Asbestos management Program

Asbestos management Program
Asbestos Management Program
For the Properties under the
Control and Administration of
Pembina Trails School Division
Winnipeg, Manitoba
Prepared for:
Pembina Trails School Division
181 Henlow Bay
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3Y 1M7
Attention: Lorie Carriere
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
Copyright © 2011 by Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Revisions History
REVISION
DATE
REVISION DESCRIPTION
REVISED
BY:
APPROVED
BY:
54 TERRACON PLACE, WINNIPEG, MANITOBA R2J 4G7 PHONE: (204) 452-0983 FAX: (204) 453-0788
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY MANAGEMENT SERVICES FROM OFFICES ACROSS CANADA
www.pinchin.com • 1-888-767-3330
Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
TABLE OF CONTENTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS...................................................................................................................i
LIST OF APPENDICES ....................................................................................................................iii
GENERAL INFORMATION
Introduction & Objectives......................................................................................................iv
Document Summary & Scope ...............................................................................................vi
Definitions..............................................................................................................................vii
1.0 BACKGROUND ON ASBESTOS .......................................................................................1-1 1.1 Occurrence and Types of Asbestos .............................................................................1-1 1.2 Health Effects of Asbestos ..........................................................................................1-1 1.3 Uses of Asbestos in Buildings .....................................................................................1-2 1.4 Hazard of Asbestos in Buildings .................................................................................1-5 2.0 ELEMENTS OF THE ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ....................................2-1 3.0 RESPONSIBILITIES UNDER THE AMP ...........................................................................3-1 3.1 Responsibilities Assigned to Management..................................................................3-1 3.2 Responsibilities Assigned to the APO.........................................................................3-1 3.3 Responsibilities Assigned to the APO designate ........................................................3-4 3.4 Responsibilities Assigned to Contractors ....................................................................3-5 3.5 Employee Responsibilities ..........................................................................................3-6 3.6 Medical Examinations & Surveillance ........................................................................3-7 4.0 REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS.....................................................................................4-1 5.0 ASBESTOS ASSESSMENT & MONITORING ..................................................................5-1 5.1 Survey Methodology ...................................................................................................5-1 5.2 Bulk Sample Collection & Analysis ...........................................................................5-1 5.3 Assessment of Materials during the Survey ................................................................5-1 5.4 Documentation and Notification of Results ................................................................5-2 5.5 Visual Re-evaluation & Assessment ...........................................................................5-2 5.6 Air Monitoring ............................................................................................................5-3 6.0 LOCATION OF ASBESTOS-CONTAINING MATERIALS..............................................6-1 7.0 CLASSIFICATION OF WORK ............................................................................................7-1 7.1 Emergency Procedures in the Event of a Suspect Asbestos Spill ...............................7-1 7.2 Procedures for Emergency Work ................................................................................7-1 7.3 Scheduled Asbestos Work ...........................................................................................7-2 8.0 WORK PRACTICES & PROCEDURES..............................................................................8-1 8.1 General Procedures for Type 1, Type 2 & Glove Bag Work ......................................8-1 8.2 Procedures for Type 1 or Low Risk Work ..................................................................8-1 8.3 Procedures for Type 2 or Moderate Risk Work ..........................................................8-2 8.4 Procedures for Type 3 or High Risk Work..................................................................8-2 8.5 Procedures for Glove Bag Work .................................................................................8-3 © 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
9.0 INSPECTION & AIR MONITORING .................................................................................9-1 9.1 Requirements for Project Inspection ...........................................................................9-1 9.2 Requirements for Air Monitoring................................................................................9-2 10.0 WORKER TRAINING ..........................................................................................................10-1 10.1 Training Requirements & Outline ...............................................................................10-1 10.2 Documentation of Training and Refresher Courses ....................................................10-2 10.3 Equipment Requirements ............................................................................................10-2 10.4 Work Performed by Outside Contractors ....................................................................10-2 © 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Pembina Trails School Division
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APPENDICES
Appendix A
Background Information on Asbestos in Building Materials and Health Hazards
Appendix B
Evaluation the Condition & Access of ACM
Appendix C
Action Matrix for the Control of ACM
Appendix D
Asbestos Survey Report and Update Reports
Appendix E
Bulk Sample Results
Appendix F
Sample Collection Procedures
Appendix G
Respirator Fitting, Care & Inspection
Appendix H
Worker Training Certificate & Acknowledgement
Appendix I
Contractor’s Notification & Acknowledgement
Appendix J
List of Pre-qualified Asbestos Contractors
Appendix K
Emergency Reaction in the Event of Suspected Asbestos Spill
Appendix L
Procedures – Emergency Work
Appendix M General Procedures for Type 1, 2 and Glove Bag Work
Appendix N
Procedures for Type 2 or Moderate Risk Work
Appendix O
Procedures for the Removal of Mechanical Insulation by Glove Bag
Appendix P
Asbestos Work Report
Appendix Q
Asbestos Waste Transportation Manifest
Appendix R
Asbestos Work Permit
Appendix S
Milestone Requisition
Appendix T
On-site Labelling/Stencilling of Asbestos
Appendix U
Equipment List for In-house Asbestos Work
Appendix V
Release for Re-occupancy
Appendix W Consultant Notification and Acknowledgement
Appendix X
Employee Notification and Acknowledgement
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Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
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INTRODUCTION & OBJECTIVES
Introduction
When asbestos has been identified as being present in a building, it is often not technically
feasible, necessary or cost effective to remove all of it. In fact, in the absence of any renovation,
maintenance or demolition work that has the potential for disrupting any asbestos, most owners
elect to manage their asbestos in-place.
In such instances, it is essential that management develops a program whereby the essential
resources, work procedures and training are implemented, and in such a fashion, as to effect the
control of all activities that may lead to the uncontrolled disturbance of asbestos.
With this in mind, Pembina Trails School Division (PTSD) commissioned Pinchin
Environmental Ltd. (Pinchin) to develop the following Asbestos Management Program (AMP)
document so as to ensure a safe workplace is maintained for all employees, the visiting public,
maintenance or renovation workers.
Program Objectives
In order that a uniformed approach to the control and management of asbestos-containing
materials (ACMs) throughout all PTSD owned or occupied facilities may be developed, the
following program objectives have been established:
1. The program shall clearly establish management’s intent to control any asbestos which remain
in the building and shall be written so as to satisfy the requirements for the creation of a
“Prevention Plan” as required by Manitoba Regulation 217/2006;
2. The program shall provide the criteria in which all ACMs are to be identified and evaluated
within the building and shall establish the means in which this information is to be passed on to
all affected parties (i.e., management, planning staff, maintenance or custodial workers, outside
contractors or building tenants, etc.);
3. The program shall establish the need and mannerism in which the necessary training and
education of all staff, maintenance or custodial workers or outside contractors shall be handled;
4. The program shall contain the necessary work practices and procedures to affect low to
moderate risk asbestos work (i.e., Type 1, 2 or Glove Bag Removal) in a safe manner; and
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Pembina Trails School Division
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Pinchin File: 59807
5. Initiate the implementation of an Operations & Maintenance Program to address the following:
•
Repair and/or removal (as required) of any ACM identified as being in disrepair;
•
Maintain all remaining ACM in GOOD condition;
•
Minimize future fibre releases by controlling activities that may disturb asbestos; and
•
Inspection and monitoring of all scheduled asbestos disturbances.
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Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
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DOCUMENT SUMMARY & SCOPE
The following document provides information, procedures and work practices relevant to the
management and control of ACMs known to be present throughout PTSD owned or occupied
facilities. It has been commissioned in part, to fulfil PTSD’s obligations under Manitoba
Regulation 217/2006 and to provide the means from which future exposures to asbestos may be
prevented through the combined efforts of all parties (i.e., management, planning staff,
maintenance or custodial workers, outside contractors, etc.).
The AMP document is designed to be a dynamic document, one that will require occasional
updating as conditions within the building and/or regulatory requirement change. It takes into
consideration all existing regulations and/or guidelines pursuant to the removal or management
of asbestos in effect as of July 29, 2011. It further takes into consideration any PTSD policy or
practices in effect as of July 29, 2011.
The document includes work procedures for the completion of Type 1, 2 or Glove Bag remedial
work (Low to Moderate Risk) as performed by PTSD’s own employees and/or an outside
contractor. With this in mind, the document has been prepared to allow individual sections
appropriate to certain work to be separated and provided to the worker or contractor performing
the work.
This document excludes any information or procedures related to Type 3 (major or large scale
work) asbestos removal whether brought about by deterioration or by planned renovations or
capital maintenance work. Such projects are very site specific and will require documentation
prepared for the specific scope, phasing and operational requirements of each project.
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Pembina Trails School Division
July 29, 2011
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DEFINITIONS
AMP: Asbestos Management Program.
APO Designate: Assistant to the APO.
APO: Asbestos Program Officer.
Airlock: Temporary chamber constructed at the perimeter of an Asbestos Work Area to permits
the ingress or egress of workers, materials and equipment without permitting air movement
through to non-contaminated areas.
Amended Water: Water with wetting agent added for the purpose of reducing surface tension to
allow thorough wetting of ACM.
Asbestos: From the Greek adjective meaning inextinguishable – is the general name given to a
fibrous form of mineral silicates belonging to the serpentine or amphibole groups of rockforming minerals including, but not limited to chrysotile, amosite, crocidolite, tremolite,
anthophyllite and actinolite.
Asbestos Abatement: The process of reducing or eliminating the presence or exposure to
asbestos through an act of its removal, encapsulation, repair or enclosure.
Asbestos-containing Materials (ACMs): Any material or substance found to contain 0.1% or
greater content of asbestos as determined by Polarized Light Microscopy (PLM) following codes
or method specified by authority having jurisdiction.
Asbestosis: A chronic, restrictive lung disease due to the inhalation of asbestos fibres.
Asbestos Work Area: Any area where work takes place which will, or may, disturb asbestos.
Curtained Doorway: Doorway consisting of two overlapping flaps of rip-proof polyethylene
arranged to permit ingress and egress from one room to another while permitting minimal air
movement between rooms.
Decontaminate: To remove all ACMs using approved removal methods, leaving the work area
clean and free of visible and/or airborne asbestos fibres.
DOP Test: A testing method used to determine the integrity of the Negative Pressure unit or
vacuum using dioctyl phthalate (DOP) HEPA filter leak test.
Encapsulate: Method of controlling the release of asbestos fibres by application of a liquid
sealant over the ACM.
Enclosure: An airtight, impermeable, permanent barrier around ACM installed to reduce or
prevent the release of asbestos fibres into the air.
Fitting: Individual segments or pieces of a mechanical service line which may include but is not
limited to the hangers, tees, elbows, joints, valves, unions, etc.
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DEFINITIONS (CONT’D)
Friable Material: Any material that when dry can be crumbled, pulverized or powdered by hand
or moderate pressure. Includes materials that are already in a state of being crumbled, pulverized
or powdered.
Glove Bag: Prefabricated bag which provides a completely sealed envelope surrounding a given
section of piping to permit the removal of asbestos-containing insulation from within the bag
while maintaining the integrity of the bag and preventing the spread of airborne asbestos fibres.
HEPA Filter: High Efficiency Particulate Absolute air filters capable of collecting and retaining
fibres greater than 0.3 microns in length at 99.97% efficiency. Utilized for vacuum equipment,
respiratory protection, and localized air exhaust systems.
Mesothelioma: A rare but malignant form of cancer affecting the lining of the chest or
abdominal cavity.
NIOSH: “National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health”.
Negative Pressure: A reduced pressure within the Asbestos Work Area (>0.04 in.) established
by extracting air directly from Asbestos Work Area and discharging it to the exterior of building.
Volume of air extracted must be sufficient to ensure that at all times, air movement flows into the
Asbestos Work Area as determined by visual or smoke testing to the satisfaction of the Asbestos
Programs Officer (APO).
Non-friable Material: Any material that when dry cannot be crumbled, pulverized or powdered
by hand or moderate pressure. Including but not limited to the following ACM; vinyl tiles,
asbestos cement tiles, gaskets, seals, select packings, friction products, drywall joint compound
and asbestos cement products. Exclude from the above categorization any material that is or
may become crumbled, pulverized or powdered by handling as described herein.
Operations and Maintenance Program (O & M Program): A program of work practices and
procedures implemented to maintain known ACMs in GOOD condition, ensure the clean-up of
asbestos fibres previously released and prevent further release by minimizing and controlling the
disturbance of any asbestos materials subject to disturbance or damage.
Pipewrap: Any thermal or vapour covering present on straight runs and/or fittings of mechanical
services. Include with the above, metal or other rigid jacketing associated straps, ties, fastenings,
etc.
Sealant (Encapsulant): A liquid which can be applied over ACM to control the release of
asbestos fibres.
Transite: A cementitious asbestos-containing board that is normally flat or corrugated.
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1.0
BACKGROUND ON ASBESTOS
1.1
Occurrence and Types of Asbestos
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
Asbestos is not one mineral but a generic term used to describe a family of naturally occurring
fibrous hydrated silicates. These are divided on the basis of mineralogical features into two
groups; serpentines and amphiboles. The important property of asbestos as compared to nonasbestiform varieties of silicates is the presence of mineralogical long, thin fibres that can be
easily separated. According to some definitions, there are as many as thirty varieties of asbestos,
but only six are of commercial importance. Chrysotile, which is by far the most abundant, is the
only type that belongs to the serpentine group. Crocidolite and amosite, the two other most
commonly used fibres, together with anthophyllite, tremolite, and actinolite which all belong to
the amphibole group. The distinction between asbestos types is important due to the different
degrees of severity of asbestos-related disease with different asbestos types. Of the three
commercially important types (chrysotile, amosite and crocidolite), chrysotile is considered the
least hazardous and crocidolite the most hazardous. In general, Canadian regulations reflect this
variation of health effects.
1.2
Health Effects of Asbestos
For many years asbestos has been recognized as a health hazard for workers employed in
asbestos production, processing and use. Several serious, debilitating diseases that often end in
death have been linked to the inhalation of fine asbestos fibres. It is not clear how asbestos
fibres cause disease after they enter the lung. For each disease there is a period of latency,
usually more than ten years, between first exposure to asbestos and the appearance of the
disease. Each of the more common diseases linked to asbestos exposure are described below.
Asbestosis: Asbestosis is characterized by a fibrosis (scarring) of the lung tissue, which makes
breathing difficult. The most prominent symptom is breathlessness. Detection of asbestosis is
possible by X-ray examination and lung function testing. However, the disease is irreversible
and will continue to progress even after exposure is stopped. Rarely a cause of death itself,
asbestosis results in an appreciable reduction in life expectancy due to deaths from related
illnesses. Asbestosis will develop only with chronic exposure to high levels of airborne asbestos.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Pembina Trails School Division
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
Mesothelioma: This is a rare cancer arising from the cells of the pleura (lining of the chest
cavity and lungs) and the peritoneum (lining of the abdominal cavity). The development of
mesothelioma is characterized by a long latency period, usually at least 15 years and sometimes
more than 40. There is no effective treatment for mesothelioma. Large proportions of
mesothelioma patients die within a year of diagnosis; few survive longer than five years.
Although asbestos was once thought to be responsible for all mesothelioma, other causes have
now been identified. Still, the chance of getting mesothelioma in the absence of asbestos
exposure is considered to be extremely remote.
Lung Cancer: Unlike asbestosis and mesothelioma, lung cancer is not associated only with
asbestos exposure. Furthermore, there is no basic difference between lung cancer caused by
asbestos and that due to other causes. In general, the risk of getting lung cancer increases with
the extent of asbestos exposure, in terms of both intensity and duration. This risk is also greatly
enhanced by smoking; most asbestos workers who develop lung cancer are smokers.
Other Asbestos-related Cancers: The relationship between asbestos exposure and asbestosis,
mesothelioma and lung cancer has been clearly established and is beyond argument. Several
other cancers have also been associated with the inhalation of asbestos. Although the evidence is
not as good as for the diseases discussed above, these cancers should be noted. They are:
gastrointestinal cancer affecting all sites in the gastrointestinal tract (oesophagus, stomach, colon
and rectum), and cancer of the larynx.
Other Asbestos-related Conditions: A number of less serious effects have been associated with
asbestos exposure, namely pleural plaques and asbestos warts. Pleural plaques are areas of
scarring of the pleural surfaces. In general, they are not associated with any functional
abnormality and are merely an indicator of asbestos exposure. Asbestos warts are harmless skin
growths that occur when asbestos fibres penetrate the skin.
1.3
Uses of Asbestos in Buildings
Asbestos has been widely used in buildings and some uses continue today. The uses of asbestos
are generally classed into two groups; friable and non-friable products. A friable material is a
material that when dry can be crumbled, pulverized or powdered by hand pressure. The use of
friable materials in construction is banned today but due to the widespread use of friable
materials in the past, these materials still are present in many buildings. In order to establish an
effective control program, the possible uses of asbestos must be known. These are discussed
below in the categories of non-friable and friable products.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
1.3.1
July 29, 2011
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Non-friable Asbestos Materials
Asbestos-cement (A/C) Products
The largest use of asbestos, in terms of the tonnage of fibres employed, is as a reinforcing agent
in cement products. Asbestos-reinforced cement is strong, durable, rigid and resistant to both
fire and weather. Portland cement, water and asbestos are mixed to form a slurry from which
end-products can be fabricated by a process similar to that used in paper making. Such products
can then be formed into sheets, pipes and a wide variety of other shapes. The asbestos fibre
content of A/C products is usually about 15%.
Asbestos-cement sheeting is produced and comes in four basic forms: flat sheets, corrugated
sheets, siding shingles or roofing shingles. The main use of A/C sheeting is for roofing and for
cladding the exterior of buildings.
Other uses are decorative panelling, electrical insulation and laboratory tabletops. Asbestoscement piping is used for water supply, sewage, irrigation, drainage applications, the transport of
corrosive chemical fluids, and electric and telephone conduits. Asbestos cement products are
still in use and production today.
Gaskets and Packings
The combination of long asbestos fibres and high temperature rubbers has provided some of the
best gasket materials ever produced. The asbestos, in bulk fibre, woven, or pleated form,
provides strength and temperature resistance, while the rubber acts as a binder and sealing
material. Asbestos yarns have been commonly used in the manufacture of braided and woven
packing materials. Many of these uses, particularly in sheet forms are still in production and
used today.
Coatings and Sealants
Asbestos has been used in roof coatings, cements and to a lesser extent, in sealants and caulks.
Roof coatings consist of asphalt that has been liquefied with solvents then has had asbestos fibre
added as a filler. Roof cements are similar, but they are formulated to a thicker consistency so
that they can be used to seal openings through which a liquid coating would flow. Some of these
are still in production today.
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Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
Paper Products
Asbestos paper products are used in a wide variety of applications. Among the most important
in construction are roofing felts, gaskets, pipeline wrap, millboard and electrical insulation.
Some of these applications are discussed under the headings "Insulation" and "Gaskets and
Packings". Some uses (particularly where impregnated with tar or asphalt for roofing and
pipeline wrap) are still in production today.
Plastics
Asbestos has been used as a reinforcing agent in a wide range of asbestos/polymer composites.
Applications include brake and transmission components, floor tiles, engine housings, bins and
containers, and a variety of coatings, adhesives, caulks, sealants and patching compounds. Two
areas have dominated asbestos use in plastics: phenolic moulding compounds and vinyl-asbestos
tile. Few of these products remain in production today.
Friction Materials
Asbestos has been used in the manufacture of brake and clutch linings and pads. The asbestos
fibres may be embedded in a phenolic resin with various mixtures of fillers or a woven asbestos
cloth may be impregnated with the resin. Friction products are primarily used in vehicles but
may be used in any rotating machinery. They are still widely produced and used.
Asbestos Textiles
Asbestos textile materials are predominantly manufactured from chrysotile fibres. Two types of
yarn are produced: plain, possibly braced with organic fibres, and reinforced, which incorporates
either wire or another yarn such as nylon, cotton or polyester. Major uses for asbestos textiles
are gaskets, packings, friction materials, thermal and electrical insulation, and fire resistant
applications, (i.e. welding curtains, protective clothing, theatre curtains, hot conveyor belts and
ironing board covers). These products may be considered or become friable in use. Asbestos
textiles are no longer in widespread production.
1.3.2
Friable Asbestos Materials
These products are the main concern of the public and most asbestos management programs due
to the ease of fibre release. None of the products are still in production.
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Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
Spray or Trowel Applied Fireproofing or Sprayed Insulation
Several types of fireproofing or insulation were used in the period encompassing the mid 1930s
through to about 1974. Fibrous products were spray applied after being blown as a dry mix
through an application gun. These products may contain up to 90% asbestos and any of the three
major types (chrysotile, amosite or crocidolite). Cementitious products were trowel applied or
sprayed as a wet slurry. These were harder products which did not contain more than 25%
asbestos. Only chrysotile asbestos was used in the cementitious type materials.
Sprayed or Trowel Applied Texture or Acoustic Plasters
The use of asbestos was widespread in trowel applied or sprayed texture coats, stipple coats or
acoustic plasters commencing in the 1950s through to the late 1970s (at least as late as 1977).
These products always contained less than 25% chrysotile. Some of these products may be
considered non-friable in place and only become friable when disturbed by construction or
demolition. Other products in this group can be very soft and extremely friable.
Mechanical System Insulation
This is the most widespread use of friable asbestos in buildings. Their use dates from the late
1800s to the late 1970s. The material can have a number of appearances and asbestos contents:
•
White, brown, pink or grey block;
•
White or grey corrugated paper;
•
White, grey or brown layered paper; or
•
Grey trowel or hand-applied material (with the appearance of hard grey dry mud).
It is possible to find all asbestos types in mechanical insulation although chrysotile is
predominant and amosite the next most common.
1.4
Hazard of Asbestos in Buildings
Beginning in the late 1970s, public health authorities, the media, and the public in general,
became concerned about the health effects of asbestos materials on building occupants. It was
known that asbestos miners and factory workers and installers who handled asbestos materials
suffered a higher incidence of several respiratory diseases. These groups had been exposed to
very high levels of asbestos dust for prolonged periods.
