MR SAS SW UG 80-00156
MegaRAID®
SAS Software
User Guide
80-00156-01
Rev. J
September 2010
Revision History
Version and Date
80-00156-01 Rev. J, September
2010
Description of Changes
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Added Managing Software Licensing on page 56 in the WebBIOS section
Added EKM and LKM on page 111 in the WebBIOS section.
Added Import Foreign Drives in EKM/EKM Secured Locked Drives on page 160.
Added Enabling the Snapshot Scheduler on page 217 in the WebBIOS section.
Added WebBIOS Dimmer Switch on page 164 in the WebBIOS section.
Added SafeStore Security Options on page 179 details in MegaCLI section.
Added section Enabling the Snapshot Scheduler on page 217 in the MSM section.
Added MegaRAID Software Licensing on page 321 in the MSM section.
Added Enabling Drive Security using EKM on page 355 in the MSM section.
Added Enhanced Dimmer Switch Power Settings on page 279 in the MSM section.
Added Software Licensing, EKM and LKM, Dimmer Switch, Software Licensing, and other sections in the Chapter 5.
80-00156-01 Rev. I, June 2010
Updated the document with changes to the software utilities. Added Chapter 11 for the MegaRAID Advanced Software features.
80-00156-01 Rev. H, July 2009
Documented the Full Disk Encryption (FDE) feature.
80-00156-01 Rev. G, June 2009
Updated the MegaRAID Storage Manager chapters.
80-00156-01 Rev. F, March 2009
Updated the WebBIOS Configuration Utility, MegaRAID Storage Manager, and MegaCLI chapters.
80-00156-01 Rev. E, December 2008 Added the overview chapter. Updated the WebBIOS Configuration Utility, MegaRAID Storage Manager, and MegaCLI chapters.
80-00156-01 Rev. D, April 2008
Updated the RAID overview section. Updated the WebBIOS Configuration Utility and the MegaRAID Storage Manager. Updated the MegaCLI
commands.
80-00156-01 Rev. C, July 2007
Version 2.
Updated operating system support for MegaCLI.
80-00156-01 Rev. B, June 2007
Version 2.0
Updated the WebBIOS Configuration Utility and the MegaRAID Storage Manager. Updated the MegaCLI commands. Added the RAID
introduction chapter.
80-00156-01 Rev. A, August 2006
Version 1.1
Corrected the procedure for creating RAID 10 and RAID 50 drive groups in the WebBIOS Configuration Utility.
DB15-000339-00, December 2005
Version 1.0
Initial release of this document.
LSI, the LSI logo, MegaRAID, CacheCade, SafeStore, Novell NetWare,OpenServer, Microsoft Windows, Red Hat Linux, and Dimmer Switch are trademarks or registered trademarks of LSI Corporation
or its subsidiaries. All other brand and product names may be trademarks of their respective companies.
This preliminary document describes a preproduction product and contains information that may change substantially for any final commercial release of the product. LSI Corporation makes no express
or implied representation or warranty as to the accuracy, quality, or completeness of information contained in this document, and neither the release of this document nor any information included in it
obligates LSI Corporation to make a commercial release of the product. LSI Corporation reserves the right to make changes to the product(s) or information disclosed herein at any time without notice.
LSI Corporation does not assume any responsibility or liability arising out of the application or use of any product or service described herein, except as expressly agreed to in writing by LSI Corporation;
nor does the purchase, lease, or use of a product or service from LSI Corporation convey a license under any patent rights, copyrights, trademark rights, or any other of the intellectual property rights
of LSI Corporation or of third parties.
This document contains proprietary information of LSI Corporation. The information contained herein is not to be used by or disclosed to third parties without the express written permission of LSI
Corporation.
Corporate Headquarters
Milpitas, CA
800-372-2447
Document Number: 80-00156-01 Rev. J
Copyright © 2010 LSI Corporation
All Rights Reserved
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Website
www.lsi.com
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
1.1 SAS Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
1.2 Serial-attached SCSI Device Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
1.3 Serial ATA II Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
1.4 Solid State Drive Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
1.4.1 Solid State Drive Guard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
1.5 Dimmer Switch Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
1.6 UEFI 2.0 Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
1.7 Configuration Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
1.7.1 Valid Drive Mix Configurations with HDDs and CacheCade – SSD Caching software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
1.8 Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
Chapter 2: Introduction to RAID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
2.1 RAID Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
2.2 RAID Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
2.3 RAID Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
2.4 Components and Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
2.4.1 Drive Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
2.4.2 Virtual Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
2.4.3 Fault Tolerance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
2.4.4 Consistency Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
2.4.5 Copyback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
2.4.6 Background Initialization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
2.4.7 Patrol Read . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
2.4.8 Disk Striping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
2.4.9 Disk Mirroring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
2.4.10 Parity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
2.4.11 Disk Spanning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
2.4.12 Hot Spares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
2.4.13 Disk Rebuilds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
2.4.14 Rebuild Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
2.4.15 Hot Swap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
2.4.16 Drive States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
2.4.17 Virtual Drive States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
2.4.18 Beep Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
2.4.19 Enclosure Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
2.5 RAID Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
2.5.1 Summary of RAID Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
2.5.2 Selecting a RAID Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
2.5.3 RAID 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
2.5.4 RAID 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
2.5.5 RAID 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
2.5.6 RAID 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
2.5.7 RAID 00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
2.5.8 RAID 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
2.5.9 RAID 50 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
2.5.10 RAID 60 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Page 3
Table of Contents
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
2.6 RAID Configuration Strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
2.6.1 Maximizing Fault Tolerance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
2.6.2 Maximizing Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
2.6.3 Maximizing Storage Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
2.7 RAID Availability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
2.7.1 RAID Availability Concept . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
2.8 Configuration Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
2.9 Number of Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
2.9.1 Drive Group Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Chapter 3: SafeStore Disk Encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
3.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
3.2 Purpose and Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
3.3 Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
3.4 Workflow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
3.4.1 Enable Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
3.4.2 Change Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
3.4.3 Create Secure Virtual Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
3.4.4 Import a Foreign Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
3.5 Instant Secure Erase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
Chapter 4: WebBIOS Configuration Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
4.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
4.2 Starting the WebBIOS CU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
4.3 WebBIOS CU Main Screen Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
4.4 Managing Software Licensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
4.4.1 Managing MegaRAID Advanced Software Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
4.4.2 Reusing the Activation Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
4.4.3 Managing Advanced Software Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
4.4.4 Activating an Unlimited Key Over a Trial Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
4.4.5 Activating a Trial Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
4.4.6 Activating an Unlimited Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
4.4.7 Securing MegaRAID Advanced Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
4.4.8 Confirm Rehosting Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
4.4.9 Rehosting Process Complete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
4.5 Creating a Storage Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
4.5.1 Selecting the Configuration with the Configuration Wizard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
4.5.2 Using Automatic Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67
4.5.3 Using Manual Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68
4.6 Creating a CacheCade Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
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4.7 Selecting SafeStore Encryption Services Security Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7.1 Enabling the Security Key Identifier, Security Key, and Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7.2 Enabling Drive Security using EKM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7.3 Changing the Security Key Identifier, Security Key, and Pass Phrase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7.4 Change Security from EKM to LKM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7.5 Changing Security from LKM to EKM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7.6 Disabling the Drive Security Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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4.8 Viewing and Changing Device Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.8.1 Viewing Controller Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.8.2 Viewing Virtual Drive Properties, Policies, and Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.8.3 Viewing Drive Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.8.4 Viewing and Changing Battery Backup Unit Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Table of Contents
4.9 Expanding a Virtual Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
4.10 Using MegaRAID Recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.10.1 Recovery Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.10.2 Enabling the Recovery Advanced Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.10.3 Creating Snapshots and Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.10.4 Creating Concurrent Snapshots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.10.5 Selecting the Snapshot Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.10.6 Viewing Snapshot Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.10.7 Restoring a Virtual Drive by Rolling Back to a Snapshot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.10.8 Cleaning up a Snapshot Repository . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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4.11 Viewing System Event Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
4.12 Managing Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.12.1 Running a Consistency Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.12.2 Deleting a Virtual Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.12.3 Importing or Clearing a Foreign Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.12.4 Importing Foreign Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.12.5 Import Foreign Drives in EKM/EKM Secured Locked Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.12.6 Import Foreign Drives for LKM Secured Locked Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.12.7 Import Foreign Drives in LKM /EKM Secured Locked Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.12.8 Migrating the RAID Level of a Virtual Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.12.9 New Drives Attached to a MegaRAID Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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4.13 WebBIOS Dimmer Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.13.1 Power-Save mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.13.2 Power Save Settings-Advanced . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.13.3 Power-Save While Creating Virtual Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
5.1 Product Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
5.2 Novell NetWare, SCO, Solaris, FreeBSD, and DOS Operating System Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
5.3 Command Line Abbreviations and Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
5.3.1 Abbreviations Used in the Command Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
5.3.2 Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
5.4 Pre-boot MegaCLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
5.5 CacheCade - SSD Caching Related Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
5.5.1 Create a Solid State Drive Cache Drive to Use as Secondary Cache . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
5.5.2 Delete a Solid State Drive Cache Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
5.6 Software License Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
5.7 SafeStore Security Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.7.1 Use Instant Secure Erase on a Physical Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.7.2 Secure Data on a Virtual Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.7.3 Destroy the Security Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.7.4 Create a Security Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.7.5 Drive Security Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.7.6 Change the Security Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.7.7 Get the Security Key ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.7.8 Set the Security Key ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.7.9 Verify the Security Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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5.8 Controller Property-Related Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
5.8.1 Display Controller Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
5.8.2 Display Number of Controllers Supported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
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5.8.3 Enable or Disable Automatic Rebuild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.8.4 Flush Controller Cache . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.8.5 Set Controller Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.8.6 Display Specified Controller Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.8.7 Set Factory Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.8.8 Set SAS Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.8.9 Set Time and Date on Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.8.10 Display Time and Date on Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.8.11 Get Connector Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.8.12 Set Connector Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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5.9 Patrol Read-Related Controller Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
5.9.1 Set Patrol Read Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
5.9.2 Set Patrol Read Delay Interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
5.10 BIOS-Related Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
5.10.1 Set or Display Bootable Virtual Drive ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
5.10.2 Select BIOS Status Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
5.11 Battery Backup Unit-Related Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.11.1 Display BBU Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.11.2 Display BBU Status Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.11.3 Display BBU Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.11.4 Display BBU Design Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.11.5 Display Current BBU Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.11.6 Start BBU Learning Cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.11.7 Place Battery in Low-Power Storage Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.11.8 Set BBU Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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5.12 Options for Displaying Logs Kept at the Firmware Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
5.12.1 Event Log Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
5.12.2 Set BBU Terminal Logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
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5.13 Configuration-Related Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.13.1 Create a RAID Drive Group from All Unconfigured Good Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.13.2 Add RAID 0, 1, 5, or 6 Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.13.3 Add RAID 10, 50, or 60 Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.13.4 Clear the Existing Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.13.5 Save the Configuration on the Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.13.6 Restore the Configuration Data from File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.13.7 Manage Foreign Configuration Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.13.8 Delete Specified Virtual Drive(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.13.9 Display the Free Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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5.14 Virtual Drive-Related Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.14.1 Display Virtual Drive Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.14.2 Change the Virtual Drive Cache and Access Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.14.3 Display the Virtual Drive Cache and Access Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.14.4 Manage Virtual Drives Initialization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.14.5 Manage a Consistency Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.14.6 Schedule a Consistency Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.14.7 Manage a Background Initialization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.14.8 Perform a Virtual Drive Reconstruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.14.9 Display Information about Virtual Drives and Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.14.10 Display the Number of Virtual Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.14.11 Clear the LDBBM Table Entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.14.12 Display the List of Virtual Drives with Preserved Cache . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.14.13 Discard the Preserved Cache of a Virtual Drive(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.14.14 Expand a Virtual Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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5.15 Drive-Related Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.15.1 Display Drive Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.15.2 Set the Drive State to Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.15.3 Set the Drive State to Offline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.15.4 Change the Drive State to Unconfigured Good . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.15.5 Change the Drive State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.15.6 Manage a Drive Initialization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.15.7 Rebuild a Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.15.8 Locate the Drive(s) and Activate LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.15.9 Mark the Configured Drive as Missing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.15.10 Display the Drives in Missing Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.15.11 Replace the Configured Drives and Start an Automatic Rebuild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.15.12 Prepare the Unconfigured Drive for Removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.15.13 Display Total Number of Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.15.14 Display List of Physical Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.15.15 Download Firmware to the Physical Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.15.16 Configure All Free Drives into a RAID 0, 1, 5, or 6 Configuration for a Specific Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.15.17 Set the Mapping Mode of the Drives to the Selected Controller(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.15.18 Perform the Copyback Operation on the Selected Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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5.16 Enclosure-Related Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
5.16.1 Display Enclosure Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
5.16.2 Display Enclosure Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
5.17 Flashing the Firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
5.17.1 Flash the Firmware with the ROM File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
5.17.2 Flash the Firmware in Mode 0 with the ROM File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
5.18 SAS Topology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
5.19 Diagnostic-Related Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
5.19.1 Start Controller Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
5.19.2 Start Battery Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
5.20 Recovery (Snapshot)-Related Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.20.1 Enable the Snapshot Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.20.2 Disable the Snapshot Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.20.3 Take Snapshot of Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.20.4 Set the Snapshot Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.20.5 Delete a Snapshot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.20.6 Create a View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.20.7 Delete a View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.20.8 Rollback to an Old Snapshot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.20.9 Display Snapshot and View Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.20.10 Clean the Recoverable Free Space on the Drives in a Virtual Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.20.11 Display the Information for a Specific View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.20.12 Enabling the Snapshot Scheduler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.20.13 Displays the Read and Write Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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5.21 FastPath-related Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
5.22 Dimmer Switch-Related Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.22.1 Display Selected Adapter Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.22.2 Sets the Properties on the Selected Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.22.3 Displays the Power Saving Level on the Virtual Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.22.4 Displays about Adding a RAID Level to a Specified Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.22.5 Displays creating a RAID Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.22.6 Displays about Adding the Unconfigured Drive to a Specified Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.22.7 Displays the cache and access policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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5.23 Miscellaneous Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.23.1 Display the MegaCLI Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.23.2 Display Help for MegaCLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.23.3 Summary Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 6: MegaRAID Storage Manager Overview and Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
6.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.1.1 Creating Storage Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.1.2 Monitoring Storage Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.1.3 Maintaining Storage Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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6.2 Hardware and Software Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
6.3 Prerequisites to Running MSM Remote Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228
6.4 Installing MegaRAID Storage Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.4.1 Prerequisite for MSM Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.4.2 Installing MegaRAID Storage Manager Software on Microsoft Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.4.3 Installing MegaRAID Storage Manager for SPARC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.4.4 Installing MegaRAID Storage Manager Software for Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.4.5 Prerequisites for Installing MSM on RHEL6.0 x64 Operating System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.4.6 Linux Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.4.7 Kernel Upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.4.8 MSM Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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6.5 MegaRAID Storage Manager Support and Installation on VMWare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.1 Installing MegaRAID Storage Manager for VMWare Classic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.2 Uninstalling MegaRAID Storage Manager for VMWare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.3 MegaRAID Storage Manager Support on the VMWare ESXi Operating System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5.4 Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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6.6 Installing and Configuring a CIM Provider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240
6.6.1 Installing a CIM SAS Storage Provider on Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240
6.6.2 Installing a CIM SAS Storage Provider on Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
6.7 Installing and Configuring an SNMP Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.7.1 Prerequisite for LSI SNMP Agent RPM Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.7.2 Installing and Configuring an SNMP Agent on Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.7.3 Installing and Configuring an SNMP Agent on Solaris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.7.4 Installing an SNMP Agent on Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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6.8 MegaRAID Storage Manager Support and Installation on Solaris 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
6.8.1 Installing MegaRAID Storage Manager Software for Solaris 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
6.8.2 Uninstalling MegaRAID Storage Manager Software for Solaris 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
6.9 Prerequisites to Running MSM Remote Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248
Chapter 7: MegaRAID Storage Manager Window and Menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
7.1 Starting MegaRAID Storage Manager Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
7.2 MegaRAID Storage Manager Main Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.2.1 Dashboard/PhysicalView/Logical View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.2.2 Properties/Graphical View Tabs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.2.3 Event Log Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.2.4 Menu Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 8: Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261
8.1 Creating a New Storage Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.1.1 Selecting Virtual Drive Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.1.2 Optimum Controller settings for CacheCade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.1.3 Optimum Controller settings for FastPath . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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8.1.4 Creating a Virtual Drive Using Simple Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263
8.1.5 Creating a Virtual Drive Using Advanced Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268
8.2 Converting JBOD Drives to Unconfigured Good . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273
8.2.1 Converting JBOD to Unconfigured Good from the MSM Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274
8.3 Adding Hot Spare Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275
8.4 Changing Adjustable Task Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276
8.5 Changing Power Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.5.1 Enhanced Dimmer Switch Power Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.5.2 Power Save Settings - Advanced . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.5.3 Automatically Spin up Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.5.4 Power-Save Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.5.5 Power Save Mode - SSD Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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8.6 Changing Virtual Drive Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283
8.7 Changing a Virtual Drive Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.1 Accessing the Modify Drive Group Wizard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.2 Adding a Drive or Drives to a Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.3 Removing a Drive from a Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.4 Replacing a Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.5 Migrating the RAID Level of a Virtual Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7.6 New Drives Attached to a MegaRAID Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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8.8 Deleting a Virtual Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
Chapter 9: Monitoring System Events and Storage Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295
9.1 Monitoring System Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295
9.2 Configuring Alert Notifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2.1 Setting Alert Delivery Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2.2 Changing Alert Delivery Methods for Individual Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2.3 Changing the Severity Level for Individual Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2.4 Multiple Events Displayed in a Single Pop-up Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2.5 Entering or Editing the Sender E-mail Address and SMTP Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2.6 Authenticating a Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2.7 Saving Backup Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2.8 Loading Backup Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2.9 Adding E-mail Addresses of Recipients of Alert Notifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2.10 Testing E-mail Addresses of Recipients of Alert Notifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2.11 Removing E-mail Addresses of Recipients of Alert Notifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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9.3 Monitoring Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304
9.4 Monitoring Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305
9.5 Running a Patrol Read . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306
9.5.1 Patrol Read Task Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 308
9.6 Monitoring Virtual Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 308
9.7 Monitoring Enclosures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309
9.8 Monitoring Battery Backup Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309
9.8.1 Battery Learn Cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310
9.9 Monitoring Rebuilds and Other Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310
Chapter 10: Maintaining and Managing Storage Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
10.1 Initializing a Virtual Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
10.1.1 Running a Group Initialization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Page 9
Table of Contents
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
10.2 Running a Consistency Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.2.1 Setting the Consistency Check Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.2.2 Scheduling a Consistency Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.2.3 Running a Group Consistency Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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10.3 Scanning for New Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318
10.4 Rebuilding a Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318
10.5 Making a Drive Offline or Missing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319
10.6 Upgrading the Firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319
Chapter 11: Using MegaRAID® Advanced Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321
11.1 MegaRAID Advanced Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321
11.2 Recovery Advanced Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.1 MegaRAID Software Licensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.2 Managing MegaRAID Advanced Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.3 Activation Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.4 Advanced MegaRAID Software Status Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.5 Application Scenarios and Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.6 Activating an Unlimited Key Over a Trial Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.7 Configuring Keyvault (Re-hosting process) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.8 Rehosting Complete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.9 Deactivate Trial Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.10 MegaRAID Recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.11 Recovery Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.12 Enabling the Recovery Advanced Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.13 Snapshot Repository . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.14 Selecting the Virtual Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.15 Scheduling Snapshots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.16 Editing Snapshots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.17 Snapshot Base Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.18 Manage Snapshots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.19 Editing Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.20 Advanced Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.21 Create View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.22 Viewing Snapshot Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.23 No View Details for Snapshot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.24 No Snapshot Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.25 Creating Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.26 Restoring by Rolling Back to a Snapshot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.27 Restoring from a View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.28 Deleting a Snapshot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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11.3 CacheCade Advanced Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349
11.3.1 Using the CacheCade Advanced Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349
11.4 FastPath Advanced Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353
11.4.1 Setting FastPath Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353
11.5 LSI SafeStore Encryption Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354
11.5.1 Enabling Drive Security using EKM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355
11.5.2 Supporting EKM mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355
11.5.3 Change Security Settings- LKM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357
11.5.4 Change Security Settings - EKM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360
11.5.5 Importing Foreign Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361
11.5.6 Importing Foreign Drives to LKM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362
11.5.7 Importing Foreign Drives to EKM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362
11.5.8 Importing Foreign Drives to EKM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 363
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LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Table of Contents
11.5.9 Enabling Drive Security using LKM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.5.10 Changing the Drive Security Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.5.11 Disabling Drive Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.5.12 Importing or Clearing a Foreign Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
364
367
368
369
Appendix A: Events and Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373
A.1 Error Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373
A.2 Event Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373
Appendix B: MegaCLI Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387
B.1 Error Messages and Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387
Appendix C: Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
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Table of Contents
Page 12
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Chapter 1: Overview | SAS Technology
Chapter 1
Overview
This chapter provides an overview of this guide, which documents the utilities used to
configure, monitor, and maintain MegaRAID® Serial-attached SCSI (SAS) RAID
controllers with RAID control capabilities and the storage-related devices connected to
them.
This guide describes how to use the MegaRAID® Storage Manager™ software,
WebBIOS™ configuration utility, and MegaRAID command line interface (CLI). This
chapter documents the SAS technology, Serial ATA (SATA) technology, CacheCade™ –
SSD Caching software, Dimmer Switch™, EUFI 2.0, configuration scenarios, and drive
types.
NOTE: This guide does not include the latest CacheCade software and Enterprise Key
Management System (EKMS) feature images.
1.1
SAS Technology
The MegaRAID 6Gb/s SAS RAID controllers are high-performance intelligent PCI
Express-to-SCSI/Serial ATA II controllers with RAID control capabilities. MegaRAID 6Gb/s
SAS RAID controllers provide reliability, high performance, and fault-tolerant disk
subsystem management. They are an ideal RAID solution for the internal storage of
workgroup, departmental, and enterprise systems. MegaRAID 6Gb/s SAS RAID
controllers offer a cost-effective way to implement RAID in a server.
SAS technology brings a wealth of options and flexibility with the use of SAS devices,
Serial ATA (SATA) II devices, and CacheCade – SSD Caching software devices within the
same storage infrastructure. These devices bring individual characteristics that make
each of these more suitable choice depending on your storage needs. MegaRAID gives
you the flexibility to combine these two similar technologies on the same controller,
within the same enclosure, and in the same virtual drive.
NOTE: LSI recommends that you carefully assess any decision to combine SAS drives
and SATA drives within the same virtual drives. Although you can mix drives, LSI strongly
discourages this practice; this applies to both HDDs and CacheCade – SSD Caching
software.
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Page 13
Chapter 1: Overview | Serial-attached SCSI Device Interface
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
MegaRAID 6Gb/s SAS RAID controllers are based on the LSI first-to-market SAS IC
technology and proven MegaRAID technology. As second-generation PCI Express RAID
controllers, the MegaRAID SAS RAID controllers address the growing demand for
increased data throughput and scalability requirements across midrange and
enterprise-class server platforms. LSI offers a family of MegaRAID SAS RAID controllers
addressing the needs for both internal and external solutions.
The SAS controllers support the ANSI Serial Attached SCSI standard, version 1.1. In
addition, the controller supports the SATA II protocol defined by the Serial ATA
specification, version 1.0a. Supporting both the SAS and SATA II interfaces, the SAS
controller is a versatile controller that provides the backbone of both server
environments and high-end workstation environments.
Each port on the SAS RAID controller supports SAS devices, SATA II devices, or
CacheCade – SSD Caching software devices using the following protocols:
1.2
Serial-attached SCSI
Device Interface

SAS Serial SCSI Protocol (SSP), which enables communication with other SAS
devices

SATA II, which enables communication with other SATA II devices

Serial Management Protocol (SMP), which communicates topology management
information directly with an attached SAS expander device

Serial Tunneling Protocol (STP), which enables communication with a SATA II device
through an attached expander
SAS is a serial, point-to-point, enterprise-level device interface that leverages the
proven SCSI protocol set. SAS is a convergence of the advantages of SATA II, SCSI, and
Fibre Channel, and is the future mainstay of the enterprise and high-end workstation
storage markets. SAS offers a higher bandwidth per pin than parallel SCSI, and it
improves the signal and data integrity.
The SAS interface uses the proven SCSI command set to ensure reliable data transfers,
while providing the connectivity and flexibility of point-to-point serial data transfers.
The serial transmission of SCSI commands eliminates clock-skew challenges. The SAS
interface provides improved performance, simplified cabling, smaller connectors, lower
pin count, and lower power requirements when compared to parallel SCSI.
SAS controllers leverage a common electrical and physical connection interface that is
compatible with Serial ATA technology. The SAS and SATA II protocols use a thin, 7-wire
connector instead of the 68-wire SCSI cable or 26-wire ATA cable. The SAS/SATA II
connector and cable are easier to manipulate, allow connections to smaller devices,
and do not inhibit airflow. The point-to-point SATA II architecture eliminates inherent
difficulties created by the legacy ATA master-slave architecture, while maintaining
compatibility with existing ATA firmware.
1.3
Serial ATA II Features
The SATA bus is a high-speed, internal bus that provides a low pin count (LPC), low
voltage level bus for device connections between a host controller and a SATA device.
The following list describes the SATA II features of the RAID controllers:
Page 14

Supports SATA II data transfers of 3Gb/s

Supports STP data transfers of 3Gb/s
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Chapter 1: Overview | Solid State Drive Features
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
1.4
Solid State Drive Features

Provides a serial, point-to-point storage interface

Simplifies cabling between devices

Eliminates the master-slave construction used in parallel ATA

Allows addressing of multiple SATA II targets through an expander

Allows multiple initiators to address a single target (in a fail-over configuration)
through an expander
The MegaRAID firmware supports CacheCade – SSD Caching software drives attached
to MegaRAID SAS controllers. These drives are expected to behave like SATA HDDs or
SAS HDDs. The major advantages of CacheCade – SSD Caching software drives include:

High random read speed (because there is no read-write head to move)

High performance-to-power ratio, as these drives have very low power
consumption compared to HDDs

Low latency

High mechanical reliability

Lower weight and size (for low-capacity CacheCade – SSD Caching software drives)
The features and operations on CacheCade – SSD Caching software drives are the same
as for hard disk drives (HDD).
NOTE: MegaRAID implements support for only those SATA CacheCade – SSD Caching
software drives which support ATA-8 ACS compliance.
You can choose whether to allow a virtual drive to consist of both CacheCade – SSD
Caching software devices and HDDs. For a virtual drive that consists of CacheCade –
SSD Caching software only, you can choose whether to allow SAS CacheCade – SSD
Caching software drives and SATA CacheCade – SSD Caching software drives in that
virtual drive. For virtual drives that have both CacheCade – SSD Caching software and
HDDs, you can choose whether to mix SAS and SATA HDD drives with SAS and SATA
CacheCade – SSD Caching software devices in various combinations.l
NOTE: Support for SATA SDD drives applies only to those drives that support ATA-8 ACS
compliance.
1.4.1
Solid State Drive Guard
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
CacheCade – SSD Caching software is known for its reliability and performance.
CacheCade – SSD Caching software Guard™, a feature that is unique to MegaRAID,
increases the reliability of CacheCade – SSD Caching software by automatically copying
data from a drive with potential to fail to a designated hot spare or newly inserted
drive. Because CacheCade – SSD Caching software are very reliable, non-redundant
RAID 0 configurations are much more common than in the past. CacheCade – SSD
Caching software Guard offers added data protection for RAID 0 configurations.
Page 15
Chapter 1: Overview | Dimmer Switch Feature
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
CacheCade – SSD Caching software Guard works by looking for a predictive failure
while monitoring the SDD Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology
(S.M.A.R.T.) error log. If errors indicate a CacheCade – SSD Caching software failure is
imminent, MegaRAID starts a rebuild to preserve the data on the CacheCade – SSD
Caching software and sends appropriate warning event notifications.
1.5
Dimmer Switch Feature
Powering and cooling drives represents a major cost for data centers. The new
MegaRAID Dimmer Switch reduces the power consumption of the devices connected
to a MegaRAID controller. This helps to share resources more efficiently and lower costs.
With Dimmer Switch, any unconfigured drive connected to a MegaRAID controller is
spun down after 30 minutes of inactivity, reducing its power usage. Spun down drives
are spun up automatically when you create a configuration using those drives.
1.6
UEFI 2.0 Support
Significant challenges face operating system and platform developers to innovate
using the legacy PC-AT BIOS boot environment. These include memory constraints,
maintenance challenges, and increased complexities due to a lack of industry-wide
standards.
To handle these challenges, the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) was
developed to do the following:

Define a clean interface between operating systems and the hardware platform at
boot time.

Support an architecture-independent mechanism for initializing add-in cards.
UEFI 2.0 provides MegaRAID customers with expanded platform support. The
MegaRAID UEFI 2.0 driver, a boot service device driver, handles block IO requests and
SCSI pass-through commands (SPT), and offers the ability to launch pre-boot
MegaRAID management applications through a driver configuration protocol (DCP).
The UEFI driver also supports driver diagnostic protocol, which allows administrators to
access pre-boot diagnostics.
1.7
Page 16
Configuration Scenarios
There are three main scenarios in which you can use the SAS RAID controllers:

Low-end, internal SATA II configurations: In this configuration, use the RAID
controller as a high-end SATA II compatible controller that connects up to eight
disks either directly or through a port expander. This configuration is mostly for
low-end or entry servers. Enclosure management is provided through out-of-band
I2C bus. Side bands of both types of internal SAS connectors support the SFF-8485
(SGPIO) interface.

Midrange internal SAS configurations: This configuration is like the internal SATA
II configurations, but with high-end disks. This configuration is more suitable for
low-range to midrange servers.

High-end external SAS/SATA II configurations: This configuration is for both
internal connectivity and external connectivity, using SATA II drives, SAS drives, or
both. External enclosure management is supported through in-band,
SCSI-enclosed storage. The configuration must support STP and SMP.
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Chapter 1: Overview | Configuration Scenarios
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Figure 1 shows a direct-connect configuration. The Inter-IC (I2C) interface
communicates with peripherals. The external memory bus provides a 32-bit memory
bus, parity checking, and chip select signals for pipelined synchronous burst static
random access memory (PSBRAM), nonvolatile static random access memory
(NVSRAM), and Flash ROM.
NOTE: The external memory bus is 32-bit for the SAS 8704ELP and the SAS 8708ELP,
and 64-bit for the SAS 8708EM2, the SAS 8880EM2, and the SAS 8888ELP.
SAS/SATA II Device
SAS/SATA II Device
SAS
PCI Express
RAID Controller
32-Bit Memory
Address/Data
Bus
SAS/SATA II Device
I2C
Interface
Flash ROM/
PSBRAM/
NVSRAM
I2C
SAS/SATA II Device
PCI Express Interface
Figure 1:
Example of an LSI SAS Direct-Connect Application
Figure 2 shows an example of a SAS RAID controller configured with an LSISASx12
expander that is connected to SAS disks, SATA II disks, or both.
PCI Express Interface
8
SAS RAID Controller
LSISAS1078
PCI Express to SAS ROC
SAS/SATA
Drives
LSISASx12
Expander
SAS/SATA II
Drives
Figure 2:
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
SAS/SATA II
Drives
Peripheral
Bus
72-bit DDR/DDR2
with ECC
Interface
Flash ROM/
NVSRAM/
I2C/UART
SRAM
SDRAM
SRAM
LSISASx12
Expander
SAS/SATA II
Drives
SAS/SATA II
Drives
Example of an LSI SAS RAID Controller Configured with an LSISASx12
Expander
Page 17
Chapter 1: Overview | Technical Support
1.7.1
Valid Drive Mix Configurations
with HDDs and CacheCade – SSD
Caching software
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
You can allow a virtual drive to consist of both CacheCade – SSD Caching software and
HDDs. For virtual drives that have both CacheCade – SSD Caching software and HDDs,
you can choose whether to mix SAS drives and SATA drives on the CacheCade – SSD
Caching software devices.
You can choose whether to allow a virtual drive to consist of both CacheCade – SSD
Caching software devices and HDDs. For a virtual drive that consists of CacheCade –
SSD Caching software only, you can choose whether to allow SAS CacheCade – SSD
Caching software drives and SATA CacheCade – SSD Caching software drives in that
virtual drive. For virtual drives that have both CacheCade – SSD Caching software and
HDDs, you can choose whether to mix SAS and SATA HDD drives with SAS and SATA
CacheCade – SSD Caching software devices in various combinations.
Table 1 lists the valid drive mix configurations you can use when you create virtual
drives and allow HDD and CacheCade – SSD Caching software mixing. The valid drive
mix configurations are based on manufacturer settings.
Table 1:
#
Valid Drive Mix Configurations
Valid Drive Mix Configurations
1.
SAS HDD with SAS SDD (SAS-only configuration)
2.
SATA HDD with SATA CacheCade – SSD Caching software (SATA-only configuration)
3.
SAS HDD with a mix of SAS and SATA CacheCade – SSD Caching software (a SATA HDD
cannot be added)
4.
SATA HDD with a mix of SAS and SATA CacheCade – SSD Caching software (a SAS HDD
cannot be added)
5.
SAS CacheCade – SSD Caching software with a mix of SAS and SATA HDD (a SATA
CacheCade – SSD Caching software cannot be added)
6.
SATA CacheCade – SSD Caching software with a mix of SAS and SATA HDD (a SAS
CacheCade – SSD Caching software cannot be added)
7.
A mix of SAS and SATA HDD with a mix of SAS and SATA CacheCade – SSD Caching
software
8.
A CacheCade – SSD Caching software cannot be added to a HDD, but a SAS/SATA mix is
allowed.
NOTE: Only one of the valid configurations listed in Table 1 is allowed based on your
controller card manufacturing settings.
NOTE: The valid drive mix also applies to hot spares. For hot spare information, see
Section 2.4.12, Hot Spares, on page 28.
1.8
Technical Support
For assistance with installing, configuring, or running your MegaRAID 6Gb/s SAS RAID
controller, contact an LSI Technical Support representative:
Click the following link to access the LSI Technical Support page for storage and board
support:
http://www.lsi.com/support/storage/tech_support/index.html
Page 18
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Chapter 1: Overview | Technical Support
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
From this page, you can send an e-mail or call a Technical Support representative, or
submit a new service request and view its status.
E-mail:
http://www.lsi.com/support/support_form.html
Phone Support:
http://www.lsi.com/support/storage/phone_tech_support/index.html
1-800-633-4545 (North America)
00-800-5745-6442 (International)
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Page 19
Chapter 1: Overview | Technical Support
Page 20
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Chapter 2: Introduction to RAID | RAID Description
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Chapter 2
Introduction to RAID
This chapter describes Redundant Array of Independent Disks (RAID), RAID functions
and benefits, RAID components, RAID levels, and configuration strategies. In addition, it
defines the RAID availability concept, and offers tips for configuration planning.
2.1
RAID Description
RAID is an array, or group, of multiple independent physical drives that provide high
performance and fault tolerance. A RAID drive group improves I/O (input/output)
performance and reliability. The RAID drive group appears to the host computer as a
single storage unit or as multiple virtual units. I/O is expedited because several drives
can be accessed simultaneously.
2.2
RAID Benefits
RAID drive groups improve data storage reliability and fault tolerance compared to
single-drive storage systems. Data loss resulting from a drive failure can be prevented
by reconstructing missing data from the remaining drives. RAID has gained popularity
because it improves I/O performance and increases storage subsystem reliability.
2.3
RAID Functions
Virtual drives are drive groups or spanned drive groups that are available to the
operating system. The storage space in a virtual drive is spread across all of the drives in
the drive group.
Your drives must be organized into virtual drives in a drive group and they must be able
to support the RAID level that you select. Below are some common RAID functions:
2.4
Components and
Features
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010

Creating hot spare drives

Configuring drive groups and virtual drives

Initializing one or more virtual drives

Accessing controllers, virtual drives, and drives individually

Rebuilding failed drives

Verifying that the redundancy data in virtual drives using RAID level 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, or
60 is correct

Reconstructing virtual drives after changing RAID levels or adding a drive to a drive
group

Selecting a host controller to work on
RAID levels describe a system for ensuring the availability and redundancy of data
stored on large disk subsystems. See Section 2.5, RAID Levels for detailed information
about RAID levels. The following subsections describes the components of RAID drive
groups and RAID levels.
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Chapter 2: Introduction to RAID | Components and Features
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
2.4.1
Drive Group
A drive group is a group of physical drives. These drives are managed in partitions
known as virtual drives.
2.4.2
Virtual Drive
A virtual drive is a partition in a drive group that is made up of contiguous data
segments on the drives. A virtual drive can consist of an entire drive group, more than
one entire drive group, a part of a drive group, parts of more than one drive group, or a
combination of any two of these conditions.
2.4.3
Fault Tolerance
Fault tolerance is the capability of the subsystem to undergo a drive failure or failures
without compromising data integrity, and processing capability. The RAID controller
provides this support through redundant drive groups in RAID levels 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, and
60. The system can still work properly even with drive failure in a drive group, though
performance can be degraded to some extent.
In a span of RAID 1 drive groups, each RAID 1 drive group has two drives and can
tolerate one drive failure. The span of RAID 1 drive groups can contain up to 32 drives,
and tolerate up to 16 drive failures - one in each drive group. A RAID 5 drive group can
tolerate one drive failure in each RAID 5 drive group. A RAID 6 drive group can tolerate
up to two drive failures.
Each spanned RAID 10 virtual drive can tolerate multiple drive failures, as long as each
failure is in a separate drive group. A RAID 50 virtual drive can tolerate two drive
failures, as long as each failure is in a separate drive group. RAID 60 drive groups can
tolerate up to two drive failures in each drive group.
NOTE: RAID level 0 is not fault tolerant. If a drive in a RAID 0 drive group fails, the whole
virtual drive (all drives associated with the virtual drive) fails.
Fault tolerance is often associated with system availability because it allows the system
to be available during the failures. However, this means that it is also important for the
system to be available during the repair of the problem.
A hot spare is an unused drive that, in case of a disk failure in a redundant RAID drive
group, can be used to rebuild the data and re-establish redundancy. After the hot spare
is automatically moved into the RAID drive group, the data is automatically rebuilt on
the hot spare drive. The RAID drive group continues to handle requests while the
rebuild occurs.
Auto-rebuild allows a failed drive to be replaced and the data automatically rebuilt by
“hot-swapping” the drive in the same drive bay. The RAID drive group continues to
handle requests while the rebuild occurs.
2.4.3.1
Page 22
Multipathing
The firmware provides support for detecting and using multiple paths from the RAID
controllers to the SAS devices that are in enclosures. Devices connected to enclosures
have multiple paths to them. With redundant paths to the same port of a device, if one
path fails, another path can be used to communicate between the controller and the
device. Using multiple paths with load balancing, instead of a single path, can increase
reliability through redundancy.
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Chapter 2: Introduction to RAID | Components and Features
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Applications show the enclosures and the drives connected to the enclosures. The
firmware dynamically recognizes new enclosures added to a configuration along with
their contents (new drives). In addition, the firmware dynamically adds the enclosure
and its contents to the management entity currently in-use.
Multipathing provides the following features:

Support for failover, in the event of path failure

Auto-discovery of new or restored paths while the system is online, and reversion to
system load balancing policy

Measurable bandwidth improvement to the multi-path device

Support for changing the load balancing path while the system is online
The firmware determines whether enclosure modules (ESMs) are part of the same
enclosure. When a new enclosure module is added (allowing multi-path) or removed
(going single path), an Asynchronous Event Notification (AEN) is generated. AENs
about drives contain correct information about the "enclosure", when the drives are
connected by multiple paths. The enclosure module detects partner ESMs and issue
events appropriately.
In a system with two ESMs, you can replace one of the ESMs without affecting the
virtual drive availability. For example, the controller can run heavy I/Os, and when you
replace one of the ESM modules, I/Os should not stop. The controller uses different
paths to balance the load on the entire system.
In the MegaRAID Storage Manager utility, when multiple paths are available to a drive,
the drive information will show only one enclosure. The utility shows that a redundant
path is available to a drive. All drives with a redundant path display this information.
The firmware supports online replacement of enclosure modules.
2.4.4
Consistency Check
The Consistency Check operation verifies correctness of the data in virtual drives that
use RAID levels 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, and 60. (RAID 0 does not provide data redundancy). For
example, in a system with parity, checking consistency means computing the data on
one drive and comparing the results to the contents of the parity drive.
NOTE: It is recommended that you perform a consistency check at least once a month.
2.4.5
Copyback
The copyback feature allows you to copy data from a source drive of a virtual drive to a
destination drive that is not a part of the virtual drive. Copyback is often used to create
or restore a specific physical configuration for a drive group (for example, a specific
arrangement of drive group members on the device I/O buses). Copyback can be run
automatically or manually.
Typically, when a drive fails or is expected to fail, the data is rebuilt on a hot spare. The
failed drive is replaced with a new disk. Then the data is copied from the hot spare to
the new drive, and the hot spare reverts from a rebuild drive to its original hot spare
status. The copyback operation runs as a background activity, and the virtual drive is
still available online to the host.
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Copyback is also initiated when the first Self-Monitoring Analysis and Reporting
Technology (SMART) error occurs on a drive that is part of a virtual drive. The
destination drive is a hot spare that qualifies as a rebuild drive. The drive with the
SMART error is marked as "failed" only after the successful completion of the copyback.
This avoids putting the drive group in degraded status.
NOTE: During a copyback operation, if the drive group involved in the copyback is
deleted because of a virtual drive deletion, the destination drive reverts to an
Unconfigured Good state or hot spare state.
Order of Precedence.
In the following scenarios, rebuild takes precedence over the copyback operation:

If a copyback operation is already taking place to a hot spare drive, and any virtual
drive on the controller degrades, the copyback operation aborts, and a rebuild
starts. The rebuild changes the virtual drive to the optimal state.

