Commercial heating brochure

Commercial heating brochure
For Commercial Applications
The name Mitsubishi is
synonymous with excellence
Founded in 1921, Mitsubishi Electric is
now a global, market leading environmental
technologies manufacturer. In the UK, the
Living Environmental Systems Division provides
pioneering solutions that heat, cool, ventilate
and control our buildings in some of the most
energy efficient ways possible.
Mitsubishi Electric has developed a range of heat pumps
specifically designed for heating commercial buildings. The
Ecodan® range provides renewable heating, challenging
traditional heating solutions, whilst meeting the energy and
carbon reduction demands of today and beyond.
We believe that global climate challenges need local solutions.
Our aim is to help individuals and businesses reduce the
energy consumption of their buildings and their running costs.
At Mitsubishi Electric, we have evolved and today we offer
advanced environmental systems that really can make a
world of difference.
Renewable Heating Solutions
for Commercial Buildings
Issues driving
the need for
renewable
heating
How heat is provided to commercial buildings has
to change dramatically. Fuel security, rising fossil
fuel prices, increasingly tough legislation and the
need to combat climate change, are all driving the
demand for greater efficiency and the inclusion of
renewable energy.
The key drivers encouraging the use of renewable heating are:
The need to reduce CO2 emissions by 80% by 20501
Reducing the UK’s reliance on fossil fuels
Meeting increasingly tough legislation
Incorporating renewable energy
Commercial buildings are responsible for 18% of total UK
emissions2 and typically 51% of the emissions generated by
each building are due to the need for space and water heating.3
It is clear that if the UK is to achieve the goals that have been
set then these areas need urgent attention. This is why many
new build and major refurbishment projects throughout the
UK must now demonstrate significant use of renewable
energy or simply face planning refusal.
To reduce reliance on fossil fuels and preserve our energy
resources into the future, we must consider alternative heating
solutions that harness renewable energy and subsequently
reduce energy consumption, lower emissions and
increase efficiency.
A further 900,000
commercial buildings
are expected to be in
place by 2050, this
sector has a big part to
play in reducing CO2.
Pressure to improve energy efficiency and reduce CO2 emissions,
has resulted in the UK Government introducing tough new
laws and challenging targets. As part of the EU objective to
increase the use of renewable energy, the UK has committed
to sourcing 15% of its energy from renewable sources
by 2020.4
5
Page 4
1
2
3
4
5
www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/carbon_budgets/carbon_budgets.aspx
Digest of UK Energy Statistics, BRE
Carbon Trust Analysis, BRE
www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/meeting_energy/renewable_ener/renewable_ener.aspx
Pathways 2050
To reduce reliance on fossil fuels and
preserve our energy resources into the
future, we must consider alternative
renewable heating solutions
Key legislation
driving the
need for
renewable
heating
Successive UK Government’s have led with
legislation to drive the need for renewable heating.
Some of the key items with regard to the provision
of heat to buildings include:
Part L of the Building Regulations
Through Part L (2013) the Government aims to reduce emissions
from new non-domestic buildings by an average of 9% when
compared against the 2010 standards. As the need for heat
is the major energy demand in a building, it is vital that this area
is addressed. This means that energy consumption has to be
reduced as much as possible through reducing the heat lost by a
building, making it more air tight and improving levels of insulation.
One of the most significant rules of Part L 2013 is that before
construction starts the technical, environmental and economic
feasibility of high efficiency alternative systems needs to be
considered. Low and zero carbon alternatives, such as heat
pumps, can then be chosen to deliver renewable heat, whilst
removing the need for direct fossil fuel use on site that typically
results in higher direct emission levels.
As with previous versions, Part L 2013 has a prescribed
method for showing compliance with the regulations. The
compliance calculation methods reflect a greater emphasis
on value for money of low carbon technologies. There is also
a greater requirement to demonstrate energy efficiency as
well as carbon reduction.
By setting targets for both carbon and energy use, the
new Part L 2013 prevents any dwelling meeting Part L
requirements by offsetting poor fabric performance with
renewables or low carbon technologies.
Page 6
Planning Policy
Planning is key to how buildings are delivered
and has an important role in achieving the wider
goals of reducing UK emissions and influencing
the choice of technology that should be installed.
Stringent building regulations, enforced by local
authorities, now mean that no new build project
will get planning permission without first
demonstrating an improvement in efficiency,
as well as the use of renewable energy. An
example of planning policy is The London Plan.
The London Plan
In October 2013, the Mayor of London published
an updated version of the London Plan, which is
an overall strategic plan for the UK’s capital city.
The Plan covers a broad range of important
issues including transport, economics and
the environment.
One of the most important parts of the London
Plan covers ‘London’s response to climate change’.
This section of the document deals with how the
city will be affected by increasing temperatures
and rising sea levels. The UK Climate Projects
2009 (UKCP09)6 suggest that by 2020 London
could experience an increase in the mean summer
temperature of 1.5ºC. This would be accompanied
by a rise in mean winter rainfalls of 6%.
For new-build projects, the emphasis in the latest
version of the London Plan is very much on
reducing carbon emissions. The aim is to achieve
an overall reduction in London’s carbon dioxide
emissions of 60% below 1990 levels and to
deliver 25% of the city’s energy requirement
from decentralised sources by 2025. All London
boroughs are expected to play their parts in
achieving this goal.
The plan sets carbon emissions targets for new
buildings which are expressed as improvements
on the 2010 Building Regulations. There is also
a requirement for each major development
proposal to submit an in-depth energy assessment
including how CO2 reduction targets are going to
be met. These target reductions will be set higher
each year up to 2031 when new buildings will
have to be zero carbon.
Carbon reduction targets for non-domestic buildings
Year
Improvement on 2010
Building Regulations
2010 - 2013
25%
2013 - 2016
40%
2016 - 2019
As per Building Regulation requirements
2019 - 2031
Zero carbon
The plan is very clear that one of the biggest
challenges is in the built environment. Under the
Greater London Authority Act 2007, the London
Mayor has a statutory duty to ‘contribute towards
the mitigation of, and adaptation to, climate
change in the UK’.
Two strategies that are considered particularly useful
to London are decentralised energy generation
and the issue of secondary heat sources. These
secondary sources include waste heat from
industrial and commercial activities, as well as
heat that exists naturally in the air, ground or water.
According to the London Plan, London
contributes 8.4% of the UK’s carbon emissions7,
amounting to around 44.71 million tonnes. Due
to the high density of development in London,
and the high use of public transport, the city
does have the lowest carbon emissions perperson-per-year of all the UK regions7. However,
this does not diminish the scale of the challenge.
The London Plan expresses clearly that new
development proposals should use renewable
technologies to provide secondary heat, including
heat pumps, wherever possible. A wide range of
technologies are recommended, to ensure that
each site uses the most suitable renewable
solution and can achieve the most cost-effective
carbon emissions savings.
The building stock is a key area of concern for
London, and the plan estimates that around 80%
of the existing building stock will still be in use in
2050. The plan concentrates mainly on
influencing new-build projects, with the aim of
limiting future changes in carbon emissions
beyond what is already calculated.
As a consequence of rising fuel costs,
tough legislation and the need to
reduce CO2 emissions, the energy
saving issues faced by those involved
in heating commercial properties are
now considerable.
6 UKCP09: Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) June 2009
7 Figures from The London Plan July 2011, Chapter 5 London’s Response to Climate Change
Page 7
ECR:
Efficiency,
Carbon reduction
& Renewables
At Mitsubishi Electric, we’re aware of the need
to influence and improve how energy is used.
Buildings need heating, it constitutes the greatest
part of their energy demand, however, there is
also a pressing need to increase energy efficiency,
reduce carbon emissions and incorporate
renewable energy.
Using advanced heat pump technology, our commercial
heating products can effectively address the three key
issues we all face:
Energy efficiency
Carbon reduction
Renewable energy
Increased Efficiency
Maximum efficiency is paramount: the cheapest and
cleanest kilowatt of energy is the one you do not use.
Achieving this means sealing a building’s envelope first,
but as the energy consumed through the life of a building
accounts for 83% of its total footprint8, it also requires the
selection and correct installation, maintenance, monitoring and
operation of the most energy-efficient heating technologies.
Pivotal to ECR, heat
pumps make significantly
better use of electricity to
improve efficiency and
help to preserve future
fuel supplies.
