Magnolia Montessori Academy

Magnolia Montessori Academy
Magnolia
Montessori
Academy
Charter School Application
This application for a public charter school is respectfully submitted to
the Polk County School Board by the Board of Directors of
Magnolia Montessori Academy, Inc. on August 1, 2012
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APPLICATION COVER SHEET
NAME OF PROPOSED CHARTER SCHOOL:
Magnolia Montessori Academy
NAME OF FLORIDA NONPROFIT CORPORATION THAT WILL HOLD THE CHARTER:
Magnolia Montessori Academy, Inc.
Has the corporation applied for 501-C3 Nonprofit status:
Pending approval.
CONTACT PERSON :
Tammi Crotteau
TITLE/RELATIONSHIP TO NONPROFIT:
Treasurer and ex-officio board member
MAILING ADDRESS:
5312 Messina
Lakeland, FL 33813
PRIMARY TELEPHONE:
863-581-6476
SECONDARY TELEPHONE:
863-640-1032
E-MAIL ADDRESS:
[email protected]
WEB ADDRESS:
www.magnoliamontessoriacademy.com
NAME OF EDUCATION SERVICE PROVIDER:
None
NAME OF PARTNER ORGANIZATION:
None
Projected School Opening:
Fall 2013
Term of Charter Requested:
4 years
SCHOOL YEAR
GRADE LEVELS
2013-2014
2014-2015
2015-2016
2016-2017
K-5
K-6
K-7
K-8
TOTAL PROJECTED
ENROLLMENT
63
77
89
103
I certify that I have the authority to submit this application and that all information contained herein is complete
and accurate, realizing that any misrepresentation could result in disqualification from the application process or
revocation after award. I understand that incomplete applications will not be considered. The person named as the
contact person is so authorized to serve as the primary contact person for this application on behalf of the
organization.
________________________________________________________________
Signature
_____________________________________________________
Title
________________________________________________________________
Printed Name
_____________________________________________________
Date
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Magnolia Montessori Academy
Charter Application Executive Summary
Educational Plan
Magnolia Montessori Academy will provide an authentic Montessori education to a culturally and
socio-economically diverse group of Polk County students in grades K-8. Using principles
established by Maria Montessori over 100 years ago in conjunction with scientifically based reading
instruction, the curriculum at MMA will target the individual needs of students. The Montessori
curriculum integrates seamlessly with the new Common Core, ensuring that our students will meet
or exceed the standards set across the country. In addition to core academic subjects, MMA will
focus on the arts through music education based on the Orff Approach. Through a relationship with
the Florida Air Museum, MMA will also encourage students’ growth and interest in the areas of
science, technology, engineering, and math.
Student learning and achievement will be monitored using a standards based approach as well as
benchmarks set by state-wide criterion referenced testing. Trained Montessori teachers will challenge
and support MMA students as they strive to meet not only the NGSSS and Common Core
Standards, but their personal educational goals as well. Through constant observation and targeted
lesson planning, teachers will design personal education plans for each student. Those plans will
serve as a reference for teachers, students, and parents/guardians throughout the school year.
The unique multi-age classrooms in the Montessori environment will also help students grow
socially and emotionally. The three-year cycle in each classroom will afford each student the
opportunity to grow as a mentor and friend to their classmates. An emphasis on service learning will
help MMA students become an integrated part of the community and allow them to see the impact
they can have in the world.
Organizational Plan
Magnolia Montessori Academy will operate as a public charter school. MMA has filed with the State
of Florida for incorporation as a not for profit corporation under the name Magnolia Montessori
Academy, Inc. and will apply as a 501(c) 3 tax exempt organization once a charter contract is
negotiated. MMA will be governed by a board of directors which will oversee all aspects of the
school’s operation. The board will ensure that the school adheres to Florida charter school law and
any pertinent legislation and scrutinize all financial transactions and expenditures.
The Directors of Education and Finance will report to the board and will be responsible for the
daily operations of the school. The two directors will fulfill the responsibility of the entire
administrative staff and will undergo an annual evaluation by the board. The Director of Finance
looks at all responsibilities from a financial perspective and the Director of Education reviews all
decisions from an educational point of view. In addition, the Director of Education will oversee on-
site personnel and ensure that teachers fully understand the tenets of Montessori education and
integrate them with the Common Core and NGSSS standards to ensure student success.
Finally, MMA has outlined detailed procedures to avoid disputes with parents in a manner that
focuses on bridging gaps between parents and school perspectives to resolve issues before reaching
an outside mediator. MMA plans to recruit potential students in a way that does not discriminate
based upon race, ethnicity, national origin, religion or disability and will prioritize students with prior
elementary Montessori education, traditionally-schooled or home-schooled students and students
who might not have easy access to educational options.
Business Plan
Magnolia Montessori has developed a comprehensive business plan based on funds and facilities
available at this time. The first option for the proposed facility for Magnolia Montessori Academy is
Trinity Presbyterian Church with approximately 5200 square feet of space which includes
classrooms, office, storage and hallways. The second option is the Chapel in the Grove Education
Building which is approximately 5800 square feet. Both facilities are budgeted for rent of $50,000
per year which includes everything except phone service. MMA is currently in negotiation with
McKeel Academy to provide busing service and will contract with another school within close
proximity to provide meals for students.
The budget is based on a conservative 63 students for the first year which would provide $369,111
in FTE revenue for the first year. No fundraisers or grant money have been factored into the initial
budget. The majority of the budget expenditures of $355,401 will be for five teacher salaries and
instructional supplies and is budgeted at $199,590. Pupil services, staff training, board expenditures
and school administration make up the rest of the budget. MMA expects to have an ending balance
fund of $13,710 after the first year and to increase in each subsequent year which will be used for
unexpected large expenses. Finances will be primarily managed by the Director of Finance but will
be overseen by the Director of Education and the Board of Directors. An independent financial
audit will also be conducted each year and submitted to Polk County School Board.
Table of Contents
I. EDUCATIONAL PLAN ................................................................................................................. 4
Section 1: Mission, Guiding Principles and Purpose ..................................................................... 4
Section 2: Target Population and Student Body .......................................................................... 14
Section 3: Educational Program Design ...................................................................................... 16
Section 4: Curriculum Plan .......................................................................................................... 27
Section 5: Student Performance, Assessment and Evaluation ..................................................... 57
Section 6: Exceptional Students................................................................................................... 62
Section 7: English Language Learners ........................................................................................ 70
Section 8: School Climate and Discipline ................................................................................... 73
II. ORGANIZATIONAL PLAN ....................................................................................................... 76
Section 9: Governance .................................................................................................................. 76
Section 10: Management.............................................................................................................. 81
Section 11: Education Service Providers ..................................................................................... 86
Section 12: Human Resources and Employment ......................................................................... 86
Section 13: Student Recruitment and Enrollment ........................................................................ 90
III. BUSINESS PLAN ...................................................................................................................... 94
Section 14: Facilities .................................................................................................................... 94
Section 15: Transportation Service ............................................................................................... 96
Section 16: Food Service ............................................................................................................. 96
Section 17: Budget ....................................................................................................................... 96
Section 18: Financial Management and Oversight .................................................................... 104
Section 19: Action Plan ............................................................................................................. 107
Appendix A—Bibliography ............................................................................................................ 112
Appendix B—Articles of Incorporation ......................................................................................... 115
Appendix C—By-Laws of Magnolia Montessori Academy, Inc. .................................................. 119
Appendix D—Board Code of Conduct ........................................................................................... 131
Appendix E—Oath of Office and Board Confidentiality Agreement ............................................ 133
Appendix F—Board Conflict of Interest Statement ....................................................................... 135
Appendix G—Magnolia Montessori Academy, Inc. Board Meeting Schedule ............................. 139
Appendix H—MMA Founding Group ........................................................................................... 141
Appendix I—Location Specifications............................................................................................. 144
Appendix J—Operating and Start Up Budget ................................................................................ 147
Appendix K—Start-up and Operating Budget with CSP Funding ................................................. 150
Appendix L—Monthly Cash-Flow Projections for 2012-2018 ...................................................... 153
Appendix M—Spiral of Montessori Curriculum ............................................................................ 159
Appendix N—Letters of Support .................................................................................................... 162
Appendix O—Common Core Standards and Montessori Curriculum Correlation ........................ 186
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I. EDUCATIONAL PLAN
Section 1: Mission, Guiding Principles and Purpose
A. Provide the mission statement for the proposed charter school.
The mission statement should, in a few concise sentences, indicate what the school intends to do, for whom and to
what degree. A school’s mission statement provides the foundation for the entire application.
Magnolia Montessori Academy Mission
Guided by Maria Montessori’s idea that “the secret of good teaching is to regard the child’s
intelligence as a fertile field in which seeds may be sown, to grow under the heat of flaming
imagination. Our aim is not only to make the child understand, and still less to force him to
memorize, but so to touch his imagination as to enthuse him to his innermost core.”
Magnolia Montessori students in grades K-8 will develop a strong academic foundation and a
love of learning. Students will draw upon that foundation to explore the world through project
based learning and thematic studies in science, math, and the humanities. Magnolia Montessori
seeks to cultivate students who are responsible citizens in the local and global community
through service learning. In addition, Magnolia Montessori students will build relationships
with community mentors to extend their learning beyond the classroom.
B. Describe how the school will utilize the guiding principles found in section
1002.33(2)(a), F.S.
In accordance with the law, charter schools shall be guided by the following principles:
- Meet high standards of student achievement while providing parents flexibility to choose among diverse
educational opportunities within the state’s public school system.
- Promote enhanced academic success and financial efficiency by aligning responsibility and accountability.
- Provide parents with sufficient information on whether their child is reading at grade level and whether
the child gains at least a year’s worth of learning for every year spent in the charter school.
High Standards of Achievement
Magnolia Montessori Academy will meet high standards of academic achievement in the
following ways:

By using the Montessori Method for student instruction. The Montessori Method
uses multi-aged, multi-grade classrooms that provide students with a non-competitive,
developmentally appropriate and inspiring environment. Students work as individual
learners as well as learners in community. Such diversity in instruction requires that
students be both independent and collaborative researchers and learners; this
differentiated instruction provides for developmentally necessary interaction as well as
hones the skills that encourage self-directed learners. Students also work toward goals
that are set for them individually. Students work at their precise skill level, use their own
work as baselines for student achievement and are only comparable to themselves for
success. The Montessori Method has been shown to increase not only student’s
achievement levels, but also their sense of personal efficacy.

By having Montessori-trained teachers as classroom guides. Students are
encouraged and mentored by Montessori-trained teachers who observe students, guide
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their learning and specifically design lessons and assignments with individual student
achievement in mind. The Montessori teacher is a guide in the student’s education,
providing encouragement to explore and the space to develop into an independent
thinker. Montessori teachers believe that within each student is an innate drive to learn,
the ability to accomplish feats well beyond what is normally expected and the
compassion and empathy to develop into constructive agents of change within the larger
society. Because in the Montessori classroom there are no arbitrary upper limits on how
much a student may learn, students in a Montessori classroom may far exceed the
learning outcomes for similarly aged, traditionally educated students.

By using thoughtful and purposeful assessment. In order to properly assure student
success, Magnolia Montessori Academy will use on-going, appropriate assessments to
keep track of student progress. Through student assessments, teacher observation and
guidance, mastery learning checklists, ongoing assessments like Discovery reading and
math and a yearly criterion-referenced test (FCAT) MMA will confirm the efficacy of the
approach. Since MMA will be a small population, it is possible to have individual
performance inform individual instruction to ensure individual progress. With teachers
working so closely with students, encouraging student self-awareness and this on-going
assessment, students are never inadvertently lost in the instructional process.

By using the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards and Common Core
Standards. Students will meet or exceed high standards of achievement using the
comprehensive Montessori Elementary Curriculum aligned with Florida’s Next
Generation Standards and the newly implement Common Core Standards. Magnolia
Montessori Academy will use the Montessori learning materials and pedagogical
approach, as well as implementing current relevant educational research to improve
student learning.
Diversity of Educational Opportunities
Currently, the only Montessori education opportunity for elementary-aged children in Polk
County is Lakeland Montessori Schoolhouse. Magnolia Montessori Academy seeks to make
Montessori education available to even more Polk County students. As demonstrated by over
500 students on the Lakeland Montessori Schoolhouse waiting list, there is a demand for this
type of school that is not currently being met by public school system.
Alignment of Responsibility and Accountability
Magnolia Montessori Academy is committed to promoting academic success and financial
efficiency by ensuring that money received by MMA is spent with student instruction and
teacher development in mind. Magnolia Montessori Academy is committed to financial
responsibility and will use research-based methods in the classroom, provide teachers with
adequate training and support to enhance student achievement and use developmentally
appropriate materials to ensure that MMA meets the vision of the school to provide an
authentic education. Magnolia Montessori Academy will strive for such authenticity using
means like service-learning, project-based learning, and community partnerships that maximize
student achievement in a cost-effective manner. In order for the school to be fully financially
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accountable, the MMA governing board will ensure that the operating budget reflects money
spent on pupil instruction, staff development and student enrichment.
Information on Reading Levels and Learning Gains
Parent involvement is paramount at Magnolia Montessori Academy. The school expects that
parents will play an active role in student education. Magnolia Montessori Academy will
provide parents with information about reading levels and learning gains through:

Frequent parent contact. Parents deserve to know what is happening with their children
in school. In fact, parental involvement is a contributing factor to student success.
Magnolia Montessori Academy will commit to offering parents information that will help
them guide their children toward success. Minimally, parents will be encouraged to attend
two conferences per year at which the student, teacher and parent might review the
student’s current educational progress. Conferences will serve as the primary point of
contact and discussion between parent, teacher and student, though the director and
teachers will be available through phone and email as needed. Since the school
community is small, teachers and parents will be in close proximity often, which will also
encourage communication. Parents will also be apprised the results of any assessment
testing that would provide information about a specific subject like reading or math.

A quarterly Standards-Based Assessment Report. Since Magnolia Montessori
Academy will be using a Standards-Based Assessment Report (S-BAR) for progress
reporting, parents will have additional information about their student’s progress beyond
the traditional letter grade progress report. Through the S-BAR, parents will be provided
with detailed information about all aspects of their student’s achievement along with
narrative remarks if helpful and necessary for parental involvement. For example, parents
will clearly see on the report whether their student is just being introduced to, is practicing
or has demonstrated proficiency in any of the requisite standards for each subject,
including non-core classes. Magnolia Montessori Academy will use the district’s timeline
for progress reporting.

Specific parent contact regarding Reading assessment testing. Information on
incoming reading level will be determined through prior year’s FCAT scores, Discovery
assessments and possibly Accelerated Reader (AR) instruments. If MMA determines that
these means are not adequate, then the director will determine what additional, researchbased means are necessary to ensure student achievement. All findings will be reported to
parents and students as expediently as possible through electronic or paper means.

The use of state-wide, criterion-referenced testing. Magnolia Montessori Academy
will participate in the following state-wide criterion-referenced assessment tests: FCAT
Reading, Writing, Mathematics, and Science and will provide these scores to the parents
when available. These tests, in conjunction with other means, will provide parents with the
confirmation of a year’s worth of learning gains made. Other means for ensuring a year’s
worth of measurable gains include mastery learning checklists and/or student exhibitions.
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C. Describe how the school will meet the prescribed purposes for charter schools found in
section 1002.33(2)(b), F.S.
In accordance with the law, charter schools shall fulfill the following purposes:
- Improve student learning and academic achievement.
- Increase learning opportunities for all students, with a special emphasis on low-performing students and
reading.
- Encourage the use of innovative learning methods.
- Require the measurement of learning outcomes.
Improved Learning and Academic Achievement for All Students
The Montessori Method is renowned for its ability to reach every student through innovative
educational methods and constant, consistent observation of student progress and
engagement. The Montessori multi-age classrooms will engage the average learner, challenge
the gifted student and remediate the low performing student using an approach that accepts
the student’s current capability and encourages him or her to expand his or her skills and
abilities.
Montessori learning is highly specific and addresses the individual’s talents, learning styles and
interests. Upon entering the classroom, students are automatically drawn to those areas of the
classroom that appeal to them; teachers note this and encourage students to pursue their
academic interests while integrating those interests within other subjects. Through the
uniquely Montessori concept of “following the child,” teachers prepare and encourage
students to develop a learning plan which will enable them to portion their time and select
their study materials.
Magnolia Montessori Academy classrooms will be welcoming spaces for students of varying
abilities and personal goals. The Montessori classroom is one of communal learning where
instruction alongside and in relationship with other learners coupled with the individualization
of student learning enhances every student’s outcomes in many areas: academic, social and
emotional. Students who may require remediation may find the non-competitive classroom
climate refreshing in comparison with the traditional classroom. Remediation also happens in a
variety of ways; sometimes the student may not even realize he or she is being remediated
because of the mixed grade classroom. Teachers also work so personally with the students
that they are able to specifically tailor lessons to bolster the students’ deficiencies.
Reading is at the center of the Montessori classroom; it provides a portal to all the other
disciplines. Accordingly, Magnolia Montessori Academy takes reading instruction very
seriously. Magnolia Montessori Academy’s reading curriculum will be research-based and
supported by appropriate professional development to ensure quality implementation.
Reading assessments will be performed often and used to directly inform instruction. Reading
learning gains will be monitored, and if it appears that the current approach is lagging behind
other comparable schools, MMA will revisit the curriculum and correct it.
Also, Magnolia Montessori Academy is committed to improving learning and academic
achievement through parent involvement. Magnolia Montessori Academy respects the triad of
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student, family and school, and seeks to blend the three seamlessly in order to maximize
academic strengths and address any deficiency.
Magnolia Montessori Academy views learning as holistic and life-long. Within this view,
students are encouraged to place their learning into relevant and related contexts in order to
more fully understand the concepts presented. Using contextual and integrated learning,
which is more authentic than learning in a traditional manner, students can place the concepts
and ideas into their life in an organized and connected way. This interconnectedness helps the
student with high achievement not only at MMA, but also throughout their lives.
Magnolia Montessori Academy also intends to create a staff development program which will
train teachers to address the specific needs of Montessori students and will also encourage
them to develop the classroom and community climate using Montessori methodology.
Magnolia Montessori Academy faculty will be encouraged to be lifelong learners and seekers of
knowledge with which to more fully inform instruction.
Innovative Learning Methods
By its very nature, the Montessori learning environment is innovative when compared with
traditional pedagogy. Of particular note is the use of multi-age, multi-level classrooms where
students are part of a diverse learning community which mirrors the larger society. Montessori
education focuses on students as life-long, self-directed learners who impact their community
in authentic and effective ways.
The specific innovative methods to be used at Magnolia Montessori Academy may include the
following.

A prepared environment which is crucial to student engagement
A hallmark of the Montessori classroom is a carefully prepared environment which
provides for a variety of constructive activity which will engage students in the subject
matter. The ideal prepared environment is clean, beautiful and ordered, while being
supportive of the students’ need to explore subject matter exhaustively. Magnolia
Montessori Academy teachers will be aware of the environment, and its importance in
producing students who are self-disciplined, ordered and joyful.

Multi-grade, multi-level classrooms which combine students of varying levels of
academic and social achievement
The Montessori classroom is comprised of students who have similar developmental
needs. Students who are grouped according to developmental need may discover both
learning peers and social peers who may be outside their traditional “class.” The multiaged grouping creates a richer environment than single-aged groupings and can provide a
natural motivation for student performance. Younger students look to their older peers
for inspiration and guidance. Older students, in turn, are usually excited to share their
knowledge in the form of teaching. These moments of teaching and learning often happen
spontaneously when students are given the opportunity and prepared environment to
explore subjects of interest to them.
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
Research-based, world-renown Montessori materials.
Scientifically designed manipulative learning materials are that the heart of a Montessori
classroom. The materials are self-correcting and provide the student with feedback, thus
reinforcing autonomy, confidence, and self-motivation. Every piece of learning apparatus
has a specific purpose, and focuses on a particular skill or concept, while at the same time
addressing many levels of comprehension from concrete to abstraction. In Montessori
elementary, extensive written materials in each subject support the Montessori emphasis on
the individual’s on research from reference books, primary and secondary sources, like the
internet, rather than compilations of information in textbooks. From their own research
the children synthesize their new knowledge and create books or projects illustrating their
understanding.

“Following the child,” which is a Montessori foundational tenet focusing on the
flow of information in the classroom
Instead of teachers being the source of all information disseminated in the classroom,
Montessori teachers often follow the student toward the work that the student feels is
necessary and interesting. While teachers do have required topics to cover according to the
NGSSS and other assigned standards, students will often naturally lead teachers in the
direction of these standards in the normal course of their academic work cycles, at which
point the teacher enriches, encourages and expands the content. Montessori teachers
believe that each student has the innate drive to seek out knowledge and information, but
since every child’s drive may vary in level, the teacher must be willing and able to
demonstrate a variety of responses to assist students in their research.

Small group instruction which encourages collaborative learning and expansion of
social skills
Small group instruction is often purposeful and an integral part of the prepared
environment of the Montessori classroom. Teachers conduct small workshops with
specifically designed goals for the small group. Small group instruction within a Montessori
classroom sometimes happens spontaneously as one student becomes captivated by the
work being accomplished by his or her peers. While this is usually discouraged in
traditional methods, the innovative approach of allowing interested students to join the
group results in various viewpoints and collaboration. Additionally, students who are a part
of these cohesive groups learn to listen actively, accept feedback for their own ideas and
troubleshoot solutions for issues that may arise.

Individual work plans which will meet students at their mastery level
Montessori students are assessed initially and carefully observed by the teachers to ensure
that they begin their instruction at the level they require. Unlike traditional learning
methods which often neglect the struggling student or hinder the accelerated learner, the
Montessori classroom has no limits with regard to how much learning a student may
accomplish. These learning strides are made even if they exceed the current grade level
standards for mastery. Conversely, if a teacher notes that a student requires remediation,
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the individual work plan can ensure that all the minimum standards for mastery at the
student’s grade level are being addressed.

Authentic and relevant learning opportunities like service-learning projects
These projects are conceived in the school community, researched comprehensively,
enacted with the larger community and then evaluated for effects. Through the use of
authentic and relevant projects like this, students learn to integrate the theory of what they
have learned with the hands-on application of it. Service-learning fits well within the
MMA curricular framework, offering students a way to see the academic subjects as
applicable to their lives. Service-learning is at the core of the model and encourages the
student to be a caretaker of his or her community.

Uninterrupted work cycles and project-based learning that encourage
concentration and focus.
The weekly organization of learning time will be based on an established Montessori tenet,
that it is essential for children to have long, uninterrupted daily work periods (2.5-3 hours
at a time) each school day. Therefore, the morning will be dedicated to this core subject
work time: Reading, Writing and Math, then lunch, outdoor play, silent reading, Specials
such as Spanish, Art, Music, and PE are scheduled in the afternoon. Whole class
instruction will be as needed and minimal, usually limited to the beginning and end of the
day. The school day will be structured to allow students to spend long blocks of time on
work that they choose. This enables student to explore a topic or material thoroughly, and
to carry it to completion.

Community partnerships that emphasize stewardship, respect for the natural world,
with a global awareness and appreciation for the interconnectedness of all life.
Magnolia Montessori Academy will create a lasting and profound understanding and
respect for all cultures and living being through an interdisciplinary, developmentally
appropriate, and respectful teaching and learning philosophy. Magnolia Montessori
Academy will take advantage of the vast resources available in the Lakeland area. Students
will create and use partnerships with the community as both a source of knowledge and as
a means of applying what they learn to give back. Children will learn to give back through
service to our community is a logical extension of the values of the Montessori philosophy.
Measuring Learning Outcomes
Since Magnolia Montessori Academy is committed to ensuring that each student is making
adequate progress, the efficacy of the approach is confirmed in a variety of ways. Magnolia
Montessori Academy acknowledges that objectively measurable assessment must be
accomplished in a timely manner so that instruction can be adequately informed to ensure
student success.
Moreover, MMA will measure learning outcomes in at least the following ways.
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



Baseline and periodic assessments for each student
Baseline assessments in reading will provide teachers with information to use appropriate
materials for student instruction. In addition, baseline assessments can be used as initial
indicators to measure student progress. Tools for measuring baseline levels will be aligned
with assessments used in the county.
Criterion-referenced tests like FCAT Reading, Writing, Mathematics and Science
MMA will participate in all state-required assessment tests. Student scores will be used to
inform instruction and can be used as well in any required school improvement plan.
Standards Based Assessment Reporting (S-BAR) for parent and student
information MMA will use the county’s S-BAR tool to give student and parent feedback
in an objective as well as subjective way. The tool will include, but not be limited to, the
standards delineated in the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards as well as any other
standards necessary to support the MMA mission and vision.
Mastery checklists to ensure adequate student progression in each subject area
Teachers will use mastery checklists to make certain that each student is progressing in
subject mastery over a defined time. Students will be assessed for each skill or standard
with a designator which indicates the introduction, practice or proficiency of the particular
skill. Teachers will use the mastery checklists as necessary to assess student performance in
each subject area.
D. Describe how the charter school will fulfill, the optional purposes of charter schools
found in section 1002.33(2)(c), F.S. This section is optional.
In accordance with the law, charter schools may fulfill the following purposes:
- Create innovative measurement tools.
- Provide rigorous competition within the public school district to stimulate continual improvement in all
public schools.
- Expand the capacity of the public school system.
- Mitigate the educational impact created by the development of new residential dwelling units.
- Create new professional opportunities for teachers, including ownership of the learning program at the
school site.
Innovative Measurement Tools
While Montessori learning is steeped in tradition and history, its assessment techniques are still
considered innovative by current standards of assessment. Montessori teachers are trained
observers of student progress which is reflected in their detailed assessments. Magnolia
Montessori Academy’s ultimate goal in assessment is to offer concrete feedback to teachers,
parents and students which can better inform instruction in order to increase student
achievement.
Magnolia Montessori Academy intends to develop and use the following innovative
measurement tools:

Narrative assessments which are specifically designed to provide subjective
feedback. Narrative feedback is important for measuring and improving student
performance because it can give specific details about student work. Instead of a
designated letter grade to describe student progress, teachers can offer both students
11
and parents comprehensive observations about such progress. Student weaknesses and
triumphs can be described and tracked via narrative assessment. Parents find such
feedback valuable and helpful in determining progress.

Mastery checklists and Benchmark Portfolios. Using standards based assessments,
cross-referenced with the NGSSS and Common Core standards, mastery checklists and
benchmark portfolios will be created for Lower Elementary grades 1-3, Upper
Elementary grades 4-6, and middle school grades 7-8. The checklists and portfolios will
be drafted to articulate criteria for acceptable demonstrations of learning for the
school’s goals. To create this portfolio teachers and students will diligently collect
samples of work illustrating levels of competence for checklist entries. The portfolio
and checklist will move with students as they progress through the three year cycle in
each classroom.

Completion of service-learning projects which reflect a long-term plan to help
the community. At the Upper Elementary and Secondary levels, Magnolia
Montessori Academy students are expected to engage in service-learning research,
planning, implementation and evaluation. Through the project’s progress, teachers and
students may evaluate the efficacy of student work and reflect upon how service to the
community is useful and helpful and can ultimately change the world. These projects
require student innovation, creativity and self-directedness; the satisfactory completion
of the project indicates measurable progress.

Exhibitions which serve as a demonstration of student progress. At the Upper
Elementary and Secondary levels, exhibitions are perhaps the most comprehensive
manner of subjective assessment. Student exhibition of work can take many forms,
but all effective exhibitions include the conclusion of a great deal of student work and
research. Student exhibitors must present their work using effective communication
techniques, which are cross-disciplinary in nature. Exhibitions are generally public as
well; so many observers outside of the school community might examine and question
the student about his or her research. Mastery of the subject matter is therefore crucial
to the successful exhibition.
These assessment measures are the minimum MMA will employ; often, assessment
opportunities present themselves in sometimes unusual and unorthodox ways, and MMA
teachers will be alert to any assessment opportunity.
Competitive within the District
Montessori education values and nurtures the self-directed and inquiry minded student.
Student curiosity about and willingness to seek out information beyond what is customarily
expected of students will provide an academically rigorous environment for students of all
abilities. This rigor naturally leads to students who will be competitive on standardized tests;
indeed, studies have demonstrated that the Montessori Method results in better scores on
standardized tests in reading and math. Lakeland Montessori Schoolhouse’s elementary
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program demonstrates this, and Magnolia Montessori Academy expects that its students will
also produce high scores on state standardized tests.
Professional Development Opportunities
The ideal Magnolia Montessori Academy teacher is one who will continually develop him or
herself and refine his or her teaching technique. To this end, MMA will create professional
development opportunities. The following types of professional development may be offered
at MMA:

Onsite in-services which refine practice at the school level. Teachers will meet
within their own school community in order to improve school efficacy. Topics might
include subjects of interest to the teachers or director and might be developed and
conducted by the staff on an as needed basis. The director or a teacher might also seek
out an expert in a particular field to provide training at these in-services.

