book swconfig multicast
JunosE™ Software
for E Series™ Broadband Services Routers
Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
Release
16.1.x
Modified: 2015-07-31
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Sunnyvale, California 94089
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www.juniper.net
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JunosE™ Software for E Series™ Broadband Services Routers Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
Release 16.1.x
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
All rights reserved.
Revision History
August 2015—FRS JunosE 16.1.x
The information in this document is current as of the date on the title page.
YEAR 2000 NOTICE
Juniper Networks hardware and software products are Year 2000 compliant. Junos OS has no known time-related limitations through the
year 2038. However, the NTP application is known to have some difficulty in the year 2036.
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The Juniper Networks product that is the subject of this technical documentation consists of (or is intended for use with) Juniper Networks
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http://www.juniper.net/support/eula.html. By downloading, installing or using such software, you agree to the terms and conditions of
that EULA.
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Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Abbreviated Table of Contents
About the Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
Part 1
Internet Protocol Version 4
Chapter 1
Configuring IPv4 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Chapter 2
Monitoring IPv4 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Chapter 3
Configuring IGMP and IGMP Proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Chapter 4
Monitoring IGMP and IGMP Proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Chapter 5
Configuring PIM for IPv4 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Chapter 6
Monitoring PIM for IPv4 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Chapter 7
Configuring DVMRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Chapter 8
Monitoring DVMRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Part 2
Internet Protocol Version 6
Chapter 9
Configuring IPv6 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Chapter 10
Monitoring IPv6 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Chapter 11
Configuring MLD and MLD Proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
Chapter 12
Monitoring MLD and MLD Proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
Chapter 13
Configuring PIM for IPv6 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277
Chapter 14
Monitoring PIM for IPv6 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297
Part 3
Index
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
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Table of Contents
About the Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
E Series and JunosE Documentation and Release Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
E Series and JunosE Text and Syntax Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
Obtaining Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxi
Documentation Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxi
Requesting Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxii
Self-Help Online Tools and Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxii
Opening a Case with JTAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxii
Part 1
Internet Protocol Version 4
Chapter 1
Configuring IPv4 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
IPv4 Multicast Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Reverse-Path Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Multicast Packet Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
IPv4 Multicast Platform Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
IPv4 Multicast References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Switch Fabric Bandwidth Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Configuring IPv4 Multicast Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Before You Begin Configuring IPv4 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Enabling IP Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Defining Static Routes for Reverse-Path Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Enabling and Disabling RPF Checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Specifying Unicast Routes for RPF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Defining Permanent IP Multicast Forwarding Entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Defining a Multicast Bandwidth Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Autosense Mechanism Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Example: Configuring a Multicast Bandwidth Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Adaptive Mode Mechanism Overview for IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Multicast QoS Adjustment for IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Multicast OIF Mapping Case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Multicast Traffic Receipt Without Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Multicast QoS Adjustment in Multicast Traffic Bypass Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Activating Multicast QoS Adjustment Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Hardware Multicast Packet Replication Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Supported Modules and Encapsulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Relationship with OIF Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
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Hardware Multicast Packet Replication Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Configuring Hardware Multicast Packet Replication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Configuring Hardware Multicast Packet Replication Without
OIF-Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Configuring Hardware Multicast Packet Replication With OIF-Mapping . . . . 25
Controlling Multicast Traffic on the Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Blocking Mroutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Enabling Interface Admission Bandwidth Limitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
OIF Interface Reevaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Controlling Mutlicast Traffic on the Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Creating Mroute Port Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Enabling Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Dynamic Port Admission Bandwidth Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
OIF Port Reevaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Deleting Multicast Forwarding Entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Multicast Router Information Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
BGP Multicasting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Investigating Multicast Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Chapter 2
Monitoring IPv4 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Displaying Available Routes for Reverse-Path Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Monitoring Multicast Forwarding Entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Monitoring Active Multicast Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Monitoring Multicast Entries in a Source or Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Monitoring Multicast Routes When OIF Mapping Is Configured . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Monitoring Multicast Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Monitoring Summary Information of Multicast Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Monitoring Multicast Routes When Multicast Traffic Bypass Mode Is
Activated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Monitoring Multicast Protocols Enabled on the Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Monitoring Summary Information of Multicast Protocols Enabled on the
Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Monitoring the IP Multicast Status on a Virtual Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Monitoring Multicast Routes on Virtual Router Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Chapter 3
Configuring IGMP and IGMP Proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
IGMP Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Group Membership Queries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Group Membership Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Leave Group Membership Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
IGMP Platform Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
IGMP References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Static and Dynamic IGMP Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Before You Begin Configuring IGMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Enabling IGMP on an Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Configuring IGMP Settings for an Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Configuring Multicast Groups for IGMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Specifying Multicast Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Assigning a Multicast Group to an Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Configuring Group Outgoing Interface Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
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Table of Contents
Access Node Control Protocol for IGMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
SSM Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Overview of Limiting the Number of Accepted IGMP Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
IGMP Traffic Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Explicit Host Tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Configuring IGMP Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Configuring Explicit Host Tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Disabling and Removing IGMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Example: Accepting IGMP Reports from Remote Subnetworks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
IGMP Proxy Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Configuring IGMP Proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Establishing the IGMP Proxy Baseline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Chapter 4
Monitoring IGMP and IGMP Proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Monitoring IGMP Information on a Virtual Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Monitoring IGMP Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Monitoring IGMP Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Monitoring Summary Information for IGMP Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Monitoring IGMP on a Mapped Outgoing Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Monitoring IGMP for Multicast Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Monitoring IGMP on Outgoing Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Monitoring IGMP Information for a Mapped Outgoing Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Monitoring IGMP SSM Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Monitoring the Number of IGMP Groups on a Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Monitoring IGMP Proxy Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Monitoring IGMP Proxy Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Monitoring IGMP Proxy Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Chapter 5
Configuring PIM for IPv4 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
PIM Dense Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Overriding Prunes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Preventing Duplication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
PIM Sparse Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Joining Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Timers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
PIM Sparse Mode Bootstrap Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
PIM Sparse-Dense Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
PIM Source-Specific Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
PIM for IPv4 Multicast Platform Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
PIM for IPv4 Multicast References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Enabling PIM for IPv4 on a Virtual Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Disabling PIM for IPv4 on a Virtual Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Enabling PIM for IPv4 on an Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Setting a Priority to Determine the Designated Router for IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Configuring the PIM for IPv4 Join/Prune Message Interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Configuring an RP Router for PIM Sparse Mode and PIM Sparse-Dense Mode
for IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Configuring a Static RP Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Configuring an Auto-RP Router for PIM Sparse Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
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Configuring an Auto-RP Router for PIM Sparse-Dense Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Configuring BSR and RP Candidates for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . 105
Migrating to BSR from Auto-RP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Switching to an SPT for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Multicast VPNs Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Creating Multicast VPNs Using the Default MDT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Creating Multicast VPNs Using the Data MDT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Data MDT Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Data MDT Receivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Establishing a Data MDT Using ASM or SSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Configuring the Default MDT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Configuring Data MDTs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Example: Configuring Multicast VPNs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Configuring PIM Sparse Mode Join Filters for IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Configuring PIM for IPv4 SSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
BFD Protocol for PIM for IPv4 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Configuring the BFD Protocol for PIM for IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Removing PIM for IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Resetting PIM Counters and Mappings for IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Chapter 6
Monitoring PIM for IPv4 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Enabling the Display of a PIM Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Disabling the Display of a PIM Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Monitoring PIM Router-Level Information for IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Monitoring RP Routers and the RP Mapping Agent in a PIM Sparse Mode
Environment for IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Monitoring BSR Information for IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Monitoring Active Data MDTs for IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Monitoring Each (Source, Group) Pair for PIM Dense Mode for IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . 129
Monitoring PIM Interfaces for IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Monitoring PIM Neighbors for IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Monitoring PIM Group-to-RP Mappings for IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Monitoring the RP Router that a Multicast Group Uses for IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Monitoring each (S,G) Pair for PIM Sparse Mode and PIM SSM for IPv4 . . . . . . . 135
Monitoring Unicast Routes that PIM Sparse Mode Uses for IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Monitoring the Threshold for Switching to the Shortest Path Tree at a PIM
Designated Router for IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
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Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Table of Contents
Chapter 7
Configuring DVMRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
DVMRP Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Identifying Neighbors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Advertising Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
DVMRP Platform Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
DVMRP References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Enabling DVMRP on a Virtual Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Activating DVMRP on an Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Configuring DVMRP Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Configuring the Number of Routes that the Virtual Router Records in
Warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Configuring the Maximum Number of DVMRP Routes That the Router
Advertises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
DVMRP Report Filter Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Filtering DVMRP Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
DVMRP Summary Addresses Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
Configuring DVMRP Summary Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
Changing the Metric for a Route . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Importing Routes from Other Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Specifying Routes to Be Advertised . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Preventing Dynamic Route Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
Exchange of DVMRP Unicast Routes Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
Exchanging DVMRP Unicast Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Disabling and Removing DVMRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Clearing DVMRP Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Chapter 8
Monitoring DVMRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Setting a Baseline for DVMRP Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Monitoring DVMRP Information for a Virtual Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Monitoring DVMRP Parameters for a Specific Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Monitoring DVMRP Multicast Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Monitoring DVMRP Neighbors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Monitoring DVMRP Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Monitoring the Next Hops of DVMRP Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Part 2
Internet Protocol Version 6
Chapter 9
Configuring IPv6 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
IPv6 Multicast Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Reverse-Path Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Multicast Packet Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
IPv6 Multicast Platform Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
IPv6 Multicast References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Before You Begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Switch Fabric Bandwidth Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Configuring IPv6 Multicast Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Enabling IPv6 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Defining IPv6 Static Routes for Reverse-Path Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Enabling and Disabling RPF Checks for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
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JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
Specifying Unicast Routes for RPF in IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Defining Permanent IPv6 Multicast Forwarding Entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
IPv6 Multicast Bandwidth Map Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Autosense Mechanism Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Adaptive Mode Mechanism Overview for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Example: Configuring an IPv6 Multicast Bandwidth Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Multicast QoS Adjustment for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Multicast OIF Mapping Case for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Multicast Traffic Receipt Without Forwarding for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Activating IPv6 Multicast QoS Adjustment Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
IPv6 Hardware Multicast Packet Replication Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Supported Modules and Encapsulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Relationship with OIF Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
IPv6 Hardware Multicast Packet Replication Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Configuring IPv6 Hardware Multicast Packet Replication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Interface-Level Multicast Traffic Configuration for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Blocking IPv6 Mroutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Interface-Level Admission Bandwidth Limits for IPv6 Overview . . . . . . . . . 185
Enabling Interface-Level Admission Bandwidth Limitation for IPv6 . . . . . . . 186
OIF Interface Reevaluation for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Port-Level Multicast Traffic Configuration for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Creating IPv6 Mroute Port Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Limits for IPv6 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Enabling Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Limitation for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . 189
OIF Port Reevaluation for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Deleting IPv6 Multicast Forwarding Entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
BGP Multicasting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Investigating Multicast Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Chapter 10
Monitoring IPv6 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Monitoring Available IPv6 Routes for Reverse-Path Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Monitoring IPv6 Hardware Multicast Packet Replication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Monitoring Port Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Monitoring VLAN Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Monitoring IPv6 Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
Monitoring MLD Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Monitoring IPv6 Multicast Forwarding Entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Monitoring Active IPv6 Multicast Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
Monitoring Multicast Routes on Virtual Router Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225
Monitoring IPv6 Multicast Entries in a Source or Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
Monitoring Join Interface Details When IPv6 OIF Mapping Is Configured . . . . . . 226
Monitoring IPv6 Multicast Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
Monitoring Summary Information of IPv6 Multicast Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
Monitoring IPv6 Multicast Protocols Enabled on the Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233
Monitoring Summary Information of IPv6 Multicast Protocols Enabled on the
Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234
Monitoring IPv6 Multicast Status on a Virtual Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235
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Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Table of Contents
Chapter 11
Configuring MLD and MLD Proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
MLD Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
Multicast Listener Queries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
Multicast Listener Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
Multicast Listener Done Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
MLD Platform Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
MLD References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240
Static and Dynamic MLD Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240
Enabling MLD on an Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
Configuring MLD Settings on an Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242
Configuring Multicast Groups for MLD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244
Specifying MLD Multicast Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
Assigning an MLD Multicast Group to an Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246
Configuring MLD Group Outgoing Interface Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246
MLD SSM Mapping Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
Overview of Limiting the Number of Accepted MLD Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248
MLD Traffic Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
MLD Explicit Host Tracking Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
Configuring MLD Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Configuring MLD SSM Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
Limiting the Number of Accepted MLD Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
Including and Excluding MLD Traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252
Configuring MLD Explicit Host Tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252
Disabling and Removing MLD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
MLD Proxy Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254
Configuring MLD Proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255
Establishing the MLD Proxy Baseline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256
Chapter 12
Monitoring MLD and MLD Proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
Monitoring MLD Information on a Virtual Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
Monitoring MLD Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
Monitoring MLD Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
Monitoring Summary Information for MLD Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266
Monitoring MLD on Mapped Outgoing Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
Monitoring MLD on Outgoing Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
Monitoring MLD Membership for Multicast Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268
Monitoring MLD Information for Mapped Outgoing Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
Monitoring MLD SSM Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
Monitoring the Number of MLD Groups on a Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
Monitoring MLD Proxy Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272
Monitoring MLD Proxy Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273
Monitoring MLD Proxy Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274
Chapter 13
Configuring PIM for IPv6 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast . . .
PIM Sparse Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Joining Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Timers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PIM Sparse Mode Bootstrap Router .
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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PIM Source-Specific Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280
PIM for IPv6 Multicast Platform Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281
PIM for IPv6 Multicast References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on a Virtual Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281
Disabling PIM for IPv6 on a Virtual Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on an Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282
Setting a Priority to Determine the Designated Router for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283
Configuring the PIM Join/Prune Message Interval for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284
Configuring an RP Router for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285
Configuring BSR and RP Candidates for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . 286
Switching to an SPT for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287
Configuring PIM Sparse Mode Remote Neighbors for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287
Example: Configuring PIM Sparse Mode Remote Neighbors for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . 288
Configuring PIM Sparse Mode Join Filters for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290
Configuring PIM for IPv6 SSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291
BFD Protocol for PIM for IPv6 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
Configuring BFD Protocol for PIM for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294
Removing PIM for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294
Resetting PIM Counters and Mappings for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295
Chapter 14
Monitoring PIM for IPv6 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297
Enabling the Display of a PIM Event for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297
Disabling the Display of a PIM Event for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298
Monitoring PIM Router-Level Information for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298
Monitoring BSR Information for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300
Monitoring PIM Interfaces for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301
Monitoring PIM Neighbors for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303
Monitoring PIM Remote Neighbors for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304
Monitoring PIM Group-to-RP Mappings for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305
Monitoring the RP Router that a Multicast Group Uses for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306
Monitoring each (S,G) Pair for PIM Sparse Mode and PIM SSM for IPv6 . . . . . . 306
Monitoring Unicast Routes that PIM Sparse Mode Uses for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . 308
Monitoring the Threshold for Switching to the Shortest Path Tree at a PIM
Designated Router for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309
Part 3
Index
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
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Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
List of Figures
Part 1
Internet Protocol Version 4
Chapter 1
Configuring IPv4 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Figure 1: Example of Adaptive IPv4 Multicast Bandwidth Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Figure 2: Multicast OIF Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Figure 3: Multicast Traffic Receipt Without Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Figure 4: Multicast Traffic Bypass Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Figure 5: Packet Flow Without Hardware Multicast Packet Replication . . . . . . . . 20
Figure 6: Packet Flow with Hardware Multicast Packet Replication . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Chapter 3
Configuring IGMP and IGMP Proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Figure 7: Static and Dynamic IGMP Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Figure 8: Upstream and Downstream Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Chapter 5
Configuring PIM for IPv4 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Figure 9: Source-Rooted Tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Figure 10: PIM Dense Mode Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Figure 11: Detecting Duplication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Figure 12: PIM Sparse Mode Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Figure 13: Shared Tree Versus SPT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Figure 14: Multicast VPNs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Part 2
Internet Protocol Version 6
Chapter 9
Configuring IPv6 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Figure 15: Example of Adaptive IPv6 Multicast Bandwidth Detection . . . . . . . . . . 171
Figure 16: Multicast OIF Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Figure 17: Multicast Traffic Receipt Without Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Figure 18: Packet Flow Without Hardware Multicast Packet Replication . . . . . . . 179
Figure 19: Packet Flow with Optimized Multicast Packet Replication . . . . . . . . . 180
Chapter 11
Configuring MLD and MLD Proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
Figure 20: Static and Dynamic MLD Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240
Figure 21: Upstream and Downstream Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255
Chapter 13
Configuring PIM for IPv6 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277
Figure 22: Source-Rooted Tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278
Figure 23: Source-Rooted Tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289
Figure 24: Network on Which to Configure PIM SSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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List of Tables
About the Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
Table 1: Notice Icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xx
Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xx
Part 1
Internet Protocol Version 4
Chapter 1
Configuring IPv4 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Table 3: Function of Multicast Protocols on a Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Table 4: Adaptive Mode Algorithm Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Chapter 2
Monitoring IPv4 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Table 5: show ip rpf-route Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Table 6: show ip mroute Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Table 7: show ip mroute active and show ip mroute summary active Output
Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Table 8: show ip mroute count Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Table 9: show ip mroute oif-detail Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Table 10: show ip mroute statistics Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Table 11: show ip mroute summary Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Table 12: show ip mroute mcast-by-pass Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Table 13: show ip multicast protocols Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Table 14: show ip multicast protocols brief Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Table 15: show mroute port count Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Chapter 3
Configuring IGMP and IGMP Proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Table 16: IGMP Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Chapter 4
Monitoring IGMP and IGMP Proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Table 17: show ip igmp Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Table 18: show ip igmp groups Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Table 19: show ip igmp interface Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Table 20: show ip igmp interface brief Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Table 21: show ip igmp mapped-oif Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Table 22: show ip igmp membership Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Table 23: show ip igmp oif-map Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Table 24: show ip igmp oif-mapping Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Table 25: show ip igmp ssm-mapping Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Table 26: show multicast group limit Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Table 27: show ip igmp-proxy Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Table 28: show ip igmp-proxy groups Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Table 29: show ip igmp-proxy interface Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
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Chapter 6
Monitoring PIM for IPv4 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Table 30: show ip pim Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Table 31: show ip pim auto-rp Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Table 32: show ip pim bsr Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Table 33: show ip pim data-mdt Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Table 34: show ip pim dense-mode sg-state Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Table 35: show ip pim interface Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Table 36: show ip pim neighbor Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Table 37: show ip pim rp Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Table 38: show ip pim rp-hash Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Table 39: show ip pim sparse-mode sg-state Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Table 40: show ip pim sparse-mode unicast-route Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Table 41: show ip pim spt-threshold Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Chapter 7
Configuring DVMRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Table 42: Sample Routing Table for a DVMRP Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Table 43: Sample DVMRP (S,G) Pair Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Chapter 8
Monitoring DVMRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Table 44: show ip dvmrp Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Table 45: show ip dvmrp interface Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Table 46: show ip dvmrp mroute Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Table 47: show ip dvmrp neighbor Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Table 48: show ip dvmrp route Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Table 49: show ip dvmrp routeNextHop Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Part 2
Internet Protocol Version 6
Chapter 9
Configuring IPv6 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Table 50: Function of Multicast Protocols on a Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Table 51: Adaptive Mode Algorithm Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Chapter 10
Monitoring IPv6 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Table 52: show ipv6 rpf-route Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Table 53: show interfaces gigabitEthernet Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
Table 54: show vlan subinterface Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Table 55: show ipv6 interface Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
Table 56: show ipv6 mld interface Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Table 57: show ipv6 mroute Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
Table 58: show ipv6 mroute active and show ipv6 mroute summary active
Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Table 59: show mroute port count Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225
Table 60: show ipv6 mroute count Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
Table 61: show ipv6 mroute oif-detail Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
Table 62: show ipv6 mroute statistics Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230
Table 63: show ipv6 mroute summary Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
Table 64: show ipv6 multicast protocols Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233
Table 65: show ipv6 multicast protocols brief Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235
Chapter 11
xvi
Configuring MLD and MLD Proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
List of Tables
Table 66: Static MLD Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
Chapter 12
Monitoring MLD and MLD Proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
Table 67: show ipv6 mld Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
Table 68: show ipv6 mld groups Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
Table 69: show ipv6 mld interface Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264
Table 70: show ipv6 mld interface brief Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266
Table 71: show ipv6 mld mapped-oif Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
Table 72: show ipv6 mld oif-map Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268
Table 73: show ipv6 mld membership Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269
Table 74: show ipv6 mld oif-mapping Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
Table 75: show ipv6 mld ssm-mapping Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
Table 76: show multicast group limit Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272
Table 77: show ipv6 mld-proxy Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272
Table 78: show ipv6 mld-proxy groups Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273
Table 79: show ipv6 mld-proxy interface Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274
Chapter 14
Monitoring PIM for IPv6 Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297
Table 80: show ipv6 pim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298
Table 81: show ipv6 pim bsr Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300
Table 82: show ipv6 pim interface Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302
Table 83: show ipv6 pim neighbor Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303
Table 84: show ipv6 pim remote-neighbor Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304
Table 85: show ipv6 pim rp mapping Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305
Table 86: show ipv6 pim rp-hash Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306
Table 87: show ipv6 pim sparse-mode sg-state Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307
Table 88: show ipv6 pim sparse-mode unicast-route Output Fields . . . . . . . . . 308
Table 89: show ipv6 pim spt-threshold Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
About the Documentation
•
E Series and JunosE Documentation and Release Notes on page xix
•
Audience on page xix
•
E Series and JunosE Text and Syntax Conventions on page xix
•
Obtaining Documentation on page xxi
•
Documentation Feedback on page xxi
•
Requesting Technical Support on page xxii
E Series and JunosE Documentation and Release Notes
For a list of related JunosE documentation, see
http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/software/index.html.
If the information in the latest release notes differs from the information in the
documentation, follow the JunosE Release Notes.
®
To obtain the most current version of all Juniper Networks technical documentation,
see the product documentation page on the Juniper Networks website at
http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/.
Audience
This guide is intended for experienced system and network specialists working with
Juniper Networks E Series Broadband Services Routers in an Internet access environment.
E Series and JunosE Text and Syntax Conventions
Table 1 on page xx defines notice icons used in this documentation.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
Table 1: Notice Icons
Icon
Meaning
Description
Informational note
Indicates important features or instructions.
Caution
Indicates a situation that might result in loss of data or hardware damage.
Warning
Alerts you to the risk of personal injury or death.
Laser warning
Alerts you to the risk of personal injury from a laser.
Tip
Indicates helpful information.
Best practice
Alerts you to a recommended use or implementation.
Table 2 on page xx defines text and syntax conventions that we use throughout the
E Series and JunosE documentation.
Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions
Convention
Description
Examples
Bold text like this
Represents commands and keywords in text.
•
Issue the clock source command.
•
Specify the keyword exp-msg.
Bold text like this
Represents text that the user must type.
host1(config)#traffic class low-loss1
Fixed-width text like this
Represents information as displayed on your
terminal’s screen.
host1#show ip ospf 2
Routing Process OSPF 2 with Router
ID 5.5.0.250
Router is an Area Border Router
(ABR)
Italic text like this
Plus sign (+) linking key names
xx
•
Emphasizes words.
•
Identifies variables.
•
Identifies chapter, appendix, and book
names.
Indicates that you must press two or more
keys simultaneously.
•
There are two levels of access: user and
privileged.
•
clusterId, ipAddress.
•
Appendix A, System Specifications
Press Ctrl + b.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
About the Documentation
Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions (continued)
Convention
Description
Examples
Syntax Conventions in the Command Reference Guide
Plain text like this
Represents keywords.
terminal length
Italic text like this
Represents variables.
mask, accessListName
| (pipe symbol)
Represents a choice to select one keyword
or variable to the left or to the right of this
symbol. (The keyword or variable can be
either optional or required.)
diagnostic | line
[ ] (brackets)
Represent optional keywords or variables.
[ internal | external ]
[ ]* (brackets and asterisk)
Represent optional keywords or variables
that can be entered more than once.
[ level1 | level2 | l1 ]*
{ } (braces)
Represent required keywords or variables.
{ permit | deny } { in | out }
{ clusterId | ipAddress }
Obtaining Documentation
To obtain the most current version of all Juniper Networks technical documentation, see
the Juniper Networks TechLibrary at http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/.
To download complete sets of technical documentation to create your own
documentation CD-ROMs or DVD-ROMs, see the Portable Libraries page at
http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/resources/index.html
Copies of the Management Information Bases (MIBs) for a particular software release
are available for download in the software image bundle from the Juniper Networks
website at http://www.juniper.net/.
Documentation Feedback
We encourage you to provide feedback, comments, and suggestions so that we can
improve the documentation to better meet your needs. Send your comments to
[email protected], or fill out the documentation feedback form at
https://www.juniper.net/cgi-bin/docbugreport/. If you are using e-mail, be sure to include
the following information with your comments:
•
Document or topic name
•
URL or page number
•
Software release version
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
Requesting Technical Support
Technical product support is available through the Juniper Networks Technical Assistance
Center (JTAC). If you are a customer with an active J-Care or Partner Support Service
support contract, or are covered under warranty, and need post-sales technical support,
you can access our tools and resources online or open a case with JTAC.
•
JTAC policies—For a complete understanding of our JTAC procedures and policies,
review the JTAC User Guide located at
http://www.juniper.net/us/en/local/pdf/resource-guides/7100059-en.pdf.
•
Product warranties—For product warranty information, visit
http://www.juniper.net/support/warranty/.
•
JTAC hours of operation—The JTAC centers have resources available 24 hours a day,
7 days a week, 365 days a year.
Self-Help Online Tools and Resources
For quick and easy problem resolution, Juniper Networks has designed an online
self-service portal called the Customer Support Center (CSC) that provides you with the
following features:
•
Find CSC offerings: http://www.juniper.net/customers/support/
•
Search for known bugs: http://www2.juniper.net/kb/
•
Find product documentation: http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/
•
Find solutions and answer questions using our Knowledge Base: http://kb.juniper.net/
•
Download the latest versions of software and review release notes:
http://www.juniper.net/customers/csc/software/
•
Search technical bulletins for relevant hardware and software notifications:
http://kb.juniper.net/InfoCenter/
•
Join and participate in the Juniper Networks Community Forum:
http://www.juniper.net/company/communities/
•
Open a case online in the CSC Case Management tool: http://www.juniper.net/cm/
To verify service entitlement by product serial number, use our Serial Number Entitlement
(SNE) Tool: https://tools.juniper.net/SerialNumberEntitlementSearch/
Opening a Case with JTAC
You can open a case with JTAC on the Web or by telephone.
•
Use the Case Management tool in the CSC at http://www.juniper.net/cm/.
•
Call 1-888-314-JTAC (1-888-314-5822 toll-free in the USA, Canada, and Mexico).
For international or direct-dial options in countries without toll-free numbers, see
http://www.juniper.net/support/requesting-support.html.
xxii
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
PART 1
Internet Protocol Version 4
•
Configuring IPv4 Multicast on page 3
•
Monitoring IPv4 Multicast on page 35
•
Configuring IGMP and IGMP Proxy on page 57
•
Monitoring IGMP and IGMP Proxy on page 73
•
Configuring PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 91
•
Monitoring PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 123
•
Configuring DVMRP on page 139
•
Monitoring DVMRP on page 153
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
2
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 1
Configuring IPv4 Multicast
IPv4 multicast enables a device to send packets to a group of hosts rather than to a list
of individual hosts. This chapter describes how to configure IP multicast on the E Series
router; it contains the following sections:
•
IPv4 Multicast Overview on page 4
•
IPv4 Multicast Platform Considerations on page 6
•
IPv4 Multicast References on page 6
•
Switch Fabric Bandwidth Configuration on page 6
•
Configuring IPv4 Multicast Attributes on page 7
•
Autosense Mechanism Overview on page 9
•
Example: Configuring a Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 10
•
Adaptive Mode Mechanism Overview for IPv4 on page 12
•
Multicast QoS Adjustment for IPv4 on page 14
•
Hardware Multicast Packet Replication Overview on page 19
•
Hardware Multicast Packet Replication Considerations on page 23
•
Configuring Hardware Multicast Packet Replication on page 24
•
Controlling Multicast Traffic on the Interface on page 26
•
Controlling Mutlicast Traffic on the Port on page 29
•
Deleting Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 32
•
Multicast Router Information Support on page 33
•
BGP Multicasting on page 34
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
IPv4 Multicast Overview
IPv4 defines three types of addresses: unicast, broadcast, and multicast. Each type of
address enables a device to send datagrams to selected recipients:
•
A unicast address enables a device to send a datagram to a single recipient.
•
A broadcast address enables a device to send a datagram to all hosts on a subnetwork.
•
A multicast address enables a device to send a datagram to a specified set of hosts,
known as a multicast group, in different subnetworks.
Multicast IP packets contain a class D address in the Destination Address fields of their
headers. A class D address is the IP address of a multicast group.
IP multicast improves network efficiency by enabling a host to transmit a datagram to
a targeted group of receivers. For example, for a host to send a large video clip to a group
of selected recipients would be time-consuming to unicast the datagram to each recipient
individually. If the host broadcasts the video clip throughout the network, network
resources are not available for other tasks. The host uses only the resources it needs
when multicasting the datagram.
Routers use multicast routing algorithms to determine the best route and transmit
multicast datagrams throughout the network. E Series routers support a number of IP
multicast protocols on virtual routers (VRs). Each VR handles the interoperability of IP
multicast protocols automatically. To start multicast operation on a VR, you access the
context for that VR and configure the desired protocols on the selected interfaces.
Table 3 on page 4 describes the function of each protocol that the router supports.
Table 3: Function of Multicast Protocols on a Router
Protocol
Function
Internet Group Membership Protocol (IGMP)
Discovers hosts that belong to multicast group.
Protocol Independent Multicast Protocol (PIM)
Discovers other multicast routers to receive
multicast packets.
Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol
(DVMRP)
Routes multicast datagrams within
autonomous systems.
BGP Multicasting Protocol
Routes multicast datagrams between
autonomous systems.
The router supports up to 16,384 multicast forwarding entries (multicast routes) at any
time.
This topic discusses the following sections:
4
•
Reverse-Path Forwarding on page 5
•
Multicast Packet Forwarding on page 5
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Configuring IPv4 Multicast
Reverse-Path Forwarding
IP multicasting uses reverse path forwarding (RPF) to verify that a router receives a
multicast packet on the correct incoming interface. The RPF algorithm enables a router
to accept a multicast datagram only on the interface from which the router sends a
unicast datagram to the source of the multicast datagram.
When the router receives a multicast datagram from a source for a group, the router
verifies that the packet was received on the correct RPF interface. If the packet was not
received on the correct interface, the router discards the packet. Only packets received
on the correct RPF interface are considered for forwarding to downstream receivers.
When operating in sparse-mode, the routers perform an RPF lookup to identify the
upstream router from which to request the data and then send join messages for the
multicast stream only to that router.
When operating in dense-mode, routers that have multiple paths to the source of the
multicast stream initially receive the same stream on more than one interface. In this
case, the routers perform an RPF lookup to identify multicast data streams that are not
arriving on the best path and send prune messages to terminate these flows.
The RPF lookup need not always be towards the source of the multicast stream. The
lookup is done towards the source only when the router is using a source-rooted tree to
receive the multicast stream. If the router uses a shared tree instead, the RPF lookup is
toward a rendezvous point and not toward the source of the multicast stream.
Multicast Packet Forwarding
Multicast packet forwarding is based on the source (S) of the multicast packet and the
destination multicast group address (G). For each (S,G) pair, the router accepts multicast
packets on an incoming interface (IIF), which satisfies the RPF check (RPF-IIF). The router
drops packets received on IIFs other than the RPF-IIF and notifies the routing protocols
that a packet was received on the wrong interface.
The router forwards packets received on the RPF-IIF to a list of outgoing interfaces (OIFs).
The list of OIFs is determined by the exchange of routing information and local group
membership information. The router maintains mappings of (S,G, IIF) to {OIF1, OIF2…}
in the multicast routing table.
You can enable two or more multicast protocols on an IIF. However, only one protocol
can forward packets on that IIF. The protocol that forwards packets on an IIF owns that
IIF. A multicast protocol that owns an IIF also owns the (S,G) entry in the multicast routing
table.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring IPv4 Multicast Attributes on page 7
•
IPv4 Multicast Platform Considerations on page 6
•
IPv4 Multicast References on page 6
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
IPv4 Multicast Platform Considerations
For information about modules that support IP multicasting on the ERX7xx models,
ERX14xx models, and the Juniper Networks ERX310 Broadband Services Router:
•
See ERX Module Guide, Table 1, Module Combinations for detailed module specifications.
•
See ERX Module Guide, Appendix A, Module Protocol Support for information about the
modules that support IP multicasting.
For information about modules that support IP multicasting on the Juniper Networks
E120 and E320 Broadband Services Routers:
Related
Documentation
•
See E120 and E320 Module Guide, Table 1, Modules and IOAs for detailed module
specifications.
•
See E120 and E320 Module Guide, Appendix A, IOA Protocol Support for information
about the modules that support IP multicasting.
•
IPv4 Multicast Overview on page 4
•
IPv4 Multicast References on page 6
IPv4 Multicast References
For more information about IP multicast, see the following resources:
•
A “ traceroute” Facility for IP Multicast—draft-ietf-idmr-traceroute-ipm-07.txt (January
2001 expiration)
•
RFC 2858—Multiprotocol Extensions for BGP-4 (June 2000)
•
RFC 2932—IPv4 Multicast Routing MIB (October 2000)
•
RFC 3292—General Switch Management Protocol (GSMP) V3 (June 2002)
NOTE: IETF drafts are valid for only 6 months from the date of issuance.
They must be considered as works in progress. Refer to the IETF website
at http://www.ietf.org for the latest drafts.
Related
Documentation
•
IPv4 Multicast Overview on page 4
•
IPv4 Multicast Platform Considerations on page 6
Switch Fabric Bandwidth Configuration
By default, the switch fabric for the ERX1440, ERX310, E120, and E320 Broadband Services
Routers uses a bandwidth weighting ratio of 15:2 for multicast-to-unicast weighted round
robin (WRR). In the absence of strict-priority traffic, and when both unicast and multicast
6
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Chapter 1: Configuring IPv4 Multicast
traffic compete for switch fabric bandwidth, the switch fabric allocates 15/17ths of the
available bandwidth to multicast traffic and 2/17ths of the available bandwidth to unicast
traffic.
You can use the fabric weights command to change the ratio for multicast to unicast
traffic on the router switch fabric. For more information about the fabric weights
command, see Configuring the Switch Fabric Bandwidth in the JunosE System Basics
Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
•
IPv4 Multicast Overview on page 4
•
IPv6 Multicast Overview on page 163
•
fabric weights
Configuring IPv4 Multicast Attributes
You can configure IPv4 multicast attributes with the following tasks:
•
Before You Begin Configuring IPv4 Multicast on page 7
•
Enabling IP Multicast on page 7
•
Defining Static Routes for Reverse-Path Forwarding on page 7
•
Enabling and Disabling RPF Checks on page 8
•
Specifying Unicast Routes for RPF on page 8
•
Defining Permanent IP Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 8
•
Defining a Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 8
Before You Begin Configuring IPv4 Multicast
You can configure multicasting on IPv4 and IPv6 interfaces.
For information about configuring IP and IPv6 interfaces, see JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP
Configuration Guide.
Enabling IP Multicast
In this implementation, IP multicast works on virtual routers (VRs). By default, IP multicast
is disabled on a VR. To enable IP multicast on a VR, access the context for a VR, and then
issue the ip multicast-routing command.
host1(config)#ip multicast-routing
You can use the no version to disable IP multicast routing on the VR (the default).
Defining Static Routes for Reverse-Path Forwarding
Use the ip rpf-route command to define reverse-path forwarding (RPF) to verify that a
router receives a multicast packet on the correct incoming interface.
host1(config)#ip rpf-route 11.1.0.0 255.255.0.0 atm4/1.1 56 tag 25093
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
You can use the no version to disable IP multicast routing on the VR (the default). In the
disabled state, all multicast protocols are disabled, and the VR forwards no multicast
packets.
Enabling and Disabling RPF Checks
By default, the router accepts multicast packets for each Source, Group (S,G) pair on an
incoming interface (IIF), which satisfies the RPF check (RPF-IIF). When the router performs
RPF checks, only the interface that first accepts traffic for an (S,G) pair accepts
subsequent traffic for that pair. If traffic stops arriving on that interface and starts arriving
on another interface, the router does not accept or forward the traffic.
Some network configurations require the router to accept traffic on any interface. To do
so, you can disable the RPF check on a specified set of (S,G) pairs by issuing the ip
multicast-routing disable-rpf-check command.
host1(config)#ip multicast-routing disable-rpf-check boston-list
You can use the no version to restore the default, in which the router performs RPF checks
for all (S,G) pairs.
When you disable RPF checks, the router accepts multicast packets for (S,G) pairs on
any incoming interface. When the router has added the new route to its multicast routing
table, it then accepts multicast packets for these pairs on any interface in the virtual
router and forwards them accordingly. Multicast routes established before you issue this
command are not affected.
Specifying Unicast Routes for RPF
You can specify that IS-IS, OSPF, or RIP routes be available for RPF. Routes available for
RPF appear in the multicast view of the routing table.
host1(config)#router ospf 1
host1(config-router)#ip route-type multicast
Defining Permanent IP Multicast Forwarding Entries
An mroute is a multicast traffic flow (a (Source, Group) entry used for forwarding multicast
traffic). By default, forwarding mroutes (with a valid RPF incoming interface) are timed
out if data for them is not received for 210 seconds. However, you can specify an mroute
as permanent by using the ip multicast-routing permanent-mroute command.
host1(config)#ip multicast-routing permanent-mroute routes1
You can use the no version to prevent any new mroutes from becoming permanent. To
remove existing permanent mroutes, use the clear ip mroute command.
Defining a Multicast Bandwidth Map
Multicast interface-level admission control, port-level admission control, and QoS
adjustment all use a single multicast bandwidth map. The multicast bandwidth map is
a route map that uses the set admission-bandwidth, set qos-bandwidth, set
admission-bandwidth adaptive, or set qos-bandwidth adaptive commands. The
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Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Configuring IPv4 Multicast
adaptive commands configure an autosense mechanism for measuring the multicast
bandwidth.
NOTE: Even though you can include any of the preceding commands several
times in a route map entry, only the last admission-bandwidth command or
qos-bandwidth command in the bandwidth map is used. In other words, if
you included the set qos-bandwidth command first and then the set
qos-bandwidth adaptive command, the bandwidth map uses the set
qos-bandwidth adaptive command.
Interface-level and port-level admission control is performed when an OIF on the interface
or port is added to the mroute for a given (S,G) multicast data stream and the multicast
bandwidth map contains a set admission-bandwidth or set admission-bandwidth
adaptive action for that (S,G).
QoS adjustment is performed on the joining interface when an OIF is added to the mroute
for a given (S,G) data stream and the multicast bandwidth map contains a set
qos-bandwidth or set qos-bandwidth adaptive action for that (S,G).
You can prioritize the traffic by configuring a priority value for the <S, G> data stream on
a physical port by issuing the set priority command. Dynamic multicast admission control
enables only prioritized groups to join the interface after the configured priority limit is
reached on the physical port. The system records the priority when a new <S, G> entry
is created.
NOTE: You can create a single route map with the set admission-bandwidth
command, the set qos-bandwidth command, or both. However, creating an
entry with only one of these set commands enables only that specific function
for the matched address (that is, only multicast traffic admission control or
only QoS adjustment). The same is true for the adaptive commands.
Autosense Mechanism Overview
Video bandwidth is typically considered to be a constant rate—2 Mbps for standard
definition television (SDTV) and 10 Mbps for high definition television (HDTV). However,
in reality, and depending on achievable video compression, the bit rate can vary. For
example, HDTV streams (using MPEG4 or WM9 encoding) can vary between 6 Mbps
(for low-action programs) to 10 Mbps (for a fast-paced, high-action programs). The
autosense mechanism causes the bandwidth value, used for admission control and QoS
adjustment, to be the actual measured rate of the stream. Using this feature to measure
the actual bandwidth avoids the need to configure arbitrary bandwidth limits and enables
a channel to be reassigned to a different (S, G) without requiring a bandwidth map to
be changed.
Related
Documentation
•
Adaptive Mode Mechanism Overview for IPv4 on page 12
•
Adaptive Mode Mechanism Overview for IPv6 on page 171
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
•
Defining a Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 8
Example: Configuring a Multicast Bandwidth Map
The following example creates a multicast bandwidth map for both multicast traffic
admission control and QoS adjustment:
•
Requirements on page 10
•
Overview on page 10
•
Configuring an IPv4 Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 10
Requirements
This example uses the following hardware and software components:
•
JunosE Release 7.1.0 or higher-numbered releases
•
E Series router (ERX7xx models, ERX14xx models, the ERX310 router, the E120 router,
or the E320 router)
•
ASIC-based line modules that support Fast Ethernet or Gigabit Ethernet
Before you begin configuring multicast on IPv4 interfaces, you must:
•
Configure IPv4 interfaces. For more information about configuring IPv4 interfaces, see
Configuring IPv4 in JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP Configuration Guide.
Overview
The multicast bandwidth map is a route map that uses the set admission-bandwidth,
set qos-bandwidth, set admission-bandwidth adaptive, or set qos-bandwidth adaptive
commands. Multicast interface-level admission control, port-level admission control,
and QoS adjustment all use a single multicast bandwidth map.
The adaptive commands configure an auto-sense mechanism for measuring the multicast
bandwidth.
Configuring an IPv4 Multicast Bandwidth Map
Configuring a Route Map
Step-by-Step
Procedure
Define a route map using the set admission-bandwidth and set qos-bandwidth
commands.
NOTE: In this example, you can replace the set admission-bandwidth
command and set qos-bandwidth command with their adaptive command
counterparts.
1.
10
Define a route map.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Configuring IPv4 Multicast
[edit]
host1(config)#route-map mcast-bandwidths permit 10
2.
Match the route map to an access list.
[edit]
host1(config-route-map)#match ip address sdtv
3.
Configure multicast bandwidths.
[edit multicast bandwidths for admission control and QoS adjustment]
host1(config-route-map)#set admission-bandwidth 2000000
host1(config-route-map)#set qos-bandwidth 2000000
4.
Configure the route map.
[edit]
host1(config-route-map)#route-map mcast-bandwidths permit 20
5.
Match the route map to an access list.
[edit]
host1(config-route-map)#match ip address hdtv
6.
Configure multicast bandwidths.
[edit multicast bandwidths for admission control and QoS adjustment]
host1(config-route-map)#set admission-bandwidth 10000000
host1(config-route-map)#set qos-bandwidth 10000000
Configuring an Access List
Step-by-Step
Procedure
Define the access list for use by the match ip address command to match (S,G) and
(*,G) entries.
NOTE: You can also define a prefix-list or a prefix-tree for use by the match
ip address command to match (S,G) and (*,G) entries.
1.
Configure access lists.
[edit access lists]
host1(config)#access-list sdtv permit ip host 31::1 ff3e::0/112
host1(config)#access-list hdtv permit ip host 32::1 ff3e::0/112
host1(config)#access-list hdtv permit ip host 32::2 ff3e::0/112
Related
Documentation
•
Defining a Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 8
•
access-list
•
match ip address
•
set admission-bandwidth
•
set qos-bandwidth
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
Adaptive Mode Mechanism Overview for IPv4
You configure the auto-sense mechanism in the multicast bandwidth using the set
admission-bandwidth adaptive command, set qos-bandwidth adaptive command, or
both. For example:
host1(config)#route-map mcast-bandwidths permit 10
host1(config-route-map)#match ip address sdtv
host1(config-route-map)#set admission-bandwidth adaptive
host1(config-route-map)#set qos-bandwidth adaptive
host1(config-route-map)#end
In this example, any stream with an (S,G) that matches the sdtv access list performs
adaptive bandwidth detection for admission control and QoS adjustment.
A rate measurement mechanism runs on the ingress line card that polls the forwarding
controller (FC) to obtain statistics for each mroute. This mechanism then reports the
rate measurement to the SRP to update the bandwidth map. By computing the average
bandwidth over a relatively short sampling period (T1; 5 seconds), the measurement
approximates the peak bandwidth of the multicast stream.
As an example, assume that a new mroute (S1, G1) is added to the interface controller
(IC) at time t0.
Figure 1: Example of Adaptive IPv4 Multicast Bandwidth Detection
To calculate the measured bandwidth of a stream, the router uses the following equation:
R = (N
t+5
–N)/5
t
Where
R = Calculated bandwidth of the stream during each sampling interval
N = Bytes measured at the start of each sampling period (t seconds)
t
N
12
t+5
= Bytes measured at the end of each sampling period (t+5 seconds)
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Configuring IPv4 Multicast
NOTE: When the mroute is first installed in the FC (at t = 0), R is
0
undetermined. For multicast admission control no joins are admitted until
the first bandwidth measurement is computed (that is, for admission control,
R0 is considered to be infinite). Similarly, no QoS adjustment occurs until the
first bandwidth measurement is computed (that is, for QoS adjustment, R0
is considered to be zero [0]).
Using the previous graph as a reference, the first bandwidth rate (R1 ) and at time t (N )
0
5
5
and the bytes received values are subtracted and divided by the sampling period T to
1
yield the average rate. This process is repeated every sampling interval, T , to yield rates
2
R1, R2, R3, and so on.
The first two sampling interval calculations are as follows:
R = (N - N )/5
1
5
R = (N
2
#+5
0
- N )/5
#
The router maintains a history of bandwidth measurements (H) for each mroute, up to
a maximum of M measurements. The actual rate, R, reported to the SRP is the maximum
rate measured in those H samples.
To minimize the IC to SRP traffic generated by the rate measurements, the IC reports a
bandwidth change only when a newly computed rate (R#) differs from the current rate
by a specified threshold. When R is computed at time t = 5 seconds, R is set to R . A rate
s
1
update occurs whenever a newly calculated rate (R) differs from R by at least a threshold
1
value (specified as a percentage, P) of the measured peak bandwidth. This calculation
is as follows:
R = Rt, if and only if the absolute value of (R - Rt) > P * R.
Table 4 on page 13 lists values assigned to variables associated with this algorithm.
Table 4: Adaptive Mode Algorithm Values
Variable
Value
Units
Description
T1
5
Seconds
Sampling period; the time in which a sample is taken
T2
0
Seconds
Sampling interval; zero (0) seconds indicates continuous
sampling
H
12
Samples
Number of history samples over which to compute
measurement
M
12
Samples
Maximum number of samples maintained in history
P
1
Percent
Threshold value; percent difference by which a newly
calculated rate must differ from the measured peak
bandwidth before a rate update occurs
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
Related
Documentation
•
Autosense Mechanism Overview on page 9
•
Defining a Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 8
•
match ip address
•
route-map
•
set admission-bandwidth
•
set qos-bandwidth
Multicast QoS Adjustment for IPv4
When the router uses multicast OIF mapping, any multicast streams that a subscriber
receives bypass any configured QoS treatment for that subscriber interface. The Multicast
QoS adjust feature provides a way in which the router can account for this multicast
traffic. The QoS adjustment can be performed when the multicast traffic bypasses the
router completely by using the ip multicast-routing mcast-by-pass command. On
activating the multicast traffic bypass mode on the router, the multicast QoS adjustment
is performed on the basis of IGMP join or leave messages.
The following topics provide two possible configuration cases for using multicast QoS
adjustment.
•
Multicast OIF Mapping Case on page 14
•
Multicast Traffic Receipt Without Forwarding on page 15
•
Multicast QoS Adjustment in Multicast Traffic Bypass Mode on page 16
•
Activating Multicast QoS Adjustment Functions on page 18
Multicast OIF Mapping Case
Multicast OIF mapping enables the router to decrease the inefficiencies associated with
replicating streams of multicast traffic. Using OIF maps, IGMP joins that the router receives
on a subscriber interface can be mapped to a special interface for forwarding. This special
interface can be on a different physical port or line module from that of the join interface.
Using this mapping function, the router can send a single copy of each multicast stream
over the special interface and the access nodes are configured to perform any final
replication to the subscribers and merge unicast and multicast data flows onto the
subscriber interfaces as necessary. See Figure 2 on page 15.
14
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Configuring IPv4 Multicast
Figure 2: Multicast OIF Mapping
One disadvantage to using multicast OIF mapping is that the multicast traffic bypasses
any QoS treatment that is applied to subscriber interfaces. Configuring QoS adjustment
resolves this problem. With QoS adjustment configured, when a subscriber requests to
receive a multicast stream (or, more appropriately, when an OIF is added to the mroute),
the router reduces the unicast QoS bandwidth applied to the subscriber interface (that
is, the join interface) by the amount of bandwidth for that multicast stream.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring Group Outgoing Interface Mapping on page 64
•
Multicast Traffic Receipt Without Forwarding on page 15
•
Activating Multicast QoS Adjustment Functions on page 18
Multicast Traffic Receipt Without Forwarding
In this case, the router is not given the responsibility of forwarding multicast streams.
Instead, the service provider arranges for the router to receive the multicast streams so
the router can detect the flow and perform QoS adjustment. An OIF map is installed that
maps the traffic streams to a loopback interface configured for IGMP version passive.
This means that when the traffic is received, a null mroute is installed (that is, an mroute
with an empty OIF list) and the router applies the QoS adjustment to the join interface.
See Figure 3 on page 16.
NOTE: Ensure that PIM-SM (or any other upstream multicast protocol) is
informed of the group (or source-group) interest.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
Figure 3: Multicast Traffic Receipt Without Forwarding
Related
Documentation
•
Multicast OIF Mapping Case on page 14
•
Activating Multicast QoS Adjustment Functions on page 18
Multicast QoS Adjustment in Multicast Traffic Bypass Mode
In the multicast traffic bypass mode, multicast streams bypass the router completely.
But the router can still perform the QoS adjustment on unicast bandwidth and multicast
admission control for the join interface when the router receives requests for multicast
video from a subscriber. Figure 4 on page 16 represents the multicast traffic in the bypass
mode.
Figure 4: Multicast Traffic Bypass Mode
The MGTM module receives a join notification from the IGMP module. On reception of
the join message on a subscriber interface, the MGTM module creates a (*, G) entry for
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Chapter 1: Configuring IPv4 Multicast
ASM IGMP join and an (S, G) entry for SSM IGMP join and adds the subscriber interface
to the OIL. If the (*, G) or (S, G) entry already exists, the MGTM module updates the OIL
with a new interface.
You can activate the multicast traffic bypass mode for performing the multicast QoS
adjustment when the multicast traffic bypasses the router completely by using the ip
multicast-routing mcast-by-pass command. When you activate the multicast traffic
bypass mode before the MGTM module adds the joined interface to the OIL, the router
uses the configured multicast bandwidth map to identify the QoS bandwidth of the
channel. In addition, the router reduces the QoS bandwidth of the channel from the total
available bandwidth of the interface.
If the shaping rate is modified dynamically through the change of authorization (COA),
Session and Resource Control (SRC) software, or security module (SM) the router adjusts
the bandwidth only for a new join in a new group. If the subscriber already exists in the
group, the router uses the already configured bandwidth value.
The router adds the bandwidth that is reduced on receiving the IGMP join to the total
available bandwidth after the router receives the leave notification from the IGMP module.
When you deactivate the multicast traffic bypass mode, the router does not reduce the
existing bandwidth for the new IGMP joins. However, for the existing joins, the router adds
the bandwidth that is reduced on receiving IGMP join to the total available bandwidth
only after receiving a leave message from the IGMP module or when the router clears
the group membership.
When you activate the multicast traffic bypass mode on the router and the devices acting
as access nodes (such as DSLAMs) do not perform multicast admission control, then
the router reduces the total bandwidth for each new IGMP join received on the subscriber
interface. This may reduce the unicast bandwidth to the default minimum value of
1000 bps.
NOTE:
Related
Documentation
•
The multicast traffic bypass mode does not support the bandwidth map
configured with the auto-sense mechanism and does not support multicast
admission control on the router for the incoming IGMP joins.
•
We recommend you not to use OIF mapping mode and multicast traffic
without forwarding mode when you activate the multicast traffic bypass
mode. Because the router does not receive the multicast traffic in the
bypass mode.
•
We recommend you to ensure that only one (S, G) join reaches the router
or the bandwidth map configuration contains only one (S, G) join even if
multiple sources are used for redundancy.
•
Activating Multicast QoS Adjustment Functions on page 18
•
Monitoring Multicast Routes When Multicast Traffic Bypass Mode Is Activated on
page 50
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
17
JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
•
ip multicast-routing mcast-by-pass
•
show ip mroute
Activating Multicast QoS Adjustment Functions
The ip multicast-routing bandwidth-map command activates the specified bandwidth
map. By activating the bandwidth map, this command also activates the multicast QoS
adjustment function contained in the bandwidth map.
CAUTION: To activate multicast QoS adjustment, you must first create a
bandwidth map. See “Defining a Multicast Bandwidth Map” on page 8 for
details.
To enable the QoS adjust function on the router with the configured route map:
•
Issue the ip multicast-routing bandwidth-map command in the Global Configuration
mode:
host1(config)#ip multicast-routing bandwidth-map mcast-bandwidths
You can use the no version to disable the multicast QoS adjustment function on the
router.
The ip multicast-routing mcast-by-pass command activates the multicast traffic bypass
mode for performing the multicast QoS adjustment when the multicast traffic bypasses
the router completely. On activating the multicast traffic bypass mode on the router, the
multicast QoS adjustment is performed on the basis of IGMP join or leave messages.
To activate the multicast traffic bypass mode for performing the multicast QoS
adjustment when the multicast traffic bypasses the router completely:
•
Issue the ip multicast-routing mcast-by-pass command in the Global Configuration
mode:
host1(config)# ip multicast-routing mcast-by-pass
You can use the no version to deactivate the multicast traffic bypass mode from
performing the multicast QoS adjustment when the multicast traffic bypasses the router
completely.
Related
Documentation
18
•
Multicast OIF Mapping Case on page 14
•
Multicast Traffic Receipt Without Forwarding on page 15
•
Monitoring the IP Multicast Status on a Virtual Router on page 54
•
ip multicast-routing bandwidth-map
•
ip multicast-routing mcast-by-pass
•
show ip mroute
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Configuring IPv4 Multicast
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring Group Outgoing Interface Mapping on page 64
•
IP Multicast Bandwidth Adjustment for QoS Overview
•
Parameter Definition Attributes for QoS Administrators Overview
•
ip multicast-routing bandwidth-map
Hardware Multicast Packet Replication Overview
You can configure IPv4 multicast to replicate packets to optimized hardware on a logical
port instead of using the forwarding controller (FC) on the router.
The bandwidth between the line module and the I/O module or IOA on the E Series router
is limited. A high-density Ethernet module provides eight physical ports that can consume
the bandwidth between the line module and the I/O module or IOA before providing
enough traffic to support egress line rate for all of these ports.
Figure 5 on page 20 displays how multicast traffic is typically replicated on the line module.
Each of these replicated packets is transmitted from the line module to the I/O module
or IOA.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
Figure 5: Packet Flow Without Hardware Multicast Packet Replication
The hardware multicast packet replication feature enables you to configure multicast
traffic for a VLAN or S-VLAN to be replicated on the I/O module or IOA so that only one
copy of the packet is transmitted from the line module to the I/O module or IOA.
Replication for each of the ports is performed on the I/O module or IOA.
Configuring hardware multicast packet replication for high-density Ethernet is useful
when you want to provide the same multicast stream out of some or all of the ports,
such as for IP television (IPTV). Configuring hardware multicast packet replication enables
you to:
•
Reduce the number of packets sent from the FC to the module.
•
Reduce the CPU consumed by the FC processing each elaboration of the packet.
You can use the additional bandwidth to increase the bandwidth of multicast traffic out
of each of the Gigabit Ethernet ports.
Figure 6 on page 21 displays the flow of a multicast packet using the hardware multicast
packet feature.
20
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Configuring IPv4 Multicast
Figure 6: Packet Flow with Hardware Multicast Packet Replication
Each high-density Ethernet module has eight physical ports, numbered 0–7. A logical
port is available for the hardware multicast packet replication feature, numbered port
8.
JunosE tracks the OIFs in an mroute that have been redirected to use the hardware
multicast packet replication hardware. The system accepts only egress multicast traffic
to traverse the interface stack on the enabled port. The system drops unicast traffic that
is routed to this port.
Each port on the I/O module or IOA displayed in Figure 6 on page 21 has two queues.
These queues are further down the egress path than the queues found on the line module
and populated by the FC.
The low-priority queue is dedicated to packets that are received from the line module
queues that are dedicated to the physical ports. This queue blocks when full and provides
backpressure to the line module. This queue services unicast and multicast traffic that
is not using the hardware multicast packet replication feature.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
The high-priority queue is dedicated to packets that are received from the line module
queue for port 8. This queue is serviced at a higher priority than the first queue, and drops
packets when full.
For more information about high-density Ethernet, see Configuring Ethernet Interfaces in
the JunosE Physical Layer Configuration Guide.
This topic discusses the following:
•
Supported Modules and Encapsulations on page 22
•
Relationship with OIF Mapping on page 22
Supported Modules and Encapsulations
You can enable hardware multicast packet replication on port 8 of the following
high-density Ethernet modules:
•
GE-8 I/O module (pairs with the GE-HDE line module)
•
ES2-S1 GE-8 IOA (pairs with the ES2 4G LM and the ES2 10G LM)
When enabled, the hardware multicast packet replication feature defines the
encapsulation of the egress multicast packet. The following encapsulations are supported:
•
IPv4 over Gigabit Ethernet
•
IPv4 over VLAN
•
IPv4 over S-VLAN
NOTE: 802.3ad link aggregation group (LAG) bundles do not support
hardware multicast packet replication.
The hardware multicast packet replication feature also provides an interface over which
you can configure the following:
•
IP MTU
•
Ethernet MTU
•
Egress IP policy
•
Egress VLAN policy
•
QoS
Relationship with OIF Mapping
Multicast OIF mapping enables the router to decrease the inefficiencies associated with
replicating streams of multicast traffic. Using OIF maps, IGMP joins that the router receives
on a subscriber interface can be mapped to a dedicated multicast VLAN.
The hardware multicast packet replication feature enables you to redirect each of the
IP interfaces on a line module over a dedicated multicast VLAN to a single IP interface
22
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Configuring IPv4 Multicast
over port 8. The FC is only required to send a single packet per dedicated multicast VLAN
to the I/O module or IOA. The module then replicates this packet to the appropriate ports.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring Group Outgoing Interface Mapping on page 64
•
Configuring Hardware Multicast Packet Replication on page 24
•
Hardware Multicast Packet Replication Considerations on page 23
Hardware Multicast Packet Replication Considerations
When configuring hardware multicast packet replication, the following considerations
apply.
•
Do not configure or transmit routing protocols over port 8. The FC drops traffic routed
to an IP interface stacked over port 8.
•
We recommend that you configure the IP address of the IP interface over port 8 to be
unnumbered.
•
You must configure the same VLAN settings over the port (logical port 8, in this case)
on which you configure the multicast replication feature for I/O modules or IOA and
the physical ports.
You cannot create the following configurations:
•
When two IP interfaces configured over a port reference the same IP interface over
port 8. The system does not accept this configuration attempt because you typically
configure the hardware multicast packet replication feature to redirect multicast
traffic over one VLAN, then redirect it to the same VLAN on port 8.
•
When the IP interface configured with the hardware multicast packet replication
attribute is not installed on a line module that supports hardware multicast packet
replication.
•
When the IP interface designated by the hardware multicast packet replication
attribute is not installed on a line module that supports hardware multicast packet
replication.
•
When the IP interface designated by the hardware multicast packet replication
attribute is not on the same line module as the IP interface configured with this
attribute.
•
When you configure a unique source MAC address for VLANs on port 8, the hardware
multicast packet replication hardware stamps the source MAC address on the VLAN,
overwriting any MAC address that you configured. For more information, see Configuring
Ethernet Interfaces in the JunosE Physical Layer Configuration Guide.
•
The regular multicast implementation utilizes interface stacking that provides a unique
IP attachment point for each elaboration of the egress multicast packet.
For the hardware multicast packet replication feature, you must attach policies to an
interface stack over port 8 that defines the encapsulation of the egress multicast traffic.
The system supports policies over port 8 just as it is above any of the other ports on
this line module.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
Policies applied to the interface stack over port 8 affect the packets traversing this
stack whether or not the packet is destined for one port or all of the physical ports.
Therefore, you cannot apply different egress policies to multicast traffic for the
interfaces stacked above different ports, or rate limit on an individual interface over a
port. You also cannot monitor policy statistics on individual interfaces over a port.
Instead, you can apply egress policy to an interface stacked over port 8. The system
applies the policy before the packet has been elaborated for each of the ports.
•
The JunosE QoS component provides hierarchical egress scheduling and shaping on
Gigabit Ethernet ports 0–7. The regular multicast implementation replicates packets
on the FC, with each replicated packet placed on a line module queue destined for a
single physical port. The line module queue can also receive QoS behavior specific to
that queue.
For the hardware multicast packet replication feature, the FC does not replicate the
packet for each of the individual ports. Instead, it places the packet on a special queue
destined for port 8.
You can configure QoS on the packets flowing through port 8, but this has limited value
because each packet passed through this port can be transmitted through one of more
of the physical ports. Therefore, the packets placed on this special queue might not
receive the same QoS behavior as ports 0–7.
We recommend that you configure the network so the I/O or IOA queues are not
oversubscribed. The traffic transmitted by the physical port is a combination of packets
from the two I/O or IOA queues. When the sum of the packets in these queues is greater
than line rate, the system can drop traffic that is not using hardware multicast packet
replication.
When you configure a traffic shaper on a physical port and configure hardware multicast
packet replication, the packets created using the feature avoid the traffic shaper for
that port. To control this, you can use traffic shaper on the physical port and port 8.
The sum of the traffic shapers must be less than or equal to the line rate of the port.
A traffic shaper on port 8 can result in the overall utilization of egress bandwidth for
any one port being less the line rate because the packets being replicated might not
be transmitted to every port. Packets destined to some of the ports contribute to the
traffic shaping for all of the ports on the I/O module or IOA.
Related
Documentation
•
Hardware Multicast Packet Replication Overview on page 19
•
Configuring Hardware Multicast Packet Replication on page 24
Configuring Hardware Multicast Packet Replication
The following topics explain how to configure hardware multicast packet replication
without and with OIF-mapping:
24
•
Configuring Hardware Multicast Packet Replication Without OIF-Mapping on page 25
•
Configuring Hardware Multicast Packet Replication With OIF-Mapping on page 25
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Configuring IPv4 Multicast
Configuring Hardware Multicast Packet Replication Without OIF-Mapping
To configure hardware multicast packet replication without OIF-mapping:
1.
Configure port 8 on a high-density Ethernet module to accept redirected egress
multicast traffic.
a. Specify the Gigabit Ethernet interface on port 8.
b. Create a VLAN major interface.
c. Create a VLAN subinterface.
d. Assign a VLAN ID.
e. Configure an unnumbered IP interface.
f. Enable IGMP on the interface with only multicast-data-forwarding capability.
host1(config)#interface gigabitEthernet 2/8
host1(config-if)#encapsulation vlan
host1(config-if)#interface gigabitEthernet 2/8.1
host1(config-if)#vlan id 1
host1(config-if)#ip unnumbered loopback 0
host1(config-if)#ip igmp version passive
2. Configure an IP interface to redirect egress multicast traffic to port 8.
a. Create a VLAN subinterface.
b. Assign a VLAN ID.
c. Assign an IP address.
d. Configure the interface to redirect egress multicast traffic to port 8.
host1(config)#interface gigabitEthernet 2/0.101
host1(config-if)#vlan id 1
host1(config-if)#ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0
host1(config-if)#ip multicast ioa-packet-replication gigabitEthernet 2/8.1
Configuring Hardware Multicast Packet Replication With OIF-Mapping
This section describes how to configure hardware multicast packet replication with
OIF-mapping.
1.
Configure port 8 on a supported high-density Ethernet module to accept redirected
egress multicast traffic. For information about supported high-density Ethernet
modules see “Hardware Multicast Packet Replication Overview” on page 19.
2. Use OIF maps to map the subscriber IGMP interfaces (C-VLANs) to the dedicated
multicast VLAN (M-VLAN). The dedicated M-VLAN should be located on the line
module containing the IOA replication interface. The C-VLAN and M-VLAN can either
be on the same or different line modules.
3. Configure the dedicated M-VLAN to redirect egress multicast traffic to port 8.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
Related
Documentation
•
Hardware Multicast Packet Replication Overview on page 19
•
Monitoring Multicast Routes When OIF Mapping Is Configured on page 43
•
encapsulation vlan
•
ip igmp version
•
ip multicast ioa-packet-replication
•
ip unnumbered
Controlling Multicast Traffic on the Interface
You can control multicast traffic on the interface with the following topics:
•
Blocking Mroutes on page 26
•
Enabling Interface Admission Bandwidth Limitation on page 27
•
OIF Interface Reevaluation on page 28
Blocking Mroutes
By default, when an interface that is configured with one or more multicast protocols
(for example, PIM or IGMP) receives multicast traffic, even when the scope of that traffic
exceeds link-local, the virtual router creates an mroute. You can use the ip
block-multicast-sources command to block all multicast traffic with a scope larger than
link-local (for example, global) and prevent mroute creation under these conditions.
NOTE: Issuing this command does not affect reception of link-local multicast
packets.
To prevent mroute creation by blocking multicast traffic that has a scope larger than
link-local (for example, global):
•
Issue the ip block-multicast-sources command in Interface Configuration mode:
host1(config-if)#ip block-multicast-sources
You can use the no version to restore the default behavior of creating mroutes on received
multicast packets.
Related
Documentation
26
•
Monitoring Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 37
•
Monitoring Active Multicast Routes on page 40
•
Monitoring Multicast Entries in a Source or Group on page 43
•
Monitoring Multicast Routes When OIF Mapping Is Configured on page 43
•
Monitoring Multicast Statistics on page 46
•
Monitoring Summary Information of Multicast Routes on page 49
•
Monitoring Multicast Protocols Enabled on the Router on page 52
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Configuring IPv4 Multicast
•
ip block-multicast-sources
Enabling Interface Admission Bandwidth Limitation
Interface-level multicast admission control is performed when an OIF on the interface
is added to the mroute for a given (S,G) multicast data stream and the multicast
bandwidth map contains a set admission-bandwidth action for that (S,G). When enabled,
the admission-bandwidth for a particular (S,G) is read from the multicast bandwidth
map and recorded in the mroute when the (S,G) mroute is created.
CAUTION: Before you can limit interface-level admission bandwidth, you
must first create a bandwidth map. See “Defining a Multicast Bandwidth
Map” on page 8 for details.
