Appendix C - Final Validation Report v3.0

Appendix C - Final Validation Report v3.0
Final Validation Report
(Version 3.0)
for
RACER Services and Verification and
Validation (V&V)
Contract Number: W91ZLK-07-D-0002
Delivery Order: 0008
Prepared for:
US Army Environmental Command
ATTN: IMAE-CDP
5179 Hoadley Road, Bldg E-4480
Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010-5401
23 September 2009
Table of Contents
Executive Summary .................................................................................................................... 1
1.0 Objectives ............................................................................................................................. 7
2.0 Project Process ..................................................................................................................... 8
2.1
General Assumptions for RACER Modeling ........................................................... 8
2.2
Additional Assumptions for Modeling/Upgrade of 2004 Data ........................... 9
2.3
Protocol for Historical Data Collection and Analysis........................................... 13
3.0 Summary of Location Visits............................................................................................ 20
4.0 Data Collection Summary ............................................................................................... 22
4.1
Technology Information ........................................................................................... 24
4.2
Project Identification.................................................................................................. 25
5.0 Limitations of RACER Validation ................................................................................. 27
6.0 Cumulative Analysis of Data and Cost Differentials................................................ 30
6.1
Multi-faceted Approach to Data Analysis.............................................................. 30
6.2
Understanding of Statistical AnalysEs Used in this Report ................................ 31
6.3
Statistical Cost Analysis at the Project-level .......................................................... 35
6.4
Statistical Cost Analysis of Technologies ............................................................... 44
6.5
Technology Engineering Analysis........................................................................... 54
7.0 Findings .............................................................................................................................. 94
Appendix A – Acronyms.......................................................................................................... 96
Appendix B – Project-Level Data Summary Table............................................................. 99
Appendix C – Project Summaries for all Historical Projects Selected for Analysis .. 102
Appendix D – Cumulative List of RACER Observations ............................................... 178
Appendix E – Description of Outliers to the Project and Technology Data Sets....... 197
Appendix F – Cumulative List of Lessons Learned During Data Gathering Site Visits
207
Appendix G – Project Documentation (RACER-Generated Estimate Documentation
Reports (EDRs))....................................................................................................................... 210
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
List of Tables and Figures
Table 1 – Data collection locations............................................................................................. 2
Figure 1 – True Mean Cost Difference Between RACER Estimate and Historical Project
Cost by Scenario ......................................................................................................... 4
Table 2 – RACER 2008 Technologies Which Required Recalculation During Upgrade . 11
Figure 2 – RACER Assessment Project Tasks ........................................................................ 13
Table 3 – Project Information Fields in the iShare Portal..................................................... 16
Table 4 – Scenario Description Table ...................................................................................... 17
Map 1 – Historical Project Locations....................................................................................... 21
Table 5 – Project Data Completeness Levels .......................................................................... 23
Table 6 – Project Data Completeness Levels .......................................................................... 24
Table 7 – Number of Instances of Each RACER Technology (All Locations) ................... 25
Table 8 – Comparison of 2004 and 2008 Contract Types...................................................... 28
Table 9 – Sample Project Cost Difference ............................................................................... 32
Figure 3 – Normal Curve Distribution and Standard Deviation ........................................ 34
Figure 4 – True Mean Cost Difference by Scenario, All Locations ..................................... 35
Figure 5 – Absolute Value of Mean Cost Difference in RACER Estimate and Historical
Project Cost by Scenario, All Locations ................................................................ 37
Figure 6 – Scatter Plot of Percent Cost Difference Between RACER Estimate and
Historical Cost .......................................................................................................... 38
Table 10 – Correlation of RACER Estimate to Historical Cost, by Scenario...................... 38
Figure 7 – Linear Regression Analysis Scatter Plot, Scenario 3, All Locations ................. 39
Table 11 – R2 Results by Scenario (All Locations) ................................................................. 40
Figure 9 –Regression Analysis, Scenario 3, Projects > $500,000 (historical cost), Locations
1-12 ............................................................................................................................. 41
Table 12 – Project-level Summary of Each Statistical Measure Results by Scenario for
RACER 2008 Software (All Locations).................................................................. 43
Figure 12 – The 21 Most Commonly Used Technologies by USAEC................................. 46
Figure 13 – Fourteen Most Frequently Occurring Technologies – Scenario 1 Percent
Difference in Cost..................................................................................................... 47
Figure 14 – Fourteen Most Frequently Occurring Technologies – Scenario 2 Percent
Difference in Cost..................................................................................................... 48
Figure 15 – Fourteen Most Frequently Occurring Technologies – Scenario 3 Mean
Difference in Cost..................................................................................................... 49
Figure 16 – Fourteen Most Frequently Occurring Technologies – Scenario 4 Mean
Difference in Cost..................................................................................................... 50
Figure 17 – Comparison of RACER 2008 Software and RACER 2004 Software by Top
Ten Technology Occurrences ................................................................................. 52
Table 13 – Assembly-level discrepancy in excavation equipment. .................................... 58
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Revision History
Date
Version
Description
Author
05/11/2009
1.0
Draft Report
Booz Allen Hamilton
06/23/2009
2.0
Final Report
Booz Allen Hamilton
9/23/2009
3.0
Revised Final Report
Booz Allen Hamilton
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Executive Summary
On September 25, 2008, United States Army Environmental Command (USAEC)
awarded Booz Allen Hamilton (Booz Allen) a contract (W91ZLK-07-D-0002, Task Order
(TO) 0008) to “validate the Remedial Action Cost Engineering and Requirements
(RACER) System 2008 cost models and underlying databases.” The contract directs
Booz Allen to “document comparison of RACER-generated costs with associated actual
project costs on present models and, once comparisons are completed, a new
Verification & Validation (V&V) report will be developed.”1 The opportunity to
compare actual project data with RACER cost estimates represents a best practice in the
development of parametric models and will allow continued enhancement of RACER as
a budgetary estimating tool.
In 2004, Booz Allen Hamilton performed an assessment of the RACER 2004 software
under contract to the Government.2 In support of the contract scope requirements, the
Booz Allen Hamilton data collection and analysis team (Booz Allen team) worked with
the client team to develop a process and a protocol to be used for data collection,
analysis, and management throughout the assessment process. The assessment resulted
in a comprehensive set of recommendations for enhancements to RACER models
(technologies), modifications to default and secondary parameters and technology
assemblies, and the development of new technologies and assemblies. These
recommendations were incorporated into RACER 2008. Major changes to RACER 2008
included the addition of two new technologies, the re-engineering of thirteen existing
technologies, and updates to assembly prices using the 2006 Unit Price Book (UPB).3 As
a result of these changes, and in accordance with Department of Defense Instruction
(DODI) 5000.61, the Government determined that Verification, Validation, &
Accreditation (VV&A) of RACER 2008 should be performed. The objective of this
report is to provide information sufficient for the validation portion of the VV&A.
To compare RACER 2008 cost technologies against actual project cost data, project
information was collected from a variety of Government offices. The types of project
information collected include technical reports and contracting documents for
environmental remediation projects executed by the Government within the past five
years. Under this USAEC TO, Booz Allen traveled to four Government offices to collect
project information. In addition, Booz Allen conducted similar visits in 2007 and 2008
under a TO of a contract issued by the Air Force Center for Engineering and the
Environment (AFCEE).4 Table 1, on the following page, details all data collection
locations conducted under both TOs:
1 Contract Order W91ZLK-07-D-000 TO 0008 page 5, dated September 25, 2008
2 Assessment of RACER Cost Models and Database Project, (DACA45-03-F-0010 under Contract GS-10F-0090J)
3 The UPB is updated every two years. At the time of release of RACER 2008, the latest UPB update was 2006;
therefore, RACER 2008 uses the 2006 UPB.
4 Global Engineering, Integration, and Technical Assistance 2005 (GEITA05), FA8903-05-D-8729 TO 0372 (Mod 2,
dated 19 August 2008))
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Government Office
USACE, Kansas City
District
AFCEE
USACE, Fort Worth
District
USACE, Alaska District
USACE, Louisville District
USACE, Baltimore District
USACE, Savannah District
Office Location
Kansas City, MO
Status
13-15 November 2007
Funding Source
AFCEE TO
Brooks City-Base,
TX
Fort Worth, TX
19-21 February 2008
AFCEE TO
22-24 April 2008
AFCEE TO
Anchorage, AK
Louisville, KY
Baltimore, MD
Savannah, GA
21-23 October 2008
18-20 November 2008
9-11 December 2008
27-29 January 2009
USAEC TO
USAEC TO
USAEC TO
USAEC TO
Table 1 – Data collection locations
Data collection at the sites listed in Table 1 focused primarily on remedial actions, but
other phases of remediation were also included when available, including remedial
investigations, operations and maintenance, monitoring, and site closure. Additionally,
data collection was directed toward projects completed during and after 2004 in order
to minimize distortions due to old technologies or the evolution of best practices in
environmental remediation. The data collection at the sites listed in Table 1, above,
resulted in the selection of 88 projects for further analysis and simulation in RACER
2008.
The analysis performed on the data was based on a three-phase process: 1) deconstruct
historical project documentation by identifying cost drivers, key parameters, and
historical cost, 2) cross-walk key data parameters into RACER, and 3) generate a series
of cost estimates for comparison to actual project costs, both at the RACER project and
technology-level. Creation of the RACER cost estimates entailed a four-step approach,
where modifications to RACER primary and secondary parameters could be isolated
and analyzed. These four steps are referred to as “scenarios” in this report.
In general, the scenarios represent an increased level of interaction with the RACER
technologies and specificity of the information entered into the technologies. In
Scenario 1, the user populated default parameters of the technologies only; this is
typical when planning data are very limited, such as when a site has been newly
identified with little corresponding study or when a Record of Decision has not yet been
finalized. In Scenario 2, the user populated default and modified secondary
parameters, and in Scenario 3, the user populated default and modified secondary
parameters as well as assemblies, where that information was available in the project
documentation. Scenario 4 is a test case using the US 96 City Average location
multiplier for comparison with the area cost factor (site-specific location multiplier)
used in Scenario 3. This four-scenario approach enables the analysis to show how
greater levels of specificity affect the RACER estimate. Section 2.0 provides more detail
on the process and approach used in this analysis.
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Following completion of the cost estimates, a three pronged analysis was used to
evaluate the current performance of RACER as well as provide suggestions on how to
best update the program. The first two prongs of the analysis consisted of comparing
RACER-estimated costs to actual historical costs, as reported in the project
documentation, via statistical methods first at the project-level, and then at the
technology-level. The third prong of the analysis evaluated RACER model engineering
to determine if the RACER program, technologies, assemblies, and unit costs reflect best
practices in environmental restoration. This three pronged analysis will assist the
Government in gaining a better understanding of the current performance of RACER as
well as provide suggestions on how to best update the program.5
The RACER-estimated costs were compared to actual historical costs as reported in the
project documentation via several statistical methods. Statistical analyses were
performed at two levels: project-level and technology-level. The project-level analysis
involves the statistical comparison of the historical costs of the 88 projects collected in
2007 and 2008 to the RACER-estimated costs of these efforts. The purpose of the
project-level analysis is to evaluate the accuracy of the cost generated by a grouping of
RACER technologies (for example, Excavation together with Professional Labor
Management and Residual Waste Management) as compared to actual cost incurred for
those activities. Each project-level cost is a roll-up of the specific technologies used in
RACER to capture the historical contract activities.
Technology-level analysis was conducted by isolating, where feasible, the portions of
the historical costs applicable to specific RACER technologies and comparing these
costs to RACER-generated costs at the technology-level. In addition, RACER estimates
created during the 2004 RACER Assessment6 were upgraded, where possible, and
included in the technology-level analysis.
A number of statistical measures were utilized to better understand the performance of
RACER relative to historical project data. Figure 1, on the following page, shows the
average percent difference in cost between RACER-estimated costs and actual historical
project costs for each scenario at the project-level; this figure depicts cumulative results
for projects from all seven location visits conducted as part of the 2008 validation. The
cost difference, or delta, between historical costs and RACER-estimated costs in this
figure was computed using the differential (expressed as a percent of the actual project
cost) and applied to all projects, resulting in a cumulative mean difference in cost for
each scenario.
5 Limitations to the analytical approach are discussed in detail in Section 5.0 of this document.
6 Assessment of RACER Cost Models and Database Project, (DACA45-03-F-0010 under Contract GS-10F-0090J)
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Percent Difference RACER vs Historical Cost
100%
80%
71.4%
True Mean
Standard deviation
60%
45.1%
39.9%
38.6%
40%
27.7%
20%
6.5%
4.0%
0%
Scenario 1
Scenario 2
Scenario 3
Scenario 4
-1.5%
-20%
*Does not include outlier data from project scenarios w ith cost difference greater than 200%
Figure 1 – True Mean Cost Difference Between RACER Estimate and Historical Project Cost by
Scenario
Also presented in Figure 1 is the standard deviation for each scenario. The standard
deviation is a measure of the dispersion of the data from the mean cost difference. A
smaller standard deviation value (expressed as a percentage) indicates less variation in
the results around the mean.
As illustrated in Figure 1, the true mean cost difference between RACER-estimated
costs and historical costs is 28% for Scenario 1 with a standard deviation of 71%. In
Scenario 2, by modifying important secondary parameters in the technology, the true
mean cost difference is reduced to 7% with a standard deviation of 45%. In Scenario 3,
the advanced user can modify specific assemblies that form the basis for the cost
estimate and, with those modifications, the true mean cost difference is reduced to 4%
with a standard deviation of 39%. In Scenario 4, the true mean cost difference is
negative 2%, and the standard deviation is 40%.
The analysis depicts a large improvement in the RACER-estimated costs from Scenario
1 to 2 and then a leveling off of performance from Scenario 2 to 4. The improvement
from Scenario 1 to 2 is logical as the user is able to input more site- or project-specific
data into the estimate under Scenario 2. The leveling off from Scenario 2 to 4 indicates
that modifications to assemblies for these projects did not produce a significant
improvement, and that the use of specific location modifiers as opposed to the US
average did not produce significantly different results. This analysis demonstrates a
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significant improvement in the difference between historical costs and the RACERestimated costs when secondary parameters or assemblies are modified. This finding
clearly demonstrates the benefit of utilizing detailed site or project-specific data, where
available, in preparing RACER estimates.
A more detailed discussion of the statistical analysis is found in Section 6; the major
findings are presented in Section 7.0, a summary of which is provided below.
Summary of Findings
The findings presented below are based on the results of the three pronged analysis
employed in the validation to evaluate the performance of the RACER software. The
three pronged analysis combines the project-level cost analysis, the technology-level
cost analysis, and the technology engineering analysis to provide a more complete
picture of software performance.
1. The historical data collection was successful in developing a sample population of
sufficient size and diversity to analyze the performance of RACER relative to actual
DoD remediation experience. The collection of historical data for completed
remediation projects builds upon the previous 2004 RACER Assessment benchmark
data. The additional data aids in evaluating and improving the RACER parametric
model in two ways:
•
It allows for comparative analysis between the re-engineered RACER 2008
software and the RACER 2004 software
•
It provides a larger sample population for more reliable statistical analyses.
2. The data collection and analysis effort was limited due to the high incidence of Firm,
Fixed-Price (FFP) contracting utilized at the data collection locations, resulting in
difficulty isolating historical costs for comparison to applicable RACER
technologies.7
3. The project-level cost analysis demonstrates that for the 88 selected projects, the
accuracy of RACER as compared to actual costs averaged 28% when only default
parameters were modified (Scenario 1), 7% when secondary parameters were also
modified (Scenario 2), and 4% when assemblies were also modified (Scenario 3).
This analysis demonstrates a significant improvement in the difference between
historical costs and the RACER-estimated costs when secondary parameters or
assemblies are modified. This finding clearly demonstrates the benefit of utilizing
detailed site or project-specific data, where available, in preparing RACER estimates.
However, in our project analysis, the use of RACER default values under Scenario 1
produced highly variable results. See Section 6.0 for further details.
4. There is no clear statistical evidence that RACER consistently produces higher or
lower estimates in comparison to historical benchmark costs. There is also no clear
7 Refer to Section 5.0 for a complete discussion of study limitations.
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statistical evidence that RACER produces better estimates for “high cost” or “low
cost” projects, defined as greater or less than $500,000 total project cost.
5. Under Scenarios 2, 3, and 4, the true mean cost difference at the project-level was
lower using RACER 2008 than RACER 2004, indicating improved performance of
the software relative to actual costs.
6. The 14 most frequently occurring technologies were analyzed statistically to
determine how the technology-level costs compared to actual costs. Eight of those
technologies had negative true mean cost differences, indicating that the average
RACER-estimated cost for that technology was lower than actual costs. Six of those
technologies had positive true mean cost differences, indicating that the average
RACER-estimated cost for that technology was higher than actual costs. The true
mean cost difference at Scenario 1 for the fourteen technologies ranged from -44%to
56%. However, only preliminary conclusions should be drawn from the technologylevel cost analysis due to the small data sets available for this analysis.8
7. Significant recommendations for improved performance of the 14 most frequently
occurring RACER technologies (and Well Abandonment) are provided in Section
6.0; recommendations for additional technologies are presented in Appendix D.
8 Refer to Section 5.0 for more detail on the size of the data sets.
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1.0 Objectives
The bullet point references below are objectives taken from the contract Performance
Work Statement (PWS):
•
The primary objective of this report is to provide sufficient documentation to
support validation of the RACER 2008 cost models and underlying databases by
documenting a comparison of RACER-generated costs against associated actual
historical costs for current technologies. The Government intends to use this
information to obtain Verification, Validation, and Accreditation (VV&A) of the
RACER 2008 program.
•
An additional objective is to perform a critical review of RACER technologies.
As part of the validation effort, 14 technologies within RACER 2008 have been
evaluated for cost reasonableness, the reasonableness and accuracy of default
parameters, and environmental engineering best practices (i.e., whether the
technology reflects current best practices). The results of this analysis will assist
the Government in determining if any technologies need to be updated to reflect
best practices in environmental restoration, if assemblies need to be changed or
updated, if default parameters need to be changed, or if new technologies need
to be developed. This review also provides the Government with a better
understanding of when default parameters are best used and when they should
be customized. The Government may use this information to understand how,
or if, RACER needs to be modified to ensure RACER cost estimates are auditable
and defensible and will provide a sound basis for developing estimated costs
used to report environmental liabilities.
•
Historical project parameters and costs have been collected and used in the
analysis of RACER 2008, Version 10.0.2. Historical project data were collected for
a total of 156 projects that fit the assessment criteria. Upon close examination
and evaluation, 88 of these projects were actually estimated in RACER and
incorporated into the statistical analysis. Although not used in the RACER
analysis, the remaining projects were reviewed and filed for delivery to the
Government. These data could potentially be sufficient for other future uses.
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2.0 Project Process
2.1
GENERAL ASSUMPTIONS FOR RACER MODELING
This section details the general approach and assumptions used to generate the RACER
estimates that were developed for comparison to actual historical project costs. In the
absence of specific statements indicating a deviation from these assumptions, the
following assumptions were used in the estimating process.
1. All estimates were generated using RACER 2008 (Version 10.0.2).
2. RACER default values were used in all cases for which more specific information
was not available. The following list describes and defines items considered
defaults for this process:
•
Markup Calculation – RACER uses markup templates to calculate general
conditions, overhead, risk, owner cost, and prime and subcontractor profit as a
percentage of direct costs.
A user-defined RACER markup template was applied to all projects, which
zeroed out the “owner cost.”9 All other markups were left as default in the
template. At the kick-off meeting for this TO10, held on October 14, 2008, the
Government Point of Contact (POC) agreed to the use of this template.
•
Safety Levels – RACER assumes a default safety level of “D” in all technologies.
•
Cost Database – The default RACER cost database was used to define the costs
associated with each assembly in the estimates for all scenarios. No new
assemblies were created. Assembly cost rates were not changed, although
changes to assembly quantities were made in Scenario 3 where that information
was available and applicable.
•
Escalation Factors – Standard RACER escalation factors were used to
“normalize” historical cost data such that it could be compared to RACER
estimates created in RACER 2008 (Version 10.0.2).11
•
Location Modifiers (Area Cost Factors (ACFs)) – The default location modifiers
found in RACER 2008 were used when estimating Scenarios 1, 2, and 3 (Section
9 The default template includes an “owner cost” percentage of 11%, which is added to the total after prime
contractor profit and overhead within RACER. For this assessment, the owner cost percentage has been zeroed out
in the user defined markup template. This cost in the default template pertains to management costs and oversight
activities incurred by the “owner.” For the purposes of this project, the owner is the Government, and this 11%
markup pertains to Government costs that are not included in the contractor’s cost and thus should not be included
in the comparison of RACER to historical costs for this assessment.
10 USAEC A&AS Contract W91ZLK-07-D-0002-0008
11 According to the Revised Final Database Update Report for RACER 2008 prepared by Earth Tech, Inc. (dated
November 2007), the escalation index data for the RACER 2008 release were obtained from the Secretary of the Air
Force / Financial Management and Comptroller (SAF/FMC) Web site at Hill AFB. The Raw Index for Other
Procurement (3080) was used as a basis in the Air Force Inflation Tutorial.
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Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
2.3, Subtask C should be referenced for a better understanding of these
estimating scenarios). The RACER location closest to the actual project location
was selected. Where specific cities were not available in RACER, the applicable
state average was used. For Scenario 4, the U.S. 96 City Average was used.
•
Professional Labor Rates – The direct professional labor rates found in the
default RACER cost database were used in all cases. No changes were made to
these assemblies.
•
Professional and Craft Labor Quantities – The default labor quantities
calculated within each RACER technology were retained. To ensure accurate
comparisons between actual historical project costs and RACER-estimated costs,
and to avoid prescriptive estimating scenarios where proposed Level of Effort
(LOE) was substituted for RACER-generated LOE, labor hours were not altered
at the assembly level to match proposed quantities.
•
Professional Labor Management – The Professional Labor Management (PLM)
technology was applied to each remedial action (RA) or interim remedial action
(IRA) phase within each project to ensure that a valid comparison could be made
for historical projects burdened with professional labor.
2.2
ADDITIONAL ASSUMPTIONS FOR MODELING/UPGRADE OF 2004
DATA
The following list details the general approach and assumptions used to select,
upgrade, and price-level data gathered and estimated during the 2004 RACER
assessment project. During the 2004 RACER assessment project, 11 site visits12 and
Internet research were performed. Technologies from each of these 12 data sets were
included in the upgrade. The upgraded results were incorporated into the technologylevel analysis presented in Section 6.2 of this report.
1. All estimates were originally generated using RACER 2004 (Version 6.0). RACER
2004 estimates were then upgraded to RACER 2006 (Version 8.1)13 and price-leveled
to reflect the costs current with RACER 2006. Finally, RACER 2006 estimates were
upgraded into RACER 2008 (Version 10.0.2) and price-leveled to reflect costs current
with RACER 2008. Following each upgrade, price-leveling was accomplished by
selecting all projects in each RACER database to be “price-leveled to the current cost
table.” The steps used to perform database upgrading and price-leveling match
exactly the steps used by the RACER software development contractor14 to upgrade
12 Site visit locations included: Omaha, NE; San Antonio, TX; Sacramento, CA; Louisville, KY; Seattle, WA; Mobile, AL;
Kansas City, MO; Baltimore, MD; Savannah, GA; Concord, MA; Tulsa, OK
13 Estimates prepared in RACER versions predating RACER 2006 are not compatible for upgrade into RACER 2008; therefore,
the estimates prepared in RACER 2004 were upgraded to RACER 2006 and then upgraded to RACER 2008.
14 The RACER 2008 software developer was Earth Tech, Inc.; Earth Tech, Inc. is now known as AECOM.
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and price level databases in preparation of the RACER 2008 Sensitivity Analysis
Report.15
2. During the 2004 RACER assessment, historical costs were escalated from the actual
project dates to 2004; therefore, for an accurate cost comparison, all historical costs
reported in 2004 were escalated further from 2004 to 2008.
3. Projects and technologies for which historical technology-level costs were not
available were removed from the data set. To perform a detailed analysis of
individual technologies, technology-level cost estimates (as opposed to project-level
estimates) are preferable. Therefore, only technologies with available historical costs
were retained.
4. Since the PLM technology is calculated as a percentage of the sum of the total
marked-up cost of construction-related technologies run within the same phase, an
accurate historical cost comparison can only be made if each of those constructionrelated technologies was retained in the estimate. In projects where one or more
technologies were removed, the PLM technology was not retained for comparison
and analysis in RACER 2008.
5. During the upgrade to RACER 2008, RACER technologies were forced to recalculate
if one of the following was true:
•
the technology was re-engineered for 2008
•
the technology contained analytical assemblies
•
the technology contained Other Direct Costs (ODCs).
Table 2, below, lists the technologies that were forced to recalculate in RACER 2008
and identifies the reason for the upgrade requirement.
Technology Name
Administrative Land Use Controls
Re-engineered
Technology
Air Sparging
Capping
Analytical
Templates
Other Direct
Costs
X
X
X
Corrective Measures Study
X
D&D, Conduit, Pipe & Ductwork
X
D&D, Contaminated Building Materials
X
D&D, Rad Contaminated Building
D&D, Removal, Attached Hazardous
Materials
D&D, Removal, Unattached Hazardous
Materials
D&D, Site Characterization Survey
X
X
X
X
15 Revised Sensitivity Analysis Report for Final Version of RACER 2008, U.S. Air Force Civil Engineer Support Agency,
Technical Support Directorate, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, November 2007
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Technology Name
D&D, Size Reduction
Re-engineered
Technology
Analytical
Templates
D&D, Specialty Process Equipment
D&D, Surface Decontamination
X
X
Demolition, Underground Pipes
X
Drum Staging
X
Excavation
X
Feasibility Study
X
X
Five-Year Review
X
Groundwater Monitoring Wells
In Situ Biodegradation
Other Direct
Costs
X
X
X
MEC Institutional Controls
X
MEC Monitoring
X
MEC Removal Action
X
MEC Sifting
X
Monitoring
X
Natural Attenuation
X
Off-Site Transportation & Disposal
X
Operations and Maintenance
X
Preliminary Assessment
Professional Labor Management
X
X
RCRA Facility Investigation
X
Remedial Design (Detail)
X
Remedial Investigation
X
Residual Waste Management
X
Site Close-Out Documentation
X
Site Inspection
Slurry Walls
X
X
Soil Vapor Extraction
UST Closure & Removal
X
X
X
X
Table 2 – RACER 2008 Technologies Which Required Recalculation During Upgrade
6. In technologies for which required parameters were retained in the upgrade, these
parameters were verified against the sources listed below and utilized (see Item #10
in this list, on the following page). In technologies for which required parameters
were not retained (e.g., In-Situ Biodegradation), the technology was omitted from
the data set. This is because the required parameters differed so greatly from those
in 2004, and the data necessary to populate the parameters of the reengineered
technology were not collected by the 2004 RACER assessment team.
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7. For secondary parameters and assemblies, default selections and quantities were
used, unless otherwise noted in the project documentation sources (see Item #10,
below). This approach is consistent with the analysis of data newly collected in
2008—default values were only changed when known. This approach is also
consistent with guidance for the preparation of Environmental Liability (EL)
estimates, where RACER estimators are instructed to use default parameters unless
other site or project data are available.
8. RACER default values were used for the following items, unless more specific
information was available: safety levels, cost database, escalation factors, location
modifiers (ACFs), professional labor rates, professional and craft labor quantities,
and professional labor management. These items are described in more detail in
Section 2.1.
9. A user-defined RACER markup template was applied to all projects, which zeroed
out the “owner cost,” as described in Section 2.1. All other markups were left as
default in the template.
10. Project- and technology-level parameters were obtained from the following sources:
•
Final Project Report (Appendix A-2, Model Analysis Report), Assessment of RACER
Cost Models and Database Project, USACE Hazardous Toxic and Radioactive Waste
Center of Expertise (HTRW-CX), 24 January 2005 (contains information regarding
Scenario 3 assembly-level changes to each technology)
•
RACER Assessment Database (RAD), 2004 RACER Assessment Project (project and
technology input parameters documented in a Microsoft Access database)
•
RACER Cost Estimate Databases, 2004 RACER Assessment Project (project and
technology input parameters documented in “Comments” and “Tab Notes”
fields).
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2.3
PROTOCOL FOR HISTORICAL DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS
During visits to six USACE District Offices and one AFCEE location as part of the
RACER 2008 assessment, the data collection team followed the protocol called out in the
Final Project Management Plan dated 4 November 2008. Figure 2, below, displays an
overview of the step-by-step approach that Booz Allen followed in accomplishing each
of five subtasks for the data collection, processing, and analysis portions of the
assessment.
Figure 2 – RACER Assessment Project Tasks
A description of the protocol used for each of the subtasks follows:
Subtask A – Data Gathering Site Visits
The Booz Allen team followed a consistent and systematic approach for the data
collection task at the USACE District and AFCEE office site visits to ensure that the
amount and type of data would be sufficient for deconstruction and RACER estimate
creation. Government personnel supported logistics and facilitated the gathering of all
required data during the site visits.
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The following is a list of protocol steps followed for each of the visits to USACE District
offices and AFCEE:
1. A USACE representative for this Task Order contacted the Government POCs at
each USACE District office and AFCEE to coordinate the location visits and identify
participating Government project managers and contracting personnel with relevant
historical project data.
2. USACE and USAEC provided a preliminary list of proposed projects to the Booz
Allen team and the applicable Government POC prior to the office visit. The initial
list was gathered from queries of the Formerly Used Defense Sites Management
Information System (FUDSMIS), Army Environmental Database- Restoration
(AEDB-R), and AEDB- Compliance-Related Cleanup (AEDB-CC) databases.
3. USACE sent out a pre-site visit information packet, prepared by Booz Allen, to the
Government POCs to inform them of the purpose of the visit, the types of data
needed, and the level of participation requested by the data collection team.
4. USACE, USAEC, Booz Allen, and the Government POCs participated in pre-visit
teleconferences to discuss the overall objectives of the site visit, define roles and
responsibilities, and begin to narrow down the initial project list.
5. Upon arrival at the Government Offices, the Booz Allen team conducted project inbriefs to discuss the overall objectives of the site visits and to confirm interview
availability with the project managers associated with the projects identified on the
initial project lists, as well as associated contracting personnel. Locations of project
files, scanners, copiers, and other logistics were discussed during these meetings.
6. Once relevant projects were targeted and files located during the site visit, the team
scanned or copied the supporting documentation and then returned the files. The
team organized the copied documents and transported them to the Booz Allen office
in San Antonio, Texas for processing.
Subtask B – Document and Analyze Historical Data
Upon completion of the data collection, all documents were transferred to the Booz
Allen San Antonio office for deconstruction and storage. All collected data were
organized and stored in a way that allows for easy access and review. To accomplish
this, Booz Allen is using an internal Microsoft SharePoint service called iShare. All data
collected under this TO was logged in the iShare system.
Each project was given a unique identifier consisting of an abbreviation for the site visit
location and a unique digit. The identifiers for the data gathering site visits are USACENWK-## (Kansas City District), USACE-SWF-## (Fort Worth District), AFCEE-##
(AFCEE), USACE-POA-## (Alaska District), USACE-LRL-## (Louisville District),
USACE-NAB-## (Baltimore District), and USACE-SAS-## (Savannah District), where
the “##” represents a unique number assigned by Booz Allen.
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Booz Allen utilized Data Deconstruction templates to aid in data gathering for each
project. The template captures all project and site information, cost information, and all
parameters needed to complete RACER estimates. The Data Deconstruction templates,
interview notes, and collected project data were then used to populate a project item in
the iShare portal. Each project item contains the data fields listed in Table 3, below.
Field
Description
ID
Unique project identifier
Organization
Data gathering location (e.g. USACE District, or AFCEE)
ID Number
Unique project ID number
Estimator
Name of assigned estimator
Estimate Reviewer
Name of assigned senior reviewer
Accept/Reject?
Indicates if project was selected for inclusion in the final data set
Documentation Gathered
List of each item gathered at the data gathering site visit (e.g., SOW, Cost
Estimate, Award Documentation)
Project Name
Project title, as indicated in contract award documentation
Project Date
Project award date, used as basis for escalation
Data Gatherer
Name of individual who collected project information at data gathering
site visit
RACER Database Name
Filename of RACER database
Technology-level Historical
Costs Available
Indicates if historical cost data can be broken out for any technologies in
the estimate
Issues / Comments
Issues encountered during deconstruction and estimating; includes
discrepancies with RACER technologies, bugs, inability to recreate project
tasks in RACER, etc.
FFID
Federal Facility Identification Number(s) associated with the project
Funding Source:
Source of project funds, if known (e.g., BRAC, FUDS, IRP)
Data Completeness Level
High, Medium, or Low16
Contract Number
Contract number
Contract Type
Contract award type (e.g., FFP, CPFF) 16
16 See Section 4.0 for explanation of Data Completeness Levels and Contract Types
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Field
Description
Installation
Government installation where project work was performed (used to aid
selection of Location Factor)
Project Location
State and City where project work was performed (used to aid selection
of Location Factor)
Site(s)
Site(s) associated with the project
Total Historical Cost
Total cost of project, as indicated in project documentation. In most cases,
this is the same as the contract award amount; in cases where only a
portion of the project was estimated, this cost reflects only the relevant
portion of the project that was recreated for the RACER estimate
Description (for Summary)
Full project description, as shown in Project Summary (see Appendix C
for Project Summaries)
RACER Technologies Used
List of all RACER technologies utilized in the RACER estimate
Attached files
Lists (and stores) scanned files of each item collected at the data gathering
site visit, as well as comments generated by the senior estimate reviewer
during the QC process
Table 3 – Project Information Fields in the iShare Portal
Each project item in the iShare portal was used by the RACER estimator to create the
estimates, as described in Subtask C below.
Subtask C – Validate Model (Technology) Outputs
To analyze the RACER program, the deconstructed elements and costs obtained from
the historical project documentation were compared against the RACER outputs under
four scenarios. Actual parameters found in project documentation were entered into
the RACER program using the required parameters as defined in Scenario 1 below.
Three additional scenarios were also run to facilitate identification of variance
parameters in the cost estimates. Subsequent estimates were generated by copying the
baseline estimate (Scenario 1) and following the protocol as defined in the scenarios
found in Table 4, on the following page.
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Scenario
Number
Description
Purpose
1
Scenario 1 consists of entering required parameters
into RACER based on project documentation. No
secondary parameters or assembly information is
changed from the RACER default values. The
location factor is location-specific dependent upon
the information obtained from the historical project
data.
This scenario is used to isolate and
identify any issues with the RACER
technology primary parameters as
well as to create a basis for Scenario 2.
2
Scenario 2 consists of copying Scenario 1 and then
changing the RACER default secondary parameters
to specific project values derived from the historical
project documentation. Assembly information is not
changed from the RACER default.
This scenario is used to identify any
issues with the RACER technology
secondary parameters and compare it
with Scenario 3 to determine
outstanding issues with RACER
technology assemblies. This scenario
provides data to determine if a new
technology is required or if existing
technologies require modification.
3
Scenario 3 consists of copying Scenario 2 and making
changes to the default assembly line items found
within the RACER technologies. All assembly
modifications are based on information specified in
the project documentation but are not included
within the default RACER estimate. Changes could
include modifications to the assemblies in the
technology by deleting/adding assemblies or by
changing the quantity of an assembly.
This scenario is used to isolate and
identify any issues with the RACER
technology assemblies. These can
include the assembly itself, as well as
quantities being calculated by the
technology algorithms.
4
Scenario 4 consists of copying Scenario 3 and
changing the location factor to the U.S. 96 City
Average; therefore specific location factors are not
applied to the estimate; thus the labor, material, and
equipment factors are all equal to factors used in
Scenario 1.
This scenario is used as the baseline
estimate to determine how location
factors for each project affect the
project costs variance. Its purpose is
to identify any significant problems
with an estimate that involves a
location factor modification.
Table 4 – Scenario Description Table
The Data Deconstructor and RACER Estimator provided page-specific references
within the RACER databases to all relevant sections of gathered historical project data
used to determine required parameters, secondary parameters, and changes to
assembly quantities. Finally, all changes to RACER secondary parameters and
assemblies were captured in the “Comments” field of each relevant RACER technology.
This assisted the Senior Estimate Reviewer in ensuring the estimate was accurately
created and documented. Also, documenting changes in this manner allows for recreation of estimates for future validation efforts.
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Subtask D – Analyze Models (Technologies)
Based on the level of detail found in the historical cost documentation, analyses were
performed at both the project and technology-level. Once project estimates were
created using each of the four different scenarios for each project, the difference in cost
(the percent difference between the estimated and actual cost) was analyzed to
determine how RACER performed at the project level. The project-level analysis
compares the total documented historical cost for the applicable piece of work being
estimated against the RACER-generated cost of the aggregate RACER technologies
used to model the historical cost. Technology-level analysis was conducted by
isolating, where feasible, the portions of the historical costs applicable to specific
RACER technologies and comparing these costs to RACER-generated costs at the
technology level.
