IU Northwest Bulletin

IU Northwest Bulletin
History
IU Northwest Bulletin
2012-14
Overview
Indiana University
When you become a student at Indiana University, you
join an academic community internationally known for
the excellence and diversity of its programs. With 1,189
degree programs, the university attracts students from
all 50 states and around the world. The full-time faculty
numbers more than 5,000 and includes members of many
academic societies such as the American Academy of Arts
and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and
the National Academy of Sciences.
Indiana University was founded at Bloomington in 1820
and is one of the oldest and largest institutions of higher
education in the Midwest. It serves nearly 120,000
students on eight campuses. The residential campus at
Bloomington and the urban center at Indianapolis form
the core of the university. Campuses in Gary, Fort Wayne,
Kokomo, New Albany, Richmond, and South Bend join
Bloomington and Indianapolis in bringing an education of
high quality within reach of all of Indiana’s citizens.
Faculty
The IU Northwest resident faculty numbers 177 men and
women. They are assisted in their teaching responsibilities
by associate faculty drawn from neighboring academic
institutions, area businesses, local government, and notfor-profit agencies.
All resident faculty at IU Northwest have academic
appointments from Indiana University. Their conditions of
employment, rank, salary, fringe benefits, teaching and
research expectations, and promotion are the same as
their colleagues in respective departments at all Indiana
University campuses.
The faculty of IU Northwest has its own organization,
based upon a constitution written from principles
embodied in the Indiana University Academic Handbook.
Committees established by this faculty organization guide
the conduct of the academic program at IU Northwest in
a tradition that encourages individual faculty members to
recommend policy in all areas affecting their interests and
those of their students.
Students
The student body at IU Northwest numbers more than
6,000 persons working toward certificates and associate,
bachelor's, and master's degrees. Of that number, more
than 575 are enrolled in graduate studies.
The rich economic, cultural, and racial diversity of the
northwest region of the state of Indiana is found on the
campus. About 75 percent of the students reside in
Lake County; 19 percent reside in Porter County; and 4
percent reside in Jasper, Newton, LaPorte, Starke, and
Pulaski Counties. Students, therefore, come with family
backgrounds in steel and related industries, government
agencies, service industries, the professions, and farming.
With respect to the rich cultural and racial composition of
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the region, approximately 56 percent of the students are
Caucasian, 23 percent are African American, 14 percent
are Latino, and 7 percent are other groups. About 85
percent of the students at IU Northwest work full or part
time while pursuing their education at the university. About
39 percent of the students enrolled at the campus are 26
years of age or older.
Alumni Services
The Alumni Office was established on the IU Northwest
campus in 1967 when the IU Alumni Association staffed
the local office with a field representative. There is now
a full-time Alumni Relations Director to serve the alumni
and students of Indiana University. The Office of Alumni
Relations provides programming, maintains records,
publishes communications, and provides services to those
who are members of the IU Northwest Alumni Association,
the Northwest Chapter of the IU Alumni Association, and
the Neal- Marshall Club.
Vision
We are IU in Northwest Indiana, providing personal,
affordable and life-changing education, to advance the
social, economic and civic health of the region. Through
our diverse working and learning environment, we help
build lives and communities.
Mission
The mission of Indiana University Northwest, a regional
campus of Indiana University, is to provide a high-quality
and relevant education to the citizens of Northwest
Indiana, the most diverse and industrialized area of
the state. The institution strives to create a community
dedicated to the pursuit of knowledge and intellectual
development, leading to undergraduate and selected
graduate degrees in the liberal arts, sciences and
professional disciplines. The campus is strongly dedicated
to the value of education, lifelong learning, diversity,
celebration of cultures and opportunity for all, as well as to
participating in the sustainable economic development of
the region and of the state. Indiana University Northwest is
committed to the health and well-being of the communities
it serves.
History
IU Northwest is the result of growth and change that
began in 1921 when the university offered its first formal
classes in Lake County as part of a program sponsored by
the Gary Public School System. Under various names and
in various locations, Indiana University has been serving
the needs of higher education in northwest Indiana ever
since.
In 1932 Indiana University initiated the Calumet Center in
East Chicago; and by 1939, through funds granted by the
state legislature and the federal government, the Calumet
Center was serving students in a building in Tod Park on a
site donated by the City of East Chicago.
When Gary College was founded in 1933, Indiana
University discontinued classes in Gary except for a few
advanced courses. But in 1948, at the request of the Gary
School Board, the university assumed the management of
Gary College, which became the Gary Center of Indiana
University. Gary Center classes were held after school
hours and in the evenings at the Horace Mann High
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Facilities, Maps, and Directions
School until 1949, when all the main facilities of the center
were moved to the commercial wing of the City Methodist
Church, a move that allowed for a considerable expansion
of the center's program. In 1955, with approval from the
Gary Board of Park Commissioners, the Common Council
of the city authorized the sale of 27 acres of Gleason Park
to Indiana University for the purpose of establishing a
Gary Center campus (the present site of IU Northwest).
In May of 1959, the first classes were held in the new
location.
Recognizing the growth of such centers and the increasing
demands for higher education throughout the state,
Indiana University in 1963 reorganized its various
"extension" centers into regional campuses, and the
Gary Center and the Calumet Center became the
Northwest Campus of Indiana University. Soon after
this reorganization, the first degree programs were
authorized, and the Northwest Campus became a fouryear college. The first commencement was held at the
Northwest Campus in June of 1967. In 1968, the IU Board
of Trustees changed the name of the Northwest Campus
to IU Northwest.
Facilities, Maps, and Directions
Campus and Buildings
The campus of IU Northwest in Gary is adjacent to 240
acres of wooded park land, much of which, as currently
developed, includes municipal playing fields, baseball
diamonds, and golf courses. The city of Gary has already
given 32.8 acres of this park property to Indiana University
for the campus. The Gleason Park site is bounded on the
north by an interstate expressway (I 80-94), on the east
by a major north-south artery (Broadway-Indiana 53), on
the west by the Gleason Park Golf Course, and on the
south by residential housing. The northeast and northwest
corners of the 240-acre tract lie adjacent to expressway
cloverleaf exchanges east and west.
Seven of the buildings used by IU Northwest are located
on the 27-acre main campus site. The buildings are
Raintree Hall, a classroom/office building and the Moraine
student union building, which were put into operation
in 1969; Hawthorn Hall, a four-story classroom/office
building, which was occupied in 1976; and the John W.
Anderson Library/Conference Center completed in the
spring of 1980. A three-story science/laboratory building,
Marram Hall, opened in 1991, and the Savannah Center,
which houses an art gallery, auditorium, health club
and bookstore, opened in 2000. In 2006, the University
dedicated the new Dunes Medical/Professional Building.
Adjacent to the campus is a building for divisional,
departmental, and faculty offices. Two other structures
contain university offices, research offices, and campus
support services. There are also a greenhouse and
physical plant facilities.
Maps and Directions
IU Northwest is conveniently located in Gary, Indiana.
We're easy to get to—just minutes from I-90, I-80/94, I-65,
US-12, and US-20.
The Library
The John W. Anderson library provides access to multiple
information sources and services in support of student
learning and faculty research. Along with the book
collections of 250,000 volumes and 250,000 government
publications, the library has access to 180 online abstract
or full-text journal databases, an online catalog of all IU
libraries, online catalogs of local public and university
libraries, 30,000 electronic journals, online encyclopedias,
and biography and statistics databases. The building's
variety of seating, attractive furniture and colorfully
decorated walls, vistas presented by many windows, with
Information Commons, CyberCafe, and Coffeehouse
Café, combine to provide a pleasant, comfortable place for
individual and group study, research, and socializing. The
Library has a Reference Service help Desk staffed the 7
days per week the Library is open. Special purpose areas
include the Calumet Regional Archives, the Northwest
Indiana Center for Data and Analysis, a Geographic
Information System (GIS) Lab, the Federal Government
Depository Collection, the Lake County Central Law
Library and the Community Grants Information Collection.
Through the IU Northwest library, students have access
to the 7 million volumes and 26 million other materials
of the other IU libraries. Books and journal articles in the
Bloomington, Indianapolis, and other regional campus
libraries can be obtained quickly for students and faculty
through the IU Northwest System Services (Interlibrary
Loan) Office.
The Calumet Regional Archives collects, preserves,
and makes available records of local organizations and
individuals that document the history of Indiana's Calumet
Region (Lake and Porter Counties) for use by students,
scholars, and the general public. There are more than
5,000 cubic feet of these documents, preserved for the
education and enjoyment of future generations. The
Northwest Indiana Center for Data and Analysis provides
regional and subregional economic, demographic,
health, environmental, and other data to businesses and
nonprofit and community organizations. The Geographic
Information Systems (GIS) Lab provides software and
assistance for creating spatial maps. The Community
Grants Information Collection and Foundation Center
Cooperating Collection provide materials and databases
for grantseeking.
Accreditation
IU Northwest is accredited for its undergraduate and
graduate programs by the Higher Learning Commission
[30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois,
60602-2504, (800) 621-7440] as an Academic Quality
Improvement Program (AQIP) institution and as a member
of the North Central Association (NCA). AQIP is one of
the accreditation paths offered by the Higher Learning
Commission and is based on principles of continuous
improvement. The credentials of the NCA, a voluntary
certification agency made up of member institutions in 19
states, are accepted on an equal basis by similar agencies
in other parts of the United States and in foreign countries.
Contact Information
Indiana University Northwest
3400 Broadway
Gary, IN 46408
888-YOUR-IUN (888-968-7486)
Associate Degrees
Campus Information and Switchboard
The Campus Information and Switchboard number is the
appropriate place to secure information about the campus
at large. Well-informed staff can answer general inquiries
or direct callers to the appropriate offices in the university.
For campus information, call (219) 980-6500 or 1-888YOUR-IUN (888-968-7486).
Values
We, the students, faculty, staff, and alumni of IU
Northwest, value:
Our unique identity as Indiana University in Northwest
Indiana;
Academic excellence, characterized by a love of ideas
and achievement in learning, discovery, creativity, and
engagement;
The complete richness and dignity of the human family in
all of its diversity;
Supporting aspirations of the individual and community;
The contributions of all of our constituencies;
An environment conducive for learning, self-examination,
and personal growth;
Graduates prepared for life-long learning, ethical
practices, successful careers, and effective citizenship;
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Collaboration with other educational institutions, external
partners, and the Northwest Indiana community.
Centers & Institutes
Center for Innovation and
Scholarship in Teaching and
Learning
The IU Northwest Center for Innovation and Scholarship
in Teaching and Learning (CISTL) provides leadership,
encouragement, and support for innovativeness and
scholarly attention to quality teaching and learning.
CISTL's professional development activities, services,
collaborations, and investigations are designed to invite,
value, and reward faculty excellence in teaching.
CISTL is one of the eight teaching centers in the IU
System and participates in a Centers' Network, which ties
it very closely to the technological and pedagogical goals
of the entire university.
CISTL delivers high quality professional development
activities, which are tied to the academic excellence goals
of the campus and promote the scholarship of teaching
and learning. Four major thrusts of the Center to improve
teaching and learning are: instituting quality online
course offerings taught by faculty who are professionally
trained to design and deliver engaging, collaborative, and
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technologically appropraite learning experiences for their
students; increasing active learning and collaborative
classroom strategies; and integrating technology into
instruction effectively.
The Center could not accomplish these goals alone, so it
does so through internal and external collaborations with
Academic Affairs, the Faculty Organization and several of
its committees, Instructional Technology, and the Faculty
Colloquium on Excellence in Teaching (FACET).
Center for Urban and Regional
Excellence
The Indiana University Northwest Center for Urban
and Regional Excellence is a catalyst fo communityuniversity engagement initiatives. The Center's work is
focused on enhancing civic engagement and examining
and addressing the issues associated with maintaining
and improving the region's quality of life including
Community and Economic Development, Education,
Health, Environmental Sustainability, and the Arts and
Culture.
As a member of the nationally recognized Coalition of
Urban and Metropolitan Universities, Indiana University
Northwest and the Center for Urban and Regional
Excellence are committed to active engagement and
partnership. The center recognizes the wealth of
academic and community resources in our region and
the power of collaboration. Through center initiatives,
faculty and students work closely with community partners
to identify issues that impact the region, and to create
and implement effective strategies for change while
simultaneously supporting and promoting academic
excellence in research, teaching and service.
Academic Programs
IU Northwest offers courses equivalent to those offered
by Indiana University at all its campuses throughout the
state. Courses mentioned in this bulletin as prerequisites
or recommended courses but not described herein may
be courses offered on other Indiana University campuses.
Students should consult their advisors or other bulletins in
the IU series for information about those courses.
The academic programs at IU Northwest include more
than 1,000 sections offered in the College of Arts and
Sciences, College of Health and Human Services, School
of Business and Economics, School of Education, Division
of Continuing Studies, and Medical Sciences.
Degree Programs include Associate Degrees, Certificate
Programs, Bachelor's Degrees, and Master's Degrees. In
addition Overseas Study Programs and Summer Sessions
are available.
Associate Degrees
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A.S. Business
A.S. Criminal Justice
A.S. Dental Hygiene
A.S. Health Information Technology
A.S. Labor Studies
A.S. Radiography
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Bachelor's Degrees
Bachelor's Degrees
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B.A. Afro-American Studies
B.A. Anthropology
B.A. Biology
B.A. Chemistry
B.A. Communication
B.A. Economics
B.A. English
B.A. Fine Arts
B.A. French
B.A. Geology
B.A. History
B.A. Mathematics
B.A. Philosophy
B.A. Political Science
B.A. Psychology
B.A. Sociology
B.A. Spanish
B.A. Theatre
B.G.S. Bachelor of General Studies
B.S.W. Bachelor of Social Work
B.S. Actuarial Science
B.S. Biology
B.S. Business
B.S. Chemistry
B.S. Computer Information Systems
B.S. Criminal Justice
B.S. Dental Hygiene -- Coming Soon
B.S. Elementary Education
B.S. Geology
B.S. Health Services Management
B.S. Informatics
B.S. Labor Studies
B.S. Mathematics
B.S. Nursing
B.S. Psychology
B.S. Public Affairs
B.S. Radiologic Sciences
B.S. Secondary Education
Master's Degrees
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M.B.A. - Fast Track Master of Business
Administration
• Concentration: Management and
Administrative Studies
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M.L.S. Master of Liberal Studies
M.P.A. Master of Public Affairs
• Concentrations:
• Criminal Justice
• Health Services Administration
• Human Services Administration
• Public Management
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M.S. in Clinical Counseling with
Specialization in Drug and Alcohol
Counseling
M.S. Educational Leadership
M.S. Elementary Education
M.S. Secondary Education
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M.S.W. Master of Social Work
• Concentrations:
• Health
• Mental Health and Addictions
• School Social Work
Certificate Programs
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Accounting (post-baccalaureate)
Community Development and Urban Studies (postbaccalaureate)
Computer Information Systems (post-baccalaureate)
Dental Assisting
Environmental Affairs (graduate)
General Studies
Labor Studies
Management (graduate)
Nonprofit Management (graduate)
Public Affairs
Public Health
Public Management (graduate)
Public Safety
Race-Ethnic Studies (post-baccalaureate)
Women's and Gender Studies
Summer Sessions
In addition to the regular session, Indiana University
Northwest regularly offers summer sessions. These
sessions are for students who want to study on the
graduate level, to supplement courses taken during the
regular year, or to speed up the completion of university
study. They also allow high school graduates to enter the
university immediately and to continue their education
without interruption. Admission, orientation, and testing
can thus be completed before the fall semester opens.
Students admitted to the College of Health and Human
Services may be required to enroll in summer session
courses. These students should consult with their program
directors for further information.
Overseas Study Programs
Indiana University Program
Credit earned in overseas study programs sponsored by
Indiana University or participated in by Indiana University
on a consortium basis is considered Indiana University
credit, not transfer credit. Consequently, university
scholarships and loans are applicable to fees for these
programs. Credit usually satisfies Indiana University
degree requirements and meets the senior residency
requirement. Programs are not restricted to language
majors. Indiana University's programs include academic
year programs in Bologna (Italy), Canterbury (Britain),
Hamburg (Germany), Jerusalem (Israel), Lima (Peru),
Madrid (Spain), Nagoya (Japan), Paris (France), Sâo
Paulo (Brazil), Seoul (South Korea), Aix-en-Provence
(France), and Zomba (Malawi); semester programs
in Beijing (China), Belize, Hangzhou (China), Leiden
(Netherlands), St. Petersburg (Russia), Ljubljana
(Slovenia), London (Britain), Maastrict (Netherlands),
Moscow (Russia), Rennes (France), Rome (Italy),
Rotterdam (Netherlands), Seville (Spain), and Singapore;
summer programs in Costa Rica, Dijon (France),
Florence (Italy), Graz (Austria), Guanajuato (Mexico),
Dean's List
St. Petersburg (Russia), Quebec (Canada), Salamanca
(Spain), and Mexico City (Mexico).
Other Study-Abroad Programs
Overseas study programs sponsored by institutions and
organizations other than Indiana University are of varying
quality. University policy on the acceptability of transfer
credit from such programs is as follows:
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Transfer credit will be granted in accordance with
usual Indiana University policy for credit earned in
programs administered by a regionally accredited
U.S. college or university or by a foreign institution
that is recognized by the Ministry of Education of the
country as a university-level institution.
Transfer credit will similarly be granted for universitylevel course work completed at institutions or
agencies that have been officially evaluated by
Indiana University.
Transfer credits may in certain cases be granted
for university-level course work completed at
nonaccredited overseas institutions and agencies
that have not been evaluated by Indiana University
but for which an academic record with grades is
issued, but the maximum quantity will be 1 Indiana
University credit hour for each 2 credit hours (or
the equivalent) appearing on the transcript of the
institution or agency. In many cases, despite the
issuance of a transcript, no transcript credit will be
granted.
No credit will be granted for work completed in
programs for which no grades or transcripts are
issued.
Other Policies
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In all transfer cases, the quantity of credit awarded
by Indiana University will never exceed the number
of credit hours that can be earned at an Indiana
University campus in the same amount of time.
Many courses completed in study abroad programs
fall into a sequential pattern among Indiana
University departmental offerings. In all cases where
sequential-type courses are involved, the respective
academic departments may at their discretion
require examinations before any transfer is granted.
In order to avoid misunderstanding, students who
plan to participate in overseas study programs that
are not sponsored by Indiana University are strongly
urged to consult their major departments or schools
before making any commitment.
None of the preceding affects in any way the
procedures for establishing credit by examination
outlined in this bulletin.
For further information, contact the campus international
programs coordinator in the Department of Modern
Languages.
Policies & Procedures
The Student's Responsibility
All colleges establish certain academic requirements
that must be met before a degree is granted. These
regulations concern such things as curricula and courses,
majors and minors, and campus residence. Advisors,
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directors, and deans will always help a student meet
those requirements, but the student is responsible for
fulfilling them. At the end of a student's course of study,
the faculty and the Trustees of Indiana University vote
upon the conferring of the degree. If requirements have
not been satisfied, the degree will be withheld pending
adequate fulfillment. For that reason it is important: (1)
for students to acquaint themselves with all regulations
and remain informed throughout their college careers;
and (2) for students to realize that while IU Northwest
establishes certain minimum standards that apply to
its students, other standards may be established by its
various academic divisions. Therefore, students should
refer to the appropriate section(s) of this bulletin for a
more complete statement of academic policy.
Academic Standing
Candidates in Good Standing for Baccalaureate
Degrees Students are considered to be candidates in
good standing for an Indiana University baccalaureate
degree when their academic grade point averages are not
less than a C (2.0) average for the last semester's work
and when the cumulative average is not below this same
level.
Class Standing
Class standing is based on the number of credit hours
completed: freshman, fewer than 26; sophomore, 26-55;
junior, 56-85; senior, 86 or more.
Student Load
Students may register for a single course or for a full-time
college program. Students who register for 12 or more
credit hours per semester (12 or more in the summer
sessions) are full-time students. It is not recommended
that a person employed full time take more than 6 credit
hours of academic work during each regular semester,
either in residence or in absentia, or more than 3 credit
hours in each summer session.
Students who expect to graduate in four academic years,
not counting summer sessions, should carry at least 15
credit hours during each semester of the regular academic
year. Except with special permission from the divisional
chairperson, a student is not permitted to carry more than
17 credit hours.
Chancellor's List
Students carrying 12 letter-grade credit hours or more
who earn a 4.0 grade point average for the semester
are placed on the Chancellor's List. Part-time students
enrolled in a degree or certificate program will be placed
on the Chancellor's List provided they carry 12 letter-grade
credit hours or more during the regular academic year
(August to May) and earn a 4.0 grade point average.
Dean's List
Students carrying 12 letter-grade credit hours or more who
earn a 3.3 grade point average or higher for the semester
are placed on the Dean's List. Part-time students enrolled
in a degree or certificate program will be placed on the
Dean's List provided they carry 12 letter-grade credit hours
or more during the regular academic year (August to May)
and earn a 3.3 or higher grade point average.
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Absence
Absence
Illness is usually the only acceptable excuse for absence
from class. Absences must be explained to the satisfaction
of the instructor, who will decide whether omitted work
may be made up. The instructor will report a student's
excessive absence to the chairperson of the academic
division in which the student is majoring.
A student who misses a final examination and who has
a passing grade up to that time may be given a grade of
Incomplete until the instructor or the division chairperson
has had an opportunity to review the reason for the
absence.
Dismissal
Students are dismissed from the university when they
have ceased to make adequate progress toward their
degrees. A student who has failed to earn a C average
in any two semesters and whose cumulative average is
below 2.0 is considered to be making insufficient progress
toward the degree. A student earning less than a D
average (1.0) for a semester, and whose cumulative grade
point falls below a C (2.0) average, is dismissed by the
academic unit. If this is the first dismissal, the student
may be reinstated to the university after attending
a two-hour workshop. Depending on the academic
program, a student who has been reinstated by petition
may be required to earn more than a C average in order to
be considered to be making satisfactory progress toward
the degree.
Probation
Students are placed on probation whenever their
cumulative grade point average is below 2.0. They are
also placed on academic probation for the duration of
the regular semester following the one in which they fail
to make a C average. The ramifications of probation
on a student's status at the University depend upon the
academic unit in which the student is enrolled. Students
who are placed on probation should discuss it with their
academic advisor as soon as possible, to learn what is
necessary to be allowed to continue with the academic
program.
Reinstatement
Dismissed students must remain out of their academic
program for at least one regular semester during or after
which they may petition their academic divisions for
reinstatement. Reinstatement after a second dismissal will
rarely be approved.
Applications for reinstatement must be received no later
than August 1 for the fall semester, December 1 for the
spring semester, April 1 for the first summer session,
and May 1 for the second summer session. Those
dates serve as a general guideline, but students should
check with the appropriate academic unit office for special
unit deadlines.
Academic Forgiveness Policy
Undergraduate students who have not attended Indiana
University for at least two years, are pursuing their first
bachelor’s degree, and are returning to IU Northwest for
the fall semester, 2010 or later, may request academic
forgiveness. Forgiveness means that all grades earned
during the term(s) in question will not be counted in the
calculation of the program GPA. The grades will remain
on the student’s official transcript and will count in the
IU GPA. Academic forgiveness may be requested for
no more than two terms of IU Northwest coursework.
Two consecutive summer sessions may be considered
a single academic term for purposes of this policy. The
petition must be submitted upon application for admission
to a degree-granting unit. If the student has not yet been
admitted to a degree-granting unit, the student should
submit a notification of intent to petition for academic
forgiveness as part of the academic advising process.
Academic forgiveness may be invoked only once in a
student’s academic career. Academic forgiveness is
inapplicable to any grades issued as a result of academic
dishonesty. Academic forgiveness petition forms are
available from your academic school or division.
Beginning with the Fall 2010 semester, after approval of
the Academic forgiveness petition, the original grades
will remain on a student’s academic record (official and
unofficial transcripts), but the GPA and hours earned
calculations will be adjusted appropriately in the Program
statistics.
Academic forgiveness does not impact/change the Indiana
University earned hours or GPA calculations. The policy
does impact the Student Program statistics in order to
provide academic units at IU Northwest with statistics that
support awarding an IU Northwest degree(s). Academic
forgiveness is campus-specific. Semesters forgiven
at IU Northwest need not be forgiven at any other IU
campus. Academic forgiveness only applies to students
who have not completed a bachelor’s degree. Invocation
of academic forgiveness does not preclude a student
using other available, course-specific grade replacement
options, subject to each academic unit’s rules and
procedures. The Academic Forgiveness Policy does not
circumvent any specific additional admissions or grade
policies by particular schools/divisions.
On the Degree Progress report, a text statement will be
placed above the semester approved for forgiveness
that reads: “Academic courses for this term are forgiven
by IU Northwest, mm/dd/yyyy.” In addition, under each
course forgiven, there will be a text statement that
reads: “Attention: No Academic Program Credit or GPA
(Forgiven).”
Attendance and Course Committment
Policy
Attendance and active participation in courses are
key factors for academic success. Students who do
not attend their classes and who do not complete
their assignments in a timely manner are less likely to
successfully complete their courses. At the discretion
of the academic department, students who do not
attend the first scheduled week of classes and who
have not made prior arrangements with their instructor
may be subject to administrative withdrawal. At the
discretion of the faculty, students who miss more than
50% of their class meetings and/or who do not actively
participate in their enrolled classes during the first four
weeks of the fall or spring semesters may be subject to
administrative withdrawal from their courses. Students
may be administratively withdrawn regardless of their
class level or standing. Courses in which the Attendance
and Course Commitment Policy applies are approved
by the academic department and applies to all sections.
Satisfactory
The Office of the Registrar will maintain and publish a
list of courses that have been approved to enforce the
Attendance and Course Commitment Policy. In courses
in which this policy applies, notice of the Attendance and
Course Commitment Policy, including a definition of active
participation, must be included in the course syllabus.
Students must be informed that administrative withdrawal
may have an impact on their financial aid awards and/
or student visa status. Students who are administratively
withdrawn from their courses after any refund period will
not be eligible for a tuition refund.
Addition of Courses after Semester
Start
No student is permitted to enroll in any regularly
scheduled course or for any additional hours of credit in
any course after the first week of a semester or session
unless the instructor of the course approves that an
exception be made and the request is approved by the
student's advisor.
Withdrawals from Courses
A student may withdraw from a course during the first 10
weeks of the semester (fifth week of a summer session)
and will automatically receive a grade of W. After the tenth
week (fifth week of a summer session), the grade shall be
W or F as determined by the instructor.
At any time during the semester, the student may secure
a Schedule Adjustment Form from the registrar's office. A
completed form must be submitted to the registrar's office
within seven days from the date of issuance in order for
the change to be valid. The effective date of the form for
grading and refund purposes will be the date of processing
in the registrar's office.
Withdrawals during the automatic W period require the
signatures of the student and the academic advisor. After
the automatic withdrawal period, a student may withdraw
only with the permission of his or her division dean or
director. This approval is given only for urgent reasons
relating to extended illness or equivalent distress. To
qualify for the grade of W, a student must be passing the
course on the date of withdrawal. If the student is failing,
the grade recorded on the date of withdrawal will be F.
Students who alter their original class schedules, whether
by personal incentive or by university directive, must do
so officially by the procedure outlined above. Students
who do not assume this responsibility are jeopardizing
their records by the possibility of incurring an F in a course
not properly dropped or not receiving credit in a course
improperly added.
Students who simply stop attending classes without
formally withdrawing will jeopardize their student status,
will become liable for repayment of all federal financial aid
and tuition and fees.
Grades
The official grading system of the university is as follows:
A, B, C, D, F, I (Incomplete), W (Withdrawn), P (Passed),
S (Satisfactory), R (Deferred Grade), and FX (Failure
Removed from GPA Calculations). The University Faculty
Council has passed a resolution that permits the use
of plus and minus grades. The faculty council has also
established a formula that attaches varying weights to
these grades in computing grade point averages: A+ or A
7
= 4.0; A- = 3.7; B+ = 3.3; B = 3.0; B- = 2.7; C+ = 2.3; C =
2.0; C- 1.7; D+ = 1.3; D = 1.0; D- = 0.7; F = 0.0.
The legislation was framed in general terms and applies
to instructors teaching graduates and undergraduates
on all campuses of Indiana University. Within the policy,
individual instructors and academic units can elect to
require its faculty to assign
1. only straight letter grades;
2. any combination of plus, minus, and straight letter
grades; or
3. Pass/Fail in clinical or other phases of course work,
or to permit individual students in specified courses
to elect Pass/Fail options.
The weights assigned by the registrar will be those
specified above. It is the responsibility of the academic
unit to adopt procedures for electing options, implementing
the decision, and announcing its decision to faculty and
students.
The quality of a student's work is indicated by the following
grades:
• A = Unusal degree of academic excellence
• B = Above average achievement
• C = Average achievement
• D = Passing work but below desired standards
• F = Failure in a course
• S = Satisfactory
• P = Passed (Pass/Fail Option)
• W = Withdrawn
• I = Incomplete
• R = Deferred Grade
• FX
• Credit by Examination
• Veterans Credit
Withdrawn
The grade W is given when the student, with the approval
of the academic advisor, officially withdraws during the
first 10 weeks of a semester or the first four weeks of a
summer session. Thereafter, it is given only when the
student withdraws with the approval of the instructor and
the division chairperson and if the student is passing on
the date of withdrawal.
Passed (Pass/Fail Option)
Students may elect to take one course each semester
with a grade of P (Pass) or F (Fail), with a maximum of
two such courses each school year, including summer
sessions. The student must exercise the election of this
option within the first three weeks of the semester or first
two weeks of the summer sessions. Required courses
and courses used to meet concentration requirements
may not be taken under this option. The responsibility
for approval, as well as special regulations affecting the
option, rests with the chairperson of the student's division
under procedures that the division establishes. A grade of
P is not counted in the cumulative grade point average,
but a grade of F is included. A grade of P cannot be
subsequently changed to a grade of A, B, C, or D.
Satisfactory
Certain courses are offered under the S/F grading policy.
Credits earned with the grade S count toward graduation
but are not computed in the grade point average. In any
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Deferred Grade
course in which the grade S is used, the only other grade
permitted will be F.
The course in which the student re-enrolls should be the
same course in which an F was previously received.
Deferred Grade
The FX policy has the following limitations:
Used on the final grade report, the R indicates that the
nature of the course is such that the work of the student
can be evaluated only after two or more terms. The grade
R is appropriate only so long as there is work in progress.
The deferred grade procedure can be used only with
approval of the division and the willingness of the student
to take the extended course before receiving a grade.
Removal of a Deferred Grade At the end of the second
term of a deferred grade course, the instructor will submit
the student's grade for the last term on the grade sheet for
that term and/or send a Removal of Deferred Grade Card
through the divisional office of the student's school to the
registrar's office.
If work is interrupted because of extenuating
circumstances, a special arrangement between student
and instructor must be made on a term-to--term basis. If a
student drops out of a course before the work is complete,
the instructor must assign a regular grade (A, B, C, W,
etc.) for the course.
Incomplete
The grade I may be given only when the work of the
course is substantially completed and when the student's
work is of a passing quality. When an Incomplete is
assigned, a record must be maintained in the department
in which the grade was given. The record will include the
reason for recording the Incomplete, the course number
and hours of credit, the signature of the instructor, and
a guide for its removal, with a suggested final grade in
the event of the departure or extended absence of the
instructor from the campus.
The time allowed for the removal of an Incomplete is one
calendar year from the date of its recording, however
the chairperson of the student's division may authorize
adjustment of this period in exceptional circumstances.
By assigning an Incomplete, the instructor implicitly
authorizes and requires the I to be changed to an F at
the end of the appropriate time period, if that instructor
does not otherwise act to remove the I. The registrar
will automatically change the I to an F at the end of the
appropriate time period. A grade of Incomplete may be
removed if the student completes the work within the time
limit or if the student's chairperson authorizes the change
of the Incomplete to W. Students may not reregister in a
course in which they have a grade of Incomplete.
FX
This grade marking is defined in the student transcript
as representing an F grade in a course that has been
removed from GPA calculations by a subsequent retake
of the course. The policy pertains only to undergraduate
students. The policy of re- enrollment pertains only to a
course in which an F was previously received. A grade
of D, or any other grade, cannot be improved via this
policy. In retaking the course the student must receive
a regular letter grade of A, B, C, D, F, P, or S to change
the original F to an FX. The grades of W or I will not
qualify for removal. Students wishing to repeat a course in
which they received an F must secure the approval of the
chairperson of their division prior to repeating the course.
1. A student may exercise the FX option for no more
than three courses totaling no more than 10 credits.
2. A student may use the FX option only once for a
given course.
Credit by Examination
The student may receive credit for certain courses by
successfully passing College Board Achievement Tests;
by outstanding performance on advanced placement
examinations given before the beginning of each
academic year in French, German, and Spanish; and
by successful performance on appropriate examinations
while at Indiana University. Students who believe they are
eligible for special credit because of superior preparation
or independent study are urged to accelerate their college
programs in this manner. Please see the Office of
Admissions for more details.
Where credit by examination is awarded by the university,
that credit will be recorded simply with the grade S on the
student's transcript unless the examination clearly merits
an A grade. Failure to pass the examination carries no
penalty and is not recorded. See "Special Credit" under
"Financial Information."
Veterans Credit
Veterans of military service are eligible for academic
credit as a result of their military training and experience.
The university follows the provisions of the American
Council on Education (ACE) Guide for the Evaluation
of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services in
granting credit. In general, this provides that a student
who has completed from six months to one year is eligible
for 2 credit hours, equivalent to first- year ROTC; and
a veteran of more than one year is eligible for 4 credit
hours, equivalent to two years of ROTC, and 2 credit
hours for one year of freshman physical education, less
any physical education or basic ROTC credit previously
earned. Additional credit as may be justified is awarded
for special training programs. Copies of official discharge
or separation papers or transcripts must be submitted
as a basis for granting credit. The Office of Admissions
administers evaluation of service credit.
Students attending the university with educational
assistance from the G.I. Bill should note that for full- time
monthly payment 12 hours of credit must be taken. Threequarter-time benefit is paid for 9 to 11 hours of credit; half
time consists of 6 to 8 credit hours or the equivalent.
General Education Requirements
Undergraduate Programs
The following general education principles guide the
achievement of excellence in undergraduate education at
IU Northwest. They describe university level capabilities,
knowledge across disciplines, awareness of diversity and
ethics that we believe every graduate of an IU Northwest
baccalaureate degree program should attain. These
principles embrace learning experiences that prepare
students for lifelong learning, ethical practices, successful
careers, and effective citizenship. The courses required to
fulfill the General Education Program will vary depending
General Education Requirements
upon the specific major that the student chooses. Each
academic division has incorporated specific general
education courses into the degree requirements to
insure that the following five principles and their learning
outcomes are achieved.
Principle 1 Foundations for Effective Learning and
Communication
Fluency in reading, writing, and oral communication;
mastery of the basic principles of logical, mathematical,
and scientific reasoning; and literacy in information
resources and learning technologies.
Reading and Writing - Students will:
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Read actively and critically, analyzing and evaluating
a writer's ideas and assumptions, use of illustrations,
examples and evidence, and the effectiveness of the
structure and style of challenging written texts.
Analyze and evaluate the relationship between a
writer's central purpose in a text and the rhetorical
means-ethical, emotional, and logical-used to
advance that purpose.
Use the writing process as a tool of inquiry to
discover, explore, test, and develop ideas.
Draft and revise written texts that provide readers
with effectively organized and clearly integrated
support-in the form of illustrations and examples,
relevant and sufficient data, and other pertinent
sources of information and ideas-of a wellformulated thesis.
Incorporate the words and ideas of others correctly
and effectively, as support of the text's thesis.
Edit written texts for clarity and appropriateness
of style, precision of language, and correctness
in grammar and punctuation, and adhere to the
expectations of an appropriate documentation style.
Oral Communication - Students will:
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Demonstrate a clearly defined purpose through an
effective delivery of oral presentations that manifest
logical organization, proper grammar, appropriate
word choices, and coherent sentence structure.
Present a central idea, clearly reasoned arguments,
and an audience-centered perspective that takes
account of communicative differences across
cultures.
Engage in ethical practices that include citation of
credible sources.
Demonstrate effective use of media and
technologies that enhance the presentation.
Logical Reasoning outcomes appear among
outcomes in domains 1, 2, 4 and 5.
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Use mathematical models such as formulas, graphs,
tables to draw inferences.
Represent mathematical information symbolically,
visually, numerically, and verbally.
Demonstrate the ability to effectively use arithmetic,
algebraic, geometric, logical and/or statistical
methods to model and solve real world problems.
Scientific Reasoning - Students will:
Demonstrate the ability to identify and explain
how scientific theories are formulated, tested, and
validated.
Demonstrate the ability to integrate and apply
scientific methods which include defining parameters
of problem, seeking relevant information, subjecting
proposed solutions to rigorous testing, and drawing
conclusions based on the process.
Information Literacy - Students will:
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Determine the nature and extent of the information
and the information sources needed.
Access the information efficiently from a diverse set
of information sources.
Evaluate the information sources critically and
incorporate selected information into papers and
projects.
Utilize information sources ethically and effectively
document and communicate acquired information to
accomplish a specific purpose.
Learning Technologies Literacy - Students will:
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Use appropriate technologies as a tool to solve
problems and to accomplish given tasks.
Demonstrate the ability to use and learn new
technologies.
Use computer and other technologies effectively and
appropriately to communicate information in a variety
of formats.
Use appropriate technology resources to identify and
evaluate information, create and transfer knowledge.
Principle 2 Breadth of Learning
Mastery of the core concepts, principles, and methods in
arts and humanities, cultural and historical studies, the
social and behavioral sciences, and the mathematical,
physical, and life sciences.
Arts and Humanities - Students will:
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Articulate how intellectual traditions from diverse
parts of the world shape present cultures.
Demonstrate an understanding of a broad range of
significant literary, philosophical, historical, linguistic,
or religious works and approaches.
Demonstrate an understanding of how the fine,
performing or creative arts contribute to many
aspects of human experience.
Cultural and Historical Studies - Students will:
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Mathematical Reasoning - Students will:
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Demonstrate knowledge about diverse cultures and
societies.
Demonstrate knowledge of the experiences and
worldviews of groups defined by ethnicity, race,
social class, language, religion, age, gender, sexual
orientation, or disabilities.
Analyze the interconnectedness of global and
local concerns or explain how political or historical
processes shape civilizations.
Social and Behavioral Sciences - Students will:
•
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Explain the methods of inquiry used by social or
behavioral scientists.
Explain behavior using social or behavioral science
theories and concepts.
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Writing Competencies
•
Explain the factors that influence how different
societies organize themselves or how individual
differences influence various spheres of human
activity.
Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences - Students
will:
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Use mathematical models such as formulas, graphs,
tables to draw inferences.
Represent mathematical information symbolically,
visually, numerically, and verbally.
Use arithmetic, algebraic, geometric, logical, and/or
statistical methods to model real world problems.
Recognize and understand how scientific theories
are formulated, tested, and validated.
Approach problems using scientific methods, which
include: defining parameters of problem, seeking
relevant information, subjecting proposed solutions
to rigorous testing, and drawing conclusions based
on the process.
Principle 5 Ethics and Citizenship
The application of the principles of ethics and governance
to the larger society, one's immediate community, and to
individual conduct on campus and in society.
Students will:
•
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Demonstrate the ability to reason ethically and apply
ethical principles when making decisions.
Demonstrate an awareness of the responsibilities
and roles of being a citizen and strategies for being
involved in a democratic society.
Writing Competencies
Student writing at IU Northwest is expected to reflect the
following basic competencies:
1. The purpose of the writing should be evident; the
directions of the assignment followed appropriately.
2. Topics need to be narrowed to a manageable scope.
Principle 3 Critical Thinking, Integration, and
Application of Knowledge
Logical analysis and synthesis of information and ideas
from multiple perspectives; critical acquisition, integration,
and application of knowledge in students' intellectual,
personal, professional, and community lives.
3. Ideas should be stated clearly and thoroughly
discussed: the reader shouldn't have to infer meanings.
Information presented should be accurate and complete.
Students will:
5. Material should be organized and presented in a
sensible manner.
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Raise vital questions and problems, formulating
them clearly and precisely
Gather and assess relevant information, using
abstract ideas to interpret it effectively
Come to well-reasoned conclusions and solutions,
testing them against relevant criteria and standards
Think open-mindedly about alternative systems
of thought or beliefs, recognizing and assessing,
as need be, their assumptions, implications, and
practical consequences; and
Communicate effectively with others in figuring out
solutions to complex problems
IU Northwest students should be able to apply these skills
within their disciplines.
Principle 4 Diversity
Valuing the diversity of human experience, as exemplified
in race, ethnicity, social class, language, religion, gender,
sexual orientation, age, or disabilities; understanding
how these categories are often used to create injustice;
recognizing our common human heritage and the
interconnectedness of communities in the region, the
nation, and the world.
Students will:
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Demonstrate understanding of cultural diversity in a
variety of contexts.
Demonstrate understanding of the relationships
between social structures, social justice, and human
rights.
Demonstrate understanding of racial minority
experiences and diverse worldviews and the manner
in which they shape U.S. culture and the world.
4. The tone, diction, and structure of the writing should
reveal a sense of audience.
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An introduction should lead the reader smoothly into
the body of the writing.
Adequate transitions should be used to connect
ideas as they develop in the writing.
Support paragraphs should stay with the main point
of the writing and relate clearly to each other.
A summary or conclusion will often be necessary to
reemphasize the writer's central idea and attitude.
6. A thesis should be present (or clearly implied) which
shows the writer's point of view and/or purpose, and all
material in the writing must be relevant to that thesis.
Various rhetorical strategies should be used to advance
that thesis. (Examples of such strategies could include
cause and effect, comparison and contrast, definition,
process, analysis, persuasion, illustration, classification,
description, and narration. Skills such as hypothesis
testing and summary recall should be exhibited when
appropriate.)
7. Sentences should be fluent and clear on first reading.
Their construction should be varied, their form concise.
8. Word choice should be varied and accurate in
denotation and connotation. Word choice should reflect
awareness of audience and purpose. (For example, use
of first person, jargon, or contractions in many instances is
allowable, at other times not.)
9. Grammatical and mechanical errors should be avoided.
These errors would include
•
Shifts in verb tense, improper verb endings, lack of
agreement between subject and verb.
Transfer to Other Indiana University Campuses
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Failure of pronouns to agree with their antecedents
and unclear pronoun references.
Sentence structure errors, which would include
fragments, run-ons, and comma splices.
Punctuation errors such as incorrect use or omission
of commas, apostrophes, quotation marks, and end
marks.
Capitalization errors.
10. Attention should be paid to misspellings of common
words and/or frequent misspellings of difficult words.
11. The writing should be accessible and neat, showing a
sense of the importance of presentation.
12. Students must understand that plagiarism includes
using another person's words, ideas, or information
without proper citation. (See Code of Student Rights,
Responsibilities, and Conduct) Instructors will supply
students with preferred citation formats or direct them to
reference works.
These basic competencies do not preclude other
criteria depending on the instructor's standards, the
circumstances of the writing, or the nature of the
assignment.
Emergency Closings
Occasionally, Indiana University Northwest is forced to
close because of weather emergencies. In the case of
severe storms that occur overnight, every effort is made
to assess conditions early enough in the day to notify the
mass media of a campus closing in time to alert students,
faculty, and staff members before they set out for the
campus. In periods of very bad winter weather, students
are urged to monitor northwest Indiana radio stations
for closing announcements as well as Indiana University
Northwest's Web page (www.iun.edu).
Graduation Procedures
Degree Requirements
Each division sets its own degree requirements. Students,
therefore, should be sure that they are fully informed as to
the requirements of the division from which they expect to
receive their degree.
Students are responsible for understanding all
requirements for graduation and for completing them by
the time they expect to graduate. Information about a
specific school or division can be found in the front section
of the bulletin for that school.
Requests for deviation from department, program, or
school requirements may be granted only by written
approval from the respective chairperson, director, or
dean (or a designated administrative representative).
Disposition at each level is final.
Credit Deadline
All credit of candidates for degrees, except that for the
work of the current semester, must be on record at least
one month prior to the conferring of the degrees.
11
Application for Degree
Each division sets its own dates and procedures for filing
applications for degrees. Students, therefore, should
be sure that they are fully informed about the dates and
procedures used in the division from which they expect to
receive their degree.
Degrees Awarded with Distinction
To graduate with academic distinction, baccalaureate and
associate degree candidates must rank within the highest
10 percent of the graduating class of their respective
degree-granting division. Additionally, baccalaureate
degree candidates must have completed a minimum of
60 credit hours at Indiana University. Associate degree
candidates must have completed at least half the hours
required for their degree at Indiana University. Each
degree-granting division determines the appropriate GPA
requirements for the three levels of recognition: distinction,
high distinction, and highest distinction.
Transfer to Other Indiana University
Campuses
The policy stated below concerning transfer credit pertains
to undergraduate students only.
Each campus has established one office to serve as the
central information source for intercampus transfers.
Some campuses have priority dates for students to
declare an interest in making an intercampus transfer.
Even if a campus has no priority date, it is important to
start investigating the transfer requirements as early as
possible to assure the best possibility of enrolling in your
desired courses.
Consult the intercampus transfer Web site
at www.iupui.edu/~moveiu for detailed information and
a listing of campus contacts and intercampus transfer
policies. You can also initiate an intercampus transfer by
completing the form on the Web site.
Students who want to transfer from one Indiana
University campus to another campus should follow these
procedures:
1. Meet with your home campus advisor to discuss
academic preparation, grades, and other eligibility
issues. You can get a general idea of how your
classes may apply to another degree by using the
Degree Progress Report, a computerized degreeaudit system available on the Web through the
OneStart portal at onestart.iu.edu. While the advising
capacity of the Degree Progress Report is qualified
by each individual's circumstances, it can help
you learn how courses will apply toward different
degrees.
2. Consult the intercampus transfer office at the
proposed new campus if academic and/or eligibility
questions remain. Remember that application for
intercampus transfer does not guarantee admission
to the campus or a specific school on the campus.
Campuses may provide additional information and
contact points for questions.
3. If applicable, talk to the financial aid offices at the
present and proposed campuses. Your aid eligibility
does not transfer automatically from one campus to
another.
12
Other Transfer Policies
4. Visit the new campus to explore possible academic
and social adjustment issues; some campuses
may establish special open house events for those
students who have expressed interest. Some
campuses may also require that you attend a special
orientation program or take placement examinations.
5. If you decide to proceed with the transfer, complete
the intercampus transfer form. The receiving campus
will respond to you and your home campus. If you
decide later not to transfer, you should notify both
campuses.
Title IX for Women's Rights and Issues at IU Northwest is
the director of diversity and equity, (219) 980-6705.
Admissions
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•
•
1
Some academic programs require specific qualifications
in addition to those enumerated in this policy.
Other Transfer Policies
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•
In all transfer cases, the quantity of credit awarded
by Indiana University will never exceed the number
of credit hours that can be earned at an Indiana
University campus in the same amount of time.
Many courses completed in study abroad programs
fall into a sequential pattern among Indiana
University departmental offerings. In all cases where
sequential-type courses are involved, the respective
academic departments may at their discretion
require examinations before any transfer is granted.
In order to avoid misunderstanding, students who
plan to participate in overseas study programs that
are not sponsored by Indiana University are strongly
urged to consult their major departments or schools
before making any commitment.
None of the preceding affects in any way the
procedures for establishing credit by examination
outlined in this bulletin.
Other Transfer Policies
A statement of students’ rights and responsibilities
is published in a handbook, Code of Student Rights,
Responsibilities, and Conduct, which contains a
description of due process hearings in the event of
disciplinary action.
Nondiscrimination Policy
Indiana University pledges itself to continue its
commitment to the achievement of equal opportunity
within the university and throughout American society as
a whole. In this regard, Indiana University will recruit, hire,
promote, educate, and provide services to persons based
upon their individual qualifications. Indiana University
prohibits discrimination based on arbitrary consideration
of such characteristics as age, color, disability, ethnicity,
gender, marital status, national origin, race, religion,
sexual orientation, or veteran status.
Indiana University shall take affirmative action, positive
and extraordinary, to overcome the discriminatory effects
of traditional policies and procedures with regard to the
disabled, minorities, women, and Vietnam-era veterans.
An Affirmative Action office on each campus monitors
the university’s policies and assists individuals who
have questions or problems related to discrimination. To
consult with the 504 coordinator of issues of students with
disabilities at IU Northwest, contact the Office of Student
Support Services, (219) 980- 6798. The coordinator of
•
The Office of Admissions is one of several offices on
campus for prospective students to begin learning
about the university.
Students may secure admissions applications,
academic brochures, and other information about
admissions and enrollment.
Prospective students may talk with an admissions
counselor and be given a tour of the campus, which
can provide students the opportunity to meet with
professors in their area of interest.
Application Priority Dates:
• Fall Semester: July 1
• Spring Semester: December 1
• Summer Session I: April 1
• Summer Session II: June 1
Office of Admissions
IU Northwest
Hawthorn Hall 100
3400 Broadway
Gary, IN 46408-1197
(219) 980-6991
Contact the Office of Admissions for additional contact
information.
Early Start Program Admission
Qualified high school seniors and juniors may be given
permission to enroll in appropriate on-campus freshman
courses while completing their high school courses.
Students may qualify for early admission under the
following conditions:
1. Complete the Early Start Program application.
2. Have the application signed by the school principal
or guidance counselor.
3. Submit an official high school transcript showing
at least a cumulative grade point average of 3.0
on a 4.0 scale (a B average) and standardized test
scores.
Dual Credit/Concurrent Enrollment
IU Northwest has partnered with many high schools and
s
the 21 Century Scholar Program in northwest Indiana
to offer dual credit/concurrent enrollment programs.
These programs offer high schools juniors and seniors
an opportunity to earn college credit when enrolled in
designated high school courses. For more information,
contact your high school guidance counselor or the
Office of Admissions at 219/980-6991 or www.iun.edu/
admissions.
Undergraduate Admissions
Applications
Each freshman applicant must submit the following:
1. The completed undergraduate admission application
(online application preferred)
2. An official high school transcript
3. An application fee (or fee waiver if applicable)
Transfer Students
Application Process for Freshman
Students
Each freshman applicant must submit the following:
1. The completed undergraduate admission application
(online application preferred)
2. An official high school transcript plus official college
transcripts if dual credit has been earned with a C or
better.
3. SAT/ACT scores if current high school senior or
those who have been out of high school for less than
one year (or within one year of when should have
graduated if GED recipients)
4. A $35 application fee (or 21s Century Scholar or
SAT/ACT fee waiver if applicable)
5. AP Credit by examination scores, if applicable
6. Criminal Activity Disclosure statement, if applicable
7. DD214 and other military transcripts, if veteran (for
credit granting purpose only)
IU Northwest supports the State of Indiana Core 40
curriculum. Indiana residents graduating from high school
in 2011 or thereafter must complete Core 40 to satisfy
the minimum requirement for admission. Out-of-state
applicants are expected to complete an equivalent college
preparation curriculum. Students not completing Core
40 can prove they are prepared to succeed in college
coursework by successfully completing at least twelve
credit hours of college-level courses with at least a “C’
average or at least the equivalent in each course and
applying to IU Northwest as a transfer student.
Indiana University has adopted the following admissions
policies to insure that undergraduate students are
prepared for university work. Applicants for admission to
Indiana University will be expected to meet the following
criteria.
Persons applying for admissions to degree programs
should have graduated from a state-accredited high
school and completed, before they matriculate, the
following 40 credits:
1. Eight credits of English, including a balance of
literature, composition and speech.
2. Six credits of social studies, including U.S.
history, world history/civilization, economics, U.S.
government
3. Six credits of math including four credits of algebra
and two credits of geometry or an equivalent six
credits of integrated algebra and geometry
4. Six credits of laboratory science, including biology,
chemistry or physics, or integrated chemistry-physics
5. Five credits in some combination of world
languages, fine arts or career-technical
6. Two credits of physical education and one credit of
health
7. Six elective credits which are recommended to be of
college-preparatory nature
If the requirements of an out-of-state applicant's high
school diploma preclude satisfying these course
requirements, then alternate college-preparatory courses
may be substituted where necessary.
13
Applicants are expected to have at least a cumulative
GPA of 2.0, rank in the top half of their class (if
applicable), and have SAT or ACT scores that meet or
exceed the median score for high school students in the
region we serve. Applicants who are deficient in some
of the standards listed above (excluding the Core 40)
may be admitted on a probationary status after further
consideration of academic abilities, motivation, and
maturity.
Any denied student will be referred to the Director of
Student Retention Programs for information on the Reach
Program in conjunction with Ivy Tech Community College.
Students without a high school diploma may submit a
GED certificate showing an average score of at least 50
(before January 1, 2003) or 500 (after January 1, 2003).
Transfer Students
Each transfer applicant must submit the following:
1. The completed undergraduate admission application
(online application preferred)
2. Official transcripts from every college/university
attended.
3. Official high school transcript if less than 26 hours of
college level has been successfully completed with a
“C” or better
4. SAT/ACT scores if out of high school for less than
one year (or within one year of when should have
graduated if GED recipients)
5. AP Credit by examination scores, if applicable
6. A $35 application fee
7. Criminal Activity Disclosure statement, if applicable
8. DD214 and other military transcripts, if veteran (for
credit granting purpose only)
Applicants for admission as a transfer student must be in
good standing with their previous college(s) and have a
cumulative GPA of at least a 2.0 on a 4.0 scale.
Transfer applicants must request and submit official
transcripts from ALL regionally accredited colleges/
universities attended. IU Northwest accepts electronic
transcripts directly from the institution or through secure
transcript agencies such as the National Student
Clearinghouse. IU credit will not be given at a future date
for credit previously earned from a school that is not listed
at the time of application.
IU Northwest accepts credit from regionally accredited
institutions for college level courses in which the student
has received a grade of C or better. Institutional test credit
and courses graded pass/fail or credit/no credit without
an associated grade are not transferable. In general,
there is no time limit for transferability of credit; however,
some departments have established time limitations for
transferring specific courses due to their nature. The
initial equivalency of credit is processed by the Office
of Admissions, based on the Indiana Core Transfer
Library, articulation agreements, or previously determined
equivalencies by the faculty. A student has the right to
appeal the initial conversion of credit by contacting the
department faculty chair and providing additional proof
of equivalency, such as syllabus, course content and
textbook information.
14
Visiting Students
A list of courses that will transfer among Indiana public
college and university campuses can be found at Indiana
Core Transfer Library, http:www.transferin.net/CTL.aspx
Visiting Students
Visiting applicants do not intend to seek a degree at IU
Northwest (or any Indiana University campus) but want to
earn academic credits at IU Northwest for a limited period
of time, usually one semester, to transfer to their home
institution. These students are not eligible for financial aid.
Each applicant must submit the following:
1. The completed admission application (online
application preferred)
2. An official college/university transcript showing
good standing with a “C” or better or a letter from
the school indicating good academic standing; a
transcript showing completion of a bachelor degree;
GED or high school transcript showing average or
above average achievement
3. A $35 application fee
4. Criminal Activity Disclosure statement, if applicable
Adult Non-Degree Seeking Students
This admission status is designed to serve adults who do
not want to earn a degree at this time, but want to earn
academic credits. These students are not eligible for
financial aid.
An adult nondegree student may be admitted upon
submission of the following:
1. The admission application.
2. An official high school transcript or GED showing
average or above average achievement or a
transcript showing completion of a bachelor degree.
Note: The applicant who is not eligible for regular
admission will also be denied admission in this
category.
International Applicants
All non-United States citizens and those educated in
countries other than the United States who want to
study any program at any level are required to complete
the online application as an international applicant for
Admission. The online application must be completed
and appropriate educational records, must be forwarded
to the IU Northwest Office of Admissions, where it
will be evaluated and processed in coordination with
International Services at the Bloomington campus. For
more information, please contact the Office of Admissions
at 219/980-6991.
Intercampus Transfer Students
Students attending other IU campuses who which to
transfer temporarily or permanently to IU Northwest do not
need to apply through the Office of Admissions and should
complete the online Intercampus Transfer Form at https://
www.iupui.edu/~moveiu/moveiu.html.
Veteran/Military Students
In granting credit on the basis of education gained
through military service, schools, and experience, IU
Northwest Office of Admissions follows the American
Council on Education’s Guide to Evaluation of Educational
Experiences in the Armed Services.
To receive credit for your military service background, you
must submit copies of your official discharge (DD214),
AARTS, SMARTS, Community College of the Air Force,
university/college, or Defense Language Institute
transcript.
Notice of Admission Status
All applicants who follow the guidelines will receive
notification of their admission status within 2 weeks of
the receipt of all materials. Admission to an academic
division as a pre-major does not indicate admission into
the program, i.e., Pre-Nursing, Pre-Dental Education,
Pre-Radiography or Pre-Radiologic Science, or PreHealth Information Management students must submit
a departmental application to and be admitted into the
program by the respective departments.
Some freshman students who are unable to meet regular
admission requirements may, after additional testing
and counseling be admitted into Guided Studies /Critical
Literacy where they will be required to enroll in skillbuilding courses. Students in this category will be required
to satisfactorily complete these courses before they are
admitted to an academic division.
Placement Testing
The university requires that all new students not
transferring in college level English or math take
placement tests before academic advising. This ensures
that students are placed in courses commensurate with
their academic abilities. Appointments are required and
can be scheduled online through the Placement Testing
Center or by calling (219) 980-6830. Students who have
had four years of a foreign language in high school are
encouraged to take the Foreign Language Placement
Test. Tests are offered in French, German, and Spanish
and permit the awarding of advanced and special credit.
There is a $12 fee for each test.
New Student Orientation
New Student Orientation is mandatory for all new
freshmen and transfer students. Programs are offered
before the start of fall (multiple sessions during the
summer), spring and summer terms and are designed
to make the student’s transition into IU Northwest more
efficient and effective. Students will have an opportunity
to learn more about financial aid, parking, student
accounts, academic support services, student life, and
the how-to’s of being a successful student. Academic
advising and registration will also be available. Parent
sessions are available. Reservations can be made through
New Student Orientation or by contacting the Office of
Admissions (219) 981-4348.
Graduate Programs
Students seeking graduate degrees must apply directly
to the specific division that awards the desired degree.
Each division that awards graduate degrees has its own
admission policies and procedures. The appropriate dean
or graduate advisor must officially approve a student's
enrollment in graduate courses. If students register
for graduate credits without school approval, they do
so without assurance that credit for such work may be
Determining Resident Status
15
applied toward fulfilling requirements for an advanced
degree.
in which the individual registers in the University, subject
Nondiscrimination Policy
a. The residence of an unemancipated person under
21 years of age follows that of the parents or of a legal
guardian who has actual custody of such person or
administers the property of such person. In the case of
divorce or separation, if either parent meets the residence
Indiana University is committed to equal opportunity for
all persons and provides its services without regard to
gender, age, race, religion, ethnicity, sexual orientation,
veteran status, or disability. The university director
of affirmative action is responsible for carrying out
the affirmative action program for units in central
administration. In addition, there is an affirmative action
officer on each campus who develops and administers the
program locally.
To consult with the 504 coordinator of issues of students
with disabilities at IU Northwest, contact the Office
of Student Support Services, (219) 980- 6798. The
coordinator of Title IX for Women's Rights and Issues at IU
Northwest is housed within the Office of Affirmative Action,
(219) 980-6705.
Determining Resident Status
Rules Determining Resident and Nonresident Student
Status for Indiana University Fee Purposes
These Rules establish the policy under which students
shall be classified as residents or nonresidents upon
all campuses of Indiana University for University fee
purposes. Nonresident students shall pay a nonresident
fee in addition to fees paid by a resident student.
These Rules shall take effect February 1, 1974; provided,
that no person properly classified as a resident student
before February 1, 1974, shall be adversely affected by
this Rule, if he or she attended the university before that
date and while he or she remains continuously enrolled in
the university.
1. “Residence” as the term, or any of its variations (e.g.,
“resided”), as used in the context of these Rules, means
the place where an individual has his or her permanent
home, at which he or she remains when not called
elsewhere for labor, studies, or other special or temporary
purposes, and to which he or she returns in seasons of
repose. It is the place a person has voluntarily fixed as a
permanent habitation for himself or herself with an intent
to remain in such place for an indefinite period. A person
at any one time has but one residence, and a residence
cannot be lost until another is gained.
a. A person entering the state from another state or
country does not at that time acquire residence for the
purpose of these Rules, but except as provided in Rule
1
2(c) , such person must be a resident for 12 months in
order to qualify as a resident student for fee purposes.
b. Physical presence in Indiana for the predominant
purpose of attending a college, university, or other
institution of higher education, shall not be counted in
determining the 12-month period of residence; nor shall
absence from Indiana for such purpose deprive a person
of resident student status.
2. A person shall be classified as a “resident student” if
he or she has continuously resided in Indiana for at least
12 consecutive months immediately preceding the first
scheduled day of classes of the semester or other session
1
to the exception in (c) below.
2
requirements, such person will be considered a resident.
b. If such person comes from another state or country for
the predominant purpose of attending the University, he or
she shall not be admitted to resident student status upon
the basis of the residence of a guardian in fact, except
upon appeal to the Standing Committee on Residence in
1
each case.
c. Such person may be classified as a resident student
without meeting the 12-month residence requirement
within Indiana if his or her presence in Indiana results
from the establishment by his or her parents of their
residence within the state and if he or she proves that the
move was predominantly for reasons other than to enable
such person to become entitled to the status of “resident
1
student.”
d. When it shall appear that the parents of a person
properly classified as a “resident student” under
subparagraph (c) above have removed their residence
from Indiana, such person shall then be reclassified
to the status of nonresident; provided, that no such
reclassification shall be effective until the beginning of a
semester next following such removal.
e. A person once properly classified as a resident student
shall be deemed to remain a resident student so long as
remaining continuously enrolled in the university until such
person’s degree shall have been earned, subject to the
3
provisions of subparagraph (d) above.
3. The foreign citizenship of a person shall not be a
factor in determining resident student status if such person
has legal capacity to remain permanently in the United
3
States.
4. A person classified as a nonresident student may
show that he or she is exempt from paying the nonresident
fee by clear and convincing evidence that he or she has
been a resident (see Rule 1 above) of Indiana for the
12 months prior to the first scheduled day of classes
of the semester in which his or her fee status is to be
changed. Such a student will be allowed to present his or
her evidence only after the expiration of 12 months from
the residence qualifying date, i.e., the date upon which the
student commenced the 12-month period for residence.
The following factors will be considered relevant in
evaluating a requested change in a student’s nonresident
status and in evaluating whether his or her physical
presence in Indiana is for the predominant purpose of
attending a college, university, or other institution of higher
education. The existence of one or more of these factors
will not require a finding of resident student status, nor
shall the non-existence of one or more require a finding of
nonresident student status. All factors will be considered
in combination, and ordinarily resident student status
will not result from the doing of acts which are required
or routinely done by sojourners in the state or which are
merely auxiliary to the fulfillment of educational purposes.
16
Financial Information
a. The residence of a student’s parents or guardians.
b. The situs of the source of the student’s income.
c. To whom a student pays his or her taxes, including
property taxes.
d. The state in which a student’s automobile is registered.
e. The state issuing the student’s driver’s license.
f. Where the student is registered to vote.
g. The marriage of the student to a resident of Indiana.
h. Ownership of property in Indiana and outside of Indiana.
i. The residence claimed by the student on loan
applications, federal income tax returns, and other
documents.
j. The place of the student’s summer employment,
attendance at summer school, or vacation.
k. The student’s future plans including committed place of
future employment or future studies.
l. Admission to a licensed profession in Indiana.
m. Membership in civic, community, and other
organizations in Indiana or elsewhere.
n. All present and intended future connections or contacts
outside of Indiana.
o. The facts and documents pertaining to the person’s
past and existing status as a student.
p. Parents’ tax returns and other information, particularly
when emancipation is claimed.
5. The fact that a person pays taxes and votes in the
state does not in itself establish residence, but will be
considered as hereinbefore set forth.
6. The registrar or the person fulfilling those duties on
each campus shall classify each student as resident or
nonresident and may require proof of all relevant facts.
The burden of proof is upon the student making a claim to
a resident student status.
7. A Standing Committee on Residence shall be
appointed by the president of the university and shall
include two students from among such as may be
nominated by the student body presidents of one or
more of the campuses of the university. If fewer than four
are nominated, the president may appoint from among
students not nominated.
8. A student who is not satisfied by the determination of
the registrar has the right to lodge a written appeal with
the Standing Committee on Residence within 30 days of
receipt of written notice of the registrar’s determination,
which committee shall review the appeal in a fair manner
and shall afford to the student a personal hearing upon
written request. A student may be represented by
counsel at such hearing. The committee shall report its
determination to the student in writing. If no appeal is
taken within the time provided herein, the decision of the
registrar shall be final and binding.
9. The Standing Committee on Residence is authorized
to classify a student as a resident student, though not
meeting the specific requirements herein set forth, if such
student’s situation presents unusual circumstances and
the individual classification is within the general scope
of these Rules. The decision of the committee shall be
final and shall be deemed equivalent to a decision of the
Trustees of Indiana University.
10. A student or prospective student who shall knowingly
provide false information or shall refuse to provide or
shall conceal information for the purpose of improperly
achieving resident student status shall be subject to the
full range of penalties, including expulsion, provided for by
the university, as well as to such other punishment which
may be provided for by law.
11. A student who does not pay additional monies which
may be due because of his or her classification as a
nonresident student within 30 days after demand, shall
thereupon be indefinitely suspended.
12. A student or prospective student who fails to request
resident student status within a particular semester or
session and to pursue a timely appeal (see rule 8) to the
Standing Committee on Residence shall be deemed to
have waived any alleged overpayment of fees for that
semester or session.
13. If any provision of these rules or the application
thereof to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the
invalidity does not affect other provisions or applications
of these rules which can be given effect without the invalid
provision or application, and to this end the provisions of
these rules are severable.
1
Rules 2(b) and 2(c) apply only to unemancipated
persons under 21 years of age.
2
Invocation of the provision in Rule 2(a) that applies to
cases of divorce or separation requires appropriate legal
documentation.
3
NOTE: Effective Fall 2007, students with immigration
statuses which permit the establishment of a domicile in
the United States may be eligible to pay resident fees.
Current eligible classifications are: A-1, A-2, A-3, E-1, E-2,
E-3, G-1, G-2, G-3, G-4, H-1B, H-4, I, L-1, L-2, O-1, O-3,
V-1, V-2, and V-3. Continuing eligibility to remain classified
as a resident student for fee-paying purpose depends
upon the continued maintenance of eligible immigration
status. Contact the registrar's office for more information.
Financial Information
Basic Costs
Expenses for attending Indiana University Northwest for
an academic year, including in-state fees for 30 credit
hours, books, and supplies, total approximately $8,500.
Expenditures for clothing, travel, entertainment, and
personal items are not included in this estimate.
Fees
Tuition and fees are determined by the Indiana University
Board of Trustees and are subject to change by action
of the trustees. Students are advised to consult the fee
schedule section of the campus or the Indiana University
Northwest Office of the Bursar Web site (www.iun.edu/
bursar/) to determine the current fees and due dates for
any given semester.
Deferment Plans
In accordance with Indiana University Northwest's
commitment to provide quality education at a reasonable
cost, deferment plans are offered to eligible students.
Eligibility is based on the total amount of a student's
assessed tuition and fees for a semester and past
payment history with the university. To participate in a
deferment/payment plan, the minimum amount due on
your bill must be paid by the due date. The minimum
amount due consists of approximately 25-35 percent of
Federal Pell Grants
17
the total bill. A deferment fee is charged for this service.
During the fall and spring semester, up to 4 payments can
be made. During the summer semester, up to 3 payments
can be made. Each payment must be made by the predetermined due dates for each semester. Contact the
Office of the Bursar for specific details.
Detailed information on types of financial assistance and
application procedures may be obtained from the Office
of Financial Aid and Scholarships, IU Northwest Web site
(www.iun.edu/financialaid/).
Refund of Student Fees
Most scholarships are awarded on the basis of the
applicant's academic achievement and potential for
college success. Some scholarships also require
demonstrated financial need.
When a student withdraws from a course or courses, a
refund will be made for most courses involved according
to the refund policy stated in the campus Schedule of
Classes. Full refund of fees is given only during the first
week of classes. Students are advised to consult the
Indiana University Northwest Office of the Bursar Web
site at www.iun.edu/bursar/ or contact the Office of the
Bursar for more detailed information regarding the refund
of student fees.
Special Credit
During the first two regular semesters following
matriculation at Indiana University, tuition charges are
waived for undergraduate students who earn credit for
courses by examination; however, a modest recording
fee may be assessed. A reduced per credit hour fee
is assessed to undergraduate transfer students the
first regular semester following matriculation at Indiana
University. Students who do not qualify for the previous
two fee schedules will be assessed the credit hour fees at
the appropriate resident or nonresident rate applicable on
the date of payments. Students will pay an initial exam fee
before the exam is given. Each academic unit determines
in which courses, if any, special credit by examination may
be earned.
Financial Aid & Scholarships
In addition to developing local scholarship assistance
programs, the Northwest campus participates in the full
variety of federal and state-sponsored programs. The
financial aid program serves students from diverse parts
of society. Every student who applies for financial aid and
has demonstrated financial need is assured some type of
financial assistance.
In order to be considered for financial assistance, a
student must submit a Free Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA). These forms are available through
the local high schools or the Office of Financial Aid and
Scholarships at IU Northwest.
Completed FAFSA applications should be mailed in
time to reach the federal processor by March 10 for the
following academic year to meet the state grant deadline.
Financial aid applications may also be completed
electronically on the Web.
Financial assistance, in various forms, is available for
students attending any Indiana University campus.
Because scholarship and grant funds are limited, the
student's entire need for funds cannot always be met
from these sources. Therefore, several types of financial
aid may be combined to meet the student's financial
need. It is not uncommon for a student, particularly with a
large financial need, to receive assistance in the forms of
scholarships, grants, loans, and employment earnings, or
some combination of these sources.
Scholarships
Local Scholarships
Scholarship funds, established and provided by
individuals, organizations, business, industry, and other
private organizations in the area, are available to students
attending IU Northwest. These may be offered in addition
to the scholarships awarded by the university which can
be viewed at the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships,
Scholarships page.
Children of Veterans, Law
Enforcement Officers, and
Firefighters
Indiana residents who are children of disabled or wounded
veterans, who are children of missing-in-action or
prisoner-of-war veterans of Vietnam, or who are children
of law enforcement officers or firefighters killed in the line
of duty are eligible for a partial fee remittance. Inquire
at the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships at IU
Northwest.
Federal College Work-Study Program
The federal government has provided funds to stimulate
and promote part-time employment of students in
institutions of higher education. To be eligible for this
program, students must be enrolled during the semester
in which they wish to be employed. The student must also
verify a need for financial assistance. Under this program,
employment is limited to an average of 20 hours per week
whenever regular classes are in session.
Federal Direct Student Loans
Direct Loans are low-interest loans for students and
parents to help pay for the cost of a student's education
after high school. The lender is the U.S. Department
of Education (the Department) rather than a bank or
other financial institution. Students must meet general
guidelines for eligibility for federal aid, and must be
enrolled at least half time. Repayment begins six months
after the student completes the program or is enrolled
below a half-time status. Graduate students may be
eligible for up to $20,500 per year in the Federal Direct
Student Loan Program. If graduate program official costs
of attendance exceeds the Direct Loan limit, credit-worthy
students may borrow the additional amount up to cost of
attendance in the Graduate PLUS Program.
Federal Pell Grants
The federal Pell Grants program provides financial
assistance to those who need it to attend post-secondary
educational institutions. Grants are intended to be the
"floor" of a financial aid package and may be combined
with other forms of financial aid in order to meet the full
18
Federal Direct PLUS Loan (Parents' Loans for Undergraduate Students)
cost of education. The amount is determined by the
student's and/or the family's financial resources.
Federal Direct PLUS Loan (Parents'
Loans for Undergraduate Students)
The PLUS loan allows parents to borrow on behalf
of their dependent undergraduate children who are
enrolled at least half time. Loans to parents of dependent
undergraduate students are made for up to the full cost of
the student's education less the student's financial aid.
Federal Perkins Loan
The federal government established this program to
provide long-term loans at low-interest rates to students
enrolled in 6 credit hours or more. An applicant must verify
need for financial assistance and is required to maintain
good academic standing. No interest accrues during the
time of enrollment. Repayment may be made over a 10year period at 5 percent interest beginning 9 months after
the borrower ceases to be enrolled in at least 6 credit
hours. These funds are extremely limited.
Federal Supplemental Educational
Opportunity Grants
All undergraduate students admitted to the university are
eligible for this award on the basis of high financial need.
The amount of the grant is determined by the student's
financial need for funds. First preference must be given to
Federal Pell Grant recipients.
Vocational Rehabilitation
A person with a disability may qualify for financial
assistance through the Vocational Rehabilitation Program.
Application must be made directly to the Vocational
Rehabilitation Division in the student's area.
Federal Direct Graduate PLUS
Program
Graduate or professional students are now eligible to
borrow under the PLUS Loan Program up to their cost of
attendance minus other estimated financial assistance.
The terms and conditions applicable to Parent PLUS
Loans also apply to Graduate/Professional PLUS Loans.
Satisfactory Academic Progress
To be eligible to continue to receive any Federal, State
of Indiana, or IU Northwest financial aid, a student must
demonstrate satisfactory academic progress (SAP)
toward an approved certificate or degree. The financial
aid SAP standards may differ from requirements set forth
by IU Northwest academic schools and departments.
The measure of SAP must include all college course
work attempted at IU Northwest and elsewhere. SAP
is applied to all attempted courses that appear on the
student academic transcript, whether or not financial aid
was received for all attempted courses. SAP is monitored
once a year, at the end of the spring semester. Students
are expected to understand the SAP policy and comply
with it.
To demonstrate SAP, students are expected to earn
credit for at least 67 percent of the credits they attempt.
Students are therefore not eligible to receive any further
financial aid once they have attempted 150 percent of
the credits that are needed to complete their particular
academic program. In addition, undergraduate students
must maintain a 2.00 cumulative grade point average and
graduate students must maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade
point average.
Students who fail to meet the Satisfactory Academic
Progress policy are considered not meeting SAP and
are no longer eligible for financial aid. A student can
appeal their SAP status through the Office of Retention
Initatives. Students not meeting SAP will be sent an
email informing them of the steps they need to take in
order to submit a SAP appeal. Complete appeals must
consist of the appeal form completed and signed by both
academic advisor and student, along with all relevant
documentation.
Withdrawing after the Awarding of
Financial Aid
Should a student withdraw from a class or classes, once
financial aid has already been credited to the student's
bursar account for the dropped class or classes, some
recalculation of the financial aid may be necessary.
Students should always consult with a Financial Aid
Counselor before withdrawing from any class or classes,
especially once financial aid has already been credited to
the student's bursar account.
Services
Student Services Administration
The Student Services Administration provides a variety
of developmental and support services to students as
they pursue higher education. The Office of Student
Services Administration is administered by the Vice
Chancellor for Student Services. The units reporting
to Student Services work together to enhance the
personal and academic development of all students. They
support the mission of the university and they bring the
needs of the students to the attention of the faculty and
administration. The following offices report to the Student
Services Administration: Admissions, Financial Aid and
Scholarships, Placement Testing, Student Retention
Programs, Career Services, Counseling Services,
Multicultural Affairs, Occupational Development, Student
Life, RedHawk Athletics, and Student Support Services.
Enrollment Services
Enrollment Services supports IU Northwest academic
units by assisting prospective students to become a part
of the IU Northwest community and assisting current
students to remain a part of the community and to
successfully complete their programs of study.
An integral part of Student Services, Enrollment Services
is headed by the Vice Chancellor for Student Services
and consists of the following units: Admissions, Financial
Aid and Scholarships, Student Testing and Assessment,
Student Retention Programs, and Career Services.
Student Services Administration is located in Savannah
Center 223, (219) 980-6702.
Bookstore
The campus bookstore, located in the Savannah Student
Center, carries textbooks, supplies, IU apparel and gifts.
Textbook lists and prices can be obtained by accessing Barnes & Noble at Indiana University online.
Office of Retention Initiatives
Career Services
Keep this office in mind for your career development
needs.
The staff of Career Services is committed to working with
Indiana University Northwest students and all IU alumni
in making informed academic and career decisions. The
Office of Career Services enables students and alumni to
make career decisions, investigate career options, take
career inventories that will reflect their areas of interest,
set appropriate goals, network, and create opportunities to
meet those goals by using the services we offer.
Please feel free to contact the Office of Career Services
Phone: (219) 980-6650
Location: Moraine Student Center, Room 101
Career Assessments
Identify your personal strengths and even a potential
major through career counseling assessment inventories
including Focus II, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, and
Strong Interest Inventory.
Career Counseling and Planning
We provide career counseling sessions to assist you
through your career development process, which may
include assistance with choosing a specific career
field of interest or major, resume and cover letter
writing, interviewing skills (mock interviews), job search
strategies, and exploring graduate schools (test dates and
applications).
Career / Job Fairs, Online Job Board,
and Events
Check your e-mail for job and internship opportunities.
Or visit the Career Services Web site for job postings,
upcoming dates for our annual Job Fairs, and a listing
of other local job fair events, on-campus interview and
employer recruiting events, and roundtable information
sessions.
Federal Work-Study Program
Learn about the application process, post-award
paperwork, orientation, benefits of work-study, and
identifying work-study opportunities on and off campus.
Internship Program
Let us assist you with finding quality internships to help
you grow as a professional and become marketable upon
graduation.
Employers provide paid and nonpaid opportunities for
internships.
Possible academic credit may be available upon approval
of your academic division.
Placement and Resume Referral
Services
Internship/job postings are available online through
the Office of Career Services Website. Visit the online
recruiting tool (www.collegecentral.com/iun).
Programs and Workshops
Topics include Resume and Cover Letter Writing,
Effective Job Searching, Interviewing Skills, How to
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Have a Successful Job Fair Experience: Credential Files,
and Work-Study Information. In addition, we offer inclass presentations on various topics related to career
development processes. Workshop topics, dates, times,
and locations are announced via e-mail to students and
are posted on job boards located in the Moraine Student
Center, Hawthorn Hall, Marram Hall, and the Dunes
Medical Professional Building.
Undecided Program
The Career Library and counselors help in determining
career options for particular majors.
Counseling Services
Professional counseling services are available to all
students through the IU Northwest Counseling Services
Office, Hawthorn Hall 201. A one-time assessment is
available for faculty and staff with personal problems.
Referrals to appropriate community resources will
be made as needed. When appropriate, referrals to
community or private counseling resources will be made.
All counseling and consultation, and all records, are held
in strict confidence.
Dental Clinic Services
The Dental Hygiene Program on the IU Northwest campus
offers clinical dental services to students and faculty
including a dental inspection, dental prophylaxis (scaling
and polishing of teeth), caries preventive treatments
(application of fluorides), sealants, preventive periodontal
treatment (treatment of minor gum disorders), and
diagnostic dental X-ray films Qualified dental hygiene
students under the supervision of an instructor render
all treatment. All persons are eligible for treatment, and
appointments can be made by calling (219) 980-6772.
The Dental Assisting Program also offers supervised X
rays for a nominal fee. Appointments can be made by
calling (219) 980-6772.
Health and Wellness Center
The Campus Health and Wellness Center health clinic
offers students and employees high quality health care at
very low cost. Staffed by a fully licensed and credentialed
Family Nurse Practitioner, the clinic offers services
such a acute illness care, sports physicals, gynecologic
examinations and birth control, immunizations, and more.
Walk-ins are welcome; complete physical examinations
require an appointment.
To schedule an appointment, call (219) 980-7250.
Office of Retention Initiatives
The Office of Retention Initiatives at Indiana University
Northwest exists to ensure that all IU Northwest students
are successful and attain an Indiana University degree.
We collaborate with faculty and other administrative
offices to strengthen the support systems that are
crucial to student success. We evaluate the policies and
procedures that govern academic and non-academic life
at the University and help students learn to navigate their
way through the University system.
Through the offices of Student Retention Programs and
Student Support Services, we provide supplemental
instruction, tutoring, and accommodations for
undergraduate students with disabilities, ensuring
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Multicultural Affairs Program
that our most vulnerable students acquire the skills
they need to achieve their academic goals. We also
administer the appeal process when students’ financial
aid eligibility is in jeopardy because they are not making
satisfactory academic progress and we facilitate the reentry of students who were previously dismissed from the
University for academic reasons.
In Person
The Office of Retention Initiatives is located in Savannah
Center 223.
Current students, alumni, and previous students who still
have active computing accounts are able to request their
transcript online by following the steps below:
Multicultural Affairs Program
The Multicultural Affairs Program is designed to meet the
academic, cultural, and social needs of students in order
to increase retention, graduation, and professional and
graduate school participation, specifically for students of
color.
The Multicultural Affairs Program's services include but
are not limited to the following:
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•
•
•
•
Campus-wide programming
Academic advising and academic support for student
athletes
Workshops on various issues
Graduation acknowledgment activities
Support services for the 21st Century Scholars
Program
Applications for participation are available in Savannah
226, or for further information contact the coordinator at
(219) 980-6763.
Occupational Development Program
The Occupational Development Program encourages,
supports, and facilitates academic development for
students in Radiologic Science, Health Information
Management, and Dental programs via a federally funded
program providing tutoring assistance online using
Oncourse. The Occupational Development Program
office is located in Hawthorn Hall 242. Telephone: (219)
980-6832 or www.iun.edu/occupational-development
Office of the Registrar
The Office of the Registrar has primary responsibility
for planning, implementing, and managing schedules
of classes, registrations, and course changes. Other
functions include student record maintenance, grade
processing, student information reporting, enrollment
certifications, and transcript services. Questions
concerning veterans' affairs may be addressed to the
Office of the Registrar. The Office of the Registrar is also
responsible for scheduling meeting rooms and classrooms
for activities other than classes.
Official Academic Transcript
Official transcripts are available from the Office of the
Registrar for a fee. Requests can be submitted online,
in person, by mail, or by fax. The Office of the Registrar
cannot accept e-mail or phone requests, as a signature
is required. Transcript requests for enrollment prior to fall
1965 must be submitted to the IU Bloomington Office of
the Registrar.
Transcript requests received from students with
encumbered accounts cannot be processed.
Print, complete, and sign the Transcript Request Form
(available at http://www.iun.edu/registrar/transcripts.htm or
in the Office of the Registrar) and deliver this form to the
Office of the Registrar in Hawthorn Hall room 109.
Online
1. Log into OneStart using your user name and
passphrase.
2. Make sure you are looking at the Student Self
Service tab. This tab should be brown.
3. Scroll down the page until you see the title eDocs.
4. Under this title you should see a link named Official
Transcript Request (Online). Click this link and follow
the prompts. Make sure you indicate if you will be
picking up the transcript or if you need the office to
mail it.
5. The transcript processing fee must be paid via credit
card. Your information is protected.
6. The transcript will be available within 15 minutes
if you indicate that you want to pick it up. It will be
available in the Office of the Registrar, Hawthorn
Hall room 109, during normal business hours.
(Monday and Thursday 8:00a – 6:00p; Tuesday,
Wednesday and Friday 8:00a – 5:00p)
By Mail
Print, complete, and sign the Transcript Request Form
and Transcript Request Fee Form. All transcripts are sent
regular first class mail within two to three business days.
If you are paying by check or money order, make it
payable to Indiana University and write your university ID
number in the memo section. If you are paying by credit
card, include your card information on the Transcript
Request Fee Form. Visa, MasterCard, and Discover cards
are accepted as payment.
Send the form and payment to:
Office of the Registrar
Transcript Request
Indiana University Northwest
3400 Broadway Ave
Gary, IN 46408
By Fax
Print, complete, and sign the Transcript Request Form
and Transcript Fee Form. Fax requests require credit card
payment. Include your card information on the Transcript
Request Fee Form. Visa, MasterCard, and Discover cards
are accepted as payment. Fax the form to (219) 981-4200.
After faxing these forms, students are encouraged to
call (219) 980-6679 to verify receipt of these documents
and to ensure these requests can be fulfilled at time of
submission.
Confidentiality of Records
In accordance with federal statutes and regulations, the
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA),
student records are confidential and available for
disclosure to persons other than the student only under
Student Life / Athletics Office
stated exceptions. An exception to the act exists that
permits disclosure to school officials, including collection
agencies.
Further details about the provisions of the privacy act and
a list of offices where student records are kept may be
found in the Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities, and
Conduct. Copies are available in the Office of Student Life,
Savannah Center, Room 217.
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•
Honorably discharged veterans who served
a minimum of 36 months of active-duty after
September 10, 2001
Honorably discharged veterans with a 30 percent or
more service connected disability and who served a
minimum of 30 active-duty days after September 10,
2001
Veteran Services
Students who plan on using VA education benefits at IU
Northwest will need to submit a copy of their DD214 and
eligibility letter to the Office of Veteran Services.
Hawthorn Hall 109
(219) 980-6940
Student Retention Programs
As a special service to current and former members of
the armed forces, complete information on veterans’
educational benefits may be obtained at the IU Northwest
Office of Veteran Services or e-mail Levonda Moseley,
Veteran Services Coordinator at [email protected]
APPLYING FOR VA EDUCATION BENEFITS
National Guard Members
National Guard soldiers will need to complete Form
22-1990, Application for VA Education Benefits, and have
it approved by their unit commander. This form can be
downloaded from www.gibill.va.gov. Paper copies of
this form can also be obtained from the unit’s education
counselor or the IU Northwest Office of Veteran Services.
Completed forms will be processed by the Department of
Veterans Affairs and eligibility letters will be mailed directly
to the student.
Non-National Guard Members
Soldiers, sailors, marines and airmen can visit
www.gibill.va.gov to apply for education benefits online.
From this website, applicants should click Apply for
Benefits and follow the on-screen prompts. Veterans are
encouraged to submit their application online through
the Department of Veterans Affairs website, but on an
individual basis, paper copies of this application from
the IU Northwest Office of Veteran Services. Please
be advised, paper applications take longer to process.
Completed applications will be processed by the
Department of Veterans Affairs and eligibility letters will be
mailed directly to the student.
Post 9/11
This benefit provides financial support for education and
housing to current and former members of the armed
services or their eligible dependents if one of the criteria
listed below is satisfied:
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•
Honorably discharged veterans who served a
minimum of 90 active-duty days after September 10,
2001
Honorably discharged disabled veterans who served
a minimum of 30 active-duty days after September
10, 2001
Yellow Ribbon Program
Current and former members of the armed services or
eligible dependents that qualify for Post 9/11 benefits and
are classified as nonresidents for fee paying purposes
may be eligible for this program if one of the criteria listed
below is satisfied:
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Supplemental Instruction
Supplemental Instruction (SI) is an academic support
program that offers peer assistance in historically
challenging academic courses by scheduling twice-weekly
study sessions. SI study sessions are study groups in
which students compare notes, discuss readings, develop
organizational tools, predict test items, and learn study
skills that will help in both current and future courses.
The sessions are facilitated by SI leaders, students who
have previously and successfully taken the course, and
been recommended by the instructor. The SI leader
acts as a model student of the discipline. Supplemental
Instruction is offered to enrolled students at no cost. For
further information, contact the Office of Student Retention
Programs in Hawthorn 425 or call (219) 981-4296.
Guided Studies/Critical Literacy Program
The Guided Studies Program is for students who do not
meet the university's regular or probationary admission
criteria. Admission into this program will be determined
by the Office of Admissions and Student Retention
Programs. Students may be required to take additional
proficiency tests to be admitted. Students admitted to
Guided Studies participate in the Critical Literacy Program
(CLP), designed to strengthen students' study skills and
their foundational skills in basic reading, critical thinking,
and writing. Students are offered an additional level
of support through the peer mentors assigned to the
classroom. These mentors meet with students to offer
support and share their knowledge of IU Northwest, in
one-on-one meetings and group sessions. The curriculum
consists of 12 credit hours of specific course work focused
on basic reading, writing, and study/college skills. After
successfully completing the program requirements,
students may enroll in regular university courses leading
to a degree. Support services for CLP participants include
the Writing Center (English Department, (219) 980-6502),
the Math Lab (Math Department, (219) 980-6590), and the
Reading Lab (School of Education, (219) 980-6597). For
further information, contact the Office of Student Retention
Programs in Hawthorn 425 or call (219) 981-4296.
REACH
Students who have not met the requirements for
admissions to IU Northwest are referred to REACH, a
collaborative program with IVY Tech Community College.
Upon successful completion of the REACH courses,
students are guaranteed admission to IU Northwest.
Student Life / Athletics Office
The Office of Student Life & Athletics promotes and
enhances the quality of student life on the IU Northwest
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Trio Student Support Services
campus. The office serves as the central university
resource for student clubs and organizations. Professional
assistance is available to individuals and student
organizations sponsoring campus activities, forming new
clubs, and addressing special needs or interests.
Students may participate in intramurals and recreation;
student government; planning and sponsoring campus
entertainment through the Student Activities Board;
developing journalistic skills as a member of the student
newspaper, the Redhawk Review, or the Spirits literary
magazine. More than 40 registered student clubs and
organizations seek to develop social, educational, and
cultural appreciation, and provide creative expression
through the fine arts. Additionally, the Student Life/
Athletics Office issues photo identification cards,
approves on-campus publicity, and distributes recreational
equipment and games.
Student Life/Athletics also oversees the Savannah
Recreation Center and Gym, where the IU Northwest
Redhawks sports teams play their home games.
Membership in the Savannah Recreation and Fitness
Center is available to students, faculty, and staff for a
nominal fee.
Athletic Programs
Effective fall 1998, IU Northwest became a member of the
National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. In Fall
2008 IU Northwest joined the United States Collegiate
Athletic Association to extend the RedHawks' opportunity
to compete nationally. Also in 2008, the RedHawks
became part of the conference called the Association
of Independent Institutions. The men's baseball and
basketball teams, as well as the women's basketball,
volleyball, and cheer/dance teams, can be followed at
http://www.iunredhawkathletics.com .
Trio Student Support Services
The Trio Student Support Services Office’s goals include,
but are not limited to, facilitating and increasing the
retention, graduation and professional and graduate
school enrollment rates for qualified IU Northwest
students. Qualified students include students who are
enrolled or accepted for enrollment at IU Northwest that
are income-eligible, first-generation, and ADA-eligible
(Americans with Disabilities Act). Trio Student Support
Services is funded under Title IV of the Higher Education
Act of 1965.
Academic support services designed to increase student
participant retention and graduation include: 1) Academic
advising; 2) Tutoring and supplemental classroom
instruction; 3) Academic skill building workshops; 4)
Financial literacy education, and assistance with financial
aid and scholarship applications; and 5) Scholarship
and grant aid awards for qualified student participants.
In addition, the Student Support Services Office also
provides services for program participants who are ADA
eligible. These services include: Reader and note-taker
services, test proctoring, campus orientation, and resource
information and referral services.
Military Science
Army ROTC (Reserve Officers' Training Corps) is one
of the best leadership courses in the country and is part
of Indiana University Northwest’s curriculum. During
classes, leadership labs, physical training and field training
exercises, you will learn firsthand what it takes to lead
others, motivate groups, and conduct missions as an
Officer in the Army. Upon graduation from Army ROTC,
you will earn the bar of a Second Lieutenant and be
commissioned into the Active Army, Army Reserve, or
Army National Guard and become a leader for life.
The Army Reserve Officer Training Corps strives to be
the premier leader development program in the world.
Army ROTC produces 75% of all Army officers and has
produced 500,000 lieutenants since its founding in 1916.
In addition, Army ROTC is a college elective you can try
out for up to two years with no obligation. Unlike traditional
college programs, Army ROTC gives you a wide range
of experiences while you work toward a degree. You'll
combine classroom time with hands-on experience,
learning skills that will give you an edge over your peers
when it comes time to look for a job. Whether you're
planning a career in the Army or the corporate world, Army
ROTC is a smart elective course to take.
Whether you're in high school, college, or already in the
Army, you can become an officer in today's Army. It's an
experience that you can't get anywhere else, and your
leadership skills will be challenged every day.
Information concerning admission, scholarships, and
commitment requirements for this program can be
obtained by contacting the Military Science Department
on the campus of IU Northwest, 3400 Broadway, Gary, IN
46408, telephone (219)980-7110.
Army ROTC Curriculum: Basic Course
The Basic Course takes place during your first two years
in college as elective courses. It normally involves one
elective class and lab each semester along with the
requisite physical training and field training exercises.
You will learn basic military skills, the fundamentals of
leadership and start the groundwork toward becoming an
Army leader. You can take Army ROTC Basic Courses
without a military commitment. Electives classes include:
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Military Science 101: Leadership and Personal
Development
Military Science 102: Foundations in Leadership
Military Science 201: Fundamentals of Leadership,
Organization and Planning
Military Science 202: Leadership in a Changing
Environment
Leader’s Training Course
LTC is four weeks of intense classroom and field training
held in the summer at Fort Knox, KY. This course is
an accelerated version of the two years of leadership
development training Cadets receive in the Basic Course.
By transforming yourself through this rigorous training, you
will qualify for enrollment in the Army ROTC Advanced
Course on campus-provided you have two years of
college remaining (undergraduate or graduate).
Army ROTC Advanced Course
The Advanced Course takes place during your last
two years in college as elective courses. It normally
includes one elective class and lab each semester in
addition to the requisite physical training and field training
Military Science
exercises, plus a summer leadership camp. You will learn
advanced military tactics and gain experience in team
organization, planning and decision-making. To benefit
from the leadership training in the Advanced Course, all
Cadets must have completed either the Basic Course or
have attended the Leader's Training Course. Entering
the Advanced Course requires a commitment to serve as
an Officer in the U.S. Army after you graduate. Electives
classes include:
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Military Science 301:
Military Science 302:
Tactics
Military Science 401:
Military Science 402:
World
Organizational Leaders
Military Operations and
Developing Adaptive Leaders
Leadership in a Complex
Leader Development & Assessment Course
Every Army ROTC Cadet who enters into the Advanced
Course attends the Leader Development and Assessment
Course. It's a five-week summer course to evaluate and
train all Army ROTC Cadets. This course normally takes
place between your junior and senior years of college, and
is conducted at Fort Lewis, Washington.
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24
College of Arts and Sciences (COAS)
College of Arts and Sciences
(COAS)
Administrative Officers
Mark S. Hoyert, Ph.D., Dean
Nelson H. DeLeon, Ph.D., Associate Dean
Diane Robinson Sandidge, M.P.A., Assistant to the Dean
Web site: www.iun.edu/coas
Telephone: (219) 980-6730
Overview
Mission
At the heart of IU Northwest is the College of Arts and
Sciences. We provide undergraduate and graduate
education in a broad range of arts and sciences disciplines
that prepare students for rewarding careers of their
choice. We also provide the academic coursework
that are the foundation for success in majors across
the university. The college is dedicated to helping our
students develop the communication, reasoning, and
analytic skills necessary to succeed in a rapidly changing
world. The skills and content offered in the college are
the core of what it means to be educated in the 21st
Century. We invite all of our students to delve into the
vast offerings of the College with the expectation that
expanding your knowledge of the liberal arts and sciences
will lead to better lives and more successful and fulfilling
careers.
At the core of our programs, many unique to the region,
are the analytical, cognitive, and expressive skills needed
to assimilate and advance knowledge. An arts and
sciences education focuses on an understanding of the
human condition—past and present—and the world in
which we live. It emphasizes a humanistic and aesthetic
appreciation of cultural life as well as valuing of science
and its methodology in which intellect, logical processes,
ethical perspectives, and problem solving are vital. The
strong research and creative activities of our faculty
encourage students toward a life of learning and reflection.
Intrinsic to a liberal education is preparing graduates
to appreciate, contribute to, and thrive in a diverse,
culturally rich, technologically, and scientifically advanced
society with a compelling history, a promising future,
and a capacity for transformation. Through our teaching,
research, creative arts, and professional and community
services, we engage in the vitality of Northwest Indiana.
An informed, educated population is not only democracy's
strongest, best hope, it is also society's wisest investment.
That, more than anything else, is the endeavor of the
faculty and staff of the College of Arts and Sciences.
At present, the college consists of 14 departments offering
baccalaureate degrees in the following areas: actuarial
science, Afro-American studies, anthropology, biology,
chemistry, computer information systems, economics,
English, fine arts, French, geology, history, mathematics,
communication, philosophy, political science, psychology,
sociology, Spanish, and theatre. Courses are offered
in all those fields plus astronomy, Canadian studies,
comparative literature, computer science, geography,
German, journalism, Latino studies, linguistics, music,
physics, religious studies, telecommunications, and
Women's and Gender Studies.
The College offers interdepartmental majors that lead to
baccalaureate degrees in Graphic Design, Environmental
Science, Afro-American Studies and Communication,
Afro-American Studies and English, and Computer
Information Systems and Mathematics as well.
In addition to undergraduate education leading to the
bachelor's degree, which prepares students for citizenship
as well as for professional training and graduate study,
the programs of the College of Arts and Sciences provide
students in the College of Health and Human Services,
the School of Business and Economics and the School
of Education with courses that are a foundation for those
professional programs.
Postbaccalaureate certificates are offered in Computer
Information Systems, Community Development and
Urban Studies, and Race-Ethnic Studies to students
who already hold a baccalaureate degree. The college
offers a Master of Liberal Studies degree for students
who hold a bachelors degree and wish to pursue a
broad interdisciplinary program of study and a Master of
Science in Clinical Counseling with a specialization in drug
and alcohol counseling for students who are preparing
themselves for a career in addictions treatment.
Contact Information
College of Arts and Sciences
IU Northwest
Hawthorn Hall, Room 225
3400 Broadway
Gary, Indiana 46408
(219) 980-6730
Contact the College of Arts and Sciences for additional
contact informaiton.
Accreditation
The undergraduate and graduate degree offerings of
the College of Arts and Sciences are accredited by the
Higher Learning Commission as an Academic Quality
Improvement Program and as a member of the North
Central Association.
Policies & Procedures
Students in the College of Arts and Sciences are
encouraged to familiarize themselves with "General
Academic Regulations and Policies". See IU Northwest
Bulletin Policies and Procedures
Distinctions & Opportunities
Scholastic Honor Society
Omicron Sigma Delta is a liberal arts scholastic honorary
society based on the same criteria as those used by the
prestigious national honorary scholastic society, Phi Beta
Kappa. Candidates are selected from the college's juniors
and seniors on the basis of high scholarship and good
character.
Graduation with Distinction
Recognition for excellence in scholarship is awarded at
graduation by identifying such students in three categories
Academic Forgiveness Policy
of distinction. These are, with their corresponding
minimum overall grade point averages:
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Distinction (3.60)
High distinction (3.75)
Highest distinction (3.89)
The number of students so recognized will not exceed
10 percent of the graduating class in the college for that
year. Students considered for this recognition must have
completed at least 60 graded credit hours at Indiana
University.
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Career Information
Each department and its faculty members can advise
students about graduate school and career opportunities.
Information and advising regarding preprofessional
programs is available in a seperate section of the COAS
bulletin.
Undergraduate
•
•
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Administrative Officers
Mark S. Hoyert, Ph.D., Dean
Nelson H. De Leon, Ph.D., Associate Dean
Diane Robinson Sandidge, MPA, Assistant to the Dean
•
Website: http://www.iun.edu/coas
Phone: (219) 980-6789
Admission
•
Entering the College of Arts and Sciences
Incoming freshmen generally are admitted directly to the
College of Arts and Sciences. Freshmen are encouraged
to visit departments in which they are interested to
discuss possible programs with faculty and advisors.
Additional information is available in the College of Arts
and Sciences offices, Hawthorn Hall, Room 225.
•
General Requirements
The following requirements pertain to IU Northwest only.
Students contemplating transfer to other campuses
should consult the appropriate bulletins and the Academic
Advising Report (AAR) electronic system.
•
Baccalaureate Degrees
Faculty members from the student's major department
provides academic counseling for each student in the
College of Arts and Sciences prior to each semester's
enrollment. Although academic counseling is intended
to provide effective guidance and every student is
encouraged to seek the counsel of a faculty advisor, all
students are responsible for planning their own programs
and for meeting the following degree requirements by the
time they expect to graduate. Students who have been
awarded a baccalaureate degree cannot at a later date
change the degree to include additional majors and/or
minors. (Note: Degree requirements are not the same at
every campus of Indiana University.)
•
Minimum of 120 credit hours. At least 105 credit
hours must be in courses in the College of Arts
and Sciences unless a student pursues a minor
or a certificate in another division of the university
that grants degrees. If so, the 105 credit hour
minimum in Arts and Sciences may be reduced
sufficiently to allow the student to fulfill the minimum
•
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number of credit hours for the other division's
minor or certificate, providing that all other Arts and
Sciences requirements are met. If no such non—
Arts and Sciences minor or certificate is pursued,
the remaining 15 credit hours may be taken in the
College of Arts and Sciences or in other divisions in
the university.
Minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0.
Minimum of 36 credit hours in courses at the
300-400 (junior-senior) level.
Minimum of 25 credit hours with grades of C- or
higher in the major field and a cumulative grade
point average of at least 2.0 in the major field.
Minimum of 15 credit hours with grades of C- or
higher in the minor field and a cumulative grade
point average of at least 2.0 in the minor field.
Maximum of 60 credit hours in one discipline/major
department that may be counted toward the B.A. and
B.S. degree.
Twenty-six (26) credit hours of the work of the senior
year must be completed while in residence at the IU
Northwest campus. At least 10 credit hours of course
work in the major field must be completed on the IU
Northwest campus.
Work for credit in the College of Arts and Sciences
may be done at Bloomington or other Indiana
University campuses.
Not more than 60 credit hours earned in accredited
two-year institutions of higher education, nor more
than 90 credit hours from accredited four-year
institutions of higher education, may be applied
toward a degree.
By special permission of the dean, up to 6 credit
hours toward a degree may be earned through
correspondence study through the IU School
of Continuing Studies. Ordinarily, students in
residence in the college are not permitted to enroll in
correspondence courses that are currently offered by
the college.
A student who fails to complete a degree within
10 years of matriculation will forfeit the automatic
right to use the requirements in effect at the
time of matriculation. In such cases, the dean, in
consultation with the student's major department
chair, will determine which set of requirements,
or what particular combination of old and new
requirements, will be appropriate for the student.
All credit of candidates for degrees, except that of
the current semester, must be on record at least six
weeks prior to the conferring of degrees.
An application for a degree must be filed in the
Office of the College of Arts and Sciences no later
than July 1 for December graduation. May and
August graduates must file the application for
graduation by October 15. Degrees are conferred
in May, August, and December. Commencement is
held only in May.
Academic Forgiveness Policy
Undergraduate students who have not attended any IU
campus for at least two years, are pursuing their first
bachelor's degree, and are enrolling at IU Northwest for
the fall semester 2012, or later, may request academic
forgiveness. Forgiveness means that all grades earned
during the term(s) in question will not be counted in the
26
Bachelor of Arts
calculation of the program GPA. The grades will remain
on the student's official transcript and will count in the IU
GPA. This policy will affect only the student's College of
Arts and Sciences record. Academic forgiveness may be
requested for no more than two terms of IU coursework,
consecutive or not. Two consecutive summer sessions
may be considered a single academic term for purposes of
this policy. The petition must be submitted within the first
two semesters after the two year hiatus.
Students may petition the COAS office to request
application of the Academic Forgiveness Policy. Students
may apply for forgiveness in anticipation of entering COAS
if they otherwise fit the guidelines. Students will need to
provide evidence that would indicate a significant change
in their ability to succeed in academic work. A semester of
good grades after the hiatus and before the petition can
constitute such evidence. Reevaluation of fundamental
skills may be required by the Dean before the student can
proceed.
Academic forgiveness may be invoked only once in
a student's academic career. Academic forgiveness
is inapplicable to any grades issued as a result of
academic dishonesty. The original grades earned by
the student will remain on a student's academic record
(official and unofficial transcripts), but the GPA and hours
earned calculations will be adjusted appropriately in
the Program statistics. Academic forgiveness does not
change the Indiana University earned hours or GPA
calculations. Academic forgiveness is IUN and COAS
specific. Semesters forgiven at IU Northwest need not be
forgiven at any other IU campuses (nor by an other IUN
college, school, or division).
Bachelor of Arts
The curriculum for the B.A. degree introduces the student
to a variety of subjects that provide the fundamentals of a
liberal education; enable the student to make an intelligent
choice of a subsequent field of concentration; aid the
student in securing adequate preparation for advanced
work; and provide for some degree of specialization in the
junior and senior years.
Specific Requirements
In addition to the general requirements for all degrees in
the college, candidates for the B.A. degree must complete
Groups I-V of the distribution requirements. Students may
elect to follow the requirements currently in effect or the
requirements that were in effect when they matriculated.
College of Arts and Sciences Bachelor of
Arts Areas
The College of Arts and Sciences at IU Northwest offers
instruction leading to degrees in the following majors:
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•
Afro-American Studies
Anthropology
Biology
Chemistry
Communication
Economics
English
Fine Arts
French
Geology
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•
•
•
History
Mathematics
Philosophy
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Spanish
Theatre
Courses are offered in the following disciplines, some of
which have programs that can lead to minors:
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Astronomy
Canadian Studies
Comparative Literature
Computer Science
Geography
German
Journalism
Latino Studies
Linguistics
Music
Physics
Religious Studies
Telecommunications
Women's and Gender Studies
Minors
Group I: Foundation Courses
English Composition
Every student must demonstrate the ability to use correct,
clear, effective English. The student may satisfy this
requirement in either of the following ways:
•
•
By being exempted students who wish to be
considered for exemption must take the SAT or ACT
Examination. A score of 660 or higher on the SAT
Critical Reading Examination and on the SAT Writing
Examination, or 30 or higher on the combined
English/Writing portion of the ACT, will be sufficient
for exemption.
By completing ENG W131 Elementary Composition I
(3 cr.), with a grade of C (2.0) or higher
Mathematics
May be fulfilled in one of the following ways:
•
•
•
By earning a minimum test score of 650 on the
SAT Mathematics examination or a 29 on the ACT
Mathematics examination.
By completing, with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, one
of the following courses: MATH M100, MATH M118,
MATH M119, MATH M125, or MATH M215.
By exemption (without credit) through an appropriate
examination as determined by the Department of
Mathematics.
Intensive Writing
Two intensive writing courses must be completed after
completing the ENG W131 requirement:
•
•
By completing one or two intensive writing course at
the 200 level or above in the English department, or
By completing one or two "Intensive Writing
Course" in any arts and sciences department. If so
designated, the course may also be counted toward
Bachelor of Arts
fulfilling other arts and sciences degree requirements
(e.g., distribution, major, 300-400 level).
27
of this bulletin entitled "Credit by Examination" under
"Academic Regulations and Policies" for details
An intensive writing course is one in which the writing
component is fully integrated with the content and
objectives of the course. Thus, a student would not be
able to pass the course without fulfilling the intensive
writing component and, conversely, it would be equally
impossible for a student to pass the intensive writing
component and not receive a passing grade in the course.
Foreign Students
Oral Communication
Students must take 12 credit hours outside of their major
discipline in each of the three categories from at least
two disciplines within each category. No more than 9
credit hours within a single subject area will be counted for
Group III credit.
Every student must demonstrate the ability to deliver
presentations with logical organization, proper grammar,
appropriate word choices, coherent sentence structure,
and that take the characteristics of the audience into
account. Students may satisfy this requirement by
completing SPCH S121 Public Speaking with a grade of C
(2.0) or higher.
Group II: Foreign Language
The College of Arts and Sciences entrance requirement
is two courses at the 100 level in a foreign language.
Students admitted to arts and sciences without this
background will be required to complete these courses.
The requirement may be met by examination or by
successful completion of the course taken. (Two years
of good high school work in a foreign language should
enable a student to place out of the first 8 credit hours and
into 200-level courses.)
The B.A. degree requirement of foreign language may be
fulfilled in the following ways:
•
•
By completing satisfactorily 6 credit hours of course
work or the equivalent at the 200 level in a foreign
language or by completing 3 credit hours of course
work or the equivalent at the 200 level and two
semesters of culture courses taught in English from
the same language base. These culture courses
may be taken at any point during the student's
program of study of a foreign language.
By attaining, at any time, an achievement test
score sufficient for placement in courses at the firstsemester third-year level in a foreign language.
Special Credit as a Result of Placement Test
A student who places at the third-year level on the
language placement test and receives a grade of C or
higher in the validating third-year-level course will be
eligible to receive 6 hours of special credit with a grade
of S. A student who places in the second semester of
the second year and completes the validating course
with a grade of C or higher will be eligible to receive 3
hours of special credit with a grade of S. It will be the
responsibility of the student to request that the language
department forward this information to the College of Arts
and Sciences.
Proficiency Examinations
A student may complete the language requirement by
taking a proficiency examination administered by the
department concerned. Students with a background in a
language other than those taught at IU Northwest may
take an examination from the relevant department at IU
Bloomington. Such examinations will be given after the
student has petitioned the IU Bloomington department and
received the consent of the department. See the section
Students whose native language is not English may
substitute demonstrated proficiency in their native
language if it is offered for instruction at Indiana University.
They may not, however, earn credit for any courses at the
first- or second-year level in their native language.
Group III: Distribution
A complete list of courses that fulfill these requirements is
located in an appendix of the printed bulletin.
A student must take at least one science course in Group
III A that includes a laboratory.
A student must take at least one studio arts/performing
arts/creative writing course in the humanities.
Mathematics, physical sciences, and life sciences
Anthropology
Astronomy
Biology
Chemistry
Computer information systems
Geology
Mathematics
Physics
Psychology
Social and behavioral sciences
Afro-American studies
Anthropology
Economics
Geography
History
Latino studies
Linguistics
Political science
Psychology
Sociology
Spanish
Speech
Telecommunications
Women's and Gender Studies
Humanities
Afro-American studies
Anthropology
Canadian studies
Comparative literature
English
Fine arts
French
History
Latino studies
Music
Philosophy
Religious studies
Sociology
Spanish
28
Bachelor of Arts
Speech
Theatre
Women's and Gender Studies
Group IV: Diversity
Students must take one 3 credit hour course in each of
these three categories. No course can be used more
than once in Group IV. Courses used to fulfill the Group
IV requirements cannot also be used to fulfill the Group
III requirements. Students may use a course from their
major discipline/department to satisfy requirements in
Group IV. In that case, the class cannot be used to fulfill
Group V requirements.
other arts and sciences degree requirements (e.g.,
intensive writing, major, 300-400 level). Consult
departmental advisors for details.
For procedure regarding change of major, see the
Assistant to the Dean.
Minors (Optional)
A minor shall consist of at least 15 credit hours with
a grade of C- or higher and a cumulative grade point
average of at least 2.0 in the minor field. (A minimum of 2
courses totaling at least 6 credit hours must be taken while
in residence at IU Northwest.)
•
Select one History course from the following
• HIST H105
• HIST H106
• HIST H113
• HIST H114
• HIST H232
Students in one department (e.g., French) may satisfy
requirements for a minor in another department (e.g.,
Sociology). Students may have more than one minor.
Students' major(s) and minor(s) may be listed on their
transcripts. Students must advise the recorder in the
College of Arts and Sciences of the minor(s) and receive
advisement from the minor department.
•
Racial Minority Experience in the United States
• Students must complete one course from the
list of Group IV B courses.
Students who have been awarded a baccalaureate
degree cannot at a later date change the degree to
include additional majors and/or minors.
•
Additional Diversities (social class, language,
religion, gender, sexual orientation, age, disabilities,
non-western culture)
• Students must complete one course from the
list of Group IV C courses.
The following minors are available in the College of Arts
and Sciences:
Group V: Requirements for the Major
No later than the first semester of the junior year, students
should plan a tentative outline of the program in their
major with their advisors in the department of their major.
The following are minimum requirements for any major.
Further and detailed requirements are to be found in the
departmental statements in this bulletin. The specific
departmental requirements that must be fulfilled by each
student are those published in the bulletin current at the
time the major is declared, or those in the bulletin current
at the time of graduation, whichever the student chooses.
•
•
•
•
•
At least 25 credit hours must be taken in the major,
and the cumulative grade point average in the major
must be at least 2.0.
Any course in which the student receives a grade
below C- (1.7) may not be used to fulfill requirements
for the major. However, any course that the student
passes will count toward the 120 credit hour total.
At least 10 credit hours within the major discipline
must be completed while in residence at IU
Northwest.
Individual departments may require a minor of 15
to 20 credit hours in another subject. Any course
taken to satisfy the requirements of a minor must
be completed with a grade of C- or higher; and the
cumulative grade point average of all courses taken
in the minor must be at least 2.0 (C). At least 6
credit hours of courses in the minor must be taken
in residence at IU Northwest. (See the individual
departmental listings.)
Not more than 60 credit hours in any one subject
area may be counted toward the B.A. degree.
Students must take 3 credit hours of capstone course
work. The course may also be counted toward fulfilling
•
•
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•
•
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Afro-American Studies
Anthropology
Biology
Canadian Studies
Chemistry
Communication
Computer Information Systems
Economics
English
Fine Arts
French
Geology
History
Latino Studies
Mathematics
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Race-Ethnic Studies
Sociology
Spanish
Theatre
Women's and Gender Studies
Degree Completion Chart for Bachelor of
Arts
This chart is located in an Appendix at the end of the
printed bulletin.
Group V: Requirements for the Major
Bachelor of Science
College of Arts and Sciences Bachelor of
Science Areas
The College of Arts and Sciences at IU Northwest offers
instruction leading to Bachelor of Science degrees in the
following majors:
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Actuarial science
Biology
Chemistry
Computer information systems
Environmental Science (Interdepartmental - Biology,
Chemistry, and Geosciences)
Geology
Informatics
Mathematics
Psychology
Specific Requirements
In addition to the general requirements for baccalaureate
degrees of the college, candidates for the B.S. degree
must complete the group requirements as follows:
Group I: Foundation for Effective Learning
English Composition
Students must demonstrate the ability to use correct,
clear, effective English. The student may satisfy this
requirement in either of the following ways:
•
•
By being exempted - students who wish to be
considered for exemption must take the SAT or the
ACT. A score of 660 or higher on the SAT Critical
Reading Examination and on the SAT Writing
Examination or a score of at least a 30 on the
combined English/Writing portion of the ACT will be
sufficient for exemption.
By completing ENG-W 131 Elementary Composition
I (3 cr.), with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.
Oral Communication
Every student must demonstrate the ability to deliver
presentations with logical organization, proper grammar,
appropriate word choices, coherent sentence structure,
and that take the characteristics of the audience into
account. Students may satisfy this requirement by
completing
•
•
Students must complete at least two COAS Intensive
Writing courses. (These courses can also be used to
satisfy other distribution requirements or requirements
within the major.)
Group III: Distribution
Requirements for science courses are determined by
the department of the student's major. One course
must be a science course with a lab that is outside the
student's major. A student must take a total of 18 credit
hours listed under the categories of Group IIIB and
IIIC with a minimum of 6 credit hours in each category.
These courses must be outside of the discipline of the
student's major. (A complete list of courses that fulfill
these requirements is located in an appendix in the printed
bulletin).
Group IV: Diversity
Students must take one 3 credit hour course in Racial
Minority Experience in the United States. (Any one course
from the list of Group IVB courses.) The course used to
fulfill the Group IV requirements can also be used to fulfill
the Group III requirements. (A complete list of the courses
that fulfill this requirement can be found in the College of
Arts and Sciences B.A. section of this bulletin.)
Group V: Requirements for the Major
No later than the first semester of the junior year, students
should plan a tentative outline of the program in their
major with their advisors in the department of their major.
The following are minimum requirements for any major.
Further and detailed requirements are to be found in the
departmental statements in this bulletin. The specific
departmental requirements that must be fulfilled by each
student are those published in the bulletin current at the
time the major is declared, or those in the bulletin current
at the time of graduation, whichever the student chooses.
•
•
SPCH-S 121 Public Speaking with a grade of C (2.0)
or higher.
•
Every student must demonstrate mathematical reasoning.
Students may satisfy this requirement in either of the
following ways:
•
•
By earning a minimum test score of 650 on the
SAT Mathematics examination or a 29 on the ACT
Mathematics examination.
By completing, with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, one
of the following courses: MATH-M 100, MATH-M
118, MATH-M 119, MATH-M 125, MATH-M 215.
This course can also be used to satisfy requirements
within the major. For example, the Mathematics and
Chemistry majors require MATH-M 215.
By exemption (without credit) through an appropriate
examination as determined by the Department of
Mathematics.
Group II: Intensive Writing
Mathematics
•
29
•
At least 25 credit hours must be taken in the major,
and the cumulative grade point average in the major
must be at least 2.0.
Any course in which the student receives a grade
below C- (1.7) cannot be used to fulfill requirements
within the major. However, any course that the
student passes will count toward the 120 credit hour
total.
At least 10 credit hours within he major discipline
must be completed while in residence at IU
Northwest.
Students may pursue a minor. Departments may
require a minor. Minors typically require 15 to 20
credit hours outside of the major subject area.
Any course taken to satisfy the requirements of a
minor must be completed with a grade of C- (1.7) or
higher; and the cumulative grade point average of all
courses taken in the minor must be at least 2.0 (C).
At least 6 credit hours of coursework in the minor
must be taken in residence at IU Northwest. (See the
individual departmental listings.)
Not more than 60 credit hours in any one subject
area may be counted toward the B.S. degree.
30
Certificates
•
Students must take 3 credit hours of capstone
course work. The course may also be counted
toward fulfilling other arts and sciences degree
requirements (e.g., intensive writing, major, 300-400
level). Consult departmental advisors for details.
For procedure regarding change of major, see the
Assistant to the Dean.
Certificates
The College of Arts and Sciences offers undergraduate
and post-baccalaurate certificates in the following areas:
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Computer Information Systems
Community Development/Urban Studies
Race-Ethnic Studies
Women's and Gender Studies
Second Bachelor's Degree
Normally the holder of a baccalaureate degree who
wishes to pursue a further educational goal is encouraged
to become qualified for admission to a graduate degree
program. In certain cases, however, the dean may admit
a baccalaureate degree holder to candidacy for a second
baccalaureate degree. When such admission is granted,
candidates must earn at least 26 additional credits-inresidence and meet the requirements of the College of
Arts and Sciences and of the department in which they are
candidates.
Interdepartmental Major
Interdepartmental majors are available to students who
wish to combine two disciplines or subjects into an
interdepartmental concentration area. Such students are
required to complete a minimum of 40 credit hours in the
interdepartmental major. Students must also fulfill the
following requirements:
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The 40 credit hour concentration need not be equally
divided between the two disciplines, but a program
designed to give substantial knowledge should be
planned in each discipline.
Each of the two areas should include a minimum of
four 300- or 400-level courses for a minimum of 12
credit hours in each area.
Students must have two advisors, one from each
department in which they propose to study.
The program of studies must be approved by both
departments and by the college.
The following interdepartmental majors are available in the
College of Arts and Sciences:
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Afro-American Studies and Communication
Afro-American Studies and English
Computer Information Systems and Fine Arts Graphic Design
Computer Information Systems and Mathematics
Biology, Chemistry and Geosciences Environmental Sciences
Preprofessional Curricula
The Pre-Health Professions Program is home to students
who wish to pursue medicine, dentistry, veterinary,
pharmacy, nursing, physical therapy, occupational
therapy, optometry, physician assistant, podiatry,
chiropractic therapy, speech and hearing therapy as well
as other health professions as careers. To gain admission
into those professions, students typically complete a
bachelor’s degree followed by considerable advanced
study. At the undergraduate level, students may select
and complete any major. However, students need to
enroll in a specified sequence of courses to prepare them
for professional school entrance examinations and to
satisfy professional school prerequisite requirements.
The particular sequence of courses is unique to each
professional school. The Pre-Health Professions Program
provides students with comprehensive advice and
guidance from the time they first express an interest in
a health profession (even before they matriculate at IU
Northwest) through graduation and successful transition
into a professional school). The program helps ensure that
the students’ education is of the highest quality, and helps
them identify the medical and health careers that fit their
aspirations, helps them develop a tailored sequence of
courses that will help them reach their goals, and helps
them prepare applications that present them at their best.
Dentistry
Students may be admitted to the School of Dentistry upon
receipt of their baccalaureate degrees or at the end of
three years in the College of Arts and Sciences.
A student entering the School of Dentistry after completing
90 credit hours in the College of Arts and Sciences,
exclusive of military training and physical education, who
has satisfied the Group I through V requirements, may
apply 32 credit hours earned the first year in dentistry as
electives and at the end of this year earn the B.A. degree.
Students expecting to do this should consult with their
major departments since IU Northwest awards the B.A.
degree.
Predental Requirements
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BIOL-L 101 (4 cr.)
BIOL-L 102 (4 cr.)
CHEM-C 105/C125 (5 cr.)
CHEM-C 106/C126 (5 cr.)
CHEM-C 341 (3 cr.)
CHEM-C 343 (3 cr.)
ENG-W 131 (3 cr.)
Select one of the following
• PHYS-P 201 - P202 (10 cr.)
• PHYS-P 221 - P222 (10 cr.)
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•
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Psychology (3-4 cr.)
Interpersonal communication (3 cr.)
Biochemistry (3 cr.)
Anatomy with a laboratory (4 cr.)
Physiology with a laboratory (4 cr.)
For further information regarding programs, the Dental
Aptitude Test, and applications, contact the health
professions advisor at (219) 980-7106.
Law
Admission to law schools requires a baccalaureate degree
and a Law School Admission Test (LSAT) score. The
degree may be in any discipline. Students preparing
for law school are advised to take courses in logical
thought, American history, American politics, business,
and criminal and civil law. While no specific courses are
required, Indiana University offers an interdisciplinary
Preprofessional Curricula
prelaw minor for students interested in attending law
school.
Service, programs, and application procedures, contact
the Health Professions Advisor at (219) 980-7106.
The minor includes six courses totaling 18 credit hours.
Students in the School of Public and Environmental
Affairs, the School of Business and Economics, and
the College of Arts and Sciences could double-count
courses that are required for their major or concentration,
but they are required to take at least four courses or 12
credit hours outside of their major or concentration. The
structure of the minor is as follows:
Occupational Therapy
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•
•
•
HIST-H 106 American History II (Twentieth Century)
(3 cr.)
PHIL-P 150 Elementary Logic (3 cr.)
BUS-L 201 Legal Environment of Business (3 cr.)
SPEA-J 101 American Criminal Justice (3 cr.)
POLS-Y 103 Introduction to American Politics (3 cr.)
One elective (3 cr.)
Students may pick from the following courses for the
elective:
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ECON-E 103 Introduction to Microeconomics (3 cr.)
HIST-H 105 American History I (3 cr.)
SPEA-J 301 Substantive Criminal Law (3 cr.)
SPEA-J 303 Evidence (3 cr.)
SPEA-J 306 The Criminal Courts (3 cr.)
BUS-L 303 Commercial Law (3 cr.)
BUS-A 201 Introduction to Financial Accounting (3
cr.)
HIST-A 313 Origins of Modern America (3 cr.)
HIST-A 315 Recent U.S. History (3 cr.)
SPEA-H 441 Legal Aspects of Health Care
Administration (3 cr.)
The prelaw advisor can approve an elective that is not on
this list if it meets the educational objectives.
The university provides prelaw counseling for interested
students. Contact the prelaw advisor at (219) 980-6841 or
(219) 980-6636, or (219) 980-6655.
Medicine
A student may be admitted to the School of Medicine upon
receipt of the baccalaureate degree with a major in any
department in the College of Arts and Sciences provided
courses required by the School of Medicine are included.
Premedical Requirements
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BIOL-L 101 (4 cr.)
BIOL-L 102 (4 cr.)
CHEM-C 105 (3 cr.)
CHEM-C 125 (2 cr.)
CHEM-C 106 (3 cr.)
CHEM-C 126 (2 cr.)
CHEM-C 341 (3 cr.)
CHEM-C 342 (3 cr.)
CHEM-C 343 (2 cr.)
CHEM-C 344 (2 cr.)
Select one of the following
• PHYS-P 201 - P202 (10 cr.)
• PHYS-P 221 - P222 (10 cr.)
For additional information about the Medical College
Admission Test, the American Medical College Application
31
Indiana University offers a six-year program leading
to a master's degree in occupational therapy (four
years preoccupational therapy leading to a bachelor's
degree with a major in any department in the College of
Arts and Sciences, and then two years in the master's
program offered by Indiana University on the IUPUI
campus). IU Northwest offers the courses required for
entry into master's programs in occupational therapy.
Upon completion of the bachelor's degree, students must
apply for entry to a school of occupational therapy for
their professional training. Admission to an occupational
therapy program also requires documented volunteer or
paid experiences in health care settings.
Preoccupational Therapy Requirements
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CHEM-C 101 (3 cr.)
CHEM-C 121 or higher (2 cr.)
Anatomy with a laboratory (4 cr.)
Physiology with a laboratory (4 cr.)
Composition (6 cr.)
Speech (3 cr.)
Basic statistics (3 cr.)
MATH-M 118 or higher
Ethics or philosophy (3 cr.)
Introductory sociology (3 cr.)
Introductory psychology (6 cr.)
Abnormal psychology (3 cr.)
Life span psychology (3 cr.)
Medical terminology (3 cr.)
Electives (12-13 cr.)
This plan of study will satisfy most of the requirements
of other institutions. Applicants seeking admission to an
occupational therapy program should contact the school
they are interested in attending for up-to-date information
on specific prerequisites and admission requirements.
For further information contact the health professions
advisor at (219) 980-7106.
Optometry
Indiana University offers a seven-year program leading
to a degree in optometry (three years preoptometry, four
years in the School of Optometry). During the three-year
preoptometry program, the student must complete 90
credit hours, including the following:
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•
•
•
•
CHEM-C 105 (3 cr.)
CHEM-C 106 (3 cr.)
CHEM-C 125 (2 cr.)
CHEM-C 126 (2 cr.)
CHEM-C 341 (4 cr. or two courses)
MATH-M 215 (5 cr.)
PHYS-P 201 (5 cr.)
PHYS-P 202 (5 cr.)
PSY-P 101 (3 cr.)
PSY-P 102 (3 cr.)
PSY-K 300 (3 cr.)
BIOL-L 101 (4 cr.)
BIOL-M 310 (3-4 cr.)
plus one additional advanced course in biology
32
Preprofessional Curricula
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•
•
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ENG-W 131 (3 cr.)
Arts and humanities (6 cr.)
Social and behavioral sciences (6 cr.)
Proficiency equivalent of foreign language (10 cr.)
The student may submit an application to the School of
Optometry one semester in advance of completion of
preoptometry requirements.
For applications and additional information contact the
health professions advisor at (219) 980-7106.
Pharmacy
IU Northwest does not grant a degree in pharmacy, but
students may complete prepharmacy courses on this
campus. The following plan of study is for students who
will apply for admission to the School of Pharmacy and
Pharmacal Sciences at Purdue University, West Lafayette
campus. (The information is subject to change as a
result of action by federal and/ or state governments,
the Trustees of Purdue University, the administration
of Purdue University, and the faculty of the School of
Pharmacy and Pharmacal Sciences.)
The application for admission should be submitted
to Purdue University before January 5 to ensure
consideration for the fall semester. Students who decide
to transfer to another institution may have to adjust their
program.
Prepharmacy
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
One year of general chemistry with laboratory
(minimum 8 cr.)
One year of organic chemistry with laboratory
(minimum of 8 cr.)
One year of calculus (minimum of 6 cr.)
One semester of economics (3 cr.)
One year of biology with laboratory (minimum of 8
cr.)
One semester of microbiology with laboratory
(minimum of 4 cr.)
One year of anatomy and physiology (8 cr.)
One semester of physics (5 cr.)
Two semesters of English composition (minimum of
6 cr.)
Students who complete prepharmacy at IU Northwest can
apply for admission to the School of Pharmacy at Purdue
and should schedule PHPR200 (Pharmacy Orientation)
after transferring. High school and college records will
be considered in determining eligibility for admission. A
student should also have at least a B+ average for all
courses previously taken. In addition, the grade in each
course must be at least a C for the credit to transfer.
Grades are not transferred; only credit in the course is
recorded. Purdue University does not automatically accept
advanced credit that is granted by other universities. A
similar program is now in place with the Chicago College
of Pharmacy and its 2+3 program.
department in the College of Arts and Sciences, three
years in the doctoral physical therapy program offered by
Indiana University on the IUPUI campus). IU Northwest
offers the courses required for entry into master's and
doctoral programs in physical therapy. Upon completion
of the bachelor's degree, students must apply for entry to
a school of physical therapy for their professional training.
Admission to a physical therapy program also requires
documented volunteer or paid experiences in health care
settings.
Prephysical Therapy Requirements
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•
•
•
•
CHEM-C 105 (3 cr.)
CHEM-C 125 (2 cr.)
CHEM-C 106 (3 cr.)
CHEM-C 126 (2 cr.)
Select one of the following
• PHYS-P 201 - P202 (10 cr.)
• PHYS-P 221 - P222 (10 cr.)
•
•
•
•
•
•
Anatomy with a laboratory (4 cr.)
Physiology with a laboratory (4 cr.)
Basic statistics (3 cr.)
Introductory psychology (3 cr.)
Life span Human Development / Psychology (3 cr.)
Social science or humanities electives (6 cr.)
This plan of study will satisfy most of the requirements
of other institutions. Applicants seeking admission to a
physical therapy program should contact the school they
are interested in attending for up-to-date information on
specific prerequisites and admission requirements.
For further information contact the health professions
advisor at (219) 980-7106.
Physician Assistant
Indiana University does not have a degree program in
physician assistant studies. However, the courses needed
for admission are available at IU Northwest. Admission to
most programs requires a minimum of 3 years (90 credit
hours) of study at an accredited college or university.
Some programs that offer a master's degree in physician
assistant studies also require a bachelor's degree. The
course requirements vary quite a bit, although most
programs require
•
•
•
•
•
Two courses of general chemistry with the lab
One course in biology with the lab
One course in microbiology with the lab
Two courses in anatomy and physiology with the lab
Two courses in organic chemistry with the lab
Admission to a physician assistant program generally
requires volunteer or paid experience in a health care
setting. Applicants seeking admission to a physician
assistant program should contact the school they are
interested in attending for up-to-date information on
specific prerequisites and admission requirements.
For further information on the health professions and
pharmacy contact the health professions advisor at (219)
980-7106.
For further information contact the health professions
advisor at (219) 980-7106.
Physical Therapy
Indiana University does not have a degree program in
podiatry. However, the courses needed for admission are
available at IU Northwest. The minimum requirement for
admission to a school of podiatry is completion of three
Indiana University offers a seven-year program leading
to a degree in physical therapy (four years prephysical
therapy leading to a bachelor's degree with a major in any
Podiatry
About the Department of Biology
academic years (90 credit hours) of study at an accredited
college or university. Applicants are strongly encouraged
to obtain a baccalaureate degree before entering a college
of podiatry. The undergraduate curriculum should include
these courses:
•
•
•
•
•
Biology (8 cr.) (Recommendation that 4 of those
credits be either cell biology or biochemistry)
Inorganic chemistry (8 cr.)
Organic chemistry (8 cr.)
Physics (8 cr.)
English composition and literature (6 cr.)
Science courses must include laboratories.
Further information on the health professions and podiatry
may be obtained by contacting the health professions
advisor at (219) 980-7106.
Veterinary
Indiana University does not have a degree program in
veterinary medicine. However, the courses needed to
apply for admission to such a program are available at IU
Northwest.
Candidates must complete a minimum of 70 credit hours
of course work before taking the Graduate Record Exam.
Minimum requirements
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•
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•
•
•
•
•
English composition (6 cr.)
Speech (3 cr.)
General biology with laboratories (8 cr.)
General and organic chemistry with laboratories (16
cr.)
One semester of genetics
Two semesters of calculus
Physics with laboratories (8 cr.)
Genetics with laboratory (4 cr.)
Three semesters of humanities (9 cr.)
Electives (18 cr.)
If an animal nutrition course is not available at the
undergraduate campus, a student may take this course
after admission to the program.
Further information on the health professions and
veterinary medicine may be obtained by contacting the
health professions advisor at (219) 980-7106.
Courses Outside the College of
Arts and Sciences
A candidate for a baccalaureate degree in the College
of Arts and Sciences must complete satisfactorily at
least 105 credit hours in courses in the College of Arts
and Sciences unless a student pursues a minor or a
certificate in another division of the university that grants
degrees. If so, the 105 credit hour minimum in Arts and
Sciences may be reduced sufficiently to allow the student
to fulfill the minimum number of credit hours for the other
division's minor or certificate, providing that all other Arts
and Sciences requirements are met. If no such nonArts and Sciences minor or certificate is pursued, the
remaining 15 credit hours may be taken in the College
of Arts and Sciences or in divisions of the university that
grant degrees. Any credits in excess of 120 will appear
on the academic transcript and will be credited to the
academic record.
33
Courses Outside IU Northwest
Current IU Northwest COAS students who seek to take
additional courses at another college or university that
are specifically required for their IU Northwest major
are strongly advised to seek prior approval by their
departmental chair, the chair of the department offering
the course, and the dean of COAS before those courses
are taken to ensure the transfer of those courses back
to IU Northwest and the acceptance of those courses for
their degree requirements.
Students who leave IU Northwest for a semester or longer,
take courses elsewhere, and return to IU Northwest at
a later date must go through the usual transfer of credit
process as required for students new to IU Northwest;
their department chairs and Dean have the right to
deny approval of the acceptance of those courses by IU
Northwest. Prior approval is advised.
Double Majors and Double Degree
Students may complete the requirements of two majors
as either a double major or a double degree. With a
double major, students complete the major (Group V)
requirements for two majors and receive one degree.
Students in this situation need only to satisfy the
distribution requirements of the first major. They may use
courses in the second major to satisfy the distribution
requirements. With the double degree option, students
complete two majors and receive two degrees. These
degrees are of different type. Examples could include a
student receiving a B.S. in Geology and a B.A. in English
(different types of degrees) or a B.S. in Business and a
B.S. in Biology (different divisions of the university), or a
B.S. in Education and a B.A. in Geology (different types
of degrees and different divisions of the university). A
student pursuing a double degree would need to satisfy
the distribution requirements for both majors.
Departments
Biology
Phone: (219) 980-6724
Webpage: http://www.iun.edu/biology
About the Department of Biology
Biology is the study of life. The Department of Biology at
IU Northwest offers an interdisciplinary program in the
life sciences leading to a Bachelor of Science degree,
or a Bachelor of Arts degree. Students majoring in
other subjects may also earn a Minor in Biology. Our
undergraduate programs are designed to interface
with the faculty's expertise in biomedical sciences,
biotechnology, and environmental and ecological
sciences. The programs are diverse, flexible, and
designed to accommodate individuals who have a wide
range of interests within the life sciences. Courses are
available for students seeking preprofessional training
in the medical sciences (premedical, predental, and
allied health sciences), for those pursuing occupations
in biotechnology, forensics, and the pharmaceutical
industry, for students intending to continue with graduate
studies, and for those interested in environmental issues
and field work. We firmly believe that the training of an
undergraduate student is enhanced by experience in
the "discovery side" of the discipline. Thus, students
are encouraged to participate in research with faculty
34
Major in Biology - B.S.
mentors. Many of our faculty have adjunct appointments
at the Northwest Center for Medical Education, located
across campus, and also maintain collaborations at other
research institutions within the greater metropolitan area.
This expands the opportunities for our students to engage
in research projects with a broad spectrum of life scientists
within and outside of Indiana University.
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•
Genetics, Development, Evolutionary Biology
• BIOL-Z 317 (3 cr.)
• BIOL-L 331 (3 cr.)
•
Ecology, Physiology, and Organismal Biology
• BIOL-B 351 (3 cr.)
• BIOL-B 352 (2 cr.)
• BIOL-Z 406 (3-4 cr.)
• BIOL-L 473 (3-4 cr.)
• Select one of the following
• PHSL-P 416 (3 cr.)
• PHSL-P 461 (4 cr.)
• PHSL-P 431 (4 cr.)
Each student majoring in biology is encouraged to acquire
in-depth knowledge in related scientific disciplines or
in other areas of study that use biology or contribute
to biological methodologies. Biology students are thus
encouraged to consider obtaining a minor in another
area of study. The student's advisor will help plan such a
program, which may be in disciplines in the College of Arts
and Sciences or in other divisions of the university.
In addition to course work structured for the biology
major, the Biology Department offers an array of classes
designed for students majoring in other disciplines who
are interested in certain areas of the life sciences.
The Department of Biology sponsors a chapter of Beta
Beta Beta, the national honorary society in biology.
Moreover, many of our students belong to student run
organizations with faculty advisors such as the Biology
club and the Preprofessional Studies Club. These
organizations foster friendships and community among
students interested in the biological sciences and other
sciences, and offer outside avenues for learning and
gaining experience related to their formal training within
the department.
Major in Biology - B.S.
The Bachelor of Science in Biology degree provides
students with a rigorous general background in the field
of biology to prepare for graduate or professional school
or science-related jobs requiring bachelor's-level training.
The requirements in chemistry, mathematics, and physics
have been selected to optimize the student's future
opportunities. The degree provides a rigorous background
in fundamental biology and cognate areas, and prepares
students for professional or research-oriented careers and
graduate work in a selected area of biology.
Requirements
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•
•
•
BIOL-L 101* (4 cr.)
BIOL-L 102* (4 cr.) prequisite of BIOL-L 101
BIOL-L 211(3 cr.) prequisite of BIOL-L 102
BIOL-L 311 (4 cr.) prequisite of BIOL-L 211
Students should consult with the Biology faculty for
additional information concerning prerequisites and course
content.
In addition to the required biology courses, the student
must complete
•
The following are required and should be taken
concurrently with BIOL-L 101 and BIOL-L 102
• CHEM-C 105 (3 cr.)
• CHEM-C 106 (3 cr.)
• CHEM-C 125 (2 cr.)
• CHEM-C 126 (2 cr.)
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•
•
•
CHEM-C 341 (3 cr.)
CHEM-C 342 (3 cr.)
CHEM-C 343 (2 cr.)
Select one of the folowing
• CHEM-C 344 (2 cr.)
• BIOL-L 323 (3 cr.)
•
Select one of the following
• PHYS-P 201 (5 cr.) - PHYS-P 202 (5 cr.)
• PHYS-P 221 (5 cr.) PHYS-P 222 (5 cr.)
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•
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MATH-M 215 (5 cr.)
PSY-K 300 statistics (3 cr.)
Select one of the following:
• CSCI-A 106 (3 cr.)
• CSCI-C 106 (3 cr.)
• CSCI-A 201 (4 cr.)
• CSCI-C 201 (4 cr.)
*BIOL-L 101 and BIOL-L 102 must be taken in sequence.
•
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•
At least 25 additional credit hours in Biology upperlevel (300-400) courses must be completed.
Students must complete at least four additional
upper level labs.
BIOL-L 403 (Senior Seminar) must be completed
during the senior year (1 cr.).
BIOL-L 473, BIOL-M 440, or BIOL-Z 466 may satisfy the
capstone requirement.
A minimum of one course must be taken from the listed
courses in each of the areas below
•
Molecular and Cellular Biology
• BIOL-L 312 (3-4 cr.)
• BIOL-M 310 (3-4 cr.)
BIOL-L 321 (3 cr.)
BIOL-L 323 (3 cr.)
Students may specialize in the following emphasis areas
by choosing at least 12 credit hours from the listed
courses within the specialty area (courses not listed may
be substituted with consent from the departmental chair):
Biotechnology and Molecular Biology
•
Select from the following
• BIOL-L 312 Cell Biology (3-4 cr.)
• BIOL-L 323 Molecular Biology Laboratory (3
cr.)
• BIOL-M 310 Microbiology (3-4 cr.)
• BIOL-M 430 Virology (3 cr.)
• BIOL-Z 317 Developmental Biology (3 cr.)
• BIOL-Z 318 (3 cr.)
Options for Special Credit
Biomedical Sciences
•
Select from the following
• BIOL-L 312 Cell Biology (3-4 cr.)
• BIOL-L 321 Immunology (3 cr.)
• BIOL-L 331 Human Genetics (3 cr.)
• BIOL-L 391 Special Topics in Biology
(including Autoimmunity) (1-3 cr.)
• Select one from the following
• BIOL-L 498 Professional Internship (cr.
arr.)
• BIOL-L 490 Individual Study (cr. arr.)
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•
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•
•
•
BIOL-M 310 Microbiology (3-4 cr.)
BIOL-M 430 Virology (3 cr.)
BIOL-M 440 Medical Microbiology (3 cr.)
BIOL-P 431 Human Physiology (4 cr.)
BIOL-Z 317 Developmental Biology (3 cr.)
BIOL-Z 318 Developmental Biology Laboratory
(2 cr.)
BIOL-Z 466 Endocrinology (3 cr.)
Ecology and Conservation Biology
•
Select from the following
• BIOL-L 473 Ecology (3-4 cr.)
• BIOL-L 476 Regional Ecology (2 cr.)
• BIOL-L 482 Restoration Ecology (3 cr.)
• BIOL-L 483 Conservation Biology (3 cr.)
• BIOL-L 490 Independent Research (cr. arr.)
• BIOL-Z 406 Vertebrate Zoology (3-4 cr.)
• BIOL-B 355 Plant Diversity (4 cr.)
In addition to the above courses, the student is
responsible for fulfilling the general requirements of the
Bachelor of Science degree as established by the College
of Arts and Sciences.
•
•
•
•
35
BIOL-B 352 (2 cr.)
BIOL-Z 406 (3-4 cr.)
BIOL-L 473 (3-4 cr.)
Select one of the following
• PHSL-P 416 (3 cr.)
• PHSL-P 461 (4 cr.)
• PHSL-P 431 (4 cr.)
Students should consult with the department for
additional information concerning prerequisites and
course content.
•
The following are required and should be taken
concurrently with BIOL-L 101 and BIOL-L 102
• CHEM-C 105 (3 cr.)
• CHEM-C 106 (3 cr.)
• CHEM-C 125 (2 cr.)
• CHEM-C 126 (2 cr.)
Students planning on graduate or professional
school should take
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•
•
chemistry through CHEM-C 344
PHYS-P 201
PHYS-P 202
mathematics at least through MATH-M 215
statistics (PSY-K 300 or equivalent)
computer language / application course.
BIOL-L 473, BIOL-M 440, or BIOL-Z 466 may satisfy
the capstone requirement.
In addition to the above courses, the student is
responsible for fulfilling the general requirements of
the Bachelor of Arts degree as established by the
College of Arts and Sciences. ree as established by
the College of Arts and Sciences.
Major in Biology - B.A.
Minor in Biology
Requirements
Students wanting to minor in the biological sciences are
required to take a minimum of 18 credit hours and may
elect to have a minor in one of the following fields: general
biology, microbiology, biotechnology, ecology, or human
biology. Courses in these minor areas are to be chosen
with the consent of the Department of Biology
•
•
•
•
•
•
Introductory courses BIOL-L 101* (4 cr.)
BIOL-L 102* (4 cr.) prerequisite of BIOL-L 101
BIOL-L 211 (3 cr.) prerequisite of BIOL-L 101
BIOL-L 311 (4 cr.) prerequisite of BIOL-L 211
At least 18 additional credit hours in biology upperlevel (300-400) courses must be included.
Students must complete at least two additional
upper-level labs.
*BIOL-L 101 and BIOL-L 102 must be taken in sequence.
A minimum of one course must be taken from the listed
courses in each of the areas below
•
Molecular and Cellular Biology
• BIOL-L 312 (3-4 cr.)
• BIOL-M 310 (3-4 cr.)
• BIOL-L 321 (3 cr.)
• BIOL-L 323 (3 cr.)
•
Genetics, Development, Evolutionary Biology
• BIOL-Z 317 (3 cr.)
• BIOL-L 331 (3 cr.)
•
Ecology, Physiology, and Organismal Biology
• BIOL-B 351 (3 cr.)
Special Programs for Preprofessional
Students in the Health Sciences
Students interested in a preprofessional curriculum for
medicine, dentistry, podiatry, optometry, or other health
fields should refer to the preprofessional curriculum
section in this bulletin. No specific major or degree
program is required for preprofessional students. Students
desiring a B.S. or B.A. biology degree should consult
with the biology faculty to plan their course work. Most
professional schools prefer students who will have
completed a B.S. or B.A. degree before actually beginning
the professional curriculum.
Options for Special Credit
Course credit may be awarded for high scores on the
Advanced Placement and College Entrance Examination
Board tests. Please see the Admissions Office and/or the
Biology Department for more information.
36
Courses for Nonmajors
Courses for Nonmajors
The BIOL-L 100 course offers the nonmajor an opportunity
to examine the fundamental principles of biology and to
prepare for more advanced courses should the decision
be made to continue in biology.
The 200-400 level nonmajor courses are designed
to acquaint students possessing minimal science
background with the basic principles underlying the
modern biological sciences. Emphasis is given to those
biological concepts and advances that are of prime
importance to the liberally educated nonscientist.
In addition to BIOL-L 100, the following courses are
intended for nonmajors: BIOL-L 104, PHSL-P 130, BIOL-L
200, BIOL-M 200, BIOL-L 215, PHSL-P 261, PHSL-P 262,
PHSL-P 263, BIOL-L 300, BIOL-L 302, BIOL-L 310, BIOLL 316, BIOL-L 350, BIOL-L 363, BIOL-L 378, and BIOL-L
499
Chemistry, Physics, and
Astronomy
Phone: (219) 980-6740
Webpage: http://www.iun.edu/chemistry/
Chemistry
About the Major in Chemistry
The chemistry major (B.S., B.S. (A.C.S.), or B.A.) provides
an excellent academic background for graduate school;
for a career as an industrial chemist; for acceptance
into medical, dental, or other professional health-related
programs; and for positions in chemical instrument sales
or chemically related administrative positions.
Minimum Degree: Students not receiving the Professional
American Chemical Society(A.C.S.) degree are
encouraged to take as many chemistry courses as
possible above the minimum to enhance their professional
skills and employment possibilities.
Recommended Minors (15 to 20 credit hours)
Although a minor is not required, it may enhance
professional opportunities. Recommended minors:
biology, computer science, geosciences, mathematics, or
physics. Consult the appropriate department for details.
The B.S. degree is designed to enable the student who so
desires to take a minor in one of these areas.
About the B.S. or B.S. - A.C.S. Degree
The American Chemical Society certifies the IU Northwest
A.C.S. degrees. Graduates of these programs will be
recommended to the American Chemical Society as
having fulfilled requirements of the ACS Committee on
Professional Training. The B.S. degree emphasizes
science courses as major requirements outside of the
major required core; the B.A. emphasizes non-science
courses outside of the required major core. The B.S. is
designed to enable the student to easily obtain a minor
in a related area (see the following). The proficiency
examination can be satisfied by receiving a grade of B(minus) or better in chemistry courses at or above the 300
level.
Minimum Degree: Students not receiving the Professional
(A.C.S.) degree are encouraged to take as many
chemistry courses as possible above the minimum
to enhance their professional skills and employment
possibilities.
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) Degree
Departmental Requirements
Minimum degree requirements: 34-37 credit hours of
chemistry including CHEM-C 105, CHEM-C 106, CHEM-C
125, CHEM-C 126, CHEM-C 301, CHEM-C 310, CHEM-C
341, CHEM-C 342, CHEM-C 343, CHEM-C 361, CHEMC 363, CHEM-C 430, CHEM-C 209 (waived if proficiency
exam is passed), and at least one from CHEM-C 344,
CHEM-C 362, CHEM-C 410, CHEM-C 483, Also required:
MATH-M 215, MATH-M 216 and PHYS-P 221, PHYS-P
222 (CHEM-C 301 and proficiency examinations are the
capstone requirements.)
ACS-Certified Degree
46 credit hours in chemistry including CHEM-C 105,
CHEM-C 106, CHEM-C 125, CHEM-C 126, CHEM-C
301, CHEM-C 310, CHEM-C 341, CHEM-C 342, CHEM-C
343, CHEM-C 344, CHEM- C361, CHEM-C 362, CHEMC 363, CHEM-C 409 (2 cr.), CHEM-C 410, CHEM-C
430, CHEM-C 209 (waived if proficiency examination
is passed) and any two of the following (one must be a
chemistry course): CHEM-C 431, CHEM-C 441, CHEMC 483; PHYS-P 301; or an advanced mathematics or
physics course. Also required: MATH-M 215, MATH-M
216, MATH-M 311; PHYS-P 221, PHYS-P 222; and CSCIC 201 (MATH-K 300 or PSY-K 300 may be substituted).
German is strongly suggested as the foreign language.
See the Arts and Sciences section of this bulletin for nonscience requirements. Students must also complete the
general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.
Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Degree
Departmental Requirements Chemistry: 45-46 credit
hours minimum in chemistry, including CHEM-C 105,
CHEM-C 106, CHEM-C 125, CHEM-C 126, CHEM-C
301, CHEM-C 310, CHEM-C 341, CHEM-C 342, CHEMC 343, CHEM-C 344, CHEM-C 361-, CHEM-C 362,
CHEM-C 363, CHEM-C 409 (2 cr.), CHEM-C 410, CHEMC 430, and at least one from among: CHEM-C 303,
CHEM-C 335, CHEM-C 431, CHEM-C 441, or CHEMC 483. CHEM-C 209 (waived if proficiency examination
is passed). (CHEM-C 301 and proficiency examinations
are the capstone requirements.) Physics (10 cr.): PHYSP 221, PHYS-P 222; Mathematics (13 cr.): MATH-M 215,
MATH-M 216 and MATH-M 311; Biology (4 cr.): BIOLL 101; Computer Science (4 cr.): CSCI-C 201 (MATH-K
300 or PSY-K300 may be substituted); Ancillary science
electives: minimum of 16 credit hours (consult department
for a listing of approved courses).
Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Degree (A.C.S.)
Certified
Departmental Requirements Chemistry: 48 credit
hours minimum. Requirements are the same as for the
B.S. degree except CHEM-C 483 is required. Chemistry
courses may be taken as electives but are not required for
the B.S. (A.C.S.) degree. PHYS-P 301; or an advanced
mathematics or physics course. Also required: MATH-M
215 - MATH-M 216, MATH-M 311; PHYS-P 221 - PHYS-P
222; and CSCI-C 201 (MATH-K 300 or PSY-K300 may be
substituted) . German is strongly suggested as the foreign
language.
Major in Communication
37
Courses for ACS Degree (B.S. or B.A).
Degree
Mathematics: MATH-M 215, MATH-M 216, and MATH-M
343 are required.
Suggested sequence of required science and
mathematics courses:
Minor in Physics
Freshman Year
•
•
•
CHEM-C 105, CHEM-C 106 Principles of Chemistry
Lecture I and II
CHEM-C 125, CHEM-C 126 Experimental Chemistry
Laboratory I and II
MATH-M 215, MATH-M 216 Analytical Geometry
and Calculus I and II
Sophomore Year
•
•
•
•
CHEM-C 341, CHEM-C 342 Organic Chemistry
Lecture I and II
CHEM-C 343, CHEM-C 344 Organic Chemistry
Laboratory I and II
PHYS-P 221, PHYS-P 222 Physics Lecture and
Laboratory I and II
MATH-M 311 Calculus III
Junior Year
•
•
•
CHEM-C 361, CHEM-C 362 Physical Chemistry
Lecture I and II
CHEM-C 363 Physical Chemistry Laboratory
CHEM-C 310 Analytical Chemistry
Senior Year
•
•
•
•
•
CHEM-C 483 Biochemistry
CHEM-C 301 Chemistry Seminar
CHEM-C 409 Chemical Research
CHEM-C 410 Principles of Chemical Instrumentation
CHEM-C 430 Inorganic Chemistry
Minor in Chemistry
Requirements
CHEM-C 105, CHEM-C 125, CHEM-C 106, CHEM-C 126,
CHEM-C 341 and two advanced courses of 3 credit hours
or more.
Non-Major Chemistry Courses
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CHEM–C 100 The World of Chemistry (3 cr.)
CHEM–C 101 Elementary Chemistry I (3 cr.)
CHEM–C 102 Elementary Chemistry II (3 cr.)
CHEM–C 110 The Chemistry of Life (3 cr.)
CHEM-C 120 Chemistry Laboratory (2 cr.)
CHEM–C 121 Elementary Chemistry Laboratory I
(2 cr.)
CHEM–C 122 Elementary Chemistry Laboratory II
(2 cr.)
Physics
Major in Physics - B.A.
IU Northwest does not offer a major in physics. These
requirements are for the Bloomington campus.
Concentration Requirements
Physics: At least 25 credit hours, including PHYS-P 201 PHYS-P 202 or PHYS-P 221 - PHYS-P 222, PHYS-P 301.
Recommended courses are PHYS-P 309, PHYS-P 332,
PHYS-P 340.
Requirements 16 credit hours including PHYS-P 201-,
PHYS-P 202 or PHYS-P 221, PHYS-P 222, plus PHYS-P
300 or PHYS-P 301, plus 3 more credit hours of physics
courses above the level of P300 or P301. Alternatives are
permissible with departmental approval.
Courses for Non-Science Majors
Courses PHYS-P 101 and PHYS-P 120 are intended for
students majoring in the humanities, social sciences, and
education. They assume little or no background in science
or mathematics. All courses listed can be used to satisfy
divisional distribution requirements; however, credit will be
granted for only one of the following sequences: PHYS-P
101 - PHYS-P 102, PHYS-P 103 - PHYS-P 104, or PHYSP 151 - PHYS-P 152. PHYS-P 151 - PHYS-P 152 will not
fulfill the science requirement for education majors. These
courses are not open to physics majors.
Interdepartmental Major in Environmental
Science - B.S.
The Interdepartmental major involving Biology, Chemistry,
and Geology in Environmental Science provides rigorous
interdisciplinary background in the natural science
segment of the environmental sciences, combined with a
significant background in the allied disciplines of physics
and mathematics, and coursework in environmental
affairs. Please see Geosciences for further details.
Communication
Phone: 219-980-6781
Website: http://www.iun.edu/communication/
About the Department of Communication
The communication program provides students with an
opportunity to investigate communication processes
as they occur within and among individuals, groups,
organizations, and societies. Students analyze the human
communication process, develop communication skills,
and learn how to facilitate the communication of others.
For purposes of organization and utility, courses in
speech, communication, and telecommunications have
been combined into a single administrative unit within the
department.
The major in communication provides the student with a
broad-ranged understanding of human communication
processes and the ability to apply basic principles,
methods, and findings of human communication research
in a variety of settings. The major serves as a foundation
for professional fields such as public relations, personnel,
sales, and training as well as providing excellent
preparation for graduate study in communication, law, the
ministry, public administration, and business.
Communication (COMM), Journalism (JOUR), Speech
(SPCH), and Telecommunications (TEL) courses are
listed in separate sections.
Major in Communication
Requirements
1. A minimum of 30 credit hours, with grades of C- or
higher, in courses labeled SPCH, COMM, JOUR, or
TEL.
38
Interdepartmental Major in Afro-American Studies and Communication
2. As part of the 30 credit hours, students must take
SPCH-S 122, SPCH-S 424, and one of the following:
SPCH-S 405, SPCH-S 427, or SPCH-S 450.
3. After completing 21 credit hours in the major,
students must take SPCH-S 400 (the capstone
course).
4. The general education requirements set forth
by the College of Arts and Sciences requires
students pursuing the B.A. degree to take two
courses designated as intensive writing courses.
Communication majors must take a minimum of one
intensive writing course from courses offered by the
Department of Communication (S427 & S450).
5. A minimum of 15 credit hours must be taken at the
300-400 level.
6. Communication majors are required to augment their
academic program in communication with a minor
(a minimum of 15 credit hours) in another discipline.
The student selects the minor area in consultation
with a faculty advisor.
Most of the courses fall into one of three informal
emphasis areas. A minimum of 12 credit hours in one
area constitutes an emphasis in that area. The emphasis
areas are as follows:
Emphasis Areas for Communication Majors
Cultural & Relational Communication
•
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
COMM-M 460 Culture and Mass Communication (3
cr.)
SPCH-S 122 Interpersonal Communication (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 313 Communication as Performance (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 322 Advanced Interpersonal
Communication (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 398 Independent Study in Speech
Communication (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 400 Senior Seminar in Speech (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 405 Human Communication Theory (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 414 Topics in Performance and Culture (3
cr.)
SPCH-S 424 Empirical Research Methods in
Speech Communication (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 427 Cross-Cultural Communication (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 450 Gender and Communication (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 480 Personal Narrative and Performance (3
cr.)
SPCH-S 490 Profession Practice Internship (3 cr.)
Business Communication and Public
Relations
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
JOUR-C 327 Writing for Publication (3 cr.)
JOUR-J 200 Writing for Mass Media (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 223 Business and Professional Speaking (3
cr.)
SPCH-S 320 Advanced Public Speaking (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 336 Current Topics in Communication:
Introduction to Public Relations (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 398 Independent Study in Speech
Communication (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 400 Senior Seminar in Speech (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 424 Empirical Research Methods in
Speech Communication (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 427 Cross-Cultural Communication (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 440 Organizational Communication (3 cr.)
•
•
SPCH-S 450 Gender and Communication (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 490 Profession Practice Internship (3 cr.)
New Media Studies and Mass
Communication
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
COMM-C 340 Practicum in Media Production (3 cr.)
COMM-C 351 TV Production I (3 cr.)
COMM-M 460 Cultural and Mass Communication (3
cr.)
COMM-C 462 Media Theory and Criticism (3 cr.)
JOUR-C 327 Writing for Publication (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 398 Independent Study in Speech
Communication (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 400 Senior Seminar in Speech (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 424 Empirical Research Methods in
Speech Communication (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 427 Cross-Cultural Communication (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 450 Gender and Communication (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 490 Profession Practice Internship (3 cr.)
TEL-C 200 Introduction to Mass Communication (3
cr.)
TEL-R 204 Foundations of Telecommunications (3
cr.)
TEL-R 308 Radio Production and Directing (3 cr.)
The Department of Communication is committed to
making the communication major available to part- time
and working students. Multiple courses are offered in
the evening and during the summer to meet diverse
scheduling needs. Communication majors must also
complete the general education requirements for the
Bachelor of Arts degree in the College of Arts and
Sciences as well as general university requirements.
Internships
Internships are available for communication majors.
SPCH-S 490 requirements include minimums of
junior or senior standing, 21 credit hours of completed
communication courses, a 3.0 grade point average in
the major, an overall 2.5 grade point average (or higher),
faculty supervision, and departmental approval. There are
also practicum and independent study courses such as
COMM-C 340 and SPCH-S398.
Interdepartmental Major in Afro-American
Studies and Communication
The Departments of Communication and Minority Studies
offer a thematically integrated major in Afro- American
and Communication Studies. This interdepartmental
major is designed for students who wish to combine
substantial Afro-American studies with their work in
the communication major. (Details available under the
"Department of Minority Studies" section of this bulletin.)
Minor in Communication
Requirements
•
•
•
•
SPCH-S 121 (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 122 (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 223 (3 cr.)
Select a minimum of 6 credit hours at the 300-400
level
With careful planning, it is possible for students to
eventually earn a minor through successfully completing
B.S. in Informatics (INFO)
required courses offered during a combination of
evenings, summer sessions, and weekends.
Computer Information Systems
•
Phone: 219-980-6638
Website: http://www.iun.edu/cis/
B.S. in Computer Information Systems (CIS)
Requirements
•
•
Complete a minimum of 120 credit hours. At least
36 of those credit hours must be at the 300-400
level. At least 105 of those credits must be COAS
courses.
Complete distribution requirements (please see
department for specific CIS requirements).
Group V Major—Computer Information Systems Core
(45 cr.)
• CSCI-C 106 (3 cr.)
• DPIS-D 150 (3 cr.)
• CSCI-A 106 (3 cr.)
• CSCI-A 247 (3 cr.)
• CSCI-A 285 (3 cr.)
Select one of the following programming options:
• option A
• CSCI-A 201 (4 cr.)
• CSCI-A 302 (4 cr.)
•
option B
• CSCI-C 201 (4 cr.)
• CSCI-C 307 (3 cr.)
•
option C
• CSCI-A 210 (4 cr.)
• CSCI-A 346 (3 cr.)
All of the following:
• DPIS-D 330 (3 cr.)
• DPIS-D 446 (3 cr.)
• DPIS-D 345 (4 cr.) or INFO-I 421 (3 cr.)
• DPIS-D 350 (3 cr.)
Select one of the following for the capstone requirement:
• CSCI-Y 398 (1-6 cr.)
• CSCI-C 390 (1-6 cr.)
CIS Electives to complete 45 credit hours. (See
Department for list of electives.)
Students must also complete the general requirements of
the College of Arts and Sciences.
Microcomputer Applications Proficiency Test
• A microcomputer applications proficiency test allows
students to test out of CSCI-A 106 Introduction to
Computing (3 cr.). The test consists of online and
written modules that measure the student's ability
to perform various tasks upon actual computer files.
Achieving a total minimum grade of 70 percent
would allow a student to test out of CSCI-A 106.
However, in order to receive credit hours for the
course, a student must satisfactorily complete either
CSCI-A 285 or DPIS-D 290 with a C (2.0) or higher.
Such a student will be eligible for 3 credit hours of
special credit with a grade of S. It is the responsibility
•
39
of the student to request that CIS forward this
information to his or her division.
Each module will be graded separately. Achieving
a minimum grade of 70 percent for a module would
allow a student to test out of that particular module.
CIS provides a method for students to receive
instruction only in the areas where placement scores
indicate that they are deficient by teaching three 1
credit hour courses taught concurrently with CSCIA 106: CSCI-A 103 (word processing), CSCI-A
104 (spreadsheets), and CSCI-A 105 (relational
database).
Total (45 cr.)
Group VI: Minor
• Students must select a minor in any area. (A
business or SPEA minor is very marketable with the
computer information systems degree.)
Electives and Internship
• Each student will be required to gain sufficient
elective or internship credit to meet the minimum 120
credit hour requirement.
• A maximum of 6 credit hours may be awarded for
successful completion of an internship. Credit not
given for both COAS-W 398 and CSCI-Y 398 in
excess of 6 credit hours. The CSCI-Y 398 Internship
is considered a capstone course. While internships
are opportunities to learn new skills, CIS interns are
often hired based on their cumulative knowledge and
ability to provide employers with needed skills. CIS
Internship credit is normally awarded 1 credit hour a
semester.
• Consult the department chairperson for specific
details concerning registration requirements,
and check with Career Services for internship
opportunities.
B.S. in Informatics (INFO)
Requirements
1. A minimum of 120 credit hours are required to
complete the degree requirements. At least 36 of
those credit hours must be at the 300-400 level. At
least 105 of those credits must be COAS courses.
2. Students must also complete the general
requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences
(please see department for specific INFO
requirements)
General Education Requirements (39-49 cr.)
The general education requirements for Bachelor of
Science in Informatics will parallel those for a Bachelor
of Science degree in the College of Arts and Sciences.
Specifically, in addition to the general requirements for
this baccalaureate degree, candidates for the Bachelor of
Science degree in Informatics must complete the following
group requirements.
Group V—Major (55-58 cr.)
The major requirements are organized into three
categories:
Informatics Core (34 cr.)
Informatics Electives (6 cr.)
Cognate Area (15-18 cr.)
Informatics Core (34 credit hours)
40
Interdepartmental Major: CIS and Fine Arts
Required (22 cr.)
•
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•
•
•
•
INFO-I 101 Introduction to Informatics (4 cr.)
INFO-I 201 Mathematical Foundations of Informatics
(4 cr.)
INFO-I 202 Social Informatics (3 cr.)
INFO-I 210 Information Infrastructure I (4 cr.)
INFO-I 211 Information Infrastructure II (4 cr.)
INFO-I 308 Information Representation (3 cr.)
Select two of the following (6 cr.)
• INFO-I 300 Human-Computer Interaction (3
cr.)
• INFO-I 303 Organizational Informatics (3 cr.)
• INFO-I 310 Multimedia Arts and Technology (3
cr.)
• INFO-I 320 Distributed Systems and
Collaborative Computing (3 cr.)
Select one of the following three capstone options (6
cr.)
• INFO-I 494 and INFO-I 495 Design and
Development of an Information System I/II (3 3 cr.)
• INFO-I 492 and INFO-I 493 Thesis/Senior
Project (3 - 3 cr.)
• INFO-I 420 Internship in Informatics (1 cr. may
be repeated up to 6 cr.)
Total (34 cr.)
Informatics Electives (6 credit hours, 300
level or higher)
Please see the CIS Department for a list of acceptable
courses.
Total (6 cr.)
Cognate Area (15-18 credit hours)—Select
one Cognate Area
Please see the individual departments for specific
information on the Cognate Area.
Interdepartmental Major: CIS and Fine Arts
Bachelor of Science in Computer-based
Graphic Arts
Computer-based graphic artists are sought-after in the
job market. The students who graduate with this degree
will have a strong background in artistic (fine arts) and
computer (CIS) skills. Computer-based graphic arts are
widely used tools in business, industry, and the arts.
The student will have two official advisors—one in the
Department of Fine Arts and one in Computer Information
Systems—who will help plan the course of study in detail
and with frequent consultations.
The general degree requirements are the same as for the
Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems,
except that the Group I requirement consists of only ENGW 131, ENG-W 231, and MATH-M 118 and Group V
Major requirements are replaced by the following:
Group V Interdepartmental Major
Requirements (65-67 cr.)
Department of Fine Arts (47-49 cr.)
•
Select one of the following
•
•
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•
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FINA-F 100 (3 cr.)
FINA-F 102 (3 cr.)
FINA-A 100 series (history of art) (3 cr.)
300- or 400- level art history (3 cr.)
FINA-S 250 (3 cr.)
FINA-S 351 (3 cr.)
FINA-S 352 (3 cr.)
FINA-S 353 (3 cr.)
FINA-S 400 (1-3 cr.)
FINA-S 413 (3 cr.)
FINA-S 414 (3 cr.)
FINA-S 415 (3 cr.)
FINA-A 435 (3 cr.)
FINA-S 497 (1-3 cr.)
Complete requirements 5-7 for Major in Studio
Practice
Capstone course requirement
• FINA-A 435 (3 cr.)
• FINA-S 497 (1-6 cr.)
• participating in the graduating senior exhibition
Computer Information Systems (18 cr.)
•
•
•
•
•
CSCI-A 106 (3 cr.)
CSCI-A 251 (3 cr.)
CSCI-A 348 (3 cr.)
CSCI-C 390 (6 cr.)
Select one of the following
• CSCI-A 340 (3 cr.)
• DPIS-D 250 (3 cr.) or INFO-I 310 (3 cr.)
• DPIS-D 490 (3 cr.)
For Bachelor of Science degrees, all students must
complete the group VI minor.
There is a Bachelor of Arts version of this interdepartmental degree. See the Fine Arts Department
section for details.
Interdepartmental Major: CIS and
Mathematics
Bachelor of Science in Simulation/Modeling
Analysis
The students who graduate with this degree will have
a strong background in theoretical (mathematics) and
practical (CIS) skills. Modeling and computer simulation are widely used tools in business, industry, and
research. Computer simulation allows an investigator to
test proposed alterations to existing systems as well as
proposed designs for entirely new systems.
Work in this area requires strong mathematical, statistical,
and computer skills. This program should appeal to
students interested in mathematics, computers, business,
and the sciences.
The student will have two official advisors—one in
Mathematics and one in Computer Information Systems—
who will help plan the course of study in detail.
The general degree requirements are the same as for the
Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems,
except that the Group V major requirements are replaced
by the following:
Minor in Economics
Group V Interdepartmental Major
Requirements (43-45 cr.)
Department of Mathematics (22-24 cr.)
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•
•
•
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MATH-M 215 (5 cr.)
MATH-M 216 (5 cr.)
MATH-M 301 (3 cr.)
MATH-M 360 (3 cr.)
MATH-M 447 (3 cr.)
MATH-M 448 (3 cr.)
Total (22-24 cr.)
Computer Information Systems (21-23 cr.)
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•
•
•
•
•
CSCI-C 106 (3 cr.)
DPIS-D 150 (3 cr.)
Select one of the following
• CSCI-C 201 (4 cr.) and CSCI-C 307 (3 cr.)
• CSCI-A 201 (4 cr.) and CSCI-A 302 (4 cr.)
CIS or Informatics elective @ 300 level or above (3-4
cr.)
DPIS-D 410 (3 cr.)
CSCI-C 390 (1-3 cr.)
• Capstone course requirement
• Select one of the following: CSCI-C 390
course (1-3 cr.) for which the student will
write a complete project-thesis starting with a
theoretical model of a problem and then writing
a computer program solution in C++, Java,
or other appropriate computer language. The
possibility of internships (CSCI-Y 398) also
exists because the degree is highly applicationoriented. An especially rewarding situation
would combine the internship and the capstone
experience into a single project-thesis.
The postbaccalaureate certificate program enables the
holder of a bachelor's degree with a major in another field
to obtain formal recognition of training in the computer
field. Students select one of five options after successfully
meeting or completing the following prerequisites: ENG-W
131 and ENG-W 231 and MATH-M 118.
Student Consumer Information about this Program
Requirements
•
•
•
•
•
Minor in Computer Information Systems
(CIS)
Requirements
•
•
•
•
CSCI-C 106 (3 cr.)
CSCI-A 106 (3 cr.)
200 to 400 level (9 cr.)
Students must also complete general requirements
of the College of Arts and Sciences.
Total (15 cr.)
Please see a CIS Department advisor for combinations of
classes if you have a specific interest in a particular area.
Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Computer
Information Systems
A postbaccalaureate certificate in computer information
systems is offered for students with baccalaureate
degrees in another discipline who wish to complement
their undergraduate education with course work similar
to the requirement for a Bachelor of Science degree in
computer information systems.
CSCI-C 106 (3 cr.)
CSCI-A 106 (3 cr.)
DPIS-D 150 (3 cr.)
Select seven more courses with at least four of those
courses taken at the 300 to 400 level.
Please see a CIS department advisor for combinations of
classes if you have a specific interest in a particular area.
Economics
The economics program is housed in the School of
Business and Economics. Degrees in economics are
awarded by the College of Arts and Sciences.
About Economics
The economics program is housed in the School of
Business and Economics. Degrees in economics are
awarded by the College of Arts and Sciences.
Major in Economics
Requirements
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•
•
•
ECON-E 103 (3 cr.)
ECON-E 104 (3 cr.)
ECON-E 270 (3 cr.)
Select one of the following
• ECON-E 321 (3 cr.)
• BUS-G 300 (3 cr.)
• equivalent course work
•
Select one of the following
• ECON-E 322 (3 cr.)
• equivalent course work
•
sufficient additional hours in Economics to total a
minimum of 27 credit hours
Total (21-23 cr.)
For Bachelor of Science degrees, all students must
complete the Group VI minor.
41
Total (27 cr.)
Students may not count ECON-E 309 for credit toward
the economics major. Students interested in majoring
in economics should consult with a member of the
economics faculty for additional information. Students
planning to pursue a graduate degree in economics
should plan a program of study, in consultation with
a departmental advisor, which includes course work
in economic theory and additional course work in
mathematics and statistics. Students are responsible for
completing the prerequisites for all economics courses
and for fulfilling the general education requirements of the
College of Arts and Sciences.
Minor in Economics
Requirements
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•
•
•
ECON-E 103 (3 cr.)
ECON-E 104 (3 cr.)
ECON-E 270 (3 cr.)
Select one of the following
42
English
•
•
•
•
ECON-E 321 (3 cr.)
BUS-G 300 (3 cr.)
equivalent course work
sufficient additional course work in economics
to total a minimum of 18 credit hours
Total (18 cr.)
English
Minors in English
Students must complete the general requirements of the
College of Arts and Sciences.
Following are the requirements for the three options for
minors.
Literature Option
•
Select one from the following
• ENG-L 202 (3 cr.)
• ENG-L 203 (3 cr.)
• ENG-L 204 (3 cr.)
• ENG-L 205 (3 cr.)
•
Select one from the following
• ENG-L 211 (3 cr.)
• ENG-L 212 (3 cr.)
•
Select one from the following
• ENG-L 351 (3 cr.)
• ENG-L 352 (3 cr.)
• ENG-L 354 (3 cr.)
•
Two additional 300 level courses in literature (3 cr.)
Phone: (219) 980-6565
Website: http://www.iun.edu/english/
Major in English
Requirements
Select at least 10 courses above the 100 level, of which at
least five must be on the 300-400 level (30 cr.)
• Select from the following to meet the requirement
English literature before 1700
• ENG-L 211 (3 cr) or
• Two courses from the sequence of courses
from ENG-L 303 to ENG-L 320 (6 cr)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Select from the following to meet the requirement
English literature since 1700
• ENG-L 212 (3 cr) or
• Two courses from the sequence of courses
from ENG-L 325 to ENG-L 348 (6 cr)
ENG-L 315 Major plays of Shakespeare (3 cr)
American literature - one course from the sequence
of courses from ENG-L 350 to ENG-L 363 (3 cr)
ENG-L 440 (3 cr) (also fulfills capstone requirement)
Students must submit a Senior Portfolio.
Requirements for this are available in the English
Department.
Students must also complete the general
requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences
Writing courses which count as English electives
• ENG-W 231 (3 cr)
• ENG-W 233 (3 cr)
• ENG-W 301 (3 cr)
• ENG-W 303 (3 cr)
• ENG-W 350 (3 cr)
Total (15 cr.)
Writing Option
•
•
ENG-W 132 (3 cr.)
Select one from the following
• ENG-W 231 (3 cr.)
• ENG-W 350 (3 cr.)
•
Select one from the following
• ENG-W 301 (3 cr.)
• ENG-W 303 (3 cr.)
•
Select 2 literature classes at the 200 or above level
(6 cr.)
Total (15 cr.)
Creative Writing Option
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•
•
•
ENG-W 301 (3 cr.)
ENG-W 303 (3 cr.)
ENG-W 311 (3 cr.)
2 literature classes at the 200 or above level (6 cr.)
Total (15 cr.)
Total (30 cr)
Recommendation
The department recommends that majors considering
graduate work in English take elective courses in a variety
of periods of English and American literature.
Students who expect to go on to graduate work are
advised to take substantial work in at least one foreign
language.
Interdepartmental Major in Afro-American
Studies and English
The Departments of Minority Studies and English offer
a thematically integrated major in English and AfroAmerican studies. This interdepartmental major is
designed for students who wish to combine substantial
Afro-American studies with their work in the American and
English literature major. (Details are available under the
"Department of Minority Studies" section of this bulletin.)
Courses
Composition
Courses in composition include ENG-W 130, ENG-W 131,
ENG-W 132, and ENG-W 140.
Students are not permitted to register for ENG-W 131 until
they have taken English placement exams administered
by the University Division. On the basis of the placement
test scores, the student may be counseled to take ENG-W
031 or ENG-W 130 prior to ENG-W 131.
Writing
Courses in writing include ENG-W 201, ENG-W 231,
ENG-W 233, ENG-W 301, ENG-W 303, ENG-W 350,
ENG-W 398, and ENG-W 490. Before students are
eligible to take further courses in writing, they must have
completed ENG-W 131.
Literature
Interdepartmental Major: CIS and Fine Arts
Courses in literature include ENG-L 101, ENG-L 102;
the following courses are open to sophomores, juniors,
seniors, and to second-semester freshmen who have
completed either ENG-L 101 or ENG-L 102: ENG-L 201,
ENG-L 202, ENG-L 203, ENG-L 204, ENG-L 205, ENG-L
207, ENG-L 211, ENG-L 212, ENG-L 295.
The following courses are ordinarily recommended for
juniors and seniors: ENG-L 305, ENG-L 308, ENG-L 311,
ENG-L 315, ENG-L 326, ENG-L 332, ENG-L 335, ENGL 345, ENG-L 346, ENG-L 347, ENG-L 348, ENG-L 351,
ENG-L 352, ENG-L 354, ENG-L 355, ENG-L 357, ENGL 358, ENG-L 364, ENG-L 365, ENG-L 366, ENG-L 369,
ENG-L 370, ENG-L 381, ENG-L 382, ENG-L 390, ENG-L
440, ENG-L 495.
Language
Courses in the English language include ENG-G 205,
ENG-G 207, and ENG-G 310.
Fine Arts
Phone: (219) 980-6810
Website: http://www.iun.edu/fine-arts/
About Fine Arts
Two types of courses are offered: history of art, taught
by illustrated lectures and class discussion; and practice
of art, consisting of studio work on creative and technical
problems.
Major in Studio Practice
The studio practice program enables the student to see,
to formulate, and to articulate visual concepts through
the manipulation of forms and materials. Its basic aim is
to develop an awareness of visual expression within the
humanist tradition.
Requirements
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•
•
•
•
•
A100 series history of art (6 cr.)
Art history at the 300 and 400 level (6 cr.)
Fundamental studio (9 cr.)
Studio courses above the 100 level (25-34 cr.) must
include a minimum of three and a maximum of six of
the introductory (200-level) courses
FINA-A 435 Art Theory for Graduating Seniors (2 cr.)
must be taken during the fall semester.
During the final year, each student must assume full
responsibility for mounting a personal exhibit that will
include terminal and representative work in the major
field and, if applicable, in the minor field as well. To
meet this requirement, the student must:
• File in the departmental office an "Intent to
Graduate" one calendar year prior to the
intended completion date. You must meet with
your principal teacher to determine if you are
prepared to enroll in FINA-S 497.
• Submit a portfolio of the most recent and
best work in the major discipline to the
departmental office before the completion of
the fall semester, prior to enrolling in FINAS 497. The studio program in the final year
shall be coordinated with the evaluation of the
portfolio.
• Enroll in FINA-S 497 Independent Study in
Studio Art for the spring semester during the
final year. (1-6 cr.)
•
•
•
•
43
Prepare the exhibit under the principal
teacher's guidance. This will include drafting
a descriptive statement about the work in the
exhibit: goals, intent, approach, techniques,
etc.
Be prepared to exhibit in accordance with the
departmental schedule at any time during the
final semester. FINA-A 435 and FINA-S 497
fulfill the capstone requirement.
Graduating Senior Exhibit
Students must also complete the general
requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences
Total (49-57 cr.)
A faculty committee whose evaluation will be used to
determine the studio course grade in the final semester
will judge the Graduating Senior Exhibit and the
descriptive statement.
Transfer Credit in Studio
All incoming students who want to transfer studio credit
from another institution must submit a portfolio. This
should be in the form of slides, photographs, or compact
discs, and should include the better work done in each
course for which credit transfer is desired. The faculty
shall devise a minimal studio program in residence,
specifically based upon evaluation of the portfolio, for each
transfer student.
Minor in Art History
Requirements
•
•
FINA-A 100 level art history courses (6 cr.)
300 or 400 level art history courses, excluding FINAA 435 (9 cr.)
Interdepartmental Major: CIS and Fine Arts
Bachelor of Arts in Computer-based Graphic
Arts
The student will have two official advisors, one in the
Department of Fine Arts and one in Computer Information
Systems, who will help plan the course of study in detail
with frequent consultations.
Requirements in Computer Information
Systems (18 cr.)
•
•
•
•
•
CSCI-A 106 Introduction to Computing (3 cr.)
CSCI-A 251 Introduction to Digital Imaging
Application (3 cr.)
CSCI-A 348 Mastering the World Wide Web (3 cr.)
CSCI-C 390 Individual Programming Laboratory (6
cr.)
Select one of the following:
• CSCI-A 340 An Introduction to Web
Programming (3 cr.)
• or DPIS-D 250 (INFO-I 310) Multimedia (3 cr.)
• or DPIS-D 490 Current Directions in Data
Processing and Information Systems (3 cr.)
Total (18 cr.)
Requirements in Department of Fine Arts
(31-41 cr.)
•
FINA-F 100 Fundamental Studio-Drawing (3 cr.) or
FINA-F 102 Fundamental Studio-2D (3 cr.)
44
Minor in Fine Arts
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
3 credit hours in the FINA A100 series (history of art)
3 credit hours of FINA 300 or 400 level art history
FINA-S 250 Introduction to Design Practice (3 cr.)
FINA-S 351 Graphic Design II (3 cr.)
FINA-S 352 Production for Graphic Design (3 cr.)
FINA-S 353 Graphic Design IV (3 cr.)
FINA-S 400 Independent Studio Projects (1-6 cr.)
FINA-S 413 Typography (2 cr.)
FINA-S 414 Layout (2 cr.)
FINA-S 415 Package Design (2 cr.)
FINA-A 435 Art Theory (2 cr.)
FINA-S 497 Independent Study in Fine Arts (1-6 cr.)
Total (31-41 cr.)
Complete requirements for major in studio practice.
•
•
•
•
Capstone course requirement
FINA-A 345 (2 cr.)
FINA-S 497 (1-6 cr.)
Participate in graduating seniors exhibition
There is a Bachelor of Science version of this
interdepartmental degree. See the "Department of
Computer Information Systems " section for details.
Minor in Fine Arts
Six options: Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Photography,
Sculpture, Ceramics, Graphic Design
Required courses in all options:
•
•
•
Select one of the following (3 cr.)
• FINA-F 100
• FINA-F 101
• FINA-F 102
Art history FINA-A 100 level (3 cr.)
3 Studio Art classes at the 200 or above level (9 cr.)
Total (15 cr.)
Geosciences
Phone:(219) 980-6740
Website: http://www.iun.edu/geosciences/
Geology
About Geology
The Department of Geosciences offers B.S. and B.A.
degrees in Geology. The B.S. provides rigorous general
background in the field of geology and allied disciplines.
The degree is designed for students who wish to prepare
for graduate school or employment as a professional
geologist in the private sector, government sector, or
environmental science and other related fields.This degree
offers a more extensive requirement in biology, chemistry,
mathematics, and physics compared with the B.A. and
is designed to optimize student opportunities.The B.A.
provides a general background in the field of geology
and requires a diversified liberal arts education in place
of some of the allied disciplines.It is an appropriate
choice for those who wish to teach earth sciences at
the secondary school level and those who wish to gain
a general knowledge of the geosciences and their
relationship to the other sciences. The department offers
the learning experience through the traditional lecture
series, laboratories, seminars, independent study in the
field, laboratory and library, and through field trips to
local sites and to geologically intriguing areas of North
America. Each course for majors contains a field trip, and
the department conducts one trip of two weeks duration
after the spring semester.
Major in Geology - B.S.
Majors complete 39-41 credit hours in geology and 36
credit hours in the allied disciplines
1. Any one of the following 100-level courses AND GEOL
G102 laboratory:
•
•
•
GEOL G101 Introduction to Earth Science (3 cr.)
AND G102 Intro to Earth Science Lab (1 cr.)
GEOL G107 Environmental Geology (3cr.) AND
G102 Intro to Earth Science Lab (1cr)
GEOL G103 Earth Materials and Processes (3 cr.)
AND G102 Intro to Earth Science Lab (1 cr.)
GEOL G209 History of the Earth (4 cr.)
GEOL G221 Introductory Mineralogy (4 cr.)
GEOL G222 Introduction to Petrology (4cr.)
GEOL G317 Field and Laboratory Techniques (3cr.)
GEOL G323 Structural Geology (4 cr.)
GEOL G334 Principles of Sedimentation and Stratigraphy
(4 cr.)
GEOL G429 Field Geology in the Rocky Mountains (6 cr.)
OR other chairperson approved geology field camp (5-6
credits) (fulfills capstone requirement for B.S. in Geology)
GEOL G490 Undergraduate Seminar (fulfills capstone
requirement for B.S. in Geology)
2. Complete one of the following sequences:
Two 400-level lecture-based geology courses (6-8 credit
hours)
One 400-level lecture-based geology course (3-4 credit
hours) AND one semester of research or internship
fulfilled by one of the following courses:
•
•
•
G407 Senior Science Project (3 cr.)
G408 Senior Science Project (3 cr.)
G460 Internship in Geology (3 cr.)
3. Allied Sciences
Chemistry (10 credits) CHEM C105-CHEM C106, CHEM
C125-CHEM C126
Physics (10 credits) PHYS P221, PHYS P222
Mathematics (10 credits) MATH M215, MATH M216
Biology (3 credits)
4. A 300- or 400-level Math, Chemistry or Physics course.
5. Students must also complete the general requirements
of the College of Arts and Sciences.
Major in Geology - B.A.
Requirements
Majors complete at least 25-27 credit hours in geology, 15
credit hours in the allied disciplines and a minimum of 36
credit hours in courses at the 300-400 level.
1. Any one of the following 100-level courses AND GEOL
G102 laboratory:
Interdepartmental Major in Environmental Science - B.S.
* GEOL G101 Introduction to Earth Science (3 cr.) AND
G102 Intro. to Earth Science Lab (1 cr.)
* GEOL G107 Environmental Geology (3cr.) AND G102
Intro. to Earth Science Lab (1cr)
* GEOL G103 Earth Materials and Processes (3 cr.)
AND G102 Intro. to Earth Science Lab (1 cr.)
Requirements
Complete the general education requirements for the
Bachelor of Science degree in the College of Arts and
Science. Fulfill the following:
•
Geology, Chemistry, and Biology requirements
• G101 – G102 Intro to Earth Science/Intro to
Earth Science Lab (4 cr.)
• G221 – Mineralogy – Lecture/Lab (4 cr.)
• C105 – C125 Principles of Chemistry I/
Experimental Chemistry I (5 cr.)
• C106 – C126 Principles of Chemistry II/
Experimental Chemistry II (5 cr.)
• L101 – Introduction to Biological Sciences I –
Lecture/Lab (4 cr.)
• L102 – Intro to Biological Sciences II – Lecture/
Lab (4 cr.)
•
Public and Environmental Affairs allied environment
requirement
• Select one of the following
• SPEA E400 (Topics in Environmental
Studies) – Environmental Law (3 cr.)
• SPEA E400 (Topics in Environmental
Studies) – Environmental Mediation (3
cr.)
GEOL G209 History of the Earth (4 cr.)
GEOL G221 Introductory Mineralogy (4 cr.)
GEOL G222 Introduction to Petrology (4cr)
GEOL G317 Field and Laboratory Techniques (3cr)
2. Any two 300- or 400-level lecture-based geology
courses.
(The following GEOL (geology) courses fulfill the College
of Arts & Sciences capstone requirement for the B.A. in
Geology: G323, G406, G413, G415, G435, G451, G490)
3. Allied Sciences (15 cr.): Students must complete one of
the following sequences:
* CHEM C105-CHEM C125 and 10 additional credit
hours of chemistry, mathematics, or physics
OR
* Two semesters of College-level chemistry with
corresponding laboratories and an additional 5 credit
hours of mathematics (mathematics courses must be at
or above the 100 level; MATH M100 and T-courses are
excluded), or physics.
•
4. Students must also complete the general requirements
of the College of Arts and Sciences. Including a minimum
of 36 credit hours in courses at the 300-400 (junior-senior)
level.
Double Degree in Geology (B.A.) and
Secondary Education (Earth/Space Science)
The College of Arts and Sciences and School of Education
offer a double major in Geology (B.A.) and Secondary
Education (Earth/Space Science). See an advisor for
details and course requirements.
•
Interdepartmental Major in Environmental
Science - B.S.
The Interdepartmental major involving Biology, Chemistry,
and Geology in Environmental Science provides rigorous
interdisciplinary background in the natural science
segment of the environmental sciences, combined with a
significant background in the allied disciplines of physics
and mathematics, and coursework in environmental
affairs. The degree is designed to prepare students
for graduate programs, or employment as scientists
in technical fields associated with the environmental
industry and government sector. These disciplines
include hydrology, environmental hazard mitigation, waste
management, water and air quality issues, ecology, and
habitat issues.
This is an interdepartmental degree. Students fulfill
core requirements from the disciplines of geology,
chemistry, and biology and choose two disciplines for
an interdepartmental concentration area. Students are
required to complete a minimum of 40 credit hours in the
interdepartmental major – with a minimum of 12 credit
hours at the 300- or 400-level in each area. Students are
required to complete additional coursework in associated
areas of study.
45
Complete a combined total of 40 credit hours
from two scientific disciplines in the major.
The 40 credit hour concentration need not be
equally divided between the two disciplines.
Each of the two areas should include a
minimum of 12 credit hours of 300- 400-level
coursework. The list of acceptable coursework
is listed below. Coursework completed in
the students’ chosen disciplines from 2.
above (Geology, Chemistry, and Biology
requirements) count toward the total credit
hours.
Biology
• B351 – Fungi – Lecture/Lab (3-4 cr.)
• B355 – Plant Diversity (4 cr.)
• L473 – Ecology – Lecture/Lab (3-4 cr.)
• L482 – Restoration Ecology (3 cr.)
• Z406 – Vertabrate Zoology – Lecture/Lab
(3-4 cr.)
• L490 – Individual Study in Biology (3-6
cr.)
•
Chemistry
• C341 – Organic Chemistry I (3 cr.)
• C343 – Organic Chemistry I Lab (2 cr.)
• C303 – Environmental Chemistry (3 cr.)
• C310 – Analytical Chemistry + Analytical
Chemistry Laboratory (5 cr)
• C409 – Chemical Research (3-6)
•
Geosciences
• G317 – Field and Laboratory Techniques
(3 cr.)
• G334 – Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
– Lecture/Lab (4 cr.)
• G451 – Hydrogeology – Lecture/Lab (4
cr.)
46
Minors in Geology and Earth Science
•
•
•
•
•
G407/G408 – Senior Geosciences
Research Project (3-6 cr.) Must be
advisor approved
G429e – Environmental Geology
Field Camp (6 cr.) offered through IU
Bloomington – or other chair-approved
hydrogeology/Environmental Geology
field camp. See list of pre-requisites in
the list of classes at end of bulletin.
G490 – Senior Seminar (1 cr.) – must
be environmentally-based and advisor
approved
GEOG 415/515 – Advanced Geographic
Information Systems (GIS) (3 cr.) (offered
through VIGGA – class will meet at
Valparaiso University).
Students are responsible for fulfilling
prerequisites for this course (GEOG 215)
that are not part of the Environmental
Science program.
•
Allied Sciences (18 credit hours)
• M215 – Calculus I (5 cr.)
• K300 – Statistics (3 cr.)
• P201 or P221 – Physics I (5 cr.)
• P202 or P222 – Physics II (5 cr.)
•
Senior Seminar (capstone) (integration of
Biology/Chemistry/Geology into environmental
topics of current importance) (1 cr.) – G490/
L403/C30
Electives
The following list is designed to provide stdents with
gidance in course selection. Students should speak to
their advisors to choose elective courses that best meet
their educational goals.
•
Any coursework from Biology, Chemistry, and
Geology that was not used to satisfy major
requirements.
• GEOG 230 – Remote Sensing (3 cr.) (offered
through VIGGA – class will meet at Valparaiso
University)
• M216 – Calculus II (5 cr.)
• SPEA H316 – Environmental Health (3 cr.)
• SPEA E400/V450 – Environmental Planning (3
cr.)
Minors in Geology and Earth Science
A minor in geology offers students majoring in other
disciplines a solid background in the geological sciences.
It should prove especially useful for students seeking
careers with interdisciplinary emphasis (e.g., chemistry,
biology, the environmental sciences). The earth science
minor is designed to provide students planning careers
involving the management of resources with sufficient
background to understand basic geological principles and
their relationships to human activities on earth.
Geology Minor (16 cr.)
1. Any one of the following 100-level courses AND
GEOL-G 102 laboratory:
•
•
•
•
•
GEOL-G 101 Introduction to Earth Sciences
(3 cr.) AND GEOL-G 102 Intro. to Earth
Science Lab (1 cr.)
GEOL-G 107 Environmental Geology
(3 cr.) AND GEOL-G 102 Intro. to Earth
Science Lab (1 cr.)
GEOL-G 103 Earth Materials and
Processes (3 cr.) AND GEOL-G 102 Intro.
to Earth Science Lab (1 cr.)
GEOL-G 209 History of the Earth (4 cr.)
Additional coursework may be chosen in conjunction
with a geology advisor but must consist of at least
two lecture-based geology (GEOL) courses.
Earth Science Minor (16 cr.)
1. Any one of the following 100-level courses AND
GEOL-G 102 laboratory:
• GEOL-G 101 Introduction to Earth Sciences (3
cr.) AND GEOL-G 102 Intro. to Earth Science
Lab (1 cr.)
• GEOL-G 107 Environmental Geology (3
cr.) AND GEOL-G 102 Intro. to Earth Science
Lab (1 cr.)
• GEOL-G 103 Earth Materials and Processes (3
cr.) AND GEOL-G 102 Intro. to Earth Science
Lab (1 cr.)
2. GEOL-G 209 History of the Earth (4 cr.)
3. Additional coursework may be chosen in conjunction
with a geology advisor but must consist of at least
two lecture-based geology (GEOL) or geography
(GEOG) courses.
About Geography
No major is offered in geography at IU Northwest.
The program in geography is designed to serve the
following purposes:
•
•
•
Contribute to the development of an informed
citizenry
Provide specific skills and knowledge of the
discipline for those who plan to pursue careers in
• Teaching geography, social studies, and/or
earth science
• Cartography and/or air photo analysis
• Urban and/or regional planning
Provide the background for graduate study
Valparaiso-Indiana Geography and Geology
Association
The purpose of this association is to provide educational
opportunities on the undergraduate level in the geological
and geographical sciences to the students enrolled at
Valparaiso University and Indiana University Northwest.
Provisions are made for full-time undergraduate students
in those academic disciplines to enroll for the fall, spring,
and summer under the following conditions:
1. Students may take a maximum of two courses per
semester at the other participating institution.
2. Those courses will be treated as part of the student's
normal load at his or her home institution, and tuition and
fees will be paid accordingly.
3. The total number of credit hours to be taken will be
determined by the home institution.
Minor in History
4. Students at Indiana University Northwest who wish to
take courses at Valparaiso University should obtain the
recommendation of the chairperson of the Department of
Geosciences at Indiana University Northwest.
5. Grades earned shall be recorded at the home
institution.
6. A grade point average of 2.0 must be achieved in
VIGGA courses to qualify the student to register for
courses at the host institution for the following semester.
Students matriculating at Indiana University Northwest
may take courses among the following offered at
Valparaiso: 101, World Human Geography; 102,
Geography of the Non-Industrialized World; 104,
Geomorphology; 200, American Ethnic Geography;
201, Economic Geography; 210, Current Themes in
Geography; 215, Introduction to Geographic Information
Systems; 225, Cartography; 230, Remote Sensing in
Geography; 260, Environmental Conversation; 274, North
American Indian on Film; 301, Regional Geographies
of the World; 318, Field Study in European Geography;
320, Urban Geography; 321, Urban and Regional
Planning; 360, Statistical Analysis in Geography; 361,
Research Design; 385/585, Field Study; 414/515,
Advanced Geographic Information; 466/566, Profession
of Geography; 470/570, Political Geography; 474/574,
Historical Geography of the United States; 486, Internship
in Geography; 490/590, Selected Topics in Geography;
495, Independent Study; 497, Honors Work in Geography;
498, Honors Candidacy in Geography. See the Valparaiso
University catalog for course descriptions.
47
Rhiman A. and Brenda Rotz Memorial Scholarship
Each year, junior and senior students may submit a
proposal for the scholarship, according to department
guidelines. A committee of department faculty chooses the
recipient.
Major in History
Requirements
•
•
•
HIST-H 105 (3 cr.)
HIST-H 106 (3 cr.)
Select one of the following
• HIST-H 113 (3 cr.)
• HIST-H 114 (3 cr.)
•
History courses numbered 200-499 (24 cr.),
including
• 2 courses in United States history (6 cr.)
• 2 courses in European history (from the Middle
Ages to the present) (6 cr.)
• 2 courses in other areas or topics in history
(e.g., ancient, non-European, non-U.S.) (6 cr.)
• One of the 200-499 level courses must be
a HIST-H 215 Proseminar in History, taken
before the junior year or before the capstone
courses, which, depending on its content, will
count as a course in one of the three areas
above.
• Before the final semster of senior year, majors
must also take 2 courses in HIST-J 495
proseminar (HIST-J 495 fulfills capstone
requirement).
• Majors must also take the other half of Western
Civilization (HIST-H 113 or HIST-H 114) that
they did not take in their major requirement as
a culture requirement course or an elective.
History, Philosophy, Political
Science, and Religious Studies
Phone: (219) 980-6655
Website: http://www.iun.edu/hist-phil-rel-pols/
The Department of History accepts any Latino
studies courses with history designations toward the
B.A. in history. Additionally, we will accept one CHRI
number taken by students toward an A.A. in Latino
studies and apply it to the B.A. in history toward
completion of the required 24 credits of history
courses at the 200 level and above.
About History
The Department of History offers students a wide range
of courses in American, European, and Asian history,
along with other courses in non-Western history and
historiography. The department also cross-lists courses
with Minority Studies and Women's and Gender Studies.
The goals of the department are to teach analysis of
texts, research skills, and critical thinking, along with the
local, national, and global interconnectedness of historical
events.
Minor in History
Requirements
History Honors Program
The department offers four minor concentrations in history
for nonmajors.
Superior students are encouraged to pursue independent
study and research through reading for honors courses
at the junior and senior levels. Students with a grade
point average of 3.4 in courses in history may write
an honors thesis in their senior year with the consent
of the department. Proposals should be submitted to
the chairperson in the semester before the thesis is to
be undertaken. Further information about advanced
placement and the honors program may be obtained from
the Department of History, Philosophy, Political Science,
and Religious Studies.
The Paul J. Urcan Memorial Prize Award Each year,
a committee of departmental faculty selects a student,
usually a graduating senior, who has done outstanding
work in history to be awarded the Paul J. Urcan Memorial
Prize.
•
All of them require 200-499 history courses (15 cr.)
A general minor consists of
•
•
•
•
•
United States history (3 cr.)
European history (3 cr.)
Another area or topic (3 cr.)
Elective (3 cr.)
HIST-J 495 proseminar (3 cr.)
A United States history minor consists of
•
•
•
3 courses in United States history (9 cr.)
Non-United States history (3 cr.)
HIST-J 495 proseminar (3 cr.)
A European history minor consists of
•
3 courses in European history (9 cr.)
48
About Philosophy and Religious Studies
•
•
Non-European history course (3 cr.)
HIST-J 495 proseminar (3 cr.)
An Asian history minor consists of
•
•
•
3 courses in Asian history (9 cr.)
Non-Asian history course (3 cr.)
HIST-J 495 proseminar (3 cr.)
About Philosophy and Religious
Studies
The curriculum of the philosophy program is designed to
contribute to the intellectual training of all undergraduates
and to acquaint them with some of the most important
developments in the history of ideas. Courses in the
program emphasize clear and cogent thinking about
fundamental problems, locate the origins of these
problems in the writings of the great philosophers, and
provide in-depth examinations of proposed solutions. The
department also offers courses in ethics designed for
business and medical students.
Major in Philosophy
Requirements
A minimum of 30 credit hours in philosophy. No more
than 9 credit hours at the 100 level may be included. At
least 9 credit hours must be taken at Purdue University
Calumet. (No more than 12 credit hours from Purdue
University Calumet can be counted toward fulfilling the
major requirements unless waived by the department
and the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences). Three
courses from the sequence in the history of philosophy:
PHIL-P 201, PHIL-P 211, PHIL-P 302, PHIL-P 304 or their
Purdue equivalents. One course in logic and one course
above the 100 level in each of the following four areas:
(1) ethics, (2) metaphysics or epistemology, (3) twentiethcentury philosophy, and (4) either PHIL-P 383 or PHIL-P
490 to fulfill the capstone requirement. Students must also
complete the general requirements of the College of Arts
and Sciences.
Special features of the department's program
include opportunities for field research, internships in
governmental agencies, and a senior seminar for all
political science majors.
A degree in political science is a liberal arts degree,
and as such prepares students to assume the duties of
citizenship; provides special knowledge and skills useful in
public service, law, business, and other careers; and lays
a foundation for the scholarly study of government and
politics. Prospective political science students and majors
are invited to discuss their interests with any member of
the political science faculty.
Major in Political Science - B.A.
Requirements
Political science majors are required to meet all the
requirements for the Arts and Science degree. Political
science majors should consult the "College of Arts and
Sciences" section of this bulletin.
Political science majors must take 36 credit hours in
political science, including POLS-Y 103 (Introduction to
American Politics).
Majors are required to take the following courses
•
•
•
•
POLS-Y 205 (3 cr.)
POLS-Y 372 (3 cr.)
POLS-Y 490 (3 cr.)
International relations and comparative politics from
the following courses (6 cr.)
• POLS-Y 360 (3 cr.)
• POLS-Y 362 (3 cr.)
• POLS-Y 366 (3 cr.)
• POLS-Y 401 comparative politics (3 cr.)
•
American institutions and processes from the
following courses (6 cr.)
• POLS-Y 200 (3 cr.)
• POLS-Y 301 (3 cr.)
• Select one of the following
• POLS-Y 304 (3 cr.)
• POLS-Y 305 (3 cr.)
Students majoring in philosophy may register at IU
Northwest for philosophy courses offered at Purdue
University Calumet. Please see the chairperson of the
Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies for
details.
•
Select one of the following
• POLS-Y 302 (3 cr.)
• POLS-Y 308 (3 cr.)
•
•
•
POLS-Y 318 (3 cr.)
POLS-Y 319 (3 cr.)
POLS-Y 401 (3 cr.)
Minor in Philosophy
Requirements
PHIL-P 100; one course in logic (PHIL-P 150); one course
in ethics or social and political philosophy (e.g., PHIL-P
140 or PHIL-P 343); one course at 200 level or above; one
elective 3 credit hour course in philosophy.
•
Political theory and philosophy from the following
courses (6 cr.)
• POLS-Y 381 (3 cr.)
• POLS-Y 382 (3 cr.)
• POLS-Y 383 (3 cr.)
• POLS-Y 384 (3 cr.)
•
One course in statistics is also required of political
science majors. ECON-E 270 would satisfy this
requirement as well as count toward fulfilling the
Group III B distribution requirement in the College of
Arts & Sciences. Another option is PSY-K 300.
Political Science
About Political Science
The Political Science program offers an opportunity for
the systematic study of political institutions and processes
leading to a degree in political science. Courses are
offered in the following areas of study:
•
•
•
•
Political theory and philosophy
American political institutions and processes
International relations and foreign policy
Comparative politics
Recommended: In addition to meeting departmental and
general requirements, the political science department
Mathematics and Actuarial Science
49
strongly suggests that political science majors take
supporting courses in economics and history, especially
American history.
The university provides prelaw counseling for interested
students. Contact the prelaw advisor at (219) 980-6841 or
(219) 980-6636.
Minor in Political Science
Requirements
Mathematics and Actuarial
Science
•
•
•
•
POLS-Y 103 (3 cr.)
Field of American institutions and domestic politics,
and/or policy-administration (6 cr.)
Field of international and/or comparative politics,
and/or political theory (6 cr.)
Any field of political science are required for a minor
in political science (3 cr.)
Total (18 cr.)
Phone: (219)980-6590
Website: http://www.iun.edu/math/
About the Department
The Department of Mathematics serves students
interested in one or more of the following:
•
Minor in Pre-law
Interdisciplinary Minor in the College of Arts and Sciences,
the School of Business and Economics, and the School of
Public and Environmental Affairs (SPEA).
•
•
•
Applications of mathematics to the sciences,
business, public and environmental affairs, actuarial
science, etc.
Mathematics teaching at any level
Graduate study in mathematics
Mathematical research
Admission to law schools requires a baccalaureate degree
and a Law School Admission Test (LSAT) score. The
degree may be in any discipline. Students preparing
for law school are advised to take courses in logical
thought, American history, American politics, business,
and criminal and civil law. While no specific courses are
required, IU Northwest offers an interdisciplinary prelaw
minor for students interested in attending law school.
Students in college-level mathematics courses are
generally assumed to have completed two years of high
school algebra. All newly enrolled students should take the
math placement test to determine their skill level and math
class they could enroll in.
Requirements
The order in which courses should be taken is shown in
the following tree diagram, going from top to bottom:
The minor includes six courses totaling 18 credits.
Students in SPEA, the School of Business and
Economics, and history majors in the College of Arts and
Sciences could double-count courses that are required for
their major or concentration, but they are required to take
at least four courses or 12 credits outside of their major or
concentration. The structure of the minor is as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Placement testing and counseling are available through
the Office of Admissions.
BUS-L 201 Legal Environment of Business (3 cr.)
HIST-H 106 American History II (Twentieth Century)
(3 cr.)
PHIL-P 150 Elementary Logic (3 cr.)
POLS-Y 103 Introduction to American Politics (3 cr.)
SPEA-J 101 American Criminal Justice System (3
cr.)
One elective (3 cr.)
Students may pick from the following courses for the
elective:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
BUS-A 201 Introduction to Financial Accounting (3
cr.)
BUS-L 303 The Commercial Law (3 cr.)
ECON-E 103 Introduction to Microeconomics (3 cr.)
HIST-A 313 Origins of Modern America (3 cr.)
HIST-A 315 Recent U.S. History (3 cr.)
HIST-H 105 American History I (3 cr.)
SPEA-H 441 Legal Aspects of Health Care (3 cr.)
SPEA-J 301 Substantive Criminal Law (3 cr.)
SPEA-J 303 Evidence (3 cr.)
SPEA-J 306 The Criminal Courts Administration (3
cr.)
The prelaw advisor can approve an elective that is not on
the list if it meets the educational objectives.
•
•
•
•
MATH A100 and MATH M117. For students who
lack the background in algebra for freshman-level
college mathematics.
MATH M100. Terminal course for students in the
humanities and the Allied Health sciences. Fulfills
the Group I mathematics requirement in the College
of Arts and Sciences.
MATH M118, MATH M119. May be taken in either
order. Primarily for majors in business and the social
sciences.
MATH M125-MATH M126. Preparation for calculus.
Need not be taken by students with a strong
background in algebra (including analytic geometry
50
Mathematics and Actuarial Science
•
and logarithms) and trigonometry may be taken
concurrently.
MATH M215 Calculus. Intended for students
majoring in mathematics and the sciences.
Recommended as a strong elective in mathematics
for others.
In addition to mathematics courses, all majors are strongly
encouraged to study another discipline, in depth, which
uses mathematics. Courses in physics, chemistry,
computer science, and business are recommended.
Students must also complete the general requirement of
the College of Arts and Sciences.
•
•
•
•
(2) Applications (12 cr.)
• at least four additional 300 or 400 level
mathematics courses not used for 1, 3, or 4.
•
(3) Senior Concentration (6 cr.)
• Select 2 courses from the following
• MATH-M 366 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 403 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 405 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 413 (3 cr.)
•
(4) Senior Thesis in Mathematics: (1-3 cr.)
• MATH-M 493 (1-3 cr.) (a capstone course)
Mathematics introductory courses include
•
•
MATH-A 100
MATH-M 117
Courses for nonmajors include
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
MATH-M 100
MATH-M 110
MATH-M 118
MATH-M 119
MATH-M 125
MATH-M 126
MATH-K 200
MATH-K 300
MATH-T 101
MATH-T 102
MATH-T 103
MATH-T 490
Requirements for the minor (15-20 cr.)
•
Arts and Sciences Option
• Mathematics majors are required to augment
their academic program with a minor (minimum
15 credit hours) in another discipline. The
student in consultation with a faculty advisor
selects the minor area.
•
Secondary Education Option
• For students graduating with both, Secondary
Education with major in mathematics and
Bachelor of Science in mathematics, the minor
requirement is waived.
Major in Mathematics - B.A.
Requirements (30-32 cr.)
•
Required core courses (29 cr.)
• MATH-M 215 (5 cr.)
• MATH-M 216 (5 cr.)
• Select one of the following
• MATH-M 301 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 303 (3 cr.)
•
•
•
•
•
MATH-M 311 (4 cr.) should be taken as soon
possible after completion of MATH-M 216
MATH-M 360 (3 cr.)
MATH-M 393 (3 cr.)
MATH-M 403 (3 cr.)
Select one of the following
• MATH-M 413 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 366 (3 cr.)
•
Senior Thesis in Mathematics (1-3 cr.):
• MATH-M 493 (1-3 cr.) (a capstone course)
•
Students must also complete the general
requirements for the College of Arts and Sciences
for the Bachelor of Arts degree
Consult the Mathematics Department or the appropriate
department for details.
Major in Actuarial Science - B.S.
Requirements (67-70 cr.)
•
Mathematics core courses (23 cr.)
• MATH-M 215 (5 cr.)
• MATH-M 216 (5 cr.)
• MATH-M 301 (3 cr.) or MATH-M 303 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 311 (4 cr.)
• MATH-M 360 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 366 (3 cr.)
•
Actuarial Science core courses (7-9 cr.) (One of
these will be a capstone course)
• MATH-M 320 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 325 (1-3 cr.)
• MATH-M 485 (3 cr.)
•
Computer Science core courses (7-8 cr.) (Select
one of the following):
• Option1
• CSCI-C 201 (4 cr.)
• CSCI-C 307 (3 cr.)
Total (30-32 cr.)
Major in Mathematics - B.S.
Requirements (42-44 cr.)
•
(1) Required core courses (23 cr.)
• MATH-M 215 (5 cr.)
• MATH-M 216 (5 cr.)
• MATH-M 301 (3 cr.)
MATH-M 311 (4 cr.)
MATH-M 360 (3 cr.)
Select one of the following
• MATH-M 391 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 393 (3 cr.)
•
•
Option 2
• CSCI-A 201 (4 cr.)
• CSCI-A 302 (4 cr.)
Economics and Business core courses (21 cr.)
• ECON-E 103 (3 cr.)
Mathematics and Actuarial Science
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ECON-E 104 (3 cr.)
BUS-A 201 (3 cr.)
BUS-A 202 (3 cr.)
ECON-E 270 (3 cr.)
BUS-F 301 (3 cr.)
BUS-F 420 (3 cr.)
Technical Electives (9 cr.) three courses not used
for Computer Science core from:
• Mathematics
• MATH-M 312 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 325 (MATH-M 325 serves as
a technical elective only when taken a
second time in a different subject) (1-3
cr.)
• MATH-M 343 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 371 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 447 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 448 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 451 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 469 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 477 (3 cr.)
•
Computer science
• CSCI-C 203 (4 cr.)
• CSCI-C 320 (3 cr.)
• CSCI-C 343 (4 cr.)
• CSCI-C 390 (1-3 cr.)
• CSCI-C 340 (3 cr.)
• The following serve as technical electives
when not used as (3) Computer Science
core courses.
• CSCI-A 201 4 cr.)
• CSCI-A 302 (3 cr.)
• CSCI-C 201 (4 cr.)
• CSCI-C 307 (3 cr.)
•
•
•
Business
• BUS-L 201 (3 cr.)
• BUS-N 300 (3 cr.)
• BUS-P 301 (3 cr.)
• BUS-M 301 (3 cr.)
• BUS-M 303 (3 cr.)
• BUS-A 311 (3 cr.)
• BUS-A 312 (3 cr.)
• BUS-A 322 (3 cr.)
• BUS-A 325 (3 cr.)
• BUS-A 328 (3 cr.)
• BUS-A 424 (3 cr.)
Students must also complete the general
requirements of the College of Arts and
Sciences for the Bachelor of Science degree.
Total (67-70 cr.)
For details concerning exact requirements, please
consult the Department of Mathematics and
Actuarial Science.
51
Major in Mathematics - B.S. and Master
of Science in Education with Major in
Secondary Education
The department of Mathematics and Actuarial Science
and the School of Education offer a five-year program
which results in a student graduating with a Bachelor
of Science degree in Mathematics from the College of
Arts and Sciences and a Master of Science degree in
Secondary Education from the School of Education.
Contact our department for further information and
detailed schedule.
Minor in Mathematics
An arts and sciences minor in mathematics consists of the
courses
•
•
•
MATH-M 215 (5 cr.)
MATH-M 216 (5 cr.)
Select one of the following
• Option 1
• Select one of the following
• CSCI-C 201 (4 cr.)
• CSCI-A 201 (4 cr.)
•
•
Mathematics courses above the 200 level
(6 cr.)
Option 2
• Mathematics courses above the 200 level
(9 cr.)
Recommended courses
• MATH-M 301 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 311 (4 cr.)
• MATH-M 343 (3 cr.)
Program for Secondary School Provisional
Certificate in Mathematics
(See School of Education requirements.)
Required
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
MATH-M 118 (3 cr.)
MATH-M 126 (2 cr.)
MATH-M 215 (5 cr.)
MATH-M 216 (5 cr.)
MATH-M 301 (3 cr.)
MATH-M 311 (4 cr.)
Select one of the following
• MATH-M 391 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 393 (3 cr.)
•
•
•
•
•
MATH-M 360 (3 cr.)
MATH-M 366 (3 cr.)
MATH-T 336 (3 cr.)
MATH-M 447 (3 cr.)
Two approved mathematics electives (6 cr.) The
following courses are recommended:
• MATH-M 320 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 343 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 403 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 405 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 413 (3 cr.)
Total (43 cr.)
52
Minority Studies
In order to finish this program in four years, the courses
must be taken in the sequence and at the times
recommended by the mathematics department. Most 300
and 400 level mathematics courses are offered every
other year.
•
Minority Studies
•
•
Phone: (219) 980-6629
Website: http://www.iun.edu/minority-studies/
About the Department
The Department of Minority Studies offers programs
leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree in Afro- American
studies. The curriculum is designed to acquaint the
student with the unique worldviews and experiences of
Blacks and Latinos and the problems of minority groups in
general. It prepares the student for the fields of community
development, social services, minority group relations, and
graduate study.
The university possesses a large and continuously
growing library collection covering African, West Indian,
and American experiences.
Afro-American Studies
The curriculum leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree in
Afro-American Studies is oriented toward professional
preparation and graduate study. The two program
sequences, Human Services and Community
Development, place a heavy emphasis on education
that is directly related to employment opportunities and
graduate-level study. The department also offers a
Bachelor of Arts degree in Afro-American Studies with a
concentration in Latino Studies.
Major in Afro-American Studies
Requirements - a minumum of 30 cr.
•
Required
• AFRO-A 103 (3 cr.)
• AFRO-A 301 (3 cr.)
• AFRO-A 343 (3 cr.)
• Select one of the following
• AFRO-A 398 (3 cr.)
• AFRO-A 493 (3 cr.)
•
Select one of the following (3 cr.)
• AFRO-A 150 Survey of the Culture of
Black Americans (3 cr.)
• AFRO-A 151 Minority People in the
United States (3 cr.)
•
Select from the following Afro-American History
and Culture courses(6 cr.)
• AFRO-A 355 Afro-American History I (3
cr.)
• Select one from the following
• AFRO-A 379 Early Black American
Writing (3 cr.)
• AFRO-A 356 Afro-American History
II (3 cr.)
•
•
AFRO-A 370 Recent Black American
Writing (3 cr.)
AFRO-A 380 Contemporary Black
American Writing (3 cr.)
Other courses in Afro- American studies or
approved courses in sociology, psychology, or
history may be taken to complete the major.
Twenty-five (25) credit hours of 200-400 level
courses are required.
Students must also complete the general
requirements of the College of Arts and
Sciences.
Interdepartmental Major in Afro-American
Studies and Communication
The Departments of Communication and Minority Studies
offer an interdepartmental major in Afro-American studies
and communication that reflects an interdisciplinary and
substantive field of study. An interdepartmental major in
communication and Afro-American studies focuses the
specialization of the study of the human communication
process within the Afro-American experience. This focus
enhances the application of principles, methods, and
findings of communication studies in light of the history,
culture, and theories of the Afro-American experience,
including an Africana perspective. Students will integrate
their communication studies emphasis (public and
rhetorical communication, relational communication,
media studies, or communication and culture) into the
Afro-American studies major to create a systematic and
coherent field of study.
Requirements
The chairpersons of the Departments of Minority
Studies and Communication must jointly advise the
interdepartmental major. Students must complete a total of
45 credit hours in the interdepartmental major.
Students must complete
•
Afro-American studies (18 cr.)
• Select one of the following
• AFRO-A 150 (3 cr.)
• AFRO-A 151 (3 cr.)
•
Select one of the following
• AFRO-A 355 (3 cr.)
• AFRO-A 379 (3 cr.)
•
Select one of the following
• AFRO-A 356 (3 cr.)
• AFRO-A 370 (3 cr.)
• AFRO-A 380 (3 cr.)
•
Afro-American studies electives (9 cr.)
• 300 or 400 level
•
Communication (speech, communication, journalism,
telecommunications) (27 cr.)
• SPCH-S 121 (3 cr.)
• SPCH-S 122 (3 cr.)
• 300 or 400 level (12 cr.)
• SPCH-S 400 (3 cr.) and / or AFRO-A 493 (3
cr.)
• Courses cross-listed in both departments may
be taken in either department, but students
may not receive credit in both departments for
the same course.
Minor in Race-Ethnic Studies
•
Students may not receive credit toward the
major for both SPCH-S 424 and AFRO-A 398
Minor in Afro-American Studies
Requirements
•
Select one of the following
• AFRO-A 150 (3 cr)
• AFRO-A 151 (3 cr)
•
4 additional courses in Afro-American studies to
be selected in consultation with the departmental
advisor. (12 cr)
Total (45 cr.)
Interdepartmental Major in Afro-American
Studies and English
The Departments of Minority Studies and English
offer a thematically integrated major in Afro-American
Studies and English. This interdepartmental major is
designed for students who wish to combine substantial
Afro-American Studies with their work in the American
and English literature major. Afro-American Studies is
importantly multidisciplinary, requiring students to be
familiar with the connected history and theories of the
Afro-American experience across disciplines, including
an Africana perspective. The interdepartmental major in
Afro-American Studies and English provides students
with this background as well as with an understanding of
Afro-American literature, seen in the context of American
and English literature. With this course of study, students
will be able to integrate and synthesize knowledge and
understanding of the total Afro-American experience as it
coexists with English language and literature studies.
Requirements
The chairpersons of the Departments of Minority Studies
and English must jointly advise the interdepartmental
major. A combined minimum of 45 credit hours is required.
•
•
Afro-American Studies - 300 level or above (18 cr.)
• AFRO-A 355 (3 cr.)
• AFRO-A 356 (3 cr.)
• AFRO-A 493 (multidisciplinary capstone
course) (3 cr.)
• Select from the following (9 cr.)
• AFRO-A 370 (3 cr.)
• ENG-L 370 (3 cr.)
• AFRO-A 379 (3 cr.)
• AFRO-A 380 (3 cr.)
• AFRO-A 392 (3 cr.)
English (27 cr.)
• ENG-L 202 (3 cr.)
• ENG-L 212 (3 cr.)
• ENG-L 315 (3 cr.)
• Select one of the following
• ENG-L 351 (3 cr.)
• ENG-L 352 (3 cr.)
• ENG-L 355 (3 cr.)
•
•
Select one of the following
• ENG-L 354 (3 cr.)
• ENG-L 357 (3 cr.)
• ENG-L 358 (3 cr.)
ENG-L 440 (3 cr.)
Total (45 cr.)
A 2.0 cumulative grade point average is required in
the courses taken in the interdepartmental major. Only
courses with a grade of C- or higher will be counted in the
major.
53
Total (15 cr)
Latino Studies
Latino studies is an interdisciplinary program designed to
acquaint the student with the worldview and experience
of Chicanos and Puerto Ricans in the United States.
The curriculum emphasizes the history, culture, and
socioeconomic conditions of Latino people while also
examining the nature of minority groups in American
society. The program also offers courses for the bilingual
education endorsement in the School of Education, the
education minor in ethnic and cultural studies, and the
education major with bilingual emphasis.
Minor in Latino Studies
Requirements
•
•
•
CHRI-C 101 (3 cr.)
CHRI-C 151 (3 cr.)
12 credit hours from the course listings (course
numbers in parentheses indicate cross-listing in the
Department of History) (12 cr.)
Total (18 cr.)
Minor in Race-Ethnic Studies
Race-Ethnic Studies allows students interested in
Afro-American and Latino Studies to develop a focus
of study in both programs. This field leads to a broad
understanding of the minority experience in the
United States and those of diaspora peoples; how the
phenomena of race, gender, and class have influenced
communities and individuals; how minority groups define
themselves and what strategies they have utilized for
survival; who the people called African Americans,
Latinos, Native Americans, and Asian Americans are.
Credit Hours Required—A minimum of 15 credit hours
required.
Requirements
•
•
•
AFRO-A 151 / CHRI-C 151 Minority People in the
United States (3 cr.)
4 courses from the listings for the Department of
Minority Studies (IU Northwest Bulletin) (3 cr.)
Meeting the following distribution pattern
• 2 courses from course listings in Afro-American
studies (6 cr.)
• At least one course at 200, 300, or 400 level (3
cr.)
• 2 courses from course listings in Latino Studies
(6 cr.)
• At least 1 course at 200, 300, or 400 level (3
cr.)
Total (15 cr.)
54
Postbaccalaureate Certificates
Postbaccalaureate Certificates
Community Development/Urban Studies
This certificate is for students who have completed an
undergraduate degree and would like formal recognition of
a proficiency in the field of Community Development and
Urban Studies. The focus of study will be on community
development, community economic development, and
urban studies within a matrix of the minority experience.
This certificate has wide appeal from educators to
practitioners in fields such as community development,
planning, and public policy. This certification meets a
specific need for persons intending to hold or holding
positions in the field beyond the entry level, such as
Community Development Planner II; or entry-level
positions that require postbaccalaureate certification and/
or experience.
Student Consumer Information about this Program
Requirements
•
Department of Minority Studies or approved courses
from other departments (18 cr.)
• Select from one of the following
• AFRO-A 150
• AFRO-A 151
•
•
CHRI-C 151 Minority People (3 cr.)
Modern Languages,
Comparative Literature, and
Linguistics
Phone: (219) 980-6714
Website: http://www.iun.edu/modern-languages/
French
The program in French embraces courses at all levels,
elementary through advanced, and includes the culture
and literature of France, Québec, and other Francophone
regions of Africa and the Caribbean.
Major in French
The program in French embraces courses at all levels,
elementary through advanced, and includes the culture
and literature of France, Québec, and other Francophone
regions of Africa and the Caribbean.
Requirements
•
•
•
•
Department of Minority Studies courses which be
distributed among community development, urban
studies and economic policy (12 cr.)
• AFRO-A 103
• AFRO-A 230
• AFRO-A 240
• AFRO-A 301
• AFRO-A 302
• AFRO-A 304
• AFRO-A 341
• AFRO-A 343
• AFRO-A 398
Three (3) credit hours in capstone, research or project
course.
Race-Ethnic Studies
This certificate is for students who have completed an
undergraduate degree and would like formal recognition of
a proficiency in the field of Race-Ethnic Studies (see Minor
in Race-Ethnic Studies). This certificate has wide appeal
from educators to those in business.
Minor in French
Requirements
•
Student Consumer Information about this Program
Requirements
•
•
•
•
Select one of the following
• AFRO-A 150
• AFRO-A 151
CHRI-C 151 Minority People (3 cr.)
Department of Minority Studies, must be distributed
between Latino Studies and Afro-American Studies
(12 cr.)
Capstone or research course, must be
interdisciplinary (3 cr.)
Courses above FREN-F 150 including FREN-F 328,
FREN-F 380 (30 cr.)
Chosen among FREN-F 300, FREN-F 305, and
FREN-F 306 (6 cr.)
400 level courses (9 cr.)
Select one of the following
• SPAN-S 100 (or a more advanced course
taught in Spanish)
• Select from the following list of culture options
(3 cr.)
• SPAN-S 230
• SPAN-S 231
• SPAN-S 240
• SPAN-S 241
• SPAN-S 251
• SPAN-S 260
• SPAN-S 290
• CDNS-C 101
• CDNS-C 301
• CDNS-C 350
• CDNS-C 400
• CDNS-C 495
• CMLT-C 340
•
•
FREN-F 200 / FREN-F 250 or equivalent earned
through special credit
3 courses at the third-year or fourth-year level,
taught in French
Fourth-year level courses may only be taken with
permission of instructor
Special Credit
A student who places at the third-year level on the
language placement test and receives a grade of C or
higher in the validating third-year level course will be
eligible to receive 6 hours of special credit with a grade
of S. A student who places in the second semester of the
second year and completes the validating course with
a grade of C or higher will be eligible to receive 3 hours
of special credit with a grade of S. The course numbers
Courses in English
FREN-F 200 / FREN-F 250 will be used to designate this
credit.
year level, taught in Spanish. Fourth-year level courses
may only be taken with permission of instructor.
Foreign Study
Special Credit
Outstanding students with a substantial command of
French are eligible to apply for enrollment in the Overseas
Study Program at Aix-en-Provence. Full credit will be
received for the academic year spent abroad. Students
may also apply to the six-week, 6 credit hour summer
program in Paris, or the five-week, 6 credit hour summer
program in Québec.
Courses in English
The following courses are taught in English.
•
•
•
•
•
FREN-F 309
FREN-F 310
FREN-F 311
FREN-F 312
FREN-F 341
No credit in French.
Spanish
The program offers courses at all levels, elementary
through advanced, on the Spanish language and the
cultures and literatures of Spain and Latin America.
Major in Spanish
Requirements
•
•
•
•
•
Courses above SPAN-S 150, including SPAN-S 360
(30 cr.)
Chosen among SPAN-S 311, SPAN-S 312, SPAN-S
317, SPAN-S 323, and SPAN-S 363 (9 cr.)
400 level courses (9 cr.)
Select one of the following
• FREN-F 100 (or a more advanced course
taught in French)
• Select from the following list of culture options
(3 cr.)
• FREN-F 309
• FREN-F 310
• FREN-F 311
• FREN-F 312
• FREN-F 341
• CMLT-C 261
• CMLT-C 340
• CDNS-C 101
• CDNS-C 301
• CDNS-C 350
• CDNS-C 400
• CMLT-C 460
• CDNS-C 495
The Department of Modern Languages will accept
one CHRI course that is cross-listed with Spanish
and taken by students toward an A.A. in Latino
Studies and apply it to the B.A. in Spanish toward
completion of the required 30 credits of Spanish
courses at the 200 level and above.
Minor in Spanish
Requirements
SPAN-S 200 / SPAN-S 250 or equivalent earned through
special credit and three courses at the third-year or fourth-
55
A student who places at the third-year level on the
language placement test and receives a grade of C or
higher in the validating third-year level course will be
eligible for 6 hours of special credit with a grade of S. A
student who places in the second semester of the second
year and completes a validating course with a grade of C
or higher will be eligible to receive 3 hours of special credit
with a grade of S. The course numbers SPAN-S 200 /
SPAN-S 250 will be used to designate this credit.
Native Speakers
Students who are native speakers of Spanish must get
permission from the department in order to enroll in
SPAN-S 311 / SPAN-S 312, SPAN-S 317 SPAN-S 323,
SPAN-S360, and SPAN-S363. Questions about the major
or minor should be directed to the department chair.
Undergraduate Study Abroad
IU Northwest, through the Office of Overseas Study
at Indiana University Bloomington, provides various
opportunities for students of Spanish to study in a
Spanish-speaking country. Qualified students who
want to participate in a one-year academic program are
encouraged to apply for the program offered in Madrid,
Spain. Through the Council on International Educational
Exchange, in which Indiana University cooperates,
undergraduate students may also apply to participate in
a one-semester program in Seville, Spain. Summer study
programs are available in Bilbao and Salamanca, Spain,
and at the Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City.
Credits earned in these programs can be used to fulfill
requirements for the baccalaureate degree. In addition,
the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC), of which
Indiana University is a member, offers a summer study
program in Guanajuato, Mexico. This program is intended
primarily for students whose area of specialization is
Spanish.
The Department of Modern Languages strongly
recommends foreign study at the undergraduate level for
those students who plan to become teachers of Spanish.
In all cases where credit is sought for work done abroad,
the student must consult the department chairperson
before enrolling in foreign institutions. Information and
applications for foreign study programs can be obtained
from the campus coordinator for the Office of Overseas
Study.
Courses in English
The following Spanish courses are taught in English
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SPAN-S 230
SPAN-S 231
SPAN-S 240
SPAN-S 241
SPAN-S 251
SPAN-S 260
SPAN-S 284
SPAN-S 290
No credit in Spanish.
56
German
German
Foreign Study
Outstanding students with a substantial command of
German may apply for a year's study, with full credit, at
the Indiana-Purdue Center of Undergraduate Studies
at the University of Hamburg. Juniors may, upon the
recommendation of the dean of the College of Arts
and Sciences, take their third year abroad with Indiana
University credit of 30 hours. Students must consult the
departmental foreign study advisor before enrolling in
foreign institutions.
Major in Theatre
The Department of Performing Arts (THTR) recognizes
a symbiotic relationship between theatre production
experience and classroom study. Requirements for
the Major in Theatre are therefore distributed between
practicum, production laboratory, and academic courses in
the performing arts.
Requirements (39 cr.)
•
THEATRE CORE courses (12 cr.)
• THTR-T 120 Acting I (3 cr.)
• THTR-T 228 Design for the Theatre (3 cr.)
• THTR-T 340 Directing I (3 cr.) prerequisite
THTR-T 120 and THTR-T 228 or consent of
instructor
• THTR-T 490 Independent Study in Theatre and
Drama (3 cr.) - must be a minimum 3 credit
hour capstone project
•
PRODUCTION EXPERIENCE (6 cr.)
• THTR-T 168 Practicum (1-2 cr. per semester)*
•
LABORATORY EXPERIENCE (6 cr.)
• Select two from the following:
• THTR-T 225 Stagecraft I (3 cr.)
• THTR-T 230 Costume Design and
Technology (3 cr.)
• THTR-T 335 Stage Lighting Design (3
cr.)
Canadian Studies
The Canadian Studies program gives students a better
understanding of the diverse origins and multifaceted
character of Canada. It gives direction and depth to
the student's liberal arts education through a focus on
Canada.
Minor in Canadian Studies
The minor in Canadian Studies may consist of either A or
B.
A. 15 credit hours to include
CDNS-C 101 Canadian Studies (3 cr.)
CDNS-C 301 (3 cr.)
Select three of the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
CDNS-C 350 (3 cr.)
CDNS-C 400 (3 cr.)
HIST-H 230 (3 cr.)
POLS-Y 217 (3 cr.)
GEOL-T 315 (3 cr.)
CDNS-C 495 (3 cr.)
•
•
Total (15 cr.)
B. 18 credit hours to include:
FREN-F 200 (3 cr.)
FREN-F 250 or equivalent (3 cr.)
CDNS-C 101 (3 cr.)
CDNS-C 301 (3 cr.)
Students are advised to determine an AREA
OF CONCENTRATION in consultation with a
principal teacher in their chosen area (acting,
directing, design, stage management, technical
production, dramaturgy, etc.)
Select two of the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
CDNS-C 350 (3 cr.)
CDNS-C 400 (3 cr.)
HIST-H 230 (3 cr.)
POLS-Y 217 (3 cr.)
GEOL-T 315 (3 cr.)
CDNS-C 495 (3 cr.)
Minor in Theatre
Requirements (15 cr.)
•
Select one of the following
• THTR-T 120 Acting I (3 cr.)
• THTR-T 228 Design for the Stage (3 cr.)
•
•
THTR-T 168 Practicum (3 cr.)
Select one of the following labs (3 cr.)
• THTR-T 225 Stagecraft (3 cr.)
• THTR-T 230 Costume Design and Technology
I (3 cr.)
• THTR-T 335 Stage Lighting Design (3 cr.)
•
Select one of the following Theatre and Society
courses (3 cr.)
• THTR-T 470 History of the Theatre I (3 cr.)
Total (18 cr.)
Performing Arts
Phone: (219) 980-6810
Website: http://www.iun.edu/performing-arts/
Performing Arts
Performing arts provides academic curricula in music,
theatre, and dance for students who seek to develop
careers in these areas. Extensive performance programs
provide practical experiences that complement classroom
study.
HISTORY, LITERATURE, THEORY (6 cr.)
• THTR-T 470 History of the Theatre I (3 cr.)
• THTR-T 471 History of the Theatre II (3 cr.)
• Or another theatre history course approved by
the department
•
•
• THTR ELECTIVE CREDIT HOURS (9 cr.)
• UPPER DIVISION COURSES IN MAJOR (300
level or above) (15 cr.)
Major in Psychology - B.A.
•
•
THTR-T 471 History of the Theatre II (3 cr.)
THTR elective (3 cr.)
Music and Dance Program
The Department of Performing Arts offers coursework in a
variety of Music and Dance Courses for students who wish
to learn a new instrument, dance style, or further refine
their skills.
interested in joining should contact the department
chairperson.
Major in Psychology - B.A.
Requirements (30 cr.) including the
following classes
•
•
•
Music courses include:
•
•
•
•
MUS-M174 Music for the Listener (3 cr.)
MUS-L101 Beginning Guitar (2 cr.)
MUS-P100 Piano (1-4 cr.)
MUS-V100 Voice (1-4 cr.)
•
•
Dance courses include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
MUS-J100 Ballet (2 cr.)
MUS-J200 Ballet (2 cr.)
MUS-J210 Jazz Dance (1 cr.)
MUS-J305 Ballet for the Nondegree Student (3 cr.)
MUS-J320 Pointe Technique (1 cr.)
THTR-D140 Jazz Dance I (1 cr.)
Psychology
Area B
• Select a minimum of 2 of the following
• PSY-P 303 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 314 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 316 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 319 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 320 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 324 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 336 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 389 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 425 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 430 (3 cr.)
•
Select 1 from the following Advanced Laboratory
Course which also satisfies the capstone
requirement
• PSY-P 421 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 424 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 429 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 435 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 463 (3 cr.)
•
300-400 level elective (3 cr.)
About the Department of Psychology
Career opportunities for psychology majors at the
bachelor's degree level exist in mental health clinics,
social welfare agencies, government, personnel
departments, and business and industry. A wider range of
professional opportunities is open to those who complete
master's or doctoral degrees. It is strongly recommended
that prospective majors discuss their career objectives
with a member of the Department of Psychology early so
that appropriate course planning can be accomplished.
The Department of Psychology maintains a chapter of Psi
Chi, the international honor society in psychology. With
both academic and social interests, the chapter sponsors
speakers, workshops, films, and field trips. Students
PSY-P 101 (3 cr.) prerequisites for all courses
PSY-P 102 (3 cr.) prerequisites for all courses
PSY-P 211 (3 cr.) prerequisites for all 400-level
laboratory courses
PSY-K 300 (3 cr.) prerequisites for all 400-level
laboratory courses
Area A
• Select a minimum of 2 of the following
• PSY-P 325 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 326 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 327 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 329 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 335 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 388 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 407 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 417 (3 cr.)
•
Phone: (219) 980-6680
Website: http://www.iun.edu/psychology/
The Department of Psychology offers a major in
psychology leading to the B.A. degree and the B.S.
degree, a major in psychology with a concentration
in Women's and Gender Studies leading to the B.A.
degree, a Masters in Clinical Counseling to help prepare
students for work in Addictions Counseling, and provides
course work for undergraduates who want to satisfy
distribution requirements. As a science, psychology
seeks to understand the basic principles by which
living organisms adapt their behavior to the changing
physical and social environments in which they live. The
breadth of the discipline, with its links to the humanities,
mathematics, and other social and natural sciences,
encourages the development of broad problem- solving
skills through exposure to experimental methodology and
statistical analysis, and contributes to personal growth and
the development of communication skills. Psychological
knowledge, techniques, and skills obtained in the B.A.
and B.S. programs are applied in many careers and
provide background for students entering graduate work in
psychology and related areas, as well as the professions
of medicine, dentistry, law, and business.
57
Total (30 cr.)
Students must also complete the general requirements of
the College of Arts and Sciences.
Recommended In addition to meeting departmental
and general requirements, the department suggests
that psychology majors take supporting courses in
mathematics and the natural sciences. We recommend
the following courses for all majors: Introductory Biology
and Introductory Chemistry. It is also important to
obtain a broadly based education in the humanities,
social sciences, and fine arts. Students should not
concentrate all their electives in psychology or any other
single subject area. Courses such as logic, philosophy,
sociology, chemistry, and computer science are especially
appropriate. Prospective psychology students and/or
58
Major in Psychology - B.S.
majors are invited to discuss their interests with any
member of the psychology faculty.
•
Major in Psychology - B.S.
Purpose The Bachelor of Science in Psychology degree
provides students with a rigorous general background
in the field of psychology and allied disciplines. The
degree is designed for students who wish to prepare for
graduate or professional school training in psychology or
related fields. The more extensive requirements in biology,
chemistry, mathematics, and physics have been selected
to optimize the student's future opportunities.
Requirements including the following
classes
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
PSY-P 101 (3 cr.) prerequisites for all courses
PSY-P 102 (3 cr.) prerequisites for all courses
PSY-P 211 (3 cr.) prerequisites for all 400-level
laboratory courses
PSY-K 300 (3 cr.) prerequisites for all 400-level
laboratory courses
Area A
• Select a minimum of 3 of the following
• PSY-P 325 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 326 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 327 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 329 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 335 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 388 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 407 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 417 (3 cr.)
Area B
• Select a minimum of 2 of the following
• PSY-P 303 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 314 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 316 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 319 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 320 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 324 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 336 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 389 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 425 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 430 (3 cr.)
Select 1 from the following Advanced Laboratory
Courses which also satisfies the capstone
requirement
• PSY-P 421 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 424 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 429 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 435 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 463 (3 cr.)
Select 2 additional 300-400 level elective courses (6
cr.)
Allied Science
• BIOL-L 101 (4 cr.)
• BIOL-L 102 (4 cr.)
• CHEM-C 105 (3 cr.)
• CHEM-C 106 (3 cr.)
• CHEM-C 125 (2 cr.)
• CHEM-C 126 (2 cr.)
Courses listed under the category Group IIIA
at the 100 level or above (28 cr.) - Suggested
courses include
• BIOL-L 211 (3 cr.)
• BIOL-L 311 (3-4 cr.)
• BIOL-L 312 (3 cr.)
• BIOL-Z 374 (3 cr.)
• BIOL-Z 406 (3-4 cr.)
• BIOL-M 310 (3-4 cr.)
• BIOL-M 315 (2 cr.)
• CHEM-C 341 (3 cr.)
• CHEM-C 342 (3 cr.)
• CHEM-C 343 (2 cr.)
• CHEM-C 344 (2 cr.)
• CHEM-C 483 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 118 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 119 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 125 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 126 (2 cr.)
• MATH-M 215 (5 cr.)
• MATH-M 216 (5 cr.)
• MATH-M 301 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 311 (4 cr.)
• MATH-M 312 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 360 (3 cr.)
• MATH-M 366 (3 cr.)
• PHYS-P 201 (5 cr.)
• PHYS-P 202 (5 cr.)
• PHYS-P 221 (5 cr.)
• PHYS-P 222 (5 cr.)
In addition to the preceding courses, the student is
responsible for fulfilling the general requirementst of the
Bachelor of Science degree as established by the College
of Arts and Sciences.
Major in Psychology with a Concentration in
Women's and Gender Studies
Purpose The Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology with
a concentration in Women's and Gender Studies provides
a solid background in applied and basic psychology along
with a focus on and experiences in the psychology of
women and women's issues.
Requirements (36 cr.) including the
following classes
•
•
•
•
•
PSY-P 101 (3 cr.) prerequisites for all courses
PSY-P 102 (3 cr.) prerequisites for all courses
PSY-P 211 (3 cr.) prerequisites for all 400-level
laboratory courses
PSY-K 300 (3 cr.) prerequisites for all 400-level
laboratory courses
Area A
• Select a minimum of 1 of the following
• PSY-P 325 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 326 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 327 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 329 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 335 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 388 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 407 (3 cr.)
Major in Sociology
•
PSY-P 417 (3 cr.)
•
Area B
• Select a minimum of 2 of the following
• PSY-P 303 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 314 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 316 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 319 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 320 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 324 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 336 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 389 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 425 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 430 (3 cr.)
•
Select 1 from the following Advanced Laboratory
Courses which also satisfies the capstone
requirement
• PSY-P 421 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 424 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 429 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 435 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 463 (3 cr.)
•
Select 2 Psychology courses focused on women's
issues
• PSY-P 460 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 432 (3 cr.)
•
Select 1 Women's and Gender Studies core course
• WGS-W 200 (3 cr.)
• WGS-W 400 (3 cr.)
•
Select 1 Practicum in Women's and Gender Studies
of Psychology (if focus is on women's issues)
• WGS-W 480 (3 cr.)
• PSY-B 309 (3 cr.)
who want to acquire a global perspective on the nature
and origins of human cultural and biological diversity;
different anthropology courses can be used as natural
science, social science, or humanities electives. At
the junior / senior level, some students may be eligible
to enroll in independent study courses: (1) Individual
Readings in Sociology and Anthropology (2) the Internship
Program (where the student integrates a work experience
with course work). Students graduating with a major in
sociology or anthropology may enter graduate programs
in sociology, anthropology, and social science; enter
professional schools, such as law and social work;
or enter careers requiring a bachelor's degree in the
liberal arts. Both Sociology and Anthropology majors
are encouraged to draw upon the resources of other
departments in social and behavioral sciences, as well as
the humanities and physical/natural sciences. Counseling
on programs and career choices is available within the
department.
The Department of Sociology and Anthropology maintains
a chapter of Alpha Kappa Delta International Sociology
Honor Society (Iota of Indiana Chapter). Students are
selected on the basis of excellence in research.
Major in Sociology
Four-year Program
Requirements - Majors (30 cr.)
•
•
•
•
•
•
SOC S161 (3 cr.)
SOC S215 (3 cr.)
SOC S230 (3 cr.)
SOC S261 (3 cr.)
SOC S262 Methods (3 cr.) (quantitative)
Select one course in deviance or in inequality from
the following
• SOC S310 (3 cr.)
• SOC S317 (3 cr.)
• SOC S320 (3 cr.)
• SOC S325 (3 cr.)
• SOC S328 (3 cr.)
• SOC S331 (3 cr.)
• SOC S335 (3 cr.)
• SOC S337 (3 cr.)
• SOC S420 (3 cr.)
•
Select one course in organization or in
communication from the following
• SOC S309 (3 cr.)
• SOC S311 (3 cr.)
• SOC S313 (3 cr.)
• SOC S314 (3 cr.)
• SOC S315 (3 cr.)
• SOC S316 (3 cr.)
• SOC S410 (3 cr.)
• SOC S416 (3 cr.)
• SOC S418 (3 cr.)
• SOC S419 (3 cr.)
• SOC S431 (3 cr.)
• SOC S447 (3 cr.)
•
•
SOC S340 (3 cr.) capstone requirement
Select any two additional sociology courses to
include (6 cr.)
In addition to the preceding courses, the student is
responsible for fulfilling the general requirements of the
College of Arts and Sciences.
Minor in Psychology
Requirements
Students who elect to minor in psychology must complete
the following
•
•
•
PSY-P 101 (3 cr.)
PSY-P 102 (3 cr.)
Select 3 additional courses in psychology for which
the student has the prerequisites (9 cr.)
Total (15 cr.)
Sociology and Anthropology
Phone: (219) 980-6789
Website: http://www.iun.edu/sociology-anthropology/
Sociology
The Department of Sociology and Anthropology offers
its sociology curriculum to undergraduate students who
want to pursue the systematic study of society from the
microlevel (the individual in society) to the macrolevel
(the study of institutions). The department offers its
anthropology curriculum to undergraduate students
59
60
Major in Sociology with Concentration in Women's and Gender Studies
•
300 or 400 level course
Courses in the major cannot be used to satisfy Group III
distribution.
•
•
•
SOC S262 Methods (3 cr.)
Select one course from the following Deviance/
Inequality courses
• SOC S337 Women and Crime (3 cr.)
• SOC S420 Topics in Deviance, when topic is
women, such as Women and Deviance (3 cr.)
•
Select one course from the following Organization
courses
• SOC S310 Sociology of Women in America (3
cr.)
• SOC S410 Topics in Social Organization when
topic is women, such as Women and Religion
(3 cr.)
•
Select one course from the following Theory courses
• SOC S340 SOC (3 cr.)
• SOC S441 Topics in Theory, Anthropology (3
cr.)
•
Select electives in areas of Sociology / Anthropology
Women's and Gender Studies
• Select two appropriate courses at the 300-400
level such as
• SOC S337 (3 cr.)
• SOC S420 (3 cr.)
• SOC S310 (3 cr.)
• SOC S410 (3 cr.)
• SOC S495 Individual Readings and
Research when topic is women (3 cr.)
• SOC S398 Internship in Behavioral
Sciences, when agency serves women,
such as battered women's shelters,
women's transitional houses, etc. (3 cr.)
• SOC S362 Native American Women (3
cr.)
Students must also complete the general requirements of
the College of Arts and Sciences.
Emphasis Areas for Sociology Majors
With careful planning, students may be able to select
courses that concentrate in one of two general emphasis
areas:
The Sociology emphasis would include SOC S262, SOC
S340, and additional courses that emphasize a theme
such as:
•
deviance or inequality - including
• several courses from above section as
electives
•
social organization - including
• several courses from above section as
electives
•
medical sociology - including
• SOC S314 (3 cr.)
• SOC S331 (3 cr.)
• SOC S362 Medical Anthropology (3 cr.)
•
gender - including courses such as
• SOC S164 (3 cr.)
• SOC S310 (3 cr.)
• SOC S337 (3 cr.)
• topics courses on gender (3 cr.)
•
family studies - including courses such as
• SOC S164 (3 cr.)
• SOC S316 (3 cr.)
• SOC S416 (3 cr.)
•
social movements - including courses such as
• SOC S218 (3 cr.)
• SOC S311 (3 cr.)
• SOC S418 (3 cr.)
• SOC S419 (3 cr.)
•
Outside Electives
•
•
qualitative / ethnographic methods
• Select one or both of the following
• SOC S254 (3 cr.)
• SOC S262 (3 cr.)
•
•
SOC S431 (3 cr.)
Select one or both of the following
• SOC S441 (3 cr.)
• SOC S340 (3 cr.)
SOC S261 (3 cr.)
•
•
WOST 200 Introduction to Women's and Gender
Studies (3 cr.)
Select one WOST W400 course from the following
• P460 / W400 Psychology of Women (3 cr.)
• P432 / W400 Women and Madness (3 cr.)
• Appropriate cross-listed courses from other
disciplines (3 cr.)
Students must also complete all the requirement for
the regular B.A. in Sociology and College of Arts and
Sciences B.A. general requirements.
P432 / W400 Women and Madness (3 cr.)
Minor in Sociology
Total (30 cr.)
Major in Sociology with Concentration in
Women's and Gender Studies
Requirements - Majors (30 cr.)
•
Select four Basic Sociology courses
• SOC S161 (3 cr.)
• SOC S215 (3 cr.)
• SOC S230 (3 cr.)
Requirements - Minors (15 cr.)
•
•
SOC S161 (3 cr.)
Select one from the following
• SOC S163 (3 cr.)
• SOC S164 (3 cr.)
• SOC S230 (3 cr.)
•
•
Select two 300 or 400 level sociology courses (6 cr.)
Select any additional sociology course (3 cr.)
About the Women's and Gender Studies Program
Students pursuing a minor may wish to select courses
that emphasize a theme such as
•
deviance or inequality - including
• two or three courses from the above sections
•
social organization - including
• several courses from above section as
electives
•
medical sociology - including
• SOC S314 (3 cr.)
• SOC S331 (3 cr.)
•
gender - including two or three from
• SOC S164 (3 cr.)
• SOC S310 (3 cr.)
• SOC S337 (3 cr.)
• topics courses on gender (3 cr.)
•
family studies - including two or three from
• SOC S164 (3 cr.)
• SOC S316 (3 cr.)
• SOC S416 (3 cr.)
•
social movements - including two or three from
• SOC S218 (3 cr.)
• SOC S311 (3 cr.)
• SOC S418 (3 cr.)
• SOC S419 (3 cr.)
Total (15 cr.)
Anthropology
Anthropology gives students a holistic understanding
of human existence in an ecological, evolutionary
perspective. It studies the interrelationships of human
biology and human behavior, particularly that behavior
which we call culture, both in the past and in the
present. In its four traditional subfields of cultural
anthropology, physical anthropology, archaeology, and
linguistics, anthropology covers all the aspects of being
human, making use of almost all of human knowledge.
Anthropology is also the only discipline that focuses on
the study of the origin and nature of human biological and
cultural diversity. Courses in anthropology are thus of
value to students in virtually all fields; they relate those
disciplines to a broader view of humankind as a whole.
Major in Anthropology
Indiana University Northwest offers a joint B.A. Major in
Anthropology in conjunction with Indiana University South
Bend. The required classes are taught at both schools, so
students can complete entirely at either campus. There
is no requirement that students must take classes at both
schools. At the same time, the faculty of each campus do
have different specializations and offer different elective
courses. Additionally the required classes may be offered
in different semesters at the campuses. Students are free
to take classes at both schools and apply them to the
major.
Requirements - Majors (33 cr.)
•
Select 1 of the following introductory anthropology
courses
• ANTH A104 (3 cr.)
•
Select 1 of the following
•
61
ANTH A105 (3 cr.)
•
•
E200 Cultural Anthro II (3 cr.)
Select 1 each from at least two of these pairs
• ANTH B200 / ANTH B400 Bioanthropology (3
cr.)
• ANTH L300 Language and Culture (3 cr.)
• ANTH P200 / ANTH E400 Archaeology (3 cr.)
•
Select 1 of the following Quantitative Methods
• SOC S262 (3 cr.)
•
•
ANTH A360 capstone requirement (3 cr.)
Select 1 400-level Seminar Experience course such
as
• ANTH E400 (3 cr.)
• ANTH E445 (3 cr.)
• ANTH B400 (3 cr.)
• ANTH B466 (3 cr.)
• Or others to be offered
•
•
Select any 3 elective courses in Anthropology (9 cr.)
Any course can fulfill only one of the requirements
listed above
15 credit hours of the courses taken in the major
must be at the 300 level
•
Total (33 cr.)
Minor in Anthropology
Requirements - Minor (15 cr.)
Select 5 (3 cr.) courses including
•
•
•
ANTH-A 104 (3 cr.)
ANTH-A 105 (3 cr.)
Select at least 1 course from the following:
• ANTH-B 200 (3 cr.)
• ANTH-E 200 (3 cr.)
• ANTH-L 300 (3 cr.)
• ANTH-P 200 (3 cr.)
•
Select at least one 300- or 400- level
course in addition to any used to satisfy the
above requirements. (6 cr.)
Women's and Gender Studies
Phone: (219) 980-6714
Website: http://www.iun.edu/women-and-gender-studies/
About the Women's and Gender Studies
Program
Women's and Gender Studies is an interdisciplinary
program focusing on the importance of gender as a
category of social analysis. Women's and Gender Studies
courses consider gender systems across cultures,
examining the way those systems develop, function, and
change. Women's and Gender Studies draws upon a
variety of academic disciplines.
A Women's Studies minor, Certificate in Women's and
Gender Studies, or Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in
Psychology or Sociology and a concentration in Women's
and Gender Studies provides a valuable foundation for
students entering the workforce. Women's and Gender
Studies courses will benefit those who enter jobs in
business, education, nursing, and public affairs, as well
62
Minor in Women's Studies
as those who study traditional fields such as history,
social work, sociology, psychology, the arts, and literature.
Most of the courses in the program satisfy distribution
requirements.
•
•
•
Minor in Women's Studies
Requirements - (15 cr.)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Core Courses (6 cr.)
• Select one of the following
• WGS-W 200 Women in American Society
(3 cr.) Social Sciences
• WGS-W 201 Women in American Culture
(3 cr.) Humanities
Select one of the following
• WGS-W 400 Topics in Women's and
Gender Studies (3 cr.) Social Sciences
• WGS-W 401 Topics in Women's and
Gender Studies (3 cr.) Humanities
Women in Diverse Cultures (3 cr.)
• WGS-W 301 International Perspectives on
Women (3 cr.)
• AFRO-A 210 Black Women in the Diaspora (3
cr.)
• AFRO-A 406 Literature by American Women of
Color (3 cr.)
• AFRO-A 410 The Black Woman and the AfroAmerican Experience (3 cr.)
• CHRI-C 490 Topic: The Latino Woman (3 cr.)
• CMLT-C 340 Women in World Literature (3 cr.)
• SPAN-S 284 Women in Hispanic Culture (3 cr.)
• SPAN-S 470 Women in Hispanic Literature (3
cr.)
Women in the Social Sciences (3 cr.)
• WGS-W 221 Native Uses of Herbs (3 cr.)
• WGS-W 300 Topics in Women's and Gender
Studies (3 cr.)
• WGS-W 480 Women's and Gender Studies
Practicum (3 cr.)
• AFRO-A 210 Black Women in the Diaspora (3
cr.)
• AFRO-A 410 The Black Woman and the AfroAmerican Experience (3 cr.)
• ANTH-E 221 Native Uses of Herbs (1 cr.)
• CHRI-C 490 Topic: The Latino Woman (3 cr.)
• SPAN-S 470 Women in Hispanic Literature (3
cr.)
• PSY-P 460 Women: A Psychological
Perspective (3 cr.)
• SOC-S 310 The Sociology of Women in
America (3 cr.)
• SOC-S 337 Women and Crime (3 cr.)
• SPCH-S 450 Gender and Communication (3
cr.)
Women in the Humanities (3 cr.)
• WGS-W 207 Women in Literature (3 cr.)
• WGS-W 302 Issues in Gender Studies: AfroCaribbean Experience (3 cr.)
• AFRO-A 406 Literature by American Women of
Color (3 cr.)
• CMLT-C 340 Women in World Literature (3 cr.)
•
•
ENG-L 201 Films by Women (3 cr.)
ENG-L 207 Women in Literature (3 cr.)
ENG-L 295 American Film Culture (3 cr.)
(When topic is women/gender)
ENG-L 381 Recent Writing (3 cr.) (When topic
is women/gender)
ENG-L 440 Seminar in English and America
Literature (3 cr.) (When topic is women/gender)
SPAN-S 470 Women in Hispanic Literature (3
cr.)
AFRO-A 370 Recent Black American Writing (3
cr.) (when topic is women/gender)
Total (15 cr.)
The course taken to fulfill the requirement of Women in
Diverse Cultures cannot be used to fulfill the requirements
in Women in the Social Sciences and Women in the
Humanities.
Certificate in Women's and Gender Studies
The Certificate offers students a focused program
in an interdisciplinary course of studies dealing with
women's experiences, issues related to gender, gender
identity, roles and relationships, and the impact of these
elements on life and society. The Certificate is open to
both degree-seeking and non-degree-seeking students.
Many professionals in business, psychology, social
services, medical, and legal professions find that training
in Women's and Gender Studies enhances the practice of
their profession.
Students may enter the program in two different ways.
Degree-seeking and non-degree-seeking students should
contact the WGS Director. They will then discuss the
student's career goals and needs and select a set of
courses that will best satisfy those goals. Degree-seeking
students should be in good standing within the university
and have a minimum GPA of 2.0.
Requirements - (18 cr.)
•
•
Core Courses (6 cr.)
Select courses across 3 categories (12 cr.)
• Women in Diverse Cultures (3 cr.)
• Women in the Social Sciences (3 cr.)
• Women in the Humanities (3 cr.)
•
At least 9 credit hours of the certificate must be
completed on the Indiana University Northwest
campus.
Students are required to obtain a grade of C or
better for all courses used in the Certificate.
Students may receive either a minor or Certificate in
Women's and Gender Studies, but not both.
•
•
Bachelor of Arts in Psychology Concentration in Women's and Gender
Studies
Purpose
The Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology with a
concentration in Women's and Gender Studies provides
a solid background in applied and basic psychology along
with a focus on and experiences in the psychology of
women and women's issues.
Bachelor of Arts in Sociology - Concentration in Women's and Gender Studies
Requirements (36 cr.) including the
following classes
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
PSY-P 101 (3 cr.) prerequisites for all courses
PSY-P 102 (3 cr.) prerequisites for all courses
PSY-P 211 (3 cr.) prerequisites for all 400-level
laboratory courses
PSY-K 300 (3 cr.) prerequisites for all 400-level
laboratory courses
Area A
• Select a minimum of 2 of the following
• PSY-P 325 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 326 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 327 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 329 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 335 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 407 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 417 (3 cr.)
Area B
• Select a minimum of 2 of the following
• PSY-P 314 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 316 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 319 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 320 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 324 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 336 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 389 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 425 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 430 (3 cr.)
Select 1 from the following Advanced Laboratory
Courses which also satisfies the capstone
requirement
• PSY-P 421 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 424 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 429 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 435 (3 cr.)
•
Select two psychology courses focused on women's
issues
• PSY-P 460 (3 cr.)
• PSY-P 432 (3 cr.)
•
Select one Women's and Gender Studies core
course from the following
• WGS-W 200 (3 cr.)
• WGS-W 400 (3 cr.)
•
Select one practicum in Women's and Gender
Studies or psychology from the following
• WGS-W 480 (3 cr.)
• PSY-B 309 (3 cr.)(if focus is on women's
issues)
Total (36 cr.)
In addition to the preceding courses, the student is
responsible for fulfilling the general requirements of the
B.A. degree as established by the College of Arts and
Sciences.
63
Bachelor of Arts in Sociology Concentration in Women's and Gender
Studies
The Bachelor of Arts degree in sociology with a
concentration in Women's and Gender Studies provides
a solid background in sociology along with a focus on
and experiences in the sociology of women and women's
issues.
Requirements - (30 cr.)
•
•
•
•
•
SOC S161
SOC S215
SOC S230
SOC S261
Select one Methods course from the following
• SOC-S 262
• SOC-S 254
•
Select one Deviance / Inequality course from the
following
• SOC-S 337 Women and Crime
• SOC-S 420 Topics in Deviance (when topic is
women, such as Women and Deviance)
•
Select one Organization course from the following
• SOC-S 310 Sociology of Women in America
• SOC-S 410 Topics in Social Organization
(when topic is women, such as Women and
Religion)
•
Select one Theory course from the following
• SOC-S 340
• SOC-S 441 Topics in Theory, Anthropology
•
Select elective courses in areas of sociology /
anthropology / Women's and Gender Studies
• Select two appropriate additional courses at
the 300-400 level from the following
• SOC S337
• SOC S420
• SOC S310
• SOC S410
• and / or any of S495 Individual Readings
and Research when topic is women
• S398 Internship in Behavioral Sciences,
when agency serves women, such as
battered women's shelters, women's
transitional houses, etc.
• S362 Native American Women
Total (30 cr.)
Outside Electives
•
•
WGS-W 200 Introduction to Women's and Gender
Studies
Select one WGS-W 400 course such as
• PSY-P 460 / WGS-W 400 Psychology of
Women
• SPCH-S 450 Gender and Commmunication
• Appropriate cross-listed courses from other
disciplines
Total (30 cr.)
64
Graduate
In addition to the preceding courses, the student is
responsible for fulfilling the general requirements of the
B.A. degree as established by the College of Arts and
Sciences.
Graduate
Administrative Officers
Mark S. Hoyert, Ph.D., Dean
Nelson H. De Leon, Ph.D., Associate Dean
Diane Robinson Sandidge, MPA, Assistant to the Dean
Bob Mucci, Ph.D., Director of MLS Program
Mary Ann Fischer, Ph.D. Chair, Department of Psychology
Website: www.iun.edu/coas/
Phone: (219) 980-6789
Overview
The College of Arts and Sciences offers two Masters
degree programs: a Master of Liberal Studies (M.L.S.)
and a Master of Science in Clinical Counseling with a
Specialization in Drug and Alcohol Counseling (M.S.C.C.).
Master of Science in Clinical Counseling with
Specialization in Drug and Alcohol Counseling
The Master of Science in Clinical Counseling with
Specialization in Drug and Alcohol Counseling (M.S.C.C.)
program is designed for students who wish to prepare for
careers and licensure in the field of addictions treatment.
Drug and alcohol addictions remain one of the most
vexing problems facing the region, the state, and society
in general. The extent of addiction is horrific. Substance
abuse is the nation's number one health problem. One
in ten adult in the U.S. is currently addicted to alcohol or
drugs and almost one-third of all adults will struggle with
addictions at some point in their lives. While addictions
are powerful and can have harmful consequences, they
respond well to treatment. Unfortunately, there exists a
shortage of therapists who are prepared with graduatelevel knowledge and skills in addictions treatment. The
M.S.C.C. Program is designed to provide this background.
Students will gain basic knowledge about pharmacology,
abnormal psychology, theories of addictions, and
treatment options. Students will develop and practice
counseling skills and learn how to evaluate treatment
methods and techniques. Graduates will be able to work in
this rewarding field and will be able to pursue licensure.
Master of Liberal Studies
The Master of Liberal Studies (M.L.S.) program is unique.
It does not provide a rigid schedule of courses or focus on
one particular specialty. It is inherently interdisciplinary.
It is designed for students who love to learn new ideas
and discuss them with others. It is designed for students
who are curious about the world – about art, literature,
science, politics, human nature and history. It is for people
who want to explore new worlds and who enjoy meeting
others who want to join the expedition. It is designed for
students who wish to combine several academic areas
into one tailored degree program. Students select a
sequence of graduate level courses to create their own
path of study. It allows students to explore questions
of enduring concern and contemporary urgency in the
arts, humanities, behavioral sciences, social sciences,
life sciences, and physical sciences. In doing so, the
program provides students with opportunities to engage
their curiosity in an intellectual exploration of the world
of ideas. The rewards of the pursuit of knowledge go
beyond intellectual satisfaction. Students will gain fresh
perspectives and will hone the creative, critical thinking,
decision making, analytical, and communication skills
that are so valued in today’s workplace. Uniquely among
graduate programs, the M.L.S. helps students understand
the broader context of their ideas, path of study, and
fields of work, learn to analyze problems from a variety of
perspectives, will stimulate students to find connections
between their studies and their personal and professional
lives, and encourages a lifelong commitment to learning,
free inquiry and the life of the mind.
Policies and Procedures
The general regulations and policies detailed in this
bulletin apply to all students in the college's graduate and
post-baccalaureate programs.
General Scholarship Rule
Any student who does not possess the necessary
preliminary training or who lacks other qualifications
may be required by the college to enroll in such courses
designated by the college or other corrective actions as
is necessary or desirable. The college may review a
student's record at any time and take whatever actions
seem necessary for the best interest of that student or
the college. Any student whose work is unsatisfactory or
whose conduct is unethical may be dismissed from the
college.
Academic Regulations
Students must have their programs of study approved by
the program director.
Courses at the 300 or 400 level that are available to be
taken for graduate credit as a graduate level class will
include additional assignments beyond those required
for undergraduate credit. Enrollment in such courses
requires the approval of the instructor and of the program
director. It is sometimes possible for a student to take a
graduate level course at IUN or elsewhere that can count
as an elective in the graduate program; permission for
this must be given by the program director before the
student registers. Students who have graduate course
credits before they enroll in one of the graduate programs
may have some credits transferred into the program, but
such transfers of credits will not be considered until the
student has demonstrated satisfactory progress in their
current program. Courses used for another degree or
certificate cannot also be used to satisfy graduate program
requirements.
An average grade of B (3.0) is required for graduation, and
no course with a grade lower than B-(2.7) will be counted
toward the degree. Students are required to retain good
academic standing, i.e., to maintain a GPA of at least 2.7.
Failure to maintain good standing may result in dismissal
from the program. Students whose GPA falls below 3.0
are considered to be on probation; they must earn at least
a B- in each of their next two classes with a 3.0 GPA in
those two classes in order to continue in the program.
Other academic regulations and policies are established
by the Graduate Studies Committees of the College of
Arts and Sciences. Students should consult their program
director for further information.
Master of Liberal Studies
Master of Science in Clinical
Counseling
Admission
Students are admitted to the Master of Clinical Counseling
program by the MSCC Admissions Committee of
the Psychology Department. To be considered for
admission, students must hold a bachelor’s degree from
an accredited institution and an undergraduate grade point
average of at least 3.0. GRE scores are recommended. If
the applicant is a recovering substance abuser, two years
of continuous sobriety is strongly recommended. Students
with a GPA slightly below 3.0 for a recent degree, or
students with a slightly lower GPA who are returning
to college with relevant work experience in a health or
human services agency may be admitted on probation.
Students admitted on probation must earn at least a Bin each of their first two classes and must maintain a GPA
of 3.0 in order to continue in the program. The goal is to
select applicants who can successfully complete graduate
study and work successfully in the field of addictions
counseling.
Curriculum
A. Drug and Alcohol Addictions Counseling Core Courses(21 cr.)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Psychology - P535 Introduction to Addictions
Counseling (3 cr.)
Psychology - P641 Assessment (3 cr.)
Psychology - P538 Professional Issues in Addictions
Counseling (3 cr.)
Psychology - I501 Multicultural Counseling (3 cr.)
Psychology - P657 Group and Family Counseling (3
cr.)
Psychology - P667 Neuropsychopharmacology (3
cr.)
Psychology - P624 Principles of Psychopathology (3
cr.)
B. Practica – must complete 9 credit hours
•
Psychology - P691 Practicum in Applied Psychology.
Experience in psychology-oriented work settings.
Students will work with mental health and social
service providers whose primary mission is drug and
alcohol addictions treatment.
C. Electives – must complete 6 credit hours
•
•
•
•
•
Psychology - P631 Intervention and Evaluation
Psychology - P634 Advanced Survey of Community
Psychology
Psychology - P898 Master's Degree Research
Philosophy - P694 Biomedical Ethics
SPEA - H505 Health Program Design,
Implementation, and Evaluation
Master of Liberal Studies
Admission
Students are admitted to the Master of Liberal Studies
program by the M.L.S. Committee of the College of Arts
and Sciences. To be considered for admission, students
must hold a bachelor’s degree from an accredited
institution and should have obtained an undergraduate
grade point average of at least 3.0. Students with a GPA
slightly below 3.0 for a recent degree may be admitted
65
on probation, as well as students with a lower GPA who
are returning to college after a long absence with a fresh
motivation to learn. Students admitted on probation must
earn at least a B- in each of their first two classes with a
3.0 GPA in order to continue in the program. The goal
is to select applicants who can successfully complete
graduate study and for whom the MLS program will prove
to be enriching.
Academic Curriculum
The M.L.S. requires the completion of at least 11
courses (minimum of 33 credits). Early in their programs,
students take a proseminar as introduction to graduate
liberal studies and interdisciplinary methodology, and at
least three core seminars, one each in the humanities,
the sciences, and the social sciences. Seminars
combine detailed study of a particular topic with a broad
interdisciplinary examination of ways of understanding.
The M.L.S. program draws on faculty with diverse
expertise to explore topics through a multidisciplinary
approach. The program is designed to allow students
flexibility to fashion a course of study that blends their
interests, talents and experience. Students, under
guidance of their faculty advisor, may choose graduate
courses and seminars in a variety of disciplines within the
College of Arts and Sciences. If the student chooses, the
program can culminate with a thesis or alternative project
that will grow out of the information and methodologies
acquired throughout the course work.
Proseminar (required)
•
LIBS D510 Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies
(3 cr.)
Core Seminars (all three required)
Each of the core courses is a graduate seminar
combining detailed study of particular topics with broad
interdisciplinary perspectives. These courses give
students the opportunity to explore the connections that
exist among the diverse discipline and perspectives that
define contemporary knowledge. Students may repeat
core seminars (each may be taken up to two more times
with a different topic).
•
•
•
LIBS D501 Humanities Seminar Core Seminar (3 cr.)
LIBS D502 Social Sciences Seminar Core Seminar
(3 cr.)
LIBS D503 Science Seminar Core Seminar (3 cr.)
Electives (no specific requirements)
Electives offer students a wide variety of choices with
which to create programs of study suited to their individual
interest. These elective courses may be selected to build
support and background for the graduate project, or to
enable students to more ably participate in the public
intellectual, artistic, and cultural life of their communities.
•
•
•
LIBS D511 M.L.S. Humanities Elective (3 cr.) may
each be repeated (with different topics) as many
times as needed to complete the students’ goals
LIBS D512 M.L.S. Social Science Elective (3 cr.)
may each be repeated (with different topics) as
many times as needed to complete the students’
goals
LIBS D513 M.L.S. Science Elective (3 cr.) may each
be repeated (with different topics) as many times as
needed to complete the students’ goals
66
Postbaccalaureate Certificates
•
•
•
•
•
•
LIBS D514 Graduate Liberal Studies Overseas
Study (max 6 cr.)
LIBS D594 Liberal Studies Directed Readings (max
6 cr.)
LIBS D596 Liberal Studies Independent Research
(max 6 cr.)
• M.L.S. students may take no more than a total
of 6 credit hours of D594 and D596 combined.
LIBS D501 Humanities Seminar Core Seminar (3 cr.)
LIBS D502 Social Sciences Seminar Core Seminar
(3 cr.)
LIBS D503 Science Seminar Core Seminar (3 cr.)
Independent Research / Creative Activity
Option
The Independent Research/Creative Activity Option
offers students the opportunity to work closely with a
faculty committee and to complete a final project designed
around their unique interests. Students must take 12
credits of electives and then successfully complete
their program with a graduate project. The graduate
project is an independent scholarly enterprise in which
the student demonstrates mastery of a specific topic.
Examples include a thesis, a computer program, a
translation of a work of literature, or an artistic composition
or performance.
Requirement
•
•
LIBS D601 M.L.S. Project Proposal Seminar (3 cr.)
LIBS D602 Graduate Project (3-6 cr.)
Public Intellectual Option
Upon completion of two additional core seminars and
12 credits of electives, the Public Intellectual Option
offers students the opportunity to work within a learning
community made up of other students and led by a faculty
facilitator to explore the variety of genres through which
public intellectuals communicate, and to create their own
portfolio of public intellectual work to be submitted for
completion of the M.L.S. degree. The public intellectual
coursework must be taken at IU South Bend.
Requirement
•
LIBS D600 Public Intellectual Practicum (3 cr.)
Postbaccalaureate Certificates
The College of Arts and Sciences offers
postbaccalaureate certificates in three areas: Community
Development and Urban Studies (contact Department
of Minority Studies at 219-980-6629), Computer
Information Systems (contact Department of Computer
Information Systems at 219-980-6638), and Race-Ethnic
Studies (contact Department of Minority Studies at
219-980--6629). The certificates are designed for mature
students seeking career changes, career development,
or lifelong learning objectives. The postbaccalaureate
certificate options are open to anyone holding a bachelor's
degree from an accredited college or university. Students
will receive instructions in the major certificate subject
area and selected courses in Arts and Sciences related
areas.
The complete range of academic counseling, career
counseling, and placement services are available to
postbaccalaureate certificate students (consult the IU
Northwest Undergraduate Bulletin for details)
English Graduate Coursework
The selection of courses for graduate programs in
English at Indiana University Northwest must be done
with departmental graduate counselors in the School of
Education.
College of Health and
Human Services
Administrative Officers
Patrick Bankston Ph.D., Dean
Linda R. Delunas, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.E., Associate Dean
Website: www.iun.edu/chhs/
Telephone:(219) 980-6555
Overview
The College of Health and Human Services at IU
Northwest offers degree programs in a wide range of
health-related fields. Detailed information is presented in
the sections that follow. While every effort has been made
to provide accurate information, students should seek
academic advice from a faculty member of the specific
program in which they are interested before making final
decisions based on the program descriptions contained
in this bulletin. Additionally, all programs in the College
of Health and Human Services have program specific
policies; program-specific information can be found in the
appropriate section.
Contact Information
College of Health and Human Services
IU Northwest
Dunes Medical / Professional Building, Room 3003
3400 Broadway
Gary, Indiana 46408
(219) 980-6555
Contact the College of Health and Human Services for
additional contact information.
Admission
Admission to most of the College of Health and Human
Services programs requires a separate application and
admission process. See program specific details.
The admission policies of individual programs within the
College comply with the following standards:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Prerequisite Course Work
Grade Requirements
Repeated Courses
Ineligibility
Students with Disabilities
Essential Abilities
Admissions Procedures
Transfer Credit
Correspondence Courses
Disciplinary Probation
Transfer Credit
Prerequisite Course Work
Applicants must complete prerequisite courses at an
accredited high school (or by GED equivalent), college,
or university. Individual programs determine the specific
courses and the minimum grade that must be achieved
in any course (see specific program information). Each
program must approve the completion of a prerequisite
course with a Pass/Fail grade. Applicants should read
the admission policies and program descriptions in this
bulletin for specific admission requirements.
Grade Requirements
Without exception, applicants must have a cumulative
grade point average of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale for
all course work completed at Indiana University and/or
any other college or university. Some programs have
established a minimum grade point average higher than
2.0 on a 4.0 scale. Some programs also use a component
of the overall grade point average (for example, math/
science grade point average). See specific program
information. Only completed course work and the resultant
grade point average are evaluated. Students may not be
admitted to, hold a position in, or begin a program if they
are on probation. Students are placed on probation when
the cumulative and/or semester grade point average falls
below a 2.00 on a 4.00 scale.
The applicant must also maintain the minimum grade point
average as established by the program. The applicant's
grade point average will be the major consideration. See
specific program information.
Repeated Courses
Programs in the College of Health and Human Services
have specific policies governing repeating of courses.
See program specific information.
Ineligibility
Failure to successfully complete certain General
Education courses may make a student ineligible for
admission to College of Health and Human Services
programs. A pattern of course withdrawals may reduce
the student''s chances of admission to a College of Health
and Human Services program. See program specific
information.
Individuals convicted of sexual crimes will be ineligible
for admission to most College of Health and Human
Services programs. Should such a situation occur during
enrollment in the program, decisions related to dismissal
will be addressed on a case-by-case basis.
Essential Abilities
Most academic programs in the College of Health and
Human Services have specified essential nonacademic
abilities critical to the success of students enrolled in
that program. Once admitted to an academic program,
students are expected to meet program standards for
these essential abilities in order to participate in the
educational program. Copies of each program’s essential
abilities are available upon request from the program
office. Modifications in the learning environment to assist
students in meeting these essential abilities and all other
progression requirements will be made in accordance with
federal and university guidelines and in consideration of
67
individual needs. For more information contact the specific
program office.
Admission Procedures
1.
Individuals must read the program-specific sections
in this bulletin for additional admission requirements and
deadlines.
2.
Individuals seeking admission to a professional
program must submit a complete application prior to
the program's application deadline. Admission to the
professional program is competitive; application for
admission to the university does not constitute automatic
admission to a program.
3.
Applicants who are not Indiana University students
must also file an Indiana University application and
pay the application fee prior to the program application
deadline. Applications for admission to Indiana University
can be obtained from the Office of Admissions on the
campus of interest. Some campuses may have application
deadlines.
4.
The program's admission committee reviews all
completed applications. The selection of a class is based
on school and program admission criteria. All applicants
receive written notification of their admission status.
5.
Applicants may appeal any admission decision
except the requirement of a grade point average of 2.0
on a 4.0 scale. Copies of the policies and procedures
governing the appeals process are available on request
from the programs’ administrative offices.
6.
Individuals interested in being admitted to one of the
school's programs should contact the program of interest
annually for an update of admission criteria.
7.
Applicants must obtain an application for the year in
which they wish to apply.
8.
Applicants should check the current program
application for the deadlines for submission.
9.
Students who have a positive criminal history may
be ineligible for admission, unable to be placed clinically
(and thus unable to progress through the program), or
unable to obtain appropriate credentials to practice in
some disciplines. Contact the program director for further
information.
10. A student whose name appears on the Sex Offenders
List will not be allowed to pursue admission to any
program in the College of Health and Human Services.
11. Programs may calculate the competitive grade point
average utilizing grades earned in remedial courses
differently. See the program-specific section.
Transfer Credit
The campus Office of Admissions will determine
acceptance of credit from a regionally accredited college
or university for transfer to Indiana University. Each
program in the College of Health and Human Services
retains the right to determine the acceptability of transfer
credit to meet degree requirements.
While the grades from all course work completed at
Indiana University and all other colleges and universities
are used to calculate the admission grade point average,
only grades of C or above will be considered for transfer.
68
Correspondence Courses
The university does not accept the transference of
special credit by examination awarded by another college
or university. The transfer of credit earned through a
regionally accredited junior college or a community
college is normally limited to the equivalent of two years
of academic work toward a baccalaureate degree and one
year of academic work toward an associate degree.
Correspondence Courses
All credit to be applied to a College of Health and Human
Services degree earned through correspondence study,
or other nontraditional methods must be validated and
approved by the faculty of the program to which the
student is applying.
Students with Disabilities
Persons who have physical, mental, or learning
impairments are encouraged to work with academic
counselors to plan how the applicant can be helped
to meet essential program requirements. The person
with disabilities must meet academic requirements
and technical standards that are essential to the
program of instruction or to any directly related licensing
requirements. Modifications in the means by which
academic requirements are met will be given individual
consideration. Students can also contact the Office
of Student Support Services, Hawthorn Hall at (219)
980-6941.
Disciplinary Probation
Disciplinary probation is administered according to
the Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities, and
Conduct and the College of Health and Human Services
Disciplinary and Appeals Process.
Policies & Procedures
General Policies
Student Responsibility
Students in the College of Health and Human Services
are responsible for planning their own programs, meeting
degree requirements, and receiving academic advising
from their respective program advisor each semester.
Academic counselors, faculty, and administrators are
available to assist students in understanding degree
requirements. It is important for students to acquaint
themselves with all regulations and to remain properly
informed throughout their studies. All provisions of the
bulletin are in effect for the year in which the student
enters the major. Students interrupting their studies,
pursuing part-time study, or full-time students taking more
than one year to complete prerequisite requirements
are subject to policy and curriculum changes as they
occur. Curriculum changes during the progress toward the
degree may result in revision of degree requirements.
Drug-free Campus
Students are prohibited by Indiana University to use or
possess alcoholic beverages, any drug or controlled
substance, or drug paraphernalia on university property or
in the course of a university activity or student organization
activity. Students are responsible for acquainting
themselves with this policy and the sanctions for violation
of the policy.
Professional Liability Insurance
All students in the College of Health and Human Services
having patient/client contact will be covered under the
malpractice contract for Indiana University. This liability
insurance will not extend to employment outside of
course-related activities. The student should be aware
that failure to pay course and other fees will result in
non-coverage under the malpractice contract of Indiana
University. Such non-coverage makes the student
ineligible to attend clinical classes. Some programs may
require additional professional liability insurance; see
specific program policies.
Standards of Conduct
Students are subject to the standards of conduct as
defined in Indiana University's Code of Student Rights,
Responsibilities, and Conduct. Stated due process will
be followed for any student found to be in violation of
this code. All Indiana University students are responsible
for acquainting themselves with and adhering to policies
outlined in this document. Additionally, all students are
expected to adhere to the College of Health and Human
Services Honor Code. The CHHS Honor Code can be
found at: http://www.iun.edu/chhs/.
Dress Code
In clinical courses, students wear the designated uniform
of the program. All students wear the designated photo
identification badge when in a clinical agency. Students
not appropriately attired may be asked to leave the clinical
area by their instructor. Such an occurrence constitutes
an absence. See program information for program-specific
policies.
Drug Screen
Clinical sites may require students to have a drug screen
prior to attending clinical at their agency, or may require
one on demand in certain situations. Failure to comply
immediately will result in removal from the site and
possible dismissal from the program. Additionally, a
positive drug screen may prevent students from being able
to be placed in a clinical agency. See program information
for program-specific policies.
Health Requirements
Students in many College of Health and Human Services
programs are required to show proof that they have met
the immunization, physical examination, and laboratory
examination requirements of hospitals and other health
agencies used for clinical experiences, as well as CPR
certification. Specific instructions will be distributed prior
to clinical assignment. Failure to meet those health
requirements will make the student ineligible for clinical
classes. See program information for program-specific
policies.
Criminal History Check
Many of the clinical sites where College of Health and
Human Services students complete their hands-on
clinical experiences (such as hospitals, clinics, and other
agencies) require verification of having undergone a
criminal background check before students can be placed
in their organizations. Failure to meet this requirement
will make the student ineligible for clinical classes. It
is possible that a positive criminal history may prevent
students from progressing in a College of Health and
Intercampus Transfers
Human Services program. See program information for
program-specific policies.
Transportation
Students are to provide their own transportation for
educational experiences requiring travel. Classes and
clinical facilities are distributed in various locations
throughout Northwest Indiana and the Chicago area,
with limited public transportation. Students using cars for
clinical must be able to show proof of auto insurance that
is compliant with Indiana law. In addition, the student must
show proof of a valid driver's license. Indiana University
does not assume liability for individual incidents involving
personal vehicles.
Policies & Procedures
Admission to the College of Health and Human Services
programs requires a separate application and admission
process. The admission policies of individual programs
within the College comply with the following standards.
Disciplinary Probation
Disciplinary probation is administered according to the the
College of Health and Human Services Disciplinary and
Appeals Process (available at: )
Absences
Dismissal
Upon the recommendation of the faculty in the student's
program, a student may be dismissed from the College of
Health and Human Services. Dismissal is based on the
failure to meet academic or professional standards. The
student will be informed of the dismissal in writing by the
dean of the College of Health and Human Services or the
dean's representative.
A student in the College of Health and Human Services
may be dismissed from the school when, in the judgment
of the faculty, the student has ceased to make satisfactory
progress toward a degree. When an undergraduate
student fails to attain a C (2.0) grade point average in any
two consecutive academic sessions, has a cumulative
grade point average below C (2.0) for two consecutive
sessions, or fails to earn higher than a D (1.0) grade point
average in any one semester, the student is automatically
considered to be making unsatisfactory progress toward a
degree and is thereby eligible for dismissal.
In addition, a student who fails to meet program-specific
academic requirements is considered not to be making
satisfactory academic progress toward a degree and
may be dismissed. At the time of initial enrollment, each
student receives a copy of the program-specific academic
requirements.
Loss of time in any one clinical area may require that the
student repeat the course. Faculty will distribute programspecific absence policies.
A student failing to meet the standards of professional
and personal conduct may also be recommended for
dismissal.
Audit Students
Programs have specific policies regarding reinstatement
or reenrollment of students who have withdrawn or are
dismissed. See program specific information.
An audit student officially registers for a class and pays
applicable credit hour rates. Upon completion, the course
is entered on the permanent university record as one
taken for no credit (NC). Check with your academic
counselor for specific instructions. Required general
education courses taken for NC will not apply toward
completion of program requirements. Students may
not audit any clinical course. The opportunity to audit a
didactic course is dependent on the availability of space
and permission of the instructor.
Class Standing
Within Indiana University, class standing is based on
the total number of credit hours a student has earned.
However, within a program, class standing is assigned
according to a student's progress in the professional
curriculum.
Completion of Degree Requirements
The program records specialist must receive removal of
all Incomplete and Deferred grades, special credit, and
Independent Study course grades no later than three
weeks prior to the end of classes of the student's last
semester before graduation.
Cumulative Grade Point Average
All work attempted at Indiana University is used to
calculate the cumulative grade point average. Courses
transferred from another institution are not included
for calculation in the cumulative grade point average.
However, the pre-program grade point average is
calculated by including all (transfer and IU) courses used
toward the degree.
69
Honors
The College of Health and Human Services offers
the following honors to recognize superior student
performances. In addition, see specific program
information.
Degrees Awarded with Distinction
To graduate with academic distinction, degree candidates
must rank within the highest 10 percent of the graduating
class. Additionally, baccalaureate degree candidates must
have completed a minimum of 60 credit hours at Indiana
University. Academic distinction is conferred on graduates
as follows:
3.83 - 4.00 Highest Distinction
3.66 - 3.82 High Distinction
3.50 - 3.65 Distinction
Distinction is based on course work completed at Indiana
University, including the final semester.
Dean’s List
Full time students who earned a 3.3 grade point average
or higher for the semester and part time students who
earned a 3.3 grade point average or higher carrying 12
credit hours or more during the regular academic school
year are placed on the Dean’s List.
Intercampus Transfers
Students in good academic standing may seek
intercampus transfer by petitioning the faculty on the
campus of desired transfer at least one semester in
advance of requested transfer. Intercampus transfer
requests will be evaluated individually on the basis of
70
Probation
student record review and the availability of course
positions, faculty, and facilities to meet student needs and
program objectives.
Probation
Upon the recommendation of the faculty in the student's
program, a student is placed on probation. Probationary
recommendations are made when the student does not
meet standards of academic performance or professional
behavior. A student will be placed on academic probation
for the academic session following the one in which the
student fails to attain a minimum C (2.0) cumulative and
semester grade point average. Individual programs may
have additional academic and professional standards.
A student who fails to meet these program-specific
standards may also be placed on probation. Students
are informed of program- specific standards upon
entering the program. A student will be removed from
probation after satisfactorily completing the program's
specified requirements. Students are notified in writing of
probationary actions by the College of Health and Human
Services dean or the dean's representative.
Residency Requirement
A minimum of 51 percent of the required courses must
be completed at Indiana University. Courses assigned
to the Indiana University transcript through the process
of validation will not count toward meeting the residency
requirement. The Indiana University campus on which
the student met the residency requirement will award the
degree.
Semester Load
To be considered a full-time student by the university, the
student must register for a minimum of 12 credit hours
each fall and spring semester and a total of 6 or more
credit hours during a summer session. The maximum load
is 18 credit hours. Students who want to carry more than
18 credits must obtain permission of the program director
or dean. In addition, students should have a cumulative
B (3.0) average or have earned a B (3.0) average in their
last semester.
Students in Good Standing
Students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point
average of C (2.0) and a minimum grade point average
of 2.0 for the most recent academic session and meet
additional programmatic, academic, and professional
standards in order to be considered in good standing.
Students are informed of programmatic, academic, and
professional standards during program orientation.
Withdrawals (Grade of W)
Withdrawals are issued to students wishing to withdraw
from any or all courses if the official withdrawal process
is completed by the automatic withdrawal deadline dates
printed in the current class schedule. A grade of W will
appear on student transcripts when students complete the
official withdrawal process with the appropriate approval.
After the automatic withdrawal deadline, the grade
awarded will be an F or W as determined by the instructor.
Withdrawal after the automatic deadline is not automatic
and requires approval of the College of Health and Human
Services dean or the dean's representative; permission
will be granted only in extraordinary circumstances. W is
an option after the withdrawal deadline only if the student
is passing. A grade of FN will be recorded on the official
transcript if a student stops attending but does not officially
withdraw from class.
Schools & Divisions
Dental Education
Administrative Officer
Juanita Robinson, M.S.Ed., L.D.H., C.D.A, E.F.D.A,
Clinical Assistant Professor of Dental Education, Program
Director
Web site: www.iun.edu/dental/Phone: (219) 980-6770
About Dental Education
Dental Education expects to offer a Bachelor of Science
in Dental Hygiene (beginning in the fall semester of
2013), currently offers an Associate of Science in Dental
Hygiene (expected last class accepted in the fall semester
of 2012), and currently offers a Certificate in Dental
Assisting. Detailed information is presented in the sections
that follow. While every effort has been made to provide
accurate information, students should seek academic
advice from the Dental Education advisor before making
final decisions based on the program descriptions
contained in this bulletin.
Mission
The mission of the Dental Education department at
Indiana University is to improve the public's total health
by advancing the art and science of dental assisting
and dental hygiene by increasing the awareness of and
ensuring access to quality oral health care, promoting
the highest standards of dental assisting and dental
hygiene education, certification, licensure and practice,
and representing and promoting the interest of dental
assistants and dental hygienists.
Accreditation
The Dental Assisting and Dental Hygiene programs
are accredited by the American Dental Association
Commission on Dental Accreditation, 211 East Chicago
Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60611, phone: (800) 621-8099.
Student Dental Assisting and Student Dental
Hygiene Association
Undergraduate students are eligible for student
membership in the national, state, and local constituents
of the American Dental Assistants' Association (ADAA)
or the American Dental Hygienists' Association (ADHA).
Sustaining membership is obtained by individuals
attending an accredited program. The purpose of the
organization is for the students to become active in
their professional association. The students have the
opportunity to take advantage of the tangible benefits and
the intangible benefits that play a vital role in the security
of the profession.
Admission Policies
Repeated Courses
Applicants whose grade point average is at least 2.0 on
a 4.0 scale who have repeated courses will have their
admission grade point average calculated by averaging
the grades earned together. The FX policy of Indiana
University is also utilized for repeated courses. The
FX option is applied with the following restrictions: no
more than three courses will be deleted, and the grade
will be deleted no more than once for a given course.
Dental Assisting Curriculum
If more than three courses are repeated, the applicant
will determine which of the repeated courses are to be
deleted.
Essential Abilities
A certificate in dental assisting or degree in dental hygiene
attest to the mastery of knowledge and skills. Graduates
must possess the essential knowledge and skills to
function in a variety of clinical situations and render a wide
spectrum of patient care in a safe and effective manner.
The Dental Education faculty has therefore specified nonacademic criteria, Essential Abilities for Admission and
Retention, which all applicants and students are expected
to meet in order to participate in the dental assisting
and dental hygiene programs. These criteria include the
following five categories: observation; communication;
motor function; intellectual-conceptual, integrative and
qualitative abilities; and behavior and social attributes.
All accepted students will be required to sign a statement
certifying that they can meet the essential abilities that
apply to the dental assisting and dental hygiene program.
Dental Assisting Admission Procedures
Candidates for admission to the program must be high
school graduates with a 2.0 grade point average
(on a 4.0 scale), or GED equivalent. High school courses
in biology, chemistry, and computers are strongly
recommended.
Each candidate must submit the following materials to the
Dental Education Admissions Advisor prior to July 1 for
consideration for entry into the class beginning in the fall
semester of that year. (Applications submitted beyond
the July 1 deadline will be considered based upon class
availability.)
1. Applicants must first make application to IU
Northwest if not previously admitted by an Indiana
University campus. Please contact the IU Northwest
Admissions Office for an application at (219)
980-6991.
2. Complete a Dental Assisting Program Application.
This application is available online at www.iun.edu/
~dental/, in the Dental Education Department, Dunes
Medical/Professional Building, Room 1180, or by
calling (219) 980-6770. A separate application
must be submitted to each campus the student is
interested in attending.
3. Two IU Northwest Dental Education
Recommendation Forms.
4. Official college and university transcripts, if
applicable.
71
Dental Assisting Career Options
Employment opportunities are available in private dental
practice (general or specialty); hospitals; educational
institutions; business; and federal, state and community
clinics.
Dental Assisting Curriculum
The dental assistant is a member of the dental health
team and is concerned with the prevention of dental
disease. The dental assistant is also trained to aid the
dentist in the detection, care, and treatment of already
present oral pathology.
Graduate dental assistants have completed a
professional, accredited college program that entitles them
to take a national certification examination administered
by the Dental Assisting National Board. Upon successful
passage of this examination, the assistant becomes a
Certified Dental Assistant (CDA).
The trained dental assistant is qualified to seek
employment in private dental practices, both general and
specialized, as well as in local, state, or federal health
clinics and educational programs. Dental publishing
companies and dental sales companies also offer job
opportunities.
The dental assisting program is a 1-year, 36 credit hour
certificate program. To be eligible to apply to the program,
an applicant must be a high school graduate (or GED
equivalent) with a minimum grade point average of 2.0 or
a C average.
Student Consumer Information about this Program
IU Northwest offers an educational program that allows
students to apply their credits toward an associate of
science or a bachelor'sdegree, in another discipline,
which is generally required for positions involving the
responsibilities of education and/or administration.
Fall Semester
•
•
•
•
DAST H214 Oral Anatomy (3 cr.)
DAST A112 Medical/Dental Emergencies and
Pharmacology (2 cr.)
DAST Al21 Microbiology and Asepsis Techniques (2
cr.)
DAST A171 Clinical Science I (5 cr.)
Total (12 cr.)
Spring Semester
•
•
In August, upon receipt of all application materials,
applicants are required to attend the Dental Assisting
Applicant Open House. Applicants will be notified by mail
concerning the date and time of the Open House.
•
Class size for the dental assisting program is limited.
Therefore, each applicant is encouraged to schedule
an appointment with the advisor of the dental assisting
program and to apply early. The Dental Assisting
Admissions Committee reviews all applicants without
discrimination or favor of sex, age, race, religion or
national origin.
•
•
•
DAST A131 Dental Materials I (2 cr.)
DAST A111 Oral Pathology, Physiology, and
Anatomy I (2 cr.)
DAST A113 Oral Pathology, Physiology, and
Anatomy II (1 cr.)
DAST A141 Preventive Dentistry (2 cr.)
DAST A172 Clinical Science II (5 cr.)
•
•
•
•
DAST H242 Introduction to Dentistry (1 cr.)
DAST A161 Behavioral Science (1 cr.)
DAST H303 Radiology I (2 cr.)
DAST A132 Dental Materials II (2 cr.)
•
DAST H242 Oral Histology and Embryology (1
cr.)
72
Dental Hygiene Admission Procedures
•
•
•
•
DAST A162 Oral and Written Communications
(2 cr.)
DAST A182 Practice Management, Ethics and
Jurisprudence (2 cr.)
DAST A152 Radiology Clinic (1 cr.)
Total (12 cr.)
Summer I
Total (6 cr.)
Summer II
Total (6 cr.)
Additional information may be obtained by writing to:
IU Northwest
Dental Assisting Program Advisor Dunes / Medical
Professional Building Room 1180
3400 Broadway
Gary, IN 46408
Phone: (219) 980-6770
Dental Hygiene Admission Procedures
Prerequisites for Associate of Science in
Dental Hygiene
The dental hygiene program requires 35 credit hours of
prescribed liberal arts courses. The 35 credit hours may
be taken at any accredited college or university. Required
courses should not be taken under the Pass/Fail option;
the admissions committee must approve any exceptions.
The student must maintain at least a 2.5 GPA on a 4.0
scale to be eligible for consideration. Courses taken at
institutions other than Indiana University must show a
grade of C or better to be accepted as transfer credit by
Indiana University Admission's Office. All applicants must
receive a minimum grade of C in each prerequisite course
to be eligible for the program. Required courses include
one semester of English composition, one semester of
chemistry with a laboratory, one semester of psychology,
one semester of sociology, one semester of public
speaking, one semester of computer education, one
semester of microbiology, two semesters of anatomy and
physiology each with a laboratory, and one semester
in arts and humanities (such as literature, history,
philosophy, foreign language, music, art appreciation, or
religion). Total credit hours are 35. All required courses
must be completed for eligibility in the dental hygiene
program.
Prerequisites for Bachelor of Science in
Dental Hygiene
The dental hygiene program requires 64 credit hours of
prescribed liberal arts courses. The 64 credit hours may
be taken at any accredited college or university. Required
courses should not be taken under the Pass/Fail option;
the admissions committee must approve any exceptions.
The student must maintain at least a 2.5 GPA on a 4.0
scale to be eligible for consideration. Courses taken at
institutions other than Indiana University must show a
grade of C or better to be accepted as transfer credit by
Indiana University Admissions's Office. All applicants
must receive a minimum grade of C in each prerequisite
course to be eligible for the program. Required courses
include one semester of English composition, one
semester of professional writing, two semesters of
chemistry (one with a laboratory and one without a
laboratory), one semester of psychology, one semester of
sociology, one semester of public speaking, one semester
of computer education one semester of human biology,
one semester of microbiology, two semesters of anatomy
and physiology each with a laboratory, one semester
of basic mathematics, one semester of nutrition, one
semester of statistics, one semester of urban public
health, one semester from cultural and historical studies
(elective), two semesters of arts and humanities (such as
literature, history, philosophy, foreign language, music,
art appreciation, or religion - electives). Total credit hours
are 64. All required courses much be completed for
eligibility in the dental hygiene program.
Applications may be obtained on line at www.iun.edu,
in the Dental Education Department, Dunes Medical/
Professional Building, Room 1180 or by calling (219)
980-6770. The application must be returned by February 1
to be considered for acceptance in the fall semester of that
year. A separate application must be submitted to each
campus the student is interested in attending.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Applicants must first make application to IU
Northwest if not previously admitted by an Indiana
University campus. (Courses cannot be transferred
without making application to IU Northwest.)
Applicants must complete and return the Dental
Hygiene Application to the Department of Dental
Education no later than February 1 for entry into the
class beginning in the fall semester of that year.
Items that must be submitted to the Dental Hygiene
Program Admission Committee by February 1
include:
Official high school transcript
Official college and university transcripts (This
includes transcripts to be sent for course work
completed by February 1)
Dental Hygiene Application
Proof of IU Northwest acceptance (if not currently
attending an Indiana University campus)
In February, upon receipt of the dental hygiene application
and other supporting materials, applicants are required
to attend the Dental Hygiene Applicant Open House. The
applicant will be notified of the Open House by mail during
February.
Class size for the dental hygiene program is limited and
each year there are more qualified applicants than can be
accepted. Therefore, applicants are encouraged to consult
with a program advisor for predental hygiene advising.
The Dental Hygiene Admissions Committee reviews all
applicants without discrimination or favor because of sex,
age, race, religion, or national origin.
Selection of dental hygiene students is based upon,
but is not limited to, satisfying prerequisites, number
of college credit hours satisfactorily completed, overall
college grade point average, prerequisite GPA, high
school rank, applicant Open House attendance, and an
individual appraisal of the applicant's established record
and potential for development.
Seven-Year Limit
All credit to be applied to a dental education degree
earned through Indiana University's Division of Extended
Studies, correspondence study, or other nontraditional
methods must be validated and approved by the director
Dental Hygiene Curriculum Bachelor's Degree
of the program to which the student is applying. Dental
Education retains the right to determine the acceptability
of transfer credit to meet degree requirements.
Dental Hygiene Curriculum
Dental Hygiene Career Options
First Year of Professional Courses
Fall Semester
The dental hygienist is a licensed member of the dental
health team and is concerned with the prevention
of diseases of the oral cavity. The dental hygienist
completes a professional college program that entitles
the graduate, upon successful passage of national,
regional and state board examinations, to perform specific
preventive treatments of children and adults; to expose
and process dental radiographs (x-rays); to assume duties
in the dental office; and/or to participate as a dental health
professional in federal, state, or local public health clinics
and educational programs.
IU Northwest currently offers a program that leads to
an Associate of Science in Dental Hygiene degree
(last class accepted in fall semester 2012) and will be
offering a Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene degree
(beginning in fall semester of 2013) and a Bachelor of
Science in Dental Hygiene completion degree (beginning
in fall semester of 2014). While the associate degree is
adequate to prepare the dental hygienist to perform the
tasks that may be assigned in the private dental office,
additional knowledge and skills are necessary for positions
involving the responsibilities of public health, education,
or administration. Because of increasing interest among
dental hygienists in those opportunities, the baccalaureate
degree will be offered in the fall semester of 2013 at IU
Northwest and is offered at several other institutions in the
state.
Students interested in pursuing a dental hygiene degree
should consult the Dental Education program advisor at IU
Northwest.
Dental Hygiene Curriculum - Associate
Degree
Predental Hygiene Curriculum
•
•
•
•
•
ENG W131 English Composition (3 cr.)
SOC 5161 Principles of Sociology (3 cr.)
CHEM C101 Elementary Chemistry I (Lecture) (3 cr.)
CHEM C121 Elementary Chemistry I (Lab) (2 cr.)
Select one of the following (3 cr.)
• SPCH S121 Public Speaking
• SPCH S122 Interpersonal Communication
•
Select one of the following (3 cr.)
• CSCI A106 Introduction to Computing
• CSCI C106 Introduction to Computers and
Their Use
• EDUC W200 Microcomputing for Education:
An Introduction
•
•
•
Arts and Humanities Elective (3 cr.)
PHSL P261 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4 cr.)
PHSL P262 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4
cr.)
PSY P101 Introductory Psychology I (3 cr.)
BIOL M200 Microorganisms in Nature/Disease (4
cr.)
•
•
Total (35 cr.)
73
All students must receive a minimum grade of C or better
in each course to be eligible for graduation.
•
•
•
•
•
•
DHYG H214 Oral Anatomy (3 cr.)
DHYG H303 Dental Radiology (2 cr.)
DHYG H218 Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene (4 cr.)
DHYG H205 Medical and Dental Emergencies (1 cr.)
DHYG H217 Preventive Dentistry (2 cr.)
DHYG H211 Head and Neck Anatomy (2 cr.)
Total (14 cr.)
Spring Semester
•
•
•
•
•
•
DHYG H224 Oral Histology and Embryology (1 cr.)
DHYG H308 Dental Materials (2 cr.)
DHYG H219 Clinical Practice I (4 cr.)
CHEM C102 Elementary Chemistry II (3 cr.)
DHYG H305 Radiology Clinic I (1 cr.)
DHYG H242 Introduction to Dentistry (1 cr.)
Total (12 cr.)
Summer I
•
•
•
•
•
NURS B215 Nutrition for Health Professionals (3 cr.)
DHYG H204 Periodontics (1 cr.)
DHYG H215 Pharmacology and Therapeutics (2 cr.)
DHYG H220 Summer Radiology Clinic (1 cr.)
DHYG H221 Summer Clinic (3 cr.)
Total (10 cr.)
Second Year of Professional Courses
Fall Semester
•
•
•
•
•
•
DHYG H250 Local Anesthesia and Pain Control (2
cr.)
DHYG H304 Oral Pathology (2 cr.)
DHYG H311 Dental Health Education (2 cr.)
DHYG H301 Clinical Practice II (5 cr.)
DHYG H321 Periodontics (2 cr.)
DHYG H306 Radiology Clinic II (1 cr.)
Total (14 cr.)
Spring Semester
•
•
•
•
•
DHYG H320 Ethics, Jurisprudence, and Practice
Management (2 cr.)
DHYG H307 Radiology Clinic III (1 cr.)
DHYG H302 Clinical Practice III (5 cr.)
DHYG H344 Senior Hygiene Seminar (1 cr.)
DHYG H347 Community Dental Hygiene (3 cr.)
Total (13 cr.)
Dental Hygiene Curriculum Bachelor's
Degree
Predental Hygiene Curriculum
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ENG W131 English Composition (3 cr.)
ENG W231 Professional Writing Skills (3 cr.)
SOC S161 Principles of Sociology (3 cr.)
PSY P101 Introductory Psychology I (3 cr.)
PSY K300 Statistical Techniques (3 cr.)
CHEM C101 Elementary Chemistry I (Lecture) (3 cr.)
CHEM C121 Elementary Chemistry I (Lab) (2 cr.)
74
Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Completion Degree
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CHEM C102 Elementary Cehmistry II (3 cr.)
SPCH S121 Public Speaking
Select one of the following (3 cr.)
• CSCI A106 Introduction to Computing
• CSCI C106 Introduction to Computers and
Their Use (3 cr.)
MATH M100 Basic Mathematics (4 cr.)
PHSL P130 Human Biology (4 cr.)
PHSL P261 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4 cr.)
PHSL P262 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4
cr.)
NURS B215 Nutrition for Health Professionals (3 cr.)
BIOL M200 Microorganisms in Nature/Disease (4
cr.)
Cultural and Historical Studies Elective (3 cr.)
Arts and Humanities Elective (6 cr.)
Total (64 cr.)
Dental Hygiene Curriculum
All students must receive a minimum grade of C or better
in each course to be eligible for graduation.
First Year of Professional Courses
Fall Semester
•
•
•
•
•
•
DHYG H214 Oral Anatomy (3 cr.)
DHYG H303 Dental Radiology (2 cr.)
DHYG H218 Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene (4 cr.)
DHYG H205 Medical and Dental Emergencies (1 cr.)
DHYG H217 Preventive Dentistry (2 cr.)
DHYG H211 Head and Neck Anatomy (2 cr.)
Total (14 cr.)
Total (15 cr.)
Spring Semester
•
•
•
•
Total (9 cr.)
Summer I
•
•
DHYG H224 Oral Histology and Embryology (1 cr.)
DHYG H308 Dental Materials (2 cr.)
DHYG H219 Clinical Practice I (4 cr.)
DHYG H204 Periodontics (1 cr.)
DHYG H215 Pharmacology and Therapeutics (2 cr.)
DHYG H304 Oral Pathology (2 cr.)
DHYG H305 Radiology Clinic I (1 cr.)
DHYG H242 Introduction to Dentistry (1 cr.)
Total (14 cr.)
Summer I
•
•
•
Arts and Humanities Elective (3 cr.)
DHYG H220 Summer Radiology Clinic (1 cr.)
DHYG H221 Summer Clinic (3 cr.)
Total (7 cr.)
Second Year of Professional Courses
Fall Semester
•
•
•
•
•
•
DHYG H250 Local Anesthesia and Pain Control (2
cr.)
DHYG H347 Community Dental Hygiene (3 cr.)
DHYG H311 Dental Health Education (2 cr.)
DHYG H301 Clinical Practice II (5 cr.)
DHYG H321 Periodontics (2 cr.)
DHYG H306 Radiology Clinic II (1 cr.)
DHYG H351 Advanced Clinical Procedures (2 cr.)
DHGY H402 Practicum in Dental Hygiene (3 cr.)
Total (6 cr.)
Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene
Completion Degree
: Associate of Science in Dental Hygiene Prerequisites
(35 credit hours)
: Associate of Science in Dental Hygiene Professional (62
credit hours)
(22 credit hours)
•
•
•
•
•
•
MATH M100 Basic Mathematics (4 cr.)
PBHL P201 Urban Public Health (3 cr.)
ENG W231 Professional Writing Skills (3 cr.)
PSY K300 Statistical Techniques (3 cr.)
Cultural and Historical Elective (3 cr.)
Arts and Humanities Electives (6 cr.)
(9 credit hours)
•
•
•
Spring Semester
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
DHYG H320 Ethics, Jurisprudence, and Practice
Management (2 cr.)
DHYG H307 Radiology Clinic III (1 cr.)
DHYG H302 Clinical Practice III (5 cr.)
DHYG H344 Senior Hygiene Seminar (1 cr.)
DHYG H351 Adv. Dental Hygiene Education (2 cr.)
DHYG H402 Practicum in Dental Hygiene (3 cr.)
DHYG H403 Advanced Community Dental Hygiene
(4 cr.)
Students who do not enter the degree completion program
with at least a total of 90 semester hours, but who have
met all the other prerequisite qualifications, may need to
take additional credit hours to accrue the minimum total
college credit hours necessary to award the Bachelor of
Science Degree in Dental Hygiene from IU Northwest.
The associate degree dental hygiene programs offered
at the IU campuses (Fort Wayne, Indianapolis, Northwest
and South Bend) have at least 90 credit hours.
Health Information Management
Programs
•
•
•
•
About Health Information Administration
Memberships
Admission
Curriculum
Administrative Officers
Margaret A. Skurka, M.S.,RHIA, CCS, FAHIMA, Professor
of Health Information Management, Department
Chairperson, HIM, Program Director, AS in Health
Information Technology
Linda Galocy, M.S., RHIA, Clinical Assistant Professor of
Health Information Management, Program Director, BS in
Educational Program
Health Information Administration,Clinical Coordinator of
Health Information Technology Program
Web site: www.iun.edu/health-information-management/
Phone: (219) 980-6899
About the Health Information Management
Programs
A career in health information management combines
the disciplines of medicine, information management,
computer technology, finance, and law within the health
care industry.
HIM professionals bring unique skills to the healthcare
industry. These skills include the ability to:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Manage medical records and health information
systems
Enhance the quality and uses of data within the
healthcare industry
Summarize data into useful information
Comply with standards and regulations regarding
health information
Protect the privacy and security of patient health
information
Ensure health information is complete and available
to legitimate users
Code health information for reimbursement and
research.
Within the Department of Health Information Management,
interested students can obtain an Associate of Science
Degree in Health Information Technology or a Bachelor of
Science degree in Health Information Administration. The
registered health information technician (RHIT) performs a
variety of technical health information functions, including
the following: analyzing and technically evaluating
health information for accuracy; compiling administrative
and health statistics; coding diagnoses as well as
procedures for reimbursement and databases; and
creating disease registries for researchers. The registered
health information administrator (RHIA) manages a variety
of health information management functions, including the
following: managing electronic health records, managing
clinical workflow, improving the quality and uses of data,
protecting the privacy and security of patient health
information, and analyzing information for reimbursement
and research.
Programs’ Mission and Goals
The HIM programs are designed to prepare graduates for
professional careers in the healthcare field. The programs
have set forth the following goals for our students:
1. To prepare competent entry-level health information
management profssional in the cognitive
(knowledge), psychomotor (skills), and affective
(behavior) learning domains.
2. To provide educational experiences designed
to prepare students to achieve the Domains,
Subdomains, and Tasks for Registered Health
Information Technicians and Registered Health
Information Administrators as described by
the American Health Information Management
Association and for entering a career as a health
information manager.
75
3. To provide concentrated professional practice
experiences by a rotation schedule through the
hospitals and other health care related institutions in
the community.
4. To provide the healthcare community with
individuals qualified to effectively carry out the
functions of the health information management
discipline.
5. To prepare the student to successfully write the
national certification examination of the American
Health Information Management Association
(AHIMA) for certification as a Registered Health
Information Technician (RHIT) or Registered Health
Information Administrator (RHIA).
6. To involve the student in professional continuing
education activities in an effort to instill the lifelong
learning that is required in this profession.
Associate of Science Degree
Program
About Health Information Technology
Affiliated with all Lake County hospitals and several
others.
The health information technician is a professional skilled
in the clinical data analysis,reporting of health care data
and provision of clinical data support to health care
information systems operation.
The graduate health information technician generally
works in the health information department of a hospital
or corporate healthcare facility headquarters, ambulatory
care facility, or other type of health care facility. Some of
the functions are supervising within the health information
department; compliance and risk management functions,
coordinating flow of health information to all departments
of the hospital; compiling statistics; analyzing health
record data for electronic completeness and accuracy;
coding and classifying diagnoses and procedures that
impact facility reimbursement; assigning diagnosis-related
groups (DRGs) or ambulatory payment classifications
(APCs); operating a cancer registry; functioning as a
privacy officer for the facility; preparing special studies
and tabulating data for research; and performing quality
management and utilization management activities, and
other performance improvement activities, and acting
as an electronic health record coordinator assisting with
system implementations and workflow operations.
Graduates are eligible to apply to write the American
Health Information Management Association National
Certification exam. Upon passing this exam, they may
use the initials RHIT, Registered Health Information
Technician.
Educational Program
Length of the Program
The Health Information Technology Program is two
years in length if the student attends on a full-time basis.
Opportunities are available for progression through the
program on a part-time basis.
Structure of the Professional Program
Health Information Technology core courses are offered
primarily during the day. General-education courses are
offered both day and evening. Some courses are offered
online.
76
Memberships
Design of the Professional Curriculum
Students accepted into the Health Information Technology
Program typically begin the course of study in the
fall semester. The curriculum consists of generaleducation courses, technical courses in health information
technology, and clinical experience in health care
facilities in the Lake County area. The Health Information
Technology Program is designed to
•
•
•
•
•
•
Provide educational experiences to prepare students
for beginning a career as a health information
technician.
Provide concentrated clinical experiences by a
rotation schedule through the hospitals and other
health care institutions in the community.
Provide the medical community with individuals
qualified to effectively carry out the functions of the
health information management discipline.
Contribute to the liberal education of the students by
providing a core of general education courses.
Qualify students for progression to the baccalaureate
degree in health information administration.
Assist students in reaching their goals by providing
academic, occupational, and personal guidance.
Location of Clinical Sites
The program utilizes all hospitals in Lake County, Indiana;
one hospital in Porter County, Indiana; two hospitals
in LaPorte County, Indiana; and two hospitals in Cook
County, Illinois. Additional nonacute care facilities
throughout the area are also utilized. The student is
responsible for his/her own transportation to these clinical
sites.
Additional Cost
In addition to regular university fees, students are
responsible for the cost of a physical examination and
completion of a criminal history background check before
attending clinical sites. They are also responsible for any
travel expenses incurred as part of the clinical experience.
Opportunity for Students to Work
Many students accept part-time employment in local
health care facilities while completing the professional
course work.
Program Facilities
Information Management, a prospective student may visit
http://www.hicareers.com/.
Admission
Admission to the program is competitive; therefore,
completion of the corequisites does not guarantee
admission to the program.
Criteria Used for Selection of Class
Students may apply for admission to the Health
Information Technology Program after qualifying for
regular admission to Indiana University. Admission to
the program is based upon each applicant's high school
and / or college grade point average, SAT scores, and a
personal interview.
Class Size
24 students each fall semester.
Specific Requirements
In addition to the College of Health and Human Services
admission policies and procedures found at the beginning
of the bulletin, the following admission policies apply to the
Health Information Technology Program at IU Northwest.
Application Deadline
April 1 of the year of anticipated entry.
Total Number of Prerequisite Credit Hours
This is a direct high school entry program.
Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average
C (2.0 on a 4.0 scale). Grades from remedial courses are
not figured into the cumulative grade point average.
Distribution of Credit Hours in Specific
Areas
Students must complete 26 credit hours in liberal arts as
part of the degree requirements.
Limitations of Course Work
Remedial courses may not be counted as credit hours
toward a degree. Courses completed in the former
Division of General and Technical Studies do not count
toward a degree.
Minimum Specific Grade Point Average
The Health Information Technology Program offices and
classrooms are located in the Dunes Medical building at
IU Northwest.
The program computes a selected course grade point
average based on courses the student may have taken
that are required by the program. Grades from remedial
course are not included.
Accreditation
Interview
The Health Information Technology Program of IU
Northwest is fully accredited by the Commission on
Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information
Management Education.
Memberships
Students in the Health Information Management
Technology program are strongly encouraged to join the
American Health Information Management Association
(AHIMA). Faculty frequently require students to access
the AHIMA site in various courses. In addition, there
are many member benefits that the AHIMA offers. A
student member receives a discount when applying to sit
for the RHIT exam. For more information about Health
All qualified applicants must participate in an interview.
Essential Abilities
See College of Health and Human Services Essential
Abilities policy.
Curriculum
Health Information Technology Curriculum
(60 cr.)
Fall Semester
• ENG W131* Elementary Composition I (3 cr.)
• PHSL P261 Human Anatomy & Physiology I (4 cr.)
• HIM M195* Medical Terminology (3 cr.)
• CSCI A106 Introduction to Computers (3 cr.)
Educational Program
•
HIM M100* Introduction to Health Care Delivery and
Health Information Management (2 cr.)
Total (15 cr.)
Spring Semester
•
•
•
•
PHSL P262 Human Anatomy & Physiology II (4 cr.)
HIM M101* Introduction to Health Records (3 cr.)
HIM M107* Computer Applications in Health
Information Technology (3 cr.)
MATH M100 Basic Mathematics (4 cr.)
Total (14 cr.)
Summer Session I
•
HIM M102* Professional Practice Experience I (2 cr.)
Fall Semester
• HIM M201* Coding and Classification Systems (3
cr.)
• HIM M202* Professional Practice Experience II (3
cr.)
• HIM M245* Health Record Law (2 cr.)
• HIM M205* Pathology (3 cr.)
• HIM M193* CPT Coding (2 cr.)
• HIM M208* Coding Lab (2 cr.)
Total (15 cr.)
Spring Semester
•
•
•
•
•
•
HIM M200* Management in Health Information
Technology (2 cr.)
HIM M203* Health Care Delivery & Quality
Management (2 cr.)
HIM M204* Professional Practice Experience III (2
cr.)
SPCH S121 Public Speaking (3 cr.)
HIM M206* Reimbursement Principles in Healthcare
(2 cr.)
PSY P101 Introductory Psychology I (3 cr.)
Total (14 cr.)
*Professional core course: A grade of C (2.0) or higher is
required in order to take professional core courses that
occur later in the course sequence for this major.
Bachelor of Science - Health
Information Administration
The B.S. degree in Health Information Administration
prepares students to function in a leadership capacity
in a variety of healthcare organizations. Students are
prepared to manage the electronic health record working
with physicians, nurses, and allied health professionals
to ensure proper workflow and quality of documentation
within the medical records. Professionals can perform
the job functions of electronic health record trainer,
support analyst, and work along IT experts to ensure
proper support and build of systems. HIA professionals
are poised to work with data quality experts to ensure
accurate collection and presentation of data, manage
revenue cycle processes within healthcare organizations,
function as a privacy officer, and often direct the functions
of an Health Information Management Department.
77
Educational Program
Length of the Program
The Health Information Administration program is four
years in length if the student attends on a full-time basis
and does not have a prior degree in Health Information
Technology. For a current HIT professional it could
take two to two and half years to complete the HIA
professional program courses. Opportunities are available
for progression through the program on a part-time basis.
Structure of the professional program
A student accepted into the Health Information
Administration program, with no prior degree in Health
Information Technology, will be required to take all
Health Information Technology program courses which
are offered primarily during the day. Once a student
progresses to 300 and 400 level professional courses all
are offered online only.
Design of the Professional Curriculum
Students accepted into the Health Information
Administration Program typically begin the course of
study in the fall semester. The curriculum consists of
general-education courses, technical courses in health
information technology, and clinical experience in health
care facilities at a location convenient for the student. For
those students who already hold a prior degree in Health
Information Technology, those students can begin the
program anytime in the fall or spring semesters.
Location of Clinical Sites
The program generally utilizes all hospitals within the
counties that Indiana University Northwest serves.
For distance students, not living within these areas,
appropriate arrangements will be made with program
Clinical Coordinator to accommodate a clinical placement
at a facility convenient to their home or work. Additional
nonacute care facilities can also be utilized. The student is
responsible for his/her own transportation to these clinical
sites.
Additional Cost
In addition to regular university fees, students are
responsible for the cost of a physical examination, a PPD
test, and completion of a criminal history background
check before attending clinical sites. They are also
responsible for any travel expenses incurred as part of the
clinical experience.
Opportunity for Students to Work
Many students accept part-time employment in local
health care facilities while completing the professional
course work.
Program Facilities
The Health Information Management Program offices and
classrooms are located in the Dunes Medical building at
IU Northwest.
Accreditation
The Health Information Administration Program of IU
Northwest is in candidacy status, pending accreditation
review by the Commission on Accreditation for Health
78
Memberships
Informatics and Information Management Education
(CAHIIM).
Memberships
Students in the Health Information Administration program
are strongly encouraged to join the American Health
Information Management Association (AHIMA). Faculty
frequently require students to access the AHIMA site in
various courses. In addition, there are many member
benefits that the AHIMA offers. A student member can
also obtain a discount when applying to sit for the RHIA
exam. For more information about Health Information
Management, a prospective student may visit http://
www.hicareers.com.
Admission
Admission to the program is competitive; therefore,
completion of the corequisites does not guarantee
admission to the program.
Criteria Used for Selection of Class
Students may apply for admission to the Health
Information Administration Program after qualifying
for regular admission to Indiana University Northwest.
Admission to the program is based upon each applicant's
high school and / or college grade point average, SAT
scores, and a personal interview.
Essential Abilities
See College of Health and Human Services Essential
Abilities policy.
Curriculum
If a student already holds an AS in Health Information
Technology it is not necessary to repeat coursework
from the Health Information Technology program.
Fall Semester – Year 1
•
•
•
ENG W131 Elementary Composition I (3 cr.)
PHSL P261 Human Anatomy & Physiology I (4
cr.)
HIM
M195* Medical Terminology (3 cr.)
•
CSCI
A106
Introduction to Computers (3 cr.)
•
PSY
P101
Introductory Psychology I (3 cr.)
Total 16 cr.
Spring Semester – Year 1
•
•
Class Size
•
Varies
•
PHSL P262
cr.)
MATH M100
ENG
cr.)
SOC
Human Anatomy & Physiology II (4
Basic Mathematics (4 cr.)
W231
Professional Writing Skills (3
S161
Principles of Sociology (3 cr.)
Specific Requirements
In addition to the College of Health and Human Services
admission policies and procedures found at the beginning
of the bulletin, the following admission policies apply
to the Health Information Management Programs at IU
Northwest.
Application Deadline
Total 14 cr.
Fall Semester – Year 2
•
•
April 1 of the year of anticipated entry.
•
Total Number of Prerequisite Credit Hours
•
This is a direct high school entry program.
Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average
C (2.0 on a 4.0 scale). Grades from remedial courses are
not figured into the cumulative grade point average.
Distribution of Credit Hours in Specific Areas
Students must complete 54 credit hours in various general
education courses as part of the degree requirements.
Limitations of Course Work
Remedial courses may not be counted as credit hours
toward a degree.
Minimum Specific Grade Point Average
The program computes a selected course grade point
average based on courses the student may have taken
that are required by the program. Grades from remedial
courses are not included.
Interview
All qualified applicants must participate in an interview.
•
HIM
M100* Introduction to Health Care Delivery
and Health Information Management (2 cr.)
SPCH S121
Public Speaking (3 cr.)
HIM
M205* Pathology (P: P261 & P262) (3
cr.)
Cult and Hist Elective (3 cr.)
BUS A201
(3 cr.)
Introduction to Financial Accounting
Total 14 cr.
Spring Semester – Year 2
•
Arts & Hum elective (3 cr.)
•
Cult & Hist elective (3 cr.)
•
HIM
M101* Introduction to Health Records (3
cr.)
HIM
M107* Computer Applications in Health
Information Technology (3 cr.)
PSY
K300 Statistical Analysis in Psychology (3
cr.)
•
•
Total 15 cr.
Fall Semester – Year 3
•
HIM
M201* ICD Coding and Classification
Systems (3 cr.)
School of Nursing
•
HIM
M193* CPT Coding (2 cr.)
School of Nursing
•
HIM
M245* Health Record Law (2 cr.)
Administrator
•
HIM
M202* PPE (A special PPE would be
created for the non-RHIT) (2 cr.)
DPIS D330 Systems Analysis & Design (3 cr.)
•
Spring Semester – Year 3
•
•
•
•
•
Linda Delunas, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.E., Professor of Nursing
and Director
Web site: www.iun.edu/nursing/
Phone: (219) 980-6600
About the School of Nursing
Total 12 cr.
•
79
HIM
M203* Health Care Delivery & Quality
Assessment (3 cr.)
HIM
M204* PPE for the non-RHIT (3 cr.)
HIM
M200* Management in Health Information
Technology (3 cr.)
HIM
M206* Reimbursement Principles in Health
Care (3 cr.)
DPIS D290 Microcomputer database software &
applications (3 cr.)
Arts & Hum elective (3 cr.)
The School of Nursing offers the Bachelor of Science in
Nursing. In addition to the traditional option, there are two
mobility options. First, the B.A./B.S. Mobility Option is an
18-month, full-time program, designed for individuals who
have earned a bachelor’s degree in a non-nursing fieled
and have decided on a career in nursing. Additionally,
we offer the RN to BSN Mobility Option for Registered
Nurses wishing to complete their bachelor’s degree. In
this option, all nursing courses are online and, after the
completion of any remaining general education courses,
can be completed in as little as 12 months of full-time
study.
Mission
Total 15 cr.
The mission of the Indiana University Northwest School of
Nursing is to form partnerships for preparing students for
diverse professional nursing roles in the 21st century.
Fall Semester – Year 4
Value Statement
•
•
•
•
•
BUS
Z302
Organizational Behavior &
Leadership (3 cr.)
HIM
M301* Health Quality and Information
Management (3 cr.)
HIM
M402 * Health Finance and Budgeting for
HIM (3 cr.)
HIM
M401* Heathcare Data Management in
HIM (3 cr.)
HIM
M410* Computer Systems in Healthcare
and HIM (3 cr.)
Total 15 cr.
Spring Semester – Year 4
•
•
•
•
HIM
M302*
cr.)
HIM
M403*
HIM (3 cr.)
HIM
M404*
cr.)
HIM
M415*
Health Record Law II and Ethics (3
Organization and Management of
Research Principles for HIM (3
Capstone (4 cr.)
Total 13 cr.
Summer I – Year 4
•
HIM
M459* Affiliation Experience (4 cr.)
TOTAL 120 cr.
Faculty
Margaret A. Skurka, M.S., RHIA, CCS, FAHIMA,
Professor of Health Information Management, Program
Director
Linda Galocy, M.S., RHIA, Clinical Assistant
Professor and Clinical Coordinator of Health Information
Technology
"Fostering health and human dignity while promoting
professional integrity".
Code of Ethics for Nurses
Students who are preparing to enter the profession of
nursing are expected to follow the Code of Ethics for
Nurses. Each person, upon entering the profession,
inherits a measure of responsibility and trust in the
profession and the corresponding obligation to adhere
to standards of ethical practice and conduct set by the
profession. The code was adopted by the American
Nurses' Association in 1950 and revised in 1960, 1968,
1976, and, most recently, 2001.
1. The nurse, in all professional relationships, practices
with compassion and respect for the inherent
dignity, worth, and uniqueness of every individual,
unrestricted by considerations of social or economic
status, personal attributes, or the nature of health
problems.
2. The nurse's primary commitment is to the patient,
whether an individual, family, group, or community.
3. The nurse promotes, advocates for, and strives to
protect the health, safety, and rights of the patient.
4. The nurse is responsible and accountable for
individual nursing practice and determines the
appropriate delegation of tasks consistent with the
nurse's obligation to provide optimum patient care.
5. The nurse owes the same duties to self as to others,
including the responsibility to preserve integrity and
safety, to maintain competence, and to continue
personal and professional growth.
6. The nurse participates in establishing, maintaining,
and improving health care environments and
conditions of employment conducive to the provision
of quality health care and consistent with the values
of the profession through individual and collective
action.
80
School of Nursing
7. The nurse participates in the advancement of
the profession through contributions to practice,
education, administration, and knowledge
development.
8. The nurse collaborates with other health
professionals and the public in promoting
community, national, and international efforts to
meet health needs.
9. The profession of nursing, as represented by
associations and their members, is responsible
for articulating nursing values, for maintaining the
integrity of the profession and its practice, and for
shaping social policy.
Accreditation
The Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree program is
accredited by the Indiana State Board of Nursing, and
the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission
(NLNAC), 61 Broadway, New York, NY, 10006, phone:
(212) 989-9393.
Memberships
The School of Nursing is an agency member of the
National League for Nursing and the American Association
of Colleges of Nursing.
Alumni Association
The School of Nursing Alumni Association is a constituent
member of the Alumni Association of the university with
representation on its executive council.
Sigma Theta Tau International
The Alpha Chapter of the international honor society of
nursing was organized at Indiana University. Students
may be admitted to membership when they have
demonstrated excellence in their nursing programs and
have shown superior academic and personal records
Qualified members of the nursing profession, upon
demonstration of marked achievement in nursing, are
also eligible for membership. Leadership, research, and
scholarship constitute the purposes of Sigma Theta Tau.
Student Nurses' Association
Undergraduate students are eligible for membership in the
National Student Nurses' Association, Indiana Association
of Nursing Students, and IU Northwest's local chapter.
The chief purpose of the organization is to aid in the
preparation of students for the assumption of professional
responsibilities.
Admission Requirements
National Background Check Policy
Most of the clinical sites where Indiana University
Northwest School of Nursing students complete their
hands-on clinical experiences (such as hospitals,
clinics, and other agencies) require a national criminal
background check before students can be placed in
their organization. Based on the requirements of these
agencies, as well as state and federal regulations, all
students in the School of Nursing must undergo a national
background check prior to admission and annually
thereafter. Indiana University Northwest School of Nursing
has selected CertifiedBackground.com to complete these
background checks. The background check includes the
following: residency history for the past year and county/
counties of residence criminal records. The results of
a student's background check may impact his or her
admission status in the School of Nursing, preclude
students from attending clinical, and/or affect ability to
obtain licensure as a registered nurse (RN) in the state of
Indiana and other states.
Per the School of Nursing's clinical affiliations agreements,
all background checks that are other than negative will be
sent to the student's clinical agency/agencies for review. If
a clinical agency refuses to allow a student to participate
in a clinical at the agency, the student may not be allowed
to progress in the nursing program.
If an incident occurs that would change your background
check, you are required to notify the School of Nursing
immediately. You may be required to pay for a background
re-check.
Failure to adhere to the above policy will result in
dismissal from the program. The student will not be able
to re-register until this requirement is met. The student
will be responsible for any late registration fees incurred. If
clinical time is missed, the student is subject to the clinical
absence policy.
Health Requirements
All nursing students at IU Northwest must show proof that
they have met the immunization, physical examination,
and laboratory examination requirements of hospitals and
other health agencies used for clinical experiences, as
well as health care provider CPR certification. Specific
instructions will be distributed prior to clinical assignment.
Failure to meet those health requirements will make
the student ineligible for clinical classes. Annual OSHA
training related to blood-borne pathogens is required of
all students. Students will be notified of training dates and
times. The School of Nursing faculty and administrators
strongly encourage students to carry personal health
insurance. The school will not be liable for any health
problems requiring medical treatment for students enrolled
in programs.
Drug Screen Policy
Some clinical sites require a drug screen. In addition,
faculty reserve the right to require a drug screen, at
the student's expense, if the situation warrants. Failure
to comply immediately will result in dismissal from the
nursing program.
Dress Code
Nursing students wear the designated uniform of
the school. All students wear the designated photo
identification badge. For experience in community nursing,
all students wear the uniform designated by agency policy.
Students not appropriately attired may be asked to leave
the clinical area by their instructor. Such an occurrence
constitutes an absence.
Application Ineligiblity
A student shall be ineligible for the nursing program if,
by the second completed attempt, he/she fails to earn
a minimum grade of C (2.0) in any required generaleducation course. Students may repeat no more than
three required general-education courses. Of the three
courses, no more than two sciences may be repeated. A
pattern of course withdrawals may reduce the student's
chances of admission to the undergraduate nursing
School of Nursing
program. Students must meet minimum cumulative and
pre-nursing GPA requirements.
Eligibility for Licensure
Any person who makes application for examination and
registration as a registered nurse in the state of Indiana
shall submit to the Indiana State Board of Nursing at the
Indiana Professional Licensing Agency written evidence,
verified by oath, that he/she
•
•
•
has completed an approved high school course
of study or the equivalent as approved by the
appropriate educational agency;
has completed the prescribed curriculum in a stateaccredited school of nursing and holds a diploma or
certificate there from; and
has not been convicted of any act that would
constitute a ground for disciplinary sanction under
the state board rules and regulations or of any felony
that has direct bearing on the individual's ability to
practice competently. (Note: Convictions include
the possession and use of drugs or controlled
substances.) Most states require a national criminal
background check.
Rules and regulations governing licensing in Indiana are
available from the Indiana State Board of Nursing.
International students and graduates of schools of
nursing that are outside the United States must meet the
requirements of the Indiana State Board of Nursing for
eligibility to sit for the licensing examination.
Application for National Council Licensure
Examination (NCLEX)
The School of Nursing will make available the necessary
forms to take the examination in Indiana. Those students
taking the examination in other states are responsible for
obtaining the appropriate forms from those states. It is the
student's responsibility to complete the application process
and meet the mailing and payment deadlines for taking the
NCLEX (state board examination for licensure).
School of Nursing Dean's List
Full-time undergraduate students in the School of Nursing
will be placed on the School of Nursing Dean's List
each semester that they receive a GPA of 3.5 or above.
Part-time students will be honored after they have had
consecutive fall and spring semesters (during the same
academic year) on a part-time basis and they have
accumulated 12 credit hours or more.
knowledgeable coordinator of community resources; a
politically aware professional; a beginning practitioner
whose actions are consistent with professional legal
and ethical standards; an effective communicator; a
competent provider of health care; and a person who
exemplifies a positive image. Baccalaureate graduates
assist individuals, families, and communities in attaining
mutually established health goals and in facilitating
the highest level of functioning for individuals, families,
and communities toward the maximization of their
health potential. Baccalaureate education must prepare
graduates to be knowledgeable workers, to be processors
of information, and to navigate complex health care
systems using available technologies as they design
and develop more efficient and effective approaches to
the delivery of health care services independently or in
conjunction with others.
Bachelor of Science Program Outcomes
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Three categories of students are admitted to the
baccalaureate program:
•
•
See School of Nursing Policy on repeat of Nursing
courses.
•
Philosophy
Baccalaureate nursing education provides a broad
foundation in the sciences and liberal arts necessary
for preparing professional nurses who are capable of
practicing in a competent and responsible fashion as
informed citizens in a dynamic and diverse society.
Graduates of the baccalaureate nursing program are
expected to demonstrate competencies consistent with
being a critical thinker; a culturally competent person; a
A critical thinker who is able to demonstrate
intellectual curiosity, rational inquiry, problemsolving skills, and creativity in framing problems.
A culturally competent person who provides holistic
nursing care to a variety of individuals, families, and
communities.
A knowledgeable coordinator of community
resources who facilitates individuals', families', and
communities' access to resources necessary to meet
health care needs.
A politically aware individual who participates in
the profession and practice of nursing with a global
perspective.
An individual who practices within an ethical and
legal framework of the nursing profession.
An effective communicator who is able to share
accurate information.
A competent provider of health care who assumes
the multiple role dimension in structured and
semistructured health care settings.
A professional role model who promotes a positive
public image of nursing.
A responsible manager who balances human, fiscal,
and material resources to achieve quality health care
outcomes.
Admission Policies
Repeating Courses
About the Bachelor of Science in
Nursing
81
Basic or traditional baccalaureate students pursuing
initial preparation for nursing
B.A./B.S. to B.S.N. (students who hold a bachelor's
degree in fields other than nursing)
RN to B.S.N. (students who hold an associate’s
degree or diploma in nursing and who hold a valid
nursing license)
Admission Procedure
1. Admission to Indiana University as a degree- seeking
student.
2. Completion of 26-28 credit hours of prerequisite
courses (including those listed below) with a grade of C
(2.0) or above in each course by the second completed
attempt and prior to fall semester admission. Students
may repeat no more than three (3) required B.S.N.
82
School of Nursing
general-education courses. Of the three (3) courses, no
more than two (2) sciences may be repeated.
•
•
•
•
•
•
W131 English Composition
P261/P262 Anatomy & Physiology I and II
P101 or P102 Introduction to Psychology
S161 Principles of Sociology
M100 Elementary Algebra (or a higher level math
course, excluding M110)
C110 The Chemistry of Life
3. Submission of the Application for Admission to the
Baccalaureate Nursing Major by April 1 for fall semester.
Applications are obtained from the School of Nursing
website.
4. Achieve a minimum 2.5 cumulative grade point
average and a minimum 2.7 prenursing grade point
average. The cumulative grade point average (GPA) will
be calculated according to the Indiana University Policy
for FX Grading Option regardless of when the course
was taken. The nursing GPA is calculated on all required
courses for the nursing program. Students may exercise
the grade replacement policy for a limit of three general
education courses not to exceed 10 credit hours.
5. Return of the signed acceptance letter by the date
indicated on the offer of admission.
6. Submission of an official transcript to the School
of Nursing for all work being transferred from another
university. To obtain an official transcript, the student must
request an official transcript from the other institution(s) to
be forwarded to the Office of Admissions, IU Northwest,
for evaluation.
Applicants meeting the above criteria will be placed in rank
order from high to low based upon the prenursing grade
point average in the required prerequisite courses.
The traditional baccalaureate curriculum has one year of
prerequisite courses followed by three years of nursing
and other general education courses. Nursing courses
are open only to students who have been certified into
the nursing program. Prerequisite courses may be
taken at any of the Indiana University campuses or may
be accepted as transfer credits from other accredited
institutions.
Direct all inquiries concerning the School of Nursing,
advising, and application to the program to the
Coordinator of Student Services, School of Nursing, 3400
Broadway, Gary, IN 46408. Phone: (219) 980-6611.
Admission to the Baccalaureate Major for
Traditional Undergraduate Students
Admission to the baccalaureate nursing major is highly
selective and competitive.
Application and admission are valid only for the semester
designated and will be considered when the following
requirements are met:
B.A./B.S. to B.S.N. Mobility Option for
Graduates of a Bachelor's Degree Program
in a Nonnursing Field
Admission to the B.A./B.S. to B.S.N. Mobility Option is
competitive. Candidates for admission will have previously
earned a bachelors degree in a nonnursing field with a
graduation GPA of 2.5 or higher, have an IU GPA of 2.5,
and a 3.0 on a 4.0 scale for all general-education course
work counting toward the B.S.N. degree. All general
education requirements must be met prior to program
admission.
R.N. to B.S.N. Mobility Option for Graduates
of an Associate of Science Degree or
Diploma Program
Students wishing to be admitted to the RN to BSN Mobility
Option must be Registered Nurses with an unencumbered
license to practice nursing, and have a graduation GPA
of 2.5 from their Associate Degree or Diploma Program.
Also, all general education requirements should be met
before admission to this option. Students may apply for
admission in summer, spring, or fall.
Academic Policies
Academic Standing/Progression Standards
Students Admitted to the Nursing Major
The following policies apply to all students admitted to the
baccalaureate major in the School of Nursing.
Good Standing
Students who maintain a C (2.0) or higher average in
all courses, a grade of C (2.0) or higher in all courses
required for the degree, and a grade of S in clinical
nursing courses will be in good academic standing.
Academic Probation
A student will be placed on probation when any of the
following conditions exist:
1. Cumulative grade point average is below 2.0.
2. Semester grade point average is below 2.0.
3. A grade below C has been earned in a required
course.
Academic probation will be removed after the semester
when the following conditions exist:
1. Cumulative grade point average is 2.0 or higher.
2. Semester average is 2.0 or higher.
3. A grade of C or above has been earned in the
required course(s).
4. Remedial course work, if required, has been
completed, and/or specified conditions have been
met.
Dismissal
A student may be dismissed from the School when, in the
judgment of the faculty, there is lack of progress toward
the degree. Evidence of lack of progress consists of one
or more of the following, but is not limited to:
1. Failure to attain a cumulative grade point average of
2.0 in two semesters.
2. Failure to attain a grade of C (2.0) or above for
didactic or S for clinical upon repeating a nursing
course.
3. Failure to attain a grade of C (2.0) or above in two or
more nursing courses.
4. Failure to meet probationary stipulations in the
semester following the assignment of probation.
5. Failure to achieve a grade of C (2.0) or above in any
required general education course upon the second
attempt.
6. Falsification of records or reports, plagiarism, or
cheating on an examination, quiz, or any other
School of Nursing
assignment; violation of patient/ client confidentiality
resulting in denial of access to a clinical facility.
A student may be dismissed from the School of Nursing
without being placed on probation when any of the above
conditions exist.
The faculty reserves the right to request the withdrawal of
any student whose personal integrity, health, or conduct
demonstrates unfitness to continue preparation for
professional nursing. Dismissal is subject to the appeal
process. The student can initiate the appeal through a
letter sent to the coordinator of Student Services, who will
forward it to the faculty.
Reentry
Failure to register in each sequential semester, excluding
summer sessions, constitutes an interruption in the
student's program. Students who have so interrupted
their programs are required to submit written request of
intent to reenter the program to the academic advisor.
All requests for reentry will be evaluated on the basis of
available resources. Students who reenter must adhere
to the academic policies in effect at the time of reentry.
Reentry of students who have interrupted their study,
for any reason, is not guaranteed. Reentry may require
vaidation of skill competency.
Graduation/Degree Requirements
Prospective students should study the requirements for
admission to the School of Nursing, the specific curriculum
requirements and sequences, and requirements for the
degree. Students are responsible for meeting degree
requirements and for making application for the degree.
The deadlines for filing the application for a degree are
September 1 for December and May graduation. The
School of Nursing is not responsible for certifying students
for the degree if they do not file the application.
All candidates for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing
degree must fulfill the following requirements:
1. Satisfactory completion of a minimum of 124 credit
hours that apply to the degree.
2. Minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0.
3. Minimum of a C (2.0) in each required course or
equivalent. A C- is less than minimum.
4. Completion of the nursing major within six years of
the first enrollment.
5. Residency requirements.
S/F Grades for Clinical Nursing Courses
A student must receive a grade of S (satisfactory) in each
clinical nursing course. Failure to receive a grade of S
constitutes failure. An S indicates a grade of A, B, or C
(2.0). Faculty evaluate the quailty of clinical performance
by standards listed in course syllabi.
Repeat of Nursing Courses
A student who receives less than a C (2.0) in a nursing
didactic course or less than an S in a clinical course
may be permitted to repeat the course. A student will
receive no more than two opportunities to successfully
complete a given nursing course. Failure to receive a C
(2.0) upon repeating a nursing course or failure in two or
more nursing didactic or clinical nursing courses will result
in dismissal.
83
Repeat of Required General Education Courses
To qualify for admission and progression, a student must
earn a grade of C (2.0) or higher in all required generaleducation courses (C- is not acceptable) by the second
completed attempt. Students may repeat no more than
three (3) required B.S.N. general- education courses. Of
the three (3) courses, no more than two (2) sciences may
be repeated.
Pass/Fail Option
A maximum of 6 elective credit hours taken under this
option may be applied to the B.S.N. degree. Required
prerequisite courses may not be taken uder this option.
Independent Study Courses
Required and elective courses for the nursing major,
except public speaking, currently available as independent
study at Indiana University may be taken for credit. Some
courses, however, may not meet degree requirements.
Students must contact the Coordinator of Nursing Student
Services before enrollment. Nursing majors are required to
have the academic advisor's signature for all independent
study courses. Final examinations in all independent study
courses must be completed no later than three weeks
prior to the expected graduation date.
Courses Excluded from the Degree
Credits earned in remedial courses do not apply to the
B.S.N. degree. Credits from courses that have been
repeated may be counted only one time to meet the credit
hour requirement for the degree. The second completed
attempt will be counted toward the GPA.
Withdrawal from a Nursing Course
If a student withdraws from a didactic course, withdrawal
from the co-requisite clinical course is required.
Seven-Year Limit
Anatomy and Physiology I and II, Microbiology,
Chemistry, Statistics, and Life Span Development have
a seven year age limit. Students may opt to (1) take the
course again or (2) challenge the course by examination.
B.S.N. Curriculum Plans
General Education Requirements for the
Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.)
(Applicable to Traditional Students Only)
The general education courses for the B.S.N. have been
divided into six clusters. Some courses within the cluster
may be required while others may be selected from a
specific list of courses.
Cluster I Mathematical/Physical/Life Sciences (26 credit
hours required)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
PHSL P130 Human Biology (4 cr.)
PHSL P261 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4 cr.)
PHSL P262 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4
cr.)
CHEM C110 The Chemistry of Life (3 cr.)
MATH M100 (4 cr.)
BIOL M200 Microorganisms in Nature and Disease
(4 cr.)
PSY K300 Statistics (3 cr.)
84
School of Nursing
Cluster II Communication (9 credit hours required)
•
•
•
ENG W131 Elementary Composition (3 cr.)
SPCH S121 Public Speaking (3 cr.)
ENG W231 Professional Writing Skills (3 cr.)
•
•
Cluster III Cultural and Historical Studies (6 credit hours
required).
A list of courses meeting this requirement is available on
request.
Cluster IV Social and Behavioral Sciences (6 credit hours
required)
•
•
SOC S161 Principles of Sociology (3 cr.)
Select one of the following (3 cr.)
• PSY P101 Introductory Psychology I
• PSY P102 Introductory Psychology II
•
PHIL P393 Biomedical Ethics (3 cr.)
A literature course (3 cr.)
Cluster VI Open credit (total of 3 credit hours)
•
Semester Four
• PSY K300 Statistics (3 cr.)
• NURS B230 Developmental Issues and Health
(4 cr.)
• NURS B233 Health and Wellness (3 cr.)
• NURS B248 Science and Technology of
Nursing (3 cr.)
• NURS B249 Science and Technology of
Nursing: Practicum (2 cr.)
Junior Year
Cluster V Arts and Humanities (6 credit hours required)
•
•
This area is unspecified. The course taken can
be nursing or nonnursing and should reflect the
student's study goals and program outcomes. These
courses could lead to a minor area of study (15-18
credit hours necessary for a minor).
Semester Five - Select from the following options
• Option 1
• NURS H351 Alterations in NeuroPsychological Health (3 cr.)
• NURS H352 Alterations in NeuroPsychological Health: Practicum (2 cr.)
• NURS H353 Alterations in Health I (3 cr.)
• NURS H354 Alterations in Health I:
Practicum (2 cr.)
• NURS H365 Nursing Research (3 cr.)
• PHIL P393 Biomedical Ethics(3 cr.)
•
Consult the student services coordinator for advice.
Curriculum Plan for Traditional B.S.N.
Students
Freshman Year
•
•
Semester One
• PHSL P130 Human Biology (4 cr.)
• SPCH S121 Public Speaking (3 cr.)
• ENG W131 Elementary Composition (3 cr.)
• SOC S161 Principles of Sociology (3 cr.)
• PHSL P261 Human Anatomy and Physiology I
(4 cr.)
Semester Two
• PHSL P262 Human Anatomy and Physiology II
(4 cr.)
• PSY P101 or P102 Introductory Psychology (3
cr.)
• MATH M100 (4 cr.)
• CHEM C110 The Chemistry of Life (3 cr.)
• ENG W231 Professional Writing Skills (3 cr.)
Sophomore Year
•
Semester Three
• BIOL M200 Microorganisms in Nature and
Disease (4 cr.)
• NURS B231 Communication for Health Care
Professionals (3 cr.)
• NURS B232 Introduction to the Discipline of
Nursing Theory, Practice and Research (3 cr.)
• NURS B244 Comprehensive Health
Assessment (3 cr.)
NURS B245 Comprehensive Health
Assessment: Practicum (1 cr.)
•
Option 2
• NURS H363 The Developing Family and
Child (4 cr.)
• NURS H364 Developing Family and
Child: Practicum (2 cr.)
• NURS H353 Alterations in Health I (3 cr.)
• NURS H354 Alterations in Health I:
Practicum (2 cr.)
• Cultural and Historical Studies course (3
cr.)
Semester Six - Select from the following options
• Option 1
• NURS H361 Alterations in Health II (3 cr.)
• NURS H362 Alterations in Health II:
Practicum (2 cr.)
• NURS H363 The Developing Family and
Child (4 cr.)
• NURS H364 Developing Family and
Child: Practicum (2 cr.)
• Cultural and Historical Studies course (3
cr.)
•
Option 2
•
•
•
•
•
•
NURS H361 Alterations in Health II
(3 cr.)
NURS H362 Alterations in Health II:
Practicum (2 cr.)
NURS H351 Alterations in NeuroPsychological Health (3 cr.)
NURS H352 Alterations in NeuroPsychological Health: Practicum (2
cr.)
NURS H365 Nursing Research (3
cr.)
School of Nursing
•
PHIL P393 Biomedical Ethics (3 cr.)
•
•
Senior Year
•
Semester Seven - Select from the following
options
• Option 1
• NURS S470 Restorative Health
Related to Multi-System Failures (3
cr.)
• NURS S471 Restorative Health
Related to Multi-System Failures:
Practicum (2 cr.)
• NURS S472 A Multi-System
Approach to the Health of the
Community (3 cr.)
• NURS S473 A Multi-System
Approach to the Health of the
Community: Practicum (2 cr.)
• NURS S484 Evidence Based
Practice (1 cr.)
• Open elective (3 cr.)
•
•
Option 2
• NURS S481 Nursing Management
(3 cr.)
• NURS S482 Nursing Management:
Practicum (2 cr.)
• NURS S483 Clinical Nursing
Practice Capstone (3 cr.)
• NURS S484 Evidence Based
Practice (1 cr.)
• NURS S485 Professional Growth
and Empowerment (3 cr.)
• Cultural and Historical Studies
course (3 cr.)
Semester Eight - Select from the following
options
• Option 1
• NURS S481 Nursing Management
(3 cr.)
• NURS S482 Nursing Management:
Practicum (2 cr.)
• NURS S483 Clinical Nursing
Practice Capstone (3 cr.)
• NURS S485 Professional Growth
and Empowerment (3 cr.)
• Cultural and Historical Studies
course (3 cr.)
•
Option 2
• NURS S470 Restorative Health
Related to Multi-System Failures (3
cr.)
• NURS S471 Restorative Health
Related to Multi-System Failures:
Practicum (2 cr.)
• NURS S472 A Multi-System
Approach to the Health of the
Community (3 cr.)
• NURS S473 A Multi-System
Approach to the Health of the
Community: Practicum (2 cr.)
•
85
NURS S485 Professional Growth
and Empowerment (3 cr.)
NURS S484 Evidence Based
Practice (1 cr.)
Open elective (3 cr.)
General-Education Requirements for the
B.A./B.S. to B.S.N. Mobility Option
Cluster I Mathematical, Physical, and Life Sciences
(26 credit hours required)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
PHSL P130 Human Biology (4 cr.)
PHSL P261 Human Anatomy and Physiology I
(4 cr.)
PHSL P262 Human Anatomy and Physiology II
(4 cr.)
CHEM C110 The Chemistry of Life (3 cr.)
BIOL M200 Microorganisms in Nature and
Disease (4 cr.)
PSY K300 Statistics (3 cr.)
MATH M100 Basic Mathematics (4 cr.)
Cluster II Communication (9 credit hours required)
•
•
•
ENG W131 Elementary Composition (3 cr.)
ENG W231 Professional Writing Skills (3 cr.)
SPCH S121 Public Speaking (3 cr.)
Cluster III Cultural and Historical Studies (6 credit
hours required)
•
A list of courses meeting this requirement is
available on request.
Cluster IV Social and Behavioral Sciences (9 credit
hours required)
• SOC S161 Principles of Sociology
• PSY P101 or P102 Introductory Psychology
• EDUC P214 or PSY P216 Life Span
Development
Cluster V Humanistic Appreciation (6 credit hours
required)
• PHIL P393 Biomedical Ethics (3 cr.)
• A literature course (3 cr.)
Cluster VI Open Elective (3 credit hours required)
Consult the Coordinator of Student Services for
advice.
Curriculum Plan for B.A. / B.S. to B.S.N.
Mobility Option
•
Summer Semester I
• B231 Communication for Health Care
Professionals (3 cr.)
• B233 Health and Wellness (3 cr.)
• B244 Comprehensive Health
Assessment (3 cr.)
• B245 Comprehensive Health
Assessment: Practicum (1 cr.).
•
•
Summer Semester II
• B232 Introduction to the Discipline of
Nursing (3 cr.)
86
School of Nursing
•
•
•
•
Fall Semester
• Option 1
• NURS H351 Alterations in NeuroPsychological Health (3 cr.)
• NURS H352 Alterations in NeuroPsychological Health: Practicum (2
cr.)
• NURS H353 Alterations in Health I
(3 cr.)
• NURS H354 Alterations in Health I:
Practicum (2 cr.)
• NURS H365 Nursing Research (3
cr.)
•
•
•
•
•
Option 2
• NURS H363 The Developing
Family and Child (4 cr.)
• NURS H364 Developing Family and
Child: Practicum (2 cr.)
• NURS H353 Alterations in Health I
(3 cr.)
• NURS H354 Alterations in Health I:
Practicum (2 cr.)
Spring Semester
• Option 1
• NURS H361 Alterations in Health II
(3 cr.)
• NURS H362 Alterations in Health II:
Practicum (2 cr.)
• NURS H363 The Developing
Family and Child (4 cr.)
• NURS H364 Developing Family and
Child: Practicum (2 cr.)
•
•
•
B248 Science and Technology of Nursing
(3 cr.)
B249 Science and Technology of
Nursing: Practicum (2 cr.)
Option 2
• NURS H361 Alterations in Health II
(3 cr.)
• NURS H362 Alterations in Health II:
Practicum (2 cr.)
• NURS H351 Alterations in NeuroPsychological Health (3 cr.)
• NURS H352 Alterations in NeuroPsychological Health: Practicum (2
cr.)
• NURS H365 Nursing Research (3
cr.)
Summer Semester I
• S472 A Multi-System Approach to the
Health of the Community (3 cr.)
• S473 A Multi-System Approach to the
Health of the Community: Practicum (2
cr.)
Summer Semester II
• S470 Restorative Health Related to MultiSystem Failures (3 cr.)
• S471 Restorative Health Related to MultiSystem Failures: Practicum (2 cr.)
•
•
•
S484 Evidence Based Practice (1 cr.)
Fall Semester
• S481 Nursing Management (3 cr.)
• S482 Nursing Management: Practicum (2
cr.)
• S483 Clinical Nursing Practice Capstone
(3 cr.)
• S485 Professional Growth and
Empowerment (3 cr.)
General Education Requirements for the
RN to BSN Mobility Option
Cluster I Mathematical, Physical, and Life Sciences
(26 credits required)
•
•
•
•
•
Anatomy and Physiology I and II (e.g. P261/
P262)
Microbiology (e.g., M200)
Mathematics (M100 or equivalent or higher
math)
Chemistry (C110 or organic)
M, P, and L Science electives (6 credits)
Cluster II Communication (9 credits required)
•
•
•
English Composition (e.g., W131)
Advanced or Professional Writing (e.g., W231)
Public Speaking (e.g., S121)
Cluster III Cultural and Historical Studies (6 credits
required; request list of options from nursing advisor)
Cluster IV Social Competence (6 credits required)
•
•
Introduction to Psychology
Introduction to Sociology
Cluster V Arts and Humanities (6 credits required)
•
•
Literature Course
Arts and Humanities Elective
Cluster VI Open Elective (3 credit hours)
Curriculum Plan for RN to BSN Mobility
Option
•
Semester 1—Term 1
• B231 Communication for Health Care
Professionals: RN to BSN
• B304 Professional Nursing Seminar I
•
•
Semester 1—Term 2
• S475 Health of the Community: RN to
BSN
• H355 Data Analysis
•
•
Semester II—Term 1
• H365 Nursing Research
• S474 Health Care Ethics
•
•
Semester II—Term 2
• S487 Nursing Management
• Nursing Elective
•
•
Semester III—Term 1
• B404 Professional Nursing Seminar II:
Informatics
School of Public and Environmental Affairs
•
Nursing Elective (list available from
nursing advisor)
•
Semester III—Term 2
• S483 Clinical Nursing Practice Capstone:
RN to BSN
• Nursing Elective (list available from
nursing advisor)
•
Special credit for the remaining nursing
courses leading to the BSN degree is awarded
after completion of B304. A per-credit-hour,
special-credit fee applies.
Minor in Public Health
The College of Health and Human Services, in
collaboration with other schools and departments, offers
courses leading to an interdisciplinary minor in Urban
Public Health. This minor leads to a broad understanding
of public health principles and their application in an urban
context; exposure to issues such as environmental health
and justice, public health preparedness, and healthcare
structures and policy; as well as an understanding of the
urban community in general. Students will be introduced
to the roles and functions of public health science and
practice.
Requirements (15 cr. hr.)
•
•
•
•
PBHL P201 Introduction to Public Health in the
Urban Environment (3 cr.)
SPEA H322 Principles of Epidemiology (3 cr.)
AFRO A206 The Urban Community (3 cr.)
and 2 additional courses (6 credit hours) selected in
consultation with a departmental advisor
School of Public and
Environmental Affairs
Administrative Officer
Barbara Peat, Ph.D., Director and Associate Professor of
Public and Environmental Affairs
Web site: www.iun.edu/spea/
Concentration Declaration
The student must declare a concentration prior to the
beginning of the junior year for the baccalaureate degree
and will be expected to meet the requirements for that
concentration. The concentration selection may be
changed at the beginning of any semester after that;
however, the student is responsible for checking the
concentration requirements and scheduled offerings when
a concentration is changed late in a program.
Public Service Internship Program
The Public Service Internship Program involves
participation by undergraduate students. Undergraduate
students enroll in SPEA V380 Internship in Public Affairs
or SPEA J380 Internship in Criminal Justice. Graduate
students enroll in SPEA V585 Practicum in Public Affairs.
Full-time assignment in a public service internship for one
semester is acknowledged up to 6 credit hours. Internship
credit is recommended for preservice undergraduate
students. In the undergraduate program, a maximum of
15 credit hours is allowed for participation in off-campus
experiences.
Internship possibilities are developed by the school
and involve specific job descriptions from public and
private agencies willing to involve students in significant
professional activities in public and environmental affairs.
The student has the option of identifying their own
internship site; however, the site must be approved by the
internship coordinator. In all cases, specific job details and
descriptions of supervisory capacity of the agencies must
be filed before credit may be arranged. No off-campus
experiences are approved for credit unless the necessary
information is filed and approved before the assignment
begins. It is recommended the approval process be
complete prior to the internship semester. Information can
be obtained from the School of Public and Environmental
Affairs at IU Northwest.
While the internship program is intended for students
enrolled in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs,
students in related disciplines who have an interest in the
public sector and meet eligibility requirements may be
considered for admission on a provisional basis.
Phone: (219) 980-6695
Undergraduate Programs
About the School of Public and
Environmental Affairs
Associate of Science in Criminal Justice
The Trustees of Indiana University established the School
of Public and Environmental Affairs (SPEA) as a statewide
program of the university in January 1972.
The School of Public and Environmental Affairs at IU
Northwest offers academic programs at the associate,
baccalaureate, and master's degree levels for both IU
Northwest students and for individuals presently working
in public affairs, criminal justice, health services, human
services, nonprofit organizations, or environmental affairs
settings. The school also operates a unit designed to
address a variety of public issues and problems, in
particular those of northwest Indiana. SPEA conducts
research on public problems, provides services to public
agencies, and engages in educational programs designed
to aid public officials and to inform the public on a variety
of public issues.
87
The Associate of Science in Criminal Justice will be
discontinued effective August 2013.
The Associate of Science in Criminal Justice is a 60 credit
hour degree for students interested in criminal justice
specifically. Flexibility within the program allows students
with specialized interests in law enforcement, corrections,
or other aspects of criminal justice to tailor the program to
their needs. After receiving the associate degree, students
are in an excellent position to continue in the Bachelor of
Science in Criminal Justice degree program.
Degree Requirements
1. A minimum of 60 credit hours with a cumulative grade
point average of at least 2.0 is required.
2. A grade point average of 2.3 (C+) must be attained in
all courses taken to complete the public affairs core and/or
the concentration.
3. Credit work for these degree programs may be taken
at any campus of Indiana University
88
School of Public and Environmental Affairs
4. Applicable course work completed in special student
or nondegree status will be accepted toward meeting
degree requirements.
5. No more than 30 credit hours of appropriate transfer
credit from another accredited institution may be applied
toward this degree.
6. Courses taken on the Pass/Fail option can be applied
only as electives in meeting degree requirements. In no
case can more than two Pass/Fail courses be applied
toward this degree.
7. To avoid loss of credit and other problems, students
must apply for admission to the associate degree program
prior to completing 35 credit hours of course work
creditable toward the degree (excluding ROTC credit
awarded through military service).
8. Students must complete associate degree
requirements before attaining senior status (86 credit
hours) to be eligible for awarding of an associate degree.
9. All credit of candidates for the Associate of Science
degree, except for the current semester, must be on
record at least six weeks prior to the conferring of
degrees.
10. Application for the Associate of Science degree must
be filed with the division recorder.
5. Quantitative Methods (1 course) One course from one
of the following subject areas: computer science, statistics,
mathematics (100 level or higher).
Students are responsible for planning their own programs
and for meeting degree requirements. It is the student's
responsibility to understand fully, and to comply with, all
the provisions of this publication. However, faculty and
staff advising services are available to assist all students
with their academic planning.
Degree Policies
Students admitted under previous requirements have the
option of completing the degree under the requirements in
effect at the time of their admission.
Curriculum
General Education Requirements
1. Communication (3 courses)
•
•
•
ENG W131 Elementary Composition I (3 cr.)
ENG W231 Professional Writing Skills (3 cr.)
One course in speech (3 cr.)
2. Arts and Humanities (1 course). A course from one
of the following subject areas (excluding courses used to
satisfy other degree requirements): Afro-American studies,
classical studies, comparative literature, English, fine
arts, folklore, foreign languages and literatures, history
(HIST H105 or HIST H106 recommended), musicology
and music history, philosophy, religious studies, speech,
theatre and drama.
3. Social and Behavioral Sciences (2 courses)
One course each from two of the following subject
areas (excluding courses used to satisfy other degree
requirements): anthropology, economics, geography,
journalism, linguistics, political science, psychology,
sociology (PSY P101 and SOC S161 recommended).
4. Natural Sciences (1 course) One course from one
of the following subject areas (excluding courses used to
satisfy other degree requirements): anatomy, physiology,
astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, physics, zoology.
6. Public Affairs and Policy (1 course) SPEA V170 Intro
to Public Affairs (3 cr.)
7. Criminal Justice Concentration (6 courses)
•
SPEA J101 American Criminal Justice System (3
cr.)
•
SPEA J102 Special Issues in the American
Criminal Justice System (3 cr.)
Three of the following courses:
•
SPEA J301 Substantive Criminal Law (3 cr.)
•
SPEA J306 The Criminal Courts (3 cr.)
•
SPEA J321 American Policing (3 cr.)
•
SPEA J331 Corrections (3 cr.)
One additional SPEA criminal justice courses (3 cr.)
8. General Electives: Sufficient additional courses
beyond the general education, core, and concentration
requirements are needed to meet the Associate of
Science degree requirement of 60 credit hours.
Bachelor Degrees
The School of Public and Environmental Affairs offers
three Bachelor of Science degree programs. The degrees
are the Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice, Bachelor
of Science in Health Services Management and the
Bachelor of Science in Public Affairs with concentrations
in Criminal Justice, Management, Health Services
Administration, Environmental Policy and Public Affairs
Specialized.
1. A minimum of 120 credit hours distributed to meet
degree requirements with a cumulative grade point
average of 2.0 for all course work completed is
required.
2. A grade point average of at least 2.3 in SPEA core
and concentration courses is required.
3. No more than 90 credit hours of transfer credit from
another accredited institution may be applied toward
the bachelor degree.
4. With permission of the School of Public and
Environmental Affairs, credit earned through an
accredited on-line program and/or by special credit
examination may be applied toward the bachelor
degree.
5. Courses taken on the Pass/Fail option can only be
applied as electives in meeting degree requirements.
In no case can more than eight Pass/Fail courses be
used in meeting degree requirements.
6. Credit work for this degree can be completed at any
campus of Indiana University.
7. Candidates for degrees must file an application for
graduation with the SPEA recorder in accordance
with specific campus graduation procedure where
the degree is being awarded. Application should
be filled at least six weeks prior to the conferring of
degrees.
Second Bachelor’s Degree
A student who already has a bachelor’s degree may be
admitted to candidacy for a second bachelor’s degree.
When such admission for a second degree is granted,
School of Public and Environmental Affairs
the candidate must earn at least 30 additional credit
hours as a student enrolled in SPEA and meet all the
requirements of the SPEA degree being sought. Normally,
the holder of a bachelor’s degree who wishes to pursue
further education is encouraged to become qualified for
admission to graduate study.
SPEA J222 Murder: Causes and Consequences (3 cr.)
SPEA J312 White Collar Crime (3 cr.)
SPEA J370 Sex Crimes and Offenders (3 cr.)
SPEA J370 Serial Murders (3 cr.)
5. Advanced Math Reasoning Course (3 cr.)
Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice
One of the following courses:
The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice provides
preparation for students interested primarily in a career
in criminal justice. The program includes four main areas:
general education, public affairs and policy, criminal
justice, and general electives.
SPEA K300 Statistical Techniques (3 cr.)
ECON E270 Introduction to Statistical Theory for
Economics and Business (3 cr.)
General Education
One of the following courses:
The General Education requirements are based on five (5)
principles. These principles guide undergraduate students
in their educational experience at Indiana University
Northwest and the School of Public and Environmental
Affairs. By fulfilling these requirements, students will
have an opportunity to develop effective learning and
communication skills (principle 1 requirements), a mastery
of core concepts in a broad range of disciplines (Principle
2), the ability to analyze and synthesize information
(Principle 3), an awareness of diversity (Principle 4),and
ethical consideration (Principle 5).
89
6. Advanced Scientific Reasoning Course (3 cr.)
SPEA E272 Intro to Environmental Science (3 cr.)
SPEA H322 Principles of Epidemiology (3 Cr.)
SPEA J215 Concepts of Forensic Science (3 cr.)
7. Information Literacy (3 cr.)
One of the following courses:
SPEA J202 Criminal Justice Data, Methods and
Resources
SPEA V468 Research Methods in Applied Social
Sciences (3 cr.)
8. Learning Technologies course (3 cr.)
Principle 1 Foundations for Effective Learning and
Communication (11 courses)
All students are required to take:
ENG W131 Elementary Composition (3 cr.)
SPCH S121 Public Speaking (3 cr.)
In addition, all students must complete the following
requirements under Principle 1:
1. Mathematics (3 cr.)
One of the following courses:
MATH M100 Basic Mathematics (3 cr.)
MATH M118 Finite Mathematics (3 cr.)
MATH M119 Survey of Calculus I (3 cr.)
MATH M125 Precalculus Mathematics (3 cr.)
2. Natural Science Class with Lab (4-6 cr.)
BIOL L100 Humans and the Biological World (5)
CHEM C101 Elementary Chemistry I (3 cr.)
CHEM C121 Elementary Chemistry Laboratory I (2 cr.)
GEOL G101 Introduction to Earth Science (3 cr.)
GEOL G102 Introduction to Earth Science Laboratory I
(1 cr.)
3. Intensive Writing Courses (6 cr.)
ENG W231 Professional Writing (3 cr.) Required
One of the following courses:
SPEA J275 Diversity Issues in Criminal Justice (3 cr.)
SPEA J439 Crime and Public Policy (3 cr.) (See course
description for prerequisite)
4. Advanced Oral Communication Course (3 cr.)
One of the following courses:
SPEA J201 Theoretical Foundation of Criminal Justice
(3 cr.)
SPEA V261 Computers in Public Affairs (3 cr.)
Principle 2 Breadth of Learning
1. Arts & Humanities (6 cr.)
Two of the following courses:
HIST H105 American History I (3 cr.)
HIST H106 American History II (3 cr.)
AFRO A150 Survey of the Culture of Black Americans
(3 cr.)
AFRO A151 Minority People in the United States (3 cr.)
ANTH A104 Culture & Society (3 cr.)
PHIL P100 Introduction to Philosophy (3 cr.)
PHIL P140 Introduction to Ethics (3 cr.)
PHIL P150 Elementary Logic (3 cr.)
WOST W401 Topics in Women's and Gender Studies
(3 cr.)
*2. Cultural & Historical Studies (6 cr.)
Two classes from approved College of Arts and Science
list* of classes, not including H105 and H106
3. Social & Behavioral Sciences (6 cr.)
Two of the following courses:
SOC S161 Principles of Sociology (3 cr.)
SOC S163 Social Problems (3 cr.)
SOC S320 Deviant Behavior & social Control (3 cr.)
SOC S325 Criminology (3 cr.)
*4. Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences (3 cr.)
One class from approved College of Arts and Sciences
list; in addition to the natural science class under Principle
1.
Principle 3 Critical Thinking, Integration, and Application of
Knowledge (One Course)
90
School of Public and Environmental Affairs
SPEA J439 Crime and Public Policy (3 cr.) (see course
description for prerequisite)
Principle 4 Diversity (One Course)
SPEA J275 Diversity Issues in Criminal Justice
Principle 5 Ethics & Citizenship (One Course)
One of the following courses:
SPEA J202 Criminal Justice Data, Methods &
Resources (3cr.)
SPEA V252 Career Development and Planning (3 cr.)
Public Affairs and Policy (4 courses)
Four courses from the following:
SPEA E272 Intro to Environmental Science (3 cr.)
SPEA V170 Intro to Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA V252 Career Development and Planning (3 cr.)
SPEA V263 Public Management (3 cr.)
SPEA V264 Urban Structure and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA V348 Management Science (3 cr.)
SPEA V365 Urban Development and Planning (3 cr.)
SPEA V366 Managing Behavior in Public Organizations
(3 cr.)
SPEA V372 Government Finance and Budgets (3 cr.)
SPEA V376 Law and Public Policy (3 cr.)
Other Public Affairs Courses (with advisor's consent)
General Education
The General Education requirements are based on five (5)
principles. These principles guide undergraduate students
in their educational experience at Indiana University
Northwest and the School of Public and Enviornmental
Affairs. By fulfilling these requirements students will
have an opportunity to develop effective learning and
communication skills (Principle 1), a mastery of core
concepts in a broad range of disciplines (Principle 2), the
ability to analyze and synthesize information (Principle
3), an awareness of diversity (Principle 4), and ethical
considerations (Principle 5).
Principle 1 Foundations for Effective Learning and
Communication (11 courses)
All students are required to take:
• ENG W131 Elementary Composition (3 cr.)
• SPCH S121 Public Speaking (3 cr.)
In addition, all students must complete the following
requirements under Principle 1:
1. Mathematics (3 cr.)
One of the following courses:
•
•
•
•
Concentration (12 courses)
All of the following courses:
SPEA J101 American Criminal Justice System (3 cr.)
SPEA J102 Special Issues in the American Criminal
Justice System (3 cr.)
SPEA J201 Theoretical Foundations of Criminal Justice
Policies (3 cr.)
SPEA J202 Criminal Justice Data, Methods, and
Resources (3 cr.)
SPEA J301 Substantive criminal Law (3 cr.)
SPEA J306 The Criminal Courts (3 cr.)
SPEA J321 American Policing (3 cr.)
SPEA J331 Corrections (3 cr.)
SPEA J439 Crime and Public Policy (3 cr.) (see course
description for prequisite)
Three additional courses in criminal justice
General Electives (approximately 7 courses)
Students must take additional courses beyond the
requirements listed above to meet the minimum B.S.
degree requirements of 120 credit hours.
*The College of Arts and Sciences list of classes can be
obtained from the School of Public and Environmental
Affairs or retrieved from the SPEA website.
Bachelor of Science in Health Services
Management
The Bachelor of Science in Health Services Management
provides preparation for students interested primarily in
careers in the health field. Studenst will be prepared for
management positions within hospitals, nursing homes,
healthcare facilities or nonprofit agencies.
MATH M118 Finite Mathematics (3 cr.)
MATH M119 Survey of Calculus I (3 cr.)
MATH M125 Precalculus Mathematics (3 cr.)
MATH M215 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I (5
cr.)
2. Natural Science Class (4-6 cr.)
One course with a lab from biology or chemistry
3. Intensive Writing Courses (6 cr.)
Both of the following courses:
•
•
ENG W231 Professional Writing (3 cr.)
SPEA V450 Health Disparities (3 cr.)
4. Advanced Oral Communication Course (3 cr.)
One of the following courses:
•
•
•
SPCH S223 Business and Professional Speaking (3
cr.)
SPCH S229 Discussion and Group Methods (3 cr.)
SPEA V263 Public Management (3 cr.)
5. Advanced Math Reasoning Course (3 cr.)
•
SPEA K300 Statistical Techniques (3 cr.)
6. Advanced Scientific Reasoning Course (3 cr.)
•
SPEA H322 Principles of Epidemiology (3 Cr.)
7. Information Literacy (3 cr.)
One of the following courses:
•
•
SPEA V450 Health Disparities (3 cr.)
Approved Research Methods class (3 cr.)
8. Learning Technologies course (3 cr.)
•
SPEA V261 Computers in Public Affairs (3 cr.)
Principle 2 Breadth of Learning
School of Public and Environmental Affairs
1. Arts & Humanities (6 cr.)
Both of the following:
•
•
HIST H105 American History I (3 cr.)
HIST H106 American History II (3 cr.)
*2. Cultural & Historical Studies (6 cr.)
Two classes from approved College of Arts and Science
list of classes, not including H105 and H106
3. Social & Behavioral Sciences (6 cr.)
Two of the following
•
•
•
POLS Y103 Introduction to American Politics
ECON E103 Introduction to Microeconomics
ECON E104 Introduction to Macroeconomics
*4. Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences (3 cr.)
One class from approved College of Arts and Sciences list
of classes; in addition to the natural science class under
Principle 1
Principle 3 Critical Thinking, Integration, and Application of
Knowledge (One Course)
•
SPEA H474 Health Administration Ethics Seminar (3
cr.)
Principle 4 Diversity (One Course)
•
SPEA H320 Health Systems Administration (3 cr.)
Principle 5 Ethics & Citizenship (One Course)
One of the following courses:
•
•
SPEA V450 Medical Ethics (3 cr.)
SPEA H441 Legal Aspects of Health Care
Management Core (4 courses)
The following courses:
•
•
•
•
SPEA V263 Public Management (3 cr.)
SPEA V346 Introduction to Government Accounting
and Financial Reporting (3 cr.)
SPEA V348 Management Science (3 cr.)
SPEA V366 Managing Behavior in Public
Organizations (3 cr.)
Health Service Management Concentration (9 courses)
The following courses:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SPEA H316 Environmental Health (3 cr.)
SPEA H320 Health Systems Administration (3 cr.)
SPEA H322 Principles of Epidemiology (3 cr.)
SPEA H352 Health Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.)
SPEA H371 Human Resource Management in
Health Care (3 cr.)
SPEA H402 Hospital Administration (3 cr.)
SPEA H411 Chronic and Long-Term Care
Administration (3 cr.)
SPEA H441 Legal Aspects of Health Care
Administration (3 cr.)
SPEA H445 Topics in Public Health (3 cr.)
Electives: Students must take additional courses beyond
the requirements listed above to meet the minimum B.S.
degree requirement of 120 credit hours.
91
*The College of Arts and Sciences list of classes can be
obtained from the School of Public and Environmental
Affairs or retrieved from the SPEA website.
Bachelor of Science in Public Affairs
The Bachelor of Science in Public Affairs degree program
provides students with the knowledge, skills, and abilities
to prepare them for a variety of career opportunities
in the public sector, nonprofit sector and allied fields.
Areas of study include management, criminal justice,
health services administration, environmental policy and
specialized study in public and environmental affairs.
Curriculum
General Education
The General Education requirements are based on five (5)
principles. These principles guide undergraduate students
in their educational experience at Indiana University
Northwest and the School of Public and Environmental
Affairs. By fulfilling these requirements students will
have an opportunity to develop effective learning and
communication skills (principle 1 requirements), a mastery
of core concepts in a broad range of disciplines (Principle
2), the ability to analyze and synthesize information
(Principle 3), an awareness of diversity (Principle 4) and
ethical consideration (Principle 5).
Principle 1 Foundations for Effective Learning and
Communication (11 courses)
All students are required to take:
ENG W131 Elementary Composition (3 cr.)
SPCH S121 Public Speaking (3 cr.)
In addition, all students must complete the following
requirements under Principle 1:
1. Mathematics (3 cr.)
One of the following courses:
MATH M118 Finite Mathematics (3 cr.)
MATH M119 Survey of Calculus I (3 cr.)
MATH M125 Precalculus Mathematics (3 cr.)
MATH M215 Analytic Geometry and Calculus (3 cr.)
2. Natural Science Class with Lab (4-6 cr.)
One course with a lab from biology, chemistry, geology,
or physics.
3. Intensive Writing Courses (6 cr.)
Both of the following courses:
ENG W231 Professional Writing (3 cr.)
SPEA V368 Managing Government Operations (3 cr.)
4. Advanced Oral Communication Course (3 cr.)
One of the following courses:
SPCH S223 Business and Professional Speaking (3 cr.)
SPCH S229 Discussion and Group Methods (3 cr.)
SPEA V373 Human Resources Mangement in the
Public Sector (3 cr.)
SPEA V346 Introduction to Government Accounting and
Financial Reporting (3 cr.)
5. Advanced Math Reasoning Course (3 cr.)
92
School of Public and Environmental Affairs
SPEA K300 Statistical Techniques (3 cr.)
6. Advanced Scientific Reasoning Course (3 cr.)
One of the following courses:
SPEA E272 Intro to Environmental Science (3 cr.)
SPEA H322 Principles of Epidemiology (3 Cr.)
SPEA V170 Intro to Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA V263 Public Management (3 cr.)
SPEA V264 Urban Structure and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA V372 Government Finance and Budgets (3 cr.)
SPEA V376 Law and Public Policy (3 cr.)
Concentrations
7. Information Literacy (3 cr.)
One of the following courses:
SPEA J202 Criminal Justice Data, Methods and
Resources (3 cr.)
Approved Research Methods class (3 cr.)
8. Learning Technologies course (3 cr.)
SPEA V261 Computers in Public Affairs (3 cr.)
Principle 2 Breadth of Learning (9 courses)
1. Arts & Humanities (6 cr.)
Both of the following:
HIST H105 American History I (3 cr.)
HIST H106 American History II (3 cr.)
*2. Cultural & Historical Studies (6 cr.)
Two classes from approved College of Arts and Science
list* of classes, not including H105 and H106
3. Social & Behavioral Sciences (6 cr.)
Two of the following courses:
POLS Y103 Introduction to American Politics (3 cr.)
ECON E103 Introduction to Microeconomics (3 cr.)
ECON E104 Introduction to Macroeconomics (3 cr.)
*4. Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences (3 cr.)
One class from approved College of Arts and Sciences
list; in addition to the natural science class under Principle
1.
Principle 3 Critical Thinking, Integration, and Application of
Knowledge (One Course)
One of the following:
SPEA J439 Crime and Public Policy (3 cr.)
Other approved SPEA class (3 cr.)
Principle 4 Diversity (One Course)
One of the following:
SPEA E272 Intro to Environmental Sciences (3 cr.)
SPEA V450 Health Services Utilization (3 cr.)
Other approved SPEA class (3 cr.)
Principle 5 Ethics & Citizenship (One Course)
One of the following courses:
SPEA V450 Medical Ethics (3cr.)
SPEA H441 Legal Aspects of Health Care (3 cr.)
SPEA J321 American Policing (3 cr.)
Public Affairs Core (6 courses)
SPEA E272 Intro to Environmental Science. (3 cr.)
Criminal Justice Concentration (7 courses)
Requirements
SPEA J101 The American Criminal Justice System (3
cr.)
The following courses:
SPEA J201 Theoretical Foundations of Criminal Justice
Policies (3 cr.)
SPEA J202 Criminal Justice Data, Methods, and
Resources (3 cr.)
SPEA J301 Substantive Criminal Law (3 cr.) or SPEA
J302 Procedural Criminal Law (3 cr.)
SPEA J439 Crime and Public Policy (3 cr.)
Two of the following three courses:
SPEA J306 The Criminal Courts (3 cr.)
SPEA J321 American Policing (3 cr.)
SPEA J331 Corrections (3 cr.)
Management Concentration (6 courses) Requirements
Students will take the following courses:
SPEA V346 Introduction to Government Accounting and
Financial Reporting (3 cr.)
SPEA V366 Managing Behavior in Public Organizations
(3 cr.)
SPEA V368 Managing Government Operations (3 cr.)
Any three SPEA courses selected with consent of
advisor.
Health Services Administration Concentration (6
courses) Requirements
The following three courses:
SPEA H320 Health Systems Administration (3 cr.)
SPEA H352 Health Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.)
SPEA H441 Legal Aspects of Health Care
Administration (3 cr.)
Three of the following courses with the consent of the
advisor:
SPEA H316 Environmental Health (3 cr.)
SPEA H322 Principles of Epidemiology (3 cr.)
SPEA H371 Human Resource Management in Health
Care (3 cr.)
SPEA V375 Emergency Services Administration (3 cr.)
SPEA H402 Hospital Administration (3 cr.)
SPEA H474 Health Administration Ethics Seminar (3
cr.)
Specialized Public Affairs Concentration (6 courses)
Requirements
A specialized concentration adaptable to the student's
interest.
School of Public and Environmental Affairs
93
Four of the six courses in the concentration must be
SPEA courses.
All courses in the concentration (SPEA and nonSPEA)
must be at the 300 or 400 level.
Students must have their advisor's approval for the
concentration and the courses selected.
study public policy, governmental organization, and public
management skills in addition to the major area of their
undergraduate programs. The program is interdisciplinary,
and students from any department or school of Indiana
University are eligible.
Environmental Policy Concentration (6 courses)
Requirements
The Area Certificate in Public Affairs requires a total of 27
credit hours, of which SPEA must teach at least 15 but no
more than 21 credit hours. (Each course carries 3 credit
hours.) To be eligible for a certificate, Indiana University
students must complete the following requirements in
addition to satisfying all degree requirements for the
baccalaureate degree program of their choice:
The following courses:
SPEA E400 Topics in Environmental Studies:
Environmental Law
SPEA E400 Topics in Environmental Studies:
Environmental Planning
SPEA H316 Environmental Health
Any other three SPEA courses selected with consent of
the advisor.
Note: Electives: Students must take additional courses
beyond the requirements listed above to meet the
minimum B.S. degree requirement of 120 credit hours
*The College of Arts and Sciences list of classes can be
obtained from the School of Public and Environmental
Affairs or retrieved from the SPEA website.
Certificate in Public Health
The Certificate in Public Health is available to
undergraduate students in all divisions of the university.
The curriculum provides a basic understanding of
environmental health issues, current health policies,
the structure of the medical care delivery system,
administration techniques used in health-related facilities,
and methods of determining the significance of various
factors on health.
Student Consumer Information about this Program (online)
Requirements
All of the following:
•
•
•
One course each from two of the following groups:
Organizational Behavior
•
•
•
•
Requirements
All of the following three courses:
•
•
•
SPEA H316 Environmental Health (3 cr.)
SPEA H320 Health Systems Administration (3 cr.)
SPEA H322 Principles of Epidemiology (3 cr.)
Three of the following:
•
•
•
•
•
SPEA H342 Community Health Education (3 cr.)
SPEA H416 Environmental Health Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA H441 Legal Aspects of Hospital Health Care
Administration (3 cr.)
SPEA V450 Contemporary Issues in Public AffairsHealth Topics (3 cr.)
SPEA E400 Topics in Environmental Studies (3 cr.)
Other approved planning, management, and policy
courses related to health
Area Certificate in Public Affairs
The School of Public and Environmental Affairs offers the
Area Certificate in Public Affairs to students wishing to
SPEA-J 310 Introduction to Administrative Process
(3 cr.)
SPEA-V 270 Survey of Administrative Techniques (3
cr.)
BUS-Z 302 Managing and Behavior in Organizations
(3 cr.)
POLS-Y 390 Micropolitics and Organizational
Behavior (3 cr.)
Public Administration
•
Student Consumer Information about this Program (online)
The Certificate in Public Health requires 18 credit hours,
including three required courses and three courses
from a list of health-related courses. To be eligible for
the certificate, students must complete the following
requirements in addition to all requirements for the
baccalaureate degree program of their choice.
SPEA-E 272 Intro to Environmental Science (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 170 Intro to Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 264 Urban Structure and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 366 Managing Behavior in Public
Organizations (3 cr.)
Law
•
•
•
•
SPEA-V 376 Law and Public Policy (3 cr.)
POLS-Y 304 / POLS-Y 305 American Constitutional
Law I and II (3/3 cr.)
BUS-L 201 Legal Environment of Business (3 cr.)
SPEA-J 301 Substantive criminal Law (3 cr.)
Four courses from one of the following categories:
School of Public and Environmental Affairs
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SPEA-V 260 Topics in Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 346 Introduction to Government Accounting
and Financial Reporting (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 348 Management Science (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 365 Urban Development and Planning (3
cr.)
SPEA-V 372 Government Finance and Budgets (3
cr.)
SPEA-V 373 Human Resource Management in the
Public Sector (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 432 Labor Relations in the Public Sector (3
cr.)
SPEA-V 442 Topics in Fiscal Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 444 Public Administrative Organization (3
cr.)
SPEA-V 449 Applied Policy Analysis (3 cr.)
94
School of Public and Environmental Affairs
•
•
SPEA-V 450 Contemporary Issues in Public Affairs
(3 cr.)
SPEA-V 472 Policy Processes in the U.S. (3 cr.)
Political Science
•
•
•
•
POLS-Y 200 Citizen and the Courts (3 cr.) (This
is a topics in political science course. The only
acceptable topic is "Citizen and the Courts.")
POLS-Y 302 Public Bureaucracy in Modern Society
(3 cr.)
POLS-Y 306 State Politics in the United States (3
cr.)
POLS-Y 394 Public Policy Analysis (3 cr.)
Criminal Justice
•
•
•
SPEA-J 101 American Criminal Justice System (3
cr.)
SPEA-J 322 Introduction to Criminalistics (3 cr.)
SPEA-J 370 Social Control Systems (3 cr.) (This
is a seminar in criminal justice course. The only
acceptable topic is "Social Control Systems.")
Sociology
• SOC-S 320 Deviance and Control (3 cr.)
• SOC-S 325 Criminology (3 cr.)
• SOC-S 461 Urban Sociology (3 cr.)
• SOC-S 424 Sociology of Law (3 cr.)
Certificate in Public Safety
The Certificate in Public Safety offers a broad overview
of law enforcement and its relationship to the other
elements in the criminal justice process. It is useful to
sworn and nonsworn personnel, as well as to those
seeking employment in law enforcement. The certificate
also provides excellent transition into the Associate of
Science in Criminal Justice and the Bachelor of Science in
Criminal Justice degree programs.
Student Consumer Information about this Program (online)
General Education (9 cr.)
•
•
•
ENG-W 131 Elementary Composition I (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 121 Public Speaking (3 cr.)
PSY-P 101 Introduction to Psychology I (3 cr.) OR
SOC-S 161 Principles of Sociology (3 cr.)
Criminal Justice (18 cr.)
•
•
•
•
•
•
SPEA-J 101 American Criminal Justice System (3
cr.)
SPEA-J 301 Substantive Criminal Law (3 cr.)
SPEA-J 310 Introduction to Administrative Process
(3 cr.)
SPEA-J 321 American Policing (3 cr.)
SPEA-J 320 Criminal Investigation (3 cr.) OR SPEAJ 322 Criminalistics (3 cr.)
SPEA-J 370 Seminar in Criminal Justice (3 cr.)
Minors
Minor in Criminal Justice
Requirements (Five courses)
•
•
SPEA J101 American Criminal Justice System (3 cr.)
SPEA J301 Substantive Criminal Law (3 cr.)
Three of the following courses:
•
•
•
•
SPEA J201 Theoretical Foundations of Criminal
Justice Policies (3 cr.)
SPEA J306 The Criminal Courts (3 cr.)
SPEA J321 American Policing (3 cr.)
SPEA J331 Corrections (3 cr.)
Minor in Environmental Science and Health
Requirements (Five courses)
The following courses:
•
•
SPEA-H 316 Environmental Health (3 cr.)
SPEA-H 416 Environmental Health Policy (3 cr.)
Three additional courses in environmental science and
health approved by a SPEA faculty advisor.
Minor in Health Systems Administration
Requirements (Five courses)
•
•
SPEA-H 320 Health Systems Administration (3 cr.)
SPEA-H 371 Human Resources Management
in Health Care (3 cr.) OR SPEA-V 373 Human
Resource Management in the Public Sector (3 cr.)
Three of the following courses:
•
•
•
•
•
SPEA-H 352 Health Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.)
SPEA-H 402 Hospital Administration (3 cr.)
SPEA-H 411 Chronic and Long-Term Care
Administration (3 cr.)
SPEA-H 441 Legal Aspects of Health Care
Administration (3 cr.)
SPEA-H 455 Topics in Public Health (3 cr.)
Pre-law Minor
Interdisciplinary Minor in the College of Arts and Sciences
(COAS), the School of Business and Economics, and the
School of Public and Environmental Affairs (SPEA).
Admission to law schools requires a baccalaureate degree
and a Law School Admission Test (LSAT) score. The
degree may be in any discipline. Students preparing
for law school are advised to take courses in logical
thought, American history, American politics, business,
and criminal and civil law. While no specific courses are
required, IU Northwest offers an interdisciplinary prelaw
minor for students interested in attending law school.
The minor includes six courses totaling 18 credits.
Students in SPEA, the School of Business and
Economics, and history majors in the College of Arts and
Sciences could double-count courses that are required for
their major or concentration, but they are required to take
at least four courses or 12 credits outside of their major or
concentration.
The structure of the minor is as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
BUS L201 Legal Environment of Business
HIST H106 American History II (Twentieth Century)
PHIL P150 Elementary Logic
POLS Y103 Introduction to American Politics
SPEA J101 American Criminal Justice System
One elective
Students may pick from the following courses for the
elective:
School of Public and Environmental Affairs
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
BUS A201 Introduction to Financial Accounting
BUS L303 The Commercial Law
ECON E103 Introduction to Microeconomics
HIST A313 Origins of Modern America
HIST A315 Recent U.S. History
HIST H105 American History I
SPEA H441 Legal Aspects of Health Care
SPEA J301 Substantive Criminal Law
SPEA J303 Evidence
The prelaw advisor can approve an elective that is not on
the list if it meets the educational objectives.
The university provides prelaw counseling for interested
students. Contact the prelaw advisor at (219) 980-6841 or
(219) 980-6636.
Minor in Public and Environmental Affairs
Requirements (Five courses)
•
SPEA-V 170 Intro to Public Affairs (3 cr.)
One of the following courses:
•
•
SPEA-E 162 Environment and People (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 272 Intro to Environmental Science (3 cr.)
Three of the following courses:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SPEA-E 400 Topics in Environmental Studies (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 263 Public Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 366 Managing Behavior in Public
Organizations (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 373 Human Resource Management in the
Public Sector (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 376 Law and Public Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 432 Labor Relations in the Public Sector (3
cr.)
SPEA-V 444 Public Administrative Organization (3
cr.)
SPEA-V 450 Contemporary Issues in Public Affairs
(3 cr.)
Graduate Studies
Master of Public Affairs
The graduate program of the Public and Environmental
Affairs consists of the Master of Public Affairs Degree
(M.P.A.).
95
government or quasi-governmental service and to broaden
comprehension of the economic, environmental, political,
and social context in which the public servant works.
The curriculum of this program as contained in the core
requirements encompasses preparation in a broad range
of skills relevant to the operation of public agencies. It
is, therefore, interdisciplinary, based on the academic
disciplines, but not limited to any one; it is also problemoriented, bringing the disciplines to bear on critical social,
environmental, economic, and administrative conditions.
Although the environment of public service is diverse and
changing, effectiveness in that environment requires the
development of special skills attained through detailed
study in a chosen field of concentration. The fields of
concentration span the variety of professional specialties
found in public service. Thus, the program provides both
expertise in a specific concentration area and in the core
requirements, and a general working knowledge of public
affairs.
Admission to the M.P.A. Program
Students that entered MPA Program prior to Fall 2013,
please refer to Academic Bulletin 2010-12.
Application
The prospective student should complete and return
application packet to the following address:
Indiana University Northwest
School of Public and Environmental Affairs
Graduate Program Committee
3400 Broadway
Gary, IN 46408
Application Fee
A nonrefundable application fee of $40 is required of all
applicants.
Application Requirements
For more information on SPEA’s graduate programs and
for questions regarding the application process, please
call 219-980-6695.
The following items should be compiled and submitted
in one final packet if you wish to pursue your graduate
career.
1. Graduate Application and Residency Form
The mission of the School of Public and Environmental
Affairs Masters of Public Affairs Program is to sustain a
diverse collaborative community of learning that provides
professional education to develop ethical, motivated,
and effective leaders and to impact our changing region,
nation, and world through community engagement and
research.
2. Official copy of transcripts from undergraduate
institution and/or graduate institution you have attended:
The Master of Public Affairs (M.P.A.) program, which is
fully accredited by the National Association of Schools
of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA), is an
integrated course of study that requires a minimum
of 48 credit hours. The program provides knowledge
and experience that can be used by the professional in
various roles within a changing public sector. It is also
an interdisciplinary, professional program drawing on
diverse faculty talents and resources. The goal of the
program is to equip the individual with the necessary
skills and knowledge to enter local, state, or federal
**Students who have taken another graduate exam (such
as the LSAT or GMAT) may submit evidence indicating
their score was in the 50 percentile or higher.
- Student must have an overall cumulative GPA of 3.0
-OR Student will need to take the GRE and score in the 50
percentile or higher
3. Resume or Curriculum Vitae
4. Writing Sample
5. Letter of Intent
6. 3 letters of reference sealed and sent to student for final
packet
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School of Public and Environmental Affairs
7. Submit check or money order in the amount of $40.
Make all checks payable to Indiana University Northwest
Baccalaureate Degree
Certification of a baccalaureate degree is required for
entrance into the M.P.A. Program. Although the student
may not have completed the undergraduate work at the
time of application, a decision will be made on the strength
of the student's work at the time of application. However,
a final transcript, showing baccalaureate degree must
become a part of the permanent record before the student
can be formally admitted.
Application References
Students should ask three individuals who are familiar
with their activities and potential to fill out an Application
Reference Form. These forms will be provided with the
application form.
Validity
Following notice of admission, an applicant has one
calendar year in which to enroll. Supplementary transcripts
of any academic work undertaken during that period are
required, and the division may request additional letters
of recommendation. Should the updated material prove
unsatisfactory, the admission may be canceled. If the
applicant fails to enroll within one year, a complete new
application is required.
Examinations for Admission
SPEA considers results from the GRE, GMAT or LSAT,
but the GRE is most common among our applicants.
Preparing to take the test and getting official test scores
can be a lengthy process, so plan accordingly.
Admission Committee
Each application, with accompanying transcripts and
other documents, is considered carefully by the graduate
program committee for the appropriate degree. While
the applicant's undergraduate scholastic performance is
the most significant index of ability to do graduate work,
the test scores, recommendations, writing samples and
the student's letter of intent can weigh heavily in the final
decision of the admission committee. The aim is to select
those applicants who can successfully complete graduate
study and be effective in public affairs.
Degree Policies and Procedures
Graduation Requirements
It is the responsibility of students to be certain that their
graduation or other academic requirements are met. The
graduate office will keep a record of the student's progress
and will aid in program planning.
Non-degree Students
Graduate non-degree students make take up to 12
graduate SPEA credits. These courses may not
necessarily be used toward the Certiticate or the MPA
programs. Financial Aid is not offered for non-degree
candidates.
Grade of Incomplete
An Incomplete indicates that the work is satisfactory as of
the end of the semester but has not yet been completed.
This grade may be awarded only when the student's work
is of passing quality and upon evidence that personal
hardship would render it unjust to hold that student to
the time limits previously fixed for the completion of the
work. Normally, faculty members are reluctant to give the
grade of Incomplete. One calendar year is allowed for the
removal of an Incomplete unless the chairperson of the
graduate program authorizes an adjustment of this period
due to exceptional circumstances. If those procedures are
not followed, the I is changed to F.
Grade Average, Provisional, and
Probationary Status
Students may be admitted on a provisional basis for
particular reasons, such as deficiencies in certain areas.
The provisional status will be removed upon fulfillment
of the stipulated conditions. A cumulative grade point
average of 3.0 (A=4.0) or higher for all work taken for
graduate credit must be earned as a prerequisite for
continuation in good standing and for graduation. Students
whose cumulative grade point average falls below 3.0 will
be placed on probation. To be removed from probation,
students either placed on probation or admitted on a
provisional basis are required to attain an average of at
least 3.0 for all graduate work completed by the end of the
next semester of full- time enrollment or its equivalent (12
credit hours). Failure to do so will be cause for dismissal.
Petitioning Procedures
A student may find it necessary to petition the Graduate
Program Committee relative to such matters as dismissal,
requirements, transfers, class load, etc. Such requests
must be presented in writing to the Graduate Program
Committee.
Midcareer Options
The purpose of the midcareer option of the Master
of Public Affairs graduate program is to enhance the
professional capabilities of those with previous training
or experience in public service. It is a program capable
of being specially designed to meet the educational and
professional needs of the individual.
Some administrators are engaged in professional
capacities requiring deeper understanding of certain
specialties. Others with considerable experience in a
specialization may wish to broaden their knowledge and
perspectives. The midcareer option can accommodate
those needs.
Credit waiver may be granted to midcareer option
students for significant administrative or policy-level work
experience. This work experience may be of a managerial
nature or may be in program or policy development (which
may or may not include experience in management,
e.g., as a planner). The work experience need not
necessarily be with a governmental agency. Many
private and quasi-public organizations have significant
governmental contacts. Furthermore, much managementlevel experience in the private sector is applicable to the
public sector.
Students wishing to take full advantage of the midcareer
option should apply as soon as regular admission to
the program has been granted. The Graduate Program
Committee makes a determination of Program eligibility
for the midcareer option for each applicant. Students
granted the midcareer option for more than 6 credit
hours may not take SPEA V585 Practicum in Public
Affairs for credit. Decisions about the midcareer option
are made separately from decisions about transfer of
credit. Under no circumstances will the midcareer option
School of Public and Environmental Affairs
and the transfer of credit total more than 21 credit hours
of the 48 credit hour degree requirement. Students
receiving the midcareer option should carefully plan their
programs in consultation with an advisor as early as
possible. Certification of the plan of study by the advisor is
necessary.
Transfer Credit from other Graduate
Programs
Previous graduate credit from other schools at Indiana
University or other universities may be accepted toward
a degree in the Master of Public Affairs program up to
a total of 9 credit hours. The particular courses to be
awarded credit will be arranged with the director of the
division. A Transferof-Credit Form must be completed,
and approval must be granted for each course for which
transfer credit is desired. This is true both for previous
work at Indiana University, outside the Division of Public
and Environmental Affairs and Political Science, and for
graduate work at other institutions. Courses outside the
division planned in conjunction with the chairperson of the
graduate program for the student's course of study need
not be petitioned.
General Scholarship Rule
Any student who does not possess the necessary
preliminary training or who lacks other qualifications may
be required by the division to enroll in such courses as the
division may designate or to take such other corrective
action as is necessary or desirable. The division may
review a student's record at any time and take whatever
actions seem necessary for the best interest of that
student or of the division.
Any student whose work is unsatisfactory or whose
conduct is unethical may be dismissed from the
division.
M.P.A. Degree Requirements
The Master of Public Affairs program requires a minimum
of 48 graduate credit hours and completion of (1) the
foundation requirement, (2) the core requirement, (3)
the experiential requirement, and (4) the concentration
requirement. The foundation requirement ensures that
each student has the requisite background in the areas of
computing, economics, government, and mathematics to
facilitate the mastery of core course material. No graduate
credit is given for work done to satisfy this requirement.
The core requirement consists of 21 credit hours of work
in six to seven courses, six of which are required of all
students pursuing an M.P.A. degree. The experiential
requirement ensures that each graduate of the M.P.A.
program has gained insight into the world of public service
by way of an experience outside the classroom involving
contact with prospective peers. This experience may
or may not involve the accumulation of credit hours
toward the degree. Each student must also complete
the requirements of one concentration, which consists of
18-21 credit hours of work. The remaining credit hours
necessary for graduation, if any, are general electives
that can be used to add breadth to a student's program;
to further explore a field of concentration; or to enhance
quantitative tools or administrative techniques.
Core Requirement
The M.P.A. core ensures that each student acquires both
the prerequisite analytical skills and an understanding of
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policy issues and governmental processes that compose
the environment within which graduates will pursue their
careers.
The following seven courses are required:
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SPEA V500 Quantitative Tools for Public Affairs (3
cr.)
SPEA V502 Public Management (3 cr.)
SPEA V506 Statistical Analysis for Policy and
Management (3 cr.)
SPEA V517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.)
SPEA V540 Law and Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA V560 Public Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.)
SPEA V600 Capstone in Public and Environmental
Affairs (3 cr.) (Must have 39 graduate credits and all
core requirements before enrolling in this course)
Total (21 cr.)
Unusually well-prepared applicants may petition the
program director to waive one or more of the core
requirements on the basis of advanced work done
elsewhere. Students may be exempted based on
satisfactory equivalent course work or by an examination.
Credit hours waived from the core will add to the electives
a student may use. Students requesting course waivers
should contact the appropriate program director for
requirements and guidelines.
Concentration Requirement
The concentrations following are designed to give the
student an educational experience in a substantive
area of the student's interest. The student chooses
a concentration in consultation with the director of
the M.P.A. program, and the course of study in the
concentration area is determined in conjunction with a
concentration advisor. All concentrations require at least
18-21 credit hours of course work. Up to 3 credit hours of
the concentration may be taken in SPEA V585 Practicum
in Public Affairs, if the concentration advisor approves the
field experience in advance. Concentration requirements
may be waived on the same basis as core requirements.
Criminal Justice Concentration
The criminal justice concentration is for those interested
in the issues, methods, and skills involved in the
management of criminal justice or related agencies.
Requirements
The following three courses:
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SPEA J501 Criminological Thought and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA V509 Administrative Ethics in the Public
Sector (3 cr.)
SPEA J502 Research Methods in Criminal Justice
and Public Affairs (3 cr.)
Select one of the following (3 cr.)
• SPEA J682 Planning and Management for Criminal
Justice and Public Safety (3 cr.)
• SPEA J666 Criminal Justice Policy and Evaluation (3
cr.)
Select two of the following (6 cr.)
• SPEA V504 Public Organizations (3 cr.)
• SPEA V512 Public Policy Process (3 cr.)
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School of Public and Environmental Affairs
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SPEA V539 Management Science for Public Affairs
(3 cr.)
SPEA V561 Public Human Resource Management
(3 cr.)
SPEA V566 Executive Leadership (3 cr.)
Total (18 cr.)
Health Services Administration
Concentration
The health services administration concentration is for
public administration students who plan to assume a
managerial position in the health services field. This
concentration affords the student the opportunity to study
policy, issues, and programs related to the health services
field.
Requirements
The following four courses:
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SPEA V504 Public Organizations (3 cr.)
SPEA V543 Health Services Management (3 cr.)
SPEA V545 The U.S. Health Care System (3 cr.)
SPEA V546 Health Services Utilization (3 cr.)
Select three of the following: (9 cr.)
• SPEA H514 Health Economics (3 cr.)
• SPEA H515 Health Policy Process (3 cr.)
• SPEA V550 Topics in Public Affairs: Health Topic (3
cr.)
• SPEA V522 Human Resource Management (3 cr.)
• SPEA V561 Public Human Resources Management
(3 cr.)
Total (21 cr.)
Nonprofit Management Concentration
The nonprofit management concentration prepares
persons for leadership positions in not-for-profit
organizations. The core requirements for the M.P.A.
degree provide a strong management and policy base.
The concentration offers students the opportunity to
develop this base through non-for-profit applications.
Most courses in the concentration address the unique
features and practices of not-for-profit organizations or the
policies affecting them. Supplementary courses available
in the concentration offer management techniques helpful
to nonprofit leaders.
Requirements (21 cr.)
The following seven courses:
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SPEA J502 Research Methods for Criminal Justice
and Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA V509 Administrative Ethics (3 cr.)
SPEA V512 Public Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA V521 The Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector (3
cr.)
SPEA V522 Human Resource Management in
Nonprofit Organizations (3 cr.)
SPEA V525 Management in Nonprofit
Organizations (3 cr.)
SPEA V526 Financial Management for Nonprofit
Organizations (3 cr.)
Select two of the following (6 cr.)
•
SPEA V504 Public Organizations (3 cr.)
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SPEA V539 Management Science for Public Affairs
(3)
SPEA V557 Proposal Development and Grant
Administration (3 cr.)
SPEA V558 Fund Development for Nonprofit
Organizations (3 cr.)
SPEA V562 Public Program Evaluation (3 cr.)
SPEA V566 Executive Leadership (3 cr.)
SPEA V602 Strategic Management for Public and
Nonprofit Organizations (3 cr.)
Total (21 cr.)
Public Management Concentration
The Public Management Concentration consists of a
structured program that facilitates the development of a
managerial perspective. The intent of the
curriculum is to ensure breadth of coverage across those
areas essential to a managerial career.
Requirements
The following four courses:
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SPEA V504 Public Organizations (3 cr.)
SPEA V539 Management Science for Public Affairs
(3)
SPEA V561 Public Human Resources Management
(3 cr.)
SPEA V566 Executive Leadership (3 cr.)
Select three of the following (9 cr.)
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SPEA V509 Administrative Ethics in the Public
Sector (3 cr.)
SPEA V512 Public Policy Process (3 cr.)
SPEA V562 Public Program Evaluation (3 cr.)
SPEA V525 Management in the Nonprofit Sector (3
cr.)
Total (21 cr.)
Cumulative Grade Point Average has to be 3.0 or
higher to graduate.
Certificate in Environmental Affairs
The Certificate in Environmental Affairs program is a 15
credit hour program of study in environmental affairs.
The program is flexible enough to adapt to the needs
of precareer or in-service persons and to individuals
with varying degrees of experience. Individuals currently
employed in industry, nonprofit organizations, and the
public sector in environmentally related positions who
have technical backgrounds but who see greater insight
and formal education on economic, policy, and legal
issues related to the critical environmental issues will find
the program particularly beneficial.
Required Courses (15 cr.)
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SPEA V517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.)
SPEA V520 Environmental Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA V645 Environmental Law (3 cr.)
Two additional SPEA graduate public affaris courses
are also requried (6 cr.)
If students are interested in furthering their education
in the MPA Progarm, students should plan to take
the following classes as electives:
• V500 Quantitative Tools for Public Affairs (3cr.)
About the Radiologic Sciences Programs
•
V539 Management Science for Public Affairs
(3 cr.)
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Certificate in Nonprofit Management
The Nonprofit Management Certificate is a 15 credit
hour program of study, designed to serve the needs of
individuals who would like exposure to the nonprofit sector
and nonprofit management issues but who do not wish or
need to pursue a degree in nonprofit management. The
certificate complements other courses of study or career
experience in such areas as social work, library science,
and parks and recreation. Students pursuing a nonprofit
management certificate gain an understanding of how to
work in and with nonprofit organizations.
Student Consumer Information about this Program
Required Courses (15 cr.)
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SPEA V525 Management In The Nonprofit Sector (3
cr.)
SPEA V522 Human Resource Management in
Nonprofits (3 cr.)
SPEA V526 Financial Management for Nonprofits (3
cr.)
Two additional SPEA graduate public affairs courses
are also required ( 6 cr.)
If students are interested in furthering their education
in the MPA program, students should plan to take
the following classes as electives:
• V500 Quantitative Tools for Public Affairs (3cr.)
• V517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.)
Note: Students must take V525 before V522.
Certificate in Public Management
The Certificate in Public Management is a focused 15
credit hour program of study in public management for
those students interested in a less extensive course of
study at the graduate level. The certificate program is
flexible enough to be adapted to the needs of precareer
and in-service individuals and can accommodate people
interested in a wide variety of public careers ranging from
social work to criminal justice to health administration.
The certificate is ideal for those persons in public and
community organizations or agencies who wish to
supplement their primary fields of professional or technical
competence, persons who are changing from professional
or technical roles to managerial roles in the public service,
career employees of public and community agencies who
are interested in studying a sequence of core courses in
public management, or students who wish to explore the
field of public management before committing themselves
to an extended degree program.
Candidates with a bachelor's degree are admitted to the
program from a variety of educational backgrounds.
Student Consumer Information about this Program
Required Courses (15 cr.)
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SPEA V502 Public Management (3 cr.)
SPEA V560 Public Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.)
SPEA V561 Public Human Resources Management
(3 cr.)
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Two additional SPEA graduate public affairs courses
are also required ( 6 cr.)
If students are interested in furthering their educatino
in the MPA program, students should plan to take
the following classes as electives:
• V500 Quantitative Tools for Public Affairs (3cr.)
• V517 Public Management Economics(3 cr.)
Radiologic Sciences Programs
Administrative Officers
Arlene M. Adler, M.Ed., R.T.(R), FAEIRS,
Robin J. Jones, M.S., R.T.(R),
Vesna Balac, B.S., R.T.(R), Lecturer
Sharon Lakia, M.S., R.T. (R) RDMS, RVT, Lecturer and
Director, Diagnostic Medical Sonography Program
Amanda G. Sorg, B.S., R.T. (R), Clinical Associate
Professor and Director, Radiation Therapy Program
Web site: www.iun.edu/radiologic-sciences/
Phone: (219) 980-6899
About the Radiologic Sciences Programs
Within the Department of Radiologic Sciences, interested
students can obtain an Associate of Science Degree
in Radiography or a Bachelor of Science Degree in
Radiologic Sciences. The AS Radiography Program
prepares students to be radiographers in the health
care environment. Radiographers are experts in the
performance of examinations requiring the use of Xrays and highly complex machinery to produce a quality
X-ray (radiograph) of the internal parts of the body for
interpretation by a medical doctor (radiologist).
The BS degree in Radiologic Sciences offers individuals
the opportunity to pursue three separate concentrationsan advanced clinical/health management concentration
for the associate degree radiographer, diagnostic medical
sonography, or radiation therapy. The diagnostic medical
sonography and radiation therapy programs are open to
individuals with either a health professional AS degree
background or a non-health professions background.
Among the options for advanced clinical experience for the
radiographer, are careers in cardiovascular interventional
technology, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic
resonance imaging (MRI). Cardiovascular interventional
technologists assist physicians in performing diagnostic
and therapeutic procedures of the cardiovascular system.
These procedures involve the injection of iodinated
contrast media to demonstrate diseases of the heart and
blood vessels. Computed tomography (CT) technologists
produce images of selected planes of the body by
combining the use of an X-ray beam and a computer.
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologists utilize a
magnetic field along with radio waves to create images of
patients' anatomy for interpretation by a physician.
Diagnostic medical sonographers are concerned with
the proper operation of the ultrasound equipment and
preparation of patients for various types of diagnostic
procedures. Upon request of a physician, they examine
various parts of the body by using sound waves.
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Associate of Science in Radiography
Radiation therapists use different forms of ionizing
radiation for the treatment of benign and malignant
tumors. They administer the prescribed dose of ionizing
radiation to specific sites of the patient's body as directed
by the physician.
Opportunities for Students to Work
Associate of Science in
Radiography
Program Facilities
About the A.S. in Radiography
Radiology is a science involving the medical use of Xrays, radium, and radioactive isotopes in the diagnosis
and treatment of disease. Radiographers are essential
members of the health care team. They are experts in the
performance of examinations requiring the use of X-rays
and highly complex machinery to produce a quality X-ray
image (radiograph) of the internal parts of the body for
interpretation by a medical doctor (radiologist).
Radiographers find employment possibilities in various
medical settings ranging from doctors' offices to large
medical centers. In addition, some seek employment in
industry or in the marketing and sales of X-ray products.
Length of the Program
24 months beginning in May. Professional course work
begins each July (summer session II).
Structure of the Program
Students often seek employment in part-time positions
outside the program. These positions cannot interfere with
clinical and class schedules and must be balanced with
necessary study time.
The Radiography Program offices and classrooms are
located in the Dunes
Medical/ Professional Building at IU Northwest.
Location of Clinicals
Clinical experiences occur in local hospitals, including
the Community Hospital in Munster; IU Health; LaPorte
Hospital in LaPorte; Methodist Hospital of Gary, Inc.,
in Gary and Merrillville; Porter Hospital in Valparaiso;
Franciscan St. Anthony Health in Crown Point; Franciscan
St. Anthony Health in Michigan City; Franciscan St.
Margaret Health in Hammond; and St. Mary Medical
Center in Hobart.
Additional Costs
In addition to regular university tuition and fees, students
should expect to pay program-related expenses such as
books, uniforms, physical examination, lead markers, and
radiation monitoring.
Accreditation
The Radiography Program is a full-time day program
involving classroom and laboratory experiences on
campus and clinical experiences at local hospitals.
The Radiography Program is fully accredited by the Joint
Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology
(JRCERT), 20 North Wacker Drive, Suite 2850, Chicago,
IL 60606--3182; phone: (312) 704-5300; www.jrcert.org.
Design of the Professional Curriculum
Admission Policies
The curriculum follows a pattern designed to train the
student to become adept in the performance of diagnostic
radiologic procedures. Courses in radiologic principles,
radiographic procedures, clinical application of theory, and
general education are included in the curriculum.
Students may apply for admission to the Radiography
Program after qualifying for regular admission to Indiana
University. Admission to the professional program is
competitive; therefore, completion of the application does
not guarantee admission to the program.
The Associate Degree Radiography Program offered
by Indiana University Northwest is designed to prepare
students for professional careers as radiographers in the
medical field. By providing pertinent learning experiences,
the program faculty strives to develop students' interests
in lifelong learning through the professional societies
and continuing education. The curriculum is designed
in accordance with the guidelines established by the
American Society of Radiologic Technologists.
Criteria Used for Class Selection
The Radiography Program has set forth the following
goals:
In addition to the College of Health and Human Services
admission policies and procedures, the following apply to
the Radiography Program at IU Northwest:
1. To graduate radiographers who demonstrate
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a. Clinical competence;
b. Effective communication skills;
c. Critical thinking and problem solving skills; and
d. Professional values.
2. To provide the medical community with individuals
qualified to perform radiographic procedures.
3. To involve students in professional continuing education
activities in an effort to instill a desire for life long learning.
4. To involve the student in the community we serve.
Admission to the program is based upon each applicant's
high school and college course work and a personal
interview.
Class Size
Approximately 40-45 students each May (beginning
professional course work in summer session II).
Specific Requirements
Application Deadline
January 15 of the year of anticipated entry.
Total Number of Prerequisite Credit Hours
To be eligible for admission, applicants must complete
the program's Math (M100 or higher) and written
communication (W131) requirements with a "C" (2.0)
or better prior to beginning the professional coursework
that begins each year in Summer Session II. These
requirements can be fulfilled during Summer I course
work.
In addition, specific college and/or high school courses
that are recommended include Oral communication
(S121), Psychology (P101), Computer science (A106),
Associate of Science in Radiography
Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II (P261 and
P262) and Medical Terminology (R185). Specific grades
in these courses are used as a part of the student’s
admission profile number. Completing these courses in
advance improves a student’s chance for admission into
the Radiography Program. If a student has not taken
the college equivalent of the courses listed above, a high
school transcript should be submitted with the application
and specific will be reviewed for admission purpose.
Limitations of Course Work
Remedial course work does not count as credit hours
toward the degree or for purposes of calculation of a grade
point average during the admission process.
Seven Year Limit
Anatomy and Physiology I and II have a 7 year age limit
between completion and time of admission. Students may
opt to take the course again or challenge the course by
departmental examination.
Repeated Courses
In order to qualify for admission and/or progression,
the student must pass the required arts and sciences
coursework by the second completed attempt.
Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average
A high school grade point average of 3.0 or a college
grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale is required for
admission into the Radiography Program. The college
grade point average will be used if the applicant has
completed a minimum of 12 credit hours with at least one
math or science course on the transcript. The program
admissions committee implements this requirement
when the incoming class of students is selected from the
applicant pool.
Interview
An interview is required for admission. However, if the
number of applications to the program far exceeds the
number of positions available, the program admissions
committee reserves the right to limit the number of
applicants interviewed. Interviews will be scheduled during
the spring semester.
High School Applicants
Check with your school to see if you can earn college
credit while in high school to complete the two prerequisite
courses.
Essential Abilities
Students must meet the list of essential abilities (technical
standards) for admission to the program. The list of
essential abilities is mailed to all program applicants.
Health Requirements
Students are required to show proof that they have met
the immunization, physical examination and laboratory
examination requirements for the program as well as
CPR certification. Specific information is provided to all
accepted students prior to enrolling in clinical course work.
Criminal History Check
A criminal history check is required prior to beginning
clinical experience. A positive background check may
make a student ineligible for clinical course work.
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Drug Screening Policy
Students may be required to have a drug screen prior
to attending clinical experience or it may be required on
demand under certain situations in the clinical site. A
positive drug screen will result in removal from the clinical
site and possible dismissal from the program.
Volunteer Experience
While volunteer experience is not required; it is very
helpful in making a career choice.
Curriculum
Prerequisites
Prior to beginning professional course work, all students
must complete the program's math and English
requirement with a C (2.0) or better. Students may earn up
to 6 hours of Indiana University credit by correspondence
toward fulfilling the requirements for the associate
degree. Students are encouraged to seek advising
prior to enrolling in course work. The faculty retain the
right to determine acceptability of course work taken by
nontraditional methods outside of Indiana University to
meet degree requirements.
Professional Program
Courses in the professional program are sequential and,
therefore, must be taken in the order specified by the
program faculty.
Awards
The program faculty will recommend to the university
graduating students with superior academic performance
for degrees awarded with distinction. Also, the program
may recognize students with outstanding academic and
clinical achievement during their professional program at
the time of graduation.
Scholarships
For information on scholarships and grants, students
should contact the Financial Aid Office. Some hospitals
offer financial assistance for students pursuing
radiography. Contact the program faculty for further
information.
Graduation Requirements
Satisfactory completion of 76/77 credit hours to include
23/24 credit hours of prerequisite and general education
courses and 52 credit hours of professional courses.
All course work must be completed in compliance with
the program's and school's academic and professional
policies. Upon successful completion of the program,
students are eligible to take the examination of the
American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (AART)
(www.arrt.org).
Radiography Curriculum
Two-Year Semester Sequence
Summer Session I
•
•
MATH M100 /M119 College Level Mathematics* (3-4
cr.)
ENG W131 Elementary Composition* (3 cr.)
Total (6-7 cr.)
Summer Session II
•
RADS R100 Orientation to Radiologic Technology*
(2 cr.)
102
•
•
•
Bachelor of Science - Radiological Sciences
RADS R103 Introduction to Clinical Radiography* (2
cr.)
RADS R181 Clinical Experience I* (1 cr.)
RADS R185 Medical Terminology* (1 cr.)
Total (6 cr.)
Fall Semester
•
•
•
•
RADS R101 Radiographic Procedures* (3 cr.)
RADS R102 Principles of Radiography I* (3 cr.)
RADS R182 Clinical Experience II* (4 cr.)
PHSL P261 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4 cr.)
Total (14 cr.)
Spring Semester
•
•
•
•
RADS R201 Radiographic Procedures II* (3 cr.)
RADS R202 Principles of Radiography II* (3 cr.)
RADS R281 Clinical Experience III* (4 cr.)
PHSL P262 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4
cr.)
Total (14 cr.)
Summer Sessions
•
RADS R282 Clinical Experience IV* (4 cr.)
Total (4 cr.)
Fall Semester
•
•
•
•
•
RADS R205 Radiographic Procedures III* (3 cr.)
RADS R222 Principles of Radiography III* (3 cr.)
RADS R250 Physics Applied to Radiology* (3 cr.)
RADS R283 Clinical Experience V* (4 cr.)
CSCI A106 Introduction to Computing (3 cr.)
Total (16 cr.)
Spring Semester
•
•
•
•
•
RADS R260 Radiobiology and Protection* (3 cr.)
RADS R200 Pathology* (3 cr.)
RADS R290 Comprehensive Experience* (4 cr.)
PSY P101 Introductory Psychology (3 cr.)
SPCH S121 / SPCH S122 Oral Communication
Requirement (3 cr.)
Total (16 cr.)
*Core Course requires a C (2.0) or better
Total Credit Hours (76 / 77 cr.)
Bachelor of Science - Radiologic
Sciences
About the Bachelor of Science - Radiologic
Sciences
The B.S. degree in Radiologic Sciences offers individuals
the opportunity to pursue three separate concentrations
—advanced clinical/health management concentration
for the associate degree radiographer, diagnostic medical
sonography, and radiation therapy. Diagnostic medical
sonography and radiation therapy are open to individuals
with either a health professional A.S. degree background
or a non-health professions background.
Program Mission and Goals
The BS Program in Radiologic Sciences is designed to
prepare graduates for professional careers in the medical
field. The program has set forth the following goals:
1. To graduate professionals who demonstrate: a) clinical
competence, b) effective communication skills, c) critical
thinking and problem solving skills, d) and professional
values.
2. To provide the medical community with radiographers
qualified to perform advanced procedures in
cardiovascular interventional technology, computed
tomography, magnetic resonance imaging technology
and/or picture archiving and communication systems and
individuals with entry level skills in diagnostic medical
sonography and radiation therapy.
3. To involve students in professional continuing
education activities in an effort to instill a desire for lifelong
learning.
4. To involve the student in the community we serve.
Clinical / Health Management
Concentration for Radiographers
Within the radiologic sciences profession there is a
need for qualified radiographers with the advanced skills
necessary to provide patient services in cardiovascular
interventional technology, computed tomography, and
magnetic resonance imaging. These professionals require
unique skills specific to the specialty. Cardiovascular
interventional technologists assist physicians in
performing diagnostic and therapeutic procedures of
the cardiovascular system. These procedures involve
the injection of iodinated contrast media to demonstrate
diseases of the heart and blood vessels. Computed
tomography (CT) technologists image selected planes
of the body by combining the use of an X-ray beam
and a computer. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
technologists utilize a magnetic field along with radio
waves to create images of patients' anatomy for
interpretation by a physician.
The Bachelor of Science Program in Radiologic Sciences
is designed to prepare qualified radiographers with
the skills to provide patient services in cardiovascular
interventional technology, computed tomography,
and magnetic resonance imaging. Students receive a
theoretical foundation in all these specialties and select a
clinical/health management concentration.
Graduates of the Program
Graduates receive a Bachelor of Science degree and are
eligible to take specialty examinations depending on their
clinical concentration.
Credentials Required to Practice
R.T.(R) (ARRT) Registered Radiographer.
Indiana Certification Requirements
State certification is required to operate an X-ray machine.
The state accepts the ARRT Registry for certification.
Length of the Program
A new class begins the professional course work in the fall
semester and completes the professional year at the end
of the following spring semester.
Bachelor of Science - Radiological Sciences
Structure of the Professional Program
Classes are held during the day. Clinical experience is
scheduled in cooperation with the clinical site with most
experience during normal daytime hours.
Design of the Professional Curriculum
Lectures and clinical experiences are integrated
throughout the two semesters.
Opportunity for Students to Work
Students may be employed as radiographers at local area
hospitals. Students may find full-time employment during
the professional year difficult.
Description of Facilities
The radiologic sciences classroom and offices are
located in the Dunes Medical/ Professional Building at IU
Northwest. Clinical experience is provided at local area
hospitals.
Admission Policies
General Information
Admission to the professional year is competitive.
Students are selected based on their previous academic
background, and evidence of registration or registration
eligibility with the American Registry of Radiologic
Technologists (ARRT). Students will need to select an
area of clinical or health management concentrations.
There are a limited number of spaces available in each
clinical concentration.
103
Minimum Grade Requirement in a Stated
Prerequisite
C (2.0 on a 4.0 scale).
Interview
Qualified applicants may be asked to participate in an
interview.
Essential Abilities
Students must meet the list of essential abilities (technical
standards) for admission to the program. The list of
essential abilities is mailed to all program applicants.
Health Requirements
Students are required to show proof that they have met
the immunization, physical examiniation and laboratory
examination requirements for the program as well as
CPR certification. Specific information is provided to all
accepted students prior to enrolling in clinical course work.
Criminal History Check
A criminal history check is required prior to beginning
clinical experience. A postive background check may
make a student ineligible for clinical course work.
Drug Screening Policy
Students may be required to have a drug screen prior
to attending clinical experience or it may be required on
demand under certain situations in the clinical site. A
positive drug screen will result in removal from the clinical
site and possible dismissal from the program.
Class Size
Experience
Class size is restricted by the number of clinical sites
available. An attempt will be made to place all qualified
applicants.
While radiography experience beyond the initial
radiography program is not required, it is recommended.
Specific Requirements
The Clinical Concentration prepares qualified
radiographers for advanced skills in 1) cardiovascular
interventional technology, 2) computed tomography, and
3) magnetic resonance imaging technology. The Health
Management Concentration helps prepare radiographers
for supervisory roles within the health care environment.
The following admission policies, in addition to the
CHHS admission policies, apply to the Clinical/Health
Management concentration.
Application Deadline
January 15 of the year the student wishes to begin the
professional year.
Total Number of Prerequisite Credit Hours
90 credit hours.
Limitations of Course Work
Remedial course work will not count as credit hours
toward the degree or for purposes of calculation of a grade
point average during the admission process.
Seven Year Limit
Anatomy and Physiology I and II have a 7 year age limit
between completion and time of admission. Students may
opt to take the course again or challenge the course by
departmental examination. Registered technologists are
exempt from this requirement.
Repeated Courses
In order to qualify for admission and/or progression,
the student must pass the required arts and sciences
coursework by the second completed attempt.
Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average
2.3 on a 4.0 scale at the time of the interview.
Concentration Course Work Options
Students receive a theoretical foundation in these
advanced imaging specialties and then select a
clinical concentration and / or a health management
concentration. Clinical experience is obtained at
local hospitals throughout northwest Indiana. Health
management concentration course work is offered through
the School of Public and Environmental Affairs (SPEA).
Students may select from any of the following courses
to complete their 12 credit hours of concentration course
work. Students interested in advanced clinical skills are
encouraged to enroll in the Clinical Concentration courses.
For every 1 credit hour of clinical course work, students
spend 60 hours per semester in the clinical environment
learning the advanced skills. Students interested in
supervisory roles are encouraged to take 12 credit hours
of the health management concentration course work.
Students may elect to combine these two concentrations
to equal 12 credit hours total.
Clinical Concentration Courses (0-12 Credit Hours
Total)
•
R481 Clinical Practicum: Vascular Imaging (1-12
cr).
104
•
•
Bachelor of Science - Radiological Sciences
R482 Clinical Practicum: Computed Tomography
(1-12 cr.)
R483 Clinical Practicum: Magnetic Resonance
Imaging (1-12 cr.)
Curriculum
Prerequisites
Prior to entering the program, students must complete
the following minimum prerequisites (for a total of 90 cr.).
Prerequisites may be taken at any accredited college or
university. The code (G) indicates a course that meets the
school's general-education requirements.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Oral communication (G) (3 cr.) S121
Written communication (G) (6 cr.) (W131 and second
intensive writing course)
Arts and Humanities electives (G) (6 cr.)
Cultural and Historical Studies electives (G) (6 cr.)
Introductory psychology (G) (3 cr.)
Social/Behavioral science elective (G) (3 cr.)
Computer science elective (3 cr.)
College-level mathematics (G) (3-5 cr.)
Statistics course (G) (3 cr.)
Human anatomy and physiology with lab (G)(8 cr.)
Professional radiography course work/elective (46
cr.)
Special Credit/Transfer Policy
Students seeking to transfer credit or receive special
credit for radiography course work taken in a non-creditawarding radiography program that has been accredited
by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic
Technology (JRCERT) (www.jrcert.org) should contact the
program director for additional information and counseling.
Professional Program
The professional program consists of 30 credit hours of
400-level courses.
Courses in the professional senior year are sequential.
Therefore, the following courses must be taken in the
order specified by the program faculty.
•
Fall Semester
•
•
•
•
AHLT R404 Sectional Imaging Anatomy (3 cr.)
AHLT R405 Advanced Diagnostic Imaging I (3 cr.)
AHLT R408 Topics in Radiologic Sciences (3 cr.)
Concentration Course Work (6 cr.)
•
Spring Semester
•
•
•
AHLT R406 Advanced Diagnostic Imaging II (3 cr.)
AHLT R414 Sectional Imaging Pathology (3 cr.)
AHLT R409 Senior Project in Medical Imaging
Technology (3 cr.)
Concentration Course Work (6 cr.)
compliance with the program's and school's academic and
professional policies.
Diagnostic Medical Sonography
Concentration
Description of the Profession
Within the radiologic sciences profession, there is a need
for qualified diagnostic medical sonographers. These
professionals require unique skills specific to the field
of ultrasonography. Under the direction of a radiologist,
the diagnostic medical sonographer is concerned with
the proper operation of the ultrasound equipment and
preparation of patients for various types of diagnostic
procedures.
Upon request of a physician, the diagnostic medical
sonographer examines various parts of the body by
using sound waves. This imaging technique may reveal
evidence of disease, injury, or other significant medical
information.
Graduates of the Program
Graduates receive a Bachelor of Science degree and
are eligible to take the Sonography Principles and
Instrumentation, Abdomen /Small Parts, and OB/Gyn
exams offered by the American Registry of Diagnostic
Medical Sonography (ARDMS).
Length of the Program
A new class begins the professional course work in
summer session II for non-health care students and in the
fall semester for the health care student. This program
will complete their professional portion at the end of the
following fall semester.
Structure of the Professional Program
Classes are held during the day. Clinical experience is
scheduled in cooperation with the clinical site and are also
during normal daytime hours.
Design of the Professional Curriculum
Lectures, lab, and clinical experiences are integrated
throughout the program.
Opportunity for Students to Work
Students may find full-time employment during the
professional year difficult.
Description of Facilities
The classroom and offices of the Radiologic Sciences—
DMS Concentration Program are located in the Dunes
Medical/ Professional Building at IU Northwest. Clinical
experience is provided at local hospitals.
Admission Policies
Total (30 cr.)
Admission to the professional year is competitive.
Students are selected based on their previous academic
background, a personal interview, and evidence of
registration if applying under the health care professional
background.
Graduation Requirements
Class Size
•
Satisfactory completion of 120 credit hours to include
90 credit hours of prerequisite and general-education
courses and 30 credit hours of professional courses.
All professional courses must be completed with a C
(2.0) or higher. All course work must be completed in
Class size is restricted by the number of clinical sites
available.
Bachelor of Science - Radiological Sciences
Specific Requirements
The following admission policies apply to the Diagnostic
Medical Sonography Program, in addition to the CHHS
admission policies.
(G) indicates a course that meets the campus generaleducation requirements.
•
•
Application Deadline
January 15 of the year the student wishes to begin the
professional year.
Total Number of Prerequisite Credit Hours
70 credit hours
Limitations of Course Work
Remedial course work will not count as credit hours
toward the degree or for purposes of calculation of a grade
point average during the admission process.
Seven Year Limit
Anatomy and Physiology I and II have a 7 year age limit
between completion and time of admission. Students
may opt to take the course again or challenge the course
by departmental examination. Credentialed health care
professionals are exempt from this requirement.
Repeated Courses
In order to qualify for admission and/or progression,
the student must pass the required arts and sciences
coursework by the second completed attempt
Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average
2.3 on a 4.0 scale at the time of the interview.
Minimum Grade Requirement in a Stated
Prerequisite
C (2.0 on a 4.0 scale)
Interview
All qualified applicants must participate in an interview.
Interviews are held in May.
Essential Abilities
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Oral communication (G) (3 cr.) (S121)
Written communication (G) (6 cr.) (W131 and second
intensive writing course)
Arts and Humanities electives (G) (6 cr.)
Cultural and Historical Studies electives (G) (6 cr.)
Introductory psychology (G) (3 cr.)
Social/Behavioral science elective (3 cr.)
Computer science elective (G) (3 cr.)
College-level mathematics (G) (3-4 cr.)
Statistics course (G) (3 cr.)
Human anatomy and phycology with lab (G) (8 cr.)
General or radiologic physics (3 cr.)
Health Professions course work or electives
Total minimum number of credit hours - 70
Diagnostic Medical Sonography Curriculum
Summer Semeser II (Non-Health Professionals Only)
RADS R100 Orientation to Radiologic Technology (2 cr.)
RADS R185 Medical Terminology (1 cr.)
Total 3 cr.
Fall Semester
RADS R404 Sectional Imaging Anatomy (3 cr.)
RADS R408 Topics in Radiologic Sciences (3 cr.)
RADS R490 Fundamentals of Ultrasound (4 cr.)
Total 10 cr.
Spring Semester
RADS R491 DMS Imaging-Abdomen/Sm Pts (5 cr.)
RADS R492 DMS Imaging-OB/Gyne (5 cr.)
RADS R494 DMS Clinical Practicum I (6 cr.)
Total 16 cr.
Students must meet the list of essential abilities (technical
standards) for admission to the program. The list of
essential abilities is mailed to all program applicants.
Summer Semester
RADS R495 DMS Clinical Practicum II (6 cr.)
Health Requirements
Fall Semester
RADS R409 Senior Project in Medical Imaging Tech. (3
cr.)
RADS R493 Ultrasound Physics (4 cr.)
RADS R496 DMS Clinical Practicum III (8 cr.)
Students are required to show proof that they have met
the immunization, physical examination and laboratory
examination requirements for the program as well as
CPR certification. Specific information is provided to
all accepted students prior to enrolling in clincial course
work.
Total 6 cr.
Total 15 cr.
Criminal History Check
TOTAL 50 cr.
A criminal history check is required prior to beginning
clinical experience. A positive background check may
make a student ineligible for clinical course work.
Graduation Requirements
Drug Screening Policy
Students may be required to have a drug screen prior
to attending clinical experience or it may be required on
demand under certain situations in the clinical site. A
poisitive drug screen will result in removal from the clinical
site and possible dismissal from the program.
Curriculum
Prerequisites
Prior to entering the program, students must complete the
following minimum prerequisites. Prerequisities may be
taken at any accredited college or university. The code
105
Satisfactory Completion of 120 credit hours to include
70 credit hours of prerequisite and general-education
courses and 50 credit hours of professional courses. All
professional courses must be completed in compliance
with the program's and school's academic and
professional policies.
Radiation Therapy Concentration
The educational program in radiation therapy accepts
students every other year (odd years).
Description of the Profession
Radiation therapy involves the use of different forms
of ionizing radiation for the treatment of benign and
malignant tumors. Radiation therapists administer the
106
Bachelor of Science - Radiological Sciences
prescribed dose of ionizing radiation to specific sites of
the patient's body as directed by the physician. They
operate varied types of equipment, including high energy
linear accelerators, and work with radioactive materials. In
addition, radiation therapists observe the clinical progress
of the patient undergoing radiation therapy.
Admission Policies
General Information
Graduates of the Program
Admission to the program is based upon each applicant's
college course work and a personal interview.
The Radiation Therapy Program is designed to prepare
graduates to meet the scope of practice standards for
radiation therapy. Upon completion of the program,
graduates are eligible to take the radiation therapy
certification examination given by the American Registry
of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). Having successfully
passed this exam, certificate holders are classified as
registered radiation therapists, R.T.(T) (ARRT).State
certification is required to operate radiation therapy
equipment. The state accepts the ARRT Registry for
certification.
Length of the Program
The radiation therapy program is a four-year
baccalaureate degree program composed of 52 credit
hours of prerequisite and general education requirements
and a professional core in the junior and senior years of
68 credit hours.
Design of the Professional Curriculum
The curriculum follows a pattern that trains the student to
become skilled in the performance of radiation therapy
procedures. Courses in radiologic principles, technical
courses in radiation therapy, clinical application of theory,
and general education are included in the curriculum.
Lectures, lab, and clinical experienecs are integrated
throughout the program.
Structure of the Professional program
Classes are held during the day. Clinical experience
is scheduled in cooperation with the clinical site with
experience during normal daytime hours.
Opportunity for Students to Work
Students may find full-time employment during the
professional program difficult.
Description of Facilities
The Radiation Therapy Program offices and classrooms
are located in the Dunes Medical/ Professional Building
at IU Northwest. Clinical experiences have been planned
in local hospitals, including the Community Hospital in
Munster; Ingalls Hospital in Harvey, Illinois; Memorial
Hospital in South Bend; Methodist Hospital of Gary,
Inc., in Merrillville; Michiana Hematology Oncology,
PC in Mishawaka, Franciscan St. James Health in
Olympia Fields, IL; and Franciscan St. Margaret Health in
Hammond.
Accreditation
The Radiation Therapy Program is approved by the Joint
Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology
(JRCERT), 20 N. Wacker Drive, Suite 2850, Chicago, IL
60606-3182; phone (312) 704-5300; www.jrcert.org.
Students may apply for admission to the Radiation
Therapy Program after qualifying for regular admission to
Indiana University.
Criteria Used for Selection of Class
Class Size
Class size is restricted by the number of clinical sites
available.
Specific Requirements
The following admission policies apply to the Radiation
Therapy Progarm, in addition the the CHHS admissions
policies.
Application Deadline
January 15 of the year the student wishes to begin the
professional year.
Total number of Prerequisite Credit Hours
52 credit hours
Limitations of Course Work
Remedial course work will not count as credit hours
toward the degree or for the purposes of calculation of a
grade point average during the admission process.
Seven Year Limit
Anatomy and Physiology I and II have a 7 year age limit
between completion and time of admission. Students
may opt to take the course again or challenge the course
by departmental examination. Credentialed health care
professionals are exempt from this requirement.
Repeated Courses
In order to qualify for admission and/or progression,
the student must pass the required arts and sciences
coursework by the second completed attempt.
Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average
2.3 on a 4.0 scale. This requirement is applied at the time
of interview.
Minimum Grade Requirement in a stated
Prerequisite
C (2.0 on a 4.0 scale)
Interview
A personal interview is required. If, however, the number
of applications to the program far exceeds the number of
positions available, the program's admission committee
reserves the right to limit the number of applicants to be
interview to two times the number of positions available in
the class.
Essential Abilities
Students must meet the list of essential abilities (technical
standards) for admission to the program. The list of
essential abilities is mailed to all program applicants.
Health Requirements
Students are required to show proof that they have met
the immunization, physical examination and laboratory
examination requirements for the program as well as
Overview
CPR certification. Specific information is provided to all
accepted students prior to enrolling in clinical course.
Criminal History Check
A criminal history check is required prior to beginning
clinical experience. A positive background check may
make a student ineligible for clinical course work.
Drug Screening Policy
Students may be required to have a drug screen prior
to attending clinical experience or it may be required on
demand under certain situations in the clinical site. A
positive drug screen will result in removal from the clinical
site and possible dismissal from the program.
Volunteer Experience
The student is encouraged to observe in a radiation
oncology facility prior to the interview.
Curriculum
Prerequisites
Prior to entering the program, students must complete the
following minimum prerequisites. Prerequisites may be
taken at any accredited college or university. The code
(G) indicates a course that meets the school's generaleducation requirements.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Oral communication (G) (3 cr.) (S121)
Written communication (G) (6 cr.)(W131 and second
intensive writing course)
Arts and Humanities electives (G) (6 cr.)
Cultural and Historical Studies electives (G) (6 cr.)
Introductory psychology (G) (3 cr.)
Social/Behavioral science elective (G) (3 cr.)
Computer science elective (3 cr.)
College-level mathematics (G) (3-4 cr.)
Statistics course (G) (3 cr.)
Human anatomy and physiology with lab (G) (8 cr.)
Professional radiography course work or electives
Total minimum number of credit hours - 52 cr.
Special Credit/Transfer Policy
Students seeking to transfer credit or receive special
credit for radiography course work taken in a non-creditawarding radiography program that has been accredited
by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic
Technology (JRCERT) (www.jrcert.org) should contact the
program director for additional information and advising.
Radiation Therapy Curriculum
Summer Session II (for Non-Radiographers only)
RADS R100 Orientation to Radiologic Technology (2 cr.)
RADS R185 Medical Terminology (1 cr.)
RADS R181 Clinical Expereince in Radiography I (1 cr.)
Total 4 cr.
Fall Semester
RADS R250 Physics Applied to Radiology (3 cr.)
RADS J205 Medical Imaging Anatomy (2 cr.)
RADS J301 Orientation to Radiation Oncology (4 cr.)
RADS J304 Radiation Oncology Patient Care (2 cr.)
RADS J350 Clinical Experience I (4 cr.)
Total 15 cr.
Spring Semester
RADS R200 Pathology (3 cr.)
RADS R260 Radiation Biology and Protection (3 cr.)
107
RADS J302 Radiation Oncology Techniques (3 cr.)
RADS J351 Clinical Practicum II (4 cr.)
Total 13 cr.
Summer Semester
RADS J402 Radiation Oncology Techniques II (3 cr.)
RADS J450 Clinical Practicum III (4 cr.)
Total 7 cr.
Fall Semester
RADS J303 Clinical Oncology I (3 cr.)
RADS J305 Clinical Dosimetry (3 cr.)
RADS J400 Physics of Radiation Oncology (3 cr.)
RADS J451 Clinical Practicum IV (4 cr.)
Total 13 cr.
Spring Semester
RADS J401 Physics of Radiation Oncology II (3 cr.)
RADS J403 Clinical Oncology II (3cr.)
RADS J404 Quality Management in Radiation Oncology*
(3 cr.)
RADS J409 Senior Project in Radiation Oncology (3 cr.)
RADS J452 Clinical Practicum V (4 cr)
Total 16 cr.
Total Credit Hours for Concentration - 68 cr.
Graduation Requirements
Satisfactory completion of 120 credit hours to include
52 credit hours of prerequisite and general-education
courses and 68 credit hours of professional courses.
All professional courses must be completed with a C
(2.0) or higher. All course work must be completed in
compliance with the program's and school's academic and
professional policies.
Division of Social Work
Administrative Officer
Darlene Lynch, Ph.D., LCSW.
Web site: www.iun.edu/social-work/Phone: (219)
980-7111
Overview
General Information
The Division of Social Work is a collaborative effort
of the Indiana University School of Social Work and
Indiana University Northwest. Both the Master of Social
Work (M.S.W.) and Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.)
degrees are offered on the IUN campus. The Master
of Social Work is available on a three or four year part
time schedule designed to meet the needs of working
professionals in Northwest Indiana. The Bachelor of
Social Work is offered on a full time or part time schedule.
Graduates of the school move into a broad variety of
social service settings, including those concerned with
aging, family and child welfare, corrections, mental and
physical health, and adjustment in schools. In anticipation
of such professional activities, the school provides
field instruction placements throughout the state where
students engage in services to individuals, groups,
families, communities, and organizations or function in
leadership roles.
The Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.) program prepares
students for generalist social work practice. The Master
108
Master of Social Work
of Social Work (M.S.W.) program prepares graduate
students for advanced social work practice in an area of
specialization. Although the degree programs vary in their
emphasis and levels of complexity, the school’s curricula
embody features that are systemic in their educational
effects: The total curriculum articulates the relationship of
the undergraduate and graduate levels as components of
a continuum in education for social services.
•
•
•
•
The mechanisms of instruction provide opportunities
for a range of experiences in substantive areas of
interest to students and of importance to society.
The curriculum focuses on problem-solving and
strength-enhancing experiences that involve the
classroom, the learning resources laboratory, and
field experience.
Excellent library and technology resources make
social work students effective users of social science
information.
An exploration of educational procedures and
arrangements optimizes effective training, including
institutional self-study of the entire curriculum as well
as the exploration of specific educational tools.
the program in late August with the first class meeting on
seven Saturdays. Subsequent classes and internships are
held during the week (usually Monday through Thursday).
Part time evening students are also required to complete
the concentration curriculum (the final 30 credit hours of
the program) over the course of the third calendar year,
although students may elect to extend course work and
internships up to four years.
Advanced Standing Program
Students holding undergraduate social work degrees
may be eligible for this program, which begins during the
second summer session (first week of July). The following
are specific requirements for consideration for admission
to the advanced standing program:
•
•
•
As part of the Indiana University School of Social Work,
the IUN program is accredited by the Council on Social
Work Education. The Council is the national body
authorized to accredit the baccalaureate and graduate
level social work programs in this country and to assure
student exposure to a quality professional educational
experience.
•
The School is a member of the International Association of
Schools of Social Work. The School’s administrators are
active participants in the National Association of Deans
and Directors of Schools of Social Work, the Association
of Baccalaureate Social Work Program Directors and the
Group for the Advancement of Doctoral Education, among
others.
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Master of Social Work
•
Graduation within five years from a baccalaureate
social work program accredited (or admitted to
candidacy for accreditation) by the Council on Social
Work Education.
Successful completion of a statistics course.
A cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 on a
4.0 scale.
A cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 in
all social work courses taken prior to admissions
committee action. Accordingly, applicants to the
advanced standing program must provide the
admissions committee with an official transcript.
Senior B.S.W. students must provide a transcript
including the fall semester (or winter quarter) grades
of their senior year.
Evidence of characteristics and/or potential required
for competent social work practice as defined in the
mission statement of the school. Such evidence
may be derived from application materials, letters
of reference, and/or pertinent work or volunteer
experience.
A reference letter is required from a full-time faculty
member of the applicant’s undergraduate program.
The M.S.W. program was brought to the Indiana
University Northwest campus in 1996 and graduated
its first class in 2000. Graduates of the Division of
Social Work move into a broad variety of social service
settings. These include those concerned with aging,
family and child welfare, corrections, mental and physical
health, communities, political change and analysis, and
school adjustment. In anticipation of such professional
activities, the school provides field instruction placements
throughout northwest Indiana where students engage in
services to individuals, groups, families, and communities
or function in planning and management roles.
Indiana Partnership for Social Work Education in
Child Welfare (Title IV-E)
The Title IV-E Program is offered to students involved in
the Indiana Partnership for Social Work Education in Child
Welfare, funded in part by Title IV-E, and enables students
to complete the Foundation and Intermediate Curriculum
(the first 30 credit hours of the program) over two calendar
years. Eligibility for the Title IV-E program is limited to
current employees of the Indiana Department of Child
Services. Classroom courses are offered on weekday
evenings. Students begin the program by enrolling in their
first courses during the fall semester.
The general goal of the graduate program is preparation
for advanced social work practice. In addition to generalist
knowledge and skills, the programs provide an opportunity
for development of special competence in school
social work, mental health and addictions, and health.
Educational resources for students in the program include
a substantial library, and diversified field instruction
settings.
Master of Social Work Admission
Part Time Evening Program
The part time evening program at Indiana University
Northwest enables student to complete the foundation
and intermediate curriculum (the first 30 credit hours of
the program) over two calendar years. Students begin
Professional social work education requires students
at the master's level to undertake a rigorous program
of classroom and practice work. The Indiana University
School of Social Work seeks to admit individuals who
have demonstrated competency though previous
academic work, professional achievements, and volunteer
commitments. A strong commitment to social justice and
service to others should be evident in the application.
Admission information for the Indiana University Northwest
M.S.W. program may be obtained from:
School of Social Work
Academic Regulations and Policies
IU Northwest
3400 Broadway
Gary, IN 46408-1197
Phone: (219) 980-7111
Web site: www.iun.edu/social-work
Admission information for all other Indiana University
M.S.W. programs may be obtained from:
M.S.W. Admissions
IUPUI School of Social Work
Education/Social Work Building 4134
902 W. New York Street
Indianapolis, IN 46202-5154
Telephone: (317) 274-6705
Web: www.socialwork.iu.edu
E-mail: [email protected]
Enrollment in the M.S.W. program requires official
admission to the Indiana University School of Social Work.
A limited number of students are admitted each year.
The following items are the minimum requirements for
consideration for admission:
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•
•
•
•
An earned bachelor's degree from an accredited
college or university
Evidence of course work in liberal arts
Successful completion of a minimum of six courses
in social or behavioral sciences, as defined in the
application packet
An earned cumulative undergraduate grade point
average (GPA) of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale for the
final 60 credit hours of the degree
Successful completion of an undergraduate or
graduate statistics course
Submission of the completed application packet
Applications are available in early fall of the year
preceding admission. Information pertaining to the
deadlines, requirements, and program details can be
found in the application packet. Applicants applying to
the Indiana University Northwest program cannot apply to
other Indiana University M.S.W. programs of the School
of Social Work. All applicants are encouraged to submit
applications as soon as possible and well before the
final application priority date. The M.S.W. admissions
committee will make all decisions and notify students in
early spring. Applications are evaluated on the basis of
the six criteria outlined above. Admission is competitive
and the instructional resources of the school determine
total enrollment.
International Students/International Degrees
Applicants who are not citizens of the United States
should apply as early as possible preceding the fall
in which they wish to enter. They must fill out the
international application and the Indiana University School
of Social Work application by the posted deadlines. They
also must provide proof of their ability to pay fees and
support themselves adequately during the period of
their study and, through examinations designated by the
school, must demonstrate an ability to comprehend, write,
and speak English at an acceptable level.
International students or any person holding a
degree obtained outside of the United States should
109
request an international application from the following
address:
International Affairs
IUPUI
902 W. New York Street, ES2126
Indianapolis, IN 46202-5154
Telephone: (317) 274-7000
E-mail: [email protected]
Transfer Students
A limited number of transfer students from other
accredited M.S.W. programs may be accepted each year.
Master of Social Work students interested in transferring
to Indiana University must complete an application for
admission to the program. Applicants must submit a
reference letter from the previous MSW program director
stating that the student left the program in good standing
and verifying the student's competence in the field of
social work. Upon receipt of the completed application, the
division director will review the materials and decide if the
applicant may be accepted in the program. If accepted,
the division director will analyze the student's transcript
and course syllabi to determine which credits earned in
another accredited social work program will transfer to
Indiana University. In all circumstances, however, transfer
students must complete all required courses in their
chosen Concentration Curriculum.
Academic Regulations and Policies
Phi Alpha National Social Work Honor Society
The purpose of Phi Alpha National Social Work Honor
Society is to provide a closer bond among students of
social work and promote humanitarian goals and ideals.
Phi Alpha fosters high standards of education for social
workers and invites into membership those who have
attained excellence in scholarship and achievement
in social work. Information on selection processes is
available from the Director of the School of Social Work on
the IU Northwest Campus.
Students' Rights and Responsibilities
IUSSW students in social work programs have a right
to participate in decision-making activities about the
school. Students regularly contribute to the continued
development and growth of our programs. Indeed, the
school values students' input in several critical areas:
faculty and course evaluations, school committee work,
student field placements and others.
All students enrolled at the School of Social Work have an
opportunity each semester to evaluate their courses and
instructors. At the end of each course, students are given
standardized faculty evaluation forms to complete. These
evaluations are confidential, and the results are computer
generated. The evaluations are returned to the faculty
to use for strengthening content, teaching, and learning
methods to improve instruction.
Through their elected and/or volunteer representatives,
students provide input to and learn from B.S.W. and
M.S.W. program committees and various others that might
be convened throughout the year. Student representatives
are viewed as valuable members of these committees.
110
Academic Regulations and Policies
Each student has the opportunity to have input into the
selection of his or her field practicum assignments. The
field practicum coordinator works closely with students to
negotiate suitable placements.
basis of both the quality of the scholarly content and the
quality of its presentation.
Students have the right to provide feedback about school
policies and procedures as well as the behavior of faculty
and staff members. In providing either positive or critical
feedback, students are expected to follow professional
social work norms, values, and ethics. For example,
students who believe that a faculty or staff member's
behavior is discourteous or ineffective should discuss the
concern directly with the person or people in question.
Students who have reason to believe addressing the
person directly would place them in some jeopardy should
register the concern with the director of the program, who
will address and respond to the issue.
Students are expected to follow appropriate email etiquette when communicating with faculty,
staff, and peers. Correct grammar is expected at all
times. Inappropriate use of e-mail will be grounds for
student review. For specific guidelines, please visit
informationpolicy.iu.edu/policies/.
Students, who believe that they have been treated unfairly
or unprofessionally by a faculty or staff member, or that
a policy or procedure is unjust or unwise, may submit
in writing a formal grievance petition to the dean of the
school. Grievance petitions are reserved for those issues
or incidences that warrant formal investigation and full
exploration. Such petitions should be submitted in a
professional manner, consistent with social work norms,
values, and ethics.
Student complaints regarding discrimination, sexual
harassment, racial harassment, and harassment on the
basis of sexual orientation have established complaint
procedures available in the Indiana University Code of
Student Rights, Responsibilities, and Conduct.
Academic and Scholarly Guidelines
Students admitted to the Indiana University School of
Social Work have already demonstrated potential for
superior academic work. Most students are therefore
very familiar and comfortable with high academic and
scholarly standards. Obviously, students are expected to
attend face-to-face, online, and classroom and practicum
course meetings. Regular attendance is viewed as
the responsibility of each social work student. Active
participation in course activities is the expected norm. In
participating, it is expected that students reflect interest
in, and respect for, their colleagues in a manner that
is congruent with the values, ethics, and skills of the
profession, and those of the Student Code of Conduct.
In written assignments, students are expected to
prepare documents in a scholarly and professional
manner. Submissions should be typewritten in doublespaced format and carefully edited for spelling and
grammar. All direct quotations, paraphrases, empirical
research findings, and other restatements of the
research, scholarship, or creative work of others must be
appropriately annotated using the standard bibliographic
citation methods set out in the most recent edition of
the Publication Manual of the American Psychological
Association (APA). The APA manual serves as the guide
for style and format of all papers submitted in the School
of Social Work.
Social work graduates require well-developed and refined
communication skills, including the use of the written word.
Writing well helps graduates communicate information
accurately and concisely. For this reason, formal writing
assignments in social work courses are evaluated on the
Electronic Communication
Academic Misconduct
Indiana University School of Social Work and/or the
university may discipline a student for academic
misconduct defined as any activity that tends to
compromise the academic integrity of the institution and
undermine the educational process. Academic misconduct
includes, but is not limited to, the following:
1. Cheating
a. A student must not use external assistance
on any "in-class" or "take-home" examination, unless the
instructor specifically has authorized such assistance. This
prohibition includes, but is not limited to, the use of tutors,
books, notes, and calculators.
b. A student must not use another person as a
substitute in the taking of an examination or quiz.
c. A student must not steal examinations or other
course materials.
d. A student must not allow others to conduct
research or to prepare any work for him or her without
advance authorization from the instructor to whom the
work is being submitted. Under this prohibition, a student
must not make any unauthorized use of materials obtained
from commercial term paper companies or from files of
papers prepared by other persons.
e. A student must not collaborate with other
persons on a particular project and submit a copy of a
written report that is represented explicitly or implicitly as
the student's own individual work.
f. A student must not use any unauthorized
assistance in a laboratory, at a computer terminal, or on
fieldwork.
g. A student must not submit substantial portions
of the same academic work for credit or honors more than
once without permission of the instructor to whom the
work is being submitted.
h. A student must not alter a grade or score in
any way.
2. Fabrication
A student must not falsify or invent any information
or data in an academic exercise including, but not limited
to, records or reports, laboratory results, and citations to
the sources of information.
3. Plagiarism
A student must not adopt or reproduce ideas,
words, or statements of another person without an
appropriate acknowledgment. A student must give
due credit to the originality of others and acknowledge
an indebtedness whenever he or she does any of the
following:
a. Quotes another person's actual words, either
oral or written
Master of Social Work Curriculum
b. Paraphrases another person's words, either
oral or written
c. Uses another person's idea, opinion, or theory
d. Borrows facts, statistics, or other illustrative
material, unless the information is common knowledge
4. Interference
a. A student must not steal, change, destroy,
or impede another student's work. Impeding another
student's work includes, but is not limited to, the theft,
defacement, or mutilation of resources so as to deprive
others of the information they contain.
b. A student must not give or offer a bribe,
promise favors, or make threats with the intention
of affecting a grade or the evaluation of academic
performance.
5. Violation of Course Rules
A student must not violate course rules as
contained in a course syllabus or other information
provided to the student.
6. Facilitating Academic Dishonesty
A student must not intentionally or knowingly help
or attempt to help another student to commit an act of
academic misconduct.
Academic Requirements
For continuation in and graduation from the program,
students are required to:
1. earn at least a “C” in each Social Work course;
2. maintain a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA in graduate
Social Work courses;
3. have satisfactorily fulfilled any and all contracts
for grades of Incomplete (see policy on Grades of
Incomplete);
4. earn a grade of “Satisfactory” in any practicum
course (S555, S651& S652).
Professional Requirements
Students are expected to behave in a manner consistent
with the Indiana University Code of Student Rights,
Responsibilities, and Conduct Handbook, the Code of
Ethics of the National Association of Social Workers, and
other professional guidelines established in the Handbook.
Refer to the section below that outlines some examples of
conduct that violates professional and ethical standards.
Criminal Offense Disclosure and Sexual Offenders
Policy
As part of the application process, students provide a
disclosure statement regarding past criminal offenses.
Master of Social Work graduates are eligible to apply
for legal licensure by the State of Indiana. While such
disclosure does not pre-empt an admissions decisions,
admitted students must realize that a criminal history may
affect their eligibility for licensure.
It is the policy of the School of Social Work that no
student or applicant who has been convicted of sex
offenses against children shall be eligible for admission
or matriculation into the BSW, MSW or PhD programs.
Any student who is already in an IUSSW program and
whose name appears on the Registry during the time of
111
matriculation, or has been convicted of an offense for
which the student can be listed on the Registry, shall
be ineligible for continuation or completion of the MSW
degree. Any faculty member, student, field instructor,
or other person within the school who becomes aware
of such a situation should bring it to the attention of the
respective program director for appropriate action. This
policy and the right of appeal is discussed further in the
section on Students’ Rights and Responsibilities.
Master of Social Work Curriculum
Social work is a dynamic profession concerned with
the changing needs of people and society. To respond
to such needs, the curriculum of the School of Social
Work undergoes continuing review by the faculty with
the participation of students, members of the practice
community, and others. Students must complete 60
credit hours of graduate-level course work in order
to meet the minimum requirements for the Master of
Social Work degree. All students complete a common 15
credit Foundation Curriculum and 15 credit Intermediate
Curriculum that emphasize a generalist perspective for
social work practice. The Intermediate Curriculum includes
a one-semester practicum of a minimum of 320 clock
hours. Following that, students complete a Concentration
Curriculum that prepares them for advanced practice in
health, mental health and addictions, or school social
work. The Concentration Practicum of a minimum of 640
clock hours is usually completed over two semesters. All
Foundation Intermediate Curriculum course work must
be completed before students are eligible to enroll in any
required courses in the Concentration Curriculum.
The overall objectives of the Foundation and Intermediate
Curricula of the M.S.W program include development of:
1. Basic, generalist competence applicable to a broad
range of social work practice
2. Basic competence at all levels: individual, family,
groups, communities, and organizations;
3. Basic competence for practice in social service
delivery systems
The overall objectives of the Concentration Year include
development of special competence in a concentration
area.
Typical course arrangements for students admitted to the
M.S.W. program are shown as below.
Foundation Curriculum (15 cr.)
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S501 Professional Social Work at the Master's Level:
An Immersion (3 cr.)
S502 Research I (3 cr.)
S503 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I
(3 cr.)
S504 Professional Practice Skills I (3 cr.)
S505 Social Policy Analysis and Practice (3 cr.)
Intermediate Curriculum (15 cr.)
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S513 Human Behavior in the Social Environment II
(3 cr.)
S514 Practice with Individuals, Families and Groups
I (3 cr.)
S516 Social Work Macro Practice (3 cr.)
S517 Assessment in Mental Health and Addictions
(3 cr.)
112
•
Educational Requirements
S555 Social Work Practicum I (3 cr.)
Concentration Curriculum (30 cr.)
Health
Students, who elect to practice in the health arena, apply
the knowledge and skills of advanced social work practice
to build and work effectively with multi-disciplinary teams
that include physicians, nurses, dentists, psychiatrists and
other health care professionals. They learn the medical
terminology to conduct bio-psycho-social assessments
based on myriad disease entities and patient dynamics.
As social workers, they understand how healthcare is
financed in the United States, analyze how financial
resources for healthcare affect individual patient care,
and advocate for change that improves access for all
individuals regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, age,
sexual orientation or other factors.
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S618 Social Policy and Services II: Health (3 cr.)
S623 Practice Research Integrative Seminar I (3 cr.)
S651 Social Work Practicum II (4 cr.)
S652 Social Work Practicum III (5 cr.)
S661 Executive Leadership Practice (3 cr.)
S692 Practice Skills for Health Care Settings (3 cr.)
S693 Practice with Individuals, Families and
Communities in Healthcare Settings (3 cr.)
S694 Social Work Practice with Older
Adults OR S696 Loss Grief, Death & Bereavement
(3 cr.)
3 credit hours of another 600-level course
Mental Health and Addictions
Students in the MH&A concentration assess mental
health and addictions issues from person-in-environment,
consumer focused, strengths-based, recovery-oriented,
and other relevant perspectives. They formulate
intervention, prevention, or support and maintenance
plans collaboratively with clients. They prepare to serve as
case managers, counselors, clinicians, and advocates for
and with mental health and addictions consumers. Also,
they are able to seek, discover, and evaluate relevant
research studies and apply findings in evidence-based
social work practice. Within the context of their practice,
they conduct empirical evaluations of the effectiveness of
interventions and services.
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S618 Social Policy & Services: Mental Health and
Addictions (3 cr.)
S623 Practice Research Integrative Seminar I (3 cr.)
S651 Social Work Practicum II (4 cr.)
S652 Social Work Practicum III (5 cr.)
S661 Executive Leadership Practice (3 cr.)
S683 Community-Based Practice in Mental Health /
Addictions (3 cr.)
S685 Mental Health and Addictions Practice with
Individuals and Families (3 cr.)
S686 Social Work Practice: Addictions (3 cr.)
S687 Mental Health and Addictions Practice with
Groups (3 cr.)
3 credit hours of another 600-level course
School Social Work
Social workers in school systems function in an
environment where the primary purpose is education
and socialization. When primary and secondary school
students exhibit behaviors and problems that impede
their academic and social progress, they may benefit from
interventions that social workers are prepared to deliver.
The commitment to utilizing social workers in school
settings ebbs and flows, often dictated by fiscal resources
for education in general. Nonetheless, preparation of
students to enter this field of practice remains a priority
for the School of Social Work. Students who enter this
field are prepared with clinical skills for working with
children and adolescents and their families; with teambuilding skills for working with school administrators and
teachers; and, community skills to garner the resources
necessary for to promote a safe, secure environment for
those served in the school system.
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S618 Social Policy & Services: Schools (3 cr.)
S616 Social Work Practice in Schools(3 cr.)
S619 Social Work Practice with Children &
Adolescents (3 cr.)
S623 Practice Research Integrative Seminar I ( 3
cr.)
S632 Child Welfare Practice I (3 cr.)
S555 Social Work Practicum (4 cr.)
S652 Social Work Practicum III (5 cr.)
S661 Executive Leadership Practice (3 cr.)
3 credit hours of another 600-level course
Educational Requirements
Students are admitted to the undergraduate (B.S.W.) and
graduate (M.S.W.) programs on the assumption that they
have the potential academic ability and personal suitability
for completing the professional program in which they are
enrolled. All students in the B.S.W. and M.S.W. program
are expected to maintain the standards established by
the School of Social Work and those held by the social
work profession. In order to detect possible problems,
the School of Social Work reviews students’ performance
periodically.
The Bachelor of Social Work and the Master of Social
Work degrees are recommended by the school and
conferred by the university. Undergraduate students
must successfully complete 120 credit hours of general
education and required social work courses. Graduate
students must successfully complete 60 credit hours
of required and elective courses carrying graduate
credit. Each student is expected to follow the university
and school schedules and dates for completion of
requirements. Graduate students must complete all work
within five calendar years from the time of first enrollment.
M.S.W. Academic Requirements
For continuation in and graduation from the program,
students are required to:
1. earn at least a “C” in each Social Work course;
2. maintain a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA in Social
Work courses;
3. have satisfactorily fulfilled any and all contracts
for grades of Incomplete (see policy on Grades of
Incomplete)
4. Earn a grade of “C” in S555 Practicum I and a grade
of “Satisfactory” in S 651, Practicum II and S652,
Practicum II.
B.S.W. Academic Requirements
Bachelor of Social Work
For continuation in and graduation from the program,
students are required to:
1. earn at least a “C” in each Social Work course;
2. maintain a minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA in graduate
Social Work courses;
3. maintain an overall cumulative grade point average
of 2.5
4. have satisfactorily fulfilled any and all contracts
for grades of Incomplete (see policy on Grades of
Incomplete)
5. Earn a grade of “Satisfactory” in S 481, Practicum I
and S482, Practicum II.
Professional Requirements
Students are expected to behave in a manner consistent
with the Indiana University Code of Student Rights,
Responsibilities, and Conduct Handbook, the Code of
Ethics of the National Association of Social Workers, and
other professional guidelines established in the B.S.W.
and M.S.W. Handbooks. Refer to the section below
that outlines some examples of conduct that violates
professional and ethical standards.
Criminal Offense Disclosure and Sexual Offenders
Policy
As part of the application process, students provide a
disclosure statement regarding past criminal offenses.
Bachelor and Master of Social Work graduates are eligible
to apply for legal licensure by the State of Indiana.
While such disclosure does not pre-empt an admissions
decisions, admitted students must realize that a criminal
history may affect their eligibility for licensure.
It is the policy of the School of Social Work that no
student or applicant who has been convicted of sex
offenses against children shall be eligible for admission
or matriculation into the BSW, MSW or PhD programs.
Any student who is already in an IUSSW program and
whose name appears on the Registry during the time of
matriculation, or has been convicted of an offense for
which the student can be listed on the Registry, shall
be ineligible for continuation or completion of the MSW
degree. Any faculty member, student, field instructor,
or other person within the school who becomes aware
of such a situation should bring it to the attention of the
respective program director for appropriate action. This
policy and the right of appeal is discussed further in the
section on Students’ Rights and Responsibilities.
113
This four-year degree program prepares students for
generalist social work practice. It helps students develop
the competence to apply knowledge, values, and skills
to practice with individuals, small groups, organizations,
and communities. The program also prepares students
for graduate education. The B.S.W. degree equips the
practitioner to work with people who are encountering
challenges related to personal or social circumstances.
In addition, qualified graduates may apply for advanced
standing to the IU School of Social Work or other M.S.W.
programs nationwide. Following the equivalent of a
minimum of two postgraduate years of supervised social
work practice experience, B.S.W. graduates of IU are
eligible to apply for licensure by the state of Indiana. Upon
successful completion of licensing requirements, the
Indiana State Health Professions Bureau designates the
B.S.W. graduate a Licensed Social Worker (L.S.W.).
B.S.W. Program Mission and Vision
In 2011, the School of Social Work BSW Program
reaffirmed its mission and vision. The educational
mission of the Bachelor of Social Work program of Indiana
University is to prepare students for generalist social work
practice with vulnerable people in Indiana and beyond and
prepare graduates as critical thinkers and lifelong learners,
who reflect a global perspective, recognize strengths,
enhance opportunities, create change, and contribute to
the empowerment of the people they serve.
The BSW Program’s vision is to be a leader in preparing
social workers for strengths-based generalist social work
practice with vulnerable populations. As stated in the BSW
Student Handbook, the BSW Program is committed to
high standards for educational delivery and achievement;
the core values of the profession (service, social justice,
dignity and worth of the person, importance of human
relationships, integrity, and competence); diversity
among students, faculty, and staff; and, development,
dissemination, and assessment of effective practices.
The B.S.W. degree is offered on the Indianapolis (IUPUI),
Bloomington (IUB), Gary (IUN), and Richmond (IUE)
campuses. Students in the B.S.W. Program must
complete all sophomore and junior social work courses
and achieve senior standing before enrolling in the senior
social work courses.
For specific information regarding the B.S.W. Program at
IU Northwest , contact
Students are required to carry professional liability
insurance. Under the school’s blanket policy, the cost of
insurance is included in the student’s tuition fees.
B.S.W. Program
Indiana University Northwest
3400 Broadway
Gary, IN 46408-1197
Telephone: (219) 980-7111
E-mail: [email protected]
Credit for Life Experience
BSW Scholars Program (Title IV-E)
Academic credit for life experience and previous work
experience is not given in whole or part towards the social
work degree.
The Title IV-E Program is offered to students involved
in the Indiana Partnership for Social Work Education in
Child Welfare, funded in part by Title IV-E. The program
provides training and financial support for seniors pursuing
a career in protective services through the Indiana
Department of Child Services. Students apply for this
program in the junior year with the final selections made
by the Department of Child Services. Students begin the
program by enrolling in a required course in their junior
Liability Insurance
Bachelor of Social Work
General Information
The B.S.W. program was brought to the Indiana University
Northwest campus in 2010 and graduated its first class in
2012.
114
Bachelor of Social Work Admission
year and begin their practicum within the Department of
Child Services in the senior year.
Director. Early planning can ensure a smoother transfer
process.
Bachelor of Social Work Admission
Bachelor of Social Work Curriculum
Educational Requirements
Admission Requirements
Enrollment in the B.S.W. program requires formal
admission to the School of Social Work. The following are
the minimum requirements for admission consideration:
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Regular admission to the university.
Completion of a minimum of 12 credit hours.
Although advanced students may also apply.
Satisfactory completion (grade of C or higher) of the
required course S 141 Introduction to Social Work.
A minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of
2.5 on a 4.0 scale.
Evidence of characteristics or potential required for
competent social work practitioners as defined in
the mission statement of the school. Such evidence
may be derived from application materials, letters of
reference, pertinent work or volunteer experience,
and performance in S 141 Introduction to Social
Work.
The B.S.W. Program uses a rolling admissions policy. To
allow the admissions committee sufficient time to consider
a student for admittance the following semester, students
are advised to submit their completed applications a
month prior to the end of a university semester.
Admission information may be obtained from:
B.S.W. Admissions
Division of Social Work
Indiana University Northwest
Telephone: (219) 980-7111
[email protected]
Transfer Students Students transferring from another
four year accredited academic institution or a community
college into Indiana University have their transcripts
evaluated by the University Admissions office in relation
to their progress toward meeting general education
and supportive area degree requirements. In most
instances, the University Admissions office assessment is
accepted in relation to general and supportive area course
requirements.
All social work courses beyond the introductory level must
be taken in an accredited social work program. Transfer
courses taken at another accredited BSW program must
also meet Indiana University’s academic standards (an
earned letter grade of “C” or better), and be judged as
equivalent to the School of Social Work’s required social
work courses by the campus Program Director on the
campus where students are applying for admission.
A minimum of 120 credit hours is required for the B.S.W.
degree. In addition to social work courses and electives,
the following outlines the general liberal arts requirements.
Of these 52 credit hours are social works courses and
52-53 credit hours are devoted to supportive liberal arts
courses.
General education courses requirements vary by campus.
Students enrolled at the IU Northwest campus must meet
the campus's general education requirements.
General Education Requirements (9 courses)*
1. English Composition (ENG W131 and ENG W231)
2. Modern American History (HIST H106)
3. Two courses designated as arts and humanities
courses from the following departments:
• African American Studies
• Anthropology
• Communication
• English (excluding the basic composition
course)
• Fine Arts
• French (300 level and above)
• History
• Music (non-performance courses)
• Philosophy
• Religious Studies
• Spanish (200 level and above)
• Theatre
• Women's Studies
4. Human Biology
• One course in human biological sciences
5. Computer Science (CSCI 106)
6. Mathematics (100 level or above)
7. Physical Sciences with a Lab (minimum of 4 credit
hours)
8. Statistics (SPEA 300, PSY K300, or SOCK260)
Supportive Area Requirements (6 courses)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
American Government (POL Y103)
Cultural Anthropology (ANTH A104)
Introductory Psychology (
300-level psychology course
Introduction to Sociology (SOC S161)
Macro or Microeconomics, (ECON E103 of ECON
E104) or Labor and Economy (LS 230)
Ivy Tech Transfer Students
*General Education Requirements vary by campus
The Indiana University School of Social Work welcomes
students who are transferring from Ivy Tech community
college campuses. Ivy Tech students, who have earned
the associates degree in human services, are prepared
to complete the four-year BSW degree at the Indiana
University School of Social Work.
Social Work Requirements (17 courses)
Students currently enrolled at Ivy Tech are encouraged
to plan ahead prior to transferring to an IUSSW BSW
program by calling or meeting with the campus Program
S102 Understanding Diversity in a Pluralistic Society (3
cr.)
S141 Introduction to Social Work (3 cr.)
S221 Growth and Human Development in the Social
Environment (3 cr.)
S251 History and Analysis of Social Welfare Policy (3 cr.)
S322 Small Group Theory and Practice (3 cr.)
About the IU School of Medicine - Northwest
S331 Generalist Social Work Practice I: Theory and Skills
(3 cr.)
S332 Generalist Social Work Practice II: Theory and Skills
(3 cr.)
S371 Social Work Research (3 cr.)
S401 Integrative Social Work Practicum Seminar I (2 cr.)
S402 Integrative Social Work Practicum Seminar II (3 cr.)
S423 Organizational Theory and Practice (3 cr.)
S433 Community Behavior and Practice (3 cr.)
S442 Practice-Policy Seminar in Fields of Practice (3 cr.)
S472 Social Work Practice Evaluation (3 cr.)
S481 Social Work Practicum I (4 cr.)
S482 Social Work Practicum II (4 cr.)
Academic Regulations and Policies
For continuance in and graduation from the program,
students are required to: (1) maintain a minimum
cumulative GPA of 2.5 in all letter-graded courses, (2)
attain a minimum grade of C (2.0) or satisfactory in each
required social work course, and (3) carry out professional
activity in conformity with the values and ethics of the
profession.
In the event of failure to meet such requirements, students
will be ineligible to continue in the program. Such students
are encouraged to consult with their faculty advisor
regarding realistic planning for the future, including
the right to petition for administrative review. Detailed
descriptions of student continuation policies are in the
B.S.W. Student Handbook.
Repeated Courses
Required social work courses may be repeated only after
the student is reinstated in the program with permission.
Incompletes
Instructors at Indiana University School of Social
Work follow closely the university policy regarding the
assignment of grades of Incomplete (I). An Incomplete
may be assigned by an instructor when exceptional
circumstances, such as an illness, injury, or a family
emergency, prevent a student from finishing all the work
required for the course. Instructors may award the grade
of Incomplete only when such hardship would render it
unjust to hold the student to the time limits previously
set. Furthermore, the grade of Incomplete may be given
only when the student has completed three-fourths of the
semester with course work of passing quality.
The instructor, on a case-by-case basis, evaluates
incompletes. The grade of Incomplete (I) will be changed
to a grade by the instructor of record, based upon the
contract devised by the course instructor and approved by
the B.S.W. Program Director.
If the terms of the Incomplete contract are not met by the
student, the instructor will assign the original grade.
Pass/Fail Grades
A maximum of four pass/fail courses may be applied to the
B.S.W. degree. All general education and supportive area
requirements need a letter grade. All required social work
courses receive a letter grade except for S 482 Practicum
II, which is graded as Satisfactory/Fail.
Credit for Life Experience
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Academic credit for previous life and work experience
is not given in whole or in part toward the social work
degree.
Criminal History
Students with criminal histories other than those deriving
from sexual offenses may be eligible for admission into
the B.S.W. program. Eligibility in these circumstances
is determined by a case-by-case assessment. While
having a criminal background may not preclude students
from participating in the B.S.W. program, they should
be aware of educational and professional implications.
Agency policies and state laws may impose limitations
for students and professionals with criminal histories
attempting to obtain field placements, employment in
certain practice settings, and/or professional licensure. .
Students with felony convictions must disclose this
information upon admission due to professional liability
insurance requirements of the university. Laws vary by
state and are subject to change over time. Students
should consult individual state licensing agencies for
further information. For Indiana’s licensing requirements
refer to the Indiana Professional Licensing Agency at
www.in.gov/pla/bandc/mhcb/. The B.S.W. program is not
responsible for disruptions in a student’s educational plan
resulting from a criminal background.
IU School of Medicine Northwest
Administrative Officers
D. Craig Brater, M.D., Dean of the School of Medicine,
Director of the Indiana Statewide Medical Education
System, and Director of Indiana University Medical Center
Patrick Bankston, Ph.D., Associate Dean and Director of
the School of Medicine—Northwest Campus, and Dean,
College of Health and Human Services
Carl Marfurt, Ph.D., Associate Director for Research of the
School of Medicine-Northwest Campus
Ernest Talarico, Ph.D., Associate Director of Education of
the School of Medicine-Northwest Campus
Web site: iusm-nw.medicine.iu.edu
Phone: (219) 980-6550
About the IU School of Medicine - Northwest
Location and Facilties
Indiana University School of Medicine-Northwest is
located on the Indiana University Northwest campus
in the Glen Park area of the city of Gary and occupies
approximately 35,000 square feet of a new building
on the southwest corner of the campus. The safe and
attractive campus is bounded on three sides by the Little
Calumet River, the well-kept residential community of
Glen Park, and the Gleason Golf Course. Students have
24-hour access to the building and all its facilities. The
new building includes a student lounge with a small
kitchen area and refrigerator for personal food storage and
preparation. Locker rooms and showers provide students
with a place to freshen up after exercise or sessions in the
gross anatomy laboratory.
The current undergraduate enrollment at the IU Northwest
campus is approximately 5,000 students. IU Northwest
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Patient-Centered Learning Program
has a student union complex with gymnasium and
fitness center available for medical student exercise
and a cafeteria with low-priced food. Cultural activities
on campus are numerous, including an IUN-sponsored
local drama group, the Northwest Theater, and the
Northwest Indiana Symphony Orchestra. In addition, the
numerous sports events, museums, ethnic neighborhoods,
restaurants, and cultural attractions of Chicago are less
than an hour's drive from the campus. For those who
prefer an escape to the out-of-doors, the Hoosier Prairie
and the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, in addition to
numerous parks in Lake, Porter, and LaPorte Counties,
are outstanding areas for hiking, swimming, picnics, and
cross-country skiing.
of patients. (b) Small numbers of lectures presented by
experienced faculty supplementing the PBL sessions
by providing helpful overviews of key concepts; (c)
Organization of the first- and second-year curricula into
seven sequential "steps" or units, allowing students to
concentrate all their studies to one subject at a time; (c)
Basic science laboratories in Gross Anatomy, Histology,
Neuroscience, and Pathology, providing active-learning
experiences that reinforce and expand the knowledge
base attained during PBL sessions and lectures; and (e)
PBL sessions, lectures, and laboratories end by noon
each day, allowing ample time for independent study and
one or more afternoons per week for other patient based
activities.
Housing
Curriculum
Northwest Indiana offers a variety of housing opportunities
within easy driving distance of the campus. IUN is a
commuter campus and, as such, has no dormitories or
other student housing. For housing information, contact
Dawn Ilgenfritz, director of operations and finance, Indiana
University School of Medicine-Northwest, phone (219)
980-6551, [email protected] Unscheduled visits cannot be
accommodated.
The seven steps (courses) of the IU School of MedicineNorthwest PBL curriculum are:
Patient-Centered Learning Program
The academic program at the Northwest Campus is
designed around the principle that the learning of essential
basic science information should occur in the context of
patient interaction, patient case studies, and practice of
clinical skills. To that end, the faculty of the Northwest
Campus have dedicated themselves to a student-centered
and patient-centered approach that involves their widely
acclaimed Problem Based Learning Curriculum, the
unique History and Physical Learning Center, the Steven
C. Beering Library, externship opportunities with local
physicians and hospitals, and the participation of 132
volunteer community physicians.
The Northwest campus Patient-Centered Learning
Program provides an unique opportunity within the Indiana
system for students to experience a different, and we think
excellent, approach to medical student learning.
We welcome visits from prospective students who
would like to learn more about our Patient-Centered
Learning Program and to participate with our first or
second year medical students in one of the case-based
learning sessions described below. Please contact Dr. Pat
Bankston, assistant dean and director, [email protected],
to schedule a visit.
Problem-Based (Case-Based) Learning
Approach
For 19 years after its founding in 1972, Indiana University
School of Medicine-Northwest offered a traditional first
and second year medical curriculum. Beginning with
the 1989-1990 academic year, the Northwest Campus
introduced an innovative curriculum with heavy emphasis
on problem solving and active learning. The highlights of
this new curriculum include: (a) Problem-based learning
(PBL) sessions, where small groups of five to seven
students meet three times a week for two hours to
discuss and analyze patient cases in the presence of a
faculty moderator. During these student-directed PBL
sessions, students set learning objectives, generate
and test hypotheses, share learned information, and
apply knowledge of basic science principles to the care
First Year
Step 1 The Molecular Basis of Medicine (6
weeks) (Biochemistry, Molecular Biology)
Step 2 Human Structure (11 weeks)(Gross
Anatomy, Histology, Cell Biology)
Step 3 Systemic Function and Drug Action (6
weeks)(Physiology)
Step 4 Neural Control and Disease (6 weeks)
(Neuroscience)
Step 5 Medications and Disease (6 weeks)
(Pharmacology)
Doctor-Patient Relationship (dispersed
throughout the first-year)
Second Year
Step 6 Invasion and Defense(11 weeks)(General
Pathology, Microbiology, Immunology)
Step 7 Pathophysiology and Advanced (24
weeks)
Problem Solving (Introduction to Medicine,
Systemic Pathology, Advanced Doctor / Patient
Relationship)
Noncredit Activities
Basic Science Seminars
Invited scientists and clinicians present advanced topics
and results of their research. Local physicians and Indiana
University Northwest faculty and students are invited to
attend these weekly presentations.
Fourth-Year Electives
(Instructors and credit units to be arranged.)
Physicians of northwest Indiana participate in offering
fourth-year elective courses at St. Catherine, St. Margaret
\Mercy Healthcare Centers, Methodist (Northlake and
Southlake), St. Mary Medical Center, St. Anthony Medical
Center and Porter Memorial hospitals, and Our Lady
of Mercy hospitals in collaboration with the School of
Medicine—Northwest Campus and the Indiana University
School of Medicine. Those courses cover medical
subspecialties including internal medicine, inhalation
therapy, cardiac catheterization, clinical nephrology,
obstetrics and gynecology, ophthalmology, pathology,
psychiatry, radiology, surgery, and general emergency
care.
Instructional Programs
Graduate Programs
(Instructors, courses of study, and credit hours to be
arranged.)
Since the School of Medicine-Northwest Campus faculty
also hold appointments in the University Graduate School,
graduate programs for the M.S. or the Ph.D. degree are
offered in cooperation with the basic science departments
of the Indiana University School of Medicine. Most course
work and all research leading to an advanced degree
can be completed on this campus. Graduate students
select courses from the medical school curriculum and/
or advanced graduate courses offered by the respective
basic science departments. Interested students are
encouraged to contact the office of the director.
Third-Year Clerkships and Fourth-Year
Courses and Elective
A full complement of third-year clinical experiences
required for third-year medical students is offered at
the Northwest Campus. The clinical years are what all
medical students anticipate, a time when lectures and
laboratories translate into patient care. The IU School
of Medicine - Northwest students have wide access to a
variety of clinical settings in Northwest Indiana. Numerous
hospitals and outpatient facilities in Northwest Indiana and
throughout the state provide students with valuable clinical
experiences as they rotate throughouttheir electives.
Fourth-year students have the unique opportunity to
pursue electives for seven months — a large amount of
time compared to with many other U.S. medical schools.
The third and fourth year curriculum also offers unique
opportunities due to the campus location among the most
underserved populations in the country to concentrate on
Urban Health and Health Care Disparities. Longitudinal
experiences with urban families and service learning
projects with teams of students from IU Northwest’s
College of Health and Human Services and School of
Public and Environmental Affairs are special features.
Year 3 is organized into three blocks of 16 weeks in
duration that can be given in any order. One block
is composed of clerkships in Surgery, Obstetrics
and Gynecology, and Surgical Subspecialties (and
Anesthesia). The third is composed of Family Medicine,
Pediatrics, and a vacation month.
Year 4 has three required courses of one month in
duration and 28 weeks of elective courses. The required
courses are Radiology, Emergency Medicine, and
Medicine Sub-Internships.
School of Business and
Economics
Administrative Officers
Anna S. Rominger, J.D., Dean
William B. Nelson, Ph.D., Associate Dean
John A. Gibson, M.B.A., Director for the Center for
Economic Education and Director of Undergraduate and
Graduate Programs
Helen Marie Harmon, M.A.L.S., Assistant Director
Phone: (219) 980-6552 Web site: http://www.iun.edu/
business/
117
Overview
Instructional Programs
The majority of the school's resources are committed to
instructional activities, and, of these, the bulk is devoted
to the degree programs. But an adequate summary of
the total work of the school must also give attention to the
other forms of instruction, in which it engages, to activities
that support the instructional enterprise, and to research
and publication programs.
The School of Business and Economics at IU Northwest
offers two degree programs. The undergraduate degree
is the Bachelor of Science in Business, and the graduate
degree is the Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.).
The school also offers an Associate of Science in
Business degree and a Postbaccalaureate Certificate
in Accounting. Additionally, holders of a baccalaureate
degree who want to gain expertise in a specific functional
area of business may be able to enroll in course work that
will allow them to do so.
Objectives
Indiana University's educational mission is to provide
high-quality bachelor's and master's business and
economics programs in major urban areas within the
state. Established in 1966, the School of Business and
Economics at IU Northwest endeavors to offer high levels
of teaching, research, and services consistent with Indiana
University's overall objectives.
The IU Northwest School of Business and Economics will
(1) offer students a high-quality business program that
meets the standards of professional accreditation; (2)
offer students a well-balanced curriculum that requires
students to use behavioral, functional, and technological
tools to solve business problems; (3) develop student
leadership and teamwork skills; (4) provide students
with opportunities for relevant professional experience
to meet the current challenges of business; (5) expand
knowledge by producing quality business and economics
research; and (6) provide professional service to alumni,
businesses, and other employers in our seven-county area
of Northwest Indiana.
Accreditation
In 2010, the School of Business and Economics received
reaffirmation of accreditation by the Association to
Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB
International), an organization promoting high standards
in professional education for business. Accreditation is
based upon the qualifications of the faculty; the success
of the school in meeting its mission; and the assurance of
student learning.
Accreditation by AACSB International is the most
prestigious accreditation a business school may achieve,
with only 5% of business schools world-wide who are
accredited.
Instructional Programs
The majority of the school's resources are committed to
instructional activities, and, of these, the bulk is devoted
to the degree programs. But an adequate summary of
the total work of the school must also give attention to the
other forms of instruction, in which it engages, to activities
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Standards of Professional Conduct
that support the instructional enterprise, and to research
and publication programs.
Appointed Non-Union Support and Service Staff and
Professional Staff.
The School of Business and Economics at IU Northwest
offers two degree programs. The undergraduate degree
is the Bachelor of Science in Business, and the graduate
degree is the Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.).
The school also offers an Associate of Science in
Business degree and a Postbaccalaureate Certificate
in Accounting. Additionally, holders of a baccalaureate
degree who want to gain expertise in a specific functional
area of business may be able to enroll in course work that
will allow them to do so.
Contact Information
Standards of Professional
Conduct
Centers & Institutes
Shared Values
The School of Business and Economics functions as both
a learning environment and an academic community with
the central functions of learning, teaching, and scholarship
characterized by reasoned discourse, intellectual honesty,
and mutual respect. The School of Business and
Economics also supports The Shared Vision of Indiana
University Northwest.
•
All members of the School of Business and
Economics community – students, faculty, staff - are
expected to be courteous to one another in all oral
and written interactions and to be considerate in their
treatment towards each other.
•
All members of this community are expected
to show tolerance and respect for diversity, as
defined by The Shared Vision. This also includes
the understanding that there may be viewpoints,
ideas, and opinions that differ from theirs and it’s
acceptable to ‘agree to disagree.’
•
All members of this community will honor the
confidentiality and privacy of others.
•
All members of this community will respect
University property, as well as the physical and
intellectual property of all others, when engaged in
university-related activities.
•
All members of this community are expected to
refrain from harming others.
•
All members of this community, when representing
the School of Business and Economics, will do so
in a positive manner with integrity, trustworthiness,
honesty, and professional demeanor.
Governing Codes and Procedures
The rights, responsibilities, and conduct of students are
defined and regulated by the Indiana University Code of
Student Rights, Responsibilities, and Conduct.
The faculty in the School of Business and Economics
follow specific guidelines set forth in the Indiana University
Academic Handbook, specifically under the section
entitled “Code of Academic Ethics.”
The professional staff and the bi-weekly staff in the School
of Business and Economics follow specific guidelines
set forth in the Indiana University Personnel Policies for
School of Business and Economics
IU Northwest
Dunes Medical / Professional Building, Room 1103
3400 Broadway
Gary, IN 46408
(219) 980-6552
Contact the School of Business and Economics at
[email protected] for additional contact information.
Assessment Center
Our award-winning Assessment Center in the School of
Business and Economics offers a very exciting opportunity
for our students and has two primary goals. First, we
want to ensure that students who leave Indiana University
Northwest are able to succeed in their chosen fields. We
want them to be able to find employment and perform well
in their jobs. Second, we want to ensure that our program
is functioning effectively at the university level. We want to
ensure that students are successful in school and that our
courses are effective in correcting students’ deficits. To
achieve these goals we have chosen competencies that
we have identified as being highly sought by employers as
well as important to academic success, including critical
thinking, teamwork, leadership, delegation, ethics, and
conflict management.
Students will complete the Assessment Center (as a
course requirement) in both their freshman and senior
years, as we help students identify their developmental
needs with respect to certain life skills that are helpful
to students as they progress through college and enter
the workforce. We place students into work related
simulations that allow them to see what it is like to be in
the workplace. Their performance is then evaluated by
business leaders from the community.
This approach is going to benefit students in several
ways. First, students will be introduced to key skills that
employers look for in applicants. Second, students will be
able to spend their time at Indiana University Northwest
improving deficits identified in the Assessment Center.
Students will prepare a development plan based on the
feedback from the Assessment Center. The development
plan will establish goals for improving deficits using
coursework and other Indiana University Northwest
activities. Lastly, Indiana University Northwest will use
the Assessment Center data to modify its curriculum to
further benefit the students and better prepare them for
the workplace.
Center for Economic Education
The school's award-winning Center for Economic
Education has been Northwest Indiana's leader in
economic education and financial literacy for more than 20
years. The center is nationally accredited by the National
Council on Economic Education (NCEE) and at the state
level by the Indiana Council for Economic Education
(ICEE). Each summer the center offers graduate courses
in economics for credit for elementary, middle school, and
high school teachers. Additionally, noncredit workshops
Scholarships & Awards
in economics and personal finance are offered to the
educational community during the academic year.
The Center for Economic Education at IU Northwest is
part of a network of 10 Centers for Economic Education in
the state.
Center for Management
Development
The Center for Management Development provides
customized, executive development and consulting
services to various organizations. We partner with the
business, government, and not-for-profit communities to
develop and promote effective organizations. The center
is committed to providing dependable, high- quality, costeffective services.
We draw upon the full resources of IU Northwest to meet
the needs of a number of clients located throughout the
United States. We provide four distinct kinds of services.
The first includes a wide variety of training activities
that fall within two broad categories: management
development and workforce development. The second
encompasses a number of consultation services.
Some of these services are developmental in nature
(e.g., total quality management, human resources,
project management, etc.). Others consist of more
discrete packages of services (e.g., quality assurance,
performance monitoring, process control, survey work,
focus groups, etc.). Our third broad category of activity
includes facilitation and mediation services. Finally, the
Center for Management Development contracts with
firms to perform certain kinds of project work (e.g., the
development of job descriptions and compensation
systems, job search, etc.).
If you would like additional information, call the Center for
Management Development at (219) 981-4257.
Small Business Institute
The Small Business Institute (SBI) is a program in the
School of Business and Economics of IU Northwest. This
program provides confidential, intensive, high- quality
consulting services to small businesses in northwest
Indiana. These services are provided by high-caliber
seniors in the undergraduate business program of
the university under the direct supervision of a faculty
member. The seniors are formed into teams of three
to five people and assigned to a small business for a
semester. While assigned to the business, the team
does an industry and competitive analysis for the firm,
a financial overview of the firm, and then tackles one or
more problems specific to the firm.
IU Northwest is proud to be a member of this elite group
of schools that have been carefully approved to manage
an SBI program by the Small Business Institute Directors
Association.
Distinctions & Opportunities
The School of Business and Economics identifies students
graduating with the Bachelor of Science in Business with
three levels of academic distinction: highest distinction,
high distinction, and distinction. The minimum cumulative
GPA to receive degrees with distinction are highest
distinction, a minimum GPA of 3.85; high distinction, a
minimum GPA of 3.70; Distinction, a minimum GPA of
119
3.55. No more than 10 percent of the students receiving
the Bachelor of Science in Business in any academic
year may receive a degree with distinction. Graduates
receiving degrees with distinction have the appropriate
level of distinction noted on their diplomas and in the
Commencement program; these graduates may wear
the cream and crimson fourragere at Commencement.
Graduate students do not qualify for the various levels of
distinction.
Guidance & Counseling Services
Students in the School of Business and Economics are
responsible for planning their own programs and for
meeting degree requirements. It is their responsibility to
understand fully and to comply with all the provisions of
this bulletin.
An important portion of total faculty time is devoted to
assisting students in making proper program and career
choices. Degree candidates will be assigned a faculty
advisor in their field of major interest who will aid their
program planning, follow their progress, and be available
for general counseling. Students may, in addition, turn to a
member of the faculty specializing in the curricular area in
which they are taking course work or contemplating study.
They may obtain additional counseling from the Office of
Counseling and Student Records.
The director and assistant to the director are available to
meet any student, whether on a day or evening schedule.
The office maintains a complete record of each student's
accomplishments and progress to aid students in reaching
their goals most effectively.
Student Organizations
The faculty of the School of Business and Economics
recognizes that student organizations may contribute
greatly to the total development of all students. A number
of student organizations exist at IU Northwest, and it
is recommended that each student take advantage of
extracurricular activities and opportunities provided by
those organizations. Some organizations are purpose
oriented and attempt to develop and improve a student's
understanding of the business environment. Other
organizations are honorary.
Accounting and Business Student
Organization (ABSO) Club
The IU Northwest ABSO maintains a close relationship
with accounting and business students, alumni, faculty,
and business professionals. Meetings include speakers
from prominent businesses and accounting firms.
Membership is open to all students.
Beta Gamma Sigma
Membership in Beta Gamma Sigma is the highest
recognition a business student can receive in a
baccalaureate or postbaccalaureate (master's) program
at a school accredited by AACSB International. To be
eligible for membership, the academic ranking of those
being considered must place them in the upper 10 percent
of the junior or senior class; or the upper 20 percent of the
graduating master's class.
Scholarships & Awards
Students in the School of Business and Economics
are eligible for awards and scholarships including the
120
Undergraduate Programs
following: Lloyd Buckwell Scholarship, Albert and Margaret
Gallagher Scholarship, Strack Family Scholarship, Indiana
Association of Certified Public Accountants Award,
Wanda Dudzik Scholarship, and School of Business and
Economics Scholarship.
The Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships has more
information about these scholarships and others on their
website.
Undergraduate Programs
concentration will be admitted directly into the School of
Business and Economics.
Enrollment Restriction
Students pursuing degrees in academic divisions other
than Business and Economics are permitted to enroll
in a maximum of 30 credit hours of business courses.
All students are required to meet all prerequisites and
must obtain school authorization to enroll in any junioror senior- level business and economics course prior to
registration.
Undergraduate studies provide opportunities for breadth
of education as well as for specialization. IU Northwest
subscribes to the principle that a significant portion of
a student's academic program should be in general
education subjects. The general education aspects of the
program are then complemented by study in the basic
areas of business administration.
Students who intend to transfer to Bloomington or other IU
campuses and apply for admission to the undergraduate
programs in business must understand that the admission
requirements for business vary among the IU campuses.
Students should consult the IU bulletin for the campus to
which they seek admission for specific requirements of the
business program.
In addition, all undergraduate study programs
include courses that ensure a basic understanding
of management principles and practices in the
dynamic economic, social, and political environment
of today. Consideration is also given to basic trends or
developments that are likely to shape the pattern of the
world in the years ahead.
Degree Applications
Degree Programs
Associate of Science in Business
The School of Business and Economics offers a two-year
Associate of Science in Business degree.
Bachelor of Science in Business
The undergraduate program typically occupies the three
final undergraduate years and leads to the Bachelor of
Science in Business degree. This professional degree has
extensive arts, science, and humanities content.
The Bachelor of Science in Business degree is awarded
when a student has successfully completed (1) a
core of general education courses, (2) a core of
prescribed business courses, (3) a group of courses
in a concentration, and (4) elective courses to meet
distributional and total credit hour requirements. Courses
are available to meet the general education core,
the business core, elective requirements, and the
requirements of two concentrations: accounting/financial
information systems and business administration.
Bachelor of Arts in Economics
Consult the College of Arts and Sciences section of this
bulletin for the degree requirements for a bachelor of arts
in economics.
Consult with your economics faculty advisor for the degree
requirements for the concentration in financial economics.
Minors
The School of Business and Economics offers any nonbusiness undergraduate majors the opportunity to minor in
business administration or accounting.
Policies & Procedures
Students admitted to IU Northwest who declare a business
administration or accounting/financial information systems
Candidates for the Bachelor of Science and Associate
of Science degrees must file a degree application during
registration the semester before they intend to graduate.
This allows time for the student's academic record to be
audited for degree certification. Without the audit, the
student cannot be recommended for the conferral of the
degree.
Credit Hours Requirement
The minimum number of credit hours required for the
baccalaureate degree is 124 in courses meeting the
various requirements stated in this bulletin. Of these,
a minimum of 65 credit hours must be in business and
economics courses, and at least 59 credit hours must
be in courses other than business and economics. The
School of Business and Economics requires that at least
50 percent of the business credit hours required for the
degree be earned at IU Northwest or one of the Indiana
University campuses.
No credit is given toward a degree in business for courses
taken throughout the university with a prefix of 0, or for
courses taken from the Division of General and Technical
Studies, or for other non-college-level courses.
Senior Residence Requirement
The senior year (the last 30 credit hours of work) must be
completed in residence on one of the Indiana University
campuses offering a four-year program. Students will
be certified for graduation by the campus at which they
complete the last semester (12 credit hours or more).
Registration for a minimum of two semesters in the School
of Business and Economics is required.
Permission to take credit during the senior year at another
institution or by correspondence study courses may be
procured to a maximum of 6 credits by petitioning the
assistant to the director.
Junior College, Community College, and
Correspondence Study Credits
Credits earned through junior and community colleges are
limited to a maximum of 60 credit hours. Correspondence
study is limited to 6 credit hours.
Within the above limitations, correspondence study
courses may be taken through the Division of Independent
Study of the School of Continuing Studies. Because of
Requirements for a Second Bachelor's Degree
121
their basic nature in a student's program, no business or
economics courses may be taken by correspondence to
count toward degree requirements.
with a minimum grade of C (2.0) in each course. Any
course with a number beginning with a zero will not be
counted toward graduation requirements.
For a complete listing of courses available through
independent study by correspondence at Indiana
University, consult the School of Continuing Studies
Bulletin.
Probation
Credit by Self-Aquired Competency
In the School of Business and Economics, at the
discretion of the Graduate-Undergraduate Committee, a
student may be dismissed from the school if the student
has consistently failed to make progress toward meeting
general education, business core, or concentration
requirements. Generally, a student on probation will be
dismissed if the student is 15 credit points below a 2.0
grade point average, or, if in two consecutive subsequent
enrollments the student fails to make a 2.0 in those two
enrollments considered as a unit and adds 10 credit points
to the deficiency record.
The School of Business and Economics does not award
credit on the basis of self-acquired competency.
The school will not accept transfer of credit from other
institutions for business courses if the credit was awarded
on the basis of self-acquired competency.
For nonbusiness courses, the school will accept coursespecific credit awarded on the basis of self-acquired
competency by other baccalaureate-granting divisions/
schools of Indiana University and by other institutions
accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges or
comparable regional associations.
The school will not accept general (non—course specific)
self-acquired competency credit awarded by other
divisions/schools of Indiana University or by other
institutions.
Transfer Credit Policy
Courses that were taken at other institutions and that
appear similar in either title or objectiveto the 300- or
400-level (junior and senior) courses offered by the
School of Business and Economics will be transferred
as undistributed electives and will not be regarded as
equivalent unless at least one of the following validation
processes has been performed.
1. Completion of a course review with documented
evaluation of the content, level, method of
instruction, objectives, etc., used in the course(s)
being validated. The evaluation must be performed
by an appropriate member of the school's faculty; or
2. Successful completion of an examination based
upon the material covered in that course offered by
the school; or
3. Satisfactory completion and documentation of a
subsequent course offered by the school, provided
that a significant prerequisite relationship between
the courses can be demonstrated.
Courses in advanced business subjects, not open to
freshmen and sophomores, which have been taken at twoyear institutions in the freshman and sophomore years,
will not be accepted as equivalents of the courses offered
at Indiana University. Consult with the assistant to the
director for appropriate validation processes.
Only credits earned at Indiana University will count toward
a student's grade point average.
School Grade Requirements
To be certified for graduation, a student must have a
minimum average of C (2.0) in all course work, a minimum
average of C (2.0) in all courses taken toward the degree,
a minimum average of C (2.0) for all courses taken in
the basic business and economics core, and a minimum
average of C (2.0) in the area of concentration. A student
must also have completed ENG-W 131 Elementary
Composition and CSCI-A 106 Introduction to Computing
Students are automatically placed on probation whenever
their cumulative grade point averages are below 2.0.
Dismissal
Furthermore, upon the recommendation of the GraduateUndergraduate Committee and with the approval of the
dean of the School of Business and Economics, any
student whose work is unsatisfactory or whose conduct is
unethical may be dismissed from the school.
Pass-Fail Option
Business students may elect to take one course each
semester with a grade of P (Pass) or F (Fail), with a
maximum of two such courses each school year, including
summer sessions. The student must exercise the election
of this option within the first three weeks of the semester.
Limitations on use of the Pass/Fail policy are as follows.
School of Business and Economics students may not
take any business or economics course Pass/Fail. Also,
the Pass/Fail option cannot be used for courses that
satisfy the general education requirements (I—VIII), which
include the 12 credit hours required for general education
electives. The option can be used only for courses that are
pure electives taken outside the School of Business and
Economics. A grade of P is not counted in the cumulative
grade point average, but a grade of F is included. A grade
of P cannot subsequently be changed to a grade of A, B,
C, or D.
Concentration Declaration
Students may declare a concentration before the
beginning of a semester. Any student who has not
selected a concentration will be classified as a business
administration major and will be expected to follow the
program of that concentration.
Business and economics students may choose no
more than two concentrations. They must meet all
the requirements for both concentrations. Only one
course may be used to satisfy the requirements for both
concentrations.
Credit Deadline
All credit of candidates for degrees, except that for the
work of the current semester, should be on record at least
one month prior to the conferring of the degrees.
Requirements for a Second Bachelor's
Degree
The School of Business and Economics offers to holders
of a bachelor's degree in fields other than business a
second bachelor's degree in business. The requirements
122
Statute of Limitations
are identical to the requirements for the bachelor's degree
in business (see succeeding pages).
only to students who have completed 56 or more hours of
credit applicable toward a degree.
The candidate may, of course, be exempted from any of
those requirements already fulfilled in acquiring the first
bachelor's degree.
General Education Core Requirements
Normally, the holder of a bachelor's degree who wishes
to pursue further education is encouraged to become
qualified for admission to graduate study. In certain cases,
however, a student may be admitted to candidacy for
a second bachelor's degree. When such admission is
granted, candidates must earn at least 30 additional
credit hours in residence and meet the requirements
of the School of Business and Economics and of the
concentration in which they are candidates.
At least 50 percent of the business courses required
for a business degree must be earned at Indiana
University. Students who have been awarded the B.S.
in Business degree at Indiana University may register
as special students to meet the requirements of another
concentration but cannot be certified for the degree a
second time.
Statute of Limitations
Students who are candidates for the Bachelor of Science
in Business degree have the right to complete degree
requirements specified by the bulletin in effect at the time
they matriculated at Indiana University, provided (1) that
the necessary courses are available and (2) that no more
than 10 calendar years have elapsed since matriculation.
In the event that courses are not available or more than 10
years have elapsed, students must apply to the school to
update their programs to the bulletin currently in effect.
Bachelor of Science in Business
Curriculum
Proper enrollment is the individual responsibility of each
student. There are always level prerequisites, and there
are frequently course prerequisites for the courses in
all business programs. Improper enrollments may be
cancelled by the School of Business and Economics at
any time, and, if credit is earned in such an enrollment, the
school may refuse to apply that credit to a degree program
or may require enrollment in an additional course.
Course Requirements
Before there can be a proper enrollment in any course
having prerequisites, the prerequisites must be
successfully completed. Concurrent enrollment is not
permissible unless specifically stated otherwise.
The undergraduate curriculum in the School of Business
and Economics consists of four parts:
1.
2.
3.
4.
the general education core,
the basic business core,
the professional courses for a concentration, and
electives to meet distributional and total hours
requirements.
Level Requirements
Courses numbered 200-299 are open only to students
who have completed 24 or more hours of credit applicable
toward a degree. Courses numbered 300-499 are open
(59 credit hours)
I. Communications (12 cr.)
ENG-W 131 Elementary Composition (3 cr.)
ENG-W 231 Professional Writing Skills (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 121 Public Speaking (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 223 Business and Professional Speaking (3 cr.)
II. Mathematics and Science (7-8 cr.)
MATH-M 118 Finite Mathematics (3 cr.)
Natural science elective with lab (4-5 cr.)
III. Social/Behavioral Sciences (6 cr.)
PSY-P 102 Introductory Psychology II (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 122 Interpersonal Communication (3 cr.)
IV. Computer Science (6 cr.)
CSCI-A 106 Introduction to Computing (3 cr.)
CSCI-A 285 Advanced Microcomputer Applications (3 cr.)
V. Arts and Humanities (6 cr.)
PHIL-P 150 Elementary Logic (3 cr.)
PHIL-P 306 Business Ethics (3 cr.)
VI. Career Planning (4 cr.)
BUS-X 220 Career Perspectives (2 cr.)
BUS-X 255 Diversity and Inclusion in the Workplace (1 cr.)
BUS-X 410 Business Career Planning and Placement (1
cr.)
VII. Cultural and Historical Studies (6 cr.)
ECON-E 111 Economic History (3 cr.)
Select one from the following:
Afro-American Studies (excluding: A343,A384, A488,
A495)
Anthropology (A104, P210)
Canadian Studies (C101)
Comparative Literature (C190, C253, C261, C340, C460)
English (L364, L370, L382)
Fine Arts (A383)
French (F100, F150, F200, F250)
German (G100, G150, G200, G250)
History (A314, A315, A317, A318, A382, H105, H106,
H113, H114, H207, H220, H228, H232, H260)
Italian (M100, M150, M200, M250)
Latino Studies (C101, C151, C213, C290, C301, C351,
C352, C446)
Philosophy (P140, P201, P393)
Spanish (S100, S150, S200, S250, S260, S284, S290)
Women's and Gender Studies (W200, W201, W301,
W401)
VIII. General Education Electives (12 cr.)
BUS-F 260: Personal Finance (3 cr.)
An Additional 9 cr. Courses chosen from throughout
the university but excluding the Division of General and
Technical Studies courses and School of Business &
Economics courses (with the exception of those listed
Curriculum Concentrations
below). Additionally, any courses considered remedial or
developmental (such as those beginning with a O or X) will
not be counted in this group or for any credit toward the
business degree. Only a maximum of 3 credit hours may
be taken in HPER (Physical Education - 1 cr. hr.) courses
and counted in this group and applied toward the business
degree requirements.
Allowable B&E courses for General Education:
BUS-A 206: Uses of Financial Accounting Data (3 cr.)
BUS-F 261: Personal Investing (3 cr.)
BUS-M 200: Marketing and Society (3 cr.)
Basic Business and Economics Core
Functional Skills
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
BUS W100 Business Administration Introduction (3
cr.)
ECON E103 Introduction to Microeconomics (3 cr.)
ECON E104 Introduction to Macroeconomics (3 cr.)
ECON E270 Introduction to Statistical Theory for
Economics and Business (3 cr.)
BUS A201 Introduction to Financial Accounting (3
cr.)
BUS A202 Introduction to Managerial Accounting (3
cr.)
BUS L201 Legal Environment of Business (3 cr.)
BUS F301 Financial Management (3 cr.)
BUS M301 Introduction to Marketing Management (3
cr.)
BUS P301 Operations Management (3 cr.)
BUS D301 International Business Environment (3
cr.)
Teamwork and Leadership
•
•
•
•
BUS Z302 Managing and Behavior in Organization
(3 cr.)
BUS Z442 Leading and Motivating Individuals and
Teams (3 cr.)
BUS W402 Simulation of Business Enterprise (1 cr.)
BUS J403 Management Capstone (4 cr.)
Technological Skills
•
•
BUS K221 Introduction to Information Systems for
Business (3 cr.)
BUS K321 Management and Information Systems (3
cr.)
* Students who entered IU Northwest prior to 2012-2014
should refer to the bulletin of the year they entered the
university for the graduation requirements applicable to
them.
Curriculum Concentrations
The undergraduate curriculum in which complete fouryear degree programs are offered at IU Northwest is
outlinedon the following pages and includes (1) business
administration and (2)accounting/financial information
systems.
Most courses in the School of Business and Economics
award 3 credit hours. Full-time students typically enroll
in five 3 credit courses per semester; part-time students
enroll in two 3 credit courses per semester.
123
Business Administration
For students who wish to pursue a broad general program,
the business administration curriculum provides a vehicle
for organizing their studies. The integrating focus is the
responsibility for administering the multiple operations
of the business firm as a subsystem within a rapidly
changing environmental system. Emphasis is on the
processes involved in setting goals for corporate effort,
coordinating and controlling multiple programs, and
regulating human and material inputs and outputs with
varied environments.
Objectives at the undergraduate level are to provide
a broad liberal education as a base and to develop
proficiency in understanding and solving interrelated
business problems.
Course Requirements
Junior and Senior Years
Required courses are BUS Z440; BUS M450; one 3
credit 300- or 400-level international business elective;
and two additional 3 credit 300- or 400-level business
and economics courses. These courses allow additional
opportunities to gain specialized knowledge in such
fields as accounting, economics, finance, management,
or marketing. Students are encouraged to consult with
faculty in these areas to best meet their professional and
educational objectives.
Accounting/Financial Information Systems
The curriculum prepares students for positions
as accountants, auditors, controllers, income tax
accountants, financial statement analysts, cost
accountants, budget officers, and governmental or
institutional accountants. In addition, it equips the
prospective business executive with a tool for intelligent
analysis, prediction, decision making, and control.
Financial information systems graduates are encouraged
to pursue professional certification as accountants in one
or more of the several certification programs available.
The CPA designation authorizing an accountant to
practice public accounting is the oldest and most widely
recognized. The State Board of Public Accountancy
of each state administers the Uniform Certified Public
Accounting examination. The CIA (Certified Internal
Auditor), CMA (Certified Management Accountant), and
CFM (Corporate Financial Management) examinations are
administered by their respective professional societies.
Further details may be obtained from the School.
At the present time, Indiana, as well as 39 other states,
has enacted laws requiring 150 hours of college course
work to sit for the CPA examination. Graduates of the
financial information systems program can satisfy these
requirements by taking additional undergraduate course
work beyond their degree or by taking a combination of
undergraduate and graduate work and obtaining their
M.B.A.
Course Requirements
Junior and Senior Years
•
•
BUS F494,BUS A311 and BUS F420
One course from: BUS A312, BUS A325, BUS A328,
or BUS A335
124
•
B.S. in Business Degree Requirements
One 3 credit 300- or 400-level accounting or finance
course.
B.S. in Business Degree Requirements
Table of requirements found in Appendix in printed copy of
bulletin
Minors in Business Areas
The School of Business and Economics offers the
following minors for non—business undergraduate
students.
Composition and CSCI-A 106 Introduction to Computing
with a minimum grade of C (2.0) in each course. Any
course with a number beginning with zero will not be
counted toward degree requirements.
For the Associate of Science in Business, the following
general education and area concentration courses are
minimally required with specifics obtained from the School
of Business and Economics.
•
•
•
•
Accounting Minor
This minor is for non-business majors. The requirements
are BUS-A 201, BUS-A 202, BUS-A 311, BUS-A 312,
BUS-A 325.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Business Administration Minor
This minor is for non-business majors. The requirements
are BUS-A 201, BUS-A 202, BUS-L 201, BUS-F 260 or
BUS-M 200, BUS-W 100 and BUS-Z 302.
The prerequisite and academic policies of the School
of Business and Economics will be enforced. A student
must have a C (2.0) cumulative grade point average in the
courses required in any minor. Non—business students
must notify the recorder for the division in which their
records are located, as well as the assistant to the director
in the School of Business and Economics, that they are
pursuing one of these business minors. Correspondence
courses will not be accepted for credit toward any minor.
Successful completion of a minor will be indicated on the
student's official academic transcript. No more than half
of the required courses for either minor may be transfer
credit from another institution.
Associate of Science in
Business Curriculum
A program for which students may earn an Associate of
Science in Business is offered by the School of Business
and Economics in the field of business studies. This
program is for those students desiring less than a fouryear university education but who, upon completion of two
years of university work, will seek greater opportunities
than those open to individuals having lesser educational
attainments. The School of Business and Economics
will cease admitting students into the A.S. in Business
program as of Fall 2013.
The general requirements for the degree program include
(1) admission as a regular student to IU Northwest
and completion of all orientation test requirements; (2)
completion of a minimum of 60 credit hours with at least
30 credit hours completed at Indiana University and with
at least 15 credit hours at one campus (correspondence
study courses do not satisfy these requirements); (3) a
cumulative grade point average of C (2.0) or higher. Since
the courses required in the degree program are standard
university credit courses, students may apply those credits
toward an appropriate four-year degree program.
To be certified for graduation, a student must have a
minimum of a 2.0 cumulative grade point average in all
course work, a minimum average of C (2.0) in all courses
taken toward the degree, and a minimum average of C
(2.0) for all courses taken in the business core. A student
must also have completed ENG-W 131 Elementary
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
BUS-X 220 Career Perspectives (2 cr.)
BUS-X 255 Diversity in the Workplace (1 cr.)
ENG-W 131 Elementary Composition I (3 cr.)
Natural sciences with laboratory (4-5 cr.) from
approved list
PSY-P 102 Introductory Psychology II (3 cr.)
MATH-M 118 Finite Mathematics (3 cr.)
SPCH-S 122 Interpersonal Communication (3 cr.)
ECON-E 111 Topics in Economic History I (3 cr.)
PHIL-P 150 Elementary Logic (3 cr.)
CSCI-A 106 Introduction to Computing (3 cr.)
BUS-W 100 Principles of Business Administration (3
cr.)
BUS-A 201, BUS-A 202 Intro to Financial,
Managerial Accounting (6 cr.)
ECON-E 103, ECON-E 104 Intro to Microeconomics,
Macroeconomics (6 cr.)
BUS-L 201 Legal Environment of Business (3 cr.)
ECON-E 270 Intro to Stat Theory Econ & Bus (3 cr.)
BUS-F 260 Personal Finance (3 cr.)
BUS-K 221 Introduction to Information Systems for
Business (3 cr.)
General Education Electives (sufficient to make a
total of 60 credit hours) (4-5 cr.)*
*
Business and economics courses taken are subject to
prerequisites specified in the course listings in this bulletin.
Master of Business
Administration
Background
The School of Business and Economics initiated graduate
education in business with the establishment of the
M.S.B.A. degree in 1969 and succeeded it in 1988
with the M.B.A. The program is for individuals who are
employed in positions of responsibility within the business
community and who are pursuing a graduate education
concurrently with their employment. To serve these
students, all graduate courses are offered in the evening.
From its inception, the program has enjoyed a broad base
of support and participation from the Northwestern Indiana
business community.
Purpose
The M.B.A. program focuses on teamwork and leadership
and provides a professional education in business
for students who possess the baccalaureate degree
in any discipline. For most students, the M.B.A. is a
terminal professional degree designed to enhance their
performance in present and future managerial positions.
Increasingly, individuals employed in non-business fields
have used the M.B.A. program to broaden their academic
training and enhance their prospects for a career in
business.
Continuation in Good Standing
Objectives
The general program objectives are (1) to further the
initiative and creativity of each candidate and thereby
develop the individual's potentialities to the highest level
and (2) to enhance the candidate's mobility within the
corporate environment.
Specific program objectives:
•
•
•
•
•
To provide a broad foundation in both the theory
and tools required for modern managerial decision
making.
To develop within the student a better understanding
of business and the environment in which
managerial decisions are operational.
To enhance the student's ability to effectively lead
and manage teams.
To create an awareness of and to provide the
background for analyzing and controlling the
complex interrelationships in administrative policy
decisions.
To afford the student an opportunity to develop
in- depth knowledge in subject matter beyond the
minimum level of competence.
Graduate Admissions to
the School of Business and
Economics
Admission to the M.B.A. program is limited to students
of demonstrated aptitude, ability, and scholarship. The
decision is based upon a composite evaluation of the
applicant's
•
•
Undergraduate academic performance as measured
by the cumulative grade point average; and
Scores earned on the Graduate Management
Admissions Test (GMAT).
Admission Test
All applicants to the M.B.A. program are required to submit
their Graduate Management Admissions Test scores. This
aptitude test, which does not unduly benefit individuals
with previous business experience or training, is prepared
by the Graduate Management Admission Council. The test
is administered by Pearson throughout the United States.
Students must take the GMAT at least one month before
the application deadline for the semester of application.
Information on the GMAT is contained in the application
packet available from the Office of Graduate Studies in
Business, Indiana University Northwest. This packet may
be obtained by writing the address listed below or calling
the indicated phone number.
School of Business and Economics Graduate Programs
IU Northwest
Dunes Medical / Professional Building, Room 1103
3400 Broadway
Gary, IN 46408
(219) 980-6635
Contact the School of Business and Economics Graduate
Programs for additional contact information.
Application Deadline
Candidates may enter the program at the beginning of
the fall, spring, or summer semesters. The application
deadline is one month before classes start. A completed
125
application and all supporting documents must be
submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies in Business
and Economics by the established deadline date. An
official transcript from each college attended is required
as part of the application. Applicants to the M.B.A.
program who received their baccalaureate degree in
from any IU campus must request an official copy of their
undergraduate transcript from the Office of the Registrar,
Indiana University Northwest, Gary, IN 46408.
Prerequisites
Prior to enrolling in graduate courses in the M.B.A.
program, students should meet minimum proficiencies
in math and computer skills. Students should have a
minimum of a college-level finite mathematics class. The
Indiana University course equivalent is MATH M118 Finite
Mathematics. Students are also expected to be proficient
in Microsoft Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint.
Candidates who are deficient in any of these areas should
speak with the director of Undergraduate and Graduate
Programs to review the different options available to them
to satisfy the prerequisites.
Students must complete all the foundation courses before
taking core classes. Some core classes also have specific
course prerequisites. They will be stated in the schedule of
classes.
Proper enrollment is the individual responsibility of each
student. The School of Business and Economics may
cancel improper enrollment at any time, and if credit is
earned in such an enrollment, the school may refuse
to apply that credit toward a degree or may require
enrollment in an additional class.
Policies & Procedures
Students with exceptional circumstances in regard to the
policies stated in this bulletin should contact the director
for advising.
Course Load
Since most M.B.A. students are employed full time, they
normally carry a course load of 6 to 9 credit hours (two to
three courses) per semester.
Students should understand graduate courses require
more time dedicated to study outside of the classroom.
Students should expect to spend 12-15 hours in study
outside of class for every three hours in class.
Time Allowed for Completion of Degree
A maximum of six years is allowed for completion
of the program. The six-year period begins with the
first semester of course work following the granting of
admission status into the program. For those students
entering with no undergraduate business training, the
program can be completed in approximately three years.
Students with an undergraduate degree in business may
qualify to enter directly into the 36 credit hour M.B.A. core
that can be finished on a part- time basis in 20-24 months.
Continuation in Good Standing
The 3.0 grade point average required for the awarding
of the M.B.A. degree requires close monitoring of the
graduate student's academic progress.
Students who are placed on probation will be permitted
to enroll in an additional 6 credit hours (four courses).
126
Dismissal
Students on probation must raise their GPA to a 3.0 within
those six hours or they will be dismissed from the M.B.A.
program.
Students who receive a grade of F will be automatically
dismissed from the program. A student who receives
three grades of C will be automatically dismissed from the
program. If you receive a grade of C— or below, you must
repeat the course. Both grades will be included in your
GPA.
Dismissal
A student on probation will be dismissed if the student
is below a 3.0 GPA after 12 credit hours of graduate
coursework.
A grade of ‘F’ in any graduate course is ground for
immediate dismissal from the MBA program.
Upon the recommendation of the Graduate/Undergraduate
Committee and with the approval of the Dean of the
School of Business & Economics, any student whose work
is unsatisfactory or whose conduct is unethical may be
dismissed from the School. This includes violations of the
School’s Standard’s of Professional Conduct contained
within this bulletin.
Students should be familiar with the Indiana University
Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities and Conduct,
particularly in areas of academic misconduct. Academic
misconduct may involve human, hard-copy, or electronic
resources. Students should understand dismissal can
occur if any activity is deemed to undermine the academic
integrity of the institution.
Waivers
If a student has completed course work encompassing
material included in the foundation of the program, certain
waivers may be granted. Students are permitted waivers
for foundation courses only. No waivers for core classes
are permitted. Students can be considered for waivers if
they have taken equivalent undergraduate course work
with a grade of B or better (B— does not count) from an
AACSB Accredited school within the past five (5) years.
The student will be notified as to waivers granted when the
application for admission is formally approved. Contact the
Director for more information.
Non-Degree Status
Prospective students who may require foundation courses
can begin the program as a non-degree student. Students
with a non-degree status may only take up to 12 credit
hours of M.B.A. foundation courses. M.B.A. Core courses
are not open to non-degree students.
Students can be considered for foundation course waivers
if they have taken equivalent undergraduate course work
with a grade of B or better(B- does not count) within the
past five years from an AACSB accredited business
school. See the director for approval details.
Additionally, students who require all five M.B.A.
foundation courses may complete the Graduate Certificate
in Management and take all 15 credit hours of M.B.A.
foundation course before the need to meet full admission
requirements.
Students who do not require foundation courses must
enter the program fully admitted.
Students Transferring from Another M.B.A.
Program
An applicant who is admitted who has attended an M.B.A.
program at another institution must take at minimum the
36 credit hour core of which no more than 6 credit hours
can be transferred in. Their graduate and undergraduate
coursework can be used to waive the foundation courses.
Students can be considered for foundation course waivers
if they have taken equivalent undergraduate course work
with a grade of B or better(B- does not count) within the
past five years from an AACSB accredited business
school. See the director for approval details.
Transfer Credit
A total of 6 credit hours of graduate- level work may be
transferred from other accredited institutions or other
accredited programs at Indiana University. All course work
must be preapproved by the Graduate/Undergraduate
Faculty Committee, and students must obtain a grade
of B or better to qualify for transfer. See the director of
graduate studies for details.
Grade of Incomplete
A grade of Incomplete (I) may be given only when the
work in the course is substantially completed and when
the student's work is of passing quality. An Incomplete
must be changed to a letter grade within one year from
the date of its recording. The student must meet with
the professor and complete all work required by him/her
and submit it well in advance of the one-year deadline.
Students who receive a grade of I are not to re-enroll in
the same class.
Independent Study
Students are permitted to engage in up to 6 credit hours of
approved Independent Study. These credits can be used
to fulfill electives and may not to be used to complete a
required foundation or core class.
Students must submit the completed proposal form,
approved by the sponsoring professor, to the director, by
the date specified within the printed Schedule of Classes.
Withdrawals
Students are permitted to drop a class up to the Automatic
Withdrawal deadline. Students may not withdraw from
a class after the automatic withdrawal deadline except
under extreme circumstances. If a student seeks to
drop a class after the deadline, the student must submit
a request explaining the extreme circumstances that
support the withdrawal. A poor or failing grade is not
a legitimate reason to request permission to withdraw
after the deadline. The student request is submitted to
the director, who will submit the request to the dean to
approve or deny the request.
Students in the Weekend M.B.A. program are not subject
to published withdrawal deadlines. Please contact the
Director for more information.
Applying for Graduation
Students can pick up the application for graduation in
the main office of the business school or ask to have
one faxed to them. Students must submit applications
the semester prior to finishing their degree requirements
so that the graduate director has time to audit student
files. The Office of the Registrar requires a tentative list of
graduates at the beginning of each semester.
Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Accounting
Students who wish to sit for the Indiana CPA exam must
meet these requirements and may require additional
courses. Consultation with the director is strongly advised
to ensure meeting these requirements.
Degree Requirements
Each M.B.A. candidate is required to complete a minimum
of 30 credit hours in the M.B.A. core. For students who
have no waivers from the foundation courses, a total of 51
credit hours will be required for completion of the M.B.A.
degree. A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 (4.0 =
A) or higher in all work taken for graduate credit must be
earned as a prerequisite for continuation in good standing
and for graduation.
During the first semester of enrollment in the M.B.A.
program, every student will be required to prepare and file
a program of study with the director of graduate studies
in business. The program will provide the candidate with
the opportunity to chart the time period during which the
degree requirements will be met.
All students must complete a minimum of the 36 credit
hours in the M.B.A. core, of which no more than 6 credit
hours are transferred from another institution, and meet
additional requirements as stated upon admission.
Students must have at least a 3.0 cumulative GPA in all
classes counted toward the M.B.A. degree. If a student
repeated a course, both grades count in the degree GPA.
Degree requirements must be completed within six years
from the date of the first semester enrolled. Enrollment as
a guest/non-degree/certificate student counts in the six
years.
Students must file an application for graduation the
semester before they expect to complete degree
requirements. Failure to file this application will result in
the student's name not appearing on the graduation list for
the semester in which the course work is being completed.
Foundation Courses - 15 credit hours
BUNW A512 Statistical Tools for Management (3 cr.)
BUNW A514 Economics for Managers (3 cr.)
BUNW A513 Accounting for Decision Making (3 cr.)
BUNW B511 Marketing Management (3 cr.)
BUNW B512 Financial Management (3 cr.)
Total (15 cr.)
Core Courses - 36 credit hours
BUNW A516 Management Information Systems (3 cr.)
BUNW A 523 Managing Accounting Information (3 cr.)
BUNW B513 Operations Management (3 cr.)
BUNW B514 Legal, Ethical and Social Environment of
Business (3 cr.)
BUNW B 515 Introduction to International Business (3 cr.)
BUNW C512 Managing In a Team Based Organization (3
cr.)
BUNW C515 Advanced Marketing Management (3 cr.)
BUNW C517 Financial Management Analysis (3 cr.)
BUNW G502 Managerial Economics (3 cr.)
BUNW G514 Human Resource Management (3 cr.)
BUNW Z506 Leadership
BUNW D511 Strategic Management (3 cr.)
Total (36 cr.)
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Total with no waivers (51 cr.)
Certificates
In 1974 the School of Business and Economics instituted
a unique program for adults desiring to secure training for
a career in the expanding field of accounting. The Post
Baccalaureate Certificate in Accounting (PBCA) is geared
for mature students whose positions or occupations
lack opportunity or challenge or whose talents are being
underutilized. The program is open to anyone holding a
bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university.
Students will receive instruction in the major areas of
accounting and selected courses in the basic business
core.
Indiana University Northwest's Graduate Certificate in
Management (GCM) is a 15 credit hour program of study
in management designed for individual who works full-time
but wants to enhance their current management skills or
add a graduate certificate to an existing undergraduate
degree. This 15 credit hour Certificate can be finished on
a part-time basis in as little as 9-12 months. This program
is intended for someone with an undergraduate degree in
a field other than business who may not wish to pursue a
full Masters degree just yet.
The complete range of counseling and placement services
of the school is available to certificate students. (Consult
the for details)
Postbaccalaureate Certificate in
Accounting
The Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Accounting program
is intended to provide students with concentrated training
in accounting and closely related fields and is designed
for those who want to develop proficiency in accounting,
an area where there is likely to be an adequate market
demand for the next several years.
The program is open to anyone who possesses a
bachelor's degree in any field from an accredited college
or university. The only requirements for entry are an
application and official transcript for all undergraduate
work must be submitted to the School of Business and
Economics. The program is keyed to the needs of a broad
spectrum of individuals who wish to move into a field
that is both challenging and rewarding. The age range
of the participants in the program is higher than that of
typical students, running from the early twenties to forties.
Enrollment may be either full time or part time. The length
of time required to complete this program depends on
undergraduate courses already completed. The full range
of counseling and placement services of the school is
available to certificate students.
Student Consumer Information about this Program
Admissions
Students must have a bachelor's degree in any field
from an accredited college or university. An application
and application fee plus an official transcript of all
undergraduate work must be submitted to the director of
the School of Business and Economics.
A complete review of undergraduate work will determine
the student's plan of study.
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Graduate Certificate in Management
Personal Computer Prerequisites
Students must demonstrate competency in the use of
personal computers, particularly in spreadsheet use.
Students who do not have these minimum skills will be
required to take CSCI A106 Introduction to Computing.
Transfer Credits
Up to 6 credit hours can be granted for courses taken
at other accredited colleges and universities, provided
that the student submits evidence (for example, catalog
descriptions of courses) that the courses are equivalent
to those specified in the Postbaccalaureate Certificate
in Accounting program. A student who has already
successfully completed, whether as an undergraduate or
graduate student, any course specified in the program
can, at his or her option, repeat the course or take another
approved course
The specific requirements are as follows.
Accounting (24 cr.)
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BUS A201 Introduction to Financial Accounting (3
cr.)
BUS A202 Introduction to Managerial Accounting (3
cr.)
BUS A311 Intermediate Accounting I (3 cr.)
BUS A312 Intermediate Accounting II (3 cr.)
BUS A325 Cost Accounting (3 cr.)
BUS A328 Introduction to Taxation (3 cr.)
BUS A424 Auditing (3 cr.)
Additional accounting (3 cr.)
Certificate students must meet the M.B.A. admissions
requirements as stated in this bulletin if they wish to apply
Certificate courses to their M.B.A. program.
For students who need computer training, we suggest
you take advantage of the self-tutorials available online,
on CD-ROM at our bookstore or enroll in several of the
free computer training seminars offered on campus. New
students will be advised of their options when they meet
with the Graduate Director once they have been admitted.
School of Education
Administrative Officers
Stanley E. Wigle, Ph.D., Dean of Education
Janice A. Grskovic, Ph.D., Interim Associate Dean of
Education
Tim Mitchell, M.S., Director of Student Teaching and Field
Experiences
Jane Nelson, M.S., Director of Education Student Services
Kelly Zieba, B. S., Assistant Director of Education Student
Services
Phone: (219) 980-6510
Web site: www.iun.edu/education/
Overview
Degrees Offered
Bachelor's degree in elementary education
Bachelor's degree in secondary education
Master's degree in elementary education
Master's degree in secondary education
Master's degree in educational leadership
Total (24 cr.)
The Student's Responsibility
Basic Business and Economics Core (6 cr.)
Advisors and directors assist students in planning a
program of study to satisfy requirements, but each student
assumes final responsibility for meeting all deadlines and
completing all requirements.
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BUS F301 Financial Management (3 cr.)
Select one of the following
• BUS F420 Investments (3 cr.)
• BUS F494 International Finance (3 cr.)
Total (6 cr.)
No more than 6 credit hours in business law and no more
than 6 credit hours in computer science.
Students who wish to sit for the Indiana CPA exam must
meet these requirements. Consultation with the director is
strongly advised to ensure meeting these requirements.
Graduate Certificate in
Management
This program is intended for someone with an
undergraduate degree in a field other than business who
may not wish to pursue a full Masters degree just yet. All
five courses will apply towards the Masters in Business
Administration (M.B.A.) if a student wishes to continue
their studies.
Student Consumer Information about this Program
Admission
Students should submit a completed application,
application fee and official transcripts showing their
undergraduate degree.
Contact Information
School of Education
IU Northwest
Hawthorn Hall, Room 354
3400 Broadway
Gary, Indiana 46408
(219) 980-6510
Contact the School of Education for additional contact
information.
Mission
The School of Education (SOE) supports and facilitates
the shared vision of IU Northwest by collaborating
and cooperating with other educational institutions,
external partners, and surrounding communities to further
excellence in educational processes and enhance the
overall quality of life in those communities.
In light of these commitments, the mission of the SOE at
IU Northwest is to prepare professional educators who
have the knowledge, skills, and dispositions essential
for becoming reflective professionals and lead teachers.
Reflective professionals are those who, in light of current
research and best practice, exercise reasoned judgment
to:
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critically examine their professional practices
Undergraduate Licensing Programs in the SOE
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make informed decisions
effectively facilitate the learning of their students
Lead teachers are those who incorporate a rich
understanding of content knowledge and best professional
practices to renew themselves and their professional
practice through inquiry and leadership.
Accreditation
The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher
Education and the North Central Association of Colleges
and Secondary Schools fully accredit IU Northwest. The
Indiana Department of Education has approved all IU
Northwest SOE programs for teacher and administrative
licensing through the bachelor's and master's levels.
Services
Academic Advisement
This service helps students plan a complete program
of studies leading to a degree and/or teacher licensing.
Students must consult their advisors before registering for
classes each semester.
Ombudsperson
Each academic year one faculty member is designated
to be the ombudsperson for the students in the School of
Education. The function of the ombudsperson is to meet
with students to resolve their problems. There are no
restrictions placed on students concerning any problems
and/or ideas discussed. The discussions will be handled
strictly on a confidential basis. The name of the current
ombudsperson is available in the Office of Education
Student Services.
requirements based on the Conceptual Framework for
Initial Programs.
These programs focus on helping students acquire the
knowledge and skills necessary to become a reflective
professional teacher. This program is based upon the
School of Education's Reflective Professional model.
The research-based conceptual framework for this model
contains nine program outcome areas. They are:
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Rules 2002 and REPA Licenses
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The School of Education provides services for obtaining
teaching licenses. Additional information is available in the
Office of Education Student Services.
Honors
Degrees Awarded with Distinction
3.55 - 3.699 Distinction
3.70 - 3.849 High Distinction
3.85 - 4.00 Highest Distinction
Licensing Programs
The following licensing programs are offered at IU
Northwest through the SOE.
Graduate Licensing Programs in
the SOE
To be admitted to a graduate licensure program, students
must have a bachelor's degree and a 2.5 grade point
average. Admission to all programs also requires the
passing of specific Praxis I exams. Students are advised
to visit the Office of Education Student Services to
see which exams are required in their specific areas.
All programs leading to a new license have portfolio
Communications Skills
Higher-Order Thinking Skills
Instructional Media Services and Technology
Learning and Development
School Culture and Diversity
Instructional Design and Delivery
Classroom Management
Assessment and Evaluation
Professional Development
A valid extended criminal background check is required
of all students in these programs. Student portfolios must
contain at least one artifact for each of the outcomes listed
above. Each artifact must be scored at a 3 or better on a 4
point scale.
Licensure
The SOE recognizes outstanding performance in course
work by awarding degrees with three levels of distinction.
The levels of distinction, which are printed on both the
student's transcript and IU diploma, are determined by the
overall cumulative grade point average:
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Elementary and Special Education (Teaching All
Learners undergraduate program)
Special Education: Mild Interventions (K-12)
Visual Arts (K-12)
Secondary Education (Urban Teacher Education
Program)
• Language Arts (English and Speech)
• Mathematics
• Science (Earth Science, Chemistry, and/ or
Life Science)
• Social Studies (Economics, Government,
Historical Perspectives, Psychology, and/ or
Sociology)
• Visual Arts
Building Level Administration
License Additions for teachers already
holding Rules 46/47 and Rules 2002
licenses
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Elementary
• Kindergarten Endorsement
• Visual Arts Endorsement
Undergraduate Licensing
Programs in the SOE
The following licensing programs are offered at IU
Northwest through the SOE.
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Bachelor's degree in elementary education
Bachelor's degree in secondary education
Licensing Programs Rules 2002/REPA
Licenses
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Elementary/Reading/Special Education: Teaching All
Learners
K-12: Visual Arts
Secondary (Middle and High School)
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Urban Teacher Education Program - Option II
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Language Arts (English and Speech)
Mathematics
Science (Earth Science, Chemistry, Life
Science)
Social Studies (Economics, Government,
Historical Perspectives, Psychology,
Sociology)
Urban Teacher Education Program
- Option II
The Urban Teacher Education Program (UTEP) is a
program leading toward licensing in selected areas. UTEP
functions at two academic levels: Option I (undergraduate)
and Option II (graduate).
Option II
Option II is designed to attract the best and brightest
non-education majors who desire to be urban teachers.
Successful completion of the program (licensure) will
be obtained by demonstrating successful functioning in
an urban classroom; receiving a satisfactory evaluation
of performance by a mentor, university supervisor, and
building administrator; passing Praxis I and Praxis II
exams; and completing required course and portfolio
requirements.
Requirements
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EDUC S508: Content Area Methods in the Urban
Classroom. Separate sections for English/Speech/
Mathematics/ Science/Social Studies (3 cr.)
EDUC S510 Methods of Teaching in Secondary
Urban Schools (3 cr.)
EDUC K505 Introduction to Special Education (3 cr.)
EDUC L517 Advanced Study in the Teaching of
Reading in the Junior High and Secondary Schools
(3 cr.)
EDUC T550 Cultural/ Community Forces and the
School (3 cr.)
EDUC M501 Field Experience in Urban Classrooms
(3 cr.)
EDUC S508 Content Area Methods in the Urban
Classroom. Separate sections for English/
Mathematics/ Science/Social Studies/Visual Arts (3
cr.)
EDUC P507 Testing in the Classroom (3 cr.)
EDUC M550 Student Teaching (12 weeks) (3 cr.)
Initial License in Exceptional
Needs - Mild Interventions (K-12)
Only EDUC K505 and K555 may be taken by students
before passing the Praxis I exams.
Course Requirements (all courses are 3
credits):
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EDUC K505 Introduction to Special Education
EDUC K555 Reading Assessment and Instruction for
Special Education
EDUC K501 Adaptive Computers for Special
Education
EDUC K520 Introduction to Emotional Disabilities
EDUC K525 Introduction to Mild Disabilities
EDUC K535 Assessment and Remediation of Mild
Disabilities I
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EDUC K536 Assessment and Remediation of Mild
Disabilities II
EDUC K543 Education of Students with Emotional
Disturbances
EDUC M501 Field Experience in Special Education:
Mild Disabilities
EDUC M501 Field Experience in Special Education:
Emotional Disabilities
EDUC P519 Psychological Assessment of
Exceptional Children
One approved elective
The following 15-week practicum experience:
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EDUC K595 Practicum in Special Education
Prerequisites to Student Teaching or the Practicum in
Special Education are completion of all other courses
required for this program with a C or better, a cumulative
grade point average of 3.0 for these program courses,
completion of Portfolio requirements, and passing scores
on the Praxis II exams.
Endorsements
Teachers may still add endorsements on their Indiana
standard teacher's license. Requirements can be obtained
at the Office of Education Student Services.
Endorsements are available for kindergarten, and visual
arts.
Building-Level Administrator
License
Teachers may earn a building-level administrator's license
through the Master's degree in Educational Leadership.
Conversion of a Standard
Teaching License to a
Professional Teaching License
See the Licensure Officer for requirements.
Certification Only / Undergraduate
Programs
Indiana University Northwest welcomes students with
bachelor's degrees who wish to obtain teacher certification
but do not qualify for or wish to enroll in any of the
graduate programs. Requirements for these programs
are the same as for undergraduates, do not carry
graduate credit, and can be found in the IU Northwest
Undergraduate Bulletin. In some circumstances a student
may earn a second bachelor's degree.
Bachelor of Science in
Education
The School of Education at IU Northwest offers bachelor's
degrees in elementary education and secondary
education.
Admission
Teacher Education Program (TEP)
The Teacher Education Program (TEP) begins in the
junior year for Teaching All Learners/elementary education
students and in the junior year for secondary and visual
arts education students and focuses on helping students
Correspondence Courses
acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to become
a reflective professional teacher. This program is based
upon the SOE's Reflective Professional Model. The
research- based conceptual framework for this model
contains nine program outcome areas:
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Communications Skills
Higher-Order Thinking Skills
Instructional Media Services and Technology
Learning and Development
School Culture and Diversity
Instructional Design and Delivery
Classroom Management
Assessment and Evaluation
Professional Development
Student Portfolio
The student portfolio shall consist of artifacts, scoresheets
and reflections created by the student that demonstrate
the acquisition of the knowledge and skills within each of
the nine initial program outcomes. The student will begin
to create the portfolio prior to entering the TEP. Specific
portfolio checkpoints have been established in both the
elementary and secondary programs. The portfolio must
be completed prior to student teaching.
Admission to the Teacher Education
Program
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Application for admission to the Teacher Education
Program must be filed prior to the beginning of the
semester in which students plan to start.
Students must have successfully completed at least
26-45 credit hours with a cumulative grade point
average of at least 2.50 and have submitted an
Extended Criminal Background Check.
Students must have successfully completed with
a grade of C or higher ENG W131 Elementary
Composition (3 cr.), SPCH S121 Public Speaking (3
cr.), EDUC W200 Using Computers in Education (3
cr.), EDUC F200 Examining Self as Teacher (3 cr.),
EDUC K205 Introduction to Exceptional Children,
and EDUC P250 Educational Psychology (3 cr.).
Students must have passed all parts of the Praxis
I Exam (reading, writing, and mathematics). The
cutoff scores are available in the Office of Education
Student Services.
Requests for exceptions are handled by the
Admissions and Reinstatement Committee,
which shall be the sole judge as to whether the
students have met the requirements for admission
to, continuing in, or completion of the Teacher
Education Program.
Student Teaching Program
In the Student Teaching Program, the student assumes
all the responsibility for teaching in an elementary, special
education, or secondary classroom.
Admission Requirements
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File an application for admission to the Student
Teaching Program at least six calendar months
before the beginning of the student teaching
semester. (Deadlines are sent to students via
university listserv)
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131
Complete at least 30 of the last 60 credit hours
of academic work at IU Northwest, including the
professional methods courses.
Have at least a 2.50 cumulative grade point average
with grades of C or higher in all required cognate
and education courses.
Be at least a first-semester senior. Normally, this will
mean that the student has satisfactorily completed at
least 86 credit hours of academic work.
In the case of elementary education majors,
complete required work in the areas of language
arts, mathematics, science, and social studies.
In the case of SH/JH /MS education majors,
complete at least 85 percent of the major teaching
area requirements and 75 percent of the minor
teaching area requirements.
Complete all required professional methods courses
within three years prior to enrolling in student
teaching.
Pass the prestudent teaching portfolio check.
Pass the Praxis II exams.
If an interview is requested by the cooperating
institution, the student must participate in an
interview with a representative of the institute
or agency in which the student teaching will be
completed and obtain a favorable recommendation.
Students are discouraged from taking additional academic
work during the same semester of enrollment in student
teaching.
The Director of Student Teaching and Field Experiences
shall be the sole judge as to whether the student has met
the requirements for admission to, and continuing in, the
Student Teaching Program.
Completion of the Student Teaching
Program and Application for a Teaching
License
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Obtain a satisfactory recommendation from the
Director of Student Teaching and Field Experiences
The student will be eligible for a teaching license when
the baccalaureate degree has been granted, the Praxis
tests have been passed, an extended criminal background
check shows no negative activity, and fees required by the
Indiana Department of Education have been paid.
Policies & Procedures
Undergraduate Admission
Admission to the School of Education expires upon receipt
of a degree, upon completion of special admission work,
or when no work has been completed on this campus in a
period of one calendar year. Students must then reapply
for admission to the school.
Admission and Reinstatement Appeals
A student whose enrollment was terminated by the SOE
may petition for reinstatement to the Education Admission
and Reinstatement Committee.
Correspondence Courses
Undergraduate students in residence carrying regular
academic work in the SOE may take academic
correspondence work through the Independent Study
Division of the School of Continuing Studies only in
exceptional cases and with the permission of the director
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Credit Transfer Policy for Baccalaureate Degrees
of Education Student Services. If a correspondence
course is to apply toward graduation requirements during
the same semester, it must be successfully completed at
least 15 days prior to the close of regular classes at IU
Northwest.
Students will not be given credit toward a teaching
license or the Bachelor of Science degree in education
for more than 18 credit hours of academic work through
correspondence. Of these credit hours, only a maximum of
9 credit hours in a major subject area and 6 credit hours in
a minor subject area may be used. Professional education
courses may not be taken by correspondence.
Credit Transfer Policy for Baccalaureate
Degrees
Undergraduate students wishing to transfer from other
institutions should first call or write the admissions office
at IU Northwest for information concerning admission and
transfer of credit. Even though credit hours are transferred
through the admissions office, they may or may not be
applicable to degree programs in the SOE. The SOE
determines the acceptance of transferred credit.
Two major concerns underlie this policy: program integrity
and fairness. The SOE ensures program integrity through
counseling and mentoring by faculty. Fairness is ensured
through collaborative planning by the student and his/her
faculty mentor.
Credit transfer is administered by the IU Northwest
admissions office and the academic advisor of the SOE
with the advice of appropriate faculty, including the
student's faculty advisor. Formal appeals of decisions and
the consideration of requests for exceptions to existing
policy are provided for by a standing committee of the
faculty of the SOE.
Credit transfers for a course must not be confused
with performance criteria for a degree, certificate, or
license. Most programs of the SOE require performance
criteria that are evidenced by portfolio artifacts. Course
completion or credit transfer does not, by itself, constitute
meeting performance criteria. While it may be possible
to include work done apart from courses taken at IU
Northwest within a required portfolio, performance criteria
required for degrees, certificates, or licenses awarded by
the SOE must be demonstrated after acceptance into the
school.
Academic work from a regionally accredited college or
university that is certified by the state of Indiana, or a
body of similar stature, to offer teacher education and for
which a student grade is at or above the level of C, may
be transferred for credit but will be transferred for program
requirements subject to the following conditions.
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Undergraduate or graduate students who have
successfully completed any course at any other
Indiana University campus that is part of a program
at IU Northwest will receive full credit for that course.
Products or performances that are required for
any academic objective at IU Northwest must
however still be demonstrated. Assistance toward
meeting performance criteria at IU Northwest is
provided, in part, through enrolling and completing
credit courses. A student who has transferred such
course credit will be given assistance as may be
needed toward meeting performance criteria by
being allowed to attend the course at IU Northwest
without having to re-enroll or pay tuition for it. Similar
arrangements may be possible for other transfer
students. These will be considered on a case-bycase basis.
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The last 30 credit hours of any undergraduate
degree program to be awarded by IU Northwest
must be completed after being admitted to the SOE
at IU Northwest.
Acceptance into a degree, certificate, license, or
endorsement program must be accompanied with an
approved program of studies that has been validated
by appropriate faculty and certification advisors
within the SOE at IU Northwest.
Electives
Free electives for Senior High / Junior High / Middle
School majors are those courses applied toward the
required credit hour total, but not applied to the area
of general education, professional education, subject
major, or subject minor. Courses numbered 100 or higher
may be used as free electives. No College of Arts and
Sciences courses with a J prefix and no courses without a
departmental prefix may be used as electives.
Field Experiences
When applying for admission to an undergraduate
education program, students should know that each
semester of the education sequence has a field
experience course.
Good Standing
To maintain good standing within the SOE, undergraduate
students must keep a cumulative grade point average of
at least 2.5. Students whose GPA falls below 2.5 will be
placed on probation. Students whose GPA remains below
2.5 a third semester will be placed on strict academic
probation.
Students on strict academic probation whose GPA does
not rise above 2.5 will be dismissed from the SOE.
Semester Load
A full-time undergraduate student is expected to carry
12-17 credit hours of academic work per semester. If
students have earned a cumulative grade point average
of at least B (3.0) in all work taken at Indiana University,
they may receive permission from the dean or director of
Education Student Services to carry 18 credit hours or
more in a semester. Education students are encouraged
not to enroll in more than 6 credit hours of academic work
during either Summer Session. It is recommended that
a person who is employed full time take no more than 6
credit hours of academic work.
Bachelor of Science in Education
Degree Requirements
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Regular matriculation requirements of the university.
Admission to the Teacher Education Program.
Admission to the Student Teaching Program.
A cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5.
Successful completion of 35 credit hours of juniorand senior-level courses (courses numbered higher
than 299).
Successful completion of at least 30 of the last
60 credit hours of academic work, including the
Teacher Education Requirements
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•
teaching methods courses, in residence at IU
Northwest preceding admission to student teaching.
Successful completion of at least 120 credit hours
of appropriately distributed academic credit hours
within seven calendar years of the intended date of
receipt of the degree. Any work completed seven or
more calendar years prior to that date will be subject
to review to determine its acceptability toward the
degree. Methods courses three or more calendar
years old and student teaching two or more years
old will also be subject to review.
Successful completion of all required courses and a
grade of C or better in all education courses and all
teaching subject courses.
Successful completion of all program checkpoint and
portfolio requirements.
Demonstration of specific knowledge, performances,
and dispositions as required by the Indiana
Department of Education.
Application for Degree
When students register at IU Northwest the last time
before completing the requirements for a degree in the
School of Education, they should file an application for
the degree with the Office of Education Student Services.
Students completing work for degrees in the SOE in
absentia must notify the same office at least two months
prior to the time when the degree is to be granted.
Elementary / Special Education
Initial Program
General Education Requirements
Teaching All Learners: Elementary / Special
Education Initial Program
The School of Education prepares students in the
Teaching All Learners: Elementary Education Initial
Program (TAL) for careers teaching in elementary K-6 and
special education classrooms grades K-12.
Candidates who complete this program will receive a
Bachelor of Science degree in Elementary Education and
are eligible for the Early and Middle Childhood Generalist
(K-6), Exceptional Needs—Mild Interventions, and the
Reading Licenses.
General Education Requirements (59 cr.)
Language Arts (6 cr.)
•
•
ENG W131 Elementary Composition (3 cr.)
SPCH S121 Public Speaking (3 cr.)
Social and Behavioral Studies (6 cr.)
•
•
GEOG G110 Introduction to Human Geography (3
cr.)
Approved Minority Studies elective (3 cr.)
Mathematics (9 cr.)
•
•
MATH T101 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I
(3 cr.)
Select one of the following
• MATH T102 Mathematics for Elementary
Teachers II (3 cr.)
•
•
133
EDUC F401 Conceptual Understanding of
Mathematical Concepts I (3 cr.)
Select one of the following
• MATH T103 Mathematics for Elementary
Teachers III (3 cr.)
• EDUC F401 Conceptual Understanding of
Mathematical Concepts II (3 cr.)
Science (12 cr. minimum)
•
•
•
Biology (with lab)
Geology (with lab)
Chemistry or Physics (with lab)
Health, Physical Education and Recreation (5 cr.)
•
•
HPER P290 Movement Experiences for Preschool
and Elementary School Children (2 cr.)
HPER H414 Health Education in Grades K-8 (3 cr.)
Fine Arts (9 cr.)
•
•
•
EDUC M323 Teaching Music in the Elementary
Schools (3 cr.)
EDUC M333 Art Experiences for the Elementary
Teacher (3 cr.)
EDUC H340 Education and American Culture
(recommended for the third block) (3 cr.)
Educational Foundation Requirements (12 cr.)
•
•
•
•
EDUC F200 Examining Self as Teacher (3 cr.)
EDUC W200 Microcomputing for Education: An
Introduction (3 cr.)
EDUC P250 Educational Psychology (3 cr.)
EDUC K205 Introduction to Exceptional Children (3
cr.)
Checkpoint #1
Teacher Education Requirements
Professional Education
The required education courses are sequenced into
five blocks. The courses listed in Blocks 1, 2, 3, and 4
must be completed in this order. Each of these courses
must be completed with a grade of C or higher before a
student can continue in the program. The professional
education courses listed as follows may be taken only
after admission into the Teacher Education Program.
The second, third, and fourth blocks of the elementary
sequence have specific methods courses with general
education prerequisites. The prerequisite for EDUC
E325 Social Studies in the Elementary Schools is
Geography G110 Introduction to Human Geography plus
one-half of the other required social studies courses.
The prerequisites for EDUC E343 Mathematics in the
Elementary Schools are (1) MATH T101 Mathematics for
Elementary Teachers I and (2) MATH T102 Mathematics
for Elementary Teachers II. The prerequisite for EDUC
E339 Methods of Teaching Language Arts is ENG L390
Children's Literature. The prerequisite for EDUC E328
Science in the Elementary Schools is two-thirds of the
required science classes.
Teacher Education Program (58 cr.)
134
Secondary and K-12 Visual Arts Education Program
Candidates may begin the Teacher Education Program
only when they have completed the requirements listed
earlier in this bulletin.
First Block (12 cr.)
•
•
•
•
EDUC M310 General Methods (3 cr.)
EDUC K343 Education of the Socially and
Emotionally Disturbed I (3 cr.)
EDUC K370 Introduction to Learning Disabilities (3
cr.)
EDUC E335 Education of Young Children (3 cr.)
Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences (minimum
11 cr.)
•
•
•
Math and Science majors should check with their advisors
and take the most appropriate courses.
Social and Behavioral Sciences
•
Second Block (12 cr.)
•
•
•
•
EDUC E339 Methods of Teaching Language Arts (3
cr.)
EDUC E340 Methods of Teaching Reading I (3 cr.)
EDUC E325 Social Studies in the Elementary
Schools (3 cr.)
EDUC M301 Field Experience (3 cr.)
Third Block (12 cr.)
•
•
•
•
EDUC E341 Methods of Teaching Reading II(3 cr.)
EDUC K344 Education of the Socially and
Emotionally Disturbed II (3 cr.)
EDUC K352 Education of Children with Learning
Problems (3 cr.)
EDUC K495 Practicum in Special Education (3 cr.)
Fourth Block (12 cr.)
•
•
•
•
EDUC E328 Science in the Elementary Schools (3
cr.)
EDUC E343 Mathematics in the Elementary Schools
(3 cr.)
EDUC P345 Academic and Behavioral Assessment
of the Mild Handicapped Child (3 cr.)
EDUC M304 Field Experience (3 cr.)
(Checkpoint #2)
Fifth Block (12 cr.)
Student Teaching (12 cr.)
•
•
EDUC M425 Student Teaching: Elementary (6 cr.)
EDUC K480 Student Teaching: Special Education (6
cr.)
Science majors must take GEOG-G 315 plus the minority
studies elective.
Arts and Humanities (6 cr.)
ENG -W 231 (3 cr.)
FINA -A 101 (3 cr.)
Cultural and Historical studies (6 cr.)
Total (30 cr.)
Educational Foundation Courses
•
•
•
•
•
Secondary education majors must check with the Office of
Education Student Services for changes in requirements.
The general education courses required for this program
provide a liberal education regardless of teaching major.
Language Arts (6 cr.)
o ENG-W 131 Elementary Composition (3 cr.)
o SPCH-S 121 Public Speaking (3 cr.)
EDUC F200 Examining Self as Teacher (3 cr.)
EDUC W200 Using Computers in Education (3 cr).
EDUC P250 Educational Psychology (3 cr.)
EDUC K205 Introduction to Exceptional Children (3
cr.)
EDUC H340 Education and American Culture (3 cr.)
Total (15 cr.)
Professional Education Courses
The required education courses are sequenced into
four blocks. The courses listed in Blocks 1,2, and 3
must be completed in this order. Each of these courses
must be completed with a grade of C or better before a
student can continue in the program. The professional
education courses listed as follows may only be taken
after admission into the Teacher Education Program.
•
First Block
• EDUC M314 General Methods: Senior High/
Junior High/Middle School Teachers (3 cr.)
• EDUC K306 Teaching Students with Special
Needs in Secondary Classrooms (3 cr.)
•
Second Block - The second block requires that 70
percent of content courses be completed and the
following courses be taken concurrently
• EDUC M464 Methods of Teaching Reading (3
cr.)
• EDUC M301 Field Experience (3 cr.)
• The appropriate methods course for each
specific teaching major.
• EDUC M330 Foundations of Art Education and
Methods I (3 cr.)
• EDUC M437 Teaching Science 5-12 (3 cr.)
• EDUC M441 Methods of Teaching SH /JH/ MS
Social Studies (3 cr.)
Urban Teacher Education Program Option I - Provides
fourth-block field experiences and student teaching in
urban schools.
Required General Education Courses
(6 cr.) must be successfully completed from minority
studies and one of the following departments:
anthropology, geography, public and environmental
affairs, sociology, economics, history, political
science, and psychology.
Social studies majors must take HIST-H 105 and AFRO-A
355 to meet this requirement.
(Checkpoint #3)
Secondary and K-12 Visual Arts
Education Program
MATH-M 100 (4 cr.)
MATH-M 200 (3 cr.)
One science course with a lab (4-5 cr.)
Required Courses for Science Major
•
•
•
•
EDUC M452 Methods of Teaching SH /JH/ MS
English (3 cr.)
EDUC M457 Methods of Teaching SH /JH/ MS
Mathematics (3 cr.)
Third Block - To be eligible to enroll in the third
semester of the education sequence, which deals
with specific methods, the student must have
successfully completed at least 85 percent of the
teaching major. The third block requires the following
courses to be taken concurrently:
• EDUC P407 Psychological Measurement in the
Schools (3 cr.)
• EDUC M304 Laboratory/Field Experience (3
cr.) The appropriate methods course for each
specific teaching major.
• EDUC M430 Foundations of Art Education and
Methods II (3 cr.)
• EDUC M446 Methods of Teaching SH /JH/ MS
Science (3 cr.)
• EDUC M483 Teaching Social Studies 5-12 (3
cr.)
• EDUC M469 Content Area Literacy (3 cr.)
• EDUC M459 Teaching Mathematics 5-12 (3
cr.)
• EDUC M478 Methods of Teaching High School
Speech
Urban Teaching Education Program Option I Provides third-block field experiences and student
teaching in urban schools.
Portfolio Checkpoint #2
•
Fourth Block
• EDUC M480 Student Teaching in the
Secondary School (12 cr.)
Portfolio Checkpoint #3
•
•
•
•
Teaching Majors Available - Credit for at least 36
credit hours must be obtained in each subject area
(not including the methods). Some majors require
more than 36 credit hours. To have a science major,
students must select one licensure area. To have
a social studies major, students must select two
licensure areas in addition to historical perspectives.
English
Mathematics
Science with licensure areas in
• Life Science
• Chemistry
• Earth Space Science
•
Social Studies with licensure areas in
• Historical Perspectives (required)
• Economics
• Government (Political Science)
• Psychology
• Sociology
•
•
Visual Arts
Required Courses for English Major
•
Select one of the following (3 cr.)
• ENG W301 Writing Fiction (3 cr.)
•
•
135
ENG W303 Writing Poetry (3 cr.)
ENG W231 Professional Writing Skills (3 cr.)
•
Select one of the following (3 cr.)
• ENG W233 Intermediate Expository Writing (3
cr.)
• ENG W490 Writing Seminar (3 cr.)
•
•
ENG W350 Advanced Expository Writing (3 cr.)
ENG G205 Introduction to the English Language (3
cr.)
ENG G207 Grammar and Usage (3 cr.)
ENG L315 Major Plays of Shakespeare (3 cr.)
Two courses (200- or 300-level) of English Literature
(6 cr.)
ENG L391 Literature for Young Adults (3 cr.)
Two courses (300-level) of American Literature (6
cr.)
One course (300- or 400-level) of Minority or
Multicultural Literature (3 cr.)
Three courses in speech, communication, or theatre
(9 cr.)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Required Courses for Mathematics Major
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
MATH M118 Finite Mathematics (3 cr.)
MATH M126 Trigonometric Functions (2 cr.)
MATH M215 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II (5
cr.)
MATH M216 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II (5
cr.)
MATH M311 Calculus III (4 cr.)
MATH M301 Applied Linear Algebra (3 cr.)
MATH M360 Elements of Probability (3 cr.
MATH M391 Foundations of the Number System (3
cr.)
MATH M366 Elements of Statistical Inference (3 cr.)
MATH T336 Topics in Euclidean Geometry (3 cr.)
MATH M447 Mathematical Models and Applications
I (3 cr.)
Two approved mathematics electives (6 cr.)
Required Courses for Science Major
Science Candidates must select at least one licensure
area from the following: life science, chemistry, and
earth space science. Candidates must complete all core
courses as well as all courses in their chosen licensure
area.
• Core Courses
•
• BIOL L101 Introduction to the Biological
Sciences (4 cr.)
• CHEM C105 Principles of Chemistry (3 cr.)
• CHEM C125 Experimental Chemistry (2 cr.)
• GEOL G101 Introduction to Earth Science:
Lecture (3 cr.)
• GEOL G102 Introduction to Earth Science:
Laboratory (1 cr.)
• GEOL G185 Global Environmental Change (3
cr.)
•
•
Life Science
• CHEM C106 Principles of Chemistry II (3 cr.)
• CHEM C126 Experimental Chemistry II (2 cr.)
• PHYS P101 Physics in the Modern World (4
cr.)
• Select one of the following (3 cr.)
136
Required Courses for Social Studies Major
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
BIOL L102 Introduction to the Biological
Sciences II (4 cr.)
BIOL L211 Molecular Biology (3 cr.)
BIOL L311 Genetics (4 cr.)
BIOL L473 Ecology (3 cr.)
Select one of the following (4 cr.)
• BIOL M200 Microorganisms in Nature
and Disease (4 cr.)
• BIOL M310 Microbiology (4 cr.)
•
Select one of the following (3 or 4 cr.)
• BIOL B355 Plant Diversity (4 cr.)
• BIOL L351 Fungi (3 cr.)
• BIOL Z406 Vertebrate Zoology (4 cr.)
•
•
AST A100 The Solar System (3 cr.)
AST A105 Stellar Astronomy (3 cr.)
•
PHYS P101 Physics in the Modern World (4
cr.)
Select one of the following (3 cr.)
• GEOL G210 Oceanography (3 cr.)
• GEOG G304 Meteorology and Physical
Climatology (3 cr.)
•
•
GEOL G334 Principles of Sedimentology and
Stratigraphy (4 cr.)
GEOL G451 Hydrogeology (4 cr.)
Required Courses for Social Studies Major
Candidates must take the required courses in three
licensure areas: historical perspectives and two from
government (political science), psychology, and sociology.
Licensure Areas
• Economics
• ECON E103 Introduction to
Microeconomics (3 cr.)
• ECON E104 Introduction to
Macroeconomics (3 cr.)
•
Select one of the following (3 cr.)
• ECON E350 Money and Banking (3
cr.)
• BUS G300 Introduction to
Managerial Economics (3 cr.)
• Advanced Economics Electives
(300-400 level) (3 cr.)
Government
• POLS Y103 Introduction to American
Politics (3 cr.)
• Select one of the following (3 cr.)
• POLS Y360 United States Foreign
Policy (3 cr.)
• POLS Y372The Analysis of
International Politics (3 cr.)
•
Select one of the following (3 cr.)
• POLS Y307lndiana State
Government and Politics(3 cr.)
• POLS Y308 Urban Politics (3 cr.)
•
Select one of the following (3 cr.)
• POLS Y318 The American
Presidency (3 cr.)
• POLS Y319 The United States
Congress (3 cr.)
•
Psychology
• PSY P101 Introductory Psychology I (3
cr.)
• PSY P102 Introductory Psychology II (3
cr.)
• Select two approved psychology
electives (6 cr.)
•
Sociology
• SOC S161 Principles of Sociology (3 cr.)
• SOC S163 Social Problems (3 cr.)
• SOC S362 World Societies and Cultures
(3 cr.)
• One approved sociology elective (3 cr.)
Select one of the following (5 cr.)
• PHYS P202 General Physics II (5 cr.)
• PHYS P222 General Physics II (5 cr.)
Earth / Space Science
• GEOL G209 History of Earth (3 cr.)
• GEOL G221 Introductory Mineralogy (4 cr.)
• GEOL G222 Introductory Petrology (4 cr.)
•
•
•
Chemistry
• CHEM C106 Principles of Chemistry II (3 cr.)
• CHEM C126 Experimental Chemistry II (2 cr.)
• CHEM C341 Organic Chemistry I (3 cr.)
• CHEM C343 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (2
cr.)
• CHEM 300 or 400 level approved electives (8
cr.)
• AST A105 Stellar Astronomy (3 cr.)
• Select one of the following (5 cr.)
• PHYS P201 General Physics I (5 cr.)
• PHYS 221 General Physics I (5 cr.)
•
•
AST A100 The Solar System (3 cr.)
AST A105 Stellar Astronomy (3 cr.)
Historical Perspectives
• GEOG G110 Introduction to Human
Geography (3 cr.)
• HIST H106 American History II (3 cr.)
• HIST A363 Survey of Indiana History (3 cr.)
• One approved American History elective (3 cr.)
• HIST H113 History of Western Civilization I (3
cr.)
• HIST H114 History of Western Civilization II (3
cr.)
• One non-Western History course (3 cr.)
Secondary and K-12 Visual Arts
Education Program
Visual Arts Education Program
The undergraduate and graduate Initial License programs
in Visual Arts Education at IU Northwest are designed
to prepare effective educators to work in a variety of
school settings. Candidates in this program are provided
opportunities to learn and practice the knowledge, skills,
Graduate Visual Arts Education Program Degree Requirements
and dispositions needed to become effective visual arts
teachers. Graduate candidates earn a license for the
secondary setting grades 5-12 through the Urban Teacher
Education Program (UTEP). Undergraduate candidates
earn a Bachelor of Science in Education: Visual Arts
degree, which prepares them to teach art at all grades
(K-12).
Visual Arts Graduate Degree Requirements
Secondary and K-12 Visual Arts Education
Program Degree Requirements
The Undergraduate Initial License Program in Visual Arts
is a 134 credit hour program leading to an initial teaching
license in Visual Arts and a Bachelor’s of Science degree
in Education. Candidates can choose to earn a license
in all grades K-12, elementary K-6, or secondary 5-12.
Field and clinical experiences are at the appropriate levels
for licensure. All candidates earn a minor in Fine Arts (15
credit hours) and a minor in Art History (15 credit hours).
Required General Education Courses (35 cr.) include
Language Arts (6 cr.), Mathematical, Physical and Life
Sciences (11 cr.), Social and Behavioral Sciences (6 cr.),
Arts and Humanities (6 cr.), and Cultural and Historical
Studies (6 cr.) with at least one course in minority studies.
At a minimum, 15 credit hours are required in the area of
educational foundations prior to admission to the Teacher
Education Program. Courses deemed appropriate for
meeting the educational foundations requirements (15
cr.) include EDUC-F200 Examining Self as Teacher (3
cr.), EDUC-W200 Using Computers in Education (3 cr.),
EDUC-P250 Educational Psychology (3 cr.), EDUC-K205
Introduction to Exceptional Children (3 cr.) and EDUCH340 Education and American Culture (3 cr.).
The visual arts major courses for this program encourage
a broad content knowledge basis grounded in The
Indiana Department of Education Professional Teaching
Standards for Visual Arts. Students take 54 credit hours of
visual arts major courses including art history and studio
art courses at both the foundational and upper-levels.
To begin the Teacher Education Program (TEP), students
must successfully complete advising checkpoint #1
and apply to the program. In order to pass checkpoint
#1, students must maintain a minimum cumulative
GPA of 2.50 and minimum visual arts content GPA
of 2.50. A minimum grade of C must be earned in all
Educational Foundation and Visual Arts content courses.
All Educational Foundation courses must be completed.
Portfolio artifacts must have acceptable scores (3 or
better) and any unresolved dispositional deficiencies
must be addressed. Candidates must be of sophomore
standing with at least 26 credit hours accumulated and
have successfully passed all three Praxis I tests. Students
must complete a criminal background check. Admission to
the TEP is in the fall semester only.
Once admitted to the Teacher Education Program (TEP),
candidates complete the program in four semesters of
full-time study, beginning in the fall session. Professional
Education courses are taken after admission to the
Teacher Education Program and are sequenced into
four blocks. All required Professional Education courses
must be completed with a grade of C or better before a
137
student can continue in the program. These courses are
sequential and must be completed in order.
The First Block of the educational sequence contains
6 credits of professional educational courses including
EDUC-M314 General Methods (3cr.) and EDUC-K306
Teaching Students with Disabilities (3 cr.).
The Second Block of the educational sequence contains
9 credits of professional educational courses including
EDUC-M330 Foundations of Art Education and Methods I
(3 cr.), EDUC-M464 Methods of Teaching Reading (3 cr.),
and EDUC-M301 Field Experience (3 cr.) an elementary
placement with an emphasis in classroom management.
The Third Block of the educational sequence contains
9 credits of professional educational courses including
EDUC-M430 Foundations of Art Education and Methods II
(3 cr.), EDUC-M304 Field Experience (3 cr.) a secondary
placement with an emphasis in diversity, and EDUC-P407
Psychological Measurement in the Schools (3 cr.).
The Fourth Block of the educational sequence
contains 12 credits of professional educational courses
consisting of student teaching. Candidates choose one
of the following; Option One: Grades K-12 visual arts
certification- Candidates complete two consecutive 8week placements, EDUC-M425 Student Teaching in
the Elementary School (6 cr.) and EDUC-M480 Student
Teaching in the Secondary School (6 cr.). Option Two:
Grades K-6 visual arts certification- Candidates complete
a 16-week placement, EDUC M425 Student Teaching
in the Elementary School (12 cr.). Option Three: Grades
5-12 visual arts certification- Candidates complete a 16week placement, EDUC-M480 Student Teaching in the
Secondary School (12 cr.).
Graduate Visual Arts Education Program
Degree Requirements
The Graduate Initial License Program in Visual Arts is
offered through the Urban Teacher Education Program
(UTEP). The UTEP program is experience-rich, fieldbased, and leads to teacher licensing in visual arts. The
UTEP track is designed for individuals who possess
a bachelor's degree from accredited institutions in
subjects other than education with at least a 2.5 grade
point average and appropriate coursework in Visual
Arts. To be admitted to UTEP at IU Northwest, students
must complete advising checkpoint #1 with the Director
of UTEP and apply to the program. In order to pass
checkpoint #1 students must have a minimum cumulative
GPA of 2.50, a minimum visual arts content GPA of 2.50
and all content courses must be completed with a grade
of C or better. Upon entrance to UTEP, no more than 9
credit hours of the required 60 credit hours in visual arts
content may remain incomplete. Candidates must have
successfully passed all three Praxis I tests and completed
a criminal background check. Admission to UTEP is in the
spring semester only.
Once admitted to the UTEP program in Visual Arts,
candidates complete the program in four semesters
of full-time study, beginning in the spring session.
Successful completion of the 27 credit hour UTEP Visual
Arts program will lead to an initial teaching license
in Secondary Education: Visual Arts for grade 5-12.
Professional Education courses are taken after admission
to the Teacher Education Program and are sequenced
138
Urban Teacher Education Program
into four blocks. All required Professional Education
courses must be completed with a grade of C or better
and a graduate GPA of 3.0 must be maintained to
continue in the program. Professional Education courses
are sequential and must be completed in order.
Graduates of the program are given "first consideration"
in hiring by the urban districts of East Chicago, Gary, and
Hammond.
The First Block of the educational sequence contains
6 credits of professional educational courses including
EDUC-S510 Methods of Teaching in Secondary Urban
Schools (3 cr.), an elementary or middle school field
placement in an urban school and EDUC S508 Visual Arts
Methods in the Urban Classroom (3 cr.) (Elementary and
Middle School Methods).
The Graduate Program is divided into the following
categories:
The Second Block of the educational sequence contains
9 credits of professional educational courses including
EDUC-P507 Assessment in Schools (3 cr.), EDUC-T550
Cultural/ Community Forces and the Schools (3 cr.), and
EDUC-K505 Introduction to Special Education (3 cr.).
The Third Block of the educational sequence contains
6 credits of professional educational courses including
EDUC-M501 Field Experience in Urban Classrooms (3 cr.)
which is a secondary field placement and EDUC-S508:
Visual Arts Methods in the Urban Classroom. (Secondary
Methods) (3 cr.).
The Fourth Block of the educational sequence contains
6 credits of professional educational courses including
EDUC-L517 Advanced Study of Content Reading and
Literature (3 cr.) and EDUC-M550 Student Teaching
(3 cr.). Candidates complete two consecutive 8-week
placements, which consist of an 8-week placement in a
middle school, and an 8-week placement in a high school.
Candidates must pass through Checkpoints at critical
decision points and must meet grade, GPA, portfolio,
disposition, Praxis, and SPA assessment requirements
before moving forward in their program.
Urban Teacher Education Program
The Urban Teacher Education Program (UTEP) is
experience-rich, field-based, and leads to teacher
licensing in selected areas through undergraduate and
graduate programs, Option I and Option II, respectively.
•
•
Option I is designed for undergraduates and offers a
unique opportunity for those enrolled in the SOE to
do a yearlong experience in an urban professional
development school and obtain certification in
elementary or secondary education.
Option II is designed for graduate students who
have obtained degrees from accredited institutions in
subjects other than education. This option offers the
opportunity for graduate students to do a yearlong
internship in both urban middle and high school
settings and obtain certification in a secondary
education field.
UTEP is committed to the development of "star" urban
teachers as supported by the research on effective
teaching in urban schools. The program ensures that
preservice teachers are exposed to "best practice" in
urban teaching, through the collaborative mentorship of
school-based and university-based faculty members.
M.S. in Education
•
Advanced Programs:
• Master of Science in Elementary Education
• Master of Science in Secondary Education
• Master of Science in Educational Leadership
•
Graduate Licensure Programs:
• UTEP—Option II: Secondary Education
majors
• Special Education: Mild Interventions (P-12)
A student with a bachelor's degree is considered to be
a graduate student. Graduate students who are working
toward a master's degree must maintain at least a 3.0
(B) cumulative grade point average. Students who are
working toward an initial teaching license must maintain at
least a 2.5 cumulative grade point average.
Graduate Study—General Information
The advanced programs at the School of Education
are built on two models: The Lead Teacher and the
Professional Leader. Both models have research-based
conceptual frameworks.
The Lead Teacher model has five program outcomes:
•
•
•
•
•
Teacher effectiveness
Information technologies
Curriculum design and delivery
Education equity
Leadership
The Professional Leader model has six program
outcomes:
•
•
•
•
•
•
A Vision of Learning;
School Culture and Instructional Program;
Management;
Collaboration with Families and Community;
Integrity, Fairness, and Ethical Behavior;
Political, Social, Economic, Legal, and Cultural
Context
Before completing either program, each student shall
complete a portfolio demonstrating mastery of the program
outcomes.
Portfolios consist of required artifacts. In order to
successfully complete portfolio requirements, each artifact
must have received a passing score.
Admission
Admission to Graduate Study
Students interested in graduate study should obtain
the application materials from the Office of Education
Student Services. All official transcripts required for
application purposes must be sent directly from the
originating institution to the Office of Education Student
Services. Indiana University students need not provide a
Credit Transfer Policies
transcript. Admission to all graduate licensure programs
also require the passing of specific Praxis I and/or Praxis
II exams. See the Office of Education Student Services
for the names and code numbers of the required exams in
specific areas of study.
Foreign students and students with non—U.S. institutional
degrees must contact the Office of Admissions at Indiana
University Northwest.
Students may be able to transfer some courses taken at
other campuses or universities. The school transfer policy
appears earlier in this bulletin.
Admission to the School of Education expires upon receipt
of a degree, the completion of special admission work,
or when no work has been completed on this campus in
a period of seven calendar years. Students must then
reapply for admission.
Admission to graduate study does not necessarily imply
admission to a degree program. If a student is admitted
to a degree program, this will be specifically indicated in
those courses required for the degree.
Requirements
To be admitted into the program for the Master of Science
degree in elementary or secondary education at Indiana
University Northwest, the candidate must successfully
meet multiple criteria for demonstrating preparedness
for study. While graduates may enroll in graduate-level
education courses before being formally admitted into the
master's program, no more than 12 such credit hours of
appropriate graduate course work may be applied to the
master's degree program except in the special programs
outlined later in this bulletin.
Candidates for admission to the master's degrees in
education must:
•
•
•
Have graduated from an accredited institution of
higher education with a grade point average of 2.5 or
higher and provide transcripts to that affect.
Hold a valid teacher's license.
Submit two letters of reference from K-12 school
officials.
degree requirements will not be recommended for that
program or degree.
If students fail to make progress in the removal of
academic deficiencies during the following semester, their
eligibility to enroll in any additional course work through
the School of Education shall be terminated. If terminated,
the students are placed on the all-university checklist.
They are then not eligible to enroll in courses through the
School of Education.
Licensing
Completion of requirements for master's degrees does not
necessarily imply that students have met requirements
for state licensing. If students want both the degree and
licensing, they should contact the graduate advisor to
have an appropriate program of study prepared.
Credit Transfer Policies
Credit transfer is administered by the graduate advisor
with the advice of appropriate faculty, including the
student's faculty advisor. Formal appeals of decisions and
the consideration of requests for exceptions to existing
policy are provided for by a standing committee of the
faculty of the SOE.
Credit transfers for a course must not be confused with
performance criteria for a degree, certificate, license
or endorsement. Most programs of the SOE require
performance criteria that are evidenced by a portfolio.
Course completion or credit transfer does not, by itself,
constitute meeting performance criteria. Performance
criteria (portfolio artifacts) required for certificates, licenses
or endorsements must be demonstrated after acceptance
into the school.
Academic work from a regionally accredited college
or university for which a student grade is at or above
the level of C may be transferred for credit but will be
transferred for program requirements subject to the
following conditions.
•
Undergraduate or graduate students who have
successfully completed any course at any other
Indiana University campus that is part of a program
at IUN will receive full credit for that course.
Products or performances that are required for
any academic objective at IUN must however still
be demonstrated. Assistance toward meeting
performance criteria at IUN is provided, in part,
through enrolling and completing credit courses.
A student who has transferred such course credit
will be given assistance as may be needed toward
meeting performance criteria by being allowed to
attend the course at IUN without having to re-enroll
or pay tuition for it. Similar arrangements may be
possible for other transfer students. These will be
considered on a case-by-case basis.
•
Except as noted below, two-thirds of the credits
for any graduate degree, license or certificate
program but including all related student teaching or
other required practicums must be completed after
being formally admitted to that program within the
SOE at IUN. Graduate students in good standing
from another IU campus who have been formally
admitted to a degree, license or certificate program
that is also available at IUN may transfer in all
but one-fourth of the same or similar program
Semester Load
Full-time work generally consists of 6 credit hours each
semester. The maximum load for either summer session
is 9 credit hours. It is recommended that a person who
is employed full time take no more than 6 credit hours of
academic work during any regular semester.
Good Standing
Graduate students not accepted into graduate-level
programs must maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5,
while those who are working toward a license or master's
degree must maintain at least a 3.0 (B) cumulative grade
point average in those graduate courses leading to the
license or degree. No course with a grade of C- or lower
may be used for meeting the requirements of a new
license, license addition, or a master's degree.
Probation
Students who do not maintain good standing are placed
on academic probation and remain on probation until their
grade point average returns to the good standing level.
Students on probation when they complete program or
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140
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Exit Requirements
credit requirements at IUN before being awarded
the degree, license or certificate. However, the
transferred credit may not include student teaching
or other required practicum, and performance criteria
required at IUN must still be demonstrated.
Acceptance into a degree, certificate, license, or
endorsement program must be accompanied with an
approved program of studies that has been validated
by appropriate faculty and certification advisors
within the SOE at IUN.
Guest students, or students who are seeking
personal, short-term objectives such as license
renewal or self-development, are not normally
affected by transfer of credit issues at IUN. The
Student Admission and Reinstatement Committee of
the SOE will consider any such cases on a case-bycase basis. However, the transferability of any IUN
course or other experience to a program at another
institution, within or outside of the Indiana University
School of Education, is entirely the responsibility of
the guest or short-term student.
Exit Requirements
An application for a graduate degree should be completed
and filed in the Office of Education Student Services one
semester before the degree is to be granted. Application
forms are available from that office.
Candidates for the Master of Science degree in
elementary or secondary education must satisfactorily
complete a portfolio consisting of at least one artifact for
each of the program outcomes.
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The student must have been admitted
unconditionally to the master's degree program, or,
if allowed to enter conditionally, must have removed
the conditions satisfactorily.
The student must complete a minimum of 33 credit
hours of graduate courses that are appropriate to the
particular master's degree program. All work to be
applied toward the degree must be completed within
six calendar years from the date when the grade is
received in the first course that is to be used toward
the degree.
Credit acquired in courses taken by correspondence
will not apply toward degree requirements unless
approved by the Director of Education Student
Services and the student's graduate advisor.
The student must have a cumulative grade point
average of at least a 3.0 in those courses required
for the degree.
Major Requirements
Master of Science in Education with Major in
Elementary or Secondary Education
Course Requirements
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EDUC A510 School/Community Relations (3 cr.)
EDUC A512 Curriculum for K-12 Educational
Leaders (3 cr.)
EDUC A530 Statistical Data for Educational Leaders
(3 cr.)
EDUC H637 Race, Class, and Gender Issues in
Education (3 cr.)
EDUC J511 Methods of Individualizing Instruction (3
cr.)
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EDUC P570 Managing Classroom Behavior (3 cr.)
EDUC R503 Application of Instructional Media and
Technology (3 cr.)
EDUC Y520 Strategies for Educational Inquiry (3 cr.)
EDUC W505 Masters Portfolio Preparation (3 cr.)
Two advisor-approved electives (3 cr.)
Secondary Education: Urban Option
Completers of Option II of the Urban Teacher Education
Program, when accepted into this program, may apply 24
credits of graduate courses from that program toward their
degree requirements.
In addition, the students must then take:
Course Requirements
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EDUC A530 Statistical Data for Educational Leaders
(3 cr.)
EDUC Y520 Strategies for Educational Inquiry (3 cr.)
EDUC R503 Application of Instructional Media and
Technology (3 cr.)
EDUC W505 Capstone Seminar (3 cr.)
Elementary or Secondary Education:
Special Education Focus
This option is not limited to completers of the graduate
Special Education Program (described later in this
bulletin), but those students, when accepted into this
program, may apply graduate courses taken in that
program toward degree requirements in this program.
Course Requirements
27 credit hours from the following courses as approved by
your faculty advisor
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EDUC K501 Adaptive Computers for Special
Education (3 cr.)
EDUC K505 Introduction to Special Education (3 cr.)
EDUC K520 Introduction to Emotional Disabilities (3
cr.)
EDUC K525 Introduction to Mild Disabilities (3 cr.)
EDUC K555 Reading Assessment and Instruction in
Special Education (3 cr.)
EDUC A510 School/Community Relations (3 cr.)
EDUC H637 Race, Class, and Gender Issues in
Education (3 cr.)
EDUC P570 Managing Classroom Behavior (3 cr.)
EDUC A530 Statistical Data for Educational Leaders
(3 cr.)
EDUC R503 Application of Instructional Media and
Technology (3 cr.)
EDUC A512 Curriculum for K-12 Educational
Leaders (3 cr.)
EDUC K535 Assessment and Remediation of Mild
Disabilities I (3 cr.)
EDUC K543 Education of the Socially and
Emotionally Disturbed (3 cr.)
EDUC P519 Psychological Assessment of
Exceptional Children (3 cr.)
EDUC K536 Assessment and Remediation of Mild
Disabilities II (3 cr.)
EDUC J511 Methods of Individualizing Instruction (3
cr.)
EDUC R503 Application of Instructional Media and
Technology (3 cr.)
Academic Standards
•
EDUC P570 Managing Classroom Behavior (3 cr.)
And the following two courses
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EDUC Y520 Strategies for Educational Inquiry (3 cr.)
EDUC W505 Masters Portfolio Preparation (3 cr.)
Master of Science in Educational Leadership
This master's degree is recommended for licensed
classroom teachers who wish to earn a building-level
administrator's license. All required courses must be
completed with a grade of B or higher.
Course Requirements
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EDUC A500 School Administration (3 cr.)
EDUC A510 School/Community Relations (3 cr.)
EDUC A512 Curriculum for K-12 Educational
Leaders (3 cr.)
EDUC A530 Statistical Data for Educational Leaders
(3 cr.)
EDUC A540 Elementary and Secondary School
Administration (3 cr.)
EDUC A608 Legal Perspectives in Education (3 cr.)
EDUC A670 Supervision of School Instruction (3 cr.)
EDUC A675 Leadership in Special Education(3 cr.)
EDUC P514 Life Span Development (3 cr.)
The B.G.S. degrees consist of two parts: (1) course work
that must be done in broad categories, called "required
areas of learning," and (2) course work that can be done
in any school, division, or program of the university, called
"elective credit." The three required areas of learning
are arts and humanities, science and mathematics, and
social and behavioral sciences. They provide students
with a broad exposure to the humanities and the sciences.
Electives permit students to explore other areas of interest
and to tailor the degree to their individual needs.
Admission
General Admission Requirements
The general studies degree programs are open to all
qualified high school graduates or individuals with the
appropriate General Educational Development (GED)
certificate.
Application Procedures
Persons interested in applying for admission to the
general studies degree program should comply with the
following procedures:
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Total (27 cr.)
Capstone Experience:
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EDUC A695 Practicum in School Administration—
Fall Semester
EDUC A695 Practicum in School Administration—
Spring Semester
The School Leaders Licensure Assessment must be
taken and passed before students may begin the second
semester of EDUC A695.
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General Studies Program
Administrative Officers
Mark S. Hoyert, Ph.D., Dean
Nelson H. DeLeon, Ph.D., Associate Dean
Joan F. Wolter, B.G.S., Assistant Director Georgia Kontos,
B.A., Project Coordinator
Phone: (219) 980-6828
Web site: http://www.iun.edu/general-studies/
General Studies Program
The General Studies Program at IU Northwest offers the
Bachelor of General Studies (B.G.S.) degree.
General studies degree programs provide higher
education alternatives for nontraditional students that
leads to a Bachelor of General Studies (B.G.S.) degree.
Those students may have work or home schedules that
are uncertain, or may simply desire flexibility in program
planning and scheduling that is not generally available
in traditional programs. Many of our students began
a program some time ago and now wish to continue
their education in a way that builds upon prior academic
achievements and present personal realities.
It is possible to design an academic program that fits you.
It is possible to complete your studies in a variety of ways.
141
•
All applicants must complete the application form
available from the General Studies Program.
Citizens of other countries, including those in the
United States on immigration visas, must complete
the International Application for Admission form
in addition to the regular application form. The
International Application for Admission form is
available from the Office of Admissions, Indiana
University, Bloomington, IN 47405.
If the applicant has previously attended college, the
applicant should direct the college or university to
forward a transcript to the Office of Admissions.
All applicants who have not previously attended
Indiana University must submit a copy of their high
school transcript or evidence of having completed
the GED certificate. Applicants over 21 years
of age without a high school diploma or GED
certificate should attach a letter explaining how their
experience has prepared them for college-level
work.
All of the preceding information and supporting
materials should be sent to the Continuing Studies
Program, IU Northwest, Gary, IN 46408.
Academic Standards
Degrees Awarded with Distinction
The General Studies Program recognizes outstanding
performance in course work by awarding degrees with
three levels of distinction: distinction, high distinction, and
highest distinction. In order to graduate with distinction,
students must have 60 graded IU credit hours for the
B.G.S. degree. (Pass/fail and self-acquired competency
credits and courses not applicable to the degrees [e.g.,
remedial courses] are not counted in calculating the
number of credit hours.) Courses with S grades (not selfacquired competency) are counted in these 60 hours.
The levels of distinction, which are printed on both the
student's transcript and IU diploma, are determined by the
overall cumulative grade point average of each graduating
class and generally approximates the following GPAs:
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3.50-3.74 distinction
3.75-3.89 high distinction
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Required Areas of Learning
3.90-4.00 highest distinction
Required Areas of Learning
Areas
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Arts and Humanities
Capstone Experience
Electives
Science and Mathematics
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Each degree program requires completion of course
work in three required areas of learning. To fulfill the
requirements, students may choose from within each area
of learning.
In each degree program, a student must demonstrate
competency in each of the following areas: written
communication, oral communication, mathematics, and
computer literacy. All students are required to take an
additional writing course and a diversity course (see
advisor for details) Students should discuss with their
academic advisors the appropriate ways to establish
competency.
The subject fields grouped under the three areas of
learning follow. Similar subject fields from other colleges
and universities may be applied toward fulfilling the area
requirements.
Science and Mathematics
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Anatomy and physiology
Astronomy
Biology
Chemistry
Computer science
Data processing and information systems
Geology
Mathematics
Microbiology
Physics
Plant sciences
Zoology
Arts and Humanities
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Classical studies
Comparative literature English
Fine arts
Folklore
History
History and philosophy of science
Language courses
Minority studies
Musicology and music history
Philosophy
Religious studies
Speech and communication
Theatre and drama
Social and Behavioral Sciences
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Anthropology
Economics
Geography
Linguistics
Political science
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Psychology
Sociology
Electives
Students may select any of the courses offered by Indiana
University or other schools to fulfill elective requirements.
Students are encouraged to consult with their advisors
and to concentrate their elective course work in subject
fields related to their primary academic interest, a second
area of expertise, and personal interests. Students are
also encouraged to focus their learning by selecting
minors available from the College of Arts and Sciences,
the School of Business and Economics, and the School of
Public and Environmental Affairs.
Capstone Experience
The General Studies Degree Program offers course
work leading to a capstone experience that is available
both on campus and at a distance. Completing a
capstone experience enables you to demonstrate
accomplishments in undergraduate education. It allows
you to apply both academic and real-world experience
to the principles of undergraduate learning, thereby
enabling you to understand the educational philosophy of
a multidisciplinary education. The capstone experience will
help you make constructive decisions for academic and
career planning. Contact your general studies advisor or
program director for details.
For any changes to the degree requirements that may
have occurred since the publication of this bulletin, contact
your general studies advisor or program director.
Degree Requirements
Bachelor of General Studies (B.G.S.)
Requirements
•
A minimum of 12 credit hours in each of the three
required areas of learning. (The credit hours required
in each area must be taken in at least two academic
departments.)
• Arts and humanities (12 cr.)
• Science and mathematics (12 cr.)
• Social and behavioral sciences (12 cr.)
•
A minimum of 18 additional credit hours in one of
the preceding areas with courses from at least two
academic departments (18 cr.)
Electives (66 cr.)
•
Total (120 cr.)
Certificate in General Studies Requirements
•
A minimum of 6 credit hours in each of the three
required areas of learning. (The credit hours required
in each area must be taken in at least two academic
departments.)
• Arts and humanities (6 cr.)
• Science and mathematics (6 cr.)
• Social and behavioral sciences (6 cr.)
•
Electives (12 cr.)
Total (30 cr.)
Credits Eligible for Transfer from Institutions Other than Indiana University
Other Requirements
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No more than three sequential courses (not to
exceed 10 credit hours) in any one academic
department may be applied to the 30 credits.
Students must successfully complete at least 8
credit hours of course work at Indiana University or
through the IU Independent Study program. Earning
credit through an academic department examination
at Indiana University is the equivalent of having
completed the course at IU. Credits earned by selfacquired competency (SAC) and Defense Activity
for Non-Traditional Education Support (DANTES)
cannot be applied to the 8 credit hour requirement.
The campus director must approve exceptions.
The Certificate in General Studies is available
to students admitted to the School of Continuing
Studies who have 24 credits or fewer applicable to
the General Studies Program.
Students must complete at least 6 credit hours after
admission to the General Studies Degree Program.
This must be Indiana University course work. Credits
for SAC and DANTES cannot be applied to this 6
credit hour requirement.
Students must earn a minimum cumulative grade
point average of 2.0 on all courses considered for
the certificate and on all courses completed after
admissions to the School of Continuing Studies. The
minimum grade for any course completed to satisfy
non-elective requirements must be a C–.
Students must be admitted according to the
standards for admission to the general studies
degrees.
Students are required to meet the oral and written
communication fundamental skills requirements of
the general studies degrees.
Student Consumer Information about this Program
Requirements for a Second Bachelor's
Degree
Normally, the holder of a baccalaureate degree who
wishes to pursue a further educational goal is encouraged
to become qualified for admission to a graduate degree
program. In certain cases, however, a student may be
admitted to candidacy for the B.G.S. degree.
After admission to the General Studies Degree Program,
bachelor's degree candidates must earn
•
•
•
At least 30 credit hours of the required 120 from
Indiana University if they have not previously earned
credit from the Indiana University system
A minimum of 20 credit hours acceptable for the
B.G.S. degree after admission to the General
Studies Degree Program
All requirements for the Bachelor of General Studies
degree
Recognition of Previously
Earned Credit
Many students in the General Studies Degree Program
have previously earned academic credit at Indiana
University or at other institutions. They may also be
eligible for credit by examination or for the award of credit
for college-level learning gained through life experiences
143
(self-acquired competency). Such credit is applied to the
degree requirements of the B.G.S. degrees within the
following guidelines.
Credits from Indiana University
A maximum of 100 hours of credit can be applied to the
B.G.S. degree, provided that the grades earned were
D or higher. Exception: Credit for the grade of D will be
granted only for elective courses, not those required for
the distribution requirements of the degree or the minor(s).
Students with academic deficiencies (cumulative grade
point average below 2.0 or below a C average) in course
work done within the Indiana University system may be
admitted to the General Studies Degree Program on
"probation." All students must achieve at least a 2.0 grade
point average for all courses applied to the degree at
Indiana University after admission to the General Studies
Degree Program in order to obtain a degree. Students
who have been dismissed from another academic unit of
Indiana University and whose cumulative GPA is below
2.0 may not be admitted to the General Studies Degree
Program until at least one calendar year has passed since
the date of dismissal.
Upon the successful completion (GPA of 2.0 or higher) of
12 credit hours in the General Studies Degree Program,
the following policies take effect:
Grades of D or F earned in the Indiana University system
five years or more before admission to the General
Studies Degree Program may be deleted from the General
Studies records at the option of the student; a student
may request forgiveness of an unsatisfactory semester
at Indiana University if that semester is within a five-year
period of the student's admission to the program. Although
all Indiana University course work remains on the
student's permanent record, the General Studies Degree
Program can exclude the grades and credit earned during
this unsatisfactory semester when computing the student's
grade point average. Students should note that the
General Studies Program removes all grades and credit
earned during this unsatisfactory semester from the grade
point average; therefore, students are advised to consult
with their advisors about the advisability of this procedure.
The program is designed to avoid placing an excessive
burden on students who have made an unsatisfactory
start at Indiana University in the past. The program is
not intended to permit students with chronically poor
performance in the university to stay in school, nor to raise
false hopes for students who are not making progress
toward a degree.
Credits Eligible for Transfer from
Institutions Other than Indiana University
A maximum of 90 credit hours at an institution other
than Indiana University can be applied to the B.G.S.
degree, provided that grades are at least C. In order
for transfer credit to be applied to any of the required
areas of learning, courses taken must be equivalent in
nature to those offered by Indiana University in these
areas. Courses taken at another institution in which the
student received the grade of C– or below will not be
transferable for credit. In addition, there is a 64 credit hour
maximum for courses applied toward the B.G.S. degree
from community/associate's colleges.
144
Credit by Examination at Other Institutions
Students who have been dismissed from another
postsecondary institution cannot be admitted to the
General Studies Degree Program until at least one
calendar year has passed since the date of dismissal.
University regulations require that the admissions office
indicate on the credit transfer report any deficiencies in
grade point average (grade point average below 2.0 on a
4.0 scale) at another institution.
Credit by Examination at Other Institutions
If the transcript indicates credit by examination, and if
students do not enroll in sequential courses to validate
their knowledge in the subject matter, credit will be
granted only on the basis of review by the appropriate
academic department of Indiana University.
Credits Awarded for Educational Programs
in Noncollegiate Organizations
Where relevant to the academic program sponsored by
the General Studies Degree Program, the Program will
consider the evaluation and credit recommendations of
the two publications below as a guide in awarding credit to
persons who have successfully completed noncollegiate
or in- company sponsored instruction:
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American Council on Education, The National Guide
to Educational Credit for Training Programs
University of the State of New York, A Guide
to Educational Programs in Noncollegiate
Organizations
Credit for Self-Acquired Competencies
(SAC)
The General Studies Degree Program recognizes
that students do gain college-level knowledge and
understanding through various life experiences that are
equivalent to the subject matter of specific courses in the
university curriculum or that may be recognized as general
elective credit. Students who believe themselves eligible
for such credit are encouraged to accelerate their college
programs by discussing their background in detail with the
General Studies Degree Program advisor.
In general, the following procedures and limitations govern
the awarding of credit for self-acquired competencies:
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A student must be admitted to the School of
Continuing Studies, have completed 12 credit hours,
and be in good standing before any credit for selfacquired competency is awarded.
A maximum of 30 credit hours to the B.G.S. degree.
Students seeking either general-elective or specific
course credit for self-acquired competencies should
first consult their General Studies Degree Program
advisors about the feasibility of their applications for
credit.
General credit is awarded as elective credit for
college-level knowledge that cannot be equated
to any specific course. The general self-acquired
competency credit awarded is recorded as School of
Continuing Studies SCS G299 or SCS G499 credit
and is applied only in the fulfillment of the elective
credits to be earned for a degree. In other words,
the Continuing Studies Self-Acquired Competency
Committee awards this general credit only if the
learning of the student cannot be credited as a
•
specific course, or courses, by other schools,
divisions, or departments.
The student requesting credit for self-acquired
competency will always do so in consultation with
the General Studies Degree Program advisor and
the chairperson of the campus SAC committee.
Details on procedures to be followed will be
furnished at the time the advisor and the student
begin fitting the SAC activities into the student's plan
of study.
Transfer of Self-Acquired Competencies
Credit within the Indiana University System
Self-acquired competencies credit awarded by the
faculty of one Indiana University campus is recorded and
explained on the permanent record of the student in the
system-wide office. The School of Continuing Studies
on any other Indiana University campus to which the
student may transfer in order to complete the associate
or bachelor's degree will honor such credit. The student
should be aware, however, that such credit would not
necessarily be honored by other degree programs of
Indiana University or by other institutions.
Transfer of Self-Acquired Competencies
Credit from Other Institutions
Up to 15 hours of the possible credit toward the
B.G.S. degree will be awarded for self-acquired
competencies previously recognized by other accredited
postsecondary institutions. Additional hours of selfacquired competencies credit from other institutions
must be reviewed in the same manner as other Indiana
University self-acquired competencies credit. The total
amount (transfer and IU) of SCS G299-SCS G499 credit
applicable to the B.G.S. is 30 credit hours.
Military Service and Law Enforcement Credit
Veterans of military service and military and law
enforcement personnel on active duty are eligible
for academic credit as a result of their training and
experience. The General Studies Degree Program of the
School of Continuing Studies follows the provisions of
the American Council on Education's Guide to Evaluation
of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services in
granting credit. Copies of official discharge, separation
papers, certificates of completion (in-service schools),
or transcripts must be submitted as a basis for granting
credit. For more information, contac the Admissions office.
School of Library and
Information Science (SLIS)
Bulletin
Administrative Officer
Timothy Sutherland, Director of the Library
Phone: (219) 980-6946
Web site: http://www.iun.edu/library/library-science/
The School of Library and Information Science (SLIS)
located on the Indianapolis campus offers courses
at Indiana University Northwest through distributed
education. The courses available are listed with course
descriptions. Please see the SLIS website at IUPUI for
additional information.
Division of Labor Studies
Library
IU Northwest
Library, Room 140B
3400 Broadway
Gary, Indiana 46408
Division of Labor Studies
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145
any economics course (3 cr.)
A minimum of 12 credit hours in one of the above
areas (12 cr.)
Total credit hours required in the major areas of learning
(39 cr.)
Phone: (219) 980-6825
Web site: www.iun.edu/labor-studies
The credit hours required in each of the above areas must
be distributed over at least two of the subject fields in each
area.
Associate of Science in Labor
Studies
A minimum of 42 credit hours in labor studies courses; five
must be core courses (42 cr).
The requirements for the Associate of Science degree
program with a major in labor studies are as follows:
Electives, including additional labor studies courses (27
cr.)
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Social and behavioral science (9 cr.)
Arts and humanities (12 cr.)
Required: ENG W131 (3 cr.)
One additional writing course (3 cr.)
Science and mathematics (6 cr.)
Select One of the following
• Required: one economics course
• LSTU L230 Labor and the Economy
Recommended:
• one course in computer science, taken through
any academic division, including Labor Studies
Total credit hours required in the major areas of learning
(27 cr.)
The credit hours required in each area must be distributed
over at least two subject fields in each area. A minimum of
27 credit hours from the list of labor studies courses; five
must be core courses.
•
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100- and 200-level courses are considered "core."
LSTU L290, however, is not considered core.
Electives in any area including labor studies (6 cr.)
Total credit hours required for the degree program (60 cr.)
Other requirements and limitations:
1. A minimum of 12 credit hours of the required 60
credit hours must be taken within the Indiana
University system.
2. A minimum of 10 credit hours of course work
accepted for the A.S. degree must be taken after the
student has been admitted to Indiana University.
3. No more than 15 credit hours can be taken within a
single subject other than labor studies.
Bachelor of Science, Major in
Labor Studies
The requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree
program with a major in labor studies are as follows:
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Social and behavioral sciences (12 cr.)
Arts and humanities (12 cr.)
Required: ENG W131 (3 cr.)
One additional writing course (3 cr.)
Science and mathematics (15 cr.)
Computer competency (3 cr.)
Economics (3 cr.)
Select one of the following
• LSTU L230 (3 cr.)
Total credit hours required for the degree program (120
cr.)
Other requirements and limitations:
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A minimum of 24 credit hours of the required 120
credit hours must be taken within the Indiana
University system.
A minimum of 20 credit hours of course work
accepted for the B.S. degree must be taken after the
student has been admitted to Indiana University.
A minimum of 30 credit hours of the required 120
credit hours must be in 300-400 level courses, at
least 12 cr. of the 30 cr. in labor studies.
A maximum of 21 credit hours toward a major or
concentration (other than the concentration in labor
studies) will be accepted toward the B.S.
Minor in Labor Studies
For a minor in Labor Studies, a student must take 15
credits in the discipline. At least 6 credits must be taken in
300-400 level courses.
Certificate in Labor Studies
Student Consumer Information about this Program
The requirements for the Certificate in Labor Studies are
as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
A minimum of 3 credit hours in two of the required
areas of learning and a minimum of 6 credit hours in
the third major area (12 cr.)
Required: one economics course or LSTU L230
Labor and the Economy
Recommended: one course in computer science,
taken through any academic division, including
Labor Studies
Arts and humanities (3 cr.)
Social and behavioral sciences (3 cr.)
Science and mathematics (3 cr.)
Elective in any of the above areas (3 cr.)
A total of 18 credit hours from the labor studies course list;
five must be core courses (18 cr.)
Total credit hours required for the Certificate in Labor
Studies program (30 cr.)
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Full Course List
Full Course List
AFRO-A 101 Contemporary Minority Political
Problems (3 cr.) Introductory study of the contemporary
political problems of the Afro-American. Attention will
be given to immediate as well as long-range alternative
solutions. (Fall)
AFRO-A 103 Introduction to Urban Studies (3 cr.) A
survey course designed to expose students to the social,
economic, and political issues that affect America's urban
communities. (Spring)
AFRO-A 150 Survey of the Culture of Black Americans
(3 cr.) The culture of black people in America viewed from
a broad interdisciplinary approach, employing resources
from history, literature, folklore, religion, sociology, and
political science. (Fall, Summer I)
AFRO-A 151 Minority People in the United States
(3 cr.) A study of the cultural experiences of minority
people in the United States. Focus will be on African
Americans and Latinos. Other minority groups will
be studied where appropriate. The course will be
interdisciplinary with heavy emphasis on original texts.
Credit cannot be earned for both AFRO-A 151 and CHRIC 151. (Spring)
AFRO-A 169 Introduction to Afro-American Literature
(3 cr.) Representative Afro-American writings, including
poetry, short stories, sermons, novels, and drama. (Fall)
AFRO-A 204 Topics in Afro-American Studies (3 cr.)
Analysis of selected topics and contemporary issues
relating to the Afro-American experience. (Fall, Spring)
AFRO-A 206 The Urban Community (3 cr.) An
examination of the urban community in general, with a
focus on the African-American community from an asset
perspective. Focus on uneven development and how
race and class have formed the basis for the inequalities
among urban communities. (Fall)
AFRO-A 208 The African Caribbean (3 cr.) Introductory
examination to issues concerning Africans in the
Caribbean from a historical, cultural, social, and political
perspective. Themes discussed include: the system of
plantation slavery, the Haitian revolution, de-colonization,
Pan-Africanism, class conflicts, neo-colonialism, struggles
for national identity, and the impact of race, color, gender,
music, and religion on regional distinctiveness.
AFRO-A 210 Black Women in the Diaspora (3 cr.)
Interdisciplinary examination of salient aspects of black
women's history, identity, and experience, including
policies, cultural assumptions, and knowledge systems
that affect black women's lives. While the primary focus
will be North America, the lives of black women in other
cultural settings within the African diaspora will also be
examined. (Fall)
AFRO-A 230 Contemporary Urban Affairs and the
African American Experience (3 cr.) An examination of
contemporary urban affairs and the socioeconomic and
cultural experiences of the African-American male. Focus
on social and economic change and how these changes
affect communities in general, the African-American
community, the family, and particularly the role and status
of the African American male. (Fall)
AFRO-A 240 Social Welfare and Minorities (3 cr.)
P: AFRO-A 103 Review and study of the factual
information regarding the welfare system as it is currently
administered. Emphasis on the interface between minority
welfare recipients and the welfare system. (Spring)
AFRO-A 249 Afro-American Autobiography (3 cr.) A
survey of autobiographies written by black Americans in
the last two centuries. The course emphasizes how the
autobiographers combine the grace of art and the power
of argument to urge the creation of genuine freedom in
America. (Occasionally)
AFRO-A 250 U.S. Contemporary Minorities (3 cr.)
R: AFRO-A 151 or CHRI-C 151 An interdisciplinary
study of how members of four minority groups - Asian
Americans, African Americans, Latinos and Native
Americans - combine their struggle for social justice with
their desire to maintain their own concepts and identity.
(Fall - Occasionally)
AFRO-A 255 The Black Church in America (3 cr.)
History of the black church from slavery to the present
emphasis on the church's role as a black social institution,
its religious attitudes as expressed in songs and sermons,
and its political activities as exemplified in the ministerpolitician. (Fall)
AFRO-A 260 Contemporary Minority Problems (3 cr.)
A seminar, primarily designed for sophomores and juniors,
directed to critical analysis of selected topics germane to
the future socioeconomic and political position of AfroAmericans. (Spring)
AFRO-A 261 The Black Family (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in
sociology An analysis of the historical background of the
black family. The contemporary social forces that affect
the black family are examined, along with strategies for
social reform. (Fall)
AFRO-A 280 Racism and Law (3 cr.) Contemporary
racial problems in American society with regard to law and
constitutional principles of basic freedom and associated
conflict. The effects of societal norms and the impact of
racism. (Occasionally)
AFRO-A 282 The Black Community, Law, and Social
Change (3 cr.) A study of the black community with
emphasis on law and social change. (Spring)
AFRO-A 290 Sociocultural Perspective of AfroAmerican Music (3 cr.) Survey of cultural, social,
and political attitudes that influenced blacks in the
development and participation in blues, jazz, urban black
popular music, and "classical" music. (Spring)
AFRO-A 301 Community Planning and Development
(3 cr.) P: AFRO-A 103 or consent of instructor Overview
of the planning process and its impact on urban minority
communities. Topics include socioeconomic studies, land
use planning, and urban development strategies. (Spring)
AFRO-A 302 Strategies of Community Organizations
(3 cr.) P: AFRO-A 240 or consent of instructor
Examination of several communities and the various
theories and strategies developed for community
organizations. (Fall)
AFRO-A 304 Housing and the Minority Community
(3 cr.) P: AFRO-A 301, SPEA-V 365, or consent of
instructor An examination of contemporary issues in
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147
housing, urban development, and the provision of public
services as they affect minority communities. Topics
include gentrification, exclusionary zoning, housing
assistance, disinvestment, and economic development.
(Occasionally)
of history (antebellum to present) and social change
(rural to urban). Use of oral traditions and life histories to
explore aspects of black culture and history. Credit not
given for both AFRO-A 392 and Folklore-F 394. (Fall—
Occasionally)
AFRO-A 333 Africans and Cultural Minorities in
International Film (3 cr.) Introduction to cinema from
French-speaking Africa, the Caribbean and Europe
involving enthnocultural minority groups from an
interdisciplinary approach. Course topics covered will
explore issues surrounding colonialism and its aftermath,
multiculturalism, expressions of national identity,
interracial relations, gender, class, and the social position
of enthnocultural minority groups from a world view.
AFRO-A 398 Introduction to Black Studies Research
(3 cr.) An introduction to historical sociological methods of
research and experimental design with emphasis on the
application of those methods to the black community. The
appropriate quantitative methods and their computation
are also used for each research approach. (Occasionally)
AFRO-A 341 Poverty in America (3 cr.) Intensive
comparative analysis of the way of life of America's urban
poor and their relationship to the larger society. (Fall)
AFRO-A 343 Practicum in Urban Studies (3 cr.)
P: AFRO-A 301 or AFRO-A 302 or consent of instructor
Designed to enhance the student's practical, working
knowledge of the social, economic, and political dynamics
affecting the urban community. Field placement will be
facilitated within three areas of professional endeavor:
social services, local government, and community
development and planning. Does not count toward
fulfillment of College of Arts and Sciences Group III
distribution requirements. (Spring)
AFRO-A 355 (HIST A355) Afro-American History I
(3 cr.) History of blacks in the United States. Slavery,
abolitionism, Reconstruction, post-Reconstruction to 1900.
(Fall)
AFRO-A 356 (HIST A356) Afro-American History II
(3 cr.) History of blacks in the United States from 1900 to
present. Migration north, NAACP, Harlem Renaissance,
postwar freedom movement. (Spring)
AFRO-A 370 Recent Black American Writing (3 cr.)
A study of selected black American writers of the latenineteenth and twentieth centuries with emphasis on
very recent writing. The focus of this course will be on the
literary qualities unique to those writers as individuals and
as a group. Credit not given for both AFRO-A 370 and
ENG-L 370. (Spring - Occasionally)
AFRO-A 379 Early Black American Writing (3 cr.) AfroAmerican writing before World War II with emphasis on
critical reactions and analyses. Includes slave narratives,
autobiographies, rhetoric, fiction, and poetry. (Spring—
Occasionally)
AFRO-A 380 Contemporary Black American Writing
(3 cr.) The black experience in America as it has been
reflected since World War II in the works of outstanding
Afro-American writers: fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and
drama. (Spring—Occasionally)
AFRO-A 384 Blacks in American Drama and Theatre,
1945–Present (3 cr.) Images of Blacks as reflected in
American drama from 1945 to present. Emphasis on
the contributions of Black playwrights such as Lorraine
Hansberry, Langston Hughes, Imamu Amiri Baraka (LeRoi
Jones), Ted Shin, and Ed Bullins
AFRO-A 392 Afro-American Folklore (3 cr.) AfroAmerican culture in the United States viewed in terms
AFRO-A 401 Minorities, Politics, and Social Change
(3 cr.) Topical study of the struggle of black Americans
to obtain representative political power. Redistricting and
gerrymandering, independent candidates and new political
alternatives, the impact of the 18-year-old vote on black
political activity, black quasi-political organizations, black
power in the U.S. Congress. (Spring)
AFRO-A 404 Topics in Afro-American Studies (3 cr.)
P: consent of instructor Extensive analysis of selected
topics and contemporary issues relating to the AfroAmerican experience. Topics vary from semester to
semester. May be repeated once for a different topic with
a maximum of two courses or 6 credit hours. (Fall, Spring)
AFRO-A 406 Literature by American Women of Color
(3 cr.) This course explores the literature of Native
American, African American, Asian American, and
Latina writers. These works as art define and theorize
the experience of minority women in the United States.
Critical and artistic issues are examined in light of their
sociohistorical context. (Fall)
AFRO-A 410 The Black Woman and the AfroAmerican Experience (3 cr.) Historical examination of
the black woman in America—from the African past to the
present—in relationship to her position in the family and
in society. Analysis of the social science paradigm, which
creates and perpetuates stereotypes of black women.
(Spring)
AFRO-A 440 History of the Education of Black
Americans (3 cr.) Education of black Americans and
its relationship to the Afro-American experience. Trends
and patterns in the education of black Americans as such
relate to the notions of education for whom and for what.
(Occasionally)
AFRO-A 488 Community Experience Internship (3 cr.)
P: AFRO-A 398 and AFRO-A 498 or departmental consent
Field placement for majors in Afro-American studies.
Work with an agency or organization that deals primarily
with inner-city minority groups under joint supervision of
agency and departmental staff members. Does not count
toward fulfillment of College of Arts and Sciences Group III
distribution requirements. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
ANTH-A 104 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
(3 cr.) A survey of cultural and social processes that
influence human behavior, using comparitive examples
from different ethnic groups around the world, with the
goal of better understanding the broad range of human
behavioral potenials and those influences that shape the
different expressions of these potentials. (Fall, Spring,
Summer)
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ANTH-A 105 Human Origins and Prehistory (3 cr.)
Human biological evolution and prehistory from the
earliest archaeological record through the rise of
civilization. (Fall, Spring, Summer II)
ANTH-A 200 Topics in Anthropology (topic varies)
(3 cr.) P: ANTH A104. Course is geared to the nonmajor
and emphasizes the development of skills in the use
of anthropological approaches to the study of human
behavior and belief. Topics will vary. ANTH A200 may be
taken twice with different topics. (Occasionally)
ANTH-A 210 Ancillary Topics in Anthropology (.5-2 cr.)
Individual and group activities that may be independent
of or connected to a course. May include activities such
as discussions, fieldwork, service learning, and applied
anthropology projects. May be repeated with different
topics to total up to 3 credit hours. (Occasionally)
ANTH-A 220 Hands-on Fossil Observations (1 cr.)
Hands-on observations, measurements, and interpretations of human fossils and fossil casts; offered
in conjunction with human paleontology courses.
(Occasionally)
ANTH-A 230 Linguistic Anthropology Lab (1 cr.)
Linguistics problems, word games, and videos.
Offered in conjunction with Language and Culture
courses. (Occasionally)
ANTH-A 240 History of Ethnographic Film (1 cr.)
Viewing of ethnographic films from earliest to most recent,
with discussions. Offered in conjunction with theory
courses. May be repeated once with different topic and
with different theory course.
ANTH-A 360 Development of Anthropological Thought
(3 cr.) P: two courses in Anthropology, including ANTH
A104, A105, and E200. An overview of the major
theoretical developments within anthropology as the
discipline has attempted to produce a universal and
unified view of human life based on knowledge of
evolution and prehistoric and contemporary cultures.
(Spring—even years)
ANTH-A 495 Independent Studies in Anthropology
(1-4 cr.) P: Two courses in anthropology and authorization
of the instructor. A supervised, in-depth examination
through individual research on a particular topic selected
and conducted by the student in consultation with an
anthropology faculty member. (Fall, Spring, Summer I,
Summer II)
ANTH-B 201 Bioanthropology and Forensics Lab
(3 cr.) C: ANTH B200 or ANTH B400. Laboratory
exercises in anatomy, genetics, primates, fossils; and
identification, aging, and sexing of the human skeleton.
(Occasionally)
ANTH-B 206 Primate Zoo Observation (1 cr.) P: Any
one of ANTH A103, ANTH A105, ANTH B200, ANTH
B266, or ANTH B466. Observation of primate anatomy,
locomotion, and social behavior at various Midwestern
zoos. (Occasionally)
ANTH-B 250 Topics in Biological Anthropology (3 cr.)
P: ANTH A105, or one course in biology or anatomy.
Selected topics in bioanthropology. May be repeated once
with a different topic. (Occasionally)
ANTH-B 300 Bioanthropology (3 cr.) P: ANTH A103,
ANTH A105, or one semester of college biology.
Bioanthropology of humans, basic biological principles,
functional morphology, evolutionary history. Human
evolution from lower forms, environmental factors,
speciation and differentiation, growth, sexual differences,
constitutional variability. (Spring—even years)
ANTH-B 368 The Evolution of Primate Social Behavior
(3 cr.) Major patterns of social organization in the order
Primates, with focus on several important primate species.
Examination of Darwinian theories of behavioral evolution.
Particular attention paid to the influence of food-getting
and diet on social behavior.
ANTH-B 400 Undergraduate Seminar (3 cr.) P: ANTH
A105 and junior standing, or three courses in biology or
anatomy. Selected topics in bioanthropology. Analysis of
research. Development of skills in analysis and criticism.
Topic varies. ANTH B400 may be taken twice with
different topics. (Occasionally)
ANTH-B 464 Human Paleontology (3 cr.) P: ANTH A103
or ANTH A105 or ANTH B200 or 6 credit hours of biology.
Human fossils: their structure, classification, geologic
range, and geographical distribution. (Occasionally)
ANTH-B 466 The Primates (3 cr.) P: Any one of
ANTH A103, ANTH A105, ANTH B200, or 6 credit
hours in biology or consent of instructor. Paleontology,
functional morphology, behavior, and natural history of
the nonhuman primates. Emphasis on behavioral and
ecological correlates of morphology. Credit given for only
one of the following: ANTH B106, ANTH B266, and ANTH
B466. (Occasionally)
ANTH-E 200 Social and Cultural Anthropology (3 cr.)
P: ANTH A104. Intermediate survey of theories and
problems in social and cultural anthropology. Historical
development, methods of inquiry, focal problems, and
contemporary theoretical perspectives. (Occasionally)
ANTH-E 205 Peoples of the World (3 cr.) P: ANTH
A104. All peoples have to confront similar challenges
in order to survive and thrive as individuals and as
societies. This course will examine how several
cultures around the world shape their values, behaviors,
institutions, and stories in response to external and
internal challenges. (Occasionally)
ANTH-E 221 Native Uses of Herbs (1 cr.) A field
experience course on Native American women's uses
of herbs, with required readings and hands-on work with
plants. (Occasionally)
ANTH-E 300 Culture Areas and Ethnic Groups
(variable title) (1-3 cr.) P: ANTH A104. An ethnographic
survey of a selected culture area or ethnic group. (May not
be repeated for more than 6 credit hours.) (Occasionally)
ANTH-E 320 Indians of North America (3 cr.) P: ANTH
A104. Ethnographic survey of culture areas from the Arctic
to Panama plus cross- cultural analysis of interrelations of
culture, geographical environment, and language families.
(Fall, Spring)
ANTH-E 324 Native American Art (3 cr.) P: A104.
This course is an introduction to the visual arts of Native
Americans in the period since contact. Topics will
include the artist (traditional and contemporary); the
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relationship of art, myth, and ritual the effects of contact
with other cultures on Indian arts; shamanism and
art. Class discussion will be illustrated with slides and
movies. (Occasionally)
149
internal accounting controls through systems design,
development, and documentation.
ANTH-E 335 Ancient Civilization of MesoAmerica
(3 cr.) P: A104. Historical Ethnography of the major preColumbian Civilizations including the Olmec, Mayan and
Aztec. Emphasis on the social life, cultural achievements,
religion, worldview, and political systems to illustrate
the diversity and richness of Amerindian life before the
Spanish conquest. (Occasionally)
BACC-A 571 Accounting Theory and Practice (3 cr.)
Important accounting constructs (such as assets,
liabilities, cost) will be defined, and measurement issues
discussed. Generally accepted accounting principle
concepts, principles, and assumptions will be examined.
The value of information via an examination of various
theories of information and decision making, including
psychological theories and theories of ethical decision
making will be considered.
ANTH-E 400 Undergraduate Seminar (topic varies)
(3 cr.) P: ANTH A104, and junior standing. Intensive
examination of selected topics in anthropology. Emphasis
upon analytic investigation and critical discussion. Topics
will vary. ANTH E400 may be taken twice with different
topics. (Occasionally)
BACC-A 573 Advanced Topics in Taxation (3 cr.)
Teaches the primary sources of tax law, topics relating
to the formation of a business enterprise such as
partnerships and corporations, dividends and distributions,
proprietorships, S corporations, and international aspects
of United States taxation.
ANTH-E 445 Medical Anthropology (3 cr.) P: ANTH
A104. A cross- cultural examination of human biocultural
adaptation in health and disease, including biocultural
epidemiology, ethnomedical systems in the prevention,
diagnosis, and treatment of disease, and sociocultural
change and health. (Occasionally)
BACC-A 574 Seminar in Taxation (3 cr.) P: BUNW
A513. Internal Revenue Code and Regulations. Income
exclusions, deductions, and credits of individual,
partnership, and corporate taxable entities.
ANTH-L 300 Culture and Language (3 cr.) P: ANTH
A104. Explores the relationships between language and
culture, focusing on research methodology and surveying
various theoretical frameworks. (Fall—odd years)
ANTH-P 200 Introduction to Archaeology (3 cr.)
P: ANTH A104 & A105. Introduction to the goals,
methods, and theories that archaeologists use to learn
about the past. The pursuit and interpretation of
archaeological evidence are explored by reviewing case
studies from across the globe and diverse time periods.
Topics include food and subsistence, culture change,
social life, political economies, and archaeological ethics.
(Spring)
AST-A 100 The Solar System (3 cr.) Celestial sphere
and constellations, measurement of time, astronomical
instruments, earth as a planet, moon, eclipses, planets
and their satellites, comets, meteors, theories of origin of
solar system. (Fall)
AST-A 105 Stellar Astronomy (3 cr.) The sun as a star,
physical properties of stars, principles of spectroscopy
as applied to astronomy, double stars, variable stars,
star clusters, gaseous nebulae, stellar motions and
distributions, Milky Way system, external galaxies,
expanding universe, cosmic time scale. (Spring)
AST-A 200 Introduction to Cosmology (3 cr.) P: A
college-level introductory course in astronomy, chemistry,
or physics An introduction to the ultimate structure
and evolution of the universe. Topics include history of
cosmology, nature of galaxies, space-time and relativity,
models of the universe, black holes, quasars, and sources
of gravitational radiation. (Occasionally)
BACC-A 523 Managing Accounting Information
Decision Making (3 cr.) This course is designed as an indepth discussion and analysis of the roles of accounting
information systems in current business environments,
advanced technologies in accounting information systems,
BACC-F 583 Topics in Economics (3 cr.)
The variable title course is designed for elementary,
middle and secondary educators to provide a broad
understanding of economic concepts, current economic
issues in conjunction with a broad overview of the
methods, materials and simulations that can be used
to present these concepts to their students. Students
will use current pedagogy to increase their own levels of
economic understanding and will examine available media
and other economic education materials. It is also the
intention the course will enhance teachers’ knowledge
of economics for not only their professional lives but
their personal lives as well. No formal background in
economics is assumed of the teachers. However, as a
graduate class in economics, educators should expect
rigor in the materials presented. Students may retake this
course for credit as long as the title is different and they
have not taken the course in the past five years.
BACC-L 574 Business Law (3 cr.) Focuses primarily on
the law of ownership, forms of business organizations, the
uniform commercial code as it relates to sales, commercial
paper and secured transactions, governmental regulation
of business and accountant's liability.
BIOL-B 351 Fungi (3 cr.) P: BIOL L101 and BIOL L102.
R: Junior or senior standing or consent of the instructor.
Morphology, life histories, classification, genetics,
physiology, development, ecology, medical and economic
importance of fungi. (Occasionally)
BIOL-B 352 Fungi Laboratory (2 cr.) P or C: B351.
R: Junior or senior standing or consent of instructor.
Laboratory and field studies of fungi and their
activities. (Occasionally)
BIOL-B 355 Plant Diversity (4 cr.) P: an introductory
biology course Study of major plant groups - algae
to flowering plants. Information will be provided on
classification, evolution, ecology, cytology, morphology,
anatomy, reproduction, life cycle, and economic
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importance. Two lectures and one three- hour laboratory
per week. (Fall)
BIOL-B 364 Summer Flowering Plants (5 cr.) P: one
introductory biology course For those desiring a broad,
practical knowledge of common wild and cultivated plants.
(Summer I or II)
BIOL-E 111 Basic Biology by Examination I (3 cr.)
Credit by examination for demonstrating an understanding
of the basic facts and concepts of the lecture content of
BIOL-L 102. Credit not given for both BIOL-E 111 and
BIOL-L 102 or BIOL-L 111. Lecture credit only. One
additional laboratory course must be included in the core
program. (Occasionally)
BIOL-E 112 Basic Biology by Examination II (3 cr.)
Credit by examination for demonstrating an understanding
of basic facts and concepts of the lecture content of BIOLL 101. Credit not given for both BIOL-E 112 and BIOL-L
101 or BIOL-L 112.
BIOL-L 100 Humans and the Biological World (3-5 cr.)
Principles of biological organization, from molecules
through cells and organizations to populations. Emphasis
on processes common to all organisms with special
reference to humans. Credit will be given for only one of
the following introductory-level courses or sequences:
BIOL-L 100, BIOL-L 104, BIOL-L 101 - BIOL-L 102, PHSLP 130.
BIOL-L 101 Introduction to the Biological Sciences
I (4 cr.) R: CHEM-C 105 concurrently An introductory
course designed for prospective biology majors and
students majoring in ancillary sciences. Principles of
life processes including the chemical basis of life, cell
structure and function, genetics, and evolution. (Fall,
Spring)
BIOL-L 102 Introduction to the Biological Sciences
II (4 cr.) Integrates a brief survey of the diversity of life
with an emphasis on a comparative review of the major
functional systems in diverse groups and an introduction
to the principles of ecology. (Summer, Spring)
BIOL-L 104 Introductory Biology Lectures (3 cr.)
An introduction to living organisms. Designed for
nonscientists with no background in biology. Does not
count as a preprofessional course. Primary emphasis may
vary with the instructor. Credit given for only one of the
following: BIOL-L 100, BIOL-L 104, BIOL-E 112, or BIOLQ 201.
BIOL-L 200 Environmental Biology and Conservation
(3 cr.) Study of flora and fauna of northwest Indiana
through laboratory and fieldwork. Emphasis on
identification, classification, life histories, and habitats of
organisms and their conservation as renewable resources.
(Summer)
BIOL-L 211 Molecular Biology (3 cr.) P: BIOL-L 101
Structure and function of DNA and RNA. DNA replication,
mechanisms of mutation, repair, recombination, and
transposition. Mechanism and regulation of gene
expression. The genetic code, transcription, and
translation. Introduces bacteriophages, plasmids, and the
technology of recombinant DNA. (Fall)
BIOL-L 215 Conservation Biology (3 cr.) P: sophomore
standing. Fundamental ecology will be presented and
applied to conservation of ecosystems and wildlife. In
laboratory sessions, students will perform research on
restoration of an ecosystem, for example, a prairie. This
course is for nonmajors only. (Summer I)
BIOL-L 290 Introduction to Biological Research (1 cr.)
P: BIOL-L 101 An introduction to the biological research at
IU Northwest, preparing students to undertake BIOL-L 490
research projects. (Fall, Spring)
BIOL-L 300 Social Implications of Biology (3 cr.)
Biological aspects of social problems such as AIDS,
genetic engineering, population explosion, eugenics, drug
abuse, heredity, hazards of irradiation, etc. (Occasionally)
BIOL-L 302 Topics in Human Biology (3 cr.)
P: nonmajor junior or senior standing Physiology,
genetics, and biochemistry. Topics to be considered
may vary from year to year: cancer, genetic diseases,
cardiovascular diseases, blood groups, immune system,
genetic damage, contraception and pregnancy, genetics of
intelligence, environmental hazards, genetic engineering,
etc. (Occasionally)
BIOL-L 311 Genetics (3-4 cr.) P: BIOL-L 211 or consent
of instructor. Principles governing the transmission
of specific traits to the progeny of prokaryotes and
eukaryotes, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, higher
plants, and animals. Analysis at the level of the individual
and population; interactions between genetic constitution
and environment; application to the study of development,
human genetic disease,and agricultural breeding. Credit
not given for both BIOL-L 311 and BIOL-S 311. (Spring)
BIOL-L 312 Cell Biology (3-4 cr.) P: BIOL-L 211. Current
views of the structure and function of cellular organelles
and components, with emphasis on the flow of information
through the cell, the metabolism that supports cellular
functions, and differences among different specialized
cells. Current techniques will be stressed. (Fall)
BIOL-L 316 Fundamentals of Human Sexuality (3 cr.)
P: junior standing An exploration of the anatomical and
physiological factors relating to the development of
human sexuality with particular emphasis on the biological
mechanisms involved in health and disease. (Summer I or
II).
BIOL-L 318 Evolution (3 cr.) P: BIOL-L 311 or BIOLS 311 Provides a rigorous exploration of the theory
of evolution; the conceptual core of biology. Topics
include origins and history of life: the interplay of heredity
and environment in shaping adaptations; molecular,
behavioral, and social evolution; patterns of speciation,
extinction, and their consequences; methods of inferring
evolutionary relationships among organisms. Credit not
given for both BIOL-L 318 and BIOL-S 318, or both BIOLL 318 and BIOL-L 479. (Occasionally)
BIOL-L 321 Principles of Immunology (3 cr.) P: BIOLL 211 and CHEM-C 101 or CHEM-C 105 An introductory
survey of the basic principles of immunology and their
practical applications. (Spring)
BIOL-L 323 Molecular Biology Laboratory (3 cr.)
P: BIOL-L 211 Manipulation and analysis of genes and
genomes. Gene cloning and library screening. Gene
amplification and disease diagnosis. Gene mapping and
southern blot analysis of complex genome structure.
Full Course List
Credit given for only one of BIOL-L 323, BIOL-L 324, or
BIOL-S 211.
BIOL-L 331 Human Genetics (3 cr.) Principles of
heredity at the molecular, cellular, individual, and
population levels. Credit not given for both BIOL-L 363
and BIOL-L 331.
BIOL-L 363 Genetics and Humans (3 cr.) Principles
of heredity at the molecular, cellular, individual, and
population levels. Credit not given for both BIOL-L 363
and BIOL-L 331. (Fall)
BIOL-L 378 Biological Aspects of Aging (3 cr.)
P: BIOL-L 100, PHYS-P 130, or the equivalent Biological
mechanisms that alter cells with age and the effects
those changes have on the human organism as a whole.
Models for the aging process will be presented, as well
as research done on the major systems of the body.
(Summer I or II)
BIOL-L 391 Special Topics in Biology (1-3 cr.)
P: consent of the instructor Study and analysis of selected
biological issues and problems. Topics vary from semester
to semester. May be repeated with change in topics. (Fall,
Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
BIOL-L 403 Biology Seminar (1 cr.) Individual
presentation of topics of current importance. Student
cannot enroll for more than two semesters for credit. (Fall,
Spring)
BIOL-L 473 Ecology (3-4 cr.) P: 8 credit hours of biology
courses above the 100 level Major concepts of ecology
for science majors or science education majors; relation
of individual organisms to their environment; population
ecology; structure and function of ecosystems. Credit not
given for both BIOL-L 473 and BIOL-S 309. Course serves
as one option for capstone course for the biology major.
(Fall)
151
BIOL-L 490 Individual Study (arr-12 cr.) P: written
permission of faculty supervising research Must complete
a written assignment as evidence of each semester's work
and present an oral report to complete more than 6 credit
hours. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, II)
BIOL-L 498 Internship in Professional Practice (1-6 cr.)
Provides an opportunity for students to receive credit for
selected career-related work. Evaluation by employer and
faculty sponsor on a satisfactory / unsatisfactory basis.
(Fall, Spring)
BIOL-L 499 Internship in Biology Instruction (3 cr.)
P: consent of departmental chairperson Supervised
experience in teaching undergraduate biology courses.
May be repeated once for credit. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
BIOL-M 200 Microorganism in Nature and Disease
(4 cr.) R: high school chemistry and biology Principles
of microbiology, including the study of major microbial
groups, cultivation, physiology and genetics, destruction,
and control of microorganisms in nature and disease.
For students in programs requiring one semester of
microbiology (not premedical or medical technology
students). Includes laboratory (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
BIOL-M 215 Microorganism Laboratory (1 cr.) BIOLM 200 must be taken concurrently. Introduction to basic
techniques and procedures of microbiology laboratories.
Emphasis on aspects useful to nursing students. Growth
and transfer of living microorganisms, aseptic techniques,
and the staining of and identification of bacteria. (Fall,
Spring, Summer I)
BIOL-M 310 Microbiology (3-4 cr.) P: CHEM-C 105 CHEM-C 106, BIOL-L 211, or permission of instructor
Application of fundamental biological principles to the
study of microorganisms. Significance of microorganisms
to humans and their environment. (Fall)
BIOL-L 474 Field and Laboratory Ecology (2 cr.) P: or
concurrent: BIOL-L 473 and one course in organismal
biology Introduction to research problems and techniques
in the ecology of individuals, populations, and ecosystems.
This course does not serve as the BIOL-L 473 lab. (Fall)
BIOL-M 315 Microbiology Laboratory (2 cr.) P: BIOLM 310 C: BIOL-M 310 Laboratory exercises and
demonstrations to yield proficiency in the principles and
techniques of cultivation and the use of microorganisms
under aseptic conditions. (Fall)
BIOL-L 476 Regional Ecology (2 cr.) P: or concurrent:
BIOL-L 473 or consent of the instructor Open to juniors
and seniors only. Selective trips to ecological areas to
study both the flora and fauna of a biome. (Summer I or
II)
BIOL-M 430 Virology: Lecture (3 cr.) P: BIOL-L 211
and BIOL-L 311 or BIOL-M 310 R: BIOL-L 312 Viruses
of plants, animals (including humans), and bacteria:
emphasis on molecular biology of viral systems. Viruses
and human disease such as cancer and AIDS; viruses and
their evolution. (Occasionally)
BIOL-L 482 Restoration Ecology (3 cr.) P: 8 credit
hours of biology courses at or above the 300 level
This course presents the fundamentals of ecology and
restoration ecology to the restoration / reestablishment
of natural ecological communities. The lab will feature
actual restoration / reestablishment of wetlands, prairies,
savannas, woodlands, and forests of Northwest Indiana.
(Fall)
BIOL-L 483 Conservation Biology (3 cr.) P: 8 credit
hours of biology courses at or above the 300 level This
course will present scientific fundamentals applied to
conservation of endangered species, biodiversity, and
ecosystems. The lab will feature field experiments that
evaluate the level of success of various conservation
projects (e.g., plant diversity, animal diversity, ecosystem
function) in Northwest Indiana. (Fall)
BIOL-M 440 Medical Microbiology (3 cr.) P: BIOL-M
310 or permission of instructor Microorganisms as agents
of disease; host / parasite relationships; epidemiology;
chemotherapy. (Occasionally) This course may fulfill the
capstone requirement.
BIOL-N 213 Human Biology Lab (1 cr.) Laboratory to
accompany Human Biology Lecture. Students must be
concurrently enrolled in Human Biology (P130) lecture.
Consent of instructor is required. (Fall)
BIOL-Z 317 Developmental Biology (3 cr.) P: BIOLL 311 Analysis of developmental processes that lead to
the construction of whole organisms from single cells.
Includes the principles of embryology and analysis of
mutations affecting development. (Occasionally)
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Full Course List
BIOL-Z 318 Developmental Biology Laboratory (2 cr.)
P: BIOL-L 211, BIOL-L 311, BIOL-L 317 C: BIOL-L 317 A
laboratory about developing organisms, with emphasis on
vetrebrate embryology and organogenesis.
BIOL-Z 406 Vertebrate Zoology (3-4 cr.) P: BIOL-L
101 and BIOL-L 102 Morphology, ecology, life history,
physiology, and general biology of vertebrates. (Spring)
BIOL-Z 466 Endocrinology (3 cr.) P: BIOL L211 and
CHEM C341 or the equivalent, organic chemistry, and at
least junior standing Experimental procedures and results
relative to glandular interrelationships; mode of actions
of hormones and their role in behavior of organisms.
(Occasionally) This course may fulfill the capstone
requirement.
BUNW-A 510 Management Communications (3 cr.)
Investigates communication processes and strategies
used by managers. Students will learn to use critical
thinking skills to develop and present effective oral and
written presentations to business audiences; to identify,
assess, and select alternate communication strategies.
Presentation software and other computer applications will
be integrated in the course. (MBA Elective)
BUNW-A 512 Statistical Tools for Management (3 cr.)
Application of probability theory and statistics to business
decision making. Builds on knowledge from previous
courses. Topical areas included are random distributions,
sampling theory, inference testing, simple and multiple
regression, correlation and curve- fitting, analysis of
variance, experimental design, factor analysis, and time
series analysis. (MBA Foundation Course)
BUNW-A 513 Accounting for Decision Making (3 cr.)
P: All foundation courses. Accounting is an integral
part of a management information system. This course
emphasizes obtaining, organizing, and using accounting
information from the standpoint of internal management
for planning and control. The course is divided equally
between financial and managerial topics that focus on
uses of accounting information. (MBA Core Course)
BUNW-A 514 Economics for Managers (3 cr.) Provides
the student with an opportunity to learn the central core
of traditional microeconomic theory, including the theory
of the firm, the theory of consumer demand, and the
theory of markets, while also introducing applications of
the theory to several areas of business decision making.
(MBA Foundation Course)
BUNW-A 515 Management and Organization Behavior
(3 cr.) Review of management history and the role of
managers. Includes management principles, concepts,
and functions, and their relationships to effective
management of modern organizations. Includes models
of leadership, motivation, and communication; and
integration of the individual, group, and organization.
(MBA Foundation Course)
BUNW-A 516 Management Information Systems (3 cr.)
P: All foundation courses. An integration of applications
and techniques. The design of management information
systems. Advanced topics include the interaction between
organizational structure, the information system, and
the database. Case studies of system design and
implementation. (MBA Core Course)
BUNW-B 511 Marketing Management (3 cr.) Marketing
planning and decision making examined from the firm's
and consumers' points of view, marketing concept and
its company-wide implications; integration of marketing
with other functions. Market structure and behavior and
their relationship to marketing strategy. Marketing systems
viewed in terms of both public and private policy in a
pluralistic society. (MBA Foundation Course)
BUNW-B 512 Financial Management (3 cr.) An
introduction to the firm's investment, financing, and
dividend decisions. Working capital management,
capital budgeting, and capital structure strategies. (MBA
Foundation Course)
BUNW-B 513 Operations Management (3 cr.) P: All
foundation courses. Application of statistical and
quantitative techniques to the design of work methods and
standards, materials management and handling systems,
inventory control, scheduling and planning, productionline design, plant layout and location, maintenance,
and product control. Includes discussion of material
requirements planning (MRP and MRP-II), just-in-time
inventory (JIT) and its Japanese equivalent KANBAN,
quality control (QC), and operations strategy. (MBA Core
Course)
BUNW-B 514 Legal, Ethical and Social Environment
of Business (3 cr.) P: All foundation courses. Basic
understanding of the legal environment and the roles
that legal factors, from local ordinances to international
law, play in all business decisions. Legal concepts are
illustrated from the viewpoint of the individual firm. (MBA
Core Course)
BUNW-B 515 Introduction to International Business
(3 cr.) P: All foundation courses. Economic, political,
and social environment of foreign business affairs in
"developed" and "underdeveloped" countries. Influence of
business policy environment in marketing and overseas
operations. (MBA International Elective)
BUNW-C 512 Managing in a Team-Based Organization
(3 cr.) P: All foundation courses. Uses multiple
psychological and behavioral assessment tools as a
foundation to evaluate and enhance student capabilities in
teamwork and leadership. (MBA Core Course)
BUNW-C 515 Advanced Marketing Management (3 cr.)
P: All foundation courses. A case approach to marketing
problems and solutions involving marketing adaptations
of conceptual, quantitative, behavioral, and economic
analysis. (MBA Core Course)
BUNW-C 517 Financial Management Analysis (3 cr.)
P: All foundation courses. Application of financial theory
and techniques of analysis in searching for optimal
solutions to financial management problems. (MBA Core
Course)
BUNW-D 511 Management Strategy (3 cr.) P: All
foundation courses and BUNW A516, BUNW 0517,
BUNW B513, and one of last four classes taken prior
to graduation. Administration of the business firm from
the point of view of top management. Formulation and
administration of policy; integration of internal operations
with each other and with the environment; diagnosis of
executive and organizational problems; evaluation of
administrative strategies. Case studies and research
Full Course List
reports supplement lectures, discussions, and selected
readings. (MBA Core Course)
BUNW-E 501 International Economics: Globalization
and International Economies in Transition (3 cr.)
History and challenges of globalization in the twenty first
century; economic reform process in the developed and
developing world; emerging markets, country report on
fast-growing economies of Asia, Africa, South America
and the transitional economies of Eastern Europe. (MBA
International Elective)
BUNW-F 517 Speculative Markets and Investment
Strategies (3 cr.) P: BUNW B512. An in-depth analysis
of the market for commodities, options, and real estate;
and capital management within the legal, competitive, and
economic environment. (MBA Elective)
BUNW-F 524 Investment Management (3 cr.) P: BUNW
B512.
Conceptual and analytical frameworks for formulating
investment policies, analyzing securities, and constructing
portfolio strategies for individuals and institutions. (MBA
Elective)
BUNW-F 527 Speculative Markets and Investment
Strategies (3 cr.) P: BUNW B512. An in-depth analysis
of the market for commodities, options, and real estate;
and capital management within the legal, competitive, and
economic environment. (MBA Elective)
BUNW-F 575 Management of International Operations
(3 cr.) P: BUNW B512. Financial management of foreign
operations of the firm. Financial constraints of the
international environment and their effect on standard
concepts of financial management. Study of international
currency flows, forward cover, and international banking
practices. (MBA Elective)
BUNW-F 591 Independent Study in Business (1-6 cr.)
P: Consent of instructor and dean.
BUNW-G 514 Human Resources Management (3 cr.)
P: All foundation courses. Modern personnel practices
such as recruitment and selection, job classification, and
training and development in a contemporary setting;
the roles of management, government, and unions in
collective bargaining.
BUNW-G 522 Personnel Measurement (3 cr.) P: BUNW
A512, BUNW A515. Examination of techniques for
measuring personnel characteristics and performance.
Basic research methods and techniques. (MBA Elective)
BUNW-G 540 Labor Economics (3 cr.) P: BUNW A514.
The economic issues and implications of the labor force.
Particular emphasis on labor markets, earnings, hours of
work, unemployment, and inflation. (MBA Elective)
BUNW-G 545 Collective Bargaining (3 cr.) P: All
foundation courses. Emphasis is on the negotiating
process, the structure of bargaining, and the issues
involved in the bargaining process. (MBA Elective)
BUNW-G 549 Topics in Collective Bargaining
(3 cr.) P: All foundation courses. In-depth analysis of
contemporary collective bargaining issues, topics, etc.
(MBA Elective)
153
BUNW-M 503 Applied Marketing Research (3 cr.)
P: BUNW B511, BUNW A512. An analytical informationbased approach to solving major classes of marketing
management problems, such as forecasting, market
segmentation, and resource allocation. Case problem
applications of problem structuring and marketing data
collection processing, and analysis. (MBA Elective)
BUNW-M 550 Buyer Behavior (3 cr.) P: BUNW B511
or equivalent. Buyer behavior relevant to marketing
decisions. Analysis of buyer capacities, capabilities, and
motivations in relation to environmental factors and the
marketing context. Implications for product design and
promotion. Applications of behavioral sciences to buyer
behavior. Survey of research methods and behavioral
models. Discussion of contemporary issues in both
consumer and industrial buyer behavior. (MBA Elective)
BUNW-M 595 International Marketing (3 cr.) P: BUNW
B511 or equivalent. Due to the rise of emerging markets
such as China and India, and the regional trade blocks
such as NAFTA and the EU, the world trade is undergoing
a rapid transformation. As a result, U.S. businesses, large
and small, are becoming deeply involved in international
business. Under these circumstances, it is imperative that
business managers possess the skill sets to adapt their
marketing strategies to the needs of international markets.
This course will cover the concepts and theories pertaining
to international marketing, and provide the tools necessary
to develop an international marketing plan.
BUNW-S 560 Management Information Systems
Design and Applications (3 cr.) P: BUNW A516.
Integration and application of the concepts, tools, and
techniques learned in prior management of information
systems courses using case and/or field studies.
Consideration of the economic, organizational, behavioral,
technical, legal, and other environmental contingencies
in information systems design. Consideration of issues in
project team management and systems integration. (MBA
Elective)
BUNW-W 506 Leadership (3 cr.) P: All foundation
courses. This course is a research-based review of the
major theoretical approaches to leadership, with an
emphasis on practical applications and implications for
managers; includes several opportunities for assessment
of leadership capabilities.
BUNW-W 511 New Venture Creation (3 cr.) P: All
foundation courses. Covers the entire breadth of the
new venture-creation process, from idea generation to
financing the proposed venture. The course employs
lectures and case analyses to introduce a substantive
framework for new ventures. Students develop business
plan proposals in teams and then simulate the negotiation
process of obtaining capital. (MBA Elective)
BUNW-W 511 Seminar in Industrial Relations (3 cr.)
P: All foundation courses. Explores current issues in
industrial relations and human resource management,
including management decisions about recruiting, testing,
hiring, assessing performance, structuring compensation,
and retaining workers. Current public policy issues will
also be discussed. (MBA Elective)
BUNW-W 516 Organization Development and Change
(3 cr.) P: BUNW A515. Techniques for introducing and
successfully managing change in complex organizations.
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Full Course List
Forces inducing change, organizational barriers to
change, strategies for overcoming resistance to change,
intervention techniques, and elements of effective
programs for organizational change. (MBA Elective)
BUNW-W 530 Organizations and Organizational
Design (3 cr.) P: BUNW A515. Designing the basic
organizational structure and the operating mechanisms
that implement this basic structure. Design of the structure
involves dividing and assigning the organization's
work among positions and work groups (departments).
Operating mechanisms include control procedures,
information systems, reward systems, and spatial
arrangements. Theories and applications to a wide variety
of organizations. (MBA Elective)
BUNW-W 570 Organizational Behavior II (3 cr.)
P: All foundation courses. Seminar in individual and
group behavior in organizations. Major theories of
motivation, leadership, group dynamics, and decision
making are among the topics discussed. These topics
will be discussed in depth because it is assumed that
students will have had at least one previous course in
organizational behavior. Discussion and experiential
learning will be stressed. (MBA Elective)
BUS-A 201 Introduction to Financial Accounting (3 cr.)
Concepts and issues of financial reporting for business
entities; analysis and recording of economic transactions.
(Fall, Spring, Summer)
BUS-A 202 Introduction to Managerial Accounting
(3 cr.) P: BUS-A 201 Concepts and issues of
management accounting, cost determination, and
analysis. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
BUS-A 206 Uses of Financial Accounting Data (3 cr.)
P: BUS-A201 and CSCI-A106
This course requires students to use accounting software
to begin and complete the accounting cycle for several
small businesses. Included are the preparation and
printing of financial statements as well as a variety of
software generated reports including accounts receivable,
accounts payable, customer lists, inventories and payroll.
BUS-A 311 Intermediate Accounting I (3 cr.) P: BUS-A
202 Theory of asset valuation and income measurement.
Principles underlying published financial statements. (Fall,
Spring, Summer)
BUS-A 312 Intermediate Accounting II (3 cr.) P: BUSA 311 Special sales arrangements; cash flow and
forecasting; presentations and interpretation of financial
data; price level problems. (Spring)
entities; municipal and federal government, schools, and
hospitals. (Occasionally)
BUS-A 337 Accounting Information Systems (3 cr.)
P: BUS-A 311, CSCI-A 106 Impact of modern computer
systems on analysis and design of accounting information
systems. Discussion of tools of systems analysis, simple
computer-based systems, and internal controls and
applications. Orientation in the use of a microcomputer.
(Fall, Summer)
BUS-A 339 Advanced Income Tax (3 cr.) P: BUS-A
328 Internal Revenue Code and Regulations: advanced
aspects of income, deductions, exclusions, and credits,
especially as applied to tax problems of estates, trusts,
partnerships, and corporations. Tax forms and practical
tax-problem situations. (Occasionally)
BUS-A 422 Advanced Financial Accounting (3 cr.)
P: BUS-A 312 Generally accepted accounting principles
as applied to branches, consolidations, foreign operations,
corporate combinations, and insolvency and liquidations.
(Fall)
BUS-A 424 Auditing (3 cr.) P: BUS-A 312, BUS-A 337
Internal and external audits of business operations.
Review of internal control including EDP systems.
Verification of systems for recording and processing
transactions and balance sheet and operating accounts.
Statistical sampling in auditing. (Spring)
BUS-A 433 The International Aspects of Accounting
(3 cr.) P: BUS-A 311 Study of differences between
countries in accounting principles, in legal traditions
reflected in corporation and tax laws, and in political
and economic philosophies as revealed in attitudes of
management and labor toward their social and economic
involvement. (Occasionally)
BUS-A 490 Special Studies in Accounting (arr. cr.)
P: consent of instructor and dean two weeks prior to
enrollment Supervised individual study and research
in student's field of interest. The student will propose
the investigation desired and, in conjunction with the
instructor, develop the scope of work to be completed.
Written report required. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
BUS-D 301 International Business Environment (3 cr.)
P: ECON-E 103 and ECON-E 104
How the international business environment affects us as
citizens, consumers, and employer(ee)s. Describe trade,
investments, and financial links among countries. Help
interpret contemporary events from the perspective of
international business.
BUS-A 325 Cost Accounting (3 cr.) P: BUS-A 202
Conceptual and technical aspects of management and
cost accounting. Product costing; cost control over
projects and products; profit planning. (Fall, Spring,
Summer)
BUS-F 260 Personal Finance (3 cr.) Financial
problems encountered in managing individual affairs,
family budgeting, installment buying, insurance, home
ownership, and investing in securities. Use of financial
planning software. (Fall, Spring)
BUS-A 328 Introduction to Taxation (3 cr.) P: BUS-A
202 Internal Revenue code and regulations. Emphasis on
income, exclusions from income, deductions, and credits.
Use of tax forms in practical problem situations. (Fall)
BUS-F 261 Basics of Personal Investments (3 cr.) An
introduction to the basic theory and practical techniques
for the process of setting and achieving personal
investment objectives. Course topics typically include:
risk tolerances; sources and measurements of risk and
return; the mechanics of economic, industry and company
analysis; and characteristics of equities, fixed income and
other investment classes.
BUS-A 335 Fund Accounting (3 cr.) P: BUS-A 311,
or by permission of the accounting program Financial
management and accounting for non-profit-seeking
Full Course List
BUS-F 301 Financial Management (3 cr.) P: BUS-A
202, CSCI-A 106, ECON-E 103, ECON-E 104, ECONE 270, MATH-M 118 Conceptual framework of the firm's
investment, financing, and dividend decisions; includes
working capital management, capital budgeting, and
capital structure strategies. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
BUS-F 402 Financial Decision Making (3 cr.) P: BUSF 301 Application of financial theory and techniques
of analysis in search for optimal solutions to financial
management problems. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
BUS-F 420 Investment (3 cr.) P: BUS-F 301 Conceptual
and analytical frameworks for formulating investment
policies, analyzing securities, and constructing portfolio
strategies for individuals and institutions. (Fall, Spring)
BUS-F 423 Topics in Investment (3 cr.) P: BUS-F 420
An in-depth analysis of selected topics in security analysis,
investment banking, and portfolio construction.
BUS-F 446 Management of Commercial Banks and
Other Financial Institutions (3 cr.) P: BUS-F 301,
ECON-E 350 Management policies and decisions
including asset, liability, and capital management within
the legal, competitive, and economic environment.
BUS-F 490 Independent Study in Finance (arr. cr.)
P: consent of instructor and dean two weeks prior to
enrollment (Fall, Spring, Summer)
BUS-F 494 International Finance (3 cr.) P: BUS-F 301
Financial management of foreign operations of the firm.
Financial constraints of the international environment and
their effect on standard concepts of financial management.
Study of international currency flows, forward cover, and
the currency exposure. (Spring)
BUS-G 300 Introduction to Managerial Economics
(3 cr.) P: ECON-E 103, ECON-E 104, ECON-E 270
Applications of elementary concepts of microeconomic
theory in the solution of business problems. Production
and cost analysis. Decision making under uncertainty.
Economic approaches to business strategy. (Fall, Spring)
BUS-G 330 Principles of Urban Economics (3 cr.)
P: ECON-E 103 or consent of instructor Introduction
to basic concepts and techniques of urban economic
analysis to facilitate understanding of current urban
problems; urban growth and structure; public provisions
of urban services, housing, employment, transportation;
relationships between public and private sectors.
BUS-G 406 Business Enterprise and Public Policy
(3 cr.) P: 9 credit hours of economics Legal, political, and
economic framework of American business- government
relationships; emergence of specific industry promotion,
regulation, and public ownership; government promotion
of competition and policing of market practice.
BUS-G 409 Business Conditions and Public Policy
(3 cr.) P: 9 credit hours of economics Measurement and
economic analysis of general business conditions; the
role of government in promoting high employment, price
stability, and economic growth.
BUS-G 490 Independent Study in Business Economics
and Public Policy (arr. cr.) P: consent of instructor and
dean two weeks prior to enrollment
155
BUS-J 403 Management Capstone (4 cr.) P: admitted
status in the School of Business and Economics, senior
standing, and BUS-F 301, BUS-K 321, BUS-M 301, BUSP 301, BUS-Z 302 Concerned with the role and tasks of
firms' top managers (i.e., strategic decision makers). This
course is designed to provide an appreciation for the total
firm perspective and the means by which firms create
and sustain competitive advantage in today's increasingly
challenging and complex business environment (domestic
and global). Strategic management of a firm involves
diagnosing the firm's current situation and developing
realistic solutions to the strategic and organizational
problems that confront top managers. This course
focuses on the small business enterprise and involves an
extensive team-based field consulting project with local
small business. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
BUS-K 221 Introduction to Information Systems
for Business (3 cr.) P: BUS-W 100 and CSCI-A 106
Introduction to usage of computers and Internet in
business; the components of information systems for
business, and applications of software in a business
environment, software tools for communication, decision
support, and productivity improvement. (Fall, Spring)
BUS-K 321 Management Information Systems (3 cr.)
P: BUS-K 221 and either CSCI-A 285 or CSCI-A 348
Introduction to management information systems and
systems theory; system life-cycle and development
processes; investigation and analysis of information
systems as a managerial resource for decision making.
Emphasizes business-oriented information systems. (Fall,
Spring, Summer)
BUS-K 371 Enterprise Resource Planning (3 cr.)
P: admitted status in the School of Business and
Economics, senior standing, and BUS-F 301, BUS-M
301, BUS-P 301, BUS-Z 302, BUS-K 321 In this course
a business is viewed as a series of processes and
subprocesses. To improve these processes continuously,
they must be understood and linked together. This
understanding will require the use of quantitative tools
that can be used to analyze and improve each process or
subprocess and, to exploit the linking, SAP R/3, a stateof-the-art enterprise resource planning (ERP) tool for
integration and management. Exercises will be used to
stimulate process improvement methodologies.
BUS-K 410 Decision Support Systems (3 cr.) P: BUS-K
321 Investigation, analysis, and development of decision
support systems, executive information systems, and
intelligent systems for decision making; technologies and
applications of decision support systems and intelligent
systems; building and presenting a prototype of decision
support system and expert system. (Summer)
BUS-L 201 Legal Environment of Business (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131 Emphasis on the nature of law through
examining a few areas of general interest: duty to avoid
harming others (torts), duty to keep promises (contracts),
and government regulation of business (trade regulation).
Credit not given for both BUS-L 201 and BUS-L 203. (Fall,
Spring, Summer)
BUS-L 303 Commercial Law II (3 cr.) P: BUS-L 201
Law of ownership, forms of business organization,
commercial paper, real and personal property, and
secured transactions. For accounting majors and others
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desiring a rather broad and detailed knowledge of
commercial law. (Once every two years)
BUS-M 200 Marketing and Society: Roles and
Responsibilities (3 cr.) The course will help students
appreciate the relationship between marketing and the
consumer culture. The course will also aid the student in
becoming a more aware and intelligent consumer. It will
highlight the roles played by the different stakeholders,
including consumers, industries, and government. Credit
not given if BUS-M 301 already taken prior to enrollment in
this course.
BUS-M 210 Social Media Marketing (3 cr.) The
course will help students to learn what social media
are and how they influence personal life and business
communication. The course will acquaint the students
with the top sites, and will highlight how businesses
are using social media for communication, branding,
marketing, customer service, and market research.
Students will learn 1quick, easy ways to use popular
social network sites to engage and retain customers.
BUS-M 301 Introduction to Marketing Management
(3 cr.) P: BUS-A 202, CSCI-A 106, ECON-E 103, ECONE 104, MATH-M 118 Overview of marketing for all
undergraduates. Marketing planning and decision making
examined from the firm's and consumers' point of view;
marketing concept and its companywide implications;
integration of marketing with other functions. Market
structure and behavior and their relationship to marketing
strategy implementation. Marketing systems views in
terms of both public and private policy in a pluralistic
society. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
BUS-M 303 Marketing Research (3 cr.) P: BUS-M
301, ECON-E 270 Focuses on the role of research in
marketing decision making. Topics include defining
research objectives, syndicated and secondary data
sources of marketing information, exploratory research
methods, survey research design, experimental design,
and data analysis. (Fall, Summer)
BUS-M 401 International Marketing (3 cr.) P: BUSM 301 Surveys the strategic marketing planning factors
facing domestic marketing managers operating in the
multinational environment. Focuses on the importance
of cultural dynamics and legal, political, geographic, and
environmental factors. Identifies characteristics of markets
in various stages of development. Contrasts domestic
product, pricing, promotion, and distribution policies with
those practiced by international marketers. Provides a
foundation for students interested in exploring international
opportunities. (Fall, Summer)
BUS-M 403 Direct Marketing (3 cr.) P: BUS-M 301, BUSM 303 Survey of theory and methods of marketing directly
—without intervening distribution intermediaries—to
consumers and business/industrial customers. Particular
emphasis given to applications of existing and emerging
computer, communications, and other technologies;
behavioral trends and other uncontrollable factors; and
balancing of both analytical skills and creative talent.
BUS-M 405 Buyer Behavior (3 cr.) P: BUS-M 301 or
BUS-M 300 (offered at IUB and IUPUI) and PSY-P 101
or PSY-P 102 Description and explanation of consumer
behavior in retail markets. Topics include demographic,
socioeconomic, psychographic, attitudinal, and group
influences on consumer decision making. Applications
to promotion, product design, distribution, pricing, and
segmentation strategies. (Summer)
BUS-M 407 Business to Business Marketing (3 cr.)
P: BUS-M 303 or BUS-M 300 (offered at IUB and
IUPUI) and PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 102 Examination of
marketing problems, decision methods, and philosophies
involved in the marketing of industrial goods and services.
Differences, similarities, and interrelationships between
consumer and industrial marketing.
BUS-M 415 Advertising and Promotion Management
(3 cr.) P: BUS-M 301 Basic advertising and salespromotion concepts. The design, management, and
integration of a firm's promotional strategy. Public
policy aspects and therole of advertising in marketing
communications in different cultures. (Spring)
BUS-M 419 Retail Management (3 cr.) P: BUS-M
301 Major management problems in retail institutions.
Treatmentof retail/marketing strategy design and problems
related to financial requirements, buying, inventory,
pricing, promotion, merchandising, physical facilities,
location, and personnel. (Fall)
BUS-M 426 Sales Management (3 cr.) P: BUS-M 325
Emphasizes the activities and problems of first-line field
sales managers. Includes organizing the sales force,
recruiting, training, compensation, motivation, sales
techniques, forecasting, territory design, evaluation, and
control. Lecture and case studies. (Spring)
BUS-M 450 Marketing Strategy (3 cr.) Provides an indepth understanding of the job of the typical product or
band manager in a consumer product industry. Focus
is on four major activities common to the position of
a product manager: analysis of market information;
developing a product strategy; programming the strategy;
and implementation.
BUS-M 480 Professional Practice in Marketing (3-6 cr.)
P: BUS-M 301 and junior or senior standing, and approval
of the director of undergraduate studies and student's
faculty advisor Work experience in cooperating firm or
agencies. Comprehensive written report. Grades of A, S,
or F assigned by faculty. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
BUS-M 490 Special Studies in Marketing (1-3 cr.)
P: permission of the director of undergraduate studies
and student's faculty advisor two weeks before enrollment
Supervised individual study and research in student's
field of interest. The student will propose the investigation
desired and, in conjunction with the instructor, develop
the scope of the work to be completed. Comprehensive
written report required. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
BUS-N 300 Principles of Risk and Insurance (3 cr.)
Nature of risk; insurance as method of dealing with risk;
property, liability, life, and health insurance; insurance as
an economic and social institution. (Spring)
BUS-P 301 Operations Management (3 cr.) P: BUS-A
202, CSCI-A 106, ECON-E 103, ECON-E 104, ECONE 270, MATH-M 118 Role of production in a business
enterprise; basic types of production processes used in
industry. Emphasis on application of economic principles
and analytical techniques to decisions made by the
Full Course List
operations manager of any business. (Fall, Spring,
Summer)
BUS-R 300 Principles of Real Estate (3 cr.) Real estate
divisions and operations related to location factors;
reference to economic background of cities, city growth
and structure, neighborhoods, and districts; real estate
market analysis; principal subdivisions of real estate field;
managerial policies of private enterprises and government
agencies. (Fall)
BUS-S 305 Business Telecommunications
(E-commerce) (3 cr.) P: BUS-K 321 Introduces
telecommunications technologies and computer
networking as applicable to enhancing business
performance. Includes analysis and discussion of Web
and Internet technologies for operations, business, and
commerce. Includes hands-on experience with Web and
Internet technologies and software. (Spring)
BUS-S 435 Advanced Topics in Information Systems
(3 cr.) P: BUS-K 321 Variable topics course; topics offered
will depend on student interests and faculty interests and
expertise. (Occasionally)
BUS-W 100 Business Administration: Introduction
(3 cr.) Business administration from the standpoint of a
manager of a business firm operating in the contemporary
economic, political, and social environment. No credit
for juniors and seniors in the School of Business and
Economics. (Fall, Spring)
BUS-W 301 Simulation of Business Enterprise (3 cr.)
P: BUS-F 301, BUS-M 301, BUS-P 301, BUS-Z 301,
CSCI-A 106 An integrative course designed to provide the
student with an opportunity to synthesize analytical skills
and knowledge developed in the basic functional fields of
business. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
BUS-W 311 Small Business Entrepreneurship (3 cr.)
Primarily for those interested in creating a new business
venture or acquiring an existing business. Covers such
areas as choice of a legal form, problems of the closely
held firm, sources of funds, preparation of a business plan,
and negotiating. (Spring)
BUS-W 402 Simulation of Business Enterprise (1 cr.)
P: BUS-F 301, BUS-K 321, BUS-M 301, BUS-P 301,
BUS-Z 302 An integrative course designed to provide the
student with the opportunity to synthesize analytical skills
and knowledge developed in the basic functional fields of
business. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
BUS-W 430 Organizations and Organizational
Change (3 cr.) P: BUS-W 301, BUS-Z 302 Analysis and
development of organizational theories with emphasis on
environmental dependencies, sociotechnical systems,
structural design, and control of the performance of
complex systems. Issues in organizational change such as
intervention strategies and techniques, barriers to change,
organizational analysis, and evaluation of formal change
programs. (Fall, Spring)
BUS-W 480 Professional Practices in Management
(3 cr.) This course title is reserved for students who
are conducting an internship in the functional area of
management and who wish to obtain credit. Internships
are coordinated with the Office of Career Services.
157
BUS-W 490 Independent Study in Business
Administration (arr. cr.) P: consent of instructor and
dean two weeks before enrollment Supervised individual
study and research in student's field of interest. The
student will propose the investigation desired and, in
conjunction with the instructor, develop the scope of
the work to be completed. Written report required. (Fall,
Spring, Summer)
BUS-X 220 Career Perspectives (2 cr.) Open to
freshmen. A course designed to assist students in
developing career and related academic goals and
skills relative to professional employment in business
administration; to assist students in making sound,
informed choices regarding potential career paths
and attendant academic options within the business
administration degree program; to develop a more
sophisticated understanding of the professional realm, the
changing nature of work, and those tools and knowledge
critical to developing effective career management skills.
No credit is given to juniors and seniors in the School of
Business and Economics. (Fall, Spring)
BUS-X 255 Diversity and Inclusion in the Workplace
(1 cr.) Open to freshmen. Identify and evaluate
biases, assumptions and stereotypes about diverse
groups. Understand the impact of social identity group
membership. Appraise the benefits of diversity and
inclusion in the workplace and in society.
BUS-X 410 Business Career Planning and Placement
(1 cr.) P: junior standing Assists students in obtaining
positions consistent with career goals. Career planning,
organized employment campaign, job-application
methods, interview, initial conduct on job. Includes
addresses by prominent executives. Enrollment for juniors
recommended. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
BUS-Z 302 Managing and Behavior in Organizations
(3 cr.) P: PSY-P 102 Integration of behavior and
organizational theories. Application of concepts and
theories toward improving, individual, group, and
organizational performance. Builds from a behavioral
foundation toward an understanding of managerial
processes. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
BUS-Z 440 Personnel—Human Resource Management
(3 cr.) P: BUS-Z 302 Nature of human resource planning,
development, and utilization in modern organizations.
Establishment and operation of a total human resource
program. Includes recruitment, selection, training and
development, performance appraisal, reward systems,
benefit programs, role of personnel department, and role
of government. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
BUS-Z 441 Wage and Salary Administration (3 cr.)
P: BUS-Z 302 Tools and techniques of wage and salary
administration consisting of steps in job evaluation,
wage theories and complexities; a total framework of
the compensation program involving systems of reward
and implications for management decision making is
presented. (Occasionally)
BUS-Z 442 Leading and Motivating Individuals and
Teams (3 cr.) P: BUS-Z 302 Improves manager's ability
to motivate employees to work on behalf of the company
by examining what motivates people to work and how to
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Full Course List
direct individuals and teams toward a desired goal. (Fall,
Spring, Summer)
BUS-Z 444 Personnel Research and Measurement
(3 cr.) P: BUS-Z 302, BUS-Z 440, ECON-E 270
Personnel search through review and evaluation of
studies in appropriate journals, opportunity to master
personnel measurement techniques. Job analysis, job
evaluation, wage-curve computation, predictor validation
techniques, morale measurement, and personnel auditing.
(Occasionally)
BUS-Z 480 Professional Practices in Human Resource
Management (3 cr.) This course title is reserved
for students who are conducting an internship in the
functional area of human resource management and who
wish to obtain credit. Internships are coordinated with the
Office of Career Services.
CDN-C 101 Introduction to Canadian Studies (3 cr.)
This interdisciplinary course introduces the student to
some of the problems explored by the humanities and
social sciences in the study of Canada. Themes will
vary from year to year and could cover topics such as
Canadian-American relations, Quebec's special status,
regionalism, trade, and the environment. (Fall)
CDN-C 301 Canadian Diversity (3 cr.) P: CDNS C101
Study of diversity in contemporary Quebec and English
Canada through a variety of interdisciplinary readings
drawn from literature, culture studies, politics, and social
history. Course may focus on the multicultural experience
in Canada, on particular ethnic or racial groups, or on
other dimensions of diversity as evidenced by cultural,
linguistic, religious, or sexual minorities. (Spring)
CDN-C 350 Introduction to French Canadian Literature
and Civilization (3 cr.) The civilization of French Canada
from New France to the present. Tendencies in the novel
from the late-nineteenth century to the beginning of the
twenty-first century. Selections from poetry anthologies,
with special emphasis on Nelligan, Grandbois, and the
contemporary scene. Selected plays from Gelinas to
Desrosiers. (Occasionally)
CDN-C 400 Comparative Canadian Literature (3 cr.)
Survey of French and English Canadian fiction, from a
comparative perspective. Representative works from
early-twentieth-century novelists to the contemporary
period. (Occasionally)
CDN-C 495 Advanced Topics in Canadian Studies
(3 cr.) P: junior standing or consent of the instructor
Seminar or small group discussion of topics in Canadian
studies; independent study or research in selected
problems in Canadian studies. (Occasionally)
CDN-H 230 History of Canada (3 cr.) Canada as a
French colony, as a British colony, and as a nation
evolving through dominion status as an independent
entity (with ties to both Anglophone and Francophone
nations) and seeking a viable existence with the United
States despite the vast difference in population size.
(Occasionally)
CDN-T 315 North American Landscap (3 cr.) P: course
in physical or general geology. Gives the student an
elementary understanding of various geologic controls
and processes that have produced the topographic
features. Regional concept stressed rather than
individual landforms. The continent is divided into
geomorphic regions based on similar geologic controls
and geomorphic histories.(Occasionally)
CDN-Y 217 Introduction to Comparative Politics (3 cr.)
Studies foreign political systems of Western and nonWestern countries. Includes comparative political analysis,
organized by topics, emphasizing nongovernmental as
well as governmental power. Discussion will include
economics systems, social classes, national groupings,
constitutions, bureaucracies, political parties, armies,
elements of political culture, and types of political change.
(Occasionally)
CHEM-C 100 The World of Chemistry (3 cr.) Intended
for nonscience majors, the chemistry of everyday life
—water, air, plastics, fuels, nutrition, medicinal and
agricultural products, living systems, and consumer
chemistry. Lectures illustrated by visual displays,
computer animation, and interviews with famous scientists
and on-site demonstrations of industrial processes. (Fall,
Spring, often in Summer I or Summer II)
CHEM-C 101 Elementary Chemistry I (3 cr.) P: MATHM 007 or equivalent Introduction to chemistry, includes
chemical and gas laws, atomic and molecular structure,
energy, equilibrium, kinetics, states of matter, and
applications in chemical processes. Usually taken
concurrently with CHEM-C 121. Lectures and discussion.
The two sequences, CHEM-C 101-CHEM-C 121 and
CHEM-C 102-CHEM-C 122, usually satisfy programs
that require only two semesters of chemistry. Admission
to advanced courses on basis of CHEM-C 101, CHEMC 121, CHEM-C 102, CHEM-C 122 granted only in
exceptional cases. May be taken without credit in
preparation for CHEM-C 105. Credit given for only CHEMC 101 or CHEM-C 105. (Fall, Spring, often in Summer I or
Summer II)
CHEM-C 102 Elementary Chemistry II (3 cr.) P: CHEMC 101 Continuation of CHEM-C 101. Usually taken
concurrently with CHEM-C 122. The chemistry of organic
compounds and their reactions, followed by an extensive
introduction to biochemistry. Lectures and discussion.
(Spring, occasionally in Summer I or Summer II)
CHEM-C 105 Principles of Chemistry I (3 cr.) P: two
years of high school algebra or MATH-M 014, one year
of high school chemistry; CHEM-C 125 recommended
concurrently Basic principles, including stoichiometry,
atomic and molecular structure, bonding, gases, and
solutions. Lectures and discussion. Credit given for only
CHEM-C 101 or CHEM-C 105. (Fall, Spring)
CHEM-C 106 Principles of Chemistry II (3 cr.)
P: CHEM-C 105 CHEM-C 126 recommended
concurrently. Chemical equilibria with emphasis on
acids, bases, solubility, and electrochemistry; elementary
thermodynamics; chemical kinetics; descriptive chemistry;
and coordination compounds. Lectures and discussion.
(Spring, Summer II)
CHEM-C 110 The Chemistry of Life (3 cr.) Intended for
nonscience majors, the qualitative survey of chemistry
with applications to biology and health. Emphasis is
placed on foundation chemistry and the chemistry of
biomolecules and their interactions.
Full Course List
159
CHEM-C 120 Chemistry Laboratory (2 cr.) P: or C:
CHEM-C 100, laboratory component of CHEM-C 100. C:
Experiments illustrating chemical principles and their
applications to biology, environment, and health sciences.
Laboratory and laboratory lecture. (Fall, Spring)
CHEM-C 342 Organic Chemistry Lecture II (3 cr.)
P: CHEM-C 343 C: CHEM-C 343 Syntheses and reactions
of polyfunctional compounds, natural and industrial
products; physical and chemical methods of identification.
(Spring)
CHEM-C 121 Elementary Chemistry Laboratory I (2 cr.)
P: CHEM-C 101 C: CHEM-C 101 An introduction to the
techniques and reasoning of experimental chemistry. (Fall,
Spring, often in Summer I or Summer II)
CHEM-C 343 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (2 cr.)
P: CHEM-C 341 C: CHEM-C 341 Laboratory instruction in
the fundamental techniques of organic chemistry and the
use of general synthetic methods. (Fall)
CHEM-C 122 Elementary Chemistry Laboratory II
(2 cr.) P: CHEM-C 101, CHEM-C 121, CHEM-C 102
C: CHEM-C 102 Continuation of CHEM-C 121. Emphasis
on organic and biochemical experimental techniques.
(Spring)
CHEM-C 344 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II
(2 cr.) P: CHEM-C 343, CHEM-C 342 C: CHEM-C
342 Preparation, isolation, and identification of organic
compounds; emphasis on modern research methods.
(Spring)
CHEM-C 125 Experimental Chemistry I (2 cr.)
P: CHEM-C 105 C: CHEM-C 105 An introduction
to laboratory experimentation with emphasis on the
collection and use of experimental data, some properties
of solutions, stoichiometry, molecular geometry, and
synthesis. (Fall, Spring)
CHEM-C 361 Physical Chemistry I (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C
106; MATH-M 216; PHYS-P 202 or PHYS-P 222 (either
MATH M216 or PHYS P202 /PHYS P222 concurrent).
Chemical thermodynamics and kinetics, introduction to
statistical thermodynamics. (Fall)
CHEM-C 126 Experimental Chemistry II (2 cr.)
P: CHEM-C 106 or concurrent, CHEM-C 125. A
continuation of CHEM-C 125 with emphasis on equilibria,
qualitative analysis, acids and bases, thermodynamics,
oxidation-reduction (including electrochemistry), chemical
kinetics, and spectrometry. (Spring, Summer II)
CHEM-C 209 Special Problems (1-2 cr.) Preparation
of special reports on topic(s) designated by chemistry
faculty from the results of the proficiency examination.
(Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
CHEM-C 301 Chemistry Seminar (1 cr.) P: 18 credit
hours of chemistry with a grade point average of at
least 2.5 Independent study and reading with emphasis
on basic chemistry and interdisciplinary applications.
Research reports and discussions by students and faculty.
(Spring)
CHEM-C 303 Environmental Chemistry Lecture
(3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 106, CHEM-C 126, and CHEM-C 341
Investigation of the chemistry of water and air pollution;
analytical procedures and techniques as applied to
pollution problems, effects, and controls. This course will
be offered as part of a postbaccalaureate environmental
sciences certificate. (Fall—alternate year)
CHEM-C 310 Analytical Chemistry (3-5 cr.) P: CHEMC 341 or CHEM-C 342 and MATH-M 215, CHEMC 361 for majors Fundamental analytical processes,
including solution equilibria, electrochemical theory and
applications, and selected instrumental methods. (Fall,
Spring—twice every three years)
CHEM-C 335 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (1-3 cr.)
P: CHEM-C 430 C: CHEM-C 430 Preparation of inorganic
and organometallic compounds illustrating special and
advanced techniques, including characterization by
modern physical methods. (Spring—alternate year)
CHEM-C 341 Organic Chemistry Lecture I (3 cr.)
P: CHEM-C 106, CHEM-C 126 Chemistry of carbon
compounds. Nomenclature; qualitative theory of valence;
structure and reactions. Syntheses and reactions of major
classes of monofunctional compounds. (Fall)
CHEM-C 362 Physical Chemistry II (3 cr.) P: CHEMC 361 Introduction to quantum mechanics. Structure
and spectra of atoms, molecules, and solids. (Spring—
alternate year)
CHEM-C 363 Experimental Physical Chemistry
(2-4 cr.) P: CHEM-C 106, CHEM-C 361 or concurrent.
Experimental work to illustrate principles of physical
chemistry and to introduce research techniques. (Fall)
CHEM-C 403 History of Chemistry I (1 cr.) P: senior
standing, consent of instructor Development of significant
chemical knowledge and concepts through the nineteenth
century. Student report and discussion. (Fall, Spring,
Summer I, Summer II)
CHEM-C 409 Chemical Research (1-5 cr.) P: senior
standing (open also to Honors juniors), grade point
average of at least 2.8 in all chemistry courses Can be
elected only after consultation with research advisor and
approval of chairperson. May be taken for total of 10 credit
hours. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
CHEM-C 410 Principles of Chemical Instrumentation
(4 cr.) P: CHEM-C 310 or consent of instructor Theory and
practice of modern analytical methods, including electroanalytical techniques, quantitative spectrophotometry,
magnetic methods, extraction, and chromatography.
(Spring—twice every three years)
CHEM-C 430 Inorganic Chemistry (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C
361 or consent of instructor Structural inorganic chemistry,
coordination compounds, mechanisms of inorganic
reactions, inorganic synthetic methods. Special topics.
(Fall)
CHEM-C 431 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3 cr.)
P: CHEM-C 430 Systematic descriptive chemistry of the
elements. Emphasis onperiodic properties, chemical
bonding, and thermodynamic and kinetic properties.
(Spring—alternate year)
CHEM-C 441 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3 cr.)
P: CHEM-C 342 The structure of organic compounds,
the mechanisms, and the synthetic application of organic
reactions. (Spring—alternate year)
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Full Course List
CHEM-C 483 Biological Chemistry (3 cr.) P: 13 credit
hours of chemistry, including CHEM-C 341 Introduction
to structure, chemical properties, and interrelationships of
biological substances. (Spring— alternate year)
CHRI-C 101 Introduction to Latino Studies (3 cr.) An
introduction to the most important themes of the Chicano
and Puerto Rican experiences from the disciplinary
perspectives of arts, education, folklore, history, literature,
music, political science, and sociology. Pre-Columbian to
World War II. (Fall, Summer I)
CHRI-C 151 Minority People in the United States (3 cr.)
A study of the cultural experiences of minority people in
the United States. Focus will be on African Americans
and Latinos. Other minority groups will be studied where
appropriate. The course will be interdisciplinary in nature
with a heavy emphasis on the analysis of original texts.
Credit may not be earned for both AFRO-A 151 and CHRIC 151. (Spring)
CHRI-C 213 Politics of Chicano Cultural Identity
(3 cr.) Following the conclusion of World War II, a
relatively distinct Chicano racial/cultural identity emerges
in communities throughout the Southwest and major
urban areas of the Midwest. This course examines the
relationship between this cultural identity and the Chicano
social movement politics of the 1960s and early 1970s.
(Spring)
CHRI-C 290 Topics in Latino Studies (3 cr.) P: consent
of the instructor Analysis of selected topics and
contemporary issues related to the Chicano and Puerto
Rican experiences in the United States. Topics will be
chosen by the instructor and vary from semester to
semester. May be repeated once with a different topic.
(Fall, Spring)
CHRI-C 301 (HIST-F 301) History of Puerto Rico
(3 cr.) Colonization by Spain; international development;
Spanish-American War; occupation by United States;
economic, social and political development; migration to
the mainland; debate on independence, autonomy, and
statehood. (Occasionally)
CHRI-C 351 Latino Culture and Society (3 cr.)
P: sophomore standing or consent of instructor This
course will be a survey of Latino culture and society in the
United States. There will be an emphasis on how Latinos
have used forms of cultural expression to interpret their
experience in this country. (Occasionally)
CHRI-C 352 (HIST-A 352) History of Latinos in the
United States (3 cr.) Latino experience in the United
States; economic and social factors of the Latino role in a
non-Latino nation. (Fall)
CHRI-C 444 (HIST-F 444) History of Mexico (3 cr.)
Brief survey of the colonial period and independence
movement. Ideological conflicts within Republic.
Revolution of 1910. Relationship with United States from
Mexican viewpoint. (Occasionally)
CHRI-C 446 Mexican and Puerto Rican Immigration
and Migration (3 cr.) Study of the migration of Mexicans
and Puerto Ricans to the United States. Emphasis will be
on push-pull factors of migration; the incorporation of both
groups into the American socioeconomic structure; the
role of federal legislation in patterns of migration; and the
special plight of undocumented workers. (Occasionally)
CHRI-C 490 Topics in Latino Studies (3 cr.) Extensive
analysis of selected topics and contemporary issues
relating to the Chicano and Puerto Rican experiences in
the United States. Topics vary from semester to semester.
May be repeated once with a different topic. (Fall, Spring)
CHRI-C 495 Individual Readings in Latino Studies
(1-3 cr.) P: consent of instructor Intensive study of a
specific problem in Chicano-Riqueño studies. May be
repeated once for credit. (Fall, Spring).
CMLT-C 190 An Introduction to Film (3 cr.) Nature
of film technique and film language; analysis of specific
films and introduction to major critical approaches in film
studies. (Occasionally)
CMLT-C 253 Third World and Black American Films
(3 cr.) Black American films, both within the Hollywood
"mainstream" and from the more independent producers;
films from Africa, India, and Latin America. Discussion
and analysis of the individual films as well as their cultural
backgrounds. (Occasionally)
CMLT-C 261 Introduction to African Literature (3 cr.)
Oral and written poetry, epic, fiction, and drama from
around the continent used to illustrate varied aspects of
African life, aesthetic issues, and theoretical debates.
(Every other year)
CMLT-C 340 Women in World Literature (3 cr.) R:
3 credits in literature. Comparison of attitudes toward
women in works of different ages and societies. Study
of stereotyped images in relation to literary and social
conventions. Focus on one genre or mode each time
course is offered (e.g., women in drama, in narrative, in
satire). (Occasionally)
CMLT-C 460 Origins of African Literature (3 cr.) The
roots of Francophone African literature in the Antilles.
Haitian literature (Price-Mars, Césaire, Dépestre). The
Paris movement of Negritude (Senghor, Damas, Césaire).
Contribution of Afro-American writers (Hughes, McKay,
Toomer). African poetry (Senghor, D. Diop, Dadie) and
novels (Camara Laye, Beti, Oyono). All readings in
English translations. (Occasionally)
COAS-J 151 Career Exploration and Development
(1 cr.) Provides an opportunity to explore career
options and define career objectives through the use of
recognized occupational preference tests, self-evaluation
techniques, guest lecturers, and outside readings.
Intended for freshmen and sophomores.
COAS-S 104 Freshman Seminar in Social and
Historical Studies (3 cr.) This class is designed to help
first-year students begin a successful college career.
It includes a broad range of topics and experiences
designed to help students adjust to college-level work.
Topics will vary. Open only to freshmen.
COAS-W 398 Internship in Professional Practice
(1-6 cr.)
COMM-C 320 Advanced Public Speaking (3 cr.)
P: SPCH-S 121 Development of a marked degree of
skills in preparation and delivery of various types of
speeches, with emphasis on depth of research, clarity
Full Course List
of organization, application of proof, and felicitous style.
(Occasionally)
COMM-C 340 Practicum in Media Production (3 cr.)
This course is designed to give students hands-on
practical experience with all facets of television and radio
production. In this course, students will work with others
as part of a team in media production and complete a
comprehensive and professional quality portfolio of his or
her work.
COMM-C 351 TV Production I (3 cr.) P: TEL-C 200
Coordination and integration of production principles for
practical application in television; emphasis on studio
production of nondramatic program forms. Lecture and
laboratory. (Occasionally)
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CSCI-A 210 Introduction to Visual Basic Programming
(4 cr.) P: DPIS-D 150, or MATH-M 100 or higher
Introduction to business application programming.
Students learn the skills necessary to design and
implement programs and program interfaces using
rapid application development techniques and visual
development tools such as Visual Basic. (Fall)
CSCI-A 247 Network Technologies and Administration
(3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 106 or consent of instructor Introduction
to network principles and current network technology,
both hardware and software. Network administration tools
and techniques. Laboratory exercises provide practical
experience. Students cannot receive credit for both CSCIA 247 and DPIS-D 205. (Fall, Spring)
COMM-C 462 Media Theory and Criticism (3 cr.)
P: TEL-C 200 Description and evaluation of various
theoretical strategies that attempt to explain the ways
individuals and groups react to media. Critical analysis of
several media with attention to the connective and artistic
functions of visual and aural components. (Occasionally)
CSCI-A 251 Introduction to Digital Imaging
Applications (3 cr.) P: CSCI-A 106 An introduction to
digital imaging software applications such as Adobe
Photoshop and Illustrator. Students will learn the technical
skills necessary to use such digital imaging software,
primarily for the use of Office applications and Web
development. (once a year)
COMM-M 460 Culture and Mass Communication (3 cr.)
P: TEL-C 200 This course is a critical overview of the
relationship between mass media and American culture.
Course content will explore what it means (politically,
economically, culturally, and morally) to live in a culture
in which a major portion of information comes to the
citizen through multiple channels of mass communication.
(Occasionally)
CSCI-A 285 Advanced Microcomputer Applications
(3 cr.) P: CSCI-A 106 or consent of instructor Introduces
and applies advanced features of microcomputer
applications packages such as word processors,
spreadsheets, graphic presentation software, etc.
Emphasis is put on the movement of data among various
software packages and on the creation and use of macros,
styles, and scripts. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
CSCI-A 103 Microcomputer Applications: Word
Processing (1 cr.) P: Placement by CSCI-A 106
placement test Word processing portion of CSCI-A 106.
To be taught concurrently with CSCI-A 106. Lecture and
laboratory. Credit not given for both CSCI-A 103 and
(CSCI-A 106 or CSCI-A 200) and BUS-K 201.
CSCI-A 302 Object-Oriented Programming Techniques
(4 cr.) P: CSCI-A 201 or consent of instructor Advanced
programming techniques: user-oriented functions and
types, recursion versus iteration, parameter-passing
mechanisms. Abstract data types: stacks, queues, linked
lists, trees, hash tables. Algorithmic solutions to standard
problems of searching, sorting, string matching, spacetime complexity. Continued emphasis on programming
styles issues. Object-oriented programming. Credit cannot
be given for both CSCI-A 302 and INFO-I 211 except with
permission. (Spring)
CSCI-A 104 Microcomputer Applications:
Spreadsheets (1 cr.) P: Placement by CSCI-A 106
placement test Spreadsheet portion of CSCI-A 106. To
be taught concurrently with CSCI-A 106. Lecture and
laboratory. Credit not given for both CSCI-A 104 and
(CSCI-A 106 or CSCI-A 200) and BUS-K 201.
CSCI-A 105 Microcomputer Applications: Databases
(1 cr.) P: Placement by CSCI-A 106 placement test
Relational database portion of CSCI-A 106. To be taught
concurrently with CSCI-A 106. Lecture and laboratory.
Credit not given for both CSCI-A 105 and (CSCI-A 106 or
CSCI-A 200) and BUS-K 201.
CSCI-A 106 Introduction to Computing (3 cr.) P: ENGW 031 or equivalent and MATH-M 007 or equivalent The
use of computers in everyday activities. How computers
work; use of packaged programs for word processing,
spreadsheets, file management, communication, graphics,
etc. Lecture and laboratory. No credit given for both CSCIA 106 and BUS-K 201 or CSCI-A 200. (Fall, Spring,
Summer I, Summer II)
CSCI-A 201 Introduction to Computers and
Programming (4 cr.) P: DPIS-D 150, or MATH-M 100
or higher, or consent of instructor Emphasis on modular
programming, user-interface design, and documentation
principles. (Fall)
CSCI-A 340 An Introduction to Web Programming
(3 cr.) P: CSCI-A 348 An introduction to programming
Web documents, including HTML, JavaScript, and Perl.
Creation of a simple Web site, including a home page with
dynamic elements, using both client-side and server-side
techniques. (Fall)
CSCI-A 346 User Interface Programming (3 cr.)
P: CSCI-A 210, or consent of instructor Learn to
prototype and build graphical user interfaces for computer
applications, using contemporary software design
methodology. Students design and implement prototype
interfaces to applications provided by the instructor.
Extensive use of both commercial and experimental
software tools. (Spring)
CSCI-A 347 Computer and Network Security
Essentials (3 cr.) The computing security problem.
Threats, vulnerabilities, exploits, defenses, and
countermeasures. Firewalls and TCP/IP services.
Information and risk. Implementing security policies and
practices. Disaster planning, prevention, and recovery
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operations. Legal, ethical and privacy issues. (Spring, Fall,
alternate years)
CSCI-A 348 Mastering the World Wide Web (3 cr.)
P: CSCI-A 106 or CSCI-C 106 Survey of World Wide Web
applications and use including browsers, search engines,
e-mail, news groups, FTP, multimedia, etc. Design and
develop personal and professional Web pages using
hypertext and scripting languages. Publishing and posting
Web pages and documents. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
CSCI-C 106 Introduction to Computers and Their
Use (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 031 or equivalent and MATH-M
007 or equivalent An introduction to computers and data
processing. Includes the historical and current status
of data processing and electronic digital computers; a
survey of computer applications; foundations of computer
programming; survey of programming languages. Credit
cannot be given for both CSCI-C 106 and INFO-I 101.
(Fall, Spring, Summer I)
CSCI-C 201 Computer Programming II (4 cr.) P: DPISD 150 or MATH-M 100 or higher Computer programming,
algorithm, and program structure. Computer solutions
to problems. FORTRAN or Java will be the vehicle for
program development. Lecture and discussion. Credit
will not be given for both CSCI-C 201 and CSCI-A 201 or
CSCI-C 203 or INFO-I 210, except by permission of the
department. (Fall)
CSCI-C 203 COBOL and File Processing (4 cr.)
P: CSCI-C 106 and DPIS-D 150 Computer programming and algorithms. Application to large file processing
functions of an organization. Credit not given for both
CSCI-C 203 and CSCI-C 201, or for both CSCI-C 203
and CSCI-C 303, except by permission of the department.
(Occasionally)
CSCI-C 297 Sophomore Topics in Computer Sciences
(3 cr.) P: Listed in Schedule of Classes or consent of
instructor Selected topics in computer science appropriate
to the student in or nearing the end of the sophomore
year. Course may cover a topic selected from but not
limited to the following list: programming languages,
computer graphics, artificial intelligence, ethics in data
processing, and database systems. May be repeated
for no more than 9 credit hours. Credit not given for both
CSCI-C 297 and DPIS-D 285 in excess of 9 credit hours.
(Occasionally)
CSCI-C 307 Applied Programming Techniques (3 cr.)
P: CSCI-C 201 or equivalent Programming techniques:
data analysis, sorting and searching, use of tape and disk
files, string and text manipulation. Credit cannot be given
for both CSI-C 307 and INFO-I 211, except by permission.
(Spring)
CSCI-C 311 Programming Languages (4 cr.) P: CSCIA 302 or CSCI-C 307 or CSCI-C 320 or CSCI-A 346
Systematic approach to programming languages.
Relationships among languages, properties and features
of language, and the computer environment necessary to
use languages. Lecture and laboratory. (Occasionally)
CSCI-C 320 Advanced COBOL (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 203 A
continuation and extension of COBOL syntax as taught
in CSCI-C 203. Extensive use will be made of structured
COBOL in the development of large programs requiring
access to various file structures. (Occasionally)
CSCI-C 343 Data Structures (4 cr.) P: CSCI-A 302 or
CSCI-C 307 or CSCI-C 320 or CSCI-A 346 Systematic
study of data structures encountered in computing
problems; structure and use of storage media; methods of
representing structured data; and techniques for operating
on data structures. Lectures and laboratory. (Occasionally)
CSCI-C 390 Individual Programming Laboratory
(1-3 cr.) P: CSCI-A 302 or CSCI-C 307 or CSCI-C 320
or CSCI-A 346 Students will design, program, verify,
and document a special project assignment selected
in consultation with an instructor. This course may be
taken several times up to a maximum of 6 credits. Prior
to enrolling, students must arrange for an instructor to
supervise their course activity. Credit not given for both
CSCI-C 390 and DPIS-D 390 in excess of 6 credit hours.
(Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
CSCI-C 445 Information Systems Design (3 cr.)
P: CSCI-C 343 or DPIS-D 320 Concepts, theory, and
practice in systems design and analysis with particular
attention to current database methods and control.
(Occasionally)
CSCI-C 446 Information Systems Development
(3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 445 or consent of instructor Analysis
and implementation of information systems. Hardware
organization and the relationship to software constructs
such as sequential versus direct access, coding and
indexing strategies, inverted files, rings, trees, and
multilinked structures. (Occasionally)
CSCI-Y 398 Internship in Professional Practice (1-6 cr.)
P: sophomore standing; approval of major department.
Designed to provide opportunities for students to receive
credit for selected, career related, full-time or part-time
work. Evaluation by employer and faculty sponsors. May
be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (Fall, Spring,
Summer I, Summer II)
DAST-A 111 Oral Pathology, Physiology, and Anatomy
I (2 cr.) An overview of the structure and function of the
body, starting with the basic tissues, organs, and organic
systems; followed by the mechanisms of disease with
emphasis on the head and neck region. (Spring)
DAST-A 112 Dental and Medical Emergencies and
Therapeutics (2 cr.) Recognition and clinical experience
of systemic emergencies. Comprehensive study of the
physiological, toxicological, and therapeutic effects
of drugs on living organisms, with emphasis on their
rational application in the treatment of disease. Content
includes discussions of drugs that are widely prescribed
by physicians and dentists. (Fall)
DAST-A 113 Oral Pathology, Physiology, and Anatomy
II (1 cr.) An overview of the diseases of the human body
including basic cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems,
with specific emphasis on diseases of the face and mouth.
(Spring)
DAST-A 121 Microbiology and Asepsis Techniques
(2 cr.) An overview of microbiological aspects of health
and disease, with emphasis on current infection control
protocol. (Fall)
DAST-A 131 Dental Materials I (2 cr.) These courses
[Dental Materials I and II] are designed to acquaint
the student with the basic mechanical, physical, and
chemical properties of dental materials and the effect of
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manipulation procedures on those properties. The exact
role of properties in the usage and behavior of materials
is stressed. Also, biological considerations are covered.
(Spring)
DAST-A 132 Dental Materials II (2 cr.) These courses
[Dental Materials I and II] are designed to acquaint
the student with the basic mechanical, physical, and
chemical properties of dental materials and the effect of
manipulation procedures on those properties. The exact
role of properties in the usage and behavior of materials
is stressed. Also, biological considerations are covered.
(Summer I)
DAST-A 141 Preventive Dentistry (2 cr.) Etiology
of prevalent oral diseases and their prevention, with
particular emphasis on plaque, plaque control, and
fluorides. The effects of major nutrients on the physiologic
body processes; applied nutrition in dental caries and
periodontal disease. (Spring)
DAST-A 152 Radiology Clinic II (1 cr.) Clinical
experience in the placing, exposing, processing,
evaluating, and mounting of intraoral and extraoral dental
radiographs. Practical application of radiation safety
measures is required in the clinical setting. (Summer II)
DAST-A 161 Behavioral Science (1 cr.) An introduction
to psychology applicable in the dental office, emphasizing
communication and personal relationships; the role of the
dental assistant as seen by the dentist, office personnel,
and patient. Attitude, personality, motivation, and habit
formation are discussed from a dental perspective.
(Summer I)
DAST-A 162 Oral and Written Communications (2 cr.)
Instruction and practice in gathering and organizing
material for written and oral presentation. Individual and
group projects in communication, including table clinics'
posters and professional articles for presentation and/or
publication. (Summer II)
DAST-A 171 Clinical Science I (5 cr.) A core course in
dental nomenclature; historical developments in dentistry;
role of assistant as member of the dental health team;
dental specialties; charting the mouth; identification and
utilization of instruments and equipment; principles of
dental procedures and instrument transfer. (Fall)
DAST-A 172 Clinical Science II (5 cr.) Clinical chairside
experience in extramural assignments with a seminar to
provide opportunities for students to share experiences.
(Spring)
DAST-A 182 Practice Management, Ethics, and
Jurisprudence (2 cr.) Study of legal and ethical aspects
of dentistry. Dental practice management in reception
procedures, appointment control, clinical and financial
records, purchasing, and inventory control. Preparation
of a resume, letter of application, and interviewing
techniques. (Summer II)
DAST-H 214 Oral Anatomy (3 cr.) A study of the
morphology, structure, and function of deciduous and
permanent teeth and their surrounding tissues, including
the osteology of the maxilla and mandible, the nerve and
vascular supply of teeth, the muscles of mastication, and
the anatomy of the temporomandibular joint. (Fall)
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DAST-H 224 Oral Histology and Embryology (1 cr.)
A study of the histological aspects of the tooth and
periodontium, including enamel, dentin, cementum,
pulp, periodontal ligament, bone and alveolar process,
gingiva, and oral mucous membrane and a study of the
embryologic development of the face and teeth. (Summer
II)
DAST-H 242 Introduction to Dentistry (1 cr.) An
overview of the specialties of dentistry with emphasis
on the dental personnel's role within each of the dental
specialties. (Summer I)
DAST-H 303 Radiology I (2 cr.) The principles of
radiation production, theories of radiographic image
formation, chemistry of film processing, radiation hygiene,
and interpretation of processed radiographs. Laboratory
experience includes placement of intraoral film and proper
exposure and processing of film. (Summer I)
DHYG-H 204 Periodontics: First Year (1 cr.) A
study of periodontal diseases, including the anatomy,
classification, etiology, treatment, and relationship to
systemic conditions. (Summer I)
DHYG-H 205 Medical and Dental Emergencies: First
Year (1 cr.) A study of emergency situations in the dental
office, including predisposing factors, drugs, and treatment
to include the support of the cardiopulmonary system.
(Fall)
DHYG-H 211 Head and Neck Anatomy: First Year
(2 cr.) Head and neck anatomy, with emphasis on
muscles of mastication, nerves and blood vessels
supplying the teeth, and temporomandibular joint
problems. (Fall)
DHYG-H 214 Oral Anatomy: First Year (3 cr.) A study
of the morphology, structure, and function of deciduous
and permanent teeth and their surrounding tissues, with
laboratory procedures, including the identification and
reproduction of tooth forms by viewing representative
teeth. An introduction to the osteology of the maxilla
and mandible, the nerve and vascular supply of teeth,
the muscles of mastication, and the anatomy of the
temporomandibular joint. (Fall)
DHYG-H 215 Pharmacology and Therapeutics: First
Year (2 cr.) Actions and uses of drugs and theory
of anesthetics; emphasis on drugs used in dentistry.
(Summer I)
DHYG-H 217 Preventive Dentistry: First Year (2 cr.)
Etiology of prevalent oral diseases and their prevention,
with particular emphasis on plaque, plaque control, and
fluorides. The effects of major nutrients in the physiologic
body process; applied nutrition in dental caries and
periodontal disease. (Fall)
DHYG-H 218 Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene: First
Year (4 cr.) An introduction to the theory, principles,
and procedures necessary for the performance of dental
hygiene services through didactic, laboratory, and clinical
experiences. There will be emphasis placed on infection
control procedures, structures of the oral cavity, soft and
hard deposits, instrumentation, medical/dental histories,
oral inspection, polishing and fluoride procedures. (Fall)
DHYG-H 219 Clinical Practice I: First Year (4 cr.)
Performance of dental hygiene services in a clinical
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setting. Didactic and clinical instruction in advanced
theories, principles, and procedures necessary to perform
an oral prophylaxis. Emphasis will be placed on the
enrichment of skills necessary to perform preventive oral
health services. (Spring)
DHYG-H 220 Summer Radiology Clinic: First Year
(1 cr.) Continued performance of intraoral and extraoral
radiographs. (Summer I)
DHYG-H 221 Summer Clinic: First Year (3 cr.)
Continued performance of dental hygiene services in a
clinical setting. (Summer I)
DHYG-H 224 Oral Histology and Embryology: First
Year (1 cr.) A study of the histological aspects of the tooth
and periodontium. Also a brief study of the embryologic
development of the face and teeth. (Spring)
DHYG-H 242 Introduction to Dentistry: First Year
(1 cr.) An overview of the dental specialties with emphasis
on the dental personnel's role within each of the dental
specialties. (Spring)
DHYG-H 250 Local Anesthesia and Pain Control:
Second Year (2 cr.) Prepare the student for the clinical
admisnistration of local anesthetic drugs. Provide
the dental hygiene student with understanding of the
neurophysiology of local anestetic action coupled with the
pharmacology of the local anesthetics themselves and
vasoconstrictors. (Fall)
DHYG-H 301 Clinical Practice II: Second Year (5 cr.)
Continued performance of dental hygiene services in the
clinical setting. Included is didactic instruction and clinical
application of dental hygiene services for providing patient
care. (Fall)
DHYG-H 302 Clinical Practice III: Second Year (5 cr.)
Continued performance of dental hygiene services in the
clinical setting. Included is didactic instruction and clinical
application of dental hygiene services for providing patient
care. (Spring)
DHYG-H 303 Dental Radiology: First Year (2 cr.)
Through didactic instruction, the student will learn the
principles of radiation protection, theories of radiographic
image formation, chemistry of film processing, radiation
hygiene, and interpretation of processed radiographs. The
laboratory portion of the course will include the practical
application of exposure and processing techniques. (Fall)
DHYG-H 304 Oral Pathology: Second Year (2 cr.) An
overview of the diseases of the human body with specific
emphasis on developmental abnormalities and acquired
disorders of teeth and surrounding structure. (Fall)
DHYG-H 305 Radiology Clinic I: First Year (1 cr.)
Clinical application of intraoral and extraoral radiographs
with advanced interpretation skills. (Spring)
DHYG-H 306 Radiology Clinic II: Second Year (1 cr.)
Clinical application of intraoral and extraoral radiographs
with advanced interpretation skills. (Fall)
DHYG-H 307 Radiology Clinic III: Second Year (1 cr.)
Clinical application of intraoral and extraoral radiographs
with advanced interpretation skills. (Spring)
DHYG-H 308 Dental Materials: First Year (2 cr.) A
course designed to acquaint the student with the basic
mechanical, physical, and chemical properties of dental
materials and the effect of manipulation procedures on
those properties. The exact role of properties in the usage
and clinical behavior of materials is stressed. Certain
biological considerations are also covered. A laboratory is
required. (Spring)
DHYG-H 311 Dental Health Education: Second Year
(2 cr.) An introduction to basic communication and
motivation skills, instructional objectives, learning theory,
evaluation of education materials, and special needs
patients. Health program planning and evaluation methods
are investigated. (Fall)
DHYG-H 320 Ethics, Jurisprudence, and Practice
Management: Second Year (2 cr.) Ethics, jurisprudence,
and practice management concepts, including a study of
state practice acts and business management procedures.
(Spring)
DHYG-H 321 Periodontics: Second Year (2 cr.) A
study of periodontal diseases, including the anatomy,
classification, etiology, treatment, and relationship to
systemic conditions. (Fall)
DHYG-H 344 Senior Hygiene Seminar: Second Year
(1 cr.) Reviews of formats and procedures involved in
national and state board examinations. Participation in
developing employment-seeking skills. (Spring)
DHYG-H 347 Community Dental Hygiene: Second Year
(3 cr.) A study of aspects of dental public health, including
public health professionals, epidemiology, research,
and implementing community dental health programs.
Major emphasis on supervised field experience in various
community settings. (Spring)
DHYG-H 351 Advanced Clinical Procedures: Second
Year (2 cr.) The course is designed to acquaint the
students with the theory and principles of advanced
clinical dental hygiene procedures. It provides the
students with the education and skills necessary to
perform dental hygiene services in a variety of settings
(e.g., private dental practice, public health clinics, school
systems, institutions, and hospitals).
DHYG-H 402 Practicum in Dental Hygiene Education
(Capstone): Second Year (3 cr.) This course is designed
to provide instruction in planning, implementing, and
evaluating effective teaching methodologies in an
educational setting (teaching methods and techniques,
choices of material and equipment with emphasis on
evaluation). The course also provides instruction in
supervising the teaching of dental hygiene services in a
clinical or public health setting.
DHYG-H 403 Advanced Community Dental Hygiene:
Second Year (4 cr.) The course is designed to give
instruction in public health principles including a study
of health care delivery system and preventive public
health care at the community level. It includes active
involvement in service learning activities and problem
solving related to actual community oral health needs as
well as participation in the design and implementation of
effective public health programs.
DPIS-D 120 Introduction to Microcomputers
(3 cr.) Hardware survey includes a brief history of
microcomputers, CPU operations and types, primary and
secondary memories. I/O and commercially available
Full Course List
systems. Software topics include programming languages
and application programs. Systems applications include
demonstrations of graphics, sound, and control apparatus.
(Occasionally)
DPIS-D 150 Procedures and Problem Solving (3 cr.)
P: MATH-M 014 or higher A systematic examination
of problem perception and problem-solving techniques
with an emphasis on data processing and information
systems applications. Includes the study of structured
methodologies and various heuristic and algorithmic
procedures. By providing training in problem solving
independent of a programming language, the student will
be better prepared to use these skills in programming and
computer applications classes that assume their mastery.
(Spring, Summer II)
DPIS-D 250 Multimedia (3 cr.) P: CSCI-A 106 Covers
the development of CD and graphics-based presentations
such as would be made by corporate trainers, system
developers, elementary/secondary school teachers,
and marketing professionals. Students will use image
capture, scanning, and audio capture to create projected
presentations in class.
DPIS-D 290 Microcomputer Database Software
and Applications (3 cr.) P: CSCI-A 106 or consent
of instructor Review of different database models
available for microcomputers: flat file, relational (including
structured query language [SQL]), personal information
managers (PIMS), and Hypertext. Includes simulated
and actual hands-on experience. Application design and
implementation stressed. (Fall)
DPIS-D 305 Advanced Networking Systems and
Administration (3 cr.) P: CSCI-A 247, CSCI-C 106
This course provides a comprehensive study of Local
Area Networks (LANs). Topics include the study of LAN
communication protocols, the Open Systems Interconnect
(OSI) model, client/server operating system architectures,
basic security services, and systems administration
concepts. Students design, construct, and administer a
LAN using a popular network operating system. (Spring)
DPIS-D 330 Object-Oriented System Analysis
Plus Design (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 106 and DPIS-D 150
Descriptive and analytical tools of systems analysis used
with computer systems, subsystems, and functional
modules to define data flow, control, and process
requirements: flowcharting, data flow diagrams, functional
decomposition, interviewing, questionnaires, systems and
data models with an emphasis on object-oriented design.
Credit not given for both DPIS-D 330 and (CSCI-C445 or
DPIS-D 230). (Fall)
DPIS-D 345 Database Systems Management and
Design (4 cr.) P: DPIS-D 330 or consent of instructor The
theory and practice of Database Management Systems
(DBMS); information management; database models
—hierarchical, network, relational—current DBMS;
distributed processing; database administration, design,
evaluation, acquisition, and implementation; use of DBMS
by analysts, programmers, and end users. Students will
use a DBMS. (Alternate Years)
DPIS-D 350 Data Processing Management (3 cr.)
P: CSCI-A 302 or CSCI-C 307 or CSCI-C 320 or CSCIA 346 or consent of instructor The functions and duties
of a manager of a data processing organization or
165
information system. Includes studies of the various types
of organizations, techniques of preparing and maintaining
budgets, personnel management, and management
techniques as applied to data processing environments.
(Spring)
DPIS-D 390 Individual Computer Application
Laboratory (1-3 cr.) P: 300 or 400 level course in DPIS or
CSCI Student will design, program, verify, and document
a special project assignment selected in consultation with
the instructor. This course may be taken several times
up to a maximum of 6 credits. Prior to enrolling, students
must arrange for an instructor to supervise their course
activity. Credit not given for both CSCI-C 390 and DPIS-D
390 in excess of 6 credits. (Occasionally)
DPIS-D 401 Computer Resource Research (3 cr.)
P: CSCI-C 106 or consent of instructor In-depth study
of the practical computer information systems research
methodologies. Computer hardware / software / personnel
evaluation and selection. Procedures, resources, and
tradeoffs. (Occasionally)
DPIS-D 410 Computer Simulation and Modeling (3 cr.)
P: CSCI-C 307 or CSCI-C 343 An examination of the
construction of various types of computer science models
and simulations to include scheduling and forecasting,
queuing, and process control. (Occasionally)
DPIS-D 446 Application Development without
Programmers (3 cr.) P: CSCI-A 106 and DPIS-D 330
or consent of instructor The economics, resistance,
functional components, and implications of this
developing trend: where conventional development is
necessary; software for application development without
application programming; information centers; application
development by analysts and end users; future prospects.
Students will complete practical exercises. (Spring)
DPIS-D 490 Current Directions in Data Processing and
Information Systems (3 cr.) P: departmental major with
senior standing A survey of current computer systems
and an examination of state-of-the- art applications
that significantly improve workplace productivity; e.g.,
information management and decision-support systems,
office automation, communication networks, knowledgebased information systems. Students will investigate one
area in depth. (Occasionally)
ECON-E 103 Introduction to Microeconomics (3 cr.)
P: MATH-M 007 or equivalent proficiency Introduction to
economic analysis. Resource allocation in market and
nonmarket economics. Behavior of consumers, firms, and
industries. Policy issues such as regulation of business,
collective bargaining, and environmental protection. (Fall,
Spring, Summer)
ECON-E 103 Introduction to Microeconomics (3 cr.)
P: MATH M007 or equivalent proficiency
Introduction to economic analysis. Resource allocation
in market and nonmarket economics. Behavior of
consumers, firms, and industries. Policy issues such
as regulation of business, collective bargaining, and
environmental protection. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
ECON-E 104 Introduction to Macroeconomics (3 cr.)
P: MATH-M 007 or equivalent proficiency Introduction
to aggregate economic analysis. National income and
production, unemployment and inflation, international
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trade, and economic growth. Use of fiscal and monetary
policy to control the economy. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
monopoly; allocation and pricing of resources; partial and
general equilibrium theory; welfare economics.
ECON-E 104 Introduction to Macroeconomics (3 cr.)
P: MATH M007 or equivalent proficiency
Introduction to aggregate economic analysis. National
income and production, unemployment and inflation,
international trade, and economic growth. Use of fiscal
and monetary policy to control the economy. (Fall, Spring,
Summer)
ECON-E 322 Theory of Income and Employment (3 cr.)
P: ECON-E 103, ECON-E 104 Macroeconomics: national
income accounting; theory of income, employment,
and price level. Counter-cyclical and other public policy
measures.
ECON-E 111 Economic History (3 cr.) A broad
introductory course to the economic and business history
of the United States from the time of European and African
colonization of the New World to the present. Topics
include: origins and evolution of capitalism; economic
growth; changing relationship between labor and capital;
and globalization.
ECON-E 111 Economic History (3 cr.)
A broad introductory course to the economic and business
history of the United States from the time of European
and African colonization of the New World to the present.
Topics include: origins and evolution of capitalism;
economic growth; changing relationship between labor
and capital; and globalization.
ECON-E 270 Introduction to Statistical Theory for
Economics and Business (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 118 Basic
statistical methods. Descriptive statistics, probability
estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis.
(Fall, Spring, Summer)
ECON-E 270 Introduction to Statistical Theory for
Economics and Business (3 cr.) P: MATH M118.
Basic statistical methods. Descriptive statistics, probability
estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis.
(Fall, Spring, Summer)
ECON-E 309 Topics in Economics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E
103, ECON-E 104.
Study of a topic area in economics. Topics will vary,
intended primarily for non-majors wanting exposure
to economics beyond the introductory level. May be
repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit
hours. Only 3 credit hours may count toward the major or
minor in economics.
ECON-E 309 Topics in Economics (3 cr.)
Study of a topic area in economics. Topics will vary.
Intended primarily for non-majors wanting exposure
to economics beyond the introductory level. May be
repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credit
hours. Only 3 credit hours may count toward the major or
minor in economics.
ECON-E 321 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
(3 cr.) P: ECON-E 103, ECON-E 104 Microeconomics:
the theory of demand; theory of production; pricing under
conditions of competition and monopoly; allocation and
pricing of resources; partial and general equilibrium
theory; welfare economics.
ECON-E 321 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
(3 cr.) P: ECON E103, ECON E104
Microeconomics: the theory of demand; theory of
production; pricing under conditions of competition and
ECON-E 322 Theory of Income and
EmploymentEconomics and Business (3 cr.) P: ECON
E103, ECON E104.
Macroeconomics: national income accounting; theory of
income, employment, and price level. Counter-cyclical and
other public policy measures.
ECON-E 323 Urban Economics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 103,
ECON-E 104 Economic analysis of cities and regions.
Growth and structure of cities. Location decisions by
businesses. Topics such as transportation, housing, local
public services, poverty, and pollution.
ECON-E 323 Urban Economics (3 cr.) P: ECON E103,
ECON E104. Economic analysis of cities and regions.
Growth and structure of cities. Location decisions by
businesses. Topics such as transportation, housing, local
public services, poverty, and pollution.
ECON-E 330 International Finance (3 cr.) P: ECON-E
103, ECON-E 104 Theory and determination of foreign
exchange rates, mechanisms of adjustment to balance
of payments disturbance, fixed versus flexible exchange
rates. Monetary aspects of the adjustment mechanism.
International mobility of short-term capital. International
reserve supply mechanism and proposals for reform of the
international monetary system.
ECON-E 330 International Finance (3 cr.) P: ECON
E103, ECON E104. Theory and determination of foreign
exchange rates, mechanisms of adjustment to balance
of payments disturbance, fixed versus flexible exchange
rates. Monetary aspects of the adjustment mechanism.
International mobility of short-term capital. International
reserve supply mechanism and proposals for reform of the
international monetary system.
ECON-E 340 Introduction to Labor Economics (3 cr.)
P: ECON-E 103, ECON-E 104 Economic problems of
the wage earner in modern society; structure, policies,
and problems of labor organization; employer and
governmental policies affecting labor relations.
ECON-E 340 Introduction to Labor Economics (3 cr.)
P: ECON E103, ECON E104. Economic problems of
the wage earner in modern society; structure, policies,
and problems of labor organization; employer and
governmental policies affecting labor relations.
ECON-E 350 Money and Banking (3 cr.) P: ECON-E
103, ECON-E 104 Monetary and banking system of the
United States, including problems of money and prices,
proper organization, functioning of commercial banking
and Federal Reserve systems, monetary standards, and
credit control. Recent monetary and banking trends.
(Occasionally)
ECON-E 350 Money and Banking (3 cr.) P: ECON
E103, ECON E104. Monetary and banking system of the
United States, including problems of money and prices,
Full Course List
proper organization, functioning of commercial banking
and Federal Reserve systems, monetary standards, and
credit control. Recent monetary and banking trends.
(Occasionally)
ECON-E 360 Public Finance: Survey (3 cr.) P: ECON-E
103, ECON-E 104 Major elements of taxation and public
expenditures.
ECON-E 360 Public Finance: Survey (3 cr.) P: ECON
E103, ECON E104. Major elements of taxation and public
expenditures.
ECON-E 406 Advanced Undergraduate Seminar in
Economics (2-4 cr.) Open to juniors and seniors only by
special permission; preference given to superior students.
Discussion of contemporary economic problems. Tutorial
sections limited to 12 students each.
ECON-E 406 Advanced Undergraduate Seminar in
Economics (2-4 cr.) Open to juniors and seniors only by
special permission; preference given to superior students.
Discussion of contemporary economic problems. Tutorial
sections limited to 12 students each.
ECON-E 408 Undergraduate Readings in Economics
(1-3 cr.) P: consent of instructor and dean two weeks
prior to enrollment Individual readings and research.
Restricted to junior and senior business majors or majors
in economics.
ECON-E 408 Undergraduate Readings in Economics
(3 cr.) P: consent of instructor and dean two weeks
prior to enrollment. Individual readings and research.
Restricted to junior and senior business majors or majors
in economics.
ECON-E 430 International Economics (3 cr.) P: BUSG 300 or ECON-E 321 or consent of instructor Gains from
trade, relation between factor rentals and goods prices,
distributional effects of trade, tariff policy and quantitative
interferences, trade problems of developing countries,
discrimination and customs unions, balance-of-payments
adjustment via prices and incomes, exchange rate policy,
role of international reserves.
ECON-E 430 International Economics (3 cr.) P: BUS
G300 or ECON E321 or consent of instructor. Gains from
trade, relation between factor rentals and goods prices,
distributional effects of trade, tariff policy and quantitative
interferences, trade problems of developing countries,
discrimination and customs unions, balance-of-payments
adjustment via prices and incomes, exchange rate policy,
role of international reserves.
ECON-E 445 Collective Bargaining: Practice and
Problems (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 340 or consent of
instructor Economic analysis of problems resulting from
legislative and judicial efforts to determine rights, duties,
and responsibilities of labor unions and employers.
Development and current position of public policy in labor
relations.
ECON-E 445 Collective Bargaining: Practice
and Problems (3 cr.) P: ECON E340 or consent of
instructor. Economic analysis of problems resulting
from legislative and judicial efforts to determine rights,
duties, and responsibilities of labor unions and employers.
Development and current position of public policy in labor
relations.
167
ECON-E 446 Public Policy in Labor Relations (3 cr.)
P: ECON-E 340 or consent of instructor Current labor
relations law as contained in the Wagner, Taft-Hartley,
and Landrum-Griffin Acts; National Labor Relations Board
and court decisions.
ECON-E 446 Public Policy in Labor Relations (3 cr.)
P: ECON E340 or consent of instructor. Current labor
relations law as contained in the Wagner, Taft-Hartley,
and Landrum-Griffin Acts; National Labor Relations Board
and court decisions.
ECON-E 447 Economics of the Labor Market
(3 cr.) P: ECON-E 103, ECON-E 104 Analysis of the
functioning of the U.S. labor market. Labor force concepts,
unemployment, mobility, wages, and current manpower
problems and policies. Analysis of wage determination,
wage policy, and their interaction with institutional factors.
ECON-E 447 Economics of the Labor Market (3 cr.)
P: ECON E103, ECON E104.
Analysis of the functioning of the U.S. labor market. Labor
force concepts, unemployment, mobility, wages, and
current manpower problems and policies. Analysis of
wage determination, wage policy, and their interaction with
institutional factors.
EDUC-A 500 School Administration (3 cr.) Organization
and structure of the school system, legal basis of school
administration, agencies of administration and control,
and standards for administration in the various functional
areas. (Summer I)
EDUC-A 510 School/Community Relations (3 cr.) For
teachers and school administrators. Characteristics of the
community school, including the multicultural quality of the
community; adapting the education program to community
needs; use of community resources in instruction;
planning school-community relations programs. (Summer
I)
EDUC-A 512 Curriculum for K-12 Educational Leaders
(3 cr.) For future educational leaders, but appropriate for
all educators; provides an overview of the K-12 curriculum;
explores principles of curriculum development, design,
and evaluation; and examines forces that influence
curricular change.
EDUC-A 530 Statistical Data for Educational Leaders
(3 cr.) This course provides experiences in administering,
analyzing, and evaluating standardized tests and their
results. Emphasis will be placed on how to provide
leadership in using test data to improve classroom
instruction.
EDUC-A 540 Elementary and Secondary
Administration (3 cr.) This course focuses on the role
of the building principal as a professional leader in the
development and operation of schools.
EDUC-A 608 Legal Perspectives on Education (3 cr.)
Overview of the legal framework affecting the organization
and administration of public schools, including churchstate issues, pupils' rights, staff- student relationships,
conditions of employment, teacher organizations, tort
liability, school finance, and desegregation. (Summer II)
EDUC-A 670 Topical Seminar in Educational
Leadership (3 cr.) Advanced students investigate and
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Full Course List
discuss current issues, developments, and concerns
bearing on educational leadership.
EDUC-A 675 Leadership in Special Education (3 cr.)
The purpose of this course is to provide pre-service school
principals a general understanding of the educational
entitlement and civil rights of children with disabilities, take
an in-depth look at IDEA, examine specific exceptionalities
and their educational implications, and examine the
process of cultivating and retaining teachers of the
exceptional student. Laws ensuring the provision of
special education to students with disabilities are based
on constitutional principles, written and enacted by
legislatures and administrative agencies, and interpreted
by the courts. It is through the interaction of these various
components of the legal system, legislative and judicial,
that the field of special education has evolved. The
knowledge and skills gained in this course shape the
advocacy and ethical dispositions of the building principal.
EDUC-A 695 Practicum in School Administration
(3 cr.) Provides for closely supervised field experience in
various areas of school administration. (Fall, Spring)
EDUC-E 317 Practicum in Early Childhood Education
(4 cr.) P: admission to the Teacher Education Program
and EDUC-E 335 Methods and materials used in the
education of children from three to six years of age.
Observation and participation. Grades: S or F. (As
requested)
EDUC-E 325 Social Studies in the Elementary Schools
(3 cr.) P: admission to the Teacher Education Program
and appropriate arts and sciences prerequisites Explores
the sociological background of education and surveys
subject matter, materials, and methods in the content
area. (Fall, Spring)
EDUC-E 328 Science in the Elementary Schools
(3 cr.) P: admission to the Teacher Education Program
and appropriate arts and sciences prerequisites The
focus is on developing teacher competencies in writing
performance objectives, question asking, evaluation, and
sequencing. Those competencies will reveal themselves
in the preparation and development of science activities
and the teaching strategies involved in presenting those
activities to elementary school children. (Fall, Spring)
EDUC-E 339 Methods of Teaching Language Arts
(3 cr.) P: admission to the Teacher Education Program
and appropriate arts and sciences prerequisites Describes
and appraises the materials, methods, and techniques
employed for schoolchildren from early childhood through
early adolescence in the language arts program. (Fall,
Spring)
EDUC-E 340 Methods of Teaching Reading I (3 cr.)
P: admission to the Teacher Education Program and
EDUC-E 339 Examines the basis of, describes, and
appraises the methods and techniques employed in
developmental reading programs for school children from
early childhood through early adolescence. (Fall, Spring)
EDUC-E 341 Methods of Teaching Reading II (3 cr.)
P: admission to the Teacher Education Program, EDUC-E
339, EDUC-E 340 Describes and appraises the methods,
materials, and techniques employed in reading diagnosis
and prescription for children from early childhood through
early adolescence. (Fall, Spring)
EDUC-E 343 Mathematics in the Elementary School
(3 cr.) P: admission to the Teacher Education Program
and successful completion of MATH-T 101 and MATHT 102, Completion of MATH-T 103 is recommended
Emphasis on the developmental nature of the arithmetic
process and its place as an effective tool in the
experiences of the elementary school child. (Fall, Spring)
EDUC-E 505 Organization and Administration of
Early Childhood Program (3 cr.) P: One course in early
childhood education or consent of instructor. The study of
different organizational plans for early childhood programs
from infancy through age eight. Includes discussion of
school philosophy, goals, curriculum, housing, staffing,
budget policies for admission, grouping, health, licensing
requirements, and school-community relations. (Fall)
EDUC-E 506 Curriculum in Early Childhood Program
(3 cr.) Education and guidance of children two to six years
of age in the home, nursery school, and kindergarten.
Observation, reading, and discussion.
EDUC-E 518 Workshop in General Elementary
Education (credit arranged cr.) Individual and group
study of problems within the field ofelementary education.
One credit hour is offered for each week of full-time work.
Grades S or F. (As needed)
EDUC-E 535 Elementary School Curriculum (3 cr.)
Social, economic, and educational forces influencing
changes in the curriculum of the elementary school;
observation and study of the curriculum of the elementary
school and methods of evaluating it. (Summer II)
EDUC-E 536 Supervision of Elementary School
Instruction (3 cr.)
Modern concepts of supervision and the evaluation
processes through which they have emerged. Supervisory
work of the principal and supervisor or consultant. Study of
group processes in a democratic school system. (Spring)
EDUC-F 200 Examining Self as a Teacher (3 cr.)
Designed to help a student make a career decision, better
conceptualize the kind of teacher the student wishes to
become, and reconcile any preliminary concerns that may
be hampering a personal examination of self as teacher.
Student will design a major portion of the work (Fall,
Spring, Summer II).
EDUC-F 401 Topical Explorations in Education (3 cr.)
P: MATH-T 101 Help pre-service teachers develop an
understanding of mathematics content and pedagogy
relevant to be a successful elementary school teacher.
Focus is on content and methods that are consistent with
recent recommendations about mathematics learning and
teaching and the state of Indiana Academic Standards.
EDUC-H 340 Education and the American Culture
(3 cr.) The present educational system, its social impact
and future implications viewed in historical, philosophical,
and sociological perspectives. Special attention is given
to minorities and the ethnic and cultural dimensions of the
educational system. (Fall, Spring)
EDUC-H 520 Education and Social Issues (3 cr.)
Identification and analysis of major problems in education
and the pluralistic nature of American society. (Fall,
Summer I)
Full Course List
EDUC-H 637 Topical Seminar (3 cr.) Critical examination
of a problem area in history of education or comparative
education that has been extensively studied by the
instructor. Includes discussions of how issues of race,
class, and gender affect the education of students in
the past and present. Analyzes the political, economic,
and social relations in the U.S. that led to changes in
perceptions of race, class, and gender. Discusses
multicultural and global perspectives on change that affect
education.
EDUC-K 205 Introduction to Exceptional Children
(3 cr.) An overview of the characteristics and identification
of exceptional children. The course presents the issues
in serving exceptional children as they participate in the
educational, recreational, and social aspects of their lives.
(Fall, Spring, Summer I)
EDUC-K 306 Teaching Students with Special Needs
in Secondary Classrooms (3 cr.) This course includes
an overview of the skills and knowledge necessary
for effective instruction of students with disabilities in
inclusive secondary programs. Course covers various
instructional strategies applicable to students with and
without disabilities. (Fall)
169
EDUC-K 495 Practicum in Special Education (3 cr.)
P: admission to the Teacher Education Program, EDUCK 205 and EDUC-K 370, and must be taken concurrently
with EDUC-K 352 and in the TAL program concurrently
with EDUC-E 328 and EDUC-E 341 Closely supervised
field experience in areas of MiMH / LD. (Fall, Spring)
EDUC-K 501 Adapting Computers for the Handicapped
(3 cr.) Provides background information and experiences
necessary to plan for and integrate special education
technology into the curriculum of special education
classrooms and for individuals with handicaps in the
mainstream situation: software/uses, integration/
implementation planning, IEP/ data management, adaptive
devices and funding. (Spring, Summer II)
EDUC-K 505 Introduction to Special Education for
Graduate Students (3 cr.) Basic special education
principles for graduate students with no previous course
work in special education. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
EDUC-K 520 Survey of Behavior Disorders (3 cr.)
An advanced survey of the literature related to
behaviorally disordered/emotionally disturbed children,
including historical information, theoretical approaches,
characteristics, and issues. (Fall)
EDUC-K 343 Education of the Socially and
Emotionally Disturbed (3 cr.) A survey of the literature
related to behavioral and emotional disturbances in
children, including historical information, theoretical
approaches, characteristics, and issues. (Fall, Spring)
EDUC-K 525 Survey of Mild Handicaps (3 cr.) An
advanced survey of the literature relating to mild
disabilities, including historical foundations, definitions,
and current issues facing workers in the field.
EDUC-K 344 Education of the Socially and
Emotionally Disturbed II (3 cr.) P: EDUC-K 205 A survey
of educational curricula, procedures, and materials for
children who are socially and emotionally disturbed.
Development of teaching skills is emphasized. (Fall,
Spring)
EDUC-K 535 Assessment/Remediation of Mildly
Handicapped I (3 cr.) Emphasizes the collection and
use of formal and informal assessment information for
designing the content of individual educational plans for
handicapped children in such academic areas as reading
and mathematics. (Spring)
EDUC-K 352 Education of Children with Learning
Problems (3 cr.) P: admission to the Teacher Education
Program, EDUC-K 205, EDUC-K 370 Educational
programs for optimum growth and development of
educable mentally retarded and learning disabled children.
Study and observation of curriculum content, organization
of special schools and classes, and teaching methods
and materials. (Course also includes knowledge of
techniques in behavioral control, how to develop and
implement prescriptive programs based on diagnostic
findings, awareness of referral agencies available for aid
to students with learning disabilities.) (Fall, Spring)
EDUC-K 536 Assessment/Remediation of Mildly
Handicapped II (3 cr.) Focuses on the analysis and
selection of instructional materials, use of assessment
information, and development and implementation of
individual educational plans for mildly handicapped
children. (Summer I)
EDUC-K 370 Introduction to Learning Disabilities
(3 cr.) P: admission to the Teacher Education Program,
EDUC-K 205 Survey of historical development and current
status of definitions, classifications, assessment, and
treatment procedures for learning disabled students.
(Course also includes discussion of Article 7 requirements
for identification of learning disability in Indiana public
schools.) (Fall, Spring)
EDUC-K 555 Variable Title: Reading Assessment and
Instruction for Special Education (3 cr.) Investigates
methods employed in reading diagnosis and prescription
for students with special needs.
EDUC-K 480 Student Teaching Special Education
(6 cr.) P: admission to the Teacher Education Program,
Completion of all minor requirements Provides experience
for each student in the respective area of exceptionality
under the direction of a supervising teacher in an
educational school setting. (Fall, Spring)
EDUC-K 543 Education of the Socially and
Emotionally Disturbed I (3 cr.) A basic survey of the
field of emotional disturbance and social maladjustment.
Definitions, classifications, and characteristics: diagnostic
and treatment procedures from a psychoeducational point
of view. (Fall—odd years)
EDUC-K 595 Practicum in Special Education (3 cr.)
P: All checkpoint three criteria must be met. Closely
supervised field experience in areas of Mild Interventions.
This course is intended to provide practical application of
content taught throughout the mild interventions licensure
program.
EDUC-L 517 Advanced Study of Content Reading and
Literacy (2-3 cr.)
EDUC-M 201 Field Experience (1 cr.) Students observe
and participate in the use of methods and materials of
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elementary schools and reflect on how they relate to
classroom management. (Fall, Spring)
EDUC-M 301 Field Experience (3 cr.) Students observe
and participate in the use of methods and materials of
elementary schools and reflect on how they relate to
classroom management. (Fall, Spring)
EDUC-M 304 Field Experience (3 cr.) Students observe
and participate in the use of methods and materials of
elementary schools and reflect on how they relate to the
diversity of learners. (Fall, Spring)
EDUC-M 310 General Methods (3 cr.) P: admission
to the Teacher Education Program An introduction to
instructional design, media, and methodology appropriate
to all teaching levels. Provides an orientation to classroom
management, legal rights and responsibilities of students
and teachers, disability awareness, human relations skills,
and other general methods concerns. (Fall, Spring)
EDUC-M 314 General Methods: Senior High / Junior
High / Middle School Teachers (3 cr.) P: admission to
the Teacher Education Program General methodology
and organization and knowledge about the teaching
process, including general methods, instructional media,
measurement, curriculum development, organization
of the senior high / junior high / middle school, and
techniques to promote individualized and interdisciplinary
learning. (Fall)
EDUC-M 323 The Teaching of Music in the Elementary
Schools (2 cr.) P: admission to the Teacher Education
Program, Not open to music majors Fundamental
procedures of teaching elementary school music,
stressing music materials suitable for the first six grades.
(Fall, Summer I)
EDUC-M 330 Foundations of Art Education and
Methods I (3 cr.) Learning to teach art at the middle
school level. (Spring)
EDUC-M 333 Art Experiences for the Elementary
Teacher (2 cr.) P: admission to the Teacher Education
Program The selection, organization, and guidance
and evaluation of art activities, individual and group.
Laboratory experiences with materials and methods of
presenting projects. (Fall, Summer I)
EDUC-M 425 Student Teaching in the Elementary
School (3-16 cr.) P: entrance to the Student Teaching
Program Classroom teaching and other activities
associated with the work of the full-time elementary
classroom teacher. (Fall, Spring)
EDUC-M 430 Foundations of Art Education and
Methods II (3 cr.) Learning to teach art at the high school
level. (Fall)
EDUC-M 437 Teaching Science 5-12 (1-3 cr.) Focus
on curriculum decisions teachers make every day.
Specifically, students in this course will examine current
learning theories and apply these theories to instructional
practices at the middle grades and high school. (Spring)
EDUC-M 441 Methods of Teaching Senior High /
Junior High / Middle School Social Studies (3 cr.)
P: admission to the Teacher Education Program Develops
concepts and theories from social science, humanities,
and education into practice of successful social studies
instruction. Integrates social issues and reflective thinking
skills into the social studies curriculum. Emphasis on
curriculum development skills and repertoire of teaching
strategies appropriate for learners. (Spring)
EDUC-M 446 Methods of Teaching Senior High /
Junior High / Middle School Science (3 cr.)
P: admission to the Teacher Education Program Designed
for students who plan to teach biology, chemistry, earth /
space science, general science, or physical science in the
senior high / junior high / middle school. (Fall)
EDUC-M 452 Methods of Teaching Senior High /
Junior High / Middle School English (3 cr.)
P: admission to the Teacher Education Program Methods,
techniques, content, and materials applicable to the
teaching of English in the senior high / junior high / middle
school. (Spring)
EDUC-M 457 Methods of Teaching Senior High /
Junior High / Middle School Mathematics (3 cr.)
P: admission to the Teacher Education Program Study
of methodology, heuristics of problem solving, curriculum
design, application of instructional computing, professional
affiliations, and teaching of daily lessons as related to
instructional units appropriate for the senior high / junior
high / middle school mathematics classroom. (Spring)
EDUC-M 459 Teaching Mathematics 5-12 (1-3 cr.) This
course will focus on the curriculum and instruction issues
that teachers face every day in the classroom. Specifically,
students in the course will examine current theories and
apply these theories to instructional practices. (Fall)
EDUC-M 464 Methods of Teaching Reading (3 cr.)
P: admission to the Teacher Education Program Focuses
on the senior high / junior high / middle school curriculum,
methods and materials for teaching students to read more
effectively (with emphasis on description and appraisal
of methods), and materials and techniques used in
developmental reading programs. (Spring)
EDUC-M 469 Content Area Literacy (1-3 cr.) Focuses
on middle, junior, and senior high school. Curriculum,
methods and materials for teaching students to read and
learn more effectively in all content areas. (Fall)
EDUC-M 480 Student Teaching in the Secondary
School (3-16 cr.) P: entrance to the Student Teaching
Program Students assume, under the direction of the
supervising teacher, responsibility for teaching in their own
subject-matter area in a public school in the state. (Fall,
Spring)
EDUC-M 483 Teaching Social Studies 5-12 (1-3 cr.)
Historical and contemporary roles of social studies
will be explored with an emphasis on roles played by
history, the social sciences, and the humanities. Particular
attention is given to development of skills essential to
successful social studies instruction and a resource bank
of instructional ideas. (Fall)
EDUC-M 501 Laboratory/Field Experience (3 cr.) Field
Experience: Emotional Disabilities. Supervised field
experience in area of emotional disabilities. M501 must
be taken concerrently with K543. This course is intended
to provide practical application of content covered in K543
Education of the Socially and Emotionally Disturbed.
EDUC-M 501 Laboratory/Field Experience (3 cr.)
Field Experience: Mild Disabilities. Supervised field
Full Course List
experience in area of mild disabilities. M501 must be
taken concurrently with K535. This course is intended to
provide practical application of content covered in K535
Assessment/Remediation of Mildly Handicapped I.
EDUC-M 501 Laboratory/Field Experience (3 cr.)
Field Experience in Urban Classrooms. Supervised field
experience in urban education. This course is designed
to acquaint students with concepts and practices that are
appropriate for successful urban teaching. The course
will focus on Critical pedagogy in theory and practice.
The seminar will accompany the hours spent in an
urban secondary school. it is the intent of this course to
integrate urban strategies with content methods.
EDUC-M 550 Practicum (3 cr.) Teaching or experience
in an accredited school, usually in Indiana. (S/F graded.)
(Fall, Spring)
EDUC-P 250 Educational Psychology (3 cr.) The study
and application of psychological concepts and principles
as related to the teaching-learning process. Topics
covered include educational research methods, cognitive
and language development; personal, social, and moral
development; behavioral learning; motivation; effective
teaching; and measurement and evaluation. (Fall, Spring)
EDUC-P 345 Academic/Behavioral Assessment of the
Mildly Handicapped Child (3 cr.) Instruments used to
assess intellectual, educational, and social comptencies of
exceptional children. (Fall, Spring)
EDUC-P 407 Psychological Measurement in the
Schools (3 cr.) P: admission to the Teacher Education
Program Application and measurement principles of
classroom testing, construction, and evaluation of
classroom tests; evaluation of student performance;
interpretation and use of measurement data; assessment
of aptitudes, achievement, and interests via standardized
tests; school testing programs. (Fall, Spring, Summer II)
EDUC-P 507 Testing in the Classroom (3 cr.)
Construction of classroom tests and other evaluation
devices. Teacher's use of standardized tests. Designated
for master's-level teacher-training students who had no
undergraduate course in measurement. (Spring, Summer
II)
EDUC-P 508 Practicum in Measurement (1-6 cr.)
P: EDUC P507. Gives experience in constructing
and analyzing teacher-made tests and administering,
analyzing, and evaluating standardized tests. Emphasis is
on group and individual tests that do not require extensive
training in administration and analysis. (Indiana University
Northwest will offer EDUC P508 as a 3 credit hour
course.) (Spring, Summer II)
EDUC-P 510 Psychology in Teaching (3 cr.) Basic study
of psychological concepts and phenomena in teaching.
An analysis of representative problems of the teacher's
assumptions about human behavior and its development.
(Summer II)
EDUC-P 514 Life Span Development: Birth to Death
(3 cr.) A survey course of human development from
infancy through old age emphasizing the life span
perspective of development. Classical stage theorists,
current popular conceptions, major research findings, and
educational implications for all life stages fro birth to death.
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EDUC-P 519 Psychoeducational Assessment of
Exceptional Children (3 cr.) P: EDUC P518 or consent
of instructor. Instruments used to assess intellectual,
educational, and social competencies of exceptional
children. Additional credit for supervised practice
in administering those tests to children with visual
or acoustical handicaps, cerebral palsy, language
impairment, or mental retardation. Must be taken
concurrently with EDUC M501. (Summer II)
EDUC-P 570 Managing Classroom Behavior (3 cr.)
An analysis of pupil and teacher behaviors as they relate
to discipline. Attention is given to the development of
such skills as dealing with pupil’s problems and feelings,
behavior modification, reality therapy, assertiveness in
establishing and maintaining rules and group processes.
Designed for teachers, administrators and pupil personnel
workers. (Summer II)
EDUC-Q 200 Introduction to Scientific Inquiry (3 cr.)
This course provides education majors an opportunity to
think and explore science through active participation.
Students will plan investigations and formulate working
explanations using questions, data, claims, and evidence
based on their own experiences and appropriate
resources. The course emphasizes developing
the practice of critical thinking and argument-based
science inquiry.
EDUC-S 490 Research in Secondary Education
(arr cr.) Individual research. Consent of instructor required
prior to enrollment.
EDUC-S 503 High School Curriculum (3 cr.) Designed
to provide an overview for the teacher of the basic theories
underlying the secondary school curriculum as well as
an examination of the subject areas, problems, trends,
challenges for the future, and significant research in the
field. (Spring, Summer I)
EDUC-S 508 Problems in Secondary Education (3 cr.)
Analysis of a common problem in the field of secondary
education. (Fall, Spring)
EDUC-S 510 Development of Secondary School
Programming (3 cr.) This course is designed to acquaint
you with appropriate methods and materials for successful
teaching in secondary urban classrooms, covering
grades 5-12. The course will include an overview of the
latest research and practice related to urban teaching.
Their implications for planning, delivering and assessing
instruction will be discussed. EDUC-S 510 will acquaint
the student with both the philosophies and practices
associated with teaching in the urban environment.
EDUC-S 512 Workshop in Secondary Education
(1-6 cr.) Individual and group study of issues or concerns
relating to the field ofsecondary education (in workshop
format). Grades S or F. (As needed)
EDUC-S 517 (EDUC N517) Advanced Study in the
Teaching of Secondary School Mathematics (3 cr.) For
experienced mathematics teachers. Methods, materials,
literature; laboratory practice with mathematics equipment;
evaluation techniques; standards and determination of
essentials of content. Developing mathematics programs
for specific school situations. (Fall)
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EDUC-S 518 Advanced Study in the Teaching of
Secondary School Science (3 cr.) For science teachers.
Improved techniques, current literature, textbooks, and
free and low-cost materials. Solutions to specific practical
problems confronting science teachers in the classroom
and laboratory. (Spring)
EDUC-S 519 Advanced Study in the Teaching
of Secondary School Social Studies (3 cr.) For
experienced teachers. Restudying the purposes of high
school social studies, evaluating recent developments
in content and instructional procedures, and developing
social studies programs for specific school situations.
(Spring)
EDUC-S 655 Supervision of Secondary School
Instruction (3 cr.)
The roles and functions of supervisors, the modern
concept of supervision, techniques of supervision,
improvement of teaching procedures, and new trends in
the organization of instruction. (Fall, Spring)
EDUC-T 550 Cultural/Community Forces and the
Schools: (variable title) (3 cr.)
Promotes modification of instructional strategies within
diverse educational settings by providing opportunities to
analyze community forces and cultures through cultural
orientation workshops and seminars, culturally focused
readings, direct residential participation in communityrelated activities, and site-based culture/strategies reports.
(Summer I)
Credit does not apply toward a degree. (Fall, Spring,
Summer II)
EDUC-X 157 Strategies for Academic Success (3 cr.)
A course designed to increase student success in college
through the study of time management, learning styles,
test taking, note taking, and study techniques. Credit does
not apply toward a degree. (Fall, Spring, Summer II)
EDUC-X 400 Diagnostic Teaching of Reading in the
Classroom (3 cr.) P: admission to the Teacher Education
Program, EDUC-M 464, and EDUC-P 407 Describes
and appraises the methods, materials, and techniques
employed in diagnosis and prescription of reading
instruction in middle and high schools. (As needed)
EDUC-X 401 Critical Reading in the Content Areas
(3 cr.) P: admission to the Teacher Education Program
Aids elementary and secondary teachers in the
development of instructional strategies that assist students
in the comprehension, critical analysis, and integration of
ideas present in print material and various subject matter
areas. (As needed)
EDUC-X 425 Practicum in Reading (3 cr.) P: admission
to the Teacher Education Program, EDUC-X 400 and
EDUC-M 464 or EDUC-E 340 and EDUC-E 341 or
consent of instructor Students work in selected elementary
and secondary classrooms diagnosing and assisting
pupils in the area of reading. This experience will always
include a series of seminars in conjunction with the field
placement. Grades S or F. (As needed)
EDUC-W 200 Microcomputing for Education:
An Introduction (3 cr.) Introduction to instructional
computing, educational computing literature, and BASIC
programming. Review of and hands-on experience with
educational software packages and commonly used
microcomputer hardware. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
EDUC-X 460 Books for Reading Instruction (3 cr.)
P: admission to the Teacher Education Program, EDUCM 464 or EDUC-E 340 or consent of instructor Examines
the use of children's literature, trade books, and other
nontext materials in reading instruction. Contemporary and
historical selections for children and adolescents included.
(As needed)
EDUC-W 505 Professional Development Workshop
(3 cr.) Master's Capstone Seminar. This seminar
is designed as a capstone experience in which
candidates will select artifacts and develop rationales for
teaching decisions. Through the portfolio, students will
demonstrate their knowledge and skills related to the Lead
Teacher conceptual framework. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
EDUC-X 470 Psycholinguistics of Reading (3 cr.)
P: admission to the Teacher Education Program Explores
the linguistic and cognitive dimensions of language.
Discusses relationships among the systems of language
and among the various expressions of language. Always
includes topics on semantics, grammar, and dialect.
(Spring)
EDUC-W 531 Computers in Education (3 cr.)
Introduction to instructional computing, educational
computing literature, and BASIC programming. Review
of and hands-on experience with educational software
packages and commonly used microcomputer hardware.
(Fall, Spring)
EDUC-X 151 Reading / Learning Techniques II (3 cr.)
Develops higher levels of learning skills with instruction
and practice in critical reading and listening and test-taking
techniques. Students are required to spend at least two
hours per week in the Reading Laboratory. Credit does not
apply toward a degree. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
EDUC-X 155 Critical Reading and Research
Seminar (3 cr.) A course which helps students gain
a better understanding of how people think and learn,
accomplished through processes such as self- reflection
and discovery, critical thinking, and reading analysis.
EDUC-X 490 Research in Reading (arr cr.) Individual
research dealing with diagnosis of reading difficulty and
solutions and problems through research, conferences,
and practice in the use of materials and equipment.
Grades S or F. (As needed)
EDUC-X 501 Critical Reading in Content Areas (3 cr.)
Aids elementary and secondary teachers in the
development of instructional strategies, which assist
students in the comprehension, critical analysis, and
integration of ideas present in print material and various
subject matter areas. (Summer I)
EDUC-X 502 Psycholinguistics of Reading (3 cr.)
EDUC X502 Psycholinguistics of Reading (3 cr.) Explores
the linguistics and cognitive dimensions of language.
Discusses relationships among the systems of language
and among the various expressions of language. Always
Full Course List
173
includes topics on semantics, grammar, and dialect.
(Summer II)
ENG-G 552 Linguistics and the Teaching of English
(4 cr.) Topics in applied English linguistics, intended for
English teachers at all levels. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
EDUC-X 502 Practicum in Reading (1-4 cr.)
P: Education EDUC E545 or EDUC 5514, EDUC X504, or
consent of instructor.
Diagnostic testing, remedial classroom teaching, compiling
clinical records, and reporting to academic counselors.
Grades S or F. (Spring)
ENG-L 101 Western World Masterpieces I (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131 or equivalent Literary masterpieces from
Homer to the Renaissance. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
EDUC-X 503 Books for Reading Instruction (3 cr.)
Examines the use of children's literature, trade books,
and other nontext materials in reading instruction.
Contemporary and historical selections for children and
adolescents included. (Summer II)
ENG-L 201 Special Studies in Literature (3 cr.)
Reading of literary works in relation to special themes.
May be repeated once for credit with a change in topic.
(Occasionally)
EDUC-X 504 Diagnosis and Correction of Reading
Difficulties in the Classroom (3 cr.) P: EDUC E545 and
EDUC P507.
Treats the theory; correlates instruments and techniques
of diagnosing reading difficulties in the classroom. (Fall)
EDUC-X 530 Topical Workshop in Reading (variable
title) (1-3 cr.) P: Instructor's permission.
Individual and group study of special topics in the field
of reading. Means for improving the teaching of reading.
One (1) credit hour offered for each week of full-time work.
Grades S or F. (Summer I)
EDUC-X 590 Research in Reading (1-6 cr.) Consent of
instructor required prior to enrollment. Grades S or F. (As
needed)
EDUC-X 590 Master's Thesis in Education (3 cr.)
The thesis may be an organized scientific study or a
systematic and comprehensive analysis of theory and
practice in a specific area. (Fall, Spring, Summer I,
Summer II)
EDUC-Y 520 Strategies for Educational Inquiry (3 cr.)
Introductory course intended to orient beginning graduate
students to the conduct of social science inquiry in general
and educational inquiry in particular and to acquaint them
with key terms and generally accepted procedures in
qualitative and quantitative inquiry. (Fall, Spring, Summer
II)
ENG-G 205 Introduction to the English Language
(3 cr.) Acquaints the student with contemporary studies
of the nature of language in general and of the English
language in particular. Required of students preparing
to teach English in secondary schools. Does not count
toward group distribution requirements. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-G 207 Grammar and Usage (3 cr.) Provides
students with a foundation in traditional grammar and
usage. Intended primarily for students preparing to teach
English in secondary schools. Does not count toward
group distribution requirements. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
ENG-G 500 Introduction to the English Language
(4 cr.) An introduction to the English language: its nature,
structure, and development. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-L 102 Western World Masterpieces II (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131 or equivalent Literary masterpieces from
the Renaissance to the present. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
ENG-L 202 Literary Interpretation (3 cr.) Development
of critical skills essential to participation in the
interpretation process. Through class discussion and
focused writing assignments, introduces the premises and
motives of literary analysis and critical methods associated
with historical, generic, and / or cultural concerns. May be
repeated once for credit by special arrangement with the
Department of English. Note: Students planning to transfer
to IU Bloomington should be aware that Advance College
Project (ACP) ENG-L 202 will neither count toward the
English major nor satisfy the intensive writing requirement
at IU Bloomington. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-L 203 Introduction to Drama (3 cr.) Representative
groups of significant plays to acquaint students with
characteristics of drama as a type of literature. (Fall or
Spring)
ENG-L 204 Introduction to Fiction (3 cr.) Representative
works of fiction: stresses structural technique in the novel,
theories and kinds of fiction, and thematic scope of the
novel. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-L 205 Introduction to Poetry (3 cr.) Kinds,
conventions, and elements of poetry in a selection of
poems from several historical periods. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-L 207 Women and Literature (3 cr.) Critical issues
and methods in the study of women writers and treatment
of women in British and American literature. (Fall or
Spring)
ENG-L 211 English Literature to 1700 (3 cr.)
Representative selections with emphasis on major writers
from Beowulf to 1700. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-L 212 English Literature since 1700 (3 cr.)
Representative selections with emphasis on major writers
from 1700 to the early twentieth century. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-L 295 American Film Culture (3 cr.) Film in relation
to American culture and society. Topic varies. Works
of literature may be used for comparison, but the main
emphasis will be on film as a narrative medium and as an
important element in American culture. (Occasionally)
ENG-L 305 Chaucer (3 cr.) Chaucer's works with special
emphasis on the Canterbury Tales. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-L 308 Elizabethan Drama and Its Background
(3 cr.) English drama from Middle Ages to 1642, including
principal Elizabethan, Jacobean, and Caroline dramatists.
(Occasionally)
174
Full Course List
ENG-L 311 Studies in Renaissance Literature (3 cr.)
Major Renaissance writers, with special attention to the
poetry. (Occasionally)
ENG-L 315 Major Plays of Shakespeare (3 cr.) A close
reading of a representative selection of Shakespeare's
major plays. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-L 326 Major Authors of the Eighteenth Century
(3 cr.) Representative selections from the works of writers
such as Dryden, Swift, Pope, and Johnson. (Occasionally)
ENG-L 332 Romantic Literature (3 cr.) Major
Romantic writers, with emphasis on the following: Blake,
Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats. (Fall or
Spring)
ENG-L 335 Victorian Literature (3 cr.) Major poetry
and prose, 1839-1900, studied against the social and
intellectual background of the period. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-L 345 Twentieth - Century British Poetry (3 cr.)
Modern poets, particularly Yeats, Eliot, and Auden; some
later poets may be included. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-L 346 Twentieth - Century British Fiction
(3 cr.) Modern fiction, its techniques and experiments,
particularly Joyce, Lawrence, and Woolf; some later
novelists may be included. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-L 347 British Fiction to 1800 (3 cr.) Forms,
techniques, and theories of fiction as exemplified by such
authors as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, and
Sterne. (Occasionally)
ENG-L 348 Nineteenth - Century British Fiction (3 cr.)
Forms, techniques, and theories of fiction as exemplified
by such romantic and Victorian authors as Scott, Dickens,
Eliot, and Hardy. (Occasionally)
ENG-L 351 American Literature 1800 - 1865 (3 cr.)
American writers to 1865: Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville,
Whitman, and two or three additional major writers. (Fall or
Spring)
ENG-L 352 American Literature 1865 - 1914 (3 cr.)
American writers, 1865 - 1914: Mark Twain, Dickinson,
James, and two or three additional major writers. (Fall or
Spring)
ENG-L 354 American Literature since 1914 (3 cr.)
American writers since 1914: Faulkner, Hemingway, Eliot,
Frost, and two or three additional major writers. (Fall or
Spring)
areas, with particular attention to the image of the Indian.
(Occasionally)
ENG-L 365 Modern Drama: Continental (3 cr.)
Special attention to such dramatists as Ibsen, Chekhov,
Hauptmann, Pirandello, Brecht, and Sartre. (Occasionally)
ENG-L 366 Modern Drama: English, Irish, and
American (3 cr.) Special attention to such dramatists
as Shaw, Synge, O'Neill, Hellman, Williams, Miller, and
Albee. (Occasionally)
ENG-L 369 Studies in British and American Authors
(3 cr.) Studies in single authors (such as Wordsworth and
Melville), groups of authors (such as the Pre-Raphaelites),
and periods (such as American writers of the 1920s).
Topics will vary from semester to semester. May be
repeated once for credit. (Occasionally)
ENG-L 370 Recent Black American Writing (3 cr.)
A study of selected black American writers of the latenineteenth and twentieth centuries with emphasis on
very recent writing. The focus of this course will be on
the literary qualities unique to those writers as individuals
and as a group. Credit not given for both ENG-L 370 and
AFRO-A 370. (Occasionally)
ENG-L 381 Recent Writing (3 cr.) Study of selected
writers of contemporary significance. May include relevant
groups and movements (such as black writers, poets of
projective verse, new regionalists, parajournalists and
other experimenters in pop literature, folk writers, and
distinctively ethnic writers); several recent novelists, poets,
or critics; or any combination of groups. (Occasionally)
ENG-L 382 Fiction of the Non-Western World (3 cr.) Indepth study of selected narratives from the fiction of the
non-Western world. Focus and selections vary from year
to year. (Occasionally)
ENG-L 390 Children's Literature (3 cr.) Historical and
modern children's books and selections from books,
designed to assist future teachers, parents, librarians, or
others in selecting the best of children's literature for each
period of the child's life. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
ENG-L 391 Literature for Young Adults (3 cr.) Study of
books suitable for junior high and high school classroom
use. Special stress on works of fiction dealing with
contemporary problems, but also including modern
classics, biography, science fiction, and other areas of
interest to teenage readers.
ENG-L 355 American Fiction to 1900 (3 cr.)
Representative nineteenth - century American novels and
short fiction. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-L 440 Senior Seminar in English and American
Literature (3 cr.) Thorough study of one or more major
British and American writers or of a significant theme or
form in English and American literature. (Fall)
ENG-L 357 Twentieth - Century American Poetry (3 cr.)
American poetry since 1900, including such poets as
Pound, Eliot, Frost, Stevens,Williams, and Lowell. (Fall or
Spring)
ENG-L 495 Individual Reading in English (1-3 cr.)
P: consent of instructor and departmental chairperson May
be repeated once for credit. (Occasionally)
ENG-L 358 Twentieth - Century American Fiction
(3 cr.) American fiction since 1900, including such writers
as Dreiser, Lewis, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, and
Bellow. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-L 364 Native American Literature (3 cr.) A survey
of traditional and modern literature by American Indians,
especially of the high plains and Southwest culture
ENG-L 553 Studies in Literature (1-3 cr.) Especially for
secondary school teachers of English. Critical evaluation
of poems, short stories, a major novel, and some major
plays. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-L 612 Chaucer (4 cr.) Critical analysis of the
Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and selected
shorter poems. (Fall or Spring)
Full Course List
ENG-L 620 Studies in English Literature 1500-1660
(4 cr.) Intensive study of one writer, a group of writers, or
a theme or form significant to the period. May be repeated
once for credit. (Occasionally)
ENG-L 623 English Drama from the 1590s to 1800,
Exclusive of Shakespeare (4 cr.) P: familiarity with six
plays of Shakespeare. (Occasionally)
ENG-L 625 Shakespeare (4 cr.) Critical analysis of
selected texts. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-L 631 English Literature: 1660-1790 (4 cr.)
Extensive reading in poetry and nonfictional prose.
(Occasionally)
ENG-L 639 English Fiction to 1800 (4 cr.) (Occasionally)
ENG-L 642 Studies in Romantic Literature (4 cr.)
Study of one writer, a group of writers, or a theme or form
significant to the period. May be repeated once for credit.
(Occasionally)
ENG-L 645 English Fiction 1800-1900 (4 cr.)
(Occasionally)
ENG-L 647 Studies in Victorian Literature (4 cr.) Study
of one writer, a group of writers, or a theme or form
significant to the period. May be repeated once for credit.
(Fall or Spring)
ENG-L 649 British Literature since 1900 (4 cr.)
Extensive reading in all genres. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-L 653 American Literature, 1800-1900 (4 cr.)
Intensive historical and critical study of all genres from
Washington Irving through Frank Norris. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-L 655 American Literature since 1900 (4 cr.)
Intensive historical and critical study of all genres from
Theodore Dreiser to the present. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-L 660 Studies in British and American Literature,
1900 to the Present (4 cr.) Intensive study of one writer,
a group of writers, or a theme or form significant to the
period. May be repeated once for credit. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-L 666 Survey of Children's Literature (4 cr.) A
survey of literature written for children and adolescents
from the medieval period to the present. (Fall, Spring,
Summer I)
ENG-L 670 Continental Nineteenth Century Drama
(4 cr.) Focuses on such major European dramatists of the
19th and 20th Centuries as Ibsen, Strindberg, Checkhov,
Ionesco, and Beckett. (Occasionally)
ENG-L 672 Modern American Drama (4 cr.)
(Occasionally)
ENG-W 031 Precomposition (3 cr.) P: placement
Provides practice in the essential writing and
organizational skills needed for admission to ENG. With
emphasis on the essay, this course concentrates on
the writing skills needed for college credit courses. S / F
grading only; credit does not count toward any degree.
(Fall, Spring)
ENG-W 130 Principles of Composition (3 cr.)
Placement according to IU Northwest English Placement
Test. For students with significant writing problems
who need an intensive, two-semester freshman writing
experience. Practice in writing papers for a variety of
175
purposes and audiences. Attention to revision and to
sentence and paragraph structure. (Fall, Spring)
ENG-W 131 Elementary Composition I (3 cr.) Offers
instruction and practice in the reading and writing skills
required in college. Emphasis is on written assignments
that require synthesis, analysis, and argument based on
sources. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
ENG-W 132 Elementary Composition II (3 cr.) P: ENGW 131 Continuation of ENG-W 131, with emphasis on
writing from secondary sources: research, evaluating
evidence, and documentation. Does not count toward
group distribution requirements. (Fall, Spring)
ENG-W 231 Professional Writing Skills (3 cr.) P: ENGW 131 or equivalent To develop research and writing skills
requisite for most academic and professional activities.
Emphasis on methods of research, organization, and
writing techniques useful in preparing reviews, critical
bibliographies, research and technical reports, proposals,
and papers. Junior or senior standing recommended. (Fall,
Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
ENG-W 233 Intermediate Expository Writing (3 cr.)
This course is a logical extension of the rhetorical and
stylistic principles introduced in ENG-W 131. Emphasis
is on the writing process, modes of discourse reflective
of professional writing, and language conventions.
Does not count toward group distribution requirements.
(Occasionally)
ENG-W 301 Writing Fiction (3 cr.) May be repeated once
for credit. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-W 303 Writing Poetry (3 cr.) May be repeated once
for credit. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-W 311 Non-fiction Creative Wrting (3 cr.) May be
repeated once for credit. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-W 350 Advanced Expository Writing (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131 or equivalent Close examination of
assumptions, choices, and techniques that go into a
student's own writing and the writing of others. Does
not count toward group distribution requirements.
(Occasionally)
ENG-W 398 Internship in Writing (1-3 cr.) P: ENG-W
131 or equivalent Combine study of writing with practical
expertise in working with professionals in journalism,
business communication, or technical writing. Researched
reports are required. Evaluations made by both supervisor
and instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6
credits. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-W 553 Theory and Practice of Exposition (4 cr.)
Especially for secondary school teachers of English.
Writing analysis or exposition: resources of the writer's
"voice," of logical structure, and of language as instrument.
(Occasionally)
ENG-W 611 Writing Fiction I (4 cr.) May be repeated
once for credit. (Fall or Spring)
ENG-W 613 Writing Poetry I (4 cr.) Writing poetry. May
be repeated once for credit. (Fall or Spring)
FINA-A 101 Ancient and Medieval Art (3 cr.) A survey of
major styles and monuments in art and architecture from
prehistoric times to the end of the Middle Ages. (Fall)
176
Full Course List
FINA-A 102 Renaissance through Modern Art (3 cr.)
A survey of major artists, styles, and movements in
European and American art and architecture from the
fifteenth century to the present. (Spring)
FINA-A 160 Introduction to East Asian Art (3 cr.) An
introduction to the art of India, Southeast Asia, China,
Japan, and Korea. This course covers painting, sculpture,
architecture, and other arts identified with the Far East.
(Fall)
FINA-A 340 Topics in Modern Art (3 cr.) P: FINA-A 102
Topics rotate covering different aspects of the history and
study of modern art. May be repeated with a different topic
for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
FINA-A 341 Nineteenth-Century European Art
(3 cr.) P: FINA-A 102 Survey of major artists and styles
in painting and sculpture from circa 1770 to 1900,
emphasizing developments in France, England, and
Germany. Topics include neoclassicism, romanticism,
realism, impressionism, and postimpressionism. (Fall)
FINA-A 342 Twentieth-Century Art (3 cr.) P: FINA A102
Survey of major artists, styles, and movements in painting
and sculpture from 1900 to the present in Europe and
the United States. Topics include expressionism, cubism,
futurism, dada, surrealism, and abstraction. (Spring)
FINA-A 383 Contemporary Art (3 cr.) This course will
survey art from the 1970s to the present. Classroom
lectures, museum gallery visits will be a part of the course.
(Spring)
FINA-A 396 Foreign Study in History of Art (1-9 cr.)
Intended only for students participating in IU Overseas
Study Program; all fine arts majors are required to obtain
prior approval from undergraduate history of art advisor.
May be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours. (Occasionally
during Summer)
includes investigation of conventional and invented tools
and media. (Spring)
FINA-H 100 Introduction to Art History and Visual
Culture for Non-majors (3 cr.) Objectives: to acquaint
students with outstanding works of art and to provide an
approach to appreciation through knowledge of purpose,
techniques, form, and content. (Fall, Spring)
FINA-S 200 Drawing I (3 cr.) Preliminary course for
advancement in drawing, stressing visual awareness;
seeing, representing, and technical command on a twodimensional surface. Problems in handling placement,
scale, space, volume, light, and formal articulation. (Fall,
Spring)
FINA-S 230 Painting I (3 cr.) Preliminary course for
advancement in painting; exploring technical and visual
aspects of color media. Emphasis on media command
and structural problems in painting. Media: oil and acrylics.
(Fall, Spring)
FINA-S 240 Basic Printmaking Media (3 cr.) Introduction
to printmaking. Emphasis on relief. Problems in pictorial
composition and drawing stressed. (Fall, Spring)
FINA-S 250 Introduction to Design Practice (3 cr.)
P: CSCI-A 106. Visual communication emphasizing
the perceptive use of line, interval, proportion, color,
sequence, and grid systems. Basic tools and drawing
disciplines of graphic design. (Fall, Spring)
FINA-S 260 Ceramics I (3 cr.) A limited introduction to
handbuilding, throwing, glaze mixing, glaze application,
including a few lectures on basic ceramic techniques.
(Fall, Spring, Summer I)
FINA-S 270 Sculpture I (3 cr.) The study of the
relationships of volume and space through modeling,
carving, and construction. (Fall, Spring)
FINA-A 435 Art Theory—Seniors (2 cr.) P: two 100level Art History courses This course is designed to cover
broad-ranging concerns vital to the art major's continuing
career in graduate school and the professional art world.
Open to seniors only. (Fall)
FINA-S 291 Fundamentals of Photography (3 cr.) Basic
practice of camera operations; exposure calculation;
and exposing, printing, and enlarging monochrome
photographs. Guidance toward establishment of a
personal photographic aesthetic. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
FINA-A 495 Readings and Research in Art History
(1-4 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. This course is
reserved for students wishing to pursue undergraduate
research. Arrangements are made with faculty supervisor.
Individual study. May be repeated for a total of 8 credits.
FINA-S 301 Drawing II (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 200 or
consent of instructor. Intermediate course in drawing
from the model and other sources. Emphasis on
technical command of the media in conjunction with the
development of a visual awareness.Continued problems
in the articulation of space, scale, volume, and linear
sensitivity. May be repeated once. (Fall, Spring)
FINA-F 100 Fundamental Studio—Drawing (3 cr.)
Development of visual awareness and coordination of
perceptual and manual skills; seeing, representing, and
inventing on an experimental, exploratory level in two
dimensions. Includes placement, scale, volume, light,
formal articulation, and investigations of color theory.
(Spring)
FINA-S 331 Painting II (3 cr.) P: FINA S230 or consent of
instructor. Intermediate course in painting from the model
and other sources. Emphasis on technical command and
understanding of the components of painting space, color,
volume, value, and scale. Media: oil or acrylics. May be
repeated once. (Fall, Spring)
FINA-F 101 Fundamental Studio-3D (3 cr.) Volume,
space, material, and physical force studies provide the
basis for exploration of three-dimensional form; includes
carving, construction, modeling. (Fall)
FINA-S 337 Watercolor Painting I (3 cr.) An introduction
to watercolor working from still life, portrait, and figure,
stressing technical competence. (Occasionally)
FINA-F 102 Fundamental Studio-2D (3 cr.) Color, shape,
line, and value structures are studied as the basis for
exploration of two-dimensional spatial relationships;
FINA-S 338 Watercolor Painting II (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 337.
Further work in advancing technical skill in watercolor and
achieving stylistic individuality. May be repeated once
(Occasionally)
Full Course List
FINA-S 341 Printmaking II Intaglio (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 340
or consent of instructor. Advanced study with emphasis
on intaglio. Problems in pictorial composition and drawing
stressed. May be repeated once (Fall, Spring)
FINA-S 344 Printmaking II Silkscreen (3 cr.) P: FINAS 340. Advanced study with emphasis on silkscreen.
Problems in pictorial composition and drawing stressed.
May be repeated once. (Fall, Spring)
FINA-S 351 Typography 1 (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 250
or consent of instructor. Further studies in visual
communication concentrating on letter drawing, symbolic
drawing, and typographic exploration. Production
methods. (Fall, Spring)
FINA-S 352 Graphic Design III (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 351 or
consent of instructor. Advanced studies in visual problem
solving relating to the development of symbols and their
integration with typographic communication, photography,
and design-oriented drawing. (Fall, Spring)
FINA-S 353 Graphic Design IV (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 352
or consent of instructor. Using a variety of media to
communicate messages, students apply processes from
printing to multimedia as appropriate for directed projects.
(Fall, Spring)
FINA-S 361 Ceramics II (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 260 or consent
of instructor. Continued practice in forming and glazing
Lectures. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
FINA-S 371 Sculpture II (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 270 or consent
of instructor. Continuation of basic studies, using both
figurative (modeling from human figure in clay) and
abstract means (constructions in metal, wood, and
plaster). Concentration on manipulative and technical
skills and more complex materials. May be repeated
once. (Fall, Spring)
FINA-S 392 Intermediate Photography (3 cr.) P: FINAS 291 or consent of instructor. Practice of photography
applied to student's major study or area of special interest
in the humanities and social sciences. (Fall, Spring,
Summer I)
FINA-S 400 Independent Studio Projects (1-6 cr.)
P: FINA 300-level studio course. Designed for advanced
studio art students who want to work independently on
special studio projects under the guidance of a faculty
member or committee. This course work does not fulfill
a specific course requirement for fine arts major. It does
count within the 25-34 credit hour studio art limit. Students
must arrange a project with a faculty member who will
supervise and grade the work produced. One credit is
given for each three hours of work per week for the entire
semester. Repeatable up to 6 credits. (Fall, Spring,
Summer I, Summer II)
FINA-S 401 Drawing III (arr. cr.) P: junior/senior standing,
FINA-S 301. Advanced drawing. Continuation of FINA
S301. May be repeated up to a total of 20 credit hours.
(Fall, Spring)
FINA-S 413 Typography (2 cr.) P: FINA-S 351. Studies in
graphic design concentrating on typography as it relates to
other design elements in practical design application. (Fall,
Spring)
177
FINA-S 414 Layout and Design (2 cr.) P: FINA-S 351.
Students in graphic design concentrating on layout as it
relates to other publication design. (Fall, Spring)
FINA-S 415 Package Design (2 cr.) P: FINA-S 351.
Studies in graphic design concentrating on package
design. (Fall, Spring)
FINA-S 420 Topics in Studio Art (3 cr.) P: junior
standing or consent of instructor. May be repeated up
to a total of 20 credit hours. A multidisciplinary studio
course that explores topics through the use of a variety
of artistic approaches. Students will work in the media of
their choice. (Fall, Spring)
FINA-S 431 Painting III (arr. cr.) P: junior standing, FINAS 331. May be repeated up to a total of 20 credit hours.
Advanced course in painting. Continuation of FINA 5331.
(Fall, Spring)
FINA-S 438 Water Media (arr. cr.) P: FINA-S 338.
Experimentation with the various water media. With
source and nonsource. Maximum of 9 credit hours.
(Occasionally)
FINA-S 441 Printmaking III Intaglio (arr. cr.) P: junior/
senior standing, FINA-S 341 or consent of instructor. May
be repeated up to a total of 20 credit hours. Advanced
work in intaglio for qualified students. (Fall, Spring)
FINA-S 444 Printmaking III Silk Screen (arr. cr.)
P: FINA-S 344. May be repeated for a total of 20 credit
hours. Advanced work in silkscreen for qualified students.
(Fall, Spring)
FINA-S 447 Printmaking III (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 341 or
FINA-S 344. May be repeated for a total of 20 credit
hours. Advanced work in intaglio, lithography, or
serigraphy for qualified students. (Fall, Spring)
FINA-S 451 Graphic Design Problem Solving (arr. cr.)
P: FINA-S 352 and consent of instructor. May be repeated
for a total of 20 credit hours. Professional problem
solving in graphic design. Using a variety of media to
communicate messages, students apply processes from
printing to multimedia as appropriate for directed projects.
(Occasionally)
FINA-S 461 Ceramics III (arr. cr.) P: junior/senior
standing, FINA-S 361. May be repeated for a total of 20
credit hours. Further practice in ceramic studio techniques.
Body preparation. Lectures. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
FINA-S 471 Sculpture III (arr. cr.) P: junior/senior
standing. May be repeated for a total of 20 credit hours.
Concentration on construction, carving, welding, and
figure modeling. Concentration will be on foundry
techniques each spring semester. (Fall, Spring)
FINA-S 490 Advanced Photography I (arr. cr.) P: junior/
senior standing, FINA-S 392 or consent of instructor. May
be repeated for a total of 20 credit hours. (Fall, Spring,
Summer I)
FINA-S 491 Advanced Photography II (arr. cr.) P: junior/
senior standing, FINA-S 490 or consent of instructor. May
be repeated for a total of 20 credit hours. (Fall, Spring,
Summer I)
FINA-S 497 Independent Study in Fine Arts (1-6 cr.)
P: majors only, senior standing Creative projects and
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senior exhibition in the student's area of practice. Course
requires a section authorization form. (Fall, Spring)
(cultural or literary). All work in French. May be repeated
once for credit. (Occasionally)
FREN-F 100 Elementary French I (4 cr.) Introduction
to French language and selected aspects of French
civilization and culture. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
FREN-F 380 French Conversation (3 cr.) P: FREN
F250 or equivalent. For nonnative speakers of French.
Designed to develop conversational skills through reports,
debates, and group discussions with an emphasis on
vocabulary building, mastery of syntax, and general oral
expression. Both FREN F380 and FREN F480 may be
taken for credit. (Fall)
FREN-F 150 Elementary French II (4 cr.) P: FREN
F100 or equivalent Introduction to French language and
selected aspects of French civilization and culture. (Fall,
Spring, Summer II)
FREN-F 200 Second-Year French I: Language and
Culture (3 cr.) P: FREN F150 or equivalent. Grammar,
composition, conversation coordinated with the study of
cultural texts. (Fall, Spring)
FREN-F 250 Second-Year French II: Language and
Culture (3 cr.) P: FREN F200 or equivalent. Grammar,
composition, conversation coordinated with the study of
cultural texts. (Fall, Spring)
FREN-F 300 Lectures et analyses litteraires (3 cr.)
P: FREN F250. Preparation for more advanced work
in French or Francophone literature. Readings and
discussion of one play, one novel, short stories, and
poems as well as the principles of literary criticism and
explication de texte. (Spring)
FREN-F 305 Theatre et essai (3 cr.) P: FREN F250 or
equivalent. Drama and literature of ideas. Dramatists such
as Corneille, Racine, Moliere, Beaumarchais, and Sartre;
essayists and philosophers such as Descartes, Pascal,
Voltaire, Diderot, and Camus. (Spring)
FREN-F 306 Roman et poesie (3 cr.) P: FREN F250 or
equivalent. Novel and poetry. Novelists such as Balzac,
Flaubert, and Proust; readings in anthologies stressing
sixteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth- century poetry.
(Spring)
FREN-F 310 Topics in French Literature in Translation
(3 cr.) Readings in English translation of novels, plays,
essays, and poetry or other works that reflect a specific
topic chosen by the instructor. May be repeated once
for credit with a different topic. No credit in French.
(Occasionally)
FREN-F 311 Contemporary French Civilization (3 cr.)
Political, social, and cultural aspects of contemporary
France. No credit in French. (Occasionally)
FREN-F 312 Readings in French Literature in
Translation (3 cr.) Representative readings emphasizing
a particular author, genre, or topic in French literature.
Subject may vary with each listing and is identified in the
Schedule of Classes. No credit in French. (Occasionally)
FREN-F 328 Advanced French Grammar and
Composition (3 cr.) P: FREN F250 or equivalent. Study
and practice of French thinking and writing patterns. (Fall)
FREN-F 341 Topics in Francophone Culture (3 cr.)
Topics in Francophone culture will be explored from
a variety of perspectives. The course will be given in
English. May be repeated once for credit with a different
topic. No credit in French. (Occasionally)
FREN-F 375 Themes et perspectives litteraires et
culturels (3 cr.) Study of a subject or topic in French
FREN-F 391 Studies in the French Film (3 cr.) Analysis
of major French art form, introduction to modern French
culture seen through the medium of film art, and the study
of relationship to cinema and literature in France and the
Francophone world. Films shown in French with English
subtitles. Class taught in French.
FREN-F 424 Comedie classique (3 cr.) P: 6 credit
hours at 300 level, including FREN F305 or FREN
F306. Moliere, Marivaux, Beaumarchais, and others.
(Occasionally)
FREN-F 441 Literature and Culture of the Francophone
World (3 cr.) This course investigates the cultures of
French-speaking Africa, the Caribbean, and Asia. Literary,
cultural, and visual works will be explored. Subjects
covered include the search for identity; the challenges of
colonialism and acculturation; writing for social change;
class, gender and social status; local traditions versus
global modernity. Taught in French.
FREN-F 443 Nineteenth-Century Novel I (3 cr.) P: 6
credit hours at 300 level, including FREN F305 or FREN
F306. Introduction to French language and selected
aspects of French civilization and culture. (Fall, Spring,
Summer I)
FREN-F 450 Colloquium in French Studies (3-9 cr.)
P: 6 credits at 300 level, including FREN F305 or FREN
F306 or consent of the instructor. Emphasis on one topic,
author, or genre. (Occasionally)
FREN-F 452 Civilisation et litterature quebecoises
(3 cr.) P: 6 credits at 300 level, including FREN F305 or
FREN F306. The objective of this course is to acquaint
students with Quebec literature and civilization from its
origins to the present. Emphasis on the events leading to
the "Quiet Revolution" and on contemporary poetry, fiction,
drama, and film. (Occasionally)
FREN-F 453 Literature contemporaine I (3 cr.) P: 6
credit hours at 300 level, including FREN F305 or FREN
F306. Twentieth-century French literature until 1940.
(Occasionally)
FREN-F 463 Civilization francaise I (3 cr.) P: 6
credit hours in French at the 300 level or departmental
permission. French civilization from the medieval period
through the seventeenth century. Readings in French.
Eligible for graduate credit. (Occasionally)
FREN-F 464 Civilization francaise II (3 cr.) P: 6
credit hours in French at the 300 level or departmental
permission. French civilization from the eighteenth century
to the contemporary period. Readings in French. Eligible
for graduate credit. (Occasionally)
FREN-F 480 French Conversation (3 cr.) P: FREN
F380 or consent of department for nonnative speakers
of French. Class designed to develop conversational
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skills. Includes reviews, presentations, and discussion.
Places responsibility on the student for contributing to
the animation and interest of the class. Essentially a
performing class. Supplemental work is required beyond
FREN F380. (Occasionally)
FREN-F 495 Individual Readings in French Literature
(1-3 cr.) P: Consent of department. May be repeated.
(Fall, Spring)
GEOG-G 107 Physical Systems of the Environment
(3 cr.) Introduction to the physical principles governing
the geographical distribution and interrelationships of
the earth's physical features (atmosphere and oceans,
landforms, soils, vegetation, plate tectonics, and the rock
cycle). The course provides students with the background
necessary to evaluate current environmental issues.
(Occasionally)
GEOG-G 110 Introduction to Human Geography (3 cr.)
An introduction to geographic perspectives and principles
through a consideration of six themes: environmental
perception, diffusion, regionalization, spatial distribution,
spatial interaction of populations, and location theory.
Themes are illustrated using examples such as pollution,
population problems, and urbanization. (Fall, Spring)
GEOG-G 120 World Regional Geography—Topic:
Geography of the Middle East (3 cr.) Analysis of
population, culture, environment, and economics of major
world regions. Examination of issues of global importance,
including development, demographic change, urbanization
and migration, and international conflict.
GEOG-G 213 Introduction to Economic Geography
(3 cr.) P: ECON E103 or GEOG G110. Principles of
economic geography including theories concerning
industrial location, competition for land, economic nature
of resources, and geographic background of interregional
trade. (Occasionally)
GEOG-G 250 Computer Methods in Geography (3 cr.)
P: GEOG G110. Introduction to computing in geography,
emphasizing practical applications. Topics include
programming concepts, analysis of spatial data, and
graphics. Numerous exercises give practical experience
with the analysis and interpretation of geographic data.
GIS programs will be emphasized. (Fall)
GEOG-G 304 Meteorology and Physical Climatology
(3 cr.) Fundamental atmospheric properties and
interrelationships. Radiation theory, components of energy
and moisture balance, atmospheric circulation, upper
air-surface relationships, and global weather systems.
(Occasionally)
GEOG-G 313 Political Geography (3 cr.) P: 3 credit
hours of geography or advanced courses in history or
political science or special permission. Geographical
influences which have affected development of political
units, such as nations, states, and parties, as background
for better understanding of current events. (Occasionally)
GEOG-G 314 Urban Geography (3 cr.) R: 3 credit
hours of geography or special permission. Principles of
location and distribution of urban centers, urban land use,
geographical aspects of city planning. (Occasionally)
GEOG-G 315 Environmental Conservation (3 cr.)
R: junior standing. Conservation of natural resources
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including soil, water, wildlife, and forests as interrelated
components of the environment emphasizing an
ecological approach. Current problems relating to
environmental quality. (Spring)
GEOG-G 327 Geography of Indiana (3 cr.) P: GEOG
G110 or consent of the instructor. A geographical
analysis of the state of Indiana. Emphasis placed on
the interrelationship of the state's physical and human
geography. (Occasionally)
GEOL-G 101 Introduction to Earth Science: Lecture
(3 cr.) Origin and classification of minerals and rocks.
Gradation processes and landform evolution. Atmosphere
and weather. Geologic time and earth history. Earth
resources. Two lectures each week. Credit is given
for only one of the following: GEOL101 OR GEOL103,
GEOL107. (Occasionally)
GEOL-G 102 Introduction to Earth Science Laboratory
(1 cr.) P: Any 100-level GEOL (geology) lecture-based
course. Classification and identification of minerals, rocks,
and fossils. Weather and climates. Map projections, maps,
and local topography. One laboratory each week. (Fall,
Spring, Occasionally Summer)
GEOL-G 103 Earth Science: Materials and Processes
(3 cr.) Introduction to origin and classification of minerals
and rocks. Relationships between rock types, rock
structures, surficial geological processes of running water,
subsurface water, glaciation, wind, tides, and landform
evolution. Geologic time. Two lectures each week. Credit
given for only one of the following: GEOL G101, GEOL
G103, or GEOL G107. (Occasionally)
GEOL-G 107 Environmental Geology (3 cr.) An
introduction to geology through discussion of geological
topics that show the influence of geology on modern
society. Topics include mineral and energy resources,
water resources, geologic hazards and problems, geology
and health, and land use. Credit given for only one of
the following: GEOL101, GEOL103, or GEOL107. (see
schedule of classes for offerings).
GEOL-G 108 Selected Earth Science Topics (1-3 cr.)
Selected topics of general interest in earth science offered
as individual units. Consult Schedule of Classes for
current offerings. (Occasionally)
GEOL-G 185 Global Environmental Change (3 cr.)
The scientific basis behind natural and human-based
global environmental changes. Geological perspective of
the formation of the earth. Human activities influencing
the natural system, including population, deforestation,
water usage, acid rain, ozone depletion, smog and global
warming. Subsequent human reactions. (see schedule of
classes for offerings).
GEOL-G 209 History of Earth (4 cr.) P: Any 100level lecture-based geology course and G102. Earth
history emphasizing physical and biological evolution.
Geologic time, stratigraphic correlation, plate tectonics,
paleodepositional environments, paleography, and
evolution of life. Laboratory, field trip required. (Spring)
GEOL-G 210 Oceanography (3 cr.) P: One college-level
science course or consent of the instructor. Introduction to
the study of the oceans and marine processes. Emphasis
on morphology of the ocean floor, life in the ocean,
oceanic circulation, and submarine geology. Three
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lectures or two lectures with occasional laboratory per
week. (Occasionally)
GEOL-G 220 Regional Geology Field Trip (1-2 cr.)
P: Any 100-level geology course; or consent of instructor.
Field investigation of selected regions of North America.
Six to 15 days in the field. (Spring, Occasionally)
GEOL-G 221 Introductory Mineralogy (4 cr.) P: any
100-level lecture-based geology course and G102.
College-level course in chemistry, or permission of
instructor. Crystallography: morphology, classes, twinning
habit. Physical and chemical mineralogy. Description,
identification, association, occurrence, and use of common
and important minerals. Two lectures and one laboratory
each week. Required field trip. (Three semester rotation:
Fall 2011, Spring 2013, Fall 2014, Spring 2016)
GEOL-G 222 Introduction to Petrology (4 cr.)
P: GEOL G221. Dynamic processes that form
igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks: Focus
on composition, field occurrence, characteristics,
classification, origin, laboratory description, and
identification. Two lectures and one laboratory each week.
This class meets the intensiver writing require for the
IUNorthwest campus. (Three semester rotation: Fall 2010,
Sprint 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2015)
GEOL-G 317 Field and Laboratory Techniques
(3-5 cr.) P: GEOL G101, GEOL G102. Field trips
mandatory. A field and laboratory-based course. Content
includes map construction, reading, and interpretation,
surveying, computer graphics, aerial photography
interpretation, lithostratigraphic logging of sediment and
bedrock, stream gauging, statistical analysis of geological
data, grain size analysis, and an instruction to GIS and
remote sensing. (Summer or Fall-even years)
GEOL-G 323 Structural Geology (4 cr.) P: GEOL G222
and a course in trigonometry, precalculus or calculus, or
consent of the instructor. Nature and origin of structural
features of the earth's crust, with emphasis on mechanics
of deformation. Two lectures and one laboratory each
week. Required field trip. (Three semester rotation: Spring
2011, Fall 2012, Spring 2014, Fall 2015)
GEOL-G 334 Principles of Sedimentology and
Stratigraphy (4 cr.) P: GEOL G221 or consent of
instructor. Interrelationship of sedimentation and
stratigraphy; process and factors influencing genesis of
sedimentary strata; provenance, depositional environment,
sedimentary facies, paleoecology; analytical techniques;
application of principles to interpretation of stratigraphic
record. Required field trip. Two lectures and one
laboratory each week. (Spring—even years)
GEOL-G 406 Introduction to Geochemistry (3 cr.)
P: CHEM C106, GEOL G222, MATH M216, or consent of
instructor. Application of chemical principles in study of the
earth from primarily dynamic approach. Two lectures and
one laboratory each week. (Occasionally)
GEOL-G 407 Senior Geosciences Projects I (3 cr.)
P: Senior standing in geosciences. Field and/or laboratory
research project in geosciences, under faculty or faculty
committee supervision. A preliminary report must be
submitted at the end of the first semester, and a final
report at the end of the second. Each must be written in
proper scientific form. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
GEOL-G 408 Senior Geosciences Projects II (3 cr.)
P: Senior standing in geosciences. Field and/or laboratory
research project in geosciences, under faculty or faculty
committee supervision. A preliminary report must be
submitted at the end of the first semester, and a final
report at the end of the second. Each must be written in
proper scientific form. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
GEOL-G 410 Undergraduate Research in Geology
(1-6 cr.) P: Junior standing and consent of advisor. Field
and laboratory research in selected problems in geology.
Total of 6 credit hours may be counted toward the degree
in geology. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
GEOL-G 413 Introduction to Earth Physics (3 cr.)
P: GEOL G323, PHYS P202 or PHYS P222. P or C:
MATH M216 or consent of instructor. Physics in the
study of the earth: its origin, history, internal constitution,
structure, and mineral resources. (Occasionally)
GEOL-G 415 Geomorphology (4 cr.) P: GEOL G222 or
consent of instructor. Geomorphic processes, evolution
and classification of landforms. Laboratory: topographic,
geologic, and soil maps; aerial photographs. Required
field trip. Two lectures and one laboratory each week.
(Odd years)
GEOL-G 420 Regional Geology Field Trip (1-3 cr.)
P: 10 credit hours of geology and consent of instructor.
Field investigations of selected regions of North America
for study of mineralogic, lithologic, stratigraphic,
structural, paleontologic, geomorphic, or other geological
relationships. Six to 15 days in the field. May be repeated.
Usually follows spring semester. (Spring, Occasionally)
GEOL-G 435 Glacial and Quaternary Geology (3-4 cr.)
P: GEOL G222. Topics include glacier processes,
glacial sediments, glacial landforms, glacial history, and
interpretations of climate change from the glacial record.
The focus is on glaciation during the Quaternary Period
with specific emphasis on glacial history and landforms of
Northwest Indiana. Two lectures and one laboratory are
required each week. (Occasionally)
GEOL-G 451 Principles of Hydrogeology (4 cr.)
P: GEOL G334 or consent of instructor. Water resources:
occurrence, regulation, and management of water;
hydrologic cycle, water movement, well hydraulics;
water quality and pollution; surface and subsurface
investigations; basin-wide development of water
resources; legal aspects; relationship of hydrogeology to
engineering geology. Two lectures and one laboratory
are required each week. (Usually Spring odd years, see
schedule of classes for offerings)
GEOL-G 460 Internship in Geology (3 cr.) P: Geology
major with senior standing and approval from the chair.
Industrial or similar experiences in geologically oriented
employment. Projects jointly arranged, coordinated,
and evaluated by faculty and industrial/ governmental
supervisors. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
GEOL-G 490 Undergradute Seminar (1-2 cr.) Open to
junior and senior majors by special permission. Readings
and discussion of selected topics. May be repeated for a
maximum of 4 credit hours. (see schedule of classes for
offerings)
GEOL-T 315 North American Landscape (3 cr.)
P: Course in physical or general geology. Gives the
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student an elementary understanding of various
geologic controls and processes that have produced the
topographic features. Regional concept stressed rather
than individual landforms. The continent is divided into
geomorphic regions based on similar geologic controls
and geomorphic histories. (Occasionally)
specialty systems will be discussed and applied in this
course. (Spring)
GER-G 100 Beginning German I (4 cr.) Introduction to
present-day German and to selected aspects of German
culture. Survey of the language: structure and meaning.
Introduction to German grammatical forms and their
function. Development of listening comprehension, simple
speaking proficiency, controlled reading and writing skills.
(Fall)
HIM-M 195 Medical Terminology (3 cr.) The study of
the language of medicine, including word construction,
definitions, spelling, and abbreviations; emphasis on
speaking, reading, and writing skills. (Fall, Spring)
GER-G 150 Beginning German II (4 cr.) P: GER G100
or equivalent Introduction to present-day German and
to selected aspects of German culture. Survey of the
language: structure and meaning. Introduction to German
grammatical forms and their function. Development of
listening comprehension, simple speaking proficiency,
controlled reading and writing skills. (Spring)
GER-G 200 Oral Practice, Writing, and Reading I (3 cr.)
P: GER G150 or equivalent. Further development of oral
and written command of language structures. Reading of
literary and nonliterary texts. (Fall)
GER-G 250 Oral Practice, Writing, and Reading II
(3 cr.) P: GER G200 or equivalent. Review of selected
grammatical items. Reading of modern German prose
and plays with stress on discussion in German. Writing
of descriptive and expository prose based on the reading
material. (Spring)
HIM-C 150 Body Structure and Function I (3 cr.) An
introduction to the basic structures and functions of the
human body, fundamental anatomic terminology, and
relationships of clinical laboratory to diagnosis. (Fall)
HIM-C 151 Body Structure and Function II (3 cr.) An
introduction to the basic structures and functions of the
human body; fundamental anatomic terminology; study of
disease, relationships of clinical laboratory to diagnosis
and pharmacology. (Spring)
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HIM-M 193 CPT Coding (2 cr.) The study of CPT (Current
Procedural Terminology) coding and classification
principles. (Fall)
HIM-M 200 Supervision in Health Information Services
(2 cr.) Study of supervisory principles and practices, with
application to health information services. Introduction to
effective planning, organizing, and controlling. (Spring)
HIM-M 201 Coding and Classification Systems
(3 cr.) The study of classifications, nomenclatures, and
reimbursement systems. Includes cancer registry and
other registries. (Fall)
HIM-M 202 Clinical Experience in Coding and
Classification Systems (3 cr.) Clinical instruction
includes health record coding and related functions. (Fall)
HIM-M 203 Health Care Delivery and Quality
Assessment (3 cr.) The study of clinical quality
assessment and improvement; review of regulatory and
accrediting organizations and health record applications
in alternate health care settings; other health information
systems and functions. (Spring)
HIM-M 204 Clinical Experience in Health Care Delivery
and Quality Management (2 cr.) Assignment is to area
health care facilities and to the program health information
laboratory. Areas of clinical instruction include quality
management activities and health record systems in
alternate health care settings. (Spring)
HIM-M 205 Pathology (3 cr.) P: P-261 and P-262. A
survey of changes that occur in the diseased state to
include general concepts of disease, causes of disease,
clinical sympotms and treatment, and diseases that affect
specific body systems. (Fall)
HIM-M 100 Introduction to Health Care Delivery and
Health Information Management (2 cr.) Overview of the
health care industry and specifically the health information
management profession. Includes overview of health care
reimbursement and medical staff organization.
HIM-M 206 Reimbursement Principles in Health
Care (2 cr.) Integration of information about all U.S.
health care payment systems; overview of the complex
interrelationships between reimbursement, coded data,
and compliance; Managed Care; Government- sponsored
Health Care Programs. (Spring)
HIM-M 101 Introduction to Health Records (3 cr.)
Organization of the health care industry; systems and
processes for collecting, maintaining, and disseminating
health-related information. (Spring)
HIM-M 208 Coding Lab (2 cr.) The application of
ICD and CPT coding and classification principles.
Application of the prospective payment system and DRG
reimbursement.
HIM-M 102 Clinical Experience I (2 cr.) Clinical
assessment in systems and processes for collecting,
maintaining, and disseminating health-related information;
development of professional attitude for interacting with
other professions and consumers in the health care
industry. (Summer I)
HIM-M 245 Health Record Law (2 cr.) Study of the basic
concepts and principles of law and their application to
the health care field, specifically to health information
services. Review of the law dealing with confidentiality and
release of information, liability of health care providers,
and other topics. Discussion of the judicial process. (Fall)
HIM-M 107 Computer Applications in Health
Information Technology (3 cr.) P: CSCI A106
An introduction to information and communication
technologies commonly used in health care and Health
Information Management departments. Electronic health
record concepts, voice recognition, and health information
HIM-M 301 Healthcare Quality and Information
Management (3 cr.)
The study and application of regulatory requirements
for quality and performance improvement, utilization
management, risk management, and medical staff
organization. The examination of other quality-based
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programs affecting healthcare such as pay-forperformance and RAC programs. Application of the
collection, analysis and interpretation of healthcare data.
(Fall)
HIM-M 302 Health Law II and Ethics (3 cr.)
Detailed study of legal issues in health informatics and
information management. HIPAA and other statutory and
regulatory requirements are studied. Study and application
of ethics within health informatics and HIM. (Spring)
HIM-M 401 Healthcare Data Management in HIM (3 cr.)
Management of the coding function and revenue cycle
processes in all healthcare settings. Planning and
implementation of compliance programs related to HIM.
The study of healthcare informatics standards for health
data collection. (Fall)
HIM-M 402 Health Finance and Budgeting for HIM
(3 cr.)
A study of the financial management of health care
facilities based on generally accepted business principles.
Accounting principles, budgeting, and evaluation of short
and long-term debt in healthcare environments will be
studied. The analysis and application of reimbursement
processes will be studied at length in this course. (Fall)
HIM-M 403 Organization and Management of HIM
(3 cr.)
A study of and application of human resources
management in a Health information Department.
Creation of performance standards and workforce
education and training are examined. Budgeting,
contracts, labor laws and unions are studied.(Spring)
HIM-M 404 Research Principles for HIM (3 cr.)
Applied research methodologies in healthcare services,
health informatics, and health information management.
This course will cover research design principles,
inclusion of vital statistics, national research policy
making, biomedical and health research investigation, and
research protocol data management. (Spring)
HIM-M 410 Computer systems in Healthcare (3 cr.)
Understanding and applying the systems development life
cycle in system implementations and updates integrating
project management theory. Evaluate and implement
national health information initiatives and standards.
Examine the concepts of data security, integrity, validity,
and data quality monitoring. (Fall)
HIM-M 415 Capstone (4 cr.)
The student will complete an applied project related to
health information management upon approval from the
course instructor. (Spring)
HIM-M 459 Professional Practicum (4 cr.)
Professional internship in an approved clinical site.
The student will participate and/or coordinate a project
approved by the site’s management team. (Summer)
HIST-A 301 Colonial and Revolutionary America
I (3 cr.) Possible themes for this course include the
development of British North America, the colonial
origins of the revolutionary struggle in America, and an
exploration of the American Revolutionary era, 1765 to
1789. (Occasionally)
HIST-A 303 The United States, 1789-1865 (3 cr.)
This course will examine the early American republic,
beginning with the Constitutional Convention and ending
with the conclusion of the Mexican-American War. Topics
that will be explored include the early development of
the American government, the rise of partisanship and
democracy, social and economic developments, slavery,
and westward expansion. (Occasionally)
HIST-A 313 Origins of Modern America, 1865-1917
(3 cr.) Social, economic, cultural, and political ways in
which Americans accommodated and resisted changes
introduced by large-scale industrialization. Populism and
progressivism receive special attention. (Occasionally)
HIST-A 314 United States, 1917-1945 (3 cr.) Political,
demographic, economic, and intellectual transformation
during World War I, the twentieis, the Great Depression,
and World War II. (Occasionally)
HIST-A 315 Recent U.S. History (3 cr.) Political,
demographic, economic, and intellectual transformation
after World War II, with special emphasis on the 1950s.
(Occasionally)
HIST-A 317 American Social History, 1865 to Present
(3 cr.) Development of modern American social and
intellectual patterns since 1880. Social thought, literature,
science, arts, religion, morals, education. (Occasionally)
HIST-A 318 The American West (3 cr.) Western
expansion and development 1763-1900: economic,
political, and social changes. Special attention to natural
resources, Indian-white relations, and the role of the West
in American myth and symbology. (Occasionally)
HIST-A 321 American Social History, 1865 to Present
(3 cr.) Ideas that have influenced American history. From
the image of New World to challenge of Jacksonian
democracy. (Occasionally)
HIST-A 346 American Diplomatic History (3 cr.)
Foundations and evolution of American foreign policy with
particular emphasis on the role of the United States as a
world power in the twentieth centure. (Occasionally)
HIST-A 347 American Urban History (3 cr.)
Development of cities and processes of urbanization in
United States history. (Occasionally)
HIST-A 348 Civil War and Reconstruction (3 cr.) Crisis
of the Union; social, political, economic, and cultural
factors leading to war and their influence in the war.
Reconstruction and its consequences in the South and in
the nation. (Occasionally)
HIST-A 352 (may be cross-listed with CHRI-C 352)
History of Latinos in the United States (3 cr.) Latino
experience in the United States; economic and social
factors of the Latino role in a non-Latino nation.
HIST-A 355 (may be cross-listed with AFRO-A 355)
Afro-American History I (3 cr.) History of blacks in the
United States. Slavery, abolitionism. Reconstruction, postReconstruction to 1900.
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HIST-A 356 (may be cross-listed with AFRO-A 356)
Afro-American History II (3 cr.) History of blacks
in the United States from 1900 to present. Migration
north, NAACP, Harlem Renaissance, postwar freedom
movement.
HIST-A 363 Survey of Indiana History (3 cr.) A survey of
Indiana history and culture from the original inhabitants to
recent times, with emphasis on the growth of a distinctive
Hoosier culture.
HIST-A 369 Issues in Early United States History
(3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and
problems in United States history to 1870. Topics will vary.
May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6
credit hours.
HIST-A 382 The Sixties (3 cr.) An intensive examination
of the decade that tore apart post-World War II American
society, beginning with the confident liberalism that
believed the nation could "pay any price" and "bear
any burden" in order to stop communism abroad and
to promote reform at home, focusing on the internal
contradictions and external challenges that destroyed this
liberal agenda (civil rights and black power, the New Left,
the counterculture, second-wave feminism, the sexual
revolution, the Vietnam War, and the globalization of the
economy), and finishing with the more conservative order
that emerged in the early 1970s to deal with the conflicting
realities of limited national power and wealth on the one
hand, and rising demands for rights and opportunities on
the other. (Occasionally)
HIST-A 391 ( may be cross-listed with CHRI-C 391)
History of Chicanos and Puerto Ricans in the U.S. I
(3 cr.) Analysis of the historical experiences of Chicanos
and Puerto Ricans in American society from colonial times
to 1900. Focuses on original Spanish settlements; colonial
and Mexican societies; Mexican-American War; processes
of subordination and proletarianization; development of
Mexican culture in the United States; and the SpanishAmerican War.
HIST-A 392 (may be cross-listed with CHRI-C 392)
History of Chicanos and Puerto Ricans in the U.S. II
(3 cr.) Analysis of the historical experiences of Chicanos
and Puerto Ricans in American society from 1900 to
present. Focuses on issues of immigration and migration;
continued subordination; social and cultural adaptation;
and political protest and organization.
HIST-A 446 (may be cross-listed with CHRI-C 446)
Mexican and Puerto Rican Immigration and Migration
(3 cr.) Study of the migration of Mexicans and Puerto
Ricans to the United States. Emphasis will be on push-pull
factors of migration, the incorporation of both groups into
the American socioeconomic structure, the role of federal
legislation in patterns of migration, and the special plight of
undocumented workers.
HIST-B 200 Issues in Western European History
(3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues
and problems across more than one period of Western
European history. Topics vary but usually cut across
fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a
different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
HIST-B 300 Issues in Western European History
(3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues
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and problems across more than one period of Western
European history. Topics vary, but usually cut across
fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated with a
different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
HIST-B 304 Postwar European Youth (3 cr.) In the
period following the Second World War European society
was rapidly remade, granting greater social, cultural, and
economic autonomy to young people. Young people
in Britain, France, the Germanys, and the Soviet Union
created new identities for themselves that illustrated the
convergence of culture and politics. This course explores
the experiences of young people in the postwar era to
gauge the broader transformations in contemporary
European life.
HIST-B 351 Western Europe in the Early Middle
Ages (3 cr.) Evolution of European civilization from
the fall of Rome, development of Christianity, and the
Germanic invasions through Charlemagne's Empire and
the subsequent development of feudalism, manorialism,
papacy, and Romanesque architecture.
HIST-B 352 Western Europe in the High Middle Ages
(3 cr.) Expansion of European culture and institutions:
chivalry, Crusades, rise of towns, universities, Gothic
architecture, law, revival of central government. Violent
changes in late-medieval Europe: overpopulation, plague,
Hundred Years' War, peasant revolt, crime, inquisition,
and heresy.
HIST-B 353 The Renaissance (3 cr.) Italian Renaissance
as a political and cultural phase in the history of Western
civilization: its roots in antiquity and the middle ages; its
characteristic expression in literature, art and learning;
social transformations; manners and customs. Expansion
of Renaissance into France, Germany, and England.
(Occasionally)
HIST-B 354 The Reformation (3 cr.) Economic,
political, social, and religious background of Protestant
Reformation; Lutheran, Reformed, Anglican, and
Anabaptist movements, with reference to their political and
theological trends; Catholic Reformation. (Occasionally)
HIST-B 356 French Revolution and Napoleon (3 cr.)
Crisis of the Old Regime; middle class and popular revolt;
constitutional monarchy to Jacobin commonwealth;
the Terror and revolutionary government; expansion of
Revolution in Europe; rise and fall of the Napoleonic
Empire. (Occasionally)
HIST-B 357 Modern France (3 cr.) A social, political, and
cultural survey of France in the nineteenth and twentieth
centuries.
HIST-B 359 Europe from Napoleon to the First World
War (3 cr.) Vienna settlement and period of reaction in
Europe; liberalism and nationalism; revolutions; industrial
revolution; capitalism; socialist movements; unification
of Italy and Germany; clericalism and anticlericalism;
struggles for political democracy; social legislation;
imperialism, nationalist rivalries, and background of World
War I. (Occasionally)
HIST-B 361 Europe in the Twentieth Century I (3 cr.)
Diplomatic, economic, intellectual, military, political, and
social developments within Europe from World War I to
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present; changing relationships between Europe and other
parts of the world.
political development; migration to the mainland; debate
on independence, autonomy, and statehood.
HIST-B 362 Europe in the Twentieth Century II (3 cr.)
Diplomatic, economic, intellectual, military, political, and
social developments within Europe from World War I to
present; changing relationships between Europe and other
parts of the world.
HIST-F 444 (may be cross-listed with CHRI-C 444)
History of Mexico (3 cr.) Brief survey of the colonial
period and independence movement. Ideological conflicts
within the republic. Revolution of 1910. Relation with
United States from Mexican viewpoint.
HIST-B 391 Themes in World History (3 cr.)
Contemporary bibliography and interpretations of major
problems in world history.
HIST-G 200 Issues in Asian History (3 cr.) Study and
analysis of selected historical issues and problems of
general import. Topics vary from semester to semester
but usually are broad subjects that cut across fields,
regions, and periods. May be repeated with a different
topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
HIST-B 393 German History from Bismarck to Hitler
(3 cr.) Social, political, and cultural developments from the
middle-nineteenth through the middle- twentieth century,
including the tragic efforts of liberalism and democracy
to assert themselves against the opposing forces of
militarism and nationalism.
HIST-C 300 Issues in Classical and Byzantine History
(3 cr.) Study and analysis of the history of Greece or
Rome, the history of Late Antiquity in the Greco-Roman
world, or of the Byzantine Empire. Topics will vary
in focus, region, and period. May be repeated with a
different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
HIST-C 386 Greek History (3 cr.) Political, social, and
economic developments in Greek world from age of
Mycenae and Troy until Roman conquest (167 B.C.).
Greek colonial world, Athens, and Sparta, career and
legend of Alexander the Great, the Hellenistic Age.
Archaeology as a source for political and social history.
HIST-C 388 Roman History (3 cr.) History of Roman
people, from legendary origins to death of Justinian (A.D.
565), illustrating development from city-state to world
empire. Evolutionary stages exemplify transition from
early kingship to republican forums, finally replaced by
monarchy of distinctively Roman type.
HIST-D 310 Russian Revolutions and the Soviet
Regime (3 cr.) Russia on the eve of World War
I; revolutions that have swept Russia; principal
developments in government, economy, cultural and
social life, and international policy under the Communist
regime; expansion of Russian and Communist power,
particularly since 1945.
HIST-D 418 Russian and Soviet Foreign Policy in the
Twentieth Century (3 cr.) Expansion and war in Far East;
World War I and revolution; international communism;
interwar problems in Europe and Asia; World War II;
postwar relations with China, United States, and Eastern
Europe.
HIST-D 426 History of Balkans 1914 to Present (3 cr.)
First World War in the Balkans; politics, economies, and
societies in the Balkan countries during the twentieth
century; Balkan unity movements; Macedonian question;
international events and World War II; rise of socialism in
the region; era of Cold War and detente.
HIST-D 431 Eastern Europe since World War II (3 cr.)
World War II; communist movement; political, economic,
and social changes; inter-bloc relationships; foreign policy.
HIST-F 301 (may be cross-listed with CHRI-C 301)
History of Puerto Rico (3 cr.) Colonization by Spain;
international development; Spanish-American War;
occupation by United States; economic, social, and
HIST-G 369 Modern Japan (3 cr.) Western impact and
social and intellectual change in late Tokugawa Japan
from about 1720. The Meiji Restoration. State capitalism
and the Japanese development process. Empire, war
defeat, U.S. occupation, and renewal in the twentieth
century. Japan's rise to the front rank of world economic
powers after World War II.
HIST-G 385 Modern China (3 cr.) A survey of the final
century of dynastic rule and the rise to power of the
Nationalist and Communist parties, highlighting social and
cultural developments, the impact of Western imperialism,
and the evolution of revolutionary ideologies.
HIST-G 387 Contemporary China (3 cr.) A survey
of recent Chinese history focusing on social, cultural,
and political life in the People's Republic of China and
post-1949 Taiwan. Events covered include the Long
March, the Cultural Revolution, and the Tiananmen
Square Protests of 1989.
HIST-G 410 China, Japan and the U.S. in the 20th
and 21st Centuries (3 cr.) This course discusses the
relationship between China, Japan, and the U.S. in the
20th and 21st centuries. We study the mutual perceptions
and interactions of the three countires over the 20th
Century, and examine how the perceptions and memoires
of these interactions impact their relationships in the 21st
Century. (Every other year)
HIST-H 105 American History I (3 cr.) Colonial period,
Revolution, Confederation and Constitution. National
period to 1865. Political history forms the framework,
with economic, social, cultural, and intellectual history
interwoven. Introduction to historical literature, source
material, and criticism. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer
II)
HIST-H 106 American History II (3 cr.) 1865 to present.
Political history forms the framework, with economic,
social, cultural, and intellectual history interwoven.
Introduction to historical literature, source material, and
criticism. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
HIST-H 107 American History: General Course III
(3 cr.) A thematic approach to the study of American
history, 1600 to the present. Each section will deal with
one or more topics, according to the interests of the
instructor. Topics might be, for example, a study of
American character, race and ethnicity, violence, women
and sexism, or mobility and change. (Occasionally)
HIST-H 113 History of Western Civilization I (3 cr.)
Rise and fall of ancient civilizations; barbarian invasions;
Full Course List
rise, flowering, and disruption of medieval Church;
feudalism; national monarchies; rise of middle class;
parliamentary institutions; liberalism; political democracy;
industrial revolution; capitalism and socialist movements;
nationalism, imperialism, and international rivalries; wars.
(Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
HIST-H 114 History of Western Civilization II (3 cr.)
Rise and fall of ancient civilizations; barbarian invasions;
rise, flowering, and disruption of medieval Church;
feudalism; national monarchies; rise of middle class;
parliamentary institutions; liberalism; political democracy;
industrial revolution; capitalism and socialist movements;
nationalism, imperialism, and international rivalries; wars.
(Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
HIST-H 205 Ancient Civilization (3 cr.) Political, cultural,
and economic development of ancient Near East, Greece,
and Rome from Bronze Age to end of classical period.
HIST-H 207 Modern East Asian Civilization (3 cr.)
Contrasting patterns of indigenous change and response
to Western imperialism in East Asia during the nineteenth
and twentieth centuries. China and Japan receive primary
consideration. Emphasis on the rise of nationalism and
other movements directed toward revolutionary change.
HIST-H 215 Proseminar in History (3 cr.) P: Freshmen
and sophomores with consent of instructor. Selected
topics of history. May be taken three times.
HIST-H 219 Origins and History of the Second World
War (3 cr.) Nazi and fascist aggression, collective
security, appeasement and outbreak of war in Europe.
German blitzkrieg; Russian front; North African, Italian,
and Normandy campaigns; Hitler's racial policies;
Japanese-American hostility; Pearl Harbor; island
hopping; the atomic bomb. Roosevelt, Stalin, and Churchill
at Teheran, Yalta, and Potsdam. War-crime trials.
(Occasionally)
HIST-H 220 American Military History (3 cr.) From
settlement of colonies to present. European background,
colonial militia, Indian fighting. Principal foreign wars
and their strategic objectives. Technological changes
and effect of military on American society. Army is
emphasized, with some attention to Navy, Marines, and
Air Force. (Occasionally)
HIST-H 225 Special Topics in History (3 cr.) Study
and analysis of selected historical issues and problems
of general import. Topics will vary from semester to
semester, but will usually be broad subjects that cut
across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated once
for credit.
HIST-H 227 African Civilization (3 cr.) Introduction to
African culture; African environment; early humans in
Africa; precolonial history; traditional political, economic,
and social systems; language, religion, art, music,
literature. (Occasionally)
185
and Western political and social ideas, with non-Western
lands. Examination of revolutionary, national, ideological,
social, and/or religious movements in Japan, China, India,
Mexico, Russia, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, Africa.
Today's political, social, and economic institutions.
HIST-H 260 History of Women in the U.S. (3 cr.)
Colonial to nineteenth century. An examination of the
social, economic, and political factors that have created
and re-created women's role in American history from the
colonial period to the nineteenth century.
HIST-H 262 American Women's History: Twentieth
Century (3 cr.) An extension of HIST H260, examines
the social, economic and political issues affecting women
from 1890-2000 including the rise and diversity of feminist
ideology in the second half of the twentieth century.
HIST-H 315 History and Memory of Modern China
and Japan (3 cr.) This class surveys the history and
memory revolving around the war between China and
Japan (1937-45), which was part of the Pacific phase
of World War II. By focusing on how the Sino-Japanese
War, and especially the Nanjing (Nanking) Massacre
has been remembered in both China and Japan, this
course explores the relationship between memory, politics,
culture, and society in the formation of history and memory
in modern China and Japan.
HIST-H 425 Topics in History (3 cr.) Intensive study
and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of
limited scope from the perspective of arts and humanities.
Topics will vary but will ordinarily cut across fields,
regions, and periods. May be repeated for credit.
HIST-H 495 Undergraduate Readings in History
(1-12 cr.) P: At least junior standing and 12 credit hours
of related course work. Prior arrangement with individual
faculty member. Faculty-supervised experience in
museum work, historic preservation, historical societies,
oral history, or other history- related fieldwork in private
and public institutions.
HIST-J 485 Historiography (3 cr.) Principles,
methodology, and practice of historical study, with
emphasis on the varieties of history, the writing of history,
and historical literature. (Occasionally)
HIST-J 495 Proseminar for History Majors (3 cr.)
Selected topics of history. May be taken three times. (Fall,
Spring)
HIST-K 493 Reading for Honors (12 cr.) P: Approval of
departmental honors committee.
HIST-K 499 Senior Honors Thesis (3 cr.) Senior-level
course for honors students only. Training in research and
writing, culminating in honors thesis to be written under
direction of faculty member. Oral examination over thesis
conducted by three faculty members.
HIST-H 228 The Vietnam War (3 cr.) Indochinese
history; French colonialism; Cold War dynamics; U.S.
military-political actions; domestic U.S. politics; U.S.
disengagement; Indochinese and American legacies.
HIST-T 325 Topics in History (3 cr.) Study and analysis
of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope
from perspective of the arts and humanities. Topics
will vary, but will usually cut across fields, regions, and
periods. May be repeated with a different topic.
HIST-H 232 The World in the Twentieth Century (3 cr.)
Shaping of the contemporary world, with emphasis on the
interaction of the West, particularly Western imperialism
HIST-T 425 Topics in History (3 cr.) Intensive study and
analysis of selected historical issues and problems of
limited scope from the perspective of arts and humanities.
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Full Course List
Topics will vary, but will ordinarily cut across fields,
regions, and periods. May be repeated for credit.
HPER-E 100 Experiences in Physical Education
(1-2 cr.) Instruction in a specified physical education
activity that is not a regular offering of the Department
of Kinesiology. Emphasis on development of skill and
knowledge pertinent to the activity. (Fall, Spring)
HPER-E 102 Group Exercise (1 cr.) A total fitness class
that emphasizes cardiorespiratory conditioning, flexibility,
muscular endurance, and coordination through rhythmical
body movement. Only S-F grades given. (Fall, Spring)
HPER-E 105 Badminton (1 cr.) Beginning instruction
in basic skills and techniques of badminton for singles,
doubles, and mixed doubles play. Emphasis is on basic
skill development, rules, and strategy. (Occasionally)
HPER-E 111 Basketball (1 cr.) Instruction in fundamental
skills of shooting, passing, ball handling, footwork,
basic strategies of offensive and defensive play, and
interpretation of rules. (Spring)
HPER-E 119 Personal Fitness (1-3 cr.) Instruction in
basic principles of conditioning and fitness. Emphasis on
muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and
cardiorespiratory endurance. For students without prior
knowledge of conditioning methods. (Fall, Spring)
HPER-E 133 Fitness and Jogging I (1 cr.) Beginning
instruction in the basic principles of fitness as they apply
to a jogging program. Emphasis on cardiorespiratory
endurance and flexibility. Basic concepts underlying Dr.
Kenneth Cooper's aerobic program. For students without
prior experience in jogging programs, aerobics levels I
through III. Only S-F grades given. (Fall, Spring)
sequence and poses will be appropriate for everyone.
Standing poses, forward stretched, twists, backward
stretches, inversions, regenerative and breathing
exercises. (Occasionally)
HPER-E 211 Intermediate Basketball (1 cr.) Review of
fundamental basketball skills including passing, dribbling,
shooting, rebounding, and defense. Instruction in the
principles of motion offense including spacing, screening,
rebounding, and passing. Instruction in man-to-man
defense and zone defenses. (Spring)
HPER-E 235 Intermediate Golf (1 cr.) P: Yellow belt
technical level or consent of instructor. The course builds
on and refines the basic fundamentals of swing motion.
Ball flight control is introduced with more in- depth swing
analysis.(Fall, Summer)
HPER-E 250 Karate—Intermediate (1 cr.) P: Yellow
belt technical level or consent of instructor. Karate—
Intermediate (1 cr.) P: yellow belt technical level or
consent of instructor. Instruction in advance applications
of basic techniques and free fighting. Students should
achieve technical level of green belt. Karate uniform
required. (Occasionally)
HPER-E 281 Tennis—Intermediate (1 cr.) P: None.
Students with basic competency in the forehand,
backhand, and serve improve these strokes and learn
the lob and overhead strokes through practice with the
class. (Occasionally)
HPER-E 370 Scuba Certification (2 cr.) Instruction in the
skills and techniques of scuba diving. Course offered at
The Scuba Tank in Valparaiso. Additional fees required.
(Fall, Spring, Summer)
HPER-E 135 Golf (1 cr.) Beginning instruction in
techniques for putting, chipping, pitching, iron swing, and
wood strokes. Rules and etiquette of golf. Students play
on par3 courses. Fee charged. (Fall, Summer I, Summer
II)
HPER-E 371 Advanced Scuba (2 cr.) P: E370 or
instructor permission. HPER E371Advanced Scuba (2 cr.)
P: E370 or instructor permission. Advanced instruction in
skills within a confined water environment. Course offered
at The Scuba Tank in Valparaiso. Additional fees required.
(Fall, Spring, Summer)
HPER-E 150 Karate (1 cr.) Beginning instruction in
techniques of blocking, kicking, striking, punching, limited
free fighting, and self-defense. Student should achieve
technical level of yellow belt. Karate uniform required.
(Occasionally)
HPER-E 470 Diver Safety and Rescue (2 cr.) P: E371
or instructor permission. Diver safety issues leading
to rescue certification and divemaster training. Course
offered at The Scuba Tank in Valparaiso. Additional fees
required. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
HPER-E 151 Self-Defense (1 cr.) Instruction in
techniques for practical self-defense skills and situations.
No uniform required. (Fall, Spring)
HPER-E 472 Scuba Instructor Development (2 cr.)
P: E470 or instructor permission. Instructor development
course for recreational scuba diving. Participants will
complete all basic requirements for national evaluation
exams. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
HPER-E 181 Tennis (1 cr.) Beginning instruction in the
fundamental skills of serves and forehand and backhand
strokes. Competitive play in women's, men's and mixed
doubles tennis. (Occasionally)
HPER-E 185 Volleyball (1 cr.) Instruction in fundamental
skills of power volleyball including the overhand serve,
bump, set, dig, and spike. Team offensive and defensive
strategies. (Fall)
HPER-E 187 Weight Training (1 cr.) Instruction in basic
principles and techniques of conditioning through use
of free weights. Emphasis on personalized conditioning
programs. Only S-F grades given. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
HPER-E 190 Yoga I (1 cr.) P: None. Every participant will
be challenged at his/her own level and form. The class
HPER-H 160 First Aid and Emergency Care (2 cr.)
Lecture and demonstration on first-aid measures
for wounds, hemorrhage, burns, exposure, sprains,
dislocations, fractures, unconscious conditions,
suffocation, drowning, and poisons, with skill training in all
procedures. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
HPER-H 318 Drug Use in American Society (3 cr.)
An interdisciplinary approach to the study of drug use
in American society. Examines the effects of alcohol,
tobacco, and the "illicit" drugs on the physical, mental, and
social health of individuals. (Summer I)
HPER-H 363 Personal Health (3 cr.) This survey course
provides a theoretical and practical treatment of the
Full Course List
concepts of disease prevention and health promotion.
Covers such topics as emotional health; aging and death;
alcohol, tobacco, and drug abuse; physical fitness;
nutrition and dieting; consumer health; chronic and
communicable disease; safety; and environmental health.
(Fall, Spring)
HPER-H 414 Health Education in Grades K-8 (3 cr.)
Practical guidelines for developing health and safety
education programs in grades K-8, including child
health problems, school health service programs, the
school environment, subject matter in health instruction,
curriculum development, lesson and unit planning,
innovative approaches to health teaching, and evaluation.
(Fall, Spring)
HPER-H 511 Advanced Emergency Care (3 cr.) Skills
required to render advanced first aid and emergency care
in various accident and disaster situations. Procedures for
personal and family survival in natural or human disasters.
Interested students may qualify for instructor certification.
(Summer II)
HPER-H 518 Alcohol and Drug Education (3 cr.)
Alcohol and drug abuse in American society are probed
in a comprehensive yet practical manner. Physiological,
psychological, sociological, theological, and legal
dimensions of the issue are explored through lectures,
group discussions, guest speakers, and audiovisual
presentation. Discusses principles of teaching and
counseling in drug education programs. (Summer I)
HPER-H 617 Seminar in Health Education (credit
arranged cr.) Contemporary topics in the area of health
education are studied under the direction of faculty
members with specialized areas of expertise. Specific
topics vary and may be repeated for credit. IUN offers
the following topics: alcohol education and drug use, first
aid, medical self-help, disaster preparedness, and health
science experiments. (Summer I)
HPER-P 211 Introduction to Sport Management
(3 cr.) An examination of the broad spectrum of career
opportunities available in the sport management
profession. Special emphasis on career planning, sport
management terminology, and an overview of specific
skills and courses required for professional preparation in
sport management. (Occasionally)
HPER-P 290 Movement Experiences for Preschool
and Elementary School Children (2 cr.) Covers
potential outcomes of preschool and elementary school
motor development programs, how to implement such
programs, and appropriate movement experiences for
young children. Allows observation and teaching of young
children in a structured gymnasium setting. (Spring,
Summer II)
HPER-P 333 Sport in America: Historical Perspectives
(3 cr.) Study of the evolution of sport in the United States
within the larger context of historical developments in
society; women's sport experiences in relation to the
development of sport; examination of sport as a reflection
of American culture from the founding of the colonies to
the present. (Occasionally)
HPER-P 392 Sport in American Society (3 cr.) An
introduction to sport sociology, in which students critically
examine American sport from a social context and analyze
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the interrelationship between sport and American culture.
Lectures, discussions, videos, guest speakers, and
investigative analyses. (Occasionally)
HPER-P 418 Sport Marketing (3 cr.) Examination of the
elements of the marketing mix as they pertain to the sport
enterprise. Also includes the coverage of decision making
and planning from the sport manager's perspective and
the impact of corporate sponsorship on the delivery of
sport. (Occasionally)
HPER-P 610 Physical Education in the Elementary
School (3 cr.) Course focuses on a developmental
approach to the physical education of children. Emphasis
is placed on the impact of development experiences,
curriculum development, teacher behavior, class
management, play environment, and a variety of
developmentally appropriate movement activities.
Students participate in classroom instruction; group
projects; and contemporary game, rhythm, and self-testing
activities. (Summer II)
INFO-I 101 Introduction to Informatics (4 cr.)
P: Computer literacy. Emphasis on topics in humancomputer interaction and human factors, collaborative
technologies, group problem solving, ethics, privacy,
and ownership of information and information sources,
information representation, and the information life cycle.
INFO-I 201 Mathematical Foundations of Informatics
(4 cr.) An introduction to the suite of mathematical and
logical tools used in information sciences, including
finite mathematics, automata and computability theory,
elementary probability, and statistics and basics of
classical information theory.
INFO-I 202 Social Informatics (3 cr.) P: INFO I101
Introduces the social and behavioral foundations of
informatics. Theoretical approaches to how technology is
used from psychological and sociotechnical perspectives.
Examples of how current and emerging technologies such
as games, e-mail, and electronic commerce are affecting
daily lives, social relations, work, and leisure time. (Fall,
Spring)
INFO-I 210 Information Infrastructure I (4 cr.) P: INFO
I101 The software architecture of information systems.
Basic concepts of systems and applications programming.
Credit cannot be given for both INFO-I 210 and CSCI-C
201 or CSCI-A 201 except by permission. (Fall)
INFO-I 211 Information Infrastructure II (4 cr.) P: INFOI 210 The systems architecture of distributed applications.
Advanced programming, including an introduction to the
programming of graphical systems. Credit cannot be
given for both INFO-I 211 and CSCI-C 307 or CSCI-A 302
except by permission. (Spring)
INFO-I 300 Human-Computer Interaction (3 cr.)
P: INFO-I 211 The analysis of human factors and the
design of computer application interfaces. A survey of
current best practice with an eye toward what future
technologies will allow.
INFO-I 303 Organizational Informatics (3 cr.)
P: INFO-I 101 Examines the various needs, uses, and
consequences of information in organizational contexts.
Topics include organizational types and characteristics,
functional areas and business processes, informationbased products and services, the use of and redefining
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role of information technology, the changing character
of work life and organizational practices, sociotechnical
structures and the rise and transformation of informationbased industries.
INFO-I 308 Information Representation (3 cr.) P: INFOI 201 and INFO-I 210. The basic structure of information
representation in social and scientific applications.
Representational structures and approaches from many
disciplines are introduced; philosophical theories of
classification and categorization; information access
and representation on the World Wide Web; objectoriented design and relational databases; AI knowledge
representation and discovery.
INFO-I 310 Multimedia Arts and Technology (3 cr.)
P: INFO-I 308
The study of the evolution of media arts and underlying
principles of communication. Application development
paradigms in current practice. Cross-listed with CSCIN 351 and DPIS-D 250; Credit cannot be given for both
INFO-I 310 and DPIS-D 250.
INFO-I 320 Distributed Systems and Collaborative
Computing (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 211 An introductory
treatment of distributed systems and programming.
Topics range from the distributed and object models
of computation to advanced concepts, such as remote
method invocations, object brokers, object services, open
systems, and future trends for distributed information
systems.
INFO-I 420 Internship in Informatics Professional
Practice (3-6 cr.) P: Approval of informatics director
and completion of 100 and 200 level requirements in
informatics. Students gain professional work experience
in an industry or research organization setting, using skills
and knowledge acquired in informatics course work.
INFO-I 421 Applications of Data Mining (3- cr.)
P: DPIS-D 150 This course explores the use of data
mining techniques in different settings, including business
and scientific domains. The emphasis will be on using
techniques, instead of developing new techniques or
algorithms. Students will select, prepare, visualize,
analyze, and present data that leads to the discovery of
novel and usable information. (Alternate years)
INFO-I 492 Senior Thesis I (3 cr.) P: Senior standing and
approval of the informatics director. The senior student
prepares and presents a thesis: a substantial, typically
multichapter paper based on a well-planned research
or scholarly project, as determined by the student and a
sponsoring faculty member.
INFO-I 493 Senior Thesis II (3 cr.) P: Senior standing
and approval of the informatics director. The senior
student prepares and presents a thesis: a substantial
typically multichapter paper based on a well-planned
research or scholarly project, as determined by the
student and a sponsoring faculty member.
INFO-I 494 Design and Development of an Information
System (3 cr.) P: Senior standing and approval of the
informatics director. System design and development
present both technical and managerial problems with
which students will be familiar from their undergraduate
course work. This course puts these lessons into practice
as students work in teams to develop an information
system. Examples of course projects include design
and development of a database for a business or
academic application, preparation and presentation of
an interactive media performance or exhibit, or design
and implementation of a stimulated environment (virtual
presentation of an interactive media performance or
exhibit, or design and implementation of a simulated
environment (virtual reality).
INFO-I 495 Design and Development of an Information
System II (3 cr.) P: Senior standing and approval of the
informatics director. System design and development
present both technical and managerial problems with
which students will be familiar from their undergraduate
course work. This course puts these lessons into practice
as students work in teams to develop an information
system. Examples of course projects include design
and development of a database for a business or
academic application, preparation and presentation of an
interactive media performance or exhibit, or design and
implementation of a simulated environment (virtual reality).
ITAL-M 100 Elementary Italian I (4 cr.)
Introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography,
and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments
and activities that develop grammatical competency and
proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing.
Cultural topics and simple cultural comparisons are
introduced.
ITAL-M 150 Elementary Italian II (4 cr.) P: M100
Continued introduction to contemporary Italian language,
geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of
assignments and activities that build grammatical
competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading
and writing. Practice with new cultural topics and basic
cultural analysis.
ITAL-M 200 Intermediate Italian I (3 cr.) P: M150 or
equivalent
Building on Elementary Italian I-II, students further study
and practice fundamental concepts and structures in
Italian grammar. Through a variety of assignments
and activities, they strengthen proficiency in listening,
speaking, reading, writing, cultural analysis and
understanding. Includes an introduction to brief literary
texts.
ITAL-M 250 Intermediate Italian II (3 cr.) P: M200 or
equivalent
The study of more complex concepts and structures
in Italian grammar. Through a variety of texts, media,
and assignments, students practice listening, speaking,
reading, writing, and they analyze cultural topics and
situations in greater depth. Increased attention to short
literary texts.
JOUR-C 327 Writing for Publication (3 cr.) A workshop
for nonmajors to improve writing skills and learn basic
requirements of writing for publication. Instruction
in market analysis and interpreting specific editorial
requirements, in gathering and researching background
materials, and in preparing manuscripts. Examination
of various types and styles of published writing. Will not
count toward journalism major. (Occasionally)
Full Course List
JOUR-J 200 Writing for Mass Media (3 cr.) P: Typing
ability of 35 words per minute and ENG W131, or its
equivalent. Small working seminar relating communication
theory to practice in journalistic writing. Emphasis on
narration, exposition, description, and argumentation.
Development of skills in conceptualization, organization,
gathering evidence, and effective presentation of articles
for publication in various mass media. (Occasionally)
LIBR-S 401 Computer-Based Information Tools (3 cr.)
Graded S /F. This skills-based course introduces basic
applications that will be used throughout the student's
course work and beyond. Students' experiences in
this course should be seen as a basis for further skill
development and learning throughout their careers.
The course covers computing platforms, access tools,
and management tools. Demonstration of skills will
be a mastery test or an assignment in each unit of the
course. L401 does not count toward graduate degree
requirements.
LIBR-S 501 Information Sources and Services (3 cr.)
P: LIBR S401 This course introduces students to the basic
information sources and services among different types
of libraries and information centers, including academic,
public, special, and school media.
LIBR-S 502 Collection Development and Management
(3 cr.) Theoretical and pragmatic aspects of the selection,
evaluation, and management of collections in all types of
libraries. Acquisitions, publishers and publishing, policy
making, and intellectual freedom and censorship are also
covered.
LIBR-S 504 Bibliographic Access and Control (3 cr.)
P: LIBR S401 Historical development and principles
essential to the understanding of the conceptual
foundations of providing bibliographic access and control
of materials and information. Discussion and examples in
the application of AACR2r will be presented to illustrate
and reflect current practice. Emphasis is on monographic
publications.
LIBR-S 551 Management of Libraries and Information
Centers (3 cr.) P: LIBR S401 Management and
administration of all types of libraries. Covers basics of
organizational structure, planning, budget management,
human resources issues and skills, and an understanding
of the manager in the context of the organization.
LIBR-S 554 Library Automation (3 cr.) P: LIBR S401
Principles for the design, selection, implementation,
and management of automated systems of all
types in libraries, including systems for technical
services processing, reference and user services, and
management. Focus is on present and future applications
of technology in libraries, their technical features, and their
implications for library services and management. When
possible, some practical experience with a particular
application will be provided.
LIBR-S 571 Library Materials for Children and Young
Adults (3 cr.) P: LIBR S401 Evaluation and use of
books, magazines, recordings, films, radio and television
broadcasts, and other sources of information and
recreation.
LIBR-S 574 The School Media Specialist (3 cr.) P: LIBR
S524 LIBR S533 The School Media Specialist (3 cr.) P
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or concurrent: L524 and L533, or consent of instructor.
Establishes the professional teaching and administrative
role of the certified school library media specialist in K-12
settings. Situations are examined that pertain specifically
to policy development, budgeting, collection development,
instructional design, support staff training, facility design,
district supervision, and information networking within
the modern school corporation. Students make site visits
to leading school information centers, conferences, and
media fairs.
LIBR-S 671 The School Media Specialist (3 cr.) P: LIBR
S524, LIBR S524, or consent of instructor. Establishes
the professional teaching and administrative role of the
certified school library media specialist in K-12 settings.
Situations are examined that pertain specifically to
policy development, budgeting, collection development,
instructional design, support staff training, facility design,
district supervision, and information networking within
the modern school corporation. Students make site visits
to leading school information centers, conferences, and
media fairs.
LIBS-D 501 Humanities Seminar (3 cr.) An
interdisciplinary graduate seminar in the humanities.
Topics vary from semester to semester. May be repeated
twice for credit.
LIBS-D 502 Social Science Seminar (3 cr.) An
interdisciplinary graduate seminar in the social sciences.
Topics Vary from semester to semester. May be repeated
twice for credit.
LIBS-D 503 Science Seminar (3 cr.) An interdisciplinary
graduate seminar in the sciences. Topics Vary from
semester to semester. May be repeated twice for credit.
LIBS-D 510 Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies
(3 cr.) A comprehensive introduction to graduate liberal
studies. Explores the cultures of the humanities, social
sciences, and sciences. Investigates interdisciplinary
methodologies. Offers strategies for graduate-level
reading, research, and writing for other publics.
LIBS-D 511 M.L.S. Humanities Elective (3 cr.)
P: LIBS D510 An M.L.S. graduate elective course in the
humanities. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit.
LIBS-D 512 M.L.S. Social Science Elective (3 cr.)
P: LIBS D510 An M.L.S. graduate elective course in the
social sciences. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit.
LIBS-D 513 M.L.S. Science Elective (3 cr.) P: LIBS
D510 An M.L.S. graduate elective course in the sciences.
Topics vary. May be repeated for credit.
LIBS-D 514 Graduate Liberal Overseas Study (3-6 cr.)
P: LIBS D510 This course will enable M.L.S. students to
participate in overseas studies. In some cases there may
be a language prerequisite.
LIBS-D 594 Liberal Studies Directed Readings (1-3 cr.)
P: LIBS D501, LIBS D502, LIBS D503 and prior consentof
instructor. Independent study involoving systematic
schedule of readings sponsored and supervised by a
faculty member. May be repeated up to a maximum 6
credit hours.
LIBS-D 596 Liberal Studies Independent Research
(1-3 cr.) P: LIBS D501, LIBS D502, LIBS D503 and prior
consentof instructor. An independent research project
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Full Course List
formulated and conducted in consultation with a faculty
member and culminating in a final analytical paper. May
be repeated up to a maximum of 6 credit hours.
LIBS-D 600 Public Intellectual Practicum. (3 cr.)
P: Completion of all M.L.S. course work. A capstone
seminar for the M.L.S. public intellectual option. Students
will study the history of public intellectuals, explore the
cariety of ways in which public intellectuals carry out their
work, and create a portfolio of their own public intellectual
work.
LIBS-D 601 M.L.S. Project Proposal Seminar (3 cr.)
P: Approval of director. A capstone seminar for the
independent research /creative activity option in which
students choose a topic or creative activitiy for their
project, complete the initial research to determine its
feasibility, write a formal proposal with an extenstive
bibliographay identifying sources and/or resourses
necessary to complete the project, and defend it before a
faculty committee.
LIBS-D 601 Graduate Project (3-6 cr.) P: LIBS D601.
Independent project work conducted in consultation with a
faculty director.
LING-L 103 Introduction to the Study of Language
(3 cr.) P: Sophomore standing. Linguistics as a body of
information; nature and function of language; relevance of
linguistics to other disciplines, with reference to modern
American English and principal European languages.
(Occasionally)
LING-L 210 Topics in Language and Society (3 cr.)
The study of topics related to the role of language as a
social phenomenon. May be repeated once for credit with
a different topic. (Occasionally)
LING-L 315 Introduction to Sociolinguistics (3 cr.)
Examines the relationships between language and
society. Issues include the nature of sociolinguistics; the
importance of age, sex, socioeconomic status; language
ideologies; why people use different dialects/languages
in different situations; bilingualism and multilingualism;
language choice, language attitudes, and language
endangerment; the relevance of sociolinguistics to general
linguistic theory. (Occasionally)
LSTU-L 100 Survey of Unions and Collective
Bargaining (3 cr.) A survey of labor unions in the
United States, focusing on their organization and their
representational, economic, and political activities.
Includes coverage of historical development, labor law
basics, and contemporary issues. (Core Course)
LSTU-L 101 American Labor History (3 cr.) A survey
of the origin and development of unions and the labor
movement from colonial times to the present. The
struggle of working people to achieve dignity and
security is examined from social, economic, and political
perspectives. (Core Course)
LSTU-L 104 Labor History (3 cr.) This course serves
as an orientation for the study of labor history. It
explores both critical and historical methodologies
based on primary and secondary sources, biases, and
interpretations. Discussion focus on selective questions
and events.
LSTU-L 110 Introduction to Labor Studies (1 cr.) An
introduction to the changing role of labor in society. The
coursewill emphasize a comparative approach to issues
confronting labor organizations. (Core Course)
LSTU-L 190 The Labor Studies Degree (1 cr.) Required
for all labor studies majors. An introduction to the degree
and preparation of plan of study.
LSTU-L 199 Portfolio Development Workshop (1 cr.)
Emphasis on developing learning portfolios as foundation
documents for academic self-assessment and planning
and as applications for self-acquired competency (SAC)
credit. Applies only as elective credit to labor studies
degrees.
LSTU-L 200 Survey of Employment Law (3 cr.) Statutes
and common law actions protecting income, working
conditions, and rights of workers. Topics include workers'
compensation, unemployment compensation, fair labor
standards, social security, retirement income protection,
privacy, and other rights. (Core Course)
LSTU-L 201 Labor Law (3 cr.) A survey of the law
governing labor-management relations. Topics include the
legal framework of collective bargaining; problems in the
administration and enforcement of agreements; protection
of individual rights to representation. (Core Course)
LSTU-L 203 Labor and the Political System (3 cr.)
Federal, state, and local governmental effects on workers,
unions, and labor-management relations; political goals;
influences on union choices of strategies and modes of
political participation, past and present; relationships with
community and other groups. (Core Course)
LSTU-L 205 Contemporary Labor Problems (3 cr.) This
course examines some of the major problems confronting
society, workers, and the labor movement. Topics may
include automation, unemployment, international trade,
environmental problems, minority and women's rights,
community relations, and changing government policies.
LSTU-L 210 Workplace Discrimination and Fair
Employment (3 cr.) Examines policies and practices
that contribute to workplace discrimination and those
designed to eliminate discrimination. Explores effects of
job discrimination and occupational segregation. Analyzes
Title VII, ADA, and related topics in relation to broader
strategies for addressing discrimination. (Core Course)
LSTU-L 220 Grievance Representation (3 cr.) Union
representation in the workplace. The use of grievance
procedures to address problems and administer the
collective bargaining agreement. Identification, research,
presentation, and writing of grievance cases. Analysis of
relevant labor law and the logic applied by arbitrators to
grievance decisions. (Core Course)
LSTU-L 230 Labor and the Economy (3 cr.) Analysis of
the political economy of labor and the role of organized
labor within it. Emphasis on the effect of unemployment
on workers, unions, and collective bargaining; investment
policy and changes in technology and corporate structure.
Patterns of union political and bargaining responses.
(Core Course)
LSTU-L 231 Globalization and Labor (3 cr.) This
course explores the globalization of trade, production,
and migration and the effects of these processes on
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American workers. Through reading, discussion, and
problem formation, students will critically think about the
ways global processes and policies impact American
workers' daily lives, analyze existing historical and current
justifications for offshore production and the dismantling of
barriers to trade and investment, and explore alternatives
to these policies.
of employees and labor organizations. Inquire at the
Labor Studies Program office on the appropriate campus.
(Counts as Women's and Gender Studies credit when
topic is women.) Can be repeated.
LSTU-L 240 Occupational Health and Safety (3 cr.)
Elements and issues of occupational health and safety.
Emphasis is on the union's role in the implementation of
workplace health-and-safety programs, worker and union
rights, hazard recognition techniques, and negotiated and
statutory remedies—in particular, the Occupational Safety
and Health Act of 1970. (Core Course)
LSTU-L 314 Ethical Dilemmas in the Workplace (3 cr.)
The course explores the fundamental basics for ethical
decision making in a workplace, both unionized and
nonunionized. We will discuss specific considerations for
making moral judgments within the work environment and
explore the basis upon which those decisions are made.
LSTU-L 250 Collective Bargaining (3 cr.) The
development and organization of collective bargaining
in the United States, including union preparation for
negotiations, bargaining patterns and practices, strategies
and tactics, economic and legal considerations. (Core
Course)
LSTU-L 251 Collective Bargaining Laboratory (1-3 cr.)
Designed to provide collective bargaining simulations and
other participatory experiences in conjunction with L250.
Student must be currently enrolled or have taken L250.
(Core Course)
LSTU-L 255 Unions in State and Local Government
(3 cr.) Union organization and representation of state
and municipal government employees, including patterns
in union structure, collective bargaining, grievance
representation, and applicable law. (Core Course)
LSTU-L 260 Leadership and Representation (3 cr.)
Organizational leadership issues for union, community,
and other advocate organizations. Analyzes leadership
styles, membership recruitment, and leadership
development. Examines the role of leaders in internal
governance and external affairs including committee
building, delegation, negotiations, and coalition building.
(Core Course)
LSTU-L 270 Union Government and Organization
(3 cr.) An analysis of the growth, composition, structure,
behavior, and government processes of U.S. labor
organizations, from the local to the national federation
level. Consideration is given to the influence on unions
of industrial and political environments, to organizational
behavior in different types of unions, and to problems in
union democracy. (Core Course)
LSTU-L 280 Union Organizing (3 cr.) Explores various
approaches and problems in private and public sector
organizing Traditional approaches are evaluated
in light of structural changes in labor markets and
workforce demographics. Topics range from targeting
and assessments, to committee building and leadership
development.
LSTU-L 285 Assessment Project (1 cr.) Capstone
experience for associate degree students. (Core Course)
LSTU-L 290 Topics in Labor Studies (1-3 cr.) This
is a course number under which a variety of topics can
be addressed in classroom-based programs on the
campuses. Courses may focus on contemporary or
special areas of labor studies, such as "Balancing Work
and Family;" others are directed toward specific categories
LSTU-L 299 Self-Acquired Competency in Labor
Studies (1-15 cr.)
LSTU-L 315 The Organization of Work (3 cr.) Examines
how work is organized and jobs are evaluated, measured,
and controlled. Explores social and technical elements
of work through theories of scientific management,
the human relations school of management, and
contemporary labor process literature.
LSTU-L 320 Grievance Arbitration (3 cr.) The legal and
practical context of grievance arbitration, its limitations and
advantages in resolving workplace problems. Varieties of
arbitration clauses and the status of awards. Participants
analyze, research, prepare, and present cases in mock
arbitration hearings. (Recommended only after L220 or
with permission of instructor.)
LSTU-L 330 Global Comparisons: Labor Relations
Examples from There Continents (3 cr.) This course
uses a political economy framework to explore and
compare countries' systems of labor relations, drawing
from at least three continents. It analyzes the diverse
approaches to the structure of twenty-first century labor
law and social policy. It focuses on the role of organized
labor in the global economy, patterns of breakdown in the
enforcement of labor and employment law, and union and
nonunion political and bargaining responses.
LSTU-L 331 Global Problems, Local Solutions (3 cr.)
This course addresses local manifestations of global
problems confronting society, workers, and the labor
movement. Students will cooperatively analyze issues,
propose potential solutions, and engage in activities
or practices that address globally driven local issues.
Students will identify governmental, non-governmental,
and charitable organizations that aid in ameliorating
local problems. As a final project, students will design
collaborative solutions based on our contemporary global
situation in which work is characterized by flexibility,
insecurity, and geographic mobility.
LSTU-L 350 Issues in Collective Bargaining (3 cr.)
Readings and discussion of selected problems. Research
paper usually required.
LSTU-L 360 Union Administration and Development
(1-3 cr.) Practical and theoretical perspectives on strategic
planning, budgeting, and organizational decision making.
Addresses needs and problems of union leaders by
studying organizational change, staff development, and
cohesiveness within a diverse workforce. May be repeated
for up to 3 credit hours with department approval.
LSTU-L 370 Labor and Religion (3 cr.) This course has
primarily an historical focus. It looks at the relationship
between religion and the labor movement as it developed
in the United States over the course of the 19th and 20th
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Full Course List
centuries. It attempts to uncover the tradition in which
workers of faith have connected their religious values to
their more secular concerns for social justice.
LSTU-L 380 Theories of the Labor Movement (3 cr.)
Perspectives on the origin, development, and goals of
organized labor. Theories include those that view the
labor movement as a business union institution; an agent
for social reform; a revolutionary force; a psychological
reaction to industrialization; a moral force; and an
unnecessary intrusion.
LSTU-L 385 Class, Race, Gender, and Work (3 cr.)
Historical overview of the impact and interplay of class,
race, and gender on shaping U.S. labor markets,
organizations, and policies. Examines union responses
and strategies for addressing class, race, and gender
issues.
LSTU-L 390 Topics in Labor Studies (3 cr.) This is a
variable-title course. L390 can be repeated for credit with
different subjects. Some courses focus on contemporary
or special areas of labor studies. Others are directed
toward specific categories of employees and labor
organizations.
LSTU-L 410 Comparative Labor Movements (3 cr.)
Labor movements and labor relations in industrial
societies from historical, analytical, and comparative
perspectives. Emphasis on interaction between unions
and political organizations, national labor policies, the
resolution of workplace problems, the organization of
white collar employees, and the issues of workers' control
and codetermination.
LSTU-L 420 Labor Studies Internship (1-6 cr.)
Application of knowledge gained in the classroom in
fieldwork experience.
LSTU-L 430 Labor Research Methods (3 cr.) Study of
research design, methods, techniques, and procedures
applicable to research problems in labor studies.
LSTU-L 480 Senior Seminar of Readings (3 cr.)
Designed as either a classroom seminar or directed
reading. This course addresses current issues, historical
developments, and other labor-related concerns. Topics
vary each semester.
LSTU-L 490 Advanced Topics in Labor Studies
(1-3 cr.)
LSTU-L 495 directed Labor Study (1-6 cr.) By
arrangement. An advanced course to suit the special
and varied needs and interests of individual students.
Arrangements with the faculty member might include
reading and directed application of prior course work,
tutorials, or internships. Competencies assessed through
written papers, projects, or reports. Repeatable to a
maximum of 6 credit hours.
LSTU-L 499 Self-Acquired Competency in Labor
Studies (1-15 cr.)
MATH-A 100 Fundamentals of Algebra (4 cr.)
P: Level MA102 on Placement Exam. Designed to
provide algebraic skills needed for future mathematics
courses. Integers, rational and real numbers, exponents,
decimals, integers, rational and real numbers, exponents,
decimals, polynomials, equations, word problems,
factoring, roots and radicals, quadratic equations,
graphing, linear equations in more than one variable, and
inequalities. Does not satisfy the College of Arts and
Sciences distribution requirements nor general education
mathematical reasoning requirement. (Fall, Spring,
Summer)
MATH-K 200 Statistics for Teachers (3 cr.) P: One year
of high school algebra or at least a C in MATH A100 The
course serves as an introduction to statistical tools and
spreadsheets or statistical packages used in everyday
teaching practice. The emphasis is on understanding reallife applications of graphs of data, measures of central
tendency, variation, probability, normal distributions,
confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and sampling.
(Fall, Spring)
MATH-K 300 Statistical Techniques (3 cr.) P: at
least a C in MATH M117 or equivalent. MATH M118
An introduction to statistics. Nature of statistical data.
Ordering and manipulation of data. Measures of central
tendency and dispersion. Elementary probability.
Concepts of statistical inference and decision, estimation,
and hypothesis testing. Special topics discussed may
include regression and correlation, analysis of variance,
nonparametric methods. (Occasionally)
MATH-M 100 Basic Mathematics (4 cr.) P: One year of
high school algebra or at least a C in MATH A100 Topics
in algebra, geometry, graphing, probability, statistics, and
consumer mathematics. Emphasis on problem solving
and constructing mathematical models. This course
is designed for allied health students and liberal arts
students who plan to take no additional mathematics
courses. Does not count toward a major in mathematics.
(Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
MATH-M 110 Excursions into Mathematics (3 cr.)
P: One year of high school algebra or at least a C in
MATH A100. A course designed to convey the flavor
and spirit of mathematics, stressing reasoning and
comprehension rather than technique. Not preparatory to
other courses; explores the theory of games and related
topics that may include the mathematics of politics and
elections. This course does not count toward a major in
mathematics. (Occasionally)
MATH-M 117 Intermediate Algebra (3 cr.) P: Level
MA103 on Placement Exam or MATH A100. Designed
to introduce nonlinear models and their applications,
advanced linear systems, and function foundations. Does
not satisfy the College of Arts and Sciences distribution
requirements nor general education mathematical
reasoning requirement. (Fall, Spring, Summer)
MATH-M 118 Finite Mathematics (3 cr.) P: Proficiency in
two years of high school algebra or at least a C in MATH
M117. Set theory, linear systems, matrices, probability,
linear programming, Markov chains. Applications to
problems from business and the social sciences. (Fall,
Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
MATH-M 119 Brief Survey of Calculus (3 cr.)
P: Proficiency in two years of high school algebra or
at least a C in MATH M117. Introduction to calculus.
Primarily for students in business and the social sciences.
A student cannot receive credit for both MATH M119 and
MATH M215. (Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II)
Full Course List
MATH-M 125 Precalculus Mathematics (3 cr.)
P: Proficiency in two years of high school algebra
or at least a C in MATH M117. Designed to prepare
students for calculus (MATH M215). Algebraic operations,
polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions and
their graphs, conic sections, linear systems of equations.
Does not satisfy the arts and sciences distributional
requirements. (Fall, Spring, Summer II)
MATH-M 126 Trigonometric Functions (3 cr.)
P: Proficiency in two years of high school algebra or at
least a C in MATH M117. MATH M125 or equivalent.
Designed to develop the properties of the trigonometric
and prepare for courses in calculus (MATH M215). Does
not satisfy arts and sciences distributional requirements.
(Fall)
MATH-M 215 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I
(5 cr.) P: either two years of high school algebra and
trigonometry or MATH M125 and MATH M126 (MATH
M126 may be taken concurrently with MATH M215).
Functions, limits, continuity, derivative, definite integral,
applications, exponential and logarithmic functions. A
student cannot receive credit for both MATH M119 and
MATH M215. (Fall, Spring, Summer I)
MATH-M 216 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II (5 cr.)
P: M215 Definite integral, applications, L'Hopital's Rule,
techniques of integration, limits of sequence, infinite
series, polar coordinates. (Fall, Spring)
MATH-M 295 Readings and Research (1-3 cr.)
Supervised problem solving. Admission only with
permission of a member of the mathematics faculty, who
will act as supervisor. (Occasionally)
MATH-M 301 Applied Linear Algebra (3 cr.) P: M216 or
consent of instructor. Emphasis on applications: systems
of linear equations, vector spaces, linear transformations,
matrices, simplex method in linear programming.
Computer used for applications. Credit not given for
both MATH M301 and MATH M303. (2-year cycle, see
department for details)
MATH-M 311 Calculus III (4 cr.) P: MATH M216.
Elementary geometry of 2, 3, and n-space; functions of
several variables; partial differentiation; minimum and
maximum problems; multiple integration. (Fall)
MATH-M 312 Calculus IV (3 cr.) P: MATH M311.
Differential calculus of vector-valued functions,
transformation of coordinates, change of variables in
multiple integrals. Vector integral calculus: line integrals,
Green's theorem, surface integrals, Stokes' theorem.
Applications. (Occasionally)
MATH-M 320 Theory of Interest (3 cr.) P: MATH M216.
Measurement of interest: accumulation and discount,
equations of value, annuities, perpetuities, amortization
and sinking funds, yield rates, bonds and other securities,
installment loans, depreciation, depletion, and capitalized
cost. This course covers topics corresponding to the
society of Actuaries' Exam FM.(2-year cycle, see
department for details)
MATH-M 325 Problem-solving Seminar in Actuarial
Science (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. A problemsolving seminar to prepare students for the actuarial
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exams. May be repeated up to three times for credit. (2year cycle, see department for details)
MATH-M 343 Introduction to Differential Equations
with Applications I (3 cr.) P: MATH M216. Derivation of
equations of mathematical physics, biology, etc. Ordinary
differential equations and methods for their solution,
especially series methods. Simple vector field theory.
Theory of series, Fourier series, applications to partial
differential equations. Integration theorems, Laplace
and Fourier transforms, applications. A student may not
receive credit for both MATH M313 and MATH M343. (2year cycle, see department for details)
MATH-M 360 Elements of Probability (3 cr.) P: MATH
M216 and MATH M311, which may be taken concurrently.
MATH M118. The study of probability models that
involve one or more random variables. Topics include
conditional probability and independence, gambler's ruin
and other problems involving repeated Bernoulli trials,
discrete and continuous probability distributions, moment
generating functions, probability distributions for several
random variables, some basic sampling distributions of
mathematical statistics, and the central limit theorem.
Course topics match portions of Exam for Course 1 of
the Society of Actuaries. Credit not given for both MATH
M360 and MATH M365. (2-year cycle, see department for
details)
MATH-M 366 Elements of Statistical Inference (3 cr.)
P: MATH M360. ECON E270. An introduction to statistical
estimation and hypothesis testing. Topics include the
maximum likelihood method of estimation and the
method of moments, the RaoCarmer bound, large sample
confidence intervals, type I and type II errors in hypothesis
testing, likelihood ratio tests, goodness of fit tests, linear
models, and the method of least squares. This course
covers portions of Actuarial Exam C. (2-year cycle, see
department for details)
MATH-M 371 Elementary Computational Methods
(3 cr.) P: CSCI C201, or equivalent or consent of
instructor. MATH M215-MATH M216. Interpolation
and approximation of functions, solution of equations,
numerical integration and differentiation. Errors,
convergence, and stability of the procedures. Students
write and use programs applying numerical methods. (2year cycle, see department for details)
MATH-M 391 Foundations of the Number Systems
(3 cr.) P: MATH M216. Sets, functions and relations,
groups, real and complex numbers. Bridges the
gap between elementary and advanced courses.
Recommended for students with insufficient background
for 400-level courses, for M.A.T. candidates, and for
students in education. Not open to students who have
received credit for MATH M403 or MATH M413. Credit
given only for one of MATH M391, MATH M393. (2-year
cycle, see department for details)
MATH-M 393 Bridge to Abstract Mathematics (3 cr.)
P: MATH M216 or consent of instructor. Preparation for
400-level math courses. Teaches structures and strategies
of proofs in a variety of mathematical settings: logic,
sets, combinatorics, relations and functions, and abstract
algebra. Credit given only for one of MATH M391, MATH
M393. (2-year cycle, see department for details)
194
Full Course List
MATH-M 403 Introduction to Modern Algebra I (3 cr.)
P: MATH M301 or MATH M307. Study of groups, rings,
fields (usually including Galois theory), with applications to
linear transformations. (2-year cycle, see department for
details)
covers probability theory, Brownian motion, Ito's Lemma,
stochastic differential equations, and dynamic hedging.
These topics are applied to the Black-Scholes formula,
the pricing of financial derivatives, and the term theory of
interest rates. (Occasionally)
MATH-M 405 Number Theory (3 cr.) P: MATH M216.
Numbers and their representation, divisibility and
factorization, primes and their distribution, number
theoretic functions, congruences, primitive roots,
diophantine equations, quadratic residues, sums of
squares, number theory and analysis, algebraic numbers,
irrational and transcendental numbers. (Occasionally)
MATH-M 463 Introduction to Probability Theory (3 cr.)
P: MATH M301 or MATH M303, and MATH M311, or
consent of instructor. Idealized random experiments,
conditional probability, independence, compound
experiments. Univariate distributions, countable additivity,
discrete and continuous distributions, Lebesgue-Stieltjes
integral (heuristic treatment), moments, multivariate
distribution. Generating functions, limit theorems, normal
distribution. (Occasionally)
MATH-M 406 Topics in Mathematics (3 cr.) Selected
topics in various areas of mathematics that are not
covered by the standard courses. May be repeated for
credit. (Occasionally)
MATH-M 413 Introduction to Analysis I (3 cr.) P: MATH
M301 or MATH M303, and MATH M311, or consent of
instructor. Modern theory of real number system, limits,
functions, sequences and series, Riemann-Stieltjes
integral, and special topics. (2-year cycle, see department
for details)
MATH-M 420 Metric Space Topology (3 cr.) P: MATH
M301 or MATH M303. Topology of Euclidean and metric
spaces. Limits and continuity. Topological properties
of metric spaces, including separation properties,
connectedness, and compactness. Complete metric
spaces. Elementary general topology. (Occasionally)
MATH-M 425 Graph (Network) Theory and
Combinatorial Theory (3 cr.) P: MATH M301 or MATH
M303. Graph theory: basic concepts, connectivity,
planarity, coloring theorems, matroid theory, network
programming, and selected topics. Combinatorial theory:
generating functions, incidence matrices, block designs,
perfect difference sets, selection theorems, enumeration,
and other selected topics. (Occasionally)
MATH-M 436 Introduction to Geometries (3 cr.)
P: MATH M391 or its equivalent. Non-Euclidean geometry,
axiom systems. Plane projective geometry, Desarguesian
planes, perspectivities coordinates in the real projective
plane. The group of projective transformations and
subgeometries corresponding to subgroups. Models for
geometries. Circular transformations. (Occasionally)
MATH-M 447 Mathematical Models and Applications
I (3 cr.) P: MATH M311and MATH M360, or consent of
instructor. Formation and study of mathematical models
used in the biological, social, and management sciences.
Mathematical topics include games, graphs, Markov and
Poisson processes, mathematical programming, queues,
and equations of growth. (2-year cycle, see department for
details)
MATH-M 448 Mathematical Models and Applications
II (3 cr.) P: MATH M311 and MATH M360, or consent of
instructor. Formation and study of mathematical models
used in the biological, social, and management sciences.
Mathematical topics include games, graphs, Markov and
Poisson processes, mathematical programming, queues,
and equations of growth. (2-year cycle, see department for
details)
MATH-M 451 The Mathematics of Finance (3 cr.)
P: MATH M311 and MATH M366, R: M343. Course
MATH-M 469 Applied Statistical Techniques (3 cr.)
P: MATH M366 Linear regression, multiple regression,
applications to credibility theory, time series and ARIMA
models, estimation, fitting, and forecasting. This course
covers the Applied Statistics portion of the actuarial VEE
requirements and portions of Exam C. (2-year cycle, see
department for details)
MATH-M 477 Mathematics of Operations Research
(3 cr.) P: MATH M301 or MATH M303, MATH M311,
MATH M360. Introduction to the methods of operations
research. Linear programming, dynamic programming,
integer programming, network problems, queuing theory,
scheduling, decision analysis, simulation. (2-year cycle,
see department for details)
MATH-M 483 Historical Development of Modern
Mathematics (3 cr.) P: MATH M301, MATH M311, and at
least 3 additional credit hours in mathematics at the 300
level or above. The development of modern mathematics
from 1660 to 1870 will be presented. The emphasis is on
the development of calculus and its ramifications and the
gradual evolution of mathematical thought from mainly
computational to mainly conceptual. (Occasionally)
MATH-M 485 Life Contingencies I (3 cr.) P: MATH M320
and MATH M360. Measurement of mortality, life annuities,
life insurance, net annual premiums, net level premium
reserves, the joint life and last- survivor statuses, and
multiple-decrement tables. (2-year cycle, see department
for details)
MATH-M 486 Life Contingencies II (3 cr.) P: MATH
M485 Population theory, the joint life status, last- survivor
and general multilife statuses, contingent functions,
compound contingent functions, reversionary annuities,
multiple-decrement tables, tables with secondary
decrements. (Occasionally)
MATH-M 493 Senior Thesis in Mathematics (3 cr.) P: At
least one 400-level mathematics course. At least one 400level mathematics course. Student must write a paper,
relating to 400-level mathematics study, on a topic agreed
upon by the student and the department chair or advisor
delegated by the chair.
MATH-T 101 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I
(3 cr.) P: Proficiency in elementary algebra (demonstrated
by placement exam or a grade of C o