When an OIF is subsequently added to the mroute, the OIF is blocked from forwarding
data if the additional bandwidth contributed by the (S,G) exceeds the
admission-bandwidth limit for the interface. In JunosE releases earlier than Release 12.0.x,
in an OIF mapping scenario where the DSLAM does not perform per-subscriber multicast
admission control, the router disregards the multicast admission bandwidth limit
configured on the join interface. If the limit configured on the mapped interface exceeds
the admission-bandwidth limit for the interface, the router blocks the mapped interface
from forwarding data.
Now, in an OIF mapping scenario where the DSLAM performs per-subscriber multicast
admission control, the router checks the bandwidth limit configured on the join interface.
If the multicast stream is forwarded over the mapped interface, the router admits the
multicast stream and forwards the stream to the join interfaces whose bandwidth does
not exceed the configured bandwidth limit. The router also performs QoS Adjust for the
multicast stream on the unblocked (forwarding) subscriber interfaces. The router does
not replicate the stream to the subscriber interfaces whose bandwidth exceeds the
configured bandwidth limit and it does not perform QoS Adjust for the multicast stream
on the blocked subscriber interfaces.
If the multicast stream is not forwarded over the mapped interface, the router blocks the
multicast stream and does not forward the stream. The router also does not perform
QoS Adjust for the multicast stream on the blocked subscriber interface.
You can use the ip multicast admission-bandwidth-limit command to enable multicast
admission control on interfaces (including dynamic IP interfaces) that are configured to
run IGMP. You can also use this command on a PIM (sparse-mode, dense-mode, or
sparse-dense-mode) interface if IGMP is configured on the interface (including the ip
igmp version passive command).
To limit the bandwidth for an interface that accepts IGMP groups:
•
Issue the ip multicast admission-bandwidth-limit command in Interface Configuration
mode.
host1(config-if)#ip multicast admission-bandwidth-limit 2000000
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
You can use the no version to remove the bandwidth limitation for the interface.
Related
Documentation
•
OIF Interface Reevaluation on page 28
•
Monitoring Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 37
•
Monitoring Active Multicast Routes on page 40
•
Monitoring Multicast Routes When OIF Mapping Is Configured on page 43
•
Monitoring Multicast Statistics on page 46
•
Monitoring Multicast Protocols Enabled on the Router on page 52
•
ip igmp version
•
ip multicast admission-bandwidth-limit
•
set admission-bandwidth
OIF Interface Reevaluation
If you change the admission bandwidth for an interface, all mroutes with that interface
as an OIF are reevaluated as follows:
•
If the bandwidth limit is increased, blocked OIFs may become unblocked. If the interface
is a blocked OIF on multiple mroutes, the order in which the mroutes are visited, and
which (S,G) streams become unblocked, is not specified.
•
If the bandwidth limit is decreased, no currently admitted OIFs are blocked. However,
no new OIFs are admitted until the total admitted bandwidth for the interface drops
below the new limit.
•
If the bandwidth is increased to the point that the bandwidth limit for an interface is
now exceeded, no currently admitted OIFs for the affected mroutes are blocked.
However, no new OIFs are admitted until the total admitted bandwidth drops below
the configured limit.
NOTE: If the multicast bandwidth map that includes the set
admission-bandwidth command is changed, all affected mroutes are
reevaluated in the same manner described previously.
As an example of this function, if the interface has accepted a total bandwidth of
2000000 bps, and you set a limit of 1000000 bps on the interface, the router does not
disconnect any already connected OIFs but prevents the interfaces from accepting any
more groups. Over time, some groups leave the interfaces and, eventually, the interface
limit of 1000000 bps is reached and maintained by the router.
If you set limits for both a port and interfaces on that port, the router uses the lower of
the two limits when determining whether or not an interface can accept any new IGMP
groups. For example, if you specify an admission bandwidth limit of 2000000 bps for
the port and 3000000 bps groups for each interface, additional groups can only be
accepted until the port limit of 2000000 bps is reached.
28
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Configuring IPv4 Multicast
Related
Documentation
Related
Documentation
•
Defining a Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 8
•
Enabling Interface Admission Bandwidth Limitation on page 27
•
OIF Port Reevaluation on page 31
•
set admission-bandwidth
•
Creating Mroute Port Limits on page 29
•
Enabling Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Control on page 30
•
Dynamic Port Admission Bandwidth Control on page 31
•
OIF Port Reevaluation on page 31
•
ip block-multicast-sources
•
ip igmp version
•
ip multicast admission-bandwidth-limit
•
set admission-bandwidth
Controlling Mutlicast Traffic on the Port
You can control multicast traffic on the port with the following topics:
•
Creating Mroute Port Limits on page 29
•
Enabling Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Control on page 30
•
Dynamic Port Admission Bandwidth Control on page 31
•
OIF Port Reevaluation on page 31
Creating Mroute Port Limits
When a multicast forwarding entry (that is, an mroute) is added with an outgoing interface
(OIF) on a port, the OIF count for that port is incremented. If you configure a port limit,
and the OIF count on the port exceeds that limit, no OIFs on that port are added to mroutes
(that is, OIFs are blocked).
To configure a limit on the number of mroute OIFs that can be added across different
virtual routers on a port:
•
Issue the mroute port limit command in Global Configuration mode.
host1(config)#mroute port 3/0 limit 10
You can use the no mroute port limit command to remove any OIF port limits.
Related
Documentation
•
Monitoring Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 37
•
Monitoring Active Multicast Routes on page 40
•
Monitoring Multicast Routes When OIF Mapping Is Configured on page 43
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
29
JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
•
Monitoring Multicast Statistics on page 46
•
Monitoring Summary Information of Multicast Routes on page 49
•
Monitoring Multicast Routes on Virtual Router Ports on page 55
•
mroute port limit
Enabling Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Control
Port-level multicast admission control is performed when an OIF on that port is added
to the mroute for a given (S,G) multicast data stream and the multicast bandwidth map
contains a set admission-bandwidth action for that (S,G).
When enabled, the admission-bandwidth for a particular (S,G) is read from the multicast
bandwidth map and recorded in the mroute when the (S,G) mroute is created. If you
configure a port limit and the OIF count on the port exceeds that limit, no OIFs on that
port are added to mroutes (that is, OIFs are blocked).
When a multicast forwarding entry (an mroute) is added with an outgoing interface, OIF
is blocked from forwarding data if the additional bandwidth contributed by the (S,G)
would exceed the admission-bandwidth limit for the port on which the interface resides.
CAUTION: Before you can limit port-level admission bandwidth, you must
first create a bandwidth map. See “Defining a Multicast Bandwidth Map” on
page 8 for details.
You can use the mroute port admission-bandwidth-limit command to limit the total
multicast bandwidth that can be admitted on a port. The admitted bandwidth is summed
across all virtual routers with IPv4 and IPv6 mroutes that have OIFs on the port.
NOTE: Admission bandwidth values for a given (S,G) mroute are determined
from the bandwidth map. See “Defining a Multicast Bandwidth Map” on
page 8 for details.
Related
Documentation
30
•
Dynamic Port Admission Bandwidth Control on page 31
•
OIF Port Reevaluation on page 31
•
Monitoring Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 37
•
Monitoring Active Multicast Routes on page 40
•
Monitoring Multicast Routes When OIF Mapping Is Configured on page 43
•
Monitoring Multicast Statistics on page 46
•
Monitoring Multicast Protocols Enabled on the Router on page 52
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Configuring IPv4 Multicast
•
Monitoring Multicast Routes on Virtual Router Ports on page 55
•
mroute port admission-bandwidth-limit
•
set admission-bandwidth
Dynamic Port Admission Bandwidth Control
You can configure the system to dynamically limit the total multicast bandwidth that
can be admitted on a port. The system performs dynamic port-level admission control
when an OIF on that port is added to the mroute for a given <S, G> multicast stream.
After the priority bandwidth limit on the port is reached, OIFs on the prioritized <S, G>
are only allowed to forward the traffic and unprioritized <S, G> streams are blocked from
forwarding data on the OIF.
To enable a priority value for the <S, G> multicast stream, issue the set priority command
in the multicast bandwidth map. A priority value of 0 indicates an unprioritized stream
and any value other than 0 indicates a prioritized stream. Currently there is no support
for classification of prioritized streams.
host1(config)#mroute port admission-bandwidth-limit 3000000
You can configure limits for the bandwidth that is dynamically admitted on the port. The
priority bandwidth limit controls the priority bandwidth admitted on a port. The hysteresis
limit sets the minimum priority bandwidth limit before the system evaluates mroutes
and admits any blocked OIFs.
Related
Documentation
•
Defining a Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 8
•
Enabling Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Control on page 30
•
OIF Port Reevaluation on page 31
•
mroute port admission-bandwidth-limit
•
set priority
OIF Port Reevaluation
If you change the admission bandwidth for a port, all mroutes with an OIF on that port
are reevaluated as follows:
•
If the bandwidth limit is increased, blocked OIFs can become unblocked. However, the
order in which the mroutes are visited, and which (S,G) streams become unblocked,
is not specified.
•
If the bandwidth limit of a port is decreased, no currently admitted OIFs are blocked.
However, no new OIFs are admitted until the total admitted bandwidth for the port
drops below the new limit.
•
If the bandwidth is increased to the point that the bandwidth limit for an interface is
now exceeded, no currently admitted OIFs for the affected mroutes are blocked.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
However, no new OIFs are admitted until the total admitted bandwidth drops below
the configured limit.
NOTE: If the multicast bandwidth map that includes the set
admission-bandwidth command is changed, all affected mroutes are
reevaluated in the same manner described previously.
As an example of this function, if the port has accepted a total bandwidth of
3000000 bps, and you set a limit of 2000000 bps on the port, the router does not
disconnect any already connected OIFs but prevents the interfaces from accepting any
more groups. Over time, some groups leave the interfaces and, eventually, the port limit
of 2000000 bps is reached and maintained by the router.
If you set limits for both a port and interfaces on that port, the router uses the lower of
the two limits when determining whether or not an interface can accept any new IGMP
groups. For example, if you specify an admission bandwidth limit of 2000000 bps for
the port and 3000000 bps groups for each interface, additional groups can only be
accepted until the port limit of 2000000 bps is reached.
Related
Documentation
Related
Documentation
•
OIF Interface Reevaluation on page 28
•
Defining a Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 8
•
Enabling Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Control on page 30
•
Dynamic Port Admission Bandwidth Control on page 31
•
set admission-bandwidth
•
Blocking Mroutes on page 26
•
Enabling Interface Admission Bandwidth Limitation on page 27
•
OIF Interface Reevaluation on page 28
•
mroute port admission-bandwidth-limit
•
mroute port limit
•
set admission-bandwidth
Deleting Multicast Forwarding Entries
You can clear one or more forwarding entries from the multicast routing table. However,
if you do so, the entries might reappear in the routing table if they are rediscovered.
If you specify an *, the router clears all IP multicast forwarding entries. If you specify the
IPv4 address of a multicast group, the router clears all multicast forwarding entries for
that group. If you specify the IPv4 address of a multicast group and the IPv4 address of
a multicast source, the router clears the multicast forwarding entry that matches that
group and source.
32
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Configuring IPv4 Multicast
To delete IP multicast forwarding entries issue the clear ip mroute command in Privileged
Exec mode.
host1:boston#clear ip mroute *
Related
Documentation
•
Defining Permanent IP Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 8
•
Monitoring Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 37
•
Monitoring Active Multicast Routes on page 40
•
Monitoring Multicast Entries in a Source or Group on page 43
•
Monitoring Multicast Routes When OIF Mapping Is Configured on page 43
•
Monitoring Multicast Statistics on page 46
•
Monitoring Summary Information of Multicast Routes on page 49
•
clear ip mroute
Multicast Router Information Support
When you enable multicast routing on a virtual router, the router acts as a multicast
router information (mrinfo) server. This feature enables the router to respond to mrinfo
requests from other network hosts. Specifically, E Series virtual routers respond to DVMRP
ask neighbors and DVMRP ask neighbors2 requests.
Each virtual router responds to mrinfo requests with a list of multicast interfaces and
their IP addresses. If appropriate, the virtual router also supplies the following information
for each interface:
•
Current functional status of the interface (for example, if the interface is down).
•
Information as to whether the interface is disabled and the reason for the interface
being disabled—either because IP is not configured on the interface or because the
interface has been disabled through the software.
•
Whether the interface is performing the IGMP queries for this subnet.
•
Information about PIM neighbors:
If PIM is configured on the interface, the virtual router supplies a list of the interface's
PIM neighbors and indicates which neighbors are leaf neighbors.
•
Information about DVMRP and GRE tunnels:
If the interface is an endpoint of a tunnel, the virtual router specifies the IP address of
the endpoint of the tunnel.
Related
Documentation
•
IPv4 Multicast Overview on page 4
•
Monitoring Summary Information of Multicast Routes on page 49
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
33
JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
BGP Multicasting
BGP multicasting (MBGP) is an extension of the BGP unicast routing protocol. Many of
the functions available for BGP unicasting are also available for MBGP.
The MBGP extensions specify that BGP can exchange information within different types
of address families. The address families available are unicast IPv4, multicast IPv4, and
VPN-IPv4. When you enable BGP, the router employs unicast IPv4 addresses by default.
We recommend you be thoroughly familiar with BGP before configuring MBGP. See
Configuring BGP Routing in the JunosE BGP and MPLS Configuration Guide for detailed
information about BGP and MBGP.
This topic discusses the following:
•
Investigating Multicast Routes on page 34
Investigating Multicast Routes
You can use the mtrace command to trace the path that multicast packets take from a
source to a destination through a multicast group address. This command is similar to
the traceroute command for investigating unicast routes.
host1#mtrace 100.4.4.4 40.1.1.1 232.1.1.1
Tracing multicast route from 100.4.4.4 to 40.1.1.1 for group 232.1.1.1 using response address
10.6.129.56
(Press ^c to stop.)
Received mtrace response packet of length 88
1. 40.1.1.1 Protocol: PIM(3) FwdingCode: RPF iif(9)
2. 21.2.2.2 Protocol: PIM(3) FwdingCode: Reached RP(8)
Related
Documentation
34
•
mtrace
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 2
Monitoring IPv4 Multicast
The following topics describe how to monitor IP multicast configuration on the E Series
router:
•
Displaying Available Routes for Reverse-Path Forwarding on page 35
•
Monitoring Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 37
•
Monitoring Active Multicast Routes on page 40
•
Monitoring Multicast Entries in a Source or Group on page 43
•
Monitoring Multicast Routes When OIF Mapping Is Configured on page 43
•
Monitoring Multicast Statistics on page 46
•
Monitoring Summary Information of Multicast Routes on page 49
•
Monitoring Multicast Routes When Multicast Traffic Bypass Mode Is
Activated on page 50
•
Monitoring Multicast Protocols Enabled on the Router on page 52
•
Monitoring Summary Information of Multicast Protocols Enabled on the
Router on page 53
•
Monitoring the IP Multicast Status on a Virtual Router on page 54
•
Monitoring Multicast Routes on Virtual Router Ports on page 55
Displaying Available Routes for Reverse-Path Forwarding
Purpose
Action
Display all available routes, only the routes to a particular destination, or routes associated
with a specific unicast protocol that the router can use for RPF. You can specify the IP
address and the network mask to view routes to a particular destination. You can also
specify a unicast routing protocol to view routes associated with that protocol.
To display all routes that the router can use for RPF:
host1#show ip rpf-route
Protocol/Route type codes:
I1- ISIS level 1, I2- ISIS level2,
I- route type intra, IA- route type inter, E- route type external,
i- metric type internal, e- metric type external,
O- OSPF, E1- external type 1, E2- external type2,
N1- NSSA external type1, N2- NSSA external type2
L- MPLS label, V- VR/VRF, *- indirect next-hop
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
35
JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
Prefix/Length
------------10.10.0.112/32
10.1.1.0/24
25.25.25.25/32
Type
Next Hop
----------Static 192.168.1.1
Connect 10.1.1.1
Connect 25.25.25.25
Dist/Met
-------1/1
0/1
0/1
Intf
-----fastEthernet0/0
atm3/0.100
loopback0
To display the best static routes added by network management to the routing table:
host1#show ip rpf-route static
Protocol/Route type codes:
I1- ISIS level 1, I2- ISIS level2,
I- route type intra, IA- route type inter, E- route type external,
i- metric type internal, e- metric type external,
O- OSPF, E1- external type 1, E2- external type2,
N1- NSSA external type1, N2- NSSA external type2
L- MPLS label, V- VR/VRF, *- indirect next-hop
Prefix/Length
------------10.10.0.112/32
Meaning
Type
Next Hop
Dist/Met
-----------------Static 192.168.1.1 1/1
Intf
-------------fastEthernet0/0
Table 5 on page 36 lists the output fields of the show ip rpf-route command.
Table 5: show ip rpf-route Output Fields
Related
Documentation
36
Field Name
Field Description
Prefix
Value of the logical AND of the IP address of the
destination network and the subnet address
Length
Length of the subnet mask in bits
Type
Protocol type for the interface:
•
Connect—Subnet directly connected to the
interface
•
Static—Static route
•
protocol-name—Route learned through the named
protocol
Next Hop
IP address of the next hop for this route
Dist
Distance configured for this route
Met
Learned or configured cost associated with this route
Intf
Type of interface and interface specifier for the next
hop. For details about interface types and specifiers,
see Interface Types and Specifiers in the JunosE
Command Reference Guide.
•
Defining Static Routes for Reverse-Path Forwarding on page 7
•
Specifying Unicast Routes for RPF on page 8
•
show ip rpf-route
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Monitoring IPv4 Multicast
Monitoring Multicast Forwarding Entries
Purpose
Action
Display information about all or specified multicast routes. You can specify a multicast
group IP address or both a multicast group IP address and a multicast source IP address
to display information about particular multicast forwarding entries.
To display all multicast forwarding entries while bandwidth rate is constant:
host1#show ip mroute
IP Multicast Routing Table
(S, G) uptime d h:m:s
[Data rate: Kbps] [SPT Threshold: Kbps] [Threshold: Kbps]
[Admission bandwidth: bps]
[QoS bandwidth: bps]
RPF route: addr/mask, incoming interface
neighbor address, owner route-owner
Incoming interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner [(RPF IIF)]
Outgoing interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner, Uptime/Expires
(10.0.10.1, 225.1.1.1) uptime 0 00:10:31
Data rate: 2132 Kbps, Threshold 500 Kbps
Admission bandwidth: 2000000 bps
RPF route: 10.0.10.0/24, incoming interface atm5/3.1010
neighbor 10.0.10.8, owner Local
Incoming interface list:
atm5/3.1010 (10.0.10.8/24), Accept/Pim (RPF IIF)
Outgoing interface list:
atm5/1.108 (108.0.8.5/8), Forward/Pim, 0 00:02:52/never
atm5/1.109 (107.0.8.4/8), Forward/Pim, 0 00:10:07/never
(1.1.1.1, 225.1.1.1) uptime 0 00:00:34, never expires
RPF route: 1.0.0.0/8, incoming interface ATM5/1.200
neighbor 2.2.2.2, owner Netmgmt
Incoming interface list:
ATM5/1.200 (2.1.1.1/8), Accept/Igmp (RPF IIF)
Outgoing interface list:
ATM5/1.300 (3.1.1.1/8), Forward/Igmp, 0 00:00:34/never
Counts:
2 (S, G) entries
0 (*, G) entries
To display all multicasting entries while adaptive bandwidths enabled:
Host1#show ip mroute
IP Multicast Routing Table
(S, G) uptime d h:m:s[, expires d h:m:s]
[Admission bandwidth: bps]
[QoS bandwidth: bps]
RPF route: addr/mask, incoming interface
neighbor address, owner route-owner
Incoming interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner [(RPF IIF)]
Outgoing interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner, Uptime/Expires
(10.0.1.9, 225.1.1.1) uptime 0 00:00:23
Admission bandwidth: 1998000 bps (adaptive)
QoS bandwidth: 1998000 bps (adaptive)
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
37
JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
RPF route: 10.0.0.0/8, incoming interface ATM2/1.200
neighbor 21.1.1.1, owner Netmgmt
Incoming interface list:
ATM2/1.200 (21.2.2.2/8), Accept/Pim (RPF IIF)
Outgoing interface list:
ATM2/1.300 (31.2.2.2/8), Blocked (port-adm-limit)/Pim, 0 00:00:23/never
Counts: 1 (S, G) entries
0 (*, G) entries
To display all multicast forwarding entries when the bandwidth limit of all the join
interfaces exceeds the configured connection admission control limits (CAC):
host1#show ip mroute
IP Multicast Routing Table
(S, G) uptime d h:m:s[, expires d h:m:s]
[Admission bandwidth: bps]
[QoS bandwidth: bps]
RPF route: addr/mask, incoming interface
neighbor address, owner route-owner
Incoming interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner [(RPF IIF)]
Outgoing interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner, Uptime/Expires
(10.0.1.9, 225.1.1.1) uptime 0 00:00:23
Admission bandwidth: 1998724 bps (adaptive)
QoS bandwidth: 1998724 bps (adaptive)
RPF route: 10.0.0.0/8, incoming interface ATM2/1.200
neighbor 21.1.1.1, owner Netmgmt
Incoming interface list:
ATM2/1.200 (21.2.2.2/8), Accept/Pim (RPF IIF)
Outgoing interface list:
ATM2/1.300 (31.2.2.2/8), Blocked (join-intf-adm-limit)/IGMP, 0 00:00:23/never
Counts: 1 (S, G) entries
0 (*, G) entries
Meaning
Table 6 on page 38 lists the output fields of the show ip mroute command.
Table 6: show ip mroute Output Fields
38
Field Name
Field Description
(S, G)
IP addresses of the multicast source and the
multicast group
Uptime
Length of time that the (S,G) pair has been active, in
days hours:minutes:seconds format
Expires
Length of time that the (S,G) pair can be active, in
days hours:minutes:seconds format or never
Data Rate
Flow rate for the threshold entry, in Kbps
SPT Threshold
SPT threshold value for the entry, in Kbps
Threshold
Threshold value for the entry, in Kbps
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Monitoring IPv4 Multicast
Table 6: show ip mroute Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Admission bandwidth
Admission bandwidth per mroute, in bps
QoS bandwidth
QoS bandwidth per mroute, in bps
RPF Route
IP address and subnetwork mask of the RPF route
incoming interface
Type and specifier of the incoming interface for the
RPF route
neighbor address
IP address of the neighbor
State/Owner
Owner of the route:
Incoming interface list
Outgoing interface list
Counts
Related
Documentation
•
•
Local—route belonging to the local interface
•
Static—Static route
•
Other protocols—Route established by a protocol
such as RIP or OSPF
List of incoming interfaces on the router. Details
include:
•
Type of interface and its specifier
•
Action that the interface takes with packets:
Accept or Discard
•
Multicast protocol that owns the interface
List of outgoing interfaces on the router. Details
include:
•
Type of interface and its specifier
•
Action that the interface takes with packets:
Forward or Blocked (intf-adm-limit,
join-intf-adm-limit, port-adm-limit, port-limit,
port-priority-adm-limit)
•
Protocol running on the interface: PIM, DVMRP, or
IGMP
•
Amount of time that the interface has been active
in this multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
•
Length of time that the interface can remain active
in this multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format or never
Numbers of types of source group mappings:
•
(S,G)—Number of (S,G) entries
•
(*,G)—Number of (*,G) entries
Defining Static Routes for Reverse-Path Forwarding on page 7
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
39
JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
•
Specifying Unicast Routes for RPF on page 8
•
Defining Permanent IP Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 8
•
Deleting Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 32
•
Defining a Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 8
•
Blocking Mroutes on page 26
•
Creating Mroute Port Limits on page 29
•
show ip mroute
Monitoring Active Multicast Routes
Purpose
Action
Display active multicast routes.
•
You can specify a multicast group IP address or both a multicast group IP address and
a multicast source IP address to display information about particular active multicast
forwarding entries.
•
You can specify the bandwidth threshold to display the active multicast routes with
admission bandwidth greater than the specified bandwidth threshold. The default
bandwidth threshold is 4000 bps.
•
You can use the summary option to see a summary rather than a detailed description.
•
You can use the count option to display the number of active multicast forwarding
entries.
•
You can use the oif-detail option to display the details of the join interfaces
corresponding to the mapped interface when oif-mapping is configured.
•
You can use the statistics option to display statistics for packets received through all
active multicast forwarding entries that the router has added to the multicast routing
table and established on the appropriate line modules.
To display the active multicast routes with bandwidth above 10000 bps:
host1#show ip mroute active 10000
Active IP Multicast Routes >=10000 bps
(S, G) uptime d h:m:s[, expires d h:m:s]
[Admission bandwidth: bps]
[QoS bandwidth: bps]
RPF route: addr/mask, incoming interface
neighbor address, owner route-owner
Incoming interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner [(RPF IIF)]
Outgoing interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner, Uptime/Expires
(52.0.0.1, 232.0.0.1) uptime 0 00:01:07
Admission bandwidth: 47000 bps (adaptive)
QoS bandwidth: 47000 bps (adaptive)
RPF route: 52.0.0.0/24, incoming interface ATM2/1.17
neighbor 17.0.0.2, owner NetmgmtRpf
Incoming interface list:
40
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Monitoring IPv4 Multicast
ATM2/1.17 (17.0.0.2/24), Accept/Igmp (RPF IIF)
Outgoing interface list:
NULL
Counts: 1 (S, G) entries
0 (*, G) entries
To display the summary of active multicast routes:
host1#show ip mroute summary active
Active IP Multicast Routes >=4000 bps
Group Address
Source Address
--------------- --------------232.0.0.1
51.0.0.1
232.0.0.2
51.0.0.1
232.0.0.3
51.0.0.1
Counts: 3 (S, G) entries
0 (*, G) entries
Meaning
RPF route
-----------------51.0.0.0/24
51.0.0.0/24
51.0.0.0/24
RPF Iif
--------------ATM3/1.17
ATM3/1.17
ATM3/1.17
#Oifs
----0
0
0
Table 7 on page 41 lists the show ip mroute active and show ip mroute summary active
commands output fields.
Table 7: show ip mroute active and show ip mroute summary active Output
Fields
Field Name
Field Description
(S,G)
IP addresses of the multicast source and the multicast
group
Uptime
Length of time that the (S,G) pair has been active, in
days hours:minutes:seconds format
Expires
Length of time for which the (S,G) pair will be active,
in days hours:minutes:seconds format
Admission bandwidth
Admission bandwidth (in bps)
QoS bandwidth
QoS bandwidth (in bps)
RPF Route
IP address and subnetwork mask of the RPF route
Incoming interface
Type and specifier of the incoming interface for the
RPF route
neighbor address
IP address of the neighbor
owner
Owner of the route:
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
•
Local—route belonging to the local interface
•
Static—Static route
•
Other protocols—Route established by a protocol
such as RIP or OSPF
41
JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
Table 7: show ip mroute active and show ip mroute summary active Output
Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Incoming interface list
List of incoming interfaces on the router. Details
include:
Outgoing interface list
Counts
Related
Documentation
42
•
Type of interface and its specifier
•
Action that the interface takes with packets: Accept
or Discard
•
Multicast protocol that owns the interface
List of outgoing interfaces on the router. Details
include:
•
Type of interface and its specifier
•
Action that the interface takes with packets:
Forward or Blocked (intf-adm-limit,
join-intf-adm-limit, port-adm-limit, port-limit,
port-priority-adm-limit)
•
Protocol running on the interface: PIM, DVMRP, or
IGMP
•
Amount of time that the interface has been active
in this multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
•
Length of time that the interface can remain active
in this multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format or never
Numbers of types of source group mappings:
•
(S,G)—Number of (S,G) entries
•
(*,G)—Number of (*,G) entries
Group Address
IP address of the multicast group
Source Address
IP address of the multicast source
RPF Iif
Type and identifier for the incoming interface for the
RPF route
#Oifs
Number of outgoing interfaces
•
Defining Static Routes for Reverse-Path Forwarding on page 7
•
Specifying Unicast Routes for RPF on page 8
•
Defining Permanent IP Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 8
•
Deleting Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 32
•
Defining a Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 8
•
Blocking Mroutes on page 26
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Monitoring IPv4 Multicast
•
Creating Mroute Port Limits on page 29
•
show ip mroute
Monitoring Multicast Entries in a Source or Group
Purpose
Action
Display information about the number of groups and sources.
•
You can specify a multicast group IP address or both a multicast group IP address and
a multicast source IP address to display information about a particular multicast
forwarding entry.
•
You can use the active option to display information for the active multicast routes.
•
You can specify the bandwidth threshold along with the active option to display
information for the active multicast routes with admission bandwidth greater than the
specified bandwidth threshold. The default bandwidth threshold is 4000 bps.
To display the number of groups and sources:
host1#show ip mroute count
IP Multicast Routing Table
Counts:
Meaning
2 (S, G) entries
0 (*, G) entries
Table 8 on page 43 lists the show ip mroute count command output fields.
Table 8: show ip mroute count Output Fields
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Counts
Number of types of source group mappings:
•
(S,G)—Number of (S,G) entries
•
(*,G)—Number of (*,G) entries
•
Defining Permanent IP Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 8
•
Deleting Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 32
•
Blocking Mroutes on page 26
•
show ip mroute
Monitoring Multicast Routes When OIF Mapping Is Configured
Purpose
Display details of the join interfaces corresponding to the mapped interfaces when OIF
mapping is configured.
•
You can specify a multicast group IP address or both a multicast group IP address and
a multicast source IP address to display information about a particular multicast
forwarding entry.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
43
JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
Action
•
You can use the active option to display information for the active multicast routes.
•
You can specify the bandwidth threshold along with the active option to display
information for the active multicast routes with admission bandwidth greater than the
specified bandwidth threshold. The default bandwidth threshold is 4000 bps.
To display details of the join interfaces:
host1#show ip mroute oif-detail
IP Multicast Routing Table
(S, G) uptime d h:m:s[, expires d h:m:s]
[Admission bandwidth: bps]
[QoS bandwidth: bps]
RPF route: addr/mask, incoming interface
neighbor address, owner route-owner
Incoming interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner [(RPF IIF)]
Outgoing interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner, Uptime/Expires
(10.0.1.9, 225.1.1.1) uptime 0 00:00:23
Admission bandwidth: 1998724 bps (adaptive)
QoS bandwidth: 1998724 bps (adaptive)
RPF route: 10.0.0.0/8, incoming interface ATM2/1.200
neighbor 21.1.1.1, owner Netmgmt
Incoming interface list:
ATM2/1.200 (21.2.2.2/8), Accept/Pim (RPF IIF)
Outgoing interface list:
ATM2/1.300 (31.2.2.2/8), Forward/IGMP, 0 00:00:23/never
Join interface list:
ATM2/1.2 (2.2.2.2/32), Blocked (intf-adm-limit)/IGMP, 0 00:00:23/never
ATM2/1.3 (3.2.2.2/32), Forward/IGMP, 0 00:00:23/never
Counts: 1 (S, G) entries
0 (*, G) entries
Meaning
Table 9 on page 44 lists the show ip mroute oif-detail command output fields.
Table 9: show ip mroute oif-detail Output Fields
44
Field Name
Field Description
(S,G)
IP addresses of the multicast source and the multicast
group
Uptime
Length of time that the (S,G) pair has been active, in
days hours:minutes:seconds format
Expires
Length of time for which the (S,G) pair will be active,
in days hours:minutes:seconds format
Admission bandwidth
Admission bandwidth (in bps)
QoS bandwidth
QoS bandwidth (in bps)
RPF Route
IP address and subnetwork mask of the RPF route
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Monitoring IPv4 Multicast
Table 9: show ip mroute oif-detail Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Incoming interface
Type and specifier of the incoming interface for the
RPF route
neighbor address
IP address of the neighbor
owner
Owner of the route:
Incoming interface list
Outgoing interface list
Join interface list
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
•
Local—Route belonging to the local interface
•
Static—Static route
•
Other protocols—Route established by a protocol
such as RIP or OSPF
List of incoming interfaces on the router. Details
include:
•
Type of interface and its specifier
•
Action that the interface takes with packets: Accept
or Discard
•
Multicast protocol that owns the interface
List of outgoing interfaces on the router. Details
include:
•
Type of interface and its specifier
•
Action that the interface takes with packets:
Forward or Blocked (intf-adm-limit,
join-intf-adm-limit, port-adm-limit, port-limit,
port-priority-adm-limit)
•
Protocol running on the interface: PIM, DVMRP, or
IGMP
•
Amount of time that the interface has been active
in this multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
•
Length of time that the interface can remain active
in this multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format or never
List of join interfaces on the router. Details include:
•
Type of interface and its specifier
•
Action that the interface takes with packets:
Forward or Blocked (intf-adm-limit,
join-intf-adm-limit, port-adm-limit, port-limit,
port-priority-adm-limit)
•
Protocol running on the interface: PIM, DVMRP, or
IGMP
•
Amount of time that the interface has been active
in this multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
•
Length of time that the interface can remain active
in this multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format or never
45
JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
Table 9: show ip mroute oif-detail Output Fields (continued)
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Counts
Numbers of types of source group mappings:
•
(S,G)—Number of (S,G) entries
•
(*,G)—Number of (*,G) entries
•
Defining Static Routes for Reverse-Path Forwarding on page 7
•
Defining Permanent IP Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 8
•
Deleting Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 32
•
Defining a Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 8
•
Configuring Hardware Multicast Packet Replication With OIF-Mapping on page 25
•
Blocking Mroutes on page 26
•
Creating Mroute Port Limits on page 29
•
show ip mroute
Monitoring Multicast Statistics
Purpose
Action
Display statistics for packets received through multicast routes that the router has added
to the multicast routing table and established on the appropriate line modules.
•
You can specify a multicast group IP address or both a multicast group IP address and
a multicast source IP address to display information about a particular multicast
forwarding entry.
•
You can use the active option to display information for the active multicast routes.
•
You can specify the bandwidth threshold along with the active option to display
information for the active multicast routes with admission bandwidth greater than the
specified bandwidth threshold. The default bandwidth threshold is 4000 bps.
To display statistics of the multicast routes added to the multicast routing table:
host1#show ip mroute statistics
IP Multicast Routing Table
(S, G) uptime d h:m:s[, expires d h:m:s]
[Admission bandwidth: bps]
[QoS bandwidth: bps]
RPF route: addr/mask, incoming interface
neighbor address, owner route-owner
Incoming interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner [(RPF IIF)]
Outgoing interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner, Uptime/Expires
(10.0.1.9, 225.1.1.1) uptime 0 00:00:23
Admission bandwidth: 2000000 bps
QoS bandwidth: 2000000 bps
46
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Monitoring IPv4 Multicast
RPF route: 10.0.0.0/8, incoming interface ATM2/1.200
neighbor 21.1.1.1, owner Netmgmt
Incoming interface list:
ATM2/1.200 (21.2.2.2/8), Accept/Pim (RPF IIF)
Outgoing interface list:
ATM2/1.300 (31.2.2.2/8), Blocked (port-adm-limit)/Pim, 0 00:00:23/never
Statistics:
Received
: 23 pkts, 1472 bytes
Forwarded : 0 pkts, 0 bytes
Rcvd on OIF: 0 pkts
Counts: 1 (S, G) entries
0 (*, G) entries
Meaning
Table 10 on page 47 lists the show ip mroute statistics command output fields.
Table 10: show ip mroute statistics Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
(S,G)
IP addresses of the multicast source and the multicast
group
Uptime
Length of time that the (S,G) pair has been active, in
days hours:minutes:seconds format
Expires
Length of time for which the (S,G) pair will be active,
in days hours:minutes:seconds format
Admission bandwidth
Admission bandwidth (in bps)
QoS bandwidth
QoS bandwidth (in bps)
RPF Route
IP address and subnetwork mask of the RPF route
Incoming interface
Type and specifier of the incoming interface for the
RPF route
neighbor address
IP address of the neighbor
owner
Owner of the route:
Incoming interface list
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
•
Local—Route belonging to the local interface
•
Static—Static route
•
Other protocols—Route established by a protocol
such as RIP or OSPF
List of incoming interfaces on the router. Details
include:
•
Type of interface and its specifier
•
Action that the interface takes with packets: Accept
or Discard
•
Multicast protocol that owns the interface
47
JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
Table 10: show ip mroute statistics Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Outgoing interface list
List of outgoing interfaces on the router. Details
include:
Statistics
•
Type of interface and its specifier
•
Action that the interface takes with packets:
Forward or Blocked (intf-adm-limit,
join-intf-adm-limit, port-adm-limit, port-limit,
port-priority-adm-limit)
•
Protocol running on the interface: PIM, DVMRP, or
IGMP
•
Amount of time that the interface has been active
in this multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
•
Length of time that the interface can remain active
in this multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format or never
•
Received—Number of packets and bytes that the
virtual router received for this multicast route
•
Forwarded—Number of packets and statistics that
the virtual router has forwarded for this multicast
route
•
Rcvd on OIF—Number of packets and statistics
that the virtual router has received on the OIF for
this multicast route
NOTE: The output shows statistics after the virtual
router has added the multicast route to the multicast
routing table and established the route on the
appropriate line module. Statistics for interactions
before the route is established on the line module are
not displayed.
Counts
Related
Documentation
48
Numbers of types of (S,G) mappings:
•
(S,G)—Number of (S,G) entries
•
(*,G)—Number of (*,G) entries
•
Defining Static Routes for Reverse-Path Forwarding on page 7
•
Specifying Unicast Routes for RPF on page 8
•
Defining Permanent IP Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 8
•
Deleting Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 32
•
Defining a Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 8
•
Blocking Mroutes on page 26
•
Creating Mroute Port Limits on page 29
•
show ip mroute
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Monitoring IPv4 Multicast
Monitoring Summary Information of Multicast Routes
Purpose
Action
Display summary of all or specified multicast routes.
•
You can specify a multicast group IP address or both a multicast group IP address and
a multicast source IP address to display information about a particular multicast
forwarding entry.
•
You can use the active option to display information for the active multicast routes.
•
You can specify the bandwidth threshold along with the active option to display
information for the active multicast routes with admission bandwidth greater than the
specified bandwidth threshold. The default bandwidth threshold is 4000 bps.
To display brief information about the multicast routes:
host1#show ip mroute summary
IP Multicast Routing Table
Group Address
--------------224.0.1.39
224.0.1.40
Counts:
Meaning
Source Address
--------------52.1.1.1
51.1.1.1
RPF route
--------51.1.1.1/32
51.1.1.1/32
RPF Iif
------------Register IIF
loopback1
#Oifs
---0
1
2 (S, G) entries
0 (*, G) entries
Table 11 on page 49 lists the show ip mroute summary command output fields.
Table 11: show ip mroute summary Output Fields
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Group Address
IP address of the multicast group
Source Address
IP address of the multicast source
RPF Route
IP address and network mask of the RPF route
RPF Iif
Type and identifier for the incoming interface for the
RPF route
#Oifs
Number of outgoing interfaces
Counts
Numbers of types of (S,G) pairs:
•
(S,G)—Number of (S,G) entries
•
(*,G)—Number of (*,G) entries
•
Defining Static Routes for Reverse-Path Forwarding on page 7
•
Specifying Unicast Routes for RPF on page 8
•
Defining Permanent IP Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 8
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
49
JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
•
Deleting Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 32
•
Blocking Mroutes on page 26
•
Creating Mroute Port Limits on page 29
•
show ip mroute
Monitoring Multicast Routes When Multicast Traffic Bypass Mode Is Activated
Purpose
Display multicast routes present on the router when the multicast traffic bypass mode
is activated even though there are no entries in the forwarding table.
You can specify a multicast group IP address or both a multicast group IP address and
a multicast source IP address to display the information about a particular multicast
forwarding entry.
NOTE: When you use the active option with the mcast-by-pass option, no
valid output is displayed; because there are no active mroutes present on the
router.
Action
To display multicast routes present on the router when the multicast traffic bypass mode
is activated:
host1#show ip mroute mcast-by-pass
IP Multicast Routing Table [By-pass mode]
(S, G) uptime d h:m:s[, expires d h:m:s]
[Admission bandwidth: bps]
[QoS bandwidth: bps]
RPF route: addr/mask, incoming interface
neighbor address, owner route-owner
Incoming interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner [(RPF IIF)]
Outgoing interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner, Uptime/Expires
(101.1.1.100, 225.0.0.1) uptime 0 00:02:08
Admission bandwidth: 5000 bps
QoS bandwidth: 5000 bps
Priority: 1
rpf neighbor is not a pim neighbor
RPF check disabled
Incoming interface list:
NULL
Outgoing interface list:
GigabitEthernet16/0/3.10
Meaning
50
Table 12 on page 51 lists the show ip mroute mcast-by-pass command output fields.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Monitoring IPv4 Multicast
Table 12: show ip mroute mcast-by-pass Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
(S,G)
IP addresses of the multicast source and the multicast group
Uptime
Length of time that the (S,G) pair has been active, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
Expires
Length of time that the (S,G) pair can be active, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format or never
Admission bandwidth
Admission bandwidth per mroute, in bps
QoS bandwidth
QoS bandwidth per mroute, in bps
RPF Route
IP address and subnetwork mask of the RPF route
incoming interface
Type and specifier of the incoming interface for the RPF route
neighbor address
IP address of the neighbor
Owner
Owner of the route:
Incoming interface list
Outgoing interface list
Related
Documentation
•
Local—Route belonging to the local interface
•
Static—Static route
•
Other protocols—Route established by a protocol such as RIP or
OSPF
List of incoming interfaces on the router. Details include:
•
Type of interface and its specifier
•
Action that the interface takes with packets: Accept or Discard
•
Multicast protocol that owns the interface
List of outgoing interfaces on the router. Details include:
•
Type of interface and its specifier
•
Action that the interface takes with packets: Forward or Blocked
(intf-adm-limit, join-intf-adm-limit, port-adm-limit, port-limit,
port-priority-adm-limit)
•
Protocol running on the interface: PIM, DVMRP, or IGMP
•
Amount of time that the interface has been active in this multicast
forwarding entry, in days hours:minutes:seconds format
•
Length of time that the interface can remain active in this multicast
forwarding entry, in days hours:minutes:seconds format or never
•
Multicast QoS Adjustment in Multicast Traffic Bypass Mode on page 16
•
Activating Multicast QoS Adjustment Functions on page 18
•
ip multicast-routing mcast-by-pass
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
•
show ip mroute
Monitoring Multicast Protocols Enabled on the Router
Purpose
Action
Display information about the multicast protocols enabled on the router.
To display information about the multicast protocols enabled on the router:
host1#show ip multicast protocols
Multicast protocols:
Protocol Pim
Type: Sparse
Interfaces: 1 registered, 1 owned
Registered interfaces:
ATM2/1.103 (103.0.0.2/24) owner Pim
Protocol Igmp
Type: Local
Interfaces: 1000 registered, 1000 owned
Registered interfaces:
ATM2/0.131 (13.0.0.1/24) local Igmp owner Igmp
Admission-bandwidth 2000000/10000000 bps
QoS Adjust 2000000 bps
Active <S,G> count
15
Blocked <S,G> count 10
ATM2/0.132 (13.0.0.2/24) local Igmp owner Igmp
Admission-bandwidth 0/10000000 bps
QoS Adjust 0 bps
Active <S,G> count
25
Blocked <S,G> count 10
ATM2/0.133 (13.0.0.3/24) local Igmp owner Igmp
Admission-bandwidth 8000000/10000000 bps
QoS Adjust 0 bps
...
Count: 2
Meaning
protocols
Table 13 on page 52 lists the show ip multicast protocols command output fields.
Table 13: show ip multicast protocols Output Fields
52
Field Name
Field Description
Multicast Protocols
Multicast protocols on this router
Protocol
Name of the multicast protocol
Type
Mode of the multicast protocol:
•
For DVMRP—Dense
•
For PIM—Sparse, Dense, or Sparse-Dense
•
For IGMP—Local
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Monitoring IPv4 Multicast
Table 13: show ip multicast protocols Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Interfaces
•
registered—Number of interfaces on which the
protocol is configured
•
owned—Number of interfaces that a protocol owns.
If you configure only IGMP on an interface, IGMP
owns the interface. However, if you configure IGMP
and either PIM or DVMRP on the same interface,
PIM or DVMRP owns the interface.
Registered interfaces
Related
Documentation
Information about interfaces on which the protocol
is configured:
•
Types and identifiers of interfaces. For details about
interface types and specifiers, see Interface Types
and Specifiers in the JunosE Command Reference
Guide.
•
Protocols configured on the interface and the
protocol that owns the interface. If you configure
only IGMP on an interface, IGMP owns the interface.
However, if you configure IGMP and PIM or DVMRP
on the same interface, PIM or DVMRP owns the
interface.
•
Admission-bandwidth—Actual admission
bandwidth or configured admission bandwidth (in
bps)
•
QoS Adjust—Bandwidth of QoS adjustment, in bps
•
Count—Number of multicast protocols on the
virtual router
•
Active <S,G> count—Number of active S,G data
streams on the interface
•
Blocked <S,G> count—Number of blocked S,G data
streams on the interface
•
Defining a Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 8
•
Blocking Mroutes on page 26
•
Enabling Interface Admission Bandwidth Limitation on page 27
•
Enabling Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Control on page 30
•
show ip multicast protocols
Monitoring Summary Information of Multicast Protocols Enabled on the Router
Purpose
Action
Display a summary of information about the multicast protocols enabled on the router.
To display a summary of information about the multicast protocols enabled on the router:
host1#show ip multicast protocols brief
Protocol
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Registered
Interfaces
Owned
Interfaces
Type
53
JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
--------- ---------Pim
2
Igmp
1
---------2
0
------------------Sparse Dense
Local
Count: 2 protocols
Meaning
Table 14 on page 54 lists the show ip multicast protocols brief command output fields.
Table 14: show ip multicast protocols brief Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Protocol
Name of the multicast protocol
Registered Interfaces
Number of interfaces on which the protocol is
configured
Owned Interfaces
Number of interfaces that a protocol owns. If you
configure only IGMP on an interface, IGMP owns the
interface. However, if you configure IGMP and either
PIM or DVMRP on the same interface, PIM or DVMRP
owns the interface.
Type
Mode of the multicast protocol:
Count
Related
Documentation
•
•
For DVMRP—Dense
•
For PIM—Sparse, dense, or sparse-dense
•
For IGMP—Local
Number of multicast protocols on the virtual router
show ip multicast protocols
Monitoring the IP Multicast Status on a Virtual Router
Purpose
Action
Display information about the status of IP multicast on the virtual router.
To display information about the status of IP multicast on the virtual router:
host1#show ip multicast routing
Multicast forwarding is enabled on this router
Multicast graceful restart is complete (timer 0 seconds) on this router
Multicast cache-miss processing is enabled on this router
Related
Documentation
54
•
Enabling IP Multicast on page 7
•
Enabling and Disabling RPF Checks on page 8
•
Defining Permanent IP Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 8
•
Activating Multicast QoS Adjustment Functions on page 18
•
show ip multicast routing
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Monitoring IPv4 Multicast
Monitoring Multicast Routes on Virtual Router Ports
Purpose
Display information for multicast routes on a port across all virtual routers.
NOTE: This command displays information for mroutes on a port across all
virtual routers.
Action
To display the multicast route port outgoing interface, limits, counts, bandwidth settings,
and bandwidth accepted:
host1#show mroute port count
BW
Port
----1/1/0
1/1/1
Meaning
Priority
Limit
----None
None
Count
----1
2
bps
----None
15000
BW bps
-------None
10000
Hysteresis
---------85
85
Admitted
-------0
2000
Table 15 on page 55 lists the output fields of the show mroute port count command.
Table 15: show mroute port count Output Fields
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Port
Slot or port value on the router
Limit
None (reserved for future functionality)
Count
Number of multicast route outgoing interfaces on the
specified port
BW bps
Bandwidth limit (in bits per second)
Priority BW bps
Priority bandwidth limit (in bits per second)
Admitted
Bandwidth admitted on the port (in bits per second)
•
Defining a Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 8
•
Creating Mroute Port Limits on page 29
•
Enabling Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Control on page 30
•
show mroute port count
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
56
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 3
Configuring IGMP and IGMP Proxy
IP hosts use Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) in IPv4 to report their multicast
group memberships to neighboring routers. Similarly, multicast routers, such as an E Series
router, use IGMP to discover which of their hosts belong to multicast groups.
This chapter describes how to configure IGMP for IP multicast on an E Series router; it
contains the following sections:
•
IGMP Overview on page 58
•
IGMP Platform Considerations on page 59
•
IGMP References on page 60
•
Static and Dynamic IGMP Interfaces on page 60
•
Before You Begin Configuring IGMP on page 62
•
Enabling IGMP on an Interface on page 62
•
Configuring IGMP Settings for an Interface on page 63
•
Configuring Multicast Groups for IGMP on page 64
•
Access Node Control Protocol for IGMP on page 65
•
SSM Mapping on page 65
•
Overview of Limiting the Number of Accepted IGMP Groups on page 66
•
IGMP Traffic Overview on page 67
•
Explicit Host Tracking on page 67
•
Configuring IGMP Attributes on page 68
•
Example: Accepting IGMP Reports from Remote Subnetworks on page 69
•
IGMP Proxy Overview on page 70
•
Configuring IGMP Proxy on page 71
•
Establishing the IGMP Proxy Baseline on page 72
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
IGMP Overview
The IPv4 address scheme assigns class D addresses for IP multicast. IGMP is the protocol
that uses these addresses, which can be in the range 224.0.0.0 to 239.255.255.255. The
following addresses have specific functions or are unavailable:
•
224.0.0.0 is reserved—you cannot assign it to a group.
•
224.0.0.1 is the all-hosts address—a packet sent to this address reaches all hosts on
a subnet.
•
224.0.0.2 is the all-routers address—a packet sent to this address reaches all routers
on a subnet.
This implementation of IGMP complies with IGMP versions 1, 2, and 3. IGMPv3 supports
source-specific join and leave messages and is backward compatible with IGMPv1 and
IGMPv2.
IGMPv2 mode interfaces exchange the following types of messages between routers
and hosts:
•
Group membership queries
•
Group membership reports
•
Leave group membership messages
IGMPv3 mode interfaces exchange the following types of messages with IGMPv3 hosts:
•
Group membership queries
•
IGMPv3 group membership reports
This topic discusses the following:
•
Group Membership Queries on page 58
•
Group Membership Reports on page 59
•
Leave Group Membership Messages on page 59
Group Membership Queries
A multicast router can be a querier or a nonquerier. Only one querier is on a network at
any time. Multicast routers monitor queries from other multicast routers to determine
the status of the querier. If the querier detects a query from a router with a lower IP
address, it relinquishes its role to that router.
IGMPv1 and IGMPv2 mode interfaces send two types of group membership queries to
hosts on the network:
•
General queries to the all-hosts group address (224.0.0.1)
•
Specific queries to the appropriate multicast group address
IGMPv3 mode interfaces send the following types of queries to IGMPv3 hosts:
58
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 3: Configuring IGMP and IGMP Proxy
•
General queries
•
Group-specific queries
•
Source-specific queries
The purpose of a group membership query is to discover the multicast groups to which
a host belongs.
IGMPv2 and IGMPv3 group membership queries have a Max Response Time field. This
response time is the maximum amount of time that a host can take to reply to a query.
Group Membership Reports
When a host receives a group membership query, it identifies the groups associated with
the query and determines to which groups the query belongs. The host then sets a timer,
with a value less than the Max Response Time field in the query, for each group to which
it belongs.
When the timer expires, the host sends a group membership report to the group address.
When a multicast router receives a report, it adds the group to the membership list for
the network and sets a timer to the group membership interval. The router calculates the
group membership interval using the following formula of configurable IGMP values:
( query interval x robustness value ) + query maximum response time
If this timer interval expires before the router receives another group membership report,
the router determines that the group has no members left on the network.
IGMPv3 supports an extended report format you can use to report multiple groups and
source lists in a single report.
Leave Group Membership Messages
When a host leaves a group, it sends a leave group membership message to multicast
routers on the network. A host generally addresses leave group membership messages
to the all-routers group address (224.0.0.2).
Related
Documentation
•
IGMP Platform Considerations on page 59
•
IGMP References on page 60
•
Enabling IGMP on an Interface on page 62
IGMP Platform Considerations
For information about modules that support IGMP on the ERX7xx models, ERX14xx
models, and the ERX310 Broadband Services Router:
•
See ERX Module Guide, Table 1, Module Combinations for detailed module specifications.
•
See ERX Module Guide, Appendix A, Module Protocol Support for information about the
modules that support IGMP.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
For information about modules that support IGMP on the E120 and E320 Broadband
Services Routers:
Related
Documentation
•
See E120 and E320 Module Guide, Table 1, Modules and IOAs for detailed module
specifications.
•
See E120 and E320 Module Guide, Appendix A, IOA Protocol Support for information
about the modules that support IGMP.
•
IGMP Overview on page 58
•
IGMP References on page 60
IGMP References
For more information about IGMP, see the following resources:
Related
Documentation
•
IGMP-based Multicast Forwarding (“ IGMP
Proxying”)—draft-ietf-magma-igmp-proxy-00.txt (May 2002 expiration)
•
RFC 2236—Internet Group Management Protocol, Version 2 (November 1997)
•
RFC 2933—Internet Group Management Protocol MIB (October 2000)
•
RFC 3292—General Switch Management Protocol (GSMP) V3 (June 2002)
•
RFC 3376—Internet Group Management Protocol (October 2002)
•
GSMP extensions for layer2 control (L2C) Topology Discovery and Line
Configuration—draft-wadhwa-gsmp-l2control-configuration-00.txt (July 2006
expiration)
•
IGMP Overview on page 58
•
IGMP Platform Considerations on page 59
Static and Dynamic IGMP Interfaces
The router supports static and dynamic IGMP interfaces. Unlike static interfaces, dynamic
interfaces are not restored when you reboot the router. For some protocols, dynamic
layers can build on static layers in an interface; however, in a dynamic IGMP interface,
all the layers are dynamic. See Figure 7 on page 61 for examples of static and dynamic
IGMP interfaces.
60
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 3: Configuring IGMP and IGMP Proxy
Figure 7: Static and Dynamic IGMP Interfaces
You configure static IGMP interfaces by using software such as the CLI or an SNMP
application; you configure dynamic IGMP interfaces by using a profile. A profile constitutes
a set of attributes for an interface; a profile for dynamic IGMP interfaces contains attributes
for configuring all the layers in the interface.
You define a profile by using the same CLI commands that you use to configure a static
IGMP interface; however, the mode in which you use the commands differs. Use the
commands in Interface Configuration mode to configure a static IGMP interface and in
Profile Configuration mode to define a profile.
When you have defined a profile, you can apply it to an interface or a group of interfaces.
Profiles provide an efficient method of creating and managing large numbers of dynamic
interfaces. For detailed information about creating and assigning profiles, see Configuring
Dynamic Interfaces in the JunosE Link Layer Configuration Guide. When you create a profile
for dynamic IGMP interfaces, specify attributes for configuring all layers in the interface.
You use the following IGMP commands to configure a static IGMP interface. You also
use these commands to define the attributes for the IGMP layer when you create a profile
for dynamic IGMP interfaces:
Table 16: IGMP Commands
ip igmp
ip igmp query-max-response-time
ip igmp access-group
ip igmp robustness
ip igmp access-source-group
ip igmp ssm-map enable
ip igmp apply-oif-map
ip igmp ssm-map static
ip igmp explicit-tracking
ip igmp query-interval
ip igmp group limit
ip igmp static-exclude
ip igmp immediate-leave
ip igmp static-group
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Table 16: IGMP Commands (continued)
ip igmp last-member-query-interval
ip igmp static-include
ip igmp promiscuous
ip igmp version
ip igmp querier
multicast group port limit
ip igmp querier-timeout
The following sections describe the tasks associated with these and other ip igmp
commands.
You can also use various IGMP-specific RADIUS attributes in RADIUS Access-Accept
messages as an alternative method of configuring certain values. See Configuring RADIUS
Attributes in the JunosE Broadband Access Configuration Guide for additional information.
Related
Documentation
•
Dynamic Interfaces Overview
Before You Begin Configuring IGMP
You can configure IGMP on IPv4 multicast interfaces.
For information about configuring IP interfaces, see Configuring IP in the JunosE IP, IPv6,
and IGP Configuration Guide. For information about configuring IPv6 interfaces, see
Configuring IPv6 in the JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring IPv4 Multicast Attributes on page 7
•
Configuring IPv6 Multicast Attributes on page 167
Enabling IGMP on an Interface
You must start IGMP on each interface that you want to use the protocol. You can
configure IGMP and either PIM or DVMRP on the same interface. If you configure only
IGMP on an interface, IGMP owns that interface. If you configure IGMP and either PIM or
DVMRP on an interface, PIM or DVMRP owns the interface.
By enabling IGMP, the router processes incoming multicast packets and creates an entry
in the multicast routing table. If neither PIM nor DVMRP own the interface (for example,
when only IGMP is configured), then the packets are locally routed to other interfaces
on the router. PIM or DVMRP must be configured on the interface for packets to be sent
to other routers.
For networks that use only IGMPv1, you can configure an interface to operate in IGMPv1
mode. However, IGMPv2 and IGMPv3 interfaces support IGMPv1 hosts. In an IGMPv1
network, you must configure one interface to act as a querier. In an IGMPv2 or IGMPv3
network, the querier is the router with the lowest IP address.
To start IGMP, complete the following steps:
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Chapter 3: Configuring IGMP and IGMP Proxy
1.
Enable IGMP on the interface (IGMPv2 is the default version).
host1:boston(config-if)#ip igmp
2. (IGMPv1 or IGMPv3) Specify the IGMP version for the interface.
host1:boston(config-if)#ip igmp version 1
3. (IGMPv1 only) Specify that the interface act as the querier for the network.
host1:boston(config-if)#ip igmp querier
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring IGMP Settings for an Interface on page 63
•
Configuring Multicast Groups for IGMP on page 64
•
ip igmp
Configuring IGMP Settings for an Interface
When you start IGMP on an interface, it operates with the default settings. You can,
however, modify:
•
The method that the router uses to remove hosts from multicast groups (IGMPv2 and
IGMPv3 interfaces only).
host1:boston(config-if)#ip igmp immediate-leave
•
The query time interval for the querier sends group membership messages.
host1:boston(config-if)#ip igmp last-member-query-interval 90
•
The time that a non-querier waits for queries from the current querier before sending
query messages to assume responsibility of querier.
host1:boston(config-if)#ip igmp querier-timeout 200
•
The time that a new querier waits before sending query messages after it assumes
responsibility from another querier.
host1:boston(config-if)#ip igmp query-interval 100
•
The time that a host can take to reply to a query (maximum response time).
host1:boston(config-if)#ip igmp query-max-response-time 120
•
The number of times that the router sends each IGMP message from this interface.
host1:boston(config-if)#ip igmp robustness 2
Related
Documentation
•
Enabling IGMP on an Interface on page 62
•
Configuring Multicast Groups for IGMP on page 64
•
ip igmp immediate-leave
•
ip igmp last-member-query-interval
•
ip igmp querier-timeout
•
ip igmp query-interval
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•
ip igmp query-max-response-time
•
ip igmp robustness
Configuring Multicast Groups for IGMP
You can configure multicast groups for IGMP using the following tasks:
•
Specifying Multicast Groups on page 64
•
Assigning a Multicast Group to an Interface on page 64
•
Configuring Group Outgoing Interface Mapping on page 64
Specifying Multicast Groups
You can use a standard-format or extended-format IP access list to specify the multicast
groups that a host can join.
1.
Configure the host on a subnetwork to join only multicast groups that appear on the
specified IP access list.
host1:boston(config-if)#ip igmp access-group boston-list
2. Configure the host on a subnetwork to become a member of only those (S,G) pairs
(also known as channels) which are included on the specified IP access list.
host1:boston(config-if)#ip igmp access-source-group dallas-list
Assigning a Multicast Group to an Interface
You can assign an interface to send and receive all traffic for a particular multicast group.
This feature enables you to control the IGMP traffic and to test the behavior of multicast
protocols in the network.
To send and receive all traffic for a multicast group from a specific interface:
•
Issue the ip igmp static-group command in Interface Configuration mode.
host1:boston(config-if)#ip igmp static-group 225.1.2.3
You can use the no version to stop the interface from sending all traffic for the group.
The interface sets no timers for this group.
Configuring Group Outgoing Interface Mapping
You can configure an IGMP interface to use a different outgoing interface (OIF) for
multicast-data-forwarding by applying an OIF map. When you configure an OIF map on
an IGMP interface, the map is applied to all IGMP membership requests that the interface
receives.
To configure OIF mapping on an interface:
1.
Create an OIF map using the ip igmp oif-map command at the global level.
host1(config)#ip igmp oif-map OIFMAP atm 3/0.1 232.0.0.1/32 51.0.0.1/32
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host1(config)#ip igmp oif-map OIFMAP atm 3/0.2 232.0.0.1/32 51.0.0.2/32
host1(config)#ip igmp oif-map OIFMAP atm 3/0.3 233.0.0.1/32
host1(config)#ip igmp oif-map OIFMAP atm 3/0.4 233.0.0.0/24 51.0.0.1/32
host1(config)#ip igmp oif-map OIFMAP atm 3/0.5 233.0.0.0/24 51.0.0.2/32
host1(config)#ip igmp oif-map OIFMAP self 0.0.0.0/0 51.0.0.0/24
2. Apply the OIF map to an interface using the ip igmp apply-oif-map command.
host1(config-subif)#ip igmp apply-oif-map OIFMAP
To properly configure an interface used in the OIF map for multicast-data-forwarding
capability, you must configure the interface version as passive with the ip igmp version
command. You can either specify a passive interface as the OIF or specify the OIF as self
(to use the IGMP interface as the OIF) in the ip igmp oif-map command.
Access Node Control Protocol for IGMP
By using ANCP, IGMP is no longer terminated or proxied at the access node. Instead,
IGMP passes through the access node transparently. B-RAS terminates both the data
PVC and IGMP. After possible user permission verification, B-RAS may instruct the access
node, by using GSMP, to establish a multicast branch for the subscriber port.
Access Node Control Protocol (ANCP), also known as Layer 2 Control (L2C) works with
a special IGMP session to collect OIF mapping events in a scalable manner. For additional
information about configuring ANCP for IGMP, see Configuring ANCP in the JunosE IP
Services Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring ANCP
•
Configuring Group Outgoing Interface Mapping on page 64
SSM Mapping
Source-specific multicast (SSM) mapping enables the router to determine one or more
source addresses for group G. The mapping effectively translates IGMPv1 or IGMPv2
membership reports to an IGMPv3 report, enabling the router to continue as if it had
initially received an IGMPv3 report. After the router is joined to these groups, it sends out
PIM join messages and continues to enable joining from these groups, as long as it
continues to receive IGMPv1 and IGMPv2 membership reports and no change occurs to
the SSM mapping for the group.
When you statically configure SSM mapping, the router can discover source addresses
from a statically configured table.
The following conditions apply when you configure SSM mapping:
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•
When an SSM map is configured without any matching access list, SSM mapping is
not applied on the incoming (*,G) groups. The PIM SSM range must deny any
unacceptable SSM group addresses.
NOTE: An access list must be explicitly configured with the same name
as that of the SSM map and group addresses that are to be SSM mapped.
Related
Documentation
•
When you issue the no ip igmp ssm-map enable command, the router removes all
SSM map (S,G) states and establishes a (*,G) state.
•
You can enter multiple ssm-map static commands for different access lists. Also, you
can enter multiple ssm-map static commands for the same access list, as long as the
access list uses different source addresses.
•
SSM maps do not process statically configured groups.
•
ip igmp ssm-map static
Overview of Limiting the Number of Accepted IGMP Groups
By default, there is no limit on the number of IGMP groups that an IGMP interface can
accept. However, you can manage multicast traffic on the router by restricting the number
of IGMP groups accepted by:
•
A specific port on an I/O module
•
A specific IGMP interface
If you set limits for both a port and interfaces on that port, the router uses the lower of
the two limits when determining how many IGMP groups an interface can accept. For
example, if you set a limit of 10 groups for the port and 15 groups for each interface, only
10 groups can be accepted among the interfaces.
However, if you set a limit for a port and that limit is lower than the number of groups
currently accepted by the interfaces on that port, the router does not dissociate the
groups from the interfaces. The router enforces the new limit on the port when the number
of groups associated with the interfaces falls to that limit. For example, if the interfaces
on the port have accepted a total of 15 groups, and you set a limit of 10 groups on the
port, the router does not disconnect any of the groups and prevents the interfaces from
accepting any more groups. Over time, some groups leave the interfaces and, eventually,
a maximum of ten groups remain connected.
Related
Documentation
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•
Configuring Multicast Groups for IGMP on page 64
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Chapter 3: Configuring IGMP and IGMP Proxy
IGMP Traffic Overview
IGMPv3 extends IGMPv2 functionality with the ability to include or exclude specific
multicast traffic sources. That is, with IGMPv3, hosts signal (S,G) pairs to be included or
excluded.
For hosts that cannot signal group membership dynamically, you can use the ip igmp
static-include or ip igmp static-exclude command to statically include or exclude
multicast traffic, respectively.
IGMPv3 is the industry-designated standard protocol for hosts to signal channel
subscriptions in SSM.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM SSM
•
ip igmp static-include
•
ip igmp static-exclude
Explicit Host Tracking
Explicit host tracking enables the router to explicitly track each individual host that is
joined to a group or channel on a particular multi-access network.
Explicit host tracking provides the following:
•
Minimal leave latency when a host leaves a multicast group or channel. When the
router receives a leave message for a group or channel on an interface, it accesses a
list of hosts and immediately stops forwarding traffic if the sender is the last host to
request traffic for that group or channel. The leave latency is bound only by the packet
transmission latencies in the multi-access network and the processing time in the
router.
•
Ability to change channels quickly in networks where bandwidth is constrained between
a multicast-enabled router and hosts.
•
Ability to determine what multicast hosts are joined to particular multicast groups or
channels, which is useful for accounting purposes.
•
Reduction of control message traffic on the network because, when it receives a leave
message, the router no longer needs to send out IGMP queries to verify membership.
As a result, interested hosts also do not need to respond to these queries with reports.
•
Tracking based on the IGMP reports for hosts in both include and exclude modes for
every multicast group or channel on an interface.
When the router is configured for explicit host tracking and starts immediate leave using
the host information collected, every leave message received for a group or channel is
treated as follows:
•
The router checks the number of hosts that receive traffic from the group or channel.
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•
If the host sending the leave message is the only host, it starts immediate leave for
that group or channel on that interface. The router removes the interface from the
multicast group or channel immediately, without sending out a group or
group-source-specific query and waiting for the last member query interval.
•
If the host sending the leave message is not the only host receiving traffic for that group
or channel, the router removes the host from the list of hosts on that interface, but
keeps the interface in the outgoing interface list for the multicast group or channel. No
group or group-source-specific queries are sent.
