Massey University Council meeting papers - 2 May 2014

Massey University Council meeting papers - 2 May 2014
MEETING OF MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL
FRIDAY 2 MAY 2014
commencing at 9.45 am
to be held in
THE UNIVERSITY HOUSE MEETING ROOM,
UNIVERSITY HOUSE, MANAWATU CAMPUS
MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL
A meeting of Massey University Council will be held in the
University House Meeting Room, University House, Manawatu Campus
on
Friday 2 May 2014
commencing at 9.45am
AGENDA- PART I
Official Information Act 1982 and Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987
Massey University (including its Council) is subject to the Official Information Act 1982. This means that if
a specific request for disclosure is made, information that it holds must be disclosed unless non-disclosure
can be justified in the terms of the Official Information Act 1982.
Matters that are included in Part II and most matters in the Finance Section of Council (or Committee)
meetings are protected from disclosure under the Official Information Act 1982. That is, non-disclosure of
information relating to such matters can usually be justified in terms of the Official Information Act 1982.
Therefore, care should be taken to ensure that papers relating to Part II or Finance Section matters are not
seen outside Council (or its relevant Committee) and that such matters are not mentioned outside Council (or
its relevant Committee).
All requests (whether written or oral) by any person who is not a Council member for information included
under Part II or the Finance Section of Council (or Committee) meetings and requests for the minutes of
those parts of Council (or Committee) meetings must be referred immediately to the Registrar for decision on
disclosure or otherwise. Individual members are advised not to disclose Part II or Finance Section matters.
Interest: Declaration and Disqualification
In accordance with the Education Act 1989 members are reminded that if they have any direct or indirect
pecuniary interest (including their conditions of service as the Chief Executive or as a member of the staff of
the institution) in a matter being considered or about to be considered by the Council (or Committee) then as
soon as possible after the relevant facts have come to their knowledge they:
(a)
must disclose the nature of the interest at a meeting of the Council (or Committee);
(b)
must not be present during any deliberation or take part in any decision of the Council (or
Committee) with respect to that matter unless the Council decides otherwise.
Page 1 of 4
Paper
Number
Index
Item
Number
1.0 INTRODUCTION
1.1 Welcome
1.2 Health and Safety Briefing
1.3 Apologies
A
1.4 Declaration of Interest/ Register of Interest
1.5 Meeting Agenda Review
B
1.6 Minutes of Council meetings – Part I - meeting held on 7 March 2014
C14/42
1.7 Matters Arising
C
1.8 Follow-up Schedule as at 2 May 2014
D
1.9 Council Agenda Plan as at 2 May 2014
2.0 STRATEGIC DISCUSSIONS
2.1 Student Forum
3.0 KEY REPORTS
3.1 Chancellor’s Report - Part I - oral
E
3.2 Vice-Chancellor’s Report – Part I
C14/43
4.0 DECISION ITEMS
F
4.1 Council Committee Appointments - 2014
C14/44
G
4.2 Revised Council and Council Committee Meeting Schedule
C14/45
4.3 University Policy Approval
HI
4.3.1 Intellectual Property Policy
C14/47
JK
4.3.2 Trust Funds Policy
C14/48
4.3.3 Massey University Business Case Policy
C14/49
L
5.0 ITEMS FOR NOTING
N
5.1 Financial Report for the three months ending 31 March 2014
C14/51
O
5.2 Academic Board Report for meeting held on 19 March 2014
C14/52
5.3 Report on E-Ballots:
• 4 April 2014: Conferring Doctorate - 5 April 2014
• 15 April 2014: Fees Setting Principles 2014
C14/53
PQ
6.0 INFORMATION/BACKGROUND ITEMS
6.1 Outline of Campus Tour - oral
6.2 Debrief of Campus Tour - oral
7.0 MOVING INTO PART II
7.1 Exclusion of the Public
Page 2 of 4
THE CHANCELLOR WILL MOVE THAT, EXCLUDING
•
•
•
•
Mr Stuart Morriss, Assistant Vice-Chancellor and University Registrar
Ms Rose Anne MacLeod, Assistant Vice-Chancellor – Finance, Strategy and
Information Technology
Mr James Gardiner, Director of Communications
Ms Paddy Nicol, Executive Secretary
WHO HAVE, IN THE OPINION OF COUNCIL, KNOWLEDGE THAT COULD BE OF
ASSISTANCE, MEMBERS OF THE PRESS AND PUBLIC BE NOW EXCLUDED FROM
THE MEETING SO THAT FOR THE UNDERNOTED REASONS THE FOLLOWING
MATTERS MAY BE DISCUSSED WITHOUT PUBLIC DISCLOSURE; THE
COMMITTEE BEING SATISFIED, WHERE APPROPRIATE, THAT THERE ARE
CONSIDERATIONS WHICH OUTWEIGH THE PUBLIC INTEREST OF DISCLOSURE.
Reference: Section 48 (1) of the Local Government and Information and Meetings Act 1987.
Reference: Section 9 as detailed hereunder of the Official Information Act 1982.
Item
Item 8.1
C14/54
Confirmation of Minutes – meeting held on 6
December 2013
Item 8.2
Matters Arising
Item 8.3
Follow-up Schedule as at 2 May 2014
Item 9.1
Chancellor’s Report
Item 9.2
Vice-Chancellor’s Report
Item 11.1
Honorary Awards Committee
Recommendations
Item 12.1
C14/59
Health and Safety Report for the period
January – February 2014
Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion
These matters were considered in Part II of
the meeting held on 7 March 2014
These matters were considered in Part II of
the meeting held on 7 March 2014
These matters were considered in Part II of
the meetings held on 7 March 2014 and
before
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
To protect the privacy of natural persons
Reference: Section 9 2 (a)
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
To protect the privacy of natural persons
Reference: Section 9 2 (a)
To protect the privacy of natural persons
Reference: Section 9 2 (a)
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
To protect the privacy of natural persons
Reference: Section 9 2 (a)
Page 3 of 4
Item
Item 12.2
C14/55
Vice-Chancellor’s 2014 objectives: January –
March 2014
Item 12.3
C14/56
Financial Report for the three months ended
31 March 2013
Item 12.4
C14/57
2014 Enrolment Report – Update to 13 April
2014
Item 12.5
C14/58
Consolidated Performance Report: Quarter
One, 2014
Item 12.6
C14/60
Debtors Report as at 28 February 2014
Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
To protect the privacy of natural persons
Reference: Section 9 2 (a)
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
Items 12.7
Controlled Entities Annual Reports – items
deferred
Item 12.8.1
C14/64
Audit and Risk Committee Report –Meeting
held on 7 March 2014
Item 12.8.2
C12/65
Audit and Risk Committee Report –Meeting
held on 7 April 2014
Item 12.9
C14/66
Academic Board Report – meeting held on
19 March 2014
Item 14.1
C14/67
Risk Management Report Commentary –
January 2014
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
AND
Item 13.0
Such matters as members of Council declare their intention to raise under Late Items in the
privileged part of the meeting.
Page 4 of 4
C14/42 – May
Part I
MINUTES OF MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL
THE MEETING OF MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE
UNIVERSITY HOUSE MEETING ROOM, UNIVERSITY HOUSE, MANAWATU
CAMPUS
On
FRIDAY 7 MARCH 2014 AT 11.15am
PART I
PRESENT:
Mr Chris Kelly (Chancellor), Mr Michael Ahie (Pro Chancellor),
Ms Fiona Coote, Ms Kura Denness, Associate Professor Grant Duncan,
Ms Nitika Erueti-Satish, Hon Steve Maharey (Vice-Chancellor),
Mr Alastair Scott, Professor Tony Signal, Mr Ralph Springett,
Mr Bruce Ullrich and Ms Lesley Whyte
IN ATTENDANCE:
Mr Stuart Morriss, Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations, International and
University Registrar
Ms Rose Anne MacLeod, Assistant Vice-Chancellor Strategy, Finance, IT
and Commercial Operations
Mr James Gardiner, Director Communications
Ms Paddy Nicol, Executive Secretary
Official Information Act 1982 and Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act
1987
Massey University (including its Council) is subject to the Official Information Act 1982. This
means that if a specific request for disclosure is made, information that it holds must be disclosed
unless non-disclosure can be justified in the terms of the Official Information Act 1982.
Matters that are included in Part II and most matters in the Finance Section of Council (or
Committee) meetings are protected from disclosure under the Official Information Act 1982. That
is, non-disclosure of information relating to such matters can usually be justified in terms of the
Official Information Act 1982. Therefore, care should be taken to ensure that papers relating to Part
II or Finance Section matters are not seen outside Council (or its relevant Committee) and that such
matters are not mentioned outside Council (or its relevant Committee).
All requests (whether written or oral) by any person who is not a Council member for information
included under Part II or the Finance Section of Council (or Committee) meetings and requests for
the minutes of those parts of Council (or Committee) meetings must be referred immediately to the
Registrar for decision on disclosure or otherwise. Individual members are advised not to disclose
Part II or Finance Section matters.
Page 1 of 11
C14/42 – May
Part I
Interest: Declaration and Disqualification
In accordance with the Education Act 1989 members are reminded that if they have any direct or
indirect pecuniary interest (including their conditions of service as the Chief Executive or as a
member of the staff of the institution) in a matter being considered or about to be considered by the
Council (or Committee) then as soon as possible after the relevant facts have come to their
knowledge they:
(a)
Must disclose the nature of the interest at a meeting of the Council (or Committee);
(b)
Must not be present during any deliberation or take part in any decision of the
Council (or Committee) with respect to that matter unless the Council decides
otherwise.
1.0
INTRODUCTION
1.1
WELCOME
The Chancellor opened the meeting at 11.15am welcoming those present including new
Council member Colin Harvey to his first face-to-face meeting. He noted that this was the
last meeting for Distance student member Ralph Springett who had served on Council for 6
years. The annual Council elections for the three student positions on Council were
underway.
The meeting had been preceded by a Staff Survey 2013 strategic discussion led by Assistant
Vice-Chancellor People and Organisational Development Mr Alan Davis.
1.2
APOLOGIES
Apologies were received and noted from Dr Russ Ballard, Ben Vanderkolk and Professor
Cynthia White
1.3
DECLARATION OF INTEREST
The Chair noted the Interests Register and called for any further declarations of which there
were none. Members were asked to provide updated information for the Register to the
Executive Secretary.
1.4
MEETING AGENDA REVIEW
There we no late items for Part I or Part II.
1.5
MINUTES OF COUNCIL MEETINGS – PART I
1.5.1
C14/03
CONFIRMATION OF PART I MINUTES - MEETING HELD ON 6 DECEMBER
2013
1.1 RESOLVED THAT THE MINUTES OF THE MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL
MEETING HELD ON FRIDAY 6 DECEMBER 2013 (PART I) BE RECEIVED AS A
TRUE AND CORRECT RECORD
AHIE/SIGNAL
Carried
Page 2 of 11
C14/42 – May
Part I
1.5.2
C14/38
CONFIRMATION OF PART I MINUTES - SPECIAL MEETING HELD ON 14
FEBRUARY 2014
1.2 RESOLVED THAT THE MINUTES OF THE SPECIAL MASSEY UNIVERSITY
COUNCIL MEETING HELD ON FRIDAY 14 FEBRUARY 2014 (PART I) BE
RECEIVED AS A TRUE AND CORRECT RECORD
ULLRICH/COOTE
Carried
1.6
MATTERS ARISING
There were no matters arising further to those on the Follow-up Schedule.
1.7
FOLLOW-UP SCHEDULE AS AT 7 MARCH 2014
Ongoing Issues:
No 1: Trust Funds Policy: It was noted that due to the requirement for further consultation
approval of the Trust Funds Policy had been moved to the 2 May 2014 Council meeting.
No 2: Disciplinary Committee Terms of Reference: The delay in bringing the Disciplinary
Committee Terms of Reference to Council was because of the requirement for another
review being completed first. It was anticipated that these would be brought to the 4 July
2014 Council meeting for approval.
1.8
COUNCIL AGENDA PLAN – UPDATE FOR 7 MARCH 2014
A Health and Safety Briefing will be given at the beginning of each Council meeting.
2.0
KEY REPORTS
2.1
CHANCELLOR’S REPORTS
2.1.1
CHANCELLOR’S REPORT – oral
The Chancellor reported that since he took office on 6 December 2013 he had attended a
variety of meetings and events. These included:
• The Veterinary Science graduation ceremony in Palmerston North on 12 December
2013;
• Waitangi Day celebrations at Government House;
• The Massey University Worldwide launch;
• Massey University Defining Excellence Awards in Auckland. This vibrant occasion
profiled the University very positively;
• The pōwhiri for Victoria University’s the new Vice-Chancellor;
• Two Honorary Awards Committee meetings and the Vice-Chancellor’s Performance
Review Committee meeting; and
• His meetings and calls to the Vice-Chancellor.
Page 3 of 11
C14/42 – May
Part I
2.1.2
C14/04
CORRESPONDENCE: MINISTER OF TERTIARY EDUCATION, 11 FEBRUARY
2014: CHANGES TO GOVERNANCE SETTINGS FOR UNIVERSITIES
The Chancellor noted that the Governance Committee would meet to consider a way forward
for the membership of the Council at the proposed eight to twelve members. This would be
brought back to Council for further discussion and approval. Transitional arrangements of
the current membership would also need to be determined.
Feedback from Council members included but was not limited to the following:
• Two alumni members to be maintained however the process by which they were
appointed could be through expressions of interest rather than through Court of
Convocation elections.
• Another view was that with the restricted membership one alumni member
would be sufficient to represent alumni;
• Both competencies and the role of the person e.g. staff or student member
needed to be included in the legislation with regard to requirements for
membership;
• Student members needed to be well connected to and supported by the student
body. This could be achieved by elected student bodies electing the Council
member;
The Chancellor asked members to provide the Executive Secretary with any further
feedback. This would be considered at the Governance Committee meeting.
It was considered that diversity of membership was required in the legislation to avoid
councils becoming a governing body with a singular point of view.
2.2
VICE-CHANCELLOR’S REPORTS
2.2.1
C14/05
VICE-CHANCELLOR’S REPORT – PART I
The Vice-Chancellor’s report was taken as read.
The Vice-Chancellor drew Council members’ attention to Item 1.1: Massey University’s
Heritage Year and 1.6: Massey Agriculture Ranks 19th in the World – QS Rankings by
Subject Area.
1.3 RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL RECEIVE THE VICE-CHANCELLORS REPORT
CHANCELLOR
Carried
2.2.2
C14/06
FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE TWELVE MONTHS ENDED 31 DECEMBER
2013 -PART I
The Chancellor commended the Assistant Vice-Chancellor Strategy, Finance, IT and
Commercial Operations Ms MacLeod on the excellent year-end result.
Page 4 of 11
C14/42 – May
Part I
Ms MacLeod noted that appropriate managerial action had been taken to address issues
arising from the downturn in the economic environment.
1.4 RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL RECEIVE THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE
TWELVE MONTHS ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2013
SCOTT/SIGNAL
Carried
3.0
DECISION ITEMS
3.1
COUNCIL POLICY APPROVAL
3.1.1
C14/07
PAYMENT TO COUNCIL MEMBERS POLICY 2014
It was suggested that with the future changes to the governance environment consideration
should be given to Council payments, bringing them in line with company directors.
1.5 RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPROVE THE PAYMENT TO COUNCIL
MEMBERS POLICY 2014 (C14/07)
WHYTE/AHIE
Carried
3.1.2
C14/08
GUIDELINES FOR THE CONDUCT OF COUNCIL AND COUNCIL SUBCOMMITTEES MEETINGS 2014
1.6 RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPROVE GUIDELINES FOR THE CONDUCT OF
COUNCIL AND COUNCIL SUB-COMMITTEES MEETINGS 2014 (C14/08)
SCOTT/SIGNAL
Carried
3.2
UNIVERSITY POLICY APPROVAL – RISK MANAGEMENT
3.2.1
C14/09
COMPLIANCE POLICY
Audit and Risk Committee Chair Ms Denness noted that the Audit and Risk Committee had
recommended the approval of this policy with the following amendment.
1.7 RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPROVE THE COUNCIL APPROVE, WITH THE
FOLLOWING AMENDMENT:
Page 1: Policy: first line: ‘the Road to 2025, and …’ should read ‘the University
strategy, and…’
THE COMPLIANCE POLICY (C14/09)
AHIE/SIGNAL
Carried
Page 5 of 11
C14/42 – May
Part I
3.2.2
C14/10
CONTROLLED ENTITIES GOVERNANCE FRAMEWORK POLICY
Audit and Risk Committee Chair Ms Denness noted that the Audit and Risk Committee had
recommended the approval of this policy.
1.8 RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPROVE THE CONTROLLED ENTITIES
GOVERNANCE FRAMEWORK POLICY (C14/10)
SCOTT/SIGNAL
Carried
3.3
C14/11
CONTROLLED ENTITIES REPORTING SCHEDULE 2014
Audit and Risk Committee Chair Ms Denness noted that the Audit and Risk Committee had
recommended the approval of this schedule.
1.9 RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL CONTROLLED ENTITIES REPORTING
SCHEDULE 2014 (C14/11)
DENNESS/SPRINGETT
Carried
3.4
COUNCIL COMMITTEES TERMS OF REFERENCE
3.4.1
C14/12
AUDIT AND RISK COMMITTEE TERMS OF REFERENCE 2014
Audit and Risk Committee Chair Ms Denness noted that the update of titles in the Terms of
Reference and that the Audit and Risk Committee had recommended the approval of the
Terms of Reference.
1.10 RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPROVE THE AUDIT AND RISK COMMITTEE
TERMS OF REFERENCE 2014 (C14/12)
DENNESS/ERUETI-SATISH
Carried
3.4.2
C14/13
PERFORMANCE REVIEW COMMITTEE TERMS OF REFERENCE 2014
In the absence of the Performance Review Committee Chair Mr Vanderkolk the Chancellor
noted that as the Vice-Chancellor’s reported his performance against his objectives at each
Council meeting it has been determined that one regular Committee meeting only per year
was required. In line with this it was noted an additional amendment was required as detailed
in the resolution.
Page 6 of 11
C14/42 – May
Part I
1.11 RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPROVE, WITH THE FOLLOWING
AMENDMENT (deletion strikethrough, addition in bold)
Page 1 of 2: 3: The Responsibilities of the Committee are: (c) To review the
remuneration of the Vice-Chancellor biannually annually…..;
THE PERFORMANCE REVIEW COMMITTEE TERMS OF REFERENCE 2014
(C14/13)
SPRINGETT/SIGNAL
Carried
3.5
SPECIFIC DELEGATIONS
3.5.1
C14/14
CONFERRING OF DEGREES AND AWARDING OF DIPLOMAS AND
CERTIFICATES GRADUATION CEREMONIES 2014
1.12 RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPROVE THAT THE CHANCELLOR, OR HIS
NOMINEE, BE AUTHORISED TO CONFER DEGREES AND AWARD DIPLOMAS
AND CERTIFICATES AT THE FORTHCOMING MASSEY UNIVERSITY
GRADUATION CEREMONIES TO BE HELD ON
•
•
•
•
8, 9 & 10 APRIL 2014 IN AUCKLAND;
12, 13, 14 & 15 MAY 2014 IN PALMERSTON NORTH;
29 MAY 2014 IN WELLINGTON; AND
28 NOVEMBER 2014 IN PALMERSTON NORTH
TO THOSE REPORTED AS HAVING SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED THE
PRESCRIBED COURSES OF STUDY
SCOTT/HARVEY
Carried
3.5.2
C14/15
APPROVAL OF ANNUAL ACCOUNTS AND STATEMENT OF SERVICE
PERFORMANCE
1.13 RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL DELEGATE THE AUTHORITY TO THE AUDIT
AND RISK COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL TO APPROVE THE 2013 ANNUAL
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND STATEMENT OF SERVICE PERFORMANCE
HARVEY/ULLRICH
Carried
3.6
C14/40
REVIEW OF MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL ELECTION RULES
Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations, International and University Registrar Mr Morriss
spoke to the report noting that the proposed amendments were to address social media use.
Mr Vanderkolk, lawyer, had been consulted.
Page 7 of 11
C14/42 – May
Part I
1.14 RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPROVE THE CHANGES TO THE MASSEY
UNIVERSITY COUNCIL ELECTION RULES (C14/40)
ERUETI-SATISH/DUNCAN
Carried
4.0
COMMITTEE, ASSOCIATED ENTITIES AND OTHER REPORTS
4.1
ACADEMIC BOARD REPORTS
Academic Board Chair and Academic Board Appointee to Council Professor Signal spoke to
the two Academic Board reports noting the academic discussions.
4.1.1
4.1.2
C14/16
ACADEMIC BOARD MEETING HELD ON 20 NOVEMBER 2013 – PART I
&
C14/17
ACADEMIC BOARD MEETING HELD ON 19 FEBRUARY 2014 – PART I
The Chancellor noted the 20 November 2013 and 19 February 2014 Academic Board
reports.
4.2
C14/18
TRACKING COUNCIL DECISIONS AND DELEGATIONS - PART I
It was suggested that resolutions in the Council minutes be numbered.
Action: Executive Secretary to number resolutions.
It was noted that No 2: Committee membership 2014 would be approved at the 2 May 2014
Council meeting.
1.15 RESOLVED THAT THE TRACKING COUNCIL DECISIONS AND
DELEGATIONS – PART 1 – AS 31 DECEMBER 2013 BE NOTED
CHANCELLOR
Carried
5.0
INFORMATION/BACKGROUND ITEMS
There were no items of information for Part I.
6.0
MOVING INTO PART II
EXCLUSION OF THE PUBLIC
THE CHANCELLOR MOVED THAT, EXCLUDING
• Mr Stuart Morriss, Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations, International and
University Registrar
Page 8 of 11
C14/42 – May
Part I
•
•
•
Ms Rose Anne MacLeod, Assistant Vice-Chancellor Strategy, Finance, IT and
Commercial Operations
Mr James Gardiner, Director Communications
Ms Paddy Nicol, Executive Secretary
WHO HAVE, IN THE OPINION OF COUNCIL, KNOWLEDGE THAT COULD BE OF
ASSISTANCE, MEMBERS OF THE PRESS AND PUBLIC BE NOW EXCLUDED
FROM THE MEETING SO THAT FOR THE UNDERNOTED REASONS THE
FOLLOWING MATTERS MAY BE DISCUSSED WITHOUT PUBLIC DISCLOSURE;
THE COMMITTEE BEING SATISFIED, WHERE APPROPRIATE, THAT THERE ARE
CONSIDERATIONS WHICH OUTWEIGH THE PUBLIC INTEREST OF DISCLOSURE.
Reference: Section 48 (1) of the Local Government and Information and Meetings Act
1987.
Reference: Section 9 as detailed hereunder of the Official Information Act 1982.
Item
Item 7.1.1
C14/03
Confirmation of Minutes – meeting held on 6
December 2013
Item 7.1.2
C14/39
Confirmation of Minutes – special meeting
held on 14 February 2014
Item 7.2
Matters Arising
Item 7.3
Follow-up Schedule as at 7 March 2014
Item 8.1.1
C14/20
Council Evaluation 2013
Item 8.1.2
C14/21
Chancellor’s Report
Item 8.1.3
C14/22
Consideration of Council Committees and
Meeting Schedule
Item 8.1.2
C14/23
Council Committee Appointments - 2014
Item 8.2.1
C14/24
Vice-Chancellor Scene Setting
Item 8.2.2
C14/25
Financial Report for the twelve months ended
31 December 2013
Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion
These matters were considered in Part II of
the meeting held on 6 December 2013
These matters were considered in Part II of
the meeting held on 14 February 2014
These matters were considered in Part II of
the meetings held on 6 December 2013 and
14 February 2014
These matters were considered in Part II of
the meetings held on 14 February 2014 and
before
To protect the privacy of natural persons
Reference: Section 9 2 (a)
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
To protect the privacy of natural persons
Reference: Section 9 2 (a)
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
Page 9 of 11
C14/42 – May
Part I
Item
Item 8.2.3
C14/37
Major Capital Projects Report: Quarter Four
2013
Item 8.2.3
C14/27
Health and Safety Report
Item 9.1
C14/28
Shaping the Nation Taking the Best to the
World –The Road to 2025
Item 9.2
C14/29
Human Ethics Committee: Southern B: ViceChancellor’s Nominee
Item 10.1.1
C14/30
Audit and Risk Committee Report –Meeting
held on 6 December 2013
Item 10.1.2
Audit and Risk Committee Report –Meeting
held on 7 March 2014
Item 10.1.3
C14/26
Risk Management Report Commentary –
January 2014
Item 10.2.1
C14/31
Academic Board Report – meeting held on
20 November 2013
Item 10.2.2
C14/32
Academic Board Report – meeting held on
19 February 2014
Item 10.3
C14/33
Honorary Awards Committee Report
Item 10.4
C14/34
2013-2014 Insurance Renewal: Further
Update
Item 10.5
C14/35
Tracking Council Decisions and Delegation –
Part II
Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
To protect the privacy of natural persons
Reference: Section 9 2 (a)
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
To protect the privacy of natural persons
Reference: Section 9 2 (a)
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
To protect the privacy of natural persons
Reference: Section 9 2 (a)
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
To prevent the disclosure or use of official
information for improper gain or improper
advantage
Reference: section 9 2 (k)
To protect the privacy of natural persons
Reference: Section 9 2 (a)
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Part I
Item
Item 10.6
C14/36
Performance Review Committee Report –
meeting held on 19 February 2014
Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion
To protect the privacy of natural persons
Reference: Section 9 2 (a)
AND
Item 11.0
Such matters as members of Council declare their intention to raise under Late Items in the
privileged part of the meeting.
CHANCELLOR
Carried
13.0
ITEMS MOVED FROM PART II TO PART I
There were no decisions to move from Part II into Part I
Signature: _______________________________________
Date:
__________________
Page 11 of 11
C14 – May
Part I
Council Follow-up Schedule Part I – 2 May 2014
From last meeting
Note: bracketed italics are completed actions
Item
1.
Outcome
•
Action
•
Milestone dates
•
Council Follow-up Schedule Part I – 2 May 2014
Ongoing Issues
Note: bracketed italics are completed actions
Item
1. Trust Funds Policy
2. Disciplinary Committee
Outcome
• It was agreed to hold over the approval of the Trust
Finds Policy following consideration of:
o Reviewing the proposed Trust definition in
line with the legal definition;
o A definition of cash researches; and
o Inclusion and definition of a Constructive
Trust.
•
The Disciplinary Committee of Terms of Reference
have not been reviewed since 2005. Need to ensure
they meet the needs of the University.
Action
• Assistant Vice-Chancellor Finance,
Strategy and IT Ms MacLeod to work
with Council member Mr Vanderkolk
as required, making the suggested
changes.
• The work on the Policy is not yet
complete. To be tabled at the 7 March
2014 Council meeting.
• Consultation underway. To be tabled at
2 May 2014 Council meeting
•
•
AVC Operations & University Registrar
to review Terms of Reference and
Membership criteria
The Disciplinary Committee Terms of
Reference form part of a wider review
Milestone dates
• 6 December
2013 Council
meeting.
•
•
•
7 March
2014 Council
meeting
2 May 2014
6 September
2013
Page 1 of 2
C14 – May
Part I
Item
Outcome
Action
of the Student Disciplinary Procedures
being undertaken by the Office of the
AVC Academic and International. AVC
Operations & University Registrar
liaising with the Office in their review.
• The wider review of the Student
Disciplinary Procedures has been
extended. It is planned that the
Disciplinary Committee Terms of
Reference will be tabled at the 7 March
2014 Council meeting.
• Wider review not yet complete. To be
tabled at time of completion
Milestone dates
•
6 December
2013
•
7 March
2014 Council
meeting.
•
4 July 2014
Page 2 of 2
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Part I
COUNCIL AGENDA PLAN – MARCH - DECEMBER – 2014
Strategic
Discussions
Friday 7 March (Manawatu)
Function: Close off of previous year;
Establishing parameters for new year;
Strategy approval for the current year
• VC scene setting
• Approve Road to 2025
• Preparation for grads and Honorary Awards
• Annual Accounts for previous year
(delegation)
• Review of Council performance
• Farewell to leaving Council members
Staff Survey: Assistant Vice-Chancellor People
and Organisational Development
Site visits
Key Reports
Student Forum
Palmerston North Campus Tour including School
of Sport and Exercise
• Chancellor’s Report
• VC Reports - to include
• VC Report – Part I
• Financial Report
• Performance Review Report
• Enrolment Report
• Health and Safety Report
• Quarterly Performance Reports
• Debtors Report
•
•
Chancellor’s Report
VC Reports - to include
•
VC Report – Part I
•
VC scene setting 2014
•
Financial Reports
•
Major Capital Projects Report
•
Performance Review Report
•
Health and Safety Report
•
2013 Annual Accounts and Statement of
Service Performance delegation to A&R
Committee
Conferring of Degrees & Awarding of
Diplomas and Certificates at graduation
ceremonies delegation
Review Guidelines Council meeting
conduct
Terms of Reference- Council Committees
Policies as per schedule
•
Audit & Risk Committee Report –
including Risk Management Report
commentary
Academic Board Reports
Performance Review Committee Report
Honorary Awards Committee Report
Review of Council Evaluation 2013
Tracking Council Decisions and
Delegations
•
Decision
Items
•
•
•
•
•
Committee,
Associated
Entities and
Other
Friday 2 May (Manawatu)
Function: Consolidation of business for current
year
• Monitoring progress re enrolments
• Induction of new members
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Student Fee Setting Process and Principles
(Domestic and International) – report e-ballot
Policies as per schedule
Audit & Risk Committee Report – including
Risk Management Report commentary
Academic Board Reports
NZSM Annual Report 2013
Massey Ventures Ltd Annual Report 2013
Agri One Ltd Annual Report 2013
Business Cases will brought to Council for approval as appropriate
A Health and Safety Briefing by will be held at the beginning of each meeting
Page 1 of 3
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Part I
COUNCIL AGENDA PLAN – MARCH - DECEMBER – 2014
Friday 4 July (Manawatu)
Function: Strategy planning for the following
year; Approval of International Fees
• Approve Domestic, International and Other
Student Fees
Friday 5 September (Wellington)
Function: Approval of Investment Plan and
Domestic Fees
• Approve Investment Plan
• Establish Council agenda plan and schedule
for following year
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
including Institute of Education strategies: (Pro
Vice-Chancellor CHSSc)
Strategic
Discussions
IP Commercialisation (deferred from 2013: MVL
and Bio Centre Chairs/CEOs)
Site visits
PN Campus visit: Possibly Milson Flight Centre
Wellington Campus visit – tbc
Key Reports
•
•
Chancellor’s Report
VC Reports - to include
• VC Report – Part I
• Financial Reports
• Performance Review Report
• Enrolment Report
• Health and Safety Report
• NZSM Report
•
•
Chancellor’s Report
VC Reports - to include
• VC Reports - to include
• VC Report – Part I
• Financial Report
• Quarterly Performance Reports
• Major Capital Projects Report
• Performance Review Report
• Enrolment Report
• Health and Safety Report
• Reflection on 2014 Scene Setting
PowerPoint Show
•
Domestic, International and Other Student
Fees 2015 – (AVC Academic and
International in person)
Māori Protocols Review Report
Policies as per schedule
Privacy Policy
•
•
•
•
•
Investment Plan 2015-2017
Domestic Student Fees 2015
Draft Agenda Plan 2015
Draft Meeting Schedule 2015
Policies as per schedule
Audit & Risk Committee Report
Academic Board Reports
Academic Board Chair’s Report (in person)
Honorary Awards Committee Report
Massey Ventures Limited Chair’s visit
MU Foundation Annual Report 2013
•
Audit & Risk Committee Report– including
Risk Management Report commentary
Academic Board Reports including Chair
Honorary Awards Committee Report
Research Strategy Framework Annual Report
(AVC RE in person)
Massey Foundation – Chair’s visit
Tracking Council Decisions and Delegations
Decision
Items
•
•
•
•
Committee,
Associated
Entities and
Other
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Business Cases will brought to Council for approval as appropriate
A Health and Safety Briefing by will be held at the beginning of each meeting
Page 2 of 3
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Part I
COUNCIL AGENDA PLAN – MARCH - DECEMBER – 2014
Friday 3 October (Albany)
Function: Budget review
• Review Operating and Capital Budget for
following year
• Insurance Renewal – delegate authority to
approve
Friday 5 December (Manawatu)
Function: Budget approval & Final Decisions for
current year and prep for following year
• Approve Operating and Capital Budget for
following year
• Election of Chancellor and Pro-Chancellor
• Committee membership established
Massey University Regional Strategies
Strategic
Discussions
Employability - Links to employer/employment:
Assistant Vice-Chancellor Research, Academic
and Enterprise and Assistant Vice-Chancellor
Operations, International and University
Registrar
Site Visits
Albany Site visit - tbc
• Chancellor’s Report
• VC Reports - to include
• VC Report – Part I
• Financial Report
• Performance Review Report
• Enrolment Report
• Health and Safety Report
• 2015 University Operating and Capital
Budget
tbc
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Key Reports
Decision
Items
•
•
Insurance Renewal – delegate authority to
approve
Agri One Ltd SCI 2015
Policies as per schedule
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Committee,
Associated
Entities and
Other
•
•
•
•
Audit & Risk Committee Report
Honorary Awards Committee Report
Notice of Intention for Chancellor and Pro
Chancellor positions
Council Graduation Schedule 2015
•
•
•
•
•
Chancellor’s Report
VC Reports - to include
VC Report – Part I
Financial Report
Quarterly Performance Reports
Major Capital Projects Report
Performance Review Report
Enrolment Report
Health and Safety Report
Aged Debtors Report
2015 University Operating and Capital Budget
Renewal of Insurance 2015-report delegation
NZ School Music SCI 2015
MVL SCI 2015
Student Bad Debts
Council Committee membership
Review Guidelines for Conduct of Council and
Council Committees meetings
Review Council Code of Conduct
Election: Chancellor & Pro Chancellor
Policies as per schedule
Audit & Risk Report Committee – including
Risk Management Report commentary
Academic Board Reports
Academic Board Chair Report (in person)
Honorary Awards Committee Report
Council Evaluation 2014
Business Cases will brought to Council for approval as appropriate
A Health and Safety Briefing by will be held at the beginning of each meeting
Page 3 of 3
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Part I
VICE-CHANCELLOR’S OFFICE
To:
Members of Council
From:
Vice-Chancellor
Date:
14 April 2014
Subject:
Vice-Chancellor’s Part I Report to Council
Period: mid-March to early April 2014
Purpose:
This report is presented to update Council on key achievements, highlights and major issues arising
over the period late-February to mid-April 2014 and also seeks to give Council a flavour of the
breadth and depth of University–associated activities. The report gathers together strategic items
provided by college and service lines, the Vice-Chancellor’s elog and diary. Further detail is provided
in the appendices to this report.
1.0
Topical Issues
1.1
Orientation 2014
All three campuses had a great start to the year with the successful delivery of the
Orientation 2014 programme. In Manawatū more than 700 students participated in the
activities, including the Guinness World record attempt (bobbing for apples), refer to item 1.2
below for further details. A noted success in Wellington was the new Student-to-Student
Panel, where senior students talked about student life and responded to questions from new
students. Albany’s Student Life team worked closely with the Albany Students’ Association,
clubs, societies and cultural groups to create a fantastic buzz on campus for the start of the
semester.
A careers session, at Wellington campus during Orientation week, was very well attended
and more than 150 first-year students have already signed up with the Career Hub.
Our online distance orientation, delivered by a partnership between the Centre for Teaching
and Learning and the Library, saw more than 200 students register from across New
Zealand. This was offered on February 15. In addition, an intensive orientation programme
was presented for 32 distance students at the Manawatū campus on February 22.
Thank you to all of the staff who have been making our students feel welcome and at home.
1.2
World Record
Stunning weather and the arrival of Semester One students made all our campuses very
lively at the end of February. Massey students and staff at Manawatū even managed to
secure the world record for apple bobbing! Apple-bobbing was chosen as a fun way of
celebrating 2014 Orientation and Massey's 50th anniversary of its world-leading Food
Technology research and teaching programme. Please refer to Appendix I for further details.
1.3
Finance 2014
The end of February was also marked by Finance 2014. Held in Auckland, the annual event
saw some 250 businesspeople listen to the Minister of Finance discuss the New Zealand
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economy. As a co-sponsor of the event, Massey University was very prominent and the
feedback from those present was positive. Thank you to the staff who made the event a
success.
1.4
The Wheat from the Chaff, a history of 80 years (there is some dispute about date) of Chaff
publications was launched by the Massey University Foundation in March. Congratulations to
William Muirhead, who edited the publication, and the many Massey staff who supported the
project. The Wheat from the Chaff can be purchased through the Alumni office, with
proceeds going to the foundation.
1.5
This is the 11th year that Relay for Life has been held in the Manawatū. Millions of dollars
have been raised for cancer research. Massey University has hosted the event at the
Hokowhitu site every year and a good number of staff and students take part. Thank you.
1.6
Members of the Royal Family were in New Zealand at the beginning of April. One of the gifts
for Prince George was a children’s book, Le Quesnoy: the story of the town New Zealand
saved, authored by Professor Glyn Harper and illustrated by Jenny Cooper. The book is one
in a series dealing with war produced by Professor Harper – it is outstanding.
2.0
Key Strategic Issues and Positioning
2.1
Shaping the Nation and taking the best to the world: The Road to 2025
The Massey Council signed off the new 2025 strategy in early March. It is now available on
the Massey website and copies are available from Rosanna Couto-Mason, Strategy and
Research. A more accessible Profile of the University is also being prepared along with a
small pocket-sized Key Facts.
The updated strategy keeps all our big goals virtually unchanged, discusses the forces that
we see as shaping our future and sets a path of increased focus on globalisation,
digitalisation and online platforms as the best means of meeting our needs and those of our
students and other stakeholders. The strategy will help us create the foundation that will let
us continue to define the future of our nation and take the best of New Zealand to the world.
2.2
Centres of Research Excellence
Massey University currently hosts two (Riddet and Allan Wilson) of the eight Centres of
Research Excellence (CoRE). We are participants in all of the other CoREs. The committee
reviewing funding for the CoRE announced at the beginning of March that The Riddet
Institute, the Bio-Protection Research Centre, Gravida and Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga are
not included in the second round.
The Allan Wilson Centre hosted a visit from the Centres of Research Excellence rebid team
in mid-March. I am told the visit went very well and a positive result is anticipated. Thanks to
everyone who worked hard to ensure that a sound case was advanced.
3.0
Research and Scholarship
3.1
Breakthrough in hybrid species science
With yet another first, Massey University scientists have published their discovery of a
universal law that explains how hybrid species survive and thrive. Congratulations to
computational biologist Professor Murray Cox, Institute of Fundamental Sciences, and
molecular biologist Dr Austen Ganley, Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, who
led the research that analyzed what happens when a new species is formed. Their findings
were published in the Public Library of Science online journal, Genetics. Please refer to
Appendix II for further details.
3.2
Kiwi scientist helps find what makes cells different
Continuing on the theme of impactful research above, a global project that includes Massey
University Albany lecturer in Bioinformatics and Genomics, Dr Sebastian Schmeier, Institute
of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, is helping us to understand why cells act differently.
This work will also help in the fight against diseases. Please refer to Appendix III for further
details.
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3.3
Advancing Health
Last year the College of Health was established and it is beginning to take shape. During a
recent staff engagement day, the college set about identifying the six big health issues that
need to be addressed in the 21st century. These will now form the basis of new centres:
• Centre for Advancement of Foods for Health and Wellness:
• Centre for Food Choice and Behavioural Research:
• Centre for Hearing Loss Prevention (CHeLP):
Ian Laird, Wyatt Page, Stuart McLaren, Kirsten Olsen.
• Centre to Develop Practice Centre Model:
• Metabolic Health Centre:
• Shaping Communities for Healthy Ageing:
The six centres help showcase the strengths that the college has to offer and will hopefully
encourage collaboration from inside and outside the University.
3.4
Three College of Humanities and Social Sciences research projects have received gold
ratings for the University from the Ministry of Innovation Business, and Employment. The
gold standard from the ministry recognises projects that have met and exceeded contract
requirements, with this year’s annual report showing Massey’s gold tally rose from two last
year to three this year. This is an outstanding result. Please refer to Appendix IV for further
details of all the projects rated.
3.5
National Science Challenges
National Science Challenges are designed to provide a new framework for science
innovation to drive up performance across New Zealand. They are designed as part of the
first stage of reviewing and aligning national science funding to support innovation and
secure step change developments in science and utilisation of the benefits. Many Crown
agencies have been directed to realign their core funding to meet the demands of the
challenges. Universities are invited to contribute the expertise of their staff and facilities and
where appropriate to provide some co-funding into the challenges, where relevant.
The first tranche of bids have been reviewed:
• High Value Nutrition – has been awarded provisional funding and will have to submit
revised proposals by the end of this year to the Ministry of Business, Innovation and
Employment to secure full funding.
• Natural Hazards – has been reviewed and funding decisions deferred.
• Deep South – is not significant to Massey University but we are supporting where
appropriate in a general manner and will seek to engage when competitive funding
released.
The second tranche of challenges are currently in bidding stage, with a submission deadline
of the end of April.
• The most significant is the Health suite: Better Start, Healthier Lives and Ageing Well
– it is proposed that Auckland and Otago universities lead the facilitation and coordination of a multi-party collaborative model the bidding process across these three
areas given their close overlap. Massey has supported this model as a means of going
forward in the first instance, with a review of hosting arrangements as the challenge
unfolds.
• Biological Heritage – is one of the largest challenges and is being lead, by the Crown
Research Institutes (Landcare will likely hold the contract). This is a challenge that has
developed a major new stakeholder group focus and now involves every major
government agency, crown research institutes and universities. The Allan Wilson Centre,
which Massey hosts, in also involved.
• Land and Water – is another major challenge with strong linkages to Massey capability.
• Medical technologies – is being lead by Callaghan Innovation and we will be
associated in various ways with the challenge as it matures.
• Oceans – is not a main topic for Massey but we do expect to secure research
opportunities once the competitive funding is opened next year.
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3.6
Competitive funding rounds
As demonstrated in item 3.4 and 3.5 above, and throughout this report, the life of any
modern University involves preparation of bids for competitive funding rounds. Thanks to the
staff who submitted bids to the Education New Zealand round. I note that the Ministry of
Business, Innovation and Employment round is about to begin.
3.7
Drs James Hollings and Grant Hannis, School of Communication, Journalism and Marketing
and Karl Pajo, School of Management, joined with Professor Geoff Lealand of Waikato
University to undertake A New Zealand survey of journalists. The survey is part of the first
global survey of journalists, the Worlds of Journalism Study, due for completion in late 2014.
The study will map the attitudes, ethics and work practices of journalists throughout the
world.
3.8
MPOWER is hosted Living Wage Ideas and Information Exchange on March 26. This event
will have high-level speakers, including Annie Newman (Living Wage Aotearoa New
Zeeland), Brian Hannah (Wellington City Council), Jesse Chalmers (Tonzu), Diana Yukich
(Opticmix Ltd) and David Lowe (Employers and Manufacturers Association - Northern). This
represents the first stage of the hub’s living wage research project.
3.9
Studies led by Massey University Associate Professor Antonia Lyons, School of Psychology,
into links between social networking and young people’s use of alcohol is among projects
chosen by the Marsden Fund to highlight its 20-year contribution to research. Dr Lyons and a
team of researchers were awarded $864,000 from the Marsden Fund in 2009 to lead a threeyear research project exploring the convergence of social networking and youth drinking
cultures, something she says represents an entirely new social phenomenon. Contributions
are being made by all six academics in Development Studies at Massey, with collaborators
from around the world, including Australia, Scotland, Japan, the United States, Thailand and
Fiji.
For other highlights please also refer to sections 5.0 Celebrating Excellence, 6.0 Connections and
Responsibility and 8.0 Generating Income, below.
4.0
Teaching and Learning
4.1
Graduation
It is graduation season. We began, as always, in Albany. Thank you to everyone at Albany
who worked hard to make the week the success it always is.
The following exceptional individuals will receive Massey University honorary awards over
this graduation period:
Massey University Medal:
Professor Emeritus Roger Morris has been awarded a Massey University Medal in
recognition of his outstanding service to the University in the establishment of an
internationally recognised programme of veterinary epidemiology training, research and
spread of infectious disease simulations based at the EpiCentre, leadership and influence in
global agencies concerned with human and animal health, development of innovative
computer and software technology for disease investigation and control, and influence of
public policy related to management of biosecurity.
Honorary Doctorates:
• Dame Suzie Moncrieff, designer and World of WearableArt (WOW) founder, has been
awarded the degree of Doctor of Fine Arts (honoris causa) in recognition of her
outstanding contribution to the public in the field of art and design. The honorary
doctorate will be conferred at Wellington graduation. . Please refer to Appendix V for
further details.
•
Geoff Murphy, New Zealand film director, producer and screenwriter, has been awarded
the degree of Doctor of Literature (honoris causa) in recognition of his outstanding
service to the public in the field of New Zealand cinema and for his outstanding
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contributions to the national culture and heritage. The honorary doctorate will be
conferred at Manawatū graduation.
4.2
Academic Audit praised Massey for strong student focus
Massey University has received national praise from the Academic Quality Agency for New
Zealand Universities for its student-centred learning and the extensive range of support
services it offers following the recent release of the fifth academic audit. Please refer to
Appendix VI for further details.
4.3
The Sir Stephen Tindall Chair in Retail Management has been publicly launched. The
recruitment process has begun for a world-class retail professor to fill the endowed chair.
When appointed the College of Business’ new professor in retail management will be
responsible for laying the groundwork for launching a successful Bachelor of Retail and
Business Management, including building industry support and establishing a research
programme that has relevance to the sector. Please refer to Appendix VII for further details.
4.4
A Strategic Innovations Fund project entitled, Tertiary students’ learning experiences in their
introductory papers invited participants in three 100-level papers from February 24-28. Dr
David Ishii, School of Humanities, two translators (Chinese and Arabic), and collaboration
with the School of Management are in the process of collecting the first survey from both
domestic and international students to obtain background information about their previous
education, initial perceptions of Massey, and learning expectations. This project aims to
provide findings that will help further the University’s Seven Big Goals.
4.5
The Centre for Professional and Continuing Education and the College of Business are
working collaboratively on a pilot in semester one for students staircasing from the Direct
Entry English programme through to the college’s degrees. The aim is to increase degree
enrolment from well prepared international students.
4.6
Hospital-based Dietetics Supervision skills workshops
Following the success of an inaugural workshop in January for hospital-based supervisors of
master’s students in dietetics, Jane Terrell, Centre for Teaching and Learning, delivered two
more such workshops covering the Auckland District Health Board region. The workshops
were prepared in close consultation with dietetics teaching staff, who were in turn responding
to student feedback on their supervision experience.
4.7
The Massey University Expressive Arts paper, 139.220 Applied Theatre, will be delivered as
part of a transnational teaching and learning project entitled e(LAB)orating Performance. The
project is an ongoing collaboration between Dr Rand Hazou, School of English and Media
Studies, and colleagues from universities in India and South Africa. The pilot project is
funded by the Brown University International Advanced Research Institute on 'Theatre and
Civil Society’. The project seeks to facilitate creative engagements by students enrolled at
participating institutions to foster conversations around performance praxis and collaborative
pedagogies. As part of this project, Dr Hazou attended a curriculum development meeting in
Pune, India, in January.
4.8
The Ministry of Education’s Technology Online website has published case studies of the
Massey work with industry partners to develop eco-friendly fibres. Technology teachers can
now access curriculum-linked examples of Massey University’s textile research.
4.9
The Academic Standing Model has been launched, with students and staff being informed of
the new means by which the University will measure and monitor student success. This
initiative will replace Academic Progress Monitoring and the former criteria for college and
University exclusions. High-performing students and those who are struggling will be able to
be identified and acknowledged earlier and interventions are specifically targeted to those
who will benefit most.
4.10
Dr Jeffrey Stangl, School of Economics and Finance, and Dr Loren Stangl, School of
Communication, Journalism and Marketing, have been promoting and fundraising for a new
engagement initiative: Business Boot Camp (to be held from April 28 to May 2). Fifty of the
top year 13 secondary school pupils studying business, accounting or economics will
undertake a programme of five days of intensive business skills development, both functional
and soft skills, incorporated with company visits. Hewlett Packard has been secured as a key
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sponsor. Business Boot Camp is a Massey University and Auckland Commerce Teachers
Colloquium initiative. It is an excellent example of how partnership initiatives can play an
important role in engaging with the Auckland secondary school community and building
future student awareness of what our College of Business can offer.
5.0
Celebrating Excellence – Awards and Recognition
5.1
2014 Massey University Defining Excellence Awards
This is the event of the year, which took place on March 5, to celebrate Massey University's
most distinguished alumni, researchers and teachers. Congratulations to Distinguished
Alumni Awardees 2014: Linda Jenkinson, Peter Hughes CNZM, Kathryn Wilson, and Don
McKenzie OBE, CNZM. And congratulations to all our other outstanding awardees. Please
refer to Appendix VIII for further details.
5.2
Vice-Chancellor's Teaching Excellence and Teaching Support Awards
At the end of March I had great pleasure in announcing the Vice-Chancellor's Teaching
Excellence and Teaching Support Award winners. This year's recipients exemplify
excellence in teaching and learning practice. The criteria for awards cover design and
facilitation of learning, assessment and evaluation strategies, and teaching and learning
leadership. This year's winning portfolios exhibited a wealth of supporting evidence from
students, colleagues, academic and service unit leaders and the many stakeholders outside
of Massey. It is yet further evidence of the processes we are adopting to enhance and
develop teaching quality.
The Award winners are:
Teaching Excellence:
Dr Terry MacPherson - College of Business
Helen Simmons - College of Health
Paul Stock - College of Sciences
The Spanish Language Programme of Dr Leonel Alvarado, Dr Celina Bortolotto, Mrs Raquel
Direnzo, Mr Francisco González and Ms Cynthia Landa - College of Humanities and Social
Science
Teaching Support:
Andrew Jamieson - National Centre for Teaching and Learning
Massey has also nominated Paul Stock, Helen Simmons and previous VC award winner
Associate Professor Trevor Kitson for the National Teaching Excellence Awards.
5.3
Congratulations to our staff, students and alumni whose expertise and excellence has
been recognised in the following ways:
5.3.1
Congratulations to Professor Barry Scott, Institute of Fundamental Sciences, who has been
awarded the prestigious Humboldt Research Award by the Alexander von Humboldt
Foundation in Germany. Please refer to Appendix IX for further details of all the projects
rated.
5.3.2
Professor Emeritus Errol Hewett, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health, has been
made a Fellow of the International Society for Horticultural Science. This honour is presented
in recognition of his outstanding contribution to horticultural science world-wide.
5.3.3
Professor Emeritus Ian Warrington, has also been made a Fellow of the International Society
for Horticultural Science and has been awarded honorary membership of the society.
5.3.4
Also receiving recognition is Massey Alumni Distinguished Professor Wayne McIlwraith. Dr
McIlwraith recently received the prestigious career-achievement award, called the Marshall R
Urist Award, from the Orthopaedic Research Society. He is the first veterinarian to be so
honoured. Dr McIlwraith maintains strong links with Massey University and is a member of
the Massey University Foundation Board in the United States.
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Professor Hugh Blair, Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, has been
named as the inaugural recipient of the Oasis International Friendship Award by the Xinjiang
Production and Construction corporations. The award will be presented in Urumqi in
October 2014.
5.3.6
Chrissy Lepper, Centre for Educational Development, has been awarded the prestigious
Margaret Blackwell Travel Fellowship for 2014. Ms Lepper will travel to Italy, the United
Kingdom, Canada and the United States to explore international approaches to early
childhood education – specifically in developing language, culture and identity in diverse
communities.
5.3.7
College of Creative Arts senior lecturer Maddie Leach has been shortlisted for New
Zealand’s most significant contemporary art prize, the Walters Prize. Four artists are
shortlisted for the $50,000 prize, which is awarded once every two years and sets out to
make contemporary art a more widely recognised and debated feature of cultural life in New
Zealand. Ms Leach’s shortlisted work, If you find the good oil let us know, was commissioned
by Taranaki’s Govett-Brewster Art Gallery as its latest artist residency before the gallery
closed for major renovations.
Each shortlisted artist receives $5000 in recognition of their achievement. The shortlisted
work will be presented in the Walters Prize exhibition at Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki,
July 12 – October 12. The winner, to be chosen by an as-yet unnamed international judge,
will be announced in September.
The prize is named after the late Gordon Walters, who was a Massey alumnus and has been
inducted into the College of Creative Arts Hall of Fame.
5.3.8
Jack Hill and Lucilla Gray were College of Creative Arts student finalists in the iD
International Emerging Designer Awards – a platform that recognises and rewards the next
generation of future designers from the world's most prestigious design schools.
Congratulations to Ms Gray, Bachelor of Design (Hons), who won the New Zealand Light
Leathers Award ($2000) at iD International Emerging Designers competition in Dunedin.
5.3.9
Professor Julian Heyes, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health, has been elected as
chairman of the International Society for Horticultural Science.
5.3.10 Mrs Janet Molyneux and team from the Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical
Sciences, have been nomination for the Best Reality Series in TV Guide's annual Best on the
Box awards for the Animal Files TV series.
5.3.11 Fellow researchers from the School of Economics and Finance, Professor Ben Marshall,
Professor Nhut Nguyen and Professor Nuttawat Visaltanachoti, received the inaugural Philip
Brown best published paper award for their research paper using Sirca data.
5.3.12 Master of Fine Arts candidate Mica Mick had one of his films selected from competitive entry
in the Wellington Underground Film Festival.
5.3.13 Professor Julian Heyes, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health, has been elected as
Chair of the Commission on Fruits, Vegetables and Human Health for the International
Society for Horticultural Science for the next four years. He takes up this office at the
International Horticultural Congress in Brisbane in August.
5.3.14 Dr Kate Lewis, School of Management, has been appointed to the Editorial Board of the
International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship.
5.3.15 Dr Anna Powles, Centre for Defence and Security Studies, has been re-appointment as
Visiting Fellow, Fragile States Project, University of New South Wales. She is working with
the Head of the Fragile States Project on several journal articles on the Fijian security sector
and a seminar is being planned to be held in Canberra later this year.
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5.3.16 Dr France Grenaudier-Klijn, School of Humanities, has been invited as guest editor of a
special issue of the New Zealand Journal of French Studies (NZJFS 34-2 (2013)). The issue
focused on the theme of blood in a range of literary and cinematographic French texts.
5.3.17 Dr Linda Jones, School of Psychology, has been invited to be the external moderator and
review the NZ Open Polytechnic’s General and Applied Psychology programme, which will
take place in April.
5.3.18 Anna Brown, director of Open Lab in the College of Creative Arts, was an invited mentor at
Wellington's Start-Up weekend held in late February.
5.3.19 Dr Lin Mei Tan, School of Accountancy, contributed two chapters to New Zealand Taxation
2014 Principles, Cases and Questions. Chapter five - Income from property and Chapter 21 Fringe Benefit Tax.
5.3.20 Dr James Lockhart, School of Management, wrote a chapter called “Strategy and the board:
A division of labour”. In, J. Mueller & P. Wells (Eds). Governance in action globally - strategy,
process, and reality.
5.3.21 Professor Regina Scheyvens, School of People, Environment and Planning, published 2014
Development Fieldwork: A Practical Guide (second edition), Sage, London.
5.3.22 Dr John O'Neill, Institute of Education, along with co-editors St George, A. and Brown, S.,
edited Facing the big questions in teaching: Purpose, power and learning, second edition.
Melbourne: Cengage Learning.
5.3.23 Jenny Gillam’s, School of Art, co-edited book with Dieneke Jansen, An urban quest for
chlorophyll, was launched in Auckland. Published by Rim Books, the book profiles four
recent creative urban projects bringing together a range of practices where notions of urban
planting are explored in a New Zealand context.
5.3.24 Maddie Leach, School of Art, published her book If You Find The Good Oil Let Us Know
through Govett Brewster Art Gallery. The publication is the culmination of the artist’s 2012
Govett-Brewster Aotearoa New Zealand artist’s residency and includes a text by Associate
Professor David Cross.
5.3.25 Dr Max Schleser, School of Design, published the chapter Towards Mobile Filmmaking 2.0:
Amateur Filmmaking as an Alternative Cultural Practice in Amateur Filmmaking - the home
movie, the archive, the web (eds.) Rascaroli, Young and Monahan. Bloomsbury (New
York/London)
5.3.26 Anna Brown, College of Creative Arts Open Lab, collaborated with Jack Body and Michael
Norris of Wai-te-ata Music Press on Strange Terrain, an 18-month project that was launched
at the Adam Concert Room, New Zealand School of Music. The publication, designed and
typeset by Ms Brown, brings together a major anthology of graphic scores from 1965 to
2012, with composers ranging from Douglas Lilburn to Cilla McQueen.
5.3.27 College of Business students Vicky Yang and Christopher Wright were the inaugural winners
of the Finance 2014 Top Student Awards. The top first-year economics and finance students
at the Albany campus will be awarded with a $1000 prize funded by the Finance event cohosted each year by Massey University and the Auckland Chamber of Commerce.
5.3.28 Tracy Brighten, Bachelor of Arts student, won the Massey University Pro-Chancellor's Prize
for Speech Writing (Distance).
5.3.29 Lauren Crimp, Bachelor of Communication student, won the Massey University ProChancellor's Prize for Speech Writing (Internal).
5.3.30 Amanda Saxton, Bachelor of Arts student, won the Massey University Pro-Chancellor's Prize
for Feature Writing (Distance).
5.3.31 Emily Elliott, Bachelor of Communication student, won the Massey University ProChancellor's Prize for Feature Writing (Internal).
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5.3.32 Catherine West, Bachelor of Resource and Environmental Planning student, won the
Waldebago young rider championship trophy 2014 and the Fissenden memorial trophy for
highest points 2014.
5.3.33 Malcolm Gibson, Bachelor of Veterinary Science student, won the Men's K1 (kayak) at the
North Island championships.
5.3.34 Danielle Fourie, Bachelor of Sport and Exercise student, won the Women's Open at the
Central District Squash doubles (with team mate Rebecca Clifford).
Please also refer to sections 6.0 Connections and Responsibility, and 8.0 Generating Income for
further examples external recognition of Massey expertise.
6.0
Connections and Responsibility
6.1
Massey University Summer School campaign wins bronze
Congratulations to the Massey marketing team for their attention-grabbing marketing
campaign that showed the absurd/possible dangers of summer and how you can avoid them
by attending Summer School at Massey. The campaign was awarded a bronze at the New
Zealand Direct Marketing Awards.
6.2
Connections overview
Massey continues to work hard to improve and deepen its connections. As noted in item 9.7
below, in March, the University’s strategic plan – Shaping the Nation and taking the best to
the world – the Road to 2025 – was printed and is being sent by Senior Leadership Team
members to their key stakeholders. This is an opportunity to inform others about the
University’s direction and to engage in further discussions in areas of mutual interest.
In addition, we continue to host high-profile and topical events to engage our staff and our
external stakeholders – these include, in March, the Defining Excellence Awards at Auckland
(refer to item 5.1 above), Central Districts Field Days in Feilding, the Wheat from the Chaff
book launch as part of the 50-year celebrations (refer to item 1.4 above), the Future New
Zealand events in Taranaki and Wellington (with a third to be held in Hawke's Bay in late
April) (refer to item 6.8 below).
We also hosted two successful lectures: Olympic marathon medallist Lorraine Moller and
Professor Paul McDonald, who gave a professorial lecture. The College of Business also
held its second “Big Ideas in Business” event in Albany (refer to item 6.7.2 below). The
successful “It’s My Life” smoke-free campaign, was launched in Wellington on March 24, with
local schools invited; and a series of successful Career Advisers Update Days were held on
each campus as well as in Christchurch during March.
Senior University staff Deputy Vice-Chancellor and College of Sciences Pro Vice-Chancellor
Professor Robert Anderson and Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations, International and
University Registrar Stuart Morriss have hosted alumni events during the month to connect
with our alumni in our 50th year.
We have just been advised of the success of Massey University in the Randstad Awards
being rated for the second time as the most attractive employer brand in the education sector
– ahead of Otago, Auckland and AUT – demonstrating that our reputation is strong. As
Assistant Vice-Chancellor People and Organisational Development Alan Davis says, public
perception undoubted reflects the fact that our staff and stakeholders hold us in high regard
and speak positively about us. It does not mean we cannot find ways to improve (please
refer to item 9.1 below for further details).
6.3
Creativity update
The Wellington campus and the College of Creatives Art have continued to lead our Create
value. Activities over the reporting period include:
• Meetings have been held with Callaghan Innovation to discuss our involvement in a
proposed design technology network.
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A meeting of the post-Centre of Research Excellence bid steering group is to take place
in the near future to maintain the momentum gained through the bid process. The aim
will be to set out next steps in the nationwide Value of Design initiative that Massey is
leading.
We are working with the Wellington Employers’ Chamber of Commerce to advance a
proposed event on Wellington’s creative ecology in August 2014.
Plans to establish the new School of Music and Media Production are now well
advanced. The new school will have a significant impact on the capacity of the College of
Creative Arts to provide qualifications in the creative sector sought by employers and
students, and to maintain its leadership in the area of tertiary provision of creative arts
education.
Planning is also under way for a major symposium in November this year on the Art
School of the Future, the first stage of a broader initiative concerned with the Value of
Art, alongside the Value of Design initiative.
Through Open Lab work has commenced on four Massey-led initiatives aimed at
encouraging youth voter participation in the 2014 election.
6.4
Māori, Pasifika and New Migrants update
6.4.1
With the purpose of continuing to maintain a positive presence within a range of communities
the Office of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor Māori and Pasifika has actively participated in
various events and meetings with stakeholders and communities over the reporting period,
including the following examples: Careers Day at Te Wharekura o Ngā Taiatea, Hamilton;
spoke with teachers and students at St Patrick’s College, Wellington College, Te Kuiti High
School, Naenae College, Newlands College; exhibited at Wellington’s Te Ra o Te Raukura
Festival; provided a campus tour for 17 young men from Opotiki (Whakatohea) at Albany
campus; met with the head of the Māori Department, New Plymouth Boys’ High; a keynote
address was given to the Toi Tangata conference in Auckland; a presentation on Māori
mental health was given in Auckland to students enrolled on the Te Rau Puawai: Māori
Mental Health programme; participated in a major public lecture in Rotorua organised by the
Lakes District Health Board and included Whānau Ora providers from Rotorua, Taupo, and
Turangi; Pacific Health; The New Zealand Committee of the Pacific Economic Cooperation
Council; United Church of Tonga branches; Auckland Mayor Len Brown; the Director Pasifika
has started weekly radio slots on Planet FM 104.6 and Radio 531pi.
6.4.2
A number of significant research-related activities were undertaken by staff in the Office of
Assistant Vice-Chancellor Māori and Pasifika over the reporting period, including:
• Active engagement in the preparation of a Smoking Cessation Initiative (with other
Massey University researchers) designed to reduce harm specifically within the Māori
population.
• The Māori Directorate continues to build its relationship with the Institute of Education
and the development of a Centre of Excellence – Research and Teaching Hub.
• Active membership and domain leaders of New Zealand’s largest longitudinal study.
Staff have also been included as named investigators within a Marsden Fund application.
• A child nutrition study also remains part of the directorate’s research portfolio, with some
encouraging results emerging with respect to childhood obesity within marginalised
populations.
• A major research initiative utilising demographic information garnered from the Te Hoe
Nuku Roa study is also being led by the directorate. A launch of the first output from this
study is anticipated shortly.
• Seeking EuropeAid funding for a proposal under the heading Investing in People:
Education, knowledge and skill, Employment and social cohesion.
• Supervised and supported the summer scholarship holder for the project Exploring
what/how Pasifika children engage in learning activities during the long summer holidays.
• Research work around Pasifika student success with Dr Cherie Chu of Victoria University
of Wellington.
• Part of a group of consultants from Institute of Education and Centre of Educational
Development to respond to a request-for-proposal from Ministry of Foreign Affairs and
Trade to design and deliver a Programme on Literacy, School Leadership, and Research
on literacy progression in three Pacific Islands.
6.4.3
Professor Paul McDonald, Pro Vice-Chancellor, College of Health, Dr Selwyn Katene,
Assistant Vice-Chancellor Māori and Pasifika and Margaret Kawharu, Māori Directorate,
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met recently with Phillip Alexander-Crawford, general manager – Education for Te Iwi o
Ngātiwai and Rawiri Hemi, chairperson for the Education Committee for Te Runanga o
Whangaroa to discuss ways Massey could better connect with Northland iwi.
6.5
Sustainability Update
The Consolidating Sustainability project is currently focusing on working with Massey
students and staff on projects aimed at improving campus sustainability using a Living Lab
approach. Initiatives include:
• Organic composting system design – Wellington campus staff and industrial design
students.
• Waste to landfill minimisation in the library – Manawatū campus
• Puke Ahu - Wellington campus identity project.
• Sustainable Library project (all campuses) – involving an audit of Library sustainability.
• On-site solar energy system design for dairying – Manawatū campus.
The Sustainability project is also involved in a number of projects incorporating themes of
sustainability, including; No. 1 Dairy Project (sustainable agriculture), Kuratini Marae
redevelopment (sustainable building design), Rangitāne Gardens project (cultural and
environmental sustainability) and a project in Taranaki (community engagement and creative
reinterpretation of social, cultural and scientific data).
Other current strands of work in the project involve improving communication and
staff/student engagement around sustainability at Massey University, including; the creation
of a Sustainability at Massey blog, redesign of the Massey University Sustainability website,
investigating the use of OneMassey project sites as a collaboration tool, and the formation of
a Massey University Sustainability Club and Facebook group. Work is also under way on a
network analysis of Massey University sustainability research aimed at identifying the key
groups, networks and areas of current research expertise at Massey.
The intended impact of this work is to embed sustainability across all areas of the University,
enhance institutional connectivity around sustainability and provide some strategic focus in
terms of sustainability research and expertise at Massey University. Collaboration on
campus-based Living Lab projects will demonstrate the value of the approach in addressing
complex problems – improving operational sustainability of the University and providing
teaching, learning and research opportunities on campus.
6.6
Agri-food update
6.6.1
The work of the director of Agrifood Business and executive director of Te Puna Whakatipu,
Professor Claire Massey, is focused on implementing the Massey agrifood business strategy
(launched December 2012). This means supporting the University’s core business in relation to
agrifood business (eg teaching programmes and strategic initiatives such as FoodHQ) as
well as identifying new strategic projects where there is the potential for the University to earn
revenue and/or demonstrate thought leadership in the agrifood space.
Specific activities over the reporting period include:
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Projects and business development with key clients:
Of note is the dairy futures project with NZX which is progressing well.
In addition we are working on proposals for multiple projects with Fonterra. The three
main areas of focus are staff capability development, food safety and developing a
programme of initiatives in order to support Fonterra’s corporate social responsibility
objectives.
In March a workshop with the Livestock Improvement Corporation identified several
new projects and funding from the corporation for a partnership if a strategic
innovations fund bid was secured.
Activities in the five areas of the agrifood strategy:
Continued to support University initiatives in a number of key areas (eg the Global Food
Safety Programme, the FoodPilot) and/or initiatives started in previous period (eg the
projects with firms in Hawke’s Bay, Marlborough and Taranaki). New strategic initiatives
include food safety (a $950,000 proposal written for the Ministry for Primary Industries
was successful and was announced at the end of March).
Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade - Agricultural Service Panel:
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Appointed to this newly-established Agricultural Services Panel in December. In this
period the focus has been on developing protocols for dealing with our identified partners
and working with these partners to evaluate the opportunities currently on offer. Two
projects are current – funding has been secured for one (agricultural development in
Indonesia) and Massey is shortlisted for a second (dairy development in Colombia).
Formal announcement of Te Puna Whakatipu – Transforming Agrifood Business:
Te Puna is a new university entity designed to improve the level of coordination of
existing agrifood initiatives which also signals a new approach to operating in this key
sector using the skills of the three principals: Professor Claire Massey, Professor Hamish
Gow and Mark Ward. Te Puna will focus on three key areas; developing regions (led by
Mr Ward), developing leaders within firms (led by Professor Gow) and developing firms
(led by Professor Massey).
6.6.2
The FoodHQ Board met at the end of March. Good progress is being made across a wide
range of activities. Of particular note: the Crown Research Institute Environmental Science
and Research has joined FoodHQ and the Riddet Complex is the first of our buildings to
have a FoodHQ sign in front of it.
6.6.3
Thanks to Associate Professor Matt Golding who appeared on TVNZ’s Rural Delivery
programme explaining FoodHQ.
6.6.4
I recently met with Ted Tan, deputy chief executive of SPRING in Singapore, who had been
leading a delegation of 29 people to Massey. SPRING is an enterprise development agency
under the Singapore Ministry of Trade and Industry. He was very positive about the visit and
was returning home to champion Massey and FoodHQ as the place for food innovation. Well
done to the staff involved.
6.6.5
DairyNZ has been relocated to new premises on the Manawatū campus adjacent to the
AgHort Complex and the Institute of Agriculture and Environment.
6.6.6
The Riddet Institute has also been brokering connections between the New Zealand food
industry and some of India’s premier food scientists and industry stakeholders and signed a
memorandum of understanding with India’s National Dairy Research Institute. Please refer
to Appendix X for further details.
6.7
Examples of other connections, relationships, contributions and impacts:
6.7.1
The 27th Annual Workshop held by the Fertilizer and Lime Research Centre on February 1820 was attended by more than 270 delegates from New Zealand and Australia representing
universities, Crown Research Institutes, the fertiliser industry, private consultancies, regional
councils, national policy-makers and farmers. The theme this year focussed on Nutrient
Management for Farm, Catchment and Community. Eighty-two papers were presented in
the three-day programme, with four invited speakers delivering keynote addresses.
6.7.2
The College of Business first Big Ideas in Business event for 2014 focused on big data. Big
data, wise decisions: What managers need to know about big data took place at the Student
Central Lounge on the Albany campus on March 27. Speakers included Professor Marius
Leibold, Simon Pomeroy from Westpac and Myles Matheson from Microsoft.
6.7.3
Professor Jim Arrowsmith, School of Management and MPOWER co-director, has been
invited to be a panelist alongside senior human resource managers at the CCH Learning HR
and Employment Law summit in Auckland in May. Speakers at the summit include Labour
Minister Simon Bridges and president Helen Kelly, Council of Trade Unions president, as
well as company executives and employment lawyers. Professor Arrowsmith will be the only
academic speaking at the conference, addressing the implications of proposed employment
law changes in the workplace.
6.7.4
Associate Professor Dennis Viehland, School of Management, and Lindsay Eastgate,
MPOWER Coordinator and master’s candidate in the School of Management, spoke at the
Taranaki Business Expo 2014 on March 6. Ms Eastgate’s speech, What will New Zealand’s
future workforce look like and how will this impact on Taranaki businesses? related to
relevant “people and work” research goals and activities pursued by MPOWER. Dr Dennis
Viehland explored the pros and cons of working remotely for employees, business owners
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and customers. This was a prerequisite to a series of Massey-hosted regional events in
Wellington and Hawke’s Bay in March in conjunction with business and community groups.
6.7.5
The ecentre held its regular Demo Day on March 25. Ten new entrepreneurs lined up to pitch
their ventures in just 90 seconds. The industry sectors include primary healthcare,
recruitment, fashion and enterprise IT.
6.7.6
Tanya Marriott, School of Design, as the president of the National Institute of American Doll
Artists was invited to jury and confer the inaugural Pandora Award for excellence within the
field of doll art and design in Moscow. Her work features in an article regarding her figurative
design practice published within the Russian publication Doll Master, and an article
Designing dolls through 3D printing published within the United States publication Art Doll
Quarterly.
6.7.7
Associate Professor Robin Peace and Dr Angelique Praat, School of People, Environment
and Planning, for eSocSci | Hui Rangahau Tahi, attended the inaugural forum discussion of
the Social Sciences and Policy Roundtable. Those present included research academics
from the universities, Distinguished Professor Paul Spoonley, the Chief Science Adviser
Professor Sir Peter Gluckman, and Cabinet Ministers Bill English, Tony Ryall, Hekia Parata,
and Paula Bennett. The objectives for this meeting were to improve collective understanding
of the current policy frameworks used by Government; clarify Ministers social policy and
social science requirements including targeting of government’s investment in social science
research, establishment of a pipeline of timely, accessible social science research and the
improved use of data analytics, prioritisation of social science research that informs and
contributes to the production of better public services, welfare reforms, health, housing and
education public policy, and to identify mechanisms and practices that achieve government’s
public policy objectives and social science researchers objectives. (N.B.: eSocSci is a
Massey University hosted collaborative interdisciplinary social science community which
facilitates research for innovation in social and economic policy, social services delivery, the
community sector and business.)
6.7.8
The WH Oliver Humanities Research Academy held a workshop on February 17 with the
theme So what will a research centre do for me?. About 30 Massey staff were joined by
Professor Lydia Wevers, director of the Stout Research Centre, Professor Tony Ballantyne,
director of the Centre for Research of Colonial Culture and Professor Robert Phiddian,
director of the Australasian Consortium of Humanities Research Centres. The workshop
began setting a three-year agenda of activity for the newly established Oliver Academy.
6.8
With the purpose of reinforcing strong strategic connections and taking the opportunity to
present the University’s point of view, I meet with various people and groups around New
Zealand and overseas. The following are by way of example:
• Massey University and Palmerston North city working together to promote the region as
the centre of the New Zealand foodbowl.
• Interview with Jamie MacKay for RadioSport's The Farming Show
• Finance 2014 in association with the Auckland Chamber of Commerce. Please refer to
item 1.3 above for further details.
• Event with High Commissioner of India in Wellington.
• Country99 TV interview.
• Met with Sport Wellington. The work being done with Sport Wellington is resulting in an
excellent partnership. The senior team visited the Manawatū campus at the end of
February to look at what we have to offer. The College of Creative Arts students who
designed the new strategic plan for Sport Wellington are now in the running for four
awards at the Sport New Zealand Sport and Recreation Awards. The one that is of
significance to Massey is the Innovation Excellence award.
• Met with Environmental Science and Research chief executive Graham Smith, who was
on the Manawatū campus at the end of February and confirmed his organisation’s
interest in joining FoodHQ. This is good news and continues the slow but steady build-up
of FoodHQ activities.
• Catch up with Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development chief executive
Brett O’Reilly.
• Hosted Wellington Employers’ Chamber of Commerce on the Wellington campus to
discuss Massey University and Wellington employers working together to promote the
city as the creative capital.
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Spoke at the Institute of Public Administration New Zealand Expert Series Workshop in
Wellington.
Speech at the Higher Education Summit.
Meeting with Blackboard Inc.
Meeting with Consultant Action Group re international students.
Met with Dr Russell Normal MP to discuss innovation policy.
Chaired the Committee on University Academic Programmes all-day meeting in
Wellington.
Speech to Rangitoto College parents and year 12 and 13 pupils.
Meeting of the Riddet Institute Board.
Speech at the Wellington City Council Leaders conference.
Meeting with Jo Moir from the Dominion Post.
Meeting with Wellington Mayor Celia Wade-Brown and city chief executive Kevin Lavery
to discuss Massey University’s contribution to the city.
International Centre of Excellence information reception.
Meeting with new chief executive of Auckland City Council Steve Town.
Meeting with Auckland Mayor Len Brown.
Speech to the New Zealand Association for Gifted Children conference. It was noticeable
that Massey staff play a central role in the Gifted Children area. Special mention to
Associate Professor Tracey Riley, Research and Enterprise, who play a major leadership
role.
Welcome to the Science Communicators Association conference, Te Manawa,
Palmerston North.
Speech to the Child Youth and Family end of the pilot year event.
Attended the Manawatū Chamber of Commerce advisory board meeting.
Met with the visiting Director of the Higher Education Institute of Qatar (Ministry of
Education). Ashok Poduval from the School of Aviation hosted the delegation from
Qatar. I heard very positive comments about the MBA programme that has been tailored
to meet the needs of Qatar Airlines.
Interview with the International Channel Shanghai.
Interview by Jamie MacKay for RadioSport's The Farming Show.
Attended a FoodHQ board meeting.
Attended a New Zealand School of Music board meeting.
Meeting with Farib Sos, executive chair of the Asia Forum.
Speech to St Mary’s College, Wellington.
Interview with the International Education Strategic Road-mapping process.
Meeting with the Education Council of Aotearoa New Zealand transition board.
Speech to the Future New Zealand regional event in Wellington focused on politics.
Business Central members made up an enthusiastic audience. Thanks to Distinguished
Professor Paul Spoonley, Associate Professor Richard Shaw and Professor Claire
Robinson for sharing their thoughts. The next event is in Hawke’s Bay.
Attended the Fourth International Summit on the Teaching Profession.
Catch-up with the new Vice-Chancellor of Victoria University of Wellington, Professor
Grant Guilford.
Speech at the Festival of Education in Wellington. I was pleasantly surprised at the
number of parents and students who attended the festival. Thanks to the staff who were
on hand to discuss what we have to offer.
Visit by Mary Quin, chief executive of Callaghan Institute.
Speech to Rotary Club of Newmarket.
Meeting with the Palmerston North City Council.
Attended Universities New Zealand meeting.
Attended a lecture by Colonel Paul Bayly (a Massey Alumni) on David Livingston:
Africa’s Greatest Explorer at Auckland Museum.
Speech to Takapuna Grammar School Achievers.
Please also refer to section 7.0 Internationalisation, below, for an update on my recent trip to
China.
7.0
Internationalisation
7.1
Visit to China
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In March I spent nine days in China. The diary included:
• Massey agents based in China.
• China Academy of Agricultural Sciences.
• China Study Abroad Forum.
• China International Exhibition (where Massey had a stall).
• Visit to Fonterra farms.
• Nanjing Agricultural University.
• Nanjing University of Finance and Economics.
• One Health Graduation Ceremony (Please refer to Appendix XI for further details).
• Hebei University.
• China Academy of Sciences (this allowed a catch-up with Hon. Professor Ma).
• Prime Minister’s speech (which focused on food) and signing of the China-New Zealand
Dairy Cooperation Centre Agreement.
• China Agricultural University.
• New Zealand promotion event to celebrate the New Zealand – China Dairy Partnership.
As always happens, the visit also provided an opportunity to talk informally with our Chinese
partners and catch up with New Zealanders who are working in China.
Thanks to Michael O’Shaughnessy and others in the International Office. For any details
about the visit, please contact Mr O’Shaughnessy.
Special mention to Farnaaz Mohammed, Professor Don Cleland, Professor Steve Marsland,
Professor Emeritus Roger Morris, Professor Eric Newman and Dr Lachlan McIntyre. All of
whom contributed to the visit while getting on with their own busy schedules. Professor
Martin Young also merits a mention, given the very positive feedback we had about his work
at Nanjing University of Finance and Economics.
Thanks also to the New Zealand Embassy in Beijing staff who assisted during the visit and
hosted the One Health Graduation ceremony.
I was on TV3’s The Nation on March 22 talking about the China visit.
Please refer to Appendix XII for further details.
7.2
Massey University Worldwide
Massey University Worldwide is the banner under which Massey University is committing to
expand its international education capability to become a major export earner for the
University and for the New Zealand economy.
There is enormous growth in demand from students for education from countries that cannot
meet students’ requirements. Massey is well positioned to meet this demand because of our
long history of online education and our strong relationships with many corporations,
governments and educational institutions, developed worldwide over many years.
A Massey University Worldwide office has been established and Richard van der Jagt
appointed to the role of Massey University Worldwide Business Development Manager. In
addition, each college will have a key contact who will liaise with Mr van der Jagt to identify
and develop opportunities within specific subject areas. Contacts for your college can be
found on the Massey University Worldwide website
http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/learning/departments/massey-world-wide/massey-worldwide_home.cfm
The launch went very well. Interest in what Massey is seeking to do globally is very high. We
already have some major successes to refer to – the challenge now is to build as rapidly as
possible on what has been achieved.
Thanks in particular to Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations, International and University
Registrar Stuart Morriss, Assistant Vice-Chancellor Research, Academic and Enterprise
Professor Brigid Heywood, the staff who were showcased on the night, and the many staff
who worked hard to ensure the event demonstrated how outstanding Massey University is.
Please refer to Appendix XIII for further details.
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7.3
Other Examples of international connections, relationships, contributions and impact:
7.3.1
Professors Paul McDonald and Richard Archer, College of Health, welcomed a delegation of
six senior members from the Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research on
March 4 to the Albany campus. The delegation is interested in food chemical/molecular
structure of bioactive compounds. They met with staff from the Institute of Food, Nutrition
and Human Health and toured our facilities.
7.3.2
An articulation agreement with Manipal University in India to allow Manipal students to
articulate into the Bachelor of Science (Logistics and Supply Chain Management) is close to
being signed. It is hoped that the first cohort will arrive in January 2015.
7.3.3
Joint Secretary Sibal and colleagues from the Indian Department of Animal Husbandry,
Dairying and Fisheries as well as staff from the Ministry for Primary Industries were hosted
by the Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences and Massey University
Agricultural Experiment Station staff. Indications since the visit have identified areas of
possible co-operation and these have since been followed up.
7.3.4
Dr Gina Salapata, School of Humanities, was invited to participate in the External Evaluation
Committee of the Master of Arts in Black Sea Cultural Studies, School of Humanities of the
International Hellenic University, Thessaloniki, Greece, in February.
7.3.5
The Joint Centre for Disaster Research and the Wellington Region Emergency Management
Office are coordinating a new International Centre of Excellence in Community Resilience
based in the Wellington Region. This regional International Centre of Excellence forms part
of a United Nations initiative to enhance the regional and research focus of the International
Research on Disaster Risk programme through a network of international research and
practice clusters.
8.0
Generating Income and Financial
8.1
The International Education Growth Fund held by Education New Zealand has awarded
funding to the School of Engineering and Advanced Technology to investigate a new
initiative to encourage Chinese computer science students to study in New Zealand. The
funding will help increase the number of Information, Communication and Technology
graduates and open the door for Chinese students to continue with postgraduate studies in
New Zealand.
8.2
Dr Mingjun Liu (Xinjiang Academy of Animal Science) was successful in obtaining a grant of
2.7 million RMB from the Ministry of Science and Technology, China, to support a project
examining the genetic diversity of sheep breeds in Xinjiang. Professors Hugh Blair, Steve
Morris and Paul Kenyon and Dr Rao Dukkipati from the Institute of Veterinary, Animal and
Biomedical Sciences are co-applicants and the project will run from April 2014 to December
2016. In addition to research papers, it is anticipated a PhD student will enrol at Massey.
8.3
Professors Hugh Blair (2013), Steve Morris (2014) and Paul Kenyon (2015), Institute of
Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, are sharing the role of high-end experts for
SAFEA (State Administration of Foreign Experts Affairs) projects. The project on the effect
of soil fertility on sheep production is sponsored by the Xinjiang Production and Construction
Corps and receives a grant of 110,000 RMB/year (RMB is the Chinese renminbi currency).
Soil samples from Xinjiang farms were analysed in the Massey Soils Laboratory late in 2013
and will be used to devise fertiliser trials in April 2014.
8.4
Associate Professor David Parsons, Institute of Information and Mathematical Sciences, was
successful in the Ako Aotearoa funding bid for the project: Learners and Mobile devices: A
framework for enhanced learning and institutional change. This project will run for two years
and has a funding value of $300,000.
8.5
Dr Andy Martin, School of Sport and Exercise, has been awarded $5000 Good Practice
funding from Ako Aotearoa. Dr Martin has led the development of Sport Management
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Cooperative Education programmes at Massey over the past 20 years, and is recognised as
a leading expert in this field
8.6
St Kilda AFL Guernsey
College of Creative Arts graduate Kahu Douglas and fourth-year student Jason Sheardown
have designed a special guernsey to be worn by the St Kilda players when they take on the
Brisbane Lions in the second annual AFL match played at Westpac Stadium on April 25. The
contemporary Māori design emphasises the links between New Zealand and Australia
through the Anzac journey, using authentic motifs.
8.7
Tulia Moss, School of Design, received research funding to investigate and design packaging
for food exports. The contract is a new collaboration in partnership with both Massey Food
and Bioprocess Engineers and Crown Research Institute scientists at Scion.
Please also note that numerous items throughout this report relate to generating income.
9.0
Enabling Excellence
9.1
Massey rated top employer in NZ education sector
As mentioned in item 6.2 above, at the beginning of April, Massey University was recognised
as New Zealand’s Most Attractive Employer in the Education Sector and in the Top 20
employers in the overall 2014 Randstad Award for New Zealand.
The Randstad Awards are hosted in 23 countries and are based in information gathered from
people external to the organisation. In New Zealand the information is gathered from 7000
respondents.
The award confirms that Massey is committed to providing a positive working environment.
This is what we all need to continue to do. A focus on constant improvement is needed
because we can always do better and changes in our environment mean we will always have
to address new challenges.
But for now – the Award tells us we are well thought of by the wider New Zealand
community.
Please refer to Appendix XIV for further details.
9.2
People will have noted that the International Marketing Team is now part of External
Relations. This stems from the reshaping of new portfolios with the departure of Professor
Ingrid Day from the Assistant Vice-Chancellor Academic and International portfolio.
9.3
Campus Infrastructure:
9.3.1
The new Herbarium, under the Manawatū campus College of Sciences retrofit project, is now
complete and was occupied in March.
9.3.2
Bennetts Bookshop has been relocated from Student Services Trust building to the area
adjacent to Student Central and the Pyramid on the Wellington campus.
9.3.3
Seismic strengthening on Block 4, Wellington campus, is complete.
9.3.4
The School of Public Health (all three services) are now fully operational in the new location
in Blocks 3 and 4 on the main Wellington campus.
9.3.5
Stage one of the Wellington campus Library project is in the final stages of completion. The
new area is open for staff and student use. Work on stage two has started and will continue
through to completion in December.
9.3.6
The Distance Students’ Centre has now moved premises and is located on the second floor
of the Students’ Centre building, Manawatū campus.
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9.3.7
9.3.8
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Thank you to the Massey Foundation and Alumni for hosting four very well-received Alumni
events in the newly refurbished Tiritea House (formerly the Vice-Chancellors’ residence).
The opening of the Riddet Building complex was a significant event for the University. It
provided an opportunity to celebrate two areas of particular expertise – food technology and
engineering. A lecture on 3D Printing (additive manufacturing) by Dr Olaf Diegel preceded
the opening and was very well received.
The opening has been a long time coming – but a look around the building shows that a
great deal has been achieved and the University now has another great set of facilities. Alan
Wright deserves a particular mention given his role in leading the development of the
complex. Thank you again to all of those who worked on the projects. Please refer to
Appendix XV for further details.
9.3.9
Te Ara Hihiko shortlisted for national prize
The New Zealand Institute of Architects jury for the New Zealand Architecture Award visited
the College of Creative Arts building - Te Ara Hihiko, Wellington campus, which has been
short listed for the national prize.
9.3.10 Science space nominated for international award
Science laboratories at Massey University's Manawatū campus have been shortlisted in the
laboratory-related teaching and learning category in this year's international S-Lab awards,
run from Britain. Massey University is one of only two Australasian universities shortlisted for
the awards that will be presented at the Supporting World Class Science conference in
London in September. Please refer to Appendix XVI for further details.
9.4
Enrolment processing went extremely well with the throughput times being significantly
reduced. This also had a beneficial effect on calls through the contact centre and other
points of contact, (less calls from students awaiting processing decisions) this in turn enabled
new calls to be handled faster.
9.5
Enrolment packs dispatched without delays this year. Student-initiated copies of
Sreamresources were running at a slightly higher rate than expected in the first week of
semester. There have been no operational delays with this service. The review of Stream
resources in relation to student work load is ongoing.
9.6
Highlights of meetings I have had with Massey staff and associated groups included:
• Professorial forum on the Manawatū campus.
• Massey University Foundation Board meeting.
• Discussion on the New Zealand School of Music.
• Senior Leadership Team sub-committee meeting.
• Launch of Massey University Worldwide.
• Met newly-promoted associate professors and professors at the Albany campus.
• Met Mike Fiszer, the new Associate Pro Vice-Chancellor in the College of Business.
• Met Library staff at the Manawatū campus.
• Meeting with the College of Sciences executive team.
• Various What’s Happening meetings.
• Chaired Tenders Board (March).
• Met with the pro-vice chancellors.
• Hosted the Albany-all staff meeting to review the activities of 2014.
• Met with the College of Humanities and Social Sciences executive at Albany.
• Attended the Defining Excellence Awards event, where Massey researchers, teachers,
professional staff and alumni are recognised. Please refer to item 5.1 above for further
details.
• Audit and Risk Committee of Massey Council (March and April).
• First Massey Council meeting of the year.
• Attended the launch of The Wheat from the Chaff, at Manawatū campus.
• Meeting with the Combined Unions.
• Hosted the All Staff meetings on the Manawatū, Wellington and Albany campuses (refer
to item 9.6 below for further details)
• Chaired the monthly Senior Leadership Team meeting (March).
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
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While the University turns 50, the Albany campus turns 21. I enjoyed the birthday
celebration held at Albany for staff and students – particularly the world record breaking
number of muffins covered in “21 years” icing. (Please refer to Appendix XVII for further
details).
Afternoon tea to congratulate staff supporting the first-year Engineering and Food
Technology Honours programmes.
Chaired Tenders Board (March).
Meeting to review recruitment and marketing for 2014 and 2015.
Discussion with the recruitment agency re new Pro Vice-Chancellor for Sciences.
Visit to new spaces for service teams in Wellington.
Meeting with Chancellor Chris Kelly.
Speech to the Head of Departments/Institutes managerial leadership forum.
Visit to the new Public Health spaces in Wellington.
Meeting with the International Office.
Discussion of a proposed Worldwide business plan.
Discussion on the New Migrants initiative.
Attended the opening of Riddet Building complex (refer to item 9.3.8 above for further
details), which was a significant event for the University. It provided an opportunity to
celebrate two areas of particular expertise – food technology and engineering. Thank
you to everyone involved. Alan Wright deserves a particular mention given his role in
leading the development of the complex.
Catch-up with Paul Watters, School of Engineering and Advanced Technology, to
discuss the ICT cluster at Albany.
Attended Massey University Council’s Audit and Risk committee.
Attended the College of Business Dean’s List, Albany campus.
Attended Albany Graduation ceremonies 1 – 6.
Attended the celebration to honour Pasifika graduates.
Attended the celebration to honour Māori graduates.
These meetings with staff are very useful. I actively seek meetings but am also pleased to be
invited to discuss any of the issues the University is dealing with.
9.7
Campus-all staff meetings
I have been catching up with the executive teams of all colleges and service lines over recent
weeks as well as some other groups. Thank you to everyone who came to the All Staff 2014
briefings held on each campus in March. For those who could not make the meetings, the
webcast of the presentation can be found on mediasite or via the following address:
https://webcast.massey.ac.nz/Mediasite/Login?ReturnUrl=%2fMediasite%2fPlay%2f8486ff64
dbae40c0a1a21af5597c1bab1d.
9.8
There are a lot of issues being advanced through SLT at the moment, these include: ViceChancellor key performance indicator accountabilities to Council; change of trading name to
Massey Business School; actions to improve performance in international rankings; Risk
Management committee - terms of reference; legislative compliance report for 2013;
business continuance management – 2013; internal audit and external audit status report;
proposal to establish a Pacific Research and Policy Centre; Risk Management policy review;
Controlled Entities Governance Framework policy; Leave and Ancillary Appointments
committee; 2013 Strategic Innovations Fund grant report backs; Using University Capability
Development Group and managing demand for career development and other needs arising
from the staff survey; Employee Development Calendar report on uptake in 2013; report on
Massey Manager Induction programme; report on Intercultural Communication programme;
quarterly capital report; Risk Management report – January 2014; Actions to improve
performance in international rankings; revised Innovation strategy; Health and Safety plan
2014; QS Stars contract renewal; proposal to continue Open Lync Federation; Information
Systems Services Oversight committee - Project Alignment Committee reporting; Domestic
Marketing strategy 2014; Strategic Innovation Fund grant report backs; Senior Leadership
Team expectations of Head of Department leadership programme and SLT contribution to
the programme and to defining of leadership capability; Information Security incident
response plan; Health and Safety Accident Compensation Commission internal audit results;
monthly portfolio update papers (for January/February/March) from Assistant ViceChancellors (Research, Academic and Enterprise; External Relations; Strategy, Finance,
Information Technology and Commercial Operations; People and Organisational
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Development; Operations, International and University Registrar; Māori and Pasifika), and
Pro Vice-Chancellors (Business; Health; Humanities and Social Sciences; Creative Arts;
Sciences).
Further explanation on these items is provided in the SLT web reports available via the
University Management-Senior Leadership Team webpage
http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/about-massey/university-management/universitymanagement/university-management_home.cfm.
10.0
Bereavement
10.1
Thomas Hardy
It is with sadness that I share the passing of Tom Hardy. Mr Hardy passed away on March 1,
after a short illness. He was a strong supporter of Student Life Services on the Wellington
campus in his capacity as chair of the Student Services Trust, an organisation that
administers the delivery of Student Health and Counselling, Recreation Services and food
and beverage (most notably Tussock Café). Mr Hardy was a chartered accountant, who,
since 2003, generously volunteered his time in support of Wellington campus.
Mr Hardy was also well known for his support of Wellington’s Downstage Theatre, having
been a previous board chairman and longstanding member of their board.
11.0 Opportunities/Threats
11.1
As mentioned in item 2.1 above, this is the first year of our revised 2025 strategic plan.
Understanding where we are heading is also crucial to the process of developing strategies
within the various colleges and service lines that make up the University. Relating to this, I
outlined the Senior Leadership Teams focus for 2014 at the All-Staff meetings held in March
(see item 9.7 for further details and a link to the webcast.)
It is important that every member of staff makes sure they know what the University is
seeking to achieve in 2014 so they can make a contribution through their work.
11.2
Enrolments have been softening across the sector over the past two years so our ability to
convert student interest into enrolments is crucial. The enrolments team have been doing
great work.
12.0 Overall sense/feel of the place
12.1
I had the opportunity to talk with a number of executive teams from around the University
over the past weeks. I was impressed by how focused the teams are on driving forward their
plans in 2014. This is already a very busy year, with a lot being accomplished.
12.2
With our students back our campuses are again humming with activity and renewed energy.
Appendices attached:
Appendix I:
Crunch time for apple-bob world record at Massey (Ref. item 1.2)
Appendix II:
Breakthrough in hybrid species science (Ref. item 3.1)
Appendix III:
Kiwi scientist helps find what makes cells different (Ref. item 3.2)
Appendix IV:
Humanities, social science researchers get top rating (Ref. item 3.4)
Appendix V:
WearableArt founder awarded honorary doctorate (Ref. item 4.1)
Appendix VI:
Audit praises Massey for strong student focus (Ref. item 4.2)
Appendix VII:
TW Group funds retail chair at Massey (Ref. item 4.3)
Appendix VIII: Making a difference defines winners (Ref. item 5.1)
Appendix IX:
German research award for Massey scientist (Ref. item 5.3.1)
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Appendix X:
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Riddet Institute links NZ to India's top dairy researchers (Ref. item 6.6.6)
Appendix XI:
Massey health graduates celebrate in China (Ref. item 7.1)
Appendix XII:
Links with China to be strengthened by visit (Ref. item 7.1)
Appendix XIII
Joyce backs Massey Worldwide (Ref. item 7.2)
Appendix XIV: Massey rated top employer in NZ education sector (Ref. item 9.1)
Appendix XV:
$22m food tech and engineering upgrade (Ref. item 9.3.8)
Appendix XVI: Science space nominated for international award (Ref. item 9.3.10)
Appendix XVII: Cupcakes and confetti for Albany 21st celebrations (Ref. item 9.6)
Steve Maharey
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Appendix I
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Student Nick Putt, the first to finish bobbing apples and re-set the world record.
Crunch time for apple-bob world record at
Massey
Some of the 628 apple-bobbers at Massey’s Manawatü campus.
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Appendix I
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The final tell by the 2 independent counters.
Ducking your head into a bucket of cold water was the ideal activity for a scorcher of a day in
Palmerston North on Friday. That’s what hundreds of Massey University students and staff did to
break the world record by 31 for the most people bobbing for apples at the same time.
A total of 628 people plunged faces into buckets of water to bob for apples in a bid to break the
current record held by a healthcare organisation in Jackson, Ohio, where 597 people bobbed in sync
in 2012.
Tension and excitement grew around midday before the start of the event on the Manawatü campus
Concourse as new students and staff lined up to simultaneously bob ten apples from their individual
buckets.
With a $500 voucher from Student Flights awarded to the first person to bob all ten apples, it was no
surprise that there was a tie-breaker between two students.
To decide on an overall winner Nick Putt and Scott Cudby had an apple bobbing face-off where Nick,
a first-year Bachelor of Agri-Science student, came out on top.
“I give full credit to the boys, and my job in a vege shop. This is another great win for Matai [student
hall of residence],” says Nick.
Dr Sarah Golding, Events Coordinator for the university, said the event took hours to set up with
tables bearing hundreds of buckets and apples, as well as cordons and independent stewards
needed to count and then monitor participants to make sure they did not cheat.
The Warehouse Palmerston North donated buckets, a Hawke’s Bay fruit producer Crasborn donated
apples, and the Palmerston North Fire Service provided a truck to help fill the buckets with water.
“Apple-bobbing was chosen as a fun way of celebrating 2014 Orientation and Massey's 50th
anniversary of its world-leading Food Technology research and teaching programme,” says Student
Life Coordinator Kirsty Greenwell.
Organisers had to follow strict protocols for the attempt, which started when everyone was inside a
specially marked area and ended when the first person had bobbed all 10 of their apples from the
bucket.
The apples and buckets had to be of a minimum standard and size (30cm diameter bucket and 20cm
deep water, and 145g average apple). Hands had to be behind backs at all times, and anyone who
used their hands was immediately disqualified. No one was. Local sports teams, the Manatwatü Jets
and Turbos helped out as stewards and the Manawatü Striders were independent witnesses.
Massey event organisers will now submit documentation to the Guinness World Record authorities in
the form of time-stamped, uninterrupted video footage and an aerial photo of the event to claim their
record.
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Appendix II
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Massey University computational biologist Murray Cox
Breakthrough in hybrid species science
Massey University scientists have discovered a universal law that explains how hybrid species
survive and thrive.
Computational biologist Professor Murray Cox and molecular biologist Dr Austen Ganley led the
research that analysed what happens when a new species is formed. Their findings were published
today in the Public Library of Science online journal, Genetics.
“When two very different species suddenly merge together, a new species is created instantaneously
that contains two different sets of machinery, or RNA (Ribonucleic acid) as it’s known,” Professor
Cox says. “Some parts of this machinery won’t work together, so we asked the question, how does
this hybrid survive?”
Professor Cox says hybrids are surprisingly common and can be seen in the cotton used to make
bed-sheets, the wheat in bread and in New Zealand alpine plants.
His team used advanced computational biology methods to sequence and analyse hundreds of
millions of RNA copies of a fungus found in grass. “This particularly fungus [epichloe endophyte] is
one of the good guys," he says. "The plant gives the fungus a place to live, and the fungus produces
chemicals that kill insects that try to eat the grass. This hidden relationship is a key reason for the
success of New Zealand’s multibillion dollar dairy industry.”
Professor Cox was amazed to find that the RNA levels in the grass fungus were almost identical to
the patterns found in cotton – the only other hybrid species that has undergone similar analysis.
“These species are radically different, for starters, one is a plant, the other is a fungus,” he says.
“Therefore we realised we had identified universal rules that dictate how gene expression has to
behave in order for hybrid species to control their two sets of machinery [RNA], regardless of what
exact species those hybrids are."
These genetic rules revealed that the hybrid’s genes mimic one parent or the other. “The RNA levels
showed one copy effectively gets turned off. It’s not simply an average of what its parents have. This
pattern occurs in both fungi and plants — in other words, there are universal rules that control gene
expression levels in hybrids across the tree of life.”
It is this final point that has generated the greatest interest in the scientific community and earned
Professor Cox’s research a place in the PLOS Genetics publication.
24
Appendix III
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Genomics Dr Sebastian Schmeier
Kiwi scientist helps find what makes cells
different
Ever wondered why some parts of your body get fat but others don’t? The answer lies in the many
different types of cells we have.
A global project that includes Massey University Albany lecturer in Bioinformatics and Genomics Dr
Sebastian Schmeier is helping us to understand why cells act differently.
Different types of cells turn different genes on and off, and this gives the cells their unique properties.
But understanding why different genes are on or off in a particular type of cell is a mystery that Dr
Schmeier and collegues are working to understand.
All genes have central control regions, called promoters, that decide whether they are turned on or
turned off. In a major breakthrough, the project on which Dr Schmeier works, known as the
FANTOM5 project, has identified the central control regions for all human genes.
“To understand why, for example, fat cells behave differently to brain cells, we need to know how
different genes are turned on and off in different cells. The problem has been that the locations that
control gene behaviour haven’t been known,” says Dr Schmeier. “Using a technology developed by
RIKEN in Japan called Cap Analysis of Gene Expression, we have finally been able to find all these
regions.”
This work, which has just been published in the prestigious journal Nature, will allow researchers to
develop a much better understanding of how cell types differ.
The work will also help in the fight against diseases. “Many human diseases result from genes being
inappropriately turned on or turned off,” says Dr Schmeier. “Identifying the regions that control these
decisions will allow us to understand why this happens.”
Dr Schmeier worked with 250 researchers from over one hundred different institutes across the world
on the project.
“My contribution was computational analysis of the data,” says Dr Schmeier. “Analysing huge
datasets like those produced by RIKEN is becoming a major area of biology, and Massey
University’s Albany campus has developed a real strength in this area. The publication in Nature is
another demonstration of this.”
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Appendix III
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Scientific coordinator of FANTOM5 Dr Alistair Forrest says: “We are complex multicellular organisms
composed of at least 400 distinct cell types. This beautiful diversity of cell types allows us to see,
think, hear, move and fight infection, yet they all have the same genes. The difference between all
these cells is which genes they use – for instance, brain cells use different genes than liver cells, and
therefore they work very differently.
“In FANTOM5, we have, for the first time, systematically investigated exactly what genes are used in
virtually all cell types across the human body and the regions which determine where the genes are
read.”
The FANTOM (functional annotation of the mammalian genome) project is a RIKEN initiative
launched in 2000 originally to build a complete gene catalogue with cDNA technologies.
FANTOM5 is the fifth stage of the project, and provides the first holistic view of the control of gene
activity for the majority of cell types that make up a human. To do this, the RIKEN organisers
recruited a multidisciplinary network of experts in cell biology and computational biology.
For more information on the project, go to http://fantom.gsc.riken.jp/
26
Appendix IV
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Humanities, social science researchers
get top rating
Members of the research team for the New Zealand Longitudinal Study of Work,
Social, and Psychological Participation in an Ageing Population.
A study on how New Zealanders are coping with the challenges of ageing is one of three College of
Humanities and Social Sciences research projects to score the only gold ratings for the University
from the Ministry of Innovation Business, and Employment.
It is the second year running that the study, led by Professor Fiona Alpass, has earned the accolade.
Another study, on the impact and future implications of dramatic population and economic changes in
the regions, led by Distinguished Professor Paul Spoonley, also earned a gold rating for the second
consecutive year. A study, led by Associate Professor David Johnston, on how communities build
resilience after natural disasters, was awarded gold this year.
The gold standard from the ministry recognises projects that have met and exceeded contract
requirements, with this year’s annual report showing Massey’s gold tally rose from two last year to
three this year.
The three projects were among 14 from the University featured in the annual results. The other 11
earned the next rating – a highly achieved green score. Six of these projects are from the College of
Humanities and Social Sciences, with four from the College of Health and one from the College of
Sciences.
Professor Spoonley, the college Pro Vice-Chancellor, is delighted with the result. “Not only are these
important research projects, which add to our understanding of key aspects of social life in New
Zealand, but the ratings are recognition that how we go about the research is highly valued by the
research funders.”
Gold-rated projects:
•
The New Zealand Longitudinal Study of Work, Social, and Psychological Participation in an
Ageing Population: Enhancing Community Participation, Independence and Wellbeing, led by
Professor Fiona Alpass and Professor Chris Stephens (School of Psychology)
•
Ngā Tāngata Oho Mairangi: Regional Impacts of Demographic and Economic Change, by
Distinguished Professor Paul Spoonley, Associate Professor Robin Peace and Dr Trudie Cain
•
Understanding Factors that Build Resilience in New Zealand, by Associate Professor David
Johnston and Tom Huggins (School of Psychology - Joint Centre for Disaster Research)
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Appendix IV
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Green-rated projects:
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
•
eSOCSCI Hui Rangahau Tahi : a website-facilitated social research knowledge space to
develop and transfer knowledge and expertise between researchers, evaluators and users
across sectors by Associate Professor Robin Peace (School of People, Environment and
Planning)
•
The participation of older people: Independence, Contribution, Connection, by Associate
Professor Chris Stephens (School of Psychology)
•
Enhancing Coastal Ecosystems for Iwi - Manaaki Taha Moana, by Professor Murray Patterson
(School of People, Environment and Planning)
•
Integrated Valuation of Marine and Coastal Ecosystem Services, by Professor Murray
Patterson
•
Sustainable Pathways for New Zealand's Cities and Regions, by Associate Professor Marjan
van den Belt (Ecological Economics Research New Zealand)
•
Framework for Integrated Freshwater Solutions, by Associate Professor Marjan van den Belt
College of Health
•
Best Outcomes for Māori: Te Hoe Nuku Roa, by Professor of Māori Health Chris Cunningham
•
Cooperative effects of functional foods of Japan and New Zealand on bone health in
menopausal women, by Professor Marlena Kruger and Research Director (Institute of Food,
Nutrition and Human Health)
•
Long-term successful youth transitions - A national, longitudinal mixed methods investigation,
by Professor Robyn Munford (School of Health and Social Services)
•
A national mixed methods investigation of troubled children/young people’s pathways to
resilience Professor Robyn Munford
College of Sciences
•
New cathodes for aqueous rechargeable batteries, by Professor Simon Hall (Institute of
Fundamental Sciences)
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Appendix V
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World of Wearable Art 2008 supreme award-winning costume by Massey graduate Nadine Jaggi
WearableArt founder awarded honorary
doctorate
Dame Suzie Moncrieff
World of WearableArt (WOW) founder Dame Suzie Moncrieff has been awarded an honorary
doctorate by Massey University for her contribution to the public in the field of art and design.
Dame Suzie will be conferred a Doctor of Fine Arts on May 29 at this year’s Wellington graduation
ceremony for graduates from the College of Creative Arts.
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In 1987 Dame Suzie founded and became the driving force of WOW, an instantly recogniseable
acronym that is synonymous with innovative off-the-wall art and design interpretations.
The World of WearableArt Awards has grown from a largely community effort, taking art off the wall
and placed it on the human body in extravagant and orginal ways, to become an international
showcase which last year attracted more than half its entries from intyernational designers from
countries such as Taiwan to the Netherlands.
“In the early days I had no idea that it [WOW] would grow to the extent it has,” Dame Suzie says.
College Pro Vice-Chancellor Professor Claire Robinson says Dame Suzie’s nomination recognises
her outstanding service to arts in New Zealand, her contribution to the economy and the country’s
international reputation as well as her ongoing support of creative programmes at Massey University
during its heritage year.
“Dame Suzie has been a friend and mentor to creative arts education at Massey for many years.
[Among its many contributions] World of WearableArt have sponsored an educational exchange for
Massey fashion students with the San Francisco Academy of Art University.”
Head of Fashion at the School of Design, Sue Prescott, says Dame Suzie’s support saw a specific
category created within the WOW awards to showcase design students and help boost their visibilty
to the wider design industry.
“This has enabled students to push boundaries and produce work of a cross-disciplinary nature in an
environment that also showcases practising and professional artists and designers.”
She and Professor Robinson note that Massey students have won top awards at the shows,
including Supreme Award winner Nadine Jaggi in 2008, Luka Mues and Loren Shields in 2010, Katie
Collier and Sophie Littin in 2011 and the 2012 WOW Factor Award winner Rebecca Maxwell who
featured throughout the 2013 WOW promotion campaign.
Dame Suzie says in terms of its design influence WOW’s reach is spread globally with regular
workshops taught at schools and universities, previously unfamiliar with the WearableArt concept,
from the UK, India, China and the United States.
“What the teachers at these institutions love about WOW is that it encourages the students to be
innovative and original.”
It’s a message Dame Suzie plans to impart in an acceptance speech she will deliver once she is
conferred with her doctorate.
“I want to tell the gradates to follow their dreams; against the odds, I have been lucky enough to see
my own dreams come to fruition and WOW grow into what it is today.”
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Audit praises Massey for strong student
focus
Massey University has received national praise for its student-centred learning and the extensive
range of support services it offers.
The praise came as part of Massey University’s fifth academic audit by the Academic Quality Agency
for New Zealand Universities, conducted last year.
The agency audits the processes that underpin quality in universities. Its board is appointed by
Universities New Zealand but it is operationally independent.
Massey University Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey says the panel was impressed with the
University’s strategic plan and the significant work undertaken to develop and embed new studentcentred policies and procedures around core academic activities since the previous audit, in 2008.
“From its inception, 50 years ago, Massey has always focused on providing education tailored for
students," Mr Maharey says. "We are delighted that the audit panel members were impressed by the
ways in which Massey is endeavouring to ensure that pedagogy is shaping learning space
development and gave an example of our Student Success Policy and Academic Standing Model as
demonstrating good innovative practice.
“Massey has a reputation for being innovative in its provision of education. Nearly half of our students
study by distance or online learning, so our teaching staff are very receptive to looking at new and
better ways of delivering course content.”
The panel says Massey articulates and manages its multi-campus model effectively and clearly.
Massey has campuses in Albany, Manawatū and Wellington and also delivers a programme in
Singapore.
It is the first university to be audited in this round. The agency audit methodology is centred on a
framework of 40 guideline statements that are expressions of the qualities or standards that a
contemporary university of good standing internationally might be expected to demonstrate.
The full report by the agency is available via: http://www.aqa.ac.nz/masseycycle5
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Massey University's Professor Ted Zorn with TW Group chief executive Mark Powell.
TW Group funds retail chair at Massey
The Warehouse Group (TW Group), New Zealand’s largest listed retailer, is funding a new chair at
Massey University – the Sir Stephen Tindall Chair in Retail Management.
The agreement will see the appointment of a Professor in Retail Management within Massey’s
College of Business.
This is the first step towards the development of New Zealand’s first retail-focused degree which has
widespread industry support and which the university hopes will receive its first intake of students in
2015.
Head of Massey’s College of Business, Professor Ted Zorn said: “The Warehouse Group is a leader
in both the retail sector and the community and Massey is extremely pleased to be working with such
an organisation to increase the capability of one of the largest sectors of New Zealand’s economy.
“This agreement is another example of the College of Business partnering with industry to ensure its
programmes are relevant and innovative. Partnerships like these create fantastic learning and
employment opportunities for our students.”
TW Group chief executive Mark Powell believes a strong university degree will raise the profile of
retail as a desirable career choice.
“Retail is an exciting industry to work in and the new retail degree will combine general business
knowledge with retail-specific content, meaning students will be set up for a wide array of career
opportunities, ranging from logistics to supply chain management to running multi-million dollar
businesses.
“With global benchmarking, a best in class curriculum and wide spread industry support, I believe the
new retail-focused degree will strengthen New Zealand’s business offering in this highly competitive
global economic environment,” said Mr Powell.
Professor Zorn said the search for an internationally respected scholar in retail studies to take up the
Sir Stephen Tindall Chair in Retail Management has already begun. “We are looking for someone
who can build on our strong industry connections to develop a world-class retail degree, someone
who also has a demonstrated ability to lead a new academic programme,” he says.
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The new professor will be tasked with laying the groundwork for launching a successful Bachelor of
Retail and Business Management, including building industry support and establishing a research
programme that has relevance to the sector.
The new degree will be aimed at those already employed in the retail industry who want to upskill, or
secondary school leavers attracted to a professional career in the retail sector.
Key areas of study will include retail marketing, retail buying and planning, logistics and supply chain
management, management information systems, human resources, retail strategy and
entrepreneurship. An internship programme in partnership with industry is also a key component of
the proposed degree.
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(From left to right) Linda Jenkinson, Kathryn Wilson, Steve Maharey, Don McKenzie (with guide dog Holly),
Professor Brigid Heywood, Peter Hughes
Making a difference defines winners
The desire to make a difference to the world was a recurring theme reiterated by all of the winners at
the Defining Excellence Awards, held at the Auckland War Memorial Museum on Wednesday night.
The awards celebrate Massey’s alumni who have made outstanding contributions to their
professions, their communities, the nation, and the University.
The Sir Geoffrey Peren Award, went to its first female recipient, Linda Jenkinson. Originally from
Palmerston North, Ms Jenkinson is a serial entrepreneur now based in San Francisco and was the
first New Zealand woman to take a company public on the NASDAQ exchange. She co-founded
WOW For Africa, a new model social investment fund focused on building women-led businesses in
Senegal, West Africa. She is now turning her focus closer to her New Zealand roots.
“I’ve learned so much working alongside these amazing women in West Africa, and I am looking
forward to bringing this social investment model to women in Māori and Pacific Island communities.”
Prominent disability rights campaigner Don McKenzie OBE, CNZM was awarded the Distinguished
Alumni Service Award. Originally from Hawke’s Bay, Mr McKenzie was one of the first blind
physiotherapists in New Zealand. He continued his education by distance learning, with rehabilitation
studies at Massey University, which helped him gain a wider understanding of the challenges
presented to people with different types of disabilities.
He has campaigned tirelessly to ensure people with disabilities are empowered to take responsibility
for their lives, and emphasised persistance as a key asset in his drive for change. He gave an
example of the struggle to introduce confidential voting for blind people.
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“For the last 43 years, I’ve been asking about making confidential voting available to blind people.
I’ve been advised that this might be possible in 2020, so we will just have to keep pushing to make
that happen.”
Ministry of Education chief executive Mr Peter Hughes CNZM was delighted to accept the
Distinguished Achievement Award, in recognition of his 30-year career in the New Zealand state
sector. It’s a career path the native-born Wellingtonian is very passionate about.
“If you really want to make a difference in the world, go into public service. It’s extremely rewarding
because you can help make positive changes in peoples’ lives.”
The Distinguished Young Alumni Award was presented to Auckland-based shoe designer Kathryn
Wilson. Over the past decade Ms Wilson has established herself as New Zealand’s premier footwear
designer, and built a reputation as a business leader and brand ambassador.
“It’s nice to be able to take time out to celebrate special moments in your career, and this is one of
them. I remember the support I received from my mentors and lecturers at the College of Creative
Arts, and I’m happy to pay that forward by mentoring young design students when I can.“
In addition to the Distinguished Alumni Awards, the annual teaching and research excellence awards
and professional staff service awards were presented to Massey staff.
Teaching excellence awards were presented to Mr Scott Symonds, Dr Jing Chi, Dr Thom Conroy,
Associate Professor John Holland, Dr Damian Ruth and Ms Anna Weatherstone.
The early career research medal was presented to Dr Mary Breheny from the College of Health, the
research supervisor award went to Professor Steve Morris in the College of Sciences and the
individual research medal was awarded to Profesor Sally Morgan from the College of Creative Arts.
The Veterinary Epidemiology and Public Health team filled the stage as they accepted their Team
Research Medal.
The newly-created staff service excellence awards recognised professional services staff, with the
“One-Safe” team from the College of Sciences taking out the award for contribution to health and
safety practice. Ms Ema Alter from the Centre for Teaching and Learning was recognised for notable
improvement in work practices or service experience, and Ms Nancy Braithwaite from the College of
Health was recognised for sustained excellence in a service area. The Distance Library Service team
received the team award for sustained excellence in a service area.
Proceeds from the evening’s ticket sales will go towards the construction of a new purpose-built
Wildbase Hospital, New Zealand’s only dedicated wildlife hospital. Master of ceremonies and
Wildbase ambassador Te Radar was passionate about the specialist work done at the hospital.
This year’s Defining Excellence Awards usher in a year of celebrations across all of Massey
University’s campuses. 2014 marks 50 years since Massey became a University, and 21 years since
the Albany campus was established. It is also 50 years since Massey offered the world’s first degree
in food technology.
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German research award for Massey
scientist
Professor of Molecular Genetics Barry Scott
Massey University Professor of Molecular Genetics Barry Scott has been awarded a Humboldt
Research Award, worth around $100,000, by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in Germany.
Each year the foundation grants research awards to internationally renowned academics from
outside Germany, in recognition of their research achievements to date. “This award is granted to
academics whose fundamental discoveries, new theories, or insights have had a significant impact
on their own discipline and who are expected to continue producing cutting edge achievements in the
future,” the Foundation states.
Much of Professor Scott’s work has helped the advancement of New Zealand’s agricultural sector,
including his world-leading research into how an endophyte fungus protects ryegrass from drought,
disease and insects.
The Alexander von Humboldt Foundation aims to “bring the knowledge of the world to Germany” and
has invited Professor Scott to spend six months working on a research project of his choice with
German scientists.
Professor Scott says he plans to travel to Germany to advance his research on fungal-plant
symbiosis. “One of the huge benefits of the award will be the opportunity to interact with several
world class groups working on related research and to be able to access some of the best research
facilities in the world,” Scott says.
Professor Scott will be hosted by Dr Regine Kahmann from the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial
Microbiology in Marburg, but will collaborate with scientists from Göttingen University, Freiburg
University, Münster University and the Braunschweig University of Technology.
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From back left: Distinguished Professor Harjinder Singh, Distinguished Professor Paul Moughan, Massey
International Relations Director Michael O’Shaughnessy
Bottom row: Professor AK Srivastava, Director and Vice-Chancellor of the National Dairy Research Institute,
Massey University Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey.
Riddet Institute links NZ to India's top
dairy researchers
The Riddet Institute is brokering connections between the New Zealand food industry and some of
India’s premier food scientists and industry stakeholders.
The Massey University-based centre has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with India’s
National Dairy Research Institute.
Distinguished Professor Harjinder Singh, from the Riddet Institute, says this will be achieved through
Riddet Foodlink, a two-way communication channel between the New Zealand food industry and
India’s institute.
“Through our Riddet Foodlink network we will be able to involve the New Zealand food industry in
visits by Indian researchers and businesses,” says Professor Singh. “This MoU will assist Riddet
Institute researchers to acquire a new set of knowledge about food products for the emerging Indian
and Asian markets. It will also create a pathway for increasing joint publications, third party funding
applications and the recruitment of post-graduate students.”
Professor AK Srivastava, Director and Vice-Chancellor of the National Dairy Research Institute, said
they have been involved with the Riddet Institute since 2009. He met Distinguished Professor
Harjinder Singh, co-director of the Riddet Institute, on a New Zealand government sponsored factfinding science mission to India. “We wish to formalise and standardise our relationship in order to
provide consistency, and a focal point, for the preparation and administration of programmes for
collaboration and co-operation,” Professor Srivastava says.
The National Dairy Research Institute undertakes research, teaching and extension activities, and
provides the technically skilled workforce needed for dairy industry development in India.
The Riddet Institute is one of seven New Zealand Centres of Research Excellence.
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Massey’s new One Health graduates at the New Zealand Embassy in Beijing with Food Safety
Minister Nikki Kaye, Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey, senior Massey staff and Chinese government
and health officials
One Health Massey health graduates
celebrate in China
Nine new Massey graduates were celebrated yesterday in Beijing at an event attended by Food
Safety Minister Nikki Kaye, Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey, and senior Chinese government officials
from health, agriculture and education agencies.
The celebration for Chinese graduates of a unique World Bank-funded "One Health" programme that
integrated veterinary and medical specialist topics in a single curriculum for the first time as a
measure against pandemics was held at the New Zealand Embassy.
Four graduates have completed a Master of Veterinary Medicine (Biosecurity) degree and five have
completed a Master of Public Health (Biosecurity). The programme was delivered over a year in New
Zealand and China.
To be selected for the programmes, students needed to have either medical or veterinary
qualifications and be working in specialist human and/or animal health roles within government
agencies in one of the Asian countries that took part.
One Health programme director Associate Professor Eric Neumann says the programme addressed
key strategic priorities to respond to avian influenza, brucellosis and other serious animal health
diseases affecting humans.
Dr Neumann says the programme in China was “an outstanding success". Teaching was delivered to
allow the students to take advantage of a world-leading education programme while still functioning
in their roles as key operational public and animal health officials.
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The delivery model consisted of a customised mix of four months face-to-face on-site teaching in
New Zealand and the remaining study conducted via closely supervised Massey online learning.
The Master of Public Health (Biosecurity) graduates are:
• Ru Liu, emergency response programmes specialist, Centre for Disease Control and
Prevention, Liaoning Province.
• Xuelian Li, epidemiology lecturer, China Medical University, Shenyang.
• Xiaoyan Huang, public health policy specialist, Shanghai Municipal Health and Family
Planning Commission.
• Boxi Liu, public health specialist, Centre for Endemic Disease Control and Research, Inner
Mongolia Autonomous Region.
• Jiabing Wu, head of emergency response, Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Anhui
Province.
The Master of Veterinary Medicine (Biosecurity) graduates are:
• Xiaoxue Gu, veterinary diagnostic laboratory specialist, China Animal Disease Control
Centre, Beijing.
• Qingwen Meng, deputy director of the Veterinary Bureau, Xilingol League, Inner Mongolia
Autonomous Region.
• Miaojie Zhang, veterinarian, Surveillance Department, China Animal Disease Control Centre,
Beijing.
• Lin Li, foreign animal disease specialist, China Animal Health and Epidemiology Center,
Qingdao.
The graduation celebration is one of a range of events and activities Mr Maharey and other members
of the Massey delegation will take part in over the next week in Beijing and other cities when they will
meet with a range of university, government, academic and business partners.
Other members of the Massey delegation include One Health project manager Lachlan McIntyre,
international relations director Michael O’Shaughnessy, Agrifood Business director Professor Claire
Massey and Professor Emeritus Roger Morris, the initiator of the One Health programme.
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Links with China to be strengthened by
visit
Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey
Massey University's longstanding connections with China will be strengthened over the next fortnight
as Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey leads a senior delegation to Beijing and other cities to meet a
range of the university's government, academic and business partners.
The visit will include a celebration for Chinese government health workers who completed the Master
of Veterinary Medicine (Biosecurity) and Master of Public Health (Biosecurity) degrees that Massey
developed as part of a World Bank-funded One Health programme.
Mr Maharey was invited by the Chinese Service Centre for Scholarly Exchange to be a keynote
speaker at a China Study Abroad Forum on Friday. He will also speak at the China International
Education Exhibition on Saturday.
On Tuesday, he will attend a celebration at the New Zealand Embassy for the nine Chinese One
Health graduates who took part in the unique programme that integrated veterinary and medical
specialist topics in a single curriculum for the first time as a measure against pandemics.
Mr Maharey says helping countries protect their people and animals from the spread of disease
"addresses one of today’s great national, regional and global issues. The One Health project
showcases Massey University’s strengths as New Zealand’s leading agricultural university and
ranking 19th in the world," he says. "This collaborative programme not only develops the human
capability to manage key global issues of biosecurity, pandemic disease and food safety, but it does
so through a programme that simultaneously builds effective functioning national and regional
intergovernmental networks.”
Other engagements include visits with the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Chinese Academy of
Agricultural Sciences and several key universities partners. He will sign a new collaborative master’s
agreement with Nanjing Agricultural University in Nanjing and meet with the presidents and staff at
Nanjing University of Finance and Economics and the Hebei University of Technology in Tianjin.
Massey’s School of Engineering and Advanced Technology staff already have a strong relationship
with the Hebei University and are discussing a new collaborative Bachelor of Information Science
programme, a project that has funding support from Education New Zealand. It would see Massey
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lecturers teaching part of the programme at in China, with students coming to New Zealand to
complete the final year of study at Massey's Albany campus.
Mr Maharey says the One Health programme and the partnership with Hebei University of
Technology are examples of the Massey University Worldwide brand, launched last month to meet
growing demand from international partners for high-quality programmes delivered outside New
Zealand and online. “We have provided education offshore for many years and this initiative is aimed
at taking our people – their expertise and knowledge – to the rest of the world."
Others in the Massey delegation include School of Engineering and Advanced Technology head
Professor Don Cleland, Agrifood Business director Professor Claire Massey and Professor Emeritus
Roger Morris, the initiator of the One Health programme.
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Diplomatic representatives from numerous nations as well as members of Massey's senior leadership team and
external stakeholders, joined Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey and Tertiary Education Minister Steven Joyce at
the launch of Massey University Worldwide. Back row from left: Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations,
International and University Registrar, Stuart Morriss; Chinese Ambassador HE Wang Lutong; Mr Maharey; Mr
Joyce; Indian High Commissioner HE Ravi Thapar; Brazlian Acting Deputy Head of Mission Egbert de Freitas
Ferreira; Spanish Education Adviser Pablo Mateu García; Education NZ Chief Executive Grant McPherson.
Front Row from left: Vietnamese Ambassador HE Mr Hong Cuong Nguyen; Pakistani High Commissioner HE
Zehra Akbari; Cuban Ambassador HE Maria del Carmen Herrera;Thai Ambassador HE Noppadon Theppitak;
Sri Lankan Honorary Consul Aruna Abeygoonesekera; Assistant Vice-Chancellor Research, Academic and
Enterprise, Professor Brigid Heywood.
Joyce backs Massey Worldwide
Massey University’s plans to develop the international education market under a single banner have
been enthusiastically endorsed by Tertiary Education Minister Steven Joyce.
At a launch function on the Wellington campus for the initiative Massey University Worldwide, Mr
Joyce, who is also Economic Development Minister, made a strong connection between New
Zealand’s economic performance and its international links.
Looking around the room at the gathering of government and corporate representatives, as well as
diplomatic representatives from numerous nations from countries including China, Pakistan, Sri
Lanka and Vietnam, Mr Joyce said the “ambassadorial roll-call acknowledged the efforts being made
[by New Zealand interests] in global education.
“I personally would like to see us become the most linked small country in the world,” he said.
“It is appropriate but necessary that Massey is one of the first to be involved in this globalising trend
in education.”
Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey told guests that Massey already attracts a large number of
international students to New Zealand, but there is a rapidly growing demand for high quality
programmes delivered by an internationally-focused university in their own country.
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Building on its base as one of the first universities in the world to launch distance and online learning,
Mr Maharey said Massey will now expand its teaching and research activity internationally to secure
tertiary education as a major export earner for New Zealand.
“Advances in technology mean a transformational change in education is taking place. There is
enormous growth in demand from students for education from countries that cannot meet that
requirement themselves. Massey is well positioned to meet this demand because of our long history
of online education and our strong relationships with many corporations, governments and
educational institutions developed worldwide over many years.”
Massey already provides online, face-to-face and distance education to a number of international
partners including: the MBA programme to Qatar Airways pilots which has been tailored to have an
aviation focus; a $10m World-Bank funded project working with public health specialists, biosecurity
experts and veteriarians in South Asia to better manage the spread of animal-to-human diseases;
and development of a Spanish language programme taught online for Australian students enrolled at
the University of New England (UNE) in Armidale, New South Wales, with tutorials run at UNE.
Mr Maharey said the university will now take up the opportunity to increase its high quality, niche
educational offering to overseas students in the university’s key areas of expertise such as
agriculture, business studies, emergency management and design.
It would also look to further develop on-line programmes to suit international students studying
overseas; work with New Zealand businesses seeking to expand offshore through capability building;
bid for more internationally-funded research projects and make use of emerging technology and
innovative delivery platforms – like Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) – to extend the
university’s international reach and profile, he said.
“We have provided education offshore for many years and this initiative is aimed at taking our
people, their expertise and knowledge to the rest of the world. Using new technology we now have
the technology, the experience and faculty to deliver our programmes anywhere anytime.”
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Massey rated top employer in NZ
education sector
Massey University has been ranked as the New Zealand education sector's most attractive employer
brand for the second time.
Employer branding and recruitment agency Randstad uses research company ICMA International to
conduct a survey of 160,000 respondents in 14 countries, including 7000 New Zealanders, who were
asked to rate employers by 17 factors, including the financial health of the organisation, management
and leadership, job security, career progression opportunities, learning and development
opportunities, work-life balance, environmental and social awareness, salaries and benefits, and
quality products and services.
Assistant Vice-Chancellor People and Organisational Development Alan Davis, who received the
education sector award on Massey's behalf at a function in Auckland last night, says the award
shows the widespread recognition Massey has as a genuine New Zealand brand.
"Our own survey of staff last year showed Massey has much to be proud of as an employer," Mr
Davis says, "but it also showed us there are many areas in which we need to do better and those are
very much front of mind for our senior management. Public perception undoubted reflects the fact
that our staff and stakeholders hold us in high regard and speak positively about us. That doesn't
mean we cannot find ways to improve in all of the areas we were rated in for this survey."
Other finalists in the education sector category were the University of Auckland and the University of
Otago. The overall winner was Television New Zealand. In the overall rankings, Massey was 11th
this year, down from fifth last year.
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Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey, Assistant Vice-Chancellor Māori and Pasifika Dr Selwyn Katene and
Callaghan Innovation chief executive Dr Mary Quin plant a southern rātā tree.
$22m food tech and engineering upgrade
Massey University today unveiled a $22 million upgrade of the Manawatū campus Riddet Complex,
its base for food technology and engineering.
The major revamp is a significant step in the planned $250 million investment into Food HQ, a
research collaboration between Massey and other big stakeholders in the agri-food business that
have combined to help boost the annual value of New Zealand’s food exports to $60 billion by 2025.
University Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey says the investment in research and teaching spaces,
including state-of-the-art laboratories and a food Pilot plant, shows Massey's commitment to solving
one of the big global issues – sustainable food production.
"Agriculture and the science and innovation behind food production are areas of specialisation in
which Massey University is an acknowledged world leader and has been for our 50-year history," Mr
Maharey says. "The students who come to Massey are all part of a project, in this case a project of
vital importance to the New Zealand economy, to the public good and to the global issue of providing
healthy food to rapidly-growing populations."
FoodHQ general manager Mark Ward says the complex is an integral building in New Zealand’s first
food super campus. “It’s significant to Massey University but also to New Zealand because we
always envisaged it as an open-access facility for other industry partners,” Mr Ward says.
Guest speaker at the opening was Callaghan Innovation chief executive Dr Mary Quin. Callaghan is
a Crown entity established to promote higher value exports, greater productivity and a stronger and
more sustainable New Zealand economy. It uses government funding of more than $140 million a
year to connect scientists, engineers, technologists and businesses.
Dr Quin congratulated Massey on its investment into innovation and collaboration. “This complex is a
significant statement of belief about the future of New Zealand. We look forward to partnering with
Massey as it makes breakthroughs and helping bring those ideas and innovations into the market,”
Dr Quin says.
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Massey professor of mechatronics Olaf Diegel also gave seminar on the future of 3D printing and the
ability to use that additive manufacturing technology to make houses and even body parts.
The complex is home to parts of the Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health and the School of
Engineering and Advanced Technology, both part of the University's College of Sciences.
Reconstruction of the complex started in 2006 and included the development of the Food Pilot plant,
microbrewery and several state-of-the-art labs and shared spaces.
Massey is celebrating 50 years of heritage in food technology, with the Riddet complex first occupied
in 1965 and named after Professor William Riddet, a founding father of the University with Sir
Geoffrey Peren.
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Bachelor of AgriCommerce student Kate Fallaver
Science space nominated for international
award
Science laboratories at Massey University's Manawatū campus have been shortlisted in the
laboratory-related teaching and learning category in this year's international S-Lab awards, run from
Britain.
Massey University is one of only two Australasian universities shortlisted for the awards that will be
presented at the "Supporting World Class Science" conference in London in September.
The nomination is for a “total re-think of how teaching lab space and equipment is managed and
tailored to a variety of disciplines". The shared science laboratory space can accommodate students
dissecting specimens, analysing soil samples or analysing biological signals using physiology
software, virtually simultaneously within a single day.
College of Sciences facility manager, Mr Brian Best, says the $4.6 million reconstruction of the
laboratories involved a complete culture change. “We’re optimising the use of the laboratory space
by shifting to a more collaborative approach between disciplines that is allowing teachers and
students to share knowledge and resources.”
The rebuild was completed in 2010 and the facilities now support disciplines including zoology,
ecology, plant science, seed science, horticulture, animal science, environmental science,
physiology, anatomy, soil and earth sciences, human bioscience, education and vet science.
The S-Lab Conference and Awards are described as a unique initiative to create better linkages
between, and highlight best practice amongst, all the key players involved in laboratory design,
operation and management. They originated in tertiary education but have growing involvement by
public sector and commercial laboratories and suppliers, and are organised by the S-Lab (safe,
successful, sustainable laboratories) initiative.
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Original Albany staff members cutting the cake (from left to right): Mrs Gabrielle Graham, Dr Nitha
Palakshappa, Professor Michael Belgrave, Dr Elanor Rimoldi and Associate Professor Grant Duncan
Cupcakes and confetti for Albany 21st
celebrations
One thousand cupcakes were supplied to staff and students
Massey University's Albany campus kicked off celebrations for its 21st birthday with 1000 cupcakes
and a chocolate cake that covered a square metre.
Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey welcomed the large crowd at Student Central, and paid tribute to the
visionary people who purchased the site all those years ago.
48
Appendix XVII
C 14/43 - May
Part I
“This University is 50 years old as a university. Twenty-one years ago it was an extremely bold
decision by Sir Neil Waters and the council and staff of the time to say ‘Let’s start a university here in
what is going to be the most growing, dynamic part of New Zealand’ – and that has proved to be true.
“Vision is part of what we’re looking back on today, and the braveness of the people who could see
something that was going to happen here that’s quite special. They wanted this to be the university
that could take this community forward.
“Twenty-one years later, we’re looking around this campus, which is currently half-built. Building will
continue; the accommodation is going up and we have plans for other buildings on this campus as
we grow over the next few years. We’re here to stay. We’re the local university."
After a rousing rendition of “Happy Birthday” was topped off by confetti cannons, the chocolate cake,
donated by Mozaik Café, was cut by five original Albany staff members. It was then sliced up and
handed out, along with the cupcakes, to waiting students and staff. Student life coordinator Sarah
Francis had spent the previous evening cutting each of the cupcake icing circles by hand.
For more information on the other celebrations planned for 2014 visit the website.
Related articles
Tiritea House re-opens for Massey’s Jubilee year
2014 academic start marks 50 years of Massey University
49
C14/44 – March
Part I
MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL
COUNCIL COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS – 2014
2 May 2014
Purpose
The purpose of this paper is to make recommendations on the establishment of a
Finance Committee and the appointment of members to the Council committees for
2014 and
Background
The Terms of Reference for Council committees define the membership of each
committee and the process for their appointment.
Committees consist of ex officio members and members appointed by Council or in
the case of the Honorary Awards committee by both Council and the Academic
Board. The Chancellor and Pro Chancellor are ex-officio members of the Audit and
Risk, Honorary Awards and the Performance Review Committees and the Chancellor,
Pro Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor and the Chairs of the Audit and Risk and
Performance Review Committees are ex-officio members of the Governance
Committee.
It is proposed that a new Finance Committee be established. While Terms of
Reference have yet to be established but it is suggested that the Pro Chancellor is not
an ex-officio member of this committee. As a discussive and issues based committee a
small membership is considered to be desirable.
As in previous years, the Executive Secretary has polled Council members on their
interest in Council committee membership and I have consulted with existing
committee about skill mixes. Council composition is not expected to change
substantially this year. The committees continue to work well and most members’
preferences reflect the status quo.
Recommendations
It is recommended that Council approve the following appointments to Council
committees:
Page 1 of 2
C14/44 – March
Part I
1. Audit and Risk
Appoint the following members for a term of one year:
o
o
o
o
o
Ms Kura Denness (Chair) (current member)
Mr Alistair Scott (current member)
Prof Tony Signal (current member)
Professor Cynthia White (new member)
Ms Lesley Whyte (current member)
2. Finance Committee
Appoint the following members for a term of one year:
o
o
o
o
Dr Russ Ballard
Fiona Coote (new member)
Mr Colin Harvey
Mr Ben Vanderkolk
2. Honorary Awards
Reaffirm the following Council appointees:
o Mr Bruce Ullrich (current member) - casual vacancy ends 2 December
2013 – new three year term from 3 December 2013 to 2 December
2016
o Ms Fiona Coote (appointed for three year term - current member) –
term ends 3 March 2014 - new three year term from 4 March 2014 to 3
March 2017
3. Performance Review
Appoint the following members for a term of one year:
o Mr Ben Vanderkolk (current member)
o Dr Russ Ballard (had been ex-officio as Chancellor)
o Ms Lesley Whyte (new member)
4. Governance
Appoint the following members for a term of one year:
o Associate Professor Grant Duncan (current member)
Chris Kelly
Chancellor
22 April 2014
Page 2 of 2
C14/45 – March
Part I
MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL
CHANCELLOR’S REPORT –
REVISED COUNCIL AND COMMITTEE MEETING SCHEDULE
2 May 2014
Purpose
The purpose of this paper is to approve a Finance Committee, new committee of Council and
to note changes to the Council Committee meeting schedule 2014.
Proposal
Council meetings
It had been proposed to reduce Council meetings by one per year but the timing of Council
business does not currently make this possible. Full Council will continue to meet face-toface six times a year (March, May, July, September, October and December). Four meetings
will be in Palmerston North, one in Wellington and one in Albany.
Finance Committee
Following feedback from Council members it was agreed that a new Finance Committee
should be established. This would be a discussive and issues based committee. It would meet
face-to face three times a year, offset from Council meetings as follows:
• March: to consider the annual accounts prior to approval by the Audit and Risk
Committee in April and the forecasts for the year;
• Mid-year: to review progress against forecast;
• Mid-October: to review the following year’s Operating and Capital Budgets prior to
them coming to the full Council for review in October.
Meeting dates for the remainder of 2014 will need to be scheduled individually. When the
Council and Committee meeting schedule is established for 2015 the dates going forward will
be decided at this time. Terms of Reference will need to be established.
Audit and Risk Committee
Instead of meeting prior to the Council meetings these meetings would also be offset from the
Council meetings. They would meet face-to-face or videoconference four or five times a year
to best consider internal, external and risk matters including in April to approve the Annual
Accounts and Statement of Service Performance under the delegated authority of Council.
Page 1 of 2
C14/45 – March
Part I
Meeting dates for the remainder of 2014 will need to be adjusted individually. When the
Council and Committee meeting schedule is established for 2015 the dates going forward will
be decided at this time.
Honorary Awards, Performance Review and Governance committees
The Honorary Awards, Performance Review and Governance committees would continue to
meet as scheduled.
Council Strategy Session
A full one day Council strategy session will continue to be and in 2014 this is to be changed
from the scheduled 4 September 2014 to 3 July 2014 to enable possible strategic decisions to
be included in the 2015 budget.
Please find attached a draft Council and Council committee meeting plan.
Recommendations
It is recommended that Council:
1. Approve the formation of a Finance Committee of Council and the development of its
Terms of Reference; and
2. Note changes to the Council Committee meeting schedule
Chris Kelly, Chancellor
Steve Maharey, Vice-Chancellor
22 April 2014
Page 2 of 2
PROPOSED COUNCIL AND COUNCIL COMMITTEE MEETING SCHEDULE
Meeting
Council
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
Tele
Tele
August
September October
November
Tele
Tele
Audit & Risk
Committee
Finance
Committee
Honorary
Awards
Committee
Governance
Committee
Tele
As and
when
required
Performance
Review
Committee
Council
Strategy Day
Chancellor - 2014
Tele
December
C14/47 – May
Part I
COUNCIL
REVISED INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY POLICY
2 May 2014
1.
REASON FOR REPORT
This policy was extensively reviewed in 2011, with full consultation. However, further
amendments are now required to ensure that the status of software is captured and to
clarify Intellectual Property ownership of student work used in promotions and
competitions.
2.
BACKGROUND
The review of the Policy is part of the Council’s review schedule.
3.
PROPOSAL
The proposed amendments are outlined in the attached document.
4.
IMPLICATIONS
There are no financial or HR implications.
5.
CONSULTATION
This paper has undergone consultation through the College Review Group, College Boards,
the Tertiary Education Union, the Students’ Associations and the University Research
Committee and Academic Board. The comments and feedback from these fora have been
incorporated into the policy. Legal advice on the proposed changes has also been sought.
6.
COMMUNICATION
The revised Policy will replace the existing version.
7.
AUTHORITY TO APPROVE
The proposed amendments to the Intellectual Property Policy as detailed in Appendix 1 are
forwarded to Council to consider and approve in line with their terms of reference which
state Council has responsibility to:
Page 1 of 2
Consider, approve and/or adopt:
Changes to existing or introduction of new academic policies and procedures.
8.
RECOMMENDATIONS
It is recommended that the Council:
8.1
Approve the amended Intellectual Property Policy (Appendix 2) as recommended
by Academic Board.
Professor Brigid Heywood
Assistant Vice-Chancellor Research, Academic & Enterprise
23rd April 2014
Page 2 of 2
Massey University Policy Guide
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY POLICY
Section
Research
Contact
Office of AVC Research, Academic
and Enterprise
Last Review
May 2011November 2013
Next Review
May 2013November 2016
Approval
Council
Purpose:
To ensure that Intellectual Property Rights generated by Massey University Staff and Students are used to maximise
the flow of benefits to the community, enhance the reputation and wealth of the University, encourage Staff and
Students to benefit from their commercially viable activities and to protect the rights of Staff, Students and the
University where Intellectual Property Rights are concerned.
Policy:
The Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research, Academic & Enterprise) is the custodian of the University’s Intellectual
Property Policy and is the University’s delegated agent for all of the University’s rights and obligations under this
Policy. All matters involving Intellectual Property Rights in which the University has an interest, must be directed
through the office of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research, Academic & Enterprise) unless exempted in this Policy
or otherwise agreed by this Office (See Schedule 1);
In general, the University claims legal and beneficial ownership of all Intellectual Property Rights generated under the
auspices of the University. However, Staff and Students retain ownership of copyright and other rights (as identified in
this policy) in certain works but grant a licence to the University on the terms specified in the policy. The Assistant
Vice-Chancellor (Research, Academic & Enterprise) will endeavour to ensure that claims are clearly recognised and
attributed fairly to the parties (e.g. Staff, Students, the University) in which an interest is held (See Schedule 2);
Staff and Students are bound by obligations of confidentiality in relation to Intellectual Property Rights or any other
commercially sensitive information (either that which the University and/or a third party has an interest) they become
aware of during their work or study at the University. Except as expressly stated in this Policy, where Staff or Students
create Intellectual Property Rights which may be of commercial interest to the University, they will formally notify (in
confidence and at the earliest practicable opportunity) the Commercial Office (See Schedule 3);
The Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research, Academic & Enterprise) (or delegated agent) will normally contract the
Commercial Office who will evaluate notified Intellectual Property Rights and make a decision, within a prescribed or
agreed period of time, as to whether to pursue Commercialisation. Where the Commercial Office decides not to
exploit the Intellectual Property Rights, the Staff and/or Students involved can apply to have all ownership rights
assigned to them (See Schedule 4);
The Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research, Academic & Enterprise) will take all reasonable steps necessary to fairly
and transparently allocate the benefits of Intellectual Property Rights to all parties with an interest (See Schedule 5);
© This Policy is the property of Massey University
Massey University Policy Guide
Intellectual Property Policy – Page 2
Students are subject to most of the rights and obligations of Staff for the purposes of this Policy. Relevant academic
staff and the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research, Academic & Enterprise) are required to take special care to ensure
that the interests and academic progress of students are protected (See Schedule 6);
Where Intellectual Property Rights are directly related to Maori Māori Language Resources or derived from any Maori
Māori Traditional Knowledge, the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research, Academic & Enterprise) must notify the
Assistant Vice-Chancellor Maori Māori & PacificPasifika if and when it decides to proceed with Commercialisation
(See Schedule 7);
Contracts with third parties will take precedence over this Policy. In negotiating contracts between the University and
third parties, the Assistant Vice-Chancellor and Commercial Office will endeavour to negotiate intellectual property
clauses which are consistent with this Policy. (See Schedule 8);
Exceptions – Written signed Agreements between the University and the Students concerning intellectual property
rights shall apply to Student Works defined in the Agreement concerned and not this Policy. When a Student’s Work
is submitted for a competition organised by the University, the rules for that competition shall apply to the Student’s
Work submitted and not this Policy.
The University will take all reasonable steps to resolve any dispute over Intellectual Property Rights between the
University and the applicable Staff and Students. This will be carried out with the assistance of an independent third
party if necessary (See Schedule 9).
Staff and Students that leave the University may be entitled to continue receiving benefits from the Commercialisation
of Intellectual Property Rights (See Schedule 10).
Audience:
Massey University staff, students and other personnel using Massey University facilities and resources.
Relevant Legislation:
Patents Act 1953
Designs Act 1953
Plant Variety Rights Act 1987
Copyright Act 1994
Layout Designs Act 1994
Companies Act 1993
Trade Marks Act 2002
© This Policy is the property of Massey University
Massey University Policy Guide
Intellectual Property Policy – Page 3
Legal Compliance
All research practice must comply with relevant legislation. Guidance can be obtained from the Law Guide available
on-line at http://policyguide.massey.ac.nz/
Related Procedures:
Definitions and Schedules for Intellectual Property Policy (see below)
Research Practice Policy (Responsible Research Conduct)
Code of Responsible Research Conduct and Procedures for dealing with Research Misconduct
Conflict of Commitment and Interest Policy
Research and Consultancy Activity Proposals Policy
Matua Reo Kaupapa: Māori Language Policy
Use of Research and Consultancy Funding Policy
Student Contract
Student Work Consent Form
Document Management Control:
Prepared by: Director, Research Management Services
Owned by: Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research, Academic & Enterprise)
Authorised by: Council
Date issued:
Last review: May 2011
Next Review: May 2013November 2016
© This Policy is the property of Massey University
Massey University Policy Guide
Intellectual Property Policy – Page 4
SCHEDULES AND DEFINITIONS
Definitions
Schedule 1:
Schedule 2:
Schedule 3:
Schedule 4:
Schedule 5:
Schedule 6:
Schedule 7:
Schedule 8:
Schedule 9:
Schedule 10:
Authority for Dealing with Intellectual Property Rights
Ownership of Intellectual Property Rights
Disclosure and notification of Intellectual Property Rights
Evaluation of Intellectual Property Rights
Allocating the benefits of IP
Students
Maori Māori Language Resources and Traditional Knowledge
Contracts with Third Parties
Dispute Resolution
Cessation of Employment or Enrolment
Definitions pertaining to the Massey University Policy on Intellectual Property:
Artistic Work means a Scholarly Work or Student Work that has an artistic quality and may include: paintings;
design,; photography drawings; sculptures; literature; poetry; performances; musical works, dramatic works or films
that have any artistic quality.
Commercialisation in relation to any New Intellectual Property Rights, includes:
(a)
the sale, licensing or other transfer of the New Intellectual Property Rights; or
(b)
the use of the New Intellectual Property Rights in relation to the supply of any good or service,
in return for consideration which may include the provision or promise of assets, money, shares or similar. However,
Commercialisation does not include the University’s use of New Intellectual Property Rights in relation to the supply of
teaching or contract research services or the supply of any goods related to those teaching or contract research
services. Commercialise, Commercialising and Commercialisable have corresponding meanings.
Commercial Office means the administrative office or other entity nominated by the Assistant Vice-Chancellor
(Research, Academic & Enterprise) and charged with responsibility for identifying, protecting and Commercialising
Intellectual Property Rights in which the University has an interest.
Confidential Information means information obtained by a Staff member in the course of his or her employment, or
by a Student in the course of his or her enrolment, which the University identifies as confidential, or that could
reasonably be considered to be confidential, to the University or a third party, and includes information:
(a)
relating to any New Intellectual Property Rights created by any Staff or Students;
© This Policy is the property of Massey University
Massey University Policy Guide
Intellectual Property Policy – Page 5
(b)
relating to the actual or proposed Commercialisation of any Intellectual Property Rights by the University,
including the terms of any commercial agreement; or
(c)
provided by, or confidential to, any of the University’s clients, collaborators, licensees, service providers or any
other third party,
but does not include information that is in, or becomes part of, the public domain (other than because of a breach of
this Policy by any Staff or Student) or which the Commercial Office confirms in writing is no longer confidential.
Creator means the Staff member or Student responsible for creating, inventing, developing or conceiving any New
Intellectual Property Right and who has an ownership interest in that New Intellectual Property Right or who, but for
this Policy, any agreement to the contrary or operation of law, would have an ownership interest in that New
Intellectual Property Right.
Intellectual Property Rights means all intellectual property rights whether conferred by statute, at common law or in
equity, including, but not limited to all copyright and similar rights that may subsist in works or other subject matter;
rights in relation to inventions (including all patents and patent applications); trade secrets and know-how; rights in
relation to designs (whether registrable); rights in relation to registered and unregistered trademarks; business names;
and rights in relation to domain names.
Maori Māori Language Resources means any (re)sources written in the Maori Māori Language, Te Reo Maori
New Intellectual Property Rights means all Intellectual Property Rights arising in the course of a Staff member’s
employment, and/or a Student’s enrolment at the University (as the case may be), where the course of employment or
enrolment will be read widely to include all research, development, inventive and/or creative work undertaken by that
Staff member or Student in connection with their employment or enrolment (as the case may be) or otherwise using
University resources as part of their employment or enrolment.
Policy means this Intellectual Property Policy including the Schedules and Definitions.
Scholarly Work means all literary, dramatic, musical or artistic works, sound recordings, films or communication
works produced by a Staff member in the course of his or her employment at the University and includes:
(a)
in relation to a Staff member’s research activities, any scholarly publications including books, text-books,
articles in scholarly journals or conference proceedings or other collections, research reports and book reviews;
and
(b)
in relation to teaching and other activities, any lectures, lecture notes and material, study guides, assessment
materials, images, multi-media presentations, web content and published lectures,
but excludes Software.
Software means protectable computer programs and related programming code, including machine readable object
code and human readable source code, and related documentation.
© This Policy is the property of Massey University
Comment [I1]: Clarifies the issue of
software IP
Massey University Policy Guide
Intellectual Property Policy – Page 6
Staff means persons employed by Massey University under either individual employment contracts or a collective
employment contract.
Student means a person who has enrolled at Massey University in any paper listed in the University Calendar and
who has received a student identity number.
Comment [I2]: Deleted: formally
Student Work means all literary, dramatic, musical or artistic works, sound recordings, films or communication works
produced by a Student in the course of his or her enrolment at the University and includes reports, research papers,
theses, dissertations, books, journal articles, conference papers and book reviews,
but excludes Software.
Traditional Maori Māori Knowledge means a body of knowledge, innovations, and practices generated within Maori
Māori communities and transmitted between generations in oral, written, or electronic form.
University means the tertiary education institution established as a University under the Education Act 1989.
SCHEDULE 1: Authority for Dealing with Intellectual Property Rights
1.
The Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research & Enterprise) is the custodian of this Policy and is the University’s
delegated agent for all of the University’s rights and obligations under this Policy. All matters involving
Intellectual Property Rights in which the University has ana commercial interest must be directed through the
office of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research & Enterprise) unless otherwise provided under this Policy or
directed by the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research & Enterprise)’s office.
2.
Except where expressly permitted under this Policy, no Staff member or Student may apply for in their own
name, assign, license or otherwise deal with, any Intellectual Property Rights in which the University has ana
commercial interest or can reasonably be said to have ana commercial interest, without the written consent of
the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research, Academic & Enterprise).
3.
The Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research, Academic & Enterprise) will normally delegate his or her authority
under this Policy to the Commercial Office to allow for the expeditious use and Commercialisation of New
Intellectual Property Rights by the University in accordance with this Policy.
SCHEDULE 2: Ownership of Intellectual Property Rights
1.
Ownership of New Intellectual Property Rights:
© This Policy is the property of Massey University
Comment [I3]: Deleted: under the
Massey University Act 1963 and the
Education Amendment Act 1990
Comment [I4]: The focus of this policy
is on commercial interest for clarity
Massey University Policy Guide
Intellectual Property Policy – Page 7
1.1
2.
Each Creator agrees that the legal and beneficial ownership of all New Intellectual Property Rights he
or she creates vests in the University on creation except:
(i)
in relation to copyright in Scholarly Works which is addressed under clause 2.1 of this
Schedule;
(ii)
in relation to copyright in Student Works, which is addressed under clause 2.2 of this Schedule;
(iii)
in relation to moral rights, which are addressed in clause 3 of this Schedule;
(iv)
where otherwise agreed in writing by the Commercial Office.
1.2
Where required by the Commercial Office, Creators must promptly complete and sign all
documentation required by the Commercial Office to give effect to clause 1.1 of this Schedule.
1.3
Ownership of any New Intellectual Property Rights developed by a Creator that the Commercial Office
notifies the Creator are not considered Commercialisable under Schedule 4, may be assigned to the
Creator in accordance with clause 3 of Schedule 4.
Scholarly Works and Student Works:
2.1
2.2
Each Staff member:
(i)
retains copyright (but no other Intellectual Property Rights) in his or her Scholarly Work;
(ii)
grants the University a non-exclusive, royalty free, irrevocable, transferable perpetual license to
use, modify and reproduce his or her Scholarly Works for research and teaching purposes;
(iii)
must not assign or license copyright in his or her Scholarly Work to any other university or
tertiary education institute other than in accordance with clause 2.1(iv) or with the Commercial
Office’s prior written agreement; and
(iv)
must not use his or her Scholarly Work to provide any course at any other university or tertiary
education institute during the term of his or her employment, other than as reasonably required
as part of that Staff member’s overseas duties, study leave, secondment or similar visit to that
university or tertiary education institute approved by the relevant Head of Department for that
Staff member.
Each Student:
(i)
retains copyright (but no other Intellectual Property Rights) in his or her Student Work; and
(ii)
grants the University a non-exclusive, royalty free, irrevocable, transferable perpetual license to
use, modify and reproduce such Student Work for the University’s research and teaching
purposesteaching, research and promotional purposes.
© This Policy is the property of Massey University
Comment [I5]: Deleted: and
Massey University Policy Guide
Intellectual Property Policy – Page 8
3.
2.3
Notwithstanding clauses 2.1 and 2.2 above, Staff and Students must comply with their confidentiality
obligations relating to Scholarly Works and Student Works, including those set out in Schedule 3 of
this Policy.
2.4
Nothing in this policy requires that a Staff member or Student share with the University any
consideration he or she derives from the licensing or other Commercialisation of any copyright held by
that Staff member or Student.
Moral rights and modification
3.1
The University recognises moral rights held by Creators in their works under the Copyright Act 1994,
including the right of fair attribution of authorship and the need for work not to be modified or used in
such a way that it harms the Creator’s reputation.
3.2
The University will use its reasonable endeavours to assist Creators in asserting their moral rights in
Scholarly Works or Student Works in cases where clear breaches of accepted academic conventions
occur.
3.3
In exercising the rights granted under clause 2.1(ii) or 2.2(ii) of this Schedule, the University will use
its reasonable endeavours to ensure that any modification it makes to any Scholarly Work or Student
Work:
(i)
any modification it makes to any Scholarly Work or Student Work does not harm the Creator’s
reputation; and
(ii)
is limited to the extent that modification is necessary for the University’s purposes; and
(iii)
does not in its opinion prejudice the creative integrity of that work.
SCHEDULE 3: Disclosure and notification of Intellectual Property Rights
1.
Where a Creator develops, creates, or conceives (whether totally or in part) any New Intellectual Property Right
that is related to the business of Massey University in any way and/or that may be of commercial interest to the
University, he or she must discuss that New Intellectual Property Right with a senior representative of the
Commercial Office as soon as practicable and must complete and return to the Commercial Office a
confidential notification about that New Intellectual Property Right, unless the Commercial Office agrees in
writing that the confidential notification is not required. The notification must include sufficient information for the
Commercial Office to understand the New Intellectual Property Right and to assess its commercial potential.
2.
If a Creator is not sure whether to have discussion with, or notify, the Commercial Office about any New
Intellectual Property Right under clause 1 of this Schedule, he or she should consult the head of his or her
academic unit or supervisor. If any doubt remains, the Creator must discuss the New Intellectual Property
Right with the Commercial Office and notify the Commercial Office about the New Intellectual Property Right in
accordance with clause 1 of this Schedule.
© This Policy is the property of Massey University
Comment [I6]: Deleted: research and
teaching
Massey University Policy Guide
Intellectual Property Policy – Page 9
3.
A confidential register of notifications submitted under this Schedule will be maintained by the Commercial
Office.
4.
Staff members or Students must not use or disclose Confidential Information for any unauthorised purpose.
Where a Staff member or Student knows (or should reasonably know) that the University owes another party an
obligation of confidentiality in relation to any information, he or she will comply with that obligation.
5.
Staff members and Students must keep confidential all New Intellectual Property Rights developed at the
University that are notified (or should be notified) to the Commercial Office under this Policy. Without limitation,
this means they must not submit or publish any academic abstracts or other publications, make any conference
presentations, release press articles or otherwise disclose or use such New Intellectual Property Rights without
the written approval of the Commercial Office. Such use or disclosure may prejudice the patentability and
commercial potential of those New Intellectual Property Rights. This requirement is in addition to the
requirements of the University’s Thesis Embargo policy. The University will comply with its obligations under
Schedule 6 of this Policy in relation to Students’ obligations under this paragraph.
6.
When a Staff member or Student is considering publishing or commercialising material that can be reasonably
said to relate directly to Maori Māori Language Resources or to be derived from any Maori Māori Traditional
Knowledge they must notify the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Maori Māori & PacificPasifika) as well as the
Commercial Office as soon as is practicable and before a decision is made to submit for publication or before
they complete and return a confidential notification form to the Commercial Office.
SCHEDULE 4: Evaluation of Intellectual Property Rights
1.
Determination by the Commercial Office as to the viability of Commercialisation
1.1
2.
The Commercial Office will use its best efforts to assess the commercial potential of any New
Intellectual Property Right within three months of receiving all relevant information relating to that New
Intellectual Property Right.
Notice of determination by the Commercial Office
© This Policy is the property of Massey University
Massey University Policy Guide
Intellectual Property Policy – Page 10
2.1
The Commercial Office will promptly advise the Creator(s) of any decision it makes to proceed with
Commercialisation or not or where it decides to defer that decision.
2.2
Where the Commercial Office decides to pursue Commercialisation of any New Intellectual Property
Right:
(i)
it will have discretion in relation to seeking patent protection and negotiating and entering into
commercial agreements;
(ii)
it will advise the Creator(s) on progress, but will not need consent from the Creator(s) in relation
to such activities; and
(iii)
the Creator(s) will:
(a)
(b)
3.
provide all reasonable assistance to the Commercial Office including providing
information and advice, assisting with due diligence, attending meetings and executing
required documentation; and
assign to the University copyright in all Student Works or Scholarly Works (as applicable)
that are part of or directly related to the New Intellectual Property Right that the
Commercial Office wishes to Commercialise solely to the extent that the Commercial
Office considers on reasonable grounds that the copyright in such works is, or will be,
required for the purpose of Commercialisation.
Unwanted IP
3.1
3.2
Where the Commercial Office notifies the Creator(s) that it does not wish to Commercialise any New
Intellectual Property Right ,or continue to commercialise any new IP Right, the Creator(s) may request
that the New Intellectual Property Right be transferred to him, her or them. The continuation of the
dissemination embargo would then be at the discretion of the Creator(s). That transfer will then be
negotiated with the Commercial Office in good faith and in a timely manner. The Commercial Office
may require some form of consideration for that transfer, including (for example) ongoing royalty
payments or the provision of an ongoing licence back to the University for research and teaching
purposes or both. However, the Commercial Office must not unreasonably withhold its consent to a
transfer or seek to impose unreasonable consideration obligations or other conditions in relation to
any transfer under this clause 3.1.
Without limiting the Commercial Office’s discretion, the Commercial Office may decide not to assign
any New Intellectual Property Right to the Creator(s) where:
© This Policy is the property of Massey University
Comment [I7]: This clause needs a
statement to say the dissemination embargo
is lifted as soon as IP is deemed unwanted.
Comment [I8]: Sufficient time needs to
be available for the Creator to pursue
commercialization if the University decides
to discontinue commercialisation.
Massey University Policy Guide
Intellectual Property Policy – Page 11
(i)
that New Intellectual Property Right arose out of, or is closely related to, any ongoing research
or development work at the University and the Commercial Office wishes to assess the future
outputs from that research or development work before determining whether or not to assign
any New Intellectual Property Right to the Creator(s); or
(ii)
the Commercial Office can demonstrate that any use or disclosure of the New Intellectual
Property may:
(a)
endanger public safety;
(b)
prejudice the teaching and research activities of the University; or
(c)
prejudice the commercialisation of any other Intellectual Property by the University or its
clients, licensees or collaborators.
SCHEDULE 5: Allocating the benefits of IP
1.
Revenue and costs
1.1
1.2
Subject to the terms of this Policy or any applicable agreement, the Commercial Office will treat both
Staff and Students fairly and equitably in any negotiations under clause 2 of this Schedule.
In relation to any period, “Net Revenue” means (subject to clause 1.3 of this Schedule) all Revenue
received by the University in relation to New Intellectual Property Rights in that period less all Costs
that have not yet been recovered by the University as at the end of the period, where:
(i)
“Revenue” includes:
(a)
all royalties, licence fees or other cash consideration from the licensing, assignment or
other Commercialisation of the New Intellectual Property Rights; and
(b)
where the University acquires shares in return for the licensing, assignment or other
Commercialisation of New Intellectual Property Rights (which may include the creation of
a new entity), all cash revenue received as distributions or from the sale of such shares,
but does not include research funding received in relation to the licensing, assignment or other
Commercialisation of the New Intellectual Property Rights; and
(ii)
“Costs” include:
(a)
costs and expenses incurred by the University in the development of the applicable New
Intellectual Property Rights as evidenced by written records of the University following
discussions between the relevant Head of Department or Head of College and the
Commercial Office;
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(b)
(c)
(d)
1.3
Subject to clause 1.4, when offsetting Costs against Revenue to determine Net Revenue, the
University on the recommendation of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research, Academic &
Enterprise) may first off set its own Costs (including Costs of the Commercial Office) then offset Costs
of the applicable College in which the Creators were employed or enrolled.
1.4
In relation to any period, the Commercial Office may decide to spread Costs over both current and
expected future Revenue. Where it does so:
1.5
2.
all costs and expenses incurred by the Commercial Office directly in relation to the
Commercialisation of New Intellectual Property Rights;
all external costs and expenses incurred by the University directly in relation to the
Commercialisation of the New Intellectual Property Rights including all legal, accounting
and other consultancy costs, all patent protection, defence and enforcement costs and all
other costs and liabilities arising from any action or proceedings in contract or tort
relating to the Commercialisation of the New Intellectual Property Rights, including
(without limitation) all collection costs; and
any penalties or third party liabilities incurred by the University in relation to the New
Intellectual Property Rights or its Commercialisation.
(i)
only the portion (determined by the Commercial Office) of Costs that have not been recovered
by the University as at the end of that period will be off set against Revenue received in that
period;
(ii)
any Net Revenue that thereby arises in that period will be allocated in accordance with clause 2
of this Schedule; and
(iii)
unless the Commercial Office determines otherwise, at least the same portion of Costs that
have not been recovered by the University at the end of any future period will be off set against
Revenue in that future period until all Costs are recovered by the University.
Any Creator that has a right to any Net Revenue under this Policy may, by written notice and no more
frequently than once every 12 months, appoint a registered accountant to audit the University’s
records at a time reasonably convenient for the University for the sole purpose of validating any Net
Revenue payments paid or payable to that Creator. The Creator will meet the full costs of any audit
provided that the University will refund those costs where the audit reveals a discrepancy in total
payments of more than 5%.
Allocation of Net Revenue
2.1
Each year, the University will allocate a percentage of Net Revenue received in that year in
accordance with this clause. The percentage of Net Revenue allocated to the Creator(s) and the
applicable College and the percentage retained by the University will depend on the total cumulative
value of Net Revenue received by the University over the life of the Commercialisation up to the date
of the allocation, as follows:
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Cumulative Net Revenue
(over life of Commercialisation)
3.
Creator(s)
College
University
$1 to $15,000
100%
0%
0%
$15,001 to $50,000
50%
25%
25%
More than $50,000
30%
35%
35%
2.2
Where there is more than one Creator, their percentage of Net Revenue set out above will be shared
equally between them, unless they have otherwise agreed in writing.
2.3
Where a Creator(s) has been allocated shares under clause 3 of this Schedule:
(i)
that Creator(s) will not be entitled, under this clause 2, to any Net Revenue from revenue
received by the University in relation its shareholding, including revenue received by the
University from distributions, share sales or similar;
(ii)
half of the portion of Net Revenue that would otherwise have been allocated to that Creator(s)
will be allocated to the College and half will be retained by the University; and
(iii)
if, in relation to the same New Intellectual Property Rights, another Creator(s) has not been
allocated shares, the Commercial Office may enter an agreement with that Creator(s) to set out
the appropriate allocation of Net Revenue to that Creator(s). That allocation must recognise
the reduction of the University’s Revenue from distributions and share sales resulting from the
other Creator(s)’ shareholding.
Allocation of shares to Staff and Students
3.1
In some circumstances, the Commercial Office and the Creator(s) may agree that it is appropriate for
the Creator(s) to acquire shares in a company or other entity into which the applicable New
Intellectual Property Rights have been licensed or assigned. In such circumstances the Creator(s):
(i)
must comply with the Formation of Spin-Out Companies Policy, Conflict of Commitment and
Interest Policy and other relevant University policies;
(ii)
if required, must negotiate and agree an appropriate shareholders’ agreement and constitution
in good faith with the University and other shareholders (as applicable);
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(iii)
acknowledges the intention that the total aggregate value of the Creator(s) initial shareholding
will be no greater than one third of the combined initial shareholding of the University and/or the
Commercial Office and the Creator(s);
(iv)
acknowledges that, for the purpose of attracting and securing external investment or support, it
may be necessary for the Creator(s) to:
(a)
(v)
be issued shares of a certain class and/or to enter into a shareholders’ agreement so
that in any matter that requires unanimous assent or a special resolution of shareholders,
the Creator(s) must either not vote, or (if they do vote) they must vote consistently with
the University; and
(b)
not have a voting position on the applicable company’s or entity’s board of directors; and
acknowledges that the Creator(s) will have no right to any payment or return received by the
University in relation to its shareholding,
provided that it is always open to the Commercial Office and the Creator(s) to negotiate arrangements
outside these parameters in particular cases where the Commercial Office and Creator(s) consider it
appropriate.
4.
General
4.1
Each Creator is responsible for assessing and complying with all tax obligations associated with
benefits allocated to that Creator under this Policy.
4.2
The Commercial Office will advise Creators to obtain independent advice prior to them signing any
shareholders’ agreement or any other agreement relating to any New Intellectual Property Rights.
4.3
Without limiting clause 4.1, where the Commercial Office and a Creator intend to agree on that
Creator acquiring shares under clause 3.1, the University will refund that Creator the direct cost for
first three hours of legal and/or accounting advice he or she receives in relation to that arrangement
provided that:
4.4
(i)
the Creator notifies the Commercial Office before seeking such advice;
(ii)
the Commercial Office agrees that the proposed advice will fall within the scope of this clause;
and
(iii)
the Creator provides an itemised invoice or other evidence of the actual costs incurred by the
Creator in relation to that advice.
Where any New Intellectual Property Right is licensed or assigned to a wholly owned subsidiary of the
University, that subsidiary will be treated as part of the University for the purpose of this Schedule,
including the determination of Net Revenue.
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SCHEDULE 6: Students
1.
Subject to written signed agreements with Students concerning intellectual property rights, and subject to rules
for competitions held by Massey University, where Students are involved in activities that could lead to the
development of New Intellectual Property Rights, the following conditions will apply:
1.1
participation in the research should not interfere with the assessment of the Student’s academic
performance;
1.2.
any delays in publication of the Student’s thesis that arise from a confidentiality agreement should be
consistent with the University’s embargo policy or as otherwise agreed by the Assistant Vice
Chancellor Research, Academic & Enterprise; and
1.3
any agreement with a third party should be reached with a view to ensuring that the Student’s rights
under this Policy are maintained as far as practicable.
For competitions and promotions, see the Student Consent Form under Related Procedures, listed on page two
of this document.
SCHEDULE 7: Maori Māori Language Resources and Traditional Knowledge
1.
The University is mindful of its obligations under the Treaty of Waitangi.
2.
The University is also mindful that Maori Māori language is an official language of New Zealand, and of Massey
University.
3.
Where the University has a commercial interest in New Intellectual Property Rights that can reasonably be said
to be directly related to Maori Māori Language Resources or derived from any Maori Māori Traditional
Knowledge, the Commercial Office must notify the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Maori Māori & PacificPasifika) if
and when it decides to proceed with Commercialisation (See Schedule 4 section 2).
4.
Where publication of material that can similarly be reasonably said to relate directly to Maori Māori Language
Resources or to be derived from any Maori Māori Traditional Knowledge, and which has not hitherto been
appropriately acknowledged, the relevant academic manager will notify the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Maori
Māori & PacificPasifika) before a decision is made to submit for publication.
5.
The Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Maori Māori & PacificPasifika) will consider those aspects of Commercialisation
or publication that have implications for Maori Māori intellectual property rights and will endeavour to identify
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Comment [I9]: This clarifies the use of
student work in Massey University
promotions and competitions.
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where those rights properly reside and how the processes of Commercialisation or publication might then
proceed.
6.
In the case of Commercialisation, if the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Maori Māori & PacificPasifika) wishes to
respond, the response must be supplied to the Commercial Office within 21 working days (or otherwise by
mutual agreement) of receiving notification of the matter.
7.
The Commercial Office is obliged to take account of this advice (if tendered) before allowing any transfer,
license or other third party use or Commercialisation of those New Intellectual Property Rights.
SCHEDULE 8: Contracts with Third Parties
1.
In the event of a conflict between this policy and any agreements the University has with a third party, the latter
shall prevail.
2.
The University reserves its right to transfer its Intellectual Property Rights to third parties in accordance with this
Policy, or otherwise, where practicable, following consultation with the Creator(s) of the Intellectual Property
Rights that are still employed by, or enrolled at, the University.
3.
All contracts between the University and third parties which include considerations about Intellectual Property
Rights must include specific clauses defining the ownership of Intellectual Property. The University shall
endeavour to negotiate intellectual property clauses which are consistent with this Policy.
4.
On entering contracts with third parties which include considerations about Intellectual Property Rights, the
Commercial Office will ensure that the applicable Staff and Students are aware of the content of that agreement
to the extent it impacts on those Staff and Students in their employment or enrolment at the University.
5.
When Staff members or Students are to undertake work with considerations about Intellectual Property Rights
at sites controlled by other organisations in the course of their employment or research with the University, the
Staff or Students concerned shall notify the Commercial Office before such work commences. The Commercial
Office will use its best endeavours to negotiate an agreement with the other organisation(s) regarding the
allocation of Intellectual Property Rights created. Such agreement shall be in accordance with this Policy as far
as is possible.
6.
Staff and Students who have been advised of the terms of a contract with a third party must not act (or omit to
act) in any way that may result in the University breaching its obligations under that third party contract.
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SCHEDULE 9: Dispute Resolution
1.
This disputes procedure is available to all Staff and Students having an interest in decisions or processes
relating to the exploitation of Intellectual Property Rights, as described in the Massey University Intellectual
Property Policy to which this procedure is appended as a Schedule.
Procedure
2.
In the event of a dispute arising between persons (including the University itself) having an interest in decisions
or processes relating to the exploitation of Intellectual Property Rights at or by the University, resolution of this
dispute shall be sought in accordance with the following procedure:
2.1
The aggrieved person(s) shall immediately inform the other party or parties to the dispute of their
grievance in writing, and invite them either to remedy the matter complained of or respond to the
grievance within thirty (30) days.
2.2
Should the dispute remain unresolved, all parties shall then seek to settle the matter informally
through discussion or negotiation.
2.3
If no such informal resolution can be reached within a reasonable time
then any party may refer the
matter for compulsory arbitration by a single
arbitrator to be nominated by the President of the
Arbitrators’ and Mediators’ Institute of New Zealand Inc. and such arbitration shall be regarded as
final and binding upon all parties.
2.4
Any party may seek the advice, support, assistance or representation from whomever it chooses in
seeking to resolve the dispute.
SCHEDULE 10: Cessation of Employment or Enrolment
1.
When a Staff member or Student retires, graduates or otherwise leaves the University, without limiting any
other right or obligations he or she may have, that Staff member or Student will continue to be bound by his or
her obligations of confidentiality in relation to information he or she worked on or became aware of while
employed by or enrolled at Massey University.
2.
When a Staff member or Student, who is entitled to an allocation of benefits under Schedule 5, retires,
graduates, dies or otherwise leaves the University while employed by the University or enrolled at the
University, the allocation of benefits will continue after the date of retirement, graduation, death or other
departure (and to the extent necessary, will endure to the benefit of his or her estate) provided that the Staff
member or Student is not in material breach of any Policies of the University. Nothing in this Policy requires
that the University continue any commercial activity that is uneconomic or otherwise not in the interests of the
University. It is always open to the Commercial Office to negotiate arrangements outside these parameters in
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particular cases where the Commercial Office considers it appropriate. Shareholdings already allocated in spin
out companies are not affected by this clause.
3.
It is the responsibility of Staff and Students to ensure that the University is aware of their contact details so the
University is able to make any payments due under this Policy.
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INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY POLICY
Section
Research
Contact
Office of AVC Research, Academic
and Enterprise
Last Review
November 2013
Next Review
November 2016
Approval
Council
Purpose:
To ensure that Intellectual Property Rights generated by Massey University Staff and Students are used to maximise
the flow of benefits to the community, enhance the reputation and wealth of the University, encourage Staff and
Students to benefit from their commercially viable activities and to protect the rights of Staff, Students and the
University where Intellectual Property Rights are concerned.
Policy:
The Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research, Academic & Enterprise) is the custodian of the University’s Intellectual
Property Policy and is the University’s delegated agent for all of the University’s rights and obligations under this
Policy. All matters involving Intellectual Property Rights in which the University has an interest, must be directed
through the office of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research, Academic & Enterprise) unless exempted in this Policy
or otherwise agreed by this Office (See Schedule 1);
In general, the University claims legal and beneficial ownership of all Intellectual Property Rights generated under the
auspices of the University. However, Staff and Students retain ownership of copyright and other rights (as identified in
this policy) but grant a licence to the University on the terms specified in the policy. The Assistant Vice-Chancellor
(Research, Academic & Enterprise) will endeavour to ensure that claims are clearly recognised and attributed fairly to
the parties (e.g. Staff, Students, the University) in which an interest is held (See Schedule 2);
Staff and Students are bound by obligations of confidentiality in relation to Intellectual Property Rights or any other
commercially sensitive information (either that which the University and/or a third party has an interest) they become
aware of during their work or study at the University. Except as expressly stated in this Policy, where Staff or Students
create Intellectual Property Rights which may be of commercial interest to the University, they will formally notify (in
confidence and at the earliest practicable opportunity) the Commercial Office (See Schedule 3);
The Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research, Academic & Enterprise) (or delegated agent) will normally contract the
Commercial Office who will evaluate notified Intellectual Property Rights and make a decision, within a prescribed or
agreed period of time, as to whether to pursue Commercialisation. Where the Commercial Office decides not to
exploit the Intellectual Property Rights, the Staff and/or Students involved can apply to have all ownership rights
assigned to them (See Schedule 4);
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The Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research, Academic & Enterprise) will take all reasonable steps necessary to fairly
and transparently allocate the benefits of Intellectual Property Rights to all parties with an interest (See Schedule 5);
Students are subject to most of the rights and obligations of Staff for the purposes of this Policy. Relevant academic
staff and the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research, Academic & Enterprise) are required to take special care to ensure
that the interests and academic progress of students are protected (See Schedule 6);
Where Intellectual Property Rights are directly related to Māori Language Resources or derived from any Māori
Traditional Knowledge, the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research, Academic & Enterprise) must notify the Assistant
Vice-Chancellor Māori & Pasifika if and when it decides to proceed with Commercialisation (See Schedule 7);
Contracts with third parties will take precedence over this Policy. In negotiating contracts between the University and
third parties, the Assistant Vice-Chancellor and Commercial Office will endeavour to negotiate intellectual property
clauses which are consistent with this Policy. (See Schedule 8);
Exceptions – Written signed Agreements between the University and the Students concerning intellectual property
rights shall apply to Student Works defined in the Agreement concerned and not this Policy. When a Student’s Work
is submitted for a competition organised by the University, the rules for that competition shall apply to the Student’s
Work submitted and not this Policy.
The University will take all reasonable steps to resolve any dispute over Intellectual Property Rights between the
University and the applicable Staff and Students. This will be carried out with the assistance of an independent third
party if necessary (See Schedule 9).
Staff and Students that leave the University may be entitled to continue receiving benefits from the Commercialisation
of Intellectual Property Rights (See Schedule 10).
Audience:
Massey University staff, students and other personnel using Massey University facilities and resources.
Relevant Legislation:
Patents Act 1953
Designs Act 1953
Plant Variety Rights Act 1987
Copyright Act 1994
Layout Designs Act 1994
Companies Act 1993
Trade Marks Act 2002
Legal Compliance
All research practice must comply with relevant legislation. Guidance can be obtained from the Law Guide available
on-line at http://policyguide.massey.ac.nz/
Related Procedures:
Definitions and Schedules for Intellectual Property Policy (see below)
Research Practice Policy (Responsible Research Conduct)
Code of Responsible Research Conduct and Procedures for dealing with Research Misconduct
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Conflict of Commitment and Interest Policy
Research and Consultancy Activity Proposals Policy
Matua Reo Kaupapa: Māori Language Policy
Use of Research and Consultancy Funding Policy
Student Contract
Student Work Consent Form
Document Management Control:
Prepared by: Research Strategy and Policy Manager
Owned by: Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research, Academic & Enterprise)
Authorised by: Council
Date issued:
Last review: May 2011
Next Review: November 2016
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SCHEDULES AND DEFINITIONS
Definitions
Schedule 1:
Schedule 2:
Schedule 3:
Schedule 4:
Schedule 5:
Schedule 6:
Schedule 7:
Schedule 8:
Schedule 9:
Schedule 10:
Authority for Dealing with Intellectual Property Rights
Ownership of Intellectual Property Rights
Disclosure and notification of Intellectual Property Rights
Evaluation of Intellectual Property Rights
Allocating the benefits of IP
Students
Māori Language Resources and Traditional Knowledge
Contracts with Third Parties
Dispute Resolution
Cessation of Employment or Enrolment
Definitions pertaining to the Massey University Policy on Intellectual Property:
Artistic Work means a Scholarly Work or Student Work that has an artistic quality and may include: paintings;
design; photography drawings; sculptures; literature; poetry; performances; musical works, dramatic works or films
that have any artistic quality.
Commercialisation in relation to any New Intellectual Property Rights, includes:
(a)
the sale, licensing or other transfer of the New Intellectual Property Rights; or
(b)
the use of the New Intellectual Property Rights in relation to the supply of any good or service,
in return for consideration which may include the provision or promise of assets, money, shares or similar. However,
Commercialisation does not include the University’s use of New Intellectual Property Rights in relation to the supply of
teaching or contract research services or the supply of any goods related to those teaching or contract research
services. Commercialise, Commercialising and Commercialisable have corresponding meanings.
Commercial Office means the administrative office or other entity nominated by the Assistant Vice-Chancellor
(Research, Academic & Enterprise) and charged with responsibility for identifying, protecting and Commercialising
Intellectual Property Rights in which the University has an interest.
Confidential Information means information obtained by a Staff member in the course of his or her employment, or
by a Student in the course of his or her enrolment, which the University identifies as confidential, or that could
reasonably be considered to be confidential, to the University or a third party, and includes information:
(a)
relating to any New Intellectual Property Rights created by any Staff or Students;
(b)
relating to the actual or proposed Commercialisation of any Intellectual Property Rights by the University,
including the terms of any commercial agreement; or
(c)
provided by, or confidential to, any of the University’s clients, collaborators, licensees, service providers or any
other third party,
but does not include information that is in, or becomes part of, the public domain (other than because of a breach of
this Policy by any Staff or Student) or which the Commercial Office confirms in writing is no longer confidential.
Creator means the Staff member or Student responsible for creating, inventing, developing or conceiving any New
Intellectual Property Right and who has an ownership interest in that New Intellectual Property Right or who, but for
this Policy, any agreement to the contrary or operation of law, would have an ownership interest in that New
Intellectual Property Right.
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Intellectual Property Rights means all intellectual property rights whether conferred by statute, at common law or in
equity, including, but not limited to all copyright and similar rights that may subsist in works or other subject matter;
rights in relation to inventions (including all patents and patent applications); trade secrets and know-how; rights in
relation to designs (whether registrable); rights in relation to registered and unregistered trademarks; business names;
and rights in relation to domain names.
Māori Language Resources means any (re)sources written in the Māori Language, Te Reo Māori
New Intellectual Property Rights means all Intellectual Property Rights arising in the course of a Staff member’s
employment, and/or a Student’s enrolment at the University (as the case may be), where the course of employment or
enrolment will be read widely to include all research, development, inventive and/or creative work undertaken by that
Staff member or Student in connection with their employment or enrolment (as the case may be) or otherwise using
University resources as part of their employment or enrolment.
Policy means this Intellectual Property Policy including the Schedules and Definitions.
Scholarly Work means all literary, dramatic, musical or artistic works, sound recordings, films or communication
works produced by a Staff member in the course of his or her employment at the University and includes:
(a)
in relation to a Staff member’s research activities, any scholarly publications including books, text-books,
articles in scholarly journals or conference proceedings or other collections, research reports and book reviews;
and
(b)
in relation to teaching and other activities, any lectures, lecture notes and material, study guides, assessment
materials, images, multi-media presentations, web content and published lectures,
but excludes Software.
Software means protectable computer programs and related programming code, including machine readable object
code and human readable source code, and related documentation.
Staff means persons employed by Massey University under either individual employment contracts or a collective
employment contract.
Student means a person who has enrolled at Massey University in any paper listed in the University Calendar and
who has received a student identity number.
Student Work means all literary, dramatic, musical or artistic works, sound recordings, films or communication works
produced by a Student in the course of his or her enrolment at the University and includes reports, research papers,
theses, dissertations, books, journal articles, conference papers and book reviews, but excludes Software.
Traditional Māori Knowledge means a body of knowledge, innovations, and practices generated within Māori
communities and transmitted between generations in oral, written, or electronic form.
University means the tertiary education institution established as a University under the Education Act 1989.
SCHEDULE 1: Authority for Dealing with Intellectual Property Rights
1.
The Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research, Academic & Enterprise) is the custodian of this Policy and is the
University’s delegated agent for all of the University’s rights and obligations under this Policy. All matters
involving Intellectual Property Rights in which the University has a commercial interest must be directed through
the office of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research, Academic & Enterprise) unless otherwise provided under
this Policy or directed by the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research & Enterprise)’s office.
2.
Except where expressly permitted under this Policy, no Staff member or Student may apply for in their own
name, assign, license or otherwise deal with, any Intellectual Property Rights in which the University has a
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commercial interest or can reasonably be said to have a commercial interest, without the written consent of the
Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research & Enterprise).
3.
The Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research & Enterprise) will normally delegate his or her authority under this
Policy to the Commercial Office to allow for the expeditious use and Commercialisation of New Intellectual
Property Rights by the University in accordance with this Policy.
SCHEDULE 2: Ownership of Intellectual Property Rights
1.
Ownership of New Intellectual Property Rights:
1.1
2.
Each Creator agrees that the legal and beneficial ownership of all New Intellectual Property Rights he
or she creates vests in the University on creation except:
(i)
in relation to copyright in Scholarly Works which is addressed under clause 2.1 of this
Schedule;
(ii)
in relation to copyright in Student Works, which is addressed under clause 2.2 of this Schedule;
(iii)
in relation to moral rights, which are addressed in clause 3 of this Schedule;
(iv)
where otherwise agreed in writing by the Commercial Office.
1.2
Where required by the Commercial Office, Creators must promptly complete and sign all
documentation required by the Commercial Office to give effect to clause 1.1 of this Schedule.
1.3
Ownership of any New Intellectual Property Rights developed by a Creator that the Commercial Office
notifies the Creator are not considered Commercialisable under Schedule 4, may be assigned to the
Creator in accordance with clause 3 of Schedule 4.
Scholarly Works and Student Works:
2.1
2.2
Each Staff member:
(i)
retains copyright (but no other Intellectual Property Rights) in his or her Scholarly Work;
(ii)
grants the University a non-exclusive, royalty free, irrevocable, transferable perpetual license to
use, modify and reproduce his or her Scholarly Works for research and teaching purposes;
(iii)
must not assign or license copyright in his or her Scholarly Work to any other university or
tertiary education institute other than in accordance with clause 2.1(iv) or with the Commercial
Office’s prior written agreement; and
(iv)
must not use his or her Scholarly Work to provide any course at any other university or tertiary
education institute during the term of his or her employment, other than as reasonably required
as part of that Staff member’s overseas duties, study leave, secondment or similar visit to that
university or tertiary education institute approved by the relevant Head of Department for that
Staff member.
Each Student:
(i)
retains copyright (but no other Intellectual Property Rights) in his or her Student Work; and
(ii)
grants the University a non-exclusive, royalty free, irrevocable, transferable perpetual license to
use, modify and reproduce such Student Work for the University’s teaching, research and
promotional purposes.
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3.
2.3
Notwithstanding clauses 2.1 and 2.2 above, Staff and Students must comply with their confidentiality
obligations relating to Scholarly Works and Student Works, including those set out in Schedule 3 of
this Policy.
2.4
Nothing in this policy requires that a Staff member or Student share with the University any
consideration he or she derives from the licensing or other Commercialisation of any copyright held by
that Staff member or Student.
Moral rights and modification
3.1
The University recognises moral rights held by Creators in their works under the Copyright Act 1994,
including the right of fair attribution of authorship and the need for work not to be modified or used in
such a way that it harms the Creator’s reputation.
3.2
The University will use its reasonable endeavours to assist Creators in asserting their moral rights in
Scholarly Works or Student Works in cases where clear breaches of accepted academic conventions
occur.
3.3
In exercising the rights granted under clause 2.1(ii) or 2.2(ii) of this Schedule, the University will use
its reasonable endeavours to ensure that any modification it makes to any Scholarly Work or Student
Work:
(i)
does not harm the Creator’s reputation; and
(ii)
is limited to the extent that modification is necessary for the University’s purposes; and
(iii)
does not in its opinion prejudice the creative integrity of that work.
SCHEDULE 3: Disclosure and notification of Intellectual Property Rights
1.
Where a Creator develops, creates, or conceives (whether totally or in part) any New Intellectual Property Right
that is related to the business of Massey University in any way and/or that may be of commercial interest to the
University, he or she must discuss that New Intellectual Property Right with a senior representative of the
Commercial Office as soon as practicable and must complete and return to the Commercial Office a
confidential notification about that New Intellectual Property Right, unless the Commercial Office agrees in
writing that the confidential notification is not required. The notification must include sufficient information for the
Commercial Office to understand the New Intellectual Property Right and to assess its commercial potential.
2.
If a Creator is not sure whether to have discussion with, or notify, the Commercial Office about any New
Intellectual Property Right under clause 1 of this Schedule, he or she should consult the head of his or her
academic unit or supervisor. If any doubt remains, the Creator must discuss the New Intellectual Property
Right with the Commercial Office and notify the Commercial Office about the New Intellectual Property Right in
accordance with clause 1 of this Schedule.
3.
A confidential register of notifications submitted under this Schedule will be maintained by the Commercial
Office.
4.
Staff members or Students must not use or disclose Confidential Information for any unauthorised purpose.
Where a Staff member or Student knows (or should reasonably know) that the University owes another party an
obligation of confidentiality in relation to any information, he or she will comply with that obligation.
5.
Staff members and Students must keep confidential all New Intellectual Property Rights developed at the
University that are notified (or should be notified) to the Commercial Office under this Policy. Without limitation,
this means they must not submit or publish any academic abstracts or other publications, make any conference
presentations, release press articles or otherwise disclose or use such New Intellectual Property Rights without
the written approval of the Commercial Office. Such use or disclosure may prejudice the patentability and
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Intellectual Property Policy – Page 8
commercial potential of those New Intellectual Property Rights. This requirement is in addition to the
requirements of the University’s Thesis Embargo policy. The University will comply with its obligations under
Schedule 6 of this Policy in relation to Students’ obligations under this paragraph.
6.
When a Staff member or Student is considering publishing or commercialising material that can be reasonably
said to relate directly to Māori Language Resources or to be derived from any Māori Traditional Knowledge they
must notify the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Māori & Pasifika) as well as the Commercial Office as soon as is
practicable and before a decision is made to submit for publication or before they complete and return a
confidential notification form to the Commercial Office.
SCHEDULE 4: Evaluation of Intellectual Property Rights
1.
Determination by the Commercial Office as to the viability of Commercialisation
1.1
2.
The Commercial Office will use its best efforts to assess the commercial potential of any New
Intellectual Property Right within three months of receiving all relevant information relating to that New
Intellectual Property Right.
Notice of determination by the Commercial Office
2.1
The Commercial Office will promptly advise the Creator(s) of any decision it makes to proceed with
Commercialisation or not or where it decides to defer that decision.
2.2
Where the Commercial Office decides to pursue Commercialisation of any New Intellectual Property
Right:
(i)
it will have discretion in relation to seeking patent protection and negotiating and entering into
commercial agreements;
(ii)
it will advise the Creator(s) on progress, but will not need consent from the Creator(s) in relation
to such activities; and
(iii)
the Creator(s) will:
(a)
(b)
3.
provide all reasonable assistance to the Commercial Office including providing
information and advice, assisting with due diligence, attending meetings and executing
required documentation; and
assign to the University copyright in all Student Works or Scholarly Works (as applicable)
that are part of or directly related to the New Intellectual Property Right that the
Commercial Office wishes to Commercialise solely to the extent that the Commercial
Office considers on reasonable grounds that the copyright in such works is, or will be,
required for the purpose of Commercialisation.
Unwanted IP
3.1
Where the Commercial Office notifies the Creator(s) that it does not wish to Commercialise any New
Intellectual Property Right or continue to commercialise any new IP Right, the Creator(s) may request
that the New Intellectual Property Right be transferred to him, her or them. The continuation of the
dissemination embargo would then be at the discretion of the Creator(s). That transfer will then be
© This Policy is the property of Massey University
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negotiated with the Commercial Office in good faith and in a timely manner. The Commercial Office
may require some form of consideration for that transfer, including (for example) ongoing royalty
payments or the provision of an ongoing licence back to the University for research and teaching
purposes or both. However, the Commercial Office must not unreasonably withhold its consent to a
transfer or seek to impose unreasonable consideration obligations or other conditions in relation to
any transfer under this clause 3.1.
3.2
Without limiting the Commercial Office’s discretion, the Commercial Office may decide not to assign
any New Intellectual Property Right to the Creator(s) where:
(i)
that New Intellectual Property Right arose out of, or is closely related to, any ongoing research
or development work at the University and the Commercial Office wishes to assess the future
outputs from that research or development work before determining whether or not to assign
any New Intellectual Property Right to the Creator(s); or
(ii)
the Commercial Office can demonstrate that any use or disclosure of the New Intellectual
Property may:
(a)
endanger public safety;
(b)
prejudice the teaching and research activities of the University; or
(c)
prejudice the commercialisation of any other Intellectual Property by the University or its
clients, licensees or collaborators.
SCHEDULE 5: Allocating the benefits of IP
1.
Revenue and costs
1.1
1.2
Subject to the terms of this Policy or any applicable agreement, the Commercial Office will treat both
Staff and Students fairly and equitably in any negotiations under clause 2 of this Schedule.
In relation to any period, “Net Revenue” means (subject to clause 1.3 of this Schedule) all Revenue
received by the University in relation to New Intellectual Property Rights in that period less all Costs
that have not yet been recovered by the University as at the end of the period, where:
(i)
“Revenue” includes:
(a)
all royalties, licence fees or other cash consideration from the licensing, assignment or
other Commercialisation of the New Intellectual Property Rights; and
(b)
where the University acquires shares in return for the licensing, assignment or other
Commercialisation of New Intellectual Property Rights (which may include the creation of
a new entity), all cash revenue received as distributions or from the sale of such shares,
but does not include research funding received in relation to the licensing, assignment or other
Commercialisation of the New Intellectual Property Rights; and
(ii)
“Costs” include:
(a)
(b)
(c)
costs and expenses incurred by the University in the development of the applicable New
Intellectual Property Rights as evidenced by written records of the University following
discussions between the relevant Head of Department or Head of College and the
Commercial Office;
all costs and expenses incurred by the Commercial Office directly in relation to the
Commercialisation of New Intellectual Property Rights;
all external costs and expenses incurred by the University directly in relation to the
Commercialisation of the New Intellectual Property Rights including all legal, accounting
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(d)
1.3
Subject to clause 1.4, when offsetting Costs against Revenue to determine Net Revenue, the
University on the recommendation of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research, Academic &
Enterprise) may first off set its own Costs (including Costs of the Commercial Office) then offset Costs
of the applicable College in which the Creators were employed or enrolled.
1.4
In relation to any period, the Commercial Office may decide to spread Costs over both current and
expected future Revenue. Where it does so:
1.5
2.
and other consultancy costs, all patent protection, defence and enforcement costs and all
other costs and liabilities arising from any action or proceedings in contract or tort
relating to the Commercialisation of the New Intellectual Property Rights, including
(without limitation) all collection costs; and
any penalties or third party liabilities incurred by the University in relation to the New
Intellectual Property Rights or its Commercialisation.
(i)
only the portion (determined by the Commercial Office) of Costs that have not been recovered
by the University as at the end of that period will be off set against Revenue received in that
period;
(ii)
any Net Revenue that thereby arises in that period will be allocated in accordance with clause 2
of this Schedule; and
(iii)
unless the Commercial Office determines otherwise, at least the same portion of Costs that
have not been recovered by the University at the end of any future period will be off set against
Revenue in that future period until all Costs are recovered by the University.
Any Creator that has a right to any Net Revenue under this Policy may, by written notice and no more
frequently than once every 12 months, appoint a registered accountant to audit the University’s
records at a time reasonably convenient for the University for the sole purpose of validating any Net
Revenue payments paid or payable to that Creator. The Creator will meet the full costs of any audit
provided that the University will refund those costs where the audit reveals a discrepancy in total
payments of more than 5%.
Allocation of Net Revenue
2.1
Each year, the University will allocate a percentage of Net Revenue received in that year in
accordance with this clause. The percentage of Net Revenue allocated to the Creator(s) and the
applicable College and the percentage retained by the University will depend on the total cumulative
value of Net Revenue received by the University over the life of the Commercialisation up to the date
of the allocation, as follows:
Cumulative Net Revenue
(over life of Commercialisation)
Creator(s)
College
University
$1 to $15,000
100%
0%
0%
$15,001 to $50,000
50%
25%
25%
More than $50,000
30%
35%
35%
2.2
Where there is more than one Creator, their percentage of Net Revenue set out above will be shared
equally between them, unless they have otherwise agreed in writing.
2.3
Where a Creator(s) has been allocated shares under clause 3 of this Schedule:
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3.
(i)
that Creator(s) will not be entitled, under this clause 2, to any Net Revenue from revenue
received by the University in relation its shareholding, including revenue received by the
University from distributions, share sales or similar;
(ii)
half of the portion of Net Revenue that would otherwise have been allocated to that Creator(s)
will be allocated to the College and half will be retained by the University; and
(iii)
if, in relation to the same New Intellectual Property Rights, another Creator(s) has not been
allocated shares, the Commercial Office may enter an agreement with that Creator(s) to set out
the appropriate allocation of Net Revenue to that Creator(s). That allocation must recognise
the reduction of the University’s Revenue from distributions and share sales resulting from the
other Creator(s)’ shareholding.
Allocation of shares to Staff and Students
3.1
In some circumstances, the Commercial Office and the Creator(s) may agree that it is appropriate for
the Creator(s) to acquire shares in a company or other entity into which the applicable New
Intellectual Property Rights have been licensed or assigned. In such circumstances the Creator(s):
(i)
must comply with the Formation of Spin-Out Companies Policy, Conflict of Commitment and
Interest Policy and other relevant University policies;
(ii)
if required, must negotiate and agree an appropriate shareholders’ agreement and constitution
in good faith with the University and other shareholders (as applicable);
(iii)
acknowledges the intention that the total aggregate value of the Creator(s) initial shareholding
will be no greater than one third of the combined initial shareholding of the University and/or the
Commercial Office and the Creator(s);
(iv)
acknowledges that, for the purpose of attracting and securing external investment or support, it
may be necessary for the Creator(s) to:
(a)
(v)
be issued shares of a certain class and/or to enter into a shareholders’ agreement so
that in any matter that requires unanimous assent or a special resolution of shareholders,
the Creator(s) must either not vote, or (if they do vote) they must vote consistently with
the University; and
(b)
not have a voting position on the applicable company’s or entity’s board of directors; and
acknowledges that the Creator(s) will have no right to any payment or return received by the
University in relation to its shareholding,
provided that it is always open to the Commercial Office and the Creator(s) to negotiate arrangements
outside these parameters in particular cases where the Commercial Office and Creator(s) consider it
appropriate.
4.
General
4.1
Each Creator is responsible for assessing and complying with all tax obligations associated with
benefits allocated to that Creator under this Policy.
4.2
The Commercial Office will advise Creators to obtain independent advice prior to them signing any
shareholders’ agreement or any other agreement relating to any New Intellectual Property Rights.
4.3
Without limiting clause 4.1, where the Commercial Office and a Creator intend to agree on that
Creator acquiring shares under clause 3.1, the University will refund that Creator the direct cost for
first three hours of legal and/or accounting advice he or she receives in relation to that arrangement
provided that:
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4.4
(i)
the Creator notifies the Commercial Office before seeking such advice;
(ii)
the Commercial Office agrees that the proposed advice will fall within the scope of this clause;
and
(iii)
the Creator provides an itemised invoice or other evidence of the actual costs incurred by the
Creator in relation to that advice.
Where any New Intellectual Property Right is licensed or assigned to a wholly owned subsidiary of the
University, that subsidiary will be treated as part of the University for the purpose of this Schedule,
including the determination of Net Revenue.
SCHEDULE 6: Students
1.
Subject to written signed agreements with Students concerning intellectual property rights, and subject to rules
for competitions held by Massey University, where Students are involved in activities that could lead to the
development of New Intellectual Property Rights, the following conditions will apply:
1.1
participation in the research should not interfere with the assessment of the Student’s academic
performance;
1.2.
any delays in publication of the Student’s thesis that arise from a confidentiality agreement should be
consistent with the University’s embargo policy or as otherwise agreed by the Assistant Vice
Chancellor Research, Academic & Enterprise; and
1.3
any agreement with a third party should be reached with a view to ensuring that the Student’s rights
under this Policy are maintained as far as practicable.
For competitions and promotions, see the Student Consent Form under Related Procedures, listed on page two
of this document.
SCHEDULE 7: Māori Language Resources and Traditional Knowledge
1.
The University is mindful of its obligations under the Treaty of Waitangi.
2.
The University is also mindful that Māori language is an official language of New Zealand, and of Massey
University.
3.
Where the University has a commercial interest in New Intellectual Property Rights that can reasonably be said
to be directly related to Māori Language Resources or derived from any Māori Traditional Knowledge, the
Commercial Office must notify the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Māori & Pasifika) if and when it decides to
proceed with Commercialisation (See Schedule 4 section 2).
4.
Where publication of material that can similarly be reasonably said to relate directly to Language Resources or
to be derived from any Māori Traditional Knowledge, and which has not hitherto been appropriately
acknowledged, the relevant academic manager will notify the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Māori & Pasifika)
before a decision is made to submit for publication.
5.
The Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Māori & Pasifika) will consider those aspects of Commercialisation or
publication that have implications for Māori intellectual property rights and will endeavour to identify where
those rights properly reside and how the processes of Commercialisation or publication might then proceed.
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6.
In the case of Commercialisation, if the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Māori & Pasifika) wishes to respond, the
response must be supplied to the Commercial Office within 21 working days (or otherwise by mutual
agreement) of receiving notification of the matter.
7.
The Commercial Office is obliged to take account of this advice (if tendered) before allowing any transfer,
license or other third party use or Commercialisation of those New Intellectual Property Rights.
SCHEDULE 8: Contracts with Third Parties
1.
In the event of a conflict between this policy and any agreements the University has with a third party, the latter
shall prevail.
2.
The University reserves its right to transfer its Intellectual Property Rights to third parties in accordance with this
Policy, or otherwise, where practicable, following consultation with the Creator(s) of the Intellectual Property
Rights that are still employed by, or enrolled at, the University.
3.
All contracts between the University and third parties which include considerations about Intellectual Property
Rights must include specific clauses defining the ownership of Intellectual Property. The University shall
endeavour to negotiate intellectual property clauses which are consistent with this Policy.
4.
On entering contracts with third parties which include considerations about Intellectual Property Rights, the
Commercial Office will ensure that the applicable Staff and Students are aware of the content of that agreement
to the extent it impacts on those Staff and Students in their employment or enrolment at the University.
5.
When Staff members or Students are to undertake work with considerations about Intellectual Property Rights
at sites controlled by other organisations in the course of their employment or research with the University, the
Staff or Students concerned shall notify the Commercial Office before such work commences. The Commercial
Office will use its best endeavours to negotiate an agreement with the other organisation(s) regarding the
allocation of Intellectual Property Rights created. Such agreement shall be in accordance with this Policy as far
as is possible.
6.
Staff and Students who have been advised of the terms of a contract with a third party must not act (or omit to
act) in any way that may result in the University breaching its obligations under that third party contract.
SCHEDULE 9: Dispute Resolution
1.
This disputes procedure is available to all Staff and Students having an interest in decisions or processes
relating to the exploitation of Intellectual Property Rights, as described in the Massey University Intellectual
Property Policy to which this procedure is appended as a Schedule.
Procedure
2.
In the event of a dispute arising between persons (including the University itself) having an interest in decisions
or processes relating to the exploitation of Intellectual Property Rights at or by the University, resolution of this
dispute shall be sought in accordance with the following procedure:
2.1
The aggrieved person(s) shall immediately inform the other party or parties to the dispute of their
grievance in writing, and invite them either to remedy the matter complained of or respond to the
grievance within thirty (30) days.
2.2
Should the dispute remain unresolved, all parties shall then seek to settle the matter informally
through discussion or negotiation.
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Intellectual Property Policy – Page 14
2.3
If no such informal resolution can be reached within a reasonable time then any party may refer the
matter for compulsory arbitration by a single arbitrator to be nominated by the President of the
Arbitrators’ and Mediators’ Institute of New Zealand Inc. and such arbitration shall be regarded as
final and binding upon all parties.
2.4
Any party may seek the advice, support, assistance or representation from whomever it chooses in
seeking to resolve the dispute.
SCHEDULE 10: Cessation of Employment or Enrolment
1.
When a Staff member or Student retires, graduates or otherwise leaves the University, without limiting any
other right or obligations he or she may have, that Staff member or Student will continue to be bound by his or
her obligations of confidentiality in relation to information he or she worked on or became aware of while
employed by or enrolled at Massey University.
2.
When a Staff member or Student, who is entitled to an allocation of benefits under Schedule 5, retires,
graduates, dies or otherwise leaves the University while employed by the University or enrolled at the
University, the allocation of benefits will continue after the date of retirement, graduation, death or other
departure (and to the extent necessary, will endure to the benefit of his or her estate) provided that the Staff
member or Student is not in material breach of any Policies of the University. Nothing in this Policy requires
that the University continue any commercial activity that is uneconomic or otherwise not in the interests of the
University. It is always open to the Commercial Office to negotiate arrangements outside these parameters in
particular cases where the Commercial Office considers it appropriate. Shareholdings already allocated in spin
out companies are not affected by this clause.
3.
It is the responsibility of Staff and Students to ensure that the University is aware of their contact details so the
University is able to make any payments due under this Policy.
© This Policy is the property of Massey University
C14/48 – May
Part I
MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL
POLICY REVIEW: TRUST FUNDS POLICY
2 May 2014
1.0
Purpose
To present to Massey University Council the Updated Trust Fund Policy for renewal for a
further three years to May 2017.
2.0
Introduction
At the 6 September 2013 Council meeting discussion took place in relation to the updated
Trust Funds Policy that had been presented to Council for approval. It was agreed to hold over
the approval of this Policy until the following changes had been considered:
•
•
•
Revision of the proposed Trust definition in line with the legal definition;
Clarification in the policy as to retention of cash reserves; and
Necessity to include constructive trusts in the policy.
Consideration of these changes has been outlined in section 3 of this paper.
3.0
Discussion
The following amendments were undertaken in line with feedback from Council:
•
•
•
•
•
4.0
Inclusion of the three main categories of trusts likely to be established or administered
by the University or Massey University Foundation Trust (MUF);
Removal of the Trust definition as the original definition was legally incorrect and the
actual definition of a trust was not considered to be integral to this policy;
Amendment of the definition of a Trust to reflect the correct legal definition;
Removal of reference to Constructive Trusts as such trust structures are not likely to
be established by the University; and
Expansion of the explanation in relation to the retention of cash reserves.
Consultation
A further discussion was held with Ben Vanderkolk, Council Member.
Page 1 of 2
C14/48 – May
Part I
5.0
Implications of Decision: Not Applicable.
6.0
Financial Implications and Treasury Comment: Not applicable.
6.1
Treaty of Waitangi Implications
Treaty of Waitangi Implications
6.2

No 
Equity and Operational Implications
People Implications (Staff/Student/Other)
7.0
Implementation
7.1
Implementation of Decision
Yes 
The policy will be published through the Office of Risk Management.
7.2
Implementation and Communication of Proposal
Communication as a renewed policy will be through the Office of Risk Management.
8.0
Recommendation
8.1
It is recommended that the Massey University Council approve the Trust Funds Policy.
Rose Anne Macleod
Assistant Vice-Chancellor
Strategy, Finance, IT & Commercial Operations
23 April 2014
Page 2 of 2
C13/87 – September
C13/87 – September
Part I
Part I
Massey University Policy Guide
Formatted: Font: (Default) Arial
TRUST FUNDS POLICY
Section
Finance, Strategy and Information
Technology
Contact
FinanceChief Financial Officer
Last Review
August 2013May 2014
Next Review
August 2016May 2017
Style Definition: L2 Text: Tab stops:
Not at 0.63 cm
Style Definition: L3 Text: Tab stops:
Not at 1.4 cm
Approval
Purpose:
To ensure that trust fundsTrust Funds established and administered by the University are managed:
•
In accordance with the wishes of the settlers settlors/testators
•
In an effective and efficient manner
•
In compliance with legal, Audit and good governance/ best practice requirements
•
And in a manner that minimises the potential liability or loss by the University or its Council and its staff.
Formatted: Indent: Left: 0 cm
Definitions:
A Trust is a legal arrangement, whereby funds are set aside for a specific purpose as defined in the Trust Deed. A
Trust is generally (but not always) a long term arrangement, with a capital base being established with the intention to
be grown over a period of time, from which base the income will be earned to fund the purpose for which the Trust
Fund was created.
Trust Funds include the following:
•
Intervivos Trusts;
•
Charitable Trusts; and
•
Testamentary Trusts.
Policy:
Trust fundsFunds must only be accepted, transferred to the University or otherwise established with the approval and
resolution of the University’s Council. This may be delegated to the Vice-Chancellor, AVC Operations & University
Registrar, or AVC Strategy, Finance, Strategy and Information Technology and Commercial Operations.
All Trust Funds accepted must be covered by aadministered in accordance with the terms of the Will or the Trust
Deed thatas the case may be so as to properly and fully describesmeet the wishes of the settlersettlor and the/or
testator and which govern the obligations and responsibility of the trustees and Massey University.
Procedures must be implemented, followed and audited to ensure compliance with settlers/settlor’s wishes, Trust
DeedDeeds and legal and financial reporting requirements.
Trust fundsFunds and their administration, including disbursements, must be in compliance with Massey University
policies and procedures.
Trust Funds and their administration mustmay be audited from time to time to ensure compliancein accordance with
© This Policy is the property of Massey University
Formatted: Font: Helvetica, 8 pt,
Bold, Condensed by 0.5 pt
Massey University Policy Guide
Trust Funds Policy – Page 2
these policiestheir respective Trust Deed.
Trust Funds may be administrated by the Massey University Foundation, Trust (MUF), a charitable trust set
upestablished by Masseythe University.
The University will maintain restricted cash reserves, to an amount equal to the value of the Trusts and constructive
TrustsTrust, other than those administered by Massey University FoundationMUF.
Audience:
All staff, council members and the UniversitiesUniversity’s professional advisors and potential
benefactors/settlerssettlors.
Relevant Legislation:
Crown Entities Act 2004
Public Finance Act 1989
The Trustees Act 1956
The Friendly Societies and Credit Union Act 1982,
Charities Act 2005
Legal Compliance:
The Crown Entities Act 2004 and ss 203 of the Education Act 1989 states that every tertiary institution is a "Crown
Entity" for the purposes of the Public Finance Act 1989. All monies received by a crown entity must be banked into its
bank account as soon as practicable.
The Trustee Act 1956 details the powers and obligations of Trustees in respect of managing trust funds. Trustees are
legally obligated to invest prudently, and may be sued for breach by beneficiaries if negligence can be proven. The
Courts have power to amend trusts in certain circumstances.
Where the trust funds are provided for the establishment of a friendly society or credit union, the obligations of the
Friendly Societies and Credit Union Act 1982 will apply. In these circumstances, appointment of trustees must be by
way of a majority resolution of the members.
Related Procedures and Documents:
Delegations Document
Treasury Policy
Legal Compliance Policy
Delegations Document
Treasury Policy
Legal Compliance Policy
Document Management Control:
Prepared by: Chief Financial Accountant
Officer
© This Policy is the property of Massey University
Formatted: Font: Helvetica, 8 pt,
Bold, Condensed by 0.5 pt
Massey University Policy Guide
Trust Funds Policy – Page 3
Owned by: Assistant Vice-Chancellor, Strategy, Finance, StrategyIT and Information Technology
Commercial Operations
Approved by: C11/77 July: 3.2.1
Date issued: 6 May 2011
Last review: August 2013
Next review: August 2016
© This Policy is the property of Massey University
Formatted: Highlight
C14/48 – May
Part I
Massey University Policy Guide
TRUST FUNDS POLICY
Section
Finance
Contact
Chief Financial Officer
Last Review
May 2014
Next Review
May 2017
Approval
Purpose:
To ensure that Trust Funds established and administered by the University are managed:
•
In accordance with the wishes of the settlors/testators
•
In compliance with legal, Audit and good governance/ best practice requirements
•
And in a manner that minimises the potential liability or loss by the University or its Council and its staff.
Trust Funds include the following:
•
Intervivos Trusts;
•
Charitable Trusts; and
•
Testamentary Trusts.
Policy:
Trust Funds must only be accepted, transferred to the University or otherwise established with the approval and
resolution of the University’s Council. This may be delegated to the Vice-Chancellor, AVC Operations & University
Registrar, or AVC Strategy, Finance, Information Technology and Commercial Operations.
All Trust Funds accepted must be administered in accordance with the terms of the Will or the Trust Deed as the case
may be so as to properly and fully meet the wishes of the settlor and/or testator and which govern the obligations and
responsibility of the trustees and Massey University.
Procedures must be implemented, followed and audited to ensure compliance with settlor’s wishes, Trust Deeds and
legal and financial reporting requirements.
Trust Funds and their administration, including disbursements, must be in compliance with University policies and
procedures.
Trust Funds and their administration may be audited from time to time in accordance with their respective Trust Deed.
Trust Funds may be administrated by the Massey University Foundation Trust (MUF), a charitable trust established by
the University.
The University will maintain restricted cash reserves, to an amount equal to the value of the Trust, other than those
administered by MUF.
Audience:
All staff, council members and the University’s professional advisors and potential benefactors/settlors.
© This Policy is the property of Massey University
Massey University Policy Guide
Trust Funds Policy – Page 2
Relevant Legislation:
Crown Entities Act 2004
Public Finance Act 1989
The Trustees Act 1956
The Friendly Societies and Credit Union Act 1982,
Charities Act 2005
Legal Compliance:
The Crown Entities Act 2004 and ss 203 of the Education Act 1989 states that every tertiary institution is a "Crown
Entity" for the purposes of the Public Finance Act 1989. All monies received by a crown entity must be banked into its
bank account as soon as practicable.
The Trustee Act 1956 details the powers and obligations of Trustees in respect of managing trust funds. Trustees are
legally obligated to invest prudently, and may be sued for breach by beneficiaries if negligence can be proven. The
Courts have power to amend trusts in certain circumstances.
Where the trust funds are provided for the establishment of a friendly society or credit union, the obligations of the
Friendly Societies and Credit Union Act 1982 will apply. In these circumstances, appointment of trustees must be by
way of a majority resolution of the members.
Related Procedures and Documents:
Delegations Document
Treasury Policy
Legal Compliance Policy
Document Management Control:
Prepared by: Chief Financial Officer
Owned by: Assistant Vice-Chancellor, Strategy, Finance, IT and Commercial Operations
Approved by: C11/77 July: 3.2.1
Date issued: 6 May 2011
Last review: August 2013
Next review: August 2016
© This Policy is the property of Massey University
C14/49 – May
Part I
MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL
MASSEY UNIVERSITY BUSINESS CASE POLICY
2 MAY 2014
1.0
Purpose
1.1
The purpose of the paper is to adopt a business case policy for Massey University.
1.2
SLT endorsed this proposal, along with the proposed Business Case Framework, at its 14 April
meeting and it is now forwarded to University Council for approval.
2.0
Introduction
2.1
Attached is the new Business Case Policy is proposed for Massey University. It refers to a
framework which incorporates the Better Business Case (BBC) methodology used by
Government departments and crown agencies. The framework is also appended. The BBC is
recognised as a good practice approach.
2.2
The New Zealand Government adopted a standardised business case model, “Better Business
Cases for Capital Proposals”, with the aim of improving capital investment decisions across the
public sector.
2.3
This policy (and framework) is being established at Massey University to:
•
•
•
•
•
provide a robust and consistent methodology to business planning and investment;
better inform decision makers and provide quality assurance;
ensure better value for money;
achieve better outcomes; and
integrate the Better Business Case methodology into University systems and processes.
3.0
Discussion
3.1
Business cases are the primary mechanism for executives and council members to determine
if a proposal for investment has strong alignment with University strategy, is value for money
and is assured of success. The case is the main route for capital approval in the University
although other papers are also submitted to SLT and Council that represent a significant
financial commitment or change to Massey’s risk profile.
3.2
In the past, some business cases have tended to justify a particular solution rather than clearly
establish the strategic outcome and identify what options will lead to an optimal solution(s), and
a focused investment. Over the years, gaps in some proposals and business cases has
manifested in recurrent business cases, gatekeeping, stalled projects and delays.
3.3
Adopting the BBC methodology will enhance University outcomes, reduce rework and avoid
downstream delays by:
•
aligning proposals with specific strategic objectives, gaining early stakeholder approval
in principle and bringing key stakeholders on board;
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C14/49 – May
Part I
•
•
•
•
•
considering a full range of options to provide confidence we are making the right
choice to achieve our objectives;
providing assurance we are getting value for money;
defining governance structures, responsibilities, planning, management and quality
assurance processes;
defining procurement strategies, contracts and payment processes; and
assessing affordability, financial resources and on-going benefits and costs for our
financial sustainability.
3.4
Integration of the BBC methodology with University systems and processes will align with
Minister of Tertiary Education expectations and crown agencies. In turn this will build
confidence with monitoring agencies (TEC & OAG) the University has robust processes, and
ensures cases that require TEC approval meet mandatory submission requirements.
3.5
The BBC process is fully scalable and can accommodate small investment proposals through
to very large proposals. Its use will give the senior leadership team and council a high level of
confidence objectives will be achieved. The process will ensure that all business cases will
deliver the Shaping the Nation strategy and that they are robust, value for money, prepared
consistently and supported by a strong quality assurance process.
3.6
Adopting the BBC methodology provides the University with a solid framework using
international best practice that has been thoroughly reviewed by the Treasury and TEC for
application within the Tertiary Sector. All the templates and guidelines are provided free and
are available as open source documents, updated as necessary by the National Infrastructure
Unit.
3.7
It is recommended that the University adopt the BBC templates and guidelines for decisions
that seek SLT or Council approval to change the University’s baseline operating expenditure,
to spend against capital budgets, or to alter the University’s risk profile.
3.8
The new policy (and framework) focuses on planning and managing projects for success, that
is, the achievement of strategy through delivery of quality assured outcomes. The main
features of the policy include:
•
integration of business case establishment, development, reviews and approval with
established University processes;
•
a clear distinction in the policy (and framework) between SLT decision making and
Finance management of the process, as the business process owner;
•
provision for an Early Decision Point where SLT portfolio owners have existing
approved budgets and delegations;
•
scoping, risk assessment and strategic assessment require SLT approval in principle
prior to inclusion in a capital plan or operating budget;
•
business cases reviewed by a quality assurance review panel before final SLT
approval;
•
support structures to assist with business case preparations are established; and
•
business case developers will have access to supporting collateral, facilitators and
BBC training.
3.9
Business Case Thresholds
3.9.1
Risk Thresholds and Risk Assessment
The proposed business case thresholds for the type of business case and level of effort are
aligned with the existing risk framework and delegations documents. The Risk Management
2
C14/49 – May
Part I
office has prepared a Massey University Risk Profile Assessment (RPA) tool consistent with
University risk criteria. The RPA is integrated with the BBC Scoping phase.
3.9.2
$150k Requirement for a Business Case
It is proposed that business cases will be required for projects over $150k in capital or $150k in
annual operating costs; this is the status quo for capital cases. The $150k aligns with most
SLT member operating budget centre delegations. Capital projects are assigned to budget
centres in the University finance system which determines the minimum delegation at that
level.
The $150k also aligns with capital equipment committee processes and with the establishment
of project sites for electronic document and records management systems.
3.10
Training in all aspects of the business case process is available through regular courses run
through the National Infrastructure Unit and it is expected that the business case developers
and reviewers would be fully trained in the BBC methodology.
3.11
In the10 Year Capital Plan, Projects Approved in Principle (Group 3) and Other Funded
Projects (Group 4) will require business cases. If this policy is adopted, based on 2014, over
the next 10 years
•
•
•
6 projects under $1m will require single stage (light) cases;
23 projects between $1m & $10m will require single stage cases;
4 projects over $10m will require 2 stages case.
3.12
Some proposals below the business case thresholds would also benefit from the discipline and
structure of the BBC. For example, the establishment of commercial entities, new
transportation proposals or major teaching programme initiatives. It is recommended portfolio
owners consider BBC, for proposals where projects interact with multiple stakeholders across
the University, or where strong planning and management is desirable.
4.0
Consultation
4.1
Senior Leadership Team members, project directors and managers, college business
managers and finance managers were distributed the draft Business Case Policy and
Framework documents. Staff and their subordinates were invited to provide feedback on the
proposed changes. Meetings were held with staff members who expressed an interest in direct
consultation.
5.0
Implications of Decision:
5.1
Financial Implications and Treasury Comment
Financial Implications
•
Yes 
Comment from AVC Strategy, Finance, IT and Commercial Operations:
No
FIN 14-05
The establishment of a policy and framework for business cases is an important step in
improving the quality of University investment decisions and their timely achievement.
Undertaking robust strategic assessments, evaluating a range of options and deciding upon an
optimal solution in a structured and consultative way has benefits that will be measured in
terms of value, time, cost and reputation.
The adoption of the business case policy and framework has some financial implications, in
terms of training costs, establishing an intranet page and additional operational costs relating
to business case specialist support. It is envisaged that these costs will be absorbed within the
established operating baselines.
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C14/49 – May
Part I
5.2
Treaty of Waitangi Implications
Treaty of Waitangi Implications
•
Yes 
No 
Comment from AVC Māori & Pasifika:
Overall I see merit in the use of the BBC methodology. The test will be in how well it is
implemented and how well the Strategic Assessment required of any Business Case,
addresses the priorities of the Kia Mārama and Growing Pearls of Wisdom Strategies; and the
goals of the Investment Plan and Road to 2025.
5.3
Equity and Operational Implications
People Implications (Staff/Student/Other)
Yes 
Cultural & Ethnic Implications (Māori/Pasifika/New Migrant/Other) Yes 
Equity Implications
Yes 
Gender Implications
Yes 
Disability Implications
Yes 
Information Technology Implications
Yes 
Library Implications
Yes 
International Implications
Yes 
Teaching Implications
Yes 
Research Implications
Yes 
Other (state____________________________)
Yes 
No 
No 
No 
No 
No 
No 
No 
No 
No 
No 
No 
•
People Implications.
Staff who prepare business cases will need to utilise the new business case templates. BBC
writers will need assistance to move from ‘justification of a predetermined solution approach’ to
a strategic assessment approach with evidence based options leading to an optimal solution.
Staff should complete the BBC foundation and developer training and reviewers should
undertake the BBC reviewer training courses.
•
Information Technology Implications
A business case intranet page and SharePoint team site is required to provide a single point of
contact for collateral and guidance to assist with business case preparation. Para’s 6.1.1 and
6.1.2 refer.
6.0
Implementation
6.1
Implementation of Decision
•
The development and publication of intranet pages for business case collateral will proceed
when SharePoint team sites are established May 2014.
•
Business cases collaboration and documentation is integrated with the electronic document
and record management system and processes. Project sites should be established for all
projects and are a requirement for projects over $150k to enable business case collaboration
and records management.
•
The better business case guidelines and templates are accessible through the National
Infrastructure website and are free of change.
•
The establishment of Business Case specialist support, for facilitating and oversight of the
development of business cases, will be part of the SFIC portfolio.
•
Staff who prepare business cases should complete the BBC training and those staff who
review business cases should complete the BBC Reviewers course. Courses will be offered to
staff involved.
•
The introduction of scoping, risk assessment and strategic assessment stages will commence
for all new business cases, upon approval of the policy by Council. However, due to timing
issues with operating and capital planning cycles, a 12 month transition period is
recommended. Transition will be applied to projects already approved in principle and
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Part I
commencing financial expenditure in 2015. These projects will include scoping, risk
assessment and strategic assessment directly into their respective business cases.
•
The scoping, risk assessment and strategic assessment process will be introduced for projects
and will require SLT approval prior to the 2016 operational and capital planning processes.
Existing 10 Year Capital Plan projects in Group 3 - Approved in Principle, Group 4 Other
funded projects and Horizon projects, that commence from 2016, will be required to complete
these pre-entry steps before scheduling into the 2016 10 Year Capital Plan.
•
SLT Portfolio owners with projects scheduled to commence from 2016 will be provided with a
schedule of projects in Group 3 , Group 4 and Horizon Projects, that require scoping, risk
assessment and strategic assessment
6.2
Implementation and Communication of Proposal
•
The business case policy will be communicated through the policy update channel to
University staff
•
The policy and framework will be directly sent to project directors and project managers.
6.3
SLT Web Report
•
A new business case policy and framework is being adopted at Massey University. The policy
and framework integrates the government Better Business Cases (BBC) methodology with
university systems and processes.
•
The BBC will provide a robust and consistent methodology for business planning and better
inform decision makers. Other benefits include better value for money and improve confidence
with an integrated quality assurance process.
7.0
Recommendations
7.1
It is recommended that the Massey University Council:
1. Approve the adoption of the Business Case Policy by Massey University.
2. Approve a recommended 12 month transition period, where projects already approved in
principle and commencing financial expenditure in 2015, will include scoping, risk
assessment and strategic assessment directly into their respective business cases.
3. Agree that, existing 10 Year Capital Plan Group 3, Group 4 and Horizon projects, and new
operating initiatives, commencing financial expenditure from 2016 will require scoping, risk
assessment and strategic assessment, approved by SLT before inclusion into an operating
budget or capital plan.
Rose Anne MacLeod
Assistant Vice-Chancellor
Strategy, Finance, IT and Commercial Operations
15 April 2014
Appendices
1. Business Case Policy
5
C14/49 – May
Part I
Massey University Policy Guide
BUSINESS CASE POLICY
Section
Finance
Contact
National Capital Manager
Last Review
May 2014
Next Review
May 2017
Approval
Council Day Month Year
Purpose:
This policy defines the business case requirements of Massey University.
Policy:
Massey University has adopted the Better Business Case (BBC) methodology to provide a framework for
effective business planning and to ensure quality assurance for better business outcomes.
1. The Senior Leadership Team (SLT) has responsibility for determining the merits and priority of
change and investment proposals for Massey University.
2. SLT will approve a proposal in principle, for inclusion in an operating budget or capital plan, based on
BBC scoping, risk assessment and strategic assessment processes.
3. Thereafter, if the proposal has been approved in principle by SLT, a scalable business case will be
required, consistent with the level of risk and financial value in Table 1 below.
4. The BBC methodology and templates will be used for all business cases presented to SLT, University
Council, and the Crown. The business case will also undergo a quality assurance review before
submission to SLT.
5. Business cases will comply with the Business Case Framework and Procedures aligned to this policy.
This document references the Better Business Case guidelines detailed on the National Infrastructure
Unit Website, http://www.infrastructure.govt.nz/publications/betterbusinesscases.
6. The Chief Financial Officer is the business case process owner and business cases will comply with
any advisory requirements that the Chief Financial Officer may request.
7. A business case is required for any capital funding request exceeding $150,000 in capital cost; any
operating budget baseline adjustment exceeding $150,000 in operating cost in any one financial year;
or any business related venture with a risk assessment of high or greater assessed in accordance
with the Massey University Risk Profile Assessment.
© This Policy is the property of Massey University
Massey University Policy Guide
Business Case Policy – Page 2
Table 1 - The type of business case to be completed for any given project.
Risk Threshold
Financial Threshold
Programme Business Case
To be completed for all interconnected cases with common benefits
Two Stage Business Case
Any case assessed as extreme risk
All projects in excess of $ 10 M
Single Stage Business Case
Any case assessed as high risk
All projects in excess of $5.0 M
Single Stage Business Case
Any case assessed as moderate risk
All projects in excess of $1.0 M
Single Stage Light Business Case
Any case assessed as low risk
All projects in excess of $0.15 M
Note: The actual level of risk is determined by completion of a risk profile assessment. Refer to Related Procedures/ Documents
8. At the discretion of the SLT manager, the Business Case Framework and Procedures process may
also be adopted for those projects that fall below the financial thresholds in Policy 6 above, but which
have been assessed as moderate risk and by their nature justify a formal business case approach.
These projects can be approved within the SLT manager’s delegated authority.
9. Quality Assurance Review
Business case quality assurance reviews will be completed by a panel of specialists prior to
submitting the business case to SLT. A panel will consist of standing representation from Finance and
Risk Management sections. It will be convened by Finance and will be augmented and supported by
specialists consistent with the type and content of the business case being reviewed.
Panel membership is determined using the policy risk and financial thresholds. Refer to Business
Case Framework & Procedure Page 10.
10. The Chief Financial Officer will provide commentary on the business case quality assurance review,
and this commentary must be included in the committee paper’s ‘Financial Implications and Treasury
Comment” section.
11. Business cases must be approved through the established University planning and executive
approval procedures including, sub-committee, SLT and, if over $1.0m, University Council.
Definitions:
Scoping
The scoping phase of the BBC determines the scale and risk of the proposal under consideration, identifies who the
stakeholders are and how they will be engaged, and determines the level of effort and resource required developing
the business case. Refer to Business Case Framework & Procedure Page 10.
Strategic Assessment
The strategic assessment phase of the BBC demonstrates alignment with strategy, estimate of cost and identifies
strategic risks. Refer to Business Case Framework & Procedure Page 10.
Capital Cost
The fixed, one-time expenses incurred on the purchase of land, buildings, construction, and equipment. It is the total
cost needed to bring a project to a commercially operable status.
Whole of Life Cost (WOLC)
© This Policy is the property of Massey University
Massey University Policy Guide
Business Case Policy – Page 3
The net present value of cash costs of the proposal under consideration. Cash costs include the initial capital or
operating costs, plus the operating costs for the expected life of the asset, discounted using Public Sector Discount
Rates. Refer to Business Case Framework & Procedure Page 7.
Quality Assurance Review
A planned and systematic review to provide adequate confidence that the proposal optimally fulfils stakeholder
expectations, i.e. the proposal is problem-free and will achieve the stated outcomes, in terms of benefits, cost, time,
viability, affordability, sustainability, risk and reputation.
Audience:
All staff preparing business cases
Relevant legislation:
Education Act 1989 Section 192 Powers of Institutions
Legal compliance:
All projects requiring TEC or Crown approval must be submitted in BBC format. TEC approval is required for all
proposals requiring borrowing outside the Massey University Consent to Borrow, Projects exceeding a $25m WOLC
and Public Private Partnerships.
Related procedures / documents:
Shaping the Nation, Taking the Best to the World, The Road to 2025
The Investment Plan
University Sub-strategies including Research, Internationalisation, [email protected], [email protected], Teaching and
Learning, Sustainability Framework and Finance
Business Case Framework and Procedure, including the Massey University Risk Profile Assessment
Delegations Document
Procurement Policy and Procedures
Tenders Board Terms of Reference and Procedures
Capital Projects Policy
Capital Planning and Approval Procedure
Capital Developments Post Completion Review Policy
Capital Asset Management Plan
Campus Development Plans
Project Management Policy
Document Management Control:
Prepared by: National Capital Manager
Authorised by: AVC Strategy Finance, Information Technology & Commercial Operations
Approved by: SLT +date
Date issued: Day Month year
Last review: February 2014
Next review: February 2017
© This Policy is the property of Massey University
C14/51 - May
Part I
MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL
FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED 31 MARCH 2014
2 MAY 2014
PURPOSE
This report summarises the financial results for Massey University (the “University”) and it’s
controlled entities (the “group”) for the three months ended 31 March 2014.
DISCUSSION
Income Statement
The University and group Income Statements are attached as Appendix 1.
The group’s year to date operating surplus of $19.4m was $1.8m ahead of budget. The main
entities contributing to the favourable result were the University and the Massey University
Foundation Trust (MUF). The group is forecast to achieve a year end surplus of 1.5% of total
revenue.
UNIVERSITY
The comments made in this section are in relation to the University’s financial performance
only.
EFTS Related Contribution
The year to date EFTS related contribution was $16.1m against a budget of $15.3m. Student
numbers have softened and as a result management are undertaking mitigating actions in order
to meet a budgeted surplus of 1.3% of total revenue.
Contract & Trading(C&T) Related Contribution
The year to date C&T income was lower than budget by $2.9m. This was the result of a
slower rate of C&T activities. The slower rate of activities was also reflected in the drop in
Contract & Trading expenditure. The C&T activities are forecast to be in line with budget by
year end.
Page 1 of 7
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Part I
MASSEY UNIVERSITY CONTROLLED ENTITIES
The year to date surplus for the University’s controlled entities was in line with the budget and
is forecast to be in line with budget by year end.
Balance Sheet
The University and group’s Balance Sheets are attached as Appendix 2.
The University’s controlled entities contributed $10.5m to Total Assets. This is mainly from
MVL and NZSM. Similarly to Total Assets, MVL and NZSM contribute $4.9m towards
Total Liabilities. Overall, the University’s Balance Sheet represents 99% of the group’s
Balance Sheet.
Cash Flow Statement
It should be noted that some of the controlled entities do not currently produce monthly cash
flow statements. As a result a Cash Flow Statement for the University only has been provided
– refer to Appendix 3.
Overall net cash flows from operating activities year to date were in line with budget.
Net cash flows from investing activities were $37.1m ahead of budget.
Net cash flows from financing activities were less than half of the year to date budget.
However, the actual amounts involved are relatively small and are expected to be in line with
budget by the year end.
Capital Expenditure
The University’s Capital Expenditure Report is attached as Appendix 4.
A summary of ‘Group One’ Capital expenditure is included in the table below:
Year to Date
Actual
Budget
($000)
($000)
Group 1 (Recurrent)
7,161
7,510
Full Year
Budget Forecast
($000)
($000)
26,620
Group One projects expenditure is at $7.2m with a small variance to budget of 5%. Library
expenditure dominates the early expenditure as other programmes are in their initiation phase.
Appendix 4 highlights that capital equipment over $20k and the desktop computer
replacement programmes are both ahead of schedule.
Page 2 of 7
26,620
C14/51 - May
Part I
RECOMMENDATIONS
It is recommended that Massey University Council:
1. Receive the financial report for the three months ended 31 March 2014.
Rose Anne MacLeod
Assistant Vice-Chancellor
Strategy, Finance, IT & Commercial Operations
16 April 2014
Appendices
1.
2.
3.
4.
Income Statement
Balance Sheet
University Cash Flow Statement
University Capital Expenditure Report (Group One projects)
Page 3 of 7
C14/51 - May
Part I
Appendix 1
Income Statement
For the Three Months Ended 31 March 2014
YTD
Actual
($000)
Total EFTS Income
Total EFTS Expenditure
Contribution - EFTS
Total Contract & Trading Income
Total Contract & Trading Expenditure
Contribution - C&T
Total Trading Operating Surplus
YTD
Budget
($000)
UNIVERSITY
YTD
2014 FY
Variance
Budget
($000)
($000)
2014 FY
Forecast
($000)
YTD
Actual
($000)
GROUP
YTD
YTD
Budget
Variance
($000)
($000)
2014 FY
Budget
($000)
99,626
83,546
16,080
99,549
84,224
15,325
77
678
755
367,250
365,731
1,519
360,348
358,684
1,664
100,930
84,015
16,915
100,707
85,034
15,673
223
1,019
1,242
373,976
371,306
2,670
17,496
15,223
2,273
20,394
18,406
1,988
(2,898)
3,183
285
74,050
69,643
4,407
74,260
70,193
4,067
18,307
15,787
2,520
22,886
20,913
1,973
(4,579)
5,126
547
84,458
80,397
4,061
18,353
17,313
1,040
5,926
5,731
19,435
17,646
1,789
6,731
Page 4 of 7
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Appendix 2
Balance Sheet
As at 31 March 2014
YTD
Actual
($000)
Total Current Assets
Total Non Current Assets
YTD
Budget
($000)
UNIVERSITY
YTD
2014 FY
Variance
Budget
($000)
($000)
2014 FY
Forecast
($000)
YTD
Actual
($000)
GROUP
YTD
Variance
($000)
($000)
YTD
Budget
2014 FY
Budget
($000)
189,279
980,127
177,031
980,414
12,248
(287)
81,488
1,015,217
96,360
1,006,501
196,839
983,060
181,401
983,325
15,438
(265)
83,776
1,017,831
1,169,406
1,157,445
11,961
1,096,705
1,102,861
1,179,899
1,164,726
15,173
1,101,607
Total Current Liability
Total Non Current Liabilities
157,691
48,328
146,078
49,182
11,613
(854)
97,479
48,428
103,830
48,428
161,988
48,354
147,913
49,207
14,075
(853)
97,983
48,454
Total Liabilities
206,019
195,260
10,759
145,907
152,258
210,342
197,120
13,222
146,437
Public Equity
Capital & Reserves
Revaluations/ Other
Surplus/(Deficit)
Total University Equity
945,105
(71)
18,353
963,387
944,872
17,313
962,185
233
(71)
1,040
1,202
944,872
5,926
950,798
944,872
5,731
950,603
950,193
(71)
19,435
969,557
949,960
17,646
967,606
233
(71)
1,789
1,951
948,439
6,731
955,170
1,169,406
1,157,445
11,961
1,096,705
1,102,861
1,179,899
1,164,726
15,173
1,101,607
Total Assets
Total Liabilities and Public Equity
Page 5 of 7
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Appendix 3
Cash Flow Statement
For the Three Months Ended 31 March 2014
YTD
Actual
($000)
YTD
Budget
($000)
UNIVERSITY
YTD
Variance
($000)
2014 FY
Budget
($000)
2014 FY
Forecast
($000)
Net Cash Flows From Operating Activities:
Net Cash Flows From Investing Activities:
Net Cash Flows From Financing Activities:
65,428
(18,621)
(270)
67,329
(55,755)
(558)
(1,901)
37,134
288
56,026
(55,841)
(1,060)
55,930
(36,527)
(972)
NET (DECREASE)/INCREASE IN CASH
46,537
11,016
35,521
(875)
18,431
29,632
(134)
76,035
24,987
36,003
4,645
(134)
40,032
24,987
24,112
29,632
(134)
47,929
Cash Brought Forward
Net Foreign Exchange (Losses)
Ending Cash Carried Forward
Page 6 of 7
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Part I
Appendix 4
University Capital Expenditure Report
For the Three Months Ended 31 March 2014
Project Budget
Business Case
Project Description as at 31 Mar 2014
GROUP ONE PROJECTS (RECURRENT)
IT Server and Storage Refresh
IT Communications Infrastructure
IT AV Refresh
IT Support Systems Refresh
Capital Equipment - $2-20k
Capital Equipment - >$20k
Equipment Replacement > $150k
Capital Equipment - Farms
Capital Equipment - >$20k Utility Vehicles
Lab and Desktop Computer Replacement
Halls of Residence Refurbishment-Manawatu
Campus Infrastructure
- Albany
- Manawatu
- Wellington
Building Capital Renewal/Refurb Programme (inclu Space consolidation)-Manawatu
VC Discretionary
- Albany Campus Raod Frontage Sign
Library
Minor Capital Works
-Albany
- Manawatu
- Wellington
Aircraft Overhaul and Refurbishment
New Initiatives Capital
Self Insurance Cover
TOTAL GROUP ONE PROJECTS (Recurrent)
E150
VAN
PN406
PN605
SIGN
AIR
SUB TOTAL
Council
Approved
Budget
($000)
660
1,000
1,000
660
1,750
2,200
1,470
220
220
2,000
300
1,000
1,000
500
2,000
500
225
6,600
800
1,040
700
225
350
200
26,620
Actual
Expenditure to
Date
($000)
14
178
22
36
(8)
808
150
34
1
872
229
93
1
21
132
4,107
325
(27)
162
11
-
7,161
2014 Full Year Budget
Forecast Final
Expenditure
($000)
Approved 2014
FY Budget
($000)
660
1,000
1,000
660
1,750
2,200
1,470
220
220
2,000
300
1,000
1,000
500
2,000
500
225
6,600
800
1,040
700
225
350
200
660
1,000
1,000
660
1,750
2,200
1,470
220
220
2,000
300
1,000
1,000
500
2,000
500
225
6,600
800
1,040
700
225
350
200
26,620
26,620
YTD Actual
Expenditure
($000)
14
178
22
36
(8)
808
150
34
1
872
229
93
1
21
132
4,107
325
(27)
162
11
7,161
YTD Budget 31
Mar
($000)
2014 FY
Forecast
($000)
78
238
48
106
130
543
197
15
13
704
100
120
40
65
256
80
50
4,264
240
32
113
28
50
660
1,000
1,000
660
1,750
2,200
1,470
220
220
2,000
300
1,000
1,000
500
2,000
500
225
6,600
800
1,040
700
225
350
200
7,510
26,620
Page 7 of 7
C14/52 – May
Part I
The Chancellor
Massey University Council
Dear Chancellor,
Report from the Academic Board Meeting (Part 1): 19 March 2014
At the Academic Board meeting held on Wednesday 19 March 2014 in Part I of the meeting the
following items are referred to Council for information.
1.
Advice on Matters of Academic Policy
There was no advice on matters of academic policy in Part I.
2.
Information to Council with Respect to Major Academic Directions
Nature/Ethos of the Modern University
Professorial Electoral College Board member Professor Lock led the academic discussion on
his paper ‘Nature/Ethos of the Modern University’. He noted the main points for his
motivation for providing his interpretation of the literature on the subject was:
• What was the significance of the growth of management and their relationship with
academia?;
• The development of management-speak in universities; and
• Academic apathy related to ‘speaking out’.
Discussion included but was not limited to the following:
• Modern employment patterns were such that academic staff may stay within a university
for short periods only and as such may well consider themselves as employees rather than
members of a university. However for an area to survive it needed staff to remain for long
periods and this did not necessarily fit with a management view.
• It was suggested that a move to decentralising some administration staff would bring
closer ties between administration and the faculty.
• The staff survey had been released as summary of the full results. Management were
releasing this down through their staff.
• It was noted that a Deloitte survey taken 18 months ago found Massey University had the
lowest management to academic staff ratio in New Zealand universities.
• It was asked if the University had the right structures e.g. Academic Board and personnel
to engage in the high quality product it aspired to deliver.
• The change over the last 15-20 years in the breadth of the range of functions had required
a different professorial team and that many general staff were in fact filling academic
roles e.g. non-paper based teaching.
• The complexity of academic roles over the last 15-20 years had increased with professors
now being asked to engage in many dimensions of the University e.g. contributing to the
University’s strategy and that such engagement would be likely to increase into the
future.
Page 1 of 3
C14/52 – May
Part I
In conclusion Professor Lock considered that further reading of the literature would enable
different ways of looking at the issue, and that the recasting and increased complexity of
professorial roles over time was significant.
3.
Report of Academic Approvals Taken Under Delegation
There are academic approvals taken under delegation to report in Part I of the meeting.
4.
Sub-Committee Matters
There are no sub-committee matters to report in Part I of the meeting.
5.
Items of Early Notice
There are no matters for early notice to report in Part I of the meeting.
6.
For Information
Incorporating Māori Protocols in the Governance Setting of the Academic Board
An invitation to Board members who wished to take the opportunity to say a karakia at the
beginning or end of a meeting was extended.
Discussion took place on the use of written te reo as well as oral as was outlined in the
recommended action and following consideration of this it will be brought back to the Board
for discussion at a future meeting.
The practicalities of using a marae for a meeting were noted however with the good will of
the Board I was keen to facilitate this at one of the face to face meetings. Also considered was
the induction session for Board members being held on the regional marae or equivalent.
The Board approved the following and noted that progress against these would be reviewed
annually.
Review item
1. Māori and Pasifika
celebrations
2. Use of written and
spoken Māori
language
3. Board Membership
4. Welcoming protocols
5. Treaty of Waitangi
policy
Recommended Actions
Encourage members of Board to attend these
ceremonies.
Respect and agreement for any member’s wish to open
or close the meeting with a non-sectarian karakia.
Respect for members and guests to offer a karakia
before eating (especially after pōwhiri or mihi
whakatau).
At next review of Board terms of reference consider
whether greater Māori representation on Board is
appropriate.
Investigate use of marae for part or all of future Board
meetings.
Support Māori @Massey 2020 and further
developments.
Page 2 of 3
C14/52 – May
Part I
Appointment to the Doctoral Research Committee
The Academic Board appointed the Associate Professor Christine Cheyne as the Academic
Board academic staff member to the Doctoral Research Committee for a three-year term.
Conferring of Degrees and awarding of Diplomas and Certificates
Degrees were conferred and diplomas and certificates awarded under the delegated authority
of Council.
Professor Tony Signal
Chair, Academic Board
Page 3 of 3
C14/53 – March
Part I
MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL
REPORT ON E-BALLOTS: 4 APRIL 2014 AND 15 APRIL 2014
2 May 2014
Purpose
This paper sets out the two e-ballots that Council considered on 4 April 2014 and 15 April 2014.
4 April 2014 e-ballot: Fees Setting Principles 2014
A request was made for the conferral of a Doctor of Philosophy on Jan (John) Kramer to take
place at Mary Potter Hospice, Wellington on Saturday 5 April 2014 as it was considered that ill
health would not permit Mr Kramer to attend the up and coming graduation ceremonies.
To enable this conferment to take place the Chancellor or his nominee required the delegated
authority of Council. The following resolution was passed unanimously.
RESOLVED THAT THE CHANCELLOR, OR HIS NOMINEE, BE AUTHORISED TO
CONFER A DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY ON JAN KRAMER, WHO HAS
SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED THE PRESCRIBED COURSE OF STUDY, ON OR
ABOUT 5 APRIL 2014
The Chancellor Chris Kelly and Assistant Vice-Chancellor Research, Academic and Enterprise
Professor Brigid Heywood attended a small family graduation ceremony on 5 April 2014 where
the Chancellor conferred the degree.
15 April 2014 e-ballot: Fees Setting Principles 2014
At the 7 March 2014 Council meeting it was agreed that an e-ballot asking Council members to
consider and approve the Fees Setting Principles 2014 would be undertaken. The request for this
e-ballot, rather than waiting for the 2 May 2014 Council meeting was to enable fee consultation to
commence earlier than in previous years.
The paper Fees Setting Principles 2014 (C14/40 – April) as attached was distributed at the time of
the e-ballot. The following resolution was passed unanimously.
Page 1 of 4
C14/53 – March
Part I
RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL:
1. NOTE THE PROCESS AND TIMELINE FOR SETTING INTERNATIONAL,
DOMESTIC AND NON-TUITION FEES FOR 2015; AND
2. APPROVE THE AMENDED FEES SETTING PRINCIPLES 2014 FOR 2015 FEES
AS FOLLOWS:
a)
FEES SET ARE ALIGNED WITH THE ADVANCEMENT OF UNIVERSITY
STRATEGY AS OUTLINED IN MASSEY UNIVERSITY STRATEGY;
b)
THE AREAS THAT WILL BE FUNDED BY, AND BENEFITS GAINED
FROM, INCREASES IN FEES WILL BE MADE CLEAR;
c)
THE UNIVERSITY’S MARKET POSITION, I.E. RELATIVITY OF FEES
WITH OTHER UNIVERSITIES, WILL BE CONSIDERED IN SETTING
FEES, WHICH FOR DOMESTIC FEES MAY REQUIRE CONSIDERATION
OF AN ANNUAL MAXIMUM FEE MOVEMENT (AMFM) EXCEPTION
APPLICATION; APPROPRIATE BENCHMARKING WILL INFORM THE
SETTING OF INTERNATIONAL FEES;
d)
FEES SET ARE CONSISTENT WITH THE BUDGET PRIORITIES AND
FISCAL PROJECTS AS OUTLINED IN THE UNIVERSITY’S 2014 BUDGET
POLICY STATEMENT AND DESIGNED TO ENSURE THE UNIVERSITY’S
FINANCIAL SUSTAINABILITY;
e)
THE STUDENTS’ ASSOCIATIONS, ON BEHALF OF ALL STUDENTS,
AND OTHER RELEVANT STUDENT BODIES, WILL CONTINUE TO BE
CONSULTED IN THE PROCESS LEADING UP TO THE
RECOMMENDATION BY MANAGEMENT TO COUNCIL OF STATED
FEES FOR THE ENSUING YEAR;
f)
FEES SET WILL CONSIDER THE IMPACT OF FEES ON STUDENT
AFFORDABILITY;
g)
FEES WILL BE SET IN ACCORDANCE WITH CURRENT GOVERNMENT
POLICY;
h)
THE RATIONALE FOR THE FEES SET WILL BE TRANSPARENT AND
WILL ENDEAVOUR TO DEMONSTRATE VALUE FOR LEARNERS;
i)
THE PROCESS OF FEE SETTING WILL RECOGNISE THAT THERE ARE
DIFFERENTIAL COSTS AND POTENTIAL BENEFITS TO THE
INDIVIDUAL AND THE UNIVERSITY OF STUDY FOR DIFFERENT
TYPES OF COURSE; AND
j)
THE STRUCTURE OF THE UNIVERSITY’S FEES WILL BE CONSISTENT
WITH THE GOALS OF THE FEE STRATEGY REVIEW I.E. THAT FEES
STRUCTURES BE ADMINISTRATIVELY STRAIGHT FORWARD AND
PRACTICAL
Paddy Nicol
Executive Secretary
22 April 2014
Page 2 of 4
C14/53 – March
Part I
C14/40 – March
Part I
MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL
E-BALLOT: FEES SETTING PRINCIPLES AND PROCESS
11 APRIL 2014
1.0
Purpose
The purpose of this document is to outline the process and timeline for setting next year’s
domestic, international and non-tuition fees.
2.0
Outline of the Fees Setting Process
The process for setting 2015 fees for domestic and international students will follow a
similar path to previous years, namely:
•
•
•
•
Fee benchmarking exercises undertaken in relation to international, domestic and nontuition fees (April);
Principles for setting fees to be agreed by Council by this e-ballot;
Recommendations relating to international, domestic and non-tuition fees considered
by the Senior Leadership Team in May;
International and non-tuition fees decision paper considered by Council at the 4 July
2014 meeting
In relation to the setting of domestic tuition fees, the Annual Maximum Fee Movement
(AMFM) Policy places restrictions on the maximum percentage that domestic tuition fees
can be raised. A recommendation regarding Domestic Tuition Fees can be considered at
the July Council meeting, pending confirmation of the AMFM Policy by the Ministry of
Education, likely to be returned at the end of July / early August.
3.0
Fees Setting Principles
3.1
The set of principles to guide fees setting were first approved by Council in 2012 (C12/38
– May Part I). The principles have been developed over a number of years and minor
updates are normally made on an annual basis.
An important feature of the principles is that students are engaged with throughout the fees
setting process. This will continue to occur via meetings between the University and
Student Associations, and at various student fora.
Page 3 of 4
C14/53 – March
Part I
Current Fees Setting Principles were approved by Council in 2013.
3.2
4.0
It is recommended that the Fees Setting Principles 2014 for 2015 fees be guided by the
same principles, namely (change strikethrough and highlighted):
k)
Fees set are aligned with the advancement of University strategy as outlined in
Massey University Defining – the Road to 2020 Strategy;
l)
The areas that will be funded by, and benefits gained from, increases in fees will be
made clear;
m)
The University’s market position, i.e. relativity of fees with other universities, will
be considered in setting fees, which for domestic fees may require consideration of
an Annual Maximum Fee Movement (AMFM) exception application; appropriate
benchmarking will inform the setting of international fees;
n)
Fees set are consistent with the budget priorities and fiscal projects as outlined in
the University’s 20134 Budget Policy Statement and designed to ensure the
University’s financial sustainability;
o)
The Students’ Associations, on behalf of all students, and other relevant student
bodies, will continue to be consulted in the process leading up to the
recommendation by Management to Council of stated fees for the ensuing year;
p)
Fees set will consider the impact of fees on student affordability;
q)
Fees will be set in accordance with current Government policy;
r)
The rationale for the fees set will be transparent and will endeavour to demonstrate
value for learners;
s)
The process of fee setting will recognise that there are differential costs and
potential benefits to the individual and the University of study for different types of
course; and
t)
The structure of the University’s fees will be consistent with the goals of the Fee
Strategy Review i.e. that fees structures be administratively straight forward and
practical.
Recommendations
It is recommended that Council:
1. Note the process and timeline for setting international, domestic and non-tuition
fees for 2015; and
2. Approve the amended Fees Setting Principles 2014 as set out in Section 3.2.
Stuart Morriss
Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations, International and University Registrar
Page 4 of 4
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