TM-9-3405-216-14-and-P
TM 9-3405-216-14&P
TECHNICAL MANUAL
OPERATOR’S, ORGANIZATIONAL, DIRECT SUPPORT
AND GENERAL SUPPORT MAINTENANCE
MANUAL INCLUDING REPAIR PARTS LIST
FOR
SAW, BAND
MODEL L-9
(NSN 3405-00-473-6430)
W.F. Wells & Sons, Inc.
HEADQUARTERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
AUGUST 1982
TM 9-3405-216-14&P
HEADQUARTERS
DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
Washington, DC, 4 August 1982
Technical Manual
No. 9-3405-216-14&P
OPERATOR’S, ORGANIZATIONAL, DIRECT SUPPORT
AND GENERAL SUPPORT MAINTENANCE MANUAL
INCLUDING REPAIR PARTS LIST
FOR
SAW,BAND
MODEL L-9
(NSN 3405-00-473-6430)
W.F. Wells & Sons, Inc.
REPORTING OF ERRORS
You can help improve this manual. If you find any mistakes or if you know of a way
to improve the procedures, please let us know. Mail your letter, DA Form 2028
(Recommended Changes to Publications and Blank Forms), or DA Form 2028-2,
located in the back of this manual direct to: Commander, US Army Armament
Materiel Readiness Command, ATTN: DRSAR-MAS, Rock Island, IL 61299.
A Reply will be furnished directly to you.
NOTE
This manual is published for the purpose of identifying an authorized commercial manual for the use
of the personnel to whom this equipment is issued.
Manufactured by: W.F. Wells & Sons, Inc.
16645 Heimbach Road
Three Rivers, Michigan 49093
Procured under Contract No. DAAA09-79-C-4819
This technical manual is an authentication of the manufacturers’ commercial
literature and does not conform with the format and content specified in AR 310-3,
Military Publications. This technical manual does, however, contain available
information that is essential to the operation and maintenance of the equipment.
i/(ii blank)
INSTRUCTIONS FOR REQUISITIONING PARTS
NOT IDENTIFIED BP NSN
When requisitioning parts not identified by National Stock Number, it
is mandatory that the following information be furnished the supply
officer.
1 - Manufacturer's Federal Supply Code Number. 82331
2 - Manufacturer's Part Number exactly as listed herein.
3 - Nomenclature exactly as listed herein, including dimensions, if necessary.
4 - Manufacturer's Model Number. L-9
5 - Manufacturer's Serial Number (End Item).
6 - Any other information such as Type, Frame Number, and
Electrical Characteristics, if applicable.
7 - If DD Form 1348 is used, fill in all blocks except 4, 5, 6,
and Remarks field in accordance with AR 725-50.
Complete Form as Follows:
(a) In blocks 4, 5, 6, list manufacturer's Federal
Supply Code Number - 8 2 3 3 1 followed by a colon and
manufacturer's Part Number for the repair part.
(b) Complete Remarks field as follows:
(nomenclature or repair part)
Noun:
NSN: 3405-00-473-6430
For:
M a n u f a c t u r e r : W. F. Wells & Sons Inc.
16645 Heimbach Road
Three Rivers, Michigan 49093
Model: L-9
Serial:
(of end item)
Any other pertinent information such as Frame Number,
Type, Dimensions, etc.
iii
SAFETY MANUAL
For Use and Care of
Band Sawing Machinery
CONTENTS
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
OSHA
Safety
Safety
Safety
Safety
and the metal cutting band saw machine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
during installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
during manual operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
during operation with barfeed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
during maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2
2
2
3
3
1
A. OSHA AND THE METAL CUTTING BAND
SAW MACHINE
A1. As of this writing OSHA regulations do not
carry a single set of standards for metal band
sawing machinery such as those applying to
presses. Instead, metal band sawing machinery
falls under the general safety regulations. This
means that each inspector makes his own decisions
as to whether or not a machine is safe and properly
guarded.
A2. In this manual we will present the safety points
we have found to be of importance to many inspectors.
A3. The general regulations provide many rules for
your guidance. Listed below are the most common
safety problems in the field. However, let us stress
that this is our interpretation, and that your area
inspector is the proper person to contact for answers to your questions. He may require safety
devices other than those suggested here, based on
more recent rulings or regulations.
A4. Many states also have codes similar to OSHA,
but with different interpretations. Therefore, we
will limit this discussion to the national
requirements. You should check with your own area
inspector for further regulations.
A5.
A. The machine should be installed in accordance
with the national electrical code and any area codes
that are more restrictive.
B. Be sure to ground the machine with the
grounding wire. This wire should be green.
C. Sawing machines should have all guards in place
and maintained in good condition.
D. A guard should be used to cover the saw blade
from the cutting head to the blade guides.
G. We recommend you discuss the possibility of
color coding the various parts of your machine with
your area inspector.
B. SAFETY DURING INSTALLATION
B1. Many metal cutting band sawing machines are
top heavy and should always be handled as such.
Use tag chains when moving a machine with fork
lift trucks or cranes.
B2. Do not lift the machine by the cutting head
when moving with fork lift trucks or cranes. Lift
the machine only by connecting to the base or bed.
B3. When moving the machine, be careful to place
slings and chains where they will not damage
hydraulic hose, tubing, fittings or electrical
equipment.
B4. After installation, make sure the machine has
been grounded with the grounding wire, and that
the energized conductors are properly attached to
the switch terminals (and not accidentally crossed
with the grounding wire). Check the voltage before
using the machine to be sure of the proper connection.
B5. Install the machine to comply with any area
code as well as the national electrical code.
C. SAFETY DURING OPERATION
C1. The operator should always keep his hands and
feet clear when operating a metal band sawing
machine to prevent injury from moving parts or
while loading or removing metal pieces.
C2. Reports show that many accidents while
working around metal sawing machines are caused
by dropping work pieces on the toes, and in some
cases over half of the reported accidents were from
this cause.
C3. Never place round barstock or cut pieces on a
stock support table without some type of retaining
device to keep them from rolling off the table.
C4. Use some type of supporting or catching device
for the cut off work pieces, whether long or short.
They can drop off unexpectedly and injure feet and
legs.
E. Most metal sawing is below the 90 decibel noise
level. However, when using high blade speeds,
check for excessive noise and consult your regional
OSHA Office for proper employee protection when
over 90 decibels.
C5. Never use pedestal type single roller stock
support devices (stock stands) with heavy loads.
They are very unstable with large bars and tip over
easily. These devices are designed for light loads
that can be lifted manually and placed on the roller
by one operator.
F. Be sure to train employees who operate and
maintain the machine in accordance with this
manual and the other manuals supplied with the
machine.
C6. When cutting thin pieces from large blocks
(such as die blocks) always remember these thin
work pieces are likely to tip over when cut off. Take
steps to support them or they can cause injury.
2
C7. Be sure to keep clear of the clamping area when
operating machines equipped with hydraulic vises.
When these vises clamp, a very high force is applied
that can cause severe injury.
C8. When loading large material requiring more
than one person, be sure the operator and his
helpers are all clear before starting any machine
movement.
C9. Never reach or position any part of your body
under a saw blade. Someone could start the
machine, or some type of malfunction could cause
the cutting head to drop.
C10. Never reach through or under a pinch point
that could create a hazard if a machine part should
move.
C11. Never wipe or clean off parts which are being
sawed. The wipe rag could catch on the saw blade,
and pull the operator’s hand into the moving blade.
C12. It is good sawing practice to support the saw
blade as close as possible to the work piece for
maximum cutting accuracy as well as safety.
Always keep the saw guides as close as possible to
the work piece. Attaching blade guards to the
guides will also keep the guards closed as far as
possible.
C13. Always stop the machine when it becomes
necessary to adjust it.
C14. If the operator leaves his control station to
observe or inspect the operation of the machine, he
should always have another qualified operator at
the control station in case he is inadvertently
caught in the machine. Failure to do this could be
very serious.
C15. Do not get into the habit of climbing or
leaning on the machine while it is in operation.
Greasy, coolant-covered surfaces can be very
slippery.
C16. It is very important that your mind be entirely
on your job at all times when working on a machine.
Outside activities and problems which occupy your
mind during working hours greatly endanger your
personal safety.
C17. Always keep the floor and working area
around the machine free from debris, oil and coolant
slicks. These can be extremely hazardous.
C18. Avoid unnecessary contact with machine
coolants or other cutting compounds.
C19. Always wear safety glasses when operating a
band sawing machine.
C20. If it is necessary for two or more operators to
work with a machine, be sure only one lead operator
“calls the signals”, and make sure the other
workers are clear before starting any machine
movement.
C21. Read, study and know this manual and the
other machine manuals before any attempt is made
to operate the band sawing machine.
D. SAFETY DURING OPERATION WITH
BARFEED
D1. Always remember that movements occur
without warning when automatic machinery is
operating. In manual operation, a push button is
depressed to start a movement so one can anticipate what will happen. When in the automatic
mode, the movement occurs without operator
action. If someone has reached into the machine, a
serious accident can happen.
D2. This suggests two good rules to remember: (1.)
Whenever someone is around a machine running in
automatic operation, the operator should always be
at his station to stop the machine in case the person
gets caught by it. This may be a person walking by
who stops for a moment, but carelessly places his
foot on the machine, or lays his hand near a moving
part.
(2.) If the operator decides to leave his control
station to perform a quick adjustment, first shut
down the machine. If the operator does not shut it
down, and should accidentally slip and become
caught, the machine will keep running. With no one
at the stop button to shut it down, he could sustain
serious injuries before help arrived.
D3. Many automatic sawing machines have barfeeds with a moving carriage. Never allow anyone,
or yourself, to get between the carriage and the saw
base.
E. SAFETY DURING MAINTENANCE
E1. Always lock off the electrical supply disconnect
when working on moving parts of the machine, its
electrical or hydraulic systems.
E2. Never remove hydraulic lines or parts from the
machine unless the cutting head is resting on the
saw bed or other solid support. In normal operation
t h e c u t t i n g h e a d i s supported by hydraulic
cylinders. Removal of hoses or machine parts will
permit a discharge of pressurized oil, allowing the
cutting head to fall to its lower position. This could
cause injury to personnel as well as damage to the
machine.
E3. Never adjust the hydraulic system pressures
beyond those given on the hydraulic diagrams. To
do so can cause hydraulic lines or other parts to
rupture and create a hazard.
3
E4. Always replace guards before putting the
machine back into operation.
E5. A saw blade which has been removed from
service and coiled should always be tied with wire
or other suitable device to keep it from uncoiling. A
coiled blade suddenly springing open can cause
serious cuts to persons nearby.
sure the blade wheels have stopped coasting.
Opening the covers too soon may allow the blade to
catch on a wheel and be thrown out, striking
someone.
E6. Never change a broken blade on a machine
manufactured for high blade speeds until you are
E8. If a machine should for any reason stop or
refuse to start, lock out the electrical disconnect
switch before starting any service procedures.
4
E7. When changing saw blades, always close the
blade wheel guards before applying the final blade
tension.
BAND SAW BLADE SELECTION AND APPLICATION
INDEX
SUBJECT
General
Blade Types
Carbon Steel Blades
Hard Edge, Flexible
Back Blades
Hard Back Blades
Alloy Steel Blades
High Speed Steel Blades
Super High Speed Blades
Carbide Tipped Blades
Carbide Edge Coated Blades
What Blade Should I Use?
Blade Pitch Selection
Blade Set Selection
Blade Tooth Form or Style
Coolant
Cutting Force
Blade Speed
Accuracy of Cut
Production Cutting
Cost Per Cut
Blade Speed Chart
Cutting Rate Calculation
Sawing Problems
Blade Tension
SECTION
PAGE
1
2
2.1
6
6
6
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
6
6
6
7
7
7
7
7
7
9
9
9
9
11
11
11
12
14
15
17
18
5
1. GENERAL
Bandsawing machines are unique compared to
other machine tools in that they use a flexible
cutting tool. Tensioning the tool (saw blade) and
supporting it near the cutting zone (with saw
guides) results in its becoming sufficiently rigid
to perform useful work.
Most machine tools feed the cutting tool on the
basis of inches per revolution. Band saws generally
feed the cutting tool based on pounds of cutting
force. This allows the tool to cut at its own rate
in relation to inches per revolution.
When the proper cutting feed force is applied to the
blade, it will cut at maximum efficiency and still
maintain good accuracy. This type of feed is
necessary because most cutoff sawing involves
ever-changing cross section areas. With this
method the blade will not be over-fed as it enters
a larger cross section area. The cutting force will
be maintained but the forward progress of the blade
into the cut will slow, until it enters a smaller
section. At this point it will progress faster through
the cut. This explains why THE BLADE CUTS
AT ITS OWN RATE.
2. BLADE TYPES
Band saw blades are generally referred to by the
type of material from which they are made. “CARBON” blades are manufactured from high carbon
steel and “HIGH SPEED” blades are manufactured from high speed steel. The “WELDED
EDGE” blade has a high speed steel strip welded
to an alloy blade back. “CARBIDE” blades have
carbide steel fused to the tooth tips.
2.1 CARBON STEEL BLADES
Carbon steel blades can be called the work horse
of the industry, as they are very widely used. They
perform well on steel sections, aluminum, plastics,
carbon and similar materials. The limiting factor
is the cutting rate. As the cutting rate is increased
the heat generated in the blade increases. Carbon
blades will easily reach a temperature that removes
the heat treatment of the steel, allowing the teeth
to dull. They do, however, work very well on applications where high cutting rates are not required.
On steel they are seldom run over 120 lineal feet per
minute with coolant, and will cut materials up to
250 Brinell hardness with good results.
The two basic types of carbon steel blades are as
follows:
2.2 CARBON STEEL BLADES WITH A HARD
EDGE AND A SOFT OR FLEXIBLE BACK
This blade is available with several types of backs,
6
from soft to spring tempered, with a hard edge only
the depth of the teeth. It is the most common of the
carbon steel blades.
The softer back on this type of blade has the lowest
tensile strength of all blades. This makes for the
lowest “beam strength”, limiting the amount of
cutting force which can be applied. (Beam strength
is the deflection of the blade body between the saw
guides as it contacts the work piece and a cutting
force develops. ) Blade tensioning is also the lowest
of all blades as a result of the low tensile strength
of the blade back.
2.3 HARD BACK BLADES
Hard back blades are the second type of carbon
steel blade. This blade is completely heat treated,
edge and back, with the back as hard as possible
while still allowing it to flex around the drive
wheels. The hard back improves the two limiting
factors discussed in section 2.2, beam strength and
tensile strength.
Because this blade is an improvement over the
“soft back”, it can be more highly tensioned with
a resulting improved beam strength. It can be fed
into the work piece with. more cutting force. This
provides an increased cutting rate. However, the
blade cannot travel any faster in lineal feet per minute without losing the heat treatment.
2.4 ALLOY STEEL BLADES
Alloy steel blades offer an improvement over carbon steel blades. They can be operated at higher
lineal feet per minute speeds, and have greater
beam strength and tensioning strength. This
results in increased cutting rates as we can operate
the blade at higher speeds and with greater cutting
force.
Some alloys that work-harden with cutting can be
cut with alloy steel blades that cannot be cut with
carbon steel blades. A very heavy cutting force
must be used, and the alloy steel teeth have sufficient strength to cut without stripping.
Alloy steel blades are also referred to as “intermediate” or “semi-high speed”. Their performance
levels fall somewhere between carbon steel and high
speed steel blades. There is no standardization between manufacturers of these blades, and they vary
widely. Some approach the performance of high
speed steel blades while others are only slightly
improved over carbon steel blades.
When using alloy steel blades we suggest working
closely with the blade manufacturer.
2.5 HIGH SPEED STEEL BLADES
High speed steel blades are available in two types,
solid high speed and welded edge. The latter is a
high speed steel edge welded to an alloy back.
Solid high speed blades are the most popular “premium” blades in use today. However, the welded
edge blades are predicted to surpass the solid high
speed blades within a few years.
Both blade types have high beam and tensile
strength. This, combined with the high temperature capabilities of high speed steel, provides a
blade with the fastest cutting rates available. Tip
hardness is greater than other blades, thus harder
alloys (up to 400 Brinell) can be cut successfully.
Blade speeds up to 350 lineal feet per minute with
coolant can be used on mild steel without generating excessive heat.
Solid high speed blades require a special welding
unit, while the welded edge blade can be welded on
equipment used for other blades.
Some welded edge blades are prone to losing teeth
if they are subjected to a sudden impact such as
starting a cut too hard or cutting tubing with
excessive vibration. We would recommend trying
both types on your applications and using the one
that works best for you.
2.6 SUPER HIGH SPEED BLADES
Super high speed blades are high speed steel blades
with alloys added to provide higher tip wear and
heat resistance. These blades can be best evaluated by using them on a production cutting application where you have past performance records
of other blades.
2.7 CARBIDE TIPPED BLADES
Carbide tipped blades have an alloy back and teeth
with carbide tooth tips welded on by various
means. These blades provide the hardest tooth
available. They will cut much harder materials
than any other type of blade, even to the point of
cutting case hardened materials.
The blade speed can be increased to greater lineal
feet per minute when using these blades. However,
the feed rate and cutting force should not be higher
than other blades, as most blade damage results
from chipping the carbide teeth. The most successful sawing applications are those without severe
vibration.
Generally the successful use of carbide tipped
blades is based on experience with the blade. We
would recommend trying it on a particularly difficult job.
2.8 CARBIDE EDGE-COATED BLADES
Carbide edge-coated blades are alloy blades with
no teeth, but with carbide granules bonded to one
edge, forming the cutting surface. These blades are
usually operated at higher lineal feet per minute
speeds and with less cutting force, as the chip
storage area is small and may load if forced too
hard. However, this blade will cut hard materials
that cannot be cut by any other method.
3. WHAT BLADE SHOULD I USE?
These general guidelines will help you choose the
proper blade type:
3.1 If cutting mild steel is the primary operation,
either carbon steel or high speed steel blades will
do a good job. Use carbon steel blades if machine
time is not a factor and cost per cut does not include overhead rates. If overhead cost is included,
high speed blades may be the least expensive overall. See cutting cost section.
3.2 When many operators use a machine each day
for cutting a variety of materials, consider using
carbon steel blades. A high speed steel blade can
be ruined just as easily and will cost much more to
replace. High speed steel blades work best when
one operator only has control of a machine on each
shift.
3.3 When cutting alloy steels that work-harden,
use a high speed steel or alloy steel blade so that
greater cutting forces can be used.
3.4 Brass and bronze should always be cut with a
NEW BLADE. The sharpest teeth possible are
required. Then use the blade on steel to finish out
the life.
3.5 Aluminum can usually be cut very successfully
with carbon steel blades run at high lineal feet
per minute speeds, if the machine has a sufficiently
large drive motor. Speeds from 300 to 1200 lineal
feet per minute are not uncommon.
3.6 Tough alloy steels, such as many die steels,
require slow blade speeds and medium to low cutting forces. On large blocks use a new blade for each
cut. Save the used blades to cut smaller pieces.
3.7 Use high speed steel blades for cutting stainless steel.
4. BLADE PITCH
Three teeth minimum should be in contact with
7
the work at all times if possible. Gullet capacity
(space between each tooth) must be large enough
to store all chips cut during travel of the tooth
across the work.
Any blade meeting the above conditions can be
used for the job. In general it follows that: a coarse
tooth blade will cut faster-a fine tooth blade will
FIG. 4.1
8
give the smoothest finish and usually the least
burr.
Fig. 4-1 chart gives the usual choice of pitch.
Special conditions may cause use of pitches listed
here to be wrong; however, it is a good starting
place until one has the experience of cutting a
particular material.
TABLE OF BLADE TOOTH SIZE AND STYLE
5. BLADE SET
Blade set is normally one of two types:
5.1 Raker (or regular type). One tooth left, one
tooth right, one tooth straight and then the pattern
is repeated. This is the most common set and is
almost universal in use and application. We recommend using this type of set.
5.2 Wavy set. All teeth slowly oscillate from center
to left across to right then back to center, repeating
this oscillating pattern. This set is common on
blade pitches that are too fine for regular setting,
usually 18 and finer. We recommend using this set
only when fine teeth are used, and regular set is not
available.
5.3 A raker tooth form is best for all normal applications.
6. TOOTH FORM OR STYLE
6.1 Regular or normal tooth style works well on
most applications, as the cutting angle does not
encourage the blade to dig into the work piece but
still generates a good chip. The tooth will normally
have enough chip storage.
6.2 Skip tooth blades are used for cutting wide surfaces where maximum tooth gullet storage is required, and for non-ferrous materials making larger
chips.
