenPRIDE
(Family and Children’s Services)
PH: 612-728-2062
1-888-PRIDE-99 Toll free
WEB: www.familychildrenservice.nonprofitoffice.com
WHO: Women ages 13-18
WHAT: Counseling, advocacy, referrals to women teens.
24 crisis line that accepts collect calls. Free
services, support groups, transportation to those
who are at risk for sexual exploitation and/or who
have been sexually exploited or victims of prostitution
WHERE: Support groups are held at Mon 5pm – 7pm
at Project Off streets (41 N 12th Street in Minneapolis)
Tues 5pm – 7pm at the Lake Street Branch
(4123 East Lake Street)
HOW: Call 24 hour line; drop in
WHEN: Lake Street Open: Mon, Tues and Thurs: 8:00am –
8:00pm. Wed and Fri: 8:00am – 4:30pm.
Family Service
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: FEE:
pg 173
651-635-0095
www.chsfs.org
Anyone
Individual, family and group counseling and
therapy services.
Sliding fee scale
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
PH: 612-638-0700
WEB: www.ahc.umn.edu/CUHCC/
WHO: Anyone in need of medical services
WHAT: Primary medical care, mental health and dental
and legal services
LANGUAGE: Cambodian; English; Hmong; Laotian; Somali;
Spanish; and Vietnamese.
WHERE: 2001 Bloomington Ave South, Minneapolis
BUS: 2, 14 and 24 bus lines and within walking distance
of the Franklin Station Stop on the Hiawatha Light
Rail and the 19 and 8 bus lines.
WHEN: Mon – Fri 8am – 5pm; Walk-ins welcome!
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: If you are under 18, parents have
access to your records. Fees based on sliding fee scale and
have community programs to help with fees.
Culturally Specific Services and Resources: LGBTQQ
Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender/Queer/
Questioning (LGBTQQ) Community Resources
LGBTQQ Community Resources
Culturally Specific Services and Resources: LGBTQQ
Minnesota Coalition for Battered Women
PH: 651-646-6177 (office)
651-646-0994 (24 hours in metro)
1-800-289-6177 (state wide 24 hrs)
WEB: www.mcbw.org
WHAT: Resources, information and referrals.
Advocacy and safe home access for victims
of abuse.
WHERE: 590 Park Street, Suite 410, Saint Paul
Out for Equity
PH: 651-603-4942
WEB: outforequity.spps.org
WHAT: Program of Saint Paul school district, sponsoring
Gay-Straight Alliances, support groups and
services to students and staff.
WHERE: 1495 Rice Street Saint Paul, MN
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 174
Jewish Family Service
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: FEE: 651-698-0767
www.jfcsmpls.org
Culturally appropriate services for Jewish clients
Counseling, family life education, services and case
management for elderly, resettlement and training
services.
Sliding fee scale
Jewish Community Relations Council
PH: 612-338-7816
WEB: www.minndakjcrc.org
WHAT: Social justice, advocacy, no direct services,
literary services—most services address anti Semitism.
WHERE: 12 N. 12th Street #480, Minneapolis
Culturally Specific Services and Resources: Jewish
Jewish Community Resources
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 175
Latina/Latino Community Resources
Culturally Specific Services and Resources: Latina/Latino
C.L.U.E.S.
(Communidades Latinas Unidas En Servicio)
PH: 612-746-3500 Office
612-746-3537 Crisis Line
WEB: www.clues.org
WHO: Culturally appropriate for the Spanish speaking
community.
WHAT: Individual, family and group counseling in Spanish
and English.
WHERE: 720 East Lake Street, Minneapolis
Casa de Esperanza (House of Hope)
PH: 651-772-1611 (24 hours)
651-772-1723 (Business)
WEB: www.casadeesperanza.org
WHO: Culturally appropriate for Latinas, however
services available to all women and children.
WHAT: Shelter with Spanish-English bilingual staff.
Provides certain legal, housing, employment and
domestic violence advocacy exclusively to the
Latina community.
WHERE: 1515 East Lake Street, Minneapolis
Community University Health Care Center
(CUHCC)
PH: 612-638-0700
WEB: www.ahc.umn.edu/CUHCC/
WHO: Anyone in need of medical services
WHAT: Primary medical care, mental health and
dental and legal services
LANGUAGE: Cambodian; English; Hmong; Laotian;
Somali; Spanish; and Vietnamese.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 176
WHERE: 2001 Bloomington Ave South, Minneapolis
BUS: 2, 14 and 24 bus lines and within walking distance
of the Franklin Station Stop on the Hiawatha Light
Rail and the 19 and 8 bus lines.
WHEN: Mon – Fri 8am – 5pm; Walk-ins welcome!
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: If you are under 18, parents have
access to your records. Fees based on sliding fee scale
and have community programs to help with fees.
Esperanza Para Mujeres
Sexual Assault Services
PH:
WHO: WHAT: 1-800-630-1425
Any resident of Saint Peter, MN serving Nicollet,
Blue Earth, Brown and Sibley counties and who
is a sexual assault victim.
Crisis intervention, crisis counseling for sexual
assaults.
La Familia Guidance Center, Inc.
PH: 651-221-0913
WEB: www.lafamiliaguidance.org
WHO: Youth, families and adults
WHAT: mental health counseling; youth intervention;
parent and family counseling
WHERE: 155 S. Wabasha Street Suite #120, Saint Paul
and 2217 Nicollet Avenue South in Minneapolis
LANGUAGE: Fluent in Spanish and English; has multicultural mental health clinic
KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: Must have insurance; agency
works to keep children in the family.
La-Mano, Inc.
PH: 507-244-8361 (Mankato)
1-800-519-8988 (Crisis line)
WEB: lamanomn.org
WHO: Latin American community living in Mankato,
Faribault and Owatonna, MN
WHAT: Provides services for abused children, general
and sexual assault crimes and provides advocacy,
legal aid, reparations, support groups and referrals.
WHERE: 1400 Madison Avenue Suite 218, Mankato MN
West Side Community Health Services
(La Clinica)
PH: 651-222-1816
WEB: www.westsidechs.org
WHAT: STD and HIV testing, pre-natal care and family
planning
WHERE: 153 Cesar Chevaz Street, Saint Paul
Mujeres Unidas (Women United)
PH: 218-236-9884 (Moorhead MN)
WEB: www.mujeresunidaswomenunited.org
WHO: Chicana/Latina women, particularly single mothers
WHAT: Information and referrals, advocacy and support
working with law enforcement, legal information.
Susana De Leon
PH: 612-822-6269
WHO: Anyone, culturally appropriate for Latina
community.
WHAT: Lawyer specializing in domestic violence and
immigration related legal work.
WHERE: 547 Cedar Avenue South, Minneapolis
Culturally Specific Services and Resources: Latina/Latino
Latina/Latino Community Resources
SHYIP Resources
For Providers
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 177
Native Americans Community Resources
Culturally Specific Services and Resources: Native American
Ain Dah Yung
PH: 651-227-4184
WEB: www.aindahyung.com
WHO: Youth
WHAT: Emergency shelter for runaway and homeless
American Indian youth, accepts all youth from
diverse backgrounds. Also offers other youth
programming and support.
WHERE: 1089 Portland Ave, Saint Paul
Division of Indian Work
PH: 612-722-8722
WEB: www.gmcc.org
WHO: Girls in Daughters in Transition Program, 8 to 12
yrs of age. Must have referral to be in program
from Child Protective Services
WHAT: No direct services without referrals, with referral
from Child Protection Services, probation, etc.
they offer counseling and support groups as part
of the Family Violence Program. Also offers a food
shelf.
WHERE: 1001 East Lake Street, Minneapolis, MN
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
Minnesota Indian Women’s Sexual
Assault Coalition, MN Indian Women’s
Resource Center
PH: 612-728-2028
WEB: www.miwsac.org
WHO: Culturally appropriate for Native American/Alaskan Native women
WHAT: Offers support groups, supportive counseling, legal
and medical advocacy, information and referrals.
WHEN: Monday-Friday day hours
WHERE: 1619 Dayton Ave, Saint Paul
Women of Nations—Eagles Nest
PH:
WEB:
WHO: WHAT: ***
pg 178
651-222-5836 (24 hours)
www.women-of-nations.org
Culturally appropriate for Native American/Alaskan
Native women, but services available to all women
and children
Provides temporary shelter and legal advocacy for
women who have experienced domestic violence,
sexual violence and women who have been
prostituted.
Hotlines
OUR
GUIDE
Resources for Young Adults
in the Twin Cities
Ambulance, Fire, Police
911
United Way 211
211 or 651-291-0211
A 24 hour referral to
community agencies including food
and shelter. Spanish—Para que le
ayuden en español llame al 2-1-1 o
al: 1-800-543-7709
Hmong—Xav tau tus neeg pab
txhais lus hmoob thov hu 2-1-1 los:
1-800-543-7709
The Bridge for Runaway Youth
612-377-8800
A 24 hour crisis line providing support
and referrals for homeless youth.
YMCA Point Northwest
763-493-3052
A 24 hour crisis line providing
support and referrals for homeless
youth in the Northwest Suburbs.
Ramsey County
Mobile Crisis Team
651-771-0076
Dakota County Crisis Intervention
and Response Unit
952-891-7171
PRIDE
612-728-2062 or
1-888-774-3399
A 24 hour crisis line for women,
girls and transgender youth who are
victims of prostitution; collect calls
are accepted.
Battered Women’s Hotline
651-646-0994
A 24 hour crisis line providing support
and referrals for men and women.
Suicide Prevention
612-873-2222
A 24 hour telephone crisis counseling,
information and referral line.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 179
Council on Crime and Justice
Victim Services
612-340-5400
A 24 hour advocacy and support for
victims of any crime.
Sexual Violence Center
612-871-5111
A 24 hour crisis counseling line
providing immediate support and
resources for survivors of sexual
violence, their families, friends and
other concerned persons.
Crisis Connection
612-379-6363
A 24 hour telephone crisis
counseling, information
and referral line.
Crisis Connection—Men’s Line
612-379-6367
A 24 hour counseling line for men
and others who want to talk about
issues of abuse and violence in
their lives.
OutFront Minnesota
612-824-8434
A 24 hour crisis hotline
providing advocacy, information,
support and counseling for victims
of domestic violence in same-sex
relationships.
Youth Runaway
Switchboard Hotline
1-800-runaway
Call if you are thinking of running
from home, have a friend who has
run or if you are a runaway ready to
go home through the Home
Free Program.
Neighborhood Involvement
Program—Youth Program
A 24 hour helpline: 612-825-4357
612-374-9077
www.neighborinvolve.org
Rape and sexual assault.
HOW TO
USE
THIS
GUIDE
If you are having an emergency, call one of the hotline numbers
on the inside cover. Otherwise, find what you need in the table of
contents. The bold titles are good starting points if you don’t know
exactly what you are looking for. Follow the page numbers to specific
types of services.
In each section, there is a list of services and advice about how to
use them. Check for these symbols under each entry:
This agency is really good at helping gay, lesbian,
bisexual, transgender and questioning people.
This agency does not require you to have an ID.
This agency has free condoms and/or lube and dental
dams if you need them.
This agency can work with immigrants who are not in
the US legally (undocumented).
TIP:
CheCk out the “tIPS” In eaCh SeCtIon. they Come
from young PeoPle lIke you!
O
t
TABLE OF
CONTENTS
s
6
w
w
h
I don’t know where to start ..........................6
Street Outreach Workers ...........................................6
Drop-In Centers ........................................................6
Community Centers ..................................................7
Identification ............................................................9
I want to get back In school,
get my ged or fInd a job .................................39
Education ................................................................39
Education and Employment .......................................41
Employment ............................................................43
I don’t have much money for my basIc needs
10
Food ........................................................................10
Clothes ....................................................................12
Haircut ....................................................................14
Transportation ..........................................................14
Health Care ..............................................................15
General Medical .......................................................16
Dental ......................................................................17
Mental Health ...........................................................18
Public Assistance .....................................................19
Ways to Get Cash ....................................................21
I want to fInd an apartment ..........................45
Transitional Living Programs .....................................45
Independent Living Skills ..........................................48
Housing ...................................................................49
Rental Assistance .....................................................50
Furniture .................................................................53
I need to talk to someone ...............................53
Case Management ...................................................53
Counseling and Therapy ...........................................54
I want to have safer sex .................................22
Safer Sex Supplies ...................................................22
HIV, STD and Pregnancy Testing ................................22
I’m an ImmIgrant or a person of color ......57
Immigrant and Legal Services ...................................57
Culturally Specific Agencies ......................................58
I’m pregnant or a parent ................................24
Pregnancy Testing and Prenatal Care ........................24
Abortion Providers ....................................................25
Parenting Help .........................................................26
Baby Supplies ..........................................................27
Childcare .................................................................27
I am gay, lesbIan, bIsexual,
transgender or questIonIng .........................61
Drop-In Centers .......................................................61
Advocacy .................................................................61
Support Groups ........................................................62
Housing ...................................................................63
I can’t stay at home ..........................................29
Shelter ....................................................................29
Domestic and Sexual Abuse ......................................35
Places to Hang Out ..................................................38
Showers and Laundry ...............................................37
Storage ...................................................................39
Phone, Voicemail and Address ..................................39
I am/was In foster care, jaIl or wIll turn 21
soon .....................................................................63
Leaving Foster Care .................................................63
Resources for Ex-Offenders ......................................64
Getting Help When You’re 21 ....................................65
I’m under 16 ........................................................55
Services ..................................................................55
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
I need legal help .........................................65
General Legal Services ...................................................65
Your Rights and the Police ..............................................67
I use drugs ................................................................68
Safer Drug Use ..............................................................68
Drug and Alcohol Treatment ............................................68
Housing First .................................................................69
Support Groups ..............................................................70
I’m lIvIng or workIng on the street ...................70
Sex Work .......................................................................70
Gangs ...........................................................................72
Panhandling and Loitering ..............................................72
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schedule of free meals ........................................74
mInneapolIs map ......................................................76
st. paul map ...............................................................78
I want to help others ............................................83
Volunteering and Activism ...............................................83
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pg 180
Outreach workers are always a good place to start. Most outreach workers in
the Twin Cities work for StreetWorks.
streetworks
612-252-2735; www.streetworksmn.org
who: Ages 12-21.
what: Outreach workers (OWs) are safe people on the streets. When they are
working, they carry big green StreetWorks bags. Inside the bags are basic
supplies such as condoms, snacks, bus tokens, hygiene supplies, clothing and
diapers. OWs can also help you out with other things like finding a job, getting
a GED, getting an ID, Rental Assistance, getting a bus ticket to go live with your
family, getting into shelter, housing and more.
how: Call StreetWorks to find out who is working and their phone number. Give
them a call and see if they can talk to you or meet you. If you see an OW on the
street, ask them for help.
language: One Spanish speaker and one Hmong speaker.
know before you go: If you call StreetWorks after 5 PM, the answering machine
will list numbers for the OWs out that night and other emergency numbers.
DROP-IN CENTERS
Drop-in centers are safe places young people can go to get lots of different
kinds of help. Whether you need a place to be for a while, get a bite to eat or
talk to someone about your options, they are a good place to be.
safeZone
651-224-9644; www.face2face.org
who: Ages 14-20.
what: A drop-in center that offers case management, independent living skills
classes, GED tutoring, employment services (including Twin Cities Rise, YouthLEAD, bus cards and other assistance), a small clothing closet, an emergency
food shelf, GLBTQ groups, a youth clinic on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 2:30
to 5:30 PM that offers HIV testing (results in 20 minutes), answers to health
questions and referrals to other health care services, an open kitchen with
snacks, a hot meal, computer with internet access, a phone, help getting ID
and birth certificates, Rental Assistance through case managers (first month or
deposit), YMCA trips and Friday cooking classes. It’s OK to go there and hang
out, but the staff will want to talk to you or help you work on something while
you are there.
where: 308 Prince Street, St. Paul
when: Mon-Fri 1-5:30 PM, Sat 1-4 PM, not open on holidays.
know before you go: Call to get information and times of specific programs.
You must be sober while you are there. The first time you are there they will
give you a tour and do a quick intake. They will want to know your name, age,
address and a little about your current situation. They might ask for ID, but you
don’t need it. Wheelchair accessible. No warrant or background checks.
summIt unIversIty teen center—the loft
651-644-3311
who: Ages 13-19, focus on African American youth.
what: Drop-in center offering informal counseling, recreation, a youth leadership
training program, job help, health education and a pregnancy prevention
program. Has open gym, teen nights, computer lab and TV area.
where: 1063 Iglehart Avenue, St. Paul
when: Mon-Fri noon-7 PM.
youthlInk/project offstreets
612-252-1200; www.youthlinkmn.org
who: Ages 16-20 can access all services. Ages 12-20 can access clinic. Ages
16-21 can access transitional housing.
what: Drop-in center with kitchen, hot showers, free laundry, health clinic,
clothing, limited household goods, personal hygiene products, help getting
haircut, independent living skills classes, a GED program, a transitional housing
program through St. Barnabus and Archdale Apartments with 24 hour crisis
support, group residential housing (for youth diagnosed with mental illness, HIV
or chemical dependency), legal clinic on Monday, GLBTQ groups and safe space,
help getting into shelter and housing, help getting Social Security cards, state
ID and birth certificate. Other activities include karaoke and open mic night,
youth advisory board, cultural celebrations/dinners, peer support groups, chef
training program, social activism, health advisory board, sex education, teens in
prostitution support group and sports activities.
where: 41 N. 12th Street, Minneapolis
when: Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri and Sat 3-8 PM. Hot meal served at 5 PM. Kulture Klub
(youth art group) meets Tue and Thu 5 -7 PM. Youth Law Clinic on Mon 3:30-5
PM.
how: You only get a case manager if you ask for one and do an intake.
language: One Spanish speaker.
know before you go: All services are free. Call for information about specific
programs. They may ask you for ID, but you don’t need it.
youth say: GED program is good, and you get an award when you finish.
COMMUNITY CENTERS
These places aren’t just for youth. Instead, they are places where all members of
the community can come together. They often have youth programs with different
forms of assistance for people who need help. They are safe and fun places to
hang out. A staff person can tell you more about the programs they have.
neIghborhood house (wellstone center)
651-789-2500 (main), 651-789-2531 (Life Connections) and 651-7892517 (Youth Leadership); www.neighb.org
who: Anyone, but mostly residents of West St. Paul. Food shelf is for 55107
residents or people in crisis. Youth programs are for youth ages 6-18 who are
in school.
what: Food shelf. Youth leadership programs: health education, indoor
athletics, computer skills classes and internet access. New immigrants:
English classes, coaching on how to get a library card, driver’s license, use
public transportation, enroll children in school, banking, saving, leasing, buying
and groups for East African refugees and immigrants. Parents: early childhood
education programs and childcare is available for when you are in the building.
where: 179 Robie Street E., St. Paul
when: Call for hours.
how: Call to make an appointment for the food shelf. Drop by and hang out in
Youth Center. Case managers and social workers available by referral.
language: Staff speak 19 different languages including Spanish, Hmong
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 181
and Somali.
know before you go: To register for Youth Center, need form signed by parent.
If homeless, talk to director for special provisions.
brIan coyle center
612-338-5282; www.puc-mn.org
who: Residents of Cedar-Riverside neighborhood. Mainly Somali, Ethiopian,
Oromo and other East African immigrants. Youth programs for 18 and under.
what: A number of programs including after school and summer youth
programs with recreation (including basketball and soccer), leadership and
academic support. Also have FANS (college preparation program), a food shelf
and basic computer skills training. Confederation of Somali Communities and
the Oromo Community Center are in the same building. Gym has open hours,
especially on hot days.
where: 420 15th Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 8 AM-8:30 PM. Call for specific program times.
bus: 55
language: Somali, Oromo, Swahili Amharic, Hmong, English and others.
know before you go: Some programs have a low cost ($10-$25). They
emphasize parental involvement and prefer that your parents know you are
there.
oak park neIghborhood center
612-377-7000; www.puc-mn.org
who: Residents of North Minneapolis.
what: A variety of programs including an education scholarship program, a
clothing closet, Rental Assistance, a women’s walking club and basic
computer training.
where: 1701 Oak Park Avenue N., Minneapolis
when: Mon-Thu 8:30 AM-6 PM, Fri 8:30 AM-5 PM.
bus: 19
know before you go: Need ID. No undocumented youth.
pIllsbury house
612-824-0708; www.puc-mn.org
who: Community center for neighborhood residents.
what: Has a public computer lab (8 AM-5:30 PM), a clothing closet, emergency
rental assistance, information, referrals and other programming.
where: 3501 Chicago Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Mon, Tue 8 AM-9 PM, Fri 8 AM-6 PM, Sat 9 AM-2 PM, Sun 10 AM-noon.
how: Come in and fill out an application. They will call you if you qualify.
bus: 5
language: Spanish and Somali.
sabathanI communIty center
612-827-5981; www.sabathani.org
who: Residents of South Minneapolis.
what: Offers youth programming, a clothing closet, free used furniture, a food
shelf, garden plots, tax preparation assistance, education and employment
services.
where: 310 East 38th Street, Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 7:30 AM-9 PM.
know before you go: Call for program hours.
southeast asIan communIty councIl
612-521-4859; www.seacc-mn.org
who: Ages 12-18.
what: Cultural programs including martial arts and theater. Youth leadership
program helps youth find a job and explore post secondary options, including
careers and college opportunities. Also have teen pregnancy prevention and
tobacco prevention programs.
where: 1827 44th Avenue N., Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 8:30 AM-5 PM.
how: Call for more information about meeting times for specific programs.
bus: 724 LTD, 5M
language: Hmong, Laotian, Thai, English and others.
waIte house
612-721-1681; www.puc-mn.org
who: Phillips community.
what: Youth employment program helps with job searching, résumés, portfolios
and opening bank accounts (ages 14-21). Youth leadership program (grades
K-12) creates murals and has service learning, academic support, technology,
sports and dance. Teen nights have salsa dance, soccer and other activities.
They can refer you to other services if you need help.
where: 2529 13th Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 2-7 PM during the school year. Mon-Fri 12:30-6 PM during the
summer. Not open weekends.
how: Drop-in or call to find out what is going on.
youth say: There can be a long waiting time.
IDENTIFICATION
Before you start finding help for other needs, it’s a good idea to think about your
ID. Do you have one? Can you get your birth certificate, green card or other
papers from home? If not, read this section.
Many agencies require you to have some form of identification. They often want
a state ID (such as a driver’s license), Social Security card, school ID or passport.
If you need a new copy of an identifying document, these places can help you
apply and pay for one.
allIance of the streets
612-870-0529
who: Anyone.
what: Assists housing and job seekers with résumés, voicemail boxes and
getting your birth certificate.
where: 330 E. 22nd Street, Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 10 AM-4 PM.
how: Call to ask if voicemail boxes are available.
know before you go: This agency makes the “Handbooks of the Streets” so
they know a lot of resources to help you find other things you need.
basIlIca of saInt mary (see Clothes section, pg. 12)
612-317-3477 (if no answer, press 0 and get redirected); www.mary.org
who: Anyone.
what: Help get green card, INS (USCIS) documentation, finger printing, state ID
and birth certificate.
where: Corner of Hennepin and N. 17th Street, Minneapolis. Services in
church basement.
when: Tue and Thu 9:30-11:30 AM, Sat and Mon 9:30-11 AM. Come early!
Closed holidays.
know before you go: Disability accessible. All faiths welcome. There is no
charge for the parking lot on weekends, but there is on weekdays—so park on
the street.
safeZone (see Drop-In Centers section, pg. 6)
651-224-9644
who: Ages 14-20.
where: 308 Prince Street, St. Paul
when: Mon-Fri 1-5:30 PM, Sat 1-4 PM, not open on holidays.
youthlInk/project offstreets
(see Drop-In Centers section, pg. 6)
612-252-1200; www.youthlinkmn.org
who: Ages 16-20.
where: 41 N. 12th Street, Minneapolis
when: Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri and Sat 3-8 PM.
I DOn’T HAvE
mUcH mOnEy FOR
my BASIc nEEDS...
If you don’t have much money and are having trouble getting by, the places in
this section might be able to help you get things you need.
In Minneapolis, Mary Jo Copeland provides many different things at Sharing and
Caring Hands.
sharIng and carIng hands/mary jo’s
612-338-4640; www.sharingandcaringhands.org
who: Anyone.
what: Free meals Mon-Thu at 10 AM, noon and 4 PM. Free clothes, showers
and laundry. Family shelter. Help with getting ID, birth certificate, dental work,
furniture, family reunification, bus tokens and money for other needs. Help is
dependent on what is available and is not guaranteed.
where: 525 N. 7th Street, Minneapolis
when: Mon-Thu 10-11:30 AM and 1:30-3 PM. Come early!
how: Wait in line to talk to Mary Jo.
know before you go: When asking for things, you really have to make your
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 182
case. Whether or not you receive help is totally up to Mary Jo. Sharing and
Caring Hands is a Christian organization.
youth say: Go as early as 6:30 AM and get a handful of bus tokens. It’s a good
place to volunteer.