The rebuild operation takes precedence over the copyback operation when the
conditions exist to start both operations. For example:
— Where the hot spare is not configured (or unavailable) in the system.
— There are two drives (both members of virtual drives), with one drive exceeding
the SMART error threshold, and the other failed.
— If you add a hot spare (assume a global hot spare) during a copyback operation,
the copyback is aborted, and the rebuild operation starts on the hot spare.
2.4.6
Background Initialization
Background initialization is a check for media errors on the drives when you create a
virtual drive. It is an automatic operation that starts five minutes after you create the
virtual drive. This check ensures that striped data segments are the same on all of the
drives in the drive group.
Background initialization is similar to a consistency check. The difference between the
two is that a background initialization is forced on new virtual drives and a consistency
check is not.
New RAID 5 virtual drives and new RAID 6 virtual drives require a minimum number of
drives for a background initialization to start. If there are fewer drives, the background
initialization does not start. The following number of drives are required:
— New RAID 5 virtual drives must have at least five drives for background
initialization to start.
— New RAID 6 virtual drives must have at least seven drives for background
initialization to start.
The default and recommended background initialization rate is 30 percent. Before you
change the rebuild rate, you must stop the background initialization or the rate change
will not affect the background initialization rate. After you stop background
initialization and change the rebuild rate, the rate change takes effect when you restart
background initialization.
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2.4.7
Patrol Read
Patrol read involves the review of your system for possible drive errors that could lead
to drive failure and then action to correct errors. The goal is to protect data integrity by
detecting drive failure before the failure can damage data. The corrective actions
depend on the drive group configuration and the type of errors.
Patrol read starts only when the controller is idle for a defined period of time and no
other background tasks are active, though it can continue to run during heavy I/O
processes.
You can use the MegaRAID Command Tool or the MegaRAID Storage Manager to select
the patrol read options, which you can use to set automatic or manual operation, or
disable patrol read. See Section 5.8, Controller Property-Related Options or Section 9.5,
Running a Patrol Read.
2.4.8
Disk Striping
Disk striping allows you to write data across multiple drives instead of just one drive.
Disk striping involves partitioning each drive storage space into stripes that can vary in
size from 8KB to 1024 KB. These stripes are interleaved in a repeated sequential manner.
The combined storage space is composed of stripes from each drive. It is
recommended that you keep stripe sizes the same across RAID drive groups.
For example, in a four-disk system using only disk striping (used in RAID level 0),
segment 1 is written to disk 1, segment 2 is written to disk 2, and so on. Disk striping
enhances performance because multiple drives are accessed simultaneously, but disk
striping does not provide data redundancy.
Segment 1
Segment 5
Segment 9
Figure 3:
2.4.9
Segment 2
Segment 6
Segment 10
Segment 3
Segment 7
Segment 11
Segment 4
Segment 8
Segment 12
Example of Disk Striping (RAID 0)
2.4.8.1
Stripe Width
Stripe width is the number of drives involved in a drive group where striping is
implemented. For example, a four-disk drive group with disk striping has a stripe width
of four.
2.4.8.2
Stripe Size
The stripe size is the length of the interleaved data segments that the RAID controller
writes across multiple drives, not including parity drives. For example, consider a stripe
that contains 64 KB of disk space and has 16 KB of data residing on each disk in the
stripe. In this case, the stripe size is 64 KB and the strip size is 16 KB.
2.4.8.3
Strip Size
The strip size is the portion of a stripe that resides on a single drive.
Disk Mirroring
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
With mirroring (used in RAID 1 and RAID 10), data written to one drive is simultaneously
written to another drive. The primary advantage of disk mirroring is that it provides 100
percent data redundancy. Because the contents of the disk are completely written to a
second disk, data is not lost if one disk fails. In addition, both drives contain the same
data at all times, so either disk can act as the operational disk. If one disk fails, the
contents of the other disk can be used to run the system and reconstruct the failed disk.
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Disk mirroring provides 100 percent redundancy, but is expensive because each drive
in the system must be duplicated. Figure 4 shows an example of disk mirroring.
Segment 1
Segment 2
Segment 3
Segment 4
Figure 4:
2.4.10
Segment 1 Duplicated
Segment 2 Duplicated
Segment 3 Duplicated
Segment 4 Duplicated
Example of Disk Mirroring (RAID 1)
Parity generates a set of redundancy data from two or more parent data sets. The
redundancy data can be used to reconstruct one of the parent data sets in the event of
a drive failure. Parity data does not fully duplicate the parent data sets, but parity
generation can slow the write process. In RAID, this method is applied to entire drives
or stripes across all of the drives in a drive group. The types of parity are described in
Table 2.
Parity
Table 2:
Types of Parity
Parity Type
Description
Dedicated
The parity data on two or more drives is stored on an additional disk.
Distributed
The parity data is distributed across more than one drive in the system.
RAID 5 combines distributed parity with disk striping. If a single drive fails, it can be
rebuilt from the parity and the data on the remaining drives. An example of a RAID 5
drive group is shown in Figure 5. RAID 5 uses parity to provide redundancy for one
drive failure without duplicating the contents of entire drives. RAID 6 uses distributed
parity and disk striping, also, but adds a second set of parity data so that it can survive
up to two drive failures.
Segment 1
Segment 7
Segment 2
Segment 8
Segment 3
Segment 9
Segment 4
Segment 10
Segment 13
Segment 19
Segment 25
Parity (26–30)
Segment 14
Segment 20
Parity (21-25)
Segment 26
Segment 15
Parity (16-20)
Segment 21
Segment 27
Parity (11–15)
Segment 16
Segment 22
Segment 28
Segment 5
Parity (6-10)
Segment 11
Segment 17
Segment 23
Segment 29
Parity (1-5)
Segment 6
Segment 12
Segment 18
Segment 24
Segment 30
Note: Parity is distributed across all drives in the drive group.
Figure 5:
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Example of Distributed Parity (RAID 5)
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2.4.11
Disk Spanning
Disk spanning allows multiple drives to function like one big drive. Spanning
overcomes lack of disk space and simplifies storage management by combining
existing resources or adding relatively inexpensive resources. For example, four 20 GB
drives can be combined to appear to the operating system as a single 80 GB drive.
Spanning alone does not provide reliability or performance enhancements. Spanned
virtual drives must have the same stripe size and must be contiguous. In Figure 6, RAID
1 drive groups are turned into a RAID 10 drive group.
NOTE: Make sure that the spans are in different backplanes, so that if one span fails, you
do not lose the whole drive group.
60 GB
60 GB
Can Be Accessed as
One 120-GB Drive
Figure 6:
60 GB
60 GB
Can Be Accessed as
One 120-GB Drive
Example of Disk Spanning
Spanning two contiguous RAID 0 virtual drives does not produce a new RAID level or
add fault tolerance. It does increase the capacity of the virtual drive and improves
performance by doubling the number of spindles.
2.4.11.1 Spanning for RAID 00,
RAID 10, RAID 50, and RAID 60
Table 3 describes how to configure RAID 00, RAID 10, RAID 50, and RAID 60 by
spanning. The virtual drives must have the same stripe size and the maximum number
of spans is eight. The full drive capacity is used when you span virtual drives; you
cannot specify a smaller drive capacity.
See Chapter 8, Configuration for detailed procedures for configuring drive groups and
virtual drives, and spanning the drives.
Table 3:
Spanning for RAID 10, RAID 50, and RAID 60
Level
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Description
00
Configure RAID 00 by spanning two contiguous RAID 0 virtual drives, up to
the maximum number of supported devices for the controller.
10
Configure RAID 10 by spanning two contiguous RAID 1 virtual drives, up to
the maximum number of supported devices for the controller. RAID 10
supports a maximum of eight spans. You must use an even number of drives
in each RAID virtual drive in the span. The RAID 1 virtual drives must have
the same stripe size.
50
Configure RAID 50 by spanning two contiguous RAID 5 virtual drives. The
RAID 5 virtual drives must have the same stripe size.
60
Configure RAID 60 by spanning two contiguous RAID 6 virtual drives. The
RAID 6 virtual drives must have the same stripe size.
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NOTE: In a spanned VD (R10, R50, R60) the span numbering starts from Span 0, Span 1,
Span 2, and so on.
2.4.12
Hot Spares
A hot spare is an extra, unused drive that is part of the disk subsystem. It is usually in
standby mode, ready for service if a drive fails. Hot spares permit you to replace failed
drives without system shutdown or user intervention. MegaRAID SAS RAID controllers
can implement automatic and transparent rebuilds of failed drives using hot spare
drives, providing a high degree of fault tolerance and zero downtime.
NOTE: When running RAID 0 and RAID 5 virtual drives on the same set of drives (a sliced
configuration), a rebuild to a hot spare will not occur after a drive failure until the
RAID 0 virtual drive is deleted.
The RAID management software allows you to specify drives as hot spares. When a hot
spare is needed, the RAID controller assigns the hot spare that has a capacity closest to
and at least as great as that of the failed drive to take the place of the failed drive. The
failed drive is removed from the virtual drive and marked ready awaiting removal once
the rebuild to a hot spare begins. You can make hot spares of the drives that are not in a
RAID virtual drive.
You can use the RAID management software to designate the hot spare to have
enclosure affinity, meaning that if there are drive failures present on a split backplane
configuration, the hot spare will be used first on the backplane side that it resides in.
If the hot spare is designated as having enclosure affinity, it will attempt to rebuild any
failed drives on the backplane that it resides in before rebuilding any other drives on
other backplanes.
NOTE: If a rebuild to a hot spare fails for any reason, the hot spare drive will be marked
as "failed". If the source drive fails, both the source drive and the hot spare drive will be
marked as "failed".
There are two types of hot spares:

Global hot spare

Dedicated hot spare
2.4.12.1 Global Hot Spare
A global hot spare drive can be used to replace any failed drive in a redundant drive
group as long as its capacity is equal to or larger than the coerced capacity of the failed
drive. A global hot spare defined on any channel should be available to replace a failed
drive on both channels.
2.4.12.2 Dedicated Hot Spare
A dedicated hot spare can be used to replace a failed drive only in a selected drive
group. One or more drives can be designated as a member of a spare drive pool. The
most suitable drive from the pool is selected for fail over. A dedicated hot spare is used
before one from the global hot spare pool.
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Hot spare drives can be located on any RAID channel. Standby hot spares (not being
used in RAID drive group) are polled every 60 seconds at a minimum, and their status
made available in the drive group management software. RAID controllers offer the
ability to rebuild with a disk that is in a system, but not initially set to be a hot spare.
Observe the following parameters when using hot spares:
2.4.13
Disk Rebuilds

Hot spares are used only in drive groups with redundancy: RAID levels 1, 5, 6, 10, 50,
and 60.

A hot spare connected to a specific RAID controller can be used to rebuild a drive
that is connected to the same controller only.

You must assign the hot spare to one or more drives through the controller BIOS or
use drive group management software to place it in the hot spare pool.

A hot spare must have free space equal to or greater than the drive it replaces. For
example, to replace an 18-GB drive, the hot spare must be 18 GB or larger.
When a drive in a RAID drive group fails, you can rebuild the drive by recreating the
data that was stored on the drive before it failed. The RAID controller recreates the data
using the data stored on the other drives in the drive group. Rebuilding can be done
only in drive groups with data redundancy, which includes RAID 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, and 60
drive groups.
The RAID controller uses hot spares to rebuild failed drives automatically and
transparently, at user-defined rebuild rates. If a hot spare is available, the rebuild can
start automatically when a drive fails. If a hot spare is not available, the failed drive must
be replaced with a new drive so that the data on the failed drive can be rebuilt.
The failed drive is removed from the virtual drive and marked ready awaiting removal
when the rebuild to a hot spare begins. If the system goes down during a rebuild, the
RAID controller automatically restarts the rebuild after the system reboots.
NOTE: When the rebuild to a hot spare begins, the failed drive is often removed from
the virtual drive before management applications detect the failed drive. When this
occurs, the events logs show the drive rebuilding to the hot spare without showing the
failed drive. The formerly failed drive will be marked as "ready" after a rebuild begins to
a hot spare.
NOTE: If a source drive fails during a rebuild to a hot spare, the rebuild fails, and the
failed source drive is marked as offline. In addition, the rebuilding hot spare drive is
changed back to a hot spare. After a rebuild fails because of a source drive failure, the
dedicated hot spare is still dedicated and assigned to the correct drive group, and the
global hot spare is still global.
An automatic drive rebuild will not start if you replace a drive during a RAID-level
migration. The rebuild must be started manually after the expansion or migration
procedure is complete. (RAID-level migration changes a virtual drive from one RAID
level to another.)
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2.4.14
Rebuild Rate
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
The rebuild rate is the percentage of the compute cycles dedicated to rebuilding failed
drives. A rebuild rate of 100 percent means that the system gives priority to rebuilding
the failed drives.
The rebuild rate can be configured between 0 percent and 100 percent. At 0 percent,
the rebuild is done only if the system is not doing anything else. At 100 percent, the
rebuild has a higher priority than any other system activity. Using 0 or 100 percent is
not recommended. The default rebuild rate is 30 percent.
2.4.15
Hot Swap
A hot swap is the manual replacement of a defective drive unit while the computer is
still running. When a new drive has been installed, a rebuild occurs automatically if:

The newly inserted drive is the same capacity as or larger than the failed drive.

It is placed in the same drive bay as the failed drive it is replacing.
The RAID controller can be configured to detect the new drives and rebuild the
contents of the drive automatically.
2.4.16
Drive States
A drive state is a property indicating the status of the drive. The drive states are
described in Table 4.
Table 4:
Drive States
State
Description
Online
A drive that can be accessed by the RAID controller and is part of the virtual
drive.
Unconfigured
Good
A drive that is functioning normally but is not configured as a part of a
virtual drive or as a hot spare.
Hot Spare
A drive that is powered up and ready for use as a spare in case an online
drive fails.
Failed
A drive that was originally configured as Online or Hot Spare, but on which
the firmware detects an unrecoverable error.
Rebuild
A drive to which data is being written to restore full redundancy for a virtual
drive.
Unconfigured Bad A drive on which the firmware detects an unrecoverable error; the drive was
Unconfigured Good or the drive could not be initialized.
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Missing
A drive that was Online but which has been removed from its location.
Offline
A drive that is part of a virtual drive but which has invalid data as far as the
RAID configuration is concerned.
When a virtual drive with cached data goes offline, the cache for the virtual
drive is discarded. Because the virtual drive is offline, the cache cannot be
saved.
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2.4.17
Virtual Drive States
The virtual drive states are described in Table 5.
Table 5:
Virtual Drive States
State
2.4.18
Beep Codes
Description
Optimal
The virtual drive operating condition is good. All configured drives are
online.
Degraded
The virtual drive operating condition is not optimal. One of the configured
drives has failed or is offline.
Partial Degraded
The operating condition in a RAID 6 virtual drive is not optimal. One of the
configured drives has failed or is offline. RAID 6 can tolerate up to two drive
failures.
Failed
The virtual drive has failed.
Offline
The virtual drive is not available to the RAID controller.
An alarm sounds on the MegaRAID controller when a virtual drive changes from an
optimal state to another state, when a hot spare rebuilds, and for test purposes.
Table 6:
Beep Codes, Events, and Virtual Drive States
Event
Virtual Drive State
Beep Code
RAID 0 virtual drive loses 1 or more
virtual drives
Offline
3 seconds on and 1 second off
RAID 1 loses a mirror drive
Degraded
1 second on and 1 second off
RAID 1 loses both drives
Offline
3 seconds on and 1 second off
RAID 5 loses 1 drive
Degraded
1 second on and 1 second off
RAID 5 loses 2 or more drives
Offline
3 seconds on and 1 second off
RAID 6 loses 1 drive
Partially
Degraded
1 second on and 1 second off
RAID 6 loses 2 drives
Degraded
1 second on and 1 second off
RAID 6 loses more than 2 drives
Offline
3 seconds on and 1 second off
A hot spare completes the rebuild
process and is brought into a drive
group
N/A
1 second on and 3 seconds off
2.4.19
Enclosure Management
Enclosure management is the intelligent monitoring of the disk subsystem by software
and/or hardware. The disk subsystem can be part of the host computer or can reside in
an external disk enclosure. Enclosure management helps you stay informed of events
in the disk subsystem, such as a drive or power supply failure. Enclosure management
increases the fault tolerance of the disk subsystem.
2.5
RAID Levels
The RAID controller supports RAID levels 0, 00, 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, and 60. The supported
RAID levels are summarized in the following section.
In addition, it supports independent drives (configured as RAID 0 and RAID 00.) The
following sections describe the RAID levels in detail.
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2.5.1
Summary of RAID Levels
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
RAID 0 uses striping to provide high data throughput, especially for large files in an
environment that does not require fault tolerance.
RAID 1 uses mirroring so that data written to one drive is simultaneously written to
another drive. This is good for small databases or other applications that require small
capacity but complete data redundancy.
RAID 5 uses disk striping and parity data across all drives (distributed parity) to provide
high data throughput, especially for small random access.
RAID 6 uses distributed parity, with two independent parity blocks per stripe, and disk
striping. A RAID 6 virtual drive can survive the loss of two drives without losing data. A
RAID 6 drive group, which requires a minimum of three drives, is similar to a RAID 5
drive group. Blocks of data and parity information are written across all drives. The
parity information is used to recover the data if one or two drives fail in the drive group.
A RAID 00 drive group is a spanned drive group that creates a striped set from a series
of RAID 0 drive groups.
RAID 10, a combination of RAID 0 and RAID 1, consists of striped data across mirrored
spans. A RAID 10 drive group is a spanned drive group that creates a striped set from a
series of mirrored drives. RAID 10 allows a maximum of eight spans. You must use an
even number of drives in each RAID virtual drive in the span. The RAID 1 virtual drives
must have the same stripe size. RAID 10 provides high data throughput and complete
data redundancy but uses a larger number of spans.
RAID 50, a combination of RAID 0 and RAID 5, uses distributed parity and disk striping.
A RAID 50 drive group is a spanned drive group in which data is striped across multiple
RAID 5 drive groups. RAID 50 works best with data that requires high reliability, high
request rates, high data transfers, and medium-to-large capacity.
NOTE: Having virtual drives of different RAID levels, such as RAID 0 and RAID 5, in the
same drive group is not allowed. For example, if an existing RAID 5 virtual drive is created
out of partial space in an array, the next virtual drive in the array has to be R5 only.
RAID 60, a combination of RAID 0 and RAID 6, uses distributed parity, with two
independent parity blocks per stripe in each RAID set, and disk striping. A RAID 60
virtual drive can survive the loss of two drives in each of the RAID 6 sets without losing
data. It works best with data that requires high reliability, high request rates, high data
transfers, and medium-to-large capacity.
2.5.2
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Selecting a RAID Level
To ensure the best performance, you should select the optimal RAID level when you
create a system drive. The optimal RAID level for your drive group depends on a
number of factors:

The number of drives in the drive group

The capacity of the drives in the drive group

The need for data redundancy

The disk performance requirements
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2.5.3
RAID 0
RAID 0 provides disk striping across all drives in the RAID drive group. RAID 0 does not
provide any data redundancy, but, along with RAID 0, does offer the best performance
of any RAID level. RAID 0 breaks up data into smaller segments, and then stripes the
data segments across each drive in the drive group. The size of each data segment is
determined by the stripe size. RAID 0 offers high bandwidth.
NOTE: RAID level 0 is not fault tolerant. If a drive in a RAID 0 drive group fails, the whole
virtual drive (all drives associated with the virtual drive) will fail.
By breaking up a large file into smaller segments, the RAID controller can use both SAS
drives and SATA drives to read or write the file faster. RAID 0 involves no parity
calculations to complicate the write operation. This makes RAID 0 ideal for applications
that require high bandwidth but do not require fault tolerance. Table 7 provides an
overview of RAID 0. Figure 7 provides a graphic example of a RAID 0 drive group.
Table 7:
RAID 0 Overview
Uses
Provides high data throughput, especially for large files. Any environment
that does not require fault tolerance.
Strong Points
Provides increased data throughput for large files.
No capacity loss penalty for parity.
Weak Points
Does not provide fault tolerance or high bandwidth.
All data lost if any drive fails.
Drives
1 to 32
Segment 1
Segment 3
Segment 5
Segment 7
Figure 7:
2.5.4
RAID 1
RAID 0 Drive Group Example with Two Drives
In RAID 1, the RAID controller duplicates all data from one drive to a second drive in the
drive group. RAID 1 supports an even number of drives from 2 through 32 in a single
span. RAID 1 provides complete data redundancy, but at the cost of doubling the
required data storage capacity. Table 8 provides an overview of RAID 1. Figure 8
provides a graphic example of a RAID 1 drive group.
Table 8:
Uses
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Segment 2
Segment 4
Segment 6
Segment 8
RAID 1 Overview
Use RAID 1 for small databases or any other environment that requires fault
tolerance but small capacity.
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Table 8:
RAID 1 Overview
Strong Points
Provides complete data redundancy. RAID 1 is ideal for any application that
requires fault tolerance and minimal capacity.
Weak Points
Requires twice as many drives. Performance is impaired during drive
rebuilds.
Drives
2 through 32 (must be an even number of drives)
Segment 1
Segment 1
Duplicate
Segment 2
Segment 2
Duplicate
Segment 3
Segment 3
Duplicate
Segment 4
Segment 4
Duplicate
Segment 5
Segment 5
Duplicate
Segment 6
Segment 6
Duplicate
7
Segment 7 Segment
Duplicate
...
Segment 8
Segment 8
Duplicate
...
...
RAID1
RAID1
Figure 8:
2.5.5
RAID 5
RAID1
...
RAID1
RAID 1 Drive Group
RAID 5 includes disk striping at the block level and parity. Parity is the data’s property of
being odd or even, and parity checking is used to detect errors in the data. In RAID 5,
the parity information is written to all drives. RAID 5 is best suited for networks that
perform a lot of small input/output (I/O) transactions simultaneously.
RAID 5 addresses the bottleneck issue for random I/O operations. Because each drive
contains both data and parity, numerous writes can take place concurrently.
Table 9 provides an overview of RAID 5. Figure 9 provides a graphic example of a RAID 5
drive group.
Table 9:
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RAID 5 Overview
Uses
Provides high data throughput, especially for large files. Use RAID 5 for
transaction processing applications because each drive can read and write
independently. If a drive fails, the RAID controller uses the parity drive to
recreate all missing information. Use also for office automation and online
customer service that requires fault tolerance. Use for any application that
has high read request rates but low write request rates.
Strong Points
Provides data redundancy, high read rates, and good performance in most
environments. Provides redundancy with lowest loss of capacity.
Weak Points
Not well-suited to tasks requiring lot of writes. Suffers more impact if no
cache is used (clustering). Drive performance will be reduced if a drive is
being rebuilt. Environments with few processes do not perform as well
because the RAID overhead is not offset by the performance gains in
handling simultaneous processes.
Drives
3 through 32
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Segment 1
Segment 7
Segment 2
Segment 8
Segment 3
Segment 9
Segment 4
Segment 10
Segment 13
Segment 19
Segment 25
Parity (26–30)
Segment 14
Segment 20
Parity (21-25)
Segment 26
Segment 15
Parity (16-20)
Segment 21
Segment 27
Parity (11–15)
Segment 16
Segment 22
Segment 28
Segment 5
Parity (6-10)
Segment 11
Segment 17
Segment 23
Segment 29
Parity (1-5)
Segment 6
Segment 12
Segment 18
Segment 24
Segment 30
Note: Parity is distributed across all drives in the drive group.
Figure 9:
2.5.6
RAID 6
RAID 5 Drive Group with Six Drives
RAID 6 is similar to RAID 5 (disk striping and parity), except that instead of one parity
block per stripe, there are two. With two independent parity blocks, RAID 6 can survive
the loss of two drives in a virtual drive without losing data. Provides a high level of data
protection through the use of a second parity block in each stripe. Use RAID 6 for data
that requires a very high level of protection from loss.
In the case of a failure of one drive or two drives in a virtual drive, the RAID controller
uses the parity blocks to recreate all of the missing information. If two drives in a RAID 6
virtual drive fail, two drive rebuilds are required, one for each drive. These rebuilds do
not occur at the same time. The controller rebuilds one failed drive, and then the other
failed drive.
Table 10 provides an overview of a RAID 6 drive group.
Table 10: RAID 6 Overview
Uses
Use for office automation and online customer service that requires fault
tolerance. Use for any application that has high read request rates but low
write request rates.
Strong Points
Provides data redundancy, high read rates, and good performance in most
environments. Can survive the loss of two drives or the loss of a drive while
another drive is being rebuilt. Provides the highest level of protection
against drive failures of all of the RAID levels. Read performance is similar to
that of RAID 5.
Weak Points
Not well-suited to tasks requiring a lot of writes. A RAID 6 virtual drive has to
generate two sets of parity data for each write operation, which results in a
significant decrease in performance during writes. Drive performance is
reduced during a drive rebuild. Environments with few processes do not
perform as well because the RAID overhead is not offset by the performance
gains in handling simultaneous processes. RAID 6 costs more because of the
extra capacity required by using two parity blocks per stripe.
Drives
3 through 32
Figure 2.5.7 shows a RAID 6 data layout. The second set of parity drives are denoted by
Q. The P drives follow the RAID 5 parity scheme.
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Segment 1
Segment 6
Segment 2
Segment 7
Segment 3
Segment 8
Segment 4
Parity (P5-P8)
Segment 11
Segment 16
Parity (P17-P20)
Segment 12
Parity (P13-P16)
Parity (Q17-Q20)
Parity (P9-P12)
Parity (Q13-Q16)
Segment 17
Parity (Q9–Q12)
Segment 13
Segment 18
Parity (P1-P4)
Parity (Q5-Q8)
Segment 9
Segment 14
Segment 19
Parity (Q1-Q4)
Segment 5
Segment 10
Segment 15
Segment 20
Note: Parity is distributed across all drives in the drive group.
Figure 10:
2.5.7
RAID 00
Example of Distributed Parity across Two Blocks in a Stripe (RAID 6)
A RAID 00 drive group is a spanned drive group that creates a striped set from a series
of RAID 0 drive groups. RAID 00 does not provide any data redundancy, but, along with
RAID 0, does offer the best performance of any RAID level. RAID 00 breaks up data into
smaller segments and then stripes the data segments across each drive in the drive
groups. The size of each data segment is determined by the stripe size. RAID 00 offers
high bandwidth.
NOTE: RAID level 00 is not fault tolerant. If a drive in a RAID 0 drive group fails, the whole
virtual drive (all drives associated with the virtual drive) will fail.
By breaking up a large file into smaller segments, the RAID controller can use both SAS
drives and SATA drives to read or write the file faster. RAID 00 involves no parity
calculations to complicate the write operation. This makes RAID 00 ideal for
applications that require high bandwidth but do not require fault tolerance. Table 11
provides an overview of RAID 00. Figure 11 provides a graphic example of a RAID 00
drive group.
Table 11: RAID 00 Overview
Page 36
Uses
Provides high data throughput, especially for large files. Any environment
that does not require fault tolerance.
Strong Points
Provides increased data throughput for large files.
No capacity loss penalty for parity.
Weak Points
Does not provide fault tolerance or high bandwidth.
All data lost if any drive fails.
Drives
2 through 256
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RAID 00
Segment 1
Segment 2
Segment 3
Segment 4
Segment 5
Segment 6
Segment 7
Segment 8
Segment 9
Segment 10
Segment 11
Segment 12
Segment 13
Segment 14
Segment 15
Segment 16
Segment 17
...
Segment 18
Segment 19
...
Segment 20
Segment 21
...
Segment 22
Segment 23
...
Segment 24
RAID 0
RAID 0
RAID 0
RAID 0
RAID 0
Figure 11:
2.5.8
RAID 10
RAID 00 Drive Group Example with Two Drives
RAID 10 is a combination of RAID 0 and RAID 1, and consists of stripes across mirrored
drives. RAID 10 breaks up data into smaller blocks and then mirrors the blocks of data
to each RAID 1 drive group. The first RAID 1 drive in each drive group then duplicates its
data to the second drive. The size of each block is determined by the stripe size
parameter, which is set during the creation of the RAID set. The RAID 1 virtual drives
must have the same stripe size.
Spanning is used because one virtual drive is defined across more than one drive
group. Virtual drives defined across multiple RAID 1 level drive groups are referred to as
RAID level 10, (1+0). Data is striped across drive groups to increase performance by
enabling access to multiple drive groups simultaneously.
Each spanned RAID 10 virtual drive can tolerate multiple drive failures, as long as each
failure is in a separate drive group. If there are drive failures, less than total drive
capacity is available.
Configure RAID 10 by spanning two contiguous RAID 1 virtual drives, up to the
maximum number of supported devices for the controller. RAID 10 supports a
maximum of eight spans, with a maximum of 32 drives per span. You must use an even
number of drives in each RAID 10 virtual drive in the span.
NOTE: Other factors, such as the type of controller, can restrict the number of drives
supported by RAID 10 virtual drives.
Table 12 provides an overview of RAID 10.
Table 12: RAID 10 Overview
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Uses
Appropriate when used with data storage that needs 100 percent
redundancy of mirrored drive groups and that also needs the enhanced I/O
performance of RAID 0 (striped drive groups.) RAID 10 works well for
medium-sized databases or any environment that requires a higher degree
of fault tolerance and moderate to medium capacity.
Strong Points
Provides both high data transfer rates and complete data redundancy.
Weak Points
Requires twice as many drives as all other RAID levels except RAID 1.
Drives
4 - The maximum number of drives supported by the controller (using an
even number of drives in each RAID 10 virtual drive in the span)
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In Figure 12, virtual drive 0 is created by distributing data across four drive groups
(drive groups 0 through 3).
RAID 10
Segment 1
Segment 1
Duplicate
Segment 2
Segment 2
Duplicate
Segment 3
Segment 3
Duplicate
Segment 4
Segment 4
Duplicate
Segment 5
Segment 5
Duplicate
Segment 6
Segment 6
Duplicate
7
Segment 7 Segment
Duplicate
...
Segment 8
Segment 8
Duplicate
...
...
RAID1
...
RAID1
RAID1
RAID1
RAID 0
Figure 12:
2.5.9
RAID 50
RAID 10 Level Virtual Drive
RAID 50 provides the features of both RAID 0 and RAID 5. RAID 50 includes both parity
and disk striping across multiple drive groups. RAID 50 is best implemented on two
RAID 5 drive groups with data striped across both drive groups.
RAID 50 breaks up data into smaller blocks and then stripes the blocks of data to each
RAID 5 disk set. RAID 5 breaks up data into smaller blocks, calculates parity by
performing an exclusive-or on the blocks and then writes the blocks of data and parity
to each drive in the drive group. The size of each block is determined by the stripe size
parameter, which is set during the creation of the RAID set.
RAID level 50 can support up to eight spans and tolerate up to eight drive failures,
though less than total drive capacity is available. Though multiple drive failures can be
tolerated, only one drive failure can be tolerated in each RAID 5 level drive group.
Table 13 provides an overview of RAID 50.
Table 13: RAID 50 Overview
Page 38
Uses
Appropriate when used with data that requires high reliability, high request
rates, high data transfer, and medium to large capacity.
Strong Points
Provides high data throughput, data redundancy, and very good
performance.
Weak Points
Requires 2 to 8 times as many parity drives as RAID 5.
Drives
Eight spans of RAID 5 drive groups containing 3-32 drives each (limited by
the maximum number of devices supported by the controller)
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RAID 50
Segment 1
Segment 2
(Segment 1,2)
Segment 3
Segment 4
(Segment 3,4)
Segment 6
(Segment 5,6)
Segment 5
Segment 8
(Segment 7,8)
Segment 7
(Segment 9,10)
Segment 9
Segment 10
Segment 11
Segment 12
(Segment 11,12)
RAID 5
RAID 5
RAID 0
Figure 13:
2.5.10
RAID 60
RAID 50 Level Virtual Drive
RAID 60 provides the features of both RAID 0 and RAID 6, and includes both parity and
disk striping across multiple drive groups. RAID 6 supports two independent parity
blocks per stripe. A RAID 60 virtual drive can survive the loss of two drives in each of the
RAID 6 sets without losing data. RAID 60 is best implemented on two RAID 6 drive
groups with data striped across both drive groups.
RAID 60 breaks up data into smaller blocks, and then stripes the blocks of data to each
RAID 6 disk set. RAID 6 breaks up data into smaller blocks, calculates parity by
performing an exclusive-or on the blocks and then writes the blocks of data and parity
to each drive in the drive group. The size of each block is determined by the stripe size
parameter, which is set during the creation of the RAID set.
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RAID 60 can support up to 8 spans and tolerate up to 16 drive failures, though less than
total drive capacity is available. Two drive failures can be tolerated in each RAID 6 level
drive group.
Table 14: RAID 60 Overview
Uses
Provides a high level of data protection through the use of a second parity
block in each stripe. Use RAID 60 for data that requires a very high level of
protection from loss.
In the case of a failure of one drive or two drives in a RAID set in a virtual
drive, the RAID controller uses the parity blocks to recreate all of the missing
information. If two drives in a RAID 6 set in a RAID 60 virtual drive fail, two
drive rebuilds are required, one for each drive. These rebuilds can occur at
the same time.
Use for office automation and online customer service that requires fault
tolerance. Use for any application that has high read request rates but low
write request rates.
Strong Points
Provides data redundancy, high read rates, and good performance in most
environments. Each RAID 6 set can survive the loss of two drives or the loss
of a drive while another drive is being rebuilt. Provides the highest level of
protection against drive failures of all of the RAID levels. Read performance is
similar to that of RAID 50, though random reads in RAID 60 might be slightly
faster because data is spread across at least one more disk in each RAID 6 set.
Weak Points
Not well suited to tasks requiring lot of writes. A RAID 60 virtual drive has to
generate two sets of parity data for each write operation, which results in a
significant decrease in performance during writes. Drive performance is
reduced during a drive rebuild. Environments with few processes do not
perform as well because the RAID overhead is not offset by the performance
gains in handling simultaneous processes. RAID 6 costs more because of the
extra capacity required by using two parity blocks per stripe.
Drives
A minimum of 8
Figure 14 shows a RAID 6 data layout. The second set of parity drives are denoted by Q.
The P drives follow the RAID 5 parity scheme.
RAID
60
Segment 1
Segment 2
Parity (Q3-Q4)
Parity (Q1-Q2)
Parity (P1-P2)
Segment 3
Segment 4
Parity (Q3-Q4)
Segment 8
Parity (P3-P4)
Segment 7
Segment 6
Parity (Q5-Q6)
Parity (P5-P6)
Parity (Q11–Q12)
Parity (P11-P12)
Segment 11
Segment 12
Parity (Q9–Q10)
Parity (P9-P10)
Segment 13
Segment 9
Parity (P15-P16)
Segment 15
Segment 16
Parity (Q15-Q16)
Parity (P13-P14)
Segment 14
Parity (P3-P4)
Segment 5
Segment 10
Parity (Q13-Q14)
RAID 6
RAID 6
RAID 0
Note: Parity is distributed across all drives in the drive group.
Figure 14:
2.6
RAID Configuration
Strategies
Page 40
RAID 60 Level Virtual Drive
The most important factors in RAID drive group configuration are:

Virtual drive availability (fault tolerance)

Virtual drive performance

Virtual drive capacity
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You cannot configure a virtual drive that optimizes all three factors, but it is easy to
choose a virtual drive configuration that maximizes one factor at the expense of
another factor. For example, RAID 1 (mirroring) provides excellent fault tolerance, but
requires a redundant drive.
The following subsections describe how to use the RAID levels to maximize virtual
drive availability (fault tolerance), virtual drive performance, and virtual drive capacity.
2.6.1
Maximizing Fault Tolerance
Fault tolerance is achieved through the ability to perform automatic and transparent
rebuilds using hot spare drives and hot swaps. A hot spare drive is an unused online
available drive that the RAID controller instantly plugs into the system when an active
drive fails. After the hot spare is automatically moved into the RAID drive group, the
failed drive is automatically rebuilt on the spare drive. The RAID drive group continues
to handle requests while the rebuild occurs.
A hot swap is the manual substitution of a replacement unit in a disk subsystem for a
defective one, where the substitution can be performed while the subsystem is
running hot swap drives. Auto-Rebuild in the WebBIOS Configuration Utility allows a
failed drive to be replaced and automatically rebuilt by “hot-swapping” the drive in the
same drive bay. The RAID drive group continues to handle requests while the rebuild
occurs, providing a high degree of fault tolerance and zero downtime.
Table 15: RAID Levels and Fault Tolerance
RAID
Level
Fault Tolerance
0
Does not provide fault tolerance. All data is lost if any drive fails. Disk striping writes data across multiple drives instead of just one drive.
It involves partitioning each drive storage space into stripes that can vary in size. RAID 0 is ideal for applications that require high
bandwidth but do not require fault tolerance.
1
Provides complete data redundancy. If one drive fails, the contents of the other drive in the drive group can be used to run the system
and reconstruct the failed drive.
The primary advantage of disk mirroring is that it provides 100 percent data redundancy. Since the contents of the drive are completely
written to a second drive, no data is lost if one of the drives fails. Both drives contain the same data at all times. RAID 1 is ideal for any
application that requires fault tolerance and minimal capacity.
5
Combines distributed parity with disk striping. Parity provides redundancy for one drive failure without duplicating the contents of
entire drives. If a drive fails, the RAID controller uses the parity data to reconstruct all missing information. In RAID 5, this method is
applied to entire drives or stripes across all drives in a drive group. Using distributed parity, RAID 5 offers fault tolerance with limited
overhead.
6
Combines distributed parity with disk striping. RAID 6 can sustain two drive failures and still maintain data integrity. Parity provides
redundancy for two drive failures without duplicating the contents of entire drives. If a drive fails, the RAID controller uses the parity
data to reconstruct all missing information. In RAID 6, this method is applied to entire drives or stripes across all of the drives in a drive
group. Using distributed parity, RAID 6 offers fault tolerance with limited overhead.
00
Does not provide fault tolerance. All data in a virtual drive is lost if any drive in that virtual drive fails. Disk striping writes data across
multiple drives instead of just one drive. It involves partitioning each drive storage space into stripes that can vary in size. RAID 00 is
ideal for applications that require high bandwidth but do not require fault tolerance.
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Table 15: RAID Levels and Fault Tolerance (Continued)
RAID
Level
Fault Tolerance
10
Provides complete data redundancy using striping across spanned RAID 1 drive groups. RAID 10 works well for any environment that
requires the 100 percent redundancy offered by mirrored drive groups. RAID 10 can sustain a drive failure in each mirrored drive group
and maintain drive integrity.
50
Provides data redundancy using distributed parity across spanned RAID 5 drive groups. RAID 50 includes both parity and disk striping
across multiple drives. If a drive fails, the RAID controller uses the parity data to recreate all missing information. RAID 50 can sustain
one drive failure per RAID 5 drive group and still maintain data integrity.
60
Provides data redundancy using distributed parity across spanned RAID 6 drive groups. RAID 60 can sustain two drive failures per RAID
6 drive group and still maintain data integrity. It provides the highest level of protection against drive failures of all of the RAID levels.
RAID 60 includes both parity and disk striping across multiple drives. If a drive fails, the RAID controller uses the parity data to recreate
all missing information.
2.6.2
Maximizing Performance
A RAID disk subsystem improves I/O performance. The RAID drive group appears to the
host computer as a single storage unit or as multiple virtual units. I/O is faster because
drives can be accessed simultaneously. Table 16 describes the performance for each
RAID level.
Table 16: RAID Levels and Performance
RAID
Level
Performance
0
RAID 0 (striping) offers excellent performance. RAID 0 breaks up data into smaller blocks and then writes a block to each drive in the
drive group. Disk striping writes data across multiple drives instead of just one drive. It involves partitioning each drive storage space
into stripes that can vary in size from 8KB to 1024 KB. These stripes are interleaved in a repeated sequential manner. Disk striping
enhances performance because multiple drives are accessed simultaneously.
1
With RAID 1 (mirroring), each drive in the system must be duplicated, which requires more time and resources than striping.
Performance is impaired during drive rebuilds.
5
RAID 5 provides high data throughput, especially for large files. Use this RAID level for any application that requires high read request
rates, but low write request rates, such as transaction processing applications, because each drive can read and write independently.
Since each drive contains both data and parity, numerous writes can take place concurrently. In addition, robust caching algorithms
and hardware based exclusive-or assist make RAID 5 performance exceptional in many different environments.
Parity generation can slow the write process, making write performance significantly lower for RAID 5 than for RAID 0 or RAID 1. Drive
performance is reduced when a drive is being rebuilt. Clustering can also reduce drive performance. Environments with few processes
do not perform as well because the RAID overhead is not offset by the performance gains in handling simultaneous processes.
6
RAID 6 works best when used with data that requires high reliability, high request rates, and high data transfer. It provides high data
throughput, data redundancy, and very good performance. However, RAID 6 is not well suited to tasks requiring a lot of writes. A RAID
6 virtual drive has to generate two sets of parity data for each write operation, which results in a significant decrease in performance
during writes. Drive performance is reduced during a drive rebuild. Environments with few processes do not perform as well because
the RAID overhead is not offset by the performance gains in handling simultaneous processes.
00
RAID 00 (striping in a spanned drive group) offers excellent performance. RAID 00 breaks up data into smaller blocks and then writes a
block to each drive in the drive groups. Disk striping writes data across multiple drives instead of just one drive. Striping involves
partitioning each drive storage space into stripes that can vary in size from 8KB to 1024 KB. These stripes are interleaved in a repeated
sequential manner. Disk striping enhances performance because multiple drives are accessed simultaneously.
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Table 16: RAID Levels and Performance (Continued)
RAID
Level
Performance
10
RAID 10 works best for data storage that need the enhanced I/O performance of RAID 0 (striped drive groups), which provides high
data transfer rates. Spanning increases the capacity of the virtual drive and improves performance by doubling the number of spindles.
The system performance improves as the number of spans increases. (The maximum number of spans is eight.) As the storage space in
the spans is filled, the system stripes data over fewer and fewer spans and RAID performance degrades to that of a RAID 1 or RAID 5
drive group.
50
RAID 50 works best when used with data that requires high reliability, high request rates, and high data transfer. It provides high data
throughput, data redundancy, and very good performance. Spanning increases the capacity of the virtual drive and improves
performance by doubling the number of spindles. The system performance improves as the number of spans increases. (The maximum
number of spans is eight.) As the storage space in the spans is filled, the system stripes data over fewer and fewer spans and RAID
performance degrades to that of a RAID 1 or RAID 5 drive group.
60
RAID 60 works best when used with data that requires high reliability, high request rates, and high data transfer. It provides high data
throughput, data redundancy, and very good performance. Spanning increases the capacity of the virtual drive and improves
performance by doubling the number of spindles. The system performance improves as the number of spans increases. (The maximum
number of spans is eight.) As the storage space in the spans is filled, the system stripes data over fewer and fewer spans and RAID
performance degrades to that of a RAID 1 or RAID 6 drive group.
RAID 60 is not well suited to tasks requiring a lot of writes. A RAID 60 virtual drive has to generate two sets of parity data for each write
operation, which results in a significant decrease in performance during writes. Drive performance is reduced during a drive rebuild.
Environments with few processes do not perform as well because the RAID overhead is not offset by the performance gains in handling
simultaneous processes.
2.6.3
Maximizing Storage Capacity
Storage capacity is an important factor when selecting a RAID level. There are several
variables to consider. Striping alone (RAID 0) requires less storage space than mirrored
data (RAID 1) or distributed parity (RAID 5 or RAID 6). RAID 5, which provides
redundancy for one drive failure without duplicating the contents of entire drives,
requires less space then RAID 1. Table 17 explains the effects of the RAID levels on
storage capacity.
Table 17: RAID Levels and Capacity
RAID
Level
Capacity
0
RAID 0 (striping) involves partitioning each drive storage space into stripes that can vary in size. The combined storage space is
composed of stripes from each drive.
RAID 0 provides maximum storage capacity for a given set of drives.
1
With RAID 1 (mirroring), data written to one drive is simultaneously written to another drive, which doubles the required data storage
capacity. This is expensive because each drive in the system must be duplicated.
5
RAID 5 provides redundancy for one drive failure without duplicating the contents of entire drives. RAID 5 breaks up data into smaller
blocks, calculates parity by performing an exclusive-or on the blocks, then writes the blocks of data and parity to each drive in the drive
group. The size of each block is determined by the stripe size parameter, which is set during the creation of the RAID set.
6
RAID 6 provides redundancy for two drive failures without duplicating the contents of entire drives. However, it requires extra capacity
because it uses two parity blocks per stripe. This makes RAID 60 more expensive to implement.
00
RAID 00 (striping in a spanned drive group) involves partitioning each drive storage space into stripes that can vary in size. The
combined storage space is composed of stripes from each drive. RAID 00 provides maximum storage capacity for a given set of drives.
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Table 17: RAID Levels and Capacity (Continued)
RAID
Level
Capacity
10
RAID 10 requires twice as many drives as all other RAID levels except RAID 1.
RAID 10 works well for medium-sized databases or any environment that requires a higher degree of fault tolerance and moderate to
medium capacity. Disk spanning allows multiple drives to function like one big drive. Spanning overcomes lack of disk space and
simplifies storage management by combining existing resources or adding relatively inexpensive resources.
50
RAID 50 requires two to four times as many parity drives as RAID 5. This RAID level works best when used with data that requires
medium to large capacity.
60
RAID 60 provides redundancy for two drive failures in each RAID set without duplicating the contents of entire drives. However, it
requires extra capacity because a RAID 60 virtual drive has to generate two sets of parity data for each write operation. This makes RAID
60 more expensive to implement.
2.7
RAID Availability
2.7.1
RAID Availability Concept
2.7.1.1
Spare Drives
Data availability without downtime is essential for many types of data processing and
storage systems. Businesses want to avoid the financial costs and customer frustration
associated with failed servers. RAID helps you maintain data availability and avoid
downtime for the servers that provide that data. RAID offers several features, such as
spare drives and rebuilds, that you can use to fix any drive problems, while keeping the
servers running and data available. The following subsections describe these features.
You can use spare drives to replace failed or defective drives in a drive group.
A replacement drive must be at least as large as the drive it replaces. Spare drives
include hot swaps, hot spares, and cold swaps.
A hot swap is the manual substitution of a replacement unit in a disk subsystem for a
defective one, where the substitution can be performed while the subsystem is
running (performing its normal functions).
The backplane and enclosure must support hot swap in order for the functionality to
work.
Hot spare drives are drives that power up along with the RAID drives and operate in a
standby state. If a drive used in a RAID virtual drive fails, a hot spare automatically takes
its place and the data on the failed drive is rebuilt on the hot spare. Hot spares can be
used for RAID levels 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, and 60.
NOTE: If a rebuild to a hot spare fails for any reason, the hot spare drive will be marked
as "failed." If the source drive fails, both the source drive and the hot spare drive will be
marked as "failed."
A cold swap requires that you power down the system before replacing a defective
drive in a disk subsystem.
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2.7.1.2
2.8
Rebuilding
Configuration Planning
If a drive fails in a drive group that is configured as a RAID 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, or 60 virtual
drive, you can recover the lost data by rebuilding the drive. If you have configured hot
spares, the RAID controller automatically tries to use them to rebuild failed drives.
Manual rebuild is necessary if no hot spares with enough capacity to rebuild the failed
drives are available. You must insert a drive with enough storage into the subsystem
before rebuilding the failed drive.
Factors to consider when planning a configuration are the number of drives the RAID
controller can support, the purpose of the drive group, and the availability of spare
drives.
Each type of data stored in the disk subsystem has a different frequency of read and
write activity. If you know the data access requirements, you can more successfully
determine a strategy for optimizing the disk subsystem capacity, availability, and
performance.
Servers that support video on demand typically read the data often, but write data
infrequently. Both the read and write operations tend to be long. Data stored on a
general-purpose file server involves relatively short read and write operations with
relatively small files.
2.9
Number of Drives
Your configuration planning for the SAS RAID controller depends in part on the number
of drives that you want to use in a RAID drive group.
The number of drives in a drive group determines the RAID levels that can be
supported. Only one RAID level can be assigned to each virtual drive.
2.9.1
Drive Group Purpose
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Important factors to consider when creating RAID drive groups include availability,
performance, and capacity. Define the major purpose of the drive group by answering
questions related to these factors, such as the following, which are followed by
suggested RAID levels for each situation:

Will this drive group increase the system storage capacity for general-purpose file
and print servers? Use RAID 5, 6, 10, 50, or 60.

Does this drive group support any software system that must be available 24 hours
per day? Use RAID 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, or 60.

Will the information stored in this drive group contain large audio or video files that
must be available on demand? Use RAID 0 or 00.

