DataSystemsNewsletter_1975_Jan1_17pages

DataSystemsNewsletter_1975_Jan1_17pages
a
by Ray Smelek/Boise
I am pleased to announce Bill Murph
Boise Division as Marketing Man
extensive marketing experience at
•
Bill will be moving to Boise in early January; in the
meantime, will be formulating marketing strategy for
Boise products while he phases out of his current
position. H E w L E n ~ p A c K A R D
BOISE DIVISION NEWS
by Ray SmeleklBoise
I know there is considerable concern in the field
regarding the long availability on 7970 Magnetic Tape
Drives. First I want t o assure you that everyone in Boise
e
is equally concerned and striving hard to r e d ~ ~ cit.
Before I elaborate on what we are doing to rectify the
situation I want to fill you in on hat lead us to this
predicament.
Many people feel this transfer asf Mag Tapes from
Mountain View to Boise was untimely and poorly
planned. Well, in looking back one Isan always see ways
of doing things better, but by and large the transfer
came off very smoothly. What w e did not anticipate
was the sudden demand on Tape Drive deliveries.
You people in the field did an outstanding job in signing
OEM's during the summer. The order rate in August,
September, and October has been over 200% of
a
customers supplied with units.
All prices quoted in this Newsletter
are domestic USA prices only
(Conrinued on page 2)
I
Company Private
work our way out of this long availability situation and
still maintain good relationships with our customers
BOISE DIVISION NEWS - (Continued from page 1 )
overtime and have several people on loan in Bo~sewho
are spending full time expediting material to ensure the
pull-ups occur on time. P,lso, we did work the three days
prior to Thanksgiving.
I expect our availability to be down to 8-10 weeks by
April. We must be careful we don't over produce and
end up with an inventory problem in the months to
come. I'd welcome the opportunity to speak to you
regarding your specific customer situation and any
insights you have about the future requirements for
Mag Tape Drives. In the meantime, keep selling.
You can help by continuing to review your customer's
needs. Do not keep units scheduled in tight if your
customer does not really need them. Keep us informed
of his needs. If we work closely together, I know we can
HrwLETTIP*cX*eD
maintenance charge of $2.00 and $3.00 respectively.
The time base generator is standard in a M-Series DOS
svstems The standard MI230 119662Bi and oution 203
of the MI260 119655B) include the privleged'interrupt
card,
SUMMARY OF DOS-IIID DATA COMMlINICATION INTERFACES AND DRIVERS
by Dan Jorgenson
DOS-IIIB logicallphysical data communication drivers
and hardware Interfaces currently released (as of
December 15, 1974) are listed below. All drlver software
and a new comprehensive driver manual
124307-90012)
are shipped with DOS-lllB 124307B) and serviced under
the DOS hardware service contract.
I
Terminal
I
I
Although r,ot a logicallphysical
type, the
Hardwlred Serlal Interface IHSI) driver is also sh~pped
with D O S - l l i B
the r-,ameof D V R 67 and works
with the HP 12889A card. It enables h ~ q hspeed data
transfer between two DOS systems.
'
(Continued on page 31
a
l
I lnd~catesthe log~cald r ~ v e rw~lloperate w ~ t hp h y s ~ c a driver
( a t the Intersection of row and column)
nomenclature
ATDOI = asynchronous term~naldrlver =1
PMTOl = page mode t e r m ~ n a dl r ~ v e r=1
D V R 7 2 : Driver "72"
SLC
=
Synchronous L~ne
Control Package
Notes
(1)
HP 2640A presently supported n character rnode
A page mode Logical D r ~ v e rI S LUI rently b e ~ r r g
(2)
PMTOl ?upports B e e h ~ v eSuper Bee I I Computer
Term~nnl,Model 1 1 2-0600 000 ( F o r m ~ HP
r
261 6 A )
wrltten
'
7
HP Computer Museum
www.hpmuseum.net
For research and education purposes only.
SUMMARY OF DOS-IIIB DATA COMMUNICATION
INTERFACES AND DRIVERS - ( C o n t i n u e d f r o m page 2)
has been claimed that the REMACS and satellite CPU's
can be intermixed on the same cable, but the level of
software support for this approach is unknown.
UPGRADING E X I S T I N G CUSTOMERS
-
Those customers that received DOS-IIIB without one 01
all of these drivers may order then1 individually at $25.00
per tape.
Pan M
The central host system must be a MODCOMP II
computerwith 32K or more of memory, a disc, a console
device, and theextended disc version of M A X Ill Version
F operating system. The satellite system must be a
MODCOMP II computer with at least 24K words of
memory, and the non-discversion of M A X Ill. (However,
one of the examples shown in the MAXNET Ill brochure
indicates that a MODCOMP Ill computer can also be a
satellite computer.) The lower cost MODCOMP I
computer (for dedicated applications) is n o t available as
a satellite computer. This can be compared t o HP's BCS
based 2105 for dedicated applications where l o w cost is
very important.