It is vital that short-term decisions give way to those that take
a whole lifetime view. Fossil fuels will continue to increase in
cost and become harder to obtain, making them a far less
attractive option, especially as the technologies that burn them
are already at their peak efficiency. Greater economies can
now be realised by switching to other fuels. Indeed, a future
with electricity as the only point-of-use energy source is now
possible and desirable, as heat pumps can use this to multiply
naturally available heat to more useable temperatures.
8 Low Carbon Construction, Innovation & Growth Team, Final Report
Page 8
Reduce Carbon Emissions
Integrate Renewables
Buildings in all their forms account for the highest
proportion of emissions in the UK than any other
sector. This has to change and the emissions
generated through the need for heat must be the
first priority.
The UK is looking to achieve 12% of its heat
from renewable sources by 20209, and this
ambitious target requires immediate action if it is
to be realised. Heat pumps offer a solution that
delivers proven environmental benefits that are
scalable for use in many buildings, whilst being
competitive in economic terms and acceptable
to the vast majority of users due to their reliable
and efficient operation.
Reductions can be achieved now with technology
that is readily available, reliable and scalable for
use in many building types. Heat pumps are one
of the options, and the skills already exist to
incorporate them into most building designs.
They can remove the use of fossil fuels on-site,
thereby reducing direct emissions and with national
targets that are large and short term, they are
increasingly seen as being a pivotal solution.
Heat pumps are the only technology that will
benefit from grid electricity supplies getting
cleaner over time.
We are fortunate that most of our buildings are
suitable for the inclusion of heat pumps and that
our ambient conditions mean they can work at
their optimum output.
Our heat pumps upgrade naturally occurring
renewable heat found in the outside air,
ground or water.
The ECR Approach:
9 www.decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/What%20we%20do/UK%20energy%20supply/Energy%20mix/Renewable%20energy/policy/renewableheat/1387-renewable-heat-incentive.pdf
Page 9
Renewable
heat from heat
pumps is the
answer
Decisions taken on which heating technology to use will
affect the performance of a building for many years to come.
The need to address the urgent issues of climate change as
well as fuel security and rising prices are key, and with
heating accounting for more than half of the total energy
consumed by an average commercial property, this is the
obvious area to target to make the required difference.
Using advanced heat pumps specifically designed to deliver
heat in the UK climate, Mitsubishi Electric meet these tough
energy challenges head on. Designed for use in commercial
properties our renewable products use proven heat pump
technology to deliver effective, low carbon heating; providing
a simple solution that can replace traditional systems.
Classified by the UK Government and European Union
as a renewable technology10, our commercial heating
products come in a range of sizes and options to meet
the required demands.
For every 1kW of
electricity consumed by
one of our air source heat
pump systems, 3.2kW of
heat can be delivered,
69% of which is
renewable energy.
Renewable heat pumps:
Help to achieve renewable energy targets
Provide high levels of efficiency, cutting running costs
as well as CO2 emissions
Are easy to design, reducing installation
time and minimising disruption
11
Offer cost effective renewable heating,
suitable for retro-fit or new build
Are fully scalable and able to work independently
or in conjunction with other systems
Provide sanitary hot water
Page 10
10 European Parliament & Council, Renewable Energy Directive 2009/28/EC
11 As independently tested by BSRIA based upon BSEN14511 Part 3 standard rating conditions. Due to the method
of operation, the performance of heat pumps will vary based upon the temperature of the heat source and the
requirements of the heat delivered. The BSEN14511 testing relates to the heat pump performance only and
not the entire heating system.
How a heat pump works
Our Ecodan heat pumps require only a small amount of electricity to harvest,
upgrade and move heat from one location to another.
To achieve this a vapour compression cycle is used, which has the ability to take low temperature
renewable heat from the environment and raise it to usable temperatures capable of handling the
space and water heating loads required in buildings.
The Vapour Compression Cycle :
11
2
1
Condenser
Compressor
4
Evaporator
3
Expansion Device
1
Compression - Refrigerant vapour is raised in pressure and therefore temperature.
2
Condensing - This hot pressurised refrigerant vapour is then passed through a condenser,
3
Expansion - Liquid refrigerant is then allowed to expand, which lowers its pressure.
4
where it liquefies and gives off useable heat that can be delivered to a building by either air or water.
Evaporation - The low pressure liquid then expands and absorbs naturally occurring heat from
the environment (this can be from the air, water or ground) and in doing so changes back to a vapour,
which is then passed to the compressor for the cycle to start again.
Page 11
The
Non-Domestic
Renewable
Heat Incentive
The Renewable Heat Incentive is the world’s first
long term financial support for the generation of
renewable heat. It was introduced to encourage the
uptake of renewable technologies, such as heat
pumps, whilst lowering the UK’s carbon emissions.
The Government’s Department of Energy & Climate Change
(DECC) will now pay for the generation of renewable heat.
This has been designed to level the playing field between the
cost of renewable and traditional fossil fuel systems.
The non-domestic RHI aims to encourage the uptake of
renewable heat technologies by compensating for barriers
to their adoption, including the current higher capital costs
and in some cases higher operational expenditure for these
technologies compared to those using traditional fossil fuels.
The heat generated must be used for space, water or process
heating to be eligible for RHI support and participants in the
scheme will be required to meet a number of ongoing
obligations, including maintaining equipment, providing
information to Ofgem (which administers the scheme)
and allowing installations to be inspected.
So how does it work:
The Non-Domestic Renewable
Heat Incentive Application Process
Set up RHI profile on the Ofgem website
Submit application to Ofgem online
Ofgem accredits install if all eligibility criteria is met
Meter readings are submitted periodically
Save money and get paid thanks
to Mitsubishi Electric’s Ecodan
Time period - Claimable for 20 years
Tariff - 2.5p/kWh (Air) / 7.2p/kWh* (Ground/ Water)
Heat claimable - Total heat output
Installations from - 15th July 2009 (Ground / Water) / 4th December 2013 (Air)
Claim from - 28th November 2011 (Ground/ Water) / 28th May 2014 (Air)
Flow temperatures - Low flow temperatures will achieve lower
running costs, but RHI allows any flow temperature as long as it
achieves an SPF (Seasonal Performance Factor) of 2.5
Accreditation - Our non-domestic heat pumps are Microgeneration
Certification Scheme (MCS) and Enhanced Capital Allowance
(ECA) approved
*Tier 1 - 8.7p/kWh Tier 2 - 2.6p/kWh
Page 12
Ecodan Selection Tool
Mitsubishi Electric has developed a calculation tool to help all stakeholders involved
in selecting a new heating system get an insight into what a new Ecodan heat pump
can deliver for their individual project.
By answering a few very simple questions Mitsubishi Electric can now deliver a bespoke proposal for
a project, including an estimate of running costs and Carbon emissions against alternative systems.
The application interface is intuitive and goes on to deliver Renewable Heat Incentive payment figures,
allowing you to see how making small adjustments to the system will affect the financial reward for having
made the decision to move towards this renewable technology.
The new tool is just part of a suite of new functionality we are moving
towards in order to make the process of selecting, designing and
signing off on choosing Ecodan easier
Approximate
Renewable
Heat Incentive
payment
Financial
analysis
summary
The tool is available online or as an app for tablets or smartphones:
heating.mitsubishielectric.co.uk/ecodanselectiontool
Page 13
MELFinance
Solutions for
Businesses
Mitsubishi Electric developed MELFinance
Solutions to respond to current market
conditions and the need for customers to
manage cash flow, while benefitting from the
installation of leading technology to reduce
carbon and operational costs.
Through project finance your organisation benefits from
a minimum five-year ‘trouble free’ heating, cooling and
ventilation proposition, for every new installation, with a
finance package that integrates:
On-site installation and commissioning fees
Minimum 3 year warranty on all Mitsubishi Electric equipment
Minimum six-monthly scheduled maintenance visits
24/7 emergency technical helpline for any on-site issues
The Benefits of MELFinance Solutions
Project finance from Mitsubishi Electric is a flexible alternative
to a traditional bank loan or overdraft facility that provides
significant cash flow and tax benefits:
No need for hefty deposits: Finance deals are secured
wholly or largely on the heating, cooling and/or ventilation
equipment being financed
Stronger cash flow: Releases tied-up cash and preserves
other forms of credit for other business or operational needs
Fixed, regular payments: Helps you plan for the future
by eliminating uncertainty and costly surprises
Quick decisions: We always aim to provide a prompt
turnaround for funding applications
Immediate payment: Settlement of the full installation and
equipment invoice upon installation/delivery
A structured finance programme will give you access to
Mitsubishi Electric equipment with the benefit of savings on
items such as energy, maintenance and CO2.
Applying for finance is easy. Once your quote for equipment,
installation and commissioning is agreed, a decision on funding
is normally reached by our finance providers within 24 hours.
To get your no obligation finance proposal visit:
MELFinanceSolutions.co.uk
Mitsubishi Electric Europe B.V.’s credit brokerage reference number: 658891.
See Financial Conduct Authority’s Interim Permission Consumer Credit Register for full details.
Hire-purchase finance will be considered subject to status by an independent finance house as facilitated by Mitsubishi
Electric. Finance house’s terms and conditions apply. This brochure does not constitute an offer to supply goods/services or
provide or arrange hire-purchase finance. Finance only available where you enter into Mitsubishi Electric’s contract package
for removal of any existing installation, design, supply and commissioning services. Package is conditional on you entering
into (i) a maintenance contract for the installation and (ii) a hire-purchase agreement with Mitsubishi Electric’s finance partner.
Otherwise, all goods are supplied subject to Company’s General Terms and Conditions of sale, copy available upon request.
Page 14
Project finance from
Mitsubishi Electric is a flexible
alternative to a traditional bank
loan or overdraft facility that
provides significant cash flow
and tax benefits
Why choose
Ecodan
heat pumps
over other
technologies
Efficient, versatile and renewable, Ecodan heat
pumps are specifically designed for commercial
properties of any size, new build or refurbishment.
Wherever there’s a need for space or water heating,
we rival gas, oil and biomass - easily meeting heat
load and renewable energy targets.
Ecodan is also compliant with the Energy Related Products
Directive or ErP, which is a key part of the European Union’s
drive to encourage businesses and consumers to use more
energy efficient products.
Mitsubishi Electric heat pumps perform well against all relevant
criteria. Crucially they are highly scalable and can be applied to
projects of all sizes, from doctors surgeries through to entire
district heating projects for instance. While it has existed for
a long time and is tried and tested, heat pump technology
continues to evolve and improve.
Commercial scale Ecodan heat pumps are available as
air or ground / water source options and can be applied
in a variety of different methods.
The following pages outline some potential
applications of heat pumps, highlighting the
heat source (where heat is being transferred
from) and the heat delivery method (how heat
is being delivered).
Page 16
Heat Sources
Air source - Air
Water source - Rivers and lakes
Water source - Aquifers
Page 17
Heat Sources
Ground source - Bore holes
Ground source - Slinky systems
Heat recovery - Industrial processes
Page 18
Heat Delivery
Working with AHU’s and HIU’s
Technology working together
Passive cooling
Page 19
How our Ecodan heat pumps
work for you commercially
Perfect for use in a variety of applications, our commercial heating products
are easy to design, quick to install, simple to maintain and efficient to run.
To demonstrate how our systems work and to show how easily they can be applied
to suit many commercial applications, we’ve used a large school as an example.
This illustration depicts 3 different commercial Ecodan options:
1
Ecodan CAHV Air Source Heat Pump Monobloc System
2
Ecodan CRHV Water Source Heat Pump Monobloc System
3
Ecodan CRHV Ground Source
Heat Pump Monobloc System
2
Ecodan CRHV Water Source Heat Pump Monobloc System
These systems are able to extract heat from an aquifer or open loop system such as a lake or river in
order to maximise efficiency. Educational facilities are an example of where there may be available water
resources that can be used to optimum effect.
Page 20
Ecodan CAHV Air Source Heat Pump Monobloc System
Our monobloc system provides a simple, packaged solution that’s perfect for use on retro-fit and new
build alike. Using ‘Optimised Cascade’ for high level efficiency and ‘Back-up & Rotate’ built into the
controller, the monobloc system’s ability to replicate fossil fuel burning systems is second-to-none.
1
3
Ecodan CRHV Ground Source
Heat Pump Monobloc System
These systems are able to extract heat from the ground in order
to maximise efficiency. Educational facilities are an example of
where there may be available ground resources that can be
used to optimum effect.
Page 21
Specifying
and sizing
an Ecodan
heat pump
Heat pumps generally deliver their capacity
through higher flow rates. This means that the
sizing of pumps and pipe work needs to be
carefully considered at the design stage to
ensure optimum efficiency.
Factors to consider when sizing a heat pump should include:
Flow temperature
The lower the flow temperature, the more efficient the heat
pump will be. Our heat pumps can vary the flow temperature
according to conditions and load, in order to optimise the
system’s full potential.
Heat emitter sizing
The heat emitter will need to be sized correctly to achieve
the required output at a lower flow temperature. This is easily
achieved at the design stage, with an adaptable approach
to the application of the heating system.
Working with other technology
In most cases we can meet 100% of the load. However, the
best solution for a given application may be a combination
of technologies working together to meet the load. Our heat
pumps work perfectly with other technologies and are capable
of fully integrating with the majority of BEMS (Building Energy
Management Systems).
The illustration below shows a heat pump working in conjunction
with a secondary heat source in a bivalent set-up.
Ecodan Working in Conjunction
With Other Technologies:
Page 22
Operating an Ecodan heat pump
Operating an Ecodan heat pump correctly is essential. Many features are built
into our Ecodan systems to ensure that the optimum control, performance and
efficiency are achieved. Some examples of these are:
Night Setback - ensuring fabric protection and faster heat up times
24 hour running - optimising the Coefficient of Performance (COP) by trickling heat
into a building at partial loads
Defrost on air source - allowing the unit to function at outdoor temperatures of -20ºC
Weather compensation - by varying the flow temperature, Ecodan optimises the system at different
ambient conditions and loads. The two graphs below illustrate the effect that flow temperature
control can have on COP, when compared to a fixed flow temperature system
Effect of Flow Temperature on COP:
Variable Flow Temperature
Variable Flow Temperature Control:
Fixed Flow Temperature 55ºC
Page 23
CAHV Monobloc System
The Ecodan CAHV air source heat pump monobloc
system can operate singularly, or form part of a
multiple unit system. The CAHV also comes equipped
with a wide range of controller features as standard.
A multiple unit system has the ability to cascade available units on and
off to meet the load from a building. As an example of this modulation,
a 16 unit system allows 0.5kW increments of capacity, from 18kW all
the way up to 688kW. This level of modulation is unprecedented within
the heating industry and with cascade and rotation built in as standard,
the Ecodan CAHV system is perfectly suited to a wide range of
commercial applications.
CAHV-P500YA-HPB
Certificate Number: MCS HP0002
Heat Pumps
Product Reference: CAHV-P500YA-HPB
Key Features
Multiple unit cascade control of up to 688kW capacity
Split refrigerant circuits within each CAHV provide 50% back up
Ability to rotate units based on accumulated run hours
Provides from 25ºC up to 70°C water flow temperatures
without boost heaters
Low maintenance, hermetically-sealed monobloc design
Low on-site refrigerant volume
HIC (Zubadan) technology delivers 43kW at -3ºC
with minimal drop off down to -20ºC
The CAHV Monobloc system qualifies for the Energy Technology
List. It is also an MCS certified product, helping to build a rapidly
growing Microgeneration industry based on quality and reliability.
Optimisation of Cascading Units Deliver Maximum Efficiency
Optimisation is built into
the CAHV systems logic
in order to deliver
maximum efficiency.
The standard controller adapts
the capacity delivered to ensure
that compressors work within
their most efficient range, turning
individual CAHV units on and off
as necessary.
This feature utilises inverter technology
to its greatest potential, whilst also
ensuring capacity is available at all
working ambient temperatures.