The results from each project were reviewed considering the following criteria:
•
Default Parameter Reasonableness and Accuracy
This review was conducted by comparing RACER outputs in Scenarios 1 and 2. The
greater the difference in estimated costs from Scenario 1 to Scenario 2, the farther from
historical project data the secondary default parameters were. For all projects, Scenario
1 had an average percent difference in estimated cost of 28%; by changing default
secondary parameters to include additional site- or project-specific values (Scenario 2)
the difference in estimated cost was reduced to 7%. These results imply that utilizing
default values for RACER secondary parameters may lead to estimates with reduced
accuracy compared to estimates with changed secondary parameters.
•
Best Environmental Engineering Practices
Each technology or project was evaluated to determine the reason for the cost difference
(or lack thereof). This was accomplished by reviewing the assembly information to
determine if the assemblies and quantities used coincided with current best
environmental engineering practices. Results of this analysis are listed in Section 6.3.
•
Cost Reasonableness
The project estimates and included technologies were reviewed for cost reasonableness.
The statistical analysis of cost differentials between historical project costs and RACERestimated costs was performed at both the project and technology-levels. In the
cumulative analysis, once a sufficient number of project estimates were completed, the
difference in cost was analyzed statistically to evaluate the standard deviation between
estimated and historical project cost at the project and technology-level (referred to as
average percent difference).
The team evaluated each project’s RACER output against historical project cost data by
comparing the ratio of the cost difference [(RACER – historical estimate) / (historical
costs)]. Specifically, the team computed the average (mean) of the cost difference ratio
for each of the four scenarios.
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The team then aggregated project and technology outputs in appropriate data sets by
scenario to produce comparable data sets for statistical analysis. This activity
confirmed the utility of the modified scenario approach used to identify and isolate cost
drivers.
Subtask E – Reporting
Upon completion of each site visit under this TO, Booz Allen prepared and submitted
an Interim Model Report. Each Interim Model Report presented the data collection
process, data analysis for the location visit, and cumulative data analysis for all the
projects gathered to date. The Interim Model Reports presented detailed information
on the data gathered at each specific location and also provided cumulative analyses of
data gathered to date for each location visit. For the three locations visited under the
AFCEE TO, this information was presented in one report titled “Final Interim
Validation Report” (dated 5 December 2008).
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3.0 Summary of Location Visits
The data collection team visited seven locations to gather historical data for completed
environmental remediation projects. Six of the locations were USACE district offices,
and one was AFCEE in San Antonio, TX. The information below lists locations, dates of
visits, and project counts for analysis in RACER. Map 1, on the following page, depicts
the geographical dispersion of the project locations.
Location: Kansas City, KS (USACE)
Date: November 13–15, 2007
•
24 projects were collected.
•
3 projects were selected for analysis with RACER.
Location: San Antonio, TX (AFCEE)
Date: February 19–21, 2008
•
23 projects were collected.
•
8 projects were selected for analysis with RACER.
Location: Fort Worth, TX (USACE)
Date: April 22–24, 2008
•
18 projects were collected.
•
11 projects were selected for analysis with RACER.
Location: Anchorage, AK (USACE)
Date: October 21–23, 2008
•
27 projects were collected.
•
18 projects were selected for analysis with RACER.
Location: Louisville, KY (USACE)
Date: November 18–20, 2008
•
22 projects were collected.
•
19 projects were selected for analysis with RACER.
Location: Baltimore, MD (USACE)
Date: December 9–11, 2008
•
23 projects were collected.
•
14 projects were selected for analysis with RACER.
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Location: Savannah, GA (USACE)
Date: 27-29 January, 2009
•
19 projects were collected.
•
15 projects were selected for analysis with RACER.
Map 1 – Historical Project Locations17
Lessons Learned From Data Collection and Site Visits
During each of the seven data gathering site visits, lessons learned were gathered and
documented to improve efficiency and performance of future data gathering site visits.
These lessons learned should be considered for future efforts of a similar nature. An
aggregated list of lessons learned is presented in Appendix F.
17 Note: Map is not to scale.
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4.0 Data Collection Summary
The historical project data were provided in varying types of documentation across
projects. The following list is indicative of the types of documents collected:
•
Scope of Work or Statement of Work (SOW) – The detailed description of the
work to be performed at the site, produced by the Government before the project
is started. This document may also be referred to as the Performance Work
Statement (PWS) or Scope of Services (SOS).
•
Contractor’s Technical Proposal – A detailed description of the work to be
performed at the site produced by the contractor which was submitted to the
Government for review as a response to a request for proposal. Typically this
document contains a detailed discussion of how the contractor proposes to
accomplish the work. In some cases this includes a detailed cost estimate.
•
Contractor’s Estimate (at the time of award) – An estimate, proposal, or price
from an independent contractor stating the charge for the service or product the
independent contractor is offering. Typically this is the estimate, which was
used to accomplish the work (the winning proposal).
•
Independent Government Estimate (IGE) – An independent detailed estimate
by the Government or a Government representative used to evaluate the
winning proposal and used as a basis for negotiations. This document is often
included as part of the Price Negotiation Memorandum (PNM) or PreNegotiation Objective Memorandum (PNOM).
•
Construction Completion Report – The final document compiled and submitted
by the contractor performing the work on a project to the Government. Typically
the document summarizes the work performed during the construction phase of
a project.
•
Invoice – The document submitted to the Government during or at the end of a
project summarizing the work performed for payment of work completed.
•
Order for Supplies or Services – The contract award document. This includes
the final negotiated price, lists all Contract Line Item Numbers (CLINs), and
includes a copy of the contract SOW.
•
Work Plan – The document submitted to the Government, by the contractor,
post-award, which details how the work will be accomplished. This document
generally elaborates on work spelled out in the SOW and includes specific
approaches to successful project completion, more detailed site information, and
detailed information regarding anticipated contract deliverables, such as level of
report detail and frequency of reporting.
In some cases, the project data collected did not provide sufficient documentation for
the purpose of assessing the RACER technologies against the historical costs. For
example, the data collection team may have located a contractor’s estimate and the
original SOW, but neither document provided a description of the project parameters
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sufficient to complete a RACER estimate. The data completeness for these projects was
designated as “low;” these projects were not included in the project data set. In other
instances, project data were collected that provided sufficient information to create a
RACER estimate; in addition the information available contained the SOW and
Contractor’s estimate at time of award, as well as the final project costs. In these
instances, the data completeness was designated as “high.” When collected data
included the SOW and estimate at the time of award (or the final site report and a cost
breakdown, but not both) the project data completeness was designated as “medium.”
Table 5, below, describes the project-level data completion categories and the minimum
types of documentation required to meet each level. Projects that fell within either the
high or medium categories were included in the data analysis. Projects that fell within
the low category were eliminated from the scope of the data analysis, but source data
has been retained for possible future analysis and reference.
Level of Project Data
Completeness
Information Type
High
Scope, design, and detailed
cost information available
from the time of award to
the project closeout stage,
including scope or design
modifications made during
the life of the project.
Medium
Scope, design, and cost
information available at the
time of award, or final
project closeout
information including cost
and scope is available.
Low
Scope, design, and partial
cost information available
for the project, no final
project information found,
and incomplete/no project
data.
Document Types
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Scope of Work
Contractor’s estimate at time of award
Contractor’s Technical Proposal
Construction and Completion Report
Final Invoice/Cost Breakdown
Project Modification Details
Contract Execution Summary
Scope of Work
Contractor’s Technical Proposal
Contractor’s Estimate at time of award
OR
Construction and Completion Report
Final Invoice/Cost Breakdown
Scope of Work
Partial Technical Proposal
Partial Contractor’s Estimate
Various Reports
Independent Government Estimates
Table 5 – Project Data Completeness Levels
Appendix C provides selected project summary information from each of the seven
location visits. A total of 156 total projects were collected, with 88 projects selected for
RACER modeling and analyses.
Contract award type was noted when collected and assessing the historical project data.
Table 6, on the following page, shows the number of projects for each contract award
type. The most common award type at every location visited was FFP; 83% of the
estimated projects were awarded under FFP contracts.
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Contract Award Type
Number of Projects
Firm, Fixed-Price
Time and Materials
Cost Plus Fixed-Fee
Cost Plus Award Fee
Indeterminate (“unknown”)
Total
73
6
5
2
2
88
Table 6 – Project Data Completeness Levels
4.1
TECHNOLOGY INFORMATION
During the historical data deconstruction process, phases and associated technologies
were identified specific to each of the projects selected and reviewed. Parameters
associated with each technology were extracted from the historical project
documentation and then ultimately entered into the associated RACER technology. The
estimated project costs produced by RACER were then compared with the historical
cost for each project using the scenario approach described in Section 2. When possible,
line items and quantities from the historical project cost were compared against the
RACER assemblies and quantities from the RACER technology.
A total of 40 RACER technologies were utilized when completing the RACER estimates
using historical project costs. There were 425 total technology occurrences within the
selected projects based on the number of times a technology was used in different
projects. The list of technologies that were utilized and the number of instances of each
are presented below in Table 7.
Project Type
(RACER Phase Type)
Study
Remedial Design
Removal or Remedial Action
RACER Technology (Model)
Feasibility Study
Remedial Investigation
Site Inspection
Preliminary Assessment
RCRA Facility Investigation
Remedial Design
Administrative Land Use Controls
Asbestos Removal
Bioslurping
Bulk Material Storage
Buried Drum Recovery
Cleanup and Landscaping
Clear and Grub
Decontamination Facilities
Demolition, Underground Pipes
Demolition, Pavements
Drum Staging
Excavation
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Number of Instances,
2008 Data Set
8
18
6
9
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
5
2
5
1
7
2
39
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Operations and Maintenance
Ex Situ Solidification/Stabilization
Fencing
Groundwater Monitoring Well
In Situ Biodegradation
Load and Haul
MEC Removal Action
Monitoring
Off Site Transportation and Waste
Disposal
Professional Labor Management
Restoration Advisory Board
Resurfacing Roadways/Parking Lots
Residual Waste Management
Sanitary Sewer
Site Close-Out Documentation
Soil Vapor Extraction
Special Well Drilling & Installation
Storage Tank Installation
Transportation
Trenching/Piping
Underground Storage Tank
Closure/Removal
Well Abandonment
Operations & Maintenance
Total
1
4
19
9
8
2
63
20
43
1
2
56
1
29
1
3
4
1
6
18
12
10
425
Table 7 – Number of Instances of Each RACER Technology (All Locations)
4.2
PROJECT IDENTIFICATION
This section lists and describes the types of project information that were gathered
during location visits and is the basis for the organizing and accessing the historical
data collected. Refer to Appendix C for tables listing the following information for all
estimated projects.
•
Project ID – The project’s unique identifier, assigned by Booz Allen. This is the
Level 1 and 2 name entered into RACER.
•
Installation Name – The installation for which the project was completed. The
installation name corresponds to the folder level within the RACER estimate.
•
Federal Facility Identification Number (FFID) – The Federal Facility
Identification Data Standard provides a consistent means of identifying facilities
that are owned or operated by the federal Government. The data standard
consists of data elements and their permissible values that indicate a facility (or
the land it occupies) is owned or operated by the federal Government. Also
included is information about the federal agency or organization that is
responsible for the facility or land. The role or management relationship of the
responsible party to the facility or land may also be specified.
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•
Project Name – The project name is the name identified in the historical data
collected. Note that in some cases this name differs slightly from the name found
in the Government database systems.
•
Project Date – The project date is the date of project execution found on the
project documentation from which the data was derived. This date may not be
the same as when the project was actually completed or called out in the client
database systems.
•
Contract Number – The contract and task order number are defined in the
historical data collected.
•
Funding Source – Indicates the funding mechanism for the project, if known.
Examples include Installation Restoration Program (IRP), Formerly Used
Defense Sites (FUDS), and Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC).
•
Project Location – The project location is the city or state where the work was
performed. This location parameter may be different from the location where the
data was collected or the project was managed.
•
Site(s) – This refers to the site(s) on the installation which the project is intended
to address.
•
Documents Collected – This includes all project documentation collected during
the data collection effort.
•
Project Description – This is a brief description of the project components.
•
Total Project Cost – This is the actual cost of the project taken from the historical
documentation.
•
RACER Technologies Used – This includes all RACER technologies used to
estimate the project.
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5.0 Limitations of RACER Validation
The accuracies of the validation project protocol, data collection, and resulting data
analysis are limited by the capabilities of the RACER technologies themselves. Since the
technologies are populated with information (parameters) gathered by the users, the
quality of the RACER technology outputs is constrained by the following:
• The amount and accuracy of project data available to populate each of the
technologies in the software
• The methodology employed by the user to segregate project components and
correlate those components to individual RACER technologies
• Whether the remediation technologies employed in the actual project are
available for cost modeling in the RACER software
• The accuracy of the unit prices employed in the RACER assemblies
• The accuracy of the algorithms employed in each RACER model
• The accuracy of the Area Cost Factors employed in the RACER software
• The accuracy of the values for Markups (including General Conditions,
Overhead, Profit, Prime Markup on Subcontractor, Risk, and Owner Cost)
employed in the RACER software.
The quality of the data analysis described in following Section 6.0 is limited by the
quality of the data gathered during the data collection effort, and the ability of the Booz
Allen team to break out those costs into segments that correlate to RACER technologies.
It is important to note that the data trends identified during the RACER validation
effort apply only to the project data gathered. The amount of usable data gathered in
support of RACER validation posed perhaps the greatest challenge. The segregation of
project components into useable pieces correlating with RACER technologies is
dependent on the level of detail present in the contract documents (SOW/PWS),
contractor’s proposal, IGE, etc.). The trend of Government contracting towards
Performance-Based Contracting (PBC) and FFP awards results in contract documents
which provide very little project-specific detail, as the emphasis is on overall project
performance. Time and Materials (T&M), Cost Plus Fixed-Fee (CPFF), Cost Plus Award
Fee (CPAF), and Cost Reimbursable contract documentation, on the contrary, typically
provide more specific detail regarding project parameters and costs.
Table 8, on the following page, displays the trend of Government contracting away
from cost-type contracts and toward FFP contracts. Note that during the 2004 RACER
assessment effort, only 41% of the gathered project data were FFP contracts; during the
2008 effort, 83% of the gathered project data were FFP contracts, representing a 103%
increase in this contract type.
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Contract Award
Type
2004 Projects
2008 Projects
Percent
Change
Number
Percent
Number
Percent
Firm, Fixed-Price
49
41%
73
83%
103%
Time and Materials
9
8%
6
7%
-9%
Cost Plus Fixed-Fee
30
25%
5
6%
-77%
Cost Plus Award Fee
9
8%
2
2%
-70%
Cost Reimbursable
12
10%
0
0%
-100%
Indeterminate
(“unknown”)
11
9%
2
2%
-75%
Total
120
-
88
-
-
Table 8 – Comparison of 2004 and 2008 Contract Types
The FFP contract type posed difficulties for extracting cost, parameter, and assembly
quantity information. This created a challenge to obtaining “apples to apples”
comparisons between the contract documents and the RACER technology outputs.
Other common difficulties in data deconstruction included:
• The presence of “lump sum” items in contract documentation
• An actual task (project) could have a range of reasonable costs
• An actual task (project) cost could be skewed for reasons not apparent in the
documentation (e.g., part of an installation wide effort that contributed
economies of scale).
In addition, data gathered during the Alaska site visit had unique problems attributed
to the remote location of these sites as well as the necessity to ship supplies and wastes
via barges. The true mean cost difference for the subset of project data excluding the
Alaska projects was only 19% at Scenario 1 vs. 28% average for the entire data set.
Specific problems with the project data collected in Alaska are discussed in Final Alaska
District Interim Model Report, dated 5 February 2009.18 Individual technologies whose
performance was affected by these problems are discussed in further detail in Section
6.5.
At the technology level, the cost analysis was limited by small data sets for specific
technologies due to the prevalence of FFP contracting in the project data, resulting in
18 Final Alaska District Interim Model Report, Booz Allen Hamilton, San Antonio, TX, 5 February 2009.
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the inability of the data collection and analysis team to break out historical project costs
into distinct task-related costs that can be compared to a RACER technology cost.
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6.0 Cumulative Analysis of Data and Cost Differentials
6.1
MULTI-FACETED APPROACH TO DATA ANALYSIS
This section of the report is divided into three different subsections to holistically
evaluate the current performance of RACER. The first subsection compares historical
costs and RACER-estimated costs at the project-level, providing high level insight into
the overall performance of the RACER software. The second subsection compares
historical costs and RACER-estimated costs for 14 different frequency-used technologies
to evaluate the accuracy of individual RACER technology models. The third subsection
evaluates RACER model engineering to determine if the RACER program, technologies,
algorithms, assemblies, and unit costs reflect current best practices in environmental
restoration.
For the project-level cost analyses, actual historical costs and RACER-estimated costs
were compared to determine relevant differences under each scenario. Each projectlevel cost is a roll-up of the specific technologies used in RACER to capture the
historical contract activities. The purpose of the project-level analysis is to evaluate the
accuracy of the cost generated by a grouping of RACER technologies (for example,
Excavation together with Professional Labor Management and Residual Waste
Management) as compared to actual cost incurred for those activities. Data from all
seven site visit locations are presented as a percent difference (ratio) between the
RACER estimates and identifiable historical project costs. This assessment pertains to
the 88 selected projects (for all locations) and demonstrates the cost differential trends
and data fit between identifiable historical data and RACER estimates.
This cost-based analysis was also performed at the technology-level, where actual costs
relevant to the RACER technologies could be logically isolated from the rest of the
historical cost estimate.19 This technology-level cost analysis provides insight into how
well each RACER technology estimates costs for specific environmental restoration
activities. It measures the soundness of the algorithms employed in RACER models
one piece at a time. However, due to data collection limitations,20 the data sets for
technology-level cost analysis were small. In addition, sufficient data were not
available for technology-level cost analysis of each of the 113 standard RACER cost
models.
Enough historical data are available to statistically evaluate RACER at the project-level;
however, some technologies do not have enough data points for a highly confident
statistical analysis. Therefore, the additional engineering analysis of the technologies
was performed. Analyzing RACER at both the project-level and technology-level, as
19 For the technology-level assessment, historical contract data collected during the RACER 2004 Assessment were also
included; this increased the number of technology-level data points so that a technology-level statistical analysis could be
performed. The inclusion of these data was not necessary at the project level, as the 88 historical projects utilized were
enough to provide a sample size with high confidence.
20 See Section 5.0 for a detailed discussion of project limitations.
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well as from both statistical and engineering viewpoints, measures the soundness of
RACER estimates while compensating for data limitations for any one approach to
analysis.
This three pronged analysis approach will assist the Government in gaining a better
understanding of the current performance of RACER as well as provide suggestions on
how to best update the program. It helps overcome data limitations at both the project
and technology levels, and includes an analysis of the engineering reasoning that makes
up the technology models. By itself, each analytical approach is limited; in order to
form a qualified judgment, all three of these analyses are needed.
6.2
UNDERSTANDING OF STATISTICAL ANALYSES USED IN THIS REPORT
At the project level, although there are a total of 88 selected projects, the number of
projects analyzed for each scenario varies. To prevent mean analyses from giving
misleading descriptions of the central tendencies of the data for each scenario analysis,
projects and technologies with differences between RACER-estimated costs and actual
historical costs greater than 200% were omitted as outliers.21 Scenario 1 has three
outliers, Scenario 2 has four outliers, Scenario 3 has two outliers, and Scenario 4 has no
outliers. Omitting the outliers brings the number of selected projects analyzed for each
scenario to:
•
Scenario 1 — 85 projects
•
Scenario 2 — 84 projects
•
Scenario 3 — 86 projects
•
Scenario 4 — 88 projects
Appendix E provides a rationale for the large discrepancy between RACER-estimated
cost and actual historical cost for each project- and technology-level outlier.
The analysis consists of an evaluation of the difference between the RACER estimates
and the actual historical project costs. An example of sample project cost data and how
cost differences were calculated for each scenario is shown in Table 9, on the following
page.
21 It was determined that sample projects with cost differences greater than 200% were not understood well enough to explain
the considerable difference between the RACER estimated cost and the actual historical project cost. Thus, these projects
were omitted from the sample analysis for that scenario and identified as outliers.
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Scenario
Scenario 1
Scenario 2
Scenario 3
Scenario 4
Historical
Project Cost
RACER Estimated
Project Cost
(Marked-Up)
(2)
$ 722,388
$ 375,378
$ 386,437
$ 394,121
(1)
$ 427,063
$ 427,063
$ 427,063
$ 427,063
Difference
($)
Percent
Difference
(3)=(2)-(1)
$ 295,325
(51,685)
(40,626)
(32,942)
(4)=(3)/(1)
69%
-12%
-10%
-8%
Table 9 – Sample Project Cost Difference
Five measures of the percent difference are used for analyses:
•
True mean cost difference
•
Absolute value of mean cost difference
•
Standard deviation of each mean cost difference
•
Correlation coefficient
•
Regression analysis
The true mean cost difference provides a metric to evaluate the accuracy of RACER on a
software-wide basis to predict average project cost. This measure is used to assess
RACER against the Tri-Service Parametric Model Specification Standard22 which states
the ranges of accuracy acceptable for various categories of cost estimates. The true
mean difference in cost accounts for both the positive and negative values of the
difference between the RACER-estimated cost and the actual historical project cost, so
that the positive and negative values cancel out. The true mean cost difference is
computed using the following formula:
1
(1) µ =
M
 RACER − Historical 
∑

Historical


M
i =1
i
Where: RACER = RACER-estimated cost
Historical = Actual historical cost
M = Total number of projects for each scenario (excluding outliers)
The absolute value of mean cost difference is computed using the following formula:
22 Tri-Service Parametric Model Specification Standard, Project Time & Cost, Inc., April 1999
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(2) ABS ( µ ) =
1
M
 RACER − Historical 
∑

Historical


M
i =1
i
Where: RACER = RACER-estimated cost
Historical = Actual historical cost
M = Total number of projects for each scenario (excluding outliers)
Using the absolute value of mean cost difference provides a significant comparison
between scenarios. The absolute value of mean cost difference converts the negative
difference values between RACER estimates and historical project costs into positive
values. Thus, this measure only evaluates the positive percent difference between
RACER-estimated costs and actual historical costs. This provides a comparative basis
to evaluate the relative accuracy of the RACER tool at different levels of use (default,
secondary, and assembly levels).
The third cost difference measure evaluated is the standard deviation of each mean cost
difference. The standard deviations for the true mean cost difference and the absolute
value of mean cost difference are computed using the following formulas, respectively.
σ
PercentDifference
=
)
ABS σ PercentDifference =
(4)
2
i =1
(3)
(
 RACER − Historical 

1
−
∑ 
 µ PercentDifference
M
Historical

i


M
(
)
  RACER− Historical 

1
∑
 − ABS µ PercentDifference 
M
Historical

i


M
i =1
2
Where: RACER = RACER-estimated cost
Historical = Actual historical cost
M = Total number of projects for each scenario (excluding outliers)
µ Percent Difference = True mean
ABS (µ Percent Difference) = Absolute value of the mean
The standard deviation is a measure of the dispersion of the data from the mean. A
smaller standard deviation indicates less variation in the difference between RACERestimate cost and the actual historical costs from the mean. Figure 3, on the following
page, illustrates the concept of the standard deviation of a normal distribution.
Standard deviation values are an important factor in considering how well RACER
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produces cost estimates in comparison with historical projects. Hypothetically, a mean
of 50% with a standard deviation of 50% across all selected projects would imply that
RACER could produce estimates within a range of +/- 100% of the average expected
cost.
Figure 3 – Normal Curve Distribution and Standard Deviation
The correlation coefficient is also used to analyze the percent difference between
RACER estimates and identified historical costs. The correlation coefficient measures
the linear relationship between the RACER–estimated cost and the actual historical
costs on a scale from –1 to 1. If the actual historical cost is high and the correlation
coefficient is close to 1, the RACER-estimated cost will also be high. Thus, the
correlation coefficient provides a predictive value of the RACER-estimated cost based
on the actual historical cost. The correlation coefficient is computed using the following
formula:
(5)
ρ=
cov(Historical, RACER )
σ
Historical
σ
RACER
Where: cov(Historical,RACER)= E(Historical, RACER) – E(Historical)E(RACER)
E is the expected value of the particular function of Historical and RACER
Historical = Standard deviation of the identified historical costs
σ RACER = Standard deviation of the RACER estimate costs
Racer = RACER-estimated cost
Historical = Actual historical cost.
σ
The final measure used to evaluate cost differentials is a regression analysis between the
RACER-estimated cost and the actual historical costs. The regression analysis is
computed using the following equation:
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(6) RACER-estimated cost = α + β (identified historical cost) + ε
Where: α = Intercept parameter
β = Slope parameter
ε = Standard error parameter.
The R2 value from the regression analysis provides a measure of fit for the RACERestimated cost from the actual historical cost on a scale from 0 to 1. The closer the R2
value is to 1, the closer the RACER–estimated cost will be to the actual historical cost.
Hypothetically, if the R2 value were 1, then the RACER estimated-cost would be the
same as the actual historical cost.
6.3
STATISTICAL COST ANALYSIS AT THE PROJECT-LEVEL23
Mean Cost Differential
Figure 4, on the following page, presents the true value of mean cost difference between
RACER-estimated costs and historical project costs for each scenario. The results
include data for all seven location visits for the selected projects, excluding outliers.
The true value of mean cost difference between RACER-estimated cost and historical
cost was computed for each scenario (1–4) using Equation 1, while the standard
deviation was calculated using Equation 3.
Percent Difference RACER vs Historical Cost
100%
80%
71.4%
True Mean
Standard deviation
60%
45.1%
39.9%
38.6%
40%
27.7%
20%
6.5%
4.0%
0%
Scenario 1
Scenario 2
Scenario 3
Scenario 4
-1.5%
-20%
*Does not include outlier data from project scenarios w ith cost difference greater than 200%
Figure 4 – True Mean Cost Difference by Scenario, All Locations
23 Raw data used for the project-level statistical analysis are presented in Appendix B. This appendix shows the historical cost,
scenario costs, and scenario percent differences for each of the 88 projects in the data set.
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As shown in Figure 4, above, there is significant improvement from Scenario 1 to 2, and
then a flattening out from Scenarios 2 through 4 for the average cost difference, with the
standard deviations decreasing in lockstep. The improvement between Scenarios 1 and
2 is logical, as Scenario 2 allows changes to secondary parameters which incorporates
more project-specific information into the estimates. The leveling off from Scenarios 2
to 4 indicates that modifications to assemblies for these projects did not produce a
significant improvement, and that the use of specific location modifiers as opposed to
the US average did not produce significantly different results. This lack of
improvement from Scenario 2 to 3 can be partially attributed to one of several facts: that
the level of detail required for assembly-level modifications was not available for some
projects; that LOE for labor categories was not modified; and that although assemblylevel modifications were made in some instances, associated assembly-level costs were
not comparable to the proposed costs.
In Scenario 1, the mean cost difference between RACER-estimated costs and historical
costs is 27.7% with a standard deviation of 71.4%. In Scenario 2, by modifying
important secondary parameters in the technology, the mean cost difference is reduced
to 6.5% with a standard deviation of 45.1%. The analysis of the mean cost difference
presented in Figure 4 reveals a considerable difference between historical costs and
RACER-estimated costs under Scenarios 1 and 2. This difference in mean cost under
Scenario 1 is exacerbated by large standard deviations that depict broad distribution
from the mean cost difference. In Scenario 3, the advanced user can modify specific
assemblies that form the basis for the cost estimate, and the mean cost difference is
slightly reduced to 4.0% with a standard deviation of 38.6%.
In Scenario 4, the mean cost difference decreases to negative 1.5%, but the standard
deviation slightly increases to 39.9%. Scenario 4 utilizes the same parameters for the
RACER estimate as Scenario 3 but selects the 96 city-average location modifier, which
sets labor, equipment, and material location modifiers equal to “1”. The labor,
equipment, and material modifiers are varied up or down by the different location
modifiers for each specific location. When the location modifiers were set to “1”, as in
Scenario 4, the analysis yielded no considerable difference when comparing Scenario 4
to Scenario 3.
The true mean cost difference provides insight on the overall effect (software-wide) of
using RACER for multiple project estimates. A closer look at the dispersion (standard
deviation) from the true mean cost difference also provides information on the expected
range of outcomes for the RACER estimate relative to the historical costs. The standard
deviations for Scenarios 1–4 in Figure 4 show relatively high levels of uncertainty in the
accuracy and predictability of any given RACER estimate when compared to the
historical cost.
Figure 5 presents the absolute value of mean cost difference between RACER-estimated
cost and actual historical project cost for each scenario. This measure provides a
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comparative basis to evaluate the relative accuracy of RACER at different levels of use
(default, secondary, and assembly levels).
Difference RACER vs Historical
Cost (Absolute Value)
100%
90%
ABS Mean
80%
Standard deviation
70%
60%
54.9%
53.1%
50%
32.4%
40%
31.8%
26.9% 27.8%
31.4% 24.5%
Scenario 2
Scenario 3
Scenario 4
30%
20%
10%
0%
Scenario 1
*Does not include outlier data from project scenarios with cost difference greater than 200%
Figure 5 – Absolute Value of Mean Cost Difference in RACER Estimate and Historical Project Cost by
Scenario, All Locations
Figure 5 shows that the absolute value of mean cost difference is much higher than the
true mean cost difference presented in Figure 4 for each scenario. This is due to the
exclusion of both positive and negative cost differences that tend to cancel each other
out. However, the standard deviation is much lower for the absolute value of mean
cost difference because the data dispersion considers only the positive side of the
expected zero mean.
A scatter plot of the cost difference data points provides greater insight into how well
RACER estimates cost in comparison with the historical project cost. In Figure 6, on the
following page, the cost difference between the RACER-estimated cost and the
corresponding actual historical project cost for Scenario 3 (the most detailed
comparison) is shown. The percent cost difference in positive and negative terms for 86
projects are displayed. As shown in Figure 6, on the following page, the scatter plot
begins to resemble the normal distribution with the true mean cost difference at
approximately 0%. The difference in cost generally falls within the 50% cost differential
range for most projects. Based on identified historical project cost data, there appears to
be no clear trend whether RACER estimates are “low” or “high” for remediation
projects, and that the data collected from the seven site visits resemble a normal
distribution.
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$3,500,000
$3,000,000
Historical Cost
$2,500,000
$2,000,000
$1,500,000
$1,000,000
$500,000
$-100.00%
-50.00%
0.00%
50.00%
100.00%
150.00%
Percent Difference
Figure 6 – Scatter Plot of Percent Cost Difference Between RACER Estimate and Historical Cost
Correlation Index
The next statistical measure pertains to the correlation of the RACER–estimated cost to
the actual historical cost data. As shown in Table 10 below, the correlation of the
RACER-estimated cost and actual historical cost data improves slightly from Scenarios
1 to 2. There is not, however, a marked change in correlation from Scenario 2 to
Scenario 3 or the 96 City Average applied in Scenario 4 based on cumulative data from
the four locations. These are high correlation values (approaching “1”).
Correlation Coefficient Historical Marked-up Project Cost:
RACER, All Locations
Scenario 1
90%
Scenario 2
93%
Scenario 3
92%
Scenario 4
94%
Table 10 – Correlation of RACER Estimate to Historical Cost, by Scenario
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Regression Analysis
The least-squares regression analysis result is presented in Figure 7.
$7,000,000
$6,000,000
y = 1.4325x - 110610
R2 = 0.8412
RACER Scenario 3
$5,000,000
$4,000,000
$3,000,000
$2,000,000
$1,000,000
$$-
$500,000
$1,000,000 $1,500,000 $2,000,000 $2,500,000 $3,000,000 $3,500,000
$(1,000,000)
Historical
Figure 7 – Linear Regression Analysis Scatter Plot, Scenario 3, All Locations
The value of R2 is most useful as a relative measure across similar data sets, and
although a fit above 0.9 usually indicates a “good fit”, this qualitative assessment varies
significantly depending on the application. In this analysis, a fit of 0.84 still represents a
good R2 for Scenario 3.
The slope of the least-squares regression trend line (Scenario 3) is 1.4. A 1:1 slope (slope
of 1.0) would describe a 45-degree line and indicate that the best fit trend (straight line)
tracks consistently from low- to high-cost projects. The reported value of 1.4 is a good
fit under Scenario 3.
Table 11, on the following page, presents conclusive narrowing of the “fit” from
Scenario 1 to 2. The slopes of the best-fit lines move towards 1.0 from Scenario 1 to 2,
slightly decreases from Scenario 2 to 3, then moves back towards 1.0 from Scenario 3 to
4 indicating that the RACER technology results’ predictive capability improves from
Scenario 1 to 2 and then from Scenario 3 to 4. There is not, however, a marked change
in correlation from Scenarios 2 to 4.
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R-Squared Historical Cost vs.
RACER
Scenario 1
80%
Scenario 2
86%
Scenario 3
84%
Scenario 4
88%
Table 11 – R2 Results by Scenario (All Locations)
Low- Versus High–Cost Project Analysis
The team performed additional regression analyses, separating the 88 projects into two
data sets: historical projects with a cost less than $500,000 and those with a cost greater
than $500,000 (roughly splitting the total number of projects into two data sets).
$600,000
$500,000
y = 0.8921x + 10453
2
R = 0.8437
RACER Scenario 3
$400,000
$300,000
$200,000
$100,000
$$-
$100,000
$200,000
$300,000
$400,000
$500,000
$600,000
Historical
Figure 8 – Regression Analysis Scenario 3 Scatter Plot, Projects < $500,000 (historical cost), All
Locations
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Results of this analysis for locations 1-7, displayed in Figures 8 and 9, indicate that with
this data set there are no significant statistical differences in the predictability of RACER
for low- versus high-cost projects. The R2 (0.84 for projects less than $500K, 0.79 for
projects greater than $500K) indicates a slightly greater predictive power for the lowcost projects’ regression, and the line slopes (0.89 for <$500K, 1.86 for >$500K) also
indicate a slightly tighter fit (closer to 1:1) for the low-cost projects’ regression model.
Nonetheless, the analysis presents findings that indicate no comparative advantage to
RACER project cost-estimating capability for either low- or high-cost ($500K threshold)
projects.
$7,000,000
$6,000,000
RACER Scenario 3
$5,000,000
y = 1.8629x - 835596
2
R = 0.7885
$4,000,000
$3,000,000
$2,000,000
$1,000,000
$$-
$500,000
$1,000,000
$1,500,000
$2,000,000
$2,500,000
$3,000,000
$3,500,000
Historical
Figure 9 –Regression Analysis, Scenario 3, Projects > $500,000 (historical cost), Locations 1-12
Comparative Analysis between the RACER 2008 software and benchmark 2004 RACER
software
The collection of historical data for completed remediation projects in 2008 builds upon
the previous 2004 RACER benchmark data. The additional data aids in evaluating and
improving the RACER parametric model by allowing for comparative analysis between
the re-engineered 2008 RACER software against the benchmark 2004 RACER software.
Figure 10, below compares the historical data collected from seven site visits in 2008
with the benchmark historical data collected from the eleven site visits and internet data
in 2004.
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One way to compare the two versions of the RACER software data is to simultaneously
evaluate the true mean and standard deviation for each software version by scenario.
The true mean cost difference comparison provides insight on the overall effect
(software-wide) between each version of the RACER software for multiple project
estimates. A closer look at the dispersion (standard deviation) from the true mean cost
difference also provides information on the expected range of outcomes for each
version of the RACER-estimated costs relative to the actual historical costs.
100.00%
2008 RACER Software - True Mean
2008 RACER Software - Standard deviation
80.00%
Difference RACER vs Historical Cost
71.36%
2004 RACER Software - True Mean
2004 RACER Software - Standard deviation
60.95%
60.00%
51.36%
45.06%
38.60%
40.00%
39.95%
37.75%
37.04%
27.69%
20.00%
16.17%
9.67%
6.47%
7.31%
4.05%
2.11%
0.00%
Scenario 1
Scenario 2
Scenario 3
-1.51% Scenario 4
-20.00%
*Does not include outlier data from project scenarios with cost difference greater than 200%
Figure 10: True Mean Cost Difference Comparison Between RACER 2008 Software and RACER 2004
Software by Scenario, All Locations
Figure 10 depicts summary results for both the RACER 2008 software version and 2004
RACER software version for all site locations, excluding outliers. The data show that
RACER 2008 has a higher true mean and standard deviation than RACER 2004 for
Scenario 1. However, the true mean cost difference for RACER 2008 is slightly lower
than RACER 2004 for Scenarios 2 – 4. The standard deviation is similar between the
RACER software versions for Scenarios 2 - 4. The standard deviations for Scenarios 1–4
in Figure 10, above, show relatively high levels of uncertainty in the accuracy and
predictability of any given RACER estimate when compared to the actual historical
project cost.
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Summary of Project-level Statistical Analysis
Table 12, below, summarizes each of the five measures used to evaluate the difference
between the RACER-estimated cost and the actual historical project costs by scenario.