Will this drive group contain data from an imaging system? Use RAID 0, 00, or 10.
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Fill out Table 18 to help you plan the drive group configuration. Rank the requirements
for your drive group, such as storage space and data redundancy, in order of
importance, and then review the suggested RAID levels.
Table 18: Factors to Consider for Drive Group Configuration
Requirement
Page 46
Rank
Suggested RAID Level(s)
Storage space
RAID 0, RAID 5, RAID 00
Data redundancy
RAID 5, RAID 6, RAID 10, RAID 50, RAID 60
Drive performance and throughput
RAID 0, RAID 00, RAID 10
Hot spares (extra drives required)
RAID 1, RAID 5, RAID 6, RAID 10, RAID 50,
RAID 60
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Chapter 3: SafeStore Disk Encryption | Overview
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Chapter 3
SafeStore Disk Encryption
This chapter describes the LSI® SafeStore™ Disk Encryption service. The SafeStore Disk
Encryption service is a collection of features within LSI storage products that supports
self-encrypting disks. SafeStore encryption services supports Local Key Management.
3.1
Overview
The SafeStore Disk Encryption service offers the ability to encrypt data on drives and
use disk-based key management to provide data security. This solution provides data
protection in the event of theft or loss of physical drives. With self-encrypting drives, if
you remove a drive from its storage system or the server it is housed in, the data on that
drive is encrypted and useless to anyone who attempts to access without the
appropriate security authorization.
With the SafeStore encryption service, data is encrypted by the drives. You can
designate which data to encrypt at the individual virtual disk (VD) level.
Any encryption solution requires management of the encryption keys. The security
service provides a way to manage these keys. Both the WebBIOS Configuration Utility
(Chapter 4) and MegaRAID Storage Manager (Chapter 11) offer procedures that you
can use to manage the security settings for the drives.
3.2
Purpose and Benefits
Security is a growing market concern and requirement. MegaRAID customers are
looking for a comprehensive storage encryption solution to protect data. You can use
the SafeStore encryption service to help protect your data.
In addition, SafeStore local key management removes the administrator from most of
the daily tasks of securing data, thereby reducing user error and decreasing the risk of
data loss. Also, SafeStore local key management supports instant secure erase of drives
that permanently removes data when repurposing or decommissioning drives. These
services provide a much more secure level of data erasure than other common erasure
methods, such as overwriting or degaussing.
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Chapter 3: SafeStore Disk Encryption | Terminology
3.3
Terminology
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Table 19 describes the terminology related to the SafeStore encryption feature.
Table 19: Terminology used in FDE
Option
Description
Authenticated Mode
The RAID configuration is keyed to a user password. The password must be provided on system boot to
authenticate the user and facilitate unlocking the configuration for user access to the encrypted data.
Blob
A blob is created by encrypting a key(s) using another key. There are two types of blob in the system –
encryption key blob and security key blob.
Key backup
You need to provide the controller with a lock key if the controller is replaced or if you choose to migrate
secure virtual disks. To do this, you must back up the security key.
Password
An optional authenticated mode is supported in which you must provide a password on each boot to
make sure the system boots only if the user is authenticated. Firmware uses the user password to encrypt
the security key in the security key blob stored on the controller.
Re-provisioning
Re-provisioning disables the security system of a device. For a controller, it involves destroying the
security key. For SafeStore encrypted drives, when the drive lock key is deleted, the drive is unlocked and
any user data on the drive is securely deleted. This does not apply to controller-encrypted drives, because
deleting the virtual disk destroys the encryption keys and causes a secure erase. See Section 3.5, Instant
Secure Erase, for information about the instant secure erase feature.
Security Key
A key based on a user-provided string. The controller uses the security key to lock and unlock access to the
secure user data. This key is encrypted into the security key blob and stored on the controller. If the
security key is unavailable, user data is irretrievably lost. You must take all precautions to never lose the
security key.
Un-Authenticated Mode
This mode allows controller to boot and unlock access to user configuration without user intervention. In
this mode, the security key is encrypted into a security key blob, stored on the controller, but instead of a
user password, an internal key specific to the controller is used to create the security key blob.
Volume Encryption Keys (VEK)
The controller uses the Volume Encryption Keys to encrypt data when a controller-encrypted virtual disk
is created. These keys are not available to the user. The firmware (FW) uses a unique 512-bit key for each
virtual disk. The VEK for the VDs are stored on the physical disks in a VEK blob.
3.4
Workflow
3.4.1
Enable Security
You can enable security on the controller. After you enable security, you have the
option to create secure virtual drives using a security key.
There are three procedures you can perform to create secure virtual drives using a
security key:

Create the security key identifier

Create the security key

Create a password (optional)
3.4.1.1 Create the Security Key
Identifier
The security key identifier appears whenever you enter the security key. If you have
multiple security keys, the identifier helps you determine which security key to enter.
The controller provides a default identifier for you. You can use the default or enter your
own identifier.
3.4.1.2
You need to enter the security key to perform certain operations. You can choose a
strong security key that the controller suggests.
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Create the Security Key
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CAUTION: If you forget the security key, you will lose access to your data.
3.4.1.3
Create a Password
The password provides additional security. The password should be different from the
security key. You can select a setting in the utilities so that you must enter the password
whenever you boot your server.
CAUTION: If you forget the password, you will lose access to your data.
When you use the specified security key identifier, security key, and password, security
will be enabled on the controller.
3.4.2
Change Security
You can change the security settings on the controller, and you have the option to
change the security key identifier, security key, and password. If you have previously
removed any secured drives, you still need to supply the old security key to import
them.
There are three procedures you can perform to change the security settings on the
controller:

Change the security key identifier

Change the security key

Change a password
See Section 4.7, Selecting SafeStore Encryption Services Security Options for the
procedures used to change security options in WebBIOS or Section 11.5, LSI SafeStore
Encryption Services for the procedures used to change security options in MegaRAID
Storage Manager.
3.4.2.1 Change the Security Key
Identifier
You have the option to edit the security key identifier. If you plan to change the security
key, it is highly recommended that you change the security key identifier. Otherwise,
you will not be able to differentiate between the security keys.
You can select whether you want to keep the current security key identifier or enter a
new one. To change the security key identifier, enter a new security key identifier.
3.4.2.2
Change the Security Key
You can choose to keep the current security key or enter a new one. To change the
security key, you can either enter the new security key or accept the security key that
the controller suggests.
3.4.2.3
Word
Add or Change the Pass
You have the option to add a password or change the existing one. To change the
password, enter the new password. To keep the existing password, enter the current
password. If you choose this option, you must enter the password whenever you boot
your server.
This procedure updates the existing configuration on the controller to use the new
security settings.
3.4.3
Create Secure Virtual Drives
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You can create a secure virtual drive and set their parameters as desired. To create a
secure virtual drive, select a configuration method. You can select either simple
configuration or advanced configuration.
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3.4.3.1
Simple Configuration
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
If you select simple configuration, select the redundancy type and drive security
method to use for the drive group.
See Section 8.1.4, Creating a Virtual Drive Using Simple Configuration for the procedures
used to select the redundancy type and drive security method for a configuration.
3.4.3.2
Advanced Configuration
If you select advanced configuration, select the drive security method, and add the
drives to the drive group.
See Section 8.1.5, Creating a Virtual Drive Using Advanced Configuration for the
procedures used to import a foreign configuration.
After the drive group is secured, you cannot remove the security without deleting the
virtual drives.
3.4.4
Import a Foreign Configuration
After you create a security key, you can run a scan for a foreign configuration and
import a locked configuration. (You can import unsecured or unlocked configurations
when security is disabled.) A foreign configuration is a RAID configuration that already
exists on a replacement set of drives that you install in a computer system. WebBIOS
Configuration Utility and MSM allows you to import the existing configuration to the
RAID controller or clear the configuration so you can create a new one.
See Section 4.8, Viewing and Changing Device Properties for the procedure used to
import a foreign configuration in WebBIOS or Section 11.5.12, Importing or Clearing a
Foreign Configuration for the procedure in MegaRAID Storage Manager.
To import a foreign configuration, you must first enable security to allow importation of
locked foreign drives. If the drives are locked and the controller security is disabled, you
cannot import the foreign drives. Only unlocked drives can be imported when security
is disabled.
After you enable the security, you can import the locked drives. To import the locked
drives, you must provide the security key used to secure them. Verify whether any
drives are left to import as the locked drives can use different security keys. If there are
any drives left, repeat the import process for the remaining drives. After all of the drives
are imported, there is no configuration to import.
3.5
Instant Secure Erase
Instant Secure Erase is a feature used to erase data from encrypted drives. After the
initial investment for an encrypted disk, there is no additional cost in dollars or time to
erase data using the Instant Secure Erase feature.
You can change the encryption key for all MegaRAID RAID controllers that are
connected to encrypted drives. All encrypted drives, whether locked or unlocked,
always have an encryption key. This key is set by the drive and is always active. When
the drive is unlocked, the data to host from the drive (on reads) and from the host to
the drive cache (on writes) is always provided. However, when resting on the drive
platters, the data is always encrypted by the drive.
You might not want to lock your drives because you have to manage a password if they
are locked. Even if you do not lock the drives, there is still a benefit to using encrypted
disks.
If you are concerned about data theft or other security issues, you might already invest
in drive disposal costs, and there are benefits to using SafeStore encryption over other
technologies that exists today, both in terms of the security provided and time saved.
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If the encryption key on the drive changes, the drive cannot decrypt the data on the
platters, effectively erasing the data on the disks. The National Institute of Standards
and Technology (http://www.nist.gov) values this type of data erasure above secure
erase and below physical destruction of the device.
There are three major reasons for using instant secure erase.
If there is a need to repurpose the hard drive for a different application.
You might need to move the drive to another server to expand storage elsewhere, but
the drive is in use. The data on the drive might contain sensitive data including
customer information that, if lost or divulged, could cause an embarrassing disclosure
of a security hole. You can use the instant secure erase feature to effectively erase the
data so the drive can be moved to another server or area without concern that old data
could be found.
If there is a need to replace drives.
If the amount of data has outgrown the storage system, and there is no room to expand
capacity by adding drives, you might choose to purchase upgrade drives. If the older
drives support encryption, you can erase the data instantly so the new drives can be
used.
If there is a need to return a disk for warranty activity.
If the drive is beginning to show SMART predictive failure alerts, you might want to
return the drive for replacement. If so, the drive needs to be effectively erased if there is
sensitive data. Occasionally a drive is in such bad condition that standard erasure
applications do not work. If the drive still allows any access, it might be possible to
destroy the encryption key.
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Chapter 4: WebBIOS Configuration Utility | Overview
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Chapter 4
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
This chapter describes the WebBIOS Configuration Utility (CU), which enables you to
create and manage RAID configurations on LSI SAS controllers.
4.1
Overview
The WebBIOS CU, unlike the MegaRAID Storage Manager™ software, resides in the SAS
controller BIOS and operates independently of the operating system.
You can use the WebBIOS CU to do the following tasks:

Create drive groups and virtual drives for storage configurations

Display controller, drive, virtual drive, and battery backup unit (BBU) properties, and
change parameters

Delete virtual drives

Migrate a storage configuration to a different RAID level

Detect configuration mismatches

Import a foreign configuration

Scan devices connected to the controller

Initialize virtual drives

Check configurations for data consistency

Create a CacheCade configuration
The WebBIOS CU provides a configuration wizard to guide you through the
configuration of virtual drives and drive groups.
4.2
Starting the WebBIOS CU
Follow these steps to start the WebBIOS CU and access the main screen.
1. When the host computer is booting, hold down the <Ctrl> key and press the <H>
key when the following text appears on the screen:
Copyright© LSI Corporation
Press <Ctrl><H> for WebBIOS
The Controller Selection screen appears.
2. If the system has multiple SAS controllers, select a controller.
3. Click Start to continue.
The main WebBIOS CU screen appears.
NOTE: On systems that do not have the PS2 port, you must enable 'port 60/64
emulation' in the System BIOS to emulate USB as PS2. When this option is disabled on
this system, WebBIOS does not work.
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4.3
WebBIOS CU Main Screen
Options
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Figure 15 shows the screen that appears when you start the WebBIOS CU and select a
controller.
Figure 15:
WebBIOS CU Main Screen
In the right frame, the screen shows the virtual drives configured on the controller, and
the drives that are connected to the controller. In addition, the screen identifies drives
that are foreign or missing.
NOTE: In the list of virtual drives, the drive nodes are sorted based on the order in which
you added the drives to the drive group, rather than the physical slot order that displays
in the physical trees.
NOTE: The minimum screen resolution for WebBIOS is 640x480.
To toggle between the physical view and logical view of the storage devices connected
to the controller, click Physical View or Logical View in the menu in the left frame.
When the physical view screen appears, it shows the drive groups that are configured
on this controller.
For drives in an enclosure, the screen shows the following drive information:
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
Enclosure

Slot

Interface type (such as SAS or SATA)

Drive type (HDD or SSD)

Drive size
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
Drive status (such as Online or Unconfigured Good)
The toolbar at the top of the WebBIOS CU has the following buttons, as listed in
Table 20.
Table 20: WebBIOS CU Toolbar Icons
Icon
Description
Click this icon to return to the main screen from any other WebBIOS CU
screen.
Click this icon to return to the previous screen that you were viewing.
Click this icon to exit the WebBIOS CU program.
Click this icon to turn off the sound on the onboard controller alarm.
Click this icon to display information about the WebBIOS CU version, browser
version, and HTML interface engine.
Here is a description of the options listed on the left of the main WebBIOS CU screen
(the hotkey shortcut for each option is shown in parentheses next to the option name):
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010

Advanced Software Options: (Alt+a) Select this option to enable the advanced
features in the controller. For more information, see section Section 4.4.1, Managing
MegaRAID Advanced Software Options.

Controller Selection: (Alt+c) Select this option to view the Controller Selection
screen, where you can select a different SAS controller. You can then view
information about the controller and the devices connected to it, or create a new
configuration on the controller.

Controller Properties: (Alt+p) Select this option to view the properties of the
currently selected SAS controller. For more information, see Section 4.8.1, Viewing
Controller Properties.

Drive Security: (Alt+r) Select this option to encrypt data on the drives and use
disk-based key management for the data security solution. This solution protects
your data in case of theft or loss of physical drives. For more information, see
Section 4.7, Selecting SafeStore Encryption Services Security Options.

Scan Devices: (Alt+s) Select this option to have the WebBIOS CU re-scan the
physical and virtual drives for any changes in the drive status or the physical
configuration. The WebBIOS CU displays the results of the scan in the physical and
virtual drive descriptions.
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4.4
Managing Software
Licensing
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide

Virtual Drives: (Alt+v) Select this option to view the Virtual Drives screen, where
you can change and view virtual drive properties, delete virtual drives, initialize
drives, and perform other tasks. For more information, see Section 4.8.2, Viewing
Virtual Drive Properties, Policies, and Operations.

Drives: (Alt+d) Select this option to view the Drives screen, where you can view
drive properties, create hot spares, and perform other tasks.
For more information, see Section 4.8.3, Viewing Drive Properties.

Configuration Wizard: (Alt+o) Select this option to start the Configuration Wizard
and create a new storage configuration, clear a configuration, or add a
configuration. For more information, see Section 4.5, Creating a Storage
Configuration.

Logical View/Physical View: (Alt+l) for Logical View; Alt+h for Physical View)
Select this option to toggle between the Physical View screen and the Logical View
screen.

Events: (Alt+e) Select this option to view system events in the Event Information
screen. For more information, see Section 4.11, Viewing System Event Information.

Exit: (Alt+x) Select this option to exit the WebBIOS CU and continue with system
boot.
The MegaRAID advanced software offers the software license key feature to enable the
advanced options in WebBIOS. The license key, also known as the Activation key is used
to transfer the advanced features from one controller to another by configuring the Key
vault.
You have to configure the Advanced Software Options menu present in the WebBIOS
main screen to use the advanced features present in the controller.
4.4.1
Managing MegaRAID
Advanced Software Options
Perform the following steps to configure the Advanced Software Options wizard to
enable the advanced options using the activation key.
1. Click Advanced Software Options menu on the WebBIOS main screen. The
Advanced Software Options wizard appears as shown in the following figure.
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Figure 16:
Manage MegaRAID Advanced Software Options Wizard
NOTE: When you click the Advanced Software Options menu in the main WebBIOS
screen, if rehosting is not required, the Manage MegaRAID Advanced Software
Options screen as shown in Figure 16 appears, otherwise if the user decides to opt the
rehosting process, the Section 4.4.8, Confirm Rehosting Process screen appears.
The Activated Advanced Software Options field consists of Advanced Software
Options, License, and Mode columns.

The Advanced Software column displays the list of advanced software features
available in the controller.

The License column displays the license details for the list of advanced softwares
present in the Advanced Software column. The license details validates if the
software is under trial period, or if it can be used without any trial period
(Unlimited).

The Mode column displays the current status of the advanced software. The current
status can be Secured, Not secured, or Factory installed.
Both the Safe ID and the Serial Number fields consist of a pre-defined value
internally generated by the controller.
2. Click Activate.
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The Advanced Software Options Summary wizard appears as shown in Figure 22.
3. Click Configure Key Vault.
The Confirm Rehosting process wizard appears as shown in Figure 27.
The Configure Key Vault button is conditional, and appears in two scenarios.
a. Scenario #1
When features have been transferred from NVRAM to keyvault, and no rehosting is
required, the Configure Key Vault button will not be displayed.
b. Scenario# 2
When the rehosting process needs to be completed, the Configure Key Vault
button appears.
4. Click Deactivate All Trial Software.
The Deactivate All Trial Advanced Software Options dialog box appears as
shown in the following figure.
Figure 17:
Deactivate All Trial Advanced Software Options
If you want to deactivate the software that is being used with a trial key, then click Yes;
otherwise, click No.
When the activation key is improper in the Activation field in the Advanced Software
Options wizard (Figure 16), the following messages appear based on the scenarios.
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a. Scenario # 1
If you enter an invalid activation key, the following message appears.
Figure 18:
Invalid Activation Key
b. Scenario # 2
If you leave the activation key field blank or enter space characters, the following
message appears.
.
Figure 19:
Activation key Blank or Space
c. Scenario # 3
If you enter an incorrect activation key, and if there is a mismatch between the
activation key and the controller, the following message appears.
.
Figure 20:
4.4.2
Reusing the Activation Key
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Activation Key Mismatch
If you are using an existing activated key, the features get transferred to the key vault,
and the message appears as shown in the following figure.
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.
Figure 21:
4.4.3
Managing Advanced Software
Summary
Reusing the Activation Key
When you click Activate in Manage MegaRAID Advanced Software Options wizard
(Figure 16), the Advanced Software Options Summary wizard appears as shown in
the following figure.
Figure 22:
Advanced Software Options Summary Wizard
The Summary field displays the list of the advanced Software options along with their
former status and new status in the controller.
— The Advanced Software Options column displays the currently available
software in the controller.
— The Former Status column displays the status of the available advanced
software prior to entering the activation key.
— The New Status column displays the status of the available advanced software,
after entering the activation key.
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4.4.4
Activating an Unlimited Key
Over a Trial Key
When you activate an unlimited key over a trial key, the message, "Review the summary
and go back if you need to make corrections" appears as shown in the following figure.
Figure 23:
4.4.5
Activating a Trial Software
When you activate a trial software, the message "This trial software expires in 30 days",
appears as shown in the following figure.
Figure 24:
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Activating an Unlimited Key over a Trial Key
Activating a Trial Software
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4.4.6
Activating an Unlimited Key
When you activate an unlimited key, the message "Review the summary and go back if
you need to make corrections" , appears as shown in the following figure.
Figure 25:
4.4.7
Securing MegaRAID Advanced
Software
Confirm Rehosting Process
Activating an Unlimited Key
If the advanced software is not secured, when you click the Configure Key Vault
button in the Advanced Software Options wizard in Figure 16, the Secure MegaRAID
Advanced Software Options dialog box appears as shown in the following figure.
Figure 26:
4.4.8
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Securing MegaRAID Advanced Software
Confirming rehosting process involves the process of transferring or rehosting the
advanced software features from one controller to another.
When you need to transfer the features from controller 1 to controller 2, and in
controller 2 NVRAM, if there are some features which needs to be transferred to Key
Vault, the Confirm Re-hosting Process screen appears as shown in Figure 27.
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Perform the following steps to confirm the rehosting process.
1. Click the Configure Key Vault button in the Advanced Software Options wizard
in Figure 16.
The Confirm Rehosting Process wizard appears as shown in the following figure.
Figure 27:
Confirm Rehosting Process
2. Select the check box next to the message "I acknowledge that I have completed the
re-hosting process in the LSI Advanced Software License Management Portal"
3. Click Next.
The Manage Advanced Software Options Summary as shown in Figure 23 appears.
4.4.9
Rehosting Process Complete
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In a scenario where only keyvault feature needs to be transferred from controller1 to
controller2, the Re-hosting Process Complete screen appears as shown in the
following figure.
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Figure 28:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Rehosting Process Complete
1. Select the check box next to the message "I acknowledge that I have completed the
re-hosting process in the LSI Advanced Software License Management Portal".
2. Click Next.
The Manage MegaRAID Advanced Software Options Wizard as shown in
Figure 16 appears.
The rehosting process is completed.
NOTE: If you click Next in the Rehosting Process Complete screen, if rehosting is not
complete, the features will not be copied into the keyvault, and the features remain in
the keyvault itself, but the user can still use the advanced features.
4.5
Creating a Storage
Configuration
This section explains how to use the WebBIOS CU Configuration Wizard to configure
RAID drive groups and virtual drives to create storage configurations:
4.5.1
Selecting the Configuration
with the Configuration Wizard
Follow these steps to start the Configuration Wizard, and select a configuration option
and mode:
1. Click Configuration Wizard on the WebBIOS main screen.
The first Configuration Wizard screen appears, as shown in Figure 29.
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Figure 29:
WebBIOS Configuration Wizard Screen
2. Select a configuration option.
CAUTION: If you choose the first or second option, all existing data in the configuration
will be deleted. Make a backup of any data that you want to keep before you choose an
option.
— Clear Configuration: Clears the existing configuration.
— New Configuration: Clears the existing configuration and lets you create a new
configuration.
— Add Configuration: Retains the existing storage configuration and adds new
drives to it (this does not cause any data loss).
3. Click Next.
4. The Convert JBOD Drives to Unconfigured Drives screen appears as shown in
Figure 30.
NOTE: The JBOD Drives to Unconfigured Drives screen does not appear for MR cards.
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Figure 30:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
JBOD Drives to Unconfigured Good Screen
5. Click Next.
A dialog box warns that you will lose data if you select Clear Configuration or New
Configuration.
The WebBIOS Configuration Method screen appears, as shown in the following
figure.
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Figure 31:
WebBIOS Configuration Method Screen
6. On this screen, select a configuration mode:
— Manual Configuration: Allows you to control all attributes of the new storage
configuration as you create drive groups and virtual drives, and set their
parameters.
— Automatic Configuration: Automatically creates an optimal RAID
configuration.
— If you select Automatic Configuration, you can choose whether to create a
redundant RAID drive group or a non-redundant RAID 0 drive group. Select one
of the following options in the Redundancy field:
Redundancy when possible
No redundancy
— If you select Automatic Configuration, you can choose whether to use a drive
security method. Select one of the following options in the Drive Security
Method field:
No Encryption
Drive Encryption
7. Click Next to continue.
If you select the Automatic Configuration option, continue with Section 4.5.2, Using
Automatic Configuration. If you select Manual Configuration, continue with
Section 4.5.3, Using Manual Configuration.
4.5.2
Using Automatic Configuration
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Follow these instructions to create a configuration with automatic configuration, either
with or without redundancy:
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1. When WebBIOS displays the proposed new configuration, review the information
on the screen, and click Accept to accept it. (Or click Back to go back and change
the configuration.)
— RAID 0: If you select Automatic Configuration and No Redundancy, WebBIOS
creates a RAID 0 configuration.
— RAID 1: If you select Automatic Configuration and Redundancy when
possible, and only two drives are available, WebBIOS creates a RAID 1
configuration.
— RAID 5: If you select Automatic Configuration and Redundancy when
possible, and three or more drives are available, WebBIOS creates a RAID 5
configuration.
— RAID 6: If you select Automatic Configuration and Redundancy when
possible, and the RAID 6 option is enabled, and three or more drives are
available, WebBIOS creates a RAID 6 configuration.
2. Click Yes when you are prompted to save the configuration.
3. Click Yes when you are prompted to initialize the new virtual drive(s).
WebBIOS CU begins a background initialization of the virtual drives.
New RAID 5 virtual drives and new RAID 6 virtual drives require a minimum number
of drives for a background initialization to start. If there are fewer drives, the
background initialization will not start. The following number of drives is required:
— New RAID 5 virtual drives must have at least five drives for a background
initialization to start.
— New RAID 6 virtual drives must have at least seven drives for a background
initialization to start.
4.5.3
Using Manual Configuration
4.5.3.1 Using Manual
Configuration: RAID 0
This section contains the procedures for creating RAID drive groups for RAID levels 0, 1,
5, 6, 00, 10, 50, and 60.
RAID 0 provides drive striping across all drives in the RAID drive group. RAID 0 does not
provide any data redundancy but does offer excellent performance. RAID 0 is ideal for
applications that require high bandwidth but do not require fault tolerance. RAID 0 also
denotes an independent or single drive.
NOTE: RAID level 0 is not fault-tolerant. If a drive in a RAID 0 drive group fails, the whole
virtual drive (all drives associated with the virtual drive) fails.
When you select Manual Configuration and click Next, the drive group Definition
screen appears. You use this screen to select drives to create drive groups.
1. Hold <Ctrl> while selecting two or more ready drives in the Drives panel on the left
until you have selected all desired drives for the drive group.
2. Click Add To Array to move the drives to a proposed drive group configuration in
the Drive Groups panel on the right, as shown in Figure 32.
3. If you need to undo the changes, click Reclaim.
4. Choose whether to use drive encryption.
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Figure 32:
WebBIOS Drive Group Definition Screen
5. After you finish selecting drives for the drive group, click Accept DG.
6. Click Next.
The Virtual Drive Definition screen appears, as shown in Figure 33. This screen lists
the possible RAID levels for the drive group.
Use this screen to select the RAID level, strip size, read policy, and other attributes
for the new virtual drives.
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Figure 33:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
WebBIOS Virtual Drive Definition Screen
7. Change the virtual drive options from the defaults listed on the screen as needed.
Here are brief explanations of the virtual drive options:
— RAID Level: The drop-down menu lists the possible RAID levels for the virtual
drive. Select RAID 0.
— Strip Size: The strip size is the portion of a stripe that resides on a single drive in
the drive group. The stripe consists of the data segments that the RAID
controller writes across multiple drives, not including parity drives. For example,
consider a stripe that contains 64 KB of drive space and has 16 KB of data
residing on each drive in the stripe. In this case, the stripe size is 64 KB and the
strip size is 16 KB. You can set the strip size to 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, and
1024 KB. A larger strip size produces higher read performance. If your computer
regularly performs random read requests, choose a smaller strip size. The default
is 64 KB.
— Access Policy: Select the type of data access that is allowed for this virtual drive:
RW: Allow read/write access. This is the default.
Read Only: Allow read-only access.
Blocked: Do not allow access.
— Read Policy: Specify the read policy for this virtual drive:
Normal: This option disables the read ahead capability. This is the default.
Ahead: This option enables read ahead capability, which allows the controller to
read sequentially ahead of requested data and to store the additional data in
cache memory, anticipating that the data will be needed soon. This speeds up
reads for sequential data, but there is little improvement when accessing
random data.
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— Write Policy: Specify the write policy for this virtual drive:
WBack: In Writeback mode the controller sends a data transfer completion signal
to the host when the controller cache has received all of the data in a
transaction. This setting is recommended in Standard mode.
WThru: In Writethrough mode the controller sends a data transfer completion
signal to the host when the drive subsystem has received all of the data in a
transaction. This is the default.
Bad BBU: Select this mode if you want the controller to use Writeback mode but
the controller has no BBU or the BBU is bad. If you do not choose this option, the
controller firmware automatically switches to Writethrough mode if it detects a
bad or missing BBU.
CAUTION: LSI allows Writeback mode to be used with or without a battery. LSI
recommends that you use either a battery to protect the controller cache, or an
uninterruptible power supply (UPS) to protect the entire system. If you do not use a
battery or a UPS, and there is a power failure, you risk losing the data in the controller
cache.
— IO Policy: The IO Policy applies to reads on a specific virtual drive. It does not
affect the read ahead cache.
Direct: In direct I/O mode, reads are not buffered in cache memory. Data is
transferred to the cache and the host concurrently. If the same data block is read
again, it comes from cache memory. This is the default.
Cached: In cached I/O mode, all reads are buffered in cache memory.
— Drive Cache: Specify the drive cache policy:
Enable: Enable the drive cache.
Disable: Disable the drive cache.
NoChange: Leave the current drive cache policy as is. This is the default.
— Disable BGI: Specify the background initialization status:
No: Leave background initialization enabled. This means that a new
configuration can be initialized in the background while you use WebBIOS to do
other configuration tasks. This is the default.
Yes: Select Yes if you do not want to allow background initializations for
configurations on this controller.
— Select Size: Specify the size of the virtual drive in megabytes. Normally, this
would be the full size for RAID 0 shown in the Configuration panel on the right.
You can specify a smaller size if you want to create other virtual drives on the
same drive group.
8. Click Accept to accept the changes to the virtual drive definition.
9. If you need to undo the changes, click Reclaim.
10. Click Next after you finish defining the virtual drives.
The Configuration Preview screen appears, as shown in Figure 34.
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Figure 34:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
RAID 0 Configuration Preview
11. Check the information in the configuration preview.
12. If the virtual drive configuration is acceptable, click Accept to save the
configuration. Otherwise, click Back to return to the previous screens and change
the configuration.
13. If you accept the configuration, click Yes at the prompt to save the configuration.
The WebBIOS main menu appears.
4.5.3.2 Using Manual
Configuration: RAID 1
In RAID 1, the RAID controller duplicates all data from one drive to a second drive. RAID
1 provides complete data redundancy, but at the cost of doubling the required data
storage capacity. It is appropriate for small databases or any other environment that
requires fault tolerance but small capacity.
When you select Manual Configuration and click Next, the Drive Group Definition
screen appears. You use this screen to select drives to create drive groups.
1. Hold <Ctrl> while you select two ready drives in the Drives panel on the left. You
must select an even number of drives.
2. Click Add To Array to move the drives to a proposed drive group configuration in
the Drive Groups panel on the right, as shown in Figure 35.
3. If you need to undo the changes, click Reclaim.
4. Choose whether to use drive encryption.
NOTE: A RAID 1 virtual drive can contain up to 16 drive groups and 32 drives in a single
span. (Other factors, such as the type of controller, can limit the number of drives.) You
must use two drives in each RAID 1 drive group in the span.
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Figure 35:
WebBIOS Drive Group Definition Screen
5. After you finish selecting drives for the drive group, click Accept DG.
6. Click Next.
The Virtual Drive Definition screen appears, as shown in Figure 36. You use this
screen to select the RAID level, strip size, read policy, and other attributes for the
new virtual drives.
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Figure 36:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
WebBIOS Virtual Drive Definition Screen
7. Change the virtual drive options from the defaults listed on the screen as needed.
Here are brief explanations of the virtual drive options:
— RAID Level: The drop-down menu lists the possible RAID levels for the virtual
drive. Select RAID 1.
— Strip Size: The strip size is the portion of a stripe that resides on a single drive in
the drive group. The stripe consists of the data segments that the RAID
controller writes across multiple drives, not including parity drives. For example,
consider a stripe that contains 64 KB of drive space and has 16 KB of data
residing on each drive in the stripe. In this case, the stripe size is 64 KB and the
strip size is 16 KB. You can set the strip size to 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, and
1024 KB. A larger strip size produces higher read performance. If your computer
regularly performs random read requests, choose a smaller strip size. The default
is 64 KB.
— Access Policy: Select the type of data access that is allowed for this virtual drive:
RW: Allow read/write access. This is the default.
Read Only: Allow read-only access.
Blocked: Do not allow access.
— Read Policy: Specify the read policy for this virtual drive:
Normal: This option disables the read ahead capability. This is the default.
Ahead: This option enables read ahead capability, which allows the controller to
read sequentially ahead of requested data and to store the additional data in
cache memory, anticipating that the data will be needed soon. This speeds up
reads for sequential data, but there is little improvement when accessing
random data.
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— Write Policy: Specify the write policy for this virtual drive:
WBack: In Writeback mode the controller sends a data transfer completion signal
to the host when the controller cache has received all of the data in a
transaction.
This setting is recommended in Standard mode.
WThru: In Writethrough mode the controller sends a data transfer completion
signal to the host when the drive subsystem has received all of the data in a
transaction.
This is the default.
Bad BBU: Select this mode if you want the controller to use Writeback mode but
the controller has no BBU or the BBU is bad. If you do not choose this option, the
controller firmware automatically switches to Writethrough mode if it detects a
bad or missing BBU.
CAUTION: LSI allows Writeback mode to be used with or without a battery. LSI
recommends that you use either a battery to protect the controller cache, or an UPS to
protect the entire system. If you do not use a battery or a UPS, and there is a power
failure, you risk losing the data in the controller cache.
— IO Policy: The IO Policy applies to reads on a specific virtual drive. It does not
affect the read ahead cache.
Direct: In Direct I/O mode, reads are not buffered in cache memory. Data is
transferred to the cache and the host concurrently. If the same data block is read
again, it comes from cache memory. This is the default.
Cached: In Cached I/O mode, all reads are buffered in cache memory.
— Drive Policy: Specify the drive cache policy:
Enable: Enable the drive cache.
Disable: Disable the drive cache.
NoChange: Leave the current drive cache policy as is. This drive policy is the
default.
— Disable BGI: Specify the background initialization status:
No: Leave background initialization enabled. This means that a new
configuration can be initialized in the background while you use WebBIOS to do
other configuration tasks. This is the default.
Yes: Select Yes if you do not want to allow background initializations for
configurations on this controller.
— Select Size: Specify the size of the virtual drive(s) in megabytes. Normally, this
would be the full size for RAID 1 shown in the Configuration panel on the right.
You can specify a smaller size if you want to create other virtual drives on the
same drive group.
8. Click Accept to accept the changes to the virtual drive definition.
9. If you need to undo the changes, click Reclaim.
10. Click Next after you finish defining the virtual drives.
The Configuration Preview screen appears, as shown in Figure 37.
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Figure 37:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
RAID 1 Configuration Preview
11. Check the information in the configuration preview.
12. If the virtual drive configuration is acceptable, click Accept to save the
configuration. Otherwise, click Back to return to the previous screens and change
the configuration.
13. If you accept the configuration, click Yes at the prompt to save the configuration.
The WebBIOS main menu appears.
4.5.3.3 Using Manual
Configuration: RAID 5
RAID 5 uses drive striping at the block level and parity. In RAID 5, the parity information
is written to all drives. It is best suited for networks that perform a lot of small
input/output (I/O) transactions simultaneously. RAID 5 provides data redundancy, high
read rates, and good performance in most environments. It also provides redundancy
with lowest loss of capacity.
RAID 5 provides high data throughput. RAID 5 is useful for transaction processing
applications because each drive can read and write independently. If a drive fails, the
RAID controller uses the parity drive to recreate all missing information. You can use
RAID 5 for office automation and online customer service that require fault tolerance.
In addition, RAID 5 is good for any application that has high read request rates but low
write request rates.
When you select Manual Configuration and click Next, the Drive Group Definition
screen appears. You use this screen to select drives to create drive groups.
1. Hold <Ctrl> while you select at least three ready drives in the Physical Drives panel
on the left.
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2. Click Add To Array to move the drives to a proposed drive group configuration in
the Drive Groups panel on the right, as shown in Figure 38.
3. If you need to undo the changes, click Reclaim.
4. Choose whether to use drive encryption.
Figure 38:
WebBIOS Drive Group Definition Screen
5. After you finish selecting drives for the drive group, click Accept DG.
6. Click Next.
The Virtual Drive Definition screen appears, as shown in Figure 39. You use this
screen to select the RAID level, strip size, read policy, and other attributes for the
new virtual drives.
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f
Figure 39:
WebBIOS Virtual Drive Definition Screen
7. Change the virtual drive options from the defaults listed on the screen as needed.
Here are brief explanations of the virtual drive options:
— RAID Level: The drop-down menu lists the possible RAID levels for the virtual
drive. Select RAID 5.
— Strip Size: The strip size is the portion of a stripe that resides on a single drive in
the drive group. The stripe consists of the data segments that the RAID
controller writes across multiple drives, not including parity drives. For example,
consider a stripe that contains 64 KB of drive space and has 16 KB of data
residing on each drive in the stripe. In this case, the stripe size is 64 KB and the
strip size is 16 KB. You can set the strip size to 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, and
1024 KB. A larger strip size produces higher read performance. If your computer
regularly performs random read requests, choose a smaller strip size. The default
is 64 KB.
— Access Policy: Select the type of data access that is allowed for this virtual drive:
RW: Allow read/write access. This is the default.
Read Only: Allow read-only access.
Blocked: Do not allow access.
— Read Policy: Specify the read policy for this virtual drive:
Normal: This disables the read ahead capability. This is the default.
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Ahead: This enables read ahead capability, which allows the controller to read
sequentially ahead of requested data and to store the additional data in cache
memory, anticipating that the data will be needed soon. This speeds up reads
for sequential data, but there is little improvement when accessing random
data.
— Write Policy: Specify the write policy for this virtual drive:
WBack: In Writeback mode the controller sends a data transfer completion signal
to the host when the controller cache has received all of the data in a
transaction. This setting is recommended in Standard mode.
WThru: In Writethrough mode the controller sends a data transfer completion
signal to the host when the drive subsystem has received all of the data in a
transaction. This is the default.
Bad BBU: Select this mode if you want the controller to use Writeback mode but
the controller has no BBU or the BBU is bad. If you do not choose this option, the
controller firmware automatically switches to Writethrough mode if it detects a
bad or missing BBU.
CAUTION: LSI allows Writeback mode to be used with or without a battery. LSI
recommends that you use either a battery to protect the controller cache, or an UPS to
protect the entire system. If you do not use a battery or a UPS, and there is a power
failure, you risk losing the data in the controller cache.
— IO Policy: The IO Policy applies to reads on a specific virtual drive. It does not
affect the read ahead cache.
Direct: In Direct I/O mode, reads are not buffered in cache memory. Data is
transferred to the cache and the host concurrently. If the same data block is read
again, it comes from cache memory. This is the default.
Cached: In Cached I/O mode, all reads are buffered in cache memory.
— Drive Policy: Specify the drive cache policy:
Enable: Enable the drive cache.
Disable: Disable the drive cache.
NoChange: Leave the current drive cache policy as is.
This drive policy is the default.
— Disable BGI: Specify the background initialization status:
No: Leave background initialization enabled. This means that a new
configuration can be initialized in the background while you use WebBIOS to do
other configuration tasks. This is the default.
Yes: Select Yes if you do not want to allow background initializations for
configurations on this controller.
NOTE: New RAID 5 virtual drives require at least five drives for a background
initialization to start.
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— Select Size: Specify the size of the virtual drive in megabytes. Normally, this
would be the full size for RAID 5 shown in the Configuration panel on the right.
You can specify a smaller size if you want to create other virtual drives on the
same drive group.
8. Click Accept to accept the changes to the virtual drive definition.
9. If you need to undo the changes, click Reclaim.
10. Click Next after you finish defining the virtual drives.
The Configuration Preview screen appears, as shown in Figure 40.
Figure 40:
RAID 5 Configuration Preview
11. Check the information in the configuration preview.
12. If the virtual drive configuration is acceptable, click Accept to save the
configuration. Otherwise, click Cancel to end the operation and return to the
WebBIOS main menu, or click Back to return to the previous screens and change
the configuration.
13. If you accept the configuration, click Yes at the prompt to save the configuration.
The WebBIOS main menu appears.
4.5.3.4 Using Manual
Configuration: RAID 6
RAID 6 is similar to RAID 5 (drive striping and distributed parity), except that instead of
one parity block per stripe, there are two. With two independent parity blocks, RAID 6
can survive the loss of two drives in a virtual drive without losing data. Use RAID 6 for
data that requires a very high level of protection from loss.
RAID 6 is best suited for networks that perform a lot of small input/output (I/O)
transactions simultaneously. It provides data redundancy, high read rates, and good
performance in most environments.
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In the case of a failure of one drive or two drives in a virtual drive, the RAID controller
uses the parity blocks to recreate all of the missing information. If two drives in a RAID 6
virtual drive fail, two drive rebuilds are required, one for each drive. These rebuilds do
not occur at the same time. The controller rebuilds one failed drive, and then the other
failed drive.
NOTE: Integrated MegaRAID (IMR) displays new drives as JBOD (Just a Bunch of Disks).
For MegaRAID, unless the inserted drive contains valid DDF metadata, new drives
display as JBOD for MegaRAID Entry level controllers, such as the SAS 9240-4i/8i.
Rebuilds start only on unconfigured good drives, so you have to change the new drive
state from JBOD to unconfigured good to start a rebuild.
When you select Manual Configuration and click Next, the drive Group Definition
screen appears. You use this screen to select drives to create drive groups.
1. Hold <Ctrl> while selecting at least three ready drives in the Drives panel on the left.
2. Click Add To Array to move the drives to a proposed drive group configuration in
the Drive Groups panel on the right, as shown in Figure 41.
3. If you need to undo the changes, click Reclaim.
4. Choose whether to use drive encryption.
The drop-down menu in the Encryption field lists the options.
Figure 41:
WebBIOS Drive Group Definition Screen
5. After you finish selecting drives for the drive group, click Accept DG for each.
6. Click Next.
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The Virtual Drive Definition screen appears, as shown in Figure 42. Use this screen to
select the RAID level, strip size, read policy, and other attributes for the new virtual
drives.
Figure 42:
WebBIOS Virtual Drive Definition Screen
1. Change the virtual drive options from the defaults listed on the screen as needed.
Here are brief explanations of the virtual drive options:
— RAID Level: The drop-down menu lists the possible RAID levels for the virtual
drive. Select RAID 6.
— Strip Size: The strip size is the portion of a stripe that resides on a single drive in
the drive group. The stripe consists of the data segments that the RAID
controller writes across multiple drives, not including parity drives. For example,
consider a stripe that contains 64 KB of drive space and has 16 KB of data
residing on each drive in the stripe. In this case, the stripe size is 64 KB and the
strip size is 16 KB. You can set the strip size to 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, and
1024 KB. A larger strip size produces higher read performance. If your computer
regularly performs random read requests, choose a smaller strip size. The default
is 64 KB.
NOTE: WebBIOS does not not allow you to select 8KB as the stripe size when you create
a RAID 6 drive group with three drives.
— Access Policy: Select the type of data access that is allowed for this virtual drive:
RW: Allow read/write access. This is the default.
Read Only: Allow read-only access.
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Blocked: Do not allow access.
— Read Policy: Specify the read policy for this virtual drive:
Normal: This disables the read ahead capability. This is the default.
Ahead: This enables read ahead capability, which allows the controller to read
sequentially ahead of requested data and to store the additional data in cache
memory, anticipating that the data will be needed soon. This speeds up reads
for sequential data, but there is little improvement when accessing random
data.
— Write Policy: Specify the write policy for this virtual drive:
WBack: In Writeback mode the controller sends a data transfer completion signal
to the host when the controller cache has received all of the data in a
transaction.
This setting is recommended in Standard mode.
WThru: In Writethrough mode the controller sends a data transfer completion
signal to the host when the drive subsystem has received all of the data in a
transaction. This is the default.
Bad BBU: Select this mode if you want the controller to use Writeback mode but
the controller has no BBU or the BBU is bad. If you do not choose this option, the
controller firmware automatically switches to Writethrough mode if it detects a
bad or missing BBU.
CAUTION: LSI allows Writeback mode to be used with or without a battery. LSI
recommends that you use either a battery to protect the controller cache, or a UPS to
protect the entire system. If you do not use a battery or a UPS, and there is a power
failure, you risk losing the data in the controller cache.
— IO Policy: The IO Policy applies to reads on a specific virtual drive. It does not
affect the read ahead cache.
Direct: In Direct I/O mode, reads are not buffered in cache memory. Data is
transferred to the cache and the host concurrently. If the same data block is read
again, it comes from cache memory. This is the default.
Cached: In Cached I/O mode, all reads are buffered in cache memory.
— Drive Policy: Specify the drive cache policy:
Enable: Enable the drive cache.
Disable: Disable the drive cache.
NoChange: Leave the current drive cache policy as is. This drive policy is the
default.
— Disable BGI: Specify the background initialization status:
No: Leave background initialization enabled. This means that a new
configuration can be initialized in the background while you use WebBIOS to do
other configuration tasks. This is the default.
Yes: Select Yes if you do not want to allow background initializations for
configurations on this controller.
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NOTE: New RAID 6 virtual drives require at least seven drives for a background
initialization to start.
— Select Size: Specify the size of the virtual drive in megabytes. Normally, this
would be the full size for RAID 6 shown in the Configuration panel on the right.
You can specify a smaller size if you want to create other virtual drives on the
same drive group.
2. Click Accept to accept the changes to the virtual drive definition.
3. If you need to undo the changes, click Reclaim.
4. Click Next after you finish defining the virtual drives.
The Configuration Preview screen appears, as shown in Figure 43.
Figure 43:
RAID 6 Configuration Preview
5. Check the information in the configuration preview.
6. If the virtual drive configuration is acceptable, click Accept to save the
configuration. Otherwise, click Back to return to the previous screens and change
the configuration.
7. If you accept the configuration, click Yes at the prompt to save the configuration.
The WebBIOS main menu appears.
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4.5.3.5 Using Manual
Configuration: RAID 00
Chapter 4: WebBIOS Configuration Utility | Creating a Storage Configuration
A RAID 00 drive group is a spanned drive group that creates a striped set from a series
of RAID 0 drive groups. It breaks up data into smaller blocks and then stripes the blocks
of data to RAID 00 drive groups. The size of each block is determined by the stripe size
parameter, which is 64 KB.
RAID 00 does not provide any data redundancy but does offer excellent performance.
RAID 00 is ideal for applications that require high bandwidth but do not require fault
tolerance.
When you select Manual Configuration and click Next, the Drive Group Definition
screen appears.
You use the Drive Group Definition screen to select drives to create drive groups.
1. Hold <Ctrl> while you select ready drives in the Drives panel on the left.
2. Click Add To Array to move the drives to a proposed drive group configuration in
the Drive Groups panel on the right.
3. If you need to undo the changes, click Reclaim.
4. Click Accept DG to create a RAID 0 drive group.
An icon for the next drive group appears in the right panel.
5. Hold <Ctrl> while you select more ready drives in the Drives panel to create a
second RAID 0 drive group.
6. Click Add To Array to move the drives to a second drive group configuration in the
Drive Groups panel, as shown in Figure 44.
7. If you need to undo the changes, click Reclaim.
NOTE: RAID 00 supports a maximum of eight spans, with a maximum of 32 drives per
span. (Other factors, such as the type of controller, can limit the number of drives.)
8. Choose whether to use drive encryption.
9. Click Accept DG to create a RAID 0 drive group.
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Figure 44:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
WebBIOS Drive Group Definition Screen
10. Repeat step 4 through step 6 until you have selected all the drives you want for the
drive groups.
11. After you finish selecting drives for the drive groups, select each drive group and
then click Accept DG for each selection.
12. Click Next.
The Span Definition screen appears, as shown in Figure 45. This screen shows the
drive group holes that you can select to add to a span.
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Figure 45:
WebBIOS Span Definition Screen
13. Under the heading Array With Free Space, hold <Ctrl> while you select a drive
group, and then click Add to SPAN.
The drive group you select appears in the right frame under the heading Span.
14. Hold <Ctrl> while you select a second drive group, and then click Add to SPAN.
15. Repeat the previous two steps until you have selected all of the drive groups that
you want.
16. Click Next.
The Virtual Drive Definition screen appears, as shown in Figure 46. You use this
screen to select the RAID level, strip size, read policy, and other attributes for the
new virtual drives.
17. Hold <Ctrl> while you select drive groups in the Configuration panel on the right.
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Figure 46:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
WebBIOS Virtual Drive Definition Screen
18. Change the virtual drive options from the defaults listed on the screen as needed.
Here are brief explanations of the virtual drive options:
— RAID Level: The drop-down menu lists the possible RAID levels for the virtual
drive. Select RAID 00.
— Strip Size: The strip size is the portion of a stripe that resides on a single drive in
the drive group. The stripe consists of the data segments that the RAID
controller writes across multiple drives, not including parity drives. For example,
consider a stripe that contains 64 KB of drive space and has 16 KB of data
residing on each drive in the stripe. In this case, the stripe size is 64 KB and the
strip size is 16 KB. You can set the strip size to 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, and
1024 KB. A larger strip size produces higher read performance. If your computer
regularly performs random read requests, choose a smaller strip size. The default
is 64 KB.
— Access Policy: Select the type of data access that is allowed for this virtual drive:
RW: Allow read/write access.
Read Only: Allow read-only access. This type of access is the default.
Blocked: Do not allow access.
— Read Policy: Specify the read policy for this virtual drive:
Normal: This option disables the read ahead capability. This is the default.
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Ahead: This option enables read ahead capability, which allows the controller to
read sequentially ahead of requested data and to store the additional data in
cache memory, anticipating that the data will be needed soon. This speeds up
reads for sequential data, but there is little improvement when accessing
random data.
— Write Policy: Specify the write policy for this virtual drive:
WBack: In Writeback mode, the controller sends a data transfer completion
signal to the host when the controller cache has received all of the data in a
transaction. This setting is recommended in Standard mode.
WThru: In Writethrough mode, the controller sends a data transfer completion
signal to the host when the drive subsystem has received all of the data in a
transaction. This is the default.
Bad BBU: Select this mode if you want the controller to use Writeback mode but
the controller has no BBU or the BBU is bad. If you do not choose this option, the
controller firmware automatically switches to Writethrough mode if it detects a
bad or missing BBU.
CAUTION: LSI allows Writeback mode to be used with or without a battery. To protect
the entire system, LSI recommends that you use either a battery to protect the
controller cache or a UPS. If you do not use a battery or a UPS, and there is a power
failure, you risk losing the data in the controller cache.
— IO Policy: The IO Policy applies to reads on a specific virtual drive. The policy
does not affect the read ahead cache.
Direct: In Direct I/O mode, reads are not buffered in cache memory. Data is
transferred to the cache and the host concurrently. If the same data block is read
again, the block comes from cache memory. This setting is the default.
Cached: In Cached I/O mode, all reads are buffered in cache memory.
— Drive Policy: Specify the drive cache policy:
Enable: Enable the drive cache.
Disable: Disable the drive cache.
NoChange: Leave the current drive cache policy as is. This setting is the default.
— Disable BGI: Specify the background initialization status:
No: Leave background initialization enabled. This means that a new
configuration can be initialized in the background while you use WebBIOS to do
other configuration tasks. This setting is the default.
Yes: Select Yes if you do not want to allow background initializations for
configurations on this controller.
— Select Size: Specify the size of the virtual drive in megabytes. Normally, this
would be the full size for RAID 00 shown in the Configuration Panel on the right.
You can specify a smaller size if you want to create other virtual drives on the
same drive group.
19. Click Accept to accept the changes to the virtual drive definition.
20. If you need to undo the changes, click Reclaim.
21. After you finish defining the virtual drives, click Next.
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The Configuration Preview screen appears, as shown in Figure 47.
Figure 47:
RAID 00 Configuration Preview
22. Check the information in the configuration preview.
23. If the virtual drive configuration is acceptable, click Accept to save the
configuration. Otherwise, click Cancel to end the operation and return to the
WebBIOS main menu, or click Back to return to the previous screens and change
the configuration.
24. If you accept the configuration, click Yes at the prompt to save the configuration.
The WebBIOS main menu appears.
4.5.3.6 Using Manual
Configuration: RAID 10
RAID 10, a combination of RAID 1 and RAID 0, has mirrored drives.
It breaks up data into smaller blocks, then stripes the blocks of data to each RAID 1
drive group. Each RAID 1 drive group then duplicates its data to its other drive. The size
of each block is determined by the stripe size parameter, which is 64 KB. RAID 10 can
sustain one drive failure in each drive group while maintaining data integrity.
RAID 10 provides both high data transfer rates and complete data redundancy. It works
best for data storage that must have 100 percent redundancy of RAID 1 (mirrored drive
groups) and that also needs the enhanced I/O performance of RAID 0 (striped drive
groups); it works well for medium-sized databases or any environment that requires a
higher degree of fault tolerance and moderate to medium capacity.
When you select Manual Configuration and click Next, the Drive Group Definition
screen appears.
You use the Drive Group Definition screen to select drives to create drive groups.
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1. Hold <Ctrl> while selecting two ready drives in the Drives panel on the left.
2. Click Add To Array to move the drives to a proposed two-drive drive group
configuration in the Drive Groups panel on the right.
3. If you need to undo the changes, click Reclaim.
4. Click Accept DG to create a RAID 1 drive group.
An icon for the next drive group displays in the right panel.
5. Click on the icon for the next drive group to select it.
6. Hold <Ctrl> while selecting two more ready drives in the Drives panel to create a
second RAID 1 drive group with two drives.
7. Click Add To Array to move the drives to a second two-drive drive group
configuration in the Drive Groups panel, as shown in Figure 48.
8. If you need to undo the changes, click Reclaim.
9. Choose whether to use drive encryption.
NOTE: RAID 10 supports a maximum of eight spans, with a maximum of 32 drives per
span. (Other factors, such as the type of controller, can limit the number of drives.) You
must use an even number of drives in each RAID 10 drive group in the span.
Figure 48:
WebBIOS Drive Group Definition Screen
10. Repeat the previous three steps until you have selected all the drives you want for
the drive groups.
11. After you finish selecting drives for the drive groups, select each drive group and
click Accept DG for each.
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12. Click Next.
The Span Definition screen appears, as shown in Figure 49.
This screen displays the drive group holes you can select to add to a span.
Figure 49:
WebBIOS Span Definition Screen
13. Under the heading Array With Free Space, hold <Ctrl> while you select a drive
group with two drives, and click Add to SPAN.
The drive group you select displays in the right frame under the heading Span.
14. Hold <Ctrl> while you select a second drive group with two drives, and click Add to
SPAN.
Both drive groups display in the right frame under Span.
15. If there are additional drive groups with two drives each, you can add them to the
virtual drive.
16. Click Next.
The Virtual Drive Definition screen appears, as shown in Figure 50. You use this
screen to select the RAID level, strip size, read policy, and other attributes for the
new virtual drives.
17. Hold <Ctrl> while you select two drive groups with two drives in the Configuration
panel on the right.
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Figure 50:
WebBIOS Virtual Drive Definition Screen
NOTE: The WebBIOS Configuration Utility shows the maximum available capacity while
creating the RAID 10 drive group. In version 1.03 of the utility, the maximum size of the
RAID 10 drive group is the sum total of the two RAID 1 drive groups. In version 1.1, the
maximum size is the size of the smaller drive group multiplied by two.
18. Change the virtual drive options from the defaults listed on the screen as needed.
Here are brief explanations of the virtual drive options:
— RAID Level: The drop-down menu lists the possible RAID levels for the virtual
drive. Select RAID 10.
— Strip Size: The strip size is the portion of a stripe that resides on a single drive in
the drive group. The stripe consists of the data segments that the RAID
controller writes across multiple drives, not including parity drives. For example,
consider a stripe that contains 64 KB of drive space and has 16 KB of data
residing on each drive in the stripe. In this case, the stripe size is 64 KB and the
strip size is 16 KB. You can set the strip size to 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, and
1024 KB. A larger strip size produces higher read performance. If your computer
regularly performs random read requests, choose a smaller strip size. The default
is 64 KB.
— Access Policy: Select the type of data access that is allowed for this virtual drive:
RW: Allow read/write access.
Read Only: Allow read-only access. This is the default.
Blocked: Do not allow access.
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— Read Policy: Specify the read policy for this virtual drive:
Normal: This disables the read ahead capability. This is the default.
Ahead: This enables read ahead capability, which allows the controller to read
sequentially ahead of requested data and to store the additional data in cache
memory, anticipating that the data will be needed soon. This speeds up reads
for sequential data, but there is little improvement when accessing random
data.
— Write Policy: Specify the write policy for this virtual drive:
WBack: In Writeback mode the controller sends a data transfer completion signal
to the host when the controller cache has received all of the data in a
transaction. This setting is recommended in Standard mode.
WThru: In Writethrough mode the controller sends a data transfer completion
signal to the host when the drive subsystem has received all of the data in a
transaction. This is the default.
Bad BBU: Select this mode if you want the controller to use Writeback mode but
the controller has no BBU or the BBU is bad. If you do not choose this option, the
controller firmware automatically switches to Writethrough mode if it detects a
bad or missing BBU.
CAUTION: LSI allows Writeback mode to be used with or without a battery. LSI
recommends that you use either a battery to protect the controller cache, or a UPS to
protect the entire system. If you do not use a battery or a UPS, and there is a power
failure, you risk losing the data in the controller cache.
— IO Policy: The IO Policy applies to reads on a specific virtual drive. It does not
affect the read ahead cache.
Direct: In Direct I/O mode, reads are not buffered in cache memory. Data is
transferred to the cache and the host concurrently. If the same data block is read
again, it comes from cache memory. This is the default.
Cached: In Cached I/O mode, all reads are buffered in cache memory.
— Drive Policy: Specify the drive cache policy:
Enable: Enable the drive cache.
Disable: Disable the drive cache.
NoChange: Leave the current drive cache policy as is. This drive policy is the
default.
— Disable BGI: Specify the background initialization status:
No: Leave background initialization enabled. This means that a new
configuration can be initialized in the background while you use WebBIOS to do
other configuration tasks. This is the default.
Yes: Select Yes if you do not want to allow background initializations for
configurations on this controller.
— Select Size: Specify the size of the virtual drive in megabytes. Normally, this
would be the full size for RAID 10 shown in the configuration panel on the right.
You can specify a smaller size if you want to create other virtual drives on the
same drive group.
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19. Click Accept to accept the changes to the virtual drive definition.
20. If you need to undo the changes, click Reclaim.
21. After you finish defining the virtual drives, click Next .
The Configuration Preview screen appears, as shown in Figure 51.
Figure 51:
RAID 10 Configuration Preview
22. Check the information in the configuration preview.
23. If the virtual drive configuration is acceptable, click Accept to save the
configuration. Otherwise, click Cancel to end the operation and return to the
WebBIOS main menu, or click Back to return to the previous screens and change
the configuration.
24. If you accept the configuration, click Yes at the prompt to save the configuration.
The WebBIOS main menu appears.
4.5.3.7 Using Manual
Configuration: RAID 50
RAID 50 provides the features of both RAID 0 and RAID 5. RAID 50 uses both distributed
parity and drive striping across multiple drive groups.
It provides high data throughput, data redundancy, and very good performance. It is
best implemented on two RAID 5 drive groups with data striped across both drive
groups. Though multiple drive failures can be tolerated, only one drive failure can be
tolerated in each RAID 5 level drive group.
RAID 50 is appropriate when used with data that requires high reliability, high request
rates, high data transfer, and medium to large capacity.
When you select Manual Configuration and click Next, the Drive Group Definition
screen appears. You use this screen to select drives to create drive group.
1. Hold <Ctrl> while selecting at least three ready drives in the Drives panel on the left.
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2. Click Add To Array to move the drives to a proposed drive group configuration in
the Drive Groups panel on the right.
3. If you need to undo the changes, click Reclaim.
4. Click Accept DG to create a RAID 5 drive group.
An icon for a second drive group displays in the right panel.
5. Click on the icon for the second drive group to select it.
6. Hold <Ctrl> while selecting at least three more ready drives in the Drives panel to
create a second drive group.
7. Click Add To Array to move the drives to a proposed drive group configuration in
the Drive Groups panel on the right, as shown in Figure 52.
8. If you need to undo the changes, click Reclaim.
9. Choose whether to use drive encryption.
Figure 52:
WebBIOS Drive Group Definition Screen
10. After you finish selecting drives for the drive groups, select each drive group and
click Accept DG for each.
11. Click Next.
The Span Definition screen appears, as shown in Figure 53.
This screen displays the drive group holes you can select to add to a span.
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Figure 53:
WebBIOS Span Definition Screen
12. Under the heading Array With Free Space, hold <Ctrl> while you select a drive
group of three or more drives, and click Add to SPAN.
The drive group you select displays in the right frame under the heading Span.
13. Hold <Ctrl> while you select a second drive group of three or more drives, and click
Add to SPAN.
Both drive groups display in the right frame under Span.
14. Click Next.
The Virtual Drive Definition screen appears, as shown in Figure 54. You use this
screen to select the RAID level, strip size, read policy, and other attributes for the
new virtual drive(s).
15. Hold <Ctrl> while you select two drive groups with three or more drives each in the
Configuration panel on the right.
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Figure 54:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
WebBIOS Virtual Drive Definition Screen
16. Change the virtual drive options from the defaults listed on the screen as needed.
Here are brief explanations of the virtual drive options:
— RAID Level: The drop-down menu lists the possible RAID levels for the virtual
drive. Select RAID 50.
— Strip Size: The strip size is the portion of a stripe that resides on a single drive in
the drive group. The stripe consists of the data segments that the RAID
controller writes across multiple drives, not including parity drives. For example,
consider a stripe that contains 64 KB of drive space and has 16 KB of data
residing on each drive in the stripe. In this case, the stripe size is 64 KB and the
strip size is 16 KB. You can set the strip size to 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, and
1024 KB. A larger strip size produces higher read performance. If your computer
regularly performs random read requests, choose a smaller strip size. The default
is 64 KB.
— Access Policy: Select the type of data access that is allowed for this virtual drive:
RW: Allow read/write access.
Read Only: Allow read-only access. This is the default.
Blocked: Do not allow access.
— Read Policy: Specify the read policy for this virtual drive:
Normal: This disables the read ahead capability. This is the default.
Ahead: This enables read ahead capability, which allows the controller to read
sequentially ahead of requested data and to store the additional data in cache
memory, anticipating that the data will be needed soon. This speeds up reads
for sequential data, but there is little improvement when accessing random
data.
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— Write Policy: Specify the write policy for this virtual drive:
WBack: In Writeback mode the controller sends a data transfer completion signal
to the host when the controller cache has received all of the data in a
transaction.
This setting is recommended in Standard mode.
WThru: In Writethrough mode the controller sends a data transfer completion
signal to the host when the drive subsystem has received all of the data in a
transaction.
This is the default.
Bad BBU: Select this mode if you want the controller to use Writeback mode but
the controller has no BBU or the BBU is bad. If you do not choose this option, the
controller firmware automatically switches to Writethrough mode if it detects a
bad or missing BBU.
CAUTION: LSI allows Writeback mode to be used with or without a battery. LSI
recommends that you use either a battery to protect the controller cache, or an
uninterruptible power supply (UPS) to protect the entire system. If you do not use a
battery or a UPS, and there is a power failure, you risk losing the data in the controller
cache.
— IO Policy: The IO Policy applies to reads on a specific virtual drive. It does not
affect the read ahead cache.
Direct: In Direct I/O mode, reads are not buffered in cache memory. Data is
transferred to the cache and the host concurrently. If the same data block is read
again, it comes from cache memory. This is the default.
Cached: In Cached I/O mode, all reads are buffered in cache memory.
— Drive Policy: Specify the drive cache policy:
Enable: Enable the drive cache.
Disable: Disable the drive cache. This drive policy is the default.
NoChange: Leave the current drive cache policy as is.
This is the default.
— Disable BGI: Specify the background initialization status:
No: Leave background initialization enabled. This means that a new
configuration can be initialized in the background while you use WebBIOS to do
other configuration tasks. This is the default.
Yes: Select Yes if you do not want to allow background initializations for
configurations on this controller.
— Select Size: Specify the size of the virtual drive in megabytes. Normally, this
would be the full size for RAID 50 shown in the Configuration Panel on the right.
You can specify a smaller size if you want to create other virtual drives on the
same drive group.
17. Click Accept to accept the changes to the virtual drive definition or click Reclaim to
undo the changess
18. Click Next after you finish defining the virtual drives.
The Configuration Preview screen appears, as shown in Figure 55.
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Figure 55:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
RAID 50 Configuration Preview
19. Check the information in the configuration preview.
20. If the virtual drive configuration is acceptable, click Accept to save the
configuration. Otherwise, click Back to return to the previous screens and change
the configuration.
21. If you accept the configuration, click Yes at the prompt to save the configuration.
The WebBIOS main menu appears.
4.5.3.8 Using Manual
Configuration: RAID 60
RAID 60 provides the features of both RAID 0 and RAID 6, and includes both parity and
drive striping across multiple drive groups. RAID 6 supports two independent parity
blocks per stripe. A RAID 60 virtual drive can survive the loss of two drives in each of the
RAID 6 sets without losing data. RAID 60 is best implemented on two RAID 6 drive
groups with data striped across both drive groups. Use RAID 60 for data that requires a
very high level of protection from loss.
RAID 60 can support up to eight spans and tolerate up to 16 drive failures, though less
than total drive capacity is available. Two drive failures can be tolerated in each RAID 6
level drive group.
RAID 60 is appropriate when used with data that requires high reliability, high request
rates, high data transfer, and medium to large capacity.
When you select Manual Configuration and click Next, the Drive Group Definition
screen appears. You use this screen to select drives to create drive groups.
1. Hold <Ctrl> while selecting at least three ready drives in the Drives panel on the left.
2. Click Add To Array to move the drives to a proposed drive group configuration in
the Drive Groups panel on the right.
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3. If you need to undo the changes, click Reclaim.
4. Click Accept DG to create a RAID 6 drive group.
An icon for a second drive group displays in the right panel.
5. Click on the icon for the second drive group to select it.
6. Hold <Ctrl> while selecting at least three more ready drives in the Drives panel to
create a second drive group.
7. Click Add To Array to move the drives to a proposed drive group configuration in
the Drive Groups panel on the right, as shown in Figure 56.
8. If you need to undo the changes, click Reclaim.
9. Choose whether to use drive encryption.
Figure 56:
WebBIOS Drive Group Definition Screen
10. After you finish selecting drives for the drive groups, select each drive group and
click Accept DG for each.
11. Click Next.
The Span Definition screen appears, as shown in Figure 57.
This screen displays the drive group holes you can select to add to a span.
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Figure 57:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
WebBIOS Span Definition Screen
12. Under the heading Array With Free Space, hold <Ctrl> while you select a drive
group of three or more drives, and click Add to SPAN.
The drive group you select displays in the right frame under the heading Span.
13. Hold <Ctrl> while you select a second drive group of three or more drives, and click
Add to SPAN.
Both drive groups display in the right frame under Span.
14. Click Next.
The Virtual Drive Definition screen appears, as shown in Figure 58. You use this
screen to select the RAID level, strip size, read policy, and other attributes for the
new virtual drive(s).
15. Hold <Ctrl> while you select two drive groups with at least three drives each in the
Configuration window on the right.
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Figure 58:
WebBIOS Virtual Drive Definition Screen
16. Change the virtual drive options from the defaults listed on the screen as needed.
Here are brief explanations of the virtual drive options:
— RAID Level: The drop-down menu lists the possible RAID levels for the virtual
drive. Select RAID 60.
— Stripe Size: The strip size is the portion of a stripe that resides on a single drive
in the drive group. The stripe consists of the data segments that the RAID
controller writes across multiple drives, not including parity drives. For example,
consider a stripe that contains 64 KB of drive space and has 16 KB of data
residing on each drive in the stripe. In this case, the stripe size is 64 KB and the
strip size is 16 KB. You can set the strip size to 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, and
1024 KB. A larger strip size produces higher read performance. If your computer
regularly performs random read requests, choose a smaller strip size. The default
is 64 KB.
— Access Policy: Select the type of data access that is allowed for this virtual drive:
RW: Allow read/write access.
Read Only: Allow read-only access. This is the default.
Blocked: Do not allow access.
— Read Policy: Specify the read policy for this virtual drive:
Normal: This disables the read ahead capability. This is the default.
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Ahead: This enables read ahead capability, which allows the controller to read
sequentially ahead of requested data and to store the additional data in cache
memory, anticipating that the data will be needed soon. This speeds up reads
for sequential data, but there is little improvement when accessing random
data.
— Write Policy: Specify the write policy for this virtual drive:
WBack: In Writeback mode the controller sends a data transfer completion signal
to the host when the controller cache has received all of the data in a
transaction. This setting is recommended in Standard mode.
WThru: In Writethrough mode the controller sends a data transfer completion
signal to the host when the drive subsystem has received all of the data in a
transaction. This is the default.
Bad BBU: Select this mode if you want the controller to use Writeback mode but
the controller has no BBU or the BBU is bad. If you do not choose this option, the
controller firmware automatically switches to Writethrough mode if it detects a
bad or missing BBU.
CAUTION: LSI allows Writeback mode to be used with or without a battery. LSI
recommends that you use either a battery to protect the controller cache, or an
uninterruptible power supply (UPS) to protect the entire system. If you do not use a
battery or a UPS, and there is a power failure, you risk losing the data in the controller
cache.
— IO Policy: The IO Policy applies to reads on a specific virtual drive. It does not
affect the read ahead cache.
Direct: In Direct I/O mode, reads are not buffered in cache memory. Data is
transferred to the cache and the host concurrently. If the same data block is read
again, it comes from cache memory. This is the default.
Cached: In Cached I/O mode, all reads are buffered in cache memory.
— Drive Policy: Specify the drive cache policy:
Enable: Enable the drive cache.
Disable: Disable the drive cache. This drive policy is the default.
NoChange: Leave the current drive cache policy as is.
This is the default.
— Disable BGI: Specify the background initialization status:
No: Leave background initialization enabled. This means that a new
configuration can be initialized in the background while you use WebBIOS to do
other configuration tasks. This is the default.
Yes: Select Yes if you do not want to allow background initializations for
configurations on this controller.
— Select Size: Specify the size of the virtual drive in megabytes. Normally, this
would be the full size for RAID 60 shown in the Configuration panel on the right.
You can specify a smaller size if you want to create other virtual drives on the
same drive group.
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NOTE: WebBIOS does not not allow you to select 8 KB as the stripe size when you create
a RAID 60 drive group with six drives.
17. Click Accept to accept the changes to the virtual drive definition.
18. If you need to undo the changes, click Reclaim button.
19. Click Next after you finish defining virtual drives.
The Configuration Preview screen appears, as shown in Figure 59.
Figure 59:
RAID 60 Configuration Preview
20. Check the information in the configuration preview.
21. If the virtual drive configuration is acceptable, click Accept to save the
configuration. Otherwise, or click Back to return to the previous screens and
change the configuration.
22. If you accept the configuration, click Yes at the prompt to save the configuration.
The WebBIOS main menu appears.
4.6
Creating a CacheCade
Configuration
This section contains the procedures for creating CacheCadeRAID virtual drives for the
CacheCade advanced software feature.
The MegaRAID CacheCade advanced software improves application performance by
expanding the MegaRAID read caching capacity. The CacheCade feature uses
high-performing CacheCade software as a secondary tier of cache to provide faster
reads and to maximize transactional I/O performance.
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NOTE: This procedure does not create a RAID configuration. It creates an CacheCade
software virtual drive that functions as a secondary tier of cache.
Using CacheCade software as controller cache allows for very large data sets to be
present in cache, delivering performance up to 50 times greater than regular cache in
read-intensive applications, such as online transaction processing (OLTP), and file and
Web server workloads. The solution accelerates the IO performance of HDD-based
drive groups while requiring only a small investment in CacheCade software
technology.
To support full-throughput for multiple direct-attached CacheCade software, this
feature reduces I/O-processing overhead in the 2108-chip-based MegaRAID
controllers. CacheCade offers performance equivalent to flash-based controllers and
better performance for RAID 5 and RAID 6 when compared to Fusion I/O.
Follow these steps to create a CacheCade drive group.
1. Click Configuration Wizard on the WebBIOS main screen.
The first Configuration Wizard screen appears, as shown in Figure 60.
Figure 60:
WebBIOS Configuration Wizard Screen
2. Select CacheCade(TM) Configuration and click Next.
The Span Definition screen appears, as shown in Figure 60.
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Figure 61:
CacheCade Array Selection Screen
3. Select an array with free space from the drop-down list and click Select Array.
The selected array moves to the right frame under the heading Selected Array.
4. Click Next.
The Create CachCade Disk screen appears, as shown in Figure 62.
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Figure 62:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
CacheCade Disk Screen
5. Click Next to accept the drive group.
6. If you need to undo the changes, click Reclaim.
The Config Wizard Preview screen appears, as shown in Figure 63.
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Figure 63:
CacheCade Configuration Preview
7. Click Accept if the configuration is OK. Otherwise, or click Back to return to the
previous screens and change the configuration.
8. If you accept the configuration, click Yes at the prompt to save the configuration.
The WebBIOS main menu screen appears, as shown in Figure 64. It shows the
CacheCade virtual drive.
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Figure 64:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
WebBIOS Main Menu with a CacheCade Virtual Drive
4.7
Selecting SafeStore
Encryption Services Security
Options
The SafeStore Encryption Services feature provides the ability to encrypt data and use
disk-based key management for the data security solution. This solution protects your
data in case of theft or loss of physical drives. This section describes how to enable,
change, or disable the drive security settings, and how to import a foreign
configuration.
4.7.1
Enabling the Security Key
Identifier, Security Key, and Password
Perform the following steps to enable the encryption settings for the security key
identifier, security key, and password.
1. Click Drive Security on the main WebBIOS screen.
The Drive Security Settings screen appears, as shown in the following figure.
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Figure 65:
Driver Security Settings Screen
2. To enable the drive security settings, select Enable drive security, and click Accept.
The Drive Security Choose mode wizard appears as shown in the following figure.
This wizard allows you to choose the security key management mode.