6.3 High positive cutting angles or hook tooth
forms are fast cutting in non-ferrous materials and
are made with large gullet capacity. They are equally good in cutting larger steel bars.
7. COOLANT
7.1 Coolant and cutting oil perform nearly the
same task. They lubricate the blade against wear
and absorb most of the cutting heat.
7.2 At slow cutting speeds one can use a plain light
oil with very good results; however, most oils are
combustible and use of them increases insurance
costs.
7.3 Soluble oil and water work together and do a
good job with most of the advantages of other
fluids. The oil is in an emulsion, but still gives good
lubricating properties. Water carries away cutting
heat better than pure oil. It can be used for all cutting speeds below 200 surface feet per minute. Over
200 surface feet per minute the heat will break
down the oil. At these higher blade speeds other
fluids will carry the heat away faster than a soluble
oil and water solution.
7.4 Synthetic cutting fluids are recommended for
blade speeds above 200 surface feet per minute
because of the more intense heat generated. Synthetic cutting fluids are equally good below 200
surface feet per minute and make a good all-purpose coolant. We recommend using this type of
coolant for all general work.
7.5 In general, all metals can be cut faster with
coolant; however, some alloys and cast iron are
best cut dry. Refer to the cutting speed chart for
information.
8. CUTTING FORCE
8.1 Cutting force is the force required for a saw
blade tooth’s cutting edge to penetrate the work
piece and form or shear a chip from the material.
8.2 When the cutting force is too light, small dusty
chips will be formed. The blade will slide over the
work, doing little cutting, and abrasive wear will
quickly dull the blade.
8.3 When the cutting force is correct, most chips
will be curled or rolled up with a few small chips
mixed in. At this point the blade is cutting full contact length of the work, giving the longest blade
life and most accurate cutting.
8.4 Increasing the cutting force beyond this point
will produce coarse curled chips. This will put the
cutting edge at its maximum point of stress. Although the blade will be cutting at the maximum
possible speed, the high force will be undesirable.
High shearing force, high heat generation, and the
high chip storage load at these forces will cause the
blade to fail or cut inaccurately.
8.5 The ideal cutting force is outlined in section
8.3. Any additional cutting force will shorten blade
life, but increase production per hour, also blade
cost per cut.
8.6 Any less cutting force than outlined in section
8.3 will increase blade cost per cut and decrease
cuts per hour. See Fig. 8.1.
8.7 The proper cutting force can easily be reached
by operator’s experience. Various blades will differ
slightly and the amount of blade wear causes variations. Different materials will vary also. There is
no substitute for an observant, experienced operator.
8.8 Cutting force recommendations are given in
Chart 8.2. They are very general due to the varying
conditions in the field; however, they will serve
as a starting place and will usually provide good
9
blade life. After gaining some experience, most operators will watch the chip and adjust the force
accordingly.
FIG. 8-1
APPROXIMATE BLADE LIFE CURVE
8.9 Some materials will not produce curled chips
(cast iron is one). In this case judge the cutting
force by the volume of chips being removed from
the work. If it looks similar to the volume from
cuttings of mild steels, cutting force should be in
the proper range.
8.10 When cutting large solid work, decrease the
cutting force. This gives the blade its best opportunity to cut straight. Also, the length of tooth
contact is great and a fine chip may roll up and
become very large during the travel time across the
work. It is in an area of maximum heat generation;
therefore, running the blade 15% slower than on
average work will add to the blade life. This is reflected in the cutting charts in this section.
CHART 8.2
AVERAGE CUTTING FORCE CHART
*Increasing the cutting force any higher on blades of less than 1” width may cause crooked cuts,
†Reduce the cutting force on blades of less than 1-1/4” or crooked cuts may result.
NOTE: Start all new blades at 20% lower cutting force for the first 150 square inches of cutting. This allows
high points of any long teeth or extra-sharp teeth to wear down until all teeth are cutting uniformly. Failure to do this could cause tooth tips to fracture and ruin a new blade.
10
9. BLADE SPEED
9.1 Blade speed is measured in feet per minute of
blade travel. Slower than normal speeds will not
harm the blade. Faster than normal speeds will
generate excess heat and will quickly destroy the
cutting edge of the blade. Blade speed selection is
a compromise between good blade life, number of
cuts per hour, and keeping the heat generated to an
acceptable level. Fig. 9-1 shows this graphically.
9.2 Small work can be cut at higher speeds due to
the short time during which the cutting edge is in
contact with the work. As the work size becomes
larger, the blade speed becomes slower to compensate for the longer contact time and more heat generated per tooth contact. When cutting large solid
blocks 20 inches and over, the cutting speed should
be reduced 15% to 30% from the average speeds
shown on the cutting charts. This will compensate
for the extra long blade contact.
9.3 If a good blade life is obtained at the given
speeds, it may be possible to increase the cutting
speed for better production. On production cutting,
increase the blade speed 5% to 10% each time a new
blade is installed. When the new blade fails to equal
the number of cuts made by the last blade, reduce
the speed to that of the last blade. This can soon
reveal the best speed for your particular job.
FIG. 9-1
TEMPERATURE DUE TO BLADE SPEED
9.4 See recommended blade speeds later in this
booklet (Section 13, table of blade speeds and
cutting rates).
10. ACCURACY OF CUT
10.1 Accuracy of cut is shown in Fig. 8-1. The
blade should be run on the conservative side in
order to keep maximum tooth sharpness. Proceed
as follows for maximum cutting accuracy:
A. Use less cutting force
B. Use less blade speed
C. Use maximum blade tension for highest
beam strength
This technique is suggested for tool room cutting
where time is not important, but where the highest
percentage of straight cuts is necessary. However,
straight cuts can also be made in production
cutting. The possibility of slight run-off is higher,
and the chance of a blade breakdown during a
critical job is much more likely.
11. PRODUCTION CUTTING
Maximum production speed should be based on allowable blade life.
11.1 If more production per hour is necessary, use
the highest reasonable speeds and feeds. This will
result in less blade life but more production. Total
cost per cut with all overhead expenses included
may be the least overall cost.
This is a figure each must compute for himself
as much depends upon work load. Many shops
want minimum blade cost per cut and use carbon
steel blades with slower production rates. Others
use automatic equipment with high speed steel
blades with maximum cutting conditions. This will
often give the lowest cost per cut when total overhead is used to compute cost.
11
12. HOW TO DETERMINE THE LOWEST
COST PER CUT
To determine this you must have the following
information
1. Overhead cost per hour.
2. Blade cost.
3. Hours of run time
4. Number of pieces cut, or square inches
cut
The following is a typical example with a sim
plified overhead figure:
1. Overhead cost per hour.
Cost of machine $5000.00
Cost per year for 10 year life $ 500.00
7000.00
Cost per year for operator
Total $7500.00
Total hours worked 1 shift per yr. 2000.00
Simplified overhead cost per hr. $ 3.75
2. Blade cost (approximate for this example)
High speed steel blade $40.00 Example ‘A’
Example ‘B’
Carbon steel blade $8.00
Cost of cutting 200 pieces of 4” 4140
Example ‘A’
High speed steel blade
Cutting rate 4 in.2 minute*
Running time 10.5 hours
Blade cost 3 blades
$40.00 each $120.00 total
Example ‘B’
Carbon steel blade
Cutting rate .84 in.2 minute*
Running time 50 hours
Blade cost 6 blades
$8.00 each $48.00 total
Referring to the nomograph 1 select cost per
hour overhead on column 1 (3.75). Select
hours per run on column 3. Find total run
overhead on column 2.
Example ‘A’ (continued)
Total overhead
Add blade cost
Total cost
Example ‘B’ (continued)
Total overhead
Add blade cost
Total cost
$ 39.37
120.00
$159.37
$ 187.50
48.00
$235.50
NOW select total cost on column 4 and number of pieces cut on column 6. Now read cost
per cut from column 5
Example ‘A’ (continued)
Cost per cut
Example ‘B’ (continued)
Cost per cut
*Square inches per minute
12
$0.79
$1.18
If cost per square inch is desired, figure total
run 200 x 12.56 area equals 2,512 square
inches cut.
Example ‘A’ (continued)
Find 2,512 on column 7 and move horizontally
left to column 6.
Select 159.37 on column 4, read 6.5 on
column 5, move decimal two places to the left
for cost of $0.065 per square inch.
Example ‘B’ (continued)
Select column 7 as above use total cost
235.50 for column 4.
Read 9.3 on column 5. move deceimal two
places to left for cost per square inch of
$0.093.
Graph 1
Graph 1 has been constructed by computing
more examples as above with the high speed
steel blade, except the overhead rate has been
changed to:
Curve A $3.75 per hour
B $6.00 per hour
C $10.00 per hour
D $Blade cost only
Also the number of blades used to cut the
same number of pieces increased as the
cutting rate Increased, as the blades were fed
harder and therefore broke down sooner and
this also changed the total cost used.
By connecting the minimum cost points on
each curve (Line E) a general cost trend
appears. That is, as overhead rates increase,
more economical sawing is acheived by
Increasing the cutting rate even though blade
life IS shortened.
The only way to find the minimum costs for
your applications is to compute a chart as
shown, or use this one as an average until your
own shop history accumulates.
