AE4-1303 R14 April 2014 Compressors

AE4-1303 R14 April 2014 Compressors
AE4-1303 R14
AE4-1303 R14
April 2014
7 to 15 Ton ZR*KC and ZP*KC Copeland Scroll™ Compressors
Section
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page Section
Safety
Safety Instructions.......................................................2
Safety Icon Explanation...............................................2
Instructions Pertaining to Risk of Electrical
Shock, Fire, or Injury to Persons...............................3
Safety Statements........................................................3
Page
Assembly Line Procedures
Compressor Handling................................................ 12
Mounting.................................................................... 12
Suction & Discharge Fittings...................................... 12
Assembly Line Brazing Procedure............................. 12
Unbrazing System Components................................ 12
Pressure Testing........................................................ 12
Assembly Line System Charging Procedures............ 13
Electrical Connections............................................... 13
Hipot Testing.............................................................. 13
Tandem Assembly...................................................... 13
Introduction
Nomenclature...............................................................4
Application Considerations
Operating Envelope.....................................................4
Internal Pressure Relief (IPR) Valve............................4
Advanced Scroll Temperature Protection.....................4
Discharge Line Thermostat..........................................5
High Pressure Control..................................................5
Low Pressure Control..................................................5
Shut Down Device.......................................................5
Discharge Check Valve................................................5
Discharge Mufflers.......................................................5
Compressor Cycling.....................................................5
Piping Length & High Refrigerant Charge....................6
Suction & Discharge Line Noise & Vibration................6
Suction & Discharge Fittings........................................6
System Tubing Stress..................................................6
Accumulators...............................................................7
Crankcase Heat...........................................................7
Pump Down Cycle.......................................................7
Reversing Valves.........................................................7
System Screens & Strainers........................................8
Contaminant Control....................................................8
Oil Type & Removal.....................................................8
Three Phase Electrical Phasing...................................9
Power Factor Correction..............................................9
Deep Vacuum Operation..............................................9
Manifolded Compressors.............................................9
Manifolded Applications..............................................10
Motor Protection..........................................................10
Service Procedures
Field Replacement..................................................... 14
Mounting.................................................................. 14
Removing Oil........................................................... 14
Electrical.................................................................. 14
Module..................................................................... 14
Compressor Replacement after a Motor Burn........... 14
Manifolded Compressor Replacement....................... 15
Start-Up of a New or Replacement Compressor....... 15
Field Troubleshooting the Kriwan Module.................. 15
Field Troubleshooting the CoreSense
Communications Module......................................... 16
Scroll Functional Check............................................. 16
Refrigerant Retrofits................................................... 17
Figures & Tables
How a Scroll Works.................................................... 18 Scroll Operating Envelopes....................................... 19
Compressor Terminal Box Wiring.............................. 20
ASTP Label................................................................ 21
Crankcase Heater Location....................................... 21
Scroll Suction Tube Brazing....................................... 22
Field Application Test................................................. 23
Design Configurations................................................ 23
Compressor Accessories & Service Parts................. 24
Refrigerant Charge Limits.......................................... 25
Torque Values............................................................ 25
Protector Specifications............................................. 26
CoreSense LED Flash Code Information.................26-27
Tandem Oil Balancing................................................ 28
Tilted Tandem............................................................. 28
Application Tests
Application Test Summary..........................................10
Continuous Floodback Test.........................................11
Field Application Test..................................................11
APPENDIX
Kriwan to CoreSense Retrofit Instructions................. 29
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
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AE4-1303 R14
Safety Instructions
Copeland Scroll™ compressors are manufactured according to the latest U.S. and European Safety
Standards. Particular emphasis has been placed on the user's safety. Safey icons are explained below
and safety instructions applicable to the products in this bulletin are grouped on Page 3. These
instructions should be retained throughout the lifetime of the compessor. You are strongly advised
to follow these safety instructions.
Safety Icon Explanation
DANGER
DANGER indicates a hazardous situation which, if not avoided, will result
in death or serious injury.
WARNING
WARNING indicates a hazardous situation which, if not avoided, could
result in death or serious injury.
CAUTION
CAUTION, used with the safety alert symbol, indicates a hazardous
situation which, if not avoided, could result in minor or moderate injury.
NOTICE
CAUTION
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
NOTICE is used to address practices not related to personal injury.
CAUTION, without the safety alert symbol, is used to address practices
not related to personal injury.
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Instructions Pertaining to Risk of Electrical Shock, Fire, or Injury to Persons
WARNING
ELECTRICAL SHOCK HAZARD
• Disconnect and lock out power before servicing.
• Discharge all capacitors before servicing.
• Use compressor with grounded system only.
• Molded electrical plug must be used with all -1XX and -8XX bills of material.
• Refer to original equipment wiring diagrams.
•
• Failure to follow these warnings could result in serious personal injury.
WARNING
PRESSURIZED SYSTEM HAZARD
• System contains refrigerant and oil under pressure.
• Remove refrigerant from both the high and low compressor side before
removing compressor.
•
• Never install a system and leave it unattended when it has no charge,
a holding charge, or with the service valves closed without electrically
locking out the system.
• Use only approved refrigerants and refrigeration oils.
• Personal safety equipment must be used.
• Failure to follow these warnings could result in serious personal injury.
WARNING
BURN HAZARD
• Do not touch the compressor until it has cooled down.
• Ensure that materials and wiring do not touch high temperature areas of
the compressor.
• Use caution when brazing system commponents.
• Personal safety equipment must be used.
• Failure to follow these warnings could result in serious personal injury or
property damage.
CAUTION
COMPRESSOR HANDLING
• Use the appropriate lifting devices to move compressors.
• Personal safety equipment must be used.
• Failure to follow these warnings could result in personal injury or
property damage.
Safety Statements
• Refrigerant compressors must be employed only for their intended use.
•
install, commission and maintain this equipment.
•
• All valid standards and codes for installing, servicing, and maintaining electrical and
refrigeration equipment must be observed.
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
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Introduction
Operating Envelope
NOTICE
The 7 to 15 ton ZR*KC and ZP*KC Copeland
Scroll™compressors are designed for a wide variety
of light commercial air-conditioning, heat pump, and
chiller applications. This bulletin describes the operating
characteristics, design features, and application
requirements for these compressors.
It is essential that the glide of R-407C is carefully
considered when adjusting pressure and
superheat controls.
Figure 2 illustrates the operating envelopes for
the ZR*KC and ZP*KC compressors with R-22/R407C/R-134a and R-410A respectively. The operating
envelopes represent operating conditions with 20F°
(11K) superheat in the return gas. The steady-state
operating condition of the compressor must remain
inside the prescribed operating envelope. Excursions
outside of the envelope should be brief and infrequent.
Use of refrigerants other than R-22, R-407C, or R-134a
with ZR*KCE and R-410A with ZP*KCE voids the
compressor UL recognition.
For additional information, please refer to the online
product information accessible from the Emerson
Climate Technologies website at www.emersonclimate.
com. Operating principles of the Copeland Scroll
compressor are described in Figure 1 of this bulletin.
The ZR*KC and ZP*KC scrolls outlined in this bulletin
range in size from 84,000 to 190,000 Btu/hr (24.6
to 55.7 kW) and 90,000 to 182,000 Btu/hr (26.4 to
53.3 kW) respectively. These models include all of
the standard 50 and 60 Hertz three phase voltages.
Compressors in this size range include a number of
features outlined in Table 1 below.
Internal Pressure Relief (IPR) Valve
WARNING
A high pressure control must be used in all
applications.
Nomenclature
The model numbers of the Copeland Scroll
compressors include the approximate nominal 60
Hz capacity at standard operating conditions. An
example would be the ZP90KCE-TFD, which has
90,500 But/hr (26.5kW) cooling capacity at the AHRI
high temperature air conditioning rating point when
operated at 60 Hz. Note that the same compressor
will have approximately 5/6 of this capacity or 74,500
Btu/hr (21.8kW) when operated at 50 Hz.
These models of Copeland Scroll compressors do not
have internal pressure relief valves. To ensure safe
operation, a high pressure control must be used in
all applications.
Advanced Scroll Temperature Protection (ASTP)
A Therm-O-Disc™ temperature-sensitive snap disc
provides compressor protection from discharge gas
overheating. Events such as loss of charge, evaporator
blower failure, or low side charging with inadequate
pressure will cause the discharge gas to quickly
rise above a critical temperature. Once this critical
temperature is reached, the ASTP feature will cause
the scrolls to separate and stop pumping but allow the
motor to continue to run. After the compressor runs for
some time without pumping gas, the motor overload
Application Considerations
The following application guidelines should be
considered in the design of a system using ZR*KC and
ZP*KC scroll compressors. Some of this information
is recommended, whereas other guidelines must be
followed. The Application Engineering department will
always welcome suggestions that will help improve
these types of documents.
Table 1 – Copeland Scroll™ Family Features
Application
Model
IPR
Valve
Discharge
Temperature
Protection
(ASTP)
Quiet
Shutdown
Discharge
Motor
Electrical
Check
Protection Connections1
Valve
A/C
Heat
Pump
ZR84-144KCE-TF*
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
ZR160-190KCE-TE/W*
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Module
TB
ZP90-137KCE-TF*
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Internal
MP, TB
ZP154-182KCE-TE/W*
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Module
TB
Internal
MP, TB
* Last Character In Voltage Code (5 = 200/230-3-60, 200/220-3-50; D = 460-3-60, 380/420-3-50; E = 575-3-60; 7 = 380-3-60)
1
MP = Molded Plug, TB = Terminal Block & Ring Terminals
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
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protector will open. Depending on the heat buildup in
the compressor, it may take up to two hours for the
ASTP to reset. The addition of the Advanced Scroll
Temperature Protection makes it possible to eliminate
the discharge line thermostat previously required in
heat pump applications. A graphic explanation and a
short video clip are available on our website at www.
emersonclimate.com/ASTP. Compressors in this size
range that have ASTP are identified with the ASTP label
shown in Figure 4.
Heat pumps:
20 psig/1.4 bar (R-410A)
10 psig/0.7 bar (R-22, R-407C, & R-134a)
Shut Down Device
All scrolls in this size range have floating valve
technology to mitigate shut down noise. Since Copeland
Scroll™ compressors are also excellent gas expanders,
they may spin backwards for a brief period after
shutdown as the internal pressures equalize.
Discharge Line Thermostat
Discharge Check Valve
A discharge temperature thermostat is not an application
requirement because of the built-in ASTP feature that
protects the compressor against abnormally high
discharge temperatures. If the system designer wants to
prevent ASTP trips and limit the maximum compressor
discharge temperature to a lower temperature, a
discharge temperature switch should be used. Table 4
lists available discharge line thermostats that strap on
to the discharge line of the compressor for the highest
level of compressor reliability.
A low mass, disk-type check valve in the discharge
fitting of the compressor prevents the high side, high
pressure discharge gas from flowing rapidly back
through the compressor after shutdown. This check
valve was not designed to be used with recycling pump
down because it is not entirely leak-proof.
Discharge Mufflers
Flow through Copeland Scroll compressors is semicontinuous with relatively low pulsation. External
mufflers, where they are normally applied to
piston compressors today, may not be required for
Copeland Scroll compressors. Because of variability
between systems, however, individual system tests
should be performed to verify acceptability of sound
performance. When no testing is performed, mufflers
are recommended in heat pumps. The muffler should
be located a minimum of six inches (15 cm) to a
maximum of 18 inches (46 cm) from the compressor
for the most effective operation. The further the muffler
is placed from the compressor within these ranges the
more effective it may be. If adequate attenuation is not
achieved, use a muffler with a larger cross-sectional
area to inlet-area ratio. The ratio should be a minimum
of 20:1 with a 30:1 ratio recommended. The muffler
should be from four to six inches (10 -15 cm) long.
High Pressure Control
A high pressure cut-out control must be used in all
applications. The maximum cut out setting is 425 psig
(30 bar) for R-22, R-407C, and R-134a and 650 psig
(45 bar) for R-410A. The high pressure control should
have a manual reset feature for the highest level of
system protection.
Low Pressure Control
A low pressure control is highly recommended for loss
of charge protection and other system fault conditions
that may result in very low evaporating temperatures.
Even though these compressors have internal discharge
temperature protection, loss of system charge will result
in overheating and recycling of the motor overload
protector. Prolonged operation in this manner could result
in oil pump out and eventual bearing failure.
Compressor Cycling
There is no set answer to how often scroll compressors
can be started and stopped in an hour, since it is
highly dependent on system configuration. There
is no minimum off time because Copeland Scroll
compressors start unloaded, even if the system has
unbalanced pressures. The most critical consideration
is the minimum run time required to return oil to the
compressor after startup. To establish the minimum
run time, obtain a sample compressor equipped with
a sight tube (available from Emerson) and install
it in a system with the longest connecting lines
that are approved for the system. The minimum on
time becomes the time required for oil lost during
compressor startup to return to the compressor sump
The low pressure cut-out setting will depend on the
application type and minimum expected evaporating
temperature. The low pressure cut-out should be
selected to prevent compressor overheating and other
system failure modes such as coil icing in air conditioning
systems and frozen heat exchangers in chiller systems.
The minimum, recommended low pressure cut-out switch
settings are:
Air conditioning and chiller:
55 psig/3.8 bar (R-410A)
25 psig/1.7 bar (R-22 & R-407C)
10 psig/0.7 bar (R-134a)
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
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and restore a minimal oil level that will assure oil pick
up through the crankshaft. The minimum oil level
required in the compressor is 1.5" (40 mm) below
the center of the compressor sight-glass. Cycling
the compressor for a shorter period than this, for
instance to maintain very tight temperature control,
will result in progressive loss of oil and damage to the
compressor. See AE17-1262 for more information on
preventing compressor short cycling.
and vibration characteristics differ in some respects from
those of reciprocating compressors. In rare instances,
these could result in unexpected sound complaints.
One difference is that the vibration characteristics of
the scroll compressor, although low, include two very
close frequencies, one of which is normally isolated from
the shell by the suspension of an internally suspended
compressor. These frequencies, which are present in all
compressors, may result in a low level “beat” frequency
that may be detected as noise coming along the suction
line into the building under some conditions. Elimination
of the “beat” can be achieved by attenuating either
of the contributing frequencies. The most important
frequencies to avoid are 50 and 60 Hz power supply
line. This is easily done by using one of the common
combinations of design configuration described in Table
3. The scroll compressor makes both a rocking and
torsional motion, and enough flexibility must be provided
in the line to prevent vibration transmission into any lines
attached to the unit. In a split system the most important
goal is to ensure minimal vibration is all directions at
the service valve to avoid transmitting vibrations to the
structure to which the lines are fastened.
Long Pipe Lengths / High Refrigerant Charge
Some system configurations may contain higher-thannormal refrigerant charges either because of large
internal coil volumes or long line sets. If such a system
also contains an accumulator then the permanent
loss of oil from the compressor may become critical.
If the system contains more than 20 pounds (9 kg)
of refrigerant, it is our recommendation to add one
fluid ounce of oil for every 5 pounds (15 ml/kg) of
refrigerant over this amount. If the system contains
an accumulator the manufacturer of the accumulator
should be consulted for a pre-charge recommendation.
Other system components such as shell and tube
evaporators can trap significant quantities of oil and
should be considered in overall oil requirements.
Reheat coils and circuits that are inactive during part of
the normal cycle can trap significant quantities of oil if
system piping allows the oil to fall out of the refrigerant
flow into the inactive circuit. The oil level must be
carefully monitored during system development, and
corrective action should be taken if the compressor
oil level falls more than 1.5" (40 mm) below the center
of the sight-glass. The compressor oil level should
be checked with the compressor "off" to avoid the
sump turbulence when the compressor is running.
A second difference of the Copeland Scroll compressor
is that under some conditions the normal rotational
starting motion of the compressor can transmit an
“impact” noise along the suction line. This phenomenon,
like the one described previously, also results from the
lack of internal suspension, and can be easily avoided
by using standard suction line isolation techniques as
described in Table 3.
The sound phenomena described above are not usually
associated with heat pump systems because of the
isolation and attenuation provided by the reversing valve
and tubing bends.
These compressors are available to the OEM with a
production sight-glass that can be used to determine the
oil level in the compressor in the end-use application.
These compressors are also available to the OEM with
an oil Schrader fitting on the side of the compressor to
add additional oil if needed because of long lengths of
piping or high refrigerant charge. No attempt should
be made to increase the oil level in the sight-glass
above the 3/4 full level. A high oil level is not
sustainable in the compressor and the extra oil will
be pumped out into the system causing a reduction
in system efficiency and a higher-than-normal oil
circulation rate.
Suction and Discharge Fittings
Copeland Scroll compressors have copper plated steel
suction and discharge fittings. These fittings are far
more rugged and less prone to leaks than copper fittings
used on other compressors. Due to the different thermal
properties of steel and copper, brazing procedures
may have to be changed from those commonly used.
See Figure 6 for assembly line and field brazing
recommendations.
System Tubing Stress
System tubing should be designed to keep tubing
stresses below 9.5 ksi (62 MPa), the endurance limit
of copper tubing. Start, stop and running (resonance)
cases should be evaluated.
Suction & Discharge Line Noise and Vibration
Copeland Scroll™ compressors inherently have low
sound and vibration characteristics. However, the sound
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
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AE4-1303 R14
Accumulators
starting the compressor. This will prevent oil dilution
and bearing stress on initial start up.
The use of accumulators is very dependent on the
application. The Copeland Scroll™ compressor’s inherent
ability to handle liquid refrigerant during occasional
operating flood back situations makes the use of an
accumulator unnecessary in standard designs such as
condensing units. Applications such as heat pumps with
orifice refrigerant control that allow large volumes of
liquid refrigerant to flood back to the compressor during
normal steady operation can dilute the oil to such an
extent that bearings are inadequately lubricated, and
wear will occur. In such a case an accumulator must
be used to reduce flood back to a safe level that the
compressor can handle. Heat pumps designed with a
TXV to control refrigerant during heating may not require
an accumulator if testing assures the system designer
that there will be no flood back throughout the operating
range. To test for flood back conditions and to determine
if the accumulator or TXV design is adequate, please
see the section entitled Application Tests.
To properly install the crankcase heater, the heater
should be installed in the location illustrated in Figure
5. Tighten the clamp screw carefully, ensuring that the
heater is uniformly tensioned along its entire length
and that the circumference of the heater element is
in complete contact with the compressor shell. It's
important that the clamp screw is torqued to the range
of 20-25 in-lb (2.3-8 N-m) to ensure adequate contact
and to prevent heater burnout. Never apply power to
the heater in free air or before the heater is installed
on the compressor to prevent overheating and burnout.
WARNING! Crankcase heaters must be properly
grounded.
Pump Down Cycle
A pump down cycle for control of refrigerant migration
is not recommended for scroll compressors of this
size. If a pump down cycle is used, a separate
discharge line check valve must be added. The scroll
compressor’s discharge check valve is designed to stop
extended reverse rotation and to prevent high-pressure
gas from leaking rapidly into the low side after shut off.
The check valve will in some cases leak more than
reciprocating compressor discharge reeds, normally
used with pump down, causing the scroll compressor to
recycle more frequently. Repeated short-cycling of this
nature can result in a low oil situation and consequent
damage to the compressor. The low-pressure control
differential has to be reviewed since a relatively large
volume of gas will re-expand from the high side of the
compressor into the low side after shut down. Pressure
control setting: Never set the low pressure control
to shut off outside of the operating envelope.
The low pressure control should be set to open
no lower than 5 to 10F° (3-6K) equivalent suction
pressure below the lowest expected evaporating
temperature.
A large-area protective screen no finer than 30x30
mesh (0.6mm openings) is required to protect this small
orifice from plugging. Tests have shown that a small
screen with a fine mesh can easily become plugged
causing oil starvation to the compressor bearings. The
size of the accumulator depends upon the operating
range of the system and the amount of sub cooling and
subsequent head pressure allowed by the refrigerant
control. System modeling indicates that heat pumps
that operate down to and below 0°F (-18°C) will require
an accumulator that can hold around 70% to 75% of
the system charge. Behavior of the accumulator and
its ability to prevent liquid slugging and subsequent oil
pump-out at the beginning and end of the defrost cycle
should be assessed during system development. This
will require special accumulators and compressors
with sight tubes and/or sight glasses for monitoring
refrigerant and oil levels.
Crankcase Heat
Reversing Valves
A 90 watt crankcase heater is required when the
system charge exceeds the values listed in Table 5.
This requirement is independent of system type and
configuration. Table 5 lists Emerson crankcase heaters
by part number and voltage. See Figure 6 for the proper
heater location on the compressor shell. The crankcase
heater must remain energized during compressor
off cycles.
Since Copeland Scroll compressors have very high
volumetric efficiency, their displacements are lower
than those of comparable capacity reciprocating
compressors. CAUTION Reversing valve sizing must
be within the guidelines of the valve manufacturer.
Required pressure drop to ensure valve shifting
must be measured throughout the operating range
of the unit and compared to the valve manufacturer's
data. Low ambient heating conditions with low flow
rates and low pressure drop across the valve can
result in a valve not shifting. This can result in a
condition where the compressor appears to be
not pumping (i.e. balanced pressures). It can also
The initial start-up in the field is a very critical period for
any compressor because all load-bearing surfaces are
new and require a short break-in period to carry high
loads under adverse conditions. The crankcase heater
must be turned on a minimum of 12 hours prior to
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
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AE4-1303 R14
result in elevated compressor sound levels. During
a defrost cycle, when the reversing valve abruptly
changes the refrigerant flow direction, the suction
and discharge pressures will go outside of the normal
operating envelope. The sound that the compressor
makes during this transition period is normal, and
the duration of the sound will depend on the coil
volume, outdoor ambient, and system charge level.
The preferred method of mitigating defrost sound is to
shut down the compressor for 20 to 30 seconds when
the reversing valve changes position going into and
coming out of the defrost cycle. This technique allows
the system pressures to reach equilibrium without the
compressor running. The additional start-stop cycles do
not exceed the compressor design limits, but suction
and discharge tubing design should be evaluated.
responsibility to make sure that the filter-drier is
adequately sized to accommodate the contaminants
from system manufacturing processes which leave
solid or liquid contaminants in the evaporator coil,
condenser coil, and interconnecting tubing plus any
contaminants introduced during the field installation
process. Molecular sieve and activated alumina are
two filter-drier materials designed to remove moisture
and mitigate acid formation. A 100% molecular sieve
filter can be used for maximum moisture capacity. A
more conservative mix, such as 75% molecular sieve
and 25% activated alumina, should be used for service
applications.
Oil Type & Removal
Mineral oil is used in the ZR*KC compressors for
R-22 applications. Polyolester (POE) oil is used in the
ZR*KCE and ZP*KCE compressors for R-22/R-407C/R134a and R-410A applications respectively. See the
compressor nameplate for the original oil charge. A
complete recharge should be approximately four fluid
ounces (118 ml) less than the nameplate value.
The reversing valve solenoid should be wired so
that the valve does not reverse when the system is
shut off by the operating thermostat in the heating
or cooling mode. If the valve is allowed to reverse at
system shutoff, suction and discharge pressures are
reversed to the compressor. This results in pressures
equalizing through the compressor which can cause
the compressor to slowly rotate backwards until the
pressures equalize. This condition does not affect
compressor durability but can cause unexpected sound
after the compressor is turned off.
If additional oil is needed in the field for POE
applications, Copeland ™ Ultra 32-3MAF, Lubrizol
Emkarate RL32-3MAF, Parker Emkarate RL32-3MAF/
(Virginia) LE32-3MAF, or Nu Calgon 4314-66 (Emkarate
RL32-3MAF) should be used. Copeland™ Ultra 22 CC,
Hatcol EAL 22CC, and Mobil EAL Arctic 22 CC are
acceptable alternatives.
System Screens & Strainers
Screens finer than 30x30 mesh (0.6mm openings)
should not be used anywhere in the system. Field
experience has shown that finer mesh screens used
to protect thermal expansion valves, capillary tubes, or
accumulators can become temporarily or permanently
plugged with normal system debris and block the flow
of either oil or refrigerant to the compressor. Such
blockage can result in compressor failure.
If additional oil is needed in the field for mineral oil
applications, Sonneborn Suniso 3GS or Chevron
Texaco Capella WF32 should be used.
When a compressor is exchanged in the field it is
possible that a major portion of the oil from the replaced
compressor may still be in the system. While this may
not affect the reliability of the replacement compressor,
the extra oil will add to rotor drag and increase power
usage. To remove this excess oil an access valve
port has been added to the lower shell of the service
compressor. After running the replacement compressor
for a minimum of 10 minutes, shut down the compressor
and drain excess oil from the Schrader valve until the oil
level is at one-half of the sight-glass level. This should
be repeated twice to make sure the proper oil level has
been achieved.
Contaminant Control
Copeland Scroll™ compressors leave the factory with
a miniscule amount of contaminants. Manufacturing
processes have been designed to minimize the
introduction of solid or liquid contaminants. Dehydration
and purge processes ensure minimal moisture levels
in the compressor, and continuous auditing of lubricant
moisture levels ensures that moisture isn’t inadvertently
introduced into the compressor.
CAUTION POE must be handled carefully and
the proper protective equipment (gloves, eye
protection, etc.) must be used when handling POE
lubricant. POE must not come into contact with any
surface or material that might be harmed by POE,
including without limitation, certain polymers (e.g.
PVC/CPVC and polycarbonate).
It is generally accepted that system moisture levels
should be maintained below 50 ppm. A filter-drier is
required on all POE lubricant systems to prevent
solid particulate contamination, oil dielectric
strength degradation, ice formation, oil hydrolysis,
and metal corrosion. It is the system designer’s
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
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AE4-1303 R14
Three Phase Scroll Compressor Electrical Phasing
CAUTION! Copeland Scroll compressors (as with
any refrigerant compressor) should never be used
to evacuate a refrigeration or air conditioning
system. The scroll compressor can be used to pump
down refrigerant in a unit as long as the pressures
remain within the operating envelope shown in Figure 2.
Prolonged operation at low suction pressures will result
in overheating of the scrolls and permanent damage to
the scroll tips, drive bearing and internal seal. See AE241105 for proper system evacuation procedures.
NOTICE
Compressors that employ CoreSense technology
have phase protection and will be locked out after
one reverse phase event.
Copeland Scroll compressors, like several other types
of compressors, will only compress in one rotational
direction. Three phase compressors will rotate in either
direction depending upon phasing of the power. Since
there is a 50% chance of connecting power in such a
way as to cause rotation in the reverse direction, it is
important to include notices and instructions in
appropriate locations on the equipment to ensure
that proper rotation direction is achieved when
the system is installed and operated. Verification
of proper rotation direction is made by observing that
suction pressure drops and discharge pressure rises
when the compressor is energized. Reverse rotation will
result in no pressure differential as compared to normal
values. A compressor running in reverse will sometimes
make an abnormal sound.
Manifolded Compressors
Tandem compressor assemblies are available for
purchase from Emerson. In lieu of purchasing the
assembled tandem, the OEM can choose to purchase
the manifold-ready compressor and perform the
assembly in their factory. All of the ZP*KC and ZR*KC
compressors are available for manifolding with another
compressor in this compressor family. Manifoldready compressors are designated with a -4XX bill of
material number at the end of the model number (e.g.
ZP120KCE-TFD-422). Drawings of tandem and trio
compressor assemblies are available from Emerson
Climate Technologies by contacting your Application
Engineer. NOTICE Customers who choose to design
and build their own manifolds for tandem and trio
compressor assemblies are ultimately responsible
for the reliability of those manifold sets.
There is no negative impact on durability caused by
operating three phase Copeland Scroll™ compressors in
the reversed direction for a short period of time (under
one hour). After several minutes of reverse operation,
the compressor’s internal overload protector will trip
shutting off the compressor. If allowed to repeatedly
restart and run in reverse without correcting the
situation, the compressor bearings will be permanently
damaged because of oil loss to the system. All threephase scroll compressors are wired identically internally.
As a result, once the correct phasing is determined for
a specific system or installation, connecting properly
phased power leads to the identified compressor
electrical (Fusite™) terminals will maintain the proper
rotational direction (see Figure 3). It should be noted
that all three-phase scrolls will continue to run in reverse
until the internal overload protector opens or the phasing
is corrected.
The suction manifold is close to a symmetrical layout
with the design intent of equal pressure drop to each
compressor. A straight length of pipe is connected to
the suction manifold "T" connection to serve as a flow
straightener to make the flow as uniform as possible.
The discharge manifold is the less critical of the two
manifolds in terms of pressure drop. Low pipe stress
and reliability are its critical design characteristics.
Two different oil balancing techniques are used with
tandems in this family of compressors – two-phase
tandem line (TPTL) and oil equalization line (OEL).
For trio assemblies, only the TPTL design has been
qualified. The TPTL design is a larger diameter pipe
connecting the oil sumps of the individual compressors
allowing both gas and oil to flow between the
compressors at the same time. To install the TPTL, the
individual sight-glasses on each compressor must be
removed to allow the TPTL to screw on to the sight-glass
fitting on the compressors. A sight-glass is installed on
the TPTL to view the presence of oil (see Figure 9).
Power Factor Correction
If power factor correction is necessary in the end-use
application, please see AE9-1249 for more information
on this topic.
Deep Vacuum Operation
Copeland Scroll compressors incorporate internal low
vacuum protection and will stop pumping (unload) when
the pressure ratio exceeds approximately 10:1. There
is an audible increase in sound when the scrolls start
unloading.
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
The OEL design is a 3/8" (10mm) copper tube
connecting the oil sumps of the individual compressors
allowing the flow of oil between the compressor sumps.
To install the OEL, the oil drain Schrader fitting on each
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AE4-1303 R14
Motor Overload Protection
compressor must be removed to expose the stub tube
fitting for a brazed connection (see Tandem Assembly
section). The OEL has an oil drain Schrader fitting on
the 3/8" OEL tube for adding/removing oil (see Figure
9). The OEL design allows the individual oil levels in
each compressor to be viewed, which isn't possible
with the TPTL.
Models with Electrical Code TF
Models with an "F" in the electrical code (i.e. ZP120KCETFD), have an internal line break motor overload located
in the center of the Y of the motor windings. This
overload disconnects all three legs of the motor from
power in case of an over-current or over-temperature
condition. The overload reacts to a combination of motor
current and motor winding temperature. The internal
overload protects against single phasing. Time must be
allowed for the motor to cool down before the overload
will reset. If current monitoring to the compressor is
available, the system controller can take advantage
of the compressor internal overload operation. The
controller can lock out the compressor if current draw
is not coincident with contactor energizing, implying that
the compressor has shut off on its internal overload.
This will prevent unnecessary compressor cycling on
a fault condition until corrective action can be taken.
Manifolded Applications
NOTICE
Manifolded compressor designs employ a passive
oil management system. All system designs must
be tested by the OEM to ensure that the passive
design will provide adequate oil balancing
between the compressors in the manifolded set
under all operating conditions. If inadequate oil
balancing can't be demonstrated, an active oil
management system should be considered.
Manifolded compressors follow the same application
guidelines as single compressors outlined in this bulletin.
The refrigerant charge limit for tandem compressors is
shown in Table 5. A tandem circuit with a charge over
this limit must have crankcase heaters applied to both
compressors.
Models with Electrical Code TW* or TE*
WARNING
The electronic motor protection module is a U.L.
recognized safety device and must be used with
all compressors that have TW* electrical codes
and TE* electrical codes respectively.
Oil levels in the individual sight-glasses will vary,
depending on whether one or more compressors in the
manifolded set are operating and if the manifolded set
is made up of equal or unequal compressor capacities.
Because of the unequal oil levels that can exist, oil levels
should be viewed with the compressors off to allow the
oil level to stabilize between the compressor sumps. With
the compressors off, oil should be visible in the individual
compressor sight-glasses when the OEL is used, or in
the sight-glass on the TPTL. If oil is not visible, additional
oil should be added to the system.
Models with a "W" or "E" in the electrical code (i.e.
ZP182KCE-TWD) have a motor overload system
that consists of an external electronic control module
connected to a chain of four thermistors embedded in
the motor windings. The module will trip and remain off
for a minimum of 30 minutes if the motor temperature
exceeds a preset point.
Note: Turning off power to the module will reset it
immediately.
Suction and discharge tandem manifolds are not
designed to support system piping. Support means
must be provided by the system designer to support
suction and discharge lines so that stress is not placed
on the manifolds.
The module has a 30 minute time delay to allow the
scrolls to cool down after the motor temperature limit has
been reached. CAUTION Restarting the compressor
sooner may cause a destructive temperature build
up in the scrolls. For this reason, module power must
never be switched off with the control circuit voltage.
Since the compressor is dependent upon the contactor
to disconnect it from power in case of a fault, the
contactor must be selected in accordance with AE101244. The contactor must meet both the Rated Load
Amps (RLA) and Locked Rotor Amps (LRA) specified
for the compressor.
The compressors in a manifolded set can be started/
stopped in any desired sequence. To help reduce
inrush current, starting the compressors individually is
recommended.
Please consult with Application Engineering during
the development of systems with trio compressor
assemblies. Trio compressor assemblies are
sensitive to system operating conditions and
configurations which will affect oil balancing. Trio
compressor assemblies must be qualified for each
application.
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
APPLICATION TESTS
Application Test Summary
There are a minimal number of tests the system
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AE4-1303 R14
designer will want to run to ensure the system operates
as designed. These tests should be performed during
system development and are dependent on the
system type and amount of refrigerant charge. These
application tests are to help identify gross errors in
system design that may produce conditions that could
lead to compressor failure. The Continuous Floodback
Test and Field Application Test, both outlined below, are
two tests to run to help verify the design. When to run
these tests can be summarized as follows.
flood back conditions. The compressor suction and
discharge pressures and temperatures as well as the
sump temperature should be recorded. The system
should be allowed to frost up for several hours (disabling
the defrost control and spraying water on the outdoor
coil may be necessary) to cause the saturated suction
temperature to fall below 0°F (-18°C). The suction
superheat must remain positive or design changes must
be made to increase suction superheat and reduce
flooding. Increasing indoor coil volume, increasing
outdoor air flow, reducing refrigerant charge, decreasing
capillary or orifice diameter, and adding a charge
compensator can also be used to reduce excessive
continuous liquid refrigerant flood back.
For manifolded compressor assemblies, oil balancing
tests must be performed to demonstrate oil balancing
between the compressors. Compressors with sighttubes for viewing a wide range of oil levels is appropriate
for this type of testing. The least amount of testing will
evaluate the minimum and maximum flow conditions at
which the compressors will be required to operate, with
min and max suction superheat.
Field Application Test
To test for repeated, excessive liquid flood back
during normal system off-cycles, perform the Field
Application Test that is outlined in Table 2. Obtain a
sample compressor with a sight-tube to measure the
liquid level in the compressor when it is off.
Continuous Floodback:
Required for all air-source heatpumps.
Note: The sight-tube is not a good liquid level indicator
when the compressor is running because the top of
the sight-tube is at a lower pressure than the bottom
causing a higher apparent oil level.
Field Application Test:
Required for any unit where both the design system
charge is higher than the compressor refrigerant
charge limit listed in Table 5; and a capillary tube,
fixed orifice, or bleed-type TXV is used on either the
indoor or the outdoor coil of the unit.
Set the system up in a configuration with the indoor
unit elevated several feet above the outdoor unit with
a minimum of 25 feet (8 meters) of connecting tubing
with no traps between the indoor and outdoor units. If
the system is designed to be field charged, the system
should be overcharged by 15% in this test to simulate
field overcharging. Operate the system in the cooling
mode at the outdoor ambient, on/off cycle times, and
number of cycles specified in Table 2. Record the
height of the liquid in the compressor at the start of
each on cycle, any compressor overload trips, or any
compressor abnormal starting sounds during each
test. Review the results with Application Engineering
to determine if an accumulator or other means of off
cycle migration control are required. This test does
not eliminate the requirement for a crankcase
heater if the system charge level exceeds the
values in Table 5. The criteria for pass/fail is whether
the liquid level reaches the bottom of the terminal box.
Liquid levels higher than this can allow refrigerant/oil
to be ingested by the scrolls and pumped out of the
compressor after start-up.
Continuous Floodback Test
It is expected that the design would not flood during
standard air conditioning operation. Flooding during
defrost cycles should be minimal and the flow control
device must regain control of the refrigerant flow after
the defrost cycle to ensure suction gas superheat. The
use of a TXV in heating does not guarantee operation
without flood back in the lower end of the unit/TXV
operating range.
To test for excessive continuous liquid refrigerant flood
back, it is necessary to operate the system in a test
room at conditions where steady state flood back may
occur (low ambient heating operation). Thermocouples
should be attached with glue or solder to the center of
the bottom shell and to the suction and discharge lines
approximately 6 inches (15 cm) from the shell. These
thermocouples should be insulated from the ambient air
with Permagum™ or other thermal insulation to be able
to record true shell and line temperatures. If the system
is designed to be field charged, it should be overcharged
by 15% in this test to simulate overcharging often found
in field installations.
The tests outlined above are for common applications
of compressors in this family. Many other applications
of the compressor exist, and tests to insure those
designs can’t possibly be covered in this bulletin.
Please consult with Application Engineering on
applications outside of those outlined above for the
The system should be operated at an indoor
temperature of 70°F (21°C) and outdoor temperature
extremes of 10°F (-12°C) or lower in heating to produce
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
11
AE4-1303 R14
appropriate application tests.
ASSEMBLY LINE PROCEDURES
Assembly Line Brazing Procedure
WARNING
Compressor Handling
WARNING
Personal safety equipment must be used during
brazing operation. Heat shields should be used to
prevent overheating or burning nearby temperature
sensitive parts. Fire extinguishing equipment
should be accessible in the event of a fire.
Use care and the appropriate material handling
equipment when lifting and moving compressors.
Personal safety equipment must be used.
Because oil might spill out of the suction connection
located low on the shell, the suction connection plug
must be left in place until the compressor is set into the
unit. If possible, the compressor should be kept vertical
during handling. The discharge connection plug should
be removed first before pulling the suction connection
plug to allow the dry air pressure inside the compressor
to escape. Pulling the plugs in this sequence prevents
oil mist from coating the suction tube making brazing
difficult. The copper coated steel suction tube should
be cleaned before brazing (see Figure 6). No object
(e.g. a swaging tool) should be inserted deeper than
two inches (51 mm) into the suction tube, or it might
damage the suction screen and motor.
Figure 6 discusses the proper procedures for brazing
the suction and discharge lines to a scroll compressor.
NOTICE It is important to flow nitrogen through the
system while brazing all joints during the system
assembly process. Nitrogen displaces the air and
prevents the formation of copper oxides in the system.
If allowed to form, the copper oxide flakes can later
be swept through the system and block screens such
as those protecting capillary tubes, thermal expansion
valves, and accumulator oil return holes. The blockage
– whether it is of oil or refrigerant – is capable of doing
damage resulting in compressor failure.
Unbrazing System Components
WARNING
Mounting
The tested rubber mounting grommet and sleeve
kit is listed in Table 4. This drawing can be found at
www.emersonclimate.com under the Miscellaneous
tab in the Online Product Information (OPI). For
applications such as tandems or mobile applications,
the compressor should be hard mounted directly
to the rails or base to relieve stress on the tubing.
An additional bellyband brace must be used with
mobile applications to keep compressor movement
to a minimum and relieve stress on both the feet
and the tubing. The steel spacer developed for such
applications is the 027-0385-00.
Before attempting to braze, it is important to recover
all refrigerant from both the high and low side of
the system.
If the refrigerant charge is removed from a scrollequipped unit by evacuating the high side only, it is
possible for the scrolls to seal, preventing pressure
equalization through the compressor. This may leave
the low side shell and suction line tubing pressurized.
If a brazing torch is then applied to the low side while
the low side shell and suction line contain pressure, the
pressurized refrigerant and oil mixture could ignite when
it escapes and contacts the brazing flame. CAUTION!
It is important to check both the high pressure
and low pressure sides with manifold gauges
before unbrazing. Instructions should be provided
in appropriate product literature and assembly (line
repair) areas. If compressor removal is required, the
compressor should be cut out of system rather than
unbrazed. See Figure 6 for the proper compressor
removal procedure.
Many OEM customers buy the mounting parts directly
from the supplier, but Emerson's grommet design and
durometer recommendations should be followed for
best vibration reduction through the mounting feet.
Suction and Discharge Fittings
These compressors are available with stub tube or
Rotalock connections. The stub tube version has
copper-plated steel suction and discharge fittings.
These fittings are far more rugged than copper fittings
used on other compressors. Due to the different
thermal properties of steel and copper, brazing
procedures may have to be changed from those
commonly used. See Figure 6 for assembly line and
field brazing procedures and Table 6 for Rotalock
torque values.
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
Pressure Testing
WARNING
Never pressurize the compressor to more than
400 psig (27.6 bar) for ZR*KCE and 475 psig (32.8
bar) for ZP*KCE compressors. Never pressurize
the compressor from a nitrogen cylinder or other
pressure source without an appropriately sized
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AE4-1303 R14
conduits, poor conduit connections to the terminal box,
an incorrectly installed terminal box cover or a missing
terminal box cover gasket are a few possible air leakage
paths. CAUTION! Moisture from warm, moist air that
is permitted to freely enter the terminal box can
condense into droplets of water inside the cooler
terminal box of the compressor. To alleviate this
problem, the warm, moist air must be prevented
from entering the terminal box. Sealing conduits
and eliminating other air leakage paths must be
taken. Dow Corning 3165 RTV is ideally suited for
sealing around wires in a conduit at the compressor
terminal box. Drilling a hole in the bottom of the
terminal box to allow the moisture to escape is not
acceptable.
pressure regulating and relief valve.
Higher pressure may result in permanent deformation of
the compressor shell and possibly cause misalignment
or bottom cover distortion.
Assembly Line System Charging Procedure
Systems should be charged with liquid on the high side
to the extent possible. The majority of the charge should
be pumped in the high side of the system to prevent low
voltage starting difficulties, hipot failures, and bearing
washout during the first-time start on the assembly line.
If additional charge is needed, it should be added as
liquid to the low side of the system with the compressor
operating. Pre-charging on the high side and adding
liquid on the low side of the system are both meant to
protect the compressor from operating with abnormally
low suction pressures during charging. NOTICE Do not
operate the compressor without enough system
charge to maintain at least 55 psig (3.8 bar) suction
pressure for R-410A and 20 psig (1.4 bar) for R-22
& R-407C. Do not operate the compressor with the
low pressure cut-out disabled. Do not operate with
a restricted suction or liquid line. Do not use the
compressor to test the opening set point of a high
pressure cutout. Bearings are susceptible to damage
before they have had several hours of normal running
for proper break in.
“Hipot” (AC High Potential) Testing)
CAUTION
Use caution with high voltage and never hipot
when compressor is in a vacuum.
Copeland Scroll compressors are configured with the
motor down and the pumping components at the top
of the shell. As a result, the motor can be immersed
in refrigerant to a greater extent than hermetic
reciprocating compressors when liquid refrigerant is
present in the shell. In this respect, the scroll is more like
semi-hermetic compressors which can have horizontal
motors partially submerged in oil and refrigerant. When
Copeland Scroll compressors are hipot tested with liquid
refrigerant in the shell, they can show higher levels of
leakage current than compressors with the motor on
top. This phenomenon can occur with any compressor
when the motor is immersed in refrigerant. The level of
current leakage does not present any safety issue. To
lower the current leakage reading, the system should
be operated for a brief period of time to redistribute
the refrigerant to a more normal configuration and the
system hipot tested again. See AE4-1294 for Megohm
testing recommendations. Under no circumstances
should the hipot test be performed while the
compressor is under a vacuum.
Electrical Connections
The orientation of the electrical connections on the
Copeland Scroll™ compressors is shown in Figure 3
and is also shown on the wiring diagram inside the
terminal box cover. The T-block screw terminals used
on this compressor should be fastened with a torque of
21 to 25 in-lb (2.37 to 2.82 Nm).
A molded plug electrical option is available for
compressors with internal overload protection (TF
electrical code) and is noted by a 1XX series bill of
material (i.e. ZP120KCE-TFD-130). The terminal cover
must be installed after the molded plug is installed to
help keep the plug in place.
Tandem Assembly
WARNING! The molded electrical plug should be
installed by hand to properly seat the plug on the
electrical terminals. The plug should not be struck
with a hammer or any other device.
The first step in the tandem assembly process is to
securely mount both compressors to the rails using the
appropriate mounting hardware. After both compressors
are mounted to the rails, the suction and discharge
manifolds can be brazed to the appropriate stub tubes
on each compressor using standard brazing practices
with a nitrogen purge. See Figure 9 for a picture of
a typical tandem assembly. Special consideration
needs to be given to the oil line that connects the oil
sumps of the two compressors. For even tandems
(two compressors with equal capacities) there are two
The terminal boxes used on compressors with TW*/
TE* electrical codes are larger because of the motor
overload module that is housed inside of the terminal
box. These terminal boxes also have a higher ingress
protection (IP) rating. Every effort should be made to
keep the terminal box completely sealed. Oversized
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
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AE4-1303 R14
If the oil level is higher than the oil Schrader fitting on
the sump of the compressor oil can be drained from this
fitting until the oil level reaches the level of the Schrader
fitting. To remove oil from the compressor when the
oil level is below the oil Schrader fitting one of two
different procedures can be used. The first procedure
is to remove the compressor from the system and drain
the oil from the compressor suction connection. This
method ensures complete removal of the oil from the
compressor. The second procedure is to remove the
compressor sight-glass and insert a hose into the sump
of the compressor and draw the oil out with a hand-held
pump (Yellow Jacket Pump UPC#77930).
options for connecting the compressor oil sumps--oil
equalization line (OEL) or two-phase tube line (TPTL).
For uneven tandems (two compressors with unequal
capacities) only the TPTL option is qualified.
After the compressors are mounted to the compressor
rails the entire assembly should be tilted back a minimum
of 12 degrees from horizontal (see Figure 10) to move
the oil level away from the Schrader fittings and sightglasses. If the compressor sumps are to be connected
with the TPTL the compressor sight-glasses can now
be removed for installation of the TPTL. The TPTL
Rotalock fitting should be torqued to the value listed in
Table 6. If the compressor sumps are to be connected
with the OEL option the Schrader fittings can now be
removed by unscrewing them. Removing the Schrader
fittings exposes the stub that is used to braze the OEL to
each compressor. The oil equalization stubs of both
compressors should be wiped clean with a lint free
towel to remove any oil residue before brazing.
Electrical
When replacing a compressor, especially one that has
been in the field for a number of years, it is always a
good idea to replace the contactor.
Note: See the locked rotor on the nameplate of
the new compressor and make sure the contactor
exceeds this locked rotor rating.
For a detailed instruction list of how to assemble a trio
of compressors, please contact Application Engineering.
Module
If the compressor to be replaced has a motor protection
module (i.e. ZR*K3) but the new compressor does not,
the following modifications must be made.
SERVICE PROCEDURES
CAUTION
POE oil must be handled carefully and the proper
protective equipment (gloves, eye protection, etc.)
must be used when handling POE lubricant. POE
must not come into contact with any surface or
material that might be harmed by POE, including
without limitation, certain polymers (e.g. PVC/CPVC
and polycarbonate).
1. Entirely remove the wiring leads originally run to
(T1-T2) on the solid state module from the line
or transformer.
2. Either tie together the leads originally attached to
the control terminals (M1-M2) on the solid state
module, or remove the leads to M1-M2 and rerun
the control wiring directly from the control to the
contactor coil.
Field Replacement
WARNING
3. The only wiring connections to the new
compressor will be the three high-power leads.
Use care and the appropriate material handling
equipment when lifting and moving compressors.
Personal safety equipment must be used.
Compressor Replacement after Motor Burn
In the case of a motor burn, the majority of
contaminated oil will be removed with the compressor.
The rest of the oil is cleaned through use of suction
and liquid line filter dryers. A 100% activated alumina
suction filter drier is recommended but must be
removed after 72 hours. See AE24-1105 for clean up
procedures and AE11-1297 for liquid line filter-drier
recommendations.
Mounting
There is an older 7 to 15 ton scroll family (ZR*K3) as well
as a reciprocating compressor family (BR) that can be
replaced by this scroll compressor family. The mounting
dimensions of the older scroll and the reciprocating
compressor are 8.65" X 8.65" (220mm X 220mm) to the
center of the mounting holes. The newer scroll has a
mounting dimension of 7.5" X 7.5" (190mm X 190mm).
To help adapt to this new dimension use mounting
kit 922-0001-00 that contains an adaptor plate and
mounting bolts. It will bolt in place of the old compressor
mounts and has a 7.5" (190mm) square mounting bolt
hole pattern for the new compressor.
NOTICE It is highly recommended that the suction
accumulator be replaced if the system contains
one. This is because the accumulator oil return orifice
or screen may be plugged with debris or may become
plugged shortly after a compressor failure. This will
result in starvation of oil to the replacement compressor
Removing Oil
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
14
AE4-1303 R14
and a second failure.
Manifolded Compressor Replacement
As mentioned in the Manifolded Applications section,
attention must be given to compressor oil levels
when commissioning a new system and servicing an
existing system. Oil levels should be checked with the
compressor "off" and after the oil has had a chance
to equalize between the compressors (for manifolded
applications). If oil can't be seen in the sight-glass of the
compressor, add oil until the sight-glass is approximately
half full.
WARNING
When lifing manifolded compressor assemblies,
all compressors must be lifted by their respective
lifting rings. Use care and exercise extreme
caution when lifting and moving compressors.
Personal safety equipment must be used.
Should a compressor fail in a manifolded set, only the
failed compressor should be replaced and not both
compressors. The oil from the failed compressor will
stay mostly in the failed compressor. Any contaminated
oil that does enter the tandem circuit will be cleaned by
the liquid line filter drier, and when used, the suction
line filter drier.
Field Trouble Shooting the Kriwan Module
Follow the steps listed below to trouble shoot the
module in the field. See wiring diagram Figure 3 or in
terminal box cover.
1. De-energize control circuit and module power.
Remove the control circuit wires from the module
(Terminals M1 & M2). Connect a jumper across
these “control circuit” wires. This will bypass the
“control contact” of the module.