External Key Management (EKM) mode

Local Key Management (LKM) mode
Figure 66:
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Drive Security Choose mode
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3. Select EKM in the Drive Security Choose mode wizard.
4. Click OK.
5. Click OK, the system asks you for a restart. The restart message appears as shown in
Figure 71.
6. If you select LKM in Drive Security Choose mode wizard (Figure 66), the screen
used to create a security key identifier appears, as shown in the following figure.
Figure 67:
Enable Drive Security – Enter Security Key ID Screen
7. Accept the default security key ID or enter a new security key ID.
8. Click Next.
The Enable Drive Security – Enter Security Key screen appears as shown in
Figure 68.
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Figure 68:
Enable Drive Security – Enter Security Key
9. Enter a new drive security key or click Suggest to fill the new security key. Enter the
new drive security key again to confirm.
The security key is case-sensitive. It must be between eight and thirty-two
characters and contain at least one number, one lowercase letter, one uppercase
letter, and one non-alphanumeric character (e.g. < > @ +). The space character is not
permitted.
10. Click Next.
The Enable Drive Security – Enter Pass Phrase screen appears as shown in Figure 69.
You have the option to provide a pass phrase for additional security.
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Figure 69:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Enable Drive Security – Enter Pass Phrase
11. If you want to use a pass phrase, click the checkbox Use a pass phrase in addition
to the security key.
12. Enter a new pass phrase and then enter the new pass phrase again to confirm.
The pass phrase is case-sensitive. It must be between eight and thirty-two
characters and contain at least one number, one lowercase letter, one uppercase
letter, and one non-alphanumeric character (e.g. < > @ +). The space character is not
permitted.
Non-US keyboard users must be careful not to enter DBCS characters in the pass
phrase field or security key field. Firmware works only with the ASCII character set.
13. Click Accept.
The Confirm Enable Drive Security screen appears, as shown in Figure 70.
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Figure 70:
Confirm Enable Drive Security Screen
14. Click Yes on the Confirm Enable Drive Security screen to confirm that you want to
enable the drive security settings.
WebBIOS enables the security key ID, security key, and pass phrase (if applicable)
that you entered and returns you to the main menu.
CAUTION: If you forget the security key, you will lose access to your data. Be sure
to record your security key information. You might need to enter the security key to
perform certain operations.
4.7.2
EKM
Enabling Drive Security using
EKM is used for key management when a large number of systems are deployed. You
can automate and manage the life cycle of keys, and also use to unlock configurations.
When you select EKM in Figure 66, and click OK, the following dialog box appears.
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Figure 71:
4.7.3
Changing the Security Key
Identifier, Security Key, and Pass Phrase
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
System Restart
If you selected disk-based encryption when you made the RAID configuration, the drive
security will be enabled. Perform the following steps to change the encryption settings
for the security key identifier, security key, and pass phrase.
1. Click Drive Security on the main WebBIOS screen.
The Change Drive Security screen appears as shown in Figure 72.
Figure 72:
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2. To change the drive security settings, select Change drive security settings... and
click Accept.
4.7.4
LKM
Change Security from EKM to
The Change Security Settings – Introduction screen appears as shown in Figure 73.
Figure 73:
Change Security Settings – Introduction
3. Select Change current security s ettings, and click OK, the system restart message
appears as shown in Figure 71.
4. Select Switch to Local Key management (LKM) mode, the Change Security
Settings – Security Key ID screen appears as shown in Figure 74.
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Figure 74:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Change Security Settings – Security Key ID
5. Choose whether you want to use the existing security key ID or enter a new security
key ID. You have the following options:
— Use the existing security key identifier (Current security key identifier).
— Enter a new security key identifier (New security key identifier).
6. Click Next.
The Change Security Settings – Security Key screen appears as shown in
Figure 75. You have the option to use the existing security key or enter a new one.
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Figure 75:
Change Security Settings – Security Key
7. Choose whether you want to use the existing security key or enter a new security
key. You have the following options:
— Use the existing drive security key.
— Enter a new drive security key.
8. If you want to create a new drive security key, either enter a new drive security key
in the New security key field or click Suggest to fill the new security key.
9. Enter the new drive security key again in the Confirm field.
The security key is case-sensitive. It must be between eight and thirty-two
characters and contain at least one number, one lowercase letter, one uppercase
letter, and one non-alphanumeric character (e.g. < > @ +). The space character is not
permitted.
10. Click Next.
The Change Security Settings – Pass Phrase screen appears as shown in Figure 76.
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Figure 76:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Change Security Settings – Pass Phrase Screen
11. If you want to use a pass phrase, click the checkbox Use a pass phrase in addition
to the security key.
12. Enter a new pass phrase and then enter the new pass phrase again to confirm.
The pass phrase is case-sensitive. It must be between 8and 32 characters and
contain at least one number, one lowercase letter, one uppercase letter, and one
non-alphanumeric character (e.g. < > @ +). The space character is not permitted.
Non-US keyboard users must be careful not to enter DBCS characters in the pass
phrase field or security key field. Firmware works only with the ASCII character set.
13. Click Accept.
If you entered a new pass phrase, the Authenticate Drive Security Settings screen
appears.
14. On the Authenticate Drive Security Settings screen, enter the security key and click
Ok.
If you entered a new drive security key, the Authenticate Drive Security Settings
screen appears, as shown in Figure 77.
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Figure 77:
Authenticate Drive Security Settings Screen
15. Enter the current security key and click OK.
The text box for the security key can hold up to 32 characters. The key must be at
least eight characters. After you enter the correct security key, the Confirm screen
appears, as shown in Figure 78.
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Figure 78:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Confirm Screen
16. Click Yes to confirm that you want to change the drive security settings.
If the current security key is not needed, WebBIOS saves the changes to the security
settings and returns you to the main menu. If the current security key is needed, the
Authenicate Drive Security Settings screen appears.
4.7.5
EKM
Changing Security from LKM to
Perform the following steps if you want to change security from LKM to EKM.
1. Select Drive Security from the WebBIOS main page.
2. Select Change Drive security.
The Change Security Settings wizard appears as shown in the following figure.
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Figure 79:
Change Security Settings
3. Select the Change current security settings option, the Change Security
Settings – Security Key ID wizard is displayed (Figure 74). This procedure
continues till Figure 78.
4. Select the Switch to External Key Management (EKM) mode, and click OK, the
Authenticate Drive Security Settings screen is displayed (Figure 72).
4.7.6
Disabling the Drive Security
Settings
Perform the following steps to disable the drive security settings.
NOTE: If you disable the drive security settings, you cannot create any new secure
virtual drives. Disabling these settings does not affect the security or data of foreign
drives. If you removed any drives that were previously secured, you will still need to
enter the security key when you import them.
1. Click Drive Security on the main WebBIOS screen.
The Drive Security screen appears, as shown in Figure 80.
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Figure 80:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Drive Security
2. To disable the drive security settings, select Disable drive security and click
Accept.
The Confirm Disable Drive Security screen appears as shown in Figure 81.
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Figure 81:
Confirm Disable Drive Security Settings
3. On the Confirm Disable Security Settings screen, click Yes to confirm that you want
to disable the drive security settings.
WebBIOS returns you to the MSM main menu.
4.8
Viewing and Changing
Device Properties
This section explains how you can use the WebBIOS CU to view and change the
properties for controllers, virtual drives, drives, and BBUs.
4.8.1
WebBIOS displays information for one LSI SAS controller at a time. If your computer
system has multiple LSI SAS controllers, you can view information for a different
controller by clicking Controller Selection on the main screen. When the Controller
Selection screen appears, select the controller you want from the list.
Viewing Controller Properties
Follow these steps to view the properties of the currently selected controller.
1. Click Controller Properties on the main WebBIOS screen.
There are three Controller Properties screens. Figure 82 shows the first screen.
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Figure 82:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
First Controller Properties Screen
The information on this screen is read-only and cannot be modified directly. Most of
this information is self-explanatory. The screen lists the number of virtual drives that
are already defined on this controller, and the number of drives connected to the
controller.
2. Click Next to view the second Controller Properties screen, as shown in Figure 83.
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Figure 83:
Second Controller Properties Screen
3. Click Next to view the third Controller Properties screen, as shown in Figure 84.
Figure 84:
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Third Controller Properties Screen
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Table 21 describes the entries/options listed on the second and third Controller
Properties screen. LSI recommends that you leave these options at their default
settings to achieve the best performance, unless you have a specific reason for
changing them.
Table 21: Controller Properties Menu Options
Option
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Description
Battery Backup
This entry indicates whether the selected controller has a BBU. If
present, you can click Present to view information about the BBU. For
more information, see Section 4.8.4, Viewing and Changing Battery
Backup Unit Information
Set Factory Defaults
Use this option to load the default MegaRAID® WebBIOS CU settings.
The default is No.
Cluster Mode
Use this option to enable or disable Cluster mode. The default is
Disabled. A cluster is a grouping of independent servers that can access
the same data storage and provide services to a common set of clients.
When Cluster mode is disabled, the system operates in Standard mode.
Rebuild Rate
Use this option to select the rebuild rate for drives connected to the
selected controller. The default is 30 percent. The rebuild rate is the
percentage of system resources dedicated to rebuilding a failed drive.
The higher the number, the more system resources devoted to a
rebuild.
BGI Rate
Use this option to select the amount of system resources dedicated to
background initialization of virtual drives connected to the selected
controller. The default is 30 percent.
CC Rate
Use this option to select the amount of system resources dedicated to
consistency checks of virtual drives connected to the selected
controller. The default is 30 percent.
Reconstruction Rate
Use this option to select the amount of system resources dedicated to
reconstruction of drives connected to the selected controller. The
default is 30 percent.
Controller BIOS
Use this option to enable or disable the BIOS for the selected controller.
The default is Enabled. If the boot device is on the selected controller,
the BIOS must be enabled; otherwise, the BIOS should be disabled or it
might not be possible to use a boot device elsewhere.
NCQ
Native Command Queuing (NCQ) gives an individual drive the ability to
optimize the order in which it executes the read and write commands.
The default is Enabled.
Coercion Mode
Drive coercion is a tool for forcing drives of varying capacities to the
same size so they can be used in a drive group. The coercion mode
options are None, 128MB-way, and 1GB-way. The default is None.
The number you choose depends on how much the drives from various
vendors vary in their actual size. LSI recommends that you use the 1GB
coercion mode option.
S.M.A.R.T. Polling
Use this option to determine how frequently the controller polls for
drives reporting a Predictive Drive Failure (S.M.A.R.T.: Self-Monitoring
Analysis and Reporting Technology error). The default is 300 seconds (5
minutes).
Alarm Control
Select this option to enable, disable, or silence the onboard alarm tone
generator on the controller. The default is Disabled.
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Table 21: Controller Properties Menu Options (Continued)
Option
Description
Patrol Read Rate
Use this option to select the rate for patrol reads for drives connected to
the selected controller. The default is 30 percent. The patrol read rate is
the percentage of system resources dedicated to running a patrol read.
See Section 5.9, Patrol Read-Related Controller Properties for additional
information about patrol read.
Cache Flush Interval
Use this option to control the interval (in seconds) at which the
contents of the onboard data cache are flushed. The default is 4
seconds.
Spinup Drive Count
Use this option to control the number of drives that spin up
simultaneously. The default is 2 drives.
Spinup Delay
Use this option to control the interval (in seconds) between spinup of
drives connected to this controller. The delay prevents a drain on the
system’s power supply that would occur if all drives spun up at the same
time.
The default is 12 seconds.
StopOnError
Enable this option if you want the boot process to stop when the
controller BIOS encounters an error during boot-up. The default is
Disabled.
Spin Down Delay Time Use this option to control the interval (in seconds) between spindown
of drives connected to this controller. The delay prevents a drain on the
system’s power supply that would occur if all drives spun down at the
same time.
The default is 30 minutes.
Stop CC on Error
Enable this option if you want to stop a consistency check when the
controller BIOS encounters an error. The default is No.
Maintain PD Fail
History
Enable this option to maintain the history of all drive failures. The
default is Enabled.
Schedule CC
Indicates whether the option to schedule the date and time for a
consistency check is supported.
Snapshot
Use this option to create a snapshot of a volume. MegaRAID Recovery,
also known as Snapshot, offers a simplified way to recover data and
provides automatic protection for the boot volume. You can use the
Recovery feature to take a snapshot of a volume and to restore a
volume or file. Snapshot functionality allows you to capture data
changes to the volume, and, if data is deleted accidentally or
maliciously, restore the data from the view or roll back to a snapshot at
a previous point-in-time (PiT). MegaRAID Recovery supports up to eight
snapshots of PiTs for each volume.
Disk Activity
Enable this property if you want to locate a particular disk. This disk can
be identified with a continuous blinking of green activity LED. This
works only if the disks are installed in a enclosure.
Manage JBOD
Converting the multiple JBOD drives to unconfigured drive at single
selection.
If you make changes to the options on this screen, click Submit to register them. If you
change your mind, click Reset to return the options to their default values.
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4.8.2
Viewing Virtual Drive
Properties, Policies, and Operations
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WebBIOS displays properties, policies, and operations for virtual drives.
To view these items for the currently selected virtual drive, click on a virtual drive icon
in the right panel on the WebBIOS CU main screen.
The Virtual Drive screen appears, as shown in Figure 85.
Figure 85:
Virtual Drive Screen
The Properties panel of this screen displays the virtual drive’s RAID level, state, capacity,
strip size.
The Policies panel lists the virtual drive policies that were defined when the storage
configuration was created. For information about these policies, see Section 4.5.3,
Using Manual Configuration To change any of these policies, make a selection from the
drop-down menu and click Change.
The Operations panel lists operations that can be performed on the virtual drive. To
perform an operation, select it and click Go. Choose from the following options:
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
Select Delete to delete this virtual drive. For more information, see Section 4.12.2,
Deleting a Virtual Drive.

Select Locate to make the LEDs flash on the drives used by this virtual drive. This
works only if the drives are installed in a drive enclosure that supports SAFTE
(SCSI-Accessed-Fault-Tolerant-Enclosure).

Select Fast Init or Slow Init to initialize this virtual drive. A fast initialization quickly
writes zeroes to the first and last 10-MB regions of the new virtual drive and then
completes the initialization in the background. A slow initialization is not complete
until the entire virtual drive has been initialized with zeroes. It is seldom necessary
to use this option, because the virtual drive was already initialized when you
created it.
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CAUTION: Before you run an initialization, back up any data on the virtual drive that
you want to save. All data on the virtual drive is lost when you initialize the drive.

Select CC to run a consistency check on this virtual drive. For more information, see
Section 4.12.1, Running a Consistency Check. (This option is not available for RAID 0
virtual drives.)

Select AdvOpers to access screens to remove drives, migrate RAID levels (that is,
change the virtual drive configuration by adding a drive and changing the RAID
level), and use MegaRAID Recovery.
See Section 4.12.8, Migrating the RAID Level of a Virtual Drive for information about
adding a drive to a virtual drive or migrating its RAID level. See Section 4.10, Using
MegaRAID Recovery for the MegaRAID Recovery procedure.

Select Enable MegaRAID Recovery to use MegaRAID Recovery, also known as
Snapshot. Recovery offers a simplified way to recover data and provides automatic
protection for the boot volume. You can use the Recovery feature to take a snapshot
of a volume and to restore a volume or file.
See Section 4.10, Using MegaRAID Recovery for the MegaRAID Recovery procedure.

Select Expand to increase the size of a virtual drive to occupy the remaining
capacity in the drive group. In addition, you can add drives to the virtual drive in
order to increase capacity.
See Section 4.9, Expanding a Virtual Drive for the procedure you can use to expand a
virtual drive.
CAUTION: Before you change a virtual drive configuration, back up any data on the
virtual drive that you want to save.
4.8.3
Viewing Drive Properties
The Physical Drive screen displays the properties of a selected drive and enables you to
perform operations on the drive. There are two ways to access the Physical Drive
screen:

On the main menu screen, click on a drive in the right panel under the heading
Physical Drives.

On the main menu screen, click on Physical Drives in the left panel to display the
Physical Drive screen. Then click on a drive in the right panel. Click on the
Properties button, and click Go. The properties for the selected drive displays.
Figure 86 shows the Physical Drive screen.
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Figure 86:
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Physical Drive Screen
The drive properties are view-only and are self-explanatory. Note that the properties
include the state of the drive.
Operations you can perform are listed at the bottom of the screen. After you select an
operation, click Go to start the operation. The operations vary depending on the drive
state. If the drive state is Online, the following operations appear.

Select MakeDriveOffline if you want to force the drive offline.
NOTE: If you force offline a good drive that is part of a redundant drive group with a hot
spare, the drive will rebuild to the hot spare drive. The drive you forced offline will go
into the Unconfigured Bad state. Access the BIOS utility to set the drive to the
Unconfigured Good state.

Select Locate to make the LED flash on the drive. This works only if the drive is
installed in a drive enclosure.
If the drive state is Unconfigured Good, four additional operations appear on this
screen.
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
Select Make Global HSP to make a global hot spare, available to all of the virtual
drives.

Select Make Dedicated HSP to make a hot spare dedicated to a specific virtual
drive.
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WebBIOS displays the global hot spare as Global and the dedicated hot spare as
Ded. The icon for the dedicated hot spare displays under its associated virtual drive.
The drive number, drive state, drive capacity, and drive manufacturer display.

Select Enclosure Affinity so if there are drive failures present on a split backplane
configuration, then the hot spare will be used first on the backplane side that it
resides in.

