Safety Quick Guide
Safety Quick‐Guide
For Arc
Welding
and Cutting
the
Safe Way!
Visit our websites at
www.MillerWelds.com
www.HobartWelders.com
Be sure this guide reaches the operator.
Safety Quick-Guide
Page 1
Thank you for using Miller or Hobart arc welding and cutting equipment.
We ask you to work like a pro ⎯ and pros weld and cut safely. Please
read and comply with the sample safety procedures outlined in this
guide and the equipment Owner’s Manual.
Always read and follow the Owner’s Manual, the safety labels
on the product, and all applicable safety standards, especially ANSI Z49.1, Safety in Welding, Cutting, and Allied Processes (we recommend you get a copy and keep it handy). A
list of the safety standards and where to get them is located
in Section 7 of this guide.
Thank you for working safely.
CONTENTS
1. General Safe Practices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
2. Arc Welding Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2
3. Engine Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
4. Plasma Arc Cutting Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6
5. Trailer Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8
6. Special Situations & Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11
7. EMF Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12
7. Principal Safety Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13
8. Lens Shade Selector Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14
9. Weld Cable Selector Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15
Safety Quick-Guide
Page 2
1. General Safe Practices
+
Become trained and read the
instructions before working on the
machine or welding or cutting.
Read Material Safety Data Sheets
(MSDSs) for metals, consumables, and coatings.
Wear approved safety glasses with side shields under your
welding helmet or face shield and at all times in the work area.
Read and follow all labels and the Owner’s Manual carefully before
installing, operating, or servicing unit. Read the safety information
at the beginning of the manual and in each section.
Wear a safety harness if working above floor level.
Keep children away from all equipment and processes.
Do not install or place machine on or over combustible surfaces.
Use only genuine replacement parts from the manufacturer.
Perform maintenance and service according to the Owner’s
Manuals, industry standards, and national, state, and local codes.
2. Arc Welding Hazards
Electric shock from welding electrode or wiring
can kill.
Wear dry, hole-free insulating gloves and body protection. Do not
touch electrode with bare hand. Do not wear wet or damaged gloves.
Do not touch live electrical parts.
Do not use AC weld output in damp, wet, or confined spaces, or if
their is a danger of falling.
Use AC output ONLY if required for the welding process.
If AC output is required, use remote output control if present on unit.
Protect yourself from electric shock by insulating yourself from work
and ground. Use non-flammable, dry insulating material if possible,
or use dry rubber mats, dry wood or plywood, or other dry insulating
material big enough to cover your full area of contact with the work
or ground, and watch for fire.
Disconnect input plug or power before working on machine.
Do not make input connections if color blind.
Frequently inspect input power cord for damage or bare wiring —
repair or replace cord immediately if damaged. Keep cords dry,
free of oil and grease, and protected from hot metal and sparks.
Be sure input ground wire is properly connected to a ground
terminal in disconnect box or receptacle.
Properly install and ground all equipment according to its Owner’s
Manual and national, state, and local codes.
Safety Quick-Guide
Page 3
Breathing welding fumes can be hazardous to
your health.
Keep your head out of the fumes. Do not breathe the fumes. Use
enough ventilation, exhaust at the arc, or both, to keep fumes and
gases from your breathing zone and the general area.
Read Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) for metals, consumables, and coatings.
Use enough forced ventilation or local exhaust (forced suction) at
the arc to remove the fumes from your breathing area.
Use a ventilating fan to remove fumes from the breathing zone and
welding area.
If adequacy of ventilation or exhaust is uncertain, have your
exposure measured and compared to the Threshold Limit Values
(TLV) in the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS).
Welding can cause fire or explosion.
Do not weld near flammable material or where the atmosphere
may contain flammable dust, gas, or liquid vapors (such as
gasoline). Move flammables at least 35 feet (11 meters) away or
protect them with flame-proof covers (see NFPA 51B listed in
Section 7).
Welding sparks can cause fires. Have a fire extinguisher nearby,
and have a trained fire watcher ready to use it. After completion
of work, inspect area to ensure it is free of sparks, glowing embers,
and flames.