If one or more hosts that support only IGMP V1 are present on a network, the leave
latencies for the multicast groups to which those hosts are joined revert to the IGMP V1
leave latency. This affects only the multicast groups to which these legacy hosts are
actually joined at any point in time.
You cannot configure explicit host tracking on passive IGMP interfaces or on IGMP V1
interfaces. When you enable IGMP V2 or V3 on an interface, explicit host tracking is not
enabled by default.
When you enable explicit host tracking on an interface that has a membership state, the
router does not immediately start performing immediate leave. For a maximum of group
membership interval seconds, the router only performs host tracking. Any leave messages
that the router receives during this period receive normal leave processing. Any leave
messages received after this interval has elapsed receive immediate leave processing,
when appropriate.
When explicit host tracking has been enabled on an IGMP V3 interface, even if a group
has to downgrade to IGMP V2 due to the presence of an IGMP V2 host, explicit host
tracking continues for that group. To avoid this, you can use the
disable-if-igmp-v2-detected keyword. If you select this option, the router turns off explicit
host tracking for the group when IGMP V2 host reports are received for the group on that
interface. This option does not have any significance on an interface configured for IGMP
V2 and is ignored if provided. Because IGMP V1 does not support leave messages, explicit
host tracking is turned off for a group that downgrades to IGMP V1 due to the presence
of IGMP V1 hosts.
Explicit host tracking cannot be enabled on an interface that has immediate-leave
configured and vice versa. Any attempt to configure immediate-leave on an interface
that has explicit host tracking enabled or to configure explicit host tracking on an interface
that has immediate-leave enabled is rejected and an error message logged on the screen.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring Explicit Host Tracking on page 69
Configuring IGMP Attributes
You can configure IGMP attributes using the following tasks:
68
•
Configuring Explicit Host Tracking on page 69
•
Disabling and Removing IGMP on page 69
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 3: Configuring IGMP and IGMP Proxy
Configuring Explicit Host Tracking
The following example enables IGMP V3 explicit host tracking on interface 3/0.101 with
the default configuration where the router continues to perform explicit host tracking for
IGMP V2 groups. To override this default configuration, you must use the ip igmp
explicit-tracking disable-if-igmp-v2-detected command.
[email protected]#interface 3/0.101
[email protected]#ip igmp version 3
[email protected]#ip igmp explicit-tracking
Disabling and Removing IGMP
To disable and re-enable IGMP on the VR:
•
Disable IGMP on a VR.
host1(config)#virtual-router boston
host1:boston(config)#router igmp
host1:boston(config-router)#igmp disable
•
Enable IGMP on a VR.
host1(config)#virtual-router boston
host1:boston(config)#router igmp
You can remove IGMP from the VR and recreate it on the VR.
Related
Documentation
•
igmp disable
•
router igmp
•
virtual-router
Example: Accepting IGMP Reports from Remote Subnetworks
This example shows how to accept IGMP reports from a remote subnetwork.
•
Requirements on page 69
•
Overview on page 70
•
Configuration on page 70
Requirements
This example uses the following hardware and software components:
•
JunosE Release 7.1.0 or higher-numbered releases
•
E Series router (ERX7xx models, ERX14xx models, the ERX310 router, the E120 router,
or the E320 router)
•
ASIC-based line modules that support Fast Ethernet or Gigabit Ethernet
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Overview
By default, IGMP interfaces accept IGMP reports only from associated subnetworks. You
can configure the router to accept IGMP reports from subnetworks that are not associated
with its interfaces. The igmp promiscuous command in Router Configuration mode
specifies whether interfaces on the router can accept IGMP reports from indirectly
connected subnets. To override this global setting on a particular interface, use the ip
igmp promiscuous command in Interface Configuration mode.
Configuration
In the following example, the router is configured to accept IGMP reports from indirectly
connected subnets on all interfaces. The interface on port 0 of the line module in slot 4
is then configured to accept IGMP reports only from directly connected subnets. This
configuration discusses the following procedure:
•
Configuring Router Interface to Accept IGMP Reports from Indirectly Connected
Subnets on page 70
Configuring Router Interface to Accept IGMP Reports from Indirectly Connected
Subnets
Step-by-Step
Procedure
Access virtual-router boston and enable IGMP on the virtual-router.
1.
host1(config)#virtual-router boston
Enable all IGMP interfaces on the router to accept IGMP reports from hosts on any
subnetwork.
2.
host1:boston(config-router)#igmp promiscuous
host1:boston(config-router)#exit
Enable the interface to accept IGMP reports only from hosts on subnetworks
associated with this interface.
3.
host1:boston(config)#interface serial 4/0
host1:boston(config-if)#ip igmp promiscuous off
Related
Documentation
•
ip igmp promiscuous
•
virtual-router
IGMP Proxy Overview
IGMP proxy enables the router to issue IGMP host messages on behalf of hosts that the
router discovered through standard IGMP interfaces. The router acts as a proxy for its
hosts. E Series routers support IGMP proxy versions 2 and 3.
Figure 8 on page 71 shows a router in an IGMP proxy configuration. You enable IGMP
proxy on one interface, which connects to a router closer to the root of the tree. This
interface is the upstream interface. The router on the upstream interface is running IGMP.
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Chapter 3: Configuring IGMP and IGMP Proxy
You enable IGMP on the interfaces that connect the router to its hosts that are farther
away from the root of the tree. These interfaces are known as downstream interfaces.
Figure 8: Upstream and Downstream Interfaces
As described in “IGMP Overview” on page 58, earlier in this chapter, hosts interact with
the router through the exchange of IGMP messages. Similarly, when you configure IGMP
proxy, the router interacts with the router on its upstream interface through the exchange
of IGMP messages. However, when acting as the proxy, the router performs the host
portion of the IGMP task on the upstream interface, as follows:
Related
Documentation
•
When queried, sends group membership reports to the group.
•
When one of its hosts joins a multicast address group to which none of its other hosts
belong, sends unsolicited group membership reports to that group.
•
When the last of its hosts in a particular multicast group leaves the group, sends an
unsolicited leave group membership report to the all-routers group (244.0.0.2).
•
Configuring IGMP Proxy on page 71
Configuring IGMP Proxy
To configure a downstream interface, enable IGMP on that interface. To configure IGMP
proxy on the router, complete the following tasks:
1.
Enable IP multicast.
host1(config)#ip multicast-routing
2. Identify the interface that you want to act as the upstream interface.
3. Enable IGMP proxy on that interface.
host1(config-if)#ip igmp-proxy
4. (Optional) Specify how often the router sends unsolicited reports to routers on the
upstream interface.
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host1(config-if)#ip igmp-proxy unsolicited-report-interval 600
5. (Optional) Specify how long the router calculates an IGMPv1 querier router to exists
on the subnetwork after the router receives an IGMPv1 query on this interface.
host1(config-if)#ip igmp-proxy V1-router-present-time 600
Related
Documentation
•
IGMP Proxy Overview on page 70
•
Establishing the IGMP Proxy Baseline on page 72
Establishing the IGMP Proxy Baseline
You can set the counters for the number of queries received and reports sent on the
upstream interface to zero. This feature enables you to establish a reference point, or
baseline, for IGMP proxy statistics.
(host1)#baseline ip igmp-proxy interface
Related
Documentation
72
•
Configuring IGMP Proxy on page 71
•
baseline ip igmp-proxy interface
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CHAPTER 4
Monitoring IGMP and IGMP Proxy
IP hosts use Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) in IPv4 to report their multicast
group memberships to neighboring routers. Similarly, multicast routers, such as an E
Series router, use IGMP to discover which of their hosts belong to multicast groups.
NOTE: The output for monitor and show commands from E120 and E320
routers is identical to the output from other E Series routers, except that the
output from E120 and E320 routers includes information about the adapter
identifier in the interface specifier (slot/adapter/port).
The following topics describe how to monitor IGMP for IP multicast and IGMP proxy on
an E Series router:
•
Monitoring IGMP Information on a Virtual Router on page 73
•
Monitoring IGMP Groups on page 75
•
Monitoring IGMP Interfaces on page 76
•
Monitoring Summary Information for IGMP Interfaces on page 80
•
Monitoring IGMP on a Mapped Outgoing Interface on page 81
•
Monitoring IGMP for Multicast Groups on page 81
•
Monitoring IGMP on Outgoing Interfaces on page 83
•
Monitoring IGMP Information for a Mapped Outgoing Interface on page 84
•
Monitoring IGMP SSM Mapping on page 85
•
Monitoring the Number of IGMP Groups on a Port on page 85
•
Monitoring IGMP Proxy Parameters on page 86
•
Monitoring IGMP Proxy Groups on page 87
•
Monitoring IGMP Proxy Interfaces on page 88
Monitoring IGMP Information on a Virtual Router
Purpose
Display IGMP information for a virtual router.
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Action
To display IGMP information for a virtual router:
host1:boston#show ip igmp
Routing Process IGMP, Administrative state enabled, Operational state enabled
2 total interfaces, 2 enabled, 0 disabled
0 enabled interfaces performing graceful restart
2 learnt groups
IGMP Statistics:
Rcvd: 1 total, 0 checksum errors, 0 unknown types
0 queries, 1 reports, 0 leaves
Sent: 11 total
Meaning
Table 17 on page 74 lists the show ip igmp command output fields.
Table 17: show ip igmp Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Routing Process
Routing process for this virtual router (IGMP)
Administrative state
Status of IGMP in the software: enabled or disabled
Operational state
Status of IGMP on the virtual router: enabled or
disabled
Total interfaces
Number of interfaces on which you started IGMP
enabled
Number of interfaces on which IGMP is enabled
disabled
Number of interfaces on which IGMP is disabled
learnt groups
Number of multicast groups that the virtual router
has discovered
IGMP graceful restart duration
Restart interval in seconds
IGMP Statistics Rcvd
Statistics for IGMP messages received:
IGMP Statistics Sent
•
total—Total number of IGMP messages received
•
checksum errors—Number of IGMP messages
received with checksum errors
•
unknown types—Number of IGMP messages
received that are not group membership queries,
group membership reports, or leave group
membership messages
•
queries—Number of group membership queries
•
reports—Number of group membership reports
•
leaves—Number of leave group membership
messages
Statistics for IGMP messages sent:
•
74
Total number of group membership queries sent
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 4: Monitoring IGMP and IGMP Proxy
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring IGMP Attributes on page 68
•
Disabling and Removing IGMP on page 69
•
show ip igmp
Monitoring IGMP Groups
Purpose
Action
Display statically joined and directly connected groups learned through IGMP.
To display statically joined and directly connected groups learned through IGMP without
OIF mapping:
host1:boston#show ip igmp groups
Grp Address
Interface
State
Reporter
ExpTim oldHTo
------------- --------------- ----------- ------------ ------ -----228.1.1.
FastEthernet1/1 Version3
17.0.0.2
44
0
228.1.1.2
FastEthernet1/1 Version3
17.0.0.2
50
0
228.1.1.3
FastEthernet1/1 Version3
17.0.0.2
48
0
230.1.1.1
FastEthernet1/1 Version3
17.0.0.2
44
0
Included Sources:
51.0.0.1
44
51.0.0.2
44
51.0.0.3
44
231.1.1.1
FastEthernet1/1 Version3
17.0.0.2
44
0
Excluded Sources:
51.0.0.1
0
51.0.0.2
0
51.0.0.3
0
Counts: 5 version-3, 0 version-2, 0 version-1, 0 check state, 0 disabled
(5 total)
0 excluded
Source-groups: 3 included, 3 excluded
To display statically joined and directly connected groups learned through IGMP with
OIF mapping:
host1:boston#show ip igmp groups
Grp Address
Interface
State
Reporter
ExpTim oldHTo
------------- --------------- ----------- ------------ ------ -----232.1.1.1
ATM5/0.12
Version3
1.1.1.2
371
0
oif-map OIFMAP ATM5/0.121
232.1.1.1
ATM5/0.13
Version3
1.1.1.3
375
0
oif-map OIFMAP ATM5/0.121
232.1.1.2
ATM5/0.12
Version3
1.1.1.2
373
0
Included Sources:
10.1.1.2
oif-map OIFMAP self
373
10.1.1.10
oif-map OIFMAP ATM5/0.120
373
10.1.1.11
oif-map OIFMAP ATM5/0.121
373
232.1.1.2
ATM5/0.13
Version3
1.1.1.3
375
0
Included Sources:
10.1.1.2
oif-map OIFMAP self
375
10.1.1.10
oif-map OIFMAP ATM5/0.120
375
10.1.1.11
oif-map OIFMAP ATM5/0.121
375
Counts: 4 version-3, 0 version-2, 0 version-1, 0 check state, 0 disabled
(4 total)
0 excluded
Source-groups: 6 included, 0 excluded
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Meaning
Table 18 on page 76 lists the output fields of the show ip igmp groups command.
Table 18: show ip igmp groups Output Fields
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Grp Address
Address of the multicast group
Interface
Interface that discovered the multicast group
oif-map
Name of the OIF map and the mapped OIF interface,
when a group or source has been mapped to an OIF
State
IGMP version on the interface
ExpTim
Time, in seconds, at which the router stops polling
for more members of this group
oldHTo
Time at which the router stops polling for more
IGMPv1 members of a group. If this value is 0, the
interface has received no IGMPv1 reports for the group
Included Sources
Sources included in the multicast group
Excluded Sources
Sources excluded from the multicast group
Counts
Number of source-group mappings by version and
state
•
Configuring Multicast Groups for IGMP on page 64
•
Specifying Multicast Groups on page 64
•
Assigning a Multicast Group to an Interface on page 64
•
Configuring Group Outgoing Interface Mapping on page 64
•
show ip igmp groups
Monitoring IGMP Interfaces
Purpose
Action
Display IGMP information for interfaces on which IGMP is enabled. You can specify the
count keyword to view the number of IGMP interfaces. You can also specify the group
address keyword to view the information for interfaces that belongs to that group.
To display IGMP information for interfaces on which IGMP is enabled:
host1:boston#show ip igmp interface
Interface ATM2/1.15 address 15.0.0.2/255.255.255.0
Administrative state enabled, Operational state enabled
Interface parameters:
Version 2
State Querier
76
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Chapter 4: Monitoring IGMP and IGMP Proxy
Query Interval 125 secs, 53 secs before the next query
Other querier present interval 250 secs
Maximum response time 100 (in 10ths of a second)
Last member query interval 10 (in 10ths of a second)
Robustness 3
Interface defaults to global promiscuous mode
No inbound access group
No inbound access source-group
No inbound apply-oif-map
Immediate Leave: disabled
Explicit Host Tracking: enabled
Max-Group limit: No Limit
Admission-Bandwidth limit: No Limit
Group Count: 1
Interface statistics:
Rcvd: 0 reports, 0 leaves, 0 wrong version queries
Sent: 1 queries
Groups learnt: 1
Counts: 0 down, 0 init state, 1 querier, 0 non-querier, 1 Total
Counts: 0 down, 0 init state, 1 querier, 0 non-querier, 1 Total
To display IGMP information for a specific interface:
host1#show ip igmp interface gigabitEthernet 3/0.0
Interface GigabitEthernet3/0.0 address 10.1.1.1/255.255.255.0
Administrative state enabled, Operational state disabled
Interface parameters:
Version 2
State Down
Query Interval 125 secs
Other querier present interval 250 secs
Maximum response time 100 (in 10ths of a second)
Last member query interval 10 (in 10ths of a second)
Robustness 3
Interface defaults to global promiscuous mode
No inbound access group
No inbound access source-group
No inbound apply-oif-map
Immediate Leave: disabled
Explicit Host Tracking: enabled
Max-Group limit: No Limit
Admission-Bandwidth limit: No Limit
Group Count: 0
IOA packet replication gigabitEthernet 3/8.1
Interface statistics:
Rcvd: 0 reports, 0 leaves, 0 wrong version queries
Sent: 0 queries
Groups learnt: 0
Meaning
Table 19 on page 77 lists the output fields of the show ip igmp interface command.
Table 19: show ip igmp interface Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Interface
Type of interface and interface specifier. For details
about interface types and specifiers, see Interface
Types and Specifiers in the JunosE Command
Reference Guide.
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Table 19: show ip igmp interface Output Fields (continued)
78
Field Name
Field Description
address
IP address of the interface
Administrative state
Status of the interface in the software: enabled or
disabled
Operational state
Physical status of the interface: enabled or disabled
Version
IGMP version
State
Function of the interface: querier or nonquerier
Query Interval
Time interval in seconds at which this interface sends
query messages
Other querier present interval
Time in seconds that the interface waits before
declaring itself as the querier
Maximum response time
Time interval, in tenths of a second, during which this
interface waits for a host to respond
Last member query interval
Time, in tenths of a second, that this interface waits
before sending a new query to a host that sends a
group leave message
Robustness
Number of times this interface sends IGMP messages
Interface defaults to global
promiscuous mode
Interface uses the setting of the igmp promiscuous
command to determine whether it accepts IGMP
reports from hosts on any subnetwork
Inbound access group
Information about standard IP access lists configured
with the ip igmp access-group command
No inbound access group
No access list specified
Inbound access source-group
Information about IP access lists configured with the
ip igmp access-source-group command
No inbound access source-group
No access list specified
Inbound apply-oif-map
Information about OIF maps configured with the ip
igmp apply-oif-map command
No inbound apply-oif-map
No map name specified
Immediate Leave
Setting of the ip igmp immediate-leave command:
enabled or disabled
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 4: Monitoring IGMP and IGMP Proxy
Table 19: show ip igmp interface Output Fields (continued)
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Explicit Host Tracking
Setting of the ip igmp explicit-tracking command:
enabled or disabled
Max-Group limit
Number of IGMP groups that the interface can accept,
as configured with the ip igmp group limit command
Admission-Bandwidth limit
Value of the admission-bandwidth limit set for an
interface that accepts IGMP groups, or No Limit
Group Count
Number of IGMP groups that the interface has
accepted
IOA packet replication
Hardware multicast packet replication interface to
which egress multicast packets on this interface are
redirected
Interface statistics Rcvd
Information about IGMP messages received on this
interface:
•
reports—Number of group membership reports
received
•
leaves—Number of group leave messages received
•
wrong version queries—Number of group
membership queries received from devices running
a different version of IGMP
Interface statistics Sent
Number of IGMP messages this interface has sent
Interface statistics Groups learnt
Number of groups this interface has discovered
Counts
Breakdown of IGMP interfaces:
•
down—Number of interfaces down
•
init state—Number of interfaces in the initialization
state
•
querier—Number of querier interfaces
•
non-querier—Number of non-querier interfaces
•
Total—Total number of IGMP interfaces
•
Configuring IGMP Settings for an Interface on page 63
•
Configuring Multicast Groups for IGMP on page 64
•
Specifying Multicast Groups on page 64
•
Configuring Group Outgoing Interface Mapping on page 64
•
Configuring IGMP Attributes on page 68
•
Overview of Limiting the Number of Accepted IGMP Groups on page 66
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•
Configuring Explicit Host Tracking on page 69
•
show ip igmp interface
Monitoring Summary Information for IGMP Interfaces
Purpose
Action
Display a summary of IGMP information for interfaces on which IGMP is enabled.
To display a summary of IGMP information for interfaces on which IGMP is enabled:
host1:boston# show ip igmp interface brief
Interface
Intf Address
Ver
------------------------fastEthernet0/0 192.168.1.250/24 2
atm3/0.2
21.1.1.1/8
2
Count: 2 interfaces
Meaning
State
-----Querier
Querier
Querier
------------192.168.1.250
21.1.1.1
QTime
----28
26
QPTime
--0
0
Table 20 on page 80 lists the output fields of the show ip igmp interface brief command.
Table 20: show ip igmp interface brief Output Fields
Related
Documentation
80
Field Name
Field Description
Interface
Type of interface and interface specifier. For details
about interface types and specifiers, see Interface
Types and Specifiers in the JunosE Command
Reference Guide.
Intf Address
IP address of the interface
Ver
IGMP version
State
Function of the interface: querier or nonquerier
Querier
IP address of the querier on the network to which this
interface connects
QTime
Time interval, in seconds, at which this interface
sends query messages
QPTime
Time in seconds that the interface waits before
declaring itself as the querier
Count
Total number of IGMP interfaces
•
Configuring IGMP Settings for an Interface on page 63
•
show ip igmp interface
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 4: Monitoring IGMP and IGMP Proxy
Monitoring IGMP on a Mapped Outgoing Interface
Purpose
Action
Display the current mappings to all the mapped outgoing interfaces or to the specified
mapped outgoing interface.
To display the current mappings to all the mapped outgoing interfaces:
host1# show ip igmp mapped-oif
OIF
Oper Group Address Source Address
Join I/F
Map Name
--------------- ---- --------------- --------------- --------------- ---------ATM5/0.120
Up
232.1.1.2
10.1.1.10
ATM5/0.12
OIFMAP
ATM5/0.13
OIFMAP
ATM5/0.121
Up
232.1.1.1
*
ATM5/0.12
OIFMAP
ATM5/0.13
OIFMAP
232.1.1.2
10.1.1.11
ATM5/0.12
OIFMAP
ATM5/0.13
OIFMAP
Counts: 3 source-group mappings
Meaning
Table 21 on page 81 lists the output fields of the show ip igmp mapped-oif command.
Table 21: show ip igmp mapped-oif Output Fields
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
OIF
Outgoing interface used in an OIF map
Oper
Operation status of the outgoing interface
Group Address
Multicast group IP address associated with the OIF
Source Address
Source IP address associated with the OIF
Join I/F
IGMP interface associated with the OIF
Map Name
Name of the map associated to the OIF
Counts
Number of source-group mappings to OIFs
•
Configuring Multicast Groups for IGMP on page 64
•
Configuring Group Outgoing Interface Mapping on page 64
•
show ip igmp mapped-oif
Monitoring IGMP for Multicast Groups
Purpose
Display the IGMP membership information for multicast groups and (S, G) channels. You
can specify the tracked keyword to view the interface information only for interfaces
where explicit host tracking is enabled.
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Action
To display IGMP membership information for multicast groups and (S, G) channels:
host1# show ip igmp membership
Flags: M – Uses Oifmap S– SSM mapped T – tracked
1,2,3 – The version of IGMP the group is in
Reporter:
<ip-address> - last reporter if the group is not explicitly tracked
<n>/<m> - <n> reporters include mode, <m> reporters in exclude
Group
Source
Reporter
ExpTim
Flags
--------------- --------------------------------------------------224.0.1.40
*
10.10.1.1
02:41
2S
FastEthernet2/1
224.0.1.50
1/2
02:56
3MT
FastEthernet2/2
11.10.0.21
02:56
11.10.2.22
02:30
20.30.0.11
11.10.0.23
02:48
20.30.0.12
11.10.0.21
02:56
20.30.0.13
11.10.0.21
02:56
11.10.0.22
02:30
11.10.0.23
02:48
224.0.1.60
20.20.0.1
01:56
3
FastEthernet2/3
10.30.0.100
02:45
10.30.0.101
02:35
10.30.0.102
02:15
10.30.0.104
stop
224.0.1.70
30.20.0.1
stop
3
FastEthernet2/4
40.30.0.100
01:10
40.30.0.101
01.24
239.0.1.80
2/0
stop
3T
FastEthernet2/5
50.30.0.100
10.10.0.10
02:48
50.30.0.101
10.10.0.20
02:56
10.10.0.10
02:48
50.30.0.102
10.10.0.20
02:56
235.0.1.90
0/3
02:56
2T
FastEthernet2/6
*
12.10.0.10
02:48
12.10.0.20
02:56
12.10.0.30
02:48
Meaning
Interface
Table 22 on page 82 lists the output fields of the show ip igmp membership command.
Table 22: show ip igmp membership Output Fields
82
Field Name
Field Description
Group
Multicast group or (S, G) channel
Source
(S, G) entries that are forwarding traffic
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 4: Monitoring IGMP and IGMP Proxy
Table 22: show ip igmp membership Output Fields (continued)
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Reporter
Hosts that requested including sources or have not
requested excluding sources. If listed under a group,
host that sent exclude reports for the group. If listed
under a source, host that requested traffic from this
source for the group. For any (S, G), if listed under a
source, hosts interested in the traffic for this (S, G).
Flags
•
M—Uses Oifmap
•
S—SSM mapped
•
T—Tracked
•
1, 2, 3—IGMP version that the group is in
ExpTim
Expiration time
Interface
Type of interface and interface specifier. For details
about interface types and specifiers, see Interface
Types and Specifiers in the JunosE Command
Reference Guide.
•
Configuring Multicast Groups for IGMP on page 64
•
Assigning a Multicast Group to an Interface on page 64
•
Configuring IGMP Attributes on page 68
•
IGMP Traffic Overview on page 67
•
Configuring Explicit Host Tracking on page 69
•
show ip igmp membership
Monitoring IGMP on Outgoing Interfaces
Purpose
Action
Display all the OIF maps or the OIF map for the specified map name.
To display all the OIF maps:
host1#show ip igmp oif-map
Map Name
Group Prefix
Source Prefix
------------------ ------------------ -----------------OIFMAP
232.1.1.0/24
0.0.0.0/0
232.1.1.0/24
10.1.1.2/32
232.1.1.0/24
10.1.1.10/32
232.1.1.3/32
0.0.0.0/0
232.1.1.4/32
0.0.0.0/0
Meaning
OIF
-----------------ATM5/0.121
self
ATM5/0.120
ATM5/0.130
ATM5/0.130
Table 23 on page 84 lists the output fields of the show ip igmp oif-map command.
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Table 23: show ip igmp oif-map Output Fields
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Map Name
Name of the map associated to the show output
Group Prefix
Multicast group IP prefix
Source Prefix
Source IP prefix
OIF
Outgoing interface associated with the group and
source prefix
•
Configuring Multicast Groups for IGMP on page 64
•
Configuring Group Outgoing Interface Mapping on page 64
•
show ip igmp oif-map
Monitoring IGMP Information for a Mapped Outgoing Interface
Purpose
Action
Display the mapped OIF that is assigned to a given map name, group address, and source
address.
To display the mapped OIF that is assigned to a given map name, group address, and
source address:
host1#show ip igmp oif-mapping OIFMAP 232.1.1.1 10.1.1.10
OIF Mapping
OIF-MAP Name
Group Address
Source Address
Mapped OIF
Meaning
:
:
:
:
OIFMAP
232.1.1.1
10.1.1.10
ATM5/0.120
Table 24 on page 84 lists the output fields of the show ip igmp oif-mapping command.
Table 24: show ip igmp oif-mapping Output Fields
Related
Documentation
84
Field Name
Field Description
OIF-MAP Name
Name of the map requested
Group Address
Multicast group IP address requested
Source Address
Source IP address requested
Mapped OIF
Interface associated with the OIF map
•
Configuring Multicast Groups for IGMP on page 64
•
Configuring Group Outgoing Interface Mapping on page 64
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 4: Monitoring IGMP and IGMP Proxy
•
show ip igmp oif-mapping
Monitoring IGMP SSM Mapping
Purpose
Display the SSM mapping state and the source list mapping associated with a multicast
group address, based on the static SSM mapping configuration.
Action
To display the SSM mapping state and the source list mapping associated with a multicast
group address:
host1:boston#show ip igmp ssm-mapping 232.1.1.1
SSM Mapping
: Enabled
Group Address : 232.1.1.1
Source List
: 172.1.1.1
: 172.1.1.2
Meaning
Table 25 on page 85 lists the output fields of the show ip igmp ssm-mapping command.
Table 25: show ip igmp ssm-mapping Output Fields
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
SSM Mapping
Status of SSM mapping on the interface: Enabled or
Disabled
Group Address
Multicast group address requested
Source List
List of sources mapped to the multicast group
address
•
Configuring IGMP Attributes on page 68
•
SSM Mapping on page 65
•
show ip igmp ssm-mapping
Monitoring the Number of IGMP Groups on a Port
Purpose
Display the number of IGMP groups that ports have accepted and, if configured, the
maximum number of groups that ports can accept.
NOTE: Only ports that have accepted IGMP groups and ports for which you
have configured a limit for the number of IGMP groups appear in this output.
Action
To display the number of IGMP groups that ports have accepted and, if configured, the
maximum number of groups that ports can accept:
host1:boston#show multicast group limit
Port
limit count
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--------- ----- ----2/0
5
0
2/1
-1
1
Meaning
Table 26 on page 86 lists the output fields of the show multicast group limit command.
Table 26: show multicast group limit Output Fields
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Port
Identifier of the port in slot/port format:
•
slot—Number of the chassis slot in the range 0–6
(ERX7xx models) and 0–13 (ERX14xx models)
•
port—Port number on the I/O module
limit
Maximum number of IGMP groups that the port can
accept. A value of –1 indicates that no limit has been
specified.
count
Actual number of IGMP groups that the port has
accepted
•
Configuring IGMP Attributes on page 68
•
Overview of Limiting the Number of Accepted IGMP Groups on page 66
•
show multicast group limit
Monitoring IGMP Proxy Parameters
Purpose
Action
Display the IGMP proxy parameters for a virtual router.
To display the IGMP proxy parameters for a virtual router:
host1#show ip igmp-proxy
Routing Process IGMP Proxy, Administrative state enabled, Operational state enabled
total 1 upstream interface, state enabled
6 multicast group
Meaning
Table 27 on page 86 lists the output fields of the show ip igmp-proxy command.
Table 27: show ip igmp-proxy Output Fields
86
Field Name
Field Description
Routing Process
IGMP proxy protocol
Administrative state
State of IGMP proxy in the software: enabled or
disabled
Operational state
Operational state of IGMP proxy: enabled or disabled
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 4: Monitoring IGMP and IGMP Proxy
Table 27: show ip igmp-proxy Output Fields (continued)
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
total interface
Number of IGMP proxy interfaces on the virtual router;
currently only one upstream interface per virtual
router
state
Operational state of the IGMP proxy interfaces:
enabled or disabled
multicast group
Number of multicast groups associated with IGMP
proxy interfaces
•
Configuring IGMP Proxy on page 71
•
show ip igmp-proxy
Monitoring IGMP Proxy Groups
Purpose
Action
Display information about the multicast groups that IGMP proxy reported.
To display information about the multicast groups that IGMP proxy reported:
host1#show ip igmp-proxy groups
Grp Address
--------------225.1.1.1
225.1.1.2
225.1.1.3
225.1.1.4
225.1.1.5
225.1.1.6
count 6
Interface
Member State
--------------- -------------atm3/0.2
Idle
atm3/0.2
Idle
atm3/0.2
Idle
atm3/0.2
Idle
atm3/0.2
Idle
atm3/0.2
Idle
To display information about a particular multicast group:
host1#show ip igmp-proxy group 225.1.1.1
Grp Address
Interface
Member State
--------------- --------------- -------------225.1.1.1
atm3/0.2
Idle
To display the number of groups that IGMP proxy reported:
host1#show ip igmp-proxy group count
Count: 6 groups
Meaning
Table 28 on page 87 lists the output fields of the show ip igmp-proxy groups command.
Table 28: show ip igmp-proxy groups Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Grp Address
Address of the multicast group
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Table 28: show ip igmp-proxy groups Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Interface
Type and specifier of the upstream interface
associated with the multicast group
Member State
State of the associated group address and interface:
count
Related
Documentation
•
•
Idle—Interface is going to send a group
membership report to respond to a group
membership query for this group
•
Delay—Interface has responded to the latest group
membership query for this group
Total number of multicast groups associated with
this interface
show ip igmp-proxy groups
Monitoring IGMP Proxy Interfaces
Purpose
Action
Display information about the interface on which IGMP proxy is configured. To view
information about a particular interface, enter an interface type and specifier, such as
atm 3/0. For details about interface types and specifiers, see Interface Types and Specifiers
in the JunosE Command Reference Guide. You can specify the brief keyword to display a
summary rather than a detailed description.
To display information about the specific interface on which IGMP proxy is configured:
host1#show ip igmp-proxy interface atm 3/0.2
Interface atm3/0.2 address 21.1.1.1/255.0.0.0
Administrative state enabled, Operational state enabled
Interface parameters:
Version 2
State No v1 Router Present
Unsolicited report interval 10 secs
Version 1 router present timeout 400 secs
0 multicast group
Interface statistics:
Rcvd: 0 v1 query, 6 v2 queries
0 v1 report, 0 v2 report
Sent: 0 v1 report, 48 v2 reports, 0 leave
Meaning
Table 29 on page 88 lists the output fields of the show ip igmp-proxy interface command.
Table 29: show ip igmp-proxy interface Output Fields
88
Field Name
Field Description
Interface
Type of upstream interface. For details about
interface types, see Interface Types and Specifiers in
the JunosE Command Reference Guide.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 4: Monitoring IGMP and IGMP Proxy
Table 29: show ip igmp-proxy interface Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
address
Address of the upstream interface
Administrative state
State of the upstream interface in the software:
enabled or disabled
Operational state
Physical state of the upstream interface: enabled or
disabled
Version
IGMP version on this interface
State
Presence of IGMPv1 routers on the same subnet as
this upstream interface
Unsolicited report interval
Time interval, in tenths of a second, at which this
upstream interface sends an unsolicited group
membership report
Version 1 router present timeout
How long, in seconds, that the upstream interface
calculates an IGMPv1 router to exist on the subnet
after that interface receives an IGMPv1 group
membership query
multicast group
Number of multicast groups associated with this
upstream interface
Interface statistics Rcvd
Statistics for messages received on this interface:
Interface statistics Sent
Related
Documentation
•
v1 queries—Number of IGMPv1 group membership
queries received
•
v2 queries—Number of IGMPv2 group membership
queries received
•
v1 reports—Number of IGMPv1 group membership
reports received
•
v2 reports—Number of IGMPv2 group membership
reports received
Statistics for messages sent from this interface:
•
v1 reports—Number of IGMPv1 leave group reports
sent
•
v2 reports—Number of IGMPv2 leave group reports
sent
•
leaves—Number of leave group membership
messages sent
•
Configuring IGMP Proxy on page 71
•
Establishing the IGMP Proxy Baseline on page 72
•
show ip igmp-proxy interface
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Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 5
Configuring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
The Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) protocol is a collection of multicast routing
protocols that enables multicast routers to identify other multicast routers to receive
packets.
This chapter describes how to configure PIM for IPv4 on E Series routers; it contains the
following sections:
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
PIM for IPv4 Multicast Platform Considerations on page 98
•
PIM for IPv4 Multicast References on page 99
•
Enabling PIM for IPv4 on a Virtual Router on page 99
•
Disabling PIM for IPv4 on a Virtual Router on page 100
•
Enabling PIM for IPv4 on an Interface on page 100
•
Setting a Priority to Determine the Designated Router for IPv4 on page 101
•
Configuring the PIM for IPv4 Join/Prune Message Interval on page 102
•
Configuring an RP Router for PIM Sparse Mode and PIM Sparse-Dense Mode for
IPv4 on page 103
•
Configuring BSR and RP Candidates for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv4 on page 105
•
Migrating to BSR from Auto-RP on page 105
•
Switching to an SPT for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv4 on page 106
•
Multicast VPNs Overview on page 107
•
Configuring the Default MDT on page 109
•
Configuring Data MDTs on page 111
•
Example: Configuring Multicast VPNs on page 113
•
Configuring PIM Sparse Mode Join Filters for IPv4 on page 117
•
Configuring PIM for IPv4 SSM on page 118
•
BFD Protocol for PIM for IPv4 Overview on page 119
•
Configuring the BFD Protocol for PIM for IPv4 on page 120
•
Removing PIM for IPv4 on page 120
•
Resetting PIM Counters and Mappings for IPv4 on page 121
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast
The IPv4 implementation of PIM supports PIM dense mode, PIM sparse mode, PIM
sparse-dense mode, and PIM source-specific multicast (PIM SSM).
Figure 9 on page 92 represents how PIM builds a source, group (S,G) entry in a
source-rooted tree (SRT). When multiple routers are connected to a multiaccess network,
one router becomes the designated router. The designated router receives data from the
source on interface 1/0 and multicasts the data to its downstream neighbors on interfaces
1/1, 2/0, and 2/1. In the designated router routing table, the entry for this operation lists
the source as the IP address of the source and the group as the IP address of the multicast
group.
Figure 9: Source-Rooted Tree
DR Routing Table Entry
PC
Source
Group
Register
RP
Input interface
Output interface
Source
128.5.4.33
1/0
PC
DR
PC
2/1
1/1
128.5.4.33
225.1.3.5
1/0
1/1, 2/0, 2/1
1/0
1/1, 2/0, 2/1
2/0
PC
PC
PC
PC
PIM
PIM
PIM
PC
g013059
PC
Neighbors exchange hello messages periodically to determine the designated router.
The router with the highest network layer address becomes the designated router. If the
designated router subsequently receives a hello message from a neighbor with a higher
network layer address, that neighbor becomes the designated router.
The IPv4 implementation of PIM supports the following modes:
•
PIM Dense Mode on page 92
•
PIM Sparse Mode on page 94
•
PIM Sparse Mode Bootstrap Router on page 97
•
PIM Sparse-Dense Mode on page 97
•
PIM Source-Specific Multicast on page 98
PIM Dense Mode
PIM dense mode uses a reverse-path multicast, flood-and-prune mechanism. The protocol
was developed for situations that meet one or more of the following criteria:
•
92
Sources and receivers are close together, and there are many more receivers than
sources.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 5: Configuring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
•
There is a constant stream of multicast data.
•
There is a lot of multicast data.
Dense-mode routing protocols use SRT algorithms. An SRT algorithm establishes a tree
that connects each source in a multicast group to the members of the group. All traffic
for the multicast group passes along this tree.
Figure 10 on page 93 illustrates how PIM dense mode works. When a source sends a
multicast packet to a first-hop router, the first-hop router multicasts that packet to its
neighbors. Those neighbors in turn forward the packet to their neighbors and their hosts
that belong to the multicast group. If a neighbor has no hosts that belong to the multicast
group and has no other PIM neighbors, it returns a prune message to the first-hop router.
The first-hop router does not multicast subsequent packets for that group to neighbors
who respond with prune messages.
Figure 10: PIM Dense Mode Operation
Data for Multicast Group Boston
First-hop
router
Assert, prune
RPF interface
Member of Multicast Group Boston
Member of Multicast Group Boston
Overriding Prunes
If a host on a previously pruned branch requests to join a multicast group, it sends an
IGMP message to its first-hop router. The first-hop router then sends a graft message
upstream.
PIM routers send join messages on multiaccess interfaces to override prune messages.
For example, if a PIM router sent a prune message to indicate that it had no hosts for a
multicast group, and one of its hosts subsequently requests to send a packet to that
group, the router sends a join message to the first-hop router.
Preventing Duplication
If there are parallel paths to a source, duplicate packets can travel downstream through
different routers to the network. If a forwarding router receives a multicast packet on its
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outgoing interface, the router identifies that the packet is a duplicate and notifies the
upstream routers. See Figure 11 on page 94.
Figure 11: Detecting Duplication
Source
The upstream routers responsible for the duplication send assert messages to determine
which router becomes the forwarder. Downstream routers listen to the assert messages
to discover which router becomes the forwarder.
PIM Sparse Mode
This implementation of PIM sparse mode supports the following features:
•
Rendezvous point (RP) routers
•
Designated routers and designated router election
•
Join/prune messages, hello messages, assert messages, and register messages
•
Switching from a shared tree to a shortest path tree (SPT)
•
(*,*,RP) support for interoperation with dense-mode protocols
•
RPF checks of multicast entries when unicast routing configuration changes
•
Timers for tree maintenance
•
Border, null, Rendezvous Point Tree (RPT), SPT, and wildcard flags
PIM sparse mode resolves situations that meet one or more of the following criteria:
•
The multicast group contains few receivers.
•
Multicast traffic is infrequent.
•
Wide area networks (WANs) separate sources and receivers.
Sparse-mode routing protocols use shared trees. In a shared tree, sources forward
multicast datagrams to a directly connected router, the designated router. The designated
94
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Chapter 5: Configuring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
router encapsulates the datagram and unicasts it to an assigned RP router, which then
forwards the datagram to members of multicast groups. See Figure 12 on page 95.
Figure 12: PIM Sparse Mode Operation
Source
Designated router unicasts datagram to RP
DR
Router forwards datagram to RP
Router forwards datagram to RP
RP
Members of multicast group receive the multicast
In PIM sparse mode, an RP announces a source and establishes paths from the source
to members of a multicast group before multicasting any datagrams. RPs transmit join
messages to become part of the shared tree that enables distribution of packets to the
multicast group.
However, when a source starts multicasting datagrams, PIM sparse mode can switch to
an SRT—known in PIM sparse mode as an SPT—to improve the network's efficiency.
Although shared trees minimize the traffic in the network and the costs associated with
unnecessary transmission of data, the routes in a shared tree might be longer than those
in an SPT. See Figure 13 on page 96.
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Figure 13: Shared Tree Versus SPT
Source
DR
g013119
Target
The designated routers on the network determine when the source switches from a
shared tree to an SPT. A designated router switches to the SPT when it receives a certain
number of packets which you can configure.
When all designated routers associated with a specific RP router have switched to the
SPT, the RP router sends a join/prune message toward the multicast source. When the
multicast source receives this message, it stops sending multicast data through the SPT.
Joining Groups
A host's designated router (DR) sends join messages to the RP when that host wants to
join a group. When a host wants to leave a group, it communicates with its designated
router through IGMP. When the designated router no longer has any hosts that belong
to a particular group, it sends a prune message to the RP.
Timers
PIM sparse mode uses timers to maintain the networking trees.
NOTE: PIM sparse mode routers poll their neighbors and hosts for various
pieces of information at set intervals.
If a PIM sparse mode router does not receive information from a neighbor or host within
a specific time, known as the hold time, it removes the associated information from its
routing tables.
You can configure how often an interface sends hello messages (hello interval) and how
often routers send RP announce messages (RP announce interval). The hold-time
associated with hello messages is 3.5 times the hello interval, and the holdtime associated
with RP announce messages is 2.5 times the RP announce interval.
All other timers are fixed and take the default values recommended in RFC 2934—Protocol
Independent Multicast MIB for IPv4 (October 2000).
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Chapter 5: Configuring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
PIM Sparse Mode Bootstrap Router
PIM sparse mode routers need the address of the rendezvous point (RP) for each group
for which they have (*,G) state. They obtain this address either through a bootstrap
mechanism or through static configuration. PIM sparse mode routers commonly use one
of two bootstrap mechanisms: bootstrap router (BSR) or auto-RP. Auto-RP is standards
based, but is not used in IPv6 implementations, so BSR configuration has become more
popular.
When implemented, BSR operates as follows:
1.
One router in each PIM domain is elected the BSR.
2. All the routers in the domain that are configured to be RP candidates periodically
unicast their candidacy to the BSR.
3. The BSR picks an RP set from the available candidates and periodically announces
this set in a bootstrap message.
4. Bootstrap messages are flooded hop by hop throughout the domain until all routers
in the domain learn the RP set.
NOTE: A PIM router can receive group-to-RP mappings from either BSR
or auto-RP, but not from both. Because BSR and auto-RP use different
mapping algorithms, the mechanisms cannot coexist.
NOTE: Static-override is configured using the override switch in the ip pim
rp-address command.
CAUTION: The maps distributed by BSR and Auto-RP for the same RP
announcements may be different. Because the Auto-RP mapping agent
resolves mapping conflicts, a PIM router that applies the BSR mapping
algorithm to an Auto-RP distributed map should produce the same result
as a router that applies the Auto-RP mapping algorithm. However, the
reverse is not true. A PIM router that applies the BSR mapping algorithm
to a BSR distributed map may produce a different result to a router that
applies the Auto-RP mapping algorithm. This means that a PIM IPv4
domain can operate either BSR or Auto-RP.
PIM Sparse-Dense Mode
In PIM sparse-dense mode, if an RP is not known for a group, the router sends data using
PIM dense mode. However, if the router discovers an RP or you configure an RP statically,
PIM sparse mode takes over.
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You can configure both PIM dense mode and PIM sparse mode commands in PIM
sparse-dense mode.
PIM Source-Specific Multicast
PIM SSM is an extension of the PIM protocol. Using SSM, a client can receive multicast
traffic directly from the source. PIM SSM uses PIM sparse mode functionality to create
an SPT between the client and the source, but builds the SPT without using an RP.
By default, the SSM group multicast address is limited to the IP address range 232.0.0.0
to 232.255.255.255. You can use the ip pim ssm command to extend SSM operations
into another Class D range. (See “Configuring PIM for IPv4 SSM” on page 118.)
An SSM-configured network has the following advantages over a traditionally configured
PIM sparse mode network include the following:
•
No need for shared trees or RP mapping (no RP is required).
•
No need for RP-to-RP source discovery through Multicast Source Discovery Protocol
(MSDP).
•
Simplified administrative deployment; you need only configure PIM sparse mode on
all router interfaces and issue the necessary SSM commands (including specifying
IGMPv3 on the receiver local area network).
•
Support for source lists; you can use source lists, supported in IGMPv3, where only
specified sources send traffic to the SSM group.
In a PIM SSM–configured network, an E Series router subscribes to an SSM channel (by
means of IGMPv3 or by means of IGMP ssm-mapping for IGMPv2/v1 joins), requesting
to join group G and source S. The directly connected PIM sparse mode router, the
designated router of the receiver, sends an (S,G) join message to its RPF neighbor for
the source. For PIM SSM, the RP is not contacted in this process by the receiver (as
happens in normal PIM sparse mode operations).
Related
Documentation
•
PIM for IPv4 Multicast Platform Considerations on page 98
•
PIM for IPv4 Multicast References on page 99
•
Enabling PIM for IPv4 on a Virtual Router on page 99
•
Disabling PIM for IPv4 on a Virtual Router on page 100
•
Enabling PIM for IPv4 on an Interface on page 100
PIM for IPv4 Multicast Platform Considerations
For information about modules that support PIM on the ERX7xx models, ERX14xx models,
and the ERX310 Broadband Services Router:
98
•
See ERX Module Guide, Table 1, Module Combinations for detailed module specifications.
•
See ERX Module Guide, Appendix A, Module Protocol Support for information about the
modules that support PIM.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 5: Configuring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
For information about modules that support PIM on the E120 and E320 Broadband
Services Routers:
Related
Documentation
•
See E120 and E320 Module Guide, Table 1, Modules and IOAs for detailed module
specifications.
•
See E120 and E320 Module Guide, Appendix A, IOA Protocol Support for information
about the modules that support PIM.
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
PIM for IPv4 Multicast References on page 99
PIM for IPv4 Multicast References
For more information about PIM, see the following resources:
•
Protocol Independent Multicast MIB for IPv4—draft-ietf-idmr-pim-mib-10.txt (July
2000 expiration)
•
RFC 2362—Protocol Independent Multicast-Sparse Mode (PIM-SM): Protocol
Specification (June 1998)
•
RFC 3569—An Overview of Source-Specific Multicast (SSM) (July 2003)
•
Source-Specific Multicast for IP—draft-ietf-ssm-arch-06.txt (March 2005 expiration)
•
Source-Specific Protocol Independent Multicast in
232/8—draft-ietf-mboned-ssm232-08.txt (September 2004 expiration)
•
Multicast in MPLS/BGP VPNs—draft-rosen-vpn-mcast-06.txt (April 2004 expiration)
•
Multicast in MPLS/BGP IP VPNs—draft-rosen-vpn-mcast-08.txt (June 2005 expiration)
NOTE: IETF drafts are valid for only 6 months from the date of issuance.
They must be considered as works in progress. Please refer to the IETF
website at http://www.ietf.org for the latest drafts.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
PIM for IPv4 Multicast Platform Considerations on page 98
Enabling PIM for IPv4 on a Virtual Router
By default, PIM is disabled. To enable PIM on a VR:
1.
Enable multicast routing. (See “Enabling IP Multicast” on page 7.)
2. Create a VR, or access an existing VR context.
host1(config)#virtual-router boston
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3. Create and enable PIM processing.
host1:boston(config)#router pim
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
Disabling PIM for IPv4 on a Virtual Router on page 100
•
Removing PIM for IPv4 on page 120
•
Resetting PIM Counters and Mappings for IPv4 on page 121
•
Monitoring PIM Router-Level Information for IPv4 on page 124
•
virtual-router
•
router pim
Disabling PIM for IPv4 on a Virtual Router
To disable PIM processing on a router, use the pim disable command. By default, PIM
processing is enabled:
•
Issue the pim disable command in Router Configuration mode.
host1:boston(config-router)#pim disable
Use the no version to reenable PIM processing.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
Enabling PIM for IPv4 on a Virtual Router on page 99
•
Removing PIM for IPv4 on page 120
•
Resetting PIM Counters and Mappings for IPv4 on page 121
•
pim disable
Enabling PIM for IPv4 on an Interface
You can enable PIM on an interface in one of the PIM modes (dense, sparse, or
sparse-dense) and specify how often the interface sends hello messages to neighbors.
You can configure PIM and IGMP on the same interface. If you configure IGMP and PIM
on an interface, the router determines that PIM owns the interface.
NOTE: You cannot configure DVMRP and PIM on the same interface.
To enable PIM on an interface:
1.
100
Enable PIM on an interface in one of the PIM modes. By default, PIM is enabled in
dense mode.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 5: Configuring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
host1(config-if)#ip pim sparse-dense-mode
2. Specify the interval, in seconds, at which the router sends hello messages to neighbors.
host1(config-if)#ip pim query-interval 100
3. Set the graceful restart duration for IP PIM sparse mode.
host1(config-if)#ip pim sparse-mode graceful-restart-duration 10
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
Enabling PIM for IPv4 on a Virtual Router on page 99
•
Removing PIM for IPv4 on page 120
•
Resetting PIM Counters and Mappings for IPv4 on page 121
•
Monitoring PIM Interfaces for IPv4 on page 131
•
ip pim
•
ip pim query-interval
•
ip pim sparse-mode graceful-restart-duration
Setting a Priority to Determine the Designated Router for IPv4
You can influence whether a particular router is selected as the designated router with
the ip pim dr-priority command. A higher priority value increases the likelihood that a
router is selected as the designated router, while a lower value decreases the likelihood.
The ip pim dr-priority command in Router Configuration mode sets the designated router
priority on all the PIM interfaces on the router. To override this global setting on a particular
interface, use the ip pim dr-priority command in Interface Configuration mode.
NOTE: You cannot set the designated router priority on PIM dense mode
interfaces.
•
To set a priority value, in the range 1–254, by which a router is likely to be selected as
the designated router, issue the ip pim dr-priority command.
In Router Configuration mode:
host1(config-router)#ip pim dr-priority 24
The no version restores the default value. The default value is 1.
In Interface Configuration mode:
host1(config-subif)#ip pim dr-priority 24
The no version restores the value that is specified in Router Configuration mode.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
Enabling PIM for IPv4 on a Virtual Router on page 99
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•
Disabling PIM for IPv4 on a Virtual Router on page 100
•
Monitoring PIM Router-Level Information for IPv4 on page 124
•
Monitoring PIM Interfaces for IPv4 on page 131
•
ip pim dr-priority
Configuring the PIM for IPv4 Join/Prune Message Interval
When you use the router for PIM, the router sends join/prune messages to the upstream
RPF neighbor. The default join/prune message interval is 60 seconds. You can configure
the join/prune message interval using the ip pim join-prune-interval command. The ip
pim join-prune-interval command in Router Configuration mode configures the join-prune
interval on all the PIM interfaces on the router. To override this global setting on a
particular interface, use the ip pim join-prune-interval command in Interface Configuration
mode.
The hold-time associated with the PIM join/prune interval messages is 3.5 times the PIM
join/prune message interval.
NOTE: You cannot configure the PIM join/prune message interval on PIM DM
interfaces.
•
To set an interval value, in the range 10–210 seconds, at which the router sends the
PIM join/prune message, issue the ip pim join-prune-interval command.
In Router Configuration mode:
host1(config-router)#ip pim join-prune-interval 150
The no version restores the default value, 60 seconds.
In Interface Configuration mode:
host1(config-subif)#ip pim join-prune-interval 150
The no version restores the value that is specified in Router Configuration mode.
Related
Documentation
102
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
Enabling PIM for IPv4 on a Virtual Router on page 99
•
Enabling PIM for IPv4 on an Interface on page 100
•
Monitoring PIM Router-Level Information for IPv4 on page 124
•
Monitoring PIM Interfaces for IPv4 on page 131
•
ip pim join-prune-interval
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 5: Configuring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
Configuring an RP Router for PIM Sparse Mode and PIM Sparse-Dense Mode for IPv4
When you use the router for PIM sparse mode or PIM sparse-dense mode, some VRs
must act as RP routers. You can configure static RP routers or configure the router to
assign RP routers automatically.
To configure the router to assign RP routers automatically, you must define several VRs
as RP routers and one VR as an RP mapping agent. RP routers send their announcement
messages to the RP mapping agent, which assigns groups to RP routers and resolves
any conflicts. The RP mapping agent notifies neighbors of the RP assigned to each group.
NOTE: You can configure PIM on IPv4 and IPv6 interfaces. However, IPv6
does not support all PIM configuration options. For information about
configuring PIM on IPv6 interfaces, see the Configuring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
chapter of JunosE Multicast Routing Configuration Guide.
The following subsections explain how to configure an RP router for PIM sparse mode
and PIM sparse-dense mode:
•
Configuring a Static RP Router on page 103
•
Configuring an Auto-RP Router for PIM Sparse Mode on page 103
•
Configuring an Auto-RP Router for PIM Sparse-Dense Mode on page 104
Configuring a Static RP Router
If you want to control PIM more tightly, you can configure a static RP router. To do so:
1.
Configure an access list that specifies the multicast groups that can use the static RP
router.
host1(config)#access-list boston permit 228.0.0.0 15.255.255.255
2. Specify a static RP router.
host1(config)#ip pim rp-address 122.0.0.1 1 boston
Configuring an Auto-RP Router for PIM Sparse Mode
Two multicast groups, 224.0.1.39 and 224.0.1.40, are reserved for forwarding auto-RP
messages through the network. When you configure an auto-RP router for PIM sparse
mode, you must assign a static RP router to these two groups. You can then specify an
RP mapping agent for other multicast groups.
To configure an auto-RP router for PIM sparse mode:
1.
Configure a static RP to have priority over the auto-RP for the groups that send auto-RP
multicast messages.
host1(config)#access-list 11 permit 224.0.1.39 0.0.0.0
host1(config)#access-list 11 permit 224.0.1.40 0.0.0.0
host1(config)#ip pim rp-address 192.48.1.22 11 override
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2. Assign an RP mapping agent.
host1(config)#ip pim send-rp-discovery scope 23 loopback 1
3. Configure routers to send auto-RP announcement messages to the mapping agent.
host1(config)#ip pim send-rp-announce loopback 2 scope 16 group-list 1
Configuring an Auto-RP Router for PIM Sparse-Dense Mode
In PIM sparse-dense mode, you must prevent routers from advertising auto-RP messages
to the multicast groups 224.0.1.39 and 224.0.1.40, which are reserved for forwarding
auto-RP messages through the network. To configure an auto-RP router for PIM
sparse-dense mode:
1.
Assign an RP mapping agent.
host1(config)#ip pim send-rp-discovery scope 23 loopback 1
2. Configure an access list that details the multicast groups that can use the static RP
router.
host1(config)access-list boston permit 224.0.0.0 15.255.255.255
3. Prevent routers from advertising auto-RP messages to the multicast groups that are
reserved for forwarding auto-RP messages through the network.
host1(config)#access-list 1 deny 224.0.1.39
host1(config)#access-list 1 deny 224.0.1.40
4. Configure routers to send auto-RP announcement messages to the mapping agent.
host1(config)#ip pim send-rp-announce loopback 2 scope 23 group-list boston interval
200
Related
Documentation
104
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
Configuring the PIM for IPv4 Join/Prune Message Interval on page 102
•
Configuring BSR and RP Candidates for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv4 on page 105
•
Monitoring RP Routers and the RP Mapping Agent in a PIM Sparse Mode Environment
for IPv4 on page 126
•
Monitoring PIM Group-to-RP Mappings for IPv4 on page 133
•
Monitoring the RP Router that a Multicast Group Uses for IPv4 on page 134
•
access-list
•
ip pim rp-address
•
ip pim send-rp-discovery scope
•
ip pim send-rp-announce
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 5: Configuring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
Configuring BSR and RP Candidates for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv4
When choosing candidate BSRs, select well-connected routers in the core of the network.
Typically, candidate BSRs are a subset of the candidate RPs. A single BSR is elected for
the domain of candidate BSRs. The elected BSR floods bootstrap messages (BSMs)
containing their group-to-RP mappings to all PIM routers. PIM routers use the group-to-RP
mappings supplied by the elected (or preferred) BSR.
•
Issue the ip pim bsr-candidate command in Global Configuration mode to define a
router as a BSR candidate:
host1(config)#ip pim bsr-candidate loopback 1 30 10
The no version disables the router BSR candidacy.
•
Issue the ip pim rp-candidate command in Global Configuration mode to define a
router as an RP candidate:
host1(config)#access-list 1 permit 227.0.0.0 15.255.255.255
host1(config)#access-list 1 permit 228.0.0.0 15.255.255.255
host1(config)#ip pim rp-candidate loopback 1 group-list 1
The no version stops the router from being an RP candidate.
NOTE: You can configure PIM on IPv4 and IPv6 interfaces. However, IPv6
does not support all PIM configuration options. For information about
configuring PIM on IPv6 interfaces, **see the Configuring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
chapter of JunosE Multicast Routing Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
Monitoring BSR Information for IPv4 on page 127
•
Monitoring the RP Router that a Multicast Group Uses for IPv4 on page 134
•
ip pim rp-address
•
ip pim send-rp-announce
•
ip pim send-rp-discovery scope
Migrating to BSR from Auto-RP
Migrating to BSR from auto-RP requires that you upgrade all PIM routers in the domain
to support BSR. However, until all routers are BSR-capable, continue to use auto-RP.
After all routers are BSR-capable, switch from auto-RP to BSR as follows:
1.
Use the no ip pim send-rp-discovery scope command to stop PIM in the network by
disabling all auto-RP mapping agents. This results in flooding to an empty map.
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2. Reconfigure auto-RP mapping agents as candidate BSRs by using the ip pim
bsr-candidate command.
3. Reconfigure auto-RP candidate RPs as BSR candidate RPs by issuing the no ip pim
send-rp-announce command and then issuing the ip pim rp-candidate command.
NOTE: You can configure PIM on IPv4 and IPv6 interfaces. However, IPv6
does not support all PIM configuration options. For information about
configuring PIM on IPv6 interfaces, see the Configuring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
chapter of JunosE Multicast Routing Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
Monitoring BSR Information for IPv4 on page 127
•
ip pim rp-candidate
•
ip pim bsr-candidate
Switching to an SPT for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv4
PIM sparse mode initiates multicasting using a shared tree. You can configure PIM sparse
mode to switch to an SPT when a source starts sending multicast messages, or you can
prevent PIM sparse mode from switching to an SPT. Multicasting over an SPT might be
more efficient than multicasting over a shared tree. (See PIM Sparse Mode in
“Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast” on page 92.)
To specify the network configuration that PIM sparse mode uses when a source starts
sending multicast messages:
•
Issue the ip pim spt-threshold command in Global Configuration mode.
host1(config)#ip pim spt-threshold
The no version restores the default value, 0.
NOTE: You can configure PIM on IPv4 and IPv6 interfaces. However, IPv6
does not support all PIM configuration options. For information about
configuring PIM on IPv6 interfaces, see the Configuring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
chapter of JunosE Multicast Routing Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
106
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
Monitoring the Threshold for Switching to the Shortest Path Tree at a PIM Designated
Router for IPv4 on page 138
•
ip pim spt-threshold
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 5: Configuring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
Multicast VPNs Overview
JunosE Software provides the ability to create multicast VPNs by using GRE tunnels. This
implementation is based on Multicast in MPLS/BGP VPNs (draft-rosen-vpn-mcast-06.txt
and draft-rosen-vpn-mcast-08.txt) and further defined by Base Specification for Multicast
in MPLS/BGP VPNs (draft-raggarwa-13vpn-2547-mvpn-00.txt).
NOTE: Although you can configure PIM sparse mode remote neighbors, you
can no longer use these remote neighbors for BGP/MPLS VPNs. For multicast
VPNs, use the functionality described in this section.
The JunosE Software supports default Multicast Distribution Trees (MDTs) and data
MDTs. The following topics explain how to create multicast VPNs using the default MDTs
and the data MDTs:
•
Creating Multicast VPNs Using the Default MDT on page 107
•
Creating Multicast VPNs Using the Data MDT on page 107
Creating Multicast VPNs Using the Default MDT
The JunosE Software does not support a single MDT command. Instead, you must
configure the multicast tunnel interfaces (MTIs) explicitly. The MTI is an IP interface that
is stacked on a GRE tunnel interface. The destination address of the GRE tunnel is the
multicast VPN (MVPN) group address of the MDT.
A tunnel mdt command specifies that the tunnel is the MTI for the default MDT, enabling
the creation of a second, layer 2 interface (interface tunnel gre:name.mdt) on which an
unnumbered IP interface (tied to the provider edge loopback interface) is stacked in the
context of the parent virtual router.
Creating Multicast VPNs Using the Data MDT
A data multicast distribution tree (MDT), based on section 8 of Internet draft
draft-rosen-vpn-mcast-08.txt, Multicast in MPLS/BGP IP VPNs, solves the problem of P
routers flooding unnecessary multicast information to PE routers that have no interested
receivers for a particular VPN multicast group. The data MDT solution requires the creation
of a new tunnel by the PE router if the source exceeds a configured rate threshold
parameter. All other PE routers join the new tunnel only if the PE router has receivers in
the VPN for that multicast group.
The JunosE Software uses dynamic point-to-multipoint GRE tunnels to configure data
MDTs. In the current release, IPv6 transport over GRE (unicast or multicast) is not
supported. For more information, see Configuring Dynamic IP Tunnels in the JunosE IP
Services Configuration Guide.
Data MDTs are established using PIM-SM (shared RP Trees) and PIM-SSM (Source
Trees). Profiles for dynamic interfaces in the VRF are restricted to sparse-mode only.
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Data MDT Sources
A C-SG flow arriving in the source VRF is a candidate for a data MDT if the system matches
the C-SG in the route map that you specify for the data MDT using the ip pim data-mdt
command. The C-SG flow is initially forwarded on the default MDT. The system creates
the data MDT when the flow rate exceeds a value you configure in the route map using
the set threshold command.
When the Source C-PIM-SM first creates a data MDT for a C-SG flow, it sends a <C-SG,
P-G> MDT join message with type, length, value (TLV) format to the default MDT. This
message invites peer PE routers to join the new data MDT. It starts a timer that you can
configure using the mdt-data-delay command to track the number of seconds before
switching to the data MDT. When that timer expires, C-PIM-SM switches from sending
C-SG data on the default MDT to sending data on the data MDT.
When the C-SG flow is switched to the data MDT, the Source C-PIM-SM starts a timer
that you can configure using the mdt-data-holddown command to track the number of
seconds before switching to the default MDT. When the timer expires, the data MDT is
deleted and the C-SG flow switched back to the default MDT if the flow rate drops back
below the threshold. If the flow rate exceeds the threshold, the timer restarts. If the timer
expires and the flow rate is below the threshold, the data MDT is removed.
The Source C-PIM-SM maintains sent MDT Join TLV messages in its database as long
as they are active. While the data MDT is active, C-PIM-SM resends that MLD Join TLV
message using a setting that you can configure using the mdt-interval command to
measure time in seconds between successive MLD join TLV messages.
Data MDT Receivers
When the Receiver C-PIM-SM receives a <C-SG, P-G> MDT Join TLV message from the
default MDT, it extracts the C-SG and the data MDT P-Group address from the TLV and
queries the route map that you specified for the data MDT to determine whether the
C-SG is a candidate for a data MDT. If it matches, the C-PIM-SM adds the MDT Join TLV
to its database and records the time.
If the Receiver C-PIM-SM does not receive an MDT Join TLV<C-SG, P-G> to refresh its
database within the amount of time specified for the timeout in the mdt-data-timeout
command, the MDT Join TLV<C-SG> is removed from the database and the associated
data MDT is removed.
When a new MDT Join TLV<C-SG, P-G> is added to the database, the Receiver C-PIM-SM
determines whether it has an SG, SPT state. If it has an SG state, and the incoming
interface (IIF) is the default MDT, then C-PIM-SM creates the data MDT and deletes the
corresponding forwarding entry. C-PIM-SM waits for the source to transmit data on the
data MDT. During this period, data can continue to be received on the default MDT.
C-PIM-SM fails the reverse-path forwarding (RPF) check, which results in a forwarding
entry with a discarded IIF.
If the C-SG,SPT state is created (either as a result of a C-SSM join or switch from RPT
to SPT), and it is the default MDT, the Receiver C-PIM-SM determines whether an MDT
Join TLV<C-SG> is active. If it is, C-PIM-SM creates the data MDT.
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Chapter 5: Configuring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
Establishing a Data MDT Using ASM or SSM
A data MDT carries one C-SG flow. If the data MDTs are established using any-source
multicast (ASM), then the P-Group address selected by a PE for the data MDT must be
unique to that PE in the MDT (that is, the range of MDT P-Group addresses available in
the core must be administratively divided among all the PEs that will source VPN
multicasts). The VRFs in a PE must share the P-Group addresses in the assigned range
for the PE.
If the data MDTs are established using single-source multicast (SSM), you must configure
VRFs to transmit on a tunnel using the same MDT P-Group address. Each VRF transmits
using a unique P-Source address; however, each data MDT created by the VRF must use
a different P-Group address. There might be one sender data MDT and possibly many
receiver data MDTs sharing an IP tunnel. Each PE can assign MDT P-Groups from the
same range, but the P-Group addresses must be administratively divided among the
VPNs.
For a receiver on the data MDT, P-PIM-SM joins the data MDT by propagating join state
into the core. The P-Group for that join is extracted from the MDT Join TLV. If SSM is not
activated or the P-Group is not in the SSM group range, P-PIM-SM performs a <*, G> join
towards the RP for that P-Group.
If SSM is activated and the P-Group is in the SSM group range, P-PIM-SM performs an
<S, G> join towards the P-Source, where the P-Source address is the SA of the MDT Join
TLV.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
Configuring the Default MDT on page 109
•
Configuring Data MDTs on page 111
•
Example: Configuring Multicast VPNs on page 113
Configuring the Default MDT
To configure the default MDT:
1.
On the parent virtual-router, configure an IP interface over the MDT interface, and
make it a PIM interface.
host1(config)#virtual-router pe1
host1:pe1(config)#ip multicast-routing
host1:pe1(config)#interface loopback 0
host1:pe1(config-if)#ip address 1.1.1.1 255.255.255.255
host1:pe1(config-if)#ip pim sparse-mode
host1:pe1(config-if)#exit
2. Configure the VRF.
host1(config)#virtual-router pe1
host1:pe1(config)#ip vrf pe13
host1:pe1(config-vrf)#rd 100:13
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host1:pe1(config-vrf)#route-target both 100:3
host1:pe1(config-vrf)#exit
3. To enable MDT, configure a GRE multicast tunnel interface (MTI) for VPN1.
host1:pe1(config)#virtual-router default
host1:(config)#interface tunnel gre:MTI-11 transport-virtual-router pe1
host1:(config-if)#tunnel source 1.1.1.1
host1:(config-if)#tunnel destination 233.3.1.1
host1:(config-if)#tunnel mdt
host1:(config-if)#exit
The tunnel mdt command enables the IP tunnel component to create an MDT
interface.
4. For the VRF, configure an IP interface on the MTI interface.
host1(config)#virtual-router pe1
host1:pe1(config)#virtual-router pe1:pe13
host1:pe1:pe13(config)#ip multicast-routing
host1:pe1:pe13(config)#interface loopback 0
host1:pe1:pe13(config-if)#ip address 1.1.1.1 255.255.255.255
host1:pe1:pe13(config-if)#exit
NOTE: The IP address that you configure for the VRF must be identical to
the IP address of the loopback interface in the parent virtual router.
5. Configure the MTI interface in the VRF.
host1:pe1:pe13(config)#interface tunnel gre:MTI-11
host1:pe1:pe13(config-if)#ip unnumbered loopback 0
host1:pe1:pe13(config-if)#ip pim sparse-mode
host1:pe1:pe13(config-if)#exit
NOTE: You can use the ip unnumbered loopback 0 command to configure
the MTI interface on the VRF as an unnumbered interface, or the ip address
1.1.1.1 255.255.255.255 command to configure it as a numbered interface.
6. Specify the GRE tunnel configuration for the parent virtual router.
NOTE: The MDT interface in the parent virtual router must be unnumbered.
host1:pe1(config)#interface tunnel gre:MTI-11.mdt
host1:pe1(config-if)#ip unnumbered loopback 0
host1:pe1(config-if)#ip pim sparse-mode
host1:pe1(config-if)#exit
host1:pe1(config)#virtual-router default
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Chapter 5: Configuring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
NOTE: You can configure PIM on IPv4 and IPv6 interfaces. However, IPv6
does not support all PIM configuration options. For information about
configuring PIM on IPv6 interfaces, see the Configuring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
chapter of JunosE Multicast Routing Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
Multicast VPNs Overview on page 107
•
Configuring Data MDTs on page 111
•
Example: Configuring Multicast VPNs on page 113
•
ip pim
•
tunnel mdt
Configuring Data MDTs
To configure data MDTs:
1.
Configure a dynamic interface profile to specify the PIM configuration of the IP interface
or MTI interface in the VRF.
host1(config)#profile pe13DataMdtMti
host1(config-profile)#ip virtual-router pe1:pe13
host1(config-profile)#ip unnumbered loopback 0
host1(config-profile)#ip pim sparse-mode
host1(config-profile)#exit
2. Configure a dynamic interface profile to specify the IP interface or MDT interface in
the parent.
host1(config-profile)#profile pe1DataMdtMdt
host1(config-profile)#ip virtual-router pe1
host1(config-profile)#ip unnumbered loopback 0
host1(config-profile)#ip pim sparse-mode
host1(config-profile)#exit
3. Configure the destination profile for dynamic IP tunnel creation.
host1(config)#gre destination profile pe13DataMdtProfile virtual-router pe1
host1(config-dest-profile)#tunnel source 1.1.1.1
host1(config-dest-profile)#tunnel destination ip subnet 233.3.0.0/16
host1(config-dest-profile)#tunnel mdt profile pe1DataMdtMdt
host1(config-dest-profile)#profile pe13DataMdtMti
host1(config-dest-profile)#exit
The router uses this destination profile to verify whether it can create a dynamic tunnel,
and to supply additional configuration parameters when it creates a tunnel. For more
information about creating dynamic IP tunnels, see Configuring Dynamic IP Tunnels
in the JunosE IP Services Configuration Guide.
4. Configure the group address pools in the route map.
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host1(config)#virtual-router pe1
host1:pe1(config)#ip pim group-address-pool pe13DataMdtGroups 233.3.1.0 233.3.1.255
If the data MDTs are established using ASM, you must divide the range of available
MDT P-Group addresses so that PEs source VPN multicasts. All VRFs in a PE draw
from a single address pool that contains the range of group addresses assigned to
that PE.
If the data MDTs are established using SSM, you can configure VRFs to transmit on
a tunnel using the same MDT P-Group address. Each VRF transmits using a unique
P-Source address; however, each data MDT created by the VRF must use a different
P-Group address. There might be one sender data MDT and possibly many receiver
data MDTs sharing an IP tunnel.
For SSM, each PE can assign MDT P-Groups from the same range, but the P-Group
addresses must be administratively divided among the VPNs as mentioned in the
following example:
host1(config)#virtual-router pe1
host1:pe1(config)#ip pim group-address-pool pe11DataMdtSSMGroups 233.3.1.0
233.3.1.255
host1:pe1(config)#ip pim group-address-pool pe12DataMdtSSMGroups 233.3.2.0
233.3.2.255
host1:pe1(config)#ip pim group-address-pool pe13DataMdtSSMGroups 233.3.3.0
233.3.3.255
5. Configure the access list to match <S,G> and <*,G> entries.
host1:pe1(config)#virtual-router pe1:pe13
host1:pe1:pe13(config)#access-list pe13DataMdtSend permit ip host 10.13.0.100
225.1.1.0 0.0.0.255
host1:pe1:pe13(config)#access-list pe13DataMdt permit ip any 225.1.0.0 0.0.255.255
6. Specify a route map to configure the set of <S, G> for which data MDTs can be created,
and the threshold to be applied for each SG.
host1:pe1:pe13(config)#route-map pe13MdtThresholds permit 10
host1:pe1:pe13(config-route-map)#match ip address pe13DataMdtSend
host1:pe1:pe13(config-route-map)#set threshold 0
host1:pe1:pe13(config-route-map)#route-map pe13MdtThresholds permit 20
host1:pe1:pe13(config-route-map)#match ip address pe13DataMdt
host1:pe1:pe13(config-route-map)#exit
7. Configure the data MDT.
host1:pe1:pe13(config)#ip pim data-mdt
host1:pe1:pe13(config-ip-pim-data-mdt)#tunnel source 1.1.1.1
host1:pe1:pe13(config-ip-pim-data-mdt)#tunnel group-address-pool pe13DataMdtG$
host1:pe1:pe13(config-ip-pim-data-mdt)#route-map pe13MdtThresholds
NOTE: You can configure PIM on IPv4 and IPv6 interfaces. However, IPv6
does not support all PIM configuration options. For information about
configuring PIM on IPv6 interfaces, see the Configuring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
chapter of JunosE Multicast Routing Configuration Guide.
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Chapter 5: Configuring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
Multicast VPNs Overview on page 107
•
Configuring the Default MDT on page 109
•
Example: Configuring Multicast VPNs on page 113
•
Monitoring Active Data MDTs for IPv4 on page 128
•
ip pim data-mdt
•
ip pim group-address-pool
•
mdt-data-delay
•
mdt-data-holddown
•
mdt-data-timeout
•
mdt-interval
•
set threshold
•
tunnel group-address-pool
Example: Configuring Multicast VPNs
The following example illustrates how to configure multicast VPNs.
•
Requirements on page 113
•
Overview on page 113
•
Configuring a Multicast VPN Network on page 114
Requirements
This example uses the following software and hardware components:
•
JunosE Release 7.1.0 or higher-numbered releases
•
E Series router (ERX7xx models, ERX14xx models, the ERX310 router, the E120 router,
or the E320 router)
•
ASIC-based line modules that support Fast Ethernet or Gigabit Ethernet
Overview
In the following example (Figure 14 on page 114), customer edge router 1 (CE1) and
customer edge router 2 (CE2) exist in two separate VPNs. Each VPN is configured with
its assigned Multicast Domain (235.1.1.1 and 235.1.1.2, respectively).
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Figure 14: Multicast VPNs
To better understand the example, keep the following in mind:
•
Lp is a loopback interface in the parent router. This address is the loopback interface
used as the BGP peer address of the provider edge router (PE). Its address is advertised
in the provider address space.
•
Tv is the MTI in the VRF. This interface is typically configured as a PIM sparse-mode
interface (though you can configure it for dense-mode or sparse-dense-mode). Any
packets that originate in the VRF are sent using the address of this interface as the
source address. You must set this interface address to be identical to loopback interface
of the parent router (Lp).
CAUTION: Defining the Tv interface with an address other than the
loopback interface of the parent router might restrict operation with
non-Juniper Networks routers.
•
Tp is an unnumbered IP interface that is tied to the loopback interface of the provider
edge router (PE).
Configuring a Multicast VPN Network
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To configure the example, use the following general procedures:
NOTE: This example provides general information for configuring a simple
Multicast VPN network. For detailed information about creating GRE tunnels,
see Configuring IP Tunnels in the JunosE IP Services Configuration Guide. For
detailed information about PIM sparse-mode configuration, see PIM Sparse
Mode in “Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast” on page 92.
1.
114
Configure BGP/MPLS VPN.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 5: Configuring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
host1:PE2(config-router)#router bgp 100
host1:PE2(config-router)#address-family vpnv4 unicast
host1:PE2(config-router-af)#neighbor 1.1.1.1 activate
host1:PE2(config-router-af)#neighbor 1.1.1.1 next-hop-self
host1:PE2(config-router-af)#neighbor 3.3.3.3 activate
host1:PE2(config-router-af)#neighbor 3.3.3.3 next-hop-self
host1:PE2(config-router-af)#exit-address-family
See Configuring BGP-MPLS Applications in the JunosE BGP and MPLS Configuration
Guide for details.
2.
Configure PIM sparse mode in the core and RP for MVPN group addresses.
NOTE: For MVPN, it is a typical practice to use shared trees.
host1:PE1(config-router)#virtual-router PE2
host1:PE2(config)#ip multicast-routing
host1:PE2(config)#
host1:PE2(config)#! MDT RP is 72.72.72.72 (P1)
host1:PE2(config)#access-list 1 permit ip 235.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 any
host1:PE2(config)#ip pim rp-address 72.72.72.72 1
host1:PE2(config)#
host1:PE2(config)#! Do not switch from RPT for MDTs
host1:PE2(config)#ip pim spt-threshold infinity group-list 1
host1:PE2(config)#
3.
Configure the loopback interface, Lp, in parent router PE2.
host1:PE2(config)#interface loopback 0
host1:PE2(config-if)#ip address 2.2.2.2 255.255.255.255
host1:PE2(config-if)#ip pim sparse-mode
host1:PE2(config-if)
NOTE: You must configure the loopback interface for PIM sparse mode
to support unnumbered MDTs.
4.
Add PIM-SM to core-facing interfaces.
host1:PE2(config)#interface atm2/1.20
host1:PE2(config-subif)#ip pim sparse-mode
host1:PE2(config-subif)#
5.
Extend the BGP router configuration to contribute VPN routes into the multicast
router table of the VRF using the ip route-type both command.
host1:PE2(config)#router bgp 100
host1:PE2(config-router)#address-family ipv4 unicast vrf PE21
host1:PE2(config-router-af)#ip route-type both
host1:PE2(config-router-af)#exit
host1:PE2(config-router)#
6.
Configure the GRE tunnel for VPN1.
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host1(config)#interface tunnel gre:MTI-21 transport-virtual-router PE2
host1(config-if)#tunnel source 2.2.2.2
host1(config-if)#tunnel destination 235.1.1.1
host1(config-if)#tunnel mdt
host1(config-if)#exit
host1(config)#
7.
Configure the GRE tunnel for VPN2.
host1(config)#interface tunnel gre:MTI-22 transport-virtual-router PE2
host1(config-if)#tunnel source 2.2.2.2
host1(config-if)#tunnel destination 235.1.1.2
host1(config-if)#tunnel mdt
host1(config-if)#exit
host1(config)#
8.
Configure the IP interface (Tv) in PE2:CE1 as a numbered or unnumbered PIM
sparse-mode interface. Use the same address as the loopback interface, Lp in the
parent router, PE2.
host1(config)#virtual-router PE2:CE1
host1:PE2:CE1(config)#interface tunnel gre:MTI-21
host1:PE2:CE1(config-if)#ip address 2.2.2.2 255.255.255.255
host1:PE2:CE1(config-if)#ip pim sparse-mode
host1:PE2:CE1(config-if)#exit
host1:PE2:CE1#
9.
Configure the IP interface (Tv) in PE2:CE2 as a numbered or unnumbered PIM
sparse-mode interface. Use the same address as the loopback interface, Lp in the
parent router, PE2.
host1(config)#virtual-router PE2:CE2
host1:PE2:CE2(config)#interface loopback 0
host1:PE2:CE2(config-if)#ip address 2.2.2.2 255.255.255.255
host1:PE2:CE2(config-if)#exit
host1:PE2:CE2(config)#
host1:PE2:CE2(config)#interface tunnel gre:MTI-22
host1:PE2:CE2(config-if)#ip unnumbered loopback 0
host1:PE2:CE2(config-if)#ip pim sparse-mode
host1:PE2:CE2(config-if)#exit
host1:PE2:CE2#
10.
Configure the Tp interfaces in the parent router, PE2, as unnumbered PIM
sparse-mode interfaces tied to the loopback interface, Lp.
host1(config)#virtual-router PE2
host1: PE2(config)#interface tunnel gre:MTI-21.mdt
host1:PE2(config-if)#ip unnumbered loopback 0
host1:PE2(config-if)#ip pim sparse-mode
host1:PE2(config-if)#exit
host1:PE2(config)#
host1:PE2(config)#interface tunnel gre:MTI-22.mdt
host1:PE2(config-if)#ip unnumbered loopback 0
host1:PE2(config-if)#ip pim sparse-mode
host1:PE2(config-if)#exit
host1:PE2(config)#
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Chapter 5: Configuring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
NOTE: You can configure PIM on IPv4 and IPv6 interfaces. However,
IPv6 does not support all PIM configuration options. For information
about configuring PIM on IPv6 interfaces, see the Configuring PIM for
IPv6 Multicast chapter of JunosE Multicast Routing Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
Multicast VPNs Overview on page 107
•
Configuring the Default MDT on page 109
•
Configuring Data MDTs on page 111
•
tunnel mdt
Configuring PIM Sparse Mode Join Filters for IPv4
You can use PIM sparse mode join filters to prevent multicast state from being created
in the PIM sparse mode router. The filters are applied to join entries in PIM join/prune
messages that are received from PIM sparse mode neighbors.
By denying joins at the edge of a network, you can limit the multicast state and traffic in
the network. By accepting only certain joins, you can control which multicast services an
end user can receive. PIM join filters also reduce the potential for denial of service (DoS)
attacks where large numbers of joins forwarded to each router on the RPT can result in
a PIM state explosion and very high memory consumption.
For information about how to create access lists, see Configuring Routing Policy in the
JunosE IP Services Configuration Guide.
To specify an extended access list that you want this PIM interface to use as a join filter:
•
Issue the ip pim join-filter command in Global Configuration mode:
host1(config)#ip pim join-filter gold
The no version removes the filter association. You can apply the join filter at the global
level or at the interface level. If an interface-level filter exists, it takes precedence over
the global-level filter.
NOTE: You can configure PIM on IPv4 and IPv6 interfaces. However, IPv6
does not support all PIM configuration options. For information about
configuring PIM on IPv6 interfaces, see the Configuring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
chapter of JunosE Multicast Routing Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
Configuring the PIM for IPv4 Join/Prune Message Interval on page 102
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•
Configuring an RP Router for PIM Sparse Mode and PIM Sparse-Dense Mode for IPv4
on page 103
•
Configuring BSR and RP Candidates for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv4 on page 105
•
Configuring PIM for IPv4 SSM on page 118
•
Configuring the BFD Protocol for PIM for IPv4 on page 120
•
Monitoring PIM Router-Level Information for IPv4 on page 124
•
Monitoring PIM Interfaces for IPv4 on page 131
•
ip pim join-filter
Configuring PIM for IPv4 SSM
Source Specific Multicast (SSM) is a datagram delivery model that best supports
one-to-many applications, also known as broadcast applications. SSM is networking
technology that targets audio and video broadcast application environments.
To configure PIM SSM, you enable PIM SSM on the router and define the SSM range of
IP multicast addresses.
To use PIM SSM, IGMPv3 must be configured on customer premise equipment
(CPE)–facing interfaces to receivers, and PIM sparse mode must be configured on
CPE-facing interfaces to sources and on core-facing interfaces. After configuring SSM,
you can use the show ip pim sparse-mode sg-state command to display SSM group
membership information.
To configure PIM SSM:
1.
Enable PIM SSM on the E Series router. The IANA SSM range (232.0.0.0/8) is
configured by default. You can modify the SSM address range by using the access
list.
host1(config)#access-list 15 permit ip any host 239.0.0.2
host1(config)#access-list 15 permit ip any 232.0.0.0 0.225.225.225
host1(config)#ip pim ssm range 15
2. Enable PIM sparse mode on the CPE-facing interface towards the source or core.
3. Enable IGMPv3 on the CPE-facing interface towards the receiver. PIM SSM also works
with IGMPv2 if you configure the ssm-map in IGMP as in the following example:
PIM SSM also works with IGMPv2 if you configure the ssm-map in IGMP as in the following
example:
host1(config)#ip pim ssm
host1(config)#access-list ssm_map1 permit 232.0.0.1 255.255.255.255
host1(config)#ip igmp ssm-map enable
host1(config)#ip igmp ssm-map static ssm_map1 51.0.0.1
The no version disables ssm-map:
host1(config)#no ip igmp ssm-map static ssm_map1 51.0.0.1
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Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 5: Configuring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
NOTE: You can configure PIM on IPv4 and IPv6 interfaces. However, IPv6
does not support all PIM configuration options. For information about
configuring PIM on IPv6 interfaces, see the Configuring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
chapter of JunosE Multicast Routing Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
Monitoring each (S,G) Pair for PIM Sparse Mode and PIM SSM for IPv4 on page 135
•
ip pim ssm
BFD Protocol for PIM for IPv4 Overview
The ip pim bfd-liveness-detection command configures the Bidirectional Forwarding
Detection (BFD) protocol for PIM. The BFD protocol uses control packets and shorter
detection time limits to more rapidly detect failures in a network. Also, because they are
adjustable, you can modify the BFD timers for more or less aggressive failure detection.
PIM routers send periodic hello messages from each PIM-enabled interface. You can
configure this interval using the ip pim query-interval command. By default, the PIM
router sends a hello message every 30 seconds (with an interval range of 0–210 seconds).
If it receives no response from a neighbor within 3.5 times the interval value (a minimum
of 3.5 seconds), the PIM router drops the neighbor.
In contrast, when a BFD session exists between neighbors, a PIM neighbor that goes
down is detected quickly (in milliseconds rather than in seconds).
When you issue the ip pim bfd-liveness-detection command on a PIM router, the router
establishes BFD liveness detection with all BFD-enabled PIM neighbors. When the local
router receives an update from a remote PIM neighbor—if BFD is enabled and if the session
is not already present—the local router attempts to create a BFD session to the remote
neighbor.
Each adjacent pair of neighbors negotiates an acceptable transmit interval for BFD
packets. The negotiated value can be different on each neighbor. Each neighbor then
calculates a BFD liveness detection interval. When a neighbor does not receive a BFD
packet within the detection interval, it declares the BFD session to be down.
NOTE: Before the router can use the ip pim bfd-liveness-detection command,
you must specify a BFD license key. To view an already configured license,
use the show license bfd command.
For general information about configuring and monitoring the BFD protocol, see Configuring
BFD in the JunosE IP Services Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
Configuring the BFD Protocol for PIM for IPv4 on page 120
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•
Monitoring PIM Router-Level Information for IPv4 on page 124
•
Monitoring PIM Interfaces for IPv4 on page 131
•
Monitoring PIM Neighbors for IPv4 on page 132
•
ip pim bfd-liveness-detection
Configuring the BFD Protocol for PIM for IPv4
To enable BFD (bidirectional forwarding detection) and define BFD values to more quickly
detect PIM data path failures:
•
Issue the ip pim bfd-liveness-detection command in Interface Configuration mode.
host1(config-if)#ip pim bfd-liveness-detection minimum-interval 800
NOTE: Before the router can use the ip pim bfd-liveness-detection
command, you must specify a BFD license key. To view an already
configured license, use the show license bfd command.
For details on liveness detection negotiation, see Negotiation of the BFD Liveness Detection
Interval in the JunosE IP Services Configuration Guide.
NOTE: You can configure PIM on IPv4 and IPv6 interfaces. However, IPv6
does not support all PIM configuration options. For information about
configuring PIM on IPv6 interfaces, see the Configuring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
chapter of JunosE Multicast Routing Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
BFD Protocol for PIM for IPv4 Overview on page 119
•
ip pim bfd-liveness-detection
Removing PIM for IPv4
To remove PIM from the VR:
•
Issue the no router pim command in Global Configuration mode.
host1:boston(config)#no router pim
Related
Documentation
120
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
Enabling PIM for IPv4 on a Virtual Router on page 99
•
Disabling PIM for IPv4 on a Virtual Router on page 100
•
Enabling PIM for IPv4 on an Interface on page 100
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 5: Configuring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
•
Resetting PIM Counters and Mappings for IPv4 on page 121
•
router pim
Resetting PIM Counters and Mappings for IPv4
You can use the clear ip pim commands to reset PIM counters and mappings.
•
Issue the clear ip pim auto-rp command in Privileged Exec mode to clear the
group-to-RP router mappings that the router learned through auto-RP:
host1#clear ip pim auto-rp 192.34.56.7
There is no no version.
NOTE: Specify the IP address of an RP to clear the group-to-RP mappings
for a particular RP. If you do not specify an IP address, the router clears the
group-to-RP mappings on all RP routers learned through auto-RP.
•
Issue the clear ip pim remote-neighbor count command in Privileged Exec mode to
clear the counters for remote neighbor statistics on all interfaces or the specified
interface:
host1#clear ip pim interface atm 3/0.5 count
There is no no version.
•
Issue the clear ip pim interface count command in Privileged Exec mode to clear the
counters for multicast packet statistics on all interfaces or a specified interface:
host1#clear ip pim interface atm 3/0.5 count
There is no no version.
NOTE: Specify the IP address of an interface to clear the counters for that
interface. If you do not specify an interface, the router clears the counters
on all interfaces.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
Enabling PIM for IPv4 on a Virtual Router on page 99
•
Disabling PIM for IPv4 on a Virtual Router on page 100
•
Enabling PIM for IPv4 on an Interface on page 100
•
Removing PIM for IPv4 on page 120
•
Monitoring PIM Interfaces for IPv4 on page 131
•
Monitoring PIM Group-to-RP Mappings for IPv4 on page 133
•
router pim
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CHAPTER 6
Monitoring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
You can display information about PIM events and parameters. You can use the debug
PIM commands to view information about PIM events and the show ip pim commands
to display information about PIM settings.
•
Enabling the Display of a PIM Event on page 123
•
Disabling the Display of a PIM Event on page 124
•
Monitoring PIM Router-Level Information for IPv4 on page 124
•
Monitoring RP Routers and the RP Mapping Agent in a PIM Sparse Mode Environment
for IPv4 on page 126
•
Monitoring BSR Information for IPv4 on page 127
•
Monitoring Active Data MDTs for IPv4 on page 128
•
Monitoring Each (Source, Group) Pair for PIM Dense Mode for IPv4 on page 129
•
Monitoring PIM Interfaces for IPv4 on page 131
•
Monitoring PIM Neighbors for IPv4 on page 132
•
Monitoring PIM Group-to-RP Mappings for IPv4 on page 133
•
Monitoring the RP Router that a Multicast Group Uses for IPv4 on page 134
•
Monitoring each (S,G) Pair for PIM Sparse Mode and PIM SSM for IPv4 on page 135
•
Monitoring Unicast Routes that PIM Sparse Mode Uses for IPv4 on page 137
•
Monitoring the Threshold for Switching to the Shortest Path Tree at a PIM Designated
Router for IPv4 on page 138
Enabling the Display of a PIM Event
To display information about the selected event.
•
Issue the debug ip pim command in Privileged Exec mode.
host1#debug ip pim events severity 1 verbosity low
Use the no version to disable the display.
NOTE: To control the type of events displayed, specify a severity level, and
to control how much information to display, specify a verbosity level.
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Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
Disabling the Display of a PIM Event on page 124
•
debug ip pim
Disabling the Display of a PIM Event
To turn off the display of information previously enabled with the debug ip pim command.
•
Issue the undebug ip pim command in the Privileged Exec mode.
host1#undebug ip pim events
There is no no version to disable the display.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
Enabling the Display of a PIM Event on page 123
•
undebug ip pim
Monitoring PIM Router-Level Information for IPv4
Purpose
Action
Display general PIM router-level information.
To display general PIM router-level information:
host1:1#show ip pim
Default PIM Version: 2
Default Domain Id: 0
Default Hello Period: 30
Default Hello HoldTime: 105
Join-Prune Interval: 100
Join-Prune Holdtime: 350
Keepalive Period: 210
Assert Time: 210
Register Suppression Time: 60
Register Probe Time: 5
Register TTL: 64
SSM enabled, range default
Sparse-Mode Graceful Restart Duration: 30
Graceful restart is complete (timer 0 seconds)
Join filter, access-list bronze
Designated Router Priority: 2
Meaning
Table 30 on page 124 lists the show ip pim command output fields.
Table 30: show ip pim Output Fields
124
Field Name
Field Description
Default PIM Version
Default PIM version number (always 2)
Default Domain Id
Default Domain Id (always 0)
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Monitoring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
Table 30: show ip pim Output Fields (continued)
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Default Hello period
Default interval (in minutes) at which the router sends
hello messages to neighbors
Default Hello Hold Time
Default time (in minutes) for which the router keeps
the neighbor state alive
Join-Prune Interval
Interval value (in seconds) set in the join/prune
message originated by the PIM router
Join-Prune Holdtime
Hold time value (in seconds) set in the join/prune
messages originated by the PIM router. The hold time
is 3.5 times the PIM join/prune message interval value.
Keepalive Period
Time SG join state is maintained in the absence of SG
Join message
Assert Time
Period after last assert before assert state is timed
out
Register Suppression Time
Period during which a designated router stops sending
registers to the RP
Register Probe Time
Time before register suppression time (RST) expires
when a designated router might send a NULL-Register
to the RP
Register TTL
TTL value (in PIM register packets) originated by this
PIM router
SSM
State of SSM on this PIM router (enabled or disabled)
range
Default SSM group range or name of the access list
specifying the range
Sparse-Mode Graceful Restart
Duration
Restart interval in seconds
Join filter
Name of the join filter access-list (if configured) for
this PIM router
Designated Router Priority
Designated router priority value
•
Enabling PIM for IPv4 on a Virtual Router on page 99
•
Setting a Priority to Determine the Designated Router for IPv4 on page 101
•
Configuring the PIM for IPv4 Join/Prune Message Interval on page 102
•
Configuring PIM Sparse Mode Join Filters for IPv4 on page 117
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•
show ip pim
Monitoring RP Routers and the RP Mapping Agent in a PIM Sparse Mode Environment
for IPv4
Purpose
Action
Display information about RP routers and the RP mapping agent in a PIM sparse mode
environment.
To display information about RP routers and the RP mapping agent in a PIM sparse mode
environment.
To display information on a PIM router that is an Auto RP mapping agent:
host1:1#show ip pim auto-rp
This PIM router is an Auto RP mapping agent.
Configured with ttl 64
[ Using interface addr 121.0.0.1, interval 60 ].
PIM AutoRP candidate RP mapping(s)
To display information on a PIM router that is not an Auto RP mapping agent:
host1:1# show ip pim auto-rp
This PIM router is _not_ an Auto RP mapping agent.
PIM AutoRP candidate RP mapping(s)
Candidate RP 122.0.0.1
Group(s) 224.0.0.0/4, AutoRP, ttl 64, interval 60, from access List 1
Candidate RP 122.0.0.1
Group(s) 224.0.1.39/32 (negative), AutoRP, ttl 64, interval 60, from access
List 1
Candidate RP 122.0.0.1
Group(s) 224.0.1.40/32 (negative), AutoRP, ttl 64, interval 60, from access
List 1
Meaning
Table 31 on page 126 lists the show ip pim auto-rp command output fields.
Table 31: show ip pim auto-rp Output Fields
Related
Documentation
126
•
Field Name
Field Description
Configured with ttl
Number of hops for which the RP discovery message
is valid
Using interface addr
IP address of the interface from which the router
sends RP discovery messages
interval
Time interval, in seconds, at which the router sends
RP discovery messages
PIM AutoRP candidate RP
mapping(s)
Routers that the RP mapping agent is evaluating to
determine an RP router for this interface
Configuring an RP Router for PIM Sparse Mode and PIM Sparse-Dense Mode for IPv4
on page 103
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Monitoring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
•
show ip pim auto-rp
Monitoring BSR Information for IPv4
Purpose
Action
Display BSR information and the group prefixes for which the local router is a candidate
RP in a PIM sparse mode environment.
To display information on a router that is the elected BSR:
host1:1#show ip pim bsr
This PIM router is a Candidate BSR.
Configured on intf ATM3/0.101, address: 101.0.0.1
hashMaskLen 30, priority 2, period 60 seconds.
Elected BSR is this router, next BSM in 3 seconds.
Local candidate RP mapping(s):
Candidate RP 101.0.0.1
224.0.0.0/4, BSR, hold-time 150, interval 60, priority 192
228.0.0.0/24, BSR, hold-time 150, interval 60, priority 192, from access-list
acl
230.0.0.0/24, BSR, hold-time 150, interval 60, priority 192, from access-list
acl
To display information on a router that is a candidate BSR:
host1:1#show ip pim bsr
This PIM router is a Candidate BSR.
Configured on intf ATM3/0.100, address: 100.0.0.1
hashMaskLen 30, priority 2, period 60 seconds.
Elected BSR is 101.0.0.1 (priority 0), expires in 73 seconds.
To display information on a router that is not a candidate BSR:
host1:1#show ip pim bsr
This PIM router is not a Candidate BSR.
Elected BSR is 101.0.0.1 (priority 0), expires in 73 seconds.
Meaning
Table 32 on page 127 lists the show ip pim bsr command output fields.
Table 32: show ip pim bsr Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Candidacy
Whether the router is a candidate BSR
Configured on
Interface on which the router is configured
address
Address of the router
hashMaskLen
Hash mask length
priority
Priority of the router
period
Time between bootstrap messages, in seconds
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Table 32: show ip pim bsr Output Fields (continued)
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Elected BSR
This router or IP address of the elected bootstrap
router
next BSM
If BSR is this router, time until the next bootstrap
message is sent, in seconds
expires in
If BSR is not this router, time until the elected BSR
expires if no bootstrap messages are received
Local candidate RP mapping(s)
Routers that the mapping agent is evaluating to
determine an RP router for this interface
•
Configuring BSR and RP Candidates for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv4 on page 105
•
Migrating to BSR from Auto-RP on page 105
•
show ip pim bsr
Monitoring Active Data MDTs for IPv4
Purpose
Action
Display information about active data MDTs. Use the following keywords to display the
required information:
•
sender—To display information about data MDTs on which the provider edge transmits
data
•
receiver—To display information about data MDTs on which the provider edge receives
data
•
group—To display information about an IP PIM group address pool
•
summary—To display a summary of configuration for each data MDT
•
count—To display the number of data MDTs
To display information about a data MDT sender:
host1:PE1#show ip pim data-mdt 225.1.1.1
PE11 - Sender
C-SG: 10.11.0.100, 225.1.1.1
P-SG: 1.1.1.1, 235.0.1.1
MTI: TUNNEL gre:mvpn-dynamic-1
Data rate/Threshold: 10012/500 Kbps
Time until next MDT Join TLV: 25 seconds
To display information about a data MDT receiver:
host1:PE1#show ip pim data-mdt 225.2.2.2
PE31 - Receiver
C-SG: 10.13.0.100, 225.2.2.2
P-SG: 3.3.3.3, 235.0.1.1
128
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Chapter 6: Monitoring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
MTI: TUNNEL gre:mvpn-dynamic-3
Time until MDT Join TLV expires: 29 seconds
To display a summary of data MDT senders:
host1:PE1#show ip pim data-mdt senders summary
VRF
S/R
C-Group
-----------------PE11
Sender
225.1.1.1
gre:mvpn-dynamic-1
PE12
Sender
225.1.1.1
gre:mvpn-dynamic-2
C-Source
P-Group
P-Source
MTI
----------10.11.0.100
--------235.0.1.1
-------1.1.1.1
--------------TUNNEL
10.12.0.100
235.0.1.2
1.1.1.1
TUNNEL
Counts: 2 senders, 0 receivers, total 3.
To display the number of data MDT senders and receivers:
host1:PE1#show ip pim data-mdt count
Counts: 2 senders, 1 receivers, total 3.
Meaning
Table 33 on page 129 lists the show ip pim data-mdt command output fields.
Table 33: show ip pim data-mdt Output Fields
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
PE Name
Name of the PE
C-SG
Address of the C-SG
P-SG
Address of the P-SG
MTI
Name of the dynamic IP tunnel on which the data
MDT was created
Data rate/Threshold
Rate and threshold of multicast data
Time until next MDT Join TLV
Configured delay until next MDT Join TLV
Time until MDT Join TLV expires
Configured delay until MDT Join TLV expires
Time until switchover from
default-MDT
Configured delay until the data MDT switches over to
the default MDT
•
Configuring Data MDTs on page 111
•
show ip pim data-mdt
Monitoring Each (Source, Group) Pair for PIM Dense Mode for IPv4
Purpose
Display information for each (Source, Group) pair for PIM dense mode.
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Action
To display information for each (Source, Group) pair for PIM dense mode:
host1:8#show ip pim dense-mode sg-state
PIM DM route table and pruned oif information
<122.0.0.1, 224.0.1.39>
EntryExpires: 99
RPF Route: 122.0.0.0/255.0.0.0
IIF: 107.0.8.4
Pruned Oifs:
Address: 108.0.8.5
IfId: 95
Pruned due to assert
Pruned time remaining 129
<130.0.0.2, 224.0.1.39>
EntryExpires: 100
RPF Route: 130.0.0.0/255.0.0.0
IIF: 107.0.8.4
Pruned Oifs:
Address: 108.0.8.5
IfId: 95
Pruned due to assert
Pruned time remaining 130
<121.0.0.1, 224.0.1.40>
EntryExpires: 102
RPF Route: 121.0.0.0/255.0.0.0
IIF: 107.0.8.4
Pruned Oifs:
Address: 108.0.8.5
IfId: 95
Pruned due to assert
Pruned time remaining 133
Meaning
UpNbr: 107.0.4.8
UpNbr: 107.0.4.8
UpNbr: 107.0.4.8
Table 34 on page 130 lists the show ip pim dense-mode sg-state command output fields.
Table 34: show ip pim dense-mode sg-state Output Fields
Related
Documentation
130
Field Name
Field Description
(Source, Group) pair
IP address and network mask for the unicast route
EntryExpires
Time until the (S,G) pair entry expires
RPF Route
Reverse-path forwarding route
IIF
IP address of incoming interface
UpNbr
IP address of upstream neighbor
Pruned Oifs
Outgoing interfaces that have been pruned
Address
IP address of outgoing interface
IfId
Index of the interface
Pruned due to
Reason for prune: assert or explicit prune
Pruned time remaining
Time in seconds until the prune expires
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
show ip pim dense-mode sg-state.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Monitoring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
Monitoring PIM Interfaces for IPv4
Purpose
Display information about PIM interfaces. Specify no keywords or variables to view
information about all PIM interfaces.
Specify the summary keyword to view the number of configured, enabled, and disabled
PIM dense mode, PIM sparse mode, and PIM sparse-dense mode interfaces.
Specify the count keyword to view the number of multicast packets that the interface
has sent and received.
Action
To display information about PIM interfaces. Specify no keywords or variables to view
information about all PIM interfaces:
host1# show ip pim interface
PIM Interface Table
Interface Addr Interface
JoinFilter
101.0.0.1
102.0.0.1
silver
103.0.0.1
gold
State Ver Mode
Nbr
Hello
J/P
DR
DR Addr
ATM2/0.100
Up
2
Sparse
Count
1
Intvl Intvl
30
150
Pri
5
101.0.0.2
ATM2/0.101
Up
2
Sparse
1
30
100
2
102.0.0.2
ATM3/0.102
Up
2
Sparse
1
30
100
2
103.0.0.1
host1#show ip pim interface summary
PIM Interface Summary
SM:
0, 0 enabled, 0 disabled
DM:
0, 0 enabled, 0 disabled
SM/DM: 1, 0 enabled, 1 disabled
host1#show ip pim interface count
PIM Interface Count
Interface Addr Interface Name
192.32.10.20
Meaning
ATM3/0.20
ControlPktCount In|Out
Hello
JoinPrune Assert
0
0
0
0
0
0
Table 35 on page 131 lists the show ip pim interface command output fields.
Table 35: show ip pim interface Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Interface Addr
IP address of the interface
Interface Name
Type and specifier of the interface. For details about
interface types and specifiers, see Interface Types
and Specifiers in JunosE Command Reference Guide.
Ver
Version of PIM running on this interface
Mode
PIM mode running on this interface: Sparse, Dense,
or SparseDense
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Table 35: show ip pim interface Output Fields (continued)
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Nbr Count
Number of neighbors connected to this interface
Hello Intvl
Time interval, in seconds, at which the interface sends
hello messages to neighbors
J/P Interval
Time interval, in seconds, at which the interface sends
the join/prune messages
DR Addr
Address of the designated router
SM
Number of PIM sparse mode interfaces
DM
Number of PIM dense mode interfaces
SM/DM
Number of PIM sparse-dense mode interfaces:
•
enabled—Number of interfaces administratively
enabled
•
disabled—Number of interfaces administratively
disabled
DR Pr
Designated router priority value
ControlPktCount In|Out
PIM messages received on and sent from this interface
Hello
Total number of hello messages
JoinPrune
Total number of join and prune messages
Assert
Total number of assert messages
•
Enabling PIM for IPv4 on an Interface on page 100
•
Configuring PIM Sparse Mode Join Filters for IPv4 on page 117
•
Resetting PIM Counters and Mappings for IPv4 on page 121
•
show ip pim interface
Monitoring PIM Neighbors for IPv4
Purpose
Action
Display information about PIM neighbors that the router discovered.
To display information about PIM neighbors that the router discovered:
host1#show ip pim neighbor
Neighbor
Addr
132
Interface Name
Uptime
Expires
Ver
Mode
BFD
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Monitoring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
-------1.1.1.1
Neighbor
Addr
-------1.1.1.1
Neighbor
Addr
-------1.1.1.1
Meaning
--------------FastEthernet1/1
-------00:02:49
-------00:01:27
--2
-----Sparse
---
Interface Name
--------------FastEthernet1/1
Uptime
-------00:03:16
Expires
-------00:01:30
Ver
--2
Mode
-----Sparse
BFD
--up
Interface Name
--------------FastEthernet1/1
Uptime
-------00:00:07
Expires
-------00:01:39
Ver
--2
Mode
-----Sparse
BFD
---down
Table 36 on page 133 lists the show ip pim neighbor command output fields.
Table 36: show ip pim neighbor Output Fields
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Neighbor Addr
IP address of the neighbor
Interface Name
Type and specifier of the interface to which the
neighbor connects. For details about interface types
and specifiers, see Interface Types and Specifiers in
JunosE Command Reference Guide
Uptime
Time since the router discovered this neighbor in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
Expires
Time available for the neighbor to send a hello
message to the interface. If the neighbor does not
send a hello message during this time, it no longer is
a neighbor
Ver
Version of PIM that the neighbor is running
Mode
PIM mode that the neighbor is using: Sparse, Dense,
or SparseDense
BFD
BFD status: up or down
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
BFD Protocol for PIM for IPv4 Overview on page 119
•
show ip pim neighbor
Monitoring PIM Group-to-RP Mappings for IPv4
Purpose
Display information about PIM group-to-RP mappings. Specify the address of a group
to view PIM group-to-RP mappings for a particular group. Specify the mapping keyword
to display all group-to-RP mappings that the router has recorded.
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Action
To display information about PIM group-to-RP mappings:
host1:8#show ip pim rp mapping
PIM Group-to-RP mapping(s)
Group(s) 224.0.0.0/4
RP 122.0.0.1, priority 0, via
Group(s) 224.0.1.39/32 (negative)
RP 122.0.0.1, priority 0, via
Group(s) 224.0.1.40/32 (negative)
RP 122.0.0.1, priority 0, via
AutoRP, expiryTime 88
AutoRP (Negative), expiryTime 88
AutoRP (Negative), expiryTime 88
host1:8#show ip pim rp mapping
PIM Group-to-RP mapping(s)
Group(s) 224.0.0.0/4
RP 134.0.0.1, priority 0, via Static, from access-list 1
Group(s) 232.0.0.0/16
RP 134.0.0.1, priority 0, via BSR, expires in 121 seconds
Meaning
Table 37 on page 134 lists the show ip pim rp command output fields.
Table 37: show ip pim rp Output Fields
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Group(s)
Prefix of the multicast group
RP
IP address of RP router for the multicast group
priority
Priority of the router
via
Method by which the RP router was assigned: AutoRP,
Static RP, or BSR
expiryTime
Time in seconds at which the RP mapping becomes
invalid, unless the mapping agent (access list)
reassigns the RP router to this group
•
Configuring an RP Router for PIM Sparse Mode and PIM Sparse-Dense Mode for IPv4
on page 103
•
Resetting PIM Counters and Mappings for IPv4 on page 121
•
show ip pim rp
Monitoring the RP Router that a Multicast Group Uses for IPv4
Purpose
Action
Show which RP router that a multicast group is using.
To show which RP router that a multicast group is using:
host1:2#show ip pim rp-hash 232.1.1.1
Group(s) 224.0.0.0/4
RP 122.0.0.1, priority 0, via
134
AutoRP, expiryTime 128
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Monitoring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
host1:2#show ip pim rp-hash 226.0.0.1
Group(s) 226.0.0.0/24
RP 101.0.0.1, priority 192, via BSR, expires in 145 seconds
*RP 145.0.0.3, priority 192, via BSR, expires in 145 seconds
Meaning
Table 38 on page 135 lists the show ip pim rp-hash command output fields.
Table 38: show ip pim rp-hash Output Fields
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Group(s)
Multicast group or groups
RP
RP router for the multicast group
priority
Priority of the router
via
Method by which the RP router was assigned: AutoRP,
Static RP, or BSR
expiryTime
Time in seconds at which the RP mapping becomes
invalid, unless it is renewed by the mapping agent
•
Configuring an RP Router for PIM Sparse Mode and PIM Sparse-Dense Mode for IPv4
on page 103
•
Configuring BSR and RP Candidates for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv4 on page 105
•
show ip pim rp-hash
Monitoring each (S,G) Pair for PIM Sparse Mode and PIM SSM for IPv4
Purpose
Action
Display information for each (S,G) pair for PIM sparse mode and PIM SSM.
To display information for each (S,G) pair for PIM sparse mode and PIM SSM:
host1:2# show ip pim sparse-mode sg-state
<*, 224.0.1.40>
Group-to-RP mapping: 224.0.0.0/240.0.0.0
RP: 123.0.0.1
RPF Route: 123.0.0.0/255.0.0.0
IIF: 106.0.7.3
UpNbr: 106.0.3.7
Oifs:
Auto RP Discovery SELF oif.
Joined as <*, G>
<*, 225.1.2.3>
Group-to-RP mapping: 224.0.0.0/240.0.0.0
RP: 123.0.0.1
RPF Route: 123.0.0.0/255.0.0.0
IIF: 106.0.7.3
UpNbr: 106.0.3.7
Oifs:
Address: 78.7.7.7
Interface: loopback7
Local group membership present.
<*, 235.1.1.1>
Group-to-RP mapping: 224.0.0.0/240.0.0.0
RP: 123.0.0.1
RPF Route: 123.0.0.0/255.0.0.0
IIF: 106.0.7.3
UpNbr: 106.0.3.7
Oifs:
Address: 78.7.7.7
Interface: loopback7
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Local group membership present.
<118.1.33.34, 232.0.0.1>
SSM Group
RPF Route: 118.1.0.0/255.255.0.0
IIF: 118.1.0.1 (Directly attached)
Oifs:
Register Oif to RP: 141.0.0.2 suppressed for SSM Group.
Address: 134.0.0.1
Interface: ATM3/0.104
Joined as <S, G>
Join Expires: 161
<118.1.33.35, 232.0.0.1>
SSM Group
RPF Route: 118.1.0.0/255.255.0.0
IIF: 118.1.0.1 (Directly attached)
Oifs:
Register Oif to RP: 141.0.0.2 suppressed for SSM Group.
Address: 134.0.0.1
Interface: ATM3/0.104
Joined as <S, G>
Join Expires: 161
<10.0.1.8, 235.1.1.1>
EntryExpires: 143
Group-to-RP mapping: 224.0.0.0/240.0.0.0
RP: 123.0.0.1
RPF Route: 10.0.0.0/255.0.0.0
IIF: 106.0.7.3
UpNbr: 106.0.3.7
Oifs:
Address: 78.7.7.7
Interface: loopback7
Joined as <*, G>
Count of entries - <S, G>
: 3
<*, G>
: 3
<*, *, RP>: 0
Meaning
Table 39 on page 136 lists the show ip pim sparse-mode sg-state command output fields.
Table 39: show ip pim sparse-mode sg-state Output Fields
136
Field Name
Field Description
(S, G) pair
Source, Group pair for which information is provided
Group-to-RP mapping
IP addresses and network mask of the multicast group
RP
IP address of RP router
SSM group
Indicator that this is an SSM group
RPF Route
IP address and network mask of the RPF route
IIF
IP address of the incoming interface for the RPF route
UpNbr
IP address of the upstream neighbor
Oifs
Outgoing interface
Auto RP Discovery SELF oif
Indicates that RP router for this group was assigned
through auto-RP
Register Oif to RP
IP address of RP router for the outgoing interface;
suppressed for SSM
Address
IP address of outgoing interface
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Monitoring PIM for IPv4 Multicast
Table 39: show ip pim sparse-mode sg-state Output Fields (continued)
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Interface
Type and specifier of the interface. For details about
interface types and specifiers, see Interface Types and
Specifiers in JunosE Command Reference Guide
Joined as
Type of mapping:
•
(S, G)—Mapping from a specific source to a specific
group
•
(*, G)—Mapping from any source to a specific group
•
(*, *, RP)—Mapping from any source to any group
Join expires
Number of seconds before the (S,G) membership
expires
Count of entries
Total counts of (S,G) pair mappings
•
Configuring PIM for IPv4 SSM on page 118
•
show ip pim sparse-mode sg-state
Monitoring Unicast Routes that PIM Sparse Mode Uses for IPv4
Purpose
Action
Display the unicast routes that PIM sparse mode is using.
To display the unicast routes that PIM sparse mode is using:
host1:2#show ip pim sparse-mode unicast-route
PIM SM unicast route table information
Route
RpfNbr
Iif
Pref Metric
--------------------------------------------------------------------------122.0.0.0
/255.0.0.0
122.0.0.1
255
1
Count of entries: 1
Meaning
Table 40 on page 137 lists the show ip pim sparse-mode unicast-route command output
fields.
Table 40: show ip pim sparse-mode unicast-route Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Route
IP address and network mask for the unicast route
RpfNbr
RPF neighbor
Iif
Incoming interface for the unicast route
Pref
Preference value for the unicast route
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Table 40: show ip pim sparse-mode unicast-route Output
Fields (continued)
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Metric
Value of metric for the unicast route (type of metric
varies with the unicast protocol)
Count of entries
Number of unicast routes that PIM sparse mode is
using
•
Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast on page 92
•
show ip pim sparse-mode unicast-route
Monitoring the Threshold for Switching to the Shortest Path Tree at a PIM Designated
Router for IPv4
Purpose
Action
Display the threshold for switching to the shortest path tree at a PIM designated router.
To display the threshold for switching to the shortest path tree at a PIM designated router:
host1:2#show ip pim spt-threshold
Access List Name
SptThreshold(in kbps)
------------------------------------------------------1
infinity
Meaning
Table 41 on page 138 lists the show ip pim spt-threshold command output fields.
Table 41: show ip pim spt-threshold Output Fields
Related
Documentation
138
Field Name
Field Description
Access List Name
Name of the IP access list that specifies the groups
to which the threshold applies
SptThreshold (in kbps)
Value at which PIM sparse mode switches from a
shared tree to an SPT. A value of infinity indicates that
PIM sparse mode never switches to an SPT
•
Switching to an SPT for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv4 on page 106
•
show ip pim spt-threshold
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 7
Configuring DVMRP
E Series routers support Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol (DVMRP) on VRs
to forward multicast datagrams through a network. DVMRP is an interior gateway protocol
that supports operations within an autonomous system, but not between autonomous
systems. The multicast backbone of the Internet, MBone, uses DVMRP to forward
multicast datagrams. This chapter describes how to configure DVMRP on E Series routers;
it contains the following sections:
•
DVMRP Overview on page 140
•
DVMRP Platform Considerations on page 141
•
DVMRP References on page 142
•
Enabling DVMRP on a Virtual Router on page 142
•
Activating DVMRP on an Interface on page 143
•
Configuring DVMRP Limits on page 143
•
DVMRP Report Filter Overview on page 144
•
Filtering DVMRP Reports on page 144
•
DVMRP Summary Addresses Overview on page 145
•
Configuring DVMRP Summary Addresses on page 145
•
Changing the Metric for a Route on page 146
•
Importing Routes from Other Protocols on page 146
•
Specifying Routes to Be Advertised on page 147
•
Preventing Dynamic Route Distribution on page 148
•
Exchange of DVMRP Unicast Routes Overview on page 148
•
Exchanging DVMRP Unicast Routes on page 149
•
Disabling and Removing DVMRP on page 149
•
Clearing DVMRP Routes on page 150
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DVMRP Overview
NOTE: PIM has gained general acceptance among a large number of
multicast-enabled networks. We recommend that you use PIM rather than
DVMRP for applications that are not otherwise required to run DVMRP.
DVMRP is a dense-mode multicasting protocol and therefore uses a broadcast and prune
mechanism. The protocol builds a source-rooted tree (SRT) in a similar way to PIM dense
mode. DVMRP routers flood datagrams to all interfaces except the one that provides
the shortest unicast route to the source. DVMRP uses pruning to prevent unnecessary
sending of multicast messages through the SRT.
A DVMRP router sends prune messages to its neighbors if it discovers that:
•
The network to which a host is attached has no active members of the multicast group.
•
All neighbors, except the next-hop neighbor connected to the source, have pruned the
source and the group.
When a neighbor receives a prune message from a DVMRP router, it removes that neighbor
from its (S,G) pair table, which provides information to the multicast forwarding table.
When a host on a previously pruned branch attempts to join a multicast group, it sends
an IGMP message to its first-hop router. The first-hop router then sends a graft message
upstream.
Identifying Neighbors
In this implementation of DVMRP, a neighbor is a directly connected DVMRP router. When
you enable DVMRP on an interface, the associated VR adds information about local
networks to its DVMRP routing table. The VR then sends probe messages periodically
to learn about neighbors on each of its interfaces. To ensure compatibility with other
DVMRP routers that do not send probe messages, the VR also updates its DVMRP routing
table when it receives route report messages from such routers.
Advertising Routes
As its name suggests, DVMRP uses a distance-vector routing algorithm. Such algorithms
require that each router periodically inform its neighbors of its routing table. DVMRP
routers advertise routes by sending DVMRP report messages. For each network path, the
receiving router picks the neighbor advertising the lowest cost and adds that entry to its
routing table for future advertisement.
The cost, or metric, for this routing protocol is the hop count back to the source. The hop
count for a network device is the number of routers on the route between the source and
that network device.
Table 42 on page 141 shows an example of the routing table for a DVMRP router.
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Chapter 7: Configuring DVMRP
Table 42: Sample Routing Table for a DVMRP Router
Source
Subnet
Subnet Mask
From Router
Metric
Time Before
Entry Is Deleted
from Routing
Table
143.2.0.0
255.255.0.0
143.32.44.12
4
85
3/0
4/0, 4/1
143.3.0.0
255.255.0.0
143.2.55.23
2
80
3/1
4/0, 4/1
143.4.0.0
255.255.0.0
143.78.6.43
3
120
3/1
4/0, 4/1
Input
Port
Output
Port
The DVMRP router maintains an (S,G) pair table that provides information to the multicast
forwarding table. The (S,G) pair table is based on:
•
Information from the DVMRP routing table
•
Information learned from prune messages
•
If IGMP and DVMRP are on the same interface, group information learned from IGMP
The (S,G) pair table includes a route from each subnetwork that contains a source to
each multicast group of which that source is a member. These routes can be static or
learned routes. Table 43 on page 141 shows an example of the (S,G) pair table for DVMRP.
A dash (–) in the Input Port column indicates that the interface is associated with a
protocol other than DVMRP.
Table 43: Sample DVMRP (S,G) Pair Table
Source
Subnet
Multicast
Group
Time Before Entry Is
Deleted from Routing
Table
Input Port
Output Port
143.2.0.0
230.1.2.3
85
3/0
4/0, 4/1
230.2.3.4
75
3/0
4/0, 4/1
230.3.4.5
60
3/0
4/1
230.4.5.6
90
—
4/0
230.1.2.3
80
3/1
4/0, 4/1
143.3.0.0
Related
Documentation
•
DVMRP Platform Considerations on page 141
•
DVMRP References on page 142
DVMRP Platform Considerations
For information about modules that support DVMRP on the ERX7xx models, ERX14xx
models, and the ERX310 Broadband Services Router:
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•
See ERX Module Guide, Table 1, Module Combinations for detailed module specifications.
•
See ERX Module Guide, Appendix A, Module Protocol Support for information about the
modules that support DVMRP.
For information about modules that support DVMRP on the E120 and E320 Broadband
Services Routers:
Related
Documentation
•
See E120 and E320 Module Guide, Table 1, Modules and IOAs for detailed module
specifications.
•
See E120 and E320 Module Guide, Appendix A, IOA Protocol Support for information
about the modules that support DVMRP.
•
DVMRP References on page 142
DVMRP References
For more information about DVMRP, see the following resource:
Related
Documentation
•
Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol—draft-ietf-idmr-dvmrp-v3-11.txt (April
2004 expiration)
•
DVMRP Platform Considerations on page 141
Enabling DVMRP on a Virtual Router
By default, DVMRP is enabled on the router. To enable DVMRP on a VR:
1.
Enable multicast routing.
host1(config)#ip multicast-routing
2. (Optional) Create a VR or access a VR context.
host1(config)#virtual-router boston
NOTE: If you do not specify a VR, you can configure DVMRP on the default
router.
You must enable and configure DVMRP on one or more interfaces for DVMRP to function.
See “Activating DVMRP on an Interface” on page 143. You can also set DVMRP limits for
the VR; see “Configuring DVMRP Limits” on page 143.
Related
Documentation
142
•
DVMRP Overview on page 140
•
ip multicast-routing
•
virtual-router
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Configuring DVMRP
Activating DVMRP on an Interface
By default, DVMRP is not activated on an interface. Configuring any DVMRP parameter
on an interface automatically activates DVMRP on that interface. You can also activate
DVMRP on an interface and use the default parameters.
The ip dvmrp command automatically creates and enables DVMRP processing on the
current VR. Issuing this command identifies this interface as one that DVMRP owns.
To activate DVMRP on an interface:
•
Issue the ip dvmrp command in Interface Configuration mode.
host1:boston(config-if)#ip dvmrp
Use the no version to remove DVMRP from an interface.
Related
Documentation
•
DVMRP Overview on page 140
•
ip dvmrp
Configuring DVMRP Limits
You can configure DVMRP and IGMP on the same interface. If you configure DVMRP and
IGMP on an interface, the router determines that DVMRP owns the interface.
NOTE: You cannot configure DVMRP and PIM on the same interface.
When you have enabled DVMRP processing on a VR, you can configure the following
settings for that VR:
•
Configuring the Number of Routes that the Virtual Router Records in
Warnings on page 143
•
Configuring the Maximum Number of DVMRP Routes That the Router
Advertises on page 144
Configuring the Number of Routes that the Virtual Router Records in Warnings
The following steps describe how you can set the number of DVRMP routes that the
router can record before it generates a system log warning message. The warning alerts
you so you can identify routers that are injecting large numbers of routes into the MBone.
To configure the number of routes that the router can record before it generates a system
log warning message:
•
Issue the ip dvmrp route-hog-notification command in Global Configuration mode.
host1:boston(config)#ip dvmrp route-hog-notification 5000
Use the no version to restore the default value, 10,000 routes.
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Configuring the Maximum Number of DVMRP Routes That the Router Advertises
To limit the number of routes that the router can advertise on each interface:
•
Issue the ip dvmrp route-limit command in Global Configuration mode.
host1:boston(config)#ip dvmrp route-limit 5000
Use the no version to restore the default value, 7000 routes.
Related
Documentation
•
DVMRP Overview on page 140
•
ip dvmrp route-hog-notification
•
ip dvmrp route-limit
DVMRP Report Filter Overview
You can configure an interface to accept only reports with routes that appear on a
standard IP access list. You can refine the set of accepted routes further, by defining a
second access list of neighbors who can supply the specified routes.
For example, suppose you define an access list that specifies that the router accepts
only reports for the route 172.16.2.0/24. You then define a second access list that specifies
that only neighbors 192.168.1.1 and 193.168.1.1 can supply this route. If neighbor 192.168.2.2
supplies the route, the DVMRP router rejects this report.
You can also modify the value (distance) that the router associates with a DVMRP route
when it computes the RPF interface for the source of a multicast packet. By default, the
router associates a distance of 0 with DVMRP routes; this value specifies that the router
use DVMRP, rather than a unicast routing protocol, to transport multicast datagrams.
However, in a configuration where PIM discovers multicast routes and a unicast routing
protocol performs RPF lookups, you can increase the administrative distance to favor
the unicast protocol.
For information about defining access lists, see Configuring Routing Policy in the JunosE
IP Services Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
•
DVMRP Overview on page 140
•
Filtering DVMRP Reports on page 144
Filtering DVMRP Reports
The following procedure describes how to filter routes in DVMRP reports in accordance
with a standard IP access list. You can specify a standard IP access list of sources for
which the interface can accept routes, specify a DVMRP administrative distance to favor
a unicast routing protocol, or specify a neighbor list to restrict the neighbors from which
reports for routes on the first list can be accepted.
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Chapter 7: Configuring DVMRP
To filter routes in a DVMRP report:
•
Issue the ip dvmrp accept-filter command in Interface Configuration mode.
host1:boston(config-if)#ip dvmrp accept-filter boston-list 4 neighbor-list
boston-neighbors
Use the no version to disable a filter.
Related
Documentation
•
ip dvmrp accept-filter
DVMRP Summary Addresses Overview
You can configure an interface to advertise a summary address with a known metric
rather than a more specific route. DVMRP advertises the summary address if the DVMRP
routing table contains a more specific route that matches the address and mask of the
summary address.
If you want to advertise all routes rather than a summary, disable automatic
summarization on the interface (no ip dvmrp auto-summary). By default, the router
automatically summarizes DVMRP routes. DVMRP automatic summarization maps a
unicast subnet route to a classful network number route when the subnet has a different
network number from the IP address of the interface (or tunnel) over which the
advertisement travels. If the interface is unnumbered, the router compares the network
number of the numbered interface to the IP address to which the unnumbered interface
points.
If you configure a summary address on an interface and do not disable automatic
summarization, the interface advertises the least-specific address.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring DVMRP Summary Addresses on page 145
Configuring DVMRP Summary Addresses
This section describes how you can reenable the router to summarize routes automatically
for a specific interface and use it to advertise DVMRP summary addresses on an interface.
To reenable the router to summarize routes automatically for this interface:
•
Issue the ip dvmrp auto-summary command in Interface Configuration mode..
host1:boston(config-if)#ip dvmrp auto-summary
By default, automatic summarization is enabled. Use the no version to disable automatic
summarization for this interface.
To advertise DVMRP summary addresses on an interface:
•
Issue the ip dvmrp summary-address command in Interface Configuration mode.
host1:boston(config-if)#ip dvmrp summary-address 192.48.1.2 255.255.255.0 metric
1
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By default, an interface advertises only summary addresses generated by automatic
summarization. If you configure multiple overlapping summary addresses on an
interface, the one with the shortest mask takes preference. Use the metric keyword
to specify a DVMRP metric (hop count); the default metric value is 1. Use the no version
to stop advertising a summary address on the interface.
Related
Documentation
•
DVMRP Summary Addresses Overview on page 145
•
ip dvmrp auto-summary
•
ip dvmrp summary-address
Changing the Metric for a Route
The metric for DVMRP is hop count. For example, a route with two hops over a slow serial
line is preferable to a route with three hops over a faster optical line.
The router increases the number of DVMRP routes in incoming reports by a default metric
of one and in outgoing reports by a default of 0. You can change the metric for an interface
to promote or demote the preference for associated routes.
To adjust the number of hops associated with a route:
•
Issue the ip dvmrp metric-offset command in Interface Configuration mode. This
action specifies that the route is more efficient or less efficient than an alternative
route.
host1:boston(config-if)#ip dvmrp metric-offset in 3
Use the no version to revert to the default settings: 1 for incoming reports and 0 for
outgoing reports.
Related
Documentation
•
Clearing DVMRP Routes on page 150
•
Disabling and Removing DVMRP on page 149
•
Enabling DVMRP on a Virtual Router on page 142
•
Importing Routes from Other Protocols on page 146
•
Specifying Routes to Be Advertised on page 147
•
Preventing Dynamic Route Distribution on page 148
•
ip dvmrp metric-offset
Importing Routes from Other Protocols
You can import routing information from other protocols into the DVMRP routing table.
Only routes that appear in the RPF table can be imported.
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Chapter 7: Configuring DVMRP
NOTE: If you want to use IS-IS, OSPF, or RIP routes, you must make those
routes available to multicast protocols. See “Defining Static Routes for
Reverse-Path Forwarding” on page 7.
1.
Issue the router dvmrp command in Global Configuration mode to access Router
Configuration mode. You can create and enable DVMRP processing on a VR from the
Router Configuration mode.
host1:boston(config)#router dvmrp
Use the no version to remove DVMRP from the VR.
2. Specify a route map using the route-map command in Global Configuration mode.
host1:boston(config-router)#route-map boston-map atm 3/2
Use the no version to delete the route map. If you do not specify an interface, it removes
the global route map if one exists.
3. Import information from one type of routing domain into another using the redistribute
command in Router Configuration mode.
Example—Importing routing information from BGP into DVMRP
host1:boston(config-router)#redistribute bgp 100 route-map boston-map
Use the no version to disable redistribution.
Related
Documentation
•
Clearing DVMRP Routes on page 150
•
Changing the Metric for a Route on page 146
•
Disabling and Removing DVMRP on page 149
•
Enabling DVMRP on a Virtual Router on page 142
•
Specifying Routes to Be Advertised on page 147
•
Preventing Dynamic Route Distribution on page 148
•
redistribute
•
router dvmrp
•
route-map
Specifying Routes to Be Advertised
By default, if DVMRP owns an interface, that interface advertises all DVMRP routes it
has learned to its neighbors. You can specify the routes that the interface advertises by
issuing the ip dvmrp announce-filter command in conjunction with a standard IP access
list. The IP access list defines the DVMRP routes that are advertised.
To specify the DVMRP routes for an interface to advertise:
•
Issue the ip dvmrp announce-filter in Interface Configuration mode.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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host1:boston(config-if)#ip dvmrp announce-filter boston-list
Use the no version to enable the interface to advertise all DVMRP routes that it has
learned.
Related
Documentation
•
Clearing DVMRP Routes on page 150
•
Changing the Metric for a Route on page 146
•
Disabling and Removing DVMRP on page 149
•
Enabling DVMRP on a Virtual Router on page 142
•
Importing Routes from Other Protocols on page 146
•
Preventing Dynamic Route Distribution on page 148
•
ip dvmrp announce-filter
Preventing Dynamic Route Distribution
By default, if you make changes to a route map, the router dynamically redistributes the
routes in DVMRP. To prevent this dynamic redistribution, use the
disable-dynamic-redistribute command.
To prevent the dynamic redistribution of routes:
•
Issue the disable-dynamic-redistribute command in Router Configuration mode.
host1(config-router)#disable-dynamic-redistribute
There is no no version.
Related
Documentation
•
Clearing DVMRP Routes on page 150
•
Changing the Metric for a Route on page 146
•
Disabling and Removing DVMRP on page 149
•
Enabling DVMRP on a Virtual Router on page 142
•
Importing Routes from Other Protocols on page 146
•
Specifying Routes to Be Advertised on page 147
•
disable-dynamic-redistribute
Exchange of DVMRP Unicast Routes Overview
DVMRP maintains its own unicast routing table, based on distance vector calculations.
The routing table defines the best-known distance to each destination and how to get
there. The router updates the table by exchanging information with its neighbors. The
DVMRP routing table is used solely for RPF lookups.
By default, if DVMRP owns an interface, that interface exchanges DVMRP unicast routes
with its neighbors, and you cannot disable the exchange of routes. However, you can
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Chapter 7: Configuring DVMRP
enable and disable the exchange of DVMRP unicast routes on interfaces that DVMRP
does not own.
When an interface exchanges DVMRP routes, the router obtains routes from DVMRP
report messages and stores them in its DVMRP routing table. Other multicast protocols,
such as PIM, can then use these routes for RPF lookups. With this feature, PIM can use
the DVMRP routing table even when the router is not running DVMRP.
All interfaces, including tunnels, support DVMRP unicast routing. DVMRP tunnels use
DVMRP multicast routing to support DVMRP unicast routing.
Related
Documentation
•
Exchanging DVMRP Unicast Routes on page 149
Exchanging DVMRP Unicast Routes
Use the ip dvmrp unicast-routing command to enable the exchange of DVMRP unicast
routes on an interface not owned by DVMRP. DVMRP tunnels enable the exchange of IP
multicast traffic between routers separated by networks that do not support multicast
routing. For information about DVMRP tunnels, see Configuring IP Tunnels in the JunosE
IP Services Configuration Guide.
