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.: Lambton Kent
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District School Board
Student Achietl(imentLCo
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V' L mmmuty uccess
REGULAR BOARD MEETING
PUBLIC SESSION
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12 2013
7:00p.m.
A
Board Room
Chatham Education Centre
476 McNaughton Avenue, Chatham
Page Reference
1.
Call to Order
2.
Approval of Agenda
3.
Declaration of Conflict of Interest
4.
Approval of the Minutes from the October 22, 2013 Regular Board Meeting
5.
Business Arising from the Minutes
6.
Motions Emanating from the Regular Board Private Session
7.
Motion that the Actions of the Regular Board Private Session be the Action of the Board .
8.
Presentations:
a) John McGregor Secondary School Student Engagement Video
b) Director Costello and Superintendent Sadder LK Connect Update
9.
Delegations
10. Questions from the Public
11 . Reports for Board Action
a) Policies and Regulations on Accessibility in Employment and Provision
for Accessible Student Transportation Services
Recommendations
1. "That the Board approve the new policy and regulations on Accessibility
In Employment."
2. "That the Board approve the new policy and regulations on Provision for
Accessible Student Transportation Services."
b) Policy and Regulations on Student Dress Code
Director Costello
Report B-13-142
6
Director Costello
Report B-13-143
15
Director Costello
Report B-13-144
18
Director Costello
Report B-13-145
23
Recommendation
"That the Board approve the review of the policy and regulations on
Student Dress Code."
c)
Policy and Regulations on Use of Volunteers
Recommendation
"That the Board approve the review of the policy and regulations on
Use of Volunteers ."
d) Regulations on Suspension Reviews and Appeals
Recommendation
"That the Board approve the revised regulations on Suspension Reviews
and Appeals. "
B
e) 2012/2013 School Year Audited Financial Statements
Superintendent Andruchow
Report B-13-146
28
Superintendent Andruchow
Report B-13-147
52
Trustee Altiman
Report B-13-148
59
Recommendation
"That the Audit Committee recommends to the Lambton
Kent District School Board the approval of the annual aud ited
Financial Statements and the accompanying Auditors' Report
for the year ending August 31 , 2013."
f) 2013/2014 Internal Audit Plan
Recommendation
"That the Board approve the 2013/2014 Internal Audit Plan ."
12. Reports for Board Information
a) Native Advisory Committee Report
b) Ontario Public School Boards' Association (OPSBA)
Trustee Krall
Oral Report
c) Elementary Teacher/Board Communications Committee Report
Trustee Dodman
Report B-13-149
60
d) International Education Program Report
Director Costello
Report B-13-150
61
e) Budget Meeting Schedule for the 2014/2015 School Year
Superintendent Andruchow
Report B-13-151
64
13. Correspondence
a) Letter from the Walpole Island First Nation Board of Education regarding the appointment of
Lareina Rising as the Alternate Native Trustee
b) Letter from the Ontario College of Teachers proposing representatives meet with Trustees
to discuss their role, services they provide and how they can work together with Trustees.
(October 30, 2013)
14. New Business
15. Trustee Question Period
16. Notices of Motion
Trustee Jack Fletcher served Notice of Motion to revise Section 7.2 , Voting by Proxy, of the Board's
Procedural By-laws:
"That the Board ensure voting rights of the First Nation Alternate Trustee through a by-law
Amendment of the Lambton Kent District School Board By-Law 7.2 Voting by Proxy."
17. Future Agenda Items
18. Announcements
a) The next Regular Board Meeting will be held on Tuesday, November 26, 2013 at the
Sarnia Education Centre at 7:00 p.m.
19. Adjournment
65
66
Lambton Kent District School Board
Minutes Of The Regular Board Meeting of October 22, 2013 held at the Sarnia Education Centre
Page 1
PRESENT:
Trustees :
Chair Scott McKinlay, Vice-Chair lan Cryer, Anika Altiman , Jane Bryce, Randy
Campbell , Ruth Ann Dodman , Jack Fletcher, Elizabeth Hudie, Judy Krall , Dave
Macko and Carmen McGregor (via teleconference)
Student Trustee
Kristen Dawson and Emily Schaefer
Staff:
Jim Costello, Director of Education , Ron Andruchow, Superintendent of
Business, Superintendents of Education Joy Sadder, Dave Doey, and Phil
Warner and Manager of Human Resources Doug Bestard
Regrets:
Recording Secretary:
Superintendents Mike Gilfoyle and Tat Lounsbury
Trish Johnston , Executive Assistant and Communications Officer
Call to Order:
Chair McKinlay called the Meeting to order at 7:00p.m.
#2013-146
Approval of the Agenda
Oct/22/2013
Moved by Randy Campbell, seconded Dave Macko,
Declaration of Conflict of
Interest:
No declarations of conflict of interest were issued .
#2013-147
Approval of Minutes
Oct/8/2013
Moved by Judy Krall , seconded by Ruth Ann Dodman,
#2013-148
Action of the Regular
Board Private Session be
the Action of the Board
Moved by lan Cryer, seconded by Jane Bryce ,
Presentation
School Within a College
(SWAC)
Superintendent Warner introduced James Morton, System Coordinator of
Alternative and Continuing Education, Heather Burk, SWAC Teacher and Elaine
Welting from St. Clair College and explained that they had been invited to share
information on the innovative practices that are going on between the Board and
St. Clair College. Heather Burk explained that she works mostly with students who
are disengaged from school. She uses various methods to recruit the students
like Ontario Works and also receives referrals from guidance staff. The program is
located at St. Clair College and Lambton College. The students work on
correspondence courses as well as college courses to meet the requirements to
graduate from secondary school. She explained that most of the time it is what
else is going on in their lives that prevents them from being successful in the
secondary school environment. Elaine explained that she was employed by St.
Clair College to run the program for the students that addresses their academic
needs as well as provide support programs. The program is designed to support
the students and build community experiences for the students to help them
succeed. A slide show of student activities was shared . Trustee Hudie
commented that it was a wonderful example of student engagement. Heather
advised that it is a one year program and that there are 25 to 30 students in the
class with some having been out of school for many years. The Ministry of
Education provides full time funding for the program, the same as if the students
were attending a secondary school. The Board also received funding from the
College for the dual credit component. The unique structure of the SWAC
"That the Agenda for the Regular Board Meeting Public Session of October
22 , 2013 be approved ."
CARRIED.
"That the Board approve the Minutes of the Regular Board Meeting of
October 8, 2013."
CARRIED.
'That the Action of the Board in Private Session be the Action of the Board. "
CARRIED.
Lambton Kent District School Board
Minutes Of The Regular Board Meeting of October 22, 2013 held at the Sarnia Education Centre
Page2
~
program with St. Clair College was noted . Heather explained that there has not
been an increase in need over the years but more interest in the program as more
people become aware of the opportunity. The coterminous school board has a
similar program. Elaine Waiting advised that St. Clair College benefits from the
program when students stay on at the College. Students in the program receive a
College student card and are given access to everything at the College. They
receive a $500 bursary upon graduation if they attend one of the Colleges (St. Clair
or Lambton). Heather confirmed that she provides data to the Ministry on how
many credits were attempted and success rate and shared her personal
observations of student success stories. Chair McKinlay thanked the guests for
attending the Board Meeting and for sharing information about there-engagement
program.
Capital Project
Report B-13-140
Superintendent Andruchow explained that the Ministry of Education has
requested school boards to provide the Ministry with an update on their capital
priorities projects. In addition school boards were asked to focus on projects
that support the following needs:
1. Accommodation Pressure - where enrolment is projected to exceed
capacity at a school or within a group of schools.
2. Facility Condition - major retrofit of a school that has a high renewal need
and provides an opportunity to right-size the facility, reduce operating costs
and other benefits such as energy efficiency.
3. School Consolidations resulting from Accommodation Reviews - projects in
this category enable the board to reduce their excess capacity and address
operating costs & renewal needs to better focus available resources. A
final board decision on an accommodation review study must be made by
December 31 , 2013 to be considered for Capital Priorities funding in Spring
2014.
The Board 's multi-year capital priorities plan was reviewed during the
development of the 2013/14 school year budget. The highest priority projects
address system needs in the following categories:
• ARC - School Consolidation projects
• Additions to schools (full size gymnasiums at various Elementary schools)
• Major upgrade and renovation projects for program needs
• Accessibility projects
The Wallaceburg family of schools ARC concluded on June 11 , 2013 with the
Board approving the consolidation of three elementary schools into two and the
configuration of the Wallaceburg District School (WDSS) to a Grade 7 to 12
program. The completion of the Wallaceburg ARC meets all of the Ministries initial
requirements noted in criteria #3 above including the Board 's final decision being
made prior to December 31 , 2013. With this new opportunity to apply for capital
project funding, a comprehensive project to both enhance the learning
environment at WDSS for the Grade 7 and 8 students and the entire school
student body, has been provided as the #1 priority project in the Board 's capital
priorities plan. The proposed project is estimated to cost $8,000,000.
Moved by Jack Fletcher, seconded by Anika Altiman ,
#2013-149
Capital Priorities Projects
List Approved .
"That the Board approve the Capital Priorities projects listed in Report B-13140 for submission to the Ministry of Education's capital funding program. "
Superintendent Andruchow confirmed the partnership with the Municipality of
Chatham-Kent regarding the Wallaceburg pool. The Board owns the pool and the
Municipality manages the day to day operation of the pool for community use. The
school books use of the pool through the Municipality. This arrangement has been
Lambton Kent District School Board
Minutes Of The Regular Board Meeting of October 22, 2013 held at the Sarnia Education Centre
Page 3
in place for over 20 years . It is the only community pool in the community. The
municipality is consulting with the community regarding use of the pool and are
hosting a meeting October 22, 2013.
CARRIED.
OPSBA Update
Trustee Krall shared updates from OPSBA. She reported that Bill 107, An Act to
amend the Education Act with respect to hiring practices for teachers was
defeated in the House. The Ontario government introduced the Schools Board's
Collective Bargaining Act on October 22, 2013. It includes an opportunity for
Trustees to bargain locally. She advised that this is local government week. After
talking with the Director and Board Chair, she contacted schools and arranged four
visits to educate students on role of a Trustee.
Pupil Accommodation
Report
Report B-13-141
Director Costello presented the annual Pupil Accommodation Report . He
acknowledged the contributions to the development of the report by
Superintendent Andruchow, Executive Assistant Johnston and Planning Officer
Vandeschoot. The Vision 2020 enrolment study is referenced in the report .
Elementary enrolment as of September 30, 2013 was 13,322.50 FTE, which
represents a decline of approximately 91.5 FTE from September 24, 2012.
Fortunately, we projected an enrolment FTE of 13,273 for the current school year,
so are plus 49.5 FTE above projection . While we still have a small number of
elementary schools facing declining enrolment challenges, the phase-in of Full Day
Kindergarten (FDK) is creating the need for additional classroom space to
accommodate our kindergarten-aged students over the next year. Currently, we
have 1962 FTE Full Day Kindergarten students in 40 of our elementary school
sites. Next year is the final year of the FDK phase in timeline and we will complete
the implementation schedule at the remaining 12 elementary sites. Secondary
enrolment as of September 30, 2013 was 8,162.50 FTE which represents a
decline of approximately 448.25 FTE from September 24, 2012 . As we had
projected a secondary enrolment of 8,238 FTE, this represents a shortfall of 75.5
FTE. Efforts are currently underway to locate and re-engage secondary students
who have dropped out into our alternative and continuing education centres, as
well as into a number of our secondary pathways to help offset this deficit. He
spoke to the reconfiguration plans for the Wallaceburg schools. The first
Transition Committee Meeting is scheduled for October 23, 2013. He commented
that the Board may need to reconfigure more rural communities with the
Kindergarten to Grade 6 and Grade 7 to 12 model. The LKDSB Engagement
model leads to more equitable access to all four pathways - World of Work,
Skilled Trades Apprenticeship , College and University. Financial data was
provided . The demographic data was outlined as well as the enrolment data.
The enrolment for the last ten years shows a decline. Over the past three years ,
the decline has been averaging 450 or less, in comparison to the previous three
years that each experienced a decline of more than 550. Elementary enrolment
numbers are beg inning to support the prediction that in the next few years , we will
see a more gradual decline in our elementary enrolment. However, secondary
schools continue to experience a more significant decline . Historically, secondary
enrolment averages a 3.5% to 4.0% decline in the number of secondary students
attending in the second semester. The Board has done 34 ARCs since 1998.
Director Costello advised that the focus this year was to ensure a smooth
transition in the Wallaceburg Family of Schools. An elementary boundary
adjustment is required. Administration is meeting next week with Transportation
staff to look at possible boundary options and hope to share information with the
community before the December school break. Director Costello explained that
the LKDSB Engagement Model calls for a change in instructional practice and an
Lambton Kent District School Board
Minutes Of The Regular Board Meeting of October 22 , 2013 held at the Sarnia Education Centre
J.--j
Page 4
expansion of pathway opportunities to provide equitable outcomes for all potential
graduates. Administration is collecting student achievement data in schools where
the model is in effect. For example our LK Connect pilot project in the Dresden
Family of Schools has shown an increase in their Grade 9 Math EQAO scores.
This is a promising result and accordingly we have replicated the project in the
Wallaceburg Family of Schools this year. If the Engagement Model proves to be
as effective in Wallaceburg , Senior Administration may consider similar replication
and expansion to more secondary schools and families of schools. This in turn
would necessitate further accommodation reviews in the future but not this year.
Trustee McGregor questioned if the enrolment decrease at the secondary level
was caused by the labour unrest and if it would improve this year. Director
Costello advised that data was not collected on the topic. Student Trustees
Schaefer and Dawson advised that students did not leave their schools due to
labour issues. Superintendent Warner explained that the enrolment projections
were done in the spring when the labour strife was settling so it was not a factor.
Superintendent Sadder confirmed that as of September almost all of the
elementary Grade 9 students in Wallaceburg were attending Wallaceburg District
Secondary School. Director Costello explained that Administration is studying the
impact of the LK Connect project on student achievement prior to expanding it in
other communities. Chair McKinlay noted that the enrolment in Grade 7 and 8
program at Ridgetown District High School was up 10%. Trustees thanked the
Director for the detailed report.
Parent Involvement
Committee (PIC) Report
Director Costello reported on the first PIC meeting of the year which was held on
September 30, 2013. Four new members joined the Committee. Committee
Members planned the district wide fall event for parents. Dr. Jed Baker, autism
and social skills expert, will speak on November 21 , 2013 at 7:00p.m. at SCITS .
PIC and Special Education Advisory Committee (SEAC) members will cosponsor
the event. Trustees are welcome to attend . Director Costello presented the
LKDSB Engagement Model to the PIC members and gathered input on the
Ministry's seven questions. Information was also provided on the LKDSB mobile
application. Chair McKinlay advised that he had been approached by an individual
to forward information to school councils about protesting Regulation 27 4. He
indicated that he would share it with PIC members.
Correspondence
The Board received a letter from the Aamjiwnaang First Nation supporting
regarding the appointment of Lareina Rising as the First Nation Trustee Alternate.
Trustee Questions
In response to Trustee Dodman's question , Superintendent Andruchow advised
that the Chatham-Kent Secondary School track is not due to be resurfaced in the
2013/2014 school year.
Trustee Fletcher referred to fact that drivers do not slowdown in school zones
and asked what measures the Board had in place to address concerns. Director
Costello commented on the strong working relationship the Board and schools
have with the local police and support provided by the police on any areas of
concern. Superintendent Doey advised that Administration has worked with the
police on a number of occasions on local student safety issues . They monitor
situations such as this one and if they feel it necessary, traffic analysis is done to
determine the best course of action to take. The police work closely with the
school principal. Trustee Fletcher noted the steps taken at P.E. McGibbon
Public School to make the school traffic pattern safer for students.
Announcements
The next Regular Board Meeting will be held on Tuesday, November 12, 2013
at 7:00p.m . at the Chatham Education Centre.
Naahii Ridge Public School Grand Opening will be held on November 14, 2013
Lambton Kent District School Board
Minutes Of The Regular Board Meeting of October 22 , 2013 held at the Sarnia Education Centre
Page 5
6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Adjournment
8:30p.m.
Chair of the Board
There being no further business , Chair McKinlay declared the meeting
adjourned at 8:30 p.m.
Director of Education and Secretary of the Board
:.~.:
Lambton Kent
~ ~ District School Board
Stu(/entAcltierJementL.
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V L mmumt_y ,,uccess
REPORT NO: B-13-142
REGULAR BOARD, PUBLIC SESSION
Report To Board
FROM:
Jim Costello, Director of Education
DATE:
November 12, 2013
SUBJECT:
Policies and Regulations on Accessibility in Employment and
Provision for Accessible Student Transportation Services
In 2005, the Government of Ontario passed the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005
(AODA). Its goal is to make Ontario accessible by 2025. Accessibility standards are being created
as part of the AODA. These standards are rules that businesses and organizations in Ontario need to
follow to identify, remove and prevent barriers so that people with disabilities will have more
opportunities to participate in everyday life.
The Accessibility Standards for Customer Service was the first standard to become law as a
regulation. The Board revised its policy and regulations on Accessibility Standards- Customer
Service in February 2013 to comply with the new legislation.
The next three standards, information and communications, employment, and transportation, have
been combined under one regulation, the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation. This is now
law and the requirements are being phased in between 2011 and 2025. As part of the phase in
process, the Board is required to pass a policy on Accessibility in Employment and Provision for
Accessible Student Transportation Services. The documents have been developed with input from
the Ontario Education Services Corporation (OESC), members of the Board's Human Resources
Department and Special Education Department.
Members of the Board's Information Technology Department are in the process of addressing the
requirements of the information and communications guidelines.
RECOMMENDATION #1:
"That the Board approve the new policy and regulations on Accessibility in Employment."
RECOMMENDATION #2:
"That the Board approve the new policy and regulations on Provision for Accessible Student
Transportation Services."
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POLICY NO.: P-
Latnbton Kent
---·- District School Board
~~
POLICY
SUBJECT:
DRAFT
Accessibility in Employment
It is the policy of the Lambton Kent District School Board to ensure that people with
disabilities have the same opportunity of access to employment opportunities and
services as do all employees and prospectiye employees. The Board is committed to
meeting the accessibility needs of people with disabilities, in a timely manner, in the
provision of services related to employment.
Implementation Date :
Reference: Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 (AODA)
Integrated Accessibility Standards, Ontario Regulation 191/11
Ontario Human Rights Code
Workplace Safety and Insurance Act
Page 1 of l
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REGULATION NO: R-AD-
Larnbton Kent
---·- District School Board
~~
DIIAFT
REGULATIONS
SUBJECT:
Accessibility in Employment
Definitions
The procedure with regard to Accessibility in Employment applies only to employees and does
not apply to volunteers and other non-paid individuals.
Performance management: means activities related to assessing and improving employee
performance, productivity and effectiveness with the goal of facilitating employee success.
Career development and advancement: includes providing additional responsibilities within
an employee's current position and the movement of an employee from one job to another that
may be higher in pay, provide greater responsibility or be at a higher level , or a combination of
these. For both additional responsibilities and employee movement this is usually based on
merit or seniority or a combination of these.
Redeployment: means the reassignment of employees to other departments or jobs as an
alternative to layoff when a particular job or department has been eliminated .
Information: includes data, facts and knowledge that exist in any format, including text, audio ,
digital or images, and that convey meaning.
Communications: means the interaction between two or more persons or entities, or any
combination of them, where information is provided , sent, or received .
Accessible formats: include but are not limited to options such as large print, screen readers,
braille, audio format, captioning .
Conversion-ready: is an electronic or digital format that facilitates conversion into an
accessible format.
WCAG : refers to the World Wide Web Consortium Web Content Accessibility Guidelines
Page 1 of 4
1. Responsibility
A. Supervisory Officers, Principals, Departmental Managers and other staff who have
responsibility for hiring and employee selection and/or supervise the work of employees of
the Board will ensure that the provisions in this procedure are implemented.
B. Staff of the Board's Human Resources department will ensure that the provisions of this
procedure are incorporated in their practices.
C. Unless otherwise stated, the provisions of this procedure will be in place by January 1,
2014.
2. Recruitment
A. The Board will ensure that in its recruitment outreach practices the public is made aware
that the Board will provide accommodation for applicants with disabilities in its recruitment
processes.
B. Employees of the Board will be made aware that the Board provides accommodation for
applicants with disabilities in its recruitment processes.
C. When the Board selects job applicants for a job selection process, the Board will make
applicants aware that, upon request, they have access to accommodations in relation to
materials and processes that will be used for applicant selection and that they will be
consulted about the necessary accommodations that take into account their accessibility
needs due to disability.
D. When the Board makes an offer of employment, the Board will notify the successful
applicant of its policy of accommodating employees with disabilities.
3. Supports for Employees
A. The Board will inform employees of the Board's policy of supporting employees with
disabilities and procedures that provide for job accommodations.
B. The Board will make this information available as soon as practicable to new employees
and will provide updated information as policies are revised .
4. Accessible Formats and Communication Supports
A. Where an employee with a disability so requests, the Board will consult with the employee
to provide or arrange for accessible formats and communication supports in relation to
information that is generally available to employees in the workplace and that the employee
needs to perform the employee's job.
B. The Board, in determining the suitability of an accessible format or communication as
required by 4.1, will consult with the employee.
5. Workplace emergency response information
A. The Board will ensure that individualized workplace emergency response information is
provided to employees who have a disability provided the disability is such that
individualized information is necessary and the Board has been made aware of the need
Page 2 of4
10
for accommodation due to the disability. The Board will provide the necessary information
as soon as practicable after becoming aware of the need for accommodation .
B. If an employee who receives individualized workplace emergency response information
requires assistance, the Board will , with the consent of the employee, provide such
information to the person designated to provide assistance to the employee.
C. The Board will review individualized workplace emergency response information:
(a) When the employee moves to a different location in the Board;
(b) When the employee's overall accommodations needs or plans are reviewed , and
(c) When the Board reviews its general emergency response procedures.
D. The Board will ensure that the requirements of this section are in place as of January 1,
2014.
6.
Individual Accommodation Plans
A. The Board will have in place a written process for the development of documented
individual accommodation plans for employees with disabilities.
B. The Board's written process will address:
(a) How the employee requesting accommodation can participate in the development of the
individual accommodation plan.
(b) The means by which the employee is assessed on an individual basis.
(c) How the Board can request an evaluation by an outside medical or other expert, at the
Board 's expense, to assist in determining if accommodation can be achieved and, if so,
how it can be achieved.
(d) How the employee can request to have a representative of their bargaining unit, or
another workplace representative if the employee is not a member of a bargaining unit,
participate in the development of the accommodation plan.
(e) The steps taken to protect the privacy of the employee's personal information.
(f) The frequency with which the individual accommodation plan will be reviewed and
updated and how this will be done.
(g) How the reasons for denying an individual accommodation plan will be provided to an
employee, if accommodation is denied .
(h) How the Board will ensure that the individual accommodation plan is provided in a
format that takes into account the employee's accessibility needs due to disability.
C. The Board will provide individual accommodation plans that:
(a) Include, if requested any information regarding accessible formats and accommodation
supports provided;
(b) Include, if required , individualized workplace emergency response information; and
(c) Identify any other accommodation to be provided.
7. Return to Work Process
This return to work process does not replace or override any other return to work process
created as a result of any other statutory compliance, e.g . under the Workplace Safety and
Insurance Act.
Page 3 of 4
II
A. The Board will develop, put in place and document a return to work process for its
employees who have been absent from work due to a disability and require disabilityrelated accommodations in order to return to work.
B. The return to work process will:
(a) Outline the steps the Board will take to facilitate the return to work of employees who
were absent because their disability required them to be away from work; and
(b) Use documented individual accommodation plans (as in 6.0) as part of the process.
Ensure that all staff involved in program or course design, delivery and instruction will be
provided with accessibility awareness training related to these responsibilities.
8. Performance Management
A. In administering performance appraisal processes in respect of employees with disabilities,
the Board will take into account the accessibility needs of employees with disabilities as
well as individual accommodation plans.
9. Career Development
A. Where the Board provides career development and advancement to its employees, the
Board will take into account the accessibility needs of employees with disabilities as well as
any individual accommodation plans.
10. Redeployment
A. Where the Board has in place a redeployment process, the Board will take into account the
accessibility needs of employees with disabilities as well as any individual accommodation
plans during the redeployment process.
Implementation Date:
Reference: Board Policy and Regulations
Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 (AODA)
Integrated Accessibility Standards, Ontario Regulation 191/11
Ontario Human Rights Code
Workplace Safety and Insurance Act
Page 4 of 4
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~~.:
POLICY NO.: P-
Larnbton Kent
-----·- District School Board
~~
POLICY
SUBJECT:
Provision for Accessible Student Transportation
Services
It is the policy of the Lambton Kent District School Board to ensure that accessible school
transportation services are provided for students with disabilities in a manner that meets their
unique needs and ensures their safety.
T
Implementation Date:
Reference: Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 (AODA)
Integrated Accessibility Standards, Ontario Regulation 191/11
Ontario Human Rights Code
Page 1 of l
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- ... _.. Lambton Kent
·- -.
--·-
---·-·
-- District School Board
... ~
~ -
rAFT
REGULATION NO: R-AD
REGULATIONS
SUBJECT: Provision for Accessible Student Transportation Services
The Lambton Kent District School Board is committed to meeting , in a timely manner,
the accessibility needs of students with disabilities in the provision of services related to
student transportation.
The provision of accessible student transportation services will include the development
of an individual school transportation plan for each student who has a disability that
affects their transportation to and from school. The plan will be developed by the
Board's Special Education Services in collaboration with the Transportation Provider
and in consultation with the student's parents or guardians.
Definitions
Individual School Transportation Plan: is a plan that provides details of the
arrangements that meet the transportation needs of an individual student who has a
disability.
Operator: means the driver of the school transportation vehicle.
Transportation Provider: is an entity or person who has entered into an agreement
with the board for the transportation of students in accordance with the Education Act.
Transportation Services: means transportation that a board provides for students in
accordance with the Education Act.
1. Responsibility
A The Superintendent responsible for Special Education and the managerial staff
responsible for student transportation will ensure that the provisions of this
administrative procedure are implemented .
Page 1 of 2
Pf
2. Individual School Transportation Plans
A The Superintendent responsible for Special Education or his/her designate will, in
consultation with parents or guardians, annually identify students with disabilities who
require specific transportation services; such identification will, wherever possible, be
made prior to the commencement of the school year.
B. Following consultation with parents or guardians, the Superintendent responsible for
Special Education, or his/her designate, will work with the Student Transportation
Manager, or his/her designate, to develop an individual student transportation plan for
each student with a disability who requires specific transportation services.
3. Content of Individual School Transportation Plans
A An individual school transportation plan shall, in respect of each student with a
disability requiring specific transportation services, include the following:
(a) Details of the student's assistance needs with respect to transportation to and
from school
(b) Provisions for the boarding, securement, and disembarking of the student as
applicable.
4. Communication of responsibilities re Individual School Transportation Plans
A. The Superintendent responsible for Special Education and, where appropriate, the
Student Transportation Manager, will identify and communicate roles and
responsibilities with regard to the implementation of the individual school
transportation plan to the following:
(a) The Transportation Provider
(b) The parents or guardians of the student with the disability
(c) The operator (driver) of the student transportation vehicle
(d) The appropriate members of the school staff (e.g., principal, teacher, educational
assistant)
(e) The student with the disability.
Implementation Date:
Reference: Board Policy & Regulations
Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 (AODA)
Integrated Accessibility Standards, Ontario Regulation 191/11
Ontario Human Rights Code
Page 2 of 2
~~-=
Lambton Kent
~ ~ District School Board
Student AchievementL.
C
. S
I{ Cummumty tlCC<'.ss
REGULAR BOARD, PUBLIC SESSION
REPORT NO: B-13-143
Report To Board
FROM:
Jim Costello, Director of Education
DATE:
November 12, 2013
SUBJECT:
Policy and Regulations - Student Dress Code
According to Board Regulation Development and Review of Board Policies and Regulations,
No. R-AD-1 00 , "All Board Policies and Regulations must be reviewed prior to the fourth year of
implementation, or sooner if necessary."
The policy and regulations on Student Dress Code were reviewed . Changes are not being
recommended to the policy or regulations.
RECOMMENDATION:
"That the Board approve the review of the policy and regulations on Student Dress
Code."
~~
~
La111bton Kent
...
.
.
...
~ ~ District School Board
~-
J(p
POLICY NO: P-AD-133-08
POLICY
I sUBJECT:
Student Dress Code
It is the Policy of the Lambton Kent District School Board that individual schools establish a
student dress code respecting appropriate dress for pupils.
Implementation Date: June 26 , 2001
Reviewed:
May 13, 2008
Reference:
Board Regulations
Page 1 of 1
-
-----
A~... .:
~
';! ~
Lambton Kent
District School Board
POLICY NO: R-AD-133-08
REGULATIONS
I SUBJECT:
Student Dress Code
1.
The principal/designate will review the school's dress code annually with students, school
staff, volunteers working in schools, school council members and parents/guardians.
2.
The review process is designed to enable a majority of parents, through their school
councils, to have input on what an appropriate dress code policy should be in their own
school.
3.
The school's student dress code will relate to fostering a safe and respectful learning and
teaching environment.
4
The school dress code will be consistent with the Human Rights Code and the Charter of
Rights and Freedoms (e.g. disability, religious beliefs) .
5.
Expectations will be stated for student compliance with the school dress code policy and will
take into consideration local circumstances and the principal's authority under the Education
Act.
6.
If a significant change in the dress code (e.g. implementation of uniforms) is being
considered a consensual approach is recommended but a vote may be used. If a vote is
used, a majority of parents is defined at 70% of the parents/guardians (one vote per family)
of registered students in the school. Issues of affordability will be addressed in the process.
7.
No student will be denied access to school as a result of inability to afford appropriate
clothing required by a school's dress code.
Implementation Date: June 26 , 2001
Revised:
May 13, 2008
Reference:
Board Regulations
Page 1 of 1
,cg
A~.:
Lambton Kent
~ ~ District School Board
Sllldenl Achieveme111~..
. S
I( Lummuntty uccess
REGULAR BOARD, PUBLIC SESSION
REPORT NO: B-13-144
Report To Board
FROM:
Jim Costello, Director of Education
DATE:
November 12, 2013
SUBJECT:
Policy and Regulations- Use of Volunteers
According to Board Regulation Development and Review of Board Policies and Regulations,
No. R-AD-1 00, "All Board Policies and Regulations must be reviewed prior to the fourth year of
implementation, or sooner if necessary. "
The policy and regulations on Use of Volunteers were reviewed. Changes are not being
recommended to the policy or regulations.
RECOMMENDATION:
"That the Board approve the review of the policy and regulations on Use of Volunteers."
A~~ Lambton Kent
-..
~~
POLICY NO: P-PR-219-08
District School Board
POLICY
ISUBJECT:
Use of Volunteers
It is the policy of the Lambton Kent District School Board to encourage the use of
volunteers to assist and support schools in the provision of programs and services.
Implementation Date: May 22, 2001
Revised:
May 13, 2008
Reference:
Regulations
Page 1 of 1
- r.: Lambton Kent
a.T
---·- District School Board
~;
REGULATION NO: R-PR-219-08
REGULATIONS
ISUBJECT:
Use of Volunteers
Definitions
A "parent/guardian volunteer'' in a school is a parent or guardian who currently has a child
enrolled in and attending that school.
A "community volunteer'' is a member of the community who does not have a child enrolled
in the school and who agrees to undertake, without pay, a designated task that supports a
classroom, school or Board-sponsored activity.
When not specifically stated , the word "volunteer'' refers to both parent/guardian and
community volunteers. Co-op students are not defined as volunteers.
"Management of volunteers" includes procedures for ongoing screening , orienting/training ,
Responsibility
1. The school board and principal share the responsibility for volunteers.
Assignment and General Role of Volunteers
2. The use of parent/guardian and/or community volunteers is encouraged but remains
optional.
3. Within a school , volunteers are assigned at the discretion of the school principal and in
accordance with the restrictions and requirements outlined in this and other Board
policies and procedures.
4. Volunteers must treat as confidential all personal information which they may acquire in
the course of their involvement in the school.
5. All provisions of board policies and procedures and of negotiated collective agreements
supersede any statements regarding the use of volunteers unless specifically noted
herein.
Page 1
Use of Volunteers
Regulation No. R-PR-219-08
6. Volunteers serving in any capacity are to be assigned appropriately in order to augment
and supplement staff supervising school activities or programs.
d/
7. Volunteers enhance and support student and school activities at the request of and
under the supervision of Board staff, and the principal in particular.
8. Volunteers do not assign disciplinary consequences.
9. Volunteers will not have any responsibility for the diagnosis of learning strengths or
difficulties, the assignment of learning experiences, or the evaluation of pupil progress.
Supervision of Students in Physical Education/Sports Activities
10. Volunteer coaches may, at the discretion of the principal and with a regular staff
member acting as liaison, participate in co-curricular physical education activities.
11. Teams may be coached by volunteers without teacher supervision with the approval of
the principal of the school.
12. Community volunteers will be subject to the high-risk screening process.
13. All non-employee volunteer coaches must be qualified as a coach for the sport in
question and be present at practice and game. Parents must be informed if the coach is
a non-employee volunteer.
14. When an overnight trip occurs at least one adult supervisor, either a coach or an
approved volunteer, must be the same sex as the athletes.
Liability
15.1n any school-sponsored activity that is undertaken by a volunteer, the Board's liability
insurance regarding negligence will apply.
16. The principal must make the volunteers aware that the Board's insurance does not
include a loss-of-income provision should the volunteer sustain an injury that prevents
him/her from resuming his/her normal employment.
Screening and Risk Management
17. Recognizing that the welfare of students is at all times of paramount importance, all
board employees are required to exercise their full responsibility for the care, welfare
and supervision of pupils. In this regard, all volunteers must be assessed as to their
suitability for placement within a school or program setting.
18. The process of screening for volunteers begins from the very moment a person applies
or is recruited to the time he/she terminates this commitment. The degree of screening
is dependent upon the volunteer activity; the extent of interaction with, and responsibility
for students and the degree of direct supervision of the volunteer. Levels of risk are
outlined below:
Page 2 of 3
Regulation No. R-PR-219-08
Use of Volunteers
Level of Risk
in classroom under direct supervision of staff
Low Risk
•
•
•
in open, common area (e.g. hallways, library, gym) with
intermittent observation
Medium Risk
in isolated area working with a group of students, (e.g. band)
High Risk
Initial
a)
b)
c)
in isolated area working with one or two students (e.g. tutoring)
Coaching or other group or individual activity off-site
screening tools include but are not limited to:
Volunteer intake interview
Reference checks
Police/criminal record checks
19. Most volunteer activities in the school are considered low risk; for example, if the
parent/guardian volunteer is working in the classroom or an open, common area with a
group of students under direct supervision or intermittent observation by staff. Where
the principal deems the volunteer activity to be of low risk, the principal or designate
may allow a parent of a child in the school to volunteer without screening provided the
principal or designate has verified that the parent/guardian volunteer has the necessary
skills and/or experience.
20. Where the principal deems the volunteer activity to be of medium to high risk and for all
community volunteers, the principal or designate will complete the screening process as
outlined in the Board's Administrative Procedures.
Implementation Date: May 22, 2001
Revised:
May 13, 2008
Reference:
Policy
Page 3 of 3
=.~.:
Lambton Kent
~~ District School Board
StudentAchievementL.
. S
'(' C()nmuuu
0
~v uccess
REPORT NO.: B-13-145
REGULAR BOARD PUBLIC SESSION
REPORT TO BOARD
FROM:
JIM COSTELLO, DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
DATE:
NOVEMBER 12, 2013
SUBJECT:
POLICY & REGULATIONS ON SUSPENSION REVIEWS AND APPEALS
In September 2013, the Board reviewed the policy and regulations on Suspension of a Student as
part of the Board's cyclical review. Changes were made to the documents to align with the Board's
Safe Schools Policy statement and the provisions of Bill 13.
The Board's regulations on Suspension Reviews and Appeals have now been reviewed and changes
have been made to align with the Board's Safe Schools Policy statement and to incorporate the
provisions of Bill 13.
Recommendation:
"That the Board approve the revised regulations on Suspension Reviews and Appeals."
Lambton Kent
-a.~-·--.: District
School Board
~
REGULATIONS
SUBJECT:
REGULATION NO: A-R-113.1-
DRAFT
Suspension Reviews and Appeals
Where a student has been suspended, a request to review the suspension, or a request to appeal
the suspension may be made by the parent/guardian of a minor student, or the student if 16 or 17
years of age and having withdrawn from parental control, or the student if 18 years of age or
older.
Requests for review of a suspension must be received either verbally or in writing within 3 days of
the start date of the suspension.
Requests to appeal a suspension must be received in writing within 10 days of the start of the
suspension, and will automatically result in a review of the suspension as a preliminary step.
Review of a Suspension
1. The review will be conducted by the Superintendent of Education or designate. The
review may involve but not necessarily be limited to: the circumstances from which the
suspension arose, the reason(s) for the suspension , the duration of the suspension ,
mitigating or other factors, or any other information deemed relevant to the review.
2. The Superintendent of Education may consult with the principal with regard to
modifying or expunging the suspension.
3. The Superintendent of Education will notify the adult pupil or pupil's parent I guardian
as to the outcome of the review.
Appeal of a Suspension
1. An appeal of a suspension does not stay the suspension.
2. The appeal shall be heard by a Suspension Review Committee, a committee of the Board , as
constituted by the Chairperson of the Board.
3. The Board shall hear and determine the appeal within fifteen (15) school days of
receiving notice of the appeal , unless the parties agree on a later deadline, and shall not
refuse to deal with the appeal on the grounds that there is a deficiency in the notice of
the appeal.
4. The appeal will be conducted in camera, and in accordance with the Education Act,
Board policy, regulations, and administrative procedures, and not be subject to the
Statutory Powers Procedure Act.
Page 1 of 5
SUSPENSION REVIEWS AND APPEALS
Regulation No. A-R-113.1-
5. Upon receipt of written notice of intention to appeal the suspension, the Superintendent
of Education:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Will promptly advise the principal of the appeal, and the review prerequisite;
Will promptly advise the adult pupil or the pupil's parent I guardian that a review
of the suspension will take place and invite the appellant to discuss any matter
respecting the incident and I or appeal of the suspension;
Will review the suspension, which may involve but not necessarily be limited to:
the circumstances from which the suspension arose, the reason(s) for the
suspension, the duration of the suspension, mitigating or other factors, or any
other information deemed relevant to the review;
May consult with the principal with regard to modifying or expunging the
suspension;
May work independently, or may request a meeting with the adult pupil or the
pupil's parent I guardian and the principal to narrow the issues and try to effect
a settlement;
Will, where a settlement is not effected, provide notice of the review decision to
the adult pupil or pupil's parent I guardian.
6. Where the suspension is upheld on review and the adult pupil or pupil's parent
/guardian chooses to continue with the appeal, the Superintendent of Education will:
Arrange a date for the appeal before the Suspension Review Committee;
Co-ordinate the preparation of a written report for the Committee. The report
will contain but may not be limited to the following components:
i. A report of the incident and rationale for suspension prepared by the
principal;
ii. A copy of the original suspension letter;
iii. A copy of the letter requesting the Suspension Appeal; and,
iv. A copy of the correspondence with respect to the decision of the
Superintendent of Education regarding the outcome of the suspension
review.
7. Inform the adult pupil or the pupil's parent I guardian of the date of the Suspension
Appeal meeting, provide a guide to the process for the appeal, and a copy of the
documentation that will go the Suspension Review Committee.
The Suspension Appeal Meeting
1. The Area Superintendent or designate will act in an advisory role to the committee on
procedural matters during the suspension hearing and the committee's subsequent
deliberations, ensure that a copy of the principal's report is forwarded to the appellant
and to the committee prior to the appeal , and to ensure that any documents, reports
and/or submissions prepared by the appellant are provided to the Principal and the
committee at the earliest opportunity prior to, or at the beginning of the Appeal.
2. The parties to the appeal shall include the parent/guardian of a minor student, or the
student if 16 or 17 years of age having withdrawn from parental control , or the student if
18 years of age or older, and the Principal or designate. The pupil may also attend the
suspension appeal.
Page 2 of 5
SUSPENSION REVIEWS AND APPEALS
Regulation No. A-R-113.1-
3. An advocate may represent the appellant. Prior notice of an advocate's attendance at
the appeal must be provided to the area superintendent or designate. If prior notice is
not provided, the suspension appeal may be re-scheduled. The committee and I or the
principal may exercise the right to legal counsel.
4. The principal will prepare a report summarizing the incident, the evidence relied upon
and the rationale for discipline, including the student's disciplinary and academic history,
any progressive discipline strategies that have been undertaken, and any mitigating or
other factors that may be applicable.
5. The committee of the Board may decide that the suspension was:
a. justified and should be upheld; or
b. justified but that the number of days imposed was too many, in which case the
committee may reduce the length of the suspension and amend the record of
suspension accordingly;
c. justified, but that the record of suspension be removed after a period of time if
there are no further incidents requiring discipline;
d. not justified, in which case the record of suspension will be expunged, and the
pupil will be permitted to return to school, if the suspension remains outstanding;
or such other order as the committee considers appropriate.
6. When making their determination the committee shall consider the:
a. principal's report and submissions;
b. submissions and any other information provided by the appellant; and
c. analysis and application of the mitigating and other factors, which may or may
not be applicable in the circumstances.
7. The committee may give such directions or make such orders at a suspension appeal
as it considers necessary for the maintenance of order at the appeal. Should any
person disobey or fail to comply with any such order and direction, a trustee may call for
the assistance of a police officer to enforce the direction.
8. The committee will wait for thirty (30) minutes after the time communicated for the
commencement of the suspension appeal. If the appellant or their representative has
not yet attended and notice that they may be late has not been provided, the committee
may proceed to hear the appeal or dismiss the appeal in their absence.
9.
At the outset of the meeting, the superintendent will invite the parties into the
meeting room and introduce the parties to the committee.
10. The superintendent will introduce the committee and will indicate that:
a. they have been appointed by the Board to hear the matter;
b. they are not connected as trustees to the school in question;
c. they have had no prior involvement with the matter that has come before them;
d. this matter will be heard In Camera (in private); and
e. the decision of the committee is final.
Page 3 of 5
SUSPENSION REVIEWS AND APPEALS
Regulation No. A-R-113.1-
11. The superintendent will call the meeting to order.
12. The superintendent will outline the:
a. process to be followed during the suspension appeal;
b. matter on appeal before the committee, including the suspension that was imposed
and the infraction for which the pupil was suspended .
13. The superintendent will distribute copies of the principal's report and any documents
submitted by or to be submitted by the appellant to the committee. The committee may
choose to call a brief recess in order to review the submissions.
14. The Administration will be invited to make a presentation.
a. Either the Principal or the Superintendent of Education will review the Report
provided to the Discipline Committee and the Appellant, and provide any response
to the Appellant's presentation.
b. Trustees may ask questions of clarification through the Chair.
c. The Appellant may ask questions of clarification through the Chair
15. The appellant will be invited to make an oral presentation.
a. trustees may ask questions of clarification through the Chair
b. the administration may ask questions of clarification through the Chair
16. The pupil will be invited to make a statement on his or her own behalf to the
committee.
a. trustees may ask questions of clarification through the Chair
b. the administration may ask questions of clarification through the Chair
17. At the conclusion of both presentations, the appellant and administration will be invited
to make summary statements but may not introduce new issues. The committee may
choose to call a brief recess prior to hearing the summary statements.
18. Trustees may ask final questions of clarification.
19. The superintendent will explain that:
a. except for the committee, all persons will be asked to leave the room while the
trustees deliberate and make their decision;
b. the superintendent will be informed of the decision by the committee
20. The superintendent will contact the parties involved by phone the next day with the
decision of the committee. Written notice shall also be provided to the adult student or
the student's parent/guardian informing them of the decision of the committee.
21. The decision of the committee is final.
Implementation Date:
Revised:
Reference:
September 12, 2001
January 29, 2008
Policy & Regulations
Education Act
Page 4 of 5
A~.:
Lambton Kent
~ ~ District School Board
. S
vc mmumty
. uccess
StudetttAcltii'vettletttLCo
BOARD REPORT
REGULAR BOARD, PUBLIC SESSION
REPORT NO: B-13-146
Memorandum To:
Jim Costello, Director of Education
FROM:
Ron Andruchow, Superintendent of Business & Treasurer
DATE:
November 12, 2013
SUBJECT:
2012-2013 School Year Audited Financial Statements
The audit of the 2012-2013 school-year financial operations has been completed and is being
presented to the Board this evening.
The firm of Bailey Kearney Ferguson , Chartered Accountants, was appointed by the Board to
perform this past school year's annual audit of its financial statements. Following Board review
and approval these audited financial statements will be submitted to the Ministry of Education.
The LKDSB Audit Committee met on November 6, 2013 to review the 2012-13 draft financial
statements and the results of the external audit.
Attached to this report are the following financial data:
• Management Report to the Board from the Director and Superintendent of Business
and Treasurer
• Auditors' report and notes to the financial statements
Financial Statement Schedules
(Noted as draft until they have been approved by the Board.)
For the Year Ended August 31, 2013:
• Schedule 1 - Consolidated Statement of Financial Position
• Schedule 1.1 - Consolidated Statement of Operations
• Schedule 1.2 -Consolidated Statement of Cash Flow
• Schedule 1.3 -Consolidated Statement of Change in Net Debt
Page 1 of2
2012-213 Audited Financial Statements
Report B-13-
During the 2012-13 school year, the Lambton Kent DSB implemented numerous Ministry of
Education projects that were carried out as additionally funded projects outside of the regular
Grants for Student Needs (GSN). Samples of these projects are listed here and were focused
on providing support to the Board's schools and students.
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Collaborative Inquiry- Mathematics
Small and Northern Boards Mathematics
Autism Supports and Training
Early Primary Collaborative Inquiry
Aboriginal Education FNMI
Schools Helping Schools Networking
Library Elementary Schools Staffing project
MISA Local Capacity
Schools in the Middle/OFIP Support
Math/Literacy Professional Learning
OLE - French as a Second Language
Specialist High Skills Majors (SHSM)
Student Success
Community Use of Schools Coordinators
Full Day EY Phase 4 Implementation
Mr. Kevin Sabourin, partner with the firm of Bailey Kearney Ferguson and Sandy Anderson,
Manager of Financial Services for the Lambton Kent DSB will be attending the meeting this
evening. Mr. Sabourin will present and explain the Auditors' Report, the Financial Statement
Forms attached to this report and answer questions pertaining to these financial statements.
Sandy Anderson coordinated the board's work within our accounting office, provided all
necessary support to the audit process and completed the Ministry year-end financial
statements.
Through the collective efforts of the Board, our Administrative staff and school leaders, the
LKDSB achieved a successful financial operation for the 2012-13 school year.
Recommendation:
"That the Audit Committee recommends to the Lambton Kent District School Board the
approval of the annual audited Financial Statements and the accompanying Auditors' Report
for the year ending August 31, 2013."
MANAGEMENT REPORT
Management's Responsibility for the Consolidated Financial Statements
The accompanying con olidatcd financial statements of the Lambton Kent District School Board are the
responsibility of the Board management and ha e been prepared in accordance with the Financial Administration
Act, supplemented by Ontario Ministry of Education memorandum 2004:B2 and Ontario Regulation 305/ 11 of
the Financial Administration Act, as described in Note I to the consolidated financial statements.
The preparation of con olidated financial statements necessarily involves the use of estimate based on
management's judgement particularly when tran action affecting the current accounting period cannot be
finalized with certainty until future periods.
Board management maintain a y tern of internal control designed to provide rea onable as urance that assets
are safeguarded, transactions are properly authorized and recorded in compliance with legislative and regulatory
requirements, and reliable financial infonnation is a ailable on a timely basis for preparation of the consolidated
financial statements. These system are monitored and evaluated by management.
The Board meets with management and the external auditors to review the consolidated financial statements and
discuss any significant financial reporting or internal control matters prior to their approval of the consolidated
financial statements.
The consolidated financial statements have been audited by Bailey Kearne Fergu on LLP, independent external
auditors appointed by the Board. The accompanying Independent Auditor 'Report outlines their responsibilities,
the scope of their examination and their opinion on the Board's consolidated financial statements.
Director of Education
November 12, 20 13
Superintendent of Business -Treasurer
I
~I
I
INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT
To the Board of Trustees of the
Lambton Kent District School Board
We have audited the accompanying consolidated financial statements of Lil
a·
·
nt District School Board
which comprise the_ consolidated statement of. financial position as at Au "' st 3 2013 and the co~sol_idated
statements of operatiOns, cash flow and change m net debt for the years th
•· . , and a summary of stgmficant
accounting policies and other explanatory information.
Management's Responsibility for tbe Consolidated Financialfa
Ste nts
Management is responsible for the preparation of these consolid
n cial statements in accordance with the
m
ia
ements, and for such internal control as
basis of accounting described in note 1 to the consolidated~
management determines is necessary to enable the prepara · n o
nsolidated financial statements that are free
from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.
Auditors' Responsibility
r
t
the~~~ed
Our responsibility is to express an opinion on
financial statements based on our audit. We
conducted our audit in accordance with Canadia f Jal accepted auditing standards. Those standards require
that we comply with ethical requirements and I
erform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about
whether the consolidated financial statement
om material misstatement.
An audit involves performing procedures to
audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the
Tocedures selected depend on the auditors' judgement, including the
consolidated financial statements.~;
assessment of the risks of material m· ta
t of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to fraud or
error. In making those risk asses~ e auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity's preparation
of the consolidated financial
tern ts in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the
circumstances, but not for th
rpos of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity's .internal
control. An audit also inclu
e a · ng the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness
of accounting estimates rna
management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated
fmancial statements.
We believe that the ,.. __ ..,.,e,vidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our
qualified audit opi : n.
Basis for Qualifie
I
inion
In common Wl~
.
school boards, individual schools derive revenue from school fundraising activities held
througho ~ - y . , the completeness of which is not susceptible to satisfactory audit verification. Accordingly,
our veri a ·
these revenues was limited to the amounts recorded in the records of the individual schools.
We w
able to determine whether any adjustments might be necessary to school fundraising revenue,
us, financial assets and net financial assets (net debt).
I________- ------
Qualified Opinion
I
In our opinion, except for the possible effects of adjustments, if any, had the fundraising revenue in the p
paragraph been susceptible to complete audit verification, the consolidated financial statements as at an
year ended August 31, 2013 are prepared, in all material respects, in accordance with the basis oraW:ibtJ.Jing
described in Note 1 to the financial statements.
Emphasis of Matter
Without modifying our opinion, we draw attention to note 1 to the consolidated financia
describes the basis of accounting used in the preparation of these consolidated tina a
significant differences between such basis of accounting and Canadian public sector acco ting
Dater
Wallaceburg, Ontario
Chartered AccouWifiRSl~tr.·
Licensed Public
33
(a)
BASIS OF ACCOUNTING
The consolidated financial statements have been prepared
Administration Act supplemented by Ontario Ministry of E
Ontario Regulation 395/11 ofthe Financial Administratio~~
The Financial Administration Act requires that the co , tidat
~financial statements be prepared
in accordance with the accounting principles determin
e relevant Ministry of the Province
of Ontario. A directive was provided by the Ont
of Education within memorandum
2004:B2 requiring school boards to adopt
public sector accounting standards
commencing with their year ended August 31,
d that changes may be required to the
application of these standards as a result of r.· lati
j
i
i
In 2011 , the government passed Ontario~
· · egu 1on 395/11 ofthe Financial Administration Act.
The Regulation requires that contrib ions eceived or receivable for the acquisition or
development of depreciable tangi
· assets and contributions of depreciable tangible
be recorded as deferred capital contributions and be
capital assets for use in providin
recognized as revenue in the con
statement of operations over the periods during which
the asset is used to provide s
e same rate that amortization is recognized in respect of
the related asset. The reg tion
her requires that if the net book value of the depreciable
tangible capital asset is reduce
any reason other than depreciation, a proportionate reduction
of the deferred capit
ntribution along with a proportionate increase in the revenue be
recognized. For 0 ar·
ool boards, these contributions include government transfers,
externally restri~
ce
"butions and, historically, property tax revenue.
The accounting
!icy I)quirements under Regulation 395/11 are significantly different from the
a.dflfu public sector accounting standards which require that
requiremen~
•
gove
ent transfers, which do not contain a stipulation that creates a liability, be
as revenue by the recipient when approved by the transferor and the
criteria have been met in accordance with public sector accounting standard
.£~~fniz
~ ~ility
•~esources
L i :xter~:l;ly
n.J
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V
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restricted contributions be recognized as revenue in the period in which the
are used for the purpose or purposes specified in accordance with public sector
accounting standard PS31 00; and
property taxation revenue be reported as revenue when received or receivable in
accordance with public sector accounting standard PS3510.
As a result, revenue recognized in the consolidated statement of operations and certain related
deferred revenues and deferred capital contributions would be recorded differently under
Canadian Public Sector Accounting Standards.
- 1-
I
~----·---·-------·
(b)
reporting entity. The reporting entity is comprised of all organiz t . ns accountable for the
hich are controlled by
administration of their financial affairs and resources to the Bo
the Board.
School generated funds, which include the assets, liabili ie
es and expenses of various
organizations that exist at the school level and which are c~·tr~~-~ by the Board are reflected in
the consolidated financial statements as noted in t~ , paragraph of the Independent
Auditors' Report.
~
TRUSTFUNDS
(c)
Trust funds and their related operations a inis
consolidated financial statements as the.?
c~ tr
(d)
v
marketabl~~
. ~
.
INVESTMENTS
d by the Board have been included in the
ed by the Board.
Investments consist of
ties which are recorded at cost. Investments are
assessed regularly for impairmen~~itten down if a permanent impairment exists.
(e)
DEFERRED REVENUE
A
receive~ant to legislation, regulation or agreement and may only be
Certain amounts are
used in the conduct o
in programs or in the delivery of specific services and transactions.
as revenue in the fiscal year the related expenses are incurred or
services performe
DEFERRED~-
(f)
ONTRIBUTIONS
Contribution
ceived or receivable for the purpose of acquiring or developing a depreciable
tangible capita sset for use in providing services, or any contributions in the form of
depre ~ tangible assets received or receivable for use in providing services, shall be
re~ize~ deferred capital contributions as defined in Ontario Regulation 395/11 of the
p· · n l Administration Act. These amounts are recognized as revenue at the same rate as the
re
- tangible capital asset is amortized. The following items fall under this category:
~ Government transfers received or receivable for capital purpose
/l3
~
Other restricte.d contributions ~eceived o~ rec:ivable for capital purp.ose
Property taxation revenues which were histoncally used to fund capital assets
()
-2L_________ _
-·--·---..
--~------------ ..
-
----------·--·-
.
-I
.1
.I
!
1. SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)
(g)
RETIREMENT AND OTHER EMPLOYEE FUTURE BENEFITS
The Board provides defined retirement and other future benefits t speci a·employee groups.
These benefits include pension, life insurance, and health care be . 1ts, retirement gratuity,
worker's compensation and long-term disability benefits. In 2 ~·
· nges were made to the
Board's retirement gratuity plan, sick leave plan and retire
ife and dental plan. The
Board was not impacted by the changes to retiree health, · fe
dental plan entitlements as
retirees are responsible for the entire premiums. The B
opted the following policies
with respect to accounting for these employee benefits:
(i)
e . ployee future benefit plans are
The costs of self-insured retirement and
actuarially determined using manage~n
'
> st estimate
of salary escalation,
accumulated sick days at retirement, in
· ce nd health care costs trends, disability
n
scount rates. In prior years, the cost of
recovery rates, long-term inflatio=nat
retirement gratuities that vested or. cum ted over the periods of service provided by
the employee were actuarially d
. sing management's best estimate of salary
escalation, accumulated sick d s at tirement and discount rates. As a result of the
plan change, the cost of r · ' en gratuities are actuarially determined using the
employee's salary, banke
ys and years of service as at August 31, 2012 and
ount rates. The changes resulted in a plan curtailment
management's best estii&
and any unamortized act ·
ains and losses are recognized as at August 31, 2012.
Any actuarial gain~'i~ arising from changes to the discount rate are amortized
over the expected a~~maining service life of the employee group.
·
For self-insur
over the peri
benefits fo
method
tirement and other employee future benefits that vest or accumulated
ice provided by employees, such as life insurance and health care
s, the cost is actuarially determined using the projected benefits
service. Under this method, the benefit costs are recognized over the
service life of the employee group. The changes to the retiree health,
plans resulted in a plan curtailment and any unamortized actuarial gains
and · es associated with the employees impacted by the change are recognized as at
st , 2012.
hose self-insured benefit obligations that arise from specific events that occur from
o time, such as obligations for worker's compensation, long-term disability and life
insurance and health care benefits for those on disability leave, the cost is recognized
immediately in the period the events occur. Any actuarial gains and losses that are
related to these benefits are recognized immediately in the period they arise.
The costs of multi-employer defined pension plan benefits, such as the Ontario
Municipal Employees Retirement System pensions, are the employer's contributions due
to the plan in the period;
(iii)
The costs of insured benefits are the employer's portion of insurance premiums owed for
coverage of employees during the period.
-3'·--·---------·----·-----·-·---·---------·-----------·--------·--·
Q
1. SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)
(h)
TANGIBLE CAPITAL ASSETS
Tangible capital assets are recorded at historical cost less accumul ted am ization. Historical
cost includes amounts that are directly attributed to acquisition, co · uction, development or
betterment of the asset, as well as interest related to financi
construction. When
historical cost records were not available, other methods w
o estimate the costs and
accumulated amortization.
Leases which transfer substantially all of the benefits
s incidental to ownership of
property are accounted for as leased tangible capital a~
_M · other leases are accounted for as
operating leases and the related payments are charged ~3ses as incurred.
Tangible capital assets, except land, are amortizL A straight line basis over their estimated
~
useful lives as follows:
J
Asset
rAu
Buildings
Portable structures
First-time equipping of schools
Equipment
Computer hardware
~J
Estimated Useful Life in Years
40
20
10
r\
Y
5-15
5
Computer software
5
5-10
Vehicles
Assets unde!f
.n c · are recorded as construction in progress and are not amortized until the
asset is ava · 1 or productive use.
Land~e
anen removed from service and held for resale is recorded at the lower of cost and
estim · net realizable value. Cost includes amounts for improvements to prepare the land for
I
e · ing. Buildings permanently removed from service and held for resale cease to be
d and are recorded at the lower of carrying value and estimated net realizable value.
capital assets which meet the criteria for financial assets are reclassified as "Assets held
' on the Consolidated Statement of Financial Position.
-4-
1. SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)
(i)
GOVERNMENT TRANSFERS
1ze
fer occur, providing the
-~em1?tnable estimates of the
Investment income is reported as revenue in th
When required by the funding governm t or elated Act, investment income earned on
externally restricted funds such as pup~co · . dation, education development changes and
special education forms part of the resp tive ferred revenue balance.
(k)
BUDGET FIGURES
r.A
provi~~~mparison
Budget figures have been
purposes and have been derived from the
budget approved by the T ste ~~he budget approved by the Trustees is developed in
accordance with the provi · lly andated funding model for school boards and is used to
manage program spending wt · the guidelines of the funding model. Given differences
between the funding~
and Canadian generally accepted accounting principles established
by the Public Secto
ing Board, the budget figures presented have been adjusted to
1
f accounting as it is used to prepare the consolidated financial
conform with th'
statements. The · udge - tgures are unaudited.
The pre ·!aration consolidated financial statements in conformity with the basis of accounting
desc · ' in note L(a) requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the
ed a
nts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the
he consolidated financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses
the year. Accounts subject to significant estimates include the estimated useful life of
~-mil~ Capital Assets and the liability related to Employee Future Benefits. Actual results
~ ld differ from these estimates.
Q
-5-
j
.I
I
2012
Cost
Cost
Mutual Funds
$
Interest bearing investments maturing within
one year
Market Value
732,340
573,025
1,971,727
2,640,847
2,641,679
6,580,882
6,769,179
Interest bearing investments maturing in more
than one ear
10,140,281 $
$
9,794,754
$
$
573,025
9,983,883
3. ACCOUNTSRECEIVABLE-GOVERNMENT
The Province of Ontario replaced variablef:lla
ing with a one-time debt support grant in 20091 d a one-time grant that recognized capital debt as of
2010. Lambton Kent District School Boar
August 31, 2010 that is supported by the ~~~ pita] programs. The Board receives this grant in cash
over the remaining term of the existi ~~ debt instruments. The Board may also receive annual
capital grants to support capital pro
s wli h are also reflected in this accounts receivable.
The Board has an account receiv le fro
with respect to this capital debt p
he Province of Ontario of $43,943,483 (2012 - $47,073,635)
-6-
.I
. I
4. NET LONG-TERM DEBT
The Board has entered into six loan agreements with the Ontario Financing A hori
assisting school boards with financing the Good Places to Learn and Primary Class
2013
4.560% Loan payable semi-annually $3 70,973 including interest, ' - . '
maturing November, 2031
r:o~
~'
$
rA
4.900% Loan payable semi-annually $397,678 including inter
maturing March, 2033
2012
9,205,111
$
9,516,610
10,006,208
10,300,405
5.062% Loan payable semi-annually $237,756 includin:s·~~
maturing March, 2034
6,076,680
6,238,425
5.232% Loan payable semi-annually $128,180 in
maturing April, 2035
3,319,410
3,398,965
9,045,489
9,259,209
2,923,087
3,000,000
~Ill
rest,
4.833% Loan payable semi-annually $329,3
maturing March, 2036
3.564%
i
J
3.799%
.,
995,401
I
41,571,386
41,713,614
1,216,996
1,137,629
~,
Less:
I
$
40 354,390
$
40,575 985
all times with the Board's obligations in respect of the debt and financial
ility limits applicable to it under the Education Act and the regulations made
thereunder.~"lure
the Board to pay any principal, interest, fees or other amounts payable by it under
these loan
ents constitutes an event of default. The Minister of Finance is entitled to deduct from
· ted by the Legislature for payment to the Board amounts equal to any amounts that the
monies ! : o
under these loan agreements.
Board f: s
obligations an
Pr~~~ interest repayments required on net long-tenn debt are approximately as follows:
~
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
Princi al
$
$
$
$
$
-7-
1,216,996
1,275,274
1,336,362
1,400,398
1,467,524
Interest
$
$
$
$
$
1,956,264
1,897,986
1,836,898
1,772,862
1,705,736
Total
$ 3,173,260
$ 3,173,260
$ 3,173,260
$ 3,173,260
$ 3,173,260
40
5. DEFERRED REVENUE
Revenues received and that have been set aside for specific purposes by 1 islati , regulation or
agreement are included in deferred revenue and reported on the Consolidated
ent of Financial
Position.
~
Deferred revenue set-aside for specific purposes by legislation, regulaoi
comprised of:
~ent as at August 31
~
Proceeds of disposition
Special education - equipment 1
Special education - Full-day kindergarten
Retrofitting school space for child care
School renewal
1
Dcl'orr<d ""'"""" "'""' to ""'"' progrnm' "" •
"'"~
q
~
~0
~~
~
- 8-
2013
2012
$
266,166 $
1,683,177
327,366
1,061,237
1,122,944
$
4,460,890
funding period than the Board's fiscal year.
is
$
441,962
884,229
171,400
1,497,591
J.fl
a
6. RETIREMENT AND OTHER EMPLOYEE FUTURE BENEFITS
Actuarial Valuation of Future Benefit Liabilities
The Board engaged a qualified actuary to perform a valuation of the liabili
. future benefits
liabilities. The valuation specifically addresses the liability for Retireme · ratuities, carry-over sick
leave benefits and Workers' Compensation benefits.
The valuation was completed as at August 31, 2013 based on data pro ·
at the valuation date. The
valuation takes into account all of the relevant plan changes de · ribe e ow. The valuation was
c
cto andbook. The actuary has
completed in accordance with the requirements of the CICA Pub~
also p~ovided projections of the future benefit amounts basedc .i n
'ion available at the time ofthe
valuatiOn.
The following amounts were provided by the actuary and ar ·n ~~ in the Board's financial statements.
Liabilities
2013
Other
Employee
Future
Benefits
$
I
I
1,795,013 $
2012
Total
Employee
Future
Benefits
Total
Employee
Future
Benefits
28,014,826
$
28,091,972
$
28,091,972
770,821
Employee future benefits liability
at Au ust 31
$
26,990,634
$
1,795,013 $
28,785,647
2012
2013
Exl!ense
Other
Employee
Future
Benefits
Retirement
Gratuities
$
$
396,715 $
Total
Employee
Future
Benefits
396,715
789,907
45,121
835,028
1,827,000
38,221
1,865,221
Total
Employee
Future
Benefits
$
(17,624,364)
ition of unamortized actuarial gains
an amendments/curtailments I
$
1
2,616,907
$
480,057 $
Excluding pension contributions to the OMERS, a multi-employer pension plan, described above.
-9' - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ------·-·
3,096,964
1,169,656
1,855,753
1,670,765
$
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STA
I
I
6. RETIREMENT AND OTHER EMPLOYEE FUTURE BENEFITS (continued)
Piau Changes
In 2012, changes were made to the Board's retirement gratuity plan, sick leave pia
etiree health, life
and dental plan. As a result, employees eligible for a retirement gratui will receive payout upon
retirement based on their accumulated vested sick days under the plan,
rvice and salary as of
August 31 , 2012. All accumulated non-vested sick days were eliminat
September 1, 2012, and
were replaced with a new short term leave and disability plan. In 20e ,
· e changes were made to the
short-term leave and di~ability plan .. Under the ne~ short-term leav nd sability plan, 11 unused _sick
leave days may be earned forward mto the followmg year only,
-·~ d to top-up benefits recetved
under the short-term leave and disability plan in that year. Ar:§a~on was established as of August
31, 2013 representing the expected usage of sick days that ha
n rried forward for benefit top-up in
the following year.
r .A
~J
Retirement benefits
(i)
Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan
Teachers and related employee
eligible to be members of Ontario Teachers'
Pension Plan. Employer contrib ions . r these employees are provided directly by the
on . ·~g- s and obligations related to this plan are a direct
Province of Ontario. The p
responsibility of the Provin
_ rdingly, no costs or liabilities related to this plan are
included in the Board's co
id~ financial statements.
(ii)
Ontario Municipal E ,· oy
All non-teaching emplo
of the Board are eligible to be members of the Ontario
·
s Retirement System (OMERS), a multi-employer pension plan. The
Municipal Emp~
plan provides fi .
nsion benefits to employees based on their length of service and
Board contributions equal the employee contributions to the plan.
rates of pa
During th . ye en<ied August 31 , 2013, the Board contributed $2,835,083 (2012 $2,512, 4 to t plan. As this is a multi-employer pension plan, these contributions are
the B d' pe ton benefit expenses. No pension liability for this type of plan is included
in the
rd's consolidated financial statements.
(iii) 14tirement Gratuities
:'T~ard
<)
provided retirement gratuities to certain groups of employees hired prior to
ecified dates. The Board provides these benefits through an unfunded defined benefit
an. The benefit costs and liabilities related to this plan are included in the Board's
nsolidated financial statements. In the prior year, the amount of gratuities payable to
ligible employees at retirement was based on their salary, accumulated sick days, and
years of service at retirement. As a result of the plan change, the amount of the gratuities
payable to eligible employees at retirement is now based on their salary, accumulated sick
days, and years of service at August 31 , 2012. The changes to the Board's retirement
gratuity plan resulted in a one-time decrease to the Board's obligation of $8,054,258 and a
corresponding curtailment gain/loss was reported in the consolidated statement of
operations and accumulated surplus (deficit) as at August 31 , 2012.
- 10-
43
The Board is a Schedule 2 employer under the Workplace Sa
and Insurance Act and,
as such, assumes responsibility for the payment of all cia
1 injured workers under
the Act. The Board does not fund these obligations i
n of payments made under
the Act. The benefit costs and liabilities related to is pla are included in the board's
consolidated financial statements. Plan changes ~~ I2 require school boards to
provide salary top-up to a maximum of 4 112 y~
e
iJ~Ioyees receiving payments from
the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board,
e
· e previously negotiated collective
agreement included such provision. This r
a i a one-time increase to the Board's
obligation of$I54,846 as at August 31, 20 .
(ii)
School Boards Co-operative Inc.
Co-operative Inc., a co-operative managing
The Board is a member of the Schoo
workers' compensation. The
a s annual contributions, in trust, to the cooperative which are invested on
If. The fund reimburses Workplace Safety and
Insurance Board for claims ~
SO o · ' alf of the Board. The annual contributions are
reported as expenditures in
ancial statements. As at August 31, 2013, the cooperative holds $8,030 (~ . . ' ,174) in trust for the Board. These funds are not
reflected in these finan · kst~lpents.
(iii)
Sick Leave Benefits
As a result ofi h · · n changes, The Board's liability related to compensated absences from
sick leave a
Mioos was eliminated, resulting in a one-time reduction to the
obligation5
6,573 and a corresponding curtailment gain was reported in the
consolidat · sta
nt of operations and accumulated surplus (deficit) as at August 31,
2012.
i
I
·i
L...4.~op-Up Benefits
a ~f new changes made in 2013 to the short-term sick leave and disability plan, a
Sick
imum of II unused sick leave days from the current year may be carried forward into
he
owing year only, to be used to top-up salary for illnesses paid through the shortrm disability plan in that year. The benefit costs related to this change expensed in the
nancial statements are $189,875.
~he accrued benefit obligation for the sick leave top-up is based on an actuarial valuation
1 "\
for accounting purposes as of August 3I , 20I3. This actuarial valuation is based on
assumptions about future events.
The Board has restricted a portion of its accumulated surplus for certain ofthese employee
future benefit obligations. The balance of these internal appropriations totalled
$5,974,329 at August 3I , 2013 (20I2- $5,989,835).
- 11 -
4'-1
I
I
. i
.·I
!
I
7. DEFERRED CAPITAL CONTRIBUTIONS
Deferred capital contributions include grants and contributions received that are u d for · •. e acquisition of
tangible capital assets in accordance with regulation 395/11. The contributions are .. ·ized into revenue
over the life of the asset acquired.
2012
2013
149,729,831 $
8,123,274
(8,959,845)
Balance as at August 31
Additions to deferred capital contributions
Revenue recognized in the period
Dis osals write offs and ad"ustments
$ 148,893,260
Balance as at August 31
$ 149,729,831
8. DEBT CHARGES AND CAPITAL LOANS
. mcipal and interest payments as follows:
2012
2013
Princi al and interest payments on long-term ·
$
3,891 ,292
$
3,745,388
Actual
Actual
$ 175,372,311
23 ,291,268
897,623
31,244,416
1,973 ,367
16,393,714
1,026,223
9,021 818
$ 177,756,911
25,743,889
1,030,692
28,046,700
2,009,0ll
16, 157,552
841,299
9,108917
$ 177,196,001
15,428,004
1,532,626
27,660,470
1,989,514
17,032,467
840, 122
9 331,267
$ 259,220,740
$ 260,694,971
$ 251,010,471
Bud et
(Unaudited)
- 12-
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL ST
10. ONTARIO SCHOOL BOARD INSURANCE EXCHANGE (OSBIE)
The school board is a member of the Ontario School Board Insurance Exchan~ (OSt E), a reciprocal
insurance company licensed under the Insurance Act. OSBIE insures general p~ ability, property
damage and certain other risks.
The ultimate premiums over a five year period are based on the reciprocaf~iml· Board's actual claims
experience. Periodically, the Board may receive a refund or be asked
dditional premium based
on its pro rata share of claims experience.
e .ices for the Board are provided by
Transportation, childcare services and Community Use of Sch
~A~ in partnership with the St. Clair
Chatham-Kent Lambton Administrative School Services~
Catholic District School Board. Under the agreement
e at the time CLASS was established,
' §
f
SS are shared. Neither partner is in a
decisions related to the financial and operating activitt
position to exercise unilateral control. Operations< C SS have been included in these financial
statements based on the share of net operating e
,
contributed by the Board during the fiscal
period being reported. Consolidated revenues re esent mounts paid to the consortium by the Board and
have been offset against the corresponding Board
2013
Board Portion
Financial Position
Financial assets
51,598
$
51,598
.,
Total
2012
Board Portion
29,101 $
52,421
29,101
52,421
$
31,219
$
31,219
$
$
I
I
i
i
l
0 erations
Revenues
Total
$
2013
Board Portion
Total
2012
Board Portion
17,881,056 $
11 ,818,101 $
18,018,879
17 881 056
11818101
18 018 879
II
$
$
11,871 ,640
11,871640
$
T~er
as been named in various lawsuits. No provision has been made in the financial statements as
t . o . m.e is not determinable at this time. The settlement amount, if any, in excess of liability insurance
~e will be accounted for in the year determined. It is the opinion of the Board that their resolution
D.o-rh.ave a material adverse effect on the Board's financial position or results of operations.
oard has entered into contractual agreements for capital projects that were not completed by
August 31 , 2013 . The total costs to complete these projects are estimated to be approximately $5,248,419
2012- $6,166,502). Costs incurred to August 31, 2013 on these capital projects were $5,855,940 (2012$2,876,772).
- 13-
13. TEMPORARY BORROWING
The Board has entered into a credit facilities agreement with the Canadian Imp
B k of Commerce
(CffiC) which provides a demand operating line. The demand operating line has
urn credit limit
of $15 million. All amounts advanced under this facility are to be used for~
u - t expenditures.
Interest on this credit facility is calculated on the. b~sis ofthe provision.s ·
Agreement for the Chatham-Kent Lambton Admtmstrators Group.
will be charged at a rate ofCffiC prime less 0.75%.
C O~fsetting ~anking
ent outhnes that mterest
'M
...._V
Cj~
14. ACCUMULATED SURPLUS /(DEFICIT)
Accumulated surplus /(deficit) consists of the following:
V\
$
$
15. REPAYMENT OF "55 SCHOOL BO
2012
2013
1,569,969 $
1,574,520
7,641,821
9,865,242
18,282,027
16,433,825
(27,882,052)
(28,091 ,972)
2,288,855
2,014,258
I 900 620
$
1 795 873
UST" FUNDING
On June 1, 2003 , the Board ~·v.• ,995,250 from The 55 School Board Trust for its capital related
debt eligible for provincial fun
support pursuant to a 30-year agreement it entered into with the trust.
re ed to refinance the outstanding not permanently financed (NPF) debt
The 55 School Board Trusea
of participating boards wh are b eficiaries of the trust. Under the terms of the agreement, The 55 School
Board Trust repaid th
· bt in consideration for the assignment by the Board to the trust of future
provincial grants pay
o the Board in respect of the NPF debt.
As a result of ~a~~~e a eement, the liability in respect of the NPF debt is no longer reflected in the
Board's fmanci~ p~on .
~
QQ!
- 14 '-~------------------------------·-------------·--·
.. .,
• '
j
16. TANGffiLE CAPITAL ASSETS
2013
COST
Balance
Se(!temher 12 2012
Land
Buildings
Portable structures
First-time equipping of schools
Construction in progress
Equipment
Computer hardware
Computer software
Vehicles
Additions
and Transfers
1,569,969
229,540,776
5,039,800
639,562
1,870,937
2,529,264
9,792,333
1,257,096
755 263
$
$ 252,995,000
$
$
Disposals
and Transfers
$
Balance
August 31 2 2013
Balance
AUI!USt 31. 2013
$
$
11.774.728
52,579
260,146
1,018,554
58,562
47681
1,191,364
8,307,253
1,210,651
562 617
755,315
3,559,623
1,585, 118
2,864,028
82,409
260,069
$ 109,293,639
$ 154.809.960
Balance
Au!!USt 31. 2012
Net book
Value
Aul!ust 31. 2012
$
$
666,129
$
666,129
$100,197,503
1,569,969
144,133,429
92,874,385
5,039,800
107,569
7,467,038
223,322
2,354,815
247,218
I ,378,948
35,964
67,423
Net book
Value
August 31 2 2013
$ 9,096,136
$
2012
ACCUMULATED AMORTIZATION
Disposals
and Transfers
Land
Buildings
Portable structures
First-time equipping of schools
Construction in progress
Equipment
Computer hardware
Computer software
Vehicles
$
1.600. F
...'\
0
I
~
$
$
8,173,641
\ ) 2,208,590
. 8,638,164
1,247,989
643,972
227,541
1,870,937
320,674
1,154,169
9,107
111,291
$ 243,890,433
$ _11,867,360
30.858
2,731,935
$ 2,762,793
Balance
AUI!USt 31, 2012
$
1,569,969
229,540,776
5,039,800
639,562
1,870,937
2,529,264
9,792,333
1,257,096
755,263
$ 252,995,000
Balance
at September 1. 2011
$
Disposals,
Writeoffs &
Amortization
$
$
79,711,894
5,033, 747
17,195
699,036
6,350,781
1,061,692
475,738
$ 93,350,083
7,240,819
6,053
37,795
1,736,942
232, 182
937,918
90,397
. 39,!9~$ 8,584,361_
_$_j,736,942
85 ,215,771
5,039,800
54,990
1,569,969
144,325,005
931,218
7,288,699
1,152,089
514 936
584,572
1,870,937
1,598,046
2,503,634
105,007
240,327
$ 100,197,503
$ 152,797,497
First-time equipping of schools assets with a cost of $223,322 (2012 - $227,541) were not amortized in the current year
as the related assets were not placed into service until subsequent to the year-end date.
I
I
!_______ _________----
- IS..
__________ -· -·--·---- ·--··-- ·--
i5
~ ~e1of4
2012-13 Financial Staterrents V2
Mnistry of Education
Schedule 1
Consolidated Statement of Financial Position
For the year ending August 31
2011-12
2012-13
Col. 1
Col. 2
ANANC lAL ASSEIS
1.1
Cash and cash equivalents
1.2
Temporary
inve~1ments
25 ,643 ,462
13 ,713,240
0
0
1.3
Accounts receivable
54,369,702
60,148,48 2
1.4
Investments
10,026,291
9,794,754
1.4.1
Assets held for sale
0
240,000
1.5
Other
0
0
1.6
10TAL ANANCIAL ASSEIS
90,039,455
83 ,896,476
2
LIABIU'ruS
2.1
2.2
Temporary borro\\oing
Accounts payable & Accrued liabilities
2.3
Other
2.4
Net Debenture Debt, Capital Loans and Leases
2.5
Deferred revenue
2.6
Employee benefits payable
0
0
21 ,224,873
15 ,942 ,699
855 ,982
858,274
41,571,386
41 ,713 ,614
4,460,890
1,497,591
28,785,647
28,091,972
2.7
Deferred Capital Contril:mions
148,893,260
149,729,831
2.8
10TAL LIABIU'ruS
245,792,038
237,833 ,981
3
NEfflNANCIALASSEIS (NEfDEB'I)
-155 ,752,583
-153 ,937,505
4
NO N-ANANC lAL ASSEIS
4.1
Prepaid Expenses
2,843,244
2,935 ,881
0
0
4.2
Inventories of supplies
4.3
Tangible Capital Assets
154,809,959
152,797,497
4.4
10TAL NON-ANANCIAL ASSEIS
157,653,203
155,733,378
5
ACCUMULA'IID SURPLUS (DIDCI'I)
1,900,620
1,795 ,873
Signed On BebalfOf'lbe Board:
Signature of Chief Executive Officer
66036 L.arrtlton Kent DSB
Signature of Chair of the Board
10_FIN_1213_kent
2013-11-04 03:21 FlJ
Mnistry of Eilucation
Page 2 of 4
2012-13 Financial Staterrents V2
Schedule 1.1
Consolidated Statement of Operations
For the year ended Augru.1 31
2012-13 Budget
1
2012-13 Actual
2011-12 Actual
REVE'II UF.S
182,334,656
181,660,200
6,485 ,150
9,411,601
5,158,392
58,167,669
58,050,787
58,228,533
School generated fimds
6,956,000
5,416,778
6,732,033
1.1
Provincial grants- Grants for Student Needs
1.2
Provincial grants- Other
1.3
Local taxation
1.4
184,887,608
1.5
Federal grants & fees
4,385 ,801
4,570,818
4,600,975
1.6
Investment income
200,000
541 ,772
525 ,240
1.7
Other revenues- School boards
308,886
19,945
47,941
1.8
Other fees & revenues
167,496
1,127,817
1,538,102
1.10
10 TAL REVE'II UE
259,005,658
260,799,718
261,718,824
2
EXP E'IIS F.S
187,740,642
2.1
Instruction
192,875 ,484
196,873,355
2.2
Administration
6,154,564
6,237,017
6,165 ,883
2.3
Transportation
11 ,726,880
11,925,271
12,004,340
2.4
Pupil Accommodation
40,763,158
39,768,384
37,961,872
2.5
School generated fimds
6,956,000
5,146,290
6,393 ,080
2.6
Other
744,654
744,654
744,654
2.7
10 TAL EXPE'IIS F.S
259,220,740
260,694,971
251 ,010,471
3.1
Annual Surplusi(Deficit)
-215,082
104,747
10,708,353
3.2
Acc\UIIulated Surplus I (Deficit) at beginning of year
200,306
1,795,873
-8,912,480
3.3
AcciUJiulated Surplus I (Deficit) at end of year
-14,776
1,900,620
1,795,873
66036 Lantlton Kent DSB
10_FIN_1213_kent
2013-11-0403:21 ~
Page 3 of 4
2012-13 Financial Staterrents V2
Mnistry of Education
Schedule 1.2
Statement of Changes in Financial Position
For the year ended Augru.'t 31
2012-13
2011-12
Col. I
I
Col. 2
OPtRATING 1RANSAC1IONS
104,747 10,708,353
1.1 Annual surplll'V( deficit)
Non-cash items including:
2.1 Amortization, write downs and (gain)/loss on disposal of TCA (excluding deferred gain on disposal of remicted assets) and transfer
of TCA to assets held for sale
9,096,137 9,571,267
-8,959,845 -9,006,808
2.2 Deferred capital contributions revenue
2.3 Deferred Gain on Disposal of Restricted Assets
0
0
2.4 (Increase) Decrease in temporary investments
0
0
2.5 (Increase) Decrease in accounts receivable- other
2,838,627 -2,435, 198
0
0
240,000
-240,000
5,282,174
-790,498
-2,292
133,070
2.10 Increase (Decrease) in deferred revenues- operating
954,914
608,556
2.11 Increase (Decrease) employee benefits payable
693,675
2.6 (Increase) Decrease in other fmancial assets
2.7 (Increase) Decrease in assets held for sale
2.8 Increase (Decrease) in Accounts payable & Accrued liabilities
2.9 Increase (Decrease) in Other liabilities
10,067,380
2.12 (Increase) Decrease in prepaid expenses
92,637 -2,935 ,88 1
0
2.13 (Increase) Decrease in inventories of supplies
2.14 Cash provided by (applied to) operating transactions
3
0
10,340,774 -4,454,519
CAPITAL 1RANSAC1IONS
3.1 Proceeds on sale of tangible capital assets
0
38 ,946
3.2 Cash used to acquire tangible capital assets
11 ,108,599 11 ,867,360
3.3 Cash provided by (applied to) capital transactions
11,108,599 11,828,414
4
INVFSTING 1RANSAC1IONS
4.1 (Increase) Decrease in long term investments
-231 ,537
-227,742
4.2 Net increase/(decrease) in cash from investing
-231,537
-227,742
5
flNANCING 1RANSAC1IONS
5.1 Long term liabilities issued
5.2 Increase (Decrease) in temporary borrowing
995 ,401 3,000,000
0
5.3 Debt repaid and sinking fund contributions
5.4 (lncrease)/decrease in acco1111ts receivable- Government of Ontario- Approved capital
0
-1,137,629 -1 ,011 ,223
2,940,153 -3 ,222,3 10
5.5 Additions to/( disposals from) deferred capital contributions
5.6 Increase!(decrease) in deferred revenues- capital
5.7 Net increase!( decrease) in cash from fmancing
2,008,385 -297,32 4
12,929,584 9,027 ,408
5
CHANGE IN CASH AND CASH fl2UIVALE\111S
II ,930,222 -7,483,267
6
Opening Cash and Cash Equivalents
13 ,713 ,240 2 1,196,507
7
Closing Cash and Cash Equivalents
25 ,643,462 13,713,240
66036 Larrtlton Kent DSB
8,123,274 10,55 8,265
10_ FIN_1213_kent
2013-11-04 03:21 FM
2)/
2012-13 Financial Staterrents V2
Mnistry of Education
Page4 of 4
Schedule 1.3
Consolidated Statement of Change in Net Debt
For the year ended Augw.t 31
2012-13 Actual
Annual Surplus!( Deficit)
2
TANGIBLECAPITALASSET ACTIVITY
2.1
2.2
2.3
Acquisition of tangible capital assets
Amortization of tangible capital assets
(Gain) I loss on sale of tangible capital assets
2.4
2.4.1
Proceeds on sale of tangible capital assets
Less: Gains on sale allocated to deferred revenue
2.5
2.6
Transfer to assets held for sale
Write-downs of tangible capital assets
2. 7
Total tangible capital asset activity
3
OTHER NON-FINANCIAL ASSET ACTIVITY
3.1
Acquisition of supplies inventories
3.2
3.3
Acquisition of prepaid expenses
ConSIDilption of supplies inventories
3.4
3.5
Useofprepaidexpenses
Total other non-fmancial asset activity
4
Change in net fmancial assets I (net debt)
4.1
4.2
2011-12 Actual
104,747
10,708,353
-11 ,108,599
9,096,137
-11 ,867,360
0
0
0
0
8,584,36 1
26 1,054
38,946
0
240,000
485,853
0
-2,012,462
-2,257,146
0
92,63 7
0
-2,935 ,88 1
0
0
0
92,637
0
-2,935,881
-1,815,078
5,515 ,326
Net fmancial assets I (net debt) at beginning of year
-153,937,505
-159,452,831
Net fmancial assets I (net debt) at end of year
-155 ,752,583
-153 ,937,505
66036 Larrbton Kent DSB
10_ FIN_1213_kent
2013-11-04 03:21 FM
~~.: Lambton Kent
~ S1 District School Board
StudentAchiewment/,',..
. S
V w111111111111J IICO'SS
BOARD REPORT
REGULAR BOARD, PUBLIC SESSION
Memorandum To:
Jim Costello, Director of Education
FROM:
Ron Andruchow, Superintendent of Business
DATE:
November 12, 2013
SUBJECT:
2013-2014 Internal Audit Plan
REPORT NO: B-13-147
At the Audit Committee Meeting of September 23, 2013, the South Region Internal Audit Office
presented the updated multi-year Annual Internal Audit Plan. This plan is on the following tables,
providing details of the work and audit objective.
RECOMMENDATION:
"That the Board approve the 2013-20141nternal Audit Plan."
Attachment B- Listing of Planned Audits 2013-2014
South Region Internal Audit
2013-2014 Annual Internal Audit Plan
Listing of Planned Audits
Audit Title
Dep.-tment
Preliminary Audit
Schedule
Estimated
Audit Objective
Hours
Planned Audits
Payroll/Compensation &
Benefits
Business
Services/Human
Resources
Q1
~013/2014
300
To obtain assurance that the controls relating to payroll
and compensation & benefits policy and procedures are
adequately designed and operating effectively,
incompliance with ministry directives/collective
agreements, etc. and value for money is being obtained.
To determine whether adequately designed and
operationally effective controls are in place to ensure:
1) That monitoring and reconciliation performed is
adequate to ensure compliance and accuracy.
2) Adequate documented procedures exist to govern
the activities related to payroll and compensation &
benefits
3) The human resource systems reflect remuneration
data in accordance with the terms and conditions of
the collective bargaining agreements, non-union
group agreements and personal services
agreements.
4) Employee details in the human resource master files
are accurate (personal details, properly classified,
years of services, qualifications, annual grid
changes, vacation days, sick days, benefits/pension
group benefits)
i
10
~
5) There is a school board process to assess whether
Facility Requirement
Forecasting/Capital
Planning
Facilities
Q3 2013/2014
150
ODA Compliance
Facilities
N/A
N/A
Develop IT Strategy
(development)
Information
Technology &
Communications
Q4 2013/2014
75
Total Planned Audit Hours
benefits are competitive within the industry (value
for money)
6) Access to human resources /payroll systems is
granted to appropriate staff and that
permissions/approvals are appropriate.
To obtain assurance that the controls around the review
and communication of facility requirement forecasting
and capital plans policies and administrative procedures
/guidelines/ etc., including consideration of long term
objectives, pupil accommodation and environmental
issues are adequately designed and operating
effectively.
Objectives and testing related to ODA Compliance will be
embedded in the Facilities audits as they relate to the
facilities processes
To obtain assurance that the controls around the review
and communication of IT strategy policies and
administrative procedures I guidelines/ etc. (are
adequately designed and operating effectively.
To determine whether adequately designed and
operationally effective controls are in place to ensure:
1) Purchase vs. Build decisions are in line with the
board strategy and are well supported by both
quantitative and qualitative data
2) Business requirements are well defied in order to
ensure the needs of business are understood and
being met
3) End user computing risks are being considered
(security, back-up, change management, etc.)and
incorrect data and inefficient use of board resources
reviewed
525
11
~----------------------------------------------~ ~
Audit Title
Department
Prellml1111ry Audit
Schedule
Estlm.ted
Hours
Audit Objective
Other Audit Plan Components
Special Requests
N/A
N/A
10
This category would include requests from the Audit
Committee, Ministry of Education, etc. This may include
planned requests or contingency for unplanned requests
(such as fraud investigations). Requests should be within
the internal audit mandate and may include consulting
engagements, as long as such engagements have the
potential to improve management of risks, add value
and improve operations and are consistent with the
overall values and goals of the district school board.
Contingency
N/A
N/A
50
Audit Follow-up
N/A
N/A
40
Part of the audit plan set aside for other and unforeseen
items such as: assistance for external auditors and
quality assurance reviews, employee turnover, overruns,
etc.
Dedication of hours to follow up on outstanding audit
findings and recommendations.
Total Audit Plan Hours
625
- - - - -· - - -
-----
12
~\
Attachment C- Listing of Planned Audits 2014-2018
South Region Internal Audit
2014-2018 Internal Audit Plan
Listing of Planned Audits
Audit Title
Department
Preliminary
Audit Schedule
Estlm.ted
Hours
Audit Objective
Develop IT Strategy
(implementation)
Information
Technology &
Communications
2014/2015
100
Fundraising
Business Services
2014/2015
675+
To obtain assurance that the controls around the review and
communication of IT strategy policies and administrative
procedures/ guidelines/ etc. (are adequately designed and
operating effectively.
To determine whether adequately designed and
operationally effective controls are in place to ensure:
4) Purchase vs. Build decisions are in line with the board
strategy and are well supported by both quantitative and
qualitative data
5) Business requirements are well defied in order to ensure
the needs of business are understood and being met
6) End user computing risks are being considered (security,
back-up, change management, etc.)and incorrect data
and inefficient use of board resources reviewed
To obtain assurance that the controls around the review and
communication of the fundraising policy and administrative
procedures/guidelines/etc. are adequately designed and
operating effectively; that adequate and operationally
effective controls have been implemented by the school
board to monitor the fundraising activities of schools; that
other controls relating to fund raising at the school level are
adequately designed and operating effectively; that the
scho~lleve!controls around__!b_e sel~£~1"1 of fund raising_ _
Planned Audits
13
~
Audit Title
D..,..-tment
Preliminary
Audit Schedule
Estimated
Houn
Audit Objective
Planned Audits
activities to engage in for the year, execution of fundraising
activities, purchase of goods/services to be used in
fundraising activities, collection of money opening, use and
monitoring of bank accounts; the custody and deposit of
fundraising proceeds; and the bank reconciliation process
issuance, recording and safeguarding of cheques use of
proceeds raised financial reporting to the school board are
adequately designed and operating effectively; that the
controls around the review and communication of the
donations policy and administrative procedures are
adequately designed and operating effectively; that controls
over the receipt and use of charitable donations are
adequately designed and operating effectively
Procurement &
AP/Facilities Procurement
Business
Services/Facilities
2015/2016
300
-- - -
To obtain assurance that the controls around the review and
communication of the policy and administrative procedures
I guidelines/ etc. relating to all procurement activities and
accounts payable are adequately designed and operating
effectively.
To determine whether adequately designed and
operationally effective controls are in place to ensure:
1) That the district school board is in compliance with the
Broader Public Sector Procurement Directive.
Compliance with this directive helps to ensure that:
2) Publicly funded goods and services are acquired by the
school board through a process that is open, fair &
transparent.- The school board is held accountable for
the results of its procurement decisions and the
appropriateness of the process.- The school board uses a
value for money approach that aims to deliver goods and
services at the optimum totallifecycle cost .- The right
product is delivered at the right time in the right place.-
14
0\
-\1
Audit Title
Department
Preliminary
Audit Schedule
Estimated
Hours
Audit Objective
Planned Audits
Budget planning,
development & control
Business Services
2016/2017
300
Plan, Develop & Deliver
Programs
Instruction &
Schools
2017/2018
300
A standardized procurement process is in place to
remove inefficiencies and create a level playing field .
3) Contracts and payments are signed by the appropriate
individuals.
4) Amounts payable are managed appropriately and paid
timely.
To obtain assurance that the controls relating to budget and
revised budget planning and development, enrolment
forecasting, staffing allocation policy and procedures are
adequately designed and operating effectively, strategic and
program goals are being met.
To obtain assurance that the controls relating to planning,
developing and delivering programs policy and procedures
are adequately designed and operating effectively, strategic
and program goals are being met.
To determine whether adequately designed and
operationally effective controls are in place to ensure:
1) Continuing education programs
2) Delivery of special education meets the needs of the
students
3) Implementation of new curriculum is well planned
and roll-out is well executed
4) Student success is considered and students at risk
are provided with alternate programs (including
Section 23 programs)
15
(h.
~
a.~.:
Lambton Kent
~ ~ District School Board
SludeuiAchie•~emellfL
Co
. ,.
V G mmmuty,,uccess
REGULAR BOARD, PUBLIC SESSION
REPORT NO: B-13-148
REPORT TO BOARD
FROM:
Anika Altiman, Trustee
DATE:
November 15, 2013
SUBJECT:
Native Advisory Committee Report
The committee convened for their October meeting at Delaware Nation, on October 16, 2013.
Reports from the First Nation Communities:
Delaware Nation: There is a key focus on increasing engagement between schools and the
community to strengthen ties between families and educators. PO for staff is also a priority this year.
These priorities are reflected in the board's Ministry project proposals this year.
Aamjiwnaang First Nation: There is a residential school project being developed at Sir John Moore
between band and school staff. It will involve research as well as collaboration on the FN
components of the social science curriculum for gr. 3 and 4 students. The reading support program
has resumed for students after school, involving collaboration between the program teachers and
classroom teachers to ensure effective supports are made available.
Trustee Altiman has been encouraging First Nation participation and hoping to announce
representatives to PIC, SEAC, and the Student Senate soon. She provided input to the Ministry's
seven question survey on education direction at a regional session, and is taking part in the
Wallaceburg Transition Committee meetings. On October 30, Trustee Altiman co-presented at a
regional session on education service (tuition) agreements with Superintendent Doey.
Aboriginal Liaison Janette Richmond noted that author David Bouchard presented in a number of our
schools, and she attended with students at the 2"d anniversary of Nmaachihna. Networking sessions
for Native Language teachers are being planned in collaboration with program staff
Superintendent Doey reviewed this year's set of project proposals for Ministry funding, drafted in
collaboration and involving partnerships with each of the four First Nations, as well as the St. Clair
Catholic District School Board. The committee discussed recent EQAO results including year over
year data, and comparisons with provincial results.
School Administrators spoke to their areas of program focus for the year and more specifically how
supports were being provided to students. They also touched on the theme of engagement and
talked about how teachers were developing strategies to strengthen this important aspect. It was
noted that a significant number of students participated in recent events focusing on Chief Tecumseh
and the War of 1812.
The next meeting of the Native Advisory Committee will be held at Aamjiwnaang First Nation Community Centre, on Wednesday, November 20 , 2013 at 6:00pm.
:~.:
Lambton Kent
~ ~ District School Board
StudentAcllievemeniLCo
. S
vc mmunrty
tuxess
REGULAR BOARD, PUBLIC SESSION
REPORT NO. B-13-149
FROM:
Ruth Ann Dodman, Trustee
DATE:
November 12, 2013
SUBJECT:
Elementary Teacher/Board Communications Committee Report
The Elementary Teacher/Board Communications Committee met on October 22, 2013
Committee members discussed the Wallaceburg restructuring of schools, staffing committee September
timelines, employee reporting forms (safe schools and employee incident), closing of the media centre,
student cell phone use during breaks, locked doors and possession of keys and staffing of clerks and
vice-principals.
a.~.:
(of
Lambton Kent
~ ~ District School Board
StudentAclliellemellf4,_
. S
v u.mmumty. lla:e...s
REPORT NO: B-13-150
REGULAR BOARD, PUBLIC SESSION
Report To Board
FROM:
Jim Costello, Director of Education
DATE:
November 12, 2013
SUBJECT:
International Education Program Report
The objective of the Lambton Kent District School Board International Education Program is to
expand the global perspective of our students and staff by providing them with opportunities to
experience different languages, customs and cultures that will better prepare them to participate fully
in a fast-changing, multi-cultural world. It should be noted that these program coexist with the
traditional student exchange programs which are offered by all school boards. In both cases,
students develop lifelong friendships and report that International Education has provided them with a
lifechanging experience.
The arrival of international students increases the diversity across our schools, while positioning
exemplary international student citizens into our schools and our communities. From the other side of
the lens, our students benefit from the experience of hosting and/or learning alongside students from
another part of the world. In short, their view of the world widens as a result of the program.
The International Education Program offers two primary experiences:
1. Tuition-Paying Students
• A number of students from countries around the world - mainly from Asia - pay tuition
to be students on roll in our schools.
• Enrollment varies from year to year
• Duration of stay varies from two weeks to full academic year.
• Host families are secured via third party for homestay experiences.
• LKDSB has agreements in place with approximately 15 international agents who
arrange for students to come here in and are paid a 10-15% commission.
• Revenues are used to upgrade instructional materials and electronic equipment in our
classrooms to the benefit of both international students and our resident students
requiring ESL instruction. We have also added ESL staff with these monies.
2. Students Abroad
• Approximately 20 Grade 7 and 8 students travel to South Korea for a two week home
stay and school experience every July. This program has been in place for six years.
• Students are pre-screened as the program is limited enrollment.
• Students pay $3000 apiece for airfare. Board covers ground transportation and
chaperone costs.
• We partner with two schools in Susan, South Korea.
• LKDSB sends three VP/Principals to chaperone, which helps to build capacity.
• Students are billeted and do combination of English tutoring/school experience mixed
with cultural experience (field trips etc ... )
International Education Program Report
Report B-13-150
Page 2
Current Trends and Factors
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Major challenges in the recruitment of international students going forward include a very
competitive national and international market, the lure of larger centres such as Toronto,
relatively strict Canadian immigration requirements. Also, the strength of the Canadian dollar
has increased the cost of coming to Canada from many countries.
The Director was invited onto an International Education Advisory Committee with the former
Deputy Minister to work with other boards to address these challenges. This committee has
been inactive since our current Deputy Minister was appointed in 2012.
We are members of Ontario Association of School District International (OASDI) and Canadian
Association of Public School - International (CAPS-I) which work with other provincial boards
to promote and brand both urban and rural public schools in Ontario as exemplary destinations
of choice. Along with other provincial associations, we continue to petition senior government
departments to ease immigration requirements and assist in the marketing and promotion of
Canadian public education. In fact, a national brand Imagine has been created and is used
with marginal success to promote Canadian school boards worldwide.
Successful international education programs are built on relationships, locally, provincially,
nationally and internationally. The Board is fortunate to have local partners that not only
promote our system through their contacts in various countries abroad but provide exemplary
home stay services to the visiting students upon arrival and for the duration of their stay with
us. We have hired a fulltime staff member to provide focused attention to recruitment and
program expansion.
Teachers Abroad- a program where a small number of teachers were invited by York Region
District School Board and DSBN to teach in China for two weeks each July has moved ahead
with our invitation being revoked as both boards are offering opportunities to their own staff
only.
China has been identified as the market most likely to pay dividends in our recruitment efforts.
We are however, represented in Mexico, Germany and Chile as we cautiously explore new
opportunities for further student recruitment. As our new staff member grows into the role, our
number of contacts and opportunities increase; however we must remain focused on a
manageable number of initiatives in order to achieve the balance of recruiting success with
program expansion .
We are experiencing a trend toward more short term stay requests (two and four weeks) which
amount to a "cultural experience" focus rather than an "academic experience" focus which we
have always seen as our core business.
Reciprocal Exchange 2012/2013 School Year
19 Lambton Kent District School Board students participated in reciprocal exchanges during the
2012/2013 School Year. The Ministry of Education provides funding to school boards for reciprocal
exchanges.
International Education Program Report
Report B-13-150
Page 3
International Education 2012-13 School Year
Secondary Students:
• 12 full year students
• 4 for one semester
• 1 for 7 months
• 1 for 4 months
• 1 for 3 months
• 1 for 2 months
• 2 for 1 month
• 12 for 2 weeks (Master Sun's Winter Camp)
A total of 34 students attended our schools during the 2012/2013 school year.
• 19 of these students were from Korea,
• 10 were from China,
• 3 were from Germany,
• 1 was from Japan, and
• 1 was from Mexico.
Elementary Students:
• 2 full year student
• 2 for 5 months
• 4 for 4 months
• 1 for 3 months
• 11 for 2 months
• 4 for 1 month
A total of 24 students attended our schools during the 2012/2013 school year. All of the students
were from Korea
~.:
Lambton Kent
~~ District School Board
StudentAch/ewnll'lllLCo
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V'G mmumty 5uccess
BOARD REPORT
REGULAR BOARD, PUBLIC SESSION
REPORT NO: B-13-151
Memorandum To:
Jim Costello, Director of Education
FROM:
Ron Andruchow, Superintendent of Business
DATE:
November 12, 2013
SUBJECT:
Budget Meeting Schedule for the 2014-2015 School Year
The Board begins its annual budget process in February, by establishing the budget schedule that will
guide the planning of revenues and expenses, for the upcoming new school year.
The meeting timelines proposed below will be used to guide the budget development process, but
ultimately will depend upon the date when the Ministry provides school boards with the grant
regulations.
•
Development and release of the Grant Regulations, by the Ministry of Education, during the
month of March.
•
Budget workshops (2) for Trustees and Administration : April 2 and May 7, 2014; all meetings
from 5:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. via video conference.
•
Presentation , review, public input and development of the budget at the public Regular Board
Meetings on April 8 & 22 and May 13 & 27.
•
Budget information sessions: Parent Involvement Committee-May 26, SEAC-May 15, and
Native Advisory-May 21.
•
Final approval of the 2014/2015 Budget scheduled for the June 10, 2014 Regular Board
Meeting {contingency plan , if required - June 24, 2014 Regular Board Meeting}.
October 22, 2013
Walpole Island
First Nation
BOARD OF
EDUCATION
(c/o) Walpole Island
Elementary School
R.R.#3
Wallaceburg, Ontario
N8A4K9
Mr. Jim Costello
Director of Education
Lambton Kent District School Board
200 Wellington Street, P.O. Box 2019
SARNIA, Ontario
N7T 7L2
Dear Mr. Costello:
RE:
ALTERNATE LKDSB NATIVE TRUSTEE
The Walpole Island First Nation recommends Lareina Rising for the
Alternate LKDSB Native Trustee position on the Lambton Kent District
School Board for the remainder of the current four year term.
Furthermore, we assert that the Alternative Native Trustee be afforded
voting rights and compensation when required to attend meetings. In
addition, the Alternate Native Trustee should be given the opportunity
to access the complete Board package for review, and be notified of
the meetings that occur outside of the public Board meetings,
Including meeting minutes and action items .
We commend the Lambton Kent District School Board for endorsing
the Alternate Native Trustee position, and we hope that you will take
further steps to ensure that the Alternate Native Trustee is able to fully
fulfil the mandate of representing the Four First Nation communities
when the Native Trustee is unable to attend.
If you have any questions, please contact me at 519-627-0708 or 519627-3026.
?~----;1
TEL: (519) 627-0708
FAX: (519) 627-8596
EMAIL:
[email protected] wifn.org
"william Tooshkenlg,
BOE Chairperson
WIFN BOARD OF EDUCATION
Ontario
College of
Teachers
Ordre des
enseignantes et
des enseignants
de !'Ontario
October 30, 2013
i
I~(G fEIJVlE/D
NOV 0 6 2013
Scott McKinlay
Chair
Lambton Kent District School Board
200 Wellington Street
P.O. Box 2019
Sarnia ON N7T 7L2
---------------
Dear Mr. McKinlay,
As CEO and Registrar of the Ontario College ofTeachers, I have the privilege of
working alongside school board trustees like you to ensure that the needs and priorities of
your community are considered in the regulation of Ontario's teaching profession.
Whether we are accrediting teacher education programs, granting teacher certification or
setting high standards for teacher professionalism, I have learned that collaboration is the
key to continually strengthening our education system.
As the regulatory body for the teaching profession in Ontario, the College is responsible
for ensuring that Ontario's students are taught by qualified and competent teachers and
that students are safe in their care.
It is certainly true that when it comes to educating our children, we all have a role to play.
That role is played by community leaders like you, educators, parents and regulators, and
ongoing dialogue is critical to the evolution of education in Ontario.
We would like to arrange an informal meeting at your convenience with you and other
interested trustees to bring this dialogue to life in the 2013-2014 school year. A
representative from the College would discuss our role, the range of services we make
available to the public and, most importantly, how we can work together.
My colleague Marla DiCandia will be in touch to follow-up with you in the coming days.
If you have any questions before then, please contact us at 1-888-534-2222, extension
625 or [email protected]:ca. I look forward to worki~g with you.
Sincerely,
Michael Salvatori, OCT
Chief Executive Officer and Registrar
MS!MD/mn-pol
ror Bloor Street West, Toronto ON M5S OAr
416-961-8800 I -888-534-2222 (ONTARIO)
FAX 416-961-8822 [email protected] www.oct.ca
ror , rue Bloor O uest, Toronto ON M5S OAr
416-g6r-8800 1-888-534-2222 (ONTARIO)
TEu k . 416-g6r -8822 [email protected] www.oeeo.ca
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