13
13. TABLE OF BLADE SPEEDS AND CUTTING RATES
FOR USE WITH COOLANT
BLADE SPEED
HIGH SPEED
STEEL BLADE
WORKPIECE
WIDTH
0"-3" 3”-6” 6”-UP
SQUARE
INCHES
PER MINUTE
CUTTING
RATE
BLADE SPEED
CARBON
STEEL BLADE
WORKPIECE
WIDTH
0”-3” 3”-6" 6”-UP
SQUARE
INCHES
PER MINUTE
CUTTING
RATE
CARBON STEEL
1010-1035
1038-1095
1100 SERIES
1200 SERIES
1300 SERIES
2000 SERIES
3000 SERIES
4000 SERIES
5000 SERIES
52100
6000 SERIES
8000 SERIES
9000 SERIES
300
175
350
325
250
175
200
225
225
150
200
200
150
250
140
300
250
200
130
150
175
175
100
150
150
125
200
100
250
200
150
100
125
150
150
75
125
125
75
10-16
6-9
8-20
8-20
6-10
3-7
3-7
3-8
4-8
3-7
3-7
4-7
2-5
130
100
140
120
100
85
110
85
65
70
65
65
100
120
80
130
100
80
75
80
70
50
50
50
50
60
90
60
120
80
60
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
1-2
1-2
1-3
1-3
.5-1
.5-1
.5-1
.5-1
.5-1
.5-1
.5-1
.5-1
.5-1
125
125
80
80
60
50
1-3
2-4
50
50
50
50
50
50
.2-.7
.2-.7
120
100
100
75
50
50
3-5
1-2
50
50
50
50
50
50
.5-1
.2-.7
175
100
175
125
75
100
100
50
75
3-4
1-2
4-6
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
.5-1
.2-.7
.5-1
.5-2
.5-2
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
STAINLESS STEEL
300 SERIES
400 SERIES
HIGH SPEED TOOL STEEL
S,H SERIES
T,M SERIES
DIE STEEL
A,H SERIES
D* SERIES
L,O SERIES
NICKEL BASE ALLOY STEEL
75
75
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
500
200
500
200
500
200
10-40
10-20
500
200
500
200
500
200
10-30
10-15
CAST IRON*
100
75
50
2-4
100
75
50
.5-1
KIRKSITE
500
400
300
5-20
200
120
80
MONEL
INCONEL X
TITANIUM
ALUMINUM
BAR STOCK
CAST
5-10
BRONZE
200 100
300 200 150
4-10
MANGANESE
50
50
100
75
50
3-10
ALUMINUM
125 100
275 225 200
3-8
PHOSPHOR
75
50
175 150 100
3-12
SILICON
*Do not use coolant.
Above blade speeds are for cutting with coolant. When dry cutting reduce
speeds 50% and carbon steel blade speeds 25%.
14
80
50
80
50
.5-1
.5-1
.5-1
.5-1
high speed steel blade
TABLE OF DIAMETERS IN INCHES AND
CORRESPONDING AREAS IN
SQUARE INCHES
14. HOW TO DETERMINE CUTTING RATE
OR TIME
After selecting the desired cutting rate from the
foregoing charts, locate the same point on Column
3 of Nomograph 2. Now compute the cross sectional
area of the work piece and locate it on Column 1 of
Nomograph 2. Now place a straight line from the
Column 1 point to the Column 3 point and read the
cutting time required per cut from the intersecting
point on Column 2.
When sawing conditions are set for the listed blade
speed, blade tooth pitch, and cutting force, the time
per cut should be similar to the time per cut. on
Nomograph 2. If not the cutting force can be adjusted to increase or decrease the cutting time.
When the cutting time is known it can be set on
Column 2 and a line from Column 1 through Column 2 will intersect Column 3 to give the present
cutting rate.
TABLE OF STEEL SECTION WEIGHT AND
CORRESPONDING AREA IN SQ. INCHES
Steel Section
Weight Per
Foot - Pounds
500
450
400
350
300
250
200
150
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Area of
Section in
Square inches
147.05
132.35
117.64
102.94
88.23
73.52
58.82
44.11
29.41
26.47
23.52
20.58
17.64
14.70
11.76
8.82
5.88
2.94
2.68
2.35
2.05
1.76
1.47
1.17
0.88
0.58
0.29
Diameter
Inches
3-8
1-2
9-16
5-8
3-4
7-8
Area
.11
.20
.25
.31
.44
.60
Diameter
6
6 1-8
6 1-4
6 3-8
6 1-2
6 5-8
6 3-4
6 7-8
Area
28.27
29.47
30.70
31.92
33.18
34.47
35.80
37.12
1
1 1-8
1 1-4
13-8
1 1-2
1 5-8
1 3-4
1 7-8
.79
.99
1.22
1.49
1.76
2.07
2.40
2.76
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
1-8
1-4
3-8
1-2
5-8
3-4
7-8
38.48
39.87
41.30
42.72
44.17
45.66
47.20
48.71
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1-8
1-4
3-8
1-2
5-8
3-4
7-8
3.14
3.55
3.97
4.43
4.90
5.41
5.93
6.49
8
8 1-8
8 1-4
8 3-8
8 1-2
8 5-8
8 3-4
8 7-8
50.26
51.85
53.50
55.09
56.74
58.43
60.00
61.86
3
3 1-8
3 1-4
3 3-8
3 1-2
3 5-8
3 3-4
3 7-8
7.06
7.67
8.25
8.95
9.62
10.32
11.04
11.79
9
9 1-8
9 1-4
9 3-8
9 1-2
9 5-8
9 3-4
9 7-8
63.61
65.40
67.20
69.03
71.00
72.76
74.50
76.59
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
1-8
1-4
3-8
1-2
5-8
3-4
7-8
12.56
13.36
14.18
15.03
15.90
16.80
17.72
18.67
10
10 1-8
10 1-4
10 3-8
10 1-2
10 5-8
10 3-4
10 7-8
78.53
80.52
82.50
84.54
86.60
88.66
91.00
92.89
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
1-8
1-4
3-8
1-2
5-8
3-4
7-8
19.63
20.63
21.64
22.69
23.75
24.85
25.96
27.11
11
11 1-8
11 1-4
113-8
11 1-2
11 5-8
11 3-4
11 7-8
95.00
97.21
99.50
101.62
104.00
106.14
108.40
110.75
15
16
15. SAWING PROBLEMS
SLOW CUTTING
Use coarser pitch tooth if possible.
Use faster blade speed when possible.
Increase cutting force if possible.
POOR BLADE LIFE
Blade is running too fast.
Cutting force is too heavy.
Blade pitch is too fine.
Use ample coolant.
TOOTH STRIPPING
Cutting force is too heavy.
Blade pitch is wrong. Use a coarser pitch blade
on wide sections, a finer pitch on thin sections,
plus ample coolant.
Check blade brush to make sure it is cleaning
the blade.
BLADE STARTS CUT INTO WORK PIECE,
THEN STOPS CUTTING
This condition is typical of work hardening
material. Apply ample cutting force so teeth
are continually cutting, not sliding through
the work piece.
Blade running too fast, causing the teeth to
dull from overheating.
Use coarser pitch blade.
CROOKED CUTS
Replace old blade.
Place blade guides as close to work as practical.
Check alignment of blade guides.
Check for leakage in hydraulic system allowing
the cutting head to leak down.
Check alignment of the cutting head guide
post.
BLADE BREAKAGE
Blade tensioned too tight. See manual for your
machine.
Roller guides adjusted too tight, causing high
flexing of band.
Check blade wheels for wear and alignment
(see maintenance instructions).
If saw blade is breaking at welds, use a longer
annealing period with gradual decreasing of
heat. If blades were purchased, return for rewelding.
Cutting force may be too high.
CONCAVE CUTS
Increase the blade tension.
Use a coarser pitch blade if possible.
Use less feed force.
Place guides as close as possible to the work
piece.
Replace old blade.
Check for leakage in hydraulic system allowing
cutting head to leak down.
JUMPING OF CUTTING HEAD
Check blade weld carefully for improper alignment or grinding.
Check blade for stripped teeth.
CUTTING HEAD BINDING ON HINGE OR
COLUMNS
Machine is not properly leveled causing the
hinge or columns to misalign.
Clean columns of rust, dirt, etc. and apply
light film of oil.
BLADE VIBRATION
Change blade speed to break the resonant
pattern of the blade.
Increase blade tension.
Use different pitch blade.
Change the cutting force.
Check work clamping.
Move blade guides closer to work.
Blade speed is too fast.
LOADING OF TOOTH GULLETS
Use a coarser pitch blade.
Apply coolant liberally or try a different type
of coolant.
Use less feed force with increased blade speed.
BLADE STALLS IN WORK
Decrease cutting force.
Decrease cutting head approach speed.
Check blade tension.
Check drive motor belts.
Blade not tracking properly on wheels.
CHIPS WELDED TO TEETH
Use coolant.
Check blade brush.
Decrease cutting force rate.
LOSS OF TOOTH SET
Blade is running with teeth between guide
rollers or on blade wheels.
BLADE SIDES ARE HEAVILY SCORED
Check carbide blocks in guide.
Check coolant supply
BLADE NOT TRACKING PROPERLY
Consult manual and align blade wheels.
(Continued Next Page)
17
15. Continued
SCALE ON WORKPIECE
All hot rolled materials will have a degree of mill
scale. On low carbon mild steels this scale is
negligible as far as cutting rates are concerned, but
it shortens the blade life. When structurals, angles,
etc. are being cut, the ratio of exterior area to the
cross section area is very high, resulting in extreme
abrasion to the blade and consequent shorter blade
life.
On alloy steels this mill scale can be very
detrimental to the band saw blade and we definitely
recommend it be removed prior to the cut. Some
scales are so hard and abrasive that they must be
removed in order to successfully cut the materials.
HARD SURFACES
Hard surfaces can be created on a work piece by a
wide variety of operations. The following are a few
of the more common problems encountered:
CUTTING WITH A TORCH can create a
“case hardened” area if an excess of acetylene
is used to make the cut. While this shell is only
a few thousandths of an inch thick, cutting
through it with a band saw blade will dull the
teeth, creating extreme problems.
GROUND SURFACES -- on some high carbon
and die steels, improper grinding practices can
result in the hardening of the surface.
HARD SPOTS IN THE WORK PIECE
Some welded seam tubing will have a hard zone by
the welded area if it is not properly annealed. This
hard section can at times be too hard to cut.
Some die steels may have inclusions of slag or scale
within the block. These inclusions are as hard as the
teeth on the blade, and will dull the teeth as the
blade cuts through them. This in turn will cause the
blade to start cutting crooked.
16. BLADE TENSION
As a general guide line, the higher the blade tension, the sooner the blade will fail and break due to
running stress and tension. However, as the blade
tension is increased, the accuracy of cut also increases. This means that a tension must be used
that is high enough for accurate cutting, but not
high enough to shorten blade life.
Machines that are equipped with manual hand
knobs for blade tensioning have knobs sized so one
can generally tighten them with one hand as tight
18
as comfortably possible. This will put the blade in
the proper operating range.
Machines with hydraulic blade tension control can
in most cases be adjusted to over-tension a blade.
As a starting point, we recommend checking the
hydraulic diagram for the recommended pressure
adjustment. On average sized work pieces this will
be adequate tension for good cutting and good
blade life.
When cutting large material with wide blade spans,
the blade tension may have to be increased to
obtain maximum blade stability. Because the
maximum allowable tension varies from blade
types and manufacturers, the best procedure is to
check with the blade manufacturer for the
maximum allowable tension of the blade being
used. This tension can then be applied and used as a
good starting point.