To enable the exchange of DVMRP unicast routes on an interface not owned by DVMRP:
•
Issue the ip dvmrp unicast-routing command in Interface Configuration Mode.
host1:boston(config-if)#ip dvmrp unicast-routing
Use the no version to disable the exchange of DVMRP unicast routes on an interface
not owned by DVMRP.
Related
Documentation
•
Exchange of DVMRP Unicast Routes Overview on page 148
•
ip dvmrp unicast-routing
Disabling and Removing DVMRP
This topic describes how to disable and remove DVMRP on a virtual router or an interface.
You can disable DVMRP on a VR or an interface without removing the configuration. You
can also remove DVMRP from a VR or an interface.
Use the disable command to disable DVMRP processing on a VR without removing the
DVMRP configuration.
To disable DVMRP processing on a VR without removing the DVMRP configuration:
•
Issue the disable command in Interface Configuration.
host1:boston(config-router)#disable
Use the no version to reenable DVMRP processing on a VR. By default, DVMRP
processing is enabled.
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Use the ip dvmrp disable command to disable DVMRP processing on an interface without
removing the DVMRP configuration.
To disable DVMRP processing on an interface without removing the DVMRP configuration:
•
Issue the ip dvmrp disable command in Interface Configuration mode.
host1:boston(config-if)#ip dvmrp disable
Use the no version to reenable DVMRP processing on an interface.
Related
Documentation
•
Clearing DVMRP Routes on page 150
•
Changing the Metric for a Route on page 146
•
Enabling DVMRP on a Virtual Router on page 142
•
Importing Routes from Other Protocols on page 146
•
Preventing Dynamic Route Distribution on page 148
•
Specifying Routes to Be Advertised on page 147
•
disable
•
ip dvmrp
•
ip dvmrp disable
•
router dvmrp
Clearing DVMRP Routes
You can clear one or more routes from the DVMRP routing table. However, if you do so,
the routes might reappear in the routing table if they are rediscovered. If you do not specify
any options, the router removes all routes except those associated with its own interfaces
from the DVMRP table. If you specify an IP address but not a subnet mask, the router
removes the longest route to that IP address from the DVMRP table. If you specify a
subnet mask, the router removes that specific route from the DVMRP table.
To clear DVMRP routes from the routing table:
•
Issue the clear ip dvmrp routes command in Privileged Exec mode.
host1:boston#clear ip dvmrp routes
There is no no version.
Related
Documentation
150
•
Changing the Metric for a Route on page 146
•
Enabling DVMRP on a Virtual Router on page 142
•
Importing Routes from Other Protocols on page 146
•
Preventing Dynamic Route Distribution on page 148
•
Specifying Routes to Be Advertised on page 147
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Configuring DVMRP
•
Disabling and Removing DVMRP on page 149
•
clear ip dvmrp routes
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CHAPTER 8
Monitoring DVMRP
This chapter describes how to monitor DVMRP on E Series routers. It contains the following
sections:
•
Setting a Baseline for DVMRP Statistics on page 153
•
Monitoring DVMRP Information for a Virtual Router on page 153
•
Monitoring DVMRP Parameters for a Specific Interface on page 154
•
Monitoring DVMRP Multicast Groups on page 156
•
Monitoring DVMRP Neighbors on page 156
•
Monitoring DVMRP Routes on page 158
•
Monitoring the Next Hops of DVMRP Routes on page 159
Setting a Baseline for DVMRP Statistics
Use the baseline ip dvmrp to set the counters for DVMRP statistics to zero, which
establishes a reference point, or baseline, for DVMRP statistics.
To set the counters for DVMRP statistics to zero:
•
Issue the baseline ip dvmrp command in Privileged Exec mode.
(host1)#baseline ip dvmrp
There is no no version.
Related
Documentation
•
baseline ip dvmrp
Monitoring DVMRP Information for a Virtual Router
Purpose
Action
Display DVMRP information for a VR.
To display DVMRP information for a VR:
host1:boston>show ip dvmrp
Routing Process DVMRP - Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol
Dvmrp Administrative State:
Enabled
Multicast Administrative State:
Enabled
Dvmrp Version:
3.255
Generation ID:
0x46828e2b
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Number of Routes:
Number of Triggered Routes:
Reachable Routes:
route-hog-notification:
route-limit:
Send-S32-Prunes-Only:
unicastRoutingOnly:
Graceful Restart Duration:
Graceful Restart is:
Redistribution
dynamic-redistribution:
Meaning
2
0
2
10000
7000
true
false
60
complete (timer 0 seconds)
None Configured
enabled
Table 44 on page 154 lists the show ip dvmrp command output fields.
Table 44: show ip dvmrp Output Fields
Field
Description
Dvmrp Administrative State
State of DVMRP in the software: Enabled or Disabled
Mcast Administrative State
State of multicasting in the software: Enabled or Disabled
Dvmrp Version
Version of DVMRP with which this software is compatible
GenerationID
A number the router generates each time it reboots; when the number changes,
neighbors discard all information previously learned from the router
Number of Routes
Number of routes in the DVMRP routing table
Number of Triggered Routes
Number of routes waiting to be advertised, because a parameter for the route
changed
Reachable Routes
Number of routes that the router can currently reach
Route-hog-notification
Number of DVMRP routes that the router can record before it generates a system
log warning message
Route-limit
Maximum number of routes that the router can advertise on each interface
Send-S32-Prunes-Only
Indicator of whether the router sends only S-32 prunes
true
Router sends only S-32 prunes and grafts to ensure compatibility with other protocols,
such as PIM
false
Router sends S-32 and S/Prefix grafts and prunes
Related
Documentation
•
show ip dvmrp
Monitoring DVMRP Parameters for a Specific Interface
Purpose
154
Display DVMRP parameters for a specified interface.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 8: Monitoring DVMRP
Action
To display DVMRP parameters for a specified interface:
host1:v3#show ip dvmrp interface
Interface: ATM2/0.1
SourceAddress:
Network/Mask:
Received Bad Packets:
Received Bad Routes:
Routes Sent:
Administrative State:
Summary Address(es)
auto-summary:
metric-offset in:
metric-offset out:
announce-filter:
accept-filter(s)
1.0.0.1
1.0.0.1/24
0
0
0
Enabled
None Configured
Disabled
1
0
None
None Configured
To display a summary of DVMRP parameters for a specified interface:
host1:boston#show ip dvmrp interface brief
Interface
SourceAddress
Network/Mask
atm5/0.14
14.0.1.1
14.0.1.1/8
atm5/0.15
15.0.1.1
15.0.1.1/8
Meaning
RBdPk RBdRt SntRt
0
0
2
0
0
2
Table 45 on page 155 lists the show ip dvmrp interface command output fields.
Table 45: show ip dvmrp interface Output Fields
Field
Description
Interface
Type and specifier of the interface connected to a source. For details about interface
types and specifiers, see Interface Types and Specifiers in JunosE Command Reference
Guide.
SourceAddress
IP address of the interface or, for an unnumbered interface, address of the loopback
interface
Network/Mask
Network and mask of the subnet on which the interface resides
Received Bad Packets/RBdPk
Number of bad packets received on this interface
Received Bad Routes/RBdRt
Number of bad routes received on this interface
Routes Sent/SntRt
Number of bad routes advertised on this interface
Administrative State
Configured state of DVMRP on this interface: enabled or Disabled
Summary Address(es)
Specific summary address or addresses that this interface should advertise
auto-summary
Status of automatic summarization: Enabled or Disabled
metric-offset in
Number of hops by which the router increases a DVMRP route advertised in incoming
DVMRP reports
metric-offset out
Number of hops by which the router increases a DVMRP route advertised in outgoing
DVMRP reports
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Table 45: show ip dvmrp interface Output Fields (continued)
Field
Description
announce-filter
Routes advertised by the interface
accept-filter(s)
Names of IP access lists that specify the sources for which the interface accepts
routes
Related
Documentation
•
show ip dvmrp interface
Monitoring DVMRP Multicast Groups
Purpose
Action
Display information about DVMRP routes to multicast groups.
To display information about DVMRP routes to multicast groups:
host1:boston#show ip dvmrp mroute
IP DVMRP Multicast Routing Table
(40.0.0.0/16, 228.1.1.1) Uptime: 77
Upstream Prune: none
RPF Interface
atm5/0.40
Outgoing interface list:
atm5/0.31
Meaning
Table 46 on page 156 lists the show ip dvmrp mroute command output fields.
Table 46: show ip dvmrp mroute Output Fields
Field
Description
(S,G) pair
Source, Group pair value
Uptime
Time, in seconds, that this (S, G) pair entry has been in the routing table
Upstream Prune
Whether the router has sent prune messages for this group
RPF Interface
Interface that provides the shortest path back to the source
Outgoing interface list
Types and specifiers of interfaces through which the VR forwards DVMRP messages, such
as atm3/0. For details about interface types and specifiers, see Interface Types and
Specifiers in JunosE Command Reference Guide.
Related
Documentation
•
show ip dvmrp mroute
Monitoring DVMRP Neighbors
Purpose
156
Display information about DVMRP neighbors. Specify the brief keyword to view a summary
of information.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 8: Monitoring DVMRP
Action
To display information about DVMRP neighbors:
host1:boston# show ip dvmrp neighbor
Neighbor Address:
14.0.0.1
Interface:
atm5/0.14
Neighbor upTime:
28
Neighbor Major Version:
3
Neighbor Minor Version:
255
Neighbor Capabilities: Prune GenerationId
Neighbor State:
Active
Generation ID:
0x3a13fbc2
Routes Received:
1
Bad Routes Received
0
Bad Packets Received:
0
Mtrace
NetMask
To display a summary of information about DVMRP neighbors:
host1:v3#show ip dvmrp neighbor brief
Interface
NbrAddress
atm5/0.14
14.0.0.1
atm5/0.15
15.0.0.1
Meaning
UpTime Maj Min Cap
32
3 255 PGMN
34
3 255 PGMN
State
Active
Active
Table 47 on page 157 lists the show ip dvmrp neighbor command output fields.
Table 47: show ip dvmrp neighbor Output Fields
Field
Description
Neighbor Address/NbrAddress
IP address of the neighbor
Interface
Interface type and specifier, such as atm3/0. For details about interface types and
specifiers, see Interface Types and Specifiers in JunosE Command Reference Guide.
Neighbor upTime/UpTime
Length of time, in seconds, that this router has been a neighbor
Neighbor Major Version/Maj
Major number of the DVMRP version on the neighbor
Neighbor Minor Version/Min
Minor number of the DVMRP version on the neighbor
Neighbor Capabilities/Cap
Capability of the neighbor
Prune/P
Ability to send prune messages
Generation ID
Ability to create a generation ID number
Mtrace/M
Ability to trace multicast routes
Netmask/N
Ability to send prunes and grafts with a network mask address
Neighbor State/State
Status of communications with the neighbor
Active
Router is able to communicate with this neighbor
Down
Neighbor is down
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Table 47: show ip dvmrp neighbor Output Fields (continued)
Field
Description
Ignoring
Router is not accepting messages from this neighbor
Oneway
Router is receiving messages from the neighbor, but the neighbor does not include
the router's IP address in the messages. This state can indicate a starting transition,
or a problem.
Generation ID
Number that the neighbor generates each time it boots; when the number changes,
the VR discards all information previously learned from the router.
Routes Received
Number of routes received from this neighbor
Bad Routes Received
Number of bad routes received from this neighbor
Bad Packets Received
Number of bad packets received from this neighbor
Related
Documentation
•
show ip dvmrp neighbor
Monitoring DVMRP Routes
Purpose
Display information about DVMRP routes.
You can specify an IP address to display the best route to that address or specify an IP
address and subnet mask to display the route that exactly matches this IP address and
subnet mask. You can use the brief keyword to view a summary of information. You can
specify an interface type and specifier to display routes associated with that interface.
For details about interface types and specifiers, see Interface Types and Specifiers in
JunosE Command Reference Guide.
Action
To display information about DVMRP routes:
host1:boston>show ip dvmrp route
Prefix/Length
usNbr/Owner
14.0.0.0/8
Dvmrp Local
Downstream Interface(s)
Interface
atm5/0.15
15.0.0.0/8
Dvmrp Local
Downstream Interface(s)
None
25.0.0.0/8
14.0.0.1
Downstream Interface(s)
Interface
atm5/0.15
Metric ExpireTime UpTime Interface
1
Never
18
atm5/0.14
1
Never
18
atm5/0.15
2
129
11
atm5/0.14
To display a summary of information about DVMRP routes:
host1:v3# show ip dvmrp route brief
Prefix/Length
usNbr/Owner
14.0.0.0/8
Dvmrp Local
158
Metric ExpireTime UpTime Interface
1
Never
26
atm5/0.14
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Chapter 8: Monitoring DVMRP
15.0.0.0/8
25.0.0.0/8
Meaning
Dvmrp Local
14.0.0.1
1
2
Never
121
26
19
atm5/0.15
atm5/0.14
Table 48 on page 159 lists the show ip dvmrp route command output fields.
Table 48: show ip dvmrp route Output Fields
Field
Description
Prefix
IP address of the network
Length
Length of the subnet mask for the network
usNbr/Owner
IP address of the upstream neighbor associated with this route or a description of the
origin of the route
Dvmrp Local
Route is associated with a directly attached network
Dvmrp Aggregate
Route is an aggregate route determined by summarization
Metric
Metric associated with this interface for this route
ExpireTime
Time, in seconds, until the VR starts the process for removing the route
UpTime
Length of time, in seconds, that the route has been in the DVMRP routing table
Interface
Type and specifier for the interface, such as atm3/0.
Related
Documentation
•
show ip dvmrp route
Monitoring the Next Hops of DVMRP Routes
Purpose
Action
Display information about the next hop.
To display information about the next hop:
host1:boston>show ip dvmrp routeNextHop
addr/mlen
ifIndex Type
172.16.0.0/16
4 leaf
172.17.0.0/16
4 leaf
172.18.0.0/16
3 leaf
172.19.0.0/16
3 leaf
172.19.0.0/16
4 branch
Meaning
Table 49 on page 159 lists the show ip dvmrp routeNextHop command output fields.
Table 49: show ip dvmrp routeNextHop Output Fields
Field
Description
addr
IP address of the next-hop router
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Table 49: show ip dvmrp routeNextHop Output Fields (continued)
Field
Description
mlen
Mask length of the next-hop router
ifIndex
SNMP interface index for the interface that connects to the next hop
Type
Description of the next-hop router
leaf
Neighbor with no downstream neighbors
branch
Neighbor with downstream neighbors
Related
Documentation
160
•
show ip dvmrp routeNextHop
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
PART 2
Internet Protocol Version 6
•
Configuring IPv6 Multicast on page 163
•
Monitoring IPv6 Multicast on page 193
•
Configuring MLD and MLD Proxy on page 237
•
Monitoring MLD and MLD Proxy on page 259
•
Configuring PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 277
•
Monitoring PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 297
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162
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 9
Configuring IPv6 Multicast
IPv6 multicast enables a device to send packets to a group of hosts rather than to a list
of individual hosts. This chapter describes how to configure IPv6 multicast on the E Series
router; it contains the following sections:
•
IPv6 Multicast Overview on page 163
•
IPv6 Multicast Platform Considerations on page 165
•
IPv6 Multicast References on page 166
•
Before You Begin on page 166
•
Switch Fabric Bandwidth Configuration on page 166
•
Configuring IPv6 Multicast Attributes on page 167
•
IPv6 Multicast Bandwidth Map Overview on page 169
•
Autosense Mechanism Overview on page 170
•
Adaptive Mode Mechanism Overview for IPv6 on page 171
•
Example: Configuring an IPv6 Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 173
•
Multicast QoS Adjustment for IPv6 on page 175
•
IPv6 Hardware Multicast Packet Replication Overview on page 178
•
IPv6 Hardware Multicast Packet Replication Considerations on page 182
•
Configuring IPv6 Hardware Multicast Packet Replication on page 183
•
Interface-Level Multicast Traffic Configuration for IPv6 on page 184
•
Port-Level Multicast Traffic Configuration for IPv6 on page 188
•
Deleting IPv6 Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 190
•
BGP Multicasting on page 191
IPv6 Multicast Overview
IPv6 defines three types of addresses: unicast, anycast, and multicast. Each type of
address enables a device to send datagrams to selected recipients:
•
A unicast address enables a device to send a datagram to a single recipient.
•
An anycast address enables a device to send a datagram to one recipient out of a set
of recipients.
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•
A multicast address enables a device to send a datagram to a specified set of hosts,
known as a multicast group, in different subnetworks.
IPv6 multicast improves network efficiency by allowing a host to transmit a datagram
to a targeted group of receivers. For example, a host may want to send a large video clip
to a group of selected recipients. It would be time-consuming for the host to unicast the
datagram to each recipient individually. If the host broadcasts the video clip throughout
the network, network resources are not available for other tasks. The host uses only the
resources it needs when multicasting the datagram.
Routers use multicast routing algorithms to determine the best route and transmit
multicast datagrams throughout the network. E Series routers support a number of IPv6
multicast protocols on virtual routers. Each virtual router handles the interoperability of
IPv6 multicast protocols automatically. To start IPv6 multicast operation on a virtual
router, you access the context for that virtual router and configure the desired protocols
on the selected interfaces. Table 50 on page 164 describes the function of each the protocol
that the router supports.
Table 50: Function of Multicast Protocols on a Router
Protocol
Function
Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD)
Discovers hosts that belong to multicast group.
Protocol Independent Multicast Protocol (PIM)
Discovers other multicast routers that should
receive multicast packets.
BGP Multicast Protocol
Routes multicast datagrams between
autonomous systems.
The router supports up to 16,384 multicast forwarding entries (multicast routes) at any
time.
Reverse-Path Forwarding
IP multicasting uses reverse path forwarding (RPF) to verify that a router receives a
multicast packet on the correct incoming interface. The RPF algorithm enables a router
to accept a multicast datagram only on the interface from which the router sends a
unicast datagram to the source of the multicast datagram.
When the router receives a multicast datagram from a source for a group, the router
verifies that the packet was received on the correct RPF interface. If the packet was not
received on the correct interface, the router discards the packet. Only packets received
on the correct RPF interface are considered for forwarding to downstream receivers.
When operating in sparse-mode, the routers perform an RPF lookup to identify the
upstream router from which to request the data and then send join messages for the
multicast stream only to that router.
When operating in dense-mode, routers that have multiple paths to the source of the
multicast stream initially receive the same stream on more than one interface. In this
164
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Chapter 9: Configuring IPv6 Multicast
case, the routers perform an RPF lookup to identify multicast data streams that are not
arriving on the best path and send prune messages to terminate these flows.
The RPF lookup need not always be towards the source of the multicast stream. The
lookup is done towards the source only when the router is using a source-rooted tree to
receive the multicast stream. If the router uses a shared tree instead, the RPF lookup is
toward a rendezvous point and not toward the source of the multicast stream.
Multicast Packet Forwarding
Multicast packet forwarding is based on the source (S) of the multicast packet and the
destination multicast group address (G). For each (S,G) pair, the router accepts multicast
packets on an incoming interface (IIF), which satisfies the RPF check (RPF-IIF). The router
drops packets received on IIFs other than the RPF-IIF and notifies the routing protocols
that a packet was received on the wrong interface.
The router forwards packets received on the RPF-IIF to a list of outgoing interfaces (OIFs).
The list of OIFs is determined by the exchange of routing information and local group
membership information. The router maintains mappings of (S,G, IIF) to {OIF1, OIF2…}
in the multicast routing table.
You can enable two or more multicast protocols on an IIF. However, only one protocol
can forward packets on that IIF. The protocol that forwards packets on an IIF owns that
IIF. A multicast protocol that owns an IIF also owns the (S,G) entry in the multicast routing
table.
Related
Documentation
•
IPv6 Multicast Platform Considerations on page 165
•
IPv6 Multicast References on page 166
•
Switch Fabric Bandwidth Configuration on page 6
IPv6 Multicast Platform Considerations
For information about modules that support IPv6 multicasting on the ERX7xx models,
ERX14xx models, and the ERX310 Broadband Services Router:
•
See ERX Module Guide, Table 1, Module Combinations for detailed module specifications.
•
See ERX Module Guide, Appendix A, Module Protocol Support for information about the
modules that support IPv6 multicasting.
For information about modules that support IPv6 multicasting on the E120 and E320
Broadband Services Routers:
•
See E120 and E320 Module Guide, Table 1, Modules and IOAs for detailed module
specifications.
•
See E120 and E320 Module Guide, Appendix A, IOA Protocol Support for information
about the modules that support IPv6 multicasting.
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Related
Documentation
•
IPv6 Multicast Overview on page 163
•
IPv6 Multicast References on page 166
IPv6 Multicast References
For more information about IPv6 multicast, see the following resource:
Related
Documentation
•
A “ traceroute” Facility for IP Multicast—draft-ietf-idmr-traceroute-ipm-07.txt (January
2001 expiration)
•
IPv6 Multicast Overview on page 163
•
IPv6 Multicast Platform Considerations on page 165
Before You Begin
Before you begin configuring multicast on IPv4 and IPv6 interfaces, you must:
Related
Documentation
•
Configure IP interfaces. For more information about configuring IP interfaces, see
Configuring IP in the JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP Configuration Guide.
•
Configure IPv6 interfaces. For more information about configuring IPv6 interfaces, see
Configuring IPv6 in JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP Configuration Guide.
•
Configuring IPv6 Multicast Attributes on page 167
•
Example: Configuring an IPv6 Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 173
•
Activating IPv6 Multicast QoS Adjustment Functions on page 177
•
Configuring IPv6 Hardware Multicast Packet Replication on page 183
•
Blocking IPv6 Mroutes on page 185
•
Enabling Interface-Level Admission Bandwidth Limitation for IPv6 on page 186
•
Creating IPv6 Mroute Port Limits on page 188
•
Enabling Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Limitation for IPv6 on page 189
•
Deleting IPv6 Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 190
Switch Fabric Bandwidth Configuration
By default, the switch fabric for the ERX1440, ERX310, E120, and E320 Broadband Services
Routers uses a bandwidth weighting ratio of 15:2 for multicast-to-unicast weighted round
robin (WRR). In the absence of strict-priority traffic, and when both unicast and multicast
traffic compete for switch fabric bandwidth, the switch fabric allocates 15/17ths of the
available bandwidth to multicast traffic and 2/17ths of the available bandwidth to unicast
traffic.
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Chapter 9: Configuring IPv6 Multicast
You can use the fabric weights command to change the ratio for multicast to unicast
traffic on the router switch fabric. For more information about the fabric weights
command, see Configuring the Switch Fabric Bandwidth in the JunosE System Basics
Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
•
IPv4 Multicast Overview on page 4
•
IPv6 Multicast Overview on page 163
•
fabric weights
Configuring IPv6 Multicast Attributes
You can configure IPv6 multicast to control the flow of multicast traffic with the following
tasks:
•
Enabling IPv6 Multicast on page 167
•
Defining IPv6 Static Routes for Reverse-Path Forwarding on page 167
•
Enabling and Disabling RPF Checks for IPv6 on page 168
•
Specifying Unicast Routes for RPF in IPv6 on page 168
•
Defining Permanent IPv6 Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 168
Enabling IPv6 Multicast
IPv6 multicast works on virtual routers. By default, IPv6 multicast is disabled on a virtual
router. To enable IPv6 multicast on a virtual router, access the context for a virtual router,
and then issue the ipv6 multicast-routing command.
To enable IPv6 multicast routing on the default virtual router:
•
Issue the ipv6 multicast-routing command in Global Configuration mode.
host1(config)#ipv6 multicast-routing
Use the no version to disable IPv6 multicast routing on the virtual router (the default).
In the disabled state, all multicast protocols are disabled, and the virtual router forwards
no multicast packets.
Defining IPv6 Static Routes for Reverse-Path Forwarding
You can use the ipv6 rpf-route command to define RPF to verify that a router receives
a multicast packet on the correct incoming interface.
To customize the static IPv6 routes that the router may use for RPF:
•
Issue the ipv6 rpf-route command in Global Configuration mode.
host1(config)#ipv6 rpf-route 1000::/64 ATM2/1.200
Use the no version to remove the static route.
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Enabling and Disabling RPF Checks for IPv6
By default, the router accepts multicast packets for each (S,G) pair on an IIF, which
satisfies the RPF check (RPF-IIF). When the router performs RPF checks, only the interface
that first accepts traffic for an (S,G) pair accepts subsequent traffic for that pair. If traffic
stops coming on that interface and starts arriving on another interface, the router does
not accept or forward the traffic.
Some network configurations require the router to accept traffic on any interface. To do
so, you can disable the RPF check on a specified set of (S,G) pairs by issuing the ipv6
multicast-routing disable-rpf-check command.
When you disable RPF checks, the router accepts multicast packets for (S,G) pairs on
any incoming interface. When the router has added the new route to its multicast routing
table, it accepts multicast packets for these pairs on any interface in the virtual router
and forwards them accordingly. Multicast routes established before you issue this
command are not affected.
To enable and disable RPF checks:
•
Enable RPF checks for all (S,G) pairs (the default situation).
host1(config)#no ipv6 multicast-routing disable-rpf-check
•
Disable RPF checks for the (S,G) pair specified using a standard IPv6 access list.
host1(config)#ipv6 multicast-routing disable-rpf-check denver-list
Specifying Unicast Routes for RPF in IPv6
You can use the ipv6 route-type command to specify that BGP or OSPF IPv6 routes
should be available for RPF. Routes available for RPF appear in the multicast view of the
routing table.
To specify that BGP IPv6 routes are available for both unicast protocols and multicast
protocols to perform RPF checks:
host1(config)#router bgp
host1(config-router)#ipv6 route-type both
Defining Permanent IPv6 Multicast Forwarding Entries
An mroute is a multicast traffic flow, a (S,G) entry used for forwarding multicast traffic.
By default, forwarding mroutes (with a valid RPF incoming interface) are timed out if
data for them is not received for 210 seconds. However, you can specify an mroute as
permanent by using the ipv6 multicast-routing permanent-mroute command.
To specify that any newly created mroutes that match the specified access-list do not
time out:
•
Issue the ipv6 multicast-routing permanent-mroute command in Global Configuration
mode.
host1(config)#ipv6 multicast-routing permanent-mroute routesv61
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Use the no version to prevent any new mroutes from becoming permanent. To remove
existing permanent mroutes, use the clear ipv6 mroute command.
NOTE:
Related
Documentation
•
The ipv6 multicast-routing permanent-mroute command does not change
existing mroutes.
•
Permanent mroutes are removed if a topology change occurs that affects
the mroute.
•
Permanent mroutes may be removed due to certain protocol actions (for
example, PIM sparse mode switching from shared to shortest path tree).
•
Outgoing interface lists of permanent mroutes may change due to protocol
actions.
•
IPv6 Multicast Overview on page 163
•
Before You Begin on page 166
•
Deleting IPv6 Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 190
•
clear ipv6 mroute
•
ipv6 multicast-routing
•
ipv6 multicast-routing disable-rpf-check
•
ipv6 multicast-routing permanent-mroute
•
ipv6 route-type
•
ipv6 rpf-route
IPv6 Multicast Bandwidth Map Overview
Multicast interface-level admission control, port-level admission control, and QoS
adjustment all use a single multicast bandwidth map. The multicast bandwidth map is
a route map that uses the set admission-bandwidth, set qos-bandwidth, set
admission-bandwidth adaptive, or set qos-bandwidth adaptive commands. The
adaptive commands configure an auto-sense mechanism for measuring the multicast
bandwidth.
NOTE: Even though you can include any of the above commands several
times in a route map entry, only the last admission-bandwidth command or
qos-bandwidth command in the bandwidth map is used. In other words, if
you included the set qos-bandwidth command first and then the set
qos-bandwidth adaptive command, the bandwidth map would use the set
qos-bandwidth adaptive command.
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Interface- and port-level admission control is performed when an outgoing interface
(OIF) on the interface or port is added to the mroute for a given (S,G) multicast data
stream and the multicast bandwidth map contains a set admission-bandwidth or set
admission-bandwidth adaptive action for that (S,G).
QoS adjustment is performed on the joining interface when an OIF is added to the mroute
for a given (S,G) data stream and the multicast bandwidth map contains a set
qos-bandwidth or set qos-bandwidth adaptive action for that (S,G).
NOTE: You can create a single route map with the set admission-bandwidth
command, the set qos-bandwidth command, or both. However, creating an
entry with only one of these set commands enables only that specific function
for the matched address (that is, only multicast traffic admission control or
only QoS adjustment). The same is true for the adaptive commands.
Related
Documentation
•
IPv6 Multicast Overview on page 163
•
Autosense Mechanism Overview on page 9
•
Adaptive Mode Mechanism Overview for IPv6 on page 171
•
Example: Configuring an IPv6 Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 173
•
set admission-bandwidth
•
set qos-bandwidth
Autosense Mechanism Overview
Video bandwidth is typically considered to be a constant rate—2 Mbps for standard
definition television (SDTV) and 10 Mbps for high definition television (HDTV). However,
in reality, and depending on achievable video compression, the bit rate can vary. For
example, HDTV streams (using MPEG4 or WM9 encoding) can vary between 6 Mbps
(for low-action programs) to 10 Mbps (for a fast-paced, high-action programs). The
autosense mechanism causes the bandwidth value, used for admission control and QoS
adjustment, to be the actual measured rate of the stream. Using this feature to measure
the actual bandwidth avoids the need to configure arbitrary bandwidth limits and enables
a channel to be reassigned to a different (S, G) without requiring a bandwidth map to
be changed.
Related
Documentation
170
•
Adaptive Mode Mechanism Overview for IPv4 on page 12
•
Adaptive Mode Mechanism Overview for IPv6 on page 171
•
Defining a Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 8
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Chapter 9: Configuring IPv6 Multicast
Adaptive Mode Mechanism Overview for IPv6
You can configure the auto-sense mechanism in the multicast bandwidth using the set
admission-bandwidth adaptive command, set qos-bandwidth adaptive command,
or both. For example:
host1(config)#route-map mcast-bandwidths permit 10
host1(config-route-map)#match ipv6 address sdtv
host1(config-route-map)#set admission-bandwidth adaptive
host1(config-route-map)#set qos-bandwidth adaptive
host1(config-route-map)#end
In this example, any stream with an (S,G) that matches the sdtv access list performs
adaptive bandwidth detection for admission control and QoS adjustment.
A rate measurement mechanism runs on the ingress line card that polls the forwarding
controller (FC) to obtain statistics for each mroute. This mechanism then reports the
rate measurement to the switch route processor (SRP) to update the bandwidth map.
By computing the average bandwidth over a relatively short sampling period (T1; 5
seconds), the measurement approximates the peak bandwidth of the multicast stream.
As an example, assume that a new mroute (S1, G1) is added to the interface controller
(IC) at time t0.
Figure 15: Example of Adaptive IPv6 Multicast Bandwidth Detection
To calculate the measured bandwidth of a stream, the router uses the following equation:
R = (N
t+5
–N )/5
t
Where
R = Calculated bandwidth of the stream during each sampling interval
N = Bytes measured at the start of each sampling period (t seconds)
t
N
t+5
= Bytes measured at the end of each sampling period (t+5 seconds)
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NOTE: When the mroute is first installed in the FC (at t = 0), R is
0
undetermined. For multicast admission control no joins are admitted until
the first bandwidth measurement is computed (that is, for admission control,
R is considered to be infinite). Similarly, no QoS adjustment occurs until the
0
first bandwidth measurement is computed (that is, for QoS adjustment, R
0
is considered to be zero [0]).
Using the earlier graph as a reference, the first bandwidth rate (R1 ) and at time t (N )
0
5
5
and the bytes received values are subtracted and divided by the time period T to yield
1
the average rate. This process is repeated every sampling interval, T , to yield rates R1,
2
R2, R3, and so on.
The first two sampling interval calculations would look like the following:
R = (N - N )/5
1
5
R = (N
2
#+5
0
- N )/5
#
The router maintains a history of bandwidth measurements (H) for each mroute, up to
a maximum of M measurements. The actual rate, R, reported to the SRP is the maximum
rate measured in those H samples.
In order to minimize the IC to SRP traffic generated by the rate measurements, the IC
reports a bandwidth change only when a newly computed rate (R#) differs from the
current rate by a specified threshold. When R is computed at time t = 5 seconds, R is set
s
to R . A rate update occurs whenever a newly calculated rate (R) differs from R by at
1
1
least a threshold value (specified as a percentage, P) of the measured peak bandwidth.
This calculation would look like the following:
R = Rt, if and only if the absolute value of (R - Rt) > P * R.
The values assigned to variables associated with this algorithm are as shown in
Table 51 on page 172.
Table 51: Adaptive Mode Algorithm Values
172
Variable
Value
Units
Description
T1
5
Seconds
Sampling period; the time in which a sample is taken
T2
0
Seconds
Sampling interval; zero (0) seconds indicates continuous
sampling
H
12
Samples
Number of history samples over which to compute
measurement
M
12
Samples
Maximum number of samples maintained in history
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Chapter 9: Configuring IPv6 Multicast
Table 51: Adaptive Mode Algorithm Values (continued)
Related
Documentation
Variable
Value
Units
Description
P
1
Percent
Threshold value; percent difference by which a newly
calculated rate must differ from the measured peak
bandwidth before a rate update occurs
•
IPv6 Multicast Bandwidth Map Overview on page 169
•
Autosense Mechanism Overview on page 9
•
Example: Configuring an IPv6 Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 173
•
match ipv6 address
•
route-map
•
set admission-bandwidth
•
set qos-bandwidth
Example: Configuring an IPv6 Multicast Bandwidth Map
This example shows how to create a multicast bandwidth map for both multicast traffic
admission control and QoS adjustment.
•
Requirements on page 173
•
Overview on page 173
•
Configuring an IPv6 Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 174
Requirements
This example uses the following hardware and software components:
•
JunosE Release 7.1.0 or higher-numbered releases
•
E Series router (ERX7xx models, ERX14xx models, the ERX310 router, the E120 router,
or the E320 router)
•
ASIC-based line modules that support Fast Ethernet or Gigabit Ethernet
Before you begin configuring multicast on IPv6 interfaces, you must:
•
Configure IPv6 interfaces. For more information about configuring IPv6 interfaces, see
Configuring IPv6 in JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP Configuration Guide.
Overview
The multicast bandwidth map is a route map that uses the set admission-bandwidth,
set qos-bandwidth, set admission-bandwidth adaptive, or set qos-bandwidth adaptive
commands. Multicast interface-level admission control, port-level admission control,
and QoS adjustment all use a single multicast bandwidth map.
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The adaptive commands configure an auto-sense mechanism for measuring the multicast
bandwidth.
Configuring an IPv6 Multicast Bandwidth Map
Configuring a Route Map
Step-by-Step
Procedure
Define a route map using the set admission-bandwidth and set qos-bandwidth
commands.
NOTE: In this example, you can replace the set admission-bandwidth
command and set qos-bandwidth command with their adaptive command
counterparts.
1.
Define a route map.
[edit]
host1(config)#route-map mcast-bandwidths permit 10
2.
Match the route map to an access list.
[edit]
host1(config-route-map)#match ipv6 address sdtv
3.
Configure multicast bandwidths.
[edit multicast bandwidths for admission control and QoS adjustment]
host1(config-route-map)#set admission-bandwidth 2000000
host1(config-route-map)#set qos-bandwidth 2000000
4.
Configure the route map.
[edit]
host1(config-route-map)#route-map mcast-bandwidths permit 20
5.
Match the route map to an access list.
[edit]
host1(config-route-map)#match ipv6 address hdtv
6.
Configure multicast bandwidths.
[edit multicast bandwidths for admission control and QoS adjustment]
host1(config-route-map)#set admission-bandwidth 10000000
host1(config-route-map)#set qos-bandwidth 10000000
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Configuring an Access List
Step-by-Step
Procedure
Define the access list for use by the match ipv6 address command to match (S,G) and
(*,G) entries.
NOTE: You can also define a prefix-list or a prefix-tree for use by the match
ipv6 address command to match (S,G) and (*,G) entries.
1.
Configure access lists.
[edit access lists]
host1(config)#access-list sdtv permit ip host 31::1 ff3e::0/112
host1(config)#access-list hdtv permit ip host 32::1 ff3e::0/112
host1(config)#access-list hdtv permit ip host 32::2 ff3e::0/112
Related
Documentation
•
IPv6 Multicast Bandwidth Map Overview on page 169
•
Configuring Routing Policy in JunosE IP Services Configuration Guide
•
access-list
•
match ipv6 address
•
route-map
•
set admission-bandwidth
•
set qos-bandwidth
Multicast QoS Adjustment for IPv6
When the router uses multicast outgoing interface (OIF) mapping, any multicast streams
that a subscriber receives bypass any configured QoS treatment for that subscriber
interface. The Multicast QoS adjust feature provides a way in which the router can account
for this multicast traffic.
•
Multicast OIF Mapping Case for IPv6 on page 175
•
Multicast Traffic Receipt Without Forwarding for IPv6 on page 176
•
Activating IPv6 Multicast QoS Adjustment Functions on page 177
Multicast OIF Mapping Case for IPv6
Multicast outgoing interface (OIF) mapping enables the router to decrease the
inefficiencies associated with replicating streams of multicast traffic. Using OIF maps,
Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) joins that the router receives on a subscriber interface
can be mapped to a special interface for forwarding. This special interface can be on a
different physical port or line module from that of the join interface.
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NOTE: For additional information about how to configure OIF mapping, see
“Configuring Group Outgoing Interface Mapping” on page 64.
Using this mapping function, the router can send a single copy of each multicast stream
over the special interface and the access nodes are configured to perform any final
replication to the subscribers and merge unicast and multicast data flows onto the
subscriber interfaces as necessary. See Figure 16 on page 176.
Figure 16: Multicast OIF Mapping
One disadvantage to using multicast OIF mapping is that the multicast traffic bypasses
any QoS treatment that is applied to subscriber interfaces. Configuring QoS adjustment
resolves this problem. (See Parameter Definition Attributes for QoS Administrators Overview
for additional information about configuring QoS adjustment.) With QoS adjustment
configured, when a subscriber requests to receive a multicast stream (or, more
appropriately, when an OIF is added to the mroute), the router reduces the unicast QoS
bandwidth applied to the subscriber interface (that is, the join interface) by the amount
of bandwidth for that multicast stream.
Related
Documentation
•
Multicast Traffic Receipt Without Forwarding for IPv6 on page 176
•
Activating IPv6 Multicast QoS Adjustment Functions on page 177
Multicast Traffic Receipt Without Forwarding for IPv6
In this case, the router is not given the responsibility of forwarding multicast streams.
Instead, the service provider arranges for the router to receive the multicast streams so
the router can detect the flow and perform QoS adjustment. An outgoing interface (OIF)
map is installed that maps the traffic streams to a loopback interface configured for
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Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) version passive. This means that when the traffic is
received, a null mroute is installed (that is, an mroute with an empty OIF list) and the
router applies the QoS adjustment to the join interface. See Figure 17 on page 177.
NOTE: Ensure that Protocol Independent Multicast-single mode (PIM-SM)
(or any other upstream multicast protocol) is informed of the group (or
source-group) interest.
Figure 17: Multicast Traffic Receipt Without Forwarding
Related
Documentation
•
Multicast OIF Mapping Case for IPv6 on page 175
•
Activating IPv6 Multicast QoS Adjustment Functions on page 177
Activating IPv6 Multicast QoS Adjustment Functions
The ipv6 multicast-routing bandwidth-map command activates the specified bandwidth
map. By activating the bandwidth map, this command also activates the multicast QoS
adjustment function contained in the bandwidth map.
CAUTION: To activate multicast QoS adjustment, you must first create a
bandwidth map. See “Example: Configuring an IPv6 Multicast Bandwidth
Map” on page 173 for details.
To enable the QoS adjust function on the router with the configured route map:
•
Issue the ipv6 multicast-routing bandwidth-map command in Global Configuration
mode.
host1(config)#ipv6 multicast-routing bandwidth-map mcast-bandwidths
Use the no version to disable the multicast QoS adjustment function on the router.
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Related
Documentation
Related
Documentation
•
Multicast OIF Mapping Case for IPv6 on page 175
•
Multicast Traffic Receipt Without Forwarding for IPv6 on page 176
•
ipv6 multicast-routing bandwidth-map
•
Before You Begin on page 166
•
Multicast OIF Mapping Case for IPv6 on page 175
•
Multicast Traffic Receipt Without Forwarding for IPv6 on page 176
•
Activating IPv6 Multicast QoS Adjustment Functions on page 177
•
ipv6 multicast-routing bandwidth-map
IPv6 Hardware Multicast Packet Replication Overview
You can configure IPv6 multicast to replicate packets to optimized hardware on a logical
port instead of using the forwarding controller (FC) on the router.
The bandwidth between the line module and the I/O module or input/output adapter
(IOA) on the E Series router is limited. A high-density Ethernet module provides eight
physical ports that can consume the bandwidth between the line module and the I/O
module or IOA before providing enough traffic to support egress line rate for all of these
ports.
Figure 18 on page 179 displays how multicast traffic is typically replicated on the line
module. Each of these replicated packets is transmitted from the line module to the I/O
module or IOA.
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Chapter 9: Configuring IPv6 Multicast
Figure 18: Packet Flow Without Hardware Multicast Packet Replication
The hardware multicast packet replication feature enables you to configure multicast
traffic for a virtual LAN (VLAN) or service VLAN (S-VLAN) to be replicated on the I/O
module or IOA so that only one copy of the packet is transmitted from the line module
to the I/O module or IOA. Replication for each of the ports is performed on the I/O module
or IOA.
Configuring hardware multicast packet replication for high-density Ethernet is useful
when you want to provide the same multicast stream out of some or all of the ports,
such as for IP television (IPTV). Configuring hardware multicast packet replication enables
you to:
•
Reduce the number of packets sent from the FC to the module.
•
Reduce the CPU consumed by the FC processing each elaboration of the packet.
You can use the feature to increase the bandwidth of multicast traffic out of each of the
Gigabit Ethernet ports.
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Figure 19 on page 180 displays the flow of a multicast packet using the hardware multicast
packet feature.
Figure 19: Packet Flow with Optimized Multicast Packet Replication
Each high-density Ethernet module has eight physical ports, numbered 0–7. A logical
port is available for the hardware multicast packet replication feature, numbered port
8.
JunosE tracks the outgoing interfaces (OIFs) in an mroute that have been redirected to
use the hardware multicast packet replication hardware. The system accepts only egress
multicast traffic to traverse the interface stack on the enabled port. The system drops
unicast traffic that is routed to this port.
Each port on the I/O module or IOA displayed in Figure 19 on page 180 has two queues.
These queues are further down the egress path than the queues found on the line module
and populated by the FC.
The low-priority queue is dedicated to packets that are received from the line module
queues that are dedicated to the physical ports. This queue blocks when full and provides
backpressure to the line module. This queue services unicast and multicast traffic that
is not using the hardware multicast packet replication feature.
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The high-priority queue is dedicated to packets that are received from the line module
queue for port 8. This queue is serviced at a higher priority than the first queue, and drops
packets when full.
For more information about high-density Ethernet, see Configuring Ethernet Interfaces in
JunosE Physical Layer Configuration Guide.
Supported Modules and Encapsulations
You can enable optimized multicast packet replication on port 8 of the following
high-density Ethernet modules:
•
GE-8 I/O module (pairs with the GE-HDE line module)
•
ES2-S1 GE-8 IOA (pairs with the ES2 4G LM and the ES2 10G LM)
When enabled, the optimized multicast packet replication feature defines the
encapsulation of the egress multicast packet. The following encapsulations are supported:
•
IPv6 over Gigabit Ethernet
•
IPv6 over VLAN
•
IPv6 over S-VLAN
NOTE: 802.3ad link aggregation group (LAG) bundles do not support
optimized multicast packet replication.
The optimized multicast packet replication feature also provides an interface over which
you can configure the following:
•
IP maximum transmission unit (MTU)
•
Ethernet MTU
•
Egress IP policy
•
Egress VLAN policy
•
QoS
Relationship with OIF Mapping
Multicast OIF mapping enables the router to decrease the inefficiencies associated with
replicating streams of multicast traffic. Using OIF maps, Multicast Listener Discovery
(MLD) joins that the router receives on a subscriber interface can be mapped to a special
interface for forwarding.
The hardware multicast packet replication feature enables you to redirect each of the
IPv6 interfaces on a line module over a dedicated multicast VLAN to a single IPv6 interface
over port 8. The FC is only required to send a single packet per dedicated multicast VLAN
to the I/O module or IOA. The module then replicates this packet to the appropriate ports.
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For more information about configuring OIF mapping, see “Configuring MLD Group
Outgoing Interface Mapping” on page 246.
Related
Documentation
•
IPv6 Hardware Multicast Packet Replication Considerations on page 182
•
Configuring IPv6 Hardware Multicast Packet Replication on page 183
IPv6 Hardware Multicast Packet Replication Considerations
When configuring hardware multicast packet replication, the following considerations
apply.
•
Do not configure or transmit routing protocols over port 8. The FC drops traffic routed
to an IPv6 interface stacked over port 8.
•
We recommend that you configure the IP address of the IPv6 interface over port 8 to
be unnumbered.
•
We recommend that you configure an IPv6 interface over a VLAN over one of the
physical ports to reference the IPv6 interface over the same VLAN over port 8.
You cannot create the following configurations:
•
When two IPv6 interfaces configured over a port reference the same IPv6 interface
over port 8. The system does not accept this configuration attempt because you
typically configure the hardware multicast packet replication feature to redirect
multicast traffic over one VLAN, then redirect it to the same VLAN on port 8.
•
When the IPv6 interface configured with the hardware multicast packet replication
attribute is not installed on a line module that supports hardware multicast packet
replication.
•
When the IPv6 interface designated by the hardware multicast packet replication
attribute is not installed on a line module that supports hardware multicast packet
replication.
•
When the IPv6 interface designated by the hardware multicast packet replication
attribute is not on the same line module as the IPv6 interface configured with this
attribute.
•
When you configure a unique source MAC address for VLANs on port 8, the hardware
multicast packet replication hardware stamps the source MAC address on the VLAN,
overwriting any MAC address that you configured. For more information, see Configuring
Ethernet Interfaces in JunosE Physical Layer Configuration Guide.
•
The regular multicast implementation utilizes interface stacking that provides a unique
IPv6 attachment point for each elaboration of the egress multicast packet.
For the hardware multicast packet replication feature, you must attach policies to an
interface stack over port 8 that defines the encapsulation of the egress multicast traffic.
The system supports policies over port 8 just as it is above any of the other ports on
this line module.
Policies applied to the interface stack over port 8 affect the packets traversing this
stack whether or not the packet is destined for one port or all of the physical ports.
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Chapter 9: Configuring IPv6 Multicast
Therefore, you cannot apply different egress policies to multicast traffic for the
interfaces stacked above different ports, or rate limit on an individual interface over a
port. You also cannot monitor policy statistics on individual interfaces over a port.
Instead, you can apply egress policy to an interface stacked over port 8. The system
applies the policy before the packet has been elaborated for each of the ports.
•
The JunosE QoS component provides hierarchical egress scheduling and shaping on
Gigabit Ethernet ports 0–7. The regular multicast implementation replicates packets
on the FC, with each replicated packet placed on a line module queue destined for a
single physical port. The line module queue can also receive QoS behavior specific to
that queue.
For the hardware multicast packet replication feature, the FC does not replicate the
packet for each of the individual ports. Instead, it places the packet on a special queue
destined for port 8.
You can configure QoS on the packets flowing through port 8, but this has limited value
because each packet passed through this port can be transmitted through one of more
of the physical ports. Therefore, the packets placed on this special queue might not
receive the same QoS behavior as ports 0–7.
We recommend that you configure the network so the I/O or IOA queues are not
oversubscribed. The traffic transmitted by the physical port is a combination of packets
from the two I/O or IOA queues. When the sum of the packets in these queues is greater
than line rate, the system can drop traffic that is not using hardware multicast packet
replication.
When you configure a traffic shaper on a physical port and configure hardware multicast
packet replication, the packets created using the feature avoid the traffic shaper for
that port. To control this, you can use traffic shaper on the physical port and port 8.
The sum of the traffic shapers must be less than or equal to the line rate of the port.
A traffic shaper on port 8 can result in the overall utilization of egress bandwidth for
any one port being less the line rate because the packets being replicated might not
be transmitted to every port. Packets destined to some of the ports contribute to the
traffic shaping for all of the ports on the I/O module or IOA.
Related
Documentation
•
IPv6 Hardware Multicast Packet Replication Overview on page 178
•
Configuring IPv6 Hardware Multicast Packet Replication on page 183
Configuring IPv6 Hardware Multicast Packet Replication
To configure hardware multicast packet replication:
1.
Configure port 8 on a high-density Ethernet module to accept redirected egress
multicast traffic.
a. Specify the Gigabit Ethernet interface on port 8.
b. Create a VLAN major interface.
c. Create a VLAN subinterface.
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d. Assign a VLAN ID.
e. Configure an unnumbered IPv6 interface.
f. Enable MLD on the interface with only multicast-data-forwarding capability.
host1(config)#interface gigabitEthernet 2/8
host1(config-if)#encapsulation vlan
host1(config-if)#interface gigabitEthernet 2/8.1
host1(config-if)#vlan id 1
host1(config-if)#ipv6 unnumbered loopback 0
host1(config-if)#ipv6 mld version passive
2. Configure an IPv6 interface to redirect egress multicast traffic to port 8.
a. Create a VLAN subinterface.
b. Assign a VLAN ID.
c. Assign an IPv6 address.
d. Configure the interface to redirect egress multicast traffic to port 8.
host1(config)#interface gigabitEthernet 2/0.101
host1(config-if)#vlan id 1
host1(config-if)#ipv6 address 1::1/64
host1(config-if)#ipv6 multicast ioa-packet-replication gigabitEthernet 2/8.1
Related
Documentation
•
Before You Begin on page 166
•
IPv6 Hardware Multicast Packet Replication Overview on page 178
•
IPv6 Hardware Multicast Packet Replication Considerations on page 182
•
Monitoring IPv6 Hardware Multicast Packet Replication on page 194
•
encapsulation vlan
•
interface gigabitEthernet
•
ipv6 address
•
ipv6 mld version
•
ipv6 multicast ioa-packet-replication
•
ipv6 unnumbered
•
vlan id
Interface-Level Multicast Traffic Configuration for IPv6
You can block mroute creation and limit the multicast bandwidth admitted on an outgoing
interface.
184
•
Blocking IPv6 Mroutes on page 185
•
Interface-Level Admission Bandwidth Limits for IPv6 Overview on page 185
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 9: Configuring IPv6 Multicast
•
Enabling Interface-Level Admission Bandwidth Limitation for IPv6 on page 186
•
OIF Interface Reevaluation for IPv6 on page 186
Blocking IPv6 Mroutes
By default, when an interface receives multicast traffic, even when the scope of that
traffic exceeds link-local, the virtual router creates an mroute. You can use the ipv6
block-multicast-sources command to block all multicast traffic with a scope larger than
link-local (for example, global) and prevent mroute creation under these conditions.
NOTE: Issuing this command does not affect reception of link-local multicast
packets.
To block all multicast traffic with a scope larger than link-local:
•
Issue the ipv6 block-multicast-sources command in Global Configuration mode.
host1(config)#ipv6 block-multicast-sources
Use the no version to restore the default behavior of creating mroutes on receiving
multicast packets.
Related
Documentation
•
Interface-Level Admission Bandwidth Limits for IPv6 Overview on page 185
•
Enabling Interface-Level Admission Bandwidth Limitation for IPv6 on page 186
•
OIF Interface Reevaluation for IPv6 on page 186
•
ipv6 block-multicast-sources
Interface-Level Admission Bandwidth Limits for IPv6 Overview
Interface-level multicast admission control is performed when an outgoing interface
(OIF) on the interface is added to the mroute for a given (S,G) multicast data stream
and the multicast bandwidth map contains a set admission-bandwidth action for that
(S,G). When enabled, the admission-bandwidth for a particular (S,G) is read from the
multicast bandwidth map and recorded in the mroute when the (S,G) mroute is created.
CAUTION: Before you can limit interface-level admission bandwidth, you
must first create a bandwidth map. See “Example: Configuring an IPv6
Multicast Bandwidth Map” on page 173 for details.
When an OIF is subsequently added to the mroute, the OIF is blocked from forwarding
data if the additional bandwidth contributed by the (S,G) exceeds the
admission-bandwidth limit for the interface. In JunosE releases earlier than Release 12.0.x,
in an OIF mapping scenario where the digital subscriber line access multiplexer (DSLAM)
does not perform per-subscriber multicast admission control, the router disregards the
multicast admission bandwidth limit configured on the join interface. If the limit configured
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on the mapped interface exceeds the admission-bandwidth limit for the interface, the
router blocks the mapped interface from forwarding data.
Now, in an OIF mapping scenario where the DSLAM performs per-subscriber multicast
admission control, the router checks the bandwidth limit configured on the join interface.
If the multicast stream is forwarded over the mapped interface, the router admits the
multicast stream and forwards the stream to the join interfaces whose bandwidth does
not exceed the configured bandwidth limit. The router also performs QoS Adjust for the
multicast stream on the unblocked (forwarding) subscriber interfaces. The router does
not replicate the stream to the subscriber interfaces whose bandwidth exceeds the
configured bandwidth limit and it does not perform QoS Adjust for the multicast stream
on the blocked subscriber interfaces.
If the multicast stream is not forwarded over the mapped interface, the router blocks the
multicast stream and does not forward the stream. The router also does not perform
QoS Adjust for the multicast stream on the blocked subscriber interface.
Related
Documentation
•
Blocking IPv6 Mroutes on page 185
•
Enabling Interface-Level Admission Bandwidth Limitation for IPv6 on page 186
•
OIF Interface Reevaluation for IPv6 on page 186
Enabling Interface-Level Admission Bandwidth Limitation for IPv6
You can use the ipv6 multicast admission-bandwidth-limit command to enable
multicast admission control on interfaces (including dynamic IP interfaces) that are
configured to run MLD. You can also use this command on a PIM (sparse-mode,
dense-mode, or sparse-dense-mode) interface if MLD is configured on the interface
(including the ipv6 mld version passive command).
To limit bandwidth for an interface that accepts MLD groups:
•
Issue the ipv6 multicast admission-bandwidth-limit command in Interface
Configuration mode.
host1:boston(config-if)#ipv6 multicast admission-bandwidth-limit 2000000
Use the no version to remove the bandwidth limitation for the interface.
Related
Documentation
•
Blocking IPv6 Mroutes on page 185
•
Interface-Level Admission Bandwidth Limits for IPv6 Overview on page 185
•
OIF Interface Reevaluation for IPv6 on page 186
•
ipv6 multicast admission-bandwidth-limit
OIF Interface Reevaluation for IPv6
If you change the admission bandwidth for an interface, all mroutes with that interface
as an outgoing interface (OIF) are reevaluated as follows:
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Chapter 9: Configuring IPv6 Multicast
•
If the bandwidth limit is increased, blocked OIFs may become unblocked. If the interface
is a blocked OIF on multiple mroutes, the order in which the mroutes are visited, and
which (S,G) streams become unblocked, is not specified.
•
If the bandwidth limit is decreased, no currently admitted OIFs are blocked. However,
no new OIFs are admitted until the total admitted bandwidth for the interface drops
below the new limit.
•
If the bandwidth is increased to the point that the bandwidth limit for an interface is
now exceeded, no currently admitted OIFs for the affected mroutes are blocked.
However, no new OIFs are admitted until the total admitted bandwidth drops below
the configured limit.
NOTE: If the multicast bandwidth map that includes the set
admission-bandwidth command is changed, all affected mroutes are
reevaluated in the same manner described previously.
As an example of this function, if the interface has accepted a total bandwidth of
2000000 bits per second (bps), and you set a limit of 1000000 bps on the interface,
the router does not disconnect any already connected OIFs but prevents the interfaces
from accepting any more groups. Over time, some groups leave the interfaces and,
eventually, the interface limit of 1000000 bps is reached and maintained by the router.
If you set limits for both a port and interfaces on that port, the router uses the lower of
the two limits when determining whether or not an interface can accept any new Multicast
Listener Discovery (MLD) groups. For example, if you specify an admission bandwidth
limit of 2000000 bps for the port and 3000000 bps groups for each interface, additional
groups can only be accepted until the port limit of 2000000 bps is reached.
Related
Documentation
Related
Documentation
•
Blocking IPv6 Mroutes on page 185
•
Interface-Level Admission Bandwidth Limits for IPv6 Overview on page 185
•
Enabling Interface-Level Admission Bandwidth Limitation for IPv6 on page 186
•
Before You Begin on page 166
•
Example: Configuring an IPv6 Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 173
•
Interface-Level Admission Bandwidth Limits for IPv6 Overview on page 185
•
Enabling Interface-Level Admission Bandwidth Limitation for IPv6 on page 186
•
OIF Interface Reevaluation for IPv6 on page 186
•
ipv6 block-multicast-sources
•
ipv6 mld version
•
ipv6 multicast admission-bandwidth-limit
•
set admission-bandwidth
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Port-Level Multicast Traffic Configuration for IPv6
You can limit outgoing interface creation and limit the multicast bandwidth admitted on
a port.
•
Creating IPv6 Mroute Port Limits on page 188
•
Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Limits for IPv6 Overview on page 188
•
Enabling Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Limitation for IPv6 on page 189
•
OIF Port Reevaluation for IPv6 on page 189
Creating IPv6 Mroute Port Limits
When a multicast forwarding entry (that is, an mroute) is added with an OIF on a port,
the OIF count for that port is incremented. If you configure a port limit and the OIF count
on the port count exceeds that limit, no OIFs on that port are added to mroutes (that is,
new OIFs are blocked).
To configure a limit on the number of mroute OIFs that can be added across different
virtual routers on a port:
•
Issue the mroute port limit command in Global Configuration mode.
host1(config)#mroute port 3/0 limit 10
Use the no version to remove any OIF port limits.
Related
Documentation
•
Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Limits for IPv6 Overview on page 188
•
Enabling Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Limitation for IPv6 on page 189
•
OIF Port Reevaluation for IPv6 on page 189
•
mroute port limit
Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Limits for IPv6 Overview
Port-level multicast admission control is performed when an outgoing (OIF) on that port
is added to the mroute for a given (S,G) multicast data stream and the multicast
bandwidth map contains a set admission-bandwidth action for that (S,G).
When enabled, the admission-bandwidth for a particular (S,G) is read from the multicast
bandwidth map and recorded in the mroute when the (S,G) mroute is created. When an
IOF is subsequently added to the mroute, the OIF is blocked from forwarding data if the
additional bandwidth contributed by the (S,G) would exceed the admission-bandwidth
limit for the port on which the interface resides.
CAUTION: Before you can limit port-level admission bandwidth, you must
first create a bandwidth map. See “Example: Configuring an IPv6 Multicast
Bandwidth Map” on page 173 for details.
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Chapter 9: Configuring IPv6 Multicast
Related
Documentation
•
Creating IPv6 Mroute Port Limits on page 188
•
Enabling Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Limitation for IPv6 on page 189
•
OIF Port Reevaluation for IPv6 on page 189
Enabling Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Limitation for IPv6
You can use the mroute port admission-bandwidth-limit command to limit the total
multicast bandwidth that can be admitted on a port. The admitted bandwidth is summed
across all virtual routers with IPv4 and IPv6 mroutes that have OIFs on the port.
NOTE: Admission bandwidth values for a given (S,G) mroute are determined
from the bandwidth map. See “Example: Configuring an IPv6 Multicast
Bandwidth Map” on page 173 for details.
To configure a limit on the admission bandwidth of OIFs containing IPv4 or IPv6 mroutes,
across different virtual routers, on a port:
•
Issue the mroute port admission-bandwidth-limit command in Global Configuration
mode.
host1(config)#mroute port admission-bandwidth-limit 3000000
Use the no version to remove any OIF admission bandwidth limits.
Related
Documentation
•
Creating IPv6 Mroute Port Limits on page 188
•
Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Limits for IPv6 Overview on page 188
•
OIF Port Reevaluation for IPv6 on page 189
•
mroute port admission-bandwidth-limit
OIF Port Reevaluation for IPv6
If you change the admission bandwidth for a port, all mroutes with an outgoing interface
(OIF) on that port are reevaluated as follows:
•
If the bandwidth limit is increased, blocked OIFs can become unblocked. However, the
order in which the mroutes are visited, and which (S,G) streams become unblocked,
is not specified.
•
If the bandwidth limit of a port is decreased, no currently admitted OIFs are blocked.
However, no new OIFs are admitted until the total admitted bandwidth for the port
drops below the new limit.
•
If the bandwidth is increased to the point that the bandwidth limit for an interface is
now exceeded, no currently admitted OIFs for the affected mroutes are blocked.
However, no new OIFs are admitted until the total admitted bandwidth drops below
the configured limit.
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NOTE: If the multicast bandwidth map that includes the set
admission-bandwidth command is changed, all affected mroutes are
reevaluated in the same manner described previously.
As an example of this function, if the port has accepted a total bandwidth of 3000000
bits per second (bps), and you set a limit of 2000000 bps on the port, the router does
not disconnect any already connected OIFs but prevents the interfaces from accepting
any more groups. Over time, some groups leave the interfaces and, eventually, the port
limit of 2000000 bps is reached and maintained by the router.
If you set limits for both a port and interfaces on that port, the router uses the lower of
the two limits when determining whether or not an interface can accept any new Multicast
Listener Discovery (MLD) groups. For example, if you specify an admission bandwidth
limit of 2000000 bps for the port and 3000000 bps groups for each interface, additional
groups can only be accepted until the port limit of 2000000 bps is reached.
Related
Documentation
Related
Documentation
•
Creating IPv6 Mroute Port Limits on page 188
•
Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Limits for IPv6 Overview on page 188
•
Enabling Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Limitation for IPv6 on page 189
•
Before You Begin on page 166
•
Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Limits for IPv6 Overview on page 188
•
Enabling Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Limitation for IPv6 on page 189
•
OIF Port Reevaluation for IPv6 on page 189
•
mroute port admission-bandwidth-limit
•
mroute port limit
•
set admission-bandwidth
Deleting IPv6 Multicast Forwarding Entries
You can clear one or more forwarding entries from the multicast routing table. However,
if you do so, the entries may reappear in the routing table if they are rediscovered. If you
specify an *, the router clears all IP multicast forwarding entries. If you specify the IPv6
address of a multicast group, the router clears all multicast forward entries for that group.
If you specify the IPv6 address of a multicast group and the IPv6 address of a multicast
source, the router clears the multicast entry that matches that group and source.
To delete IPv6 multicast forwarding entries:
•
Issue the clear ipv6 mroute command in Privileged Exec mode.
host1:boston#clear ipv6 mroute *
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Related
Documentation
•
Before You Begin on page 166
•
Defining Permanent IPv6 Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 168
•
clear ipv6 mroute
BGP Multicasting
BGP multicasting (MBGP) is an extension of the BGP unicast routing protocol. Many of
the functions available for BGP unicasting are also available for MBGP.
The MBGP extensions specify that BGP can exchange information within different types
of address families. The address families available are unicast IPv4, multicast IPv4, and
VPN-IPv4. When you enable BGP, the router employs unicast IPv4 addresses by default.
We recommend you be thoroughly familiar with BGP before configuring MBGP. See
Configuring BGP Routing in the JunosE BGP and MPLS Configuration Guide for detailed
information about BGP and MBGP.
This topic discusses the following:
•
Investigating Multicast Routes on page 191
Investigating Multicast Routes
You can use the mtrace command to trace the path that multicast packets take from a
source to a destination through a multicast group address. This command is similar to
the traceroute command for investigating unicast routes.
host1#mtrace 100.4.4.4 40.1.1.1 232.1.1.1
Tracing multicast route from 100.4.4.4 to 40.1.1.1 for group 232.1.1.1 using response address
10.6.129.56
(Press ^c to stop.)
Received mtrace response packet of length 88
1. 40.1.1.1 Protocol: PIM(3) FwdingCode: RPF iif(9)
2. 21.2.2.2 Protocol: PIM(3) FwdingCode: Reached RP(8)
Related
Documentation
•
mtrace
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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192
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 10
Monitoring IPv6 Multicast
IPv6 multicast enables a device to send packets to a group of hosts rather than to a list
of individual hosts. This chapter describes how to monitor IPv6 multicast on the E Series
router; it contains the following sections:
•
Monitoring Available IPv6 Routes for Reverse-Path Forwarding on page 193
•
Monitoring IPv6 Hardware Multicast Packet Replication on page 194
•
Monitoring IPv6 Multicast Forwarding Entries on page 219
•
Monitoring Active IPv6 Multicast Routes on page 222
•
Monitoring Multicast Routes on Virtual Router Ports on page 225
•
Monitoring IPv6 Multicast Entries in a Source or Group on page 226
•
Monitoring Join Interface Details When IPv6 OIF Mapping Is Configured on page 226
•
Monitoring IPv6 Multicast Statistics on page 229
•
Monitoring Summary Information of IPv6 Multicast Routes on page 232
•
Monitoring IPv6 Multicast Protocols Enabled on the Router on page 233
•
Monitoring Summary Information of IPv6 Multicast Protocols Enabled on the
Router on page 234
•
Monitoring IPv6 Multicast Status on a Virtual Router on page 235
Monitoring Available IPv6 Routes for Reverse-Path Forwarding
Purpose
Action
Display the IPv6 routes that the router can use for RPF. You can specify the IPv6 address
and the network mask to view routes to a particular destination. You can use the detail
keyword to view more detailed information about routes to a particular destination. You
can specify a unicast routing protocol to view routes associated with that protocol.
To display all IPv6 routes that the router can use for RPF:
host1#show ipv6 rpf-route
Protocol/Route type codes:
O- OSPF, E1- external type 1, E2- external type2,
N1- NSSA external type1, N2- NSSA external type2
L- MPLS label, V- VR/VRF, *- indirect next-hop
Prefix/Length
Type
Dst/Met
Intf
-------------------------------- --------- ------- -------------------11:1:1:10::/60
Static
1/0
ATM2/0.300
21:2:2:20::/60
Static
1/0
ATM2/0.300
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31:2:2:20::/60
131:1:1:10::/60
1000::/64
Connect
Connect
Static
0/0
0/0
1/0
ATM2/0.300
ATM2/1.1300
ATM2/0.300
To display more detailed information about an IPv6 route to a particular destination:
host1#show ipv6 rpf-route 1000::/64 detail
1000::/64 Type:Static Distance:1 Metric:0
NextHop:31:2:2:23::2:3 IntfIndex 18
Meaning
Intf ATM2/0.300
Table 52 on page 194 lists the show ipv6 rpf-route command output fields.
Table 52: show ipv6 rpf-route Output Fields
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Protocol/Route type codes
Protocol and route type codes for the table that
follows
Prefix
Value of the logical AND of the IPv6 address of the
destination network and the subnet address
Length
Length of the subnet mask in bits
Type
•
Connect—Subnet directly connected to the
interface
•
Static—Static route
Dst
Distance configured for this route
Met
Learned or configured cost associated with this route
Intf
Type of interface and interface specifier for the next
hop. For details about interface types and specifiers,
see Interface Types and Specifiers in JunosE Command
Reference Guide.
•
Defining IPv6 Static Routes for Reverse-Path Forwarding on page 167
•
show ipv6 rpf-route
Monitoring IPv6 Hardware Multicast Packet Replication
You can use the commands explained in this topic to monitor hardware multicast packet
replication-related statistics for port 8. For port 8, queue statistics have no direct
relationship to any of the 8 ports because each packet that is transmitted through the
queue can be sent through 1 or more of the 8 physical ports.
Multicast traffic redirected by the hardware multicast packet replication feature is
displayed in the statistics for the IPv6 or VLAN interface over port 8, not the original IP
or VLAN interface over the physical port.
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The statistics for the IPv6 or VLAN interface over port 8 reflect the number of packets
that passed through this interface destined for the hardware multicast packet replication
hardware. These statistics have no direct correlation to the number of packets being
transmitted from any of the physical ports.
The various statistics that are monitored over port 8 are:
•
Monitoring Port Statistics on page 195
•
Monitoring VLAN Statistics on page 200
•
Monitoring IPv6 Statistics on page 202
•
Monitoring MLD Statistics on page 216
Monitoring Port Statistics
Purpose
Display the status of Gigabit Ethernet interfaces. You can use the delta keyword to view
baselined statistics. You can use the brief keyword to view the operational status of all
configured interfaces.
NOTE: The E120 and E320 routers output for monitor and show commands
is identical to output from other E Series routers, except that the E120 and
E320 router output also includes information about the adapter identifier in
the interface specifier (slot/adapter/port).
Action
To display the status of a Gigabit Ethernet interface:
host1#show interfaces gigabitEthernet 14/0/0
GigabitEthernet14/0/0 is Up, Administrative status is Up
Hardware is Intel IXF1104, address is 0090.1a42.0b87
MAU is 1000BASE-SX
TX Output Power: 469.6 uW RX Input Power: 0.5 uW
MTU: Operational 1518, Administrative 1518
Duplex Mode: Operational Full Duplex, Administrative Auto Negotiate
Speed: Operational 1000 Mbps, Administrative Auto Negotiate
Debounce: State is Disabled
5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
In: Bytes 0, Unicast 0
Multicast 0, Broadcast 0
Errors 0, Discards 0, Mac Errors 0, Alignment 0
CRC 0, Too Longs 0, Symbol Errors 0
Out: Bytes 0, Unicast 0
Multicast 0, Broadcast 0
Errors 0, Discards 0, Mac Errors 0, Deferred 0, No Carrier 0
Collisions: Single 0, Multiple 0, Late 0, Excessive 0
Policed Statistics:
In: 0, Out: 0
ARP Statistics:
In: ARP requests 0, ARP responses 0
Errors 0, Discards 0
Out: ARP requests 0, ARP responses 0
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Meaning
Table 53 on page 196 lists the output fields of the show interfaces gigabitEthernet
command.
Table 53: show interfaces gigabitEthernet Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
GigabitEthernet or
tenGigabitEthernet
interfaceSpecifier
Status of the hardware on this interface:
Administrative status
up—Hardware is operational
•
down—Hardware is not operational
Operational state that you configured for this
interface:
•
up—Interface is enabled
•
down—Interface is disabled
Hardware
Type of MAC device on this interface
Address
MAC address of the processor on this interface
MAU
Type of MAU on the primary and secondary physical
ports:
•
SFP—1000BASE-LH, 1000BASE-SX,
1000BASE-ZX; for SFPs that are empty, SFP
(Empty) appears in this field; for SFPs that are
installed in the OC3-2 GE APS I/O module and do
not have a Juniper Networks part number
programmed, SFP (GE Compliant) appears in this
field
•
XFP—10GBASE-SR (10 Gbps), 10GBASE-LR
(10 Gbps), 10GBASE-ER (10 Gbps); for XFPs that
are empty, XFP (Empty) appears in this field
TX Output Power
Transmitted output optical power
RX Input Power
Received input optical power
MTU
Size of the MTU for this interface:
Duplex Mode
196
•
•
Operational—Size of the largest packet processed
•
Administrative—Setting for MTU size that you
specified
Duplex option for this interface:
•
Operational—Duplex option currently used
•
Administrative—Setting for duplex that you
specified
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Chapter 10: Monitoring IPv6 Multicast
Table 53: show interfaces gigabitEthernet Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Speed
Line speed for this interface:
Debounce
Clear arp
Link
•
Operational—Current rate at which packets are
processed
•
Administrative—Setting for line speed that you
specified
Debounce configuration for this interface:
•
State is—Enabled, Disabled
•
Interval is—Number of seconds that this interface
maintains a given state before the state change is
reported to the upper-layer links
State of the removal of the ARP entries on an
interface with redundant ports:
•
Enabled—Clears ARP entries on the interface when
the primary link fails
•
Disabled—Maintains ARP entries on the interface
until the specified timeout elapses
Link information for this interface:
•
Operational Link Selected—Port that the I/O
module is currently using: primary or secondary
•
Administrative link selected—Port that the I/O
module is configured to use:
•
primary—Only primary port is configured to
operate
•
secondary—Only redundant port is configured
to operate
•
automatically—Software controls port
redundancy automatically
Link Failover Timeout
Time to wait for a failed link to be active before the
router uses a different active link
Primary link selected x times
Number of times that the I/O has used the primary
port since the module was last rebooted
Secondary link selected x times
Number of times that the I/O has used the secondary
port since the module was last rebooted`
Primary/Secondary link signal
detected, Primary/Secondary link
signal not detected
Specifies the port (primary or secondary) on which
the router detects a signal (not displayed on GE I/O
modules that do not support SFPs)
5 minute input rate
Data rates based on the traffic received in the last 5
minutes
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Table 53: show interfaces gigabitEthernet Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
5 minute output rate
Data rates based on the traffic sent in the last 5
minutes
In
Analysis of inbound traffic on this interface:
Out
198
•
Bytes—Number of bytes received in error-free
packets
•
Unicast—Number of unicast packets received
•
Multicast—Number of multicast packets received
•
Broadcast—Number of broadcast packets received
•
Errors—Total number of errors in all received
packets; some packets might contain more than
one error
•
Discards—Total number of discarded incoming
packets
•
Mac Errors—Number of incoming packets
discarded because of MAC sublayer failures
•
Alignment—Number of incomplete octets received
•
CRC—Number of packets discarded because the
checksum that the router computed from the data
does not match the checksum generated by the
originating devices
•
Too Longs—Number of packets discarded because
the size exceeded the MTU
•
Symbol Errors—Number of symbols received that
the router did not correctly decode
Analysis of outbound traffic on this interface:
•
Bytes—Number of bytes sent
•
Unicast—Number of unicast packets sent
•
Multicast—Number of multicast packets sent
•
Broadcast—Number of broadcast packets sent
•
Errors—Total number of errors in all transmitted
packets; note that some packets might contain
more than one error
•
Discards—Total number of discarded outgoing
packets
•
Mac Errors—Number of outgoing packets discarded
because of MAC sublayer failures
•
Deferred—Number of packets that the router
delayed sending because the line was busy. In half
duplex mode, a high number of deferrals means
the link is very busy with traffic from other stations.
In full duplex mode, when the link is always
available for transmission, this number is zero.
•
No Carrier—Number of packets sent when carrier
sense was unavailable
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 10: Monitoring IPv6 Multicast
Table 53: show interfaces gigabitEthernet Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Collisions
Analysis of the collisions that occurred:
•
Single—Number of packets sent after one collision
•
Multiple—Number of packets sent after multiple
collisions
•
Late—Number of packets aborted during sending
because of collisions after 64 bytes
•
Excessive—Number of packets not sent because
of too many collisions
Policed Statistics
Number of packets that exceeded the number
allowed and were policed (or dropped)
ARP Statistics
Analysis of ARP traffic on this interface; In fields are
for traffic received on the interface and Out fields are
for traffic sent on the interface:
Administrative qos-shaping-mode
Operational qos-shaping-mode
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
•
ARP requests—Number of ARP requests
•
ARP responses—Number of ARP responses
•
Errors—Total number of errors in all ARP packets
•
Discards—Total number of discarded ARP packets
QoS shaping mode:
•
disabled—Shaping mode is configured but not
operational
•
frame—Statistics are reported about bytes in
frames, such as transmitted bytes and dropped
bytes.
•
cell—Shaping mode for shaping and policing rates
is cell-based; resulting traffic stream conforms
exactly to the policing rates configured in
downstream devices. Reports statistics in bytes in
cells and accounts for cell encapsulation and
padding overhead.
•
none—Shaping mode is not configured
Actual shaping mode for the interface:
•
disabled
•
frame
•
cell
•
none
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Table 53: show interfaces gigabitEthernet Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
queue
Hardware packet queue associated with the specified
traffic class and interface:
•
traffic class—Name of traffic class
•
bound to—Interface to which queue is bound
•
Queue length—Length of the queue, in bytes
•
Forwarded packets, bytes—Number of packets
and bytes that were forwarded on this queue
•
Dropped committed packets, bytes—Number of
committed packets and bytes that were dropped
•
Dropped conformed packets, bytes—Number of
conformed packets and bytes that were dropped
•
Dropped exceeded packets, bytes—Number of
exceeded packets and bytes that were dropped
Monitoring VLAN Statistics
Purpose
Display configuration and status information for a specified VLAN subinterface or for all
VLAN subinterfaces configured on the router. You can use the mac-address keyword to
display information about the VLAN subinterfaces that were configured with unique MAC
addresses.
Action
To display full status and configuration information for the specified VLAN subinterface:
host1#show vlan subinterface fastEthernet 0/0.1
Interface
Status MTU Svlan Id Vlan Id Ethertype Type
------------------- ------ ---- -------- ------ --------- ------FastEthernet 0/0.1
Up
1526
1
0
0x9100
Static
In: Bytes 39256, Packets 612
Multicast 0, Broadcast 0
Errors 0, Discards 0
Out: Bytes 4538652, Packets 70911
Multicast 0, Broadcast 70296
Errors 0, Discards 0
ARP Statistics:
In: ARP requests 0, ARP responses 0
Errors 0, Discards 0
Out: ARP requests 0, ARP responses 0
Errors 0, Discards 0
Meaning
Table 54 on page 200 lists the show vlan subinterface command output fields.
Table 54: show vlan subinterface Output Fields
200
Field Name
Field Description
Interface
Type and specifier of the VLAN subinterface
Status
Status of the VLAN subinterface: up, down, dormant,
lowerLayerDown, absent
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 10: Monitoring IPv6 Multicast
Table 54: show vlan subinterface Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
MTU
Maximum allowable size (in bytes) of the MTU for
the VLAN subinterface
Svlan Id
S-VLAN ID value, if configured
Vlan Id
VLAN ID value for the VLAN subinterface
Ethertype
S-VLAN Ethertype value, if configured
Type
Type of VLAN subinterface:
In
Out
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
•
Static—VLAN or S-VLAN subinterface was
configured statically
•
Dynamic—VLAN or S-VLAN subinterface was
configured dynamically
Analysis of inbound traffic on this interface:
•
Bytes—Number of bytes received on the VLAN or
S-VLAN subinterface
•
Packets—Sum of all unicast, broadcast, and
multicast packets received on the VLAN or S-VLAN
subinterface
•
Multicast—Number of multicast packets received
on the VLAN or S-VLAN subinterface
•
Broadcast—Number of broadcast packets received
on the VLAN or S-VLAN subinterface
•
Errors—Total number of errors in all received
packets; some packets might contain more than
one error
•
Discards—Total number of discarded incoming
packets
Analysis of outbound traffic on this interface:
•
Bytes—Number of bytes sent on the VLAN or
S-VLAN subinterface
•
Packets—Number of packets sent on the VLAN or
S-VLAN subinterface
•
Multicast—Number of multicast packets received
on the VLAN or S-VLAN subinterface
•
Broadcast—Number of broadcast packets received
on the VLAN or S-VLAN subinterface
•
Errors—Total number of errors in all transmitted
packets; some packets might contain more than
one error
•
Discards—Total number of discarded outgoing
packets
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Table 54: show vlan subinterface Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
ARP Statistics
Analysis of ARP traffic on this interface; In fields are
for traffic received on the interface and Out fields are
for traffic sent on the interface:
•
ARP requests—Number of ARP requests
•
ARP responses—Number of ARP responses
•
Errors—Total number of errors in all ARP packets
•
Discards—Total number of discarded ARP packets
Monitoring IPv6 Statistics
Purpose
Action
Display detailed or summary information for a particular IPv6 interface or for all IPv6
interfaces.
To display statistics for all IPv6 interfaces:
host1#show ipv6 interface
null0 line protocol IpLoopback is up, ipv6 is up
Network Protocols: IPv6
Link local address: fe80::90:1a00:740:1d44
Unnumbered Interface: Corresponding Numbered Interface not specified or
removed
Operational MTU 1500 Administrative MTU 0
Operational speed 100000000 Administrative speed 0
Creation type Static
Neighbor Discovery is disabled
In Received Packets 0, Bytes 0
Unicast Packets 0, Bytes 0
Multicast Packets 0, Bytes 0
In Total Dropped Packets 0, Bytes 0
In Policed Packets 0
In Invalid Source Address Packets 0
In Error Packets 0
In Discarded Packets 0
Out Forwarded Packets 0, Bytes 0
Unicast Packets 0, Bytes 0
Multicast Routed Packets 0, Bytes 0
Out Total Dropped Packets 0, Bytes 0
Out Scheduler Dropped Packets 0, Bytes 0
Out Policed Packets 0
Out Discarded Packets 0
FastEthernet9/1.5 line protocol VlanSub is up, ipv6 is up
Description: IPv6 interface in Virtual Router Hop5
Network Protocols: IPv6
Link local address: fe80::90:1a00:740:31ce
Internet address: 5:1:1::2/64
Operational MTU 1500 Administrative MTU 0
Operational speed 100000000 Administrative speed 0
Creation type Static
ND reachable time is 3600000 milliseconds
ND duplicate address detection attempts is 100
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ND neighbor solicitation retransmission interval is 1000 milliseconds
ND proxy is enabled
In Received Packets 13, Bytes 1356
Unicast Packets 5, Bytes 588
Multicast Packets 8, Bytes 768
In Total Dropped Packets 0, Bytes 0
In Policed Packets 0
In Invalid Source Address Packets 0
In Error Packets 0
In Discarded Packets 0
Out Forwarded Packets 22, Bytes 2480
Unicast Packets 22, Bytes 2480
Multicast Routed Packets 0, Bytes 0
Out Total Dropped Packets 8, Bytes 0
Out Scheduler Dropped Packets 0, Bytes 0
Out Policed Packets 0
Out Discarded Packets 8
queue 0: traffic class best-effort, bound to ipv6 FastEthernet9/1.5
Queue length 0 bytes
Forwarded packets 4, bytes 680
Dropped committed packets 0, bytes 0
Dropped conformed packets 0, bytes 0
Dropped exceeded packets 0, bytes 0
FastEthernet9/0.6 line protocol VlanSub is up, ipv6 is up
Description: IPv6 interface in Virtual Router Hop6
Network Protocols: IPv6
Link local address: fe80::90:1a00:740:31cd
Internet address: 6:1:1::1/64
Operational MTU 1500 Administrative MTU 0
Operational speed 100000000 Administrative speed 0
Creation type Static
ND reachable time is 3600000 milliseconds
ND duplicate address detection attempts is 100
ND neighbor solicitation retransmission interval is 1000 milliseconds
ND proxy is enabled
ND RA source link layer is advertised
ND RA interval is 200 seconds, lifetime is 1800 seconds
ND RA managed flag is disabled, other config flag is disabled
ND RA advertising prefixes configured on interface
In Received Packets 0, Bytes 0
Unicast Packets 0, Bytes 0
Multicast Packets 0, Bytes 0
In Total Dropped Packets 0, Bytes 0
In Policed Packets 0
In Invalid Source Address Packets 0
In Error Packets 0
In Discarded Packets 0
Out Forwarded Packets 8, Bytes 768
Unicast Packets 8, Bytes 768
Multicast Routed Packets 0, Bytes 0
Out Total Dropped Packets 5, Bytes 0
Out Scheduler Dropped Packets 0, Bytes 0
Out Policed Packets 0
Out Discarded Packets 5
queue 0: traffic class best-effort, bound to ipv6 FastEthernet9/0.6
Queue length 0 bytes
Forwarded packets 0, bytes 0
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Dropped committed packets 0, bytes 0
Dropped conformed packets 0, bytes 0
Dropped exceeded packets 0, bytes 0
loopback5 line protocol IpLoopback is up, ipv6 is up
Network Protocols: IPv6
Link local address: fe80::90:1a00:740:1d44
Internet address: 10:1:1:0:290:1aff:fe40:1d44/64 (eui-64)
Operational MTU 1500 Administrative MTU 0
Operational speed 100000000 Administrative speed 0
Creation type Static
Neighbor Discovery is disabled
In Received Packets 0, Bytes 0
Unicast Packets 0, Bytes 0
Multicast Packets 0, Bytes 0
In Total Dropped Packets 0, Bytes 0
In Policed Packets 0
In Invalid Source Address Packets 0
In Error Packets 0
In Discarded Packets 0
Out Forwarded Packets 0, Bytes 0
Unicast Packets 0, Bytes 0
Multicast Routed Packets 0, Bytes 0
Out Total Dropped Packets 0, Bytes 0
Out Scheduler Dropped Packets 0, Bytes 0
Out Policed Packets 0
Out Discarded Packets 0
IPv6 policy input ipv6InPol25
rate-limit-profile Rlp2Mb classifier-group clgA entry 1
Committed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Conformed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Exceeded: 0 packets, 0 bytes
rate-limit-profile Rlp8Mb
Committed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Conformed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Exceeded: 0 packets, 0 bytes
IPv6 policy output ipv6PolOut2
rate-limit-profile RlpOutA classifier-group clgB entry 1
Committed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Conformed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Exceeded: 0 packets, 0 bytes
rate-limit-profile RlpOutB
Committed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Conformed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Exceeded: 0 packets, 0 bytes
IPv6 policy local-input ipv6PolLocIn5
rate-limit-profile Rlp1Mb classifier-group clgC entry 1
Committed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Conformed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Exceeded: 0 packets, 0 bytes
rate-limit-profile Rlp5Mb
Committed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Conformed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Exceeded: 0 packets, 0 bytes
queue 0: traffic class best-effort, bound to ipv6 FastEthernet9/0.6
Queue length 0 bytes
Forwarded packets 0, bytes 0
Dropped committed packets 0, bytes 0
Dropped conformed packets 0, bytes 0
Dropped exceeded packets 0, bytes 0
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To display statistics for a particular IPv6 interface:
host1#show ipv6 interface FastEthernet 9/0.6
FastEthernet9/0.6 line protocol VlanSub is up, ipv6 is up
Description: IPv6 interface in Virtual Router Hop6
Network Protocols: IPv6
Link local address: fe80::90:1a00:740:31cd
Internet address: 6:1:1::1/64
Operational MTU 1500 Administrative MTU 0
Operational speed 100000000 Administrative speed 0
Creation type Static
ND reachable time is 3600000 milliseconds
ND duplicate address detection attempts is 100
ND neighbor solicitation retransmission interval is 1000 milliseconds
ND proxy is enabled
ND RA source link layer is advertised
ND RA interval is 200 seconds, lifetime is 1800 seconds
ND RA managed flag is disabled, other config flag is disabled
ND RA advertising prefixes configured on interface
In Received Packets 0, Bytes 0
Unicast Packets 0, Bytes 0
Multicast Packets 0, Bytes 0
In Total Dropped Packets 0, Bytes 0
In Policed Packets 0
In Invalid Source Address Packets 0
In Error Packets 0
In Discarded Packets 0
Out Forwarded Packets 8, Bytes 768
Unicast Packets 8, Bytes 768
Multicast Routed Packets 0, Bytes 0
Out Total Dropped Packets 5, Bytes 0
Out Scheduler Dropped Packets 0, Bytes 0
Out Policed Packets 0
Out Discarded Packets 5
queue 0: traffic class best-effort, bound to ipv6 FastEthernet9/0.6
Queue length 0 bytes
Forwarded packets 0, bytes 0
Dropped committed packets 0, bytes 0
Dropped conformed packets 0, bytes 0
Dropped exceeded packets 0, bytes 0
IPv6 policy input ipv6InPol25
rate-limit-profile Rlp2Mb classifier-group clgA entry 1
Committed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Conformed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Exceeded: 0 packets, 0 bytes
rate-limit-profile Rlp8Mb
Committed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Conformed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Exceeded: 0 packets, 0 bytes
IPv6 policy output ipv6PolOut2
rate-limit-profile RlpOutA classifier-group clgB entry 1
Committed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Conformed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Exceeded: 0 packets, 0 bytes
rate-limit-profile RlpOutB
Committed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Conformed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Exceeded: 0 packets, 0 bytes
IPv6 policy local-input ipv6PolLocIn5
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rate-limit-profile Rlp1Mb classifier-group clgC entry 1
Committed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Conformed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Exceeded: 0 packets, 0 bytes
rate-limit-profile Rlp5Mb
Committed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Conformed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Exceeded: 0 packets, 0 bytes
queue 0: traffic class best-effort, bound to ipv6 FastEthernet9/0.6
Queue length 0 bytes
Forwarded packets 0, bytes 0
Dropped committed packets 0, bytes 0
Dropped conformed packets 0, bytes 0
Dropped exceeded packets 0, bytes 0
Http Redirect Url: http://www.juniper.net
To display detailed IPv6 status and configuration information for all IPv6 interfaces:
host1#show ipv6 interface detail
null0 line protocol IpLoopback is up, ipv6 is up
Network Protocols: IPv6
Link local address: fe80::90:1a00:740:1d44
Unnumbered Interface: Corresponding Numbered Interface not specified or
removed
IPv6 statistics:
Rcvd: 0 local destination
0 hdr errors, 0 addr errors
0 unkn proto, 0 discards
Sent: 0 generated, 0 no routes, 0 discards
ICMPv6 statistics:
Rcvd: 0 destination unreach,
0 time exceeded, 0 pkt
0 echo replies
Sent: 0 destination unreach,
0 time exceeded, 0 pkt
0 echo replies
0 admin unreach, 0 parameter problem
too big, 0 echo requests
0 admin unreach, 0 parameter problem
too big, 0 echo requests
Operational MTU 1500 Administrative MTU 0
Operational speed 100000000 Administrative speed 0
Creation type Static
Neighbor Discovery is disabled
ICMPv6 statistics:
Rcvd: 0 total, 0 errors
0 rtr solicits, 0 rtr advertisements
0 neighbor solicits, 0 neighbor advertisements
Group membership: 0 queries, 0 responses, 0 reductions
0 redirects
Sent: 0 total, 0 errors
0 rtr solicits, 0 rtr advertisements
0 neighbor solicits, 0 neighbor advertisements
Group membership: 0 queries, 0 responses, 0 reductions
0 redirects
In Received Packets 0, Bytes 0
Unicast Packets 0, Bytes 0
Multicast Packets 0, Bytes 0
In Total Dropped Packets 0, Bytes 0
In Policed Packets 0
In Invalid Source Address Packets 0
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In Error Packets 0
In Discarded Packets 0
Out Forwarded Packets 0, Bytes 0
Unicast Packets 0, Bytes 0
Multicast Routed Packets 0, Bytes 0
Out Total Dropped Packets 0, Bytes 0
Out Scheduler Dropped Packets 0, Bytes 0
Out Policed Packets 0
Out Discarded Packets 0
FastEthernet9/1.5 line protocol VlanSub is up, ipv6 is up
Description: IPv6 interface in Virtual Router Hop5
Network Protocols: IPv6
Link local address: fe80::90:1a00:740:31ce
Internet address: 5:1:1::2/64
IPv6 statistics:
Rcvd: 0 local destination
0 hdr errors, 0 addr errors
0 unkn proto, 0 discards
Sent: 0 generated, 0 no routes, 0 discards
ICMPv6 statistics:
Rcvd: 0 destination unreach,
0 time exceeded, 0 pkt
3 echo replies
Sent: 0 destination unreach,
0 time exceeded, 0 pkt
0 echo replies
0 admin unreach, 0 parameter problem
too big, 0 echo requests
0 admin unreach, 0 parameter problem
too big, 5 echo requests
Operational MTU 1500 Administrative MTU 0
Operational speed 100000000 Administrative speed 0
Creation type Static
ND reachable time is 3600000 milliseconds
ND duplicate address detection attempts is 100
ND neighbor solicitation retransmission interval is 1000 milliseconds
ND proxy is enabled
ND RA source link layer is advertised
ND RA interval is 200 seconds, lifetime is 1800 seconds
ND RA managed flag is disabled, other config flag is disabled
ND RA advertising prefixes configured on interface
ICMPv6 statistics:
Rcvd: 13 total, 0 errors
0 rtr solicits, 8 rtr advertisements
1 neighbor solicits, 1 neighbor advertisements
Group membership: 0 queries, 0 responses, 0 reductions
0 redirects
Sent: 31 total, 0 errors
0 rtr solicits, 16 rtr advertisements
5 neighbor solicits, 5 neighbor advertisements
Group membership: 0 queries, 0 responses, 0 reductions
0 redirects
In Received Packets 13, Bytes 1356
Unicast Packets 5, Bytes 588
Multicast Packets 8, Bytes 768
In Total Dropped Packets 0, Bytes 0
In Policed Packets 0
In Invalid Source Address Packets 0
In Error Packets 0
In Discarded Packets 0
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Out Forwarded Packets 22, Bytes 2480
Unicast Packets 22, Bytes 2480
Multicast Routed Packets 0, Bytes 0
Out Total Dropped Packets 8, Bytes 0
Out Scheduler Dropped Packets 0, Bytes 0
Out Policed Packets 0
Out Discarded Packets 8
queue 0: traffic class best-effort, bound to ipv6 FastEthernet9/1.5
Queue length 0 bytes
Forwarded packets 4, bytes 680
Dropped committed packets 0, bytes 0
Dropped conformed packets 0, bytes 0
Dropped exceeded packets 0, bytes 0
FastEthernet9/0.6 line protocol VlanSub is up, ipv6 is up
Description: IPv6 interface in Virtual Router Hop6
Network Protocols: IPv6
Link local address: fe80::90:1a00:740:31cd
Internet address: 6:1:1::1/64
IPv6 statistics:
Rcvd: 0 local destination
0 hdr errors, 0 addr errors
0 unkn proto, 0 discards
Sent: 0 generated, 0 no routes, 0 discards
ICMPv6 statistics:
Rcvd: 0 destination unreach,
0 time exceeded, 0 pkt
0 echo replies
Sent: 0 destination unreach,
0 time exceeded, 0 pkt
0 echo replies
0 admin unreach, 0 parameter problem
too big, 0 echo requests
0 admin unreach, 0 parameter problem
too big, 0 echo requests
Operational MTU 1500 Administrative MTU 0
Operational speed 100000000 Administrative speed 0
Creation type Static
ND reachable time is 3600000 milliseconds
ND duplicate address detection attempts is 100
ND neighbor solicitation retransmission interval is 1000 milliseconds
ND proxy is enabled
ND RA source link layer is advertised
ND RA interval is 200 seconds, lifetime is 1800 seconds
ND RA managed flag is disabled, other config flag is disabled
ND RA advertising prefixes configured on interface
ICMPv6 statistics:
Rcvd: 0 total, 0 errors
0 rtr solicits, 0 rtr advertisements
0 neighbor solicits, 0 neighbor advertisements
Group membership: 0 queries, 0 responses, 0 reductions
0 redirects
Sent: 13 total, 0 errors
0 rtr solicits, 9 rtr advertisements
2 neighbor solicits, 2 neighbor advertisements
Group membership: 0 queries, 0 responses, 0 reductions
0 redirects
In Received Packets 0, Bytes 0
Unicast Packets 0, Bytes 0
Multicast Packets 0, Bytes 0
In Total Dropped Packets 0, Bytes 0
In Policed Packets 0
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In Invalid Source Address Packets 0
In Error Packets 0
In Discarded Packets 0
Out Forwarded Packets 8, Bytes 768
Unicast Packets 8, Bytes 768
Multicast Routed Packets 0, Bytes 0
Out Total Dropped Packets 5, Bytes 0
Out Scheduler Dropped Packets 0, Bytes 0
Out Policed Packets 0
Out Discarded Packets 5
queue 0: traffic class best-effort, bound to ipv6 FastEthernet9/0.6
Queue length 0 bytes
Forwarded packets 0, bytes 0
Dropped committed packets 0, bytes 0
Dropped conformed packets 0, bytes 0
Dropped exceeded packets 0, bytes 0
loopback5 line protocol IpLoopback is up, ipv6 is up
Network Protocols: IPv6
Link local address: fe80::90:1a00:740:1d44
Internet address: 10:1:1:0:290:1aff:fe40:1d44/64 (eui-64)
IPv6 statistics:
Rcvd: 0 local destination
0 hdr errors, 0 addr errors
0 unkn proto, 0 discards
Sent: 0 generated, 0 no routes, 0 discards
ICMPv6 statistics:
Rcvd: 0 local destination
0 hdr errors, 0 addr errors
0 unkn proto, 0 discards
Sent: 0 generated, 0 no routes, 0 discards
ICMPv6 statistics:
Rcvd: 0 destination unreach,
0 time exceeded, 0 pkt
0 echo replies
Sent: 0 destination unreach,
0 time exceeded, 0 pkt
0 echo replies
0 admin unreach, 0 parameter problem
too big, 0 echo requests
0 admin unreach, 0 parameter problem
too big, 0 echo requests
Operational MTU 1500 Administrative MTU 0
Operational speed 100000000 Administrative speed 0
Creation type Static
Neighbor Discovery is disabled
ICMPv6 statistics:
Rcvd: 0 total, 0 errors
0 rtr solicits, 0 rtr advertisements
0 neighbor solicits, 0 neighbor advertisements
Group membership: 0 queries, 0 responses, 0 reductions
0 redirects
Sent: 0 total, 0 errors
0 rtr solicits, 0 rtr advertisements
0 neighbor solicits, 0 neighbor advertisements
Group membership: 0 queries, 0 responses, 0 reductions
0 redirects
In Received Packets 0, Bytes 0
Unicast Packets 0, Bytes 0
Multicast Packets 0, Bytes 0
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In Total Dropped Packets 0, Bytes 0
In Policed Packets 0
In Invalid Source Address Packets 0
In Error Packets 0
In Discarded Packets 0
Out Forwarded Packets 0, Bytes 0
Unicast Packets 0, Bytes 0
Multicast Routed Packets 0, Bytes 0
Out Total Dropped Packets 0, Bytes 0
Out Scheduler Dropped Packets 0, Bytes 0
Out Policed Packets 0
Out Discarded Packets 0
IPv6 policy input ipv6InPol25
rate-limit-profile Rlp2Mb classifier-group clgA entry 1
Committed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Conformed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Exceeded: 0 packets, 0 bytes
rate-limit-profile Rlp8Mb
Committed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Conformed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Exceeded: 0 packets, 0 bytes
IPv6 policy output ipv6PolOut2
rate-limit-profile RlpOutA classifier-group clgB entry 1
Committed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Conformed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Exceeded: 0 packets, 0 bytes
rate-limit-profile RlpOutB
Committed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Conformed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Exceeded: 0 packets, 0 bytes
IPv6 policy local-input ipv6PolLocIn5
rate-limit-profile Rlp1Mb classifier-group clgC entry 1
Committed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Conformed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Exceeded: 0 packets, 0 bytes
rate-limit-profile Rlp5Mb
Committed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Conformed: 0 packets, 0 bytes
Exceeded: 0 packets, 0 bytes
queue 0: traffic class best-effort, bound to ipv6 FastEthernet9/0.6
Queue length 0 bytes
Forwarded packets 0, bytes 0
Dropped committed packets 0, bytes 0
Dropped conformed packets 0, bytes 0
Dropped exceeded packets 0, bytes 0
To display brief summary of IPv6 status and configuration information for all IPv6
interfaces:
host1# show ipv6 interface brief
Interface
IPv6-Address
Status Protocol
Description
----------------- ------------------ ------- -------- ---------------null0
Unnumbered
up
up
FastEthernet9/1.5
5:1:1::2/64
up
up
IPv6 interface in
Virtual Router Hop
5
FastEthernet9/0.6
6:1:1::1/64
up
up
IPv6 interface in
Virtual Router Hop
6
loopback5
10:1:1:0:290:1aff:fe up
up
40:1d44/64
210
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Meaning
Table 55 on page 211 lists the show ipv6 interface command output fields.
Table 55: show ipv6 interface Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Description
Optional description for the interface or address
specified
Network Protocols
Network protocols configured on this interface
Link local address
Local IPv6 address of this interface
Internet address
External address of this interface
IPv6 statistics Rcvd
•
local destination—Frames with this router as their
destination
•
hdr errors—Number of packets containing header
errors
•
addr errors—Number of packets containing
addressing errors
•
unkn proto—Number of packets received containing
unknown protocols
•
discards—Number of discarded packets
•
generated—Number of packets generated
•
no routes—Number of packets that could not be
routed
•
discards—Number of packets that could not be
routed that were discarded
IPv6 statistics Sent
NOTE: If you configure the router to discard
packets for static routes with null 0 interfaces as
the next-hop points using the reject keyword with
the ipv6 route command, the value displayed in
this field also includes the packets that reached
the null 0 interface and were dropped.
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Table 55: show ipv6 interface Output Fields (continued)
212
Field Name
Field Description
ICMPv6 statistics Rcvd
•
total—Total number of received packets
•
errors—Error packets received
•
destination unreach—Packets received with
destination unreachable
•
admin unreach—Packets received because the
destination was administratively unreachable (for
example, the packet encountered a firewall filter)
•
parameter problem—Packets received with
parameter errors
•
time exceeded—Packets received with time-to-live
exceeded
•
pkt too big—Number of packet-too-big messages
received that indicate a packet was too large to
forward because of the allowed MTU size
•
redirects—Received packet redirects
•
echo requests—Echo request (ping) packets
•
echo replies—Echo replies received
•
rtr solicits—Number of received router solicitations
•
rtr advertisements—Number of received router
advertisements
•
neighbor solicits—Number of received neighbor
solicitations
•
neighbor advertisements—Number or received
neighbor advertisements
•
Group membership (queries, responses,
reductions)—Number of queries, responses, and
reduction requests received from within a group to
which the interface is assigned
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 10: Monitoring IPv6 Multicast
Table 55: show ipv6 interface Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
ICMPv6 statistics Sent
•
total—Total number of sent packets
•
errors—Error packets sent
•
destination unreach—Packets sent with destination
unreachable
NOTE: If you configure the router to discard
packets for static routes with null 0 interfaces as
the next-hop points using the reject keyword with
the ipv6 route command, the value displayed in
this field also includes the number of ICMPv6
unreachable messages sent out for packets that
reached null 0 interfaces with static routes.
•
admin unreach—Packets sent because the
destination was administratively unreachable (for
example, due to a firewall filter)
•
parameter problem—Packets sent with parameter
errors
•
time exceeded—Packets sent with time-to-live
exceeded
•
pkt too big—Number of packet-too-big messages
sent because a received packet was too large to
forward because of the allowed MTU size
•
redirects—Sent packet redirects
•
echo requests—Echo request (ping) packets
•
echo replies—Echo replies sent
•
rtr solicits—Number of sent router solicitations
•
rtr advertisements—Number of sent router
advertisements
•
neighbor solicits—Number of sent neighbor
solicitations
•
neighbor advertisements—Number of sent neighbor
advertisements
•
Group membership (queries, responses,
reductions)—Number of queries, responses, and
reduction requests sent to a group of which the
interface is assigned
Operational MTU
Value of the MTU
Administrative MTU
Value of the MTU if it has been administratively
overridden using the configuration
Operational speed
Speed of the interface
Administrative speed
Value of the speed if it has been administratively
overridden using the configuration
Creation type
Method by which the interface was created (static or
dynamic)
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Table 55: show ipv6 interface Output Fields (continued)
214
Field Name
Field Description
HTTP Redirect Url
URL to which a subscriber’s initial web browser
session is redirected
ND reachable time
Amount of time (in milliseconds) that the neighbor is
expected to remain reachable
ND duplicate address detection
attempts
Number of times that the router attempts to
determine a duplicate address
ND neighbor solicitation
retransmission interval
Interval in which the router retransmits neighbor
solicitations
ND proxy
Indicates whether the router will reply to solicitations
on behalf of a known neighbor
ND RA source link layer
Indicates whether the RA includes the link layer
ND RA interval
Interval (in seconds) of the neighbor discovery router
advertisement
ND RA lifetime
Lifetime (in seconds) of the neighbor discovery router
advertisement
ND RA managed flag
State of the neighbor discovery router advertisement
managed flag
ND RA other config flag
State of the neighbor discovery router advertisement
other config flag
ND RA advertising prefixes
Configured advertisement prefixes for neighbor
discovery router advertisement
In Received Packets, Bytes
Total number of packets and bytes received on this
interface:
•
Unicast Packets, Bytes—Unicast packets and bytes
received on the IPv6 interface; link-local received
multicast packets (non-multicast-routed frames)
are counted as unicast packets
•
Multicast Packets, Bytes—Multicast packets and
bytes received on the IPv6 interface which are then
multicast-routed are counted as multicast packets
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 10: Monitoring IPv6 Multicast
Table 55: show ipv6 interface Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
In Total Dropped Packets, Bytes
Total number of inbound packets and bytes dropped
on this interface:
Out Forwarded Packets, Bytes
Out Total Dropped Packets
IPv6 policy
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
•
In Policed Packets—Packets that were received
and dropped on the interface for any of the
following reasons: exceeding the token bucket limit,
exceeding the rate limit, a drop action in a policy,
discarded MAC validation packets, a destination
address lookup failure, or when the destination
address is an IP interface that has a route
configured to the null 0 interface.
•
In Invalid Source Address Packets—Packets
received with invalid source address (for example,
spoofed packets)
•
In Error Packets—Number of packets received with
errors
•
In Discarded Packets—Packets received that were
discarded for reasons other than rate limits, errors,
and invalid source address
Total number of packets and bytes that were sent
from this interface:
•
Unicast Packets, Bytes—Unicast packets and bytes
that were sent from this interface
•
Multicast Routed Packets, Bytes—Multicast
packets and bytes that were sent from this
interface
Total number of outbound packets and bytes dropped
by this interface:
•
Out Scheduler Dropped Packets, Bytes—Number
of outbound packets and bytes dropped by the
scheduler
•
Out Policed Packets, Bytes—Number of outbound
packets and bytes dropped because of rate limits
•
Out Discarded Packets—Number of outbound
packets that were discarded for reasons other than
those dropped by the scheduler and those dropped
because of rate limits
Type (input, output, local-input) and name of policy:
•
rate-limit-profile—Name of profile
•
classifier-group entry—Entry index
•
Committed—Number of packets and bytes
conforming to the committed access rate
•
Conformed—Number of packets and bytes that
exceed the committed access rate but conform to
the peak access rate
•
Exceeded—Number of packets and bytes exceeding
the peak access rate
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Table 55: show ipv6 interface Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
queue, traffic class, bound to ipv6
Queue and traffic class bound to the specified IPv6
interface:
•
Queue length—Number of bytes in queue
•
Dropped committed packets, bytes—Total number
of committed packets and bytes dropped by this
interface
•
Dropped conformed packets, bytes—Total number
of conformed packets and bytes dropped by this
interface
•
Dropped exceeded packets, bytes—Total number
of exceeded packets and bytes dropped by this
interface
Monitoring MLD Statistics
Purpose
Action
Display MLD information for interfaces on which you enabled MLD.
To display statistics, including hardware multicast packet replication status, for all IPv6
interfaces on which you enabled MLD:
host1:boston#show ipv6 mld interface
Interface ATM2/0.103 address 13.0.0.1/255.255.255.0
Administrative state enabled, Operational state enabled
Interface parameters:
Version 2
State Querier
Query Interval 125 secs, 125 secs before the next query
Other querier present interval 250 secs
Maximum response time 255 (in 10ths of a second)
Last member query interval 10 (in 10ths of a second)
Robustness 3
No inbound access group
No inbound access source-group
No inbound apply-oif-map
Immediate Leave: disabled
Explicit Host Tracking: enabled
Max-Group limit: No Limit
Admission-Bandwidth limit: No limit
IOA Packet Replication: None
Group Count: 1
Interface statistics:
Rcvd: 2 reports, 0 leaves, 0 wrong version queries
Sent: 2 queries
Groups learnt: 1
Counts: 0 down, 0 init state, 1 querier, 0 non-querier, 1 Total
To display statistics, including hardware multicast packet replication status, for a
particular IPv6 interface on which you enabled MLD:
host1#show ipv6 mld interface gigabitEthernet 3/0.0
Interface GigabitEthernet3/0.0 address 10.1.1.1/255.255.255.0
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Administrative state enabled, Operational state enabled
Interface parameters:
Version 1
State Querier
Query Interval 125 secs, 123 secs before the next query
Other querier present interval 250 secs
Maximum response time 100 (in 10ths of a second)
Last member query interval 10 (in 10ths of a second)
Robustness 3
No inbound access group
No inbound access source-group
No inbound apply-oif-map
Immediate Leave: disabled
Explicit Host Tracking: enabled
Max-Group limit: No Limit
Group Count: 0
IOA packet replication gigabitEthernet 3/8.1
Interface statistics:
Rcvd: 0 reports, 0 leaves, 0 wrong version queries
Sent: 14 queries
Groups learnt: 0
Counts: 0 down, 0 init state, 1 querier, 0 non-querier, 1 Total
Meaning
Table 56 on page 217 lists the show ipv6 mld interface command output fields.
Table 56: show ipv6 mld interface Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Interface
Type of interface and interface specifier. For details
about interface types and specifiers, see Interface
Types and Specifiers in JunosE Command Reference
Guide.
address
IPv6 link-local address of the interface
Administrative state
Status of the interface in the software: enabled or
disabled
Operational state
Physical status of the interface: enabled or disabled
Version
MLD version
State
Function of the interface: querier or nonquerier
Query Interval
Time interval at which this interface sends query
messages
Other querier present interval
Time that the interface waits before declaring itself
as the querier
Maximum response time
Time interval during which this interface expects a
host to respond
Graceful restart
Status of graceful restart: active or complete
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Table 56: show ipv6 mld interface Output Fields (continued)
218
Field Name
Field Description
Last member query interval
Time that this interface waits before sending a new
query to a host that sends a group leave message
Robustness
Number of times this interface sends MLD messages
Inbound access group
Information about IPv6 access lists configured with
the ipv6 mld access-group command
No inbound access group
No IPv6 access list configured with the ipv6 mld
access-group command
Inbound access source-group
Information about IPv6 access lists configured with
the ipv6 mld access-source-group command
No inbound access source-group
No IPv6 access list configured with the ipv6 mld
access-source-group command
Inbound apply-oif-map
Information about OIF map names configured with
the ipv6 mld apply-oif-map command
No inbound apply-oif-map
No OIF map name configured with the ipv6 mld
apply-oif-map command
Immediate Leave
Setting of the ipv6 mld immediate-leave command:
enabled or disabled
Explicit Host Tracking
Setting of the ipv6 mld explicit-tracking command:
enabled or disabled
Max-Group limit
Number of MLD groups that the interface can accept,
as configured with the ipv6 mld group limit command
Group Count
Number of MLD groups that the interface has
accepted
IOA packet replication
Hardware multicast packet replication interface to
which egress multicast packets on this interface are
redirected
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 10: Monitoring IPv6 Multicast
Table 56: show ipv6 mld interface Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Interface statistics Rcvd
Information about MLD messages received on this
interface:
Counts
Related
Documentation
•
reports—Number of group multicast listener reports
received
•
leaves—Number of group multicast listener done
messages received
•
wrong version queries—Number of multicast
listener queries received from devices running a
different version of MLD
•
Interface statistics Sent—Number of MLD
messages this interface has sent
•
Interface statistics Groups learnt—Number of
groups this interface has discovered
Total number of MLD interfaces
•
Configuring IPv6 Hardware Multicast Packet Replication on page 183
•
show interfaces
•
show ipv6 interface
•
show ipv6 mld interface
•
show vlan subinterface
Monitoring IPv6 Multicast Forwarding Entries
Purpose
Action
Displays information about all or specified multicast forwarding entries. You can specify
a multicast group IPv6 address or both a multicast group IPv6 address and a multicast
source IPv6 address to display information about particular multicast forwarding entries.
To display all multicast forwarding entries while bandwidth rate is constant:
host1#show ipv6 mroute
IPv6 Multicast Routing Table
(S, G) uptime d h:m:s[, expires d h:m:s]
[Admission bandwidth: bps]
[QoS bandwidth: bps]
RPF route: addr/mask, incoming interface
neighbor address, owner route-owner
Incoming interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner [(RPF IIF)]
Outgoing interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner, Uptime/Expires
(10:0:0:1:1::, ff0e::1) uptime 0 01:04:12
RPF route: 10:0:0:1::/64, incoming interface ATM2/3.1001
neighbor 10:0:0:1::1, owner Local
Incoming interface list:
ATM2/3.1001 (10:0:0:1::1/64), Accept/Pim (RPF IIF)
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Outgoing interface list:
ATM2/0.200 (21:2:2:21::2:1/60), Forward/Pim, 0 01:04:12/never
(10:0:0:1:2::, ff0e::1) uptime 0 01:04:12
RPF route: 10:0:0:1::/64, incoming interface ATM2/3.1001
neighbor 10:0:0:1::1, owner Local
Incoming interface list:
ATM2/3.1001 (10:0:0:1::1/64), Accept/Pim (RPF IIF)
Outgoing interface list:
ATM2/0.200 (21:2:2:21::2:1/60), Forward/Pim, 0 01:04:12/never
Counts: 2 (S, G) entries
0 (*, G) entries
To display all multicast forwarding entries when bandwidth limit of all the join interfaces
exceeds configured CAC limits:
host1#show ipv6 mroute
IP Multicast Routing Table
(S, G) uptime d h:m:s[, expires d h:m:s]
[Admission bandwidth: bps]
[QoS bandwidth: bps]
RPF route: addr/mask, incoming interface
neighbor address, owner route-owner
Incoming interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner [(RPF IIF)]
Outgoing interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner, Uptime/Expires
(10:0:0:1:1::, ff0e::1) uptime 0 01:04:12
RPF route: 10:0:0:1::/64, incoming interface ATM2/3.1001
neighbor 10:0:0:1::1, owner Local
Incoming interface list:
ATM2/3.1001 (10:0:0:1::1/64), Accept/Pim (RPF IIF)
Outgoing interface list:
ATM2/0.200 (21:2:2:21::2:1/60), Forward/Pim, 0 01:04:12/never
(10:0:0:1:2::, ff0e::1) uptime 0 01:04:12
RPF route: 10:0:0:1::/64, incoming interface ATM2/3.1001
neighbor 10:0:0:1::1, owner Local
Incoming interface list:
ATM2/3.1001 (10:0:0:1::1/64), Accept/Pim (RPF IIF)
Outgoing interface list:
ATM2/0.200 (21:2:2:21::2:1/60), Blocked (join-intf-adm-limit)/IGMP, 0
01:04:12/never
Counts: 2 (S, G) entries
0 (*, G) entries
Meaning
Table 57 on page 220 lists the show ipv6 mroute command output fields.
Table 57: show ipv6 mroute Output Fields
220
Field Name
Field Description
(S,G)
IPv6 addresses of the multicast source and the
multicast group
Uptime
Length of time that the (S,G) pair has been active, in
days hours:minutes:seconds format
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 10: Monitoring IPv6 Multicast
Table 57: show ipv6 mroute Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Expires
Length of time for which the (S,G) pair will be active,
in days hours:minutes:seconds format
Admission bandwidth
Admission bandwidth (in bps)
QoS bandwidth
QoS bandwidth (in bps)
RPF Route
IPv6 address and prefix of the RPF route
Incoming interface
Type and specifier of the incoming interface for the
RPF route
neighbor address
IPv6 address of the neighbor
owner
Owner of the route:
Incoming interface list
Outgoing interface list
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
•
Local—route belonging to the local interface
•
Static—Static route
•
Other protocols—Route established by a protocol
List of incoming interfaces on the router. Details
include:
•
Type of interface and its specifier
•
Action that the interface takes with packets: accept
or discard
•
Multicast protocol that owns the interface
•
Time that the interface has been active in this
multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
•
Time that the interface will cease to be active in
this multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
List of outgoing interfaces on the router. Details
include:
•
Type of interface and its specifier
•
Action that the interface takes with packets:
Forward or Blocked (intf-adm-limit,
join-intf-adm-limit, port-adm-limit, port-limit,
port-priority-limit)
•
Protocol running on the interface: PIM or MLD
•
Time that the interface has been active in this
multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
•
Time that the interface will cease to be active in
this multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
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Table 57: show ipv6 mroute Output Fields (continued)
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Counts
Numbers of types of source group mappings:
•
(S,G)—Number of (S,G) entries
•
(*,G)—Number of (*,G) entries
•
Defining IPv6 Static Routes for Reverse-Path Forwarding on page 167
•
show ipv6 mroute
Monitoring Active IPv6 Multicast Routes
Purpose
Action
Display the active multicast routes.
•
You can specify a multicast group IPv6 address or both a multicast group IPv6 address
and a multicast source IPv6 address to display information about particular multicast
forwarding entries.
•
You can specify the bandwidth threshold to display the active multicast routes with
admission bandwidth greater than the specified bandwidth threshold. The default
bandwidth threshold is 4000 bps.
•
You can use the summary option to see a summary rather than a detailed description.
•
You can use the count option to display the number of active multicast forwarding
entries.
•
You can use the oif-detail option to display the details of the join interfaces
corresponding to the mapped interface when oif-mapping is configured.
•
You can use the statistics option to display statistics for packets received through all
active multicast forwarding entries that the router has added to the multicast routing
table and established on the appropriate line modules.
To display the active multicast routes with admission bandwidth above 10000 bps:
host1#show ipv6 mroute active 10000
Active IP Multicast Routes >=10000 bps
(S, G) uptime d h:m:s[, expires d h:m:s]
[Admission bandwidth: bps]
[QoS bandwidth: bps]
RPF route: addr/mask, incoming interface
neighbor address, owner route-owner
Incoming interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner [(RPF IIF)]
Outgoing interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner, Uptime/Expires
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(52::1, ff3e::1) uptime 0 00:01:07
Admission bandwidth: 47000 bps (adaptive)
QoS bandwidth: 47000 bps (adaptive)
RPF route: 52::/112, incoming interface ATM2/1.17
neighbor 17::2, owner NetmgmtRpf
Incoming interface list:
ATM2/1.17 (fe80::90:1a00:3140:1ff8/128), Accept/MLD (RPF IIF)
Outgoing interface list:
NULL
Counts: 1 (S, G) entries
0 (*, G) entries
To display the summary of active multicast routes:
host1#show ipv6 mroute summary active
Active IP Multicast Routes >=4000 bps
Group Address Source Address
RPF route RPF Iif
#Oifs
--------------- ------------ ----------- --------- ----232.0.0.1
51.0.0.1
51.0.0.0/24
ATM3/1.17
0
232.0.0.2
51.0.0.1
51.0.0.0/24
ATM3/1.17
0
232.0.0.3
51.0.0.1
51.0.0.0/24
ATM3/1.17
0
Counts: 3 (S, G) entries
0 (*, G) entries
Meaning
Table 58 on page 223 lists the show ipv6 mroute active and show ipv6 mroute summary
active commands output fields.
Table 58: show ipv6 mroute active and show ipv6 mroute summary active
Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
(S,G)
IPv6 addresses of the multicast source and the
multicast group
Uptime
Length of time that the (S,G) pair has been active, in
days hours:minutes:seconds format
Expires
Length of time for which the (S,G) pair will be active,
in days hours:minutes:seconds format
Admission bandwidth
Admission bandwidth (in bps)
QoS bandwidth
QoS bandwidth (in bps)
RPF Route
IPv6 address and prefix of the RPF route
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Table 58: show ipv6 mroute active and show ipv6 mroute summary active
Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Incoming interface
Type and specifier of the incoming interface for the
RPF route
neighbor address
IPv6 address of the neighbor
owner
Owner of the route:
Incoming interface list
Outgoing interface list
Counts
224
•
Local—route belonging to the local interface
•
Static—Static route
•
Other protocols—Route established by a protocol
List of incoming interfaces on the router. Details
include:
•
Type of interface and its specifier
•
Action that the interface takes with packets: accept
or discard
•
Multicast protocol that owns the interface
•
Time that the interface has been active in this
multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
•
Time that the interface will cease to be active in
this multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
List of outgoing interfaces on the router. Details
include:
•
Type of interface and its specifier
•
Action that the interface takes with packets:
Forward or Blocked (intf-adm-limit,
join-intf-adm-limit, port-adm-limit, port-limit,
port-priority-limit)
•
Protocol running on the interface: PIM or MLD
•
Time that the interface has been active in this
multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
•
Time that the interface will cease to be active in
this multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
Numbers of types of source group mappings:
•
(S,G)—Number of (S,G) entries
•
(*,G)—Number of (*,G) entries
Group Address
IP address of the multicast group
Source Address
IP address of the multicast source
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 10: Monitoring IPv6 Multicast
Table 58: show ipv6 mroute active and show ipv6 mroute summary active
Output Fields (continued)
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
RPF Iif
Type and identifier for the incoming interface for the
RPF route
#Oifs
Number of outgoing interfaces
•
Defining IPv6 Static Routes for Reverse-Path Forwarding on page 167
•
show ipv6 mroute
Monitoring Multicast Routes on Virtual Router Ports
Purpose
Display information for multicast routes on a port across all virtual routers.
NOTE: This command displays information for mroutes on a port across all
virtual routers.
Action
To display the multicast route port outgoing interface, limits, counts, bandwidth settings,
and bandwidth accepted:
host1#show mroute port count
BW
Port
----1/1/0
1/1/1
Meaning
Priority
Limit
----None
None
Count
----1
2
bps
----None
15000
BW bps
-------None
10000
Hysteresis
---------85
85
Admitted
-------0
2000
Table 15 on page 55 lists the output fields of the show mroute port count command.
Table 59: show mroute port count Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Port
Slot or port value on the router
Limit
None (reserved for future functionality)
Count
Number of multicast route outgoing interfaces on the
specified port
BW bps
Bandwidth limit (in bits per second)
Priority BW bps
Priority bandwidth limit (in bits per second)
Admitted
Bandwidth admitted on the port (in bits per second)
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Related
Documentation
•
Defining a Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 8
•
Creating Mroute Port Limits on page 29
•
Enabling Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Control on page 30
•
show mroute port count
Monitoring IPv6 Multicast Entries in a Source or Group
Purpose
Action
Display information about the number of groups and sources.
•
You can specify a multicast group address or both a multicast group address and a
multicast source address to display information about a particular multicast forwarding
entry.
•
You can use the active option to display information for the active multicast routes.
•
You can specify the bandwidth threshold along with the active option to display
information for the active multicast routes with admission bandwidth greater than the
specified bandwidth threshold. The default bandwidth threshold is 4000 bps.
To display the number of groups and sources:
host1#show ipv6 mroute count
IPv6 Multicast Routing Table
Counts: 2000 (S, G) entries
0 (*, G) entries
Meaning
Table 60 on page 226 lists the show ipv6 mroute count command output fields.
Table 60: show ipv6 mroute count Output Fields
Related
Documentation
•
Field Name
Field Description
Counts
Number of types of source group mappings:
•
(S,G)—Number of (S,G) entries
•
(*,G)—Number of (*,G) entries
show ipv6 mroute
Monitoring Join Interface Details When IPv6 OIF Mapping Is Configured
Purpose
226
Display details of the join interfaces corresponding to the mapped interfaces when OIF
mapping is configured.
•
You can specify a multicast group address or both a multicast group address and a
multicast source address to display information about a particular multicast forwarding
entry.
•
You can use the active option to display information for the active multicast routes.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 10: Monitoring IPv6 Multicast
•
Action
You can specify the bandwidth threshold along with the active option to display
information for the active multicast routes with admission bandwidth greater than the
specified bandwidth threshold. The default bandwidth threshold is 4000 bps.
To display details of the join interfaces:
host1#show ipv6 mroute oif-detail
IPv6 Multicast Routing Table
(S, G) uptime d h:m:s[, expires d h:m:s]
[Data rate: Kbps] [SPT threshold: Kbps]
[Threshold: Kbps]
[Admission bandwidth: bps]
[QoS bandwidth: bps]
RPF route: addr/mask, incoming interface
neighbor address, owner route-owner
Incoming interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner [(RPF IIF)]
Outgoing interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner, Uptime/Expires
Join interface list:
Interface (addr/mask)[, State/Owner]
(2000::1, ff1e::1) uptime 0 00:00:04
Admission bandwidth: 60000000 bps
QoS bandwidth: 0 bps (adaptive)
RPF route: 2000::1/128, incoming interface GigabitEthernet13/1/1
neighbor 2000::1, owner Local
Incoming interface list:
GigabitEthernet13/1/1 (fe80::290:1aff:fe42:8e5a/128), Accept/Mld (RPF IIF)
Outgoing interface list:
GigabitEthernet13/1/4 (fe80::290:1aff:fe42:8e5d/128), Blocked
(intf-adm-limit)/Mld, 0 00:00:04/never
Join interface list:
GigabitEthernet15/0/1.10 (fe80::290:1aff:fe42:2731/128)
Counts: 1 (S, G) entries
0 (*, G) entries
Meaning
Table 61 on page 227 lists the show ipv6 mroute oif-detail command output fields.
Table 61: show ipv6 mroute oif-detail Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
(S,G)
IPv6 addresses of the multicast source and the
multicast group
Uptime
Length of time that the (S,G) pair has been active, in
days hours:minutes:seconds format
Expires
Length of time for which the (S,G) pair will be active,
in days hours:minutes:seconds format
Admission bandwidth
Admission bandwidth (in bps)
QoS bandwidth
QoS bandwidth (in bps)
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Table 61: show ipv6 mroute oif-detail Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
RPF Route
IPv6 address and prefix of the RPF route
Incoming interface
Type and specifier of the incoming interface for the
RPF route
neighbor address
IPv6 address of the neighbor
owner
Owner of the route:
Incoming interface list
Outgoing interface list
228
•
Local—route belonging to the local interface
•
Static—Static route
•
Other protocols—Route established by a protocol
List of incoming interfaces on the router. Details
include:
•
Type of interface and its specifier
•
Action that the interface takes with packets: accept
or discard
•
Multicast protocol that owns the interface
•
Time that the interface has been active in this
multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
•
Time that the interface will cease to be active in
this multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
List of outgoing interfaces on the router. Details
include:
•
Type of interface and its specifier
•
Action that the interface takes with packets:
Forward or Blocked (intf-adm-limit,
join-intf-adm-limit, port-adm-limit, port-limit,
port-priority-limit)
•
Protocol running on the interface: PIM or MLD
•
Time that the interface has been active in this
multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
•
Time that the interface will cease to be active in
this multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 10: Monitoring IPv6 Multicast
Table 61: show ipv6 mroute oif-detail Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Join interface list
List of join interfaces on the router. Details include:
Counts
Related
Documentation
•
Type of interface and its specifier
•
Action that the interface takes with packets:
Forward or Blocked (intf-adm-limit,
join-intf-adm-limit, port-adm-limit, port-limit,
port-priority-adm-limit)
•
Protocol running on the interface: PIM, DVMRP, or
IGMP
•
Amount of time that the interface has been active
in this multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
•
Length of time that the interface can remain active
in this multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format or never
Numbers of types of source group mappings:
•
(S,G)—Number of (S,G) entries
•
(*,G)—Number of (*,G) entries
•
Blocking IPv6 Mroutes on page 185
•
Creating IPv6 Mroute Port Limits on page 188
•
show ipv6 mroute
Monitoring IPv6 Multicast Statistics
Purpose
Action
Display statistics for packets received through multicast routes that the router has added
to the multicast routing table and established on the appropriate line modules.
•
You can specify a multicast group address or both a multicast group address and a
multicast source address to display information about a particular multicast forwarding
entry.
•
You can use the active option to display information for the active multicast routes.
•
You can specify the bandwidth threshold along with the active option to display
information for the active multicast routes with admission bandwidth greater than the
specified bandwidth threshold. The default bandwidth threshold is 4000 bps.
To display the statistics of the multicast routes added to the multicast routing table:
host#show ipv6 mroute statistics
IPv6 Multicast Routing Table
(S, G) uptime d h:m:s[, expires d h:m:s]
[Admission bandwidth: bps]
[QoS bandwidth: bps]
RPF route: addr/mask, incoming interface
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neighbor address, owner route-owner
Incoming interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner [(RPF IIF)]
Outgoing interface list:
Interface (addr/mask), State/Owner, Uptime/Expires
(10:0:0:1:1::, ff0e::1) uptime 0 01:05:23
Admission bandwidth:
RPF route: 10:0:0:1::/64, incoming interface ATM2/3.1001
neighbor 10:0:0:1::1, owner Local
Incoming interface list:
ATM2/3.1001 (10:0:0:1::1/64), Accept/Pim (RPF IIF)
Outgoing interface list:
ATM2/0.200 (21:2:2:21::2:1/60), Forward/Pim, 0 01:05:23/never
Statistics:
Received
: 346 pkts, 22144 bytes
Forwarded : 346 pkts, 22144 bytes
Rcvd on OIF: 0 pkts
(10:0:0:1:2::, ff0e::1) uptime 0 01:05:23
RPF route: 10:0:0:1::/64, incoming interface ATM2/3.1001
neighbor 10:0:0:1::1, owner Local
Incoming interface list:
ATM2/3.1001 (10:0:0:1::1/64), Accept/Pim (RPF IIF)
Outgoing interface list:
ATM2/0.200 (21:2:2:21::2:1/60), Forward/Pim, 0 01:05:26/never
Statistics:
Received
: 346 pkts, 22144 bytes
Forwarded : 346 pkts, 22144 bytes
Rcvd on OIF: 0 pkts
Meaning
Table 62 on page 230 lists the show ipv6 mroute statistics command output fields.
Table 62: show ipv6 mroute statistics Output Fields
230
Field Name
Field Description
(S,G)
IPv6 addresses of the multicast source and the
multicast group
Uptime
Length of time that the (S,G) pair has been active, in
days hours:minutes:seconds format
Expires
Length of time for which the (S,G) pair will be active,
in days hours:minutes:seconds format
Admission bandwidth
Admission bandwidth (in bps)
QoS bandwidth
QoS bandwidth (in bps)
RPF Route
IPv6 address and prefix of the RPF route
Incoming interface
Type and specifier of the incoming interface for the
RPF route
neighbor address
IPv6 address of the neighbor
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 10: Monitoring IPv6 Multicast
Table 62: show ipv6 mroute statistics Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
owner
Owner of the route:
Incoming interface list
Outgoing interface list
Statistics
•
Local—route belonging to the local interface
•
Static—Static route
•
Other protocols—Route established by a protocol
List of incoming interfaces on the router. Details
include:
•
Type of interface and its specifier
•
Action that the interface takes with packets: accept
or discard
•
Multicast protocol that owns the interface
•
Time that the interface has been active in this
multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
•
Time that the interface will cease to be active in
this multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
List of outgoing interfaces on the router. Details
include:
•
Type of interface and its specifier
•
Action that the interface takes with packets:
Forward or Blocked (intf-adm-limit,
join-intf-adm-limit, port-adm-limit, port-limit,
port-priority-limit)
•
Protocol running on the interface: PIM or MLD
•
Time that the interface has been active in this
multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
•
Time that the interface will cease to be active in
this multicast forwarding entry, in days
hours:minutes:seconds format
•
Received—Number of packets and bytes that the
virtual router received for this multicast route
•
Forwarded—Number of packets and statistics that
the virtual router has forwarded for this multicast
route
•
Rcvd on OIF—Number of packets and statistics
that the virtual router has received on the OIF for
this multicast route
NOTE: The display shows statistics after the virtual
router has added the multicast route to the multicast
routing table and established the route on the
appropriate line module. Statistics for interactions
before the route is established on the line module are
not displayed.
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Related
Documentation
•
Blocking IPv6 Mroutes on page 185
•
Creating IPv6 Mroute Port Limits on page 188
•
show ipv6 mroute
Monitoring Summary Information of IPv6 Multicast Routes
Purpose
Action
Display a summary of all or specified multicast routes.
•
You can specify a multicast group address or both a multicast group address and a
multicast source address to display information about a particular multicast forwarding
entry.
•
You can use the active option to display information for the active multicast routes.
•
You can specify the bandwidth threshold along with the active option to display
information for the active multicast routes with admission bandwidth greater than the
specified bandwidth threshold. The default bandwidth threshold is 4000 bps.
To display a summary of all multicast routes:
host1#show ipv6 mroute summary
IPv6 Multicast Routing Table
Group Address
--------------ff0e::1
ff0e::1
ff0e::1
ff0e::1
ff0e::1
ff0e::1
ff0e::1
ff0e::1
ff0e::1
ff0e::1
ff0e::1
ff0e::1
ff0e::1
ff0e::1
ff0e::1
Source Address
--------------10:0:0:1:1::
10:0:0:1:2::
10:0:0:1:3::
10:0:0:1:4::
10:0:0:1:5::
10:0:0:1:6::
10:0:0:1:7::
10:0:0:1:8::
10:0:0:1:9::
10:0:0:1:a::
10:0:0:1:b::
10:0:0:1:c::
10:0:0:1:d::
10:0:0:1:e::
10:0:0:1:f::
RPF route
-----------------10:0:0:1::/64
10:0:0:1::/64
10:0:0:1::/64
10:0:0:1::/64
10:0:0:1::/64
10:0:0:1::/64
10:0:0:1::/64
10:0:0:1::/64
10:0:0:1::/64
10:0:0:1::/64
10:0:0:1::/64
10:0:0:1::/64
10:0:0:1::/64
10:0:0:1::/64
10:0:0:1::/64
RPF Iif
--------------ATM2/3.1001
ATM2/3.1001
ATM2/3.1001
ATM2/3.1001
ATM2/3.1001
ATM2/3.1001
ATM2/3.1001
ATM2/3.1001
ATM2/3.1001
ATM2/3.1001
ATM2/3.1001
ATM2/3.1001
ATM2/3.1001
ATM2/3.1001
ATM2/3.1001
#Oifs
----1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Counts: 16 (S, G) entries
0 (*, G) entries
Meaning
Table 63 on page 232 lists the show ipv6 mroute summary command output fields.