Select Prepare for Removal to prepare the drive for removal from the enclosure.
The Prepare for Removal feature is different from spinning a drive down into
powersave mode because it also involves flagging the drive as ready to remove.
Therefore, if you choose to prepare a drive for removal, Ready to Remove displays
in the device tree for that drive, instead of Powersave.
4.8.4
Viewing and Changing Battery
Backup Unit Information
If your SAS controller has a battery backup unit (BBU), you can view information about
it and change some settings. To do this, follow these steps:
1. Click Controller Properties on the WebBIOS CU main menu screen.
The first Controller Information screen appears, as shown in Figure 87.
Figure 87:
First Controller Properties Screen
2. Click Next to view the second Controller Properties screen.
The second Controller Properties screen appears, as shown in Figure 88. The
Battery Backup field at the top left of the screen indicates whether the iBBU is
present.
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Figure 88:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Second Controller Properties Screen
3. Click Present in the Battery Backup field.
The Battery Module screen appears, as shown in Figure 89. This screen contains the
following information:
—
—
—
—
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Battery information
Design information
Capacity information
Auto Learn properties and settings
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Figure 89:
Battery Module Screen
Most of the Battery Module properties are view-only and are self-explanatory.
In the lower right corner of the screen are the auto learn options. A learning cycle is a
battery calibration operation performed by the controller periodically to determine
the condition of the battery. You can change the learn delay interval (the length of
time between automatic learning cycles) and the auto learn mode.
NOTE: LSI recommends leaving the the learn delay interval and the auto learn mode at
their default settings.
4.8.4.1 Setting the Learn Delay
Interval
The learn delay interval is the length of time between automatic learning cycles.
Perform the following steps to change the interval:
a. Open the drop-down menu in the Auto Learn Mode field.
b. Select the learn mode as Auto (the default).
This is so the controller performs the learning cycle automatically.
c. Change the number of hours in the Learn Delay Interval field.
You can delay the start of the learn cycles for up to 168 hours (7 days).
d. Click Go to set the interval.
4.8.4.2
Mode
Setting the Auto Learn
You can start battery learning cycles manually or automatically. The Auto Learn
modes are:
— BBU Auto Learn: Firmware tracks the time since the last learning cycle and
performs a learn cycle when due.
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— BBU Auto Learn Disabled: Firmware does not monitor or initiate a learning cycle.
You can schedule learning cycles manually.
— BBU Auto Learn Warn: Firmware warns about a pending learning cycle. You can
initiate a learning cycle manually. After the learning cycle is complete, firmware
resets the counter and warns you when the next learning cycle time is reached.
Perform the following steps to choose an auto learn mode:
a. Open the drop-down menu in the Auto Learn Mode field.
b. Select an auto learn mode.
c. Click Go to set the auto learn mode.
NOTE: When you replace the iBBU, the charge cycle counter is reset automatically.
4.9
Expanding a Virtual Drive
You can increase the size of a virtual drive to occupy the remaining capacity in a drive
group. In addition, you can add drives to the virtual drive in order to increase capacity.
Follow these steps to expand a virtual drive.
1. Access the Virtual Drive screen by clicking a virtual drive icon in the right panel on
the WebBIOS CU main screen.
The Virtual Drive screen appears, as shown in Figure 90.
Figure 90:
Virtual Drive Screen
2. Click the Expand radio button and then click Go.
The Expand Virtual Drive screen appears, as shown in Figure 91.
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Figure 91:
Expand Virtual Drive Screen
3. Enter the percentage of the available capacity that you want the virtual drive to use.
For example, if there are 100 GB of capacity available and you want to increase the
size of the virtual drive by 30 GB, select 30 percent.
4. Click Calculate to determine the capacity of the virtual drive after expansion.
5. Click Ok.
The virtual drive expands by the selected percentage of the available capacity.
4.10 Using MegaRAID
Recovery
MegaRAID Recovery, also known as Snapshot, offers a simplified way to recover data
and provides automatic protection for the boot volume. You can use the Recovery
feature to take a snapshot of a volume and to restore a volume or file. Snapshot
functionality allows you to capture data changes to the volume, and, if data is deleted
accidentally or maliciously, you can restore the data from the view or roll back to a
snapshot at a previous point-in-time (PiT). MegaRAID Recovery supports up to eight
snapshots of PiTs for each volume.
Each Recovery PiT volume snapshot is typically a fraction of the original volume size,
because it tracks only the changes that are made to a volume after the PiT is created.
Disk space for PiTs is reserved in the Snapshot Repository virtual drive, and the PiT is
expanded in small increments as new data is written to the volume. Multiple PiTs of
each volume can be retained online, enabling frequent snapshots to be stored in a
space-efficient manner.
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CAUTION: Do not select the virtual drive containing the operating system (OS) as the
Snapshot Repository. Updates to the operating system or operating system crashes
could destroy data on that virtual drive.
4.10.1
Recovery Scenarios
There are three primary scenarios in which to use the Recovery feature:
1. Restore the missing or deleted files (restore from view).
a. Discover the files are missing or deleted.
b. Review the Snapshot views of the file content (also known as "mounting" af
snapshot) from each PiT until you find the missing file.
A Snapshot view contains the content from the Point-in-Time at which the
snapshot was made.
c. Drag and drop the missing file from Snapshot view back into the online storage
volume that was the source of the Snapshot.
2. If there are corrupt operating system files in a volume, roll back the volume to a
previous state.
a. Reboot the system and run WebBIOS.
b. Select the most recent snapshot that does not contain the corrupted or
malicious file to roll back to. Select the most recent PiT snapshot to roll back to.
c. Reboot the system.
The system automatically rolls back to its previous state based on the selected
PiT snapshot.
3. Reduce the risk of extended downtime during application updates/upgrades in the
IT center.
a. When the application is offline, take a snapshot of the application volume.
b. Install each patch individually and test for any new defects that might have been
introduced.
c. Take a snapshot after you test each patch and determine that it is clean.
d. If a defect is introduced, roll back to the previous installation and bypass the
installation of the defective patch.
NOTE: If the volume is still damaged, continue to select from the next most current PiT
snapshot to the oldest.
4.10.2 Enabling the Recovery
Advanced Software
You can enable the Recovery advanced software in WebBIOS. After you enable
Recovery, you create two virtual drives - one as a Snapshot Base or source and the other
as a Snapshot Repository. The Snapshot Base virtual drive contains the data that is
stored in the repository virtual drive.
Follow these steps to enable MegaRAID Recovery.
1. Click on a virtual drive icon in the right panel on the WebBIOS CU main screen to
access the Virtual Drive screen.
The Virtual Drive screen appears, as shown in Figure 92.
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Figure 92:
Virtual Drive Screen
2. Click Enable MegaRAID Recovery in the Operations panel of the screen.
3. Click Go in the Operations panel of the screen.
The Enable MegaRAID Recovery screen appears, as shown in Figure 93.
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Figure 93:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Enable MegaRAID Recovery Screen
4. Select a virtual drive from the list of virtual drives in the Select Snapshot
Repository drop-down menu.
This is the Snapshot Repository virtual drive. This drive stores the snapshot data.
Make sure you select a Snapshot Repository virtual drive with enough available
capacity. The available capacity is the largest free block of capacity on the selected
repository.
NOTE: A virtual drive and a Snapshot Repository virtual drive can be associated with
the same drives or a common set of drives, or the two virtual drives can be located on
two completely separate set of drives. Using a separate set of drives for the virtual drive
and the Snapshot Repository virtual drives provides a performance advantage over
using a common set of drives.
5. Click the Update Capacity button to determine the available capacity of the
selected repository.
CAUTION: Do not select the virtual drive containing the operating system as the
Snapshot Repository. Updates to the operating system crashes can destroy data on that
virtual drive.
6. In the Allocated Capacity for snapshots field, select the available capacity in the
Snapshot Repository to use for changes to the virtual drive .
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The capacity is dependent on how write-intensive the application is that you are
taking snapshots of. The available capacity is the largest free block of capacity on
the Snapshot Repository virtual drive.
NOTE: If you use all of the space of the Repository virtual drive, there will be insufficient
space to create a snapshot and a view.
CAUTION: Copy all of your data to another virtual drive before you select this option. If
there is any existing data on this virtual drive, it will be lost.
7. Click Next.
The snapshot settings screen appears as shown in Figure 101.
8. Click Finish.
A confirmation dialog box appears.
9. Confirm that you want to make these selections.
This virtual drive becomes a snapshot repository. Use it only for storing
snapshot-related data.
CAUTION: After you enable snapshots on this virtual drive, you cannot change the
allocated percentage of capacity or the snapshot repository without first disabling
snapshots and losing any snapshot data.
4.10.3
Creating Snapshots and Views
You can use WebBIOS to create up to eight snapshots of a volume. WebBIOS shows the
snapshots in chronological order from the oldest to the newest. Each snapshot is a PiT
snapshot of the virtual drive that is the Snapshot Base. First, create the Snapshot Base
virtual drive and then create the snapshot.
After you create the snapshots, you can create views of the PiT snapshots. You can
search the views to find a snapshot that does not contain the corrupt data or a
snapshot that contains the deleted data, depending on the situation. After you create a
snapshot, you can reboot and roll back to a snapshot to restore data.
Follow these steps to create a snapshot.
1. Enable MegaRAID Recovery.
See Section 4.10.2, Enabling the Recovery Advanced Software, for the procedure used
to enable MegaRAID Recovery in WebBIOS.
2. Click on the virtual drive in the Logical View on the main screen to go to the
operations for the virtual drive.
The Virtual Drive screen appears, as shown in Figure 94.
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Figure 94:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Snapshot Base Virtual Drive Operations
3. Click Manage Snapshots in the Operations panel.
The Virtual Drive Properties screen appears, as shown in Figure 95.
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Figure 95:
Properties
4. Enter a snapshot name in the Enter snapshot name textbox and click Create
Snapshot.
This creates a snapshot that appears as a link in the Snapshot Timeline.
5. Click on the link of a specific snapshot.
The snapshot details appear.
6. Click Advanced. The Snapshot Settings screen appears as shown in Figure 101.
7. Click Create View.
The Create View screen appears, as shown in Figure 96.
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Figure 96:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Create View Screen
8. Enter a view name in the Enter View Name field, specify the capacity of the view in
the Write Capacity field and click OK.
This creates the view. After you create a view, you can view details about both the
snapshot and the view on a single page, as shown in Figure 97.
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Figure 97:
4.10.4
Creating Concurrent Snapshots
Snapshot and View Details
If you have created multiple Snapshot Base virtual drives, you can create snapshots on
all of them at one time (concurrent snapshots). Each snapshot has the same name and
timestamp.
Follow these steps to create concurrent snapshots.
1. Click Controller Properties on the WebBIOS main screen.
The first Controller Properties screen displays. There are three Controller Properties
screen.
2. Click Next to on the first two Controller Properties screens to access the third
Controller Properties screen, as shown in Figure 98.
Figure 98:
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Third Controller Properties Screen
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3. Click Create in the Snapshot field.
The Snapshot Base Properties screen appears, as shown in Figure 99.
Figure 99:
Create Snapshots Screen
4. Enter a snapshot name in the Enter Snapshot Name field.
5. Select the Snapshot Base virtual drives on which you want to create concurrent
snapshots.
6. Click Create Snapshot.
This creates a snapshot with same name and the same timestamp on all of the
selected Snapshot Base virtual drives.
4.10.5 Selecting the Snapshot
Settings
You can use the Snapshot Settings screen to perform the following actions:

Take a snapshot on reboot.
This action takes a snapshot of the virtual drive when you reboot after every
successful system shutdown. This feature is mainly intended to take a snapshot of
boot virtual drives to allow the operating system to be restored in case of
corruption.

Enable automatic deletion of a snapshot.
This action deletes the oldest snapshot automatically and lets you create a new
snapshot.
Follow these steps to enable the snapshot settings.
1. Click a virtual drive icon in the right panel on the WebBIOS CU main screen.
The Virtual Drive screen appears, as shown in Figure 100.
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Figure 100:
Virtual Drive Screen
2. Click Manage Snapshots.
The Snapshot Settings screen appears, as shown in Figure 101.
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Figure 101:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Snapshot Settings Screen
3. Select the check box next to Take Snapshot on every Reboot option, or select the
Automatically delete the oldest snapshot option, or select the Stop tracking
snapshots using the radio button.
4. Click Finish.
4.10.6
Viewing Snapshot Properties
You can view the properties of a snapshot, such as the total capacity, capacity used, and
capacity available.
Follow these steps to view snapshot properties.
1. Click a virtual drive icon in the right panel on the WebBIOS CU main screen.
The Virtual Drive screen appears, as shown in Figure 102.
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Figure 102:
Virtual Drive Screen
2. Click Snapshot Properties.
The Snapshot Repository Properties screen appears, as shown in Figure 103.
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Figure 103:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Snapshot Repository Properties
3. Click OK to return to the Virtual Drive screen.
4.10.7 Restoring a Virtual Drive by
Rolling Back to a Snapshot
You can roll back to a previous Point-in-Time snapshot to recover an entire volume. This
action is often used where there are malicious files that cannot be traced. Reboot the
system, and then roll back to a snapshot that does not have the malicious or corrupt
files.
Follow these steps to roll back the volume version to an earlier version.
1. After you determine there are malicious or corrupt files, start the WebBIOS
configuration utility.
2. Access the Virtual Drive screen by clicking on a virtual drive icon in the right panel
on the WebBIOS CU main screen.
The Virtual Drive screen appears, as shown in Figure 104.
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Figure 104:
Virtual Drive Screen
3. Click the AdvOpers radio button and then click Go.
The Advanced Operations screen appears, as shown in Figure 105.
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Figure 105:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Advanced Operations Screen
4. Select a snapshot from the drop-down menu.
If the volume is still damaged, continue to select from the next most current PiT
snapshot to the oldest.
5. Click Go.
The system rolls back to the selected PiT snapshot and returns you to a snapshot
that does not have the malicious or corrupt files.
4.10.8 Cleaning up a Snapshot
Repository
The clean up option can be performed only on a Snapshot Repository virtual drive.
Perform a cleanup if a Snapshot Base virtual drive goes offline and the Snapshot
Repository virtual drive is still connected to the system. After you perform the cleanup,
memory that was allocated to the offline base virtual drives will be available to the
Snapshot Repository virtual drive.
Follow these steps to clean up a Snapshot Repository.
1. Access the Virtual Drive screen by clicking on a Snapshot Repository virtual drive
icon in the right panel on the WebBIOS CU main screen.
The Virtual Drive screen appears, as shown in Figure 106.
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Figure 106:
Virtual Drive Screen
2. Click the AdvOpers radio button and then click Go.
The Advanced Operations screen appears, as shown in Figure 107.
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Figure 107:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Advanced Operations Screen
3. Click Cleanup Snapshot Repository.
4. Click Go.
This action cleans up the Snapshot Repository.
4.11 Viewing System Event
Information
The SAS controller firmware monitors the activity and performance of all storage
configurations and devices in the system. When an event occurs (such as the creation
of a new virtual drive or the removal of a drive) an event message is generated and is
stored in the controller NVRAM.
You can use the WebBIOS CU to view these event messages. To do this, click Events on
the main WebBIOS CU screen. The Event Information screen appears, as shown in
Figure 108.
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Figure 108:
Event Information Screen
The right side of the screen is blank until you select an event to view. The First
Sequence and Last Sequence fields in the upper left of the screen show you how many
event entries are currently stored.
To view event information, follow these steps:
1. Select an Event Locale from the menu. For example, select Enclosure to view events
relating to the drive enclosure.
2. Select an Event Class: Information, Warning, Critical, Fatal, or Dead.
3. Enter a Start Sequence number, between the First Sequence and Last Sequence
numbers. The higher the number, the more recent the event.
4. Enter the Number of events of this type that you want to view, and click Go.
The first event in the sequence appears in the right panel.
5. Click Next or Prev to page forward or backward through the sequence of events.
6. If you want, select different event criteria in the left panel, and click Go again to
view a different sequence of events.
Each event entry includes a timestamp and a description to help you determine when
the event occurred and what it was.
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4.12
Managing Configurations
This section includes information about maintaining and managing storage
configurations.
4.12.1
Running a Consistency Check
You should periodically run a consistency check on fault-tolerant virtual drives. A
consistency check verifies that the redundancy data is correct and available for RAID 1,
RAID 5, RAID 6, RAID 10, RAID 50, and RAID 60 drive groups. To do this, follow these
steps:
1. On the main WebBIOS CU screen, select a virtual drive.
2. Click Virtual Drives.
3. When the Virtual Drive screen appears, select CC in the lower left panel, and click
Go.
The consistency check begins.
If the WebBIOS CU finds a difference between the data and the parity value on the
redundant drive group, it assumes that the data is accurate and automatically corrects
the parity value. Be sure to back up the data before running a consistency check if you
think the data might be corrupted.
4.12.2
Deleting a Virtual Drive
You can delete any virtual drive on the controller if you want to reuse that space for a
new virtual drive. The WebBIOS CU provides a list of configurable drive groups where
there is a space to configure. If multiple virtual drives are defined on a single drive
group, you can delete a virtual drive without deleting the whole drive group.
CAUTION: Back up any data that you want to keep before you delete the virtual drive.
To delete a virtual drive, follow these steps.
1. Access the Virtual Drive screen by clicking on a virtual drive icon in the right panel
on the WebBIOS CU main screen.
The Virtual Drive screen appears.
2. Select Delete in the bottom panel under the heading Operations, and click Go.
3. When the message appears, confirm that you want to delete the virtual drive.
4.12.3 Importing or Clearing a
Foreign Configuration
A foreign configuration is a storage configuration that already exists on a replacement
set of drives that you install in a computer system.
In addition, if one or more drives are removed from a configuration, by a cable pull or
drive removal, for example, the configuration on those drives is considered a foreign
configuration by the RAID controller.
The BIOS CU allows you to import the foreign configuration to the RAID controller, or to
clear the configuration so you can create a new configuration using these drives.
NOTE: When you create a new configuration, the WebBIOS CU shows only the
unconfigured drives. Drives that have existing configurations, including foreign
configurations, will not appear. To use drives with existing configurations, you must first
clear the configuration on those drives.
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If WebBIOS CU detects a foreign configuration, the Foreign Configuration screen
appears, as shown in Figure 109.
Figure 109:
Foreign Configuration Import Screen
Follow these steps to import or clear a foreign configuration.
1. Click the drop-down list to show the configurations.
The GUID (Global Unique Identifier) entries on the drop-down list are OEM names
and will vary from one installation to another.
2. Select a configuration or All Configurations.
3. Perform one of the following steps:
a. Click Preview to preview the foreign configuration(s).
The Foreign Configuration Preview screen appears, as shown in Figure 110.
b. Click Clear to clear the foreign configuration(s) and reuse the drives for another
virtual drive.
If you click Cancel, it cancels the importation or preview of the foreign
configuration.
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Figure 110:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Foreign Configuration Preview Screen
The right panel shows the virtual drive properties of the foreign configuration. In
this example, there are two RAID 1 virtual drives with 67.843 GB each. The left panel
shows the drives in the foreign configuration.
4. Click Import to import this foreign configuration(s) and use it on this controller.
If you click Cancel, you return to Figure 109.
4.12.3.1 Foreign Configurations
in Cable Pull and Drive Removal
Scenarios
If one or more drives are removed from a configuration, by a cable pull or drive
removal, for example, the configuration on those drives is considered a foreign
configuration by the RAID controller.
Use the Foreign Configuration Preview screen to import or clear the foreign
configuration in each case. The import procedure and clear procedure are described in
Section 4.12.3, Importing or Clearing a Foreign Configuration
The following scenarios can occur with cable pulls or drive removals.
NOTE: If you want to import the foreign configuration in any of the following scenarios,
you should have all of the drives in the enclosure before you perform the import
operation.

Scenario #1: If all of the drives in a configuration are removed and re-inserted, the
controller considers the drives to have foreign configurations.
Import or clear the foreign configuration. If you select Import, automatic rebuilds
will occur in redundant virtual drives.
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NOTE: Start a consistency check immediately after the rebuild is complete to ensure
data integrity for the virtual drives.
See Section 4.12.1, Running a Consistency Check for more information about checking
data consistency.

Scenario #2: If some of the drives in a configuration are removed and re-inserted,
the controller considers the drives to have foreign configurations.
Import or clear the foreign configuration. If you select Import, automatic rebuilds
will occur in redundant virtual drives.
NOTE: Start a consistency check immediately after the rebuild is complete to ensure
data integrity for the virtual drives.
See Section 4.12.1, Running a Consistency Check for more information about checking
data consistency.

Scenario #3: If all of the drives in a virtual drive are removed, but at different times,
and re-inserted, the controller considers the drives to have foreign configurations.
Import or clear the foreign configuration. If you select Import, all drives that were
pulled before the virtual drive became offline will be imported and then
automatically rebuilt. Automatic rebuilds will occur in redundant virtual drives.

If the drives in a non-redundant virtual drive are removed, the controller considers
the drives to have foreign configurations.
Import or clear the foreign configuration. No rebuilds occur after the import
operation because there is no redundant data to rebuild the drives with.
4.12.3.2 Importing Foreign
Configurations from Integrated
RAID to MegaRAID
The LSI Integrated RAID solution simplifies the configuration options and provides
firmware support in its host controllers. LSI offers two types of Integrated RAID (IR):
Integrated Mirroring (IM) and Integrated Striping (IS).
You can import an IM or IS RAID configuration from an IR system into a MegaRAID
system. The MegaRAID system treats the IR configuration as a foreign configuration.
You can import or clear the IR configuration.
NOTE: For more information about Integrated RAID, refer to the Integrated RAID for SAS
User’s Guide. You can find this document on the LSI web site at:
http://www.lsi.com/cm/DownloadSearch.do.
4.12.3.3 Troubleshooting
Information
An IR virtual drive can have either 64 MB or 512 MB available for metadata at the end of
the drive. This data is in LSI Data Format (LDF). MegaRAID virtual drives have 512 MB for
metadata at the end of the drive in the Disk Data Format (DDF).
To import an IR virtual drive into MegaRAID, the IR virtual drive must have 512 MB in the
metadata, which is the same amount of megadata as in a MegaRAID virtual drive. If the
IR virtual drive has only 64 MB when you attempt to import it into MegaRAID, the
import will fail because the last 448 MB of your data will be overwritten and the data
lost.
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If your IR virtual drive has only 64 MB for metadata at the end of the drive, you cannot
import the virtual drive into MegaRAID. You need to use another upgrade method,
such as backup/restore to the upgraded virtual drive type.
In order to import an IR virtual drive into a MegaRAID system, use the Foreign
Configuration Preview screen to import or clear the foreign configuration. The import
procedure and the clear procedure are described in Section 4.12.3, Importing or
Clearing a Foreign Configuration.
4.12.4 Importing Foreign
Configurations
After you create a security key, you can run a scan for a foreign configuration and
import a locked configuration. (You can import unsecured or unlocked configurations
when security is disabled.) A foreign configuration is a RAID configuration that already
exists on a replacement set of drives that you install in a computer system. You can use
the WebBIOS utility to import the existing configuration to the RAID controller or clear
the configuration so you can create a new one.
See Section 4.12.3, Importing or Clearing a Foreign Configuration for the procedures
used to import or clear a foreign configuration.
To import a foreign configuration, you must first enable security to allow importation of
locked foreign drives. If the drives are locked and the controller security is disabled, you
cannot import the foreign drives. Only unlocked drives can be imported when security
is disabled.
After you enable the security, you can import the locked drives. To import the locked
drives, you must provide the security key used to secure them. Verify whether any
drives are left to import as the locked drives can use different security keys. If there are
any drives left, repeat the import process for the remaining drives. After all of the drives
are imported, there is no configuration to import.
4.12.5 Import Foreign Drives in
EKM/EKM Secured Locked Drives
When you scan a foreign configuration, and if any of the foreign EKM secured locked
drives are present when EKM is enabled, the following wizard is displayed.
Figure 111:
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4.12.6 Import Foreign Drives for LKM
Secured Locked Drives
When you scan a foreign configuration, and if any of the foreign LKM secured locked
drives prompt you to enter a security key, assuming that the drive security is enabled
on the controller, the following wizard appears.
.
Figure 112:
4.12.7 Import Foreign Drives in LKM
/EKM Secured Locked Drives

The Locked drives field displays the locked physical drives and their corresponding
security key identifiers.

You must enter the drive security key in the Security Key field.
When you scan a foreign configuration, and if you import foreign drives in LKM mode,
when EKM secured locked drives are present, the following wizard appears.
Figure 113:
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Import Foreign Drives in EKM or LKM mode
Import Foreign Drives in LKM mode
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4.12.8 Migrating the RAID Level of a
Virtual Drive
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
As the amount of data and the number of drives in your system increase, you can use
RAID-level migration to change a virtual drive from one RAID level to another. You do
not have to power down or restart the system. When you migrate a virtual drive, you
can keep the same number of drives, or you can add drives. You can use the WebBIOS
CU to migrate the RAID level of an existing virtual drive.
NOTE: While you can apply RAID-level migration at any time, LSI recommends that you
do so when there are no reboots. Many operating systems issues I/O operations serially
(one at a time) during boot. With a RAID-level migration running, a boot can often take
more than 15 minutes.
Migrations are allowed for the following RAID levels:

RAID 0 to RAID 1

RAID 0 to RAID 5

RAID 0 to RAID 6

RAID 1 to RAID 0

RAID 1 to RAID 5

RAID 1 to RAID 6

RAID 5 to RAID 0

RAID 5 to RAID 6

RAID 6 to RAID 0

RAID 6 to RAID 5
Table 22 lists the number of additional drives required when you change the RAID level
of a virtual drive.
Table 22: Additional Drives Required for RAID-Level Migration
Original Number of Drives in Drive
Group
From RAID Level to RAID Level
Additional Drives
Required
RAID 0 to RAID 1
RAID 0: 1 drive
1
RAID 0 to RAID 5
RAID 0: 1 drive
2
RAID 0 to RAID 6
RAID 0: 1 drive
3
RAID 1 to RAID 5
RAID 1: 2 drives
1
RAID 1 to RAID 6
RAID 1: 2 drives
1
Follow these steps to migrate the RAID level:
CAUTION: Back up any data that you want to keep before you change the RAID level of
the virtual drive.
1. On the main WebBIOS CU screen, select a virtual drive.
2. Click Virtual Drives.
The Virtual Drive screen appears.
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3. Select AdvOpers under the Operations heading.
The Advanced Operations screen appears, as shown in Figure 114.
Figure 114:
Advanced Operations Screen
4. Select either Change RAID Level or Change RAID Level and Add Drive.
— If you select Change RAID Level, change the RAID level from the drop-down
menu.
— If you select Change RAID Level and Add Drive, change the RAID level from
the drop-down menu and then select one or more drives to add from the list of
drives.
The available RAID levels are limited, based on the current RAID level of the virtual
drive plus the number of drives available.
5. Click Go.
6. When the message appears, confirm that you want to migrate the RAID level of the
virtual drive.
A reconstruction operation begins on the virtual drive. You must wait until the
reconstruction is completed before you perform any other tasks in the WebBIOS CU.
4.12.9 New Drives Attached to a
MegaRAID Controller
When you insert a new drive on a MegaRAID system, if the inserted drive does not
contain valid DDF metadata, the drive displays as JBOD for MegaRAID Entry level
controllers, such as the SAS 9240-4i/8i. If the drive does contain valid DDF metadata, its
drive state is Unconfigured Good.
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A new drive in JBOD drive state is exposed to the host operating system as a
stand-alone drive. Drives in JBOD drive state are not part of the RAID configuration
because they do not have valid DDF records. The operating system can install and run
anything on JBOD drives.
Automatic rebuilds always occur when the drive slot status changes, for example, when
you insert a drive or remove a drive, so that a hot spare can be used. However, a new
drive in JBOD drive state (without a valid DDF record), will not perform an automatic
rebuild.
To start an automatic rebuild on the new JBOD drive, you must change the drive state
from JBOD to Unconfigured Good. (Rebuilds start only on Unconfigured Good drives.)
After you set the drive state to Unconfigured Good, the drive state information always
remains on the drive, and you can use the drive for configuration.
See Section 4.12.3.3, Troubleshooting Information for more information about DDF and
metadata.
4.13
WebBIOS Dimmer Switch
This section helps you change the power-save settings using the Dimmer Switch
feature.
The power savings is done by reducing power consumption of drives that are not in use
by spinning down the unconfigured drives, hot spares, and configured drives.
Perform the following steps to change the power savings feature.
1. Select the Controller Properties option from the main WebBIOS screen as shown
in Figure 15.
The Controller Information screen appears as shown in the following figure.
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Figure 115:
Controller Information - Power Save Mode for Config Drives
2. Click Next.
The Controller Properties screen appears as shown in the following figure.
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Figure 116:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Controller Properties
3. Click Next.
The Controller Properties screen with the Manage Powersave option appears in
the following figure.
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Figure 117:
Controller Properties - Manage Powersave option
4. Click the Manage Powersave option.
The Power Save Setting screen appears as shown in the following figure.
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Figure 118:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Power Save Setting
5. Select all the check boxes to go to the following screen.
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Figure 119:
Power Save Setting- Check boxes
6. Click Finish.
The Confirmation message as shown in Figure 121 appears.
In the Power-Save Setting screen (Figure 118) , if you select all the check boxes, except
the configured drives, then the following screen appears.
Figure 120:
Power Save Setting - except Configured Drive
7. Under the Specify the power-save setting below field in Figure 118, select the
Unconfigured drives check box to let the controller enable the Unconfigured
drives to enter the Power-Save mode.
8. Select the Hot spare drives check box to let the controller enable the Hot spare
drives to enter the Power-Save mode.
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9. Select the Configured drives check box to let the controller enable the Configured
drives to enter the Power-Save mode.
10. Click Next.
The following confirmation message page appears.
Figure 121:
Power Save Settings Confirmation Message
If you do not specify the Power-Save settings in the Power Save settings screen as
shown in Figure 118, the following message appears.
Figure 122:
4.13.1
Power-Save mode
Power-Save Settings Not Saved Message
You can select the drive standby time, and the Power-Save mode by selecting the Auto,
Max, Max without cache option.
1. Select the drive standby time using the drop-down selector.
2. Select the power save mode by using the radio button.
3. Click Finish.
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Figure 123:
4.13.2
Power Save Settings-Advanced
Power-Save Mode
You can schedule the drive active time by selecting the Start time and End time in the
Power-Save Settings screen.
Perform the following steps to schedule the drive active time.
1. Click the Advanced button in the Power-Save mode screen as shown in Figure 119.
The Power-Save Settings Advanced screen appears as shown in the following figure.
Figure 124:
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Power-Save Settings Advanced
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2. Select the start time and end time from the Scheduled drive active time field using
the Start time and End time drop-down selectors.
3. Click OK.
The drive active time is scheduled.
NOTE: Select the Do not schedule drive active time check box if you do not want to
schedule the drive active time.
4.13.3 Power-Save While Creating
Virtual Drives
You can select the power saving policy while creating virtual drives using the Power
save Mode drop-down selector.
Figure 125:
Power-Save policy While Creating Virtual Drives
The power save mode can be Max, Max without cache, Auto, None, and Controller
defined.
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Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | Product Overview
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Chapter 5
MegaRAID Command Tool
The MegaRAID Command Tool (CT) is a command line interface (CLI) application for
SAS. You can use this utility to configure, monitor, and maintain MegaRAID SAS RAID
controllers and the devices connected to them.
NOTE: The CT supports only MegaRAID controllers that support SAS and SATA II. It does
not support other types of MegaRAID controllers, such as U320, SATA I, or IDE.
NOTE: The IA-64 release for Windows is similar to the 32-bit release, so you can follow
the 32-bit instructions. 32-bit applications that were validated on an x64 system, such as
the Intel Market system, can use the 32-bit instructions, also.
5.1
Product Overview
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
The MegaCLI Configuration Utility is a command line interface application you can use
to manage MegaRAID SAS RAID controllers. You can use MegaCLI Configuration Utility
to perform the following tasks:

Configure MegaRAID SAS RAID controllers and attached devices

Display information about virtual drives and drives for the controller and other
storage components

Display ongoing progress for operations on drives and virtual drives

Change properties for the virtual drives and drives for the controller and other
storage components

Set, retrieve, and verify controller default settings

Change the firmware on the controllers

Monitor the RAID storage systems

Support RAID levels 0, 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, and 60 (depending on the RAID controller)

Create and use scripts with the scriptable CLI tool

Configure drive into groups and virtual drives on the controller

Display configuration information for the controller, drives, and virtual drives

Change virtual drive properties on the controller

Change drive properties on the controller

Display controller properties

Load configuration to the controller from a file

Save the controller configuration to a file

Start or stop a rebuild, consistency check (CC), or initialization operation

Enable or disable a background initialization (BGI)
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Operating System Support
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
Stop or display an ongoing background initialization

Start or display a reconstruction

Start or stop patrol read

Set and retrieve patrol read related settings

Flash new firmware on the SAS RAID controller

Read and program NVRAM and flash memory directly into DOS

Display relevant messages on the console and/or in the log file

Display controller data using one command

Exit with predefined success or failure exit codes

Scan, preview, and import foreign configurations

Set predefined environment variables, such as the number of controllers and virtual
drives

Display firmware event logs

Display help for how to use the command line options

Enable or disable snapshots (for the Recovery advanced software feature)

Create and delete snapshots and views of a virtual drive

Roll back the virtual drive to an older snapshot

Display snapshot properties

Create a CacheCade - SSD Caching virtual drive to use as secondary cache

Display battery CacheCade - SSD Caching unit properties

Display enclosure properties

Display and set connector mode on supported controllers
The following sections describe the command line options in the MegaCLI
Configuration Utility that you can use to perform these functions.
NOTE: The MegaCLI error messages are listed in Appendix B.
NOTE: The MegaCLI Configuration Utility has support for the Intel® Itanium (64-bit)
platform. MegaCLI is the only application currently supported on IPF system.
5.2
Novell NetWare, SCO,
Solaris, FreeBSD, and DOS
Operating System Support
The MegaCLI Configuration Utility functions under the Novell® NetWare®, SCO®
OpenServer™, SCO UnixWare®, Solaris, FreeBSD, and DOS operating systems in the same
way that it does under the Windows and Linux operating systems. All of the commands
supported for the Windows and Linux operating systems are supported for the
NetWare, SCO, and Solaris operating systems as well.
For the SCO OpenServer and SCO UnixWare operating systems, LSI provides an
executable file that you can execute from any folder, and an image of the same
executable file on a floppy drive. The image filename is MegaCLI.image. The floppy
disk is provided so that you can distribute MegaCLI and install the executable file later
as needed.
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Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | Command Line Abbreviations and Conventions
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
For the Solaris operating system, LSI releases MegaCLI as a package that can be
installed like any other package installation in Solaris.
For the Novell NetWare operating system, LSI provides an executable file,
MegaCLI.nlm, that you can execute from any folder. No installation is required. The
output of all of the commands appears in the console window.
5.3
Command Line
Abbreviations and Conventions
This section explains the abbreviations and conventions used with MegaCLI
Configuration Utility commands.
5.3.1
Abbreviations Used in the
Command Line
The following table lists the abbreviations for the virtual drive parameters used in the
following sections.
Table 23: Command Line Abbreviations
Abbreviation
5.3.2
Conventions
Description
WB
WriteBack write policy
WT
WriteThrough write policy
ADRA
Adaptive Read Ahead read policy
RA
Read Ahead read policy
NORA
Normal Read policy (No read ahead)
DIO
Direct I/O cache policy
CIO
Cached I/O cache policy
There are some options for which you can specify multiple values.
You can enter commands for a single controller (–aN), multiple controllers (-a0,1,2) or
work on all present controllers (-aALL). This is denoted as –aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL in this
document and specifies that you can enter commands for one controller, multiple
controllers, or all controllers.
NOTE: All options in the MegaRAID Command Tool are position-dependent, unless
otherwise specified.
The following table describes the conventions used in the options.
Table 24: Conventions
Convention
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Description
|
Specifies “or,” meaning you can choose between options.
-aN
N specifies the controller number for the command.
-a0,1,2
Specifies the command is for controllers 0, 1, and 2. You can select two or
more controllers in this manner.
-aALL
Specifies the command is for all controllers.
-Lx
x specifies the virtual drive number for the command.
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Table 24: Conventions (Continued)
Convention
Description
-L0,1,2
Specifies the command is for virtual drives 0, 1, and 2. You can select two or
more virtual drives in this manner.
-Lall
Specifies the command is for all virtual drives.
[E0:S0,E1,S1 Specifies when one or more physical devices need(s) to be specified in the
,…]
command line. Each [E:S] pair specifies one physical device where E
means device ID of the enclosure in which a drive resides, and S means the
slot number of the enclosure.
In the case of a physical device directly connected to the SAS port on the
controller, with no enclosure involved, the format of [:S] can be used
where S means the port number on the controller. For devices attached
through the backplane, the firmware provides an enclosure device ID and
MegaCLI expects the user input in the format of [E:S]. In the following
sections, only the format, [E:S], is used in the command descriptions,
although both formats are valid.
[ ]
Indicates that the parameter is optional except when it is used to specify
physical devices. For example, [WT] means the write policy (WriteThrough)
is optional.
If you enter WT at the command line, the application will use WriteThrough
write policy for the virtual drive. Otherwise, it uses the default value for the
parameter.
{ }
Indicates that the parameters are grouped and that they must be given at
the same time.
-Force
Specifies that the MegaCLI utility does not ask you for confirmation
before it performs this command. You might lose data using this option
with some commands.
You can specify the -Silent command line option for all possible functions of the
MegaCLI Configuration Utility. If you enter this option at the command line, no
message displays on the screen.
5.4
Pre-boot MegaCLI
A second CLI utility, known as Pre-boot MegaCLI (PCLI), is available. You can enter this
utility during bootup. PCLI gives you an alternative way to access the CLI utility.
To access PCLI, while the host computer is booting, hold down the <Ctrl> key and press
the <Y> key when the following text appears on the screen:
Copyright© LSI Logic Corporation
Press <Ctrl><Y> for Preboot CLI
The following commands that are in the regular MegaCLI utility are not available in
PCLI:
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
AdpSetVerify

AdpCcSched

AdpDiag

AdpBatTest

option ProgDsply
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | CacheCade - SSD Caching Related Options
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
5.5
CacheCade - SSD Caching
Related Options

CfgSave

CfgRestore

AdpBbuCmd

AdpFacDefSet

AdpFwFlash

AdpGetConnectorMode

AdpSetConnectorMode

DirectPdMapping

ShowEnclList

ShowVpd

EnclLocate

PdFwDownload

SetFacDefault

PDCpyBk

AdpFwDump

Snapshot
Enbl/Setprop/Dsbl/TakeSnapshot/DeleteSnapshot/CreateView/DeleteView/Info/Cl
ean/GetViewInfo