Another method may also be used in the absence of
any available information. Keep a record of the
running time on the saw blade until it breaks. Then
increase the blade tension 10% each time a new
blade is installed until the blade breaks before it
wears out. This will then be the maximum tension
point. Reduce the tension 15% below this point and
operate the blades long enough to see if the average
blade life is used before the blade breaks.
When this point is reached, the blade will be
operating at its maximum practical beam strength.
Let us again call to your attention that this is
normally only necessary when large machines are
sawing near capacity work.
For most applications and blades, the tension range
given on the hydraulic diagram or manual will
result in adequate tension and good cutting. Some
machines show the proper hydraulic pressure
setting on the blade tension gauge by setting the
gauge needle to a green dot on the dial.
M O D E L
1. INTRODUCTION
2. INSTALLATION
A. Location
B. Electrical hookup
C. Check-out
D. Stock stop installation
E. Blade installation.
3. OPERATION
A. Cutting Force
B. Blade speed.
C. Vise operation
D. Stock stop bar
E. Guide arm setting
F. Cutting head descent rate
G. Coolant
H. Angle cutting
4. MAINTENANCE
A. Lubrication
INDEX
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
21
21 5.
21
22
22
22
22
22
23 6.
23
24 7.
L - 9
B. Blade wheel alignment
C. Ring gear&pinion adjustment
D. Timing Belt adjustment
E. Motor switch adjustment
F. Drive belt adjustment
G. Blade guide adjustment
H. Blade brush adjustment
I. Blade tension indicator accessory
TROUBLE SHOOTING
A. Crooked cuts
B. Blade stalls
C. Broken blades
D. Stripped teeth
E. Poor blade life
F. Erratic feed
SPARE PARTS FOR
MINIMUM DOWNTIME
REPLACEMENT PARTS LIST.
24
24
25
25
25
25
25
25
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
19
1. INTRODUCTION
The purpose of this manual is to provide instructions for the installation, operation and
maintenance of your Model L-9 metal cutting band
saw machine, a comparatively simple but rugged
machine tool.
Any power driven machine tool constitutes a
potential hazard to the operator’s safety. The
Model L-9 saw has been designed with safety in
mind, but it is still necessary to observe all the
safety rules employed in the operation of any
machine. We recommend you read the safety
manual included with this manual before you start
up the machine. CAUTION: Some guards have
been removed to show the underlying parts in the
following photos. In actual use, make sure all
guards are in place before operating the machine.
2. INSTALLATION
A. LOCATION. When installing the L-9 saw, it is
important that proper consideration be given to the
surroundings and location. It should be in an area
large enough for operator safety. The machine and
the work area should be properly lighted, without
severe reflections or other visibility hazards.
The L-9 saw does not normally require any special
foundations or footings. However, the floor under it
should be adequate to support the machine with its
maximum intended load. The machine should be
level and shimmed so that each foot is resting
firmly on the floor, carrying its proportion of the
load without twisting or straining the machine bed.
B. ELECTRICAL HOOKUP. All electrical wiring
to the machine must meet all local and national
electrical codes, and should be installed so that it
will not be subject to damage from normal
operation of the machine or related material
handling equipment.
C. CHECK-OUT. Before the initial start-up,
visually inspect the machine to see that all drive
belts are in proper position and that the machine
appears free from damage. The cutting head should
lift freely, and when the cutting head descent valve
(Fig. 8) is opened, the cutting head should lower
freely. If it does not, consult Section 4A concerning
lubrication. If this does not adequately free up the
cutting head, the machine should be thoroughly
inspected for concealed damage such as bent frame
members or broken cutting head hinge bolts.
Using the switch next to the cutting head descent
valve (Fig. 8), turn on the blade motor. The
machine should start and run quietly and freely. If
it does not, check for damaged pulleys or belts,
bent shafts, etc.
D. STOCK STOP INSTALLATION. Insert the
bar slot end first into the hole in the machine bed.
Align the slot in the bar end with the pin on the
opposite side of the machine base. As the bar
engages the pin, place the push arm into the notch
on the cutting head pivot arm (Fig. 1). Attach the
spring to the bracket as shown.
20
Figure 1
Figure 2
The purpose of the arm and pin is to swing the
length stop up and away from the work piece, so
that when cut off it will not twist and jam between
the blade and length stop.
E. BLADE INSTALLATION. Raise the cutting
head 6” or 7” and hold it in this position by closing
the cutting head descent valve. Open both blade
wheel guards on the cutting head. Swing up the
blade guard cover (mounted on the saw guide).
Hold the looped blade in front of you with the
smooth back edge toward you. Lower the blade into
the cutting head and place it around the wheels
(Fig. 2). The teeth on the lower strand of the blade
should be in position to cut as the blade travels
toward the driving wheel. If the teeth are not
pointing in this direction, remove the blade, turn it
inside out, and replace it. At each blade guide, twist
the blade to a vertical position (teeth down) and
insert it up between the guide rollers (Fig. 3). Turn
the blade tensioning knob just enough to take the
slack out of the blade, but leave the blade loose
enough so that it can be slid up against the wheel
flanges (Fig. 4). After lifting the blade against the
flanges, close the wheel guards and tension the
blade by turning the handknob as tight as is
comfortably possible with one hand (Fig. 5). If the
blade is too loose, it may slip on the driving wheel
or it may not cut straight. If the blade is too tight,
metal fatigue will cause premature failure. With the
blade properly installed and tensioned, start the
blade motor for a final check.
3. OPERATION
A. CUTTING FORCE. When a new blade is installed on the machine, the cutting force should
always be reduced for the first five or six cuts. A
new blade, being sharp, will penetrate the work
much faster and may be damaged by tooth tips
chipping off or teeth stripping if the cutting force is
not reduced. After the “break-in” period the
cutting force may be increased to normal and, as
the blade dulls, the cutting force may be increased
more to maintain cutting speed. Eventually a point
will be reached where either the blade will cut too
slowly, or the force required to make it cut will be
so high that crooked cuts will result, dictating a
new blade.
The cutting force is adjusted by the step cam (Fig.
6) that controls the tension on the counterbalance
spring. Lift the cutting head completely up. Then
pull the spring rod out and rotate the cam up to the
highest point for minimum cutting force, or the
lowest point for maximum cutting force. In normal
use, position the spring rod in the second step down
from the top. If you find the blades are producing
fine dust when cutting, increase the cutting force
by iowering the rod one step. If the blade is being
overfed and is producing large heavy curled chips,
raise the spring rod one step on the cam to reduce
the cutting force. Ideally, the average cutting
should produce a mixture of chips and curled chips.
Normally, a narrow work piece requires a light
cutting force, and a wide work piece requires a
medium to heavy cutting force. Tooth pitch must
also be considered in determining cutting force. A
coarse pitch blade on a narrow work piece will
require much less cutting force that a fine pitch
blade on the same work piece. To familiarize
yourself with the saw blades, tooth pitch, cutting
force and other related factors, read the accompanying Saw Blade Selection and Application
Manual.
B. BLADE SPEED. One of the critical factors
when cutting any type of material is the blade
speed. If a blade is run too fast for the material
being cut, it will burn out long before it would have
worn out had it been run at the proper speed. When
the surface speed of any cutting tool is increased,
the cutting edge will run hotter. At some point the
critical temperature of the cutting tool will be
exceeded and the tool will “soften” and subsequently fail.
To change the blade speed on 4-speed machines,
open the belt guard and loosen the cap screw in the
motor mount bracket (Fig. 7) so the motor will
Figure 3
Figure
Figure 4
Figure 6
21
swing, and loosen the primary drive belt. Move the
belt toward the large end of the motor pulley to
increase the blade speed, or toward the small end to
decrease the blade speed. Be sure to also move the
belt on the counter-shaft pulley, in the same
direction and the same number of steps, so that the
belt will run straight from the motor pulley to the
countershaft pulley. If the belt runs angled from
pulley to pulley it will wear unduly and may jump
off the pulley. When the belt is adjusted to the
proper step for the desired blade speed, swing the
motor to tension the belt and tighten the cap screw
to securely clamp the motor mount bracket.
On variable speed machines, start the drive motor,
then turn the crank arm (Fig. 7b) until the indicator
shows the desired blade speed. The crank arm will
be self locking as long as the small friction screw is
kept snug.
C. VISE OPERATION. To adjust the saw vise to
the work piece size, place the work piece on the saw
bed against the stationary vise jaw. Then simply
lift the half nut carrier handle (Fig. 8) connected to
the movable vise jaw and slide it up against the
work piece. Lowering the handle engages the half
nut and vise screw so that final tightening can be
done with the handwheel at the end of the vise
screw.
D. STOCK STOP BAR. If a number of pieces are
to be cut the same length, the stock stop bar may
be used to preclude measuring each piece. Place the
work in the machine vise and lower the cutting
head until the blade is just above the work piece.
Position the work piece under the blade for the
desired length of cut, and tighten the vise securely.
Loosen the clamp screw in the stop arm casting
(Fig. 9) so that the casting will slide along the stock
stop bar. Slide it up against the end of the work
piece and tighten the clamp screw, positioning the
stop on the upper edge of the work piece.
This will allow the arm to swing up and away from
the work piece, eliminating jamming of the work
piece between the blade and the stop arm at the
completion of the cut. When setting the stop for
short work pieces, be careful not to adjust the stop
arm so that it will swing up into the saw guide.
E. GUIDE ARMS SETTING. Before starting a
cut, adjust the two saw guide arms as close as
possible to the work piece, but be sure to leave
enough room so that the guides will not hit the vise
jaws or stock stop bar as the cutting head swings
through the cut. Keeping the guides as close to the
work as possible will insure the best cutting results
and will maintain the blade guard as close as
possible to the work piece.
F. CUTTING HEAD DESCENT RATE. To start
a cut, start the blade motor and “crack open” the
Figure 7
Figure 8
Figure 7-B
22
Figure 9
cutting head descent valve to lower the blade very
slowly onto the work piece. This will protect the
blade at the start of the cut when only a few teeth
are engaged. As soon as the cut has progressed far
enough that several teeth are engaged, the valve
may be opened about l/4 turn. This will allow the
cutting head to descend at its sawing rate, and
opening the valve further will not speed the cutting
action.
If the work piece to be cut is thin wall tubing or any
other thin section (so that only a few teeth will be in
contact with the work piece at any time), a light
cutting force should be used, and the cutting head
descent valve should be opened only enough to
allow a slow, even feed through the cut. A thin
section does not present enough area to the saw
blade for normal cutting forces to be used.