There is significant improvement from Scenario 1 to 2, and then a flattening out from
Scenarios 2 through 4 for both the true mean and absolute value of mean cost
difference, with the standard deviations decreasing in lockstep. The standard
deviations for both the true mean and absolute value of mean cost difference show
relatively high levels of uncertainty in the accuracy and predictability of any given
RACER estimate when compared to the historical project cost. Both the correlation
coefficient and R-Squared show there is high correlation between the RACER estimates
and historical costs for all the scenarios. The R-squared measure presents conclusive
narrowing of the fit from Scenario 1 to 2, but not a marked change in fit from Scenario 2
through 4.
Summary Results for RACER 2008 Software by Scenario
Scenario 1
Scenario 2
Scenario 3
Scenario 4
True Mean
28%
7%
4%
-2%
Absolute Mean
53%
32%
27%
31%
True Standard
Deviation
71%
45%
39%
40%
Absolute Standard
Deviation
55%
32%
28%
25%
Correlation
Coefficient
90%
93%
92%
94%
R-Squared
80%
86%
84%
88%
Table 12 – Project-level Summary of Each Statistical Measure Results by Scenario for RACER 2008
Software (All Locations)
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6.4
STATISTICAL COST ANALYSIS OF TECHNOLOGIES
This second subsection compares historical costs and RACER-estimated costs for 14
frequently-used technologies to evaluate the accuracy of these RACER technology
models. This second prong of the three pronged analysis looks at the performance of
some of the more frequently used technologies generally included in environmental
restoration projects rather than looking at the entire project (collection of technologies).
The technology and project level cost analyses work together to form the total cost
analysis. Engineering analyses of the algorithms that make up the technology models
follow this section to provide a more complete understanding of the current
performance of RACER as well as provide suggestions on how to best update the
software.
The approach developed for evaluating technologies in RACER was based on three
major factors:
•
Technologies most frequently used in DoD program experience;
•
Most frequently occurring technologies within the historical project database;
and
•
Technologies that were re-engineered for RACER 2008.
In combination, these three factors effectively identified the most important
technologies for evaluation. Forty technologies were applied as RACER technologies in
the 88 historical projects. These 40 technologies were applied as RACER technologies in
425 instances. Table 7 in Section 4.1 of this document describes these technologies and
frequency of use in RACER cost estimating during this project.
Due to data limitations at the technology-level,24 sufficient data are available for only a
subset (14 technologies) of these 40 technologies to make comparisons between RACER
estimates and historical technology-level costs. This analysis of the subset of
technologies measures the accuracy of RACER with more granularity than at the
project-level. However, as described in Section 5.0 above, due to the limitations of the
data collection and analysis process, data sets for the individual 14 technologies are
small; therefore, only preliminary conclusions should be drawn from the technologylevel cost analysis.
Figure 11, on the following page, depicts the Top 25 technologies encountered during
the data collection effort for the 2008 validation project. This set of 25 RACER
technologies represents those most frequently encountered within the 88 historical
projects.
24 See Section 5.0 for a detailed discussion of project limitations.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 44 of 210
Residual Waste Management
55
Monitoring
48
38
Professional Labor Management
Groundwater Monitoring Well
36
Excavation
31
Site Closeout Documentation
27
20
Off-Site Transportation and Waste Disposal
Remedial Investigation
19
UST Closure/Removal
18
Technology
Well Abandonment
14
10
Preliminary Assessment
In Situ Biodegradation
9
Operations and Maintenance
9
Load and Haul
8
Feasibility Study
8
Demolition, Pavements
7
Cleanup and Landscaping
5
Trenching/Piping
4
Transportation
4
Storage Tank Installation
4
Fencing
4
Decontamination Facilities
4
Site Inspection
4
Special Well Drilling & Installation
3
Resurfacing Roadways/Parking Lots
2
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
Count
Figure 11 - “Top 25” Technologies Identified in Historical Projects
In an effort to develop a viable benchmark for comparison, the USAEC provided a list
of the agency’s most frequently used technologies based on their user community and
program experience; this list is displayed in Figure 12, on the following page, along
with their frequency of use in the 88 validation projects gathered for the 2008 validation
project. A comparison of the technologies most frequently identified in the validation
projects (as presented in Figure 11) with the USAEC list (as presented in Figure 12)
provides credibility to the top 25 technologies identified during this analysis due to the
overlap. The reader should note that 4 of the 25 most common technologies identified
by USAEC are Munitions and Explosives of Concern (MEC) technologies (MEC
Removal Action, MEC Monitoring, MEC Institutional Controls and MEC Site
Characterization and Removal Assessment) that were not covered by this project, as a
sufficient number of historical projects was not available. Therefore, those technologies
are not included in Figure 12.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 45 of 210
60
55
Technology Occurrences
Technology Occurrences with Historical Cost
48
Number of Occurrences
50
40
36
38
38
31
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27
24
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Figure 12 – The 21 Most Commonly Used Technologies by USAEC25
Analysis of Fourteen Most Frequently Occurring Technologies
This section evaluates the performance of a subset of the “Top 25” technologies most
frequently occurring within the historical data set. The subset of the 14 most frequently
occurring technologies was evaluated using the same statistical cost differentials
presented in the project-level discussion under Section 6.1. This analysis provides a
more specific cost differential evaluation between RACER-estimated cost and historical
cost at the technology-level. This is especially relevant as the cost difference at the
project-level is the result of multiple technologies being employed. The examination of
the cost difference at the technology-level reveals how well specific and frequently used
RACER technologies are performing in isolation.
Figures 13 – 16 depict the cost differentials of the 14 most frequently occurring
technologies under each scenario. These technologies identify relative trends in cost
performance. The technologies are arrayed from low to high frequency of identified
historical cost occurrence per technology beginning with “Site Close-Out
Documentation” and ending with “Monitoring.” In addition to the 88 projects collected
25 “Technology Occurrences” counts the number of technologies identified in the historical projects that could be cross-walked
into a RACER estimate. The technology occurrences with historical costs are the number of technologies identified in the
historical projects for which specific technology costs could be isolated for comparison with the RACER estimate.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 46 of 210
as part of this effort, Booz Allen also utilized assessment data collected from the
previous RACER 2004 software assessment to increase the number of RACER
technology occurrences for this analysis. The 2004 technology-level assessment data
were run through the 2008 RACER software following the same methodology described
in Section 2.3.
Figure 13, below, depicts the 14 most frequently occurring technologies for Scenario 1.
The true mean cost difference and standard deviation are shown for each technology.
True Mean
True STD
%
2
9
100%
%
4
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Figure 13 – Fourteen Most Frequently Occurring Technologies – Scenario 1 Percent Difference in
Cost26
26 Scenario 1: Site Close-Out Documentation has 8 historical occurrences with no outliers.
UST Closure/Removal has 11 historical occurrences, but 1 was omitted as an outlier.
Feasibility Study has 11 historical occurrences with no outliers.
Fencing has 13 historical occurrences, but 4 were omitted as outliers.
Cleanup and Landscaping has 14 historical occurrences, but 1 was omitted as an outlier.
Load and Haul has 16 historical occurrences with no outliers.
Remedial Investigation has 18 historical occurrences, but 2 were omitted as outliers.
Groundwater Monitoring Wells has 18 historical occurrences with no outliers.
Operations and Maintenance has 22 historical occurrences, but 1 was omitted as an outlier.
Residual Waste Management has 26 historical occurrences, but 4 were omitted as outliers.
Excavation has 39 historical occurrences, but 3 were omitted as outliers.
Professional Labor Management has 42 historical occurrences, but 2 were omitted as outliers.
Off-Site Transportation and Waste Disposal has 47 historical occurrences, but 5 were omitted as outliers.
Monitoring has 68 historical occurrences, but 20 were omitted as outliers.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 47 of 210
Figure 14, below, depicts the 14 most frequently occurring technologies for Scenario 2.
The true mean cost difference and standard deviation are shown for each technology.
With the modification of secondary parameters in Scenario 1, the mean difference in
cost is reduced compared to Scenario 1. The standard deviation is also improved for the
technologies with higher numbers of occurrences. Monitoring, the technology with the
highest number of occurrences, has similar means and standard deviations for both
Scenarios 1 and 2. However, eight occurrences were omitted as outliers in Scenario 2
while yielding similar results to Scenario 1.
True Mean
True STD
%
1
9
100%
%
4
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80%
40%
%
6
6
%
3
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8
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Figure 14 – Fourteen Most Frequently Occurring Technologies – Scenario 2 Percent Difference in
Cost27
27 Scenario 2: Site Close-Out Documentation has 8 historical occurrences with no outliers.
UST Closure/Removal has 11 historical occurrences, but 1 was omitted as an outlier.
Feasibility Study has 11 historical occurrences with no outliers.
Fencing has 13 historical occurrences, but 4 were omitted as outliers.
Cleanup and Landscaping has 14 historical occurrences, but 1 was omitted as an outlier.
Load and Haul has 16 historical occurrences with no outliers.
Remedial Investigation has 18 historical occurrences, but 2 were omitted as outliers.
Groundwater Monitoring Wells has 18 historical occurrences with no outliers.
Operations and Maintenance has 22 historical occurrences, but 1 was omitted as an outlier.
Residual Waste Management has 26 historical occurrences, but 5 were omitted as outliers.
Excavation has 39 historical occurrences, but 2 were omitted as outliers.
Professional Labor Management has 42 historical occurrences, but 2 were omitted as outliers.
Off-site Transportation and Waste Disposal has 47 historical occurrences, but 5 were omitted as outliers.
Monitoring has 68 historical occurrences, but 12 were omitted as outliers.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 48 of 210
Figure 15, below, depicts the 14 most frequently occurring technologies for Scenario 3.
The true mean cost difference and standard deviation are shown for each technology.
The mean difference in cost is more consistently shown to fall within the 25–50%
category with the user’s ability to specifically modify parameters and technology
assemblies.
True Mean
True STD
100%
%
7
7
80%
60%
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Figure 15 – Fourteen Most Frequently Occurring Technologies – Scenario 3 Mean Difference in Cost28
Figure 16, on the following page, depicts the 14 most frequently occurring technologies
for Scenario 4. The true mean cost difference and standard deviation are shown for
28 Scenario 3: Site Close-Out Documentation has 8 historical occurrences with no outliers.
UST Closure/Removal has 11 historical occurrences, but 1 was omitted as an outlier.
Feasibility Study has 11 historical occurrences with no outliers.
Fencing has 13 historical occurrences, but 3 were omitted as outliers.
Cleanup and Landscaping has 14 historical occurrences with no outliers.
Load and Haul has 16 historical occurrences with no outliers.
Remedial Investigation has 18 historical occurrences, but 2 were omitted as outliers.
Groundwater Monitoring Wells has 18 historical occurrences with no outliers.
Operations and Maintenance has 22 historical occurrences, but 1 was omitted as an outlier.
Residual Waste Management has 26 historical occurrences, but 2 were omitted as outliers.
Excavation has 39 historical occurrences, but 1 was omitted as an outlier.
Professional Labor Management has 42 historical occurrences, but 2 were omitted as outliers.
Off-Site Transportation and Waste Disposal has 47 historical occurrences, but 5 were omitted as outliers.
Monitoring has 68 historical occurrences, but 13 were omitted as outliers.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 49 of 210
each technology. Consistent with the analysis of Scenario 4 at the project-level in
Section 6.1, it does not appear that a considerable difference in the accuracy of estimates
is occurring with the use of either area cost factors (Scenario 3) or the 96-City Average
(Scenario 4).
True Mean
True STD
100%
80%
%
7
7
%
8
6
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Figure 16 – Fourteen Most Frequently Occurring Technologies – Scenario 4 Mean Difference in Cost29
29 Scenario 4: Site Close-Out Documentation has 8 historical occurrences with no outliers.
UST Closure/Removal has 11 historical occurrences with no outliers.
Feasibility Study has 11 historical occurrences with no outliers.
Fencing has 13 historical occurrences, but 2 were omitted as outliers.
Cleanup and Landscaping has 14 historical occurrences, but 1 was omitted as an outlier.
Load and Haul has 16 historical occurrences with no outliers.
Remedial Investigation has 18 historical occurrences, but 2 were omitted as outliers.
Groundwater Monitoring Wells has 18 historical occurrences with no outliers.
Operations and Maintenance has 22 historical occurrences, but 1 was omitted as an outlier.
Residual Waste Management has 26 historical occurrences, but 2 were omitted as outliers.
Excavation has 39 historical occurrences, but 1 was omitted as an outlier.
Professional Labor Management has 42 historical occurrences, but 1 was omitted as an outlier.
Off-Site Transportation and Waste Disposal has 47 historical occurrences, but 5 were omitted as outliers.
Monitoring has 68 historical occurrences, but 12 were omitted as outliers.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 50 of 210
Comparative Technology Analysis between the RACER 2008 software and benchmark 2004
RACER software
This section evaluates the performance of the “Top 10” technologies that most
frequently occurred within the 2004 benchmark historical cost dataset. This subset of
the 10 most frequently occurring technologies is evaluated using the same statistical
cost differentials presented in the project-level discussion under Section 6.1.
This analysis provides more specific cost differential evaluation between RACER
estimates and historical cost at the technology-level. Furthermore the analysis provides
a comparison of the RACER 2008 software against the benchmark RACER 2004
software. This is especially relevant for analyzing changes in the estimation
performance of the re-engineered RACER 2008 software. The examination of the cost
difference at the technology-level reveals how well specific and frequently-used RACER
2008 technologies are performing.
For this comparison, benchmark 2004 historical technologies costs were re-estimated
using the RACER 2008 software.30 Only true mean and standard deviation technology
cost differences that were not omitted as outliers and were able to be estimated by both
the RACER 2008 software and the benchmark RACER 2004 software were utilized in
the analysis.
Figure 17, on the following page, depicts a comparison between the RACER 2008
software and RACER 2004 software by cost differentials of the most frequently
occurring technologies under Scenario 2. These technologies identify change in
estimation performance with the re-engineered RACER 2008 software. The
technologies are arrayed from low to high frequency of historical cost occurrences per
technology beginning with “Capping” and ending with “Professional Labor
Management.”
30 See Section 2.2 of this document for a detailed discussion of the re-estimation / upgrade process.
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92%
2008 True Mean
2008 True STD
100%
2004 True Mean
49%
54%
62%
75%
67%
59%
81%
77%
22%
43%
22%
0%
3%
25%
22%
19%
20%
23%
42%
23%
37%
18%
40%
46%
59%
58%
70%
70%
74%
69%
49%
60%
48%
-30%
Professional Labor
Management
-4%
Off-Site Transportation
Monitoring
Excavation
-26%
UST Closure/Removal
-43%
Load and Haul
-19%
-27%
Clean-up and
Landscaping
-40%
Groundwater
Monitoring Well
-20%
Clear and Grub
0%
Capping
-80%
-66%
-60%
-65%
Comparison of RACER 2008 Software and 2004 Software
by Percent Difference RACER vs. Historical Costs
80%
75%
2004 True STD
-100%
Figure 17 – Comparison of RACER 2008 Software and RACER 2004 Software by Top Ten Technology
Occurrences
Four of these technologies, including Capping, Clear and Grub, Cleanup and
Landscaping, UST Closure/Removal, have a lower percentage difference in RACER
2008 than in RACER 2004, indicating improved performance. Six of these technologies
have a higher percentage difference in RACER 2008 than in RACER 2004. These are
Groundwater Monitoring Well, Load and Haul, Excavation, Monitoring, Off-Site
Transportation and Waste Disposal, and Professional Labor Management. A discussion
of the possible reasons for this greater difference follows below; these issues are
discussed in detail in Section 6.3.
Monitoring
The following issues may play a large role in why the RACER 2008 Monitoring
technology shows a greater deviation from historical costs than in 2004.
1. Travel (incorrectly calculating travel to and from the site for each day of
sampling)
2. Plans and Reports (overestimation of costs, particularly at the comprehensive
selection)
3. Purge water calculations (calculating purge water volumes from ground surface
to average sample depth).
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Off-Site Transportation and Waste Disposal (Off-Site T&D)
The prominent issue with the Off-Site T&D technology appears to be that the
technology separately accounts for loading, transport, analysis, and disposal of waste
(via separate assemblies). Project documentation reviewed as part of this project
indicates that most often waste disposal costs are charged as a lump sum cost (all
inclusive cost for pickup, transport, and disposal). In most instances the RACERestimated cost was elevated relative to the actual cost, indicating the combination of
assemblies employed in this technology are overstating the typical costs for these
services. A second, smaller issue is utilizing hazardous waste assemblies for waste
transport, where non-hazardous assemblies should be used.31 The use of the correct
non-hazardous assemblies should result in a more accurate estimation of actual costs.
This issue was also identified in the 2004 report.
Load and Haul
Although the percent cost difference between RACER 2004 and RACER 2008 is 41%,
Load and Haul now shows a positive deviation (22%) from historical costs where it
showed a moderate negative deviation (-19%) in RACER 2004. Of the three assemblies
utilized in this technology, one is calculated by user input (17020401, Dump Charge);
therefore, the discrepancy is either in the number of hours calculated for equipment use
(e.g., wheel loader) or the number of hours calculated for the travel distance to the
dump site (e.g., dump truck or semi-dump).
Excavation
The Excavation technology exhibits a negative deviation from historical project costs.
We have identified several requirements not found in RACER that are common to
excavation projects: mobilization, per diem, and surveying. A discussion of each of
these is found in Section 6.3 below. This issue was not identified in the 2004 report.
Professional Labor Management (PLM)
Since PLM is calculated in RACER via a default percentage, the reason for the deviation
of PLM from the historical project costs must lie in the calculation of this percentage or
the technologies which are included in the total “Marked Up Construction Cost”
calculation.
31 Two examples of this issue are when non-hazardous, bulk solid waste is selected, the assembly is “33190205 Transport Bulk
Solid Hazardous Waste, Maximum 20 CY (per Mile)”; and when non-hazardous liquid waste in drums is selected, the
assembly is “33190204 Transport 55 Gallon Drums of Hazardous Waste, Max 80 drums (per Mile)”.
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6.5
TECHNOLOGY ENGINEERING ANALYSIS
The last prong of the three pronged analysis is the engineering analysis. The
combination of the project-level cost analysis, technology-level cost analysis, and
technology engineering analysis form the total analysis of the RACER software
performed as part of the software validation. This three pronged approach helps to
compensate for data and analytic limitations, previously mentioned in Sections 5 and 6,
that each analytical approach has when used separately.
This section discusses the engineering analysis of the RACER technologies as it pertains
to the list of projects deconstructed for all seven site locations. As part of the critical
review of the RACER program, technologies, assemblies, and unit costs were analyzed
to determine if they reflect best practices in environmental restoration. The assemblies
were reviewed to see if they need to be changed or updated, if default parameters need
to be changed, and to identify if new technologies need to be developed. This section
will assist the Government in gaining a better understanding of the current
performance of RACER as well as provide suggestions on how to best update the
program.
The following observations were gathered during the deconstruction and development
of the four RACER scenarios for the 88 selected projects used for comparison against the
historical project costs. As part of the analysis, the technologies were reviewed for Cost
Reasonableness, Current Technology Methodology, and General Technology
Functionality. The complete list of RACER observations and recommendations is
presented in Appendix D.
The RACER software is based on engineering logic for environmental restoration
treatment trains. Because environmental technologies are continuously evolving, the
RACER software must be periodically assessed and updated as well. As a result, it is
necessary that ongoing annual RACER training be provided for estimators to maintain
their proficiency in and knowledge of the software.
Suggested Improvements to the Most Frequently Observed Technologies
A detailed analysis was performed on the “Top 14” technologies to identify deficiencies
and suggest improvements to each. The results of this analysis are presented below for
the following technologies (listed alphabetically): Cleanup and Landscaping,
Excavation, Feasibility Study, Fencing, Groundwater Monitoring Well, Load and Haul,
Monitoring, Off-Site Transportation and Waste Disposal, Operations and Maintenance,
Professional Labor Management, Remedial Investigation, Residual Waste Management,
Site Close-Out Documentation, and Underground Storage Tank Closure/Removal. In
addition, a discussion on Well Abandonment is included, as it is a new technology to
the RACER 2008 software.
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Technology #1: Cleanup & Landscaping
The Cleanup & Landscaping technology was observed five times throughout the seven
location visits; only one instance was available for comparison at the technology-level.
Combined with technology-level data from the 2004 effort, there are a total of 14
instances of the technology that can be compared at the technology level. The most
frequent observations and suggested solutions are listed below.
•
Issue: There is not sufficient information in the Help Topic to determine the
difference between the options for “Remove Debris” and “Area Cleanup.”
•
Recommended Solution: To aid the user in selecting the option most appropriate
to their estimate, revise the description of the options for “Remove Debris” and
“Area Cleanup” so that the difference between the options is clear.
•
Issue: Each selection for cleanup type (Road Cleanup, Remove Debris, and Area
Cleanup) has only one assembly item associated with it. Unlike other RACER
technologies, there are not different assemblies based on material volumes,
hauling distances, and other parameters which affect project cost.
•
–
17040102 Pavement Sweeping, Machine, for Road Cleanup, at a cost of $0.04/SY
–
17040103 Load & Haul Debris, 5 Miles, Dumptruck, for Remove Debris, at a cost
of $7.46/CY
–
17040101 Cleaning Up, site debris clean up and removal, for Area Cleanup, at a
cost of $624.14/ACR
Recommended Solution: Review algorithm to ensure the equipment assemblies
used in the technology are appropriate for all possible combinations of
parameter inputs.
Technology #2: Excavation
The excavation technology (EXC) was observed 39 times throughout the seven location
visits; seven instances were able to be compared at the technology level. Combined
with technology-level data from the 2004 effort, there are a total of 38 instances of EXC
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available for technology-level analysis. The most frequent observations and suggested
solutions are listed below.
•
Issue: The backfill hauling distance is limited to 20 miles. RACER should allow
longer distances for the transportation of backfill to the site. While this applies
especially to remote sites, it may impact major CONUS installations as well.
•
Recommended Solution: Increase the maximum valid range to match that of
hauling distances used throughout the RACER system. These should be
consistent throughout.
Off-Site Backfill
Hauling
Distance is
Limited to 20
miles
Figure 18
•
Issue: Several Alaska District projects involved transporting workers and
material to and from the site via helicopter. There are no options available for
selecting different modes of transporting excavated materials or fill. Trucks are
assumed.
•
Recommended Solution: Provide a “remote” option to better estimate projects in
remote locations. When selected, other options or combinations of options
would be available for selection (similar to the list provided under Residual
Waste Management but revised to include helicopter usage).
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•
Issue: The technology cannot account for surveying requirements.
•
Recommended Solution: Create a surveying mini-model to address surveying
requirements identified in several RACER technologies (e.g., Excavation,
Groundwater Monitoring Well, MEC Site Characterization, Monitoring,
Remedial Investigation).
•
Issue: The technology cannot account for travel requirements/per diem.
•
Recommended Solution: Provide a per diem option in the technology. The per
diem duration could be defaulted based on the excavation duration calculation;
number of travelers could be based on the quantities of labor categories.
•
Issue: The assembly for a scraper (“22 CY Scraper by BCY”) is brought in for
situations that normally would not require a scraper but, rather, an excavator.
RACER selects the scraper based on excavation volume (between 13,000 and
999,999 BCY), width of excavation (greater than 15 feet), and whether dewatering
is required (no dewatering required). Use of a scraper is based on excavation
depth, and the RACER calculation should reflect that.
In addition, using width as a part of the calculation presents an issue. For
area/depth and volume/depth methods, width is calculated by RACER by using
the square root of the excavation footprint (this method assumes the excavated
area is a square). However, for the length/width/depth method, RACER uses
the user input values for length and width. The RACER scenario in Table 13, on
the following page, illustrates this issue. Both input combinations result in the
same excavation volume; however, combination 1 results in the use of a scraper
whereas combination 2 results in an excavator for the exact same excavation
volume. (It is also worth noting that using the appropriate conversions for the
volume/depth and area/depth methods results in the use of the scraper
assembly.) The resulting cost difference between the two input combinations is
$31,684.68, or 51%.
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Input Combination 1
User Input Values
Length 14 ft
Width 10,000 ft
Depth 4 ft
Input Combination 2
User Input Values
Length 10,000 ft
Width 14 ft
Depth 4 ft
RACER Assembly-Level Output
RACER Assembly-Level Output
Assembly
Number
17030242
Description
QTY
UOM
22 CY
Scraper by
BCY
20741
BCY
Extended
Cost
$62,633.14
Assembly
Number
17030278
Description
QTY
UOM
Excavate and load,
bank measure,
medium material,
3-1/2 C.Y. bucket,
hydraulic
excavator
20741
BCY
Extended
Cost
$30,948.46
Note: comparison assumes all other input parameters are set equally; assembly costs calculated using US 96-city
average. All other assembly outputs are the same, except the assembly listed.
Table 13 – Assembly-level discrepancy in excavation equipment.
•
Recommended Solution: Reevaluate equipment algorithms so that the use of the
scraper is based on the volume and depth of the excavation, not the volume and
width. Further, for any algorithms based on excavation width, it is
recommended that the approach to user-input width values for non-square
excavation footprints be re-evaluated to avoid discrepancies as shown above in
Table 10.
•
Issue: Volume of dewatering passed to Residual Waste Management (WMS) is
incorrect for small excavation volumes. The quantity of dewatering passed to
WMS is 4800 gallons for several scenarios of small-volume excavations. The
algorithm is based on soil type and equipment duration, but equipment
durations are stepped values in RACER, not linear calculations. This approach is
not inappropriate for equipment duration, but results in highly inflated values
for several dewatering scenarios.
•
Recommended Solution: Revise algorithm so that the calculated volume of
dewatering liquid passed to Residual Waste Management more closely matches
the amount of water at the base of the excavated area.
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•
Issue: Mobilization/Demobilization costs are not included in the technology.
The Help Topic for Field Office Overhead/G&A states:
“Field Office Overhead/G&A costs in RACER include all indirect
costs to the general contractor(s) performing the construction
work; including job overhead costs associated with field-related
tasks that are required to execute a contract, as well as non projectspecific costs that are required to support labor and general
operations of the general contractors’ business. Field Office
Overhead/G&A costs may include the items listed above, as well as
the following job-related overhead items:
– Taxes;
– Operations and maintenance of
temporary project-site facilities;
– Project-specific insurance;
– Project vehicles;
– Bonds;
– Personal protective equipment
– Permits and licenses;
and Occupational Health and
– General supervision;
Safety (OSHA) requirements;
– Temporary office personnel;
– Quality controls;
– Schedules;
– Preparatory work and testing services; – Mobilization and demobilization;
and
– Temporary project facilities;
– Site security.”
– Temporary utilities (e.g. phone,
electrical);
It is unclear whether these costs are accounted for in the EXC technology since
several other technologies do include mobilization/demobilization assemblies.
•
Recommended Solution: Reevaluate mobilization/demobilization costs in the
EXC technology as well as throughout the RACER system. Ensure
mobilization/demobilization costs are accounted for consistently and accurately;
revise Help Topics accordingly.
Technology #3: Feasibility Study
Throughout the seven location visits, this technology had two observations called out in
Appendix D. Feasibility Study was observed eight times, and each of the eight
instances was able to be compared at the technology level. Combined with data from
2004, there are 11 instances of the Feasibility Study technology available for technologylevel comparison. The most frequent observations and suggested solutions are listed
below.
Treatability Study Tab (Figure 19, on the following page)
•
Issue: RACER only provides a default cost for bench-scale and pilot-scale
treatability studies (TS) without modifiers that could increase or decrease the
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default costs. It might be more accurate not to use the TS option but to cost out
all TS tasks individually using applicable technologies.
•
Recommended Solution: Compile average actual costs for various types of
bench-scale treatability tests and pilot-scale tests from various environmental
projects. RACER would then provide options for selecting the types of tests such
as chemical in-situ tests. The cost estimate would be determined by RACER by
multiplying the average actual costs with a multiplier determined from the site
complexity and level of study chosen by the user in the System Definition tab.
The option for the user to input a cost can be provided by including a “userdefined” option in the types of tests option.
Add a Drop-down
list that provides
options for types
of bench-scale
test.
Add a drop-down
list that provides
types of pilotscale tests.
“Costs per tests”
could be left for
input by the
estimator if “userdefined” is
selected in the
parameters above.
Figure 19
•
Issue: There is no option for additional meetings.
•
Recommended Solution: Amend the technology by adding a Meetings tab
similar to that of the Site Close-Out Documentation technology as shown in
Figure 20. The estimator would input the number of meetings, distance, airfare,
and number of travelers. RACER would calculate per diem, labor, and other
travel costs using the inputs.
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Add a mileage box for
occasions when travel is
by car. When mileage is
inputted, then the Air
Fare box will not allow
inputting a cost for
airfare.
Figure 20
Scoping Tab
•
Issue: There are no travel costs for site visits under the Scoping tab.
•
Recommended Solution: Provide inputs for mileage or site distance in this tab or
include site visits for scoping in the proposed tab shown above in Figure 20.
Feasibility Report Tab (Figure 21)
•
Issue: There is no Draft Final version for the Feasibility Study report. There are
no Draft and Draft Final versions for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decisions.
•
Recommended Solution: Provide additional tabs for selection of the noted
document versions.
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Add option for Draft
Final version of FS
report.
Add option for Draft
and Draft Final versions
of Proposed Plan and
Record of Decision.
Figure 21
•
Issue: The hours allocated for preparation of the Proposed Plans and Record of
Decisions are very low compared to actual experience.
•
Recommended Solution: Provide additional hours for the various versions of
these two documents.
Technology #4: Fencing
The fencing technology (FEN) was observed four times throughout the seven location
visits; two instances were able to be compared at the technology level. Combined with
technology-level data from the 2004 effort, there are a total of 12 technology-level
instances of FEN available for technology-level analysis. The most frequent
observations and suggested solutions are listed below.
FEN was observed in the 2004 assessment project, but was not re-engineered for
RACER 2008. Issues identified in 2004 are listed below along with new observations.
•
Issue: The current parameters within the fencing technology do not allow an
accurate estimate within RACER for the fencing task.
•
Recommended Solution: Add additional secondary parameters that would refine
the estimate based on known site requirements, as shown in Figure 22.
Examples of types of parameters needed based on historical project data are as
follows:
–
Height of fence
–
Fence Material (chain link, plastic, etc)
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–
Number and types of gates for entry
–
Post type and spacing
–
Permanent or Temporary Fencing
–
Type of signage (in-ground installation vs. signage installed on fencing)
Additional suggested FEN
secondary parameters are:
• Height of fence
• Fence material (chain link,
plastic, etc)
• Number and Type of gates for
entry
• Permanent or Temporary
fencing
• Type of signage
Figure 22
•
Issue: The FEN Help Topic does not reveal that signage is included in the
estimate.
•
Recommended Solution: Add language to the Help Topic explaining the
inclusion of signage costs at the assembly level.
•
Issue: Cost of signage ($59.44 EA, using US 96-City Average) implies signage is
of a simple, fence-mounted type. However, the line items associated with
signage indicate several hours of semi-skilled laborers for installation of signs.
•
Recommended Solution: Add signage type as a secondary parameter; ensure line
items associated with fence-mounted are appropriate. For in-ground signage,
line items should include necessary labor, and cost (expected to be $400-$500
range) should be based on historical documentation.
Technology #5: Groundwater Monitoring Well
The Groundwater Monitoring Well technology (GWM) was observed 19 times
throughout the seven location visits; 10 instances were able to be compared at the
technology level. Combined with technology-level data from the 2004 effort, there are a
total of 18 instances of GWM that can be compared at the technology-level. The most
frequent observations and suggested solutions are listed below.
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Assemblies
•
Issue:. Analytical assembly quantities do not account for Quality Assurance
Quality Control (QA/QC) analysis.
•
Recommended Solution:. Update this technology to include the monitoring minimodel that is now used in many of the technologies that were reengineered in
RACER 2008 (e.g. Monitoring, Remedial Investigation, Feasibility Study). When
utilizing Soil Analytical Template under the Aquifer Tab (Figure 23), add an
optional check box or secondary requirements tab to enable the user to define
QA/QC sample quantities.
Figure 23
•
Issue: There are no assemblies to account for the cost of disposable materials per
sample or decontamination materials per sample collected (see Figure 24).
•
Solution: Add requisite assemblies to cover the cost for disposable sample
collection equipment and decontamination equipment.
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Include assemblies
to account for the
cost of sample
collection and
decontamination
materials.
Account for
QA/QC
quantities in
sample analysis
quantities.
Figure 24
•
Issue: LOE for the Field Technicians does not change when the split spoon
sample collection option (Figure 25) is selected. With the addition of a sample
collection, the LOE should increase for the technicians (Figure 26).
•
Recommended Solution: Modify algorithms to account for additional labor
when split-spoon sample collection is specified under the Aquifer Tab.
Figure 25
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Adjust Field
technician LOE
to account for
additional field
time required for
split spoon
sample collection
Figure 26
•
Issue:. Well development Assemblies 33231186 (weekly rental) and 33231193
(daily rental) are not default assemblies in this technology; therefore, they must
be added manually (Figure 27). Well development is an integral part of
groundwater well installation and should be included in this technology as part
of the cost of well installation.
•
Recommended Solution:. Modify algorithms to provide for the cost of well
development in the assemblies for the Groundwater Monitoring Well
technology. The LOE for the field technicians will require an increase as well to
ensure adequate labor for performing the well development tasks.
Add Assembly to
account for well
development costs.
Figure 27
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Technology #6: Load and Haul
The Load and Haul technology was observed eight times throughout the seven location
visits; three instances were able to be compared at the technology level. Combined with
technology-level data from the 2004 effort, there are a total of 16 instances of Load and
Haul that can be compared at the technology-level. The most frequent observations and
suggested solutions are listed below.
Assemblies (Figure 28)
•
Issue: Assembly 17020401 “Dump Charges” is associated with the unit of
measure “Each.”
•
Recommended Solution: Change the unit of measure for this assembly to Cubic
Yards (CY) to match the unit of measure under the system definition tab (Figure
29).
Unit of measure
(EA) for “Dump
Charges” should be
changed to match
unit of measure
(CY) under System
Definition Tab
Figure 28
Figure 29
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Technology #7: Monitoring
The Monitoring technology was observed 63 times throughout the seven location visits;
38 instances were able to be compared at the technology level. Combined with
technology-level data from the 2004 effort, there are a total of 68 instances of Monitoring
that can be compared at the technology level. While the Monitoring technology has
been re-engineered since the 2004 report, there are still numerous problems and
inconsistencies with the technology. More detail on these issues is provided below.
General
•
Issue: The Monitoring technology was re-engineered but the Natural Attenuation
Technology (MNA) was not. This has resulted in very different costs for similar
work depending on which technology is used. For example, cost for
collection/analysis of 400 groundwater samples assuming default parameters is
~$700,000 in the Monitoring module (with MNA Analytical Template used) and
~$1,000,000 in the Natural Attenuation module with the same parameters
selected.
•
Recommended Solution: Reevaluate Natural Attenuation and update it to be
more in sync with the re-engineered Monitoring technology.
•
Issue: The Monitoring technology does not properly account for travel (either
mileage or travel time) when sampling over several days. For example: when
site distance is 200 miles, number of wells sampled is 24 wells at 15 ft average
sample depth, assuming a single sampling event, RACER calculates that six wells
will be sampled per day (four total days of sampling). RACER calculates travel
as if the contractor is traveling 200 miles each way for each of the four days of
sampling, resulting in the following quantities:
Assembly
Description
Quantity
33010104
Sample collection, vehicle mileage charge, car or van
1,720 Mi
33010202
Per Diem (per person)
8 Day
33022043
Overnight delivery service, 51 to 70 lb packages
480 Lb
33220112
Field Technician
101 Hr
The quantities for Assemblies 33010104 and 33220112 are excessive when
compared to historical data.
–
The quantity for assembly 33010104 should be 400 miles plus onsite mileage
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•
–
The quantity for assembly 33010202 appears to be accurate (4 days for each of
2 field techs)
–
The quantity for 33022043 appears to be accurate
–
The quantity for assembly 33220112 should be approximately 16 hours for
travel time (4 hours each way for each of 2 technicians). For comparison, the
quantity of hours for a site with a 10 mile site distance is 18 hours compared
to the example shown above, with a 200 mile site distance, is 101 hours.
Recommended Solution: Reevaluate quantities for assemblies listed above.
Additionally, RACER should calculate travel for the sampling technicians by car
up to a reasonable number of miles and by air for greater distances.
Groundwater Tab
•
Issue: Projects frequently include requirements for measuring groundwater
depths at certain wells or checking for free product with no corresponding
sample collection. Additionally, RACER does not provide the ability to measure
for depth- to-water or presence of free product when samples are not also
collected. The only option in RACER is to sample. RACER does not have an
assembly for rental of oil/water interface probe.
•
Recommended Solution: Include an option in the Groundwater tab for depth to
water measurements only, and/or free product presence/absence at a userprovided number of wells. This should result in assemblies for rental of a well
depth indicator or oils/water interface probe, as well as an increased LOE for a
field technician.
•
Issue: The technology does not properly capture purge water volume. In order
to properly calculate purge water, the following well parameters must be
obtained: depth to groundwater (DTW), average sample depth, total depth (TD),
and well diameter. The only input in RACER is average sample depth. The
following is from the Monitoring Addendum dated 5/25/07:
GWPV1 = Groundwater Purge Volume in Year 1
Note: the calculations presented below assume 4-inch diameter well casings, and 80%
of GWD.
If GWMETH = PMP or BLR (assume 5 purge volumes per well)
=
5 * (pi * R^2 * well depth) * GWSPE1 * GWEV1 * (7.48 gallons per cubic foot)
=
5 * pi * (2/12)^2 * GWD * GWSPE1 * GWEV1 * 7.48 * 0.8
Final Validation Report
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Page 69 of 210
If GWMETH = LFP (assume 2.0 purge volume per well)
=
2 * (pi * R^2 * well depth) * GWSPE1 * GWEV1 * (7.48 gallons per cubic foot)
=
2 * pi * (2/12)^2 * GWD * GWSPE1 * GWEV1 * 7.48 * 0.8
The problems with these calculations are as follows:
1. Purge volumes for bailers and pumps are inconsistent with standard
sampling procedures. It is recommended that the five purge volumes be
changed to a minimum of three volumes based on the HQ AFCEE Model Field
Sampling Plan32 and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
Groundwater Sampling for Superfund and RCRA Projects.33
2. The formula specifies use of the average DTW and an average well diameter
of four inches in the purge volume calculation; however, the actual model
input is the average sample depth, not average depth to groundwater.
Regardless of this discrepancy, this parameter does not provide the most
accurate calculation. The section of casing between the depth to groundwater
and the total well depth should be used for this calculation.
•
Recommended Solution: Adjust technology to require depth to water and total
well depth parameters; use these parameters to calculate purge water volume. In
addition, reduce purge volumes per well for pump and bailer methods.
Surface Water tab
•
Issue: The average sample depth for surface water samples does not impact cost
as much as it should; only values at the extremes of the valid range affect costs.
•
Recommended Solution: Check the technology algorithm to ensure this
functionality is working as intended; consider revising. The Monitoring
Addendum dated 25 May 2007 does not discuss sample depth.
Subsurface Soil tab
•
Issue: RACER appears to assign a maximum of eight hand auger borings/day,
even if these borings are only 2-ft. deep.
•
Recommended Solution: Check the technology algorithm to ensure this
functionality is working as intended; consider revising.
32 HQ AFCEE Model Field sampling Plan, Final Version 1.2, September 2002
33 Yeskis, Douglas and Bernard Zavala. Ground-Water Sampling Guidelines for Superfund and RCRA Project Managers,
Ground-Water Forum Issue Paper. US EPA, Washington DC, May 2002
Final Validation Report
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Page 70 of 210
Data Management tab
•
Issue: The Help Topic does not adequately define the terms for selection of the
various options for Monitoring Plan (Abbreviated, Standard, and
Comprehensive). It only lists the options with no corresponding definitions.
•
Recommended Solution: Add more detail to the Monitoring Plan section of the
Help Topic.
•
Issue: There is a problem/inaccuracy with the LOE associated with the
Monitoring Plan options. In one example involving collection of only one
groundwater sample, when “None” is selected for Monitoring Plan, the marked
up project cost is $8,177; when “Abbreviated” plan is selected, marked up cost
goes up to $20,167 ($11,990 increase), when “Standard” plan is selected, marked
up cost is $30,381 ($22,204 increase), and when “Comprehensive” plan is
selected, marked up cost is $49,993 ($41,816 increase). These cost increases do
not seem realistic for a monitoring plan associated with a sampling event
involving only one sample. For examples with larger numbers of samples, cost
again seem unrealistically high.
•
Recommended Solution: Reevaluate the algorithms and assumed LOE associated
with this parameter.
•
Issue: The Monitoring Report algorithm appears to be incorrect. In one example,
changing from “Abbreviated” report to “Standard” to “Comprehensive”
increased the marked up total project cost from $104,787 (for Abbreviated
Report) to $109,776 (for Standard Report) to $209,782 (for Comprehensive
Report). The jump of $100K from Standard Report to Comprehensive does not
appear reasonable.
•
Recommended Solution: Review the Monitoring Report LOE and associated
algorithm to determine if this is an error; if so, revise software code accordingly.
If not, consider review and revision of the Model Addendum to ensure these cost
increases are reasonable.
•
Issue: Default values for Monitoring Report (Data Management tab) are not
functioning in accordance with the Help Topic. For example, in one estimate the
number of samples in the first year is 53. According to the Help Topic, the
default for Report should be Comprehensive, but it is Abbreviated. The Help
Topic does not correspond to the Monitoring Addendum dated 5/25/07. The
addendum states that QA must be a selection higher than 1 to trigger automatic
adjustment of the report, however the Help Topic does not mention this.
•
Recommended Solution: Ensure Help Screen for Monitoring Report options are
correct.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 71 of 210
•
Issue: The Monitoring technology does not contain options for preparation of
quarterly reports, and the Help Topic does not indicate whether changing the
"number of events per year" changes the number of reports prepared for each
year; resulting assembly quantity changes are not indicative of this.
•
Recommended Solution: For each type of sampling, ensure Help Topic indicates
how many reports per year are accounted for.
•
Issue: RACER does not provide an option for no data validation.
•
Recommended Solution: An option could be provided for rare cases when no
validation is required. Alternatively, the Help Topic could be revised to describe
what assemblies are affected, so that the user could make informed assembly
changes should they choose to remove the LOE associated with data validation.
Assemblies
•
Issue: There appears to be many discrepancies of both cost and types of analyses
available within RACER. Some of the more frequently encountered issues
related to analyses are listed below.
1. Metals. Metals analyses are frequently run for single elements (manganese,
cadmium, chromium, nickel) and are approximately $10-20/ea. While there
is also an extraction that is necessary, this type of individual analysis is not an
available option in RACER (except for chromium) so total metals must be
used as a substitution but the cost is much greater ($332/sample). Consider
adding assemblies for single element analyses.
2. RACER does not provide analyses for DRO and GRO. The user has to
approximate using TPH.
3. RACER does not include an assembly for the SW 9056 analysis.
•
Recommended Solution: Revise assembly cost database to include above-listed
assemblies.
Technology #8: Off-Site Transportation and Waste Disposal
The Off-Site Transportation and Waste Disposal (Off-Site T&D) technology was
observed 20 times throughout the seven location visits; eight instances were able to be
compared at the technology level. Combined with technology-level data from the 2004
effort, there are a total of 47 instances of Off-Site T&D that can be compared at the
technology level. The most frequent observations and suggested solutions are listed
below.
Final Validation Report
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Page 72 of 210
System Definition/Assemblies (Figures 30 through 33)
•
Issue: When utilizing the Off-site Transportation and Waste Disposal
Technology to account for transporting via truck, rail, or truck/rail and
disposing of a non-hazardous liquid waste, this technology will add an
assembly for transporting radioactive waste by rail. The additional assembly
will result in over-estimated site costs.
•
Recommended Solution: Review the algorithms and make requisite corrections
to incorporate nonhazardous waste transport via truck and rail.
Non-hazardous
liquid waste with
truck transport.
Figure 30
Remove incorrect
assembly for
radioactive waste
rail transport and
replace with the
appropriate
assemblies for
disposal of nonhazardous waste.
Figure 31
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 73 of 210
Non-hazardous
liquid waste with
truck transport.
Figure 32
Remove incorrect
assemblies for
radioactive waste
rail transport and
replace with the
appropriate
assemblies for
disposal of nonhazardous waste.
Note the double
assemblies.
Figure 33
System Definition/Assemblies (Figure 34 and 35)
•
Issue: When utilizing the Off-Site Transportation and Waste Disposal
Technology to account for transporting via rail or truck/rail combination and
disposing of a non-hazardous solid waste, this technology will add an assembly
for transporting radioactive waste by rail. The additional assembly will result in
over-estimating site costs.
•
Recommended Solution: Review the algorithms and make requisite corrections
to incorporate nonhazardous waste transport via rail.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 74 of 210
Non-hazardous
solid waste with rail
transport.
Figure 34
Remove incorrect
assemblies for
radioactive waste
rail transport and
replace with the
appropriate
assemblies for nonhazardous waste
transport via rail.
Figure 35
System Definition/Assemblies (Figures 36 and 37)
•
Issue:. When Non-Hazardous waste type is selected under the System definition
Tab, the Transport Bulk Solid Hazardous Waste Assembly is loaded to cover
transport cost.
•
Recommended Solution:. Replace Transport Bulk Solid Hazardous Waste
Assembly 33109215 with an assembly for transporting non-hazardous waste such
as Assembly 17030289 – “32 CY Semi Dump.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 75 of 210
Figure 36
Replace assembly for
Transport of Bulk
Solid Hazardous
Waste with an
assembly for
transporting nonhazardous waste
such as Assembly
17030289 – “32 CY
Semi Dump.”
Figure 37
Technology #9: Operations and Maintenance (O&M)
Throughout the seven location visits, the O&M technology was observed ten times.
Nine of these instances were relevant for comparison at the technology level; combined
with the 2004 data, there are 22 total instances in the data set. O&M had three
observations called out in Appendix D. The most frequent observations and suggested
solutions are listed below.
•
Issue: The values for the Professional Labor assemblies were all the same,
regardless of whether "Moderate," "Minimum," or "Exclude from Estimate" was
selected.
•
Recommended Solution: Check technology algorithm to ensure this
functionality is working as intended; consider revision.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 76 of 210
•
Issue: RACER does not provide Professional Labor hours when "Minimum" is
selected. The algorithm for Staff Engineer Labor Hours for Inspection and
Certification of Active Treatment Systems (SEHRTS) in the Operations and
Maintenance (O&M) Model Addendum Report shows it as zero. Need to revise
algorithm.
•
Recommended Solution: Check technology algorithm to ensure this
functionality is working as intended; consider revision.
•
Issue: RACER does not provide the option of using a vacuum truck for free
product removal. Many contractors supply a vacuum truck to perform this
service.
•
Recommended Solution: Provide an option in the Free Product Removal or
O&M technology to perform removal work using a vacuum truck.
•
Issue: RACER does not provide the option of on-site disposal such as water
generated from oil/water separators and SVE knockout drums. These only
require loading/transportation and/or direct disposal to a POTW by pipeline.
•
Recommended Solution: Add an additional tab within the O&M technology that
would provide an extensive list of on-site and off-site options for all wastes
generated during O&M activities.
•
Issue: RACER does not provide the option of renting equipment such as
Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) modules. Many contractors provide
treatment equipment at a per month rental rate.
•
Recommended Solution: Provide an option in the applicable tab for treatment
technologies process equipment rental of systems such as GAC modules, thermal
& catalytic oxidation, and in-situ treatment systems. Rental costs would be
based on average industry costs. RACER already offers some assemblies with
rental rates. See Figure 38.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 77 of 210
Add an option if
equipment is
rented.
Figure 38
•
Issue: The algorithms for Field Technician Labor Hours for Inspection and
Certification of Active Treatment Systems (FTHRTS) and Staff Engineer Labor
Hours for Inspection and Certification of Active Treatment Systems (SEHRTS) in
the O&M Model Addendum Report go to zero whenever there is an in situ
biodegradation technology even though there might be other active systems.
•
Recommended Solution: Check technology algorithm to ensure this
functionality is working as intended; consider revision.
•
Issue: The algorithms for Project Engineer Labor Hours for Inspection and
Certification of Active Treatment Systems (PEHRTS) in the O&M Model
Addendum Report require that there be an In-Situ Biodegradation component
present in the O&M technology for hours to be added for minimum and
moderate scenarios.
•
Recommended Solution: Check technology algorithm to ensure this
functionality is working as intended; consider revision.
•
Issue: The summations for Field Technician Labor Hours in Year 1 (FTHR1), Staff
Engineer Labor Hours in Year 1 (SEHR1), and Project Engineer Total Hours in
Year 1 (PEHR1) in the O&M Model Addendum Report should include hours for
an in situ biodegradation technology. It is also noted that there are no labor
algorithms for Staff Engineer when there is a biodegradation technology.
•
Recommended Solution: Check technology algorithm to ensure this
functionality is working as intended; consider revision.
•
Issue: Need to be consistent when determining professional labor in the
algorithms for other staff such as project manager and QC. In some cases, some
labor categories are considered professional labor and in other cases they are not.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 78 of 210
•
Recommended Solution: Check technology algorithm to ensure this
functionality is working as intended; consider revision.
•
Issue: The algorithms for the rental of a portable air sampler (page 36 of the
O&M Technology Addendum) seem to be reversed. The daily rental assembly is
attached to the long-term rental algorithm, while the weekly assembly is
attached to the daily algorithm.
•
Recommended Solution: Check technology algorithm to ensure this
functionality is working as intended; consider revision.
•
Issue: The duration equations used for the O&M technology seem to shorten the
duration of operations more than what one would expect. For example, if one
starts on day 1 of the 1st month and ends on day 31 of the 2nd month, then there
would be two months of operations. The algorithm calculates only one month:
End Point (EP) – Start Point (SP) = 2 – 1 = 1.
•
Recommended Solution: Check technology algorithm to ensure this
functionality is working as intended; consider revision.
•
Issue: The list of chemicals for in situ biodegradation should be upgraded to
include commonly used injectants such as persulfate, Regenesis compounds, and
EOS (emulsified edible oil substrate). A search of commercially available
applications will provide commonly used chemicals.
•
Recommended Solution: Consider revision to include additional injectants.
•
Issue: On page 110 of the O&M Technology Addendum, the table heading
indicates that Start-up Duration for Technology (SUDUR) values are months but
the algorithms assume that SUDUR values are weeks.
•
Recommended Solution: Check technology algorithm to ensure this
functionality is working as intended; consider revision.
•
Issue: Four assemblies related to the handling of spent activated carbon within
RACER have incorrect unit costs. RACER assigns a unit cost of $0.02 per pound
of carbon to each of these assemblies. During each annual update to the RACER
cost database, most RACER assemblies, including these, are obtained from the
same source as the assemblies used in an RS Means catalog. The RS Means
catalog was checked to confirm whether the RACER unit costs were valid and it
was found that they were incorrect (too low). The assemblies and their
respective unit costs as defined in the RS Means catalog are as follows:
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 79 of 210
Assembly
Number
Assembly Description
RS Means
Assembly
Unit Cost
33132065
Removal, Transport, Regeneration of Spent Carbon, < 2k lb
$0.61
33132066
Removal, Transport, Regeneration of Spent Carbon, < 2k to 10k lb
$0.28
33132073
Remove and dispose of Spent Carbon from Water Treatment
$0.30
33132074
Remove and dispose of Spent Carbon from Offgas Treatment
$0.30
•
Recommended Solution: Incorporate correct costs into the correct cost database
for these assemblies.
•
Issue: When modeling the operations and maintenance of a bioslurping system
using the O&M technology in RACER, the technology assumes the system will
be continuously pumping 90% of the time. In reality, the pumps in a bioslurping
system cycle on and off regularly and are actually not running the majority of the
time. The method used by RACER to model this operation results in an
extremely high quantity of waste water generated, resulting in excessive waste
disposal costs. The Total Quantity of Liquids Removed (gallons / year)
(SLPTQLR) algorithm contains a runtime factor (SRTF) but the O&M technology
does not provide the option of changing the default SRTF.
•
Recommended Solution: Incorporate an option that will allow the user to change
the SRTF. See Figure 39. Check technology algorithm to ensure this
functionality is working as intended; consider revision.
Add an option to
input the SRTF.
Figure 39
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 80 of 210
Technology #10: Professional Labor Management
The Professional Labor Management (PLM) technology was observed 43 times
throughout the seven location visits; 11 instances were able to be compared at the
technology level. Combined with technology-level data from the 2004 effort, there are a
total of 42 instances of PLM that can be compared at the technology level. While PLM
applies a percentage to the remedial action work performed, there are several changes
or enhancements that would make the technology perform better. More detail on these
suggestions is provided below.
General
•
Issue: PLM should be applied the same whether a technology is performed as
part of a remedial action or investigation phase. Example: Groundwater
Monitoring Well – if this technology is used under an RA phase, RACER applies
PLM to the technology. However, this same technology can be used under a
study or LTM phase. When this is the case, no PLM can be applied resulting in a
different cost for the same work simply by choosing a different phase.
•
Recommended Solution: Allow PLM to be selected in more phases and constrain
over-estimating by excluding non-relevant technologies from the capital
construction cost calculation from which the PLM cost is calculated.
•
Issue: RACER does not provide sufficient options for reports such as Remedial
Action Report or Treatability Study reports. The Help Topic for PLM states that
PLM is designed to capture costs performed by a specific list of activities, one of
which is “prepare and submit contract-required deliverables.”
•
Recommended Solution: Clarification should be provided for exactly what PLM
is intended to cover concerning reporting. (This comment overlaps with Site
Closeout.) If not covered by PLM, technologies could be developed for
preparation of a wide range of reports.
Technology #11: Remedial Investigation
Throughout the seven location visits, this technology had five observations identified in
Appendix D. Eighteen instances of Remedial Investigation were observed, and 14 were
relevant for comparison at the technology level. Combined with the 2004 data set, there
are 18 total instances of this technology. The most frequent observations and suggested
solutions are listed below.
•
Issue: There is no option for additional meetings.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 81 of 210
•
Recommended Solution: The technology could be amended by adding a
Meetings tab similar to that of the Site Close-Out Documentation technology as
shown in Figure 40. The estimator would input the number of meetings,
distance, airfare, and number of travelers. RACER would calculate per diem,
labor, and other travel costs using the inputs.
Add a mileage box for
occasions when travel is
by car. When mileage is
inputted, then the Air
Fare box will not allow
inputting a cost for
airfare.
Figure 40
•
Issue: There is no option for travel via airlines. RACER assumes travel by truck
even for long distances.
•
Recommended Solution: Revise this technology to default to air travel when a
certain mileage is surpassed such as 150 miles or an industry accepted standard.
For remote sites, the system would benefit from the addition of additional
transportation options for personnel and equipment such as barge, helicopter,
and rail.
•
Issue: There are no costs in the assemblies when selecting slug tests or one of the
two pump tests under the Other Investigations tab. The algorithms in the
Monitoring Model Addendum Report are just for the mileage. Dye Tracer Tests
do show up in the assemblies. It is suggested that material costs be added to
these four tests.
•
Recommended Solution: Provide appropriate assemblies when the user has
selected these options. Revise accordingly.
•
Issue: The algorithm for geophysical surveys in the Monitoring Model
Addendum Report indicates hours for oversight should be calculated but these
do not show up. Mileage does show up but there is no algorithm in the
Monitoring Model Addendum Report.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 82 of 210
•
Recommended Solution: Revise accordingly.
•
Issue: See applicable issues for the Monitoring technology and apply to the S&A
tabs.
Technology #12: Residual Waste Management
Throughout the seven locations visits, this technology was observed a total of 56 times.
This high number can be attributed to Residual Waste Management (WMS) being a
“companion technology;” that is, it is utilized in conjunction with all technologies for
activities which generate IDW. In 24 instances, this technology was able to be
compared at the technology level. Combined with the 2004 data set, there are a total of
26 instances of WMS available for technology-level comparison. Thirteen observations
were made in Appendix D. The most frequent observations and with suggested
solutions are listed below. The technology was found to estimate high most of the time.
There are a number of reasons for this, such as:
•
Actual cost of disposal fees are generally lower than RACER assembly costs
•
Loading and transport costs are typically rolled into the disposal cost, rather than
broken out as separate costs
•
Actual cost of barging is lower than RACER costs.
More detail is provided below on these issues.
General
•
Issue: This technology does not distribute cost over time. Therefore, when used
in conjunction with cost-over-time technologies, such as Monitoring, Natural
Attenuation, or Operations and Maintenance, the costs for all years of waste
management and disposal are concentrated in the first year of the corresponding
phase. See example Phase Cost over Time Report below (Figure 41); this
example is for thirty years of groundwater monitoring (accounted for via the
Monitoring technology) with purge water disposal associated with each event
(accounted for via the Residual Waste Management technology). Although
residual wastes (purge water) are generated each year, the entire thirty-year cost
for the Residual Waste Management technology occurs in the first year (FY2010).
Final Validation Report
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Page 83 of 210
Technology Name
Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Year 4
Year 5
Year 6
Year 7
Year 8
Year 9
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
MONITORING
Residual Waste Management
$161,332
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$214,758 $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
-
TOTAL
$376,090
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year
Year 10
Year 11
Year 12
Year 13
Year 14
Year 15
Year 16
Year 17
Year 18
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
MONITORING
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
Residual Waste Management $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
TOTAL
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year
Year 19
Year 20
Year 21
Year 22
Year 23
Year 24
Year 25
Year 26
Year 27
2028
2029
2030
2031
2032
2033
2034
2035
2036
MONITORING
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
Residual Waste Management $
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
TOTAL
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
Fiscal Year Fiscal Year Fiscal Year
Year 28
Year 29
Year 30
2037
2038
2039
Row
Total
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625
MONITORING
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625 $1,046,330
Residual Waste Management $
$
$
$214,758
TOTAL
$110,625
$110,625
$110,625 $1,261,088
Figure 41
•
Recommended Solution: Revise technology to distribute costs over time for
appropriate technologies.
System Definition Tab
•
Issue: When used in conjunction with the UST Closure/Removal technology, a
waste stream of four CY of concrete material is generated for tank removals. The
concrete waste stream appears in the Residual Waste Management technology
even when the corresponding assembly in the UST Closure/Removal technology
is zeroed out (17020211 Minor site demolition, concrete, reinforced, 7" to 24" thick,
remove with backhoe, excludes hauling).
•
Recommended Solution: Revise Residual Waste Management technology to
delete concrete when this assembly is zeroed out in companion technology.
Note: this applies to other technologies, such as Monitoring and Excavation. The waste
streams in WMS should be linked to assembly quantities of the companion technologies
regardless of whether the assembly quantities are user-inputted.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 84 of 210
Assemblies
•
Issue: The RACER-generated cost for transport of waste off-site via barge (Figure
42) is commonly substantially higher than actual costs. Furthermore, the barging
cost in RACER is not dependent upon number of miles traveled. Cost is the same
for barging whether it is going 5 miles or 3,000 miles.
Figure 42
•
Recommended Solution: Reevaluate cost of barging and update assembly line
item associated with barging. (Assembly line item 33190292 Barge Transport of
Containerized Waste; per CWT). Reengineer the line item so that the cost of
barging is more realistic and is tied to the mileage traveled.
•
Issue: Costs of Assembly 33197270 Landfill Nonhazardous Solid Bulk Waste by CY
($98/CY), and 33197269 Landfill Nonhazardous Solid Bulk Waste by Ton
($72.50/TON) were high compared to proposed costs in several projects.
Proposed cost for Project SWF-04 (for non-hazardous excavated soil) was
$27.5/CY. Based on information obtained from the State of California Integrated
Waste Management Board website34, average disposal fees in the year 2000 for
loose or uncompacted solid waste in the State of California were $11.13/CY or
$36.00/TON for non-compacted solid waste. Information obtained from the City
of Phoenix website35 indicates a fee of $3825/TON for solid waste disposal.
•
Recommended Solution: Recent and nationally-relevant averages should be
obtained and used for the costs in these assembly line items.
34 http://www.ciwmb.ca.gov/landfills/tipfees/2000
35 http://phoenix.gov/GARBAGE/landfill.html
Final Validation Report
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Page 85 of 210
•
Issue: Assembly 33190317 Waste Stream Evaluation Fee, Not Including 50% Rebate
on 1st Shipment at a cost of $460/load of residual waste is a component of the
technology. This cost applies to any load of waste, regardless of size/quantity;
for example, the quantity and associated cost are the same for a load of one drum
and a load of 10,000 CY of soil. Project documentation reviewed for this project
indicates that disposal facilities typically do not charge separate evaluation fees
for waste streams. Refer to two Figures 43 and 44 below, the first for disposal of
115,000 CY of excavated soil, and the second for disposal of one drum of purge
water. Both contain the same quantity and cost for waste stream evaluation.
Figure 43
Figure 44
Final Validation Report
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Page 86 of 210
•
Recommended Solution: Reevaluate cost of waste profiling, and consider
including these costs as a component of the disposal fees.
•
Issue: There is no assembly for transport of non-hazardous waste streams.
Instead, assembly 33190205 Transport Bulk Solid Hazardous Waste, Maximum 20 CY
(per Mile); 33190204 Transport 55 Gallon Drums of Hazardous Waste, Max 80 drums
(per Mile); or 33190207 Transport Bulk Liquid/Sludge Hazardous Waste, Maximum
5,000 Gallon (per Mile) is brought in at the assembly level when waste stream is
non-hazardous.
•
Recommended Solution: Add additional assemblies to account for transport of
non-hazardous waste streams.
•
Issue: For purge water generated during semi-annual or quarterly groundwater
sampling in the Monitoring technology, the Residual Waste Management
assumes only one disposal trip for the year. However, generally purge water is
disposed immediately following a sampling event; therefore, there would be two
disposal trips for semi-annual sampling and four disposal trips for quarterly
sampling. Refer to Figure 45 below where one drum of purge water is generated
for each of four annual events (quarterly sampling) but only one disposal trip
(Figure 46) is included.
Example assumes 20
miles per disposal event
Figure 45
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 87 of 210
WMS technology only
provides for one trip to
dispose of drums from four
sampling events
Figure 46
•
Recommended Solution: Update algorithms to assume equivalent number of
disposal events as sampling events
Technology #13: Site Close-Out Documentation
Site Close-Out Documentation was observed a total of 29 times throughout the seven
location visits, and two observations were identified in Appendix D. Six instances
could be compared at the technology level, and there are a total of eight instances for
technology-level comparison when combined with the 2004 data set. The most frequent
observations and with suggested solutions are listed below.
General
•
Issue: The Help Topic for this technology does not contain enough information
to allow the user to properly determine which site complexity is most
appropriate for the site. A screen shot of the Help Tab (Figure 47) related to this
selection is provided below:
Figure 47
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 88 of 210
•
Recommended Solution: Add additional description to the Help Topic to
present details about appropriate complexities for specific sites.
•
Issue: Use of this technology often extends to estimate requirements other than
site closeout documentation: because RACER does not contain a technology to
estimate some types of reporting (e.g., Treatability Reports, Remedial Action
Completion Reports) this technology is often used to approximate preparation of
other reports.
•
Recommended Solution: Consider generalizing this technology to accommodate
various types of reporting requirements, with various options for types of
reports as the Required Parameter.
Work Plans & Reports tab
•
Issue: It is unclear why Progress Reports are included in this technology only,
when they are typically a contract requirement for all project types.
•
Recommended Solution: Consider adding Progress Reports into a more general
technology to cover different types of required reporting (could be a
modification to the Site Close-Out Documentation module).
Technology #14: Underground Storage Tank (UST) Closure/Removal
The UST Closure/Removal (UST) technology was observed 18 times throughout the
seven location visits; only one instance was able to be compared at the technology level.
Combined with technology-level data from the 2004 effort, there are a total of 11
instances of UST that can be compared at the technology level. Several suggestions on
enhancements that could be made to the UST technology are provided below.
General
•
Issue: RACER does not have the ability to estimate aboveground storage tank
(AST) removals/closures. To estimate AST closure, the UST Closure/Removal
technology must be used with changes made at the Assembly level to
accommodate the aboveground nature of the tanks.
•
Recommended Solution: Recommend changing name of UST Closure/Removal
to “Tank Closure/Removal” to include options for AST closure/removals in the
technology.
•
Issue: USTs smaller than 500 gallons can not be estimated in UST
Closure/Removal technology (the minimum tank size is 500 gallons.).
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 89 of 210
•
Recommended Solution: Suggest revising the technology to allow for
closure/removal of tanks as small as 250 gallons.
•
Issue: There is no ability to specify piping length in the UST Closure/Removal
technology. The technology adds 100 feet of piping demolition as an assembly.
These piping lengths can vary greatly, particularly depending on whether or not
the tank is connected to a dispenser or a series of dispensers.
•
Recommended Solution: Suggest revising the technology and adding an option
to allow the user to change the piping length.
•
Issue: Frequently, tanks of different compositions are located in the same tank
pit.
•
Recommended Solution: Revise the technology to allow the selection of multiple
tank types.
•
Issue: The technology assumes a straight 50 gallons of contents removed per
tank, no matter how large the tank is, if 0% is selected for Tank Percentage Full
(average). Suggest making this proportional to tank size. In addition, the
amount entered into the % full adds that quantity onto the base of 50 gals. This
appears to be an error.
•
Recommended Solution: Revise algorithms and revise if necessary.
•
Issue: Backfill costs cost for on-site fill appears to be higher than cost for off-site
fill; in addition, the quantities are different for the same tank size (and resulting
same size excavation):
Assembly
Description
Quantity
Extended Cost
17030423
Unclassified Fill, 6" Lifts, Off-Site, Includes Delivery,
Spreading, and Compaction
437 CY
3121.29
17030461
On-Site Backfill for Small Excavations and Trenches,
Includes Compaction
402CY
4183.22
•
Recommended Solution: Revise algorithms and revise if necessary.
•
Issue: For closure-in-place scenarios, the default decontamination for is “none.”
However, tanks are typically purged prior to tank closure. This is not a
selectable option in the UST Removal/Closure technology.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 90 of 210
•
Recommended Solution: Add a purging option to the tank decontamination
method.
•
Issue: The only report options available within the UST closure/removal
technology are sampling reports.
•
Recommended Solution: Revise PLM to include an option for closure reports.
Analytical results would be included in these reports. State UST programs
typically require more than just the reporting of the analytical results.
Technology #15: Well Abandonment
In the 2004 effort, the following recommendation was made:
“Use the historical project data to create a new Well Abandonment cost
technology. The new technology will contain options for cutting the well riser
below ground, final round of sampling, various types of material to close the well
such as gravel, sand and grout, and removal of well casing.”6
The recommendation to create a new technology was implemented; however, the
options to cut the casing below ground, perform sampling, and choose fill
material were not incorporated. Sampling can be accounted for using the
Monitoring technology, but the other options are not available to the User.
RACER assumes wells will be grouted, and the User is given options only for inplace abandonment or full overdrill/removal of the well.
In the 2008 effort, the well abandonment technology (GWA) was observed 12 times
throughout the seven location visits; four instances were able to be compared at the
technology level. This technology was new in 2008; therefore, there are no instances
brought forward from the 2004 effort. The most frequent observations with GWA and
suggested solutions are listed below.
•
Issue: The GWA technology does not have the ability to estimate partial removal
of well casing, which is a common method of abandonment.
•
Recommended Solution: Revise technology to include an option for partial
removal, such as cutting casing at a certain depth and grouting.
•
Issue: RACER does not include reporting in the Well Abandonment technology.
It is common that preparation of a well abandonment or well sealing report is
required per state regulations upon completion of abandonment activities. These
reports range from short summary letter reports to large-scale detailed well
abandonment activity reports. For projects estimated for RACER validation, the
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 91 of 210
Site Close-Out documentation technology had to be utilized to capture the cost of
reporting.
•
Recommended Solution: Add an option to GWA to include reports; also consider
adding a reporting "level of complexity," as project reporting requirements differ
and can range from short summary memos to fully detailed abandonment
reports. Since the preparation of reports is a necessary requirement of the well
sealing activities, the report option should be included in the GWA technology,
not in a separate technology for full site closure reporting (Site Close-Out
Documentation).
•
Issue: Camera survey/geophysical log was a project requirement that could not
be accounted for in RACER.
•
Recommended Solution: Add an assembly for this activity from the UPB; if one
does not exist in the UPB, suggest that it is researched and submitted for addition
to the UPB.
•
Issue: Neither GWA or the Groundwater Monitoring Well technology has the
ability to estimate well repair.
•
Recommended Solution: Revise technology to include addition of items to repair
wells; otherwise, ensure adequate assemblies (such as are available so users can
add these items.
•
Issue: GWA technology does not provide options for selection of grout material.
An assembly for grout is included in the estimate; however, most states’ well
sealing codes call for use of specific materials such as cement grouts, bentonitebased grouts, and clean clay, sand, or gravel.
•
Recommended Solution: Add a secondary parameter for the user to select the
specific type of grouting material to be used in the well sealing.
•
Issue: The system definition screen occasionally does not display all the well
groups which have been selected and estimated. Figures 48 and 49, on the
following page, show the proper and improper functioning of the system
definition screen, respectively. This issue also presents itself in the estimate
documentation report, where the full cost is calculated and displayed, but only
the first well groups is documented and displayed. This is not auditable estimate
documentation.
•
Recommended Solution: Review and revise the algorithm which displays the
well groups on the system definition screen and on RACER reports.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 92 of 210
Figure 48
Note that the cost
estimates are the
same, even
though system
definition screens
do not show the
same number of
well groups.
Figure 49
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 93 of 210
7.0 Findings
This section lists a summary of the overall validation findings that are presented
throughout this report. The findings are based on the results of the three pronged
analysis employed in the validation to evaluate the performance of the RACER
software. The three pronged analysis combines the project-level cost analysis, the
technology-level cost analysis, and the technology engineering analysis to provide a
more complete picture of software performance.
1. The historical data collection was successful in developing a sample population of
sufficient size and diversity to analyze the performance of RACER relative to actual
DoD remediation experience. The collection of historical data for completed
remediation projects builds upon the previous 2004 RACER Assessment benchmark
data. The additional data aids in evaluating and improving the RACER parametric
model in two ways:
•
It allows for comparative analysis between the re-engineered RACER 2008
software and the RACER 2004 software
•
It provides a larger sample population for more reliable statistical analyses.
2. The data collection and analysis effort were limited due to the high incidence of FFP
contracting utilized at the data collection locations, resulting in difficulty isolating
historical costs for comparison to applicable RACER technologies.36
3.
The project-level cost analysis demonstrates that for the 88 selected projects, the
accuracy of RACER as compared to actual costs averaged 28% when only default
parameters were modified (Scenario 1), 7% when secondary parameters were also
modified (Scenario 2), and 4% when assemblies were also modified (Scenario 3).
This analysis demonstrates a significant improvement in the difference between
historical costs and the RACER-estimated costs when secondary parameters or
assemblies are modified. This finding clearly demonstrates the benefit of utilizing
detailed site or project-specific data, where available, in preparing RACER estimates.
However, in our project analysis, the use of RACER default values under Scenario 1
produced highly variable results.37
4. There is no clear statistical evidence that RACER consistently produces higher or
lower estimates in comparison to historical benchmark costs. There is also no clear
statistical evidence that RACER produces better estimates for “high cost” or “low
cost” projects, defined as greater or less than $500,000 total project cost.
5. Under Scenarios 2, 3, and 4, the true mean cost difference at the project level was
lower using RACER 2008 than RACER 2004, indicating improved performance
relative to actual costs.
36 Refer to Section 5.0 for a complete discussion of study limitations.
37 See Section 6.0 for further details.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 94 of 210
6. The 14 most frequently occurring technologies were analyzed statistically to
determine how the technology-level costs compared to actual costs. Eight of those
technologies had negative true mean cost differences, indicating that the average
RACER-estimated cost for that technology was lower than actual costs. Six of those
technologies had positive true mean cost differences, indicating that the average
RACER-estimated cost for that technology was higher than actual costs. The true
mean cost difference at Scenario 1 for the fourteen technologies ranged from -44%to
56%. However, only preliminary conclusions should be drawn from the technologylevel cost analysis due to the small data sets available for this analysis.38
7. Significant recommendations for improved performance of the 14 most frequently
occurring RACER technologies (and Well abandonment) are provided in Section 6.0;
recommendations for additional technologies are presented in Appendix E.