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Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
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Pinchin File: 59807
In order to determine whether the public anxiety over the current situation of asbestos materials
“in place” in buildings was justified, the Ontario Royal Commission on Matters of Health and
Safety Arising from the Use of Asbestos in Ontario was established in 1981. This three (3) year
study considered all aspects of the asbestos problem. After considering all available data, the
Commission concluded in its final report (Chapter 9, Page 585) that:
"....The risk to occupants from asbestos in buildings is a small
fraction of the risks faced by workers exposed to asbestos under the
1 f/cc control limit for chrysotile (the current exposure limit for
industrial asbestos use in Ontario). It is less than 1/50 as great as
the risk of commuting by car to and from those buildings. In
concluding that this risk is insignificant, we conclude that the risk
does not present a public health problem. While asbestos has
caused serious health problems for workers and may present a
problem for building maintenance, renovation, construction, and
demolition workers, we conclude that it does not pose a significant
problem for the general occupants of a buildings, except in the three
situations outlined in Section D of this chapter, namely: (i) the
occupant is in the immediate vicinity of work that disturbs friable
asbestos-containing insulation; (ii) the occupant is within the range
of air circulation of work that disturbs friable asbestos-containing
insulation; or (iii) significant quantities of friable asbestoscontaining insulation have fallen onto building surfaces and are
being disturbed."
and in the overview to this section (Chapter 9, page 548):
“We will conclude that it is rarely necessary to take corrective
action in buildings containing asbestos insulation in order to protect
the general occupants of those buildings. On the other hand,
construction, demolition, renovation, maintenance, and custodial
workers in asbestos-containing buildings may be exposed to
significant fibre levels and may, during their work, cause elevated
fibre levels for nearby occupants.”
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Section 1-6
Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
The general conclusions of the Royal Commission have been supported by independent testing
by independent researchers, the Ontario Ministry of Labour, and authorities in other
jurisdictions. Air sampling has shown that the airborne asbestos levels in buildings with sprayed
asbestos are no higher than outdoor levels, unless the friable asbestos or asbestos debris is being
disturbed at the time. Airborne levels in buildings are not elevated even when the ceiling space
containing the sprayed asbestos or asbestos mechanical insulation functions as an air plenum.
The following Asbestos Management Program (AMP) document has therefore been modelled to
be in line with the conclusions of the Royal Commission and applicable provincial regulations
which have been adopted based on a review on this model.
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End of Section
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Section 1-7
Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
2.0
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
ELEMENTS OF THE ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
The maintenance of a safe work environment for all PTSD employees, the visiting public,
maintenance or renovation workers depends on the establishment of an effective management
program. Such a program shall incorporate and/or require the implementation of the measures
noted below to ensure the safe and proper control of all suspect or confirmed ACM.
1. The development of a Written Plan.
2. Provide for the Appointment of an APO whose responsibilities shall include the
implementation and enforcement of the AMP.
3. Establish Parameters for the Evaluation of all suspect or confirmed ACM.
4. Create or otherwise establish an Inventory of all suspect or confirmed ACM.
5. Establish procedures for the Notification of all workers, custodial or maintenance staff, outside
contractors, building tenants (if applicable), etc., whose work will or may result in the
disturbance of any suspect or confirmed ACM.
6. Provide policy pertaining to the on-site Identification of ACM.
7. Establish Training protocol for all PTSD employees and any other personnel (i.e., outside
contractor, maintenance or renovation workers) required to work on or near any ACM or
whose activities in the building may result in the disturbance of asbestos.
8. Establish policy pursuant to the periodic Surveillance and re-evaluation of all materials known
to contain asbestos.
9. Develop Special Work Procedures for the repair, clean-up or removal of minor amounts of
ACM during routine maintenance, minor renovations or demolition.
10. Give special consideration to the Pro-active Removal of asbestos during any renovation or
demolition work performed on or near any known or suspect ACM. Such activities are
normally performed by an outside contracting firm who specializes in asbestos work and will
require the preparation of site-specific contract documents.
11. Affect the Removal and/or Repair of any ACM which have been damaged and/or are
otherwise in disrepair.
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Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
12. Minimize Future Fibre Releases by controlling activities that may disturb asbestos and
ensuring all affected ACM is removed prior to any major renovations, maintenance or
demolition work.
13. Provide for the Scheduled Re-assessment and Updating of the AMP document itself to
ensure it remains a current and viable document.
14. Establish policy to ensure the Independent Inspection and Monitoring of all asbestos-related
disturbances (whether undertaken by PTSD’s own employees or by an outside contractor) to
ensure compliance with the requirements of the AMP document and governing authorities.
Each of the above elements is discussed at length under the following sections and/or appendices
and have been formulated so as to meet or exceed the requirements of current regulations and
guidelines specific to asbestos control and management.
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End of Section
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Section 2-2
Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
3.0
RESPONSIBILITIES UNDER THE AMP
3.1
Responsibilities Assigned to Management
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
The following tasks and/or duties shall be the responsibility of the Assistant Superintendent
Divisional Support Services:
1. Be responsible for the overall administration and maintenance of the AMP;
2. Appointment of an APO who shall be responsible for the overall administration and
maintenance of the AMP and whose duties shall include those items listed under Paragraph 3.2
below; and
3. Provide the appointed APO with the necessary technical support and resources to effectively
manage and administrate his/her duties assigned under the AMP.
3.2
Responsibilities Assigned to the APO
The following tasks and/or duties shall be the responsibility of the Safety & Health Officer:
4. Maintain documents required by the AMP including copies of any Asbestos Work Reports,
permits, correspondence with regulatory agencies, Improvement Orders, survey updates,
worker training certificates, asbestos waste transportation manifests, site inspection reports,
etc.;
5. Arrange for copies of the completed Asbestos Inventory and Assessment Report to be held on
file with or at the following persons/locations:
•
181 Henlow Bay – 2nd Floor Common Area; and
•
The Custodian of each School.
6. Evaluate on an annual basis or more frequently as the need may arise, and in consultation with
management, the need to hold refresher training for any recently employed workers or to
individual workers engaged in active asbestos work on a more regular basis;
7. Respond to any report of asbestos debris, damage or disturbance. Evaluate the condition and
provide or initiate the necessary clean-up, removal or repair as appropriate;
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Pembina Trails School Division
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
8. Evaluate the potential for asbestos disturbance in advance of any major maintenance,
renovation or construction activities planned for the property. Ensure the appropriate risk
classification is assigned to any asbestos removal (Low, Moderate or High) required and that
such work is completed safely;
9. Ensure all departmental supervisors, maintenance and custodial staff are informed of the
current location of all known ACMs and are updated as conditions change or as these materials
are removed;
10. Notify all outside contractors or service personnel (i.e., plumbers, custodial or maintenance
firms, telephone service personnel, etc.) whose work in the building has the potential of
disturbing asbestos of the presence of asbestos and its approximate location. Refer to the form
provided for this purpose under Appendix I as attached hereto at the end of this document:
11. Provide or arrange for awareness and procedural training of all maintenance or custodial
workers and supervisory staff whose job descriptions require them to work on or near asbestos
or may have occasion to respond to a spill or damage of asbestos;
12. Ensure all ACMs present throughout the building are maintained in GOOD condition and/or
are repaired or removed as deemed appropriate;
13. Commission or otherwise undertake a self examination or review of the AMP on a bi-annual
basis so as to measure the effectiveness of the program, the need for additional training and/or
modifications to the program itself:
14. Commission and/or otherwise complete a regular review and evaluation of all remaining
ACMs on an annual basis or more frequently as circumstances warrant;
15. Label and/or otherwise identify the presence of all remaining ACMs as detailed and required
under Appendix T as attached to the end of this document;
16. Ensure all outside contractors or service personnel (i.e. plumbers, custodial or maintenance
firms, telephone service personnel, etc.) are provide with and complete a Contractor’s
Notification & Acknowledgement form as contained in Appendix I where appropriate;
17. Ensure a duly signed and executed Asbestos Work Permit is issued to and completed by all
project supervisors and outside contractors, maintenance or custodial staff prior to completing
any scheduled asbestos abatement activities;
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Pembina Trails School Division
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
18. Ensure the following agencies, individuals and/or departmental supervisors are notified in
advance of any scheduled asbestos disturbances:
(a)
Manitoba Department of Labour
Workplace Safety & Health Branch
200 – 401 York Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3C 0P8
Phone: (204) 945-3446
Fax: (204) 945-4556
(b)
Director Facilities & Operations
165 Henlow Bay
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3M 1Y7
Phone: 204-488-1767 Ext. 1292
Fax: 204-488-4291
19. Co-ordinate and/or otherwise effect the removal or repair of any ACMs which have been
damaged and/or are otherwise in disrepair;
20. Update the asbestos survey report and files to reflect ongoing asbestos abatement projects;
21. Co-ordinate and supervise all asbestos abatement activities whether undertaken internally by
PTSD’s own employees or through an outside contractor;
22. Conduct and/or otherwise allocate to an outside asbestos consulting firm (i.e., Designated
Inspection Agency) the task of providing regular site inspections and air monitoring services
during all scheduled asbestos disturbances. Such services shall be provided at a frequency to
ensure compliance with existing regulations and corporate policy as set forth under Section 9
of the AMP document;
23. Ensure the following individuals and/or departmental supervisors receive a copy of all site
inspection reports and corresponding air monitoring data as compiled in association with any
asbestos abatement activities undertaken on the premises:
(a)
Safety & Health Officer
165 Henlow Bay
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3M 1Y7
Phone: (204) 488-1767
Fax: (204) 488-8385
24. Ensure the materials and supplies as itemized under Appendix U as attached to the end of this
document are maintained on-hand ready for use during any in-house asbestos abatement work;
25. Arrange for the disposal of asbestos waste generated through asbestos abatement activities
undertaken internally by PTSD’s own employees; and
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July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
26. Conduct annual respirator fit-testing for all staff who may have occasion to make use of a
respirator during the completion of any asbestos abatement activities.
3.3
Responsibilities Assigned to the Director Facilities and Operations (APO designate)
The following tasks and/or duties shall be the responsibility of the Director Facilities &
Operations:
1. Ensure the APO is kept informed (in advance) of all maintenance, renovation, or construction
activities in sufficient time to assess their potential for asbestos disturbance;
2. Evaluate the potential for asbestos disturbance in advance of any major maintenance,
renovation or construction activities planned for the property. Ensure the appropriate risk
classification is assigned to any asbestos removal (Low, Moderate or High) required and that
such work is completed safely;
3. Co-ordinate and/or otherwise effect the removal or repair of any ACMs which have been
damaged and/or are otherwise in disrepair;
4. Co-ordinate and supervise all asbestos abatement activities whether undertaken internally by
PTSD’s own employees or through an outside contractor;
5. Engage, as required, the services of an outside asbestos consulting firm to assist in the design,
co-ordination, inspection and monitoring of all Type 3 (Large Scale or High Risk) asbestos
remedial work;
6. Engage, as required, the services of an outside asbestos consulting firm (i.e., Designated
Inspection Agency) to assist the APO in providing regular site inspection and air monitoring
services during all scheduled asbestos disturbances. Such services shall be provided at a
frequency to ensure compliance with existing regulations and corporate policy as set forth
under Section 9 of the AMP document;
7. Engage, through the normal tendering process, an outside contracting firm who specializes in
asbestos abatement work for all Type 3 (Large Scale or High Risk) asbestos removal projects.
Ensure adequate information is contained in the Tender Package to satisfy regulatory
requirements. Refer to Appendix J for a list of pre-qualified contractors;
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Section 3-4
Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
8. Brief all outside contractors or service personnel (i.e. plumbers, custodial or maintenance
firms, telephone service personnel, etc.) of the presence and approximate location of all known
ACMs if their work in the building may lead to the possible disturbance of known ACMs.
Refer to the form provided for this purpose in Appendix I as attached to the end of this
document;
9. Ensure all outside contractors or service personnel (i.e. plumbers, custodial or maintenance
firms, telephone service personnel, etc.) are provided with and complete a Contractor’s
Notification & Acknowledgement form as contained in Appendix I where appropriate; and
10. Ensure the following agencies, individuals and/or departmental supervisors are notified in
advance of any scheduled asbestos disturbances:
(c)
Manitoba Department of Labour
Workplace Safety & Health Branch
200 – 401 York Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3C 0P8
Phone: (204) 945-3446
Fax: (204) 945-4556
3.4
(d)
Safety & Health Officer
165 Henlow Bay
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3M 1Y7
Phone: 204-488-1767 Ext. 1292
Fax: 204-488-4291
Responsibilities Assigned to Contractors
The following responsibilities fall upon any contractor whose work will or may result in the
disturbance of any asbestos-containing or contaminated materials or surfaces:
1. Before commencing work, ensure all employees and supervisory staff have been informed as
to the presence and approximate location of all ACMs that may become subject to disturbance
(whether intentional or not);
2. Upon discovery of any unidentified asbestos-containing or suspect ACMs, secure the area,
suspend all activities that may disturb such materials and immediately notify the APO. Do not
proceed with work in the area until it has been determined if the material in question contains
asbestos and written authorization to proceed is obtained from the APO;
3. File with the APO, a signed and executed copy of a Contractor’s Notification &
Acknowledgement form as provided in Appendix I at the end of this document;
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Asbestos Management Program
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Pembina Trails School Division
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
4. Perform work in such a manner as to avoid the disturbance of any asbestos-containing or
contaminated surfaces or materials other than those materials intentionally contracted to
remove, repair, encapsulate or enclose;
5. Prior to proceeding with any asbestos disturbance (i.e. removal, clean-up or repair) ensure a
signed and duly executed Asbestos Work Permit as contained in Appendix R of the AMP
document is obtained from the APO;
6. Ensure all work that may disturb any asbestos-containing or contaminated surfaces is
completed in accordance with current regulatory requirements and while following prescribed
asbestos procedures as detailed under Appendix M-O as attached to the end of this document;
and
7. Provide the APO with a copy of all executed Asbestos Waste Transportation Manifests
verifying the safe and proper disposal of asbestos waste generated. Refer to the form provided
in Appendix Q at the end of this document.
3.5
Employee Responsibilities
The following responsibilities shall be assigned to all PTSD employees whose work will and/or
may result in the disturbance of any asbestos-containing or contaminated materials or surfaces:
1. Be familiar with all duties and responsibilities assigned to him/her under the terms of the AMP;
2. Be knowledgeable as to the location of all known ACMs and/or surfaces known to be
contaminated with asbestos;
3. Upon discovery of any unidentified asbestos-containing or suspect ACMs, secure the area,
suspend all activities that may disturb such materials and immediately notify the APO. Do not
proceed with work in the area until it has been determined if the material in question contains
asbestos and authorization to proceed is granted by the APO;
4. Report any damage to existing ACMs to the APO upon discovery; and
5. Execute all work in compliance with the AMP.
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Section 3-6
Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
3.6
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
Medical Examinations & Surveillance
Under existing regulation (i.e. Manitoba Regulation 100/88R), medical examinations are not a
mandatory requirement for “casual” work involving minor repair or removal (i.e. Type 1 or Type
2 Work). “Casual” being defined by the regulation as any worker or employee who is expected
to be exposed to asbestos dust for less than 100 hours/year.
Notwithstanding the above, any employee who is required to work with asbestos on a “casual”
basis may at his/her own discretion or initiative, undergo the following medical examination the
cost of which will be borne by PTSD.
Where an employee has opted to undergo a medical examination, said examination shall include
the following items along with any other test deemed appropriate by the attending physician.
Initial or Pre-placement Examination
Follow-up Examinations
•
Screening chest radiograph
•
Screening chest radiograph
•
Lung function test (LFT)
•
Lung function test (LFT)
•
Medical examination
•
Occupational exposure history
•
Occupational exposure history
•
Health questionnaire
•
Health questionnaire
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End of Section
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Section 3-7
Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
4.0
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS
PTSD has varying responsibilities assigned to them as a building owner and employer under the
following acts, regulations and guidelines:
1. Workplace Safety and Health Act, Chapter W210 of the Continuing Consolidation of the
Statutes of Manitoba.
2. Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS), Manitoba Regulation
217/2006.
3. Workplace Health Hazard Regulation, Manitoba Regulation 217/2006.
4. Fibrosis & Silicosis Regulation, Manitoba Regulation 100/88R.
5. Asbestos Operations and Maintenance Program, being a guideline as issued by the Manitoba
Department of Labour, Workplace Safety and Health Branch.
6. Guidelines for Working with Asbestos, being a guideline as issued by the Manitoba
Department of Labour, Workplace Safety and Health Branch.
7. Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992 (TDGA, 1992), S.C, 1992, c. 34 including
Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations SOR/85/77 and subsequent amendments.
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End of Section
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Section 4-1
Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
5.0
ASBESTOS ASSESSMENT & MONITORING
5.1
Survey Methodology
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
One of the fundamental components of any AMP is the establishment of a detailed and accurate
survey or inventory of all known or suspect asbestos-containing building materials. Existing
regulation further requires that such an assessment be carried out in all workplaces throughout
the province wherever the presence of asbestos has been confirmed or can reasonably be
suspected as being present given the age of the facility.
To satisfy the above obligation, the APO in consultation with management shall commission
and/or otherwise complete an initial asbestos inventory of all suspect building materials if one
has not already be compiled. Such an assessment shall incorporate the following minimum
requirements:
1. The survey shall be conducted in accordance with current regulations and guidelines;
2. The survey and subsequent report shall be performed and compiled on a room-by-room basis;
3. The survey shall check for and include an evaluation of all suspect or confirmed asbestos
building materials (both friable and non-friable) as described under Section 1.3 of the AMP
document; and
4. All materials found to contain 0.1% or greater asbestos shall be included in the investigation
and shall be identified in the report as asbestos.
5.2
Bulk Sample Collection & Analysis
To establish the presence of asbestos in any suspect building materials it is necessary to submit
for analysis a limited number of bulk samples for asbestos analysis.
Such sampling of materials shall be conducted in accordance with the procedures set forth under
Appendix F as attached to the end of this document.
5.3
Assessment of Materials during the Survey
The evaluation of all asbestos or suspect asbestos-containing materials shall be performed in
accordance with those requirements as set forth under Appendix B as provided at the end of this
document.
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Section 5-1
Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
Recommendations concerning any remedial actions deemed necessary shall be formulated in
accordance with the protocol as set forth under Appendix C as provided at the end of this
document.
5.4
Documentation and Notification of Results
Once the field survey and analysis are completed, the results (whether positive or negative) must
be reported, and in a fashion readily accessible to building maintenance or custodial staff,
supervisors or outside contractors. To obtain this objective, the report shall contain the following
information:
•
A listing of all materials found to contain or be contaminated with asbestos;
•
Copy of all bulk sample analysis or test data;
•
Plan or schedule providing the approximate location of all bulk samples collected;
•
Plan showing the approximate location of all asbestos-containing sprayed
fireproofing, thermal insulation or texture coats, ceiling tiles or flooring products;
•
An adequate description (i.e, by room number) as to the location of all asbestoscontaining mechanical insulation and any other non-friable materials detected;
•
A summary of materials requiring remedial action (i.e. repair, removal, clean-up,
etc.); and
•
A listing of all materials tested that do not contain asbestos so as to avoid future
re-testing.
Once completed, the APO shall pass on to those individuals listed under Paragraph 3.2.4 above a
copy of the final report.
5.5
Visual Re-evaluation & Assessment
The APO shall in consultation with management, commission and/or otherwise complete a
regular review and evaluation of all remaining ACMs on an annual basis or more frequently as
circumstances warrant.
Wherever practical, the re-evaluation shall be performed by the same individual or firm who
completed the initial survey to maintain as uniform an evaluation as possible.
In most instances, the re-evaluation process will not require the collection of additional bulks. It
must however, take into consideration all of the factors originally considered during the initial
survey and shall concentrate on any signs of deterioration, delimitation or disturbance.
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Section 5-2
Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
5.6
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
Air Monitoring
The technique of air monitoring is sometimes suggested to determine whether or not any
particular area poses a potential health problem. At the present time, no authority recommends
air sampling for hazard identification for a number of reasons. The usual method used, the
NIOSH PCM, does not differentiate asbestos fibres from any other type of fibre and therefore the
result is not related to the presence or absence of asbestos. Also, due to the limited resolution of
the optical microscope, the small diameter fibres which may be asbestos fibres cannot be
detected. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) does not have these drawbacks but is
relatively slow and quite expensive. In addition, although an air sample may show no fibres are
present, there may still be an undetected potential hazard lurking around the corner. That is, if a
friable product is disturbed later the airborne fibre levels may increase sharply. Therefore, air
sampling is not routinely used in assessing the potential health risk or need to take remedial
action in a building known to contain asbestos.
If building users or occupants request air sampling in a building, this may be performed to
address these concerns. Monitoring shall be performed by an independent consultant using the
TEM. Due to the limited use of air sampling in material evaluation, air monitoring by any
technique is not recommended and will not be routinely performed.
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End of Section
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Section 5-3
Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
6.0
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
LOCATION OF ASBESTOS-CONTAINING MATERIALS
The location of ACMs within each building is provided in the original Survey Report and the subsequent
Asbestos Survey Reports.
Refer to the most recent copy of the Asbestos Survey Report maintained at each building.
Note: Current survey reports will be available in digital format on the PTSD – HMIS website.
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End of Section
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Section 6-1
Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
7.0
CLASSIFICATION OF WORK
7.1
Emergency Procedures in the Event of a Suspect Asbestos Spill
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
It is possible that PTSD personnel may encounter a spill of asbestos or suspect asbestos material
(debris) from time-to-time. In such cases, it is important that the exposure to the worker(s) and
all other building occupants be minimized by isolating the material (debris) in question until it
can be determined if it contains asbestos and the appropriate clean-up is completed.
Should such an incident arise, refer to Appendix K as attached to the end of this document for
additional information and prescribed procedures.
7.2
Procedures for Emergency Work
The need to conduct asbestos removal on an emergency basis may arise from time-to-time.
Examples of such unscheduled emergency work include:
•
The clean-up of fallen or damaged asbestos-containing ceiling tiles as a result of a
broken sprinkler line, etc.;
•
The emergency repair of any mechanical service lines (piping) or vessels
currently insulated with asbestos; and
•
Entry into a ceiling space (air plenum) to complete emergency repairs in any
building which contain sprayed asbestos.
In such instances, it is not always possible to strictly adhere to Type 2 precautions given the
urgency of the situation. In such cases, the attending worker or the APO (if available) will have
to exercise prudent judgement.
Should such an episode arise, the procedures outlined in Appendix L shall be adhered to.
Principle consideration shall also be given to the protection of worker(s) performing the work
while implementing additional precautions (i.e. additional wetting of the material prior to
disturbance) so as to minimize the generation of airborne fibres.
Such emergency procedures would also prove to be acceptable in the event of a breach in
containment during any Type 2, Type 3 or Glove Bag removal work.
In order to facilitate a speedy response as possible to any such emergency, the APO shall ensure
the materials and supplies as itemized under Appendix U are maintained on-hand ready for use.
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Section 7-1
Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
7.3
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
Scheduled Asbestos Work
Excluding work undertaken on an emergency basis or in response to a spill of asbestos or suspect
asbestos materials, all asbestos-related work must only be completed at scheduled times as
approved by the APO.
Before such work can proceed, the worker, supervisor or contractor in charge of the work must
first obtain a signed and duly authorized “Asbestos Work Permit” from the APO.
The APO, upon receipt of such a request, shall review the work at hand and classify it into one of
the following categories:
•
Type 1 or Low Risk Work: Activities that represent a low risk of exposure to airborne
asbestos fibres and almost no health risk;
•
Type 2 or Moderate Risk Work: Activities that represent a moderate risk of exposure
to airborne asbestos fibres and some health risk; and
•
Type 3 or High Risk Work: Activities that present a high risk of exposure to airborne
asbestos and a corresponding higher risk of health effects if handled improperly.
In evaluating the hazard a particular task or scope of work may represent, consideration must be
given to the following two overriding factors; (a) the extent at which airborne asbestos dust will
be generated; and (b) the duration in which it will take to complete the work. Factors that affect
the level of airborne asbestos dust include the nature of the asbestos material, how the work is to
be performed and the availability of controls to limit exposure.
Consideration must also be given to the material’s friability. For example, non-friable materials,
when dry, cannot easily be crumbled, pulverized or powdered by hand or moderate pressure and
hence represent a lower risk of fibre release when disturbed. In contrast, friable asbestos
materials readily release airborne fibres when disturbed and require a heightened level of
precautions.
Once the work has been evaluated by the APO and the required work permit issued, workers
may proceed with the work while adhering to the procedures and precautions assigned to the
work.
For a more comprehensive listing of the work permissible under each of the above noted
categories, and the required work procedures and precautions, refer to Section 8.0 below.
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Section 7-2
Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
8.0
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
WORK PRACTICES & PROCEDURES
The following sections and corresponding appendices describe the minimum acceptable asbestos
work practices for work undertaken at any PTSD owned or occupied premises and are
formulated to meet or exceed current regulatory requirements.
All work shall be performed in accordance with regulations in effect at the time the work is
performed. In any case of conflict between the procedures specified herein and those set down
by regulatory authorities, the more stringent requirement shall prevail.
8.1
General Procedures for Type 1, Type 2 & Glove Bag Work
Many of the requirements and work practices set down for Type 1, Type 2 or even the removal
of mechanical pipe insulation by Glove Bag Method are similar in nature. For ease of reference,
such procedures have been summarized collectively under Appendix M and shall apply equally
to all classifications of work.
8.2
Procedures for Type 1 or Low Risk Work
The following is a list of activities that can normally be performed while adhering to Type 1
asbestos precautions as detailed in Appendix M as attached to the end of this document:
•
Handling, installation or removal of non-friable manufactured products known to
contain asbestos provided no sanding, cutting or similar destructive operations are
required. Such manufactured products include such items as vinyl composite
floor tiles, gaskets, seals, asbestos-cement panels, siding and piping;
•
Working in close proximity to friable ACMs (excluding jacketed mechanical
insulation rated as being in GOOD condition) provided that such materials are not
actively being disturbed;
•
Using a mechanical or electrical power tool, fitted with a HEPA filtered dust
collection shroud to cut, shape, drill or grind manufactured products containing
asbestos;
•
Using hand tools to cut, shape, drill, grind or remove manufactured products
known to containing asbestos;
•
Wearing or using protective equipment or clothing made of asbestos-containing
textiles; and
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8.3
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
Procedures for Type 2 or Moderate Risk Work
The following is a list of activities that can normally be performed while adhering to Type 2
asbestos precautions as set down in Appendix N as attached to the end of this document:
8.4
•
Entry into any ceiling space above which friable asbestos-containing sprayed
fireproofing or thermal insulation is known to be present;
•
Entry into a crawlspace, mechanical chase, service area, etc. in which there is
known to be loose and damaged ACMs or debris;
•
The clean-up, removal or encapsulation of minor amounts of friable ACMs.
Limitations as to the amount of material allowed to be removed or otherwise
disturbed while adhering to Type 2 precautions shall be at the sole discretion of
the APO or Designated Inspection Agency;
•
Removal of asbestos-containing sheet flooring;
•
Repair of asbestos-containing mechanical insulation materials; and
•
Removal of greater than ten asbestos-containing ceiling tiles. The removal of less
than ten ceiling tiles can be classified as a Type 1 operation provided the approval
of the APO or Designated Inspection Agency is obtained prior to the
commencement of such work.
Procedures for Type 3 or High Risk Work
Employees at PTSD will not undertake any Type 3 (or high risk) work. Instead, such work will
only be performed through an outside contractor who specializes in such work and has a wellestablished reputation for quality workmanship in the field of asbestos control and remediation.
As Type 3 work represents a higher risk or potential for exposure to both the workers performing
the removal as well as to all other building occupants, special consideration and planning must
be given to such projects.
To achieve this goal, an outside Asbestos Consulting firm shall be engaged (either directly or as
a sub-consultant to the Prime Consultant or Architect) to assist in the preparation of a site
specific specification to effect the safe and proper removal of all ACM subject to disturbance.
Wherever practical, these projects shall be designed to avoid the need for any PTSD employee to
enter the enclosure during the abatement process.
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Section 8-2
Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
8.5
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
Procedures for Glove Bag Work
As an alternative to completing the removal of pipewrap insulation from within a sealed Type 2
or Type 3 enclosure, workers may consider (where approved by the APO) completing such work
by “Glove Bag Method” while adhering to the precautions set forth under Appendix O.
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Section 8-3
Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
9.0
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
INSPECTION & AIR MONITORING
To ensure the highest standard of care and workmanship is maintained at all times, the APO shall
conduct and/or otherwise allocate to an outside asbestos-consulting firm (i.e. Designated
Inspection Agency) the task of providing regular site inspections and air monitoring services
during all scheduled asbestos disturbances.
The following sub-sections outline minimum standards for the completion of such site inspection
and air monitoring services at any PTSD owned or occupied premises to obtain compliance with
existing regulation and current corporate policy.
9.1
Requirements for Project Inspection
All asbestos-related disturbances at PTSD shall fall under the control and direct supervision of
the APO or appointed representative.
The APO, or appointed representative, shall review each active asbestos work site a minimum of
once per day as a means of ensuring worker compliance with the procedures and work practices
established by the AMP document.
In addition, the APO, or appointed representative, shall re-visit each work site at the following
times to provide the necessary approval before allowing the work to proceed:
•
Following the completion of clean site preparations and set-up but prior to the
commencement of any asbestos disturbance; and
•
Following the completion of all required work (i.e. clean-up, removal or repair)
but prior to the dismantlement of any perimeter seals or barricades and the recommissioning of the area.
As a means of documenting the safe and proper completion of the work, any difficulties
encountered or the issuance of any site instructions, etc., a daily site inspection report shall be
filed and maintained on record for each inspection performed. Such a report shall include any
comments or observations made on the following items:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Air Monitoring
Site Isolation
Facilities & Equipment
Negative Air
Worker Protection
6.
7.
8.
9.
Dust Suppression
Waste Handling
Clean-up
Other
Copies of the above site inspection reports shall be passed onto and maintained on file by each of
those individuals and/or departmental supervisors listed under Paragraph 3.2.18 above.
Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Copyright ©, 2011
Section 9-1
Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
9.2
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
Requirements for Air Monitoring
Traditionally, air monitoring of active asbestos abatement projects has always been done while
observing one of the following test methods:
•
Phase Contrast Microscopy (PCM);
•
Fibrous Aerosol Monitor (FAM); and
•
Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM).
As a general rule, all monitoring of asbestos disturbances at any PTSD owned or occupied
premises shall be performed using the PCM test method while adhering to the requirements set
out below and to those established under Appendix F as attached to the end of this document.
Existing regulation states that an employer must measure for airborne asbestos in all workplaces
where a risk of exposure to asbestos dust may exist. Such regulations and guidelines further
state that such a program of air monitoring shall be undertaken in such a pattern and frequency as
to:
1. Ensure the health of all workers (both inside and adjoining any asbestos work area) is
effectively protected;
2. To aid in the proper selection and use of respiratory equipment appropriate to the work at hand;
3. To ensure levels of airborne dust as measured immediately outside or surrounding any asbestos
work site does not exceed established Action Limits (i.e. 0.05 fib/mL);
4. Verify that any preventative actions or measures (i.e. work procedures) previously
implemented or observed remain effective;
5. Establish worker exposure profiles for various work functions or tasks, and that such exposure
levels remain consistent or are shown to be on the decline;
6. Ensure individual work exposures are maintained “as close to zero” as is reasonably
practicable. Manitoba Labour, Workplace Safety & Health Branch has defined “as close to
zero” as being 0.1 fib/mL of air as measured by PCM analysis;
7. Ensure any change in site conditions or in prescribed work procedures do not lead to an
increase in individual worker exposures; and
8. Ensure compliance with post-abatement clearances established by Manitoba Labour,
Workplace Safety & Health as listed under Appendix F as attached to the end of this document.
Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Copyright ©, 2011
Section 9-2
Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
To effect compliance with the above objectives, air sampling shall be performed on a daily basis
both within and immediately adjacent to each active asbestos work area.
Results obtained from all test monitoring shall be maintained on record for 30 years and must be
provided to individual workers upon request.
************************
End of Section
Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Copyright ©, 2011
Section 9-3
Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
10.0
WORKER TRAINING
10.1
Training Requirements & Outline
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
Existing regulations require that the employer provide training to all workers whose job
descriptions require them to work on or near ACMs or may have the occasion to respond to a
spill or damage of asbestos.
To satisfy this requirement, PTSD management, in consultation with the APO, shall provide or
arrange for awareness and procedural training of all maintenance and custodial workers who may
have occasion to work with or be exposed to asbestos. In addition, awareness training shall be
provided to any supervisory staff responsible for overseeing or co-ordinating such work.
In each case, the training shall be individually tailored to address the specific needs of each
group being trained and shall be based on site conditions as they exist at PTSD.
The following is a sample curriculum designed to meet the requirements set forth by governing
authorities for workers involved in Type 1, Type 2 or Glove Bag remedial work:
(40 min.)
(25 min.)
(25 min.)
(30 min.)
(40 min.)
(30 min.)
(40 min.)
(20 min.)
(160 min.)
Introduction & Use of Asbestos in the Workplace
Health Effects Associated with Asbestos Work
Regulatory Requirements
Morning Break
Introduction to the Asbestos Management Program (AMP)
Work Practices & Procedures
• Type 1, Type 2 & Glove Bag Work
• Emergency Procedures in the Event of a Suspect Asbestos Spill
• Procedures for Emergency Work
Slides of Typical Type 1, Type 2 & Glove Bag Work
Lunch Break
Respirator Use and Fit-testing
Use of Other Protective Gear & Equipment
Hands-on Training (Type 1, 2 & Glove Bag Work)
For those individual workers or supervisory staff who will not be working directly with asbestos,
but require awareness training alone, attendance during the morning section is usually sufficient.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Section 10-1
Asbestos Management Program
Properties Under the Control and Administration
Pembina Trails School Division
10.2
July 29, 2011
Pinchin File: 59807
Documentation of Training and Refresher Courses
Following attendance at the above training course, each individual employee will sign a “Worker
Training Certificate & Acknowledgement” as provided in Appendix H as attached to the end of
this document. These certificates will be maintained on record by the APO and shall be used to
record the date and level of training each individual worker received.
On an annual basis or more frequently as the need may arises, the APO in consultation with
management, shall assess the need to hold refresher training courses for any recently employed
workers or for individual workers who are engaged in active asbestos work on a more regular
basis.
10.3
Equipment Requirements
Refer to Appendix U as attached to the end of this document for a list of typical equipment
required for training purposes and/or any in-house asbestos remedial work.
10.4
Work Performed by Outside Contractors
Whenever the services of an outside contractor is to be engaged to perform work that will or is
likely to create an asbestos disturbance, the APO shall first obtain confirmation that the
Contractor’s workforce has received the appropriate asbestos training. This can be done by
obtaining a signed copy of the “Contractor’s Notification & Acknowledgement” form contained
in Appendix I as attached to the end of this document.
************************
End of Section
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Section 10-2
APPENDIX A
BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON ASBESTOS IN BUILDING
MATERIALS AND HEALTH HAZARDS
Asbestos Management Program
Background Information on Asbestos in Building
Materials and Health Hazards
Appendix A
OCCURRENCE AND TYPES OF ASBESTOS
Asbestos is not one mineral but a generic term used to describe a family of naturally occurring
fibrous hydrated silicates. These are divided on the basis of mineralogical features into two
groups; serpentines and amphiboles. The important property of asbestos as compared to nonasbestiform varieties of silicates is the presence of long, thin fibres that can be easily separated.
According to some definitions, there are as many as thirty varieties of asbestos, but only six are
of commercial importance. Chrysotile, which is by far the most abundant, is the only type that
belongs to the serpentine group. Crocidolite and Amosite, the two other most commonly used
fibres, together with Anthophyllite, Tremolite, and Actinolite belong to the amphibole group.
The distinction between asbestos types is important due to the different degrees of severity of
asbestos related disease with different asbestos types. Of the three commercially important types
(Chrysotile, Amosite and Crocidolite), Chrysotile is considered the least hazardous. In general,
Canadian regulations reflect this variation of health effects.
Chrysotile Asbestos
Amosite Asbestos
HEALTH EFFECTS OF ASBESTOS
For many years asbestos has been recognized as a health hazard for workers employed in
asbestos mining, processing and installing of asbestos products. Several serious, debilitating
diseases that often end in death have been linked to the inhalation of fine asbestos fibres. It is
not clear how asbestos fibres cause disease after they enter the lung. For each disease there is a
period of latency, usually more than ten years, between first exposure to asbestos and the
appearance of the disease. The diseases linked to asbestos exposure are described below.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 1
Asbestos Management Program
Background Information on Asbestos in Building
Materials and Health Hazards
Appendix A
Asbestosis
Asbestosis is a fibrosis (scarring) of the lung tissue, which makes breathing difficult. The most
prominent symptom is breathlessness. Detection of asbestosis is by physical examination, X-ray
examination and lung function testing. The disease is irreversible and may continue to progress
even after exposure is stopped. Rarely a cause of death itself, asbestosis results in an appreciable
reduction in life expectancy due to deaths from related illnesses. Asbestosis will develop only
with chronic (long term) exposure to high levels of airborne asbestos.
Mesothelioma
This is a rare cancer of the cells of the pleura (lining of the chest cavity and lungs) and the
peritoneum (lining of the abdominal cavity). The development of mesothelioma is characterized
by a long latency period, usually at least 15 years and sometimes more than 40. There is no
effective treatment for mesothelioma. Large proportions of mesothelioma patients die within a
year of diagnosis; few survive longer than five years. The amphibole asbestos materials are
considered more important than chrysotile in the causation of mesothelioma. Although asbestos
was once thought to be responsible for all mesothelioma, other causes have now been identified.
Still, the chance of getting mesothelioma in the absence of asbestos exposure is considered to be
extremely remote. Mesothelioma is a very rare cancer in the general population.
Lung Cancer
Unlike asbestosis and mesothelioma, lung cancer is not associated only with asbestos exposure.
Cigarette smoking has been and continues to be the major cause of lung cancer. Furthermore,
there is no basic difference between lung cancer caused by asbestos and that due to other causes.
In general, the risk of getting lung cancer increases with the extent of asbestos exposure, in terms
of both intensity and duration. This risk is also greatly enhanced by smoking; most asbestos
workers who develop lung cancer are smokers. There is no difference in the risk for lung cancer
between chrysotile and the amphibole asbestos minerals.
Other Asbestos-Related Cancers
The relationship between asbestos exposure and asbestosis, mesothelioma and lung cancer has
been clearly established and is beyond argument. Several other cancers have also been
associated with inhalation of asbestos. Although the evidence is not as good as for the diseases
discussed above, these cancers should be noted. They are gastrointestinal cancer affecting all
sites in the gastrointestinal tract (oesophagus, stomach, colon and rectum) and cancer of the
larynx. The elevated risks of these diseases in the most heavily exposed asbestos workers have
always been much less than the elevated risk for lung cancer and mesothelioma. If asbestos
exposures are controlled to prevent any increase in lung cancer or mesothelioma risk, the other
potential cancer risks should also be well controlled.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 2
Asbestos Management Program
Background Information on Asbestos in Building
Materials and Health Hazards
Appendix A
Other Asbestos-Related Conditions
A number of less serious effects have been associated with asbestos exposure, namely pleural
plaques and asbestos warts. Pleural plaques are areas of scarring of the pleural surfaces. In
general, they are not associated with any functional abnormality and are merely an indicator of
asbestos exposure. Asbestos warts are harmless skin growths that occur when asbestos fibres
penetrate the skin. These will usually retract when exposure ceases.
USES OF ASBESTOS IN BUILDING MATERIALS
Asbestos has been widely used in buildings and several uses continue today. The uses of
asbestos are generally classed into two groups for purposes of hazard assessment; friable and
non-friable products. A friable material is a material that when dry can be crumbled, pulverized
or powdered by hand pressure. The use of friable materials in construction is banned today but
due to the widespread use of friable materials in the past, these materials still are present in many
buildings. In order to establish an AMP, the possible uses of asbestos must be known. These are
discussed below in the categories of non-friable, potentially friable and friable products.
NON-FRIABLE ASBESTOS MATERIALS
Asbestos-cement Products (Transite)
The largest use of asbestos, in terms of the tonnage of fibres employed, is as a reinforcing agent
in cement products. Asbestos-reinforced cement is strong, durable, rigid and resistant to both
fire and weather. Portland cement, water and asbestos are mixed to form a slurry from which
end-products can be fabricated by a process similar to that used in paper making. Products
include sheets, pipes and a wide variety of other shapes. The asbestos fibre content of asbestos
cement products is usually about 15%.
Asbestos-cement sheet is produced in four basis forms: flat sheet, corrugated sheet, siding
shingles and roofing shingles. The main use of asbestos cement sheet is for the roofing and
cladding of buildings. Other uses are ceiling tiles, decorative panelling, electrical insulation,
fume hood liners and laboratory tabletops. Asbestos-cement pipe is used for water supply,
sewage, irrigation, drainage applications, the transport of corrosive chemical fluids, and electric
and telephone conduits. Asbestos cement products are still in production. Non-asbestos
substitute cement products are available for some though not all asbestos products.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 3
Asbestos Management Program
Background Information on Asbestos in Building
Materials and Health Hazards
Appendix A
Transite Drain Pipe
Corrugated Transite Siding/Roofing
Laboratory Bench Countertop
Transite Blocks in Elevator Switchgear
Gaskets and Packings
The combination of long asbestos fibres and high temperature rubbers has provided some of the
best gasket materials. The asbestos, in bulk fibre, woven, or pleated form, provides strength and
temperature resistance, while the rubber or synthetic compound acts as binder and sealing
material. Asbestos yarns have been commonly used in the manufacture of braided and woven
packing materials. Many of these uses, particularly in sheet forms are still in production and use.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 4
Asbestos Management Program
Background Information on Asbestos in Building
Materials and Health Hazards
Rope Gasket
Appendix A
Rope Gasket at Boiler Plate
Coatings and Sealants
Asbestos has been used in roof coatings and cement and, to a lesser extent, in sealants and
caulks. Roof coatings consist of asphalt liquefied with solvents and asbestos fibre filler. Roof
cements are similar, but are formulated to a thicker consistency so that they can be used to seal
openings through which a liquid coating would flow. Some of these are still in production.
Asbestos Roof Cement
Caulking at Glazing
Paper Products
Asbestos paper products have been used in a wide variety of applications. Among the most
important in construction are roofing felt, gaskets, pipe wrap, as building paper under roof tiles
and wood flooring, tape at joints on ducts and duct insulation, as a finishing layer over fibreglass
pipe insulation, as heat shields in incandescent light fixtures, as an underpad beneath vinyl sheet
flooring, millboard and electrical insulation. Some of these applications are discussed under the
headings "Insulation" and "Gaskets and Packings".
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 5
Asbestos Management Program
Background Information on Asbestos in Building
Materials and Health Hazards
Paper Heat Shield on Incandescent Fixture
Vinyl Sheet Flooring with Paper Underpad
Plastics
Appendix A
Paper on Seams of Duct
Building Paper Under Roof Tiles
Asbestos has been used as a reinforcing agent in a wide range of asbestos/polymer composites.
Applications include, floor tiles, engine housings, bins and containers, and a variety of coatings,
adhesives, caulks, sealants, and patching compounds. Two areas dominated asbestos use in
plastics: phenolic moulding compounds and vinyl-asbestos tile. Few of these products remain in
production.
Vinyl Asbestos Tile
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 6
Asbestos Management Program
Background Information on Asbestos in Building
Materials and Health Hazards
Appendix A
Asbestos Textiles
Asbestos textile materials are manufactured from chrysotile fibres. Two types of yarn are
produced: plain, possibly braced with organic fibres, and reinforced, which incorporates either
wire or another yarn such as nylon, cotton or polyester. Major uses for asbestos textiles are
gaskets, packings, vibration damper/duct connectors, friction materials, thermal and electrical
insulation, and fire resistant applications, i.e. welding curtains, protective clothing, theatre
curtains, hot conveyor belts and ironing board covers. These products may be considered or
become friable in use. Asbestos textiles are no longer in widespread production.
Textile Vibration Damper/Duct Connector
Friction Materials
High Voltage Cable Insulation
Asbestos has been used in the manufacture of brake and clutch linings and pads. The asbestos
fibres may be embedded in a phenolic resin with various mixtures of fillers or a woven asbestos
cloth may be impregnated with the resin. Friction products are primarily used in vehicles but
may be used in any rotating machinery, for example elevators or printing presses. They are still
produced and used although not widely.
POTENTIALLY FRIABLE ASBESTOS MATERIALS
Acoustic Ceiling Tiles
Some types of mineral wool type acoustic ceiling tiles were formulated with asbestos from the
early 1960s. The use of asbestos in ceiling tiles was discontinued in the early 1980s. Analytical
testing is required to distinguish the asbestos and non-asbestos ceiling tiles. From field
experience at Pinchin, the fire-rated tiles are more likely to contain asbestos. Amosite was the
predominant fibre type used. Acoustic tile, particularly if splined or glued-on, can become
friable or release dust when removed. They are usually considered non-friable as they are
normally handled intact.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 7
Asbestos Management Program
Background Information on Asbestos in Building
Materials and Health Hazards
Glued-on (Laminated) Ceiling Tiles
Appendix A
Lay-in Ceiling Tile
Plaster
Asbestos was used in random fashion in the brown coat and surface coat of smooth plaster
finishes. This has been used at a low level (less than 5% in most cases). In many instances the
asbestos content is less than 1% or even less than 0.5%. This is often due to the presence of
vermiculite in plaster. Vermiculite frequently contains actinolite or chrysotile as an impurity
which contributes to the asbestos content. Only chrysotile was ever intentionally added to
plaster. Plaster is non-friable in place but removal is impossible without causing it to become
friable. This is significantly different than lay-in acoustic tiles or transite boards which can be
removed intact.