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TIP: Volunteer at agenCIeS So you Can get helP from them
when you need It. I Volunteered at CatholIC CharItIeS and
they SaVed me a SPot In the Shower and laundry lIne. you
Can eVen Volunteer to helP out at Small loCal buSIneSSeS
to get what you need.
FOOD
FyI: EATInG HEALTHy On A LOw BUDGET
You can eat healthy without spending much money.
- Dry beans and rice are cheap and a good way to get protein.
- Buy fresh produce that’s in season.
- Canned vegetables are a healthy choice.
If you have to eat out, eat these healthier fast food options:
- Taco Bell: get a bean burrito with cheese and extra salsa or a vegetable fajita.
- KFC: roasted chicken is much better than fried chicken. Get greens, slaw, corn,
potatoes or rice as a side.
- McDonald’s: get a salad, chicken breast or fish sandwich. Ask for extra onions,
lettuce and tomato.
- Wendy’s: the baked potato with broccoli and cheese is nutritious, cheap and filling.
- Subway: many healthy options. Pile on lettuce and other veggies. Choose
whole wheat bread for fiber.
Free Meals
If all you need is a free meal, you can go to any of the places on the meal
schedule (pg. 74). A good spot for young people to eat is:
monday nIght youth dInner
(st. mark’s epIscopal cathedral)
612-870-7800
who: Ages 25 and under.
what: Free meal with really good food.
where: 519 Oak Grove Street, Minneapolis (across from Loring Park)
when: Mon 6 PM.
youth say: They treat youth very well and have lots of good tasting, healthy
food.
Young people can also eat at one of these drop-in centers during their open
hours. You can learn more about these agencies on pg. 6.
youthlInk/project offstreets
612-252-1200; www.youthlinkmn.org
who: Ages 16-20.
what: Drop-in center that offers a hot meal.
where: 41 N. 12th Street, Minneapolis
when: Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri and Sat 3-8 PM. Hot meal served at 5 PM.
youth say: YouthLink has good food, big meals and variety. Plus, it’s served by
youth cooks!
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safeZone
651-224-9644; www.face2face.org
who: Ages 14-20.
what: Hot meal set out between 2 and 4 PM on days it is open. They also make
some sandwiches and put them in the fridge for people to take, but they run out
fast. There is an open kitchen and a small emergency food shelf (talk to a case
manager if you want to access the food shelf).
where: 308 Prince Street, St. Paul
when: Mon-Fri 1-5:30 PM, Sat 1-4 PM, not open on holidays.
youth say: Food is healthy, but it is often the same meal.
If you need groceries, you can go to a food shelf. Most food shelves require an
ID and proof of residency. However, these two youth food shelves do not:
groveland food for youth
612-718-7521 (ask for Matt)
who: Ages 23 and under without proof of residency or identification.
what: Two grocery bags full of food. Food and parenting supplies (diapers,
formula) when available. A StreetWorks outreach worker is available to help you
with other needs. Call on Monday before 10 AM for the opportunity to work for
$10/hr for a three hour shift. It may take a few weeks of calling before you can
get a shift (it’s not a part-time job).
where: 1900 Nicollet Avenue S., Minneapolis in the basement of the Plymouth
Congregational Church (on the Groveland side)
when: Tue, Thu 4-7 PM, Fri 10 AM-1 PM
how: Drop-in. No appointment.
youth say: You can get a lot of food and interaction with the people packing
your bags. You get to pick what you want and see what you are getting.
prIsm food for youth
763-529-1350
who: Ages 21 and under.
what: Free food, baby formula and supplies.
where: 730 Florida Avenue S., Golden Valley
when: Mon 5-9 PM.
bus: 643 LTD
know before you go: No ID or appointment required. It doesn’t matter where
you live. You can come every two weeks. You will have to do a short registration
the first time you go. Shuttles are provided from the Brookdale Transit Center at
4:30 PM and 6:30 PM.
where: 1000 Oliver Avenue N., Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 9:30-11:20 AM; new registration closes at 11 AM.
how: You should call the day before you want to go and pre-register. When you
go the next day, you will need to fill out a six-page document and bring a current
piece of mail, picture IDs and Social Security cards of all household members
to finish registering. After that, the head of household can pick up food once a
month by bringing IDs of each household member and a current piece of mail.
bus: 19
know before you go: Pastor Paul’s usually gives you more food than one
person can carry without a car.
If you have some money for groceries, this program can help you buy them at a
big discount:
fare for all
763-450-3880 or 1-800-582-4291
who: Anyone who can afford it.
what: Discounted produce, frozen meat and dry goods that are dropped off at
distribution sites once a month. Packages range from $10 to $20.
where: Dozens of local distribution sites.
when: Call for distribution times.
how: Call the month before and order with a credit card, money order or check.
To pay with cash or EBT, pay in advance at your local distribution site (call to find it).
TIP: If you alwayS need food, joIn a Program lIke ProjeCt Solo
(Pg. 42) So that you Can aCCeSS It eVery day and meet Some
of your goalS.
Meal sites and food shelves are great for emergencies. But if you need money for
food every week, you should think about getting Public Assistance. See pg. 19.
CLOTHES
There are many free stores and clothing closets that can help you build a
wardrobe. It is often a good idea to call ahead if you are looking for something
specific, like formal clothing.
basIlIca of saInt mary
612-317-3477 (if no answer, press 0 and get redirected); www.mary.org
who: Clothes, food and ID help for anyone. Financial assistance for residents of
zip codes 55403 or 55401. Shoe Ministry for 55401, 55402, 55403, 55405 or
55411 residents.
what: Free clothes. Shoe Ministry gives vouchers for Kmart to buy new shoes
If you can’t go to these youth food shelves, call the emergency food
network at 763-450-3860 or visit www.mnhungerpartners.org online to find
another food shelf close to you. You will probably need picture ID and proof of
residence (electric bill, gas bill, medical card, etc.) to go to these food shelves. If
you are a family of two or more, Pastor Paul’s food shelf is another option.
pastor paul’s
612-521-4665; www.pastorpaul.org
who: Families of two or more or single disabled persons living anywhere.
what: About 165 pounds of food can be picked up once a month. Dry goods,
cereal, breads, fruits, vegetables, dairy, meats, frozen foods, hygiene and
cleaning products are often included.
(no size over 14). Have bus cards for people without jobs. Continental breakfast
served in the morning and always sandwiches in the rectory. Limited financial
assistance for people living in 55403 or 55401 for car repair, rent, uniform, etc.
Help get green cards, INS (USCIS) documentation, finger printing, state IDs and
birth certificates. Give out vouchers for their thrift store.
where: Corner of Hennepin and N. 17th Street in Minneapolis; in the basement
of the church
when: Tue-Thu 9:30-11:30 AM, Sat and Mon 9:30-11 AM. Closed holidays.
Shoe Ministry Mon and Sat. Come early!
know before you go: Must have picture ID for services, or they will help you
get one. Disability accessible. All faiths welcome. There is no charge for the
parking lot on weekends, but there is on weekdays—so park on the street.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 183
central lutheran church
612-870-4416; www.centralmpls.org
who: Anyone.
what: Free clothing. Hot meal served at 10:30 AM on Mon for two to 400 people.
where: 333 South 12th Street, Minneapolis
when: Mon 10 AM-noon, Thu 1-2:30 PM
cornerstone mInIstry-park avenue church
612-825-6863
who: Anyone from 55404, 55406, 55407, 55408 or 55409 zip codes.
what: Clothing and house wares sold for $1 per bag.
where: 3400 Park Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Tue 1-4 PM, Thu 2-5 PM.
know before you go: Need ID.
hallIe q. brown mlk center
651-251-9015; www.maccalliance.org
who: Anyone can get clothes. 55104 zip code residents can get food.
what: Free food and clothing. Any amount of clothing.
where: 100 N. Oxford, St. Paul
when: Mon-Fri 10 AM-2 PM.
how: Food by appointment. Walk in for clothes.
know before you go: Need proof of residency and picture ID for food; you only
need money for clothes.
joseph’s coat
651-291-2472; www.josephscoatmn.org
who: Anyone 16 and over. If you are under 16, you need a parent, guardian or
responsible adult like a case manager or outreach worker.
what: Free store that provides clothing, household items, small appliances,
personal hygiene products and children’s items. Staff can also help you find
other resources. Limit of one bag each week for each person 14 or older.
where: 1107 West 7th Street, St. Paul
when: Mon and Wed 9 AM-4:30 PM; can only shop once a week.
bus: 54, 74
language: Spanish.
know before you go: Need ID. Handicap accessible.
oak park neIghborhood center (see Community Centers section, pg. 7)
612-377-7000; www.puc-mn.org
who: Anyone.
what: Can get one bag of clothes at a time. Have a range of seasonal clothes
and often have formal clothes usable for job interviews.
where: 1701 Oak Park Avenue N., Minneapolis
when: Tue-Thu 10 AM-4 PM.
bus: 19
pIllsbury house clothIng closet
(see Community Centers section, pg. 7)
612-824-0708; www.puc-mn.org
what: Free clothing. Allowed 15 minute appointment.
where: 3501 Chicago Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Mon-Thu 9 AM-3 PM or by appointment.
bus: 5
language: Spanish and Somali.
sabathanI communIty center
(see Community Centers section, pg. 7)
612-827-5981; www.sabathani.org
who: Residents of South Minneapolis.
what: Clothing and household items. You can go four times each month.
where: 310 East 38th Street, Minneapolis
when: Mon-Thu 9:30 AM-noon and 1-3:30 PM. Third Saturday of the month
10 AM-2 PM.
st. stephen’s free store
612-874-0311; www.ststephenscommunity.org
who: Anyone.
what: Free clothing, shoes, linens and house wares. All in season and mostly
used. Shop for a reasonable amount as often as you like.
where: 2211 Clinton Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Hours may change in next year, so call for hours.
bus: 2, 11
know before you go: Spanish and Somali.
HAIRCUT
If you have a case manager (pg. 53) at a program she or he might be able to
help you pay for a haircut or to get your hair done. Here’s a place for men to get
a free haircut.
lIstenIng house of st. paul
who: Men.
what: Free haircuts once a week.
when: Wed 9 AM.
where: 215 9th Street W., St. Paul
what: Free bike program which helps homeless and street dependent youth
learn how to build and maintain their own free bike.
when: Anytime.
how: Call to meet Matt at the bike shop by appointment.
If you are on GAMC or Medical Assistance or if you have medical insurance,
you may be eligible for free transportation to medical appointments. Call your
provider to find out!
guaranteed rIde home program (grh)
612-349-7370
who: Anyone who gets to work or school by bus, carpool, bicycle or walking at
least three days per week.
what: Free emergency ride home program. You get two coupons for a ride
home every six months. Coupons are good for up to $25 in cab fare, a bus or
a train ride.
how: Register for the program by filling out the online form at
http://www.metrotransit.org/riderPrograms/grh.asp.
know before you go: Lost or stolen coupons are not replaced. You need an
address and phone number for home and work/school.
basIlIca of saInt mary (see Clothes section, pg. 12)
612-317-3477 (if no answer, press 0 and get redirected); www.mary.org
who: Anyone without a job.
what: Limited supply of bus cards/tokens for people without jobs.
where: Corner of Hennepin and N. 17th Street, Minneapolis. Services in
the basement.
when: Tue-Thu 9:30-11:30 AM, Sat and Mon 9:30-11 AM. Come early!
Closed holidays.
know before you go: Will serve anyone with an ID (or they can help you get an ID).
TIP: SChool CounSelorS often haVe buS tokenS for kIdS haVIng
a hard tIme.
HEALTH CARE
TRANSPORTATION
The bus is a great way to get around the Twin Cities. It will cost $1.50-$2 for
most rides. However, by being enrolled in a program (including Project SOLO,
Project Offstreets or transitional living programs) you can often get bus tokens or
cards from your case manager.
If you are stuck somewhere, you can call StreetWorks at 612-252-2735. They
will give you the number of an outreach worker who might be able to come and
give you a token or give you a ride if you are in a bad situation.
For long-term transportation, you can get your own bike and learn how to fix it here:
full cycle
612-718-7521 (ask for Matt)
who: Ages 23 and under.
FyI: yOUTH DO nOT nEED PAREnTAL PERmISSIOn
FOR mEDIcAL cARE IF…
• It is for pregnancy, childbirth, care for your child, an STI (sexually transmitted
infection) or drug and alcohol treatment (see Abortion Providers section pg.
25 if under 18).
• You live on your own and support yourself. It does not matter how you support
yourself; it can be with work, General Assistance (GA) or Minnesota Family
Investment Program (MFIP).
• It is an emergency and getting your parents’ consent delays your care.
• You have been married or have a child.
If you can’t go to the clinics below, call the neIghborhood health care
network at 651-489-2273 or 1-866-489-4899 (toll free) to get referrals to
nearby community clinics with general health, dental and mental health care.
They will refer you to clinics seeing uninsured patients on a sliding fee scale.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 184
You can also get information about applying for Minnesota State Health Care
Programs, including Medical Assistance, General Assistance, MinnesotaCare and
MSHO. This information is also available at www.nhcn.org.
GENERAL MEDICAL
These youth clinics offer general medical services. They are either free or have a
sliding fee scale based on income.
face to face medIcal (see Education section, pg. 39)
651-772-5555; www.face2face.org
who: Ages 11-23.
what: Doctor on Thursdays. At all other times there are nurse practitioners
who do sexual and reproductive health care. They are here for you if you have
a cough or rash, want an STI check, need a pregnancy test or have other
health concerns. HIV test results in five to six days. Not a free clinic: accepts all
insurances or sliding fee without insurance. Will not turn people away if they
cannot pay.
where: 1165 Arcade Street, St. Paul
when: Mon and Wed 1-5 PM, Tue 9:30 AM-7 PM, Thu 1-8 PM, Fri 9:30 AM3 PM (winter 9:30 AM-5 PM) and Sat 10 AM-1 PM.
how: Call 651-224-9644 to schedule an appointment.
know before you go: Face to Face has a ton of services under one roof and is
connected to SafeZone drop-in center.
famIly tree clInIc
24 hour helpline: 612-825-4357; www.familytreeclinic.org
what: Free low cost medical services, rapid HIV/STI testing, pregnancy testing
and planning.
where: 1619 Dayton Avenue, St. Paul, 55103
when: Mon and Wed 8:30 AM-8:30 PM, Tue and Thu 8:30 AM-5 PM, Fri-Sun
closed.
freemont clInIc
612-588-9411; www.fremonthealth.org
what: “Scene on the Streets”—a local youth outreach program offering free
testing for gonorrhea and chlamydia. Sliding scale medical services.
where: 3300 Freemont Avenue, north Minneapolis
when: Mon, Wed, Thu, Fri 8 AM-5 PM, Tue 8 AM-7 PM.
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la clínIca
651-222-1816; www.westsidechs.org
who: Anyone. Need note from parent or bring adult if you are under 18.
what: Adolescent, dental, diabetes, family planning and pregnancy testing,
family support, mental health counseling, HIV care, nutrition services, pharmacy
services, children’s health services, immunizations and women’s health. Accepts
most insurance. Sliding scale fee based on income.
where: 153 Cesar Chavez Street, St. Paul
when: Mon, Tue, Fri 8 AM-5 PM, Wed and Thu 8 AM-8 PM, Sat 8 AM-noon.
bus: 68, 71
language: Spanish, English and Hmong.
know before you go: Will consider parent’s income for sliding fee.
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safeZone (see Drop-In Centers section, pg. 6)
651-224-9644; www.face2face.org
who: Ages 14-20.
what: Free clinic that offers HIV testing and results in 20 minutes, answers to
health questions and referrals to other health care services.
where: 308 Prince Street, St. Paul
when: Mon-Fri 1-5:30 PM, Sat 1-4 PM, not open on holidays.
know before you go: You must be sober while you are there. The first time you
are there they will give you a tour and do a quick intake. They will want to know
your name, age, address and a little about your current situation. They might
ask for ID, but it is OK if you don’t have it. Wheelchair accessible. No warrant or
background checks.
youth say: The same day HIV test results are great.
southsIde communIty health servIces
612-822-3186; www.southsidechs.org
what: STI screening, dental services, vision care, men’s clinic, sliding fee,
discount if income, walk-ins welcome.
where: 4730 Chicago Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 8 AM-7 PM and 1 Saturday per month.
teenage medIcal servIce (tams)
612-813-6125; www.teenhealth411.org
who: Ages 10-22.
what: Teen Clinic provides primary medical care (exams, common health
problems), family planning (birth control, pregnancy tests, abortion referrals),
nutrition counseling, mental health services and health education. Sliding fee
scale is based on income (parent’s income may affect the fee); they don’t turn
anyone away who can’t pay.
where: 2425 Chicago Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri 8:30 AM-5:30 PM, Wed 8:30 AM-8:30 PM.
how: Call for appointment and ask what documents you need. Call to register
for birth control classes.
bus: 2, 5, 8
language: Front desk employee speaks Spanish. Translation is available.
know before you go: You may have to wait up to a week for an appointment
unless it is an emergency. If you are over 18 and working, you need a check
stub. Bring health insurance info if you have it.
youth say: TAMS is great with pregnancy and counseling.
youthlInk health and wellness clInIc
(see Drop-In Centers section, pg. 6)
612-252-1258; www.youthlinkmn.org
who: Ages 12-20.
what: Outreach site of Community University Health Care Center. Complete
health care for homeless youth and young adults. You can access STD
testing and treatment, birth control, pregnancy testing and prenatal care,
immunizations and illness and injury check-ups. Services are free. They will
help you apply for insurance.
where: YouthLink: 41 N. 12th Street, Minneapolis
when: Call for hours.
acupuncture
If you are interested in acupuncture, you can get it for free at the Salvation
Army Harbor Light Center, which is an adult shelter at 1010 Currie Avenue in
Minneapolis. Ask at the front desk or call 612-338-0113 for more information.
DENTAL
chIldren’s dental servIces
612-746-1530; www.childrensdentalservices.org
who: Youth 17 and under (accompanied by an adult) and pregnant women.
what: Free or reduced cost dental care. Accepts insurance or uses sliding fees
based on income.
where: 636 Broadway Street NE, Minneapolis
when: Mon, Thu, Fri 8:30 AM-5 PM, Tue and Wed 10:30 AM-7 PM, every other
Sat 9 AM-1 PM.
bus: 17
language: Spanish, Arabic, Somali, Hmong, Russian, French, Oromo,
Vietnamese, Ukranian and others.
know before you go: Need state plan insurance number or Social Security
number or other form of ID.
la clínIca, in the General Health section, pg. 17, also has dental care.
MENTAL HEALTH
In crisis situations, call crIsIs connectIon at 612-379-6363 for 24
hour telephone crisis counseling, information and referral. Or call suIcIde
preventIon at 612-873-2222.
For non-crisis mental health services, try these agencies:
afrIcan amerIcan famIly servIces
612-871-7878; www.aafs.net
who: Anyone, focus on African Americans.
what: Mental health: individual and group counseling. No male counselors
and no prescriptions. Sliding fee. Chemical health: Rule 25 and outpatient
treatment. Free if in Hennepin or Ramsey County and low-income. Groups:
SAFE—Sistas Advocating For Empowerment—domestic violence and anger
management focus for women (18+), MOVE—Men Opposing Violence—anger
management for men (18+). Family services: help with child protection and
welfare, parent assessments, family group counseling.
where: 2616 Nicollet Avenue, Minneapolis. There is also one more office in
Minneapolis and one in St. Paul.
when: Mon and Tue 8 AM-7 PM, Wed and Thu 8 AM-9 PM. Closed Fri.
how: Call main number. Walk-ins in morning and appointments in afternoon.
Confirm office location.
know before you go: Need ID or documentation. If you have insurance,
bring information.They have a list of felony-friendly jobs at the front desk. Come in
and ask to see it.
youth say: They have a great anger management program.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 185
comunIdades latInas unIdos en servIcIos (clues)
(see Culturally Specific Agencies section, pg. 58)
612-746-3500 (Minneapolis), 651-379-4200 (St. Paul);
www.clues.org
who: Anyone, especially Latinos/as.
what: Mental health: counseling, case management. Youth development
program, sexual assault advocacy and education and parent education and
assessments. Chemical health: Rule 25 for any age. Alcoholics Anonymous
(AA) meetings, reintegration support for families, outreach/case management for
homeless persons, tobacco prevention and intervention projects and the Latino
Resource Center. Accepts insurance. Sliding scale fee based on income.
where: 720 E. Lake Street, Minneapolis and 797 E. 7th Street, St. Paul
when: Mon-Thu 8:30 AM-7 PM, Fri 8:30 AM-5 PM.
how: Call for appointment.
language: Spanish.
know before you go: Go to the Minneapolis office if you live in Hennepin or
Dakota County and go to the St. Paul office if you live in Ramsey or Dakota
County. Otherwise, you will have to pay full price for services.
face to face mental health and counselIng
(see Education section, pg. 39)
651-772-5555; www.face2face.org
who: Ages 11-23.
what: Counseling and mental health services. Don’t offer chemical health
services or Rule 25 assessments. Sliding fee scale based on income. Will not
turn anyone away who can’t pay.
where: 1165 Arcade Street, St. Paul
when: Call intake worker at 651-772-5620 with questions or to schedule an
appointment. There can be a long waiting list. Therapist does own schedule
anytime Mon, Wed, Fri 8 AM-5 PM or Tue and Thu 10 AM-7 PM.
know before you go: Face to Face has a ton of services under one roof and is
connected to SafeZone drop-in center.
west suburban teen clInIc (see General Medical section, pg. 16)
952-474-3251; www.westsuburbanteenclinic.org
who: Ages 12-23.
what: Teen clinic that provides short-term crisis counseling and therapy.
where: 478 2nd Street, Excelsior
when: Mon, Thu, Fri noon-5 PM, Tue noon-8 PM, Wed 10 AM-8 PM and Sat
10 AM-2 PM.
how: Call to make appointment. Emergency spots available for urgent care.
language: Translation available.
st. paul youth servIces chIldren’s crIsIs response team
24 hour crisis response 651-771-1301; www.spys.org
what: Mobile Crisis Mental Health Response team for youth and their family.
where: 2100 Wilson Avenue, St. Paul
If you have been diagnosed with a serious mental illness and are 18 or older you
are eligible for:
spectrum communIty mental health servIces
612-752-8200 (Minneapolis), 612-752-8350 (Bloomington),
612-752-8300 (Crystal); www.resource-mn.org/spectrum
who: 18 and older with serious and persistent mental illness.
what: Community based drop-in centers that provide support for people
with serious and persistent mental illness. Services offered include case
management, educational and vocational support, help finding supportive
housing, recreation and social activities, as well as arts programs.
where: The LightHouse, 1825 Chicago Avenue S., Minneapolis
Charaka Community Support Program, 7830 Fifth Avenue S., Bloomington
Northwest Community Support Program, 5510 W. Broadway, Suite 112-A, Crystal
when: Mon-Fri 8:30 AM-5 PM.
how: Call to find out if you need a diagnosis to participate in a specific program.
know before you go: Many programs are free, but some require a co-pay.
PUBLIC ASSISTANCE
Everyone has the right to apply for public assistance. Public assistance is
available to people who can’t pay for needs like food, housing and medical
care. There are different types of assistance, and each program has its own
requirements and limits on income/assets.
Call hennepIn county easy Info lIne at 612-596-1300 24 hours a day
to find out about food stamps, checks and check replacement, the electronic
benefit system and your financial worker’s name and phone number.
What you need: An original ID or a birth certificate and your Social Security
number. Contact 612-596-1300 or 651-266-4444 to see what other forms of
ID are acceptable.
The county will help you get a birth certificate, but you will have to wait longer
for assistance.
Other useful information:
• You can’t get benefits during your first 30 days in Minnesota.
• There is a five-year lifetime limit on getting cash assistance.
• If you violate the terms of your parole, you can’t get General Assistance.
• You must have a place to live to get assistance. You can be in a shelter but
not on the street.
• Emergency Assistance is limited to one use during a 12 month period.
• Expect to wait in line (or several lines) for a very long time!
• If you are applying for Emergency Assistance you will be expected to sit through
an hour seminar on how to fill out the application forms. This is required.
TIP: alwayS aSk, “am I elIgIble for any other benefItS?”
emergency assIstance: Provides emergency financial assistance for those
experiencing a crisis such as eviction, fire, utility shut-off, theft, immediate need
for food or a crisis which threatens to displace a person or family from a home
or apartment. You must meet income and resource eligibility requirements.
mn famIly Investment program (mfIp): Provides monthly assistance
for men and women with children, pregnant women and two parent families that
have little or no income. If you have been convicted of a drug felony, you are not
eligible from the date of your conviction through five years after completion of
your sentence.