38 Refer to Section 5.0 for more detail on the size of the data sets.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 95 of 210
Appendix A – Acronyms
A&AS
AA
AAFES
AAP
ABS
ACS
AEDB-CC
AEDB-R
AFB
AFCEE
AFRIMS
AFS
AOC
AST
BCY
BRAC
BTEX
CAP
CLIN
CONUS
CPFF
CWT
CY
DPE
DODI
DPT
DRO
EPA
FFID
FFP
FOIA
FS
FUDS
FUDSMIS
FY
GAC
GRO
GW
GWM
HASP
Advisory & Assistance Service
Ammunition Area
Army and Air Force Exchange Service
Army Ammunition Plant
Absolute
Alaska Communication System
Army Environmental Database—Compliance-Related Cleanup
Army Environmental Database—Restoration
Air Force Base
Air Force Center for Engineering and the Environment
Air Force Restoration Information Management System
Air Force Station
Area of Concern
Aboveground Storage Tank
Bank Cubic Yard
Base Realignment and Closure
benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes
Corrective Action Plan
Contract Line Item Number
Continental United States
Cost Plus Fixed Fee
Counterweight
Cubic Yard
Dual Phase Extraction
Department of Defense Instruction
Direct Push Technology
Diesel Range Organics
Environmental Protection Agency
Federal Facility Identification Number
Firm, Fixed-Price
Freedom of Information Act
Feasibility Study
Formerly Used Defense Sites
Formerly Used Defense Sites Management Information System
Fiscal Year
Granular Activated Carbon
Gasoline Range Organics
Groundwater
Groundwater Monitoring
Health and Safety Plan
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 96 of 210
HVDP
IDW
IGE
IMR
IRP
ISCO
LEAD
LF
LOE
LSI
LTM
LUC
MD
MEC
MMRP
MNA
MR
O&M
ORC
OU
PA
PADEP
PAH
PBC
PCB
PDO
PI
PLM
PNOM
POC
PWS
QA
QAPP
RA
RAB
RACER
RAWP
RCRA
RFP
RI
RPM
RPX
High Vacuum Dual-Phase Extraction
Investigative-Derived Waste
Independent Government Estimate
Interim Model Report
Installation Restoration Program
In-Situ Chemical Oxidation
Letterkenny Army Depot
Landfill
Level of Effort
Limited Site Inspection
Long-Term Monitoring
Land Use Control
Munitions Debris
Munitions and Explosives of Concern
Military Munitions Response Program
Monitored Natural Attenuation
Munitions Response
Operations and Maintenance
Oxygen Release Compound
Operable Unit
Preliminary Assessment
Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection
polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
Performance-Based Contract
Polychlorinated Biphenyl
Property Disposal Office
Preliminary Investigation
Professional Labor Management
Price Negotiation Objective Memorandum
Point of Contact
Performance Work Statement
Quality Assurance
Quality Assurance Program Plan
Remedial Action
Restoration Advisory Board
Remedial Action Cost Engineering and Requirements
Remedial Action Work Plan
Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
Request for Proposal
Remedial Investigation
Remedial Project Manager
Real Property Exchange
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 97 of 210
RRO
RRS
SAF/FMC
SAP
SE
SI
SOS
SOW
SSHP
SVE
SVOC
SWMU
T&M
TAL
TCA
TCE
TERC
TO
TPH
TS
UPB
USACE
USAEC
UST
VDEQ
VOCs
VV&A
WBG
WWII
WWTP
Residual Range Organics
Radio Relay Station
Secretary of the Air Force/Financial Management and Comptroller
Sampling and Analysis Plan
South East
Site Inspection
Scope of Services
Scope (or Statement) of Work
Site Safety and Health Plan (or Site-Specific Health Plan)
Soil Vapor Extraction
Semi-Volatile Organic Compound
Solid Waste Management Unit
Time & Materials
Target Analyte List
Trichloroethane
Trichloroethylene
Total Environmental Restoration Contract
Task Order
Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons
Treatability Study
Unit Price Book
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
U.S. Army Environmental Command
Underground Storage Tank
Virginia Department of Environmental Quality
Volatile Organic Compounds
Verification, Validation, & Accreditation
Winklepeck Burning Ground
World War II
Wastewater Treatment Plant
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 98 of 210
Appendix B – Project-Level Data Summary Table
Project ID
Historical
Cost
Project
Year
Esc
Fac
NWK-23
NWK-24
NWK-26
AFCEE-04
AFCEE-08
AFCEE-10
AFCEE-11
AFCEE-12
AFCEE-13
AFCEE-16
AFCEE-24
SWF-01
SWF-02
SWF-03
SWF-04
SWF-05
SWF-08
SWF-09
SWF-10
SWF-12
SWF-16
SWF-17
POA-01
POA-02
POA-03a
POA-03b
POA-03c
POA-04
POA-05
POA-06
$ 443,805
$ 405,222
$ 80,417
$ 136,344
$ 19,999
$ 246,763
$ 801,482
$ 477,167
$ 919,983
$ 272,655
$1,627,734
$ 60,462
$ 78,396
$
8,597
$ 121,611
$ 67,802
$ 19,125
$ 232,954
$ 29,337
$ 57,488
$ 135,089
$ 27,769
$1,139,272
$ 106,903
$ 125,413
$ 36,343
$ 36,343
$ 145,353
$ 303,951
$ 462,568
2008
2006
2006
2007
2007
2007
2008
2008
2006
2008
2005
2002
2003
2004
2005
2003
2007
2008
2008
2008
2007
2007
2007
2007
2008
2008
2008
2008
2008
2008
1.0000
1.0496
1.0496
1.0240
1.0240
1.0240
1.0000
1.0000
1.0496
1.0000
1.0821
1.1460
1.1347
1.1125
1.0821
1.1347
1.0240
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
1.0240
1.0240
1.0240
1.0240
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Escalated
Historical
Cost
$ 443,805
$ 425,341
$ 84,410
$ 139,611
$ 20,478
$ 252,676
$ 801,482
$ 477,167
$ 965,659
$ 272,655
$1,761,426
$ 69,289
$ 88,955
$
9,564
$ 131,599
$ 76,934
$ 19,583
$ 232,954
$ 29,337
$ 57,488
$ 138,326
$ 28,434
$1,166,570
$ 109,464
$ 125,413
$ 36,343
$ 36,343
$ 145,353
$ 303,951
$ 462,568
RACER
S1
$ 473,463
$ 322,839
$ 57,532
$ 152,206
$ 24,986
$ 146,973
$ 552,188
$ 374,668
$ 988,082
$ 111,103
$1,440,932
$ 36,109
$ 95,370
$ 24,091
$ 154,133
$ 95,666
$ 42,216
$ 259,122
$ 26,914
$ 102,261
$ 110,514
$ 66,340
$2,096,182
$ 99,629
$ 161,298
$ 108,841
$ 108,841
$ 111,881
$ 158,135
$ 549,185
S2
$ 413,494
$ 373,562
$ 61,954
$ 151,036
$ 22,526
$ 146,973
$ 777,133
$ 468,775
$1,047,938
$ 209,204
$1,754,068
$ 30,756
$ 91,449
$ 16,883
$ 150,132
$ 72,081
$ 42,216
$ 254,388
$ 30,519
$ 97,433
$ 120,444
$ 36,531
$2,163,543
$ 94,334
$ 89,840
$ 152,741
$ 152,741
$ 70,662
$ 77,957
$ 499,139
S3
$ 396,452
$ 357,199
$ 67,329
$ 151,036
$ 19,375
$ 256,556
$ 794,930
$ 442,487
$ 965,490
$ 237,565
$1,478,144
$ 22,749
$ 85,785
$ 12,037
$ 122,515
$ 66,261
$ 34,721
$ 243,603
$ 30,519
$ 85,551
$ 106,142
$ 29,764
$2,158,849
$ 104,473
$ 129,489
$ 155,153
$ 155,153
$ 80,297
$ 100,753
$ 348,891
%Difference
S4
$ 426,271
$ 344,557
$ 66,453
$ 94,524
$ 15,286
$ 262,826
$ 806,160
$ 372,252
$ 946,960
$ 199,598
$1,049,537
$ 25,165
$ 99,059
$ 14,346
$ 141,472
$ 79,903
$ 40,093
$ 258,985
$ 36,375
$ 102,427
$ 122,295
$ 35,844
$ 858,406
$ 44,773
$ 52,939
$ 62,724
$ 62,724
$ 62,167
$ 128,256
$ 124,692
S1
7%
-24%
-32%
9%
22%
-42%
-31%
-21%
2%
-59%
-18%
-48%
7%
152%
17%
24%
116%
11%
-8%
78%
-20%
133%
80%
-9%
29%
199%
199%
-23%
-48%
19%
S2
-7%
-12%
-27%
8%
10%
-42%
-3%
-2%
9%
-23%
0%
-56%
3%
77%
14%
-6%
116%
9%
4%
69%
-13%
28%
85%
-14%
-28%
320%
320%
-51%
-74%
8%
S3
-11%
-16%
-20%
8%
-5%
2%
-1%
-7%
0%
-13%
-16%
-67%
-4%
26%
-7%
-14%
77%
5%
4%
49%
-23%
5%
85%
-5%
3%
327%
327%
-45%
-67%
-25%
S4
-4%
-19%
-21%
-32%
-25%
4%
1%
-22%
-2%
-27%
-40%
-64%
11%
50%
8%
4%
105%
11%
24%
78%
-12%
26%
-26%
-59%
-58%
73%
73%
-57%
-58%
-73%
Page 99 of 210
Project ID
POA-07
POA-08
POA-09
POA-12
POA-18
POA-19
POA-20
POA-22
POA-24
POA-25
LRL-01
LRL-02
LRL-03
LRL-04
LRL-05
LRL-06
LRL-07
LRL-08
LRL-09
LRL-10a
LRL-10b
LRL-10c
LRL-10d
LRL-11
LRL-12
LRL-13
LRL-14
LRL-15
LRL-16
NAB-02
NAB-03
NAB-04
Historical
Cost
Project
Year
Esc
Fac
$2,552,638
$ 122,972
$2,199,827
$ 125,446
$ 11,264
$ 27,045
$ 345,767
$ 371,511
$2,583,842
$ 263,586
$ 35,960
$1,122,167
$ 88,500
$ 185,529
$ 69,506
$1,111,840
$ 196,058
$ 32,007
$ 29,868
$ 48,778
$ 102,783
$ 103,345
$ 105,802
$ 109,124
$ 13,420
$ 132,378
$1,600,429
$ 550,680
$ 275,635
$ 341,779
$ 29,326
$ 23,972
2006
2005
2007
2004
2003
2003
2003
2005
2001
2003
2008
2008
2007
2006
2006
2006
2008
2006
2006
2007
2007
2007
2007
2008
2005
2007
2008
2007
2005
2008
2006
2005
1.0496
1.0821
1.0240
1.1125
1.1347
1.1347
1.1347
1.0821
1.1553
1.1347
1.0000
1.0000
1.0240
1.0496
1.0496
1.0496
1.0000
1.0496
1.0496
1.0240
1.0240
1.0240
1.0240
1.0000
1.0821
1.0240
1.0000
1.0240
1.0821
1.0000
1.0496
1.0821
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Escalated
Historical
Cost
$2,679,372
$ 133,072
$2,252,536
$ 139,555
$ 12,781
$ 30,688
$ 392,337
$ 402,025
$2,985,030
$ 299,088
$ 35,960
$1,122,167
$ 90,621
$ 194,740
$ 72,957
$1,167,041
$ 196,058
$ 33,596
$ 31,351
$ 49,947
$ 105,246
$ 105,821
$ 108,337
$ 109,124
$ 14,522
$ 135,550
$1,600,429
$ 563,874
$ 298,274
$ 341,779
$ 30,782
$ 25,941
RACER
S1
$2,805,286
$ 365,111
$4,586,287
$ 417,257
$
9,863
$ 26,781
$ 412,513
$ 548,102
$7,495,703
$ 240,496
$ 70,309
$1,166,439
$ 143,464
$ 131,694
$ 110,041
$1,015,141
$ 188,655
$ 90,801
$ 59,817
$ 39,711
$ 42,953
$ 41,111
$ 40,387
$ 84,126
$ 44,110
$ 130,404
$1,679,874
$ 203,071
$ 308,929
$ 190,305
$ 40,246
$ 33,087
S2
$3,072,866
$ 347,430
$4,583,199
$ 432,962
$
9,863
$ 27,307
$ 409,577
$ 413,329
$6,338,290
$ 240,496
$ 33,629
$1,077,279
$ 132,472
$ 131,694
$ 110,041
$1,015,141
$ 123,445
$ 43,040
$ 40,636
$ 39,711
$ 42,953
$ 41,111
$ 40,387
$ 109,876
$ 44,979
$ 142,131
$1,575,792
$ 203,071
$ 308,929
$ 371,332
$ 32,791
$ 32,795
S3
$2,995,141
$ 282,078
$3,063,756
$ 268,844
$ 16,891
$ 26,106
$ 409,577
$ 406,277
$6,657,638
$ 358,483
$ 32,330
$1,145,118
$ 146,761
$ 155,751
$ 74,759
$ 825,676
$ 137,756
$ 40,272
$ 37,259
$ 37,783
$ 45,182
$ 42,597
$ 41,761
$ 112,097
$ 30,434
$ 139,440
$1,548,351
$ 209,490
$ 315,614
$ 233,190
$ 30,478
$ 34,620
%Difference
S4
$1,154,155
$ 111,730
$2,392,304
$ 214,738
$ 13,074
$ 20,206
$ 317,275
$ 315,183
$2,693,553
$ 234,558
$ 36,596
$1,164,900
$ 126,300
$ 142,390
$ 60,924
$ 756,757
$ 140,115
$ 41,261
$ 38,164
$ 32,600
$ 38,878
$ 38,786
$ 38,283
$ 129,043
$ 28,576
$ 160,887
$1,573,611
$ 212,125
$ 318,074
$ 220,086
$ 28,521
$ 37,169
S1
5%
174%
104%
199%
-23%
-13%
5%
36%
151%
-20%
96%
4%
58%
-32%
51%
-13%
-4%
170%
91%
-20%
-59%
-61%
-63%
-23%
204%
-4%
5%
-64%
4%
-44%
31%
28%
S2
15%
161%
103%
210%
-23%
-11%
4%
3%
112%
-20%
-6%
-4%
46%
-32%
51%
-13%
-37%
28%
30%
-20%
-59%
-61%
-63%
1%
210%
5%
-2%
-64%
4%
9%
7%
26%
S3
12%
112%
36%
93%
32%
-15%
4%
1%
123%
20%
-10%
2%
62%
-20%
2%
-29%
-30%
20%
19%
-24%
-57%
-60%
-61%
3%
110%
3%
-3%
-63%
6%
-32%
-1%
33%
S4
-57%
-16%
6%
54%
2%
-34%
-19%
-22%
-10%
-22%
2%
4%
39%
-27%
-16%
-35%
-29%
23%
22%
-35%
-63%
-63%
-65%
18%
97%
19%
-2%
-62%
7%
-36%
-7%
43%
Page 100 of 210
Project ID
NAB-05
NAB-08
NAB-09
NAB-10
NAB-11
NAB-12
NAB-16
NAB-17
NAB-18
NAB-19
NAB-23
SAS-01
SAS-02
SAS-04
SAS-06
SAS-07
SAS-08
SAS-10
SAS-11
SAS-12
SAS-13
SAS-14
SAS-16
SAS-17
SAS-18
SAS-19
Historical
Cost
Project
Year
Esc
Fac
$ 27,420
$ 445,886
$ 67,448
$ 31,262
$ 36,590
$ 411,343
$ 143,502
$1,108,734
$ 142,692
$ 39,467
$ 225,427
$ 518,815
$ 579,699
$ 369,300
$ 898,355
$ 32,529
$ 72,011
$ 250,250
$ 67,114
$ 237,280
$ 672,718
$ 81,413
$ 101,276
$ 77,879
$ 348,121
$ 134,926
2005
2006
2007
2007
2007
2007
2007
2008
2005
2005
2007
2007
2008
2005
2005
2008
2009
2008
2006
2008
2004
2008
2008
2008
2008
2008
1.0821
1.0496
1.0240
1.0240
1.0240
1.0240
1.0240
1.0000
1.0821
1.0821
1.0240
1.0240
1.0000
1.0821
1.0821
1.0000
0.9775
1.0000
1.0496
1.0000
1.1125
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Escalated
Historical
Cost
$ 29,672
$ 468,024
$ 69,064
$ 32,011
$ 37,467
$ 421,199
$ 146,940
$1,108,734
$ 154,412
$ 42,709
$ 230,828
$ 531,246
$ 579,699
$ 399,632
$ 972,141
$ 32,529
$ 70,392
$ 250,250
$ 70,446
$ 237,280
$ 748,379
$ 81,413
$ 101,276
$ 77,879
$ 348,121
$ 134,926
RACER
S1
$ 27,444
$ 636,747
$ 37,148
$ 54,026
$ 109,004
$ 380,115
$ 173,230
$ 946,001
$ 149,226
$ 20,319
$ 291,147
$1,167,346
$ 576,057
$ 484,455
$3,175,487
$ 88,156
$ 82,990
$ 601,173
$ 11,077
$ 274,769
$1,743,403
$ 115,442
$ 129,018
$ 149,630
$5,766,333
$ 86,904
S2
$ 27,444
$ 560,370
$ 37,148
$ 42,522
$ 43,915
$ 371,040
$ 108,695
$ 963,591
$ 209,309
$ 20,319
$ 281,553
$1,167,346
$ 506,219
$ 283,434
$ 879,651
$ 57,859
$ 82,990
$ 362,009
$ 31,857
$ 279,389
$ 868,304
$ 86,549
$ 138,586
$ 149,850
$ 365,739
$ 100,260
S3
$ 31,249
$ 552,632
$ 39,369
$ 42,522
$ 47,308
$ 286,983
$ 148,655
$1,003,554
$ 147,703
$ 22,666
$ 261,316
$ 541,894
$ 550,309
$ 286,845
$ 872,274
$ 51,543
$ 82,990
$ 315,801
$ 33,008
$ 261,085
$ 952,570
$ 98,452
$ 135,482
$ 127,972
$ 396,163
$ 139,569
%Difference
S4
$ 33,547
$ 538,430
$ 39,621
$ 34,619
$ 38,745
$ 289,395
$ 146,899
$ 841,720
$ 137,835
$ 22,257
$ 255,213
$ 548,627
$ 649,400
$ 298,149
$ 997,506
$ 56,176
$ 95,364
$ 369,319
$ 37,643
$ 303,777
$1,107,940
$ 115,802
$ 136,692
$ 146,010
$ 453,355
$ 157,983
S1
-8%
36%
-46%
69%
191%
-10%
18%
-15%
-3%
-52%
26%
120%
-1%
21%
227%
171%
18%
140%
-84%
16%
133%
42%
27%
92%
1556%
-36%
S2
-8%
20%
-46%
33%
17%
-12%
-26%
-13%
36%
-52%
22%
120%
-13%
-29%
-10%
78%
18%
45%
-55%
18%
16%
6%
37%
92%
5%
-26%
S3
5%
18%
-43%
33%
26%
-32%
1%
-9%
-4%
-47%
13%
2%
-5%
-28%
-10%
58%
18%
26%
-53%
10%
27%
21%
34%
64%
14%
3%
S4
13%
15%
-43%
8%
3%
-31%
0%
-24%
-11%
-48%
11%
3%
12%
-25%
3%
73%
35%
48%
-47%
28%
48%
42%
35%
87%
30%
17%
Page 101 of 210
Appendix C – Project Summaries for all Historical Projects Selected for
Analysis
USACE-NWK-23
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project
Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies
Used:
Fort Riley
KS721402075600
Custer Hill Landfill Repairs
28 September 2007 – 30 September 2008 (FY08)
W912DQ-07-D-0010; Delivery Order 0007
IRP
Fort Riley, KS
Custer Hill Landfill
SOW Revision 1 (20 Sep 07)
Contractor’s Price Proposal (20 Sep 07)
Order for Services (28 Sep 07)
Repair depressions in the cover of the Custer Hill Landfill to
eliminate ponding and facilitate runoff, perform surveys, grade
drainage features, remove trash and rubble, and perform
seeding and mowing.
$443,805
1. Cleanup and Landscaping
2. Excavation
3. Trenching/Piping
4. Load and Haul
5. Professional Labor Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 102 of 210
USACE-NWK-24
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project
Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies
Used:
Fort Leonard Wood
MO721372097900
Removal of Underground Storage Tanks (USTs)
2005 (FY06)
W912DQ-05-D-0008
IRP
Fort Leonard Wood, MO
Buildings 645 & 745
SOW (28 Sep 05)
IGE (27 Sep 05)
Revised Proposal (29 Sep 05)
Remove six (6) USTs at Buildings 645 and 745 along with any
contaminated soil, backfill the excavated areas with clean fill,
re-plant with a grass cover mix, and provide documentation for
bringing the site to closure.
$405,222
1. UST Removal/Closure
2. Excavation
3. Residual Waste Management
4. Professional Labor Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 103 of 210
USACE-NWK-26
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project
Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies
Used:
Garland Gap GF Annex and Former Forbes Atlas Missile Site
KS79799F027700
Firm Fixed Price Task Order Remediation Services of UST
Removals at Former Forbes Atlas Missile Site S-7 in
Pottawatomie County, Kansas and Garland Gap GF Annex
P-72 Radar Tower, Bourbon County, KS
FY06
W912DQ-05-D-0008 TO 0004
FUDS
Bourbon County, KS (Garland Gap)
Garland Gap GF ANX P-72 Radar Tower and Former Forbes
Atlas Missile Site S-7
Performance Work Statement (Jan 06)
Independent Government Estimate (14 Feb 06)
Contractor’s Proposal (9 Feb 06)
Contractor’s Revised Proposal (10 Mar 06)
Post-Negotiation Price Memorandum (16 Feb 06)
Remove one 5,000 gallon UST (at Garland Gap) and one 275
gallon UST (at Forbes S-7), and perform associated excavation,
site restoration, and closure reports.
$80,417
1. UST Closure/Removal
2. Cleanup and Landscape
3. Site Close-Out Documentation
4. Residual Waste Management
5. Professional Labor Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 104 of 210
AFCEE-04
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project
Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies
Used:
AFCEE-08
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project
Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies
Used:
Clear AFS
AK057112863800
Site 15 Remedial Investigation
FY07
F41624-03-D-8597-0205
Unknown
Clear AFS, AK
Site 15
SOW (8 Aug 06)
Proposal (23 Aug 06)
Perform Remedial Investigation to aid in the identification of
potential source areas of metals contamination in sediment and
water at the Site 15 pond.
$136,344
1. Remedial Investigation
Andersen AFB
GU957309951900
Underground Storage Tank Removal at Building 18017 in
Andersen AFB, Guam
15 October 15 2006 through 15 April 15 2007 (FY07)
FA8903-04-D-8685-004
Compliance/O&M
Andersen AFB, Guam
UST Removal at Building 18017
Supply Order (28 Sep 06)
SOW (27 Sep 06)
IGE (27 Sep 06)
Proposal; Tech & Mgt Approach (26 Sep 06)
Cost Proposal (26 Sep 06)
Remove one 650-gallon UST with oil/water separator at Bldg
18017 Andersen AFB, Guam.
$19,999
1. UST Removal
2. Residual Waste Management
3. Professional Labor Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 105 of 210
AFCEE-10
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project
Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies
Used:
Air Force Plant 85
OH557172887000
Air Force Plant 85 Building 10
2006 (FY07)
F41624-03-D-8597-0196
Unknown
Columbus, OH
Building 10
Proposal (11 Aug 06)
SOW (21 Jul 06)
Conduct a Feasibility Study at Building 10 where two former
USTs were extracted. The USTs contained 1,1,1-trichloroethane
(TCA) and trichloroethylene (TCE). Contamination entered the
soil and groundwater. Further investigation is required.
$246,763
1. Feasibility Study
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 106 of 210
AFCEE-11
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project
Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies
Used:
Altus AFB
OK657152404500
Altus AFB, Site SS-17
2007 (FY08)
F41624-03-D-8597-0242
Unknown
Altus AFB, OK
SS-17 & Base Wide (Groundwater monitoring)
Proposal (11 Aug 07)
SOW (17 Jul 07)
Conduct base wide groundwater monitoring using Monitored
Natural Attenuation (MNA) parameters, conduct surface water
monitoring, and conduct quarterly maintenance of the
Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) system. The monitoring is
to verify plume stability throughout the base as well as in the
vicinity of the biowall. The GAC system was formerly used to
remediate a plume. It is being kept on standby as a secondary
remedial technology to the biowall. The GAC system is
currently used for the discharge of water obtained during the
monitoring of 400 wells.
$801,482
1. Natural Attenuation
2. Monitoring
3. Operations & Maintenance
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 107 of 210
AFCEE-12
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project
Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies
Used:
Edwards AFB
CA957172450400
OU 5/10 Site 282 Enhanced Bioremediation Treatability Study
21 September 2007 to 20 March 2009 (FY08)
F41624-03-D-8597, TO 0234
Unknown
Edwards AFB, CA
Site 282
SOW (26 Jun 07)
Cost Proposal (6 Sep 07)
Technical Proposal (6 Sep 07)
Confirmation of Negotiations (18 Sep 07)
Conduct treatability study for enhanced in-situ bioremediation
for spots at Site 282; install groundwater monitoring wells;
conduct sampling; prepare treatability report; dispose
Investigative-Derived Waste (IDW) on site.
$477,167
1. Monitoring
2. In Situ Biodegradation
3. Groundwater Monitoring Wells
4. Residual Waste Management
5. Professional Labor Management
6. Site Closeout Documentation
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 108 of 210
AFCEE-13
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project
Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies
Used:
Chanute AFB
IL557002475700
Landfill Operation, Maintenance, and Monitoring for Landfill 1
(LF016), Landfill 2 (LF014), and Landfill 3 (LF018)
January 2006 – July 2007 (FY06 - FY07)
F41624-03-D-8609, Task Order 0343
BRAC
Chanute AFB, IL
Landfill 1 (LF016), Landfill 2 (LF014), and Landfill 3 (LF018)
Confirmation of Negotiations (19 Dec 05)
Price Proposal (14 Dec 05)
Technical Proposal (14 Dec 05)
Conduct O&M of three landfills, including landfill inspections,
landfill gas monitoring, groundwater and storm water
sampling, and landfill repairs
$919,983
1. UST Closure/Removal
2. Excavation
3. Off-Site Transportation and Waste Disposal
4. Professional Labor Management
5. Trenching/Piping
6. Operations & Maintenance
7. Monitoring
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 109 of 210
AFCEE-16
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Edwards AFB
CA957172450400
OU 7/Site 3 Groundwater and Vapor Monitoring Sampling
FSPM 2007-7655 at Edwards AFB, CA
Project Date:
31 July 2007 through 31 July 2009 (FY07 – FY08)
Contract Number:
F41624-03-D8597-0233
Funding Source:
Unknown
Project Location:
Edwards AFB, CA
Site(s):
OU 7/Site 3
Documents
SOW (19 Jun 07)
Collected:
Price Negotiation Memorandum (19 Jul 07)
Technical Evaluation (12 Jul 07)
Confirm of Negotiation (18 Jul 07)
Contractor Proposal (10 Jul 07)
Project Description Conduct one round of groundwater sampling from 14
monitoring wells and one round of vapor sampling from five
landfill vapor monitoring wells at site 3.
Total Project Cost: $272,655
RACER
1. Monitoring
Technologies
2. Site Closeout Documentation
Used:
AFCEE-24
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project
Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies
Used:
Andersen AFB
GU957309951900
Interim Remedial Action at Ritidian Point Dump Site
2005 (FY04-FY05)
FA8903-04-D-8676
ERA
Andersen AFB, Guam
Ritidian Point Dump Site
SOW (5 May 04)
Contractor Proposal (29 Jun 04)
Excavate 9,200 BCY of lead-contaminated soil; perform on-site
treatment of lead contaminated soil using triple phosphate
stabilizing agent. Perform sampling and analysis of
contaminated soil, transport waste, and backfill excavated area.
$1,627,734
1. Off-Site Transportation and Waste Disposal
2. Excavation
3. Residual Waste Management
4. Professional Labor Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 110 of 210
USACE-SWF-01
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project
Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies
Used:
Lone Star Army Ammunition Plant
TX621382183100
Removal of Soil and Site Restoration at G Ponds Unit
2002
DACA63-01-D-0012-0002
Unknown
Texarkana, TX
Lone Star Army Ammunition Plant, G Ponds
Solicitation/MOD (30 Sep 02)
Detailed SOW (20 Sep 02)
Price Negotiation Memorandum (4 Apr 02)
Contractor’s Cost Estimate (1 Apr 02)
Conduct contaminated soil removal in two zones; the Eastern
PLC Zone (MPSS-75) east of Building G-1, and the Western
PLC Zone. Excavate and dispose of the contaminated soil;
backfill and restore the site.
$60,462
1. Demolition, Underground Pipes
2. Excavation
3. Residual Waste Management
4. Professional Labor Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 111 of 210
USACE-SWF-02
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project
Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies
Used:
Lone Star Army Ammunition Plant
TX621382183100
Excavation of Contaminated Soil at the K-15 North and South
Area
2003
DACA63-01-D-0012-0008
Unknown
Texarkana, TX
K-15 North and South
Order for Supplies and Services (1 Aug 03)
Detailed SOW (Jul 03)
Figure of Excavation Area (Aug 01)
Purchase Request and Commitment (1 Aug 03)
Contractor Cost Estimate (27 Jul 03)
Excavate soil at the K-15 North and South areas. Remove
approximately 609 CY of soil; work included soil excavation,
disposal of stockpiled soil, and restoration of the site.
$78,396
1. Excavation
2. Cleanup and Landscaping
3. Residual Waste Management
4. Professional Labor Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 112 of 210
USACE-SWF-03
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project
Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies
Used:
Former Zapata AFS
TX69799F674400
Removal of (2) 500 gallon UST @ Former Zapata AFS
March 2004 (FY04)
DACA63-01-D-0012-0011
Unknown
Zapata, TX
N/A
SOW (2 Mar 04)
Proposal (17 Feb 04)
Order for Supplies or Services (31 Mar 04)
Purchase Request and Commitment (11 Mar 04)
Price Negotiation Memorandum (5 Mar 04)
Remove two 500 gallon USTs, vents, fill pipes, and associated
piping. Conduct sampling and analysis of soil from all four
sides and under each tank, purging and ensuring the tanks are
empty, backfill the tank hold, topsoil replacement, grass
seeding and mulch, and create and submit four copies of
closure report.
$8,597
1. UST Closure/Removal
2. Residual Waste Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 113 of 210
USACE-SWF-04
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project
Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies
Used:
Lone Star Army Ammunition Plant
TX621382183100
Excavation of Contaminated Soil at Unit 16 - High Explosive
Burning Ground
2004
DACA63-01-D-0012-0017
Unknown
Texarkana, TX
Unit 16
SOW (19 Apr 05)
Contractor Proposal (7 Apr 05)
Order for Supplies or Services (4 May 2005)
Excavate contaminated soil to facilitate site remediation and
subsequent closure of Unit 16. Perform all activities required
for remediation of the site including soil excavation and
stockpiling, disposal of stockpiled soil, and restoration of the
site. Confirmation sampling and analyses and waste
characterization were performed under a separate contract.
$121,611
1. Excavation
2. Residual Waste Management
3. Professional Labor Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 114 of 210
USACE-SWF-05
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project
Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies
Used:
Fort Bliss
TX621372010100
Fort Bliss Assessment and Remediation Activities
March 2003
DACA631-01-D-0013-0015
Unknown
Fort Bliss, TX
Buildings 11106, 2469, 11024, 1742
SOW (3 May 03)
Proposal (12 Mar 03)
Price Negotiation Memorandum (20 Mar 03)
Conduct pilot tests using high vacuum dual-phase extraction
(HVDP) technology. Annual groundwater monitoring will also
be performed at Buildings 11106 and 2469, with additional free
product and groundwater assessment to be performed at
Building 11106. Following quarterly sampling and an annual
groundwater monitoring and reporting event, monitoring wells
at Building 11024 will be plugged and abandoned and the Final
Site Closure Report will be prepared and submitted.
Monitoring wells at Building 1742 will be plugged and
abandoned and the Final Site Closure Report will be prepared
and submitted.
$67,802
1. Groundwater Monitoring Well
2. Monitoring
3. Residual Waste Management
4. Well Abandonment
5. Site Close-out Documentation
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 115 of 210
USACE-SWF-08
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project
Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies
Used:
Lone Star Army Ammunition Plant
TX621382183100
Excavation of Contaminated Soil at Unit 6-BB-15 Area
November 2006 (FY07)
W9126G-06-D-0018
Unknown
Texarkana, TX
Unit 6 BB-15 Area
Order for Supplies and Services (5 Dec 06)
Detailed SOW (1 Nov 06)
MOD 1 (23 Oct 06)
Contractor’s Price Proposal (11 Nov 06)
Transport approximately 300 cubic yards of contaminated soil
from stockpile Area A within the BB-15 area to a Class 1
disposal facility.
$19,125
1. Load and Haul
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 116 of 210
USACE-SWF-09
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project
Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies
Used:
Fort Polk
LA621402071600
Removal of Underground Storage Tanks, Buildings 1725 &
4919
September 2007
W9126G-06-D-0018-0009
Unknown
Fort Polk, LA
Building 1725 and Building 4919
SOW (10 Sep 07)
Proposal (17 Sep 07)
Order for Supplies or Services (25 Sep 07)
Remove six 10,000-gallon USTs and associated piping, three
tanks at Building 1725 and three at Building 4919, residual
liquid or sludge in the tanks, and associated facilities and
piping; conduct testing and reporting; and complete site
restoration.
$232,954
1. UST Closure/Removal
2. Demolition, Pavements
3. Residual Waste Management
4. Resurfacing Roadways/Parking Lots
5. Professional Labor Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 117 of 210
USACE-SWF-10
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project
Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies
Used:
USACE-SWF-12
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project
Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies
Used:
U.S. Border Patrol Site, Brackettville, TX
Unknown
Cleanup and Remediation of a 2.6 acre site for the US Customs
and Border Patrol Facility
March 2008
W9126G-06-D-0018-0011
Unknown
Brackettville, TX
N/A
SOW (25 Feb 08)
Proposal (25 Feb 08)
Order for Supplies or Services (5 Mar 08)
Remove debris and potentially contaminated soil at the 2.6 acre
site.
$29,337
1. Drum Staging
2. Excavation
3. Off-site Transportation and Waste Disposal
4. Residual Waste Management
5. Professional Labor Management
Fort Bliss
TX621372010100
Soil Gas Survey and Methane Remediation, Municipal Solid
Waste Landfill
September 2007
W9126G-06-D-0020-0013
Unknown
Fort Bliss, TX
Municipal Solid Waste Landfill
SOW (31 Aug 07)
Proposal (7 Sep 07)
Perform a methane gas survey and install two passive vent
wells. Revise methane gas monitoring plan.
$57,488
1. Groundwater Monitoring Well
2. Remedial Investigation
3. Residual Waste Management
4. Professional Labor Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 118 of 210
USACE-SWF-16
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project
Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies
Used:
Lone Star Army Ammunition Plant, TX
TX621382183100
Long Term Monitoring at the G Ponds and O Ponds
Compliance Plan No. CP-50292 at Lone Star Army
Ammunition Plant, TX
March 2007 through February 2008
W9126G-06-D-0017-0006
Unknown
Texarkana, TX
Long Term Monitoring at the G Ponds and O Ponds
Supply Order (23 Feb 07)
SOW (2 Feb 07)
Acceptance Memo (14 Feb 07)
Technical Analysis (14 Feb 07)
Cost Proposal (13 Feb 07)
Perform groundwater and surface water monitoring at the G
and O Ponds at the LSAAP, Texarkana, TX.
$135,089
1. Monitoring
2. Residual Waste Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 119 of 210
USACE-SWF-17
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project
Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies
Used:
Fort Bliss
TX621372010100
FY06 Groundwater Monitoring and Reporting at Building
11106
30 September 2006
W9126G-06-D-0020-0008
Unknown
Fort Bliss, TX
Building 11106
Order for Services (30 Sep 06)
SOW (13 Sep 06)
Proposal (27 Sep 06)
Perform one annual groundwater monitoring event in
December 2006 at 36 monitoring wells, and analyze each
sample for TPH and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and
xylenes (BTEX.)
$27,769
1. Monitoring
2. Residual Waste Management
USACE-POA-01
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Amaknak Island (FUDS)
AK09799F299500
Environmental Design and Remediation, Pre-WWII Tank Farm
2007
DACA85-95-D-0018, TO 0026 Mod 09
Unknown
Amaknak Island, Unalaska, Alaska
Pre-WWII Tank Farm
Proposal No. 2 (21 Aug 07)
Modification of Contract (7 Sep 07)
Final Focused Feasibility Study Report (May 06)
Final Remedial Action Report (May 08)
Project Description: Excavate petroleum contaminated soil, collect and analyze
confirmatory samples, and transport and dispose of excavated
soil off-site.
Total Project Cost:
$1,139,272
RACER
1. Excavation
Technologies Used: 2. Residual Waste Management
3. Professional Labor Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 120 of 210
USACE-POA-02
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description
Total Project Cost
RACER
Technologies Used:
USACE-POA-03a
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description
Total Project Cost
RACER
Technologies Used:
Amaknak Island (FUDS)
AK09799F299500
GW Monitoring, Amaknak Pre-WWII Tank Farm
2007
W911KB-05-D-007
Unknown
Unalaska, Alaska
Amaknak Pre-WWII Tank Farm
GW Monitoring Program 2006 Annual Report (Aug 06)
Final GW Monitoring Program 2007 Annual Report (8 Feb 08)
Order for Supplies or Services (29 Mar 07)
Contractor Proposal (29 Mar 07)
GW Monitoring to occur between May 1 and June 19, 2007.
Based on previous monitoring, sampling should be conducted
for VOCs, PAH and fuels. One sampling event will take place at
seven wells. Wells containing free product will not be sampled.
$106,903
1. Monitoring
Amaknak Island (FUDS)
AK09799F299500
Well Installation, Amaknak Pre-WWII Tank Farm
2008
W911KB-08-D-0004
Unknown
Unalaska, Alaska
Amaknak Pre-WWII Tank Farm
Amaknak Pre-WWII Tank Farm Well Installation and
Monitoring Work Plan (Jul 08)
Contractor Proposal (20 Jun 08)
GW Monitoring Program 2006 Annual Report (Aug 06)
Under this task, the contractor will install, develop, and survey
five monitoring wells.
$125,413
5. Monitoring
6. Professional Labor Management
7. Residual Waste Management
8. Groundwater Monitoring Well
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 121 of 210
USACE-POA-03b
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description
Total Project Cost
RACER
Technologies Used:
USACE-POA-03c
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description
Total Project Cost
RACER
Technologies Used:
Amaknak Island (FUDS)
AK09799F299500
2009 GW Sampling, Amaknak Pre-WWII Tank Farm
2008
W911KB-08-D-0004
Unknown
Unalaska, Alaska
Amaknak Pre-WWII Tank Farm
Amaknak Pre-WWII Tank Farm Well Installation and
Monitoring Work Plan (Jul 08)
Contractor Proposal (20 Jun 08)
GW Monitoring Program 2006 Annual Report (Aug 06)
The contractor will sample and analyze GW for diesel range
organics, residual range organics, benzene, toluene,
ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX), and PAHs.
$36,343
1. Monitoring
2. Residual Waste Management
Amaknak Island (FUDS)
AK09799F299500
2010 GW Sampling, Amaknak Pre-WWII Tank Farm
2008
W911KB-08-D-0004
Unknown
Unalaska, Alaska
Amaknak Pre-WWII Tank Farm
Amaknak Pre-WWII Tank Farm Well Installation and
Monitoring Work Plan (Jul 08)
Contractor Proposal (20 Jun 08)
GW Monitoring Program 2006 Annual Report (Aug 06)
The contractor will sample and analyze GW for diesel range
organics, residual range organics, BTEX, and PAHs.
$36,343
1. Monitoring
2. Residual Waste Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 122 of 210
USACE-POA-4
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Fort Richardson
AK021002215700
Well Assessment and Compliance Moose Run Golf Course
July 2008 (Contract Award)
W911KB-05-D-0007 TO 0008 Mod 05
Unknown
Fort Richardson, Alaska (13 miles outside Anchorage)
N/A
Final Tech Memo (29 Sep 08)
Contract Award (28 Jul 08)
SOW (28 May 08)
Proposal (25 Jun 08)
Project Description: GW Monitoring of eight wells for pesticides & herbicides.
Total Project Cost:
$145,353
RACER
1. Monitoring
Technologies Used:
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 123 of 210
USACE-POA-05
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Former Alaska Communications Site
AK09799F272200
Alaska Communications System Radio Relay Site Drum Removal
August 2007
W911KB-06-D-0006 TO 0005
FUDS
Tok, AK
Buried Drum
Proposal (May 07)
Project Work Plan (Aug 07)
Project Final Report (Jan 08)
Project Description: Removal of buried drums suspected of containing Agent Orange.
Excavate 75’x10’x10 area to uncover suspected buried drums (six
suspected), transfer product to new drums; over-pack old drums;
dispose of ~300 pounds of hazardous waste at closest Canadian
Hazardous Waste facility. Characterize excavation surface
beneath each drum for contaminants of concern (Pesticide,
Herbicide, GRO, DRO, BTEX, and Dioxins); perform TCPL
characterization (VOC, SCOC, Pesticide, Herbicide, and Metals)
on drum contents for disposal profiling; backfill excavation with
excavated material and supplement with clean fill to account for
removed drum voids.
Total Project Cost:
$303,951
RACER
1. Buried Drum Removal
Technologies Used: 2. Excavation
3. Drum Staging
4. Residual Waste Management
5. Professional Labor Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 124 of 210
USACE-POA-06
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
American River FUDS
F10AKF10AK0814_01
American River Formerly Used Defense Site
2007
W911KB-06-D-009 DO 0002
FUDS
American River FUDS (near Nome, AK)
American River FUDS
Order for Supplies or Services (28 Dec 07)
Contractor Proposal (20 Dec 07)
IGE (19 Dec 07)
Project Description: This project is to remove and treat/dispose of one overpacked
drum and six tons of lead contaminated soil at this site. Options
include removing and treating/disposing of additional 14 tons of
lead contaminated soil and 38 tons of petroleum contaminated
soil. The deliverable is a Remedial Action Report providing
information on the tasks performed, characterization data, and
results.
Total Project Cost:
$462,568
RACER
1. Excavation
Technologies Used: 2. Monitoring
3. Off-site Transportation and Waste Disposal
4. Professional Labor Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 125 of 210
USACE-POA-07
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description
Total Project Cost
RACER
Technologies Used:
DoD Facilities located on Cape Sarichef
AK09799F293400
2006 Cape Sarichef Interim Removal Action
2006
DACA85-95-D-0018 TO 0027
FUDS
Cape Sarichef, Alaska
White Alice Communication System (WACS) and the United
States Coast Guard (USCG) Long Range Aid to Navigation
(LORAN) Facilities
Work Plan, 2006 Cape Sarichef Interim Removal Action (Jul 06)
Final Report, Cape Sarichef Interim Removal Action (Mar 07)
Contractor Estimate and Basis of Estimate (10 Jan 06)
Individual Contracting Report (documents contract completion
28 Nov 08)
Order for Supplies or Services (24 Jan 06)
Scope of Work (Jan 06)
Cape Sarichef Interim Removal Action and Demobilization.
Removal of pipeline, ASTs, USTs. Drain and treat UST contents
and drain ASTs of usable fuel. Confirmatory samples at all
removal sites.
$2,552,638
1. Monitoring
2. UST Closure/Removal
3. Off-Site Transportation and Waste Disposal
4. Site Close out Documentation
5. Site inspection
6. Residual Waste Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 126 of 210
USACE-POA-08
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Fort Learnard, Unalaska, AK
AK09759F250700
Additional Investigation of Eight Sites
August 2007
W911KB-06-D-0006/TO 0005
FUDS
Unalaska, AK
E1-10, E1-14, E1-17, E1-18, E1-24, E1-28, E1-42, E1-46,
SOW (24 Oct 05)
Project Work Plan (Jun 06)
Project Final Characterization Report (Oct 07)
Project Description: Supplemental investigation to fill data gaps and confirm absence
or extent of soils contamination. Primary COC is fuels
contamination (GRO, DRO, RRO, BTEX), but also metals (esp.
lead), and PCBs (Site E-46, transformer storage). Also,
magnetometer survey to locate USTs at two sites, use of on-site
IR spectrometer for screening soil samples for lead, and UXO
safety officer oversight required for accessing site E1-42.
Total Project Cost:
$122,972
RACER
1. Remedial Investigation
Technologies Used:
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 127 of 210
USACE-POA-09
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description
Total Project Cost
RACER
Technologies Used:
Hoonah Remedial Relay Station
AK09799F261200
Hoonah Remedial Relay Station Remedial Action
2007
W911KB-06-D-0007
Unknown
Hoonah, Alaska
Hoonah Radio Relay Station
Hoonah RRS RA Report – Final (Apr 08)
Hoonah RRS RA Work Plan Rev 1, (Jul 07)
Hoonah Summary of Work (15 Nov 05)
Proposal Requirements (undated)
Unsolicited Price Proposal, Mod 1 (15 Aug 07)
Excavate, transport and dispose of PCB-contaminated soil in
excess of 1,271 tons at a price of $1,479.34 per ton. Site Closeout
documentation and reports will be provided upon completion of
fieldwork.
$2,199,827
1. Decontamination Facilities
2. Excavation
3. Professional Labor Management
4. Residual Waste Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 128 of 210
USACE-POA-12
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Northeast Cape
AK017002757200
NE Cape (Saint Lawrence Island) RA, soil removal
2004
W911KB-04-C-0019
Unknown
Saint Lawrence Island, Alaska
Northeast Cape
Solicitation, Offer & Award; Supplies or Services and Price Costs;
Statement of Work (Apr 04)
This project covers CLIN 0014- Excavating, packaging,
transporting and disposing of PCB contaminated soil from 7
locations.
$125,446
1. Decontamination Facilities
2. Excavation
3. Cleanup and Landscaping
4. Professional Labor Management
5. Residual Waste Management
USACE-POA-18
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Fort Richardson
AK021002215700
Circle Drive Soil Stockpile Assessments and Bldg 47-220 Soil
Excavation Assessment and Treatment
Project Date:
2002
Contract Number:
DACA-85-02-C-0013 P00001
Funding Source:
Unknown
Project Location:
Fort Richardson, Alaska
Site(s):
Circle Drive Soil Stockpile
Documents
Fence proposal (18 Sep 02)
Collected:
Revised SOW (13 Sep 002)
IGE (13 Sep 02)
Project Description: This project specifies installing a fence around Stockpile A at Fort
Richardson.
Total Project Cost:
$11,264
RACER
1. Fencing
Technologies Used:
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 129 of 210
USACE-POA-19
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Wildwood Air Force Station
AK09799F273900
Wildwood AFS Well Installation and LTM
2004
DACA85-03-C-0019 P0002
Unknown
Wildwood Air Force Station
Monitoring Wells 30 and 31
Statement of Work (Jan 04)
Contractor Item 9 Revised Assumptions (Oct 03)
Contracting Action (Mar 04)
Project Description: Install and Develop Two GW Monitoring Wells (MW-30 and
MW-31) at former tank farm area at Wildwood Air Force Station.
Total Project Cost:
$27,045
RACER
1. Groundwater Monitoring Well
Technologies Used: 2. Monitoring
3. Residual Waste Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 130 of 210
USACE-POA-20
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Whittier, Alaska
AK09799F906800
Port of Whittier Utilidor Removal
2003
DACA85-03-C-0016
Unknown
Whittier, Alaska
Monitoring Wells 30 and 31
Memo for Record (19 Nov 03)
Modification to Contract (24 Jun 03)
Price Negotiation Memo (13 Nov 03)
Cost Proposal, Mod# P00002, Tech & Mgt Approach (10 Oct 03)
Project Description: Remove and dispose of asbestos insulation from 550 LF of 6 to 8
inch pipe. Remove and dispose up to 250 cubic yards (cy) of
debris containing soil, concrete rebar, and piping that is
contaminated with asbestos and Bunker "C" fuel. Treat or
dispose up to 24,000 gallons of petroleum contaminated water.
Total Project Cost:
$345,767
RACER
1. Asbestos Removal
Technologies Used: 2. Excavation
3. Residual Waste Management
4. Off-site Transportation and Disposal
5. Professional Labor Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 131 of 210
USACE-POA-22
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Former Yakutat Air Force Base
AK09799F703900
Focused Remedial Investigation
2005
DACA85-03-D-0003 TO 0009
Unknown
Yakutat, AK
Army Dock Area (Concern D); Engineer Road (Concern L and
Aviation Gasoline Pipeline)
Documents
SOW Revision 1 (24 Mar 05)
Collected:
Contractor Proposal (28 Mar 05)
Project Description: This project continues Remedial Investigation of this site.
Additional site investigation at Concern D involves installation
of 4 GW monitoring wells and performing a pipeline survey of
the diesel fuel system. The survey will include providing
information on pipeline and associated equipment specifics.
Characterization of soil and water will occur during well
installation. Site investigation of Engineer Road involves
determination of presence or absence of a 6-inch gasoline
pipeline. The survey will also include providing information on
pipeline and associated equipment specifics. The deliverable is a
RI report providing information on the tasks performed,
characterization data, conclusions, and recommendations.
Total Project Cost:
$371,511
RACER
1. Remedial Investigation
Technologies Used: 2. Groundwater Monitoring Well
3. Residual Waste Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 132 of 210
USACE-POA-24
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Drury Gulch
Not Provided
Drury Gulch (Kodiak Island) Contaminated Soil Removal
2001
DACA85-95-D-0018 TO0006
Unknown
Kodiak, Alaska
Drury Gulch
RI/FS Report (October 02)
RA Report (May 04)
SOW (Dec 00)
Award Documentation (22 Dec 00)
Clarification/Verification Report (Dec 02)
Project Description: Approximately 2,963 cubic yards (CY) of PCB-contaminated soil
will be excavated and disposed of. Area will be backfilled with
clean fill.
Total Project Cost:
$2,583,842
RACER
1. Excavation
Technologies Used: 2. Residual Waste Management
3. Sanitary Sewer
4. Professional Labor Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 133 of 210
USACE-POA-25
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Fort Wainwright and Fort Richardson
AK021452242600 & AK021002215700
Decommissioning GW Monitoring Wells, Fort Wainwright and
Fort Richardson, AK
Project Date:
2003
Contract Number:
DACA-85-01-R-0030 TO 0004
Funding Source:
DERA
Project Location:
Anchorage, AK (Fort Richardson) & Fairbanks, AK (Fort
Wainwright)
Site(s):
Various sites on each installation
Documents
Statement of Work (8 Jul 03)
Collected:
Contractor Proposal (21 Jul 03)
Final Contracting Action (31 Mar 04)
Project Description: Decommissioning and repair of GW Monitoring Wells at Fort
Wainwright (Fairbanks, AK) and Fort Richardson (Anchorage,
AK). This project calls for the closure of 41 wells at Fort
Richardson and 126 wells at Fort Wainwright in accordance with
Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (ADEC)
guidelines. In addition, 4 wells at Fort Richardson will be
repaired. Work Plans, Summary Reports, and Review Meetings
are included in the task.
Total Project Cost:
$263,586
RACER
1. Well Abandonment
Technologies Used: 2. Decontamination Facilities
3. Demolition, Pavements
4. Site Closeout Documentation
5. Load & Haul
6. Professional Labor Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 134 of 210
USACE-LRL-01
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
Former Nike CD-78 Launch Area
OH59799F365000
Nike CD-78 Monitored Natural Attenuation
2008
W912QR-04-D-0037 DO 0008
FUDS
Oxford, OH
Former Nike CD-78 Launch Area
Performance Work Statement (Dec 07)
IGE, Revision 1 (19 Dec 07)
Proposal, Revision 1 (20 Dec 07)
Order for Supplies or Services (28 Dec 07)
The project objective is to conduct one year (base year for the
contract) of monitored natural attenuation sampling, analysis,
and reporting (at seven existing wells using pumps, and five offsite locations using Direct Push Technology (DPT)) at the Nike
CD-78 FUDS site.
$35,960
(This cost is the sum of the base-year awarded cost for MNA ($34,800), and the cost
for IDW disposal cost for four drums ($1160), per memo from Advanced Waste
Services priced for fourth option year. IDW disposal cost is not included in the base
year awarded cost.)
RACER
Technologies Used:
1. Monitoring
2. Residual Waste Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 135 of 210
USACE-LRL-02
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Ravenna AAP
OH521382073600
Sampling of Soils below floor Slabs & Excavation &
Transportation of Contaminated Soils to Load Line 4
2008
W912QR-04-D-0025 DO 0006
IRP
Ravenna, OH
LL-2, LL-3, LL-4
Modification of Contract (22 Aug 08)
Revised SOW (10 Jul 08)
Proposal (11 Jun 08)
Revised Proposal (7 Jul 08)
Purchase Request (8 Aug 08)
This project is to sample and analyze 75 four-foot deep soil cores,
11 surface soils, and surface water stored in a tank. Scope
includes transporting and disposal of this surface water (6,000
gallons). Other tasks include excavation and disposal of 300 yd3
of Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated soils.
Contractor will also transfer 300 yd3 of piled soil to another onsite location and transport/dispose of approximately 5,000 yd3 of
excavated soils. Scope includes digging a trench approximately
2,500 feet for soil assessment. This project will also restore the
excavated areas of approximate 2 acres. Deliverables include
work plans, ESS Amendments, and a Remediation Report.
$1,122,167
1. Remedial Investigation
2. Off-site Transportation and Waste Disposal
3. Bulk Material Storage
4. Excavation
5. Load and Haul
6. Monitoring
7. Trenching/Piping
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 136 of 210
USACE-LRL-03
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Former Camp McDowell Radar School
N/A
UST Removal
2007
W912QR-04-D-0037 DO 0005
FUDS
Naperville, IL
Former Camp McDowell Radar School
PWS (Feb 07)
Order for Supplies & Services (14 Mar 07)
Contractor Proposal (8 Mar 07)
Project Closeout Documentation (7 Nov 08)
Fuel, pesticide, metal, and PCB contaminated soil removal.
Decommission of underground steel pipe. Removal of three
USTs, and removal of sludge and contaminated water associated
with the USTs.
$88,500
1. UST Closure/Removal
2. Residual Waste Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 137 of 210
USACE-LRL-04
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Carmi Air Force Station
IL59799F218900
Limited Site Inspection
2006
W912QR-04-D-0020 DO 0014
FUDS
Carmi, IL
Carmi Air Force Station
Order for Supplies (30 Mar 06)
SOW for Limited Site Inspection (28 Feb 06)
IGE dated (27 Mar 06)
Proposal for Limited Site Inspection (17 Mar 06)
This project is to perform a limited site inspection for Carmi Air
Force Station located at Carmi, IL. Tasks involve obtaining
surface and sub-surface soil samples, and groundwater samples.
Five groundwater monitoring wells will be installed to
determine groundwater flow. This project will also perform a
geotechnical survey for the southwestern portion of the site to
locate a possible septic tank. The deliverable is a Limited Site
Inspection (LSI) report for this site.
$185,529
1. Site Inspection
2. Groundwater Monitoring Well
3. RCRA Facility Investigation
4. Residual Waste Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 138 of 210
USACE-LRL-05
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Boston RPX Site
N/A
Potential RPX Site Phase II Site Investigation
2006
W912QR-04-D-0020 DO 0016
FUDS
Boston, MA
Boston RPX Site
Order for Supplies & SOW (15 Jun 06)
IGE dated (27 Mar 06)
Proposal for Phase II Site Investigation (12 Jun 06)
This project is to perform a Phase II Site Investigation for a
potential RPX site (Boston RPX Site) located at Boston, MA.
Tasks involve obtaining sub-surface soil samples from 11 soil
bores, and groundwater samples from two new monitoring wells
developed from two soil bores. Two groundwater monitoring
wells will be installed to determine groundwater flow. This
project will also review data from the Phase I Site Investigation.
The deliverable is Phase II report for this site.
$69,506
1. Site Inspection
2. Groundwater Monitoring Well
3. Residual Waste Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 139 of 210
USACE-LRL-06
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Camp Ellis Military Reserve
IL59799F804800
Limited Site Inspection
2006
W912QR-04-D-0020 DO 0016
FUDS
Table Grove, IL
Camp Ellis Military Reserve
Order for Supplies & SOW (29 Jun 06)
IGE dated (19 Jun 06)
Revised Proposal for Limited Site Inspection (27 Jun 06)
This project is to perform an LSI for the former Camp Ellis
Military Range located at Table Grove, IL. Tasks involve
performing geophysical surveys of 240 acres; installing soil
borings, piezometers, and groundwater monitoring wells; and
collecting and analyzing soil and groundwater. Two
groundwater monitoring wells will be installed to determine
groundwater flow. This project will also review data from
previous investigations. The deliverable is an LSI report for this
site.
$1,111,840
1. Site Inspection
2. Groundwater Monitoring Well
3. Residual Waste Management
4. RCRA Facility Investigation
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 140 of 210
USACE-LRL-07
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Ravenna AAP
OH521382073600
MEC Removal Action
2008
W912QR-04-D-0040 DO 0003
IRP
Ravenna, OH
Winklepeck Burning Grounds
Revised IGE (30 Jul 08)
Revised SOW (30 Jul 08)
Cost Summary (30 Jul 08)
Price Negotiation Memo (30 Jul 08)
Revised Contractor Proposal (28 May 08)
Modification of Contract (22 Aug 08)
This project is in support of the munitions and explosives of
concern (MEC) disposal and munitions debris (MD) final
disposition supporting the survey and munitions response (MR)
at the Winklepeck Burning Ground (WBG) pads # 61,61A, 67,
and 70 at Ravenna AAP.
$196,058
1. MEC Removal Action
2. Monitoring
3. Excavation
4. Professional Labor Management
5. Residual Waste Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 141 of 210
USACE-LRL-08
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
USACE-LRL-09
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Marion Engineer Depot
OH59799F367500
Relative Risk Site Assessment
1998
DACW27-97-D-0015 DO 0005 WAD 6
FUDS
Marion, OH
Dump Site and Property Disposal Site
Summary of Cost by WAD, TO 0005 (undated)
Mod 6 (Undated)
Contractor’s Proposal, Technical Approach and Assumptions
(27 Mar 98)
Pre-Negotiation Objectives Memorandum (5 Feb 98)
Price Negotiation Memorandum (17 Apr 98)
WAD-6- Relative Risk Site Evaluation for Marion Engineer
Depot.
$32,007
1. Monitoring
Marion Engineering Depot
OH59799F367500
Well Assessment and Closure
2006
W912QR-04-D-0019 DO 0021
FUDS
Marion, OH
Local Training Area
Order for Supplies and Services (Sep 06)
SOW (Jul 06)
IGE (Jul 06)
Final Proposal (Aug 06)
Contract Completion Statement (Mar 07)
Assess an approximately 100-foot well and provide proper
abandonment and closure of the well, as well as a well sealing
report. Collect samples for analysis of VOCs, SVOCs, and
metals.
$29,868
1. Monitoring
2. Well Abandonment
3. Professional Labor Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 142 of 210
USACE-LRL-10
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Calumet Harbor Yard (USACE-LRL-10a)
Chanute Quartermaster Area (USACE-LRL-10b)
C-60 Housing and Gunsite (USACE-LRL-10c)
Nike Battery C-46 (USACE-LRL-10d)
IL59799F223900, IL557002475700, Unknown for C-60 Housing,
IN59799F951500
Preliminary Assessments for Four Formerly Used Defense Sites
2007
W912QR-04-D-0020 DO 0028
FUDS
Chicago, IL
Rantoul, IL
Bedford Park, IL
Munster, IN
Calumet Harbor Yard
Chanute Quartermaster Area
C-60 Housing and Gunsite
Nike Battery C-46
Order for Supplies (7 Jun 07)
SOW for Preliminary Assessment (May 07)
IGE (2 May 07)
Proposal for Preliminary Assessments (5 Jun 07)
This project is to perform three full performance assessments
(PA) for three FUDS: Calumet Harbor Yard, Chanute
Quartermaster Area, and Nike Battery C-46. This project will
also perform an abbreviated PA and a geotechnical survey for
C-60 Housing and Gunsite. The deliverables are the PA reports
for these four sites.
$360,708 (10a: $48,778, 10b: $102,783, 10c: $103,345, 10d: $105,802)
1. Preliminary Assessment
2. Remedial Investigation
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 143 of 210
USACE-LRL-11
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description
Total Project Cost
RACER
Technologies Used:
USACE-LRL-12
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Blue Grass Army Depot
KY421002010500
2008 IRP Groundwater LTM
2008
W912QR-04-D-0018 DO 0029
BRAC
Richmond, KY
Installation-wide
Scope of Work (11 Mar 08)
Order for Supplies and Services (9 Apr 08)
IGE (19 Feb 08)
Contractor Proposal (13 Mar 08)
The scope of work for this project entails development of a Sitewide Long-Term Monitoring and Operations Plan. Work will
generally consist of obtaining water level readings, collection of
samples, laboratory analysis of samples, and reporting findings
from the six sites being monitored.
$109,124
1. Monitoring
Army Reserve Center, Wausau, WI
WI521044346200
Groundwater Sampling
2005
W912QR-04-D-0020 DO 0003
Unknown
Wausau, WI
Army Reserve Center, Wausau, WI
Proposal (26 Sep 05)
Revised Proposal (28 Sep 05)
Modification of Contract (29 Sep 05)
Acceptance of CH2M Hill Proposal (Sep 05)
IGE (22 Sep 05)
SOW (Sep 05)
Contractor to perform one round of groundwater sampling at
Army Reserve Center, Wausau, WI.
$13,420
1. Monitoring
2. Off-site Transportation and Waste Disposal
3. Professional Labor Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 144 of 210
USACE-LRL-13
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description
Total Project Cost
RACER
Technologies Used:
Lexington Blue Grass Army Depot
KY421002050900
Long Term Monitoring of Landfills
2007
W912QR-05-D-0026 CY01
BRAC
Lexington, KY
Landfills
Order for Supplies and Services (27 Nov 07)
Scope of Work (2 Oct 07)
IGE (26 Nov 07)
Contractor Proposal (15 Nov 07)
Monitoring events will take place at three surface water locations
and 13 groundwater wells to sample for metals and VOCs.
Samples will be collected over a period of four years. The
contractor will be responsible for submitting annual
groundwater monitoring reports.
$132,378
1. Monitoring
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 145 of 210
USACE-LRL-14
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Ravenna AAP
OH521382073600
Environmental Services at Sand Creek (RVAAP-34), Open
Demolition Area No. 1 (RVAAP-03), and Suspected Mustard
Agent Burial Site (RVAAP-28)
2008
W912QR-08-D-0013 DO 0002
IRP
Ravenna, OH
Sand Creek Disposal Road Landfill (RVAAP-34)
Open Demolition Area #1 (RVAAP-03)
Suspected Mustard Agent Burial Site (RVAAP-28)
Winklepeck Burning Grounds (RVAAP-05)
Order for Supplies (22 Sep 08)
SOW for Environmental Services (26 Aug 08)
IGE (29 Aug 08)
Price Negotiation Memorandum (19 Sep 08)
This project is to perform RI activities for the Sand Creek
Disposal Road Landfill. RI activities include sampling surface
water, surface soils, sub-surface soils, and sediments. The
deliverable is an RI report for this site. This project will also
prepare FS Reports, Proposed Plans, and Records of Decision for
the Sand Creek, Open Demolition, and Suspected Mustard sites.
Additional characterization work to be performed includes
geophysical investigations of these three sites without intrusive
activities. The deliverable is a Geophysical Investigation Report.
Other activities for this project are to put up new signs at the
Open Demolition site and to provide support to the client for
meetings with the Restoration Advisory Board.
$1,600,429
1. Restoration Advisory Board
2. MEC Site Characterization & Removal
3. Remedial Investigation
4. Administrative Land Use Controls
5. Feasibility Study
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 146 of 210
USACE-LRL-15
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Various FUDS
Nike CL-11: OH9799F3653; Nike CL-13: OH9799F3654; Nike CL34: OH9799F3655; Nike CL-67: OH9799F3658; Nike CL-69:
OH9799F3651; Nike CD-46: OH9799F3649
Six Former Nike Sites Preliminary Assessments
2007
W912QR-04-D-0044 DO 0011
FUDS
Ohio, Various
Nike CL-11; Nike CL-13; Nike CL-34; Nike CL-67; Nike CL-69;
Nike CD-46
SOW (21 May 07)
Revised Basis of Proposal (24 May 07)
Preliminary assessments of six former Nike Missile Sites.
Includes Property Visit, interviews, photo interpretation, records
search via telephone Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)
requests, visits to local Ohio based agencies in three counties,
and visits to two National Archive offices (Chicago and
Washington DC), an Air Force Historical Archive, Maxwell AFB,
AL, and the Military History Inst., Carlisle Barracks, PA.
$550,680
1. Preliminary Assessment
2. Remedial Investigation
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 147 of 210
USACE-LRL-16
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Former Kincheloe Air Force Base
MI59799F226000
Remedial Action at Fuel Storage Area (FS01)
2005
DACW27-97-D-0015 DO 4009 Mod 07
FUDS
Kinross Township, MI
Fuel Storage Area (FS01)
Underground Storage Tank 10 (US10)
Modification of Contract (29 Jun 05)
Cost Proposal (7 Jun 05)
This project is to prepare an RI report using available data
obtained from previous studies. No additional RI will be done,
such as characterization activities. The deliverable is an RI
report for this site. This project will also prepare an FS Report,
Proposed Plan, and Decision Document for these two sites of
concern.
$275,635
1. Remedial Investigation
2. Feasibility Study
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 148 of 210
USACE-NAB-02
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Fort Drum
NY221402028100
2007 Basewide Sampling, Analysis, and Reporting
2008
W912DR-05-D-0004 DO 0003 Mod 05
IRP
Fort Drum, NY
Basewide
Award Document (29 Aug 07)
SOW (26 Jun 06)
Contractor Proposal (12 Jul 07)
IGE (12 Jul 07)
Project Description: This project will include the development of Work Plans
(Monitoring Plans, Quality and Assurance Program Plan, a
Corrective Measures Study Work Plan and a Final Work Plan for
Groundwater Sampling). Groundwater and Surface water
sampling events will take place in Fall 2007 and Spring 2008.
Each sampling event will be followed by consolidated
monitoring reports. Eight wells will be decommissioned upon
completion of the groundwater and surface water sampling.
Total Project Cost:
$341,779
RACER
1. Monitoring
Technologies Used: 2. Site Close-Out Documentation
3. Well Abandonment
4. Residual Waste Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 149 of 210
USACE-NAB-03
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Fort Drum
NY221402028100
Basewide Sampling and Analysis
2006
W912DR-05-D-0004 DO 0003 Mod 04
IRP
Fort Drum, NY
Gasoline Alley Area 1295
Award Document (20 Sep 05)
SOW (17 Aug 05)
Contractor Proposal (19 Aug 05)
Price Negotiation Memorandum (20 Sep 05)
Contracting Action Report (30 Jun 07)
IGE (19 Aug 05)
Project Description: This project encompasses collection of five groundwater samples
from the Gasoline Alley Area 1295. The samples are to be
collected via direct push rig, and samples analyzed for benzene,
toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) only. Field water
quality measurements for DO, ORP, pH, and turbidity also will
be collected via water quality meter. The project will require a
technical report presenting sampling results, evaluating nature
and extent of contamination, and discussing data evaluation.
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
No work plan is required, as existing plans will be used.
However, a permit, Health and Safety Plan update, and
drawings showing proposed locations will be required.
$29,326
1. Monitoring
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 150 of 210
USACE-NAB-04
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Fort Eustis
VA321372032100
2005 Long Term Monitoring Program
2005
W912DR-05-D-0004 DO 0005
IRP
Fort Eustis, VA
Oil/Sludge Holding Pond Site
Award Document (18 Apr 05)
SOW (12 Jan 05)
Contractor Proposal (26 Jan 05)
Price Negotiation Memorandum (18 Apr 05)
IGE (14 Jan 05)
Project Description: This project is to perform long-term monitoring in 2005. Tasks
include preparing a Sampling & Analysis plan, obtaining
groundwater samples from four existing monitoring wells, and
analyzing the samples. The deliverable is a sampling report for
this site.
Total Project Cost:
$23,972
RACER
1. Monitoring
Technologies Used:
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 151 of 210
USACE-NAB-05
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Fort Eustis
VA321372032100
Incinerator Ash Assessment
2005
W912DR-05-D-0004 DO 0011
IRP
Fort Eustis, VA
Building 801 Area
Award Document (7 Jun 05)
SOW (11 Apr 05)
Contractor Proposal (19 Apr 05)
Price Negotiation Memorandum (7 Jun 05)
IGE (15 Apr 05)
Project Closeout (13 Nov 06)
Project Description: Conduct an assessment of the incinerator ash and surrounding
soils in accordance with EPA Region III and Virginia Department
of Environmental Quality (VDEQ) criteria. Collect continuous
split spoon soil samples from 12 borings using direct push
method, analyze for pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls
(PCBs), and Target Analyte List (TAL) metals, and prepare and
assessment report.
Total Project Cost:
$27,420
RACER
1. Site Inspection
Technologies Used:
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 152 of 210
USACE-NAB-08
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Fort Belvoir
VA321022008200
CAP Implementation at Building 1197 and Continued CAP
Implementation at Nine Sites
Project Date:
2006
Contract Number:
W912DR-06-D-0003 DO 0001
Funding Source:
IRP
Project Location:
Fort Belvoir, VA
Site(s):
Building 1197
Nine petroleum-contaminated sites:
Building 305
Building 1124
Building 2217
Building 247
Building324
Building 1199
Building 2444
Building 3161
Building 1138
Documents
Award Document (6 Mar 06)
Collected:
SOW (20 Feb 06)
Contractor Proposal (21 Feb 06)
IGE (21 Feb 06)
Project Description: This project is to implement the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) at
Building 1197 and to continue CAP activities at the other nine
sites. CAP implementation at Building 1197 includes installation
of a Soil Vapor Extraction (SVE) system, preparation of O&M
manuals, start-up, and O&M. CAP activities at the other sites
include continued O&M, sampling, decommissioning, and
well/subsurface line abandonment. The deliverables are
quarterly O&M reports and decommissioning letter reports.
Total Project Cost:
$445,886
RACER
1. Trenching/Piping
Technologies Used: 2. Load and Haul
3. Soil Vapor Extraction
4. Professional Labor Management
5. Operations and Maintenance
6. Monitoring
7. Well Abandonment
8. Site Close-Out Documentation
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 153 of 210
USACE-NAB-09
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Letterkenny Army Depot
PA321382050300
Well Abandonment
2007
W912DR-05-D-0026 DO 0023
Unknown
Chambersburg, PA
Letterkenny Army Depot (LEAD), Ammunition Area (AA),
Property Disposal Office (PDO) Area, and Southeast (SE) Area
Monitoring Well Abandonment.
Documents
Official Contract Record Checklist (6 Sep 07)
Collected:
Award Document (5 Sep 07)
Pre-Negotiation Objective Memorandum (including IGE) (Apr
07)
Contractor Proposal (4 Apr 07)
SOW (including PA Monitoring Well Guidance) (5 Jul 07)
Signed Final Invoice and Payment (15 Aug 08)
Project Description: Abandon 18 wells in three areas of LEAD according to
Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP)
Guidelines, prepare a PADEP well abandonment form for each
well abandoned, produce one well abandonment map, and
dispose of all waste generated by well abandonment activities.
Total Project Cost:
$67,448
RACER
1. Well Abandonment
Technologies Used: 2. Site Close-Out Documentation
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 154 of 210
USACE-NAB-10
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Camp Kilmer
Biennial Inspections/Certification for Land-Use Controls
2007
W912DR-05-D-0026 DO 0028
Unknown
Camp Kilmer, Edison Township, NJ
Basewide
Official Contract Record Checklist (17 Dec 07)
Award Document (14 Dec 07)
SOW (11 Dec 07)
Pre-negotiation Objective Memorandum (including IGE) (4 Oct
07)
Contractor Proposal (16 Oct 07)
Project Description: Provide Biennial Inspection/Certification for Land Use Controls
(LUCs), at Camp Kilmer. Total project cost of $15,362.00 includes
Option Year 1 to Provide Biennial Inspection/Certification for
LUCs at $15,900.00 for a total of $31,262.00.
Total Project Cost:
$31,262
RACER
1. Administrative Land Use Controls
Technologies Used:
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 155 of 210
USACE-NAB-11
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Fort Monmouth
NJ221382059700
GW and Surface Water Monitoring
2007
W912DR-05-D-0026 DO 0021
BRAC
Fort Monmouth, NJ
Evans Area
Award Document (10 Aug 07)
SOW (10 July 07)
Price Negotiation Memorandum (Aug 07)
Pre-Negotiation Objective Memorandum(1 Aug 07)
Contractor Proposal (6 Aug 07)
Project Description: This project is to perform long-term monitoring in 2007. Tasks
include obtaining groundwater samples from 13 GW monitoring
wells and five surface water samples from predetermined
locations along Laurel Gulley Brook, and analyzing the samples.
In addition, a composite soil sample will be taken from a soil pile
for characterization. The deliverables are an annual sampling
report for the water samples and a letter report for the soil
sample.
Total Project Cost:
$36,590
RACER
1. Monitoring
Technologies Used:
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 156 of 210
USACE-NAB-12
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Letterkenny Army Depot
PA321382050300
LEAD IWWS Building 37 Bypass Pumping
2007
W912DR-05-D-0026 DO 0020
IRP
Chambersburg, PA
Building 37
Official Contract Record Checklist (4 May 07)
Award Document (2 May 07)
SOW (13 Apr 07)
Pre-Negotiation Objective Memorandum (Including IGE) (Apr
07)
Contractor Proposal (20 Apr 07)
Project Description: This project is to transport wastewater from Building 37 storage
tanks to Lift Station 1 via tanker truck for a three-month period.
Other tasks include performing wastewater sampling at two lift
stations and preparing a letter report summarizing results. The
scope also includes cleanout of five 21,000-gallon temporary
storage tanks and a wet well. Waste materials will be placed in
containers provided by the Army. Scope does not include offsite disposal.
Total Project Cost:
$411,343
RACER
1. Transportation
Technologies Used: 2. Monitoring
3. Professional Labor Management
4. Underground Storage Tank Closure / Removal
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 157 of 210
USACE-NAB-16
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
U.S. Army Garrison Fort Hamilton
NY221402039500
O&M of Multi Phase Extraction System
2007
W912DR-05-D-0026
Unknown
Brooklyn, NY
AAFES Station (Bldg. 200)
IGE (7 Aug 08)
Order for Supplies (2 Sep 08)
SOW (7 Aug 08)
Purchase Request (22 Aug 08)
Request for Proposal (RFP) (1 Aug 08)
Scope of Services (7 Aug 08)
Remedial Action Work Plan (RAWP) (Final) (Dec 07)
Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) (Oct 07)
Final Health and Safety Plan (HASP) (Dec 07)
Final Field Sampling Plan (FSP) (Nov 07)
Project Description: This project is to perform Operation and Maintenance (O&M) of
a multi-phase extraction system at Army & Air Force Exchange
Service (AAFES) Station (Bldg. 200). Tasks include O&M,
monitoring, sampling, and reporting for a period of nine months.
The deliverables are three quarterly reports.
Total Project Cost:
$143,502
RACER
1. Operations and Maintenance
Technologies Used: 2. Monitoring
3. Residual Waste Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 158 of 210
USACE-NAB-17
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Frankford Arsenal
PA39799F144700
Hazardous, Toxic, and Radioactive Waste Interim Removal
Action
Project Date:
2008
Contract Number:
W912DR-07-D-0038 DO 0002
Funding Source:
FUDS
Project Location:
Frankford, PA
Site(s):
Area I
Documents
Contract (25 Sep 08)
Collected:
SOW (4 Aug 08)
IGE (15 Aug 08)
Contractor Approach and Proposal (29 Aug 08)
Project Description: Excavations, UST Removals, and off-site transportation and
disposal of residual wastes.
Total Project Cost:
$1,108,734
RACER
1. Excavation
Technologies Used: 2. Site Close-Out Documentation
3. Feasibility Study
4. Decontamination Facilities
5. Professional Labor Management
6. Residual Waste Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 159 of 210
USACE-NAB-18
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Tobyhanna Army Depot
PA321382089200
Install Nine Monitoring Wells
2005
W912DR-05-D-0022 DO 0002
Unknown
Tobyhanna, PA
Building 21
Building 300
Wherry Housing Area #1
Documents
Contract (11 May 05)
Collected:
SOW (11 May 05)
Contractor approach and Proposal (4 April 05)
Project Description: This estimate is for the installation of nine monitoring wells at
three former UST sites. The wells were installed via sonic
drilling methods. Subsequent quarterly GW monitoring was
conducted on the newly installed wells for one year after the
wells were completed.
Total Project Cost:
$142,693
RACER
1. Groundwater Monitoring Well
Technologies Used: 2. Monitoring
3. Professional Labor Management
4. Residual Waste Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 160 of 210
USACE-NAB-19
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
DDSP New Cumberland
PA397152064200
Remedial Investigation- DDSP
2005
W912DR-05-D-0022 DO 0007
Unknown
New Cumberland, PA
Aircraft Maintenance Shop Closure Site (AMSCS)
Contract (30 Jun 05)
SOW (2 Jun 05)
Contractor approach and Proposal (13 Jun 05)
Project Description: This project covers the labor, materials, and equipment necessary
to abandon six residential monitoring wells. A final report
(letter) will be prepared, for each well, that documents that
activities conducted at each residence. For three of the six wells,
a geophysical survey will be performed on a 50'x50' area to
determine exact location and estimate size and depth of wells.
Total Project Cost:
$39,467
RACER
1. Well Abandonment
Technologies Used: 2. Site Close-Out Documentation
3. Remedial Investigation
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 161 of 210
USACE-NAB-23
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Fort Drum
NY221402028100
Remedial Design and Remedial Action, Soil Vapor Extraction,
Aquifer Air Sparging, and World War II Landfill Limited
Excavation
Project Date:
2007
Contract Number:
DACA31-01-D-0031 DO 0007
Funding Source:
Unknown
Project Location:
Fort Drum, NY
Site(s):
Area 1795, Gasoline Alley
Documents
SOW (21 Jul 06)
Collected:
Contractor Proposal (17 Aug 06)
Award Document (22 Sept 06)
Project Description: This project encompasses excavation of 1200 cubic yards (CY) of
debris from a Word War II (WWII) era landfill and transporting
the waste debris for disposal as nonhazardous waste at another
facility. Also included is a surface soil sampling event prior to
excavation activities to determine extent of contamination, clear
and grub of two acres to allow for site access, and postexcavation confirmatory sampling. According to the WWII
Landfill Excavation Option of the proposal, no backfilling will
occur.
Total Project Cost:
$225,427
RACER
1. Excavation
Technologies Used: 2. Clear and Grub
3. Professional Labor Management
4. Residual Waste Management
5. Monitoring
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 162 of 210
USACE-SAS-01
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Fort Bragg
NC421402032800
Wastewater Treatment Plant Pollution Prevention Biosolids
Recycling Project
2007
W912HN-05-D-0031 DO 0004
IRP
Fort Bragg, NC
Operable Unit (OU) 7 (Wastewater Treatment Plant Sludge
Drying Beds – Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 50)
IGE (25 Sep 06)
Contractor's Proposal (26 Sep 06)
SOW (28 Sep 06)
Revised Contractor's Proposal (28 Sep 06)
Price Negotiation Memorandum (28 Sep 06)
Award (29 Sep 06)
This project is to remove and dispose of approximately 9,800 yd3
(13,720 tons) of Class A treated sludge from the sludge drying
bed area located at OU7 (Wastewater Treatment Plant Sludge
Drying Beds – SWMU 50) in Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The
deliverable is a brief addendum to the Construction Completion
Report detailing all work performed and total volume of treated
sludge removed.
$518,815
1. Off-site Transportation and Waste Disposal
2. Professional Labor Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 163 of 210
USACE-SAS-02
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Fort Bragg
NC421402032800
FY08 Heating Oil Tank Removals/Replacements, Building E3556
2008
W912HN-07-D-0011 DO 0010
Unknown
Fort Bragg, NC
Various
SOW (17 Aug 07)
Contractor’s Proposal (21 Sep 07)
Price Negotiation Memorandum (21 Sep 07)
Award (30 Sep 07)
Draft Site Safety and Health Plan (Nov 07)
Final Tank Closure Assessment Report (9 Jul 08)
Final Work Plan (Jan 08)
Final Payment/invoice screen (8 Dec 08)
The project objectives are to remove 26 USTs, collect
confirmatory samples, provide closure reports, and install 18
replacement Aboveground Storage Tanks (ASTs).
$579,699
1. Underground Storage Tank Closure/Removal
2. Professional Labor Management
3. Residual Waste Management
4. Storage Tank Installation
5. Monitoring
6. Fencing
7. Site Close-out Documentation
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 164 of 210
USACE-SAS-04
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Former McCoy AFB
FL49799F453600
Pilot Scale Alternatives Assessment and Implementation Plan for
Groundwater VOC/SVOC Reduction at Fire Fighter Training
Area
2005, 2006
F41624-03-D-8607 DO CV01
FUDS
Orlando, FL
Fire Fighter Training Area
Final Revised SOW (Mar 04)
IGE (23 Mar 04)
Contractor's Proposal (26 Mar 04)
Award (30 Mar 04)
Final Work Plan Addendum (Sep 04)
Draft Final Pilot Test Plan (Mar 05)
This project is to install seven groundwater monitoring wells to
define the source area and monitor the selected remedial action.
Groundwater samples will be collected from 15 groundwater
monitoring wells and analyzed for a baseline assessment during
the pilot-scale test. Other scope includes preparing a Pilot Test
Plan that includes Remedial Alternatives evaluation, proposed
remedial alternative, proposed pilot test design, and required
monitoring. The scope will also implement the pilot test and
perform the required monitoring. The deliverable is a report
that recommends the remedial action with a 35% construction
cost.
$369,300
1. Remedial Investigation
2. Groundwater Monitoring Well
3. Monitoring
4. Feasibility Study
5. In Situ Biodegradation
6. Residual Waste Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 165 of 210
USACE-SAS-06
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Former Edenton Naval Auxiliary Air Station
NC49799F483300
Monitored Natural Attenuation at Former Edenton Naval
Auxiliary Air Station Fuel Storage Complex
2005
W912HN-04-D-0005 DO0005
FUDS
Chowan County, NC
Fuel Storage Complex
Performance Work Statement (14 Feb 05)
IGE (20 Mar 05)
Award (30 Mar 05)
Modification of Contract (6 May 05)
Contractor’s Proposal (8 Jun 06)
This project is to install 29 groundwater monitoring wells to
monitor the selected remedial action and natural attenuation. A
baseline monitoring of 31 wells will be conducted after
installation of the wells. Other scope includes performing four
Oxygen Release Compound (ORC) injections using a geoprobe
over a two-year period (4 events). Groundwater sampling will
occur on 14 wells approximately 30 days after ORC injections. If
successful, the scope includes well abandonment. The
deliverables are progress reports after each injection event.
$898,355
1. Remedial Investigation
2. Groundwater Monitoring Well
3. Monitoring
4. In Situ Biodegradation
5. Well Abandonment
6. Professional Labor Management
7. Site Close-Out Documentation
8. Residual Waste Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 166 of 210
USACE-SAS-07
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Fort McPherson
GA421402056500
Buildings #105 and #143 Investigation
2008
W912HN-08-D-0018 DO0001
IRP
Fort McPherson, GA
Buildings #105 and #143
SOW (May 08)
Award (19 Jun 08)
Price Negotiation Memorandum(13 Jun 08)
Contractor's Proposal (10 Jun 08)
Install four groundwater monitoring wells; dispose of soil
cuttings. Collect groundwater samples from 18 groundwater
monitoring wells in two areas and analyze for BTEX. Prepare
one letter report summarizing groundwater sampling results at
each area (two total reports); attend one meeting to discuss
groundwater sampling results at each area. Prepare Accident
Prevention Plan, Site Specific Health and Safety Plan, Field
Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP), and combined Work Plan.
$32,529
1. Monitoring
2. Groundwater Monitoring Well
3. Professional Labor Management
4. Residual Waste Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 167 of 210
USACE-SAS-08
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Fort Bragg
NC421402032800
FY09 Heating Oil Tank Removals/Replacements
2009
W912HN-08-D-0018 DO 0006
IRP
Fort Bragg, NC
Various tanks
SOW (26 Sep 08) (including App E, List of Tanks)
Contractor’s Proposal (29 Sep 08)
Award (30 Sep 08)
The project objectives are to remove 34 USTs, collect
confirmatory samples, provide closure reports, and install 15
replacement ASTs. Due to a lack of detail in the project
documentation, only three of the tasks were estimated. Those
tasks include Task 2 (Work Plan), Task 4 (Reports), and Task 6
(Well Abandonment).
72,011
1. Well Abandonment
2. Site Close-Out Documentation
3. Remedial Investigation
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 168 of 210
USACE-SAS-10
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Hunter Army Airfield
GA421402273300
Soil Remediation and FY08 Groundwater Monitoring at Former
Pumphouse #2
2008
W912HN-07-D-0012 DO 0007
Unknown
Savannah, GA
Former Pumphouse #2 (Facility ID #9-025086; near Former
Building 8065)
SOW (Oct 07)
Contractor's Proposal (Nov 07)
Award (Jan 08)
Corrective Action Plan (Jan 09)
For the Former Pumphouse #2 Site at Hunter Army Airfield,
GA, this project consists of preparation of a Work Plan and
Accident Prevention Plan, excavation of 3,334 ft2 of
contaminated soils to a depth of 14 feet, removal and
replacement of four groundwater monitoring wells, semi-annual
groundwater sampling, preparation of a Corrective Action Plan
Part B Addendum Report, and preparation of semi-annual
project progress reports.
$250,250
1. Well Abandonment
2. Residual Waste Management
3. Professional Labor Management
4. Groundwater Monitoring Well
5. Excavation
6. Monitoring
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 169 of 210
USACE-SAS-11
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Fort Benning
GA421372101800
Installation Gas Station, Building 3763, UST Monitoring CAP
Part B Compliance
2006
DACA21-02-D-0004 DO 0068
Unknown
Fort Benning, GA
Bldg 3763 UST
Revised SOW (Jun 06)
Contractor’s Proposal (8 Jun 06)
Award (20 Jun 06)
This project is to install three permanent injection wells for an InSitu Chemical Oxidation (ISCO) pilot study and perform ISCO
treatment. The existing Corrective Action Plan (CAP) will be
amended along with the Health and Safety Plan.
$67,114
1. In Situ Biodegradation
2. Professional Labor Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 170 of 210
USACE-SAS-12
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Former Turner AFB
GA49799F474900
Amend Corrective Action Plan and Initiate Monitored Natural
Attenuation at Site B and Initiate Long Term Monitoring at Site
A11J
2008
W912HN-05-D-0015 DO 0018
Unknown
Albany, GA
Site B and Site A11J
SOW (8 May 08)
Contractor's Proposal (13 Jun 08)
Award (19 Jun 08)
Final Payment Invoice (25 Jun 08)
This project entails work to be performed at two sites at the
Former Turner AFB. Objectives for Site B are to revise CAP,
implement monitored natural attenuation, and submit
monitoring reports for each monitoring event. Objectives for
Site A11J are to place free product removal devices in existing
wells, prepare and submit draft and final long term monitoring
plans, initiate long term monitoring for a two-year period, and
submit monitoring reports for each monitoring event.
$237,280
1. Residual Waste Management
2. Monitoring
3. Feasibility Study
4. Remedial Investigation
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 171 of 210
USACE-SAS-13
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Former Turner AFB
GA49799F474900
Complete Remedial Action Site B
2004
DACA21-03-D-0009 DO 0002
FUDS
Albany, GA
Site B
Site B Sampling Matrix (6 Jun 03)
Revised SOW (24 Jun 03); Modification 01 to Contract (23 Jun
06); Modification 02 of Contract (5 Mar 08)
Contractor’s Proposal (24 Jun 03)
IGE (24 Jun 03)
Price Negotiation Memorandum (24 Jun 03)
Award (30 Jun 03)
Final Project Management Plan (Dec 04)
Pre-Negotiation Objective/Price Negotiation Memorandum (25
Oct 07)
Final Release of Lien/Contractor’s Certification of Invoice (3 Mar
08)
This project is to perform a Preliminary Investigation (PI) to
define the limits of contamination to the south and southeast of
the site by installing four shallow and four intermediate wells,
and performing sampling and analysis. Results of the PI and
recommendation for installation and operation of a remedial
action will be provided in a CAP Part B Addendum. The
Remedial Action is installing a Dual-Phase Vacuum Extraction
(DPE) system. Implementation consists of installing 12 recovery
wells to address the source area free product, smear zone and
groundwater contamination. O&M requires operating the
system for 12 months and performing vapor, soil, and
groundwater sampling and analyses. Deliverable is a Corrective
Action Report.
$672,718
1. Remedial Investigation
2. Groundwater Monitoring Well
3. Special Well Drilling & Installation
4. Residual Waste Management
5. Bioslurping
6. Fencing
7. Professional Labor Management
8. Operations and Maintenance
9. Monitoring
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 172 of 210
USACE-SAS-14
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Fort Jackson
SC4210028QG100
Interim Corrective Action Free Product Removal, Bldg 4120,
AAFES Gas Station
2008
W912HN-07-D-0018 DO 0006
Unknown
Fort Jackson, SC
Bldg 4120 (AAFES Gas Station)
Scope of Services (26 Sep 07)
Award (29 Sep 07)
Contractor's Proposal (29 Sep 07)
Draft Work Plan (23 Jun 08)
Final Payment Invoice (undated)
This project is to install eight shallow wells (20 ft bgs) and four
deep wells (45 ft bgs) in order to conduct surfactant vacuum
pilot tests. Scope involves preparation of a work plan that
includes a Site Safety and Health Plan (SSHP). Options (1-2)
include performing 2 surfactant vacuum capture events on both
shallow and deep wells. Other tasks include sampling and
analyzing soil samples from each well installation. The
deliverable is the Corrective Action Summary Report detailing
all field activities.
$81,413
1. Special Well Drilling & Installation
2. Monitoring
3. Residual Waste Management
4. Professional Labor Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 173 of 210
USACE-SAS-16
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Former Bushnell AAF
FL49799F436400
Baseline/Composite Sampling of all Onsite Wells for Two
Events
2008
W912HN-05-D-0015 DO 0004
IRP
Bushnell, FL
East Pumping Station study area
Final Supplemental Contamination Assessment Report (Jun 00)
IGE (24 Sep 07)
SOW (May 08)
Contractor’s Proposal (28 Jun 08)
Award (30 Jun 08)
The Scope of Work consists of groundwater monitoring at all
wells on site for two events during a hydrologic year (once
during the summer and once during the winter). A total of 40
wells will be sampled for Fuels, TPH, and PAH. Offsite disposal
of nonhazardous Investigative-Derived Waste (IDW) will be at a
licensed disposal facility.
$101,276
1. Monitoring
2. Residual Waste Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 174 of 210
USACE-SAS-17
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Fort Bragg
NC421402032800
Investigate Soil Contamination
2008
W912HN-07-D-0018 DO 0017
IRP
Fort Bragg, NC
Special Operations Shoot House
SOW (29 Jul 08)
Contractor's Proposal (22 Aug 08)
Price Negotiation Objective Memorandum (22 Aug 08)
Award (28 Aug 08)
The project objective is to conduct an investigation and prepare
an assessment report. Tasks to be performed are: prepare a
Work Plan, SSHP, and Accident Prevention Plan; perform a field
investigation of a 30 ft x 50 ft contaminated area, including
collection of 50 soil samples and one groundwater sample;
excavate, remove and dispose of contaminated soils to a depth of
2 ft, including collection of 15 confirmatory soil samples; backfill,
compaction, and seeding of excavated area; prepare an
Assessment Report and a Remedial Action Report.
$77,879
1. Residual Waste Management
2. Monitoring
3. Groundwater Monitoring Well
4. Excavation
5. Professional Labor Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 175 of 210
USACE-SAS-18
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Fort Benning
GA421372101800
Corrective Action Design and Implementation
2008
W912HN-07-D-0018 DO 0016
IRP
Fort Benning, GA
SWMU FBSB-100 (Running Track)
SOW (Jul 08)
Contractor’s Proposal (22 Aug 08)
Price Negotiation Objective Memorandum (22 Aug 08)
Award (28 Aug 08)
This project is to inject Regenesis 3-D to the subsurface using an
injection grid around two monitoring wells. Tasks include site
visits and preparation of a work plan. The work plan is to
specify the injection system and will include SSHP, Quality
Assurance Plan, and SAP. Monthly progress reports are
required. Injection of Regenesis 3-D is to occur through 140
injection points located on 15-foot centers in a 200-ft wide by
150-ft long grid. Another task includes updating the
Community Relations Plan. This project will also conduct a
second injection around 2 other groundwater monitoring wells
through two 50 x 50 grid with 25 injection points (50 injection
points in total). Monitoring consists of a baseline sampling from
all required wells and the data is to be provided in the first
Quarterly CAP Progress Report. Additional sampling involves
two semiannual sampling events from 10 monitoring wells. A
CAP Progress Report is to be provided after each sampling
event. IDW disposal is also included in this project.
$348,121
1. Remedial Investigation
2. In Situ Biodegradation
3. Monitoring
4. Residual Waste Management
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 176 of 210
USACE-SAS-19
Installation Name:
FFID:
Project Name:
Project Date:
Contract Number:
Funding Source:
Project Location:
Site(s):
Documents
Collected:
Project Description:
Total Project Cost:
RACER
Technologies Used:
Fort Bragg
NC421402032800
Free Product Removal
2008
W912HN-07-D-0011 DO 0009
Unknown
Fort Bragg, NC
Simmons Army Airfield, Former Airport Hydrant System
SOW (15 Aug 07)
Contractor's Proposal (21 Sep 07)
Award (29 Sep 07)
This project is to perform free product removal from two sixinch and three four-inch wells located at Fort Bragg. Free
product removal will be done monthly using a vacuum truck.
Another task is to prepare a work plan containing an Accident
Prevention Plan and Site Safety and Health Plan. The contractor
is also responsible for disposal of the removed water/free
product. The deliverable for this project is a Remedial Action
Report along with a Waste Closeout Report at the completion of
the project.
$134,926
1. Operations and Maintenance
2. Site Close-Out Documentation
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 177 of 210
Appendix D – Cumulative List of RACER Observations
RACER
Technology
Site Visit
Location
Project
Observation
Suggested Solution
Bioventing
Alaska
POA-23
RACER does not provide for
addition of more than one
horizontal trench per blower.
Provide options to
select number of
trenches per blower.
Decontamination
Facilities
Louisville
LRL-09
The conditions of use of
Decontamination Facilities
module should be more
clearly spelled out in the Help
Topic. For example, are
decontamination costs
typically included in labor
hour calculations for tasks
like in the Well Abandonment
technology? It is not clear.
Revise Help Topic for
Decontamination
Facilities.
Demolition,
Underground Pipes
Fort Worth
SWF-01
No shoring option;
technology uses old Load and
Haul-type inputs for waste
disposal
Insert shoring options
similar to excavation
technology; revise load
and haul screens to
more closely parallel
off-site T&D.
Excavation
Alaska
POA-06
The backfill hauling distance
is limited to 20 miles.
RACER should allow
longer distances
especially for remote
sites.
Excavation
Alaska
POA-06
This project involved
transport of workers and
material to and from the site
via helicopter. There are no
options available for selecting
different modes of
transporting excavated
materials or fill. Trucks are
assumed.
RACER could provide
a "remote" option.
When selected, other
options or combinations
of options would be
presented for selection
(similar to the list
provided under
Residual Waste
Management but
revised for helicopter
usage).
Excavation
Alaska
POA-06
There are no options for
selecting method of
excavation.
RACER could provide
options of excavation:
default, hand, and
others.
Excavation
Fort Worth
SWF-01
Cannot account for surveying
requirements
Need Surveying in
excavation technology
Excavation
Fort Worth
SWF-01
Cannot account for travel
requirements/per diem
Have per diem option in
technology.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 178 of 210
RACER
Technology
Site Visit
Location
Project
Observation
Suggested Solution
Excavation
Kansas City
NWK-23
Excavation sometimes brings
up 22 CY Scraper by BCY
assembly. Is this most
appropriate for a 5 ft
excavation?
Reevaluate assemblies
for construction
equipment to dig
excavation to ensure
most appropriate.
Feasibility Study
Alaska
POA-23
RACER only provides a
default cost for bench-scale
and pilot-scale treatability
studies (TS) without
modifiers that could increase
or decrease the default costs.
It might be more accurate not
to use the TS option but to
cost out all TS tasks
individually using applicable
technologies.
Develop cost modifiers
that the user can select
so that RACER derives
a cost. Most preferably,
the selection would be
based on type of
technology to be
evaluated such as
bioventing, chemical
injections, and others.
The technologies
should be those
commonly seen in the
field.
Feasibility Study
Louisville
LRL-16
There is no option for
additional meetings; also the
Help Topic does not indicate
if the cost accounts for
internal technical reviews of
deliverables.
The technology could
be amended by adding a
secondary requirement
for meetings and
distances to the
meeting. The estimator
would input the number
of meetings, distance,
airfare, and number of
persons. RACER
would calculate per
diem, labor, and other
travel costs using the
inputs. The Help Topic
should be amended to
indicate whether
internal technical
reviews are accounted
for.
Groundwater
Monitoring Well
Alaska
POA-03a
GW Monitoring Well
technology (for well
installation) does not account
for creation of a well
installation report.
Revise technology to
include option drafting
a well installation
report.
Groundwater
Monitoring Well
Alaska
POA-03a
POA-19
GW Monitoring Well
technology (for well
installation) does not account
for well development.
Revise technology to
include option for
developing wells.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 179 of 210
RACER
Technology
Site Visit
Location
Project
Observation
Suggested Solution
Groundwater
Monitoring Well
Alaska
POA-19
GW Monitoring Well
technology does not provide
drums for drill cuttings; then
in the Residual Waste
Management technology, the
only option is “use existing
containers.” The user has to
manually add in cost of
drums.
Revise GWM
technology to properly
include cost of drums
for containerizing drill
cuttings.
Groundwater
Monitoring Well
Fort Worth
SWF-12
No option to deselect surface
pad installation when
installing a well - many wells
do not have surface pads
Revise technology to
make surface pads an
option.
Groundwater
Monitoring Well
Louisville
LRL-04
Installation of a well with a
direct push rig is not provided
by RACER. In many cases, a
well is completed using a
direct push rig after a bore is
taken for sampling soils.
Direct push could be
added to the list of
drilling methods.
Groundwater
Monitoring Well
Alaska
POA-22
POA-24
There are no technologies to
add surveying crews when
installing wells. Surveying
cannot be added in Scenarios
1 and 2; it requires addition of
assemblies.
Consider a separate
technology for
conducting surveys, or
incorporating surveys
as secondary
parameters in key
technologies.
In-Situ
Biodegradation
Savannah
SAS-11
SAS-18
RACER does not provide
costs for peroxide or other
chemicals used in ISCO
treatments.
An extensive list of
chemicals should be
provided as options.
In-Situ
Biodegradation
Savannah
SAS-11
The In-Situ Biodegradation
technology does not provide
options of using injection
without well development,
i.e., when injection wells are
already available. If selected
for well installation, then
technology should provide
option to select well
diameters, materials of
construction, and other well
information.
The In-Situ
Biodegradation
technology should
provide options of
using injection without
well development. If
selected for well
installation, then
technology should
provide option to select
well diameters,
materials of
construction, and other
well information.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 180 of 210
RACER
Technology
Site Visit
Location
Project
Observation
Suggested Solution
MEC Site
Characterization &
Removal
Assessment
Louisville
LRL-06
When this technology is used
to cost the geophysical
surveys alone (without reports
or other field activities),
results were observed which
were much higher than
historical contractor's costs.
Review and revise the
technology as
necessary; one option is
to have a mini-model
for geophysical surveys
at MEC sites.
Monitoring
Alaska
POA-02
RACER does not provide
ability to just measure for
depth to water.
Revise Monitoring
technology to include
option for measuring
depth to water.
Monitoring
Alaska
POA-02
RACER does not include
assemblies for RRO/DRO,.
Also, available assembly
costs for laboratory analyses
are much greater than
(approximately twice) actual
cost. For BTEX - RACER
cost: $247, actual cost: $132.
For PAHs - RACER cost:
$540, actual cost: $224.
Add DRO and GRO as
analyses; review and
revise other analysis
costs as necessary.
Monitoring
Alaska
POA-03a
RACER does not have an
assembly for rental of
oil/water interface probe.
Revise assembly cost
database to include an
assembly for rental of
oil/water interface
probe.
Monitoring
Alaska
POA-03b
POS-19
RACER does not include
assemblies for RRO/DRO,
Alaska methods. Also,
available assembly costs for
laboratory analyses are much
greater (approximately twice)
than actual cost. DRO/RRO
(AK methods not available in
RACER so substitute TPH) RACER cost: $243, actual
cost: $95. PAHs - RACER
cost: $540, actual cost: $185.
The user has to approximate
using TPH.
Add DRO and GRO as
analyses; review and
revise other analysis
costs as necessary.
Monitoring
Alaska
POA-03b
RACER does not provide
ability to measure for depth to
water or presence of free
product. This is required
oftentimes at wells that are
not otherwise sampled, and
there is not way to account for
that effort.
Revise Monitoring
technology to include
option for measuring
depth to water and
measuring presence of
free product.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 181 of 210
RACER
Technology
Site Visit
Location
Project
Observation
Suggested Solution
Monitoring
Alaska
POA-03b
The LOE (labor) for the
Comprehensive Reporting
option seems incorrect. For
this project, selecting
Abbreviated Report provides
29 total hours in the Data
Management Element;
selecting Standard Report
provides 40 total hours in the
Data Management Element;
selecting Comprehensive
provides 371 total hrs LOE in
the Data Management
Element. The jump from 40
to 371 seems unrealistically
high and was a major
contributor to the cost
differential on this project.
Review and revise
technology accordingly.
Monitoring
Alaska
POA-04
Analyses are more expensive
in the proposal than in
RACER; proposal lists $3,400
for separate shipping of
herbicide samples.
Review and revise
analysis costs as
necessary.
Monitoring
Alaska
POA-04
RACER does not include an
assembly for the SW 9056
analysis.
Revise assembly cost
database to include an
assembly for SW 9056
analysis.
Monitoring
Baltimore
NAB-08
The Monitoring technology
does not contain options for
preparation of quarterly
reports, and the Help Topic
does not indicate whether
changing the "number of
events per year" changes the
number of reports prepared
for each event; resulting
assembly quantity changes
are not indicative of this. An
existing assembly for Job
Hazards Analysis was used to
estimate the cost for an
additional report(s).
Provide an option to
select more than one
report; modify Help
Topic to better explain
reporting.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 182 of 210
RACER
Technology
Site Visit
Location
Project
Observation
Suggested Solution
Monitoring
Baltimore
NAB-11
RACER does not provide an
option for no data validation.
An option could be
provided for rare cases
when no validation is
required. Or, the Help
Topic could be revised
to describe what
assemblies are affected,
so that the user could
make informed
assembly changes
should they choose to
remove the LOE
associated with data
validation.
Monitoring
Baltimore
NAB-16
The Monitoring technology
does not contain options for
preparation of quarterly
reports, and the Help Topic
does not indicate whether
changing the "number of
events per year" changes the
number of reports prepared
for each event; resulting
assembly quantity changes
are not indicative of this. An
existing assembly for Job
Hazards Analysis was used to
estimate the cost for an
additional report(s).
Provide an option to
select more than one
report; modify Help
Topic to better explain
reporting.
Monitoring
Louisville
LRL-09
Noticed problem/inaccuracy
with Monitoring Plan option
on Data Management tab.
For this project collect only
one GW sample, when No
Monitoring Plan is selected,
marked up cost is $8177,
when Abbreviated Monitoring
Plan is selected, marked up
cost goes up to $20,167
($11,990 increase), and when
Standard Plan is selected,
marked up cost is $30,381
($22,204 increase), and when
Comprehensive Plan is
selected, marked up cost is
49993 ($41,816 increase).
These cost increases do not
seem realistic for a sampling
event involving only one
sample.
The Monitoring Plan
cost should be
reevaluated following a
review of the
Monitoring Model
Addendum.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 183 of 210
RACER
Technology
Site Visit
Location
Project
Observation
Suggested Solution
Monitoring
Louisville
LRL-11
Default values for Monitoring
Report (Data Management
tab) are not functioning in
accordance with the Help
Topic. For example, in this
estimate the number of
samples in the first year is 53.
According to Help Topic, the
default for Report should be
Comprehensive, but it is
Abbreviated.
Review Monitoring
Model Addendum and
Help Topic; revise
technology software
code accordingly to
correct the error.
Monitoring
Louisville
LRL-11
The Help Topic does not
adequately define the terms
for selection of the various
options for Monitoring Plan
(Abbreviated, Standard, and
Comprehensive). It only lists
the options with no
corresponding definitions.
Add more detail to
Monitoring Plan section
of the Help Topic.
Monitoring
Louisville
LRL-11
The Comprehensive
Reporting LOE seems
unrealistically high. For this
example, changing from
Abbreviated Report to
Standard to Comprehensive
increases the marked up total
project cost from $104,787
(for Abbreviated Report) to
$109,776 (for Standard
Report) to $209,782 (for
Comprehensive Report).
There appears to be a problem
with the algorithm.
Review Model
Addendum for
Reporting options to
determine if this is an
error; if so, revise
software code
accordingly. If not,
consider review and
revision of the Model
Addendum to ensure
these cost increases
related to Reporting are
correct.
Monitoring
Louisville
LRL-12
This high cost differential for
this project is primarily due to
the Monitoring Plan selection
(with no plan selected, cost is
~$16K; adding abbreviated
plan almost double cost to
~$29K). Plan costs do not
appear to be reasonable.
Reevaluate Model
Addendum calculations
for LOE for Monitoring
Plans to determine if
this is an error; if so,
revise software code
accordingly. If not,
consider review and
revision of the Model
Addendum.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 184 of 210
RACER
Technology
Site Visit
Location
Project
Observation
Suggested Solution
Monitoring
Louisville
LRL-13
Metals analyses listed in the
project proposal are for single
elements (manganese,
cadmium, chromium, nickel)
and are $10/ea. That is not an
available option in RACER
(except for chromium) so
total metals was used as a
substitution but the cost is
much greater ($332/sample).
Consider adding
assemblies for single
element analyses.
Monitoring
Savannah
SAS-12
SAS-17
RACER assigns travel for the
entire roundtrip distance for
each day of sampling during a
round (ex: if sampling 18
wells at 6 wells/day, RACER
calculates 3 round trips of
mileage and 3 round trips of
driving hours for 2
technicians, just for the 18
wells).
Modify the calculations
so that the travel for the
sampling technicians is
by car up to a
reasonable number of
miles, and by air for
greater distances.
Monitoring
Savannah
SAS-12
SAS-17
RACER does not properly
calculate the volume of purge
water.
Check technology
algorithm to ensure this
functionality is working
as intended; if so,
consider revision.
Monitoring
Savannah
Various
The average sample depth for
surface water samples does
not impact cost.
Check technology
algorithm to ensure this
functionality is working
as intended; if so,
consider revision.
Monitoring
Savannah
SAS-17
Hand Auger - RACER
appears to assign a maximum
of 8 hand auger borings/day,
even if these borings are only
2 ft. deep.
Check technology
algorithm to ensure this
functionality is working
as intended; if so,
consider revision.
Monitoring
AFCEE
AFCEE-11
There is no way in
Monitoring to account for
travel to site via airplane. If
large site distance is selected,
mileage for automobile is
increased at the Assembly
level to account for distance.
Typically for large site
distances the sampling crew
would fly and rent a car.
Under Site Distance on
System Definition tab,
suggest adding option
for travel to site via
airline, which would
generate airfare
assemblies and per
diem.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 185 of 210
RACER
Technology
Site Visit
Location
Project
Observation
Suggested Solution
Monitoring
Natural Attenuation
AFCEE
AFCEE-11
Monitoring was re-engineered
but Natural Attenuation was
not. Cost for
collection/analysis of 400
GW samples assuming
default parameters is $700K
in the Monitoring module
(with MNA Analytical
Template used) and $1M in
the Natural Attenuation
module with the same
parameters selected.
Need to reevaluate
Natural Attenuation and
update it to be more in
sync with the reengineered Monitoring
technology.
N/A
Kansas City
NWK-23
Several project tasks include
survey work. There is no
technology to account for this
requirement.
Add a technology for
survey work.
N/A
Baltimore
NAB-19
RACER does not contain an
assembly for a flame
ionization detector (FID).
There is an assembly for a
Photo-Ionization detector
(PID) but not the FID. The
only FID-related assemblies
in RACER are for
soil/sediment sampling using
a FID.
Add an assembly for
daily rental of a FID.
Off-Site
Transportation and
Disposal
AFCEE
AFCEE-13
Landfill disposal cost for nonhazardous solid waste appears
too high (RACER is $86/ton;
proposed cost is $29/ton).
Reevaluate assemblylevel disposal costs for
non hazardous solid
waste (Assembly
33197270 Landfill
Nonhazardous Solid
Bulk Waste by CY).
Operations and
Maintenance
Savannah
SAS-19
Professional Labor assemblies
did not change between
"Moderate" and "Minimum."
Values for "Minimum" were
the same as "Exclude from
Estimate."
Check technology
algorithm to ensure this
functionality is working
as intended; if so,
consider revision.
Operations and
Maintenance
Savannah
SAS-19
RACER does not provide the
option of using a vacuum
truck for free product
removal.
Provide an option in the
Free Product Removal
or O&M technology to
perform removal work
using a vacuum truck.
Operations and
Maintenance
Savannah
SAS-19
RACER does not provide
Professional Labor hours
when "Minimum" is selected.
Check technology
algorithm to ensure this
functionality is working
as intended; if so,
consider revision.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 186 of 210
RACER
Technology
Site Visit
Location
Project
Observation
Suggested Solution
Preliminary
Assessment
Fort Worth
SWF-12
In order to get options for soil
gas survey, RI technology
must be run even when a full
RI is not necessary.
Include items like soil
gas survey in
technologies such as
Preliminary Assessment
and Site Inspection.
Preliminary
Assessment
Louisville
LRL-10
Project Management hours
are minimal compared to
contractor's proposal.
Review and revise
technology accordingly.
Preliminary
Assessment
Louisville
LRL-10
This technology does not
provide for preparation of
plans such as QA, SAP, and
HASP.
Add option for
preparation of
supplemental plans
such as in Site
Inspection. For
Remedial Action
projects, these activities
are accounted for in the
Professional Labor
Management
technology; however,
Professional Labor
Management can not be
added to a Study-type
phase in RACER.
Preliminary
Assessment
Louisville
LRL-10
Labor hours are very
inconsistent with the
contractor's proposals for
these sites. Note that the sites
are large (38, 10 and 14 acres)
and this is more complex than
the High selection for site
complexity is intended to
account for (see Help Topic).
For example, RACER is
estimating 319 hrs total for
the HIGH complexity for the
Chanute site, and contractor
has proposed 921. The other
three sites are similarly off.
Reevaluate LOE for
varying complexities.
Preliminary
Assessment
Louisville
LRL-10
PA technology does not
account adequately for title
search/search of real estate
records. Proposal states that
this task alone is assumed to
add 166 LOE/location.
According to RACER Help
Screen, RACER adds 66
hours for high site
complexity.
Reevaluate LOE for
varying complexities.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 187 of 210
RACER
Technology
Site Visit
Location
Project
Observation
Suggested Solution
Preliminary
Assessment
Louisville
LRL-15
The large cost difference is
due to a massive difference in
the number of labor hours for
each task. For example, in
the proposal, the task for
reporting is 528 hours per
site, while RACER gives only
96 hours for reporting, at high
site complexity.
Reevaluate LOE for
varying complexities.
Professional Labor
Management
Alaska
POA-06
PLM does not distinguish site
complexities that should
impact the default percentage.
Site complexities include
mobilization/demobilization
activities or setting up camps
for temporary living.
A site complexity
option could be added
to PLM that would
adjust the default
percentage.
Professional Labor
Management
Alaska
POA-06
POA-23
RACER does not provide
sufficient options for reports
such as Remedial Action
Report or Treatability Studies.
Technologies could be
developed for
preparation of such
deliverables.
Remedial
Investigation
Alaska
POA-22
There are no options for
transportation of personnel,
supplies, and equipment.
Provide transportation
options similar to those
used for Residual
Waste Management.
Remedial
Investigation
Louisville
LRL-16
There is no option for
additional meetings; also the
Help Topic does not indicate
if the cost accounts for
internal technical reviews of
deliverables.
The technology could
be amended by adding a
secondary requirement
for meetings and
distances to the
meeting. The estimator
would input the number
of meetings, distance,
airfare, and number of
persons. RACER
would calculate per
diem, labor, and other
travel costs using the
inputs. The Help Topic
should be amended to
indicate whether
internal technical
reviews are accounted
for.
Remedial
Investigation
Louisville
LRL-16
There is no option for travel
via airlines. RACER assumes
travel by truck even for long
distances.
RACER should
determine appropriate
travel method based on
mileage or provide an
option for travel.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 188 of 210
RACER
Technology
Site Visit
Location
Project
Observation
Suggested Solution
Residual Waste
Management
AFCEE
AFCEE11AFCEE-12
These projects involve on-site
treatment of IDW, so there
are loading and
transportation-related costs
but no disposal fees. There is
no way to account for loading
and transport to an on-site
facility (with no disposal cost)
without making assemblylevel changes.
Include on-site disposal
option in Residual
Waste Management
technology.
Residual Waste
Management
Alaska
POA-01
The cost for transport of
waste off-site via barge is
substantially higher than the
actual cost for this project.
Furthermore, the barging cost
is not dependent upon number
of miles traveled. Cost is the
same for barging whether it is
going 5 miles or 3000. The
Alaska District PMs indicated
that the barging cost never
models reality; therefore, they
are not using it. Instead they
are substituting trucking for
barging when barging is
required.
Reevaluate cost of
barging and update
assembly line item
associated with barging.
(Assembly line item
33190292 Barge
Transport of
Containerized Waste;
per CWT). Reengineer
the line item so that the
cost of barging is more
realistic and is tied to
the mileage traveled.
Residual Waste
Management
Alaska
POA-02
Transport of purge water to an
on-site disposal facility
cannot be handled in Residual
Waste Management.
Add options to account
for the containerizing
and transport to on-site
facility.
Residual Waste
Management
Alaska
POA-03b
The barging cost is not
dependent upon number of
miles traveled. Cost is the
same for barging whether it is
going 5 miles or 3000.
Reevaluate cost of
barging and update
assembly line item
associated with barging.
(Assembly line item
33190292 Barge
Transport of
Containerized Waste;
per CWT). Reengineer
the line item so that the
cost of barging is more
realistic and is tied to
the mileage traveled.
Residual Waste
Management
Alaska
POA-04
Transport of purge water to an
on-site disposal facility
cannot be handled in Residual
Waste Management.
Add options to account
for the containerizing
and transport to on-site
facility.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 189 of 210
RACER
Technology
Site Visit
Location
Project
Observation
Suggested Solution
Residual Waste
Management
Alaska
POA-04
Transport of purge water to an
on-site disposal facility
cannot be handled in Residual
Waste Management.
Add options to account
for the containerizing
and transport to on-site
facility (no disposal
fee).
Residual Waste
Management
Alaska
POA-06
RACER does not include an
option for using a helicopter
to transport waste.
A helicopter option and
concomitant
combination options
could be added to the
current transportation
options.
Residual Waste
Management
Alaska
POA-06
There is no option for using
Supersacks. This packaging
type is becoming more
common.
Incorporate Supersacks
as a containering
option.
Residual Waste
Management
Fort Worth
SWF-03
Concrete disposal present in
residual waste even when
zeroed out in UST.
Revise Residual Waste
Management
technology to delete
concrete when none is
selected in companion
technology.
Residual Waste
Management
Fort Worth
SWF-04
Assembly 33197270 Landfill
Nonhazardous Solid Bulk
Waste by CY may be too high
($84.87/CY). Proposed cost
(for non-hazardous excavated
soil) is $27.5/CY.
Reevaluate assemblylevel disposal costs for
non hazardous solid
waste (Assembly
33197270 Landfill
Nonhazardous Solid
Bulk Waste by CY).
Residual Waste
Management
Fort Worth
SWF-09
Concrete disposal present in
residual waste even when
zeroed out in UST.
Revise Residual Waste
Management
technology to delete
concrete when none is
selected in companion
technology.
Residual Waste
Management
Louisville
LRL-11
Technology does not allow
for transport/disposal at onsite
Wastewater Treatment Plant
(WWTP).
Consider modifying
technology to include
option for onsite
disposal (loading and
transport only).
Residual Waste
Management
Savannah
SAS-17
RACER cost for roll-off
containers is very high $2,420/month.
Revise cost for rolloffs. Cost is usually
nominal - mostly
covered by the disposal
of the contents.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 190 of 210
RACER
Technology
Site Visit
Location
Project
Observation
Suggested Solution
Restoration
Advisory Board
Louisville
LRL-14
This technology provides
three options for number of
RAB meetings.
The options should be
modified for the user to
select the number of
meetings rather than
having to select from
just three. RACER can
then determine the
appropriate cost.
Restoration
Advisory Board
Louisville
LRL-14
The system definition tab has
an input field for duration (in
years). However, when a
number of years greater than
1 is entered, RACER puts the
costs for all the years into the
first year, rather than
allocating those costs equally
on a year by year basis. This
results in an incorrect cost
over time report.
Review and revise the
algorithm which
allocates costs for the
cost over time
calculations to parallel
the monitoring
technology (which has
similar input fields but
properly allocates the
costs over time).
Site Closeout
Documentation
AFCEE
AFCEE-12
The project included
preparation of a Treatability
Report. There is no
technology for reports, such
as Treatability Report so Site
Closeout Documentation had
to be used to approximate
cost of Treatability Report.
Suggest considering
new RACER
technology to
accommodate various
types of reporting
requirements. Could be
a modification to the
Site Closeout
Documentation module
to turn this module into
a Reporting technology
with various options for
types of reports as the
Required Parameter.
Site Closeout
Documentation
Savannah
SAS-19
RACER does not provide the
option of using a car and
inputting distance for travel in
Site Close-Out
Documentation.
Revise technology so
that travel distances
below a certain
reasonable distance are
assumed to be by car,
and greater distances
are assumed to be by air
travel.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 191 of 210
RACER
Technology
Site Visit
Location
Project
Observation
Suggested Solution
Site Inspection
Alaska
POA-22
For this project, the RI
technology was used because
the project contained specific
activities only available in
this technology; however, the
SI technology should include
these activities. The RI
technology over-estimated the
total cost, as this was just an
SI-type of investigation.
Add geophysical tests
to SI technology.
Site Inspection
Baltimore
NAB-10
Selecting Biennial for
frequency puts cost in each
year when a cost over time
report is run.
Revise algorithm so
that cost over time
displays the correct
dollar amounts per year.
Site Inspection
Louisville
LRL-05
Some tasks require filling in
bore holes after sampling with
bentonite.
An option to be
provided under well
abandonment or
wherever soil sampling
is provided to fill bore
holes.
Site Inspection
Louisville
LRL-06
RACER does not have an
option for installation of
piezometers.
Provide for an option
either in this and similar
technologies for
installation of
piezometers.
Site Inspection
Louisville
LRL-06
Performance of on-site
analyses cannot be estimated.
Provide for an option
either in this and similar
technologies for
performance of on-site
analyses such as with
x-ray fluorescence
detectors and others.
Special Well
Drilling
Savannah
SAS-09
Options should be provided in
RACER for installation of
sparge points.
Utilize algorithms from
other technologies that
include installation of
sparge points to ensure
consistency of this
activity throughout
RACER.
UST
Closure/Removal
Fort Worth
SWF-03
Has assembly for “Minor
Demolition, Concrete”
included, even if none
needed. No ability to specify
piping length.
Revise technology.
Delete concrete when
none selected. Add
option for piping
length.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 192 of 210
RACER
Technology
Site Visit
Location
Project
Observation
Suggested Solution
UST
Closure/Removal
Fort Worth
SWF-03
USTs smaller than 500
gallons can not be estimated
in UST Closure/Removal
technology.
Revise technology to
allow for
closure/removal of
tanks smaller than 500
gallons.
UST
Closure/Removal
Kansas City
NWK-13
(Evaluated but
not estimated
due to lack of
information)
This project included the
removal for ASTs but the
RACER Module for tank
removals does not
accommodate that option.
UST Closure has to be
estimated and changes made
at the Assembly level to
accommodate aboveground
nature of the tanks.
Change UST
Closure/Removal to
Tank Closure/Removal
and include option for
ASTs in module.
UST
Closure/Removal
Kansas City
NWK-26
275 Gallon UST at Forbes S7 site was estimated as a 500
Gallon tank; minimum valid
value for "Average Volume of
Tank" in UST Closure
Module is 500 Gallons
Revise technology to
allow for
closure/removal of
tanks smaller than 500
gallons.
UST
Closure/Removal
Savannah
SAS-02
UST technology cannot
account for AST removal or
closure. These are common
activities.
Revise technology to
include option for
ASTs.
Various
Savannah
SAS-14
Stand-alone pumping units
for injection of surfactants or
other chemicals are not
provided.
Provide technology or
assemblies with standalone pumping units.
Various
(Groundwater
Monitoring Well,
Soil Vapor
Extraction, etc.)
Baltimore
NAB-08
RACER does not provide a
technology for modifying
well heads from one purpose
to another, i.e., from a
monitoring well to a SVE
well.
Addition of an
assembly, or a mini
technology, would
assist such occasions.
Various / Remedial
Action Technologies
Alaska
POA-06
RACER's mobilization and
demobilization costs for
remedial actions reflects
average site conditions.
Some remote sites can only
be accessed by helicopter,
barges, and/or off-road
vehicles. Some sites will
require site workers to live on
site in temporary facilities.
RACER should better
account for access to
remote sites.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 193 of 210
RACER
Technology
Site Visit
Location
Project
Observation
Suggested Solution
Various / Systemwide issue
Alaska
POA-02
Travel to island cannot be
accounted for in RACER
unless assemblies are added.
Increasing Site Distance on
the System Definition tab
only adds additional miles for
Sample Collection Vehicle,
and does not include the
option of air travel then truck
rental, which is the more
likely scenario.
Consider addition of
options and/or
assemblies that would
allow user to generate
an accurate cost for
travel to remote sites.
Various / Systemwide issue
Alaska
POA-03a,
POA-03b
Travel to island cannot be
accounted for in RACER
unless assemblies are added.
Increasing Site Distance on
the System Definition tab
only adds additional miles for
Sample Collection Vehicle,
and does not include the
option of air travel then truck
rental, which is the more
likely scenario.
Consider addition of
options and/or
assemblies that would
allow the user to
generate an accurate
cost for travel to remote
sites.
Various / Systemwide issue
Alaska
POA-12
RACER can not estimate
mobilization and
demobilization to remote
camps.
Consider addition of
options and/or
assemblies that would
allow the user to
generate an accurate
cost for travel to remote
sites.
Well Abandonment
Alaska
POA-25
Technology does not have the
ability to estimate partial
removal, which is a common
method of abandonment.
Revise technology to
include an option for
partial removal, such as
cutting casing at a
certain depth and
grouting.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 194 of 210
RACER
Technology
Site Visit
Location
Project
Observation
Suggested Solution
Well Abandonment
Baltimore
NAB-09
RACER does not include
reporting in the Well
Abandonment technology. It
is common that preparation of
a Well Abandonment report is
required upon completion of
abandonment activities; in the
case of this project, a short
"summary letter" was
prepared for each well, and
RACER was unable to
estimate this activity within
the technology. The Site
Close-Out documentation
technology had to be run to
capture this cost.
Add an option to Well
Abandonment to
include reports; also
consider adding a
reporting "level of
complexity," as project
reporting requirements
differ and can range
from short summary
memos to fully detailed
abandonment reports.
Well Abandonment
Baltimore
NAB-19
RACER does not include
reporting in the Well
Abandonment technology. It
is common that preparation of
a Well Abandonment report is
required upon completion of
abandonment activities; in the
case of this project, a short
"summary letter" was
prepared for each well, and
RACER was unable to
estimate this activity within
the technology. The Site
Close-Out documentation
technology had to be run to
capture this cost.
Add an option to Well
Abandonment to
include reports; also
consider adding a
reporting "level of
complexity," as project
reporting requirements
differ and can range
from short summary
memos to fully detailed
abandonment reports.
Well Abandonment
Louisville
LRL-09
Camera survey/geophysical
log was a project requirement
that could not be accounted
for in RACER.
Consider adding an
assembly for this
activity from the UPB;
if one does not exist in
the UPB, suggest that it
is researched and
added.
Well Abandonment
Louisville
LRL-09
Well abandonment report
preparation was a project
requirement and could not be
accommodated by the
technology.
Consider adding option
for well abandonment
report to the
technology.
Well Abandonment
Baltimore
NAB-19
RACER does not contain an
assembly for concrete mix; all
concrete-related assemblies
include labor and equipment
but there is no assembly for
the material only.
Include cost book line
items for concrete mix.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 195 of 210
RACER
Technology
Well Abandonment
Groundwater
Monitoring Well
Site Visit
Location
Alaska
Project
POA-25
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Observation
Suggested Solution
Neither technology has the
ability to estimate well repair.
Revise technology to
include addition of
items to repair wells;
otherwise, ensure
adequate assemblies are
available so users can
add these items.
Page 196 of 210
Appendix E – Description of Outliers to the Project and Technology Data Sets
Project-level Outliers
Site
Location
Project
Name
Hist
cost
Project
Year
Esc
Fac
Esc. Hist
Cost
S1
Estimate
S2
Estimate
S3
Estimate
S4
Estimate
S1 %
Difference
S2 %
Difference
S3 %
Difference
S4 %
Difference
Alaska
POA-03b
$36,343
2008
1.0000
$36,343
$108,841
$152,741
$155,153
$62,724
199.48%
320.28%
326.91%
72.59%
Alaska
POA-03c
$36,343
2008
1.0000
$36,343
$108,841
$152,741
$155,153
$62,724
199.48%
320.28%
326.91%
72.59%
Alaska
POA-12
$125,446
2004
1.1125
$139,555
$417,257
$432,962
$268,844
$214,738
198.99%
210.24%
92.64%
53.87%
Louisville
LRL-12
$13,420
2005
1.0821
$14,522
$44,110
$44,979
$30,434
$28,576
203.74%
209.72%
109.57%
96.77%
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Reason for Outlier
The large increase in cost
difference from Scenario 1 (S1) to
Scenario 2 (S2) is due to the
change of Monitoring Report from
the RACER default of Abbreviated
to Comprehensive, per the
reference documentation.
The large increase in cost
difference from S1 to S2 is due to
the change of Monitoring Report
from the RACER default of
Abbreviated to Comprehensive,
per the reference documentation.
The high cost difference for this
project is primarily due to the cost
difference of the Monitoring
technology, used to account for
borehole installation and
groundwater sampling. Refer to the
technology-level analysis below for
a detailed explanation of the
reasons for the cost difference for
that technology.
The quantity of delivery points was
800 by RACER default in S1,
changed to 169 in S2. In addition,
delivery method was changed from
Injection Wells (default) to Direct
Push. This change dramatically
reduced the overall cost and
brought the RACER cost in line
with the historical cost.
Page 197 of 214
Project-level Outliers
Site
Location
Project
Name
Hist
cost
Project
Year
Esc
Fac
Esc. Hist
Cost
S1
Estimate
S2
Estimate
S3
Estimate
S4
Estimate
S1 %
Difference
S2 %
Difference
S3 %
Difference
S4 %
Difference
Savannah
SAS-06
$898,355
2005
0.9241
$972,141
$3,175,487
$879,651
$872,274
$997,506
226.65%
-9.51%
-10.27%
2.61%
Savannah
SAS-18
$348,121
2008
1.0000
$348,121
$5,766,333
$365,739
$396,163
$453,355
1556.42%
5.06%
13.80%
30.23%
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Reason for Outlier
The quantity of delivery points was
800 by RACER default in S1,
changed to 169 in S2. In addition,
delivery method was changed from
Injection Wells (default) to Direct
Push. This change dramatically
reduced the overall cost and
brought the RACER cost in line
with the historical cost.
The task is to perform a Regenesis
3DME injection in two monitoring
wells. The In-Situ Biodegradation
technology was used. In this case,
the primary parameters did not
produce an accurate model. The
default number of delivery points
was >100% too high; also the
delivery method was direct push,
instead of the default injection well
installation. Together, these two
changes account for the majority of
the cost difference at S1.
Page 198 of 210
Technology-level Outliers
Project
No.
Technolo
-gy
Hist
cost
Project
Year
Esc
Fac
Esc. Hist
Cost
S1
Estimate
S2
Estimate
S3
Estimate
S4
Estimate
S1 %
Difference
S2 %
Difference
S3 %
Difference
S4 %
Difference
AFCEE
-12
Residual
Waste
Management
$7,185
2008
1.0000
$7,185
$24,036
$25,489
$4,625
$4,220
234.5%
254.7%
-35.6%
-41.3%
USACE
-LRL02
Off-Site
Transportation and
Waste
Disposal
$2,940
2008
1.0000
$2,940
$11,532
$11,532
$11,532
$11,732
292.2%
292.2%
292.2%
299.0%
USACE
-LRL08
Monitoring
$23,815
2006
0.9527
$24,997
$90,801
$43,040
$40,272
$41,261
263.2%
72.2%
61.1%
65.1%
USACE
-LRL12
Monitoring
$12,099
2005
0.9241
$13,093
$42,460
$43,329
$28,783
$27,029
224.3%
230.9%
119.8%
106.4%
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Reason for Outlier
The high percent difference for this
technology is due to the fact that the
Residual Waste Management
technology cannot account for on-site
disposal (with no associated disposal
fees) in S1 or S2. This project
involved IDW management, which
included containerizing the soil
cuttings and purge water in drums,
and disposing as non-hazardous at an
on-base location.
This technology is being used to
account for the disposal of 6K gallons
of nonhazardous water. It appears
that the technology overestimated the
requirements associated with that
task.
The high cost difference in S1 is due
primarily to the fact that QA/QC
samples and a monitoring plan were
not required.
The high cost difference in S1 and S2
is due primarily to the fact that Fuels
analytical templates are used. This
means that certain components of the
template are not required and are
zeroed out at assembly level (zeroed
out PAH and BTEX for groundwater,
and PAH, TPH, and BTEX for soil).
Page 199 of 210
Technology-level Outliers
Project
No.
Technolo
-gy
Hist
cost
Project
Year
Esc
Fac
Esc. Hist
Cost
S1
Estimate
S2
Estimate
S3
Estimate
S4
Estimate
S1 %
Difference
S2 %
Difference
S3 %
Difference
S4 %
Difference
USACE
-LRL13
Monitoring
$42,401
2007
0.9766
$43,417
$130,404
$142,131
$119,360
$135,188
200.4%
227.4%
174.9%
211.4%
USACE
-LRL14
MEC Site
Characterization &
Removal
Assessment
$169,237
2008
1.0000
$169,237
$653,361
$522,390
$522,390
$530,103
286.1%
208.7%
208.7%
213.2%
USACE
-NAB08
Remedial
Design
$1,307
2006
0.9527
$1,372
$7,051
$5,556
$2,919
$2,837
413.8%
304.9%
112.7%
106.7%
USACE
-NAB08
Monitoring
$7,702
2006
0.9527
$8,085
$80,231
$29,134
$25,195
$24,496
892.4%
260.4%
211.6%
203.0%
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Reason for Outlier
This technology was used to account
for the annual sampling of 13
groundwater wells and three surface
water locations. The reason for the
cost difference could not be effectively
isolated, but it is likely that it is partially
due to the high LOE involved in the
preparation of Standard Monitoring
Plans.
The contractor likely assumed that
they were not going to find much; cost
proposal included a minimal crew with
a wheeled EM61. The technology
assumes a site where ordinance would
be found. Therefore there is a heavy
load of labor for management,
planning, and characterization, even
though surface clearance and intrusive
investigations were deleted.
Since RD is calculated as a default
percentage based upon the approach,
it appears that the percentage is not
correct in this case.
Cost difference at S1 is primarily due
to inclusion of a monitoring plan &
QA/QC samples. This plan and the
QA/QC sampling are not necessary for
this project, and were eliminated in S2.
While these two items do not account
for the entire difference, they account
for ¾ of the difference between S1 and
the historical cost. This brings the
RACER cost much closer to the
historical cost.
Page 200 of 210
Technology-level Outliers
Project
No.
Technolo
-gy
Hist
cost
Project
Year
Esc
Fac
Esc. Hist
Cost
S1
Estimate
S2
Estimate
S3
Estimate
S4
Estimate
S1 %
Difference
S2 %
Difference
S3 %
Difference
S4 %
Difference
USACE
-NAB08
Monitoring
$9,361
2006
0.9527
$9,826
$58,475
$22,898
$18,527
$18,011
495.1%
133.0%
88.6%
83.3%
USACE
-NAB08
Monitoring
$9,826
2006
0.9527
$10,314
$52,026
$25,756
$22,481
$21,850
404.4%
149.7%
118.0%
111.9%
USACE
-NAB11
Monitoring
$2,170
2007
0.9766
$2,222
$38,582
$7,475
$9,098
$7,493
1636.4%
236.4%
309.5%
237.2%
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Reason for Outlier
Cost difference at S1 is primarily due
to inclusion of a monitoring plan &
QA/QC samples. This plan and the
QA/QC sampling are not necessary for
this project, and were eliminated in S2.
While these two items do not account
for the entire difference, they account
for ¾ of the difference between S1 and
the historical cost. This brings the
RACER cost much closer to the
historical cost.
Cost difference at S1 is primarily due
to inclusion of a monitoring plan &
QA/QC samples. This plan and the
QA/QC sampling are not necessary for
this project, and were eliminated in S2.
While these two items do not account
for the entire difference, they account
for ¾ of the difference between S1 and
the historical cost. This brings the
RACER cost much closer to the
historical cost.
Cost difference at S1 is primarily due
to inclusion of a monitoring plan &
QA/QC samples and purge water
collection. The plan and purge water
disposal are not necessary for this
project, and were eliminated in S2.
QA/QC samples were dramatically
reduced. While these items do not
account for the entire difference, they
account for ¾ of the difference
between S1 and the historical cost.
This brings the RACER cost much
closer to the historical cost.
Page 201 of 210
Technology-level Outliers
Project
No.
Technolo
-gy
USACE
-NAB12
Monitoring
USACE
-NAB16
Residual
Waste
Management
USACE
-NAB18
USACE
-POA01
Residual
Waste
Management
Profession
-al Labor
Management
Hist
cost
Project
Year
Esc
Fac
Esc. Hist
Cost
S1
Estimate
S2
Estimate
S3
Estimate
S4
Estimate
S1 %
Difference
S2 %
Difference
S3 %
Difference
S4 %
Difference
Reason for Outlier
$13,585
2007
0.9766
$13,911
$62,258
$24,149
$24,033
$24,154
347.6%
73.6%
72.8%
73.6%
$425
2007
0.9766
$435
$1,972
$1,972
$1,092
$1,076
353.1%
353.1%
150.9%
147.3%
$1,100
2005
0.9241
$1,190
$13,969
$14,701
$5,501
$5,132
1073.5%
1135.0%
362.1%
331.1%
Cost difference at S1 is primarily due
to inclusion of a monitoring plan &
QA/QC samples. This plan and the
QA/QC sampling are not necessary for
this project, and were eliminated in S2.
While these two items do not account
for the entire difference, they account
for ¾ of the difference between S1 and
the historical cost. This brings the
RACER cost much closer to the
historical cost.
Cost difference from S1 & S2 to S3
was primarily due to the disposal of
the liquid versus an on-site treatment.
When this change was made at the
assembly level in S3, the RACER cost
(while still high) came much closer to
the historical cost.
RACER was dramatically
overestimating the quantity of purge
water for disposal. RACER calculated
quantity is 1,504 gallons, whereas the
historical quantity is 600 gallons.
When this quantity was reduced at the
assembly level in S3, the RACER cost
(while still high) came much closer to
the historical cost.
181.1%
Since PLM is a default percentage, it
appears that the percentage is not
correct in this case.
$46,980
2007
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
0.9766
$48,106
$298,427
$304,829
$304,168
$135,233
520.4%
533.7%
532.3%
Page 202 of 210
Technology-level Outliers
Project
No.
Technolo
-gy
Hist
cost
Project
Year
Esc
Fac
Esc. Hist
Cost
S1
Estimate
S2
Estimate
S3
Estimate
S4
Estimate
S1 %
Difference
S2 %
Difference
S3 %
Difference
S4 %
Difference
USACE
-POA03b
Monitoring
$35,261
2008
1.0000
$35,261
$105,734
$149,649
$152,553
$61,721
199.9%
324.4%
332.6%
75.0%
USACE
-POA03c
Monitoring
$35,261
2008
1.0000
$35,261
$108,841
$149,649
$152,553
$61,721
208.7%
324.4%
332.6%
75.0%
$39,846
2004
0.8989
$44,328
$240,827
$240,827
$76,709
$65,903
443.3%
443.3%
73.1%
48.7%
USACE
-POA12
USACE
-SAS01
Cleanup
and
Landscaping
Profession
-al Labor
Management
$9,864
2007
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
0.9766
$10,100
$179,744
$179,744
$87,797
$88,881
1679.6%
1679.6%
769.2%
780.0%
Reason for Outlier
The large increase in cost difference
from S1 to S2 is due to the change of
Monitoring Report from the RACER
default of Abbreviated to
Comprehensive, per the reference
documentation.
The large increase in cost difference
from S1 to S2 is due to the change of
Monitoring Report from the RACER
default of Abbreviated to
Comprehensive, per the reference
documentation.
This technology is used to account for
the seeding of 29 acres. It appears
that the technology overestimated the
requirements associated with that
task. Hydroseeding is the RACER
default, however S3 replaced
hydroseeding with a less expensive
seeding assembly. Also, watering and
mowing is included at the assembly
level for all areas selected for seeding.
However, in this project those activities
were not required and were zeroed out
at S3, bringing the cost closer to
historical. However, the cost was still
73% higher than historical cost; even
at S3. It is likely that the high location
modifier for this project contributed to
the 73% difference at S3, since the %
difference improves at S4.
Since PLM is a default percentage, it
appears that the percentage is not
correct in this case.
Page 203 of 210
Technology-level Outliers
Project
No.
Technolo
-gy
Hist
cost
Project
Year
Esc
Fac
Esc. Hist
Cost
S1
Estimate
S2
Estimate
S3
Estimate
S4
Estimate
S1 %
Difference
S2 %
Difference
S3 %
Difference
S4 %
Difference
USACE
-SAS04
Monitoring
$10,852
2005
0.9241
$11,743
$48,756
$26,053
$27,819
$29,038
315.2%
121.9%
136.9%
147.3%
USACE
-SAS04
Monitoring
$3,359
2005
0.9241
$3,635
$33,640
$10,042
$11,252
$11,745
825.5%
176.3%
209.6%
223.1%
USACE
-SAS06
In-situ
Biodegradation
$418,519
2005
0.9241
$452,893
$2,391,174
$384,621
$369,624
$423,583
428.0%
-15.1%
-18.4%
-6.5%
USACE
-SAS06
Residual
Waste
Management
$3,465
2005
0.9241
$3,750
$5,903
$14,651
$18,465
$21,224
57.4%
290.7%
392.5%
466.0%
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Reason for Outlier
Cost difference at S1 is primarily due
to inclusion of a monitoring plan. This
plan is not necessary for this project,
and was eliminated in S2.
Cost difference at S1 is primarily due
to inclusion of a monitoring plan &
QA/QC samples. This plan and the
QA/QC sampling are not necessary for
this project, and were eliminated in S2.
While these two items do not account
for the entire difference, they account
for ¾ of the difference between S1 and
the historical cost.
The quantity of delivery points was
800 by RACER default in S1, changed
to 169 in S2. In addition, delivery
method was changed from Injection
Wells (default) to Direct Push. This
change dramatically reduced the
overall cost and brought the RACER
cost in line with the historical cost.
The number of drums of purge water
for disposal increased from 23 drums
(default) in S1 to 56 drums in S2. This
increase is due to the automatic
calculation of the volume of purge
water from the monitoring technology.
The actual volume of drums disposed
(70) was entered in S3. The cost
difference at this Scenario is likely due
to a difference in disposal cost
between historical cost and RACER.
Page 204 of 210
Technology-level Outliers
Project
No.
Technolo
-gy
USACE
-SAS13
Bioslurping
USACE
-SAS13
Hist
cost
Project
Year
Esc
Fac
Esc. Hist
Cost
S1
Estimate
S2
Estimate
S3
Estimate
S4
Estimate
S1 %
Difference
S2 %
Difference
S3 %
Difference
S4 %
Difference
$64,395
2004
0.8989
$71,638
$921,104
$166,057
$175,779
$205,349
1185.8%
131.8%
145.4%
186.6%
Monitoring
$779
2004
0.8989
$867
$29,020
$5,900
$5,662
$6,618
3248.7%
580.8%
553.3%
663.7%
USACE
-SAS14
Monitoring
$7,428
2008
1.0000
$7,428
$43,689
$21,248
$22,749
$27,115
488.1%
186.0%
206.2%
265.0%
USACE
-SAS18
In-situ
Biodegradation
$182,608
2008
1.0000
$182,608
$4,228,816
$209,188
$219,708
$251,540
2215.8%
14.6%
20.3%
37.7%
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Reason for Outlier
The number of vapor extraction wells
was reduced from 75 (RACER default)
in S1 to 11 (actual historical quantity)
in S2. The default number of wells
used in S1 overestimated the actual
quantity by almost 7 times. The
reduction from S1 to S2 brought the
cost much closer to the historical cost.
Cost difference at S1 is primarily due
to inclusion of a monitoring plan &
QA/QC samples. This plan and the
QA/QC sampling are not necessary for
this project, and were eliminated in S2.
While these two items do not account
for the entire difference, they account
for ¾ of the difference between S1 and
the historical cost.
Cost difference at S1 is primarily due
to inclusion of a monitoring plan &
QA/QC samples. This plan and the
QA/QC sampling are not necessary for
this project, and were eliminated in S2.
While these two items do not account
for the entire difference, they account
for ¾ of the difference between S1 and
the historical cost.
The quantity of delivery points was
300 by RACER default in S1, changed
to 140 in S2. Method was also
changed from injection wells (RACER
default) to direct push. These
changes dramatically reduced the
overall cost and brought the RACER
cost in line with the historical cost.
Page 205 of 210
Technology-level Outliers
Project
No.
Technolo
-gy
Hist
cost
Project
Year
Esc
Fac
Esc. Hist
Cost
S1
Estimate
S2
Estimate
S3
Estimate
S4
Estimate
S1 %
Difference
S2 %
Difference
S3 %
Difference
S4 %
Difference
USACE
-SAS18
In-situ
Biodegradation
$58,882
2008
1.0000
$58,882
$1,411,412
$54,357
$59,580
$68,313
2297.0%
-7.7%
1.2%
16.0%
USACE
-SWF01
Residual
Waste
Management
$1,440
2002
0.8726
$1,650
$15,987
$15,987
$1,705
$1,526
868.8%
868.8%
3.3%
-7.5%
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Reason for Outlier
The quantity of delivery points was
100 by RACER default in S1, changed
to 50 in S2. Method was also changed
from injection wells (RACER default)
to direct push. These changes
dramatically reduced the overall cost
and brought the RACER cost in line
with the historical cost.
The high percent difference for this
technology is due to the fact that the
Residual Waste Management
technology cannot account for on-site
disposal (with no associated disposal
fees) in S1 or S2. This project
involved IDW management, which
included landfilling excavated material
at an on-site Army landfill.
Page 206 of 210
Appendix F – Cumulative List of Lessons Learned During Data
Gathering Site Visits
Listed below are some of the lessons learned that were encountered during the Data
Collection Site Visits under both the AFCEE and USAEC TOs, and should be considered
for future efforts of a similar nature.
•
An actively engaged contracting staff is extremely helpful, as it allows more time
for the Data Collection Team to interview project managers and identify projects
that are suitable for the validation effort. For example, at the Savannah District,
the contracting staff were particularly helpful in locating contracting files,
delivering them to the Data Collection Team, and returning them to the file room
following review by the Data Collection Team. The contracting staff’s
knowledge of the file system and file check-out procedures enabled them to
perform these tasks much quicker than the Data Collection Team.
•
Collecting data on-location is more efficient than trying to coordinate follow-up
data collection after the data collection team has returned to their home offices.
•
Collecting the signed final contracting action (e.g., “Order for Supplies or
Services”) that documents awarded project cost is critical to a complete data set.
Contracting representatives at the Alaska District had a better knowledge of this
documentation than the project managers. Their participation allowed the data
gathering team to locate the required documents.
•
Complex or “blanket”-type projects are not always good candidates for cost
analysis. For example, projects that include several small activities/technologies
in one lump-sum historical cost can be difficult to model in RACER.
•
Final invoicing information can be obtained from project managers and
contracting POCs. These data are most easily obtained via access of a database;
print-outs of the on-screen data are sufficient to document that the contract has
been closed-out. This is a critical piece of information for projects to be classified
as having “high” data completeness.
•
Having contract personnel available during the site visit is also very important.
Contracts personnel can be more familiar with the contract files than project
personnel and provide insight and guidance to the data gathering team.
•
It is critical for contracting staff to participate in pre-data gathering site visit
planning teleconferences. Sensitive contracting files will need to be copied
and/or scanned by the data collection team, and it is imperative that contracting
representatives are fully aware of this and are comfortable with the data
collection team’s non-disclosure agreement.39
39 The data collection team signed non-disclosure agreements at AFCEE, Fort Worth, and Kansas City; these signed agreements
were designed to provide contracting representatives with an additional assurance that the project team would not use collected
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 207 of 214
•
It is important that the data gathering team has assistance in deciphering
District-specific contracting vehicles and documentation. Unique contracting
vehicles, such as the Alaska District’s Total Environmental Restoration Contract
(TERC), often contain several modifications, as well as contract documentation,
that differs from traditional contracts. The Alaska District’s contracting
representatives were engaged and available throughout the visit, providing
assistance in understanding these documents and gathering the necessary
documentation to verify historical project costs. The contracting representatives
at the Alaska District were extremely helpful in this regard; in addition, the
District’s Project Managers had ample knowledge of these issues as well and also
provided direction to the data gathering team.
•
It is important to log all gathered project data, regardless of whether the project
is included in the final data set for analysis. A subjective analysis of
environmental remediation and restoration projects is important to determine if
there are any emerging technologies or processes not currently captured by the
RACER system.
•
Large IDIQ contracts can be very difficult to navigate and are frequently not
good candidates for the validation effort. Frequently the Statement of Work is
brief, as is the contractor’s proposal, resulting in not enough detailed information
to estimate the project.
•
On-site internet access for Booz Allen staff is not necessary; however, it is helpful
in collection, transfer, and storage of data. Since the use of portable “flash”
drives is restricted, transfer of scanned data is limited to e-mailing directly from
the scanner. Without internet access, it is difficult to determine that the files
transferred correctly. Several files had to be re-scanned during and following the
Savannah visit due to file transfer errors.
•
Performance-based contracts also pose a challenge. These projects typically have
Statements of Work and proposals that do not contain the task specific
information and pricing that is needed to accurately cost the project and compare
it to actual historical costs.
•
Project documentation that is stored at the District offices on CD can be easily
transferred and logged for use in Data Deconstruction and estimating. This is
often the easiest method of obtaining Remedial Action Reports, Work Plans,
Monitoring Reports, and other similar documents which are useful supplements
to the contractor’s cost estimate and SOW.
•
Project-specific interviews with program and project managers allowed the data
gathering team to get a better understanding of even simple projects. Waste
handing, decontamination, and mobilization/demobilization are all examples of
key project components which generally are not detailed in the contractor’s
proposals but are included in the project cost. In order to determine whether the
data for purposes other than specifically stated in this contract PWS. Team members are already under a non-disclosure
agreement as part of the GEITA05 contract.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 208 of 210
RACER system accurately estimates these costs, the actual methodologies for
these tasks must be captured as accurately as possible.
•
The Alaska District staff made themselves readily available for post-visit follow
up and project interviews. This allowed the data gathering team to gather
complete data sets for a larger number of projects than would have otherwise
been possible.
•
The scanning of contract data is much more efficient than copying the data and
bringing it back. Also important is the organization of this electronic data while
still on site and while the information is still fresh in the minds of the data
gathering team.
•
The signed final contracting action (“Order for Supplies or Services”) is critical
for a project’s inclusion in the final data set, as it is the key differentiator between
projects identified as “low” and “medium” data completeness.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 209 of 210
Appendix G – Project Documentation (RACER-Generated Estimate
Documentation Reports (EDRs))
Complete documentation of each estimate will be delivered for storage to USAEC in
hard copy along with gathered project and contract data and RACER databases, as per
the PWS.
Final Validation Report
Contract: W91ZLK-07-D-0002, TO 0008
Page 210 of 210
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