M A X N E T Services
Each computer system (satellite and host) in a MAXNET
I l l network has all the software capabilities of a system
using the extended disc version of the standard M A X Ill
Version F operating system. In addition the MAXNET Ill
system provides the following functions and system
tasks.
DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS SALES AMPLIFIER
ADDENDUM
Operator Directives - Satellites and Hosts
by David Borton
FIL
RAS
The past t w o months have seen (changes in the
distributed systems products available from the
competition. In particular, t w o packages have been
announced and another is expected soon.
MODCOMP and I B M have both announced new
packages for linking computers together. DEC is also
expected t o announce a distributed system package by
April 1975. Data General could quite easily join the
group also by enhancing their present multi-CPU
package t o include longer distance hardware (their
Dresent hardware has a limit of 75 feet).
-
RRS
RDF
-
RTK
RTA
RTE
RTD
BTK
-
BGV
-
RBP
-
RFO
RHD
RFI
-
-
-
-
MODCOMP
MODCOMP announced a distributed systems package
in October, 1974, called MAXNET Ill. The software
prices are $3000 for the first satellite and $500 for each
additional satellite. Hardware communication techniques supported include parallel techniques for local
high-speed transfers (100K vvords per second),
hardwired serial for up t o one mile at speeds from 15K
t o 125K words per second, and synchronous and
asynchronous modem communications for longer
distances at speeds up t o 9600 bits per second.
The prices for this hardware range frorn $500 t o $2000
per computer. The serial hardwired technique is the
same technique used by the REMACS remote
measurement box and costs about $1250 This
technique is a multi-drop scheme with up t o 4 drops. It
-
Initial program load a remote system.
Create or change a logical file assignment in a
remote system.
Remote task resume.
Create or change a logical file default
assignment in a remote system.
Remote task kill.
Remote task activate.
Remote task establish (make core resident).
Remote task deestablish.
Background take (HOST only t o regain use of
the batch processing task).
Background give (HOST only t o allow satellite
computers t o use a batch processing task).
Remote batch processing (SATELLITE only t o
use background and peripherals of the HOST
for program development).
Remote task information.
Remote task hold.
Remote logical file interrogation.
Rex Services and F O R T R A N Calls -- available to assembly language
and F O R T R A N users.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Remote
Remote
Remote
Remote
Remote
Remote
Remote
Remote
Remote
task establish.
default assign.
task resume.
task deestablish.
task information
file assign.
task activate.
task kill.
task hold.
(Continued on page 4 )
DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS SALES AMPLIFIER
A D D E N D U M - (Continued from page 3)
System Tasks - provided by M A X N E T I l l which can be included at
system generation time.
As can be seen from these calls, MODCOMP offers
extensive capabilities in coordinating tasks between
computers in a network. Features not provided are the
named remote file access calls and the requested
program load feature. (MODCOMP does provide a
forced load only, however.)
-'3
1. A link task ( L K T ) which interfaces t o the logical I10
system and allows device independent I10 transfers
over multiple computer links.
2. A loader task (LDR) which enables loading of tasks
from a host system dlsc t o a satellite computer.
3. A simultaneous output task (SYC) that takes data
written t o one device and outputs that same data t o
t w o devices. IVormally this is used t o output system
messages t o consoles at satellite and host systems
simultaneously.
4. MAXNET Ill Linking Loader which looks at the
computer link for binary data during remote fill
operations. This loader will perform a checksum
calculation on a record by record basis and request a
fixed number of retries if an error is detected.
5. A software core device interface which allows a user
t o transfer data to and from core partitions defined
at system generation time either locally or remotely.
Normally these partitions will be subdivisions of global
common areas.
I B M announced a distributed system package for the
370 t o System17 computers in October 1974. It basically
makes a product out of equipment that had been
furnished before on an RPQ (special) basis only. The
package is called Distributed Intelligence System ( D I S )
and is provided at no charge. It operates with 370's
using the following access methods: Basic Sequential
( B S A M ) , Basic Direct ( B D A M ) , and Virtual Sequential
(VSAM).
DIS provides data transmission capabilities so that the
user does not have t o concern himself with data
communication protocols. This is essentially equivalent
t o HP's approach. I B M also provides program
preparation capabilities for the System17 on the 370. In
fact, this was the orlginal technique. Not until the spring
of 1974 was local program preparation available on the
System17
The conflguratlon is as follows
I
I
BLOCK MULTlPLEXER CHANNEL
up T o 64 PORTS
SENSOR-BASED
CONTROL UNIT
-
$35,000(%75tmanth)
SZMI
277K bps coax
up to 1 mile
IS! mm~nrnl
II
ADAPTER
ADAPTER
ADAPTER
SYSTEM17
SYSTEM17
SYSTEM17
1
SYSTEMS APPLICATIONS GROUP
by Peter Rosenbladr
You may not have heard about us, but we are here to
help you be successful. W e are part of Bill Klrause's
organization and look at ourselves as the "Development
group with an ear to the field." Our charter is to develop
and maintain applications software packages which can
enable you to sell more system~s. Our produc;ts are
based on hardware and software components created
by Data Systems R 8 D Lab.