You will be put on the Diversionary Work Program (DWP) for four months before
you can access MFIP. DWP will help you find work and childcare. The point of
this program is to prevent you from getting MFIP if you don’t need it. DWP will
decide whether or not you need MFIP.
food support: Monthly grants for food can be used at a grocery store.
The amount of the grant depends on the monthly income of each person in the
family/household and your housing costs.
general assIstance (ga): General Assistance provides monthly assistance
to single persons and childless couples who have little or no income and who
meet eligibility requirements.
medIcal assIstance (ma): Provides assistance with payment of medical
bills for persons and families who meet income eligibility requirements. People
on GA are automatically put on GA Medical Care (GMAC).
energy assIstance: Provides financial assistance to pay utility or heat bills
from October 1 to May 30. You must have a shut-off notice.
socIal securIty: Provides monthly assistance for persons who are disabled
and unable to work for a year or more. Disability is defined as a mental or
physical problem which prevents an individual from gaining and/or holding
employment. Examples include: chronic back pain, arthritis, bad knees, seizures,
chronic depression or mental illness. Call 1-800-772-1213 and apply at 1811
Chicago Avenue S., Minneapolis or 316 Robert Street, St. Paul.
apply for all programs except ssI at these locatIons.
call before you go!
hennepin county human services department
330 S. 12th Street (Century Plaza)
612-596-1300
612-335-5837 (residents of Minneapolis)
952-930-3541 (suburban Hennepin County)
OR
ramsey county human services
160 E. Kellogg
651-266-4444
Open 8 AM-5:45 PM
appeals: You have the right to appeal any decision about your benefits. To
appeal means to have your case reviewed and your benefits reconsidered. You
must appeal a decision within 30 days. However, if you receive a termination
notice, you need to appeal within 10 days.
If you want your grant to continue, you will need to request that in writing within
10 days or it will NOT continue. Any benefits received during an appeal will be
considered an overpayment if you lose the appeal.
Call a century plaZa advocate at 612-348-8263 or call Ramsey County
at 651-266-4444 and ask for a benefit appeals advocate.
TIP: there are SatellIte offICeS for theSe SerVICeS In SuburbS.
Call the County to See If there IS one CloSe to you.
WAYS TO GET CASH
It’s hard to get cash. Here are a few ideas we’ve come up with.
groveland food for youth
612-718-7521 (ask for Matt)
who: Age 23.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 186
what: Call on Monday before 10 AM for the opportunity to work for $10/hour for
a three hour shift. It may take a few weeks of calling before you can get a shift.
This is not a part time job.
where: 1900 Nicollet Avenue S., Minneapolis—in the basement of the
Plymouth Congregational Church (on the Groveland Avenue side).
when: Tue, Thu 4-7 PM, Fri 10 AM-1 PM
plato’s closet
952-431-8494 or 952-941-6200; www.platoscloset.com
what: Clothing store. Bring in gently used brand-name clothes and trade them
for cash.
where: Burnsville, Eden Prairie, Roseville, Minnetonka and others
how: Call for hours and closest location. Check out the Web site for a list of their
“Most Wanted” items.
TIP: you Can often take a SurVey at the mall of amerICa or
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Southdale mall for CaSh.
temp agencIes
For a list of temp agencies, go to www.puc-mn.org, click “News and Events”
then “Community Resources” then “Employment.”
aaa daIly labor
612-871-2505
who: Anyone who is legal to work in the US and over 18. Must be able to do
labor—some jobs require heavy lifting.
what: Unskilled to semi-skilled temporary labor opportunities. Will transport
worker to job if no bus access. On completion of job, get cash advance off check
that day. Example: You will get $30 that day if you worked 8 hours and get the
rest of the money next Friday in a check.
where: 1908 Chicago Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: 365 days a year. Weekdays 5 AM-6 PM, weekends 5:30 AM-6 PM. Best
time to get work is early morning, between 5-7 AM.
how: Come in and fill out an application anytime it’s open. You’re more likely to
get work if you come in than if you call in or ask them to call you.
know before you go: Need government issued ID, Social Security card or work
papers. Casual work dress (best: jeans, tennis shoes or work boots and T-shirt/
sweatshirt). Does not drug test unless employer asks. Need minimal English.
labor all
651-917-5387
who: Anyone over 18 who is legal to work in the US.
what: Unskilled to semi-skilled. Daily workers get a check that day. Longer term
workers get a weekly check. Main skilled work is welding and construction.
where: 2432 University Avenue, St. Paul
when: Mon-Fri 6 AM-4 PM. Best time to come is early!
how: Come in and fill out paperwork. Longer term work available depending
on skills.
language: Spanish.
know before you go: Need two forms of ID—state issued picture ID, Social
Security card/birth certificate or passport.
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SAFER SEX…
SAFER SEX SUPPLIES
FyI: SAFER SEX
• Every time you have sex you are putting yourself at risk for getting an STI
(Sexually Transmitted Infection). Many STIs like chlamydia and gonorrhea
can be cured with medicine and having your partner treated. Other STIs like
herpes, genital warts and HIV have no cure.
• If you choose to have sex, always use a latex condom or dental dam with your
partner when having vaginal, anal and oral sex. Condoms and dental dams
work by protecting you from your partner’s body fluids. Contact with infected
body fluids and genital sores are the way STIs spread.
• Dental dams go over the vagina during oral sex; if you can’t find a dental
dam, cut the tip off of a condom and cut it down the side to make a protective
sheet of latex.
• You can find out if you or your partner has an STI by getting tested regularly.
Privacy laws at clinics will protect your personal information. Limiting your
number of partners will also reduce risk.
• Agencies with this symbol
hand out free condoms, dental dams or lube.
HIV, STD AND PREGNANCY TESTING
These teen clinics only help you with sexual and reproductive health care.
annex teen clInIc
763-533-1316; www.mnteenhealth.org
who: Ages 12-23.
what: Offers birth control, pelvic and STI exams and treatments, Plan B,
pregnancy tests and all-options counseling, Depo-Provera shots, counseling,
free hepatitis B vaccine and free birth control classes by appointment. You can
pick up safer sex supplies without appointment. Sliding fee scale based on
income for most services, but they do not turn people away who can’t pay and
do not bill them.
where: 4915 42nd Avenue N., Robbinsdale, just west of the tracks between
Hwys 100 and 81
when: Mon, Wed, Fri 1-5 PM, Tue and Thu 1-8:30 PM. Closed most holidays. Wait
time is usually five to seven days. Emergency appointments may be available.
bus: 14, 52K
language: Basic Spanish and American Sign Language.
know before you go: Can help with transportation if you have no other way.
Not disability accessible, but will refer you to somewhere that is. If you have ID,
you may qualify for the MN Family Planning program and get extra services free.
mn aIds project
612-373-2437; www.mnaidsproject.org
what: Provides information about HIV, including prevention, testing, treatment
and general information. Information and referral to HIV and STD/STI testing,
prevention and services statewide. Chat line through Web site.
when: Mon-Fri 9 AM-5:30 PM.
safeZone (see Drop-In Centers section, pg. 6)
651-224-9644; www.face2face.org
who: Ages 14-20.
what: Free clinic that offers HIV testing and results in 20 minutes, answers to
health questions and referrals to other health care services. Full STD/STI testing
and pregnancy testing.
where: 308 Prince Street, St. Paul
when: Mon-Fri 1-5:30 PM, Sat 1-4 PM, not open on holidays.
know before you go: You must be sober while you are there. The first time you
are there they will give you a tour and do a quick intake. They will want to know your
name, age, address and a little about your current situation. They might ask for ID,
but you don’t need it. Wheelchair accessible. No warrant or background checks.
red door clInIc of the hennepIn county publIc health clInIc
612-543-5555; www.reddoorclinic.org
who: Anyone.
what: Walk-in clinic for HIV and STD testing, treatment and prevention. HIV test
results in 20 minutes ($20 donation suggested but not required). Ryan White
Services for recently diagnosed HIV+ without insurance that gets you blood work
and referrals. Support groups including Health Interventions for Men (HIM for gay
and bisexual men), and the Sistas Intervention Services (SIS program for African
American teen women). Services are either low-cost or free, based upon your
ability to pay. No one is ever turned away for inability to pay.
where: Health Services Building, 525 Portland Avenue, 4th Floor, Minneapolis
when: Mon 11 AM-7 PM, Tue-Fri 8 AM-4 PM.
how: Walk-in for treatment, call for specific program information.
bus: 24, 5
youth and aIds project
612-627-6820; www.yapmn.com
what: HIV Prevention education and case management services for HIV positive youth.
where: 428 Oak Grove Street, Minneapolis, 55403
when: Mon-Fri 9 AM-5 PM, by appointment only.
youthlInk health and wellness clInIc
(see Drop-In Centers section, pg. 6)
612-252-1258; www.youthlinkmn.org
who: Ages 12-20.
what: Outreach site of Community University Health Care Center. Complete
health care for homeless youth and young adults. You can access STD
testing and treatment, birth control, pregnancy testing and prenatal care,
immunizations and illness and injury check-ups. Services are free. Will help you
apply for insurance.
where: YouthLink: 41 N. 12th Street, Minneapolis
when: Call for hours.
This is not a youth specific clinic, but it is low-cost, offers many services
(including abortion) and has multiple locations:
have to wait over three hours. Minors don’t have to be accompanied and parents
don’t have to be notified.
planned parenthood
1-800-230-PLAN for a clinic; www.plannedparenthood.org
what: Reproductive health services, including birth control, Plan B, safer sex
supplies, STD testing and treatment, pregnancy testing, HPV vaccine, HIV
testing, gynecological and male reproductive health services. Sliding fee scale is
available for people without insurance or who are unable to pay.
where: Many local clinics; call for locations, times and services.
know before you go: Different clinics have different services; be sure to ask
which clinic has the services you need. Also, ask about enrolling in the 4Now
Plan, a way to get things like annual exams, testing and treatment of sexually
transmitted infections identified during an annual exam, hormonal birth control
and Plan B for free. Need picture ID of any kind.
west suburban teen clInIc
952-474-3251; www.westsuburbanteenclinic.org
who: Ages 12-23.
what: Teen clinic that provides family planning (contraception, pregnancy tests,
Plan B), HIV testing, short-term crisis counseling, health education, therapy,
addiction intervention and assessment. Support program for pregnant and
parenting women. Sliding fee based on income. No one is turned away for
inability to pay. Give abortion referrals.
where: 478 2nd Street, Excelsior
when: Mon, Thu, Fri noon-5 PM, Tue noon-8 PM, Wed 10 AM-8 PM and Sat
10 AM-2 PM.
how: Call to make appointment for exams, counseling or classes. Walk-in for
refills, Plan B, pregnancy test and information. Emergency spots available for
urgent care.
language: Translation available.
know before you go: Must take a class and have exam to get the pill or the
patch.
If you are HIV+, check out this agency:
the alIveness project
612-822-7946; www.aliveness.org
who: Anyone who is HIV+.
what: Hot, nutritious meals served six days a week, members-only food shelf
(three to four days of meals for one person per week), acupuncture, Shiatsu
Anma, Healing Touch, massage, chiropractic services, Reiki healing and help
finding other forms of assistance for HIV+ members.
where: 730 E. 38th Street, Minneapolis
when: Call for program information.
how: Fill out a membership application by calling them or visiting their Web site.
Then call the director of member services at 612-822-7946, ext. 202, and set
up an orientation meeting and tour. They will verify your HIV status with your
doctor or case manager, and then you will receive an Access Pass Card and
number to present when using services.
language: Spanish.
know before you go: Sober space. Services are only available to registered
language: Spanish and Somali.
know before you go: Come 15 minutes before opening time; otherwise might
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 187
members. Require income verification and HIV+.
I’m PREGnAnT OR A
PAREnT…
PREGNANCY TESTING AND PRENATAL CARE
For pregnancy testing and prenatal care with all-options (including abortion)
counseling, look in the last section.
This section has great resources to get a free pregnancy test and to get supplies
for your baby. But they are anti-abortion agencies, so if you are thinking about
abortion they will try to convince you NOT to have one. You may want support from
somewhere else to help you make that decision, like the clinics in the last section.
cIty lIfe center
612-874-1808; www.citylifecenter-mn.org
who: Any pregnant or parenting woman.
what: Life Bags: diapers, sweaters, caps, soap, booties, blankets, bibles and
food vouchers. Rental Assistance applications for pregnant women in crisis. Free
pregnancy tests and free ultrasound. They can also refer you to other services.
where: 1909 Nicollet Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Always call to set up an appointment and confirm eligibility.
know before you go: Need some sort of ID.
These agencies have many of the same services. Find the one closest to you:
mInnEAPOLIS:
bIrthrIght: 612-338-2353
unIversIty area new lIfe pregnancy care center: 612-623-8378
south sIde lIfe-care center: 612-823-0301
north sIde lIfe-care center: 612-522-6589
unIversIty lIfe-care center: 612-623-3211
ST. PAUL:
bIrthrIght: 651-646-7033
lIfecare center east: 651-776-2328
hIghland lIfe-care center: 651-695-0111
pro-lIfe actIon mInIstrIes: 651-771-1500
new lIfe famIly servIces: 651-730-4342
ABORTION PROVIDERS
FyI: GETTInG An ABORTIOn In mInnESOTA
In Minnesota, there is a mandatory waiting period for women who want an
abortion. This means:
- A clinician must give a woman information about abortion either in person or
over the phone.
- The woman must then wait 24 hours before she can have an abortion.
youth say: You get great supplies for participating.
If you are under 18, both of your parents must be notified before you can have
an abortion. The clinic won’t let you get an abortion without a note from at least
one parent (and possibly both parents) saying that he/she/they are aware of
your decision. You can get around this requirement with a judicial bypass, in
which a judge rules that you are capable of making this decision without the
informed consent or notification of your parents. For advice on how to get a
judicial bypass, go to the Youth Law Clinic on Mondays 3:30-6 PM (see Legal
Help section pg. 65).
father project
612-724-3539;
http://mnges.easterseals.com (click “Services”)
who: Men ages 16-30 who have a child or expect one and are not employed
can be Father Project participants. All services are for participants only except
parenting classes and GED program which are open to women. No active
domestic abuse or sexual abuse charges.
what: Parents: paternity establishment, parent and support groups (new topic
every week like financial planning, health, discipline, relationships, mental
illness, insurance, etc.), assistance with visitation or custody and child support
assistance. Education and employment: GED and job search assistance
(one-on-one job counseling). Support: one-on-one advocacy, counselor (sign
up), empowerment group. Health class: attend three classes and get voucher
for free care (one physical and one dental appointment).
where: 1600 E. Lake Street, Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 9 AM-4:30 PM. Most intakes done Mon and Tue 10 AM-2 PM;
otherwise you may have to wait. Orientation every other week Tue-Thu 9:45
AM-3 PM (light breakfast and lunch served). Drop-in for GED Tue-Thu 10 AM4:30 PM. Call for parenting class times.
how: To become a Father Project participant, call or come in for 15 minute
intake. If eligible, do three day orientation. Then you can do any program and have
an advocate assigned to you. For GED and parenting class, anyone can drop-in.
know before you go: Need Social Security number. Do background checkups
for domestic/sexual abuse charges. Other charges OK. Food always provided at
groups. Participants get bus cards and tokens.
youth say: They are a really helpful resource for fathers.
There are many abortion providers, but this one is low-cost and does not require
insurance. For other providers, call one of the reproductive health clinics in the
last section and ask for a referral.
hIghland park clInIc—planned parenthood
651-698-2406; www.plannedparenthood.org
what: Abortion, tubal ligation, referral and patient education. Sliding fee based
on income, family size and need.
where: 1965 Ford Parkway, St. Paul
how: Call to make an appointment. Ask for an estimate of your fees at the
time you make your appointment. Need state or foreign ID, school ID or a birth
certificate.
PARENTING HELP
FyI: RIGHTS FOR UnDERAGE PAREnTS
- Most low-income mothers will qualify for Medical Assistance (MA). If you are
already receiving MFIP or General Assistance, you automatically qualify for MA.
- Paternity establishes the father of the child for legal purposes. Paternity can
be established if both parents agree, or if the mother wins a paternity action in
court. Fathers who have established paternity will probably be responsible for
child support and/or visiting the child.
- Having a baby does not affect your rights in relation to your parent(s). You are
not emancipated from them and cannot move out unless you have parental
permission, a court order, are in the armed forces or are married. However:
- The mother of the child has legal and physical custody of the child. The mother
can decide the child’s name, as well. Additionally, the mother of the child can
file assault charges or get an Order for Protection if someone is abusing her
or the child.
face to face connect
651-772-5555 or 651-772-5590; www.face2face.org
who: Pregnant women ages 11-23 that are OB patients at the clinic.
what: Classes for pregnant women about health, child birth, breast feeding,
hospital tour and nutrition. If you complete a class, you get a pack and play crib.
For every third appointment, get a $5 gift card.
when: Call to find out.
how: Meet with nurse practitioner and case manager and do a social and
medical history intake.
know before you go: Face to Face has a ton of services under one roof and is
connected to SafeZone drop-in center.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 188
ramsey county department of publIc health teen
parent program
651-766-4062; www.co.ramsey.mn.us
what: Teen and child health, effective parent-child interaction with positive
parenting, assistance for high school and GED programs.
where: 70 West County Rd B-2, Little Canada
BABY SUPPLIES
Baby supplies are available at many food shelves (mostly baby formula and often
diapers). groveland food for youth (pg. 11) and prIsm food for
youth (pg. 11) both have these items. So do the pro-life clinics and parenting
classes in the last section. Also, check out the MFIP assistance program on
pg. 19 for long term assistance.
TIP: youth reCommend gettIng a SoCIal worker So you wIll
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haVe helP fIndIng SuPPlIeS for your baby.
For larger items like strollers and cribs:
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marIe sandvIk center
612-870-9617; www.mariesandvikcenter.org
who: Anyone.
what: Free store with ladies’ clothing as well as baby supplies, often including
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used strollers and cribs.
when: Thu 1 PM.
where: 1112 East Franklin Avenue, Minneapolis
bus: 2
language: English, Spanish and American Sign Language.
know before you go: This is a Christian organization. They have a lot of
programs that address spiritual needs. Handicap accessible.
lss lIfe haven shelter
651-776-9805
where: 325 Jenks Street, St. Paul
what: Sometimes have extra supplies. Call to find out.
TIP: durIng ChrIStmaS tIme, SIgn uP to get free SuPPlIeS and
gIftS for your ChIldren at PlaCeS lIke SalVatIon army
or ChurCheS.
CHILDCARE
Crisis nurseries are for parents who need short-term help immediately so they
can get out of a bad situation.
greater mInneapolIs crIsIs nursery
24 hour Parent Helpline: 763-591-0100
who: Legal guardians with children, newborn to 6 years old.
what: 72 hour placement in the nursery. Can be used up to 30 days in a
calendar year in three day intervals. If you use the crisis nursery more than three
times you will be referred to the 4th Day Program, which provides access to
more sustained support and case management for up to one and a half years.
when: 24 hours a day.
where: Multiple locations
know before you go: Need some proof of county address. Need some sort of
ID when picking up children to prove that you are the right person. No parent
background checks.
For Crisis Nursery in Ramsey County, call 651-641-1300 or visit
www.crisisnursery.org.
oak park neIghborhood center—pIllsbury crIsIs nursery
24 hour crisis line 612-302-3500;
www.puc-mn.org/Default.aspx?tabid=347
who: Parents living in Hennepin County experiencing stress or crisis with
children from 6 months to 12 years old.
what: Temporary childcare. Day placements are at daycare centers or with
home providers. Overnights are with foster parents. Advice is available on 24
hour crisis line.
where: 1701 Oak Park Avenue N., Minneapolis
when: Can do daytime placements every day and some overnight placements
on Fri and Sat nights.
bus: 19
know before you go: If you can’t speak English, you’ll need to find a translator.
Most providers only speak English. Need proof of address in Hennepin County.
No parent background checks.
FROm HOmE
Instep
612-871-1741; www.jabbokfamilyservices.org
who: Low income families with children ages 6 weeks to 12 years old living in
the Whittier Neighborhood.
what: Temporary drop-in center daycare for 40 kids. Families can use 22 hours
per week. Costs 50 cents per hour. On-site workers can help you connect with
other services. Provide breakfast and snacks.
where: 2608 Blaisdell Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Mon-Thu 8 AM-4 PM, Fri 8 AM-2:30 PM.
how: Call for appointment. Do half hour of paper work. Need child’s
immunization records.
language: Spanish.
know before you go: Need Social Security number if you have one, MFIP or
EBT case number, name and address of medical contacts and two emergency
contacts. No parent background checks.
chIld care assIstance program (ccap)
1-888-291-9811;
www.coveringallfamilies.org/Child_Care_Assistance_Program2.html
who: Low-income parents who make at least minimum wage if they are
employed, work at least 20 hours a week, are job searching or are attending
school.
what: Helps families with the cost of childcare. Eligible families choose the type
of care and provider that best meets their family’s needs. The family pays a
monthly co-payment based income.
when: Mon-Fri 9 AM-5 PM.
how: Call 651-641-6665 to be screened for eligibility in Ramsey County. OR
call 1-888-291-9811 to find the program in your area. Up to 30 days of wait
after you have applied. If you are on MFIP, ask your case manager about
childcare assistance.
TIP: many hIgh SChoolS In the twIn CItIeS haVe free ChIldCare
CenterS In them. broadway and arlIngton SChoolS are
great SChoolS for Pregnant or ParentIng women.
I cAn’T STAy
AT HOmE…
This section can help you find a safe place to be if you can’t live at home or if
you have nowhere to go, for any reason.
SHELTER
FyI: KnOw yOUR RIGHTS: yOUTH LIvInG AwAy
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 189
If you fear you will be hurt or neglected at home, tell that to the police or a
county child protection worker. You can also call the agencies listed in this
section. You can ask for a court order to let you live with someone else or on
your own.
There are also certain legal procedures that allow you to live away from
your parents.
• A CHIPS petition (Child in Need of Protective Services). The juvenile court
can order you to live in foster care. If you are at least 16 years old, the court
can order that you are allowed to live independently. The court decides what
supervision you need. CHIPS cases are usually filed by the county, after child
protection investigates, but you can file one with the help of a lawyer (see
General Legal Services section, pg. 65).
• A Delegation of Parental Authority (DOPA). Delegation means to give a
right or duty to someone else. The DOPA is a paper your parents sign to let
someone else act as the parent. It can last up to 12 months, and your parents
can take it back at any time.
• An Order for Protection (OFP). If your parents have abused you emotionally,
physically or sexually, or contact with them is harmful, the court can order
that they stay away from you or see you only under certain conditions.
Some states have “emancipation” where a court orders that a youth is not under
the parents’ care or control and is on their own. There is no set process for
emancipation in Minnesota, but emancipation is possible here. Call the Youth
Law Project at 612-332-1441 to find out more.
FyI: HOw TO GET InTO SHELTERS
Shelters are safe places to stay for the night. Sadly, there are not enough
shelters for all of the young people who need them. To get in a shelter, you may
need to work very hard. You can try to get into shelter on your own or you can
find someone to help you.
For help, call StreetWorks (612-252-2735) and tell them that you are trying to
get into shelter. A StreetWorks outreach worker (OW) might be able to talk you
through the process, help you make phone calls or give you bus tokens to get to
a shelter. OR, go to a drop-in center (pg. 6). Someone there can sit with you and
make phone calls.
If you want to do it on your own, REMEMBER:
-Be determined.
-Call as many places as you can.
-When people tell you “no,” ask what your next steps should be.
who to call
There are different types of shelter for different people. All of the shelters are
described at the end of this section. Try calling shelters in this order:
fIrst response for help: Call 211 or 651-291-0211 to find out which
shelters you are eligible for and if they have space.
If you are beIng abused by a partner:
Domestic and sexual abuse shelters are for men, women and children who are
being emotionally, physically or mentally abused. See pg. 30 for shelters.
yOUTH:
sIngle youth:
1. Call The Bridge and Avenues (Minneapolis) or Ain Dah Yung (St. Paul) or
YMCA Point Northwest (in the NW Hennepin suburbs) because they take
people 24 hours a day.
2. Next, try Hope Street (Minneapolis).
3. Next, call LSS Safe House (St. Paul) after 7 PM.
4. The last youth options are The Bridge, Hope Street and Avenues emergency
spots (for crisis). Show up to The Bridge by 10 PM for a lottery for three spots
or call Avenues by midnight to sleep on their couch.
moms wIth kIds:
LSS Life Haven is the only youth shelter for moms with kids, but it has a long
waiting list.
IF yOUTH SHELTERS ARE FULL:
Then, your next option is an adult shelter. Staying in an adult shelter can by
scary or even dangerous for youth. Try to get into shelter in the order below to
have the best experience. No matter where you stay, be safe. Demand extra
attention because you are young. Find a staff person and tell them your name
and age; ask them to watch out for you and check in with them. An adult staying
at the shelter might try to help you out too but be careful; do not let them get too
close to you. Try to get into a youth shelter the next night if you can.
sIngle men:
1. Try St. Stephen’s, Simpson or Our Saviour’s in Minneapolis because these
church shelters are smaller, safer and cleaner than other adult shelters.
These three shelters have a lottery system.
the lotteryfor all three shelters is held at Simpson shelter (2740 1st
Avenue) on Monday night at 6:30 PM. Arrive after 6 PM and sign up before 6:30
PM. You must be sober to sign up.
2. If you can’t get to Minneapolis, try Union Gospel Mission Hotel in St. Paul
(435 E. University Avenue). Sign up every night between 5:30 PM and 6:30
PM. You must attend a church service at 7:30 PM. There are 34 free beds
and 55 $6 beds.
3. If you do not get in, try to get vouchered into a shelter through the county.
the voucher system can be very frustrating; this is something outreach
workers can help you with.
Hennepin County: Before 5 PM, you will need to go down to Century Plaza
(330 S. 12th Street, Minneapolis). After 5 PM, call 211 and ask for After
Hours Shelter Team or 612-673-9138. At both places, you will have the best
results if you say, “I am homeless in Hennepin County.”
If you are under 18, you can still call the Shelter Team or call First Response
at 612-821-4539. This local first response line helps youth who are abused
or in crisis by working with Child Protection and shelter systems. No matter
what, make it clear that you don’t have anywhere else to go.
Ramsey County: Intake is done in person at Family Place (244 10th Street)
Mon-Fri 6:30 AM-6:30 PM and Sat/Sun 8:30 AM-6:30 PM. Last intake
appointments are at 5 PM. Call 651-225-9357 to see if there are spaces.
4. If you can’t get in a county shelter, then your last options are Secure Waiting
and Salvation Army Harbor Lights in Minneapolis or Dorothy Day in St.
Paul (see Shelter Details section below).
sIngle women:
1. Try Our Saviour’s in Minneapolis because this church shelter is smaller,
safer and cleaner than other adult shelters. There are six beds for women in
a lottery system.
the lottery is for all three shelters is held at Simpson shelter (2740
1st Avenue) on Monday night at 6:30 PM. Arrive after 6 PM and sign up
before 6:30 PM. You must be sober to sign up.
2. If you do not get in, try to get vouchered into a shelter through the county
(see #3 in Single Men)
3. If you can’t get vouchered into a shelter, then your last options are Simpson’s
Women Shelter and Salvation Army Harbor Lights. Call nightly after 5 PM
to reserve a bed at Simpson or show up around 4 PM to get into Harbor
Lights (see Shelter Details section below).
famIlIes wIth chIldren:
1. First, try to get vouchered into a shelter through the county
(see #3 in Single Men).
2. The last options are Families Moving Forward or Mary’s Place in
Minneapolis. Call FMF to set up an appointment for an intake (612-871-0095)
Mon-Fri 8 AM-2 PM. Visit Sharing and Caring Hands (525 N. 7th Street) with
your entire family Mon-Thu 10-11:30 AM or 1:30-3:30 PM to apply for shelter
at Mary’s Place.
If you can’t get Into shelter at all
If you are in danger in your home, you or an outreach worker can call Child
Protection Services at 612-348-3552 in Hennepin County or 651-266-4500
in Ramsey County to report it. If you feel like you were wrongfully denied by
Child Protection Services or the Shelter Team, call the Youth Law Project at
612-334-5970 in Hennepin County or South Minnesota Regional Legal
Services at 651-222-4731 in Ramsey or other counties. Finally, see “Places to
Hang Out at Night” on pg. 36 for a safe place to be.
SHELTER DETAILS
TIP: to get Into Shelter, alwayS Call earlIer than they tell
you to. and be there when they Say to or Someone elSe
wIll take your SPot.
aIn dah yung
651-227-4184; www.aindahyung.com
who: Single youth (without children) and pregnant women ages five to 17
with a focus on Native American youth. No youth who have history of sexual
perpetration or arson, have been recently suicidal or have aggressive behavior.
what: Emergency, short term shelter. Five male and five female beds. Fifteenday stay during which they try to find you permanent housing and do family
reunification and case management. Three meals a day plus snacks and
small clothing closet. There are a lot of rules; all privileges (like phone access
and outings) are decided by your legal guardian. Can use phone/address if
job searching.
where: 1089 Portland Avenue, St. Paul
when: Call 24 hours a day for intake. Daytime is best time to call, especially if
you need a ride. There is sometimes a waiting list.
language: Spanish and Ojibwa.
know before you go: Need to give name and birth date. You will be searched
when you enter. Must be sober. Often do warrant checks. Staff follow the law
and call police if need to. Trans can stay on the side they identify with. GLBTQ
youth not common. Will run warrant if you leave without permission.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 190
youth say: There are a lot of rules, and staff are very involved in your personal
issues. Staff will help you with whatever you need.
avenues for homeless youth
612-522-1690; www.avenuesforyouth.org
who: Single youth (without children) and pregnant women ages 15-20. No
violent crime or sexual perpetration record.
what: Emergency shelter: case management twice a week and pet therapy.
No maximum stay. Fifteen beds: all doubles and one single. Weekly bus passes
for clean room check. One chore per day. Meals provided. Small clothing closet
with shoes and hygiene supplies. Storage space. Can use phone/address. Art
club, large television, movies, weights, pool table and foosball table. Curfew and
bedtime. Room checks every half hour at night. Get overnight passes from case
manager. Free laundry, nice rooms and air conditioning. Emergency bed: couch
reserved for crisis situation—show up at midnight.
where: 1708 Oak Park Avenue N., Minneapolis
when: Call for intake 24 hours a day.
bus: 19
language: A few Spanish-speaking staff.
know before you go: Automatic General Assistance paperwork at intake. Trans
youth get own room or choose side. Sober. Need name and birthday for warrant
check. No violent crime accepted; try to make arrangements for truancy or run
warrants. Do not put out run warrant if you leave.
youth say: It is a house so you feel like you are in a home, which is motivating.
the brIdge
612-377-8800; www.bridgeforyouth.org
who: Single youth (no children) and pregnant women ages 10-17. No violent
crime or sexual perpetration record.
what: Emergency shelter: 14 emergency beds. Focus on family reunification.
Open 24 hours a day. Provides meals, clothing, case management, life
skills training, counseling and family reunification. Approximately three to five
days. Meals served. Emergency beds: three late night beds. Arrive at 10 PM to
get name in lottery. Must leave by 8 AM next morning. Storage for your stuff.
where: 2200 Emerson Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: 24 hour intake, don’t hold spots.
bus: 6
language: Somali, Swahili and Spanish.
know before you go: Outreach workers. Sober. No drug testing, but everyone
is searched before entering. This shelter is for Hennepin County, so if you
say you are from outside of Hennepin County, you may be billed. Need ID for
emergency beds. Staff will check with parents of shelter residents. No warrant
check. Hygiene and safer sex supplies. Don’t have to get on GA. Will notify
parents and police if you run.
youth say: Good at reunifying you with your family or finding you somewhere
else to stay.
hope street shelter
612-827-9372; www.ccspm.org/hope-street.aspx
who: Single youth (no children) or pregnant women ages 16-20.
what: Emergency shelter: flexible 30-day stay. Case management, kitchen,
day room with TV and pool table; culturally appropriate hair care, laundry and
nurse. Curfew and bedtime. Support for any spiritual traditions. Bus tokens
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provided every morning. Youth don’t have to leave during day, but must be doing
something constructive. Help getting on General and Medical Assistance if you
want. Emergency bed reserved for crisis situations.
where: 1121 East 46th Street, Minneapolis
when: Call 612-827-9372 for shelter. Between 1-7 PM call 612-729-9590.
how: Call to see if there is space. Intake when you arrive. You will be discharged
if you don’t show up for two days.
bus: 5
language: Spanish and Somali speakers in building.
know before you go: Trans youth can get their own room. No warrant checks.
youth say: Case managers are flexible if you keep in contact with them. Three
good meals a day.
lss safe house
651-644-3446; www.lssmn.org
who: Single youth (no children) and pregnant women ages 16-20.
what: Emergency shelter. Can stay 30 days and then reapply after three days.
Clean place with dinner and breakfast, laundry, storage space and hygiene
supplies. Chores and curfew. Bike library. Case managers help with goal setting,
connecting to resources, health, education, employment and longer term
housing. Use mailing address and phone. Get three tokens every morning.
where: Private location.
when: 7 PM-9 AM. You can’t come until 8 PM.
how: First call first served. Call at 7 PM to see if there is space.
bus: 21A
language: Two Spanish speakers and one Vietnamese speaker.
know before you go: No substances/weapons on property. Usually do not do
warrant checks, but they can check. Staff will help take care of warrants but
having one doesn’t prohibit access. Criminal records considered case by case.
youth say: It is a great place but small.
lss lIfe haven
651-776-9805; www.lssmn.org
who: Women ages 16 and 17 with children (if you are under 16, call to see if
they can make an exception).
what: Shelter in an air conditioned house with private bedrooms for six mothers
and their children. Independent living skills (including cooking) and parenting
classes are given. Fun activities in the house and in the community are
arranged. Fridge is always full. Can stay three to six months. Clothing, blankets,
baby supplies, a phone line and voicemail are provided. Curfew is 10 PM every
day with one night out every other week.
where: 325 Jenks Street, St. Paul
when: 24 hours a day.
how: Call to get on list. Space varies. Sometimes people are placed quickly and
other times the waiting list can be months long.
bus: 71, 68
know before you go: Life Haven can help you get on MFIP. If you are on
MFIP you have to be in school while you are there. Sobriety not required, but
no chemicals allowed on the property. If you have a violent criminal history you
need to be working on it somehow.
ymca poInt northwest host home
763-535-4800;
www.ymcatwincities.org/locations/pnw_main.asp
who: Under 18. Need parent’s permission. Residents of northwest Hennepin
County only.
what: Host home shelter program: stay for three to five days in a local family’s
home. Youth stay in home all day (except for school) and have to do activities
with family. No chores.
how: Call 24 hour crisis line (763-493-3052) for 15 minute screening interview.
know before you go: No warrant or background checks. Will call police if leave
without permission.
ADULT SHELTER DIREcTORy
You can get into these adult shelters on your own (see Who to Call on pg. 29).
mEn OnLy:
dorothy day center: 651-293-1919,
183 Old 6th Street, Minneapolis
Arrive 8-10 PM. Open 9 PM-6 AM. Free mat on the floor with a wool blanket
and no sheets.
youth say: Most guests are older men so this can be a scary place for a
single youth.
hennepIn county secure waItIng: 612-338-8093,
1000 Currie Avenue, Minneapolis
Open 5 PM-7 AM. Free mat on the floor, restrooms, showers and a light dinner.
Beds upstairs for $4 per night.
sImpson men: 612-874-8683 (day) 612-874-0306 (after 6 PM), 2740 1st
Avenue, Minneapolis
See Lottery System on pg. 30. 45 beds for 28 days. Free hot dinner, simple
breakfast, showers, laundry, storage, savings, health clinic, job prep/search and
advocacy. Legal clinic on Monday nights. Guests who save 40 percent of their
income can stay longer.
st. stephen’s: 612-874-9292,
2211 Clinton Avenue S., Minneapolis
See Lottery System on pg. 30. 43 beds for 28 days. Free breakfast, showers,
weekend meals, laundry, medical care and job prep/search. Spanish speaking
staff.
unIon gospel mIssIon hotel: 651-292-1721,
435 E. University Avenue, St. Paul
Sign up for shelter from 5:30-7:30 PM and must attend church service at
7:30 PM. 34 free emergency beds and 55 $6 hotel beds. Free showers,
breakfast and dinner. Free clothes from 5:30-7:30 PM.
salvatIon army harbor lIghts: 612-338-0113,
1010 Currie Avenue, Minneapolis
Overnight for men: Free mat on the floor without blanket. Shower and food in the
nutrition line. Show up around 7 PM to get in. Bed for the month costs $8/night
or $50/week. Prefer ID and Social Security number. Can hold 130 clients in Safe
Bay. No laundry. Pass out socks, underwear and T-shirts.
youth say: Most guests are older men, so this shelter can be a scary place for
a single youth. Not GLBTQ friendly.
Overnight for women (Sally’s): Show up around 4 PM to get in. Free bed, shower,
laundry and occasionally a locker.
FAmILIES:
famIlIes movIng forward: 612-529-2185,
1808 Emerson Avenue N., Minneapolis
Beds for 32 single adults with children and couples with children for 45 days.
Free meals, laundry and showers. Call for intake interview appointment MonSun 7:30 AM-4:30 PM. Appointments are available Mon-Fri 11 AM-1 PM.
youth say: This shelter is helpful, supportive and small.
mary’s place, sharIng and carIng hands
612-338-4640; www.sharingandcaringhands.org
Shelter for families with two or more children for 30 days. Go to Sharing and
Caring Hands (525 N. 7th Street) Mon-Thu 10-11:30 AM or 1:30-3:30 PM to
apply for shelter. Must bring whole family to apply!
youth say: Mary Jo loves kids.
You need to be vouchered into these adult shelters by the county (see Voucher
System on pg. 30):
people servIng people: 612-277-0201,
614 S. 3rd Street, Minneapolis
The focus is on families with children, vulnerable women and youth. Single
women share rooms.
st. anne’s place: 612-521-2128,
2634 Russell Avenue N., Minneapolis
Women and children. No men over age 18.
famIly place/mary hall: 651-225-9357,
244 10th Street E., St. Paul
Women and children stay at Family Place in Maplewood and men stay at Mary
Hall in St. Paul.
salvatIon army—harbor lIghts: 612-338-0113,
1010 Currie Avenue, Minneapolis
Youth (18+) on GA or SSI should call Hennepin County to get first come
first serve beds. You will have to pay for three to 19 days of one month stay
depending on benefits.
wOmEn OnLy:
sImpson women: 612-874-8683 (day) 612-874-1330 (after 5 PM), 1900
11th Avenue S. (CES), Minneapolis
Twenty beds. Call nightly at 5 PM to save a spot. Free dinner, simple breakfast,
shower, laundry and advocacy. Guests who save 40 percent of their income can
stay longer. Note: most of the guests are older women with mental illness, so
this can be a scary place for young girls to stay.
mEn AnD wOmEn:
our savIour’s: 612-872-4193,
2219 Chicago Avenue S., Minneapolis
See Lottery System on pg. 30. 34 beds for men and six beds for women for 30
days. Longer stays possible. Free breakfast, dinner and showers.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 191
DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL ABUSE
FyI: wHAT IS ABUSE?
Call 911 if you are in immediate danger.
Domestic violence is when a family member or intimate partner hurts you or
someone else in your family. The violence can be physical or emotional, it can be
threats to you or people you love or it can be controlling behavior.
Sexual abuse is when someone does sexual things to you that you don’t want
them to do. This can include watching or touching you without your permission,
forcing you to do sexual things that you don’t want to do or having sex with you
even though you say no or are under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Sexual
abuse is also called rape, sexual assault or date rape.
Anyone can be abusive and anyone can be abused. If you want to learn more
about abuse, check out this Web site http://www.tubmanfamilyalliance.org/
need_help/for_teens/index.html.
If you are in an abusive relationship or have been sexually abused, there are
different shelters and agencies that can help you depending on your needs.
You can call the battered women’s hotlIne (even if you are not a woman)
at 651-646-0994 for more information about abuse, crisis counseling and help
finding shelter.
If you want to leave an abusive relationship or have left one and don’t have
anywhere to go, you can call the hotline or any of these shelters. If one is full,
they will be able to help you find a shelter that isn’t. Most shelters also offer
legal and medical advocacy (help filing restraining orders or having a rape
exam at a hospital), individual counseling, support groups and help finding
financial assistance.
alexander house: 763-780-2330, Blaine
b. robert lewIs: 651-452-7288/651-437-129, Eagan/Hastings
cornerstone: 952-884-0330, Bloomington *Serves men
home free: 763-559-9008, Plymouth
sojourner project: 952-933-7433, Hopkins
women’s advocates: 651-227-8284, St. Paul
eagle’s nest/women of natIons: 651-222-5830, St. Paul
awu of mn/house of peace shelter, mInneapolIs
crIsIs: 612-724-8823 or 612-724-4538
who: Any women and children (boys up to 15).
what: Shelter for women and children in confidential location. Help filing orders
for protection, getting financial assistance, legal referrals and advocacy. Refer to
other shelters.
how: Call and do crisis intake.
know before you go: You can stay here without ID for one night, but you will
need ID or documentation after one day.
casa de esperanZa, st. paul
crIsIs: 651-772-1611 or 651-772-1723; www.casadeesperanza.org
who: Any women with or without children. Male children up to age 18.
Focus on Latinas.
what: Shelter for women and children in confidential location. Help getting
financial assistance and finding your own apartment. Shared rooms with other
families. Can assign you an advocate without staying in shelter. Refer to other
shelters if full.
how: Call crisis line 24 hours a day.
language: Spanish. They will find translators for other languages.
harrIet tubman, mInneapolIs, lake elmo, cottage grove
crIsIs: 612-825-0000 or 612-825-3333;
www.tubmanfamilyalliance.org
who: Women and children can stay in the shelter. Support groups for men
or women.
what: 128 beds at three emergency shelters and 12 onsite transitional housing
units. Makes referrals to other shelters when there is not space. Helps with
orders for protection and other legal help. Support groups for people struggling
with anger and violence—14 week program with couples counseling.
where: 3111 1st Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: 24 hours a day.
know before you go: Most of the guests are older women, so you may want to
ask the Crisis Line worker for a more age-appropriate resource.
hcmc—sexual assault resource servIce (sars)
612-873-5832
who: Victims of rape and sexual assault.
what: SARS provides a counselor to meet with rape and/or sexual assault
victims and their families in the emergency department of HCMC and other
participating hospitals to complete the evidentiary exam and to help them cope
with the trauma and consequences of the assault.
rape and sexual abuse center
612-374-9077; 24 crisis line 612-825-4357; www.neighborhoodinvolve.org
who: Ages 18 plus.
what: Walk-in and phone crisis counseling related to rape and sexual abuse.
where: 2431 Hennepin Avenue, Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 9 AM-5 PM, evenings by appointment.
sexual offense servIces of ramsey county
651-643-3006 (24 hour), 651-643-3022 (Business Line);
http://www.co.ramsey.mn.us/ph/yas/sos.htm
who: Anyone (primary or secondary) that is a victim of sexual violence.
what: crisis supportive counseling for victims, friends and families that are
affected by sexual violence; advocacy, referrals, emergency services, medical
outreach to Regions Hospital, support groups, 24 hour crisis line.
where: 1619 Dayton Avenue, Suite #201, St. Paul
when: 24 hour crisis line; office open 8:30 AM-5 PM, 24 hour medical
outreach.
know before you go: All services are free and confidential.
Here are some support groups for survivors of domestic or sexual abuse:
afrIcan amerIcan famIly servIces
(see Mental Health section, pg. 17)
612-871-7878; www.aafs.org
who: Anyone, focus on African Americans.
what: SAFE—Sistas Advocating For Empowerment: domestic violence and
anger management focus for women (18+). MOVE—Men Opposing Violence:
anger management for men (18+).
where: 2616 Nicollet Avenue, Minneapolis (main office—two in Minneapolis
and one in St. Paul).
when: Mon and Tue 8 AM-7 PM, Wed and Thu 8 AM-9 PM. Closed Fri.
know before you go: Need ID or documentation. If you have insurance,
bring information.
face to face (see Education section, pg. 39)
651-772-5544
who: Girls ages 13-17.
what: Gender Group: Thursday evenings Let’s Talk and Safe Talk Support
Groups: work with girls that have been sexually abused Tuesday afternoons.
Safe Talk same thing. Open to anyone.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 192
c
PLACES TO HANG OUT
Drop-in and community centers (pgs. 6 and 7) are great places to hang out
and get connected with services. These are other safe places to go during
the day that have more opportunities for recreation and connecting with your
community; most are free and some are low-cost.
DURInG THE DAy
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boys and gIrls club
www.boysandgirls.org
who: Ages 6-18.
what: Clubs for youth include job skills, goal planning, leadership, homework
help, health and life skills, art, sports, fitness, recreation, gang prevention and
family support.
Membership is $5 a year. No one has ever been turned away, and there are
ways to “earn” membership. To register, bring your legal guardian to a Club and
ask for an application.
where: Visit the Web site to find the Twin Cities location near you.
when: Club hours: 3-9 PM regularly and 11 AM-7 PM in the summer.
A
hospItalIty house
612-522-4485; www.hhyd.org
who: Anyone. Membership is $30 a year but negotiable if you cannot pay. Can
enroll without parents.
what: Recreation: open gym, African drum and dance, baseball, basketball,
track teams, movie nights on Saturday and midnight basketball for ages 16 to
22. Groups: Sista’ to Sista’ helps girls ages 11 to 17 improve their self-esteem,
behavior in school, academic performance, social skills, personal relationships
and emotional and spiritual development. Wise Guys is for 10 to17 year old
boys to help prevent teen pregnancy and teach about responsibility. Teen Mom
Support Group.
where: 1220 Logan Avenue N., Minneapolis
when: Summer: 8 AM-5:30 PM. School year: 1-6 PM.
know before you go: Provide transportation and snacks at all groups and
events.
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612-729-2837; www.thejackpine.org
who: Anyone. Homeless and traveling youth are warmly welcomed.
what: The Jack Pine is a family-friendly space for skill sharing, events, meetings
and art. Collectively run community space with recreation, meeting space,
workshops and events. Free internet and library. Call or check online for events.
Events open and free to the public.
where: 2815 East Lake Street, Minneapolis
when: Drop-in Mon noon-8 PM, Tue noon-6 PM, Wed 4 PM-midnight, Thu
4-8 PM, Fri midnight-4 PM, Sat noon-5 PM, Sun 5 PM-midnight.
know before you go: No drugs or alcohol allowed.
neIghborhood house (wellstone center)
651-789-2531 (Life Connections), 651-789-2517 (Youth Leadership)
who: Youth programs are for youth ages 6-18 who are in school.
what: Youth leadership programs: health education and indoor athletics,
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computer skills classes and internet access.
where: 179 Robie Street E., St. Paul
when: Neighborhood House Youth Center (ages 6-18) is open 1-7 PM,
Neighborhood House is open 2-8 PM.
how: Drop by and hang out in Youth Center. Case managers and social workers
available by referral.
know before you go: To register for Youth Center, need form signed by parent.
If homeless, talk to director for special provisions.
who: Ages 16-20.
where: 41 N. 12th Street, Minneapolis
when: Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri and Sat 3-8 PM.
youth say: It is safe and clean.
STORAGE
AT nIGHT
At night most agencies are closed. Here are some safe places to go late at night
if you have nowhere else to be. Remember, these are not social services and
you’ll need money to buy something.
hard tImes café
612-341-9261
what: Vegetarian, hangout for punkers, artists, students, etc. Good coffee for $1.
where: 1821 Riverside Avenue, Minneapolis
when: 6 AM-4 AM.
perkIns
Open all night. Call 612-866-4021 for locations. You will have to buy
something to stay there.
bus lInes 16 and 5 run all nIght
The 16 goes between downtown St. Paul and downtown Minneapolis and the 5
runs in Minneapolis.
TIP: the uPtown buS Shelter IS oPen all nIght, and It IS heated.
SHOWERS AND LAUNDRY
TIP: you Can get a Shower and do laundry at many dIfferent
organIzatIonS In the twIn CItIeS, InCludIng adult ShelterS.
howeVer, many young PeoPle feel more Comfortable
goIng to youth droP-In CenterS beCauSe the ShowerS are
Cleaner and you haVe more PrIVaCy.
safeZone (see Drop-In Centers section, pg. 6)
651-224-9644; www.face2face.org
who: Youth ages 14-20.
where: 308 Prince Street, St. Paul
when: Mon-Fri 1-5:30 PM, Sat 1-4 PM, not open on holidays.
youth say: It is safe and clean.
youthlInk/project offstreets
(see Drop-In Centers section, pg. 6)
612-252-1200; www.youthlinkmn.org
YouthLink and SafeZone offer small, secure storage lockers on a first come first
served basis.
TIP: If you are leaVIng or were forCed to leaVe a Program
(SuCh aS a youth Shelter or a tranSItIonal lIVIng
Program), aSk the Staff If they Can Store your thIngS
untIl you haVe a PlaCe to Put them.