Therefore, the cutting head would fall through the
work too rapidly, causing overfeeding and blade
failure. This situation is prevented by slowing the
maximum rate of descent.
G. COOLANT. If your machine is equipped with a
coolant system, it is wired so that the coolant pump
will run whenever the blade motor is turned on.
CAUTION: Do not run the coolant pump any
length of time unless it is submerged in coolant. If
you wish to run the machine without coolant in the
tank, unplug the coolant pump.
For most sawing applications, a weak soluble oil
and water mixture is used for coolant. If the coolant
becomes too thick or oily, it will result in too much
lubrication and poor blade life. Most materials can
be cut satisfactorily without coolant, but blade life
will be somewhat less and the time per cut will be
somewhat longer because the blade speed must be
reduced to prevent overheating. It may be desirable
to cut some items dry due to their size, shape or
other physical characteristics, or to eliminate other
possible problems which may arise when using
coolant. The only materials on which we do not
recommend using coolant are the “D” series of air
and oil hardening tool steels, cast iron, and brass or
bronze alloys.
H. ANGLE CUTTING. To make cuts of various
angles from 90 to 45 degrees, loosen the two bolts
holding the stationary vise jaw to the saw bed. Use
a protractor to position the vise jaw on the bed to
the desired angle. As the angle becomes more
acute, it may be necessary to remove the bolt from
the slot in the vise jaw (Fig. 10). This bolt may then
be placed in either of the other holes in order to
obtain the desired angle. Tighten the bolts securely
when the angle is set. Next, loosen the two bolts on
the movable vise jaw (Fig. 11), slide it snugly up
against the adjusted stationary jaw, and retighten
the bolts. Be sure to check the guide arms before
making a cut to be sure they are as close as
practical, but with the necessary clearance.
Figure 10
Figure 11
Machine set up for 45° cuts.
4. MAINTENANCE
Any machine tool will require periodic maintenance
including lubrication, minor adjustments, and
eventual replacement of some parts. A good
maintenance program will insure a smooth running
machine. For normal maintenance we recommend
the following:
23
A. LUBRICATION.
SAW BLADE GUIDE ROLLERS
VISE SLIDE WAYS
VISE SCREW
Clean and lubricate with a light to medium weight oil,
daily for heavy use and weekly for occasional use.
RING GEAR
We do not recommend any lubrication. If it is greased
or oiled it will pick up dirt and shavings which would
normally fall away.
GUIDE BEAM
This should be kept clean, with a light film of oil
maintained on it.
CUTTING HEAD PIVOT POINTS
CYLINDER PIVOT POINTS
BLADE TENSION SCREW
A few drops of light to medium oil should be applied
weekly.
VARIABLE SPEED DRIVE PULLEY
Grease monthly (Fig. 13).
The oil level of the hydraulic cylinder should be
maintained within l/2” from the top, with the
piston rod all the way down. This will require
occasional filling with a medium grade of hydraulic
oil. If the oil level falls below the top hose fittings in
the cylinder, the cutting head action will become
spongy and a considerable drop in the head will be
noticed after the head is raised and released onto
the hydraulic cylinder. If this happens, remove the
cylinder cap and fill the cylinder. Replace the cap,
leaving it loose, and work the head up and down 8
or 9 times, closing the cutting head descent valve
each time before the head is lifted. Remove the cap
and refill the cylinder. Repeat this cycle until all air
has been worked out of the system and the oil level
does not fall between cycling periods.
B. BLADE WHEEL ALIGNMENT. When the
blade wheels are properly adjusted, the blade will
run with the smooth edge making light contact
with the wheel flanges. If this contact becomes too
heavy, it will wear the wheel flange unduly and
create a noisy scrubbing sound. It also causes an
edgewise strain on the blade at the point of wheel
contact which can cause blade fatigue and
breakage.
Before making any blade wheel pitch adjustments,
we strongly recommend that a new blade be in-
stalled on the machine. If a blade that is worn or
stretched out of shape is used to make this adjustment, the end result may not be satisfactory.
To make a wheel pitch adjustment, release the
blade tension and loosen the cap screw in the outer
edge of the wheel axle plate (Fig. 12). Turn the
socket set screws next to them in or out to get the
desired change of axle inclination. If the blade is
running hard against the wheel flange, turn the set
screws out (counterclockwise) and retighten the cap
screws. This will lower the outer edge of the wheel,
reducing the tendency of the blade to run against
the flange. If the blade runs down away from the
flange, turn the set screws in (clockwise) and
tighten the cap screws. This will raise the outer
edge of the wheel, causing the blade to run closer to
the flange.
Figure 12
Figure 13
24
C. RING GEAR AND PINION ADJUSTMENT.
The ring gear and pinion should be adjusted to
.010” to .015” clearance between the two gears.
To make this adjustment, loosen the cap screw in
the lower edge of the pinion bearing flange (Fig.
13). Lightly tap the flange in the direction desired
to get the proper clearance, then tighten the cap
screw and check the clearance. Be sure to have a
blade on the machine, under normal tension, when
making this adjustment.
Figure 14
F. DRIVE BELT ADJUSTMENT. 4-speed
machines: There are two different V-belt drives on
the 4-speed machine. The primary drive belt goes
from the motor to a countershaft pulley, and the
final drive belts go from the countershaft pulley to
the ring gear pinion shaft pulley. To adjust the final
drive belts, turn the screw shown in Fig. 15. These
belts should be reasonably tight, so that there is
only l/4” of movement when the belt is pushed
with the fingers midway between the pulleys.
To adjust the primary drive belt, loosen the cap
screw in the motor mount bracket (Fig. 15) and
swing the motor up until the belt is tensioned. This
belt will not require much tension to drive the
machine satisfactorily. With the belt tensioned
properly, retighten the cap screw to clamp the
motor mount bracket securely to the support bar.
G. BLADE GUIDE ADJUSTMENT. For
satisfactory cutting results, it is necessary to
maintain the blade guides in good repair and proper
adjustment. This is probably the most important
adjustment on the machine, and must be done
carefully and thoroughly. It is very important that
a new blade be installed on the machine before
making any blade guide adjustments. Because this
adjustment is so important, a separate manual has
been prepared and is included with the original
machine manuals.
H. BLADE BRUSH ADJUSTMENT. The blade
brush should engage the blade lightly, usually just
enough to turn it. The blade brush should not
engage the blade beyond the depth of the teeth. To
make this adjustment, slightly loosen the wingnut
and turn the thumb screw to engage the brush
against the blade (Fig. 16). Retighten the wingnut.
Do not make this adjustment with the machine
running for safety reasons.
I. BLADE TENSION INDICATOR ACCESSORY. When the blade has been installed in
accordance with this manual, tighten the blade
until the marks on the indicator line up (Fig. 17).
Figure 15
Figure 16
D. TIMING BELT ADJUSTMENT (Fig. 13). The
timing belt should be adjusted tight or snug, but
not tensioned as one may do with V-belts. If the
belt “sings” it indicates too much tension. If the
belt is run too loose it may jump cogs. Therefore,
when performing this adjustment, the mid-span
point of the belt, when moved with the fingers,
should have a small but definite up and down
movement. Loosen the timing belt adjustment bolt
and rotate the cam sleeve until the desired position
is reached. Then hold the cam in position while
retightening the bolt.
E. MOTOR SWITCH ADJUSTMENT. Switch
adjustment can be made by means of the set screw
in the end of the pin which the switch rod passes
through (Fig. 14). Loosen the set screw and adjust
the switch rod longer or shorter as required so that
the cutting head, when lowered, will turn the switch
off just before it comes to rest on the stop. The
switch should not be turned off so soon that the
cutting head rests on the switch rather than on the
stop.
25
Figure 17
5. TROUBLE SHOOTING
Problems will eventually be encountered with any
machine tool, and it is our intent here to help solve
them. The Model L-9 saw is a basically simple
machine, and it is usually not difficult to find the
underlying cause of the problem.
A. CROOKED CUTS. This problem can be caused
by many faults which may occur singly or in any
combination. A machine that is perfectly aligned
and properly operated can make unsatisfactory
cuts if the blade being used is defective. For this
reason, if a machine suddenly begins to cut out of
tolerance, we recommend that a new blade be installed as a first attempt to obtain satisfactory
cuts. Always keep the blade guide arms adjusted as
close to the work as practical, as a long blade span
provides less rigidity.
If a new blade is installed and the machine continues to make crooked cuts, consult Section 3-A
and the saw blade manual concerning the proper
cutting force for the material being cut and the
length of blade in contact with the cut.
Crooked cuts are sometimes caused by the blade
being too loose. Consult Section 2-E concerning
blade tension. If the preceding suggestions have
been followed and the machine still does not cut
straight, consult the separate manual on saw guide
adjustment and carefully check the adjustment and
alignment of the saw blade guides.
B. BLADE STALLS. If the blade stalls during a
cut, first check to determine whether the blade is
slipping on the drive wheel or if the V-belts are
slipping on the pulleys. If the saw blade is slipping
on the drive wheel, the blade is not properly tensioned. Consult Section 2-E and properly tension
the saw blade. If the V-belts are slipping on the
pulleys, consult Section 4-F and properly tension
the belts. If nothing is slipping but the motor is
stalled and will not start, allow it to cool, then push
the stop or reset button to reset.
C. BROKEN BLADES. Consult the separate
guide booklet and check to see if the blade guide
rollers are too tight. Sometimes poor blade wheel
26
alignment causes broken blades. Consult Section 4B and check for this condition. Another cause of
blade breakage is too much cutting force. Consult
Section 3-A and the Saw Blade Selection and
Application Manual to determine the correct
cutting force for the material being cut.
D. STRIPPED TEETH. The most frequent cause
of stripped blade teeth is incorrect tooth pitch for
the job being performed. Consult the saw blade
manual to determine the proper blade tooth pitch
for the material and size being cut. Sometimes
excessive cutting force will cause teeth to strip.
Consult Section 3-A and the saw blade manual
c o n c e r n i n g p r o p e r c u t t i n g f o r c e . Another
possibility is improper blade brush adjustment.
Consult Section 4-H to correct this condition.
E. POOR BLADE LIFE. This problem is usually
caused by a blade speed too fast for the type of
material being cut. Consult Section 3-B and the saw
blade manual to determine the proper blade speed.
Cutting scaly material or cutting through or near
torch-cut areas can also reduce blade life.
F. ERRATIC FEED. If the cutting head does not
feed smoothly into the cut but surges and hesitates,
we suggest you consult Section 4-A concerning
lubrication. This problem may also be caused by
improper blade tooth pitch for the job being performed. In this case, consult the Saw Blade
Selection and Application Manual to determine the
correct blade pitch. Another possibility is poor
blade brush adjustment. Consult Section 4-H of
this manual.
6. SPARE PARTS FOR MINIMUM DOWNTIME
DESCRIPTION AND
QUANTITY PART NO. COMMERCIAL PART NO.
4
901500 Guide Bearing Fafnir 5200 PP
2
901200 Guide Bearing Fafnir 200 PP
1
900083 Blade Brush
4-SPEED MACHINES ONLY:
1
908503 Drive Motor Belt 4L280
2
908504 Final Drive Belt 4L390
VARIABLE SPEED MACHINES ONLY:
1
909041 Variable Speed Belt 260K8
1
908550 Timing Belt 270L100
7. REPLACEMENT PARTS LIST
A. Required for any part order:
1. Saw model
2. Serial number
B. This parts list does not show all the parts that
make up the machine. We have tried to show all the
common parts that may require replacement. Also,
some parts may not be shown due to machine
design changes. When this occurs, order parts as
described above.
C. Parts that can normally be obtained from local
mill supply stores, etc. are not listed.
D. Parts not listed: Give a complete detailed
description of what it is, where it is used, and what
it does in operation. This will often give us enough
information to supply the part.
27
28
415190 DRIVE WHEEL. BEARINGS. AND GEAR ASSEMBLY
(415191 WITHOUT GEAR)
DRIVE WHEEL ASSEMBLY
BEARING SPACER
RING GEAR
DRIVE WHEEL ONLY
415191 WHEEL, BEARINGS,
AND SPACER
415190 WHEEL, BEARINGS,
SPACER, AND GEAR
ECCENTRIC BUSHING
WHEEL AXLE PLATE
GUARD HINGE
WHEEL BEARINGS
29
GUIDE ARM ASSEMBLY
GUIDE ARM ASSEMBLY
410350
410390
410400
411030
916013
GUIDE ARM ONLY
(WILL FIT LEFT OR RIGHT)
CLAMP WASHER
ARM STUD
ECCENTRIC BOLT
ARM KNOB
VISE ASSEMBLY
410090
410100
410110
410120
410130
410140
410150
410170
410175
410180
410190
410200
410210
410220
410230
907001
30
STATIONARY VISE JAW
VISE JAW BACK-UP BAR
STATIONARY JAW STUD
VISE ANGLE BAR
ANGLE BAR STUD
MOVABLE VISE JAW
SLIDE BLOCK
SLIDE BLOCK STUD BAR
MOVABLE JAW CLAMP BAR
SLIDE BLOCK HINGE PIN
SLIDE BLOCK HANDLE
HANDLE LOCK
BRASS HALF NUT
VISE SCREW
VISE HANGLE
LOCK SPRING
STOCK STOP ASSEMBLY
410250
410270
410280
410310
410260
907003
STOCK STOP
STOCK STOP
STOCKSTOP
STOCK STOP
STOCKSTOP
STOCK STOP
PIN
ARM
PUSHROD
BOLT
BAR
SPRING
COOLANT PARTS
911500
912000
912111
912902
COOLANTVALVE
COOLANT HOSE (SPECIFY LENGTH)
HOSE FITTING
COOLANT NOZZLE
931900
931901
115 VOLT COOLANT PUMP
230 VOLT COOLANT PUMP
31
HYDRAULIC CYLINDER AND VALVE ASSEMBLY
010307
010333
010334
010335
010343
900086
900088
907013
907037
907038
911505
912301
NOTE A
32
CYLINDER CAP
PISTON ROD
PISTON
CYLINDER TUBE
ROD SEAL RETAINER
PISTON LEATHER
ROD SEAL
RETAINING CLIP
SPRING
PISTON LEATHER RETAINER
VALVE
PIPE THREAD TO HOSE FITTING
TO ORDER HOSE ASSEMBLIES, SPECIFY
LENGTH OF 912000 HOSE WITH 912154 FITTINGS
AND 912155 COLLARS INSTALLED.
VARIABLE SPEED DRIVE ASSEMBLY
VARIABLE SPEED DRIVE ASSEMBLY
380230
385110
410490
410500
410510
410520
410530
410540
410550
410560
410570
410580
410590
410600
410610
410620
410630
410640
MOTOR MOUNT
COMPLETE MOTOR PULLEY ASSEMBLY
RING GEAR PINION
PINION GEAR BEARING AND SHAFT
BEARING HOUSING
ECCENTRIC BUSHING
LARGE TIMING BELT PULLEY
PULLEY HALF (COMES WITH 410550)
PULLEY HALF (COMES WITH 410540)
PULLEY KEY
SMALL TIMING BELT PULLEY
COUNTERSHAFT
BEARING SPACER
SPEED INDICATOR
SPEED CHANGE CRANK
MOTOR PULLEY HALF (COMES WITH 410640)
PULLEY KEY
MOTOR PULLEY HALF (COMES WITH 410620)
410650
410660
410690
410700
415110
900020
901103
901204
901503
904111
906057
906400
907002
907004
908550
909041
SPRING RETAINER
GREASE SLEEVE
BELT GUARD
INDICATOR COVER
COMPLETE COUNTERSHAFT AND
PULLEY ASSEMBLY
GREASE FITTING
BEARING TYPE 103
BEARING TYPE 204
BEARING TYPE 5203
O-RING TYPE 2-111
INTERNAL RETAINING RING
EXTERNAL RETAINING RING
INDICATOR SPRING
MOTOR PULLEY SPRING
TIMING BELT 27OL100
VARIABLE SPEED BELT 24V10
33
4 SPEED DRIVE ASSEMBLY
4 SPEED DRIVE ASSEMBLY
34
330220
380240
380250
380260
380320
380340
410490
410510
410520
908503
908504
908600
908601
908602
MOTOR MOUNT LOCK BOLT
PINION BEARING AND SHAFT
COUNTERSHAFT MOUNT
COUNTERSHAFT AND BEARING
BELT GUARD HINGE
MOTOR MOUNT
PINION GEAR
BEARING HOUSING
ECCENTRIC BUSHING
MOTOR BELT 4L280
FINAL DRIVE BELTS 4L390
LARGE FINAL DRIVE PULLEY
LARGE PULLEY HUB
LARGE 4 STEP PULLEY
908603
908604
SMALL FINAL DRIVE PULLEY
SMALL 4 STEP MOTOR PULLEY
SAW BLADE GUIDE AND METERING VALVE MANUAL
Adjustment, Maintenance, and Replacement Parts
INDEX
PAGE
A. G u i d e A d j u s t m e n t .
..........................
36
B. M e t e r i n g V a l v e A d j u s t m e n t
........................................
37
C. Preventive Maintenance
...................................................
38
D. P r o b l e m s a n d S u g g e s t i o n s
...............................................
39
E. Spare Parts for Minimum Downtime
...............................................
............................................
39
F.
Replacement Parts
39
35
A. BLADE GUIDE ADJUSTMENTTYPE 415200, L-9 AND W-9 MACHINES
Adjustment of the saw blade guides is one of the
most critical on your machine as it plays an important part in the overall machine performance. It
is VERY IMPORTANT that a NEW BLADE be
INSTALLED and PROPERLY TENSIONED
before adjusting the blade guides.
TO ADJUST THE BLADE GUIDE ROLLER
CLEARANCE, refer to Fig. 1. One guide roller is
mounted on shoulder bolt 411140 and threaded
directly into the housing 411080. This roller is
rigidly mounted and non-adjustable. The opposing
roller (Fig. 2) is mounted on a cam shoulder bolt
411100 and an adjustment of the roller centers can
be made by loosening the hex nut on the top (Fig. 3)
and rotating the bolt. These rollers should be
adjusted just tight enough so that grasping the
blade in the area between the guide and its adjacent
band wheel and oscillating it across the vertical
center will not permit movement of the blade in the
cutting area between the two guides. Any
movement of the blade transmitted through the
36
rollers into the cutting area should be removed by
adjusting the cam bolt. It is also very important
that after this adjustment has been completed you
can manually push the blade down partially out of
the guide and when released it will partially return
of its own accord. CAUTION: If these two guide
rollers are adjusted too tightly it will cause the
blade to “snake” through the rollers, resulting in
metal fatigue and blade breakage. Guide rollers
adjusted too tightly will also cause the metering
valves controlling the cutting head feed to become
inoperative or very erratic, resulting in extreme
feed problems.
PARALLEL AND VERTICAL ALIGNMENT OF
THE BLADE GUIDES. In order to make an
accurate adjustment of the blade guides it is first
necessary to check the stationary vise jaw for
squareness on the saw bed (Fig. 4). Place a combination square on the machine bed using the front
edge of the wide bed top plate in the vise slideway,
and adjust the rear stationary vise jaw to obtain a
true 90o setting. The guide settings will be trued to
the vise face, so it is very important that the vise
face be at right angles to the saw bed.
Fig. 1
Fig. 3
Fig. 2
Fig. 4
Fig. 5
Fig. 6
With a properly tensioned new blade on the
machine, place the combination square against the
front face of the blade very lightly so the blade will
not be deflected and slide the square against the
rear vise jaw (Fig. 5). If the blade and vise jaw are
not at right angles, refer to Fig. 6. The cam bolt
410520 on the lower end of each guide arm can be
adjusted to bring the blade into parallel alignment
with the saw bed and at right angles to the work
vise. Loosen the hex head cap screw (Fig. 6 ) and the
hex nut on the 410520 cam bolt. By turning the cam
bolt the lower end of the blade guide casting 411040
or 411060 can be moved in or out to bring the blade
into parallel alignment with the saw bed. The
question at this point is which guide should be
moved in which direction to keep the blade in as
straight a line as possible between the lower edge of
the two blade carrier wheels. To find out, individually loosen the hand knob clamps which hold
the guide arms to the guide beam, so that guide
arm movement caused by the tensioned blade may
be observed (Fig. 6, Ref. A & B). Then adjust the
guide castings to minimize this deflection with the
saw bed and at right angles to the work vise. After
retightening the hex nut on the cam bolt and the
hex head cap screw, recheck the blade against the
stationary vise jaw to assure proper alignment is
still intact.