While we are not here to solve a particular customer's
problem, we are in a position to develop a solution for a
class of problems which will enable your customers to
get on the air quickly, or we may be able to develop
dedicated system solutions for particular end-user
markets.
Sl210 IS NOW MI210
The Sl210 Data System (19657B) is now playing on the
M Series team. Although this change in nomenclature is
minor, the MI210 is a seasoned veteran and will round
out the M-Series team identity by anchoring the starting
position.
Like the former Sl210, the MI210 consists of 2108A
processor, 16K words X2 memory, dual channel port
controller, memory protect, disc loader ROIVI, power fail
recovery system, time base generator, 5 Mbyte
cartridge disc, paper tape reader, single bay cabinet,
ASR33 console printer and DOS-IIIB software. A new
data sheet is ava~lablefor the MI210 system: publication
number 5952-4659.
MI280 ADDED TO LINE-UP
NEW SALES POWER IN THE M-SERIES LINE-UP
The newest member of the team is the MI280 Sales
Order Processing System, a merchandizing extension of
the Ml260, based on the 19655B. The MI280 fields the
ball with ON-TOP, an application software package.
This hard hitting software as well as the MI280 is
described in the Product News section of this
Newsletter.
by Dan Jorgenson
The M-SERIES TEAM OF THE 2000MX SYSTEMS
Effective January, 1975, several changes and additions
have been made to the M-Series COS systems to
simplify and strengthen your selling efforts.
As a result of the preceding changes, our M-Series team
looks like this:
Let us have your inputs as t o where w e should apply our
creativity. ~ W L E T T I P * C ~ R D
Sl250 DATA SYSTEM DELETED
Because of the similarity in configuration and capability
of the MI260 Data System (19655B) and the Sl250 Data
System (1966063, the Sl250 has been deleted from the
Corporate Price List effective January, 1975. This action
will simplify your selling efforts by focusing selling
activity on one rather than t w o data base management
systems.
However, you may sell an equivalent S/'250 system by
adding the following accessories to the Ml260.
(Continued on page 61
For comparison, HP discounts computers and the 2640
according to this schedule:
NEW SALES POWER IN THE M-SERIES LINE-UP
(Continued from page 5)
New price information sheets are available for the above
systems:
System
2100121MX Products Qty
Percent Discount
Pub. No.
NEW OPTION FOR Ml230, MI260
2640
A new option 217 has been created for the M-Series
DOS systems (Ml230, MI2601 to add dual channel port
controller to the 1/0 extender. This option is necessary
for large system configurations.
Product
Oescription
Price
Service
196628-21 7
(M1230)
Add Dual Channel
port controller
t o 110 extender
(HP 12898A)
$500
$10
196558-217
(MI2601
Add Dual Channel
port controller
to I10 extender
(HP12898A)
500
10
Percent Discount
A ) Quant~tySix or more
(applies to any customer
who buys six or more at
one ti me).
12%
8 ) Volume Agreement
(Customer must sign a
Volume Purchase
Agreement)
C) HP Computer System
OEM (Customer must
have a current OEM
agreement with HPI
The option will be on the January, 1975 Corporate Price
List . H E w L E r r I w c X m D
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS ADDRESSES OEM
MARKET
TI has also limited charges for software
documentation to the first system purct~ased
by Dave Carver
Texas Instruments has announced a formal OEM
discount schedule for its 960B and 980B minicomputers,
912 and 913 CRT term~nals, and Silent 700 series
hardcopy terminals. Hardware is discounted as follows:
Equipment
Quantity
Percent Discount
and
By announcincj a formal OEM dgreelnent, TI has made,
for the first time, a significant move towards addressing
the OEM market. Note that HP offers a better computer
products discount schedule, and a competitive CRT
schedule. HP does not discount telepr~rlters.
IHEWLETT#PICL<ID
0-4
5-9
10-24
25 - 4 9
50 - 200
0
15
17
19
20
C R T Terminal
0-4
5 - 24
25 - 49
50 - 99
100 - 499
500 up
0
10
15
20
25
35
Teleprinter
0-4
5 - 24
25 - 49
50 - 99
100 - 499
500 UP
0
10
12
15
17
20
Computer
.
-
-
MPE C IN USE
hy Jean~
M i c h e l Gahet
The new version of the HP 3000 Multiprogramming
Executive seems to accommodate users with requirements for high reliability, even when the system is not
attended. A simulation of a solid state problem
undertaken by Doctor Barna of HP Labs was
successfully run on an almost finished Version C of MPE
last October As the following printout indicates, the
program was launched Friday, October 31, at 2:40 A M
and completed running Monday, November 4, at 9.28
A M , this is over three days and 17 hours of CPU time
out of iour days of connect tlme.
(Continued o n page 71
'3
MPE C I N USE - (Continued from page 6)
memory can fit in the 5 114 inch mainframe. A key point
is that the 11/04 will not be available in quantities until
summer 1975. Sell the standard features and
expandability of the 21MX, plus its availability now.