PHONE, VOICEMAIL AND ADDRESS
YouthLink and SafeZone also let you use their phone. Many agencies let you use
their address to have things like an ID sent to you. Many agencies can hook you
up with voicemail through this service.
twIn cItIes voIcemaIl (tcv)
651-643-0883
who: Low-income people looking for jobs or housing, survivors of domestic
violence or abuse or people who need to stay in contact with their doctor.
what: Free voicemail service.
how: Ask your case manager to sign you up. Or call TCV for a list of agencies
that can sign you up.
TIP: a good addreSS IS ImPortant. fInd a PlaCe where you Can
truSt the PeoPle to SaVe your maIl and get It to you.
I wAnT TO GET BAcK
In ScHOOL, GET my
GED OR FInD A JOB…
EDUCATION
FyI: yOU HAvE THE RIGHT TO ATTEnD ScHOOL
Students in homeless situations have the right to:
• Go to school, no matter where they live or how long they have lived there.
• Continue in the school they attended before they became homeless.
• Get transportation to the school they attended before they became homeless,
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 193
if possible.
• Get the same programs and services that are provided to all other youth.
• Automatically qualify for free breakfast and lunch.
• Enroll in a new school without immunization, proof of residential status,
school records, proof of guardianship or other documents.
• Go to school with children who are not homeless.
• Get information and referrals to health, mental health, dental and other services.
• Have school enrollment disagreements settled quickly and go to the school
they chose while disagreements are settled.
A homeless school lIaIson can help you enroll in school, retrieve records
and find transportation, school supplies, homework help or other services. Call
651-632-3788 or 612-668-5480.
FyI: ScHOOL ATTEnDAncE
• You have to go to school if you are 16 or younger. If you skip school, you can
be charged with truancy in juvenile court. Your school may drop you if you
skip over 15 days in a year.
• If you are 16 to 18 years old and you want to drop out, you have to have a
meeting with your parents and school staff. You and your parents have to sign
a written statement.
• If you get MFIP, you must go to school until you graduate, get a GED or turn 18.
• If you are 18 to 20 years old and getting MFIP, you can decide if you want to
keep going to school or go to work. You have to choose one or the other or
you will lose your MFIP benefits.
FyI:
GED
A GED is a General Education Development. It shows that you have an
educational experience that is the same as earning a high school diploma. To
earn a GED, you have to take a test. You are eligible to take the GED test if:
• You are at least 19.
• If you are age 16-18 and you meet certain requirements and submit an age
waiver form. You are eligible if you have been out of school for at least a year,
or if your high school class has graduated or in many other circumstances.
You can get an Age Waiver Form and find out more information about GED age
waivers and test centers by calling GED Testing at 651-582-8445 or at this Web
site http://mnabe.themlc.org/GED.
If you are working on your GED, these tutoring programs can help you prepare
for the test. Most of the programs under the Education and Employment section
also offer GED tutoring.
TIP: Some emPloyerS Prefer a hIgh SChool dIPloma oVer a ged,
So If you haVe a ChoICe, try and fInISh your dIPloma.
If you are in school and need help with your homework you can call the
homework helplIne at 1-800-866-BIGY. Teachers available Mon-Thu 4-7 PM.
safeZone ged tutorIng (see Drop-In Centers section, pg. 6)
651-224-9644; www.face2face.org
who: Ages 14-20.
what: Mon-Thu a teacher can help you get back in school, provide homework
help, earn your GED or anything educational.
where: 308 Prince Street, St. Paul
when: Mon-Fri 1-5:30 PM, Sat 1-4 PM, not open on holidays.
bus: 61, 64
know before you go: You must be sober while you are there. The first time you
are there they will give you a tour and do a quick intake. They will want to know
your name, age, address and a little about your current situation. They might ask
for ID. Wheelchair accessible. No warrant or background checks.
youthlInk/project offstreets ged tutorIng
(see Drop-In Centers section, pg. 6)
612-252-1200; www.youthlinkmn.org
who: Ages 16-20.
what: Drop-in center that has a GED tutoring program.
where: 41 N. 12th Street, Minneapolis
when: Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri and Sat 3-8 PM.
know before you go: All services free. Call for GED tutoring hours.
youth say: GED program is good, and you get an award when you finish.
If you are looking for an alternative to traditional schools, there are many
alternative learning centers in the Twin Cities. You can find out more about
these schools by looking at www.centerforschoolchange.org. One alternative
school is:
face to face academy
651-772-5544; www.face2face.org
who: Ages 15-19 who have completed the 8th grade.
what: A year-round charter school for youth who are struggling in traditional
schools. About 60 students. Electives geared toward youths’ skills. Also has a
medical clinic, mental health and counseling services, parenting classes and
youth groups. Medical clinic for colds, STIs, pregnancy tests and prenatal care.
Prenatal classes: finish one and get a free crib.
where: 1165 Arcade Street, St. Paul
when: Orientations first Wed of the month at 5 PM to get on the waiting list
(unless it’s a holiday).
know before you go: Face to Face has a ton of services all in one location and
is connected to SafeZone drop-in center.
This program helps you go to college:
fans
who: Youth of color from inner city Minneapolis in grades 8-12.
what: College preparation program. Youth and staff work together and develop
plans to meet goals like delaying parenthood, resisting drugs, contributing
to the community and going to college. Helps you find scholarships, prepare
for the ACT/SAT tests and look at career opportunities and college programs.
Participating youth who fulfill the requirements are eligible to earn $2,000 each
year (up to $10,000) in college scholarships that are held in trust until you
graduate high school.
where: FANS is offered at:
oak park neIghborhood center: 1701 Oak Park Avenue N.,
Minneapolis or 612-377-7000
brIan coyle center: 420 15th Avenue S., Minneapolis or
612-338-5282
pIllsbury house: 3501 Chicago Avenue S., Minneapolis or
612-824-0708
waIte house: 2529 13th Avenue S., Minneapolis or
612-721-1681
when: FANS is year-round with weekly meetings.
know before you go: Parental involvement is preferred, but youth living
independently are still eligible.
EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT
Some agencies combine education and employment programs because
education helps you get and keep a job.
amerIcan IndIan oIc
612-341-3358; www.aimovement.org
who: Each program is different. GED: 16 or older with parent/guardian waiver.
High school diploma: grades 9-12. WIP: Native Americans who are 18+
and live in Hennepin County. WIA: low income youth ages 14-21 who live in
Hennepin County.
what: Get your GED or high school diploma. The three employment programs
(Minneapolis Employment Training, WIP and WIA) help you with life skills, work
readiness, job skills, applying for college and financial aid for college.
where: 1845 E. Franklin Avenue, Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 8 AM-4:30 PM.
how: Contact Betsy Green ext. 129 to schedule an appointment for WIP or WIA.
Call for orientation times for other programs.
know before you go: Need ID and Social Security number for employment programs.
employment actIon center—youth futures
612-752-8800 (ask for Youth Futures), 612-377-6300 (Northside location);
www.eac-mn.org
who: Low-income youth ages 14-21 that live in (or are homeless in) Minneapolis.
what: Help with setting education goals, GED testing and researching
educational options for after completion of high school (FAFSA and
scholarships), employment services such as bus cards (sometimes), résumé
writing and interview practice.
where: 900 20th Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 8 AM-4:30 PM.
bus: 55, 2
know before you go: Walk-in or appointment. If you have proof of Minneapolis
residency bring it. Need Social Security number or something to prove
citizenship or legal status. Will work with homeless youth.
father project (see Parenting Help section, pg. 25)
612-724-3539; www.goodwilleasterseals.org
who: 16-30 year old men who have a child or expect one and are not employed.
All services for participants only, except for GED program which is open to
women. No active domestic abuse or sexual abuse charges.
what: GED (open to anyone including women, drop-in Tue-Thu 10 AM-4:30 PM)
and job search assistance (one-on-one job counseling).
where: 1600 E Lake Street, Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 9 AM-4:30 PM. Intakes done mostly on Mon and Tue 10 AM2 PM, otherwise may have to wait. Orientation every other week Tue-Thu
9:45 AM-3 PM (light breakfast and lunch served).
how: To become a Father Project participant, call or come in for 15 minute intake.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 194
If eligible, do three day orientation. Then you can do any program and have an
advocate assigned to you. For GED and parenting class, anyone can drop-in.
know before you go: Need Social Security number. Do background checks for
domestic/sexual abuse charges; other charges are OK. Food always provided at
groups. Participants get bus cards and tokens.
job corps
1-800-934-5627; http://jobcorps.dol.gov/centers/MN.htm
who: Legal US residents ages 16-24, 290 spots. Two year limit (don’t have
to leave on 25th birthday). Must qualify as low income and be free of any
legal/criminal complications. No active legal issues. No felony convictions and no
violent misdemeanors.
what: Seven to 12 month job training and education program: get your
GED or high school diploma and job training. Must take academic classes unless
you already have a GED or high school degree and pass the test. Classes and
training are Mon-Fri 8 AM-3:40 PM. Cannot have a job for the first six months
and can only work part time after that. Live in: 290 residential spots. Has
curfew. Friends and family can visit. Counseling and support services available.
Very few non-residential spots. Students who do not live in get bus cards for
transportation. During the program: no cost. Full room and board, meals, basic
medical, dental and vision care covered. Get $25/week for other basic needs.
After the program: helps you find a job or apartment or enroll in college or the
military after program is over. Get up to $1200 to help out.
where: 1480 Snelling Avenue N., St. Paul
when: Year-round enrollment.
how: Enroll by calling 1-800-934-5627 for an eligibility screening. If you are
eligible, you will receive an application and an enrollment counselor. The average
wait is two to 10 weeks.
know before you go: Will be kicked out for drug or alcohol use, sex on
campus, gang activity or violence. No special accommodations for GLBTQ
youth—trans will be placed in biological sex dorm.
youth say: You have to go to school every day, but it is a great program.
project solo/freeport west
612-874-1936
who: Ages 16-19 can enroll; can stay until age 21. Youth living anywhere.
what: Offers case management, GED tutoring, homework help, help finding a
job, writing a résumé and cover letter, filling out applications, independent living
skills, food and a transitional living program.
where: 2222 Park Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Mon-Thu 11 AM-8 PM, Fri 12-5 PM
bus: 5
know before you go: SOLO is not a drop-in center. You have to enroll in person
between 1-4:30 PM on Mon, Tue or Wed to access any of its services. You can
be there to during open hours to work on something productive.
sabathanI communIty center—lIfe skIlls center
612-827-5981; www.sabathani.org
who: Residents of South Minneapolis, ages 16 and up.
what: Prepares adults 16 and older for the workforce through GED and college/
trade exam preparation, tutoring in math and reading, computer skills, English
language learners, adult basic education and citizenship classes.
where: 310 East 38th Street, Minneapolis
when: Call for hours.
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what: Case managers can help youth with a job search, submitting applications
EMPLOYMENT
These programs only have job training and job placement opportunities.
cookIe cart
612-521-0855 (press 2 to apply); www.cookiecart.org
who: Neighborhood youth (Northside) ages 14-17.
what: Cookie bakery program provides first job opportunity to youth along with
business skills to transition into employment.
where: 1119 W. Broadway Avenue, Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 9 AM-5 PM.
emerge
612-529-9267; www.puc-mn.org
who: Ages 18 and older, ex-offenders 18 and older. Rarely someone under 18.
what: Several employment services. Northside Job Connections helps exoffenders who are over 18 find and hold jobs through résumé building, soft skills
training, connection to employers, advocacy and transportation. Call to set up an
appointment and to do paperwork. City Skills and NET provide assessment, job
coaching, soft skills training and résumé building. City Skills is for anyone over
18, NET is for Minneapolis residents. Emerge Staffing places people in jobs and
is open to anyone, but they rarely have job openings for those under 18.
where: 1101 West Broadway, Minneapolis
when: You must attend orientation for City Skills, NET and Emerge Staffing.
Orientation is twice a month. Call or stop in to reserve a seat with the
receptionist—only 25 spots at each orientation.
language: NET has Spanish speaking staff.
goodwIll/easter seals
651-379-5800 (press 2 for “Training Programs”);
www.goodwilleasterseals.org
who: Ages 16 and older who have experienced a barrier to employment. Many
skills programs are 18 and older. The only way to see if you qualify is to call an
intake worker and find out.
what: Work experience program (positions available at Goodwill stores) and skill
training programs (automotive, banking, construction, retail, customer service).
where: Main office is 553 Fairview Avenue N., St. Paul (many other sites in
area)
when: Mon-Fri 9 AM-6 PM. Closed holidays.
how: Call one of the following intake lines to find out if you are eligible. If so,
the intake worker will set up an appointment to meet with you to complete
paperwork, introduce you to services and set a start date.
- If you are out of work through no fault of your own and are in Hennepin County
call 612-824-7810.
- If you are out of work through no fault of your own and are in Ramsey County
call 651-379-5957.
- For job placement or retention in the Twin Cities Metro Area call
651-379-5994.
- For skill training in the Twin Cities Metro Area call 651-379-5879.
- For employment services for those just released from prison, call
651-379-5972.
hIred
651-642-0363; www.hired.org
who: Ages 18 and older. Need at-risk status, federal poverty income guidelines,
must be homeless, pregnant or parenting teen, basic skills deficient, second
language speaker, juvenile offender or drop-out.
and résumés, connecting with social services providers and setting up and
preparing for interviews. Bus cards and other supportive services available.
where: 379 University Avenue, St. Paul
when: Mon-Fri 8 AM-5 PM.
how: Contact Carol Aharoni at 651-999-5655.
know before you go: Need Social Security card and photo ID.
lorIng nIcollet-bethlehem center youth employment program
612-872-2770; www.lnbcc.org
who: Ages 14-21.
what: Youth employment program that offers individual employment assistance
with job referrals and training. Services include assessments, job search,
assistance, soft skills training, résumé writing, interviewing techniques and
transportation assistance (discount bus passes for eligible participants). Can
often place youth in jobs.
where: 1925 Nicollet Avenue, Minneapolis
when: Call for program hours.
know before you go: Functional English needed. ID and Social Security
card needed. Can work with undocumented youth but often cannot find job
placements. Companies may require background checks.
ramsey county workforce solutIons—youthlead
651-770-4499; www.co.ramsey.mn.us/workforce/Youth.htm
who: Ramsey County youth ages 17-21, who a have a disability, speak limited
English, are chemically dependent, are a parent, are pregnant, are/were in foster
care, have a criminal record, are/were homeless or runaway, did not finish high
school, lack basic skills, are low-income, are behind in school or are the child of
a drug or alcohol user.
what: Employment training, help with applications, résumés and job keeping skills.
where: Contact any of these agencies to enroll:
- Employment Action Center and Lifetrack Resources: 709 University
Avenue, St. Paul; 651-265-2359 or 612-752-8008.
- Guadalupe Alternative Program: 381 East Robie Street, St. Paul;
651-222-0757.
- HIRED St. Paul Workforce Center: 540 Fairview Avenue, St. Paul;
651-642-0756.
- Hmong American Partnership: 1075 Arcade Street, St. Paul; 651-495-1542.
- Workforce Solutions St. Paul Workforce Center: 540 Fairview Avenue, St.
Paul; 651-642-0749 or 651-642-0750.
- YWCA: 375 Selby Avenue, St. Paul; 651-222-3741.
- Workforce Solutions: 2098 11th Avenue E., North St. Paul;
651-779-5164 or 651-779-5136.
when: Year-round, usually with weekly meetings.
know before you go: You need to be able to prove your age with an ID or
school record. You need a Social Security card. There is often a waiting list. Must
have functional English.
southeast asIan refugee communIty home (search)
612-673-9388
who: Low income youth living in Minneapolis, ages 17-21; or refugees who
have been in the United States for less than five years.
what: Youth employment program that can help you find full time or part time work.
where: 1113 East Franklin Avenue, Suite 212, Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 8 AM-5 PM.
language: Vietnamese, Laotian, Hmong, Cambodian and Somali.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 195
know before you go: Need to be able to prove your age (some form of ID) and
income. Social Security number is also needed.
tree trust
651-644-5800; www.treetrust.org
who: Ages 17-24, completed or dropped out of school from Hennepin County.
Ex-offenders welcome. Must speak functional English.
what: Young Adult Conservation Corps is three to six month on the job
training in landscape or construction. Get a pre-apprenticeship certificate for
construction. Start at $7 per hour.
where: 2350 Wycliff Street, Suite 200, St. Paul
when: Office open Mon-Fri 7:30 AM-4:30 PM.
how: Call and ask for an application.
know before you go: Cannot be undocumented; need ID.
I wAnT TO FInD
An APARTmEnT…
Living in your own place is especially difficult for young people. Landlords don’t
like to rent to people with no rental history. These agencies in this section can
help you find, afford and keep an apartment.
TRANSITIONAL LIVING PROGRAMS
Transitional Living Programs (TLPs) are for young people who are homeless or
don’t have a stable living situation. Different programs offer different levels of
support and independence, depending on how much help you need. Some rent
apartments to youth in one big building, while others help you find an apartment
where you want to live.
Many TLPs are subsidized, so you don’t have to pay a lot for rent. Most help
you sign your own lease, build a rental history and teach you important skills
like money management and housekeeping that can ensure that you make payments on time, keep your landlord happy and keep your place.
avenues glbtq host home program (see GLBTQ section, pg. 61)
612-522-1690; www.avenuesforyouth.org
archdale apartments
612-253-1460; www.youthlinkmn.org/housing
who: Homeless youth ages 16 and up who are working or in school. Pregnant
women and teen parents with one child allowed. No couples. Must be Section 8
eligible—no outstanding warrants or felonies.
what: Transitional living program: 30 units, plus seven units off-site. Two programs
to choose from—six months or two years. (Can stay indefinitely in six month
program. Two year program requires new apartment upon completion.) Affordable
housing combined with case management, life skills classes, GED, job search and
a psychologist. No curfew, can have visitors. Drug tests/room checks if suspected.
Must pay 30 percent of income for rent and pay for own electronics.
where: 1600 1st Avenue, Minneapolis
when: Can call 24 hours a day.
how: There is a waiting list. Turn in application in-person to office at Archdale
or Barnabas. Must provide three month living situation history as part of
application.
bus: 18
know before you go: Completely drug free and sober. Not disability accessible.
Need Social Security card or green card, state ID, birth certificate or yellow slip
showing you have applied for state ID.
barnabas transItIonal lIvIng program
612-253-0630; www.youthlinkmn.org/housing
what: The same as Archdale Program except there’s a focus on mental health
with on-site therapists and access to low-cost medications. Disability accessible.
where: 906 South 7th Street, Minneapolis
beverly benjamIn/aIn dah yung youth lodge program
651-632-8923; www.aindahyung.com
who: Ages 16-20. Native youth and old shelter residents given preference. No
youth with county contact (parole officers or social workers), no couples and no
parents with kids. Pregnant women have to leave two weeks before their due
date. Criminal histories looked at on a case-by-case basis.
what: Six spots in 18 month program in community home with single and
double rooms. Housing is combined with independent living skills, education and
employment help, transportation and case management. Has curfew but fewer
rules than Ain Dah Yung shelter. Help with rent after completion.
where: 1212 Raymond Avenue, St. Paul
when: Often one bed open, call for openings.
know before you go: Need ID.
the brIdge (hyp)
612-377-8800; www.bridgeforyouth.org
who: Ages 16-21, no parents with children, no couples.
what: Transitional Living Program (HYP): youth ages 16-21 who cannot
return home and need a safe and supportive place to live. Independent living
skills and transition into a safe, permanent living situation. Independent 365Permanent Housing: 20 apartments for youth ages 17-21 (scattered site)
who need a permanent place to live while working or going to school. Year-long
program. Need income to pay for half of rent (up to $300) and other expenses.
The Bridge also has a 24 hour walk-in counselor: open to anyone in
community, a 24 hour crisis line: (612-377-8800) and groups for community.
Groups: Circle Group (Thu 6-9 PM), Hip Hop Group (Wed 6-9 PM), Women’s
Group and Men’s Group: (Mon 5-6:30 PM), So What If I Am (GLBTQ) (Sat 10
AM-noon), and Chemical Health Group (Wed 5-6:30 PM) for 16-21 year olds.
where: 2200 Emerson Avenue S., Minneapolis
how: Call to get on waiting list for HYP. Independent 365 is first come first serve,
but you need to be referred by your case manager and do an application and
interview.
bus: 6
know before you go: Outreach workers available, sober space.
youth say: They help you find a job and a place to stay quickly.
hope street transItIonal house
www.ccspm.org./hope-street.aspx
who: Males only. Apply by 20th birthday.
what: 24-month transitional housing. Six single occupancy bedrooms.
Independent living skills training, educational and employment support,
counseling, therapy and case management services. Bus cards provided. Have
rules but pretty flexible. No curfew. Can get nights out. Meet weekly with case
manager and have house meetings. Help obtaining ID. Pay portion of income
towards rent that is given back at end of stay. Must work on goals.
where: 36th Street and 13th Avenue, Minneapolis
when: Call weekdays for application information.
how: Call 612-827-9371 to be referred to a case manager and begin this
application process.
bus: Between routes 5 and 14.
lIndquIst apartments
612-287-1670
who: Anyone 16 or older who is not undocumented.
what: Permanent, supportive, sober housing. You can stay as long as you need
to. Case management, independent living skills, tutoring, GED and employment
help are provided. 24 single occupancy furnished studios. You start with a
one-year lease, and after that you rent month to month. You have to pay 30
percent of your income as rent. Guests must be out by 10 PM on weeknights
and midnight on weekends, and residents can have two overnights per week.
Program offers access to YMCA, a book lending library, a computer lab, half
price bus cards and free things like condoms, some bus tokens, hygiene
products. Groceries ($50) are provided at the beginning.
where: 1931 West Broadway Avenue, Minneapolis
when: Call anytime. Applications available at www.lifesmissinglink.com/
Lindquist_Application_Materials.html.
how: Call. The intake is a three to four month process that involves interviewing
with the building manager, the public housing authority and the program.
know before you go: You need to be able to prove you are homeless (with a
verification that you are staying at a shelter) or disabled. A background check
is involved, so you can’t have a history of arson, violent or sexual crimes.
Preference is given to youth who are homeless, at risk of becoming homeless,
disabled, receiving case management from another youth serving agency,
referred by the Hearth Connections Mobile Unit, or who have been in and out of
home placement (like jail or foster care). You must be able to pass a drug test
when you sign the lease.
lutheran socIal servIces—tlp
651-644-7739; www.lssmn.org
who: Ages 16-21 who are homeless or precariously housed and from
Ramsey County.
what: Helps you find an apartment to lease at market rates. Case management
and life skills training are provided. Six to 10 bus tokens every other week.
where: Office: 501 Asbury Street, St. Paul
how: If you are interested you need to go to an informational meeting on the
third Thursday of the month at 2 PM (call for information). Then you can set up
an appointment to interview for the program.
language: Spanish.
know before you go: Need to earn enough income to pay market-rate rent.
Small subsidy provides for six months. You should know your Social Security
number and have pay stubs to prove your income. If you are a couple, both of
you must be 16-21 and you must have a child to be eligible. You don’t have to
be sober to be in this program. Ex-offenders are welcome.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 196
lutheran socIal servIces—reZek house
651-644-7739; www.lssmn.org
who: Ages 16-21 who are homeless—on the streets or in a shelter—and from
Ramsey County. Single youth and parents with one child.
what: Two-year transitional housing program, 12 furnished apartments, case
management, independent living skills, advocacy, basic needs supplies, tokens/
bus passes and tutoring provided. Pay 30 percent of income toward rent or, if no
income, volunteer hours count as in-kind rent payment. Guests must be out by
midnight Sun-Thu, 1 AM Fri and Sat. No chemicals on the property.
where: 503 Asbury Street, St. Paul
when: Come to an informational meeting on the third Thursday of the month at
2 PM at 501 Asbury St. to begin application process. There is a wait list, usually
six to nine months of wait.
project solo—tlp
(see Education and Employment section, pg. 41)
612-874-1936
who: Ages 16-19 can enroll; can stay until age 21.
what: Transitional living program. You pay up to 30 percent of your income into
a savings account as rent that you get back once you complete the program.
You sign your own lease with an apartment where you want.
where: 2222 Park Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Mon-Thu 11 AM-8 PM, Fri 12-5 PM
how: You have to enroll in Project SOLO and complete their independent living
skills curriculum.
bus: 5
know before you go: To be eligible for the TLP, you need a job or legal income
(from MFIP or SSI). You have to be documented as homeless according to HUD,
so you need verification from a shelter. All Project SOLO members get bus
tokens home.
youth say: This is a helpful program.
rose center
651-690-0625
who: Women ages 18-24 who are able to work or go to school.
what: Transitional living home. Independent living skills, case management.