Table 63: show ipv6 mroute summary Output Fields
232
Field Name
Field Description
Group Address
IP address of the multicast group
Source Address
IP address of the multicast source
RPF Route
IP address and network mask of the RPF route
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 10: Monitoring IPv6 Multicast
Table 63: show ipv6 mroute summary Output Fields (continued)
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
RPF Iif
Type and identifier for the incoming interface for the
RPF route
#Oifs
Number of outgoing interfaces
Counts
Numbers of types of (S,G) mappings:
•
(S,G)—Number of (S,G) entries
•
(*,G)—Number of (*,G) entries
•
Defining IPv6 Static Routes for Reverse-Path Forwarding on page 167
•
show ipv6 mroute
Monitoring IPv6 Multicast Protocols Enabled on the Router
Purpose
Action
Display information about multicast protocols enabled on the router.
To display information about enabled multicast protocols:
host1:2#show ipv6 multicast protocols
Multicast protocols:
Protocol Pim
Type: Sparse
Interfaces: 1 registered, 1 owned
Registered interfaces:
ATM2/1.103 (21:2:2:22::1:2/60) owner Pim
Protocol Mld
Type: Local
Interfaces: 1000 registered, 1000 owned
Registered interfaces:
ATM2/0.131 (31:2:2:22::2:2/604) local Mld owner Mld
Admission-bandwidth 2000000/10000000 bps
QoS Adjust 2000 bps
ATM2/0.132 (31:2:2:22::2:3/60) local Mld owner Mld
Admission-bandwidth 0/10000000 bps
QoS Adjust 0 bps
ATM2/0.133 (31:2:2:22::2:4/60) local Mld owner Mld
Admission-bandwidth 8000000/10000000 bps, 2 Blocked OIFs
QoS Adjust 0 bps
...
Count: 2 protocols
Meaning
Table 64 on page 233 lists the show ipv6 multicast protocols command output fields.
Table 64: show ipv6 multicast protocols Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Protocol
Name of the multicast protocol
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Table 64: show ipv6 multicast protocols Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Type
Mode of the multicast protocol:
Interfaces
Registered interfaces
Count
Related
Documentation
•
For PIM—Sparse
•
For MLD—Local
•
registered—Number of interfaces on which the
protocol is configured
•
owned—Number of interfaces that a protocol owns.
If you configure only MLD on an interface, MLD
owns the interface. However, if you configure MLD
and PIM on the same interface, PIM owns the
interface.
Includes the following information about interfaces
on which the protocol is configured:
•
Types and identifiers of interfaces. For details about
interface types and specifiers, see Interface Types
and Specifiers in JunosE Command Reference Guide.
•
Protocols configured on the interface and the
protocol that owns the interface. If you configure
only MLD on an interface, MLD owns the interface.
However, if you configure MLD and PIM on the same
interface, PIM owns the interface.
•
Admitted bandwidth / configured admission
bandwidth (in bps)
•
Number of blocked OIFs
•
QoS adjustment bandwidth (in bps)
Number of multicast protocols on the virtual router
•
Example: Configuring an IPv6 Multicast Bandwidth Map on page 173
•
Activating IPv6 Multicast QoS Adjustment Functions on page 177
•
Enabling Interface-Level Admission Bandwidth Limitation for IPv6 on page 186
•
Enabling Port-Level Admission Bandwidth Limitation for IPv6 on page 189
•
show ipv6 multicast protocols
Monitoring Summary Information of IPv6 Multicast Protocols Enabled on the Router
Purpose
Action
Display information about multicast protocols enabled on the router.
To display a summary of information about multicast protocols enabled on the router:
host1#show ipv6 multicast protocols brief
Protocol Registered Owned
Type
Interfaces Interfaces
--------- ---------- ---------- -------------------
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Chapter 10: Monitoring IPv6 Multicast
Pim
Mld
1
1
1
1
Sparse
Local
Count: 2 protocols
Meaning
Table 65 on page 235 lists the show ipv6 multicast protocols brief command output
fields.
Table 65: show ipv6 multicast protocols brief Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Protocol
Name of the multicast protocol
Registered Interfaces
Number of interfaces on which the protocol is
configured
Owned Interfaces
Number of interfaces that a protocol owns. If you
configure only MLD on an interface, MLD owns the
interface. However, if you configure MLD and PIM on
the same interface, PIM owns the interface
Type
Mode of the multicast protocol:
Count
Related
Documentation
•
•
For PIM—Sparse
•
For MLD—Local
Number of multicast protocols on the virtual router
show ipv6 multicast protocols
Monitoring IPv6 Multicast Status on a Virtual Router
Purpose
Action
Display information about the status of IPv6 multicast on the virtual router.
To display information about the status of IPv6 multicast on the virtual router:
host1#show ipv6 multicast routing
Multicast forwarding is enabled on this router
Multicast graceful restart is complete (timer 0 seconds) on this router
Multicast cache-miss processing is enabled on this router
Multicast forwarding is enabled on this router
Multicast graceful restart is complete (timer 0 seconds) on this router
Multicast cache-miss processing is enabled on this router
Related
Documentation
•
Enabling IPv6 Multicast on page 167
•
show ipv6 multicast routing
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Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 11
Configuring MLD and MLD Proxy
Hosts use Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) protocol in IPv6 to report their multicast
group memberships to neighboring routers. Similarly, multicast routers, such as the
E Series router, use MLD to discover which of their hosts belong to multicast groups.
This chapter describes how to configure MLD and MLD proxy on an E Series router; it
contains the following sections:
•
MLD Overview on page 237
•
MLD Platform Considerations on page 239
•
MLD References on page 240
•
Static and Dynamic MLD Interfaces on page 240
•
Enabling MLD on an Interface on page 241
•
Configuring MLD Settings on an Interface on page 242
•
Configuring Multicast Groups for MLD on page 244
•
MLD SSM Mapping Overview on page 247
•
Overview of Limiting the Number of Accepted MLD Groups on page 248
•
MLD Traffic Overview on page 249
•
MLD Explicit Host Tracking Overview on page 249
•
Configuring MLD Attributes on page 250
•
MLD Proxy Overview on page 254
•
Configuring MLD Proxy on page 255
•
Establishing the MLD Proxy Baseline on page 256
MLD Overview
The IPv6 address scheme uses hexadecimal FF at the start of an address for IPv6
multicast. Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) is a protocol that uses these addresses.
The following addresses have specific functions:
•
You can assign only multicast addresses of global-scope (that is, containing an FFxE
prefix, where x is the flags field) to a multicast group.
•
FF02::1 is the link-scope all-nodes address—A packet sent to this address reaches all
nodes on a subnetwork.
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•
FF02::2 is the link-scope all-routers address—A packet sent to this address reaches
all routers on a subnetwork.
•
FF02::16 is the link-scope all-MLDv2 routers address—A packet sent to this address
reaches all MLDv2 routers on a subnetwork.
This implementation of MLD complies with MLD versions 1 and 2. MLDv2 allows for
source-specific join and leave messages and is backward compatible with MLDv1.
Configuring MLDv1 with the SSM mapping feature provides support for source-specific
joins.
MLDv1 mode interfaces exchange the following types of messages between routers and
hosts:
•
Multicast Listener Queries on page 238
•
Multicast Listener Reports on page 239
•
Multicast Listener Done Messages on page 239
MLDv2 mode interfaces exchange the following types of messages with MLDv2 hosts:
•
Multicast Listener Queries on page 238
•
MLDv2 “Multicast Listener Reports” on page 239
Multicast Listener Queries
A multicast router can be a querier or a nonquerier. There is only one querier on a network
at any time. Multicast routers monitor queries from other multicast routers to determine
the status of the querier. If the querier hears a query from a router with a lower IPv6
address, it relinquishes its role to that router.
MLDv1 and MLDv2 mode interfaces send two types of multicast listener queries to hosts
on the network:
•
General queries to the all-nodes address (FF02::1)
•
Specific queries to the appropriate multicast group address
MLDv2 mode interfaces send the following type of queries to MLDv2 hosts:
•
General queries
•
Group-specific queries
•
Source-specific queries
The purpose of a membership group query is to discover the multicast groups to which
a host belongs.
MLDv1 and MLDv2 multicast listener queries have a Max Response Time field. This
response time is the maximum that a host can take to reply to a query.
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Chapter 11: Configuring MLD and MLD Proxy
Multicast Listener Reports
When a host receives a multicast listener query, it identifies the groups associated with
the query and determines to which groups it belongs. The host then sets a timer, with a
value less than the Max Response Time field in the query, for each group to which it
belongs.
When the timer expires, the host sends a multicast listener report to the group address.
When a multicast router receives a report, it adds the group to the membership list for
the network and sets a timer to the multicast address listening interval. If this timer expires
before the router receives another multicast listener report, the router determines that
the group has no members left on the network.
If the router does not receive any reports for a specific multicast group within the maximum
response time, it determines that the group has no members on the network. The router
does not forward subsequent multicasts for that group to the network.
MLDv2 supports an extended report format that allows you to report multiple groups
and source lists in a single report. These reports are addressed to the all-MLDv2 router's
multicast address (FF02::16).
Multicast Listener Done Messages
When an MLDv1 host leaves a group, it sends a multicast listener done message to
multicast routers on the network. A host generally addresses multicast listener done
messages to the all-routers address, FF02::2.
When an MLDv2 host leaves a group, it sends a multicast listener report. This report
includes an empty source list for that group.
Related
Documentation
•
MLD Platform Considerations on page 239
•
MLD References on page 240
MLD Platform Considerations
For information about modules that support MLD on the ERX7xx models, ERX14xx models,
and the ERX310 Broadband Services Router:
•
See ERX Module Guide, Table 1, Module Combinations for detailed module specifications.
•
See ERX Module Guide, Appendix A, Module Protocol Support for information about the
modules that support MLD.
For information about modules that support MLD on the E120 and E320 Broadband
Services Routers:
•
See E120 and E320 Module Guide, Table 1, Modules and IOAs for detailed module
specifications.
•
See E120 and E320 Module Guide, Appendix A, IOA Protocol Support for information
about the modules that support MLD.
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Related
Documentation
•
MLD Overview on page 237
•
MLD References on page 240
MLD References
For more information about MLD, see the following resources:
Related
Documentation
•
RFC 3710—Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) for IPv6 (October 1999) on page 578
•
IGMP/MLD-based Multicast Forwarding ('IGMP/MLD
Proxying')—draft-ietf-magma-igmp-proxy-06.txt (October 2004 expiration) on
page 587
•
Multicast Group Membership Discovery MIB—draft-ietf-magma-mgmd-mib-06.txt
(October 2004 expiration) on page 587
•
MLD Overview on page 237
•
MLD Platform Considerations on page 239
Static and Dynamic MLD Interfaces
The router supports static and dynamic Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) interfaces.
Unlike static interfaces, dynamic interfaces are not restored when you reboot the router.
For some protocols, dynamic layers can build on static layers in an interface; however,
in a dynamic MLD interface, all the layers are dynamic. See Figure 20 on page 240 for
examples of static and dynamic MLD interfaces.
Figure 20: Static and Dynamic MLD Interfaces
Static MLD interfaces are configured with software such as the command-line interface
(CLI) or an SNMP application; dynamic MLD interfaces are configured with a profile. A
profile comprises a set of attributes for an interface; a profile for dynamic MLD interfaces
contains attributes for configuring all the layers in the interface.
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You define a profile by using the same CLI commands that you use to configure a static
MLD interface; however, the mode in which you use the commands differs. Use the
commands in Interface Configuration mode to configure a static MLD interface and in
Profile Configuration mode to define a profile.
When you have defined a profile, you can apply it to an interface or a group of interfaces.
Profiles provide an efficient method of creating and managing large numbers of dynamic
interfaces. For detailed information about creating and assigning profiles, see Configuring
Dynamic Interfaces in the JunosE Link Layer Configuration Guide. When you create a profile
for dynamic MLD interfaces, specify attributes for configuring all layers in the interface.
You use the MLD commands shown in Table 66 on page 241 to configure a static MLD
interface. You also use these commands to define the attributes for the MLD layer when
you create a profile for dynamic MLD interfaces.
Table 66: Static MLD Commands
ipv6 mld
ipv6 mld query-interval
ipv6 mld access-group
ipv6 mld query-max-response-time
ipv6 mld access-source-group
ipv6 mld robustness
ipv6 mld explicit-tracking
ipv6 mld static-include
ipv6 mld group limit
ipv6 mld static-exclude
ipv6 mld immediate-leave
ipv6 mld static-group
ipv6 mld last-member-query-interval
ipv6 mld version
ipv6 mld querier-timeout
You can also use various MLD-specific RADIUS attributes in RADIUS Access-Accept
messages as an alternative method of configuring certain values. See Juniper Networks
VSAs Supported for Subscriber AAA Access Messages for additional information.
Related
Documentation
•
MLD Overview on page 237
•
MLD Platform Considerations on page 239
•
MLD References on page 240
Enabling MLD on an Interface
You must start MLD on each interface that you want to use the protocol. You can configure
MLD and PIM on the same interface. If you configure only MLD on an interface, the router
determines that MLD owns that interface. If you configure MLD and PIM on an interface,
the router determines that PIM owns the interface.
In an MLDv1 or MLDv2 network, the querier is the router with the lowest IPv6 address.
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NOTE: You can configure MLD only on IPv6 interfaces. For information about
configuring IPv6 interfaces, see Configuring IPv6 in the JunosE IP, IPv6, and
IGP Configuration Guide.
To start MLD and set the MLD version on the interface, complete the following steps:
1.
Enable MLD on the interface (MLDv2 is the default version).
host1:boston(config-if)#ipv6 mld
Use the no version to disable MLD on an interface.
2. (MLDv1) Specify the MLD version for the interface.
host1:boston(config-if)#ipv6 mld version 1
Use the no version to set the version to the default, MLDv2.
Related
Documentation
•
Monitoring MLD Information on a Virtual Router on page 259
•
Monitoring MLD Groups on page 260
•
Monitoring MLD Interfaces on page 262
•
ipv6 mld
•
ipv6 mld version
Configuring MLD Settings on an Interface
When you start MLD on an interface, it operates with the default settings. You can,
however, modify:
•
The method that the router uses to remove hosts from multicast groups
•
The time interval at which the querier sends multicast listener queries
•
The time that a querier waits before sending a new query to hosts from which it receives
multicast listener done messages
•
The time that a non-querier waits for queries from the current querier before sending
query messages to assume responsibility of querier
•
The time that a host can take to reply to a query (maximum response time)
•
The number of times that the router sends each MLD message from this interface
NOTE: You can configure MLD only on IPv6 interfaces. For information about
configuring IPv6 interfaces, see Configuring IPv6 in the JunosE IP, IPv6, and
IGP Configuration Guide.
To configure MLD settings for an interface:
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•
Enable the immediate-leave feature.
host1:boston(config-if)#ipv6 mld immediate-leave
The router immediately removes a host from a multicast group after receiving a
multicast listener done message from the host associated with this interface.
Use the no version to restore the default behavior, in which the router removes a host
from a multicast group if that host does not return a multicast listener report within a
certain length of time after receiving a multicast listener query from the router.
CAUTION: Issue this command only on MLD interfaces to which one MLD
host is connected. If more than one MLD host is connected to a LAN through
the same interface, and one host sends a done message, the router removes
all hosts on the interface from the multicast group. The router loses contact
with the hosts that should remain in the multicast group until they send
join requests in response to the router's next general multicast listener
query.
NOTE: As an alternative method, you can configure the immediate-leave
feature using the MLD-Immediate-Leave RADIUS attribute (VSA 26-100)
in RADIUS Access-Accept messages. The RADIUS setting takes precedence
over a CLI setting. The radius ignore command is used to ignore or accept
RADIUS attributes from Access-Accept messages.
•
Configure the last member query interval, which specifies the maximum time the router
will wait for a response after sending a last member query. Using a lower value allows
members to leave groups more quickly.
host1:boston(config-if)#ipv6 mld last-member-query-interval 90
Use the no version to restore the default, 10-tenths of a second (1 second).
•
Configure the time that the interface waits before declaring itself as the querier.
host1:boston(config-if)#ipv6 mld querier-timeout 200
Use the no version to set the time to the default, twice the query interval.
•
Configure the query interval, which specifies how often the router sends MLD host-query
packets from the interface.
host1:boston(config-if)#ipv6 mld query-interval 100
Use the no version to set the polling interval to the default, 125 seconds.
NOTE: As an alternative method, you can configure the query interval using
the MLD-Query-Interval RADIUS attribute (VSA 26-98) in RADIUS
Access-Accept messages. The RADIUS setting takes precedence over a
CLI setting. The radius ignore command is used to ignore or accept RADIUS
attributes from Access-Accept messages.
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•
Configure the maximum response time, which specifies the period during which the
host is expected to respond to an MLD query. MLDv1 and MLDv2 include this value in
MLD query messages sent out on the interface. Using a lower value allows members
to join and leave groups more quickly.
host1:boston(config-if)#ipv6 mld query-max-response-time 120
Use the no version to restore the default, 100 tenths of a second (10 seconds).
NOTE: As an alternative method, you can configure the query maximum
response time using the MLD-Query-Max-Resp-Time RADIUS attribute
(VSA 26-99) in RADIUS Access-Accept messages. The RADIUS setting
takes precedence over a CLI setting. The radius ignore command is used
to ignore or accept RADIUS attributes from Access-Accept messages.
•
Configure the robustness value, which specifies the number of times that the router
sends MLD group-specific queries before declaring a group to no longer have any
members on the interface.
host1:boston(config-if)#ipv6 mld robustness 2
Use the no version to restore the default, 3.
Related
Documentation
•
Monitoring MLD Interfaces on page 262
•
Monitoring Summary Information for MLD Interfaces on page 266
•
Juniper Networks VSAs Supported for Subscriber AAA Access Messages
•
CLI Commands Used to Include or Exclude Attributes in RADIUS Messages
•
ipv6 mld immediate-leave
•
ipv6 mld last-member-query-interval
•
ipv6 mld querier-timeout
•
ipv6 mld query-interval
•
ipv6 mld query-max-response-time
•
ipv6 mld robustness
•
radius ignore
Configuring Multicast Groups for MLD
You can configure various attributes related to MLD multicast groups. This topic describes
how to configure multicast group attributes.
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NOTE: You can configure MLD only on IPv6 interfaces. For information about
configuring IPv6 interfaces, see Configuring IPv6 in the JunosE IP, IPv6, and
IGP Configuration Guide.
•
Specifying MLD Multicast Groups on page 245
•
Assigning an MLD Multicast Group to an Interface on page 246
•
Configuring MLD Group Outgoing Interface Mapping on page 246
Specifying MLD Multicast Groups
You can use a standard IPv6 access list to specify the multicast groups that a host can
join.
To restrict the host to join only the groups permitted by the IPv6 access list:
•
Restrict hosts on this subnetwork to join only multicast groups on the specified IPv6
access list. The access list is queried whenever the router receives an MLDv1 report
requesting membership of a group and MLDv2 ChangeToInclude, IsInclude,
ChangeToExclude, or IsExclude reports. The request is ignored if the access list query
fails. The ipv6 mld access-group command uses IPv6 access lists, which allow both
source and destination/group addresses to be specified. You must set the source
address to any.
host1:boston(config-if)#ipv6 mld access-group boston-list
Use the no version to dissociate the interface from an access list and to allow hosts
on the interface to join any multicast group.
NOTE: As an alternative method, you can restrict the hosts using the
MLD-Access-Name RADIUS attribute (VSA 26-74) in RADIUS
Access-Accept messages. The radius ignore command is used to ignore
or accept RADIUS attributes from Access-Accept messages.
•
Restrict hosts on this subnetwork to membership only in (S,G) pairs (also known as
channels) permitted by the specified IPv6 access list. When configured, both source
and group addresses query the associated access list whenever the router receives an
MLDv2 report requesting membership of the (S,G) pairs (that is, the router receives an
MLDv2 ChangeToInclude, IsInclude, or AllowNewSource group report). The request is
ignored if the access list query fails. The ipv6 mld access-source-group command
uses IPv6 access lists, which allow both source and destination group addresses to be
specified.
host1:boston(config-if)#ipv6 mld access-source-group dallas-list
Use the no version to remove any access list restriction.
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NOTE: As an alternative method, you can restrict the hosts using the
MLD-Access-Src-Name RADIUS attribute (VSA 26-75) in RADIUS
Access-Accept messages. The radius ignore command is used to ignore
or accept RADIUS attributes from Access-Accept messages.
Assigning an MLD Multicast Group to an Interface
You can assign an interface to send and receive all traffic for a particular multicast group.
This feature allows you to control MLD traffic and to test the behavior of multicast
protocols in the network.
To send and receive all traffic for a multicast group from the interface:
•
Issue the ipv6 mld static-group command in Interface Configuration mode. The
interface sets no timers for this group.
host1:boston(config-if)#ipv6 mld static-group ff0e::1
Use the no version to remove the group from the interface.
Configuring MLD Group Outgoing Interface Mapping
You can configure an MLD protocol interface to use a different OIF for
multicast-data-forwarding by applying an OIF map. When you configure an OIF map on
an MLD protocol interface, the map is applied to all MLD membership requests that the
interface receives. To configure OIF mapping on an interface, you first create the OIF map
using the ipv6 mld oif-map command and then apply that map to an interface with the
ipv6 mld apply-oif-map command.
To properly configure an interface used in the OIF map for multicast-data-forwarding
capability, you must configure the interface version as passive with the ipv6 mld version
command. You can either specify a passive interface as the OIF or specify the OIF as self
(to use the MLD protocol interface as the OIF) in the ipv6 mld oif-map command.
To configure group outgoing interface mapping:
1.
Create an OIF map.
host1(config)#ipv6 mld oif-map OIFMAP atm 3/0.1 ff0e::1:1/128 2001::1:1/128
host1(config)#ipv6 mld oif-map OIFMAP atm 3/0.2 ff0e::1:1/128 2001::1:1/128
host1(config)#ipv6 mld oif-map OIFMAP atm 3/0.3 ff0e::1:1/128
host1(config)#ipv6 mld oif-map OIFMAP atm 3/0.4 ff0e::1:0/112 2001::1:1/128
host1(config)#ipv6 mld oif-map OIFMAP atm 3/0.5 ff0e::1:0/112 2001::1:1/128
host1(config)#ipv6 mld oif-map OIFMAP self ::/0 2001::1:0/112
Use the no version to remove an outgoing interface map attribute.
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NOTE: As an alternative method, you can create the OIF map using the
MLD-OIF-Map-Name RADIUS attribute (VSA 26-76) in RADIUS
Access-Accept messages. The radius ignore command is used to ignore
or accept RADIUS attributes from Access-Accept messages.
2. Apply the created OIF map to the current interface.
host1(config-subif)#ipv6 mld apply-oif-map OIFMAP
Use the no version to remove the outgoing interface map association from the interface.
3. Configure the MLD version for the interface as passive with only
multicast-data-forwarding capability.
host1:dallas(config-if)#ipv6 mld version passive
Use the no version to set the version to the default, MLDv2.
NOTE: As an alternative method, you can configure the MLD version using
the MLD-Version RADIUS attribute (VSA 26-77) in RADIUS Access-Accept
messages. The radius ignore command is used to ignore or accept RADIUS
attributes from Access-Accept messages.
Related
Documentation
•
Overview of Limiting the Number of Accepted MLD Groups on page 248
•
Limiting the Number of Accepted MLD Groups on page 251
•
Monitoring MLD Groups on page 260
•
Juniper Networks VSAs Supported for Subscriber AAA Access Messages
•
CLI Commands Used to Include or Exclude Attributes in RADIUS Messages
•
ipv6 mld access-group
•
ipv6 mld access-source-group
•
ipv6 mld apply-oif-map
•
ipv6 mld oif-map
•
ipv6 mld static-group
•
ipv6 mld version
•
radius ignore
MLD SSM Mapping Overview
Source-specific multicast (SSM) mapping enables the router to determine one or more
source addresses for group G. The mapping effectively translates a Multicast Listener
Discovery version 1 (MLDv1) multicast listener report to an MLDv2 report, enabling the
router to continue as if it had initially received an MLDv2 report. After the router is joined
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to these groups, it sends out Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) join messages and
continues to enable joining from these groups, as long as it continues to receive MLDv1
membership reports and no change occurs to the SSM mapping for the group.
When you statically configure SSM mapping, the router can discover source addresses
from a statically configured table.
The following applies when you configure SSM mapping:
•
When an SSM map is configured without any matching access list, SSM mapping is
not applied on the incoming (*,G) groups. The PIM SSM range must deny any
unacceptable SSM group addresses.
NOTE: An access list must be explicitly configured with the same name
as that of the SSM map and group addresses that are to be SSM mapped.
Related
Documentation
•
When you issue the no ipv6 mld ssm-map enable command, the router removes all
SSM map (S,G) states and establishes a (*,G) state.
•
You can enter multiple ipv6 mld ssm-map static commands for different access lists.
Also, you can enter multiple ipv6 mld ssm-map static commands for the same access
list, as long as the access list uses different source addresses.
•
SSM maps do not process statically configured groups.
•
Configuring MLD SSM Mapping on page 251
•
ipv6 mld ssm-map enable
•
ipv6 mld ssm-map static
Overview of Limiting the Number of Accepted MLD Groups
By default, there is no limit on the number of MLD groups that an MLD interface can
accept. However, you can manage multicast traffic on the router by restricting the number
of MLD groups accepted by:
•
A specific port on an I/O module
•
A specific MLD interface
If you set limits for both a port and interfaces on that port, the router uses the lower of
the two limits when determining how many MLD groups an interface can accept. For
example, if you set a limit of 10 groups for the port and 15 groups for each interface, the
router allows only 10 groups to be accepted among the interfaces.
However, if you set a limit for a port and that limit is lower than the number of groups
currently accepted by the interfaces on that port, the router does not dissociate the
groups from the interfaces. The router enforces the new limit on the port when the number
of groups associated with the interfaces falls to that limit. For example, if the interfaces
on the port have accepted a total of 15 groups, and you set a limit of 10 groups on the
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port, the router does not disconnect any of the groups and does not allow the interfaces
to accept any more groups. Over time, some groups leave the interfaces and, eventually,
a maximum of ten groups remains connected.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring Multicast Groups for MLD on page 244
•
Limiting the Number of Accepted MLD Groups on page 251
MLD Traffic Overview
MLDv2 extends MLDv1 functionality with the ability to include or exclude specific multicast
traffic sources. That is, with MLDv2, hosts signal (S,G) pairs that they want to include or
exclude.
For hosts that cannot signal group membership dynamically, you can use the ipv6 mld
static-include or ipv6 mld static-exclude command to statically include or exclude
multicast traffic, respectively.
MLDv2 is the industry-designated standard protocol for hosts to signal channel
subscriptions in SSM. For additional information about SSM, see PIM Source-Specific
Multicast in “Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast” on page 92.
Related
Documentation
•
Including and Excluding MLD Traffic on page 252
MLD Explicit Host Tracking Overview
Explicit host tracking enables the router to explicitly track each individual host that is
joined to a group or channel on a particular multi-access network.
Explicit host tracking provides the following benefits:
•
Minimal leave latency when a host leaves a multicast group or channel. When the
router receives a leave message for a group or channel on an interface, it accesses a
list of hosts and immediately stops forwarding traffic if the sender is the last host to
request traffic for that group or channel. The leave latency is bound only by the packet
transmission latencies in the multi-access network and the processing time in the
router.
•
Ability to change channels quickly in networks where bandwidth is constrained between
a multicast-enabled router and hosts.
•
Ability to determine what multicast hosts are joined to particular multicast groups or
channels; this is useful for accounting purposes.
•
Reduction of control message traffic on the network because, when it receives a leave
message, the router no longer needs to send out MLD queries to verify membership.
As a result, interested hosts also do not need to respond to these queries with reports.
•
Tracking based on MLD reports for hosts in both include and exclude modes for every
multicast group or channel on an interface.
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When the router is configured for explicit host tracking and starts performing immediate
leave using the host information collected, every leave message received for a group or
channel is treated as follows:
•
The router checks the number of hosts that receive traffic from this group or channel.
•
If the host sending the leave message is the only host, it performs immediate leave for
that group or channel on that interface. The router removes the interface from the
multicast group or channel immediately, without sending out a group or group-source
specific query and waiting for the last member query interval.
•
If the host sending the leave message is not the only host receiving traffic for that group
or channel, the router removes the host from the list of hosts on that interface, but
keeps the interface in the outgoing interface list for the multicast group or channel. No
group or group-source specific queries are sent.
You can enable Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) explicit host tracking on an interface
only if MLD V1 or V2 has been previously enabled on the interface. Explicit host tracking
is not enabled by default when you enable MLD on the interface. Explicit host tracking
cannot be configured on passive MLD interfaces.
When you enable explicit host tracking on an interface that has a membership state, the
router does not immediately start performing immediate leave. For a maximum of group
membership interval seconds, the router only performs host tracking. Any leave messages
that the router receives during this period receive normal leave processing. Any leave
messages received after this interval has elapsed receive immediate leave processing,
when appropriate.
When explicit host tracking is enabled on an MLD V2 interface, even if a group has to
downgrade to MLD V1 due to the presence of an MLD V1 host, explicit host tracking
continues for that group. To avoid this, you can use the disable-if-mld-v1-detected
keyword. If you select this option, the router turns off explicit host tracking for the group
when MLD V1 host reports are received for the group on that interface. This option does
not have any significance on an interface configured for MLD V1 and is ignored if selected.
If you execute the command on an interface that was previously enabled for
immediate-leave, the configuration is accepted, immediate-leave is turned off and an
appropriate warning message logged. Any attempt to configure immediate-leave on an
interface that has explicit host tracking enabled is rejected and an error message logged.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring MLD Explicit Host Tracking on page 252
Configuring MLD Attributes
You can configure MLD Attributes using the following set of tasks:
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NOTE: You can configure MLD only on IPv6 interfaces. For information about
configuring IPv6 interfaces, see Configuring IPv6 in the JunosE IP, IPv6, and
IGP Configuration Guide.
•
Configuring MLD SSM Mapping on page 251
•
Limiting the Number of Accepted MLD Groups on page 251
•
Including and Excluding MLD Traffic on page 252
•
Configuring MLD Explicit Host Tracking on page 252
•
Disabling and Removing MLD on page 253
Configuring MLD SSM Mapping
SSM mapping statically assigns sources to MLDv1 groups. You must use SSM mapping
for MLDv1 hosts to interoperate with PIM SSM. SSM mapping allows the router to use a
statically configured list to translate (*,G) memberships to (S,G) memberships.
The ipv6 mld ssm-map static command uses IPv6 access lists, which allow both source
and destination/group addresses to be specified. You must set the source address to
“any”.
To statically configure SSM mapping:
1.
Enable SSM mapping on the router.
host1:boston(config)#ipv6 mld ssm-map enable
Use the no version to disable the SSM map.
2. Specify an access list and source address for use in SSM mapping.
host1:boston(config)#ipv6 mld ssm-map static boston-list 2001::1
Use the no version to remove the SSM map association.
NOTE: To operate correctly, the static source addresses must fall within
the configured PIM SSM range.
Limiting the Number of Accepted MLD Groups
You can manage multicast traffic on the router by restricting the number of MLD groups.
To limit the number of accepted MLD groups:
1.
Configure the maximum number of MLD groups that an interface can accept.
host1:boston(config-if)#ipv6 mld group limit 5
Use the no version to restore the default situation, in which there is no limit on the
number of MLD groups that an interface can accept.
2. Configure the maximum number of MLD groups that a port can accept.
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•
On ERX models:
host1(config)#multicast group port 3/0 limit 5
•
On E120 and E320 routers:
host1(config)#multicast group port 3/1/0 limit 5
NOTE: You can specify the identifier for the port in slot/port format (ERX
routers) or in slot/adapter/port format (E120 and E320 routers) and the
maximum number of MLD groups that interfaces can accept.
•
slot—Number of the chassis slot in the range 0–6 (ERX7xx models),
0–13 (ERX14xx models), 0–5 (E120 router), or 0–16 (E320 router)
•
adapter—Number of the bay in which the I/O adapter (IOA) resides.
This identifier applies to the E120 and E320 routers only. In the software,
adapter 0 identifies the right IOA bay (E120 router) and the upper IOA
bay (E320 router); adapter 1 identifies the left IOA bay (E120 router)
and the lower IOA bay (E320 router).
•
port—Port number on the I/O module or IOA
Use the no version to restore the default situation, in which there is no limit on the
number of MLD groups that a port can accept.
Including and Excluding MLD Traffic
MLD allows you to include or exclude specific multicast traffic sources.
To include and exclude traffic:
•
Configure the interface to statically include the MLD (S,G) membership for a host that
is not capable of dynamically signaling group membership.
host1:boston(config-if)#ipv6 mld static-include 2001::1 ff0e::1
Use the no version to remove the static designation.
•
Configure the interface to statically exclude the MLD (S,G) membership for a host that
is not capable of dynamically signaling group membership.
host1:boston(config-if)#ipv6 mld static-exclude 2001::1 ff0e::1
Use the no version to remove the static designation.
Configuring MLD Explicit Host Tracking
Explicit host tracking enables the router to explicitly track each individual host that is
joined to a group or channel on a particular multi-access network.
To enable explicit host tracking on the interface:
1.
Configure the MLD version for the interface.
host1(config)#interface 3/0.101
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host1(config-if)#ipv6 mld version 2
2. Enable explicit host tracking on the interface without the capability of being
automatically disabled even if MLD V1 hosts are detected on the MLD V2 interface.
This tracking continues for a group even if the group downgrades to MLD V1 due to
the presence of an MLD V1 host.
host1(config)#ipv6 mld explicit-tracking
Use the no version to disable explicit host tracking on the interface.
3. Enable explicit host tracking on the interface with the capability of being automatically
disabled if MLD V1 hosts are detected on the MLD V2 interface. The router turns off
explicit host tracking for the group when MLD V1 host reports are received for the
group on the MLD V2 interface.
host1(config)#ipv6 mld explicit-tracking disable-if-mld-v1-detected
Use the no version with the disable-if-mld-detected keyword to revert to the default
explicit host tracking behavior.
Disabling and Removing MLD
You can disable and reenable MLD on the virtual router. You can also remove MLD from
the virtual router and re-create it on the virtual router.
To disable and enable MLD on a virtual router:
1.
Disable MLD on a virtual router.
host1(config)#virtual-router boston
host1:boston(config)#router mld
host1:boston(config-router)#mld disable
Use the no version to enable MLD on a virtual router.
2. Create and enable MLD on a virtual router.
•
Using the router mld command:
host1(config)#virtual-router boston
host1:boston(config)#router mld
Use the no version to delete MLD and MLD proxy from the virtual router.
•
Using the ipv6 router mld command:
host1(config)#virtual-router boston
host1:boston(config)#ipv6 router mld
Use the no version to delete MLD and MLD proxy from the virtual router.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring Multicast Groups for MLD on page 244
•
MLD SSM Mapping Overview on page 247
•
Overview of Limiting the Number of Accepted MLD Groups on page 248
•
MLD Traffic Overview on page 249
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•
MLD Explicit Host Tracking Overview on page 249
•
interface
•
ipv6 mld explicit-tracking
•
ipv6 mld group limit
•
ipv6 mld ssm-map enable
•
ipv6 mld ssm-map static
•
ipv6 mld static-exclude
•
ipv6 mld static-include
•
ipv6 mld version
•
ipv6 router mld
•
mld disable
•
multicast group port limit
•
router mld
•
virtual-router
MLD Proxy Overview
Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) proxy enables the router to issue MLD host messages
on behalf of hosts that the router discovered through standard MLD interfaces. The router
acts as a proxy for its hosts. The E Series router supports MLD proxy versions 1 and 2.
Figure 21 on page 255 shows a router in an MLD proxy configuration. You enable MLD proxy
on one interface, which connects to a router closer to the root of the tree. This interface
is the upstream interface. The attached upstream router on the upstream interface should
be running MLD.
You enable MLD on the interfaces that connect the router to its hosts that are farther
away from the root of the tree. These interfaces are known as downstream interfaces.
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Chapter 11: Configuring MLD and MLD Proxy
Figure 21: Upstream and Downstream Interfaces
As described in “MLD Overview” on page 237, hosts interact with the router through the
exchange of MLD messages. Similarly, when you configure MLD proxy, the router interacts
with the router on its upstream interface through the exchange of MLD messages.
However, when acting as the proxy, the router performs the host portion of the MLD task
on the upstream interface as follows:
Related
Documentation
•
When queried, sends multicast listener reports to the group.
•
When one of its hosts joins a multicast address group to which none of its other hosts
belong, sends unsolicited multicast listener reports to that group.
•
When the last of its hosts in a particular multicast group leaves, the group sends either
an unsolicited multicast listener done report to the all-routers address (FF02::2) for
MLDv1 or an MLDv2 multicast listener report to the all-MLDv2 routers address (FF02::16).
•
MLD Overview on page 237
•
Configuring MLD Proxy on page 255
•
Establishing the MLD Proxy Baseline on page 256
Configuring MLD Proxy
To configure a downstream interface, enable MLD on that interface. To configure MLD
proxy on the router, complete the following tasks:
1.
Enable IPv6 multicast.
2. Identify the interface that you want to act as the upstream interface.
3. Enable MLD proxy on that interface.
4. (Optional) Specify how often the router should send unsolicited reports to routers on
the upstream interface.
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NOTE: You can configure MLD proxy only on IPv6 interfaces. For information
about configuring IPv6 interfaces, see Configuring IPv6 in the JunosE IP, IPv6,
and IGP Configuration Guide.
To configure MLD proxy on an interface:
1.
Enable MLD proxy on the upstream interface.
host1(config-if)#ipv6 mld-proxy
Use the no version to disable MLD proxy on an interface.
NOTE: You can enable only one upstream interface.
2. (Optional) Configure unsolicited report interval, which specifies how often the
upstream interface should transmit unsolicited reports.
host1(config-if)#ipv6 mld-proxy unsolicited-report-interval 600
Use the no version to transmit unsolicited reports using the default value, 100-tenths
of a second (10 seconds).
NOTE: Issue this command only on the upstream interface. Otherwise,
this command has no effect.
3. (Optional) Configure the MLD proxy version for the interface.
host1(config-if)#ipv6 mld-proxy version 1
Use the no version to set the version to its default value, MLDv2.
Related
Documentation
•
MLD Proxy Overview on page 254
•
Monitoring MLD Proxy Parameters on page 272
•
Monitoring MLD Proxy Interfaces on page 274
•
ipv6 mld-proxy
•
ipv6 mld-proxy unsolicited-report-interval
•
ipv6 mld-proxy version
Establishing the MLD Proxy Baseline
You can set the counters for the numbers of queries received and reports sent on the
upstream interface to zero. This feature allows you to establish a reference point for MLD
proxy statistics.
To set the counters:
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Chapter 11: Configuring MLD and MLD Proxy
•
Issue the baseline ipv6 mld-proxy interface command in Global Configuration mode.
(host1)#baseline ipv6 mld-proxy interface
NOTE: Issue this command only on the upstream interface. Otherwise, this
command will have no effect.
Related
Documentation
•
MLD Proxy Overview on page 254
•
Monitoring MLD Proxy Interfaces on page 274
•
baseline ipv6 mld-proxy interface
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CHAPTER 12
Monitoring MLD and MLD Proxy
To display Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) and MLD proxy parameters, use the show
commands described in this section.
NOTE: The E120 and E320 routers output for monitor and show commands
is identical to output from other E Series routers, except that the E120 and
E320 routers output also includes information about the adapter identifier
in the interface specifier (slot/adapter/port).
•
Monitoring MLD Information on a Virtual Router on page 259
•
Monitoring MLD Groups on page 260
•
Monitoring MLD Interfaces on page 262
•
Monitoring Summary Information for MLD Interfaces on page 266
•
Monitoring MLD on Mapped Outgoing Interfaces on page 267
•
Monitoring MLD on Outgoing Interfaces on page 267
•
Monitoring MLD Membership for Multicast Groups on page 268
•
Monitoring MLD Information for Mapped Outgoing Interfaces on page 270
•
Monitoring MLD SSM Mapping on page 270
•
Monitoring the Number of MLD Groups on a Port on page 271
•
Monitoring MLD Proxy Parameters on page 272
•
Monitoring MLD Proxy Groups on page 273
•
Monitoring MLD Proxy Interfaces on page 274
Monitoring MLD Information on a Virtual Router
Purpose
Action
Display MLD information for a virtual router.
To display MLD information for a virtual router:
host1:boston#show ipv6 mld
Routing Process MLD, Administrative state enabled, Operational state enabled
2 total interfaces, 2 enabled, 0 disabled
2 enabled interfaces performing graceful restart
2 learnt groups
MLD Statistics:
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Rcvd: 1 total, 0 checksum errors, 0 unknown types, 0 discards
0 queries, 1 reports, 0 leaves
Sent: 2 total
Meaning
Table 67 on page 260 lists the show ipv6 mld command output fields.
Table 67: show ipv6 mld Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Administrative state
Status of MLD in the software: enabled or disabled
Operational state
Status of MLD on the virtual router: enabled or
disabled
total interfaces
Number of interfaces on which you started MLD
enabled
Number of interfaces on which MLD is enabled
disabled
Number of interfaces on which MLD is disabled
learnt groups
Number of multicast groups that the virtual router
has discovered
MLD Statistics Rcvd
Statistics for MLD messages received:
MLD Statistics Sent
Related
Documentation
•
total—Number of MLD messages received
•
checksum errors—Number of MLD messages
received with checksum errors
•
unknown types—Number of messages received
that are not multicast listener queries, multicast
listener reports, or multicast listener done
messages
•
discards—Number of multicast listener discards
•
queries—Number of multicast listener queries
•
reports—Number of multicast listener reports
•
leaves—Number of done messages
Number of multicast listener queries sent
•
Enabling MLD on an Interface on page 241
•
Configuring MLD Attributes on page 250
•
Disabling and Removing MLD on page 253
•
show ipv6 mld
Monitoring MLD Groups
Purpose
260
Display information about statically joined and directly connected groups learned through
MLD.
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Chapter 12: Monitoring MLD and MLD Proxy
Action
To display statically joined and directly connected groups learned through MLD without
OIF mapping:
host1:boston# show ipv6 mld groups
Grp Address
Interface
State
Reporter
------------------- ---------------------- -------- --------------ff0e::1
ATM2/0.15
Version2 fe80::90:1a02:1
640:91d
ff0e::4:1
ATM2/0.15
Version2 fe80::90:1a02:1
640:91d
Included Sources:
51::1
51::2
Counts: 2 version-2, 0 version-1, 0 check state, 0 disabled
(2 total)
0 excluded
Source-groups: 2 included, 0 excluded
ExpTim oldHTo
------ -----54
0
54
0
54
54
To display statically joined and directly connected groups learned through MLD with OIF
mapping:
host1:boston# show ipv6 mld groups
Grp Address
Interface
State
Reporter
------------------- ---------------------- -------- --------------ff3e::1
ATM5/0.12
Version2 fe80::f7:0:91a:
0
oif-map OIFMAP ATM5/0.
121
ff3e::1
ATM5/0.13
Version2 fe80::f7:0:a1a:
0
oif-map OIFMAP ATM5/0.
121
ff3e::2
ATM5/0.12
Version2 fe80::f7:0:91a:
0
Included Sources:
10::2
oif-map OIFMAP self
10::10
oif-map OIFMAP ATM5/0.
120
10::11
oif-map OIFMAP ATM5/0.
121
ff3e::2
ATM5/0.13
Version2 fe80::f7:0:a1a:
0
Included Sources:
10::2
oif-map OIFMAP self
10::10
oif-map OIFMAP ATM5/0.
120
10::11
oif-map OIFMAP ATM5/0.
121
ExpTim oldHTo
------ -----377
0
369
0
370
0
370
370
370
373
0
373
373
373
Counts: 4 version-2, 0 version-1, 0 check state, 0 disabled
(4 total)
0 excluded
Source-groups: 6 included, 0 excluded
Meaning
Table 68 on page 262 lists the show ipv6 mld groups command output fields.
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Table 68: show ipv6 mld groups Output Fields
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Grp Address
Address of the multicast group
Interface
Interface that discovered the multicast group
oif-map
Name of the OIF map and the mapped OIF interface,
if a group or source has been mapped to an OIF
State
MLD version of the group
Reporter
Link-local address of the host reporting the multicast
group
ExpTim
Remaining time, in seconds, at which the router stops
polling for more members of this group
oldHTo
Remaining time at which the router stops polling for
more MLDv1 members of a group. If this value is 0, the
interface has received no MLDv1 reports for the group.
Included Sources
Sources included in the multicast group
Excluded Sources
Sources excluded from the multicast group
Counts
Number of source-group mappings by version and
state
•
Enabling MLD on an Interface on page 241
•
Configuring Multicast Groups for MLD on page 244
•
Specifying MLD Multicast Groups on page 245
•
Assigning an MLD Multicast Group to an Interface on page 246
•
Configuring MLD Group Outgoing Interface Mapping on page 246
•
show ipv6 mld groups
Monitoring MLD Interfaces
Purpose
Action
Display MLD information for interfaces on which you enabled MLD. You can use the brief
keyword to see a summary of the information. You can use the count keyword to see the
number of MLD interfaces.
To display MLD information for all interfaces on which you enabled MLD:
host1:boston#show ipv6 mld interface
Interface ATM2/0.103 address 13.0.0.1/255.255.255.0
Administrative state enabled, Operational state enabled
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Interface parameters:
Version 2
State Querier
Query Interval 125 secs, 125 secs before the next query
Other querier present interval 250 secs
Maximum response time 255 (in 10ths of a second)
Last member query interval 10 (in 10ths of a second)
Robustness 3
No inbound access group
No inbound access source-group
No inbound apply-oif-map
Immediate Leave: disabled
Explicit Host Tracking: enabled
Max-Group limit: No Limit
Admission-Bandwidth limit: No limit
IOA Packet Replication: None
Group Count: 1
Interface statistics:
Rcvd: 2 reports, 0 leaves, 0 wrong version queries
Sent: 2 queries
Groups learnt: 1
Counts: 0 down, 0 init state, 1 querier, 0 non-querier, 1 Total
To display MLD information for the interface on which you enabled MLD:
host1#show ipv6 mld interface gigabitEthernet 3/0.0
Interface GigabitEthernet3/0.0 address 10.1.1.1/255.255.255.0
Administrative state enabled, Operational state enabled
Interface parameters:
Version 1
State Querier
Query Interval 125 secs, 123 secs before the next query
Other querier present interval 250 secs
Maximum response time 100 (in 10ths of a second)
Last member query interval 10 (in 10ths of a second)
Robustness 3
No inbound access group
No inbound access source-group
No inbound apply-oif-map
Immediate Leave: disabled
Explicit Host Tracking: enabled
Max-Group limit: No Limit
Group Count: 0
IOA packet replication gigabitEthernet 3/8.1
Interface statistics:
Rcvd: 0 reports, 0 leaves, 0 wrong version queries
Sent: 14 queries
Groups learnt: 0
Counts: 0 down, 0 init state, 1 querier, 0 non-querier, 1 Total
Meaning
Table 69 on page 264 lists the show ipv6 mld interface command output fields.
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Table 69: show ipv6 mld interface Output Fields
264
Field Name
Field Description
Interface
Type of interface and interface specifier. For details
about interface types and specifiers, see Interface
Types and Specifiers in JunosE Command Reference
Guide.
address
IPv6 link-local address of the interface
Administrative state
Status of the interface in the software: enabled or
disabled
Operational state
Physical status of the interface: enabled or disabled
Version
MLD version
State
Function of the interface: querier or nonquerier
Query Interval
Time interval at which this interface sends query
messages
Other querier present interval
Time that the interface waits before declaring itself
as the querier
Maximum response time
Time interval during which this interface expects a
host to respond
Graceful restart
Status of graceful restart: active or complete
Last member query interval
Time that this interface waits before sending a new
query to a host that sends a group leave message
Robustness
Number of times this interface sends MLD messages
Inbound access group
Information about IPv6 access lists configured with
the ipv6 mld access-group command
No inbound access group
No IPv6 access list configured with the ipv6 mld
access-group command
Inbound access source-group
Information about IPv6 access lists configured with
the ipv6 mld access-source-group command
No inbound access source-group
No IPv6 access list configured with the ipv6 mld
access-source-group command
Inbound apply-oif-map
Information about OIF map names configured with
the ipv6 mld apply-oif-map command
No inbound apply-oif-map
No OIF map name configured with the ipv6 mld
apply-oif-map command
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Chapter 12: Monitoring MLD and MLD Proxy
Table 69: show ipv6 mld interface Output Fields (continued)
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Immediate Leave
Setting of the ipv6 mld immediate-leave command:
enabled or disabled
Explicit Host Tracking
Setting of the ipv6 mld explicit-tracking command:
enabled or disabled
Max-Group limit
Number of MLD groups that the interface can accept,
as configured with the ipv6 mld group limit command
Group Count
Number of MLD groups that the interface has
accepted
IOA packet replication
Hardware multicast packet replication interface to
which egress multicast packets on this interface are
redirected
Interface statistics Rcvd
Information about MLD messages received on this
interface:
•
reports—Number of group multicast listener reports
received
•
leaves—Number of group multicast listener done
messages received
•
wrong version queries—Number of multicast
listener queries received from devices running a
different version of MLD
Interface statistics Sent
Number of MLD messages this interface has sent
Interface statistics Groups learnt
Number of groups this interface has discovered
Counts
Total number of MLD interfaces
•
Enabling MLD on an Interface on page 241
•
Configuring MLD Settings on an Interface on page 242
•
Configuring Multicast Groups for MLD on page 244
•
Specifying MLD Multicast Groups on page 245
•
Configuring MLD Group Outgoing Interface Mapping on page 246
•
Configuring MLD Attributes on page 250
•
Limiting the Number of Accepted MLD Groups on page 251
•
Configuring MLD Explicit Host Tracking on page 252
•
ipv6 mld access-group
•
ipv6 mld access-source-group
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•
ipv6 mld apply-oif-map
•
ipv6 mld explicit-tracking
•
ipv6 mld group limit
•
ipv6 mld immediate-leave
•
show ipv6 mld interface
Monitoring Summary Information for MLD Interfaces
Purpose
Action
Display a summary of MLD information for interfaces on which you enabled MLD.
To display a summary of MLD information for interfaces on which you enabled MLD:
host1:boston# show ipv6 mld interface brief
Interface
Intf Address
Ver
State
Querier
QTime QPTime
--------------- --------------- --- ---------- ------------- ------ -----ATM2/0.103
130.0.0.1/24
2
Querier
130.0.0.1
3(7)
0
ATM5/0.102
131.0.0.1/24
2
Querier
130.0.0.1
101(7)
0
Counts: 0 down, 0 init state, 2 querier, 0 non-querier, 2 Total
Meaning
Table 70 on page 266 lists the show ipv6 mld interface brief command output fields.
Table 70: show ipv6 mld interface brief Output Fields
Related
Documentation
266
Field Name
Field Description
Interface
Type of interface and interface specifier. For details
about interface types and specifiers, see Interface
Types and Specifiers in JunosE Command Reference
Guide.
Intf Address
IPv6 link-local address of the interface
Ver
MLD version
State
Function of the interface: querier or nonquerier
Querier
IPv6 address of the querier on the network to which
this interface connects
QTime
Remaining time interval at which this interface sends
query messages
QPTime
Remaining time that the interface waits before
declaring itself as the querier
•
Configuring MLD Settings on an Interface on page 242
•
show ipv6 mld interface
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 12: Monitoring MLD and MLD Proxy
Monitoring MLD on Mapped Outgoing Interfaces
Purpose
Action
Display the current mappings to all mapped outgoing interfaces or to the specified
mapped outgoing interface.
To display the current mappings to all mapped outgoing interfaces:
host1# show ipv6 mld mapped-oif
OIF
Oper Group Address Source Address
Join I/F
Map Name
--------------- ---- --------------- --------------- --------------- ---------ATM5/0.120
Up
ff3e::2
10::10
ATM5/0.12
OIFMAP
ATM5/0.13
OIFMAP
ATM5/0.121
Up
ff3e::1
*
ATM5/0.12
OIFMAP
ATM5/0.13
OIFMAP
ff3e::2
10::11
ATM5/0.12
OIFMAP
ATM5/0.13
OIFMAP
Counts: 3 source-group mappings
Meaning
Table 71 on page 267 lists the show ipv6 mld mapped-oif command output fields.
Table 71: show ipv6 mld mapped-oif Output Fields
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
OIF
OIF used in an OIF map
Oper
Operation status of the outgoing interface
Group Address
Multicast group IP address associated with the OIF
Source Address
Source IP address associated with the OIF
Join I/F
MLD protocol interface associated with the OIF
Map Name
Name of the map associated to the OIF
Counts
Number of source-group mappings to OIFs
•
Configuring Multicast Groups for MLD on page 244
•
Configuring MLD Group Outgoing Interface Mapping on page 246
•
show ipv6 mld mapped-oif
Monitoring MLD on Outgoing Interfaces
Purpose
Display all OIF maps or the OIF map for the specified map name.
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Action
To display all OIF maps:
host1#show ipv6 mld oif-map
Map Name
Group Prefix
------------------ -----------------OIFMAP
ff3e::/112
ff3e::/112
ff3e::/112
ff3e::3/128
ff3e::4/128
Meaning
Source Prefix
-----------------::/0
10::2/128
10::10/128
::/0
::/0
OIF
-----------------ATM5/0.121
self
ATM5/0.120
ATM5/0.130
ATM5/0.130
Table 72 on page 268 lists the show ipv6 mld oif-map command output fields.
Table 72: show ipv6 mld oif-map Output Fields
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Map Name
Name of the map associated to the show output
Group Prefix
Multicast group IPv6 prefix
Source Prefix
Source IPv6 prefix
OIF
Outgoing interface associated with the group and
source prefix
•
Configuring Multicast Groups for MLD on page 244
•
Configuring MLD Group Outgoing Interface Mapping on page 246
•
show ipv6 mld oif-map
Monitoring MLD Membership for Multicast Groups
Purpose
Action
Display MLD membership information for multicast groups and (S, G) channels. You can
use the brief keyword to see a summary of the information. You can use the tracked
keyword to see interface information only for interfaces where explicit host tracking is
enabled.
To display MLD membership information for multicast groups and (S, G) channels:
host1:boston# show ipv6 mld membership
Flags: M – Uses Oifmap S– SSM mapped T – tracked
1,2 – The version of MLD the group is in
Reporter:
<ip-address> - last reporter if the group is not explicitly tracked
<n>/<m> - <n> reporters include mode, <m> reporters in exclude
Group
Source
Reporter
ExpTim
Flags
--------- --------------------------------------ff0e::40
*
fe80::90:1a02:1640:91d
02:41
2S
ff0e::50
1/2
fe80::90:1a02:1640:911
fe80::90:1a02:1640:912
02:56
02:30
02:48
3MT
Interface
--------------FastEthernet2/1
FastEthernet2/2
20::11
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fe80::90:1a02:1640:913
02:56
fe80::90:1a02:1640:911
02:30
fe80::90:1a02:1640:911
fe80::90:1a02:1640:912
fe80::90:1a02:1640:913
fe80::90:1a02:1640:901
2/0
02:30
02:48
02:56
01:56
02:45
02:35
02:15
stop
stop
01:10
01.24
stop
fe80::90:1a02:1650:910
02:48
fe80::90:1a02:1650:920
fe80::90:1a02:1650:910
fe80::90:1a02:1650:920
0/3
02:56
02:48
02:56
02:56
fe80::90:1a02:1660:910
fe80::90:1a02:1660:920
fe80::90:1a02:1660:930
02:48
02:56
02:48
20::12
20::13
ff0e::60
10::10
10::11
10::12
10::14
ff0e::70
fe80::90:1a02:1640:91
40::10
40::11
ff0e::80
3
FastEthernet2/3
3
FastEthernet2/4
3T
FastEthernet2/5
2T
FastEthernet2/6
50::10
50::11
50::12
ff0e::90
*
Meaning
Table 73 on page 269 lists the show ipv6 mld membership command output fields.
Table 73: show ipv6 mld membership Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Group
Multicast group or (S, G) channel
Source
(S, G) entries that are forwarding traffic
Reporter
Hosts that requested including sources or that have
not requested excluding sources. If listed under a
group, host that sent exclude reports for the group. If
listed under a source, host that requested traffic from
this source for the group. For any (S, G), if listed under
a source, indicates hosts interested in the traffic for
this (S, G).
ExpTim
Expiration time
Flags
•
M—Uses Oifmap
•
S—SSM mapped
•
T—Tracked
•
1, 2—MLD version that the group is in
Interface
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Type of interface and interface specifier. For details
about interface types and specifiers, see Interface
Types and Specifiers in JunosE Command Reference
Guide.
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Related
Documentation
•
Configuring Multicast Groups for MLD on page 244
•
Assigning an MLD Multicast Group to an Interface on page 246
•
Configuring MLD Attributes on page 250
•
Including and Excluding MLD Traffic on page 252
•
Configuring MLD Explicit Host Tracking on page 252
•
show ipv6 mld membership
Monitoring MLD Information for Mapped Outgoing Interfaces
Purpose
Action
Display the OIF to be assigned to a given map-name, group address, and source address.
To display the mapped OIF to be assigned to a given map-name, group address, and
source address:
host1#show ipv6 mld oif-mapping OIFMAP ff3e::1 10::10
OIF Mapping
OIF-MAP Name
: OIFMAP
Group Address : ff3e::1
Source Address : 10::10
Mapped OIF
: ATM5/0.120
Meaning
Table 74 on page 270 lists the show ipv6 mld oif-mapping command output fields.
Table 74: show ipv6 mld oif-mapping Output Fields
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
OIF-MAP Name
Name of the map requested
Group Address
Multicast group IP address requested
Source Address
Source IP address requested
Mapped OIF
Join interface associated with the OIF map
•
Configuring Multicast Groups for MLD on page 244
•
Configuring MLD Group Outgoing Interface Mapping on page 246
•
show ipv6 mld oif-mapping
Monitoring MLD SSM Mapping
Purpose
270
Display the SSM mapping state and the source list mapping associated with a multicast
group address, based on the static SSM mapping configuration.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 12: Monitoring MLD and MLD Proxy
Action
To display the SSM mapping state and the source list mapping associated with a multicast
group address:
host1:boston#show ipv6 mld ssm-mapping ff3e::1
SSM Mapping
: Enabled
Group Address : ff3e::1
Source List
: 2001::1
: 2001::2
Meaning
Table 75 on page 271 lists the show ipv6 mld ssm-mapping command output fields.
Table 75: show ipv6 mld ssm-mapping Output Fields
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
SSM Mapping
Status of SSM mapping on the interface (enabled or
disabled)
Group Address
Multicast group address requested
Source List
List of sources mapped to the multicast group address
•
Configuring MLD Attributes on page 250
•
Configuring MLD SSM Mapping on page 251
•
show ipv6 mld ssm-mapping
Monitoring the Number of MLD Groups on a Port
Purpose
Display the number of MLD groups that ports have accepted and, if configured, the
maximum number of groups that ports can accept. A value of –1 indicates that no port
group limit is configured. Only ports that have accepted MLD groups and ports for which
you have configured a limit for the number of MLD groups appear in this display.
Action
To display the number of MLD groups that ports have accepted and the maximum number
of groups that ports can accept:
host1:boston#show multicast group limit
Port
limit count
--------- ----- ----2/0
5
0
2/1
-1
1
Meaning
Table 76 on page 272 lists the show multicast group limit command output fields.
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Table 76: show multicast group limit Output Fields
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Port
Identifier of the port in slot/port format:
•
slot—Number of the chassis slot in the range 0–6
(ERX7xx models) or 0–13 (ERX14xx models)
•
port—Port number on the I/O module
limit
Maximum number of MLD groups that the port can
accept. A value of –1 indicates that no limit has been
specified.
count
Actual number of MLD groups the port has accepted
•
Configuring MLD Attributes on page 250
•
Limiting the Number of Accepted MLD Groups on page 251
•
show multicast group limit
Monitoring MLD Proxy Parameters
Purpose
Action
Display MLD proxy parameters for a virtual router.
To display MLD proxy parameters for a virtual router:
host1#sshow ipv6 mld-proxy
Routing Process MLD Proxy, Administrative state enabled, Operational state
enabled
total 1 upstream interface, state enabled
1 multicast group
Meaning
Table 77 on page 272 lists the show ipv6 mld-proxy command output fields.
Table 77: show ipv6 mld-proxy Output Fields
272
Field Name
Field Description
Routing Process
MLD proxy protocol
Administrative state
State of MLD proxy in the software
Operational state
Operational state of MLD proxy: enabled or disabled
total interfaces
Number of MLD proxy interfaces on the virtual router;
currently only one upstream interface per virtual router
state
Operational state of the MLD proxy interfaces:
enabled or disabled
multicast group
Number of multicast groups associated with MLD
proxy interfaces
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 12: Monitoring MLD and MLD Proxy
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring MLD Proxy on page 255
•
show ipv6 mld-proxy
Monitoring MLD Proxy Groups
Purpose
Action
Display information about all or specified multicast groups that MLD proxy reported.
To display information about all multicast groups that MLD proxy reported:
host1#show ipv6 mld-proxy groups
Grp Address
--------------ff0e::1
ff0e::2
ff0e::3
2001::1
ff0e::4
ff0e::5
2001::2
Interface
Grp Mode
--------------- -------------ATM5/1.200
ATM5/1.200
ATM5/1.200
Include(1):
ATM5/1.200
ATM5/1.200
Exclude(1):
Counts: 3 <*,G>, 1 Exclude (1 sources), 1 Include (1 sources)
(5 total)
To display information about specified multicast groups that MLD proxy reported:
host1#show ipv6 mld-proxy groups ff0e::1
Grp Address
Interface
Grp Mode
--------------- --------------- -------------ff0e::1
ATM5/1.200
Counts: 1 <*,G>
(1 total)
To display the number of multicast groups that MLD proxy reported:
host1#show ipv6 mld-proxy groups count
Counts: 3 <*,G>, 1 Exclude (1 sources), 1 Include (1 sources)
(5 total)
Meaning
Table 78 on page 273 lists the show ipv6 mld-proxy groups command output fields.
Table 78: show ipv6 mld-proxy groups Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Grp Address
Address of the multicast group
Interface
Type and identifier of the upstream interface
associated with the multicast group
Grp Mode
•
Blank—No sources included or excluded for this
group
•
Include—Sources included for this group
•
Exclude—Sources excluded for this group
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Table 78: show ipv6 mld-proxy groups Output Fields (continued)
Related
Documentation
•
Field Name
Field Description
Count
Total number of multicast groups associated with
this interface
show ipv6 mld-proxy groups
Monitoring MLD Proxy Interfaces
Purpose
Action
Display information about all or specified interfaces on which you configured MLD proxy.
To view information about a particular interface, enter an interface type and specifier,
such as atm 3/0. You can use the brief option to display a summary rather than a detailed
description.
To display information about all interfaces on which you configured MLD proxy:
host1#show ipv6 mld-proxy interface
Interface ATM5/1.200 address fe80::f7:0:231a:0
Administrative state enabled, Operational state enabled
Interface parameters:
Version 2
State No v1 Router Present
Unsolicited report interval 100 (in 10ths of a second)
5 multicast groups
Interface statistics:
Rcvd: 0 v1 query, 0 v1 report, 25 v2 queries, 0 v2 report
Sent: 0 v1 report, 0 v1 leave, 35 v2 reports
To display summarized information about all interfaces on which you configured MLD
proxy:
host1#show ipv6 mld-proxy interface brief
Interface
Intf Address
Ver State
UnSlTime
--------------- ------------------ --- -------------------- -------ATM5/1.200
fe80::f7:0:231a:0
2 No v1 Router Present
100
Meaning
Table 79 on page 274 lists the show ipv6 mld-proxy interface command output fields.
Table 79: show ipv6 mld-proxy interface Output Fields
274
Field Name
Field Description
Interface
Type of upstream interface. For details about interface
types, see Interface Types and Specifiers in JunosE
Command Reference Guide.
Address
Address of upstream interface
Administrative state
State of upstream interface in the software: enabled
or disabled
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 12: Monitoring MLD and MLD Proxy
Table 79: show ipv6 mld-proxy interface Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Operational state
Physical state of upstream interface: enabled or
disabled
Version
MLD version on this interface
State
Presence of MLDv1 routers on the same subnetwork
as this upstream interface
Unsolicited report interval
Time interval at which this upstream interface sends
unsolicited group membership report
multicast group
Number of multicast groups associated with this
upstream interface
Interface statistics Rcvd
Statistics for messages received on this interface:
Interface statistics Sent
Related
Documentation
•
v1 queries—Number of MLDv1 multicast listener
queries received
•
v1 report—Number of MLDv1 multicast listener
reports received
•
v2 queries—Number of MLDv2 multicast listener
queries received
•
v2 report—Number of MLDv2 multicast listener
reports received
Statistics for messages sent from this interface:
•
v1 reports—Number of MLDv1 multicast listener
reports sent
•
v1 leaves—Number of multicast listener done
messages sent
•
v2 reports—Number of MLDv2 multicast listener
reports sent
•
Configuring MLD Proxy on page 255
•
Establishing the MLD Proxy Baseline on page 256
•
show ipv6 mld-proxy interface
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CHAPTER 13
Configuring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) is a collection of multicast routing protocols that
enable multicast routers to identify other multicast routers that can receive packets.
This chapter describes how to configure PIM for IPv6 multicast on the E Series router; it
contains the following sections:
•
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 278
•
PIM for IPv6 Multicast Platform Considerations on page 281
•
PIM for IPv6 Multicast References on page 281
•
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on a Virtual Router on page 281
•
Disabling PIM for IPv6 on a Virtual Router on page 282
•
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on an Interface on page 282
•
Setting a Priority to Determine the Designated Router for IPv6 on page 283
•
Configuring the PIM Join/Prune Message Interval for IPv6 on page 284
•
Configuring an RP Router for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv6 on page 285
•
Configuring BSR and RP Candidates for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv6 on page 286
•
Switching to an SPT for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv6 on page 287
•
Configuring PIM Sparse Mode Remote Neighbors for IPv6 on page 287
•
Example: Configuring PIM Sparse Mode Remote Neighbors for IPv6 on page 288
•
Configuring PIM Sparse Mode Join Filters for IPv6 on page 290
•
Configuring PIM for IPv6 SSM on page 291
•
BFD Protocol for PIM for IPv6 Overview on page 293
•
Configuring BFD Protocol for PIM for IPv6 on page 294
•
Removing PIM for IPv6 on page 294
•
Resetting PIM Counters and Mappings for IPv6 on page 295
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Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast
This implementation of PIM supports PIM sparse mode and PIM source-specific multicast
(PIM SSM) for IPv6 multicast.
SSM is an extension to the Any Source Multicast (ASM) service model and facilitates
the deployment of broadcast (one-to-many) applications, such as Internet TV and radio
where large receiver audiences require traffic from a few well-known sources.
Figure 22 on page 278 represents how PIM builds an (S,G) entry in an SRT. When multiple
routers are connected to a multiaccess network, one router is assigned the role of the
designated router. The designated router receives data from the source on interface 1/0
and multicasts the data to its downstream neighbors on interfaces 1/1, 2/0, and 2/1. In
the designated router routing table, the entry for this operation lists the source as the IP
address of the source and the group as the IP address of the multicast group.
Neighbors exchange hello messages periodically to determine the designated router.
The router with the highest network layer address becomes the designated router. If the
designated router subsequently receives a hello message from a neighbor with a higher
network layer address, that neighbor becomes the designated router.
Figure 22: Source-Rooted Tree
DR Routing Table Entry
PC
Source 100::1
1/0
PC
DR
PC
2/1
1/1
Source
Group
Register
RP
Input interface
Output interface
100::1
FF04::5
1/0
1/1, 2/0, 2/1
1/0
1/1, 2/0, 2/1
2/0
PC
PC
PC
PC
PIM
PIM
PIM
PC
g013237
PC
The IPv6 implementation of PIM supports the following modes:
•
PIM Sparse Mode on page 278
•
PIM Sparse Mode Bootstrap Router on page 279
•
PIM Source-Specific Multicast on page 280
PIM Sparse Mode
In addition to the features PIM sparse mode supports for IPv4, this IPv6 implementation
of PIM sparse mode also supports remote neighbors.
278
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Chapter 13: Configuring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
For a description of PIM sparse mode, see “Understanding PIM for IPv4 Multicast” on
page 92.
Joining Groups
A host's designated router (DR) sends join messages to the RP when that host wants to
join a group. When a host wants to leave a group, it communicates with its designated
router through MLD. When the designated router no longer has any hosts that belong to
a particular group, it sends a prune message to the RP.
Timers
PIM sparse mode uses timers to maintain the networking trees.
NOTE: PIM sparse mode routers poll their neighbors and hosts for various
pieces of information at set intervals.
If a PIM sparse mode router does not receive information from a neighbor or host within
a specific time, known as the hold time, it removes the associated information from its
routing tables.
You can configure how often an interface sends hello messages (hello interval) and how
often routers send RP announce messages (RP announce interval). The hold-time
associated with hello messages is 3.5 times the hello interval, and the holdtime associated
with RP announce messages is 2.5 times the RP announce interval.
All other timers are fixed and take the default values recommended in:
RFC 2934—Protocol Independent Multicast MIB for IPv4 (October 2000)
PIM Sparse Mode Bootstrap Router
PIM sparse mode routers need the address of the rendezvous point (RP) for each group
for which they have (*,G) state. They obtain this address either through a bootstrap
mechanism or through static configuration. Two bootstrap mechanisms exist—bootstrap
router (BSR) or auto-RP. Auto-RP is not used in IPv6 implementations.
When implemented, BSR operates as follows:
1.
One router in each PIM domain is elected the BSR.
2. All the routers in the domain that are configured to be RP candidates periodically
unicast their candidacy to the BSR.
3. The BSR picks an RP set from the available candidates and periodically announces
this set in a bootstrap message.
4. Bootstrap messages are flooded hop by hop throughout the domain until all routers
in the domain learn the RP Set.
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PIM Source-Specific Multicast
PIM source-specific multicast (SSM) is an extension of the PIM protocol. Using SSM, a
client can receive multicast traffic directly from the source. PIM SSM uses PIM sparse
mode functionality to create an SPT between the client and the source, but builds the
SPT without using an RP.
By default, the SSM group multicast address is limited to the IPv6 address range FF3x::/96
where x represents any valid scope. You can use the ipv6 pim ssm range command to
change the SSM group address range.
Advantages that an SSM-configured network has over a traditionally configured PIM
sparse mode network include the following:
•
No need for shared trees or RP mapping (no RP is required).
•
No need for RP-to-RP source discovery through Multicast Source Discovery Protocol
(MSDP).
•
Simplified administrative deployment; you need only configure PIM sparse mode on
all router interfaces and issue the necessary SSM commands (including specifying
MLDv2 on the receiver local area network).
•
Support for source lists; you can use source lists, supported in MLDv2, where only
specified sources send traffic to the SSM group.
In a PIM SSM–configured network, the E Series router subscribes to an SSM channel (by
means of MLDv2), announcing a desire to join group G and source S. The directly
connected PIM sparse mode router, the designated router of the receiver, sends an (S,G)
join message to its RPF neighbor for the source. For PIM SSM, the RP is not contacted in
this process by the receiver (as happens in normal PIM sparse mode operations).
NOTE: You can configure multicast on IPv4 and IPv6 interfaces. For
information about configuring PIM on IPv4 interfaces, see “Understanding
PIM for IPv4 Multicast” on page 92.
For information about configuring IP interfaces, see Configuring IP in the
JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP Configuration Guide. For information about configuring
IPv6 interfaces, see Configuring IPv6 in the JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP
Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
280
•
PIM for IPv6 Multicast Platform Considerations on page 281
•
PIM for IPv6 Multicast References on page 281
•
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on a Virtual Router on page 281
•
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on an Interface on page 282
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Configuring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
PIM for IPv6 Multicast Platform Considerations
For information about modules that support PIM for IPv6 multicasting on the ERX7xx
models, ERX14xx models, and the ERX310 Broadband Services Router:
•
See ERX Module Guide, Table 1, Module Combinations for detailed module specifications.
•
See ERX Module Guide, Appendix A, Module Protocol Support for information about the
modules that support PIM for IPv6 multicasting.
For information about modules that support PIM for IPv6 multicasting on the E120 and
E320 Broadband Services Routers:
Related
Documentation
•
See E120 and E320 Module Guide, Table 1, Modules and IOAs for detailed module
specifications.
•
See E120 and E320 Module Guide, Appendix A, IOA Protocol Support for information
about the modules that support PIM for IPv6 multicasting.
•
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 278
•
PIM for IPv6 Multicast References on page 281
PIM for IPv6 Multicast References
For more information about IPv6 multicast, see the following resources:
•
RFC 2362—Protocol Independent Multicast-Sparse Mode (PIM-SM): Protocol
Specification (June 1998)
•
RFC 3569—An Overview of Source-Specific Multicast (SSM) (July 2003)
•
Source-Specific Multicast for IP—draft-ietf-ssm-arch-06.txt (March 2005 expiration)
•
Source-Specific Protocol Independent Multicast in
232/8—draft-ietf-mboned-ssm232-08.txt (September 2004 expiration)
NOTE: IETF drafts are valid for only 6 months from the date of issuance.
They must be considered as works in progress. Please refer to the IETF
website at http://www.ietf.org for the latest drafts.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 278
•
PIM for IPv6 Multicast Platform Considerations on page 281
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on a Virtual Router
By default, PIM is disabled. To enable PIM on a VR:
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1.
Enable multicast routing.
2. Create a VR, or access the VR context.
3. Create and enable PIM processing.
host1(config)#virtual-router boston
host1:boston(config)#ipv6 router pim
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 278
•
Disabling PIM for IPv6 on a Virtual Router on page 282
•
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on an Interface on page 282
•
Removing PIM for IPv6 on page 294
•
Resetting PIM Counters and Mappings for IPv6 on page 295
•
ipv6 router pim
•
virtual-router
Disabling PIM for IPv6 on a Virtual Router
To disable PIM processing on a router, use the pim disable command. By default, PIM
processing is enabled:
•
Issue the pim disable command in Router Configuration mode.
host1:boston(config-router)#pim disable
Use the no version to reenable PIM processing.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 278
•
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on a Virtual Router on page 281
•
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on an Interface on page 282
•
Removing PIM for IPv6 on page 294
•
Resetting PIM Counters and Mappings for IPv6 on page 295
•
pim disable
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on an Interface
You can enable PIM on an interface in one of the allowed modes and specify how often
the interface sends hello messages to neighbors.
You can configure PIM and MLD on the same interface. If you configure MLD and PIM on
an interface, the router considers that PIM owns the interface.
To enable PIM on an interface:
1.
282
Enable PIM in sparse mode on an interface.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Configuring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
host1(config-if)#ipv6 pim sparse-mode
Use the no version to disable PIM in sparse mode on an interface.
2. Specify the interval, in seconds, at which the router sends hello messages to neighbors.
host1(config-if)#ipv6 pim query-interval 100
Use the no version to restore the default setting, 30 seconds.
3. Set the graceful restart duration for IP PIM sparse mode.
host1(config-if)#ip pimv6 sparse-mode graceful-restart-duration 10
Use the no version to return to the default duration of 30 seconds.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 278
•
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on a Virtual Router on page 281
•
Removing PIM for IPv6 on page 294
•
Resetting PIM Counters and Mappings for IPv6 on page 295
•
ipv6 pim query-interval
•
ipv6 pim sparse-mode
•
ipv6 pim sparse-mode graceful-restart-duration
Setting a Priority to Determine the Designated Router for IPv6
You can influence whether a particular router is selected as the designated router with
the ipv6 pim dr-priority command. A higher priority value increases the likelihood that a
router is selected as the designated router, while a lower value decreases the likelihood.
The ipv6 pim dr-priority command in Router Configuration mode sets the designated
router priority on all the PIM interfaces on the router. To override this global setting on a
particular interface, use the ipv6 pim dr-priority command in Interface Configuration
mode.
NOTE: You cannot configure the designated router priority on PIM DM
interfaces.
•
To set a priority value, in the range 1–254, by which a router is likely to be selected as
the designated router, issue the ip pim dr-priority command.
In Router Configuration mode:
host1(config-router)#ipv6 pim dr-priority 24
The no version restores the default value. The default value is 1.
In Interface Configuration mode:
host1(config-subif)#ipv6 pim dr-priority 24
The no version restores the value that is specified in Router Configuration mode.
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Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 278
•
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on a Virtual Router on page 281
•
Disabling PIM for IPv6 on a Virtual Router on page 282
•
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on an Interface on page 282
•
Removing PIM for IPv6 on page 294
•
Monitoring PIM Router-Level Information for IPv6 on page 298
•
Monitoring PIM Interfaces for IPv6 on page 301
•
ipv6 pim dr-priority
Configuring the PIM Join/Prune Message Interval for IPv6
When you use the router for PIM, the router sends join/prune message to the upstream
RPF neighbor. The default join/prune message interval is 60 seconds. You can configure
the join/prune message interval using the ipv6 pim join-prune-interval command. The
ipv6 pim join-prune-interval command in Router Configuration mode configures the
join-prune interval on all the PIM interfaces on the router. To override this global setting
on a particular interface, use the ipv6 pim join-prune-interval command in Interface
Configuration mode.
The hold-time associated with the PIM join/prune interval messages is 3.5 times the PIM
join/prune message interval.
NOTE: You cannot configure the PIM join/prune message interval on PIM
dense mode interfaces.
•
To set an interval value, in the range 10–210 seconds, at which the router sends the
PIM join/prune message, issue the ipv6 pim join-prune-interval command.
In Router Configuration mode:
host1(config-router)#ipv6 pim join-prune-interval 150
The no version restores the default value, 60 seconds.
In Interface Configuration mode:
host1(config-subif)#ipv6 pim join-prune-interval 150
The no version restores the value that is specified in Router Configuration mode.
284
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Chapter 13: Configuring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
NOTE: You can configure multicast on IPv4 and IPv6 interfaces. For
information about configuring PIM on IPv4 interfaces, see the Configuring
PIM for IPv4 Multicast chapter of JunosE Multicast Routing Configuration Guide.
For information about configuring IP interfaces, see Configuring IP in the
JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP Configuration Guide. For information about configuring
IPv6 interfaces, see Configuring IPv6 in the JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP
Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 278
•
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on a Virtual Router on page 281
•
Disabling PIM for IPv6 on a Virtual Router on page 282
•
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on an Interface on page 282
•
Removing PIM for IPv6 on page 294
•
Monitoring PIM Router-Level Information for IPv6 on page 298
•
Monitoring PIM Interfaces for IPv6 on page 301
•
ipv6 pim join-prune-interval
Configuring an RP Router for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv6
When you use the router for PIM sparse mode, some VRs must act as RP routers. If you
want to control PIM more tightly, you can configure a static RP router. To do so:
1.
Configure an access list that details the multicast groups that can use the static RP
router (in this case, all globally scoped multicast groups).
host1(config)#ipv6 access-list boston permit ff0e::/16 any
2. Specify a static RP router.
host1(config)#ipv6 pim rp-address ::122:1 boston
NOTE: You can configure multicast on IPv4 and IPv6 interfaces. For
information about configuring PIM on IPv4 interfaces, see the Configuring
PIM for IPv4 Multicast chapter of JunosE Multicast Routing Configuration Guide.
For information about configuring IP interfaces, see Configuring IP in the
JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP Configuration Guide. For information about configuring
IPv6 interfaces, see Configuring IPv6 in the JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP
Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 278
•
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on a Virtual Router on page 281
•
Disabling PIM for IPv6 on a Virtual Router on page 282
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•
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on an Interface on page 282
•
Removing PIM for IPv6 on page 294
•
Monitoring PIM Group-to-RP Mappings for IPv6 on page 305
•
Monitoring the RP Router that a Multicast Group Uses for IPv6 on page 306
•
ipv6 pim rp-address
Configuring BSR and RP Candidates for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv6
When choosing candidate BSRs or candidate RPs, select well-connected routers in the
core of the network.
Typically, candidate BSRs are a subset of the candidate RPs. A single BSR is elected for
the domain the set of candidate BSRs. The elected BSR floods bootstrap messages
(BSMs) containing their group-to-RP mappings to all PIM routers. PIM routers use the
group-to-RP mappings supplied by the elected (or preferred) BSR.
Candidate RPs are routers that are capable of performing as a rendezvous point router
for one or more multicast groups. Candidate RPs periodically advertise the set of groups
they support to BSRs. A candidate RP may support all the multicast group address range
or any subset thereof. You can achieve redundancy by configuring more than one
candidate RP for a group or range of groups.
•
Issue the ipv6 pim bsr-candidate command in Global Configuration mode to define
a router as a BSR candidate:
host1(config)#ipv6 pim bsr-candidate loopback 1 30 10
The no version stop the router from acting as a BSR candidate.
•
Issue the ipv6 pim rp-candidate command in Global Configuration mode to define a
router as an RP candidate:
host1(config)#ipv6 access-list 1 permit 1001::1
host1(config)#ipv6 access-list 1 permit 1002::1
host1(config)#ipv6 pim rp-candidate loopback 1 group-list 1
The no version stops the router from being an RP candidate.
NOTE: You can configure multicast on IPv4 and IPv6 interfaces. For
information about configuring PIM on IPv4 interfaces, see the Configuring
PIM for IPv4 Multicast chapter of JunosE Multicast Routing Configuration Guide.
For information about configuring IP interfaces, see Configuring IP in the
JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP Configuration Guide. For information about configuring
IPv6 interfaces, see Configuring IPv6 in the JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP
Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
286
•
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 278
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Configuring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
•
Monitoring BSR Information for IPv6 on page 300
•
ipv6 pim bsr-candidate
•
ipv6 pim rp-candidate
Switching to an SPT for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv6
PIM sparse mode initiates multicast using a shared tree. You can configure PIM sparse
mode to switch to an SPT when a source starts sending multicast messages, or you can
prevent PIM sparse mode from switching to an SPT. Multicasting over an SPT can be
more efficient than multicasting over a shared tree (see PIM Sparse Mode in
“Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast” on page 278).
To specify when PIM sparse mode switches from a shared tree to an SPT:
•
Issue the ipv6 pim spt-threshold command in Global Configuration mode.
host1(config)#ipv6 pim spt-threshold 4
The no version restores the default value, 0.
NOTE: You can configure multicast on IPv4 and IPv6 interfaces. For
information about configuring PIM on IPv4 interfaces, see the Configuring
PIM for IPv4 Multicast chapter of JunosE Multicast Routing Configuration Guide.
For information about configuring IP interfaces, see Configuring IP in the
JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP Configuration Guide. For information about configuring
IPv6 interfaces, see Configuring IPv6 in the JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP
Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 278
•
Monitoring the Threshold for Switching to the Shortest Path Tree at a PIM Designated
Router for IPv6 on page 309
•
ipv6 pim spt-threshold
Configuring PIM Sparse Mode Remote Neighbors for IPv6
You must use PIM sparse mode remote neighbors to run multicast services over
BGP/MPLS VPNs.
NOTE: Although you can configure PIM sparse mode remote neighbors, you
cannot use these remote neighbors for BGP/MPLS VPNs.
To configure a pair of E Series routers to act as PIM remote neighbors:
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1.
On one router, specify the other router to be a remote neighbor, and identify the IP
address of the interface on the other router that is used for the connection to this
router.
host1(config-router):boston#remote-neighbor 1001::1 sparse-mode
2. Specify the location of the local interface whose address is used as the source address
for the PIM connection to a remote neighbor.
host1(config-router-rn):boston#update-source atm 2/1.108
3. (Optional) Specify how often the router sends hello messages to the remote neighbor.
host1(config-router-rn):boston#query-interval 40
4. Repeat Steps 2 to 3 for the other router.
NOTE: You can configure multicast on IPv4 and IPv6 interfaces. For
information about configuring PIM on IPv4 interfaces, see the Configuring
PIM for IPv4 Multicast chapter of JunosE Multicast Routing Configuration Guide.
For information about configuring IP interfaces, see Configuring IP in the
JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP Configuration Guide. For information about configuring
IPv6 interfaces, see Configuring IPv6 in the JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP
Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 278
•
Example: Configuring PIM Sparse Mode Remote Neighbors for IPv6 on page 288
•
Monitoring PIM Remote Neighbors for IPv6 on page 304
•
query-interval
•
remote-neighbor
•
update-source
Example: Configuring PIM Sparse Mode Remote Neighbors for IPv6
The following example illustrates how to configure PIM sparse mode remote neighbors
for IPv6.
•
Requirements on page 288
•
Overview on page 289
•
Configuring PIM Sparse Mode Remote Neighbors for IPv6 on page 289
Requirements
This example uses the following software and hardware components:
•
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•
E Series router (ERX7xx models, ERX14xx models, the ERX310 router, the E120 router,
or the E320 router)
•
ASIC-based line modules that support Fast Ethernet or Gigabit Ethernet
Overview
This example uses the configuration shown in Figure 22 on page 278. Two E Series routers
called router Boston and router Chicago are running PIM and are connected by MPLS
tunnels.
Figure 23: Source-Rooted Tree
DR Routing Table Entry
PC
Source 100::1
1/0
PC
DR
PC
2/1
1/1
Source
Group
Register
RP
Input interface
Output interface
100::1
FF04::5
1/0
1/1, 2/0, 2/1
1/0
1/1, 2/0, 2/1
2/0
PC
PC
PC
PC
PIM
PIM
PIM
PC
g013237
PC
Configuring PIM Sparse Mode Remote Neighbors for IPv6
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To configure the routers as PIM remote neighbors:
1.
Specify that router Chicago will be a remote neighbor of router Boston, and identify
the IP address on router Chicago that will transmit datagrams to router Boston.
boston(config-router)#remote-neighbor 1001::1 sparse-mode
2.
Specify the location of the interface that will transmit datagrams from router Boston
to router Chicago.
boston(config-router-rn)#update-source atm 2/1.108
3.
Specify that router Boston will send hello messages to router Chicago every 40
seconds.
boston(config-if)#ipv6 pim query-interval 40
4.
Specify that router Boston will be a remote neighbor of router Chicago, and identify
the IP address on router Boston that will transmit datagrams to router Chicago.
chicago(config-router)#remote-neighbor 2001::1 sparse-mode
5.
Specify the location of the interface that will transmit datagrams from router Chicago
to router Boston.
chicago(config-router-rn)#update-source atm 2/1.95
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6.
Specify that router Chicago will send hello messages to router Boston every 40
seconds.
chicago(config-if)#ipv6 pim query-interval 40
7.
See update-source.
NOTE: You can configure multicast on IPv4 and IPv6 interfaces. For
information about configuring PIM on IPv4 interfaces, see the Configuring
PIM for IPv4 Multicast chapter of JunosE Multicast Routing Configuration
Guide.
For information about configuring IP interfaces, see Configuring IP in the
JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP Configuration Guide. For information about
configuring IPv6 interfaces, see Configuring IPv6 in the JunosE IP, IPv6,
and IGP Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 278
•
Configuring PIM Sparse Mode Remote Neighbors for IPv6 on page 287
•
Monitoring PIM Remote Neighbors for IPv6 on page 304
•
ipv6 pim query-interval
•
remote-neighbor
•
update-source
Configuring PIM Sparse Mode Join Filters for IPv6
You can use PIM sparse mode join filters to prevent multicast state from being created
in the PIM sparse mode router. The filters are applied to join entries in PIM join/prune
messages that are received from PIM sparse mode neighbors.
By denying joins at the edge of a network, you can limit the multicast state and traffic in
the network. By accepting only certain joins, you can control which multicast services an
end user can receive. PIM join filters also reduce the potential for denial of service (DOS)
attacks where large numbers of joins forwarded to each router on the RPT can result in
a PIM state explosion and very high memory consumption.
For information about how to create access lists, see Configuring Routing Policy in the
JunosE IP Services Configuration Guide.
To specify an extended access list that you want this PIM interface to use as a join filter:
•
Issue the ipv6 pim join-filter command
In Global Configuration mode:
host1(config)#ipv6 pim join-filter gold
In Interface Configuration mode:
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Chapter 13: Configuring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
host1(config-interface)#ipv6 pim join-filter gold
The no version removes the filter association. You can apply the join filter at the global
level or at the interface level. If an interface-level filter exists, it takes precedence over
the global-level filter.
NOTE: You can configure multicast on IPv4 and IPv6 interfaces. For
information about configuring PIM on IPv4 interfaces, see the Configuring
PIM for IPv4 Multicast chapter of JunosE Multicast Routing Configuration Guide.
For information about configuring IP interfaces, see Configuring IP in the
JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP Configuration Guide. For information about configuring
IPv6 interfaces, see Configuring IPv6 in the JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP
Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 278
•
Configuring the PIM Join/Prune Message Interval for IPv6 on page 284
•
Configuring an RP Router for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv6 on page 285
•
Configuring PIM Sparse Mode Remote Neighbors for IPv6 on page 287
•
Monitoring PIM Router-Level Information for IPv6 on page 298
•
Monitoring PIM Interfaces for IPv6 on page 301
•
ipv6 pim join-filter
Configuring PIM for IPv6 SSM
Source Specific Multicast (SSM) is a datagram delivery model that best supports
one-to-many applications, also known as broadcast applications. SSM is networking
technology that targets audio and video broadcast application environments.
To use PIM SSM, MLDv2 must be configured on customer premises equipment
(CPE)–facing interfaces to receivers, and PIM sparse mode must be configured on
CPE-facing interfaces to sources and on core-facing interfaces. After configuring SSM,
you can use the show ipv6 pim sparse-mode sg-state command to display SSM group
membership information.
To configure PIM SSM, you enable PIM SSM on the router and define the SSM range of
IP multicast addresses.
Figure 24 on page 292 shows how PIM SSM is configured between a receiver and a source
in the network. Interface 1 has MLDv2 enabled and all other interfaces towards the core
or source have PIM SSM enabled.
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Figure 24: Network on Which to Configure PIM SSM
Source
2
3
g017108
RP router 4
1
Receiver
To configure PIM SSM:
1.
Enable PIM SSM on the E Series router. The IANA SSM range is configured by default.
You can modify the SSM address range by using the access list.
host1(config)#access-list 15 permit ip any host 239.0.0.2
host1(config)#access-list 15 permit ip any 232.0.0.0 0.225.225.225
host1(config)#ipv6 pim ssm range 15
2. Enable PIM sparse mode on the CPE-facing interface towards the source or core.
3. Enable MLDv2 on the CPE-facing interface towards the receiver.
PIM SSM also works with MLDv1 if you configure the ssm-map in MLD as in the following
example:
host1(config)#ipv6 pim ssm
host1(config)#ipv6 access-list ssm_map1 permit any host ff3e::1
host1(config)#ipv6 mld ssm-map enable
host1(config)#ipv6 mld ssm-map static ssm_map1 51::1
The no version disables ssm-map:
host1(config)#no ipv6 mld ssm-map static ssm_map1 51::1
You can enable PIM SSM and define the SSM range of IPv6 multicast addresses as in
the following examples:
Example 1—Enables SSM with addresses in the IANA range. The SSM address range is
set as the default, which is limited to the IPv6 address range, and where x represents any
valid scope.
host1(config)#ipv6 pim ssm FF3 x ::/96
Example 2—Configures Class D addresses outside of the default SSM range.
host1(config)#ipv6 access-list alist permit any ff3e::1:0:0/96
host1(config)#ipv6 pim ssm range alist
Example 3—Resets the SSM address range to the default.
host1(config)#ipv6 pim ssm default
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Chapter 13: Configuring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
NOTE: You can configure multicast on IPv4 and IPv6 interfaces. For
information about configuring PIM on IPv4 interfaces, see the Configuring
PIM for IPv4 Multicast chapter of JunosE Multicast Routing Configuration Guide.
For information about configuring IP interfaces, see Configuring IP in the
JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP Configuration Guide. For information about configuring
IPv6 interfaces, see Configuring IPv6 in the JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP
Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 278
•
Monitoring each (S,G) Pair for PIM Sparse Mode and PIM SSM for IPv6 on page 306
•
access-list
•
ipv6 pim ssm
BFD Protocol for PIM for IPv6 Overview
The ipv6 pim bfd-liveness-detection command configures the Bidirectional Forwarding
Detection (BFD) protocol for PIM. The BFD protocol uses control packets and shorter
detection time limits to more rapidly detect failures in a network. Also, because they are
adjustable, you can modify the BFD timers for more or less aggressive failure detection.
PIM routers send periodic hello messages from each PIM-enabled interface. You can
configure this interval using the ipv6 pim query-interval command. By default, the PIM
router sends a hello message every 30 seconds (with an interval range of 0–210 seconds).
If it receives no response from a neighbor within 3.5 times the interval value (a minimum
of 3.5 seconds), the PIM router drops the neighbor.
In contrast, when a BFD session exists between neighbors, a PIM neighbor that goes
down is detected quickly (in milliseconds rather than in seconds).
When you issue the ipv6 pim bfd-liveness-detection command on a PIM router, the
router establishes BFD liveness detection with all BFD-enabled PIM neighbors. When the
local router receives an update from a remote PIM neighbor—if BFD is enabled and if the
session is not already present—the local router attempts to create a BFD session to the
remote neighbor.
Each adjacent pair of neighbors negotiates an acceptable transmit interval for BFD
packets. The negotiated value can be different on each neighbor. Each neighbor then
calculates a BFD liveness detection interval. When a neighbor does not receive a BFD
packet within the detection interval, it declares the BFD session to be down.
NOTE: Before the router can use the ipv6 pim bfd-liveness-detection
command, you must specify a BFD license key. To view an already configured
license, use the show license bfd command.
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For general information about configuring and monitoring the BFD protocol, see Configuring
BFD in the JunosE IP Services Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 278
•
Configuring BFD Protocol for PIM for IPv6 on page 294
•
ipv6 pim bfd-liveness-detection
Configuring BFD Protocol for PIM for IPv6
To enable BFD (bidirectional forwarding detection) and define BFD values to more quickly
detect PIM data path failures:
•
Issue the ipv6 pim bfd-liveness-detection command in Interface Configuration mode.
host1(config-if)#ipv6 pim bfd-liveness-detection minimum-interval 800
The no version disables BFD on the PIM interface.
NOTE: Before the router can use the ipv6 pim bfd-liveness-detection
command, you must specify a BFD license key. To view an already
configured license, use the show license bfd command.
For details on liveness detection negotiation, see Negotiation of the BFD Liveness Detection
Interval in the JunosE IP Services Configuration Guide.
NOTE: You can configure multicast on IPv4 and IPv6 interfaces. For
information about configuring PIM on IPv4 interfaces, see the Configuring
PIM for IPv4 Multicast chapter of JunosE Multicast Routing Configuration Guide.
For information about configuring IP interfaces, see Configuring IP in the
JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP Configuration Guide. For information about configuring
IPv6 interfaces, see Configuring IPv6 in the JunosE IP, IPv6, and IGP
Configuration Guide.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 278
•
BFD Protocol for PIM for IPv6 Overview on page 293
•
ipv6 pim bfd-liveness-detection
Removing PIM for IPv6
To remove PIM from the VR:
•
Issue the no ipv6 router pim command in Global Configuration mode.
host1:boston(config)#no ipv6 router pim
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Chapter 13: Configuring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 278
•
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on a Virtual Router on page 281
•
Disabling PIM for IPv6 on a Virtual Router on page 282
•
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on an Interface on page 282
•
Resetting PIM Counters and Mappings for IPv6 on page 295
•
ipv6 router pim
Resetting PIM Counters and Mappings for IPv6
You can use the clear ipv6 pim commands to reset PIM counters and mappings.
•
Issue the clear ipv6 pim interface command in Privileged Exec mode to clear the
counters for multicast packet statistics on all interfaces or a specified interface:
host1#clear ipv6 pim interface atm 3/0.5 count
There is no no version.
NOTE: Specify an interface type and identifier, such as atm 3/0 to clear
the counters on that interface. For details about interface types and
specifiers, see Interface Types and Specifiers in JunosE Command Reference
Guide. If you do not specify an interface, the router clears the counters on
all interfaces.
•
Issue the clear ipv6 pim remote-neighbor command in Privileged Exec mode to clear
the counters for remote neighbor statistics on all interfaces or the specified interface:
host1#clear ipv6 pim remote-neighbor 1001::1 count
There is no no version.
NOTE: Specify the IP address of an interface to clear the counters for that
interface. If you do not specify an interface, the router clears the counters
on all interfaces.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 278
•
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on a Virtual Router on page 281
•
Disabling PIM for IPv6 on a Virtual Router on page 282
•
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on an Interface on page 282
•
ipv6 router pim
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CHAPTER 14
Monitoring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
You can display information about PIM events and parameters. You can use the debug
PIM commands to view information about PIM events and the show ipv6 pim commands
to display information about PIM settings.
•
Enabling the Display of a PIM Event for IPv6 on page 297
•
Disabling the Display of a PIM Event for IPv6 on page 298
•
Monitoring PIM Router-Level Information for IPv6 on page 298
•
Monitoring BSR Information for IPv6 on page 300
•
Monitoring PIM Interfaces for IPv6 on page 301
•
Monitoring PIM Neighbors for IPv6 on page 303
•
Monitoring PIM Remote Neighbors for IPv6 on page 304
•
Monitoring PIM Group-to-RP Mappings for IPv6 on page 305
•
Monitoring the RP Router that a Multicast Group Uses for IPv6 on page 306
•
Monitoring each (S,G) Pair for PIM Sparse Mode and PIM SSM for IPv6 on page 306
•
Monitoring Unicast Routes that PIM Sparse Mode Uses for IPv6 on page 308
•
Monitoring the Threshold for Switching to the Shortest Path Tree at a PIM Designated
Router for IPv6 on page 309
Enabling the Display of a PIM Event for IPv6
To display information about the selected event.
•
Issue the debug ipv6 pim command in Privileged Exec mode:
host1#debug ipv6 pim events severity 1 verbosity low
Use the no version to disable the display.
NOTE: To control the type of events displayed, specify a severity level, and
to control how much information to display, specify a verbosity level.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 278
•
Disabling the Display of a PIM Event for IPv6 on page 298
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•
debug ipv6 pim
Disabling the Display of a PIM Event for IPv6
To turn off the display of information previously enabled with the debug ipv6 pim
command.
•
Issue the undebug ipv6 pim command in the Privileged Exec mode:
host1#undebug ipv6 pim events
There is no no version to disable the display.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 278
•
Enabling the Display of a PIM Event for IPv6 on page 297
•
undebug ipv6 pim
Monitoring PIM Router-Level Information for IPv6
Purpose
Action
Display general PIM router-level information.
To display general PIM router-level information:
host1:1#show ipv6 pim
Default PIM Version: 2
Default Domain Id: 0
Default Hello Period: 30
Default Hello HoldTime: 105
Join-Prune Interval: 100
Join-Prune Holdtime: 350
Keepalive Period: 210
Assert Time: 210
Register Suppression Time: 60
Register Probe Time: 5
Register TTL: 64
SSM enabled, range default
Sparse-Mode Graceful Restart Duration: 30
Graceful restart is complete (timer 0 seconds)
Join filter, access-list bronze
Designated Router Priority: 2
Meaning
Table 80 on page 298 lists the show ipv6 pim command output fields.
Table 80: show ipv6 pim
298
Field Name
Field Description
Default PIM Version
Default PIM version number (always 2)
Default Domain Id
Default Domain Id (always 0)
Default Hello period
Default interval (in minutes) at which the router sends
hello messages to neighbors
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Chapter 14: Monitoring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
Table 80: show ipv6 pim (continued)
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Default Hello Hold Time
Default time (in minutes) for which the router keeps
the neighbor state alive
Join-Prune Interval
Interval value (in seconds) set in the join/prune
message originated by the PIM router
Join-Prune Holdtime
Hold time value (in seconds) set in the join/prune
message originated by the PIM router. The hold time
is 3.5 times the PIM join/prune message interval value.
Keepalive Period
Time SG join state is maintained in the absence of SG
Join message
Assert Time
Period after last assert before assert state is timed
out
Register Suppression Time
Period during which a designated router stops sending
registers to the RP
Register Probe Time
Time before register suppression time (RST) expires
when a designated router might send a NULL-Register
to the RP
Register TTL
TTL value (in PIM register packets) originated by this
PIM router
SSM
State of SSM on this PIM router (enabled or disabled)
range
Default SSM group range or name of the access list
specifying the range
Join filter
Name of the join filter access-list (if configured) for
this PIM router
Designated Router Priority
Designated router priority value
•
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on a Virtual Router on page 281
•
Setting a Priority to Determine the Designated Router for IPv6 on page 283
•
Configuring the PIM Join/Prune Message Interval for IPv6 on page 284
•
Configuring PIM Sparse Mode Join Filters for IPv6 on page 290
•
show ipv6 pim
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Monitoring BSR Information for IPv6
Purpose
Action
Display BSR information and the group prefixes for which the local router is a candidate
RP in a PIM sparse mode environment.
To display information on a router that is the elected BSR:
host1:1#show ipv6 pim bsr
This PIM router is a Candidate BSR.
Configured on intf ATM3/0.101, address: ::107:9
hashMaskLen 30, priority 2, period 60 seconds.
Elected BSR is this router, next BSM in 3 seconds.
Local candidate RP mapping(s):
Candidate RP ::107:9
::108:86, BSR, hold-time 150, interval 60, priority 192
::108:87, BSR, hold-time 150, interval 60, priority 192, from access-list acl
::108:88, BSR, hold-time 150, interval 60, priority 192, from access-list acl
To display information on a router that is a candidate BSR:
host1:1#show ipv6 pim bsr
This PIM router is a Candidate BSR.
Configured on intf ATM3/0.100, address: ::107:9
hashMaskLen 30, priority 2, period 60 seconds.
Elected BSR is ::107:8 (priority 0), expires in 73 seconds.
To display information on a router that is not a candidate BSR:
host1:1#show ipv6 pim bsr
This PIM router is not a Candidate BSR.
Elected BSR is ::107:9 (priority 0), expires in 73 seconds.
Meaning
Table 81 on page 300 lists the show ipv6 pim bsr command output fields.
Table 81: show ipv6 pim bsr Output Fields
300
Field Name
Field Description
Candidacy
Whether or not the router is a candidate BSR
Configured on
Interface on which the router is configured
address
Address of the router
hashMaskLen
Hash mask length
priority
Priority of the router
period
Time between bootstrap messages
Elected BSR
“ this router” or IP address of the elected bootstrap
router
next BSM
If BSR is “ this router,” time until the next bootstrap
message is sent
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Chapter 14: Monitoring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
Table 81: show ipv6 pim bsr Output Fields (continued)
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
expires in
If BSR is not “ this router,” time until the elected BSR
expires if no bootstrap messages are received
Local candidate RP mapping(s)
Routers that the mapping agent is evaluating to
determine an RP router for this interface
•
Configuring BSR and RP Candidates for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv6 on page 286
•
show ipv6 pim bsr
Monitoring PIM Interfaces for IPv6
Purpose
Display information about PIM interfaces. Specify no keywords or variables to view
information about all PIM interfaces. You can specify the detail keyword to view detailed
information for all PIM interfaces or for a specified PIM interface. You can specify the
summary keyword to view the number of configured, enabled, and disabled PIM
sparse-mode interfaces. You can specify the count keyword to view the number of
multicast packets that the interface has sent and received.
NOTE: Provide an interface type and specifier (such as atm 3/0) to display
information about that interface only. For details about interface types and
specifiers, see Interface Types and Specifiers in JunosE Command Reference
Guide.
Action
To display information for all PIM interfaces, or for a specified PIM interface:
host1# show ipv6 pim interface
PIM Interface Table
Interface Addr Interface
JoinFilter
101::1
102::1
silver
103::1
gold
State Ver Mode
Nbr
Hello
J/P
DR
DR Addr
ATM2/0.100
Up
2
Sparse
Count
1
Intvl
30
Intvl
150
Pri
5
101::2
ATM2/0.101
Up
2
Sparse
1
30
100
2
102::2
ATM3/0.102
Up
2
Sparse
1
30
100
2
103::1
To display the number of configured, enabled, and disabled PIM sparse-mode interface:
host1#show ipv6 pim interface summary
PIM Interface Summary
SM:
0, 0 enabled, 0 disabled
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To display the number of multicast packets that the interface has sent and received:
host1#show ipv6 pim interface count
PIM Interface Count
Interface Addr Interface Name
::107:84
Meaning
ATM3/0.20
ControlPktCount In|Out
Hello
JoinPrune Assert
0
0
0
0
0
0
Table 82 on page 302 lists the show ipv6 pim interface command output fields.
Table 82: show ipv6 pim interface Output Fields
302
Field Name
Field Description
Interface Addr
IPv6 address of the interface
Interface Name
Type and identifier of the interface. For details about
interface types and specifiers, see Interface Types and
Specifiers in JunosE Command Reference Guide
Ver
Version of PIM running on this interface
Mode
PIM mode running on this interface: Sparse
Nbr Count
Number of neighbors connected to this interface
Hello Intvl
Time interval at which the interface sends hello
messages to neighbors
J/P Interval
Total number of join/prune message interval, in
seconds, at which the interface sends the join/prune
messages
DR Address
Address of the designated router
SM
Number of PIM sparse mode interfaces:
•
enabled—Number of interfaces administratively
enabled
•
disabled—Number of interfaces administratively
disabled
DR Pri
Designated router priority value
ControlPkt Count In | Out
PIM messages received on and sent from this
interface:
•
Hello—Number of hello messages
•
JoinPrune—Total number of join and prune
messages
•
Assert—Number of assert messages
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 14: Monitoring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
Related
Documentation
•
Enabling PIM for IPv6 on an Interface on page 282
•
Setting a Priority to Determine the Designated Router for IPv6 on page 283
•
Configuring the PIM Join/Prune Message Interval for IPv6 on page 284
•
Configuring PIM Sparse Mode Join Filters for IPv6 on page 290
•
Resetting PIM Counters and Mappings for IPv6 on page 295
•
show ipv6 pim interface
Monitoring PIM Neighbors for IPv6
Purpose
Display information about PIM neighbors that the router discovered. You can specify the
detail keyword to view detailed information for all PIM neighbors or for a specified PIM
neighbor.
NOTE: Provide an interface type and specifier (such as atm 3/0) to display
information about that interface only. For details about interface types and
specifiers, see Interface Types and Specifiers in JunosE Command Reference
Guide.
Action
To display information about PIM neighbors that the router discovered:
host1#show ipv6 pim neighbor
PIM Neighbor Table
Neighbor Addr
Interface Name
::107:48
atm2/1.109
::108:58
atm2/1.108
::111:98
atm2/0.110
Meaning
Uptime
1d15:47:35
1d15:47:34
1d15:48:02
Expires
00:01:41
00:01:42
00:01:44
Ver
2
2
2
Mode
Sparse
Sparse
Sparse
Table 83 on page 303 lists the show ipv6 pim neighbor command output fields.
Table 83: show ipv6 pim neighbor Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Neighbor Addr
IPv6 address of the neighbor
Interface Name
Type and specifier of the interface to which the
neighbor connects. For details about interface types
and specifiers, see Interface Types and Specifiers in
JunosE Command Reference Guide.
Uptime
Time since the router discovered this neighbor
Expires
Time available for the neighbor to send a hello
message to the interface. If the neighbor does not
send a hello message during this time, it will no longer
be a neighbor
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Table 83: show ipv6 pim neighbor Output Fields (continued)
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Ver
Version of PIM that the neighbor is running
Mode
PIM mode that the neighbor is using: sparse
•
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 278
•
show ipv6 pim neighbor
Monitoring PIM Remote Neighbors for IPv6
Purpose
Action
Display information about PIM remote neighbors.
To display information about PIM remote neighbors:
host1:boston#show ipv6 pim remote-neighbor
PIM RemoteNbr Table
RemoteNbr Addr OurEnd Addr
Ver Mode
1001::1
2001::1
2
In interface : atm2/1.109
Out interface: atm2/1.108
Meaning
Sparse
Nbr
Hello
Count Intvl
1
30
DR Addr
::107:84
Table 84 on page 304 lists the show ipv6 pim remote-neighbor command output fields.
Table 84: show ipv6 pim remote-neighbor Output Fields
304
Field Name
Field Description
Remote Nbr Addr
IPv6 address of remote neighbor
OurEnd Addr
IPv6 address of local interface, such as the local
endpoint of a tunnel, that transmits data to remote
neighbor
Ver
Version of PIM running on the local interface
Mode
PIM mode running on the local interface; always PIM
sparse mode
Nbr Count
Number of remote neighbors detected: 0 or 1
Hello Intvl
Time interval at which the interface sends hello
messages to neighbors
DR Addr
Address of designated router
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 14: Monitoring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
Table 84: show ipv6 pim remote-neighbor Output Fields (continued)
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
In interface
Type and identifier of the interface on which PIM
router receives packets from remote neighbor. For
details about interface types and specifiers, see
Interface Types and Specifiers in JunosE Command
Reference Guide.
Out interface
Type and identifier of the interface on which PIM
router sends packets to remote neighbor. For details
about interface types and specifiers, see Interface
Types and Specifiers in JunosE Command Reference
Guide.
•
Configuring PIM Sparse Mode Remote Neighbors for IPv6 on page 287
•
Example: Configuring PIM Sparse Mode Remote Neighbors for IPv6 on page 288
•
Resetting PIM Counters and Mappings for IPv6 on page 295
•
show ipv6 pim remote-neighbor
Monitoring PIM Group-to-RP Mappings for IPv6
Purpose
Action
Display information about PIM group-to-RP mappings. You can specify the address of
a group to view PIM group-to-RP mappings for a particular group. You can specify the
mapping keyword to display all group-to-RP mappings that the router has recorded.
To display information about PIM group-to-RP mappings:
host1:8#show ipv6 pim rp mapping
PIM Group-to-RP mapping(s)
Group(s) ff00::/12
RP ::122:1, priority 0, via
Group(s) ff0e::1:0/96
RP ::120:1, priority 0, via
Meaning
static
static
Table 85 on page 305 lists the show ipv6 pim rp mapping command output fields.
Table 85: show ipv6 pim rp mapping Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Group
Prefix of the multicast group
RP
IP address of RP router for the multicast group
priority
This field is not functional
via
Method by which the RP router was assigned (static,
BSR)
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Related
Documentation
•
Configuring an RP Router for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv6 on page 285
•
show ipv6 pim rp
Monitoring the RP Router that a Multicast Group Uses for IPv6
Purpose
Action
Display the RP Router that a multicast group uses.
To display the RP Router that a multicast group uses:
host1:2#show ipv6 pim rp-hash 232.1.1.1
Group(s) ff00::/12
RP ::122:1, priority 0, via static
Meaning
Table 86 on page 306 lists the show ipv6 pim rp-hash command output fields.
Table 86: show ipv6 pim rp-hash Output Fields
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Group
Multicast group
RP
RP router for the multicast group
priority
This field is not functional
via
Method by which the RP router was assigned (static,
BSR)
•
Configuring an RP Router for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv6 on page 285
•
show ipv6 pim rp-hash
Monitoring each (S,G) Pair for PIM Sparse Mode and PIM SSM for IPv6
Purpose
Action
Display information for each (S,G) entry for PIM sparse mode and PIM SSM.
To display information for each (S,G) entry for PIM sparse mode and PIM SSM:
host1:2#show ipv6 pim sparse-mode sg-state
PIM SM route table and oif information
<*, ff0e::1:3>
Group-to-RP mapping: ff00::/12 RP: ::123:1
RPF Route: ::123:1/96 IIF: :106:73 UpNbr: ::106:37
Oifs:
Address: ::78:7:7 Interface: loopback7
Local group membership present.
<*, ff0e::a:1>
Group-to-RP mapping: ff001:/12 RP: ::123:1
RPF Route: :123:1/96 IIF: :106:73 UpNbr: :106:37
Oifs:
Address: ::78:7:7 Interface: loopback7
Local group membership present.
<::118:34, ff3e::1>
306
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 14: Monitoring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
SSM Group
RPF Route: ::118:0/96 IIF: :118:1 (Directly attached)
Oifs:
Register Oif to RP: ::141:2 suppressed for SSM Group.
Address: ::134:1 Interface: ATM3/0.104
Joined as <S, G>
Join Expires: 161
<::118:35, ff3e::1>
SSM Group
RPF Route: ::118:0/96 IIF: ::118:1 (Directly attached)
Oifs:
Register Oif to RP: ::141:2 suppressed for SSM Group.
Address: ::134:1 Interface: ATM3/0.104
Joined as <S, G>
Join Expires: 161
<::10:8, ff0e::5:1>
EntryExpires: 143
Group-to-RP mapping: ff00::/12 RP: ::123:1
RPF Route: ::10:0/96 IIF: ::106:73 UpNbr: ::106:37
Oifs:
Address: ::78:7:7 Interface: loopback7
Joined as <*, G>
Count of entries - <S, G>
: 3
<*, G>
: 2
<*, *, RP>: 0
Meaning
Table 87 on page 307 lists the show ipv6 pim sparse-mode sg-state command output
fields.
Table 87: show ipv6 pim sparse-mode sg-state Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Group-to-RP mapping
IPv6 addresses and network mask of the multicast
group
RP
IPv6 address of RP router
SSM group
Indicates that this is an SSM group
RPF route
IPv6 address and network mask of the RPF route
IIF
IPv6 address of the incoming interface for the RPF
route
UpNbr
IPv6 address of the upstream neighbor
Oifs
Outgoing interface
Register Oif to RP
IP address of RP router for the outgoing interface;
suppressed for SSM
Address
IPv6 address of outgoing interface
Interface
Type and specifier of the interface. For details about
interface types and specifiers, see Interface Types and
Specifiers in JunosE Command Reference Guide.
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Table 87: show ipv6 pim sparse-mode sg-state Output Fields (continued)
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Joined as
Type of mapping:
•
(S,G)—Mapping from a specific source to a specific
group
•
(*,G)—Mapping from any source to a specific group
•
(*,*,RP)—Mapping from any source to any group
Join expires
Number of seconds before the (S,G) membership
expires
Count of entries
Total count of (S,G) pair mappings
•
Configuring PIM for IPv6 SSM on page 291
•
show ipv6 pim sparse-mode sg-state
Monitoring Unicast Routes that PIM Sparse Mode Uses for IPv6
Purpose
Action
Display the unicast routes that PIM sparse mode is using.
To display the unicast routes that PIM sparse mode is using:
host1:2#show ipv6 pim sparse-mode unicast-route
PIM SM unicast route table information
Route
RpfNbr
Iif
Pref Metric
--------------------------------------------------------------------------::122:0
/96
::122:1
255
1
Count of entries: 1
Meaning
Table 88 on page 308 lists the show ipv6 pim sparse-mode unicast-route command
output fields.
Table 88: show ipv6 pim sparse-mode unicast-route Output Fields
308
Field Name
Field Description
Route
IPv6 address and network mask for the unicast route
RpfNbr
RPF neighbor
Iif
Incoming interface for the unicast route
Pref
Preference for the unicast route
Metric
Value of metric for the unicast route (type of metric
varies with the unicast protocol)
Count of entries
Number of unicast routes that PIM sparse mode is
using
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 14: Monitoring PIM for IPv6 Multicast
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM for IPv6 Multicast on page 278
•
show ipv6 pim sparse-mode unicast-route
Monitoring the Threshold for Switching to the Shortest Path Tree at a PIM Designated
Router for IPv6
Purpose
Action
Display the threshold for switching to the shortest path tree at a PIM designated router.
To display the threshold for switching to the shortest path tree at a PIM designated router:
host1:2#show ipv6 pim spt-threshold
Access List Name
SptThreshold(in kbps)
------------------------------------------------------1
infinity
Meaning
Table 89 on page 309 lists the show ipv6 pim spt-threshold command output fields.
Table 89: show ipv6 pim spt-threshold Output Fields
Related
Documentation
Field Name
Field Description
Access List Name
Name of the IPv6 access list that specifies the groups
to which the threshold applies
SptThreshold (in kbps)
Value at which PIM sparse mode should switch from
a shared tree to an SPT. A value of infinity indicates
that PIM sparse mode should never switch to an SPT
•
Switching to an SPT for PIM Sparse Mode for IPv6 on page 287
•
show ipv6 pim spt-threshold
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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310
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
PART 3
Index
•
Index on page 313
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
311
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312
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Index
A
access lists, IP
specifying multicast groups.......................................64
access lists, IPv6
specifying multicast groups....................................245
advertising DVMRP routes........................................140, 147
assert messages.....................................................................94
assigning multicast groups.......................................64, 246
auto-RP router
PIM sparse mode.........................................................103
PIM sparse-dense mode...........................................103
B
baseline commands
baseline ip dvmrp.........................................................153
baseline ip igmp..............................................................73
baseline ip igmp-proxy interface..............................72
baseline ipv6 mld-proxy interface........................256
BFD (Bidirectional Forwarding Detection)
RIP, configuring for..............................................119, 293
BGP multicasting............................................................34, 191
C
class D IPv4 addresses.........................................................58
clear ip commands
clear ip dvmrp route....................................................150
clear ip mroute................................................................32
clear ip pim auto-rp......................................................121
clear ip pim interface count.............................121, 295
clear ip pim remote-neighbor count......................121
clear ipv6 commands
clear ipv6 mroute.........................................................190
clear ipv6 pim remote-neighbor count...............295
conventions
notice icons......................................................................xix
text and syntax................................................................xx
customer support..................................................................xxii
contacting JTAC.............................................................xxii
D
data path failure
detecting RIP.........................................................119, 293
debug commands
debug ip pim...................................................................123
debug ipv6 pim.............................................................297
default MDT, creating...........................................................107
detecting RIP data path failure...............................119, 293
disable-dynamic-redistribute command
DVMRP.............................................................................148
disabling dynamic route redistribution
DVMRP.............................................................................148
Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol. See
DVMRP
documentation set
comments on..................................................................xxi
downstream interface..................................................71, 254
DRs (designated routers)
PIM routing..............................................................92, 278
DVMRP (Distance Vector Multicast Routing
Protocol)
advertising routes................................................140, 147
configuring
limits.........................................................................143
summary addresses...........................................145
default router, configuring.........................................142
deleting routes..............................................................150
enabling
on a virtual router.................................................142
on an interface......................................................143
exchanging unicast routes........................................148
filtering reports..............................................................144
metric................................................................................146
monitoring.......................................................................153
neighbors........................................................................140
overview...........................................................................140
pruning.............................................................................140
summary addresses....................................................145
using with IGMP............................................................143
using with PIM......................................................100, 143
dynamic route redistribution, disabling
in DVMRP........................................................................148
E
exchanging DVMRP unicast routes................................148
F
filtering
DVMRP reports.............................................................144
data MDT, creating................................................................107
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G
group membership
queries......................................................................58, 237
reports.......................................................................58, 237
H
hardware multicast packet replication
OIF mapping............................................................21, 180
overview.............................................................................19
hello interval...................................................................96, 279
PIM.....................................100, 131, 282, 288, 301, 304
hold time
PIM sparse mode.................................................96, 279
hop count.................................................................................146
I
IGMP (Internet Group Management
Protocol).........................................................................57, 73
configuring........................................................................63
disabling............................................................................69
enabling.............................................................................62
limiting groups on interfaces.....................................66
monitoring..................................................................37, 73
performing host functions...........................................71
removing...........................................................................69
specifying version..........................................................64
igmp commands
igmp disable....................................................................69
IGMP proxy................................................................................70
configuring.........................................................................71
enabling..............................................................................71
monitoring........................................................................86
version................................................................................70
IGP (interior gateway protocol).......................................139
importing routes. See redistributing routes
Internet Group Management Protocol. See IGMP
investigating IP multicast routes...............................34, 191
IP addresses
class D................................................................................58
for multicasting...............................................................58
ip commands
ip multicast-routing..........................................................7
ip multicast-routing disable-rpf-check....................8
ip multicast-routing permanent-mroute................8
ip route-type.......................................................................8
ip rpf-route...........................................................................7
mroute port limit...........................................29, 30, 188
314
ip dvmrp commands............................................................143
ip dvmrp..................................................................143, 149
ip dvmrp accept-filter.................................................144
ip dvmrp announce-list..............................................147
ip dvmrp auto-summary...........................................145
ip dvmrp disable...........................................................149
ip dvmrp metric-offset...............................................146
ip dvmrp route-limit....................................................144
ip dvmrp routehog-notification...............................143
ip dvmrp summary-address.....................................145
ip dvmrp unicast-routing...........................................148
See also show ip dvmrp commands
ip igmp commands
ip igmp access-source-group...................................64
ip igmp ssm-map enable............................................65
ip igmp ssm-map static..............................................65
ip igmp static-exclude..................................................67
ip igmp static-include...................................................67
ip igmp version................................................................64
ip igmp-proxy....................................................................71
ip igmp-proxy unsolicited-report-interval.............71
ip igmp-proxy V1-router-present-time....................71
ip multicast commands
ip multicast admission-bandwidth-limit..............27
ip multicast-routing bandwidth-map.....................18
ip multicast-routing mcast-by-pass.......................18
IP multicast groups
assigning to an interface.............................................64
identifying.........................................................................58
leaving................................................................................58
maintaining membership of......................................58
reporting......................................................................57, 73
specifying..........................................................................64
IP multicast interfaces, monitoring...................................37
IP multicast routes.........................................................34, 191
IP multicasting
benefits of...........................................................................4
deleting routes.................................................................32
enabling................................................................................7
M-BONE..................................................................139, 153
monitoring.........................................................................35
ip pim commands................................................................100
ip pim................................................................................100
ip pim bsr-candidate..................................................105
ip pim join-filter...............................................................117
ip pim query-interval..................................................100
ip pim rp-address.........................................................103
ip pim rp-candidate.....................................................105
ip pim send-rp-announce.........................................103
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Index
ip pim send-rp-discovery scope.............................103
ip pim sparse-mode
graceful-restart-duration.....................................100
ip pim spt-threshold...................................................106
See also show ip pim commands
ip rip commands
ip rip bfd-liveness-detection...........................119, 293
IP tunnels
monitoring.........................................................................37
ipv6 commands....................................................................168
ipv6 block-multicast-sources.................................185
ipv6 mld robustness...................................................242
ipv6 multicast-routing................................................167
ipv6 multicast-routing disable-rpf-check..........168
ipv6 multicast-routing permanent-route...........168
ipv6 route-type.............................................................168
ipv6 rpf-route.................................................................167
See also show ipv6 commands
IPv6 hardware multicast packet replication
overview...........................................................................178
ipv6 mld commands
ipv6 mld...........................................................................241
ipv6 mld access-group..............................................245
ipv6 mld access-source-group..............................245
ipv6 mld apply-oif-map...........................................246
ipv6 mld explicit-tracking.........................................252
ipv6 mld group limit.....................................................251
ipv6 mld immediate-leave.......................................242
ipv6 mld last-member query-interval.................242
ipv6 mld oif-map.........................................................246
ipv6 mld querier-timeout.........................................242
ipv6 mld query-interval.............................................242
ipv6 mld query-max-response-time....................242
ipv6 mld ssm-map enable........................................251
ipv6 mld ssm-map static..........................................251
ipv6 mld static-exclude.............................................252
ipv6 mld static-group................................................246
ipv6 mld static-include..............................................252
ipv6 mld version..................................................241, 246
ipv6 mld-proxy.............................................................255
ipv6 mld-proxy
unsolicited-report-interval..................................255
ipv6 mld-proxy version..............................................255
IPv6 multicast
benefits of.......................................................................163
deleting routes..............................................................190
enabling............................................................................167
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
ipv6 multicast commands
ipv6 multicast
admission-bandwidth-limit................................186
ipv6 multicast-routing bandwidth-map..............177
IPv6 multicast groups
assigning to an interface..........................................246
identifying.......................................................................237
leaving..............................................................................237
maintaining membership of....................................237
reporting..........................................................................237
specifying........................................................................245
ipv6 pim commands..................................................282, 287
ipv6 pim...........................................................................282
ipv6 pim bsr-candidate............................................286
ipv6 pim join-filter.......................................................290
ipv6 pim query-interval.............................................282
ipv6 pim rp-address...................................................285
ipv6 pim rp-candidate...............................................286
ipv6 pim spt-threshold..............................................287
See also show ipv6 pim commands
J
join messages.................................................................96, 278
L
leave group membership messages......................58, 237
leaving an IP multicast group.............................................58
leaving an IPv6 multicast group......................................237
limiting IGMP groups on interfaces.................................66
limiting MLD groups on interfaces.................................248
liveness detection
RIP and BFD...........................................................119, 293
M
M-BONE (multicast backbone of the
Internet).......................................................................139, 153
manuals
comments on..................................................................xxi
MDT (Multicast Distribution Tree)
creating with default MDT.........................................107
metric
DVMRP.............................................................................146
MLD (Multicast Listener Discovery)...............................237
configuring......................................................................242
disabling..........................................................................253
enabling............................................................................241
explicit host tracking..................................................249
limiting groups on interfaces..................................248
monitoring......................................................................259
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performing host functions.......................................255
removing.........................................................................253
specifying version.........................................................241
SSM mapping................................................................247
traffic................................................................................249
mld disable command.......................................................253
MLD explicit host tracking................................................249
MLD proxy...............................................................................254
configuring.....................................................................255
enabling..........................................................................255
monitoring......................................................................259
version..............................................................................254
MLD SSM mapping..............................................................247
MLD traffic..............................................................................249
mrinfo requests, support for...............................................37
multicast
IP. See IP multicasting
IPv6. See IPv6 multicast
Multicast Distribution Tree. See MDT
multicast group port limit command............................251
Multicast Listener Discovery. See MLD
multicast VPNs
creating with data MDTs.............................................114
creating with the default MDT.................................107
overview...........................................................................107
N
neighbors, DVMRP...............................................................140
notice icons...............................................................................xix
P
PIM (Protocol Independent Multicast)..................91, 297
displaying events.................................................123, 297
enabling
on a virtual router.........................................99, 281
on an interface...........................................100, 282
monitoring.......................................................37, 123, 297
removing................................................................120, 294
resetting counters and mappings.................121, 295
using with DVMRP..............................................100, 143
using with IGMP...........................................................100
using with MLD.............................................................282
See also PIM dense mode, PIM sparse mode,
PIM sparse-dense mode
PIM dense mode.....................................................................92
See also PIM
pim disable command.......................................................100
PIM SM. See PIM sparse mode
316
PIM sparse mode..........................................................94, 278
configuring auto-RP router.......................................103
joining groups................................................................278
pruning.............................................................................278
remote neighbors, configuring..............106, 107, 287
setting a threshold.............................................106, 287
timers........................................................................96, 279
PIM sparse-dense mode ......................................................91
configuring auto-RP router.......................................103
overview.............................................................................97
PIM SSM (PIM source-specific multicast)
enabling...................................................................118, 291
requirements for IGMPv3...........................................118
requirements for MLDv2............................................291
Protocol Independent Multicast. See PIM
prune messages............................................................93, 278
R
reachability commands
IP multicast..............................................................34, 191
redistribute command
DVMRP.............................................................................146
redistributing routes, DVMRP...........................................146
redistribution routes
disabling dynamic (DVMRP)...................................148
remote neighbors
PIM sparse mode
configuring...........................................106, 107, 287
removing PIM................................................................120, 294
rendezvous point router. See RP routers
reporting IP multicast groups......................................57, 73
reporting IPv6 multicast groups......................................237
resetting PIM counters and mappings.................121, 295
reverse-path forwarding. See RPF
RIP (Routing Information Protocol)
BFD liveness detection and.............................119, 293
detecting path failures......................................119, 293
purging learned routes.......................................119, 293
route-map command..........................................................147
router commands
router dvmrp.........................................................146, 149
router igmp.......................................................................69
router mld.......................................................................253
router pim.............................................99, 120, 281, 294
routes
using for other protocols......................................8, 168
routing policy commands
set admission-bandwidth.............................................8
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Index
RP (rendezvous point) routers..............................103, 285
assigning automatically.............................................103
configuring
automatic...............................................................103
static...............................................................103, 285
RPF (reverse-path forwarding)...........................7, 163, 167
RPF routes, monitoring................................................35, 193
S
setting
baseline
DVMRP....................................................................153
IGMP...........................................................................73
IGMP Proxy...............................................................72
MLD Proxy.............................................................256
DVMRP hop-count......................................................146
PIM SPT threshold
IP................................................................................106
IPv6..........................................................................287
SFPs (small form-factor pluggable
transceivers).......................................................................196
shared trees...................................................94, 95, 106, 287
shortest path trees. See SRTs
show ip commands
show ip mroute................................................................37
show ip mroute active.................................................40
show ip mroute count..................................................43
show ip mroute mcast-by-pass...............................50
show ip mroute oif-detail...........................................43
show ip mroute statistics...........................................46
show ip mroute summary..........................................49
show ip rpf-route............................................................35
show mroute port count....................................55, 225
show ip dvmrp commands
show ip dvmrp...............................................................153
show ip dvmrp interface...................................153, 154
show ip dvmrp mroute...............................................153
show ip dvmrp neighbor............................................153
show ip dvmrp route...................................................153
show ip dvmrp routeNextHop.................................153
show ip igmp commands
show ip igmp....................................................................73
show ip igmp groups.....................................................73
show ip igmp interface.................................................73
show ip igmp interface brief.......................................73
show ip igmp membership.........................................73
show ip igmp-proxy......................................................86
show ip igmp-proxy groups.......................................86
show ip igmp-proxy interface...................................86
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
show ip multicast commands
show ip multicast protocols.......................................52
show ip multicast protocols brief............................53
show ip multicast routing...........................................54
show ip pim commands
show ip pim ....................................................................124
show ip pim auto-rp....................................................126
show ip pim bsr..............................................................127
show ip pim data-mdt................................................128
show ip pim dense-mode sg-state.......................129
show ip pim interface...................................................131
show ip pim neighbor..................................................132
show ip pim rp................................................................133
show ip pim rp-hash....................................................134
show ip pim sparse-mode sg-state......................135
show ip pim sparse-mode unicast-route............137
show ip pim spt-threshold........................................138
show ipv6 commands
show ipv6 interface....................................................202
show ipv6 mroute........................................................219
show ipv6 mroute active...........................................222
show ipv6 mroute count...........................................226
show ipv6 mroute oif-detail....................................226
show ipv6 mroute statistics....................................229
show ipv6 mroute summary...................................232
show ipv6 rpf-route.....................................................193
show ipv6 mld commands
show ipv6 mld..............................................................259
show ipv6 mld groups...............................................260
show ipv6 mld interface...................................216, 262
show ipv6 mld interface brief.................................266
show ipv6 mld membership...................................268
show ipv6 mld oif-mapping....................................270
show ipv6 mld ssm-mapping.................................270
show ipv6 mld-proxy..................................................272
show ipv6 mld-proxy groups...................................273
show ipv6 mld-proxy interface...............................274
show ipv6 multicast commands
show ipv6 multicast protocols...............................233
show ipv6 multicast protocols brief.....................234
show ipv6 multicast routing....................................235
show ipv6 pim commands
show ipv6 pim..............................................................298
show ipv6 pim bsr......................................................300
show ipv6 pim interface............................................301
show ipv6 pim neighbor...........................................303
show ipv6 pim remote-neighbor..........................304
show ipv6 pim rp.........................................................305
show ipv6 pim rp-hash.............................................306
317
JunosE 16.1.x Multicast Routing Configuration Guide
show ipv6 pim sparse-mode sg-state................306
show ipv6 pim sparse-mode
unicast-route............................................................308
show ipv6 pim spt-threshold.................................309
show multicast group limit command...................85, 271
show vlan subinterface command...............................200
source-rooted trees. See SRTs
Source-Specific Multicast for
IP—draft-ietf-ssm-arch-06.txt (March 2005
expiration)....................................................................99, 281
specifying IP multicast groups..........................................64
specifying IPv6 multicast groups...................................245
SPTs (shortest path trees). See SRTs
SRTs (source-rooted trees)..........92, 106, 140, 278, 287
static routes
configuring..................................................................7, 167
summary addresses
DVMRP routing..............................................................145
support, technical See technical support
T
technical support
contacting JTAC.............................................................xxii
text and syntax conventions...............................................xx
timers
PIM sparse mode.................................................96, 279
trace packets....................................................................34, 191
U
undebug commands
undebug ip pim..............................................................124
undebug ipv6 pim.......................................................298
unicast routes, DVMRP.......................................................148
upstream interface.......................................................70, 254
X
XFPs (10-gigabit small form-factor pluggable
transceivers).......................................................................196
318
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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