Page 24
Product Information
Heating
CAHV-P500YA-HPB
MODEL
CAHV-P500YA-HPB
HEAT PUMP SPACE
HEATER - 55˚C
ErP Rating
ɳs
HEAT PUMP SPACE
HEATER - 35˚C
SCOP
ErP Rating
ɳs
SCOP
HEATING*1
Capacity (kW)
(A-3/W35)
Power Input (kW)
COP
OPERATING AMBIENT TEMPERATURE (°C DB)
SOUND PRESSURE LEVEL AT 1M (dBA)*2*3
LOW NOISE MODE (dBA)*2
FLOW RATE(l/min)
WATER PRESSURE DROP (kPa)
DIMENSIONS (mm)
Width
Depth
Height
WEIGHT (kg)
ELECTRICAL SUPPLY
PHASE
NOMINAL RUNNING CURRENT [MAX] (A)
FUSE RATING - MCB SIZES (A)*4
A++
125%
3.19
A+
139%
3.54
42.6
15.2
2.80
-20~+40ºC
59
Variable
126
18
1978
759
1710 (1650 without legs)
526
380-415v, 50Hz
3
17.6 [52.9]
63
*1 Under normal heating conditions at outdoor temp: -3°CDB / -4°CWB, outlet water temp 35°C, inlet water temp 30°C
*2 Under normal heating conditions at outdoor temp: 7°CDB / 6°CWB, outlet water temp 35°C, inlet water temp 30°C as tested to BS EN14511
*3 Sound power level of the CAHV-P500YA-HPB is 70.7dBA. Tested to BS EN12102
*4 MCB Sizes BS EN60898-2 & BS EN60947-2
ɳs is the seasonal space heating energy efficiency (SSHEE)
ɳwh is the water heating energy efficiency
Schematics
Upper View
Front View
Side View
Page 25
PUHZ Monobloc Systems
Our range of Ecodan monobloc air source heat
pumps includes 5, 8.5, 11.2 and 14kW sizes.
Now with the ability to cascade up to six units of
the same output, Ecodan monobloc systems offer
a capacity range from 5 through to 84kW.
Designed to suit a wide number of applications, these models offer a
viable solution for the varying requirements that domestic and small
commercial applications demand.
PUHZ-W50VHA2(-BS)
Key Features
Self-contained unit, only requiring water and electric connections
No need for gas supply, flues or ventilation
Single phase power supply with a low starting current
(3 phase available for 14kW)
Low maintenance and quiet operation
Operates with outside temperatures as low as -25ºC
Multiple unit connection
Hybrid function, for use with conventional boilers
2-zone energy efficient space heating control
Available as a standalone, packaged or semi packaged system
Energy monitoring as standard
Coastal protection models available (-BS)
PUHZ-W85VHA2(-BS)
Application Examples
The vast majority of UK homes
Small Retail Outlets
Dental / Doctors Surgeries
Public Sector / Commercial Buildings
The PUHZ Monobloc systems qualify for the Energy
Technology List. They are also MCS certified products,
helping to build a rapidly growing Microgeneration
industry based on quality and reliability.
PUHZ-(H)W112-140VHA(2) / YHA2(-BS)
Page 26
Certificate Number: MCS HP0002
Product Type: Heat Pumps
Product Reference: PUHZ-W50VHA2-(BS), PUHZ-W85VHA2-(BS)
PUHZ-W112VHA-(BS), PUHZ-HW140VHA2/YHA2-(BS)
Product Information
Heating
PUHZ-(H)W50-140VHA(2)/YHA2(-BS)
MODEL
PUHZ-W50VHA2(-BS) PUHZ-W85VHA2(-BS) PUHZ-W112VHA(-BS) PUHZ-HW140VHA2(-BS) PUHZ-HW140YHA2(-BS)
HEAT PUMP SPACE
HEATER - 55˚C
ErP Rating
ɳs
SCOP
HEAT PUMP SPACE
ErP Rating
ɳs
HEATER - 35˚C
SCOP
HEAT PUMP COMBINATION
ErP Rating
HEATER - Large Profile*1
ɳwh
HEATING*2
Capacity (kW)
(A-3/W35)
Power Input (kW)
COP
OPERATING AMBIENT TEMPERATURE (°C DB)
SOUND PRESSURE LEVEL AT 1M (dBA)*3*4
LOW NOISE MODE (dBA)*3
WATER DATA
Pipework Size (mm)
Flow Rate (l/min)
Water Pressure Drop (kPa)
DIMENSIONS (mm)*7
Width
Depth
Height
WEIGHT (kg)
ELECTRICAL DATA
Electrical Supply
Phase
Nominal Running Current [MAX] (A)
Fuse Rating - MCB Sizes (A)*6
A++
127%
3.25
A++
162%
4.12
A
99%
4.8
1.63
2.95
-15 ~ +35°C
45
40
22
14.3
12
950
330+30*5
740
64
220-240v, 50Hz
Single
5.4 [13]
16
A++
128%
3.27
A++
162%
4.12
A
97%
8.3
2.96
2.80
-20 ~ +35°C
48
42
22
25.8
13.5
950
330+30*5
943
77
220-240v, 50Hz
Single
10.3 [23]
25
A++
125%
3.20
A++
164%
4.18
A
100%
11.0
3.65
3.01
-20 ~ +35°C
53
46
28
32.1
6.3
1020
330+30*5
1350
133
220-240v, 50Hz
Single
11.2 [29.5]
32
A++
126%
3.22
A++
157%
3.99
A
96%
14.0
4.81
2.91
-25 ~ +35°C
53
46
28
40.1
9
1020
330+30*5
1350
134
220-240v, 50Hz
Single
14.9 [35]
40
A++
126%
3.22
A++
157%
3.99
A
96%
14.0
4.81
2.91
-25 ~ +35°C
53
46
28
40.1
9
1020
330+30*5
1350
148
380-415v, 50Hz
3
5.1 [13]
16
*1 Combination with EHPT20X-MHCW Cylinder
*2 Under normal heating conditions at outdoor temp: -3°CDB / -4°CWB, outlet water temp 35°C, inlet water temp 30°C.
*3 Under normal heating conditions at outdoor temp: 7°CDB / 6°CWB, outlet water temp 35°C, inlet water temp 30°C as tested to BS EN14511.
*4 Sound power level of the PUHZ-W50VHA2 is 61dBA, PUHZ-W85VHA2 is 62.5dBA, PUHZ-W112VHA is 65dBA, PUHZ-HW140VHA2 is 65.5dBA, PUHZ-HW140YHA2 is 67.5dBA. Tested to BS EN12102.
*5 Grille.
*6 MCB Sizes BS EN60898-2 & BS EN60947-2.
*7 Flow Temperature Controller (FTC) for standalone systems PAC-IF062B-E Dimensions WxDxH (mm) - 520x150x450
ɳs is the seasonal space heating energy efficiency (SSHEE)
ɳwh is the water heating energy efficiency
Schematics
PUHZ-W50VHA2(-BS)
PUHZ-W85VHA2(-BS)
PUHZ-(H)W112-140VHA(2) / YHA2(-BS)
Upper View
Upper View
Upper View
Front View
Front View
Front View
Page 27
CRHV Monobloc Ground/Water
Source System
Our Ecodan CRHV ground / water source heat pump
units provide a renewable heating solution capable
of delivering the highest level of COP efficiency
throughout the year.
These units use the same inverter technology as our air source systems,
allowing them to extract heat from the ground, aquifer or open loop
system with maximum efficiency. The scalability of a ground / water
source system also helps to make larger projects more cost effective.
Key Features
Bore holes, slinkies, aquifers, lakes, rivers, waste heat can all be used as a heat source
Multiple unit cascade control of up to 960kW capacity
CRHV-P600YA-HPB
Split refrigerant circuits within each CRHV provide 50% back up
Ability to rotate units based on accumulated run hours
Provides up to 65°C water flow temperatures without booster heaters
Low maintenance, low refrigerant volume hermetically-sealed
monobloc design
Heat recovery applications can be achieved by moving heat
between applications
Passive cooling possible by exchanging ground/water source
with a chilled water system
Certificate Number: MCS HP0002
Heat Pumps
Product Reference: CRHV-P600YA-HPB
Low pressure drop to ensure pumping power is kept to a minimum
High specification touch screen controls interfacing with BEMS
The ground itself is a very efficient source of energy for heat pump systems. Ground source heat pumps
use the Earth's natural solar collection and heat storage capabilities as an infinite heat source/heat sink.
At between 1.7m and 3m below the ground, the temperature changes from 17ºC in the summer to 10ºC in the winter.