Montessori training which will provide support and education appropriate for
the Montessori classroom. Montessori trainings are exhaustive and require years to
complete. While MMA does not expect its teachers to initially be trained in
Montessori education, a willingness to obtain this or another Montessori training is
paramount in teacher selection and retention. Montessori-trained teachers are experts
in observation, leading and collaboration—skills which every teacher can use in his or
her classroom.
District training and professional development opportunities. Magnolia Montessori
Academy teachers will be strongly encouraged to attend any district workshops or inservices which would be beneficial to the school’s climate and community.
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Section 2: Target Population and Student Body
A. Describe the anticipated target population to be served.
If applicable, applicants should describe if they will target, in accordance with the law, certain populations
defined in section 1002.33(10)(e), F.S.
Magnolia Montessori Academy seeks to serve families in our local community who are
interested in a proven, hands-on learning approach for their K-8 aged children. Magnolia
Montessori Academy does not discriminate against, and is nonsectarian in its programs,
admission policies, employment practices and operation. The school will enroll any eligible
student who submits a timely application, unless the school receives a greater number of
applications than there are spaces for students, in which case students will be admitted through
a random selection process called a lottery. We seek to bring a world-class Montessori
educational experience to those children for whom traditional education is not benefitting.
Magnolia Montessori Academy will adhere to the anti-discrimination provisions of s. 1000.05.
In order to help explain our education method to the community and families who may never
have heard of Montessori, we will hold regular “What is Montessori?” information sessions at
the public library and other venues. These informational sessions will commence upon charter
approval notification. Informational Sessions will eventually be moved to the new school
property, where we will provide actual small group and individual tours of the Montessori
classrooms for prospective families. Montessori education is most beneficial for children when
families are committed to the full K-8 educational program. We will offer regular Parent
Education Events to help educate and involve parents, leading to improved education
commitment to Montessori education and to the school. In order to establish an excellent,
healthy Montessori program according to our mission., we will follow an enrollment growth
plan that “front loads” kindergarten through fifth grade; the sequentially adding a grade level as
children develop and are promoted through the grades, and offering new student enrollment at
each grade level. Please see Enrollment Projections for the full plan. Magnolia Montessori
Academy is an equal access school governed by all applicable laws as stated in the Florida
Charter Statutes.
Non-discriminatory Policy
Magnolia Montessori Academy is a Florida Charter School that admits students of any race,
color, national or ethnic origin and honors all the rights, privileges, programs and activities
generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the
basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies,
admissions policies, athletic and other school administered program.
Under 1002.33(10(e) 5, which says, “A charter school may limit the enrollment process only to
target the following student populations: Students who meet reasonable academic, artistic, or
other eligibility standards established by the charter school and included in the charter school
application and charter or, in the case of existing charter schools, standards that are consistent
with the school’s mission and purpose. Such standards shall be in accordance with current
state law and practice in public schools and may not discriminate against otherwise qualified
individuals.”
1. MMA may choose to give enrollment preference to eligible students with previous
Montessori school experience, preschool and/or elementary, in fulfillment of our
Montessori school mission, however this is not a requirement for enrollment.
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2. Students residing in Polk county, and who submit a timely application, unless number of
applications exceeds the capacity of our program, class, grade level, or facility. In such
cases, all applicants shall have an equal chance of being admitted through the random
selection process of a lottery.
3. Students who are siblings of a student enrolled in MMA.
4. Students who are the children of a member of the governing board, or an employee of
MMA.
Returning students will not be required to re-apply each academic year.
Our Montessori charter school program is based on a cooperative type of learning that will
involve a family and community spirit. Therefore, commitment to the school’s mission and
educational philosophy will manifest itself in the signing of the MMA Partnership Agreement,
which will include a requirement of at least 20 hours of participation per year from each family
in our school and an agreement that they will follow our policies as outlined in the School
Handbook. Our Handbook will include the integration of the Polk County code of student
conduct for elementary students.
B. Provide the following projection for each year of proposed operation: the grades that
the school will serve, the projected number of students to be served in each grade, the
number of students expected in each class, and the total number of students enrolled.
Magnolia Montessori Academy will be a small school, limited in growth by space
considerations. Staff and enrollment projections are identified below.
Classroo
m
K
1 -3rd
4th-6th
7th-8th
st
2013-2014
Staf
f
1
2
1
Student
s
14
33
16
2014-2015
Staf
f
1
2
2
Student
s
14
36
27
2015-2016
Staf
f
1
2
2
Student
s
14
36
31*
8*
2016-2017
Staf
f
1
3
2
1
Student
s
14
39
32
18
2017-2018
Staf
f
1
3
2
1
Student
s
14
42
33
20
*Based on current projections, the 8 students who become 7th graders in 2015-2016 will be
included in Upper Elementary classroom with lessons designed specifically for the middle
school level. Beginning in 2016-2017, budget and enrollment numbers allow for an additional
teacher to create a separate 7th-8th grade classroom.
C. Provide a description of how the student population projections were developed.
Student population calculations were based on structural capacity for our potential school
locations, initial enrollment figures for other similar Montessori schools and startup staff
needed. These numbers allow the school to operate comfortably following a conservative
budget. Enrollment projections are based on retaining students from year to year. Any
vacancies will be filled from the applicant pool.
15
Section 3: Educational Program Design
A. Describe the school’s daily schedule and annual calendar, including the annual
number of days and hours of instructional time.
Magnolia Montessori will follow the Polk County School Board’s traditional calendar year; and
meet for 180 days per school year. The MMA schedule for breaks and holidays will be aligned
with the district’s as well. In addition, the school will follow the same patterns for FCAT
assessment and provide parents with a progress report every nine weeks.
Magnolia Montessori’s daily schedule will maintain the Montessori traditions of having threehour work blocks wherein the student has rotating work in each of the core subject areas as
well as the extra-core areas. Three-hour work cycles are vital to the structure and order of the
Montessori classroom because they provide the student with the necessary time to engage in
active, productive work without interruptions. During each three-hour work cycle, students
will be able to work on individual work or engage in group lessons. This flexibility allows for
students to be engaged in work that is meaningful for them for the length of time that works
best for them. In addition, if a student needs remediation in a particular subject the three-hour
work cycle enables the student to complete an individualized work plan which addresses the
student’s unique needs.
School hours are tentatively scheduled from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm. Students will arrive
beginning at 8:15 with classes starting at 8:30. Student dismissal will begin at 2:45.
Any changes to MMA’s school calendar and / or schedule will be reviewed by MMA’s Board
of Directors.
B. Describe the proposed charter school’s educational program.
History of Montessori Education
Dr. Maria Montessori spent her life in communion with children, attempting to decipher
optimal methodology for instruction. Her philosophy, often referred to simply as
“Montessori,” is a unique pedagogy that both approaches and diverges from constructivism.
Dr. Montessori worked closely with children of varying abilities and backgrounds, adapting her
work when necessary and focusing on the student as center in the learning process. She found
that students learned best when presented with size-appropriate, interesting materials. She
noted that when permitted students took initiative in their own education, seeking out new
topics and experiences.
Contrary to popular pedagogy of her time, she found students responded better when teachers
acted as observers and guides in a process of learning, rather than as the ultimate source of all
knowledge. She spent the next fifty years of her life honing the method, establishing the
model and providing for the training of future of Montessori educators. She is considered to
be a developer of cognitive-developmental education alongside Piaget and Dewey.
The Montessori classroom is at the center of the Montessori philosophy. It generally is large
and open and inviting. There are sections to the classroom: math, music, art, language,
science, and history. The furniture is student-sized, but not arranged in the traditional way.
16
The classroom belongs to the children who learn there; indeed, it is not set up for teacher
convenience, but rather to address the physical and developmental needs of the child.
Dr. Montessori devised specific plans for use in Primary classroom (three years to six years
old), Lower Elementary classroom (six years to nine years old) and Upper Elementary
classroom (nine years to twelve years old). During these important preschool and elementary
years, the use of materials is paramount to the education of the student. Montessori preschools and elementary schools are notable for their use of tangible “manipulative” objects to
provide sensorial lessons.
Indeed, Montessori education focuses on moving children through a spiral of learning which
begins with learning in its simplest, most concrete forms. As children become
developmentally, emotionally and physically ready, studies move into the more abstract
disciplines and concepts. This gradual, natural progression from concrete to abstract allows
students to revisit similar materials again and again, increasing in abstraction for each three
year cycle. Please see Appendix M—The Spiral of the Montessori Curriculum for a visual
representation of the progression.
Instruction for students begins to evolve from the tactile, concrete lessons to the more
intangible, abstract ideas. The social and emotional developmental needs of the student require
meaningful work that includes them in their society. Service-learning allows students to see
themselves as agents of change within their communities. As students use their knowledge
and skills to develop and enact community projects, they see that not only can students
contribute to their community; they can use their education in a relevant and practical manner.
Magnolia Montessori Academy Philosophy
Magnolia Montessori Academy will be sensitive to the academic and developmental needs of
our students. Magnolia Montessori Academy views the student as a whole person, focusing on
the student as more than a bundle of cognitive potential. Rather, MMA is holistic with an
integrated, discipline-spanning curriculum. The MMA curriculum connects the past, present
and future and integrates the local community within the global community. The school’s
holistic approach considers students in partnership with family, teachers, and community
moving toward a goal of maturation of the individual.
According to Dr. Angeline Lillard (2005), developmental psychologist and Montessori expert,
the eight principles of Montessori education can be summarized to demonstrate:
1. that movement and cognition are closely entwined, and movement can enhance thinking
and learning;
2. that learning and well-being are improved when people have a sense of control over their
lives;
3. that people learn better when they are interested in what they are learning;
4. that tying extrinsic rewards to an activity, like money for reading or high grades for tests,
negatively impacts motivation to engage in that activity when the reward is withheld;
5. that collaborative arrangements can be very conducive to learning;
17
6. that learning situated in meaningful contexts is often deeper and richer than learning in
abstract contexts;
7. that particular forms of adult interaction are associated with more optimal child outcomes;
and
8. that order in the environment is beneficial to children.
Taking our cues from these most basic tenets of Montessori philosophy, Magnolia Montessori
Academy will use the following innovative learning approaches:
1. Movement enhances learning: Students at MMA will be free to choose their space for
individual work and, to a lesser extent, group work. The space will be conducive to
movement because it will be unencumbered by rows of desks, lending itself instead to a
more comfortable and developmentally appropriate arrangement. Students will also be
physically moving from subject to subject and with that comes new venues and new spaces
in which to work. The flow of the Montessori classroom is important. Kinesthetic
learners, in particular, find the use of movement while learning effective and useful.
2. Personal choice is important: Students at MMA will have a greater degree of personal
choice in the classroom. Indeed, the ability to self-direct is a vital concept for Montessori
students. Magnolia Montessori believes that each student is capable of making decisions
about what to learn, who to work with, and how long to work. Always working within the
classroom standards (which include the NGSSS and Common Core), teachers guide
students in their academic endeavors while still allowing for personal choice of materials,
workmates and duration. This sense of autonomy provides the student with enough
academic investment to learn what he or she must.
3. Interest in Subject Matter: Students are naturally drawn to certain subjects and study
topics, and MMA’s classroom will encourage great diversity in both method and matter.
The teacher will guide students in widening subject horizons by exposing them to multiple
options from which to choose. In addition, research plays a large part in Lower and Upper
Elementary and Secondary Montessori classrooms, allowing the student to exhaust a
subject, wringing out the sponge to the student’s liking before the student begins to
explore another subject. Alternatively, the use of research methods in the classroom allows
for multiple engaging projects to be worked on simultaneously.
4. No extrinsic rewards: While it has become commonplace to offer rewards to students
for expected behaviors, MMA will not likely engage in providing extrinsic rewards for a job
“well done.” This concept can extend into grades as rewards and to further this end,
MMA will not focus on letter grades as rewards for hard work. Magnolia Montessori
Academy wants students to work hard and learn the necessary material to be a vital part of
the community. Using mastery checklists and narrative grading will discourage the use of
letter grades as extrinsic rewards. These mastery checklists will, however, be converted to
letter grades for means of transferring to other schools.
5. Importance of collaboration: Magnolia Montessori Academy feels that working
alongside one’s peers is crucial in the learning process. Students fill the role as both
18
student and teacher in the Montessori model as the student progresses in proficiency in a
certain topic. When a student is able, he or she will demonstrate and instruct his or her
peers in a skill, both to further the confidence of the skill and also to reinforce it.
6. Meaningful contexts: Using a service learning model, MMA will provide its students
with the opportunity to choose meaningful work, important to the class as a whole and to
each individual according to talents and interests. Service learning will provide the
students with the ability to demonstrate community, confront practical problems, and
integrate the theory of their core subjects into their real lives. Service learning encourages
a group process where communication and collaboration are fostered. Through service
learning, the classroom environment is enriched through value exploration, goal setting
and achievement, responsibility assumption, and individual accountability. Through real
work, youth develop a personal vision of themselves, helping them to see who they wish to
be, how they may contribute and what matters deeply to them. This vision has the power
to sustain students through the contradictions and dilemmas of life, to make them strong
and to imbue their lives with meaning and purpose.
7. Interactions with teachers: In contrast with the traditional model, which designates
teacher as the ultimate authority both on appropriate behavior and knowledge, the
authoritative teacher in MMA classroom will serve as a guide and a consistent source of
information. Magnolia Montessori Academy teachers will provide interaction and
opportunity without removing the child’s autonomy and ambition to learn. Montessori
pedagogy allows the teacher as observer to evaluate the precise skill set and personal
interests of an individual student, and to tailor a learning program to the learner,
encouraging them to move beyond skills already mastered into areas in which he or she
may not be yet proficient. In addition, MMA teachers will not intimidate students with
lessons for which they are not ready.
8. Order is important: Order is fundamental to the Montessori classroom. The prepared
environment is important to effective student learning. The student follows the clues of
the environment, so if the space is orderly and spacious, so will be the student’s mind. The
teachers and director will ensure that the classroom is prepared with activities which will
engage the student and encourage learning. Information presented in clear, ordered ways
can find its way into the mind in a more efficient fashion.
C. Describe the research base for the educational program.
The Montessori Method has been extensively studied over the course of the hundred years since
Maria Montessori first outlined the methodology. The curricular team at Magnolia Montessori
Academy, in cooperation with the authors of the Magnolia Montessori Academy School charter,
used the research conducted by Montessori herself, as well as those who studied her method in
order to form the research base. Below are some of the foundational articles used to refine the
curricular approach. Numerous other articles and books were used to inform the application.
For a complete bibliography, please see Appendix A—Bibliography.
19
Lillard, A., & Else-Quest, N. (2006). Evaluating Montessori education. Science. 313, 18931894.
This article details the research of Lillard and Else-Quest and provides a comparative analysis of
Montessori educated and traditionally educated students’ academic and social work.
The study evaluated the social and academic impact of Montessori education. Overall 53 control
(traditionally educated students) and 59 Montessori students were studied. Both groups came
from equal social economic levels. The two groups were divided, then, by age. Children in both
the Montessori group and control group were tested for cognitive/academic and social/behavioral
skills that were selected for importance in life. This was done so as not to examine results specific
of Montessori education.
Significant differences favoring Montessori students were found in the younger age group in the
following areas: Letter/Word identification, phonological decoding abilities, and math skills. The
younger group was also tested for executive function (following multi-step procedures) and the
Montessori educated group performed significantly higher than the traditionally educated group.
Lillard and Else-Quest also studied moral levels of reasoning with both groups.
Montessori students were significantly more likely to use higher levels of reasoning by referring to
justice and/or fairness when confronted with social scenarios. Observationally, Lillard and ElseQuest indicated that Montessori children, at work or at play, were more likely to be involved in
positive shared play versus traditionally educated children.
In the older group of students studied, both groups were asked to complete a writing prompt in
five minutes. Montessori students’ writing was scored as significantly more creative and used more
sophisticated sentence structure. The older group of Montessori students also scored higher at
tests designed to evaluate social and behavioral measures.
The conclusion of the study indicated that Montessori educated students performed better on
standardized tests of reading and math, engaged in more positive interactions with their peers, and
showed more advanced social cognition and executive control. They also showed more concern
for fairness and justice.
Dohrmann, K (2003). Outcomes for Students in a Montessori Program. Association of
Montessori International, May.
This article details the research Kathryn Dohrmann and provides a comparative analysis of
Montessori educated and traditionally educated students’ scores on standardized assessments. The
study was longitudinal, looking at students’ performance five or more years after they left the
Montessori environment.
The study evaluated the academic impact of Montessori education. Overall , a matched sample of
201 Montessori educated students, who received Montessori education from age three through
grade 5 and continued their education in Milwaukee Public Schools, and a peer control group were
studied. The groups were matched by gender, race/ethnicity, and socio-economic status.
The study compared the students’ ACT scores, WKCE scores, and GPAs. The results of the study
show that there is an association between Montessori education and superior performance on the
Math and Science scales of the ACT and WKCE. Dohrmann confirmed the hypothesis that
20
Montessori education has a positive long-term impact. In addition, Dohrmann’s research shows
that Montessori students continue to be successful in traditional schools.
Richardson, S (2004). Research Validates Montessori Approach to Teaching Language.
Montessori Life 16, No. 3, 46-48.
This article compares the literacy research sponsored by the National institutes of Health to the
progression of language acquisition in the Montessori classroom. Richardson shows that the
Montessori approach to teaching language helps children with dyslexia and other reading
disabilities. Children with language-based reading disabilities struggle with phonemic awareness
and decoding. The Montessori approach ties language and sound to kinesthetic exercises that help
students build memory and increase their phonemic awareness and phonological processing skills.
Montessori materials like the sandpaper letters and the moveable alphabet help students connect
sounds and written symbols. Presenting language and grammar concepts using games and
concrete exercises makes language learning more meaningful for all students, but students with
learning disabilities benefit greatly from this approach. Additionally, Montessori work in the
Sensorial and Practical Life areas of the classroom help build dexterity and support writing
development. The National Institutes of Health research study validates the methods first
presented by Maria Montessori over 100 years ago.
Rathunde, K. (2003).A comparison of Montessori and traditional middle schools:
motivation, quality of experience, and social context. The NAMTA Journal. 28, No. 3, 13-52.
Rathunde takes two motivational theories, goal theory and flow theory, and discusses his research
and their implications for middle school reform and the facets they share with Montessori
education. Both of these theories help illustrate the positive dimensions of a Montessori based
middle school.
Goal Theory
Goal theory indicates how students’ goals are intertwined with the quality of their commitment to
their education. There are two basic types of goals: task and performance (Anderman & Maehr).
Task focused students are intrinsically motivated. They are drawn to master tasks they may find
more challenging. Performance focused students are concerned with evaluation by those
surrounding them—their peers and those in authority. This can decrease productivity and learning
because students don’t want their ability to be judged. It also disrupts student learning. Since
many traditional middle schools focus on performance learning, strategies have been implemented
to change classroom and school cultures to better reflect task focused students. One of these
strategies is summarized in the acronym TARGET (Task, Authority, Recognition, Grouping,
Evaluation, and Time). Research and observation showed that Montessori educated students
reflect the goals of the TARGET proposals (see table).
TARGET
MONTESSORI STUDENTS
Task
A task focus was emphasized by a school culture that emphasizes intrinsic
learning. Students have freedom to select projects and are given several hours a
day to complete them.
Authority
In the Montessori school, authority is not necessarily hierarchical. Students
21
often take on leadership and planning roles for different school functions.
Recognition
Recognition of student achievement is done in a way that avoids achievement
competition.
Grouping
Ability grouping is rarely done as students are often grouped by interest. By the
very nature of Montessori education, students are encouraged to collaborate with
each other.
Evaluation
Students are evaluated in many alternative forms, instead of the traditional
ABCDF manner.
Time
Time is managed in a flexible setting to allow for the better use of a student’s
learning time.
Flow Theory
Optimal experience theory, or flow theory, was developed by M. Csikszentmihalyi. Coincidentally,
it is an aspect that is familiar with Montessori students. “Flow is an intrinsically motivated, taskfocused state characterized by full concentration, a change in the awareness of time (time going by
quickly), feelings of clarity and control, a merging of action and awareness, and a lock of selfconsciousness” (Csikszentmihalyi, Flow). Maria Montessori wrote that “children not only work
seriously, but have great powers of concentration…action can absorb the whole attention and
energy of a person” (Montessori. Unpublished lectures, 83-84). A school environment that that
fosters deep engagement and concentration is one the goals of Montessori education.
Many of the policies and practices of Montessori education are consistent with goal theory and
flow theory. The expectation of this study is that the Montessori students would report a more
positive quality of experience in their educational studies.
The Study
The following results were obtained from the study:
Part 1. Do Montessori students have more optimal experience while working in
school?
Montessori students reported a significantly better quality of experience in academic work than
the traditional students. There were strong differences suggesting that Montessori students
were feeling more active, strong, excited, happy, relaxed, sociable, and proud while engaged in
academic work. They were also enjoying themselves more, they were more interested in what
they were doing, and they wanted to be doing academic work more than the traditional
students.
In addition to the comparison of the Montessori and traditional students, the results also
provide additional interesting information about experience while working at school. The
Montessori students’ affect, potency, and motivation in academic work were about the same as
their average levels for the week. In other words, they seemed to be just as engaged while
doing work in school as they were the rest of the week doing various activities outside of
school.
22
Therefore, the fact that Montessori students are feeling about the same in schoolwork as in the
rest of their lives (e.g., feeling “some” sense of excitement and strength) suggests that school is
not an aversive place; it fits well into the ecology of their lives.
Part 2. Do Montessori schools provide a more positive community for learning?
Montessori students reported more support from teachers, more order in the classroom, and a
greater feeling of emotional/psychological safety. The findings here are clear and simple to
interpret. The Montessori students were much more positive about the quality of their school
environments. Overall, the Montessori students (1) saw their teachers as more fair, friendly,
and interested in them; (2) did not perceive as much chaos in the environment in terms of
disruptions and misbehavior; and (3) felt safe from the emotional pain associated with
putdowns by teachers and students.
Final conclusion
Results from the study showed that while engaged in academic work at school, Montessori
students reported higher affect, potency (feeling alert and energetic), intrinsic motivation
(enjoyment, interest), and flow experience than students from traditional middle schools. Almost
40% of their schoolwork was intrinsically motivating and important; in contrast, the traditional
students felt this way only 24% of the time.
Works Cited
Anderman, E., & M.L. Maehr. “Motivation and schooling in the middle grades.” Review of
Educational Research 64 (1994): 287-309.
Csikszentmihalyi, M. Flow: The psychology of optimal experience. New York: Harper & Row, 1990.
Montessori, M. Unpublished lectures. Dr. Maria Montessori’s International Training Course,
London, England, 1946.
Franciscan Montessori Earth School. (2003). The Longitudinal Assessment Study:
Eighteen Year Follow-up (Final Study) [Study Results]. Portland, OR: Christopher Glenn.
Premise
The premise of this study is that students with two or more years of Montessori education would
possess to a higher degree those qualities which are emphasized in the Montessori teaching
environment. These include such characteristics as being a lifelong learner, self-control and
direction, personal growth, spontaneity, and creativity. The second proposal was that students
with Montessori education will be as successful as students who were more traditionally educated.
Study
Over 18 years, six assessments were conducted. The first four involved extensive assessment of
parents and teachers (using surveys), and students (using surveys, personality tests, and
achievement test scores). The first four assessments are primarily quantitative while the latter two
were qualitative.
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Results
Non-Montessori teachers of former Montessori educated students consistently rated the students
as better than classmates in:
 Overall academic performance
 Ability to work alone
 Ability to finish a product
 Ability to cooperate with a teacher
 Ability to handle stress
 Appropriate use of spontaneity
 Overall self-image
In analyzing the content of the open ended questions, participants attributed these beliefs, traits
and behaviors of their current life style to the Montessori Education.
Academically, they favored:
 Learning for learning’s sake (not just as a means to an end)
 Life-long learning
 Actively seeking knowledge
 Personalized and self-paced education
 Hands-on and experiential learning
 Self-directed learning, knowing how and where to look for information, confidence in
searching for information
 Better collaboration in groups
 Understanding, questioning, analyzing, comprehending and discussing, not just
memorization or assignment completion.
Personality preferences included
 Life-long self-improvement
 Tolerance and open mindedness
 Self-confidence
 Thinking before speaking
 Effective decision making
 Patience and calmness
 Social awareness
 Environmental awareness
D. Explain how the educational program aligns with the school’s mission.
Magnolia Montessori Academy is a Montessori educational program which provides
elementary and middle school students educational exploration in a carefully ordered
environment. By its very nature, Montessori education encourages students to interact with
their environment in a variety of ways including tactile, service and self-directed project-based
learning which directly aligns with our school’s mission:
24
Magnolia Montessori students in grades K-8 will develop a strong academic foundation and a
love of learning. Students will draw upon that foundation to explore the world through project
based learning and thematic studies in science, math, and the humanities. Magnolia Montessori
seeks to cultivate students who are responsible citizens in the local and global community
through service learning. In addition, Magnolia Montessori students will build relationships
with community mentors to extend their learning beyond the classroom.
In the Educational Program – Authentic, joyful, and when thoughtfully and comprehensively
implemented the Montessori method quite naturally fits every child, because it is designed
around researched child development theories as to how children construct their knowledge.
Children respond enthusiastically inside a Montessori classroom, and this naturally motivates
them to achieve. True Montessori classrooms are lesson-driven, child appealing, and
individualize to help children exceed most expectations. Children are guided to reach their
potential academically, personally and socially. True Montessori inspires the elementary child
to develop an awareness of other people and to participate with them in making the world a
more peaceful, productive place. This is congruent with Dr. Montessori’s Mission for helping
children develop into intelligent, caring members of a global community in order to promote a
more peaceful world.
In Governance – The Montessori philosophy is a way of approaching life and learning, with a
desire to help, to understand, and to respect. School governance polies and procedures are
based upon these shared values, and keep our education community focused upon the school
wide goal of helping children grow and achieve, and supporting all the members of the
learning community.
In Policies and Procedures – Established upon the Montessori values of respect and
responsibly, school policies and procedures ,which effect children and adults in the school
community, reflect and support the school’s mission to cultivate excellent and responsible,
sensitive behavior.
E. Explain how the services the school will provide to the target population will help them
attain the Next Generation Sunshine State-Common Core Standards, as required by
section 1002.33, F.S.
Since Magnolia Montessori Academy will be using the Montessori Method, which is a proven
and innovative approach to education, the administration and faculty assume the Next
Generation Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS) and the Common Core Standards to be the
minimum in student achievement. The NGSSS and Common Core will be used to ensure that
each pupil is making adequate learning gains as measured by the FCAT assessment. However,
it is important to MMA that each student’s success reaches beyond the standards as he or she
explores his or her own diverse interests.
The Montessori Educational Program successfully prepares every child to meet or exceed state
benchmarks. The comprehensive, developmentally appropriate Montessori academic
curriculum will assist each child in the successful attainment of state and national standards.
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The Montessori Curriculum will be correlated with these standards for every subject and
instructional level. These correlated standards will guide individual and differentiated
instruction in the classroom, providing students with the means to demonstrate academic
success in all core subjects and grade levels. The Montessori K-8 curriculum provides an
excellent academic preparation, and the alignment/correlation will assist teachers in the timing
for specific lessons within the comprehensive Montessori curriculum to meet required FCAT
testing timelines. Montessori is individualized and differentiated education and therefore helps
every child achieve and attain the state education standards.
The following Magnolia Montessori Academy services will help the target population attain the
NGSSS and Common Core Standards:
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Weekly Plans. All students will be given a blueprint to help them create work plans each
week. Teacher will help students build weekly plans that encourage their learning interests
and challenge them to explore each subject matter in depth.
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Observation Based Lesson Planning. Teachers will closely observe their students and
identify their academic strengths and challenges. Teachers will develop engaging lessons
that target areas of improvement for students and encourage them to practice in these
lessons often.
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Data Driven Lesson Planning. While the Montessori Method is designed to follow each
child and meet his or her individual needs, teachers will also use results from assessments
like Discovery and the FCAT to make sure students are provided targeted support in areas
they may struggle in. These lessons will be integrated seamlessly into the function of the
Montessori classroom.
Replication
Although Magnolia Montessori Academy will not be replicating a specific school, we continue
to research and adopt sound practices from existing high-achieving Montessori and other
charters schools in Florida, implementing proven strategies and approach to policy and
sustainable charter program creation.
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Section 4: Curriculum Plan
A. Describe the school’s curriculum in the core academic areas, illustrating how it will
prepare students to achieve the Next Generation Sunshine State-Common Core
Standards.
Magnolia Montessori Academy will use a traditionally Montessori curriculum which accents
the integrated quality of education. Truly, all of the core academic areas are fully integrated
within each other, resulting in a remarkably authentic education which mimics the nature of
society. Integrated curricula tend to make the study of individual subjects or ideas more
relevant and related, creating a natural and authentic education. The eccentricities of
Montessori education are what make it innovative and effective.
Montessori education is also unique in the manner in which the school day is structured. Each
student participates in the community by defining and pursuing his or her own needs and
interests. It is truly student-directed, teacher-facilitated education. This differs from the
traditionally teacher-centered classroom and allows for more freedom and personal ownership
of the process. For example, students choose their work plan—deciding which assignment
and tasks to complete according to their own individual styles. Mixed in with individual work
is expected group work which joins students together for opportunities to approach tasks with
their peers. In these groups, students will learn to work cooperatively toward a goal while
mentoring each other and being guided by the classroom teachers.
The Montessori curriculum provides an array of specially developed materials and lessons.
These encourage children to construct abstract concepts using concrete materials, models, and
experiences through self-directed activity, peer collaboration, and teacher interaction. These
core materials become less evident as students’ progress through higher grade levels as student
begin transition to symbolic and abstract conceptual understandings. Montessori curriculum
also draws attending to certain academic subjects that are often underdeveloped in many
public schools such as calculation, geometry, grammar, anthropology, geography, foreign
languages, and economic geography.
Magnolia Montessori strives to meet the following goals for each student:
Development of the student – Students will see their education as an incredible intellectual
and personal journey. They will be independent, confident learners who meet rigorous
standards of academic and personal achievement, be excited by and crave learning, and be
motivated to take the next steps in their education, community, and work beyond the school.
Academic Achievement- Upon completion of the 8th grade, students will be able to
demonstrate proficient or advanced competencies in Core Subjects: Reading, Written and Oral
Communication, Mathematics, Science, History and Social Studies, and Geography as defined
in the school’s mastery checklists and the NGSSS and Common Core standards. Student will
demonstrate habits of self-discipline, intrinsic motivation, persistence, intellectual risk-taking,
and independence.
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Personal Achievement – Upon completion of the 8th grade, students will be able to evaluate
and reflect on their work according to defined criteria. Students will be able to plan and work
toward achievable goals though self-directed activity. They will demonstrate Montessori-based
values of grace, courtesy, respect, empathy for others, and responsibility.
Community Awareness – Student will understand their place within large communities and
be able to contribute productively through peaceful attitudes, effective conflict resolution,
creative problem solving, responsible action, and purposeful follow-through. Student will have
contributed positively in collaboration with communities through projects and events.
Social Development – Upon completing of 8th grade, students will comprehend and
appreciate community in different contexts (global, local, school, classroom) and demonstrate
respect for all people and cultural aspects in diverse communities. Students will integrate and
apply academic competencies, problem solving, and critical thinking skill to improve a
community. Students will apply conflict resolution skills to achieve progress for individuals or
a group.
The Great Lessons
During each successive level of education, Magnolia Montessori student will interact with
Montessori’s Five Great Lessons in increasing depth. These lessons and timelines form the
backbone of the History, Geography, Cultural Studies, and Sciences and enhance learning of
Mathematics and Language Arts. They are broadly engaging stories that highlight universal
themes and encourage vital connections between science and human affairs. The Great
Lessons sever to integrate and unify classroom-learning experiences and to inspire children’s
sense of wonder, curiosity, and motivation about the world around them.
Montessori Great Lessons
1. The Story of the Universe
2. Timeline of Life
3. Timeline of Early Humans
4. The Story of Writing
5. The Story of Numbers and Mathematics
Language Arts: Great Lesson-The Story of Writing/The Story of Language
Language Arts in the Montessori classroom is easily the most integrated discipline in
Montessori education. The concepts of language are necessarily required in all the other
disciplines in order to obtain the information presented. With this in mind, Magnolia
Montessori Academy’s Language Arts curriculum is focused on the development of language
with an emphasis on writing and analyzing language. Montessori students will focus on the
structure of language, to more fully understand using language as a way to interact with their
environment.
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Handwriting
Control of the hand in preparation for writing is developed through many exercises, including
specially designed tasks in the use of the pencil. Such exercises begin with very young children
and extend over several years so that mastery is gradually, but thoroughly, attained.
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The young children practice making letters from the time of their first initial "explosion
into writing" at Primary level:
Moveable Alphabets' made up of easily manipulated plastic letters are used for the early
stages of phonetic word creation, the analysis of words, and spelling. They facilitate early
reading and writing tasks during the period when young children are still not comfortable
with their own writing skills. Even before the children are comfortable in their handwriting
skills, they spell words, compose sentences and stories, and work on punctuation and
capitalization with the moveable alphabets (Primary).
At first, by tracing letters into sand.
Later, by writing on special tilted, upright blackboards: unlined, wide-lined, and narrowlined.
Later, by writing on special writing tablets, becoming comfortable with script.
Cursive writing (Primary )
Word Processing (Primary)
Calligraphy (Upper Elementary)
Composition
At an early age, before handwriting has been mastered, the children compose sentences,
stories, and poetry through oral dictation to adults and with the use of the moveable alphabet.
Once handwriting is fairly accomplished, the children begin to develop their composition
skills. They continue to develop over the years at increasing levels of sophistication.
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Preparing written answers to simple questions.
Composing stories to follow a picture series.
Beginning to write stories or poems on given simple themes.
Preparing written descriptions of science experiments.
Preparing written reports.
Learning how to write letters.
By Grade three, research skills and the preparation of reports become major components
of the educational program. Students research areas of interest or topics that have been
assigned in depth, and prepare formal and informal, written and oral reports.
Creative and expository composition skills continue to develop as the children advance
from level to level. Students are typically asked to write on a daily basis, composing short
stories, poems, plays, reports, and news articles.
In the Upper Elementary and middle school grades, quality literature is used as a springboard.
Students will write frequently, putting their thoughts and ideas into written form. Magnolia
Montessori Academy believes that in order to be a successful student and ultimately a
successful member of society, one must be able to write in a clear, concise and effective
manner. The only way that this can happen is if students write often and with feedback given
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from the teacher and their peers. Middle school begins a point in writing when students can
begin to offer each other feedback on their writings, creating a writing community which helps
each student grow and achieve. Magnolia Montessori Academy will focus on the recursive
writing process, teaching students that the best writing happens with thoughtful preparation,
numerous revisions and eventual publication of their work in some fashion. The methodology
for such publications might include student sharing, portfolio submissions, dramatic
interpretation, publication in a student literary magazine, or exhibition. In addition, MMA will
offer students the chance to write freely in a journal which allows them ample time for
reflection on their process as a student. Continuing in the Montessori tradition, writing will
flow through all the disciplines, as students seek knowledge, ask questions and ultimately put
that knowledge to work for them.
Spelling
Children begin to spell using the moveable alphabet to sound out and spell words as they are
first learning to read. They 'take dictation' - spelling words called for by the teacher - as a daily
exercise. The sequence of spelling, as with all language skills, begins much earlier than is
traditional in this country, during a time when children are spontaneously interested in
language. It continues throughout their education.
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Learning to sound out and spell simple phonetic words.
Learning to recognize and spell words involving phonograms, such as ei, ai, or ough.
Developing a first "personal" dictionary of words that they can now spell.
Learning to recognize and spell the "puzzle words" of English: words that are nonphonetic and are not spelled as they sound.
Studying words: involving compound words, contractions, singular-plural, masculinefeminine words, prefixes, suffixes, synonyms, antonyms, homonyms.
Grammar
The study of grammar begins almost immediately after the child begins to read, during the
sensitive period when he is spontaneously interested in language. It continues over several
years until mastered. The idea is to introduce grammar to the young child as she is first
learning how to put thoughts down on paper, when the process is natural and interesting,
rather than waiting until the student is much older and finds the work tedious.
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We introduce our children to the function of the parts of speech one at a time through
many games and exercises that isolate the one element under study. Montessori has
assigned a geometric symbol to represent each element of grammar. (For example, verbs
are represented by a large red circle.) The children analyze sentences by placing the
symbols for the appropriate part of speech over each word.
Once students have mastered the concrete symbols for the parts of speech, they perform
more advanced exercises for several years with grammar boxes set up to allow them to
analyze sentences by their parts of speech.
Sentence analysis: simple and compound sentences, clauses, verb voices, and logical
analysis of all sorts of sentences are studied using many different concrete materials and
exercises. This normally begins about age 5 and continues over several years.
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Students continue their study of language from the mid-elementary years onward,
reviewing as well as engaging new concepts and skills: tenses, moods, irregular verbs,
person and number, the study of style, the study of grammatical arrangements in other
languages.
These grammar studies begin in the early elementary years of Montessori and are fleshed out in
proportion to the student’s grade and ability. Magnolia Montessori Academy will continue
with this type of grammar instruction in the Upper Elementary and middle school classes by
using materials that help the students represent their sentences in a linear fashion—
highlighting the parts of a sentence, learning to manipulate those parts and expanding upon
simple sentences and grammar into more complex. Grammar instruction will be integrated
into both literature and composition and will progress in complexity as the student progresses
in understanding. Using grammar as a way of better understanding the rules of writing can
assist students in fluency both in reading and writing. To further the work of the student as
grammarian, a close look at other writers and why they use the syntax and diction that they
choose can assist the students in escalating their compositions.
Literature
In the Lower and Upper Elementary classes, students will experience literature through read
aloud, reader’s theater, and small language groups. As their reading ability increases, students
will be encouraged to select high-quality literature from the classroom libraries to enjoy during
independent reading.
As Magnolia Montessori Academy grows to include students in grades 5-8, MMA may choose
the Junior Great Books series produced by the Junior Great Books Foundation, a non-profit
foundation which focuses on Shared Inquiry as a methodology for interacting with the texts.
Shared Inquiry is a specific type of instruction which seeks self-reliant thinkers as a goal. In
addition, Shared Inquiry perfectly reflects the Montessori tenets of using literature as a way of
interacting with cultures, self and the learning community. In Shared Inquiry, the teacher acts
as guide to encourage discussion that begins with a concept of theme learned in the reading
selection which then continues into the development of those themes through free thought,
composition, conversation and demonstration. Shared Inquiry allows the student the space to
not only hear his or her peers’ response to the reading selection, but it also allows the student
the ability to engage in discourse about topics that span beyond the superficial plot summation,
reaching into deeper concepts. Beyond the Shared Inquiry, MMA expects that the students
will seek out research projects based upon the reading texts that they encounter. In the
Montessori classroom, outside research via personal interview, internet research or
books/periodicals is common and expected from the students. When Montessori students
discover a topic or an idea that piques their interest, the next logical step is to find out any
information they can about this topic. If MMA decides that the Junior Great Series will not
be adopted for our school, MMA is committed to finding a rigorous reading and literature
series which can help develop similar attributes as Shared Inquiry in the classroom
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Mathematics: Great Lesson – The Story of Numbers
While mathematics is a fairly straight-forward subject from which little deviation from theory
is possible, the Montessori approach to mathematics is unique. Montessori curriculum
addresses the eight Common Core Mathematic Practices as mapped in the Common Core
Correlation – Appendix O. Students will use a range of Montessori materials to extensively
explore the Mathematic Practices moving progressively from the concrete to the abstract.
The Magnolia Montessori mathematics curriculum will be:
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Tactile: Montessori mathematics at the preschool and elementary school levels uses
specific manipulative materials for instruction. Indeed, students are engaged in such
concepts as exponents, binomials and trinomials at the age of three, though the practice of
the theory comes incrementally as they mature in their mathematical abilities. Montessori
mathematics presumes that children are capable of understanding complex mathematical
concepts if they are presented in the proper manner. For example, students begin work in
the Primary level classroom with factors, exponents and ratios through the use of the pink
tower. The work begins as a tactile exercise during which students stack blocks in
exponentially increasing size; they handle these blocks carefully and through this tactile
stimulation integrate the concepts of an object increasing in size exponentially. In the
Lower Elementary classroom, these concepts become more fully realized as students begin
working with numbers instead of blocks, and by the time they reach the Upper Elementary
classroom students are able to work with exponents in a theoretical manner.
Magnolia Montessori students who move up from the elementary level to the secondary
level will have been introduced to such practical mathematics as described above, this
tactile mathematics will continue with the addition of more abstract work problems dealing
with algebraic and geometric concepts. For those students for whom MMA is the first
exposure to a Montessori environment, mathematics will prove to be enlightening and
collaborative as the more seasoned students demonstrate mastery of the mathematics
manipulative materials. For students who require remediation, the use of manipulatives
should prove to reinforce abstract concepts in a concrete manner.
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Collaborative: In addition to being tactile, the mathematics curriculum is collaborative.
Students will work together in groups in order to learn the mathematical concepts
presented in the lessons, drawing from each other’s strengths to help overcome deficits. In
addition, this collaborative learning addresses the social and psychological needs of the
student as well as serving to reinforce the importance of interdependence and community.
Since the classroom is multi-aged, collaborative mathematics learning also becomes an
assessment tool. When students are comfortable enough with the subject to teach it to
another student, it demonstrates mastery with that skill or concept, as well as serving to
further instill the concept in the student’s mind.
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Integrative: Mathematics is also incredibly integrative in the Montessori classroom.
Using practical application of mathematics, students use the other disciplines in order to
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complete projects and tasks. For example, students might use mathematics in order to
solve a particular question in their science classes. Or, students may need to compile
statistics for their service learning project. In addition, they could use mathematics for
construction during a practical life lesson.
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Progression of Concepts in Montessori Mathematics: Students are typically introduced
to numbers at age 3: learning the numbers and number symbols one to ten: the red and
blue rods, sand-paper numerals, association of number rods and numerals, spindle boxes,
cards and counters, counting, sight recognition, concept of odd and even.
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Introduction to the decimal system typically begins at age 3 or 4. Units, tens, hundreds,
thousands are represented by specially prepared concrete learning materials that show the
decimal hierarchy in three dimensional form: units = single beads, tens = a bar of 10 units,
hundreds = 10 ten bars fastened together into a square, thousands = a cube ten units long
ten units wide and ten units high. The children learn to first recognize the quantities, then
to form numbers with the bead or cube materials through 9,999 and to read them back, to
read and write numerals up to 9,999, and to exchange equivalent quantities of units for
tens, tens for hundreds, etc.
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Linear Counting: learning the number facts to ten (what numbers make ten, basic addition
up to ten); learning the teens (11 = one ten + one unit), counting by tens (34 = three tens
+ four units) to one hundred.
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Development of the concept of the four basic mathematical operations: addition,
subtraction, division, and multiplication through work with the Montessori Golden Bead
Material. The child builds numbers with the bead material and performs mathematical
operations concretely. (This process normally begins by age 4 and extends over the next
two or three years.) Work with this material over a long period is critical to the full
understanding of abstract mathematics for all but a few exceptional children. This process
tends to develop in the child a much deeper understanding of mathematics.
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Development of the concept of "dynamic" addition and subtraction through the
manipulation of the concrete math materials. (Addition and subtraction where exchanging
and regrouping of numbers is necessary.)
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Memorization of the basic math facts: adding and subtracting numbers under 10 without
the aid of the concrete materials. (Typically begins at Primary level and is normally
completed by Lower Elementary.)
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Development of further abstract understanding of addition, subtraction, division, and
multiplication with large numbers through the Stamp Game (a manipulative system that
represents the decimal system as color-keyed "stamps") and the Small and Large Bead
Frames (color-coded abacuses).
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Skip counting with the chains of the squares of the numbers from zero to ten: i.e.,
counting to 25 by 5's, to 36 by 6's, etc. (Primary) Developing first understanding of the
concept of the "square" of a number.
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Skip counting with the chains of the cubes of the numbers zero to ten: i.e., counting to
1,000 by ones or tens. Developing the first understanding of the concept of a "cube" of a
number.
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Beginning the "passage to abstraction," the child begins to solve problems with paper and
pencil while working with the concrete materials. Eventually, the materials are no longer
needed.
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Development of the concept of long multiplication and division through concrete work
with the bead and cube materials. (The child is typically 6 or younger, and cannot yet do
such problems on paper without the concrete materials. The objective is to develop the
concept first.)
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Development of more abstract understanding of "short" division through more advanced
manipulative materials (Division Board); movement to paper and pencil problems, and
memorization of basic division facts. (Normally by Lower Elementary)
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Development of still more abstract understanding of "long" multiplication through highly
advanced and manipulative materials (the Multiplication Checkerboard). (Usually Lower
Elementary)
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Development of still more abstract understanding of "long division" through highly
advanced manipulative materials (Test Tube Division apparatus). (Typically by Lower
Elementary)
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Solving problems involving parentheses, such as (3 X 4) - (2 + 9) = ?
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Missing sign problems: In a given situation, should you add, divide, multiply or subtract ?
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Introduction to problems involving tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands, and
millions. (Normally by Lower Elementary.)
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Study of fractions: Normally begins when children using the short division materials who
find that they have a "remainder" of one and ask whether or not the single unit can be
divided further. The study of fractions begins with very concrete materials (the fraction
circles at the primary level), and involves learning names, symbols, equivalencies common
denominators, and simple addition, subtraction, division, and multiplication of fractions up
to "tenths". (Normally by Lower Elementary)
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Study of decimal fractions: all four mathematical operations. (Normally begins by age 8-9,
and continues for about two years until the child totally grasps the ideas and processes.)
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Practical application problems, which are used to some extent from the beginning, become
far more important around age 7-8 and afterward. Solving word problems and determining
arithmetic procedures in real situations becomes a major focus.
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Money: units, history, equivalent sums, foreign currencies (units and exchange). (Begins as
part of social studies and applied math at Primary level.)
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Interest: concrete to abstract; real life problems involving credit cards and loans; principal,
rate, time.
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Computing the squares and cubes of numbers: cubes and squares of binomials and
trinomials. (Upper Elementary)
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Calculating square and cube roots: from concrete to abstract. (Normally in Upper
Elementary)
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The history of mathematics and its application in science, engineering, technology &
economics.
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Reinforcing application of all mathematical skills to practical problems around the school
and in everyday life.
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Basic data gathering, graph reading and preparation, and statistical analysis.
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Sensorial exploration of plane and solid figures at the Primary level: the children learn to
recognize the names and basic shapes of plane and solid geometry through manipulation
of special wooden geometric insets. They then learn to order them by size or degree.
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Stage I: Basic geometric shapes.
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Stage II: More advanced plane geometric shapes-triangles, polygons, various rectangles and
irregular forms.
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Stage III: Introduction to solid geometric forms and their relationship to plane geometric
shapes.
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Study of the basic properties and definitions of the geometric shapes. This is essentially as
much a reading exercise as mathematics since the definitions are part of the early language
materials.
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More advanced study of the nomenclature, characteristics, measurement and drawing of
the geometric shapes and concepts such as points, line, angle, surface, solid, properties of
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triangles, circles, etc. (Continues through Middle School in repeated cycles.)
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Congruence, similarity, equality, and equivalence.
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The history of applications of geometry.
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The theorem of Pythagoras.
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The calculation of area and volume.
Middle School Mathematics Plan
Middle school students will use a math textbook to guide core content skill development in
relation to the Common Core standards. Students will engage in skill integration and
application through in-depth project-based curriculum. The project-based curriculum will
provide student many opportunities to develop and apply new skills in areas such as data
analysis and problem solving.
While the school has not yet chosen a series of books to be adopted, Magnolia Montessori will
be researching to find a program to use at the middle school level. One such series is
University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) which is a research-based
mathematics series which begins with the transition between arithmetic and algebra. In
addition to pre-transition and transition mathematics, the series moves to algebra, geometry
and advanced algebraic functions. In addition, the UCSMP texts include a strong focus on
logic, data and technology, as well as a wealth of real-life application suggestions.
Montessori requires that the series be relevant to the learner who is transitioning into higher
mathematics, rigorous enough to prepare students to move into calculus and beyond in high
school, and expandable in content to ensure that students who move beyond algebra and
geometry and into pre-calculus can be introduced to those concepts within the series.
Magnolia Montessori’s mathematics curriculum will cover the domains for all three grades,
with their accompanying clusters and associated standards. MMA may offer algebra and
geometry through Florida Virtual School as courses for advanced mathematics students.
Social Studies: Great Lessons – The Story of the Universe, Timeline of Life, Timeline
of Early Humans
The Montessori Method approaches social studies from a global perspective. While the social
studies curriculum covers all the requisite areas of the NGSS, it also focuses on a more global
perspective and integration of historical events into the larger context. Social studies are also
easily integrated into other subjects and can serve to contextualize ideas for literature, science
and mathematics. The ultimate goal of MMA’s social studies curriculum is to help the students
grow, explore, appreciate and join the global community. Magnolia Montessori Academy’s
social studies curriculum can be divided into culture, history, geography and citizenship.
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Culture: Maria Montessori was a student of the world and encouraged multicultural diversity
as much as possible in her time. Montessori believed that children should be introduced to the
world as a whole and then move forward into the concepts of regions and diversity. The study
of the world’s cultures intersects with many other disciplines. Students at MMA will study the
world’s cultures through exploration of their people, arts and contribution to literature,
mathematics and science. Extant and extinct cultures will be researched, their cultures
demonstrated and explained. The culture aspect of the social studies curriculum is an
important space for exhibition. Magnolia Montessori Academy will host a multicultural day
wherein the students have exhibits, presentations and even food and drink tastings of the
culture which they have chosen to research. As an exploration of other cultures, MMA will
open its classroom to peoples of other cultures in order to become more aware of the mixing
of culture and its outcomes.
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Geography: A working knowledge of geography is required if students can be expected to
study the cultures of the different regions of the world. To this end, MMA students will study
geography that goes beyond naming the countries of the world or the US states. The
Montessori study of geography explores land formations and the way time moves across the
world, leaving its mark behind. In geography, students will be expected to know and
understand rivers, oceans and lakes, as well as the unique traits of our world. Students will
intertwine this knowledge with the other information they obtain in the other aspects of social
studies in order to gather a full picture of the world’s regions, its inhabitants and cultures. The
adolescent years also mark the place wherein students can begin to understand more abstract
concepts present in world geography. The conflicts and alliances of the world’s regions and
the shifting power bases in the world may be explored in order to better understand humanity
and its conflicts and triumphs.
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History: In order to fully understand cultures and geography, however, students must
research and learn history. Montessori education focuses on the history of the earth and its
place in the universe. Magnolia Montessori Academy will continue this study into ever more
abstract and subjective areas of history. The study of history will span the world, the United
States and Florida. Events in history will be explored in thematic units which demonstrate the
interconnectedness of the human experience. In addition, the product of a culture’s history
like visual art, music, literature, food and drink and trading trends can provide a wealth of
knowledge about the culture and people. Magnolia Montessori Academy students will be
encouraged to study history in an in depth and personal manner in order to connect it with
their own lives and work.
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Citizenship: The overarching goal of the MMA social studies curriculum is to connect
students to the past and the present in such a way that they feel they are part of the human
experience. Magnolia Montessori Academy strives toward holistic and effective learning and in
the social studies groups; student will be encouraged to become productive citizens of their
local community and the world. As an aspect of social studies, students will be encouraged to
become active in the history of their city and the building of its future. Students will learn
about the political process and the citizen’s place in it. They will see politics in action and
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prepare themselves to be part of the process. In addition, students will be encouraged to seek
out the needs of their community and try to help fill those needs.
All of the NGSSS Strands, Standards and Benchmarks for are covered in the social studies
curriculum. Application of the Common Core Literacy will be outlined in the Reading
curriculum portion of the application.
Social Studies in the Montessori curriculum:
Physical Geography
 The Primary Globes: specially prepared globes for the very young child that isolate single
concepts of globe study-how land and water are shown, and the corresponding shapes of
the continents that they learned from the puzzle maps.
 The Puzzle Maps: These are specially made maps in the forms of intricate, color-coded,
wooden jigsaw puzzles representing the continents, the countries of each continent, and
the states of the U.S. They are presented to the children at an early age, and are at first
enjoyed simply as challenging puzzles. Soon, however, the children begin to learn the
names of given countries, and by age 6 are normally very familiar with the continents of
the globe, the nations of North America, South America, and Europe, along with most of
the states of the U.S. As soon as the children can read they begin to lay the puzzle pieces
out and place the appropriate name labels to each as a reading and geography exercise.
 Land & Water Formations: materials designed to help the very young child understand
basic land and water formations such as island, isthmus, peninsula, strait, lake, cape, bay,
archipelago, etc. At first, they are represented by three-dimensional models of each,
complete with water. Then the children learn to recognize the shapes on maps, and learn
about famous examples of each.
 Transference to maps: Introduction to written names and various forms of maps, along
with early study of the flora, fauna, landscapes, and people of the continents.
 Maps and compass: Introduction to longitude and latitude, coordinate position on the
globe, the Earth's poles, the magnetic poles, history and use of the compass, topographic
maps, global positioning satellite devices, electronic charts.
 An introduction to humankind's search to understand how the Earth was formed, from
creation stories to the evidence of contemporary scientific research: origins, geologic
forces, formations of the oceans and atmosphere, continental drift and tectonic plates,
volcanoes, earth quakes, the ice ages and the formation of mountain ranges.
 The study of coasts and land reliefs: hills, mountain ranges, volcanoes, valleys, plains, etc.;
their formation, animal life, and effect on people.
 The study of the hydrosphere: ocean, rivers, lakes, the water cycle.
Cultural Geography
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Countries are studied in many ways at all levels, beginning at Primary level. A number of
studies are held every year to focus on specific cultures and to celebrate life together: an
example being Chinese New Year, when a class might study China, prepare Chinese food,
learn Chinese dances, and participate in a special dragon dance parade. Anything that the
children find interesting is used to help them become familiar with the countries of the
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world: flags, boundaries, food, climate, traditional dress, houses, major cities, children's
toys and games, stamps, coins, traditional foods, art, music, and history. This interweaves
through the entire curriculum.
Study of the regions , culture, and natural resources of the United States, including
geography, climate, flora and fauna, major rivers and lakes, capitals, important cities,
mountains, people, regional foods, traditions, etc. This begins in the primary and continues
at increasing depth at each level.
The detailed study of one nation at a time. Focus moves over the years from one continent
to another, as the children's interest leads them. All aspects of the nation are considered:
geography, climate, flora and fauna, major rivers and lakes, cities, mountains, people, food,
religions, etc.
Economic Geography
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Natural Resources of the Earth.
Production: How natural resources are used by humankind.
Imports and Exports: The interdependence of nations.
History & the needs all people share
The basic needs of man are food, shelter, clothing, defense, transportation, culture, law,
religion or spiritual enlightenment, love, and adornment. (This study begins at Primary
level and continues throughout the curriculum.)
The concept of time and historical time is developed through many activities and repeated
at deeper complexity from age 5:
Telling time on the clock
Time-lines of the child's life
Time-lines showing the activities of a day, week, month, year
Family trees
Time-line of the Earth's history
Time-line from 8,000 B.C. to 2,000 A.D. to study ancient to modern history
The story of the evolution of the planet and its life forms over the eons is first studied at
about age 6, along with an overview of human history. This is repeated throughout the
curriculum in increasing depth of study.
Each year the child continues to study and analyze the needs, culture, technology, and
social history of various periods in history. The trends of human achievement are charted,
such as the development of transportation, architecture, great inventions, and great leaders.
By age 8, students begin to study the earliest humans, ending with an introduction to the
first farmers. They consider early societies in terms of how they organized themselves to
meet the common needs of all peoples: food, clothing, shelter, defense, transportation,
medicine, arts, entertainment, government, and religion.
The Upper Elementary level (ages 9-12) history program follows a three-year cycle of
thematic study. Students study whichever themes are being presented that year regardless
of their age. In year 1 of the cycle, the class will focus on the creation of the universe,
formation of the earth, evolution of life, and early human civilizations. These topics were
first introduced at the lower elementary level. At this level, students will go into
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considerably greater depth and prepare increasingly sophisticated projects and research
reports.
Continuing the three-year cycle of thematic history study at the Upper Elementary level
(ages 9-12), in year 2 of the cycle, the class will focus on ancient civilizations, including the
Mesopotamian cultures, Greece, Rome, ancient China, Byzantium, ending with an
introduction to the Middle Ages.
In the third year of the three- year cycle of thematic history study at the Upper Elementary
level (ages 9-12), the class will focus on American studies, including an introduction to the
history of the United States, American folk culture, technology, children's literature,
government, and geography. The class will also consider Pre-Colombian Central and South
American cultures, the Native American peoples of North America, the age of exploration,
and the immigrant cultural groups who came to America from Europe, Africa, Asia, and
Latin America.
Science
Magnolia Montessori’s science curriculum will be inquiry-based and hands on, supplemented
by useful and appealing texts which explain theory. The following disciplines may be
addressed: ecology, meteorology, biology, electricity, astronomy, geology, zoology, botany,
anatomy and physiology, physics and chemistry. Other disciplines may be addressed if a
student shows an interest in exploring outside these suggestions.
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Ecology: The ecology portion of the MMA science curriculum will focus on ecosystems
and their populations and the interrelatedness of species within habitats. Students will
study the interaction between humans and their environment with a special focus on earthfriendly existence. Magnolia Montessori Academy is committed to encouraging students to
live in symbiosis with their environment. Exploration of conservation will be a key point
in the ecology curriculum.
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Meteorology: In the meteorology section, students will explore the relationship between
our earth and its weather systems. Special focus will be placed upon Earth’s atmosphere
and changing weather patterns as they interrelate with other planetary systems.
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Life Sciences: Life science is a broad subject which encompasses biology, zoology,
botany and human anatomy. These topics will be explored through observation of the
processes of life systems. Students will study life from its essential building blocks to more
complex organisms. In addition, students will look at the structure and function of plants
and animals with a focus on understanding how the structure of an organism’s parts
contributes to function. Students will then apply these concepts to their own bodies with
an emphasis on health and wellness.
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Electricity: Students will be presented with the basic concepts of electricity including
studies of circuits, voltage and current. These extremely tactile lessons present concepts
that are at work in our daily lives, but often ignored. Such explorations will encourage
students to be more aware of their environments and the work that is necessary in
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maintaining them. More advanced or interested students may explore the concepts of
resistors, capacitors, diodes and transistors through hands-on experiments.
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Astronomy: Students will observe the astronomical wonders of the earth and its place in
the universe. Students will study the moon, the solar system and extra solar system
astronomical events. Abstract physics concepts will be casually introduced in these lessons
as students progress from the concrete to the abstract in preparation for more advanced
studies in astronomy.
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Geology: Students will study the use of rocks throughout history, looking closely at the
types of rock and how they are formed. The geology section contains sections about the
process of fossilization. In addition, students will observe how humankind has used rocks
throughout history to advance civilization.
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Physics: At the secondary level, in preparation for higher mathematics and science classes
in high school, students will begin looking at concepts surrounding movement and the
physics related to a body in motion. Students will look at acceleration, gravity, and
momentum and contemplate how these forces intersect with their lives on a daily basis.
Students will also apply mathematics to solve complex problems involving physics.
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Chemistry: At the secondary level, students will begin looking at the structure of matter
on a microscopic level, including atomic structure and the interaction between molecules.
Studies will branch into energy transfers and bonding as well as interactions on a chemical
level. In addition, the chemistry section will focus on the phases of matter and the energy
requirements to shift from phase to phase.
All of the NGSSS Strands, Standards and Benchmarks for are covered in the social studies
curriculum. Application of the Common Core Literacy will be outlined in the Reading
curriculum portion of the application.
Science in the Montessori Curriculum
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Differentiation between living and non-living things (Primary)
Differentiation between animals and plants; basic characteristics (Primary)
Study of Animals: Observation of animals in nature, in the classroom, or through images –
zoology puzzles including nomenclature for External Parts of Vertebrates: Fish,
Amphibians, Reptiles, Birds, and Mammals Elementary adds Invertebrates to this
expanding zoological study: Insects, Mollusks, Crustaceans, etc.
Study of Plants: representing the biological parts of flowers, root systems, and trees, along
with the anatomical features of common animals. These are first used by very young
children and puzzles, then as a means to learn the vocabulary, then are related to photos
and/or the "real thing," then traced onto paper, and finally with labels as a reading
experience
Nomenclature Cards:
Botany: identifying, naming, and labeling the parts of plants, trees, leaves, roots, and
flowers
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Zoology: identifying, naming, and labeling the external parts of human beings, insects, fish,
birds, and other animals
Introduction of the families of the animal kingdom, and identification and classification of
animals into the broad families Introduction to the basic characteristics, life-styles, habitats,
and means of caring for young of each family in the animal kingdom
Introduction to ecology: habitat, food chain, adaptation to environment and climate,
predator-prey relationships, camouflage, and other body adaptations of common animals
Advanced elementary biology study: the names and functions of different forms of leaves,
flowers, seeds, trees, plants, and animals. This usually begins with considerably more field
work collecting specimens or observing.
Study of evolution and the development of life on the Earth over the eons
Study of the internal parts of vertebrates: limbs, body coverings, lungs, heart, skeleton,
reproduction
Advanced study of plants in class, greenhouse and garden: experimenting with soil,
nutrients, light, etc.
More advanced study of the animal kingdom: classification by class and phyla
The plant kingdom: Study of the major families of plant life on the Earth and classification
by class and phyla
Life cycles; water, oxygen, carbon-dioxide, and nitrogen
Introduction to chemistry: Begins at age 6 and continues throughout the elementary
science curriculum
The three states of matter
Basic atomic theory
How elements are created through stellar fusion
Elements and compounds
Mendeleev's table of the elements
Basic molecular theory: Building atomic models
Physical and chemical changes
Research into the elements and continued study of the periodic table
Introduction to chemistry lab experiments
Animal behavior: detailed observation
Anatomy: Systems of the animal and human body
Health and nutrition
Ecology: Advanced study of the interrelationships of life forms
Development of skills in careful observation, recording and describing, and use of
increasingly sophisticated techniques of measurement
Development of skills using common scientific apparatus: microscopes, telescopes, hand
lens, collecting field specimens, dissecting, preparing displays
Development of field science skills: tracking, listening, observing
Development of scientific inquiry skills: forming hypothesis, designing experiments,
recording results
Study of the great inventions; machines and technology and their effect on society
throughout history
Study of the great scientists
Introduction to the physical sciences:
Geology and mineralogy
Meteorology
Astronomy and cosmology
Elementary physics: light, electricity, magnetic fields, gravity, mass
Preparing and analyzing graphs and data displays; basic statistics
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B. Describe the research base and foundation materials that were used or will be used to
develop the curriculum.
Magnolia Montessori Academy used many materials to help shape the curriculum. A complete
bibliography that informed the application can be found in Appendix A—Bibliography. The
research base includes….
Next Generation Sunshine State Standards: Every aspect of the curriculum has been or
will be cross-referenced with the NGSSS. These standards serve as the minimum that students
must achieve in order for adequate success at MMA.
Common Core Standards. Magnolia Montessori academy will follow the correlations to the
Common Core Standards as outlined in Appendix O. These standards are outlined at the end
of each three-year cycle, illustrating the expectations of students in Kindergarten, Grade 3, and
Grade 6. As the school grows to include middle grades, we will extend the correlation to grade
8.
Primary Research Sources
o Cheryl Green: Cheryl received her Bachelor of Arts in Childhood Development from
Florida State University and an Early Childhood Montessori AMS credential at the
Florida Institute of Montessori Studies. She has over 35 years of early childhood
teaching experience with 25 of those years in the Montessori environment. She was the
director of two Montessori schools and has worked in a variety of early childhood
developmental programs. Her background in traditional early childhood education
gives her a unique perspective on Montessori education for young children.
o Cara Helpling: Cara is a Montessori educator with 15 years of experience teaching at
the elementary level, 9 of those years in the Montessori environment. She received a
Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education from Bryan College. She has credentials in
both Primary and Elementary Montessori Education and completed her Master of
Education in Montessori Education from Xavier University.
o John Iskra: John received his Bachelor of Music Education from Florida State
University and a Master of Music degree from the University of Texas at Austin. He is
currently the Education Director at the Florida Air Museum where his responsibilities
include youth and adult programs with emphasis on STEM hands on learning. John
taught music for eleven years and was voted teacher of the year in 2008. During his
tenure at Alturas Elementary school, John developed interdisciplinary materials and
plans bridging music and STEM concepts and activities.
o Seton Montessori: Seton Montessori Institute is committed to furthering the
understanding and prevalence of the Montessori Method in the United States and
throughout the world. By combining excellent research, scholarship, publishing, and
innovation with outreach, advisory services, and public education, the Institute serves
the Child by serving the community that surrounds her.
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Subject area materials: In developing curriculum for the subject areas, MMA looked to
current research that was aligned with the Montessori Method. Much of the research needed
was found in Maria Montessori’s seminal works on the Montessori Method or from the
potential research-based textbooks that are being considered.
Additionally, the following articles on individual disciplines were used:
Chattin-McNichols, John. (2002). Revisiting the Great Lessons, Spotlight: Cosmic
Education. Montessori Life. 14, n2, 43-44.
McNichols reviews the Montessori approach to teaching History, Geography, and Social
Studies through The Great Lessons. By combining stories of key events in the timeline of the
world with hands-on work and research in the classroom, Montessori teachers are able to
engage students’ imaginations while covering the require curriculum at the Elementary level.
Glendinning, Paul. View from the Pennies: Montessori Mathematics. Retrieved
February 2, 2009 from www.maths.manchester.ac.uk/~pag/view/gayna20.pdf
This article demonstrated the foundational mathematics that is learned in Montessori schools.
Glendinning explains the use of the trinomial cube and the progression of learning algebra
from the concrete to the abstract. The three-period lesson is explained: naming, recognition
and identification/recall. The author demonstrates the usefulness of beginning Montessori
mathematics as a young child to more fully realize one’s potential as a student of mathematics.
Additionally, Glendinning explains the use of the Pythagoras’ Theorem and its integration into
more complex mathematical courses.
Turner, Joy. How Do Children Learn To Read. Montessori Life. Fall 1998. v10, n4,
p37.
Turner contends that “the Montessori approach to reading offers ‘the best of both worlds’ in
terms of preparing the child to read”. Because the Montessori incorporates sound games, word
play games, and multisensory alphabetic instruction it builds children’s phonological awareness
– the key to a strong reading foundation and reading success.
Rule, A & Barrera, M. Using Objects To Teach Vocabulary Words with Multiple
Meanings. Montessori Life. Summer 2003. v15, n3, p14-17.
Rule and Barerra discuss the importance of using objects to teach vocabulary based on the
results of their study comparing the learning gains made by third graders using tradition direct
instruction and worksheets to those made by third graders using a hands-on approach with
objects. The hands-on, object rich Montessori environment and teaching strategies created
significantly greater vocabulary progress than the other students.
C. Describe the school’s reading curriculum. Provide evidence that reading is a primary
focus of the school and that there is a curriculum and set of strategies for students who
are reading at grade level or higher and a separate curriculum and strategy for students
reading below grade level.
The reading curriculum must be consistent with effective teaching strategies and be grounded in scientificallybased reading research.
The Montessori reading program meets all research requirements for providing all students
with high quality approved reading curriculum. All of the essential components of reading are
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taught in the Montessori program: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary
development, and comprehension. The methods used in Montessori schools are highly
effective with both learning-disabled and gifted learners; the reason for their effectiveness,
however, is that the learning environments have been designed to ensure success for all
children. Magnolia Montessori will use the Montessori Reading Curriculum for students at
grade level and higher, as well as with students who are reading below grade level. Those
students who are below grade level will benefit the most from the Orton-Gillingham-like
Montessori Reading phonics materials, one-on-one lessons and the differentiated curriculum.
The Montessori Reading Program fully incorporates initial instruction (ii), and immediate
intensive intervention (iii) of the NCLB solution.
Reading serves as a building block for the entire curriculum and is interwoven throughout all
aspects of it, making reading a primary focus of the student’s activities. A specific 267 item
Montessori Language Arts Scope and Sequence includes items such as phonetic sounds,
phonetic writing and reading, irregular or sight words, phonograms and blends, which lead to
fluent (total) reading. Journal keeping, creative writing, whole language, poetry and many other
activities are also part of the program. All of the Florida state required components of reading
are comprehensively taught in the Montessori program:
1.
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5.
Phonemic Awareness
Phonics
Fluency
Vocabulary Development
Comprehension
The Comprehensive School Reform Demonstration (CSRD) program, approved and funded
by the U.S. Department of Education, has named Montessori as a research-based program
supported by reliable research and effective practices. In addition, the scope of the Montessori
reading curriculum meets the Common Core Reading Standards for Literature, Information
Text, and Speaking and Listening as mapped in the Common Core Correlation- Appendix O.
The Montessori Reading Curriculum is an enriching program for gifted students – the depth
and breadth as well as the individualized nature of the Montessori curriculum ensures that the
needs of gifted children will be met. Students in the Montessori classroom are active
participants in the learning process and are intrinsically motivated to achieve higher levels of
reading; they read because they want to, not because they have to.
The three types of assessment in the No Child Left behind Solution are also part of our
Montessori reading program: screening, diagnosis, and progress monitoring. The program
incorporates initial instruction (ii) along with immediate intensive intervention (iii).
Ongoing reading assessment will be used to monitor student mastery and to determine needs
for immediate intensive intervention. Examples are:
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Computerized monitoring of lessons that that judge the child’s progress and effort towards
mastery of phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary development, and
comprehension.
Computerized monitoring to track the child’s usage and mastery of the Montessori reading
materials and activities.
Discovery computer-based assessments help determine whether the child is at grade level
in reading.
Each student is provided web based access to Accelerated Reader (AR) to increase reading
comprehension.
Process-focused reading assessments like interviewing and work plans developed together
with the student.
Observations of reading ability are documented.
Performance assessments such as oral reading presentations and demonstrations.
Computerized reports are prepared four times per year based on each student’s Personal
Education Plan. The PEP outlines how the child has succeeded in meeting their individual
goals and objectives. These goals and objectives are reevaluated throughout the year with
the teacher, student and parents.
Student Portfolios include samples of student reading work and product (work and
product that document reading development in other areas of the curriculum, such as
science and geography projects can also be included).
All of these items, along with similar ongoing assessments in other curriculum areas, are used
to provide documentation to parents concerning their child’s progress in achieving learning
goals.
Pre-Reading
Due to our multi-age classroom design, our youngest students are constantly exposed to the
older children in the class who are already reading. The total environment of the Primary
classes tends to create and reinforce in our young children a spontaneous interest in learning
how to read. We begin to teach reading as soon as that interest is first expressed.
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Using a total immersion approach, we help the youngest children to develop a highly
sophisticated vocabulary and command of the language.
The children are taught through many early approaches to listen for and recognize the
individual phonetic sounds in words.
We introduce the children to literature by reading aloud and discussing a wide range of
classic stories and poetry.
We help our youngest students to recognize the shape and phonetic sounds of the alphabet
through the 'sandpaper letters:' a tactile alphabet.
Reading
The development of the concept that written words are actual thoughts set down on paper.
(This takes children much longer than most people realize.)
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Sounding out simple three or four-letter phonetic words. (Primary)
Early exercises to practice reading and to gain the concept of a noun: labeling objects with
written name tags, mastering increasingly complex words naming things that interest them,
such as dinosaurs, the parts of a flower, geometric shapes, the materials in the classroom,
etc.
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Learning to recognize verbs: normally exercises in which the child reads a card with a
verbal "command" printed out (such as run, sit, walk, etc.) and demonstrates his
understanding by acting it out. As the child's reading vocabulary increases, verbal
commands involve full sentences and multiple steps: "Place the mat on the table and bring
back a red pencil."
Reading specially selected or prepared small books on topics that really interest the child,
such as in science, geography, nature or history.
Interpretive reading for comprehension at ever increasing levels of difficulty, beginning in
the early elementary grades and continuing until high school graduation.
Use of the library and reference books on a daily basis for both research and pleasure.
An introduction to the world's classical children's literature at increasing depth and
sophistication.
Reading serves as the foundation for the entire Montessori curriculum and is individually
taught as well as interwoven throughout all aspects of it, making reading a primary focus of the
student’s activities. The Montessori curriculum stresses the importance of reading and writing,
and promotes an integrated approach where reading and writing are supported across the
curriculum. Phonemic awareness, direct instruction in phonics, grammar, and vocabulary
development are essential components of the Montessori reading curriculum, as well as
developing fluency and comprehension skills through individual and guided reading. The
Montessori Reading scope and sequence includes items such as intensive practice and review
of all phonetic sounds, phonetic writing and reading using movable alphabets, irregular or sight
words, phonograms and blends, which with daily practice of skills acquired, all combined lead
to fluent (total) reading. Guided Reading, Writing Workshop, Spelling, Word Study/Greek and
Latin Roots, journal writing, composition, exposure to great literature, reading and writing
poetry, and other literacy-based activities complete or language program.
Below-grade Level Readers
Magnolia Montessori will incorporate the Guided Reading program (Fountas and Pinnell,
1996) in conjunction with the Montessori reading curriculum as the method for teaching below
grade level students and will move to literature groups as children become fluent readers.
Guided reading, a proven and researched based program is only one aspect of our literacy
program. The entire program includes language/word study, reading practice, compositionwriting workshop, spelling, etc., and guided reading.
Guided reading gives students the opportunity to read at their just right level, which means
that the books provide them with a moderate challenge. They are grouped with students who
are similar in ability, needs, and strengths. Instruction is then finely tuned to the needs of those
particular students. Without teaching at the point of need, many students will not progress. By
providing small group instruction that allows children to discover how to think about a text,
they will be able to use their strategies in other classroom reading throughout the curriculum.
A guided reading lesson is also an opportunity to talk about story elements such as character,
setting, plot, metaphors, pint of view, and vocabulary, etc. It is also a great time to talk about
effective decoding strategies. The purpose of guided reading is to teach individual children to
read increasingly difficult texts with understanding and fluency.
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An individual and sequenced approach to phonics and spelling through teacher guided minilessons and classroom manipulative work forms the language/word study component of
reading in Montessori. Reading baseline assessments using Discovery will provide screen and
assist in creating each child’s personalized educational plan, and clarifying reading instructional
needs. Individual reading lessons are provided daily for every child in the Lower Elementary
and Upper Elementary classes as need, and provide ample opportunities for progress
monitoring. Diagnostic tools include Discovery, FCAT and SAT10, as well as classroom-based
assessments of reading.
Additionally, Magnolia Montessori is exploring the possibility incorporating Houghton Mifflin
Harcourt's Journeys reading curriculum for both on grade-level and below grade-level students.
Journeys is correlated to the Common Core Standards and includes instruction materials for
small group sessions that align directly with the Montessori approach. This curriculum also
includes intervention support for below grade-level readers and additional support for English
Language Learners.
The Montessori Elementary Reading Program begins with “The Story of Writing” to spark the
child’s imagination and interest in written communication. Intervention is embedded in the
Montessori reading program as outlined above. Accelerated Reader will supplement skills with
fluency practice and provide frequent reading assessment.
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Montessori Reading Curriculum and Components:
1. Phoneme evaluation and phonics practice: Sandpaper Letters – Identifying initial sounds
and sound practice for individual master; Movable Alphabet (a box of letters sorted into
compartments)-practice of simple blends such as “bl”, encoding c-v-c words such as hat,
cat, mat; begin decoding three letter phonically controlled words. I Spy games, puzzles, etc.
for attractive phonics practice opportunities.
2. Pink Boxes: Object-Word Boxes; progressing to Picture-Word Boxes; then progressing to
reading simple, phonically controlled boos such as Series 1- Bob books, Primary Phonics,
Set 1. Daily practice reading aloud to an adult at school. The Montessori Pink, Blue, and
Green Boxes provide child-appealing, individual and small group hands-on practice for
every step in phonics mastery. Used with Movable Alphabets. Waseca Phonics Boxes as
alternative in elementary.
3. Blue Boxes – sounding out simple four-six letter phonetic words, practice bending sounds
and increasing word base. Children compose/encode phonically controlled words using
Movable Alphabet.
4. Word Study/Decoding and Encoding/Spelling Words increasingly difficult phonetic and
non-phonetic words using the Movable Alphabets; composing simple sentences and sort,
original stories using the Movable Alphabet. Instructional Level Spelling program.
5. Green Boxes-Phonograms: Objects/Labels, Pictures/Labels: Silent e, digraphs,
diphthongs, r-controlled, /oa/etc. Sight Word-High Frequency word practice.
6. Early Grammar/Parts of Speech: exercises to practice reading and to introduce and
strengthen the concept of a noun; labeling objects with written name tags, mastering
increasingly complex words, naming things that interest them, such as dinosaurs, the parts
of a flower, geometric shapes, the material in the classroom, etc. Later using these words to
create booklets in other areas of curriculum, after handwriting develops. Creating a list of
personal “naming” words using Movable Alphabet and copying on paper.
7. Learning to recognize action words-verbs: normally exercises in which the child reads a
card with a verbal “command” printed out (such as run, sit, walk, toss the tissue to a
friend, etc.) and demonstrates comprehension though the acting out. Children work in
small groups with grammar materials. As the child’s reading and vocabulary increases,
verbal commands involve full sentences and multiple steps; “Place the mat on the table
and bring back a red pencil.” Children love to act out the verb command cards.
8. Guided Reading (Fountas and Pinnell) in class small reading group practice three-four
times per week. Reading aloud with fluency, comprehension, timing, and inflection.
Vocabulary expansion and practice is embedded in Lower Elementary reading activities,
and highlighted in Upper Elementary. Greek and Latin Roots embedded in Lower
Elementary.
9. Supplemental daily phonics practice: includes individual mini-lessons in phonics spelling, as
well as “Exploratory Phonics” workbooks to reinforce and practice skills.
10. Reading specially selected or prepared small books on topics that really interest the child,
such as animal and plant books, cultural geography, nature or historical books.
11. Teacher-led daily whole group interactive read-aloud of Non-Fiction, Fiction, Poetry,
Rhyming books, cultural folktales, Mythology. Reading and comprehending
imaginative/literary and information/expository text. Reading and literature are celebrated
throughout the Montessori curriculum and sequence.
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12. Greek and Latin Root Words – word study for meaning.
13. Interpretive reading for comprehension at even increasing levels of difficulty, beginning in
the early elementary grades and continuing until high school graduation. Accelerated
Reader Program for independent reading practice.
14. Use of the library and reference books on a daily basis for both research and pleasure.
Supervised interplay of technology for research purposes.
15. An introduction to the worlds’ classical children’s literature at increasing depth and
sophistication. Literacy Circles; Book Club; Junior Greet Books or other.
Reading Instruction Guidelines
The school has devised the following guidelines for reading instruction:
1. Every student will be evaluated individually for reading fluency and
comprehension. Upon initial acceptance to MMA, each student’s prior year FCAT or
SAT10 reading score will be reviewed by the classroom teacher. By using these
assessments, teachers will be able to specifically encourage student work toward
improvement in reading. Students who are working at or above grade level will be
encouraged to explore more advanced avenues of reading like vocabulary improvement,
writing groups, and reading mentoring. Students who are working below grade level will
be given the confidence and support to strive for reading excellence.
MMA will monitor for progress in reading fluency and comprehension on an ongoing
basis by not only by using progress monitoring in Discovery, but also through personal
interaction with and observation of individual students. Magnolia Montessori teachers will
observe student interaction with the reading selections, closely watching whether or not a
student appears proficient in reading in comparison to his or her peers. Students may also
conduct self-evaluations about their own perceptions of their reading ability and ways to
improve. Students will also be assessed by teachers through oral presentations and
demonstrations.
2. MMA will provide a reading-friendly environment. Magnolia Montessori Academy
has an intense commitment to making reading paramount in the program. The classroom
environment will welcome reading in various manners and for various reasons. The
classroom will have a designated area for quiet reading, where a student can relax and read
a book on a comfortable surface. Students will have access to a wealth of reading material
in a variety of genre—fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama and creative non-fiction.
Students will be encouraged to obtain their own library card to have unfettered access to
reading material even during school vacation times. MMA may also provide instruction to
parents on how to create a reading-friendly space in order to provide reinforcement of
reading for pleasure and information.
3. MMA will encourage educator professional development in reading. Magnolia
Montessori will encourage teachers to pursue professional development in reading
through the county’s in-services or other training programs. The teachers and/or the
director will be trained in administering and interpreting screenings, progress monitoring,
and diagnostic assessments. In addition, MMA may choose to send teachers to the series
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specific trainings that accompany the textbooks the school chooses. For example, if the
school adopts Junior Great Books, then teachers may train in the Shared Inquiry
methodology which encourages higher-level thinking skills. Teachers may be required to
pursue professional development in reading endorsement or certification if the
administration notes a declining trend in reading scores.
4. MMA will use writing to improve decoding and reading comprehension. Using
writing to improve reading is not a new idea, but it is a crucial one. Writing about subjects
clarifies information for the student making it more easily assimilated into his or her life.
Also, writing demonstrates the craft of writing, which teaches students to read like a writer.
Writing also requires multiple drafts which require not only reading, but a basic
understanding of sentence structure and grammar, all of which helps students read more
effectively. Revision creates an active reader who looks at his or her work critically and
judges the work’s diction, syntax and style. Writing also activates the student’s knowledge
base before he or she may begin writing, which encourages them to draw upon the text or
thoughts upon which they are asked to compose. MMA will use writing as a way to
improve reading, as well as further develop higher order thinking skills because writing
requires those intellectual skills to be successful.
D. Explain how students who enter the school below grade level will be engaged in and
benefit from the curriculum.
Magnolia Montessori Academy expects that students of varying abilities and exceptional
students will benefit greatly from our school and curriculum. Specifically, exceptional students
and students below grade level will benefit from:
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Individualized instruction which can focus specifically on the student. Exceptional
students who are working below grade level are in need of immediate and individualized
instruction. Magnolia Montessori’s personalized education plan and individual work plans
are devised specifically with the student’s strengths and weaknesses in mind.
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A small school community which respects and encourages diversity among its
population. As a small school, MMA is uniquely equipped to quickly identify student
weaknesses and address those weaknesses in the most effective manner possible. Also,
through the emotional and peace education components of the MMA curriculum, students
will be exposed to techniques for embracing difference.
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Peer interaction which can encourage a struggling student. Certain aspects of the
curriculum depend upon peer interaction which can be helpful for a struggling learner.
Working in collaboration with a student who can demonstrate effective strategies for
learning can help a struggling learner to learn techniques to improve.
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Integration of disciplines which demonstrates the interconnectedness of
knowledge. Learning isolated facts about non-related courses can be intimidating and feel
useless. Integrating those subjects with one another demonstrates the interconnectedness
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of the disciplines which can help the exceptional student and the student working below
grade level assimilates information in a long-term way.
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Use of relevant and practical activities like service-learning to reinforce the
importance of education. The use of service-learning to reinforce the theory education
that students will receive in the classroom is of immense importance to exceptional
students and students who are working below grade level. Service-learning projects show
students that they are important to the community and that they can make a discernible
difference with enough education. In addition, service-learning uses all the disciplines in a
relevant manner.
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Montessori multi-level, multi-grade classroom. In a multi-grade, multi-level
classroom, students will discover social peers and learning peers all in the same classroom.
Since the whole class is moving at differing paces and are different ages, the exceptional
student and the student working below grade level need not feel out of sync with the rest
of the class. Everyone is learning according to his or her level and while there are typical
students there is not one acceptable level for students.
E. Describe proposed curriculum areas to be included other than the core academic areas.
Magnolia Montessori is committed to offering a wide array of subjects in which students will
engage outside the core academic areas in order to create a well-balanced individual. These
areas are practical life and sensorial skills, the arts, health, wellness and physical education,
peace education, grace and courtesy and service learning. In addition, students in Montessori
classrooms often self-select subjects in which to become proficient. MMA is open to
expanding the curriculum in whatever manner the students may wish.
Practical Life & Sensorial: One of the first goals is to develop in the very young child a
strong and realistic sense of independence and self-reliance. Along with love and a stable
environment, this is the child's greatest need. This area of the curriculum focuses on
developing skills that allow the child to effectively control and deal with the social and physical
environment in which he lives.
There is a growing pride in being able to "do it for myself." Practical life begins as soon as the
young child enters the school and continues throughout the curriculum to more and more
advanced tasks appropriate to the oldest students.
Early Tasks (Age 3-6 Kindergarten)
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Dressing oneself
Learning home address and phone number
Pouring liquids without spilling
Carrying objects without dropping
Carrying liquids without spilling
Walking without knocking into furniture or people
Using knives and scissors with good control
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Using simple carpentry tools
Putting materials away on the shelves where they belong when finished
Working carefully and neatly
Dusting, polishing and washing just about anything: floors, tables, silver
Sweeping and vacuuming floors and rugs
Flower arranging
Caring for plants and animals
Table setting-serving yourself-table manners
Folding cloth: napkins, towels, etc.
Simple use of needle and thread
Using common household tools: tweezers, tongs, eye-droppers, locks, scissors, knives
Increasingly precise eye-hand coordination
Simple cooking and food preparation
Dish washing
Weaving, bead stringing, etc.
This process continues logically so that older (6-9, 9-12 and Middle School students) will learn such practical
tasks as:
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Caring for animals
Dog training
Sewing
Cooking complex meals
Working with tools
Making simple repairs
Basic auto maintenance
Getting around on their own: Metro, buses, cabs, hiking
Self-defense
Computing tax forms
Making consumer purchase decisions, comparison shopping, budgeting
Maintaining a checkbook
Applying for a job
Earning spending money
Mastering test taking strategies
Caring for young children
Interior decorating
Making clothes
Furniture refinishing
Wilderness survival
Running a small business enterprise
Landscaping
Arts: MMA will implement the Orff-Schulwerk Method as its music curriculum program. The
Orff-Schulwerk Method is a natural complement to the Montessori Method in that much of its
philosophy and implementation mirrors Montessori principles.
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The Orff-Schulwerk approach provides an education range from the most concrete
manipulation of materials to the most abstract concepts of form and expression in a noncompetitive environment. There are ample opportunities for individual and group work.
Children learn music more comprehensively by breaking down music into individual activities
and concepts and then forming those steps into a complete composition. The Orff-Schulwerk
Method incorporates the concept of the progression from concrete to abstract, and important
tenet in Montessori education, is wonderfully achieved in the study of music and the visual arts
and can be realized with almost any instructional materials. All of these concepts tie in
naturally with the Montessori Method and its approach to learning.
The Orff-Schulwerk Method is one that can be implemented regardless of the size of a
school’s financial budget. For a startup school on a shoestring budget, the Orff-Schulwerk
Method can incorporate such things as:
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the body as an instrument (e.g., singing, clapping, tapping, body percussion, dancing and
movement)
materials around the classroom (creating instruments out of existing materials thereby
combining art with music)
inexpensive instruments such as recorders
As the school’s budget grows, the Orff-Schulwerk Method of music curriculum can grow with
it. The following is a list of some additional concepts and benefits of the Orff-Schulwerk
Method:
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Choosing music with strong nationalistic flavor, being related to folk songs and music of
the child’s own heritage
Providing arts education to underserved public schools and communities
Providing a developmental approach to teaching music that draws children into successful
children through their natural desire and ability to sing, move, create, play and explore
Incorporating speech, singing, movement and instrumental playing in a creative
environment
Teaching children to become active listeners and participants with a balance of emotional
and intellectual stimulation
Resulting in noticeable gains in self-confidence, problem-solving ability, enthusiasm for
school and ability to synthesize information and articulate their ideas
Foreign Language: MMA will offer students a foreign language option, probably Spanish,
in addition to their core classes. The school will likely combine instruction with immersion
software like Rosetta Stone or Pimsleur, as well as offering opportunity for discussions in the
language themselves. In its early stages, MMA will offer foreign language in the form of
labeling objects around the classroom in at least 2 languages and providing bilingual books and
materials where possible. As the budget allows, MMA will explore hiring a foreign language
tutor or bilingual teacher. Foreign language is an example of a class that might be
supplemented with a regular volunteer or specialist who would come in specifically for
language lessons.
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Health and Wellness: MMA is committed to encouraging students to grow physically as well
as intellectually. The health and wellness curriculum will consist of a mixture of physical
education and health education which will cover the NGSSS for health education. MMA also
considers the emotional health of a child to be very important. The integrated curriculum may
include topics related to emotional intelligence and interaction with others. For younger
children, Gross motor movement for children 3 months through 3 years is critical to their
development. Activities such as walking up and down stairs, walking on a balance beam, or
simply climbing a small hill, encourages coordination, balance and self-confidence.
Coordination and balance is further refined through line activities such as walking, heel-to-toe,
or slowly carrying objects. Large motor activities such as skipping, climbing, ball catching, and
throwing is practiced indoors and outdoors in the playgrounds. MMA will also incorporate
simple group games with rules.
Children of all ages will experience the purpose of movement as it is incorporated into the
school day. MMA will also leverage many opportunities for outdoor activities and physical
education lessons throughout the week.
MMA will encourage a nutritious diet in the way of promoting healthy lunches and snacks.
MMA’s school policy will discourage unhealthy foods such as those with a high sugar or fat
content.
Service Learning: Service learning is an integral part of the authentic learning in a Montessori
classroom. Service learning at MMA has four related stages: preparation, action, reflection,
demonstration.
Preparation: Magnolia Montessori Academy students will consider the needs of their
community as well as what they would like to learn. They will then research the need, discuss
the goals, and create a plan for service. This will be largely shaped and driven by the individual
interests and strengths of the students.
Action: This is the stage that is more visible to the community. In this stage, students will
actually perform their community service. By doing so, they will interact positively with their
community and gain knowledge and experience.
Reflection: Both during and after the action stage, students will take the time to consider
what they have learned, how they have served, and what impact these will have. This is an
opportunity for the individual student to assess personal skills and knowledge gained and to
consider if changes to the project are needed.
Demonstration: The demonstration stage allows the students to show what they have
learned. This can come in the form of a report, a presentation, a lesson given to fellow
students, materials created for younger students, or any way that gives the students
opportunities to use their newly gained knowledge.
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Grace and Courtesy: The Montessori concept of grace and courtesy is closely related to the
character education in the school system. Grace and courtesy is a specific curriculum which
helps MMA students to become polite, caring children who are socially adept. Topics
addressed in grace and courtesy lessons will include but not be limited to interpersonal
communication, common courtesy when dining, phone and email etiquette and other social
graces.
Peace Education: In exploring the five great lessons of Montessori philosophy, students will
come to find their place in the universe and the impact that humans can have on the planet.
Through peace education, students will learn about concepts surrounding peace, conflict
resolution, self-discipline and stewardship of their community on all levels.
MMA will work closely with the United Nations UNESCO tenets of peace education for its
peace curriculum. Of the concepts in the UNESCO curriculum, some that would specifically
be incorporated into MMA’s curriculum include:
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Develop a climate that models peaceful and respectful behavior among all members of the
learning community
Demonstrate the principles of equality and non-discrimination in administrative policies
and practices
Draw on the knowledge of peace-building that exists in the community, including means
of dealing with conflict that are effective, non-violent, and rooted in the local culture
Handle conflicts in ways that respect the rights and dignity of all involved
Integrate an understanding of peace, human rights, social justice and global issues
throughout the curriculum whenever possible
Provide a forum for the explicit discussion of values of peace and social justice
Use teaching and learning methods that stress participation, Cupertino, problem-solving
and respect for differences
Enable children to put peace-making into practice in the educational setting as well as in
the wider community
Generate opportunities for continuous reflection and professional development of all
educators in relation to issues of peace, justice and rights.
F. Describe how the effectiveness of the curriculum will be evaluated.
Magnolia Montessori Academy’s curriculum will be evaluated using both objective assessments
like FCAT scores and AYP, but also more subjective and personal assessments such as student
and mastery checklists, parent feedback, teacher self-assessment and student portfolios. In
addition, students will engage in numerous projects, demonstrations and presentations which
show the progress made throughout the school year.
If the evaluation indicates that the curriculum is not working as well as Magnolia Montessori
Academy’s goals predict, then the director, in conjunction with the teachers, will determine the
steps to take to bring MMA up to the high standards that can be expected from Montessori
education.
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Section 5: Student Performance, Assessment and Evaluation
A. State the school’s educational goals and objectives for improving student achievement.
Indicate how much academic improvement students are expected to show each year,
how student progress and performance will be evaluated, and the specific results to be
attained.
Goal 1: Magnolia Montessori students will become proficient in reading.
Objectives:
1. Beginning with Spring 2014 assessment data, at least 80% of MMA students will score a Level 3 or
higher on FCAT Reading assessment tests and/or make learning gains on the FCAT Reading as
compared to the prior year’s scores (where available).
In subsequent years of the charter contract, MMA expects that our students will make consistent,
steady progress in learning gains for the population of the school, including subgroups. Due to the fact
that there is not yet baseline data, all predictions are based upon comparable data.
· 2013-2014: At least 85% of students taking the Reading FCAT at MMA will score Level 3.5 or above.
· 2014-2015: At least 86% of students taking the Reading FCAT at MMA will score Level 3.5 or above.
· 2015-2016: At least 88% of students taking the Reading FCAT at MMA will score Level 3.5 or above.
· 2016-2017: At least 90% of students taking the Reading FCAT at MMA will score Level 3.5 or above.
· Within two years, 85% of students taking the Reading FCAT at MMA will make learning gains.
· Within two years, 75% of the lowest 25% of students taking the Reading FCAT at MMA will make
learning gains.
2. Beginning with Spring 2014 at least 85% of Magnolia Montessori students who participate in all
three assessment periods will demonstrate a full year’s growth on the Discovery Education Reading
Assessment. This goal will remain consistent in the following three years.
Goal 2: Magnolia Montessori students will become proficient in mathematics.
Objectives:
1. Beginning with Spring 2014, at least 85% of MMA students will score a Level 3 or higher on FCAT
Mathematics assessment test and/or make learning gains on the FCAT Math as compared to last
year’s scores (where available).
In subsequent years of the charter contract, MMA expects that our students will make consistent,
steady progress in learning gains for the population of the school, including subgroups. Due to the fact
that there is not yet baseline data, all predictions are based upon comparable data.
· 2013-2014: At least 85% of students taking the Math FCAT at MMA will score at Level 3.5 or above.
· 2014-2015: At least 87% of students taking the Math FCAT at MMA will score at Level 3.5 or above.
· 2015-2016: At least 89% of students taking the Math FCAT at MMA will score at Level 3.5 or above.
· 2016-2017: At least 90% of students taking the Math FCAT at MMA will score at Level 3.5 or above.
· Within two years, 85% of students taking the Math FCAT at MMA will make learning gains.
· Within two years, 80% of the lowest 25% of students taking the Math FCAT at MMA will make
learning gains.
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2. Beginning with Spring 2014, at least 80% of MMA students in grades 1-2 will score in the
80thpercentile or better on the SAT10 Mathematics Assessment.
· 2013-2014: At least 80% of MMA students will score in the 80th percentile on SAT10 Math.
· 2014-2015: At least 82% of MMA students will score in the 80th percentile on SAT10 Math.
· 2015-2016: At least 84% of MMA students will score in the 80th percentile on SAT10 Math.
· 2016-2017: At least 86% of MMA students will score in the 80th percentile on SAT10 Math.
3. Beginning with Spring 2014 at least 85% of Magnolia Montessori students who participate in all
three assessment periods will demonstrate a full year’s growth on the Discovery Education Reading
Assessment. This goal will remain consistent in the following three years.
Goal 3: Magnolia Montessori Academy students will become proficient in writing.
Objective:
1. In Spring 2014, 85% of MMA’s 4th grade students will score at or above Level 4 as measured by the
FCAT Writing assessment.
In subsequent years of the charter contract, MMA expects that our students will make consistent,
steady progress in learning gains for the population of the school, including subgroups. Due to the fact
that there is not yet baseline data, all predictions are based upon comparable data.
2013-2014: At least 85% of MMA students will score at least Level 4 on FCAT Writing.
2014-2015: At least 86% of MMA students will score at least Level 4 on FCAT Writing.
2015-2016: At least 88% of MMA students will score at least Level 4 on FCAT Writing.
2016-2017: At least 90% of MMA students will score at least Level 4 on FCAT Writing.
Goal 4: Magnolia Montessori Academy students will become proficient in science.
Objective:
1. Beginning in Spring 2014, the percentage of MMA’s students earing a 3 or better on FCAT Science
assessment will meet or exceed the majority of the comparable elementary schools in the area.
B. Describe the school’s student placement procedures and promotion standards.
All incoming students will be evaluated to create a baseline of academic performance to
determine grade level placement. Next, students with previous Montessori educational
experience, demonstrated though progress reports, etc., will be placed in their appropriate
multi-age level. Students with no pervious Montessori experience will be placed in their
appropriate multi-age grade level. Students with no previous Montessori experience will be
placed appropriately for their chronological age and previous educational performance data.
Placement of individual students for optimal academic success may require a series of planning
sessions with instructional staff, administration, and parents. Our goal at MMA is to help
children achieve academic success, and so in light of our mission statement, students will be
placed in grade levels that will best serve their individual needs.
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The promotion policy at MMA is intended to reflect this mission and the belief that multiple
measures are necessary for judging student achievement, and that student achievement can be
demonstrated in a variety of ways, including through informal and formal assessments, verbal
demonstrations, multi-media presentations and portfolios that demonstrate achievement. It is
important to remember that teachers and parents at MMA are committed to supporting and
monitoring student learning throughout each level of the school’s programs. It is the
responsibility of professional instructional staff to try to anticipate and address student needs
and supports in advance so that students do not fail to make progress. Some students present
complicated learning profiles, however, so the school’s promotion policy must address these
differences and make available a variety of supports and timing for promotion. It is our
concern that no student be judged as failing in one skill area due to a weakness in another (i.e.
a student should not be judged as failing in math achievement due to a still developing skill in
written language.)
In order to provide a range of demonstration opportunities for students, promotion to the
next program level at MMA (for example Lower Elementary to Upper Elementary), will be
determined though faculty consultation and successful achievement of the MMA and
NGSSS/Common Core correlation standards. Since MMA benchmarks serve primarily as
“promotion standards” most will not be achievable by students until the final year of each
program level, grades 3, 6, and 8. In general, students who successfully complete 75% or more
of the grade 3, 6, or 8 benchmarks demonstrate readiness for promotion in August of the
following year. It is also possible, however for students completing only 50-75% of the
benchmarks to need more time to complete the grade level benchmarks, but not to benefit
from remaining a full year in the current grade. In these cases, promotion will occur as
students demonstrate readiness (i.e. Delayed Promotion), Potential at some mid-point during
the following school year. In fewer cases, those students who are not able to achieve 50% of
the benchmarks may need to remain in the current grade level and gain greater command and
confidence with the benchmark standards before moving on. Promotion will thus be
individualized to benefit each student. MMA will recommend that students who do not
meeting the promotion criteria in grade 8 should return to learn and work for another year,
and/or students may opt to take advantage of extra supports identified during
student/parent/teacher conferences.
Since benchmarks are formal demonstrations of student achievement, all student benchmark
submissions will be work that is independent of peer and adult support. Benchmark standards
will be organized and given by teachers, but the goal is to word them for student use, helping
students to envision and assess their own achievement in the learning process.
C. If the school will serve high school students, describe the methods used to determine if a student has
satisfied the requirements specified in section 1003.428, F.S., and any proposed additional requirements.
Magnolia Montessori Academy will not serve high school students.
D. Describe how baseline achievement data will be established, collected, and used.
Describe the methods used to identify the educational strengths and needs of students and how these baseline
rates will be compared to the academic progress of the same students attending the charter school.
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Baseline achievement data will be collected upon admission to MMA each fall. Initial baseline
achievement data will be established using the prior year’s FCAT scores, in conjunction with
other baselines assessment tools as deemed necessary by the teachers and administrator.
In order for MMA to achieve its educational goals and objectives as stated, baseline
assessments will be collected each fall to measure student performance and provide yearly
baseline information for school administration, the curriculum coordinator and instructional
staff. Baseline data will be used for planning student Personal Education Plans, as well as
tracking individual, grade level, and school-wide progress and gains through the months
leading up to Spring FCATs. This information, along with other relevant student academic
records from previous schools will provide the necessary baseline instructional data
demonstrating specific strengths and needs of our students. Baseline data will be monitored,
tracked and used for future comparison of achievement of the same student while enrolled.
MMA provide frequent assessment to provide optimal instructional response in real time.
In addition to these objective assessment standards, as the school adds 7th and 8th grades newly
accepted MMA middle school students will complete an entrance portfolio which accents the
student’s gifts and strengths as well as highlighting academic and personal goals that the
student has for the upcoming school year. This is not conventional baseline data, but will play
a large role in ensuring that each student works toward a goal of self-directed learning and
personal improvement.
E. Identify the types and frequency of assessments that the school will use to measure
and monitor student performance.
Student performance will be assessed with the following tools, all designed to determine and
report individual progress toward specific benchmarks defined in the MMA curriculum and
NGSS/Common Core Standards.
Test taking skills will be incorporated into the Practical Life area of the curriculum to ensure
students are prepared for the mechanics of test taking. In addition to state mandates, test
results will be used to inform and update students’ PEPs as well as modify the program
curriculum.
Standardized Tests-Formal Assessments:
 SAT10, or similar when offered by the District. Will be used for next year’s baseline data.
 Discovery for reading and math three times per year as offered by the District
 FCAT annually each spring for grades 3-8.
The school will use the Polk County S-BAR to report mastery learning quarterly. For grade
levels not yet using the S-BAR, MMA will create a report that uses the benchmarks of mastery
learning to provide parents and students with a concrete look at the level of mastery for each
subject. This progress report goes beyond traditional numerical or letter grades and looks at
specific topics and skills within a subject as well as cataloging the progression of student
mastery.
Narrative Grading
As part of the S-BAR, teachers will have the opportunity to evaluate each student in narrative
format. These personal and individual feedback sections may accompany each section of the
report card and indicate in an intimate manner how each student is working in the classroom.
The narrative portion of the report is where teachers might explore important, but commonly
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overlooked aspects of student performance including citizenship, specific weaknesses and
strengths and interaction with peers.
Other Innovative Assessments
In addition to the assessment techniques listed above, student learning will assessed in many
other ways. Magnolia Montessori teachers will use portfolios of student work, exhibitions,
class presentations, peer teaching, rubric assessment, service learning projects, intensive
research projects, and student speeches. These innovative assessments will take place on an
on-going basis.
F. Describe how student assessment and performance data will be used to evaluate and
inform instruction.
Since it is the goal of Magnolia Montessori Academy to provide quality education, MMA will
use the student assessment and performance data to directly inform instruction. Magnolia
Montessori Academy teachers and the director will work together to devise the optimal
educational experience for each child’s individual needs. For example, if it is noted that a
particular student’s progress as measured by the above assessments seems to be lagging, the
teacher can immediately and effectively guide the student with individualized supplements.
G. Describe how student assessment and performance information will be shared with
students and with parents.
Nine-Week Progress Reports
Magnolia Montessori Academy will provide students and parents with SBAR (Standards Based
Assessment Report) progress reports on the standard nine-week schedule that the Polk County
School Board currently uses. Magnolia Montessori Academy’s progress reports will be
different, however, than the typical report card which gives numerical information. The school
will use the Polk County S-BAR to report mastery learning quarterly. For grade levels not yet
using the S-BAR, MMA will create a report that uses the benchmarks of mastery learning to
provide parents and students with a concrete look at the level of mastery for each subject.
The student will be assessed by the teacher according to where along the mastery continuum
the student is currently working. For example, if the student has just begun working with a
concept or skill, the progress report will indicate that the student is in the introductory phases
of learning about that concept. As the student progress toward mastery, the skill will be
appended with different words: introduced, practicing or proficient. As mentioned before,
the MMA progress reports will be accompanied by the narrative grading described above in
order to provide parents with a complete, holistic account of how their child is working.
Parent/Teacher/Student Conferences
At least twice a year, students and parents may conference with teachers regarding the specific
learning strides that students are making. Magnolia Montessori Academy prefers that parents
make an extraordinary commitment to their children’s education, and one expression of such a
commitment is the willingness to engage in discussion with teachers about their student’s
progress. Teachers provide parents with detailed information about each core subject area, as
well as information about student achievement in time management, planning and
social/emotional development. Parent-teacher conferences are also attended by the student
and offer a time when parents and teachers can discuss student work openly and transparently.
Presentations and Exhibitions
During the school year, students will hold demonstrations, presentations or exhibitions that
demonstrate student progress. Parents, siblings and members of the community may be
invited to attend these events. At these times, students participate to showcase the remarkable
strides students are making in the individual subject areas.
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Section 6: Exceptional Students
A. Please indicate the level of service that the school will provide to students with
disabilities by selecting from the list below.
o The school will serve students with disabilities whose needs can be met in a regular classroom
environment (at least 80% of instruction occurring in a class with non-disabled peers) with the
provision of reasonable supplementary supports and services and/or modifications and accommodations.
o The school will serve students with disabilities whose needs can be met in a regular classroom and
resource room combination (between 40%-80% of instruction occurring in a class with non-disabled
peers) with the provision of reasonable supplementary supports and services and/or modifications and
accommodations.
o The school will serve students with disabilities whose needs can be met in a separate classroom (less
than 40% of instruction occurring in a class with non-disabled peers).
Magnolia Montessori Academy will not discriminate on the basis of race, religion,
national/ethnic origin, or disability in the admission of students. The school will comply with
all applicable federal, state, and local health, safety, and civil rights requirements. The school
and will in no way knowingly violate the antidiscrimination provisions of Florida Statutes or of
the federal government.
Due to the nature of the small school environment, however, MMA will be unable to
accommodate students who require self-contained classrooms or specific assistants; therefore,
the student with disabilities must be well served by the inclusive, non-restrictive environment
of the Montessori classroom. For this reason, MMA will thoroughly inform parents of space
and staff limitations.
Magnolia Montessori Academy expects that exceptional students who require a low level of
support would easily be accommodated within the model. Students with special needs will
only be referred to other schools within the district if the nature and severity of the disability
precludes education in a Montessori classroom. In the event that the disability does not
preclude complete participation in the MMA classroom, but the student still needs supportive
services, then MMA will contract with the district for those support services.
Magnolia Montessori Academy is committed to having a policy of non-discrimination offering
Free and Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) in the Least Restrictive Environment (LRE)
for exceptional student admitted to MMA. The school will offer Individual Education Plans
(IEPs) and meetings as well as accommodate and modify the curriculum for functional
limitations as much as possible within our budget, facility and staff resources.
In addition, MMA prefers that concerns about student performance be openly shared between
parents, teachers and students. Parents of students with disabilities will be afforded procedural
safeguards in their native language, which include the areas of notice and consent, independent
educational evaluations, confidentiality of student records and due process hearings. Magnolia
Montessori Academy is committed to a cooperative approach in order to offer a program of
instruction best suited to the needs of the child according to the recommendations of the
team.
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Magnolia Montessori Academy will follow a rigorous process to ensure that each exceptional
student receives the modifications and accommodations that he or she needs in the classroom.
The following steps will be taken with students who have special needs:
1. Identification of needs: If a student enters MMA with a documented need,
Individualized Education Plans (IEP), a 504 plan, or evidence of modifications and
accommodations within the classroom at a prior school, MMA administration will meet
with parents and teachers in order to plan appropriately for student needs. If a student’s
academic or non-academic performance suggests that they may need specialized
instruction but had not been previously identified as needing specialized instruction, MMA
administration will meet with teacher and parents to determine the intervention strategies
to be utilized at MMA. These intervention strategies will be developed with the goal of
student success at MMA, and will be evaluated to determine their efficacy.
2. Evaluation of intervention strategies: If it is apparent that the current intervention
strategies are not enabling the student to have success in the Montessori classroom, or
MMA administration or teachers are concerned about a potential disability, then a written
referral will be made to the 504 coordinator (MMA Director of Education). At such a
time, parents of the student will be contacted and notified of the proceedings and
concerns.
3. 504 team meeting: Magnolia Montessori Academy’s Director or Education and teachers
will convene at a 504 planning meeting at which point concerns about the student’s
performance and current intervention strategies will be reviewed. The committee may at
this point recommend further intervention strategies or evaluation. The committee may
include the student, the parents/guardians, director, teacher and/or any necessary support
staff.
4. Monitoring Post-504 meeting: After the meeting, the 504 team will continue to closely
monitor the student’s performance and adapt the interventions as needed. The team will
review evidence of modification, and the monitor the success of the student. The team
will monitor for no less than six weeks, having a meeting every two weeks to help discern
the nature of the student’s issue in the classroom. These meetings will answer the
following questions:




What is the nature of the student’s continued struggles?
Is this problem a potential disability?
Can reasonable accommodation be made in the classroom?
Should the issue be referred to the ESE specialists at PCSB?
5. Formation of the IEP team: If it is determined that additional testing is necessary, then
parent/guardian will be notified. Magnolia Montessori Academy will request assistance
from a district representative for exceptional student education, and an IEP team will be
formed. The IEP team will consist of the student, the parents, the teacher, a special
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education teacher, and potentially a district representative and anyone else required by the
family, the school or the district.
6. Determination of IEP necessity: IEP team members will meet and firstly determine if
an IEP is necessary or if the matter might be resolved via a 504 plan. If the IEP is not
necessary, the 504 plan committee will reconvene to determine appropriate intervention
strategies. If through testing and evaluation, an IEP is found to be necessary, then the
team will decide what type of evaluation is necessary for the student.
7. Evaluation results: The team meets to review the results of the evaluation and decide if
state and federal criteria for a disability exist, and whether the student requires special
instruction.
8. Construction of an Individualized Education Plan: The IEP team will design an
Individual Education Plan including specialized instruction or appropriate supportive
services, accommodations and/or modifications, and a description of the current
performance level of the student.
9. Implementation of IEP and monitoring of student progress: The IEP is
implemented in the classroom with the full support of the teachers, administration and
parents. Teachers and administration will begin monitoring student progress in the same
intervals as the rest of the student body.
IEP review and updating: Prior to the expiration date on the IEP or as needed based on
student progress, the IEP will be reviewed for efficacy and amended to reflect current needs.
A formal evaluation of the IEP will be conducted every three years to determine continued
eligibility for special education status.
B. Describe how the school will ensure that students with disabilities will have an equal
opportunity of being selected for enrollment in the charter school.
Magnolia Montessori Academy will serve children whose disabilities can be managed in a
Montessori classroom (see Question A in Section 6: Exceptional Students). In cases where the
MMA classroom can accommodate a child’s special needs, MMA will comply with the
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).
C. Describe how the school will work with the sponsor to ensure the charter school is the
appropriate placement for each student with a disability, based on the student’s needs.
The following steps will be taken with students who have special needs:
1. Identification of needs: If a student enters MMA with a documented need,
Individualized Education Plans (IEP), a 504 plan, or evidence of modifications and
accommodations within the classroom at a prior school, MMA administration will meet
with parents and teachers in order to plan appropriately for student needs. If a student’s
academic or non-academic performance suggests that they may need specialized
instruction but had not been previously identified as needing specialized instruction, MMA
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administration will meet with teacher and parents to determine the intervention strategies
to be utilized at MMA. These intervention strategies will be developed with the goal of
student success at MMA, and will be evaluated to determine their efficacy.
2. Evaluation of intervention strategies: If it is apparent that the current intervention
strategies are not enabling the student to have success in the Montessori classroom, or
MMA administration or teachers are concerned about a potential disability, then a written
referral will be made to the 504 coordinator (MMA Director of Education). At such a
time, parents of the student will be contacted and notified of the proceedings and
concerns.
3. 504 team meeting: Magnolia Montessori Academy’s Director or Education and teachers
will convene at a 504 planning meeting at which point concerns about the student’s
performance and current intervention strategies will be reviewed. The committee may at
this point recommend further intervention strategies or evaluation. The committee may
include the student, the parents/guardians, director, teacher and/or any necessary support
staff.
4. Monitoring Post-504 meeting: After the meeting, the 504 team will continue to closely
monitor the student’s performance and adapt the interventions as needed. The team will
review evidence of modification, and the monitor the success of the student. The team
will monitor for no less than six weeks, having a meeting every two weeks to help discern
the nature of the student’s issue in the classroom. These meetings will answer the
following questions:




What is the nature of the student’s continued struggles?
Is this problem a potential disability?
Can reasonable accommodation be made in the classroom?
Should the issue be referred to the ESE specialists at PCSB?
5. Formation of the IEP team: If it is determined that additional testing is necessary, then
parent/guardian will be notified. Magnolia Montessori Academy will request assistance
from a district representative for exceptional student education, and an IEP team will be
formed. The IEP team will consist of the student, the parents, the teacher, a special
education teacher, and potentially a district representative and anyone else required by the
family, the school or the district.
6. Determination of IEP necessity: IEP team members will meet and firstly determine if
an IEP is necessary or if the matter might be resolved via a 504 plan. If the IEP is not
necessary, the 504 plan committee will reconvene to determine appropriate intervention
strategies. If through testing and evaluation, an IEP is found to be necessary, then the
team will decide what type of evaluation is necessary for the student.
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7. Evaluation results: The team meets to review the results of the evaluation and decide if
state and federal criteria for a disability exist, and whether the student requires special
instruction.
8. Construction of an Individualized Education Plan: The IEP team will design an
Individual Education Plan including specialized instruction or appropriate supportive
services, accommodations and/or modifications, and a description of the current
performance level of the student.
9. Implementation of IEP and monitoring of student progress: The IEP is
implemented in the classroom with the full support of the teachers, administration and
parents. Teachers and administration will begin monitoring student progress in the same
intervals as the rest of the student body.
IEP review and updating: Prior to the expiration date on the IEP or as needed based on
student progress, the IEP will be reviewed for efficacy and amended to reflect current needs.
A formal evaluation of the IEP will be conducted every three years to determine continued
eligibility for special education status.
D. Describe how the school will utilize the regular school facilities and adapt them to the
needs of exceptional students to the maximum extent appropriate, including the use of
supplementary aids and services.
Montessori materials and methods inherently address children of a wide range of ability levels.
Dr. Maria Montessori did much of her early work with children with severe intellectual
disabilities and found that her methods were successful in enabling these children to perform
academically at a level equal to their peers who did not have disabilities.
The following lists ways in which a Montessori classroom naturally appeals to children of
special needs (among all levels):



Multi-age classrooms allow children more time to master concepts that may at first be
difficult to them. Children are given the freedom to spend as much time on tasks as
necessary. Children can also learn from their peers who are more proficient in specific
areas as well as reinforce their knowledge by teaching concepts to other children.
Montessori materials are brightly colored and arranged in a specific fashion around the
classroom to invite children to want to work with the materials. These materials have a
built in control of error and first introduce concepts in a concrete fashion. As children
move to abstract concepts in a Montessori classroom, these same materials can be revisited
to reinforce more complex concepts.
Following the child is a philosophy in which the Montessori teacher, considered the
classroom facilitator, can adapt a child’s education to what works best for that individual.
In cases where one method may not be effective, the teacher can redirect a child or
attempt a new approach. In a Montessori classroom, a student is typically with a teacher
for a 3-year span, during which time, the teacher comes to know each child’s individual
needs very well.
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
Freedom of movement around the classrooms allow children to move about the room in
a manner that is comfortable to them, thereby eliminating the restriction of movement that
may cause some children to be labeled as having behavioral issues. A child’s workspace
may be a rug on the floor, a table or even a controlled outdoor space.
In cases where the Montessori methods and materials do not address the special needs of an
individual child, Magnolia Montessori Academy will contract with the district in the following
areas:



Audiology services
Vision services
Response to Intervention (RTI) training
E. Describe how the school’s effectiveness in serving exceptional education students will
be evaluated.
Magnolia Montessori Academy will evaluate its effectiveness in serving exception education
students through the following safeguards: annual IEP review as required by law, attention to
parental feedback, report card assessment, and collaboration with the district. In addition,
MMA will review each exceptional education student’s FCAT scores to ensure that he or she is
making learning gains in reading, mathematics and writing.
F. Explain how exceptional students who enter the school below grade level will be
engaged in and benefit from the curriculum.
Children entering MMA who are below grade level, will benefit from the application of the
Montessori Method in a variety of ways. In practice, the Montessori approach does not limit a
child’s time on any particular task or concept, thereby allowing children more time in areas
where that student may need more time to master a certain concept. Additionally, Montessori
teachers have the flexibility to adapt their approach to each individual child allowing that
teacher to change the teaching strategy to match how an individual child learns best.
MMA will combine the benefits of the Montessori Method with district services, such as those
outlined in Section 6: Exceptional Students Question C, which describes the evaluation and
reevaluation process in place to make sure a child with an IEP stays on track.
G. Provide the school’s projected population of students with disabilities and describe
how the projection was made.
According to the research paper, Special Education in America by Christopher B. Swanson,
Ph.D., the percentage of ESE children in Florida schools is around 9%. Magnolia Montessori
Academy will assume this percentage as an estimate of the number of children with disabilities
in its population.
H. Identify the staffing plan, based on the above projection, for the school’s special
education program, including the number and qualifications of staff.
Magnolia Montessori Academy will work collaboratively with the PCSB in order to provide
appropriate intervention and education for students with disabilities. If it becomes apparent
that an ESE certified teacher is required, MMA will either contract with a district
representative or share resources with other charter schools. When presented with a student
who currently has or is in need of an IEP, the staff will work cooperatively with the district
and the parents to ensure that the school will provide appropriate and timely services. There
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will initially be five staff: a director who is a certified teacher, and four certified classroom
teachers. All teachers and the Director of Education will be certified teachers who are also
Montessori-trained or in the process of receiving Montessori training.
I. Describe how the school will serve gifted and talented students.
Since the Montessori method of education is an individualized type of instruction which allows
the teacher to evaluate and meet the needs of each student, it is perfectly geared to addressing
the specific needs of gifted and talented students. The independent and interdependent aspect
of Montessori learning, coupled with the curriculum that allows for expansion beyond the
NGSSS provides gifted and talented students with the opportunity for growth. In addition,
gifted and talented students will be encouraged to take their interests forward into the
community as they explore education through service-learning.
According to the framework for gifted learners, by graduation gifted and talented students
should be able to




critically examine the complexity of knowledge;
create, adapt, and assess multifaceted questions in a variety of fields and disciplines;
conduct thoughtful research/exploration in multiple fields; and
think creatively and critically to identify and solve real-world problems.
By its very nature, Montessori education encourages all of these goals for every student.
Magnolia Montessori Academy teachers will encourage gifted students to pursue topics in
greater depth, to tackle authentic and academic tasks with vigor and interest, to advance at
their own accelerated pace, and to develop their sense of self and consider their own place
among the larger community.
The MMA classroom will have ample opportunity for self-discovery and exploration of topics
of interest to the gifted student. During independent work, the gifted student can feel free to
explore a subject of interest to him or her in a non-competitive and supportive environment.
Group work will allow the gifted student to remain in sync with the school community while
giving him or her opportunity to participate in discussions at a level of comfort to him or her.
Service learning will allow the gifted students to use their special gifts and talents as well as
their academic abilities to connect and help their community.
In addition, the gifted and talented student will learn how to be a mentor in the Montessori
classroom. Due to the multi-age, multi-level classroom, gifted students will naturally be acting
as leader and mentor to the younger peers. Alternatively, a younger student might be called
upon to mentor an older student in a subject in which the gifted younger student is more
proficient. The Montessori classroom is an excellent venue to challenge and develop the skills
of the gifted student.
If the gifted and talented student enters MMA with an Education Plan (EP) in place, the staff
will meet to address the individual needs of each student. If the student is identified at MMA
as gifted, then a personalized Education Plan (EP) will be developed for each student, in
conjunction with the district gifted specialist, and the gifted student will be challenged to work
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at a level commensurate with his or her ability, and in areas of academic interest to the
individual gifted student.
The gifted student, however, also may have special emotional needs. Gifted students are
sometimes plagued with perfectionism, frustration, intolerance, acceptance, balance, and
relationships. The community centered and team building aspects of the Montessori
classroom as well as the flexibility in self-selecting materials for learning will provide a positive
environment for the gifted student.
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Section 7: English Language Learners
A. Describe how the school will comply with state and federal requirements for serving
English language learners, including the procedures that will be utilized for identifying
such students and providing support services.
Magnolia Montessori Academy will comply completely with state and federal requirements for
serving English language learners including strict observance of teacher training requirements.
Our teachers and administrator will have ESOL endorsement or be working toward that goal.
In addition, MMA will respect the rights provided the student under the Multicultural
Education and Training Advocacy (META) consent decree including appropriate
programming, accommodation and ESOL strategies. In addition
Magnolia Montessori Academy will follow the steps for identifying and serving English
Language Learner students:
1. Identify potential English Language Learner students via the Home Language
Survey: The Home Language Survey queries the parents of the student about language
practices in the home. If one of more responses indicated a home language other than
English, the administration will proceed to Step Two.
2. Screen for language proficiency with a battery of evaluations within the first forty
days of a student’s tenure: The initial screening instrument includes aural and oral tests
of listening and comprehension skills. English language reading and writing proficiency
will be evaluated with either the FCAT or another norm-referenced test. Any potential
ELL student scoring at or below proficiency level will be considered to be Limited English
Proficient and provided services to assist the child to navigate the regular curriculum.
3. Form a Limited English Proficiency committee if necessary: This committee will
include the teacher and the administrator. Parents will participate in all aspects of this
process. If a student needs an IEP planning committee, information and assistance from
the district may be sought. An individual LEP plan defines how instruction will be
modified or accommodated.
4. Accommodate the student’s need for instructional assistance. These
accommodations are documented in the LEP plan. Magnolia Montessori Academy will
employ ESOL strategies like thematic learning and visual prompts. In addition, the
Montessori classroom is well suited to serve the ELL student because of its cooperative
nature. Instruction and assessments will be modified for the student’s level of English
language proficiency. The curriculum itself is not modified, and students are assisted to
learn the regular curriculum. Students will be graded on their progress in content areas,
and not language proficiency. FCAT modifications will be provided as directed by state
law.
5. Evaluate student progress by tracking academic and social performance: Progress
will be communicated to parents. Whenever possible, interpreters and materials written in
the home language will be used. Teachers will document progress in basic curriculum
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performance as well as evaluation of English language proficiency. Tracking of progress is
documented, including basic curriculum performance, as well as the continued assessment
of English-language proficiency via observation and social encounters.
6. Exit the student from ELL focus based upon assessment and performance: Exit
from the LEP plan is considered when the student begins to approach the percentage
score cutoff on the measure of English language proficiency, beginning with the aural/oral
comprehension evaluation. Elements for consideration include language proficiency,
classroom performance and achievement, teacher recommendations, criterion-referenced
tests, and writing samples.
For a prescribed period of time following exit from LEP assistance, the student will continue
to be observed periodically to ensure the continued progress of the student towards academic
success.
B. Identify the staffing plan for the school’s English language learner program, including
the number and qualifications of staff.
Each member of the faculty, including the director will have ESOL endorsement on their
certificate, or be working in a timely manner toward that goal. Following the strategies and
instructional techniques suggested by TESOL, the school expects that these modifications and
accommodations will result in ELL student success. If, however, it is demonstrated that lack
of English language proficiency is being made, MMA will consider consultation with a district
specialist who specializes in ESOL for assistance.
C. Explain how English Language Learners who enter the school below grade level will
be engaged in and benefit from the curriculum.
The Montessori classroom is uniquely setup to help English Language learners with the use of the
following.
1. Visual aids. Visual aids give LEP students visual cues that may help clarify meaning and solidify
learning. Visual aids should be clear and reproduced for LEP students, when possible.
2. Incorporating hands-on activities to demonstrate concepts.
Where appropriate, hands-on activities help LEP students connect with classroom content.
Processes that can be experienced or observed make learning more concrete.
3. Teachers will be trained to allow sufficient wait time.
LEP students need additional time to formulate their answers in English. Some may still be
translating their first language into English, others may need time to find the appropriate words.
By pausing after a question is asked, everyone, native speakers included, has time to think about
the question before they respond.
4. Teachers will be trained to model spoken language.
Refrain from correcting your students spoken language. Instead, model the proper usage in a
restatement. Teachers will balance corrections with positive feedback.
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5. Teachers will prepare outlines for lectures.
Teacher-prepared outlines or notes can help LEP students follow along in class. Alternately,
teachers may ask another student to share his or her notes with the LEP student. They may also
choose to give the student information regarding the teaching plan and objectives so that they may
have an easier time following along.
6. Teachers will encourage skim and scan reading strategies for textbook assignments.
Directly teach LEP students reading strategies that will enhance their reading skills. Skimming,
scanning and even outlining chapters in the textbook are excellent pre-reading strategies that can
help students preview material prior to reading. They can also engage in other strategies such as
predicting chapter content from headings, creating vocabulary lists, writing responses, and
summarizing.
7. Teachers will avoid forcing LEP students to speak.
Most second language learners go through a silent phase. Forcing a student to speak may make
them embarrassed and overly self-conscious. In a worst case scenario, other students may laugh
them at them. While your intention may be to give them practice, this technique very well may
backfire.
Conclusion
The mantra for creating effective instruction is know your audience, that is, know your students.
Because the presence of non-native speakers is a given in many classrooms, teachers need to have
a rudimentary knowledge of the characteristics of each student. For Montessori teachers this is a
part of their training and background and is second nature for them.
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Section 8: School Climate and Discipline
1. Describe the school’s planned approach to classroom management and student
discipline.
The goal of discipline in the MMA classrooms will be to help the child develop self-discipline, or an
awareness of one’s own actions and choices and how these choices affect themselves and others.
MMA will establish discipline through ground rules, procedures and routines rather than through
punishment in which the child feels embarrassed, belittled or humiliated. Teachers will work with the
children to establish routines and procedures to promote security and ownership. As a result, children
are likely to take on the responsibility of maintaining the classroom and getting materials ready for the
next student and develop internal discipline and respect for others.
In the situations where a student’s behavior is more disruptive to the classroom and requires a
stronger approach, the teachers and Director of Education will handle the situation as outlined in the
Code of Conduct section below.
_____________________________________________________________________________
Helpling, Cara. Definition of Discipline. February 20 2012.
_____________________________________________________________________________
2. Describe the school’s Code of Conduct, including the school’s policies for discipline,
suspension, and dismissal.
Magnolia Montessori Academy will use the district’s Code of Conduct as a model to handle discipline
matters that occur at the charter school. MMA also will develop an MMA Code of Conduct that
reflects the mission and vision of Magnolia Montessori Academy.
Discipline
Montessori education is based on empowering the student to make appropriate decisions about
behavior in an atmosphere of mutual respect and trust. There is no place for corporal punishment or
emotional intimidation in a Montessori environment.
Appropriate behavior is taught when students are not currently engaged in a stressful situation. To this
end, instruction in conflict resolution and peer mediation will be part of the curriculum. Students can
learn by role-playing acceptable alternatives to hitting, screaming, name-calling, and other undesirable
behavior. Peer problem-solving is used whenever possible in student disagreements. Students who are
out of control, however, will stay with a teacher or sit alone until they can control themselves enough
to rejoin the community. Whenever possible, students will be allowed to experience the natural and/or
logical consequences of their actions. For more serious or potentially dangerous situations or situations
that could disruptive to the learning community, parents will be called to pick up their child.
In keeping with Montessori philosophy, MMA will redirect the following behavior patterns:
 Unbecoming behavior
 Behavior destructive to the environment (i.e. not respecting materials)
 Behavior destructive to others or their work (i.e. disturbing another's work)
 Unproductive behavior (i.e. walking aimlessly through the room)
 Students who are not working appropriately (using unbecoming behavior, destructive
behavior, or unproductive behavior) may be required to sit at a table by themselves and work
will be provided for them. Such students may be required to work independently of the
community, which could range from a short amount of time to an entire work period. If a
student's behavior is disruptive to the classroom the student will be removed from the
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classroom and parents notified. Parents will be notified of these situations either by email,
phone call, and/or incident report.
In a serious situation, such as a physical fight between students, the following steps are followed:
1. Check that everyone is safe
2. Remove those not involved
3. Describe what is happening in a non-judgmental way
4. State the appropriate ground rule
5. Separate the students from the situation as gently as possible
6. Preserve self-dignity
7. Notify the parents
Suspension
If the student repeatedly needs office support to deal with his or her behavior, the parent will be called
to take the student home. There will be a conference with the parent before the student returns to the
classroom. Teachers, parents and students will work together to solve the behavior issues, so that the
student can return to the school in a timely manner. The student may need out of school suspension in
order to remove the child from the situation so that the crisis can pass and the student can return to
the learning community.
Dismissal
In the event that dismissal of a student is necessary at MMA, the decision will be made by the director
in conference with the teacher and the parents. Before reaching this point, however, many
interventions would be implemented to help student and his or her family. These appropriate
measures may include:
· student/teacher conferences
· parent/teacher conferences
· out of school suspension
· probationary status letter
The reasons for dismissal would be as follows:
Attendance dismissal—In the event that a student incurs more than 15 unexcused absences a
student may be dismissed. Dismissal for this reason will depend upon the reasons for absence and
whether or not they can be categorized as excused. To be considered excused, proper documentation
must be provided in a timely manner.
Behavior dismissal—As outlined in the Polk County Code of Conduct, immediate dismissal will take
place for serious breaches of conduct. For example: possession of a weapon, possession of drugs or
battery on another student. A student may also be dismissed for frequent or repeated bouts of
misbehavior. Should the strategies outlined to avoid dismissal not result in changed behavior, then the
student may be ultimately dismissed.
Academic dismissal—If a student is academically unsuccessful at MMA, intervention strategies like
parent/teacher conferences, tutoring, academic improvement plans and academic probation will be
implemented. Dismissal will only happen if all these strategies prove unsuccessful.
Dismissal Due to Lack of Parental Support—It is the goal of MMA to assist all students attending
MMA, with the parents’ support, in attaining success. In cases in which a parent refuses to support the
school as outlined in their contractual agreement, student dismissal may occur. Consistent failure to
attend reviews, parent conferences or parent meetings, and/or to fulfill the volunteer requirements
may result in a student being removed from the school. Parent contracts will be signed at the
beginning of every school year outlining parental requirements for the year. Parents will also be
reminded throughout the school year of volunteer requirements and opportunities.
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Recommendation for Expulsion
Students who engage in severe breaches of conduct as defined by the Polk County School Code of
Conduct will be assured due process by an appeals process through the Director of Education and
MMA’s governing board. All exceptional education students will be disciplined according to state and
federal ESE requirements. All appropriate parental notifications and consideration for manifestation
of disabilities will be addressed in disciplining exceptional education student.
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II. ORGANIZATIONAL PLAN
Section 9: Governance
A. Describe how the school will organize as or be operated by a non-profit organization.
Magnolia Montessori Academy will operate as a public charter school. The school has filed
with the state of Florida for incorporation as a not for profit under the name Magnolia
Montessori Academy , Inc. on June 06, 2012, pursuant to the Florida Statutes for Charter
Schools. For a copy of the Articles of Incorporation, please see Appendix B. Once the charter
contract is negotiated, MMA will also apply with the federal government as a 501 (c) 3 taxexempt organization.
The school will be governed by a board, and all aspects of the school’s operation will be
overseen by the governing board. In order to keep the school accountable, the governing
board is committed to ensuring that the school adheres to Florida charter school law and any
pertinent legislation. The board has drafted by-laws that define board expectations, and will
also delineate all policies and procedures for the school. In addition, all financial transactions
and expenditures will be subject to board scrutiny and large expenditures will require board
approval.
The daily operations of the school will be the responsibility of the directors of education and
finance, who will report to the governing board.
B. Provide an organizational chart for the school and a narrative description of the chart.
Clearly describe the proposed reporting structure to the governing board and the
relationship of the board to the school’s leader and administration.
Magnolia Montessori Academy’s Governance Structure
The governing board is the ultimate authority in decision-making for Magnolia Montessori
Academy. The school’s director is accountable to the MMA governing board. The director will
serve as a non-voting member of the board. The director will attend all board meetings as well as
the Parent Action Committee meetings in order to report to and receive information from the
governing board and the Parent Action Committee. The governing board will be responsible for
the oversight of the director and the major expenditures of MMA. The director will oversee the
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teachers, the curriculum of the school, and the day to day operations on campus. The Parent
Action Committee (PAC) will be guided by both the governing board and the director.
C. Provide a description of how the governing board will fulfill its responsibilities and
obligations, including but not limited to::
o Adoption of annual budget
o Continuing oversight over charter school operations
The board shall have jurisdiction over the affairs of the corporation, subject to the Articles of
Incorporation and the By-laws of Magnolia Montessori Academy, Inc. The board may appoint
officers and create committees in accordance with the by-laws. Such officers and committees
shall be responsible for such tasks as determined by the board from time to time. The board
will annually perform an evaluation of the job performance of the director, using a director
evaluation tool designed by the board.
Magnolia Montessori Academy expects that its board will be an active, policy-making body,
which is responsible for financial oversight as well as managing the director. The board will
not, however, be involved in the daily operations of the school. In addition, the governing
board as a whole and as individual members will have the following responsibilities and
obligations:
Governing Board Responsibilities and Obligations:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Employ and evaluate the director
Set operational policies for MMA
Oversee the use of funds, including establishing an annual budget
Ensure the mission and guiding principles of MMA are upheld
Safeguard the integrity of the Montessori method at MMA
Ensure that assessment standards are being met
Form committees to address concerns and problems
Fill board vacancies as needed
Attend board meetings
Responsibilities of the Officers of the Board, per the By-laws
President—The president of the board is responsible for presiding at all meetings of the
board. He or she shall be the chief operating officer of the board. The president is
responsible for assuring that the policies, objectives and aims of the school are observed. The
president, with the treasurer or any other officer authorized by the board, may sign for any
deeds, mortgages, bonds, contracts, or other instrument which the board has authorized to be
executed. The president is also responsible for any other duties as assigned by the board.
Secretary—The secretary of the board is responsible for keeping all record of the minutes of
the meetings of the board and all board committees. The secretary is also the custodian of the
seal of the corporation, and may countersign on any deeds, mortgages, bonds, contracts or
other instrument which the board has authorized to be executed. The secretary is also
responsible for any duties the board as assigned by the board.
Treasurer—The treasurer has charge and custody and is responsible for all funds and
securities of the school. He or she is responsible for keeping regular, full and accurate records
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of all receipts and disbursements. The treasurer shall be familiar with the fiscal affairs of the
corporation and keep the board informed thereof.
D. Describe the proposed policies and procedures by which the governing board will
operate, including board powers and duties; board member selection, removal
procedures and term limits; code of ethics, conflict of interest, and frequency of
meetings. If the Board has not yet developed policies, the applicant shall describe the
timeline for development and approval of Board policies.
Charter school governing boards must be guided by a set of by-laws that define how the board will operate.
Applicants may include their proposed by-laws.
Please see:
Appendix C—By-laws of Magnolia Montessori Academy, Inc.
Appendix D—Code of Conduct for Board Members
Appendix E—Oath of Office and Confidentiality Agreement
Appendix F—Conflict of Interest Statement
Appendix G—Board Meeting Schedule
E. Explain how the founding group for the school intends to transition to a governing
board. (This question is not applicable if the applicant is an established governing
board.)
Magnolia Montessori Academy School’s founding group is comprised of members who are
uniquely talented and capable of accomplishing the important task of researching and creating
a Magnolia Montessori Academy School. The group began meeting and planning in March
2012 and has been committed to this project for many years. For a complete list of founding
members, please see Appendix H—MMA Founding Group.
In June 2012, Magnolia Montessori Academy School incorporated with three of the founding
members and one member of the Lakeland business community listed as directors. These
directors will serve as the initial directors of the governing board. The board will recruit and
approve other board members, as needed. MMA is hopeful that the selections will be
representative of the community the school serves; preserving the integrity of Montessori
education in Lakeland is an important aspect of board work.
F. Describe the plans for board member recruitment and development, including the
orientation process for new members and ongoing professional development.
Board Vacancies
If there are any board vacancies or the board decides that it wishes to add more members, then
the board will recruit and approve members. Funds have been budgeted for Board training as
needed.
G. List each of the proposed members of the school’s governing board, indicating any exofficio members and vacant seats to be filled. For each proposed member, provide a
brief description of the person’s background that highlights the contribution he/she
intends to make through service as a governing board member and any office of the
board that individual holds.
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Nathan Dunham
Nathan is a certified public accountant and has been with Wall Foss Financial, LLC since 1997.
He began there as an intern while attending Florida Southern College. Upon his graduation in
1999, he continued on as a full-time staff accountant. He holds a Bachelor of Science in
Accounting. In 2001, Nathan passed the national exam to be designated as a Certified
Financial Planner. His primary responsibilities are financial planning, asset allocation and
investment strategies. He also handles personal and corporate tax returns, as well. He and his
wife Julianne have two children. Nathan helped review the budget and cash flow documents
and will sit as a board member.
Tammi Crotteau
Tammi spent fifteen years working with businesses in various capacities to implement
accounting software. She currently runs a housing rental business and helps manage projects
and finances for her husband’s construction company. She has two children attending a
Montessori school and is widely read on Montessori and evidence based learning. She
contributed to the writing of the business section of the charter.
Amanda Gaspary
Amanda has a B.A. in English and her Master’s in education. She is the mother to one
Montessori student and served as the Lakeland Montessori Schoolhouse Assistant Director.
She is currently a content writer at Florida Virtual School, writing Common Core correlated
curriculum for high school English courses. Amanda contributed greatly to the curriculum
portion of the charter application as well as participated in other charter startup tasks.
Maile Valentine
Maile Valentine is the owner of Empress Media, Inc., a content management consulting
company with local and global clients. She is the mother of 2 Lakeland Montessori
Schoolhouse students and is a big proponent of the Montessori education philosophy. Maile
has contributed to the Educational Plan portion of the charter as well as participated in other
charter startup tasks.
John Iskra: John received his Bachelor of Music Education from Florida State University and
a Master of Music degree from the University of Texas at Austin. He is the father of two
children who attend a Montessori school and is currently the Education Director at the Florida
Air Museum where his responsibilities include youth and adult programs with emphasis on
STEM hands on learning. John taught music for eleven years and was voted teacher of the
year in 2008. During his tenure at Alturas Elementary school, John developed interdisciplinary
materials and plans bridging music and STEM concepts and activities. John contributed the
incorporation of the Orff-Schulwerk music program and is currently researching and
implementing Montessori concepts in a STEM based, hands-on learning curriculum.
H. Outline the methods to be used for resolving disputes between a parent and the school.
When factors that lead to conflict are identified, it is easier to understand the conflict. Therefore
MMA will make every effort to avoid disputes with parents by understanding the following:
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• If school officials can identify what parents need, and separate those needs from the parents’
positions, they can bridge gaps between parent and school perspectives. The same thing happens
when educators take seriously the parents’ long- and short-term goals for their children.
• Educators must pay attention to the whole child – strengths, desires, needs and goals – and not
just the child’s deficits.
• Financial constraints can impede the ability of IEP Teams to make important decisions about a
child’s educational programming.
• Parents cannot advocate for their children if they do not have enough knowledge to understand
if particular service offerings are appropriate.
• Power struggles between parents and schools can be defused when educators develop strong,
reciprocal relationships with parents and children. Good communication, problem-solving and
negotiating skills are vital to these relationships.
• Both parents and educators are responsible for building and maintaining trust. It is up to both to
have conciliatory and collaborative attitudes when disputes happen.
• Conflict is not necessarily bad if both sides view it as an opportunity for growth, change, creative
problem-solving and improved self-assessment and skill testing.
However if conflict occurs, the parent should first address their concern with the appropriate
teacher, if no resolution is reached then the Director of Education should be consulted. If the
parent does not feel comfortable with the Director or does not find a resolution then the parent
liaison should be consulted. If the parent still does not feel their concerns are being listened to
then they should approach the board of directors with their concerns. The board of directors may
at their discretion hire a mediator to find a resolution for the issue.
If the school is filing the application in conjunction with a college, university, museum, educational
institution, another nonprofit organization or any other partner, provide the following information:
I. Name of the partner organization.
Not Applicable
J. Name of the contact person at the partner organization and that person’s full contact
information.
Not Applicable
K. A description of the nature and purpose of the school’s partnership with the
organization.
Not Applicable
L. An explanation of how the partner organization will be involved in the governance of
the school.
Not Applicable
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Section 10: Management
A. Describe the management structure of the school. Include job descriptions for
teachers and each administrative position that identify key roles, responsibilities and
accountability.
MMA will be managed by a Director of Education and a Director of Finance. Due to the
small size of our school, the two directors will fulfill the responsibility of the entire
administrative staff.
MMA Director of Education Job Description
The Director of Education must minimally have



Experience or training in Montessori education and/or a willingness and passion to further
develop him or herself in Montessori methodology;
A bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university; and
A Florida professional or temporary teaching certificate or a willingness and ability to
obtain it.
MMA Director of Finance Job Description
The Director of Finance must minimally have



Experience or training in Montessori education and/or a willingness and passion to further
develop him or herself in Montessori methodology;
Extensive experience in accounting and finance specifically with regard to running a
business (minimum 7 to 10 years)
Knowledge of accounting for not for profit organizations
The directors of Magnolia Montessori Academy must be dynamic and competent leaders. The
directors shall implement and uphold the school’s mission and guiding principles. It is
envisioned that the Director of Finance looks at all responsibility’s from a financial perspective
and that the Director of Education reviews all decisions from an educational point of view,
they then work together to find the most optimal mix of the two perspectives. In addition, the
directors shall be responsible for maintaining professionalism in the following areas:
Relationship with the Board—The directors serve as the primary source of
communication between the school and the board. The directors will report any
applicable information regarding school performance, issues and needs to the board,
and are responsible for attending all board meetings. The directors are also
accountable to the board.
Organization—The directors are responsible for creating an organized management
team for the school. The directors seek to promote peaceful and effective
communication for the staff in order to ensure smooth day to day running of the
school. The directors work toward harmony in all relationships through a carefully
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prepared environment. Both directors are also responsible for working conditions,
training and discipline of staff.
Planning and Analysis—Both directors will work closely together and with the board
to strategize about school effectiveness and improvement. The Director of Education
is responsible for analyzing student assessment, verifying the effectiveness of the
curricular approach, and maintaining assessment-informed instruction. If either
director discovers educational deficiencies in the school’s program, he or she is
responsible for changing it. Both directors are also responsible for planning the school
calendar and implementing any board decisions.
Curriculum Development—The Director of Education works closely with the board
and teachers to develop and implement curriculum to improve student learning. The
Director of Education ensures that the Montessori method is being used appropriately
and offers feedback when necessary. Both directors evaluate any suggestions for new
materials or texts.
Personnel—The Director of Education is responsible for the on-site personnel who
look to him or her as a resource for improving community and learning. The director
assures that the staff fully understands the tenets of Montessori education and ensures
adherence to Magnolia Montessori Academy’s mission and vision.
Program and Service Support - Both directors shall work closely with staff, parents
and students to develop curricular programs to enhance the learning community at
Magnolia Montessori. Both directors are responsible for the safety of the students and
the staff. The Director of Education oversees the assessment and evaluation of
student progress and assists the teachers in developing standards for student
achievement.
Finance—The Director of Finance is responsible for all monthly and annual reporting
of revenue, expenditure and fund balances and reporting these to the board. The
director shall maintain the daily finances of the school in an efficient and careful
manner to ensure that the school is fiscally responsible. In addition, the Director of
Finance is responsible for complying with the Polk County School Board requirements
for financial documents and reports in the manner expected. In addition, the Director
of Finance is responsible for keeping current in establishing and maintaining
appropriate financial documentation as required by applicable Florida law.
Enrollment—Both directors are responsible for all aspects of enrollment for the
school including applications, admissions, suspensions and dismissals and will share
responsibilities in the areas. In addition, the director must strategize with the board
about effective community awareness techniques to increase interest in the school.
Community Relationships—Both directors represents the school and must maintain
a positive community image. MMA expects that the directors of the school will serve
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as spokespersons for the school to the larger community. To further this end, the
directors must be passionate about the Montessori Method and be able to serve as
envoy for Montessori education to the community. In addition, the directors must be
at the forefront of parent/student relationships through positive and effective parent
contact as well as a visible part of the Parent Action Committee meetings.
MMA Teacher Description
MMA expects that the teachers will have, at minimum




a broad base of knowledge from which to guide students;
a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university;
Montessori training or experience and/or a desire to obtain additional Montessori
professional development; and
a Florida professional or temporary teaching certificate, or the ability and background
to obtain one.
MMA teachers will need to be flexible, aware and available in a different manner than
traditional school teachers. MMA expects its teachers to be observers, guides and facilitators
who encourage students to explore outside of the prescribed classroom confines. The
teaching team will be interacting in close and integrative manners, so teachers must have
exceptional interpersonal skills. In addition, MMA expects excellence in the following areas:
Instructional Process—The teacher plans and implements a program of instruction that
adheres to the Montessori method as well as includes the tenets of the Next Generation
Sunshine State Standards (NGSSS). Purposeful lesson planning is vital for effective teaching
as well as addressing the individual needs of the student. Due to the integrative nature of the
Montessori classroom, the teacher is expected to be able to cross disciplines in instruction.
The teacher prepares students for lessons by capitalizing on prior knowledge and using critical
thinking methods.
Collaboration—MMA teachers must collaborate in the classroom. They are the model for
appropriate and peaceful interaction. Teachers collaborate with students, other teachers,
volunteers, parents and the director of the school. Teachers also encourage student and
community collaboration.
Classroom Climate and Culture—The teacher should create a classroom environment that
encourages student enthusiasm and assists in the development of good study habits. The
teacher capitalizes instructionally on spontaneous incidents in the classroom or beyond. The
teacher should engage the students in quality discourse which allows for student examination
of a variety of subjects, including tangential topics, without straying from the learning process.
A quality classroom climate encourages thorough and self-directed learning while being
adaptive to meet necessary standards. The teacher always reacts constructively to student
feelings and attitudes.
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Student Assessment— The teacher assesses and evaluates student progress and adjusts
instruction accordingly. The teacher uses the assessment to assure that students are meeting
appropriate learning goals. The teacher reports this progress to students, parents and the
director of the school. This information should also be used to inform instruction in such a
way that student achievement goals are being met. MMA Teachers should also be familiar
with alternative assessment and comfortable including it in the classroom. Teachers may use
assessments like mastery learning, exhibitions, student portfolios, student self-assessment and
presentations. If there is a reason for intervention with students, the teacher is knowledgeable
about options for students with disabilities as well as English language learners. The teacher
assesses and evaluates student progress and adjusts instruction accordingly.
Curriculum Development—The teacher is competent and current in a variety of subject matter
and is willing to share this information for the continual improvement of school curriculum.
The curricular revision process should be ongoing and evidence-based for the purpose of
improving student achievement. The teacher sees the world as a classroom and is constantly
looking for ways to improve and expand the learning community. The ideal teacher is forward
thinking and capable of stepping outside the boundaries of traditional education in
development and design of curriculum.
Classroom Management—The teacher develops his or her own sense of appropriate classroom
boundaries and how his or her personal philosophy resonates within the philosophy of the
school as a community. The teacher is vigilant in protecting students, equipment, facilities and
the sanctity of the classroom space. Additionally, the teacher acts positively, pleasantly and
optimistically in the classroom in order to model similar behaviors for his or her students.
Professional Growth—The teacher continues professional development through workshops,
conferences, seminars and/or advanced course work in education or a subject area.
Membership in a professional Montessori education would assist teachers in professional
development. If there are opportunities for in-services, teachers may attend and participate.
In addition, teachers may be asked to share with his or her colleagues any special training he or
she may have received.
Parent Interaction—The teacher is the initial contact point for parents who may have concerns
or feedback regarding student performance. Effective teacher/parent interaction is crucial for
the development of healthy relationships in the school community. The teacher will also
recognize the need for director intervention and initiate such intervention in a timely manner.
B. Outline the criteria and process that will be used to select the school’s leader.
The following process will be followed to select Magnolia Montessori Academy’s director:
1. The board appoints the search committee.
2. The board begins search through Montessori resources, locally-circulated media, and/or
word of mouth.
3. The potential applicants will submit their curriculum vitae.
4. The board will determine which candidates to interview.
5. The board will personally interview each candidate and use the following criteria to
evaluate applicants:
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 commitment to and knowledge of the Montessori method
 passion for educational reform
 ability to effectively and peacefully manage a staff
 superb communication and interpersonal skills
 high degree of integrity, character and ethical behavior
 current Montessori training and/or willingness to obtain Montessori training
6. The board will select the director and initiate contract signing. The final decision will be
contingent upon a clear law enforcement search including national fingerprint check,
verification of employment history and personal references as well as any other
requirements set forth in Florida law and rule.
The director will be evaluated annually by the board using an evaluation tool derived from, but
not limited to, the Polk County School Board’s Principal Evaluation instrument. This
evaluation will be conducted by a member of the board, the results of which will be discussed
at the board meeting. Additionally, the evaluation results will be included in an annual school
review.
C. Provide a staffing plan for each year of the charter term aligned with the school’s
projected enrollment as detailed on the cover page of this application.
MMA will have a director of education and a director of finance for each year of the charter
term. MMA will also employ four teachers for the first year, five the second, five and an
assistant the third and seven teachers for the next two years. If additional staff is required,
MMA’s governing board would approve any staffing plan changes. Though the MMA staffing
plan seems sparse, the projected enrollment for the school is not likely to exceed 63 for the
first year. In future years, the MMA director may have teaching responsibilities for class size
amendment compliance.
D. Explain the school’s plan for recruitment, selection, and development.
Recruitment
In order to hire the most qualified teachers, Magnolia Montessori Academy will advertise the
teaching positions locally as well as through Montessori resources. The board will draft an
advertisement identifying the school and requesting the submission of both curriculum vitae
and a cover letter explaining the applicant’s intent. In addition, the board will encourage
grassroots advertising like word-of-mouth, internet, community bulletin boards, etc.
Selection
The curriculum vitae and cover letters will be reviewed by the director (or the board if the
director is not yet hired). The director will then conduct in-person interviews. The ultimate
decision on teaching staff will be made by the director, perhaps in consultation with the
members of the board. Hiring the teaching team is a very important decision. The director
must be vigilant that the teachers are capable of fulfilling the mission and guiding principles of
the school. All applicants must at least have a Statement of Eligibility from the Florida
Department of Education indicating that they are eligible for a temporary teaching certificate.
In addition, all applicants must express a willingness to pursue Montessori training.
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Professional Development
Due to the nature of the Montessori method, Magnolia Montessori Academy teachers will be
required to expand their education to include the basics of Montessori education and any other
professional development necessary to keep current in the teacher’s field of specialization.
Teachers will also be trained in implementing service learning in and out of the classroom. In
addition, any teacher trainings required to use software or computer resources will be
conducted throughout the school year. For example, MMA expects that there will be
professional development to assist reading teachers or administrators in administering the
county and state assessments. Magnolia Montessori Academy is committed to having a staff
whose education is current, relevant and varied.
Teacher Evaluation
Teachers will be evaluated at least once per year using a tool designed by the board in
conjunction with the Magnolia Montessori Academy staff. The tool will include a rubric
assessment and a space for narrative comments if any are needed. These evaluations will be
used to inform professional development and hone skills and collaborative management of the
classroom.
Section 11: Education Service Providers
The school does not intend to contract with any education service providers.
Section 12: Human Resources and Employment
A. Explain the school’s compensation plan, including whether staff will be publicly or
privately employed.
MMA staff will be privately employed as employees of a Florida non-profit corporation.
MMA may use the teacher salary schedule of the Polk County School Board as a salary
minimum, including a similar benefits package. The directors will be paid a salary
commensurate with their level of experience and reflective of the school’s budget
requirements. Any raises in salary or changes in benefits would be at the discretion of the
MMA governing board.
B. Describe the proposed personnel policies and procedures to which staff will be
required to adhere, including expectations for participation in the school’s professional
development program. If personnel policies and procedures have not been developed
provide a clear plan, including timeline, for the development and approval by
governing board.
Magnolia Montessori Academy is developing pro forma personnel policies and procedures
based, in part, upon PCSB’s personnel procedures. These policies include equal opportunity
practices, guidelines for employment, benefits and background checks. Some general
personnel policies follow; these are representative only and not exhaustive.
Appearance
Teachers are expected to dress appropriately for their venue. Montessori teachers will be very
actively involved in the classroom, engaged in various activities that would preclude typical
professional dress. For this reason, MMA expects its teachers to dress in a casual but
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professional manner. A shirt monogrammed with the MMA logo and a pair of casual khaki
pants would be considered acceptable for typical classroom days. Special events would require
amending this policy to include the social requirements of the event. The directors should
maintain professional dress.
Mandated Reporting of Child Abuse
Magnolia Montessori Academy teachers and director must report any signs of abuse to the
applicable authorities as mandated in FS Chapter 98-328.
E-mail
All staff will be issued an e-mail address for school use. It is the responsibility of the teacher
or the director to check his or her e-mail on a regular basis and respond in a timely manner.
Magnolia Montessori Academy hopes to use primarily e-mail in its inter-staff communications
and memos in order to reduce paper use. In addition, parents will be encouraged to use email as a method of interacting with teachers. Teachers must maintain confidentiality and
professionalism in all e-mail discourse.
Materials Use
Teachers are responsible for the careful, purposeful use of materials within the Montessori
classroom. Magnolia Montessori Academy expects that each staff member would practice
diligence in assuring that both staff and the students treat the materials and space with
respect. In addition, when the school day is over, teachers must ensure that students properly
store any materials used in the day. This will enable MMA to reuse materials as much as
possible and present a good example of stewardship to the students.
Staff Meetings
Magnolia Montessori Academy staff will meet at least bi-weekly to discuss any pertinent
information regarding curriculum, schedule, student and parent issues, professional
development or any other reason deemed necessary by the board and/or the director.
Teachers are expected to attend any meetings held at MMA.
Field Trips
Teachers will be encouraged to develop and plan school trips which would enhance the
learning community. Field trip procedures must be followed to ensure student safety and
compliance with policy.
Lesson Planning
Teachers are required to maintain records documenting the lessons planned and completed.
Teachers should work closely with each other as well as the director as necessary in order to
assure that all aspects of the school year’s global plan are being addressed. Teachers should
provide enough flexibility within their lesson planning to account for student exploration of
tangential, but appropriate topics.
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Mailboxes
Teachers and the director may have mailboxes in which will be placed any appropriate
information in hard copy form. Teachers and students are encouraged to make use of e-mail
options in order to communicate interpersonally. Teachers are responsible for maintaining
personal mailboxes.
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Room Environment
The Montessori classroom is the center of the community and must be maintained in a
prepared manner. Teachers and the director are responsible for encouraging the students
toward maintaining their environment. Watchful waiting and gentle encouragement as
opposed to rigidity and authoritarian practices are more aligned with the Montessori
methodology. Each student is wholly responsible for his or her space and its condition,
keeping in mind that the space may be used next by another community member. Teachers
may use gentle suggestions to encourage students to respect the space and materials.
Volunteers
Community members and parents are an integral part of authentic and relevant learning.
Volunteers should be encouraged and welcomed into the classroom. Any volunteer who
approaches the teacher or director about being a volunteer in the classroom should be
screened and approved as a PCSB volunteer.
Professional Development
Due to the nature of the Montessori classroom, trainings to assist with development of
curriculum, classroom climate, peer interaction and potentially Montessori certification
trainings may occur during the school year. Teachers will also be trained in appropriate and
effective service learning techniques. Additional trainings may be encouraged outside the
school year, during summers or holidays. In addition to Montessori based trainings, there will
be additional in-service trainings sponsored by the PCSB or MMA to help provide information
about current topics of interest to MMA teachers or administrator
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Section 13: Student Recruitment and Enrollment
A. Describe the plan for recruiting students, including strategies for reaching the school’s
targeted populations and those that might otherwise not have easy access to
information on available educational options.
Magnolia Montessori Academy will utilize the following strategies for reaching each of the
school's targeted populations:
1. Students with prior elementary Montessori education: Parents who have had a prior
Montessori experience and are searching for another will most likely be found through our
internet marketing presence.
2. Traditionally-schooled or home-schooled students: Additionally, MMA will recruit
eligible students from the Lakeland area for the school. These students will be recruited by
community outreach through the local print media, as well as relying on word of mouth to
disseminate open enrollment information. Local homeschooling groups will also be sent
an advertisement, and MMA will consider using print flyers in the local libraries
announcing open enrollment. MMA is confident that the excellent reputation of
Montessori education in Lakeland will encourage parents of eligible students to apply for
admission to the school. Parents of these students will be provided with additional
information on the Montessori method before admission to ensure that they understand
and will support the mission and vision of the school. Parents who feel that MMA will be
a good fit for their child will be encouraged to apply
3. Students who might not have easy access to educational options: In an effort to
reach those families who might not have access to the current information about
educational options, MMA may hold public information sessions at public libraries, hold
community events and use community organizations like Parker Street Ministries or Family
Fundamentals who serve large, varied segments of the population. MMA is committed to
being a truly community school, and will welcome applications for eligible students from
homes in close proximity to our location.
In addition, Magnolia Montessori Academy may choose to use an advertising campaign to
targeted areas to more aggressively market the school if it seems like additional resources are
necessary.
B. Explain how the school will achieve a racial/ethnic balance reflective of the
community it serves or with the racial/ethnic range of other local public schools.
The Montessori philosophy celebrates diversity as an avenue to authentic education and as
enrichment of the school environment. The Montessori Method naturally attracts a wide
range of cultures, due in part to the international appeal of Montessori education. Magnolia
Montessori Academy will make every effort to ensure that the racial and ethnic ranges of Polk
County are mirrored in the school.
Magnolia Montessori Academy will not discriminate in its enrollment practices based upon
race, ethnicity, national origin, religion or disability.
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C. Describe the school’s proposed enrollment policies and procedures, including an
explanation of the enrollment timeline, criteria and/or any preferences for enrollment,
and lottery process.
Enrollment Policy and Procedure
Magnolia Montessori Academy is committed to providing Montessori education to eligible
students in the Lakeland area. Magnolia Montessori Academy will not discriminate against
applicants based upon uncontrollable factors like race, ethnicity, religion, national origin or
disability.
All eligible students, however, have an equal opportunity of attending the school through the
random lottery to be used if the school is oversubscribed. Before eligible students submit
applications, the director or board will explain carefully to parents of potential students exactly
what the MMA mission and guiding principles are as well as encourage parents to research
Montessori education to see if they feel it is a good fit for their student. Parents will then be
asked to sign a statement noting what the details of Montessori education entail (including
non-traditional methodology, assessment and parent and student requirements). Parents will
then have access to an enrollment package which contains



MMA FAQ sheet,
MMA Application explanation, and
MMA Parent Volunteer Form.
Open enrollment for the 2013-2014 school year will begin soon after the charter contract is
negotiated (as yet undetermined) and will be open for a specified time to be determined by the
board. .
The director and teachers may also wish to meet with the parents and the students during the
application process for clarification of any aspect of the portfolio.
Enrollment Preferences
The following eligible students will have preference in admission, assuming that at no point
these preferences are more than a small percentage of the school, as per federal guidelines:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Siblings of current MMA students
Children of MMA staff
Children with prior Montessori experience
Children of the MMA founders (See Appendix H—Founding Group)
Children within close geographic range of the school
Lottery Process
Following the enrollment preferences listed above, all eligible students shall have an equal
opportunity to attend MMA by selection using a random lottery selection process. If the
number of applicants exceeds the number of available openings, MMA staff will hold a
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random drawing wherein students are selected for admission to MMA. A waiting list for
eligible students will be established if there are more applicants than spaces.
D. Explain any student and/or family contracts that will be used as a requisite for initial
and continued enrollment in the school. Describe if and how the school will enforce
such contracts.
Parents must be willing to commit to 20 volunteer hours per family per school year. Parents
of eligible students who wish to enroll will be required to sign a Parent Volunteer Agreement.
Volunteer opportunities present themselves often during, before and after school hours, as
well as on campus or at home.
These volunteer hours are required for all MMA families. If a family has preexisting issues
which preclude them from participating in the volunteer process, it will be up to the director’s
discretion whether or not such absence constitutes grounds for dismissal due to lack of parent
involvement.
Parents and students must also be willing to sign an agreement that commits the family to
peaceable interaction while in communication with staff, faculty and other parents; to
supporting the MMA student in his or her academic endeavors; and to attempting a good faith
effort at attending conferences and PAC meetings. Failure to adhere to MMA policies could
result in dismissal.
E. Explain any other efforts to encourage parental and community involvement, if
applicable.
Parents are an essential element of the Magnolia Montessori Academy community. The
founding group consists of elementary and preschool parents from Lakeland Montessori
Schoolhouse who wish to make Montessori education available to even more students.
Parents were integral to the project and are wholly responsible for its conception. This
involvement, however, will not end with the opening of MMA. Magnolia Montessori
Academy fully expects that parents will participate in school life as important support for
students and classroom teachers as well as work as school volunteers, PAC members and/or
board members.
As a criterion for admission to MMA, parents will and sign a contract agreeing to 20 hours of
volunteer time per family per school year. These volunteer hours may occur in many contexts
including PAC meetings, classroom support, community awareness projects, grounds work, or
instructional support. Magnolia Montessori Academy feels that an involved parent is one who
is aware of his or her child’s educational process and supportive of the learning community.
Within Parent Action Committee (PAC) meetings, the school may offer some training on
topics such as student development, Montessori philosophy and classroom organization.
These meetings serve to orient the parent in the Montessori classroom, to assist in the parental
understanding of the important classroom work, as well as to encourage participation in the
learning process. Montessori work can sometimes feel intangible and unfamiliar, so these
trainings will serve as the place where parents can begin to understand the work of the
Montessori student. Parents will also be invited to join a specific PAC committee group
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whose work might focus on areas like community awareness, service learning, events or
fundraising.
Parents may conference with teachers and students during semester reporting time. The
semester summation conference will focus on the strengths of a student’s progress as well as
suggestions for improving student performance in the Montessori classroom. The semester
conference will review student work. A special conference may be requested any time by the
parent, student or teacher. These conferences might be related to student work, health,
discipline and/or emotional well-being.
Parents will be invited to attend board meetings and input on topics is welcomed.
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III. BUSINESS PLAN
Section 14: Facilities
If the site is acquired:
A. Describe the proposed facility, including location, size and layout of space.
Please see Appendix I
Trinity Presbyterian Church
301 North Florida Avenue
Lakeland Florida 33801
Option 1 for Magnolia Montessori Academy is the second floor center space in Trinity
Presbyterian Church. The classrooms are approximately 4129 square feet of space.
Additionally, there is a 230 square foot office, 170 square foot storage room, 208 square feet
of bathroom space and 550 sq feet of hallways. Students and teachers will have access to space
shared with Trinity, including storage, theatre, conference spaces, kitchen, fellowship hall and
outdoor playgrounds.
A unique learning experience will be available at this location. Students and teachers will have
access to field trips to police and fire stations, Polk Theatre, Exploration children’s museum
and Botanical Gardens.
B. Describe the actions that will be taken to ensure the facility is in compliance with
applicable laws, regulations and policies and is ready for the school’s opening.
This space was previously occupied by the McKeel Preschool program. It has already been
determined that the facility is in compliance with applicable district policies. Before the school
opens, however, the MMA board of directors will conduct the facilities checklist which will
ensure that compliance with all applicable laws, regulations and policies is established.
MMA’s facilities pre-opening checklist includes ensuring that:


Closet








The Certificate of Occupancy is on file at the school and at PCSB;
The Certificates of insurance are at least at the minimum levels and are on file at the
school and at PCSB;
The passing Fire Inspection Form is on file;
The passing Health Inspection Form is on file;
The transportation agreement or contract is on file;
The food service contract is in place for the upcoming school year;
Written plans for fire drills and life safety procedures are in place;
A copy of written procedures for tornado drills and fire drills are on file;
Evidence of at least one tornado drill is scheduled for the upcoming year; and
A copy of the lease agreement is on file.
Anything else that is required by state or local regulations is on file.
94
C. Describe how the facility will meet the school’s capacity needs for students to be
served.
If occupied by 63 students, the space will provide 65.5 square feet per student. If occupied by
109 students, the space will provide 37 square feet per student. This is well within the
recommended 25 square feet per student. Should enrollment grow there is also additional floor
space available as Trinity renovates currently unused space.
D. Explain the anticipated costs for the facility, including renovation, rent, utilities and
maintenance. Identify, if applicable, any funding sources (other than state and local
funding) that will be applied to facilities-related costs.
o The financial plan for the proposed school should align with the facilities-related costs described.
Magnolia Montessori Academy has a verbal agreement with Trinity Presbyterian to pay no
more than $50,000 yearly, with annual cost of living adjustment budgeted in for the inclusive
use of their educational space. At present there are no renovations necessary. Trinity
Presbyterian is planning an elevator in their renovations which should be completed before the
school opens. Should this be delayed and an elevator or lift is required there is sufficient use in
the dedicated stairwell for a lift to be installed. The only extra required by MMA is
phone/fax/internet service which has been budgeted for $200 per month/$2400 for the year.
The school will use state and local funding to pay for the school space.
“Inclusive use” constitutes
 Rent
 Utilities
 Instructional, office and storage spaces
 Security
 Maintenance services and supplies
 Janitorial services and supplies
 Reasonable shared use of a copy machine and paper supplies
 Shared use conference rooms, kitchen and fellowship hall
E. Describe the back-up facilities plan.
o What is the alternate plan for facilities if the proposed facility is not available or is determined to be
inappropriate for the school’s opening?
Chapel in the Grove Education Building
1540 New Jersey Road
Lakeland Florida 33803
Option 2 for Magnolia Montessori Academy is the education building of Chapel in Grove
Church. The classrooms are approximately 4181 square feet of space. Additionally, there is a
400 square foot office, 140 square foot storage room, 300 square feet of bathroom space and
798 square feet of hallways. Students and teachers will have access to space shared with Chapel
in the Grove, including storage, kitchen, fellowship hall and outdoor playgrounds and
extensive campus area.
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A unique learning experience will be available at this location as the acres of green space
surrounding this area are very much in line with the nature based learning incorporated in the
Montessori style.
Section 15: Transportation Service
A. Describe the school’s plan for transportation, including any plans for contracting
services. Your plan should discuss, to the greatest extent possible, the issues relevant
to the school’s transportation plans.1
Magnolia Montessori Academy believes that transportation should not impede a student’s
access to education at the school. To this end, MMA will contract with a local charter school
with appropriate and available student buses to provide transportation to and from school.
Negotiations have begun with McKeel Academy in order to contract for transportation
services. The present plan is to use McKeel’s current routes as the boundaries for provided
transportation, though students will have the option of having a parent drive them to a
McKeel school location for transportation from their campus to MMA. For those students
who live within a two mile radius from school, MMA presumes that they will walk, ride their
bikes or have parents drop them off.
Section 16: Food Service
A. Describe the school’s plan for food services, including any plans for contracting
services or plans to participate in the National School Lunch Program.
Magnolia Montessori Academy will not have on-site food preparation for its students. Instead,
the school will contract with another school in close proximity to provide meals for all
students. To further this end, MMA will participate as needed to survey families for free and
reduced lunch status. MMA will also provide a space for students to store their lunches if they
bring them from home.
Section 17: Budget
A. Provide an operating budget covering each year of the requested charter term that
contains revenue projections, expenses and anticipated fund balances. The budget
should be based on the projected student enrollment indicated on the cover page of the
application.
Magnolia Montessori Academy will operate with a budget which is primarily funded through
FEFP. In addition, MMA will seek revenue from grants and fundraising for all fiscal years.
Below is a snapshot of the operating budgets. Please see Appendix J—Magnolia Montessori
Academy’s Operating and Start-up Budget for a detailed, five year budget. There are two
budgets that were developed for use in the charter school application process: Appendix J, a
budget without the competitive Charter Schools Program federal grant money; and Appendix
K, a budget with the competitive CSP grant funds. For the purpose of MMA’s projections and
narrative, the school used the budget without CSP grant funds.
1
The charter school and the sponsor shall cooperate in making arrangements that ensure that transportation is not a
barrier to equal access for all students residing within a reasonable distance of the charter school as determined in its
charter. (Section 1002.33(20)(c), Florida Statutes)
96
Magnolia Montessori Academy Operating Budget Snapshot
Year
Projected
Enrollment
Projected
Revenue
Projected
Expenditures
Projected Net
Balance
Projected
Fund Balance
2013-2014
63
$369,111
$355,401
$13,710
--
2014-2015
77
$443,670
$421,061
$22,609
$13,710
2015-2016
89
$504,966
$459,048
$45,918
$36,319
2016-2017
103
$579,505
$543,920
$94.810
$82,237
2017-2018
103
$613,184
$564,375
$111,484
$177,047
B. Provide a start-up budget that contains a balance sheet, revenue projections, including
source of revenues, expenses, and anticipated fund balance. The start-up budget must
cover any period prior to the beginning of FTE payments in which the school will
expend funds on activities necessary for the successful start-up of the school.
Please see Appendix J—Magnolia Montessori Academy’s Operating and Start-up Budget
C. Provide a detailed narrative description of the revenue and expenditure assumptions
on which the operating and start-up budget are based.
The budget narrative should provide sufficient information to fully understand how budgetary figures were
determined.
Magnolia Montessori Academy has collaborated with a finance professional in order to ensure
current acceptable practice in establishing a budget for the school. MMA is only as sound as
its finances; a balanced budget is integral to the successful accomplishment of the school’s
mission and vision. To this end, MMA takes its financial dealings very seriously. The MMA
Start-Up and Operating Budgets do not include the competitive CSP grant money in this
budget narrative. For a copy of the Start-up and Operating Budget with grant money please
see Appendix K—Magnolia Montessori Academy’s Start-Up and Operating Budget with Grant
Funds.
Revenue Assumptions
Start-up Revenue Assumptions: The 2012-13 are based upon the founders of the
Charter covering the startup costs(13440000) to the MMA project for the purpose of
charter application preparation and start-up. MMA will seek donations from outside
sources as well to cover these expenses.
Operating Revenue Assumptions: The 2013 Florida Education Finance Program
(FEFP) revenue (Red Book 13310000) was projected using the 2012-13 Charter
Revenue Estimate Worksheet with a projected student population of 47 Base Student
K- 3rd grade and 16 Base Students 4th – 8th grade. The school did not include any
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additional ESE allocations in its estimation. Therefore, the FEFP revenue totaled
$369,111.00 for the first year of operation.
After 3 years of Operation, MMA should be eligible for capital outlay funding.
Additionally, MMA board fundraising might focus on building an unencumbered fund
balance which could be used to supplement the budget.
In subsequent school years, the school does not project any changes in levels of
funding; however, the budget does anticipate a student increase in FTE numbers per
year up to 109 students. MMA will increase its staff each year ensure that the class
sizes are in compliance with current standards for the class size amendment.
Additionally, the director of education is anticipated to be a fully trained Montessori
instructor.
Expenditure Assumptions
Start-Up (2012-13) Expenditure Assumptions
MMA has the following expenditure currently budgeted for the start-up year:
Instructional staff training services, board, school administration, contracted fiscal
services, and operation of plant.
Board: MMA has budgeted for three expenditure elements for the board in
the startup year. The application for the 501 (c) 3 with the federal government
will cost $750 and this is budgeted under Contracted Services—Admin/Gov
(17100310). Next, the directors and officers of the board will need liability
insurance (17100320) of which the initial payment of $500 is expected to be
paid during this start-up year. The board is also required by state statute to
complete a charter school governing board training (17100330) which is
estimated to be $500. MMA will be receiving pro bono legal services for other
legal issues in the start-up year to include corporate bylaws, charter contract
review, and additional corporate set up fees. The total for board expenditures
for the start-up year is $1,750.
School Administration: The administration of the school will require the
following expenditures for the start-up year: travel, postage, and supplies.
Postage (17300370) will be used for community awareness and mailings to
parents and students; it is estimated to be about $100. Administrative supplies
include charter application printing fees as well as costs associated with the
start-up year. MMA projects that these costs will be $500. Total expenditures
for the school administration are $600.
Operation of Plant: MMA projects that there will be a start-up year cost of
$500 associated with general liability and umbrella insurance deposits
(17900320).
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The total expenditures for the start-up year are $2,850. The revenue projections were
$2,850 leaving a net balance of $0.
Operating Budget Expenditure Assumptions
MMA has the following expenditures currently budgeted: Instructional, pupil
personnel services, instructional staff training services, board, school administration,
facilities, contracted fiscal services, central services with the district, transportation, and
operation of plant.
Instructional Expenditures: Instructional expenditures include four (4)
teacher salaries and benefits, instructional supplies, textbooks and substitute
teachers. The four teacher salaries (15000310) were computed using Step 2,
Level 1 teachers using the PCSB salary schedule. Included on this line item is
social security, FICA and the payroll company fee totaling 13% of salary. Also
included is health insurance totaling $12,960. Total teacher salaries of
$168,330. For subsequent years, the school budgeted for step and merit raises
for each teacher.
The budget for the first three years (2013-2015) reflects $25,000 for
instructional supplies (15000510). Included in this cost are expenditures for
necessary classroom materials only, with a focus on reusable materials. This
cost includes the cost of a classroom computer. For school years 2015-2016
and 2016-2017 the amount decreases to $15,000 because, although we fully
stocked with materials, we will be adding classrooms and additional materials.
The Montessori environment relies heavily on its materials for learning. Once
the school will be fully supplied, there is a projected expense for repair and
replacement as necessary, as well as new instructional material for additional
areas such as our arts, language and music programs.
MMA has budgeted $2,500 in 2013-2014 for instructional textbooks
(15000520). MMA will focus on obtaining textbooks from the PCSB book
warehouse and only purchase what is absolutely necessary for student
achievement. In subsequent years, the instructional textbook budget will allow
teachers to purchase additional textbooks required for student achievement.
Substitute teachers (15000750) are budgeted for each school year. The total
projected amount is $3,760 which provides for substitute coverage for 10 days
per teacher per year. The projected amount for substitutes rises 3% each year
with expected cost-of-living increases.
The total instructional expenditure amount, established through adding up
teaching salaries and benefits, instructional supplies, instructional textbooks
and substitute teachers is $199,590 for the first year of operation.
99
Pupil Personnel Services: MMA has budgeted $500 for each year of
operation for any necessary contracted services (16100390) for students like an
ESE specialist. Additionally, if any supplies (16100510) are necessary for such
services, MMA has budgeted for $500 for these expenses. The total amount
budgeted for pupil personnel services is $1,000.
Instructional Staff Training Services: MMA has budgeted $2,500 for
instructional trainings (16400330) and increasing to $3500 as additional
teachers are added for each year in the operating budget. The school considers
it a priority to encourage and provide professional development for its staff
and to this end estimates a budgeted expenditure per year of $2,500 in its first
year to $3,500 within five years.
Board Expenditures: The board expenditures include three types of
contracted services, required board directors and officers insurance, and board
training and development. The first type of contracted service is line itemed as
Contracted Services—Admin/Gov (17100310). The school has budgeted
$2,000 for the projected cost of a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) to
complete or review the school’s tax return.
The second contracted expenditure is the audit services (17100311) for which
the school has budgeted $5,000 for a yearly independent audit. The MMA
budget also reflects a built-in inflationary increase for subsequent years.
The last contracted expenditure, for any necessary legal expenses (17100312), is
$1,000. MMA has budgeted $1,000 for legal expenses for each year of
operation.
The board is also required to have both liability insurance and training. The
board insurance (17100320) is projected to be $2,500 which is the estimated
$3,000 less the deposit made in the start-up year. Required board training
(17100330) is expected to be $500 for the first year and $750 each subsequent
years. This training cost includes the required Florida Charter School
Conference costs for the board member attendance. The required
fingerprinting will be paid for by the individual board members.
Total board expenditures for 2013-2014 are $9,000. Board expenditures
increase with each year.
School Administration: For school administration, expenditures include
directors salaries, administrative travel, postage, advertising, administrative
supplies, administrative equipment, administrative dues and fees, miscellaneous
administrative expenses and the 5% district administration fee. The director of
education salary (17300310) was determined using $40,000 as a base salary.
Included in the administrator salary is social security, FICA and the payroll
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company fee totaling 13%. MMA will also contribute $270 per month to a
health insurance plan for the director of education. This totals $48,440. The
salary projections include a step level raise per year.
Base Salary:
$40,000
+
13% for payroll
services:
$5,200
+
101
+
Health insurance
payment:
$3,240
= =
Total Director
Salary:
$48,440
The director of finance salary (17300311) was determined using $15,000 as a base
salary. Included in the administrator salary is social security, FICA and the payroll
company fee totaling 13%. This totals $16,950. The salary projections include a step
level raise per year as the position increases from part time to full time.
Base Salary:
$15,000
+
13% for payroll
services:
$1,950
+
Health insurance
payment:
$0
= =
Total Director
Salary:
$16,950
Administrative travel (17300330) includes any travel the director might need to do for
conferences, meetings, etc. and is budgeted at $200. This number increases with every
year. MMA expects postage costs (17300370) for mailings to be $315.00, which is the
Florida Department of Education’s suggestion of $5 per student per school year. The
school has budgeted $500 for advertising (17300390), which will include printing of
parent informational materials and advertisements for open positions. Administrative
supplies (17300510) is budgeted at $1,000 and includes all administrative office
supplies; this amount increases to $1,500 for years after the first year of operation.
Administrative equipment (17300640) will include the school computer and other
necessary equipment; the school has budgeted $2,500 for administrative equipment. In
the 2017-2018 school year, another $2,500 is budgeted for anticipated equipment
replacement. MMA may wish to be part of various organizations, so the school has
budgeted $500 for the associated dues and fees (17300730) which will also increase
incrementally each year. MMA has also budgeted for $1,000 for miscellaneous
expenses (17300790) which might occur during the school year; again, these projected
expenses increase incrementally each year. The Polk County School Board’s
administrative fee of 5% is also included in the administration section and totals
$18,456.
The total for school administration is $89,111 for 2013-2014, and increases each year as
shown in the budget.
Facilities: For school facilities (17400360), MMA has a verbal agreement with Trinity
Presbyterian to lease unused educational space. The cost of $50,000 is inclusive,
amenities to include rent, utilities, instructional, office and storage spaces, security,
maintenance services and supplies, reasonable shared use of copy machine and paper
supplies, kitchen, fellowship hall and outdoor spaces. The rent reflects a standard
increase for each of the subsequent years.
Transportation: MMA will contract with McKeel academy to provide transportation
to the school. The school did not budget any expenditures for this for the first year as
it will be a pass-through system. In the contract negotiations with McKeel, MMA will
determine the course of events if the transportation expenditure for McKeel exceeds
the allocation for transportation. The expectation is that MMA would pay 100% of its
allocated transportation dollars to McKeel.
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Operation of Plant: Much of the operation of plant expenditures are included in the
facilities expenditures. MMA will need to provide general liability and umbrella
insurances. The budgeted expenditures for general liability is $3,000 and for umbrella
insurance is $800 which total $3,800, minus the $500 for the deposit paid in the startup year for a 2010-2011 total of $3,300. These projections are based upon the school’s
small population. These amounts increase with each successive year.
The total amount for all expenditures for the 2013-2014 school year is $355,401 and is based
upon totaling up all sections of expenditures. Subtracting total expenditures from total
revenue equals the ending fund balance for year one of $13,710, or 6.01% of total revenue.
2013-2014
Total Revenue:
$369,111
-
Total
Expenditures:
$355,401
=
=
Ending Fund
Balance, Year
One:
$13,710
For subsequent years, the available fund balance increases.
D. Explain how the governing board will monitor the budget, including a strategy for
addressing revenue shortfalls due to lower than expected enrollment.
One of the purposes behind having a Director of Education and a Director of Finance is
expressly to create a stronger system of checks and balances as well as view all expenditures
from both an educational benefit stand point as well as cost stand point.
Magnolia Montessori Academy’s board will meet once per month and all budget expenditures
will be discussed. Both directors will be present for these meetings. Any disagreements over
spending will be resolved by the board.
Children in a Montessori setting typically remain in the same classroom for a three year cycle.
This gives their teachers the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of individual
learning styles, interests, abilities and needs. Magnolia Montessori Academy intends to set
their classrooms up in this way as well. However, the second plane of development per Maria
Montessori is from ages 6-12 and is referred to as the Construction of Intelligence. Therefore,
if necessary, due to a short fall in enrolment Magnolia Montessori could combine the third
grade with the fourth and fifth, for example, and require one less teacher. We could also
engage in additional recruiting at the library and other local events as well as engage in
additional fundraisers to create revenue for Montessori Materials. However, due to our
conservative enrolment, as well as the high demand for another Montessori style school in
Polk County we do not expect that enrolment shortfall will be a big concern.
MMA does anticipate having a reasonable funds reserve in each school year. These funds will
be used for unexpected changes in FEFP funding, unexpected large expenses, and/or
replacement of one-time expense items. Additionally this balance will be used for classroom
expenses as needed. The MMA fiscal philosophy is to be compliant with regulations, to be
competitive with teacher salaries, and to provide necessary funds to the classroom.
103
E. Provide monthly cash flow projections for the school’s start-up period (i.e. from the
date on which the application is approved to the beginning of the first fiscal year of
operation) through the first year of operation.
See Appendix L—Magnolia Montessori Academy’s Monthly Cash Flow Projections.
F. Describe the school’s fundraising plan, if applicable. Report on the current status of
any fundraising efforts, including verification of any fundraising monies reported in the
school’s start-up or operating budgets.
Magnolia Montessori Academy’s board believes that fundraising locally to supplement district
and federal allocations is vital to school improvement. To this end, MMA will plan and
implement local fundraisers to augment the budget. The school expects that local fundraising
efforts will be focused initially on building unencumbered funds in reserve to protect the
school against uncertain financial forecasts.
Section 18: Financial Management and Oversight
A. Describe who will manage the school’s finances and how the school will ensure
financial resources are properly managed.
Magnolia Montessori Academy’s finances will be managed by the Director of Finance for the
school, who will be responsible for the day-to-day financial operations with oversight provided
by the governing board and by the Director of Education. To ensure that funds are not used
inappropriately, the governing board will periodically review the monthly accounting reports
and evaluate the annual audits. The board will learn to recognize any red flags which might
indicate financial irresponsibility. In addition, specific policies that ensure that the school’s
financial resources are properly managed will be developed by the board. These policies will
include two signatures on checks to prevent misuse of funds; board approval for large
expenses; and required fingerprinting for all employees. MMA has also budgeted for a finance
professional to assist the director of finance with tax preparation.
B. Describe the financial controls, including an annual audit and regular board review of
financial statements, which will be employed to safeguard finances.
MMA will hire an independent financial consultant who will prepare an annual financial report.
The governing board will use the “Auditor Selection Procedures for Charter Schools” which is
specified in Section 218.39 of the Florida Statutes. The governing board will establish an audit
committee who will
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Determine the auditor selection factors,
Publicly announce requests for auditors,
Provide interested auditing firms with the instructions to prepare their proposal,
Rank and recommend the most highly qualified audit firms, and
Present this information to the governing board, who negotiates and signs a written
contract with the chosen audit firm.
The annual audit will be submitted to the Polk County School Board on or before September
30 of each year. The annual report will contain a complete set of financial statements: assets,
liabilities, fund balances, revenues and expenditures, as well as any notes that have been
prepared by the school’s accountants.
104
In addition, MMA’s Director of Finance will prepare monthly financial statements. The
monthly financial statements will reflect all MMA’s revenue and expenditures using the
Financial and Program Cost Accounting and Reporting for Florida Schools, which is also
called the Red Book.
These financial reports will state not only the monthly information, but also the year-to-date
information. The Director of Education as well as each member of the governing board will
receive a copy of these monthly statements. MMA’s Director of Finance will also provide
monthly income statements and any other required statement to the Polk County School
Board’s financial office.
MMA will safeguard the accountability of finances by requiring




two signatures on all checks,
board approval of proposed budgets and amendments of,
an annual audit by an independent accounting firm, and
Both directors approval for all expenditures.
MMA will abide by all current and future local, state and federal guidelines for financial
controls.
Since MMA will be such a small school, the director will need to be vigilant in monitoring
student enrollment and will ensure that recruitment takes place as needed.
C. Describe the method by which accounting records will be maintained.
In order to maintain accounting records, MMA will use Generally Accepted Accounting
Principles (GAAP). Quick Books Pro is MMA’s choice for software as it uses the functions
and code numbers which are aligned with the Red Book.
D. Describe how the school will store student and financial records.
Magnolia Montessori Academy will obtain and store student and financial records in
accordance with the GS 7, the General Records Schedule for Public Schools Pre K-12, Adult
and Vocational & Technical. The school will also abide by the standards for retention
applicable to charter schools that are documented in the GS 1 (General Records Schedule for
State and Local Governments). Student records and employee files will be stored in a locked,
fireproof filing cabinet in the Director of Education’s office.
E. Describe the insurance coverage the school will obtain, including applicable health,
workers compensation, general liability, property insurance and directors and officers
liability coverage.
MMA will obtain all required insurances before the school opens.
MMA will offer health insurance coverage options to all full-time employees of MMA. During
MMA’s set up year, contracts will be set up with ACH Corporation of America to provide
105
health coverage. In addition, ACH of Corporation of America will provide employees with
worker’s compensation. The school will receive a copy of Trinity Presbyterian’s certificate of
insurances. MMA will obtain board director and officer insurance, general liability coverage
and an umbrella policy at the limits required.
106
Section 19: Action Plan
A. Present a projected timetable for the school’s start-up, including but not limited to the
following key activities:
i. Identifying and securing facility
ii. Recruiting and hiring staff
iii. Staff training
iv. Governing Board training
v. Policy Adoption by Board (if necessary)
vi. Lottery, if necessary
vii. Student enrollment
The activities included should align with the start-up budget described earlier in the
application. If an activity will be paid for by a source of funding not included in the start-up
budget, it should be clearly indicated. (This timetable is a projection and is not meant to be
binding on the school or sponsor)
Will be
completed by
August 2012
Activity
Magnolia Montessori
Academy submits application
Description


October 2012
PCSB approves charter

October 2012
MMA becomes a nonprofit
organization



Governing board established

October 2012
Implementation plan begins



October 2012
Bank accounts established

October 2012
Agreement signed with Trinity
Presbyterian or Chapel in the
107

October 2012
Application for charter will be
submitted by August 1, 2012
deadline.
Application will be reviewed by Polk
County School Board (PCSB).
Approval is granted by the Polk
County School Board and Magnolia
Montessori Academy is informed.
MMA applies for federal employer
identification number.
MMA applies for Florida sales tax
exemption.
MMA applies for 501(c)(3) status
with IRS.
The MMA governing board is
established according to state laws
and the school by-laws.
Board training is scheduled.
Necessary background checks occur.
The MMA board creates a plan to
take the school from approval to
opening.
The MMA board of directors will
establish appropriate bank accounts
and financial arrangements for the
school.
An agreement will be signed
Grove.
November 2012

First board meeting

November 2012

Charter agreement is
negotiated and signed



November 2012
Preparations for opening
MMA begin
November 2012
MMA establishes contact
information

December 2012
Recruitment of MMA staff
begins



December 2012

Recruitment of MMA
students begins

January 2013
Final plans, policies and
procedures developed and
approved

January 2013
Implementation of plans
begins

108
between MMA and either the Trinity
Presbyterian or Chapel in the Grove
for use of space.
The first MMA board meeting will
occur.
Schedule for future board meetings
will be established and published.
Charter agreement is reviewed with
legal counsel.
Terms of charter are negotiated as
needed.
Charter is signed.
MMA board and implementation
team begins execution of plans as
described in application.
The following will be established:
mailing address
phone number
email address
website
Advertising for the director and
teachers will begin.
The search for positions will be
promoted through professional
publications, local news
organizations, and word of mouth.
Interviews commence when
appropriate applications are
received.
Information will be shared with the
community so that appropriate
families learn about MMA.
The search for students will be
promoted through local news
organizations, MMA website, civic
groups, public notice boards, and
community events.
The MMA board (and MMA
directors, if hired) will create and
finalize all plans, policies, and
procedures for the school.
Plans for the following will be set
forth:
- academic achievement
- student progress
- accountability
January 2013
Admissions process begins

February 2013
Staff and student policies
established


February 2013
School calendar established



April 2013
Submit Florida Department of
Education Public Charter
School Grant application
Admission notification
May 2013
Obtain student records

May 2013
May 2013
Start Up Grant approved
Equipment and material
ordering begins


June 2013
Establish MMA at Trinity
Presbyterian or Chapel in the
Grove

Staff is hired

February 2013
June 2013
109


- record keeping
- technology
- budget
- safety
- student conduct
- transportation
- food service
- professional development
- curriculum standards
- student application
- payroll and benefits
- staff handbook
- student handbook
- school calendar
Student admission applications
accepted.
The MMA board of directors will
establish policies for both staff and
students.
Staff and student handbooks will be
written and available.
The MMA board will establish the
2013-2014 school calendar.
It is expected that this calendar will
follow the standard PCSB calendar.
Based on past experience, it is
expected that February will be an
appropriate time to submit.
Students are notified of admissions
decision.
From previous schools, student
records will be obtained once the
student has enrolled in MMA.
Items to be ordered include:
- instructional materials
- classroom supplies
- office supplies
- classroom and office furniture
- computers and software
The space at either location will be
available for MMA.
Necessary improvements will be
made to prepare the space.
The directors will be hired as soon as
possible.


June 2013
Student information system
established

July 2013
Pre-opening checks and visits
conducted
MMA approved for opening
Staff development and
training

July 2013
August 2013



August 2013
Summer orientation

August 2013
School opens

110
The directors will, ideally, hire the
staff.
All staff participate in appropriate
background checks and drug
screenings.
Using Genesis, the MMA director will
establish a student information
system.
PCSB will conduct the pre-opening
checks and site visits.
PCSB will approve MMA to open.
Training will include:
- staff policies
- student policies
- school mission and expectations
- classroom management
- Montessori philosophy
- health and safety
- technology
- sexual abuse
-service learning
This will be arranged and provided
by the MMA governing board.
Orientation will be held for students,
staff, and families.
Following the PCSB schedule, school
will begin.
STATEMENT OF ASSURANCES
This form must be signed by a duly authorized representative of the applicant group and submitted with the
application for a charter school.
As the authorized representative of the applicant group, I hereby certify that the information submitted in this
application for a charter for ____________ is accurate and true to the best of my knowledge and belief; and
further, I certify that, if awarded a charter, the school:

Will be nonsectarian in its programs, admission policies, employment practices and operations.

Will enroll any eligible student who submits a timely application, unless the school receives a greater
number of applications than there are spaces for students, in which case students will be admitted
through a random selection process.

Will adhere to the antidiscrimination provisions of section 1000.05, F.S.

Will adhere to all applicable provision of state and federal law relating to the education of students with
disabilities, including the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act; section 504 of the Rehabilitation
Act of 1974; and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

Will adhere to all applicable provisions of federal law relating to students who are limited English
proficient, including Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Equal Educational Opportunities
Act of 1974.

Will participate in the statewide assessment program created under section 1008.22, F.S.

Will comply with Florida statutes relating to public records and public meetings, including Chapter 119,
Florida Statutes, and section 286.011, F.S., which are applicable to applicants even prior to being
granted a charter.

Will obtain and keep current all necessary permits, licenses and certifications related to fire, health and
safety within the building and on school property.

Will provide for an annual financial audit in accordance with section 218.39, F.S.
The governing board, at its discretion, allows __________________ (name), _____________(title) to sign as
the legal correspondent for the school.
______________________________________________
Signature
______________________________________________
Printed Name
111
Date
Appendix A—Bibliography
112
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<http://www.aosa.org/orff.html>.
Baumann, James F. Journeys. Orlando, FL: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012. Print.
Chattin-McNichols, John. (2002). Revisiting the Great Lessons, Spotlight: Cosmic Education.
Montessori Life. 14, n2, 43-44.
Cherath, Lata. Of Scabs and Showers: Teaching Science in the Middle School Montessori
Classroom. Montessori Life. Spring 2004. Retrieved February 2, 2009 from
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa4097/is_200404/ai_n9399217/
Cossentino, J.M. (2006).Big work: goodness, vocation, and engagement in the Montessori method.
Curriculum Inquiry , 36(1)
Dohrmann, Kathryn Rindskopf, et. al. High school outcomes in a public Montessori program.
Journal of Research in Childhood Education. December 20, 2007
Elkind, D. (2003).Montessori and constructivism. Montessori Life, Winter.
Florida Department of Education. (2011). Florida school law Charlottesville, VA: LexisNexis.
Franciscan Montessori Earth School. (2003). The Longitudinal Assessment Study: Eighteen Year
Follow-up (Final Study) [Study Results]. Portland, OR: Christopher Glenn.
Fountas, Irene C., and Gay Su. Pinnell. Guided Reading: Good First Teaching for All Children.
Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1996. Print.
Glendinning, Paul. View from the Pennies: Montessori Mathematics. Retrieved February 2, 2009
from www.maths.manchester.ac.uk/~pag/view/gayna20.pdf
Greene, P.K. (2005).Dear Maria Montessori. Kappa Delta Pi Record, Summer(2005), 164-166.
Haines, A., Baker, K., & Kahn, D. (2000). Optimal Developmental Outcomes. NAMTA Journal.
Lakeland Montessori Middle. Lakeland Montessori Middle Charter Application 2009.Rep. Polk
County School Board, 2009. Print
Lakeland Montessori Schoolhouse. Lakeland Montessori Schoolhouse Charter Renewal Document
2006. Rep. Polk County School Board, n.d. Web. 24 Apr. 2012. <http://www.polkfl.net/districtinfo/departments/schoolbased/schoolchoice/documents>.
Levin, H. (1988).Accelerated schools for at-risk students. Center for Policy Research in Education,
Lillard, A.S. (2005). Montessori: The science behind the genius. New York, NY: Oxford
University Press.
113
Lillard, A., & Else-Quest, N. (2006). Evaluating Montessori education. Science. 313, 1893-1894.
Lillard, P.P. (1988). Montessori: a modern approach. New York, NY: Schocken Books.
Lillard, P.P. (1996). Montessori today: a comprehensive approach to education from birth to
adulthood.
New York, NY: Schocken Books.
Montessori of Winter Garden. West Orange Montessori Charter School Application. Rep. N.p.:
Orange County Public Schools, 2010. Print
Montessori, M. (1982). Secret of childhood. New York, NY: Ballantine Books.
Montessori, M. (1986). The discovery of the child.. New York, NY: Ballantine Books.
Montessori, M. (1988). The Montessori method. New York, NY: Schocken Books.
Montessori, M. (1987). From childhood to adolescence: including 'erdkinder' and the functions of
the
university. New York, NY: Schocken Books.
Montessori, M. (1995). The absorbent mind. New York, NY: Holt and Co.
Montessori, M. (2009). Dr. Montessori's own handbook. New York, NY: Wilder Publications.
Powell, M. (2000).Can Montessorians and contructivists really be friends?. Montessori Life,
Winter, 44-51.
"P.S. ARTS Music Program." YouTube. YouTube, 07 Dec. 2010. Web. 20 June 2012.
<http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6J6yiC1u6Q>.
Rule, A & Barrera, M. (2003). Using Objects To Teach Vocabulary Words with Multiple
Meanings. Montessori Life. Summer. v15, n3, p14-17.
Seldin, T., & Epstein, P. (2006). The Montessori way. Abingdon, MD: The Montessori
Foundation.
"Toward Best Practice in Montessori: The Exercises of Practical Life (page 3)." Education.com.
N.p., n.d. Web. 20 July 2012.
<http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Toward_Best_Practice/?page=3>.
Turner, Joy. (1998). How Do Children Learn To Read. Montessori Life. Fall. v10, n4, p37.
"United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization." United Nations Educational,
Scientific and Cultural Organization. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 July 2012.
<http://www.unesco.org/new/en/>.
114
Appendix B—Articles of Incorporation
115
Articles of Incorporation
Electronic Articles of Incorporation
For
MAGNOLIA MONTESSORI ACADEMY INC.
N12000005686
FILED
June 06,..2012
Sec. Of tate
bmcknight
The undersigned incorporator, for the purpose of fom1ing a Florida not-forprofit corporation, hereby adopts the following Articles of Incorporation:
Article I
The name of the corporation is:
MAGNOLIA MONTESSORI ACADEMY INC.
Article II
The principal place of business address:
5312 MESSINA
LAKELAND, FL. US 33813
The mailing address of the corporation is:
5312 MESSINA
LAKELAND, FL. US 33813
Article III
The specific purpose for which this corporation is organized is:
EDUCATION AND CHARITABLE PURPOSES FOR A SCHOOL SERVING
CHILDREN AGES PRESCHOOL THROUGH MIDDLE SCHOOL
Article IV
The manner in which directors are elected or appointed is:
AS PROVIDED FOR IN THE BYLAWS.
Article V
The name and Florida street address of the registered agent is:
TAMMI J CROTTEAU
5312 MESSINA
LAKELAND, FL. 33813
I certify that I am familiar with and accept the responsibilities of
registered agent.
Registered Agent Signature: TAMMI CROTTEAU
116
N12000005686
Article VI
The name and address of the incorporator is:
FILED
June 06 2012
Sec. Of tate
bmcknight
TAMMI CROTTEAU
5312 MESSINA
LAKELAND, FL 33813
Electronic Signature of Incorporator: TAMMI CROTTEAU
I am the incorporator submitting these Articles of Incorporation and affirm that the facts stated herein are
true. I am aware that false information submitted in a document to the Department of State constitutes a
third degree felony as provided for in s.817.155, F.S. I understand the requirement to file an annual report
between January 1st and May lst in the calendar year following formation of this corporation and every
year thereafter to maintain ''active" status.
.
Article VII
The initial officer(s) and/or director(s) of the corporation is/are:
Title: D
TAMMI J CROTTEAU
5312 MESSINA
LAKELAND, FL. 33813 US
Title: D
MAILE VALENTINE
834 GLENDALE STREET
LAKELAND, FL. 33803 US
Title: D
AMANDA GASPARY
6961 LAKE EAGLE BROOKE DRIVE
LAKELAND, FL. 33813 US
Article VIII
The effective date for this corporation shall be:
06/06/2012
117
Certificate of Status
I certify from the records of this office that MAGNOLIA MONTESSORI ACADEMY INC. is
a corporation organized under the laws of the State of Florida, filed electronically on June 06,
2012, effective June 06, 2012.
The document number of this corporation is N12000005686.
I further certify that said corporation has paid all fees due this office through December 31,
2012, and its status is active.
I further certify that said corporation has not filed Articles of Dissolution.
I further certify that this is an electronically transmitted certificate authorized by section
15.16, Florida Statutes, and authenticated by the code noted below.
Authentication Code: 120607081850-700235986117#1
Given under my hand and the
Great Seal of the State of
Florida at Tallahassee, the
Capital, this the Seventh day of
June, 2012
Appendix C—By-Laws of Magnolia Montessori Academy, Inc.
119
BY-LAWS
OF
Magnolia Montessori Academy, Inc.
A Florida Corporation, Not for Profit
ARTICLE I
Definitions, Purposes and Powers
Section 1.1 Definitions. The terms set forth below shall have the following meanings unless
otherwise required by the context in which they may be used:
1.1-1. Articles of Incorporation. The term "Articles of Incorporation" shall mean the Articles of
Incorporation of the Project filed with the Department of State of Florida.
1.1-2. Board. The term “Board” shall mean the Board of Directors of the Project.
1.1-3. Bylaws. The term "Bylaws" shall mean the Bylaws of this Project except where reference
is specifically made to the bylaws of another entity or unit.
1.1-4. Director. The term "Director" shall mean an individual who is a Director of the Project as
described in Article IV.
1.1-5. Majority. The term “Majority” shall mean fifty-one percent (51%) of the applicable total
number.
1.1-6. Officer. The term “Officer” shall mean one or more of the positions as provided in
Article VII.
1.1-7. President. The term "President" shall mean the President of the Project as set forth in
Article VII.
1.1-8. Project. The term "Project" shall mean Magnolia Montessori Academy, Inc., a Florida
corporation not for profit, its successors and assigns.
1.1-9. Corporation. The term "Corporation" shall mean Magnolia Montessori Academy, Inc., a
Florida corporation not for profit.
1.1-10 State. The term “State” shall mean the State of Florida.
Section 1.2 Statement of Purpose. Magnolia Montessori Academy, Inc. is a broadly based,
nonprofit community organization whose purpose is exclusively educational and charitable and
is to secure and distribute contributions from individuals, corporations, and foundations for the
benefits of the students of the Charter School in Polk County which it will operate. The specific
purposes of the Project shall be:
120
1.2-1. To operate exclusively for the benefit of and to carry out the purposes of a Montessori
charter school within the Polk County school district.
1.2-2. To solicit and raise funds, and to receive by way of gift, purchase, grant, devise, will, or
otherwise, property, real, personal, or mixed, and to hold, use, maintain, lease, donate, pledge,
encumber, loan, sell, convey, and otherwise dispose of all such property in furtherance of the
objectives and purposes of this Project;
1.2-3. To do and perform any and all acts or services that may be incidental or necessary to carry
out the above purposes, and
1.2-4. To engage in any lawful act or activity for which a not for profit corporation may be
organized under the laws of Florida, subject to the restrictions set forth in the Articles of
Incorporation and these Bylaws.
Section 1.3 Powers. Except as limited by the Articles of Incorporation or these Bylaws, the
Project shall have and exercise such powers in furtherance of its purposes as are now or may
hereafter be granted by the Florida Not For Profit Corporation Act, including, without limitation,
the following powers:
1.3-1. To encourage, motivate, accept, hold, invest, reinvest, and administer gifts, bequests, and
devises of property of any sort, without limitation as to amount or value, and to use, disburse,
loan, or donate the principal thereof or income earned thereupon in support of the charitable and
educational purposes and activities of the Project;
1.3-2. To exercise all of the powers of a not for profit corporation under the laws of the State,
provided, however, that such is not inconsistent with the Project's exclusively charitable
educational purposes, nor with the requirements of Section 501 (c)(3) of the Internal Revenue
Code of 1954, as amended, or any corresponding provisions of any future United States Internal
Revenue Law; and
1.3-3. To do and perform all other acts and things which may be incidental to and come within
the scope of any of the foregoing objectives and purposes, or which may be necessary and
appropriate for carrying out any of the Project's previously enumerated objectives and purposes.
Section 1.4. Rules. The following rules shall conclusively bind the Corporation and all persons
acting for or on behalf of it:
1.4-1. No part of the net earnings of the Corporation shall inure to the benefit of, or be
distributable to its members, directors, officers, or other private persons, except that the
Corporation shall be authorized and empowered to pay reasonable compensation for services
rendered and to make payments and distributions in furtherance of the purposes set forth herein.
No substantial part of the activities of the Corporation shall be the carrying on of propaganda, or
otherwise attempting to influence legislation, and the corporation shall not participate in, or
intervene in (including the publishing or distribution of statements) any political campaign on
behalf of any candidate for public office. Notwithstanding any other provision of these bylaws,
the Corporation shall not carry on any other activities not permitted to be carried on (a) by a
Corporation exempt from Federal income tax under section 501 (c)(3) of the Internal Revenue
121
code of 1954, as amended, or any corresponding provisions of any future United States Internal
Revenue Law, or (b) by a corporation, contributions to which are deductible under section
170(c)(2) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (or the corresponding provision of any future
United States Internal Revenue Law).
1.4-2 Upon the dissolution of the Corporation, the Board of Directors shall, after paying or
making provision for the payment of all the liabilities of the Corporation, dispose of all the assets
of the Corporation exclusively for the purposes of the Corporation in such manner, or to such
organization or organizations organized and operated for charitable, educational, or scientific
purposes as shall at the time qualify as an exempt organization or organizations under section
501 (c)(3) of the Internal Revenue code of 1986 (or the corresponding provision of any future
United States Internal Revenue Law), as the Board of Directors shall determine. Any assets not
so disposed of shall be disposed of by the State of Florida exclusively for such purposes or to
such organization or organizations, as said State shall determine, which are organized and
operated exclusively for such purposes.
1.4-3. The Corporation shall not adopt any practice, policy or procedure or take any action which
would result in the discrimination on the basis of disability, race, creed, color, gender, national
origin, religion, ancestry, marital status, or need for special educational services.
ARTICLE II
OFFICES
The Project shall have and continuously maintain in the State a registered office and registered
agent.
ARTICLE III
MEMBERSHIP
The Corporation shall have no members. The management of the affairs of the Corporation shall
be vested in a Board of Directors, as defined herein.
ARTICLE IV
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Section 4.1. General Powers. All of the business and affairs of the Project shall be managed by
the Board of Directors in a manner consistent with these Bylaws and other applicable law. The
Board shall make appropriate delegations of authority to the Officers and, to the extent permitted
by law, by appropriate resolution, the Board may authorize one or more Board Committees to act
on its behalf when it is not in session.
Section 4.2. Number of Directors. The Board shall consist of a minimum of three (3) and a
maximum of seven (7) Directors, the exact number to be established from time to time by
resolution of the Board.
Section 4.3. Appointed Directors. The Directors listed in the Articles of Incorporation will serve
as members of the Board of Directors commencing immediately upon the incorporation of the
122
Project by the State. The Appointed Directors will serve their initial term for two years, which is
defined as the date of incorporation until the end of the second full calendar year of operation.
Section 4.4. Elected Directors. Each director, other than the Appointed Directors, shall be
deemed "Elected Director" and shall be elected by the Board at its annual meeting for a two year
term commencing immediately following the annual meeting and terminating immediately
following the second annual meeting next following and upon election and qualification of his or
her successor. A Director elected to fill a vacancy shall be elected for the unexpired term of his
or her predecessor in office.
Section 4.5. Regular Meetings. An annual meeting of the Board shall be held each year for the
purpose of electing Directors, electing Officers, and for the transaction of such other business as
may come before the meeting. The Board shall also have regular meetings, the frequency of
which is consistent with the needs of the Project and, unless the Board shall provide otherwise by
resolution, regular meetings of the Board shall be held at least four times per year excluding the
annual meeting. The Board may by resolution prescribe the time and place for holding of the
regular meetings and may provide that the adoption of such resolution shall constitute notice of
such regular meetings. If the Board does not prescribe the time and place for the regular
meetings, such regular meetings shall be held at the time and place specified by the President in
the notice of such regular meeting.
Section 4.6. Special Meetings. Special meetings of the Board may be called by or at the direction
of the President or the written request of any three (3) members of the Board, such meetings to
be held at such time and place as shall be designated in the notice thereof, provided that the place
of meeting shall be in Polk County, Florida.
Section 4.7. Notice. Except as otherwise provided herein, notice of the time and place of any
regular or special meeting of the Board shall be provided at least seven (7) days previous thereto.
Any such notice may be delivered personally, by mail or by electronic means. If delivered by
mail, such notice shall be deemed delivered when deposited in the United States mail in a sealed
envelope addressed to the Director at his or her address as it appears on the records of the
Corporation, with postage thereon prepaid. If delivered by electronic means, such notice shall be
deemed delivered when transmitted to the electronic address as it appears on the records of the
Corporation. "Electronic address," as used in these By-Laws, shall include a facsimile telephone
number, an electronic mail address or any other indicia by means of which notices and other
information may be delivered. Any Director may waive notice of any meeting. The attendance of
a Director at any meeting shall constitute a waiver of notice of such meeting, except where a
Director attends a meeting for the express purpose of objecting to the transaction of any business
because the meeting is not lawfully called or convened. Neither the business to be transacted at,
nor the purpose of, any regular or special meeting of the board need be specified in the notice or
waiver of notice of such meeting, unless specifically required by law or by these By-laws. In
addition to the notice requirement provided herein, after execution of a charter for the operation
of the Corporation as a Charter School in Polk County Florida, public notice of regular and
special meetings shall be given in accordance with the requirements of The Florida Sunshine
Law.
123
Section 4.8. Quorum. At least fifty-one percent (51 %) of the members of the Board shall
constitute a quorum for the transaction of business at any meeting of the Board, unless otherwise
specifically provided by law, the Articles of Incorporation, or these Bylaws.
Section 4.9 Manner of Acting.
4.9-1. Formal Action by Board. The act of the majority of the members of the Board present at a
meeting at which a quorum is present shall be the act of the Board, unless the act of a greater
number is required by statute, The Articles of Incorporation, or these Bylaws.
4.9-2. Informal Action by Board. No action of the Board shall be valid unless taken at a meeting
at which a quorum is present, except that any action which may be taken at a meeting of the
Board may be taken without a quorum if a consent in writing (setting forth the action so taken)
shall be signed by all members of the Board.
Section 4.10. Resignations and Removal. Any member of the Board may resign from the Board
at any time by giving written notice to the President or the Secretary, and unless otherwise
specified herein, the acceptance of such resignation shall not be necessary to make it effective.
Any member of the Board may be removed from office at any time with or without cause by a
two-thirds (2/3) vote of the Board.
Section 4.11. Vacancies. Any vacancy occurring in the membership of the Board shall be filled
by the Board. A member of the Board appointed to fill a vacancy shall be appointed for the
unexpired term of such member's predecessor in office.
Section 4.12. Compensation. Members of the Board, as such, shall not receive any stated salaries
for their services, but by resolution of the Board a reasonable amount may be allowed as
reimbursement of expenses incurred in attending to their authorized duties; provided, however,
that subject to the provisions herein concerning duality of interest, nothing herein contained shall
be construed to preclude any member of the Board from serving the Project in any other capacity
and receiving compensation therefore.
Section 4.13. Attendance. Each member of the Board shall be required to attend at least sixty
percent (60%) of all meetings of the Board per calendar year duly convened pursuant to these
Bylaws unless excused by the President. Any such member who fails to meet this minimum
requirement of attendance shall be deemed to have resigned such position effective the last
meeting thereof during such year.
Section 4.14. Procedure. The Board may adopt its own rules of procedure which shall not be
inconsistent with the Articles of Incorporation, these Bylaws, or applicable law in the absence of
the Board adopting its own special rules of procedure as provided for herein, the Board will
conduct its affairs in a manner which is fair and equitable to all Directors.
ARTICLE V
COMMITTEES
Section 5.1. Designation. The Project shall have an Executive Committee and may have one or
more other standing committees as may be designated from time to time by the Directors or the
President.
124
Section 5.2. Functions. Except with respect to the Executive Committee or where a committee is
specifically delegated authority to act when the Directors are not in session, committees shall
serve in an advisory capacity to the Directors regarding those aspects of the business and affairs
of the Project to which they have been delegated responsibility.
Section 5.3. Duties of Committees. The duties of committees shall be as follows:
5.3-1 Executive Committee. When the Directors are not in session and prudent management
requires prompt action, the Executive Committee shall have and exercise all of the authority of
the Directors in the management of the Project, except as such authority is limited by resolution
of the Directors, and any such action shall be submitted to the Directors at their next meeting for
their review. The Executive committee shall assist in the preparation and modification of long
range and short range plans to assure that the Corporation's programs are attuned to meeting the
educational needs of the community served by the Project, coordinating the Project’s services
with those of other educational organizations and related community resources. Additionally, the
Executive Committee shall have the following responsibilities and duties:
A. Counsel with Officers of the Project on both current and long-term fiscal affairs and
make recommendations to the Directors concerning the fiscal affairs of the Project.
B. Perform such other duties related to fiscal matters as may be assigned to it by the
Directors or by the President.
C. Make recommendations to the Directors concerning candidates for election as Officers
of the Project and for election as Directors.
5.3.-2. Additional Committees. Additional committees which are designated by the Directors or
the President pursuant hereto shall discharge such responsibilities as may be assigned to them by
the authority establishing said committees.
Section 5.4. Powers. A committee shall have and exercise all the authority granted to it by the
authority establishing said committee. A committee shall exercise no authority except that which
has been granted to it by the Directors.
Section 5.5. Appointment of Committee Members. As committees are deemed necessary or
appropriate, the President shall appoint committee members, who may or may not be Directors,
and shall designate a chair of each committee. The Executive Committee shall include the
President, Vice-President, Secretary, and Treasurer among their number.
Section 56. Tenure of Committee Members. The members and chair of each committee shall take
office on the day of their appointment and hold office until the next succeeding annual meeting
of the Board.
Section 5.7. Compensation. Committee members shall not receive any stated salaries for their
services, but by resolution of the Board a reasonable amount may be allowed as reimbursement
of expenses incurred in attending to their authorized duties, provided, however, that subject to
the provisions herein concerning duality of interest, nothing herein contained shall be construed
125
to preclude any member of the Board from serving the Project in any other capacity and
receiving compensation therefore.
ARTICLE VI
COMMITTEE MEETINGS
Section 6.1. Meetings. Committee meetings may be called by the chair or by any two (2)
committee members. Committee meetings shall be held at the principal place of business of the
Project or at an appropriate site designated by the committee chair. Written, printed, or oral
notice stating the place and time of committee meetings must be given to each committee
member not less than three (3) days prior to said meeting.
Section 6.2. Quorum. A majority of the number of committee members shall constitute a quorum
for the transaction of committee business.
Section 6.3. Voting. Each committee member who is present at any committee meeting shall be
entitled to one (1) vote on each matter submitted to a vote of committee members.
Section 6.4. Procedure. The committees may adopt their own rules of procedure which shall not
be inconsistent with the Articles of Incorporation, these Bylaws, or applicable law.
ARTICLE VII
OFFICERS
Section 7.1. Officers. The officers of the Project shall be a President, a Vice President, a
Secretary, and a Treasurer. All Officers shall be selected from the membership of the Board of
Directors and the Administrator of the Charter School. The Administrator of the Charter School
shall serve as a non-voting officer. When the incumbent of an office is unable to perform the
duties thereof or when there is no incumbent of an office (both such situations referred to
hereafter as the "absence" of the Officer), the duties of the office shall, unless otherwise provided
by the Board or these Bylaws, be performed by the next Officer set forth in the following
sequence President, Vice President, Treasurer, Secretary. The administrator of the charter school
founded by the Board will serve as the Treasurer (non-voting) commencing immediately upon
the incorporation of this Project by the State.
Section 7.2. Appointment and Tenure. All officers shall be elected each year by the Board at its
annual meeting for terms of one year, or until their successors have been duly elected and
qualified, or until their death, resignation, or removal.
Section 7.3. Resignations and Removal. Any Officer may resign at any time by giving written
notice to the President, or to the Secretary, and, unless otherwise specified herein, the acceptance
of such resignation shall not Be necessary to make it effective. Any Officer may be removed by
the Board whenever in its judgment the best interests of the Project would be served thereby.
Section 7.4. Vacancies. A vacancy in an office may be filled by the Board for the unexpired
portion of the term.
126
Section 7.5. President. The President of the Board shall preside at all meetings of the Board of
Directors and shall exercise and perform such other powers and duties as may from time to time
be assigned to the President by the Board of Directors in these Bylaws. The President shall be
the chief operating officer of the Project, carrying out the directives of the Board and performing
functions necessary and proper to assure that the policies, objectives, and aims of the Project are
adhered to. The President may sign, with the Treasurer or any other Officer authorized by the
Board, any deeds, mortgages, bonds, contracts, or other instruments which the Board has
authorized to be executed, except in cases where the signing and execution thereof shall be
expressly delegated by the Board, by these Bylaws, or by statute, to some other Officer or agent
of the Board or Project.
Section 7.6. Vice President. The Vice President shall perform such duties as may be assigned
by the Board, the President, or these Bylaws. In the absence of the President, the Vice President
shall perform the duties of the President.
Section 7.7. Treasurer. The treasurer shall, subject to the direction of the President, have charge
and custody and be responsible for all funds and securities of the Project, to deposit the same for
safekeeping with any bank or banks or other institutions or securities firms as the Board of
Directors may designate and shall keep regular full and accurate accounts of all receipts and
disbursements, and in general perform all the duties incident to the office of Treasurer and such
other duties as from time to time may be assigned to the Treasurer by the Board, the President, or
these Bylaws. In fulfillment of the duties of the Treasurer, the Treasurer shall be familiar with
the fiscal affairs of the Project and keep the Board informed thereof.
Section 7.8. Secretary. The Secretary shall, subject to the direction of the President, cause to be
kept a record of the meetings of the Board and all Board Committees in one or more books
provided for that purpose; assure that all notices are given in accordance with the provisions of
these Bylaws and as required by law; be custodian of the seal of the Project; shall countersign,
when required, all authorized bonds, contracts, deeds, mortgages, leases, or other legal
instruments, and in general perform all duties incident to the office of Secretary and such other
duties as from time to time may be assigned to the Secretary by the Board, The President, or
these Bylaws.
Section 7.9. Compensation. Officers, as such, shall not receive any stated salaries for their
services, but by resolution of the Board a reasonable amount may be allowed as reimbursement
of expenses incurred in attending to their authorized duties; provided, however, that subject to
the provisions herein concerning duality if interest, nothing herein contained shall Be construed
to preclude any member of the Board from serving the Project in any other capacity and
receiving compensation therefore.
ARTICLE VIII
MISCELLANEOUS
Section 8.1. Contract. The Board may authorize any Officer of the Project to enter into any
contract or execute any instrument in the name of and on behalf of the Project, and such
authority may be general or confined to specific instances.
127
Section 8.2. Checks, Drafts. Etc.. All checks, drafts, or other orders for the payment of money,
and all notes or other evidences of indebtedness issued in the name of the Project shall be signed
by such Officer or Officers of the Project and in such a manner as shall from time to time be
determined by resolution of the Board. In the absence of such determination by the Board, such
instruments shall be signed by the Treasurer and countersigned by the President.
Section 8.3. Deposits. All funds of the Project shall be deposited from time to time to the credit
of the Project in one or more such banks, trust companies, securities firms, or other depositories
as the Board may from time to time designate, upon such terms and conditions as shall be fixed
by the Board The Board may from time to time authorize the opening and keeping, with any such
depository as it may designate, of general and special bank accounts or other forms of account
and may make such special rules and regulations with respect thereto, not inconsistent with the
provisions of these Bylaws, as it may deem necessary.
Section 8.4. Gifts. The Board may accept on behalf of the Project and contributions, gifts,
bequests, or devises for and consistent with the general purposes, or for and consistent with and
specific purposes, of the project.
Section 8.5. Books and Records. The Project shall keep correct and complete books and records
of account and shall also keep records of the actions of the Project, which records shall be open
to inspection by members of the Board at any reasonable time.
Section 8.6. Annual Report. The President shall cause an Annual Report to be submitted to the
Board no later than 120 days after close of each fiscal year of the Project. An annual post-audit
of the Project's operation shall be conducted in accordance with Florida statutes and State Board
Rules.
Section 8.7. Fiscal Year; Accounting Election. The fiscal year of the Project shall end on June
30, and methods of accounting for the Project shall be as the Board shall determine from time to
time by resolution of the Board.
Section 8.8. Seal. The President shall cause to be designed a magnificent corporate seal, such
seal to be circular in design and inscribed with the words "Magnolia Montessori Academy" and
"corporation not for profit" in the outer edge thereof.
Section 8 9. Notice. Unless otherwise specified herein, any notice required or permitted to be
given pursuant to the provisions of the Articles of Incorporation, these Bylaws, or applicable
law, shall be in writing, shall be sufficient and effective as of the date personally delivered or, if
sent by mail, on the date deposited with the United States Postal Service, prepaid and addressed
to the intended receiver at such receiver's last known address as shown in the records of the
Project.
Section 8 10. Loans to Members of the Board and Officers Prohibited. No loans shall be made by
the Project to members of the Board or Officers.
Section 8.11. Indemnification of Members of the Board. Officers and Others. The Project shall
indemnify any member of the Board or Officer or former member of the Board or Officer for
expenses and costs (including attorney's fees) actually and necessarily incurred thereby in
128
connection with any claim asserted by action in court or otherwise, by reason of such person
being or having been such member of the Board or Officer, except in relation to matters as to
which such person shall have been guilty of negligence or misconduct with respect to the matter
in which indemnity is sought, and to the extent permitted by the provisions of the Florida Not
For Profit Corporation Act. By order of the Board, the Project may, under comparable terms and
limitations, indemnify employees and agents of the Project with respect to activities within the
scope of their services as members of the Board Committees, Officers, or other officials of the
Project.
Section 8.12. Revocability of Authorizations. No authorization, assignment, referral, or
delegation of authority by the Board to any committee, Officer, agent, or other official of the
Project, or any other organization which is associated or affiliated with, or conducted under the
auspices of the Project shall preclude the Board from exercising the authority required to meet its
responsibility. The Board shall retain the right to rescind any such authorization, assignment,
referral, or delegation in its sole discretion.
Section 8.13. Employees of the Project. The Board of Directors may employ such personnel as it
deems necessary or desirable for the efficient operation of the Project.
Section 8.14. Duality of Interests. Any contract or other transaction between the Project and one
or more of the members of the Board or Officers, or between the Project and any other
corporation, firm, association, or other entity in which one or more of the members of the Board
or Officers are members of the board, or officers of the corporation or have a significant
financial or influential interest, shall be authorized or entered into by the Project only after all of
the following conditions are met:
8.14-1. The relevant and material facts as to such member of the Board's or Officer's interest in
such contract or transaction as to any common directorship, officer ship, or financial, or
influential interest were disclosed in good faith in advance, by such member of the Board or
Officer, to the Board, and such facts are reflected in the minutes of the Board Meeting, and
8.14-2 The relevant and material facts, if any, known to such interested member of the Board or
Officer with respect to such contract or transaction which might reasonably be construed to be
adverse to the Project's interest were disclosed in good faith in advance by such member of the
Board or Officer to the Board, and such facts are reflected in the minutes of the Board Meeting;
and
8.14-3 Such interested member of the Board or Officer has, as determined by the judgment of the
Board: (i) made the disclosures and fully responded to questions concerning the matters referred
to in (8.14 -1) and (8.14-2) above; (ii) demonstrated to the reasonable satisfaction of the Board
that the contract or transaction is fair and reasonable to the Project at the time such contract or
transaction is authorized; and (iii) not otherwise significantly influenced the action of the Board
with respect to the contract or transaction; and all such determinations by the Board are reflected
in the minutes of the Board Meeting, and
8.14-4 The Board authorized such contract or transaction by a vote of at least a majority of the
disinterested members of the Board present at a Meeting at which a quorum was present.
129
The Board may adopt duality of interest policies for the Project including, without limitation,
requirements and procedures with respect to: (1) regular annual statements and periodic
supplements thereto by members of the Board, Officers, professional advisors, key employees,
and other officials of the Project, disclosing any existing and potential dualities of interest; (2)
limitations on permitted external positions and interests; and (3) corrective action with respect to
transgressions of such policies.
Section 8.15. Rules. The Board may adopt, amend, or repeal rules (not inconsistent with these
Bylaws) for the management of the internal affairs of the Project and the governance of its
Officers, agents, Board Committees, and employees.
Section 8.16. Voting of Shares Owned by the Project. Unless otherwise ordered by the Board,
the President shall have full power and authority on behalf of the Project to attend, to vote and to
grant proxies to be used at any meeting of shareholders of any corporation or otherwise exercise
rights of any entity in which the Project may hold stock or otherwise be a member. The Board
may confer like powers upon any other person or persons.
Section 8.17. Vote by Presiding Officer. The person acting as presiding officer at any meeting
held pursuant to these Bylaws shall, if a voting member thereof be entitled to vote on the same
basis as if not acting as presiding officer.
Section 8.18. Articles and Other Headlines. The Article and other headlines contained in these
Bylaws are for reference purposes only and shall not affect the meaning or interpretation of these
Bylaws.
130
Appendix D—Board Code of Conduct
131
CODE OF CONDUCT
For Board Members of
Magnolia Montessori Academy, Inc.
A non-profit corporation
Board members of Magnolia Montessori Academy, Inc. will at all times conduct themselves
in a manner that:

Supports the objectives of the Corporation

Serves the overall best interests of the Corporation rather than any particular constituency

Brings credibility and good will to the Corporation

Respects principles of fair play and due process

Demonstrates respect for individuals in all manifestations of their cultural and linguistic
diversity and life circumstance

Respects and gives fair consideration to diverse and opposing viewpoints

Demonstrates due diligence and dedication in preparations for and attendance at
meetings, special events and in all other activities on behalf of the Corporation

Demonstrates good faith, prudent judgment, honesty, transparency and openness in their
activities on behalf of the Corporation

Ensures that the financial affairs of the Corporation are conducted in a responsible and
transparent manner with due regard for their fiduciary responsibilities and public
trusteeship

Avoids real or perceived conflicts of interest

Conforms with the By-law and policies approved by the Board, in particular this Code of
Conduct, the Oath of Office and Confidentiality and Conflict of Interest policies.