Plaster on Wood Lath
Plaster on Speed Tile
FRIABLE ASBESTOS MATERIALS
Friable asbestos products are the main concern of the public and the AMP due to the ease of fibre
release. None of the products are still in production in North America or Europe.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Asbestos Management Program
Background Information on Asbestos in Building
Materials and Health Hazards
Appendix A
Fireproofing or Sprayed Insulation
Several types of fireproofing or insulation were applied by spraying or trowel application in the
period from the mid 1930s to 1974. Fibrous products were spray applied after being blown as a
dry mix through an application gun. These products may contain up to 90% asbestos and any of
the three major types (chrysotile, amosite or crocidolite). Cementitious products were trowelled
or sprayed as a wet slurry. These were harder products that did not contain more than 25%
asbestos. Only chrysotile asbestos was used in the cementitious type materials.
Cementitious Sprayed Fireproofing
Debris from Fireproofing on Top of Ceiling
Fibrous Sprayed Fireproofing
Fibrous Sprayed Fireproofing (Beam Only)
Texture or Acoustic Plasters
The use of asbestos was widespread in trowelled or sprayed texture coats, stipple coats and
acoustic plasters from the 1950s to the late 1970s (at least as late as 1980). These products
always contain less than 25% chrysotile. Some of the harder stipple coats may be considered
non-friable in place and only become friable when disturbed by construction or demolition.
Other products in this group can be very soft and extremely friable.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Asbestos Management Program
Background Information on Asbestos in Building
Materials and Health Hazards
Sprayed Limpet Texture Ceiling on Lath
Appendix A
Texture Coat Ceiling
Mechanical Insulation
This is the most widespread use of friable asbestos in buildings. The use dates from the late
1800s to the late 1970s. The material can have a number of appearances and asbestos contents.
The more prevalent types of asbestos mechanical insulations are:
•
White, brown, pink or grey block (Magnesia Block, Caposite);
•
White or grey corrugated paper (Aircell);
•
White, grey or brown layered paper (sweatwrap); and
•
Grey trowelled or hand applied material (with the appearance of hard or granular,
grey, dry mud) (parging cement).
It is possible to find all asbestos types in mechanical insulation although chrysotile is
predominant and amosite the next most common.
Aircell Insulation (Corrugated Paper)
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Caposite Block Insulation
Page 10
Asbestos Management Program
Background Information on Asbestos in Building
Materials and Health Hazards
Parging Cement on Pipe Fitting
Appendix A
Parging Cement on Sweatwrap and Aircell
Vermiculite
Vermiculite, a mineral mined around the world, is used in a variety of commercial and consumer
products. After crushing and processing, the raw ore was shipped to many plants in Canada for
exfoliation or expanding. At these plants, the ore was heated to about 1000 °C causing it to
expand like popcorn into a lightweight granular material that is fire-resistant, absorbent, light
weight and a good insulator. Vermiculite has been and continues to be used in a variety of
building materials. It was made into a variety of insulation products, was used as a loose fill
insulation inside masonry block walls (the largest volume use), stove pipe and stack insulation,
fire separations, cold rooms and in walls and attics of buildings, mostly homes. It is important to
understand not all vermiculite contains asbestos.
Vermiculite Attic Insulation
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Libby Vermiculite
Page 11
Asbestos Management Program
Background Information on Asbestos in Building
Materials and Health Hazards
Appendix A
HAZARDS OF ASBESTOS MATERIALS IN BUILDINGS
Beginning in the late 1970s, public health authorities, the media, and the public in general,
became concerned about the health effect of these asbestos materials on building occupants. It
was known that asbestos miners and factory workers and installers who handled asbestos
materials suffered a higher incidence of several respiratory diseases. These groups had been
exposed to very high levels of asbestos dust for prolonged periods. In order to assess whether
the public anxiety over the current situation of asbestos materials and the hazard of in-place
materials was justified, the Ontario Royal Commission on Matters of Health and Safety Arising
from the Use of Asbestos in Ontario was established in 1981. This three year study considered
all aspects of the asbestos problem, from production, through installation and use in-place, to
maintenance and demolition. After considering all available data and commissioning several
research studies, the Commission concluded in its final report (Chapter 9, Page 585):
"....The risk to occupants from asbestos in buildings is a small
fraction of the risks faced by workers exposed to asbestos under the
1 f/cc control limit for chrysotile (which was the current exposure
limit for industrial asbestos use in Ontario at that time). It is less
than 1/50 as great as the risk of commuting by car to and from those
buildings. In concluding that this risk is insignificant, we conclude
that the risk does not present a public health problem. While
asbestos has caused serious health problems for workers and may
present a problem for building maintenance, renovation,
construction, and demolition workers, we conclude that it does not
pose a significant problem for the general occupants of a building,
except in the three situations outlined in Section D of this chapter,
namely: (i) the occupant is in the immediate vicinity of work that
disturbs friable asbestos-containing insulation; (ii) the occupant is
within the range of air circulation of work that disturbs friable
asbestos-containing insulation; or (iii) significant quantities of friable
asbestos-containing insulation have fallen onto building surfaces and
are being disturbed."
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Asbestos Management Program
Background Information on Asbestos in Building
Materials and Health Hazards
Appendix A
and in the overview to this section (Chapter 9, page 548):
"We will conclude that it is rarely necessary to take corrective action
in buildings containing asbestos insulation in order to protect the
general occupants of those buildings.
On the other hand,
construction, demolition, renovation, maintenance, and custodial
workers in asbestos-containing buildings may be exposed to
significant fibre levels and may, during their work, cause elevated
fibre levels for nearby occupants."
The general conclusions of the Royal Commission have been supported by independent testing
by independent researchers, the Ontario Ministry of Labour, and authorities in other
jurisdictions. Air sampling has shown that the airborne asbestos levels in buildings with sprayed
asbestos are no higher than outdoor levels, unless the friable asbestos or asbestos debris is being
disturbed at the time. Airborne levels in buildings are not elevated even when the ceiling space
containing the sprayed asbestos or asbestos mechanical insulation functions as an air plenum.
The Ministry of Labour Regulation respecting Asbestos on Construction Projects and in
Buildings and Repair Operations was modelled on the Commission findings. Several other
provinces have since issue regulations or guidelines similar to the Ministry of Labour
Regulation. The AMP was prepared to be consistent with the recommendations of the
Commission and to meet all requirements of the Regulation.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 13
APPENDIX B
EVALUATING THE CONDITION & ACCESS OF ACM
Asbestos Management Program
Evaluating the Condition & Access of ACM
Appendix B
Once the location of any ACMs is determined it is then necessary to have a basis from which its
condition and general accessibility can be measured. This in turn provides a baseline from which
recommendations can be developed to establish and maintain a safe workplace while ensuring
compliance with existing regulations and guidelines.
As the condition and general accessibility of asbestos can vary widely from location to location,
the following system of evaluation shall be used to ensure a consistent approach to the evaluation
and rating of ACMs.
EVALUATION OF CONDITION
Sprayed Fireproofing, Thermal or Textured Finishes
Evaluating the condition of spray or trowel applied fireproofing, thermal insulation, texture
coats, decorative or acoustic finishes shall be based on the following definitions:
GOOD
Surface of material shows no signs of damage, deterioration or
delamination. (Includes unencapsulated sprayed fireproofing, sprayed
insulation and sprayed or texture coats where no delamination or
damage is observed. Also includes encapsulated materials where the
encapsulation was installed after the damage or fallout occurred). Up to
1% visible damage to surface of material is allowed within range of
GOOD.
POOR
Sprayed materials show signs of damage, delamination or deterioration.
More than 1% damage to surface of the material. Areas of spray where
damage exists in isolated locations may be listed as both GOOD and
POOR condition for the same room. In this circumstance the extent of
the POOR area is recorded separate from that rated as being in GOOD
condition.
Mechanical Insulation
The condition of mechanical insulation (on boilers, breaching, ductwork, piping, tanks,
equipment, etc.) shall be evaluated according to the following criteria:
GOOD
Insulation is jacketed and has no sign of deterioration. No friable
insulation is exposed. Includes conditions where the jacketing has
minor damage (i.e. scuffs or stains), but jacket is not punctured or
penetrated.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Asbestos Management Program
Evaluating the Condition & Access of ACM
Appendix B
FAIR
Minor penetrating damage to jacketed insulation (cuts, tears,
deterioration or delamination) or undamaged insulation that is not
jacketed.
Insulation is exposed but is not showing surface
disintegration. Extent of missing insulation ranges from minor to none.
Damage can be readily repaired.
POOR
Original insulation jacket is missing, damaged, deteriorated or
delaminated. Friable insulation is exposed and significant areas have
been dislodged. Damage cannot be readily repaired.
Non-Friable and Potentially Friable Materials
For non-friable ACM such as asbestos cement products (transite), and manufactured products
that have the potential to become friable when handled, such as acoustic ceiling tiles or sheet
vinyl flooring, the condition of these materials shall be evaluated as follows. Note that FAIR is
not an applicable condition for rating non-friable materials.
GOOD
No significant damage is present. Material may be cracked or broken
but is stable and not likely to become friable upon casual contact.
POOR
Material is severely damaged. Loose debris is present or binder has
disintegrated to the point where contact will cause the material to become
friable.
Evaluation of ACM Debris
The presence of fallen ACM debris, whether as a result of delamination, deterioration or damage
to sprayed fireproofing, thermal insulation, textured surfaces, decorative or acoustic finishes or
mechanical insulation shall be noted separately from the presumed source of ACM and is merely
referred to as DEBRIS.
EVALUATION OF ACCESSIBILITY
The accessibility of ACM shall be rated according to the following criteria:
ACCESS (A)
Common areas of the building within reach (from floor level) of all
building users. Includes areas where occupant activities may result in
disturbance of ACM not normally within reach (i.e. gymnasiums,
warehouses, etc.).
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Asbestos Management Program
Evaluating the Condition & Access of ACM
Appendix B
ACCESS (B)
Frequently entered maintenance areas of the building within reach,
without use of a ladder, by maintenance staff. Includes areas within
reach from a fixed ladder or catwalk, i.e. tops of equipment or
mezzanines (as well as regularly entered pipe chases and tunnels).
ACCESS (C)
EXPOSED
Areas of the building above 8'-0" where use of a ladder is required to
reach the ACM. Only refers to ACM that are exposed to view from the
floor or ladder, without the removal or opening of other building
components such as ceiling tiles, service access door or hatches. Does
not include infrequently accessed service areas of the building.
ACCESS (C)
CONCEALED
Areas of the building which require the removal of a building
component, including lay-in ceilings and access panels into solid
ceiling systems, includes rarely entered crawlspaces, attic spaces, etc.
Observations may be limited to the extent visible from the access
points.
ACCESS (D)
Areas of the building behind inaccessible solid ceiling systems, walls or
mechanical equipment, etc. where demolition of the ceiling, wall or
equipment, etc. is required to reach the ACM. Evaluation of condition
and extent of ACM is limited or impossible, depending on the
surveyor's ability to visually examine materials in ACCESS D.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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APPENDIX C
ACTION MATRIX FOR THE CONTROL OF ACM
Asbestos Management Program
Action Matrix for the Control of ACM
Appendix C
ROUTINE MAINTENANCE & BUILDING OPERATIONS
In the absence of any major maintenance activities, renovations or demolition that may lead to
widespread disturbance of asbestos, the following factors shall be given due consideration in the
formulation of site-specific recommendations. These are as follows:
1. The evaluation or viability of a specific asbestos control option shall be primarily based on the
ACM’s current condition and overall accessibility. The logic behind this statement is that
damaged ACM located in frequently accessed areas of the building is of a higher priority than
damaged ACM in an infrequently accessed area of the building;
2. Existing regulations and good practice require the immediate clean-up and possible abatement
of areas where there is ACM in POOR condition or ACM debris, or where such materials or
debris is likely to be disturbed during normal use of the space (i.e. ACM is in POOR condition,
and/or DEBRIS, combined with ACCESSIBILITY A or B);
3. ACM in POOR condition is not routinely repairable. If an abatement action is necessary,
removal is the preferred action (enclosure may also be considered in unusual circumstances);
4. Mechanical insulation in FAIR condition can normally be repaired or removed based on the
following general recommendations applied on a case-by-case basis. Note: Either repair or
removal are both legally acceptable options for the treatment of ACM found in FAIR
condition:
•
Repair ACM mechanical insulation found in FAIR condition in ACCESS B or
ACCESS C (EXPOSED) areas,
•
Remove ACM mechanical insulation found in FAIR condition in ACCESS B and
ACCESS C (EXPOSED) areas, where future damage to the ACM is likely to
occur, and
•
Removal of ACM mechanical insulation found in FAIR condition in ACCESS A
is normally recommended to eliminate the potential for future re-damaging of the
ACM.
5. Friable or potentially friable forms of ACM found in GOOD condition in ACCESS A is only
subject to surveillance under existing regulations provided it is not subject to disturbance by
future renovations or maintenance. However, such ACMs shall be abated on a pro-active basis
wherever damage is possible by on-going occupant activity (accidental or intentional). This
recommendation exceeds current regulatory requirements;
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Asbestos Management Program
Action Matrix for the Control of ACM
Appendix C
6. Non-friable and/or manufactured products, which are in POOR condition, must be treated the
same as friable materials in POOR condition and the appropriate Action assigned;
7. For non-friable or manufactured products reported in GOOD condition, Action 7 (Surveillance)
shall be assigned regardless of Accessibility; and
8. Consideration may also be given to whatever other action that can practically be performed to
negate the need for the implementation of an AMP. Such measures may include the removal
of ACM prior to renovations or at any other time when a major disturbance of the ACM is
anticipated. Removal may also be considered a practical measure when small quantities of
ACM are present in a specific area of the building.
With these principles in mind the following Action Matrix Table shall be utilized to establish the
normal recommended asbestos control action. Note that factors not included in the above
discussion may result in a recommendation different from that in the following table.
ACTION MATRIX FOR FRIABLE ASBESTOS MATERIALS
ACCESS
GOOD
A
Action 5/71
B
CONDITION
SUSPECT
POOR
DEBRIS
Action 5/62
Action 3
Action 1
Action 8
Action 7
Action 6
Action 3
Action 1
Action 8
C (Exposed)
Action 7
Action 6
Action 4
Action 2
Action 8
C (Concealed)
Action 7
Action 7
Action 4
Action 2
Action 8
D
Action 7
Action 7
Action 7
Action 7
Action 8
1
FAIR
MATERIAL
If ACM in ACCESS (A)/GOOD condition is not removed ACTION 7 is required.
2
If ACM in ACCESS (A)/FAIR condition is not removed ACTION 6 is required.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Asbestos Management Program
Action Matrix for the Control of ACM
Appendix C
NON-FRIABLE & POTENTIALLY FRIABLE MATERIALS
CONDITION
GOOD
A
Action 7
Action 3/1
Action 1
Action 8
B
Action 7
Action 3/1
Action 1
Action 8
C (Exposed)
Action 7
Action 4/1
Action 2
Action 8
C (Concealed)
Action 7
Action 4/1
Action 2
Action 8
D
Action 7
Action 7/1
Action 7
Action 8
1
FAIR
POOR
SUSPECT
ACCESS
MATERIAL
Non-friable and potentially friable ACM found in POOR condition
shall be treated as friable ACM.
LEGEND - ACTION MATRIX TABLES
ACTION 1
Immediate
Clean-up
Restrict access that is likely to cause a disturbance of the ACM debris
and clean-up the ACM debris immediately. Utilize correct asbestos
procedures. The surveyor should immediately notify the APO of this
condition.
ACTION 2
Type 2 Entry
At locations where ACM debris cannot be practically removed or
cleaned-up, restrict access to the area to persons utilizing Type 2
asbestos precautions. The precautions will be required until the ACM
debris has been cleaned-up, and the source of the debris has been
stabilized or removed.
ACTION 3
Removal
Removal of ACM is required to comply with existing regulations and
good practice. Utilize asbestos procedures appropriate to the scope of
the removal work being done.
ACTION 4
Type 2 Access
Entry to these spaces which is likely to cause disturbance of the ACM
will require Type 2 procedures until the ACM is abated (use ACTION
1 or 2 if debris is present).
ACTION 5
Recommended
Removal
Existing regulations do not require removal, however as a matter of
corporate policy, pro-active removal is recommended to avoid any
future damage to the material and the resultant concerns.
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Asbestos Management Program
Action Matrix for the Control of ACM
Appendix C
ACTION 6
Recommended
Repair
Repair ACM found in FAIR condition, but not likely to be disturbed
during normal use of the area or room. Upon completion of the repair
work treat the ACM as material in GOOD condition and implement
ACTION 7.
ACTION 7
Surveillance
No immediate abatement action other than the implementation of the
AMP, including routine surveillance and use of asbestos precautions
during disturbance of the ACM.
ACTION 8
Suspect Materials
Materials that are historically known to possibly contain asbestos but
either cannot be sampled due to restricted access or the need to analyze
an unreasonable number of samples to confirm with confidence the
presence or absence of asbestos, are identified as Suspect Material (i.e.
vinyl floor tiles, smooth plaster on walls or ceilings). These suspect
materials are to be considered asbestos-containing with ACTION 7
applying until subsequent sampling confirms the presence or absence of
asbestos. Sampling may be most cost-effective prior to disturbance of
the suspected ACM by renovation, demolition, or maintenance work.
LARGE SCALE MAINTENANCE, RENOVATION OR DEMOLITION
Existing regulation and good practice require that all friable and non-friable ACMs be removed
prior to any large-scale maintenance work, demolition or renovations if the ACM is, or is likely,
to become disturbed.
Retain the services on an outside Asbestos Consulting firm (either directly or as a sub-consultant
to the Prime Consultant or Architect in charge of the renovation/demolition work) to assist in the
preparation of contract documents necessary to effect the safe and proper removal of all ACM
subject to disturbance.
As a matter of corporate policy, all large-scale asbestos abatement work shall be contracted out.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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APPENDIX D
ASBESTOS SURVEY REPORT AND UPDATE REPORTS
Asbestos Management Program
Asbestos Survey Report and Update Reports
Appendix D
Hard copies of the asbestos survey reports and latest asbestos survey updates as prepared from
time-to-time as required by existing regulation and as set forth under Section 5 of the AMP
document are maintained on file and/or are available for viewing at the following location(s):
1. The office of the APO
Safety & Health Officer
181 Henlow Bay
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3M 1Y7
Phone:
Fax:
(204) 488-1767 Ext. 1292
(204) 488-83-85
2. The office of the Consultant
Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
54 Terracon Place
Winnipeg, Manitoba R2J 4G7
Phone:
Fax:
(204) 452-0983
(204) 453-0788
Digital files will be available on the PTSD – HMIS website for all staff.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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APPENDIX E
BULK SAMPLE RESULTS
Asbestos Management Program
Bulk Sample Results
Appendix E
The following appendix shall be used to house a copy of all lab reports received from time-totime as a result of any additional bulk sampling having been carried out internally by PTSD’s
own employees or by an outside consulting firm.
Notwithstanding copies of the test results, copies of the original test data collected during the
initial Asbestos Survey and/or any subsequent Asbestos Survey Updates are maintained on file
and/or are available for viewing at the following location(s):
1. The office of the APO
Safety & Health Officer
Phone:
Fax:
(204) 488-1767, Ext. 1292
(204) 488-8385
2. The office of the Consultant
Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
54 Terracon Place
Winnipeg, Manitoba R2J 4G7
Phone:
Fax:
(204) 452-0983
(204) 453-0788
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 1
APPENDIX F
SAMPLE COLLECTION PROCEDURES
Asbestos Management Program
Sample Collection Procedures
Appendix F
Note: Sampling only to be undertaken by APO or an experienced outside agency at PTSD.
OBJECTIVES
1. To obtain a sample for analysis to determine if asbestos is present within a material.
2. To determine the type of asbestos and the quantity of asbestos of each type.
3. Sampling of vermiculite is specifically excluded from these procedures.
EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES
1. Pen and Sharpie marker.
2. Retractable knife (with extra blades).
3. Hook knife.
4. Flashlight and batteries.
5. Screwdriver(s) with multiple bits.
6. Small hammer.
7. Sample bags.
8. Insulation tape or duct tape.
9. Spray bottle.
10. Wipes for cleaning tools so as to not contaminate subsequent samples.
11. NIOSH approved half-face respirator with P100 filters.
SAMPLE COLLECTION
1. Only those persons needed for sampling should be present in the immediate area.
2. Where necessary, provide a drop sheet below sample location if debris or dust may be
generated by sampling operation (i.e. below a ceiling tile if sprayed fireproofing is above).
3. Use cleaned/new tools, or clean the tool to be used with a sanitizing wipe prior to sample
collection. Wipe or wash again prior to each subsequent sample.
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Asbestos Management Program
Sample Collection Procedures
Appendix F
4. Spray the material with a light mist of water if necessary to prevent fibre release during
sampling. Do not disturb the material any more than necessary. Note that using water may
delay the receipt of sample results as samples cannot be analyzed if wet.
5. Each homogeneous material should be sampled separately. A homogeneous sampling area is
defined by the USEPA as containing material that is uniform in texture and appearance, was
installed at one time and is unlikely to consist of more than one type or formulation of material.
The surveyor is to use information obtained by visual examination, available information on
the phases of the construction and information on renovations obtained from the client to
determine the extent of each homogeneous area and the number of samples required.
6. Number of samples required:
Type of Material
Surfacing material, including without limitation material
that is applied to surfaces by spraying, by trowelling or
otherwise, such as acoustical plaster on ceilings,
fireproofing materials on structural members and plaster
Thermal insulation, except as described below
Thermal insulation patch
Other material
Minimum Number of Bulk
Samples - MB
3
1
1
1
7. Collect the sample by penetrating the entire depth of the material to the underlying substrate
since it may have more than one layer. Examples of materials with more than one layer
include plaster, sweatwrap with tar paper, and parging cement over other insulations, etc. The
following points are exceptions to this rule:
•
When sampling texture coat that is applied in a thin layer to drywall, try to ensure
that you only collect a sample of the texture coat and not any drywall compound
beneath that may skew the sample result. Try to sample at an area that is 1’ x 1’
away from a corner (and likely away from drywall joint compound), or sample
overspray above ceiling. Do not sample too deep, trying only to remove the
texture coat itself;
•
When collecting samples try to minimize damage to finishes. Sample flooring at
door jambs or in corners, sample plaster above ceilings or where damaged, break
ceiling tiles off at corners so that the damage cannot be seen when placed back in
grid, etc. A piece as big as your thumbnail is all that is required;
•
When sampling VAT, try to obtain a sample of the mastic whenever possible. If
the survey is for pre-construction, the mastic must be analyzed. Add this note to
the transmittal; and
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Asbestos Management Program
Sample Collection Procedures
•
Appendix F
On pipes insulated with fibreglass and sweatwrap, check the lap joints, butt joints,
staples, and hangers for asbestos parging cement.
8. If pieces of material break off and fall during sampling, remove the debris by wet wiping and
place wipe in sample bag for disposal.
9. Scrape directly into, or place sample into a Ziploc bag and seal closure strip. Write the
following information on the sample bag:
•
Sample Number. Ensure that samples of the same homogenous material are
numbered the same number but with a different letter to signify it is a different
sample of the same homogeneous material (i.e. 001A, 001B, and 001C for three
samples of the same type of ceiling tile);
•
Date (year/month/day);
•
Collected by;
•
Company name;
•
Material; and
•
Location, including building name, room name, location number, type of system
etc.
10. Temporarily seal any openings created to collect the sample, for example, with metal foil tape
or duct tape wrapped completely around pipe insulation where the jacket was cut.
PERSONAL SAFETY
1. The use of a respirator is recommended for all sampling of materials. However, sampling can
be performed without a need for one but depends on care used and the friability of the material
being sampled.
2. Wash your hands after sampling, and you must wash your hands prior to eating drinking or
smoking.
SAMPLE SUBMISSION
1. Samples must be analyzed at only NVLAP or AIHA certified laboratories.
2. Complete the Bulk Sample Transmittal. On the transmittal ensure that you instruct the lab to
use the Stop Positive approach.
3. Submit samples using separate transmittals if separate reports are to be written (for separate
sites/buildings).
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Asbestos Management Program
Sample Collection Procedures
Appendix F
SAMPLE HANDLING AND SHIPPING
1. Include the Bulk Sample Transmittal.
2. Bulk samples do not require special handling (temperature, pressure, etc.).
ANALYSIS
1. The analytical method follows the Ontario Ministry of Labour Code for the Determination of
Asbestos from Bulk Samples, August 1985 and U.S. EPA Method 600/R-93/116 dated July
1993.
2. Analysis is to be completed using a Stop Positive Approach. Only one result of greater than
0.1% asbestos content is required to determine that a material is asbestos-containing, but all
samples must be analyzed to conclusively determine that a material is non-asbestos. The
laboratory will stop analyzing samples from a homogeneous material once greater than 0.5%
asbestos is detected in any of the samples of that material. All samples are analyzed if no
asbestos was detected.
INTERPRETATION OF BULK SAMPLE RESULTS
1. Any material containing more than 0.1% friable asbestos or 1% non-friable asbestos in
Manitoba are considered an ACM.
NOTE: The preceding sample collection & analytical practices shall be adhered to by all
personnel whether such sampling is performed internally, or through an outside consultant, as a
means of ensuring a consistent approach to sample collection and analysis.
AIR SAMPLING BY PCM
Sample Collection
1. Sample collection shall be performed in accordance with the National Institute of Occupational
Safety & Health (NIOSH) Method 7400 dated May 15, 1996.
2. Sample volumes shall be adjusted to allow statistically valid results to be reported down to
levels equal to that outlined in the following chart.
Classification of Sampling
Detection Limit
Post-asbestos abatement clearances for all Type 3 work
<0.01 Fib/mL
Post-asbestos abatement clearances for all Type 2 work
<0.05 Fib/mL
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Asbestos Management Program
Sample Collection Procedures
Appendix F
Classification of Sampling
Detection Limit
Post-abatement clean-up as performed outside a sealed work
enclosure while following Type 2 precautions
<0.05 Fib/mL
Sampling performed adjacent to, or following, the removal of
asbestos-containing pipewrap as performed by “Glove Bag” method
<0.05 Fib/mL
Sampling performed adjacent to, or following, the repair of asbestoscontaining mechanical insulation as performed while following Type
2 precautions
<0.05 Fib/mL
Sampling performed within a sealed Type 2 or 3 work enclosure shall
have their sample volumes adjusted based on anticipated dust levels
so as to obtain a minimum fibre density of 50 fibres/mm2
0.1 Fib/mL
(minimum)
3. Sampling equipment shall be flow calibrated on a daily basis.
4. For each sample collected, ensure the following information is recorded:
•
•
•
Date Sampled
Location
Sample Volume
•
•
•
Sample Number
Pump Number
On & Off Times
•
Sample Description (i.e.
personal, area, occupied,
etc.)
Sample Analysis
1. Following collection, each sample shall be submitted to an accredited laboratory for
determination of its asbestos content using PCM. Sample results shall be expressed in terms of
fibres per millilitre of air (Fib/mL).
2. Sample preparation and analysis shall be performed in accordance with the National Institute
of Occupational Safety & Health (NIOSH) Method 7400 dated May 15, 1996.
3. Fibre identification shall be performed using the “A” set of counting rules.
4. Results of air sample analysis shall be made available on a same-shift basis wherever
practicable and in all instances within a 24-hour period following sample collection.
5. For quality control purposes the selected lab, as well as the individual technician performing
the analysis, shall be accredited by the American Industrial Hygiene Association’s Asbestos
Analysts Registry (AIHA AAR) for the analysis of air samples by PCM. Written proof of such
accreditation must be provided upon request.
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Asbestos Management Program
Sample Collection Procedures
Appendix F
Interpretation of Data
1. When reviewing the results obtained from any PCM sampling, it is important to note that fibres
are not identified by this method. All particles greater than 5 μm in length and with a length to
diameter ratio of 3:1 or greater are included in the count. Fibres with a diameter of <0.3 μm
cannot be detected by this method regardless of their length.
AIR SAMPLING BY TEM
General Comments & Policy
1. As a matter of general policy, monitoring of active asbestos work sites using Transmission
Electron Microscope (TEM) test methods will not be performed due to a number of concerns
surrounding its use (i.e. cost, turn-around times, lack of guidelines to establish safe levels) and
should only be performed with the prior approval of the APO.
2. Notwithstanding the above, the use of TEM monitoring can be beneficial in instances where air
sampling by PCM or FAM indicates contamination of occupied areas by fibrous dust from an
unknown source. However, should such a contamination occur as the result of a clear failure to
observe prescribed precautions or a visible breach in the containment system, then TEM
monitoring is not recommended.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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APPENDIX G
RESPIRATOR FITTING, CARE AND INSPECTION
Asbestos Management Program
Respirator Fitting, Care and Inspection
Appendix G
NOTE: The following applies to the use of a Half-face Negative Pressure Air Purifying
Respirator (PAPR) equipped with HEPA filters.
WARNING: Such respirator does not generate or have their own supply of oxygen. They must
not be used in oxygen deficient atmospheres (less than 19.5%); in poorly ventilated areas or
enclosed spaces such as tanks or small rooms; for abrasive blasting or fire fighting; or for
protection against contaminants excluded or not covered by the applicable Approval Label.
Respirators must be approved for protection against asbestos. Check for NIOSH certification.
RESPIRATOR FITTING
1. Persons required to wear a respirators must first pass a qualitative or quantitative fit-test
administered in accordance with the most current version of CSA standard Z-94.4. The fit-test
should be repeated yearly.
2. The respirator wearer must be clean-shaven along all the seal points for proper protection to be
obtained. Even stubble growth may be sufficient to reduce the seal of the face-piece, and
therefore the protection. The respirator approval is voided for users with facial hair that may
interfere with the seal.
CHECK PRIOR TO EACH USE
1. Examine face-piece for any:
•
Dirt (clean if necessary);
•
Cracks, tears or holes (obtain new face-piece);
•
Distortion and inflexibility (stretch and knead to restore shape and flexibility or
obtain new face-piece); and
•
Cracks, or breaks in filter holders, worn threads and missing gaskets (replace or
obtain new face-piece).
2. Examine head straps for any:
•
Breaks or tears (replace if discovered);
•
Loss of elasticity (replace if discovered); and
•
Broken or malfunctioning buckles and attachments (replace if discovered).
3. Examine valves for signs of any:
•
Detergent residue, dust or other material on valves or valve seats (clean before
use);
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Asbestos Management Program
Respirator Fitting, Care and Inspection
Appendix G
•
Cracks, tears or distortion in the valve material (replace if discovered); and
•
Missing or defective valves or valve covers (replace if discovered).
4. Examine filter for:
•
Proper filter for protection against asbestos (High Efficiency Particulate);
•
Incorrect installation, loose connections, missing or worn gaskets or cross
threading (remove and re-install); and
•
Cracks or dents in filter housing (replace if discovered).
5. Perform the following tests for leaks on each donning of the respirator:
•
Negative Pressure Test: cover inlets to filters, breathe in and hold breath;
respirator should be drawn to face for minimum of 10 seconds (if not, check
exhalation valve and fit); and
•
Positive Pressure Test: cover exhalation valve cover and puff out slightly and
hold breath; respirator should slightly pressurize and still hold seal (if not, check
inhalation valves and fit).
RESPIRATOR CLEANING AND DISINFECTION
1. Remove filters and disassemble face-piece. Discard or repair defective parts.
2. Wash components in warm water (50 oC - 60 oC) with mild detergent, using a brush.
Respirator suppliers can provide ready-made cleaning and disinfectant solutions and
instructions for use.
3. Thoroughly rinse components in clean, warm water.
4. Air dry or hand dry components with a clean, lint-free cloth.
5. Reassemble respirator and test to ensure that all components are working properly (see above).
Be careful to check that valves are not lost in cleaning.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 2
APPENDIX H
WORKER TRAINING CERTIFICATE & ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
Asbestos Management Program
Worker Training Certificate & Acknowledgement
Appendix H
CERTIFICATE OF WORKER’S TRAINING
WORKING WITH ASBESTOS CAN BE DANGEROUS. INHALING ASBESTOS FIBRES CAN
CAUSE VARIOUS TYPES OF LUNG DISEASE INCLUDING CANCER. SMOKING
INCREASES THE RISK OF LUNG CANCER FROM ASBESTOS EXPOSURE.
RESPIRATOR PROTECTION: I have been supplied with a respirator and received training
for its proper use including qualitative fit-testing (irritant smoke). I understand that I must be
free of any facial hair which may interfere with the seal of the respirator with my face.
MEDICAL EXAMINATION: Medical examinations may be required for workers performing
asbestos work. I acknowledge that I may have to undergo the necessary tests as prescribed by
the Department of Labour, Workplace Safety & Health Division, Occupational Health Branch.
TRAINING COURSE: I have been trained in the dangers inherent in handling asbestos and
breathing asbestos dust and in proper work procedures and personal and area protective
measures. The topics covered in the course included the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Physical Characteristics and Use of Asbestos
Health Hazards Associated with Asbestos
Sampling & Analytical Methods
Regulations Concerning Work With Asbestos
Assessment of Asbestos-Containing Materials
Respiratory Protection
Use of Protective Equipment
Work practices including hands-on or on-job training for (check as appropriate):
(
(
(
(
(
(
(
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
General Procedures for Type 1, 2 & Glove Bag Work
Procedures for Type 1 or Low Risk Work
Procedures for Type 2 or Moderate Risk Work
Procedures for the Removal of Mechanical Insulation by Glove Bag Method
Personal Decontamination Procedures
Emergency Procedures in the Event of a Suspect Asbestos Spill
Procedures for Emergency Work
By signing this certificate, I acknowledge that I have received the above training and agree to
follow these procedures for all work assigned to me.
EMPLOYEE NAME:
DATE OF TRAINING:
RESPIRATOR MANUFACTURER:
SIZE:
SIGNATURE:
DATE:
TRAINER:
DATE:
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 1
APPENDIX I
CONTRACTOR NOTIFICATION & ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
Asbestos Management Program
Contractor Notification & Acknowledgement
Appendix I
CONTRACTOR NOTIFICATION & ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
WORKING WITH ASBESTOS CAN BE DANGEROUS. INHALING ASBESTOS
FIBRES CAN CAUSE VARIOUS TYPES OF LUNG DISEASE INCLUDING CANCER.
SMOKING INCREASES THE RISK OF LUNG CANCER FROM ASBESTOS
EXPOSURE.
Pinchin has identified the presence of various friable and non-friable ACMs as being present
throughout PTSD facilities. For a complete listing of any asbestos-containing or suspect
asbestos materials known to be present, refer to the most recent version of the asbestos survey
report maintained on file by the APO.
Manitoba Regulation 217/2006, Manitoba Regulation 100-88R (Fibrosis and Silicosis
Regulation) and associated guidelines apply to all maintenance and renovation work that may
disturb asbestos or suspect ACMs in the workplace. Such regulations and guidelines state that
any disturbance of ACMs may only be performed by workers or by an outside contractor who
have first received the required training in asbestos-related precautions.
The following is a partial listing of typical activities that will or may disturb known ACMs and
hence requiring the implementation of Type 1, 2 or 3 asbestos precautions. Any Contractor
required to perform any of the following activities and/or similar tasks that may result in the
disturbance of a known or suspect ACMs must first obtain a signed and authorized “Asbestos
Work Permit” from the APO (Appendix R).
•
Access above a suspended or enclosed ceiling system at a location where known
asbestos-containing spray or trowel applied fireproofing, thermal or acoustic
insulation is present.
•
Access within a crawlspace, pipe chase, service area or tunnel where damaged
ACMs are known to be present.
•
Work that may disturb any spray or trowel applied fireproofing, thermal or
acoustic insulation known to contain asbestos.
•
Work that may disturb any asbestos-containing spray or trowel applied texture
coats.
•
Work that may disturb any asbestos mechanical insulation (i.e. pipes, ducts,
vessels, boiler, etc.).
•
Removal, clean-up or repair of any asbestos mechanical insulation (i.e. pipes,
ducts, vessels, boilers, etc.).
•
Removal of asbestos-containing ceiling tiles.
•
Removal of asbestos-containing sheet flooring products.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Asbestos Management Program
Contractor Notification & Acknowledgement
Appendix I
•
Removal, cutting, drilling or other such disturbance of any non-friable asbestos
materials (i.e. vinyl composite tile, asbestos hardboard, transit panelling, asbestos
cement pipes, etc.).
•
Demolition, cutting, drilling or other such disturbance of any plaster finishes (i.e.
wall or ceiling) known to contain asbestos and/or listed as a suspect material in
the above mentioned asbestos survey report.
•
Other materials, as informed by subsequent notices.
As a condition of our contract to provide services and materials to PTSD, we, the undersigned
company hereby agree to perform our work in such a manor so as NOT to disturb any ACMs
without prior authorization and notification of PTSD designated APO. We further acknowledge
that this firm and it’s employees are: a) familiar with all requirements as set forth by PTSD’s
AMP document as they may pertain to work undertaken by an outside contractor; b) will conduct
our work in accordance with such requirements and in compliance with all provincial regulation
or guidelines pertaining to asbestos; c) and that all asbestos waste will be packaged and disposed
of at a licensed landfill.
COMPANY NAME:
SIGNATURE:
DATE:
NAME & TITLE:
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 2
APPENDIX J
LIST OF PRE-QUALIFIED ASBESTOS CONTRACTORS
Asbestos Management Program
List of Pre-qualified Asbestos Contractors
Appendix J
CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS
1. To ensure the highest standard of care is maintained at all times, only those contractors with
established reputations for quality workmanship in the field of asbestos control and
remediation shall be considered for work at any PTSD owned or occupied facility.
2. Before a contractor may be considered for work at any PTSD owned or occupied facility, the
contractor must first be able to demonstrate his/her compliance with the following
requirements:
•
Both the firm as well as all supervisory staff must have a minimum of three (3)
years prior experience in the field of asbestos control and remediation;
•
All supervisory staff must hold a recognized certificate proving attendance at an
asbestos removal training course (2 day minimum duration) and have performed
supervisory functions on at list five other asbestos abatement projects of similar
size and complexity;
•
The firm must carry and/or be able to provide Commercial General Liability
insurance endorsed specifically to provide coverage in respect of any claim
arising from the exposure, clean-up, removal, containment, testing or monitoring
of asbestos as it may relate to work as performed for the PTSD. Said policy must
provide coverage in an amount not less than two (2) million dollars
($2,000,000.00) per occurrence and must also be issued on an Occurrence-based
form;
•
Be licensed to transport asbestos waste and/or demonstrate that sufficient
arrangements have been secured with a licensed waste hauler to ensure proper
handling and final disposal of all waste at a licensed landfill site;
•
Provide proof that all employees are medically fit to don a respirator and have
been fit-tested for the class of respirator appropriate to the work at hand;
•
Provide proof that all employees have had instruction on the hazards of asbestos
exposure, the use of respirators and training on all other aspects of asbestos
controls and procedures; and
•
Provide proof that all employees are enrolled in a medical surveillance program.
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Asbestos Management Program
List of Pre-qualified Asbestos Contractors
Appendix J
PRE-QUALIFIED ASBESTOS CONTRACTORS
The following is a list of contractors whose firms meet or exceed the above noted requirements
and routinely carry out business within the Winnipeg area.
Power Vac Services
1355 Border Street
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3H 0N1
Phone: (204) 632-4434
Fax: (204) 633-4690
Advance Robotic Duct Cleaning
1485 Wellington Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0K4
Phone: (204) 284-6390
Fax: (204) 284-0475
Western Construction Services Inc.
300 Dawson Road
Winnipeg, Manitoba R2J 0S7
Phone: (204) 956-9475
Fax: (204) 231-3666
Q.C. Environmental Ltd.
544 Prest Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba R2V 4R9
Phone: (204) 339-2537
Fax: (204) 284-0475
RCW Environmental
775 Plinquet Street
Winnipeg, Manitoba R2J 0G3
Phone: (204) 233-0402
Fax: (204) 231-2005
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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APPENDIX K
EMERGENCY REACTION IN THE EVENT OF SUSPECTED ASBESTOS SPILL
Asbestos Management Program
Emergency Reaction in the Event of
Suspected Asbestos Spill
Appendix K
EMERGENCY RESPONSES AND NOTIFICATION IN THE EVENT OF ASBESTOSSUSPECT MATERIAL DISCOVERED DURING MAINTENANCE OR CONTRACTED
WORK OR REPORTED BY OCCUPANT
Contractor, Maintenance Worker, Tenant or Occupant discovers unexpected material
that is suspected of containing asbestos
Contact during the
night
Secure the area, to prevent
further disturbance (follow
procedures on next page)
Maintenance
Leon Prevost
981-9163
Contact during the
day
Asbestos Program Officer
S&H Officer
232-5338
Call to
Asbestos Program Officer
reviews asbestos building
materials report
Confirmed to be
an asbestoscontaining
material (ACM)
Confirmed to be nonasbestos. Resume
scheduled work
Asbestos
content not
determined
from report
Asbestos
procedures
to be used.
Asbestos
Program
Officer
ensures area
is
immediately
isolated and
arranges for
Abatement
Contractor
and/or
Asbestos
Consultant to
perform
abatement
Assume
material is
ACM.
Collect sample
for later
confirmation
Visual
inspection by
Asbestos
Program
Officer to
determine if
ACM
Confirmed to
be ACM
Indeterminate
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Confirmed to be
non-asbestos.
Resume
scheduled work
Asbestos Program Officer engages Asbestos
Consultant to sample and analyze material or
submits sample for analysis
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Asbestos Management Program
Emergency Reaction in the Event of
Suspected Asbestos Spill
Appendix K
EMERGENCY REACTION IN THE EVENT OF SUSPECTED ASBESTOS SPILL
If ACMs or suspect materials have been disturbed improperly, follow these directions:
•
Do not clean up, cover, move or contact asbestos-containing or suspect material.
Cease work in the area and do not resume work that risks disturbing the suspect
material. Workers are to leave the area and the APO is to be notified
immediately;
•
Isolate the area by locking doors if this can be done without blocking emergency
or fire routes;
•
If it is not possible to safely isolate the area, the APO will notify appropriate
persons not to enter the area. If possible, post security to prevent unnecessary
access;
•
The APO will arrange to shut down ventilation systems to the affected area
including supply, return and exhaust; and
•
The APO will determine if asbestos is contained in the debris. If material cannot
be confirmed asbestos-free by records or appearance, follow procedures below:
•
The APO will contact an Asbestos Consultant to sample or identify testing of
suspect material or to identify the material;
•
At their option, the APO may decide to employ an Asbestos Consultant to
perform air monitoring and consulting, prior to and/or after clean-up to
determine if building personnel were exposed to airborne asbestos and to
ensure airborne fibre levels are within acceptable limits to re-occupy the
space;
•
If the material is confirmed or assumed to contain asbestos, the APO is to
contract an Asbestos Abatement Contractor to clean-up contaminated area
using Emergency Procedures in Appendix L of this document; and
•
Enable ventilation systems after air monitoring or clean up of ACM.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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APPENDIX L
PROCEDURES – EMERGENCY WORK
Asbestos Management Program
Procedures – Emergency Work
Appendix L
PROCEDURES – TYPE 2 EMERGENCY CLEAN-UP
Emergency asbestos procedures shall be implemented, when required, in order to protect those
undertaking the work, as well as to protect all others from, or limit exposure to, airborne
asbestos. Procedures indicated shall be followed as closely as possible, in the event of an
emergency situation.
Procedures for asbestos work, required as an immediate response to floods through asbestos
fireproofing, accidental disturbance of ACM, ceiling collapses at asbestos-containing ceiling
tiles, or other emergencies that affect asbestos materials, are as follows:
•
Clear area of all occupants. In critical situations clear area of only non-essential
personnel only, and provide essential personnel with proper respiratory
protection;
•
Shut down ventilation systems serving area including supply, return and exhaust;
•
Isolate the area by locking doors, if this can be done without blocking emergency
or fire routes;
•
If it is not possible to safely isolate the area, the Director of Facilities and
Operations will notify personnel not to enter the area. If possible, post security to
prevent unnecessary access;
•
Close access doors to area or construct enclosure around area, if time permits. Do
not obstruct emergency exits under any circumstances;
•
Only trained workers or Abatement Contractors will perform the emergency
clean-up;
•
Entrance to the area will now be limited to those wearing applicable respiratory
protection and disposable Tyvek coveralls. Half-face NIOSH approved
respirators with P100 (HEPA) filters are adequate;
•
No eating, smoking or chewing in the Asbestos Work Area;
•
Remove all debris within the area of the accidental disturbance of ACM using
HEPA vacuums;
•
Place polyethylene drop sheets under area of repair;
•
Repair ACM pipe insulation, replace ceiling tiles or stabilize ACM as required
with minimum disturbance to ACM;
•
Remove dust using HEPA vacuums or wet wiping from all surfaces within area of
disturbance;
•
Dispose of items that cannot be cleaned as asbestos waste;
•
Dispose of all cleaning supplies and drop sheets as asbestos waste;
•
Remove coveralls and dispose of as asbestos waste;
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Asbestos Management Program
Procedures – Emergency Work
Appendix L
•
Proceed to washroom and wash face and hands;
•
At their option, the Director of Facilities and Operations may decide to employ an
Asbestos Consultant to perform air monitoring and consulting, after clean-up to
ensure airborne fibre levels are within acceptable limits to re-occupy the space;
and
•
The Director of Facilities and Operations must notify the site Joint Occupational
Health and Safety Committee of the results of air monitoring or testing.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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APPENDIX M
GENERAL PROCEDURES FOR TYPE 1, 2 AND GLOVE BAG WORK
Asbestos Management Program
General Procedures for Type 1, 2 and Glove Bag Work
Appendix M
All persons required to perform Type 1, 2 or Glove Bag remedial work while present at a PTSD
owned or occupied premises, shall comply with the following procedures at a minimum.
NOTE: The following procedures shall apply equally to all classifications (i.e. Type 1, 2 or
Glove Bag) of work and shall be read in conjunction with all other requirements and procedures
as set forth in the AMP document to which this appendix is attached.
LOCATION OF ASBESTOS-CONTAINING MATERIALS (ACMS)
For a general description as to the location of ACMs known to be present throughout any PTSD
owned or occupied premises, refer to the most current version of the Asbestos Survey Report. A
copy of this document is maintained on file by the APO.
Should any person encounter an unexpected material or material suspect of containing asbestos
that has not clearly been identified in the above referenced survey document, work in the
immediate area at risk of disturbing such a material shall be halted. Notify the APO immediately
for further direction. Do not resume work until it has been determined if the material in question
contain asbestos.
QUALITY ASSURANCE
Removal, clean-up or repair of asbestos-containing or -contaminated materials is to be performed
by persons trained in the methods, procedures and industry practices for Asbestos Abatement.
Work shall be completed in such a manner so that at no time airborne dust, visible debris, or
water runoff contaminates an area outside the established Asbestos Work Area.
Any contamination of surrounding area (indicated by visual inspection or air monitoring) shall
necessitate an immediate clean-up of affected area. The APO (if available) shall be notified as
soon as possible following such an occurrence and informed of the measures being implemented
to correct the situation.
INSPECTION
The APO or the Designated Inspection Agency shall review each active asbestos work site a
minimum of once per day as a means of ensuring worker compliance with the procedures and
work practices established by the AMP document.
Ensure each site inspection conforms to the requirements set out under Section 9.0 of the AMP
document to which this Appendix is attached.
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Appendix M
AIR MONITORING
Where required the APO or the Designated Inspection Agency shall monitor all asbestos
disturbances on a daily basis to ensure worker safety and compliance with control limits
established by governing authorities and as set out under the AMP document.
Ensure air monitoring is performed in compliance with Section 9.0 and Appendix F of the AMP
document to which this appendix is attached.
PROJECT NOTIFICATION
For work undertaken internally by the PTSD own employees, the worker in charge of the work
shall ensure that the APO has been dully notified and that a signed and executed “Asbestos Work
Permit” has been issued.
The APO shall be responsible for notifying the following:
•
Safety Officer;
•
Director of Facilities & Operations;
•
School Principal; and
•
Head Caretaker
For work contracted out, the Contractor shall be responsible for notifying the following:
•
PTSD’s APO; who will then be responsible for any PTSD internal notifications;
and
•
Manitoba Department of Labour – Workplace Safety & Health Branch.
SCHEDULING OF WORK
Schedule work outside regular school or business hours as approved by the APO and/or when the
area is unoccupied. If unauthorized persons are present, do not start work.
Schedule work during times when any HVAC systems that may be affected by the work can be
shut down and/or are otherwise isolated.
If work is required on an emergency basis and the area is occupied, have the APO advise
occupants to vacate area until work is complete and clearance is given to return to the area.
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Asbestos Management Program
General Procedures for Type 1, 2 and Glove Bag Work
Appendix M
WORKER PROTECTION
General
•
Before entry to an Asbestos Work Area, all personnel must have undergone
asbestos training.
•
Such training shall, at a minimum, satisfy each of the requirements as set forth
under Section 10.0 of the AMP document to which this appendix is attached.
•
Workers shall not eat, drink, smoke or chew neither gum nor tobacco except in
established areas outside the designated Asbestos Work Area.
•
Workers shall be protected at all times when a possibility of asbestos disturbance
exists.
Respirator Protection
•
Respirators used shall be certified by the National Institute of Occupational Safety
and Health (NIOSH) or other testing agency acceptable to governing authorities.
•
Filters used shall be tested following each use in accordance with manufacturer's
specifications or replaced at the following minimum frequency:
•
Replace filters for negative pressure respirator every sixteen (16) hours of
wear unless tested on-site;
•
Replace PAPR cartridge filters every eight (8) hours of wear unless tested onsite;
•
No person who has facial hair that may affect the seal between the respirator
and his/her face shall be granted entry to an Asbestos Work Area; and
•
Respirators shall be cared for in accordance with the procedures as set forth in
Appendix G of the AMP document to which this appendix is attached.
Protective Clothing
All persons required to enter an Asbestos Work Area must be fitted with disposable full body
coveralls with attached head covering and elastic hand and pant cuffs. Once worn within the
Asbestos Work Area, dispose of as asbestos waste.
SIGNAGE/LABELLING
Work Area Signs
Post signs at all access points to the Asbestos Work Area. Where possible, provide signage
immediately prior to entering the Asbestos Work Area, but out of public view. Letters on signs
shall be in upper case "HELVETICA MEDIUM" and read as follows:
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Asbestos Management Program
General Procedures for Type 1, 2 and Glove Bag Work
Appendix M
CAUTION (25 mm high)
Asbestos Hazard Area (19 mm high)
Unauthorized Entry Prohibited (19 mm high)
Wear Assigned Protective Equipment (19 mm high)
Breathing Asbestos Dust May Cause Serious Bodily Harm (19 mm high)
Container Signs
Label containers for the disposal of asbestos as follows:
CAUTION CONTAINS ASBESTOS FIBRES (25 mm high)
Do Not Mishandle (19 mm high)
WASTE & MATERIAL HANDLING
Asbestos-containing or -contaminated materials removed shall be treated, packaged, transported
and disposed of as asbestos-contaminated waste.
Materials that could tear or puncture a 6 mil (0.15 mm) polyethylene bag shall be packaged and
disposed of in sealed rigid waste containers acceptable to the APO and local landfill authority.
Redundant non ACMs, rubble and debris removed during contaminated work shall be treated,
packaged, and disposed of as asbestos-contaminated waste. With written approval of the APO or
Designated Inspection Agency, non-porous materials may be cleaned, sprayed with a sealer and
disposed of as clean waste.
Transportation of all waste and materials through Occupied Areas shall be covered or placed
within unmarked carts. Clean-up waste route and loading area after each load. Use asbestos
abatement precautions if appropriate or requested by the APO or Designated Inspection Agency.
For work undertaken by PTSD employees, ensure waste is relocated at the end of each work shift
to PTSD’s asbestos storage area for temporary storage. Access to this area shall remain locked
when not occupied and shall be properly posted to identify the presence of asbestos waste.
For work completed by an outside contractor, waste must be removed off-site at the end of each
work shift.
As the waste is removed off-site, the worker in charge of the work shall ensure a copy of the
completed waste waybills is obtained from the disposal firm and submitted to the APO. A copy
of the standardized “Asbestos Waste Manifest” is provided in Appendix Q and forms part of the
AMP document.
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Asbestos Management Program
General Procedures for Type 1, 2 and Glove Bag Work
Appendix M
PRODUCTS & FACILITIES
Materials and equipment must be in GOOD condition and free of asbestos, asbestos debris, and
fibrous materials. Disposable items must be of new materials only.
Asbestos Waste Container: Impermeable container acceptable to local landfill authority, labelled
as required and comprised of the following:
•
A sealed 6 mil (0.15 mm) polyethylene bag or glove bag positioned inside a
second 6 mil (0.15 mm) sealed polyethylene bag; and
•
A sealed 6 mil (0.15 mm) polyethylene bag or glove bag positioned inside or
outside a rigid sealed container of sufficient strength to prevent perforation during
filling, transportation and disposal.
Bridging Encapsulant: Bridging encapsulant for purpose of encapsulating remaining ACM at
locations deemed to be inaccessible by the APO and/or his/her appointed representative. Product
shall be colour coded bright red and be capable of withstanding surface temperature of substrate.
Apply product uniformly to minimum thickness of 10 mil.
HEPA Vacuum: Vacuum equipped with a HEPA filtration system and the necessary fittings,
tools and attachments to execute the work properly. Vacuum must also be labelled appropriately
to identify that it contains asbestos dust and must never be opened except within a sealed
Asbestos Work Area while following Type 2 precautions at a minimum.
Lock-down Agent: Sealant for purpose of trapping residual dust and shall be capable of
withstanding surface temperature of substrate. Product must be compatible with replacement
materials and shall leave no stain when dry.
Airtight tubing with metal reinforcement.
Negative Air Exhaust Ducting (Flexible):
Mechanically affixed each exhaust duct to the unit’s exhaust with metal hose clamp. Diameter
of duct to equal negative air discharge. Acceptable product: Thermalflex S-LP 10 flexible
ducting as manufactured by Flexible Technologies.
Negative Air Unit: Portable air handling system which extracts air directly from the Asbestos
Work Area and discharges air to exterior of building. Equipped as follows:
•
Pre-filter and HEPA filter. Air must pass HEPA filter before discharge;
•
Pressure differential gauge to monitor filter loading;
•
Auto shut off and warning system for HEPA filter failure; and
•
Separate hold down clamps to retain HEPA filter in place during change of prefilter.
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Asbestos Management Program
General Procedures for Type 1, 2 and Glove Bag Work
Appendix M
Polyethylene Sheeting: 6 mil (0.15 mm) minimum thickness in sheet size to minimize joints.
Protective Coveralls: Disposable full body coveralls complete with hoods and elasticized hand
and pant cuffs. Acceptable material: Tyvek coveralls.
Rip-Proof Polyethylene Sheeting: 8 mil (0.20 mm) fabric made up from 5 mil (0.13 mm) weave
and two layers of 1.5 mil (0.05 mm) poly-laminate in sheet size to minimize on-site seams and
overlaps.
Wetting Agent: Non-sudzing surface active agent. Acceptable product: Aqua-Gro.
PROCEDURES FOR TYPE 1 OR LOW RISK WORK
These procedures are to be followed by all persons required to perform the following work:
•
Handling, installation or removal of non-friable manufactured products known to
contain asbestos provided no sanding, cutting or similar destructive operations are
required. Such manufactured products include such items as vinyl composite
floor tile, gaskets, seals, asbestos-cement panels, siding and piping;
•
Working in close proximity to friable ACMs (excluding jacketed mechanical
insulation rated as being in GOOD condition) provided that such materials are not
actively being disturbed;
•
Using a mechanical or electrical power tool, fitted with a HEPA filtered dust
collection shroud to cut, shape, drill or grind manufactured products containing
asbestos;
•
Using hand tools to cut, shape, drill, grind or remove manufactured products
known to containing asbestos;
•
Wearing or using protective equipment or clothing made of asbestos-containing
textiles; and
•
Removing drywall where asbestos joint filling compounds have been used.
NOTE: The following Type 1 procedures assume the non-friable material being handled can be
removed with relatively little debris, nor visible release of airborne dust. Generation of debris is
permissible so long as the debris is maintained in a dampened state. If the work will release
more than a trivial amount of loose friable debris or should visible dust be emitted during the
work, do not proceed. For more information, consult the APO to determine which of the Type 1,
2 or 3 procedures are more appropriate.
NOTE: The following procedures shall be read in conjunction with all other requirements and
procedures as set forth under the AMP document.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Asbestos Management Program
General Procedures for Type 1, 2 and Glove Bag Work
Appendix M
EQUIPMENT
All tools, supplies and equipment necessary for the safe and effective completion of the work
must be on-site before work proceeds.
Vacuum
Use of a vacuum is optional. Wet cleaning methods may be used in place of a vacuum where
deemed to be more suitable to the work at hand. If a vacuum is to be used, it must be equipped
with a HEPA filter and must also have the necessary brushes, fittings, etc. to execute the work
properly.
Respirators
Use of a respirator is mandatory. The worker must be supplied with a half-face respirator
equipped with HEPA filters and must first, or previously, been given proper training on the use
and qualitative fit-testing of such equipment.
Protective Clothing
The use of reusable or disposable clothing is optional. Should non-disposable clothing be used
any visible asbestos contamination shall be cleaned using a HEPA vacuum prior to exiting the
work area and/or laundered. If disposable coveralls are used, they must be disposed of as
asbestos waste.
Other Equipment
•
Barrier tape and signage - to identify extent of work area.
•
Plastic sheeting (6 mil polyethylene) - to serve as a drop cloth.
•
Duct tape, spray glue, etc. - to secure drop cloth in place.
•
Pump sprayer with misting nozzle or alternative method to wet material before
handling.
•
Labelled asbestos waste bags (6 mil) or barrels - for all waste, disposable
clothing, plastic, etc.
•
Misc. small tools & cleaning supplies - i.e. scraper, sponge, rags, wire brush,
bucket, utility knife, etc.
SITE ACCESS & EGRESS
Before entering an established Asbestos Work Area, each worker shall first don an approved
respirator (c/w new or tested filters), a set of disposable coveralls, hood and all other personal
protective equipment deemed appropriate to the work at hand.
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Asbestos Management Program
General Procedures for Type 1, 2 and Glove Bag Work
Appendix M
Before leaving an established Asbestos Work Area, each worker shall complete the following:
•
Remove any disposable coveralls and place them within a labelled asbestos waste
receptacle for final disposal. If coveralls are to be reused, pre-clean them using a
HEPA vacuum prior to their removal then neatly fold them, or hang them up, at a
point immediately adjacent to the point of egress;
•
Once a worker’s coveralls have been removed, the worker should then step across
the established barricade before removing his/her respirator;
•
The worker should then proceed directly to the established wash station with
respirator in hand; and
•
Once at the wash station, the worker shall then proceed to wash-up ensuring
his/her face, hands, and respirator are adequately cleaned using soap and warm
water. Dispose of respirator cartridge filters in container provided unless tested
on-site and approved for reuse.
PREPARATION
1. Relocate from the area, all non-essential equipment, tools, etc.
2. Isolate the Asbestos Work Area from adjoining spaces through the placement of a taped
barrier, sawhorse or by closing any doors, windows, etc. at the perimeter of each work area.
3. Isolate or otherwise shut down HVAC system, vents and diffusers located within the Asbestos
Work Area.
4. Locate any tools, supplies and equipment necessary for the safe and effective completion of the
work to inside the designated Asbestos Work Area.
5. Wherever settled dust on surfaces throughout the Asbestos Work Area is likely to be disturbed,
pre-clean such surfaces using a HEPA vacuum or damp cloth prior to commencing any other
work in the area.
6. Before disturbing non-friable asbestos materials (excluding floor tile), cover floor and
surrounding surfaces situated directly beneath the work with polyethylene sheeting of sufficient
size to catch all fallen debris.
7. Post signage at all points of entry clearly identifying the area as an Asbestos Work Site and that
access by unauthorized personnel is strictly prohibited.
8. Do not proceed with any asbestos disturbance until the APO or Designated Inspection Agency
has reviewed the area and his/her subsequent authorization to proceed is granted.
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Asbestos Management Program
General Procedures for Type 1, 2 and Glove Bag Work
Appendix M
EXECUTION
Removal of Vinyl Asbestos Floor Tile
1. The use of a power scraper to assist in the removal of floor tile shall be strictly prohibited
unless specifically approved for use by the APO or Designated Inspection Agency.
2. Remove tile by wedging a heavy duty scraper in seam of two adjoining tiles and gradually
force edge of one tile up and away from floor. While being careful not to break off pieces of
tile, continue to force balance of tile upward.
3. Continue removal of tiles using hand tools, removing tiles intact wherever possible. When
adhesive is spread heavily or is quite hard, it may prove easier to force scraper through tightly
adhered areas by striking scraper handle with a hammer using blows of moderate force while
maintaining scraper at a 25° to 30° angle to floor. When even this technique cannot loosen tile,
removal can be simplified by heating tile thoroughly with a hot air gun until heat penetrates
through tile and softens the underlying adhesive.
4. As the tiles are removed, place into asbestos waste receptor. Avoid any unnecessary breakage
of these tiles during packaging.
5. After removal, scrape up remaining adhesive from floor with a hand scraper until only a thin
smooth film remains. Where deposits are heavy or difficult to scrape, a hot air gun may be
used. Deposit scrapings in an approved asbestos waste disposal bag. Do not dry scrape surface
of adhering pieces of tile.
6. On completion of removal in each work area, clean floor surface with HEPA vacuum or wet
mop.
7. Dispose of mop head as contaminated waste or store this and other materials which cannot be
cleaned effectively in a labelled polyethylene bag until needed again (open only inside an
Asbestos Work Area).
8. Proceed with the dismantlement of any barricades only after the APO or Designated Inspection
Agency has reviewed the area and his/her subsequent authorization to proceed is granted.
Installing, Cutting or Drilling Non-Friable Asbestos Materials
1. Work requiring the use of any power tools (except a power drill) not equipped with a HEPA
filter dust collector, must not be performed as Type 1 work.
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Asbestos Management Program
General Procedures for Type 1, 2 and Glove Bag Work
Appendix M
2. Where possible wet all materials to be disturbed.
3. Immediately place waste into approved asbestos waste receptor. Clean area frequently during
work with HEPA vacuum or by wet methods.
4. At completion of work, clean drop sheets to be reused with HEPA vacuum or by wet methods.
5. Drop sheets not cleaned shall be disposed of as asbestos waste.
6. Proceed with the dismantlement of any barricades only after the APO or Designated Inspection
Agency has reviewed the area and his/her subsequent authorization to proceed is granted.
Removal of Other Non-Friable Asbestos Materials
1. The following Type 1 procedures apply only to materials that can be removed intact, or in
sections, without producing any pulverized or powdered waste. This method is most
applicable to the removal of asbestos-cement hardboard panelling (i.e. transite), mechanical
gaskets and some forms of perforated ceiling tiles.
2. Wet all material to be disturbed, ceiling tiles excepted.
3. Undo fasteners necessary to remove material. Whenever possible, remove asbestos cement
panels intact. Break only if unavoidable. If broken, maintain freshly exposed edges in a
dampened state.
4. Where sections are adhered to substrate, wet material and use hand scraping to remove
adhering material.
5. Place removed material into approved asbestos waste receptor. Clean surrounding surfaces and
Asbestos Work Area frequently with HEPA vacuum or with wet methods provided all cleaning
rags are disposed of as asbestos waste.
6. Drop sheets that are not cleaned shall be disposed of as asbestos waste.
7. Proceed with the dismantlement of any barricades only after the APO or Designated Inspection
Agency has reviewed the area and his/her subsequent authorization to proceed is granted.
Checklist for Type 1 or Low Risk Work
The following checklist should be used to ensure all requirements as set forth by the AMP
document for Type 1 or Low Risk work have been complied with before, during and following
any asbestos disturbance.
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General Procedures for Type 1, 2 and Glove Bag Work
Appendix M
1. Arrangements have been made with the APO and/or Designated Inspection Agency to
complete any required site inspections or air monitoring during the abatement process.
2. All non-essential equipment and personnel have been removed from the established work area.
3. The area affected by the work has been isolated from adjoining areas of the building and the
required signage has been posted identifying the site as an “Asbestos Work Area”.
4. Adjoining surfaces and equipment (excluding floor tile) have been covered with a polyethylene
drop cloth.
5. Personal protective equipment (i.e. disposable coveralls, respirators, etc.) has been provided to
all workers.
6. Required tools, equipment and waste receptacles have been located within the established work
area.
7. HVAC systems, vents and diffusers within the Asbestos Work Area have been shut down or
otherwise isolated.
8. Suitable wash facilities have been located immediately adjacent to or near the established work
area.
9. Written authorization to proceed with the contaminated phase of the work has been received
from the APO and/or Designated Inspection Agency.
10. Non-asbestos dust on surfaces likely to be disturbed has been pre-cleaned using a HEPA
vacuum or damp cloth.
11. Where possible, wet all ACMs to be disturbed.
12. Maintain established work area free of accumulated waste, dust or debris. All material
removed shall be placed directly into approved and labelled asbestos waste receptacles as the
work progresses.
13. Drop sheets that will be reused have been cleaned or placed within a sealed and labelled
polyethylene bag.
14. Final clean the work area to remove any visible trace of dust or debris.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Asbestos Management Program
General Procedures for Type 1, 2 and Glove Bag Work
Appendix M
15. Continue to restrict access to the work area and maintain perimeter barricades in place until the
APO or Designated Inspection Agency has reviewed the area and his/her subsequent
authorization to proceed is granted.
16. An “Asbestos Work Report” has been filed with the APO detailing the extent of asbestos work
completed and the location of any remaining ACMs.
EXECUTION
1. Refer to Appendices M – O of the AMP document for detailed procedures pertaining to each of
the various classifications of Low to Moderate Risk asbestos work (i.e. Type 1, Type 2 and
Glove Bag).
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 12
APPENDIX N
PROCEDURES FOR TYPE 2 OR MODERATE RISK WORK
Asbestos Management Program
Procedures for Type 2 or Moderate Risk Work
Appendix N
These procedures are to be followed by all persons required to perform the following work:
•
Entry into any ceiling space above which an asbestos-containing fireproofing or
thermal insulation is present;
•
Entry into a crawlspace, mechanical chase, service area, etc. in which there is
known to be loose and damaged ACMs or debris;
•
The clean-up, removal or encapsulation of minor amounts of friable ACMs.
Limitations as to the amount of material allowed to be removed or otherwise
disturbed while adhering to Type 2 precautions shall be at the sole discretion of
the APO or Designated Inspection Agency;
•
Removal of asbestos-containing sheet flooring;
•
Repair of asbestos-containing mechanical insulation materials; and
•
Removal of greater than ten asbestos-containing ceiling tiles. The removal of less
than ten ceiling tiles can be classified as a Type 1 operation provided the approval
of the APO or Designated Inspection Agency is obtained prior to the
commencement of such work.
NOTE: The following procedures shall be read in conjunction with all other requirements and
procedures as set forth under Appendix J of the AMP document.
EQUIPMENT
All tools, supplies and equipment necessary for the safe and effective completion of the work
must be on-site before work proceeds.
Vacuum
An asbestos-approved vacuum (HEPA filtered), equipped with miscellaneous brushes, fittings,
etc. Vacuum must not be opened, except by a fully protected worker while within a sealed Type
2 enclosure.
Respirators
The use of a negative pressure non-powered half-face respirator equipped with HEPA cartridge
filters shall be mandatory for all work performed within an established Type 2 work area.
Other Equipment
•
Plastic sheet (6 mil polyethylene) – to erect a total enclosure and to serve as a drop sheet.
•
Wood framing or clips to support polyethylene sheeting as may be appropriate to work at
hand.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Asbestos Management Program
Procedures for Type 2 or Moderate Risk Work
Appendix N
•
Duct tape to fasten plastic enclosure to ceiling, walls, or to tape drop sheet to floor; 3/4"
double-sided tape recommended for attaching polyethylene to T-bar ceiling and floor
surfaces.
•
Labelled asbestos waste bag (6 mil) – for all asbestos waste, disposable suits, plastic for
disposal, etc.
•
Pump sprayer with misting nozzle or alternative method to wet material before handling.
•
Barrier tape and signage – to identify extent of work area.
•
Misc. small tools – i.e. scrapers, wire brushes, utility knives, hammer, nails, stapler and
staples, etc.
•
Cleaning supplies – i.e. scouring pads, sponges, rags, brushes, buckets, etc.
•
Insulation repair supplies (lagging compound, canvas, PVC covers).
•
Encapsulating sealer, for brush or airless spray application.
SITE ACCESS & EGRESS
1. Before entering Asbestos Work Area, each worker shall first don an approved respirator with
new or tested filters, coveralls and all other personal protective equipment deemed appropriate
to the work at hand.
2. Before leaving the Asbestos Work Area, remove contamination from protective clothing and
equipment using a HEPA vacuum or damp cloth.
3. Immediately after exiting the Asbestos Work Area, each worker shall complete the following:
•
Notwithstanding the above, and wherever an attached airlock has been provided,
each worker shall reseal the curtained doorway upon exiting the Asbestos Work
Area;
•
Remove contaminated clothing and place it into a labelled asbestos waste
container for disposal;
•
Clean contaminated footwear, hard hats, etc., or place into a sealed polyethylene
bag for reuse; and
•
Wash hands in wash bucket provided for this purpose.
4. Following the above, remove respirator then proceed directly to wash station and complete the
following:
•
Notwithstanding the above, and wherever an attached airlock has been provided,
each worker shall exit the airlock and reseal curtain doorway before removing
their respirator;
•
Wash exposed skin and respirator with soap and water; and
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 2
Asbestos Management Program
Procedures for Type 2 or Moderate Risk Work
•
Appendix N
Seal inlet side of respirator filters with tape then remove filters for testing or
dispose of as asbestos contaminated waste.
PREPARATION
1. Shut down ventilation systems to and from the work area. Seal over all ventilation openings,
diffusers, grilles, etc., with polyethylene and tape.
2. Wherever any non-asbestos dust settled on surfaces throughout the Asbestos Work Area is
likely to be disturbed, pre-clean such surfaces using a HEPA vacuum or damp cloth prior to
commencing any other work in the area.
3. Where practical, clear areas of movable furnishings and equipment. This should include
anything which occupants may wish to use during the work period. Any furnishings or
equipment not removed shall be adequately covered and sealed over using polyethylene and
tape. The intent of the protection is to provide an airtight envelope to protect the articles from
airborne dust or splashed debris, water, sealer, etc.
4. For small rooms, cover walls with polyethylene such that the complete room becomes the work
area. For larger rooms, erect enclosure of polyethylene of suitable dimensions to enclose the
work area and any scaffolds or ladders that may be required to gain access. If a suspended
ceiling is present, the enclosure shall extend to the u/s of ceiling line. The enclosure shall be as
airtight as conditions permit including the provision of a double overlapping flap at the
entrance. The floor of the work area shall be covered with a layer of polyethylene sealed to the
plastic walls of the enclosure.
5. At locations where a sealed work enclosure has been erected, provide an attached airlock to
facilitate access and egress to and from the work area while minimizing any air movement.
6. Install temporary lighting to provide for safe and effective completion of the work.
7. At locations where a sealed Type 2 enclosure has been provided, establish negative pressure
within the Asbestos Work Area as follows:
•
Provide a minimum of two HEPA vacuums or required number of negative
pressure units within each work area;
•
Operate vacuums (or negative pressure units) continuously from this point until
completion of site dismantlement; and
•
Provide additional vacuums (or negative air units) as necessary to maintain
desired pressure drop and to ensure at all times air movement at perimeter of
enclosure flows inward into the work area.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 3
Asbestos Management Program
Procedures for Type 2 or Moderate Risk Work
Appendix N
8. Locate any additional tools, supplies and equipment necessary for the safe and effective
completion of the work to the designated Asbestos Work Area.
9. Post signs or barrier tape to indicate asbestos hazard and requirement for protective clothing for
anyone entering the space.
10. Do not proceed with any asbestos disturbance until the APO or Designated Inspection Agency
has reviewed the area and his/her subsequent authorization to proceed is granted.
EXECUTION
Asbestos Removal, Clean-up or Ceiling Entry
1. Thoroughly wet ACMs to be removed both prior to and throughout the removal process,
ceiling tiles excepted.
2. Remove dust and loose friable material likely to be disturbed in the process of doing the work,
with a HEPA vacuum or by damp wiping.
3. To remove mechanical insulation, first wet any area of damage, then carefully cut exterior
jacket. Keep exposed surface of insulation wet. Remove insulation in large sections and place
immediately in disposal bag. After all large pieces have been removed, saturate debris on
mechanical equipment and clean all exposed surfaces with abrasive pads, sponges, cloths, etc.
4. Remove ceiling tiles required to complete work by carefully removing first tile and vacuum
while still in a horizontal position. Vacuum other tiles to be removed while still in place and
prior to removing from grid. Do not break tiles or allow them to drop to the floor.
5. Ensure complete saturation of spray or trowel applied materials before removal. Place
materials removed directly into a waste container. Do not allow scrapped materials or debris to
fall to the floor.
6. When asbestos material is removed, all pieces should be placed directly into an approved
asbestos waste receptacle as each piece is removed. Avoid dropping material to floor wherever
possible. After bulk removal is complete, brush clean completely and wet wash the exposed
surface.
7. Frequently, and at regular intervals during the work, clean-up dust, waste materials and debris
throughout the work area by wet mopping or by HEPA vacuuming.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 4
Asbestos Management Program
Procedures for Type 2 or Moderate Risk Work
Appendix N
8. After the completion of any mechanical insulation removal, seal exposed ends of insulation
with heavy coating of encapsulant.
9. At completion of work, decontaminate work enclosure, any equipment, tools and materials
used in the work area by wet cleaning or HEPA vacuum.
10. Apply a generous coating of lock-down agent (sealer) to surfaces from which any asbestos
material was removed and to any polyethylene.
11. Where ceiling tiles were removed to facilitate work in the ceiling space above, re-establish
such tiles before exiting the work enclosure.
12. Do not dismantle the work enclosure until after the APO or Designated Inspection Agency has
reviewed the area and his/her subsequent authorization to proceed is granted.
Repair of Damaged Asbestos-Containing Mechanical Insulation
1. A sealed work enclosure is not required for areas where repair of mechanical insulation alone is
to be performed. Floor and equipment in the vicinity of work must however be covered with
polyethylene drop sheets prior to commencement of repairs. Size of drop sheet to be sufficient
to catch any debris during repairs - minimum width 5 feet (1.5 m).
2. Spray surface of insulation to be repaired and adjacent material with amended water to reduce
dust generation prior to patching or repair.
3. Saturate fully all material that must be removed to accommodate installation of patch or repairs
and place directly into asbestos waste container for disposal. Do not allow material removed to
fall to the floor.
4. Repair insulation using 8 oz. canvas pasted with lagging and overcoat of flame resistant
coating.
5. Extend new canvas finish 12" (300 mm) either side of damaged area.
6. Paint repaired areas to match existing finishes.
7. HEPA vacuum fallen ACM, settled dust, etc., from surfaces throughout the Asbestos Work
Area prior to and throughout the course of the work.
8. Proceed with the dismantlement of any barricades only after the APO or Designated Inspection
Agency has reviewed the area and his/her subsequent authorization to proceed is granted.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Asbestos Management Program
Procedures for Type 2 or Moderate Risk Work
Appendix N
Removal of Sheet Flooring
1. Remove binding strips or other restrictive mouldings.
2. Make series of cuts 100 to 200 mm (4" to 8") apart through top layers and about halfway
through felt backing, parallel to wall.
3. Pry up corner of a strip at end of room furthest from access to work area.
4. Pull sheet back upon itself along with any adhering felt backing which remains adhered to top
layers.
5. Roll strip face out into tight roll, tape or tie, and place into asbestos waste container.
6. Remove maximum of three strips before wet scraping residual exposed felt underlay.
7. Remove remaining adhered underlay by wet scraping as follows:
•
Soak area with water applied by sprayer;
•
Allow water to penetrate felt;
•
Scrape off remaining material;
•
Place scrapings in asbestos waste container; and
•
Allow floor to dry. Clean with HEPA vacuum.
8. Treat all materials removed as ACM and dispose of as such. If materials or equipment
removed to access sheet flooring are to be reused, wet clean or vacuum.
9. Wet clean entire enclosure, including equipment, floor and wall surfaces, mechanical
equipment and similar items not covered with polyethylene sheeting.
10. Apply coat of sealer to surface of floor and to any surfaces covered by polyethylene.
11. Do not dismantle the work enclosure until after the final air clearance results are made
available and the APO or Designated Inspection Agency has reviewed the area and his/her
subsequent authorization to proceed is granted.
Site Dismantlement & Clean-up
1. Carefully roll polyethylene inward onto itself. As polyethylene is rolled away from underlying
finishes, immediately remove any visible debris using a HEPA vacuum or damp cloth.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Asbestos Management Program
Procedures for Type 2 or Moderate Risk Work
Appendix N
2. Place polyethylene, tape, cleaning material, clothing and other contaminated waste in approved
waste receptacle and dispose of as asbestos waste.
3. Equipment used in contaminated Asbestos Work Area shall be washed to remove any visible
signs of asbestos contamination.
4. Dismantle and remove from the area, temporary framework used to support polyethylene.
5. Immediately upon shut down of negative air unit(s), seal air inlet grill and exhaust vent with
polyethylene and tape. Dispose of unit pre and intermediate filters as asbestos contaminated
waste.
6. Seal vacuum hoses and fittings, flexible ductwork and any tools unable to be properly cleaned
in a polyethylene bag prior to removal from work area.
7. Vacuum and/or wash and mop with clean water all floor surfaces throughout the work area.
Checklist for Type 2 or Moderate Risk Work
The following checklist should be used to ensure all requirements as set forth by the AMP
document for Type 2 or Moderate Risk work have been complied with before, during and
following any asbestos disturbance.
1. Arrangements have been made with the APO and/or Designated Inspection Agency to
complete any required site inspections or air monitoring during the abatement process.
2. All non-essential equipment and personnel have been removed from the established work area.
3. The area affected by the work has been isolated from adjoining areas of the building and the
required signage has been posted identifying the site as an “Asbestos Work Area”.
4. Adjoining surfaces and equipment (excluding sheet flooring) have been covered with a
polyethylene drop cloth.
5. Personal protective equipment (i.e. disposable coveralls, respirators, etc.) has been provided to
all workers.
6. Required tools, equipment and waste receptacles have been located within the established work
area.
7. HVAC systems, vents and diffusers within the Asbestos Work Area have been shut down or
otherwise isolated.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Asbestos Management Program
Procedures for Type 2 or Moderate Risk Work
Appendix N
8. Suitable wash facilities have been located immediately adjacent to or near the established work
area.
9. Written authorization to proceed with the contaminated phase of the work has been received
from the APO and/or Designated Inspection Agency.
10. Non-asbestos dust on surfaces likely to be disturbed has been pre-cleaned using a HEPA
vacuum or damp cloth.
11. Wet all ACMs to be disturbed.
12. Maintain established work area free of accumulated waste, dust or debris. All material
removed shall be placed directly into approved and labelled asbestos waste receptacles as the
work progresses.
13. Drop sheets that will be reused have been cleaned or placed within a sealed and labelled
polyethylene bag.
14. The work area has been final cleaned to remove any visible trace of dust or debris.
15. Continue to restrict access to the work area and maintain sealed work enclosure and/or
barricades in place until the APO or Designated Inspection Agency has reviewed the area and
his/her subsequent authorization to proceed is granted.
16. An “Asbestos Work Report” has been filed with the APO detailing the extent of asbestos work
completed and the location of any remaining ACMs.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 8
APPENDIX O
PROCEDURES FOR THE REMOVAL OF
MECHANICAL INSULATION BY GLOVE BAG
Asbestos Management Program
Procedures for the Removal of
Mechanical Insulation by Glove Bag
Appendix O
The following procedures are to be adhered to by all persons required to complete any removal
of mechanical pipewrap insulation performed by Glove Bag Method.
NOTE: The following procedures shall be read in conjunction with all other requirements and
procedures as set forth under the AMP document.
NOTE: The following procedures assume the quantity, access and overall configuration of the
piping from which the insulation is being removed is suited to removal by Glovebag method. If
in the opinion of the APO and/or Designated Inspection Agency such work cannot be completed
safely, complete the work from within a sealed Type 2 enclosure or in the alternative, from
within a Full enclosure (Type 3) by an outside contractor experienced in such work.
EQUIPMENT
All tools, supplies and equipment necessary for the safe and effective completion of the work
must be on-site before work proceeds.
Glove Bag
Single use prefabricated, 0.25 mm (10 mil) minimum thickness polyvinylchloride bag with
integral 0.25 mm (10 mil) thick polyvinylchloride gloves and elasticized ports. Bag must be
equipped with reversible double-pull, double-throw zipper to facilitate progressive movement
along pipe and also be equipped with interior zip and nylon straps for sealing ends of bag around
pipe. Acceptable product: Safe-T-Strip manufactured by Asbesguard Equipment Inc., in
configurations suitable for work.
Vacuum
An asbestos-approved vacuum (HEPA filtered), equipped with miscellaneous brushes, fittings,
etc. Vacuum must not be opened, except by a fully protected worker while within a sealed Type
2 enclosure.
Respirators
The use of a negative pressure non-powered half-face respirator equipped with HEPA cartridge
filters shall be mandatory for all worker required to enter or complete work within an established
Asbestos Work Area.
Knife
Utility knife with fully retractable blade for use inside a glove bag and/or wire cut saw.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 1
Asbestos Management Program
Procedures for the Removal of
Mechanical Insulation by Glove Bag
Appendix O
Other Equipment
•
Plastic sheet (6 mil polyethylene) – to wrap damaged sections of piping or to serve as a drop
sheet.
•
Labelled asbestos waste bag (6 mil) – for all asbestos waste, disposable suits, plastic for
disposal, etc.
•
Pump sprayer with misting nozzle or alternative method to wet material before handling.
•
Barrier tape and signage – to identify extent of work area.
•
Misc. small tools – i.e. scrapers, wire brushes, utility knives, duct tape, etc.
•
Cleaning supplies – i.e. scouring pads, sponges, rags, brushes, buckets, etc.
•
Encapsulating sealer, for brush or airless spray application.
SITE ACCESS & EGRESS
1. Before entering an established Asbestos Work Area, each worker shall first don an approved
respirator (c/w new or tested filters), a set of disposable coveralls, hood and all other personal
protective equipment deemed appropriate to the work at hand.
2. Before leaving an established Asbestos Work Area, each worker shall complete the following:
•
Remove any disposable coveralls and place them within a labelled asbestos waste
receptacle for final disposal. If coveralls are to be reused, pre-clean them using a
HEPA vacuum prior to their removal then neatly fold them, or hang them up, at a
point immediately adjacent to the point of egress;
•
Once a worker’s coveralls have been removed, the worker should then step across
the established barricade before removing his/her respirator; and
•
The worker should then proceed directly to the established wash station with
respirator in hand.
3. Once at the wash station, the worker shall then proceed to wash-up ensuring his/her face,
hands, and respirator are adequately cleaned using soap and warm water. Dispose of respirator
cartridge filters in container provided unless tested on-site and approved for reuse.
PREPARATION
1. Before undertaking any asbestos-related work, a copy of a signed and approved “Asbestos
Work Permit” must be obtained from the APO.
2. Shut down ventilation systems to and from the work area. Seal over all ventilation openings,
diffusers, grilles, etc., with polyethylene and tape.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Asbestos Management Program
Procedures for the Removal of
Mechanical Insulation by Glove Bag
Appendix O
3. Wherever any non-asbestos dust settled on surfaces throughout the Asbestos Work Area is
likely to be disturbed, pre-clean such surfaces using a HEPA vacuum or damp cloth prior to
commencing any other work in the area.
4. Where practical, clear areas of movable furnishings and equipment. This should include
anything which occupants may wish to use during the work period. Any furnishings or
equipment not removed shall be adequately covered using polyethylene and tape.
5. Isolate the Asbestos Work Area from adjoining spaces through the placement of a taped
barrier, sawhorse or by closing any doors, windows, etc. at the perimeter of each work area.
6. Locate any additional tools, supplies and equipment necessary for the safe and effective
completion of the work to the designated Asbestos Work Area.
7. Post signs or barrier tape to indicate asbestos hazard and requirement for protective clothing for
anyone entering the space.
8. Do not proceed with any asbestos disturbance until the APO or Designated Inspection Agency
has reviewed the area and his/her subsequent authorization to proceed is granted.
EXECUTION
1. Provide polyethylene drop sheet under piping where damaged or unjacketed insulation is
present.
2. Spray surface of damaged jacketing with mist of amended water then tape over area of damage
to provide temporary repair.
3. Mist areas of insulation with no jacketing and wrap with polyethylene.
4. Clean surface of pipe or minor amounts of fallen insulation by HEPA vacuuming or by damp
wiping.
5. Place tools necessary to remove insulation in tool pouch then zip bag onto pipe and seal ends of
bag with cloth securing straps. For valve glove bags, seal valve cover with wire tie or
equivalent.
6. Place hands into gloves and use necessary tools to remove insulation from pipe.
7. Arrange insulation in bag to obtain full capacity of bag.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 3
Asbestos Management Program
Procedures for the Removal of
Mechanical Insulation by Glove Bag
Appendix O
8. Roll jacketing carefully to minimize the possibility of ripping or puncturing bags.
9. Insert nozzle of spray pump into bag through valve and wash down pipe and interior of bag
thoroughly. Alternate use of each hand to aid washing process.
10. Wet surface of insulation in lower section of bag and any exposed end of insulation remaining
on pipe.
11. If bag is to be removed from pipe for use at a new location, seal closure strips from inside of
bag then insert nozzle of HEPA vacuum into valve opening and evacuate air from balance of
bag. Re-install and seal in new location before re-opening closure strips. Repeat insulation
removal operation.
12. If bag is to be moved along the same pipe, insert nozzle of HEPA vacuum into valve opening
and evacuate air from bag prior to loosen holding straps then carefully move bag along length
of pipe and re-seal to pipe. Using double-pull zipper to pass hangers. Repeat insulation
removal operation.
13. Should the glove bag become ripped, cut or opened in any way, cease work and repair opening
before continuing work. If the rip, cut or opening cannot be easily repaired, dispose of as
contaminated waste and replace with new.
14. Spilled material must be cleaned up using a HEPA vacuum immediately upon discovery.
15. To remove bag after completion of insulation removal or as each bag is filled:
•
Wash top section of glove bag and tools thoroughly;
•
Place tools in one hand (glove), then pull out inverted, twist to create a separate
pouch, tape inverted hand at two separate locations 1" apart to seal pouch;
•
Remove inverted glove and tools by cutting between the two tape seals;
•
Place inverted glove and tools into the next clean glove bag to be used or into a
water bucket, open pouch underwater and clean tools and then allow to dry;
•
Insert nozzle of HEPA vacuum into valve opening and evacuate air from bag.
Remove nozzle from valve opening and seal over end of valve with tape;
•
Pull a 6 mil polyethylene bag over glove bag before removing from pipe; and
•
Remove securing straps, unfasten zipper and place sealed glove bag into a sealed
6 mil polyethylene bag so as to create an asbestos waste container.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 4
Asbestos Management Program
Procedures for the Removal of
Mechanical Insulation by Glove Bag
Appendix O
16. Ensure that newly exposed sections of pipe are free of residue before resuming removal work
or leaving the area. If necessary, after removal of each section of asbestos, vacuum all surfaces
of pipe, using HEPA filtered vacuum equipment or wet wipe with damp cloth.
17. Before completion of shift, seal surfaces of exposed pipe with lock-down agent to seal any
residual fibres.
18. Cover exposed ends of remaining asbestos insulation with heavy coat of bridging encapsulant.
19. Remove drop sheet and dispose of as contaminated waste.
20. Proceed with the dismantlement of any barricades only after the results of any final air
clearances are made available and the APO or Designated Inspection Agency has reviewed the
area and his/her subsequent authorization to proceed is granted.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 5
APPENDIX P
ASBESTOS WORK REPORT
Asbestos Management Program
Asbestos Work Report
Appendix P
ASBESTOS WORK REPORT
ASBESTOS WORK PERMIT REFERENCE:
WORK AREA:
DESCRIPTION OF WORK:
DATE WORK PERFORMED:
DESCRIPTION & CLASSIFICATION OF THE WORK:
( ) TYPE 1 – REMOVAL OR REPAIRS
( ) TYPE 2 – ASBESTOS CLEAN-UP
( ) TYPE 2 – CEILING TILE REMOVAL
( ) TYPE 2 – REMOVAL OF SHEET FLOORING
( ) TYPE 2 – REMOVAL OF MECHANICAL
( ) TYPE 2 – REMOVAL OF MECHANICAL
( ) TYPE 2 – ACCESS TO CONTAMINATED
( ) TYPE 2 – REPAIR OF MECHANICAL
INSULATION
( ) TYPE 2 – SPRAYED FIREPROOFING
( ) TYPE 2 – SPRAYED TEXTURE COAT
( ) TYPE 3 – REMOVAL (As performed by an outside
Contracting Firm)
( ) TYPE 2 – EMERGENCY REMOVAL OR
( ) OTHER:
DEPARTMENT OR CONTRACTOR:
DESIGNATED INSPECTION AGENCY:
ON-SITE SUPERVISOR:
ASBESTOS WORKERS (CONTRACTOR’S EXCLUDED):
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 1
APPENDIX Q
ASBESTOS WASTE TRANSPORTATION MANIFEST
Asbestos Management Program
Asbestos Waste Transportation Manifest
Appendix Q
ASBESTOS WASTE TRANSPORTATION MANIFEST
Project No.:
Project:
Date:
Manifest No.:
Waybill No.:
Generator:
Landfill Site:
Carrier:
Shipping Date:
Arrival Date:
Carrier Licence No.:
Vehicle Licence No.:
Asbestos Waste Product
(spray, pipewrap, plastic, etc.)
Container Type
(drum/bag/etc.)
Quantity Being
Shipped
State of Waste
(solid/liquid/slurry)
Estimated Volume Shipped (bags, drums, etc.)
Estimated Weight (kg)
Site Superintendent’s Name:
Signature:
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Estimated Weight (kg)
Page 1
APPENDIX R
ASBESTOS WORK PERMIT
Asbestos Management Program
Asbestos Work Permit
Appendix R
ASBESTOS WORK PERMIT
NOTICE: All work shall conform to Federal, Provincial, Municipal standards, codes and guidelines
and the requirements set forth in the AMP for the PTSD or any project specifications prepared. In
the case of a conflict in any of the above noted documents, the most stringent shall apply.
Asbestos Work Request Originator
Contact
Date of Request
day
Telephone No.
Anticipated Start Date
month
year
Work Site Location
Work will be completed by:
day
PERMIT NO.
Anticipated Completion Date
month
year
day
month
year
Project Description
PTSD trained Employees
Pre-Qualified Contractor
Specify Contractor:
ASBESTOS PROCEDURES
Check all applicable
Ceiling Tiles
< 10 tiles in one location – Type 1
> 10 tiles in one location – Type 2
Contaminated Space Entry (ceiling, crawlspace, shaft,
chase, etc.)
Type 1
Type 2
Sheet Flooring
Type 2
Floor Tiles
Type 1
Asbestos Cement Panels
Type 1
Type 3
Mechanical Insulation
Type 2 Removal
Type 2 Repair
Type 3
Glove Bag
Asbestos Debris Clean-up
Type 1
Type 2
Type 3
OTHER CONTROL FACTORS
Evening Work
Specify Hours:
Day Work
Specify Hours:
Weekend Work
Specify Hours:
Restricted Access to Work Area by Occupants
Specify Areas:
Re-location of Occupants Required
Specify Area to be Relocated:
Inspection and Air Monitoring Required
Arrangements made for Inspections
HVAC Shut Down
Specify Hours and Zones:
Other System Shut Down
Specify:
NOTIFICATION
Notification Sent to:
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Manitoba Workplace Safety and Health (for Type 3)
APO
Building Tenants
Department Head
Page 1
APPENDIX S
MILESTONE REQUISITION
Asbestos Management Program
Milestone Requisition Form
Appendix S
MILESTONE REQUISITION FORM
To:
Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Date:
Fax:
(204) 453-0788
cc:
Phone:
(204) 452-0983
From:
Fax:
Phone:
Project:
Work Area:
Please be advised that the above referenced work area will be ready for your review.
Date:
Time:
Your review and approval of the following Milestone Inspection and authorization to proceed with the next phase of the work
is hereby requested.
Company:
Signature:
Name & Title:
(Please Print or Type)
MILESTONE REQUESTED:
(Please Check Desired Inspection)
TYPE 3 – ASBESTOS WORK AREA
Milestone A Milestone B Milestone C Milestone D Milestone E Milestone F Other:
TYPE 1 & 2 - ASBESTOS WORK AREAS
Clean Site Preparation
Contaminated Perimeter Preparation
Contaminated Site Preparation
Visual Clearance
Air Clearance
Dismantlement Inspection
Milestone A - Clean Site Preparation
Milestone B - Dismantlement Inspection
GLOVE BAG - ASBESTOS WORK AREA
Milestone A - Clean Site Preparation
Milestone B - Dismantlement Inspection
REQUEST RECEIVED:
OUTCOME OF INSPECTION:
Date:
Authorization is hereby granted to proceed with the next phase of the work.
Authorization to proceed with the next phase of the work is hereby withheld for
reasons outlined in the attached report (Rpt. #
).
Signed by:
(Designated Inspection Agency Representative)
Time:
Initials:
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 1
APPENDIX T
ON-SITE LABELLING/STENCILLING OF ASBESTOS
Asbestos Management Program
On-Site Labelling/Stencilling of Asbestos
Appendix T
Existing asbestos guidelines and good practice dictate that a system of on-site identification be
developed whereby general work area signage, placards or stencilling is used to provide a final
line of defence against the accidental disturbance of known ACMs.
To achieve the above objective, the presence and/or general location of known ACMs shall be
identified in such a manner as to comply with one or more of the following criteria.
1.0
MECHANICAL SYSTEMS & SERVICES
1.1
Individual mechanical systems or services known to be insulated with asbestos shall be
labelled (using bright red upper case “HELVETICA MEDIUM” lettering) or individual
placards with black lettering on yellow background) as follows and in such a manner as
to clearly define the extent and approximate location of known ACMs.
1.2
At locations where asbestos-containing pipewrap is present on straight runs and fittings
of mechanical services, label as follows with continuous runs labelled at maximum
intervals of 12 feet (3.6 m):
← CAUTION: ACM →
1.3
At locations where asbestos-containing pipewrap is present on fittings of mechanical
services alone, label as follows with continuous runs labelled at maximum intervals of 12
feet (3.6 m):
← CAUTION: ACM PRESENT AT FITTINGS →
1.4
At locations where asbestos-containing insulation is present on the surface of mechanical
equipment label as follows and on each conversing side of the equipment exposed to
view:
CAUTION: ACM
DO NOT DISTURB
1.5
At locations where existing asbestos-containing pipewrap has been removed and replaced
with asbestos-free insulation, label mechanical services as follows at locations where the
newly applied insulation butts up against the remaining ACM:
← ACM FREE ⏐ CAUTION: ACM →
2.0
MECHANICAL SERVICE AREAS
2.1
At locations where known asbestos-containing debris or materials are present within
existing crawlspaces, mechanical services areas, pipechases, shafts or within existing
ceiling plenums, their presence shall be identified via the installation and use of general
work area signage.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Asbestos Management Program
On-Site Labelling/Stencilling of Asbestos
Appendix T
2.2
Such signage shall be posted in close proximity to all points of entry and must be clearly
visible to all personnel upon entry.
2.3
In the case of most mechanical rooms, service shafts or crawlspaces where access is
controlled via a limited number of doorways, hatches, etc., it shall be permissible to post
such signage on the backside of each doorway, hatch, etc.
2.4
The following is a listing of pre-approved signage for use within varying spaces.
Alternative signage (wording) may only be used with the prior approval of the APO.
Example No. 1
CAUTION
Example No. 2
CAUTION
INSULATION PRESENT ON MECHANICAL
SERVICES THROUGHOUT THIS AREA IS
KNOWN TO CONTAIN ASBESTOS
INSULATION PRESENT ON PIPING
THROUGHOUT THIS AREA IS KNOWN TO
CONTAIN ASBESTOS
BREATHING ASBESTOS FIBRES IN KNOWN TO
CAUSE SERIOUS HEALTH PROBLEMS, LUNG
DISEASE AND CANCER
BREATHING ASBESTOS FIBRES IN KNOWN
TO CAUSE SERIOUS HEALTH PROBLEMS,
LUNG DISEASE AND CANCER
DO NOT DISTURB ANY INSULATION
WITHOUT PROPER TRAINING, EQUIPMENT
AND PRIOR WRITTEN APPROVAL OF THE
ASBESTOS PROGRAMS OFFICER
DO NOT DISTURB ANY INSULATION
WITHOUT PROPER TRAINING, EQUIPMENT
AND PRIOR WRITTEN APPROVAL OF THE
ASBESTOS PROGRAMS OFFICER
Example No. 3
Example No. 4
CAUTION
CAUTION
SPRAYED FIREPROOFING MATERIAL
PRESENT THROUGHOUT THIS AREA IS
KNOWN TO CONTAIN ASBESTOS
HARDBOARD PANELLING PRESENT
THROUGHOUT THIS AREA IS KNOWN TO
CONTAIN ASBESTOS
BREATHING ASBESTOS FIBRES IN KNOWN TO
CAUSE SERIOUS HEALTH PROBLEMS, LUNG
DISEASE AND CANCER
BREATHING ASBESTOS FIBRES IN KNOWN
TO CAUSE SERIOUS HEALTH PROBLEMS,
LUNG DISEASE AND CANCER
DO NOT DISTURB THIS MATERIAL
WITHOUT PROPER TRAINING, EQUIPMENT
AND PRIOR WRITTEN APPROVAL OF THE
ASBESTOS PROGRAMS OFFICER
DO NOT DISTURB THIS MATERIAL
WITHOUT PROPER TRAINING, EQUIPMENT
AND PRIOR WRITTEN APPROVAL OF THE
ASBESTOS PROGRAMS OFFICER
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Asbestos Management Program
On-Site Labelling/Stencilling of Asbestos
Appendix T
3.0
EXEMPTIONS
3.1
Architectural finishes (i.e. sheet flooring, vinyl composite floor tiles, ceiling tiles, wall or
ceiling finishing plasters, texture coats, etc.) and/or mechanical insulation materials
visible to the general public are exempt from labelling.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 3
APPENDIX U
EQUIPMENT LIST FOR IN-HOUSE ASBESTOS WORK
Asbestos Management Program
Equipment List for In-House Asbestos Work
Appendix U
The completion of Type 1, Type 2 and Glove Bag remedial work by PTSD’s own employees can be accomplished
with tools normally maintained on hand by the building’s maintenance department supplemented by the following
asbestos-related equipment.
1.0
PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT & APPAREL
1.1
Disposable Coveralls: Disposable full body coveralls complete with hood and elasticized
hand and pant cuffs. Extra-large in size. Acceptable products: Kleen-guard and/or
Tyvek.
1.2
Respirators: A half face-piece negative pressure air purifying respirator equipped with
high efficiency (P-100) cartridge filters. Respirators should be individually assigned.
Acceptable products: North Model 5500, 3M Model 7000 and/or MSA Model Comfo
Elite.
1.3
Respirator wipes/sanitizing pads.
1.4
Rubber Boots: To ease cleaning of footwear after use. As an alternative, disposable boot
covers.
1.5
Safety glasses, hardhats and other construction related safety items.
2.0
EQUIPMENT
2.1
HEPA Vacuum: Vacuum as equipped with necessary attachments (i.e. crevice tools).
Discharged air must pass through a High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter prior to
being discharged.
2.2
Signage: Appropriately worded to clearly identify the Asbestos Work Area and the need
to don protective equipment, etc. prior to entry.
2.3
Misc. Tools & Cleaning Supplies: i.e. buckets, sponges, scrapers, utility knives c/w
retractable blade, wire brushes, cleaning/scouring pads, rags, etc.
2.4
Water Sprayer: Manual garden-type hand pump c/w nozzle capable of providing a fine
mist.
3.0
SUPPLIES
3.1
Asbestos Disposal Bags: 6 mil (0.15 mm) polyethylene bags. Labelled as containing
asbestos waste.
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Asbestos Management Program
Equipment List for In-House Asbestos Work
Appendix U
3.2
Barrier Tape: Worded appropriately. Used to define the extent of an established Asbestos
Work Area.
3.3
Glove Bags: Single use prefabricated, 0.25 mm (10 mil) minimum thickness
polyvinylchloride bag with integral 0.25 mm (10 mil) thick polyvinylchloride gloves and
elasticized ports. Bag must be equipped with reversible double-pull, double-throw,
zipper to facilitate progressive movement along pipe and also be equipped with interior
zip and nylon straps for sealing ends of bag around pipe. Acceptable product: Safe-TStrip manufactured by Asbesguard Equipment Inc., in configurations suitable for work.
3.4
High Temperature Bridging Encapsulant: Bridging type lagging compound suitable for
surface temperatures up to 1000 °C (1800 °F). Acceptable products: Serpiflex Shield or
Childers product CP-210.
3.5
Insulator’s Canvas: 8 oz canvas sheeting to be used in the repair of piping, ducts, etc.
Ensure product purchased has appropriate flame spread and smoke generation ratings.
3.6
Lock-down Agent: For post-abatement application. Acceptable product: Serpiflex Shield
3.7
Low Temperature Bridging Encapsulant: Bridging type lagging compound suitable for
surface temperatures up to 80 °C (180 °F). Acceptable products: Bakelite 120-19 or
Childers product CP-211.
3.8
Polyethylene Sheeting: 6 mil (0.15 mm) minimum thickness in sheet size to minimize
joints.
3.9
Rip-proof Polyethylene Sheeting: 8 mil (0.20 mm) fabric made up from 5 mil (0.13 mm)
weave and two (2) layers of 1.5 mil (0.05 mm) poly-laminate in sheet size to minimize
on-site seams and overlaps.
3.10
Tape: To include a variety of duct tape, double sided tapes, and packing tape to suit
varying conditions.
3.11
Wetting Agent: Non-sudzing surface active agent. Acceptable products: Aqua-Gro or
Palmolive dish soap.
4.0
SUGGESTED SUPPLIERS (SERVICING THE WINNIPEG AREA)
ACKLANDS-GRANGER
HAZMASTERS ENVIRONMENTAL
19 Scurfield Blvd.
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3Y 1G4
(204) 949-5800
3131 Underhill Avenue
Burnaby, British Columbia
V5A 3C8
(604) 420-0025
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
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Asbestos Management Program
Equipment List for In-House Asbestos Work
Appendix U
SAFETY EXPRESS
KIMRIK SAFETY EQUIPMENT INC.
4060 B Sladeview Crescent, Unit 2
Mississauga, Ontario
L5L 5Y5
1-800-465-3898
Unit 16 Mazenod Road
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R2J 4H2
(204) 668-8886
1-800-363-2234
MSA CANADA
POWER VAC SERVICES
1393 Boarder Street, Unit 1
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3H 0N1
(204) 632-7570
1355 Border Street
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3H 0N1
(204) 632-4433
TIGER VAC
INLAND PRODUCTS
11600 6th Avenue
Montreal, Quebec
H1E 1S1
(416) 782-4687
Box 2199
Drumheller, Alberta
T0J 0Y0
1-800-661-1062
POLYTARP PRODUCTS
11 LePage Court
Downsview, Ontario
M3J 2A3
(416) 633-2231
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Page 3
APPENDIX V
RELEASE FOR RE-OCCUPANCY
Asbestos Management Program
Release for Re-Occupancy
Appendix V
RELEASE FOR RE-OCCUPANCY
Directions: The release for Re-Occupancy is to be completed by the APO or their designated representative. The
APO will review the work report and all inspection reports and complete Parts A and B. Re-occupancy of the
subject space is not to proceed until this form is signed by the APO.
NOTICE: All work shall conform to Federal, Provincial, Municipal standards, codes and guidelines
and the requirements set forth in the Asbestos Management Program for the PTSD or any project
specifications prepared. In the case of a conflict in any of the above noted documents, the most
stringent shall apply.
PERMIT NO.
PART A – Milestones Completed
DATE COMPLETED
MILESTONE COMPLETED:
(Please Check All That Apply)
INITIALS
TYPE 3 – ASBESTOS WORK AREA
Milestone A - Clean Site Preparation
Milestone B - Contaminated Perimeter Preparation
Milestone C - Contaminated Site Preparation
Milestone D - Visual Clearance
Milestone E - Air Clearance
Milestone F - Dismantlement Inspection
TYPE 1 and 2 - ASBESTOS WORK AREAS
Milestone A - Clean Site Preparation
Milestone B - Dismantlement Inspection
GLOVE BAG - ASBESTOS WORK AREA
Milestone A - Clean Site Preparation
Milestone B - Dismantlement Inspection
Other: _______________________________
PART B – AUTHORIZATION & NOTIFICATION
Authorization
Asbestos Programs Officer Signature
© 20111 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
Date
Notification:
Manitoba Workplace Safety and Health (for Type 3)
Facility Manager
Maintenance Project Coordinator
Page 1
APPENDIX W
CONSULTANT NOTIFICATION AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
Asbestos Management Program
Consultant Notification and Acknowledgement
Appendix W
CONSULTANT NOTIFICATION AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
WORKING WITH ASBESTOS CAN BE DANGEROUS. INHALING ASBESTOS FIBRES CAN CAUSE
VARIOUS TYPES OF LUNG DISEASE INCLUDING CANCER. SMOKING INCREASES THE RISK OF
LUNG CANCER FROM ASBESTOS EXPOSURE.
Pinchin Environmental Ltd. has identified the presence of various friable and non-friable ACMs as being present
throughout PTSD facilities. For a complete listing of any ACM or suspect ACMs known to be present, refer to the
most recent version of the Asbestos Survey Reports maintained on file by the APO (Health & Safety Manager
(204) 488-1767, Ext. 1292).
Manitoba Regulation 217/2006 (Workplace Safety and Health Regulation) and associated Guidelines apply to all
maintenance and renovation work that may disturb asbestos or suspect ACMs in the Workplace. Such regulations
and guidelines state that any disturbance of ACMs may only be performed by workers or by an outside contractor
who have first received the required training in asbestos-related precautions.
The following is a partial listing of typical activities that will or may disturb known ACMs and hence requiring the
implementation of Type 1, Type 2 or Type 3 asbestos precautions. Any Contractor required to perform any of the
following activities and/or similar tasks that may result in the disturbance of a known or suspect ACM must first
obtain a signed and authorized “Asbestos Work Permit” from the APO. Work with ACMs must be completed by
workers trained in the hazards of asbestos and the specific procedures related to the work at hand.
Access within a Crawlspace, pipe chase, service area or tunnel where damaged ACMs are known to be
present.
Work that may disturb any asbestos-containing spray or trowel applied texture coats.
Work that may disturb any asbestos mechanical insulation (i.e., pipes, ducts, vessels, boiler, etc.).
Removal, clean-up or repair of any asbestos mechanical insulation (i.e., pipes, ducts, vessels, boilers, etc.).
Removal of asbestos-containing ceiling tiles.
Removal of asbestos-containing sheet flooring products.
Removal, cutting, drilling or other such disturbance of any non-friable asbestos materials (i.e., vinyl composite tile,
asbestos hardboard, transit panelling, asbestos cement pipes, etc.)
Demolition, cutting, drilling or other such disturbance of any plaster finishes (i.e., wall or ceiling) known to contain
asbestos and/or listed as a suspect material in the above mentioned asbestos survey report.
Drilling into, demolition of or any other disturbance of concrete block wals where asbestos-containing vermiculite is
present within the wall cavity.
Other materials, as informed by subsequent notices.
As a condition of our contract to provide services and materials to PTSD, we, the undersigned company hereby
agree to perform our work in such a manner so as NOT to disturb any ACMs without prior authorization and
notification of PTSD’s designated APO. We further acknowledge that this firm and its employees are:
a.
b.
c.
Familiar with all requirements as set forth by the PTSD AMP document as they may pertain to work
undertaken by an outside contractor;
Will conduct our work in accordance with such requirements and in compliance with all Provincial
regulation or guidelines pertaining to asbestos; and
That all asbestos waste will be packaged and disposed of at a licensed landfill.
COMPANY NAME:
COMPANY CONTACT (PRINT):
TITLE (PRINT):
SIGNATURE:
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
DATE:
Page 1
APPENDIX X
EMPLOYEE NOTIFICATION AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
Asbestos Management Program
Employee Notification and Acknowledgement
Appendix X
EMPLOYEE NOTIFICATION AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
WORKING WITH ASBESTOS CAN BE DANGEROUS. INHALING ASBESTOS FIBRES CAN CAUSE
VARIOUS TYPES OF LUNG DISEASE INCLUDING CANCER. SMOKING INCREASES THE RISK OF
LUNG CANCER FROM ASBESTOS EXPOSURE.
Pinchin Environmental Ltd. has identified the presence of various friable and non-friable ACMs as being present
throughout PTSD facilities. For a complete listing of any ACM or suspect ACMs known to be present, refer to the
most recent version of the Asbestos Survey Report maintained on file by the APO (Health & Safety Manager
(204) 488-1767, Ext. 1292)).
Manitoba Regulation 217/2006 (Workplace Safety and Health Regulation) and associated Guidelines apply to all
maintenance and renovation work that may disturb asbestos or suspect ACMs in the Workplace. Such regulations
and guidelines state that any disturbance of ACMs may only be performed by workers or by an outside contractor
who have first received the required training in asbestos-related precautions.
The following is a partial listing of typical activities that will or may disturb known ACMs and hence requiring the
implementation of Type 1, Type 2 or Type 3 asbestos precautions. Any person required to perform any of the
following activities and/or similar tasks that may result in the disturbance of a known or suspect ACM must first
obtain a signed and authorized “Asbestos Work Permit” from the APO. Work with ACMs must be completed by
workers trained in the hazards of asbestos and the specific procedures related to the work at hand.
Access within a Crawlspace, pipe chase, service area or tunnel where damaged ACMs are known to be
present.
Work that may disturb any asbestos-containing spray or trowel applied texture coats.
Work that may disturb any asbestos mechanical insulation (i.e., pipes, ducts, vessels, boiler, etc.).
Removal, clean-up or repair of any asbestos mechanical insulation (i.e., pipes, ducts, vessels, boilers, etc.).
Removal of asbestos-containing ceiling tiles.
Removal of asbestos-containing sheet flooring products.
Removal, cutting, drilling or other such disturbance of any non-friable asbestos materials (i.e., vinyl composite tile,
asbestos hardboard, transit panelling, asbestos cement pipes, etc.)
Demolition, cutting, drilling or other such disturbance of any plaster finishes (i.e., wall or ceiling) known to contain
asbestos and/or listed as a suspect material in the above mentioned asbestos survey report.
Drilling into, demolition of or any other disturbance of concrete block walls where asbestos-containing vermiculite is
present within the wall cavity.
Other materials, as informed by subsequent notices.
I the undersigned hereby agree to perform my work in such a manner so as NOT to disturb any ACMs without prior
authorization and notification of PTSD’s designated APO.
EMPLOYEE NAME (PRINT):
TITLE (PRINT):
SIGNATURE:
© 2011 Pinchin Environmental Ltd.
DATE:
Page 1
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