Deeper down however, the temperature of the ground is a constant 10ºC all year round. It is these relatively constant,
dependable temperatures that can be harnessed using ground source heat pumps. The constant ground temperatures
allow the heat pump to operate at optimum efficiency, producing higher COP’s than its air source rivals as the high
summer or low winter temperatures do not influence performance. Heat is extracted from the ground using water
which is pumped through a network of plastic pipes.
Selection of the method of extraction and depth is a bespoke decision made based on the geology of the local area. Making
the right decisions on technology and ground works will ensure that a system performs as well on year 20 as it does in year 1.
There are two standard ground source methods available, Open Loop and Closed Loop (Bore Hole or Slinky):
Open Loop - Large bodies of water can be utilised as a stable source of water at a relatively constant temperature.
This can be either surface water or ground water. Surface water would include lakes, reservoirs, rivers and the sea.
Closed Loop Slinky - A trench is dug to a depth of between 1.7 to 3m and plastic spiral pipe is laid into the bottom.
The pipe is covered with sand to provide good ground to pipe contact and then the trench is backfilled with the
excavated soil.
Closed Loop Bore Hole - A series of holes are drilled down into the ground at a depth of 50 to 130m, depending
on geothermal conditions. Two water pipes connected via a 'u bend' are fed directly into these holes and then
surrounded by a conductive grout.
Page 28
Product information
Heating
CRHV-P600YA-HPB
MODEL
CRHV-P600YA-HPB
HEAT PUMP SPACE HEATER - 55˚C
HEAT PUMP SPACE HEATER - 35˚C
HEATiNg*1
(B0/W35)
SEASONAL EffiCiENCy EN14825 (SPf)
HEATiNg*2
(B0/W35)
SEASONAL EffiCiENCy EN14825 (SPf)
HEATiNg*3
(W10/W35)
SEASONAL EffiCiENCy EN14825 (SPf)
HEATiNg*4
(W10/W35)
SEASONAL EffiCiENCy EN14825 (SPf)
SOUNd dATA
WATER dATA
flow Rate Range
Mechanical Connections
Operating Temperature Range
Heat Source fluid Type*7
Pressure drop
(at 1.5l/s inc 30% glycol in heat source fluid)
Maximum Working Pressure
diMENSiONS
WEigHT (kg)
REfRigERANT
ErP Rating
ɳs
SCOP
ErP Rating
ɳs
SCOP
Capacity (kW)
Power input inc. pump (kW)
COP
B0/W35 (60kW)
Capacity (kW)
Power input inc. pump (kW)
COP
B0/W35 (45kW)
Capacity (kW)
Power input inc. pump (kW)
COP
W10/W35 (60kW)
Capacity (kW)
Power input inc. pump (kW)
COP
W10/W35 (45kW)
Pressure Level LpA at 1m (dBA)
Power Level LwA (dBA)*5
Heat Source (Brine) (l/s (m3/hr))
Building Side (LTHW) (l/s (m3/hr))
Heat Source Outlet (Brine) (mm ("))
Heat Source inlet (Brine) (mm ("))
Building Side Outlet (LTHW) (mm ("))
Building Side inlet (LTHW) (mm ("))
Heat Source inlet (Brine) (°C)
Heat Source inlet Option (Brine) (°C)*6
Building Side Outlet (LTHW) (°C)
Heat Source (Brine) (kPa)
Building Side (LTHW) (kPa)
Heat Source (Brine) (MPa(Bar))
Building Side (LTHW) (MPa(Bar))
Width (mm)
depth (mm)
Height (mm)
Type
Charge (kg)
Max pressure (MPa (Bar))
Compressor Type
Circuit type
Electrical Supply
Phase
Maximum Running Current (A)
fuse Rating - MCB Size (A)*8
ELECTRiCAL dATA
A++
127%
3.37
A++
153%
4.03
60
14.20
4.23
4.33
45
10.20
4.41
4.03
60
11.90
5.08
5.09
45
8.89
5.11
4.55
50
66
1.5 to 4.1 (5.4 to 15)
1.5 to 4.4 (5.4 to 16)
50.8 (R2) screw
50.8 (R2) screw
50.8 (R2) screw
50.8 (R2) screw
-5 to +27
-5 to +45
+30 to +65
Min 30% Ethylene glycol or equivalent
12
7
1 (10)
1 (10)
934
780
1561
395
R410A
4.5 x 2
4.15 (41.5)
inverter driven
Hermetically Sealed System
415v, 50Hz
3 Phase
44
50
PLEASE NOTE: Full design criteria is needed to ascertain the capacity which could change based on heat source temperature and building flow temperature.
*1
*2
*3
*4
*5
*6
*7
*8
Under normal heating conditions at brine inlet: 0°C, outlet water temp 35°C as tested to BS EN14511 (60kW)
Under normal heating conditions at brine inlet: 0°C, outlet water temp 35°C as tested to BS EN14511 (45kW)
Under normal heating conditions at water inlet: 10°C, outlet water temp 35°C as tested to BS EN14511 (60kW)
Under normal heating conditions at water inlet: 10°C, outlet water temp 35°C as tested to BS EN14511 (45kW)
Sound power level as tested to BS EN12102
Heat source inlet temperature above 27ºC and up to 45°C option must reverse the inlet and outlet heat source connections and refer to manual for dip switch changes
The system should be adequately protected from freezing
MCB Sizes BS EN60898-2 & BS EN60947-2
ɳs is the seasonal space heating energy efficiency (SSHEE)
* LTHW - Low Temperature Hot Water
* Please use adequate frost protection to ensure pipework and the unit do not freeze
if the system is powered down
* Please do not use ground water or well water directly within the unit
* The water circuit must be a closed circuit
ɳwh is the water heating energy efficiency
Schematics
Front View
Side View
Page 29
Heating
Product Information
PUHZ-SW50-120VKA/VHA(-BS)
PUHZ Split Systems
Our range of Ecodan split air source heat pumps
includes 5, 7.5 and 12kW sizes.
Now with the ability to cascade up to six units of the same output Ecodan
split systems offer a capacity range from 5 to 72kW. Designed to suit a wide
number of applications, these models offer a viable solution for the varying
requirements that domestic and small commercial applications demand.
PUHZ-SW50VKA(-BS)
Key Features
Split unit allowing water connections to be made internally
No need for gas supply, flues or ventilation
Single phase power supply with a low starting current
Low maintenance and quiet operation
Operates with outside temperatures as low as -20ºC
Multiple unit connection
Hybrid function for use with conventional boilers
2-zone energy efficient space heating control
Energy monitoring as standard
Coastal protection models available (-BS)
PUHZ-SW75VHA(-BS)
Application Examples
The vast majority of UK homes
Small Retail Outlets
Dental / Doctors Surgeries
Public Sector / Commercial Buildings
PUHZ-SW120VHA(-BS)
Certificate Number: MCS HP0002
Product Reference: PUHZ-SW50VKA, PUHZ-SW75VHA
PUHZ-SW120VHA
MODEL
HEAT PUMP SPACE
HEATER - 55˚C
HEAT PUMP SPACE
HEATER - 35˚C
HEAT PUMP COMBINATION
HEATER - Large Profile*1
HEATING*2
(A-3/W35)
PUHZ-SW50VKA(-BS) PUHZ-SW75VHA(-BS) PUHZ-SW120VHA(-BS)
ErP Rating
ɳs
SCOP
ErP Rating
ɳs
SCOP
ErP Rating
ɳwh
Capacity (kW)
Power Input (kW)
COP
OPERATING AMBIENT TEMPERATURE (°C DB)*7
SOUND PRESSURE LEVEL AT 1M (dBA)*3*4
LOW NOISE MODE (dBA)*3
WATER DATA - Water connections made at indoor hydrobox Flow Rate (l/min)
DIMENSIONS (mm)
Width
Depth
Height
WEIGHT (kg)
REFRIGERANT
Type
Charge (kg) - 10m pipe length
Pipe Size - Gas/Liquid (mm (in))
Connection Type
Max Pipe Length (m)
Min Pipe Length (m)
Max Height Difference (m)
ELECTRICAL DATA
Electrical Supply
Phase
Nominal Running Current [MAX] (A)
Fuse Rating - MCB Sizes (A)*6
A++
125%
3.20
A++
163%
4.16
A
98%
5.25
1.84
2.85
-15 ~ +35°C
46
42
11.8
809+62*8
300
630
43
R410A
1.4
12.7 (1/2") / 6.35 (1/4")
Flared
40
2
30
220-240v, 50Hz
Single
3.8 [13]
16
*1 Combination with EHST20(D)(C)-MHCW Cylinders
*2 Under normal heating conditions at outdoor temp: -3°CDB / -4°CWB, outlet water temp 35°C, inlet water temp 30°C
*3 Under normal heating conditions at outdoor temp: 7°CDB / 6°CWB, outlet water temp 35°C, inlet water temp 30°C as tested to BS EN14511
*4 Sound power level of the PUHZ-SW50VKA is 62dBA, PUHZ-SW75VHA2 is 65.6dBA, PUHZ-SW120VHA is 68.8dBA. as tested to BS EN12102
*5 Grille
*6 MCB Sizes BS EN60898-2 & BS EN60947-2
*7 Heating maximum ambient temperature ~21°CDB, DHW Hot water maximum ambient temperature ~35°CDB
*8 Electrical cover
ɳs is the seasonal space heating energy efficiency (SSHEE)
Page 30
ɳwh is the water heating energy efficiency
A++
127%
3.26
A++
154%
3.92
A
93%
7.0
2.24
3.12
-20 ~ +35°C
51
48
22.9
950
330+30*5
943
75
R410A
3.2
15.88 (5/8") / 9.52 (3/8")
Flared
40
5
10
220-240v, 50Hz
Single
8.1 [19]
25
A++
125%
3.21
A++
162%
4.13
A
99%
11.2
3.71
3.02
-20 ~ +35°C
54
51
45.9
950
330+30*5
1350
118
R410A
4.6
15.88 (5/8") / 9.52 (3/8")
Flared
75
5
30
220-240v, 50Hz
Single
17.5 [29.5]
40
Product Information
Heating
EHS(D)(C)-MEC
FTC5 Hydroboxes for Ecodan Split Units
The split hydrobox offers a highly adaptable heating
solution for retrofit or new build.
Designed specifically by Mitsubishi Electric to integrate with the Ecodan split
air source heat pump range and a third party cylinder. The split hydrobox
provides hydraulic components with an advanced simplified graphical user
interface and controls. Fast commissioning via an SD card and energy
monitoring functions are now included.
Key Features
Simple graphical control
2-zone energy efficient space heating control
Sleek modern design
Compatible with Mitsubishi Electric wireless room controllers
Pre-plumbed and wired for faster installation
Hybrid function, for use with conventional boilers
SD card commissioning
Cascade function for multiple unit control
Energy monitoring as standard
EHS(D)(C)-MEC
F TC5 Controller – with Energy Monitoring
Mitsubishi Electric’s fifth generation controller (FTC5) includes
intelligent room temperature control as standard. This together
with advanced weather compensation ensures the system
delivers efficient, comfortable heating regardless of the season.
FTC5 now also includes energy monitoring showing consumed
and produced energy.
MODEL
HEAT PUMP SPACE HEATER - 55˚C
ErP Rating
HEAT PUMP SPACE HEATER - 35˚C
ErP Rating
OPERATING AMBIENT TEMPERATURE (°C DB)
APPLICABLE OUTDOOR UNITS
SOUND PRESSURE LEVEL AT 1M (dBA)
WATER DATA
Flow Rate (l/min)
Pump
optionally powered
by outdoor unit
28
28
11.8 (SW50)
22.9 (SW75) / 45.9 (SW120)
28
Primary Expansion Vessel (Litres)
10
10
0.1 (1)
0.1 (1)
Control Thermistor (°C)
1 - 80
1 - 80
Pressure Relief Valve (MPa (Bar))
0.3 (3)
0.3 (3)
Supplied
Supplied
Width
530
530
Depth
360
360
Height
800
800
38 / 44
42 / 49
Type
Control Board -
0 ~ +35°C (RH<80%)
PUHZ-SW75VHA(-BS) / PUHZ-SW120VHA(-BS)
Grundfos UPM2 15 70 - 130
Connection Size - Gas/Liquid (mm (in)
ELECTRICAL DATA
0 ~ +35°C (RH<80%)
PUHZ-SW50VKA(-BS)
28
WEIGHT EMPTY / FULL (kg)
REFRIGERANT
A++ / A++
A++ / A++
Grundfos UPM2 15 70 - 130
Flow Switch
DIMENSIONS (mm)
EHSC-MEC
A++
A++
Connection Size (mm)
Charge Pressure (MPa (Bar))
WATER SAFETY DEVICES
EHSD-MEC
R410A
R410A
12.7 (1/2") / 6.35 (1/4")
15.88 (5/8") / 9.52 (3/8")
Connection Type
Flared
Flared
Electrical Supply
220-240v, 50Hz
220-240v, 50Hz
Single
Single
10
10
Phase
Fuse Rating - MCB Sizes (A)*1
OPTIONAL SIMPLIFIED WIRELESS ROOM THERMOSTAT AND WIRELESS RECEIVER
PAR-WT50-E Controller and PAR-WR51-E Receiver
Hydrobox includes: Flow Temperature Controller (FTC5) with Main Controller and Temperature Sensors, Water Circulation Pump, Flow Sensor and Expansion Vessel.
*1 MCB Sizes BS EN60898-2 & BS EN60947-2
Page 31
Product Information
Heating
PUHZ-SW / EHS(D)(C)-MEC Schematics
PUHZ Split Systems
Schematics
PUHZ-SW50VKA(-BS)
PUHZ-SW75VHA(-BS)
PUHZ-SW120VHA(-BS)
Upper View
Upper View
Upper View
Front View
Front View
Front View
Schematics
EHS(D)(C)-MEC
Rear View
Lower View
530
F
A
E
C
D
58
291
263
242
164
B
357
Right View
(348)
Front View
800
48
310
353
395
410 461
100±5
110
260
592
86
124
163
Letter
(242)
Pipe Description
Connection Size/Type
A
Space heating/ Indirect DHW
cylinder (primary) return connection
28mm/Compression
B
Space heating/ Indirect DHW
cylinder (primary) flow connection
28mm/Compression
C
Refrigerant (Liquid)
6.35mm/Flare (EHSD-MEC)
D
Refrigerant (Gas)
E
Discharge pipe (by installer)
from pressure relief valve
G1/2” female (valve port
within hydrobox casing)
F
Electrical cable inlets
-
9.52mm/Flare (EHSC-MEC)
12.7mm/Flare (EHSD-MEC)
15.88mm/Flare (EHSC-MEC)
Page 32
Product Information
Heating
FTC2B Flow Temperature Controller
FTC2B Flow Temperature Controller
The FTC2B has been developed to allow the
Ecodan PUHZ monobloc range to interface with
third party or BEMS (Building Energy Management
System) controls.
A combination of volt free and voltage inputs allow the Ecodan
PUHZ units to be used in applications where only simple on/off
and temperature control is required.
Functions that can be controlled by third party controls
On/Off heating mode
On/Off heating ECO mode
On/Off hot water mode
On/Off holiday mode
On/Off legionella mode
Change water flow temperature
Functions that can be monitored by third party controls
Unit running
Error
Defrost
The ability to interface with third party controls opens up a huge number of
application opportunities. Many processes simply require a heat source
that provides hot water, without polished end user controls. The FTC2B
controller allows the Ecodan PUHZ to be used in these applications.
FTC2B inputs and outputs can be used in conjunction with local BEMS.
Application Examples
Leisure centres
Agriculture
Industrial process heating
Under soil heating
FTC2B
Dimensions (mm)
PAC-IF032B-E
Width
336
Depth
69
Height
278
2.4
Weight (kg)
Operating Ambient Temperature (°C DB)
Electrical Data
Electrical Supply
Phase
0~+35ºC (RH<80%)
Powered from outdoor unit (240v)
Single
Page 33
Heating
Product Information
CAHV / CRHV Accessories
CAHV/CRHV Accessories
Ecodan has a wide range of accessories
available to help improve performance
in the harshest of winter environments.
Accessories
CAHV Wind Hood
CAHV-WH
Protects the evaporating coil in high wind environments.
Allows the unit to be installed in exposed roof top locations.
Protects the unit in locations where there is a risk of snow build up.
Four hoods supplied, two side and two rear.
CAHV Raised Stand
CAHV-RS
Gives the unit a solid platform to mount and anchor to.
Raises the unit up and allows the natural flow of cold air beneath it.