The suction and discharge manifolds can be reused
if the failed compressor is carefully removed and the
manifolds are cut in such a way that a coupling and short
piece of copper can reconnect the new compressor. A
new oil equalization line can be field fabricated using
3/8" (10mm) OD AC&R tubing, if one is needed. The
replacement oil equalization line should be formed to
exactly the same outline and dimensions as the line that
is being replaced. To reconnect the oil equalization line
to the compressor, the oil in one or both compressors
will have to be lowered below the oil fitting on the
compressor. To do this, oil should either be removed
from the compressors or the compressors should be
tilted back a minimum of 12 degrees from horizontal
to move the oil away from the fitting (see Figure 10).
CAUTION ! The motor protection system within
the compressor is now bypassed. Use this
configuration to temporarily test module only.
Re-energize the control circuit and module power.
If the compressor will not operate with the jumper
installed, then the problem is external to the solid
state protection system.
If the compressor operates with the module
bypassed but will not operate when the module
is reconnected, then the control circuit relay in
the module is open. The thermistor protection
chain now needs to be tested to determine if
the module’s control circuit relay is open due
to excessive internal temperatures or a faulty
component.
Start-up of a New or Replacement Compressor
It is good service practice, when charging a system
with a scroll compressor, to charge liquid refrigerant
into the high side only. It is not good practice to dump
liquid refrigerant from a refrigerant cylinder into the
crankcase of a stationary compressor. If additional
charge is required, charge liquid into the low side of
the system with the compressor operating. WARNING!
Do not start the compressor while the system is in
a deep vacuum. Internal arcing may occur when any
type of compressor is started in a vacuum. NOTICE Do
not operate the compressor without enough system
charge to maintain at least 55 psig (3.8 bar) suction
pressure for R-410A and 20 psig (1.4 bar) for R-22
& R-407C. Do not operate with a restricted suction
or liquid line. Do not operate with the low pressure
cut-out disabled. Never install a system in the field and
leave it unattended with no charge, a holding charge, or
with the service valves closed without securely locking
out the system. This will prevent unauthorized personnel
from accidentally ruining the compressor by operating
with no refrigerant flow.
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
2. Check the thermistor protection chain located in
the compressor as follows:
De-energize control circuit and module power.
Remove the sensor leads from the module (S1
& S2). Measure the resistance of the thermistor
protection chain through these sensor leads with
an ohmmeter.
NOTICE ! Use an Ohmmeter with a maximum of
9 volts to check the sensor chain. The sensor
chain is sensitive and easily damaged; no
attempt should be made to check continuity
through it with anything other than an
ohmmeter. The application of any external
voltage to the sensor chain may cause
damage requiring the replacement of the
compressor.
15
AE4-1303 R14
The diagnosis of this resistance reading is as
follows:
Copeland Scroll Compressor Functional Check
A functional compressor test with the suction service
valve closed to check how low the compressor will pull
suction pressure is not a good indication of how well a
compressor is performing. Such a test may damage a
scroll compressor. The following diagnostic procedure
should be used to evaluate whether a Copeland Scroll
compressor is working properly.
• 200 to 2250 ohms – Normal operating range
• 2750 ohms or greater – Compressor
overheated – Allow time to cool
• zero resistance – Shorted sensor circuit –
Replace the compressor
• infinite resistance – Open sensor circuit –
Replace the compressor
1. Proper voltage to the unit should be verified.
2. The normal checks of motor winding continuity
and short to ground should be made to determine
if the inherent overload motor protector has
opened or if an internal motor short or ground fault
has developed. If the protector has opened, the
compressor must be allowed to cool sufficiently to
allow it to reset.
If the resistance reading is abnormal, remove the
sensor connector plug from the compressor and
measure the resistance at the sensor fusite pins.
This will determine if the abnormal reading was
due to a faulty connector
On initial start-up, and after any module trip, the
resistance of the sensor chain must be below the
module reset point before the module circuit will
close. Reset values are 2250-3000 ohms.
3. Proper indoor and outdoor blower/fan operation
should be verified.
4. With service gauges connected to suction
and discharge pressure fittings, turn on the
compressor. If suction pressure falls below normal
levels, the system is either low on charge or there
is a flow blockage in the system.
3. If the sensor chain has a resistance that is
below 2250 ohms, and the compressor will run
with the control circuit bypassed, but will not
run when connected properly, the solid state
module is defective and should be replaced. The
replacement module must have the same supply
voltage rating as the original module.
5. If suction pressure does not drop and discharge
pressure does not rise to normal levels, reverse
any two of the compressor power leads and
reapply power to make sure compressor was not
wired to run in reverse direction. If pressures still
do not move to normal values, either the reversing
valve (if so equipped) or the compressor is faulty.
Reconnect the compressor leads as originally
configured and use normal diagnostic procedures
to check operation of the reversing valve.
NOTE: The Kriwan INT69 SU2 has been phased
out of production by Kriwan. Kriwan modules that
require replacement in the field should be replaced
with the CoreSense Communications module
listed in Table 4. Kriwan to CoreSense retrofit
instructions are listed at the end of this bulletin.
Field Troubleshooting CoreSense Communications
Module
6. To test if the compressor is pumping properly,
the compressor current draw must be compared
to published compressor performance curves
using the operating pressures and voltage of
the system. If the measured average current
deviates more than ±15% from published values,
a faulty compressor may be indicated. A current
imbalance exceeding 15% of the average on the
three phases should be investigated further. A
more comprehensive trouble-shooting sequence
for compressors and systems can be found in
Section H of the Emerson Electrical Handbook,
Form No. 6400.
A solid green LED indicates the module is powered
and operation is normal. A solid red LED indicates an
internal problem with the module. If a solid red LED is
encountered, power down the module (interrupt the T1T2 power) for 30 seconds to reboot the module. If a solid
red LED is persistent, change the CoreSense module.
CoreSense communicates Warning codes via a green
flashing LED. Warning codes do not result in a trip
or lockout condition. Alert codes are communicated
via a red flashing LED. Alert codes will result in a trip
condition and possibly a lockout condition. Table 6 lists
the flash code information for Warning and Alert codes
along with code reset and troubleshooting information.
For more information on CoreSense please refer to
AE8-1384.
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
7. Before replacing or returning a compressor: Be
certain that the compressor is actually inoperable.
As a minimum, recheck a compressor returned
16
AE4-1303 R14
from the field in the shop or depot for Hipot,
winding resistance, and ability to start before
returning. More than one-third of compressors
returned to Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
for warranty analysis are determined to have
nothing found wrong. They were misdiagnosed in
the field as being inoperable. Replacing working
compressors unnecessarily costs everyone.
Only those refrigerants approved by Emerson Climate
Technologies, Inc. and the OEM should be considered.
For a list of Emerson approved refrigerants please
refer to Form 93-11, Refrigerants and Lubricants
Approved for Use in Copeland Compressors. Please
consult with the OEM to obtain their input and approval
on refrigerant retrofitting.
If the compressor lubricant is mineral oil, it must be
changed to POE for a successful retrofit. See the
section Removing Oil for instructions on how to remove
the oil charge from the compressor.
Refrigerant Retrofits
NOTICE
ZR compressors are UL recognized for use
with R-22, R-407C, or R-134a only. Use of any
other refrigerants will void the compressor UL
recognition.
POE oil should be added to the compressor through the
oil charging connection on the sump of the compressor.
The compressor should be filled to 1/2 sight-glass.
For detailed R-407C retrofit instructions please refer
to Form 95-14, Refrigerant Changeover Guidelines
for R-22 to R-407C. For other retrofit guidelines please
refer to the equipment OEM.
Only those systems that are in need of service should
be considered for a refrigerant retrofit if R-22 is not
available. Systems that are operating without issue
should be maintained and not be considered for a
refrigerant retrofit. In most if not all cases, the retrofitted
system will not be as energy efficient as the R-22
system.
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
17
AE4-1303 R14
Figure 1
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
18
AE4-1303 R14
R-407C, R-22, & R-134a 50/60 Hertz Operation
-34
-24
Evaporang Temperature (°C)
-4
-14
6
16
26
160
150
64
140
54
120
44
110
100
34
90
80
Condensing Temperature (°C)
Condensing Temperature (°F)
130
24
70
60
14
50
4
40
-30
-20
-10
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
Evaporang Temperature (°F)
R-410A 50/60 Hertz Operation
-34
-24
Evaporang Temperature (°C)
-4
6
-14
16
26
160
150
64
140
54
120
44
110
100
34
90
80
24
70
60
14
50
4
40
-30
-20
-10
0
10
20
30
40
50
Evaporang Temperature (°F)
Figure 2 – Scroll Operating Envelopes
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
19
60
70
80
90
Condensing Temperature (°C)
Condensing Temperature (°F)
130
AE4-1303 R14
LED’S / LED’S TEMP SENSORS / 3
SENSORES DE TEMPERATURA
DIP SWITCHES /
DIP SWITCHES
ALERT CODE (RED)
/ CODIGO DE ALERTA (ROJO)
SOLID / SOLIDO
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
WARNING (GREEN) /
PRECAUCION (VERDE)
SOLID / SOLIDO
1
2
3
4
5
TYPE / TIPO
JUMPER / JUMPER
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
EVENT / EVENTO
COMMUNICATION PORT /
PUERTO DE COMUNICACION
L1
LOCKOUT /
LOSS OF FUNCTION /
PERDIDA DE FUNCION
PERDIDA DE FUNCION
TRIP /
MOTOR HIGH TEMPERATURE /
INTERRUPCION DE FUNCION TEMPERATURA DE MOTOR ELEVADA
LOCKOUT/TRIP /
PERDIDA DE FUNCION /
INTERRUPCION DE FUNCION
LOCKOUT /
PERDIDA DE FUNCION
N/A
N/A
LOCKOUT/TRIP /
PERDIDA DE FUNCION /
INTERRUPCION DE FUNCION
LOCKOUT /
PERDIDA DE FUNCION
OPEN / SHORT MOTOR THERMISTOR /
TERMISTOR DEL MOTOR EN CIRTUITO
ABIERTO O CORTOCIRCUITO
N/A
TRIP /
INTERRUPCION DE FUNCION
FUTURE USE / USO FUTURO
MODULE LOW VOLTAGE /
BAJO VOLTAJE AL MODULO
2
M2 M1
T2 T1 L1 L2 L3
SHORT CYCLING /
CICLO FRECUENTE
N/A
FUTURE USE / USO FUTURO
1
MISSING PHASE / FASE FALTANTE
EVENT / EVENTO
NORMAL /
NORMAL
WARNING /
PRECAUCION
WARNING /
PRECAUCION
WARNING /
PRECAUCION
N/A
WARNING /
PRECAUCION
NORMAL OPERATION /
OPERACION NORMAL
LOSS OF COMMUNICATION /
PERDIDA DE COMUNICACIONES
4
L3
MOTOR WINDINGS
CONNECTIONS / CONEXION
DE DEVANADO DEL MOTOR
1
2
3
FUTURE USE / USO FUTURO
4
SHORT CYCLING /
CICLO FRECUENTE
N/A
FUTURE USE / USO FUTURO
OFF = 0 /
DIP SWITCH /
ON = 1 /
PURPOSE / PROPOSITO
DIP SWITCH
PRENDIDO = 1 APAGADO = 0
0
1 -LSB
UNIQUE ADDRESS / DIRECCION UNICA
2
0
1
3
RANGE 1 TO 32 / RANGO DESDE 1 HASTA 32
1
4
(EXAMPLE = 12) / (EJEMPLO = 12)
0
5 - MSB
6
9,600
19,200
BAUD RATE / BAUD RATE
EVEN / PAR NONE / NINGUNA
PARITY / PARIDAD
7
COMMUNICATION / COMUNICACION NETWORK / STANDALONE /
8
CONECTADO A LA RED DESCONECTADO DE LA RED
TEMP.
CONNECTOR CONFIGURATION /
9
0
CONFIGURACION DEL CONECTOR DE SENSOR DE TEMPERATURA
ENABLE / DISABLE /
SHORT CYCLE PROTECTION /
10
PROTECCION CONTRA CICLADO FRECUENTE ACTIVADO DESACTIVADO
4
L1: RED / ROJO
L2: BLACK / NEGRO
L3: WHITE / BLANCO
SYMBOLS / SIMBOLOS
PROTECTOR MODULE VOLTAGE / VOLTAGE DEL MODULO DE PROTECCION
TO CONTROL CIRCUIT / PARA CONTROLAR EL CIRCUITO
THERMAL SENSORS DO NOT SHORT / SENSORES DE TEMPERATURA – NO CONECTAR
EN CORTO CIRCUITO
PHASE SENSING / SENSOR DE FASES
USE COPPER CONDUCTORS ONLY.
USE MINIMUM 75º C WIRE FOR AMPACITY DETERMINATION.
USE THIS EQUIPMENT ON A GROUNDED SYSTEM ONLY.
PRIMARY SINGLE PHASE FAILURE PROTECTION IS PROVIDED.
PROTECTOR MODULE AND OPTIONAL CRANKCASE HEATER MUST
BE CONNECTED ONLY TO THEIR RATED VOLTAGE.
OVERCURRENT PROTECTION DEVICE RATING AND TYPE MUST
BE IN ACCORDANCE WITH REGULATORY AGENCY END PRODUCT APPROVALS
- SEE SYSTEM NAMEPLATE.
UTILICE CONDUCTORES DE COBRE UNICAMENTE.
PARA DETERMINAR LA AMPACIDAD DEL CABLE ESCOJA CABLE DE 75ºF.
UTILICE ESTE DISPOSITIVO UNICAMENTE EN SISTEMAS CONECTADOS A TIERRA.
LA PROTECCION DE FALLA DE FASE PRIMARIA MONOFASICA SE PROVEE EN ESTE
DISPOSITIVO. EL MODULO DE PROTECCION Y EL CALENTADOR DE CARTER OPCIONAL
DEBERAN SER CONECTADOS UNICAMENTE A SU VOLTAJE NOMINAL RESPECTIVO.
EL TIPO Y LAS CARACTERISTICAS NOMINALES DE LA PROTECCION DE SOBRECORRIENTE
DEBEN REPSETAR LAS ESPECIFICACIONES DE LAS AGENCIAS DE CERTIFICACION DEL
EQUIPO
– VER PLACA DE IDENTIFICACION
09-13 052-2841-00
Figure 3
Compressor Terminal Box Wiring with CoreSense Protection
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
3
L1
L2
L3
WARNING: GREEN FLASHING + PAUSE 2 SEC. /
PRECAUCION: LUZ VERDE CENTELLEANTE + PAUSA 2 SEG
TRIP: RED FLASHING + PAUSE 2 SEC. /
INTERRUPCION DE FUNCION = LUZ ROJA CENTELLEANTE + PAUSA 2 SEG
LOCKOUT: RED FLASHING + PAUSE 2 SEC. + SOLID 3 SEC. + PAUSE 2 SEC. /
PERDIDA DE FUNCION: LUZ ROJA CENTELLEANTE + PAUSA 2 SEG + LUZ
SOLIDA 3 SEG + PAUSA 3 SEG
REVERSE PHASE / FASE AL REVES
TYPE / TIPO
L2
20
AE4-1303 R14
Figure 4
ASTP Label
ZR84-144KC
ZP90-137KC
ZR160-190KC
ZP154-182KC
Figure 5
Crankcase Heater Location
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
21
AE4-1303 R14
1
}
2
}
}
3
Figure 6
Scroll Suction Tube Brazing
New Installations
Field Service
WARNING
• The copper-coated steel suction tube on scroll
compressors can be brazed in approximately the
same manner as any copper tube.
Remove refrigerant charge from both the low
and high side of the compressor before cutting
the suction and discharge lines to remove
the compressor. Verify the charge has been
completely removed with manifold gauges.
• Recommended brazing materials: Any silfos
material is recommended, preferably with a
minimum of 5% silver. However, 0% silver is
acceptable.
• To disconnect: Reclaim refrigerant from both the
high and low side of the system. Cut tubing near
compressor.
• Be sure suction tube fitting I.D. and suction tube
O.D. are clean prior to assembly. If oil film is
present wipe with denatured alcohol, DichloroTrifluoroethane or other suitable solvent.
• To reconnect:
• Using a double-tipped torch apply heat in Area 1.
As tube approaches brazing temperature, move
torch flame to Area 2.
○○ Recommended brazing materials: Silfos
with minimum 5% silver or silver braze
material with flux.
• Heat Area 2 until braze temperature is attained,
moving torch up and down and rotating around
tube as necessary to heat tube evenly. Add
braze material to the joint while moving torch
around joint to flow braze material around
circumference.
○○ Insert tubing stubs into fitting and connect
to the system with tubing connectors.
○○ Follow New Installation brazing
• After braze material flows around joint, move
torch to heat Area 3. This will draw the braze
material down into the joint. The time spent
heating Area 3 should be minimal.
• As with any brazed joint, overheating may be
detrimental to the final result.
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
22
AE4-1303 R14
Table 2
Field Application Test
Outdoor Ambient
85°F (29°C)
95°F (35°C)
105°F (40°C)
System On-Time (Minutes)
7
14
54
System Off-Time (Minutes)
13
8
6
Number of On/Off Cycles
5
5
4
Table 3
Design Configurations
Recommended Configuration
Component
Description
Tubing Configuration
Shock loop
Service Valve
"Angled valve" fastened to unit
Suction muffler
Not required
Alternate Configuration
Component
Description
Tubing Configuration
Shock loop
Service Valve
"Straight through" valve not fastened to unit
Mass / Suction muffler
May be required (acts as dampening mass)
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
23
AE4-1303 R14
Table 4 - Compressor Accessories & Service Parts
Part
Category
Mounting
Part Description
ZR84-144KC
ZR160-190KC
ZP90-137KC
ZP154-182KC
Spacer-Mounting Kit
527-0116-00
527-0186-00
527-0116-00
527-0186-00
Crankcase Heater, 120V
018-0091-21
018-0091-21
018-0091-21
018-0091-21
Crankcase Heater, 240V
018-0091-22
018-0091-22
018-0091-22
018-0091-22
018-0091-23
018-0091-23
018-0091-23
018-0091-23
018-0091-24
018-0091-24
018-0091-24
018-0091-24
Crankcase Heater Junction Box
998-7029-00
998-7029-00
998-7029-00
998-7029-00
Crankcase
Crankcase Heater, 480V
Heater
Crankcase Heater, 575V
Oil
Oil Sight-Glass Kit
998-0010-00
998-0010-00
998-0010-00
998-0010-00
Oil Sight-Glass Rotalock O-ring
020-0028-05
020-0028-05
020-0028-05
020-0028-05
Blank Cap To Cover Sight-Glass
005-1514-00
005-1514-00
005-1514-00
005-1514-00
POE Oil (1 Gallon)
998-E022-01
998-E022-01
998-E022-01
998-E022-01
Oil Access Fitting
510-0715-00
510-0715-00
510-0715-00
510-0715-00
021-0100-003
021-0227-034
021-0227-03
Terminal Box & Cover Assembly
Electrical
Protection
Suction &
Discharge
1
2
3
4
1
2
Terminal Block
021-0227-03
Ground Screw (10-32, self tapping)
100-0605-01
2
021-0100-003
021-0227-034
100-0605-01
Terminal Block Screw (10-32 x .5" Long)
100-0550-01
Molded Plug (TF* Electricals Only)
529-0099-00
100-0550-01
100-0550-01
100-0550-01
Kriwan Module 120/240V
not required
not required
replace with
CoreSense
not required
Kriwan Module 24 V
not required
replace with
CoreSense
Kriwan Diagnose Module 120/240V
not required
971-0641-00
not required
971-0641-00
Kriwan Diagnose Module 24 V
not required
971-0641-01
not required
971-0641-01
CoreSense Module Kit 120/240V
not required
971-0064-05
not required
971-0064-05
CoreSense Module Kit 24V
not required
971-0065-04
not required
971-0065-04
529-0099-00
Commercial Comfort Alert
543-0038-02
Discharge Line Thermostat
998-0071-02
998-0071-02
998-0071-02
543-0038-02
998-0071-02
Discharge 1/4" Schrader Fitting
510-0370-00
510-0370-00
510-0370-00
510-0370-00
Discharge Rotalock O-Ring Seal
020-0028-02
020-0028-02
020-0028-02
020-0028-02
Suction Rotalock O-Ring Seal
020-0028-03
020-0028-03
020-0028-03
020-0028-03
Rotalock Service Valve, Suction 1-3/8"
998-0510-46
998-0510-46
998-0510-46
998-0510-46
Rotalock Service Valve, Discharge 7/8"
998-0510-90
998-0510-90
998-0510-90
998-0510-90
Discharge Rotalock Adapter to 7/8"
Sweat
998-0034-08
998-0034-08
998-0034-08
998-0034-08
Suction Rotalock Adapter to 1-3/8" Sweat
998-0034-13
998-0034-13
998-0034-13
998-0034-13
Terminal boxes are rarely replaced; please contact Application Engineering if replacement part numbers are required
All Voltages
200/230 Volts Only
380, 460, 575 Volts
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
24
AE4-1303 R14
Table 5
Refrigerant Charge Limits
Charge Limit
Model
Pounds
kg
ZR84-144KC
16
7.2
ZR160-190KC
18
8.2
ZRT168-288KC*
24
10.9
ZRU178-233KC**
24
10.9
ZRT320-380KC*
27
12.2
ZRU269-350KC**
27
12.2
ZP90-137KC
16
7.2
ZP154-182KC
18
8.2
ZPT180-274KC*
24
10.9
ZPU193-257KC**
24
10.9
ZPT308-364KC*
27
12.2
ZPU274-336KC**
27
12.2
*Even Tandem Assembly
**Uneven Tandem Assembly
Table 6
Torque Values
Torque
Part
ft-lb
in-lb
N-m
Sight-Glass & TPTL Rotalock Fitting
74-81
885-975
100-110
Discharge Rotalock Valve
95-103
1150-1240
130-140
Suction Rotalock Valve
125-132
1505-1593
170-180
Schrader Valve
3.3-5.0
40-60
4.5-6.8
Terminal Block Screws
2
25
2.8
10-32 Green Ground Screw
2
25
2.8
3.5-3.9
42-47
4.7-5.3
M6 Terminal Box Mounting Stud Nuts
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
25
AE4-1303 R14
Table 7 – Protector Specifications
Module P/N
071-0660-01
071-0660-00
071-0686-01
071-0686-00
571-0065-05
571-0064-06
TW
TW
TW
TW
TE
TE
Kriwan
Kriwan
Kriwan
Diagnose*
Kriwan
Diagnose*
CoreSense
CoreSense
T1-T2 Voltage (AC)
24
120/240
24
120/240
24
120/240
Power Consumption (VA)
3
3
3
3
5
5
M1-M2 Contact Rating (A)
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
> 0.02
> 0.02
> 0.02
> 0.02
N/A
N/A
240
240
240
240
240
240
Trip Point (Ω)
>4.5KΩ
>4.5KΩ
>4.5KΩ
>4.5KΩ
>4.5KΩ
(motor)
>4.5KΩ
(motor)
Reset Point (Ω)
<2.75KΩ
<2.75KΩ
<2.75KΩ
<2.75KΩ
<2.75KΩ
(motor)
<2.75KΩ
(motor)
30 minutes
30 minutes
30 minutes
30 minutes
30 minutes
30 minutes
Compressor Motor Code
Type
M1-M2 Minimum Current (A)
M1-M2 Maximum Voltage
Reset Time
Features
Motor Protection, Phase
Protection, Communications
Motor Protection
* Diagnose features not supported
Table 8 – CoreSense™ Communications LED Flash Code Information
The flash code number corresponds to the number of LED flashes, followed by a pause, and then the flash code is repeated. A lockout condition produces a red flash, followed by a pause, a solid red, a second pause, and then repeated.
Code Reset
Description
Code Fault Description
Troubleshooting Information
Status
Fault Condition
Solid Green
Normal Operation
Module is powered and
operation is normal
N/A
N/A
Solid Red
Module
Malfunction
Module has internal fault
N/A
1) Reset module by removing
power from T2-T1
2) Replace module
Warning LED Flash
Green
Flash Code 1
Loss of
Communication
Green
Flash Code 2
Future Use
Green
Flash Code 3
Short Cycling
Module and master controller
have lost communications
with each other for more than
5 minutes
N/A
When
communications
are confirmed
N/A
Run time of less than 1
minute; number of short
cycles exceeds 48 in 24
hours
1) Check the control wiring
2) Verify dipswitch 8 is "on"
N/A
1) Check system charge and
pressure control setting
< 48 short cycles in
24 hours
2) Adjust set-point of
temperature controller
3) Install anti-short cycling
control
Green
Flash Code 4
Not used with this
compressor family
N/A
N/A
N/A
Green
Flash Code 5
Future Use
N/A
N/A
N/A
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
26
AE4-1303 R14
Table 8 Continued
Status
Fault Condition
Code Fault Description
Code Reset
Description
Troubleshooting Information
Alert/Lockout LED Flash
1) Check supply voltage
Red
Flash Code 1
Motor High
Temperature
Ω > 4.5K; Lockout after 5
Alerts
Ω < 2.75K and 30
minutes
2) Check system charge &
superheat
3) Check contactor
Red
Flash Code 2
Red
Flash Code 3
Open/Shorted
Motor Thermistor
Short Cycling
Ω > 220K or Ω < 40;
lockout after 6 hours
40 < Ω < 2.75K and
30 minutes
Run time of less than
1 minute; lockout if the
number of Alerts exceeds
the number configured by
the user in 24 hours
Interrupt power to
T2-T1 or perform
Modbus reset
command
1) Check for poor connections
at module and thermistor fusite
2) Check continuity of
thermistor wiring harness
1) Check system charge and
pressure control setting
2) Adjust set-point of
temperature controller
3) Install anti-short cycling
control
Red
Flash Code 4
Not used with
this family of
compressors
N/A
N/A
N/A
Red
Flash Code 5
Future Use
N/A
N/A
N/A
Red
Flash Code 6
Missing Phase
Red
Flash Code 7
Reverse Phase
Red
Flash Code 8
Future Use
Missing phase; Lockout
after 10 consecutive Alerts
After 5 minutes
and missing phase
condition is not
present
Reverse phase; Lockout
after 1 Alert
Interrupt power to
T2-T1 or perform
Modbus reset
command
N/A
N/A
1) Check incoming power
2) Check fuses/breakers
3) Check contactor
1) Check incoming phase
sequence
2) Check contactor
3) Check module phasing wires
A-B-C
N/A
1) Verify correct module p/n
Red
Flash Code 9
1
Module Low
Voltage
Low voltage on T2-T1
terminals1
This Alert does not result in a Lockout
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
27
After 5 minutes and 2) Check VA rating of
the voltage is back in transformer
the normal range
3) Check for blown fuse in
transformer secondary
AE4-1303 R14
Figure 9
Tandem Oil Balancing
Two-Phase
Line
Two -PhaseTandem
Tube Line
Oil Equalization Line
Figure 10
Tilted Tandem
Oil Equalization Line
Tilting the Compressor
For Installation of the
Oil Equalization Line
12 °
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
28
AE4-1303 R14
APPENDIX 1
Kriwan to CoreSense Communications Retrofit Instructions for
ZR160-190KC & ZP154-182KC Compressors
™
4. Using wire markers, label the M1, M2, T1, and T2
wires that are connected to the Kriwan module.
Using needle nose pliers, remove the M1, M2,
T1, T2, S1 and S2 wires from the Kriwan motor
protection module.
Kriwan has discontinued production of the INT69
SU2® motor protector module that has been used with
13 & 15 ton ZR*KC, ZP*KC and ZPD*KC Copeland
Scroll™ compressors. Kriwan modules that require
replacement in field applications should be replaced
with a CoreSense™ Communications module. Please
refer to the Kriwan, CoreSense, and compressor
model numbers listed in the table below.
5. Using your fingers to gently bend the tabs holding
the Kriwan module in the terminal box, remove
the Kriwan module from the terminal box (see
picture below).
Kriwan modules that are deemed non-operational and
in-warranty should be returned through the normal
channel for warranty purposes. Kriwan modules that
are non-operational and out of warranty should be field
scrapped in the appropriate manner.
If you have any questions, please contact your
Emerson Climate Application Engineer or visit
Emerson’s Online Product Information (OPI) located
at www.emersonclimate.com
Replacing Kriwan Module with CoreSense™
Communications
Holding
Tab
1. Disconnect and lock-out the power to the unit.
2. Using a straight blade screwdriver, carefully
depress the tabs holding the terminal cover to the
terminal box to remove the terminal cover. Before
proceeding, use a volt meter to verify that the
power has been disconnected from the unit.
3. Verify the Kriwan module part number matches
one of those shown in the table below.
Holding
Tab
Kriwan Module
Part Number
Replacement
CoreSense Kit
Number
Module
Voltage
071-0641-00/
071-0660-01
971-0065-04
24 VAC
071-0660-00
971-0064-05
120/240 VAC
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
29
Compressor Model
Numbers
ZR160-190KCE-TW*
ZP154-182KCE-TW*
AE4-1303 R14
6. Using your fingers, gently pry the S1-S2 connector
block from the compressor.
the reverse manner that the Kriwan module was
removed. The module should be installed as
illustrated below.
7. A new S1-S2 wiring harness is shipped with
the CoreSense module. The wiring harness
connector block should be fully inserted on the
two pins.
10. Plug the S1-S2 harness into the 2x2 socket on
the CoreSense module.
11. Connect the previously labeled M1, M2, T1, and
T2 wires to the appropriate terminals on the
CoreSense module.
8. Review the dip switch settings on the CoreSense
module. Dip switch #1 should be “on” or in the
“up” position. All other dip switches should be in
the “off” or “down” position.
12. Connect the L1, L2, and L3 phase sensing wires
to the L1, L2, and L3 compressor terminal block
connections. See the compressor terminal cover
wiring diagram for identification of the L1, L2, and
L3 connections on the compressor terminal block.
13. Double check the installation and make sure all
connections are secure. Install the compressor
terminal cover.
9. Route the S1-S2 wire harness so the end of the
harness will not be covered by the module when
it is installed. Install the CoreSense module in
14. The module change is complete and the system
can be put back into service.
The contents of this publication are presented for informational purposes only and are not to be construed as warranties or guarantees,
express or implied, regarding the products or services described herein or their use or applicability. Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc. and/or
its affiliates (collectively "Emerson"), as applicable, reserve the right to modify the design or specifications of such products at any time without
notice. Emerson does not assume responsibility for the selection, use or maintenance of any product. Responsibility for proper selection, use
and maintenance of any Emerson product remains solely with the purchaser or end user.
© 2013 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
30
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