Educational and employment help.
where: 1435 Grand Avenue, St. Paul
ymca poInt northwest—tlp
763-535-4800;
www.ymcatwincities.org/locations/pnw_main.asp
who: Single youth or parents ages 16-20 who have a job and live in the North
Western Hennepin area. No couples.
what: Transitional living program. Scattered site apartments. Case managers
can help you find your apartment, but you sign lease. Monthly meetings and
case manager house visits. Rental Assistance for first month’s rent or to prevent
eviction.
how: Call anytime.
know before you go: No other languages. Don’t have to be sober. Need proof
of employment. Can work with undocumented youth if they are working and
can find an apartment. Background and warrant checks only done if landlord
wants them.
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youthlInk/project offstreets
(see Drop-In Centers section, pg. 6)
612-252-1200; www.youthlinkmn.org
who: Ages 16-21.
what: YouthLink helps youth get into Archdale or St. Barnabus Apartments. You
can contact these apartments directly or go to YouthLink to apply.
where: 41 N. 12th Street, Minneapolis
when: Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri and Sat 3-8 PM.
INDEPENDENT LIVING SKILLS
Independent Living Skills (ILS) classes can help you live on your own. You can
learn about money management, saving, shopping, cooking, applying for jobs,
housing and much more. Often you get to make food and eat it during classes.
They usually meet once or twice a week, are often part of transitional living
programs and are also offered at these youth drop-in centers.
project solo—Ils (see Education and Employment section, pg. 41)
612-874-1936
who: Ages 16-19 living anywhere can enroll; can stay until age 21.
what: Independent living skills offers help with education, employment, money
management, health, cooking and housing.
where: 2222 Park Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Enroll Mon, Tue or Wed 1-4:30 PM. Mon-Thu 11 AM-8 PM, Fri 1-4 PM.
bus: 5
know before you go: You can be there to during open hours to work on
something productive. All Project SOLO members get bus tokens home.
safeZone (see Drop-In Centers section, pg. 6)
651-224-9644
where: 308 Prince Street, St. Paul
when: Mon-Fri 1-5:30 PM, Sat 1-4 PM, not open on holidays.
youthlInk/project offstreets
(see Drop-In Centers section, pg. 6)
612-252-1200; www.youthlinkmn.org
who: Ages 16-20.
where: 41 N. 12th Street, Minneapolis
when: Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri and Sat 3-8 PM.
HOUSING
FyI: REnTAL InFORmATIOn
You can rent an apartment even if you are under 18, but there is no law that
says landlords have to rent to you. It often helps to have an adult (or Rental
Assistance agency) co-sign to say they will pay rent if you can’t (see Rental
Assistance section, pg. 50).
- In MN, landlords can’t discriminate against people on public assistance or
because of race, color, religion, family size, national origin, handicap, sexual
orientation or marriage status.
- Never rent an apartment you have not seen.
- Never pay a security deposit before you sign the lease.
- Read the lease before you sign it! The landlord must give you a copy.
- Do not sign a lease until you have inspected the apartment. Make a list of
anything that is dirty, damaged or broken. Ask the landlord to sign the list and
agree to fix any problems. Save a copy.
- Unless you want to move again soon, you are better off with a written, oneyear lease than renting month to month.
- The landlord must return your deposit within 21 days. If they do not return all
of it, they have to send you a letter explaining why. If they don’t give it back you
can sue for it.
- You can bargain with your landlord to change the lease before you sign it. You
should both put your initials by any change that you make.
- Your landlord can’t evict you by changing the locks or shutting off the utilities.
Contact the police and get a lawyer immediately if this happens.
- If you are being evicted, contact a lawyer (see General Legal Services section,
pg. 65). You can fight the eviction in court; if you lose it will go on your
permanent record, but if you win you can probably get it expunged.
If you are ready to live on your own and don’t have a criminal conviction in the
last three years but can’t afford an apartment, you may be eligible for Section 8
subsidized housing. Contact the Public Housing Authority for more information:
publIc housIng authorIty (pha)
651-602-1428
who: Cannot have been convicted of any crime in the last three years.
what: You need to apply at your PHA for Section 8 Vouchers and Public Housing.
There is a waiting list, and it can be very long or closed. There are 11 PHA in the
Twin Cities Metro Area. Call to find your local PHA.
when: Mon-Fri 8 AM-4:30 PM.
This agency can help you find housing:
st. stephen’s housIng servIces program
612-874-0311 (ask for Geno or Richard)
who: If you are staying in a county-funded shelter and have children in your
custody, you can get into the Rapid Exit Program. Working adults or ex-offenders
can get into other programs.
what: Assistance finding and maintaining permanent housing, transportation to
look at apartments, help understanding leases and working with landlords.
where: 2211 Clinton Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 8:30 AM-5 PM.
how: Call if you are a parent in a shelter. Walk in and fill out application if you
are an adult.
These agencies can help you find answers to questions about renting, landlords,
deposits, utilities, evictions and other problems that may arise.
homelIne tenant hotlIne
612-728-5767 (in the metro), 866-866-3546 (for Greater Minnesota);
www.homelinemn.org
who: Tenants.
what: Speak with a tenant advocate who will provide free advice regarding
Minnesota landlord/tenant law. The advocate will provide practical advice on the
law and offer options for resolving the problem. The Homeline Tenant Hotline is
free and available to all tenants, regardless of income.
housIng lInk
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 197
612-522-2500; www.housinglink.org
what: Resources for affordable housing. Housing Authority Waiting List reports
contain the most current information on the status of Section 8 Voucher and
Public Housing waiting lists in Minnesota. Explains Public Housing, Section
8 Project Based and Section 8 housing and how to apply. Updated lists of
vacancies in affordable housing.
when: Mon-Fri 9 AM-4 PM.
know before you go: This is not individual counseling; phone call is only
helpful if you have a specific question.
mha renters’ hotlIne
952-858-8222
www.mmha.com/Resources/OwnerRenters/Renters_FAQs.asp
who: Renters with questions.
what: The Minnesota Multi-Housing Association’s (MHA) special hotline for
renters to find answers to common questions on subjects such as security
deposits, leases, Certificates of Rent Paid, repairs and maintenance, cleaning
and giving notice to vacate.
RENTAL ASSISTANCE
If you don’t have enough money to pay rent or utilities, you might be able to
get Emergency or Energy Assistance from Hennepin or Ramsey County (see
Public Assistance section, pg. 19). Try the county first because most of these
agencies will only help you if you’ve already been denied by the county.
The rest of these agencies offer some form of financial assistance for rent
or utilities. Many can only help people in a certain area, and most don’t give
enough money to cover the full cost of rent. Some agencies give you money for
the first month of rent, some can only give you money for an apartment you are
already leasing (eviction prevention), while others can do both. It’s best to call an
agency with specific questions to find out if you are eligible.
basIlIca of saInt mary (see Clothes section, pg. 12)
612-317-3477 (if no answer, press 0 and get redirected); www.mary.org
who: Financial assistance for 55403 or 55401 zip code residents.
what: Limited Financial Assistance for people living in 55403 or 55401 zip
codes for car repair, rent, uniform, etc.
where: Corner of Hennepin and N. 17th Street, Minneapolis; in the basement.
when: Tue-Thu 9:30-11:30 AM, Sat and Mon 9:30-11 AM. Closed holidays.
how: Call to see if you are eligible.
know before you go: Come early! Must have picture ID, or they can help you
get one. Disability accessible. All faiths welcome. It is a church. There is no
charge for the parking lot on weekends, but there is on weekdays—so park on
the street.
communItIes engaged In assIstIng people (ceap)
763-566-9600; www.ceap.org
who: Low-income youth ages 18 and up living in Brooklyn Center, Brooklyn Park
and Champlain. Will consider someone under 18 if a Hennepin County worker
refers her/him.
what: Eviction prevention funds to assist people to stay in their current housing.
Must have received denial from Hennepin County Emergency Assistance or
already have used funds this year. Must have been resident of Brooklyn Center,
Brooklyn Park or Champlain for at least one month. Also has clothing closet.
where: 6840 78th Avenue N., Brooklyn Park
when: Call Mon-Fri 9 AM-3 PM.
how: Call to request an appointment. Take applications all month long. No more
than a week waiting time.
st. paul urban league
651-291-0504; www.spul.org
who: Low-income youth ages 19 and up living in Ramsey County.
what: Youth programming: employment services. Housing: Rental Assistance.
Connected to youth ministry. Eviction prevention funds to assist people to
stay in their current housing. Must have received denial from Ramsey County
Emergency Assistance or already have used funds this year.
where: 401 Selby Avenue, St. Paul
how: Call ahead to schedule an appointment.
know before you go: Emphasis on abstinence and Christianity.
elIm transItIonal housIng (tlp)
763-788-1546 (press 1 for housing assistance);
www.elimtransitionalhousing.org
who: Youth ages 16-18 and single adults and women with children—
sometimes whole families.
what: Two year program offering affordable housing and case management.
where: 3989 Central Avenue NE, Suite 565, Minneapolis
when: Mon, Tue, Wed and Fri 9 AM-3 PM, Thu 9 AM-2 PM.
how: Call to apply. Don’t have a lot of openings and don’t keep a waiting list.
northpoInt socIal servIces
612-348-4700 or 612-348-4752; www.pilotcity.org
who: Renters 16 and up from North or Northeast Minneapolis only. Must have
received denial from Hennepin County. Assistance can be used once in a
lifetime.
what: Rental Assistance (first month’s rent or eviction prevention).
where: 1315 Penn Avenue, Minneapolis
when: Walk-in Mon 8:30-11:30 AM. It is better to come in early in the month.
know before you go: You need to bring a picture ID, preferably your address,
birth certificates and Social Security cards of any dependent children you have,
proof of income, your lease and an eviction notice (if applicable). If approved, it
takes seven to 10 days to get a check.
oak park neIghborhood center—rental assIstance
(see Community Centers section, pg. 7)
612-377-7000; www.puc-mn.org
who: North Minneapolis residents only.
what: Small amount of Rental Assistance for first month’s rent or eviction
prevention. Assistance can be used once in a lifetime.
where: 1701 Oak Park Avenue N., Minneapolis
when: Call Mon-Thu 8:30 AM-6 PM or Fri 8:30 AM-5 PM.
bus: 19
know before you go: Need ID. No undocumented youth.
pIllsbury house emergency rental assIstance
612-824-0708; www.puc-mn.org
who: Must have a lease in zip codes 55406, 55407 or 55408.
what: Up to $150 in Rental Assistance (have to be able to pay the difference).
where: 3501 Chicago Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Mon-Thu 8 AM-9 PM, Fri 8 AM-6 PM, Sat 9 AM-2 PM, Sun 10 AM-noon.
how: Call in the last week of the month for help with next month. Need to come
in and apply.
bus: 5
language: Spanish and Somali.
know before you go: You can’t receive assistance if you are being evicted
already. You need a Social Security card, birth certificate, driver’s license and a
bill showing how much you owe.
prIsm rental assIstance
763-529-1350
who: Low-income youth ages 18 and up living in Crystal, Robbinsdale, New
Hope, Eastern Plymouth and Golden Valley. Must have received denial from
Hennepin County Emergency Assistance or already have used funds this year.
what: Loans to help with rent, damage deposits, first month’s rent and utility bills.
where: 730 Florida Avenue South, Golden Valley
when: Mon, Tue, Wed 8:30 AM-5 PM, Thu 8:30 AM-7 PM and Fri 8:30 AM-3 PM.
how: Call Mon-Fri between 9 AM and 3 PM for phone interview. If eligible you
will then be scheduled for a budgeting class. After you’ve taken the class, then
you fill out an application for a loan. The process can take three to four weeks.
bus: 643 LTD
language: Spanish and Russian.
know before you go: You will need your lease and a picture ID.
safeZone (see Drop-In Centers section, pg. 6)
651-224-9644; www.face2face.org
who: Ages 14-20.
what: SafeZone is a drop-in center. If you have a case manager there, they can
help you with Rental Assistance. Can only help once. Need lease, budget, ID and
income verification.
where: 308 Prince Street, St. Paul
when: Mon-Fri 1-5:30 PM, Sat 1-4 PM, not open on holidays.
how: To get a case manager you’ll need to do an intake there. They will want
to know your name, age, address and a little about your current situation. They
might ask for ID, but it’s OK if you don’t have it. Wheelchair accessible. No
warrant or background checks.
know before you go: You must be sober while you are there. They have limited
funds.
streetworks (see Drop-In Centers section, pg. 6)
612-252-2735; www.streetworksmn.org
who: Ages 12-21.
what: Rental Assistance for first month of rent up to $450. The check will
always go to the landlord.
where: 2219 Oakland Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 9 AM-5 PM.
how: Call and ask for Rental Assistance or talk to a StreetWorks Outreach Worker.
know before you go: Need photo ID with birthday; this can be negotiated or an
Outreach Worker can help you get an ID.
youth say: Try and call the month before you will need assistance because
funds run out.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 198
FURNITURE
These agencies can help you furnish your apartment for free.
brIdgIng Inc.
952-888-1105 (Bloomington), also in Roseville and central MN;
www.bridging.org
who: Anyone with a referral.
what: Provides furniture and housing supplies to people who are refugees and
immigrants, or who are surviving homelessness, domestic violence or natural
disaster. You get one trip with your case manager to the furniture warehouse to
pick out beds, couches, tables, chairs, lamps, sheets, cooking supplies, etc.
how: Most social service organizations (even employment programs and
schools) can get you on the Bridging waiting list for furniture. The waiting list
is usually a month long. Anyone is eligible, but you can only go ONCE in your
lifetime. Contact your referral agency to fill out paperwork.
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612-870-9617; www.mariesandvikcenter.org
who: Anyone.
what: Sometimes have furniture available that can be dropped off where you
live. Also, between April and October, a truck and a driver may be available to
help you move.
when: Call for furniture availability. Call to schedule a moving date.
where: 1112 East Franklin Avenue, Minneapolis, MN
bus: 2
language: Spanish and American Sign Language.
know before you go: This is a Christian organization. They have a lot of
programs that address spiritual needs. If you want help moving, you will need a
man (18 or older) to help.
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612-827-5981; www.sabathani.org
who: Residents of South Minneapolis.
what: Used furniture available for pick up for free.
where: 310 East 38th Street, Minneapolis; back parking lot
when: Mon-Fri 7:30 AM-9 PM.
know before you go: Must have your own transportation.
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TO SOmEOnE…
CASE MANAGEMENT
Case management means working with a professional who can help you with
goals that you want to work on. A case manager can sometimes offer resources,
bus cards, clothes and other needs if you are meeting with him or her on a
regular basis. To get the most out of working with a case manager, it is helpful
to stay in contact with him or her and to let that person know what is going on
in your situation.
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These agencies have many case managers:
project solo—case managers
(see Education and Employment section, pg. 41)
612-874-1936
who: Ages 16-19.
where: 2222 Park Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Mon-Thu 11 AM-8 PM, Fri 12-5 PM
know before you go: You have to enroll in person between 1-4:30 PM on Mon,
Tue or Wed to access any of its services.
safeZone (see Drop-In Centers section, pg. 6)
651-224-9644
who: Ages 14-20.
where: 308 Prince Street, St. Paul
when: Mon-Fri 1-5:30 PM, Sat 1-4 PM, not open on holidays.
youthlInk/project offstreets (see Drop-In Centers section, pg. 6)
612-252-1200; www.youthlinkmn.org
who: Ages 16-20.
where: 41 N. 12th Street, Minneapolis
when: Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri and Sat 3-8 PM.
streetworks outreach workers
612-252-2735
who: Ages 12-21.
what: Outreach workers (OW) are safe people on the streets. When they are
working, they carry big green StreetWorks bags. Inside the bags are basic
supplies such as condoms, snacks, grocery gift cards, bus tokens, hygiene
supplies, clothing and diapers. OWs can also help you out with other things like
finding a job, getting a GED, getting an ID, Rental Assistance, getting a bus ticket
to go live with your family, getting into shelter, housing and more.
how: Call StreetWorks to find out who is working and their phone number. Give
them a call and see if they can talk to you or meet you. If you see an OW on the
street, ask them for help.
language: One Spanish speaker and one Hmong speaker.
COUNSELING AND THERAPY
Sometimes talking through a problem with someone else is the best way
to make things better. Counseling and therapy is available through many
different clinics.
In crisis situations, call crIsIs connectIon at 612-379-6363 for 24
hour telephone crisis counseling, information and referral. Or call suIcIde
preventIon at 612-873-2222.
If you are a survivor of domestic or sexual abuse, you can call the battered
women’s hotlIne (even if you are not a woman) at 651-646-0994 and find
a counselor.
These youth clinics also offer professional counseling and therapy.
face to face mental health (see Mental Health section, pg. 17)
651-772-5555; www.face2face.org
who: Ages 11-23.
what: Face to Face has a ton of services under one roof and is connected to
SafeZone drop-in center.
where: 1165 Arcade Street, St. Paul
SafeZone Drop-in Center has a full time therapist on staff that can see youth by
appointment or walk-in when available.
walk-In counselIng center
612-870-0565; www.walkin.org
who: Anyone in crisis.
what: They provide crisis counseling, short-term counseling for individuals,
couples and families; referrals for longer-term counseling or other resources. No
appointment is necessary; no paperwork; no fee.
where: 2421 Chicago Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Mon, Wed, Fri 1-3 PM; Mon-Thu 6:30-8:30 PM
know before you go: If you are under 18, parents do have access to your
records.
the brIdge (see Transitional Living Programs section, pg. 45)
612-377-8800; www.bridgeforyouth.org
who: Ages 16-21.
what: 24 hour walk-in counselor—open to anyone in community. 24 hour crisis
line (612-377-8800) and other groups for community.
where: 2200 Emerson Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Wed 5-6:30 PM.
bus: 6
know before you go: Outreach workers available. Must be sober.
dIstrIct 202 (see GLBTQ section, pg. 61)
612-871-5559; www.dist202.org
who: GLBTQ youth and allies ages 14-22.
what: “Ask Janet” provides one-on-one meetings with a mental health
professional.
where: 1601 Nicollet Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Call for times.
bus: 17, 18
know before you go: Unofficial case management and referral available.
StreetWorks outreach workers on site.
For more counseling services, look in the Mental Health section on pg. 17.
I’m UnDER 16…
There are very few resources if you are under 16. Things like transitional living
programs, independent living skills and employment programs that prepare you
for living on your own often only serve older teens. When you are under 16, it is
much more likely that you will be placed in protective custody (like foster care or
group homes) if you don’t have a stable living situation.
However, these places do work with youth under 16. Though your options are
more limited, the staff at these agencies can help you.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 199
SERVICES
face to face mental health (see General Medical section, pg. 16;
Mental Health section, pg. 17; Education section, pg. 39)
651-772-5555; www.face2face.org
who: Ages 11-23.
what: Face to Face has a ton of services under one roof and is connected to
SafeZone drop-in center.
where: 1165 Arcade Street, St. Paul
the brIdge (see Transitional Living Programs section, pg. 45)
612-377-8800; www.bridgeforyouth.org
who: Ages 10-21.
what: 24 hour walk-in counselor—open to anyone in community. 24 hour
crisis line (612-377-8800) and other groups for community. Emergency shelter.
Support groups. Case management.
where: 2200 Emerson Avenue S., Minneapolis
bus: 6
know before you go: May ask for your ID, but it’s OK if you don’t have it.
Sober space.
aIn dah yung (see Shelter section, pg. 28)
651-227-4184
who: Single youth (without children) and pregnant women ages five to 17 with a
focus on Native American youth. No youth with history of sexual perpetration or
arson, have been recently suicidal or have aggressive behavior.
what: Emergency shelter. Case management. Support groups.
where: 1089 Portland Avenue, St. Paul
when: Call 24 hour a day for intake.
language: Spanish and Ojibwa.
youth say: There are a lot of rules, but the staff will help you with whatever you
need.
safeZone (see Drop-In Centers section, pg. 6)
651-224-9644
who: Ages 14-20.
what: A drop-in center with food, case management, clothing, independent
living skills, GED, job search, phones, storage, showers, laundry and lots of
resources to hook you up with.
where: 308 Prince Street, St. Paul
when: Mon-Fri 1-5:30 PM, Sat 1-4 PM, not open on holidays.
know before you go: Sober space. The first time you are there they will
give you a tour and do a quick intake. They will want to know your name, age,
address and a little about your current situation. They might ask for ID, but
it’s OK if you don’t have it. Wheelchair accessible. No warrant or background
checks.
chIld protectIon servIces (cps)
612-348-3552 (Hennepin County), 651-266-4500 (Ramsey County)
In you are being abused, unsafe at home or your parents kicked you out of your
home, call CPS. If they decide that your case is serious enough they can work
with your family or put you into a different home (foster care). If CPS does not
take action the first time you call, call again to report another problem. CPS will
build a file for your case.
streetworks outreach workers
612-252-2735
who: Ages 12-21.
what: Outreach workers (OWs) are safe people out on the streets. When they
are working, they carry big green StreetWorks bags. Inside the bags are basic
supplies such as condoms, snacks, grocery gift cards, bus tokens, hygiene
supplies, clothing and diapers. OWs can also help you with other things like
finding a job, getting a GED, getting an ID, getting Rental Assistance, getting a
bus ticket to go live with your family, getting into a shelter, housing and more.
how: Call StreetWorks to find out who is working and their phone number. Give
them a call and see if they can talk to you or meet you. If you see an OW on the
street, ask them for help.
language: One Spanish speaker and one Hmong speaker.
ymca poInt northwest hotlIne
763-493-3052
Call if you are in a crisis situation and between ages 10 and 20.
I’m An ImmIGRAnT OR
A PERSOn OF cOLOR…
IMMIGRANT AND LEGAL SERVICES
Immigration law in the United States can be very confusing. Additionally, if you
have a case in the immigration courts system, a lawyer is not provided for you.
These agencies and services can help you understand the immigration system,
figure out what options you have and either represent or find someone who
can represent you in an immigration court. Many either provide services in a
language besides English or can arrange for translation.
If you are undocumented, you are at risk of deportation and should contact a
lawyer immediately. Most can work with undocumented immigrants, but some
can’t, so be sure to call and ask.
legal aId socIety
612-334-5970; www.midmnlegal.org
who: Low income individuals living in Hennepin County who need legal advice,
information or representation in civil cases in Hennepin County. Can provide
limited advice and referrals for people living outside of Hennepin County.
what: Legal advice and representation in all matters of civil law. No criminal
cases or delinquencies. Youth Law Project for youth under 18 can provide advice
about immigration law issues. For people 18 or older, legal aid provides advice,
referral and representation about immigration law.
where: 430 1st Avenue N., Minneapolis, third floor
when: If you are under 18, call Mon-Fri 9:30-11:30 AM or 1:30-3:30 PM to
do an intake. If you are over 18, call to find out when the next immigration law
clinics will be. There is usually one each month.
language: Intake staff speak Spanish, Somali, Hmong and Russian. Can serve
speakers of most languages with a translation service.
centro legal
651-642-1890
who: Low-income Latinos/as and their families.
what: Free legal assistance for civil cases including immigration, employment,
housing, consumer law and government benefits.
where: 2610 University Avenue W., Suite 450, St. Paul
language: Spanish.
know before you go: Appointments are required and only made by phone.
neIghborhood house (wellstone center)
651-789-2531 (Life Connections)
who: Anyone, but mostly residents of west St. Paul.
what: New immigrants: English classes, coaching on how to get a library card,
driver’s license, use public transportation, enroll children in school, banking,
saving, leasing and buying and groups for East African refugees and immigrants.
Food shelf: (staff speak 12 languages). Youth leadership programs: health
education and indoor athletics, computer skills classes and internet access.
Parents: early childhood education programs and childcare is available for when
you are in the building.
where: 179 Robie Street E., St. Paul
when: Call for hours.
how: Call to make an appointment for the food shelf or to find out when classes
are. Drop by and hang out in Youth Center. Case managers and social workers
available by referral.
language: Staff speak 19 languages including Spanish, Somali and Hmong
know before you go: To register for youth center, need form signed by parent.
If homeless, talk to director for special provisions.
CULTURALLY SPECIFIC AGENCIES
There are many agencies that are good at serving people who are either not
from the United States or who are not white. They offer services in different
languages, have culturally appropriate food and personal care products
and have a staff that understands a different cultural background. Many
young people feel more comfortable getting help from an agency that better
understands their culture or speaks their own language.
afrIcan amerIcan famIly servIces
612-871-7878; www.aafs.net
who: Anyone, focus on African Americans.
what: Mental health: individual and group counseling. No male counselors
and no prescriptions. Sliding fee. Chemical health: Rule 25 and outpatient
treatment. Free if in Hennepin or Ramsey County and low-income. Groups:
Sistas Advocating For Empowerment—domestic violence and anger
management focus for women (18+), MOVE—Men Opposing Violence—anger
management for men (18+). Family services: help with child protection and
welfare, parent assessments, family group counseling.
where: 2616 Nicollet Avenue Minneapolis. There is also one more office in
Minneapolis and one in St. Paul.
when: Mon and Tue 8 AM-7 PM, Wed and Thu 8 AM-9 PM.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 200
how: Call main number. Walk-ins in morning and appointments in afternoon.
Confirm office location.
know before you go: Need ID or documentation. If you have insurance, bring
information. They have a list of felony-friendly jobs at the front desk. Come in
and ask to see it.
youth say: They have a great anger management program.
amerIcan IndIan oIc
612-341-3358; www.aioic.org
who: Each program is different. GED: 16 or older with parent/guardian waiver.
High school diploma: grades 9-12. WIP: Native Americans who are 18+ and live in
Hennepin County. WIA: low income youth ages 14-21 who live in Hennepin County.
what: Get your GED or high school diploma. The three employment programs
(Minneapolis Employment Training, WIP and WIA) help you with life skills, work
readiness, job skills, applying for college and financial aid for college.
where: 1845 E. Franklin Avenue, Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 8 AM-4:30 PM.
how: Contact Betsy Green (ext. 129) to schedule an appointment for WIP or WIA.
Call for orientation times for other programs.
know before you go: Need ID and Social Security number for
employment programs.
brIan coyle center
612-338-5282; www.puc-mn.org
who: Residents of Cedar-Riverside neighborhood. Mainly Somali, Ethiopian,
Oromo and other East African immigrants. Youth programs for 18 and under.
what: A number of programs including after school and summer youth
programs with recreation (including basketball and soccer), leadership and
academic support. Also have FANS (college preparation program), a food shelf
and basic computer skills training. Confederation of Somali Communities and
the Oromo Community center are in the same building. Gym has open hours,
especially on hot days.
where: 420 15th Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 8 AM-8:30 PM. Call for specific program times.
bus: 55
language: Somali, Oromo, Swahili Amharic, Hmong, English and others.
know before you go: Some programs have a low cost ($10-$25). They
emphasize parental involvement and prefer that your parents know you are
there.
center for asIan and pacIfIc Islanders (capI)
612-721-0122; www.capiusa.org
who: Ages 18 and up, residents of Hennepin County. Serves mostly South East
Asian and East African people.
what: Asian-specific food shelf. Also have job training and placement, English
classes and education programs.
where: 3702 East Lake Street, Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 8:30 AM-4:30 PM. Closed on all major holidays.
how: Must do intake over the phone before accessing food shelf.
know before you go: Need proof of residency, proof of birth date and a Social
Security card for food shelf.
centro
612-874-1412; www.centromn.org
who: Hispanic and Latinos/as.
what: Apoyando a las familias Latinas para un futuro mejor. Family and health
p
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programs: children’s and adult’s mental health services, education and training,
women’s substance abuse support, domestic abuse services, maternal and
child health, Lamaze, HIV/STI education, diabetes prevention and management.
Centro de salud: family planning, dental care, physical exams, prenatal care,
mental health therapist and two psychologists (612-874-1420).
Youth development: youth cultural arts program. Community core programs:
crisis intervention, food shelf (specializing in Latino foods) and housing program.
Also have social worker, computer classes in Spanish, English classes and a
bilingual preschool.
where: 1915 Chicago Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 9 AM-5 PM. Closed on holidays.
how: Call and ask for the program you are interested in. Food shelf takes
appointments Friday morning, starting at 8:30 AM.
language: Spanish.
comunIdades latInas unIdos en servIcIos (clues)
612-746-3500 (Minneapolis), 651-379-4200 (St. Paul); www.clues.org
who: Anyone, especially Latinos/as.
what: Mental health: counseling and case management. Youth development
program, sexual assault advocacy and education and parent education and
assessments. Chemical health: Rule 25 for any age. Alcoholics Anonymous
(AA) meetings, reintegration support for families, outreach/case management for
homeless persons, tobacco prevention and intervention projects and the Latino
Resource Center. Employment program: use computers or walk-in program
in career center (job search, college search, résumé writing, phone calls to
employer). Can use phones, printers, fax and read newspaper, job kiosk and job
bank. Workshops on how to prepare for a job interview, résumé writing and job
counselors. Education: English language classes, citizen exam preparation, GED
exam preparation, Spanish literacy classes and basic computer skills.
where: 797 E. 7th Street, St. Paul and 720 E. Lake Street, Minneapolis
when: Mon-Thu 8:30 AM-7 PM, Fri 8:30 AM-5 PM.
how: Call for appointment.
language: Spanish.
know before you go: Go to the Minneapolis office if you live in Hennepin or
Dakota County and go to the St. Paul office if you live in Ramsey or Dakota
County. Otherwise, you will have to pay full price for services.
department of IndIan work
651-644-2768
who: Anyone who needs clothing. Tribal members of St. Paul who need food.
what: Food shelf: any age. Clothes closet: open to anyone. Parenting
program: young American Indian parents.
where: 1671 Summit Avenue, St. Paul
when: Mon-Fri 10 AM-1 PM.
know before you go: Need proof of St. Paul address and tribal identification
number for food shelf.
dIvIsIon of IndIan work
612-722-8722
who: People of American Indian descent or parenting American Indian children.
Enrolled Tribal members can access the food shelf.
what: Youth leadership development: after school help, summer
recreational activities, teen pregnancy prevention program and cultural
mentors. Strengthening family circles: prenatal, parenting, life skills and
nutrition classes for teen mothers ages 13 and up, Father’s Group, free and
confidential pregnancy testing, traditional Doula service to help with childbirth
and two reduced rent apartments for parents who cannot find safe, affordable
housing for women and their children and case management. Family violence
program: legal advocacy and counseling for men, women and children of
any age. Horizons unlimited: food shelf specializing in nutrition and diabetes
prevention, free clothing from time to time.
where: 1001 East Lake Street, Minneapolis
when: Mon-Thu 8 AM-5 PM. Food shelf: Mon-Wed 11 AM-2:45 PM, Thu 1-4:45
PM.
know before you go: Need tribal number for food shelf.
hmong amerIcan partnershIp (hap)
651-495-9160 (Main/Youth and Family), 612-377-6482 (Minneapolis),
651-291-1811 (St. Paul Education/Training); www.hmong.org/index.asp
who: Open to anyone, focus on Hmong culture.
what: Community/cultural center. English classes, basic computer training,
family circles—meet with families of youth who has left jail to help them
adapt. Classes and groups: after school, homework help, recreation, art, life
skills, Hmong culture, Hmong language, Hmong dance, tae kwon do, Hmong
Struggle for Success (for boys leaving juvenile detention centers and runaway
intervention girls group) and other peer groups. Hmong Teen Magazine is
released five times a year to 11,000 Hmong teens and needs Hmong teens to
help make it.
where: Three locations. Youth and family: 1075 Arcade Street, St. Paul.
Employment services for those on MFIP: 1121 Glenwood Avenue N.,
Minneapolis. Education and training: 430 Dale Street, St. Paul.
when: Mon-Fri 8:30 AM-5 PM.
how: Some walk-ins. Call staff (Long Vang: Struggle for Success, Vandy Vu:
Hmong youth pride peer groups) and sign up. For updated classes call
651-495-9160.
language: Hmong.
southeast asIan communIty councIl
612-521-4859; www.seacc-mn.org
who: Ages 12-18.
what: Cultural programs, including martial arts and theater. Youth leadership
program helps youth find a job and explore post secondary options including
careers and college opportunities. Teen pregnancy prevention and a tobacco
prevention program.
where: 1827 44th Avenue N., Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 8:30 AM-5 PM.
how: Call for more information about meeting times for specific programs.
bus: 724 LTD, 5
language: Hmong, Laotian, Thai and English.
I Am GAy, LESBIAn,
BISEXUAL,
TRAnSGEnDER OR
QUESTIOnInG…
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
DROP-IN CENTERS
pg 201
These are places to meet and socialize with other GLBTQ and allied young
people in a safe and confidential environment. There are also adults and
peers staff you can talk to about GLBTQ issues, like coming out and safer sex
information for non-straight sex.
dIstrIct 202
612-871-5559; www.dist202.org
who: GLBTQ youth and allies ages 14-22.
what: Drop-in center and safe space for GLBTQ youth and allies. Offers
opportunities to gain training, skills and work experience, free and confidential
HIV testing, queer sex ed, homework help and tutoring, Ask Janet (one-on-one
meetings with a mental health professional), street law discussions, mediation,
sobriety support, youth community meetings, Empowered Expressions Theatre
Group, transgender discussion group and more. Every first and third Saturday of
the month is an EVENT Saturday with dances, drag shows, etc. There is also a
library of GLBTQ materials and a small clothing closet.
where: 1601 Nicollet Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Mon, Wed and Sun 4-9 PM, Fri 4-11 PM, event Sat 5 PM-midnight, chill
Sat 4-9 PM.
bus: 17, 18
know before you go: Unofficial case management and referral available.
StreetWorks outreach workers on site.
quatrefoIl lIbrary
651-641-0969; www.quatrefoillibrary.org
who: Anyone.
what: A library of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer and
questioning materials.
where: 1619 Dayton Avenue, Suite 105, St. Paul
when: Mon-Fri 7-9 PM, Sat 10 AM-5 PM, Sun 1-5 PM. Closed on holidays.
bus: 94, 144, 21
ADVOCACY
If you are GLBTQ and you have been a target of a hate crime, intimidation or
discrimination, this agency can help you make sure that you are safe and get
the help you need.
outfront mInnesota antI-vIolence program
612-822-0127 extension 210 or 1-800-800-0350;
www.outfront.org
who: Anyone who is GLBTQ and has been a victim of domestic or intimate
partner violence or a hate crime (including assault, harassment, property
damage, vandalism, etc.).
what: Free advocacy is provided to get you in touch with people that can help
you with legal issues, counseling, medical help, safety and more.
where: 310 E. 38th Street, Suite 204, Minneapolis
when: Crisis line is answered 24 hours a day.
bus: 23, 9, 11, 18
SUPPORT GROUPS
These groups provide a safe space to discuss issues that are important
to you with your peers. They also are a place to meet other GLBTQ and allied
young people.
access works (see Safer Drug Use section, pg. 68)
612-870-1830; www.accessworks.org
who: Men who have sex with men and use crystal; often have snacks.
what: Free M2M support group.
where: 11 West 15th Street, Minneapolis
when: Wed 4:30-6 PM.
the brIdge (see Transitional Living Programs section, pg. 45)
612-377-8800; www.bridgeforyouth.org
who: Ages 16-21.
what: So What If I Am (GLBTQ) Support Group. Also has 24 hour walk-in
counselor for anyone in the community and a 24 hour crisis line (612-377-8800).
where: 2200 Emerson Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Sat 10 AM-noon.
bus: 6
know before you go: Outreach workers available. Sober space.
face to face (see Education section, pg. 39)
651-772-5555; www.face2face.org
who: Ages 11-23.
what: One GLBTQ Support Group, Tue 6-8 PM. Call for intake. (Transgender
support group Thu nights at DISTRICT 202.)
red door clInIc of the hennepIn county publIc health clInIc
(see HIV, STD and Pregnancy Testing section, pg. 22)
612-543-5555; www.reddoorclinic.org
who: Gay or bisexual men.
what: Support groups including health interventions for men. Services are either
low-cost or free, based upon your ability to pay. No one is ever turned away for
inability to pay.
where: Health Services Building, 525 Portland Avenue, 4th Floor, Minneapolis
when: Call for group times.
bus: 24, 5
safeZone (see Drop-In Centers section, pg. 6)
651-224-9644; www.face2face.org
who: Ages 14-20.
what: A drop-in center that has a number of GLBTQ groups. Call for times.
where: 308 Prince Street, St. Paul
youthlInk/project offstreets
612-252-1200; www.youthlinkmn.org
who: Ages 16-20.
what: Drop-in center with GLBTQ groups and safe space.
where: 41 N. 12th Street, Minneapolis
when: Call for group times. Drop-in is Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri and Sat 3-8 PM
HOUSING
avenues glbtq host home program
612-522-1690; www.avenuesforyouth.org
who: GLBTQ youth ages 18 and older.
what: Youth live in home with a local family that is often GLBTQ. Goal is for
youth to pay rent to family after three months. Sometimes adoption happens.
where: 1708 Oak Park Avenue N., Minneapolis
how: Must be referred by Avenues case manager.
bus: 19
language: Spanish.
know before you go: Long waiting time.
I Am/wAS In FOSTER
cARE, JAIL OR wILL
TURn 21 SOOn…
LEAVING FOSTER CARE
FyI: LEAvInG FOSTER cARE OR OTHER
cOUnTy SySTEmS
Getting help: If you have been in foster care, juvenile detention or have a case
with Child Protection Services or your county, you may be able to access many
county services.
If you were in foster care when you were under 18, you may be eligible for an
Educational and Training Voucher to help you pay for school.
Call hennepIn county front door for Social Services at 612-348-4111
or ramsey county front door at 651-266-4444. Say “I was in foster
care when I was younger (or your situation). I am [age] and need services
because [explain your needs]. I would like help figuring out what services are
available.”
TIP: alwayS let your CaSe manager know that you were In
foSter Care beCauSe they may be able to hook you uP wIth
more SerVICeS.
If you have a social worker and you are under 18, you have the right to keep
your social worker and your benefits until age 21 if you ask for it before your
18th birthday.
You also have the right to a safe home. If your foster family is abusive, call Child
Protection Services at 612-348-3552 in Hennepin County or 651-266-4500 in
Ramsey County. For legal help contact:
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 202
chIldren’s law center
651-644-4438
who: Youth in foster care or wards of the state who are under 18.
what: Provide attorneys for foster care kids who are abused or neglected, wards
of the state and youth transitioning into independent living. Totally free. Call for
more information.
where: 1463 West Minnehaha Avenue, Suite 3, St. Paul
RESOURCES FOR EX-OFFENDERS
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These agencies can help if you have a history of convictions or felonies.
amIcus: reconnect
612-348-8570; www.amicususa.org/reconnect/index.html
who: Anyone who has felonies (or occasionally misdemeanors).
what: Helps ex-offenders find shelter, housing, employment, ID, education,
aftercare programs, clothing, family services, single-parent resources, food
shelves and furniture. They give out some tokens and bus passes. They have
weekly support groups for men and women separately.
where: 15 S. 5th Street, Suite 1100, Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 9 AM-noon and 1-4 PM.
afrIcan amerIcan famIly servIces (see Mental Health section, pg. 17)
612-871-7878; www.aafs.net
who: Anyone, focus on African Americans.
what: List of felony-friendly jobs at the front desk. Come in and ask to see it.
where: 2616 Nicollet Avenue, Minneapolis (main office: two in Minneapolis and
one in St. Paul)
when: Mon, Tue 8 AM-7 PM, Wed and Thu 8 AM-9 PM.
emerge (see Employment section, pg. 43)
612-529-9267; www.emerge-mn.org
who: Ex-offenders 18 or older, rarely someone under 18.
what: Several employment services. Northside Job Connections helps exoffenders who are over 18 find and hold jobs through résumé building, soft skills
training, connection to employers, advocacy and transportation. Call to set up an
appointment and to do paperwork.
where: 1101 West Broadway, Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 8:30 AM-5 PM.
language: Spanish (in the NET program).
hmong amerIcan partnershIp (hap)
(see Culturally Specific Agencies section, pg. 58)
651-495-9160; www.hmong.org
who: Open to anyone, focus on Hmong culture.
what: Hmong Struggle for Success (for boys leaving juvenile detention centers) and
runaway intervention, girls group and other peer groups. Call for updated classes.
where: 1075 Arcade Street, St Paul
when: Mon-Fri 8:30 AM-5 PM.
how: Call Long Vang and sign up.
reentry works
651-288-0324 (ask for Chris Fotsch); mnges.easterseals.com/site
who: Men ages 18 and over who have been released to the Twin Cities Metro
Area from a MN Department of Corrections facility within the last 90 days.
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People on work release or federal parole are not eligible.
what: Receive help from either Goodwill/Easter Seals or the Wilder Foundation/
EXCEL Program. Goodwill/Easter Seals will place you in a temporary minimum
wage job within 24 hours and provide ongoing skills training, support services
and job placement. Wilder Foundation provides daily presentation on job search
and conviction response, job leads, résumé prep and access to phone/fax.
where: 1600 University Avenue, Suite 219, St. Paul (Spruce Tree Center)
when: Mon-Fri 7:30 AM-5 PM.
how: Walk in to Wilder Foundation office to sign up.
bus: 21, 94, 16
know before you go: You will not be able to choose between programs.
GETTING HELP WHEN YOU’RE 21
FyI: TURnInG 21
Turning 21 causes things to change. The good news is you can still use many
of the same food shelves, clothes closets and free meals. Requirements for
receiving Food Support, General Assistance and other county services remain
the same as well.
What does change is how to get into shelter (pg. 28) and how to get a case
manager or outreach worker:
Shelter: Try a private shelter first. They are smaller than the public shelters and
also have more one-on-one attention and support. This is also a good way to
meet an advocate who can help you with some of the changes you are making.
At the shelters you can also get medical care and mental health care provided
by the county.
Staff: Get to know staff people and ask them questions. Drop-in centers have
county outreach staff who can help you with questions. People Incorporated
651-774-2604 does street outreach in the Twin Cities. Find a case manager in
a shelter, through an outreach worker or through the county.
TIP: PICk uP a CoPy of the handbook of the StreetS at a droP-In
Center or the allIanCe of the StreetS (330 e 22nd Street,
mInneaPolIS). It IS fIlled wIth reSourCeS for adultS In need.
While change can be difficult, you can be successful in the adult service world.
Good luck.
I nEED LEGAL
HELP…
GENERAL LEGAL SERVICES
If you aren’t sure about what kind of help you need, a good place to start is the
Youth Law Clinic at Project Offstreets.
youth law clInIc at youthlInk/project offstreets
(see Drop-In Centers section, pg. 6)
612-252-1200; www.youthlinkmn.org
who: Ages 16-20.
what: Youth Law Clinic. Meet one-on-one with a lawyer to ask questions and
get legal advice. These lawyers will not represent you in court, but they can refer
you to a program that will. This referral can help you get representation faster
than if you went in on your own.
where: 41 N. 12th Street, Minneapolis
when: Mon 3:30-6 PM.
If you are being charged with a crime and need advice or representation in a
criminal court in Hennepin County, an alternative to getting a public defender is:
legal rIghts center (lrc)
612-337-0030; www.legalrightscenter.org
who: Low income and/or people of color. Can only represent people in Hennepin
County Courts but can give advice to anyone in the metro area.
what: Can help with any criminal court issue for adults or juveniles. Can be a
first call for help if you are arrested. LRC is an alternative to the public defender,
who won’t meet with you before your court appearance. Attorneys can give
you advice, information or representation depending on the need. They also do
family group conferences to help resolve conflicts; call for more information.
where: 1611 Park Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: For an intake, go in person on Tue from 10 AM-noon. If you cannot make
it then, clinics are also offered at community centers, including El Centro, CLUES,
the Brian Coyle Center and the American Indian Center. Call for these hours.
language: Spanish speaking attorneys and can get translators for other
languages.
know before you go: Bring any documents related to your legal issue.
In Ramsey County, there is no service like the Legal Rights Center. However, the
Neighborhood Justice Center may be open soon, so if you need help in Ramsey
County, call and see if they are open yet:
neIghborhood justIce center
651-645-5446; www.njcinc.org
who: Anyone with a criminal case (adult or juvenile) in Ramsey County.
what: Free legal advice and representation for criminal cases in Ramsey County.
know before you go: This service is not open as of August 2007 but it may be
soon. Call for current information.
In Hennepin County, the first time you appear in court on a misdemeanor charge
you can get 15 minutes of free advice from the Misdemeanor Defense Project
(MDP):
mIsdemeanor defense project
612-752-6666
who: Anyone making a first appearance (arraignment) in any of the four
Hennepin County Misdemeanor Courts.
what: Brief, free advice for misdemeanor cases.
where: Misdemeanor Courtrooms in Hennepin County
when: At your arraignment.
know before you go: Ask the clerk in the courtroom about the Misdemeanor
Defense Project attorney (she or he should be pointed out to you). The first
consultation is free. If you want the attorney to represent you, you will have to pay.
If you need legal help with a civil law issue (anything that isn’t a crime and isn’t
a juvenile delinquency), you can try these agencies in Hennepin County:
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 203
legal aId socIety
612-334-5970; www.midmnlegal.org
who: Low income individuals living in Hennepin County who need legal advice,
information or representation in civil cases in Hennepin County. Can provide
limited advice and referrals for people living outside of Hennepin County.
what: Free legal advice and representation in all matters of civil law (no criminal
cases or delinquencies). Youth Law Project for youth under 18 can do CHIPS
petitions, orders for protection, social service advocacy, immigration, housing,
family law and options about living away from your parents. For people 18
or older, Legal Aid provides advice, referral and representation for issues of
housing, discrimination, public benefits, taxes, family law and immigration.
where: 430 1st Avenue N., Minneapolis; 3rd floor
when: To do an intake, call Mon-Fri, 9:30-11:30 AM or 1:30-3:30 PM.
Immigration law clinics are held once a month; call for next date and time.
language: Intake staff speak Spanish, Somali, Hmong and Russian. Can get a
translator for most other languages.
volunteer lawyers network
612-752-6677; www.volunteerlawyersnetwork.org
who: Low income people that live or have an open case in Hennepin County.
More helpful for adults over 18 and may refer younger people to Youth Legal
Clinic or Youth Law Project.
what: Legal help for most civil legal matters (not public benefits). Legal clinics,
phone advice and full representation. Free or low cost.
where: 600 Nicollet Mall, Suite 390A, Minneapolis
when: Mon-Fri 9 AM-4 PM.
how: Call and complete intake based on financial eligibility (takes 20-25 minutes).
language: Somali and Spanish.
know before you go: Long wait for family law and bankruptcy.
And these agencies in Ramsey County or its neighboring counties:
southern mInnesota regIonal legal servIces
651-222-4731; 1-888-575-2954 (rural hotline); www.smrls.org
who: Youth any age from Ramsey, Washington, Dakota, Scott and Carver
Counties who do not have the right to court appointed counsel (or are
Native American).
what: Felony expungement program, help with financial situations, refugee,
immigrant, migrant services, benefits, housing and family law, government
benefits. No criminal or consumer law.
where: 166 East 4th Street, Suite 200, St. Paul and other locations
when: Mon-Fri 9 AM-noon and 1-3 PM.
how: Call with name, address and nature of problem.
language: English, Spanish, Hmong, Somali, Laotian, Amharic, Khmer,
Cambodian and Thai.
know before you go: Cannot serve undocumented immigrants.
centro legal
651-642-1890
who: Low-income Latinos and their families.
what: Free legal assistance for civil cases including immigration, employment,
housing, consumer law and government benefits.
where: 2610 University Avenue W., Suite 450, St. Paul
language: Spanish.
know before you go: Appointments are required and only made by phone.
If you are a youth in foster care or a minor ward of the state:
chIldren’s law center
651-644-4438; http://209.211.250.173/
who: Youth in foster care or wards of the state who are under 18.
what: Provide attorneys for foster care kids who are abused or neglected, wards
of the state and youth transitioning into independent living. Totally free.
where: 1463 W. Minnehaha Avenue, Suite 3, St. Paul
how: Referred through the courts or self referral.
TIP: get a SoCIal worker for helP aCCeSSIng legal SerVICeS.
YOUR RIGHTS AND THE POLICE
FyI: InTERAcTInG wITH THE POLIcE
Protecting Your Rights during Police Encounters:
- You have the right to remain silent. Don’t talk to the police or anyone else. Tell
police that you will not talk to anyone until you have a lawyer.
- If police ask permission to search you or your property, you have the right to
say “no.” Be polite but firm. Watch out for police who try to trick you into
giving permission.
- If you are arrested, police have the right to search you.
- Unless there’s an emergency, or police believe a serious crime is taking place,
police can’t enter your home without a warrant. Don’t give them permission to
enter your home. Ask them to show you a warrant before allowing them inside.
- Remain calm, even if police are violating your rights. If threatened, police are
more likely to lash out against you or others. Often, it is better to challenge
police in court.
- Keep a record of the encounter. Remember names, times, locations and
events. Contact any of the organizations in this or the previous section for
legal help.
communItIes unIted agaInst polIce brutalIty
612-874-STOP; www.cuapb.org
who: Anyone.
what: 24 hour crisis line that people can call to report instances of abuse.
Can send out a crisis team to investigate the complaint, take photos and
statements and offer immediate assistance. We follow up with legal, medical
and psychological referrals and other services as needed.
I USE DRUGS…
FyI: mARIJUAnA
SAFER DRUG USE
In Minnesota, possession of a small amount of marijuana (less than 1.5 ounces)
is only a petty misdemeanor, which is not a crime. The maximum punishment is
a $300 fine. If you are in a car, be sure to put your weed in the trunk; if you have
more than 1.4 grams in the passenger area of the car, you could be charged
with a misdemeanor. Possession of or intent to sell more than 1.5 ounces of
marijuana is a felony.
FyI: SAFER DRUG SUPPLIES
So you’ve decided to use drugs; do it the safer way! Always try to use new gear
that you can get for free at your local needle exchange. It’s best to never share
anything (like needles, cookers, cottons or water). If you must re-use your rigs,
clean them with bleach (this doesn’t kill hepatitis C). Bleach only kills HIV if you do
it right, so talk to the staff at the needle exchange and make sure you know how.
You’re more than likely going to have to deal with an overdose, so educate
yourself on what to do. Talk to older drug users you can trust or talk to the staff
at the needle exchange. They’ll talk to you about anything without judging you.
access works
612-870-1830; www.accessworks.org
who: Anyone who uses drugs.
what: Targets all injection drug users or anyone at risk for HIV or hepatitis and
tries to hook them up with services like housing and basic needs. The Needle
Exchange has safer injecting and piercing supplies as well as other safer drug
supplies. Drop by the Store Front for safer sex supplies, free coffee, HIV/STD
resources, free HIV/hepatitis C testing, prevention case management and
support groups also available.
where: 11 West 15th Street, Minneapolis (HIV/hep C testing can be done off-site)
when: Store Front/Needle Exchange: Mon-Fri 11AM-6 PM, Sat 11 AM-3 PM.
Free HIV testing Mon-Fri 11 AM-4 PM or by appointment. User’s Group (for
injection drug users) Wed 4:30-6 PM, M2M Crystal Support Group (men who
have sex with men and use crystal) Tue 7-8 PM, Health Realization Sat 1-3 PM.
know before you go: No cost, no wait. Wheelchair accessible. Often snacks
available. Can use phone, voicemail or address if needed.
DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT
If you think it’s time to take a break in using or want to make a change in your
life, treatment is an option. If you are under 18 you have a right to get treatment
without your parent’s knowledge.
If you have insurance, contact your insurance company to see if you have
coverage for treatment. If not, call Hennepin County at 612-879-3503 or
Ramsey County at 651-266-4444 and request a Rule 25 funding evaluation
(free service) that will evaluate your financial need and chemical dependency.
This will determine if you get inpatient (live in) or outpatient treatment. If you/
your family cannot afford treatment, the county should pay for it.
afrIcan amerIcan famIly servIces
(see Mental Health section, pg. 17)
612-871-7878
who: Anyone, focus on African Americans.
what: Chemical health: Rule 25 and outpatient treatment. Free if in Hennepin or
Ramsey County and low-income.
where: 2616 Nicollet Avenue, Minneapolis (main office: two in Minneapolis and
one in St. Paul)
when: Mon and Tue 8 AM-7 PM, Wed and Thu 8 AM-9 PM.
how: Call main number. Walk-ins in morning and appointments in afternoon.
Confirm office location.
know before you go: Need ID or documentation. If have insurance,
bring information.
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 204
youth say: It has a great drug treatment program.
s
comunIdades latInas unIdos en servIcIos (clues)
612-746-3500 (Minneapolis, bigger mental health department),
651-379-4200 (St. Paul); www.clues.org
who: Anyone, especially Latinos/as.
what: Free clinic. Chemical health: Rule 25 for any age from Ramsey and
Dakota Counties in St. Paul or Dakota and Hennepin Counties in Minneapolis.
Free as long as in the right county. Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings,
reintegration support for families, outreach/case management for homeless
persons, tobacco prevention and intervention projects and the Latino Resource
Center. Mental health: counseling and case management.
where: 797 E. 7th Street, St. Paul and 720 E. Lake Street, Minneapolis
when: Mon-Thu 8:30 AM-7 PM, Fri 8:30 AM-5 PM.
how: Call for appointment. Walk in to use computer or job search.
language: Spanish.
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west suburban teen clInIc (see Safer Sex Supplies section, pg. 21)
952-474-3251; westsuburbanteenclinic.org
who: Ages 12-23.
what: Teen clinic that provides addiction intervention and assessment. All
services on sliding fee based on income; no one turned away who can’t pay.
where: 478 2nd Street, Excelsior
when: Mon, Thu and Fri noon-5 PM, Tue noon-8 PM, Wed 10 AM-8 PM and Sat
10 AM-2 PM.
how: Call to make appointment for exams, counseling or classes.
language: Translation available for many languages.
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HOUSING FIRST
It is difficult to find housing if you have any drug related crimes in your
background. Public Housing Authority disqualifies people for drug/criminal
offenses in the last three years. But chemical dependency and long-term
homelessness can qualify you for permanent subsidized housing. Ask your
case manager if they can help you access “Shelter Plus Care” programs for
subsidized housing. Or try living in a transitional living program (pg. 45) until
your three-year penalty is over.
YouthLink also has a housing program for chemically dependent youth:
youthlInk/project offstreets
(see Drop-In Centers section, pg. 6)
612-252-1200; www.youthlinkmn.org
who: Youth ages 16-21 diagnosed with mental illness, HIV or
chemical dependency.
what: Group residential housing for youth with 24 hour crisis support.
where: 41 N. 12th Street, Minneapolis
when: Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri and Sat 3-8 PM.
how: Walk-in or call and ask about the program.
SUPPORT GROUPS
If you think that you’d like to meet with people like you who are dealing with
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some of the same situations as you, you might want to try a support group.
the brIdge (see Transitional Living Programs section, pg. 45)
612-377-8800
what: Chemical Health Group for ages 16-21. The Bridge also has a 24 hour
walk-in counselor open to anyone in community, a 24 hour crisis line
(612-377-8800) and other groups for community.
where: 2200 Emerson Avenue S., Minneapolis
when: Wed 5-6:30 PM.
know before you go: Sober space. Outreach workers are available.
access works
612-870-1830; www.accessworks.org
what: User’s Group for injection drug users: Wed 4:30-6 PM. M2M Crystal
Support Group for men who have sex with men and use crystal: Tue 7-8 PM.
Health Realization Group: Sat 1-3 PM.
where: 11 West 15th Street, Minneapolis (HIV/hepatitis C testing can be done
off-site)
know before you go: Wheelchair accessible. Often snacks available.
alcoholIcs anonymous
Check out www.aaminneapolis.org and www.aastpaul.org for meeting
locations and information.
I’m LIvInG OR
wORKInG On THE
STREET…
SEX WORK
So you are doing sex work, be safer about it!
FyI: SAFER SEX wORK
Before You Go:
- Have a supply of condoms, lube, rubbing alcohol, band aids and napkins.
- Let your john see you put your money away. Don’t put it in the same place as
the rest of your money so if he robs you he won’t take it all.
- Have a list of services and prices and stick to it!
Health Care:
- ALWAYS use a condom or dental dam during anal, oral or vaginal sex! If you
don’t have one, use plastic wrap for oral sex or rimming.
- Brush teeth daily, but no less than 30 minutes before giving oral sex.
- Change underwear daily or turn inside out on alternate days.
- Pee and lube up before sex if possible.
- Never touch any cuts, sores or skin openings on yourself or your partner! Cover
with gauze when you are working and wash with soap and water.
Clothes:
- Wear shoes that come off easily or that you can run in.
- Don’t wear big jewelry that can be grabbed or ripped.
- Don’t wear anything that can get caught in a car door.
- If you need glasses or contacts, wear them!
Working in a Car:
- Arrange price, time and location before you get in.
- Keep door open a crack.
- Wave goodbye and yell what time you will return so your john knows someone
will be waiting for you.
Sexual Violence:
Everyone has the right to be safe from sexual assault or violence no matter their
job! If you have been raped, sexually assaulted or abused, see pg. 34 or contact
these sex worker-specific agencies. If you or your friend gets hurt working
legally, call 911. If you get hurt during sex work, call the police anonymously and
ask for options first.
These agencies help sex workers access services and leave sex work if they want.
breakIng free
651-645-6557; www.breakingfree.net
who: Women and girls in prostitution. All ages welcome. Male sex workers can
call to find services too. Serves mostly women of color but open to anyone.
what: Services to help women escape from prostitution. Drop-in center provides
crisis services to women and girls who come in straight from the streets.
Groups: chemical dependency relapse prevention, Building Strong Families.
Health program: physical examinations, appropriate lab testing, family planning
services and other medical services. Transportation provided. Information about
HIV/AIDS, STDs, maternal alcohol abuse, breast and cervical cancer, diabetes
and family planning. Internship program: this program allows women who
may have never held a real job to become employable. Local businesses hire
women in this program, regardless of criminal records or lack of employment
history for three to six months. Women who successfully complete internships
are then hired on a permanent basis. Case manager provided. Youth: can help
you deal with Child Protection Services. Transitional housing program: five
units, 18 month program in community home, independent living skills and case
management. Permanent housing program: 17 units in apartment, indefinite
stay. Can also help you get ID.
where: 770 University Avenue W., St. Paul
when: Mon-Fri 9 AM-5 PM. Office not open on holidays.
how: Call and make an intake appointment or just walk in off the street.
language: One Spanish speaker.
know before you go: Do not have to quit sex work to get services. Also has
basic supplies, hygiene, condoms, combs, soaps and a clothing closet. Don’t
have to be sober, clean or healthy. If they can’t help you, they will find you
someone who can.
teen prIde
1-888-PRIDE-99 (toll free), 612-728-2062 (24 hour crisis line);
www.fcsmn.org/PRIDE
who: Ages 12-17 and adult survivors of prostitution. Women only.
what: Drop-in center with hygiene supplies, computer, phone books,
phone, couch and snacks. Weekly support groups for adult and teen survivors
of prostitution.
where: 4123 E. Lake Street, Minneapolis
when: Call for group meeting times. Drop-in hours are Mon 9 AM-5:30 PM,
Tue-Thu 9 AM-6:30 PM. Advocates are available Mon-Fri 8 AM-4:30 PM.
Meeting for teens at Project OffStreets (41 N. 12th Street, 612-252-1200) Mon
5-7 PM.
how: Call and set up an appointment or just drop-in. Must do 30 minute intake
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 205
to participate in groups (with paperwork and interview). No intake needed to be
in drop-in center.
language: Spanish and Somali speakers in the building but not this program.
know before you go: Goal of organization is to get you out of sex work, but
they do not require that you quit.
GANGS
east sIde boys and gIrls club gang preventIon
and tattoo removal
612-282-5953 (ask for DJ David Thelen)
who: Ages 18 and under for St. Paul youth, open on case by case basis to
other youth.
what: Tattoo removal and gang prevention program. Tattoo removal treatments
every six weeks. Attend life skills classes on Wednesdays. Volunteer
requirements of 20 hours between tattoo removal treatment. Job skills,
education and involvement and recreation.
where: Off White Bear Avenue on Ames Avenue in East St. Paul
know before you go: This is a big commitment.
PANHANDLING AND LOITERING
Panhandling is asking other people for money, things or help. Loitering is just
sitting or standing around where you’re not supposed to. You can get in trouble
for both of these activities. But you also have rights.
FyI: PAnHAnDLInG AnD LOITERInG LAwS
what’s legal on the street depends on where you are.
In mInneapolIs, it is illegal to panhandle in these places:
- In restrooms
- Within 10 feet in any direction from a crosswalk
- In public transportation vehicles, facilities, stops or shelters
- On any park land, playground or public entertainment venue, including within
50 feet of entry or exits
- By asking someone in a parked or stopped car
- At a sidewalk café
- At an entrance of a business or government building
- Within 80 feet in any direction from an ATM or financial institution
- At or within 10 feet of gas station, liquor store or convenience store property
While:
- Touching others
- Blocking a path or entrance
- Following a person who said “no” to ask again
- Using obscene, profane or abusive language
- Making others afraid that you may hurt them
- Threatening to damage other’s stuff
- Scaring others
- When you are drunk or high
- When you are in a group of two or more
- Asking for help while it is dark outside
However, it IS legal to:
- Stand calmly and ask for help once
- Sit or perform with a sign (if you have a sign you can’t verbally ask for help)
Loitering on public property is not against the law, but loiterers may be
arrested for other illegal things like:
- Drinking alcohol in public
- Trying to buy sex
- Aggressive panhandling (see above)
- Disorderly conduct
- Blocking walking or car traffic
In st. paul, it is illegal to panhandle in:
- A restroom
- At a bus or light rail stop or shelter
- At a crosswalk
- In any public transportation vehicle or public transportation facility
- In a vehicle which is parked or stopped on a public street, alley or off-ramp
- In a sidewalk café or restaurant
- In a line waiting to get into a business or government building
- Within 20 feet in any direction from an ATM or entrance to a bank, other
financial institution or check cashing business
- In a park
- Within 10 feet in any direction of a gas station, liquor store or convenience store
- In public or private property where there is a posted “no solicitation” sign
While:
- Touching a person without their consent
- Blocking someone’s path or entrance to a building or vehicle
- Following a person who walks away from you after you ask once with the
intent to intimidate or ask again
- Being or using language that is offensive, obscene or abusive
- Approaching the person in an intimidating way
- When you are drunk or high
- When you are in a group of two or more
Loitering on public property in St. Paul is only illegal in these situations:
- Hanging out with thieves, prostitutes, etc. after midnight
- Intending to do something illegal, like selling drugs or sex
- Blocking the sidewalk or traffic for no reason
TIPS: be honeSt about your needS when you are aSkIng for
money. PeoPle wIll aPPreCIate It.
tranSgender youth Should aSk for money at glbtQfrIendly PlaCeS.
try aSkIng for goodS InStead of money, lIke CIgaretteS.
mOnDAy-THURSDAy mEALS
breakfast
mInneapolIs
Branch III Catholic Charities 7-7:30 AM; 7:30-8 AM
Sharing and Caring Hands 10-11 AM
st. paul
West 7th Salvation Army 7:30-8:30 AM
lunch
mInneapolIs
Branch III Catholic Charities 11:30 AM-noon; noon-12:30 PM
House of Charity noon-1 PM
Sharing and Caring Hands noon-1:30 PM
st. paul
Salvation Army Payne Ave noon-12:45 PM
Dorothy Day Center noon-12:45 PM
dInner
mInneapolIs
Branch III Catholic Charities 7-7:30 AM; 7:30-8 AM
Sharing and Caring Hands 10-11 AM
st. paul
Dorothy Day Center 9-9:30 AM
lunch
mInneapolIs
Branch III Catholic Charities 11:30 AM-noon; noon-12:30 PM
House of Charity noon-1 PM
Wesley United Methodist noon-1 PM
st. paul
Dorothy Day Center noon-12:45 PM
dInner
mInneapolIs
Harbor Lights (Salvation Army) 6-6:30 PM
st. paul
mInneapolIs
Sharing and Caring Hands 4-5:30 PM
Holy Rosary 5:15-6:15 PM
River of Life 5:30-6:15 PM
St. Stephen’s 5:30-6:30 PM
Harbor Lights (Salvation Army) 6-6:30 PM
Marie Sandvik Center 8-8:30 PM (available Tue ONLY)
st. paul
Dorothy Day Center 4:30-5:15 PM
St. Matthew 5-6 PM
Faith Lutheran 5:30-6:30 PM (NOT available Wed)
bloomIngton
Creekside Community Center 5:30-6:30 PM
Dorothy Day Center 4:30-5:15 PM
SUnDAy mEALS
breakfast
mInneapolIs
Sharing and Caring Hands 9:30-11 AM
st. paul
Dorothy Day Center 9-9:30 AM
lunch
mInneapolIs
House of Charity noon-1 PM
st. paul
Dorothy Day Center noon-12:45 PM
dInner
FRIDAy mEALS
breakfast
mInneapolIs
Branch III Catholic Charities 7-7:30 AM; 7:30-8 AM
Harbor Lights (Salvation Army) 6-6:30 PM
Marie Sandvik Center 8-8:30 PM
st. paul
st. paul
mInneapolIs
West 7th Salvation Army 7:30-8:30 AM
lunch
mInneapolIs
Branch III Catholic Charities 11:30 AM-noon; noon-12:30 PM
House of Charity noon-1 PM
st. paul
Salvation Army Payne Ave noon-12:45 PM
Dorothy Day Center noon-12:45 PM
dInner
mInneapolIs
River of Life 5:30-6:15 PM
St. Stephen’s 5:30-6:30 PM
Harbor Lights (Salvation Army) 6-6:30 PM
Marie Sandvik Center 8-8:30 PM
st. paul
Dorothy Day Center 4:30-5:15 PM
Faith Lutheran 5:30-6:30 PM
bloomIngton
SCHEDULE OF FREE MEALS
breakfast
Creekside Community Center 5:30-6:30 PM
SATURDAy mEALS
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 206
Dorothy Day Center 4:30-5:15 PM
cOnTAcT InFORmATIOn
Branch III Catholic Charities: 714 E 17th Street, Minneapolis 612-278-1120
Creekside Community Center: 9801 Penn Avenue S., Bloomington 952-948-0746
Dorothy Day Center*: 183 Old 6th Street, St. Paul 651-293-1919
Faith Lutheran Church*: 499 Charles Avenue, St. Paul 651-291-8765
Harbor Lights (Salvation Army): 1010 Currie Avenue, Minneapolis 612-338-0113
Holy Rosary Church*: 2424 18th Avenue S., Minneapolis 612-724-8929
House of Charity: 714 Park Avenue S., Minneapolis 612-333-8968
Marie Sandvik Center: 1112 E Franklin Avenue, Minneapolis 612-870-9617
River of Life Lutheran Church*: 2200 Fremont Avenue N., Minneapolis
612-588-5777
Salvation Army: 401 West 7th Street, St. Paul 651-224-4316
Salvation Army: 1019 Payne Avenue, St. Paul 651-776-8169
Sharing and Caring Hands (Mary Jo’s): 425 N. 7th Street, Minneapolis 612-338-4640
St. Matthew Catholic Church: 510 Hall Street, St. Paul 651-224-9793
St. Stephen’s *: 2211 Clinton Avenue, Minneapolis 612-377-9810
Wesley United Methodist Church: 101 East Grant Street, Minneapolis 612-871-3585
*Meals provided by Loaves and Fishes: www.loavesandfishesmn.org
N
h
4t
St
4th
rsi
ty
St
Av
e
N
394 Target
S
3rd
S
Av
e
th
Av
e
35W
St
55
94
Riv
ers
ide
5
5
Av
e
E Franklin Ave
585
pg 207
26th Ave S
mInnEAPOLIS
Cedar Ave S
Park Ave S
E 26th St
35
27th Ave S
S
3
E 26th St
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
Street, pg. 7
e
Av
65
E Franklin Ave
4
10 youthlInk/project offstreets: 41 N. 12th
20th Ave S
52
35W
8 the brIdge: 2200 Emerson Avenue S., pg.31
9 st. mark’s: 519 Oak Grove Street, pg. 11
St
rk
rtl
an
dA
ve
4th
eA
ve
ett
rqu
Ma
S5
7 access works: 11 W. 15th Street, pg. 68
th
Av
e
Hubert H
Humphrey
Metrodome
Cedar Ave S
in
6 dIstrIct 202: 1601 Nicollet Avenue S., pg. 60
17
nn
ep
Avenue S., pg. 11
th
Portland Ave
1st Ave S
He
5 groveland food for youth: 1900 Nicollet
S
S8
12
E Franklin Ave
Blaisdell Ave S
W 26th St
5
65
Av
e
6
5
94
W Franklin Ave
8
7
2
on
t
12
Loring
Park
gt
5th
St
St
55
Lasalle Ave
9
Av
e
th
4 project solo: 2222 Park Avenue S., pg. 42
hin
19th Ave S
e
Av
S7
Wa
s
t
St
th S
H
in
ep
n
en
th
rd
S
th
2425 Chicago Avenue S., pg. 16
S4
94
10
S3
S4
Center
S
35W
3 teenage medIcal servIces (tams):
Pa
N 10th St
10
1 legal aId socIety: 430 1st Avenue N., pg. 66
SE
2 century plaZa: 330 S. 12th Street
Av
eS
1
2n
d
H
1s
Av
en
tA
e
ne
N
v
pi
e
N
n
Av
e
Glenwo
SE
152
Po
St
d
3r
55
od Ave
N
e
Av
St
h
7t
h
5t
N
52
13
4640
Un
ive
Lyndale Ave S
746
65
1
61
1 unIon gospel mIssIon: 435 E. University Avenue,
pg. 33
Ja
ck
University Ave W
so
49
n
St
Rice St
52
94
166 E. 4th Street, Suite 200, pg. 66
Mo
un
ds
7 dorothy
Bl day center: 183 Old 6th Street, pg. 33
Wa
rn
St
52
Av
e
S
Ex
Saint Paul
Downtown
Airport
St
Ra
nd
ol
ph
Rd
ha
S
S
37
as
Rd
St
ch
rt
an
be
ge
Ro
St
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36
b
Wa
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ith
Sm
e
Av
5
N
37
d
R
ep
ar
d
ph
e
Av
3
l
o
nd
Sh
vd
er
Rd place: 244 10th Street E., pg. 34
8 famIly
37
N
140
rt
Kellogg, pg. 20
servIces:
Rd
ard
e
Sh
5 ramsey county human servIces: 160 E.
6 southern mInnesota regIonal legal
5
rt
37
Fo
10
E
St
S
vd
Bl
36
Mears
Park
p
37
94
6
gg
o
ll
Ke
4
E
St
W
St
10
be
e
Av
7th
E
on
it
m
St
9th
Ro
h
7t
4 safeZone: 308 Prince Street, pg. 6
12
ks
7
um
8
c
Ja
Marshall Ave
t
aS
sh
ba
St
Wa
ter
Pe
St
12
3 la clínIca: 153 Cesar Chavez Street, pg. 16
94
52
94
2 neIghborhood house: 179 Robie Street E., pg. 7
5
Regions
Hospital 35E
Ra
ST. PAUL
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 208
2
52
nOTES
nOTES
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
nOTES
pg 209
I wAnT
TO HELP
OTHERS…
AND ACTIVISM
streetworks is interested in youth feedback. Call 612-252-2735.
VOLUNTEERING
I want to give back to the community now that I am back on my feet. Or I want to
help others in order to help myself.
Volunteer at any of the organizations in this guide or join an activist group like
one of these:
outfront mInnesota
612-822-0127; www.outfront.org
who: GLBTQ and allied youth.
what: Volunteering opportunities for activism and organizing.
where: 310 E. 38th Street, Suite 204, Minneapolis
how: Call to find out how you can help.
bus: 23, 9
peace foundatIon
612-521-4405; www.citypeace.org
what: Working to end local violence starting in North Minneapolis. Peace ball, 5K
Peace Run, Basketball on the Block, Peace Block Parties, Peace Summer and more.
how: Call to find out how you can help.
subZero collectIve
www.collectivesight.com/home.htm
what: Created by Minneapolis youth to connect hip-hop, politics and products.
The Collective provides a way to channel hip-hop culture into a political vehicle.
how: Call to find out how you can help.
yo! the movement
612-874-9696; www.yothemovement.org
what: A non-profit organization that hosts, promotes and implements safe
events, programs and happenings for youth and young adults in Minnesota.
Benefit concerts and performances.
where: 420 N. 5th Street, Suite 1040, Minneapolis
how: Call to find out how you can help.
This guide was made possible by StreetWorks and many others in the
youth-serving community. Kulture Klub also supported the creation of Our
Guide. Printing provided by Partners for Violence Prevention.
The StreetWorks team of 25 outreach workers can be found on the streets
and in community sites seven days a week. Outreach workers are on the
streets to answer questions, listen and help young people find resources.
They carry green bags filled with snacks, bus tokens, condoms, diapers,
emergency blankets, basic clothing and hygiene supplies.
This guide is made for youth, by youth. Over 130 Twin Cities youth in
shelters, drop-in centers and community centers provided the topics,
agencies, youth comments, title, tips and artwork for this guide. So, use it
in the way that fits your life. Carry it around or leave it to be found. Copy
any part of it and pass it on to your friends.
For more guides, or to make suggestions or corrections for future guides,
contact streetworks at 612-252-2735.
youthlInk/project offstreets
(see Drop-In Centers section, pg. 6)
612-252-1200; www.youthlinkmn.org
who: Ages 16-20.
what: Youth advisory board, youth health board, youth groups and social
activism around issues of youth homelessness.
where: 41 N. 12th Street, Minneapolis
when: Mon, Tue, Thu, Fri and Sat 3-8 PM.
PIcK UP A cOPy
OF OUR GUIDE!
CONTACT STREETWORKS TO LEARN HOW.
[email protected] OR
(612-252-2735.
traInIng guIde desIgn by adsoka
request more copIes by contactIng 612-279-2379 or [email protected]
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 210
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines
Redesigned and Printed Fall 2009
Graphic design by Jaclyn Kraft
jaclyn kraft / freelance graphic designer / www.jaclynkraft.com
“wholehearted creative design”
SHYIP Protocol Guidelines, Printed Fall 2009
pg 211
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