New Versions of DEC POP-8
Digital has just introduced t w o additions to its 12-bit
PDP-8 line of minicomputers. The original P D P 8 I A is
now called the 8/A-100, and is priced at $1,745 with 1K
of semi-conductor RAM memory. The t w o new
versions differ in type of memory used: the 8/A-200 will
have 4K RAMS, and the 8/A-400 will m e either 8K or
16K core memory modules.
Price for the 8/A-200 with 4K is $1,995 (list), including
battery backup. For the 8/A-400 with 8K of core, list
price is $2,795; with 16K, list is $3,795. Additional core
modules are priced at $1,500 for 8K, and $2,500 for 16K.
HEwLErrlPAcnRD
"RECENT MINICOMPU'TER COMPEI'ITIVE
ANNOUNCEMENTS"
by Dave Carver
Digital Equipment Corporation PDP 11/04
DEC has just introducted a sirniconductor memory
version of the low end PDP 11105. Called the 11104, it is
a minimum capability, low-priced computer aimed at
dedicated control type applicatioris that require more
I/O capability than hardwired controllers. It uses the
same instruction set as the 11/05, and can accept all
standard PDP 11 options. The 11/04 is mounted on one
board instead of the t w o occupied by the 11/05, and is
purported to be 20% faster than the 11/05. Mainframe
size is 5 114 inches high, with nine slots.
PRICING:
The PDP-8 family has less processing power and I10
capability than the 11/04, and is for such applications as
small test systems and special terminals.
Deliveries of the new machines will not begin until July
for Core, and September for RAM memory. HP is still
the leader in semiconductor technology.
Data General ECLIPSE
Most of you have heard of the ECLIPSE, what Data
General claims to be a major new product line. Here is
the "Competitive Spec Sheet":
There are t w o initial versions of the ECLIPSE, the S/100,
aimed at the OEM market, and the S/200, intended for
large systems applications. Both ECLIPSE models are
priced substantially above the 21MX, and fall in the
same general price range as the lVova 840 and DEC's
11/45. The major features of the ECI-IPSE are an
optional error correction capability, cache semiconductor memory that may be interleaved, and a fast floating
point processor (hardwired) that operates in parallel
with the CPU. Core memory may also be interleaved up
to eight ways.
Data General NOVA 830
The 11/04 strengthens DEC's price advantage over the
2'1 MX in the low-end, minimum capability market vvhere
the customer needs no features such as EAU, flclating
point, and parity.
The 11/04 is more densely packed than the 11/05, and
appears to have more I10 real estate available. 3:ZK of
Data General recently announced the Nova 830, which
is nothing more than a Nova 840 repackaged with
slower, cheaper 16K core memory modules. The 840
uses only 8K modules, priced at $3,200 per 8K with 800
nanosecond cycle time. The 830 uses 16K, 1000
nanosecond modules priced at $3,500 per 16K. As with
the 840, parity is not available on the 830, and maximum
memory is 128K words.
Nova 830 prices are identical to the "future" Nova price
curves distributed during the October New Product
Tour.
(Continued on page
8)
"RECENT MINICOMPUTER COMPETITIVE ANNOUNCEMENTS" - (Continued from page 7)
51460
Price
Bll,@O
(1 6K Cwe, EAU)
With [email protected]:
With memury management
and [email protected]:
t6,g00
SIMO
$16.=
21,300
Not Availsble
24,600
Pro
16 bits
4 accumulators, two of which
Registers
act as f &x
16 Memory Registers
Hardware Stack
Direat addreseing of 32K
words. Multilevel indirect.
indexed and immediate also
available.
Totel
ancements:
rnetic (EAUI: Srandard
t:
$C,m
$71 00
-
32K words
-
SfZOO 128K words
CORE: $2,7Ml per 8K
Semi~ondwctorwith cache:
$4,200 per 8K
lnterMng):
CORE: up t o 8 way
Semiconductor: up t o
4 way
CORE: 800 ns
Semiconctu~ior: 700 ns with
200 ns cache memory
ion):
5 bits per word;
Cost:
$?,ooa,plus $1.oOo
per 8K of memory
Pcvaikabl$with CORE or
Semiconductor memory.
"RECENT MINICOMPUTER COMPETITIVE ANNO'UNCEMENTS" - (Continued from page 8)
bit word count register in DEC's tape controller, the
largest data block that can be read, or written, is limited
t o 2048 bytes. When talking about IBM compatiblity,
block transfers of 7200 bytes are common (1 track of an
IBM 2314 disc drive). H L w L r n f i K A R D
SELL HP!
3000 MPE C O N TEST SITE
by Jean-Michel Gabet
The first test site for MPE Version C has been one of the
t w o 3000's used in the Cupertino plant for production
and order processing. Although some problems were
discovered and fixed through running the Operating
System in that environment, the reaction of its users
was extremely favorable. The use of the spooling
facilities has increased the work they can accomplish as
well as removing some of the burdens of controlling the
way their jobs were running. Line printer permanent
availability is the simple, most appreciated feature when
running in session mode. Also batch users find it very
convenient to feed a spooled card reader, have these
read and walk out confident that the job will be
automatically scheduled t o run without any more
human intervention. For those users who don't like
punched cards manipulation, the STREAM command
has been found very useful, still leaving terminals ready
for further use. The reception of this new system was
good enough to prompt users of the nearby 3000 t o
insist that their system too be run on Version C.