Fully adjustable in height, allowing the installer to choose ideal height for the location.
Should be installed with anti-vibration pads between the unit and the raised stand.
CAHV Drain Pan and Heater
CAHV-DP
Neatly directs condensate (naturally occurring water moisture) to a drain away.
Supplied with optional use resistance heater - the heater can be used where
there is risk of freezing due to prolonged cold weather.
Wired directly into the unit and only activated when the ambient temperature
drops below a given point.
Requires a 240v, 10amp power supply - see installation manual for details.
Should be installed with anti-vibration pads between the unit and the raised stand.
Must be purchased with the raised stand.
CAHV / CRHV Main Pipework Thermistor
TW-TH16
Pipework mountable probe thermistor - either dry or wet pocket.
For use in multiple installations where cascade ability is required.
Should be installed on the flow/outlet pipework, no more than 20m from the main unit.
CAHV / CRHV Differential Pressure Switch
Protects heat pump from low flow conditions.
Heat pump is stopped if system flow rate is too low.
2 no. required for CRHV.
CRHV External Temperature Sensor
Used for weather compensation in heating mode.
Increased system efficiency.
Comes with solar guard.
Page 34
TMP-O
K-CON KS10-EP100S
Product Information
Heating
Acoustic Kits
Acoustic Kits
Up to an 8dBA Noise Reduction
Mitsubishi Electric offer a range of Acoustic Kits
designed for noise reduction. An industry first, these
kits offer up to an 8dBA noise level reduction and
are available to use with our Ecodan CAHV model.
The sound levels of our kit are already class leading, but with local
planning regulations tightening with regards to equipment sound
levels, especially in urban environments or in residential areas close
to commercial estates, Acoustic Kits can provide the answer.
Example of a CAHV Acoustic Kit
Noise level requirements at neighbouring facades also need to be
met in order for planning permission to be granted and to further
assist with this, as well as the option of Acoustic Kits, the CAHV
systems also have a built in noise reduction input to help in the
most extreme cases.
Both ‘full kits’ and ‘top only’ kits are available. The ‘full kit’ comprises
of left, right and rear louvres with top attenuator(s). The ‘top only’
kit has top attenuator(s) only. If space is an issue then the ‘top only’
kit is still able to reduce the noise level by up to 4dBA.
The sound pressure level is calculated from an average of the
noise at a height of 1m above the unit and at a distance of 1m
from the front, sides and rear of the unit. All noise measurements
are performed in an anechoic chamber.
Installation
Due to the wrap around coil of our units, the louvres are attached to three sides of the unit. Therefore, when installing
multiple module systems, a 300mm gap between each louvre is required. See CAHV example below:
1 full kit per outdoor unit is required,
unless specifying top attenuator only.
In this case, space units as normal.
Supply and / or Installation
Please contact Ambient Acoustics directly for supply and installation costs. Installation costs will vary depending
on location and quantity of units.
Ambient Acoustics Ltd
PO Box 1585, Wedmore, Somerset, BS28 4WZ
Tel: 01934 712802 Fax: 01934 710420
Email: [email protected]
Ambient Acoustics is an independent supplier of acoustic attenuation products, all warranties and liabilities rest with Ambient Acoustic Ltd.
The acoustic kits have been tested and approved by Mitsubishi Electric UK.
Page 35
Example Application Schematics
The application of a heating system using heat pump technology takes a little more
consideration than conventional systems that use fossil fuels. The benefits however
are significantly greater.
To ensure optimum performance and efficiency, a professional installer will need to ensure the
following elements are accounted for:
Correct heat emitter selection and sizing
Recovery times at low ambient temperatures
Night setback to between 17-19ºC
Where the application requires them, buffer vessels (e.g. Air Handling Units) are specified
Including these elements at specification stage will significantly reduce running costs and carbon
emissions, helping to meet targets and get the best results from this renewable technology.
Example 1
Page 36
Underfloor Heating and Hot Water using a CAHV Monobloc System
Individual flats or rooms
Exploded flat or room schematic
Ground loop pipework
schematics simplified
for illustration purposes
Example 2
Office Application using a CRHV Ground Source Monobloc System
Page 37
Heating
Case Studies
School Heating Project, Woolley Wood
In a bid to improve conditions for pupils, Woolley Wood Primary School relocated to
a new purpose-built school in Chaucer Road, Sheffield. Rising maintenance costs
for the ageing building, erected in 1934, along with access difficulties and increased
pupil numbers combined to make the old school building redundant.
To solve this problem Sheffield’s local education authority
called upon Kier Sheffield LLP to create a new school
building, fit for purpose.
for wall mounted radiators and conserved valuable
space. The units also provide heating and hot water
to the school’s hydrotherapy pool.
Strict city council planning regulations required that at
least 10% of the building’s energy should be met by
renewable or low carbon energy and that a 20%
reduction was achieved in predicted carbon emissions.
To fulfil this brief Kier contacted West Yorkshire-based
M&E Contractor, Thornley & Lumb, to design and
specify the building services required within it.
The CAHV units at the school are roof mounted and
Turn Key AC Ltd came up with a unique skid solution
to locate the six units on, pressure test off site and
incorporate all of the electrical supplies. Thus when
the time came to crane the skid and its contents on
to the roof, valuable installation time was saved and
costs reduced.
Working in conjunction, Thornley & Lumb, renewable
energy specialists Turn Key AC Ltd, and Value Added
Reseller, PACAIR designed and installed an efficient,
economical heating and hot water system, which met
every criteria.
Woolley Wood’s new system uses six Mitsubishi Electric
Ecodan CAHV monobloc air source heat pumps to serve
the new underfloor heating. This has eliminated the need
Page 38
The Ecodan CAHV is a unique solution
to the challenge of renewable heating
within schools and can provide all a
school’s heating and hot water
requirements, either by itself, or in
conjunction with alternative systems.
Heating
Case Studies
Social Housing Community
Heating Project, St Mungo's
St Mungo's, a charity which provides help and services to the homeless in London and
the South of England, required a heating and hot water system that would serve the
needs of tenants housed in their 24 newly built dwellings in Spring Gardens, Lewisham.
The brief received from the charity contained a challenging
set of criteria; the new system had to be able to:
Use sustainable, renewable energy in order to comply
with stringent local authority planning requirements
Cope with the different loads required by a
community heating scheme
Deal effectively with regular changes in tenancy
and occupied hours
Offer tenants the ability to alter the temperature of
their individual flats, whilst giving the charity full
central control of the system
Waterstone Design, the building services consultancy
tasked with designing the new system for the charity,
specified three Ecodan CAHV monobloc air source
heat pumps capable of delivering 129kW down
to -7°C ambient, including defrost.
These systems will provide underfloor heating for all
24 dwellings, along with their hot water requirements
through a direct hot water plate heat exchanger,
ensuring the heat delivery system operating
temperatures can be kept as low as possible.
The St Mungo’s community systems load requirements
are extremely dynamic, and our CAHV monobloc systems
have been designed to cope with this by allowing the
capacity to increase in 0.5kW increments, from 18kW
upwards. The units cascade on and off, utilising optimisation
to deliver peak efficiency, ensuring even wear and tear
throughout their operating life.
Each MCS certified CAHV monobloc unit is hermetically
sealed and requires very little maintenance. Two separate
refrigerant circuits operate within each unit guaranteeing
a 50% back up, whilst offering the benefit of low on-site
refrigerant volume.
“As a homelessness charity with a limited budget, we wanted a sustainable solution offering
control and flexibility with no compromise on performance, whilst at the same time achieving our
goal of reducing the energy costs to our clients and lowering the buildings carbon emissions.
The needs of our clients are always paramount and reducing the institutional feel of their dwellings
where possible is a common goal. We aim to offer groundbreaking, innovative support services to
our residents, and this design will ideally match the quality and effectiveness we aspire to across
our organisation."
Steve Fabian
Purchasing Manager at St Mungo's
Page 39
Heating
Case Studies
Heat Pumps Provide Community
Heating via the River Thames
A new eco-friendly housing development in London is getting the energy for its
heating and hot water directly from the Thames in a pioneering community heating
scheme that could be replicated in many of our major towns and cities.
The £70 million mixed-use development has been
created by NHP Leisure Developments on the site
of a former power station right in the heart of
Kingston upon Thames, and 200 metres from
the banks of the river.
The 137 apartments, built by specialist contractor and
developer, United House, all benefit from the cuttingedge heat pump system that harvests naturally stored
energy from the River Thames.
Towards the end of 2014, the construction of a new 142
bedroom hotel, with meeting, banqueting and conference
facilities, will also be completed at the site, which will
increase the efficiency of the heating scheme further still.
The hotel will derive all its heating and hot water, as well
as its cooling, from the open water heat pump installation.
Heat recovered from cooling the individual hotel rooms will
be reclaimed and returned to the community system to
support the heating and hot water demand for the whole site.
The community heating scheme takes renewable heat
from the sun, stored in the river water and boosts it to
the temperature required for the underfloor heating and
hot water needed by residents.
Mike Spenser-Morris believes the scheme paves the way
for other developments taking place near an open body
of water to benefit from this highly energy efficient system,
doing away with the need for traditional combustion
boilers, with their attendant carbon emissions.
“At two metres below the surface the water never falls
below 7°C, even in winter, so we can be certain that it
can provide enough energy to heat the apartments,”
explains Mike Spenser-Morris, managing director of NHP
Leisure Developments and the visionary behind the scheme.
“This open water heat pump system will be capable
of producing over two megawatts of thermal energy
for this development and will provide it 24/7, 365
days a year regardless of the weather or air temperature,
even in the depths of winter,” he explains.
“If we had fitted gas boilers, then the site would be dumping
around 500 additional tonnes of carbon into the atmosphere
each year. In addition, because of this system’s exceptional
energy efficiency, the equivalent heating cost for a couple
living in a one bedroom apartment would be 18% more.”
“Almost every major city in this country is close to a river,
lake, reservoir, canal or the sea.”
Inside a specially-built plant room adjacent to the river,
water from the Thames passes through high-efficiency
heat exchangers and, once the low grade heat has been
harvested, the water is immediately fed back into the river,
untreated in any way. The heat exchangers transfer the
low grade heat to an internal ‘closed’ loop water system
which is then carried 200 metres to a plant room in the
apartment building, where Ecodan heat pumps boost
the low grade heat to the temperature required for the
apartments’ heating and hot water.
Page 40
Edward Davey, Secretary of State for Energy and Climate
Change and MP for Kingston and Surbiton, who officially
switched on the development’s innovative heating system
said: “Kingston Heights is a great example of how
sustainable solutions can help power entire communities.
I want to see a community energy revolution where
projects like this are the norm, not the exception.
“The Thames is a great natural asset to Kingston and
London as a whole. By capturing the heat permanently
stored in the river to provide heat and hot water to the
whole development the project shows the enormous
potential of renewable energy.”
Heating
Case Studies
The Glencorse Centre
A new, state-of-the-art Community Centre in Scotland is reaping the rewards of
installing a Mitsubishi Electric Ecodan CRHV monobloc ground source heat pump.
The inverter-driven Ecodan CRHV heat pump at
the Glencorse Centre in Auchendinny, just south of
Edinburgh, provides a simple, renewable solution.
The Ecodan CRHV is heating the brand new, state-ofthe-art community centre, which offers an inspirational
space for local people to meet, socialise and take part
in numerous leisure activities. The original village hall
which stood on the site was built in the 1970’s, but by
2007 it had come to the end of its lifespan and health
a safety regulations forced its closure, leaving the
community without a vital resource.
The £1.2m replacement was funded by Midlothian
Council, Scottish Rural Development Programme
and Charity Bank and provides a fit-for-purpose
facility which is environmentally sound and meets
the changing needs of the community.
The centre’s hot water is supplied by a small boiler but the
inclusion of the latest model in the Ecodan range of heat
pumps, means the CRHV will deliver 36kW of renewable
heating via an underfloor heating system, ensuring that
the centre’s heating bills are kept to a minimum.
Energy efficiency and sustainability were the key
requirements for this project and in addition to the
inclusion of the Ecodan CRHV, a number of other energy
saving initiatives were specified throughout the building.
However, with the cost of heating accounting for such
a large proportion of the projected energy use this was
one area where efficiency was vital and this is where
the Ecodan CRHV system has proved its worth.
Alan Cameron of Livingston Mechanical Services which
installed the Ecodan system says:
“In a community building of this type there is
always a requirement for energy efficiency, but
because it is in a rural, off-gas location the choices
are limited. By specifying the Ecodan ground
source heat pump to serve the underfloor heating
throughout the building, we came up with a solution
which is both simple to operate and one which
will be significantly cheaper to run throughout
the lifetime of the building than other traditional
methods of heating.”
The Ecodan CRHV is a practical alternative to more
traditional methods of heating and its efficiency has
already been demonstrated in this installation which
achieved an average Seasonal Coefficient of Performance
(SCOP) of 4.08, operating at an average flow temperature
of 50ºC in the first six months of operation.
Individual units offer 60kW capacity and up to 16 units
can be linked together to offer full multiple unit cascade
control, delivering up to 960kW of renewable heating.
Page 41
Assured
quality and
professional
service
Mitsubishi Electric commercial heating systems are
manufactured to the highest, quality assured standards
and are supported with the level of pre-sales and
after sales service that you'd expect from a leading
manufacturer. With our reputation and continued
success reliant on customer satisfaction, we invest
5% of our turnover in research and development to
ensure we deliver reliable, high performance solutions
that meet tough energy demands.
Responsible Manufacturing Excellence
Our manufacturing facility in Livingston, Scotland produces many
of our air source heat pumps for the UK and European markets.
Our manufacturing plants are also ISO14001 and ISO9001
registered, an international benchmark ensuring we meet and
continually improve upon quality and environmental standards.
Mitsubishi Electric is committed to lowering our own production
emissions levels and those generated by our equipment during their
lifetime. Our Green Gateway philosophy strives to improve energy
efficiency and take a more responsible approach to energy use,
helping the nation to achieve its climate goals.
Specific Training for professional installation
To maximise performance and efficiency, our heating systems
require professional design and installation, carried out to exacting
standards. Accordingly, the installation of our commercial Ecodan
systems must be carried out by an Accredited Mitsubishi Electric
Heating Partner. Mitsubishi Electric provide specific, in-depth training
at our state-of-the-art training centres across the UK, covering
all aspects of installation, from design through to maintenance.
Technical Support to maximise performance
Mitsubishi Electric has a dedicated Technical Support department
to ensure the optimal performance of our heating systems
throughout their lifetime. From fault-finding to quick delivery
of spare parts, our team of qualified engineers are on hand
to offer technical advice at all levels.
Warranty for added peace of mind
For added assurance, all professionally installed and
maintained systems come with a warranty period in line
with the Partner Programme terms of conditions, as long as:
The purchase is registered with Mitsubishi Electric
The system is installed and commissioned by an
Accredited Mitsubishi Electric Heating Partner12
Annual maintenance is carried out in accordance
with Mitsubishi Electric's terms and conditions
12 All CAHV/CRHV/Cascade applications must be commissioned by Mitsubishi Electric to obtain the warranty.
Page 42
Ecodan from Mitsubishi Electric
provides a renewable energy solution,
efficiently meeting the energy demands
of today and beyond.
Telephone: 01707 282880
email: [email protected]
website: heating.mitsubishielectric.co.uk
UNITED KINGDOM Mitsubishi Electric Europe Living Environmental Systems Division
Travellers Lane, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL10 8XB, England
General Enquiries Telephone: 01707 282880 Fax: 01707 278881
IRELAND Mitsubishi Electric Europe Westgate Business Park, Ballymount, Dublin 24, Ireland
Telephone: Dublin (01) 419 8800 Fax: Dublin (01) 419 8890 International code: (003531)
Country of origin: United Kingdom – Japan – Thailand – Malaysia. ©Mitsubishi Electric Europe 2015. Mitsubishi and Mitsubishi Electric
are trademarks of Mitsubishi Electric Europe B.V. The company reserves the right to make any variation in technical specification to the
equipment described, or to withdraw or replace products without prior notification or public announcement. Mitsubishi Electric is constantly
developing and improving its products. All descriptions, illustrations, drawings and specifications in this publication present only general
particulars and shall not form part of any contract. All goods are supplied subject to the Company’s General Conditions of Sale, a copy of
which is available on request. Third-party product and brand names may be trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.
Printed in September 2015
SAP No. 290609
FSC
LOGO
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement