Renewable Heat Pump

Renewable Heat Pump
A Renewable Heat
Pump in your House
Harness renewable energy to reduce your heating bill while helping the
environment.
Heat, more than 80% of our energy consumption
The burning of fossil fuels to meet our energy demand is resulting in the
emission of vast amounts of greenhouse gases. This has attained such a
level in the last decades that it poses a serious threat on our climate.
Global warming has become a reality and, if not tackled urgently, will have
dramatic effects on our lives, the lives of our children and on our planet.
Irish households consume the equivalent of 2.4 million tonnes of oil every
year for their energy needs outside transport. This represents 25% of the
total final energy consumption in Ireland. The vast majority of that energy is
provided by burning fossil fuels like coal, oil, peat, gas, etc. This results in
the emission of 11 millions tonnes of carbon dioxide, the main contributor to
greenhouse gases emissions.
Each of us has a large responsibility with the problem of climate change.
But we can be a significant part of the
Renewable Energy is energy
solution by shifting to sustainable
gained
from sources in the process
sources of energy and using energy
of
which
few or hardly any harmful
more efficiently. Today heat pumps can
effects
on
the environment occur.
help us to reduce our energy
Renewable
energy is available in
consumption for space heating and hot
inexhaustible
quantities, from
water production (which is over 80% of
sources
such
as
the sun, wind,
the energy you use at home) by more
water,
biomass,
geo-thermal
and
than 60%, with a pay-back period of
environmental
heat.
around five years.
What is a heat pump?
A heat pump is a system that can harness energy from free renewable
sources for heating your house and producing your hot water. Through
compression, heat pumps can ‘pump up’ heat at low temperature and
release it at a higher temperature so that it may be used again.
A heat pump does not look very different and can perform the same
functions as a conventional gas or oil boiler i.e. space heating and sanitary
hot water production. But it does it much more efficiently, using most of
heating energy from free renewable sources.
Heat pumps are a mature technology on which you can rely on just as any
other well-established heating system. Heat pump units often last 20 years
or more.
SUSTAINABLE ENERGY IRELAND
RENEWABLE ENERGY INFORMATION OFFICE
Hotline: 023 42193 Website: www.sei.ie/reio.htm Email: [email protected]
1
Using free sources of energy
Low temperature heat sources are available
everywhere around us in very large quantities from
renewable energy sources: outdoor air, surface water
(rivers, streams, ponds) or the ground. These sources
are continuously replenished with free energy from
the sun, rain and wind.
Waste heat can also be used. If your house is
equipped with a mechanical ventilation system, heat
from the exhaust air can also be converted to
re-usable heat by means of a heat pump.
Unbeaten efficiency
Energy is needed to drive the heat pump, generally
electricity. But for every unit of electricity used, it will
generate 3 to 5 units of useful heat. The ratio between the useful heat produced and the electricity used is
generally referred as the Coefficient of Performance (COP) to express the overall efficiency of a heat pump.
The efficiency of a heat pump will depend mainly on the temperature of its energy source and the
temperature at which the heat generated is needed. Basically, the higher the temperature of the heat
source is and the lower the temperature of the useful heat is, the more efficient will be the heat pump.
A heat pump using the soil as a heat source (constant temperature of 8 to 12°C) and floor or wall heating
(water temperature of 35 to 55°C) is one of the best combinations, with an efficiency in excess of 400%.
Compare that with the efficiency of a good oil or gas boiler (70-85%) and you will understand why heat
pumps are so attractive.
One of the most cost-effective heating technologies
While heat pumps in residential buildings are usually more expensive initially to install than other heating
systems, their greater energy efficiency allows you to recoup the extra cost in a few years. After that, you
will make large savings in energy and maintenance costs compared with conventional heating systems.
The following table presents a comparison of the costs related to different heating systems delivering
20,000 kWh for space heating and domestic hot water production in a typical 180 m2 house in Ireland.
Heating Systems
Initial Investment **
€ VAT Incl.
Purchased Energy
KWh/year
Electric storage
Gas oil boiler
Natural gas boiler
Ground source heat pump
8061
9673
9673
16122
Litres of oil
equivalent/ year
22,222
30,769
28,571
6,667
2106
2917
2708
632
Operating costs *
(€/ year, VAT Incl.)
1294
1663
982
555
(*)Energy prices and efficiency by the Irish Energy Centre, November 2000
(**) Cost for ‘turn key’ delivery including heating, hot water production and heat
distribution system according to European Heat Pump News issued by the European Heat Pump
Organisation.
SUSTAINABLE ENERGY IRELAND
RENEWABLE ENERGY INFORMATION OFFICE
Hotline: 023 42193 Website: www.sei.ie/reio.htm Email: [email protected]
2
In brief, your heating bill can be reduced by as much as 70% if you opt for a heat pump.
That means hundreds of pounds saved every year. Heat pumps also require little or no maintenance (1/3 of
conventional systems) and are less prone to failure.
Heat pumps are generally more expensive to install than conventional heating systems. But the extra cost
for the initial investment (€3,809 to €6,349) will be rapidly recovered by your energy savings, typically
between 3 and 8 years.
Annual operating costs of different heating systems
to deliver 20,000 kWh of useful heat
Ground source HP, green electricity
Ground source HP, conventional electricity
Natural gas boiler
Gas oil boiler
Electric storage
0
200
400 600
800 1000 1200 1400
Patricia and John are building their new house in Kilkenny.
A year ago, when they started planning their heating
system, they heard about ground source heat pumps from
a couple of enthusiast friends. After spending some time
researching, they decided to install one as well as a solar
water heater.
REIO: What were your motivations to choose a heat pump
instead of a conventional boiler?
John: I suppose we were always a bit greenish and we
were interested in alternative energy.
Patricia: Coming from a house that was always cold even
if our oil bill was huge, we wanted to be sure that our new
house would be comfortable while economical to heat.
REIO: Was it an easy choice?
Patricia: Building a house is not an easy thing anyway. And ground source heat pumps are new here so
we were a bit apprehensive. But we found a good supplier who was very helpful with all energy aspects
in the house. Our builder was also very co-operative and was eager to learn about it.
John: OK, it was not cheap and we had to think a lot about it, but we reckon that in the long term we
will be much better off.
REIO: Are you satisfied with it now?
Both: Sure! It works brilliantly. The winter can come now, we will be very cosy in here.
SUSTAINABLE ENERGY IRELAND
RENEWABLE ENERGY INFORMATION OFFICE
Hotline: 023 42193 Website: www.sei.ie/reio.htm Email: [email protected]
3
Best for the environment
Irish households emit nearly 7 million tonnes of CO2 per year due to the combustion of fossil fuels for
household heating and for producing hot water. This represents 18% of total CO2 emissions in Ireland.
By opting for a ground source heat pump instead of an oil boiler, you will reduce your CO2 emissions by at
least 40%. That’s already a significant contribution towards the fight against climate change. But you can
do much better at no extra cost… if you switch to green electricity to run your heat pump. That means you
will be able to heat your house with 100% renewable energy and without emitting any CO2 at all. That’s
being green!
Can I add a heat pump to my existing system?
Yes, you can. In Sweden, 50% of the replacement of existing heating
system is done with renewable heat pumps. In most cases, the heat
pump is connected to the existing central heating system and supply
most of the heat required (70 to 90%). During very cold periods of
the year, the existing boiler takes on and provides the higher temperatures required in the heat distribution system (above 50°C).
Such a combination is quite economical as the heat pump can be
sized to meet only part (around 50 to 70%) of the maximum heat
load of the building (heat required on coldest days). The rest of the
heat load is met by the boiler. The initial investment of the heat pump
is therefore relatively smaller and can be recouped more rapidly.
Safer and more comfortable
Heat pumps are small operating units which can be located inside or outside the building. Because they do
not use liquid or gaseous fuels, the risk of fire or fuel spills is non-existent. Because the equipment required
occupies less space than conventional systems, the plant room can be scaled down in size. They also don’t
need a chimney, reducing the potential for roof leaks and the on-going maintenance.
Heat pumps are almost silent in operation. When operated in conjunction with a floor or wall heating
system, they provide an evenly spread room temperature. Low temperature systems improve the quality of
indoor air, reducing the risk of asthma.
Millions of people enjoy the benefits of heat pumps worldwide
Heat pumps are a mature technology that has proved its financial and environmental benefits worldwide.
The International Energy Agency estimated that the total number of installed heat pumps in the world was
close to 90 million in 1996 (see table below). In Western Europe alone, it is estimated that by the end of
1999, some 3.8 million residential heat-pumps had been installed for space and water heating.
Country
Austria
Canada
Germany
Sweden
UK
Japan
China
USA
Total Heat Pump
stock in 1996
(thousand units)
137
509
369
350
429
58,000
16,480
11,000
And there is no reason why it should not happen in Ireland. We have the perfect climatic conditions and
renewable resources for operating heat pumps. By using free and local sources of energy, you can reduce
your dependency on imported heating fuels, whose prices are among the highest in Europe and will
continue to increase.
SUSTAINABLE ENERGY IRELAND
RENEWABLE ENERGY INFORMATION OFFICE
Hotline: 023 42193 Website: www.sei.ie/reio.htm Email: [email protected]
4
Who can supply me with a heat pump?
You will find a list of suppliers and installers of renewable heat pumps in Ireland at the back of this
brochure. Contact them to discuss your situation and enquire about a preliminary design and offer for your
building. We recommend you ask for two or three quotes for installing a heat pump in your house. Make
sure that it is based on a thorough assessment of the heating requirements of the house and its occupants,
the availability of the heat source and the structure of the heat distribution system.
Your heating engineer, your builder or your architect should be able to help you choose a system. They can
also be involved in the actual installation of the heat pump and the associated heat distribution system.
The Renewable Energy Information Office will provide you with independent information and advice on heat
pumps. Do not hesitate to contact us if you want help in analysing different proposals for a heat pump
system.
The Renewable Energy Information Office
The Renewable Energy Information Office is a service of the Sustainable Energy Ireland. Its objective is to
support the development of renewable energy in Ireland by providing independent and expert advice as
well as information on related financial, environmental and technical
issues.
Five ways to contact us:
WRITE: Renewable Energy Information Office
Sustainable Energy Ireland
Shinagh House
Bandon, Co. Cork
Ireland
TELEPHONE: our hotline – 023 42193
FAX: 023 41304
EMAIL: [email protected]
VISIT OUR WEBSITE: http://www.sei.ie/reio.htm
Sustainable Energy Ireland is a joint initiative of the Department of Public Enterprise and Enterprise Ireland.
It is supported by the EU through the community Support Framework.
I want to know more about renewable heat pumps
Further reading
Free Factsheets available Directly from Us or Our Web Site:
* Wind Energy
* Bioenergy
Biomass
Landfill Gas
* Hydropower
* Green Electricity
* Renewable Energy for Buildings & Industry:
Passive Solar Design
Heat Pumps for Your Home
Heat Pumps for Commercial Buildings
Heat Pumps for the Health Sector
Solar Water Heaters
How to Heat with Wood
All these brochures can be downloaded from our website:
http://www.sei.ie/reio.htm
SUSTAINABLE ENERGY IRELAND
RENEWABLE ENERGY INFORMATION OFFICE
Hotline: 023 42193 Website: www.sei.ie/reio.htm Email: [email protected]
5
The Heat Pump Centre of the International Energy Agency has a very good range of publications on heat
pumps, among which:
* Heat Pumps, an opportunity for reducing the greenhouse effect (1992)
* Heat Pumps, a better way of meet heat demand (1996)
* Heat Pumps, better by nature (1993)
* Environmental benefits of heat pumping technologies, analysis report (1999)
* Domestic Hot Water Heat Pumps for Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993)
* Domestic heating and cooling distribution and ventilation systems and their use with residential heat
pumps (2001)
The IEA Heat Pump Centre Newsletter is published four times a year and is a very useful source of up-todate information.
They can be ordered from:
IEA Heat Pump Centre
PO Box 17
6130 AA Sittard
The Netherlands
Fax: +31-46-4510389
Other publications:
Ground source heat pumps, a technology review
R H D Rawlings. The Building Services Research and Information Association, Technical Note TN 18/99
Saving energy with residential heat pumps in cold climates
CADDETT Energy Efficiency, 1997.
RETScreenTM International:
RETScreen provides free-of-charge software for renewable energy project analysis, including renewable
heat pumps. The software can be downloaded from the Natural Resource Canada’s website at
http://retscreen.gc.ca
Interesting websites
Renewable Energy Information Office, Sustainable Energy Ireland:
http://www.sei.ie/reio.htm
The Heat Pump Centre of the International Energy Agency:
http://www.heatpumpcentre.org
CADDET, Energy Efficiency Information of the International Energy Agency:
http://www.caddet-ee.org
The European Heat Pump Network:
http://www.ehpa.org
Centre for Alternative Technology:
http://www.cat.org.uk
UK Heat Pump Network:
http://www.heatpumpnet.org.uk
The Geothermal Heat Pump Consortium (USA):
http://www.geoexchange.org
SUSTAINABLE ENERGY IRELAND
RENEWABLE ENERGY INFORMATION OFFICE
Hotline: 023 42193 Website: www.sei.ie/reio.htm Email: [email protected]
6
List of suppliers and installers of renewable heat pumps in Ireland
CONSERVER Ltd
Manufacture ground-source heat pumps.
Network of installers nationwide.
Kim Roberts
Ashmount, Monkstown
Co. Cork
Tel: 021/4841802
Fax: 021/4841206
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.conserver-energy.com
DEKA UNDERFLOOR HEATING SYSTEMS
Supply of underfloor heating systems,
including heat pumps.
CBG House
Reen, Kenmare
Co. Kerry
Tel. 1 890 400030
Email: [email protected]
DUNSTAR Ltd
Design and installation of ground-source
heat pump systems.
Paul Sikora
Kent Street 1, Clonakilty
Co. Cork
Tel: 023/35165
Fax: 023/35174
Email: [email protected] Website:
http://www.solterra.ie
ECO HEAT Ltd
Supply and installation of ground-source
heat pumps.
Fritz G. Rinagl
Aras na hAbhann, Milltown
P.O. Borris
Co. Kilkenny
Tel: 0503/737271
Fax: 0503/737272
Email: [email protected]
GEOTHERMAL IRELAND
P.O Box 19
Fermoy,
Co.Cork
Tel: 058/60949
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.geothermal-ireland.com
MODERN HEATING SYSTEM Ltd
Supply and installation of heat pumps.
Dietmar Rickert
Newtownsmore, Killashee
Co. Longford
Tel & Fax: 043/45193
Mobile: 087/6486876
Email: [email protected]
SWEDISH TRADE CENTRE Ltd
Supply of ground source heat pumps and
exhaust air heat pumps.
Margaret Sheeran
10 Glenrichmond, Glanmire,
Co. Cork
Tel: 021/4823622
Fax: 021/4823636
Mobile: 086/8815065
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.nibe.se
WARMFLOOR HEATING IRELAND LTD
Omagh Business Complex
Omagh
Co. Tyrone
Tel: 048/82252288
Fax: 048/82259515
Email: [email protected]
SHAMROCK SOLAR ENERGIES LTD
Solar thermal, heat pumps, wood heating.
Robert Staiger
Clonroad Business Park
Clonroad
Ennis
Co. Clare
Tel: 065 6868 468
Fax: 065 6868 469
Email: [email protected]
PRECISION HEATING LTD
Solar water heating and ground source heat pumps
Alan Hogan
Unit 19, Airways Industrial Estate
Dublin 17
Tel: 01 842 8763
Fax: 01 842 8820
Mobile: 087 2585 115
Email: [email protected]
SUSTAINABLE ENERGY IRELAND
RENEWABLE ENERGY INFORMATION OFFICE
Hotline: 023 42193 Website: www.sei.ie/reio.htm Email: [email protected]
7
PURE ENERGY LTD
Solar water heating, small-scale solar and wind
power.
Gerry O’Rourke
Convent Road
Bruff
Co. Limerick
Tel: 061 383 882
Fax: 061 382 883
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.pet.ie
UNIPIPE (IRL) LTD
Ground source heat pumps
Paul O’Donnell
40 Southern Cross Business Park
Bray
Co. Wicklow
Tel: 01 2864 888
Fax: 01 2864 764
Mobile: 086 2564 122
Email: [email protected]
EAMON FIDGEON LTD
Ground Source Heat Pump
EJ Fidgeon
7B Lough Sheever
Corporate Park
Mullingar
Co. Westmeath
Tel: 1850 416 417 (callsave), 044 84883
Fax: 044 84884
Mobile: 087 223 1015
Email: [email protected]
This list is not an accreditation by the
Renewable Energy Information Office
of the organizations named.
SUSTAINABLE ENERGY IRELAND
RENEWABLE ENERGY INFORMATION OFFICE
Hotline: 023 42193 Website: www.sei.ie/reio.htm Email: [email protected]
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