On the operation management aspect of the test, it has
been reported that because batch is not hand fed the
system shows less idle CPU time, that is more efficiency
in CPU utilization and more throughput. Comments also
were made to the effect that the new system had
successfully managed t o give the console operator
many means to control and modify system load and
activity when and if it is so desired.
This testing was conducted in a production environment which by essence is not a "forgiving" one and
which cannot afford too much downtime. If this
reception of the new MPE by those users is a forerunner
of the one that our customers will experience, the
results should certainly be encouraging. H E W L E ~ ~ K A R D
ANNOUNCING THE M / 2 8 0 SALES ORDER
PROCESSING SYSTEM WITH ON-TOP
by Barry Klaas
MAG TAPES - DID YOU KNOW
by Dave Bowers
Here is a piece of information tha't can be used t o
lock-out DEC tape drive competition. Because of a 10
1
Now you can offer the MI280 Data Management
System, a sales order processing system complete with
application software. The MI280 can now be ordered
for a price of $70,235. The MI280 is a merchandising
extension of the Ml260, 19655B, which has n o w been
configured to include options and components that
serve sales order processing requirements. The
(Continued on page 10)
MI280 2000MX Datu Mailayernent Syrtein
Penny Hanney of Ciipertino portrays entry of order information on the 2640 termindl wriile the 2762A p i i r ~ t stht. picking
list and the 72987A piirits the invoice Not shown is the 2675A console Sell the M/280 to big indu\ti y execijtives
ANNOUNCING THE MI280 SALES ORDER PROCESSING
SYSTEM WITH ON-TOP - (Continued from page 9)
object~veof the M/280 introduction is t o help you sell
more DOS systems. A new Data Systems promotion
approach for the MI280 will be used--90,000 copies of
the 8 page sales brochure will be distributed t o the
readers of lnfosystems via the January Issue.
The combinatlon of O N TOP and 2000MX Data
Management Systems answers botti hardware and
application software needs of users
Model/Option
Number
196556
Featuring the HP 21 M X minicomputer, The new MI280
Data Management Systern provides an on-line, multiple
terminal DOS solution t o sales order processing
problems. Utilizing ON-TOP, HP's new sales order
processing application software, users can n o w put
their order processing fcrnction on-line while minimizing
any programming costs.
The lLl1280 with the ON-TOP (On-line Ternrina Order
Processor) software provides an easy, orie-step means of
handling all of the sales order information processing
functions normally encountered in business. sales order
entry, order update, order inquiry; customer ~ ~ p d a t e ;
product and product line inquiry; pick list printing;
Invoicing; quoting, iriitiation of credit mernos; sales
activity analysis. During order entry operations, the
system w ~ l lperform pricing, allocate inventory, total
orders, check credit, and print pick lists and invoices.
Logging and recovery as well as several batch programs
are included. The ON-TOP software, working w i t h the
HP MI280 2000MX Data Management Systern, can
handle u p to ten intcractve order processing terminals,
local or remote.
Description
BMMC
Service
Basic system ~ncludes
HP 2108A M I 2 0 24K
word mleroprogramable processor, paper
tape reader, 2762A
terminal printer, 4.9
rnbyte d~sc,1600 BPI
magnetic tape, system
table, double bay
cabinet, disc operating system software.
IMAGEj2000 software.
-162
Expands memory to
32K
-214
Multiple port I10
extender, 12979A
-305
ON-TOP, sales order
processing software.
24386A
243428
Purchase,
Price
TCS, terminal control system software
12987A
Line printer, 200 LPM
(Coritinued on page 1 11
ANNOUNCING THE MI280 SALES ORDER PROCESSING
SYSTEM WITH ON-TOP - (Continued from page 10)
I
ON-TOP now appears on the Corporate Price List and
Data Systems Availability Schedule.
ON-TOP is distributed in source form.
ON-TOP uses single channel terminal drivers and
individual terminal interface cards rather than logicallphysical drivers and multiplexer.
LITERATURE AND PROMOTION
I
W280 OPTIONS
Tne Mi280 B r o c h ~ r e ,Oh-TOP Data Snee~,and S a r s
Training Manual are being distributed to the field. As
mentioned, the MI280 Brochure is being distributed to
the 90,000 readers of Infosystems as a removable insert
in the Januarv issue.
Also available is extensive ON-TOP Reference Manual
(24386-90001) explaining the details of executing
ON-TOP and an ON-TOP Technical Manual (2438690002) encompassing software installing instructions,
program narratives and source listings.
Remember, using an MI280 with ON-TOP, your
customer can get up-and-running fast, reducing
application development expense and time to become
operational.
HEwLEmJmcmnD
WHO'S PLAYING 2ND FIDDLE NOW?
by Bob Kadarauch
The following appeared in December 16 issue of
Electronic News:
Specific customer configuration requirements oi:her
than the above may also be satisfied by building from
the basic 19655B or 19657B with other combination:^ of
options and components. DOS Ill, TCS, IMAGE/2000,
32K Memory, and hardcopy printing are requirements in
any such system.
ON-TOP SOFTWARE
ON-TOP, sales order processing application software, is
offered for $1,500 as option 305 o n 196558. Alone,
ON-TOP may be ordered as follows:
24386A ON-TOP. Requires a DOS I I I based
system with IMAGEi2000 end TCS.
Prwided on paper tape.
$3,000
-tMt
Provided on 1600 BPI magnetic tape
n/e
-101
Provided on 880 BPi magnettc tepe
nlc
Competition over CRT terminals made b y minicomputer manufacturers promises t o heat t o a new intensity early next year when Digital Equipment comes
out with a VT-51 programmable CRT incorporating a
copier unit that produces a paper record of screen display information. The new CRT from DEC is said t o
represent direct competition for the recently-introduced 2640 intelligent CRT from Hewlett-Packard,
which is believed t o planning a copier offering for its
terminal.
Go get those customers NOW, why wait for DEC?
HEwLErrJ.wcKAnD
HP BEATS IBM
by Eric Grandjean
W h o said ~tcouldn't be done? Conaratulat~onst o Denls
Ferland of St. Louis w h o didn't selyone, b u t TWO 3000
svstems last m o n t h
-
~
I
Custorneri checking out The Yew 96MXSystern.
One of these systems was purchased by Nooter
Corporation of S t . Louis, makers o f large steel and alloy
plat boilers. Impressively enough, the decision at Nooter
t o g o the 3000 was made by a man w h o was Manager of
"Common", and I B M user's group in the St. Louis area.
Our 3000 system will replace their 1130 as well'as an
I B M 360120.
The other 3000 system was ordered b y Warren and Van
Praag, a well established civil engineering consulting
firm, also located ~n St. Louis. This will be their first
in-house computer; they have been using Time Share
services until n o w .
Tom Roberts talking ubout The 21MX.
Breaking into the A t o m ~ cEnergy Corrrmiss~on'slargest
facility in Oakridge, Tennessee, is n o small task The
rewards of success are large sales t o one of the
country's largest m ~ r ~ i c o m p u t eusers.
r
To keep the
momentum going In HP's sales effort, Tom Roberts In
Atlanta, put together a major HP cornputer capab~lities
1
96MX product Ihne, Distr~huted Systems, and.. HP's
Fourier Analyzer Ttie presentatior! Included Russ
Stewart, Dennis McGini,, Emil Ar,jrnoonie, Gerald
Prlebe, and Ker, Posse a f r o m HP Atlanta, and Jim
Schmidt and Bob Kresek of Cupertirio
HP's f r s t orders from U n ~ o r iC a r b d r Oakridge should
be comlng 11) the next co~uplemonttis. w E w , . m r f i * ~ h , ~ P
?
a
A
A
3. What software and manuals are available, compatible, and shipped with each of our software systems.
D
4. Cross reference guides relating hardware devices
and their manuals t o required interfaces.
LISTINGS AVAILABLE FOR BASIC CON'TRIBllTED I-IBRARY
5. Cross reference guides linking hardware devices to
available drivers.
by Ginny Loyola
The document providing the information is titled
"Documentation Index".
A new option is n o w offered t o Time-share and other
HP BASIC users.
Who Gets It
Customers can buy listings of all the BASIC Contributed
Library programs in bulk form as follows:
Each field office worldwide supporting Data Systems
products
Distribution Frequency - monthly and it is mailed under
the Librarian label.
H E W L ~ ~ P * C X * R D
THE CANADIAN CHAIN
by P. Danzer-Rarnirez
Don Thornson has been ~ l a n n i n qan HP computer chain
in B.C.! His most recknt sale, a 2000F system t o
Vancouver City College, is a link in this chain,
Please note that listings for a single program are not
separately available.
TSBi2000E and 9830 users (and
Other custO'ners
without mag tape capability) will find these listings
useful to convert TSBi2000F Droqrams
for use on their
. equip ment .
" E W LE ~ ~ P * C X * R D
AN ESP GUIDE TO SOFWAIIE
AND MANUALS
by Chuck Ackerrnan
DATA SYSTEMS DOCUMENTATIO
INDEX -- WHAT IS IT??
WHAT GOOD IS IT??
WHO GETS IT??
What Is lt/What Good Is It
In your support of Data Systems products, have you
needed information on:
a
1. Complete lists of Data Systems product manuals,
current and obsolete, sorted by part number, rriodel
number and manual type, (i.e., languages, applications, operating and service interface, operating
guides, subsystems, etc.)
2. C o m ~ l e t e lists of current supported divisional
software products and associated part numbers for
both the 2000 and 3000 product line.
Reference selling is the basis for Don's plan. Once an
HP system is installed in an area, other prospects can be
shown HP's capabilities.