At this point, place the blade gauge furnished with
the machine on the saw blade (Fig. 7) adjacent to
the stationary vise jaw and lower the cutting head
until the cutting edge of the blade is near the work
bed top. Place the combination square blade across
the bed top and move the base of the square against
the face of the blade gauge. If the gauge is not in
vertical alignment with the square an adjustment
can be made with blade screw 411070 (Fig. 7).
Turn the adjusting screw clockwise to cause the top
end of the blade gauge to move away from the vise
jaw or turn the screw counterclockwise to cause the
top end of the blade gauge to move towards the vise
jaw. After this has bean done on the guide arm
adjacent to the stationary vise jaw, repeat the
operation on the guide arm adjacent to the
moveable vise jaw. If a large correction must be
made on the second guide arm, recheck the setting
of the first guide arm. If large corrections are made
alternately, check and adjust each guide arm as
necessary until the blade at either guide arm is in a
true vertical position.
B. METERING VALVE ADJUSTMENT,
TYPE 010660, MODEL W-9 MACHINES
ONLY.
Fig. 7
This is an extremely simple adjustment to make,
yet is the one that creates the most problems.
37
Lower the cutting head slowly (with a low cutting
force of 20 to 40 pounds) and as the head lowers,
pry up the bearing arm as shown in Fig. 8 with a
screw driver or similar tool. Note the clearance
between the bearing arm and guide casting (Fig. 8)
just at the point where the valve has been closed by
lifting up the bearing arm and the cutting head
stops its descent. This clearance should be ,060” to
.090”. If it is more than .090”, lengthen the linkage
by loosening the locknut (Fig. 9) and turning the
threaded stud counterclockwise. Retighten the
locknut and check the clearance by repeating the
procedure. Repeat if necessary. If the clearance is
less than .060”, loosen the locknut (Fig. 9) and turn
the threaded stud clockwise to shorten the linkage.
Retighten the locknut and recheck the clearance.
Repeat if necessary.
Fig. 8
After adjustment has been completed, check to be
sure the back edge of the saw blade closes the
metering valve before it contacts the guide casting.
If the upper edge of the blade contacts the guide
body before it closes the metering valve, all cutting
force control is lost and the machine will overfeed,
stripping the teeth from the blade.
The metering valve may require adjustment of the
minimum cutting force. With reference to Fig. 10,
turn the cutting force thimble “D” completely up
into the valve body as shown. Next, adjust the self
locking nut “A” up or down on the threaded stem
“B” until the spring “C” is just touching at each
end. Then turn nut “A” l/2 turn to tighten the
spring. This adjustment establishes the minimum
cutting force. If nut “A” is misadjusted to
overtighten the spring, the minimum cutting force
is increased and can become high enough to strip
teeth from the blade.
Fig. 9
C. PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE
A MONTHLY CHECK should be performed on the
metering valve and guide rollers as follows:
( 1.) Open the cutting head control valve so the head
can descend slowly. Now pry up the blade back-up
roller as illustrated in Fig. 8. The arm should raise
.060” to .090” to close the metering valve and stop
the cutting head descent. If this test stops and
holds the cutting head from descending, the
metering valve is functioning properly.
(2,) A monthly check on the guide rollers can easily
be performed by twisting the blade near the saw
guides. The guide rollers, when adjusted properly,
will not allow any movement of the blade in the
cutting area when twisted, but still must be loose
enough to allow the blade to slide through as
outlined in Section A.
(3.) Check the blade to be sure it is vertical as
shown in Fig. 7.
38
Fig. 10
(4.) These checks cover the most common maintenance adjustments on a band saw machine. If
they are not performed regularly, good blade life
and straight cuts cannot be achieved. They take
only a few minutes and will assure that your
machine will perform well.
E. SPARE PARTS FOR MINIMUM DOWNTIME.
D. PROBLEMS AND SUGGESTIONS
(1.) SAW NOT CUTTING STRAIGHT FROM
TOP TO BOTTOM
A. The most common cause is loose blade guide
rollers (Fig. 2) which allow the blade to “lean”
from a vertical position, causing crooked cuts.
See Section A for adjustments.
B. The saw blade guide casting is rotated so the
blade is not held in a vertical position. See
Section A for adjustment.
C. Long work piece is not being supported
horizontally and level through the machine.
D. Check metering valve as outlined in Section C.
(2.) SAW NOT CUTTING STRAIGHT FROM
SIDE TO SIDE
A. The saw vises are not at 90“ with the blade as
illustrated in Fig. 5. See Section A for adjustment.
B. Long work piece is not being positioned
squarely to the saw blade and flat against the
saw vise.
F.
REPLACEMENT PARTS
Required for any part order:
Saw model.
Serial number.
Parts that can normally be obtained from local
mill supply stores, etc., are not listed.
C. Parts not listed: Give a complete detailed
description of what it is, where it is used, and
what it does in operation. This will often give us
enough information to supply the part.
D. This parts list does not show all the parts that
make up the machine. We have tried to show all
the common parts that may require
replacement.
Also some parts may not be shown due to
machine design changes. When this occurs,
order parts as described above.
A.
1.
2.
B.
(3.) POOR BLADE LIFE
A. Metering valve is not closing completely,
allowing the cutting head to slowly bleed down,
overfeeding the blade. See Section B for adjustment.
B. Blade guide rollers or carbides are too tight
against the blade, preventing the blade from
moving up and down freely enough to operate
the metering valves.
C. Metering valve is dirty inside so that it cannot
close. Test as outlined in Section C.
(4.) CUTTING HEAD WILL NOT LOWER
A. The metering valve is held closed because the
guide rollers are too tight and will not permit
the blade to move downward, opening the
valve.
B. Metering valve control rod is adjusted too long,
stopping the valve from opening. See Section B
for adjustment.
C. Metering valve is held closed by dirt or other
foreign material so that it cannot open. The dirt
will normally be lodged between the valve bore
and valve spool, causing i t t o b e c o m e
inoperative.
39
SAW GUIDE PARTS
010329
010331
015030
205090
411030
411050
411070
411090
411100
411110
411120
411130
411140
411150
415220
415220
415240
415300
901200
901500
907006
907011
CONNECTING ROD
SADDLE LINK
METERING VALVE ASSEMBLY
TWO IDLER END CASTINGS ASSEMBLED
ECCENTRIC BOLT FOR CONNECTING EITHER
GUIDE TO GUIDE ARM
BEARING ARM, IDLER END
WORM SCREW
STRAIGHT BEARING BOLT
CAM BEARING BOLT
CAM BEARING BOLT NUT
BEARING ARM, DRIVE END
BEARING ARM PIN
BACK-UP BEARING BOLT
BACK-UP BEARING WASHER
COMPLETE IDLER END GUIDE ASSEMBLY
WITH BEARINGS AND BOLTS
COMPLETE IDLER END GUIDE
ASSEMBLY WITH BEARINGS AND BOLTS
(205090 ASSEMBLY IS LESS BEARINGS AND BOLTS)
COMPLETE DRIVE END GUIDE ASSEMBLY
WITH BEARINGS AND BOLTS, NO SADDLE LINK PARTS.
(415300 ASSEMBLY IS LESS BEARINGS AND BOLTS)
TWO DRIVE END CASTINGS ASSEMBLED
BACK-UP BEARING ROLLER
SIDE BEARING ROLLER
IDLER END BACK-UP ARM SPRING
DRIVE END METERING VALVE
CUTTING FORCE SPRING
METERING VALVE PARTS
010323
010324
010325
010326
010327
010328
010332
015030
VALVE BODY
NYLON VALVE PLUNGER
OVERRIDE SPRING CUP
CUTTING FORCE SPRING TUBE
TUBE NUT
CUTTING FORCE THIMBLE
DIAPHRAGM
COMPLETE METERING VALVE
ASSEMBLED
907007 OVERRIDE SPRING
907011 CUTTING FORCE SPRING
(NOT ILLUSTRATED)
40
41
BLADE BRUSH ASSEMBLY
411020
411010
900083
901200
42
BRUSH BOLT
BRUSH HOUSING
WIRE BRUSH
BEARING
CUTTING FORCE CHECK BULLETIN NO. 900414
The hydraulic control system or spring balance
mechanism of a band saw machine applies uniformly
controlled pressure to the saw blade. After being
cleaned and adjusted, the machine must maintain
an applied pressure at the saw blade of 50 lbs. or less.
If the band saw applies 50 lbs. of cutting pressure at
the minimum setting of the cutting pressure control, the pressure can readily be increased as required for heavier cutting. Excessive pressure
causes the blade to deflect or strip teeth.
For the cost of a bathroom scale (which is less than
the cost of one saw blade), the actual applied cutting
pressure may be determined. To check the machine,
stop the blade and lay the scale on the saw bed.
Place a block of wood on the scale and lower the saw
blade onto the block. Repeatedly tap the saw blade
lightly with a screw driver while lowering it. If the
hydraulic system or spring balance mechanism is
working properly, a minimum setting on the cutting
pressure control will register 50 lbs. or less on the
scale.
If the pressure on the scale continues to increase,
this indicates either a leak in the hydraulic system
or improper adjustment. This must be corrected
before the machine is operated. Unless the above
procedure is followed, applied pressure is unknown
and the machine may destroy several blades before
the problem is recognized.
43
BLADE ALIGNMENT CHECK BULLETIN NO. 900413
To check the vertical alignment of the band saw
blade, raise the cutting head several inches above
the bed. Place the contact point of a dial indicator
against the side of the blade, directly above the
tooth gullet near the right guide assembly. Open the
control valve to allow the cutting head to descend,
moving the blade slowly past the indicator point.
Adjust the guide as required to align the blade to
within .005 T.I.R.
Raise the cutting head and move the indicator near
the left guide assembly. Repeat the above pro-
44
cedure. If the left guide assembly requires more
than .010 T.I.R. adjustment to be within the .005
T.I.R. allowance, recheck the right guide assembly.
This procedure should be used to check blade alignment on all hinged, horizontal, or vertical cut-off
machines. It will eliminate problems normally caused
by cutting head misalignment, bed twist, or operator
error.
By Order of the Secretary of the Army:
E. C. MEYER
General, United States Army
Chief of Staff
Official:
ROBERT M. JOYCE
Brigadier General United States Army
The Adjutant General
Distribution:
To be distributed in accordance with Special Distribution.
U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1992 0 - 311-831 (61610)
.
PIN : 051253 - 000
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