Publicly demonstrates acceptance, respect and support for decisions legitimately taken in
transaction of the Corporation’s business
132
Appendix E—Oath of Office and Board Confidentiality Agreement
133
OATH OF OFFICE AND CONFIDENTIALITY AGREEMENT
For Magnolia Montessori Academy, Inc.
A non-profit corporation
I, _________________________________, a director of the Magnolia Montessori Academy
Inc., declare that, in carrying out my duties as a director, I will:
1. Exercise the powers of my office and fulfill my responsibilities in good faith and in the best
interests of the Corporation.
2. Exercise these responsibilities, at all times, with due diligence, care and skill in a reasonable
and prudent manner.
3. Respect and support the Corporation’s by-laws, policies, Code of Conduct, and decisions of
the Board and membership.
4. Keep confidential all information that I learn about clients, personnel, collective bargaining
and any other matters specifically determined by board motion to be matters of confidence.
5. Conduct myself in a spirit of collegiality and respect for the collective decisions of the Board
and subordinate my personal interests to the best interests of the Corporation.
6. Immediately declare any personal conflict of interest that may come to my attention.
7. Immediately resign my position as director of the Corporation in the event that I, or my
Colleagues on the Board have concluded that I have breached my ‘Oath of Office’.
Signature: _________________________________
134
Date__________________
Appendix F—Board Conflict of Interest Statement
135
Magnolia Montessori Academy, Inc.
PRO FORMA CONFLICT OF INTEREST POLICY
SECTION 1. PURPOSE:
Magnolia Montessori Academy, Inc. (MMA) is a nonprofit, tax-exempt organization. It is vital
that this tax-exempt status is zealously maintained in order that MMA is able to provide
educational services to the community. To ensure that MMA remains exempt within the strict
confines of the IRS and other state regulatory and tax officials, our business operations are
subjected to scrutiny by these organizations. In addition, to maintain a positive public image,
MMA must be transparent with regard to our finances and intentions. The board, officers and
management must have an inordinate amount of duty and loyalty to MMA’s mission and the
strides toward fulfilling the vision. The board, officers, and management of MMA must act
responsibly, honestly, and prudently for the sole benefit of MMA. It is vital that these persons
exercise good faith always in transactions involving their duties, and will not use their positions
within MMA for their own personal gain and benefit. The interests of the organization must be
the first priority in all decisions and actions of the board, officers, and the management team.
SECTION 2. PERSONS CONCERNED:
This conflict of interest policy pertains not only to directors, officers and board members, but
also to any employee who might make purchasing decisions for MMA or have proprietary
information regarding MMA.
SECTION 3. AREAS IN WHICH CONFLICT MAY ARISE:
Conflicts of interest may arise in the relations of directors, officers, and management
employees with any of the following third parties:
1. Persons and firms supplying goods and services to MMA.
2. Persons and firms from whom MMA leases property and equipment.
3. Persons and firms with whom MMA is dealing or planning to deal in connection with
the gift, purchase or sale of real estate, securities, or other property.
4. Competing or affinity organizations.
5. Donors and others supporting MMA.
6. Agencies, organizations, and associations which affect the operations of MMA.
7. Family members, friends, and other employees.
SECTION 4. NATURE OF CONFLICTING INTEREST:
A conflicting interest may be defined as an interest, direct or indirect, with any persons or
firms mentioned in Section 3. Such an interest might arise through:
1. Owning stock or holding debt or other proprietary interests in any third party dealing
with MMA.
2. Holding office, serving on the board, participating in management, or being otherwise
employed (or formerly employed) with any third party dealing with MMA.
3. Receiving remuneration for services with respect to individual transactions involving
MMA.
136
4. Using MMA’s time, personnel, equipment, supplies, or good will for other than MMAapproved activities, programs, and purposes.
5. Receiving personal gifts or loans from third parties dealing or competing with MMA.
SECTION 5. INTERPRETATION OF THIS STATEMENT OF POLICY:
The areas of conflicting interest listed in Section 3, and the relations in those areas which may
give rise to conflict, as listed in Section 4, are not exhaustive. Conflicts might arise in other areas
or through other relations. It is assumed that the directors, officers, and management
employees will recognize such areas and relation by analogy. The fact that one of the interests
described in Section 4 exists does not necessarily mean that a conflict exists, or that the
conflict, if it exists, is material enough to be of practical importance, or if material, that upon
full disclosure of all relevant facts and circumstances it is necessarily adverse to the interests of
MMA. However, it is the policy of the board that the existence of any of the interests described
in Section 4 shall be disclosed before any transaction is consummated. It shall be the continuing
responsibility of the board, officers, and management employees to scrutinize their
transactions and outside business interests and relationships for potential conflicts and to
immediately make such disclosures.
SECTION 6. DISCLOSURE POLICY AND PROCEDURE:
Transactions with parties with whom a conflicting interest exists may be undertaken only
if all of the following are observed:
1. The conflicting interest is fully disclosed;
2. The person with the conflict of interest is excluded from the discussion and approval of
such transaction;
3. A competitive bid or comparable valuation exists; and
4. The board has determined that the transaction is in the best interest of the
organization.
Disclosure in the organization should be made to the Executive director (or if she or he is the
one with the conflict, then to the board chair), who shall bring the matter to the attention of
the board. Disclosure involving directors should be made to the board chair, (or if she or he is
the one with the conflict, then to the board vice-chair) who shall bring these matters to the
board. The board shall determine whether a conflict exists and in the case of an existing
conflict, whether the contemplated transaction may be authorized as just, fair, and reasonable
to MMA. The decision of the board on these matters will rest in their sole discretion, and their
concern must be the welfare of MMA and the advancement of its purpose.
137
Magnolia Montessori Academy, Inc.
PRO FORMA CONFLICT OF INTEREST DISCLOSURE STATEMENT
Preliminary note: In order to be more comprehensive, this statement of disclosure also requires you to provide
information with respect to people who are related to you. These persons are termed “affiliated persons” and
include the following:
a. your spouse, domestic partner, child, mother, father, brother or sister;
b. any corporation or organization of which you are a board member, an officer, a partner,
participate in management or are employed by, or are, directly or indirectly, a debt holder or the
beneficial owner of any class of equity securities; and
c. any trust or other estate in which you have a substantial beneficial interest or as to which you
serve as a trustee or in a similar capacity.
NAME OF EMPLOYEE OR BOARD MEMBER: _______________________________________________
CAPACITY: ______board of directors ______officer
1.
______committee member ______staff (position)
Have you or any of your affiliated persons provided
services or property to MMA in the past year?
_____ Yes
Description:
_____ No
2.
Have you or any of your affiliated persons purchased
services or property from MMA in the past year?
_____ Yes
_____ No
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Have you or any of your affiliated persons had any direct
or indirect interest in any business transaction(s) in the
past year to which MMA was or is a
party?
Were you or any of your affiliated persons indebted to
pay money to MMA in the past year (other than travel
advances or the like)?
Have you or any of your affiliated persons receive, any
personal benefits from MMA or as a result of your
relationship with MMA, in excess of $1,000, that was
not compensation directly related to your duties to
MMA ?
_____ Yes
Are you or any of your affiliated persons a party to or
have an interest in any pending legal proceedings
involving MMA?
Are you aware of any other events, transactions,
arrangements or other situations that have occurred or
may occur in the future that you believe should be
examined by MMA’s board in accordance with the terms
and intent of MMA’s conflict of interest policy?
_____ Yes
_____ No
_____ Yes
_____ No
_____ Yes
_____ No
_____ No
_____ Yes
_____ No
I HEREBY CONFIRM that I have read and understand MMA’s conflict of interest policy and that my responses to the above
questions are complete and correct to the best of my information and belief. I agree that if I become aware of any information
that might indicate that this disclosure is inaccurate or that I have not complied with this policy, I will notify the Executive
Director immediately.
___________________________________
Signature
__________________
Date
138
Appendix G—Magnolia Montessori Academy, Inc. Board Meeting Schedule
139
Magnolia Montessori Academy, Inc. Board Meeting Schedule
The board of Magnolia Montessori Academy, Inc. will have board meetings once monthly until
otherwise changed by the board. The follow is the tentative schedule for the board meetings:
November 8, 2012
March 7, 2013
June 6, 2013
August 8, 2013
September 5, 2013
October 10, 2013
November 7, 2013
December 5, 2013
January 9, 2014
February 6, 2014
March 6, 2014
April 10, 2014
May 8, 2014
June 5, 2014
July 10, 2014
140
Appendix H—MMA Founding Group
141
Magnolia Montessori Academy
Founding Group
Founding Group
Nathan Dunham
Nathan is a certified public accountant and has been with Wall Foss Financial, LLC since 1997.
He began there as an intern while attending Florida Southern College. Upon his graduation in
1999, he continued on as a full-time staff accountant. He holds a Bachelor of Science in
Accounting. In 2001, Nathan passed the national exam to be designated as a Certified Financial
Planner. His primary responsibilities are financial planning, asset allocation and investment
strategies. He also handles personal and corporate tax returns, as well. He and his wife Julianne
have two children. Nathan helped review the budget and cash flow documents and will sit as a
board member.
Tammi Crotteau
Tammi spent fifteen years in the working with businesses in various capacities to implement
accounting software. She currently runs a housing rental business and helps manage projects and
finances for her husband’s construction company. She has two children attending a Montessori
school and is widely read on Montessori and evidence based learning. She contributed to the
writing of the business section of the charter.
Amanda Gaspary
Amanda has a B.A. in English Education and her Master’s in education. She is the mother to
one Montessori student and served as the Lakeland Montessori Schoolhouse Assistant Director.
Amanda contributed greatly to the curriculum of the charter application.
Cara Helpling
Cara Helping has her early childhood certification (3-6) (from Orlando Montessori Teacher
Education Institute) and Elementary I (6-9) (from Florida Institute of Montessori Studies). Cara’s
Montessori credentials include a Bachelor's in Elementary Education from Bryan College in
Dayton, TN and a Master’s in Education with an emphasis on Montessori education from Xavier
University in Cincinnati, OH. She has been in education for the last 15 years, eight of which
have been in Montessori (preK 3- 4th grade).
Liz Iskra
Liz Iskra is currently an assistant teacher for one of the Early Childhood (3-6 year olds)
classrooms at Lakeland Montessori. Liz holds a Bachelors and Masters of Music Degree and has
also completed the 50 hour course in Professional Development at the Center for Guided
Montessori Studies. Liz’s employment experience includes teaching positions throughout Polk
County as being part of the Music faculty at Florida Southern and Polk Community Colleges in
addition to her current position at LMS and previous experience as a substitute teacher in Polk
County schools. Liz is an avid volunteer with Make a Wish Foundation and as a board member
for Trinity Learning Center among others.
142
John Iskra
John Iskra is currently the Education Director at the Florida Air Museum and has a Master of
Music from the University of Texas at Austin. John also has a degree in Engineering Studies
from the University of South Florida. John has extensive experience in teaching in, planning and
managing a classroom. John also has experience with computer hardware and software with
mathematical modeling and problem solving. John has been instrumental as a consultant for
Magnolia Montessori Academy’s art, music and STEM curriculum development.
Maile Valentine
Maile Valentine is the owner of Empress Media, Inc., a content management consulting
company with local and global clients. She is the mother of 2 Lakeland Montessori Schoolhouse
students and is a big proponent of the Montessori education philosophy. Maile has contributed to
the Educational Plan portion of the charter as well as participated in other charter startup tasks.
143
Appendix I—/RFDWLRQ6SHFLILFDWLRQV
144
145
Chapel in the Grove
146
TRINITY
Presbyterian Church
301 N Florida A\'e- Lakeland , FL 3380 1
Phone: 863-603-7777- Fax: 863 -603-7779- w ww.trin itylakeland.org
June 29, 2012
T o Whom It May Concern:
The purpose of this letter is to confirm that I have discussed renting 5, 000ft2 of our facility at 301
N Florida Ave with Tammi Crotteau for the use of Magnolia Montessori Academy. The fee for this
r ental would be $50,000 annually for 5 years. If you have any questions please contact m e. You
can call me at 863.603.7777 or e-mail me at [email protected] Thank you.
Business Administra or
:-:---Trinity Presbyterian Churc
Appendix J—Operating and Start Up Budget
147
Magnolia Montessori Academy
INCOME STATEMENT - OPERATING FUND
2012-13, 2013-14, 2014-15, 2015-16, 2016-17, 2017-2018
WITHOUT START UP FUNDS
2012-2013
2013-2014
2014-2015
2015-16
2016-17
2017-18
FTE 63
$ 13,710.00
FTE 77
$ 36,319.00
FTE 89
$ 82,237.00
FTE 103
$ 177,047.00
FTE 109
OPERATING
FUND
OPERATING
FUND
OPERATING
FUND
OPERATING
FUND
OPERATING
FUND
369,111.00
0.00
0.00
443,670.00
504,966.00
579,505.00
613,184.00
0.00
-
0.00
-
59,225.00
-
62,675.00
-
FUND BALANCE 7/1
RED
BOOK
CODES
REVENUE
FL. EDUC. FINANCE PROGRAM
ARRA FUNDS
CAPITAL OUTLAY
INTEREST
GIFTS & DONATIONS
MISC REVENUE
13310000
13210000
13397000
13430000
13440000
13490000
START UP
PERIOD
2,850.00
0.00
TOTAL REVENUE
2,850.00
369,111.00
443,670.00
504,966.00
638,730.00
675,859.00
TOTAL FUNDS AVAILABLE
2,850.00
369,111.00
457,380.00
541,285.00
720,967.00
852,906.00
START UP
PERIOD
OPERATING
FUND
168,330.00
25,000.00
2,500.00
OPERATING
FUND
213,950.00
15,000.00
2,000.00
OPERATING
FUND
219,600.00
22,450.00
15,000.00
2,000.00
OPERATING
FUND
315,350.00
15,000.00
2,000.00
-
3,760.00
199,590.00
3,835.00
234,785.00
3,912.00
262,962.00
3,990.00
336,340.00
-
500.00
500.00
1,000.00
500.00
500.00
1,000.00
500.00
500.00
1,000.00
500.00
500.00
1,000.00
500.00
500.00
1,000.00
2,500.00
2,500.00
2,500.00
2,500.00
3,000.00
3,000.00
3,500.00
3,500.00
2,000.00
6,250.00
2,250.00
6,500.00
2,500.00
6,750.00
2,750.00
7,000.00
OPERATING EXPENSES
ACCOUNT NAME
Salaries-Teachers-leasing
Salaries-Ast Teachers - leasing
Supplies-Instructional
Textbooks-Instructional
Equipment-Instructional
Software-Instructional
Salaries-Sub Teachers
INSTRUCTIONAL
15000310
15000410
15000510
15000520
15000640
15000690
15000750
Other Purchased Services
Supplies-Student Support
PUPIL PERSONNEL SVCS
16100390
16100510
Travel - Instructional
INSTR STAFF TRNG SVCS
16400330
Contracted Services-Admin/Gov
Contracted Services-Audit
17100310
17100311
750.00
148
5,000.00
OPERATING
FUND
323,260.00
15,000.00
2,500.00
4,070.00
344,830.00
Contracted Services-Legal
Liability Insurance-Charter Board
Training & Development
BOARD
17100312
17100320
17100330
1,000.00
2,500.00
500.00
9,000.00
1,000.00
3,100.00
750.00
13,100.00
1,000.00
3,200.00
750.00
13,700.00
1,000.00
3,300.00
750.00
14,300.00
1,000.00
3,400.00
750.00
14,900.00
Salaries-Admin Dir of Education
Salaries-Admin- Dir of Finance
Travel-Admin
Postage
Advertising
Supplies-Admin
Equipment-Admin
Dues & Fees-Admin
Misc Expense
PCSB Admin Fee
SCHOOL ADM (OFFICE OF PRIN)
17300310
17300311
17300330
17300370
17300390
17300510
17300640
17300730
17300790
17300791
50,862.00
33,900.00
265.00
550.00
500.00
1,500.00
53,405.00
35,650.00
325.00
600.00
500.00
1,500.00
56,075.00
37,950.00
400.00
650.00
500.00
1,500.00
600.00
48,440.00
16,950.00
200.00
315.00
250.00
1,000.00
2,500.00
500.00
500.00
18,456.00
89,111.00
550.00
1,200.00
22,184.00
111,511.00
600.00
1,500.00
25,248.00
119,328.00
750.00
1,500.00
28,975.00
128,300.00
58,879.00
40,250.00
425.00
700.00
500.00
1,500.00
2,500.00
800.00
1,500.00
30,659.00
137,713.00
Rent
FACILITIES
17400360
-
50,000.00
50,000.00
51,000.00
51,000.00
52,020.00
52,020.00
53,060.00
53,060.00
54,121.00
54,121.00
CONTRACTED SERVICES - FISCAL
Contracted Services-Transportation
TRANSPORTATION
Bldg Insurance-Operations/GL
Telephone & Cell
Other Purchased Services
Utilities
Supplies-Operations
OPERATION OF PLANT
17500310
17800390
3,300.00
2,400.00
3,465.00
2,500.00
3,638.00
2,600.00
3,820.00
2,700.00
4,011.00
2,800.00
500.00
1,000.00
6,700.00
1,200.00
7,165.00
1,300.00
7,538.00
1,400.00
7,920.00
1,500.00
8,311.00
TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES
2,350.00
355,401.00
421,061.00
459,048.00
543,920.00
564,375.00
CURRENT YEAR NET INCOME(LOSS)
500.00
13,710.00
22,609.00
45,918.00
94,810.00
111,484.00
500.00
13,710.00
36,319.00
82,237.00
177,047.00
288,531.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13,710.00
36,319.00
82,237.00
177,047.00
3.71%
0.00%
7.94%
0.00%
15.19%
0.00%
24.56%
0.00%
ENDING FUND BALANCE 6/30
17900320
17900370
17900390
17900400
17900510
500.00
1,250.00
0.00
100.00
500.00
-
-
500.00
0
FUND BAL. RESERVED FOR CAPITAL OUTLAY
UNRESERVED FUND BALANCE 6/30
UNRESERVED FUND BAL as % OF AVAIL FUNDS
RESERVED FUND BAL. AS % OF AVAIL FUNDS
149
0.00
288,531.00
33.83%
0.00%
Appendix K—Start-up and Operating Budget with CSP Funding
150
Montessori Magnolia Academy
INCOME STATEMENT - OPERATING FUND
2009-10 THROUGH 2014-15
WITH START UP FUNDS
2012-2013
2013-2014
-
Planning
& Design
FTE 63
START
UP
OPERATING
FUND
FUND BALANCE 7/1
RED
BOOK
CODES
REVENUE
FL. EDUC. FINANCE PROGRAM
ARRA FUNDS
FEDERAL REVENUE - START UP
CAPITAL OUTLAY
INTEREST
GIFTS & DONATIONS
MISC REVENUE
13310000
13210000
43290000
13397000
13430000
13440000
13490000
TOTAL REVENUE
TOTAL FUNDS AVAILABLE
2014-2014
2014-2015
$ 14,290.00
FTE 77
START
UP
OPERATING
FUND
369,111.00
0.00
START UP
443,670.00
200,000.00
25,000.00
2014-2015
369,111.00
369,111.00
200,000.00
200,000.00
START
UP
OPERATING
FUND
193,005.00
START
UP
2016-2017
$ 68,610.00
FTE 89
FTE 103
OPERATING
FUND
OPERATING
FUND
504,966.00
579,505.00
0.00
59,225.00
50,000.00
0.00
25,000.00
25,000.00
2015-2016
$ 30,414.00
443,670.00
457,960.00
50,000.00
50,000.00
504,966.00
535,380.00
638,730.00
707,340.00
OPERATING
FUND
241,256.00
22,450.00
2,200.00
500.00
OPERATING
FUND
337,759.00
2,000.00
2,500.00
OPERATING EXPENSES
ACCOUNT NAME
Salaries-Teachers-leasing
Salaries - Asst teachers - leasing
Supplies-Instructional
Textbooks-Instructional
Equipment-Instructional
Software-Instructional
Salaries-Sub Teachers
INSTRUCTIONAL
15000310
15000410
15000510
15000520
15000640
15000690
15000750
90,000.00
2,500.00
71,000.00
2,000.00
-
Other Purchased Services
Supplies-Student Support
PUPIL PERSONNEL SVCS
16100390
16100510
Travel - Instructional
INSTR STAFF TRNG SVCS
16400330
Contracted Services-Admin/Gov
17100310
OPERATING
FUND
241,256.00
3,920.00
196,925.00
500.00
500.00
1,000.00
15,775.00
15,775.00
-
750.00
-
151
15,000.00
2,000.00
19,000.00
2,500.00
165,500.00
3,998.00
245,254.00
-
500.00
500.00
1,000.00
24,000.00
24,000.00
START UP
2,000.00
38,500.00
10,000.00
10,000.00
500.00
4,078.00
270,984.00
500.00
4,160.00
346,919.00
500.00
500.00
1,000.00
500.00
500.00
1,000.00
2,500.00
2,500.00
3,500.00
3,500.00
2,250.00
2,500.00
Contracted Services-Audit
Contracted Services-Legal
Liability Insurance-Charter Board
Training & Development
BOARD
17100311
17100312
17100320
17100330
Salaries-Admin Dir of Education
Salaries-Admin-Secretaries
Travel-Admin
Postage
Advertising
Supplies-Admin
Equipment-Admin
Dues & Fees-Admin
Misc Expense
PCSB Admin Fee
SCHOOL ADM (OFFICE OF PRIN)
17300310
17300311
17300330
17300370
17300390
17300510
17300640
17300730
17300790
17300791
Rent
FACILITIES
17400360
CONTRACTED SERVICES - FISCAL
17500310
Contracted Services-Transportation
TRANSPORTATION
17800390
Bldg Insurance-Operations/GL
Telephone & Cell
Other Purchased Services
Utilities
Supplies-Operations
OPERATION OF PLANT
17900320
17900370
17900390
17900400
17900510
5,000.00
1,000.00
2,500.00
500.00
9,000.00
500.00
1,250.00
4,500.00
100.00
500.00
500.00
250.00
-
48,440.00
22,600.00
200.00
500.00
-
6,250.00
1,000.00
3,100.00
750.00
13,100.00
6,500.00
1,000.00
3,200.00
750.00
13,700.00
6,750.00
1,000.00
3,300.00
750.00
14,300.00
1,500.00
51,390.00
37,290.00
300.00
600.00
500.00
1,500.00
600.00
1,500.00
25,248.00
118,928.00
52,932.00
43,920.00
400.00
700.00
500.00
1,500.00
800.00
1,500.00
28,975.00
131,227.00
52,020.00
52,020.00
53,060.00
53,060.00
49,893.00
33,900.00
250.00
550.00
1,500.00
5,000.00
4,000.00
1,500.00
5,850.00
500.00
500.00
18,456.00
91,196.00
10,500.00
550.00
1,200.00
22,184.00
110,027.00
-
50,000.00
50,000.00
-
51,000.00
51,000.00
1,125.00
-
-
-
-
-
-
1,000.00
1,000.00
6,700.00
-
1,200.00
7,165.00
TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES
25,000.00
354,821.00
200,000.00
427,546.00
CURRENT YEAR NET INCOME(LOSS)
-
14,290.00
-
16,124.00
-
14,290.00
-
30,414.00
0.00
UNRESERVED FUND BALANCE 6/30
0.00
UNRESERVED FUND BAL AS % OF AVAIL FUNDS
RESERVED FUND BAL AS % OF AVAIL FUNDS
0.00%
-
-
3,300.00
2,400.00
FUND BAL. RESERVED FOR CAPITAL OUTLAY
1,500.00
-
500.00
500.00
ENDING FUND BALANCE 6/30
-
0.00
14,290.00
3.87%
0.00%
152
3,465.00
2,500.00
0.00
30,414.00
6.64%
0.00%
3,638.00
2,600.00
3,820.00
2,800.00
1,400.00
7,638.00
1,500.00
8,120.00
466,770.00
558,126.00
-
38,196.00
80,604.00
-
68,610.00
149,214.00
50,000.00
0.00
68,610.00
12.82%
0.00%
0.00
149,214.00
21.10%
0.00%
Appendix L—Monthly Cash-Flow Projections for 2012-2018
153
Magnolia Montessori Academy
Cash Flow -Opening Year
2013-2014
2013-2014
Jul-13
Aug-13
43.14
Sep-13
4,463.02
Oct-13
8,332.89
Nov-13
12,752.76
Dec-13
16,622.63
Jan-14
21,042.50
Feb-14
24,912.37
Mar-14
29,332.24
Apr-14
33,202.11
May-14
37,621.98
33,555.55
33,555.55
33,555.55
33,555.55
33,555.55
33,555.55
33,555.55
33,555.55
33,555.55
33,555.55
33,555.55
33,555.55
33,598.69
38,018.56
41,888.43
46,308.30
50,178.17
54,598.05
58,467.92
62,887.79
66,757.66
71,177.53
41,541.86
15,302.73
15,302.73
15,302.73
15,302.73
15,302.73
15,302.73
15,302.73
15,302.73
15,302.73
15,302.73
15,302.73
376.00
376.00
125.00
125.00
376.00
376.00
125.00
125.00
376.00
376.00
125.00
125.00
376.00
376.00
125.00
125.00
376.00
376.00
Beginning
Cash Flow in
FL. EDUC. FINANCE PROGRAM
CAPITAL OUTLAY
Total Cash Available
RED BOOK
Codes
13310000
13397000
Jun-14
41,541.86
Cash Flow Out
Salaries-Teachers-leasing
Supplies-Instructional
Textbooks-Instructional
Salaries-Sub Teachers
Other Purchased Services
Supplies-Student Support
Contracted Services-Audit
Contracted Services-Legal
Liability Ins-Charter Board
Training & Development
Salaries-Admin Dir of Ed.
Salaries-Admin- Dir of Fin.
Travel-Admin
Postage
Advertising
Supplies-Admin
Equipment-Admin
Dues & Fees-Admin
Misc Expense
PCSB Admin Fee
Rent
Bldg Ins-Operations/GL
Telephone & Cell
Supplies-Operations
Total Cash Outflow
Ending Cash Balance
15000310
15000510
15000520
15000750
16100390
16100510
17100311
17100312
17100320
17100330
17300310
17300311
17300330
17300370
17300390
17300510
17300640
17300730
17300790
17300791
17400360
17900320
17900370
17900510
25,000.00
2,500.00
5,000.00
1,000.00
250.00
250.00
250.00
250.00
250.00
250.00
250.00
250.00
250.00
4,403.64
1,540.91
4,403.64
1,540.91
26.25
4,403.64
1,540.91
50.00
26.25
4,403.64
1,540.91
26.25
4,403.64
1,540.91
50.00
26.25
4,403.64
1,540.91
26.25
4,403.64
1,540.91
50.00
26.25
26.25
4,403.64
1,540.91
50.00
26.25
275.00
200.00
83.33
33,512.40
1,677.82
5,000.00
275.00
200.00
83.33
29,135.67
125.00
125.00
1,677.82
5,000.00
275.00
200.00
83.33
29,685.67
1,677.82
5,000.00
275.00
200.00
83.33
29,135.67
125.00
125.00
1,677.82
5,000.00
275.00
200.00
83.33
29,685.67
1,677.82
5,000.00
275.00
200.00
83.33
29,135.67
125.00
125.00
1,677.82
5,000.00
275.00
200.00
83.33
29,685.67
43.14
4,463.02
8,332.89
12,752.76
16,622.63
21,042.50
24,912.37
26.25
250.00
1,000.00
2,500.00
1,677.82
154
4,403.64
1,540.91
250.00
500.00
4,403.64
1,540.91
4,403.64
1,540.91
26.25
26.25
26.25
1,677.82
5,000.00
275.00
200.00
83.33
29,135.67
125.00
125.00
1,677.82
5,000.00
275.00
200.00
83.33
29,685.67
1,677.82
5,000.00
275.00
200.00
83.33
29,135.67
1,677.82
5,000.00
275.00
200.00
83.33
29,635.67
275.00
200.00
83.33
27,831.86
29,332.24
33,202.11
37,621.98
41,541.86
13,710.00
Magnolia Montessori Academy
Cash Flow -Opening Year
2014-2015
Beginning
Cash Flow in
FL. EDUC. FINANCE PROGRAM
CAPITAL OUTLAY
Total Cash Available
-
Jul-13
13,710.00
Aug-13
32,175.66
Sep-13
36,692.18
Oct-13
40,454.95
Nov-13
44,971.48
Dec-13
48,734.25
Jan-14
53,250.77
Feb-14
55,013.55
Mar-14
59,530.07
Apr-14
63,292.84
May-14
67,809.36
40,333.64
40,333.64
40,333.64
40,333.64
40,333.64
40,333.64
40,333.64
40,333.64
40,333.64
40,333.64
40,333.64
54,043.64
72,509.30
77,025.82
80,788.59
85,305.11
89,067.89
93,584.41
95,347.18
99,863.70
103,626.48
108,143.00
Jun-14
71,575.89
RED BOOK
Codes
13310000
13397000
443,670.00
0.00
443,670.00
71,575.89
Cash Flow Out
Salaries-Teachers-leasing
Supplies-Instructional
Textbooks-Instructional
Salaries-Sub Teachers
Other Purchased Services
Supplies-Student Support
Travel - Instructional
Contracted Services - Admin/Gov
Contracted Services-Audit
Contracted Services-Legal
Liability Ins-Charter Board
Training & Development
Salaries-Admin Dir of Ed.
Salaries-Admin- Dir of Fin.
Travel-Admin
Postage
Advertising
Supplies-Admin
Equipment-Admin
Dues & Fees-Admin
Misc Expense
PCSB Admin Fee
Rent
Bldg Ins-Operations/GL
Telephone & Cell
Supplies-Operations
Total Cash Outflow
Ending Cash Balance
15000310
15000510
15000520
15000750
16100390
16100510
16400330
17100310
17100311
17100312
17100320
17100330
17300310
17300311
17300330
17300370
17300390
17300510
17300640
17300730
17300790
17300791
17400360
17900320
17900370
17900510
213,950.00
15,000.00
2,000.00
3,835.00
500.00
500.00
2,500.00
2,000.00
6,250.00
1,000.00
3,100.00
750.00
50,862.00
33,900.00
265.00
550.00
500.00
1,500.00
550.00
1,200.00
22,184.00
51,000.00
3,465.00
2,500.00
1,200.00
421,061.00
19,450.00
19,450.00
19,450.00
19,450.00
19,450.00
19,450.00
19,450.00
19,450.00
19,450.00
19,450.00
383.50
383.50
125.00
125.00
208.33
383.50
383.50
125.00
125.00
208.33
383.50
383.50
125.00
125.00
208.33
2,000.00
383.50
383.50
125.00
125.00
208.33
383.50
383.50
208.33
208.33
19,450.00
15,000.00
2,000.00
208.33
208.33
208.33
208.33
208.33
208.33
6,250.00
1,000.00
310.00
310.00
310.00
310.00
310.00
310.00
310.00
310.00
310.00
4,623.82
3,081.82
4,623.82
3,081.82
45.83
4,623.82
3,081.82
66.25
45.83
4,623.82
3,081.82
45.83
4,623.82
3,081.82
66.25
45.83
4,623.82
3,081.82
45.83
4,623.82
3,081.82
66.25
45.83
45.83
4,623.82
3,081.82
66.25
45.83
288.75
208.33
100.00
21,867.98
2,016.73
5,100.00
288.75
208.33
100.00
35,817.11
137.50
300.00
2,016.73
5,100.00
288.75
208.33
100.00
36,570.86
2,016.73
5,100.00
288.75
208.33
100.00
35,817.11
137.50
300.00
2,016.73
5,100.00
288.75
208.33
100.00
36,570.86
2,016.73
5,100.00
288.75
208.33
100.00
35,817.11
137.50
300.00
2,016.73
5,100.00
288.75
208.33
100.00
38,570.86
32,175.66
36,692.18
40,454.95
44,971.48
48,734.25
53,250.77
55,013.55
45.83
500.00
1,500.00
-
2,016.73
155
4,623.82
3,081.82
310.00
750.00
4,623.82
3,081.82
4,623.82
3,081.82
45.83
45.83
45.83
2,016.73
5,100.00
288.75
208.33
100.00
35,817.11
137.50
300.00
2,016.73
5,100.00
288.75
208.33
100.00
36,570.86
2,016.73
5,100.00
288.75
208.33
100.00
35,817.11
2,016.73
5,100.00
288.75
208.33
100.00
36,567.11
288.75
208.33
100.00
35,256.89
59,530.07
63,292.84
67,809.36
71,575.89
36,319.00
Magnolia Montessori Academy
Cash Flow -Opening Year
2015-2016
Beginning
Cash Flow in
-
Jul-13
36,319.00
Aug-13
60,043.23
Sep-13
66,753.80
Oct-13
72,608.12
Nov-13
79,318.70
Dec-13
85,173.02
Jan-14
91,883.59
Feb-14
95,487.91
Mar-14
102,198.49
Apr-14
108,052.81
May-14
114,763.38
Jun-14
120,723.95
45,906.00
45,906.00
45,906.00
45,906.00
45,906.00
45,906.00
45,906.00
45,906.00
45,906.00
45,906.00
45,906.00
82,225.00
105,949.23
112,659.80
118,514.12
125,224.70
131,079.02
137,789.59
141,393.91
148,104.49
153,958.81
160,669.38
120,723.95
22,004.55
22,004.55
22,004.55
22,004.55
22,004.55
22,004.55
22,004.55
22,004.55
22,004.55
22,004.55
22,004.55
391.20
391.20
125.00
125.00
208.33
391.20
391.20
125.00
125.00
208.33
391.20
391.20
125.00
125.00
208.33
391.20
391.20
125.00
125.00
208.33
391.20
391.20
208.33
208.33
RED BOOK
Codes
FL. EDUC. FINANCE PROGRAM
CAPITAL OUTLAY
Total Cash Available
Cash Flow Out
13310000
13397000
504,966.00
0.00
504,966.00
Salaries-Teachers-leasing
Supplies-Instructional
Textbooks-Instructional
Salaries-Sub Teachers
Other Purchased Services
Supplies-Student Support
Travel - Instructional
Contracted Services Admin/Gov
Contracted Services-Audit
Contracted Services-Legal
Liability Ins-Charter Board
Training & Development
Salaries-Admin Dir of Ed.
Salaries-Admin- Dir of Fin.
Travel-Admin
Postage
Advertising
Supplies-Admin
Equipment-Admin
Dues & Fees-Admin
Misc Expense
PCSB Admin Fee
Rent
Bldg Ins-Operations/GL
Telephone & Cell
Supplies-Operations
Total Cash Outflow
Ending Cash Balance
15000310
15000510
15000520
15000750
16100390
16100510
16400330
242,050.00
15,000.00
2,000.00
3,912.00
500.00
500.00
2,500.00
17100310
17100311
17100312
17100320
17100330
17300310
17300311
17300330
17300370
17300390
17300510
17300640
17300730
17300790
17300791
17400360
17900320
17900370
17900510
2,250.00
6,500.00
1,000.00
3,200.00
750.00
53,405.00
35,650.00
325.00
600.00
500.00
1,500.00
600.00
1,500.00
25,248.00
52,020.00
3,638.00
2,600.00
1,300.00
459,048.00
15,000.00
2,000.00
208.33
208.33
208.33
208.33
208.33
208.33
2,250.00
6,500.00
1,000.00
50.00
500.00
1,500.00
-
2,295.27
303.17
216.67
108.33
22,181.77
60,043.23
320.00
320.00
320.00
320.00
320.00
320.00
320.00
320.00
320.00
4,855.00
3,240.91
4,855.00
3,240.91
50.00
4,855.00
3,240.91
81.25
50.00
4,855.00
3,240.91
50.00
4,855.00
3,240.91
81.25
50.00
4,855.00
3,240.91
50.00
4,855.00
3,240.91
81.25
50.00
50.00
4,855.00
3,240.91
81.25
50.00
2,295.27
5,202.00
303.17
216.67
108.33
39,195.43
66,753.80
150.00
375.00
2,295.27
5,202.00
303.17
216.67
108.33
40,051.68
72,608.12
2,295.27
5,202.00
303.17
216.67
108.33
39,195.43
79,318.70
150.00
375.00
2,295.27
5,202.00
303.17
216.67
108.33
40,051.68
85,173.02
2,295.27
5,202.00
303.17
216.67
108.33
39,195.43
91,883.59
150.00
375.00
2,295.27
5,202.00
303.17
216.67
108.33
42,301.68
95,487.91
2,295.27
5,202.00
303.17
216.67
108.33
39,195.43
102,198.49
150.00
375.00
2,295.27
5,202.00
303.17
216.67
108.33
40,051.68
108,052.81
156
4,855.00
3,240.91
320.00
750.00
4,855.00
3,240.91
4,855.00
3,240.91
50.00
50.00
50.00
2,295.27
5,202.00
303.17
216.67
108.33
39,195.43
114,763.38
2,295.27
5,202.00
303.17
216.67
108.33
39,945.43
120,723.95
303.17
216.67
108.33
38,486.95
82,237.00
Magnolia Montessori Academy
Cash Flow -Opening Year
2016-2017
Beginning
Cash Flow in
FL. EDUC. FINANCE PROGRAM
CAPITAL OUTLAY
Total Cash Available
Cash Flow Out
Salaries-Teachers-leasing
Supplies-Instructional
Textbooks-Instructional
Salaries-Sub Teachers
Other Purchased Services
Supplies-Student Support
Travel - Instructional
Contracted Services Admin/Gov
Contracted Services-Audit
Contracted Services-Legal
Liability Ins-Charter Board
Training & Development
Salaries-Admin Dir of Ed.
Salaries-Admin- Dir of Fin.
Travel-Admin
Postage
Advertising
Supplies-Admin
Equipment-Admin
Dues & Fees-Admin
Misc Expense
PCSB Admin Fee
Rent
Bldg Ins-Operations/GL
Telephone & Cell
Supplies-Operations
Total Cash Outflow
Ending Cash Balance
RED BOOK
Codes
13310000
13397000
579,505.00
59,225.00
638,730.00
15000310
15000510
15000520
15000750
16100390
16100510
16400330
315,350.00
15,000.00
2,000.00
3,990.00
500.00
500.00
3,000.00
17100310
17100311
17100312
17100320
17100330
17300310
17300311
17300330
17300370
17300390
17300510
17300640
17300730
17300790
17300791
17400360
17900320
17900370
17900510
2,500.00
6,750.00
1,000.00
3,300.00
750.00
56,075.00
37,950.00
400.00
650.00
500.00
1,500.00
750.00
1,500.00
28,975.00
53,060.00
3,820.00
2,700.00
1,400.00
543,920.00
Jul-13
82,237.00
Aug-13
117,705.11
Sep-13
128,922.30
Oct-13
139,227.00
Nov-13
150,444.20
Dec-13
160,748.89
Jan-14
171,966.09
Feb-14
179,770.79
Mar-14
190,987.98
Apr-14
201,292.68
May-14
212,509.88
Jun-14
222,977.08
52,682.27
5,384.09
140,303.36
52,682.27
5,384.09
175,771.47
52,682.27
5,384.09
186,988.67
52,682.27
5,384.09
197,293.36
52,682.27
5,384.09
208,510.56
52,682.27
5,384.09
218,815.26
52,682.27
5,384.09
230,032.45
52,682.27
5,384.09
237,837.15
52,682.27
5,384.09
249,054.35
52,682.27
5,384.09
259,359.05
52,682.27
5,384.09
270,576.24
222,977.08
28,668.18
28,668.18
28,668.18
28,668.18
28,668.18
28,668.18
28,668.18
28,668.18
28,668.18
28,668.18
28,668.18
399.00
399.00
125.00
125.00
250.00
399.00
399.00
125.00
125.00
250.00
399.00
399.00
125.00
125.00
250.00
399.00
399.00
125.00
125.00
250.00
399.00
399.00
250.00
250.00
15,000.00
2,000.00
250.00
250.00
250.00
250.00
250.00
250.00
2,500.00
6,750.00
1,000.00
330.00
330.00
330.00
330.00
330.00
330.00
330.00
330.00
330.00
5,097.73
3,450.00
5,097.73
3,450.00
54.17
5,097.73
3,450.00
100.00
54.17
5,097.73
3,450.00
54.17
5,097.73
3,450.00
100.00
54.17
5,097.73
3,450.00
54.17
5,097.73
3,450.00
100.00
54.17
54.17
5,097.73
3,450.00
100.00
54.17
318.33
225.00
116.67
22,598.26
2,634.09
5,306.00
318.33
225.00
116.67
46,849.17
187.50
375.00
2,634.09
5,306.00
318.33
225.00
116.67
47,761.67
2,634.09
5,306.00
318.33
225.00
116.67
46,849.17
187.50
375.00
2,634.09
5,306.00
318.33
225.00
116.67
47,761.67
2,634.09
5,306.00
318.33
225.00
116.67
46,849.17
187.50
375.00
2,634.09
5,306.00
318.33
225.00
116.67
50,261.67
117,705.11
128,922.30
139,227.00
150,444.20
160,748.89
171,966.09
179,770.79
54.17
500.00
1,500.00
-
2,634.09
157
5,097.73
3,450.00
330.00
750.00
5,097.73
3,450.00
5,097.73
3,450.00
54.17
54.17
54.17
2,634.09
5,306.00
318.33
225.00
116.67
46,849.17
187.50
375.00
2,634.09
5,306.00
318.33
225.00
116.67
47,761.67
2,634.09
5,306.00
318.33
225.00
116.67
46,849.17
2,634.09
5,306.00
318.33
225.00
116.67
47,599.17
318.33
225.00
116.67
45,930.08
190,987.98
201,292.68
212,509.88
222,977.08
177,047.00
Magnolia Montessori Academy
Cash Flow -Opening Year
2017-2018
Beginning
Cash Flow in
RED BOOK
Codes
FL. EDUC. FINANCE PROGRAM
CAPITAL OUTLAY
13310000
13397000
Total Cash Available
Cash Flow Out
Salaries-Teachers-leasing
Supplies-Instructional
Textbooks-Instructional
Salaries-Sub Teachers
Other Purchased Services
Supplies-Student Support
Travel - Instructional
Contracted Services Admin/Gov
Contracted Services-Audit
Contracted Services-Legal
Liability Ins-Charter Board
Training & Development
Salaries-Admin Dir of Ed.
Salaries-Admin- Dir of Fin.
Travel-Admin
Postage
Advertising
Supplies-Admin
Equipment-Admin
Dues & Fees-Admin
Misc Expense
PCSB Admin Fee
Rent
Bldg Ins-Operations/GL
Telephone & Cell
Supplies-Operations
Total Cash Outflow
Ending Cash Balance
Jul-13
177,047.00
Aug-13
212,658.96
Sep-13
225,712.82
Oct-13
237,835.44
Nov-13
250,889.30
Dec-13
263,011.91
Jan-14
276,065.77
Feb-14
285,438.38
Mar-14
298,492.25
Apr-14
310,614.86
May-14
323,668.72
613,184.00
62,675.00
55,744.00
5,697.73
55,744.00
5,697.73
55,744.00
5,697.73
55,744.00
5,697.73
55,744.00
5,697.73
55,744.00
5,697.73
55,744.00
5,697.73
55,744.00
5,697.73
55,744.00
5,697.73
55,744.00
5,697.73
55,744.00
5,697.73
675,859.00
238,488.73
274,100.69
287,154.55
299,277.16
312,331.03
324,453.64
337,507.50
346,880.11
359,933.97
372,056.59
385,110.45
335,972.58
29,387.27
29,387.27
29,387.27
29,387.27
29,387.27
29,387.27
29,387.27
29,387.27
29,387.27
29,387.27
29,387.27
407.00
407.00
125.00
125.00
291.67
407.00
407.00
125.00
125.00
291.67
407.00
407.00
125.00
125.00
291.67
407.00
407.00
125.00
125.00
291.67
407.00
407.00
291.67
291.67
-
15000310
15000510
15000520
15000750
16100390
16100510
16400330
323,260.00
15,000.00
2,500.00
4,070.00
500.00
500.00
3,500.00
17100310
17100311
17100312
17100320
17100330
17300310
17300311
17300330
17300370
17300390
17300510
17300640
17300730
17300790
17300791
17400360
17900320
17900370
17900510
2,750.00
7,000.00
1,000.00
3,400.00
750.00
58,879.00
40,250.00
425.00
700.00
500.00
1,500.00
2,500.00
800.00
1,500.00
30,659.00
54,121.00
4,011.00
2,800.00
1,500.00
564,375.00
Jun-14
335,972.58
15,000.00
2,500.00
291.67
291.67
291.67
291.67
291.67
291.67
2,750.00
7,000.00
1,000.00
58.33
500.00
1,500.00
2,500.00
2,787.18
334.25
233.33
125.00
25,829.77
212,658.96
340.00
340.00
340.00
340.00
340.00
340.00
340.00
340.00
340.00
5,352.64
3,659.09
5,352.64
3,659.09
58.33
5,352.64
3,659.09
106.25
58.33
5,352.64
3,659.09
58.33
5,352.64
3,659.09
106.25
58.33
5,352.64
3,659.09
58.33
5,352.64
3,659.09
106.25
58.33
58.33
5,352.64
3,659.09
106.25
58.33
2,787.18
5,412.10
334.25
233.33
125.00
48,387.87
225,712.82
200.00
375.00
2,787.18
5,412.10
334.25
233.33
125.00
49,319.12
237,835.44
2,787.18
5,412.10
334.25
233.33
125.00
48,387.87
250,889.30
200.00
375.00
2,787.18
5,412.10
334.25
233.33
125.00
49,319.12
263,011.91
2,787.18
5,412.10
334.25
233.33
125.00
48,387.87
276,065.77
200.00
375.00
2,787.18
5,412.10
334.25
233.33
125.00
52,069.12
285,438.38
2,787.18
5,412.10
334.25
233.33
125.00
48,387.87
298,492.25
200.00
375.00
2,787.18
5,412.10
334.25
233.33
125.00
49,319.12
310,614.86
158
5,352.64
3,659.09
340.00
750.00
5,352.64
3,659.09
5,352.64
3,659.09
58.33
58.33
58.33
2,787.18
5,412.10
334.25
233.33
125.00
48,387.87
323,668.72
2,787.18
5,412.10
334.25
233.33
125.00
49,137.87
335,972.58
334.25
233.33
125.00
47,441.58
288,531.00
Appendix M—Spiral of Montessori Curriculum
From The Montessori Way by Tim Seldin and Paul Epstein
160
Appendix N—Letters of Support
161
To whom it may concern,
07/04/2012
This a letter in support of approval for a new public Montessori Charter School: Magnolia
Montessori Academy.
I have been acquainted with the basic classroom practices of Maria Montessori for many
years. My ch ildren have attended a Montessori school for the last four years and , through their
experiences and through my volunteer service, I have gained added insight into some of the
philosophies, materials, and techniques of a Montessori classroom.
As a museum education director, I have had the opportunity to collaborate with some fine
Montessori teachers in Polk County and have implemented several Montessori type materials
and methods for all ages in the instructional curriculum at the museum.
I believe that Maria Montessori created a template for a learning environment which is effective
for all people. The Magnolia Montessori Academy will be a wonderful addition to the academic
choices in Polk County.
The Montessori philosophies, materials, and techniques are a unified instructional method
which result in high academic achievement and gives students, teachers, and parents a strong
base to develop a community of life-long learners.
Magnolia Montessori Academy will also develop the imaginative, collaborative, and creative
thinking abilities necessary for our children to achieve and excel as future leaders and citizens.
An authentic Montessori school also incorporates fine arts such as music, dance, art, and
drama in most of the school's activities.
I have become aware of the possibilities of incorporating STEM (science, technology,
engineering, and math) subjects while implementing Montessori style lessons at the museum.
The best STEM hands on learning lessons follow the Montessori philosophies of the prepared
(safe) environment and progression from concrete objects to abstract concepts.
The STEM connection is quite reasonable because Maria Montessori was a medical doctor
and used her (STEM) experience in creation of this curriculum.
Rm~;s::_consideration to approve the charter for Magnolia Montessori Academy.
John Iskra
Education Director, Florida Air Museum at Sun 'n Fun
w w w. FIori d a Air Museum. or g
Florida's Official Aviation Museum & Education Cente r ""'- Home of the Howard Hughes Aviation Collection
Dear Polk County School Board,
I am writing to you as both an educator and a parent. I am a teacher of 16 years with McKeel Academy
of Technology, and I also am the parent of a student who attends Lakeland Montessori Schoolhouse. I
have been part of a highly successful program at McKeel, and my son has flourished at LMS. It may seem
odd to some that my son does not attend a McKeel school, but I do not feel that it is at all out of the
ordinary.
As a teacher at McKeel, my colleagues and I strive for excellence as we implement the McKeel
philosophy, and we do a fantastic job. Our system works for many students, and we take pride in that. As
a parent, however, I realized early that my son might not be entirely cut out for the McKeel system, and I
looked for other options. I was fortunate that Lakeland Montessori was an available option at that time,
and I quickly got him on their list when he turned 3, and he started that Fall. I feel extremely privileged
that I had such wonderful options to choose from.
Unfortunately, for the past three years, when parents of other young children have asked me about
Montessori, although I would be able to attest to the excellence of the program and the lifelong benefits
my son is reaping as part of it, I could not recommend it to them because I knew that the waiting list
was so long, and there was no hope of getting their children in. The McKeel system has chosen to
expand, based on the demand for their services. Lakeland Montessori does not have plans for expansion,
and therefore their valuable service is available only to a select few families.
I fully support the addition of a second Montessori program in Lakeland. Montessori education is a
needed service here. The demand is high, as one can see from the waiting list. As parents, we deserve to
have affordable options for our children. For many, traditional education is the way to go. For others,
STEM-based or Fine Arts programs are the key. For my son, Montessori is his path to finding and
unlocking his potential because of its child-centered, holistic approach that uses his natural development
and curiosity to spark learning. I would hope that the School Board would encourage the addition of
another excellent option for the parents of tomorrow's leaders, one which would offer the additional
benefits of language and music integration.
Please consider the charter application for this new Montessori program. The parents and children of
Lakeland deserve to have the best options available for our many different needs. We need to reach
those who could otherwise fall through the cracks at another school. Montessori is a proven system by
which to accomplish this. Our community can only benefit from meeting the needs of our diverse
learners.
Thank you for your consideration.
Sincerely,
Rebecca A. Stacey
Dear Polk County School Board,
While investigating schools for my two daughters to attend, I discovered a charter school that
was based on the Montessori teaching method. Its hands on learning principles and mixed age
classrooms were a stark contrast to the traditional classrooms that I grew up in. After much research, 1
decided to visit the classroom for an observation and I was thrilled with what I observed. Students were
being taught individual lessons based on their ability, not a group lesson that left some behind to
flounder and others bored and unengaged. Some students were working collaboratively with their
peers of different ages. The older students were learning to be leaders. The curriculum allowed for
students to work beyond the standards and embrace a love of learning. Students were also being
taught grace and courtesy lessons. It is a huge part of the Montessori philosophy that students learn to
treat others with respect and how to problem solve with courtesy, an important lesson that should be
included in the traditional classroom.
Now that my children are in school full-time, I have returned to work as a traditional classroom
teacher. In my classroom, I frequently use Montessori methods to teach lessons to my children. My
students are engaged using Montessori materials such as the "Stamp Game" and "Addition and
Subtraction Boards". These hands on Montessori created materials allow my students to easily grasp
basic math concepts quickly. If I had the opportunity, I would love to become a Montessori certified
teacher!
It is my understanding that Lakeland Montessori has hundreds of families on its waiting list.
These families want the best for their children, an opportunity to be a part of a school that puts the
students learning needs first, unlike traditional schools that are forced to teach to a test like the FCAT.
Lakeland could easily fill another Montessori school, especially on the south side of town. All the
families on the waiting list would have an opportunity for their children to grow and thrive in an
extremely successful research based educational environment.
Sincerely,
j~ i/J.ur;J(u~
Barbara and James Vanarsdale
July 20, 2012
To the members of the Polk County School Board,
I am writing to appeal for a charter for another Montessori school located in Polk County. Our family
moved to the lakeland area in the summer of 2010 when our oldest son was three years old. Though
we immediately applied for him to attend Lakeland Montessori, by the time we moved the students for
the fall 2010 school year had already been chosen.
He was unable to attend the next school year
because those spots for four-year-olds were taken as well. Not being able to send our son to Lakeland
Montessori was extremely disappointing, so we were forced to examine our other options.
The biggest appeal of a Montessori education for our family was how the students are grouped with
other students of different ages. It's wonderful how the younger students can learn from the older
ones, and how the senior students are able to help the youngest in the classroom. After all, truly
knowing a skill is best demonstrated by being able to teach it to someone else. Our ideas were solidified
upon touring Lakeland Montessori, and in our opinion, a Montessori education is the most attractive for
our two sons. We would be so grateful if they were given the chance to experience the Montessori
culture. Thank you for taking our thoughts into account.
Best,
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D~aidateon
Abramowitz and Dr. llan Abramowitz
Cathleen Nelson
1824 Comanche Trail
Lakeland, FL 33803
863-248-2873
[email protected]
June 2, 2012
Polk County School Board
1915 South Floral Avenue
Bartow, FL 33830
Dear Polk County School Board,
Although Polk County Schools offer a variety of charter, magnet and schools of choice, the
classroom learning in almost all of them is based on a traditional model of teacher-directed
instruction, often with a focus on learning the skills included on the FCAT.
As a former K-1-2 teacher with a master's degree in education, I visited several local schools,
hoping to find one for my oldest, who will start kindergarten the fall I strongly believe,
and significant research backs up those beliefs, that elementary students should be active
participants in their own learning, and that the learning, especially for younger children,
should be play-based, hands-on, and focused on process more than product. I recognize the
many benefits of multi-age classrooms in which children are able to learn from each other,
consolidate their own learning by sharing their knowledge and skills, and practice working
and living kindly and safely together. I believe that the most powerful learning takes place
when connected meaningfully to the child's own interests.
m
Lakeland Montessori is the only local option for families looking for a non-traditional, more
student-centered, collaborative approach to classroom learning, facilitated by motivated,
well-trained teachers. As their long waitlist indicates, there are at least hundreds of local
families (and this waitlist only includes those families who could afford the almost $12,000
for the 2 years of preschool essentially required for a place in the public school) looking for
just that.
We very much need another research-backed, non-traditional elementary school in Polk
County. My family, and likely at least several hundred more families, would truly welcome
this new charter.
Sincerely,
Cathleen Nelson
29 June 2012
Dear Polk County School Board,
I have two children currently in the Polk County Schools. One is enrolled at Rochelle School of the Arts
and the other is at the lakeland Montessori Schoolhouse (LMS). We were lucky-both our children were
able to "get in" to their schools of choice in a reasonable amount of time and with a minimum of
additional cost to us. That is now, sadly, the case for many other parents.
I am not writing this letter to espouse, necessarily, the benefits of one school over another. Instead, I
would like to point out the importance of viable choices in the County. The number of places (90) and
the number of applicants on the waiting list (close to 600) at LMS makes the possibility of attending the
school out of the reach of many citizens of the county. These numbers indicate both a need and a base
of support.
I believe strongly that the educational methods and sound practical application of Montessori principles
can create an ideal learning situation for children--especially within the "elementary" educational setting.
I know that Lakeland-and Polk County more generally-has room (e.g., enough potential students and
educators) to support another Montessori-based school.
I strongly support a charter for an additional school offering a Montessori curriculum. Such an addition to
the cadre of schools will undoubtedly help galvanize our community and bring additional students back
into our public school system .
Sincerely,
Catherine R. Eskin, Ph .D.
Associate Professor of English
English Department • Il l Lake Hollingsworth Drive • Lakeland, FL 33801-5698
(863) 680-4220 • Fax (863) 680-4147 . www.flsouthem.edu
Dear Polk County School Board/
I'm writing in support of a new Montessori School to be established in Polk County. There is
currently only one offered in Polk County and both of my children have been on the waiting list for
more than 4 years. I was specifically informed by the Montessori principal of the Lakeland/ FL
Montessori school that my children will never get into her school. In my disappointment and
frustration I'm writing to you with high hopes that the Polk County School Board will be able to offer
a second location for a Montessori Schoot so that other children will have this educational
opportunity.
I am a strong supporter of Montessori schools as I was fortunate to attend school in a Montessori
environment in Wisconsin. I have very positive memories and I believe my children should have the
same opportunity to learn as I did. The Montessori environment strives to expand individualism/
prepare children to make good choices/ builds confidence and prepares children to succeed in life.
Prior to relocating to Lakeland/ Fll put my children on the Montessori waiting list. I was saddened to
learn/ per the current principat that my children "will never get in" to the school.
My experience with the Montessori philosophy is that it offers a more individualized approach that
places an emphasis on "following the child." One-age classrooms are replaced by multi-age environments/ and the prevalence of paper and textbooks are traded for multi-sensory educational tools.
Instead of adhering to strict lesson plans/ children are allowed to select their curriculum/ spending
as much time as needed in mastering the subject matter. Currently this type of structure is what my
children as well as many others/ will benefit from.
I'm sure you are well aware of the benefits of the Montessori philosophy and how many children will
learn better in this environment however just in case you haven't had the opportunity to read this I
wanted to share some recent research I found with you:
In a study sponsored by the North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA)/ the impact
of a Montessori education at the middle school level was substantial in improving the "quality of
experience" for the students. Dr. Rathundee compared the perceptions between Montessori Middle
school students and those enrolled in traditional middle schools/ and the Montessori students
reported "a significantly better quality of experience in their academic work than did traditional
students." The Montessori students also felt their schools were more positive learning environments
that "cultivated active learning/ rather than passive or rote learning:'
Thank you for considering this request to offer another Montessori school in Polk County/ this
opportunity will be a tremendous benefit to many children and families.
Sinc~ly,
Brid
te Lee
Mother of two (Kindergarten/3rd grade)
July 11, 2012
Dear Polk County School Board,
I am writing this letter in regard to the charter application for Magnolia Montessori
Academy, and the need/benefits that a school of this sort would bring to the community.
I am most certainly in support of this charter application.
I am the son of a former teacher and school board member, and the father oftwo children
who are currently enrolled in Lakeland Montessori. I believe this has allowed me to
generate a somewhat unique perspective based upon some degree of observation both of
my father and his teaching career, and my son's own educational experience.
I will never forget my first day of observation in the Montessori environment. When we
were looking for schools for our children, in the 3-6 year age group, we were allowed to
watch a classroom of approximately 20 students. I was amazed to see as I observed that
even at this young age, almost every student was engaged in some sort of self directed
learning activity that captivated their interest. So much so in fact, that there were almost
no changes in their behavior when I came to the classroom to view them. Every child
stayed on their task, obvious to me that whatever they were doing they were engaged in.
After this experience, I knew that my children would be best served in this type of
environment.
My father, as I have said, is a former teacher and school board member. He has very
traditional views about education, and had to see for himself what I was talking about. I
remember watching his mouth drop as he saw the behavior of the kids in the classroom,
even he couldn't believe the focus of the young students. Combine that with the fact that
the results of my two very different children have had one common goal, educational
success, and I believe that the Montessori method in Lakeland has proven its ability to
succeed.
There is no guarantee that the Montessori method is the best learning method for all
students, although it certainly has worked well for my children. In a demand driven
society however, it seems there is most certainly a need for more Montesori educational
opportunities. The waiting list at Lakeland Montessori is approaching 600 applications,
with less than 100 positions. There are many more than this who desire this educational
experience, but don't even apply as they realize how little chance they have to get into
the school.
In closing, I would like to thank you for taking the time to read my letter and consider the
new charter for Magnolia Montessori Academy. I am a strong supporter of the charter
for the new school, and hope many more students have the opportunity to receive a public
education like the one my children have had.
Respectfully.
Chad Englund
I am writing in support of a second Montessori school to serve Lakeland, Florida. We have
applied to the Lakeland Montessori Schoolhouse since our son, Eli, was born. We have been placed on
the waiting list since that time, and have reapplied yearly. We are always told if a spot becomes
available mid-year, although highly unlikely, we wilJ receive a call.
We were blessed to adopt our son when he was two days old. He was a fourteen-week preemie
who was given very little chance of a normal life. The doctors determined he would either have
cerebral palsy or muscular dystrophy. Thankfully, those doctors were wrong. Early Steps intervened
when Eli was seven months old to make sure he was reaching his milestones. Although he needed
short-term therapy as an infant, he quickly caught up to and exceeded his peers. He is a healthy, strong,
athletic and intelligent young boy. He currently attends St. Joseph's Academy full-time (8am - 3pm).
He has proven to be a leader in class, and is correctly completing first-grade math worksheets. The
librarian/ resource teacher at SJA commented just last week how much she believes Eli would succeed
in a Montessori environment. He is much more task focused and independent than his peers.
We believe there must be other families in a similar situation to ours who a
right children
who would thrive in a Montessori environment, but do not have a school to accommodate them. Please
approve a charter for a second Montessori school to serve the families in Lakeland.
July 11, 2012
Dear Polk County School Board,
I feel there is a need for another Charter Montessori in Lakeland. Our family has been a part of the
Lakeland Montessori Community for five years, and I believe it would be beneficial for more students to
have access to the Montessori style of education.
Despite having had Montessori experience when we moved to Lakeland from Michigan, and therefore
being moved towards the top of the LMS waiting list, it took a full year before my oldest son was able to
get a spot at Lakeland Montessori. Not wanting to use private schools, we were actually drawn to
Lakeland because there was a charter Montessori option. He had attended a charter Montessori in
Michigan, where the Montessori options were plentiful.
While we had an excellent experience with the neighborhood public school we used while we waited,
we knew Montessori was the style of education we wanted for our children. All four of our children,
who are all very different from one another, have had amazing experiences in the Montessori
classrooms.
Often, when speaking with other parents about where kids go to school, I'm told they too were
interested in having a Montessori education for their child, but they are/were/have been on the wait list
for Lakeland Montessori School. I feel there is certainly enough interest in and demand for Montessori
education to support another charter.
Heather Shamoun
6/30/2012
Ellen J. Hawtrey
2832 Vintage View Loop
Lakeland, FL 33812
Polk County Public Schools
1915 South Floral Avenue
Bartow, FL 33830
To Whom It May Concern:
As a parent of two Polk County elementary students and a resident of Lakeland, I am writing to
address the need for additional options for Montessori-based, elementary education in the Polk
County Public School system. Consideration of such a charter school application could be a
powerful addition to the Polk County Public Schools portfolio. Currently, options for Montessori
education fall short of community demands, with 600 elementary students awaiting admission to
Lakeland's sole Montessori charter school, the Lakeland Montessori Schoolhouse (LMS).
LMS cultivates proven, superior education measured by FCAT scores, adherence to Sunshine
State standards and Adequate Yearly Progress status, and consistently out-ranks both the state
and the county standard. Scores of academic excellence not only reflect the high quality of Polk
County public education, but also encourage students to embrace their education with pride.
My decision to place my daughters in a Montessori pre-school came after months of research of
available teaching methods. While I am not opposed to traditional education, my focus was to
find the best method suited for my daughters. I found that, when taught in compliance with the
true, traditional Montessori Method, this method provides students with a superior education.
Additionally, its focus of guiding children to become self-directed, responsible and respectful
learners prepares students academically, socially and emotionally to transition and succeed in
traditional public school.
Unfortunately, my daughters probably will not be offered placement at Lakeland Montessori
Schoolhouse due to the overwhelming number of students now awaiting placement there. For the
benefit of many families in this situation, as well as for Polk County Public Schools as a whole, I
urge you to consider approving another Montessori charter school for Polk County.
Respectfully Yours,
&!J~
Ellen J.
H~e£1'
May 28, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
The Lakeland Montessori Schoolhouse has been a blessing for many families looking for alternative
educational opportunities for their children. It has been noticed by many and has quite a waiting list for
the 90 spots the school has available. In fact, with over 600 children on the waiting list it is a shame that
many of these interested families will never have the chance to experience Montessori here in Lakeland.
I personally had to wait 5 years for my son to be accepted and started at number 9 on the list when the
school first opened. I was familiar with the Montessori Method but never dreamed that my children
would be able to attend such a school. First because there was not one in the area, and secondly these
schools are usually private and quite expensive. However, because of the public aspect of the Lakeland
Montessori Schoolhouse, our local children are receiving the benefits of this method of instruction.
If you or anyone in charge of issuing charters has not visited the lower primary classroom featuring ages
3-6, then you have not witnessed what these children are capable of given the opportunity.
From what I can tell with the amount of VPK programs being offered in the community parents are
starting to realize the difference an early start can make. With that said I live on the south side of town
and would love to have the option of a closer Montessori location.
I feel confident with the existing waiting list and from people I have met in the community that Lakeland
could support a second Montessori school. It would also be a draw to families moving into our area.
Usually the type of schools available plays a big part in the decision to move to one city versus another.
Lisa Youngblood
July 3, 2012
Kristy Martinez
6244 Alamanda Hills Blvd.
Lakeland, FL 33813
To whom it may concern,
My name is Kristy Martinez and I am the mother of 2 young children. I have a 3 year old and a 5 month
old. I began my search for a preschool for my daughter about a year ago. I work part time in my home
and my children remain with me at all times. Once I began reading about the different
preschools/schools in the area and going around previewing each one and their teaching techniques it
became more evident that the Mont essori philosophy is right in line with our goals and expectations as
parents. Upon hearing that the only Montessori school in Lakeland has a waiting list, I became
discouraged and felt that it was a mild injustice. I have great expectations for my children, and how can
I ensure their success if I am not given the proper resources. I truly think that this area needs another
Montessori school and was thrilled to see that there was one in the making.
I am a strong supporter of the Montessori Phi losophy and I know that another school in the area would
be a great asset to my children along w ith many others in the area.
Regards,
Kristy Martinez
KhanhPham
3824 Haverhill Drive
Lakeland, FL. 3 3 81 0
July 9, 2012
Dear Polk County School Board,
I am a parent of 3 girls age 7, 5 years and 21 months and I am writing this letter to
support a new Montessori School here in Lakeland. Let me tell you why.
I have been with Lakeland Montessori School House since 2008, when my first daughter
was three. Montessori System has been around for a long time and internationally
recognized. As a young mother, I did not know how to start my kids with their education.
The only thing I know for sure I want my kids learn at their own space, not keeping back
to how old they are. All of my girls are born after September 1 of the year hence they are
all started late compare to their peers. I am glad I found Lakeland Montessori School
House.
I cried in tears when I saw my 3 year old started to write her name after the first week of
school. I found the requirement that by the end of kindergarten year, she should write at
least short sentences. I was amazed that she ended her kindergarten year with a journal
book that she wrote stories and stories about family, school, and friend. I enjoyed reading
it and so proud to share with my relative. Now end of her first grade year, she could read
and comprehend 3rd grader books with some of the 41h grader level. They go home with
work from school that I treasure, it all piled up to the point we have to think which one
we should throw away. Don't you want to see every child in Lakeland would have the
same education opportunity as my daughters have?
Seeing the school grows, and how all the kids at the school interact with each other, I fall
in love with the school. I learned that now there is such a waiting list (600 for 90 spots
total at the school). I think this system should be expanding to allow other families have
the chance as we do.
The cost to attend a Montessori school is quite expensive in general. We are lucky to
have LMS as a charter school here. I would be glad to see another charter Montessori
school here in Lakeland. This for sure will make Lakeland as the best place to live in
Polk County, and Polk County is the best place in central Florida!
Polk County school board,
I'm writing today, in full support of the possibility of a new Montessori School opening up in Polk County.
I've been standing on the sidelines for years waiting to be called up, but have yet to be able to experience
the excitement. Having two little girls who yearn for enrichment and knowledge in all different aspects, it's
is extremely thrilling at the promise that more children may be able to finally learn through the benefits of
the Montessori methods.
I feel confident that adding another Montessori School to Polk County will not only benefit the surrounding
childrens' opportunities for education but will in turn enrich the community by the addition of a strong,
diverse, and social educational outlet.
Sincerely,
Sarah Bisesi
May 22, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
My name is Lori Hilton. Our daughter, McKenzie has been
attending Lakeland Montessori Schoolhouse for 2 years now.
I could not imagine a better way of learning for our little girl.
The Montessori approach not only teaches our children the
basics, but it teaches them to be well-rounded, independent,
respectful adults. Our children are our future. Knowing that
our child will be growing up with a Montessori background
brings us peace as we know she will be able to handle
herself for the rest of her life.
We need more Montessori education in Lakeland. More
children should have the opportunity to grow and learn with
the Montessori approach. Our little school has over 600
children on their waiting list. These children should have a
chance to grow in a Montessori environment, too.
Montessori education offers our children opportunities to
develop their potential as they step into the world as
engaged, competent, responsible, and respectful citizens.
The Montessori approach gives our children an
understanding and appreciation that learning is for life.
Having more of our children learn the Montessori way can
only be beneficial to our wonderful town.
Kindest regards,
Lori Hilton
5250 Glenmore Drive
Lakeland, FL 33813
June 15, 2012
To Whom It May Concern,
As a product of Montessori schooling myself, I am adamant about choosing that type of learning for my
two children. After attending Alexander Montessori School in Miami, FL from age 3-11, I fully believe
that the Montessori school model set me apart from my peers once I joined them in traditional public
school.
As a parent, I applied with the only Montessori school in my area when my son was not even two years
old. With no guarantee that we will be accepted, I am faced to consider back up plans for his early
education. I am active in my church, full of young families, and in three “mommy and me” type of
groups and I am certain that my friends will agree that the addition of another Montessori school can
only enhance the depth of early childhood and primary education here in Polk County. I know they will
apply with me for admission as soon as we get the opportunity.
As an experienced middle school teacher, I am very familiar with students’ learning styles and needs. I
have years of experience searching out the very best way to reach students and have them retain my
lessons. The harder I have tried to find the “perfect” teaching style, the more obvious it has been that
all students are wired differently and their needs vary dramatically from one style to the next. For some
students, the traditional classroom is effective. For many others, a different model is more appropriate.
The Montessori model of teaching might be the very best answer for many students, but without
enough Montessori schools those opportunities are often missed. The waiting list is just too long to
ensure equal opportunities for all children.
It is with these high demands in mind that I am writing this letter. I urge you, with fervent enthusiasm,
to consider adding another Montessori school to the Lakeland area. The road to long-lasting
achievement and educational excellence heavily relies on a firm foundation in the early years of a child’s
life. I believe, with conviction, that additional Montessori schools and opportunities would greatly
benefit the children of Polk County.
Thank you, in advance, for your consideration. Please feel free to contact me with any further
questions.
Respectfully,
Emma Murrell
[email protected]
Cell Phone: (863)660-6926
To whom it may concern,
06/22/2012
I am writing this letter to express my excitement and support over the possibility of another Public
Montessori Charter School being approved in Polk County: Magnolia Montessori Academy.
As a Montessori teacher and parent of two children who attend Montessori school, I am a fIrm believer in
this method and see its powerful benefits in the daily lives of my children and my students.
The Montessori philosophy is amazing. Its mission is to provide a stimulating environment that inspires a
life-long love of learning and growth. Montessori children love learning, respect each other, and respect all
living things. As a bonus, Montessori students are academically advanced and very involved in their
communities.
Although I love my children's school, we have a huge 600 count waiting list and many times deserving
families simply cannot afford the preschool and/or there are no available spots in the elementary school.
Another Montessori school would make it possible for more Polk County students to benefIt from this
method of learning.
Magnolia Montessori Academy will give more parents a choice, offering an approach to learning that best
fits their children. This new school will be open to all children and allow families in any income bracket the
opportunity to choose Montessori.
The benefits of Montessori as listed by the American Montessori Society are:
1. Each child is valued as a unique individual.
2. Beginning at an early age, Montessori students develop order, coordination,
concentration, and independence.
3. Students are a part ofa close, caring community.
4. Montessori students enjoy freedom with limits.
5. Students are supported in becoming active seekers of knowledge.
6. Self-correction and self assessment are an integral part of the Montessori classroom
approach.
7. Given the freedom and support to question, to probe deeply, and to make
connections, Montessori students become confIdent, enthusiastic, self-directed
learners. They are able to think critically, work collaboratively, and act boldly, a
skill set for the 21 st century.
(American Montessori Society)
Magnolia Montessori Academy will be a diverse community of children, their families, and teachers who
are passionate about learning and discovery. If given the opportunity, I believe the benefIts of such a school
would be tremendous for our children and community.
'Public Montessori schools are few and far between. Polk County School Board has a wonderful opportunity
to support it citizens and put itself on the map by approving the creation of Magnolia Montessori Academy,
a second Public Montessori charter school in Polk County.
Liz Iskra
June 1, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
Lakeland needs another charter Montessori school.
First, Montessori is a child-centered philosophy. Instead of cookie-cutter teaching, children are allowed to
learn at their own pace, according to their own interests with guidance from their teachers. They are kept
together for three years, allowing for the social awareness and feeling of belonging our kids
desperately need. They are given a place to learn leadership by teaching, mentoring, and
encouraging the younger students in their own class. These three unusual opportunities, having input into
their own learning, having a secure social base from which educational risks are encouraged, and having
leadership training and practice, lead to students who excel in school (and on the all-important F-CAT)
and in life.
Second, Lakeland has only one Montessori school for elementary aged students. There is a huge waiting
list, with many, many parents seeking the excellent start in life that a Montessori education provides.
I am a public school teacher of 24 years. I use many of Maria Montessori's activities and as much of her
philosophy as fits inside the curriculum of a traditional school. With the results that I see and have read
about in my research, if I had it to do over again, I would train as a Montessorian from the very beginning.
Please consider allowing another Montessori charter school.
Thank you,
Jill Rafferty
Carlton Palmore Elementary
To the members of the Polk County School Board,
I am writing to include our family among those in assembly for a new charter to create another
Montessori school in Polk County. Our daughter Eve, who is five years old and will attend kindergarten
in the fall, has attended Lakeland Montessori since the age of three. My husband and I chose a
Montessori education for Eve for so many reasons. We love that within her curriculum she is
encouraged to think independently, that the children are exposed to a wide variety of multicultural
experiences, and that kindness and courtesy to others are not only encouraged but expected. For a
parent, it is such a relief to know that your child is in the care of teachers that were taught to regard
each child as intelligent, and that the children are exposed to academics in a manner that includes
seeing all aspects of a child's life, and not only his or her learning style.
It is a discredit to our community that such a small percentage of the children in our county have access
to such an education. I am aware that the waiting list at Lakeland Montessori includes over six hundred
children, and given the current small size of Lakeland Montessori's facility, this guarantees that the
majority of those children will not be given the opportunity to gain knowledge in the approach that Eve
and her classmates are. Having another Montessori school in this area will not only serve other families
in search of a Montessori education, but will undoubtedly benefit our current school system because
Lakeland Montessori students' have consistently high standardized test scores, unquestioningly a result
of the Montessori teaching methods.
Please strongly consider the charter for another Montessori school in Polk County. Other families
deserve a chance for their four-year-olds to come home discussing how crystals are formed or what an
archipelago is as my husband and I experienced, and we cannot wait for our younger daughter, now five
months old, to do the same! Thank you for your consideration in this matter.
Sincerely,
Amy Morris
June 14, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
I am a state of Florida certified teacher and I am a credentialed primary Montessori
teacher.
I work at Lakeland Montessori Schoolhouse (LMS) in a primary classroom (ages three
to six years old). Our school is full; therefore, I hear firsthand from parents their need and want
to have their children attend an authentic Montessori program.
Our school receives daily visitors from parents and community members that wish to
observe the Montessori Method and inquire about how they can be a part of it. Parents walk
away after an observation from my classroom, stating things like, "I've never seen anything like
that before" or "The level of concentration
from children so young is amazing".
It was stated at an LMS board meeting that we have over 600 children on our waiting
list to attend our school. Unfortunately,
attend because of our low attrition
most of these children will never have a chance to
rate.
Another Montessori school is desperately needed in Lakeland. The Montessori Method
allows children to explore their own talents, while adhering to an expectation of academic
excellence. More importantly,
students at a Montessori school learn to care about their
environment
Grace, courtesy and peacemaking are interwoven through every
interaction.
and community.
Service learning projects are an integral part of what upper level elementary
students do to understand the importance of their actions in our world.
I could go on and on.
Please consider this new charter school. Children in our community will benefit greatly
from its existence.
Thank you very much for your time.
Warmest regards,
Kim Scott, M.Ed.
July 14, 2012
Dear Polk County School Board,
I am fully in support of a new Montessori school in Polk County. There is currently only one offered in Polk County
which to my understanding has a very long waiting list.
My name is Sheila Smith and my son lan has benefited greatly from a Montessori preschool, unfortunately we
will not be able to send him on through this school and the wait list is so long at lakeland Montessori that we have
no hope of getting him in that school. We think the Montess.ori method is best for him for some of these reasons
and many more.
In a stark contrast to our traditional education model, the Montessori philosophy is a more holistic, individualized
approach that places an emphasis on "following the child." One-age classrooms are replaced by multi-age
environments, and the prevalence of paper and textbooks is traded for multi-sensory educational tools. Instead of
adhering to strict lesson plans, children are allowed to select their curriculum, spending as much time as needed in
mastering the subject matter.
According to the Association Montessori International (AMI), children who learn under the Montessori Method
perform quite well academically and on standardized tests. In an AMI research study evaluating the progress of
201 Milwaukee public school students who had been educated in Montessori schools from preschool through 5th
grade, the results were quite positive. In fact, according to the report's findings, ".attending a Montessori program
from the approximate ages of three to eleven predicts significantly higher mathematics and science standardized
test scores in high school."
In addition, the research finds that the benefits of a Montessori education extend beyond better science and math
scores. In a study that compared inner-city Montessori students with inner-city traditional students, those who
attended Montessori schools developed "better social and academic skills" and "superior outcomes" as reported in
the academic journal Science. At the kindergarten level, Montessori students obtained better scores in reading and
matj, displayed more developmentally advanced control and social understanding, as well as played more
positively with their peers. At the elementary school level, the Montessori students had a stronger grasp of
complex sentence structures and a better understanding of social dilemmas.
In a study sponsored by the North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA), the impact of a
Montessori education at the middle school level was substantial in improving the "quality of experience" for the
students. Dr. Rathundee compared the perceptions between Montessori middle school students and those
enrolled in traditional middle schools, and the Montessori students reported "a significantly better quality of
experience in their academic work than did traditional students." The Montessori students also felt their schools
were more positive learning environments that cultivated active learning, rather than passive or rote learning.
In short, another school offering a Montessori method can only benefit the students of Polk County.
Sincerely,
Sheila Smith
21st June 2012
To whom it may concern
Re: Tammi Crotteau – Written Reference of Employment
I am very pleased to provide a reference for Tammi Crotteau in relation to future employment and business
ventures.
Tammi was employed with Eclipse Computing (Australia) Pty Ltd (Eclipse) between October 22nd 2001 and June
30th 2002. Initially employed as a Business Development Manager to sell Microsoft ERP Solutions, Tammi moved
into Professional Services to drive change and aid revenue growth with a particular focus on the Project
Management stream.
Both roles required a solid knowledge and understanding of finance and commerce with the focus on business
growth and return of investment as well as having the soft skills to work with prospects/customers looking to
purchase a solution or internally with people needing to change behaviour to achieve the desired outcome.
Tammi’s drive and tenacity mixed with her great people skills was the right mix for success.
I have no hesitation in recommending Tammi Crotteau for work or business opportunities.
If you would like any further information please do not hesitate to contact me on +61 2 438 227 067.
Sincerely yours,
Anne Callaghan
Chief Operation Officer
Eclipse Computing (Australia) Pty Ltd.
Phone +61 2 9279 3000 Fax +61 2 9279 3300 www.eclipsecomputing.com.au
Level 29, 580 George Street, Sydney NSW 2000
Eclipse, part of UXC Limited Eclipse Computing (Australia) Pty Ltd ABN 40 051 758 199 ACN 051 758 199
Adelaide • Auckland • Brisbane • Calgary • Canberra • Grand Rapids • Hobart • Melbourne • Perth • Suva • Sydney • Vancouver • Wellington
Appendix O—Common Core Standards and Montessori Curriculum Correlation
162
Association of
Illinois
Montessori
Schools
Common Core Standards and
Montessori Curriculum Correlation
Spring 2012
By Stacey Edwards
Common Core Standards Mission Statement The Common Core State Standards provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn, so teachers and parents know what they need to do to help them. The standards are designed to be robust and relevant to the real world, reflecting the knowledge and skills that young people need for success in college and careers. Introduction to the Common Core Standards The Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy and Mathematics are based on the current College and Career Readiness Standards. Finally released in 2010, the current work was led by the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and the National Governors Association (NGA). Drawing from national and international educational research and standards models, the NGA states that the Common Core State Standards represent a synthesis of the best elements of standards-­‐based work that builds upon the strengths of current State Standards. The standards cover grades Kindergarten through 12. Each has been deemed “developmentally appropriate” (although some might argue this point) and they collectively work as a cumulative progression of skills and understandings; a “staircase” of growing complexity across grade levels, hence preparing each child for the workforce and/or college. These standards are intended to recognize common goals and expectations for children participating in schools in America. As specified by the CCSSO and NGA, the Standards are (1) research and evidence based, (2) aligned with college and work expectations, (3) rigorous, and (4) internationally benchmarked. The creators of the Common Core State Standards assert that each particular standard was included in the document only when the best available evidence indicated that “its mastery was essential for college and career readiness in a twenty-­‐first-­‐
century, globally competitive society.” The Standards are intended to be a living work: as new and better evidence emerges, the Standards will be revised accordingly. Montessori-­‐Common Core Correlation 2012 The Common Core Standards have some clear design limitations, however, that should be considered upon implementation. They clearly do not encompass all that should or can be taught, the interventions possibly needed for some students with special needs or everything one would need to be truly college and career ready. Another critique of the Common Core Standards is that they do not “train” teachers or determine approved curricular models. This limitation works to the advantage of alternative educational approaches, such as Montessori. Common Core Implementation and Assessment The major work of implementation takes place after the standards have been adopted, as states individually tackle complementary changes in curriculum, assessment, professional development, and other related areas. States that adopt the standards must adopt all of the standards in English, language arts, and math. They have the option, however, of adding up to 15% of their own state-­‐determined content standards on top of the core in either subject. To be effective, the Standards need to be accompanied by robust assessments and partnered with content-­‐rich curriculum. Like the adoption of the standards themselves, it will be up to the states to create tools of assessment: some states plan to come together voluntarily to develop a common assessment system, based on the common core state standards (see PARCC below). A state-­‐led consortium on assessment would be grounded in the following principles: allow for comparison across students, schools, districts, states and nations; create economies of scale; provide information and support more effective teaching and learning; and prepare students for college and careers. At this time, each State that has already adopted the Standards has published their own timelines as to when assessment tools will be released. Currently, twenty-­‐five states have joined together to create the Partnership for the Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC). The goal of this group is to create an assessment system and supporting tools that will help states dramatically increase the number of students who graduate high school ready for college and careers and provide students, parents, teachers and policymakers with the tools they need to help students -­‐ from kindergarten through high school -­‐ stay on track to graduate prepared. For more thorough and specific information on the Standards, please visit www.corestandards.org and www.achieve.org. Introduction to the Montessori Approach The Montessori Approach (pronounced MON-­‐tuh-­‐SORE-­‐ee) of education, was developed by Dr. Maria Montessori, one of the first women to become a medical doctor in Italy. The approach dates back to 1907, when Dr. Montessori opened the Casa dei Bambini, or Children’s House, in a low-­‐income district of Rome. Her unique philosophy sparked the interest of educators worldwide. In the following decades, Montessori schools have opened throughout Europe, in North and South America, and finally on Africa, Australia and Asia, spanning the ages of birth through adolescence. Now, nearly a century later, there are more than 5,000 private, public and charter Montessori schools in the United States, and over 22,000 worldwide. Maria Montessori based her educational methods on scientific observation of children's learning processes, from birth through adulthood. Guided by her discovery that children teach themselves, Dr. Montessori designed a "prepared environment" (classroom) in which children could freely choose from a number of developmentally appropriate activities. 2/7 www.illinoismontessorischools.org Montessori-­‐Common Core Correlation 2012 It is an approach that values the human spirit and the development of the whole child—physical, social, emotional, cognitive through concrete experiences. The teacher, child, and environment (classroom) create a learning triangle. The classroom is prepared by the teacher to encourage independence, freedom within limits, a sense of order and appreciation for our cosmic universe and cultural diversity. The child, through individual choice, makes use of what the environment offers to develop himself, interacting with the teacher when support and/or guidance is needed. Multiage groupings are a hallmark of the Montessori Approach: younger children learn from older children; older children reinforce their learning by teaching concepts they have already mastered. This arrangement also mirrors the real world, where individuals work and socialize with people of all ages and dispositions. Dr. Montessori observed that children experience sensitive periods, or developmental windows of opportunity, as they grow. As their students develop, Montessori teachers match appropriate lessons and materials to these sensitive periods when learning is most naturally absorbed and internalized. In early childhood, Montessori students learn through sensory-­‐
motor activities, working with materials that develop their cognitive powers through direct experience: seeing, hearing, tasting, smelling, touching, and movement. In the elementary years, the child continues to organize his thinking through work with the Montessori learning materials and an interdisciplinary curriculum as he passes from the concrete to the abstract. He begins the application of his knowledge to real-­‐world experiences. This organization of information—facts and figures—prepares the child for the world of adolescence, when thought and emotion evolve into understanding more abstract, universal concepts such as equity, freedom, and justice. Montessori: Supporting Child Development & Academic Confidence Components necessary for a program to be considered authentically Montessori include multiage groupings that foster peer learning, uninterrupted blocks of work time, and guided choice of work activity. In addition, a full compliment of specially designed Montessori learning materials are meticulously arranged and available for use in an aesthetically pleasing environment. This educational approach also considers the following concepts: • Each child is valued as a unique individual. Montessori education recognizes that children learn in different ways, and accommodates all learning styles. Students are also free to learn at their own pace, each advancing through the curriculum as he is ready, guided by the teacher and an individualized learning plan. • Beginning at an early age, Montessori students develop order, coordination, concentration, and independence. Classroom design, materials, and daily routines support the individual’s emerging “self-­‐
regulation” (ability to educate one’s self, and to think about what one is learning), toddlers through adolescents. • Students are part of a close, caring community. The multi-­‐age classroom—typically spanning 3 years—re-­‐
creates a family structure. Older students enjoy stature as mentors and role models; younger children feel supported and gain confidence about the challenges ahead. Teachers model respect, loving kindness, and a belief in peaceful conflict resolution. 3/7 www.illinoismontessorischools.org Montessori-­‐Common Core Correlation 2012 •
•
•
Montessori students enjoy freedom within limits. Working within parameters set by their teachers, students are active participants in deciding what their focus of learning will be. Montessori teachers understand that internal satisfaction drives the child’s curiosity and interest and results in joyous learning that is sustainable over a lifetime. Students are supported in becoming active seekers of knowledge. Teachers provide environments where students have the freedom and the tools to pursue answers to their own questions while continually building their knowledge base in a variety of subject areas. Early access and instruction in the use of research tools broaden the possibilities for self-­‐learning. Self-­‐correction and self-­‐assessment are an integral part of the Montessori classroom approach. As they mature, students learn to look critically at their work, and become adept at recognizing, correcting, and learning from their errors. Additionally, children become comfortable in providing constructive feedback to their peers in effort to work out social and academic problems. These concepts are the cornerstone of the Montessori Approach and align with the proposed Common Core Standards outcomes for college and career ready children: • Demonstrate Independence; demonstrated through Montessori’s activities in self-­‐choice, open exploration and self-­‐correcting concrete materials. • Build strong content knowledge across a wide range of subject matter; demonstrated through the daily choice of activities in practical life, sensori-­‐motor, mathematics, language, science, culture, art, and music as well as through social interactions in a multi-­‐age group setting. •
•
•
•
•
Respond to varying demands of audience, task, purpose, and discipline through adaptive communication skills; demonstrated in Montessori’s classroom structure through multi-­‐age groupings, conflict resolution, peer mediation, cultural awareness and sensitivity, and early research. Ability to comprehend as well as critique Value evidence; demonstrated through the support of each child’s sensitive periods and innate curiosity of the world, Use technology and digital media strategically and capably: as demonstrated through early access to research tools and encouraged problem-­‐solving strategies Come to understand other perspectives and cultures: as demonstrated through early conflict resolution, cultural identification and experiences as well as access to wide range of cultural materials and books. 4/7 www.illinoismontessorischools.org Montessori-­‐Common Core Correlation 2012 Decision to Correlate Nationally, the need to correlate standards has been an ongoing issue. Montessori programs are primarily in private school settings, but the number of publicly funded Montessori programs has been growing. Currently, there are over 5,000 identified Montessori schools in the United States, with more than 500 of those being publicly funded programs. Any public or charter Montessori project must create correlations to State, and now National Standards in order to achieve approval. Most have undertaken this complex process individually, reinventing the proverbial wheel each time. Private schools are being asked more frequently now, in our ‘Standards based’ world to show how they are meeting, and hopefully exceeding, published district, State and/or National Standards. The Association of Illinois Montessori Schools has recognized this need from both its private school and public school communities, as well as the National need for a publicly accessible resource demonstrating the correlation of Montessori curriculum with the Common Core State Standards. Challenges with Correlation Demonstrating how the Montessori Approach meets and exceeds the Common Core Standards was a challenge on several fronts. This educational approach or curriculum as we have referred to it in this document does not come in a clear-­‐cut, pre-­‐packed format with lists of activities and lessons. Trained Montessori teachers however, create curriculum albums for the age-­‐ranges they are being trained in: 0-­‐3, 3-­‐6, 6-­‐9, 9-­‐12 and Adolescence. Each album covers a certain subject area and is filled with lesson information on every material and skill concept, along with extensions to these materials and concepts, direct and indirect aims of the materials and sequence to which they are to be shown to the children. This makes lesson referencing difficult in this correlation as lessons have specific names that are sometimes only recognizable by trained teachers and children in Montessori classrooms. The presentation of the Montessori curriculum within the classroom setting is also different from other educational models. While teachers are acutely aware of each child’s place in their educational journey, they do not create lesson plans that are applicable to the entire class. Each child is learning at his or her own pace. Children are more self-­‐directed and allowed to choose works within the age-­‐ appropriate classroom structure. This promotes much independence, self-­‐worth and recognition of skill development; all named outcomes of the Common Core Standards. 5/7 www.illinoismontessorischools.org Montessori-­‐Common Core Correlation 2012 Reading the Correlation The Common Core Standards divide up language and mathematics learning expectations using a traditional educational model of Kindergarten through 12th grade as its framework. Montessori schools are not divided up into grades, but rather age ranges. To best identify how Montessori curriculum meets and exceeds National Standards, this correlation document follows the Montessori Model of age-­‐
ranges and matches these “ranges” to the corresponding grades. This standards-­‐curriculum correlation is divided into the following “brackets”, 3-­‐6, 6-­‐9, and 9-­‐12. The Kindergarten National Standards are aligned to Montessori’s 3-­‐6 curriculum; the 3rd grade National Standards are aligned to Montessori’s 6-­‐9 curriculum and the 6th grade National Standards are aligned to Montessori’s 9-­‐12 curriculum. See below illustration for further clarification. Kindergarten Standards 3-­‐6 years Montessori Curriculum 3rd Grade Standards 6-­‐9 years Montessori Curriculum 6th Grade Standards 9-­‐12 years Montessori Curriculum Possible Document Uses This document was designed to clarify to the reader how the Montessori Approach of child development and education meet the National Common Core Standards. This document presents applied learning concepts, activities and the Montessori materials that are utilized with public and private Montessori classrooms to ensure the children attending Montessori schools across our Nation are meeting the minimum National and State requirements. This Standards-­‐curriculum correlation will also show the additional experiences Montessori classrooms are providing for students that exceed National and State requirements. This document is meant to be a foundational representation of what a basic Montessori classroom at each age-­‐level bracket offers its diverse student base. This document may be, and should be, altered from its original version to suit the various needs of public, private and charter Montessori schools, State Boards of Education, policymakers, educational organizations and any other State or National requests. Below is a non-­‐comprehensive list of some of the possible document uses: • Charter School Application Material • Public School and/or State Board of Education Documentation • School and/or District Assessment Development • Parent Education • Montessori Teacher Resource and Professional Development Tool 6/7 www.illinoismontessorischools.org Montessori-­‐Common Core Correlation 2012 Conclusion The purpose of this document is to demonstrate how Montessori curriculum, when done authentically, clearly not only meets our new national requirements, but also often exceeds them. The information from this introduction was obtained from www.corestandards.org and from the Center On Education Policy, the Association of Montessori Internationale, the American Montessori Society and the International Montessori Index. 7/7 www.illinoismontessorischools.org Draft As Of March 2012
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
BELOW ARE ALIGNMENTS OF ILLINOIS STATE
STANDARDS AND MONTESSORI CURRICULUM
Illinois State Goals
Science
Illinois State Learning Standards
Science
Learning Activity
Science
SG!!: Understand the processes of
scientific inquiry and technological design
to investigate questions, conduct
experiments and solve problems.
LSA:Know and apply the concepts, principals and
processes of scientific inquiry.
a. Uses
senses to explore and observe materials
and natural phenomena.
b. Collect, describe and record information.
Discriminate characteristics (e.g. long,
short; heavy, light; thin, thick; with
introduction to -er and -est)
Montessori Materials
Sink and Float
Magnetic/Non-magnetic
Hard/Soft
Solid/Liquid/Gas
Rough/Smooth Boards
Red Rods
Pink Tower
Brown Prisms
Sandpaper Letters
Knobbed Cylinders
Knobless Cylinders
Constructive Triangles
Geometric Solids
Geometric Cabinet
Color Box 3
Monomial Cube
Binomial Cube
Trinomial Cube
Thermic Tablets
Baric Tablets
Pressure Cylinders
Sound Boxes
Montessori Bells
Tone Bars
LSB: Know and apply the concepts, principles and lessons in conservation; Introduction to Activities in practical life; scale with weights;
processes of technological design. a.Use scientific using magnifying glass;
tools such as thermometers, balance scales and
magnifying glasses for investigation.
b. Become familiar with the use of devices
incorporating technology.
Science Continued…
Science Continued…
SG12: Understand the fundamental
concepts, principles and interconnections
of the life, physical and earth/space
sciences.
LSA: Know and apply concepts that explain how
living things function, adapt and change.
a. Investigate and categorize living things in the
environment.
b. Show an
awareness of changes that occur in themselvbes
and their environment.
LSB: Know and apply concepts that describe how
living things interact with each other and with their
environment.
c. Describe and compare basic needs of living
things.
LSC: Know and apply concepts that describe
properties of matter and energy and the interactions
between them.
C. Make comparisons among objects that have
been observed.
LSD: Know and apply concepts that describe force
and motion and the principles that explain them.
D. Describe the effects of forces in nature (e.g.
wind, gravity and magnetism).
LSE: Know and apply the concepts that describe the
features and processes of the Earth and its
resources.
a. Use common weather-related vocabulary (e.g.
rainy, snowy, sunny, windy).
b. Participate
in recycling in the environment
Introduction to animal kingdom (see list care of self and environment activities (plant and animal
below)
care); prehistory timecircle; Living/Non-Living activities;
seasons;
Aim of Materials
Strengthening of visual, tactile, audio, smell,
and gustatory perceptions; verbal
articulation; writing thoughts, ideas and
observations; preparation for further
scientific research;
Fine motor control; strengthening problem
solving skills; conservation;
self-care; independence; environmental
responsibility;
Introduction to characteristics and needs Living/Non-Living, plant/animal/mineral,
of living and non-living things;
vertebrate/Invertebrate Classification objects and pictures;
Zoology and Botony 3-part cards, parts-of puzzles,
matching, types and books.Animal kingdom classification;
Lifecycles of living animals and insects.
Discriminate characteristics (e.g. long, Natural and Sensorial Materials for use of comparison
Strengthening of visual, tactile, audio, smell,
short; heavy, light; thin, thick; with
making with visual, tactile, audio, smell and gustatory
and gustatory perceptions.
introduction to -er and -est)
sense.
Describing observations; Introduction of Outdoor observations; weather activities; magnet activities;
weather language; physical science
dropping objects of various weight; sink and float; water
experiements
displacement
Describing observations; Introduction of Weather and season activities; daily classroom recycling,
weather language; physical science
composting, cloud identification, weather calendar, and
experiements, weather calendar/chart, sorting
describe orally, record and illustrate
weather charts
Page 1 of 5
Draft As Of March 2012
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
LSF: Know and apply concepts that explain the
composition and structure of the universe and the
Earth’s place in it.
-Identify basic concepts associtated with night/day
and season
Schedule of day; Introducation to the
calendar; Days of the Week, Months of
the Year; Day/Night; Seaons; planet
order and characteristics; Telling time;
Earth's orbit around the sun;
Introducation to 4 directions-using a
compass;
Day/Night Sequence Cards; Daily Schedule; Seasons
categorization cards; Days of the Week; Months of the
Year; Daily Calendar; Cosmic Address Nesting Blocks; PreHistory Timecircle; Clock with Moveble Hands;
directions/compass work; Solar System activities (replicas,
3-part cards, definition books); birthday celebration ;
Science Continued…
Science Continued…
SG13: Understand the relationships among
science, technology and society in
historical and contemporary contexts.
LSA: Know and apply the accepted practices of
science.
-Begin to
understand basic safety practices.
LSB:Know and apply concepts that describe the
interaction between science, technology and
society.
a. Express wonder and ask questions about their
world.
B. Begin to be
aware of technology and how it affects their lives.
Classroom Safety rules; using goggles Classroom rules at circle; using goggles and gloves lesson Encourage exploration safely.
and gloves; walking/cautious movement, with physical science experiements, practical life self help
hand washing
skills and completing all steps of the process
Experiences with diverse classmates,
circle time; freedom within environment-practical life,
open share time and aesthtically
sensorial, language, math and culture
appealing, real materials elicite wonder
and curiosity in environment
Illinois State Learning Standards
Illinois State Learning Standards
Learning Activity
Social Science
Social Science
SG14: Understand political systems, with
an emphasis on the United States.
LSA: Understand and explain basic principles of the Classroom Rules
United States government.
-Recognize the
reasons for rules.
LSC:Understand election processes and
Introduction to voting.
responsibilities of citizens.
Participate in voting as a way of making choices.
LSD: Understand the roles and influences of
Classroom Rules;
individuals and interest groups in the political
systems of Illinois, the United States and other
nations.
-Develop an
awareness of roles of leaders in their environment.
Montessori Materials
Classroom Rules reiteration by adults and peers.
Voting on classroom decisions (ex: pet names, outdoor
play activities, number of helpers, etc.)
SG15: Understand economic systems, with
an emphasis on the United States.
LSA: Understand how different economic systems
operate in the exchange, production, distribution
and consumption of goods and services.
-Identify community workers and the services
they provide.
LSD: Understand trade as an exchange of goods
and services.
-Begin to
understand the use of trade to obtain goods and
services.
People in the community
Job charts for care of environment; picture cards and books
of community helpers
SG16: Understand events, trends,
individuals and movements shaping the
history of Illinois, the United States and
other nations.
LSA: Apply the skills of historical analysis and
interppretation.
-Recall
information about the immediate past.
Sharing personal experiences; Daily
schedule;
circle time share
SG17: Understand world geography and
the effects of geography on society, with
and emphasis on the United States.
LSA: Locate, describe and explain places, regions
and features on the Earth.
-Locate objects
and places in familiar environments.
-Express beginning geographic thinking.
Identifying local places and faces;
community helpers; parts of the farm;
Introduction to map-making (town,
bedroom, continent); introduction of
Earth's contents: land, air and water;
introduction to continent flags
Neighborhood walks; community helpers identification
cards; Farm; Town game; picture cards of local
monuments;Land, Air, Water globe; The continent globe;
hemisphere puzzle map; puzzle maps of 7 continents;
puzzle map of United States; Land, Air and Water
categorization activities (objects and pictures); land and
water forms; direction work; parts of the flag; flag puzzles;
flags of the world; flag making
Page 2 of 5
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Independence and self-control;
Preparation for geographic concepts;
learning the "shapes" of geographical
locations; vocabulary enrichment;
Draft As Of March 2012
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
SG18: Understand social systems, with an
emphasis on the United States
No standard on animal or natural
environment knowledge
LSA: Compare characteristics of culture as eflected
in language, literature, the arts, traditions and
institutions.
-Recognize similarities and differences in people.
LSB: Understand the roles and interactions of
individuals and groups in society.
Understand that each of us belongs to a family and
recognize that families vary.
No standard on animal or natural environment
knowledge
No standards on experiences with physical
science
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Physical Development and Health
Learning characteristics of people and
animals from around the world
All above including: people of the world, homes of the
world,animals of the world; traditional dress
above including world traditions; cooking & food
preparation; guest presenters
Characteristics of shells; characteristics
of rocks; characteristics of various leaf
shapes; characteristics of animals from
around the world(by continent, biome,
etc. Research and study of animal
kingdom; research and study of botony;
research and study of dinosaurs;
characteristics of animals;
Shell naming, sorting and matching; rock naming, sorting
and picture/object matching; leaf naming, sorting, tracing,
rubbing, collecting and picture/object matching; flower
arranging, naming, sorting, dissecting, pressing, planting
and matching; animals from 7 continents naming, sorting
and picture/object matching; animal kingdom naming,
sorting and picture/object matching; land/air/water animal
naming, sorting, and picture/object matching; animals in
environments sorting, naming, and picture/object matching;
vertebrate/invertebrate sorting, naming and picture/object
matching; insect naming, sorting, and picture/object
matching; Naming parts of: tree; leaf; root; flower; insect
(various); horse; bird; frog; turtle; fish; human body; variety
of dinosaur activities; arachnid/insect sorting; Lifecycles of
above mentioned categories;sandpaper animal tracks;
animal skin sorting; bird and bird egg matching;
Fine motor control; sitting concentration;
Vocabulary expansion and enrichment;
preparation for further zoology, botony and
geographical studies
No standards on experiences with physical
science
Introduction concepts of: solids, liquids,
gases (states of matter), Light,
sound,Heat, chemical reactions,
magnetism, electricity, and simple
machines (gravity)
sink and float, magnetic/non-magnetic; naming, sorting and
matching states of matter; liquid experiments; gas
experiments; experiments with light; experiments with heat;
experiements with sound; experiments with chemical
reactions; experiments with magnets; experiments with
electricity; experiments with simple machines such as
wheels, inccircled plane, levers, screws, and
pulleys(mechanical energy and gravitational pull)
Explore properties of states of matter, light,
heat, sound, chemical reactions, magnitism,
electricity and mechanical energy;
vocabulary enrichment; foundation for later
exploration
Kindergarten CORE Standards
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Physical Development and Health
SG: Acquire movement skills and
understand concepts needed to engage in
health-enhancing physical activity.
LSA: Demonstrate physical competency in
individual and team sports, creative movement and
leisure and work-related activities.
A. Engage in active play using gross motor skills.
b. Engage in active play using fine motor skills.
LSB: Analyze various movement concepts and
applications.
Coordinate movements to perform complex tasks.
LSC: Demonstrate knowledge of rules, safety and
strategies during physical activity. -Follow simple
safety rules while participating in activities.
SG20: Achieve and maintain a healthenhancing level of physical fitness based
upon continual self-assessment.
LSA: Know and apply the principles and
components of health-related fitness.
Participate in developmental activities related to
physical fitness.
LSB: Assess individual fitness levels.
-Exhibit increased endurance.
SG21: Develop team-building skills by
working with others through physical
activities.
LSA: Demonstrate individual responsibility during
group physical activities.
-Follow rules
and procedures when participating in group physical
activities.
Page 3 of 5
Draft As Of March 2012
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
LSB: Demonstrate cooperative skills during
structured group physical activity.
Demonstrate ability to cooperate with others
during group physical activities.
SG22: Understand principles of health
promotion and the prevention and
treatment of illness and injury.
LSA: Explain the basic principles of health
promotion, illness prevention and safety. Participate in simple practices that promotoe healthy
living and prevent illness.
SG23: Understand human body systems
and factors that influence growth and
development.
LSA: Describe and explain the structure and
functions of human body systems and how they
interrelate.
-Identify body parts and their functions.
LSB: Explain the effects of health-related actions on
the body systems.
-Act
independently in caring for personal hygiene needs.
SG24: Promote and enhance health and
well being through the use of effective
communication and decision-making skills.
LSA: Demonstrate procedures for communicating in
positive ways, resolving differences and preventing
conflict.
A. Use appropriate communication skills when
expressing needs, wants and feelings.
B. Use socially acceptable ways to resolve conflict.
LSC: Demonstrate skills essential to enhancing
health and avoiding dangerous situations.
-Participate in activities to learn to avoid dangerous
situations.
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Fine Arts
Kindergarten CORE Standards
Learning Activity
Fine Arts
Fine Arts
SG25: Know the language of the arts
SG26: Through creating and performing,
understand how activities of art are produced.
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Foreign Languages
LSA: Understand the sensory elements,
Introduction to the elements of the arts:
organizational principles and expressive qualities of dance, drama, music, visual arts
the arts.
A. Dance: Investigate the elements of dance.
B. Drama: Investigate the elements of drama.
C. Music: Investigate the elements of music.
D. Visual Arts: Investigate the elements of visual
arts.
LSB: Understand the similarities, distinctions and
talking about art work of self and others
connections in and among the arts. -Describe or
respond to their own creative work or the creative
work of others.
Montessori Materials
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
feelings cards; action command cards; circle time
movement ( skipping, hopping, galloping, walking, running,
tip-toe, sliding, etc), song, storytelling;
listening/singing/dancing to a variety of world music; yoga;.
Montessori Bell material;
Concentration, coordination, independence,
order, small muscle control, creative
thinking, problem solving; vocabulary
enrichment, articulation and expansion;
externalizing thoughts; large muscle control;
suditory perception; visual discrimination;
strength; cognitive development
open sharing
articulating ideas, thoughts, feelings and
opinions
LSA: Understand processes, traditional tools and
modern technologies used in the arts.
A. Dance: Participate in dance activities.
B. Drama:Participate in drama activities
C. Music: Participate in music activities.
D. Visual Arts: Participate in the visual arts.
LSB: Apply skills and knowledge necessary to
create and perform in one or more of the arts.
-use creative arts as an avenue for self-expression.
Introduction to the elements of the arts: feelings cards; action command cards; circle time
dance, drama, music, visual arts in
movement ( skipping, hopping, galloping, walking, running,
group setting
tip-toe, sliding, etc), song, storytelling and games;
listening/singing/dancing to a variety of world music; yoga;.
Montessori Bell material;
Concentration, coordination, independence,
order, small muscle control, creative
thinking, problem solving; vocabulary
enrichment and expansion; externalizing
thoughts
Variety of "art" materials avialble
throughout day; circle movement
opportunity during day
Easel, watercoloring; crayoning; penciling; markering;
cutting; gluing; collage; rubbing plates; tracing; shape
punching; stringing; movement
Concentration, coordination, independence,
order, small muscle control, creative
thinking, problem solving; vocabulary
enrichment and expansion; externalizing
thoughts
Kindergarten CORE Standards
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Foreign Languages
Page 4 of 5
Draft As Of March 2012
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
SG28: Use the target language to
communicate within and beyond the
classroom setting.
Maintain the native language for use in a variety of
purposes.
SG30: Use the target language to make
connections and reinforce knowledge and
skills across academic, vocational and
technical discipcircles.
Use and maintain the native language in order to
build upon and develop transferable language and
literacy skills.
Page 5 of 5
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March 2012
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Anchor Standards for Reading
Kindergarten CORE Standards
Key Ideas and Details
1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly
and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual
evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions
drawn from the text.
2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and
analyze their development; summarize the key supporting
details and ideas.
3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas
develop and interact over the course of a text.
Key Ideas and Details
1. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details Asking questions about stories read aloud by
in a text.
self and others.
Craft and Structure
4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text,
including determining technical, connotative, and
figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word
choices shape meaning or tone.
5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific
sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text
(e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each
other and the whole.
6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the
content and style of a text.
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
story analysis; scaffolding
cognitive development; vocabulary
enrichment; externalizing ideas, thoughts;
comprehension development
Kindergarten Reading Standards for Literature:
2. With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details.
conversations with peers and adults
Share time; circle time; informal and cognitive development; preparation for
spontaneous conversations
future literary studies
3. With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major
events in a story
Asking questions about stories read aloud by
self and others.
book corner; story time; circle time
cognitive development; book
characteristics; preparation for future
literary studies
Inquiring about new words; How to use a
dictionary
Word lists; Child's dictionary-site
word library-
cognitive development; vocabulary
expansion;
Craft and Structure
4. Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
5. Recognize common types of texts (e.g., storybooks, poems).
Storytime: Reading various types of texts; how story corner; characteristics of
to use a library; classroom exploration
books; types of books
preparation for further literary studies
6. With prompting and support, name the author and illustrator of a story
and define the role of each in telling the story.
Author and Illustrator identification
identifying parts of a book; job of
author and illustrator
book characteristics; preparation for
furtuer literary studies
word, sentence and story writing
with appropriate writing papers;
classroom books
picture & word relationship; vocabulary
enrichment; comprehension; oral
articulation
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse
media and formats, including visually and quantitatively,
as well as in words
8. Decircleate and evaluate the argument and specific
claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as
well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes
or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the
approaches the authors take.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
7. With prompting and support, describe the relationship between
Story dictation; story writing; conversations
illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story about drawn pictures and written words;
an illustration depicts).
sharing stories;
(Not applicable to literature)
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
10. Read and comprehend complex literary and
informational texts independently and proficiently.
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
10. Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and
understanding.
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Reading Standards for Informational Text:
Anchor Standards for Reading cont…
Kindergarten CORE Standards
9. With prompting and support, compare and contrast the adventures and
experiences of characters in familiar stories.
Variety of diverse stories available in
classroom for exploration as well as for
reading aloud and listening to books and CDs
cognitive development; vocabulary
enrichment and expansion; oral
articulation;
Variety of diverse stories available in story
corner for exploration as well as for reading
aloud and listening to books and CDs; finding
materials in environment through word
reading; rhyming; research; enriching
vocabulary for comprehension
Practical life activities; story time,
Label & object find; rhyming games;
encyclopedia/book research; role
play and/or dramatizations; activities
in sensorial, practical life, math,
language, music, art, culture,
botony, biology, zoology, geography
and physical science provide
enhanced vocabulary with
associated concrete examples for
understanding
cognitive development; vocabulary
expansion and enrichment; oral
articulation; picture and word
relationships; comprehension; preparation
for future literary studies
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
story analysis; scaffolding
cognitive development; vocabulary
enrichment; externalizing ideas, thoughts;
comprehension development
Reading Standards for Informational Text:
Key Ideas and Details
1. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details Asking questions about stories read aloud by
in a text.
self and others.
Page 1 of 10
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March 2012
2. With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details
of a text.
3. With prompting and support, describe the connection between two
individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
4. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about unknown
words in a text.
5. Identify the front cover, back cover, and title page of a book.
6. Name the author and illustrator of a text and define the role of each in
presenting the ideas or information in a text.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
7. With prompting and support, describe the relationship between
illustrations and the text in which they appear (e.g., what person, place,
thing, or idea in the text an illustration depicts)..
8. With prompting and support, identify the reasons an author gives to
support points in a text.
9. With prompting and support, identify basic similarities in and differences
between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or
procedures).
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Anchor Standards for Reading cont…
Asking questions about stories read aloud by
self and others; conversation
Asking questions about stories read aloud by
self and others.
book corner; story time;circle time
and/or community meetings
Picture interpretation; classroom
books; stories read aloud
How, when and why to ask a question;
Using a book;
Parts of a book; Story reading,
telling, listening and creating
activities
Author and Illustrator identification
Story dictation; story writing; conversations
about drawn pictures and written words;
sharing stories
Asking why questions;
Variety of diverse stories available in story
corner for exploration as well as for reading
alound and listening to books and CDs;
descriptive talking
cognitive development; preparation for
future literary studies
cognitive development; book
characteristics; preparation for future
literary studies
cognitive development; vocabulary
expansion;
characteristics of books;
book characteristics; preparation for
furtuer literary studies
picture & word relationship; vocabulary
enrichment; comprehension; oral
articulation
oral articulation; comprehension;
externalize thoughts; cognitive
development
dividing pictures and objects into
cognitive development; vocabulary
categories; describing objects and enrichment and expansion; oral
pictures; talking about observations articulation;
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
10. Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and
understanding.
reading aloud; information recall; story
interpretation
Practical life activities; story time,
Label & object find; rhyming games;
encyclopedia/book research; role
play and/or dramatizations; activities
in sensorial, practical life, math,
language, music, art, culture,
botony, biology, zoology, geography
and physical science provides
enhanced vocabulary with
associated concrete examples for
understanding
sitting concentration; vocabulary
enrichment; visual discrimination; auditory
discrimination; independence; explore
language; preparation for further language
studies
Kindergarten CORE Standards
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
direct phonics instruction, direct literacy
instruction; large, small, and whole group
reading instruction, sound/letter name
instruction; direct instruction in Concepts of
Print, Modeled writing, direct instruction in
encoding, direct instuction in Alphabetic
Principle
Practical life activities; Sequencing
and Patterning Exercises (bead
stringing, parquet tiles etc.);
Sandpaper Letters; Sand Tray;
Chalkboard Exercises, Moveable
alphabet; classroom library;
nomenclature 3-part cards,
picture/word matching cards,
physical organization and structure
of classroom, Trade Books,
Informational Text, Leveled
Readers, Alphabet Line,
Environmental Labels, Lined paper,
chart paper,
Left to Right/Top to Bottom Orientation;
letter formation and configuration; auditory
association of sound to written symbol;
visual and tactile perception of letters;
visual memory and discrimination;
reinforcement of letter sounds; preparation
for reading, spelling, writing and oral
expression
Kindergarten Reading Standards: Foundational Skills:
Print Concepts
1. Demonstrate understanding of the organization and basic features of
print.
a. Follow words from left to right, top to bottom, and page by
page.
b. Recognize that spoken words are represented in written language by
specific sequences of letters.
c. Understand that words are separated by spaces in print.
d. Recognize and name all upper- and lowercase letters of the alphabet.
Phonological Awareness
Page 2 of 10
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March 2012
2. Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds
(phonemes).
a. Recognize and produce rhyming words.
b. Count, pronounce, blend, and segment syllables in spoken words.
c. Blend and segment onsets and rimes of single-syllable spoken words.
d. Isolate and pronounce the initial, medial vowel, and final sounds
(phonemes) in three-phoneme (consonant-vowel-consonant, or CVC)
words.1 (This does not include CVCs ending with /l/, /r/, or /x/.)
e. Add or substitute individual sounds (phonemes) in simple, one-syllable
words to make new words.
Direct instruction of rhyming words and word
families, clap number of syllables in a given
word, Kinesthetic movements to match
syllables in spoken words, direct instruction in
syllabication, direct instruction of beginning,
medial, and ending sounds, Kinesthetic
movements to match beginning, medial, and
ending sounds, introduction of compound
words
See above including initial, middle
and end sound objects for sorting;
object picture matching, object letter
match; object/picture and label
matching; lotto; vowel substitution
chart; Sandpaper letter blending;
word building with moveable
alphabet; Rhyming cards/lists; short
vowel books; short sentence strips;
word cards; "I Spy" sound work,
Literature with rhyming patterns,
word family activities, rhyming
songs and games
See above including strengthening
vocabulary development; reinforcement of
sounds, consonent/vowel blends,
articulation of phonemes; receptive
auditory awareness of phonemes
Instruction in high frequency word
Identification and grade level vocabulary;
introduction of consonants and consonant
blends (diagraphs), Phonics instruction in
consonants and long and short vowels; Word
Building; Sentence building, Direct instruction
of Alphabetic Principle,
See above including phonogram
boxes; consonant and consonant
blend object/picture/label sorting;
word and sentence building with
moveable alphabet; sight word
cards (high frequency words),
"Magic e" materials,
See above including ability to identify
phonograms within words; awareness and
understanding of phonetic rules in English
language, increase high-frequency word
reading vocabulary,
Fluency
4. Read emergent-reader texts with purpose and understanding.
reading and comprehension instruction
Leveled Readers; student made text emergent literacy
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Anchor Standards for Writing
Kindergarten CORE Standards
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
Text Types and Purposes
1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of
substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and
relevant and sufficient evidence.
Text Types and Purposes
1. Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose opinion
pieces in which they tell a reader the topic or the name of the book they are
writing about and state an opinion or preference about the topic or book
(e.g., My favorite book is...).
Phonics and Word Recognition
3. Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding
words.
a. Demonstrate basic knowledge of letter-sound correspondences by
producing the primary or most frequent sound for each consonant.
b. Associate the long and short sounds with the common spellings
(graphemes) for the five major vowels.
c. Read common high-frequency words by sight (e.g., the, of, to, you, she,
my, is, are, do, does).
d. Distinguish between similarly spelled words by identifying the sounds of
the letters that differ.
2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and
convey complex ideas and information clearly and
accurately through the effective selection, organization,
and analysis of content.
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Kindergarten Writing Standards:
Text Types and Purposes
distinquishing patterns in trade books...using
authors as mentors and author's craft, direct
instruction in tracing & Writing Activities; Story
reading, listening and telling; Object and
picture naming; invented spelling, story
dictation, direct modeled writing instruction,
Transfering activities; Patterning
Exercises (bead stringing, parquet
tiles etc.) Pin Punching; Picture
interpretation; Easel; Sandpaper
Letters; Sand Tray; Metal Insets;
Scissor Exercises; Chalkboard
Exercises, Writing Papers;
classroom library; picture cards,
moveable alphabet, trade books,
chart paper, journals, tracing paper,
2. Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose
Direct instruction of animal/object Research in See above, including 3-part cards
informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about geography, history, biology, zoology, botany,
on living/non-living;
and supply some information about the topic.
and physical science
vertebrate/invertabrate;
plants/animals/minerals; types of
vertebrates (Animal Kingdom: birds,
fish, reptiles, amphibians, and
mammals) and types of
Invertebrates; solar system;
land/water forms; continent and
country puzzle maps; sink and float;
magnetic or non-magnetic
Page 3 of 10
Visual and tactile perception, thinking
analytically & creatively, hand-eye
coordination, recognition of patterns,
reinforcement of oral expression and
vocabulary; visual memory; strengthening
prehensil grip; increase written
communication skills
Visual and tactile perception, thinking
analytically & creatively, hand-eye
coordination, recognition of patterns,
reinforcement of oral expression and
vocabulary in geograhy and science;
visual memory; strengthening prehensil
grip; increase written communication
skills; picture, letter, and word matching;
understanding geography of the world
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March 2012
3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined
experiences or events using effective technique, wellchosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
3. Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to narrate a single
event or several loosely linked events, tell about the events in the order in
which they occurred, and provide a reaction to what happened.
Telling time; identifying days of the week and
months and seasons of the year; association
of holidays to months/seasons; direct
instruction in story sequencing; emphasize
beginning, middle, and end of read alouds
and/or small group reading instruction;
modeled writing; use of graphic organizers.
Production and Distribution of Writing
4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the
development, organization, and style are appropriate to
task, purpose, and audience.
5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning,
revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
Production and Distribution of Writing
4. (Begins in grade 3)
Production and Distribution of Writing
6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and
publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.
5. With guidance and support from adults, respond to questions and
suggestions from peers and add details to strengthen writing as needed.
Daily conversations; rules of engagement
(speaking and listening), direct instruction of
the writing process, writing conferences with
individual students, peer mentors and peer
editing
6. With guidance and support from adults, explore a variety of digital tools to Philosophical Disagreement--public school
produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers.
activities Word Processing applications such
as Stationary Studio to write Large Word
Cards, Word Lists, student generated writings.
Digital cameras to document activities such as
field trips which are followed by student
writings.
Research to Build and Present Knowledge
7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research
projects based on focused questions, demonstrating
understanding of the subject under investigation.
Research to Build and Present Knowledge
7. Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., explore a
number of books by a favorite author and express opinions about them).
8. Gather relevant information from multiple print and
digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of
each source, and integrate the information while avoiding
plagiarism.
8. With guidance and support from adults, recall information from
experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a
question.
9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to
support analysis, reflection, and research.
9. (Begins in grade 4)
Range of Writing
10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for
research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time
frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of
tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Range of Writing
10. (Begins in grade 3)
Range of Writing
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Anchor Standards for Speaking and
Listening
Kindergarten CORE Standards
Learning Activity
Comprehension and Collaboration
Comprehension and Collaboration
Story reading and repetition; journal writing;
Author's study, genre, and Author's craft,
response to literature writings, poetry, "How
To" writings, non-fiction book explorations,
Continent and Cultural studies
Environment of question asking from both
peers and adult models, use higher level
questions to broaden depth of responses of
past experiences, increase research skills,
increase inference skills, Use of sharing
techniques such as: elbow buddies and think,
pair, share. Use of assessing prior knowledge
techniques such as Anchor Charts and KWL
Charts (Know, Want to Know, Learned).
Kindergarten Speaking and Listening Standards:
Comprehension and Collaboration
Page 4 of 10
graphic organizer; story sequencing
cards, retell stories (cards), Trade
books, leveled readers, moveable
alphabet, chalkboard, chart paper,
journals, lined paper
Visual perception, thinking analytically &
creatively, hand-eye coordination,
recognition of patterns and sequencing,
reinforcement of oral expression and
vocabulary; visual memory; strengthening
prehensil grip; creative writing
peer to peer and adult to peer
conversations; lesson in grace and
courtesy,
oral expression; comprehension; peer
mentoring and grace and courtesy; critical
analyzing of one's own work, knowledge
of the writing process.
Philosophical Disagreement--public Philosophical Disagreement--public
school activities: digital camera,
school; increase writing skills, Practical
classroom computer, teacher laptop, Life exposure to real world technologies.
Montessori language materials such
as; Large Word Cards, Word Lists,
Phonetic Baskets, Short Phrases,
etc.
Writing papers; variety of multicultural books; journals, non-fiction
readers, classroom library, school
library, poetry books, Montessori
Cultural curriculum, Montessori
Continent works
classroom library; story time; circle
time; school library, classroom field
trips, key experience lessons,
research tools (internet), non-fiction
books
written and oral expression; externalize
ideas, thoughts and opinions; vocabulary
expansion and enrichment; increase
mechanics and content writing skills
Montessori Materials
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
strenghthen memory recall (cognitive
development); increase oral
communication skills, increase
comprehension skills, vocabulary
development
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
1. Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of
conversations and collaborations with diverse partners,
building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly
and persuasively.
2. Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse
media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and
orally.
3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use
of evidence and rhetoric.
Draft As Of March 2012
1. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about
kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger
groups.
a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and
taking turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion).
b. Continue a conversation through multiple exchanges.
Sharing; Open classroom and free choice
foster multiple social interactions on a variety
of topics with multi-age, diverse peer group.
Listening Exercises are provided on a daily
basis to sharpen receptive auditory skills.
Adults ask open-ended questions-- Bloom's
Taxonomy and higher level questions. Use of
sharing techniques such as: elbow buddies
and think, pair, share. Use of assessing prior
knowledge techniques such as Anchor Charts
and KWL Charts (Know, Want to Know,
Learned).
Circle Time Share; Sharing personal
observations; How to interrupt (hand
on arm); general classroom
environmental care: lessons in
practical life. Working in pairs on
rugs or at tables.
Listening Exercises: "Who am I",
Montessori Bells, Sound Cylinders,
Musical Instruments, Listening to
books on CD, Simon Says, Moving
to music, Call and Response,
Clapping exercises, the silence
game, classroom teacher and peers
as role model, Grace and Courtesy
lessons (manners, personal hygiene
{nose blowing}, introducing self,
etc.), large and small group
activities.
2. Confirm understanding of a text read aloud or information presented
Question & Answer Games; story-retelling;
Three period lesson (see glossary
orally or through other media by asking and answering questions about key repetition, higher level questions (Bloom's
for further explaination...this is,
details and requesting clarification if something is not understood.
Taxonomy), read alouds, small group reading show me, what is) for all concrete
instruction, main idea lessons, retell cards,
materials, retell cards, classroom
activities related to read alouds and trade
library, school library, reading
books (such as Montessori Images works).
extension materials from sources
such as Montessori Images, leveled
readers
3. Ask and answer questions in order to seek help, get information, or clarify How to get another adult or child's attention; Lessons in Grace and Courtesy
something that is not understood.
what to do if you have a question or need
(using manners, how and when to
help; problem solving through conversation;
interrupt, conflict resolution skills);
how to be a peer resource
informal conversations and problemsolving terminology/communication;
peer modeling, teacher modeling
Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence
such that listeners can follow the circle of reasoning and
the organization, development, and style are appropriate
to task, purpose, and audience.
Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
4. Describe familiar people, places, things, and events and, with prompting
and support, provide additional detail.
Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
Environmental Awareness; Geography
Lessons; Read alouds, receptive
comprehension, expressive comprehension,
higher level questions; personal share time;
birthday celebrations; daily schedule; how to
describe observations, affirmations, make
detail drawings, leveled reading groups
5. Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays
of data to express information and enhance
understanding of presentations.
5. Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions as desired to
provide additional detail.
6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and
communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal
English when indicated or appropriate.
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Verbal articulation; conversational rhythm,
flow and logic; auditory discrimination;
cognitive development, conflict resolution
skills
vocabulary enrichment; auditory
discrimination; comprehension; cognitive
development; preparation for further
language studies; preparation for writing
choosing appropriate speech; positive selfefficacy and self-concept; externalize
ideas, thoughts & opinions; cognitive
development, develop positive peer and
social interactions
The Farm; Envrironmental
Language Cards; Language 3-part
Cards; Parts-of Puzzles and cards;
Puzzle Maps; classroom jobs and
daily schedule; picture descriptions,
I-spy; informal/spontaneous
conversations, classroom library,
leveled readers
vocabulary enrichment; choosing
appropriate speech; positive self-efficacy
and self-concept; oral expression;
vocabulary enrichment; cognitive
development; preparation for further
language studies, preparation for writing
story writing; art creation, illustration labeling
Story Dictation on various writing
and drawing papers; art materials,
story writing and illustrating,
illustration labeling,
6. Speak audibly and express thoughts, feelings, and ideas clearly.
Lessons in conflict resolution; Share time;
read alouds, small group leveled readers,
character education activities (feelings poster,
cards, etc.), peer and social interactions,
Grace and Courtesy (manners, how to
interrupt, expressing needs), conversational
exchange, question answer sessions
Social stories; Exercises in grace
and courtesy, character education
activities, classroom library, school
library, leveled readers
externalize ideas; non-verbal
communication skills; cognitive
development, ability to express detail,
understading the importance of using
detail in expressive language; preparation
for further development of writing skills
and the writing process
externalize ideas; vocabulary enrichment;
expressive language; cognitive
development; awareness of affect, ability
to communicate feelings verbally
Kindergarten CORE Standards
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
Page 5 of 10
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March 2012
Anchor Standards for Language
Kindergarten Language Standards:
Conventions of Standard English
1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard
English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
Conventions of Standard English
1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar
and usage when writing or speaking.
a. Print many upper- and lowercase letters.
b. Use frequently occurring nouns and verbs.
c. Form regular plural nouns orally by adding /s/ or /es/ (e.g., dog, dogs;
wish, wishes).
d. Understand and use question words (interrogatives) (e.g., who, what,
where, when, why, how).
e. Use the most frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., to, from, in, out, on,
off, for, of, by, with).
f. Produce and expand complete sentences in shared language activities.
2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard
English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when
writing.
2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English
capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
a. Capitalize the first word in a sentence and the pronoun I.
b. Recognize and name end punctuation.
c. Write a letter or letters for most consonant and short-vowel sounds
(phonemes).
d. Spell simple words phonetically, drawing on knowledge of sound-letter
relationships.
Knowledge of Language
3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how
language functions in different contexts, to make effective
choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more
fully when reading or listening.
Knowledge of Language
3. (Begins in grade 2)
Knowledge of Language
Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and
multiple-meaning words and phrases by using context
clues, analyzing meaningful word parts, and consulting
general and specialized reference materials, as
appropriate.
Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words
and phrases based on kindergarten reading and content.
a. Identify new meanings for familiar words and apply them accurately (e.g.,
knowing duck is a bird and learning the verb to duck).
b. Use the most frequently occurring inflections and affixes (e.g., -ed, -s, re-,
un-, pre-, -ful, -less) as a clue to the meaning of an unknown word.
5. With guidance and support from adults, explore word relationships and
nuances in word meanings.
a. Sort common objects into categories (e.g., shapes, foods) to gain a sense
of the concepts the categories represent.
b. Demonstrate understanding of frequently occurring verbs and adjectives
by relating them to their opposites (antonyms).
c. Identify real-life connections between words and their use (e.g., note
places at school that are colorful).
d. Distinguish shades of meaning among verbs describing the same general
action (e.g., walk, march, strut, prance) by acting out the meanings.
Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
Adult, peer, and self reading of a variety of
small books, readers and story books,
dictionary, thesaurus, direct instruction in
small reading groups, read alouds, think
alouds
5. Demonstrate understanding of word relationships and
nuances in word meanings.
Conventions of Standard English
how to engage in social informal
conversations; word/sentence building and
writing; identification of parts of speech;
appropriate responses to who, what, when,
where, why and how; formal letter writing
lessons (configuration), using concrete and
abstract representations of prepositions,
higher level questions, question and answer
sessions, read alouds, small reading group
instruction, leveled readers
Sandpaper Letters; moveable
alphabet (large and small); Writing
Papers; Farm; noun game; singluar
& plural noun classification;
mascucircle & feminine noun
classification; article identification;
object adjective work; logical
adjective game; detective adjective
game; verb classification; noun and
verb categorization; preposition
game; adverb identification; logical
adverb game; conjunction game;
command cards; Grammar
Symbols; word and sentence
symbolizing; adults and peers
asking questions;
Letter sizing; Three-period lesson with
Sandpaper Letters (including
sounds; writing letters; writing words; proper capitals); sandtray; moveable
spacing when writing, writing sentences; word- alphabet (large and small); writing
building (with objects and pictures); direct
papers (sentence strips, story
instruction of capitalization rules, direct
paper); phonogram boxes;
instruction of punctuation, simple sentence
chalkboard, dry erase boards, Pink
structure, blending, modeled and shared
Level Montessori works (CVC
writing, read alouds, think alouds, small
objects/labels, pictures/labels, loose
reading group instruction
letters, large word cards, phonetic
baskets, phonetic booklets, etc.)
classroom library; word lists;
nomenclature (3-part cards), short
phrases, school library, classroom
dictionary, student generated
dictionary
Sorting and matching activities; circle time
Go together objects, pictures and
(variety of movements-marching, walking,
puzzle cards representing event
galloping etc.); language to describe variances sequence, opposites, represented
(ex: short, shorter, shortest etc.), read alouds, categories; circle time action games;
think alouds, authors as mentors, opposite
speech classification games; logical
sorting, opposite cards, access prior
adjective game; command cards;
knowledge, classroom field trips and/or
sensorial activities; classroom
outings
library, school library, outdoor and
indoor environment
Page 6 of 10
Function of words and parts of speech;
preparation for logical analysis; cognitive
development; proper formation and
configuration of letters of the alphabet,
understanding sentence structure,
preparation for sentence analysis,
preparation for writing and the writing
process,
Function of words and parts of speech;
preparation for logical analysis; cognitive
development, preparation for writing and
the writing process, increase writing
mechanics, preparation for sentence
analysis
vocabulary building; identification of
unknown words; English language speech
and phonetic rules; cognitive
development, increase expressive and
receptive language skills
vocabulary enrichment; expressive
language and phonetic rules; cognitive
development, concept skills, receptive
language
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March 2012
6. Acquire and use accurately a range of general
academic and domain-specific words and phrases
sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at
the college and career readiness level; demonstrate
independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when
encountering an unknown term important to
comprehension or expression.
6. Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and
being read to, and responding to texts.
Blending; 3-letter, short vowel word
identification; reading simple sentences;
spontaneous/informal conversation; read
alouds, small reading group instruction,
leveled readers, modeling word usage
Picture and word books; making
handmade books; sentence strips;
small leveled books and readers,
classroom library, school library,
Short Vowel Books (books with CVC
words), Montessori Pink Level
works (Bob Books, phonetic
baskets, phonetic booklets, short
phrases, objects and sentences,
pictures and sentences, etc.)
appropriate conversation; externallize
personal ideas, expresses thoughts and
opinions; cognitive development,
increases expressive and receptive
language, develop rich vocabulary
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Anchor Standards for Mathematics
Kindergarten CORE Standards
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Know number names and the count sequence.
Know number names and the count sequence.
1. Count to 100 by ones and by tens.
gradation of size (what is small-what is large
etc.) sequence of numbers; learning number
patterns; building/creating numbers 0-9999;
associating number symbol and quantity; odd
and even numbers; skip counting(1's, 2's, 3's,
4's, 5's, 6's, 7's, 8's, 9's, 10's)
pink tower; red rods; brown prisms;
Red and Blue Rods; small red and
blue table rods; sandpaper
numerals; spindle box; cards and
counters; memory game; short bead
stair (short bead stair hanging rack);
teen boards; ten boards; teen beads
hanging rack; introduction tray; 9Layout Tray; one hundred board;
bead cabinet with short (1-10
squared) and long bead chains (110 cubed); roll work
all the above including the addition
strip board; 45-layout; snake game
for the research of tens; handful
exchanging; bank game
see above for foundation including
focus on practical life activities; art
activities; chalkboard exercises;
metal insets; sandpaper numerals;
sandtray; roll work; number work
extentions for various "math"
activities that include math papers;
spindle box
one to one coorespondance; accuracy in
counting; route memorization; fine motor
control; hand-eye coordination;
subconcious experience with base ten
system; number patterns; associating
number symbol and quantity; left to right
and top to bottom orientation; hierarchy of
decimal system; cognitive development
Red and Blue Rods with Number
cards; small red and blue table rods;
sandpaper numerals; spindle box;
cards and counters; memory game;
short bead stair (short bead stair
hanging rack); teen boards; ten
boards; teen beads hanging rack;
introduction tray; 9-Layout Tray; one
hundred board; bead cabinet with
short (1-10 squared) and long bead
chains (1-10 cubed); roll work
one to one coorespondance; accuracy in
counting; route memorization; fine motor
control; hand-eye coordination;
subconcious experience with base ten
system; number patterns; associating
number symbol and quantity; left to right
and top to bottom orientation; hierarchy of
decimal system; cognitive development
Kindergarten Mathematics Standards:Counting and
Cardinality
2. Count forward beginning from a given number within the known sequence sequential counting;skip counting
(instead of having to begin at 1).
3. Write numbers from 0 to 20. Represent a number of objects with a written Number writing and associating number
numeral 0-20 (with 0 representing a count of no objects).
symbol and quantity for numbers 0-9999;
number sizing; recordkeeping;
Count to tell the Number of Objects
4. Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities;
association of quantity and symbol from 0connect counting to cardinality.
9999
When counting objects, say the number names in the standard order,
pairing each object with one and only one number name and each
number name with one and only one object.
Understand that the last number name said tells the number of objects
counted. The number of objects is the same regardless of their
arrangement or the order in which they were counted.
Understand that each successive number name refers to a quantity
that is one larger.
5. Count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20
things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as
10 things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 1–20,
count out that many objects.
Base Ten foundation in Montessori
Environment provides many materials for
counting, sorting and grading; associating
quantity and symbols
Page 7 of 10
See above including memory recall
strengthening prehensil grip; left to right,
top to bottom orientation; association of
number symbol and quantity; cognitive
development; introducing concept of zero;
correctly recording numerals
practical life activities; pink tower,
visual recognition of without counting
brown prisms; knobbed cylinders;
knobless cylinders; red rods;
constructive triangle boxes;
geometric solids; geometric cabinet;
montessori bells; metal insets; the
farm;
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March 2012
Compare Numbers
6. Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, Graphing;gradation; odd/even
less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group, e.g., by
using matching and counting strategies
Red and Blue Rods; red and blue
table rods; bead bar stair; graphing
activity; making charts; cards and
counters
one to one coorespondance; accuracy in
counting; route memorization; fine motor
control; hand-eye coordination;
subconcious experience with base ten
system; number patterns; associating
number symbol and quantity; left to right
and top to bottom orientation; hierarchy of
decimal system; cognitive
developmentvisual discrimination of
numbers
7. Compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written
numerals.
comparing numeric symbols between 0-9999
sandpaper numerals; numeral
cards; written extensions; graphing
activity; making charts
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Anchor Standards for Mathematics
Kindergarten CORE Standards
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Understand addition as putting together and adding to, and
understand subtraction as taking apart and taking from.
1. Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental
images, drawings1, sounds (e.g., claps), acting out situations, verbal
explanations, expressions, or equations.
concept of sumation; static addition for
numbers 0-9999; dynamic addition
(introduction of "carrying") for numbers 09999; static subtraction for numbers 0-9999;
dynamic subtraction (introduction of
"borrowing") for numbers 0-9999); exchanging
and borrowing from place holders
Addition strip board; red and blue
table rods; Addition with bead bars
(numbers 0-10); addition finger
chart with 6 control charts; addition
with golden bead (numbers 109999); subtraction strip board;
subtraction with beads (0-10);
subtraction with golden bead
material (numbers 10-9999);
subtraction charts; equation boxes;
circle problems; problem tickets;
equation booklets; handful
exchanging; exchange game; stamp
game; small bead frame; dot game;
positive and negative snake game
accuracy in counting;fine motor control;
hand-eye coordination; putting groups of
numbers together to make a larger group
(addition concept); taking a group of
objects away from a larger, single group
(concept of subtraction); distinguishing
units, tens, hundreds and thousands
place; memorization of simple facts;
cognitive development;various concrete
activities lead to memorization; correctly
recording equasion.
see above; child uses maniplatives to solve
problems
see above
see above
research and composition of numbers;
possible combination of numbers to make a
specific sum
see above; 0-10 materials; colored see above
bead bars (including all the possible
activities with colored beads);
sequence of numbers; addition strip
board; bead stair; positive and
negative snake game; deconomial
box of bead bars; equation papers
(problem tickets, circle problems,
etc.) and booklets
addition strip board; snake game for see above
the research of 10s; deconomial
box; equation papers (problem
tickets, circle problems etc) &
booklets
bead stair; red and blue rods; red
see above
and blue table rods; addition strip
board; addition finger charts;
subtraction strip board; subtraction
finger charts; snake game for the
research of 10s
Understand addition as putting together and adding to,
and understand subration as taking apart and taking
from.
Kindergarten Mathematics Operations and Algebraic
Thinking
2. Solve addition and subtraction word problems, and add and
subtract within 10, e.g., by using objects or drawings to represent the
problem.
Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than
one way, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each
decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 5 = 2 + 3 and 5 = 4 + 1).
4. For any number from 1 to 9, find the number that makes 10 when
added to the given number, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and
record the answer with a drawing or equation.
research and composition of numbers;
possible combination of umbers to make 10
5. Fluently add and subtract within 5
memorization of facts through the use of
hands on materials
Page 8 of 10
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Anchor Standards for Mathematics
Work with numbers 11-19 to gain foundations for place
value
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Anchor Standards for Mathematics
Draft As Of March 2012
product of combining groups of numbers;
dividing large group into equal parts;
introduction to division with remainder;
multiplication with bead bars;
deconomial bead bar box;
multiplication board;multiplication
charts;pythagoras board;
multiplication with golden bead
material (numbers 10-9999); short
and long bead chains (square of 1
through cube of 10) division board;
division charts; stamp game
accuracy in counting;fine motor control;
hand-eye coordination; concept of
multiplication; concept of division
(sharing);foundation of multiplication table;
cognitive development
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Work with numbers 11-19 to gain foundations for place value.
1. Compose and decompose numbers from 11 to 19 into ten ones and
some further ones, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each
composition or decomposition by a drawing or equation (such as 18 =
10 + 8); understand that these numbers are composed of ten ones and
one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.
teen number building; teen number
identification; teen number writing; continue
number building from 0-9999 with a focus on
the teens
see above with focus on teen
fine motor control; distinguishing units,
boards; teen hanging rack; beads
tens, hundreds and thousands place;
for number building; 45-layout; bank cognitive development
game
Kindergarten CORE Standards
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
dry and wet transferring (pouring,
spooning, tonging etc.) cooking with
measuring spoons, cups, bowls and
ingredients; red rods; pink tower;
brown prisms; knobbed cylinder
blocks; knobless cylinders;
constructive triangles; geometric
cabinet; botony cabinet; 3 various
color boxes; mystery bag; rough and
smooth boards and tablets;
geometric solids; thermic tablets;
baric tablets;pressure cylinders;
montessori bells; red rods with
red/blue rods;
see above materials list which
includes consistent exploration,
comparing, contrasting and
evaluating through given
terminology; graphing activities;
written/drawn findings;
relationship of materials in environment;
conservation; visual/perception
discrimination; auditory discrimination;
tactile discrimination; cognitive
development,
3. Classify objects into given categories; count the numbers of objects object classification; number association;
in each category and sort the categories by count.
creating simple graphs
Practical life activities; various
sensorial grading activities; cards
and counters; association extention
activities
one-to-one corespondence; accuracy in
counting; fine motor control; hand-eye
coordination; comparing objects on more
than one level; cognitive development,
relationship to materials/objects in the
environment
Kindergarten CORE Standards
Montessori Materials
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Kindergarten CORE Standards
Anchor Standards for Mathematics: Number & Operations
in Base Ten
Anchor Standards for Mathematics: Measurement and Data
Describe and compare measurable attributes.
Measurement and Data
1. Describe measurable attributes of objects, such as length or weight. exercises in practical life; lessons in
Describe several measurable attributes of a single object.
conservation; language associated with
measurable attributes (heavy, light, long,
short, thick, thin etc.) sorting and grading
objects based on attributes,
2. Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in
object classification; number association;
common, to see which object has “more of”/“less of” the attribute, and creating simple graphs
describe the difference. For example, directly compare the heights of
two children and describe one child as taller/shorter.
one-to-one corespondence; accuracy in
counting; fine motor control; hand-eye
coordination; comparing objects on more
than one level; cognitive development,
relationship to materials/objects in the
environment
Classify objects and count the number of objects in each
category.
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Anchor Standards for Mathematics
Learning Activity
Anchor Standards for Mathematics: Geometry
Identify and describe shapes (squares, circles, triangles, rectangles,
hexagons, cubes, cones, cylinders, and spheres).
Geometry
Page 9 of 10
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March 2012
1. Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes, and
describe the relative positions of these objects using terms such as
above, below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to.
Grading shapes by size/shape with associated pink tower, brown prisms, red rods;
language (-er, -est); identifying shape
knobbed cylinder blocks; knobbed
attributes; introduction to prepositions
less cylinders; Geometric cabinet;
geometric solids and all appropriate
extensions; constructive triangles;
metal insets; botany cabinet; the
farm; pronoun game
2. Correctly name shapes regardless of their orientations or overall
size.
Making new shapes from other shapes;
properties of triangles, squares, rectangles,
paralellograms, trapezoids and 4-sided
figures; introduction to angles.
3. Identify shapes as two-dimensional (lying in a plane, “flat”) or three- 2-d and 3-d shape identification by name
dimensional (“solid”).
Analyze, compare, create, and compose shapes.
4. Analyze and compare two- and three-dimensional shapes, in
different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe
their similarities, differences, parts (e.g., number of sides and
vertices/“corners”) and other attributes (e.g., having sides of equal
length).
5. Model shapes in the world by building shapes from components
(e.g., sticks and clay balls) and drawing shapes.
6. Compose simple shapes to form larger shapes. For example, “Can
you join these two triangles with full sides touching to make a
rectangle?”
no Anchor standard established for this concept
Fractions
no national standard established for this age range.
see above including 5 boxes of
constructive triangles; oragami
visual discrimination and perception;
descriptive language vocabulary;
foundation for geometry; cognitive
development
see above including congruent and noncongruent; length, width and height;
cognitive development
geometric cabinet; geometric solids see above including added vocabulary
botany cabinet; metal insets,
enrichment and space awareness
oragami
Grading shapes by size/shape with associated pink tower, brown prisms, red rods;
language (-er, -est); identifying shape
knobbed cylinder blocks; knobbed
attributes; comparing and contrasting forms
less cylinders; Geometric cabinet;
geometric solids and all appropriate
extensions; constructive triangles;
metal insets; botany cabinet;
visual discrimination and perception;
descriptive language vocabulary;
foundation for geometry; congruent and
non-congruent; identifying length, width
and height, angles, points etc.; cognitive
development
finding and identifying shapes in the
environment; creating shapes using various
media and tools
creating larger shapes from smaller ones
clay; playdough; art activities using
various medium;
see above including hand strength; handeye coordination; preoperational thought
5 boxes of constructive triangles
see above
Large Fraction Skittles; Fraction
circless for families (1-10);
Make parts from whole; visual
representation of fractions; congruent vs.
non-congruent; cognitive development
Fraction circles
see above; sumation
Fraction circles
see above;
Fractions
Introduction to whole and parts-of-whole;
exploring fraction families 1 whole, halves,
thirds, fourths, fifths, sixths, sevenths, eighths,
ninths, and tenths; writing fractions
Adding same denomiter fractions 1 whole
through tenths
Subtraction with same denomiter fractions 1
whole through tenths
Page 10 of 10
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March, 2012
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Anchor Standards for Reading
Third Grade CORE Standards
Key Ideas and Details
1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly
and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual
evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions
drawn from the text.
Key Ideas and Details
1. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text,
referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze
their development; summarize the key supporting details
and ideas.
3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas
develop and interact over the course of a text.
Craft and Structure
4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text,
including determining technical, connotative, and figurative
meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape
meaning or tone.
5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific
sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text
(e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each
other and the whole.
6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the
content and style of a text.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse
media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as
well as in words
8. Decircleate and evaluate the argument and specific
claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as
well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
3rd Grade Reading Standards for Literature:
Ability to read, ability to identify and
extract key components, compose a
sentence, ask questions, use language
from the text to answer questions and
to demonstrate understanding
2. Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse
Ability to read, ability to identify and
cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how extract key components, reads and
it is conveyed through key details in the text.
understands a variety of materials,
locates main idea, supporting details
and different components of stories,
engages in guided discussion, ability to
show understanding through creative
expression like visual art, drama, music,
and written expression
3. Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) Ability to read, ability to identify
and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.
characters, ability to have a text to self
connection, reads and understands a
variety of materials,ability to identify
and name a variety of feelings,
recognizes literature as an expression of
human experience, can sequence the
events in the stories, engages in guided
discussion, ability to show
understanding through creative
expression like visual art, drama, music,
and written expression, uses descriptive
language, understand cause and effect,
identify inferences
Craft and Structure
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,
distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.
Analyzing, decomposing, transposing
and reconstructing sentences,
participates in guided discussion, uses
metaphors and similes in spoken and
written expression
5. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking
Identify vocabulary for parts of stories
about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how and can name, reads a variety of
each successive part builds on earlier sections.
materials, participates in guided
discussion, ability to sequence
6. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of
Ability to infer, identify characters,
the characters.
identify feelings and character traits,
compare self to text, apply complex
thinking skills, show understanding of
text, participate guided discussion
Vocabulary cards, Variety of genres and
media
Variety of books; ancient creation
stories, ancient myths and fables as
related to our "Cosmic Education"
curriculum, ancient civilization timelines,
Blooms Taxonomy command cards
Variety of books, adjective key lesson,
command cards, grammar boxes and
symbols, character education materials,
blooms taxonomy cards, sequencing
materials, timelines, cause and effect
cards
Sentence and reading analysis and
extended studies, grammar symbols,
Parts of Speech materials, oral
commands and activities, grammar
boxes, command cards, teacher made
material
Variety of books, teacher made
materials, sequencing activities,
Variety of literature, command cards,
bloom's taxonomy cards
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
7. Explain how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations contribute to what is Ability to infer, participate in guided
conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of discussions, look, attain to and compare
a character or setting).
Variety of literature, bloom's taxonomy
and connect, and evaluate the
cards
illustration to text
(Not applicable to literature)
Page 1 of 9
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March, 2012
9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes
or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the
approaches the authors take.
9. With prompting and support, compare and contrast the adventures and
experiences of characters in familiar stories.
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
10. Read and comprehend complex literary and
informational texts independently and proficiently.
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
10. Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and
understanding.
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Third Grade CORE Standards
Use a variety of graphic organizers,
demonstrates knowledge of comparing
and contrasting, can identify characters, Variety of literature, teacher made
manipulative
reads and understands stories
Effectively participates and
communicates in group reading
activities, responds appropriatly and
asks questions, obtains answers from a
variety of resources, demonstrates
understanding
Variety of literature
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
3rd Grade Reading Standards for Informational Text:
Key Ideas and Details
1. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text,
referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
Effectively participates and
communicates in group discussions,
responds appropriatly and asks
questions, obtains answers from a
variety of resources, demonstrates
understanding
2. Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain
Identifies main idea and can describe
how they support the main idea.
key details, ability to sequence key
details and can determine importance of
key details
3. Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific Follows directions, ability to measure
ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using
time, ability to sequence and determine
language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.
cause and effect, demonstrates
understanding of the passage of time,
engages in scientific thought and
process, makes predictions, using the
scientific method
Craft and Structure
4. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words
and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3 topic or subject area.
read for content; make inferences,
analyze and draw conclusions; identify
and use contextual clues for meaning
5. Use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) identify various text features and tools
to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.
using appropriate vocabulary, familiar
with current technologies available in
classroom
6. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text.
Identify point of view, participation in
group discussion, verbalize opinion and
ability to support opinion
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
7. Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and
the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where,
when, why, and how key events occur).
8. Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and
paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a
sequence).
navigation of non-fiction text features
(e.g. hyperlinks, glossary, bold text,
digarams, captions, photographs, etc)
beginning guided research, introduction
to scientific method, reading response,
group discussions
Page 2 of 9
3 part cards, variety of texts
nomenclature cards, sequencing
materials, Variety of texts, main idea
command cards
Vertical and horizontal presentation of
Fundamental needs of Humans, science
experiment cards, timelines, clock work,
science materials, measurement tools,
scientific texts, like a cookbook or howto book
nomenclature cards, variety of literature
and text, command cards, science
experiments, science vocabulary
materials
presentations on research tools, like
dictionary, thesaurus, etc., presentation
on parts of a book, use of a computer
for research, research materials
Variety of text
variety of factual books, newspapers,
magazines, reference and resource
materials
sequencing cards, graphic organizers,
timelines, guided questions (command
cards), experiment cards,
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March, 2012
9. Compare and contrast the most important points and key details
presented in two texts on the same topic.
finding main topic, guided discussion,
written response, graphic organizers
sequencing cards, graphic organizers,
timelines, guided questions (command
cards), experiment cards,
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts,
reading assessments, observations,
including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end interim assessments, formative (normed
of the grades 2–3 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
informational texts, including
tests) and summative assessments,
history/social studies, science and
performance, daily documentation,
technical texts
rubrics
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Third Grade CORE Standards
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
Demonstrates symbol-sound
relationship, recognizes combinations of
letters, identifies root words,
understands meaning of suffix and
prefix, demonstrates ability to construct
and deconstruct, ability to decode,
identify and uses different parts of
words, recognizes and uses patterns
Listening activities, sandpaper letterssingle and double sound, movable
alphabet, word lists, 3 part cards,
phonogram booklets or readers, prefix
and suffix manipulatives, definition and
etymology cards, syllabication
interactive presentation, teacher made
materials, word cards
Fluency
4. Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.
Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate,
and expression.
Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding,
rereading as necessary.
Ability to read, demonstrates
understanding, recognizes words, ability
to decode, asks questions, interacts with
peers and adults, participates in
discussion groups
Exposure to a variety of trade books,
read aloud activities, Command Cards,
sequencing activities, teacher made
activities
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Anchor Standards for Writing
Third Grade CORE Standards
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
Text Types and Purposes
1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of
substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and
relevant and sufficient evidence.
Text Types and Purposes
1. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with
reasons.
Introduce the topic or text they are writing about, state an opinion, and
create an organizational structure that lists reasons.
Provide reasons that support the opinion.
Use linking words and phrases (e.g., because, therefore, since, for
example) to connect opinion and reasons.
Provide a concluding statement or section.
2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas
and information clearly.
Introduce a topic and group related information together; include
illustrations when useful to aiding comprehension.
Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details.
Use linking words and phrases (e.g., also, another, and, more, but) to
connect ideas within categories of information.
Provide a concluding statement or section.
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
3rd Grade Reading Standards for Foundational Skills:
Phonics and Word Recognition
3. Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding
words.
Identify and know the meaning of the most common prefixes and
derivational suffixes.
Decode words with common Latin suffixes.
Decode multisyllable words.
Read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words.
2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and
convey complex ideas and information clearly and
accurately through the effective selection, organization,
and analysis of content.
3rd Grade Language Arts Standards: Writing
writing process, introduction to parts of
speech, outlining, paragraphing,
graphic organizers, journals, grammar
sequencing, introduction to sentence
types, introduction to writing genres and boxes, reference materials (magazine's
newspapers as examples)
associated linking language
writing process, outlining, paragraphing,
sequencing, introduction to sentence
types, using contextual clues,
introduction to writing genres along with graphic organizers, journals, grammar
boxes, reference materials,
linking words and phrases
Page 3 of 9
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March, 2012
3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined
experiences or events using effective technique, wellchosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using
effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
Establish a situation and introduce a narrator and/or characters; organize
an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
Use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts, and feelings to develop
experiences and events or show the response of characters to situations.
Use temporal words and phrases to signal event order.
Provide a sense of closure.
Production and Distribution of Writing
4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the
development, organization, and style are appropriate to
task, purpose, and audience.
Producation and Distribution of Writing
4. With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the
development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade- writing process, assignments that reflect
specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.) presentations given in these particular
areas, manuscript and cursive
handwriting, grammar mechanics
5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and
strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing
writing process, assignments that reflect
productions of writing materials
6. With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and
publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and
collaborate with others.
Microsoft word, word processing
5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning,
revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and
publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.
Research to Build and Present Knowledge
7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research
projects based on focused questions, demonstrating
understanding of the subject under investigation.
8. Gather relevant information from multiple print and
digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each
source, and integrate the information while avoiding
plagiarism.
9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to
support analysis, reflection, and research.
writing process, introduction to parts of
speech (especially function of adjective),
outlining, paragraph sequencing,
graphic organizers, journals, grammar
introduction to sentence types,
introduction to character development, boxes, reference materials, sentence
analysis
using quotation marks
Research to Build and Present Knowledge
7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic.
student created written reports,
research papers, Young Author's
projects, grammar boxes, sentence
analysis and symbolization,
rough drafts edits and final drafts,
spelling lessons, use of
dictionary/thesaurus, alphabetical order
use technology to create student
reports, research papers, Young
Author's projects
reference books, three part cards,
guided questions, command cards,
animal and plant question cards, animal
and plant stories, history question
charts, timelines, fundamental needs
chart plant; and animal charts, botnay
and geography charts, cultural subjects
charts and timelines
construct knowledge of the research
process
8. Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and
classification materials (language,
digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided
classification, field experiences, graphic zoology, botany, history, geography,
categories.
organizing, scientific method,
science), plant and animal care
9. (Begins in grade 4)
Range of Writing
10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for
research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames
(a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks,
purposes, and audiences.
Range of Writing
10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection,
and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a
portfolio of writing samples related to
range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
activities listed above; journaling
journals, research papers, nomenclature
books
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening
Third Grade CORE Standards
Montessori Materials
3rd Grade Language Arts Standards: Speaking & Listening
Comprehension and Collaboration
Comprehension and Collaboration
Learning Activity
Page 4 of 9
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
1. Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of
conversations and collaborations with diverse partners,
building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly
and persuasively.
2. Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse
media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and
orally.
3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use
of evidence and rhetoric.
Draft As Of March, 2012
1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in
groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts,
building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material;
explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the
topic to explore ideas under discussion.
Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in
respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about
the topics and texts under discussion).
Ask questions to check understanding of information presented, stay on
topic, and link their comments to the remarks of others.
Explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion.
2.Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or
information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually,
quantitatively, and orally.
3. Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering
appropriate elaboration and detail.
Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence
such that listeners can follow the circle of reasoning and
the organization, development, and style are appropriate
to task, purpose, and audience.
Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
4. Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with
appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an
understandable pace.
5. Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays
of data to express information and enhance understanding
of presentations.
6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and
communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal
English when indicated or appropriate.
5. Create engaging audio recordings of stories or poems that demonstrate
fluid reading at an understandable pace; add visual displays when
appropriate to emphasize or enhance certain facts or details.
6. Speak in complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation in
order to provide requested detail or clarification.
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Anchor Standards for Language
Third Grade CORE Standards
Conventions of Standard English
1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard
English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
Conventions of Standard English
1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar
and usage when writing or speaking.
Explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in
general and their functions in particular sentences.
Form and use regular and irregular plural nouns.
Use abstract nouns (e.g., childhood).
Form and use regular and irregular verbs.
Form and use the simple (e.g., I walked; I walk; I will walk) verb tenses.
Ensure subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement.*
Form and use comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs, and
choose between them depending on what is to be modified.
Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions.
Produce simple, compound, and complex sentences.
2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English
capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
Capitalize appropriate words in titles.
Use commas in addresses.
Use commas and quotation marks in dialogue.
Form and use possessives.
Use conventional spelling for high-frequency and other studied words and
for adding suffixes to base words (e.g., sitting, smiled, cries, happiness).
Use spelling patterns and generalizations (e.g., word families, positionbased spellings, syllable patterns, ending rules, meaningful word parts) in
writing words.
Consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to
check and correct spellings.
2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard
English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when
writing.
group time, class meetings and lessons,
children learning protocols to group
interaction, collaborative decision
making, peer mediation, problem
solving, book groups, learning active
listening techniques
verbal responses to read aloud
information
verbal responses to read aloud
information
peace center and materials, conflict
resolution materials, child developed
code of conduct; general classroom
materials and books
trade books, charts, graphs, maps,
teacher read aloud, , PowerPoint
trade books, charts, graphs, maps,
teacher read aloud, , PowerPoint, audio
tapes, documentaries, videos
delivering a speech, improvisation, story
telling, current events, show and tell,
resource materials,
student feedback from a presentation
creating an assignment that reflect the
goals listed
materials and tape recorders, books
with CDs
modeling, description, making requests
and having needs met
language rich environment
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
teacher presentation followed by
independent student work
grammar boxes, sentence analysis,
language boxes (synonyms, prefixes,
homophones, etc), word study, trade
materials
adult language modeling, guided work
followed by independent student work;
using reference materials, sentence
structure
grammar boxes, sentence analysis,
language boxes (synonyms, prefixes,
homophones, etc), word study, trade
materials
3rd Grade Language Arts Standards: Language
Page 5 of 9
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March, 2012
Knowledge of Language
3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how
language functions in different contexts, to make effective
choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more
fully when reading or listening.
Knowledge of Language
3.Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking,
reading, or listening.
Choose words and phrases for effect.*
Recognize and observe differences between the conventions of spoken
and written standard English.
Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and
multiple-meaning words and phrases by using context
clues, analyzing meaningful word parts, and consulting
general and specialized reference materials, as
appropriate.
Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning word
and phrases based on grade 3 reading and content, choosing flexibly from
a range of strategies.
Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
Determine the meaning of the new word formed when a known affix is
added to a known word (e.g., agreeable/disagreeable,
comfortable/uncomfortable, care/careless, heat/preheat).
Use a known root word as a clue to the meaning of an unknown word with
the same root (e.g., company, companion).
Use glossaries or beginning dictionaries, both print and digital, to determine
or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases.
5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships
and nuances in word meanings.
Distinguish the literal and nonliteral meanings of words and phrases in
context (e.g., take steps).
Identify real-life connections between words and their use (e.g., describe
people who are friendly or helpful).
Distinguish shades of meaning among related words that describe states of
mind or degrees of certainty (e.g., knew, believed, suspected, heard,
wondered).
6. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate conversational, general
academic, and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that
signal spatial and temporal relationships (e.g., After dinner that night we
went looking for them).
5. Demonstrate understanding of word relationships and
nuances in word meanings.
6. Acquire and use accurately a range of general
academic and domain-specific words and phrases
sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the
college and career readiness level; demonstrate
independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when
encountering an unknown term important to
comprehension or expression.
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Third Grade CORE Standards
teacher presentation, guided work
followed by independent student work
grammar boxes, sentence analysis,
language boxes (synonyms, prefixes,
homophones, etc), word study, trade
materials
grammar boxes, sentence analysis,
teacher presentation, sentence structure language boxes (synonyms, prefixes,
and word meaning, guided work
homophones, etc), word study, trade
followed by independent student work
materials
teacher presentation, guided work
followed by independent student work,
poetry, telling jokes, idioms
grammar boxes, sentence analysis,
language boxes (synonyms, prefixes,
homophones, etc), word study, trade
materials
vocabulary building, words related to
content, specific vocabulary related to
sequencing,
past, present and future cards, chinese
boxes,
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
3rd Grade Reading Standards for Mathematics: Operations
and Algebraic Thinking
Represent and Solve Problems Involving Multiplication and Division
1. Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total
number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. For example, describe a
context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 × 7.
understanding place value,
understanding symbol and quantity
relationship, ability to group and
regroup, demonstrates multiplication
math vocabulary, can identify the
product of given equations, recognizes
patterns
2.Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 understanding place value,
as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned
understanding symbol and quantity
equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are
relationship, ability to distribute,
partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each. For example, describe a
demonstrates division math vocabulary,
context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be
can identify the quotient of given
expressed as 56 ÷ 8.
equations, recognizes patterns
3. Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in
situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., Read and interpret displays of data,
by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to models understanding, construct and
represent the problem.1
deconstruct algorithms
Page 6 of 9
Multiplication Bead Board, colored bead
box, equation boxes, squaring chains,
cubing chains, multiplication snake
game
unit division board, equation boxes with
equation and quotients
Word problem cards, decanomial bead
box
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March, 2012
4. Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division
equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the
unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 × Demonstrates and applies a knowledge
? = 48, 5 = _ ÷ 3, 6 × 6 = ?
of multiplication and division operations,
ability to recognize symbols, solve
problems using systems of numbers and
their properties.
Understand properties of multiplication and the relationship between
multiplication and division.
5. Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide.2
Examples: If 6 × 4 = 24 is known, then 4 × 6 = 24 is also known.
(Commutative property of multiplication.) 3 × 5 × 2 can be found by 3 × 5 =
15, then 15 × 2 = 30, or by 5 × 2 = 10, then 3 × 10 = 30. (Associative
property of multiplication.) Knowing that 8 × 5 = 40 and 8 × 2 = 16, one can
find 8 × 7 as 8 × (5 + 2) = (8 × 5) + (8 × 2) = 40 + 16 = 56. (Distributive
property.)
6. Understand division as an unknown-factor problem. For example, find 32
÷ 8 by finding the number that makes 32 when multiplied by 8.
Decanomial layout, decanomial bead
box, Mulitplication working chart 1 and
2, binomial cube, trinomial cube, cubing
material, colored counting bars,
binomial of a square, trinomial of a
square, Multiplication tables
Recognizes properties, relationships of
algorithms
Demonstrates and applies a knowledge
of multiplication and division operations,
ability to recognize symbols, solve
problems using systems of numbers and Division working charts, unit division
board, multiplication bead board
their properties.
Multiply and Divide within 100
7. Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the
relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 × 5 =
40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade
3, know from memory all products of two one-digit number
Solve problems using number facts
Solve problems involving the four operations, and identify and explain
patterns in arithmetic.
8. Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent
Read and interpret displays of data,
these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown
quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation models understanding, construct and
and estimation strategies including rounding.
deconstruct algorithms
9. Identify arithmetic patterns (including patterns in the addition table or
multiplication table), and explain them using properties of operations. For
example, observe that 4 times a number is always even, and explain why 4
times a number can be decomposed into two equal addends
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Third Grade CORE Standards
Multiplication and division working
charts, multiplication equation and
product box, division equation and
quotient box, decanomial bead box,
squaring and cubing chains, decanomial
layout, multiplication and division tables
Multiplication and Division Working
Charts, Multiplication Tables, Division
Tables, Prepared Equations
Identify patterns, knowledge of
operations, solve problems using
number facts
Teacher made materials, word problem
cards
hundred board, addition strip board,
Decanomial bead box, Golden bead
material, stamp game, addition snake
game, dot game, table rods, cards and
counters, red and blue rods, pythagoras
board, addition working charts, addition
equation and sums, addition tables,
subtraction snake game, subtraction
strip board, subtraction working charts,
subtraction equations and sums box,
subtraction tables, multiplication board,
multiplication working charts,
multiplication snake game,
multiplication working charts, unit
division board, division working charts,
division equation and dividends box,
teacher created materials
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
3rd Grade Reading Standards for Mathematics: Number &
Operations in Base Ten
Use place value understanding and properties of operations to
perform multi-digit arithmetic
Page 7 of 9
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March, 2012
1. Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest
10 or 100.
2.Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms
based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship
between addition and subtraction.
3. Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10–90
(e.g., 9 × 80, 5 × 60) using strategies based on place value and properties
of operations.
Golden Bead material, decimal cards,
stamp game, small bead frame, large
bead frame, golden mat
Ten squaring chain, hundred board,
pythagoras board, golden bead
materials, checkerboard, small bead
frame, large bead frame, golden bead
frame (flat bead frame), small and large
bead frame paper, dot board, dot board
paper,
3rd Grade Reading Standards for Mathematics: Number &
Operations--Fractions
Develop understanding of fractions as numbers.
1.Understand a fraction 1/b as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole
is partitioned into b equal parts; understand a fraction a/b as the quantity
formed by a parts of size 1/b.
2.Understand a fraction as a number on the number line; represent
fractions on a number line diagram.
Represent a fraction 1/b on a number line diagram by defining the interval
from 0 to 1 as the whole and partitioning it into b equal parts. Recognize
that each part has size 1/b and that the endpoint of the part based at 0
locates the number 1/b on the number line.
Represent a fraction a/b on a number line diagram by marking off a lengths
1/b from 0. Recognize that the resulting interval has size a/b and that its
endpoint locates the number a/b on the number line.
3. Explain equivalence of fractions in special cases, and compare fractions
by reasoning about their size.
Understand two fractions as equivalent (equal) if they are the same size, or
the same point on a number line.
Recognize and generate simple equivalent fractions, e.g., 1/2 = 2/4, 4/6 =
2/3). Explain why the fractions are equivalent, e.g., by using a visual
fraction model.
Express whole numbers as fractions, and recognize fractions that are
equivalent to whole numbers. Examples: Express 3 in the form 3 = 3/1;
recognize that 6/1 = 6; locate 4/4 and 1 at the same point of a number line
diagram.
Compare two fractions with the same numerator or the same denominator
by reasoning about their size. Recognize that comparisons are valid only
when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of
comparisons with the symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g.,
by using a visual fraction model
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Third Grade CORE Standards
Fraction skittles, Fraction circle, Cut-out
Labled Fraction Circle, Fraction Mat,
Teacher made materials
Fraction skittles, Fraction circle, Cut-out
Labled Fraction Circle, Fraction Mat,
Teacher made materials
Fraction skittles, Fraction circle, Cut-out
Labled Fraction Circle, Fraction Mat,
Teacher made materials
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
3rd Grade Reading Standards for
Mathematics:Measurements and Data
Solve problems involving measurement and estimation of intervals of
time, liquid volumes, and masses of objects.
1. Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in
minutes. Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time
intervals in minutes, e.g., by representing the problem on a number line
diagram.
2.Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using
standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l).1 Add, subtract,
multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or
volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as
a beaker with a measurement scale) to represent the problem
Represent and interpret data
Page 8 of 9
Clock with movable hands, clock activity
cards, teacher made activity, solaris
clock
scale, geometric solids, manipulative
materials
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March, 2012
3.Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data
set with several categories. Solve one- and two-step “how many more” and
“how many less” problems using information presented in scaled bar
graphs. For example, draw a bar graph in which each square in the bar
graph might represent 5 pets.
4. Generate measurement data by measuring lengths using rulers marked
with halves and fourths of an inch. Show the data by making a line plot,
where the horizontal scale is marked off in appropriate units— whole
numbers, halves, or quarters
teacher made materials
rulers, teacher made materials
Geometric measurement: understand concepts of area and relate area
to multiplication and to addition.
5. Recognize area as an attribute of plane figures and understand concepts
of area measurement.
A square with side length 1 unit, called “a unit square,” is said to have “one
square unit” of area, and can be used to measure area.
A plane figure which can be covered without gaps or overlaps by n unit
squares is said to have an area of n square units.
6. Measure areas by counting unit squares (square cm, square m, square
in, square ft, and improvised units).
Geometry cabinet, yellow triangles for
area, Triangle box, small hexagon box,
large hexagon box, rectangle box, blue
rectangle box, rulers, measuring tapes,
yellow triangles for area, The history of
measurement
7. Relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition.
Find the area of a rectangle with whole-number side lengths by tiling it, and
show that the area is the same as would be found by multiplying the side
lengths.
Multiply side lengths to find areas of rectangles with whole-number side
lengths in the context of solving real world and mathematical problems, and
represent whole-number products as rectangular areas in mathematical
reasoning.
Use tiling to show in a concrete case that the area of a rectangle with wholenumber side lengths a and b + c is the sum of a × b and a × c. Use area
models to represent the distributive property in mathematical reasoning.
Recognize area as additive. Find areas of rectilinear figures by
decomposing them into non-overlapping rectangles and adding the areas of
the non-overlapping parts, applying this technique to solve real world
problems.
Geometry cabinet, yellow triangles for
area, Triangle box, small hexagon box,
large hexagon box, rectangle box, blue
rectangle box, rulers, measuring tapes,
teacher chosen manipulatives
Geometric measurement: recognize perimeter as an attribute of plane
figures and distinguish between linear and area measures.
8. Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of
polygons, including finding the perimeter given the side lengths, finding an
unknown side length, and exhibiting rectangles with the same perimeter
and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters.
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Third Grade CORE Standards
Geometry cabinet, Triangle box, small
hexagon box, large hexagon box,
rectangle box, blue rectangle box,
rulers, measuring tapes, geometric
solids and wooden faces
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
3rd Grade Reading Standards for Mathematics: Geometry
Reason with shapes and their attributes.
1. Understand that shapes in different categories (e.g., rhombuses,
rectangles, and others) may share attributes (e.g., having four sides), and
that the shared attributes can define a larger category (e.g., quadrilaterals).
Recognize rhombuses, rectangles, and squares as examples of
quadrilaterals, and draw examples of quadrilaterals that do not belong to
any of these subcategories
2. Partition shapes into parts with equal areas. Express the area of each
part as a unit fraction of the whole. For example, partition a shape into 4
parts with equal area, and describe the area of each part as 1/4 of the area
of the shape.
Page 9 of 9
Geometry cabinet, Triangle box, small
hexagon box, large hexagon box,
rectangle box, blue rectangle box,
nomenclature three- part cards
nomenclature three part cards,
Geometry cabinet, Triangle box, small
hexagon box, large hexagon box,
rectangle box, blue rectangle box,
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March, 2012
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Anchor Standards for Reading
Sixth Grade CORE Standards
Learning Activity
Key Ideas and Details
1. Read closely to determine what the text says
explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite
specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to
support conclusions drawn from the text.
2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and
analyze their development; summarize the key
supporting details and ideas.
3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and
ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.
Key Ideas and Details
Key Ideas and Details
1.Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text
says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Montessori Materials
6th Grade Reading Standards for Reading:
Literature
2.Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is
conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of
the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.
3. Describe how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds
in a series of episodes as well as how the characters
respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution.
Key Ideas and Details
Literature studies, writing portfolio styles, summary writing
styles, written research in different curricular areas.
Literature studies, writing portfolio styles, summary writing
styles, written research in different curricular areas.
Literature studies, writing portfolio styles, summary writing
styles, written research in different curricular areas. Story timeline.
Craft and Structure
4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a
text, including determining technical, connotative,
and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific
word choices shape meaning or tone.
5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how
specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions
of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza)
relate to each other and the whole.
6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the
content and style of a text.
Craft and Structure
Craft and Structure
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they
are used in a text, including figurative and connotative
meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on
meaning and tone.
5. Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or
stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and
contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or
plot.
6. Explain how an author develops the point of view of the
narrator or speaker in a text.
Craft and Structure
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in
diverse media and formats, including visually and
quantitatively, as well as in words
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
7.Compare and contrast the experience of reading a story,
drama, or poem to listening to or viewing an audio, video,
or live version of the text, including contrasting what they
“see” and “hear” when reading the text to what they
perceive when they listen or watch.
8.(Not applicable to literature)
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
8. Decircleate and evaluate the argument and
specific claims in a text, including the validity of the
reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of
the evidence.
9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar
themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to
compare the approaches the authors take.
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
9. Compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres
(e.g., stories and poems; historical novels and fantasy
stories) in terms of their approaches to similar themes and
topics
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
10. Read and comprehend complex literary and
informational texts independently and proficiently.
10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature,
including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6–8
text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as
needed at the high end of the range.
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Sixth Grade CORE Standards
Word study , nomenclature, dictionary research. vocabulary
workshop, literary analysis cards, thesaurus work, command
cards.
Sentence analysis, logical analysis, story lines, story plots,
command cards, literary analysis, story boards.
Literary and cultural studies.
Literary studies. genre studies. Venn diagrams, Timelines
Range of Reading and Level of Text
Complexity
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
Literary studies. genre studies. Venn diagrams, Timelines.
nomenclature cards. Readers Theater.
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
6th Grade Reading Standards for Informational
Text:
Key Ideas and Details
Key Ideas and Details
1. Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text
says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
2. Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed
through particular details; provide a summary of the text
distinct from personal opinions or judgments.
Key Ideas and Details
Literary studies. genre studies. Venn diagrams, Timelines.
nomenclature cards.
Literary studies. genre studies. Venn diagrams, Timelines.
nomenclature cards
Page 1 of 11
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March, 2012
3. Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is
introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (e.g.,
through examples or anecdotes).
Craft and Structure
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they
are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and
technical meanings.
5.Analyze how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter,
or section fits into the overall structure of a text and
contributes to the development of the ideas.
6.Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text
and explain how it is conveyed in the text.
Character Study, Story board, plot study, literature circles.
Craft and Structure
Craft and Structure
Sentence analysis, logical analysis, story lines, story plots,
command cards, literary analysis, story boards, discussions
Word study, Science experiments.
Sentence analysis, logical analysis, story lines, story plots,
command cards, literary analysis, story boards.
Sentence analysis, logical analysis, story lines, story plots,
command cards, literary analysis, story boards, Science
experiments.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
7. Integrate information presented in different media or
formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to
develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue.
8. Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a
text, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons
and evidence from claims that are not.
9. Compare and contrast one author’s presentation of
events with that of another (e.g., a memoir written by and a
biography on the same person).
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
Range of Reading and Level of Text
Complexity
10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary
nonfiction in the grades 6–8 text complexity band
proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of
the range.
Experiments, research , oral and written presentations, Blumes
taxonomy.
Experiments, research , oral and written presentations,
Appraise and differnciate between two pieces of literature,
incorporating Venn diagrams.
literature portfolio and literature circles. Evaluation of complex
material and literature.
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Anchor Standards for Writing
Sixth Grade CORE Standards
Learning Activity
Text Types and Purposes
1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis
of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning
and relevant and sufficient evidence.
Text Types and Purposes
Text Types and Purposes
1. Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons
and relevant evidence.
Introduce claim(s) and organize the reasons and evidence
clearly.
Support claim(s) with clear reasons and relevant evidence,
using credible sources and demonstrating an
understanding of the topic or text.
Use words, phrases, and clauses to clarify the
relationships among claim(s) and reasons.
Establish and maintain a formal style.
Provide a concluding statement or section that follows
from the argument presented.
Montessori Materials
6th Grade Language Arts Standards: Writing
Page 2 of 11
Text Types and Purposes
Research, literature portfolio and literature circles. Evaluation
of complex material and literature and experiments.
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and
convey complex ideas and information clearly and
accurately through the effective selection,
organization, and analysis of content.
3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined
experiences or events using effective technique, wellchosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
Production and Distribution of Writing
4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the
development, organization, and style are appropriate
to task, purpose, and audience.
5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by
planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new
approach.
Draft As Of March, 2012
2.Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic
and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the
selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
Introduce a topic; organize ideas, concepts, and
information, using strategies such as definition,
classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect;
include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts,
tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding
comprehension.
Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete
details, quotations, or other information and examples.
Use appropriate transitions to clarify the relationships
among ideas and concepts.
Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to
inform about or explain the topic.
Establish and maintain a formal style.
Provide a concluding statement or section that follows
from the information or explanation presented.
3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences
or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive
details, and well-structured event sequences.
Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and
introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an
event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.
Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and
description, to develop experiences, events, and/or
characters.
Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to
convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or
setting to another.
Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive
details, and sensory language to convey experiences and
events.
Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated
experiences or events.
Producation and Distribution of Writing
4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the
development, organization, and style are appropriate to
task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations
for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)
5. With some guidance and support from peers and adults,
develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning,
revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce
and publish writing and to interact and collaborate
with others.
6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and
publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with
others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding
skills to type a minimum of three pages in a single sitting.
Research to Build and Present Knowledge
7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research
projects based on focused questions, demonstrating
understanding of the subject under investigation.
8. Gather relevant information from multiple print and
digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of
each source, and integrate the information while
avoiding plagiarism.
Research to Build and Present Knowledge
7. Conduct short research projects to answer a question, Extracting information from resources
drawing on several sources and refocusing the inquiry
and organizing information in order to
when appropriate.
construct a paper or oral presentation,
8.Gather relevant information from multiple print and
digital sources; assess the credibility of each source; and
quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others
while avoiding plagiarism and providing basic
bibliographic information for sources.
Page 3 of 11
Research of a Plant/Animal/Continent Cards,
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March, 2012
9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts
to support analysis, reflection, and research.
9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to
support analysis, reflection, and research.
Apply grade 6 Reading standards to literature (e.g.,
“Compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres
[e.g., stories and poems; historical novels and fantasy
stories] in terms of their approaches to similar themes and
topics”).
Apply grade 6 Reading standards to literary nonfiction
(e.g., “Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims
in a text, distinguishing claims that are supported by
reasons and evidence from claims that are not”).
Range of Writing
10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time
for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter
time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a
range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Range of Writing
Range of Writing
10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for
research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames
(a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of disciplinespecific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Anchor Standards for Speaking and
Listening
Sixth Grade CORE Standards
Comprehension and Collaboration
1. Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of
conversations and collaborations with diverse
partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing
their own clearly and persuasively.
2. Integrate and evaluate information presented in
diverse media and formats, including visually,
quantitatively, and orally.
3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and
use of evidence and rhetoric.
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
6th Grade Language Arts Standards: Speaking &
Listening
Comprehension and Collaboration
1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative
discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with
diverse partners on grade 6 topics, texts, and issues,
building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied
required material; explicitly draw on that preparation by
referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe
and reflect on ideas under discussion.
Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals
and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed.
Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration
and detail by making comments that contribute to the
topic, text, or issue under discussion.
Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate
understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection
and paraphrasing.
2. Interpret information presented in diverse media and
formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain
how it contributes to a topic, text, or issue under study.
3. Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims,
distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and
evidence from claims that are not.
Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
4. Present information, findings, and supporting
evidence such that listeners can follow the circle of
reasoning and the organization, development, and
style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
4. Present claims and findings, sequencing ideas logically
and using pertinent descriptions, facts, and details to
accentuate main ideas or themes; use appropriate eye
contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.
5. Make strategic use of digital media and visual
displays of data to express information and enhance
understanding of presentations.
6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and
communicative tasks, demonstrating command of
formal English when indicated or appropriate.
5. Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, images,
music, sound) and visual displays in presentations to
clarify information.
6.Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks,
demonstrating command of formal English when indicated
or appropriate.
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Anchor Standards for Language
Sixth Grade CORE Standards
Conventions of Standard English
Conventions of Standard English
6th Grade Language Arts Standards: Language
Page 4 of 11
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of
standard English grammar and usage when writing or
speaking.
2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of
standard English capitalization, punctuation, and
spelling when writing.
1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard
English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
Ensure that pronouns are in the proper case (subjective,
objective, possessive).
Use intensive pronouns (e.g., myself, ourselves).
Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in pronoun
number and person.*
Recognize and correct vague pronouns (i.e., ones with
unclear or ambiguous antecedents).*
Recognize variations from standard English in their own
and others' writing and speaking, and identify and use
strategies to improve expression in conventional
language.*
2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard
English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when
writing.
Use punctuation (commas, parentheses, dashes) to set off
nonrestrictive/parenthetical elements.*
Spell correctly.
Knowledge of Language
3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how
language functions in different contexts, to make
effective choices for meaning or style, and to
comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
Knowledge of Language
3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when
writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
Vary sentence patterns for meaning, reader/listener
interest, and style.*
Maintain consistency in style and tone.*
Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and
multiple-meaning words and phrases by using
context clues, analyzing meaningful word parts, and
consulting general and specialized reference
materials, as appropriate.
Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and
multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 6
reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of
strategies.
Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or
paragraph; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as
a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and
roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., audience,
auditory, audible).
Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries,
thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the
pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise
meaning or its part of speech.
Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a
word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in
context or in a dictionary).
5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word
relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
Interpret figures of speech (e.g., personification) in
context.
Use the relationship between particular words (e.g.,
cause/effect, part/whole, item/category) to better
understand each of the words.
Distinguish among the connotations (associations) of
words with similar denotations (definitions) (e.g., stingy,
scrimping, economical, unwasteful, thrifty)
6. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general
academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather
vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase
important to comprehension or expression.
5. Demonstrate understanding of word relationships
and nuances in word meanings.
6. Acquire and use accurately a range of general
academic and domain-specific words and phrases
sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening
at the college and career readiness level;
demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary
knowledge when encountering an unknown term
important to comprehension or expression.
Draft As Of March, 2012
Identify types of nouns, verbs, adverbs,
adjectives and pronouns, Conjugate
verb tenses, Identify in writing different
verb tenses, Create writing portfolio,
Parts of Speech Folders, El2 Grammar Symbols, Command
Cards for Grammar Symbols, Logical Analysis, Big Red Verb
Box, Transitive/Intransitive Doorway, Voices of Verbs,
Grammar Filling Boxes
Daily Oral Language, Word Study/Grammar Study Cards,
Albanesi Language Command Cards,
Sentence by purpose and sentence by structure, ETC Press
Sentence Analysis command cards, Verb Tense Charts,
Albanesi Language Command Cards, Neinhaus Grammar Box
Command Cards, Verbals folders (participles, infinitives and
gerunds), Writing Portfolios
Vocabulary Workshop (Sadlier-Oxford), Spellwell, Word Study
Drawers, Grammar Boxes, Literature/Novel Studies, Basal
Literature Series of choice (Junior Great Books, McGrawMcMillan, Daybook, SRA, Houghton-Miflin), Novel-Ties, Content
Area Research, Nomenclature Cards (Vital Functions of
Animals, etc)
Vocabulary Workshop (Sadlier-Oxford), Spellwell, Word Study
Drawers, Grammar Boxes, Literature/Novel Studies, Basal
Literature Series of choice (Junior Great Books, McGrawMcMillan, Daybook, SRA, Houghton-Miflin), Novel-Ties, Content
Area Research, Nomenclature Cards (Vital Functions of
Animals, etc), Reading various genres and formats
(newspapers, magazines, handouts, charts, historical fiction vs
fantasy fiction)
Vocabulary Workshop (Sadlier-Oxford), Spellwell, Word Study
Drawers, Grammar Boxes, Literature/Novel Studies, Basal
Literature Series of choice (Junior Great Books, McGrawMcMillan, Daybook, SRA, Houghton-Miflin), Novel-Ties, Content
Area Research, Nomenclature Cards (Vital Functions of
Animals, etc), Reading various genres and formats
(newspapers, magazines, handouts, charts, historical fiction vs
fantasy fiction)
Page 5 of 11
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Sixth Grade CORE Standards: Mathematics
Draft As Of March, 2012
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
6th Grade Mathematics Standards: Ratios and
Proportional Relationships
Understand ratio concepts and use ratio reasoning to
solve problems
1. Understand the concept of a ratio and use ratio
language to describe a ratio relationship between two
quantities. For example, “The ratio of wings to beaks in the
bird house at the zoo was 2:1, because for every 2 wings
there was 1 beak.” “For every vote candidate A received,
candidate C received nearly three votes.”
2. Understand the concept of a unit rate a/b associated
with a ratio a:b with b ≠ 0, and use rate language in the
context of a ratio relationship. For example, “This recipe
has a ratio of 3 cups of flour to 4 cups of sugar, so there is
3/4 cup of flour for each cup of sugar.” “We paid $75 for 15
hamburgers, which is a rate of $5 per hamburger.”
3. Use ratio and rate reasoning to solve real-world and
mathematical problems, e.g., by reasoning about tables of
equivalent ratios, tape diagrams, double number line
diagrams, or equations.
Make tables of equivalent ratios relating quantities with
whole-number measurements, find missing values in the
tables, and plot the pairs of values on the coordinate
plane. Use tables to compare ratios.
Solve unit rate problems including those involving unit
pricing and constant speed. For example, if it took 7 hours
to mow 4 lawns, then at that rate, how many lawns could
be mowed in 35 hours? At what rate were lawns being
mowed?
Find a percent of a quantity as a rate per 100 (e.g., 30% of a
quantity means 30/100 times the quantity); solve problems
involving finding the whole, given a part and the percent.
Use ratio reasoning to convert measurement units;
manipulate and transform units appropriately when
multiplying or dividing quantities.
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Sixth Grade CORE Standards: Mathematics
Ratios and Proportions Board, Command Cards
Centismal Protractor, Albanesi Math Command Cards, ETC Press
Materials
Centismal Protractor, Fraction Circles, Geometric Inset Cards, Science
Experiments, Cooking Projects, Story Problems/Extended Response,
Application within content areas/projects (physics, map studies,
economics, etc), Command Cards
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
6th Grade Mathematics Standards: The Number
System
Apply and extend previous understandings of
multiplication and divide fractions by fractions.
1. Interpret and compute quotients of fractions, and solve
word problems involving division of fractions by fractions,
e.g., by using visual fraction models and equations to
represent the problem. For example, create a story context
for (2/3) ÷ (3/4) and use a visual fraction model to show the
quotient; use the relationship between multiplication and
division to explain that (2/3) ÷ (3/4) = 8/9 because 3/4 of 8/9
is 2/3. (In general, (a/b) ÷ (c/d) = ad/bc.) How much
chocolate will each person get if 3 people share 1/2 lb of
chocolate equally? How many 3/4-cup servings are in 2/3
of a cup of yogurt? How wide is a rectangular strip of land
with length 3/4 mi and area 1/2 square mi? Compute
fluently with multi-digit numbers and find common factors
and multiples.
Fraction Circles, Fraction Operation Boards, Fraction Skittles,
Student-produced problems, Command Cards
Compute fluently with multi-digit numers and find common
factors and multiples.
2. Fluently divide multi-digit numbers using the standard
algorithm.
Test-Tube Division/Racks and Tubes, Division Boards,
Command Cards
Page 6 of 11
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March, 2012
Yellow Decimal Board, Decimal Checkerboard, Decimal
Checkerboard Squares (used to reconstruct the board and
understand relationships between decimal numbers), Albanesi
Math Command Cards, Centesimal Protractor
3. Fluently add, subtract, multiply, and divide multi-digit
decimals using the standard algorithm for each operation.
4. Find the greatest common factor of two whole numbers
less than or equal to 100 and the least common multiple of
two whole numbers less than or equal to 12. Use the
distributive property to express a sum of two whole
numbers 1–100 with a common factor as a multiple of a
sum of two whole numbers with no common factor. For
example, express 36 + 8 as 4 (9 + 2). Apply and extend
previous understandings of numbers to the system of
rational numbers.
Peg Board, 100 Board Papers, Sieve of Erathostenes, Factor
Trees, Fact Families, Command Cards
Apply and extend previous understandings of numbers to
the system of rational numbers.
5. Understand that positive and negative numbers are used
together to describe quantities having opposite directions
or values (e.g., temperature above/below zero, elevation
above/below sea level, credits/debits, positive/negative
electric charge); use positive and negative numbers to
represent quantities in real-world contexts, explaining the
meaning of 0 in each situation.
6. Understand a rational number as a point on the number
line. Extend number line diagrams and coordinate axes
familiar from previous grades to represent points on the
line and in the plane with negative number coordinates.
Recognize opposite signs of numbers as indicating
locations on opposite sides of 0 on the number line;
recognize that the opposite of the opposite of a number is
the number itself, e.g., –(–3) = 3, and that 0 is its own
opposite.
Understand signs of numbers in ordered pairs as
indicating locations in quadrants of the coordinate plane;
recognize that when two ordered pairs differ only by signs,
the locations of the points are related by reflections across
one or both axes.
Find and position integers and other rational numbers on a
horizontal or vertical number line diagram; find and
position pairs of integers and other rational numbers on a
coordinate plane.
7. Understand ordering and absolute value of rational
numbers.
Interpret statements of inequality as statements about the
relative position of two numbers on a number line diagram.
For example, interpret –3 > –7 as a statement that –3 is
located to the right of –7 on a number line oriented from
left to right.
Write, interpret, and explain statements of order for
rational numbers in real-world contexts. For example, write
–3 oC > –7 oC to express the fact that –3 oC is warmer than
–7 oC.
Understand the absolute value of a rational number as its
distance from 0 on the number line; interpret absolute
value as magnitude for a positive or negative quantity in a
real-world situation. For example, for an account balance
of –30 dollars, write |–30| = 30 to describe the size of the
debt in dollars.
Distinguish comparisons of absolute value from
statements about order. For example, recognize that an
account balance less than –30 dollars represents a debt
greater than 30 dollars.
Positive/Negative Snake Game, Number Lines, Thermometers,
Science Experiments and content area applications, Command
Cards
Number Lines, Negative Snake Game, Word Problems,
Command Cards,
Page 7 of 11
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March, 2012
8. Solve real-world and mathematical problems by
graphing points in all four quadrants of the coordinate
plane. Include use of coordinates and absolute value to
find distances between points with the same first
coordinate or the same second coordinate.
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Sixth Grade CORE Standards: Mathematics
Longitude and Latitude activities,
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
6th Grade Mathematics Standards: Expressions
and Equations
Apply and extend previous understandings of arithmetic to
algebraic expressions.
1. Write and evaluate numerical expressions involving
whole-number exponents
2. Write, read, and evaluate expressions in which letters
stand for numbers.
Write expressions that record operations with numbers
and with letters standing for numbers. For example,
express the calculation “Subtract y from 5” as 5 – y.
Identify parts of an expression using mathematical terms
(sum, term, product, factor, quotient, coefficient); view one
or more parts of an expression as a single entity. For
example, describe the expression 2 (8 + 7) as a product of
two factors; view (8 + 7) as both a single entity and a sum
of two terms.
Evaluate expressions at specific values of their variables.
Include expressions that arise from formulas used in realworld problems. Perform arithmetic operations, including
those involving whole-number exponents, in the
conventional order when there are no parentheses to
specify a particular order (Order of Operations). For
example, use the formulas V = s3 and A = 6 s2 to find the
volume and surface area of a cube with sides of length s =
1/2.
3. Apply the properties of operations to generate
equivalent expressions. For example, apply the distributive
property to the expression 3 (2 + x) to produce the
equivalent expression 6 + 3x; apply the distributive
property to the expression 24x + 18y to produce the
equivalent expression 6 (4x + 3y); apply properties of
operations to y + y + y to produce the equivalent
expression 3y.
4. Identify when two expressions are equivalent (i.e., when
the two expressions name the same number regardless of
which value is substituted into them). For example, the
expressions y + y + y and 3y are equivalent because they
name the same number regardless of which number y
stands for. Reason about and solve one-variable equations
and inequalities.
Bead Chains, Base work (eg Base 2, Base 9),
Binomial/Trinomial Cubes, Command Cards
Fact Families, Algebraic Decanomial, Story of the Kings, Cubing
Materials, Colored Counting Bars, Binomial Squares and
Trinomial Squares, Bead Cabinet, Albanesi Math Command
Cards, Bead Bars
Fact Families, Algebraic Decanomial, Story of the Kings, Cubing
Materials, Colored Counting Bars, Binomial Squares and
Trinomial Squares, Bead Cabinet, Albanesi Math Command
Cards, Bead Bars
Constructive Triangles, Geometric Insets Cabinet, Pattern
Blocks, Command Cards, Bead Bars, Golden Beads,
Decanomial,
Reason about and solve one-variable equations and
inequalities.
5. Understand solving an equation or inequality as a
process of answering a question: which values from a
specified set, if any, make the equation or inequality true?
Use substitution to determine whether a given number in a
specified set makes an equation or inequality true.
6. Use variables to represent numbers and write
expressions when solving a real-world or mathematical
problem; understand that a variable can represent an
unknown number, or, depending on the purpose at hand,
any number in a specified set.
7. Solve real-world and mathematical problems by writing
and solving equations of the form x + p = q and px = q for
cases in which p, q and x are all nonnegative rational
numbers.
Command Cards, Textbook supplements, Practical Application
(physics, science experiments)
Command Cards, Textbook supplements, Practical Application
(physics, science experiments)
Command Cards, Textbook supplements, Practical Application
(physics, science experiments)
Page 8 of 11
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March, 2012
8. Write an inequality of the form x > c or x < c to represent
a constraint or condition in a real-world or mathematical
problem. Recognize that inequalities of the form x > c or x
< c have infinitely many solutions; represent solutions of
such inequalities on number line diagrams.
Command Cards, Textbook supplements, Practical Application
(physics, science experiments), Square Root Relationships
Represent and analyze quantitative relationships between
dependent and independent variables.
9. Use variables to represent two quantities in a real-world
problem that change in relationship to one another; write
an equation to express one quantity, thought of as the
dependent variable, in terms of the other quantity, thought
of as the independent variable. Analyze the relationship
between the dependent and independent variables using
graphs and tables, and relate these to the equation. For
example, in a problem involving motion at constant speed,
list and graph ordered pairs of distances and times, and
write the equation d = 65t to represent the relationship
between distance and time.
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Sixth Grade CORE Standards: Mathematics
Command Cards, Textbook supplements, Practical Application
(physics, science experiments)
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
6th Grade Mathematics Standards: Geometry
Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving
area, surface area, and volume.
1. Find the area of right triangles, other triangles, special
quadrilaterals, and polygons by composing into rectangles
or decomposing into triangles and other shapes; apply
these techniques in the context of solving real-world and
mathematical problems.
2. Find the volume of a right rectangular prism with
fractional edge lengths by packing it with unit cubes of the
appropriate unit fraction edge lengths, and show that the
volume is the same as would be found by multiplying the
edge lengths of the prism. Apply the formulas V = l w h and
V = b h to find volumes of right rectangular prisms with
fractional edge lengths in the context of solving real-world
and mathematical problems.
3. Draw polygons in the coordinate plane given
coordinates for the vertices; use coordinates to find the
length of a side joining points with the same first
coordinate or the same second coordinate. Apply these
techniques in the context of solving real-world and
mathematical problems.
4. Represent three-dimensional figures using nets made up
of rectangles and triangles, and use the nets to find the
surface area of these figures. Apply these techniques in
the context of solving real-world and mathematical
problems.
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Sixth Grade CORE Standards: Mathematics
Geometric Insets, Yellow Area Materials, Stick Box, Geometry
Command Cards, Stand for Height (Neinhaus)
Volume Cubes, Volume Containers, Five Yellow Prisms,
Command Cards,
Platonic Solids, Found Materials Surface area, Geometric
Solids, Volume Boxes
Learning Activity
Montessori Materials
6th Grade Mathematics Standards: Statistics and
Probability
Develop understanding of statistical variability
1. Recognize a statistical question as one that anticipates
variability in the data related to the question and accounts
for it in the answers. For example, “How old am I?” is not a
statistical question, but “How old are the students in my
school?” is a statistical question because one anticipates
variability in students’ ages.
2. Understand that a set of data collected to answer a
statistical question has a distribution which can be
described by its center, spread, and overall shape.
Studies of Science and Geography, Surveys, Research of
Content Areas, Charts and Graphs,
Teacher Made Materials,
Page 9 of 11
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March, 2012
3.Recognize that a measure of center for a numerical data
set summarizes all of its values with a single number, while
a measure of variation describes how its values vary with a
single number.
Teacher Made Materials,
Summarize and describe distributions
4. Display numerical data in plots on a number line,
including dot plots, histograms, and box plots
5. Summarize numerical data sets in relation to their
context, such as by:
Reporting the number of observations.
Describing the nature of the attribute under investigation,
including how it was measured and its units of
measurement.
Giving quantitative measures of center (median and/or
mean) and variability (interquartile range and/or mean
absolute deviation), as well as describing any overall
pattern and any striking deviations from the overall pattern
with reference to the context in which the data were
gathered.
Relating the choice of measures of center and variability to
the shape of the data distribution and the context in which
the data were gathered.
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Supplemental Textbooks/worksheets, command cards
Experiments, research, geometric cabinet, command cards,
nomenclature cards and research, cultural studies.
Sixth Grade CORE Standards: History/Social
Learning Activity
Studies
Standards for History/Social Studies for Grades
6-8
Key Ideas and Details
1. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary
and secondary sources.
2. Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or
secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source
distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
3. Identify key steps in a text's description of a process related
to history/social studies (e.g., how a bill becomes law, how
interest rates are raised or lowered).
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Research
Research, interviews, written reports
time-lines , nomenclature cards, civilizations studies,
imaginary island, Research, economy studies related to the
continent studies.
Craft and Structure
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are
used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related
to history/social studies.
5. Describe how a text presents information (e.g., sequentially,
comparatively, causally).
6. Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author’s point of view
or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of
particular facts).
Literature studies / discussions of research topics, current
event studies.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
7. Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs,
photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print
and digital texts..
8. Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a
text.
9. Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary
source on the same topic.
Literature studies / discussions of research topics, current
event studies.
Literature studies / discussions of research topics, current
event studies.
Literature studies / discussions of research topics, current
event studies.
Nomenclature cards, command cards, timelines, research,
Time-lines, research, nomenclature cards,
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
10. By the end of grade 8, read and comprehend history/social
studies texts in the grades 6–8 text complexity band
independently and proficiently.
College & Career Readiness Anchor
Standards
Sixth Grade CORE Standards: Science &
Technical Subjects
Learning Activity
Page 10 of 11
Montessori Materials
Aim of Materials (Direct and
Indirect)
Common Core State Standards and Montessori Correlation
Draft As Of March, 2012
Standards for History/Social Studies for Grades 68
Key Ideas and Details
1. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science
and technical texts.
2. Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; provide
an accurate summary of the text distinct from prior knowledge
or opinions.
3. Follow precisely a multistep procedure when carrying out
experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical
tasks.
Research, reading
Writing summaries
Experiments, using the scientific method.
Craft and Structure
4. Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other
domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a
specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6–8
texts and topics.
5. Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text,
including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to
an understanding of the topic.
6. Analyze the author’s purpose in providing an explanation,
describing a procedure, or discussing an experiment in a text.
Experiments, time-lines, nomenclature cards, geography
legends in maps, map keys, science cycles, advanced land
forms.
Editing writing, writers workshop, writing traits lessons,
literature studies. research topics, Sentence analysis and
graphic organizers.
Editing writing, writers workshop, writing traits lessons,
literature studies. research topics, Sentence analysis and
graphic organizers the scientific method, Experiments.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
7. Integrate quantitative or technical information expressed in
words in a text with a version of that information expressed
visually (e.g., in a flowchart, diagram, model, graph, or table).
8 .Distinguish among facts, reasoned judgment based on
research findings, and speculation in a text.
9. Compare and contrast the information gained from
experiments, simulations, video, or multimedia sources with
that gained from reading a text on the same topic.
Research, experiments, oral and written presentations, time
lines,
Research, experiments, oral and written presentations, time
lines, literature studies.
Research, experiments, oral and written presentations, time
lines, Venn diagram, compare and contrast, debates.
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
10. By the end of grade 8, read and comprehend
science/technical texts in the grades 6–8 text complexity band
independently and proficiently.
Read and have practical application through experiments and
or simulations, creation of projects or experiments.
Page 11 of 11
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