I
For examole. Vancouver City Colleqe 113,000 enrollment) had been buying time'from the IBM system at
Simon Frasier University. The operating system was
very unreliable, the response time poor, and the
expenses were high. Don arranged for a terminal to be
brought to the college which was hooked into the 2000F
at the Vancouver School Board. Thus, t w o terminals
operating from these t w o different systems were placed
side by side and compared for response time and
reliability for a three month period. The resulting typical
response time for the HP system was less than one
second, the IBM system was five to six seconds.
In addition to good reliability and response time, the
college wanted a system with extensive application
software and a large program library. Some time ago,
Don had Carol Scheifele demonstrate IDF capabilities.
At their own expense, Vancouver City College sent their
CAI coordinator t o Cupertino who worked with Don
Lund for three days to learn more about IDF, PILOT and
Coursewriter.
Impressed by these features and satisfied that a 2000F
could meet all their needs, the college placed their order
(Continued on page 14)
THE CANADIAN CHAIN - (Continued from page 13)
in October and the system was installed the first week
of December. They've ordered a plotter and nine
terminals with their system and plan t o expand to 32
tgrminals in the near future. They're also a candidate for
a 3000 system t o replace the Honeywell 200 presently
used for administrative applications.
DEMO CENTER ORGANIZED
by Stan Shell
Already the college is a reference account for t w o
community colleges in the Vancouver area. These t w o
schools are starting t o get ports into the system and
Don plans t o continue the chain and sell them their o w n
computer system--soon!
~~~LETT~PACXARD
-
CURRICULUM PROJECT NEWS!
by P. Danzer- Ramirez
The last book set in the secondary math Curr~culum
Project book series has just been released. Entitled
Finite Mathematical Systems, this set conslsts of a
Student Text and a corresponding Teacher's Notes.
The books were authored by Charles H . Lund of the St.
Paul Public Schools, St. Paul, Minnesota
F-roi~tR O M :St1111St1~11,
f j o t ~I.!!/dsu,s,SUIIIljoot,
L I I I l~l u i ~
L)lli I>
Because f i n ~ t e systems often are not covered by
standard textbooks, or are only covered br~efly,the
subject matter is discussed q u t e thoroughly, Including
pencil-and-paper exercises in addition to computeroriented exercises
The unlt b e g ~ n swith a review of some important
properties f r o m the system of whole numbers and then
branches off Into a svstem without nurrrbers Each
section is written on a "stand alone" bas~c,allowing
teachers considerable flexibility in assignments dependn g upon student ability and mater~alsava~lable
As w ~ t hthe other Computer Curr~culumProject books,
Flnite Mathematical Systems was designed to p r o v ~ d e
students w i t h an opportunity t o use a coniputer as a
problem-solving tool within a particular subject area and
to provide teachers w ~ t hproblems, solutions and ideas
t o better "enrich" their instructional endeavors
P r ~ c e d at $3.00 each, Finite M a t h e n ~ t i c a l Systerns
(Order number 5951-5603 for the Student Text, and
5951-5604 for the Teacher's Notes) can t ~ c : ordered
from:
Hewlett-Packard Company
Curriculum Project
333 Logue Avenue
Mountain View, CA 94043
Orders under $20.00 lnust riclude paymerit.
Computer
A l l ordeis o f t e r i
or more recelve a 25% d ~ s c o u \ i t .
For your desk copy o f this p u b l ~ c a t i o n send
,
t h e c o u p o ~ below
i
to Carol Sche~feleIn C u p e r t ~ ~ i o .
- - - -
Name.
~
Please send a desk copy o f :
F ~ n ~M
te
a t h e m a t ~ c a Systems
l
(Student T e x t and Teacher's Notes)
tit H I r T T # P I C X I R i )
-
Back R O L:~10//0(,'.\ i'lt'rtio J'lc:! hint..
Tile r iewi:$,t n ~ c r ~ i b c rcli 1111s []I,;O[J r r e e d ~ :io
~ ~ beer! w ~ t h
introduction ro rn,3r-!l1ot ;/oo Rob L i n i / s , has
HP for 7 yr:,iri ;~:i(-i I<, ( . ~ . r l ~ nova:
g
frorrl A M D to
Cupertino to
oord111;itt. : ' i e d ~ s s e ;~I I:~ J ~ I O ~ i>t
I
the
~nforniatior: ilr:t\vc>err the ';:sten! Er101r
~ e e r ~ n !gS t ' s )
Factory g r o i ~ ; ~(1r:d :tie rieltl I t ' ~ 1 1 1 t!t'
Boji':;
r e s p o n s i b i l i ~1 1 , s i : c !o i t ! I i , i ~:he rrr,jrly \,jIc~ableItclrrs of
intorrrrat~on :jer~erntedt ~ vI d i v ~ d i ~ af,icctnrv
l
anti flfilr!
t e l d S.E ;inti
S t . ' s and i . ~ i ~ t i > r : i ~a, rl l. s; p r 1,iided to
~ r d e r iarl;!
