K-8 Mathematics Review Teacher Survey

K-8 Mathematics Review Teacher Survey
Anchorage School District Council of Great City Schools: Teacher Survey
Report Date: 2‐16‐2011 Section 1: General Information [Pages 2‐4]
Section 2: Textbook [Pages 5‐47] Section 3: Support Materials [Pages 48‐53] Section 4: Professional Development [Pages 54‐72] Section 5: Math in the School/Classroom [Pages 73‐120] Section 6: Math Assessment Data [Pages 121‐134] Section 7: Concluding Question [Pages 135‐152] Council of Great City Schools:
Teacher Survey of the Anchorage School District
Report Date: 2-16-2011
As a step in the Council of Great City Schools mathematics review process the Anchorage School District administered a survey to teachers
between February 1 and February 11, 2011. The survey was designed and approved by the Council of Great City Schools with input from the
Anchorage School District’s Math and Assessment and Evaluation Departments. Each section includes quantitative tables followed by the openended responses. Open response are not edited in order to keep authenticity.
GENERAL INFORMATION
Table 1: Number of Respondents
Population Type
Total Teachers
Number of Respondents
Anchorage School District
1536
607
K-8 Math Teachers
*95% confidence interval; a margin of error between ±0% & ±5% is strong
Response Rate
Margin of Error*
39.52%
±4%
Table 2: Grade Level Taught
Grade Level
N
607
481
78
Kindergarten
72
Grade 1
82
Grade 2
69
Grade 3
59
Grade 4
57
Grade 5
62
Grade 6
43
Combo
37
Middle School Grades**
Grade 6
14
Grade 7
31
Grade 8
28
Combo
5
No Designation***
48
*Elementary School respondents were teachers in schools who do not serve grades 7 and 8.
**Middle School respondents were teachers in schools who served grades 7 and 8.
***Combination teachers who could not be connected with elementary or middle school status.
Overall
All Elementary*
All Middle**
Elementary School Grades*
Column %
100.00%
86.05%
13.95%
11.86%
13.51%
11.37%
9.72%
9.39%
10.21%
7.08%
6.10%
2.31%
5.11%
4.61%
0.82%
7.91%
2 | P a g e Table 3: How many years have you taught at this grade level?
1 year or less
Overall
All Elementary
All Middle
Elementary School Grades
Middle School Grades
Kindergarten
Grade 1
Grade 2
Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade 5
Grade 6
Combo
Grade 6
Grade 7
Grade 8
Combo
No Designation
N
96
75
15
8
9
13
13
12
5
3
12
2
7
3
3
6
Row %
15.95%
15.69%
19.23%
11.11%
11.11%
18.84%
22.41%
21.05%
8.06%
6.98%
33.33%
14.29%
22.58%
10.71%
60.00%
13.04%
2-5 years
N
228
192
25
24
32
22
25
26
36
18
9
4
7
14
0
11
Row %
37.87%
40.17%
32.05%
33.33%
39.51%
31.88%
43.10%
45.61%
58.06%
41.86%
25.00%
28.57%
22.58%
50.00%
0.00%
23.91%
6-10 years
N
155
117
22
15
24
17
14
15
11
14
7
5
10
5
2
16
Row %
25.75%
24.48%
28.21%
20.83%
29.63%
24.64%
24.14%
26.32%
17.74%
32.56%
19.44%
35.71%
32.26%
17.86%
40.00%
34.78%
11-15 years
N
72
57
9
14
7
11
4
2
7
6
6
0
6
3
0
6
Row %
11.96%
11.92%
11.54%
19.44%
8.64%
15.94%
6.90%
3.51%
11.29%
13.95%
16.67%
0.00%
19.35%
10.71%
0.00%
13.04%
More than 15
years
N
Row %
51
8.47%
37
7.74%
7
8.97%
11
15.28%
9
11.11%
6
8.70%
2
3.45%
2
3.51%
3
4.84%
2
4.65%
2
5.56%
3
21.43%
1
3.23%
3
10.71%
0
0.00%
7
15.22%
Table 4: Do you have a major or minor in Math?
Yes
Overall
All Elementary
All Middle
Elementary School
Grades
Middle School Grades
No Designation
Kindergarten
Grade 1
Grade 2
Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade 5
Grade 6
Combo
Grade 6
Grade 7
Grade 8
Combo
N
64
33
27
0
1
5
4
6
6
8
3
3
10
13
1
4
No
Row %
10.70%
6.96%
34.62%
0.00%
1.28%
7.25%
7.02%
10.53%
9.68%
18.60%
8.11%
21.43%
32.26%
46.43%
20.00%
8.70%
N
534
441
51
71
77
64
53
51
56
35
34
11
21
15
4
42
Row %
89.30%
93.04%
65.38%
100.00%
98.72%
92.75%
92.98%
89.47%
90.32%
81.40%
91.89%
78.57%
67.74%
53.57%
80.00%
91.30%
3 | P a g e Table 5: Have you taken any additional math courses beyond what was required for your degree?
Yes
Overall
All Elementary
All Middle
Elementary School
Grades
Middle School Grades
No Designation
Kindergarten
Grade 1
Grade 2
Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade 5
Grade 6
Combo
Grade 6
Grade 7
Grade 8
Combo
N
362
281
56
34
45
37
39
36
38
24
28
11
23
21
1
25
No
Row %
60.43%
58.79%
74.67%
47.89%
54.88%
53.62%
66.10%
65.45%
61.29%
55.81%
75.68%
84.62%
76.67%
77.78%
20.00%
54.35%
N
237
197
19
37
37
32
20
19
24
19
9
2
7
6
4
21
Row %
39.57%
41.21%
25.33%
52.11%
45.12%
46.38%
33.90%
34.55%
38.71%
44.19%
24.32%
15.38%
23.33%
22.22%
80.00%
45.65%
4 | P a g e TEXTBOOK
Table 6: What math textbook do you use most of the time with your students?
Everyday Math
N
Row %
Overall
389
All Elementary
363
All Middle
4
Elementary Kindergarten
51
School
Grade 1
67
Grades
Grade 2
53
Grade 3
44
Grade 4
41
Grade 5
49
Grade 6
36
Combo
22
Middle
Grade 6
3
School
Grade 7
0
Grades
Grade 8
0
Combo
1
No Designation
22
*Other- Please see open response.
72.85%
86.63%
5.41%
87.93%
89.33%
89.83%
84.62%
91.11%
89.09%
90.00%
62.86%
23.08%
0.00%
0.00%
20.00%
53.66%
N
Saxon
Row %
33
30
0
2
6
5
4
4
4
1
4
0
0
0
0
3
6.18%
7.16%
0.00%
3.45%
8.00%
8.47%
7.69%
8.89%
7.27%
2.50%
11.43%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
7.32%
Investigations
N
Row
%
3
0.56%
2
0.48%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
1
2.50%
1
2.86%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
1
2.44%
Number World
N
Row
%
5
0.94%
3
0.72%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
1
1.92%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
2
5.71%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
2
4.88%
Mathscape
N
Row %
N
Other*
Row %
45
0
42
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
7
25
9
1
3
59
21
28
5
2
1
3
0
2
2
6
3
5
17
3
10
11.05%
5.01%
37.84%
8.62%
2.67%
1.69%
5.77%
0.00%
3.64%
5.00%
17.14%
23.08%
16.67%
65.38%
60.00%
24.39%
8.43%
0.00%
56.76%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
53.85%
83.33%
34.62%
20.00%
7.32%
Table 7: How would you rate the current math textbook you are using?
Poor
Everyday Math
Saxon
Investigations
Number World
Mathscape
Other
N
53
1
0
0
19
5
Row %
13.62%
3.03%
0.00%
0.00%
42.22%
8.77%
Inadequate
N
Row %
78
20.05%
1
3.03%
0
0.00%
1
20.00%
14
31.11%
4
7.02%
Fair
N
126
2
0
1
11
9
Row %
32.39%
6.06%
0.00%
20.00%
24.44%
15.79%
N
107
13
2
3
1
19
Good
Row %
27.51%
39.39%
66.67%
60.00%
2.22%
33.33%
N
25
16
1
0
0
20
Excellent
Row %
6.43%
48.48%
33.33%
0.00%
0.00%
35.09%
5 | P a g e OPEN RESPONSES REGARDING TEXTBOOKS
(Open responses are unedited to keep authenticity)
Open Response for “Table 6: What math textbook do you use most of the time with your students?” Other category.
• Algebra I
• Connecting Math and Everyday Math
• Connecting Math Concepts
• Currently Teaching Math Support (Navigation)
• EDM teacher's manual. No textbook for students.
• GLE resources and EDM resources Touchmath
• Heath
• Heath, EDM, and Number Worlds
• Houghton Mifflin, Saxon math, Number Worlds
• I use several different books as I'm a Resource sped teacher
• Math Their Way
• Mathscape and supplement with Math Connects
• McDougal Course 3
• McDougal Litell
• Mcdougal Littell
• McDougal Littell
• McDougal Littell - Pre Algebra
• McDougal Littell Algebra, and Geometry
• McDougal Littell Algebra, Geometry, Pre-Algebra
• McDougal Littell Pre-Algebra
• McDougal Littell PreAlgebra and Algebra 1
• McDougal Littell:Algebra, Geometry, Algebra II, Pre-Algebra
• McDougal-Littel Pre-Algebra
• McDougal-Littell
• McDougal/Littel PRE-ALGEBRA
• mcdougall littell
• mcdougall Littell
• McDougall Littell Pre-Algebra book and Algebra book
• MCP
• Montessori Method
• Multiple sources
• none
• Pre-Algebra
• Pre-Algebra McDougall Littell
• Pre-algebra, Algebra 1 McDougal Littell
• Prentice Hall Pre-Algebra
• Saxon
• saxon and number world
• silver burdett
• Steck Vaughan
• Supplemental Work
• Trans Math
• Trans Math Level 3
• TransMath
• TransMath by CambiumLearning
6 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
TransMath Curriculum
Transmath level 1 and 2
Transmath with 5th grade
Transmath-Special Education
Van DeWalle Texts
various teacher support materials; Evan Moore, etc.
Visual Math
Weekly: Mountain Math, timed facts tests, Math Minutes tests
What I use and what the district purchased is different, my answers below will reflect my opinion of the "current district
textbook/program."
Everyday Math Open Responses:
What do you see as the strengths of the math textbook you are using with students?
• every day examples
ƒ -covers concepts well vs. isolated skills -games and other hands on activities to assist with concept understanding and skill
practice -excellent teachers' manual
ƒ -new ideas -challenging -lots of problem solving
ƒ -simple instructions -ample practice worksheets provided -format is easy to understand
ƒ *good with word problems *good program for student who excel at math
ƒ *The students are comfortable with the program. *We have all the materials *The Online support is great *The lessons are
well organized with review and new material. *Study Links help reinforce what was taught
ƒ Easy to find what student needs 2. Good correlation with workbook 3. Offers numerous ways to see a concept
ƒ A lot of material is covered.
ƒ A lot of resources to use for lessons, such as games and supplemental activities.
ƒ A lot of the curriculum aligns with Alaska State Standards. Multiple ways of solving problems are explored. The math games are
great!
ƒ A variety of exposure to various math concepts.
ƒ A wide range of topics are covered. Advanced learners stay challenged.
ƒ Absolutely none. I really don't want to be too cheeky. The only positive thing the sixth grade EDM book has about it is the color.
I like purple.
ƒ Advanced thinking
ƒ analytical thinking.
ƒ application of knowledge exposure to different math skills- "spiral" interesting hands on activities
ƒ appropriate for k
ƒ At this point I cannot think of any strengths of the EDM program other than that the students are introduced to a variety of
concepts through out the duration of the program.
ƒ Average to above average children have the opportunity to explore.
ƒ Based on National Standards resulting from the TIMMS report. Differentiated Spiraled--based on Best Practice and current
Brain Research Dynamic Multiple venues of support for teachers, students, parents
ƒ Building conceptual understanding Challenges students to problem-solve Spiral approach ties concepts and skills together
Introduces students to advanced concepts early Excellent use of manipulatives Excellent layout in math journals
ƒ building math concepts using manipulatives to increase understanding multiple approaches to solve a problem
ƒ Can be taught to a variety of different levels.
ƒ challenges high students
ƒ challenges proficient and advanced students
ƒ Common sense is stressed.
ƒ concept development, use of games, some use of manipulatives
ƒ Concepts are taught along with the algorithms
ƒ conceptual development, writing and problem solving activities and use of alternative algorithms
ƒ content
7 | P a g e ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Covers the skills with games. Lessons are short which is needed for Kindergarten. Covers time, coins, counting, and
measureing.
Creativity with some lessons.
Currently, there is no math textbook for 1st grade.
daily review
decent review materials, great parent resources, great online math activities
Different approaches to some math concepts are helpful for some of the students
Different methods of problem solving
Different problems everyday for review.
differentiation opportunities in most lesson plans
Does cover a breadth of content. Exposes students to many concepts in math and is challenging for those students that math
comes easy.
Does not require a lot of writing for the kindergarten student.
doesn't hold students back, provides alternative ways to do math computation
Easily scripted, easy to follow text, good reference text for students. Good layout.
EDM always helps put a picture in the kids' heads for any new math concept.
Encourages problem solving and critical thinking skills.
Encourages use of manipulatives Encourages problem solving strategies if done well
Everyday Math does introduce many mathematical concepts, it does continually review previously taught material, it encourages
manipulative use
Everyday Math gives the students an opportunity to think outside of the box to solve math problems
Excellent hands-on learning for young students; Literature connections; Home-school connections; Daily routines; Theme
related activities (100's day, etc.)
Exposed to higher level concepts
Exposing kids to different ways of learning math.
Exposure to complex concepts. Done in ways they understand and can relate with. Fun.
exposure to lots of concepts
finding a variety of ways to solve a problem
Focus on problem solving and communication of mathematical thinking.
Focuses understanding the problem and the right steps to reaching the answer.
games
Games
games to reinforce concepts taught
games, fun and meaningful connections, use of manipulatives
games, manipulatives, most pages of mathbook are friendly for kids, mathbox pages
gives many different options to teach concepts to different learning styles
Good base with manipulatives, learning basic facts through games
Good challenges for higher thinkers.
Good content with higher level thinking
Good hands on learning activities Students enjoy the games
good higher level thinking problems, great diversity of strategies
Good ideas, but the spiral format does not work well with our population of students.
good illustrations and glossary
Good program for a school with a non-transient student population, and all teachers/grade levels teaching the program with
fidelity.
GREAT exposure to many skills and aspects of math. Making it truly real world for kids.
Great for gifted children.
Great for high achieving students, strong readers and students with an aptitude for math.
great for problem solving and higher level thinking skills
Hands on activities for kindergarteners.
Hands on activities use of manipulatives.
Hands on activities.
8 | P a g e ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
hands on games and activities
hands-on and games
hands-on games
handson activities, and games
Has very challenging content
Having the games in there they are great practice for the kids.
High expectations
high level thinking, challenging, covers a lot of skills
higher level thinking, lots of reading incorporated
Higher level thinking, math games, computer enhanced lessons/games, SRB
Honestly, the only strengths of this textbook I see is the supplemental computer programs and the math boxes in their Journals.
I don't see any strength in Every Day Math
I don't see strengths with this program--it is NOT beneficial in any way for students.
I enjoy the spiral effects of revisiting skills
I like how it spirals and continues to build upon concepts
I like how we review things and practice the same concept over again.
I like that Everyday Mathematics teaches students algebra at a very age. I like the games and the home links that the students
play and complete.
I like that it has an online version of the student book so the kids can look back at home.
I like that we are constantly reviewing and building. I also like that we introduce and do not expect mastering the first time.
I like the center ideas that are given for Kindergarten
I like the daily reviews on what has been learned.
I like the fact that it does spiral and you don't have to master one concept before going to the next
I like the repetition of skills, the scaffolding of skills, the differentiation strategies, the games that reinforce skills, the enrichment
activities, the reference book, the easy to use teacher's guide, the hands on lessons, and the consistency between grade level
skills.
I like the spiral affect with EDM and what skills should be secure and what skills are developmental.
I like the spiraling. I like the focus on different strategies.
I like the structure of the main daily lesson. It's great for the kids who can are strong math kids.
I like the Study Link Reviews that are provided as well as the assessment tools and enrichment activities.
I like the way it revisits topics already introduced before taking it up a notch. Also, this is a way for constant review.
I like the way the kids learn about why math works, rather than memorizing formulas. I like how the curriculum spirals a revisits
topics.
I like where it shows students the page to refer to in the Student Reference Book.
I love that Everyday math presents math in several different ways. No child learns the same and this curriculum provides
instruction for most of my students.
I love the spiraling curriculum - I feel that it greatly benefits students. One of the things that has made the biggest difference for
my students has been the number of different algorithms taught in EDM. Not only do they make sense, but there are multiple
ways to teach each operation. Kids will definitely find something that works for them.
I recently learned the teacher guides list similar gle's addressed at lower grade levels and what those key lessons are...I hope to
explore this soon
I see no strengths in our textbook for EDM.
I see that concepts aren't brand new. They understand things much quicker because it is built upon knowledge they gained in
previous years using the same curriculum.
I see that Every Day Math offers activities for students at all levels of skill, they offer a game to help student practice the new skill
or build upon a previously learned one, and Every Day math has a student journal that has many different types of learning
activities (charts, tables, graphs) that help students of many learning styles.
If you like the spiral philosophy, the text book is good. It is not good for mastery of skills.
Insightful thinking about concepts.
Introduces students to a wide variety of concepts.
introduces, in a very basic way, many math concepts to young children (I teach Kindergarten)
introducing topics early coming back and reveiwing everday through math boxes
9 | P a g e ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Introduction
Introduction of algebra and higher math skills in an understandable context for the grade level.
It calls on them to think big, to think conceptually.
It challenges the higher functioning students.
It challenges the stronger students.
It comes with a workbook and has math boxes for review of concepts already taught. It comes with math games to solidify math
concepts being taught.
It covers a lot more concepts then any other progrogram I have used.
It covers a variety of skills, and it reviews often.
It covers all curriculum areas.
It covers many different aspects of math.
It covers most strands of the GLEs. It has games to play that the kids really enjoy.
It covers quite a bit a material. Plenty of material to get through the year. Games
It does a good connecting math to everyday life
it does incorporate manipulatives
It follows some of the gle's the district has, and it gives the students good practice.
It gets students thinking concretely and abstractly about math.
It gives a hands-on, conceptual approach to math. Students learn why numbers work certain ways rather than only memorizing
facts. It is easy to keep students engaged and learning because movement, manipulation, and teamwork are built into the
program.
It gives lots of activities, games to reinforce skills, lots of math vocabulary and introduces lots of math skills.
It gives the students wide exposure to many things.
It has high expectations for kids. It shows multiple methods for solving problems. It utilizes games to learn skills.
It has lots of enrichment activities and games. It has good life application problems.
It has many games and is interesting.
It has problem solving.
It helps teachers differentiate so that different math level are being taught.
It highlights that math touches most areas of life.
It incorporates many games into the learning experience.
It introduces some high level concepts and does require them to really think about some things in different ways.
It introduces the children to a wide variety of math concepts.
It introduces the students to almost everything that they will be tested on, on the SBA.
It is a manipulative-based program
It is current.
It is fine for high achieving students.
It is great for the average and above average students.
It is nice that children get to see the concept several times.
It loops and constantly revisits concepts.
It plants the seeds to some higher order skills.
It provides a strong curriculum for students performing on or above grade level and introduces them to advanced concepts in
math.
It really does teach every area that is needed
It stresses problem solving and explaining how an answer was found, which are both higher level thinking skills.
It teaches method and why we solve things a certain way. When I was a kid we were told just to do it a certain way and don't ask
why you do it that way.
It's diverse with activities that promote higher order thinking skills.
It's easy to follow.
It's perfect exploration for kindy kids.
Just having one and letting them get used to it before heading off to 1st grade.
kids feel it's interesting
Lots of concepts.
Lots of extensions and games! Great website
10 | P a g e ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
lots of games, revisits concepts to keep it all fresh
Lots of good things in there, different methodology, tries to teach understanding versus memorization.
Lots of hands on activities, time for exploring concepts, introduction to many higher-level concepts.
Lots of hands-on applications.
Lots of opportunities for practicing different skills, a spiraling curriculum, exposure to more challenging concepts
Lots of reading
Lots of resources like games and home links.
Lots of skills to work with....
making abstract concepts as concrete as possible
Manipulatives
Manipulatives Short, developmentally appropriate activities
manipulatives, games, writing, challenging
Many hands on activities, online games
Math Boxes have practices for mixed skills, The program comes with many games utilizing different skills, Student Reference
Books are useful, Good for extension for gifted students
math boxes, review
Math games
Math games Investigative Explorations
math games, use of manipulatives, math boxes review.
Math Games;
Math games. The ITLG's are handy to use both at school and at home.
Math journal that is easy to transport home and back. Math reference book is useful to look up information at home.
Math Vocabulary, Critical Thinking, Review of Prior Mathematical Concepts
meets needs of above grade level students
mental math math in writing
Methods for developing concepts
multicultural content addresses most GLEs
National and State Standards in Math and Science
Nice illustrations and examples of how to's of solving problems
Nice spiraling. Very good whole class lessons
none
NONE
None, really.
None. It's assumed all kids reach 6th with known strands mastered..
Not a single strength
not sure unless confusing the parents is a strength
Nothing positive to say about Everyday Math!
Offering different ways to solve problems.
Offers a variety of algorithms for solving problems.
offers different ways of thinging
online games, games, online resources
Opportunity for skill practice in Math Boxes.
Options
Out of the box questions that appeal to more gifted students.
Parts A and B of assessments
Plenty of opportunity to think creatively to solve problems
plenty of review, variety of manipulatives available, works with multiple modalities, comes with a useful student workbook
prety good oin pree algebra
Primarily, it emphasizes strong problem-solving skills, using multiple ways for the students to learn. It promotes creativity in math
reasoning, rather than rote learning. It provides games that can help students practice skills in a more motivating way.
Problem solving
Problem Solving
11 | P a g e ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Problem Solving oriented, encourages higher levels of thinking.
problem solving skills...good for our high flyers
Problem solving.
promotes higher level thinking skills
Provides games, literature connection activities, opportunities to revisit material. Also the availability of the digital copy for
teacher computers!
Pushes kids to dialogue about their thinking of how they solved the problem. It is good for introducing many ways to complete
the same task (ie. traditional mult., lattice mult., partial products, etc). It is good for students with a concrete understanding of
math and are confident in their abilities and can complete multi-step functions or problems.
review of previous material throughout math boxes
Revisits concepts so they are not forgotten and then advances a little each time it is revisited.
Soem strengths include: enhanced vocabulary, variety of algorithms, examples in the SRB.
some deeper thinking activities
Some of the games and materials can be useful
Spiral - information taught in one grade is worked on the following year.
Spiral approach, encourages thinking skills, multiple ways to solve problems are encouraged and demonstrated, high correlation
to our GLE's
spiral curriculum, higher level thinking, covers most of the GLE/state standards. These strengths are also some of the
weaknesses when it comes to using the program in a Title school. I have taught this program in other grade levels and schools. I
was most success in schools where the students had high levels of English, thinking skills, assistance at home and math basics.
spiral curriculum, problem solving orientation, flexibility for differentiation
spiral curriculum...learning builds on itself through the grades. EDM is endorsed by the NCTM.
spiral use of a topic to expand on what is taught
Spiraling
Spiraling Variety of activities Literature links
Spiraling curriculum
Spiraling, Variety of Strategies and Algorithms presented, Many chances to practice
Spirals/repeats.
standards based
Strengths in the area of algebra and geometry
Strengths: organization math boxes. The color format and layouts are simple.
Students are building conceptual understanding while giving opportunities to practice the skills.
students are exposed to a lot of different concepts
students are given many tools to use as strategies
Teaches a variety of methods
Teaches problems solving, engaging, math games,
Teaches the curriculum well
teaching concepts and problem solving with the use of concrete materials
text is easy to read, interactive online games
That it does teach different strategies for multiplication, division, etc for those students who don't get it the traditional way.
That it has the students practice writing the date everyday.
That it spirals & keeps hitting on parts of math so children don't forget it.
That students can work on math skills by going on line and playing the math games in the skill they are weak in.
That the program is set up around the spiral effect of introducing something one year and then reintroducing it again the next.
The activities are age appropriate for kindergarten.
the amount of exploration is good
The amount of hands on experiences that it affords the students with learning new concepts.
The book gives a new teacher some basic guidelines on how to set up for Morningor/ Afternoon circle time.
The challenge problems are a BIG stretch and definitely push my students to think critically. I do love the Assessment assistant
program that allows me to create practice assessments and additional focused drill sheets.
The curriculum is spiraling. There are many opportunities for students to write How they are solving the problem. Students may
use a variety of problem solving strategies. Manipulatives and games are used.
12 | P a g e ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
The EDM games and somewhat familiar textbook set up such as the Lesson pages and Math Boxes.
The extra time in the schedule gives me a chance to teach to mastery in many areas.
the games
The games
The games and excitement level
The games are wonderful and I love the ideas that it gives teachers
The hands on and spiral
The material is developmentally appropriate for my students' age group.
The materials are easy to use.
The math boxes are a good review that I use to guide my supplemental instruction. This is needed greatly, see below. I
suppose the games are good, but I never have time to play them in the classroom because of the re-teaching needed.
The math boxes are great for review of concepts that have been taught.
The math boxes do spiral.
The math boxes provide for good practice.
The math curriculum provides students a large scope of math topics.
The math games
The math games and manipulatives that come with the program are great.
The math games get students excited about math.
The opportunities that it provides for various levels of learning
The organization
The problem solving strategy focus and the story problems based on experimenting or real world situations are excellent.
The program differentiates instruction well for a variety of learning styles.
The program stretches kids thinking in valuable ways. It approaches problems in a different ways and offers alternate ways to
think about math.
The spiral effect
the spiral system is works to a degree
The spiral, the many strategies and the hands on activities.
The spiraling of the program.
The strengths of the EDM textbook is that the lessons are easy to follow.
The students are exposed to a lot of different math concepts.
The students get to use manipulatives and see how math works.
The teacher's edition has lots and lots of good activities.
The use of manipulatives.
The use of more realistic problems that they might encounter in real life.
The vocabulary is not continued in the upper grades. Some vocabulary changes.
The way the program spirals each year and the way it challenges students to apply their learning of concepts.
The way they develop concepts
The workbook is good in that it introduces the topics and gives some practice. I like the math boxes as intro and review. The
program tends to lead students to higher level thinking, which is fantastic for those who are ready, but many are not ready when
the concepts are presented, and it confuses some.
There are a good number of activities to use with students. The math boxes are a nice (and constant) review of learned material.
There are a lot of good resources that can be used for different levels.
There are many hands on concrete activities to go with the lessons. Students are taught multiple algorithms. The spiral design
of the program allows for concepts to be taught over and over.
There are no strengths.
There are some good enrichment activities and the open response questions really push the students' thinking.
There is a lot of reading required, which is "real-life" math.
They like the manipulatives and the template
touches on all standards
touching on subjects more that one time
transfers from school to school
Use of manipulatives
13 | P a g e ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Variety of material in each lesson.
Variety of subject matter
varried strategies for problem solving; family letters
Very age appropriate
Very wide variety of options and activities and things to do. Too many ideas to cover
Visually appealing.
Wide variety of material. I like the concepts of games, but do not think most of the games are designed for understanding the
concepts of mathematics.
With Everyday Math, the skills spiral back and are revisited.
What do you see as the weaknesses of the math textbook you are using with students?
ƒ not enough practice with concepts before moving on to another concept/skill - not enough fact practice - not family friendly parents do not understand the way concepts are taught and cannot help their children at home - confusing vocabulary/terms some concepts inappropriate for grade level mastery (eg. counting mixed coins, time to quarter hour)
• -kids still don't master basic facts quickly enough -jumps around topics a bit too much
• -many concepts covered at one time -not enough drill/practice that the teacher doesn't have to create -I think students should
use notebook paper instead of journals as that is what they will use in the upper grades beyond the EDM curriculum -some
language in the text is EDM and not necessarily REAL math vocabulary
• -mixes too many concepts at once at times -not enough manipulative / visual activities for upper grades -needs more built in
formative assessments vs. unit tests
• *lack of practice for basic math facts
• 1. It assumes the students have many skills in place. 2. The spiraling approach does not work for the population
of
students I am teaching.
• 1.One of the weaknesses of EDM is the whole "spiraling" effect. They only touch on certain concepts and expect that "in time"
the students will eventually develop a full understanding of what is being taught. In my experience if a student doesn't understand
a concept when it is being taught, the chances of them miraculously understanding it a year later, is pretty slim. 2. Another
weakness is that many times in the Unit Assessments there are problems on the assessment that were not covered in the unit at
all. This I have found tends to frustrate many of my students and decreases their confidence in math when they are asked to
solve problems that were not cover in the unit. 3. I also feel that the EDM text book does not focus enough of practicing basic
concepts such as multiplication/ division, which in my opinion are critical concepts needing to be mastered in 5th grade
• A lot of written directions. This makes it difficult for students who cannot read at grade level able to work independently.
• At times it feels like there are too many option in a lesson, too much to do.
• basic skills mastery is lacking, probability is present in the new edition, but not strong (sometimes confusing) Not really "taught"
in the lessons, moves on to new concepts too quickly, most students need more time to work with concepts/practice, pace is
quick, wish time to explore manipulatives more
• Because of the spiraling nature of this curriculum, not enough time is spent on concepts and skills to ensure mastery. This is a
disadvantage for military students who move frequently.
• Below level students never succeed as new concepts are introbefore they have barely conquered any. The last edition
hasaddressed this a little more. Children tend to be frustrated and lost. The TE is not teacher friendly.
• Bounces back and forth...not consistent
• calculation practice
• calculation, concepts move quickly
• Challenging content is sometimes overwhelming for students
• concept focus is nil to zero
• Concepts move too quickly for first grade students to fully grasp and master concepts.
• Consistency and time with one concept is lacking.
• difficult for parents to support students because it is so different from what they are familiar with, difficult to stay on track with
pacing!
• Difficult to differentiate. Not enough practice of the skills required of mastery.
• Directions are not easy to read for younger students. Not enough practice on new skills.
14 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Do not like the spiral of information. Math needs to be more time with skills, once students have strong skills they can do more
with the abstract. Also EDM focuses on concepts that are not expected of 6th grade. EDM has a very fast pace expected of
students. It is very hard to go to the next lesson when students are not grasping the concepts. The other issue with EDM is that
most of the lesson are expecting the teacher to talk and demonstrate the entire lesson. Students sit and stare instead of being
engaged. I have had to work very hard to find a better of using the material that is student friendly.
Does not allow for a lot of traditional pen and paper practice. Few fact practices.
Does not allow for mastery of a concept before moving to another.
Does not allow for students to become secure in the necessary goals. The spiral is not appropriate, especially when you are
working with students that have high transiency and absenteeism rates. It provides too many methods for algorithms that leads
to confusion. Students need time for mastery. Students are frustrated, teachers are frustrated, and parents are frustrated. Even
when teachers teach with fidelity, the results are the same for the Title I schools I have worked in. Scores significantly drop
starting in third grade because the majority of students do not have a strong foundation of basic skills. You can even look at the
GLE reference sheets that state what GLE's are reflected in lessons. Many lessons have GLE's from 1 to 2 grade levels above
the grade level being taught.
Does not require mastery of a skill before moving on. Difficult for parents to understand. First grade teachers complain that
students come unprepared mathmatically.
Does not stay on a concept long enough for students to master. I do not like the continual "spiral" for learning that it does.
Does not teach in a sequence that students can understand and use. Why teach fractions before division?
does not teach skills to mastery before jumping to another strand
does not teach to mastery, language heavy
Does not teach to mastery, lessons vary from day to day,
Doesn't focus on one concept long enough
Doesn't give enough practice for each topic and what you work on during the unit isn't always on the test at the end.
Doesn't offer frequent review of basic facts
Doesn't spend enough time on 1 concept. Jumps too fast
Doesn't spend enough time on the basics (ie. addition, subtraction, time, money, place value, etc) and also jumps around way
too much.
Doesn't teach anything to anyplace close to a proficient or even needing practice level.....just confuses kids and frustrates those
who think they are good at math.....too many words at the primary level..kids open the book...anf automatically think they can't do
math
EDM assumes far too much uniformity in what students know. Using various methods for math operations tends to confuse
struggling students. Many students have major gaps in foundational skills and EDM provides far too little practice and/or time to
develop mastery. The idea of "spiraling" lessons through the grades too often translates into a downward spiral for students who
struggle with math, whether because of learning challenges or life challenges, such as being ELL, transiency, or other upheavals
in students' family lives.
EDM could include more practice of basic computation skills
EDM has ADD. There is little to no reinforcement of skills. Students learn a particular skill one day, then move on to something
different almost immediately. Also, there is far too much verbiage. Many EDM lessons resemble a reading test more than math
curriculum. This is off-putting for most students, especially those who may have reading difficulties.
EDM is a spiraled curriculum. It does not promote mastery. Quality teachers find that they need to supplement it to provide a
comprehensive program. As a primary teacher, I found that I had to prepare most of the games which was considerably time
consuming.
Even with the math boxes there are not enough practice pages to foster mastery in several areas
For our population of students, it is simply too difficult. It introduces algebra concepts in first grade that aren't really necessary
and are confusing. Many of our parents have a difficult time understanding the terminology, and do not have access to the online
resources because they do not have computers. The parent letters do not come in their native language and are too wordy in
English.
For some students, its just too much. 'Drill and Practice' seems to work better for them.
Giving problems in Math Boxes that skills have not been taught.
Goes overboard with skills they do not need, and it doesn't touch enough on skills they do need. I know that every good math
teacher utilizes supplemental materials, but with EDM, that seems like all I do. Being a 6th grade teacher, I feel it is important to
15 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
prepare them for middle school, but this curriculum does an extremely poor job and an abundance of supplemental materials are
a must.
Hate the spiral-most math concepts naturally spiral-don't like the random math boxes (seat work should be more focused and
engaging not so random)
Hitting on so many areas and concepts of math without teaching for mastery. Also, the text has so much information that it can
become overwhelming.
How quickly everything moves.
I believe that it needs more manipulatives
I do not have enough time to complete all of the activities for each lesson. Also, the Study Links are difficult for my students,
especially the ELL students.
I do not like the "spiral" of math concepts. The kids do not have enough time o understand a math concept before moving on to
a new one and then returning to an old concept.
I do not like the fact that there is not enough practice on new concepts, and that students are not mastering what they learn
before they move on. I believe that sometimes drill is important and that you need to learn the steps to multi-step problems not
just why the steps are done.
I don't have any weaknesses to report.
I don't like the spiral method, it doesn't teach to mastery of a concept.
I don't see any weaknesses in the actual curriculum. The weaknesses I see are in availability of extra help/time to work in ability
groups.
I don't. I do hear of it in the upper grades though. A lot of parents do not like it.
I feel more time should be spent on some concepts....multiplication/division........
I feel that for primary students we need to teach the basic skills to mastery. I also noticed my students have difficulty with the
amount of reading in EDM.
I feel that the math curriculum for kindergarten is lacking in many ways. We do not have the necessary tools to prepare students
for first grade. I have to create my own supplements.
I feel the "spiral teachingt" is not necessarily the best method to help students understand concepts
I have taught K, 1, and 6th grade using EDM. Everyday Math is a great program, but it's entire premise is based upon a
scaffolding system. This is an ineffective curriculum to have in a military school where students are here three years at most.
The weakness is that it is assumed students have the basics. Intermediate students are at an automatic disadvantage because
so much of EDM has been scaffolded and they have none of that prior knowledge.
I have to supplement a lot with my own materials and lessons.
I know that the concepts spiral and repeat themselves, but it seems if they are not getting it we should not move on.......
I like this format better than any other I have used. Big jumps in reading from 1st to 2nd. A lot more material to cover also.
I see that Every Day Math has a wide spiral instructional method that often moves too quickly from a newly learned skill that by
the time the skill is used again, the students have to be taught all over again.
I think the actual math lessons and directions for teacher's can be improved greatly. Also, the amount of journal pages and
worksheets attached to each lesson are overwhelming. Also the pacing guide is very hard to keep up with.
I think there should be more lessons on elapsed time, money, and making change
I think too much breadth is covered and the spiral is too big, students need to master some things and there is not enough time
spent on the basics.
I used to say that there was too much reading for students to do. But now that we use Interactive whiteboards the kids can read
along and do the work pages together.
I would like to have more daily living kinds of activities like cooking.
If a child is struggling with a basic concept they continue to as the year progresses.
if I only followed EDM exclusively, students would not have a good foundation of basic math concepts - number identification,
number writing, 100's chart understanding, beginning math facts
If other staff do not use the edm lessons, language, and strategies (trade first subtraction, partial sums addition, flats-longscubes, etc.) our students are forever lost and confused. If a child is new to edm, it may a tough transition.
inadequate time for ELL students and students with learning disabilities to develop proficiency before the spiral moves them on.
Proficient math students have adequate time, struggling students never really master anything.
16 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Information taught not consistent with state grade level expectations. Spiraling skips about and thus students do not have the
opportunity to master the skills they need for their age level of learning.
It does not give enough practice for each concept and the lessons are often confusing and very time consuming to set up.
It does not give students enough practice to learn major concepts. It changes skills too quickly.
It does not help students who are weak or unsure in their math skills. Even the basic lesson is often conviluted and confusing.
It does not meet the needs of middle-low achieving students.
It does not really teach a sense of number, it does not focus on having kids really learn their teen numbers in a timely manner.
It does not supply enough practice and it does not match the state test.
It does not teach concepts to mastery and leaves students with holes.
It does not teach to mastery of the subjects. It moves too quickly and does not seem to flow from one topic to another. It has
concepts in the math boxes that have not been introduced yet which tends to frustrate the students and the teacher!
It does not teach to mastery, it has a spiraling program which does not help kids master key concepts.
It doesn't allow enough time for our students to master the skills. They need more time to master basic math skills. Money &
telling time is a challenge. NOT enough practice with math facts. Unit written assessments are not 1st grade friendly. Lots of
small font & lots of questions on the page, which is hard for the students to follow along.
It doesn't allow students to master a skill before jumping to several new skills- then comes back to the original skill weeks later.
It doesn't appropriately introduce and teach basic math concepts that need to be mastered in a given grade level. For example,
2 digit addition is not taught appropriately in EDM. This skill must be taught using materials outside the program. 2 digit addition
and subtraction with regrouping should be mastered in 2nd grade to be ready for third grade. Also, day 1, the very first page of
the EDM student math journal in 2nd grade has fill in the missing numbers using 3 and 4 digit numbers. Second graders don't
know how to work with numbers in the thousands on the first day of school! The first page starts out way too difficult for any 2nd
grade student. Right off the bat, you have to tell students just do the first two problems, you don't need to know how to do the
rest of the page in second grade. I am constantly telling them this is not what I had to do in second grade. I have to reassure
them they are only to be exposed to the high level skills and don't have to master it. That is hard for many to understand. My
perfectionist student was in tears no matter how much I reassured her she didn't have to have this skill at her age. Students have
problems with the ballpark estimates, I don't care for it either. I prefer to teach rounding to the nearest ten in 2nd grade. Another
example is in learning money and counting back change. I don't think a 7/8 year old needs to know how to count back change
yet.....they are learning the value of coins and beginning to count money. Much of the program isn't a good fit. There are a lot of
great lessons in EDM and again the games and manipulatives are great. With my class I must do every math journal page whole
group and if I didn't take time away from EDM to teach some important basic skills, my students would not be able to add and
subtract (regroup) 2 digit numbers.
It doesn't teach basic skills. Spiral concept doesn't work in a highly transient schoo.
It has too much reading for the struggling readers in my class.
It hops from one concept to another, so students do not grasp or remember the concept before moving on to the next. Also,
there is a lack of teaching the fundamentals (I supplement with other lessons and curriculum).
It introduces something and then moves on, the students do not have enough time to practice their new skills. Then kids will be
tested on things we've only covered once and not on other things we spent our time on.
It is a spiral curriculum, this does not work well for students who have not had previous experience with EDM. Our students are
very transient and most do not come to us with any EDM experience. Too much vocabulary that students need to know to be
successful.
It is a spiral program and does not focus on mastery of subject-matter. This especially hurts military students.
It is a spiraling program meant for students to use from K-6. We are a military school with students attending an average of 2-3
years, and coming into the curriculum without the basic foundation unless they started school here in kindergarten.
It is HARD. Students that struggle in math, struggle even more.
It is not developmentally appropriate, it is not sequential, it does not take students to mastery.
It is often difficult for students to understand or fully grasp concepts when there is a great deal of skipping around. I teach in a
transient population; they need lots of review and repetition.
It is very wordy. My reading special ed and ELL students have a hard time because it is so language intensive.
It jumps around too much from strand to strand. There is no learning to mastery. The review (math boxes) is often too hard to
be done independently. Many skills the kids should have mastered in second grade have to be retaught , and take WAY longer
for the kids to "get" than the pacing chart suggests. There is not enough practice problems.
17 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
It jumps between skills too quickly, not giving enough to practice the new skills, very little chance for mastery. I always have to
reteach many skills and provide my own materials to reteach.
It moves too quickly. I do not like the spiral method. Kids are left feeling like they are bad at Math. Every year I have students
come in not feeling like they understand Math. Having to build their self confidence up every year because of the Math program
is wrong. Also it is a lot of reading - students that are poor at reading do not do well with this program.
it needs more drill and practice
It only covers very shallow depth of each aspect of math.
It's about a grade level too high across the board.
It's pacing guide is very fast and it also seems to jump around a bit, which I believe confuses a lot of students.
Jumps around a lot.
jumps too fast from concept to concept (does not teach to mastery), verbiage is confusing to parents, games are too time
consuming to prep
Kids do not have basic numeration knowledge.
Knowing Math Facts for Addition and Subtraction
lack of basic addition and subtraction practice, the spiral method fails students who struggle with basic math concepts, too much
time needed to prep for each lesson.
Lack of computation and practice ; my students need the opportunity to master certain skills before moving on.
lack of practice moving quickly through material
leaves strugglers behind; way above and beyond ASD first grade standards--too challenging; too much reading for first graders
little computation, it moves quickly from one thing to another and often the kids feel frustrated because they don't "get it...parents
see that too
Little practice for students Too many concepts on Math Boxes pages Content requires supplemental materials for low achievers
Lots of language base and not enough drill and practice worksheets. Jumps and spirals to much.
Lots of lessons designed to put focus on "Everyday Math" curriculum and not enough focus on basic concepts of math as
required by state gle's.
Lots of reading
Lots of reading which hampers slow readers or kids with IEPs in reading
Many. Too little time to master the concepts, too little review of concepts, too much enrichment within the lesson that is
inappropriate for most of the students. Too many pieces and parts to lessons. Too much copying to do, using paper, machines,
and precious teacher time to do the basic lesson.
For our clientele, they need to spend much time and manipulative
experiences on the major concepts in order to understand subtraction and even addition before being given complex, multistep
problems. They need time to gain foundational skills and concepts. EDM moves too fast and is too broad.
Math Facts, Traditional Math Processes, Measurement
Math journals sometimes have math boxes that have questions on skills that haven't been introduced.
Misses basic math facts - can be somewhat advanced for some students.
moves to fast for students who need longer time to master a skill
moves to quickly for students to get a good grasp. Not consistant. Asks students to do 6 different types of problems at once often
never having seen them before.
moves too fast if I use the District/EDM pacing chart not enough math time during the week not enough planning and prep time
daily/weekly
Moves too fast.
moves too quickly through each lesson
Moves very quickly, just when they are getting it, EDM throws in a harder and harder problem (too quickly) Tough for sped kids
moving from skill to skill without mastery
My students struggle with reading, and many are ESL. They are virtually locked out of learning with EDM. I get them in 6th
grade. For whatever and numerous reasons, they CANNOT do what is expected by EDM. In addition, the 6th grade EDM text is
FAR AND ABOVE Alaska state standards for 6th grade. It's great to set our expectations high but frustrating for students who
find failure at this level. The 6th grade curriculum is almost useless if they have not mastered, say, their times tables. There is
very little practice. Students are also expected to do a lot of calculations in their heads (indeed, the workbook often gives no
room for pencil work.) It is beyond frustrating to be tied to a tool that does not work for my students. They do not come to me
18 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
having mastered the concepts needed to succeed. The pacing chart makes me feel like a failure. I try to ignore it and look to the
needs of my students.
Need more drills or practicing for addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division facts.
Need more practice time
Need time to solidify skills and concepts
Needs to increase practice sessions
No consistency Skills too advanced No requirement of mastery
No drill to mastery on important skills; Not enough repetition for key concepts
no facts/concepts mastery before moving to the next concept/skill, too many options for teaching one skill, parents aren't
prepared for the strategies taught in EDM, parents unable to help kids at home.
No mastery in anything. Kids get introduced to things and before they get it, we keep marching on. Even though it spirals, they
don't get it later either.
No mastery worked into the program.
No mastery, very little actual practice
No parental support (examples in a textbook for them to refer to), lattice method, partial quotients, etc. does not apply when kids
get to middle school
no repitition of concepts
no room to show work on any workbook pages asking skills prior to introduction
no the best curriculum for a military school, not enough emphasis on mastery
No time for mastery. not enough practice provided.Study link homework not good.
None
not aligned with standards
Not enough activities for kids to master skill before moving on to another.
Not enough basic addition and subtraction fact practice
Not enough basic skills practice and problem solving.
not enough basic skills, practice, repetition of concepts
not enough chances to practice anything. EDM is like a river a 100 miles wide but only an inch deep. Students never master
anything before moving on to the next new thing. Its impossible.
Not enough computation practice. Seems to jump around - little time in one area.
not enough computation. Students come to me as fifth graders not knowing their math facts.
Not enough computation. Too much language! Needs more mastery, goes to quick, by the time they get back to the concept
the students don't remember. Not enough practice or mastery to begin with to remember when they go back to it. We do not
have enough time to do the program correctly. It is still impossible to do with all the combination classes ASD has. There is no
way you can do it well with a combination class. There is not enough time to prep. The Dist does not give combo teachers extra
pay to stay up untill 11 at night to be able to prep for it!!!!! for a combo.
Not enough computations, concept levels within problems jump too much from I can do this to a harder level where they have no
clue, not enough practice with basic facts of addition, subtraction, multiplication or division, seems to jump around and just gives
bits and pieces with no real understanding initially of why they are learning it, the online component of EDM is too large for me to
put on my desktop to access
Not enough drill and kill.
not enough drill and mastery
not enough drill and practice with basic facts
not enough emphasis on mastering math facts throughout each grade
Not enough guided or independent practice
Not enough hands on and not enough time on one concept before going to the next concept.
Not enough instructions/examples for parents to understand. Lot of reading required.
Not enough mastery of basic concepts.
Not enough mastery work with basic skills.
Not enough opportunities to practice skills being taught. I have to hunt for supplemental materials to match the EDM activities.
not enough practice
19 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Not enough practice
not enough practice and repetition, too difficult for many students, over reliance on grade level and above reading and
comprehension, assessments do not relate direction to instruction, much of edm is guess work for students, requires a high level
of teacher math content knowledge, but many teachers do not have that. As sped I do not have the materials or the training so I
find it much harder to help my students access edm
Not enough practice for students to build skills. Hard for transient students to get started with.
Not enough practice of skills the students are struggling with. The students who are struggling continue to struggle with concepts
with no time to reteach and practice concepts. It does not provide enough practice time. It also has many concepts that are not
on our GLEs.
Not enough practice on a concept for medium to lower learners.
Not enough practice problems for working with a new concept Unit Assessment questions are frequently slightly different from
what is taught in the student journal so the teacher needs to create examples/problems to add to a lesson. There are limited
materials to help students that are not keeping up with the day to day information.
not enough practice problems to secure the skill for some; spiraling method for some doesn't aid retention of the skill or
vocabulary
Not enough practice time for memorizing facts.
not enough practice with concepts after they have been introduced. Fragmented approach. Need more practice with addition
before subtraction.
Not enough practice with important concepts such as basic math skills
not enough practice with simple addition and subtraction facts; too much material covered in one lesson and not enough
practice; not enough time in a day to do a lesson with everything else we need to teach;
not enough practice, doesnt help students struggling in math, it is a spiral text that doesnt benefit students that move a lot
Not enough practice. Jumps around way too quickly. Goes from a simple concept to a very difficult concept in the same page.
Spiraling does not work.
not enough practrice in computation
Not enough skill mastery time for basic concepts
Not enough time for a teacher to keep working on a particular area that may require more time; that the pacing guide moves to
quickly not considering that taking a test may need 2 days/that the Explorations may need more guidance; not allowing teachers
any freedom to do an additional math activity that they may want to do with their class. Some math lessons seem stuck in a
lesson that they don't go with so the teachers and students may one day be doing addition and the next day an odd lesson on
temperature may be stuck in there.
Not enough time for mastery. Too many concepts/skills are in each lesson. Too much reading for lower students.
not enough time for practice as we have only one hour for teaching math
Not enough time in one area to have students completely understand concept. Book jumps to another concept the next day
(sometimes)
not enough time spent on a topic and mastering the skill
Not enough time spent on core GLEs and doesn't provide enough practice for struggling learners
Not enough time spent on learning basic facts.
Not enough time spent on mastering concepts. Most concepts are taught in 1 lesson with randomly thrown in practice questions
further along.
Not enough time spent on mastering skills
Not enough time to deepen understanding of each concept/skill, Only available in English that not suitable for language
immersion program,
Not enough time to practice skills, especially the steps in many calculation processes. Too many and varied approaches that
confuse and alienate many parents toward the program.
not mastering concepts lack of enough practice too much reading
Not spending enough time on any one subject before going ont ot he next subject.
Not too sure about the spiraling - for instance we introduce penny and nickel on concurrent days, and then a few days later, the
dime, and then many days later, the quarter. Meantime we learn about counting by 2's, shapes, half, time, etc. At times I think it
would be better to group similar topics together.
20 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Numeration- the students would really struggle to recognize number 0-20 without supplements.
On Unit assessments it often throws in a problem (even in part a) that we have never seen before. Why would this be on a unit
assessment?
Our school has a high transient rate and this program leaves students weak in fundamentals/foundational math computation.
Out of the box questions like, the IN/OUT, sometimes you have to do the opposite in your thinking to truly understand the
Mathematical process. First Graders are so concrete they don't understand two steps, backwards. I think that EDM introduces
TOO many concept on every page.
Pacing is too fast. No time for stop and drill.
Parent think that the only way to do math is the way they were taught and so they get frustrated and say they can not help their
kids.
parents don't understand how to help their kids with this program. Not enough time or practice on each skill.
poor review, lack of mastery of skills, teaches to many strategies for computation, assumes my students come to me with basic
skills and background knowledge
Questions are confusing. Nothing is ever mastered. And it skips around way too much. Harder skills are introduced before
easier ones are mastered.
quick pace. does not cover concepts in depth. have to move on before students master concepts
Rote
scope and sequence; lack of thematic approach
Skills like lattice multiplication, partial quotients, and phrases like "friendly numbers" "number sentences", and the like cause a lot
of angst for students who are new to EDM and parents generally dislike the whole program strongly. Also, many of these
concepts are not taught in middle schools and former students are very frustrated in having to relearn math concepts. The
middle school teachers I have spoken with also strongly dislike EDM for the above reasons. A lot of time in wasted in 7th grade
having to reteach concepts in the traditional formats so that students (and parents who want to assist at home) can progress to
higher math skills. Because of these problems, many teachers are not able to keep up with the EDM timeline set forth by the
district. Many of us are one unit behind due to spending so much time on mastery of skills.
Skips around a lot and we don't see mastery of the skill before presenting a new skill.
skips around, doesn't really teach to mastery, no drill and practice, tries to 'trick' the students instead of seeing what they know
Some lessons are difficult to teach
Some lessons are way over the children's heads. Time and money should be introduced sooner. Not so close to the end of the
year. Maybe add in more addition and subtraction facts.
Some of the pages that are supposed to be done whole group aren't great.
Some of the topics are not covered in depth, and students new to curriculum did not have prior knowledge due to how it spirals.
Some weaknesses include: not enough time spent on concepts, too many concepts covered in one chapter, pace is too fast for
some.
Sometimes a math concept will be introduced three lessons prior to the end of the unit assessment. This is not enough time for a
young child to learn a new concept and then be proficient. I have used EDM for over ten years and therefore I know what to
teach prior to certain lessons and/or assessments.
Sometimes the lessons feel disconnected and don't seem to logically follow one another. Often it's frustrating for children to
move on without grasping a concept.
Sometimes, there aren't enough consecutive lessons on a topic to allow students to get a firm grasp of the concept.
Spiral curriculum does not adequately meet the needs of our transient student population
spiral curriculum without enough practice on new topics. This is confusing to the high numbers of oral language students we
have in Title schools, the higher level thinking is too high for most of the students in the Title schools, does not cover all the
GLE/state standards, not enough fact practice and time on a single topic, the amount of material to cover with such diverse
learners in a Title school
Spiral doesn't give a concentrated focus for primary kids. Late introduction to penny and tally marks.
spiral: students who are naturally good at math "get it" and the students who struggle never get enough practice to "get it" before
we have to move on; does not focus on math facts enough; parents report that they have a difficult time helping their children
with homework because of the complicated nature of which things are taught.
spiraling concept to random. Needs to have more time for the student to spent on comprehending a concept.
21 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Spiraling does not work for our population of students. We have a large transient population and often new students have not
been involved in EDM and cannot catch up.
Spiraling leaves some students behind who are struggling with mastery
Spiraling, computation, basics
spiraling; too much reading required to do the work.
Spiraling. Students do not get enough practice with concepts presented.
spiraling. Students don't get the satisfaction of mastering skills.
Spiraling. Too many missed mastered areas when students reach us in 6th.
spiralling does not allow for enough mastery for stduetns the first time around, which creates anxiety in students, especially those
who are perfectionists. There is not enough time allotted in the day to teach a very time consuming curriculum - too
cumbersome. Journals very expensive in a tight economy with budget cuts. Just my grade alone pays $1900 per year for
journals.
Students are introduced to a topic and then they move on to another. They are not given the opportunity to master anything
before getting bombarded with new material. I understand it's supposed to be a spiral, but one lesson on each topic is NOT
enough to teach a skill. My students and parents are frustrated with what they are learning and many can't understand why or
the logic behind some of the topics introduced. I find myself way behind in following the "map" of when things should be taught
because I have to go back and re-teach skills. Children are not even taught common addition and subtraction facts. Students
are expected to master things that are way above their grade level (i.e. time to the quarter hour), but not taught the basics. Oh
my, I could go on and on.
Students are not able to master any concept prior to "moving on". This is a source of ongoing frustration for students, especially
when they are presented with information from one program in elementary school and then given "real" math in middle
school/junior high school.
Students do not get a chance to master a concept before we move on. Some of the concepts or explorations seem way above
grade level expectations.
Students don't learn to mastery some of the skills that are essential for further success.
Students learn parts of things and then they never return in that grad. Frustrating students.
Students need an opportunity to practice what is learned. There needs to be opportunities to practice basic skill/facts - adding
with regrouping, subtracting with borrowing, multiplying the basic facts, 2-digit problems, etc.
Students need more practice with new skills. The textbook offers practice that is too hard for first time practice.
Students never work on a skill to mastery. They touch on a skill then move on. It does not address the students needs.
Teachers choose not to devote the time to learn how to best use this resource in order to differentiate instruction where needed.
Teachers who do not respect the spiral nature of EDM by not getting to all the units, lessen the effectiveness of the program.
Teachers who use Part A and Part B of the end of unit assessments as a grade instead of just Part A as intended.
teaching a lesson and not seeing it again for two-three weeks is very challenging. Especially for the military community.
Teaching in the "spiral" method is not good teaching practice. It does not allow for mastery, just a general overview. Students
do not need to be exposed to so many concepts so early. 3rd grade should be about multiplication and beginning division for the
entire year, and should allow for mastery, as stated before. Shall I go on?
That a skill is not taught long enough for most students can learn the concept.
The 6th grade program is pre-algebra based. MANY students are not conceptually ready for it. The entire program does not
focus enough on drill and practice, so by the time kids hit 6th grade, they don't all now their math facts or understand many of the
concepts. 6th grade moves forward at a neck breaking speed with new concepts, and leaves many struggling. Also, there is a
lot of reading in the math book, and bilingual students struggle with math because of the reading. There are not enough practice
problems for concepts. The tests take many of the most difficult problems and seem to be designed for the highest students. It
is very difficult to differentiate the program for the average and lower students.
The activities or concepts being taught vary too much. Not enough time is ever spent on one subject so I never feel like the
students are concrete on a concept before moving on to another one.
The amount of time needed to get items together for games, lessons, etc.
The book is not age appropriate for Kindergarten. They need a lot of step by step together.
The children get just a glimpse of the idea, then on to something else. At the kindergarten level they may be asked to do 10
separate math activities in one week, none in depth.
22 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The curriculum does not allow time for students to thoroughly learn some core concepts. EDM discourages drill, so if the
curriculum is followed exactly students usually don't learn addition/subtraction/multiplication/division facts by memory. When it's
time to learn higher math skills, they have difficulty because they can't recall these basics.
The curriculum spiral does not happen quickly enough, or perhaps we don't spend enough time at each part of the spiral.
The EDM curriculum touches on ideas, and then circles back to them. Students are not able to focus on skill mastery. The
curriculum beyond 6th grade, and the national standardized tests need skill mastery for to be successful.
The Everyday Math curriculum does not go into enough depth to ensure that "all" students truly grasp the concepts. The type of
problems in a single unit vary sometimes. Students have a hard time making connections between them.
The Everyday Math Curriculum is not a student friendly Math program. It does not allow time for the students to gain an
understanding of one math concept before moving on to a new math concept. It assumes that my sixth grade students have a
firm understanding of a concept (eg. division of single or double digit whole numbers) and provides higher level application of the
concept (eg. division with decimals for double or triple numbers). In shorter words, the Everyday Math Curriculum assumes too
much student background knowledge of math and requires that students apply non-existent math skills. The curriculum does not
logically build a skill for students to understand and apply. It jumps from math concept to math concept in no logical order. In my
math class, I must provide very, very guided teaching. In reality, I am solving the problems in the text for the students. They
CANNOT complete the majority of the Sixth Grade EDM textbook on their own. I can't believe the Anchorage School District
adopted this math program. Did I mention the problem my students have actually reading the text to see what it is they are
supposed to do? The language is designed for high school or college students. I ALWAYS have to "translate" the math
directions into a simple "kid format". The student handbook is a joke. Most of my students DO NOT understand the concept
from the student handbook. They can find the tool and the can read most of it, but it doesn't make sense to them.
The format of the games page is difficult for young kids to understand.
The journals are difficult to complete in a year and the spiral is difficult for students who are not strong conceptually in math.
The jumping around that it does. One idea isn't the main focus it jumps back and forth. There are a few things in my mind that
we need to start teaching from the get go and EDM doesn't have us introduce it until February or March.
The lack of practice with math facts and other concepts. It spirals too quickly.
The language is difficult for ELL & students that struggle. It's tough to navigate the instructions. It could stick a little longer with
skills that need to be mastered. Also needs to be supplemented with rote practice of basic skills.
The lessons are very quick and don't really cover all the material that we need to cover by the end of the year
The lessons aren't paced or ordered well. Students aren't given the time to master, or even begin, skills. I almost always have to
supplement with my own materials which makes for many extra hours of planning. I don't feel the text helps students prepare for
the SBA tests at all and the reason they do well is mainly due to ad ons I've created.
The lessons have too many ideas. The concepts are often very difficult for kids to learn. It seems like kids are always frustrated.
The majority of my students don't know their basics facts, and EDM assumes they do. I have to supplement the curriculum on an
almost daily basis. The spiral doesn't work for the majority of my class. It doesn't give enough time to develop skills before
expecting them to have mastered the skills. It is a huge rush to finish the workbooks. There are not enough days to stop and
work on the areas that I have discovered my current class is weak with. Many homework links are confusing to parents, even
when I send the Unit newsletters home.
The material in the textbook does not align with our current report card. It does not adequately cover counting and writing to 100
for kindergarten students.
The math boxes are not always independent work for second grades. You start out having to teach each skill, it becomes easier
for them, then finally in January, it gets difficult again. Not enough practice with one skill. Too many skills on one page.
The organization of the practice boxes, the end of unit tests often do not test the concepts which were worked on most during the
unit or even test concepts not tested in the unit.
The pacing goes way too fast. Also, I wish it told us in which grades students are supposed to master certain concepts, or which
grades they start learning the concepts.
The pacing guide is too fast for the majority of the students. There is not enough practice of basic facts.
The pacing is really just too fast
The program is difficult for students who are below average, but not special ed. It does not stay on one topic long enough for this
population of students to master a topic.
The reading is way too hard for many kids. Sometimes, it seems needlessly hard.
23 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The spiral affect does not seem to help students. They will learn the concept then see it a month later on a test unexpectedly but
still be expected to remember everything. It is information overload! The vocabulary used in the text, Study Links, and tests are
too difficult even for on level students to understand. The methods teachers are expected to teach are confusing to teachers,
students, and parents, and then seem useless as students are not necessarily expected to use them on the test. Also, students
are told that they are not allowed to use those methods once they get into higher grades or they never see them again. What is
the point? Overall I think that Everyday Math is overwhelming, not just for myself as a teacher, but for students and parents as
well.
The spiral approach and language doesn't translate with the SBA style testing. The timing of the year-long program misses or
comes up short by testing time.
The spiral curricular concept IS NOT WORKING in our school. It must NOT BE WORKING in other schools either, as we get
many students throughout the year as transfers and they are struggling in math just as much as students that have been in our
school K-5.
The spiral curriculum concept does not allow students enough time to master the concepts they are expected to for their grade
level. Also, with a very transient population, students who transfer in and are not familiar with the things specific to Everyday
Math, are usually lost.
the spiral design the lack of practice until mastery
the spiral doesn't work for students who are moving in and out of a school like the military schools.
the spiral system moves to fast. There are not enough examples on problems. there is not enough relation to the real world . Not
enough time spent on math facts - the book doesn't leave time or room for the practice.
The spiraling curriculum, and lack of emphasis on building a firm foundation in the facts and operations.
The spiraling doesn't work with military students, they do not stay around long enough to get the benefit. It also makes it
extremely hard to teach a new student four years of spiral to catch up.
The spiraling....not enough practice on basic concepts...have to supplement to meet GLEs
The struggling students struggle more. The spiraling curriculum does not help them learn basic math concepts.
The student journal is not very useful at my level. Everything is teacher led.
The student population at this school need a curriculum that teaches to mastery and has concrete foundational skills. Everyday
Math does doesn't readily accomplish this.
The students are not required to master a given concept, they are introduced to several concepts and then the concept
resurfaces in the form of mathboxes.
The teaching and the testing do not seem to match up.
The text doesn't spend enough time with each area to ensure that the students are a success with it, if you follow the pacing.
Teaching one area one day and coming back to it the following week is difficult for some students.
The text jumps around too much and doesn't focus on a concept for a long period of time which students don't master the
concept before moving on. I
the vocabulary is harder to pick up mid year or for ELL students and non readers
The way the program is laid out, it does not give students enough time to master new skills.
The weaknesses are that the spiraling does not help them to master a skill. Instead it seems as if we are constantly introducing
them to ideas that they see 3 times during the year and that's it and they have no idea why they learned it or how they can use it.
There are too many ways of doing the same kinds of problems for young kids. It confuses them. Also, I would rather teach to
proficiency, instead of spiraling to exposure. To move onto something else before they master one area of math is hard on the
younger kids.
There is a great deal of material in the teacher's manual that is not addressed in the student text.
There is A LOT of reading and kids don't understand what EDM is asking for. It is very teacher directed and with our lower
income population, I don't think this is the best program for our students.
there is little focus on mastery of math facts-lessons are not sequential
There is little to no practice with specific GLE's needed in their particular grade level. There are too many concepts being taught
above the specific grade level when they haven't even mastered the skills they should. There is not enough repetition. They are
being asked to learn and remember too many concepts in each unit without any real connection to one another. For my
students, the spiraling curriculum is confusing and does not make sense to them, because they never get enough practice at any
24 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
one thing to feel as if they are understanding what it is they are supposed to be learning. These children have a difficult time with
critical thinking and many of the lessons are far too difficult. Especially when they are GLE's for upper grades.
There is no "textbook." There is a Student Reference book and a journal. Not enough work goes home--journal stays at school
until halfway through the year. Jumps around too much, lack of mastery before students move on, not enough practice.
There is no mastery with this program. Also, the spiral does not work for lower grades.
There is not always time in a one-to-two day lesson to get to Part 3 which is many times where the differentiations are located.
There is not enough "meat" for the students to grasp. It skips around way too much (this is for all grade levels). Expects the
teacher to make alot of games on his/her own time. Expects the teacher to purchase items for the program that the school does
not purchase.
There is not enough computation practice. Also, the kids barely have time to grasp one concept before the book leaves that area
and goes to another area. The program Everyday Mathematics does not match up with our GLEs.
There is not enough drill and practice of any topics. I must always supplement. The program is very advanced, and kids that are
not math savvy, struggle where they would not in a more formal text with lots of drill and practice. The tests are short, in that
they give the student one problem to demonstrate understanding, so if they missed that, a teacher can't discern if the just made
an error, or if they didn't understand the process. The course moves too quickly for many students. And lastly, when students
arrive in 6th grade who have not had EDM in prior grades, they are really at a loss and struggle.
There is not enough emphasis on arithmatic. My students don't have the arithmatic skills to do the asignments.
There is not enough practice and it moves way too quick. For students who come from families who are very supportive and
involved, it is good. However, for students from families who are unable to be as supportive and involved, it is really tough,
because they do not get the basic skills practice that they need. They also do not get enough time to practice and master each
skill, before they move on.
There is not enough practice and too many skills are hit in each lesson. Parents are unable to help students because it's
different math.
There is not enough practice for kids and the spiral just doesn't work for kids who struggle.
There is not enough repetitive practice for students who need it. It is very confusing for students with disabilities.
There is not immediate mastery. Multiplication facts are still a challenge for some. Too, many concepts are being introduced
before mastery.
There is only a single lesson for a concept. Often the concept is hard for the students to understand, so then I look at different
resources so I can continue working on it the next day.
There is research in the field of math anxiety that presenting math concepts TOO early to students who are developmentally not
ready is one cause of math anxiety. Now my students know lots and lots of things that they don't understand. They get ZERO
satisfaction in mastering anything. There is very little time left to even learn basic facts because I am required to teach 1 new
lesson per day.
There is so much covered with little understanding gained before moving on to the next concept. While the variety is a strength it
is also the weakness of the EDM program. Students become frustrated at not understanding and then just being moved on to
something new. A program with variety and review would be great, if it was limited in scope. The EDM doesn't always match up
with our GLEs.
There is very little drill and practice of the basic addition, subtraction, multiplication and division concepts. They introduce new
algorithms several days in a row and students get confused with the steps in the different processes. The pacing guides for
combo classes is poorly matched. Having to complete 2 journals in a year is nearly impossible even with the pacing guide. That
assumes all kids are on grade level and no reteaching is necessary. Kids who are new to Everyday math find difficulty being
successful because of the "format" of the program (ie: mathboxes, in/out boxes, sentence models). In order to fit "all" of the
necessary elements of EDM into a day a teacher would need to teach math 1.5 -2 hours a day. That amount of time is not
available with all of the other curriculum required to be taught. It is very difficult for kids who have poor math sense or are below
grade level. A majority of parents have difficulty helping their kids with the math processes in the book and get frustrated easily.
At the 4th and 5th time and metric volume are not taught (if at all) until late in the journals, after TeraNova and SBAs.
There isn't enough drill and practice of basic math facts. Too confusing for my bilingual students to grasp the concepts.
Things are covered to quickly, and they aren't practiced or reviewed enough.
This is a spiral program which does not work for low-income, ELL learners who are far behind peers. This program does not
teach to mastery.
25 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
This math curriculum does not provide students with adequate time to practice the skills that are being taught. It also does not
focus on time spent on basic mathematical concepts that children need to progress their math knowledge. The vocabulary is
very high level and the verbage changes from one lesson to another and it confuses the students. Everyday math does not
incorporate drill and practice for students and often assumes a student has the math foundation for a concept when they really
don't. This program has been said to spiral but infact it does not spiral for the majority of our students. When students arrive in
my classroom without the basic math skills and foundations needed to continue higher level math concepts it is a very difficult
task to try to teach these skills because they are not equipped with the understanding and background to master new concepts.
Reteaching of basic math skills is an on going challenge throughout the entire school year.
This program seems to have more success when used in a district that students are enrolled in from K-6th grade. There is a lot
of student movement in and out of district that seems to take away from the success of Everyday Math. Students come into the
district in 4th or 5th grade and have no clue what EDM is and are lost on vocabulary and concepts. The spiraling curriculum
therefore suffers.
Time to develop a concept No room for students to show their work Concepts come and go with the math boxes
To present a new concept for one lesson, does not give adiquate(sp) practice for anyone. If they are gone the next day it comes
in the spiral, then they are really at a loss.
TOO much going from one concept to the other ...too fast and no mastery of skills
Too abstract for many of my students. Not nearly enough sustained practice opportunities.
too broad. It covers too much material without allowing mastery
too challenging for below proficient kids
too dependent on games--no time to play to develop proficiency not enough drill and practice too many topics covered every
day
Too language based for first grade. Students have a difficult time with the reading of the directions. There isn't enough basic fact
focus and a lack of reinforcement. I supplement like crazy!
too many choices that lead too many directions
Too many different skills on one page. No mastery of one skill.
Too many skills presented at once. Not enough practice for each skill. No time for mastery. Spiraling curriculum does not work
for the population I teach.
Too much "spiral". Not enough focus on one concept for a length of time to encourage mastery.
too much content to cover--movers too fast.
Too much for each lesson & not enough basic practice
Too much information and concepts in each lesson! Lessons are way too lengthy!
too much prep time; not enough drilling basics; confusing for parents; goofy techniques
Too sporatic, math is not something that works well in a spiraling way. Too many concepts for for the same type of problem
confuses my kids.
Unit assessments weak Open Responses very poorly written
Very challenging for many average and below average math students. I usually give the units assessments twice so children cn
improve their score. Too many new concepts at the fourth grade.
Very little opportunity to revisit curriculum, pacing moves a bit fast for many students
Very little practice of skills taught. They learn a skill then are given work that is that skill plus. So it would be like just learning to
pass a soccer ball then instead of having time to practice that skill and really get it down the coach has them play a game in the
finals against a professional team.
way to high in language for average kids- goes to fast from one thing to another- doesnt give time to discover patterns before it
flits to much to higher level problems. It looses about 1/3 of the class.
We do not work on a strategy long enough for many kids to master it.
When a new concept is taught they throw in tricky problems which totally confuses the students. I feel like they need to be
totally clear on a concept and then step it up with the tricky problems. The concepts I am talking about are things like the
function machine or the what's my rule
When lessons are introduced, the work pages are already too difficult for students just beginning to grasp concepts. There is not
enough review. The math boxes are not helpful because my lower students need help on every box. It works better when I
create a worksheet to just practice 1 skill. Then my lower students come get my help on the first few problems but then they can
continue practice independently after I've helped them get the hang of it. This process doesn't happen with math boxes. Also,
26 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
the way clocks are introduced is counter-intuitive. Why would I try to explain that 15 minutes on a clock is a quarter past when
I'm also trying to teach that a quarter is 25 cents, and the fractions chapter, where I would teach what a quarter of something is,
isn't until the end of the year?
When the students are ready to understand the concept, we teach a new one. Then the vocabulary changes in the upper
grades.
Within a unit, I find that it jumps around to different skills. Not too much practice with specific skills that are really needed.
works poorly in spanish immersion program since we only have kids half day; math is taught in Spanish at kindergarten & 1st
grade & they do not use the EDM journal so the transition to 2nd grade EDM; EDM is language based so difficult for our many
ESL learners; the EDM structures are difficult for kids new to district
You didn't give me enough room on this to answer this question.
you don't teach to mastery, the spiral works in a perfect world if they've had it since Kindy
What would make the math textbook stronger for your students?
ƒ -include simpler examples and problems when new concept is introduced -more visual / manipulative activities for upper grades
-more quick formative assessments
ƒ -less spiral, more time on one topic
ƒ ?
ƒ *more drill drill drill (for basic math facts)
ƒ #1: Ditch it!! #2 Provide more time for math. But please, not at the expense of science or social studies.
ƒ Slow down! Let the students master a concept. Let the teacher have some discretion when a lesson needs to be repeated.
For example, BEFORE my students master the idea of 4 facts per fact family, such as 2 + 3 = 5, they are asked to fill in the
following blank: _____=2+3. They get confused and some cry.
ƒ 1. The skills presented need to be build upon 2. Prerequisite skills were taught 3. More time to practice skill
ƒ 3 or 4 activities together - like a pattern theme, etc.
ƒ A better balance between the exploration (manipulatives, hands-on) and the pencil/paper traditional fact practice.
ƒ a better balance of higher level thinking with basic skills
ƒ A better curriculum for Kindergarten students
ƒ a less extr eme spiral with enough time on a skill that allows most kids to get it
ƒ A little less spiraling/
ƒ A more direct approach. Fewer algorithms that most people wouldn't use and dumping of any section that uses a calculator
which likely would only be found in an elementary school.
ƒ A new math adoption. Like Saxon.
ƒ A new textbook that is researched based for students in Title I schools.
ƒ A program that teaches mastery before moving on to the next lesson.
ƒ A slower pacing guide and not incorporating material that is above and beyond the Alaska GLE's.
ƒ a supplemental book that correlates with the lesson giving more practice problems.
ƒ A textbook to begin with. Drill and practice sheets and a curriculum the parents can help their children with.
ƒ above
ƒ Additional Math Facts Practice, Additional Measurement Practice
ƒ additional problems ... however, I supplement for my students.
ƒ Additional rote practice with basic math skills
ƒ Align the tests with the standards
ƒ allow plenty of room to show student work
ƒ Allow the children to stick with one lesson for 2-3 days until they know the material well.
ƒ As a new teacher, sometimes it is hard for me to trust the spiral in everyday math. I feel some lessons should be taught to
mastery before moving on.
ƒ Better binding!
ƒ Better sequence....pacing that is appropriate
ƒ building knowledge upon prior knowledge mastering concepts practice
ƒ change the above.
ƒ change to a new adoption
ƒ CHANGING THE CURRICULUM!!!!!!!!!
27 | P a g e ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
connections to other subjects-- disciplinary integration
Consistency
Consistency and reinforcement of skills. Start a skill, and then build slowly, working toward mastery and continue honing the skill
until students have had a chance to attain mastery. No moving on to new material until students have achieved a solid
understanding of the current material.
Continuing with a concept until it is mastered, instead of leaving it and then going back to it later.
Covering items and skill that are on the TerraNova and SBA tests. Not including obsolete methods for skill. Skimming down the
information that is in a unit. I feel that there is a lot of "stuff" in a single unit, and it's hard for my students to create lasting
connections and grasps concepts without me going to outside resources. I would love a more inclusive program.
cumulative review, lessons building on another, requires mastery and more practice of skills taught earlier in the year.
cut it in half and focus on core lessons then provide more practice
Doing one concept longer
Easier and more practice supplements
Easier directions to read, names like Juan, do not help first grades who are sounding out, How about Bob. There can be a lot of
Bobs and Jans! If learning a new skills, more than just four problems related to this new skill for practice.
Easier examples when teaching a concept. Games that are easier to play--games that are presented to practice a math concept.
EDM has made many changes over the years. However, they need to produce materials that work for students who are at lower
levels and can go with the daily lessons of EDM. Some students just can't do that math required and they need a journal that
would go more slowly.
EDM is fine--it is lack of fidelity along with teachers who have never had thorough training on how to use it.
Everyday Math is a terrible math program for transient military students. Neither the parents or the students understand
Everyday Math. Nothing could make it stronger for military students.
Except as mentioned above, I think the textbook is already very strong.
Fewer concepts being reviewed in one unit. More concentrated.
fewer topics covered in a day more drill and practice
Fix the problems mentioned above.
Focus on the basic concepts to allow for mastering. Spiral within the grade level rather than across grade levels. Provide more
depth to math topics. Avoid "equal time" for simple vs difficult concepts.
Focus on the foundations of math strands. If we have a deeper look into any concept it would allow teachers to differentiate
more effectively while staying on the same strand, increasing all students' abilities.
Focusing on one concept longer
Focusing on one math concept strongly for an extending period of time and then bringing that concept back throughout the year.
Since Algebra is a required course for our high school graduates, whether they understand the vocabulary or the concepts, I
beleive that starting students off at the primary level using the proper vocabulary and introducing concepts in a age appropriate
level would be very beneficial for their math future.
followed a pattern and didn't jump around
For our particular school situation, I don't think EDM is a good choice. We need a program that teaches specific concepts and
builds on foundational math strategies/principals.
Full concept exploration and practice.
get a new program - I suggest Saxon
Get rid of Everyday Math! I have taught several other math series and this is BY FAR the worst series I have ever taught.
get rid of it
Getting rid of EVERYDAY MATH and replacing it with a program that offers MASTERY of SKILLS as a strong foundation.
Learners need more than a few brief encounters with a skill or concept in order to develop and strengthen their ability to work the
problems independently with confidence and success!
Give teacher and student more time ti really get the lessons that are needed for our kids to pass their ABA
Giving students the ability to master a skill before they move on to another concept
Giving them more practice problems for each concept.
go back to basics
Greater focus on algorithm mastery
Have more pages devoted to 1 concept.
28 | P a g e ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Having leveled worksheets that focuses on most basic learning level. Don't tell me the Assessment Assistant takes the place of
that, I have no life already and shouldn't need to reinvent the wheel every time I want to create a new worksheet.
having more time to actually teach math in the day
Having one concept per page and more illustrations to support the bilingual students.
I am pretty comfortable with it at this point.
I am satisfied with the Everyday Math textbook.
I basically like the everyday math program, however, there are some areas that need additional practice activities for areas that
are aligned to state and local standards.
I feel we need to incorporate touch point math a workbook that truly teachers math concepts.
I just believe that the spiral approach as seen in the Every Day Math journal is too broad and that mastery is not focused upon
before introduction of a new concept occurs.
I like the spiraling concept, but I would definitely teach to mastery.
I think allowing the instructor to select which pages to duplicate for students on a class by class, year by year basis would make
more sense. Since each group of students is different, it makes little financial or ecological sense to produce and purchase large
lots of textbooks which do not personalize the instruction to the degrees necessary.
I think it is good for our average to above..we just need some help for those very low students
I think it is important to supplement some concepts, but keeping in mind what is to be secure and what is just being introduced.
The ITLG's have helped remediation and challenging students as needed.
I think that the focus should be on basic computation, measurement, money counting, shape and number recognition and an
introduction to place value.
I think the lessons should be structured differently and keep the same concepts together and for a longer period of lessons in
order for concepts to be mastered. I don't think some concepts should be introduced if they don't have to be mastered for that
grade.
I would like it if the book has a self guiding component where students could work ahead in self guides lessons that could be
easily monitored by the teacher.
I would like more time on topics and more opportunities for students to practice those skills.
I would prefer to teach Saxon math so that my students are able to master a skill before moving on to another.
If every preceding grade level was committed to using this curriculum so students don't have a year where supplemental
curriculum is used instead of EDM.
If it had a more linear lay-out and tried to cover a few topics in-depth instead of touching on a bunch of different topics.
If it took math concepts one at a time and took more time with each one to allow students more time to process and master them.
If it was set up like Saxon math but would also need to include some higher level questioning.
If the book had more practice pages that focused on a single concept, it would help. For example, with regard to manipulation of
fractions, there needs to be lots more practice at a beginner level before advancing to more difficult problems.
If there were more review activities, and if students were able to have pages of basic skills practice.
If they could mix the chunking of concepts along with the spiral. I think that more attention should be on learning the facts in third
grade before moving on to 2 and 3 digit multiplication and division, and factors and multiples of numbers for fractions.
If they focused on one subject for longer than two lessons at a time.
If we continue to use the same textbooks, supplementary learning materials that increase basic skills should be supplied. More
music and active learning should be incorporated to encourage and motivate students to participate in math.
If we focused on one skill or concept for a longer period of time.
Include the above weak areas.
instructions simplified more work space provided
introduce a skill and then teach that skill longer rather than adding more skills right away
it if focused on a couple key themes at a time versus the spiral curriculum
It is fine to cover a broad range of topics and concepts but basic, old fashion adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing need to
be introduced and practiced. Rounding to the nearest ten, more practice sheets counting money and telling time are needed too.
We need drill and practice sheets. However, I supplement with Touch Math, Silver Burdett and other resources. I used Saxon
math for 4 years and had the same concern regarding adding and subtracting 2 digit numbers with regrouping.
It needs to be supplemented with practice of basic computation skills; the games are great, but don't always insure mastery of
facts
29 | P a g e ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
It would help if fact power was mastered. It doesn't help to know something about math facts. You have to know them. Math is a
skill.
It would help to have more drill/basic practice materials. Since they don't come with the program, we have to find our own
materials and take time from other subjects or cut short activities to practice the basic facts.
It's fine
It's the program. We need a program that gears itself to mastery at lower grade levels. Also, the workbook is to hard for many of
the students to read.
Kindergarteners need more practice and the workbook is really poor. I supplement daily.
Knowing Math Facts for Addition and Subtraction
Learning math, in my humble opinion is not hard. 1.) I believe a good student math textbook should be worded at or below
students' grade reading level. Students should not have to learn complex and high comprehension words in the English
language while also trying to understand the math. Math "vocabulary" at their level is appropriate though. 2.) New concepts
should be introduced to students in a step-by-step manner. Student directions should give clear statements of how the math
concept is unfolding to form a new understanding. Building upon basic skills and referencing these skills is also crucial. 3.)
Students should have many, many additional problems based on the new skill in order to practice. (Drill, Baby, Drill - it is an
important aspect of learning math) 4.) Student practice of skill should be kid and parent friendly. Practice should be able to be
completed at home using the math textbook for clear examples. It should be an all-in-one textbook (eg. Here is how to do it,
here is what we did, here are some practice problems, and here are the answers to those problems to check to see if you
understood this new concept).
Learning one concept to mastery. Also students need to work on basic math facts (addition and substraction in first grade).
Less abstract. More concrete
Less brand new skills to introduce and more practice/review of the most important concepts. The skills to practice/review shoudl
get progressively harder throughout the year, but must begin in a very easy way...like frames and arrows that start with adding 1,
2, 5, and 10...not subtracting 7.
Less concepts covered and more time to cover those concepts.
Less exploration activities and more time and focus on basic computation skills, measuring, fractions, and place value
less reading
Less spiral: focus on one concept for a designated period of time before moving on to something new-this helps build
confidence!
less spiraling and more time spent on each area. Able to interact with Promethean Boards
Less strategies at a time and more leaning towards mastery for key concepts.
Level curriculum
Longer lesson is each skills using language that students can relate to. Not things like frames and arrows, function machines.
Lots more pictures and visuals!!! Way to much reading...more words does not equal more complex or more conceptual...stop
giving students reading tests in math class. The extra support manuals and websites are great but I need more engaging
material at the students fingertips not hiding in a manual.
lots of computation practice, sense of order, supplemental materials for morning work every day-if there are any I haven't seen
them
Make the lessons shorter so there is more time to practice, do the mathboxes, and play the math games.
Making a traditional textbook where students are able to use it over and over.
Mastery of strand before moving on.
math workbook with more back-to-basics practice
Maybe focus on skills until they really have it down, revisit later.
More "skill and drill" work
More basic mathematics and less structures and activities that are exclusive to EDM. Help students get the fundamentals that
they will need no matter what school they are in...and teach concepts to completion, not assume they have a developing
knowledge and will become secure in the following grade.
more calculation practice and fellow teachers following the pacing chart
More computation
More concise and basic assignments, nothing so abstract
More consistency
30 | P a g e ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
More depth. Focus on basic computation and problem solving skills in 1-3rd. Allow time for mastery so that when kids are in 4th
and up they have those skills to support them when working with more difficult concepts.
More drill and practice, less journal pages which seem to not be part of the lesson.
More examples in the math journal instead of turning to the Student Reference Book. There is too much reading in the SRB for
our students. It takes forever to use the SRB for examples.
More exciting, more hands on, more practice, giving kids one day to learn something new and then asking them to test on it is
not feasible or fair.
more focus on basic facts in homework
more focus on facts/concepts mastery, smaller spiral, more practice in each skill/concept area before moving on, focusing on
strategies that will help parents understand what is being learned and how to help their children at home.
More focus on the basic math skills they need to succeed. Also less academic text for our many English lang. users. They can do
the task, but they cannot figure out what the book is asking them to do.
More focus on the basics of math.
More focused practice for what is going to be on the test in the last few lessons.
More focused practice pages on GLE's skills to be mastered
More games provdied within the text book
more grill and drill
More hands on with math manipulatives, units that focus on one topic.
More hands-on activities and projects!
more help in understanding the best way to differentiate. What to do with students who have flatlined. What to do with students
who have not mastered things like addition and subtraction when they get to 4th grade. Can't do partial products or partial
quotients unless those skills are mastered
More independent practice worksheets with one skill. (one page just adding with regrouping)
More language support for ELL students, longer amount of time for each unit, less cluttered units (fewer concepts).
More lessons that are on the same concept right in a row. For example, if it is teaching fractions, then have all of the lessons
involving fractions going from simple to complex one after another in a unit of study. The spiral makes it really tough for the
concepts to get cemented in the students minds.
More manipulative built into the program.
More manipulatives that strengthen the math concepts. Ideas like the ones Chris Optiz uses. Independent thinking, then
practice explaining thought patterns, and understanding of the concepts. I would also like to see more exemplar problems. More
"real life" math and why it is important to have a strong foundation in the fundamentals.
More of a focus on building and mastering new skills. Interactive lessons for the Promethean board.
I have used the
assessment assistant a number of times. It seems to take a lot of unnecessary steps in trying to find the items you want and
then viewing and rearranging the final page(s) to the layout you desire. It's also very time consuming, especially compared to
free
More opportunities for written practice of skills.
More opportunities to practice the skills that are being presented in the teacher's manual.
More pictures and less words.
More planning time specified for incorporation of math and other STEM lesson planning, Having the material in immersion
foreign language (translation and modification need to be done in order for the teachers to use them),
more practice
More practice
More practice activities for basic math skills. I have to use supplemental materials. More time built into the curriculum to master
skills. This curriculum moves very quickly!
More practice and consistancy
More practice and opportunity for mastery. Additional focus on building a foundation of the math facts.
More practice for basic skills/calculations.
More practice in some areas....
More practice of basic math skills
More practice of one concept.
more practice of skill
31 | P a g e ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
More practice of skills taught at their level. Don't go over how to add and subtract negative and positive numbers then have
problems that involve fractions, mixed numbers, decimals and even multiplying.
More practice of skills that are supposed to be mastered.
More practice on each concept before jumping to an almost completely unrelated topic.
More practice on Multiplication and Division.
More practice on single concepts.
More practice on some skills.
More practice on the various skills needed to be successful in math.
More practice over several weeks for computation.
more practice pages
More practice pages on counting coins, time, and math facts
More practice pages.
More practice problems. Sometimes it seems that there isn't enough practice included with a new skill.
More practice time for concepts.
More practice time with strategies and less focus on teaching multiple strategies. Very confusing for kids in earlier grades who
struggle or are developing their strategies. Basic addition and subtraction practice.
More practice with new concepts. More practice with computation basic skills.
More practice within the textbook.
More practice worksheets
more practice, better accomodations for struggling students
More practice, broken down into manageable chunks. The practice often jumps in difficulty before they are ready. We need
more baby steps.
More practice, practice and practice. Not enough time on any one area.
More practice.
More practice. More time is needed for skills that need to be mastered by third grade. Less jumping around from skill to skill.
More problems of what they were just introduced
More problems to practice beyond what is in the journal and the math boxes.
more regularly scheduled mastery tests- to counter the spiral; a way to still get the problem solving skills without having to read
so much.
More reinforcement, practice
More remedial options.
More repeated practice on a skill. More practice that doesn't escalate in difficulty until kids get a chance to practice the basic
structure of the skill.
more repetition
More repetition for key concepts; Simpler instructions for parents to follow in helping with homework
More repetition of skills before moving on. More paper/pencil activities.
More repetition of skills. Practicing same skills in different ways rather than switching standards every other day
More review and repetition.
More review type study links so students can always review what they have previously learned.
More skill instruction
more teacher training
More time allotted to work on it.
More time covering concepts so that children can master them before moving on.
More time in learned concepts.
More time in the program for mastery of basic facts.
More time spent on concepts...slower pacing for mastery.
more time spent on foundational skills.
More time spent on the concepts being taught. Even with the readiness and ELL support lessons not all students are being
reached.
More time to actually teach and have time to fully practice while in class.
32 | P a g e ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
More time to collaborate with teachers between different grade levels (one grade below and one grade above), more time to do
curriculum mapping so all STEM lessons and materials are combined (and we will have more time to work with students on
deepening their skills, knowledge, and interests)
More time to gain mastery. Teach deep not wide. Teach less better. So many materials/resources available but when is there
time to really learn how to use them and then actually use them in the classroom.
More time to practice a skill before moving on would help my student feel more successful and perform better.
More time to use it.....
More traditional practice, repetition.
More visuals for the children might help struggling students.
More work on basic facts.
Much more practice on skills being taught. Right now, I supplement with outside resources.
N/A
n/a for me.
na
no suggestions
Non-spiraling lessons, objectives taught to mastery with review segments.
not as much spiraling
Not having entire lessons that are secure for a grade or 2 up. I realize this is beneficial for stronger students who need a
challenge, but for more than 2/3 of my students, EDM does not meet their needs.
Nothing
Nothing.
Pages with basic numeration problems. Types of similar problems that repeat themselves so that students feel successful
before having to demonstrate a new skill (as often done in the material now).
Practice pages with more than one chance at a skill. Timed pages for +/- facts.
Practice skills that go over the prior lesson's main objective
pretty much anything
providing additional lessons on secure skills that are formatted the same, simple use of language and richer in
manipulative/visuals in order to help struggling students develop critical basic skills; more practice with basic computation facts
Providing more time for students to master skills before moving on to a new one.
Repetition and less of the "other" ways to solve a problem. We need a back to the basics approach.
Repetition of like concepts.
Repetition over the lessons so the kids have multiple times to practice a skill.
Repetition, repetition, repetition.
Saxon
see above
See above
See above.
see previous
See the above
Sequencing: fractions into decimals into percents More ROTE expectations - emphasis on math facts. Educators should
spend more time on math, so I don't think the books are actually the main problem.
Shorter lessons. Few concepts taught per lesson.
Simplify the language without changing the content.
Skills taught in a systematic, sequential, developmentally appropriate curriculum. Expecting students to successfully master
material.
sloooow down
slow it down, concentrate on each skill long enough for students to understand the concept before moving to something new.
Slow it down, spend time reviewing and practicing concepts. Students must master add. and sub. facts before facing
multiplication and division. They are not prepared for this. The pacing guide keeps us racing through the curriculum, often times
leaving a huge percentage of students struggling to understand previous materials. I think EDM tries to cover too many skills
that our students are not ready for.
slower pace with more practice
33 | P a g e ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Slower pacing, more work space, inviting color pages, more homework choices.
Slower progression through the skills (ie spending more than one day on a concept).
Solid units with mastery activities
Some back to basic addition, subtraction, multiplication and division time.
some easier practice problems for new concepts
Some more repetition of tasks. Sometimes the students don't get enough practice of an introduced skill.
Some skills that second graders need more practice with. The GLEs that are a must KNOW by the end of second grade.
Something that builds in a little more time for mastery.
Spending more time with each concept rather than spiraling.
Spread out the skills prior to the unit assessment. See above comment.
Stick with the basics. Break the units down to specific skills rather than skipping around and circling back throughout the year.
Units should be presented in a linear format so that skills build upon each other in a clear time line so that review is easier for
students, and parents can better assist at home. Many parents are so incredibly frustrated with EDM that they feel helpless in
their attempt to help their children. I long for the days of Heath Math or Saxon!!
sticking with skills ong enough to master them.
Strands build on mastery.
Students need time to process and practice basic math skills before moving on. Everyday math moves rapidly and when a skill
is seen again later in the book the students have forgotten how to do it because they have not mastered it previously. Telling
teachers not worry whether a student masters a concept or not because they will see it again later in the year is not the way to
teach math to young children. Practice, practice, practice is how students achieve strong mathematical concepts.
Supplementing, as I do.
Switch to a different curriculum. I taught the Bridges curriculum in Oregon and the children loved math time. I had students that
were focused and ready to learn. they understood what was expected of them and were eager for "math time" each day.
Teach in sequence and build with review. Don't bounce around.
teach more to mastery
Teach to mastery and less words.
Teachers need to supplement with other materials. The textbook isn't going to change.
Teachers not frightened of math or of making mistakes. Teachers understanding how to teach math.
Teaching more than one day at a time. The spiral effect doesn't always seem effective
Teaching to mastery as opposed to focusing on a skill for 1-2 lessons and progressing to much more difficult concepts.
The Everyday Math K textbook is "fluff". One fourth of the book is blank pages saying Writing & Drawing Pages. Then another
fourth of the workbook has number writing, which is not the adopted Handwriting w/out Tears writing. Now you are left with less
than half a workbook with some decent pages. I supplement my math program with a lot of other activities, songs, and
worksheets to help my kiddos reach the GLEs.
The last version we have showed some improvements such as illustrations, less work on a page and simplified instructions.
These things still need to be stronger for most students in our Title schools. There would need to be daily fact practice and more
time spent on a single topic. Instructions with icons and simple language.
The math book is a disposable journal. To make it better, it needs more pages of drill and practice going from simple to more
difficult problems. Also, it needs more step by step building of concepts. Example: fractions...start simple and build instead of
throwing many concepts onto one page.
the option for every family to have a Student Reference Book at home for their child (not an online version, but a real book);
more professional development and observation opportunities for me to help me streamline my teaching to keep pacing on track
The spiraling is good, but we need more lessons initially to teach new concepts before moving on.
The students should be taught using a curriculum that requires mastery while introducing new concepts.
The vocabulary used in the textbook should be simple and to the point. Students should be able to read the directions, examples,
and problems on their own and understand what they are expected to do. The lessons should focus on a specific area instead of
throwing random lessons into a unit that have nothing to do with what the students have been learning so far.
There would be a textbook, like Saxton
They would benefit from more opportunities to practice the skills.
This program is supposed to be a spiral. How can this be when a concept is "spiraled" but at the problem with the review also
has a new concept tacked on. How do we expect a below average child to succeed with this type of spiral.
Thoroughly going through concepts before moving onto the next concept and more fundamental lessons.
34 | P a g e ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
To be more consistent with skills being teach, provide more practice for each skills
To continue teaching the concepts longer.
To have units with a more strategic focus.
Unit 5 in EDM seems to do a nice job of incrementally adding components to the math concept being presented so that children
can gain a strong understanding of decimals. It would be nice if more units had that same kind clear cohesiveness. Also, some
units just present so many concepts or new algorithms that it becomes overwhelming and confusing for children.
Using another curriculum.
Using Saxxon Math
Using something that repeats more
We already have the ability to to use the EDM games and materials from other grade levels to supplement where needed.
We don't use a textbook for kindergarten and the workbook is really only good for the lowest level students.
Saxon Open Responses:
What do you see as the strengths of the math textbook you are using with students?
• -Each concept clearly and simply explained. -Constant review of previous concepts taught. -Focus on math algorithms, not
reading comprehension. -Mastery is expected. -A tight schedule of teach, assess, reteach, review, master.
• Addition, subtraction, "thought problems", algebra, measurement, time, etc. Saxon is excellent, as it builds on skills as the
children learn them.
• Building of concepts
• builds upon the skills
• Common algorithms that students need for life are used. Students, parents, and teachers learn a base of mathematics that build
a strong math foundation for life.
• Concepts are always being reviewed
• Concepts presented in daily work are cumulative.
• consistency, ability to level kids
• continual review manipulatives
• Covers a lot of concepts
• Explanations are easy to understand. Repeated activities build on new skills and examples are easy to follow for students.
• Frequent practice of skills. Skills that build upon one another is a logical sequential order. Mastery of skills is achieved by almost
all students. Daily practice of word problems, money and time.
• Good scaffolding, lots of computation practice
• great repetitive practice for kids with spiraling with the skills
• It allows a teacher of any math ability to teach math well. There is constant practice of the math skills already covered with new
skills added and then practiced as well.
• Loops, offers plenty of practice, covers many concepts, pencil and paper practice, built in homework
• Lots of practice of a new concept without being too much.
• Lots of repetition of concepts taught. Students receive lots of practice, and this allows me more time to reteach struggling
students.
• manipulatives and repetition
• much easier than math sheets being thrown at kids each day..that is... if we had a text book in 3rd grade
• Repetition
• Repetition and consistency in instructional presentation.
• repetition and use of math manipulatives.
• Repetition of basic skills
• repetition, spiral model
• Sample problems, with answers explained. A lot of review of concepts for homework. Same format for every lesson so children
are used to it.
• Spiraling- students learn new skills over time
• systematic instruction skill mastery model homework practice matches daily lesson
• The biggest strength with Saxon is its repetition of content. The students get frequent practice with each skill.
35 | P a g e •
•
•
There is not a textbook but the teachers manual is passed appropriately and on top of the assessing.
This would be a great program for a Title school where students are coming in at a lower academic level. It moves along slowly.
very well laid out, hands-on pieces, practical, brings in old lessons, well-referenced, works well with my special needs children.
What do you see as the weaknesses of the math textbook you are using with students?
• ...
• Adequate time is not spent on new concepts
• Boring!
• Close to the first half of the year is review of materials, then the second half of the year the material is rushed through to get it all
presented.
• Cost of consumables.
• does not require mastery before moving on
• Doesn't spend enough time on any one concept before moving on.
• I wish the K-1 had more activities with manipulatives like Math Their Way used to. Children would understand algorithms better.
• It is not the current edition of SAXON math, the real math program that SHOULD be used in all of ASD.
• It moves from skill to skill very slowly. I often have to supplement work to keep the students interested and moving along.
• lack of inquiry and geometry
• Less varied instruction that other programs
• Lots of parts and pieces to coordinate. Modifications have to be made for demonstrations. i.e., cutting 10 apples in half. I used
paper apples and drew the seeds.
• Most concepts are taught using only one algorithm, which does not necessarily reach all learning styles. However, because I
have an engineering degree, I make up for that flaw by first teaching the concept as presented in the text, then adding other
possible algorithms. P.S. Math should NOT have a pacing guide! It is ludicrous to forge on ahead if the majority of a class has
not grasped (as in a basic understanding, not even mastery) a concept!
• none
• None
• None...second grade uses math sheets, one side classwork, one side homework. We do not use textbooks.
• not enough practice and no lines for writing numbers on (top, middle and bottom) so that the numbers are formed correctly
• Not enough repetition of new concepts. Not enough hands-on activities. Poor selection of manipulatives.
• Students who are weak readers have some trouble, but still can be successful.
• There are no weaknesses, in my opinion,when using text books.
• There is a lot of reading for the students.
• There is a lot to squeeze into 75 minutes.
• There is not enough challenge for some students.
What would make the math textbook stronger for your students?
• ...
• Additional resources, suggested games, more skills practice.
• After teaching Every Day Math for 4 years - the Saxon is a dream!
• Buy the latest version of SAXON MATH for all of ASD.
• fix the weaknesses
• i like it the way it is - and btw there is no textbook for 1st grade
• I like Saxon Math. It is fun, not boring, not much teacher prep, lots of good teaching, loops so if student don't get concept or
missed lesson can keep getting practice until mastery. Others that already mastered won't get bored as won't have to do pages
and pages of the skill.
• I would like to see quarters introduced sooner. I do this on my own. April is too late for sufficient practice. Other than that, the
textbook or practice sheets are excellent!
• If each lesson in the teacher's manual had a section giving teachers instruction in other ways that the concept can be solved. It
would be too unwieldy to do that in the student text.
• In 2nd grade we don't have text books, we use consumables, and I wouldn't make any changes.
36 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
It would be stronger if it had more differentiation for students who are either above or below that grade level.
Let's get rid of the thousands of worksheets and get a good textbook.
Maybe more practice for the initial lesson.
more calculation practice
more challenging activities
more interactive activities and/or math games
More practice per concept
no suggestion
not sure
Parent support
See above. A student refrence book such as Everyday Math has would also be beneficial.
See the above.
unknown
Investigations Open Responses:
What do you see as the strengths of the math textbook you are using with students?
• 1. Each unit is in-depth 2. More than one way to solve solutions 3. They write about their thinking using pictures numbers and
words 4. They work in different setting-whole class, small groups and in pairs 5. They have opportunity to complete activities
that deepen their understanding of the content
• Conceptual activities to build understanding of abstract ideas
• The books are organized in a way that you work on skills for an extended period of time in different situations. Also the program
encourages exploring the process and how to figure out a problem. Students become very adept at explaining their thinking and
how they arrived at their solution.
What do you see as the weaknesses of the math textbook you are using with students?
• Lack of computation practice - but this is very easy to supplement - much easier to supplement this than the conceptual activities
• Not enough computation practice Reflecting on their own thinking and writing about that. Story problems
• The weakness of this program is that there is not a lot of basic computation practice. Students practice that in addition to the
math program.
What would make the math textbook stronger for your students?
• computation integrating journal writing
Number World Open Responses:
What do you see as the strengths of the math textbook you are using with students?
• Number Worlds is great to build on what children are using in the general curriculum. It should not be used solely as their math
curriculum.
• short interventions can use to strengthen weaker areas
• Skill work is great
• The Number Worlds program incorporates manipulatives that students can use in each lesson.
• The pre-assessment into specific units allows for more precise placement based on particular needs. The ongoing assessment
during the instruction helps drive the instruction.
What do you see as the weaknesses of the math textbook you are using with students?
• 5 day program
• At the very early levels, it moves very slowly and is repetitious to a point that is usually unnecessary.
• Not able to meet all the needs of all learners and can't do more than one instructional program at a time.
• Not enough repetition.
37 | P a g e •
Sometimes lessons are too easy or too hard. I like to I do, We do, They do design.
What would make the math textbook stronger for your students?
• not sure
• One that assists children who have difficulties in reading. When there is a lot of reading in math, these kids struggle.
• Teacher/Student friendly textbooks and manuals.
• There is not textbook, only workbook.
Mathscape Open Responses:
What do you see as the strengths of the math textbook you are using with students?
• Activity based with lots of manipulatives for the kids
• At times, it can require students to think at a higher level - analysis and synthesis. Nonetheless, these students are inadequately
prepared to do this.
• Compact book, it's not visually overwhelming
• concept based
• Creative approaches to teaching material, some good practice material in the homework and reproducible activities for class
work.
• Exploratory lessons that apply mathematical concepts in a scenario students can relate to. Lessons within "phases" build
conceptual awareness.
• For the students with a strong math foundation this textbook would be challenging to them. However, since math is so leveled in
middle school those with a solid foundation are in the higher math courses, therefore leaving those with no to little foundation left
to struggle through this word heavy book.
• Hands on activities
• Hands on activities.
• Hands on, working on concepts that build into higher math.
• Has some engaging and interesting lessons. Has cooperative learning lessons.
• I'll let you know if I find any.
• Inquiry Based, lots of projects and hands-on learning
• It has good activities to do with students.
• It is exploratory/constructive in nature. Goes decently deep in some math concepts, way beyond what students would need for
Algebra readiness.
• It is small and easy for the students to carry
• it makes the kids read, discuss math topics
• It's pretty. Small textbook.
• Lots of projects and real world applications
• Many of the lessens are thought provoking and are related to our state standards
• Mathscape has numerous PROJECTS that can be used within the classroom.
• Mathscape is based on a hands-on conceptual approach to teaching mathematical concepts. Several of the units scaffold the
concepts in a way that truly bridges the gap between student prior learning and future requirements for understanding. If the
curriculum is taught faithfully and taught well, by the end of 8th grade students have a very solid understanding of basic algebraic
concepts & statistics.
• Mathscape- is a good text for high achieving Math 7 students who are not quite ready for Pre Algebra and are able to
conceptualize new ideas from investigations.
• Mathscapes has some great project ideas beyond just "number crunching".
• MathScapes: 1) requires students to explain in writing their process 2) students work in groups
• none
• None
• NONE
• Problem solving and investigation.
38 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Problem solving skills exercised.
Project based learning Real world application
promotes a true problem solving process
Provides hands-on lessons that are tied to real-life problems. It allows for problem-based learning throughout the course.
Provides some fun hands on methods.
Requires kids to think beyond more than mathematical skills.
Small text, easy to carry.
Students learn how to think about math rather than simply doing skill practice.
The homework assignments are ok. That's about it.
The strength of mathscape is the use of inquiry learning to lead the students to math concepts.
Very hands on and inquiry based.
Well-defined homework for each lesson, variety of problems for teaching each lesson
What do you see as the weaknesses of the math textbook you are using with students?
• "Exploration" learning new to students - with no examples within the lesson Too much reading within the lessons - especially for
those students with low reading and comprehension skills. Doesn't present lesson in a way that they will see throughout the rest
of their years of education. Put together in a senseless way. Hard to connect with parents - they are totally lost when trying to
help their students. Not enough practice problems to help students learn the concept.
• 1. The textbook is not very user friendly for parents. It would be very difficult for a parent to pick up the textbook and determine
quickly how to help their child with math. There are no worked out examples for parents to follow. 2. The textbook would be
difficult for a new teacher to teach from. There are not many additional resources/activities for teachers to draw on for extra
examples and practice. The teacher really needs to understand not only the math that is being taught, but the pedagogy that the
approach is based on 3. There is a tremendous amount of reading required for this textbook. This is a concern for a district
with so many ESL learners. 4. In some sections, we spend a month working with concepts that could be thoroughly taught in a
couple of weeks.
• Difficult for non-proficient readers
• Difficult for non-proficient readers. Students required to do a lot of reading.
• every aspect of the book I am a drill and practice teacher
• Hard to follow. Not enough opportunities to learn/practice concepts. Too word driven for ELL students (most students actually).
• It does not transition into Algebra at all. Students are not being taught Pre-Algebra to get them ready for Algebra 1. It assumed
that students know way more than they do and it has no explanation or example problems for students or parents to look at while
they are working homework. As a teacher it is very labor intensive to set up lessons, it has little or no drill and practice problems.
The amount of supplementation needed in order to prepare students for the next math level is infinite.
• It has no lessons, only word problems that are to be attacked. Parents have no guidance outside of what I provide exclusive of
the text. Some units are so long and confusing (FWTP)
• Lack of examples for students on "how to"
• Lacks examples, not student/parent friendly
• Lessons are lengthy, very little practice, difficult to navigate, no examples for student to review concepts with or help with
learning, impossible for substitute teachers, involves lots of facilitating, no examples for homework. Assumes students have all
the basic concepts needed to be successful. No review.
• Limited practice for students, no parental support materials, and students have difficulty with understanding what the homework
pages want from them.
• Lots. Stuff that is difficult to get the kids to grasp, has 3-4 days of lessons, while I must take as much as 3-4 weeks until they get
it. On the flip side, stuff that is very simple is stretched to take forever. Some tests are very inadequate in their presentation and
others are double the quantity that can reasonably be completed in 45 minutes. The curriculum also assumes that once we
cover something that they know it. There is no review of previous material once it has been covered once. They will not see the
same material again until the following year, if I did not continuously add review to my lessons. The curriculum also does not
include several 6th grade GLE's like measurement, and several geometry relations. These are just few of items that I am
displeased with.
• Many abstract concepts in the activities that are difficult for the students to grasp. No formal examples for "how-to" in the book.
Not very challenging homework problems.
39 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Mathscape- requires constant supplemental work and direct teaching. Requires restructuring tests, quizzes, and book activitiesin
order for the average student to complete tasks in a reasonable amount of time. Most students do not have the "real world
knowledge" that the book attempts to build from. Text homework problems do not give students enough basic examples or is
markedly different from the chapter text,
Mathscapes doesn't have examples of math problems in the book so students are unable to help themselves. It is also very
wordy, so I must make major modifications to make it comprehensible to my ELL students.
MathScapes: 1) no examples for students to refer to at home 2) parents can't help students with homework 3) not preparing
students for high school algebra 4) course 3 has no fraction work 5) almost exclusively teacher directed curriculum because of
lack of examples 6) some of the practice unit assessments online were incorrect (had questions from wrong unit) - so I don't
even refer my students to it any more 7) MathScapes curriculum is not supported by Glencoe (not a priority for them-their focus
and resources are directed towards a different middle school math curriculum)
No clear examples, limited & missing definitions, limited practice, no guided practice, difficult for absent students to make up
work on their own, difficult for parents to use to help students. Students tell me they find the "scenarios" contrived and "silly".
Not enough homework that relates to the lesson. Poor selection of ready made tests/quizzes. Examview Pro is difficult to use
and question bank questions often do not match what was taught in the phase. No ancillary materials to support struggling
students or for enrichment or for extra practice. Teacher's edition is poorly set up, answers are not always with lesson,
examples of student work sometimes show incorrect work without indicating it is incorrect. Difficult for new to math, new to
grade level, and 1st year teachers to learn to implement. On-line textbook does not work with Macs Company has indicated it is
not really supporting text series. Difficult for LEP students and Resource students. Requires teachers to find a lot of
supplemental material.
No Examples for students/parents to follow. To many holes with meeting the standards, and with prereq. skills
No examples, all activities no regular straight forward math. Ambiguous directions. It is confusing to the teachers, students, &
parents as to what information they are looking for in many of the activities. information is not readily accessible. A student asked
for help & I had to search through the teacher's information to find the answer. No review of material. No supplemental material
so if kids don't understand.
no fraction practice, many 7th grade students are using it without having used the Mathscapes 6 text (becomes a major problem
for some units such as teaching integer operations), includes some note 'boxes', but has very few examples of how to solve
problems,
No online support, parents and others cannot get help away from the classroom
not enough computation practice
Not enough directed practice especially for students who haven't mastered basic math skills.
Not enough examples for students/parents. Topics are learned/presented through exploration and many students need more
guidance.
Not enough practice to master skills. Important topics are not explicitly printed in the textbook, so if a student misses the
exploration in class, they cannot easily find what was covered. Their parents, also, cannot help them for the same reason It is
not aligned to our grade level expectations It does not prepare our 8th grade students for Algebra both in content pre-requisites
and rigor/work load. Topics seem to "bounce" around with very little cohesion from unit to unit and oftentimes lesson to lesson
within a unit. It is language heavy, so our ELL or low level Language Arts students have a difficult time learning from the text
Not enough practice with actual problems. Students are expected to "discover" formulas ( 1/2 a p = area of a regular polygon)
and spend VERY little time actually doing math problems. Lots of copying teacher's work and not enough practice in working
problems.
Reading level too high. No direct resources for parent or student. No scope and sequence. Too hard for transient students to
male up work. Too wordy. No direct instructions.
Students do not have the depth in background knowledge of basic facts, fractions, and decimals to even begin to use the text
effectively. There is no parent support, student support, and very little teacher support or explanation of concepts or
expectations of students. Too many concepts on one page. No supplements to accommodate different learning styles. Hot
Topics book does little to supplement understanding of concepts. Teachers must constantly seek out supplementary materials
to teach prior concepts to students in order for them to further any of their math knowledge.
Teachers have to scramble to supplement the curriculum. Most teachers hate the curriculum so they make up their own
curriculum to teach. Administration doesn't enforce teachers to teach the approved curriculum so it's a free for all.
40 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The instruction is not deliberate, nonlinear and does not build among concepts - it's tangentially-linked, at best. It's almost an
"exploratory model" of mathematics. It does not offer a direct explanation of concepts and does not provide adequate practice. It
also assumes way too much prerequisite knowledge. Students and parents are highly frustrated with this textbook, and indirect
approach to learning mathematics.
The lessons do not contain examples and the homework is difficult for the students without the explanations in the text.
The mathscape text is based so much on inquiry learning that the math concepts are difficult for the students to encounter, have
enough time to work with, and then truly master them. It is possible for the students to discover the math concepts with a lot of
teacher guidance, but almost hinders the original idea of the inquiry based learning. Aside from that, there is absolutely no skills
building or review.
There are few, if any, additional supports provided by the company. The book while written at grade level assumes mastery of
standards covered in elementary school that many students have not mastered. There are no additional resources to support
students who are not ready for the coursework. There is also limited resources for students who need additional intervention
with concepts within the text. The textbook is not designed for struggling students and the majority of students in this class are
struggling. Proficient and advanced students currently take Pre-algebra and Algebra so they are not in this class. The book has
a considerable amount of reading required with no concrete examples to help tutors or parents assist their students. Finally, the
textbook does not create a link between the conceptual applications of math and the abstract problem-solving and reasoning
required in Algebra.
There are no examples or concrete concepts laid out for students to see. It is so difficult for students to read as well as for
parents.
There is no guided practice or previous knowledge base to go through with my students. Students are expected to be a particular
level with this book (which they aren't) and so I have to spend A LOT of time looking for and creating resources that allow them
to understand the activities within the book. The book is also incredibly "wordy" My students who struggle in reading have a
hard time with the directions. There are also numerous grade level requirements that are not included within this book.
There is not a link connecting the units. There are very few problems to use for practice with students. The quizzes and tests
are inadequate and most important there are many holes in the curriculum.
they do not understand how to do simple math problems, the directions are poorly written. The book expects the kids to know
more than they really do.
This book does an extremely poor job preparing those students who are in need of math reinforcements, re-teaching, and
confidence building. This is also such a word heavy book that ELL, SPED, and the struggling readers who could be good at math
and its computation side never get the opportunity to show that off. This has caused a major phobia towards math and therefore
making it that much more difficult to teach these students the concepts because we are having to break down barriers as well as
re-teach misconceptions.
This math book is not at the appropriate skill level for the majority of the Math 7 students I teach. It is a reading/project based
book. The reading level is too high. The majority of my students cannot even pass a 5th grade computation assessment. Their
skills are too low to work through the concepts as they are presented in Mathscape. We need skill building materials.
Too much language, homework does not look like practice problems in the lesson
Too vague for the lower literal students. Too much reading. Not enough practice.
What would make the math textbook stronger for your students?
• examples for students 2) more homework problems 3) textbook with answers in the back to some problems so students can
check to see if they are doing their work correctly while at home 4) textbook that is set up more like a high school textbook so
that students learn how to use a regular textbook 5) access to a website such as classzone.com that is kept uptodate
• a supplementary book with exercises and additional practice problems beyond that of the text and student handbook
• At this point, I do not know what could make the textbook stronger. When a textbook trainer from the company came to train us,
they were very clear that there was no plan to make additional supports for the textbook because it is not a big money maker for
the company. As a district we do not have the money or resources to create the supports necessary to make this program work
with our students. Teachers would need to create pre-assessments and unit tests to assess what the students know and have
learned. They would then need to create supplemental lessons that met the needs of struggling students. There would also
need to be a considerable amount of time given to creating parent packets with concrete examples to help students. Finally,
supplemental lessons would need to be created to link the conceptual applications of math taught in MathScape and the abstract
problem-solving and reasoning required in Algebra.
41 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
better examples, less words
burning it
Change text book to a pre algebra text and support with hands on activities.
examples (especially for parents to use when helping their child), fraction practice, have 6th graders use the Mathscapes 6 book
prior to entering 7th grade, more online resources
Examples showing how to complete tasks. More guidance.
Examples, examples, examples.
Examples, extra practice, review of concepts needed
Examples, Stright forward directions. Regular math skills mixed with the projects. Supplemental material.
Flush this curriculum (textbook) and replace it with Saxon, McDougal Littel or a similar textbook that teaches mathematics in a
conventional learning format: introduces the concept, provides several examples, offers proofs where necessary, offers an
exercise set that aligns to the examples and spirals the concepts among each other as the textbook/learning progresses.
Frankly, I was an advocate for this text, and after using it with fidelity, I no longer consider this a text suitable for my students. I
believe it is time to look for a new text. I had thought the Handbook would be useful but, since we don't have enough for all
students, and it requires middle schoolers to use 2 books, it has not proven to be useful. I no longer use it to assign work for
students who take vacations. The only purpose I have for it is I will make copies of "explanation pages" (ie: steps for creating a
circle graph) for students to glue into their math notebooks as a reference.
Getting rid of it. The publisher discontinued it, that shows its value.
I believe that the textbook is demeaning to students. It treats them like the only thing they will ever use math for in real life is as
a consumer. I have seen the Saxon curriculum and one other one (I don't remember the name) and they were both far superior
to Mathsacpe. Saxon, ion particular includes continual review of old topics. I also think it treats kids like smart people, not like
dim-witted consumers.
I have spent hours trying to make sense of the textbook and have been frustrated at every turn. The kids can't read it, don't have
enough time on concepts, and are generally frustrated all the time. Basically, I really hate this textbook!
I honestly do not feel this textbook can be fixed. It is a square peg trying to be pushed into a round hole. Would more resources
help? Yes, but that still doesn't fix the major issues of the text. Would a guide that mirrors the text that highlights important
concepts help? Yes, but wouldn't that in itself be a new text? Why even use Mathscape anymore?
I think we need additional resources such as worksheets & activities for teachers to use. I think we also need some pre-made
materials to give to parents so they can better understand what is being learned in class. I think we need to give our ESL
learners additional support for the reading that is required.
If we ditched it.
Lessons with math examples INSIDE the same textbook. I know there is a math resource book, but then students are juggling
two books. Plus the resource book is not laid out the same, so it is more confusing than necessary.
More computation instruction and practice.
More direct teaching strategies. Supplementary homework for both weaker and strong students.
More examples for those who are not proficient note-takers so they have something to work from at home.
More examples like the handbook, and a more direct approach for each lesson with a lesson and homework in the same section.
Students should be able to access lesson notes for help with homework.
More examples so those who are not proficient note takers have something to refer to at home.
More practice problems. More complex word problems.
More skills practice and parent support materials.
Multiple problems to practice along with extra ws if needed.
Not sure you could. A new text book would be ideal. Something that is more traditional.
Not using certain units and replacing them with a mini-unit written by math teachers on discovery and than mastery of math
concepts. (The new pre-algebra books are very strong and could be supplemented with inquiry based lessons along the way.)
Redesign it to reflect the books that are being used in High School and College. Actually give examples within the lesson to help
parents understand enough to help their child. A better overall layout of the lessons.
Resources that can be accessed away from the classroom.
Step by step procedure. Practice. Review.
42 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
Switching to the McDougal Littell middle school series. It would meet the needs of my students as well as prepare them for the
higher math level books used for pre-algebra, algebra, and geometry.
Teachers have to follow it, and work to supplement it's weaknesses. We should move to teaching Pre-Algebra text through
middle school, and supplement with basic skills along the way. Introducing the kids to the harder math, in a gentler way, with
gobs of support with basic skills would be great.
The book needs an introduction to each lesson, basic skill practice, and then a project/word problems to reinforce it. Students
shouldn't be expected to just be able to jump into the lesson and understand everything without reviewing what they already
know. Would love it if there were more practice problems for the homework as well.
The book would need to be rewritten. There is too much lacking in this text to make it effective. Parents can't help their children
because there are no examples. Students have no examples to examine for help. Teachers must often guess at what answers
are expected from students because "answers will vary" is used almost exclusively. I would not even chose this book for a
supplement for gifted students.
There needs to be a whole lot more practice on the computations. The students who are in Math 7 classes are those who are in
dire need of fractions, decimals, percents, integers, and whole number computation practice. If they had these concepts down
they would be in a higher math class at this time.
Using math connects or another resource as supplemental material.
Xeroxing actual math problems to supplement text book.
Other Open Responses:
What do you see as the strengths of the math textbook you are using with students?
ƒ Clear examples
ƒ Clear instructions. Sequential development of ideas. Frequent cumulative reviews. Simple to plan scope and sequence with well
written assessments. Error free text and student materials.
ƒ clear, concise examples and variety of problem types with varying levels of thinking skills required
ƒ Concepts are divided up into small chunks, workbooks and assessment booklets provided.
ƒ Concepts are presented Pictures support the concepts there is practice there is review
ƒ Conceptual and lots of projects.
ƒ Connecting Math is a well thought out but I don't have a teachers edition.
ƒ Consistency, ease of use for parents, students and teachers. The fact that skills are constantly repeated.
ƒ Contains drill and practice for Sped. students
ƒ Each lesson is hands-on and develops visual concepts before algorithms are introduced.
ƒ EDM has some beneficial games, and the fact triangles help teach the connection of addition/subtraction, and multiplication/division.
ƒ EDM works well for the average or above average student.
ƒ Educational Insights Math Story Problems teaches the vocabulary for solving word problems. Fast Facts Workbook works on
learning and repetition of facts, Touch Math gives students a method of computation besides using their fingers.
ƒ Examples provided and structure
ƒ Focus on using manipulation.
ƒ Games, different algorithms for students to use
ƒ Good student explanations and examples. Odd answers. Good pacing guide. More supplementary materials than I will ever
use. Online version of the student book. Same series, same publisher as ASD High School adopted curriculum. Alligned with
National Standards.
ƒ Hands on, lots of manipulatives
ƒ Has some good activities to use with the students.
ƒ I like the length of the lessons and the practice that the students are given. I also like the homework and the skills that students
are given for self correcting their work.
ƒ I use alternate curriculum with my deaf students because of the need to provide the basics without a lot of fluff. They need more
time to process and the availability to pracice as much as possible to just get the computation part. Application can be added
later. The text involve so much language that the students are unable to decipher well enough to get to the information being
43 | P a g e ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
asked of them. Many times they can compute at the level being asked of them, but do not recognize that that is being asked of
them.
It has good problems introducing the lessons that kids and parents can understand. The online book is a wonderful tool. The
online additional resources help students who need additional help and practice. It has numerous teacher resources that help
such as the test maker and power point lessons.
It's very literal, lots of ways to integrate manipulatives, not too wordy, stays on topic
Lots of examples and resources for teachers and parents.
lots of options plus good online components
lots of practice, slow steps, word problems
Lots of problems, Notetaking Guide, Good Teacher Recourses, Hands On Activities
Lots of resources. User friendly.
Lots of support materials and additional practice.
N/A
Organization of the book Review work for lessons/chapters online resources
Pacing seems to fit the students
Plenty of examples and resources within the book.
Readable by students and parents. Reference worked out within the text to help parents and students understand skill/concept at
home without a teacher. Supplementary online materials is also a plus.
real world application problems for each concept. examples are clear on-line resources Assignment
Resources, Examples, Notesheets
rigorous math curriculum encourages multiple strategies and algorithms for problem solving
Several examples and the selected answers in the back.
short mini lessons that can be adapted from whole group to small group to partner activities. ( teacher manual)
Technology incorporated into curriculum
The amount of content in each lesson is pretty reasonable, although it's designed for 50-60 minute periods, which we don't have
in middle school. The extra 10 minutes would be
The book consistently repeats concepts that have been taught through Activity 4 of the homework. Students must remember
previous lessons which is very important in math.
The computer component is excellent. The students enjoy doing assignments on line, it is also a great tool for students when
they are absent.
The curriculum provides challenging concepts for my students.
The curriculum really teaches the "why" behind the concepts taught.
The lessons provide examples and the practice reflects what is learned.
The manual is easy for the teacher to use.
The online component is very beneficial.
The online textbook and supporting material
The topics being taught, reviewed.
There are examples and realife situation problems. They talk about Why, When and How we use these concepts.
There is a lot of practice with new skills. There is review problems in several lessons after a new skill is taught. The skills are
taught to mastery!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Very important for kids with learning disabilities!!!
Thorough
Various activities that teach concepts
Visuals, practice, and reteaching
Vocabulary, examples of problems, sequential order of material.
Website access and book online.
What do you see as the weaknesses of the math textbook you are using with students?
ƒ connecting to the on-line text book students need to remember password and log-in name.
ƒ Doesn't cover all the topics needed. Not concrete sequential.
ƒ EDM offers no student practice pages, no student "reteach" practice pages, does not TEACH some concepts before presenting
them to the students, vocabulary is TOTALLY different than any general math programs I have ever taught, no mastery of
basic/primary math concepts (which are needed to move on to more difficult concepts), no logical progression of math concepts
44 | P a g e ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
to reach the end result, introduces math concepts before students are developmentally ready, few to zero brief directions, steps,
or examples to teach/remind students of the math process they need to complete, does not allow enough room for students to
show work on paper.
ELL students might find it too difficult to read at times.
Everyday math does not work with our special eduction students.
Everyday Math does now work well with students who come into first grade with no or low number sense. There is a lot of work
on the side that I need to do with these students go get their number sense proficient. I also do not feel that it spends enough
time with practice of the fact families. It is also week with subtraction practice. The curriculum seems to rely a lot on the number
grid even when moving into Journal 2. I feel students rely on the grid more because of not enough conceptual understanding
with addition and subtraction.
Homework does not provide enough space to encourage students to work answers out
I
I don't like the set up in regards to how the lesson starts with one topic but will end with something totally different and unrelated.
For example unit one lesson one begins by teaching fractions (building number concepts) and ends with organizing data
(problem solving). The print in the teacher edition is very small.
I don't like the spiral concepts. So many activities are too hard in the beginning and too easy towards the end. Many concepts
presented are too abstract for students to really grasp. Do not like the "introduce" and move on to another concept idea. No
mastery of one subject or idea.
I like it
I must do supplementary computation work. The statistics strand could be stronger.
I taught elementary for years and feel that Everyday Math is week as well as the MathScapes!!!!
I would like to see this program in the lower grades.
It is slightly too high a reading level for my 7th and 8th graders. Some concepts and sections in the book do not follow a logical
order.
It is well used the geometry section is not as good as it should be
It moves too fast with not enough practice for the population of students that I am teaching. (Special Education)
It's old and doesn't cover all the standards to a high degree
little growth and can't really use with students at different math levels
My students cannot follow a spiraling program. They need more time to develop the skills and recognize it for what it is.
Repetition until proficiency is the need.
My textbook (new edition this year) crams way to much into this book. It is moving at a quicker pace than last years book. (way
to quick!)
n/a
N/A
No
no consistency
No enough drill and kill. Many have been with EDM for 6 years and still don't know their facts.
none
None
none so far
none that I know of...
Not enough Hands On Activities
not enough time on some topics...skips ahead a little too fast sometimes
Not really hitting on specific gle's for the grade level.
Not systematic, no scientifically based research to back EDM, and lack of practice before moving through its spiral philosophy.
Nothing.
Pacing is very fast.
Skips around some
Some of the concepts are taught so they are hard to understand.
Spiral curriculum, no mastery of concepts
Textbooks and workbooks offer too many strategies and approached to a single concept
The assessments are a little too difficult for 6th graders.
45 | P a g e ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
The book spends to much time on some concepts and not enough on others. The pacing guide needs to be adjusted. Also,
teachers should have the option of multiple choice test.
The concepts are not taught to mastery.
The order of teaching some of the concepts seems out of early.
There aren't any pre-assessments.
There is no meat in it. It only has a few work mat activities and has handwriting practice of the numbers 1-10. The school district
is wasting money buying the workbooks, because writing the numbers 1-10 is covered in the Handwriting Without Tears
workbooks.
There is too much language for a product designed for students with learning disabilities. There are some typos and editorial
issues here and there. There are some glaring content gaps. For example, in today's lesson, area of a circle is introduced
without having ever looked at exponents. A student immediately asked what "squared" meant and, of course, didn't know how to
interpret the formula for area of a circle.
Too much information between sections of the book.
too much text for 5th graders
Too wordy for ELL students, directions not clear, very little examples, confusing for parents, assumes students have prior
knowledge of concepts, lacks measurement, time, conversions, fractions and estimation.
Very difficult and not teacher friendly. Often answers are in another section of the text. Complex problems that require more
than is necessary at the level.
What would make the math textbook stronger for your students?
• ???
• A better focus on what students need to master at each grade level
• a vocabulary review
• Any math textbook which works with manipulatives first at the concept level, then moves into the connecting level and then
symbolic and visualization levels would be perfect for all students.
• Assessments laid out in an easier format to have students work out problems on the test itself, providing work space.
• be more indepth, be consecutive lessons on one subject before jumping to another area of math (teacher manual)
• Books for all students
• Concrete sequential material moving slowly into abstraction More drill and practice
• Easier for the students to read on their own.
• EDM could address the weaknesses mentioned by elementary teachers.
• Get a new series that would benefit special education students. There is no help from the district to find a math series for special
education students.
• Get rid of it.
• Having the opportunity to master the skills before moving on to a new skill.
• I like it
• I like these books.
• I would like a text that focuses on one skill at a time and students would stay with the skill until mastery.
• If it had skill practice pages for the students.
• if students would use the online support materials
• Less dense. More teacher friendly. Less complex.
• Less language, more examples.
• Less reading comp.
• Make concepts easier to understand
• More flexibility in the lessons and the ability to have multiple choice test.
• More Hands On Activities, More Math Stories to bring the concepts alive for different learning styles. The book generally only
goes to one or two learning styles, and leaves others behind. Need more ESL examples.
• More homework etc.
• more interesting format to text
• More manipulatives
• More related to standards
46 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
More than one lesson on a particular concept before moving on. At least a week spent on a concept to help with securing skills.
n/a
N/A
none
Not a spiral curriculum Practice with concepts
Nothing at this time
nothing, have lots of resources
Nothing, we need to make our students stronger for the textbook. It's the fact that I have students placed into Algebra 1 based
solely on their SBA math test scores who have not even passed or taken Pre-Algebra. Can you imagine taking a student from
Math 7 and placing them into Algebra 1 and having them remotely survive? Students who achieved straight D's in Pre-Algebra
also got moved up into Algebra 1.
Nothing.
nothing...IT'S A GREAT BOOK!
Pre-made tests that have space to show your work
Seperate reference book
Slower pace with more in depth of the topic and more practice.
The textbook needs supplemental materials to reinforce the concepts being taught. Last years edition had a supplemental book
but this years does not.
This is the first year I have used TransMath and at this point, I am happy with the program. I would like to see the primary
grades have a similar program.
This works with a little tweeking of things mentioned above.
47 | P a g e SUPPORT MATERIALS
Table 8: ELEMENTARY STAFF ONLY- How would you rate the elementary support materials? AM Reviews
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Elementary
20
9.17%
13
5.96%
110
50.46%
Elementary
Kindergarten
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
15
68.18%
School
Grade 1
3
8.11%
1
2.70%
21
56.76%
Grades
Grade 2
1
3.03%
2
6.06%
17
51.52%
Grade 3
3
11.11%
3
11.11%
10
37.04%
Grade 4
4
21.05%
0
0.00%
10
52.63%
Grade 5
4
12.50%
1
3.13%
19
59.38%
Grade 6
4
15.38%
5
19.23%
11
42.31%
Combo
1
4.55%
1
4.55%
7
31.82%
Good
Row %
33.49%
31.82%
32.43%
36.36%
40.74%
26.32%
25.00%
23.08%
54.55%
N
2
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
Excellent
Row %
0.92%
0.00%
0.00%
3.03%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
4.55%
Table 9: ELEMENTARY STAFF ONLY- How would you rate the elementary support materials? ASD/STEM Website
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
Good
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Elementary
9
2.99%
12
3.99%
123
40.86%
149
49.50%
Elementary
Kindergarten
0
0.00%
1
2.63%
15
39.47%
21
55.26%
School
Grade 1
2
3.64%
2
3.64%
24
43.64%
26
47.27%
Grades
Grade 2
0
0.00%
2
4.76%
14
33.33%
24
57.14%
Grade 3
1
2.56%
1
2.56%
14
35.90%
21
53.85%
Grade 4
1
2.86%
3
8.57%
13
37.14%
18
51.43%
Grade 5
5
13.16%
1
2.63%
17
44.74%
15
39.47%
Grade 6
0
0.00%
2
6.67%
16
53.33%
12
40.00%
Combo
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
10
41.67%
12
50.00%
N
8
1
1
2
2
0
0
0
2
Excellent
Row %
2.66%
2.63%
1.82%
4.76%
5.13%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
8.33%
Table 10: ELEMENTARY STAFF ONLY- How would you rate the elementary support materials? Assessment Assistant
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
Good
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Elementary
21
6.80%
26
8.41%
118
38.19%
128
41.42%
Elementary
Kindergarten
0
0.00%
2
6.67%
17
56.67%
10
33.33%
School
Grade 1
4
6.90%
4
6.90%
22
37.93%
24
41.38%
Grades
Grade 2
2
4.65%
3
6.98%
15
34.88%
22
51.16%
Grade 3
3
7.50%
3
7.50%
17
42.50%
16
40.00%
Grade 4
6
18.18%
4
12.12%
12
36.36%
11
33.33%
Grade 5
3
6.52%
2
4.35%
15
32.61%
19
41.30%
Grade 6
2
5.88%
6
17.65%
13
38.24%
12
35.29%
Combo
1
4.00%
2
8.00%
7
28.00%
14
56.00%
Excellent
N
Row %
16
5.18%
1
3.33%
4
6.90%
1
2.33%
1
2.50%
0
0.00%
7
15.22%
1
2.94%
1
4.00%
Table 11: ELEMENTARY STAFF ONLY- How would you rate the elementary support materials? Assessment Handbook
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
Good
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Elementary
13
3.77%
27
7.83%
139
40.29%
157
45.51%
Elementary
Kindergarten
0
0.00%
4
10.26%
22
56.41%
12
30.77%
School
Grade 1
4
6.15%
2
3.08%
28
43.08%
28
43.08%
Grades
Grade 2
0
0.00%
2
4.00%
17
34.00%
31
62.00%
Grade 3
1
2.17%
2
4.35%
20
43.48%
23
50.00%
Grade 4
4
10.53%
3
7.89%
15
39.47%
15
39.47%
Grade 5
2
4.35%
5
10.87%
15
32.61%
22
47.83%
Grade 6
2
5.41%
8
21.62%
11
29.73%
15
40.54%
Combo
0
0.00%
1
4.17%
11
45.83%
11
45.83%
N
9
1
3
0
0
1
2
1
1
N
73
7
12
12
11
5
8
6
12
Excellent
Row %
2.61%
2.56%
4.62%
0.00%
0.00%
2.63%
4.35%
2.70%
4.17%
48 | P a g e Table 12: ELEMENTARY STAFF ONLY- How would you rate the elementary support materials? Complete Alignment of Lessons to GLEs
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
Good
Excellent
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Elementary
14
4.09%
25
7.31%
112
32.75%
166
48.54%
25
7.31%
Elementary
Kindergarten
0
0.00%
3
6.67%
20
44.44%
21
46.67%
1
2.22%
School
Grade 1
2
3.28%
3
4.92%
17
27.87%
35
57.38%
4
6.56%
Grades
Grade 2
0
0.00%
6
12.24%
12
24.49%
27
55.10%
4
8.16%
Grade 3
2
4.55%
5
11.36%
16
36.36%
17
38.64%
4
9.09%
Grade 4
6
15.00%
0
0.00%
14
35.00%
18
45.00%
2
5.00%
Grade 5
1
2.33%
3
6.98%
12
27.91%
21
48.84%
6
13.95%
Grade 6
3
8.82%
4
11.76%
14
41.18%
10
29.41%
3
8.82%
Combo
0
0.00%
1
3.85%
7
26.92%
17
65.38%
1
3.85%
Table 13: ELEMENTARY STAFF ONLY- How would you rate the elementary support materials? Differentiation Handbook
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
Good
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Elementary
12
3.76%
28
8.78%
153
47.96%
120
37.62%
Elementary
Kindergarten
0
0.00%
4
10.53%
20
52.63%
14
36.84%
School
Grade 1
3
4.92%
3
4.92%
27
44.26%
26
42.62%
Grades
Grade 2
0
0.00%
3
7.50%
19
47.50%
18
45.00%
Elementary
Grade 3
2
4.65%
3
6.98%
24
55.81%
13
30.23%
School
Grade 4
4
10.81%
3
8.11%
16
43.24%
13
35.14%
Grades
Grade 5
2
4.44%
4
8.89%
22
48.89%
17
37.78%
Grade 6
1
3.33%
7
23.33%
15
50.00%
7
23.33%
Combo
0
0.00%
1
4.00%
10
40.00%
12
48.00%
N
6
0
2
0
1
1
0
0
2
Table 14: ELEMENTARY STAFF ONLY- How would you rate the elementary support materials? Everyday Math Online
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
Good
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Elementary
16
4.73%
17
5.03%
87
25.74%
178
52.66%
Elementary
Kindergarten
0
0.00%
3
6.25%
17
35.42%
24
50.00%
School
Grade 1
6
9.38%
4
6.25%
13
20.31%
36
56.25%
Grades
Grade 2
0
0.00%
1
2.00%
10
20.00%
33
66.00%
Grade 3
3
6.67%
1
2.22%
14
31.11%
20
44.44%
Grade 4
4
12.12%
1
3.03%
9
27.27%
16
48.48%
Grade 5
2
4.76%
2
4.76%
6
14.29%
24
57.14%
Grade 6
1
3.13%
4
12.50%
12
37.50%
10
31.25%
Combo
0
0.00%
1
4.17%
6
25.00%
15
62.50%
Excellent
N
Row %
40
11.83%
4
8.33%
5
7.81%
6
12.00%
7
15.56%
3
9.09%
8
19.05%
5
15.63%
2
8.33%
Excellent
Row %
1.88%
0.00%
3.28%
0.00%
2.33%
2.70%
0.00%
0.00%
8.00%
Table 15: ELEMENTARY STAFF ONLY- How would you rate the elementary support materials? Focus Lessons in EDM Supporting GLEs
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
Good
Excellent
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Elementary
14
4.28%
29
8.87%
115
35.17%
152
46.48%
17
5.20%
Elementary
Kindergarten
0
0.00%
3
8.33%
17
47.22%
14
38.89%
2
5.56%
School
Grade 1
4
6.45%
5
8.06%
20
32.26%
31
50.00%
2
3.23%
Grades
Grade 2
0
0.00%
2
4.44%
14
31.11%
26
57.78%
3
6.67%
Grade 3
2
4.76%
6
14.29%
13
30.95%
19
45.24%
2
4.76%
Grade 4
3
7.69%
2
5.13%
16
41.03%
17
43.59%
1
2.56%
Grade 5
3
6.67%
2
4.44%
18
40.00%
18
40.00%
4
8.89%
Grade 6
2
5.71%
7
20.00%
11
31.43%
13
37.14%
2
5.71%
Combo
0
0.00%
2
8.70%
6
26.09%
14
60.87%
1
4.35%
49 | P a g e Table 16: ELEMENTARY STAFF ONLY- How would you rate the elementary support materials? GLE Checklist Shaded for First Semester EDM
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
Good
Excellent
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Elementary
14
4.58%
20
6.54%
105
34.31%
150
49.02%
17
5.56%
Elementary
Kindergarten
1
2.86%
2
5.71%
14
40.00%
16
45.71%
2
5.71%
School
Grade 1
4
6.90%
4
6.90%
14
24.14%
34
58.62%
2
3.45%
Grades
Grade 2
0
0.00%
1
2.44%
13
31.71%
26
63.41%
1
2.44%
Grade 3
1
2.50%
3
7.50%
14
35.00%
19
47.50%
3
7.50%
Grade 4
4
12.12%
2
6.06%
13
39.39%
12
36.36%
2
6.06%
Grade 5
2
4.76%
3
7.14%
12
28.57%
20
47.62%
5
11.90%
Grade 6
2
6.06%
4
12.12%
15
45.45%
12
36.36%
0
0.00%
Combo
0
0.00%
1
4.17%
10
41.67%
11
45.83%
2
8.33%
Table 17: ELEMENTARY STAFF ONLY- How would you rate the elementary support materials? GLEs to EDM Games by Strand
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
Good
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Elementary
11
3.34%
24
7.29%
99
30.09%
173
52.58%
Elementary
Kindergarten
0
0.00%
2
5.26%
15
39.47%
18
47.37%
School
Grade 1
4
6.90%
2
3.45%
16
27.59%
33
56.90%
Grades
Grade 2
0
0.00%
2
4.35%
11
23.91%
33
71.74%
Grade 3
0
0.00%
3
6.67%
16
35.56%
22
48.89%
Grade 4
3
8.11%
5
13.51%
7
18.92%
17
45.95%
Grade 5
2
4.26%
5
10.64%
14
29.79%
22
46.81%
Grade 6
2
5.71%
4
11.43%
14
40.00%
14
40.00%
Combo
0
0.00%
1
4.35%
6
26.09%
14
60.87%
Excellent
N
Row %
22
6.69%
3
7.89%
3
5.17%
0
0.00%
4
8.89%
5
13.51%
4
8.51%
1
2.86%
2
8.70%
Table 18: ELEMENTARY STAFF ONLY- How would you rate the elementary support materials? GLEs to Questions of the Assessment Assistant
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
Good
Excellent
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Elementary
17
5.74%
22
7.43%
113
38.18%
126
42.57%
18
6.08%
Elementary
Kindergarten
1
3.57%
3
10.71%
15
53.57%
8
28.57%
1
3.57%
School
Grade 1
4
7.02%
3
5.26%
17
29.82%
30
52.63%
3
5.26%
Grades
Grade 2
0
0.00%
1
2.50%
15
37.50%
22
55.00%
2
5.00%
Grade 3
1
2.27%
2
4.55%
18
40.91%
19
43.18%
4
9.09%
Grade 4
5
15.63%
2
6.25%
14
43.75%
11
34.38%
0
0.00%
Grade 5
3
7.50%
4
10.00%
12
30.00%
16
40.00%
5
12.50%
Grade 6
3
9.68%
6
19.35%
13
41.94%
7
22.58%
2
6.45%
Combo
0
0.00%
1
4.17%
9
37.50%
13
54.17%
1
4.17%
Table 19: ELEMENTARY STAFF ONLY- How would you rate the elementary support materials? Interactive Teacher Lesson Guides
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
Good
Excellent
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Elementary
19
6.51%
21
7.19%
106
36.30%
120
41.10%
26
8.90%
Elementary
Kindergarten
1
3.13%
4
12.50%
11
34.38%
14
43.75%
2
6.25%
School
Grade 1
4
7.14%
3
5.36%
19
33.93%
29
51.79%
1
1.79%
Grades
Grade 2
0
0.00%
3
6.67%
15
33.33%
21
46.67%
6
13.33%
Grade 3
2
5.41%
3
8.11%
18
48.65%
11
29.73%
3
8.11%
Grade 4
5
16.13%
0
0.00%
11
35.48%
10
32.26%
5
16.13%
Grade 5
3
7.89%
3
7.89%
12
31.58%
13
34.21%
7
18.42%
Grade 6
4
12.12%
5
15.15%
13
39.39%
10
30.30%
1
3.03%
Combo
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
7
35.00%
12
60.00%
1
5.00%
50 | P a g e Table 20: ELEMENTARY STAFF ONLY- How would you rate the elementary support materials? Mid-year Benchmark Assessment (GLEs Assessed
by Pacing Chart)
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
Good
Excellent
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Elementary
24
6.96%
33
9.57%
115
33.33%
154
44.64%
19
5.51%
Elementary
Kindergarten
0
0.00%
5
18.52%
12
44.44%
9
33.33%
1
3.70%
School
Grade 1
2
3.03%
5
7.58%
17
25.76%
39
59.09%
3
4.55%
Grades
Grade 2
1
2.00%
2
4.00%
18
36.00%
29
58.00%
0
0.00%
Grade 3
2
4.08%
5
10.20%
17
34.69%
22
44.90%
3
6.12%
Grade 4
5
12.50%
3
7.50%
13
32.50%
17
42.50%
2
5.00%
Grade 5
5
10.64%
5
10.64%
16
34.04%
16
34.04%
5
10.64%
Grade 6
7
18.92%
5
13.51%
10
27.03%
11
29.73%
4
10.81%
Combo
2
6.90%
3
10.34%
12
41.38%
11
37.93%
1
3.45%
Table 21: ELEMENTARY STAFF ONLY- How would you rate the elementary support materials? Minute Math
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
Good
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Elementary
14
4.29%
21
6.44%
133
40.80%
142
43.56%
Elementary
Kindergarten
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
18
43.90%
20
48.78%
School
Grade 1
1
1.67%
4
6.67%
26
43.33%
27
45.00%
Grades
Grade 2
3
6.82%
3
6.82%
15
34.09%
21
47.73%
Grade 3
1
2.27%
3
6.82%
20
45.45%
19
43.18%
Grade 4
4
10.53%
4
10.53%
17
44.74%
13
34.21%
Grade 5
3
7.14%
2
4.76%
16
38.10%
17
40.48%
Grade 6
2
6.25%
4
12.50%
11
34.38%
11
34.38%
Combo
0
0.00%
1
4.00%
10
40.00%
14
56.00%
Excellent
N
Row %
16
4.91%
3
7.32%
2
3.33%
2
4.55%
1
2.27%
0
0.00%
4
9.52%
4
12.50%
0
0.00%
Table 22: ELEMENTARY STAFF ONLY- How would you rate the elementary support materials? Pacing Chart
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
Good
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Elementary
31
8.71%
41
11.52%
108
30.34%
144
40.45%
Elementary
Kindergarten
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
16
34.78%
24
52.17%
School
Grade 1
3
4.69%
5
7.81%
19
29.69%
31
48.44%
Grades
Grade 2
2
3.92%
3
5.88%
17
33.33%
23
45.10%
Grade 3
2
4.26%
7
14.89%
14
29.79%
19
40.43%
Grade 4
5
12.20%
6
14.63%
13
31.71%
16
39.02%
Grade 5
7
15.56%
10
22.22%
10
22.22%
13
28.89%
Grade 6
9
24.32%
7
18.92%
9
24.32%
10
27.03%
Combo
3
12.00%
3
12.00%
10
40.00%
8
32.00%
Excellent
N
Row %
32
8.99%
6
13.04%
6
9.38%
6
11.76%
5
10.64%
1
2.44%
5
11.11%
2
5.41%
1
4.00%
Table 23: ELEMENTARY STAFF ONLY- How would you rate the elementary support materials? Sample Questions for GLEs on ARS
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
Good
Excellent
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Elementary
10
3.52%
21
7.39%
112
39.44%
123
43.31%
18
6.34%
Elementary
Kindergarten
0
0.00%
2
8.33%
15
62.50%
5
20.83%
2
8.33%
School
Grade 1
3
6.52%
2
4.35%
19
41.30%
20
43.48%
2
4.35%
Grades
Grade 2
1
2.70%
1
2.70%
18
48.65%
16
43.24%
1
2.70%
Grade 3
1
2.38%
4
9.52%
14
33.33%
20
47.62%
3
7.14%
Grade 4
3
9.09%
1
3.03%
16
48.48%
12
36.36%
1
3.03%
Grade 5
2
4.55%
4
9.09%
13
29.55%
20
45.45%
5
11.36%
Grade 6
0
0.00%
6
17.65%
12
35.29%
13
38.24%
3
8.82%
Combo
0
0.00%
1
4.17%
5
20.83%
17
70.83%
1
4.17%
51 | P a g e Table 24: MIDDLE SCHOOL STAFF ONLY- How would you rate the middle school support materials? Hot Words/Hot Topics
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
Good
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Middle
3
5.56%
13
24.07%
23
42.59%
15
27.78%
Middle School Grade 6
0
0.00%
1
12.50%
3
37.50%
4
50.00%
Grades
Grade 7
1
4.35%
8
34.78%
7
30.43%
7
30.43%
Grade 8
2
9.52%
4
19.05%
11
52.38%
4
19.05%
Combo
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
2
100.00%
0
0.00%
N
0
0
0
0
0
Excellent
Row %
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
Table 25: MIDDLE SCHOOL STAFF ONLY- How would you rate the middle school support materials? Interactive Teacher Lesson Guide
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
Good
Excellent
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Middle
6
11.54%
15
28.85%
16
30.77%
15
28.85%
0
0.00%
Middle School Grade 6
2
28.57%
2
28.57%
1
14.29%
2
28.57%
0
0.00%
Grades
Grade 7
3
15.00%
6
30.00%
9
45.00%
2
10.00%
0
0.00%
Grade 8
1
4.55%
7
31.82%
4
18.18%
10
45.45%
0
0.00%
Combo
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
2
66.67%
1
33.33%
0
0.00%
Table 26: MIDDLE SCHOOL STAFF ONLY- How would you rate the middle school support materials? Materials and Resources on the Middle
School Math Wiki
All Middle
Middle School
Grades
Grade 6
Grade 7
Grade 8
Combo
N
3
1
1
1
0
Poor
Row %
5.36%
12.50%
4.17%
4.55%
0.00%
Table 27: MIDDLE SCHOOL STAFF ONLY- How would
Standards)
Poor
N
Row %
All Middle
3
5.17%
Middle School Grade 6
0
0.00%
Grades
Grade 7
0
0.00%
Grade 8
3
13.04%
Combo
0
0.00%
Inadequate
N
Row %
13
23.21%
1
12.50%
8
33.33%
4
18.18%
0
0.00%
Fair
N
18
4
9
3
2
Row %
32.14%
50.00%
37.50%
13.64%
100.00%
N
17
2
6
9
0
Good
Row %
30.36%
25.00%
25.00%
40.91%
0.00%
N
5
0
0
5
0
Excellent
Row %
8.93%
0.00%
0.00%
22.73%
0.00%
you rate the middle school support materials? Melded GLE Guide (ASD and Alaska
Inadequate
N
Row %
4
6.90%
1
11.11%
3
12.50%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
Fair
Good
Row %
44.83%
44.44%
45.83%
47.83%
0.00%
N
7
2
0
5
0
Excellent
Row %
12.07%
22.22%
0.00%
21.74%
0.00%
Table 28: MIDDLE SCHOOL STAFF ONLY- How would you rate the middle school support materials? Pacing Guide
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
Good
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Middle
7
11.86%
7
11.86%
22
37.29%
18
30.51%
Middle School Grade 6
0
0.00%
1
12.50%
4
50.00%
3
37.50%
Grades
Grade 7
4
16.00%
5
20.00%
13
52.00%
2
8.00%
Grade 8
3
12.50%
1
4.17%
3
12.50%
13
54.17%
Combo
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
2
100.00%
0
0.00%
N
5
0
1
4
0
Excellent
Row %
8.47%
0.00%
4.00%
16.67%
0.00%
N
18
2
10
4
2
Row %
31.03%
22.22%
41.67%
17.39%
100.00%
N
26
4
11
11
0
52 | P a g e Table 29: MIDDLE SCHOOL STAFF ONLY- How would you rate the middle school support materials? Teacher Works Resource Disk
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
Good
Excellent
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Middle
10
17.54%
12
21.05%
20
35.09%
11
19.30%
4
7.02%
Middle School Grade 6
2
25.00%
1
12.50%
2
25.00%
3
37.50%
0
0.00%
Grades
Grade 7
3
13.04%
7
30.43%
10
43.48%
2
8.70%
1
4.35%
Grade 8
5
20.83%
4
16.67%
6
25.00%
6
25.00%
3
12.50%
Combo
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
2
100.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
Table 30: MIDDLE SCHOOL STAFF ONLY- How would you rate the middle school support materials? Test Generator
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
Good
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Middle
7
12.50%
10
17.86%
23
41.07%
15
26.79%
Middle School Grade 6
2
25.00%
1
12.50%
3
37.50%
2
25.00%
Grades
Grade 7
2
9.09%
5
22.73%
10
45.45%
5
22.73%
Grade 8
3
12.50%
4
16.67%
8
33.33%
8
33.33%
Combo
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
2
100.00%
0
0.00%
N
1
0
0
1
0
Excellent
Row %
1.79%
0.00%
0.00%
4.17%
0.00%
53 | P a g e PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Table 31: ELEMENTARY ONLY-Have you attended professional development on Everyday Mathematics?
Yes
N
Row %
All Elementary
369
87.86%
Elementary School
Kindergarten
51
87.93%
Grades
Grade 1
67
89.33%
Grade 2
49
83.05%
Grade 3
48
92.31%
Grade 4
40
88.89%
Grade 5
49
89.09%
Grade 6
38
92.68%
Combo
27
77.14%
No
N
51
7
8
10
4
5
6
3
8
Row %
12.14%
12.07%
10.67%
16.95%
7.69%
11.11%
10.91%
7.32%
22.86%
Table 32: ELEMENTARY ONLY-When was the last session of professional development that you attended on Everyday Mathematics?
2010-2011
2009
2008
2007
2006
Prior to 2006
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Elementary
104 33.44%
64
20.58%
49
15.76%
22
7.07%
18
5.79%
54
17.36%
Elementary Kindergarten
12
27.91%
2
4.65%
13
30.23%
4
9.30%
4
9.30%
8
18.60%
School
Grade 1
14
24.56%
9
15.79%
12
21.05%
7
12.28%
3
5.26%
12
21.05%
Grades
Grade 2
15
37.50%
13
32.50%
3
7.50%
1
2.50%
2
5.00%
6
15.00%
Grade 3
20
47.62%
11
26.19%
2
4.76%
2
4.76%
0
0.00%
7
16.67%
Grade 4
13
37.14%
8
22.86%
2
5.71%
4
11.43%
2
5.71%
6
17.14%
Grade 5
12
30.00%
6
15.00%
11
27.50%
1
2.50%
4
10.00%
6
15.00%
Grade 6
9
30.00%
10
33.33%
4
13.33%
1
3.33%
2
6.67%
4
13.33%
Combo
9
37.50%
5
20.83%
2
8.33%
2
8.33%
1
4.17%
5
20.83%
Table 33: ELEMENTARY ONLY-How would you rate the quality of professional development that you attended on Everyday Mathematics?
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
Good
Excellent
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Elementary
11
3.13%
45
12.78%
112
31.82%
141
40.06%
43
12.22%
Elementary
Kindergarten
1
2.08%
8
16.67%
13
27.08%
19
39.58%
7
14.58%
School
Grade 1
1
1.52%
5
7.58%
25
37.88%
31
46.97%
4
6.06%
Grades
Grade 2
0
0.00%
3
6.52%
17
36.96%
17
36.96%
9
19.57%
Grade 3
0
0.00%
8
17.78%
8
17.78%
20
44.44%
9
20.00%
Grade 4
2
5.26%
6
15.79%
14
36.84%
13
34.21%
3
7.89%
Grade 5
3
6.25%
5
10.42%
21
43.75%
14
29.17%
5
10.42%
Grade 6
4
11.11%
9
25.00%
10
27.78%
12
33.33%
1
2.78%
Combo
0
0.00%
1
4.00%
4
16.00%
15
60.00%
5
20.00%
54 | P a g e Table 34: ELEMENTARY ONLY-Was the information you received in your Everyday Mathematics professional development useful to you in
classroom instruction?
Yes
No
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Elementary
271
75.28%
89
24.72%
Elementary School
Kindergarten
36
72.00%
14
28.00%
Grades
Grade 1
51
77.27%
15
22.73%
Grade 2
43
93.48%
3
6.52%
Grade 3
36
76.60%
11
23.40%
Grade 4
27
69.23%
12
30.77%
Grade 5
30
62.50%
18
37.50%
Grade 6
25
65.79%
13
34.21%
Combo
23
88.46%
3
11.54%
Table 35: MIDDLE SCHOOL ONLY-Have you attended professional development on Mathscape?
Yes
N
Row %
All Middle
34
72.34%
Middle School Grades
Grade 6
5
50.00%
Grade 7
18
94.74%
Grade 8
11
73.33%
Combo
0
0.00%
No
N
13
5
1
4
3
Table 36: MIDDLE SCHOOL ONLY-When was the last session of professional development that you attended on Mathscape?
2010-2011
2009
2008
2007
2006
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Middle
26
81.25%
5
15.63%
0
0.00%
1
3.13%
0
0.00%
Middle
Grade 6
5
100.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
School
Grade 7
16
88.89%
2
11.11%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
Grades
Grade 8
5
55.56%
3
33.33%
0
0.00%
1
11.11%
0
0.00%
Combo
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
Table 37: MIDDLE SCHOOL ONLY-How would you rate the quality of professional development that you attended on Mathscape?
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
Good
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Middle
4
11.76%
5
14.71%
16
47.06%
7
20.59%
Middle School Grade 6
0
0.00%
1
20.00%
1
20.00%
3
60.00%
Grades
Grade 7
2
11.11%
3
16.67%
8
44.44%
4
22.22%
Grade 8
2
18.18%
1
9.09%
7
63.64%
0
0.00%
Combo
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
Row %
27.66%
50.00%
5.26%
26.67%
100.00%
Prior to 2006
N
Row %
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
N
2
0
1
1
0
Excellent
Row %
5.88%
0.00%
5.56%
9.09%
0.00%
Table 38: MIDDLE SCHOOL ONLY-Was the information you received in your Mathscape professional development useful to you in classroom
instruction?
Yes
No
N
Row %
N
Row %
All Middle
19
55.88%
15
44.12%
Middle School Grades
Grade 6
3
60.00%
2
40.00%
Grade 7
10
55.56%
8
44.44%
Grade 8
6
54.55%
5
45.45%
Combo
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
55 | P a g e Table 39: How would you rate the quality of the professional development you have received in mathematics?
Poor
Inadequate
Fair
Good
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
Overall
12
2.75%
63
14.42%
172
39.36%
148
33.87%
All Elementary
10
2.77%
51
14.13%
141
39.06%
126
34.90%
All Middle
1
2.17%
7
15.22%
17
36.96%
15
32.61%
Elementary
Kindergarten
1
1.89%
11
20.75%
19
35.85%
18
33.96%
School
Grade 1
1
1.56%
5
7.81%
34
53.13%
18
28.13%
Grades
Grade 2
0
0.00%
7
14.58%
19
39.58%
18
37.50%
Grade 3
0
0.00%
8
18.60%
11
25.58%
20
46.51%
Grade 4
2
5.26%
3
7.89%
17
44.74%
13
34.21%
Grade 5
3
6.25%
5
10.42%
18
37.50%
17
35.42%
Grade 6
2
5.41%
10
27.03%
15
40.54%
8
21.62%
Combo
1
3.33%
2
6.67%
8
26.67%
14
46.67%
Middle School Grade 6
0
0.00%
1
10.00%
5
50.00%
3
30.00%
Grades
Grade 7
1
5.26%
3
15.79%
8
42.11%
6
31.58%
Grade 8
0
0.00%
3
20.00%
3
20.00%
6
40.00%
Combo
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
1
50.00%
0
0.00%
No Designation
1
3.33%
5
16.67%
14
46.67%
7
23.33%
Excellent
N
Row %
42
9.61%
33
9.14%
6
13.04%
4
7.55%
6
9.38%
4
8.33%
4
9.30%
3
7.89%
5
10.42%
2
5.41%
5
16.67%
1
10.00%
1
5.26%
3
20.00%
1
50.00%
3
10.00%
56 | P a g e OPEN RESPONSES REGARDING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
(Open responses are unedited to keep authenticity)
Open Responses:
What supports for professional development have you received?
Kindergarten:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Additional professional math courses on ways to infuse and implement EDM in Kindergarten
Carolyn Crosby and Ann Ibele are magnificent.
EDM Training (New Employee)
Everyday Math Training Title 1
I got support when I taught 2nd grade. We were given many ideas on different ways to approach math boxes. Posters
that were made to supplement the curriculum.
I have taken math classes and I am currently taking the math consortium.
I still need to receive prof. development that is curriculum specific. Being new to the grade level, ASD traditionla
schools, and EDM, I am still familiarizing myself with it all. I missed the offered trainings in the fall at the start of the
year due to a tragedy in my personal life.
In district, 2 half day sessions that were fine. I have got more out of classes I paid for.
In-service training when the district implements a new program.
making games
Many hours of trainings on the lessons in EDM. Supplemental lessons Literature that corresponds to EDM lessons.
Materials and training
Math specialist comes in every now and again. Shortly after I was introduced to her she asked if I was a sub...not
good.
Math support staff offered to come to our class to help teach a lesson, offer advice on how we could better meet the
students needs.
Multiple EDM program trainings
None
None really.
None. In fact, our principal did not even order new EDM kits for Kindergarten several years ago. We finally got them,
but the principal maybe thought we didn't use EDM in kindergarten. So we attended professional development, but did
not have the materials. So it was vague.
Once this year our math support person spent an hour with my grade level (January). This is the first time I learned
that GLE's were available on the STEM site. This was the first that I learned that the EDM curriculum and supports
were on our school server. I am glad to know of this.
One day with the Math resourse teacher. We did not have enough time to complete games being made.
One on one with math support person.
Online help has been very helpful. Math expert teachers have been awesome. They have devised yearly schedules
for pacing the program and have offered additional activities upon request.
Our math specialist is helpful.
Penny Williams did an excellent training a few years ago. However, many of the wonderful activities she presented
could not be found in the EDM teacher's guide.
Penny Williams has come and given trainings.
talking to our math specialist at the school
teacher expert provides opportunity to assistance regularly
Teacher support Materials
There was a EDM training for 1/2 a day at the beginning of the year a couple of years ago. When we got our new EDM
math kits.
57 | P a g e •
•
Took an Everyday Math class
Workshops Credit classes
•
1 on 1 training when I was hired, combination class training, observation of math expert teaching the lesson,
presentations by the math expert, grade level collaboration and meetings
1/2 inservice on Saxon math
6-8 UAA classes each focusing on a different math strand various workshops Standards based report card committee
a few inservice/staff meetings- where a specialist stopped in. SBAR- math. New to GRade level trainings.
a few workshop on EDM games
an overview of how the first grade manuals work and some modeled lessons & a couple hours of worktime to make the
games.
Classes and teacher leaders offering to model lessons, putting stickers of GLE's in the teacher manual.
EDM only
ELL and differentiation support with EDM, initial and revised edition introduction support, data analysis of midyear test,
power lessons, assessment assistant, ITLG,
How much time do you think ;we have to answer surveyks that are never used to help teachers. This survey is long
and extremely annoying
how to reach those bilingual and disabled learners through every day math
I attended the Assessment Assistant class offered during ASDSA.
I have attended trainings from the math department and had Mary Murphy model lessons in my classroom. Both were
highly beneficial because Mary Murphy and Carolyn Crosby were such good teachers about math.
I have received how to use the math assessment online. I have had professional dev. for teaching a 1/2 combination
class and how to tie the lessons together.
I took the class Alaska Math Consortium. I have participated in several collaborative EDM grade level meetings & an
EDM In-service.
Ideas for introducing concepts and games to use as review with students
in school guidance in using Saxon math.
In-school training
In-service trainings
Math Support Specialist is outstandingly helpful!
New to EDM
New to grade-level EDM
none
Not much other then help from our Title I math person. She is very helpful in working with children. However, this
usually has nothing to do with EDM
not much, not frequently...our building rep is amazing at communicating things to us, though!
occasional pullout from classroom--45 min 2x a year
our title 1 support staff works with you when needed.
Pals training, staff meeting support, grade level meetings
Participated in the Math Consortium Attended Mikkelsen-Exxon Mobile Science and Math Course
Penny Williams has come to my room.
STEM and ASD training
Support teacher available, inservice trainings
Training at the ad building before the school year started and a follow up for a day of making games
Trainings and Make it Take it for EDM math games
trainings, email communication, and progress monitoring meetings to discuss current levels and needs.
Using the EDM assistant
using the mid-term assessment to games that they kids should play to boost proficiency
We have had many opportunities to enhance our EDM knowledge and understanding. The math department is very
supportive. I am an Alaska Math Consortium Fellow. Patty Kennedy and Sandy Schoff have been great resources.
Grade 1:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
58 | P a g e •
•
We meet with our math support person once or twice a year, with usually one staff meeting devoted to it.
When we had math support people in the building...
•
A 1/2 day training when I started in 4th grade which was not useful and two 1/2 day trainings when I started in 2nd
which were a bit better.
all day training
Besides my college degree, the only time I've had was a voluntary training for teaching a grade combo class when I
was teaching a 4/5 class two years ago.
demonstrations and examples to enhance EDM
District provided math support teachers to train new to everyday math teachers. Groups were very small and directed
to our grade level.
Everyday Math - professional dev. - yearly
Everyday math technical support recently and combo class games support 5 years ago
Good manipulatives. I have been to many professional developments
Grade level training for a combo class and new curriculum training
How to use the components of the teacher guide and learning about beginning, developing, and secure goals. How to
play games, time to create games, suggestions on how to use math boxes in the classroom.
I had the basic class my first sememster of teaching EDM. I would appreciate more training as it was so fast paced, I
couldn't keep up or understand a lot of it. I was not familiar with the curriculum at all and I was experiencing HM
reading and Ashlock for the first time. These things were happening concurrently and very overwhelming! Training
should be at least 3 days long. There is so much to cover!
I have attended classes offered by ASD and I also have had the math specialist into my classroom numerous times to
demonstrate lessons.
I've been to other grade level trainings that have been helpful, but when I switched grades this past year I inquired
about trainings but never received a response.
In-services, EDM math games, Standards based assessment for math
Inservice trainings for EDM.
Just academy classes. The one called Math Conversations with Chris Opitz was excellent.
lessons modeled, questions answered
link to online, time to review data with colleagues, over the years there have been opportunities to explore the math
games, review the pacing chart, GLE's, etc.
Math specialist visiting school and giving direct feedback on students scores as well as introducing new tools and how
to use them such as EDM online and the assessment assistant
none
Not much.
Nothing since being hired. I went to a EDM inservice while as a student teacher however.
out of building training, model lesson in classroom
quick inservice-one hour
Saxon specialist came to our school, grade level groups met with her.
some EDM math trainings SBAR pilot program for math
stem support, EDM training
STEM support., and staff teaching skills to the whole staff.
Taking classes
Teacher expert visit to my classroom to teach a lesson on a skill my students were struggling with.
Time out of the classroom.
Use of materials Focus lessons for test support Online tools
Various inservice trainings.
We are a STEM school, so Penny Williams teaches model lessons, helps with planning, and leads mini-workshops
during staff meetings.
Grade 2:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
59 | P a g e •
With our Math liason in the building we have discussed using the iTLGs, and the mid year benchmark. I have not
attended any classes outside of this school year 2010-2011.
•
Collaborative Meetings, Basic Information about the curriculum, additional classes using EDM, additional math
courses
Communication from the STEM teachers
District math coach; Alaska Math Consortium
EDM Inservice Grade Level math instruction EDM math games
EDM training
Everyday math
Everyday Math support, and a class on using literature in mathematics.
Everyday Math training.
Follow up with instructional teachers
Grade Level classes Focus opportunities with grade level and ASD rep. Summer class
I attended the math consortium many years ago.
I don't know.
I feel that all the professional development received in math has been presented in a way to persuade/force staff to use
EDM and since its so foreign, we have to be taught how to teach it.
in classroom modeling, inservice training, help on line, lots of materials provided, parent in services
Inservices
Inservices, credit classes.
Math Consortium New to Grade Level EDM Online Training RTI and Math Instruction
math meetings, inservice opportunities
Math support teachers have come into to teach a couple of lessons when I invited them in the past. Our Title 1 math
teacher is helpful.
once year, short presentation on a staff meeting; 2 (?) years ago, a brief visit from an out of state trainer
Personal introduction when I was hired. ASD trainings.
Support for the materials, as well as a wonderful math support person in the school.
The meetings we have never get beyond a certain point, so they feel worthless. Additionally, the meetings we have
seem to add more and more. For example, the district wants children to be able to apply learning to new types of math
problems. What, then, is the point of EDM's spiral if teachers at lower grades are being asked to work ahead so that
children can do this? Now, it's being asked that children gain additional instruction in algebra to prepare them for
middle/high school math. Requests keep being made, but not assistance as to where the time is to come from or the
offering of strategies as to how to make this possible. If children are having difficulty doing basic addition and
subtraction problems, what's the benefit of adding all these layers?
Too numerous to name, however, here's a few things I've done:
Extensive reading on my own. Took two one
credit EDM courses over 10 years ago. One for EDM--Kindergarten--Penny Williams taught it. One for EDM -Third
Grade--Ruth Dene taught it.
Lots of one day professional development seminars in EDM per grade levels I was
teaching. Many EDM briefings at inservices. Worked on developing the ASD math SBAR Worked with a crossdistrict team to design assessment maps for entire third grade EDM curriculum. Worked with a cross-district team to
design performance tasks to assess third grade EDM oncepts Former Math Contact
Trainings on EDM that's it.
Ways to integrate the curriculum for students with disabilities, how to differentiate
We only received EDM support recently, I believe in preparation for this survey.
We used to have support people come and teach or give us additional support. We don't have that any more.
Grade 3:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Grade 4:
•
•
•
A few trainings A new manipulative kit
Building Support visits Grade level focus groups
Class for credit such as Opening Eyes and Math In The Mind's Eye far superior to ASD professional development
during in-service training or mandatory EDM training by ASD
60 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Classes and building support from specialists.
EDm training and ASD Mentor program
Everyday Math professional development training.
I have attended professional development from EDM and I am trained as a consultant for the company. I have also
traveled to national math and science trainings. Within our district, I have attended EDM trainings.
I have attended two 1/2 day training sessions on E.D.M. and we have had Penny Williams come to our school to meet
with us.
I have taken the 3 year JIMS class, math consortium, various other classes
I took the Math Consortium class which was great. I learned a lot that I could take back to the classroom. I haven't
had much math training within the district.
I was able to take the Math Consortium Class. Was awesome. Great in helping me to understand what I am teaching
Math consortium.
Most district provided professional development sessions have been on how to use your teachers manuals. Okay,
great, but that does nothing to help me manage what has to be delivered during each lesson. How do I manage it all
within a 45 minute time block. That is what my school blocks off for math. 45 minutes.
Our Title I math teacher has helped me incorporate SBAR rubrics and method into my assessment of student work. I
love this. It has been one on one support as needed. Otherwise, I have received sporadic training in online resources,
SBA practice materials for GLEs where my students have traditionally been weak, the layout of the latest EDM edition
Penny Williams did a support lesson in my class once. She is a great resource, but super busy like all of us.
Penny Williams has come to my school.
Stipend, low cost credits.
Support and materials (strands, etc.) from math department (in the past), training that I have paid for at ASDSA,
training on the new materials during an inservice.
Support with EDM, supplemental materials to EDM
The only math development I have been to was to introduce the new EDM curriculum edition.
Title I math support, and team teaching
Training on EDM was offered last year when I first came to the district.
When I taught EDM I received training on how to implement it.
When I was at a title 1 school we had many professional development activities- trainings, Mary Murphy would visit
often with new ideas, she was willing to model math lessons, she was readily available to answer questions, provide
resources.
Grade 5:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Alaska Math Consortium's Institute was the best. I paid part of the tuition and ASD paid the rest.
EDM in-services, and two days of a math specialist meeting with my fellow grade level teachers.
EDM Math training, Math Consortium.
EDM training Excellent Math Specialist (Penny Williams) help and training whenever needed.
help with classroom presentations and lessons. assessment assistance, and lots of manipulatives
How to teach 4/5 combo everyday math
I am tired of EVERYDAY MATH being shoved down our throats, being told that WE, the teachers, LOVE IT, because
WE DON'T, and that it is THE MOST EFFECTIVE program available to us. I am not sure which buildings the math
department is gathering its information from, but the consensus in our building and from those I have spoken to from
other buildings around the district is that WE WANT MASTERY; spiral is not working no matter how much the math
department wants it to work, no matter what your data SAYS, it's NOT the best, nor the most effective program
available to us. I am tired of being fed this misinformation by people that don't even LIVE in a classroom on a DAILY
BASIS.
I have attended professional development for Everday Math when I entered the district 8 years ago. Penny Williams
came into my room numerous times to teach anchor lessons. Years ago I attended a week long session covering
Marilyn Burn's math program.
I took the Math Consortium and loved it.
61 | P a g e •
I was part of the original pilot for EDM in the early 1990s. I have been to all of the training required. I am an excellent
EDM teacher, but see many collegues that need help teaching it.
• I've received a lot of support for math when I taught in a different district using 3 different(and well written) curriculums.
It is due to these trainings that I am a good math teacher and my students are able to learn. If I had only taught EDM in
Anchorage I'm certain my students would fail.
• In-house resource people, additional materials,
• inservices
• Lessons have been demonstrated.
• Math classes
• Math support is available to come into our building if asked.
• none
• not a lot in math
• Our school site Math coordinator has helped establish "small groups," in class support, and tutoring.
• Penny Williams came to our school to in-service us on the use of the EDM assessment disk and the other EDM
materials
• Penny Williams! She is amazing! She gives information, suggests things to do in your classroom, helps use your
assessment to guide instruction, and even comes in to teach a lesson if you feel your students are lacking in a certain
area.
• Resource persons and materials Models for teaching
• resources
• Stem personnel looking at data and going over focus strand. TIps and hnts for success
• Supportive admiinistration
• The math support person comes to our building every month or every semester to check in and see how we are doing.
• The very best was the B.P. sponsored Math Consortium. It was FABULOUS.
• Training when the district readopted EDM plus district personnel coming to our school to show us EDM online and
what supports are available through staff meetings.
Grade 6 Elementary:
• A couple os classes on EDM
• A weak attempt at trying to align mixed grade curriculum delivery in a single classroom.
• An introductory class on EverydayMath for sixth graders.
• District sanctioned inservices
• District Training in EDM, District Math Specialist 1-to-1 training, Grade level peer group discussions and training with
and without district math specialist support, and additional non EDM Math Training (UAF Math consortium and Math
workshops and Math conferences).
• EDM Grade Level
• EDM support
• EDM training, grades 4 and 6
• Every now and then I've received an email related to training on MLP
• extra trainings. sit down meetings to discuss mid-year benchmark
• Inservice training, math specialist contact
• inservice, class offerings, support from a math rep visiting the classroom and presenting a lesson
• Just the support teachers who "used" to come by and either give lessons or offer support to classroom instructors...
• Lesson examples
• Math support teacher for focused lessons
• New to district training, bi-annual math support meetings, one-on-one support
• once per year visit by math specialist
• Summer Academy- Math Mulipative - Chris Optiz
• The "Opening Eyes to Mathematics" class, the professional development out of the Teachers Development Group from
Portland, and the ASD Math Consortium classes were excellent. They definitely helped me become a more proficient
math teacher!
62 | P a g e •
There used to be a one day a school year math training that we would go to but that hasn't been offered for several
years now. They were ok but didn't really help.
• Very little if any. I seek my own professional development through university classes.
• Workshops on integrating math and science, visits from the specialists at ASD.
Elementary Combo:
• Anything with Penny Williams has been enlightening!
• EDM classes, grade level training, combo class training, game support classes
• Everyday Math Game implementation
• I am new to the district this year, however in my previous district I received math curriculum training, math strategies
and problem solving and using picture books to teach and introduce math concepts. The last two were by far the BEST
for elementary teachers.
• I don't remember.
• I have just attended some professional development for Everyday math, and other math support
• I have received EDM math trainings when I was a general education teacher. As a special education teacher I haven't
felt that the trainings offered were relevant to the students in my case load.
• I have taken math courses in all strands at the graduate level. I could apply for a K-8 math endorsement, I have the
credits. I did not apply due to cost to put program on my certificate (additional cost of 275 dollars).
• Literature and math connections, multiage training for teaching EDM to two grade levels, new to grade level training.,
Alaska Math Consortium
• Math Consortium NCTM Conference Math Building Contact Training
• Math Worlds Touch Math Saxon Differentiated instruction in Math
• New to Grade Level Everyday Math Trainings and meetings with the Math District Support Staff
• New to grade level training Multiage training for EDM in the fall Lesson plans for multiage or combo classrooms
• Only classes/trainings that I have paid for or sought out on my own.
• Some encouraging words
• Special Education training on: Saxon, Number Worlds, Touchmath Differentiated instruction
• Supplemental programs
• The EDM new to grade level/Combo trainings - Inadequate EDM new curriculum/adoption trainings - Inadequate
Math Consortium - Excellent
• Title I math support teacher supports struggling students
• Trainings from the Math department
• two before school trainings by math support teacher
Grade 6 Middle School:
• Book support
• Everyday Math Curriculum Overview in all areas both teacher's edition and online
• Personal help when needed. Alignment of curriculum with the standards (GLEs). Ideas on use of manipulatives.
• Supplemental materials.
• trainings
Grade 7:
• aligning standards to curriculum to see the holes, manipulative training, collaboration.
• Cohort groups and professional development led by textbook reps.
• I believe they are doing all they can to help us use the MathScapes book. Ideas for lessons, located support material
From Other Texts to help us teach. Ideas on lessons & pacing guides.
• Lots
• Masters in C&I with math focus New to MathScape
• Mathscape professional development offerings
• McDougell Littell
• openers and example lesson plans
• Pacing guide and web site resources.
• Some training on the GLE's.
63 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
Support in my building from the Dept Chair (Excellent!), and Mathscape training
technology components
Training to continue to use materials that do not meet the needs of the students.
Unit overviews with lesson focus on how to use and teach the lesson.
With the district moving towards a STEM model I would think that it would be imperative that math and science
teachers are given/shown lessons that could be done at the same time to support one another. Rather, it seems that
we are more separated now than we were before STEM came into effect.
•
•
I have attended many trainings on new materials.
I receive some information and materials from my department chair. I am a ELL teacher and I only teach one section
of math. My instruction is heavily modified from the Math 8 curriculum and changes from year to year. So I ask for the
help I need when I need it.
I've observed other classrooms. I've gone to many trainings on many programs.
interactive white board lessons math scape lessons
Introductions to new text books.
Money for professional development days for in school and cross district alignment.
New materials and peer support in implementation.
Quarterly trainings by ASD staff or Glencoe staff.
textbook support online support
Throughout my student teaching I attended PD days on Everydaymath and Connected Math P. I have taught with the
CMP books and CORE books for several years in another district. This year, my first in ASD, I was able to have a Prof.
Dev. day on using the software to compliment the new Algebra 1 book and the new Pre-Algebra book. I love all of the
support that these texts come with and think that they are academically rigorous textbooks.
Training days to talk to the mid-level math folks is always extremely helpful.
Training on the resources available through the publisher's website, Training on best resources for teaching certain
units of the curriculum, Training on using the ExamView test generator, Training on pacing & implementation of the
Mathscape curriculum
Transmath training.
We have quarterly trainings for the Trans Math.
Grade 8:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Middle Combo:
•
•
No Designation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Graduate credit classes that were targeted for the elementary teacher. Member of a district-wide math team.
None other than the original EDM training when it was first adopted and then refresher mini lessons provided by Title 1
specialist within the elementary building where I worked for 15 years.
BA in education, Teaching Math to Special Learners (Grad course)
Course offerings in MLP
from penny williams approx. 6 times during the past school year
going over mid-year assessments
I have taken the EDM training Math Consortium Math and Manipulatives
I so far have only had Penny Williams for training, but again, the time give is rushed so there isn't a lot of practice for
the student. Just the not enough time for the students. Rush rush rush
Ideas to teach math in my combo class
instruction on how to use assessment assistant, everyday math online, using open response questions, analyzing
midyear benchmarks.
None
none for Sped. I know everyday math for Sped was offered but I don't use it - too hard for my students
Penny Williams has been very helpful in working with the teachers at our school. She has a lot of knowledge with the
EDM program.
STEM person coming to our school
The math curricular experts have offered to teach EDM lessons within the class.
64 | P a g e •
•
•
•
Training for the new edition of EDM in 2008.
two trainings in TransMath that took way more time than necessary
Various math courses offered in the district
We had collaborative meetings and trainings by our district math specialist. We had training in accessing SBA math
scores by strands and students to better focus on areas of need.
What additional professional development or information do you feel you need in mathematics?
Kindergarten:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
A better curriculum.
Any and all for kindergarten
Anything at all would be helpful. I feel like EDM is inadequate. Sometimes the lessons take 10 minutes or less for K. I
do a lot of supplemental activities on my own.
EDM training/collaboration time with other teachers of the same grade level-- to brainstorm ideas, share materials, etc.
Training/ development that entails time to make the games and supplemental materials, etc.
Everyday Math instruction. When I attended (at my cost, for credit) EDM training, the entire time was spent teaching
games and activities to supplement EDM, but most activities were NOT part of the EDM curriculum. This was most
confusing.
Have a math expert from the department come and show the assessment disks and other things available from
Everyday Math.
How to best supplement the EDM program.
I did not know what many of those items were that were listed previously.
I worry that newer Kindergarten teachers would teach exclusively EDM and not realize that it is inadequate. The
program is designed to be used for 1/2 day or full day, and because ASD is almost exclusively full day Kindergarten,
we need a more comprehensive program.
I would like to have more trainings available for kindergarten teachers on using Everyday Math and supplements and
different lessons other teachers are using in their classrooms.
I would like to see professional articles on current research maybe scanned into a website.
I would love to have a refresher courses on additional activities that are aligned with the Gle's
More courses available
more hands on ideas for teaching
N/A
None
None at kindergarten level.
None at my grade level
None. I develop a lot of my own activities that have proved to be highly effective to student learning.
Updates
When I switched grade levels I was not given any extra support. Kindergarten is set up completely different.
Grade 1:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
-how to better use the EDM assessments at the primary level
?
a 1/2 day or full day prep workshop to be used to prep EDM games at the beginning of the year with supplies provided
by the ASD
A new math curriculum. No development will help the current math curriculum.
A new math program
assessment assistant
Biannual inservice on Saxon math
How to incorporate the RTI Model to math
How to reach low students with computation , facts mastery given the short time in our schedule for math
65 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
how to take an abstract concept and make it more tangible for bilingual students or below grade level learners
How to use EDM materials with the struggling students
I am now at a school where half of my students are weak in math, yet I'm suppose to teach things like in-and-out
boxes...I would like some direction on what is less important and what is most important to make sure I can focus my
instruction so my students are the best prepared (as I am able to make them) for the next grade.
I have a minor in math so feel comfortable with teaching the curriculum. That said, collegial collaboration with teachers
outside my building would be beneficial is sharing adaptations to lessons that benefit students.
I personally don't need any, but again I still feel that EDM lacks in working with more of a conceptual understanding of
math concepts.
I'd like time to watch and demo lessons with colleagues. I find that most of my elementary colleagues are very poor at
math and math instruction.
I'd love to be trained in a more teachable program.
I'm always looking for more opportunities - I'll know them when I see them.
It would be nice to have someone tell us about the games and give us the materials and time to make the games.
more differentiation for those who are at the K level or lower.
More summer classes on math games, focus on GLE's- alignment to EDM
more time to prep math games; ideas to venture out of the set curriculum that would coordinate with the curriculum in
the text book
New program. EDM is poor teaching practices
No additional professional development needed.
none
none - I just feel EDM is not an appropriate program for 1st graders
None at this time.
None for the grade level I am teaching.
Portland State College-Math class taught up here over several weekends. It taught us to get kids to talk about their
mathematical understanding of Base Ten and the patterns they perceived.
Standards alignment with pacing chart.
strategic lesson planning at grade level
studying the GLEs and EDM math goals
Ways to make EDM more concise.
Grade 2:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Additional time for classes.
Additional time learning about games and creating more efficient game mats, along with forms to show their
understanding of the game.
Additional training on teaching and assessing students in mastery of math facts.
An answer to my question of spiraling. An answer to why a concept(lesson) is taught once or twice in a one grade
level and then not even touched on until the next year.
Basic methods for teaching how to work through addition and subtraction. General facts building practice as lack of
basic facts prevents many of my students from accessing the other curriculum.
best practices, math chair at our school and professional development during staff meetings on best practices such as
manipulative use, kagan strategies. I would like to attend a Kagan training.
better ways to teach certain skills, more professional discussion and sharing, less data discussion
Continued exposure to the curriculum. This is my first year teaching, and I feel I have to spend more time than needed
prepping for my lessons.
General review, observation of a good math teacher at my grade level.
Grade level meetings.
Help using the EDM material to its fullest potential (being effective and efficient in delivering and helping my students
find success with the program)
How to make the spiral work better for lower kids so that they do do not feel frustrated!
66 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
I do not feel I lack math information or talent in teaching math. I am absolutely forced to use a program (EDM) which
rushes students through concepts and the very next day presents new concepts.
I feel I need a second round of teaching now that I am more familiar with the curriculum. Ideas for time management
and looking at additional resources available would be very helpful. I love teaching Math and always felt more than
competent before EDM. EDM has been a real struggle for me as a teacher because it is so verbal and moves much
too quickly for my students. I teach math every day and extend the time to teach it thoroughly.
I would like an inservice or credit class on the curriculum.
I would like some help with Everyday Math Online, and have contacted Mary Hoppas, but she has not gotten back to
me.
I'd like to see how other teachers use a rotational schedule (high, med, low) to better differentiate instruction.
Knowing how to use the games (besides the explanations given in the student reference books) and how to use some
of the manipulatives would be helpful.
Lesson taught was too complex for my students and they got little out of the lesson. More appropriate target lessons
would be helpful.
Maybe other game options to use with math concepts.
Maybe review of all the components of the Saxon program.
More computer training for skills used so students can access that
More grade level game and lesson support. Not multi-grade level support as it moves too fast to keep up with when
one instructor has to run between grade levels.
More online sessions....just to use as we learn. It is difficult to remember all the things we come away with from these
sessions. I liked the step by step handouts we got in January.
None, I'm retiring! :)
review of lessons after you have gotten used to teaching the curriculum
RTI - How do I find time for students to gain mastery of ASD standards when there is so much spiraling? We don't
have time for low average students to learn the skills.
Taking classes
Teachers need on-going professional development in math. I enjoy teaching math and having the opportunity to have
collegial sharing opportunities within trainings that strengthen my teaching methods. Training with other grade level
teachers is very important.
technology based
The pacing chart is not always applicable to our Title schools, so I would like to there to be more teacher discretion
regarding the pacing.
Grade 3:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
a lot more support
additional materials.
Additional training until I can be successful using the on line material to develop additional lessons/assessments as
needed.
continuing Saxon support; mid-year assessments that align w/our curriculum
I could always use more. I am new at this grade level, so any additional help would be beneficial.
I do not need any, if the district would provide a logical, foundation-based mastery, student/ parent/ teacher friendly
basic elementary math program with proper texts to teach our elementary students.
I don't know.
I feel like it would be a good idea to become familiar with supplemental material.
I feel my teaching skills are pretty solid in math but I would like a curriculum that teaches to mastery.
If children are expected to gain a certain depth of knowledge, it would be helpful to have time to determine what can be
left out. "It works" meetings would be nice to have amongst colleagues to share math teaching strategies, etc.
Just more suggestions on how to help fill holes in students understanding.
More differentiation information, how to handle the EDM pacing chart with kids with disabilities...it goes too fast!
more realistic pacing chart, more time to teach math, smaller classes, in school math tutoring/small group help
more training on the different elements of EDM
67 | P a g e •
•
•
•
None at this time.
None. I've been teaching EDM since ASD first adopted it and feel like have a good handle on it. I'm enjoying the
teacher online tools.
We don't need MORE, we need a better curriculum we can manage ourselves.
We lost our Math contact!
Grade 4:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
A new program.
Better resources, more information on how to use the resources we already have,
Differentiation instruction
Freedom to teach GLE's. Hold us accountable for what is taught in the room without such scripted lessons. I feel we
would be more effective and you( the man) would know who is teaching math well, then look into those practices.
Frequency of training.
how does RTI? how do I teach the whole lesson in 75 minutes? yet do it in a way that continues to be fun for my
studednts
How to stay on track with pacing - I think I need assistance planning a lesson and perhaps seeing an exemplary model
of what a lesson might look like vs. what the manual contains. Then how to keep the pacing of the actual instruction
moving - when to slow down and when to move along, how to ditch stuff when you are running out of time - prioritizing.
Film me teaching and debrief with someone. Watch someone else teach and debrief.
How to use the online EDM with students More classroom assistance from the Math Department Videos or DVDs
showing math to students More trade books
I am not sure- I would love to see Larson's Math provided in our lab
I would like to have better access to differentiation materials for mathematics in my classroom.
I would like to have time and resources available to be able to teach small groups in my classroom while students are
working on their journal pages for the day. There isn't enough help available.
I would like to see the math specialists come into the classroom once a month and do a lesson with the class. Maybe
play an EDM game or a supplemental lesson. Asking me as a teacher to contact them and tell them what I need is not
very helpful, but having something the they have found helpful and actually having a schedule in place would be
extremely helpful to me as a classroom teacher. I think students would look forward to having a guest come in to
support the math lessons.
I would like to take an extended math training session after school ( a multi-day event).
More information about how students learn math Different ways to teach a challenging concept Different games to
play cooperative activities
More time working with development of technology integration in the math content.
none
See above
When I went for the training, the person who had emailed me had sent we the wrong dates. I would have loved to
have attended the training, but when I arrived at the emailed time for the training, it was not the correct day for my
grade level.
Grade 5:
•
•
•
•
•
•
A LOT. I don't understand the EDM "curriculum" at all and don't feel it benefits children in any way. The books are
written a good year behind what is being taught in other states, and the kids are still not able to master any of it as it is
presented in such a poor manner.
At the math trainings, there is always a ton of information papers given to us, but when I get back into the classroom, I
don't have time to implement it. Sometimes the information is too much.
Because we are a Level 5 Title I school, I feel that we need to be using a whole other math curriculum to really be able
to meet the needs of our students.
explain the research
How to enrich students who are too far advanced to the concepts of their grade level, how to help students who cannot
keep up, no matter how slowly we move (despite the pacing guide).
How to use the curriculum we have prescribed in the amount of time we have allotted to teach math daily. What to use
and what to leave out wihtout short changing students.
68 | P a g e •
I do not need any. However, many teachers are not assessing progress properly. They grade the journals without
considering beginning/ developing and secures skills. They give part B of the test and count all of the problems as part
of the grade. Nobody has done anything about this kind of abuse. Students and parents then feel like their child is
failing. This is an area that must be fixed and teachers should be required to show understanding of the nature of the
program and assessment.
• I have 5th graders who still don't know their basic skills-anything along these lines to help them master them.
• I would like to know how to best meet the needs of my struggling students by intervening with Tier 2 and Tier 3
interventions in Math. Is it possible with Everyday Math? If so, who's doing it in the district and would they be willing to
have teachers visit to see how it's being done? Just following the lesson is not meeting the needs of all my students,
but doing the lesson takes my entire math time. Is there a way to restructure the lesson to meet the needs of
everyone?
• I would like to see a new Math program for our school.
• I would like to see how schools with a lower income population teach EDM, so that I can better understand how to best
help my students learn the concepts that they need to learn and learn them well.
• I'm not sure. I would like to take Calculus but I don't have a lot of time to do so. I have an AA in gen studies. I am a TA.
I have taken Math up to 105, College algebra. I retook it recently and got an A. I enjoy doing math and teaching it.
• I've been teaching math for 26 years. The old methods, i.e. stressing basics, were so much more effective and easier
to teach!!!!!!!!!!!!(And better for parents too.)
• It would be helpful to have seminars, or classes offered at our site, just like we do overwhelmingly for reading.
• more
• More hands-on, concept based classes that help elementary teachers understand the concepts we are preparing our
students for as they take more challenging math classes.
• More in-depth EDM training.
• none
• none at this time
• The Math Consortium.
• Upper level math courses that would qualify me to teach Algebra or other subjects through grade 8 as "highly
qualified."
• We need a different program that offers mastery and concrete sequential learning.
Grade 6 Elementary:
• -Overall teaching math concepts course -Incorporation of visual/hands on activities in teaching math
• A class to help with pacing, incorporating games and using the assessment disk
• A different curriculum
• I really feel that leveling math groups within a grade and team teaching would be most beneficial. Having students with
advanced math skills sitting in a classroom with students lacking basic skill mastery dilutes the experience and learning
for everyone.
• I was in a training recently where the comment was made that many of the lessons are not secure skills for your grade
level, will go over a majority of the students heads, but they should still be taught. I was a bit frustrated to say the
least. Especially as a 6th grade teacher, I feel that these lessons that should be taught are not beneficial for the
majority of my students and do not prepare them for middle school. It is hard to teach to an entire class when lessons
are above their heads, and to try to explain to parents why you are doing so. It also wastes time for the high-needs
students who need more work on other skills. I have taught this curriculum for 5 years and do not feel like I need
additional professional development, and am confident that I am doing what is best to serve the individual needs of all
students. I do feel that a different curriculum that meets the needs of all students not just the highest achievers would
be wonderful!
• More updates
• New program. Come talk to teachers, don't rely on math specialists.
• none
• None
• None if it is going to be the same information that was given in 2004. I feel we need to look at another curriculum that
would better suit or socioeconomic clientel.
69 | P a g e •
•
Not much. I need a new, kid friendly math curriculum that DOESN'T use the same format as Everyday Mathematics.
On going professional development that emphasizes mathematical concepts and ideas, not a curriculum page / layout /
pacing type of P.D. Engage us with math at a high level and mesh that with real pedagogy. That is what will help.
Please do not show us how to navigate a teacher's manual. That may be helpful for new teachers or teachers new to a
particular curriculum, but it does not develop more competent math teachers.
• Refresher course- Training on the Middle School level, to be able to go and sit in the next grade to see what is
happening.
• supplemental materials to drill and practice with kids on basic concepts
• The support staff along with smaller class focuses other than the 4 credit program which is presently offered.
• The thing I most need is a good curriculum that matches the needs of my students.
• using the pacing guide more effectively, and the interactive teaching guide.
Elementary Combo:
• Balancing of time and fitting the whole lesson in, while meeting the pacing chart guide
• Continued math strategies for different types of learning and ways to use math manipulatives that kids can make and
understand how to use.
• Differentiating math instruction for students who are 2+ years behind in math.
• EDM trainers that will teach us how to implement the program more effectively.
• fewer lessons but more practice for kids that need reteaching. Maybe a strand for kids that need enrichment.
• I think that they should have some way for me to find out what my students are missing and give me some book with
lessons for me to give those specific students the concepts they need.
• I would like to be trained on how hands on algebra and pre-algebra meet and how to best use those materials to
differentiate with my more able math students. I am looking forward to finding the time to fully understand the algebra
backtracking report that was recently completed.
• I'm good.
• More at upper grades as I have changed grade levels since district-wide training took place.
• more game classes!
• More time to make all the games.
• more training on the other intervention programs for the RTI model
• none
• None at this time.
• Nothing at this time.
• online resources for Saxon, longer hands-on training
• Yearly trainings or classes for how to improve in teaching Everyday Math
Grade 6 Middle School:
• A new more instructive (not constructive) textbook and system. We so need to get back to basic instruction, forget the
EXPENSIVE fluff. The people are watching.
• Cooperative Learning and the Use of Manipulatives with Intermediate Grades
• grade level mastery information (focus- what part of GLE's etc. must be mastered at grade level) Assessments - to test
for mastery
• None, except ideas for supplementing to better meet our standards with such a language heavy text
• Websites to support current curriculum and online learning needs.
Grade 7:
• a more parent friendly curriculum
• A quality textbook to use. Then we could focus on teaching kids instead of speanding tons of quality time trying to
locate material and what to include Verses not include from mathScape in our lessons. Professional Development is
spending tons of time trying to enable us to teach the text we have, where if we had a quality text they could focus on
just helping us become better teachers. I think they are wasting valuable time & money.
• Help with the additional resources the McDougal Littell book has to offer. There is so many it would be nice to have
another training once we have used it for a year.
70 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
I would really like to see what the feedback for the MathScape textbook was when the committee went through 4 days
of evaluation. I know that the people that were involved in that process, to a person, did not pick this text in their top
three. Now, come to find out, it was bought out by another publishing company and they are refusing to do any
improvements to it because it is such a terrible text.
More info and the follow up to PreAlg professional development questions
More manipulative trainings, more collaboration, how data can drive instruction, differentiation how to and assessment
of.
more openers, ideas for cooperative learning
Projects that incorporate the standards.
Several years ago the district offered more classes that stretched our thinking mathmatically up and down the
spectrum of student learning. From K - 12 and it gave a clearer understanding of where my students were along the
spectrum. Recently the training has been more text book related and does not make one a better teacher, but just at
better at using the book.
teachers need to see modeling and have access to materials before they are required to teach it
Time to work with peers on digging deep into the lessons we teach and assessing student work and learning from each
other.
We need a different book! We need a screening device (assessment) to use when kids enter middle school (given at
the end of 5th) to help us better place them in pre-algebra, math 6, lower level math 6, and math support. We need a
better psyc test/eval than Woodcock Johnson to determine if students should be eligible for resource. (For example,
we have kids in 7th grade who have skills as low as 4th, for whom we cannot get assistance, so they are still expected
to read and work math at the 7th grade level).
Grade 8:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Middle Combo:
•
•
No Designation:
•
•
•
anything that will motivate students to complete their assignments
Help find what is missing from mid-level instruction that is causing kids to fail and flounder in higher math classes in
high school. Find what is happening with kids coming in to middle school with little to no understanding of basic math.
I feel the district has offered plenty of training & information on the math curriculum.
I need help staying ahead of the technology curve.
I teach geometry and I receive no support on this subject. We need more support for our Algebra I classes. We need
to support as our math 8 classes transition to the pre algebra text which we have begun using.
If we are continuing with the mathscape books, I would like to collaborate with other math teachers in the district on the
areas they emphasize in the books and what kind of supplemental work they give to support the curriculum.
None
None at this time.
Time to develop tests and quizzes and supplemental lessons with other teachers at the same grade level.
We need a different curriculum for 8th grade math that better prepares our general math8 students for high school
algebra (either algebra A or algebra 1). The curriculum should not be the same as that taught in the 7th grade
prealgebra classes. It needs to be more developmentally appropriate for students who tend to not be comfortable with
math and/or struggle with math.
We need support getting the on-line material up and running in our classroom. The overview training on the MBook
was unorganized and chaotic. We did not even have our on-line passwords to get in until the training was practically
over.
Ongoing development that focuses on what is current in math education. Opportunity to attend NCTM conferences.
Teaching Mathematics to deaf students
-I have lots of training and know how to use the materials, but all the recent trainings are technology oriented and it
really doesn't help a lot of teachers since there isn't time to even use all the technology. We need to focus more on the
basics. If the math folks love technology so much they should move to the technology department. Kids have learned
math for hundreds of years without computers and I think somehow we have forgotten this.
Coordination with outside professional development organizations such as NCTM, Teachers Development Group etc...
Fun "tricks", memory devices, and games for teaching various concepts and skills
71 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
I need a text that is relevant to the population- easy to navigate for sped and ell
I really am looking for more Hands on Activities, and ESL support.
I would like Trans Math training
I'd like to explore the possibility of looking at other math curriculums besides EDM.
It would be helpful to have more time to meet collaboratively with grade level teachers to plan and to share
information. We are meeting more regularly to discuss math, but most of our time and efforts are focused on reading.
keep offering those classes
Keep the math support teachers working in the schools and supporting the classroom teachers
Many of the styles used in EDM were not taught to teachers, yet they are expected to teach it.
Maybe grade level training, sort of along the lines of the HM grade level training that we get. Certainly something for
those of us teaching combos.
More computation
More support/materials based on my students' needs
Not much. I have been using EDM for as long as it has been in the district. I feel very proficient at teaching math and
enjoy using EDM with my students.
Professional development in math needs to be tailored to our Immersion model
Supplemental
72 | P a g e MATH IN THE SCHOOL/CLASSROOM
Table 40: In your math lessons, how often do you usually ask students to do the following? Explain the reasoning behind an idea.
Never or almost never
Some lessons
Most lessons
Every lesson
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
Overall
9
1.82%
156
31.52%
235
47.47%
95
19.19%
All Elementary
9
2.32%
127
32.73%
181
46.65%
71
18.30%
All Middle
0
0.00%
18
26.09%
33
47.83%
18
26.09%
Elementary
Kindergarten
2
4.08%
20
40.82%
23
46.94%
4
8.16%
School Grades
Grade 1
2
2.94%
25
36.76%
31
45.59%
10
14.71%
Grade 2
2
3.57%
23
41.07%
24
42.86%
7
12.50%
Grade 3
1
2.08%
18
37.50%
19
39.58%
10
20.83%
Grade 4
0
0.00%
12
27.27%
25
56.82%
7
15.91%
Grade 5
0
0.00%
14
27.45%
24
47.06%
13
25.49%
Grade 6
1
2.56%
6
15.38%
17
43.59%
15
38.46%
Combo
1
3.03%
9
27.27%
18
54.55%
5
15.15%
Middle School
Grade 6
0
0.00%
1
8.33%
8
66.67%
3
25.00%
Grades
Grade 7
0
0.00%
5
17.86%
13
46.43%
10
35.71%
Grade 8
0
0.00%
9
36.00%
11
44.00%
5
20.00%
Combo
0
0.00%
3
75.00%
1
25.00%
0
0.00%
No Designation
0
0.00%
11
28.95%
21
55.26%
6
15.79%
Table 41: In your math lessons, how often do you usually ask students to do the following? Represent and analyze relationships using tables, charts,
and graphs
Never or almost never
Some lessons
Most lessons
Every lesson
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
Overall
15
3.04%
327
66.33%
136
27.59%
15
3.04%
All Elementary
13
3.37%
258
66.84%
102
26.42%
13
3.37%
All Middle
1
1.45%
41
59.42%
27
39.13%
0
0.00%
Elementary
Kindergarten
3
6.12%
38
77.55%
8
16.33%
0
0.00%
School Grades
Grade 1
2
2.99%
49
73.13%
12
17.91%
4
5.97%
Grade 2
2
3.57%
37
66.07%
15
26.79%
2
3.57%
Grade 3
1
2.08%
35
72.92%
10
20.83%
2
4.17%
Grade 4
4
9.30%
27
62.79%
11
25.58%
1
2.33%
Grade 5
0
0.00%
27
52.94%
24
47.06%
0
0.00%
Grade 6
0
0.00%
25
64.10%
11
28.21%
3
7.69%
Combo
1
3.03%
20
60.61%
11
33.33%
1
3.03%
Middle School
Grade 6
0
0.00%
7
58.33%
5
41.67%
0
0.00%
Grades
Grade 7
0
0.00%
18
64.29%
10
35.71%
0
0.00%
Grade 8
0
0.00%
13
52.00%
12
48.00%
0
0.00%
Combo
1
25.00%
3
75.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
No Designation
1
2.63%
28
73.68%
7
18.42%
2
5.26%
73 | P a g e Table 42: In your math lessons, how often do you usually ask students to do the following? Work on problems for which there is not an immediately
obvious method or solution
Never or almost never
Some lessons
Most lessons
Every lesson
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
Overall
61
12.35%
281
56.88%
133
26.92%
19
3.85%
All Elementary
56
14.47%
221
57.11%
98
25.32%
12
3.10%
All Middle
3
4.35%
38
55.07%
22
31.88%
6
8.70%
Elementary
Kindergarten
21
42.86%
24
48.98%
4
8.16%
0
0.00%
School Grades
Grade 1
12
17.65%
41
60.29%
12
17.65%
3
4.41%
Grade 2
11
19.64%
28
50.00%
15
26.79%
2
3.57%
Grade 3
4
8.33%
27
56.25%
15
31.25%
2
4.17%
Grade 4
4
9.09%
33
75.00%
7
15.91%
0
0.00%
Grade 5
1
2.00%
28
56.00%
19
38.00%
2
4.00%
Grade 6
1
2.56%
20
51.28%
15
38.46%
3
7.69%
Combo
2
6.06%
20
60.61%
11
33.33%
0
0.00%
Middle School
Grade 6
0
0.00%
10
83.33%
2
16.67%
0
0.00%
Grades
Grade 7
1
3.57%
13
46.43%
11
39.29%
3
10.71%
Grade 8
1
4.00%
12
48.00%
9
36.00%
3
12.00%
Combo
1
25.00%
3
75.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
No Designation
2
5.26%
22
57.89%
13
34.21%
1
2.63%
Table 43: In your math lessons, how often do you usually ask students to do the following? Use Computers to solve exercises or problems
Never or almost never
Some lessons
Most lessons
Every lesson
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
Overall
261
52.83%
203
41.09%
26
5.26%
4
0.81%
All Elementary
211
54.52%
158
40.83%
16
4.13%
2
0.52%
All Middle
30
43.48%
31
44.93%
7
10.14%
1
1.45%
Elementary
Kindergarten
31
65.96%
14
29.79%
2
4.26%
0
0.00%
School Grades
Grade 1
48
70.59%
18
26.47%
2
2.94%
0
0.00%
Grade 2
24
42.86%
28
50.00%
4
7.14%
0
0.00%
Grade 3
23
47.92%
23
47.92%
1
2.08%
1
2.08%
Grade 4
27
61.36%
16
36.36%
1
2.27%
0
0.00%
Grade 5
27
51.92%
22
42.31%
3
5.77%
0
0.00%
Grade 6
20
51.28%
18
46.15%
1
2.56%
0
0.00%
Combo
11
33.33%
19
57.58%
2
6.06%
1
3.03%
Middle School
Grade 6
3
25.00%
7
58.33%
2
16.67%
0
0.00%
Grades
Grade 7
13
46.43%
13
46.43%
1
3.57%
1
3.57%
Grade 8
12
48.00%
9
36.00%
4
16.00%
0
0.00%
Combo
2
50.00%
2
50.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
No Designation
20
52.63%
14
36.84%
3
7.89%
1
2.63%
74 | P a g e Table 44: In your math lessons, how often do you usually ask students to do the following? Write equations to represent relationships
Never or almost never
Some lessons
Most lessons
Every lesson
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
Overall
27
5.50%
198
40.33%
202
41.14%
64
13.03%
All Elementary
19
4.92%
155
40.16%
158
40.93%
54
13.99%
All Middle
2
2.94%
26
38.24%
33
48.53%
7
10.29%
Elementary
Kindergarten
10
20.83%
31
64.58%
7
14.58%
0
0.00%
School Grades
Grade 1
2
2.99%
22
32.84%
32
47.76%
11
16.42%
Grade 2
1
1.79%
15
26.79%
29
51.79%
11
19.64%
Grade 3
4
8.33%
22
45.83%
18
37.50%
4
8.33%
Grade 4
1
2.27%
15
34.09%
21
47.73%
7
15.91%
Grade 5
0
0.00%
23
45.10%
21
41.18%
7
13.73%
Grade 6
0
0.00%
15
38.46%
15
38.46%
9
23.08%
Combo
1
3.03%
12
36.36%
15
45.45%
5
15.15%
Middle School
Grade 6
0
0.00%
5
45.45%
5
45.45%
1
9.09%
Grades
Grade 7
1
3.57%
11
39.29%
12
42.86%
4
14.29%
Grade 8
0
0.00%
8
32.00%
15
60.00%
2
8.00%
Combo
1
25.00%
2
50.00%
1
25.00%
0
0.00%
No Designation
6
16.22%
17
45.95%
11
29.73%
3
8.11%
Table 45: In your math lessons, how often do you usually ask students to do the following? Practice computational skills
Never or almost never
Some lessons
Most lessons
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
Overall
12
2.44%
88
17.92%
209
42.57%
All Elementary
11
2.86%
75
19.48%
160
41.56%
All Middle
1
1.45%
8
11.59%
31
44.93%
Elementary
Kindergarten
5
10.42%
32
66.67%
9
18.75%
School Grades
Grade 1
2
2.94%
8
11.76%
37
54.41%
Grade 2
0
0.00%
11
19.64%
18
32.14%
Grade 3
2
4.17%
6
12.50%
26
54.17%
Grade 4
0
0.00%
7
16.28%
19
44.19%
Grade 5
1
1.96%
2
3.92%
22
43.14%
Grade 6
1
2.63%
6
15.79%
14
36.84%
Combo
0
0.00%
3
9.09%
15
45.45%
Middle School
Grade 6
0
0.00%
2
16.67%
5
41.67%
Grades
Grade 7
1
3.57%
5
17.86%
12
42.86%
Grade 8
0
0.00%
1
4.00%
13
52.00%
Combo
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
1
25.00%
No Designation
0
0.00%
5
13.51%
18
48.65%
Every lesson
N
Row %
182
37.07%
139
36.10%
29
42.03%
2
4.17%
21
30.88%
27
48.21%
14
29.17%
17
39.53%
26
50.98%
17
44.74%
15
45.45%
5
41.67%
10
35.71%
11
44.00%
3
75.00%
14
37.84%
75 | P a g e Table 46: How often do you use the grade-level pacing calendar?
Once or more a
week
N
Row %
Overall
164
32.93%
All Elementary
139
35.64%
All Middle
19
27.54%
Elementary School
Kindergarten
23
43.40%
Grades
Grade 1
29
42.65%
Grade 2
26
47.27%
Grade 3
14
29.17%
Grade 4
16
36.36%
Grade 5
14
26.92%
Grade 6
10
26.32%
Combo
7
21.88%
Middle School
Grade 6
4
33.33%
Grades
Grade 7
7
25.00%
Grade 8
7
28.00%
Combo
1
25.00%
No Designation
6
15.38%
Once or twice a
month
N
Row %
141
28.31%
112
28.72%
20
28.99%
13
24.53%
26
38.24%
12
21.82%
13
27.08%
12
27.27%
13
25.00%
13
34.21%
10
31.25%
1
8.33%
9
32.14%
10
40.00%
0
0.00%
9
23.08%
A few times a
year
N
Row %
98
19.68%
77
19.74%
16
23.19%
11
20.75%
8
11.76%
11
20.00%
10
20.83%
11
25.00%
16
30.77%
8
21.05%
2
6.25%
6
50.00%
8
28.57%
2
8.00%
0
0.00%
5
12.82%
Once a year
Not applicable
N
25
20
3
3
1
2
3
1
2
5
3
0
1
2
0
2
N
70
42
11
3
4
4
8
4
7
2
10
1
3
4
3
17
Row %
5.02%
5.13%
4.35%
5.66%
1.47%
3.64%
6.25%
2.27%
3.85%
13.16%
9.38%
0.00%
3.57%
8.00%
0.00%
5.13%
Table 47: How often do you share and discuss student work with your colleagues for the purpose of improving student performance?
Once or more a
Once or twice a
A few times a
Once a year
week
month
year
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
N
Row %
Overall
190
38.15%
178
35.74%
103
20.68%
13
2.61%
All Elementary
142
36.41%
146
37.44%
85
21.79%
8
2.05%
All Middle
38
55.07%
18
26.09%
8
11.59%
4
5.80%
Elementary School Kindergarten
16
30.77%
19
36.54%
14
26.92%
1
1.92%
Grades
Grade 1
20
29.41%
27
39.71%
18
26.47%
2
2.94%
Grade 2
15
26.79%
21
37.50%
18
32.14%
1
1.79%
Grade 3
20
41.67%
18
37.50%
8
16.67%
1
2.08%
Grade 4
22
50.00%
15
34.09%
6
13.64%
1
2.27%
Grade 5
16
31.37%
20
39.22%
11
21.57%
1
1.96%
Grade 6
17
43.59%
15
38.46%
5
12.82%
1
2.56%
Combo
16
50.00%
11
34.38%
5
15.63%
0
0.00%
Middle School
Grade 6
5
41.67%
2
16.67%
4
33.33%
1
8.33%
Grades
Grade 7
15
53.57%
11
39.29%
2
7.14%
0
0.00%
Grade 8
16
64.00%
5
20.00%
2
8.00%
2
8.00%
Combo
2
50.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
1
25.00%
No Designation
10
25.64%
14
35.90%
10
25.64%
1
2.56%
Row %
14.06%
10.77%
15.94%
5.66%
5.88%
7.27%
16.67%
9.09%
13.46%
5.26%
31.25%
8.33%
10.71%
16.00%
75.00%
43.59%
Not applicable
N
14
9
1
2
1
1
1
0
3
1
0
0
0
0
1
4
Row %
2.81%
2.31%
1.45%
3.85%
1.47%
1.79%
2.08%
0.00%
5.88%
2.56%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
25.00%
10.26%
76 | P a g e Table 48: I enjoy teaching math.
Strongly agree
Overall
All Elementary
All Middle
Elementary School
Grades
Middle School
Grades
Kindergarten
Grade 1
Grade 2
Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade 5
Grade 6
Combo
Grade 6
Grade 7
Grade 8
Combo
No Designation
N
250
178
54
20
21
26
22
20
32
23
14
10
19
21
4
18
Row %
50.10%
45.41%
78.26%
37.74%
30.88%
46.43%
45.83%
45.45%
61.54%
58.97%
43.75%
83.33%
67.86%
84.00%
100.00%
47.37%
Agree
N
222
191
14
28
44
28
23
20
19
12
17
2
8
4
0
17
Row %
44.49%
48.72%
20.29%
52.83%
64.71%
50.00%
47.92%
45.45%
36.54%
30.77%
53.13%
16.67%
28.57%
16.00%
0.00%
44.74%
Disagree
N
19
16
1
5
3
0
2
2
1
2
1
0
1
0
0
2
Row %
3.81%
4.08%
1.45%
9.43%
4.41%
0.00%
4.17%
4.55%
1.92%
5.13%
3.13%
0.00%
3.57%
0.00%
0.00%
5.26%
Table 49: I have detailed knowledge of the math content covered by other teachers at my school.
Strongly agree
Agree
Disagree
Overall
All Elementary
All Middle
Elementary School
Grades
Middle School
Grades
No Designation
Kindergarten
Grade 1
Grade 2
Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade 5
Grade 6
Combo
Grade 6
Grade 7
Grade 8
Combo
N
93
54
32
2
6
5
7
5
13
13
3
3
15
13
1
7
Row %
18.83%
13.95%
46.38%
3.77%
8.82%
9.09%
14.89%
11.63%
25.49%
34.21%
9.38%
25.00%
53.57%
52.00%
25.00%
18.42%
N
233
188
27
24
33
29
25
18
26
15
18
7
10
10
0
18
Row %
47.17%
48.58%
39.13%
45.28%
48.53%
52.73%
53.19%
41.86%
50.98%
39.47%
56.25%
58.33%
35.71%
40.00%
0.00%
47.37%
N
146
126
9
21
28
17
11
19
11
8
11
2
3
2
2
11
Row %
29.55%
32.56%
13.04%
39.62%
41.18%
30.91%
23.40%
44.19%
21.57%
21.05%
34.38%
16.67%
10.71%
8.00%
50.00%
28.95%
Strongly
disagree
N
Row %
6
1.20%
5
1.28%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
1
1.79%
0
0.00%
2
4.55%
0
0.00%
2
5.13%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
1
2.63%
Not applicable
Strongly
disagree
N
Row %
17
3.44%
14
3.62%
1
1.45%
4
7.55%
1
1.47%
4
7.27%
2
4.26%
1
2.33%
1
1.96%
1
2.63%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
1
25.00%
2
5.26%
Not applicable
N
2
2
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
N
5
5
0
2
0
0
2
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
Row %
0.40%
0.51%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
1.79%
2.08%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
Row %
1.01%
1.29%
0.00%
3.77%
0.00%
0.00%
4.26%
0.00%
0.00%
2.63%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
77 | P a g e Table 50: There is consistency in math curriculum and instruction across grade levels.
Strongly agree
Agree
Disagree
Overall
All Elementary
All Middle
Elementary
School Grades
Middle School
Grades
Kindergarten
Grade 1
Grade 2
Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade 5
Grade 6
Combo
Grade 6
Grade 7
Grade 8
Combo
No Designation
N
64
48
13
2
11
11
5
4
6
6
3
2
8
3
0
3
Row %
12.96%
12.40%
18.84%
3.77%
16.67%
20.00%
10.20%
9.09%
11.76%
16.22%
9.38%
16.67%
28.57%
12.00%
0.00%
7.89%
N
205
167
21
28
31
22
27
15
21
10
13
7
5
8
1
17
Row %
41.50%
43.15%
30.43%
52.83%
46.97%
40.00%
55.10%
34.09%
41.18%
27.03%
40.63%
58.33%
17.86%
32.00%
25.00%
44.74%
Table 51: How would you rank the ability of math coaches to support you?
Excellent
Overall
All Elementary
All Middle
Elementary School
Grades
Middle School
Grades
No Designation
Kindergarten
Grade 1
Grade 2
Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade 5
Grade 6
Combo
Grade 6
Grade 7
Grade 8
Combo
N
76
51
15
6
7
7
8
7
6
3
7
2
5
8
0
10
Row %
15.42%
13.25%
21.74%
11.32%
10.45%
12.96%
17.02%
15.91%
11.76%
7.89%
22.58%
16.67%
17.86%
32.00%
0.00%
25.64%
N
143
117
18
12
27
17
14
9
18
9
11
4
5
8
1
8
N
134
108
17
16
14
15
13
12
16
14
8
2
6
8
1
9
Row %
27.13%
27.91%
24.64%
30.19%
21.21%
27.27%
26.53%
27.27%
31.37%
37.84%
25.00%
16.67%
21.43%
32.00%
25.00%
23.68%
Strongly
disagree
N
Row %
52
10.53%
35
9.04%
14
20.29%
2
3.77%
5
7.58%
3
5.45%
3
6.12%
6
13.64%
7
13.73%
4
10.81%
5
15.63%
1
8.33%
7
25.00%
5
20.00%
1
25.00%
3
7.89%
Good
Row %
29.01%
30.39%
26.09%
22.64%
40.30%
31.48%
29.79%
20.45%
35.29%
23.68%
35.48%
33.33%
17.86%
32.00%
25.00%
20.51%
Not sure
N
36
28
4
4
5
4
1
7
1
3
3
0
2
1
1
4
Fair
N
100
81
12
13
20
13
5
10
8
8
4
3
7
2
0
7
Row %
20.28%
21.04%
17.39%
24.53%
29.85%
24.07%
10.64%
22.73%
15.69%
21.05%
12.90%
25.00%
25.00%
8.00%
0.00%
17.95%
Row %
7.29%
7.24%
5.80%
7.55%
7.58%
7.27%
2.04%
15.91%
1.96%
8.11%
9.38%
0.00%
7.14%
4.00%
25.00%
10.53%
Poor
N
37
29
6
4
1
3
9
2
6
3
1
0
3
2
1
2
Row %
7.51%
7.53%
8.70%
7.55%
1.49%
5.56%
19.15%
4.55%
11.76%
7.89%
3.23%
0.00%
10.71%
8.00%
25.00%
5.13%
Not applicable
N
3
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
Row %
0.61%
0.26%
0.00%
1.89%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
5.26%
I have had no
support from
math coaches
N
Row %
137 27.79%
107 27.79%
18
26.09%
18
33.96%
12
17.91%
14
25.93%
11
23.40%
16
36.36%
13
25.49%
15
39.47%
8
25.81%
3
25.00%
8
28.57%
5
20.00%
2
50.00%
12
30.77%
78 | P a g e OPEN RESPONSES REGARDING SCHOOL/CLASSROOM
(Open responses are unedited to keep authenticity)
Open Responses:
How well-prepared are students entering mathematics study at the grade level you teach?
Kindergarten:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Barely prepared, if at all
Emergent
Fair
from preschool, n/a
Good
I teach kindergarten.
I teach Kindergarten. Most have had none.
It is kindergarten, i don't expect much
It ranges from ill-prepared to very well prepared.
It varies a lot.
It varies by the individual student i.e. whether or not they have had preschool or their parents have worked with them.
It's quite a range. I have some that are very advanced to a little guy who can only count to four.
Just fine. The are 5 and 6 year olds. Abilities will vary with entry just like any other grade.
Kindergarten?
low
Many are not very prepared if they have not been to preschool. Most who have attended some kind of preschool
program are prepared.
Many have had no preparation or pre-school even. (I teach Kindergarten)
Most are somewhat prepared.
Most have little to no math concept.
N/A
N/A I teach kindergarten, the majority of students come to school with little exposure to math.
N/A, but as this is my first year teaching kindergarten I will say I am shocked at the fact that so many of my students
didn't recognize shapes or numbers entering kindergarten.
not
Not at all. Some of them have had absolutely no math experiences at home, however, this is their first formal year of
school.
not prepared
Not well-perpared
Not- they are Kindergarteners.
O.K.
OK
poorly
Pretty well prepared with extra stuff.
ranges from being able to do addition from not being able to recognize their numbers at all
Some are prepared but most are not.
There is a wide range of preparation with my students. It generally depends on the amount of pre-school or parent
involvement.
They are kindergarten. They know very little math.
This is generally their first experience with focused math.
Varies from extremely prepared to non-existent
Very ill repaired
79 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
very little number knowledge or nothing at all
Very well, but sometimes it depends on the support from home. Learning money and their values is getting harder
each year as we are becoming so dependent upon plastic, that many Kinders are not having the chance to use money
themselves.
Very!
Wide variety of math abilities coming into kindergarten
With the supplemental curriculum and lessons I teach, they are well-prepared.
Grade 1:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
60% ready
average to below
average- missing coins, shape names,
Because I teach first grade, 1/3 of my students enter with a good understanding of number sense.
coming from Kindergarten- excellent. Placement testing into 1st grade math- fair.
decently prepared
Depends on the class and the student (usually below)
Depends on the student. Fair, on average.
fair
Fair
Fairly well-prepared within a variety of abilities.
Great!
I believe students are prepared when entering grade 1.
I think that my first graders finish the school year ready to be successful in math in second grade.
I think the Everyday Math kindergarten program in itself is not enough to prepare children for the rigorous first grade
program. At our school, the kindergarten teachers do many extra activities to prepare them, but they are not in the
curriculum. We are lucky that they take the initiative to do this.
It's mixed. Some kids come in not even know their numbers to 20.
Knowledge of basic facts is limited.
many do not count past 20 and some do not have any number sense correlating numbers to things 1+ one + 1 apple
Many students below grade level, some on grade level
mixed, some are ready for the grade level materials, many can't read or identify numbers to 20 and have very limited
understanding of academic math language or math concepts (more/less, before/after, etc)
Most can count to 100 and add. Usually a quarter of the class cannot count to 100, skip count, or add.
Most children could count up to one hundred.
Most come prepared but a lot of students are low and reviewing kindergarten skills is important.
Most of my first graders come in with an appropriate level of mathematics knowledge.
Most very are well-prepared.
not very prepared
Not very prepared in Everyday Math language
not very well
Ok--again it is EDM that isn't good and we are told we have to use it.
Overall they are prepared for the concepts we cover (after fall review).
Pretty good
pretty well, I wish they were more familiar with the coins names and values.
ready
So-so
Some are ready but many are not ready
Some students are ready for first grade math, but many are not. I also think the curriculum moves very quickly and
expects them to understand too much. Only my very brightest math students learn everything that I spent time
teaching.
Somewhat prepared.
80 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The students seem to be lower every year. The last two year my beginning first graders were unable to identify all of
their number from 1-20.
Their thoughts are too scrambled....they don't know the basics well enough
They are not prepared at all because they have never been given the opportunity to master a skill.
They are well-prepared for first grade.
They usually needs lots of review for close to the first half of the year. They may have left Kindergarten with knowing
their numbers, etc... but over the summary, very little is retained.
They're good.
Two of mine this year were well prepared, the rest from no number sense/even recognition to some
Varies some are well-prepared, while others are not.
Very poor! After half of the year, half of my class is failing the EDM tests, even after I reteach the same skills over and
over.
Very well prepared
very well prepared. the kindergarten review is too long
well
well prepared
Well prepared
Well prepared an 8 out of 10. Of course, this is also considering regression over the summer.
well-prepared
Grade 2:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
About half are well prepared. The other half have gaps in their math knowledge, particularly in number sense.
Adequately
Depends on the consept
fair
fair to low
good
Good
good in some areas, not so much in others
great
great. They know numbers to 100, and other skills needed for 2nd.
Greatly
I am fortunate to teach at a school where there is a lot of parent involvement and support at home. I think they have
been well prepared.
I feel they are prepared.
I think that they come in with a few basics but EDM moves so fast that they don't have time to master much of anything
before we move on to something else.
I think they are fairly prepared.
It depends on the school they attended the previous years.
It gets better every year. New kids coming to our school are generally behind the students here.
Many are not prepared.
Moderately so.
money, time, always in need of extra attention
Most are at grade level.
Not prepared overall.
Not well prepared at all. Some of them cannot count to 50 or use a hundreds chart.
ok
Only the past few years have some of the previous grade level teachers even finished both journals
Our school jumped into EDM all at once, without beginning it at Grade K so it was a mess. Now some kids know
some concepts although our district has many students moving in and out.
81 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Our students are lacking basic skills and understandings. They need lots of hands on manipulative experiences, acting
out solutions and drawing (pencil) experiences. They need much more practice in problem solving and need to have
lots of review time for concepts. A good percentage of my students are ELL (5 students out of 23) and the verbage in
EDM is very intense even for English speakers. There is way too much complex talk and not enough manipulation,
drawing, and acting. The curriculum is not concrete enough for 2nd graders.
Overall - very good. A few strugglers.
poorly prepared for the most part. Due to math skills appearing and then not reappearing for some time my students
retention is low and I have to supplement
Poorly prepared.
Previous teachers often teach one out of two journals.
Same as usual. Struggling students are not prepared, average students keep up, advanced students immediately
grasp concepts.
Some are prepared but others are not.
Some have the skills necessary to do well at grade level. New to district children need a lot of time acquiring
vocabulary and learning the routines of Everyday Math.
some very and others not at all
somewhat
Somewhat. It depends on if they are new to the school and the program, their math level performance from last
year(low-average and below are struggling when they come in)
Students seem to be well prepared from Saxon, but children moving into our school who have been in EDM, have a
hard time adjusting.
They are able to come in and start working with the math journals. So they seem right where they should be.
They are fairly well-prepared in their ability to solve problems, but do not know basic facts as well as I think they should
by the end of first grade.
They are not ready for the EDM math journal.
They do not know their basic facts. I know this is not due to the efforts of the previous grade level teachers, because
I've seen all the efforts they have put into math.
They seem to forget the concepts and it is reteaching most of the time.
Varied. Some are much better prepared than others.
Very well
Very well prepared. Our school blocks for math and if my class is not appropriate for the student, they are are moved
to a Math 1 class.
Well prepared
Well-prepared
Grade 3:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Average
average to below
barely
fair
Fair
Good
I know the K-2 grade teachers are teaching what they're supposed to, but the students don't always remember it. They
should be pretty well prepared, but it's just so-so.
I would say about 1/4 of the students are well prepared when they enter the new grade level.
I've noticed an increase over the years.
Inadequately prepared for the curriculum.
It depends on the students. Students who are ELL or special ed students have trouble with the reading component to
it. Otherwise they are prepared for it.
It ranges from fair to poor. Students coming from other programs or other districts really struggle at first.
Many do not have basic facts mastered. It is an upohill battle daily.
82 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Most are prepared. Genrealy a handful are not prepared but my school has a high turnover rate of students so that
definitely needs to be weighed in.
Most are well prepared
most are well-prepared.
Mostly prepared
No very prepared
Not very. Don't know the basic concepts. Ok with vocabulary.
Not at grade level
not very, usually a grade level behind
not well prepared
Not well prepared since they aren't taught enough computation skills in EDM
Not well--the program does not allow for mastery, so students come in having just a basic knowledge of skills.
Ok. Lacking in some skills that EDM thinks they should know like telling time, counting money, adding and subtracting.
Computation is poor.
Poor. But that is because I have years of teaching experience with a good idea of where students should be or what
they should have already mastered by the grade level I teach.
Poorly - The tendancy is to get between 0-40% on the end of 2nd grade test.
Some what prepapred. A lot of our population comes from all over the world.
Some years, well-prepared. Other years, not so much.
Somewhat
There are such huge leaps from 1st to 2nd to 3rd. The start of the year always feels like a struggle for children to settle
in with the increased mathematical expectations.
They are below grade level.
They seem to have a lot of holes, especially with foundational skills and basic math language.
very well
well prepared
well prepared if they have been here at our school using everyday math already......
Grade 4:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
About half are ready.
adequate
adequately
Except for their times tables they are ready.
fair
I work with a more advanced population and students are often prepared with concepts.
If they have already used Everyday Math prior to entering fourth grade then they are used to the format. However, they
are not prepared for the extent or difficulty of some of the concepts that we cover.
It depends on so many factors for the individual child. Overall this year I feel the majority of students have been well
prepared but a full 35 % seem to struggle with basic arithmetic. Some years I have had as many as 50% who struggle
in this area upon entering this grade.
Many students seem to struggle with basic computation as will as problems solving.
Most children are entering without the GLE's from the prior grade completed to mastery. How could they? There isn't
enough practice in EDM to allow them the opportunity to have mastery.
Multiplication is not mastered, therefore it is a hold up for division. Our students always seem to need more work with
the metric system and geometry.
My students are somewhat well prepared because most of my students come from a team at 1-2 grade that put a
priority on math and adequate preparation
My students come in VERY behind every year. I teach 4th grade this year and I am still trying to get them to add and
subtract with regrouping. This should have been mastered in 2nd grade.
No much - still do not mastered the basics
not very
83 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Not very well prepared. They do not know the basic math fact due in part to no mastery in the EDM curriculum.
Not well at all! Basic skills and concepts are not in place. Some kids didn't even do the second journal during their
previous school year!
not well enough
not well prepared at all.
Not well-prepared. They seem to have forgotten a lot of what was introduced in lower grades.
Now that we are in our third year of EDM implementation, the students are extremely well-prepared.
ok
Some are better prepared than others.
some are ready, many are not.
The students that entered the class this year were mostly at grade level.
Their retention and skill levels need to be re visited and re visited again and again. They don't remember basic skills
year after year. Skills that should be mastered.
They are fairly prepared. There are many concepts to which they have been introduced but not enough practice to
truly make the transfer to a new grade level.
They score about 25-35 percent on the previous year test when taking at the beginning of the year.
they seem to have "forgotten" much, or come with misconceptions that were not cleared up in previous years.
They show no evidence of having ever been exposed to EDM.
Those that have had SAXON math are very well prepared. Those coming from schools that use the ASD preferred
Everyday Math are confused.
very poor
Very poor in basic facts
Very week on multiplication facts
very well prepared
Very, if they received the same curriculum in previous years.
Wonderfully, but that is a credit to Saxon Math!
Grade 5:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
differential instruction, small group instruction, review of gle's in small grps.
differentiate
Differentiate at lower levels, Small groups Peer sharing Extra time Constant Review
differentiated activities.
Differentiated small group instruction/homework, use of concrete materials, frequent small assessments, etc.
Differentiation throughout the school.
Extra time, practice, and one on one instruction
I am attempting to do small group re-teaching on certain basic skills in the morning. Other times, I am providing whole
group reteaching on certain skills, if the skill is not gelling with the class.
I differentiate instruction based on needs and skills.
I do small group instruction when needed. In the past, I have had tutoring after school. I offer assistance to parents if
they do not understand a concept.
I don't look at the pacing guide. I figure masters is more important than how far we get in the book, within reason. I
keep the pacing guide in line, but I give up two lunches a week to work with those kids who are truly struggling.
I have an aide that helps struggling students.
I lead a small group after I teach the whole group lesson. I also add practice sheets for adding, subtracting,
multiplication and division through out the year.
I offer help at recess time twice a week. I try to fit in as much small group time as I can. I add manipulatives as
applicable.
I reteach and grade on a curve- plus I keep in contact with parents to help support my struggling students at home.
I spend extra time with them and also make worksheets that address the areas they are struggling in so they can have
more practice.
84 | P a g e •
I suggest that students get a tutor because the district has set a schedule / pace that is very rigid. I also try to offer
help during class and give extra practice. I make sure we play all of the games to insure basic skill acquisition.
• I supplement materials.
• I take more time to teach one on one and support with easier homework.
• I tend to have to go back to prior grade levels and teach the missing concepts students have before I can even think of
focusing on my current grade level. It is amazing to me how many new 5th graders I get that still struggle with basic
addition/ subtraction. Before I can effectively teach multiplication or division, they need to have mastered these basic
skills first, or they continue to struggle the entire year.
• I try to take it from what they know and like. I go back and work on facts with them. Something that they understand, let
them feel the good feeling of 'getting it'. Take it from there to the subject they struggle with. I feel they have to get that
'aha!' feeling. That's the real pay off for taking time to do math. Math is not fun if you are not sure you get it.
• I tutor them in the mornings. I also pull groups after giving the lesson.
• I use additional resources that I have learned in my 12 years of teaching.
• I use the differentiated handbook, the lessons suggested in the EDM Manual, and they work in small groups with me or
another adult to practice.
• I.E.P.'s
• Insist on students mastering computation/operation fundamentals. Increased 1 on 1 time with teacher. I teach a
before school (2-3 times/wk) math clinic. We have a twice weekly morning math clinic school-wide.
• modifying the EDM curr.
• One on one or small group help. Review of concept. More practice.
• one-on-one assistance, modified assignments
• One-on-one time with me, more manipulative concept building time, extra parent tutor time.
• peer tutoring and aids.
• Remediation work, review of basic skills
• Repetition of lessons, tutoring, drill and practice with math facts.
• RTI study groups, small group instruction, tutoring with LOI monies.
• see previous statements
• slow down, reteach, use games to strengthen skills
• Small groups when possible..differentiating instruction...slowing the pace down when necessary...using supplemental
material
• small skill groups, lots of review, weekly flashcard checking, supplement with other worksheets
• supplement
• The strugglers get very frustrated. Not a lot of support. I use the document camera to demonstrate a lesson or play
games with students. I pair kids up with a strong partner. I meet with a small group of kids at my back table.
• Trying different methods to reach them & additional practice as needed
• Tutors assist those who are struggling. I also pair strugglers with more competent students, especially during games.
• Use manipulatives, extra time tutoring at recess and before school, small group practice
• We have in school tutoring groups and after school math tutoring.
• We have small groups in Math, and I use outside resources to help reinforce concepts taught.
• We let the kids work at their own levels, so that kids don't struggle
• with replacement curriculum
Grade 6 Elementary:
• 60- 40 Sixty percent are adequately prepare, 40 percent are not, of that 40 precent most are not putting in the effort,
do not know basic math facts and do not memorize information.
• Adequate. Some are very prepared while others are not.
• Average
• Below average.
• By sixth grade, it is a real split. The curriculum definitely becomes more advanced and conceptual, and many students
are still quite concrete in their thought processes. There are the kids who really know their math facts and are ready for
85 | P a g e the challenging conceptual concepts. There are many kids who are struggling with facts and have difficulty when
finding common denominators, converting to decimals, etc.
• Depends. Some are prepared and some (D.O.D schools) are several years below grade level. Depends on if they've
been within our ASD system or not.
• Extremely un-prepared.
• Fair
• Fair. Over the years more of them are coming without knowing how to multiply numbers.
• Fairly well. Some students still need to become automatic w/ math facts and basic computation.
• I feel the upper third is prepared, but the lower 2/3 of the students are not.
• I teach resource so they enter with a variety of deficiencies.
• most students do not have a firm memory of multiplication facts. this is unfortunate since so much math is built upon
that knowlege.
• Not
• Not prepared. Although they have "moved" through the school using the Everyday Math curriculum (from grade level
to grade level), they cannot recall skills taught before. For instance, EDM will show that students had practice with the
concept in Fifth grade. However, my brightest students (I mean really bright) will state they have never seen the
concept before. Thus, introduction and teaching of an EDM "existing" concept begins again.
• Not prepared... don't even know multiplication tables by 6th grade
• Not very well.
• Not very.
• Not very. The EDM program was adopted for all grades in the same year.
• Not very. Many missing areas.
• So-so. The previous grade level teachers usually only get to unit seven, so they have holes.
• Some are above grade level, some are far below.
• Student comprehension spans the gammit. New to district students who have not used EDM have a very difficult time.
ELL students struggle.
• Students who have been in Northwood and have had Saxon instruction are very well prepared. Students who have
had Everyday Math struggle to keep up with the homework load and with the mastery requirement.
• The high (Ignite) students are fine. Many of the mid-low students do not seem prepared.
• There seem to be a lot of holes and basic skills missing. A lot of teachers struggle with teaching EDM effectively.
• They are not prepared with the basic skills needed to be successful in math.
• They are usually well-prepared.
• they aren't many don't even know multiplication facts or when reviewing concepts, they act like they have never seen
the material before although it was covered in 4th/5th
• They seem to be really unprepared.
• This year - poor
• varies from student to student
• Very unprepared!
Elementary Combo:
• 5th grade is very prepared. 6th grade needs more help.
• 75%
• as best as they can be, teach resource
• fair
• Fair - some of the prior year teachers did not finish the book so there is some discrepancy in what students have
learned. Some are much farther ahead than others.
• Fair to low.
• I am a special education teacher. I work to teach all grade level material in math, as well as cover any areas of specific
concern for the student.
• I would say 5% are prepared to take Algebra 1 in 7th Grade and 50% are prepared in 8th grade assuming they have
taken Pre-Algebra in 7th grade.
86 | P a g e •
•
•
•
moderately
Most of my students are far below grade level in their math skills
Most students are fairly well prepared, however, not all students have attended this school or district in the past.
Not very well prepared. They don't know their facts, they can't remember multiples, and factors, they don't know what
the GCF or the LCM means, and they don't know the purpose of figuring them out. They cannot remember median,
mode and maximum and minimum. They remember the definitions after I remind them but cannot put it into long term
memory.
• Not well prepared, but then, I teach students in the special education program and they are most likely 2-3 years
behind their peers.
• Not well prepared. They don't know their multiplication facts, and some can't subtract accurately.
• poorly
• Poorly for knowledge of basic addition, subtraction, multiplication and division rapid recall (0-12)
• quite well prepared when coming from within Northwood ABC
• so so
• Some are well prepared and some are not. Some are not prepared because developmentally they are not ready for
the concepts taught at their grade level. These are mostly students who have struggled with reading and who thus not
had as much time to devote to mathematics.
• Somewhat
• somewhat lacking in vocab development, basic skills
• Students do not have the basic concepts of multiplication and they do not know the multiplication facts. Many do not
know the addition and subtraction facts. Many do not know how to regroup in subtraction.
• They are not prepared at all.
• They are well prepared.
• Well prepared, except for those needing differentiation in areas of weakness.
Grade 6 Middle School:
• adequate for the most part
• Fair to adequate.
• Learning math is developmental. Also the success that a student may have is dependent on the effort they put forth.
So I feel that my teaching style will help them to be successful in my class and prepared for next year I feel that there is
about 60% of my students are actually prepared for next year.
• Many lack basic skills making it difficult to do the work expected.
• moderately
• My incoming 6th graders are fairly well prepared, except most do not know their multiplication facts, and most are weak
doing long division.
• not well prepared at all Can't (-, x, or divide)
• The majority are still struggling with multiplication facts and division skills. Many have had some experience with
graphing and fractions.
• Very badly. I have had to go back to place value to teach regrouping and the processes for the operations.
• Well-Prepared
Grade 7:
• 1-3 grade levels behind
• a mixture of students and levels come into to 7th but the majority are at a lower level than they should be
• At least half of the students in Math 7 are entering 7th grade below grade level. Many that are at grade level are in
advanced classes such as pre-algebra and algebra.
• I have implement two initial assessments at the beginning of each year, for 14 years. Students were well-prepared for
grade-level curriculum that had gone through the Silver Burdette program at the elementary level. However, after
Everyday math had been implemented, I noticed diminished aptitude. After students had had four years of Everyday
Math, scores were at the bottom. This has not changed to date.
87 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
I teach Math 7, PreAlgebra and Math Support. Of my Math 7 and PreAlgebra students many of them are not secure in
basic computation skills including operations with fractions and decimals. A noticeable number of them do not have
their basic math facts and have been exposed to too many topics without mastering the K-6 GLE's
In the 7th grade students are expected to come in on the first day and already know how to add, subtract, multiply, and
divide fractions and decimals. I feel the fraction area is incredibly weak. Students coming from the Everyday Math
program seem to have the attitude that each day will be a new day with a new concept and so they don't need to worry
about it if they didn't understand the material from the previous lesson.
Inadequate knowledge of basic facts. Absolute inability to do long division. No problem solving ability. One student
knows how to do problems, 3 are very adept at copying other's work.
lack computation skills in fractions, decimals, percents, integers, and problem solving
Most of the students are unprepared for 7th grade math and unprepared to attain 7th grade standards and GLE's.
Most need a math support class.
No calculating skills
not ready to do the work that is expected of them.
Not well-prepared at all. They have difficulty with multi-step instructions/problems. Basic operation concepts are
extremely weak as well as decimals, fraction concepts, and
Poorly prepared. The biggest hurdle is their inability to read for understanding. They do well with "naked number" but
are stymied by any problem with context. I can teach kids facts and algorithms - it's harder to teach problem solving at
7th grade when they seem to have never seen it before.
Pre Algebra and Algebra are generally well prepared (about 75 %) Math 7 students, 10% very well prepared, 30% well
prepared, 20 % not well prepared, 40% extremely ill prepared/ should be in a pull out math program.
Some are well prepared, but the majority are lacking in several of the key concepts (such as mulitplication and division)
Some students are prepared, some are not. Many lack basic fundamental skills, such as the ability to do long division,
multiplication, basic fraction work, etc... It seems there are very few opportunities in elementary school to do this rote
practice. The inability of students to perform these basic functions makes the current math lessons take longer,
because I have to re-teach these basic skills because they are necessary for completing current lessons
Somewhat prepares. Need to know their math facts better. Don't know fractions.
The average to above average student are well prepared. If a student has had "life issues" the tend to be far behind in
basic computational skills, logical thinking and reasoning skills.
The pre-algebra students are prepared. The math 7 students need more basic skills.
There is a wide spectrum of ability in my classrooms. A few students are well-prepared but many students are not.
They are not ready for MathScapes. They are making a leap from 6th grade everyday math into a curriculum that
requires the 6th grade to have complete MathScape. This material is completely foreign to them.
they seem as if they only received a breif lesson in many of the concepts, nothing is really concrete.
This totally depends on the class that they are entering. The students in Math 7 are way below grade level, usually 2-3
years on average.
Varies from year to year, but I would say satisfactory
Very
Very poorly prepared. Skill levels below 5th grade on average. Reading levels to low to understand the text. No ability
to take math notes. Very poor fraction and decimal skills.
We see the full range from well-prepared to stuggle students
Grade 8:
•
•
•
•
•
•
75%. Most, as is true at most levels of math, do not have a firm grasp on arithmetic operations with rational numbers.
About 85% are not prepared. They majority do not know how to add, subtract or multiply double digit numbers. The
majority also do not know their times facts.
fair
I teach special education students so there gaps are different. The majority of my student struggle due to gaps in their
learning.
I teach students who are new immigrants with limited math backgrounds. They are enrolled in my class because they
are very unprepared to handle the math and/or language that is used in the mainstream classroom.
mostly unprepared
88 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Middle Combo:
•
•
•
•
No Designation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
My general math 8 classes are made up of a mix of students who are either struggling in math, receiving special
education services and struggling in math, students who don't complete work, and lack motivation to do work, and a
handful of students who complete their work daily and are successful in math but are not ready for algebra1 (or failed
prealgebra because they didn't turn in work)
Not
Not adequately prepared
not prepared
Not prepared in the basics (Fractions,Decimals)
Not very well prepared: poor in basic skills like adding and subtracting. Multiplication tables are not in memory; lack
skills in fractions, decimals and percents
Not very. Kids struggle with concepts they have seen since 3rd grade that keep them from grasping the higher level
concepts in middle school.
Not well. Unable to do basic math functions like subtract and divide. Other than my advanced math students, regular
ed students almost can't do basic functions with fractions and almost all of them need the use of a calculator to do
basic division.
Okay
POORLY PREPARED
Some are well prepared, some are severely lacking.
Some better than others, a lot are weak in basic add/subract/ mult/divide
Students are adequately prepared. There are obviously holes in individual students' learning, but I haven't noticed any
systemic issues.
The SPED students were ready. They were prepared for resource math.
They are not prepared. They are weak in all areas--numeration and functions in particular.
They are somewhat prepared for my grade level.
Very poorly prepared.
Week in rational numbers operations.
Currently, with special ed students they are very ill-prepared if they have been pulled out for math instruction. Special
ed teachers are not getting the opportunities for math development in math.
I have a wide range of ability levels, but overall I see major holes in basic skills, and facts, such as addition, subtraction
with borrowing, multiplication facts, and long division.
In my school, most are below grade level.
more than two years behind
adequate
Adequately prepared. When the previous teacher has not finished both math journals, students will not have had the
necessary exposure (not mastery) to math concepts.
At the beginning of 4th grade more than half of my student's can't add with regrouping. Most can't subtract--regrouping
or not. This year no 4th grader could divide and only a few could multiply. They are missing the basics which make
starting out in EDM on schedule impossible.
Depends on the year. ALL students are lacking in computation.
fair
Fair
Fairly well prepared in all but basic computation.
good
Good and some areas but poor in other areas such as odd/even numbers.
I feel students are prepared
I teach in a self-contained special education setting. My students are working on individualized educational programs.
I teach resource
89 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Math facts are not drilled enough, so 4th grade remains lost - NO TIME IN SCHOOL TO PRACTICE! Our society has
headed in a different direction, and home life has no time for school in many of our families.
minimal
Most are not well-prepared.
My second graders were well prepared. My third graders were not well prepared.
Not good.
not prepared at all
Not very
not very prepared
Not very prepared. Everyday math leaves many holes in students understanding of concrete mathematics
Not very well prepared, but I teach special education
OK but it is a big transition from math in Spanish without the EDM journal in K &1st to the EDM journal in 2nd
poor
Some students are well-prepared. However, there is a wide range of abilities.
Special education students are fair.
Students are not prepared. Most do not have the background in their multiplication facts, and fractions. I spend much
of my time reteaching what they should know. The biggest weakness is that students are not used to learning for
mastery. Students are used to moving on whether they know it or not, and it teaches them bad math habits, they don't
try, as they are used to moving on whether they have mastered it or not.
Students do not have basic concepts down
Students with IEPs and goals in the area of mathematics: Poor
There are different levels of math for incoming 7th graders. Students entering prealgebra or algebra tend to be very
well prepared, meaning they are competent in using most 6th grade math skills/concepts. Students entering math 7
are those who were working at or below grade level. There is such a wide range of ability and achievement in math 7,
it is difficult to address the needs of the far below proficient students and the proficient students in the same math 7
class. Many math 7 students come in with skills below grade level.
They are well prepared, but we test for placement instead of just putting them in the next class up.
varies greatly. Overall fair.
very well prepared
How do you address the needs of struggling students in mathematics?
Kindergarten:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Altering things when needed. Have students teach each other, more 1-on-1 work
As time allows I provide small group instruction. This is not possible often enough.
Differination
Extra one onone time, peer tutoring
Extra one-on-one time, peer tutoring, giving parents ideas of what they can do at home to support their
Extra practice during the day, one on one/ small group, peer mentoring with an older class-- "buddies." Practice
materials sent home, newsletter for parents with ideas to support students at home.
Extra practice outside of the curriculum.
Extra practice with TA
Extra reinforcement, small gp. sessions, one on one sessions, manipulative activities, extra things to do at home for
parent support
extra time with teacher or t.a. during the school day
Games and manipulatives
Give them extra assistance and time; sometimes find a different way to explain or show the concept.
I am completing this during my lunch. Interventions would take me longer than the recommended 15 minutes.
I teach and teach and teach!!!
I try to approach each concept in a variety of ways to help learners with differing styles.
90 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
I work with students individually, small groups, and send supplemental work home for the student to work on. I also
have my aid work with students one on one, or with groups as well.
Individal and peer teaching
individual and small group help with number recognition, skills and concepts (as time allows)
Individualize instruction
Individualized instruction/ extra practice/ daily repetition
Intervention activities and games.
Manipulatives & extra practice with TA's and adults in the room. Support at home if available.
more opportunities for practice
One on One,
One-on-one support. Adjusting assignments. Additional instruction.
Practice centers, small groups, one on one time, manipulatives, repetition, routine.
provide one on one support
repeat, reteach and modify
Repetition, math games and songs Partner work, Tutoring Explorations, Math Centers instead of free time (for the
whole class. They all think Math Centers equals play time!).
Small group instruction Sending flash cards home or games home with students who are struggling so parents may
support their children at home.
Small group instruction and working one-on-one with my strugglers. I also have an aide and a tutor that comes to help
with them.
small group instruction, calendar, counting daily, etc.
small group, more time
small group, use of manipulatives, and repitition
Small groups, working with my TA, having several levels of the same game, send extra practice home.
supplement with age appropriate activities that are meaninful and integrated with other themes
Supplement with other materials.
Tutors to work on target skills students are struggling with.
Use of supplemental materials and addt'l support by using an aid.
Work one on one with them.
Work with them to learn concepts, numerals, etc.
Grade 1:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
-work one-on-one or in small groups -use manipulatives
Add one-on-one support and scaffold instruction.
Constant assessment with weekly quizzes, end of unit tests, mid-year tests. Working with students in small groups to
practice math concepts. Having bilingual students play math games with a bilingual tutor. Extra math practice at
different times of the day. Everyday Math games in the computer lab.
differentiated lessons, small group/individual instruction, online game support, math games in classroom and at home
to reinforce skills being taught.
differentiation, small groups, one-on-one instruction
drill and parctice
Extra practice, review of materials and one-on-one support
I give them more time to complete tasks and more adult assistance.
I have been using Math Their Way materials and 1-1 instruction.
I have had to stop whole group lessons and just teach in leveled groups, I differentiate with timed addition tests and
dice rolling. I pull kids over to give them pointed feedback and reteaching, but some of my students just are not getting
it.
I have to do one on one and groups to help keep them caught up. I also have to reteach concepts a lot more.
I look at assessments & try to support skills in small group or 1-on-1 support.
I teach lessons in small ability leveled groups. Use parent volunteers and high school helpers to tutor kids.
91 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
I try my best to pull them aside in small group settings and work with them so they get more one on one. I also try to
use manipulatives and other tools so they can see what it is I am trying to show them.
I try to show lots of visual aids, EDM games and review of abstract concepts.
I use fact practice sheets, teacher-created games, Waterford, and Saxon math to enhance my teaching of math in my
classroom
I use small groups, games or scaffold them with modified lessons
I usually give them other worksheets instead of using the EDM workbook. If I don't do this I have sit right by them and
tell them direction for each math box.
I work one on one with these students. Have parent conferences to assist parents in how to support their child at
home.
I'm needing to supplement EDM with other math material. I've taught Saxon in the past and my students were highly
ready for first grade coming from Kinder as well as ready for gong on to second grade.
individual attention and suggested activities for home
Individual attention, additional homework, partner work and additional practice
Individualized and small group instruction, peer tutors, intermediate student tutors, parent assistance
intervention tutoring or groups
It is hard because the EDM lessons take a lot of time to do them well, so there is not much time. I try to meet with the
struggling kids several times a week..Touch Math is often taught.
Lots of one on one, extra work from other sources
LOTS of re-teaching and supplements. Generally my entire class is sturuggling.
Minute reviews of basic knowledge, individual time as available, peer assistance as time allows, small group
interventions
More 1-on-1 assistance
one on one review with small groups utilizing parent volunteers
Peer buddy or one-on-one
peer coaching, reteach, small group, individual attention
provide extra help 1 on 1 and in small groups, provide extra math intervention time, do extra review sheets
Provide manipulatives, peer tutoring,1:1 instruction
repetition and partnering with students that do understand.
repetition, supplemental materials and teacher-made activities.
Reteaching individually
Reteaching, and chaning the presentation format if needed.
simply content by focusing on secure skills, slowing down the pacing chart when students aren't able to master secure
skills, providing individual support with struggling students or peer-assisted learning, bilingual student translation for
mono-lingual or limited English students
small group manipulatives alternative curriculum
small group help, modified whole group lessons
Small group instruction and one-on-one guidance and help along with cooperative learning
Small group instruction and practice.
small group instruction, differentiated instruction, extra practice
Small group instruction, partner teaching, EDM online, assessment assistant worksheets for extra practice, pulling in at
recess for extra help.
small group/one on one/manipulatives
small groups
small groups, one-on-one
Supplement with better math programs.
teach and reteach additional math time homework with parental support
There is very little time to address their needs. They must struggle to keep up.
Try to find time to work with them in small group to teach/practice at their level.
92 | P a g e •
•
•
use a helper to work one on one with those kids. Also, I have my title 1 specialist take a small group of kids that need
help on one skill.
use of manipulatives, songs, individual lessons and practice, math centers for additional practice
With the support of our Resource teachers. We use the differentiated curriculum. We do 4our lessons each week on
on Friday we have re-teach times or game day whichever is appropriate for each student.
Grade 2:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1. Homework 2. Lunchtime sessions. 3. Falling behind in the daily lessons and stopping to explain and reteach.
Additional help when I can find an adult to help.
After teaching a main lesson, I attempt to pull them aside for additonal help. Set up math buddies, parent volunteers
and additional work home to parents. Usually I cannot get to a struggling student as many kids need help with the
constant introduction of a new strategy or concept.
Attempt to make up for spiral touch and go EDM curriculum by buying material that will do so and assigning as
homework as well as try to fill holes with 10 minutes of skill work before EDM lesson.
Easier work load, simplifying problems, more basic skills work.
extra practice and peer tutoring
Extra small-group or individualized assistance.
I always teach the readiness portions. I have students partner up with a stronger student. I pull them for small groups.
I give them more appropriate homework from the math masters. I extend the math teaching time. We spend a lot of
time manipulating things so we understand. I rack my brain to figure out how to make things more concrete. We use
our white boards every day. We sing math songs.
I differentiate and meet with the struggling students.
I differentiate and put each student into their appropriate levels. I pace these groups based on their own needs.
I do the pages whole group or meet with a small group. I provide intervention for those that are lacking a skill. I use
lots of manipulatives and play the EDM math games.
I donate my own time before and after school daily to help strugglers. I have to.
I find other materials to supplement them.
I provide tutoring on Thursdays weekly and small group support or 1-on-1 support int he classroom.
I purchase my own K-1 & 2 math books to work with them at their levels in areas of concern.
I supplement the curriculum on a regular basis, play math games, use Title I resources, use online math games, give
partner, small group, and one to one instruction time. Proficient students help strugglers with their work. I provide
manipulatives to students on a regular basis. We pair up with another classroom as math buddies on a weekly basis. I
take time from social studies, science, and handwriting to reteach skills. In the past I used Larson Math at a lower
grade level, but it is no longer tracking student progress, so I'm not able to see how well all my students are doing.
I try to work with them in small groups.
I try to work with them in smaller groups while the other students are doing the math games.
I use the readiness activities as well as spread some lessons out over multiple days.
I utilize the Math Masters pages to send home, differentiation guide, parent support, and my classroom is always open
during lunch if a student needs help.
If they need to be moved back to Math 1, it is done. If they are in an appropriate class and still struggling, I give them
more direct instruction, or utilize a adult volunteer to help them.
Individual help, math study groups, math games for drill and repetition
Individual instruction.
lots of review, tutoring, one-on-one, small group work, use the readiness materials in EDM, incorporate needed skills
into calendar
Offer some assistance during the lessons. But for the most part just keep going. My understanding is that if they don't
get it the first time, they will pick it up the next, or following time. EDM isn't taught to mastery with every lesson.
One on one and small group support.
one on one, modified assignments, review, games, homework for more skills practice
one on one, peer tutoring, repetition in areas of struggle
partners, small group support, review
93 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Peer tutors
review often small groups
Saxon and I reinforce the basics...what the children need to know.
small group
Small group instruction with manipulatives. Parent helpers work in small groups. Adapted materials.
small group instruction, hands-on material, and any other supplemental material available that will reach the students
on their level and their way of learning.
small group instruction, individualized homework, extra assistance, peer tutoring, manipulatives, one-on-one,
computer, after school tutoring
Small group instruction.
small group lessons, multileveled games and activities, differentiation ideas in lessons
small group work and presenting multiple ways to solve problems. I encourage hands-on learning using
manipulatives/number grids also.
supplement readdress
Supplement with more practice. Meet in small groups when I can find time.
They attend resource math, they are given additional practice in their area of need.
This is an area in which I would like more support.
Use manipulatives and giving them more individualized instruction.
We ability group for math so this isn't much of an issue. Reteaching, review, explaining concepts differently
We have them jump right in and then support one on one as we see problems. It gives us a picture of where they are
and what they have.
We play games with flash cards in partners, spend at least 30 minutes on EDM online games as a class, I sent home
EDM passwords for students to practice at home, I also use the assistant to create more targeted practice for students
to differentiate homework as well as class work.
We use math blocking so students are leveled and that works really, really well.
Work with students in small group as time permits. Reteach skills students struggle with.
Working one on one. Having students share how they solved problems so students can try more than one method.
yes
Grade 3:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1:1, small group, volunteer tutor, parent involvement
Additional practice, instruction, small groups, reteaching, etc...
assess where students weakness are and build from there
differentiation, and interventions.
Diversify instruction; small group instruction
extra help one on one using manipulatives reteaching
Extra support, one on one help, or small group help
Hit and miss- no aide, no parent volunteers on a regular basis.
I differentiate that material being taught. I also have a bilingual aide in my room that can provide 1 on 1 or small group
assistance.
I have to keep them in for lunch recess to find time to work with them.
I reteach, reteach, reteach, and go back to the basics to insure students understand the foundation concept.
I think we're addressing them pretty well, between our Title 1 math support teacher, Dimond High School helpers & my
own efforts. We're trying hard!
I work one-on- one with them, small groups, do only half the math boxes, etc.
I work slower than the pacing chart to insure they get more firmly grounded in the basics. I try to integrate math into
real-life situations and other content areas, and I supplement.
Leveling classes, or supplemental materials.
more practice..teach them strategies to use
More repetition. Small group instruction Teaching basic facts
need to block math!!! Currently, SpEd pulls & we have half hour tutor to pull lowest 3 for reinforcement
94 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
One-on-One Interventions and Peer Tutoring We flexibly group according to ability for math so these challenges are
minimal.
Personal attention. Manipulatives when necessary. Online video teaching when available.
Pre-teaching of next day's lessons, additional support offered by TAs and support staff
Reteaching lessons, lessons taught over the course of 2 days. Preteaching skills the curriculum expects students to
already have.
Reteaching, small groups, extra support
Separate curriculum if I can find it.
Small group instruction, hands on materials, games, and modified material or expectations.
Small group instruction.
Small group instruction. Explicit teaching of skills on introduction with additional follow up. Supplemental activities.
Small group work, review, math games, peer partnerships, etc.
Small groups for re-teaching. Extra basic skills practice.
small groups skills work
Small groups with mini lessons. Stay in at lunchtime to work through vocab and concepts they don't understand.
small groups, adapted curriculum
Small groups, modified work
Small groups, one on one tutoring
Supllemental skill building computation sheets...
supplement with outside sources that are simpler
use skill based and differentiated instruction
Using the differentiating options and adding resources. Meet in small or individual groups. Partner students with
others, Use manipulatives.
We do small groups, teach and reteach, and modify instruction
We level our students by ability and provide slower paced lessons and re-teaching when necessary.
We spend more time that is allotted to make sure that at least a basic mastery is achieved, meaning that I don't get to
every lesson during the year.
Grade 4:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Additional practice and explanations.
Break down concepts and restart at their math needs to make gains.
Differentiated groups One on one tutoring extra practice
extra one-on-one teaching time, after school tutoring
Give them modified work.
Help them using SAXON math and it's core components and materials for struggling learners.
I communicate the need for extra practice to parents. I use a high school student to deliver readiness activities that go
with the lesson. I check in with those students more frequently and offer opportunities for extra support with
independent tasks.
I conduct review with small focus groups, use other students to tudor needy individuals. Use of online resources.
Focus on game that reinforce areas of struggle.
I constantly use supplemental materials to help struggling students get the practice they need.
I do EVERY component with EVERY student. I may work with small groups after I deliver the main lesson.
I hold reteach sessions on game days I have students stay in for recess so that I can work one-to-one I have other
students help each other
I level the work, use games, slow the pacing, offer extra credit for corrected work, inform parents, and use
supplemental materials. I sometimes have trade books to use in class.
I preteach with outside curriculum the skill or teach background knowledge, I run small groups, I have students track
what they learn/take notes in their learning logs.
I supplement, supplement, supplement. We do math 3 days a week for morning work, and extra hour on our no pull-out
days, and for homework every night.
I try to bring them all up to speed but need more parent support.
95 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
I use Silver-Burdett for my very low students. They love it.
I work in small groups. I modify the length of the assignment. Sometimes I give extra practice or more basic practice
with supplemental materials I find on the internet. I use manipulatives.
I work with students in small skill and strategy groups.
I work with them, one on one, small groups, whole class as I see the need. Supplemental assignments, activities and
formative assessments.
individual assistance
Individual help, peer help, parent help
Individualize and give extra practice.
Lots of practice. Extra math work for the opening of the day. Some structured drill and practice for multiplication facts
and the regrouping process for addition, subtraction, and multiplication. Looking at the inventory and assessments
diagnostically and reteaching and practicing skills that are not secure.
Lunch/recess interventions, homework, focus on them during classtime
My partner teacher and I block for Math so that one of us has the lower-middle to lower students and one of us has the
middle-high to high students. In the lower class the teacher is able to take more time to cover certain concepts and use
supplemental worksheets or activities for better understanding.
Not at all
partner work, cooperative learning strategies, math games for practice, tutor support, small group lessons based for
specific skills
Pull them along and ask for extra help at home with basic concepts.
review, preteach, reteach. break the concepts down into smaller parts.
review...review..supplemental work
Slow down. supplement with different materials
small group/one/one
small groups
small groups, reteaching, peer tutoring.
Small-group help, when it is possible. ***We have no funding for tutoring or extra help at our school - this is a HUGE
problem.***
Support them with tools to help them through, one-on-one support
There are several tutors that help struggling students and I also offer twice a week recess tutoring practice. I also use
various tools to help these students (SmartBoard, Base 10 blocks, etc.)
tutoring, small group instruction, shortened assignments
We differentiate our entire grade. We have 5 different flexible math groups meeting the needs of students.
We do math blocking at our school, and every student goes where they need to be for math. This allows them to
receive math instruction at their level.
Grade 5:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Collaborative Meetings, Basic Information about the curriculum, additional classes using EDM, additional math
courses
Communication from the STEM teachers
District math coach; Alaska Math Consortium
EDM Inservice Grade Level math instruction EDM math games
EDM training
Everyday math
Everyday Math support, and a class on using literature in mathematics.
Everyday Math training.
Follow up with instructional teachers
Grade Level classes Focus opportunities with grade level and ASD rep. Summer class
I attended the math consortium many years ago.
I don't know.
96 | P a g e •
I feel that all the professional development received in math has been presented in a way to persuade/force staff to use
EDM and since its so foreign, we have to be taught how to teach it.
• in classroom modeling, inservice training, help on line, lots of materials provided, parent in services
• Inservices
• Inservices, credit classes.
• Math Consortium New to Grade Level EDM Online Training RTI and Math Instruction
• math meetings, inservice opportunities
• Math support teachers have come into to teach a couple of lessons when I invited them in the past. Our Title 1 math
teacher is helpful.
• once year, short presentation on a staff meeting; 2 (?) years ago, a brief visit from an out of state trainer
• Personal introduction when I was hired. ASD trainings.
• Support for the materials, as well as a wonderful math support person in the school.
• The meetings we have never get beyond a certain point, so they feel worthless. Additionally, the meetings we have
seem to add more and more. For example, the district wants children to be able to apply learning to new types of math
problems. What, then, is the point of EDM's spiral if teachers at lower grades are being asked to work ahead so that
children can do this? Now, it's being asked that children gain additional instruction in algebra to prepare them for
middle/high school math. Requests keep being made, but not assistance as to where the time is to come from or the
offering of strategies as to how to make this possible. If children are having difficulty doing basic addition and
subtraction problems, what's the benefit of adding all these layers?
• Too numerous to name, however, here's a few things I've done:
Extensive reading on my own. Took two one
credit EDM courses over 10 years ago. One for EDM--Kindergarten--Penny Williams taught it. One for EDM -Third
Grade--Ruth Dene taught it.
Lots of one day professional development seminars in EDM per grade levels I was
teaching. Many EDM briefings at inservices. Worked on developing the ASD math SBAR Worked with a crossdistrict team to design assessment maps for entire third grade EDM curriculum. Worked with a cross-district team to
design performance tasks to assess third grade EDM oncepts Former Math Contact
• Trainings on EDM that's it.
• Ways to integrate the curriculum for students with disabilities, how to differentiate
• We only received EDM support recently, I believe in preparation for this survey.
• We used to have support people come and teach or give us additional support. We don't have that any more.
Grade 6 Elementary:
• -After school 21st Century program for homeowrk help and extra tutoring. -After the lesson is taught and the class is
working on the assignment, there is time for one-on-one instruction for struggling students. -Because Northwood has
an intermediate math block, 5th and 6th grade students who are so far behind in math mastery that they cannot catch
up to the rest of the class are moved to the next lower grade for math instruction (i.e., my 6th grader would go to a 5th
grade classroom for 5th grade math instruction). This has been very successful in building up students' understanding
of math concepts and preparing them to move up.
• -Small group reteaching -small group instruction and guided practice -weekly math workshop targeting lagging skills
while Igniters are gone
• After I have worked with students and they continue to not put out the effort, they are on their own. I spend most of my
time helping students that want it.. I offer tutoring after school and have had former students return to ask questions or
get extra help.
• Before/after school LOI tutoring along with more focused instruction when I teaching. Also, I try to get the parents "onboard" with me.
• Extra one-on-one help. Our building has a tutor to work with small groups.
• finding weak areas, and continually reteaching, and retesting until mastery prevails.
• I have to create a lot of my own math sheets to help these students and others.
• I have to supplement on many of the skills needed for middle school
• I provide a study group at recess (my lunch) two times a week, I make up special practice pages to give them repeated
problems to help build understanding. I give math timed tests to help students learn facts--in 6th grade :(
97 | P a g e •
I provide short quizes every 1-2 weeks on our current topics and standards. I identify struggling students and provide
immediate interventions each and every week. I have developed a peer coaching system that enables me to fully
identify and support strugglers on an immediate basis.
• I provide them with individual attention and extra lessons on content they struggle with.
• I supplement the curriculum with materials that address state/ASD standards but are more at their level.
• I supplement with other materials
• I try to spend time one-on-one to explain, sometimes partner, often pull a small group, and spend a lot of time finding
or creating drill and practice of the new topics. I spend 25 minute of my 40 minute lunch each Tuesdays and Thursdays
in "math group" where kids come with questions and we work on the white boards. It's very popular, and effective. I
also tutor a small group on Friday afternoons from 3:30 to 5.
• I tutor before school and during lunch and recess.
• I use small groups, and supplemental materials.
• I work at a slower rate, focus on more specific skills and work at a different grade level.
• Lots and lots of practice using non EDM worksheets sent home and used during "extra" math time and down time. I
work one-on-one with many of my students. I work with groups to review and relearn. I recommend tutoring for
students who are struggling.
• Lots of step by step break downs. Lots more time securing skills before moving on to others. Supplement,
supplement, supplement!
• lunch time, before, and after school support
• modifications review
• more extra practice and less lunch time for their teacher.
• More one on one time, and using more tools I have gathered over the years (outside of Everyday Math).
• offer tutoring every day after school and during study hall
• Peer help, individual help by teacher or volunteer in classroom, reduced assignments, modified assignments.
• Provide additional examples during instruction, one-on-one, after school tutoring.
• Reteaching, drill and practice, adapt assignments, peer teaching, visual aids, manipulatives etc.
• Review basic facts and language. Before school tutoring. Successmaker.
• Small group time when I can find it; and providing worksheets and instructional time focusing on basic math skills
which were not mastered in early grades. This puts the entire group on a slow track.
• Successmaker, after school turtoing
• SuccessMaker, focused math groups during lunch recess, extra math time in class
• USe additional materials to build students' concrete knowledge. Success Maker. Silver Burdette.
• very well. I offer 360 minutes weekly, where students can seek my our and get the help they need.
Elementary Combo:
• By scaffolding instruction, focusing on power lessons, preteach, and reteach.
• Daily assessment, iep goals and objectives, modified work, supplemental materials
• differentiate within the classroom, small intervention groups
• Differentiation materials, pullout program with Cook Inlet Tribal Council for second and third graders Alaska Native and
American Indian children who need extra help.
• extra support, one-on-one, extra time to complete assignments
• Focus on the GLEs.
• I am a special education teacher. I work in small groups & one-on-one with students addressing their specific,
individual education plans.
• I assess them to find out what areas they are struggling and then I address those needs by reteaching or using other
strategies to help the student.
• I believe that math facts are the door to understanding higher level math. Students must possess a facilty with the
relationship between numbers that math facts represent.
• I meet them where they are and give them tools to be able to reach the curriculum with the help of math manipulatives,
small groups and one on one
98 | P a g e •
I offer after school tutoring for free, and give them additional help in the test, they are given extra practice on concepts
until everyone passes a test.
• I pre-test and find out what there gaps are. Then I teach the gaps.
• I provide a lunch-time math lab, and tutoring after school until 5:30 pm. I incorporate teaching and reteaching basic
skills into my pacing such as adding and subtracting integers, fractions, dividing and multiplying. Topics I shouldn't
even be needing to touch in an Algebra 1 class that's how unprepared the batch of students I received this year were.
• I teach an alternate curriculum for my students who are 2 or more years behind.
• I teach them.
• intensive instruction, filling in holes in knowledge, hands-on instruction, utilizing other programs as needed for specific
students
• Mountain Math timed mult and division fact tests tutoring at lunch reteaching when necessary reduced assignments
parent tutors lower curriculum
• Remediation and supplementation with materials from sources other than EDM.
• Small group instruction and partners in math so there are capable students helping with those less capable in a fun
environment where everyone learns.
• Small group instruction in areas of struggle.
• Small group instruction, manipulatives, modification
• small group instructions, guided practice, supplemental materials, support from math tutor (mini lessons in areas where
they are deficient)
• Small group interventions and review lessons.
• Through morning work, individual help, group help, partner help, tutoring and lunch recess help.
• Try to work small groups/spend more time on that strategy
• tutors, extra work at recess
• variation, manipulative, hands-on, relative
• We go back over concepts that are not in place and spend a great deal of time on facts.
• We have put in place math interventions such as tutoring and small group instruction on math programs like EDM
online.
Grade 6 Middle School:
• additional help, math support, trans math, after school program, additional teacher, successmaker
• Additions to lessons, individual check ins and lunch time help.
• Frequent assessment. Remediation. Personal 1:1 when possible. Sending home flashcards.
• I continually embed re-teaching old material as I work my way through the curriculum. As well, I offer my weaker
students my lunch time, where we work on their weak spots. This has been helpful in rising the performances of the
students that care enough to come for help.
• independent one-on-one work time, small group instruction, after-school tutoring
• Lunch tutoring, remediation, peer tutoring.
• they can come in at lunch, they can retake mastery assignments, focus on basic skills, lots of vocab practice
• This year the very low students who had an IEP in math were able to be in a special math class that addressed their
needs. So most of the students who are struggling with the content and skills are unsuccessful due to their own lack of
focusing on their own learning either through not completing the practice (homework) or on task behavior during class.
• With adjusted lessons and supplemental materials including manipulatives.
• work one on one with students pre and post test
Grade 7:
• All students receive differentiated instruction using on-line resources and supplemental materials that are at students
ability level and work from where they are filling in holes and gaps to bring them up to grade level or a far as I can
during the year.
• basic skills need to be addressed stronger in elementary; much differentiation is needed in middle school.
• Continue to review things they should already know.
• Differentiate instruction. Use the Handbook as a base and build. Scrounge for support materials at the elementary level
that we are allowed to copy. More hand-on lessons - manipulatives, math dominoes. Memorizing Mondays where
99 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
students are required to memorize their basic facts! And fraction Friday's until the end of time! Hold students who fail a
test accountable by not letting them walk away from an F - they must keep coming in and work on the skill.
Differentiate, SuccessMaker
Drill, lunch practice, supplement work on elementary topics.
extra help, extra material to catch them up.
Extra work and practice, tutoring, help as requested
I attempt to fill in the gaps where possible, with supplemental material where ever i can get it, usually from the PreAlgebra book. The main area that needs addressed is if they are going to require 7th grade mathScape then the 6th
graders from the elementary school need to be taught Mathscape. However this is not happening. Then because the
text teaches such foreign material the 8th graders aren't prepared to re-enter a traditional math class with 9th grade
pre-Algebra. So to fix this 8th graders are completing only half of Mathscape 8. So we now have a program that
requires 6-8 completion and the 6th graders don't get any of it & 8th graders get 1/2 a year. It is completly disjointed
and it isolates the math education of our 7th graders.
I attempt to support struggling students in the classroom with remediation worksheets/personal instruction. Many times
I spend before/after school or at lunch helping struggling students.
I have students come in for lunch so that I can work with them one-on-one. I also do warmups that cover/review a lot
of the concepts they should have learned in 6th grade.
I heavily supplement MathScape in an attempt to overcome its deficiencies and to remediate students.
I provide extra help - before school, lunch & after school. Peer tutoring.
I supplement in warm ups or in lessons.
I use test scores to access strengths and weaknesses of students. I supplement and reteach skills needed to attain
some knowledge of the current concepts being taught. Some students work on a computer math program to
strengthen math skills.
In my Math 7 classes we spend most of the year on computation practice and reviewing 5th and 6th grade concepts.
This is still too high most of the time.
Incorporate it into the lessons
Independent help, differentiated problems
Individual intervention before & after school or during lunch when possible. Embed review and practice in lessons.
Work with students individually in class when possible (given 45 minute periods in middle school this is difficult)
Preferential seating with stronger students. Post my class notes and all handouts on my ASD website Provide
students will lists of websites and reference books for use at home. Below Proficient (on SBAs) are placed in Math
Support which is a remediation curriculum.
math support, extra time at lunch, additional review and practice from other resources.
Minute math
One-on -one tutoring. Supplemental material and math support class.
Posting class notes to a web site for review when doing homework and allowing students to use their own notes as
reference material on assessments.
Provide additional tutoring.
Provide help outside class.
reviewing several concrete concepts, but that takes up a lot of time, time that I should be using to teach new concepts.
work one on one with some. pair and share modify assignments.
work with them one-on-one, peer helpers, offer extra help during lunch, slow the pace of instruction
Grade 8:
•
•
•
pull students into small groups 2) cooperative groups of students of mixed abilities (high to low) 3) neediest students
should be in math support/intervention class or getting support in a resource study skills class 4) classroom is open at
lunch 5) a collaborator teacher or aide is in the class with the teacher 6) offer more challenging problems to the nonstruggling students
An incredible amount of review, patience, flexibility, understanding, and perseverance!
Because my students come to me with varying math abilities, I have to handle it on an individual basis. Sometimes I
reduce quantity of assignments, go back and reteach basic skills, use peer tutoring and cooperative groups, to name a
few strategies.
100 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Middle Combo:
•
•
•
•
No Designation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
before/after school help; lunch tutoring; suggestion to use online quizzes and materials; in class review of math
basics
DAILY
extra support after school and at lunch I also do practice questions during class.
extra time/help slower pace Math support
I call home and offer my time for extra help.
I continually review older math concepts while we continue through the new material. I also bring in skill review to help
support the new material.
I offer extra help at lunch and after school. I try to include the use of manipulatives whenever possible to help students
develop concrete pictures of the math. I try to connect the current learning to previous learning & experiences. I
recommend math support for those who I notice need an intervention approach.
I stop what I am suppose to teach and spend several months teaching basic skils: fractions, decimals, place value,
measurements, exponents.
More practice of basic skills
No calculator use, practice work on basics, math support class.
Offer extra help outside of class and encouragement.
peer tutoring, one on one at lunch, before and after school.
Reteach, interactive reinforcement lessons, and encouraging students to practice daily.
Reteaching and tutoring at lunch, before or after school.
Show them how to access support online. Allow them to come in for help during lunch and after school. Some
differentiated instruction, with additional practice of specific concepts.
slowing the pace giving less homework reviewing more in class together
Target students weaknesses by strands and address those weaknesses before moving into the 7th grade
GLE/standard.
Through Individualized differentiated instruction and small-group instruction. Providing struggling students with
supplementary practice materials and showing them online practices.
Trans Math offers a lot of differentiating instruction. I am able to have the students that are caught up work on
reinforcement and pull the struggling and give the instruction in an even smaller group or 1:1.
Warm ups reteach knowledge they should already know. Integrate mini lessons into new material
Warm Ups, daily practice
Warm-up problems on a daily basis that deal with performing arithmetic operations with rational numbers. Practice
makes perfect. I also open my room for tutoring before school, during lunch, and after school.
I bring in whatever I can to help them to understand the concepts they need to understand, but often it's the behavior
that has to be addressed first.
Lots of review, practice, extra time to take assessments, encourage homework to be done as an integral part of the
overall grade
use alternate materials to fill the gaps
Working these skills into my daily lessons.
Differentiating lessons, lots of assessment, dovetailing with alternate curriculums, as necessary.
Differentiation, engagement, set attainable, challenging goals for each student.
Encouraging more participation, one-on-one help whenever possible, pairing them with a classmate, slowing down the
lesson when necessary and giving more examples and practice problems.
Every day
I am now a tutor. I give students more of a "relationship" approach to math. how it is used, patterns we can find in the
systems. I make it visual in different ways so kids can see the break down of steps. and understand each step
I am trying to train myself and find materials so I can develop lessons that are based on edm strategies and
vocabulary. I don't have the materials yet, but am trying to extrapolate.
101 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
I do my best to individualize by allowing students to take more time to learn a concept when needed, allow use of notes
and textbooks on most assessments, provide opportunities to improve quiz/test grades, provide one-on-one instruction
as much as possible during the class period, encourage peers to assist one another during work time, offer additional
help outside of class, encourage them for work well done to boost their confidence
I make accommodations: they receive small-group instruction after the lesson based upon the the skill or concept with
which they are struggling. I adjust the pacing of lessons if most students need to stay with a concept longer.
Struggling students only complete certain boxes on Math Boxes pages.
I meet with them in small group and individually after the lesson is presented. We also have "lunch club" for kids who
need help in math.
I use a variety of research-based best practice instructional strategies and materials to supplement the core Saxon
Math curriculum.
I use the second and third grade curriculum for both grade levels. The second grade lessons are good for the
struggling third graders, and the third grade lessons are good for the advanced second graders.
Individual tutoring, small group instruction.
individualized program, Lots of manipulatives
individually based from pre assessment to drive instruction
its very difficult to meet with various levels which is what I would like. Right now it's pretty much sink or swim
Math club after schools 1x wk interventions inside the room
Math clubs before school, small group, online math games and parents support.
modify
modify and pull small group when I can
must go back and re-teach skills not previously mastered
one on one instruction
one on one support help when possible. Working with peers. games.
Practice sheets that I create
reteach and review
Reteaching previous concepts, and Math Support classes. Available at lunchtime, before and after school help as
students need it.
Small group interventions, mentor student's that have the concept down firm, and high school helpers to tutor students
that are struggling with basic concepts.
Small groups of students are given more layers of support. They are given additional time and attention by their
classroom teacher, Title I support, and possibly, After School program teacher support.
Supplemental materials, repetition of skills, continued review
They need to learn the basics BEFORE they move on. We require our student to master the material at 80% before
moving on. No C's or D's here!
time with international tutor in small group
Tutoring, extra time practicing, supplemental work, games.
Use Connecting Worlds.
We are a "Whole group instruction" school. Resource students go to Resource if qualifying for math.
Work in all groups and use of computer programs (skills Alaska and successmaker)
What supports for math instruction in the classroom have you received?
Kindergarten:
•
•
•
•
•
•
EDM training
EDM trainings
getting on EDM
Grade level meetings
Hands on items
I don't feel I need any.
102 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
I received new manipulatives at the beginning of the year.
Ideas on different ways to present lessons or modify the lesson.
In the past, we had a math expert from the district to come do lessons in class and trainings. That has changed now
with budget and position shifts.
Introduction to EDM online and a math coach offered to come to the class to model a lesson.
K found out about a "Math Support Person" at the end of last year. When I e-mailed that person this year, I found out
our building no longer has a Math Support Person. Our computer support, JoAnne Osbourne was helpful in setting up
our Everyday Math online.
Lessons taught by the math coaches for me to observe.
Math specialist comes to school every now and then. She have NEVER stepped into my classroom.
model lessons
N/A
none
None
None in several years
None recentlyl
None this year
Noted above ;-) They will offer every any level support that is requested from their department.
Once this year our district math support person spent 45 minutes with my grade level. In previous years it was about
the same.
One training on how to use the new EDM materials
Our math coach came once in 2009 and taught a lesson.
Penny Williams has come in to teach lessons and we have had trainings with EDM for our staff.
some group trainings (whole staff)
STEM liaison, Teacher's Aide.
supports with preparing math game materials and tech support for the online Everyday Math
The math support coaches come to school on days that I am not in the classroom.
Title I teacher support
Tools needed for lessons have been provided. For instance Pattern Block Templates.
Grade 1:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
-how to use EDM online games
0
1 professional development
A short time with STEM person to go over mid-year benchmark results. She helps get EDM computer passwords for
kids setup.
As I stated before, Mary Murphy has taught model lessons in my room. She was fabulous, I learned so much from her
and the notes I took while she was teaching.
Assessment analysis Prep games Model lessons Random teaching tidbits at site based meetings
Assessment assistance, discussing certain lessons
Classes, teacher leaders offering to do lessons, time to make materials and putting stickers of GLE's in the teacher
manual.
Collaborative meetings
Don't know who they are....
ELL Tutors
half hour meeting with math support teacher; 2 staff meetings supposedly covering math in the classroom
Hands on materials
I answered this already. I would like to comment on the above question about enjoying teaching math. I very much
enjoy teaching math when I am working with a program that makes sense.
I hardly ever see our math coach.
I have a TA
103 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
I haven't need any support as I don't have trouble teaching the concepts. What I do have to work on is teaching my
students who do not have number sense.
I've had the coach model lessons for me. I've inquired about weekly math quizes with very little help.
Iam told when they visit our building, though I have never asked for help. I think they should come to our staff
meetings, or in-service.....
In-school training, TA and Indian Ed support
In-service support for checking out new or revised resources (i.e., EDM On-line), assessment updates and analysis.
inservice trainings, lesson ideas, website info.
Inservices
Materials and opportunities to watch lessons modeled If I had not been there to handle discipline the lessons would
not have been successful.
Math Specialist Meetings
Meetings to discuss mid-year scores on assessment
meetings with our support coaches
model lessons by math support teachers
none
None
none in the last 4 years
none this year
None this year. Have worked on the Saxon Mid-Year benchmark assessment team. I know my coaches are available
and knowledgeable if I should need them.
not much of any, in the past few years
Other teachers and I discussing/ questing. I really don't need much support for teaching 1st grade math. Math is my
strongest content area.
Penny Williams
Penny Williams has presented a lesson in the classroom.
Some from the math experts in the past-but not this year
The offer to come in and teach a lesson.
Title 1 coach and STEM teacher trainings
Training and analyzing mid year math benchmarks.
visits to the school from the math expert, observation of lessons taught by the math expert, grade level meetings with
the math expert
We had a data meeting after of mid-year benchmark with a math "coach".
when available we have a good support person but she does not seem to have enough time to support us regularly. I
would like to see her monthly
Grade 2:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Aide time.
Clarification of methods Ideas on how to reteach a lesson/concept
Five years ago a math specialist came in and taught a math lesson on counting back change. Great lesson.
From the ASD Math support person.
Help as requested.
help with assessment assistant, a lot of data analysis
I am currently enrolled in the mentor program through ASD and I sign up Penny Williams in the classroom as much as
possible.
I have had little support other than Penny Williams. I am missing supplies that I need to teach with that I once had.
Since our math instruction position has been lost this year we have had no support in this area overall up until Penny
came in Feb.
I have taken Everyday classes at the Summer Academy.
inservice noted above/pacing chart
Just what is part of Saxon.
104 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Last year one of the math coaches came to my class and modeled a lesson.
lesson modeling, questions answered
Mary Hoppas is at our beck and call for questions and help.
Math support personnel come to our school for inservices and staff meetings.
Meetings with EDM folks from main office, inservice trainings, etc.
Modeled a lesson in the classroom, Title I teacher support, informal conversations with other teachers on how to
improve lessons.
None
None this year. In the past, a coach came and taught a lesson. Although, students enjoy a new voice it doesn't really
help me teach the same lesson when it doesn't get taught again for another year.
None, other than my own research and attempts to help the students.
none. the one time that I asked for help this eyar I was instructed that everyday math games online might not be taking
place. When they did become a go I did not receive any support and luckily I had a fantastic parent take the time to set
it all up and transfer student names,
offers to help are given often
Once a math support teacher taught a lesson - it did not go well.
online, pacing chart, GLE's. This year I have most of the materials.
Our math support person comes to our school to have grade level meetings and we are provided with a sub for our
meetings.
Penny Williams is the math coach for our school.
questions answered
Saxon rep. many years ago offered training and discussions.
Saxon reps came several years ago. They were great...our school math coaches seem to be most familiar with EDM.
stem support from Penny Williams, colleague support through staff mtg. discussions
supply of no. cards,etc.
Support from other grade level teachers.
Teacher expert visit; staff meeting trainings
The other Math 2 teachers.
They try.
training and data review at grade level meetings
twice a year visit from a district math specialist- I do not think there is an in house math support person at my school, I
do not know about this for certain.
We had benchmark mid year spread sheet follow up with everyday math and tech support lessons today.
When our math resource person came, I was absent. I guess it would be good to know what help is available. In the
past, I've received excellent help from math resource specialists. Since I've started EDM, my hands have been full.
Grade 3:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Almost none. We've had two sessions with our math coach.
answered this already above
As I have stated earlier, I feel like our math support staff spends more time advocating for EDM, rather than help me
help students achieve needed math concepts.
Bilingual aides, SmartBoard, math kits, math games, professional development, a strong grade-level team
Collabrative meetings to discuss quartly reviews
Continually support from the math coach, as well as fellow teachers.
demonstration lessons.
edm games online we went over mid-year tests
EDM Online, Data Review on mid-year assessments.
EDM training
Everyday math training
I could coach others---I am an expert.
105 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
I don't really need the support for someone to come in and show me what to do. I have always had a way of teaching
since I was in 3rd grade to teach my fellow classmates or students how to figure out the problem. I use my smart
board, EDM math games online with the students, plus other aides to help my students with concepts including music.
I had professional development, but received no support in the classroom. I didn't even know where all my materials
were or what I should have until I went to the training.
I have received minimal support in math instruction.
I've been told that we don't have one this year.
ideas for lessons, templates
In my opinion, the best support I could have would be a reasonably qualified adult assistant, not just in math but in
reading and writing as well.
Just email conversations and some trainings
Just inservices and instructions on how to find resources on the ASD website.
Lesson modeling; help constructing math games
Mary Murphy--last year
materials
Math Rep sends information when I request it
math specialist
Math support people have modeled lessons in the past.
None
Offers are made for our math support teachers to come in and teach lessons.
OK, now the survey is getting too long. You've lost my interest. The ASD math person for our school stops by a few
times a year. I can ask our Title 1 math teacher for help.
Penny Williams is an incredible asset!
Visiting Math Specialist demoing lessons or visiting with me to suggest alternatives to lessons.
We don't have a math person this year.
Grade 4:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
a lesson or two taught a few years back, I have provided my own manipulatives for the most part, and supplemental
materials as I see the need. Calculators were bought for my class.
Answers to my questions. The mid year assessment.
edm online, edm game kit for 4-6- too difficult for my students
Help with EDM resources
How to use EDM in a combo setting.
I have daily support from our Title I math teacher and grade level supports.
I have had 3 visits in the past 9 years.
I have had a specialist come into my room and model lessons.
I have not had any math support this year. However, I haven't asked.
I have watched a math specialist come into a room and teach math lessons to model for teachers.
I received new materials to use with EDM about a year ago.
materials
No support has happened within my classroom directly.
none
None from ASD math coaches. It seems they only want to help schools using EDM.
Penny Williams came to my room a few times last year.
Penny Williams was amazing and always on hand if we needed her help or input.
Please see entry above regarding assessment strategies and SBAR
Presentation of lessons by so-called teacher experts and university math personnel. (For the benefit of an intern
teacher working in my classroom.) It was a joke. Both of the so-called expert guest teachers could not maintain
control of the class and the lessons were boring and droned on and on. Kids were very bored and asked us afterwards
if they ever had to have them come into class again.
106 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
previous to this year we had a support teacher. Other than that I have pursued my own classes, as needed to advance
on the salary scale or for recertification.
Professional Everyday Math training session for grade level; training on Assessment Assistant.
Supplemental ideas, going over Mid-year assessments to help instruction
They keep sending disks for our tech to load on our server, but they never make it there. Every once in a while I might
get something in my box, but generally its a paper telling me I have to test my students and report back to the math
department.
Training. Nothing else.
Way back when Patty Kennedy came in and taught a decimal lesson. I don't think the children grasped the concept. It
was on grade level but above their understanding.
We went over how students did on the Mid year assessment in order to know what GLE's to focus on.
Went over mid-year assessment data.
Grade 5:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
? I feel I do not need support.
A few lessons taught by specialists. Meetings with specialists to go over data and to preach about how fantastic EDM
is.
A specialist visited my classroom to teach a lesson on multiplication facts. Others have helped me and other teachers
to practice the games and skills.
Administrative support
Aids to help struggling students.
handouts and occasional on site professional development sessions.
I feel resistance from up above to emphasize practicing Math facts regularly.
I have received a whole lot of papers (the pacing guide, the GLE chart) and the computer programs.
I have received wxtra supplies such as: calculators, templates, extra journals and SRB's. I have had a math support
teacher teach lessons in the class, as well.
I have the materials I need.
I'm not thrilled with our current math coach, but Penny Williams was fantastic!
Last year I had an hour long meeting with a math coach which was not very helpful. I felt like I was meeting with a
representative of EDM sales who had the text, and not the students, in her best interest.
Lesson modeling. Multiplication skill lessons.
manipulatives, assessment workshops, training
Manipulatives.
math coach teaches targeted lessons, looks at data, gives advice based on data
Modeling Resources In/during class assistance Data analyzed
none
None
None in the classroom, but I have attended classes outside of the school.
none lately...haven't asked
Our Math Site Coordinator has made sure that I have all the materials I need. She works with a group of 6 students
each day to ensure that the concepts taught in class are truly being learned and understood.
Penny Williams has always been willing, and more than able to support our staff and students in any way requested.
She also trains us proactively where applicable.
Penny Williams has taught lessons in my classroom. I have an ELL tutor in my classroom daily.
resources
Review of pacing charts, dissemination of current material and updates, lesson ideas
Reviewing the data from Midyear Assessment
Text book
The bilingual tutor comes into the classroom for a short amount of time everyday to give support to anyone who needs
it.
The math expert and Erika Ellers
107 | P a g e • tutoring groups
• Two people who are able to offer tutoring help to students.
• years of experience
Grade 6 Elementary:
• annual meetings
• Coaching.
• Help with focusing on what aligns with GLEs. Extra support materials. Analyzing data.
• i am aware that there are district employees willing to help out - i don't need them
• I have "had" coaches available up until this present year.
• I have had math support teacher come to my class and teach a lesson
• I have mostly received support from one grade level colleague.
• Making of the games and review of the assessments
• Materials are available. The EDM Assistant is not user friendly, although I haven't tried it in a while. Penny Wiliams
has shared lessons and expertise.
• Math department demonstration lessons
• none
• None
• none directly
• None this year due to the elimination of math support teachers in the District
• None.
• ONe mtg this year.
• Penny Williams was our coach last year and she was excellent. She answered all of my emails almost instantly.
Unfortunately she is not assigned to our school this year. I have received a lot of support over the years from various
colleagues.
• Penny Williams, math expert, used to come in and teach some awesome lessons. Not any more. boo hoo
• Support from our Special Ed staff, bilingual tutor, and fellow teachers.
• Training classes, but not in last few years.
• Very little. The best is professional development classes that focus on mathematical ideas and pedagogy. I do not
want or need help w/ curriculum navigation.
Elementary Combo:
• Analyzing weak areas for our school on SBA's and using focus lessons to improve these areas.
• Ann Ibele can to speak to us about the mid year bench mark assessment. We reviewed the test to provide information
as to any changes our school would like to make on the test to make it better fit the scope and sequence of
Montessori.
• Elementary Special Education Department has offered several trainings, workshops,and materials for their teachers.
Teaching in a structured learning classroom we were designated Saxon materials for our classrooms. I really enjoy
using the Saxon materials.
• Focus lessons for the areas where our school was weak on the Benchmark and SBA tests.
• I've been given more materials to try to fit in.
• I've had offer of help.
• Jody Solmonson, our school math contact is awesome and a wonderful resource. I have yet to see our district math
support teacher. I have never seen her in our building and she never has contacted me. I have asked her for a few
things and she has gotten them for me.
• math tutor works with struggling students
• Meetings with the Math Specialists and New to Grade Level Everyday Math Trainings.
• model lessons, training, guidance for supporting students
• Mrs. Williams is a fantastic resource and willing to help with anything and everything math related!
• My first year in ASD there was a math specialist who worked with us even though we were using Investigations. I
haven't had supports since.
• None
108 | P a g e •
•
none, this year
Nothing specifically for math this year, it has all been SIPS and Phonics training and incorporating more writing into
math.
• Only the classes or trainings I have paid for or sought out myself.
• other colleagues in my building
• Several materials that support the curriculum (i.e. calculators, yardsticks, dice, templates etc.) Penny always offers to
come in and help teach a lesson.
• some help with specific lessons/strands
• the mid -year test, and I had math support help me figure out what my students needed for additional support
• The special education department has trained me in several math programs, given my class materials, and provided
ongoing assistance from Teacher Consultants.
• This year we haven't seen a math coach. In the past, Penny Williams has been very accessible.
• Trainings and materials.
• We had someone come out to show us more about EDM online; however I am not able to easily access it from my
desktop.
• We have a math specialists that supports our program and will teach any skill. She will also observe us teach and give
us stragedies to help assist us.
Grade 6 Middle School:
• co-teacher, computer lab time, math teacher meetings
• Grade level STEM meetings Dept. Meetings
• I had a math mentor my first year of teaching. I also received some help my first year from our math chair.
• Inservice trainings
• Just training that goes with the curriculum
• Lesson support and some power point lessons. Ideas for manipulatives.
• One-on-one conferences with math support teachers and professional development
• Professional trainings at ASD on curriculum and support curriculum.
• technology resources
Grade 7:
• Cohort trainings and requests to share ideas to supplement lessons. Teachers collaborate ideas and lessons for
supplementing.
• I receive support from the math department heads in the building. 2) Quarterly training at ASD building.
• Assistance in teaching some technology applications and a project that I was unfamiliar with.
• Cohort trainings designed to explain away the deficiencies within MathScape, or attempt to offer major "supplements"
to improve MathScape's inability to meet state standards.
• collegial support
• Extra resources, clickers for promethean, training, collaborative team meetings
• Help from colleagues.
• I have been given the opportunity to have a math coach come into my classroom and teach a lesson. I have not had
the time to arrange this, but plan on it.
• I have not asked for much recently. When I started teaching (first in elementary & then transferred to middle) I was able
to have the math teacher experts (as they were called then) come in and help me figure out the best ways to
implement lessons.
• I've been yelled at in a meeting for trying to meet the needs of my students.
• Jessica has given great advice and has come in and supported many lessons and activities in my room and for my
team.
• lesson plans, new ideas
• Math dept chair, her help has been critical to my teaching this year
• Minimal. A couple trainings from teacher expert. In-house math chair usually available for collaboration.
• multiple Mathscape trainings, a Pre-Algebra/Algebra training, Mathematics Navigator training, MMA support disk with
supplemental activities and ideas, MathCounts supplemental training to help fill inadequacies of Mathscape.
109 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
My department chair is always available and shares all materials and lessons.
None really.
None....
Promethean board, tablet, books,
Support materials created by teachers on their own time to help teach mathScapes. Ideas on how to understand &
teach the MathScape text.
The district offers but I never think about calling anyone over.
The supports we have received are based on supplementing materials.
this year - none
training and reference materials
training in the math book by the company
Grade 8:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Middle Combo:
•
•
•
No Designation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
teachers at our school collaborate daily and share lessons and materials 2) ASD quarterly trainings (most not useful)
3) wiki sharing
Besides transmath training, none.
General Ed teachers are very supportive
half day training to support a curriculum which doesn't teach the students the skills to ready them for algebra
I have received support in math 8 using the TI -84 and the motion detectors.
I receive materials and information from my department chair and other teachers in the building.
I've had some other teachers as guests in my classroom, teaching specific lessons and concepts with activities.
Indian ed, special ed, and ELL.
Inservice on tools for the textbook
Jessica is always available to help and I talk with teachers in my building
Math Level Meetings
mentor (Sandy Schoff) and help with lesson planning from Mrs. Erb, and attendance to workshops with the new
textbooks.
Mentoring, co-teaching, and LOTS of ideas to use in my classroom.
Observations and having a math support specialist come teach a class in my room.
Professional Development trainings, colleague observations.
Resources, modeled lessons, ideas for activities, instruction on best practices
Text books, pacing guides, practice lessons in training settings,
training for online materials
Trainings for the Trans Math curriculum.
When I first came to my school, I got virtually no support from the math expert. I did get support from other math
teachers at my school.
I went to a two-day instruction by industry rep at the beginning of the school year.
None
Training on the program that I am using. My training in math came from another district and is not being utilized in
special education.
availability of the math specialist
Grade level training, EDM online
I have spoken with math coaches, but have not received specific support given my special population and the alternate
curriculum.
I observed a regular ed math class.
I saw a coach once 2 years ago and she gave me excellent one on one assistance. (Ann)
I use my colleagues
Ideas to teach lessons. Project based learning ideas.
Looked at data from mid-year benchmark
110 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Math Department Meetings with discussion and instruction Independent study
n/a
none
None
NONE
None, but I haven't asked.
Nothing this school year.
Number Worlds The offer to take classes
Opportunities for training, and support from the math curricular experts.
Peer support is the most help.
STEM twice a year
support that is offered includes modeling lessons, seeking out resources, creating resources for the WIKI, providing
opportunities to collaborate with colleagues, identifying and making available supplementary resources
The math support are always available to help, but I have not felt the need to have them in the classroom.
Occasionally, I will email with a question.
We had classroom modeling lessons, as well as collaborative meetings and extra resources provided, when our math
specialist was Mary Murphy.
We looked at the mid-year test result sheets
How does your principal support the math program at your school?
Kindergarten:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
?
.....
allows group training during inservice and/or staff meetings
Allows time for discussions about math at staff meetings. Allows for collaboration among staff members. Invites
experts in to train. Allows coaches to come and assist in the classrooms. Gives sub time when needed for new
teachers or struggling teachers to receive help.
As far as I know.
Correspondence with Title I staff
Encouraging the math committee to come up with ideas to improve math skills across the grade level.
He comes into my classroom on a regular, informal basis to watch the students involved in Math explorations and
playing EDM games. We have regular conversations about progress and ideas and innovations in the classroom. He
also encourages tutoring and other avenues to improve student achievement.
I have no idea.
I'm not sure.
If we ask for help she helps us find a resource.
none
Not sure.
Providing manipulatives. Supporting math night. Arranging for coaches to be in the building.
She asked us at the end of last year if there were any manipulative needs for our team.
She bought all K teachers a literature box that related to math. And she bought the K teachers some much needed
math manipulatives.
She encourages it and opens up our school to all of the available help. We also got the PTA to pay for tutoring for
struggling students.
She makes sure I have what I need to teach math.
She makes sure we have the EDM curriculum.
She supports.
STEM coordination, staff meeting agenda items
Strongly supportive!
111 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
Tries to bring in help when we need/ask for it and makes sure we all know and understand the school goal as well as
having what we need to support the goal.
We have a school wide math concept to be taught once a month.
We have met a number of times to express concerns that EDM was not meeting the needs of our students. He
essentially told us that although the optional program could teach whatever they choose, the neighborhood teachers
are required to teach EDM.
yes
Yes
Grade 1:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
-sets up trainings when needed
buys the materials
By allowing time for math in the schedule - first grade has math at the same time.
By allowing us to supplement as needed.
By making sure we have all the materials we need
Coordinates math professional development
Doesn't do much.
During grade level planning, she periodically has us discuss our math assessments, etc.
Encourages cooperative work within the program, buys/checks materials for use, seeks intervention support (PALS),
supports after-school tutoring for SES kids.
encouraging of us having the math expert teach sample lessons in our class, facilitates grade level meetings with the
math expert, invites the math experts to present at staff meetings
ensures we have the materials necessary to implement the core program, reviews and purchases supplemental math
intervention programs to provide more targeted skill instruction for struggling students, provides afterschool tutoring,
provides monthly time to review math performance data, has us utilize monthly math progress monitoring probes,
provides leadership team members with training to implement intervention programs for math, supports staff training on
best practices in math instruction
extra books
gives us time to meet with grade level partners, support coaches
good
Good support
He is very supportive and encourages us to teach EDM.
He makes sure we have the materials we need and expects us to use the curriculum.
He reminds us of options available for professional support.
It is a school goal to improve our math skills, he plans a math/science night for parents, etc
Math goals- last year for school wide
Monthly math focus, on-going professional development
Mr. Garrity makes sure we have the books and materials we need. He observes classrooms and shares ideas with
staff of ways to use the new Promethean boards. He is very supportive.
My principal supports the math program at my school by understanding that students need to be taught using the
gradual release of responsibility. We have the room to teach students at their skill level.
Our principal is very
supported in regard to math instruction and would find a way to support our math instruction if we needed further
resources or needs.
Not sure?
nothing in particular. he's new and he doesn't really know what he's doing. curriculum is a low priority in his life right
now.
Observations with critiques, extra help with any problems, tutoring offers
Our principal is good with finding us the funding to get the manipulatives that we need to fully use the program.
providing progress monitoring time for analysis of math scores and team planning.
Purchases necessary materials
She does everything she can to support our need for supplemental materials.
112 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
She encourages us to tweak things to meet our students needs but she definitely supports the program.
she encourages us to use loys of drill and practice in addition to EDM and to differentiate our instruction for our
students.
She expects us to teach, following the pacing guide
she gave us time before school, instead of going to a staff meeting, to input the data from the mid-term assessment
She has grade level meetings on mid year and end of the year benchmarks.
She is a strong believer in Saxon math and the way we, as a staff, implement it.
She is very receptive to Math/Science/Reading support.
She makes sure we have all the manipulatives and materials we need.
She supports the district on the EDM even though it is clear none of her staff like EDM.
team level planning, math committee to help implement school goals problem-assigned team members have no
choice of committee assignment
There is a Title 1 Coach, asks if supplies are needed and tries to get them
Trust in my competence to teach curriculum based on the needs of my students.
unknown.
Very supportive
We always have a school improvement goal for math. She encourages us to contact our math suport team for help.
We regularly discuss our successes and challenges in math. We are always encouraged to include a math component
that focusses on our goal for a science and math night in conjunction with our science fair.
We have had a math goal for the last several years, math tutoring in the Fall, a 2nd round of math focused on working
outside the box in the Spring, parent math night for 1st/2nd grade parents in the Fall.
yes
Yes!
Grade 2:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
?
Allows for ability grouping which relies on scheduling preferences
asks what they can do
Dont know. I believe so.
encourages use of stem coordinator
Excellent
Expects and encourages use of the designated curriculum.
gives us time at grade level meetings to train/discuss math
Has a yearly math and science night. Cross grade level meetings more than quarterly. Title I math position to help a
small group of students.
He has had Penny Williams lead mini-workshops during three staff meetings this year.
He is very supportive of our math program.
He supports the program.
Listens better than previous principals to our many frustrations with EDM curr.
materials
Math blocking
Minimal
New materials purchased; arranging trainings at staff meetings
not sure
Not sure.
Provides us with materials that we need
Providing materials that we need.
Providing most of the materials, time to meet with colleagues to review our data, and providing school wide data.
Purchasing materials and refilling kits. Having the whole school use the same program.
Requires to teach with fidelity, provides materials needed, trains us or brings in training on technology and math.
113 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Sets up time to visit with the district specialist and discusses at staff meetings how to better utilize the tools we have
available- such as EDM online and perhaps math tutors if funding is available
She asks us to use it.
She doesn't
She expects teachers to teach the curriculum and provides ideas and suggestions for teaching difficult lessons.
she helps in the classroom and teaches small groups
She invited our specialist to the building more than once, but I've missed the visits due to illness or training. She
provides manipulatives and is responsive if I ask for something.
She is very supportive and encourages us to attend any and all programs that ASD offers. She is also very
encouraging of having the math specialists coming into each of our classrooms and collaborating with us.
She supports it.
Supports it, but it is not mandated...leaves it up to our professional opinion.
The above answer: she invites our math support teacher to come to our school twice a year.
We had benchmark mid year spread sheet follow up with everyday math and tech support lessons today.
We have math goals in our plan. We have shared what we do in staff meetings with our colleagues.
We will be having someone from the Math Dept. talk to us as a follow-up meeting that helped us make use of the EDM
website, etc.
What ever we need all we have to do is ask.(classes, help, etc.)
Grade 3:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Brings in Math support twice a year to review student assessment
By buying stuff we ask for.
Check in, give suggestions on adapting curriculm
Encourages EDM
Encourages the use of the curriculum and supplemental materials necessary.
Every supportive. She is willing to help if I need help or if anyone else does. For math, I am fine.
Extra technology
Fine.
He is open to input, and will support innovative ideas.
He listens.
He tries to ensure fidelity of the program.
I do not feel supported by the principal at this school.
I don't know.
I have no idea.
Invites math support people to our faculty meetings.
math focus friday once a month, family math night
Math game days
observations, professional development, collaboration
Requires mid year assessment, arranges tutoring when funds available
She does whatever she can to meet our needs- however- it is slow-going. She always has to wait because the asd
policies and grant money is always tied up. Our tutoring afterschool program is still waiting for funds and it is almost 4th
quarter.
She gets us everything and every expert we need; always asking what else we need and making sure we are doing
what we are supposed to do in a positively supportive and helpful way.
She has most of the teachers use everyday math
She supports our program.
strongly
Supplies necessary workbooks, encourages games and manipulatives to be used.
Title 1 support with small groups; Math coach presentations ate staff meetings, purchase of math vocabulary readers
Totally supports EDM.
We are doing a math night at our school.
114 | P a g e •
•
Well
Yes
•
•
•
•
?
??
by expecting that we send parent letters home; family math night; GLEs worked toward at each grade level.
He knows that SAXON MATH is a much stronger program than EDM and supports us through purchasing SAXON
materials and training occasionally.
He provides training when available. He is very supportive of the processes of the curriculum and provides a family
training night.
I think he does it cause he has to. Very few teachers in my building like our math program. He hears us complain quite
often and I think he sees the pitfalls of the program.
My principal is very supportive. We are having a Math Night at our school this month were parents and students can
attend to experience what is being taught int he classrooms. My principal is supportive in seeing that we have the
materials we need. She helps to address our concerns.
not sure
Our Math program is supported by our principal by allowing the blocking to occur. Also by ordering supplies and new
textbooks when necessary.
Our principal is extremely supportive of the staff.
Our principal strongly suggested I attend the new to grade level Every Day Math two half day instruction. She has
brought in a math expert from the school district to speak to us at a staff meeting and for grade level meeting.
Provides time for meetings
purchases texts, workbooks, and manipulatives needed
She encourages the math program
She ensures that we are teaching the Everyday Math curriculum.
She gives us ideas regarding how to best differentiate and comes in to observe lessons and give advice.
She is very supportive of the math program.
She listen to my concerns
Supports meetings with district math professionals
Tells me to use it if I can and don't if I can't.
Tries to secure whatever materials are needed for effective instruction. Has had STEM personnel come to staff
meetings and be available in the building for individualized assistance of staff.
Very supportive.
We have grade level planning meetings
Yes
Grade 4:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Grade 5:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
?
? I feel I do not need support.
100%
allows time for math coach to visit
by providing math consultants to support; allows us to go to trainings as needed
differentiation
Encourages me to find the materials and answers I need, and then purchases materials I need.
Family math night, block math scheduling, grade level planning time
Having people provide extra services when available
He makes sure we have the materials and training that are available.
He completely and consistently supports any request teachers have for development, and is always receptive to new
ideas to help our students. He facilitated a school-wide before school math clinic for struggling students.
He is very supportive as a new principal to our school.
115 | P a g e •
•
Inservices
My principal makes sure we have all the materials needed. He also makes sure that we have a blocked 60 minutes
every day.
• Not sure.
• not to my knowledge
• Our principal is willing to help use purchase more manipulatives to teach the program, but disagrees with our feeling
that the program is not adequate in preparing our students for the next grade level.
• Our principal makes sure that we have all the materials necessary to properly implement the Math program.
• Requires data review In-house trainings Observations during class
• Sends a math support teacher to go over data with us.
• She buys the material we need each year.
• She helps out where ever she can.
• She is very supportive of whatever we need to do to help struggling students- small groups, tutoring, etc.
• She is willing to discuss issues as needed and get us manipulatives we need.
• She reviews data with us, encourages our ideas to make the program successful.
• She tells us to follow the curriculum, which seems to be the district view.
• The principal is not currently familiar with the math program, so it makes it difficult for her to support something she is
unaware of.
• very supportive
• very well
• We have a math goal each year. We have monthly data meetings in which we discuss test scores, SBA data, and midyear assessment scores.
• We have a new principal this year learning the program but has had other items on her plate requiring more time so
hasn't been able to be as supportive as would like.
• We have grade level math meetings to plan and discuss progress, ideas, and plan.
• Whatever we need.
• yes
• Yes
• Yes, it is currently the same for most, if not all elementary schools.
Grade 6 Elementary:
• -acquisition of computer programs -LOI tutoring
• ?- New principal. I haven't really seen anything yet.
• As best she can.
• By being sympathetic to whatever needs I might need, and to always come up with possible/reasonable ways to
alleviate problem.
• Computer programs, grade level meetings
• Encourages the staff to follow the rigorous pacing guide!
• Gives us anything we need, mostly an ear.
• He is all for it.
• He provides some extra training and gives his input when he is observing teachers.
• He supports students in every way and also encourages data-driven instruction.
• I don't believe she has taught EDM, but perhaps she has. She thinks it's a good program and encourages to think so
too. She recognizes that it is not a good fit for all students.
• makes sure we have everything that we need
• No.
• Not sure
• Not sure.
• Our principal strongly supports our program by ensuring that we have sufficient materials for every class and all
students, encouraging us to participate in the Math Derby, protecting our use of the Saxon program versus the district's
inane use of EDM.
116 | P a g e •
•
•
•
She does not.
She gets me the thing I need
She hasn't asked.
She is very supportive and helpful. She ensures that EDM is being taught. We have a school math night during our
science fair. We also have given parents passwords to the computer games online.
• She supports the teachers, regardless of subject.
• The principal this year has been more supportive in sending information my way. He is also getting Promethean
boards installed in our classrooms which I believe will help a lot. Last year's principal had more of a "sink or swim"
attitude.
Elementary Combo:
• Always open to hearing what we need to help make the math curriculum successful and advocate for us.
• Asks, checks in with me, supportive when needed
• collaboration time with other staff, bringing in Saxon people
• He offers help.
• He would assist when asked
• highly
• no comment
• Our principal purchases materials which we need and helps to schedule our math support person to come to faculty
meetings and to do class demonstration lessons.
• Provides money to order the materials and supports a math/science night.
• Sharing ideas and mini trainings on math and EDM online
• She is very supportive, and understands our frustration, but there is really no way to track student progress for RTI.
• she provides dedicated support time for every classroom
• She supports our use of alternate curriculum
• The principal is very supportive of the math materials used in our structured learning classrooms.
• Through monthly grade level planning meetings.
• unknown
• Very encouraging.
• Very supportive and gets us assistance where needed.
• We have a collaboration meeting focusing on math once or twice a year.
• We have a new principal in our building who has a strong math background with emphasis on manipulatives. This year
she is giving support by observing and learning what we do. She is a good listener and a strong supporter of positive
student outcomes. She is helping us gather and evaluate data to better meet the needs of our students.
• We have set up a tutoring program and STEM related trainings and activities.
• Will pursue assistance for teachers in any way if she is asked to help.
• Yes, however they do not get to swing the focus of the district to support math so currently reading and writing is the
focus.
• Yes. He is knowledgable about the program and the pieces necessary to support the curriculum. He also checks
about scheduling for teaching the programs.
Grade 6 Middle School:
• By being interested in the questions of this survey.
• Locks the manipulatives/book room and provides no inventory. Makes me guess what there is for me to use with
students outside of my classroom inventory. Allows monthly professional development days.
• Our principal is very supportive and offers ideas to use in the classroom and for professional development.
• professional development, computer lab time, title one funds, created daily time for math teachers to meet
• provides resources Encourages and provides collaboration with others Share tips, ideas, and trainings
• Supportive of a balanced schedule and curriculum for a well-rounded student.
• Supports us going to math training and cohort meetings
• With professional development opportunities.
Grade 7:
117 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
allows teachers time to discuss and collaborate on lessons and share ideas.
Directly involved in its success by allocating all the resources she can to our subject.
encourages us to get training and uses us as resources.
From what I have seen there has been very little support from her. She is moving math teachers around, changing the
classes they are teaching, and putting the better math teachers with the lowest students the whole day to raise test
scores. This is causing resentment amongst the staff.
He checks in and usually attends math meetings.
He is actively engaged in the interview process looking for qualified teachers who teach in a way that "fits" our school.
We have an excellent math department. He provides a reasonable budget for the math department to purchase
supplies He has been able to set aside the money needed to replace the consumable student workbooks for our Math
Support curriculum that previously has been provided by the ASD. He and the counselors work closely with the math
department chair on placement decisions. He supports math teachers in difficult conversations with parents about
math placement decisions.
He supports us to get the job done, using whatever means necessary - failure due to inadequate, district-adopted
curriculum is not an option.
I beleive he understands the shortcomings & some of the benefits & just asks us to do the absolute best we can.
I believe my principal has some math phobias and listens to those who talk/complain the most.
I don't know
Lip service only. Instruction time is too frequently interrupted by extra-curricular activities which seem to take
precedence over academics.
Meets with teams to see what we need. Allows us to use supplemental materials we feel help meet GLE's and
Standards.
My principal supports the math teachers and encourages us to continue working as a collaborative group to improve
our teaching and the students achievement.
Not particularly. He doesn't support the district pacing guide.
She is supportive of what we can do to improve their skills.
She supports supplementation and teacher collaboration.
STEM meetings and an open dialogue with the instructors.
The principal supports the math program by providing us professional development days to strengthen our program
and to address the needs of our students.
Unknown
Very encouraging and welcoming into her office for advice and direction
very helpful and is always encouraging new techniques
Very much.
Grade 8:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
?
Allows me to attend workshops and is willing to provide needed equipment.
Allows us to meet once a week during team planning time and okays the inservice days.
Attends our meetings...supports our curriculum choices
By allowing us to attend the trainings for our math curriculum.
Closely works with the math department, analyzing data as it's gathered and supporting math teachers in their
endeavors to adjust their lessons to meet the needs of the students. Open to new ideas that could potentially advance
student success.
I believe he is a big advocate of Math counts and other math activities sponsored by the school.
In everyway he can
Lets me use all resources available to me to teach my students
Mrs. Williams is very supportive; she constantly ask if there is any thing I need.
My principal is very involved in finding the right math program for every student in the school. She is constantly sharing
assessment scores with us and asking for our opinion on various strategies, programs that can be implemented within
the school to improve student math achievement levels.
118 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Middle Combo:
•
•
•
No Designation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Our principal is very supportive of all teachers. We have monthly grade level curriculum sessions (one period), we can
observe each other in the building, we have the latest in SmartBoard technology in each of our classrooms (and the
training to use this technology effectively). Our principal also asks for advice and guidance from staff.
Planning time has been given
She is very knowledgeable about the curriculum and how it's being taught around the school. She offers praise for
good lessons and suggests strategies for improvement.
Trying to get us the materials we need for our classroom
unknown
Very well.
Well except when parents override math teacher recommendations
Yeah
Yes
I don't know.
The principal gave me time to attend the instructional workshop. Encourage the students to do their homework.
The principal has taken a proactive approach and established a team for only math teachers so that they can serve the
students at various ability levels. However, I am not involved with the regular student body to see how this works or
evaluate its effectiveness.
chunking students together where needed,hiring tutors, math afternoon for explorationdays
Enables teachers to make decisions that are best for their particular students. Allows and encourages training
opportunities.
Encourages peer communication Gives time for professional development Gives feedback when requested
He asks me if I need anything, has encouraged me to observe TransMath teachers at others schools (there are no
others in my building), and has observed my class.
He is excellent.(New principal)
He supports whatever we do.
I saw a coach for half hour this year at a grade level meeting and the info was very good and useful. She also gave
me one on one support with an idea for sped, complete with materials to try it right away (Penny.)
LOI
My principal is very knowledgeable about math and enjoys this subject. She also makes sure that we include this as a
school goal and revisit progress and GLEs during the year. She has made a commitment to my 3rd graders (I teach a
3/4) and works with them daily, so they receive a teacher's full attention. It allows me to focus mostly on 4th grade
math.
n/a
Observation and questioning.
offers help if needed, trainings
Once a week reminder to increase explicit math instruction daily
Our principal makes sure we have the curriculum materials that we need. She also has built math collaborative
meetings into our calendar year. We have Success Maker computer program for our sixth grades. We have STEM
support this year.
Our principal sets up a 45 minute period for curriculum conversations within our department, once per month. Our
principal asks us for advice on math placement and will often consider ideas we have for improving math instruction at
our school
Our principal supports professional development, grade level planning and collegial conversations.
release time for development.
She is a strong supporter of increasing students' understanding of math skills.
She is very interested in providing what we need. We have ordered supplemental materials
She says that we have to use the curriculum
119 | P a g e •
•
•
•
She trusts our judgment in matters related to math, but also pushes us to continuously improve in order to increase
understanding.
Supports the use of Everyday math
Very supportive, able to talk to principal about frustrations and get ideas for help.
We have quarterly meetings to discuss our math program and assessments. We have family math night.
120 | P a g e MATH ASSESSMENT DATA
Table 52: I review math assessment data independently.
Weekly
Every few weeks
N
Row %
N
Row %
Overall
All Elementary
All Middle
Elementary School
Grades
Middle School
Grades
No Designation
Kindergarten
Grade 1
Grade 2
Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade 5
Grade 6
Combo
Grade 6
Grade 7
Grade 8
Combo
258
213
33
15
39
36
28
30
27
20
18
6
13
12
2
12
52.55%
55.32%
47.83%
29.41%
57.35%
64.29%
59.57%
68.18%
54.00%
54.05%
56.25%
50.00%
46.43%
48.00%
50.00%
32.43%
167
128
24
21
24
17
15
10
19
12
10
5
10
9
0
15
34.01%
33.25%
34.78%
41.18%
35.29%
30.36%
31.91%
22.73%
38.00%
32.43%
31.25%
41.67%
35.71%
36.00%
0.00%
40.54%
Table 53: I review math assessment data with teachers at my grade level.
Weekly
Every few weeks
N Row %
N
Row %
Overall
45 9.32%
152
31.47%
All Elementary
33 8.68%
122
32.11%
All Middle
10 14.71%
22
32.35%
Elementary School
Kindergarten 3
6.00%
11
22.00%
Grades
Grade 1
6
8.82%
20
29.41%
Grade 2
2
3.64%
23
41.82%
Grade 3
5 10.64%
14
29.79%
Grade 4
6 13.64%
16
36.36%
Grade 5
3
6.25%
13
27.08%
Grade 6
5 13.51%
13
35.14%
Combo
3
9.68%
12
38.71%
Middle School
Grade 6
2 16.67%
2
16.67%
Grades
Grade 7
2
7.14%
12
42.86%
Grade 8
6 25.00%
8
33.33%
Combo
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
No Designation
2
5.71%
8
22.86%
Every 6-8 weeks
N
Row %
35
26
3
11
3
3
2
2
2
2
1
0
1
2
0
6
7.13%
6.75%
4.35%
21.57%
4.41%
5.36%
4.26%
4.55%
4.00%
5.41%
3.13%
0.00%
3.57%
8.00%
0.00%
16.22%
Every 6-8 weeks
N
Row %
74
15.32%
61
16.05%
3
4.41%
8
16.00%
11
16.18%
9
16.36%
8
17.02%
5
11.36%
10
20.83%
7
18.92%
3
9.68%
1
8.33%
1
3.57%
1
4.17%
0
0.00%
10
28.57%
A few times a year
N
Row %
27
16
7
4
2
0
2
1
2
2
3
1
3
2
1
4
5.50%
4.16%
10.14%
7.84%
2.94%
0.00%
4.26%
2.27%
4.00%
5.41%
9.38%
8.33%
10.71%
8.00%
25.00%
10.81%
A few times a year
N
Row %
156
32.30%
126
33.16%
21
30.88%
19
38.00%
25
36.76%
17
30.91%
16
34.04%
12
27.27%
16
33.33%
10
27.03%
11
35.48%
6
50.00%
9
32.14%
6
25.00%
0
0.00%
9
25.71%
Once a year
N Row %
N
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
Never
Row
%
0.41%
0.26%
1.45%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
2.70%
0.00%
0.00%
3.57%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
N
33
22
6
5
4
3
2
3
4
0
1
0
2
2
2
5
Never
Row %
6.83%
5.79%
8.82%
10.00%
5.88%
5.45%
4.26%
6.82%
8.33%
0.00%
3.23%
0.00%
7.14%
8.33%
50.00%
14.29%
0.41%
0.26%
1.45%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
2.27%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
25.00%
0.00%
Once a year
N Row %
23 4.76%
16 4.21%
6
8.82%
4
8.00%
2
2.94%
1
1.82%
2
4.26%
2
4.55%
2
4.17%
2
5.41%
1
3.23%
1
8.33%
2
7.14%
1
4.17%
2 50.00%
1
2.86%
121 | P a g e Table 54: I review math assessment data with teachers across grade levels.
Weekly
Every few weeks
Every 6-8 weeks
N Row
N
Row %
N
Row %
%
Overall
8 1.65%
35
7.23%
41
8.47%
All Elementary
5 1.32%
19
5.00%
27
7.11%
All Middle
1 1.49%
12
17.91%
6
8.96%
Elementary School
Kindergarten 0 0.00%
0
0.00%
2
4.00%
Grades
Grade 1
0 0.00%
1
1.49%
2
2.99%
Grade 2
1 1.79%
3
5.36%
6
10.71%
Grade 3
1 2.17%
4
8.70%
2
4.35%
Grade 4
1 2.27%
2
4.55%
1
2.27%
Grade 5
1 2.04%
1
2.04%
6
12.24%
Grade 6
1 2.70%
6
16.22%
2
5.41%
Combo
0 0.00%
2
6.45%
6
19.35%
Middle School
Grade 6
0 0.00%
2
16.67%
1
8.33%
Grades
Grade 7
0 0.00%
8
29.63%
1
3.70%
Grade 8
1 4.17%
2
8.33%
4
16.67%
Combo
0 0.00%
0
0.00%
0
0.00%
No Designation
2 5.41%
4
10.81%
8
21.62%
Table 55: I review math assessment data with my principal.
Weekly
Every few weeks
N Row
N
Row %
%
Overall
2 0.42%
33
6.88%
All Elementary
1 0.26%
27
7.14%
All Middle
0 0.00%
4
6.15%
Elementary School
Kindergarten 0 0.00%
2
4.00%
Grades
Grade 1
0 0.00%
3
4.55%
Grade 2
0 0.00%
4
7.27%
Grade 3
0 0.00%
5
10.87%
Grade 4
0 0.00%
0
0.00%
Grade 5
0 0.00%
6
12.24%
Grade 6
1 2.70%
4
10.81%
Combo
0 0.00%
3
9.68%
Middle School
Grade 6
0 0.00%
2
16.67%
Grades
Grade 7
0 0.00%
1
3.70%
Grade 8
0 0.00%
1
4.55%
Combo
0 0.00%
0
0.00%
No Designation
1 2.70%
2
5.41%
Every 6-8 weeks
N
Row %
45
33
4
3
4
2
4
1
7
7
5
1
2
1
0
8
9.38%
8.73%
6.15%
6.00%
6.06%
3.64%
8.70%
2.27%
14.29%
18.92%
16.13%
8.33%
7.41%
4.55%
0.00%
21.62%
A few times a year
N
Row %
161
129
26
12
26
21
15
13
14
17
11
4
9
12
1
6
33.26%
33.95%
38.81%
24.00%
38.81%
37.50%
32.61%
29.55%
28.57%
45.95%
35.48%
33.33%
33.33%
50.00%
25.00%
16.22%
A few times a year
N
Row %
182
151
19
18
28
18
17
19
21
12
18
3
6
10
0
12
37.92%
39.95%
29.23%
36.00%
42.42%
32.73%
36.96%
43.18%
42.86%
32.43%
58.06%
25.00%
22.22%
45.45%
0.00%
32.43%
Once a year
N Row %
94
80
11
14
12
9
12
9
15
6
3
4
5
1
1
3
19.42%
21.05%
16.42%
28.00%
17.91%
16.07%
26.09%
20.45%
30.61%
16.22%
9.68%
33.33%
18.52%
4.17%
25.00%
8.11%
Once a year
N
Row %
115
96
15
13
23
17
14
11
10
4
4
2
7
5
1
4
23.96%
25.40%
23.08%
26.00%
34.85%
30.91%
30.43%
25.00%
20.41%
10.81%
12.90%
16.67%
25.93%
22.73%
25.00%
10.81%
N
145
120
11
22
26
16
12
18
12
5
9
1
4
4
2
14
N
103
70
23
14
8
14
6
13
5
9
1
4
11
5
3
10
Never
Row %
29.96%
31.58%
16.42%
44.00%
38.81%
28.57%
26.09%
40.91%
24.49%
13.51%
29.03%
8.33%
14.81%
16.67%
50.00%
37.84%
Never
Row %
21.46%
18.52%
35.38%
28.00%
12.12%
25.45%
13.04%
29.55%
10.20%
24.32%
3.23%
33.33%
40.74%
22.73%
75.00%
27.03%
122 | P a g e OPEN RESPONSES REGARDING SCHOOL/CLASSROOM
(Open responses are unedited to keep authenticity)
Open Responses:
What is the most useful math assessment data you have? How do you use it/them?
Kindergarten:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
AIMSweb NIM- to understand where their weaknesses are.
An assessment sheet that was handed down to me from a previous teacher...something that teacher made up.
Assessments done one-on-one. We use them to develop instructional groups.
daily assignments
Daily/weekly observations. There isn't much data on kindergarteners.
I keep a chart for all the report card data. I use it to keep track of what needs to be assessed and to ability group
students that need to work on a skill.
I keep running records/student work/files for each student that keeps me up to date on student progress.
I use my own system for assessment. It is a checklist of things they need to know. I use the report cards for
reference, along with the ASD Standards.
I use my own tests to assess skills
In Kindergarten there is no math assessment data that we have other than what we have come up with. My most
useful math assessment tool is observation and independent work check.
Individual assessments on math skills such as number recognition, counting, patterning, etc. Used for parent updates
and report cards.
Individual manipulation queries. As needed or quarterly.
Individualized testing- teacher made
informal assessments to see who is getting what is being covered
Kindergarten check lists that show progress throughout the school year.
Kindergarten report card, and other assessments.
Math assessment that I have created for use with my students. I teach whole/small groups, then give students
assessment on the lesson. I review it when they turn it in. If time permits I review the data with the student,
particularly if I detect they do not understand. I share the results with the parents weekly, in returned work, and
quarterly as report card grades.
my own assessments
My quarterly assessment of their growth. I redirect my aide and my focus groups to the kids who need extra help.
Not as applicable in kindergarten as I would like it to be. We do a lot of 1:1 testing and evaluation with portfolios to
measure progress.
number recognition counting with 1:1 correspondence Matching objects to numbers - Data that is collected helps to
inform instruction.
One on one assessments to the GLE's. I use it to add extra practice into our math lessons.
One on one discussion with students.
Our year end assessment of addition and subtraction enables me to determine the skills in which my students possess
in regard to number sense.
ranges from quarter to quarter at my grade level
Report card assessment data. Students are tested quarterly for developmentally appropriate progress.
The math questions asked my students for the Kindergarten report card.
The moat useful assessment data are the report card assessments which are given every 3-4 weeks for students who
are making adequate progress and every 2-3 weeks for students who are struggling.
Wish we had something like Dibbels for math.
•
weekly assessments - to guide instruction
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Grade 1:
123 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
-the assessment data gathered during the first grade interview, the data gathered on each unit math assessment, and
the data gathered during the math mid-year assessment. I use it to guide my instruction, target struggling math
students, and keep parents informed.
Assessments that I see visually or using a self made "test" given to students.
beginning of the year test and mid year bench mark as well as end of the year what did they learn?
benchmark assessments (beginning, mid year, and end of year)
benchmark test
Benchmarks-planning instruction and interventions
Checking in with each student after they finish math boxes.
Daily math activities and white boards
Daily math assignments, problem solving activities, games, quizzes, etc.
Daily observations and classroom work. Unit assessments.
Daily work and the mid-year benchmark
EDM unit, AIMSweb TEN progress monitoring probes, EDM midyear
End of Unit Assessments, Beginning, Mid-Year Assessment, and Math Inventory
Everyday Math Boxes and the Unit Assessments.
I like the mid-year benchmark and the unit tests. I check for areas that students may need review in and we play EDM
games to revisit concepts students are struggling with.
I use a 1st Grade Pre & Post Math Assessment along with the EDM Unit assessments.
I would say informal assessments on a daily basis as well as quizzes developed my other first grade teachers at ASD
and myself that we create and email to each other.
Individual profiles from EDM (performance assessments) Daily observations with journal tasks
Made up math reviews...checking to see where the student is and reteaching if needed.
math boxes check, independent notes, weekly standard quizzes
Mid year math assessment.
mid-year assessment and check lists.
most useful: the weekly tests also very useful: the biweekly verbal assessments that parent volunteers do
My personal assessments. The EDM assessments try to trick the kids, and I don't like that
Observation of student responses during lessons; I can pinpoint which students understand the skills and develop a
plan for reteaching these
Ongoing classroom observation and assessment
Probably my own notes on problems I am seeing as I work with students
Saxon Assessments- data used to design program needs and drive instruction.
Saxon math assessments are excellent Custom assessments make up what is not available through Saxon
Skill checks that I create
The assessment I did for the Ready Set Learn for first grade was very beneficial to me. I knew before my kids came to
school what skills they had. The mid-year benchmark results were very useful to me.
The assessments I create myself. I can make the worksheet ask easy to hard questions so I can see right where each
child is in their understanding.
The assessments I give my students. I assess the the needs of my students, reteaching needed skills.
The mid-year benchmark. It taught me where I need to refocus my instruction.
The mid-year Everyday Math Assessment, the ASD Mid-year Math Assessment, end of the unit math assessments,
and quizzes.
The weekly assessments. Also the problem solving worksheets. Both give me a weekly assessment of understanding
of skills and who has not yet mastered them. These are used weekly.
unit and mid-year test results, group review game informal assessment
Unit assessments, quarterly assessments based on the GLEs, and benchmarks
unit tests and student observation when they are doing the math lesson
Using touchmath or just old style teaching. Facts, drills, asking questions.
Weekly math assignments completed independently
124 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Weekly quiz from assessment assistant to guide instruction. I review or reteach as necessary. Mid year is helpful to
get overview of long term retention.
Weekly quizes made by a group of teachers around the district
Weekly quizes my grade level has made and the unit tests.
Weekly quizzes that a colleague has developed
Weekly Quizzes. They help me keep an eye on who is progressing, who might need some extra assistance, and who
is ready for a challenge.
Weekly written and fact assessments as well as informal checks for individual skills.
weekly written tests and bi monthly oral tests See what I need to review
written tests/to plan interventions and /or further instruction
Grade 2:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
aimsweb mcap, edm unit assess.,
assessment tool for edm, benchmark tests, weekly quizzes made using assessment tool
daily hands-on interaction with students and real-time data (ex. small white boards, math pages, etc.)
Daily journal work I grade and record every page we do so students have LOTS of grades by the end of the quarter.
They correct every mistake right then and there.
Daily observations in the classroom. It guides me in how to use my time proficiently to continue on with the curriculum,
as well as supplementing areas they have weaknesses in.
daily work
EDM benchmark. We use it to see how they are doing measured with the GLEs.
EDM skill checklist, used daily and for informing instruction.
End of unit assessment Mid-year/End of year Math Inventories
End of Unit Checking Progress, weekly quizzes based on ASD standards and student need.
Fact memorization
I like exit slips, the assessment assistant where I can make my own, I also like to cut and paste a group of math boxes
together and make a mini test. Additionally the math masters can also be great tools to check for students
understanding. I would love to share my data with other staff members but making time for that is almost impossible
unless all parties are willing to work beyond union contract hours which is rarely a possibility.
I like the end of chapter math test. I give them all year long. I also like the EDM pre and post test. Often the best
means of assessment is to meet individually with a student and watch what he/she does in problem solving or asking
basic knowledge questions with time, money, computation.
I think it is the one on one contact that I have with students everyday, questioning them, watching them work, and
seeing how they think.
Manipulatives. Unifix cubes, dice, measuring sticks/tapes, math cards for addition, subtraction, time, Clocks with 5
minute slots that open and close, white boards, markers, Green templates with shapes and measurement on them,
Classroom number grid, calendar, place value charts, fraction charts, money charts and cash register with play money,
scales, and calculators. I use them all to help kids visualize numbers and patterns, learn measurememnt, time, money
value, place value ect.
Math beg./middle and end assessments that were made from the dept. Don't know how tests are measured for tests
done in 3rd grade (good or bad).
math boxes daily
mid year and end of year assessments
Morning Work Review that I make and grade and then have students redo if they missed several or I go over it with
them during Math Games time.
My own assessments
on going kid watching!!!!!!!
Pre and post tests I make up myself before each unit.
Quarterly
The assessments on both facts and written assessments. Individual assessments.
The assessments that I make myself. I prepare students and then give them an assessment assignment.
125 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The math assessment data that Everyday provides. I use them to assess the students each unit.
The math journal pages provide instand feedback to alert me to problems. I also use the white boards for daily checks.
The mid year assessment. Shows me areas of instruction that need attention.
The pre/post test for each unit
Unit assessments
unit assessments - to plan future daily review of concepst and homework pages
Unit Assessments,Mid-year Math benchmark
Unit assessments; Used to plan future instruction and remediation
unit tests and the starred items in the teacher's guide
Unit tests are the most useful. They occur every 2-3 weeks and give me accurate feedback. ASD's
beginning/middle/end-of-year assessments I find frustrating. Questions are often formatted strangely so they look
unfamiliar to the students. Multiple responses are grouped under one problem, so a student may answer 3 parts right
and 1 part wrong but must be marked as missing the entire question.
unit tests at end of unit, District benchmark assessments twice per year, my own fact data once each quarter, math box
reviews weekly
Unit tests.
Unit tests. Semester tests.
We have assessments every five lessons
Weekly math quizzes.
Weekly quizzes and end of the unit assessments.
Weekly tests to see what concepts need to be reviewed/retaught.
Weekly tests- grade and reteach
weekly tests, oral assessments are very useful and fun. I use it to know who needs additional practice or strategies. Or
oral assessment to see who doesn't understand concepts.
Grade 3:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Computational skills
daily math boxes activities that constantly review practices, games, written responses, mid year benchmark, unit
assessments, homework
Daily work book lessons-checking daily for understanding as we do the lessons
Daily/weekly assessment that I create to know if the skills have been learned and what needs further reinforcement.
Each type has its use: speed math, unit assessments, independent work in math boxes (observation).
EDM Assistance quizzes I make
EDM mid year with benchmark strands
EDM TLG Recognized Student Achievement is used for grading purposes. EDM Online ePlanner is used daily. EDM
Online Math games data.
End of unit Progress Checks Summative--assess student learning Formative--plan further instruction
Home Links and Lesson Worksheets which I use as daily assessments of the lesson.
I liked the EDM mid-year assessment for targeting individual and class areas of improvement.
I love the benchmark tests, I would like to have more tests like them, perhaps quarterly.
I only have the assessments I do in class. There is no database of math assessments for 3rd graders.
I use several texts/blackline masters from different programs. So I therefore use different assessments, depending on
the basic math concept I am testing. The scores/grades are recorded for cumulative grades.
I use the Math Skills Link Book for weekly assessment of lessons. They address the weekly goal and give me an
immediate idea of mastery. Those areas not mastered by 80% of my students can then be retaught.
Informal assessment daily.
Mid level benchmarks
mid year benchmarks
My ability to evaluate student's daily work and how proficient they are at it. Starred Math Boxes Unit Checking
Progress Assessments Open Responses Exemplars
126 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Our unit tests because they contain the most relevant source of recent information of what we've taught and what
students have learned.
Quarterly math computation sheets, daily word problems, daily fast facts.
SBA testing
The math boxes I find useful in constantly reassessing student learning.
The math tests that I create myself give me better information than the Checking Progress tests, because they often
contain review information and not enough questions about the actual material from the unit.
The mid year is good! We share and discuss what strands are lacking.
The mid-year benchmark. I use it to guide my teaching.
The unit math tests. I usually use them to review concepts based upon what most children are missing and to point out
why errors are occurring.
Unit Assessments and Mid-Year. Helps with looking at learning patterns and areas that need additional instruction.
Allows to form small intervention groups. Inward look at what is working/not working in my practices.
Unit math tests (used every unit), exit slips (used occassionally), journals (check to see how they're doing
weekly/daily), pre/post/mid-year assessments.
We do math boxes independently each day and then correct together or I correct them. Either way, I have the
students correct their mistakes in order to learn from them. After every unit, I give them the test and go from there. I
also do some timed tests on drill work.
Weekly quizzes. I use them to inform my teaching and assess my students' learning on the weekly material. It helps
me see where my students need help.
Grade 4:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Beginning of the year assessment, mid year assessment, and skills tests.
Daily and weekly collection of data is continually used to help me form lessons and decide whether to move forward or
re-teach and practice needed skills and concepts.
Daily interactions with my students. Their reactions and demonstrations of the concepts I teach on a daily basis are the
best information I can have. I can fine tune my instruction each day based on their success or struggle.
GLE data base- create my own assessments
I make up short weekly assessments on things covered that week.
I use the data to group students for small group instruction.
I use the SBA, Unit tests, and the mid year exam
I use the suggested EDM red star assessments and the assessment handbook. The assessment handbook guides my
assessment and is nicely organized.
I use their math journals and daily assessment tools to guide my instruction. The tests are too far apart to be used as
the strongest assessment tool.
In EDM I find the ongoing assessments that show up in the math boxes most useful. For me ongoing formative
assessments drive my instruction. I don't like to wait for a unit to end to modify what I am doing for individual students.
It depends on the student. I use formal test/quizzes, daily work, homework, in-class discussion, fishbowl, and student
with student conversations.
Math tests are the most useful, so is the midyear math assessment from the school district. They show me what areas
still need to be mastered for understanding.
Mid year assessments
Review of math boxes for assessment purposes. I figured if the children have done the math boxes, had a chance to
fix their mistakes, and I've gone over unfamiliar concepts then the students should be able to do copies of math box
pages for their weekly assessments. I do use end of unit assessments too and other assessments from other sources.
Children do weekly homework that is from EDM which is graded for extra credit.
SAXON Math test computerized test generation is on target and gives exact data to help me taylor remedial instruction
to students.
Saxon Math's placement guide, and also the weekly tests
SBAs, Unit Assessments, Teacher made tests/exit slips. I like the teacher made test the best because they aligned
with a GLE and test only what I have taught so far. I do one weekly
127 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
standards based assessments of tasks that are done during each lesson. I keep a running gradebook of these
standards across the year and use these for forming small support groups to receive extra instruction.
The beginning, mid, and end of year assessments, as well as the unit tests are the most useful assessment data I
have. I look at the beginning of the year assessments to see what students may already know for the coming year. The
mid-year assessment tells me what concepts students have mastered and what concepts students need more review
on. The end of the year assessments tell me which students have learned and retained the major concepts learned
that year and which students are still struggling (information to give to next year's teacher). The unit tests are useful
because I can see which students are understanding or struggling with certain concepts. If they are struggling then I
can work with those students in a small group or individually. I can also use the data if I need to refer students for
Special Education support.
The daily work and assessments I produce in the classroom.
The EDM mid-year assessment you people created.
The end-of-unit assessment provided by EDM. The individual profile of progress gives a great sample of skills met and
not yet met, and I can guide my instruction from there.
The inventory administered pre and post and the midyear assessment to see what skills the class is strong with and
which ones are missed by a significant number of students. That way I can tailor practice work to meet the needs of
the greatest number of students in my class.
The mid year benchmark was very helpful. I look at what has not been mastered and specifically focus on those
things.
The most useful math assessment data is the AIMs Web computer programs. I use the information to address specific
needs of specific students.
The unit tests and my quizzes. I can monitor how my students are doing and reteach the concepts that need to be
taught.
unit assessments, midyear assessments. daily assignments. homework.
Unit reviews
Unit Tests - to know what concepts need to continue to be worked on
Unit tests and self-created quizes.
unit tests..
Weekly assessments
Weekly assessments.
Weekly review of concepts taught . I am able to adjust my pacing to meet students needs
white boards to see which students have a concept
Grade 5:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
AIMS concepts and AIMS computation. I use them as weekly progress monitoring to assess strengths and
weaknesses in my individual students, so I can tailor their additional instruction directly to their needs.
Benchmarks, Math Journals and Study Links. Benchmarks help me identify students who need help and problem
areas for reteaching. Daily assignments such as math journals and study links help me determine individual progress.
daily work, monitor progress or reteach
End of Unit Assessments. I give these as (Pre and Post) tests to determine what students already know, and which
areas I really need to focus on. This also helps with re-teaching.
End of unit tests
gle checklist, note who knows which concepts and strategies use guide instruction
Guided practice that students complete independently each day. Quizzes and tests weekly. They let me know if I
need to re-teach a concept to an individual, small group, or entire class.
I create quizzes on single topics to see which students have already grasped a concept and which students need
further instruction.
I do like the EDM midterm. The unit assessments seem very difficult for kids and they do poorly on them.
I like the mid year assessment because it gives a very good picture of where the students are in their progression
towards math development.
I like the midyear math benchmarks. I'd like to administer it to my students at the beginning of the year, too, so that we
could really track their individual progress.
128 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
I review their work daily and adjust lessons
Informal assessments given to students either orally or in small groups. I use these assessments often.
math journal. Every day
Mid year assessment Unit assessments slates
Mid year assessment guide instruction
Mid year benchmark data, I use it to guide me in what skills I will be re-teaching.
Mid- year assessments, SBA, pre and post assessements
My own data from activities done in the classroom - student explanations, student journaling, etc.
SBA results: It guides my teaching in the begiinning of the year. Mid Yr Test: It guides my teaching the rest of the yr.
Unit test: to make skill groups to review skills
Students work- especially homework where they have no one to work with. I can see who needs further instruction.
During class independent work is excellent too.
tests
The best assessment data is my own observation of each child daily as we work through math in class. I assess Study
LInks, Math Boxes and student engagement in games. I talk with students and ask them to explain the math problem
they are working on. We have open dialogue and do problems together on the board as I teach.
The data I get from my assessments on the material I have recently taught whether it's formal of informal. I use other
data for more general information.
The Mid Year Assessment. Form small groups based on the areas of need. ***If would be nice to have a Beginning of
the Year Assessment similar to the mid year assessment to compare with.
The mid- year benchmark was very helpful.
The most useful math assessment data I have are the formal and informal assessments I come up with on my own. I
do not look at the EDM benchmark or End of the Year assessments as being anything of value when teaching and
implementing math in my classroom.
•
The most useful math assessment data I have is the data I collect through formal/informal, observational, formative,
and summative assessments I take throughout the year based on the GLEs and state standards.
• The SBAs because it is the only tool that really shows what my students know(based on what the state says they
should). I use it as soon as scores arrive to assess my teaching and see where there are flaws that I need to work on.
• Unit assessments. I use them to determine gaps in my teaching or to determine areas that still need more instruction.
• Unit math assessment • Unit Tests for EDM, and selected workbook pages.
• We have a cumulative math test every Friday. It lets me know how the class is doing on skills covered the last few
weeks.
• We use the EDM math assessments regularly.
• Weekly assessments and daily observation. These assessments tell me which students are mastering material and
which students (or possibly whole class) needs more or different instruction to master a particular concept or strategy.
• weekly quizzes
• weekly test
• Weekly testing and daily homework
Grade 6 Elementary:
• Daily classwork assignments. I know what is working and what is not.
• Daily minute math sheets that are not EDM. Students complete and we grade together and discuss.
• daily quizzes that we create and weekly assessments
• EDM assessments - Fall, Winter, Spring
• EDM end-of-the-unit assessments.
• I like the assessment charts in EDM. I use pretty regularly.
• I use the previous year's SBA scores, paying close attention to students' weaknesses in the different strands. We have
homework lessons every night, which are immediately graded so that feedback and reteaching can be done. Saxon
offers an assessment every 5 lessons so that I can immediately respond to any breakdown of understanding.
129 | P a g e •
•
In class daily assessments. Talking to my students about math.
Last years' SBAs broken down per strand. Develop a plan for the year and address strands as needed in compared to
SBAs.
• Mountain Math.
• SBA and beginning year assessment and mid year assessment. My colleagues and I discuss where our students are
and we adapt our teaching to meet the needs of our students in the areas where they are struggling.
• SBA Tera Nova to help determine 7th grade placement
• SBA's, personal notes
• sbas
• State Math Test; I use it at the beginning and end of the year. Otherwise, I use weekly math progress monitoring
(short student quizzes on concepts covered, and computer based math programs available at school - NOT EDM - its
available, but useless.)
• Student performance on classroom assignments and by keeping tabs on how well they are doing with the
individualized Success Maker Program on the computer. I print out monthly reports with SM.
• tests from Everyday Math
• the data I come up with myself.
• The math boxes and study links they allow me to see right away what needs to be readdressed. Problem is time to do
it.
• The Mid-Year assessment is valuable, and the unit tests. I
• The most useful data is based on my on-going quizes. I give short quizes where I provide 5 questions on a specific
standard. Each quiz is most often 15 questions covering 3 standards. I code each 5 question segment into 3
categories. (0-2 correct = immediate interventions) (3 correct = check in) (4-5 correct = on pace). If I notice a pattern
of many students scoring 0-2, I use that as a cue to re-teach the concept to the entire class. Otherwise, I organize my
students into intervention groups based on each standard. I will often follow up w/ another quiz on the same or similar
standard to check growth. This method is timely and doable and it provides an objective picture of my students'
capabilities. It also identifies kids who may otherwise slip through the crack.
• Unit assessments are ok but really what you have to do is make your own that actually test the skills they have been
taught as the unit assessments usually have content we haven't covered yet and the skills we have covered have been
made so much harder than they need to be that the students can't be successful on them.
• Weekly composite of classwork used to formulate reteaching and practice during math workshop once a week, and to
guide small group instruction daily
• White boards, EDM tests, Mid- year asssessment. Self-created assessments as quizzes.
Elementary Combo:
• benchmark tests, end of unit tests
• calculation skills, it's the foundation
• daily assessments to guide the instruction and support the needs of the students in my groups
• End of unit tests and benchmark tests. I use them to help guide small group instruction.
• I assess all of my students daily, as I work with them one-on-one.
• I keep data on my students' math goals and guide my instruction accordingly.
• I keep my students for three years. I think the most useful data I have is that I know what has been taught successfully
and what has not based on daily, weekly and quarterly data.
• I like the beginning and mid year math assessments provided by the district, because they isolate the strands so I can
see the area that each students needs to work on, and that the class in general needs to work on.
• I use The end of the unit tests, weekly quizzes from the Assessment Assistant Disk, and informal observation of Math
Boxes. I use this information to see what skills my students are still having trouble with.
• Math assessment data used in my classroom: saxon assessments, data collection on iep goals and objectives,
collaboration with general ed teachers of those student attending gen ed math class
• My best assessment data is the everyday assignments and tasks that students do. At the primary level my best
assessment is observing students at work. Then I can determine who is getting it an ready to move on and who needs
more instruction. Those large mid-year assessments often tell me what I already know.
130 | P a g e •
My most useful math assessment is my individual workings with each child and my knowledge of where each child
struggles. I also give a beginning, mid and end year test that help. Unit tests are also given to help me know what
concepts were mastered by students.
• ongoing grading of lessons and fact practice
• Student quiz grades, since my quizzes can be re-taken as many times as students wish it shows me who is proficient
or eventually became proficient and who is not. Other standardized assessments currently used in middle school,
aimsweb, SBA, etc.. are only assessing proficiency at most in basic Pre-Algebra skills which has no bearing on my
current courses where they need to have mastered Pre-Algebra skills.
• The Benchmark mid-year tests to see if there is improvement since last year and concentration on the strands where
many still need assistance.
• The EDM math data for the end of the year and mid year is helpful.
• The end of unit assessments - I like Part A for the summative assessments and Part B gives me a heads up with
formative assessment.
• The kids' everyday work Helps me know their weakness/strength and I can adjust accordingly
• the mid-year tests, and last years math SBA tests. Also I use quizes, and unit tests to see if my students learned the
concepts.
• The most useful math assessment data is the daily questions asked by the students to let me know if they are getting it
or not. The weekly and quarterly grades usually reflect this same assessment.
• Unit Tests, Mid Year Benchmark Assessment
• We have the Aimsweb data and grade level assessments that are useful.
• weekly formative assessments
Grade 6 Middle School:
• ARS scores - basic idea of how the student is placed and perhaps to understand why they may not be doing well on a
particular task. • Classroom Diagnostics - to see what I need to focus on with regard to remediation • Curriculum
Diagnostics - to see whether we can move on or have new lessons and reassess • Reading the Class - if students
seem puzzled or do not perform day-to-day activities, minilesson and practice
• daily assignments and unit tests, conferences with students, tutoring observations, Mid-Year Benchmark tests, and
SBA assessments
• formative - weekly or biweekly -- do they get a skill summative -- unit test at the end of the phase -- how did they do
with the overall material.
• I am not sure which data you are referring to. SBA and Terra Nova data are used throughout the year especially for
placement. Do you mean my class assessments?
• MAZE Aims Web Formative and summative assessments.
• pre and post assessments created in the classroom (weekly) successmaker data (weekly)
• successmaker, aimsweb test. twice a week and three times a year.
• The assesments I do in class each week. At the beginning of the school year, I used the ASD website to check out my
incoming student standardized testing data, to know which students that I needed to monitor and offer additional help
to.
• The daily math that we do.
• weekly or bi-weekly mastery assignments, I use them to determine which standards I need to target more
Grade 7:
• SBA scores: used to organize students into collaborative groups 2) Quizzes/Tests
• Assessment data that I have developed to better align with instruction and curriculum.
• Classroom Assessments: to adjust daily lesson plans Standardized test scores: understand the srengths &
weaknesses of my students
• cooperative learning methods
• Depends on the time of year. SBA scores are useful to see where the students are at in the beginning of the year.
Otherwise, quizzes/tests are used to consistently monitor where they are at.
• I start with SBA test strands and Terra Nova tests to initially evaluate student strengths and weaknesses. I use
formative assessments in class to constantly access student progress and thereby adjust lessons accordingly.
• MLI
131 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Pre-tests, individual assessments, formative - clickers, white boards, etc. Every day/other day.
SBA and TerraNova tests are used for placement. SBA strands are used to help facilitate Warm-Ups that are
applicable school wide. We also look at SBA strands to help individualize lessons for students who are not proficient.
SBA Scores available on line. I use them a couple times each month.
SBA strand data helps focus instruction during the year for individual students. Frequent mastery tests on concepts in
the classroom to assess understanding.
Successmaker - to address inadequate skills.
Tests, quizzes, homework, in class work.
The district connection database.
The formative assessments that I give in my class determine the road I am going to go down. This gives me the best,
and most useful, criteria to see how my classroom needs to function and what concepts/skills need to be covered.
The information on ARS. I can organize and sort the data easily. The ability to compare data from several years helps
to assess student strengths and weaknesses.
The most useful assessment data that I have is a Math Foundation test I developed that I give my students at the
beginning and end of 7th grade (basic skills, no reading conflicts). At mid-year, I give a 5th grade computation test
developed by the Peabody Institute to see skill development. If foundation skills are underdeveloped or non-existent, it
affects the ability to use that Mathscape book. My assessments help to guide my instruction.
There is not one most useful assessment data, it depends on the purpose. For teaching & planning I use a variety of
classwork, student responses, homework and tests. As math department chair I also use SBA scores and TN scores.
In the past 7 years at middle school I have observed a strong relationship between SBA scores and success in
accelerated classes, provided the student has the work ethic and interest in taking accelerated classes. I also find that
the SBA scores are the best method we have currently for placement in Math Support classes, rather than using solely
teacher recommendation and student grades as those can be skewed by other factors. I use SBA scores, grades, TN
scores and professional judgment based on student performance to determine placement recommendations for the
next year's math class.
to start the year the SBA is useful to look at the group as a whole and individual students to plan a course for the year.
Then using class and individual assessments to look at strengths and weaknesses to build on and make sure there is
reteaching of material that is not mastered.
Unit tests
We're expected to assess them so often, I'm not sure what is the best.
Weekly quizzes. The SBA at the beginning of the year to help know what needs the most focus. Helps with planning
Grade 8:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SBA data - helps with arranging cooperating groups in my classrooms to ensure that I have students of mixed abilities
in each group. 2) Terra Nova results - I don't use this as often 3) anecdotal records - this is done daily in each class,
to guide instruction 4) quizzes and tests - quizzes about once a week and tests at the end of each unit
AIMS Web assessment and weekly formative and summative assessments within the various lessons taught in the
classroom. The data when compared to grade level "GLE mastery topics" helps me visualize the math holes students
still possess and help me plan for future lessons and improve these deficiencies, and recognize the misconceptions
about a certain concept or skill.
Comparing SBA scores from year to year. Assessment data used in our transmath program. I use this information to
see whether or not my instruction has been beneficial and students are grasping the concepts being taught.
Current assessment from quizzes and tests. I also use SBA tests scores and National Percentile Ranking to verify
what I am seeing.
I give quizzes and tests regularly...
I think the various SBA strands that are visible on ARS are the most useful to me when planning lessons. I look at the
class overview setting and can see areas where all students are weak or proficient and can plan lessons accordingly.
I use the ARS system most often, but I'm slowly starting to use the test data from Zangle as well. I use the system to
help determine which student might need extra support on certain topics. I also use it to determine which areas need
to have an increased focus.
Last years grades and sba's. I use them to help me get an accurate picture of a student's abilities.
looking at the work of each student in the class as they are all working on the same problem
132 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Middle Combo:
•
•
•
No Designation:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Pre and Post test.
Quizzes and tests are my most useful assessment data, because it shows where they understood and what they did
not understand in a unit.
Quizzes, Projects
Results from in-class assessments, both formal and informal.
I use this data to address common student
misunderstandings and make recommendations for future math classes.
SBA as that is what we are judge by as a school
SBA scores Identify student weaknesses then focus some of my instructions in those areas
SBA scores and Chapter test scores.
SBA scores to ascertain where students are with basic math skills
SBA strand breakdowns. Identify student weaknesses by strand, and work with kids at their level.
test/quiz results. I encourage mastery.
Weekly assessments of student knowledge. This helps decide passing.
Weekly/daily quizzes. It helps me plan on what concepts the student know, have learned, or need more on.
I use a variety of data. The most useful is the online part of my program as it gives me a broad picture of what my
students are learning and I use this data to report on quarterly progress reports as required by the students' IEP.
The only data I have is the SBA scores, the GLEs and my own informal assessments as I teach. I started to use the
CBM with Aimsweb, but then changed to my current assignment that does not use the math component to my
knowledge.
We use the Brigance Assessment for a snapshot of student skills, Also, I use the Transmath assessments after every 5
lessons, and at the end of every unit (15 unit per unit)
-informal observations during the lessons -unit tests
Assessment data base. Use it to find student weaknesses and strengths that help to build my math program.
Besides the EDM assessments, I also make my own on the computer. I also do informal assessments with white
boards and exit slips.
bi-monthly quizzes
Classroom quizzes and tests are most useful. I use the data to inform instruction and determine appropriate supports
and placements for my special education students.
Curricular based assessments, both formal and informal; it drives my instruction for that student.
daily work...determines what to review and when to move on
EDM, teacher made, and AIMSweb
End of the unit tests, mid year, and end of the year
Homework and tests Homework and tests drive instruction
I do not like any of the EDM assessments. And there is no other consistent assessment available.
I usually do a quick quiz at the beginning of each class to determine whether to move on to the next concept or
reteach.
Individual student online assessments...Weekly GIves me feedback on the strengths and weaknesses of all students
on an individual basis. Allows me to individual assignments.
It varies daily
Mid-assessment. I use it to plan time for extra practice, track kids that are having trouble and get them help, lesson
planning.
N/A
One on one questioning.
Progress statements for IEP objectives and my own data.
regular informal tests to assess data on goals and objectives.
results of weekly written assessments (every 5 lessons) which I analyze to guide instruction for the coming week
Terra Nova scores (unfortunately only available from 5th grade and not 6th), SBA scores, formative and summative
assessments on class material.... I use TerraNova and SBA to help with placement and chart growth at the end of the
133 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
year. SBA scores are also used to identify weaknesses in specific strands. Class assessments are used to determine
whether content was mastered and to plan next steps in instruction.
The beginning, mid and end of year report.
The benchmarks provide data about what students are able to do and what they still struggle with--I use that data to
plan review/instruction
The most useful data is the classroom assessments. I use them to focus in on what students are struggling with and/or
having a hard time with.
The SBA scores, strand by strand.
Unit Assessments- to guide instruction & for re-teaching individual students
unit reviews. pretests to determine where students are at before starting a unit. end of the year assessments given
about grade level at the beginning of the yer to determine if students can be one grade level ahead.
unit tests. computation skills tests. math journal checks. informal observations.
Weekly math assessments that review the weeks concepts. When I see that student's missed a concept, I arrange for
review in small groups for the next week.
work samples
134 | P a g e CONCLUDING QUESTION
OPEN RESPONSES REGARDING SCHOOL/CLASSROOM
(Open responses are unedited to keep authenticity)
Open Responses:
What would you advise the ASD do to improve the district-wide mathematics program and mathematics student achievement in Anchorage?
Kindergarten:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
A new program to either replace or supplement Everyday Math.
change the program
Curriculums purchased should come with materials already prepared for use by studens.
Drop EDM
Drop EDM and pick up a math curriculum that maters skills.
Drop Everyday Math and incorporate Saxon. Much better program! Denali and "Optional" programs make it difficult to
have district-wide consistency.
EDM really has little to support fact practice and teachers have to constantly supplement. I just wonder if there is a
program that has it "all." ?
Encourage EDM to add a stronger fact practice component. Better educate the parents in why EDM is a great
program - hands-on gives a better understanding of concepts, solidifies abstract thinking, etc.
Explore ways to make math more integrated with other subjects and life experiences-- a true interdisciplinary approach
will make learning more meaningful. Young children need to couple math with movement, singing and rhythm, too.
Waldorf-methods' approach is great for that movement and brain development aspect.
Find a math program that is more straight forward and easier for teachers and parents to understand.
Find a program that does not spiral and has the students master a concept before moving on.
Find another program.
Get a better math curriculum that better supports student learning in math. A quick way to assess and progress
monitor, like Dibbels, for math.
Get rid of Everyday Math.
I believe that we need to adopt a different math program. EDM is wonderful for high achieving students. Other
students seem to get further and further behind. I feel that the kindergarten curriculum doesn't provide the necessary
framework to prepare them for kindergarten.
I don't think EDM is the best, but I like it as a starting point. As a teacher, I enjoy the flexibility to choose which lessons
to spend more time on. No classroom is the same and most children learn at different paces. Although it takes time to
develop extra practice for my struggling students, I feel it is time well spent.
I think shared training with teachers at our grade level is most helpful this is when we get the tips and ideas of others to
enrich our instruction
I understand the spiral approach with EDM, but I feel that it's important for students to master certain skills before they
move on.
I would like to look at some different curriculum for Kindergarten. I think that EDM is a little week when it comes to this
grade.
I would like to try a different math program that is project based.
I would love a curriculum that balances the basics (like Saxon) with the more comprehensive mathematical
understanding (like EDM)
Implement an entirely different math curriculum. EDM is awful and does not meet the needs of our population in my
Title One school.
implement another math program
Invest in a program that solidifies computational skills or train teachers to change their philosophies and personal
learning styles to teach EDM with rigor. However, EDM doesn't help transient populations, esp. from out of district.
135 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
Make sure each classroom has the needed manipulatives and materials. Also a class set of math literature would be
nice.
Perhaps NOT introduce a whole new curriculum. Allow for some flexibility/supplement EDM to address weak points in
the curriculum.
Provide a supplement or alternative to EDM. Especially for bilingual kids that struggle with the spiral curriculum.
Replace Everyday Math.
Use a non-scaffolding program for base schools. I liked EDM before I taught at a base school. I think EDM has more
strengths than weaknesses and if my colleagues would make time for the math games their students would be more
successful. However, that said, before EDM was a district mandated program I watched teachers use more math
basic skill programs with much success.
We need to plan across the district meetings to survey ideas that have been the most successful across the
district...whether by program or by design. Schools who showing phenomenal success might share what is working for
them.
Grade 1:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
A different curriculum would be better for low, ELL and students who need mastery before throwing a lot of other math
information at them.
Adopt Saxon
At another school in ASD we used Heath (I think) and it was great because it had colorful pictures for the first graders
and emphasized mastering skills versus the spiral. Very strong on basic facts and the kids seemed to be very
successful. Once the low kids get left behind in EDM is it very hard to accomodate/catch them up. EDM is just much
more challenging than first grade standards need.
Be in the schools more. Set up lessons for each teacher and teacher the lessons
Change curriculum to something more foundational such as Saxon Math.
Consider modifying the current curriculum or adopting a different curriculum completely
Continue to provide opportunities for staff development.
Curriculum is fine. Have more teachers teach on pace w/ fidelity. Look closely at GLE objectives as opposed to just
teach lessons for sake of teaching lessons. Have more thoughtful math professional development. Provide more
opportunity for interventions for struggling students.
Do NOT force the purchase of EDM for teachers/schools.
EDM is too much spiral learning too early. I think that EDM is MUCH TOO WORDY, with written words, especially for
bilingual, monolingual and Ak. Native students village/new to the city students.
Ensure all students have access to the EDM online games.
Focus on how people are teaching and not what!!! People need to see what a good math lesson looks like. I haven't
reviewed a curriculum that will comprehensively change much in the current elementary math teaching environment.
Put the money in site based initiatives that force people to create, observe, and debrief (with a protocol) lessons. We
need time to study engagement-not more manuals.
GET A NEW MATH CURRICULUM. I strongly recommend the Bridges curriculum as I have used it with great success
in the past.
Get rid of EDM and adopt a curriculum that works by drilling students and having them master skills
Get rid of Everyday Math!
Get rid of Everyday Math. I love Saxon but would be happy with any other program that make more sense to students,
teachers, and parents.
Give us a program that doesn't demand so much to be taught each year, let us focus on the core skills needed at that
grade.
Go back to using Saxon math, district wide. Students are able to be independent and have a solid basic facts
foundation.
Have more schools use Saxon or a Saxon-type program. I used EDM and had to suppliment much more as far as
basic skills practice. The Saxon Math Calendar daily review is excellent.
Hiring math tutors to work with lower achieving students before they get to gar behind
I do not teach the District Wide Curriculum so I have no comment for this question.
136 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
I just want to say that I am very satisfied with the Everyday Math Program. a few years ago when we re-adopted the
program I served on the teacher review committee. I saw what other materials are out there and feel that Everyday
Math serves our needs very well. I hope that there are no plans to adopt a new program in future as was done with the
hand-writing curriculum, Handwriting Without Tears, which to my knowledge a large majority of elementary teacher
despise.
I think it is strong at my school. I don't know if I can answer this on a district level. I would imagine that school needs
vary greatly from school to school.
I think that for most schools and most populations, the mathematics program is sufficient.
I want to see a curriculum that starts at the conceptual level using maniuplatives, moves into the connecting level, then
the symbolic/visualization levels. The more hands-on math can be, the more you get students involved and excited
because they can understand the concepts better.
I would like another math program other than EDM.
I would like to see a different curriculum used. I believe that Saxon math would benefit the students.
I would LOVE to see an individualized computer math program that students could use to help with basic math skills,
especially in the Title 1 schools.
I would to see us use a curriuclum that focues more on practicing basic skills such as Saxon.
I would trade our EDM curriculum for a different math curriculum that parents will be more happy with. I think EDM is
very confusing for many families
It may beneficial to purchase tools to foster progress monitoring, and support students concerning the RTI process. It
would be nice to have technology purchased for all schools such as SMART boards in order to foster instruction.
Professional development training for teaching mathematics would also support instruction. For example, write grants
to send teachers to the National or State Mathematics conferences. It may beneficial to have math coaches for all
schools as well.
It would be great to have a computer program to replace the old Larson's Math program we had in the past. The EDM
online games are not always functional nor are they appropriate to the grade level. It would be great is ASD would
look into alternative programs, perhaps Accelerated Math.
look at another program .....
Look at how the bilingual students can better be taught new concepts. Make it more visual and hands on. Give
teachers more training.
More focus and support for computation. My kids have not memorized addition or subtraction facts.
More opportunities for professional development.
more technology aligned lessons- the math workbook pages available for all teachers who have smartboards. Continue
the EDM online games, align the standards with the pacing chart
more trainings and support for diverse classrooms
NEW MATH PROGRAM, EVERYDAY MATH IS AWFUL and skims areas!
nothing
Offer Professional Development during the school day or during In-Service Days
possibly adopt curriculum that teaches more to mastery with a lot of opportunities for review and one that comes with a
student workbook for every child
purchase a curriculum that does not spiral, that is user friendly to parents, and focuses on basic math facts
Put Saxon Math back in the schools, especially in Title I
Review and purchase Tier 2 math intervention programs for each school whose assessment data indicates a need for
additional support at a system level, as well as provide training for implementation of the program(s)
Saxon curriculum meets the needs of special education students (repetition, eliminating heavy language loaded
program like EDM), then need for knowledge of basic facts and more user friendly for parents. ASD needs a
consistent curriculum in such a transient district where families are constantly moving between schools.
Smaller class size
smaller class sizes!
Switch to a program that is more simple for parents to be able to support their kids at home with math.
137 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
The strength of EDM is the focus on building understanding of the concepts before rote memorization. The weakness
is the lack of math fact practice. A student does need to know their facts before moving on and this is not built into the
program. Games work well, but they aren't the final word.
To achieve mastery on skills I would recommend they not continue with EDM.
Use a different program other than Everyday Math. This program does not help struggling students. I suggest Saxon
Math.
Use a program kids and parents understand. Spiraling leads to frustration and the attitude I can't do it.
Use a program that allows students more time to gain confidence with a skill before introducing new ones. EDM does
not do this.
Grade 2:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
A math curriculum that is helpful to all students, including students with disabilities.
A program that will work with our population of students who move in and out constantly. A spiral program just isn't the
best. We get students from all over the U.S. and DOT schools.
Accountability! How can you make every teacher participate in EDM specific training and pass a test showing they
understand how to teach the EDM Focus Strategies? Next, fidelity to the pacing guide. Finally, how can we support
those 3-6 grade teachers who are trying to use EDM, but have the students from teachers who did not teach the EDM
lessons as written? We almost need lesson maps to lay over our edm lessons so newer teachers are able to focus in
on the most important elements and the needed differentiation for our population of students?????
Adopt a curriculum that is sequential, developmentally appropriate, expects mastery of grade level material and allows
for supporting students who do not master material.
adopt a different program
Adopt a mastery based program and discontinue use of EDM in Title 1 schools, distribute the focus from reading to
include math in grade level meetings and school improvement plans, have Title 1 services include more than reading
support.
Adopt something to help with the lack of extra practice that EDM is missing.
Bring in a program for adding, subtracting, multiplying, dividing, practice most days. Give teachers a few days a year
to work on lesson planning and game development.
Change to a curriculum that is more mastery based rather than spiraling. This is especially true for schools in the
military bases!
Choose curriculum that addresses the needs of various demographic areas.
Consider a program that provides more time for mastery of skills. Manipulatives to teach with important to build from
concrete examples to more abstract concepts.
Continue its practices.
Different curriculum than EDM Parents complain every year!
EDM is not a very popular program with parents. Making this program or another more user friendly would be helpful.
Encourage math blocking at more schools
Find a better Math program that teaches to proficiency. Spiraling is good, but more time needs to be spent teaching to
mastery before they move onto new things. MOre grade level review of lessons and grade level games should be
taught yearly or bi-yearly to keep teachers fresh on the material and updated on new ideas we can gain from each
other. The trainings help us to exchange ideas with each other that may not happen otherwise do to lack of time to
actually get together because we are always with our own kids.
Find a curriculum that is child friendly and prepares our students for the middle school and high school level. Going
from one style of text to another completely different style in middle school and high school is very confusing. This is
not only from a teachers point of view but as a parent as well.
find a curriculum/textbook with more repetition especially for military schools. Change the pacing guides to reflect this.
Example quarter 1 number sense to include place value, rounding, ordering numbers, addition and subtraction. (Note:
I hope these surveys are truly utilized!)
find a more repetitive curriculum
Find a new Math program. Find someone not totally in love with EDM yet knows of sucesses from other philosophies
of math and can teach us how to incorporate their ideas into our curriculum and listen to their ideas
138 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
For our title one students, I suggest using Saxon Math. It is a scripted very foundational program heavily relying on
manipulatives, and constant review. The lessons are much more age appropriate. There are some gaps, however
that would need to be covered ie.geometry.
Help those teachers who are not strong in math. They tend to neglect teaching math and put major focus on reading.
Both are important.
I felt supported with the support you provided last year. Will we get anything like this in the future?
I think we should continue using EDM but support teachers in giving instruction in fact memorization. Teachers should
be offered more math support. EDM Online should be promoted, perhaps even offering training, because it can be very
useful for students and for teachers.
I would like a new math program besides Everyday Math. I do not feel it meets enough of my students needs do to the
fact that it is a program that really addresses students who read well and understand math concepts already. It really
does not help students who are struggling in math or are ELL.
I would like to see a different math curriculum. I would also like to have a computer based math program that has
similar capabilities as Lexia (leveled appropriately to individual student needs, easy to identify which students need
help in which specific area, and data/graphs that are easy to read). I would also like to see lessons available on the
Promethean board, as well as videos reteaching skills on ASDTUBE or something similar (in a kid friendly, fun way).
More time to work on exemplars (or a curriculum that includes this sort of activity on a regular basis)
I would prefer not to use Everyday Math. It is hard for parents to understand why their child is doing boxes on 6
different math concepts in one day without having mastered any of them. And as a teacher it's hard to tell the parents
that this method is working when I don't fully support it.
It is difficult to say because we have a lot invested in EDM. I do enjoy much of it. We are given plenty of guidelines,
materials, manipulatives, web sites etc to implement the program and that is good. However, in the big picture of life,
math is math. Old fashion, basic skills need to be taught thoroughly. That is lacking in EDM.
It would be nice for new teachers to a get more help in learning the curriculum and all of the tools that are out there. I
had no idea the online and district wide resources and they could have saved me a lot of time during the beginning of
the year.
Let students that are above grade level be in a class with other students at that grade level. There is no reason to
make students sit through math lessons that they already know.
Let there be more freedom in how quickly concepts are being taught.
Listen to the lowly teachers. EDM is NOT user friendly to teachers or students.
It's fine for gifted students
probably. For those who are averaged or challenged it surely must contribute to their anxiety, anger, avoidance of
math. Tragic.
more professional development early in the year and on-going throughout
more sharing of student work and lesson ideas - more professional dialog and less discussion of data and problems
Need to be able to have math groups like reading groups...smaller in number so that concepts are taught more
individually and therefore the students have a better understanding. Spiral curriculum can be somewhat frustrating
because one tends to want to teach it to perfection. :) (not easy to do)
Offer some after school programs to struggling students (i.e. Sylvan Learning Centers)
Only that everyone change to Saxon Math...it is the best for student learning.
Schedule time for staff to meet with grade level team members, grades above and below grade level to meet and plan
on long term goals as well as targeting student gaps in understanding school wide. Without schedule time to have
these extremely valuable moments of collaboration we are not maximizing our potential as an organization.
See the answers regarding the weaknesses of the EDM program. I believe that we need a stronger math curriculum
especially in our Title schools. I have taught EDM in our district since the program was adopted. I also piloted Saxon
math. I voted for Saxon over EDM at the time. I understand that we have invested a great deal of time and money into
EDM but it is clearly not meeting the needs of our Title population. The EDM program/pace and diverse student needs
are not compatible. I also taught EDM in a language immersion school and the program was not easily translated or
compatible.
The school district should adopt the Saxon Math curriculum. They should provide more support for those schools using
Saxon Math.
139 | P a g e •
•
To pick a math program that does not spiral and learn so many contents at one time. A math program that teaches few
contents at each unit.
Use a teacher friendly well respected program like Saxon.
Grade 3:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
a basic skill piece would help. Parents need to really know what their child should be able to do by the end of each
year. Keep summer school!!!
Add basic drills to the curriculum. If we can have Spelling Bees, why not Math Bees? What happened to Math
Olympia? Students need practical, life-learning projects to apply the math skills learned. More time to play computer
math games and opportunities to teach younger/other students.
Add more time for students to learn basic math skills (add, subt & mult facts, add & subt w/ grouping, money, time)
Adopt a different program!
Adopt some intervention material.
Again, change the math curriculum to one that is better for students, not just the one that gives away the best stuff to
the math committee. I am appalled at this curriculum--I cannot wait to change districts and NEVER see this curriculum
again!
Allow individual administrators to choose the math curriculum that best meets the needs of their school population.
Allow individual schools to choose the math curriculum that best fits the needs of the kids that attend that school.
Better special education math programs
Consistency.
drop everyday math.....saxon math??
Ensure that all teachers are teaching the same program in the same school. Ensure proper training and professional
development.
Everyday Math needs to be scraped. All the schools that score high on SBA Math are using other curriculums.
Focus on allowing teachers to teach according to what is needed for their grade level rather than teaching
above/beyond what their students need. Pacing is too fast for majority of students and thus many fall through the
system because they are unable to master the basic skills.
Get a better math program. Everyday math doesn't allow for mastery before moving onto another lesson.
Get a more appropriate curriculum than Everyday Math.
Get rid of EDM and try out a different program that works to mastery, rather than spiraling. Something like Silver
Burdett.
Get rid of EDM finally. Get something with solid skill base, and proven success for ALL students, like Saxon.
Have a separate program for combination classes that is not so teacher directed.
I don't like EDM for our Title one school. I think the kids who do not have much support at home tend to struggle with
the wide range of skills we teach and the bouncing around between skills. I think we need a more concrete curriculum
where the kids learn skills to mastery and then are exposed to a lot of review.
I strongly believe that a different curriculum is necessary for TItle I schools. I do enjoy the EDM curriculum, but feel that
it is appropriate for a certain population of students. THe spiraling and constant presentation of skills above the
students ability is frustrating and not promoting the growth of students. I strongly enourage ASD to find a more
appropriate curriculum for our populations that are needing the most support!!!!!!
I would like to see more students with foundational skills and understanding of math vocabulary. I think the vocabulary
in and of itself should be a lesson. I would love to see students reach mastery, not just level of where they are not
confused anymore.
I'd like to know when children are expected to become secure in the various math concepts, and I'd like more gradelevel sharing of teaching strategies.
Keep providing training for teachers. Continue to have training for the math contact teacher so they can provide
information for their buildings.
Offer alternative curriculum such as Saxon Math to teachers who request it.
Pulling me out of class to review assessment data with other teachers is a waste of my time. I can review my own
assessment data. Pulling me out of my class in a way that gives me more work to do is counter-productive.
Bombarding me with endless technological fixes is distracting and overwhelming. Either give me actual classroom
140 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
support or leave me alone. Kids need real, human contact, and with 26 kids per class and the range of levels we have,
not to mention the behaviors and issues the kids present, there's too much going on for one teacher to be as effective
as we'd like. Sorry to be blunt, but there it is.
Replace EDM with a deeper curriculum, that teaches a skill, not just introducing it and then going on to another
concept. My students with learning disabilities are unable to be successful in such a system. They need less concepts
and more time to master them
Stay on the basics longer than one or two days at a time. I like having a specific goal once a week and working toward
it by building day by day--not jumping all over the place.
Stick to a program that is aligned with rigorous national, or international standards and see that it is taught correctly.
Provide timely math intervention coaches and computer intervention programs like Larson Math and SOAR for
struggling students. Ramp up--not dumb down. Empower grades K-2 with a Reading, Writing and Math focus. If
students are failing---provide teacher with a mentor to ramp up teaching skills.
Support Saxon more. Encourage blocking.
Take a good look at what you are asking elementary teachers to do across all the curriculum including the high needs
and neediness of our students, class sizes, assessment demands, planning time, etc. It is totally unrealistic what is
demanded of an elementary classroom teacher. If I just taught reading/language arts and math, I still couldn't fit it all
in.
Tweak the EDM curriculum.
Use Saxon and let children move to where they are developmetnally. Embellish Saxon with art and science
connections
When I used Mathland, the students learned about the concepts but not much drills. When I used Saxon math, the
students worked on the drills but not a lot on the concepts. In EDM, students learn the concepts but still need more
practice with drills. I think that there needs to be a curriculum with both. If the curriculum doesn't supply all areas then
supplemental material needs to be bought by the district instead of the individual teachers who try to fill the gaps.
Grade 4:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
adopt a new curriculum...saxon or ???
Adopt another program.
Allow teachers to choose and have access to other math programs besides EDM.
Basic facts need to be mastered. Use of computers for EDM access or math games needs to be taught to teachers.
Other resources such as trade books, videos or DVDs showing math concepts are a plus. One time, I used this very
old video showing students how much a "million" is. Except for the fuzzy quality of the film, the student were interested
in the video lesson. They were amazed with the visuals. It showed how many beads it would take to display a million.
The children then saw the concept and understood the number. Teachers need to know what resources are available
through the Math Department, and how to request them.
better train the teachers who've entered ASD recently in the EDM curriculum. It is a challenge to cover the lessons in
the time we're given each day/week/month unless you understand where the kids have been and where they're going.
Change the pacing guide. It goes way too fast.
Change to a different program that emphasis basic math skills and is more user friendly to English language learners.
Different math adoption
Do away with EDM especially in poor SES schools. These students need a solid basic math program. If ASD
implemented SAXON math district wide I guarantee district math SBA scores would rise by 7-15% in the first few years
of implementation. What could be better?
Either quite EDM or spend the money to have your teachers trained by EDM reps. The people in the math department
are great, but our time and our students education would be better managed if we had someone who knew the
program in and out directing our trainings. We need follow up in the classroom. The district needs to make sure each
teacher is teaching math each day. Maybe we need to go back to a rolling block/or team teaching philosophy. Have the
teachers that are good and math and enjoy teaching it, teach it and only it.
Expand on the material for remediation and have EDM better correlate their curriculum with our state tests.
Find a different program than EDM
Find a program that gears to mastery and that is not so heavy on reading.
141 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Find a program that will help the Title 1 schools help students master the basic skills and provide plenty of practice.
EDM moves too fast and leaves many struggling students behind. It does not give them enough practice time.
Get rid of EDM and find something that is proven to work with students in Title I schools. A reseached based
curriculum with proven results would be nice. Someone would have to show me some pretty convincing evidence to
prove to me that EDM is that curriculum.
I believe that the message to teachers needs to be to teach to the GLE's. In any content area, I believe that the
programs should be used to help students do what the GLE's state the students should do. Teachers should e
encouraged to modify what they are doing to reach each child. Teachers shouldn't feel like the program drives their
teaching. The GLE's are the minimum goal and the math program's are a tool to help us get there. If teachers need to
use other tools to help students learn, they should be encouraged to do so. That is the art of teaching.
I believe that the pacing guide and the EDM curriculum need to give more breathing room for teachers to reteach and
work on those concepts not mastered on the mid year test. As of right now, we barely have time to cover what is in our
EDM the first time, let alone reteach.
I could use more instruction in the use of Every Day Math. I also think students need more time on certain concepts
before moving ahead and not to do so just because of the pacing guide.
I don't feel that EDM meets the needs of the students at my school. We struggle to help them grasp the concepts in
EDM. Please amend or adopt another Math program.
I have strongly believe for well over a decade that math instruction in the elementary school needs to be lead by highly
qualified individuals starting with at least 3rd grade. I feel that higher thinking in math is not a strong point for the
majority of teachers in elementary. Too often math is a workbook activity instead of a rigorous endeavor. Yes there
are many who do a fantastic job in all content areas but my experience is that math and science take huge hits at this
level because the level of competency for teaching them is not what it should be.
I would not use the Everyday Math curriculum. Although there are some great resources that accompany the
curriculum, overall the material is difficult to teach and difficult to understand. Many parents have voiced their negative
opinion of Everyday Math because they cannot help their students (even with the help of Family Letters) and their
students struggle with the material.
In some cases it seems EDM is awesome and in others it seems that we are struggling with the language and missing
out on the math. I agree the language is important but some schools have parents speaking little to no english and the
"wordy" style of EDM tends to scare parents away. Freedom to pick and choose from many sources to teach math in
ways all of our students can be successful with.
Larson Math!!!
More emphasis of memorization of basic math facts at earlier grades.
More professional development for teachers in math. extra support to help students transitioning from non-EDM
schools.
More training and help in working with students who do not understand the addition and subtraction.
offer credit classes, provide materials as needed, in service
PROVIDE MONEY FOR TUTORING AND EXTRA HELP. Non-Title schools don't have any! It's ridiculous that we can
no longer provide interventions for students who are not meeting goals.
Provide more hands-on training using technology with teachers. Give time to practice the skills shown. Grade level
meetings with expert guidance using tools that are available to augment the curriculum and to analyze assessment
data.
Re-assess the math curriculum. I do not think it fits the needs of our varying population of students.
STOP USING EVERYDAY MATH!!!!! It is a language heavy program, that is not geared for all learners. It does not
emphasize repetition and practice, and parents do not like nor understand it.
Teach to mastery for key concepts.
to adopt a new curriculum for the elementary level
Too much to teach. Too many different programs in the district.
tweak EDM so slow down Quality versus quantity!!!
Grade 5:
142 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Adopt a new curriculum that is more focused on how students learn and what will make them the most successful
students they can be in the area of math, instead of being driven by which company happens to give them the best
"deal" on textbooks and materials.
adopt Saxon
Allow each building a choice of a few different curriculum programs so that they can make a better fit for their own
school population, classrooms, or learning levels. I know money is a huge consideration, but if teachers were allowed
to stray from the scripted curriculum and not worry so much about how far behind they may be in the pacing guide,
more meaningful teaching and learning can take place. EDM, despite its promises, does not work for every building or
child, and teachers like myself are giving more and more of their personal time to come up with supplemental materials
to prepare students to meet the standards and GLE's.
Army base schools, with our extremely high student transient rate, need a more fundamentals-based Math program.
Change Everyday Math to a program that is more user friendly and focues more on the basics in math
Change math programs. EDM was a great experiment, but has not proven to be the kind of program that works for the
majority of the students. It fails to meet the needs of most students and the spiral doesn't work for many reasons. This
is not the fault of the children. We have students who are very capable. However, the program lets them down. Only
teachers who are really good math teachers can have success with this program. All parents hate it and have wanted
it changed for year. Engineers in our community do not support this program and find much fault with it. We have
fought this battle for to long. It is time to get rid of it.
Drop Everyday Math and adopt a curriculum that meets the needs of all students, including the five military schools in
ASD
Drop Everyday Math. Adopt a different curriculum that has a proven track record and spends more time focusing on
basic skills aligned with GLEs. Add a computerized program such as Accelerated Math to support learners at different
levels of proficiency. Whatever is decided, institute mandated training on the curriculum so all teachers are operating
with the same current/updated information. Provide professional development opportunities that are mandated and for
which substitutes and time during work days is provided. Exit test students for proficiency on district standards and if
they don't pass then have a mechanism in place that drives parents to put them in summer school or mandatory
tutoring or allow the students to be held back until they can pass.
follow pacing
For elementary switch to Houghton Mifflin math, it combines reference sections with the lesson being taught, it shows
ways to do each lesson with groups and independent practice builds stronger basic skill levels.
get a new curriculum!!!
Get rid of EDM and use Saxon instead. Utilize homogeneous grouping to meet math needs of low, on level, and high
students.
Get rid of EDM.
Get rid of the pacing guide.. it is unrealistic. Teachers need to take the time to make sure students master the core
concepts before being rushed on.
Go back to a real math program
I do not have any suggestions at this time.
I know they don't want to hear this, but I think adopting the EDM program again was a mistake. When I taught it for 4
years many of the primary grade teachers did not teach it well and students came in very unprepared.
I really think that a comparison truly needs to be looked at between the student achievement of students at alternative
or charter schools that use different math programs.
I would ask for a new curriculum that works for all kids. EDM only works for about one third of the kids at my school.
The rest of the kids are lost. We need skills and concepts they can relate to and will build a strong foundation for
middle and high school.
I would like a Beginning of the Year math assessment for each grade level, similar to the Mid year assessment.
I would love to do Saxon Math. I have used it before and really liked it. I have gotten used to Every day Math, but I
have never liked it.
I would really like to see Everyday Math replaced in the Elementary grades. If not totally replaced in every school, then
bring back the more traditional programs in the lower income schools. Right now, my students are being asked to
learn exponents and scientific notation, which are not in the GLE's, when they need more instruction in fractions,
143 | P a g e multiplication,and division. This program is not enabling teachers to teach these concepts in an indepth way, but
instead fostering the method of teaching which is an "inch deep and a mile wide."
• I would really like to see us do a math review and think about a new curriculum.
• I'm aware that EDM is here for a long time, but I hope at the next math adoption ASD would take an unbiased look at
other math curriculums(perhaps by learning what other states are having success with) and adopt a child friendly
curriculum that promotes learning.
• Let go of EDM. When you find yourself in a hole- STOP DIGGING!
• Make sure parents know about the student reference book online. Many do not know that they have this help available
to them.
• Make sure the math program fits for the specific school! Our student population doesn't get EDM when they read the
directions.
I also have a love/hate relationship with EDM. Sometimes I really like what they do with it and
sometimes I don't. I think it jumps around too much for our students and doesn't allow them to become good at one
computation method before moving on the the next lesson. The pacing chart is fine, but I have to spend 2 weeks on
division and fractions instead of 1 day for these lessons. The pacing chart doesn't allow too much for this. It's
frustrating. I know there are "extra" days in the pacing chart, but the kids need more than 1 days practice!
• Not sure, maybe change to different math curriculum
• Our kids don't know their basics and the EDM curriculum does not address that. We need a curriculum that addresses
kids who come to us with a variety of holes in their abilities.
• Provide a curriculum that places a greater emphasis on basic operations in the primary grades, so that by the
intermediate grades, the students are ready to move on to more in depth computational skills. The spiraling curriculum
leaves many students confused, and when they don't have a firm foundation, try to give up.
• Provide a different textbook more in line with the needs of the students in this community
• Provide adequate time to teach the prescribed curriculum. The advised time is 60 - 90 minutes per day, we are given
60 minutes and this is not adequate to teach the curriculum. Provide teachers with professional development not only
in how to use the curriculum, but in math content knowledge so that we are adequate math teachers and understand
the concepts we are teaching at a deeper level. This should be required as many teacher preparation programs do not
adequately teach math conent knowledge to pre-service teachers.
• Require every grade level to have certain standards which must be mastered.
• Revise the Everyday Math Curriculum, or adopt a program that is more aligned with the types of problems on State
Tests.
• take an unbiased look at the data and research to see how well students districtwide are succeeding as they move to
the next level (elementary to middle to high)
• Teachers could have a course in the history of math so they could appreciate it. I notice many teachers don't like math
or don't have a solid confidence in their math skills. So this problem goes back before this generation. How do we turn
it around? Well, Math is an interesting subject with a fascinating history. Math is a good life skill to have. It's not a
necessary evil so we can get ahead as a civilization.
• The GLE's are too many. It seems ASD's GLE's are often higher than AK standards. It would be better to match them
up.
• The toughest part of math education is that people who "get" math become the teachers of math. They see the world
differently than about 50% of our population of students--those kids who NEED PICTURES IN THEIR HEADS before
the concepts make sense. I wish we had more math teachers who understood this group of students' learning needs.
• training with EDM for ALL- even those who have had it before. For most of us it has been 4-5 years
• YES!!!
Grade 6 Elementary:
get rid of the mid year assessment - mandate minimum instructional time (i.e. 70 minutes for 6th grade each
day)
• A curriculum that supports the needs of all students.
• Adopt a kid-friendly math curriculum. See my earlier comments on what makes a good math textbook. Please get rid
of the Everyday Math Program.
• Adopt a new curriculum that would better meet the needs of our students.
144 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Allow schools with high transient rates from outside ASD choose a different curriculum that would be better suited for
our students.
As stated, I think the kids need more drill and practice with basics. There is so much in each grade level, that
sometimes the lower grades don't have time to do as much with the foundation. By 6th, without that strong math
foundation, many kids struggle.
ASK teachers. I've got suggestions up the ying yang. The higher ups think they know how to solve the problem. They
have their own agenda, to look good for their bosses, not the students.
Consider a different math program than EDM
Create SMART Board and Promethean lessons for the curriculum.
Don't add anyting to our plates. Mine is full and my students are getting it. Check with Mears to see if Kincaid is
showing holes.
Don't depend on one program to meet the needs of all students.
EDM isn't perfect, but no math program out there is perfect. What I want to see is practice problems to go with each
lesson that really assess the skill they were taught in that lesson. You can't tell that with just one or two problems (this
is what EDM says you can do) and the assessments need to test that skill as it is. Don't complicate the issue but
teaching a sixth grade skill then giving them a 7th or 8th grade level version of that same skill. All this does is frustrate
the student and the teacher.
Eliminate Everyday Math. Look at the sort of programs being used in countries with more successful math students.
Focus on high level mathematical ideas. Help teacher understand the math they teach, not just curriculum navigation.
Focus on deepening mathematical knowledge and pedagogy. All curriculums have strengths and weaknesses. All
curriculums may need to be supplemented in certain aspects. Offer true mathematical professional development. The
math consortium is excellent. The offers that came out of the Teacher's Development Group were excellent. Not sure
if these are still offered, but it would be very beneficial. Mid-year benchmarks and SBAs are not very helpful in terms of
a formative assessment tool. Interventions must be timely and doable. When teachers must follow a curriculum, it is
not realistic to have them use a large over arching assessment to develop interventions from in the long run. After a
week or two, that data is out of date. So, instead of telling teachers to give mid-year benchmarks and provide
interventions, actually teach teachers how to make and give timely assessments in the context of their existing
curriculum that can be scored and organized quickly and immediately used. If it takes too long, if it is too cumbersome,
if it address too many standards, no assessment will be used in a sustainable way. We must break this process down
into a systematic approach that fits w/ our current curriculum and it must be small enough to be used effectively.
Get a textbook and dump EDM
get more teacher input
Get rid of EDM
I feel that EDM is a good program, but by 6th grade the learners are very diverse. Not all are ready for the pre-algebra
skills that are in the 6th grade curriculum. Others are taking pre-algebra online, so the discrepancy becomes even
larger. Class sizes are always huge for 6th grade, and it is hard to reach the strugglers with this curriculum. I would
ask ASD to look at Saxon. I would like it if 6th grade math could be leveled so those who need to focus on basic skills
could reach their potential, and those beyond that need could be challenged.
I think that EDM is not meeting the needs of students in the ASD. Students are not picking up concepts on the spiral
curriculum.
I think that grouping students by ability 'tracking' if you will starting from a much earlier time than middle school would
be most helpful. Having students with a wide ability range in one classroom does little to support the needs of the
diverse needs of the students in the class, especially when you consider how short a time is available.
I would advise ASD to adopt a new elementary math program that includes mastery of concepts in addition to
introducing new concepts.
I would like to see a program adopted that emphasizes mastery of basic concepts. Schools that have a high transient
rate do not do well with EDM. Many students develop a dislike for math because this program does not allow them to
gain confidence before moving on.
it doesnt benefit our population...get a new series
Keep doing what we've already been doing. Rome wasn't built in one day!!
Listen to the teachers and adopt a curriculum that teachers want. Dump Everyday Math.
145 | P a g e •
•
•
•
NA
new curriculum besides Everyday Math
Offer in-service trainings focused on teaching math
Please, I beg you to allow Title One schools to use a curriculum that meets the needs of our students--and it's not
EDM. I am so tired of hearing that our low test scores are from "teachers not teaching EDM right." There is certainly
an element of that, but I know my students can learn and I know I can teach them. If I had a better curriculum I could
do a lot more.
• possibly look at different curriculum.
• The vast majority of students who come to Northwood's Saxon program from the district's Everyday Math struggle.
EDM may be creative, but that is its flaw in that students lack any math mental organization. They're all over the place
in their algorithms, choosing creativity over a more direct and often easier approach. Students that come to me from
EDM have not had any expectation of mastery or basic, solid algorithms that allow students to build more complex
algorithms. In addition, EDM is too reading intensive for our special ed kids. Those students do well with Saxon
because they can focus on the math concepts and not have to wade through long, drawn out problems that they can't
read.
• work on showing work from grade 1 (showing subtracting 3 from BOTH sides of an equation rather than just one when
solving)
Elementary Combo:
• Adopt a different program.
• Don't keep switching curriculums or reviewing so harshly what we are doing and doing well. Encourage proper
placement of Middle School students. Don't put them in pre-algebra because the parents want them to be advanced.
Put them in pre-algebra is they are developmemtally ready for it.
• Examine the number of concepts that students are expected to master and decide if they are absolutely necessary at
elementary. For instance, are probability and statistics concepts that are developmentally appropriate for testing at the
elementary level?
• Explore other math curriculums
• Find a program that is less language based and focus more on math computation/calculation skills
• Get another program besides Everyday Math.
• Get rid of EDM.
• give up EDM, Saxon and other programs are much better for our transitional population. I teach Saxon, but my older
two children went through the EDM program and struggled until they reached middle school. EDM is NOT working for
our students.
• Give up Every Day Math.
• Having all the elementary schools on the same curriculum, having a different curriculum for resource besides number
worlds, different math trainings besides how to teach curriculum. The one with picture books gets a lot of bang for the
buck with kids.
• I am happy with the program that I get to use.
• I think the district needs to look at switching the math curriculum and using saxon for students k-6.
• I wish the EDM program was more steam-lined, the lessons take so long that we are always rushing, but I think the
curriculum is really great.
• Instead of wasting time and money on Successmaker, which the students hate, use tenmarks.com and
brightstorm.com which are both free. Also stop moving students onward in math when they are not proficient or by
basing their math movement on SBA scores. There should be no such thing as math 8 it should solely be a PreAlgebra course. All students should have at least taken a Pre-Algebra before high school. The current Math 8 robs
students of ever taking anything but remedial math for the rest of their education. should be the minimum requirement.
Instead of support classes, there needs to be basic skills recovery courses for those students that get to middle school
and still can't add, subtract, multiply or divide.
• Keep the programs we are now using so we don't have to go through a learning curve again with using different
materials. After choosing a program, stick with it until our kindergarteners get to high school so we can track progress.
• Look at each individual school and determine what would be best for that population of children and teachers. And
then stick with it until the teachers are comfortable with it.
146 | P a g e •
•
•
More trainings and professional development!
No recommendations at this time.
Provide a more clear GLE aligned to each lesson of what is expected to me mastered for that lesson/unit/grade level.
Provide a "curriculum or supplement" and expect it to be taught that expects all students to know their addition facts at
the end of 1st, subtraction at the end of second, multiplication at the end of 3rd and division at the end of 4th. Set up a
schedule of when math support teachers will be in each school they are assigned so each school gets equal
assistance and help. So teachers know when a "math expert" will be in the school and can count on them. OR Get rid
of the math support teachers and lower class sizes.
• Strengthen math skills for preteachers.
• There are other effective programs for math besides EDM. I think Title schools should have a say in what math
program will best meet the needs of their students.
• Understand that Everyday Math is not for everyone. It does not teach to mastery. Some kids need this!!
• We need a general curriculum that has more frequent review and practice. EDM's spiral is really hard for students in
our Title schools.
Grade 6 Middle School:
• Get a different curriculum.
• I have heard that the skill builder program is great for increasing basic math facts. This would be helpful once a week.
Also the McDougall curriculum that was adopted is awesome and has many great resources for the technologically
enhanced teacher. I love it. Wish we could replace Mathscape with this program.
• I would have basic math level skills that students should master or be secure in at each grade level There should
also be pre and post assessments for each skill Parents should also be held accountable (attendance, tardies, and
tools to support at home)
• Look at a different middle school math adoption
• More lateral conversations and planning -- what did the student do last year? What skills will they need for next year?
The state GLEs are readily available for teachers on the ASD ARS data website however the ASD district standards
are not as readily available. They need to also be somewhere easily accessible online so that teachers can be
knowledgable about the District standards and the State GLE and how both are imbedded in the curriculum being
used.
• More professional development.
• Professional Development on Manipulative Use in Intermediate Grades and Technology Incorporation
• Scrap the Mathscape curriculum.
• smaller class sizes for math
• To keep Everyday Math for ALL 6th graders. It is where all the Everyday Math comes together and is "topped off." To
push them into Mathscape is a mistake: they don't know how to take notes, the information is presented in a
COMPLETELY different way, terminology can be confusing, there are gaps that a middle school teacher would not be
aware of. We need to ditch Mathscape. I have found MATH CONNECTS is a wonderful text and dovetails with the
Pre-Algebra and Algebra text beautifully. At the very last ditch Mathscape for 6th graders and let them finish Everyday
Math.
• We should have 1 hour and 30m for a math class in the 6th grade.
Grade 7:
• "Office Hours" for struggling middle school students so that they can have more one-on-one time with teachers.
• A new curriculum is needed and professional development days are needed to learn the material before it's brought
into the classroom. Teachers need time to collaborate in professional developments to address strengths and
weaknesses.
• Adopt a more skill based program/text.
• Adopt a new math book other than Mathscape.
• Adopt curriculum/textbook , like Saxon, McDougal Littel or a similar textbook that teaches mathematics in a
conventional learning format: introduces the concept, provides several examples, offers proofs where necessary, offers
an exercise set that aligns to the examples and spirals the concepts among each other as the textbook/learning
progresses. Implement this curriculum at all levels to ensure conformity for ASD students.
• Adopt the McDougal Littel Math text for middle school - quickly, please.
147 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Allow the school to pick the curriculum that would be most beneficial to its population and needs.
better curriculum and a pass-with-mastery of skill method.
Change the 7th-8th grade Mathscapes book to one that more reflects what is being done in Pre-Algebra, Algebra, and
Geometry.
Choose a student/parent friendly textbook that offers technology resources online.
Dump everyday math and Mathscape adopt Saxon Math
Each year the students are given SBA test to see if they are at grade level in math. If a student is far below they
should not be passed to the next grade. Students develop physically and mentally at different rates, why are they
expected to learn at the same rate. The idea that no child should be help back is wrong. They are not being held
back, but given more time to develop where they can be successful. Students should not be coming to 7th grade
unable to do what was to be mastered in 4th grade. One more year of foundations has never hurt a kid.
For math achievement to improve in the district we need to get some teachers who are mathematical in the elementary
levels, get a program that will develop a strong foundation, especially in the intermediate grades, and leave the higher
level, more in-depth concepts until the students are ready for it. There are too many teachers in the district that have a
fear of math and it shows itself in their students and the EDM and MathScape texts do nothing to help ease that fear in
both teachers and students. Attitude is so important in learning math that if fear is in place I usually spend the whole
year trying to ease that fear and then it starts all over again in the fall.
Get rid of MathScape.
Have the same text/company across the district. Different Text books have different vocabulary. Very confusing for
the students.
I think ASD should stop putting any more money into its current elementary and definitely the Middle school curriculum,
and look at districts across the US for curriculums that actually work. Did you examine our text book? The middle
curriculum should feed effectively into the High School curriculum and the elementary should prepare students for the
middle curriculum...the same texts should be used throughout the district. I would choose a math program that is age
appropriate at the elementary and middle level that would prepare students for the high school curriculum. The
program should be of the same series so that concepts are tied together or built on from year to year. It should be
strong in basic facts and essential concepts that will prepare students for algebra, geometry, and higher math in later
years. It should have manipulatives, drill and practice, and many formative assessments and supplementary materials
to meet the needs of all students. There might even be a few different levels at each grade so advanced students can
work on more challenging materials while struggling students can also work on concept-appropriate materials.
Elementary teachers should receive math training to better present math curriculum to their students. I taught
elementary school for 20 years and know that most primary teachers do not feel confident or adequate to teach math
concepts and often just teach concepts that they know. I also think that the district needs to listen to teachers who
teach the curriculum and chose a text based on its own merit and its supplementary materials.....forget the numbers
game and closed door discussion after teacher unput. Teachers should receive formal training from the publisher's
representatives who would explain all facets of the curriculum. Supplementary materials should be provided to each
teacher for use in his/her classroom.
In the elementary grades, get the teachers to teach the EDM curriculum. Principals need to be 'on board' and support
the curriculum. In the middle school, adopt a decent textbook (why do we no longer use Connected Math???).
Promote conversation between elementary and middle school teachers.
Lower ability level classes need to have a smaller teacher to student ratio to be able to actually help students make
progress. Focus on teacher instruction instead of technological crutches.
Revise elementary curriculum to include basic skills. New middle school math texts that actually include math needed
for student's to pass algebra.
Students at the middle levels should be given a new textbook. The book we are using now was meant to be used in
6th, 7th, and 8th grade. Currently, the students in 6th grade are doing Everyday Math. Then in 7th and 8th grade we
are trying to use the Mathscape textbook, but are forced to have to create/find resources to supplement it to a level that
is understandable by our students. As a result, students are missing a lot of material that they should be learning at the
middle level.Teachers should not be required to have to hunt this material down if there is already an approved
textbook. By the time students reach high school, it has been two years since they have seen a "traditional" textbook
and are then required to be able to function/keep up in an Algebra class.
148 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
Teach all 6th graders Everyday Math, not just half the district & teach all 7th graders Pre-Algebra. Even those who may
not be ready will benefit more from the Pre-Algebra text we now have than they do from Mathscape. Then offer PreAlgebra again at 8th grade for those you may need to repeat the material to be successful. Currently there is not 8th
grade Pre-Algebra as an option. That or purchase a new curriculum that contains the projects that the districts wants,
but also includes some traditional math & has support materials. Math Connects is just one example that I have seen
that appears to accomplish this and could be used for 6-8.
the district wants to push more students into algebraic thinking earlier and earlier. Brain research shows that younger
student's brains are not yet capable of abstract thinking. By pushing abstract thinking earlier, the result is that students
then come to the conclusion at an earlier age that they are "dumb" in math, or "can't do" math. This is sad to see,
because the reality is that the curriculum is asking them to do something they are incapable of doing .... it's like asking
a kid to lift a weight that's too heavy .... if it's too far out of their reach, then they will just not try. It was very sad to see
a study a year or two ago that linked increased graduation rates with students who took Algebra in 8th grade, and the
suggestion was made that if we just make students take Algebra by 8th grade then we will increase the graduation
rate. The reality is that the students who are taking accelerate are already "achievers", so it is more likely that they will
graduate high school. It is not linked to the math curriculum or taking Algebra. More basic skills at lower grade levels
would be very helpful to increase math achievement
There should be a program for grades 1-5 that focuses on concepts, skills and problem solving, which threads into a 68 curriculum, which helps to continue prepare students for Algebra and higher maths.
use the new pre algebra book for the seventh and eighth grades.
What do you see as the strengths of the math textbook you are using with students? Exploratory lessons that apply
mathematical concepts in scenario students can relate to. Lessons within "phases" build conceptual awareness. What
do you see as the weaknesses of the math textbook you are using with students? No clear examples, limited &
missing definitions, limited practice, no guided practice, difficult for absent students to make up work on their own,
difficult for parents to use to help students. Students tell me they find the "scenarios" contrived and "silly". Not
enough homework that relates to the lesson. Poor selection of ready made tests/quizzes. Examview Pro is difficult to
use and question bank questions often do not match what was taught in the phase. No ancillary materials to support
struggling students or for enrichment or for extra practice. Teacher's edition is poorly set up, answers are not always
with lesson, and examples of student work sometimes show incorrect work without indicating it is incorrect. Difficult
for new to math, new to grade level, and 1st year teachers to learn to implement. On-line textbook does not work with
Macs Company has indicated it is not really supporting text series. Difficult for LEP students and Resource students.
Requires teachers to find a lot of supplemental material.
What would make the math textbook stronger for your
students?
Frankly, I was an advocate for this text, and after using it with fidelity, I no longer consider this a text
suitable for my students. I believe it is time to look for a new text. I had thought the Handbook would be useful but,
since we don't have enough for all students, and it requires middle schoolers to use 2 books, it has not proven to be
useful. I no longer use it to assign work for students who take vacations. The only purpose I have for it is I will make
copies of "explanation pages" (i.e.: steps for creating a circle graph) for students to glue into their math notebooks as a
reference. What support
Grade 8:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Mears Middle School is grades 7 and 8 only, therefore a grade 6-8 curriculum (such as MathScape) will only work if the
6th grade teachers in our feeder elementary schools are teaching the 6th grade curriculum. 2) All teachers need to
follow the curriculum and the pacing guides so that students that transfer between schools are in similar units/chapters.
3) use a prealgebra curriculum with the Math8 students that prepares them for algebra A or algebra1 in high school
Add more math levels. Pre-Algebra at 8th grade is badly needed. Also need an enriched math 7/8 along with regular
math 7/8 classes.
Adopt the new pre algebra textbook and give us teachers support in this new tool.
All levels us the same publisher, such as McDougal (Pre Algebra, Algebra, Geometry) all use the same publisher....it
builds and had the same style.
Allow individual Middle Schools to problem solve and solve their own problems creatively...WITHOUT THE CONTROL
OF "TEACHER EXPERTS"!
Computation is the weakness that I encounter most often. Many of my students (some who have been in ASD for
years) struggle with basic multiplication and division. Even though they can understand more complex mathematical
149 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Middle Combo:
•
•
•
•
concepts (volume and surface area for example), they struggle to be able to succeed without a calculator because of
basic multiplication mistakes.
Create either and 8th grade Pre-Algebra class or Algebra A and Algebra B in 7th and 8th grade.
Encourage parents and students to have a positive attitude towards math. Many parent's and student's are constantly
saying that they hate math. When students enter in with a negative attitude it hinders their ability to learn math.
Get rid of Everyday Math and Mathscapes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Give teachers time to work with other teachers at different schools to create supplemental lessons and share ideas and
tests with each other.
Hold students accountable to their academic success by retaining them when they fail. There was a time when this
district did this and students feared being left behind their peers. Now students just don't care because they know they
will be moved to the next grade level regardless of their lack of mastery. We should also have math-specific teachers
in the elementary grades and go back to drill and practice of math facts.
Let us teach. Require all students behind in skills to take an extra year long blocked Math class with a mandatory
study hall to get work done.
Listen carefully to what the math teachers say throughout the district and do not be so concerned that we use different
delivery methods to teach instruction. Too much time and effort is spent looking for one product, manual or curriculum
for an extremely varied population from Girdwood to Mirror Lake.
More interaction between different grade level teachers about specific math topics whose mastery must be achieved in
different grades through Professional development trainings within their respective schools. Teachers teaching topics
aligned with their respective grade level. Access to technology by Math teachers in the classroom (laptops for
struggling students or excellent students) so that they can work ahead of others or improve their current skills at their
own pace during lunch or after-school.
New curriculum
Pre Algebra over 2 years in middle school from the Pre-Algebra text with supplemental support for the work there. A
pacing guide established to support the standards for each grade level.
Put teachers in the elementary schools that are Math teachers (HQ in Math). Most elementary teachers aren't HQ in
Math. Give middle school math teachers more time to prep and grade. Most of us have 3 or 4 preps while all other
subject area teachers have two. We have twice as much work!
Re-visit the Math 7 and Math 8 textbooks as I don't think they meet the needs of the students.
Smaller class size, longer periods.
They need to quit switching the curriculum to a new textbook every 2 to 3 years!! This is causing students to have
severe gaps in their comprehension of math concepts. There needs to be a consistency over the years and through
the grade levels. Students should also be grouped according to skill level.
use the same text book (publisher)- through all grade levels especially 7th through 12th grade. Get elementary
students proficient in computation. Make middle school meaningful as far as pass / fail and not just move on for the
sake of moving on. Our students have learned that no one fails regardless of effort or ability/ knowledge. Forget grade
levels and place students at ability levels.
We need continued district support and access to trainings. At this point it would be best if the trainings are offered but
not mandatory. That way teachers could select the trainings that they need most.
We need additional resources
including extra examples & parent packets that we can share with parents as we begin a unit in Mathscape so they
understand more easily the concepts that we're covering and how(&why) we are covering them.
I think students need to take more responsibility to engage with their studies. The teachers are doing their part.
Students need to be held accountable to themselves for studying.
Keep things consistant. If you are using everyday math in 6th grade elsewhere then use it at middle school who teach
6th graders. Use a traditional text book for grades 7-8 to better prepare those students for algebra, geometry, etc.
Make sure that your elementary teachers are teaching their programs with fidelity and including all students in their
instruction and that at least 90 minutes a day is being spent on math.
We are using a remedial math curriculum, I think it is just about right for our students. It is a little too hard for some
students.
No Designation:
150 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Get rid of Everyday Math at the elementary level 2. Can Mathscape 3. Offer support for hands on activities, and ESL
teachers
ADD MORE HOURS OF MATH EVERY DAY, especially in grades 2-6. STOP rushing through it. Kids can't read
today, so they can't read the math. My 5th graders on 1/31/11 didn't know what a diagram is. WE NEED to spend more
time on reading. With out reading, who can do math???
Allow some of the more alternative methods of instruction to be presented to the math teachers in ASD
Everyday Math is an excellent program, but it does require a block of time each day. I would recommend that
teachers allocate about 90 minutes per day for math, possibly split up over the day. A short math lesson that does not
allow for student practice and understanding is doing a disservice to our students. More staff development may be
needed and principals should have authority to suggest when staff should be trained or retrained.
Find a curriculum that supports the GLEs andgives the kids lost of computation practice as well as higher level
thinking, graphs, story problems. And find a program that is an easy transition for kids when they go to Junior high .
Find another program to replace EDM. Too much to soon. With State GLE's in place, why can't the state or district
create a program to fit these GLE's and not purchase programs that don't meet the needs of what we expect student's
to know on the SBAs.
Get a new elementary text that fits our student (transient, ell, sped, low income)
Get another serices for all grades but one for special education since we didn't make progress in math.
Get rid of EDM and have text books for grades 3-6.
Get rid of Every Day Math - it's too expensive and it has too much emphasis on spiraling over mastery.
I would like to see other math programs available because I don't believe Everyday math meets all my students'
mathematical needs
I would recommend a curriculum review. I believe there should be consistency across the district with a core
curriculum. For example, the students in my program will face barriers to inclusion in the regular classroom setting
when there are different adopted curricula. I also believe there needs to be more accountability for teaching the core
curriculum with fidelity.
Implement Algebra concepts at earlier ages. Aim for higher math goals while supplementing with remediation and
conceptual understanding activities.
Look at other math programs and have more than one adoptions for school to choose from. Math program should fit
the school and students needs.
Look at other programs (besides EDM) which might help our diverse student population. If EDM is not replaced, more
materials (such as Success Maker, an excellent computer resource for teaching students at various levels), should be
provided. Professional development using music and movement to teach math would reach more students.
Look into another math program.
Math trainings
MORE computation skills addressed at the lower elementary grades. Students need to be proficient in these skills
before they reach 5th-6th grade. There also needs to be a more realistic pacing guide, although if computation skills
were addressed, then maybe the pacing guide would be more realistic.
MORE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT ACROSS THE BOARD
More training at grade level, more focus on math--reading eats into a great deal of time!
Need a stronger emphasis on making sure all students know and understand the basic function concepts.
New adoption...get rid of EDM and similar materials K-12. Have progress monitoring (AIMS or???) district-wide. Make
sure Sped is in the loop and doing what they should be doing as per the research on effectiveness and/or at least to
match what the district is doing. Ensure sped have materials they need to allow students to access the core
curriculum.
provide more math coaches; more professional development opportunities
Provide Sped. with a better choice of math materials, besides EDM and Number Worlds and provide more
manipulatives.
Re-evaluate the appropriateness of EDM for all programs
reconsider EDM
SAXON< SAXON< SAXON!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
151 | P a g e •
•
•
•
•
•
Scrap the math experts and put them back in the classroom or have them retire. Whole group trainings on inservice
days that we did in the past was much more effective in my opinion.
Since I didn't see another spot to share this info, I think it is important to note that many middle school math teachers
also use the McDougal-Littel prealgebra and algebra texts. Some even teach geometry and/or algebra II. Mathscapes
is only used for students in grade level math (e.g. Math 7, Math 8). I like many things about the recent adoption of the
new MD prealgebra and algebra texts. As for possible improvements.... Many students entering 7th grade are not
ready to take even Math 7 because they are far below proficient and have not even mastered 4th/5th and/or 6th grade
math GLEs. I do not believe math 7 is an appropriate placement for these students. Placing them in math 7 seems to
set them up for failure, even with individualizing the best I can. I think they would be able to learn more over the year
(perhaps even catch up to their grade level peers) if allowed to work from the level at which they left off in elementary
school. I think there should be a math class designed to teach/re-teach 4th/5th/6th grade GLEs with the intent to bring
students up to speed, rather than setting them up for stress and failure with math 7. I also think that all 6th grade
students should be using Mathscapes 6 in order to build the appropriate foundation for success in Mathscapes 7.
Teachers College in NYC has a middle school "math camp" that is very good. It's taught by a very experienced,
talented middle school math teacher. You learn many student-friendly ways of teaching math concepts and are given
lots of handouts and resources.
To take a serious look at other "research based" curriculums aside from EDM; spiral curriculums are not successful
with all students. Those students who are successful with this program will be successful in many math programs;
those who are not successful in EDM are truly struggling without the luxury of a long enough time to master a skill
before moving on to the next.
try a different program
We need a different curriculum. We need a math program that goes back to basics: math facts, mastering concepts
before adding to them, strategies that parents recognize and are able to support. One such example might be Saxon
Math
152 | P a g e 
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement