Board Meeting Items for September 10, 2008

Board Meeting Items for September 10, 2008
Siuslaw School
District 97J
Board of Directors’
Meeting Information
Packet
September 10, 2008
Siuslaw School District 97J
Regular Board of Directors Meeting
Wednesday, September 10, 2008 at 6:30 p.m.
Notice and Agenda
1. Call to Order, Flag Salute – Chairperson Burns
2. Approve Consent Agenda – Mr. Winterscheid
• Minutes of the August 13, Regular Meeting
3. Reports/Public Participation
a. Public Participation – Chairperson Burns
b. Superintendent’s Report – Mr. Winterscheid
Insight School of Oregon
c. Principals’/Special Programs Director Reports
d. Board Member Items
4. Old Business
a. Report from the Facility Signage Committee on Baseball Field House
b. Policy FF – Naming Buildings –Second Reading
c. 2008-2009 Board Goals
5. New Business
a. Quality Child Care of Florence
b. Enrollment Summary
c. 2008-2009 Superintendent’s Goals – First Reading
d. OSBA Board of Directors’ Election
e. High School Out-of-State Field Trip
6. Personnel – Mr. Winterscheid
Approve Contract to Gretchen DeWald
7. Adjourn
Siuslaw School District 97J
2111 Oak Street
Florence, OR 97439
Presented to the Board of Directors:
Subject:
Reason:
Consent Agenda
New Business
Item No:
2
Attachment:
Yes
From:
Mr. Winterscheid
Date: September 10, 2008
Background:
The board is required to approve minutes of previous meetings so that they can be
entered into district records. The minutes of the August 13 meeting make up this
month’s consent agenda.
Recommendation:
Administration recommends approval of the consent agenda.
Resolution # 091008-2
Be it Resolved that the Siuslaw School District Board of Directors approve the
consent agenda as presented.
Paul Burns, Board Chair
Derek Smith, Business Manager/Deputy Clerk
Siuslaw School District 97J
Regular Board of Directors Meeting
Wednesday August 13, 2008 at 6:30 p.m.
Minutes
1. Call to Order, Flag Salute
Chairperson Phelps called the meeting to order followed by the flag salute.
2. Elect 2008-2009 Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson
Mr. Winterscheid advised the board that during the first meeting in the new fiscal
year the board needs to elect a new Board Chair and Vice-Chair. Chairperson
Phelps opened nominations.
John Murphey nominated Paul Burns for Board Chair and Caroline Estill seconded
for approval. The board voted and Paul Burns was elected unanimously.
John Murphey nominated Tammy Butler for Vice-Chair and Paul Burns seconded
for approval. The board voted and Tammy Butler was elected unanimously.
3. Adopt Organizational Requirements for the 2008-2009 Fiscal Year
Mr. Winterscheid advised the board that it needed to adopt the district’s
organizational requirements for the 2008-2009 fiscal year. These requirements
authorize and designate organizations to facilitate district business.
Resolution #081308-1 Organizational Requirements
John Murphey moved to adopt the 2008-2009 Organizational Requirements as
presented and Paul Burns seconded for approval. The motion carried unanimously.
Outgoing Chairman Phelps turned the gavel over to new Chairman Burns. Mr.
Burns asked that the board observe a moment of silence to remember Will Beidler,
district bus driver, who passed away this summer.
4. Approve Consent Agenda
Mr. Winterscheid presented the consent agenda which included the following:
• Minutes of the June 11 Regular Meeting
• Minutes of the June 23 Special Meeting
• Minutes of the August 11 Worksession Meeting
Resolution # 081308-4 Consent Agenda
Caroline Estill moved to approve the consent agenda as presented. John Murphey
seconded for approval and the motion carried unanimously.
5. Reports/Public Participation
a. Public Participation
Laura Smith spoke to the Board about the Florence Bridge Organization that
coordinates volunteers for the district. She also updated the board on the
Textbook Fund. The Fund’s goal for the 2008-2009 school year is to raise
$75,000 which would pay for the district’s upcoming math book adoption. Ms.
Smith also reported that the foundation contributed $17,000 for last year’s
middle school outdoor school program.
Nancy Phelps thanked Laura Smith for all of the work that she does for the
school district. She noted that everyone appreciates it very much but may not
voice their appreciation as much as they should.
b. Superintendent’s Report
Mr. Winterscheid reported that…
…he had the preliminary Annual Yearly Progress (AYP) reports. He reiterated
that these reports are preliminary and some changes will be made to them before
they become official. Neither the high school nor the middle school met AYP.
The high school did not meet in the category of economic disadvantaged
students. The middle school did not meet in the special education population.
The No Child Left Behind Act stipulates that all schools must meet by 2014.
…the security enhancement projects are ongoing this summer and he hopes that
most will be completed by the time school starts.
…he met with the administrators over two full days and was impressed with
their enthusiasm and professionalism. He referred to the early release Thursday
professional development calendar and advised the board how important the
development time was to staff.
c. Business Manager’s Report
Mr. Smith gave the board an update on the OEBB Insurance Coverage that the
district will be changing to on October 1 for its health insurance benefits. He
noted that the employees will have a choice of four different plans. He believes
that the premiums are in-line with the current insurance plan.
He also reported that the Section 125 plan that was on the agenda later in the
meeting should be taken off of the agenda because he has not received all of the
information to be able to report on this item at this time. He will bring it back to
a future meeting for discussion and approval.
d. Principals’ Reports
Principals Vander Kley, Petersen, and Henry reported on their buildings start of
school activities and registration procedure changes. They also reported on new
staff, building maintenance projects, technology improvements, student
accountability, and school schedules.
e. Board Member Items
Caroline Estill said that she was happy to hear the principals’ reports and all of
their plans for the new school year.
John Murphey said that he really wanted the principals to focus on the home
schooled students this year to try and get as many as possible back in school.
He also reported that the Booster Club was able to donate $25,000 to the high
and middle school athletic programs this year.
Tammy Butler gave a brief update on the Local Option Committee’s efforts to
pass the Local Option Levy this fall. She said that they have a very strong
endorsement list in favor of the Local Option.
Deena Mitchell reported that the Local Option Committee is still accepting
donations to help fund the campaign. She also asked if she could make some
parent survey forms available during student registration at the schools.
Nancy Phelps thanked the board members and staff for their support during last
year while she was Chairperson.
Paul Burns reported that during the August 11 worksession the board discussed
the 5-year strategic plan which the board supports. They also developed a draft
of Board Goals for the 2008-2009 school year which he read to the audience.
The Board Goals will be adopted at a future meeting.
6. Old Business
a. Construction Excise Tax (CET) Inter-Governmental Agreement (IGA)with
Lane County
Mr. Winterscheid reviewed the IGA with Lane County which needs to be
approved in order for Lane County to collect and distribute funds for the CET.
Resolution # 081308-6 Approve the Inter-Governmental Agreement with Lane
County. Nancy Phelps moved and Caroline Estill seconded for approval. The
motion carried with directors Butler, Phelps, Burns, and Estill, voting in favor,
directors Scarberry and Murphey voting in opposition, and Deena Mitchell
abstaining.
7. New Business
a. Request to Name Baseball Field House
Mr. Winterscheid reviewed a request from the Western Lane Baseball
Association to name the hitting and pitching sports complex after Bert Mais.
There was discussion concerning the signage as some board members would
prefer the sign be relocated inside the building. Mr. Scarberry reminded the
board that the resolution was to approve naming the complex, not the signage.
Resolution 081308-7A – Naming Baseball Field House
Ed Scarberry moved to name the baseball hitting and pitching sports complex
after Bert Mais. John Murphey seconded for approval. Discussion followed
about the sign that has already been placed on the building. The motion carried
with directors Scarberry, Burns, Butler, and Mitchell voting to approve and
directors Murphey, Phelps, and Estill voting in opposition.
John Murphey made a motion to approve the formation of a facility signage
committee made up of Sue Davidson, Mike Rose, Ed Scarberry, and John
Murphey to meet and develop a recommendation to the board on the signage of
the Baseball Field House. Nancy Phelps seconded and the motion carried
unanimously.
b. 403(b) Tax Deferred Annuity Program
Mr. Smith advised the board that recently the IRS released regulations
establishing a requirement for written documentation of the 403(b) tax sheltered
annuity program offered to employees of Siuslaw School District. These
regulations generally become active effective January 1, 2009 – allocating to
employers greater administrative, recordkeeping, and compliance-monitoring
responsibilities. Mr. Smith said that ING will be a third party administrator for
the district’s written plan. Mr. Smith presented the Written Plan for Siuslaw
School District. The plan will be brought back to a future meeting for approval.
c. Policy FF – Naming Buildings – First Reading
Mr. Winterscheid presented two sample policies from the Oregon School Board
Association dealing with naming buildings. He also presented his
recommended policy which is a combination of the two sample policies.
The board suggested some changes to the recommended policy and it was
decided to bring it back to a future meeting for a second reading.
8. Personnel
Mr. Winterscheid reviewed the resignations and newly hired staff with the board
members. He presented resumes from the newly hired staff for the board’s review.
Mr. Winterscheid is very excited about the quality and enthusiasm of the new staff
members.
Resolution # 081308-8 Personnel Agenda
John Murphey moved to approve the personnel agenda as presented. Nancy Phelps
seconded for approval and the motion carried unanimously.
9. Adjourn
With no further business the meeting was adjourned at 8:15 p.m.
Paul Burns, Board Chair
Char Shelton, Board Secretary
LRN 110iLearning (Orientation)
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
All Insight students are required to take and complete
online orientation at the start of school. Orientation
includes introduction to the online school, how to log
in, access messages and announcements, go to class,
submit assignments, go to live sessions, communicate
with staff, get help and access the student forums and
extracurricular activities. Students will demonstrate
understanding by completing and submitting sample
assignments.
LRN 410iLearning (Senior Year)
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
This course is designed to help seniors complete all
graduation requirements including: student orientation,
transcript/credit review, completion of required state
testing, "high school and beyond" Plan, senior portfolio
and senior project. All seniors should register for this
course.
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL)
ESL and Foundation courses offer students with Limited
English Proficiency (LEP) support as they work toward
basic English language mastery and enroll in traditional
coursework.
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Insight School of Oregon is an online
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Program Guide
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ISORPG 8/08 002
School overview, course catalog,
and enrollment information
www.insightor.net
FINE, VISUAL, AND PERFORMING ARTS
ART 110Art History
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none - rigorous course
Art History is a rigorous course in which the primary goal
is for students to explore the role of visual arts in the
history of humankind and the development of culture.
Students will explore art from prehistoric times, ancient
Egypt and Greece. Students will analyze the Classical
and Hellenistic styles. This course includes but is not
limited to the examination of pottery, architecture, and
sculpture. Students who enroll in this course should
expect significant reading and writing and internet
research. Some prior studies in Ancient civilization
and/or mythology are helpful.
ART 116 Multimedia I: Digital Photography
and Graphics
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
This course will teach students to create compelling,
professional looking graphic designs and photos. They’ll
learn the basics of composition, color, and layout before
moving on to technical topics like working with layers
and masks, adding special effects and effectively using
typefaces to create visual impact.
ART 210 Orientation to Art
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
Using the tools, tricks and techniques of professional
artists, students will learn to create images of people
and objects. They’ll start a sketchbook and put down
their ideas and impressions. Developing these ideas by
using lines, colors, composition and perspective.
Students will also learn how to analyze, interpret and
evaluate art. Students will require access to a scanner.
Please contact Insight for how to acquire the hardware/
software.
ART 211 Music Appreciation
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
This one semester course introduces the major themes,
influences and personalities that shaped most of western cultural heritage through music. The periods studied
include Ancient, Classical, Renaissance, Baroque,
Modern, 20th Century and Contemporary.
ART 214 Digital Video Editing &
Production
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
In this course students will be introduced to all aspects
of digital video production, from story-boarding scenes
to creating shot lists to editing a finished, professional
product. Throughout this project-based course, students
will learn the essentials of recording, capturing and editing video. This course provides an excellent introduction
to the field. Students will require access to a digital
camcorder. Please contact Insight for how to acquire
the hardware/software.
Greek tragedy, moving on to the Elizabethan Age,
Victorian Era, and the 20th century. In addition to reading plays, students study elements of stagecraft and
production during each major dramatic period and read
author biographies.
ART 610 Performance Studio*
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
This course option allows you to get academic credit for
your extracurricular activities in the arts. Students participating in this course option will be responsible for
logging hours and activity descriptions and checking in
with the course advisor on a regularly-scheduled basis.
Talk to your admissions counselor for details about
enrollment.
LIFE AND STUDY SKILLS
SLS 101 Reading Comprehension
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
In this course students read from a wide variety of
materials to improve their literacy skills and gain an
appreciation of a variety of literary genres. They develop
a personal plan for increasing word knowledge and for
gaining and using effective reading strategies to improve
comprehension and learning.
SLS 110 Career Prep. Planning
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
In this course students learn about themselves and how
that knowledge contributes to career success. Using
various career resources to discover how goal setting
and decision making are integral to career planning.
They also master job-finding techniques and learn how
to make the transition from school to work.
SLS 111Study Skills
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
In this course students are guided through developing
study skills to improve academic and work performance,
based on their learning styles. They are provided several
application opportunities based on self-assessments in
topics such as time management, memory, oral communications, reading, writing, note taking, critical thinking,
test taking and researching.
SLS 212Personal Economics & Finance
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
In this course students visit a number of locations within a neighborhood setting to learn about different
aspects of personal economics and finance. Course
content deals with such topics as spending plans and
borrowing decisions, career planning, insurance, and
investing and other financial services.
ART 310 Drama in Literature
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
In this course students look at some of the great periods of creativity in theater and read influential dramas
from major literary periods. Beginning with a study of
17
FRN 110 French I
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
This course meets the standards of the American Council
on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) and focuses on successful communication through speaking, writing, reading, and listening, as well as a thorough grounding in aspects of culture.
FRN 210 French II
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: French I
This course meets the standards of the American Council
on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL), and
builds on French I concepts. Course strategies include
warm-up activities, vocabulary study, reading, threaded
discussions, multi-media presentations, self-checks,
practice activities and games, oral and written assignments, projects, quizzes, and exams.
FRN 310 French III
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: French II
This continuation of the beginning level French courses
will help students continue learning the French language.
Throughout the units of material (Feelings, Transportation,
Work, Countries, Future, Health, Home, Measurements,
Professions and Personal History), students learn to
express themselves using an ever increasing vocabulary,
present, past, future and conditional-tense verbs, articles, adjectives and increasingly complex grammatical
structures.
FRN 430 AP French Language
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisites: 3 years of French or equiv-
alent native fluency - college level
In this course students apply their French grammar and
vocabulary knowledge and their listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills to a wide variety of real-world contexts. Students learn to speak fluently and accurately,
write complex compositions, and comprehend native
speakers. AP French Language will prepare students for
the AP Exam and for further study of French language,
culture, and literature.
GER 110 German I
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
This course meets the standards of the American Council
on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL), and
focuses on successful communication through speaking,
writing, reading, and listening, as well as a thorough
grounding in aspects of culture.
GER 210 German II
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: German I
This course meets the standards of the American Council
on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) and builds
on German I concepts. Course strategies include warmup activities, vocabulary study, reading, threaded discussions, multi-media presentations, self-checks, practice
activities and games, oral and written assignments, projects, quizzes, and exams.
16
WELCOME to Insight School
of Oregon
LAT 110 Latin I
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
The purpose of this course is to give students a foundation in Latin grammar and vocabulary. They will also get
acquainted with the Roman gods and everyday life of the
Roman man-in-the-street.
LAT 210 Latin II
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: Latin I
In this course students build on their knowledge of Latin
grammar and vocabulary. They’ll gain a better understanding of Roman engineering, art, commerce and system of laws.
LAT 310 Latin III
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: Latin II
In this course students will strengthen their Latin vocabulary and complete the presentation of grammatical concepts in Latin I and II. Students will read and translate
Latin prose and poetry.
SPN 110 Spanish I
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
Table of Contents
Welcome........................................................................ 2
Flexibility, Support, Accessibility, Choices .... 2
Insight Students ............................................. 2
Program Overview ........................................................ 3
Getting Started .............................................. 3
Insight's Academic Options ......................................... 4
Begin With the End in Mind .......................... 4
This course meets the standards of the American Council
on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) and focuses on successful communication through speaking, writing, reading, and listening, as well as a thorough grounding in aspects of culture.
Insight Curriculum ........................................................ 5
High School Requirements ............................ 5
About Insight Instructors and iMentors......... 5
SPN 210 Spanish II
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: Spanish I
Coursework at Insight .................................................. 6
Insight Course Q & A's ................................... 6
A Day in the Life ............................................. 6
This course meets the standards of the American Council
on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL), and
builds on Spanish I concepts. Course strategies include
warm-up activities, vocabulary study, reading, threaded
discussions, multi-media presentations, self-checks,
practice activities and games, oral and written assignments, projects, quizzes, and exams.
SPN 310 Spanish III
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: Spanish II
This continuation of the beginning level Spanish courses
will help students continue learning the Spanish language. Throughout the units of material (Feelings,
Transportation, Work, Countries, Future, Health, Home,
Measurements, Professions and Personal History), students learn to express themselves using an ever increasing vocabulary, present, past, future and conditionaltense verbs, articles, adjectives and increasingly complex
grammatical structures.
SPN 430 AP Spanish Language
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisites: 3 years of Spanish or
equivalent native fluency - college level
In this course students will perfect their Spanish speaking,
listening, reading, and writing skills. They will study vocabulary, grammar, and cultural aspects of the language, and
apply what they've learned in extensive written and spoken
exercises. AP Spanish Language will prepare students for
the AP Exam and for further study of Spanish language, culture, or literature.
© 2008 Insight School of Oregon
Insight Community ........................................................ 7
Student Community ....................................... 7
Parent Community ......................................... 7
Insight Course Catalog ................................................. 8
English Language Arts ................................... 8
Mathematics ................................................... 9
Social Studies ................................................. 10
Science ............................................................ 12
Health and Physical Education ...................... 14
Occupational Education ................................. 14
World Languages ............................................ 15
The Arts ........................................................... 17
Life and Study Skills ....................................... 17
English as a Second Language ..................... 18
i
Welcome to Insight School of Oregon!
Where high school is powered by you!
Insight School of Oregon offers students a full-time, tuitionfree alternative to “traditional” high school. Insight follows
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© 2008 Insight School of Oregon
BUS 410 Communications/Public Speaking
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: English II
Communications/Public Speaking is an advanced course
in writing and structuring effective presentations. In addition to the mechanics of an effective presentation, students will learn how to present in a variety of settings
and how to revise a presentation based on desired outcomes and intended audience.
TCH 111 Computer Fundamentals I**
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
In this introductory course, students learn about computer hardware, operating systems, software programs, relationships in technology, technological design, operation
of systems, and different forms of technology. Through
step-by-step tutorials and checkpoints, students learn
the key concepts and skills needed to be competitive in
today’s technological world.
TCH 116 Digital Photography and Graphics
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
This course will teach students to create compelling, professional looking graphic designs and photos. They’ll
learn the basics of composition, color, and layout before
moving on to technical topics like working with layers and
masks, adding special effects and effectively using typefaces to create visual impact.
TCH 117 Web Design
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the
essentials of Web design, from planning page layouts to
publishing a complete site to the Web. Through real-world
design scenarios and hands-on projects, students will
create compelling, usable Web sites using the latest
suite of free tools from Microsoft.
TCH 213 Flash Animation
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
Learn to create interactive movies and games with Flash
CS3. Students will learn the basics of drawing and animating short movies before moving on to more complex challenges like adding interactivity and script-driven events. By
the end of the course students will have an interactive
portfolio to showcase their finished projects. Students will
require access to additional software. Please contact
Insight for how to acquire the hardware/software.
TCH 214 Digital Video Editing & Production
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
In this course students will be introduced to all aspects
of digital video production, from story-boarding scenes to
creating shot lists to editing a finished, professional product. Throughout this project-based course, students will
learn the essentials of recording, capturing and editing
video. This course provides an excellent introduction to
the field. Students will require access to a digital camcorder. Please contact Insight for how to acquire the
hardware/software.
TCH 311 C++ Programming I
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
In this introductory level course students learn the basics
of C++ programming through hands-on projects. Using
www.insightor.net
Visual C++ 2005 Express, they’ll master the building
blocks of programming: functions, variables, loops,
arrays and classes. This course is an excellent introduction to the C++ programming language and the field of
software development.
TCH 313 Game Design I
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
In this course students design and build original games
from scratch. They’ll learn how to use popular game
design software to create engaging, interactive games in a
variety of genres, and gain a solid foundation in the basic
concepts and phases of game development. Students will
require access to additional software. Please contact
Insight for how to acquire the hardware/software.
TCH 314 Game Design II
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: Game Design I
In continuation of Game Design I, students continue to
expand their knowledge of the game design industry
while mastering event-driven game development through
a series of interactive projects. Students will require
access to additional software. Please contact Insight for
how to acquire the hardware/software.
TCH 315 3-D Game Creation
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
This course will introduce students to script-based game
development. They’ll learn the fundamentals of level
design, skinning, importing 3D models and script-driven
gameplay. Students will require access to additional software. Please contact Insight for how to acquire the hardware/software.
TCH 431 AP Computer Science
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisites: Algebra I and II - college level
This introductory course involves developing the skills to
write programs that correctly solve specific problems. It
includes analysis of algorithms, development and use of
fundamental data structures, and the study of standard
algorithms and typical applications. Basic hardware and
software components of computer systems and the
responsible use of these systems are integral parts of the
course. This course will prepare students for the AP Exam.
WORLD LANGUAGES
CHN 110 Mandarin Chinese I
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
This beginning level course will introduce students to
Mandarin Chinese (simplified). Students will learn listening, speaking, reading and writing skills through activities
that are based on pedagogically proven methods of foreign language instruction. Culture is sprinkled throughout
the course to help focus on the Chinese speaking world,
their culture, people, geographical locations and histories.
CHN 210 Mandarin Chinese II
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese I
This course is a continuation of the beginning level course.
Throughout the five units of material (Daily Routine,
Animals, Hobbies, The Body and Descriptions), students
learn to express themselves using an ever increasing
vocabulary, present-tense verbs, articles, and adjectives.
15
HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
HPE 110 Skills for Health I**
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
Students will analyze the social, emotional, and physical
components of wellness. They’ll learn to recognize health
risks, be wise health consumers, and take responsibility for
their health. Students study the nervous, skeletal, circulatory, and digestive systems and make connections to physical fitness, food and nutrition, and weight management.
HPE 111 Skills for Health II**
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: Skills for Health I
This course begins by examining the immune and endocrine systems and covers the topics of disease and personal choices. Students identify the physical, mental,
emotional, and social changes a person goes through
from adolescence through adulthood. The course concludes with topics on marriage, parenthood, families,
human sexuality and reproduction, relationships, selfesteem, and first aid and safety.
HPE 112 Physical Education I**
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
In this course, students evaluate their fitness levels, set
goals for improvement, and evaluate their progress. The
course examines topics on safety, injury prevention,
nutrition and diet, and cardiovascular endurance.
Students develop a positive attitude for lifetime fitness,
whether through recreation, active sports, or skill-related
physical activity.
HPE 113 Physical Education II**
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: Physical Education I
This course covers the exercise techniques and guidelines that keep students safe when they engage in physical activities. The course combines online instruction with
student participation in weekly cardiovascular, muscletoning, and stretching exercises. The course focuses on
cardiorespiratory endurance, aerobic versus anaerobic
exercise, developing a cardiovascular routine, resistance
training, and developing muscular fitness and flexibility.
HPE 114 Adaptive Physical Education
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisites: IEP or 504 Plan required
Students will develop their own workout log in which they
record their cardiovascular, flexibility, strength and endurance activities. They will also learn about proper weight,
good diet, and managing stress.
HPE 210 Walking Fitness
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: Physical Education I
This course helps students establish a regular walking
program for health and fitness. Walking is appropriate
for students of all fitness levels and is a great way to
maintain a moderately active lifestyle. In addition to
reviewing fundamental principles of fitness, students will
learn about goals and motivation, levels of training, walking mechanics, safety and injury prevention, appropriate
attire, walking in the elements, good nutrition and hydration, and effective cross-training.
14
HPE 211 Running
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: Physical Education I
This one semester course is appropriate for beginning,
intermediate, and advanced runners, and offers a variety
of training schedules for each. In addition to reviewing
the fundamental principles of fitness, students will learn
about goals and motivation, levels of training, running
mechanics, safety and injury prevention, appropriate
attire, running in the elements, good nutrition and hydration, and effective cross-training. While this course focuses mainly on running for fun and fitness, it also briefly
explores the realm of competitive racing.
HPE 610 Student Athlete*
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
This course option allows you to get academic credit for
your extra curricular athletic activities. Students participating in this course option will be responsible for logging
hours and activity descriptions and checking in with the
course advisor on a regularly scheduled basis. Talk to
your admissions counselor for details about enrollment.
OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION
BUS 110 Career Prep. Planning
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
In this course students learn about themselves and how
that knowledge contributes to career success. Using various career resources to discover how goal setting and
decision making are integral to career planning. They
also master job-finding techniques and learn how to
make the transition from school to work.
BUS 210 Business Communication
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
In this course, students will explore the process of communication as it relates to the business world and discover all of the ways people communicate in today's
business environment. The 3-D animations in this course
take the concept of a virtual office a bit further by conceptualizing the business movement of the future.
BUS 211 Business & Personal Protocol
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
In this course students learn valuable skills in cultural
awareness, positive self-concept, leadership, and communication, which are essential to maintaining successful business and personal relationships.
BUS 212 Personal Economics & Finance
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
In this course students visit a number of locations within
a neighborhood setting to learn about different aspects
of personal economics and finance. Course content
deals with topics such as spending plans and borrowing
decisions, career planning, insurance, and investing and
other financial services.
BUS 317 International Business
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: A 200-level Business course
In this course, students learn about and discuss factors
involved in the flow of goods from country to country.
Students are encouraged to apply what they learn in a
variety of assessments and projects.
© 2008 Insight School of Oregon
Program Overview
In order to enroll with Insight School of Oregon your local school district must approve
your application. You must be entering 9th, 10th, 11th, or 12th grade and be a resident of Oregon. You must also be 19 years of age or younger when you enroll.†
The Enrollment Process
Insight School of Oregon works directly
with districts to identify students for
whom an online academic environment
might be a good fit. An existing agreement with your local district and Insight
Schools must be in place in order to
enroll. Each student’s ability to enroll
is ultimately at the discretion of the
district. Getting started is a basic
three step process.
Step 1: Contact Insight online or by
phone.
You can fill out a Request For
Information form online at our web site
www.insightor.net or call us directly at
1-800-711-0763. We will check to see if
Insight has a current agreement with
your local school district. If an agreement is in place, you will be put on a list
for interested students. The district will
evaluate the fit for each student and
notify Insight which students have been
approved for the upcoming enrollment
period. Insight will contact approved
students by phone and email to notify
them of the next steps.
Step 2: Determine if Insight is for you.
Review the web site, read the
Frequently Asked Questions page, or
contact us directly (see back page for
contact information).
Step 3: Complete the Get Started form.
Approved students will receive an email
link for the Get Started Form to be filled
out online. Completion of this form
starts the official application process.
There are no fees for the process as
enrollment at Insight is tuition-free.
Once your form has been submitted and
processed, you will be contacted shortly
to discuss the additional steps necessary to register for courses.
“I can choose what level of work I want to take...
If the subject of a class happens to be one that
I really struggle with, I have the option of taking
a slower-paced class.”
– Jacob, Insight Student
† Students who are 20 years old and need
additional education in order to receive a
diploma may also be admitted.
www.insightor.net
3
Insight School of Oregon Academic Options
Because our students come from many different backgrounds and have unique
goals they wish to accomplish, Insight offers choices that cover all academic areas—
courses that are appropriate for all learners.
Begin With the End in Mind
If you're a student who needs to fill
gaps in your academic background,
Insight provides Foundation courses
to help you build study skills and knowledge in a personalized, supportive
environment.
Insight offers Career Prep courses that
help prepare you to enter the workforce
upon graduation from high school.
Career-bound students select from an
expanding catalog of career and technical courses that are interesting, engaging, and relevant to their goals.
College Prep courses prepare you
to enter college or a university upon
completion of your high school diploma.
College-bound students take additional
courses to meet college and university
admission requirements.
Advanced Placement (AP) and Honors
options are designed with high achieving, well-prepared, college-bound students in mind who are willing to invest
time and effort in core academic
coursework.
ESL (English as a Second Language)
and Foundation courses offer students
with Limited English Proficiency (LEP)
support as they work toward basic
English language mastery and enroll in
traditional coursework. Insight School
of Oregon will offer this curriculum
option for ESL students for the 2008-09
school year. Online resources and tutorial support services in Mathematics and
Writing are available in Spanish. More
information regarding ESL and additional native language support will be provided during the registration process.
SCI 220 Honors Biology
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none - rigorous course
This course is about the living things on this planet, and
the way they connect together. The BioVenture Travel
Agency will send students on virtual tours like Safari
Quest, Classification Cruise, Genetic Park Excursion,
and on an all-expense-paid trip to the Egyptian pyramids. Students will also perform a series of lab experiments in their own home.
SCI 300 Chemistry Essentials
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: Algebra I Essentials
Essentials courses provide basic instruction to create a
solid foundation. In this course students learn about
matter, the structure of atoms and molecules, elements
and compounds, the periodic table, chemical reactions,
the behavior of gases, colligative properties, kinetics
and equilibrium, acids and bases, oxidation and reduction formulas, and organic chemistry. They will learn
how to balance equations, calculate empirical and
molecular formulas, and determine molar mass. Each
unit has a virtual hands-on lab experiment.
SCI 310 Chemistry
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: Algebra I
In this course students will see how chemistry works at
a petroleum refinery, a water treatment plant, a hospital, even a scuba dive shop. They will learn about the
properties of atoms, elements and molecules. Students
will also conduct their own laboratory investigations and
learn to think like a scientist.
SCI 311 Marine Science
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisites: Physical Science, Biology
Marine science is a blend of biology and physical science as it incorporates topics such as ecology, chemistry, geology, technology, zoology, meteorology, botany,
oceanography, and marine biology. Throughout this
course, students will explore the classification, anatomy, and physiology of organisms in the marine environment, as well as the ecological function of these organisms as members of complex biological communities.
Labs are required in each module and many lessons
have hands-on requirements such as graphing, datacollection, and calculating.
SCI 314 Environmental Science
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
In this course, students will explore the ecological interactions between living things and the environment. The
systematic study of global realms—atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere—provides students
with an understanding of natural processes. The course
provides an overview of the nature of ecosystems, energy flow and the relationships between biology, geology,
and chemical cycles; population studies; organization
and dynamics of ecological communities; and environmental pollution.
"I am not as nervous about
asking questions in fear of
what my peers would say...
Insight is an amazing
program for those who
are not 'cookie cutter'
children.”
—Mary, Insight Student
4
© 2008 Insight School of Oregon
www.insightor.net
SCI 320 Honors Chemistry
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: Algebra I - rigorous course
Honors Chemistry explores the world of molecular structures and interactions. Students will study the principles
of chemical structures and reactions. Students will
engage in critical thinking; the use of scientific method
including inquiry, observation and reporting; as well as
proper lab techniques.
SCI 410 Physics
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisites: Algebra I and II
This course provides opportunities to study the contributions of Galileo, Newton and Einstein. Students will
learn the concepts, theories, and laws governing the
interaction of matter, energy, and their applications
through exploratory investigations and activities.
SCI 431 AP Biology
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I
and Algebra I - college level
The primary emphasis of this second year course is to
develop an understanding of concepts rather than memorizing terms and technical details. This course requires
a great deal of self-discipline and motivation. AP Biology
prepares students for the AP Exam.
SCI 432 AP Chemistry
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisites: Chemistry and Algebra II
- college level
This course is equivalent to a full-year introductory college course in general Chemistry. Students will learn
fundamental analytical skills to logically assess chemical problems proficiently. Students will develop the
skills necessary to arrive at conclusions based on
informed judgment and present evidence in clear and
persuasive essays. This course will prepare students for
the AP Exam.
SCI 433 AP Physics B
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisites: Algebra II, Pre-Calculus,
and Trigonometry - college level
This course is a non-calculus survey course covering
five general areas: Newtonian mechanics, thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics, and
atomic and nuclear physics. Students will get an understanding of the core principles involved and learn to
apply these principles in the solution of problems. This
course will prepare students for the AP Exam.
SCI 434 AP Environmental Science
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: Biology - college level
In this course the scientific method is used to analyze
and understand the interrelationships between humans
and the natural environment. The following topics are
covered: Earth's Systems, Human Population Dynamics,
Natural Resources, Environmental Quality, Global
Changes and Environment and Society. This course will
prepare students for the AP Exam.
13
SOC 431 AP Psychology
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: Biology - college level
SCI 101 Earth Science Essentials
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
This course provides an overview of current psychological
research methods and theories. Students will explore the
therapies used by professional counselors and clinical
psychologists and examine the reasons for normal
human reactions. AP Psychology will prepare students for
the AP Exam and for further studies in psychology and
life sciences.
Essentials courses provide basic instruction to create a
solid foundation. This course covers topics such as energy in the earth system, the sun and its impact on global
climate, plate movement, and the geochemical cycles.
Lab work and journals are integral to the course. Woven
throughout the material are views of possible career
choices in earth science.
SOC 432 AP Microeconomics
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none - college level
SCI 102 Integrated Science
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
In this course students have been appointed as the new
President of the Sunny Seas Shell Company. As part of
their role in assuming the leadership duties of the company students will be learning all they can about microeconomics. This course will prepare students for the AP Exam.
SOC 433 AP Macroeconomics
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none - college level
In this course students assist the leader of the Macro
Islands to come up with feasible solutions to assist the
island’s economy. This course will prepare students for
the AP Exam.
SOC 434 AP U.S. History
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: World History - college level
In this course students interpret documents, write analytical essays, and master factual content. Issues of
American identity, diversity, religion and culture are
examined. Economic transformations, development of
politic institutions and reform movements are evaluated.
War, slavery, and demographic changes are assessed.
Globalization and environmental issues are analyzed.
This course will prepare students for the AP Exam.
SOC 435 AP U.S. Government & Politics
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: U.S. History - college level
In this course students “go behind the scenes” with the
President, Congress people, and Supreme Court Justices.
They research the roles of the media, political parties, interest groups, states, candidates, bureaucracy, and the public
in the governmental process. They will witness the largescale production of policy-building in the areas of economic/social policy, foreign policy and public administration.
This course will prepare students for the AP Exam.
SCIENCE
SCI 100 Physical Science Essentials
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
Essentials courses provide basic instruction to create a
solid foundation. This course provides students with an
introduction to the world of matter and energy. Students
explore what scientists do, how scientists think, and how
scientists solve problems. Students examine topics on
the phases of matter, the properties of matter, atoms,
chemical reactions, the periodic table, energy, motion,
and forces.
12
This course asks students to look at web sites from all
over the world to learn about different topics. One week,
students will be swimming in the deep ocean with
whales; another, they might be investigating bugs; next,
they might journey to Mars! There is no laboratory component to this science course.
SCI 110 Physical Science**
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
This course provides students with an introduction to the
world of matter and energy. Students explore what scientists do, how scientists think, and how scientists solve
problems. Students examine topics on the phases of
matter, the properties of matter, atoms, chemical reactions, the periodic table, energy, motion, and forces.
SCI 111 Earth Science**
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
This course covers topics such as energy in the earth
system, the sun and its impact on global climate, plate
movement, and the geochemical cycles. Other topics
include the origin and evolution of the earth and the universe. Lab work and journals are integral to the course.
Woven throughout the material are views of possible
career choices in earth science.
SCI 120 Honors Earth/Space Science
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none - rigorous course
In this course, students will examine the sky, oceans,
rocks, ancient fossils, perform scientific labs and learn to
think like a scientist. They’ll explore the past, present
and possible future of our earth.
SCI 200 Biology Essentials
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
Essentials courses provide basic instruction to create a
solid foundation. This course examines fundamental
components of biology including cellular biology, genetics,
ecology, evolution, botany, vertebrates, invertebrates, and
human physiology. Students apply the process of scientific inquiry to explore topics and perform virtual laboratory
exercises. The role of scientists and the ethical implications of advancing technology are examined.
SCI 210 Biology**
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
This course examines fundamental components of biology including cellular biology, genetics, ecology, evolution,
botany, vertebrates, invertebrates, and human physiology. Students apply the process of scientific inquiry to
explore topics and perform virtual laboratory exercises.
The role of scientists and the ethical implications of
advancing technology are examined.
© 2008 Insight School of Oregon
The Insight Curriculum
Insight offers a comprehensive curriculum
covering the following subject areas:
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Social Studies
Science
Health/Phys Ed
Occupational Education
World Languages
The Arts
Life and Study Skills
Electives
Insight School of Oregon
High School Requirements
About Insight Instructors
and iMentors
The Insight curriculum is aligned with
Oregon state standards and graduation
requirements. Our course catalog of
approximately 120 selections includes
all core academic areas. Insight School
of Oregon provides courses that will
help you meet or exceed the following
state graduation requirements:
• All instructors are certified in the
State of Oregon and those who
teach core courses are "highlyqualified" as defined by the state
requirements of the Federal No
Child Left Behind Act of 2002
• All instructors keep both structured and unstructured weekly
office hours, at which time you
and your parents can interact with
the instructor as needed
• Instructors answer your questions
within 24 hours and grade most
assignments within 72 hours
• A dedicated adult iMentor works
with you and/or your parents on
your goals, learning strategies,
and progress towards graduation
• An iMentor maintains regular
contact with you
• Both instructors and iMentors help
with the progression and evaluation of your personalized student
learning plan
• successful completion of 22 credits
in high school (24 credits starting
June 2009)
• complete Personal Education Plan
(PEP) to include:
- community service project
- create and submit a
student portfolio
- participate in an exit interview
- participate in the Oregon
Assessment Test
• additional requirements may be
required by your local district in order
to graduate
Students who enroll in Insight after the
beginning of 9th grade may transfer
high school credits, or submit their
homeschool portfolios for review.
Previous work that was satisfactorily
completed (as determined by an Insight
Advisor) can be applied toward Insight
graduation requirements.
www.insightor.net
“If I need help, I know that the teachers and other
people from the school will be there like a good
friend to always get your back.”
—Joanna, Insight Student
5
Coursework at Insight
The Insight course catalog lists more than 120
courses to choose from that meet Oregon state
standards. Each online course emphasizes active
learning, or applying concepts rather than simply
memorizing them.
Insight Course Q & A's
Q: How many courses should I take?
A: Full-time students generally take four
to five courses each semester.
Q: How much time do I need for each
course?
A: Each full credit course in our course
catalog represents approximately one
hour a day, four to five days a week (per
course), for 36 weeks.
Q: What is provided with each course?
A: All learning materials for each required
course are provided once a student
enrolls. Materials may include textbooks,
required software, learning guides, and
lab supplies, and are provided at no
expense to students.
Q: What kinds of course assignments
should I expect?
A: Assessments and activities include
practice problems, home labs, quizzes,
exams, essays, creative writing papers,
class discussions, individual and group
research projects, and presentations.
Q: How do I access my online courses?
A: Your course assignments and assessments reside on a password-protected
server that only you and your teachers
can access. You can collaborate with
your instructors during scheduled sessions and email with other students.
A Day in the Life...
Once you become an Insight student,
your average day might involve:
• Completing assignments
• Taking quizzes or tests
• Working on a research project
• Reading an assigned novel
• Managing your time and schedule
• Emailing teachers or students
• Meeting virtually with teachers
during office hours
• Meeting virtually, via phone, or
face-to-face with a teacher, iMentor,
academic counselor, or other
students
If at any time you encounter software or
hardware issues, 24-hour technical support is available. Academic support is
also available around the clock on
demand.
“I can take courses that allow me to be prepared for college, and that I
actually enjoy taking.” —Samantha, Insight Student
SOC 210 World History**
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
This course surveys the development of civilizations
around the world starting with the first people and progressing through our modern time. Beginning with prehistory and the beginnings of agriculture and continues
through the contemporary world. Students also explore
how human-geographic relationships, economies, political and social structures, science and technology, and
the arts have been developed and have influenced life.
SOC 211 Anthropology
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
In this course students become familiar with their own
culture, and they are introduced to cultures from around
the world and from different periods in history.
SOC 212 Geography**
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
In this course students study the relationship between
geographical, environmental, political, social issues and
events, and human behavior. Students start by studying
several specific historical events and placing them into
a geographical context. Students then study contemporary issues that help shape the world's regions in which
we live.
SOC 220 Honors World History
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none - rigorous course
In this course students will learn to understand their
connection to the development of civilization by examining the past to prepare for their future as participating
members of a global community. Students will use
knowledge pertaining to history, geography, economics,
political processes, religion, ethics, diverse cultures,
and humanities to solve problems in academic, civic,
social, and employment settings.
SOC 300 U.S. History Essentials
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
Essentials courses provide basic instruction to create a
solid foundation. This course examines significant
events in American history beginning with the native
cultures prior to European exploration and ending with
contemporary political, social, and economic issues.
Students learn how geography, war, and industrialization influenced thought and development of the
American identity.
SOC 310 U.S. History**
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
This course examines significant events in American
history beginning with the native cultures prior to
European exploration and ending with contemporary
political, social, and economic issues. Students learn
how geography, war, and industrialization influenced
thought and development of the American identity.
SOC 311 Economics
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
economic system. The purpose of this course is to help
students become a more informed consumer, producer,
investor and taxpayer.
SOC 313 Psychology**
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: Biology
This course surveys the study of behavior and mental
processes with emphasis on the scientific nature of psychological investigation. Topics discussed include
research methods, the biology of behavior, sensation,
perception, consciousness, motivation, emotion, personality, learning, memory, language, life-span development of behavior, personality, abnormal behavior and
therapies, social behavior, and individual differences.
SOC 314 Sociology: The Study of Human
Relationships
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
"The excitement of sociology lies in the fact that its perspective makes us see in a new light the very world in
which we have lived all our lives." (Peter L. Berger)
Sociology is the study of people, social life and society.
This course will emphasize new research and contemporary concerns that demonstrate how sociology
applies to the needs and concerns of students. The
development of a sociological imagination will enable
students to examine how society shapes human actions
and beliefs, and how such actions and beliefs in turn
shape society. This course also offers some exciting
online sociology experiments.
SOC 320 Honors U.S. History
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisites: English I and II -
rigorous course
In this course, students will look at some of the most
profound questions Americans still debate. Students
will develop their own personal beliefs by using verified
sources, including original documents and the writings
of people contemporary with the events. Students will
be challenged to apply their knowledge and perspective
of history to interpret the events of today.
SOC 400 U.S. Government & Politics
Essentials
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
Essentials courses provide basic instruction to create a
solid foundation. This course will help students achieve
a general understanding of United States’ government
at the national, state, and local levels. Students explore
the Constitution, the federal bureaucracy, and the three
branches of government.
SOC 410 U.S. Government & Politics**
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
This course will help students achieve a basic understanding of United States’ government at the national,
state, and local levels. Students explore the
Constitution, the federal bureaucracy, and the three
branches of government.
In this course students will learn how government,
business and the individual consumer influence our
6
© 2008 Insight School of Oregon
www.insightor.net
11
MAT 120 Honors Algebra I
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: Introductory Algebra -
rigorous course
This course will help students develop algebraic concepts and processes that can be used to solve a variety
of real-world and mathematical problems. There are
hands-on labs to help make numbers, graphs and
equations more real.
MAT 200 Geometry Essentials
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: Algebra I Essentials
Essentials courses provide basic instruction to create a
solid foundation. In this course, students learn how to
apply geometric concepts to solve mathematical and
real-world problems. Students explore concepts in logical reasoning, proofs, properties of lines and angles,
relationships in triangles, congruence and similarity,
translation and transformation, properties of circles, volume, and surface area, and properties of quadrilaterals.
MAT 210 Geometry**
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: Algebra I
In this course, students learn how to apply geometric
concepts to solve mathematical and real-world problems. Students explore concepts in logical reasoning,
proofs, properties of lines and angles, relationships in
triangles, congruence and similarity, translation and
transformation, properties of circles, volume, and surface area, and properties of quadrilaterals.
MAT 220 Honors Geometry
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: Honors Algebra I -
rigorous course
In this course students will learn to understand spatial
relationships, reasoning, connections, problem solving,
points, lines and planes.
MAT 310 Algebra II**
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: Algebra I
This course builds on concepts from Algebra I. Students
learn about systems of equations, matrices, polynomials,
complex numbers, functions, relations, graphing, complex fractions, and negative and fractional exponents.
MAT 320 Honors Algebra II
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: Honors Algebra I -
rigorous course
In this course students will start with a review of basic
algebra, then move on to polynomials, quadratic equations, exponential and logarithmic relations, and arrive
at probability and statistics. This is an advanced
course using hands-on activities, applications, group
interactions, and the latest technology.
MAT 410 Pre-Calculus
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: Algebra II with a grade
of “C” or better
Pre-Calculus is an advanced math course, covering
advanced algebraic and geometric concepts in preparation for trigonometry and Calculus. The course is presented as a combination of video lectures, printed
notes, self-check quizzes, exams, and online resources.
10
MAT 411 Trigonometry
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: Algebra II and Geometry
Trigonometry is an advanced math course, covering
advanced algebraic and geometric concepts in preparation for Calculus. The course is presented as a combination of video lectures, printed notes, self-check quizzes, exams, and online resources.
MAT 412 Calculus
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisites: Pre-Calculus and
Trigonometry with a grade of “C” or better
Calculus is an advanced math course, covering
advanced algebraic, geometric, and trigonometric concepts. The course is presented as a combination of
video lectures, printed notes, self-check quizzes, exams,
and online resources.
MAT 431 AP Calculus AB
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisites: Pre-Calculus and
Trigonometry - college level
This course provides an interactive text, graphing software and math symbol software and consists of a full
high school year of work that is comparable to calculus
courses in colleges and universities. This course will
prepare students for the AP exam and further studies
in science, engineering and mathematics.
MAT 432 AP Statistics
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: Algebra II - college level
In this course students will learn to interpret output
generated by statistical software programs. They will
gain hands-on experience collecting, analyzing, graphing and interpreting real-world data. This course will
prepare students for the AP exam and for further study
in science, sociology, medicine, engineering, political
science, geography or business.
SOCIAL STUDIES
SOC 112 Global Studies
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
Students will research and write stories as a new
reporter for the Global News Network. Human rights,
the environment, global security, and international economic systems are all part of the beat. They will
research the facts, identifying real global problems, and
then suggest well-developed solutions.
An Active Student Life
Insight School of Oregon makes sure that you have access to an active and
supportive school community. Occasional class discussions, guidance counseling,
face-to-face school get-togethers, and student clubs and organizations are available
to all students.
Student Community
Parent Community
A great way to make new friendships or
socialize during the school year...
We believe that parents play a key role
in the success of their high school students. That's why we encourage parents
to be active partners with their online
learners.
• Email other students
• Participate in online discussion
boards
• Meet with other Insight students
and staff at school gatherings and
events, such as school dances,
pizza parties, and field trips
• Sign up for clubs and extracurricular
activities, for example:
Yearbook
Student Newspaper
Photography Club
Honor Society
Language Clubs
Student Government
...the possibilities are limitless.
You can even form your own
organization and help recruit
members!
• Insight offers parents real-time visibility into student effort, progress,
attendance and grades through our
Learning Management System
• Parents will receive email notifications of student attendance and
grades
• Parents can customize a view
of student results to learn
more specific assignment-level
information
Parents can also participate as Insight
Parent Community Coordinators, or take
part in the virtual community where
parents can connect with other parents,
seek advice, and provide feedback to
the school.
SOC 200 World History Essentials
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
Essentials courses provide basic instruction to create a
solid foundation. This course surveys the development
of civilizations around the world starting with the first
people and progressing through our modern time.
Students also explore how human-geographic relationships, economies, political and social structures, science and technology, and the arts have been developed and have influenced life.
© 2008 Insight School of Oregon
“You still get the regular
experience, but it's not a
traditional school system. I
feel like I am learning more
and learning different things."
—Heather, Insight Student
www.insightor.net
7
Insight School of Oregon Course Catalog 2008/2009
Some courses and course descriptions will change, as we constantly strive to bring you the best
online courses. Please visit www.insightor.net for the latest course postings and changes.
Note: One semester is the equivalent of 0.5 credit. Year long courses are 1.0 credits.
*Extracurricular activity **Students who enroll on a rolling basis may select from these courses
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
ENG 100 Reading Comprehension
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
In this course students read from a wide variety of
materials to improve their literacy skills and gain an
appreciation of a variety of literary genres. They develop
a personal plan for increasing word knowledge and for
gaining and using effective reading strategies to
improve comprehension and learning.
ENG 101 Beginning Composition
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
In this course students visit six "Roadstops" in a nonlinear
fashion. At each "Roadstop," the students explore a different type of writing. A variety of short activities at each
"Roadstop" prepare students for longer writing projects.
ENG 102 Writing & Grammar Essentials
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
This course will provide students with integrated experiences in reading, writing, listening, viewing, speaking,
language, and literature. They will encounter the many
faces of change and be challenged to define and
describe their own place in a changing world.
ENG 110 English I: Literature and
Composition**
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
In this course students hone reading comprehension
skills by reading various types of literature—the short
story, the novel, poetry, drama, mythology, newspaper
and magazine articles, and speeches. The writing process—pre-writing, drafting, revising, and editing is
emphasized with students writing original compositions
and analyzing the writing of others.
ENG 111 Journal Writing
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
This course encourages the young writer through a variety of activities such as free writing; response to literature; prompts; graphical activities that allow the student
to express him or herself via creation of cartoons, logos,
tags, and signatures; and finally, production of one’s
own book.
ENG 112 Creative Writing
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
This course is a friendly, student-centered course written
for all skill levels. Students explore journal writing, poetry,
fiction and nonfiction such as letter writing and technical
writing to foster creative writing in a variety of forms.
ENG 113 Mythology
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
Through the study of myths, folk tales and legends of
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the Romans, Greeks, Chinese, Russians and cultures of
the Middle East, students learn to develop their own
creative ideas. Mythology is an excellent course for students who have not enjoyed English, and for students
who like to use their imaginations.
ENG 114 Journalism/Newspaper Writing
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
In this course students are introduced to the basics of
journalism, including the laws and ethics, and freedom
of the press. They will learn how to generate story ideas,
conduct an interview and then put it all together as they
write features, editorials, news and sports stories.
ENG 120 Honors English I
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none - rigorous course
In this course students will learn how to look for the
message in books, short stories, poems and plays.
They will learn how to trust their feelings about that
message, and how to express clearly and convincingly
what they think.
ENG 171 Conversational English (ESL)
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
In this intermediate-level ESL course students learn
vocabulary for daily life. In the first semester students
meet four newcomers to the United States and
become involved in their introductions and discussions of
family members. They accompany them as they go to the
supermarket, shop for clothes, buy a car, look for an
apartment, see a doctor, mail a letter, visit a school and
dine out. In the second semester students improve their
English language and study skills through interaction with
subject-matter content. Guides (astronauts, geology students, and characters from folk tales around the world)
will accompany students as they explore earth and space.
ENG 210 English II: Critical Reading &
Effective Writing**
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: English I
This course provides the connection between active
reading and writing with a purpose. The skills of rhetoric
are covered through literature analysis, writing practice,
and model analysis. Short stories, poems, plays, and
novels will introduce concepts of character, setting, plot,
point of view, and theme. Style, use of persona, context,
and genre are also some of the concepts introduced.
ENG 220 Honors English II
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: English I - rigorous course
In addition to evaluating the plot and characters of wellknown writers, students will learn to identify themes, create dialogue, and appeal to emotions. They will study various forms of communication including: oral, visual, electronic and textual. They will also develop their own ability
to communicate dreams and aspirations with conviction.
© 2008 Insight School of Oregon
ENG 310 English III: American Literature**
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: English II
In this course students read a diverse selection of
essays, short stories, historical writings, novels, and
poetry. Special emphasis is placed on using the writing
process while producing expository, research, and creative compositions. Critical and analytical skills are built
through close readings of literary, historical, expository,
and functional documents and using context strategies
to build vocabulary.
ENG 314 Drama In Literature
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
In this course students look at some of the great periods of creativity in theater and read influential dramas
from major literary periods. Beginning with a study of
Greek tragedy, moving on to the Elizabethan Age,
Victorian Era, and the 20th century. In addition to reading plays, students study elements of stagecraft and
production during each major dramatic period and read
author biographies.
ENG 320 Honors English III
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: English II
- rigorous course
In this course the writing and insights of authors
throughout American history are collected in the fastpaced pages of The Virtual Times. Students will gain
an appreciation of American literature and the ways it
reflects the times in which it was written. They’ll discover how people thought and lived and wrote about
their experiences.
ENG 410 English IV: British Literature**
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: English III
In this course students follow the development of
Britain’s literature chronologically, discussing the texts
as individual works, as representatives of the time period in which they were written, and as a part of a larger
historical context. Readings encompass works from
medieval to modern times. The major course texts
include Beowulf, a Shakespearean tragedy, and a
Victorian novel.
ENG 414 Communications/Public Speaking
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: English II
Communications/Public Speaking is an advanced
course in writing and structuring effective presentations. In addition to the mechanics of an effective presentation, students will learn how to present in a variety of settings and how to revise a presentation based
on desired outcomes and intended audience.
ENG 420 Honors English IV
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: English III -
rigorous course
In this course students will be asked to choose the literature that interests them, analyze the subject matter as
it is presented, and persuasively express their own
ideas. They will develop the tools to critically analyze
what is being said, and share their insights with others.
www.insightor.net
ENG 431 AP English Language &
Composition
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisites: English I and II -
college level
This course will provide college level instruction in studying and writing various kinds of analytic or persuasive
essays on literary and nonliterary topics in language,
rhetoric and expository writing. This course will prepare
students for the AP Exam by enabling them to read, comprehend, and write about complex texts, while developing further communication skills on a college level.
ENG 432 AP English Literature &
Composition
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisites: English I, II, and III -
college level
This course includes reading, analyzing, writing, rewriting, and discussing creations by renowned authors.
With intensive concentration on composition skills and
on authors' narrative techniques, this course equips
students for success in college, their career and the
AP exam.
MATHEMATICS
MAT 100 Fundamental Math/Pre-Algebra**
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisite: none
This course covers the basic principles of mathematics
and pre-algebra to prepare students for an Algebra 1
course. Students learn the basic concepts of fractions,
decimals, exponents and powers, equation solving, variables, expressions, integers, factors, and beginning
data analysis and geometry.
MAT 102 Algebra I Essentials
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisites: Fundamental Math and
Pre-Algebra
Essentials courses provide basic instruction to create a
solid foundation. This course develops the concepts of
variables, expressions, and equations. Topics include
algebraic properties, functions and their graphs, linear
equations, linear inequalities, exponential functions,
rational functions, polynomials, probability, graphing
and analyzing data.
MAT 110 Algebra I**
Credits: 1.0 Prerequisites: Fundamental Math and
Pre-Algebra
This course develops the concepts of variables, expressions, and equations. Topics include algebraic properties, functions and their graphs, linear equations, linear
inequalities, exponential functions, rational functions,
polynomials, probability, graphing and analyzing data.
MAT 111 Business & Consumer Math**
Credits: 0.5 Prerequisite: none
In this course, students are introduced to skills such as
calculating net pay, budgeting expenses, and balancing
a checkbook. Basic business matters, including borrowing money, investing, and calculating business profits
and losses are also introduced.
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Siuslaw School District 97J
2111 Oak Street
Florence, OR 97439
Presented to the Board of Directors:
Subject:
Reason:
Signage Committee Report
New Business
Item No:
4a
Attachment:
No
From: Mr. Winterscheid
Date: September 10, 2008
Background:
The “Use Arrangement & Agreement for the Hitting & Pitching Sports Complex between
Siuslaw School District and Western Lane Baseball Association (WLBA)” approved
December 2006 states: “with school board approval, WLBA will name the sports
complex.” It was approved at our last meeting to allow WLBA to name the field house the
“Burt Mais Field House”. It was also agreed that John Murphey and Ed Scarberry, along
with Sue Davidson and Mike Rose, would form a committee to make a recommendation to
the board as to the signage of that complex.
Recommendation:
Mr. Murphey will make a recommendation at the meeting.
Resolution # 091008-4A –Approve Signage at the Baseball Field House
Be it Resolved that the Siuslaw School District Board of Directors approve the
recommendation made by the signage committee as presented.
Paul Burns, Board Chair
Derek Smith, Business Manager/Deputy Clerk
Siuslaw School District 97J
2111 Oak Street
Florence, OR 97439
Presented to the Board of Directors:
Subject:
Reason:
Policy FF – Naming Facilities
Second Reading
New Business
Item No:
4b
Attachment:
Yes
From: Mr. Winterscheid
Date: August 13, 2007
Background:
Last month I gave you two sample policies and a combination of both which was my
recommendation. I am presenting the policy for a second reading with the changes you
requested highlighted.
Recommendation:
Administration recommends adoption of this policy.
Resolution 091008-4b – Policy FF – Naming Buildings
Be it resolved that the Siuslaw School District Board of Directors adopt Policy FF –
Naming Buildings, as presented for a second reading.
Paul Burns, Chairperson
Derek Smith, Business Manager/Deputy Clerk
Recommended Policy – 2nd Reading
Siuslaw School District 97J
Code: FF
Adopted:
Naming Facilities
The general policy is to name facilities for persons who have attained prominence locally and/or
nationally, or in the fields of education, science, art, statesmanship, political science, or military
achievement; early pioneers of Florence, Lane County, or the state of Oregon; or after the name of the
geographic area which it serves.
Schools may be named for individual persons who have been outstanding in educational endeavors or who
have worked for better schools and educational program in the community and/or in the state.
Names may be presented by petition, by chosen committees or by other representative groups in the area.
The Board has the final decision on all aspects of naming facilities.
Legal Reference(s):
ORS 332.107
Siuslaw School District 97J
2111 Oak Street
Florence, OR 97439
Presented to the Board of Directors:
Subject:
Reason:
Board Goals
Second Reading
Old Business
Item No:
4c
Attachment:
Yes
From: Mr. Winterscheid
Date: September 10, 2008
Background:
The board met on August 11 to develop its 2008-2009 Board Goals. The attached draft
goals are on the agenda for a second reading and possible adoption.
Recommendation:
Administration supports the board in adopting its 2008-2009 Board Goals.
Resolution # 091008-4c –Adopt 2008-2009 Board Goals
Be it Resolved that the Siuslaw School District Board of Directors adopt the 2008-2009
Board Goals as presented.
Paul Burns, Board Chair
Derek Smith, Business Manager/Deputy Clerk
Siuslaw School District 97J Board of Directors
2111 Oak Street
Florence, OR 97439
2008-2009 Draft Board Goals
1.
The board, through the superintendent, will research and implement policies
regarding on-line classes, Advanced Placement classes and alternative student
learning opportunities through technology at the middle school and high
school to be in place by the 2009-2010 school year.
2.
The board will be involved in the development of the five-year strategic plan
as a basis for budget decisions for the 2009-2010 fiscal year.
3.
The board, through the superintendent, will develop polices for higher
standards in the classroom and for participation in extra-curricular activities.
4.
The board, through the superintendent, will implement programs designed to
improve math achievement at all grade levels.
Mission
Motivating and preparing all students to reach their greatest potential.
Guiding Principles
•
We believe that all children, through their unique strengths and talents, have value and can learn.
•
We believe in high standards and expectations, and accountability for all.
•
We believe in providing a safe, positive, and mutually respectful educational environment.
•
We believe that involvement of the entire community is essential to our students’ success.
•
We believe that quality communication and collaboration are critical to the educational process.
•
We believe in a highly trained and well qualified staff.
Siuslaw School District 97J
2111 Oak Street
Florence, OR 97439
Presented to the Board of Directors:
Subject:
Reason:
Quality Child Care of Florence
New Business
Item No:
5a
Attachment:
Yes
From: Mr. Winterscheid
Date: September 10, 2008
Background:
Quality Child Care of Florence will present information on their vision of quality child care
for our area and possible consideration of establishing a non-profit preschool on Siuslaw
School District property.
Recommendation:
Information only at this time.
Siuslaw School District 97J
2111 Oak Street
Florence, OR 97439
Presented to the Board of Directors:
Subject:
Reason:
Enrollment
New Business
Item No:
5b
Attachment:
Yes
From:
Mr. Winterscheid
Date:
September 10, 2008
Background:
Attached is the enrollment summary that we provide at each meeting. We are hoping that the
decline will end and we can maintain at nearly 1400 students. We always have a bump up in
enrollment at the beginning of the school year. We are up from the end of last school year,
however we are still 50 down from the beginning of last school year.
Recommendation:
Information only.
Item 10a
Enrollment Update
Enrollment numbers as of September 30 each year.
2000-2001
2001-2002
2002-2003
2003-2004
2004-2005
Siuslaw Elementary, grades K-3
325
283
266
380
379
Siuslaw Elementary, grades 4-5
418
376
335
215
209
Siuslaw Middle School grades 6-8
424
470
469
437
Siuslaw High School grades 9-12
536
505
534
Alternative Programs
Alternative School
Behavior School
STEP School
Total Enrollment
1703
1634
2005-2006
2006-2007
2007-2008
592
573
579
366
337
322
325
509
547
542
559
481
27
43
16
NA
8
20
NA
30
15
NA
1530
1482
1430
8
6
27
5
2
1604
1582
1535
*****************************************************************************************************************
September 6, 2007
1461
June 12, 2008
1361
September 4, 2008
1397
Siuslaw School District 97J
2111 Oak Street
Florence, OR 97439
Presented to the Board of Directors:
Subject:
Reason:
2008-2009 Superintendent Goals
First Reading
New Business
Item No:
5c
Attachment:
Yes
From: Mr. Winterscheid
Date: September 10, 2008
Background:
Annually the board reviews and approves the Superintendent’s Goals. Attached are my
goals for the 2008-2009 school year.
Recommendation:
Administration recommends approval of the 2008-2009 Superintendent’s Goals.
Resolution # 091008-5b –Approve Superintendent’s Goals 2008-2009 Be it Resolved
that the Siuslaw School District Board of Directors approve the 2008-2009
Superintendent’s Goals as presented.
Paul Burns, Board Chair
Derek Smith, Business Manager/Deputy Clerk
Siuslaw School District 97J
Superintendent Goals
George Winterscheid
2008-2009
The following five goals directly reflect the districts’ guiding principles. The items under each goal
may be utilized as potential indicators of successful goal attainment.
Goals:
1. We will have high standards and expectations, and accountability for all.
a. Students: state-wide assessments, attendance, discipline/referral data, and graduation.
b. Staff: Content “Power” Standards, professional development, and
evaluation/supervision procedures.
c. Administrators: staff development, supervision, budget, facilities, curriculum, teambuilding, communication to stakeholders, and technical/legal requirements.
2. We will provide a safe, positive, and mutually respectful educational environment.
a. Communicate, train, and model positive/respectful processes across the school district.
b. Staff development re: board policy on harassment.
c. Facilities – Long Range Facilities Plan, routine maintenance, admin oversight.
3. We will have involvement of the entire community.
a. Volunteer programs.
b. Parent/community involvement meetings – “Personalizing Education,” student advisory
groups that support parental communication.
c. Partnering with other institutions re: Lane ESD, Lane County School Districts, Lane
CC, Community Safety Net, Law Enforcement, City of Florence, Peace Health, Boys &
Girls Club, etc.
4. We will have quality communication and collaboration with all stakeholders.
a. District/building improvement in website development and utilization.
b. Consistent, clear, open communication with Board of Directors (representing the
community).
c. Monthly Superintendent newspaper column.
d. “Second Cup” meetings with members of the public for bi-monthly, hourly meetings.
e. Superintendent involvement in building meetings re: Site Councils, staff development,
parent meetings, local leaders and groups.
5. We will have a highly trained and well qualified staff.
a. Staff development – Thursday Early Release In-Service calendar – curriculum “Power
Standards” implementation, technology, literacy, district-wide content and special
program implementations.
b. Maintain and support TSPC and NCLB Highly Qualified standards for all employees.
Siuslaw School District 97J
2111 Oak Street
Florence, OR 97439
Presented to the Board of Directors:
Subject:
Reason:
Oregon School Board Association
(OSBA) Board Election
New Business
Item No:
5d
Attachment:
No
From: Mr. Winterscheid
Date: September 10, 2008
Background:
At our September board meeting the board must take official action to choose its candidate
for OSBA Board of Director. Even though the only candidate running for election in our
region is Beth Gerot, OSBA has asked districts to cast an official vote.
Recommendation:
Administration recommends you officially take action to vote for Beth Gerot.
Resolution # 091008-5c –OSBA Election
Be it Resolved that the Siuslaw School District Board of Directors cast its vote for OSBA
board member candidate Beth Gerot in Position #6.
Paul Burns, Board Chair
Derek Smith, Business Manager/Deputy Clerk
Siuslaw School District 97J
2111 Oak Street
Florence, OR 97439
Presented to the Board of Directors:
Subject:
Reason:
Out-of-State Field Trip
New Business
Item No:
5e
Attachment:
Yes
From: Mr. Winterscheid
Date: September 10, 2008
Background:
Policy IICA requires all out-of-state field trips be approved by the school board. The High
School Honor Band is scheduled to attend the WIBC Honor Bands Clinic at the Doubletree
Hotel in Seattle, Washington, beginning November 21.
Recommendation:
Administration recommends approval of this field trip.
Resolution # 091008-5e Approve Out-of-State Field Trip
Be it resolved that the Siuslaw School District approve the out-of-state band trip as
presented.
Paul Burns, Board Chair
Derek Smith, Business Manager/Deputy Clerk
Siuslaw School District 97J
2111 Oak Street
Florence, OR 97439
Presented to the Board of Directors:
Item:
Reason:
Personnel
New Hire
Item No:
6
Attachment:
Yes
From:
Mr. Winterscheid
Date:
August 13, 2008
Background:
Please note on the attached personnel agenda that we have hired an elementary
teacher to replace Tonia Kay who resigned earlier this summer. We have included
copies of her resume for your review.
Recommendation:
Administration recommends approval of the personnel agenda as presented.
Resolution: #091008-6 – Personnel Agenda
Be it Resolved that the Siuslaw School District Board of Directors approve the
personnel agenda as presented.
Paul Burns, Board Chair
Derek Smith, Business Manager/Deputy Clerk
Agenda Item 6
Personnel Agenda
1.
Resignations:
None
2.
New Hires
1.
3.
Current Leaves of Absence Already Approved:
1.
Lisa Utz - FMLA/Maternity Leave
2.
Kelly Dotson – FMLA/Maternity Leave
Gretchen DeWald
Elementary Teacher
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