~ i rn?ely fashion
a p p r o p ~ i ~ i t,~::~storrrcirs
t:
11: ,]I
thi; cooiltiration O! ali of
It is O ~ V I O L I : ; tiid1 Rc)b w i l 1-1t:~'d
us to ;~ccorrrr>l<;htills fkirrr iiiblc? task
7
'L;
Our Demo Ctiriter oper;i!or ' I a n Davi.5 v i ~ i yt ~ eritiw tc
many of you He tltls b e i ~ \r ~r ~ HP
~ : for
/ i 2 ),cars and rrlost
rec:t:ntly was wc,rklrig : r i ',oftware ,: iii P~~blic;it~cirls
D ~ s t r ~ b ~ ~ t! il oa r/ ]: ti;l.i a g r e e ~-i o becorn. rtit: operator tor
the factor,/ Diirrici Ci:ril:,: and as > r ~ c h , wlil be
resporls~bletor 411 tilt. dav t:: dav o[-ier;irorlal ;]spec !s to1
our ecjolpnIc;l<l [ I ~ I :I ]S [)Lli.,l ilncj ;I c j e ~ ~ lI ~
( ] t BLI:>III~!~L:
?
Adrrl~n~strat~
, io
j !ri ~
~\~j k l t,j!\(i . l o o k ~ l - ~t,q,! i~c~lreer111 t i \ e
iiat;j pri!cesL l r : t i rr:,irkerinc; . r e .
1
The rr-~;iriacjc;r o f t t t : r)er:o ( c,r~ter1 5S;ir>iHoot: Sarv ihas
spi:nl 4 \/earL, dr \ I ? wo:kir L : primiir~lvI ; thi: S o f t ~ v ~ i r e
~
i
tI
l f
'
1
!W ~ J L ? ttlf !r:d~vlilua~
wltt\
overall D ~ I I , ('ti~ltt,r
~,
rf:,,p(;18; I ~ I I I L L a r ~ , ,flill
:
~;oorcl~v~~t~:
all the actiw: ~i
!!l;i! ur!!17e!Ire Ci?riti:r > t ~ ; j r ( i w a r, ~i r i c !
s o f t w a ~ e S ~ ~t)rlr-~t!s
I I a !elrc >~IIICIt91r t i : ~ n t t ~ ~ ~ s ~ ; i , , r ~ ~
;II.I ~ r n [ > o ~ t , ~ r hi
" (!~ff!,
b,
HP 3000 GROUP ORGANIZED FOR SUPPORT
b y John Page
If vou are an HP 3000 Svstems Enqirieer (SE), and you
nekd some technical helb from the-factory, who do you
contact? Chances are that you know a few people in
various departments but no channels forrnally exist to
help you. W e just changed all that.
Alice Blurn, our new secretary, will be intercepting your
calls if both lines are busy. Alice just joined Systems
Engineering after being with Technical Publications for
3 years.
Madeline Lornbaerde and Ralph White have spent the
last few weeks setting up in the HP 3000 SE support
role. You can contact them any way you want -- phone,
TWX, letter or personal visit and ask them for any kind
of software support or help you need to close some HP
3000 business. In most cases, they w~illtry to fulfill your
request personally, drawing on their wide HP 3000
experience and factory contacts. If they cannot solve
your problem themselves, they will pass it on to
someone who can; but final respor\sibility for getting
you an answer stays with them.
Alan Mitchell, the 3rd member of the support team, will
continue to be responsible for providing a strong HP
contribution to the HP 3000 Users Group, a job in which
he has been held in hiqh esteem for the past year. Alan
is also about to set up-a much improved and expanded
HP 3000 Contributed Library, so if you have any ideas
.
you feel strongly about, let him know ( ~ 2 8 6 6 )Watch
this space for more news.
The remainder of the HP 3000 Group will be operating in
a project-mode to ensure that future software products
come to you with full support and documentation. Once
again, if you have any ideas you feel strongly about in
this area, let me know.
'Stan Shell is putting the final touches to a
Demo-Center Policy. Watch this space. H E W L E T T ~ P A C X I R D
Page
Madeline was with ltel Leasing at one time and has a
C ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~Ralph
~ C has
good S P L ~ F O R T R A N ~ Sbackground.
a more commercial bias and has worked in the
Applications Group for 2-112 years before coming to
Systems Engineering. (Ralph wrote l ~ l S l 3 0 0 0and some
financial-type packages.)
So, if you need technical info, a demo', got problems
with a benchmark, or anything else; contact Ralph or
Madeline. They are waiting for your call. This service is
available world-wide.
Bob Johnson
Lornbaerde
Orly Larson
Alan M~tchell
D ~ c kSleght
Bob Strand
Bob Unanski
Jim Willits
CUSTOMER MAINTENANCE TRAINING
SCHEDULE
by Tom Lowe
Some changes have been made to the Maintenance
Training Schedule published in the Data Systems
Newsletter of October 15.
The 21MX course announced for the week of
March 24-28 has been postponed one week due
to the holiday, and w ~ l lnow stalt March 31.
A 7970B course will be conducted dur~ngthe
week of March 17 to 21.
P r ~ n t e dIn U . S . A .
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