Do not weld on drums, tanks, or any closed containers unless a
qualified person has tested it and declared it or prepared it to be
safe (see AWS F4.1 listed in Section 7).
Safety Quick-Guide
Page 4
Arc rays can burn eyes and skin.
Use welding helmet with correct shade of filter (see Section 8 to
choose the correct shade).
Wear welders cap and safety glasses with side shields. Use ear
protection when welding out of position or in confined spaces.
Button shirt collar.
Wear complete body protection. Wear oil-free protective clothing
such as leather gloves, heavy shirt, cuffless pants, and high boots.
3. Engine Hazards
Fuel can cause fire or explosion.
+ =
Engine fuel plus flames or sparks can cause fire or explosion.
Do not weld near engine fuel.
Do not spill fuel. If fuel is spilled, clean it up and do not start engine
until fumes are gone.
Do not smoke while fueling or if near fuel or fumes.
Stop engine before fueling.
Do not fuel a hot engine. Stop engine and let it cool off before
checking or adding fuel.
Safety Quick-Guide
Page 5
Using a generator indoors CAN KILL YOU IN
MINUTES.
Generator exhaust contains carbon monoxide. This is a poison you cannot see or smell.
NEVER use inside a home or garage, EVEN IF doors and windows are open.
Only use OUTSIDE and far away from windows, doors, and vents.
Moving parts can injure.
Keep hands, hair, loose clothing, and tools away from moving parts such as fans, belts, and
rotors. Keep all doors, panels, and guards closed and secured.
Battery explosion can injure.
Sparks can cause battery gases to explode.
Do not smoke and keep matches and flames away from battery.
Wear a face shield or safety glasses when working near or on a battery.
Battery acid can burn skin and eyes.
Do not spill acid.
Wear rubber gloves and a face shield or safety glasses when working on a battery.
Steam and hot coolant can burn.
Check coolant level when engine is cold to avoid scalding.
If the engine is warm and checking is needed, wear safety glasses and gloves and put a rag
over radiator cap. Turn cap slightly and let pressure escape slowly before completely
removing cap.
Exhaust sparks can cause fire.
Use approved engine exhaust spark arrestor in required areas — see applicable codes.
Keep exhaust and exhaust pipes away from flammables.
Do not locate unit near flammables.
Safety Quick-Guide
Page 6
4. Plasma Arc Cutting Hazards
Cutting sparks can cause fire or explosion.
Do not cut near flammable material or where the atmosphere may
contain flammable dust, gas, or liquid vapors (such as gasoline)..
Move flammables at least 35 feet (11 meters) away or protect them
with flame-proof covers (see NFPA 51B listed in Section 7).
Cutting sparks can cause fires. Have a fire extinguisher nearby,
and have a trained fire watch ready to use it. After completion of
work, inspect area to ensure it is free of sparks, glowing embers,
and flames.
Do not cut on drums, tanks, or any closed containers unless a
qualified person has tested it and declared it or prepared it to be
safe (see AWS F4.1 listed in Section 7).
Plasma arc can injure.
Turn off power before disassembling torch.
Do not grip material near cutting path.
Do not touch hot parts bare-handed.
Safety Quick-Guide
Page 7
Electric shock from torch or wiring can kill.
Wear dry insulating gloves. Do not wear wet or damaged gloves.
Do not touch live electrical parts.
Protect yourself from electric shock by insulating yourself from
work and ground. Use non-flammable, dry insulating material if
possible, or use dry rubber mats, dry wood or plywood, or other dry
insulating material big enough to cover your full area of contact
with the work or ground, and watch for fire.
Disconnect input plug or power before working on machine.
Do not make input connections if color blind.
Frequently inspect input power cord for damage or bare wiring —
repair or replace cord immediately if damaged. Keep cords dry,
free of oil and grease, and protected from hot metal and sparks.
Be sure input ground wire is properly connected to a ground
terminal in disconnect box or receptacle.
Properly install and ground this equipment according to its
Owner’s Manual and national, state, and local codes.
Breathing cutting fumes can be hazardous to
your health.
Keep your head out of the fumes. Do not breathe the fumes. Use
enough ventilation, exhaust at the arc, or both, to keep fumes and
gases from your breathing zone and the general area.
Read Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) for metals, consumables, and coatings.
Use enough forced ventilation or local exhaust (forced suction) at
the arc to remove the fumes from your breathing area.
Use a ventilating fan to remove fumes from the breathing zone and
cutting area.
If adequacy of ventilation or exhaust is uncertain, have your
exposure measured and compared to the Threshold Limit Values
(TLV) in the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS).
Safety Quick-Guide
Page 8
Arc rays can burn eyes and skin.
Use welding helmet or face shield with correct shade of filter (see
Section 8 to choose the correct shade).
Wear welders cap and safety glasses with side shields. Use ear
protection when cutting out of position or in confined spaces.
Button shirt collar.
Wear complete body protection. Wear oil-free protective clothing
such as leather gloves, heavy shirt, cuffless pants, and high boots.
5. Trailer Safety
Overloading can injure, and damage equipment.
Rating
Plate
Know the capacity of the trailer.
Do not overload the trailer.
Select a proper towing vehicle.
GVWR − Gross Vehicle Weight Rating
(Maximum Total Trailer Weight Including Its Load)
GAWR − Gross Axle Weight Rating
VIN NO − Vehicle Identification Number
Safety Quick-Guide
Page 9
Incorrect tongue weight can cause fishtailing and loss of control of
towing vehicle resulting in injury and equipment damage.
Install generator according to Owner’s Manual with engine end toward
hitch end of trailer.
Tongue − Level
Ground generator frame to trailer
frame — see Owner’s Manual.
Bathroom
Scale
Pipe
Approximately
10% Of GTW
Board
Trailer
And
Coupler
Class1
Gross Vehicle
Weight Rating
GVWR
lb (kg)
Gross Trailer
Weight GTW2
lb (kg)
Maximum
Tongue Weight3
lb (kg)
1
Up to 2000
(Up to 910)
1000 (455)
2000 (910)
100 (45)
200 (90)
2
2000 to 3500
(910 to 1590)
2000 (910)
3500 (1590)
200 (90)
350 (158)
3
3500 to 5000
(1590 to 2270)
3500 (1590)
350 (158)
Distribute weight so that trailer
tongue weight is approximately 10%
of the gross trailer weight (GTW).
Do not let tongue weight exceed
coupler and hitch rating.
1
Information From SAE J684 May 1987
2
Gross Trailer Weight (Actual Loaded Weight)
3
10% Of GTW Recommended
Safety chains can prevent runaway trailer in case hitch/coupler
fails.
Always use safety chains when
towing.
Bottom View
Cross safety chains under coupling to
prevent tongue from dropping to
ground.
Allow only enough slack for tight
turns.
Side View
Incorrect size or rating of hitch can cause trailer to break loose
from towing vehicle.
Make sure hitch and ball are properly
sized, match each other, and are
fully engaged.
Couplers
On optional ball couplers, always
insert hitch safety pin before towing.
Clevis
Trailer
Tongue
Lunette
Eye
Ball
Safety Pin
Safety Quick-Guide
Page 10
Chock wheels when trailer is uncoupled from vehicle.
1. Chock in direction of grade.
2. Position chock snugly behind tire.
3. Place chock square to the tire.
4. Tap chock into place.
5. For added protection, chock both sides
of tire.
Incorrectly working lights can cause accidents.
Tail, Stop, and
Turn Lights
Be sure vehicle and trailer light connectors match and are securely pushed
together.
Check all lights for proper operation
before using the trailer.
Check condition of wiring harness
leads, plugs, bulbs, and connections
regularly. Repair or replace damaged
bulbs, parts, or wires.
Side Marker Lights
Unexpected tilting of trailer can injure, and damage equipment.
When trailer is uncoupled from towing
vehicle, use jack on front and blocks
under rear to prevent tilting.
Use proper blocks that are large
enough and able to support the necessary weight.
Always chock the wheels when uncoupled.
Loose or incorrect hardware and fasteners can injure, and
damage equipment.
Periodically double-check all nuts and
bolts for tightness and condition.
Grade Marks
Manufacturer’s
Identification Mark
If necessary, always replace any
fastener with one of equal size, grade,
and type.
Be sure the grade marks on replacement fastener match the original bolt.
The manufacture’s identification mark
is not critical and does not matter for the
replacement fastener.
Safety Quick-Guide
Page 11
6. Special Situations & Equipment
Confined spaces can be hazardous.
Confined spaces are areas which lack room for full movement and often lack ventilation, such
as storage tanks, vats, tunnels, boilers, pipes, hold of a ship, corners of a room, near a ceiling
or floor corner, or in a pit. Gases can collect and form dangerous concentrations.
Always open all covers, remove any hazardous or toxic materials, provide forced ventilation,
and provide a means to turn off power and gas from the inside.
Never work alone — have constant communication with someone outside who can quickly
turn off power and gas, is trained in rescue procedures, and is able to pull you out in case
of emergency.
Do not use AC weld output in confined spaces.
Insulate yourself from work and ground using non-flammable, dry insulating material if
possible, or use dry rubber mats, dry wood or plywood, or other dry insulating material big
enough to cover your full area of contact with the work or ground, and watch for fire.
Always check and monitor the air quality in the space. Welding or cutting fumes and gases
can displace air and lower the oxygen level — use ventilation and, if needed, an air-supplied
respirator. Be sure the breathing air is safe.
Always remember: All normal arc welding and cutting hazards are amplified in confined
spaces (see ANSI Z49.1 listed in Section 7).
Cylinders can explode if damaged.
Shielding gas cylinders contain gas under high pressure. If damaged, a cylinder can explode.
Since gas cylinders are normally part of the welding process and may be part of the cutting
process, be sure to treat them carefully.
Protect compressed gas cylinders from excessive heat, mechanical shocks, slag, open
flames, sparks, and arcs.
Install cylinders in an upright position by securing them to a stationary support or cylinder rack
to prevent falling or tipping.
Keep protective cap in place over valve except when cylinder is in use or connected for use.
Cylinders can be heavy — use lifting device and proper methods to prevent back injury.
Read and follow instructions on compressed gas cylinders, associated equipment, and CGA
publication P-1 listed in Safety Standards (see Section 7).
Electric and magnetic fields (EMF) can affect
Implanted Medical Devices.
Wearers of Pacemakers and other Implanted Medical Devices should keep away.
Implanted Medical Device wearers should consult their doctor and the device manufacturer
before going near arc welding, spot welding, gouging, plasma arc cutting, or induction
heating operations.
Safety Quick-Guide
Page 12
Hot parts can burn.
Do not touch hot welded or cut parts with bare hand. If handling is needed, use proper tools
and/or wear heavy, insulated welding gloves to prevent burns.
Allow cooling period before handling parts or working on equipment.
Falling equipment can injure, and damage
equipment.
Use lifting eye to lift unit only, NOT running gear, gas cylinders, trailer, or any other accessories.
Use equipment of adequate capacity to lift and support unit.
If using lift forks to move unit, be sure forks are long enough to extend beyond opposite side
of unit.
Do not place unit where it may easily tip over or fall.
7. EMF Information
Electric current flowing through any conductor causes localized electric and magnetic fields
(EMF). Welding current creates an EMF field around the welding circuit and welding equipment. EMF fields may interfere with some medical implants, e.g. pacemakers. Protective
measures for persons wearing medical implants have to be taken. For example, access restrictions for passers−by or individual risk assessment for welders. All welders should use the
following procedures in order to minimize exposure to EMF fields from the welding circuit:
1. Keep cables close together by twisting or taping them, or using a cable cover.
2. Do not place your body between welding cables. Arrange cables to one side and away
from the operator.
3. Do not coil or drape cables around your body.
4. Keep head and trunk as far away from the equipment in the welding circuit as possible.
5. Connect work clamp to workpiece as close to the weld as possible.
6. Do not work next to, sit or lean on the welding power source.
7. Do not weld whilst carrying the welding power source or wire feeder.
About Implanted Medical Devices:
Implanted Medical Device wearers should consult their doctor and the device manufacturer before performing or going near arc welding, spot welding, gouging, plasma arc cutting, or
induction heating operations. If cleared by your doctor, then following the above procedures
is recommended.
Safety Quick-Guide
Page 13
8. Principal Safety Standards
Safety in Welding, Cutting, and Allied Processes, ANSI Standard Z49.1, from Global Engineering Documents (phone: 1-877-413-5184, website: www.global.ihs.com).
Safe Practices for the Preparation of Containers and Piping for Welding and Cutting, American Welding Society Standard AWS F4.1, from Global Engineering Documents (phone:
1-877-413-5184, website: www.global.ihs.com).
National Electrical Code, NFPA Standard 70, from National Fire Protection Association,
Quincy, MA 02269 (phone: 1-800-344-3555, website: www.nfpa.org and www. sparky.org).
Safe Handling of Compressed Gases in Cylinders, CGA Pamphlet P-1, from Compressed
Gas Association, 4221 Walney Road, 5th Floor, Chantilly, VA 20151 (phone: 703-788-2700,
website:www.cganet.com).
Safety in Welding, Cutting, and Allied Processes, CSA Standard W117.2, from Canadian
Standards Association, Standards Sales, 5060 Spectrum Way, Suite 100, Ontario, Canada
L4W 5NS (phone: 800-463-6727, website: www.csa-international.org).
Safe Practice For Occupational And Educational Eye And Face Protection, ANSI Standard
Z87.1, from American National Standards Institute, 25 West 43rd Street, New York, NY
10036 (phone: 212-642-4900, website: www.ansi.org).
Standard for Fire Prevention During Welding, Cutting, and Other Hot Work, NFPA Standard
51B, from National Fire Protection Association, Quincy, MA 02269 (phone: 1-800-344-3555,
website: www.nfpa.org.
OSHA, Occupational Safety and Health Standards for General Industry, Title 29, Code of
Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 1910, Subpart Q, and Part 1926, Subpart J, from U.S. Government Printing Office, Superintendent of Documents, P.O. Box 371954, Pittsburgh, PA
15250-7954 (phone: 1-866-512-1800) (there are 10 OSHA Regional Offices—phone for Region 5, Chicago, is 312-353-2220, website: www.osha.gov).
Booklet, TLVs, Threshold Limit Values0, from American Conference of Governmental
Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), 1330 Kemper Meadow Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45240 (phone:
513−742−3355, website: www.acgih.org).
Towing a Trailer − Being Equipped for Safety, Publication from U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 400 Seventh Street, SW, Washington,
D.C. 20590
U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), 4330 East West Highway, Bethesda,
MD 20814 (phone: 301-504-7923, website: www.cpsc.gov).
Applications Manual for the Revised NIOSH Lifting Equation, The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), 1600 Clifton Rd, Atlanta, GA 30333 (phone:
1-800-232-4636, website: www.cdc.gov/NIOSH).
Safety Quick-Guide
Page 14
9. Lens Shade Selector Guide
Electrode Size
in. (mm)
Arc Current
(Amperes)
Minimum
Protective
Shade
Suggested*
Shade No.
(Comfort)
Less than 3/32 (2.5)
3/32−5/32 (2.5−4)
5/32−1/4 (4−6.4)
More than 1/4 (6.4)
Less than 60
60−160
160−250
250−550
7
8
10
11
—
10
12
14
Gas metal arc
welding (GMAW) and
flux cored arc
welding (FCAW)
Less than 60
60−160
160−250
250−550
7
10
10
10
—
11
12
14
Gas tungsten arc
welding (GTAW)
Less than 50
50−150
150−500
8
8
10
10
12
14
Less than 500
500−1000
10
11
12
14
Plasma arc welding
(PAW)
Less than 20
20−100
100−400
400−800
6
8
10
11
6 to 8
10
12
14
Plasma arc cutting
(PAC)
Less than 20
20−40
40−60
60−80
80−300
300−400
400−800
4
5
6
8
8
9
10
4
5
6
8
9
12
14
Torch brazing (TB)
—
—
3 or 4
Torch soldering (TS)
—
—
2
Carbon arc welding
(CAW)
—
—
14
Operation/Process
Shielded metal arc
welding (SMAW)
Air carbon arc cutting
(CAC−A)
(Light)
(Heavy)
Plate thickness
in.
mm
Oxyfuel gas welding
(OFW)
Light
Medium
Heavy
Under 1/8
1/8 to 1/2
Over 1/2
Under 3.2
3.2 to 12.7
Over 12.7
4 or 5
5 or 6
6 or 8
Oxygen Cutting (OC)
Light
Medium
Heavy
Under 1
1 to 6
Over 6
Under 25
25 to 150
Over 150
3 or 4
4 or 5
5 or 6
* As a rule of thumb, start with a shade that is too dark to see the weld or cut zone. Then go to a lighter shade
which gives sufficient view of the weld or cut zone without going below the minimum. In oxyfuel gas welding,
cutting, or brazing where the torch produces a high yellow light, it is desirable to use a filter lens that absorbs
the yellow or sodium line in the visible light of the (spectrum) operation.
Guide adapted from ANSI Z49.1, 2005.
Low Current Plasma arc cutting data (0−80 Amperes) supplied by Miller Electric Mfg. Co.
Safety Quick-Guide
10.
Page 15
Weld Cable Selector Guide*
Turn Off power before connecting
to weld output terminals.
Do not use worn, damaged, undersized, or poorly spliced cables.
Electrode
Work
Weld Cable Size** And Total Cable (Copper) Length
In Weld Circuit Not Exceeding***
100 ft (30 m) Or Less
150 ft
(45 m)
200 ft
(60 m)
Welding
Amperes
10 − 60% Duty
Cycle
60 − 100%
Duty Cycle
100
4
4
4
3
150
3
3
2
1
200
3
2
1
1/0
250
2
1
1/0
2/0
300
1
1/0
2/0
3/0
350
1/0
2/0
3/0
4/0
400
1/0
2/0
3/0
4/0
500
2/0
3/0
4/0
2 ea. 2/0
600
3/0
4/0
2 ea. 2/0
2 ea. 3/0
700
4/0
2 ea. 2/0
2 ea. 3/0
2 ea. 4/0
800
4/0
2 ea. 2/0
2 ea. 3/0
2 ea. 4/0
900
2 ea. 2/0
2 ea. 3/0
2 ea. 4/0
3 ea. 3/0
1000
2 ea. 2/0
2 ea. 3/0
2 ea. 4/0
3 ea. 3/0
1250
2 ea. 3/0
2 ea. 4/0
3 ea. 3/0
4 ea. 3/0
10 − 100% Duty Cycle
*This chart is a general guideline and may not suit all applications. If cable overheating occurs
(normally you can smell it), use next size larger cable.
**Weld cable size (AWG) is based on either a 4 volts or less drop or a current density of at least
300 circular mils per ampere. Contact your distributor for the mm2 equivalent weld cable sizes.
***For distances longer than those shown in this Guide, call a factory applications
representative at 920-735-4505.
Miller Electric Mfg. Co.
An Illinois Tool Works Company
1635 West Spencer Street
Appleton, WI 54914 USA
Hobart Welding Products
An Illinois Tool Works Company
600 West Main Street
Troy, OH 45373 USA
For additional FREE copies, call
920−735−4356, or fax 920−735−4011.
M199776F 2009−08
© 2009 Miller Electric Mfg. Co.
ORIGINAL INSTRUCTIONS − PRINTED IN USA
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