AdpSetProp DefaultSnapshotSpace/DefaultViewSpace/AutoSnapshotSpace
Use the commands in this section to create CacheCade - SSD Caching drives and delete
them.
MegaRAID CacheCade - SSD Caching improves application performance by expanding
the MegaRAID read-caching capacity. The CacheCade - SSD Caching feature uses
high-performing CacheCade - SSD Caching software as a secondary tier of cache to
provide faster reads and to maximize transactional I/O performance.
Using CacheCade - SSD Caching software as controller cache allows for very large data
sets to be present in cache, delivering performance up to 50 times greater than regular
cache in read-intensive applications, such as online transaction processing (OLTP), and
file and Web server workloads. The solution is designed to accelerate the IO
performance of HDD-based drive groups while only requiring a small investment in
CacheCade - SSD Caching software technology.
To support full-throughput for multiple direct-attached CacheCade - SSD Caching
software, this feature reduces IO-processing overhead in the SAS 6Gb/s MegaRAID
controllers. CacheCade - SSD Caching offers performance equivalent to flash-based
controllers and better performance for RAID 5 and RAID 6 when compared to Fusion
I/O.
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Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | Software License Key
5.5.1
Create a Solid State Drive
Cache Drive to Use as Secondary Cache
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Use the command in the following table to create a cache drive using CacheCade
software. You can use that cache as secondary cache. CacheCade software have much
greater capacity than HDDs.
Table 25: Create a Solid State Cache Drive to Use as Secondary Cache
5.5.2
Delete a Solid State Drive
Cache Drive
Convention
MegaCli -CfgCachecadeAdd -Physdrv[E0:S0,...] {-Name
LdNamestring} -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
This command is used to create CacheCade software that you can use as
secondary cache.
-Physdrv[E0:S0,...]: Specifies the physical drive enclosure and the
slots to use to construct a drive group.
-Name LdNamestring: This is the name given to the CacheCade
software cache drive.
Use the command in the following table to delete a CacheCade software cache drive or
multiple CacheCade software cache drives on the selected controller(s).
Table 26: Delete Solid State Cache Drive(s)
5.6
Software License Key
Convention
MegaCli -CfgCachecadeDel -LX|-L0,2,5...|-LALL
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Deletes the specified CacheCade software cache drive or drives on the
selected controller(s). You can delete multiple CacheCade software cache
drives or all of the CacheCade software caches.
Use the commands in this section to obtain a software license key to enable the
advanced features present in the controller.
Table 27: Software License Key
Page 178
Convention
MegaCli ELF –GetSafeId –a0
Description
Displays the Safe ID of the controller.
Convention
MegaCli ELF -ControllerFeatures -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays the Advanced Software Options that are enabled on the controller
including the ones in trial mode.
Convention
MegaCli -ELF -Applykey key <-val> [Preview] -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Applies the Activation Key either in preview mode or in real mode.
Convention
MegaCli -ELF -TransferToVault -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Transfers the Activated Advanced Software Options from NVRAM to
keyvault.
Convention
MegaCli -ELF -DeactivateTrialKey -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Deactivates the trial key.
Convention
MegaCli -ELF -ReHostInfo -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays the Re-Host information, and if Re-Hosting is necessary it displays
the Controller and KeyVault serial numbers.
Convention
MegaCli -ELF -ReHostComplete -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Indicates to the controller that Re-Host is complete.
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | SafeStore Security Options
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
5.7
SafeStore Security
Options
Use the commands in this section to manage the SafeStore Security feature. This
feature offers the ability to encrypt data on disks and use disk-based key management
to provide data security. With this feature, data is encrypted by the drives. You can
designate which data to encrypt at the individual virtual drive (VD) level.
This solution provides data protection in the event of theft or loss of physical drives.
With self-encrypting disks, if you remove a drive from its storage system or the server it
is housed in, the data on that drive is encrypted and useless to anyone who attempts to
access without the appropriate security authorization.
Any encryption solution requires management of the encryption keys. This feature
provides a way to manage these keys. You can change the encryption key for all
ServeRAID controllers that are connected to SED drives. All SED drives, whether locked
or unlocked, always have an encryption key. This key is set by the drive and is always
active. When the drive is unlocked, the data to host from the drive (on reads) and from
the host to the drive cache (on writes) is always provided. However, when resting on
the drive platters, the data is always encrypted by the drive.
In the following options, [E0:S0, E1:S1] specifies the enclosure ID and slot ID for the
drive.
See Chapter 3, SafeStore Disk Encryption for more information about the SED feature.
5.7.1
Use Instant Secure Erase on a
Physical Drive
Use the command in the following table to perform an Instant Secure Erase of data on a
physical drive. The Instant Secure Erase feature lets you erase data on SED drives.
Table 28: Use Instant Secure Erase on a Physical Drive
Convention
MegaCli -PDInstantSecureErase
-PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1,...] | [-Force]
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Erases the data on a specified drive or drives.
-PDInstantSecureErase: Use the Instant Secure Erase feature to
erase data on a drive or drives.
-PhysDrv[E0:S0,...]: Specifies the drive(s) that you want to
perform the Instant Secure Erase on.
-Force: Specifies that the MegaCLI utility does not ask you for
confirmation before it performs this command (you might lose data
using this option with some commands).
NOTE: NOTE: Previously -szXXX expressed capacity in MB but now you can
enter the capacity in your choice of units. For example, to create a virtual
drive of 10 GB, enter the size as sz10GB. If you do not enter a unit, by default
it is considered as MB.
5.7.2
Secure Data on a Virtual Drive
Use the command in the following table to secure data on a virtual drive.
Table 29: Secure Data on a Virtual Drive
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Convention
MegaCli -LDMakeSecure -Lx|-L0,1,2,...|-Lall
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Secures data on a specified virtual drive or drives.
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Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | SafeStore Security Options
5.7.3
Destroy the Security Key
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Use the command in the following table to destroy the security key.
Table 30: Destroy the Security Key
5.7.4
Create a Security Key
Convention
MegaCli -DestroySecurityKey | [-Force] -aN
Description
Destroys the security key. The controller uses the security key to lock and
unlock access to the secure user data. This key is encrypted into the security
key blob and stored on the controller.
Re-provisioning disables the security system of a device. For a controller, it
involves destroying the security key. For SED drives, when the drive lock key
is deleted, the drive is unlocked and any user data on the drive is securely
deleted.
Use the command in the following table to create a security key.
Table 31: Create a Security Key
5.7.5
Drive Security Key
Convention
MegaCli -CreateSecurityKey -SecurityKey sssssssssss |
[-Passphrase sssssssssss] |[-KeyID kkkkkkkkkkk] -aN
Description
Creates a security key based on a user-provided string. The controller uses
the security key to lock and unlock access to the secure user data. This key is
encrypted into the security key blob and stored on the controller. If the
security key is unavailable, user data is irretrievably lost. You must take all
precautions to never lose the security key.
-CreateSecurityKey: Creates the security key.
-SecurityKey sssssssssss: Enters the new security key. The security
key is case-sensitive. It must be between eight and thirty-two characters and
contain at least one number, one lowercase letter, one uppercase letter, and
one non-alphanumeric character (e.g. < > @ +). The space character is not
permitted.
[-Passphrase sssssssssss]: Enters the new passphrase.The pass
phrase is case-sensitive. It must be between eight and thirty-two characters
and contain at least one number, one lowercase letter, one uppercase letter,
and one non-alphanumeric character (e.g. < > @ +). The space character is
not permitted.
If you want to use the security key using EKMS, the EKMS must provide the security key.
You can create a security key using EKMS, or switch from EKM to LKM, or from LKM to
EKM.
Table 32: Drive Security Key
Convention
Page 180
MegaCli -CreateSecurityKey useEKMS –aN
Description
Creates security key using EKMS.
Convention
MegaCli -ChangeSecurityKey -SecurityKey sssssssssss [-Passphrase
sssssssssss] | [-KeyID kkkkkkkkkkk] –aN
Description
To change the security from EKMS to LKM.
Convention
MegaCli -ChangeSecurityKey useEKMS -OldSecurityKey sssssssssss –aN
Description
To change security from LKM to EKM.
Convention
MegaCli -ChangeSecurityKey -useEKMS –aN-
Description
rekeying in EKMS
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | SafeStore Security Options
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
5.7.6
Change the Security Key
Use the command in the following table to change they security key to a new security
key.
Table 33: Change the Security Key
Convention
MegaCli -ChangeSecurityKey -OldSecurityKey
sssssssssss | -SecurityKey sssssssssss| [-Passphrase
sssssssssss] | [-KeyID kkkkkkkkkkk] -aN
Description
Changes a security key to a new security key.
-ChangeSecurityKey: Changes the security key.
-OldSecurityKey sssssssssss: Enters the old security key. The
security key is case-sensitive. It must be between eight and thirty-two
characters and contain at least one number, one lowercase letter, one
uppercase letter, and one non-alphanumeric character (e.g. < > @ +).
The space character is not permitted.
-SecurityKey sssssssssss: Enters the new security key. The security
key is case-sensitive. It must be between eight and thirty-two characters and
contain at least one number, one lowercase letter, one uppercase letter, and
one non-alphanumeric character (e.g. < > @ +). The space character is not
permitted.
[-Passphrase sssssssssss]: Enters the new passphrase. The pass
phrase is case-sensitive. It must be between eight and thirty-two characters
and contain at least one number, one lowercase letter, one uppercase letter,
and one non-alphanumeric character (e.g. < > @ +). The space character is
not permitted.
[-KeyID kkkkkkkkkkk]: Enters the security key ID. The key ID displays
when you have to enter a security key. If you have multiple security keys, the
security key ID helps you determine which security key to enter.
5.7.7
Get the Security Key ID
Use the command in the following table to display the security key ID.
Table 34: Get the Security Key ID
5.7.8
Set the Security Key ID
Convention
MegaCli -GetKeyID [-PhysDrv[E0:S0]] -aN
Description
-GetKeyID: Displays the security key ID.
Use the command in the following table to set the security key ID.
Table 35: Set the Security Key ID
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Convention
MegaCli -SetKeyID -KeyID kkkkkkkkkkk -aN
Description
-SetKeyID: Set the security key ID.
-KeyID kkkkkkkkkkk: Enters the security key ID. The key ID displays
when you have to enter a security key. If you have multiple security
keys, the security key ID helps you determine which security key to
enter.
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Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | Controller Property-Related Options
5.7.9
Verify the Security Key
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Use the command in the following table to verify the security key.
Table 36: Verify the Security Key ID
Convention
MegaCli -VerifySecurityKey -SecurityKey sssssssssss
-aN
Description
Verifies that the security key is the correct one for the self-encrypted disk.
-VerifySecurityKey: Verifies the security key.
-SecurityKey sssssssssss: Enters the new security key. The security
key is case-sensitive. It must be between eight and thirty-two characters and
contain at least one number, one lowercase letter, one uppercase letter, and
one non-alphanumeric character (e.g. < > @ +). The space character is not
permitted.
5.8
Controller
Property-Related Options
You can use the commands in this section to set or display properties related to the
controller(s), such as the virtual drive parameters and factory defaults.
5.8.1
Use the command in the following table to display parameters for the selected
controller(s).
Display Controller Properties
Table 37: Controller Parameters
5.8.2
Display Number of Controllers
Supported
Convention
MegaCli -AdpAllinfo -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL|
Description
Displays information about the controller, including cluster state, BIOS,
alarm, firmware version, BIOS version, battery charge counter value, rebuild
rate, bus number/device number, present RAM, memory size, serial number
of the board, and SAS address.
Use the command in the following table to display the number of controllers
supported on the system.
Table 38: Number of Controllers Supported
5.8.3
Enable or Disable Automatic
Rebuild
Convention
MegaCli -AdpCount
Description
Displays the number of controllers supported on the system and returns the
number to the operating system.
Use the command in the following table to turn automatic rebuild on or off for the
selected controller(s). If you have configured hot spares and enabled automatic rebuild,
the RAID controller automatically tries to use them to rebuild failed drives. Automatic
rebuild also controls whether a rebuild starts when a drive that was part of the drive
group is reinserted.
Table 39: Enable or Disable Automatic Rebuild
Page 182
Convention
MegaCli –AdpAutoRbld -Enbl|-Dsbl|-Dsply
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Enables or disables automatic rebuild on the selected controller(s).
The -Dsply option shows the status of the automatic rebuild state.
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5.8.4
Flush Controller Cache
Use the command in the following table to flush the controller cache on the selected
controller(s). This option sends the contents of cache memory to the virtual drive(s). If
the MegaRAID system must be powered down rapidly, you must flush the contents of
the cache memory to preserve data integrity.
Table 40: Cache Flush on Selected Controller
5.8.5
Set Controller Properties
Convention
MegaCli –AdpCacheFlush -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Flushes the controller cache on the selected controller(s).
This command sets the properties on the selected controller(s).
For example, for {RebuildRate -val}, you can enter a percentage between 0
percent and 100 percent as the value for the rebuild rate.
(The rebuild rate is the percentage of the compute cycles dedicated to rebuilding failed
drives.) At 0 percent, the rebuild is done only if the system is not doing anything else. At
100 percent, the rebuild has a higher priority than any other system activity.
NOTE: LSI recommends the default rebuild rate of 30 percent, and the default patrol
read rate of 30 percent.
Use the command in Table 41 to display the list of properties you can set for the
controller(s).
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Table 41: Set Controller Properties
Convention
MegaCli –AdpSetProp {CacheFlushInterval –val}|{RebuildRate -val}| {PatrolReadRate
–val}|{BgiRate –val}|{CCRate –val}| {ReconRate –val}| {SpinupDriveCount
–val}|{SpinupDelay –val}|{CoercionMode –val} | {ClusterEnable
–val}|{PredFailPollInterval –val}| {BatWarnDsbl –val}| {EccBucketSize
–val}|{EccBucketLeakRate –val}|{AbortCCOnError –val}|AlarmEnbl | AlarmDsbl |
AlarmSilence |{SMARTCpyBkEnbl –val} |
-AutoDetectBackPlaneDsbl | -CopyBackDsbl | -LoadBalanceMode
| NCQEnbl | NCQDsbl | {SSDSMARTCpyBkEnbl -val} | {MaintainPdFailHistoryEnbl -val} |
{EnblSpinDownUnConfigDrvs -val} | AutoEnhancedImportEnbl | AutoEnhancedImportDsbl |
{-UseFDEOnlyEncrypt -val} | {-PrCorrectUncfgdAreas -val} | -aN| -a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Sets the properties on the selected controller(s). The possible settings are:
CacheFlushInterval: Cache flush interval in seconds. Values: 0 to 255.
RebuildRate: Rebuild rate. Values: 0 to 100.
PatrolReadRate: Patrol read rate. Values: 0 to 100.
BgiRate: Background initilization rate. Values: 0 to 100.
CCRate: Consistency check rate. Values: 0 to 100.
ReconRate: Reconstruction rate. Values: 0 to 100.
SpinupDriveCount: Max number of drives to spin up at one time. Values: 0 to 255.
SpinupDelay: Number of seconds to delay among spinup groups. Values: 0 to 255.
CoercionMode: Drive capacity Coercion mode. Values: 0 - None, 1 - 128 MB, 2 - 1 GB.
ClusterEnable: Cluster is enabled or disabled. Values: 0 - Disabled, 1 - Enabled.
PredFailPollInterval: Number of seconds between predicted fail polls. Values: 0 to 65535.
BatWarnDsbl: Disable warnings for missing battery or missing hardware. Values: 0 - Enabled, 1 - Disabled.
EccBucketSize: Size of ECC single-bit-error bucket. Values: 0 to 255.
EccBucketLeakRate: Leak rate (in minutes) of ECC single-bit-error bucket. Values: 0 to 65535.
AbortCCOnError:
AlarmEnbl: Set alarm to Enabled.
AlarmDsbl: Set alarm to Disabled.
AlarmSilence: Silence an active alarm.
SMARTCpyBkEnbl: Enable copyback operation on Self-Monitoring Analysis and Reporting Technology (SMART) errors.
Copyback is initiated when the first SMART error occurs on a drive that is part of a virtual drive.
AutoDetectBackPlaneDsbl: Detect automatically if the backplane has been disabled.
CopyBackDsbl: Disable or enable the copyback operation.
LoadBalanceMode: Disable or enable the load balancing mode.
NCQEnbl: Enable the native command queueing.
NCQDsbl: Disable the native command queueing.
SSDSMARTCpyBkEnbl: Enable copyback operation on Self-Monitoring Analysis and Reporting Technology (SMART) errors
on a CacheCade software. Copyback is initiated when the first SMART error occurs on a SSD that is part of a virtual drive.
MaintainPdFailHistoryEnbl: Enable maintenance of the history of a failed drive.
EnblSpinDownUnConfigDrvs: Enable spindown of unconfigured drives.
AutoEnhancedImportEnbl: Enable the automatic enhanced import of foreign drives.
AutoEnhancedImportDsbl: Disable the automatic enhanced import of foreign drives.
UseFDEOnlyEncrypt: Use encryption on FDE drives only.
PrCorrectUncfgdAreas:
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5.8.6
Display Specified Controller
Properties
Use the command in the following table to display specified properties on the selected
controller(s).
Table 42: Display Specified Controller Properties
Convention
MegaCli –AdpGetProp CacheFlushInterval | RebuildRate | PatrolReadRate| BgiRate |
CCRate | ReconRate | SpinupDriveCount | SpinupDelay | CoercionMode |
PredFailPollInterval | ClusterEnable | BatWarnDsbl | EccBucketSize | EccBucketLeakRate
| EccBucketCount | AlarmDsply | AbortCCOnError | AutoDetectBackPlaneDsbl |
CopyBackDsbl | LoadBalanceMode | SMARTCpyBkEnbl | SSDSMARTCpyBkEnbl |
MaintainPdFailHistoryEnbl | EnblSpinDownUnConfigDrvs | EnblSSDPatrolRead | NCQDsply |
UseFDEOnlyEncrypt | WBSupport | AutoEnhancedImportDsbl | PrCorrectUncfgdAreas |
DsblSpinDownUnConfigDrvs | -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays the properties on the selected controller(s).
EccBucketCount: Count of single-bit ECC errors currently in the bucket.
WBSupport: Enables support for the WriteBack option as the Write Policy.
DsblSpinDownUnConfigDrvs: Disable spindown of unconfigured drives.
See Table 41 for explanations of the other options.
NOTE: The tty log can be saved at the controller level.
5.8.7
Set Factory Defaults
Use the command in the following table to set the factory defaults on the selected
controller(s).
Table 43: Set Factory Defaults
5.8.8
Set SAS Address
Convention
MegaCli -AdpFacDefSet -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Sets the factory defaults on the selected controller(s).
Use the command in the following table to set the SAS address on the selected
controller(s).
Table 44: Set SAS Address on Controller
5.8.9
Set Time and Date on
Controller
Convention
MegaCli –AdpSetSASA str[0-64] -aN
Description
Sets the controllers SAS address. This string must be a 64-digit hexadecimal
number.
Use the command in the following table to set the time and date on the selected
controller(s).
Table 45: Set Time and Date on Controller
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Convention
MegaCli –AdpSetTime yyyymmdd HH:mm:ss
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Sets the time and date on the controller. This command uses a 24-hour
format.
For example, 7 p.m. displays as 19:00:00. The order of date and time is
reversible.
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5.8.10 Display Time and Date on
Controller
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Use the command in the following table to display the time and date on the selected
controller(s).
Table 46: Display Time and Date on Controller
5.8.11
Get Connector Mode
Convention
MegaCli –AdpGetTime -aN
Description
Displays the time and date on the controller. This command uses a 24-hour
format. For example, 7 p.m. would display as 19:00:00.
Use the command in the following table to display which ports are enabled
(Internal/External, 0/1) on the MegaRAID SAS 8888ELP RAID controller.
NOTE: This command is reserved strictly for the SAS 8888ELP RAID controller at this
time. You must enable specific ports depending on how you intend to use the controller.
Table 47: Get Connector Mode
5.8.12
Set Connector Mode
Convention
MegaCli -AdpGetConnectorMode
-ConnectorN|-Connector0,1|-ConnectorAll
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays which ports are enabled (Internal/External, 0/1).
For example, if internal port 0 is active, internal ports 0-3 are active. If
external port 1 is active, external ports 4-7 are active.
Use the command in the following table to set (enable) the connectors for the
MegaRAID SAS 8888ELP RAID connectors that are listed in Section 5.8.11, Get
Connector Mode.
NOTE: This command is reserved strictly for the SAS 8888ELP RAID controller at this
time. You must enable specific ports depending on how you intend to use the controller
Table 48: Set Connector Mode
Page 186
Convention
MegaCli -AdpSetConnectorMode
-Internal|-External|-Auto
-ConnectorN|-Connector0,1|-ConnectorAll
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Sets (enables) the connectors listed in the GetConnectorMode command.
For example, to enable internal ports 4-7 on controller 0, run the following
command:
MegaCli –AdpSetConnectorMode –Internal –Connector1
–a0
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Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | Patrol Read-Related Controller Properties
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5.9
Patrol Read-Related
Controller Properties
You can use the commands in this section to select the settings for Patrol Read. A Patrol
Read scans the system for possible drive errors that could lead to drive failure, then
takes action to correct the errors. The goal is to protect data integrity by detecting drive
failure before the failure can damage data. The corrective actions depend on the virtual
drive configuration and the type of errors. Patrol Read affects performance; the more
iterations there are, the greater the impact.
5.9.1
Use the command in the following table on the selected controller(s) to set the Patrol
Read options.
Set Patrol Read Options
Table 49: Set Patrol Read Options
Convention
MegaCli –AdpPR –Dsbl|EnblAuto|EnblMan|Start|Stop|Info | {-SetStartTime yyyymmdd hh} |
maxConcurrentPD -aN| -a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Sets Patrol Read options on a single controller, multiple controllers, or all controllers:
-Dsbl: Disables Patrol Read for the selected controller(s).
-EnblAuto: Enables Patrol Read automatically for the selected controller(s).
This means Patrol Read will start automatically after the controller initialization is complete.
-EnblMan: Enables Patrol Read manually for the selected controller(s). This means that Patrol Read does not start
automatically; it has to be started manually by selecting the Start command.
-Start: Starts Patrol Read for the selected controller(s).
-Stop: Stops Patrol Read for the selected controller(s).
-Info: Displays the following Patrol Read information for the selected controller(s):
• Patrol Read operation mode
• Patrol Read execution delay value
• Patrol Read status
SetStartTime yyyymmdd hh: Set the start time for the patrol read in year/month/day format.
maxConcurrentPD: Sets the maximum number of concurrent drives that patrol read runs on.
5.9.2
Set Patrol Read Delay Interval
Use the command in the following table on the selected controller(s) to set the time
between Patrol Read iterations.
Table 50: Set Patrol Read Delay Interval
5.10
BIOS-Related Properties
5.10.1 Set or Display Bootable Virtual
Drive ID
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Convention
MegaCli –AdpPRSetDelay –Val -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Sets the time between Patrol Read iterations on a single controller, multiple
controllers, or all controllers:
-Val: Sets delay time between Patrol Read iterations. The value is time of
delay in hours. A value of zero means no delay and an immediate restart.
You can use the commands in this section to select the settings for BIOS-related
options.
Use the command in the following table to set or display the ID of the bootable virtual
drive.
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NOTE: This option does not write a boot sector to the virtual drive. The operating
system will not load if the boot sector is incorrect.
Table 51: Bootable Virtual Drive ID
5.10.2
Select BIOS Status Options
Convention
MegaCli –AdpBootDrive {-Set –Lx| -physdrv[E0:S0]}} |
-Get -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Sets or displays the bootable virtual drive ID:
-Set –Lx| -physdrv[E0:S0]: Sets the virtual drive as bootable so
that during the next reboot, the BIOS looks for a boot sector in the specified
virtual drive. Identifies the physical drive in the virtual drive, by enclosure
and slot, to use to boot from.
-Get: Displays the bootable virtual drive ID.
Use the command in the following table to set the options for the BIOS status.
Table 52: Options for BIOS Status
Convention
MegaCli –AdpBIOS -Enbl|-Dsbl| SOE | BE |
EnblAutoSelectBootLd | DsblAutoSelectBootLd |-Dsply|
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Sets BIOS options. The following are the settings you can select on a single
controller, multiple controllers, or all controllers:
-Enbl, -Dsbl: Enables or disables the BIOS status on selected
controller(s).
-SOE: Stops on BIOS errors during POST for selected controller(s). When set
to -SOE, the BIOS stops in case of a problem with the configuration. This
gives you the option to enter the configuration utility to resolve the
problem. This is available only when you enable the BIOS status.
-BE: Bypasses BIOS errors during POST. This is available only when you
enable the BIOS status.
-EnblAutoSelectBootLd | DsblAutoSelectBootLd: Enable or
disable automatic selection of the boot virtual drive.
-Dsply: Displays the BIOS status on selected controller(s).
5.11 Battery Backup
Unit-Related Properties
You can use the commands in this section to select the settings for BBU-related
options.
5.11.1
Use the command in the following table to display complete information about the
BBU for the selected controller(s).
Display BBU Information
Table 53: Display BBU Information
Page 188
Convention
MegaCli -AdpBbuCmd -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays complete information about the BBU, such as status, capacity
information, design information, and properties.
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
5.11.2 Display BBU Status
Information
Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | Battery Backup Unit-Related Properties
Use the command in the following table to display complete information about the
status of the BBU, such as temperature and voltage, for the selected controller(s).
Table 54: Display BBU Status Information
Convention
MegaCli -AdpBbuCmd -GetBbuStatus –aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays complete information about the BBU status, such as the temperature and voltage. The information displays in the
following formats:
BBU Status for Adapter: xx
Battery Type: XXXXXX(string)
Voltage: xx mV
Current: xx mA
Temperature: xx C°
Firmware Status: xx
Battery state: xx
Gas Gauge Status:
Fully Discharged: Yes/No
Fully Charged: Yes/No
Discharging: Yes/No
Initialized: Yes/No
Remaining Time Alarm: Yes/No
Remaining Capacity Alarm: Yes/No
Discharge Terminated: Yes/No
Over Temperature: Yes/No
Charging Terminated: Yes/No
Over Charged: Yes/No
Additional status information displays differently for iBBU™ and BBU.
For iBBU:
Relative State of Charge: xx
Charger System State: xx
Charger System Ctrl: xx
Charging Current: xx mA
Absolute State of Charge: xx%
Max Error: xx%
For BBU:
Relative State of Charge: xx
Charger Status: xx
Remaining Capacity: xx mAh
Full Charge Capacity: mAh
isSOHGood: Yes/No
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5.11.3
Display BBU Capacity
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Use the command in the following table to display the BBU capacity for the selected
controller(s).
Table 55: Display BBU Capacity Information
5.11.4 Display BBU Design
Parameters
Convention
MegaCli -AdpBbuCmd -GetBbuCapacityInfo
–aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays BBU capacity information. The information displays in the following
format:
BBU Capacity Info for Adapter: x
Relative State of Charge: xx%
Absolute State of Charge: xx%
Remaining Capacity: xx mAh
Full Charge Capacity: xx mAh
Run Time to Empty: xxx Min
Average Time to Empty: xxx Min
Average Time to Full: xxx Min
Cycle Count: xx
Max Error: xx%
Use the command in the following table to display BBU design parameters for the
selected controller(s).
Table 56: Display BBU Design Parameters
Page 190
Convention
MegaCli -AdpBbuCmd -GetBbuDesignInfo
–aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays information about the BBU design parameters. The information
displays in the following formats:
BBU Design Info for Adapter: x
Date of Manufacture: mm/dd, yyyy
Design Capacity: xxx mAh
Design Voltage: mV
Serial Number: 0xhhhh
Pack Stat Configuration: 0xhhhh
Manufacture Name: XXXXXX(String)
Device Name: XXXXXX(String)
Device Chemistry: XXXXXX(String)
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5.11.5
Display Current BBU Properties
Use the command in the following table to display the current BBU properties for the
selected controller(s).
Table 57: Display Current BBU Properties
Convention
MegaCli -AdpBbuCmd -GetBbuProperties
–aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays current properties of the BBU. The information displays in the
following formats:
BBU Properties for Adapter: x
Auto Learn Period: xxx Sec
Next Learn Time: xxxx Sec
Learn Delay Interval=<value>: Value in hours, not greater than 168 hours (7
days)
Auto-Learn Mode=<value>: Value can be 0, 1, or 2.
NOTE: If the battery type is IBBU08, then the BBU mode is displayed
as a part of GetBbuProperties.
5.11.6
Start BBU Learning Cycle
Use the command in the following table to start the BBU learning cycle on the selected
controller(s). A learning cycle is a battery calibration operation performed by the
controller periodically (approximately every three months) to determine the condition
of the battery.
Table 58: Start BBU Learning Cycle
5.11.7 Place Battery in Low-Power
Storage Mode
Convention
MegaCli -AdpBbuCmd -BbuLearn -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Starts the learning cycle on the BBU. No parameter is needed for this option.
Use the command in the following table to place the battery into Low-Power Storage
mode on the selected controller(s). This saves battery power consumption.
Table 59: Place Battery in Low-Power Storage Mode
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Convention
MegaCli -AdpBbuCmd -BbuMfgSleep -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Places the battery in Low-Power Storage mode. The battery automatically
exits this state after 5 seconds.
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Level
5.11.8
Set BBU Properties
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Use the command in the following table to set the BBU properties on the selected
controller(s) after reading from the file.
Table 60: Set BBU Properties
Convention
MegaCli -AdpBbuCmd -SetBbuProperties -f<fileName>
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Sets the BBU properties on the selected controller(s) after reading from the
file.
The information displays in the following formats:
autoLearnPeriod = 1800Sec
nextLearnTime = 12345678Sec Seconds past 1/1/2000
learnDelayInterval = 24hours - Not greater than 7 days
autoLearnMode = 0 0 – Enabled; 1 - Disabled; 2 – WarnViaEvent.
NOTE: You can change only two of these parameters: learnDelayInterval and
autoLearnMode.
NOTE: If the battery type is IBBU08 then in autoLearnmode the
WarnViaEvent is not supported.
5.12 Options for Displaying
Logs Kept at the Firmware Level
Use the commands in this section to select the display settings for the event log and
the BBU terminal log, which are kept at the firmware level.
5.12.1
Use the command in the following table to manage the event entries in the event log
for the selected controller(s).
Event Log Management
Table 61: Event Log Management
Convention
MegaCli –AdpEventLogInfo –GetEventlogInfo | –GetEvents {-info -warning -critical
-fatal} | GetSinceShutdown {-info -warning -critical -fatal} | GetSinceReboot {-info
-warning -critical -fatal} | IncludeDeleted {-info -warning -critical -fatal} |
{GetLatest <number> {-info -warning -critical -fatal} } -f <filename> | Clear
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL | {GetCCIncon} -f <filename> -LX| -L0,2,5...|-LALL -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Manages event log entries. The following are the settings you can select on a single controller, multiple controllers, or all
controllers:
-GetEventlogInfo: Displays overall event information such as total number of events, newest sequence number, oldest
sequence number, shutdown sequence number, reboot sequence number, and clear sequence number.
-GetEvents: Gets event log entry details. The information shown consists of total number of entries available at firmware
side since the last clear and details of each entries of the error log. Start_entry specifies the initial event log entry when
displaying the log.
-GetSinceShutdown: Displays all of the events since last controller shutdown.
-GetSinceReboot: Displays all of the events since last controller reboot.
-IncludeDeleted: Displays all events, including deleted events.
-GetLatest: Displays the latest number of events, if any exist. The event data will be writtent to the file in reverse order.
-Clear: Clears the event log for the selected controller(s).
-GetCCIncon: Displays the events relating to inconsistent data found during a consistency check.
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NOTE: -AdpEventLogInfo does not support the file option in PCLI.
5.12.2
Set BBU Terminal Logging
Use the command in the following table to set the BBU terminal logging for the
selected controller(s).
Table 62: Set BBU Terminal Logging
Convention
MegaCli –FwTermLog -Bbuoff |–BbuoffTemp|-Bbuon|-BbuGet| -aN| -a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Sets BBU terminal logging options. The following are the settings you can select on a single controller, multiple
controllers, or all controllers:
-Bbuoff: While storing the TTY log in DRAM, BBU is not used for buffering. In the case of power loss, this log will
be lost..
–BbuoffTemp: TTY BBU buffering will be set to OFF only for this boot.
-Bbuon: While storing the TTY log in DRAM, BBU is used for buffering. Log will be preserved even in the case of
power loss..
-BbuGet: This gives the current BBU state, i.e if BBU is ON or OFF for TTY history.
5.13 Configuration-Related
Options
You can specify the drives by using the Enclosure ID:Slot ID for SAS controllers. This
assumes that all drives are connected to the controller through an enclosure. If the
drives are not connected to an enclosure, it is assumed that they are connected to
Enclosure 0. In this case there is no slot, so you can use the pdlist command to get
the slot equivalent number. (This applies to all commands that use the Enclosure
ID:Slot ID format.) MegaCLI expects the input in [:S] format for directly attached devices.
In the following options, [E0:S0, E1:S1] specifies the enclosure ID and slot ID for the
drive.
5.13.1 Create a RAID Drive Group
from All Unconfigured Good Drives
Use the command in the following table to create one RAID drive group out of all of the
unconfigured good drives, and a hot spare, if desired. This is for RAID levels 0, 5, 6, 10,
50, or 60. All free drives are used to create a new drive group and, if desired, one hot
spare drive. If it is not possible to use all of the free drives, the command will abort with
a related error level. If there are drives of different capacities, the largest drive is used to
make the hot spare.
NOTE: Firmware supports only 32 drives per drive group. If there are more than 32
unconfigured good drives, MegaCLI cannot configure any of the drives, and the
command will abort.
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Table 63: Create a Drive Group from All of the Unconfigured Drives
Convention
MegaCli –CfgLDAdd -RX[E0:S0,E1:S1,...] [WT | WB] [NORA | RA | ADRA] [Direct |
Cached] [CachedBadBBU|NoCachedBadBBU] [-szXXX [-szYYY ...]] [-strpszM]
[-Hsp[E0:S0,...]] [-AfterLdX] | | -Force [FDE|CtrlBased]
Description
Creates one RAID drive group out of all of the unconfigured good drives, and a hot spare, if desired. This is for RAID
levels 0, 1, 5, or 6. All free drives are used to create a new drive group and, if desired, one hot spare drive.
-Rx[E0:S0,...]: Specifies the RAID level and the drive enclosure/slot numbers used to construct a drive group.
-WT (Write through), WB (Write back): Selects write policy.
-NORA (No read ahead), RA (Read ahead), ADRA (Adaptive read ahead): Selects read policy.
-Direct, -Cached: Selects cache policy.
-CachedBadBBU|NoCachedBadBBU: Specifies whether to use write cache when the BBU is bad.
Hsp: Specifies drive to make the hot spare with.
-Force: Specifies that drive coercion is used to make the capacity of the drives compatible. Drive coercion is a tool
for forcing drives of varying capacities to the same capacity so they can be used in a drive group.
NOTE: Previously -szXXX expressed capacity in MB but now you can enter the capacity in your choice of units. For
example, to create a virtual drive of 10 GB, enter the size as sz10GB. If you do not enter a unit, by default it is
considered as MB.
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5.13.2 Add RAID 0, 1, 5, or 6
Configuration
Use the command in the following table to add a RAID level 0, 1, 5, or 6 configuration to
the existing configuration on the selected controller.
For RAID levels 10, 50, or 60, see Section 5.13.3, Add RAID 10, 50, or 60 Configuration
Table 64: Add RAID 0, 1, 5, or 6 Configuration
Convention
MegaCli –CfgLDAdd -R0|-R1|-R5|-R6[E0:S0,E1:S1,...] [WT | WB] [NORA | RA | ADRA]
[Direct | Cached] [CachedBadBBU|NoCachedBadBBU]
[-szXXXXXXXX [-szYYYYYYYY [... ]]] [-strpszM] [–Hsp[E5:S5,...]] [–afterLdX]
[–Force] -aN
Description
Adds a RAID level 0, 1, 5, or 6 configuration to a specified controller. Even if no configuration is present, you have the
option to write the configuration to the controller.
Note that RAID 1 supports up to 32 drives in a single span of 16 drive groups.
RAID 1 requires an even number of drives, as data from one drive is mirrored to the other drive in each RAID 1 drive
group.
-Rx[E0:S0,...]: Specifies the RAID level and the drive enclosure/slot numbers to construct a drive group.
-WT (Write through), WB (Write back): Selects write policy.
-NORA (No read ahead), RA (Read ahead), ADRA (Adaptive read ahead): Selects read policy.
-Cached, -Direct: Selects cache policy.
[{CachedBadBBU|NoCachedBadBBU }]: Specifies : Specifies whether to use write cache when the BBU is bad.
-szXXXXXXXX: Specifies the capacity for the virtual drive, where XXXX is a decimal number of MB. However, the
actual capacity of the virtual drive can be smaller, because the driver requires the number of blocks from the drives
in each virtual drive to be aligned to the stripe size. If multiple size options are specified, CT configures the virtual
drives in the order of the options entered in the command line.
The configuration of a particular virtual drive will fail if the remaining capacity of the drive group is too small to
configure the virtual drive with the specified capacity.
This option can also be used to create a configuration on the free space available in the drive group.
-strpszM: Specifies the stripe size, where the stripe size values are 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, or 1024 KB.
Hsp[E5:S5,...]: Creates hot spares when you create the configuration. The new hot spares will be dedicated to
the virtual drive used in creating the configuration. This option does not allow you to create global hot spares. To
create global hot spares, you must use the -PdHsp command with proper subcommands.
You can also use this option to create a configuration on the free space available in the virtual drive. You can specify
which free slot should be used by specifying the -AfterLdX: This command is optional. By default, the application
uses the first free slot available in the virtual drive. This option is valid only if the virtual drive is already used for
configuration.
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Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | Configuration-Related Options
5.13.3 Add RAID 10, 50, or 60
Configuration
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Use the command in the following table to add a RAID 10, RAID 50, or RAID 60
configuration to the existing configuration on the selected controller.
For RAID levels 0, 1, 5, or 6, see Section 5.13.2, Add RAID 0, 1, 5, or 6 Configuration
Table 65: Add RAID 10, 50, or 60 Configuration
Convention
MegaCli –CfgSpanAdd -R10|-R50|R60 –Array0[E0:S0,E1:S1,...]
–Array1[E0:S0,E1:S1,...] [...]
[WT | WB] [NORA | RA | ADRA] [Direct | Cached]
[CachedBadBBU|NoCachedBadBBU] [-szXXXXXXXX [-szYYYYYYYY [... ]]] [-strpszM]
[–afterLdX] | -Force [FDE|CtrlBased] -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Creates a RAID level 10, 50, or 60 (spanned) configuration from the specified drive groups. Even if no configuration
is present, you must use this option to write the configuration to the controller.
Note that RAID 10 supports up to eight spans with a maximum of 32 drives in each span. (There are factors, such as
the type of controller, that limit the number of drives you can use.) RAID 10 requires an even number of drives, as
data from one drive is mirrored to the other drive in each RAID 1 drive group. You can have an even or odd number
of spans.
Multiple drive groups are specified using the –ArrayX[E0:S0,...] option. (Note that X starts from 0, not 1.) All
of the drive groups must have the same number of drives. At least two drive groups must be provided. The order of
options {WT |WB} {NORA | RA | ADRA} {Direct | Cached} is flexible.
The size option, -szXXXXXXXX, can be accepted to allow slicing in the spanned drive groups if the controller
supports this feature. The [–afterLdX] option is accepted if the size option is accepted. CT exits and does not
create a configuration if the size or the afterLd option is specified but the controller does not support slicing in
the spanned drive groups.
NOTE: Previously -szXXX expressed capacity in MB but now you can enter the capacity in your choice of units. For
example, to create a virtual drive of 10 GB, enter the size as sz10GB. If you do not enter a unit, by default it is
considered as MB.
5.13.4 Clear the Existing
Configuration
Use the command in the following table to clear the existing configuration on the
selected controller(s).
Table 66: Clear Existing Configuration
5.13.5 Save the Configuration on the
Controller
Convention
MegaCli –CfgClr -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Clears the existing configuration.
Use the command in the following table to save the configuration for the selected
controller(s) to the given filename.
Table 67: Save Configuration on the Controller
Page 196
Convention
MegaCli –CfgSave
Description
Saves the configuration for the selected controller(s) to the given filename.
–f FileName
-aN
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Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | Configuration-Related Options
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
5.13.6 Restore the Configuration Data
from File
Use the command in the following table to read the configuration from the file and
load it on the selected controller(s). You can restore the read/write properties and RAID
configuration using hot spares.
Table 68: Restore Configuration Data from File
5.13.7 Manage Foreign Configuration
Information
Convention
MegaCli –CfgRestore
Description
Reads the configuration from the file and loads it on the controller. MegaCLI
can store or restore all read and write controller properties, all read and write
properties for virtual drives, and the RAID configuration including hot
spares. Note the following:
• MegaCLI does not validate the setup when restoring the RAID
configuration.
• The -CfgSave option stores the configuration data and controller
properties in the file. Configuration data has only the device ID and
sequence number information of the drives used in the configuration. The
CfgRestore option will fail if the same device IDs of the drives are not
present.
–f FileName
-aN
Use the command in the following table to manage configurations from other
controllers, called foreign configurations, for the selected controller(s). You can scan,
preview, import, and clear foreign configurations.
NOTE: The actual status of virtual drives and drives can differ from the information displayed in
the –Scan option. LSI suggests that you run –Preview before you import a foreign
configuration.
Table 69: Manage Foreign Configuration Information
Convention
MegaCli -CfgForeign -Scan | [-SecurityKey sssssssssss] | -Dsply [x] |
[-SecurityKey sssssssssss] | -Preview [x] | [-SecurityKey sssssssssss] |
-Import [x] | [-SecurityKey sssssssssss] | -Clear [x] | [-SecurityKey
sssssssssss] -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Manages foreign configurations. The options for this command are:
-Scan: Scans and displays available foreign configurations.
-SecurityKey: This is a key based on a user-provided string. The controller uses the security key to lock and unlock access
to the secure user data. This key is encrypted into the security key blob and stored on the controller. If the security key is
unavailable, user data is irretrievably lost. You must be careful to never lose the security key.
-Preview: Provides a preview of the imported foreign configuration. The foreign configuration ID (FID) is optional.
-Dsply: Displays the foreign configuration.
-Import: Imports the foreign configuration. The FID is optional.
-Clear [FID]: Clears the foreign configuration. The FID is optional.
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Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | Virtual Drive-Related Options
5.13.8 Delete Specified Virtual
Drive(s)
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Use the command in the following table to delete one, multiple, or all virtual drives on
the selected controller(s).
Table 70: Delete Specified Virtual Drives
5.13.9
Display the Free Space
Convention
MegaCli –CfgLDDel –Lx|-L0,1,2|-Lall
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Deletes the specified virtual drive(s) on the selected controller(s). You can
delete one virtual drive, multiple virtual drives, or all of the selected virtual
drives on selected controller(s).
Use the command in the following table to display the free space that is available to use
for configuration on the selected controller(s).
Table 71: Display Free Space
Convention
MegaCli –CfgFreeSpaceInfo -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays all of the free space available for configuration on the selected
controller(s). The information displayed includes the number of drive
groups, the number of spans in each drive group, the number of free space
slots in each drive group, the start block, and the size (in both blocks and
megabytes) of each free space slot.
5.14 Virtual Drive-Related
Options
You can use the commands in this section to select settings for the virtual drives and
perform actions on them.
5.14.1 Display Virtual Drive
Information
Use the command in the following table to display virtual drive information for the
selected controller(s).
Table 72: Display Virtual Drive Information
Page 198
Convention
MegaCli –LDInfo –Lx|-L0,1,2|-Lall -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays information about the virtual drive(s) on the selected controller(s).
This information includes the name, RAID level, RAID level qualifier, capacity
in megabytes, state, stripe size, number of drives, span depth, cache policy,
access policy, and ongoing activity progress, if any, including initialization,
background initialization, consistency check, and reconstruction.
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5.14.2 Change the Virtual Drive Cache
and Access Parameters
Use the command in the following table to change the cache policy and access policy
for the virtual drive(s) on the selected controller(s).
Table 73: Change Virtual Drive Cache and Access Parameters
5.14.3 Display the Virtual Drive Cache
and Access Parameters
Convention
MegaCli –LDSetProp WT | WB [-Immediate]| RA |NORA |
ADRA|-Cached|Direct|CachedBadBBU|NoCachedBadBBU} |
-RW|RO|Blocked | {-Name nameString} |
-EnDskCache|DisDskCache –Lx| -L0,1,2|-Lall
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Allows you to change the following virtual drive parameters:
-WT (Write through), WB (Write back): Selects write policy.
-Immediate: Indicates that the changes take place immediately.
-NORA (No read ahead), RA (Read ahead), ADRA (Adaptive read ahead):
Selects read policy.
-Cached, -Direct: Selects cache policy.
-CachedBadBBU|NoCachedBadBBU : Specifies whether to use write
cache when the BBU is bad.
-RW, -RO, Blocked: Selects access policy.
-EnDskCache: Enables drive cache.
-DisDskCache: Disables drive cache.
Use the command in the following table to display cache and access parameters for the
virtual drive(s) on the selected controller(s).
Table 74: Display Virtual Drive Cache and Access Parameters
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Convention
MegaCli –LDGetProp -Cache | -Access | -Name |
-DskCache -Lx|-L0,1,2| -Lall -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays the cache and access policies of the virtual drive(s):
-Cache: -Cached, Direct: Displays cache policy.
-WT (Write through), WB (Write back): Selects write policy.
-NORA (No read ahead), RA (Read ahead), ADRA (Adaptive read ahead):
Selects read policy.
-Access: -RW, -RO, Blocked: Displays access policy.
-DskCache: Displays drive cache policy.
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5.14.4 Manage Virtual Drives
Initialization
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Use the command in the following table to manage initialization of the virtual drive(s)
on the selected controller(s).
Table 75: Manage Virtual Drive Initialization
5.14.5
Manage a Consistency Check
Convention
MegaCli –LDInit {–Start [Fast | Full]}
|-Abort|–ShowProg|-ProgDsply
-Lx|-L0,1,2|-Lall -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Allows you to select the following actions for virtual drive initialization:
-Start: Starts the initialization (writing 0s) on the virtual drive(s) and
displays the progress (this is optional). The fast initialization option initializes
the first and last 8 Mbyte areas on the virtual drive. The full option allows you
to initialize the entire virtual drive.
-Abort: Aborts the ongoing initialization on the virtual drive(s).
-ShowProg: Displays the snapshot of the ongoing initialization, if any.
-ProgDsply: Displays the progress of the ongoing initialization. The
routine continues to display the progress until at least one initialization is
completed or a key is pressed.
Use the command in the following table to manage a data consistency check (CC) on
the virtual drives for the selected controller(s).
Table 76: Manage Consistency Check
Page 200
Convention
MegaCli –LDCC –Start|-Abort|–ShowProg|-ProgDsply
–Lx|-L0,1,2|-Lall -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Allows you to select the following actions for a data CC:
-Start: Starts a CC on the virtual drive(s), then displays the progress
(optional) and time remaining.
-Abort: Aborts an ongoing CC on the virtual drive(s).
-ShowProg: Displays a snapshot of an ongoing CC.
-ProgDsply: Displays ongoing CC progress. The progress displays until at
least one CC is completed or a key is pressed.
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | Virtual Drive-Related Options
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
5.14.6
Schedule a Consistency Check
Use the command in the following table to schedule a consistency check (CC) on the
virtual drives for the selected controller(s). There are options to set the mode, change
the CC start time, set the delay time and display of the CC info.
Table 77: Schedule Consistency Check
5.14.7 Manage a Background
Initialization
Convention
MegaCli -AdpCcSched -Dsbl|-Info|{-ModeConc | -ModeSeq
[-ExcludeLD -LN|-L0,1,2] [-SetStartTime yyyymmdd hh ]
[-SetDelay val ] } -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Schedules check consistency on the virtual drive of the selected adapter.
Dsbl: Disables a scheduled CC for the given adapter(s).
Info: Gets information about a scheduled CC for the given adapter(s).
ModeConc: The scheduled CC on all of the virtual drives runs concurrently
for the given adapter(s).
ModeSeq: The scheduled CC on all of the virtual drives runs sequentially for
the given adapter(s)
ExcludeLd: Specify the virtual drive numbers not included in the
scheduled CC. The new list will overwrite the existing list stored on the
controller. This is optional.
StartTime: Sets the next start time. The date is in the format of
yyyymmdd in decimal digits and followed by a decimal number for the hour
between 0 ~ 23 inclusively. This is optional.
SetDelay: Sets the execution delay between executions for the given
adapter(s). This is optional.
Values: The value is the length of delay in hours. A value of 0 means
continuous execution.
Use the command in the following table to enable, disable, or suspend background
initialization (BGI), as well as display initialization progress on the selected controller(s).
Table 78: Manage Background Initialization
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Convention
MegaCli –LDBI
-Enbl|-Dsbl|GetSetting|-ShowProg|-ProgDsply
–Lx|-L0,1,2|-Lall -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Manages background initialization options. The following are the
background initialization settings you can select on a single controller,
multiple controllers, or all controllers:
-Enbl, -Dsbl: Enables or disables the background initialization on the
selected controller(s).
-ProgDsply: Displays an ongoing background initialization in a loop. This
function completes only when all background initialization processes
complete or you press a key to exit.
-ShowProg: Displays the current progress value.
- GetSetting: Displays current background initialization setting (Enabled
or Disabled).
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5.14.8 Perform a Virtual Drive
Reconstruction
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Use the command in the following table to perform a reconstruction of the virtual
drive(s) on the selected controller(s).
Table 79: Virtual Drive Reconstruction
5.14.9 Display Information about
Virtual Drives and Drives
Convention
MegaCli –LDRecon {–Start –Rx [Add | Rmv
PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1,...] ] } |–ShowProg|-ProgDsply
–Lx –aN
Description
Controls and manages virtual drive reconstruction. The following are the
virtual drive reconstruction settings you can select on a single controller:
-Start: Starts a reconstruction of the selected virtual drive to a new RAID
level.
-Rx: Changes the RAID level of the virtual drive when you start
reconstruction.
You might need to add or remove a drive to make this possible.
-Start –Add PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1....]: Adds listed drives to
the virtual drive and starts reconstruction on the selected virtual drive.
-Start –Rmv PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1....]: Removes one drive
from the existing virtual drives and starts a reconstruction.
-ShowProg: Displays a snapshot of the ongoing reconstruction process.
-ProgDsply: Allows you to view the ongoing reconstruction. The routine
continues to display progress until at least one reconstruction is completed
or a key is pressed.
Use the command in the following table to display information about the virtual drives
and drives for the selected controller(s), such as the number of virtual drives, RAID level,
and drive capacity.i
Table 80: Display Virtual Drive and Drive Information
5.14.10 Display the Number of Virtual
Drives
Convention
MegaCli –LDPDInfo -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL|
Description
Displays information about the present virtual drive(s) and drive(s) on the
selected controller(s). Displays information including the number of virtual
drives, the RAID level of the virtual drives, and drive capacity information,
which includes raw capacity, coerced capacity, uncoerced capacity, drive
temperature, enclosure position and the SAS address.
Use the command in the following table to display the number of virtual drives
attached to the controller.
Table 81: Display Number of Virtual Drives
Page 202
Convention
MegaCli –LDGetNum –aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays the number of virtual drives attached to the controller. The return
value is the number of virtual drives.
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | Virtual Drive-Related Options
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
5.14.11 Clear the LDBBM Table Entries
Use the command in the following table to clear the LDBBM table entries.
Table 82: Clear the LDBBM Table Entries
5.14.12 Display the List of Virtual
Drives with Preserved Cache
Convention
MegaCli -LDBBMClr -Lx|-L0,1,2,...|-Lall
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Clears the LDBBM table entries for the virtual drive(s) on the selected
adapter(s).
Use the command in the following table to display the list of virtual drives that have
preserved cache. Preserved cache is cache that remains in the controller cache after a
drive goes offline or missing and that has not been saved to a drive yet. You can reboot
and manage the preserved cache.
Table 83: Display the List of Virtual Drives with Preserved Cache
5.14.13 Discard the Preserved Cache of
a Virtual Drive(s)
Convention
MegaCli
Description
Display the list of virtual drives that have preserved cache.
-GetPreservedCacheList -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Use the command in the following table to discard the preserved cache of a virtual
drive(s).
Table 84: Discard the Preserved Cache of a Virtual Drive(s)
5.14.14 Expand a Virtual Drive
Convention
MegaCli -DiscardPreservedCache -Lx|-L0,1,2|-Lall
-force -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Discard the preserved cache of the virtual drive(s).
Use the command in the following table to expand a virtual drive.
Table 85: Discard the Preserved Cache of a Virtual Drive(s)
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Convention
MegaCli -LdExpansion -pN -dontExpandArray
-Lx|-L0,1,2|-Lall -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Expands the virtual drive within the existing array or beyond the size of the
existing array if you replace the drives with larger drives.
-pN: Denotes the percentage of the array to use to expand the virtual drive.
N ranges from 0 to 100 percent. For example, -p30 indicates expansion up
to 30 percent of available array size.
-dontExpandArray: Expand a virtual drive within the array, even when
there is room to expand the array.
For example, you have created a 5 GB RAID 1 virtual drive with two 30 Gbyte
drives. The array size is 30 GB and the virtual drive size is 5 GB. If you replace
the two 30-GB drives with two 60-GB drives, the array size is still 30 GB
(because of previous configuration). You have two options:
1. Expand the virtual drive within the array.
Use the -dontExpandArra option to expand the virtual drive up to 30
GB.
2. Expand the virtual drive beyond the existing array size
Use the -pN option to expand the virtual drive beyond 30 GB and up to
60 GB (the size of the replacement drives).
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5.15
Drive-Related Options
You can use the commands in this section to select settings for the drives and perform
actions on them.
5.15.1
Display Drive Information
Use the command in the following table to display information about the drives on the
selected controller(s).
Table 86: Display Drive Information
5.15.2
Set the Drive State to Online
Convention
MegaCli –PDInfo -PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1....]
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL|
Description
Provides information about the drives connected to the enclosure and
controller slot. This includes information such as the enclosure number, slot
number, device ID, sequence number, drive type, capacity (if a drive), foreign
state, firmware state, and inquiry data.
For SAS devices, this includes additional information such as the SAS address
of the drive. For SAS expanders, this includes additional information such as
the number of devices connected to the expander.
-Physdrv[E0:S0,...]: Specifies the physical drive enclosure and the
slots for the drives to provide information about.
Use the command in the following table to set the state of a drive to Online.
In an online state, the drive is working normally and is a part of a configured virtual
drive.
Table 87: Set Drive State to Online
5.15.3
Set the Drive State to Offline
Convention
MegaCli –PDOnline -PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1....]
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Changes the drive state to Online.
-Physdrv[E0:S0,...]: Specifies the physical drive enclosure and the
slots for the drives.
Use the command in the following table to set the state of a drive to Offline.
In the offline state, the virtual drive is not available to the RAID controller.
Table 88: Set Drive State to Offline
Page 204
Convention
MegaCli –PDOffline -PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1....]
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Changes the drive state to Offline.
-Physdrv[E0:S0,...]: Specifies the physical drive enclosure and the
slots for the drives.
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | Drive-Related Options
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
5.15.4 Change the Drive State to
Unconfigured Good
Use the command in the following table to change the state of a drive from
Unconfigured-Bad to Unconfigured-Good.
Table 89: Change Drive State to Unconfigured Good
5.15.5
Change the Drive State
Convention
MegaCli –PDMakeGood -PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1....] |
[-Force] -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Changes the drive state to Unconfigured Good.
-Physdrv[E0:S0,...]: Specifies the physical drive enclosure and the
slots for the drives.
Force: Force the drive to the Unconfigured Good state.
Use the command in the following table to change the drive state, as it relates to hot
spares, and to associate the drive to an enclosure and to a drive group for the selected
controller(s).
Table 90: Change Drive State
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Convention
MegaCli –PDHSP {–Set [{-Dedicated -ArrayN
|-Array0,1...}] [-EnclAffinity] [-nonRevertible] } |
-Rmv -PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1,...] -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Changes the drive state (as it relates to hot spares) and associates the drive
to an enclosure and virtual drive on a single controller, multiple controllers,
or all controllers:
-Set: Changes the drive state to dedicated hot spare for the enclosure.
-Array0: Dedicates the hot spare to a specific drive group number N.
-EnclAffinity: Associates the hot spare to a selected enclosure.
-Rmv: Changes the drive state to ready (removes the hot spare).
-Physdrv[E0:S0,...]: Specifies the physical drive enclosure and the
slots for the drives.
You can get the list of arrays by using the CLI command "CfgDsply". In the
results of the CfgDsply command, the number associated with "DISK
GROUPS" is the array number.
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5.15.6
Manage a Drive Initialization
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Use the command in the following table to manage a drive initialization on the
selected controller(s).
Table 91: Drive Initialization
5.15.7
Rebuild a Drive
Convention
MegaCli –PDClear -Start |-Stop|-ShowProg |-ProgDsply
-PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1....] -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Manages initialization or displays initialization progress on a single
controller, multiple controllers, or all controllers:
-Start: Starts initialization on the selected drive(s).
-Stop: Stops an ongoing initialization on the selected drive(s).
-ShowProg: Displays the current progress percentage and time remaining
for the initialization. This option is useful for running the application through
scripts.
-ProgDsply: Displays the ongoing clear progress. The routine continues
to display the initialization progress until at least one initialization is
completed or a key is pressed.
Use the command in the following table to start or stop a rebuild on a drive and display
the rebuild progress. When a drive in a RAID drive group fails, you can rebuild the drive
by recreating the data that was stored on the drive before it failed.
Table 92: Rebuild a Drive
Page 206
Convention
MegaCli –PDRbld –Start |-Stop|-ShowProg |-ProgDsply
–PhysDrv [E0:S0,E1:S1....] -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Manages a drive rebuild or displays the rebuild progress on a single
controller, multiple controllers, or all controllers. Note that the drive must
meet the capacity requirements before it can be rebuilt, and it must be part
of a drive group:
-Start: Starts a rebuild on the selected drive(s) and displays the rebuild
progress (optional).
-Stop: Stops an ongoing rebuild on the selected drive(s).
-ShowProg: Displays the current progress percentage and time remaining
for the rebuild. This option is useful for running the application through
scripts.
-ProgDsply: Displays the ongoing rebuild progress. This routine displays
the rebuild progress until at least one initialization is completed or a key is
pressed.
-Physdrv[E0:S0,...]: Specifies the physical drive enclosure and the
slots for the drives.
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | Drive-Related Options
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
5.15.8 Locate the Drive(s) and
Activate LED
Use the command in the following table to locate the drive(s) for the selected
controller(s) and activate the drive activity LED.
Table 93: Locate Drive and Activate LED
5.15.9 Mark the Configured Drive as
Missing
Convention
MegaCli –PDLocate –PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1....]
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Locates the drive(s) for the selected controller(s) and activates the drive
activity LED.
-Physdrv[E0:S0,...]: Specifies the physical drive enclosure and the
slots for the drives.
Use the command in the following table to mark the configured drive as missing for the
selected controller(s).
Table 94: Mark Configured Drive as Missing
Convention
MegaCli –PDMarkMissing –PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1....]
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Marks the offline drive as missing for the selected controller(s).
-Physdrv[E0:S0,...]: Specifies the physical drive enclosure and the
slots for the drives.
NOTE: PdMarkMissing works only on offline drives. If you want to make a configured
drive as missing, first mark it as offline, then mark it as missing. When PdReplaceMissing
is run, the drive becomes offline, and Rebuild does not start automatocally. One has to
start it explicitly.
Follow these steps to replace the PD or retrieve the PD:
1. pdgetmissing (This command reports the array and the row number needed for
the next command).
2. pdreplacemissing (Input the array and row number here).
3. pdonline.
5.15.10 Display the Drives in Missing
Status
Use the command in the following table to mark the configured drive as missing for the
selected controller(s).
Table 95: Display Drives in Missing Status
Convention
MegaCli –PDGetMissing -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays the drive(s) in missing status. The format is:
No Row Column SizeExpected(MB)
0
x
y
zzzzzzzzz
…
Where x is the index to the drive groups, y is the index to the drive in that
drive group, and zzzzzz is the minimum capacity of the drive that can be
used as a replacement.
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Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | Drive-Related Options
5.15.11 Replace the Configured Drives
and Start an Automatic Rebuild
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Use the command in the following table to replace configured drive(s) and start an
automatic rebuild of the drive for the selected controller(s).
Table 96: Replace Configured Drive(s) and Start Automatic Rebuild
5.15.12 Prepare the Unconfigured
Drive for Removal
Convention
MegaCli –PDReplaceMissing –PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1....]
-ArrayX -RowY -aN
Description
Replaces the configured drives that are identified as missing and then starts
an automatic rebuild.
-Physdrv[E0:S0,...]: Specifies the physical drive enclosure and the
slots for the drives.
Use the command in the following table to prepare the unconfigured drive(s) for
removal from the selected controller(s).
Table 97: Prepare Unconfigured Drive(s) for Removal
5.15.13 Display Total Number of Drives
Convention
MegaCli –PDPrpRmv [-Undo] – PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1....]
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Prepares unconfigured drive(s) for removal. The firmware spins down this
drive. The drive state is set to unaffiliated, which marks it as offline even
though it is not a part of a configuration.
-Undo: This option undoes this operation. If you select undo, the firmware
marks this drive as unconfigured good.
-Physdrv[E0:S0,...]: Specifies the physical drive enclosure and the
slots for the drives.
Use the command in the following table to display the total number of drives attached
to an controller. Drives can be attached directly or through enclosures.
Table 98: Display Number of Drives Attached to an Controller
5.15.14 Display List of Physical Devices
Convention
MegaCli –PDGetNum –aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays the total number of drives attached to an controller. Drives can be
attached directly or through enclosures. The return value is the number of
drives.
Use the command in the following table to display a list of the physical devices
connected to the selected controller(s).
Table 99: Display List of Physical Devices Attached to Controller(s)
Page 208
Convention
MegaCli –PDList –aN|-a0,1..|-aAll|
Description
Displays information about all drives and other devices connected to the
selected controller(s). This includes information such as the drive type,
capacity (if a drive), serial number,drive temperature, enclosure position, and
firmware version of the device. For SAS devices, this includes additional
information such as the SAS address of the device. For SAS expanders, this
includes additional information such as the number of drives connected to
the expander.
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | Drive-Related Options
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
5.15.15 Download Firmware to the
Physical Devices
Use the command in the following table to download firmware to the physical devices
connected to the selected controller(s).
Table 100: Download Firmware to the Physical Devices
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Convention
MegaCli –PdFwDownload [offline] {[-SataBridge]
-PhysDrv[E0:S0,E1:S1....]}|{-EncdevId[devId1,devId2,
...]} -f <filename> –aN|-a0,1,2|-aAll
Description
Flashes the firmware with the file specified at the command line. Firmware
files used to flash a physical device can be of any format. The CLI utility
assumes that you provide a valid firmware image and it flashes the same.
The physical device has to do error checking.
-SataBridge: Allows you to download the SATA Bridge firmware in online
mode.
-Physdrv[E0:S0]: Specifies the physical drive enclosure and the slots for
the drives. Flashes the firmware to only one PD.
-EncdevId[devId1,devId2,...]: Specifies the enclosure device ID.
See Section 5.16.1, Display Enclosure Information for more enclosure
information.
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Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | Drive-Related Options
5.15.16 Configure All Free Drives into a
RAID 0, 1, 5, or 6 Configuration for a
Specific Controller
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Use the command in the following table to download firmware to the physical devices
connected to the selected controller(s).
Table 101: Configure All Free Drives into a RAID 0, 1, 5 or 6 Configuration for a Specific
Controller
Page 210
Convention
MegaCli -CfgAllFreeDrv -rX [-SATAOnly] [-SpanCount
XXX] [WT|WB] [NORA|RA|ADRA] [Direct|Cached]
[CachedBadBBU|NoCachedBadBBU] [-strpszM] [-HspCount
XX [-HspType
-Dedicated|-EnclAffinity|-nonRevertible]] |
[FDE|CtrlBased] -aN
Description
Adds all of the unconfigured physical drives to a RAID level 0, 1, 5, or 6
configuration on a specified controller. Even if no configuration is present,
you have the option to write the configuration to the controller.
Rx[E0:S0,...]: Specifies the RAID level and the physical drive
enclosure/slot numbers to construct a disk group.
WT (Write through), WB (Write back): Selects the write policy.
NORA (No read ahead), RA (Read ahead), ADRA (Adaptive
read ahead): Selects the read policy.
Cached, -Direct: Selects the cache policy.
[{CachedBadBBU|NoCachedBadBBU }]: Specifies whether to use
write cache when the BBU is bad.
szXXXXXXXX: Specifies the size for the virtual disk, where XXXX is a decimal
number of MB. However, the actual size of the virtual drive might be smaller,
because the driver requires the number of blocks from the physical drives in
each virtual drive to be aligned to the stripe size.
If multiple size options are specified, CT will configure the virtual drives in
the order of the options entered in the command line. The configuration of a
particular virtual drive will fail if the remaining size of the array is too small to
configure the virtual drive with the specified size.This option can also be
used to create a configuration on the free space available in the array.
strpszM: Specifies the stripe size, where the stripe size values are 8, 16, 32,
64, 128, 256, 512, or 1024 MB.
Hsp[E5:S5,...]: Creates hot spares when you create the configuration.
The new hot spares are dedicated to the virtual drive used to create the
configuration. This option does not allow you to create global hot spares. To
create global hot spares, you must use the -PdHsp command with the
proper subcommands.
You can also use this option to create a configuration on the free space
available in the virtual drive.
AfterLdX: This command is optional. By default, the application uses the
first free slot available in the virtual drive. This option is valid only if the
virtual disk is already used for configuration.
FDE|CtrlBased: If controller support security feature, this option enables
FDE/controller-based encryption on virtual disk.
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | Enclosure-Related Options
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
5.15.17 Set the Mapping Mode of the
Drives to the Selected Controller(s)
Use the command in the following table to set the mapping mode of the physical
devices connected to the selected controller(s).
Table 102: Set the Mapping Mode of the Drive to the Selected Controller
5.15.18 Perform the Copyback
Operation on the Selected Drive
Convention
MegaCli -DirectPdMapping -Enbl|-Dsbl|-Dsply
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Sets the mapping mode of the drives connected to the specified
controller(s).
Enbl: Enables the direct physical drive mapping mode.
Dsbl: Disables the direct physical drive mapping mode.
Dsply: Displays the current state of the direct physical drive mapping.
Use the command in the following table to the perform the Copyback Operation on the
selected Drive.
The copyback feature allows you to copy data from a source drive of a virtual drive to a
destination drive that is not a part of the virtual drive. Copyback is often used to create
or restore a specific physical configuration for a drive group (for example, a specific
arrangement of drive group members on the device I/O buses).
Typically, when a drive fails or is expected to fail, the data is rebuilt on a hot spare. The
failed drive is replaced with a new disk. Then the data is copied from the hot spare to
the new drive, and the hot spare reverts from a rebuild drive to its original hot spare
status. The copyback operation runs as a background activity, and the virtual drive is
still available online to the host.
Table 103: Perform the Copyback Operation on the Selected Drive
Convention
MegaCli -PDCpyBk -Start | -Stop|-ShowProg|-ProgDsply
-PhysDrv[E0:S0] -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Performs the copyback operation on the selected physical drive.
Start: Initializes the copyback operation on the selected drive.
Stop: Stops the copyback operation on the selected drive.
ShowProg: Displays a snapshot of the ongoing copyback operation.
ProgDsply: Allows you to view the ongoing copyback operation. The
routine continues to display progress until at least one copyback is
completed or a key is pressed.
-Physdrv[E0:S0,...]: Specifies the physical drive enclosure and the
slots for the drives.
5.16 Enclosure-Related
Options
The commands in this section are used for enclosures.
5.16.1
Use the command in the following table to display enclosure information for selected
controller(s).
Display Enclosure Information
Table 104: Display Enclosure Information
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Convention
MegaCli –EncInfo -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays information about the enclosure for the selected controller(s).
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5.16.2
Display Enclosure Status
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Use the command in the following table to display the status of the enclosure for
selected controller(s).
Table 105: Display Enclosure Status
5.17
Flashing the Firmware
5.17.1 Flash the Firmware with the
ROM File
Convention
MegaCli –EncStatus -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays the status of the enclosure for the selected controller(s).
The options in this section describe the functionality of the existing flash application.
The firmware flash options do not require input from the user.
Use the command in the following table to flash the firmware with the ROM file
specified at the command line for the selected controller(s).
Table 106: Flash Firmware with ROM File
Convention
MegaCli –AdpFwFlash –f filename [-NoSigChk] [-NoVerChk]-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Flashes the firmware with the ROM file specified at the command line.
The –NoSigChk option forces the application to flash the firmware even if the check word on the file does not match the
required check word for the controller. This option flashes the firmware only if the existing firmware version on the controller
is lower than the version on the ROM image.
If you specify –NoVerChk, also, the application flashes the controller firmware without checking the version of the firmware
image. The version check applies only to the firmware (APP.ROM) version.
This command also supports the “Mode 0” flash functionality. For Mode 0 flash, the controller number is not valid. There are
two possible methods:
• Select which controller to flash after the controllers are detected.
• Flash the firmware on all present controllers.
XML output data is generated by this option.
5.17.2 Flash the Firmware in Mode 0
with the ROM File
Use the command in the following table to flash the firmware in Mode 0 with the ROM
file specified at the command line for the selected controller(s). This option is for DOS
only.
Table 107: Flash Firmware in Mode 0 with ROM File
Page 212
Convention
MegaCli –AdpM0Flash –f filename
Description
Flashes the firmware in Mode 0 with the ROM file listed on the command
line.
This option supports the Mode 0 flash functionality. For Mode 0 flash, the
controller number is not valid. The method to handle this is to flash the
firmware on all present controllers which are compatible with the image.
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | SAS Topology
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
5.18
SAS Topology
The commands in this section are used to display SAS topology.
Use the command in the following table to display the PHY connection information for
physical PHY M on the selected controller(s). Each PHY can form one side of the physical
link in a connection with a PHY on a different device. The physical link contains four
wires that form two differential signal pairs. One differential pair transmits signals, and
the other differential pair receives signals. Both differential pairs operate
simultaneously and allow concurrent data transmission in both the receive and the
transmit directions. PHYs are contained within ports.
A port can contain a single PHY or can contain multiple PHYs. A narrow port contains a
single PHY, and a wide port contains multiple PHYs.
Table 108: Display PHY Connection Information
Convention
MegaCli –PHYInfo -phyM –aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays PHY connection information for physical PHY M on the controller(s).
5.19 Diagnostic-Related
Options
The commands in this section are used to run diagnostic tests.
5.19.1
Use the command in the following table to start the controller diagnostic for a set
amount of time.
Start Controller Diagnostics
Table 109: Start Diagnostics Setting
5.19.2
Start Battery Test
Convention
MegaCli –AdpDiag [val] –aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Sets the amount of time for the controller diagnostic to run.
Val: Indicates the time in seconds for the controller diagnostic to run.
Use the command in the following table to start the battery test. This command
requires a system reboot.
Table 110: Start Battery Test
5.20 Recovery
(Snapshot)-Related Options
Convention
MegaCli –AdpBatTest –aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Starts the battery test. This command requires that you turn off the power to
the system, and then turn on the power and reboot the system.
The commands in this section are used to perform actions with the Recovery advanced
software, also known as Snapshot (LSIP200038104).
The Recovery feature uses Snapshot technology to offer a simplified way to recover lost
data and provides protection for any volume, including the boot volume. You can use
Recovery to take snapshots of a volume at designated point in time and restore the
volume or files from those points in case data is deleted, whether accidentally or
maliciously. MegaRAID Recovery supports up to eight snapshots of PiTs for each
volume.
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5.20.1
Enable the Snapshot Feature
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Use the command in the following table to enable the snapshot feature on a selected
virtual drive..
Table 111: Enable the Snapshot Feature
5.20.2
Disable the Snapshot Feature
Convention
MegaCli -Snapshot -Enbl -szXXX SnapshotRepositoryLD N
[-AutoSnapshot]
[AutoDeleteOldestSnapshot] -Lx -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Enables the snapshot on the source virtual drive for the corresponding
snapshot target virtual drive.
-szXXX: Specifies the size in MB on for the virtual drive, where XXX is a
decimal number of MB.
SnapshotRepositoryLD N: Specifies the repository LD number.
-AutoSnapshot: Optional parameter, if specified, enables the
AutoSnapshot for the source virtual drive.
-AutoDeleteOldestSnapshot: Optional parameter, if specified,
enables the AutoDeletOldestSnapshot for the source virtual drive.
-Lx: x specifies the Source LD number on which to enable snapshot.
Use the command in the following table to enable the snapshot feature on a selected
virtual drive.
Table 112: Disable the Snapshot Feature
5.20.3
Take Snapshot of Volume
Convention
MegaCli -Snapshot -Dsbl -Lx -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Command disables the snapshot on the source virtual drive.
-Lx: x specifies the Source LD number on which to disable snapshot.
Use the command in the following table to take a snapshot of a volume at designated
point in time .
Table 113: Take Snapshot of Volume
Page 214
Convention
MegaCli -Snapshot -TakeSnapshot [-snapshotName name]
[-CreateView [-ViewName view_name] [-RW|RO|Blocked]
[-szXXX]] -LN|-L0,1,2 -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
\n",
appNameP);
Description
Takes a snapshot of a volume at designated point in time.
-snapshotName name: (Optional) If specified, the snapshot is created
with the name you enter for it.
-CreateView: (Optional) If specified, this creates a view for the snapshot.
A view contains the content from the Point-in-Time [PiT] when the snapshot
was made.
-ViewName view_name: (Optional) Specifies the name of the view you
created.
-RW|RO|Blocked: Optional Parameter, specifies the access policy of the
view.
-szXXX: Specifies the size of the view in MB where XXX is a decimal number
-LN: N specifies the source LD number for the command.
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | Recovery (Snapshot)-Related Options
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
5.20.4
Set the Snapshot Properties
Use the command in the following table to set the snapshot properties..
Table 114: Set the Snapshot Properties
5.20.5
Delete a Snapshot
Convention
MegaCli -Snapshot -SetProp {-AutoSnapshot -val} |
{-AutoDeleteOldestSnapshot -val} -Lx
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Sets the Snapshot properties such as AutoSnapshot and
AutoDeleteOldestSnapshot.
-AutoSnapshot: If the value is 0, this command disables the
AutoSnapshot feature on source virtual drive. If the value is 1, it enables the
AutoSnapshot feature on source virtual drive
-AutoDeleteOldestSnapshot: If the value is 0, this command disables
the AutoDeleteOldestSnapshot feature on the source virtual drive. If the
value is 1, it enables the AutoDeleteOldestSnapshot feature on the source
virtual drive.
-Lx: x specifies the source LD number for the command.
Use the command in the following table to delete a snapshot.
Table 115: Delete a Snapshot
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Convention
MegaCli -Snapshot -DeleteSnapshot [SnapshotTime
yyyymmdd hh:mm:ss | -all] [-force|-y] -LN| -L0,1,2
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Deletes the snapshot and the associated view if -Force or -Y is specified.
-SnapshotTime yyyymmdd hh:mm:ss: (Optional) If used, this action
deletes the snapshot with the time stamp that is specified in command line,
if it is the oldest PIT.
-force: If specified, this action deletes the snapshot even if it has the view
associated with it.
-y: If specified, this action deletes the snapshot even if it has the view
associated with it.
-LN: N specifies the source LD number for the command.
-L0,1,2: Specifies the command is for LDs 0, 1, and 2. You can select more
than one LD.
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5.20.6
Create a View
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Use the command in the following table to create a view. A view contains the content
from the Point-in-Time [PiT] when the snapshot was made..
Table 116: Create a View
5.20.7
Delete a View
Convention
MegaCli -Snapshot -CreateView -SnapshotTime yyyymmdd
hh:mm:ss [-viewName NameString] [-RW|RO|Blocked]
[-szXXX] -Lx -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL \n", appNameP);
Description
Creates the view on a particular snapshot.
-SnapshotTime yyyymmdd hh:mm:ss: Creates the view on the
snapshot with the time stamp yyyymmdd hh:mm:ss
-viewName NameString: (Optional) Specifies the name of the view.
-RW|RO|Blocked: (Optional) Specifies the access policy of the view.
-szXXX: (Optional) Specifies the size of the view in MB where XXX is a
decimal number.
-Lx: x specifies the source LD number for the command.
Use the command in the following table to a view..
Table 117: Delete a View
5.20.8
Rollback to an Old Snapshot
Convention
MegaCli -Snapshot -DeleteView [-SnapshotTime yyyymmdd
hh:mm:ss] -Lx -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Deletes the view.
-SnapshotTime yyyymmdd hh:mm:ss: (Optional) If specified, this
action deletes the view on the snapshot with the time stamp yyyymmdd
hh:mm:ss.
-Lx: x specifies the source LD number for the command.
Use the command in the following table to roll the virtual drive back to an older
snapshot..
Table 118: Rollback to an Old Snapshot
Page 216
Convention
MegaCli -Snapshot -Rollback -SnapshotTime yyyymmdd
hh:mm:ss [-Force|-Y] -Lx -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Rolls back the virtual drive to an old snapshot.
-SnapshotTime yyyymmdd hh:mm:ss: Specifies the snapshot with
the time stamp yyyymmdd hh:mm:ss to which it has to roll back.
-Force: If specified, this action overrides the warning message and causes
a rollback to an older snapshot.
-Y: If specified, this action overrides the warning message and causes a
rollback to an older snapshot.
-Lx: x specifies the source LD number for the command.
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | Recovery (Snapshot)-Related Options
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
5.20.9 Display Snapshot and View
Information
Use the command in the following table to display information about the snapshot and
the view..
Table 119: Display Snapshot and View Information
5.20.10 Clean the Recoverable Free
Space on the Drives in a Virtual Drive
Convention
MegaCli -Snapshot -Info [-SnapshotTime yyyymmdd
hh:mm:ss | -ViewTime yyyymmdd hh:mm:ss] -Lx
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays snapshot and view information for the source virtual drive. If the
virtual drive is a repository virtual drive, it displays the LD info, the number of
source virtual drives mapped and their target ID andthe number of holes.
-SnapshotTime yyyymmdd hh:mm:ss: (Optional) If specified, this
displays the snapshot information for the snapshot with the time stamp
yyyymmdd hh:mm:ss.
-ViewTime yyyymmdd hh:mm:ss: (Optional) If specified, this displays
the view information for the view with the time stamp yyyymmdd
hh:mm:ss and the associated snapshot information.
-Lx: x specifies the source LD number for the command.
Use the command in the following table to clean the recoverable free space on the
drives in a snapshot repository virtual drive. The free space is unused space on the
drives in a virtual drive..
Table 120: Clean the Recoverable Free Space on the Drives in a Virtual Drive
5.20.11 Display the Information for a
Specific View
Convention
MegaCli -Snapshot -Clean
Description
Cleans the recoverable free space on the drives in a snapshot repository
virtual drive.
-Lx: x specifies the LD number for the command. The LD has to be a
repository virtual drive.
-Lx -aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Use the command in the following table to display the information for a specific view if
you specify the view target ID..
Table 121: Display the Information for a Specific View
5.20.12 Enabling the Snapshot
Scheduler
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Convention
MegaCli -Snapshot -GetViewInfo [-ViewTargetId N ]
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays the view information about a particular view if you specify the View
target ID. Otherwise, it displays the information about all of the views.
-ViewTargetId N: (Optional) If specified, this displays the information
about the view with the specified target ID.
The snapshot scheduler in MSM helps you automate the creation of Point-in-Time (PiT)
on one or more VDs. You can schedule the snapshot as monthly, weekly, daily, or
hourly. The scheduler does not support biweekly, alternate days, etc.
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NOTE: MSM or OEM applications must be running to flush file system buffers and take
snapshot when snapshot schedule expires. The system does not support snapshot
creation through BMC (sideband) and snapshot on volumes, which are used for VM
creation under virtualized environment. To flush the file system buffers, you should
interface with hypervisor.
5.20.13 Displays the Read and Write
Configuration File
Use the command in the following table to display the read and write configuration file.
Table 122: Displays the Read and Write Configuration File
5.21
FastPath-related Options
Convention
MegaSCU -AdpCfgPage -read|-write
<isPersistent> pagetype <val>
<pagenumber> <pageaddress> -f
<filename> -aN
Description
-AdpCfgPage Reads / writes the configuration
file, parses it and updates the SAS firmware's
Manufacturing Configuration Page.
Parameters:
-read : gets the configuration page from
firmware and fills the page details into a file.
-write : sends the user specified file to firmware
to modify the configuration page.
<isPersistent> : Can have a value of zero or one
<0> : for NVRAM
<1> : for current
<val> : string for page type. For manufacturing
page, the value is MAN.
Convention:
-aN: N specifies the adapter number for the
command.
Exit Code: 0x00
The command in this section is used to display information about the FastPath option.
MegaRAID FastPath is a high-performance IO accelerator for CacheCade - SSD Caching
software drive groups connected to a MegaRAID controller card. CacheCade - SSD
Caching software has a read performance advantage over HDDs and use less power.
This feature dramatically boosts storage subsystem bandwidth and overall
transactional application performance when used with a 6-Gb/s MegaRAID SATA+SAS
controller.
The FastPath feature supports full optimization of CacheCade - SSD Caching software
and hard disk drive (HDD) virtual drive groups to deliver a three-fold improvement in
read and write IOPS compared to MegaRAID controllers not utilizing FastPath
technology. Also, FastPath software is faster and more cost-effective than current
flash-based adapter card solutions.
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Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | Dimmer Switch-Related Options
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
5.22 Dimmer Switch-Related
Options
The following tables display command information about the Dimmer switch option.
5.22.1 Display Selected Adapter
Properties
Use the command in the following table to display the selected Adapter Properties.
Table 123: Displays the Selected Adapter Properties
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Convention
MegaCLI -AdpGetProp CacheFlushInterval
|RebuildRate|PatrolReadRate|BgiRate|CCRate|
ReconRate|SpinupDriveCount|SpinupDelay|
CoercionMode|ClusterEnable|PredFailPollInterval
|BatWarnDsbl|EccBucketSize|EccBucketLeakRate|
EccBucketCount|AbortCCOnError|AlarmDsply|
SMARTCpyBkEnbl|SSDSMARTCpyBkEnbl|NCQDsply|
MaintainPdFailHistoryEnbl|RstrHotSpareOnInsert
|DisableOCR|EnableJBOD|DsblCacheBypass|BootWithPinne
dCache|AutoEnhancedImportDsply|AutoDetectBackPlaneDs
bl|EnblSpinDownUnConfigDrvs|SpinDownTime|DefaultSnap
shotSpace|DefaultViewSpace|AutoSnapshotSpace|CopyBac
kDsbl|LoadBalanceMode|
UseFDEOnlyEncrypt|UseDiskActivityForLocate
|DefaultLdPSPolicy|DisableLdPsInterval|
DisableLdPsTime|SpinUpEncDrvCn|SpinUpEncDelay
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays selected adapter properties.
The possible settings are:
DefaultLdPSPolicy: Default LD power savings policy.
DisableLdPsInterval: LD power savings are disabled for yy hours beginning
at disableLdPSTime.
DisableLdPsTime: LD power savings shall be disabled at xx minutes from
12:00 am.
SpinUpEncDrvCnt: Maximum number of drives within an enclosure to spin
up at one time.
SpinUpEncDelay: Number of seconds to delay among spinup groups within
an enclosure.
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Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | Dimmer Switch-Related Options
5.22.2 Sets the Properties on the
Selected Adapter
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Use the command in the following table to set the Properties on the selected Adapter.
Table 124: Sets the Properties on the selected Adapter
5.22.3 Displays the Power Saving
Level on the Virtual Disk
Convention
MegaCLI -AdpSetProp{CacheFlushInterval -val}|{
RebuildRate -val}|{PatrolReadRate -val}| {BgiRate
-val}|{CCRate -val}|{ReconRate -val}|
{SpinupDriveCount -val}|{SpinupDelay -val}|
{CoercionMode -val}|{ClusterEnable -val}|
{PredFailPollInterval -val}|{BatWarnDsbl -val}
|{EccBucketSize -val}|{EccBucketLeakRate -val}
|{AbortCCOnError -val}|AlarmEnbl|AlarmDsbl|
AlarmSilence|{SMARTCpyBkEnbl -val}|
{SSDSMARTCpyBkEnbl -val}|NCQEnbl|NCQDsbl|
{MaintainPdFailHistoryEnbl -val}|
{RstrHotSpareOnInsert -val}|
{EnblSpinDownUnConfigDrvs -val}|{DisableOCR
-val}|{BootWithPinnedCache -val}|
AutoEnhancedImportEnbl|AutoEnhancedImportDsbl |
{CopyBackDsbl -val}|{AutoDetectBackPlaneDsbl
-val}|{LoadBalanceMode -val}|{UseFDEOnlyEncrypt
-val}|{DsblSpinDownHsp -val}|{SpinDownTime
-val}|{EnableJBOD -val} | {DsblCacheBypass
-val}|{useDiskActivityForLocate -val}|
{SpinUpEncDrvCnt -val}|{SpinUpEncDelay -val}
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Sets the properties on the selected adapter(s).
The possible settings are:
SpinUpEncDrvCnt: Max number of drives within an enclosure to spin up at
one time. Values: 0 to 255
SpinUpEncDelay: Number of seconds to delay among spinup groups within
an enclosure. Values: 0 to 255
Use the command in the following table to display the power saving level on the virtual
disk.
Table 125: Displays the Power Saving Level on the Virtual Disk
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Convention
MegaSCU -LDSetPowerPolicy
-Default| -Automatic| -None|
-MaximumWithCaching|
-MaximumWithoutCaching
-Lx|-L0,1,2|-Lall
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Sets the power saving level on the virtual disk.
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5.22.4 Displays about Adding a RAID
Level to a Specified Adapter
Use the command in the following table to add a RAID level to a specified adapter.
Table 126: Adds a RAID Level to a Specified Adapter
Convention
MegaSCU -CfgLdAdd -rX[E0:S0,E1:S1,...] [WT|WB] [NORA|RA|ADRA] [Direct|Cached]
[CachedBadBBU|NoCachedBadBBU] [-szXXX [-szYYY ...]] [-strpszM] [-Hsp[E0:S0,...]]
[-AfterLdX] [-Force] | [FDE|CtrlBased] [-Default| -Automatic| -None|
-MaximumWithCaching| -MaximumWithoutCaching] -aN
Description
-CfgLdAdd:Adds a RAID level 0, 1, 5, or 6 to a specified adapter. Even if no configuration is present, you have the option to
write the configuration to the adapter.
The possible parameters are:
Rx[E0:S0,...]: Specifies the RAID level and the physical drive enclosure/slot numbers to construct a disk array.
WT (Write through), WB (Write back): Selects write policy.
NORA (No read ahead), RA (Read ahead), ADRA (Adaptive read ahead): Selects read policy.
Cached -Direct: Selects cache policy.
[{CachedBadBBU|NoCachedBadBBU }]: Specifies whether to use write cache when the BBU is bad.
szXXXXXXXX: Specifies the size for the virtual disk, where XXXX is a decimal number of Mbytes. However, the actual size of the
virtual disk may be smaller, because the driver requires the number of blocks from the physical drives in each virtual disk to
be aligned to the stripe size. If multiple size options are specified, CT will configure the virtual disks in the order of the options
entered in the command line. The configuration of a particular virtual disk will fail if the remaining size of the array is too
small to configure the virtual disk with the specified size. This option can also be used to create a configuration on the free
space available in the array.
strpszM: Specifies the strip size, where the strip size values are 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, or 1024 Mega Bytes.
Hsp[E5:S5,...]: Creates hot spares when you create the configuration. The new hot spares will be dedicated to the virtual disk
used in creating the configuration. This option does not allow you to create global hot spares. To create global hot spares, you
must use the -PdHsp command with proper subcommands. User can also use this option to create a configuration on the free
space available in the virtual disk.
AfterLdX: This command is optional. By default, the application uses the first free slot available in the virtual disk. This option
is valid only if the virtual disk is already used for configuration.
Force: This option will force the creation of virtual disk in situations where the application finds that it is convenient to create
the virtual disk only with user's consent.
FDE|CtrlBased: If controller support security feature, this option enables FDE/Ctrl based encryption on virtual disk.
[-Default| -Automatic| -None| -MaximumWithCaching| -MaximumWithoutCaching] : If the controller supports power savings
on virtual disk, these options specify the possible levels of power savings that can be applied on a virtual disk.
5.22.5
Displays creating a RAID Level
Use the command in the following table to create a RAID level 10,50,60 (spanned
configuration).
Table 127: Creates a RAID Level 10,50,60 (spanned) Configuration
Convention
MegaSCU -CfgSpanAdd -r10 -Array0[E0:S0,E1:S1] -Array1[E0:S0,E1:S1]
[-ArrayX[E0:S0,E1:S1] ...] [WT|WB] [NORA|RA|ADRA] [Direct|Cached]
[CachedBadBBU|NoCachedBadBBU][-strpszM][-szXXX[-szYYY ...]][-AfterLdX][-Force]|
[FDE|CtrlBased] [-Default| -Automatic| -None| -MaximumWithCaching|
-MaximumWithoutCaching] -aN
MegaSCU -CfgSpanAdd -r50 -Array0[E0:S0,E1:S1,E2:S2,...] -Array1[E0:S0,E1:S1,E2:S2,...]
[-ArrayX[E0:S0,E1:S1,E2:S2,...] ...] [WT|WB] [NORA|RA|ADRA] [Direct|Cached]
[CachedBadBBU|NoCachedBadBBU][-strpszM][-szXXX[-szYYY ...]][-AfterLdX][-Force]|
[FDE|CtrlBased] [-Default| -Automatic| -None| -MaximumWithCaching|
-MaximumWithoutCaching] -aN
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Table 127: Creates a RAID Level 10,50,60 (spanned) Configuration (Continued)
Description
-CfgSpanAdd:Creates a RAID level 10, 50, or 60 (spanned) configuration from the specified arrays. Even if no
configuration is present, you must use this option to write the configuration to the adapter.
The possible parameters are:
Rx: Spcecifies the RAID Level.
ArrayX[E0:S0,...]: Specifies the Array and the physical drive enclosure/slot numbers to construct a disk array.
WT (Write through), WB (Write back): Selects write policy.
NORA (No read ahead), RA (Read ahead), ADRA (Adaptive read ahead): Selects read policy.
Cached, -Direct: Selects cache policy.
[{CachedBadBBU|NoCachedBadBBU }]: Specifies whether to use write cache when the BBU is bad.
szXXXXXXXX: Specifies the size for the virtual disk, where XXXX is a decimal number of Mbytes. However, the actual size of the
virtual disk may be smaller, because the driver requires the number of blocks from the physical drives in each virtual disk to
be aligned to the stripe size. If multiple size options are specified, CT will configure the virtual disks in the order of the options
entered in the command line. The configuration of a particular virtual disk will fail if the remaining size of the array is too
small to configure the virtual disk with the specified size. This option can also be used to create a configuration on the free
space available in the array.
strpszM: Specifies the strip size, where the strip size values are 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, or 1024 Mega Bytes.
AfterLdX: This command is optional. By default, the application uses the first free slot available in the virtual disk. This option
is valid only if the virtual disk is already used for configuration.
Force: This option will force the creation of virtual disk in situations where the application finds that it is convenient to create
the virtual disk only with user's consent.
FDE|CtrlBased: If controller support security feature, this option enables FDE/Ctrl based encryption on virtual disk.
[-Default| -Automatic| -None| -MaximumWithCaching| -MaximumWithoutCaching] : If the controller supports power savings
on virtual disk, these options specify the possible levels of power savings that can be applied on a virtual disk.
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5.22.6 Displays about Adding the
Unconfigured Drive to a Specified
Adapter
Chapter 5: MegaRAID Command Tool | Dimmer Switch-Related Options
Use the command in the following table to add the Unconfigured Drives to a Adapter.
Table 128: Adds the Unconfigured Physical Drive to RAID Level 0,1,5,6 to a Specified Adapter
Convention
MegaSCU -CfgAllFreeDrv -rX [-SATAOnly]
[-SpanCount XXX] [WT|WB] [NORA|RA|ADRA]
[Direct|Cached] [CachedBadBBU|NoCachedBadBBU]
[-strpszM] [-HspCount XX [-HspType
-Dedicated|-EnclAffinity|-nonRevertible]] |
[FDE|CtrlBased] [-Default| -Automatic| -None|
-MaximumWithCaching| -MaximumWithoutCaching] -aN
Description
Adds all the unconfigured physical drives to RAID level 0, 1, 5, or 6
configuration to a specified adapter. Even if no configuration is present,
you have the option to write the configuration to the adapter.
The possible parameters are:
Rx[E0:S0,...]: Specifies the RAID level and the physical drive
enclosure/slot numbers to construct a disk array.
WT (Write through), WB (Write back): Selects write policy.
NORA (No read ahead), RA (Read ahead), ADRA (Adaptive read ahead):
Selects read policy.
Cached, -Direct: Selects cache policy.
[{CachedBadBBU|NoCachedBadBBU }]: Specifies whether to use write
cache when the BBU is bad.
szXXXXXXXX: Specifies the size for the virtual disk, where XXXX is a
decimal number of Mbytes. However, the actual size of the virtual disk
may be smaller, because the driver requires the number of blocks from
the physical drives in each virtual disk to be aligned to the strip size. If
multiple size options are specified, CT will configure the virtual disks in
the order of the options entered in the command line. The
configuration of a particular virtual disk will fail if the remaining size of
the array is too small to configure the virtual disk with the specified size.
This option can also be used to create a configuration on the free space
available in the array.
strpszM: Specifies the strip size, where the strip size values are 8, 16, 32,
64, 128, 256, 512, or 1024 Mega Bytes.
Hsp[E5:S5,...]: Creates hot spares when you create the configuration.
The new hot spares will be dedicated to the virtual disk used in creating
the configuration. This option does not allow you to create global hot
spares. To create global hot spares, you must use the -PdHsp command
with proper subcommands. User can also use this option to create a
configuration on the free space available in the virtual disk.
AfterLdX: This command is optional. By default, the application uses the
first free slot available in the virtual disk. This option is valid only if the
virtual disk is already used for configuration.
FDE|CtrlBased: If controller support security feature, this option enables
FDE/Ctrl based encryption on virtual disk.
[-Default| -Automatic| -None| -MaximumWithCaching|
-MaximumWithoutCaching] : If the controller supports power savings
on virtual disk, these options specify the possible levels of power
savings that can be applied on a virtual disk
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5.22.7 Displays the cache and access
policies
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Use the command in the following table to display the cache and access policies of the
virtual disks.
Table 129: Displays the Cache and Access policies of the Virtual Disks
Convention
MegaSCU -LDGetProp -Cache | -Access | -Name
| -DskCache | -PSPolicy -Lx|-L0,1,2|-LALL
-aN|-a0,1,2|-aALL
Description
Displays the cache and access policies of the
virtual disk(s)
The possible parameters are:
Cache: Cached, Direct: Displays cache policy.
WT (Write through), WB (Write back): Selects
write policy.
NORA (No read ahead), RA (Read ahead), ADRA
(Adaptive read ahead): Selects read policy.
Access: -RW, -RO, Blocked: Displays access
policy.
DskCache: Displays physical disk cache policy.
PSPolicy: Displays the default & current power
savings policy of the virtual disk.
5.23
Miscellaneous Options
The commands in this section are used to display various information.
5.23.1
Display the MegaCLI Version
Use the command in the following table to display the version number of the MegaCLI
utility.
Table 130: Display MegaCLI Version
5.23.2
Display Help for MegaCLI
Convention
MegaCli –v
Description
Displays the version number of the MegaCLI utility.
Use the command in the following table to display help information for the MegaCLI
utility.
Table 131: Display Help for MegaCLI
Page 224
Convention
MegaCli –h|–Help|?
Description
Displays help for the MegaCLI utility.
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5.23.3
Summary Information
Use the command in the following table to display help information for the MegaCLI
utility.
Table 132: Display Help for MegaCLI
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Convention
MegaCli -ShowSummary [-f filename] –aN
Description
Displays a summary of system information, controller information, drive
information, virtual drive information, and enclosure information.
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Chapter 6: MegaRAID Storage Manager Overview and Installation | Overview
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Chapter 6
MegaRAID Storage Manager Overview and Installation
This chapter provides a brief overview of the MegaRAID® Storage Manager™ (MSM)
software and explains how to install it on the supported operating systems.
6.1
Overview
6.1.1
Creating Storage
Configurations
MegaRAID Storage Manager software enables you to configure, monitor, and maintain
storage configurations on LSI® SAS controllers. The MegaRAID Storage Manager
graphical user interface (GUI) makes it easy for you to create and manage storage
configurations.
MegaRAID Storage Manager software enables you to easily configure the controllers,
drives, and virtual drives on your workstation or server. The Configuration Wizard
greatly simplifies the process of creating drive groups and virtual drives. The Wizard
allows you to easily create new storage configurations and modify the configurations.
You can create the following types of configurations:

Simple configuration specifies a limited number of settings and has the system
select drives for you. This option is the easiest way to create a virtual drive.

Advanced configuration lets you choose additional settings and customize virtual
drive creation. This option provides greater flexibility when creating virtual drives
for your specific requirements.
In addition, the Modify Drive Group Wizard enables you to increase the capacity of a
virtual drive and to change the RAID level of a drive group.
NOTE: The Modify Drive Group Wizard was previously known as the Reconstruction
Wizard.
6.1.2
Monitoring Storage Devices
MegaRAID Storage Manager software displays the status of controllers, virtual drives,
and drives on the workstation or server that you are monitoring. System errors and
events are recorded in an event log file and are displayed on the screen. Special device
icons appear on the screen to notify you of drive failures and other events that require
immediate attention.
6.1.3
Maintaining Storage
Configurations
You can use MegaRAID Storage Manager software to perform system maintenance
tasks such as running patrol read operations, updating firmware, and running
consistency checks on drive groups that support redundancy.
6.2
Hardware and Software
Requirements
The hardware requirements for MegaRAID Storage Manager software are as follows:
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
PC-compatible computer with an IA-32 (32-bit) Intel Architecture processor or an
EM64T (64-bit) processor; also compatible with SPARC V9 architecture-based
systems

Minimum 256 MB of system memory (512 MB recommended)

Drive with at least 400 MB available free space

Solaris 10 SPARC occupies minimum of 630MB
The supported operating systems for the MegaRAID Storage Manager software are as
follows:

Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003, Microsoft Windows Server 2008, Microsoft
Windows Server 2008R2, Microsoft Windows XP, Microsoft Windows Vista, and
Microsoft Windows 7

Red Hat® Linux™ 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0

Installing MegaRAID Storage Manager Software for Solaris 10 X86”

SUSE Linux/SLES 9, 10, and 11, with latest updates and service packs

VMWare ESX 4.0i and ESX 4.1i (also known as COSLess, it is an embedded version of
VMWare that does not have a console to do configuration)

Solaris SPARC
Refer to your server documentation and to the operating system documentation for
more information on hardware and operating system requirements.
6.3
Prerequisites to Running
MSM Remote Administration
MSM requires ports 3071 and 5571 to be open in order to function. Follow these steps
to make sure these ports are open and to configure multicasting.
1. Configure the system with a valid Internet Protocol (IP) address.
Make sure there is no IP address conflict within the sub network and make sure that
ports 3071 and 5571 are open and available for MSM framework communication.
2. Disable all security management and the firewall.
3. Configure multicasting.
Make sure Class D multicast IP addresses are registered (at least 229.111.112.12
should be registered for MSM to work); if they are not registered, create a static
route using the following command:
Route add 229.111.112.12 dev eth1
4. Install MSM. If MSM is already installed, restart MSM framework.
6.4
Installing MegaRAID
Storage Manager
This section explains how to install (or reinstall) MegaRAID Storage Manager software
on your workstation or server for the supported operating systems: Microsoft Windows,
Red Hat Linux, and SUSE Linux.
6.4.1
Prerequisite for MSM
Installation
The MSM installation script also installs the LSI SNMP agent RPM (Red Hat Package
Manager). The LSI SNMP agent application depends upon the standard SNMP Utils
package.
Make sure that the SNMP-Util package is present in the system before you install MSM.
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The SNMP-Util package includes the RPM’s net-snmp-libs, net-snmp-utils and
additional dependent RPM’s. Make sure that these RPM’s are installed from the
operating system media before you install the MSM.
6.4.2
Installing MegaRAID Storage
Manager Software on Microsoft
Windows
Follow these steps if you need to install MegaRAID Storage Manager software on a
system running Microsoft Windows Server 2003, Microsoft Windows XP, Microsoft
Windows Vista, or Microsoft Windows 7:
1. Insert the MegaRAID Storage Manager software installation CD in the CD-ROM
drive.
If necessary, find and double-click the setup.exe file to start the installation
program.
2. When the Welcome screen appears, click Next.
If MegaRAID Storage Manager software is already installed on this system, then an
upgraded installation occurs.
3. Read the screen text and select Modify, Repair, or Remove.
4. When the next screen appears, read and accept the user license, and click Next.
The Customer Information screen appears, as shown in Figure 126.
Figure 126:
Customer Information Screen
5. Enter your user name and organization name. In the bottom part of the screen,
select an installation option:
— If you select All users, any user with administrative privileges can use this
version of MegaRAID Storage Manager software to view or change storage
configurations.
— If you select Only for current user, the MegaRAID Storage Manager shortcuts
and associated icons will be available only to the user with this user name.
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6. Click Next to continue.
7. On the next screen, accept the default Destination Folder, or click Change to select
a different destination folder. Click Next to continue.
The Setup Type screen appears, as shown in Figure 127.
Figure 127:
Setup Type Screen
8. Select one of the Setup options. The options are fully explained in the screen text.
— Normally, you would select Complete if you are installing MegaRAID Storage
Manager software on a server.
— Select Custom Installation if you want to select individual program
components.
9. Click Next to continue.
If you selected Custom Installation as your setup option, the second Setup Type
screen appears, as shown in Figure 128.
If you select Complete as your setup option, the Installation Wizard is ready to
install MSM. To begin installation, click on Install on the next screen that appears.
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Figure 128:
Setup Type Screen
10. Select one of the custom setup options. The options are fully explained in the
screen text.
— Select Client if you are installing MegaRAID Storage Manager software on a PC
that will be used to view and configure servers over a network. To begin
installation, click on Install on the next screen that appears.
In the Client mode of installation, MSM installs only client-related components,
such as MSM GUI, and monitor configurator.
Use this mode when you want to manage and monitor servers remotely. When
you install MSM in Client mode on a laptop or a desktop, you can log in to a
specific server by providing the IP address.
— Select Server to install only those components required for remote server
management. To begin installation, click on Install on the next screen that
appears.
— Select StandAlone if you will use MegaRAID Storage Manager software to
create and manage storage configurations on a standalone workstation. To
begin installation, click on Install on the next screen that appears.
— Select Custom if you want to specify individual program features to install.
If you select Custom, a window listing the installation features appears, as
shown in Figure 129. Select the features you want on this screen.
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Figure 129:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Custom Setup Screen
11. Click Next to proceed.
12. Click Install to install the program.
13. When the final Configuration Wizard screen appears, click Finish.
If you select Client installation for a PC used to monitor servers, and if there are no
available servers with a registered framework on the local subnet (that is, servers with a
complete installation of MegaRAID Storage Manager software), the server screen will
appear, as shown in Figure 130. The server screen will not list any servers. You can use
this screen to manage systems remotely.
Figure 130:
6.4.3
Installing MegaRAID Storage
Manager for SPARC
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Server Screen
Perform the following steps to install MegaRAID Storage Manager Software for Solaris
10 SPARC.
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1. Copy the “MegaRaidStorageManager-SOLSPARC-8.10-…….tar.gz” file to a
temporary folder.
2. Untar the “MegaRaidStorageManager-SOLSPARC-8.10-…….tar.gz” file using the
following command:
tar -zxvf
“MegaRaidStorageManager-SOLSPARC-8.10-…….tar.gz”
This step creates a new disk directory. Go to the new disk directory, and find and
read the readme.txt file.
3. Enter the Bash shell.
4. Execute the command ./install.sh present in the disk directory.
5. When prompted by the installation scripts, select Y to complete the installation.=
6.4.4
Installing MegaRAID Storage
Manager Software for Linux
Follow these steps if you need to install MegaRAID Storage Manager software on a
system running Red Hat Linux or SUSE Linux:
1. Copy the MegaRaidStorageManager-SOLX86-…..tar.gz file to a temporary folder.
2. Untar the MegaRaidStorageManager-SOLX86-…..tar.gz file using the following
command:
tar -zxvf MegaRaidStorageManager-SOLX86-…..tar.gz
A new disk directory is created.
3. Go to the new disk directory.
4. In the disk directory, find and read the readme.txt file.
5. To start the installation, enter the following command:
csh install.sh -a
If you select Client installation for a PC used to monitor servers, and if there are no
available servers with a registered framework on the local subnet (that is, servers with a
complete installation of MegaRAID Storage Manager software), the server screen
appears. The server screen does not list any servers. You can use this screen to manage
systems remotely.
To install the software using interactive mode, execute the command ./install.sh
from the installation disk.
To install the product in a non-interactive or silent mode, use the command
./install.sh [-options] [ -ru popup] from the installation disk. The
installation options are:

Complete installation

Client Component Only

StandAlone
The -ru popup command will remove popup from installation list.
You also can run non-interactive installation using the RunRPM.sh command.
The installer offers three types of setup options:

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Complete - This installs all the features of the product.
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
Client Components Only - The storelib feature of the product are not installed in this
type of installation. As a result, the resident system can only administer and
configure all of the servers in the subnet, but it cannot serve as a server.

StandAlone - Only the networking feature is not installed in this case, so the
resident system is not a part of the network. This means the system cannot browse
any other MSM servers in the subnet, and the MSM servers cannot will recognize it
as a server.
This installation helps you select any of the setup types, but if you run RunRPM.sh, it
installs the complete feature.
6.4.5
Prerequisites for Installing
MSM on RHEL6.0 x64 Operating System
Before installing MSM on RHEL6.0 x64 system, install the following rpms. Without these
files/RPM's MSM may not be install properly or may not work as expected.
1. libstdc++.so.6 -> libstdc++-xx.yy.i686.
2. libXext.so.6 -> libXext-1.1-2.el6.i686.rpm
3. libXtst.so.6 -> libXtst-1.0.99.2-3.el6.i686.rpm
These rpms are available as a part of RHEL6 OS DVD. These RPM's may need additional
dependent RPM's as well, and also all the dependent RPM's must be installed on the
target system.
6.4.6
Linux Error Messages
The following messages can appear while you are installing MegaRAID Storage
Manager software on a Linux system:

More than one copy of MegaRAID Storage Manager software has been installed.
This message indicates that the user has installed more than one copy of MegaRAID
Storage Manager software. (This can be done by using the rpm-force command to
install the rpm file directly, which is not recommended, instead of using the
install.sh file.) In such cases, the user must uninstall all of the rpm files manually
before installing MegaRAID Storage Manager software with the procedure listed
previously.

The version is already installed.
This message indicates that the version of MegaRAID Storage Manager software
you are trying to install is already installed on the system.

The installed version is newer.
This message indicates that a version of MegaRAID Storage Manager software is
already installed on the system, and it is a newer version than the version you are
trying to install.

Exiting installation.
This is the message that appears when the installation is complete.

RPM installation failed.
This message indicates that the installation failed for some reason. Additional
message text explains the cause of the failure.
6.4.7
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Kernel Upgrade
If you want to upgrade kernel in Linux, you have to restart the MSM Framework and
Services in the same order by typing the following commands.
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/etc/init.d/vivaldiframeworkd restart
/etc/init.d/mrmonitor restart
6.4.8
MSM Customization
You can customize your Logo and Splash screen by editing the ’msm.properties’ file
present in the <installation-directory\MegaRAID Storage Manager> folder.
In the file ‘msm.properties’ there are no values for the following keys.
a. CHANNELLOGO=
b. CHANNELSPLASHSCREEN=
There are no default values assigned for the keys mentioned above, therefore the MSM
uses the default LSI Logo and Splash screen.
To customize the Logo and Splash screen, you have to enter the Logo and Splash
screen file name against these entries.
To enter the filenames follow these steps:
1. Open the file ‘msm.properties’ in the <installation-directory\MegaRAID Storage
Manager> folder.
2. Enter the value for the Logo file against the key CHANNELLOGO
3. Enter the value for the Splash screen file against the key CHANNELSPLASHSCREEN
4. Save the file
5. Place these two images in the <installation-directory\MegaRAID Storage Manager>
folder.
6. Start the application.
Following are some of the important points.

File names for both entries should not have any spaces. For example, the valid file
name would be: logo_test_1.png or LogoTest1.png or TEST_SPLASH_FILE.jpg

The logo image dimensions should not exceed 160 * 85 (width * height).

The splash screen image dimensions should not exceed 390 * 260 (width * height).
After making the changes mentioned above, when you log into MSM, you will be able
to view the changes with the new splash screen and logo in MSM.
6.5
MegaRAID Storage
Manager Support and
Installation on VMWare
This section documents the installation of MegaRAID Storage Manager on VMWare
Classic (with console operating system) and on the VMWare ESX 3i operating system.
6.5.1
Installing MegaRAID Storage
Manager for VMWare Classic
VMWare does not support any graphics components. In order to install MSM on the
VMWare operating system, execute the script ./vmware_install.sh from the
installation disk.
The installer lets you accept the License agreement, operating system, and storelib as
follows:
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010

End user license agreement

Operating system (VMware 3.5 or VMware 4.0)

Select the Storelib (Inbox Storelib or Storelib from MSM package)
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6.5.2
Uninstalling MegaRAID
Storage Manager for VMWare
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
To uninstall the Server Component of MSM on VMWare, use the Uninstall command
in the Program menu or run the script /usr/local/MegaRAID Storage
Manager/uninstaller.sh.
Note the following points:

A MSM upgrade is supported in this release. This release can be upgraded by future
releases.

To shut down the MSM Framework service, run the following command:
/etc/init.d/vivaldiframeworkd stop
It is recommended that you stop the Monitor service before you stop the MSM
Framework service. To stop the Monitor service run the following command:
/etc/init.d/mrmonitor stop
6.5.3
MegaRAID Storage Manager
Support on the VMWare ESXi Operating
System
This section outlines the product requirements needed to support the VMWare ESX
operating system. Classic VMWare includes a Service Console that is derived from the
Linux 2.4 kernel, but with reduced functionality.
The MSM server part cannot be installed directly in VMWare ESX 3i. Management is
possible only through Common Information Model (CIM) providers. These CIM
providers integrated into the ESX 3i system build an interface between the hardware
driver of the LSI MegaRAID controller and remote applications, such as MSM.
Management is performed through MSM installed on a remote machine
(Linux/Windows). See Section 6.5.4.1, VMWare ESX 3i Management through CIM and
CMPI for more information.
The Linux installer of MSM works under console with minimal changes. Hardware RAID
is currently supported in ESX 3.x.
NOTE: There is a known limitation that virtual drives that are created or deleted will not
be reflected to the kernel. The workaround is to reboot the server or to run
esxcfg-rescan <vmhba#> from COS shell.
The network communication is a key element for a proper setup. The communication
between the ESXi CIM provider and the LSI management software is an active/passive
combination, which requires a highly reliable network. Therefore, we recommend that
you install the management on a VM within the ESXi. Follow these steps to install and
configure MSM support on the VMWare ESX operating system:
1. Network Configuration of the ESXi Host:
— Assignment of a ESXi hostname.
Even if it is not relevant for your network, you need a FQDN (Fully Qualified
Domain Name).
Example: local.lsi.com to be entered using the local ESXi console
— Configuration of a virtual network environment:
You can use the already existing Vswitch, which has a VMkernel port already
attached for the communication.
Alternatively, you can build a new Vswitch without a link to the Host network
card.
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Which one of the two possibilities to choose depends on your application. It is
recommended to choose between both possibilities at a early stage, because the
creation of a new Vswitch with VMkernel requires a reboot to make sure a proper
communication between the CIM provider and the new interface. For those who
want to reach the target as quickly as possible, no change is recommended.
— Configuration of the IP address:
Configure the IP address. The address must be accessible by the VM that will be
installed next.
2. VM Installation:
Install the operating system as usual, including the VMWare guest tools. The virtual
network card should be linked to a Vswitch that has a VMKernel port attached. For a
quick installation, no change is recommended.
3. VM Network Configuration:
— Case 1: Your network contains a DNS server:
Configure a host entry that belongs to your internal zone and make sure that the
FQDN of the ESXi server can be resolved. (Example: local.lsi.com and
192.19.221.186)
— Case 2: Your network does not have a DNS server:
Edit your file C.\windows\system32\drivers\etc\hosts and add another
entry:
IP of the ESXi Host
FQDN of the ESXi Host
192.19.221.186
local.lsi.com
4. Final Steps:
Reboot the VM and start MSM from a remote Windows/ Linux machine that has
MSM installed in complete mode. The ESXi server should now appear in the list of
the found hosts. You can now log in with the root account name and password of
the ESXi Host.
Host Overview:
Figure 131 lists the host ESXi server and other servers.
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f
Figure 131:
Host ESXi Server Name
You can click Configure Host if you want to select the display preferences for the server.
You can choose to display only the local server, systems from a list, or display all of the
systems in the network of the local server.
NOTE: The last two rows indicate VMWare Hosts.
6.5.4
Limitations
The following are the limitations of this installation and configuration:

There is no active event notification, for example, by popup or e-mail.

There is no status information for the controller

Events are collected as long as MSM runs on the Client.

MSM responds more slowly.
For more details on these limitations, see Section 6.5.4.2, Differences in MSM for VMware
ESXi.
6.5.4.1 VMWare ESX 3i
Management through CIM and
CMPI
Management of VMWare ESX 3i is possible only through a Common Information Model
(CIM) provider. It is not possible to install anything on the VMWare ESX3i system, so
management is performed through MSM installed on a remote machine
(Linux/Windows).
VMWare ESX 3i comes with the Small Footprint CIM Broker (CFCB) CIM Object Manager
(or CIMOM). A CIMOM manages communication between providers, which interact
with the hardware, and a CIM client, where the administrator manages the system.
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SFCB supports Common Manageablity Programming Interface (CMPI)-style providers.
CMPI defines a common standard used to interface Manageability Instrumentation
(providers, instrumentation) to Management Brokers (CIM Object Manager). CMPI
standardizes Manageability Instrumentation, which allows you to write and build
instrumentation once and run it in different CIM environments (on one platform).
6.5.4.2 Differences in MSM for
VMware ESXi
The following are some of the differences in the MSM utility when you manage a
VMWare server.

The following limitations apply to the system information exposed through the
application:
— Only the IP address and the Host name display.
— The operating system type and the operating system architecture do not
appear.
— There is no support for the controller health information.

Authentication support:
— MSM allows CIMOM server authentication with the user ID and the password for
VMware.
— Access to VMWare ESXi hosts is controlled based on the user privileges. Only
root users can have 'Full Access' while the non-root users can have only 'View
Only' access.
— Multiple root users can simultaneously login using 'Full Access' mode to access
the VMWare ESXi server.

Event Logging:
The event logging feature for MSM Client connected to a VMware ESXi system
behaves as follows:
— There is no support for retrieving initial logs (the events that occurred before a
client logs in). Only those events that occur after a client logs in appear in the
event logger dialog.
— System log does not display.
— The “Save log” feature is not supported; however, the “Save Log as Text” is still
supported.
— The “View Log” option allows you to view the logs saved in a text file on the
event logger dialog.
— The event descriptions might not be identical to a normal MSM Client because
the descriptions come from the firmware through the provider.
— There is no filtering of events, unlike Monitor Service.
— Refreshing of the MSM GUI after any updates on the firmware is slower for a
client connected to VMWare ESXi hosts, compared to one connected to
Windows/Linux/Solaris hosts.

Remote discovery:
— For networks that do not have DNS configured, the “hosts” file in the machine
on which MSM is installed must be edited as follows:
Add an entry to map the VMWare host’s IP address with the hostname. This is for
the discovery to happen correctly. In the absence of this entry, the VMWare host
would be discovered as 0.0.0.0.
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Add an entry to map its own IP address (not the loop back address) with the
Hostname. This is to ensure that the Alert Event Notifications (AENs) are
delivered correctly.
— For networks that has DNS configured, the “hosts” file in the machine on which
MSM is installed must be edited as follows:
When you do the initial configurations for the VMWare host, provide the correct
DNS server IP address.
In the hosts file of the machine on which MSM is installed, add an entry to map
its own IP address (not the loop back address) with the Hostname. This is to
ensure that the Asynchronous Event Notifications (AENs) are delivered correctly.

It takes a while to discover the CIMOM servers. If you start the MSM client
immediately after you install MSM (or restart Framework service), you will not be
able to discover any hosts in the network.

This is supported only on a full installation of MSM; standalone, client-only, and
server-only modes do not support VMWare ESX3i management.

Supported on the following operating systems:
— Windows, RHEL and SLES 10

The following descriptions summarize the status of components related to VMWare
ESX3i:
— MSM client GUI is supported.
— There is no support for Monitor Configurator; you cannot configure the severity
of the AENs.
— There is no pop-up service support.
— There is no e-mail and system log support.
— Monitor service support is not available.
6.6
Installing and
Configuring a CIM Provider
This section describes the installation and configuration of the LSI MegaRAID Common
Information Model (CIM) provider. The Common Information Model offers common
definitions of management information for networks, applications, and services, and
allows you to exchange management information across systems throughout a
network.
On a VMWare ESX3i system, management is possible only through a CIM provider and
it is performed through MSM installed on a remote machine running a Linux or
Windows operating system.
VMWare ESX3i comes with the Small Footprint CIM Broker (SFCB) CIM Object Manager
(or CIMOM). A CIMOM manages communication between providers, which interact
with the hardware, and a CIM client, where the administrator manages the system.
SFCB supports Common Manageablity Programming Interface (CMPI)-style providers.
CMPI defines a common standard used to interface Manageability Instrumentation
(providers, instrumentation) to Management Brokers (CIM Object Manager). CMPI
standardizes Manageability Instrumentation, which allows you to write and build
instrumentation once and run it in different CIM environments (on one platform).
6.6.1
Installing a CIM SAS Storage
Provider on Linux
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The following procedure documents how to install and un-install the LSI CIM SAS
Storage Provider on a system running on the Linux operating system.
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NOTE: Uninstall all the previous versions of LsiSASProvider before you install this
version. You can check all of the installed versions of LsiSASProvider by using the
command rpm -qa | grep LsiSASProvider .

Perform the following step to install a CIM SAS Storage Provider on a Linux system.
Install the SAS Provider using the Red Hat Package Manager (RPM) by entering the
following command:
rpm -ivh
The RPM installs all of the necessary files and the Managed Object Format (MOF),
and it registers the libraries. The Provider is now ready to use.
NOTE: After you install LSI CIM SAS Provider, the MOF file LSI_SASRaid.mof is
available under the /etc/lsi_cimprov/sas/pegasus/common directory.

Perform the following step to un- install a CIM SAS Storage Provider on a Linux
system.
Remove LSI CIM SAS Provider by entering the command:
rpm –ivh LsiSASProvider-<version>.<arch>.rpm"
This removes all of the necessary files, uninstalls the MOF, and unregisters the
libraries. The SAS Provider is no longer on the system.
NOTE: tog-pegasus binaries, such as cimmof, cimprovider, and wbemexec, should be in
PATH variable of /etc/profile, and hence, should be defined in all environments of
the system.
For Pegasus version 2.5.x, perform the following steps:
1. After you install the LSI SAS Pegasus provider, verify that libLsiSASProvider.so
and libLsiSASProvider.so.1 are in /usr/lib/Pegasus/providers directory.
If these files are not present, copy libLsiSASProvider.so.1 from
/opt/tog-pegasus/providers/lib to /usr/lib/Pegasus/providers and
create a symbolic link libLsiSASProvider.so to
/usr/lib/Pegasus/providers/libLsiSASProvider.so.1 at
/usr/bin/Pegasus/providers.
2. Restart Pegasus CIM Server and LsiServer by performing the following steps:
— To start the tog-pegasus server, execute the following command:
# /etc/init.d/tog-pegasus restart
— To start LsiSASSever, execute the following command:
# /etc/init.d/LsiSASd restart
6.6.2
Installing a CIM SAS Storage
Provider on Windows
The following procedure describes how to install and un-install the LSI CIM SAS Storage
Provider on a system running on a Windows operating system.
Perform the following steps to install a CIM SAS Storage Provider on a Windows system.
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1. Go To DISK1.
2. Run setup.exe.
The installer installs all of the necessary files and the MOF, and registers the COM dll.
The Provider is now ready to use.
Perform the following steps to uninstall a CIM SAS Storage Provider on a Windows
system.
1. Go to Control Panel > Add/Remove Program.
2. Remove the LSI WMI SAS Provider Package.
This step removes all of the necessary files, uninstalls the MOF, and unregisters the
COM dll. The SAS Provider is no longer on the system.
6.7
Installing and
Configuring an SNMP Agent
A Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)-based management application can
monitor and manage devices through SNMP extension agents. The MegaRAID SNMP
subagent reports the information about the RAID controller, virtual drives, physical
devices, enclosures, and other items per SNMP request. The SNMP application monitors
these devices for issues that might require administrative attention.
This section describes the installation and configuration of the LSI MegaRAID SNMP
agent on Linux, Solaris, and Windows operating systems.
6.7.1
Prerequisite for LSI SNMP
Agent RPM Installation
The LSI SNMP agent application depends upon the standard SNMP Utils package.
Please make sure that the SNMP-Util package is present in the system before you install
LSI SNMP agent RPM.
The SNMP-Util package includes the RPM’s net-snmp-libs, net-snmp-utils, and
additional dependent rpm’s.
Make sure that these RPM’s are installed from the operating system media before you
install the LSI SNMP agent RPM.
6.7.2
Installing and Configuring an
SNMP Agent on Linux
This section explains how to install and configure SAS SNMP Agent for the SUSE Linux
and Red Hat Linux operating systems.
To do this, perform the following steps.
NOTE: This procedure requires that you have Net-SNMP agent installed on the Linux
machine.
NOTE: The RPM has not been created to support -U version.
The RPM -U will probably fail with this RPM.
1. Install LSI SAS SNMP Agent using the rpm -ivh <sas rpm> command.
NOTE: After installation, find the SAS MIB file LSI-AdapterSAS.mib under the
/etc/lsi_mrdsnmp/sas directory.
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RPM makes the necessary modification needed in the snmpd.conf file to run the
agent.
NOTE: Before installation, check whether there is any pass command that starts with
1.3.6.1.4.1.3582 OID in snmpd.conf. If so, delete all of the old pass commands that start
with 1.3.6.1.4.1.3582 OID. (This situation could occur if an earlier version of LSI SNMP
Agent was installed in the system.)
The snmpd.conf file structure should be the same as lsi_mrdsnmpd.conf. For
reference, a sample conf file (lsi_mrdsnmpd.conf) is in the /etc/lsi_mrdsnmp
directory.
2. To run an SNMP query from a remote machine, add the IP address of that machine
in the snmpd.conf file, as in this example:
com2sec
snmpclient
172.28.136.112
public
Here, the IP address of the remote machine is 172.28.136.112.
3. To receive an SNMP trap to a particular machine, add the IP address of that machine
in the com2sec section of the snmpd.conf file.
For example, to get a trap in 10.0.0.144, add the following to snmpd.conf.
#
sec.name
source
community
com2sec
snmpclient
10.0.0.144
public
4. To run/stop the snmpd daemon, enter the following command:
/etc/init.d/snmpd start/stop
5. To start/stop the SAS SNMP Agent daemon before issuing a SNMP query, enter the
following command:
/etc/init.d/lsi_mrdsnmpd start/stop
You can check the status of the SAS SNMP Agent daemon by checked by issuing the
following command:
/etc/init.d/lsi_mrdsnmpd status
6. Issue an SNMP query in this format:
snmpwalk -v1 -c public localhost .1.3.6.1.4.1.3582
7. You can get the SNMP trap from local machine by issuing the following command:
snmptrapd -P -F "%02.2h:%02.2j TRAP%w.%q from %A %v\n"
NOTE: To receive a trap in a local machine with Net-SNMP version 5.3, you must modify
the snmptrapd.conf file (generally located at /var/net-snmp/snmptrapd.conf).
Add "disableAuthorization yes" in snmptrapd.conf and then execute "sudo
snmptrapd -P -F "%02.2h:%02.2j TRAP%w.%q from %A %v\n".
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NOTE: It is assumed that snmpd.conf is located at /etc/snmp for Red Hat and /etc for
SLES. You can change the file location from /etc/init.d/lsi_mrdsnmpd file.
You can install SNMP without the trap functionality. To do so, set the "TRAPIND"
environment variable to "N" before running RPM.
Before you install a new version, you must uninstall all previous versions.
For SLES 10, perform the following steps to run SNMP:
1. Copy /etc/snmp/snmpd.conf to /etc/snmpd.conf.
2. Modify the /etc/init.d/snmpd file and change
SNMPDCONF=/etc/snmp/snmpd.conf entry to SNMPDCONF=/etc/snmpd.conf.
3. Run LSI SNMP rpm.
6.7.3
Installing and Configuring an
SNMP Agent on Solaris
This section explains how to install and configure SAS SNMP Agent for the Solaris
operating system.
6.7.3.1
Prerequisites
This package requires that you have Solaris System Management Agent installed on
the Solaris machine.
6.7.3.2
Solaris
Installation SNMP on
To install SNMP for Solaris, perform the following procedure:
1. Unzip the LSI SAS SNMP Agent package.
2. Run the install script by executing the following command:
# ./install.sh
NOTE: The installation will exit if there are any existing versions of storelib and sassnmp
installed on the Solaris machine. Uninstall the existing version by using the following
commands:
# pkgrm storelib (to uninstall storelib library)
# pkgrm sassnmp (to uninstall LSI SAS SNMP Agent)
6.7.3.3 LSI SAS SNMP MIB
Location
After you install the LSI SAS SNMP Agent package, the MIB file
LSI-AdapterSAS.mib is installed under /etc/lsi_mrdsnmp/sas directory.
6.7.3.4 Starting, Stopping, and
Checking the Status of the LSI SAS
SNMP Agent
The following commands are used to start, stop, restart, and check the status of the
Solaris System Managment Agent (net snmpd) daemon:

Start: # svcadm enable svc:/application/management/sma:default

Stop: # svcadm disable svc:/application/management/sma:default

Restart: # svcadm restart svc:/application/management/sma:default

Status: # svcs svc:/application/management/sma:default
NOTE: Online indicates that the SMA is started. Disabled indicates that the SMA is
stopped.
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The following commands are used to start, stop, restart, and check the status of the SAS
SNMP Agent daemon:
6.7.3.5
Configuring snmpd.conf

Start: #/etc/init.d/lsi_mrdsnmpd start

Stop: #/etc/init.d/lsi_mrdsnmpd stop

Restart: #/etc/init.d/lsi_mrdsnmpd restart

Status: #/etc/init.d/lsi_mrdsnmpd status
By default, SNMP queries (walk, get) can be executed from any remote machine
without any changes to the snmpd.conf file. To quickly add a new community and
client access, perform the following steps:
1. Stop the SMA service by executing the following command:
# svcadm disable svc:/application/management/sma:default
2. Add read-only and read-write community names.
a. Add a read-only community name and client/hostname/ipaddress under
"SECTION: Access Control Setup" in the /etc/sma/snmp/snmpd.conf file, as
shown in the following excerpt:
#################################################
# SECTION: Access Control Setup
# This section defines who is allowed to talk to your
# running SNMP Agent.
# rocommunity: a SNMPv1/SNMPv2c read-only access
# community name
# arguments: community
# [default|hostname|network/bits] [oid]
# rocommunity snmpclient 172.28.157.149
#################################################
b. Add a readwrite community name and client/hostname/ipaddress under
"SECTION: Access Control Setup" in /etc/sma/snmp/snmpd.conf file, as
shown in the following excerpt:
#################################################
# SECTION: Access Control Setup
# This section defines who is allowed to talk to your
# running
# snmp agent.
# rocommunity: a SNMPv1/SNMPv2c read-only access
# community name
# arguments: community
# [default|hostname|network/bits] [oid]
# rwcommunity snmpclient 172.28.157.149
#################################################
3. Start the SMA service by using the following command:
# svcadm enable svc:/application/management/sma:default
NOTE: Refer to the command man snmpd.conf for more information about
configuring the snmpd.conf file.
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6.7.3.6
Configuring SNMP Traps
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
To receive SNMP traps, perform the following steps:
1. Stop the LSI SAS SNMP Agent by using the following command:
#/etc/init.d/lsi_mrdsnmpd stop
2. Edit the /etc/lsi_mrdsnmp/sas/sas_TrapDestination.conf file and add the
ipaddress as shown in the following excerpt:
#################################################
# Agent Service needs the IP addresses to sent trap
# The trap destination may be specified in this file
# or using snmpd.conf file. Following indicators can
# be set on "TrapDestInd" to instruct the agent to
# pick the IPs as the destination.
# 1 - IPs only from snmpd.conf
# 2 - IPs from this file only
# 3 - IPs from both the files
#################################################
TrapDestInd 2
#############Trap Destination IP##################
127.0.0.1
public
172.28.157.149 public
#################################################
3. Start the LSI SAS SNMP Agent by entering the following command:
#/etc/init.d/lsi_mrdsnmpd start
6.7.3.7 Uninstalling the SNMP
Package
The uninstall.sh script is located under the /etc/lsi_mrdsnmp/sas directory. Use
the following command to uninstall the package:
# cd /etc/lsi_mrdsnmp/sas
# ./uninstall.sh
6.7.4
Installing an SNMP Agent on
Windows
6.7.4.1
Installing SNMP Agent
This section explains how to install and configure SAS SNMP Agent for the Windows
operating system.
Perform the following steps to install SNMP Agent:
1. Run setup.exe from DISK1.
2. Use SNMP Manager to retrieve the SAS data (it is assumed that you have compiled
LSI-AdapterSAS.mib file already).
The LSI-AdapterSAS.mib file is available under %ProgramFiles%\LSI
Corporation\SNMPAgent\SAS directory.
3. Use a trap utility to get the traps.
NOTE: Before you install the Agent, make sure that SNMP Service is already installed in
the system.
6.7.4.2 Installing SNMP Service
for Windows
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If you do not have SNMP Service installed on your system, perform the following steps
to install SNMP Service for a Windows system:
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1. Select Add/Remove Programs from Control Panel.
2. Select Add/Remove Windows Components in the left side of the Add/Remove
Programs window.
3. Select Management and Monitoring Tools.
4. Click Next and follow any prompts to complete the installation procedure.
6.7.4.3 Configuring SNMP
Service on the Server Side
Perform the following steps to configure SNMP Service on the server side.
1. Select Administrative Tools from Control Panel.
2. Select Services from the Administrative Tools window.
3. Select SNMP Service in the Services window.
4. Open SNMP Service.
5. Click the Security tab and make sure that Accept SNMP Packets from any
host is selected.
6. Click the Traps tab and select the list of host IPs to which you want the traps to be
sent with the community name.
6.8
MegaRAID Storage
Manager Support and
Installation on Solaris 10
This section documents the installation of MegaRAID Storage Manager on the Solaris
10 U5,U6,U7,U8 x86 and x64 operating system.
6.8.1
Installing MegaRAID Storage
Manager Software for Solaris 10
Follow these steps to install MegaRAID Storage Manager software on a system running
Solaris 10, update 5:
1. Copy the MegaRaidStorageManager-SOLX86-…..tar.gz file to a temporary folder.
2. Untar the MegaRaidStorageManager-SOLX86-…..tar.gz file using the following
command:
tar -zxvf MegaRaidStorageManager-SOLX86-…..tar.gz
This step creates a new disk directory.
3. Go to the new disk directory, and find and read the readme.txt file.
4. Enter the Bash shell.
5. Execute the command ./install.sh present in the disk directory.
6. When prompted by the installation scripts, select Y to complete the installation.
6.8.2
Uninstalling MegaRAID
Storage Manager Software for Solaris 10
Follow these steps to uninstall MegaRAID Storage Manager software on a system
running Solaris 10, update 5:
1. Execute the Uninstaller.sh file located in /opt/MegaRaidStorageManager
directory.
2. When prompted by the uninstallation scripts, select Y to complete the installation.
NOTE: To shut down MSM Framework service, run svcadm disable -t
MSMFramework. It is advisable to stop Monitor service before stopping MSM Framework
service. To stop Monitor service, run svcadm disable -t MSMMonitor.
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NOTE: To start the Framework service, run svcadm enable MSMFramework. To start
the monitor service run svcadm enable MSMMonitor.
NOTE: When the service is in “maintenance state”, run “svcadm clear MSMFramework”
and “svcadm clear MSMMonitor.”
NOTE: To check the status of MSM services execute the command svcs -a | grep
-i msm.
6.9
Prerequisites to Running
MSM Remote Administration
MSM requires ports 3071 and 5571 to be open to function. Follow these steps to
prepare to run MSM Remote Administration.
1. Configure the system with valid IP address.
Make sure there is no IP address conflict with in the sub network.
Ports such as 3071 and 5571 are open and available for MSM framework
communication.
2. Disable all security manager and firewall.
3. Configure the multicasting.
Make sure Class D multicast IP addresses are registered (at least 229.111.112.12
should be registered for MSM to work); if not, create a static route using the
following command:
Route add 229.111.112.12 dev eth1
4. Install MSM. If MSM is already installed, restart MSM framework.
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Chapter 7: MegaRAID Storage Manager Window and Menus | Starting MegaRAID Storage
Manager Software
Chapter 7
MegaRAID Storage Manager Window and Menus
This chapter explains how to start MegaRAID Storage Manager software and describes
the MegaRAID Storage Manager window and menus.
7.1
Starting MegaRAID
Storage Manager Software
Follow these steps to start MegaRAID Storage Manager software and view the main
window:
1. Start the program using the method required for your operating system
environment:
— To start MegaRAID Storage Manager software on a Microsoft Windows system,
select Start->Programs->MegaRAID Storage Manager->StartupUI, or
double-click the MegaRAID Storage Manager shortcut on the desktop.
NOTE: If a warning appears stating that Windows Firewall has blocked some features of
the program, click Unblock to allow MegaRAID Storage Manager software to start.
(The Windows Firewall sometimes blocks the operation of programs that use Java.)
— To start MegaRAID Storage Manager software on a Red Hat Linux system, select
Applications->System Tools->MegaRAID Storage Manager StartupUI.
— To start MegaRAID Storage Manager software on a SUSE Linux/SLES system,
select Start->System->More Programs ->MegaRAID Storage Manager.
When the program starts, the Select Server window appears, as shown in
Figure 132. The remote servers display, along with their IP address, operating
system, and health status.
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f
Figure 132:
Select Server Window
If the circle in the server icon is orange instead of green, it means that the server is
running in a degraded state—for example, because a drive used in a virtual drive
has failed. If the circle is red, the storage configuration in the server has failed.
NOTE: To access servers on a different subnet, type in the box at the bottom of the
screen the IP address of a server in the desired subnet where the MegaRAID Storage
Manager software is running, and click Update. If you check the Connect to remote
server at: IP address box, you can also access a standalone (remote) installation of
MegaRAID Storage Manager software, if it has a network connection.
NOTE: For the VMWare CIMOM, the server button does not denote the health of the
server. The button is always green regardless of the health of the system.
NOTE: The VMWare server does not show the system health and the operating system
labels. It shows only the Hostname and the IP address of the server.
NOTE: When connecting to a VMWare server on a different subnet, one or more
Frameworks have to be running in the subnet in order to connect to the CIMOM.
2. Double-click the icon of the server that you want to access.
The Server Login window appears, as shown in Figure 133.
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Figure 133:
Server Login Window
3. Enter your user name and password.
The question mark icon opens a dialog box that explains what you need for full
access to the server and for view-only access to the server.
NOTE: When connected to VMWare system, the Server Login screen shows only one
label for access. "Full Access". Multiple users can have full access to the VMWare server.
4. Select an access mode from the drop-down menu for Login Mode, and click Login.
— Select Full Access if you need to both view and change the current
configuration.
— Select View Only if you need to only view and monitor the current
configuration.
NOTE: If the computer is networked, this is the login to the computer itself, not the
network login.
5. Enter the root/administrator user name and password to use Full Access mode.
NOTE: In Linux, users belonging to the root group can log in. You do not have to be the
user “root”.
If your user name and password are correct for the Login mode you have chosen,
the MegaRAID Storage Manager main menu appears.
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7.2
MegaRAID Storage
Manager Main Menu
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This section describes the MegaRAID Storage Manager main menu, which is shown in
Figure 134.
Figure 134:
Main MegaRAID Storage Manager Window
The following topics describe the panels and menu options that appear on this
screen.
7.2.1
al View
Dashboard/PhysicalView/Logic
7.2.1.1
Dashboard View
The left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window displays the Dashboard view,
the Physical view, or the Logical view of the system and the attached devices,
depending on which tab is selected.
The Dashboard view shows an overview of the system and covers the following
features:
—
—
—
—
—
Properties of the virtual drives and the physical drives
Total capacity, configured capacity, and unconfigured capacity
Background operations in progress
MSM features and their status (enabled or disabled)
Actions you can perform, such as creating a virtual drive and updating the
firmware
— Links to Online Help
Figure 135 shows the Dashboard view.
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Figure 135:
7.2.1.2
Physical View
MSM Dashboard View
The Physical view shows the hierarchy of physical devices in the system. At the top of
the hierarchy is the system itself, followed by the controller and the backplane. One or
more controllers are installed in the system. The controller label identifies the
MegaRAID controller, such as the MegaRAID SAS 9260-8i controller, so that you can
easily differentiate between multiple controllers. Each controller has one or more ports.
Drives and other devices are attached to the ports. The properties for each item appear
in the right panel of the screen.
Figure 136 shows the Physical view.
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Figure 136:
7.2.1.3
Logical View
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
MSM Physical View
The Logical view shows the hierarchy of controllers, virtual drives, and the drives and
drive groups that make up the virtual drives. The properties for these components
appear in the right panel.
Figure 137 shows the Logical view.
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Figure 137:
7.2.1.4
Controller Properties
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MSM Logical View
In the physical view and the logical view, you can view the chip temperature and
controller temperature under controller properties for the controller PERC 7.5 as
displayed in the following figure.
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Figure 138:
7.2.1.5 Physical Drive
Temperature
Chip and Controller Temperature
The temperature for the physical drive is displayed in the following figure.
Figure 139:
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The following icons in the left panel represent the controllers, drives, and other devices:
Status
System
Controller
Backplane
Enclosure
Port
Drive group
Virtual drive
Online drive
Power save mode
Dedicated hot spare
Global hot spare
Battery backup unit (BBU)
Tape drive
CD-ROM
Foreign Drive
Unconfigured Foreign Drive
Unconfigured Drive
NOTE: MegaRAID Storage Manager shows the icons for tape drive devices; however, no
tape-related operations are supported by the utility. If these operations are required, use
a separate backup application.
A red circle to the right of an icon indicates that the device has failed. For example, this
icon indicates that a drive has failed:
.
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A yellow circle to the right of an icon indicates that a device is running in a partially
degraded state. For example, this icon indicates that a virtual drive is running in a
degraded state because a drive has failed:
.
7.2.2
Tabs
Properties/Graphical View
The right panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window has one tab or two tabs,
depending on which kind of device you select in the left panel. Figure 140 shows the
MSM main menu.

The Properties tab displays information about the selected device. For example, if
you select a controller icon in the left panel, the Properties tab lists information
about the controller, such as the controller name, NVRAM size, and device port
count. For more information, see Section 9.3, Monitoring Controllers Section 9.4,
Monitoring Drives, and Section 9.6, Monitoring Virtual Drives.

The Graphical View tab displays information about the temperature, fans, power
supplies, and voltage sensors.To display a graphical view of a drive, click an
enclosure icon in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window, and
click the Graphical View tab.
Figure 140:
7.2.3
Event Log Panel
Properties Tab and Graphical View Tab
The lower part of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window displays the system event
log entries. New event log entries appear during the session. Each entry has an ID, an
error level indicating the severity of the event, the timestamp and date, and a brief
description of the event.
For more information about the event log, see Section 9.1, Monitoring System Events For
more information about the event log entries, see Appendix A, Events and Messages.
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7.2.4
Menu Bar
Chapter 7: MegaRAID Storage Manager Window and Menus | MegaRAID Storage Manager
Main Menu
Here are brief descriptions of the main selections on the MegaRAID Storage Manager
menu bar. Specific menu options are described in more detail in Chapter 8, Chapter 9,
and Chapter 10 of this manual.
7.2.4.1
Manage Menu
The Manage menu has a Refresh option for updating the display in the MegaRAID
Storage Manager window (refresh is seldom required; the display normally updates
automatically) and an Exit option to end your session on MegaRAID Storage Manager.
The Server menu item shows all the servers that were discovered by a scan. In addition,
you can perform a check consistency, initialize multiple virtual groups, and show the
progress of group operations on virtual drives.
7.2.4.2
Go To Menu
The Go To menu is available when you select a controller, drive group, physical drive,
virtual drive, or battery backup unit in the main menu screen. The menu options vary
depending on the type of device selected in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage
Manager main menu. The options also vary depending on the current state of the
selected device. For example, if you select an offline drive, the Make Drive Online
option appears in the Physical Drive menu.
Configuration options are also available. This is where you access the Configuration
Wizard that you use to perform configuration drive groups and virtual drives. To access
the Wizard, select the controller in the left panel, and then select Go
To->Controller->Create Virtual Drive.
7.2.4.3
Log Menu
The Log menu includes options for saving and clearing the message log. For more
information about the Log menu, see Appendix A, Events and Messages.
7.2.4.4
Tools Menu
On the Tools menu you can select Tools->Configure Alerts to access the Configure
Alerts screen, which you can use to set the alert delivery rules, event severity levels,
exceptions, and e-mail settings. For more information, see Section 9.2, Configuring Alert
Notifications
7.2.4.5
Help Menu
On the Help menu you can select Help->Contents to view the MegaRAID Storage
Manager online help file. You can select Help->About MegaRAID Storage Manager
to view version information for the MegaRAID Storage Manager software.
NOTE: When you use the MegaRAID Storage Manager online help, you might see a
warning message that Internet Explorer has restricted the file from showing active
content. If this warning appears, click on the active content warning bar and enable the
active content.
NOTE: If you are using the Linux operating system, you must install Firefox® or Mozilla®
for the MegaRAID Storage Manager online help to display.
NOTE: When connected to the VMWare server, only the IP address and the hostname
information display. The other information, such as the operating system name, version,
and architecture do not display.
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Chapter 8: Configuration | Creating a New Storage Configuration
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Chapter 8
Configuration
This chapter explains how to use MegaRAID Storage Manager software to create and
modify storage configurations on LSI SAS controllers.
The LSI SAS controllers support RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, RAID 6, RAID 00, RAID 10,
RAID 50, and RAID 60 storage configurations. The Configuration Wizard allows you to
easily create new storage configurations and modify the configurations. To learn more
about RAID and RAID levels, see Chapter 2, Introduction to RAID.
NOTE: You cannot create or modify a storage configuration unless you are logged on to
a server with administrator privileges.
8.1
Creating a New Storage
Configuration
You can use the MegaRAID Storage Manager to create new storage configurations on
systems with LSI SAS controllers. You can create the following types of configurations:

Simple configuration specifies a limited number of settings and has the system
select drives for you. This option is the easiest way to create a virtual drive.

Advanced configuration lets you choose additional settings and customize virtual
drive creation. This option provides greater flexibility when creating virtual drives
for your specific requirements.
This section describes the virtual drive parameters and explain how to create simple
and advanced storage configurations.
8.1.1
Selecting Virtual Drive Settings
This section describes the virtual drive settings that you can select when you use the
advanced configuration procedure to create virtual drives. You should change these
parameters only if you have a specific reason for doing so. It is usually best to leave
them at their default settings.

Initialization state: Initialization prepares the storage medium for use. Specify the
initialization status:
— No Initialization: (the default) The new configuration is not initialized and the
existing data on the drives is not overwritten.
— Fast Initialization: The firmware quickly writes zeroes to the first and last 8-MB
regions of the new virtual drive and then completes the initialization in the
background.
This allows you to start writing data to the virtual drive immediately.
— Full Initialization: A complete initialization is done on the new configuration. You
cannot write data to the new virtual drive until the initialization is complete. This
can take a long time if the drives are large.
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NOTE: BGI is supported only for RAID 5 and RAID 6 and not for any other RAID levels.
New RAID 5 virtual drives require at least five drives for a background initialization to
start. New RAID 6 virtual drives require at least seven drives for a background
initialization to start. If there are fewer drives, the background initialization does not
start.

Stripe size: Stripe sizes of 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, and 1024 KB are supported.
The default is 64 KB. For more information, see the striping entry in the Glossary.

Read policy: Specify the read policy for this virtual drive:
— Always read ahead: Read ahead capability allows the controller to read
sequentially ahead of requested data and to store the additional data in cache
memory, anticipating that the data will be needed soon. This speeds up reads
for sequential data, but there is little improvement when accessing random
data.
— No read ahead: (the default) Disables the read ahead capability.

Write policy: Specify the write policy for this virtual drive:
— Write Through: In this mode, the controller sends a data transfer completion
signal to the host when the drive subsystem has received all of the data in a
transaction. This option eliminates the risk of losing cached data in case of
power failure.
— Always Write Back: In this mode, the controller sends a data transfer completion
signal to the host when the controller cache has received all of the data in a
transaction.
— Write Back with BBU: (the default) In this mode, the controller enables Write Back
caching when the battery backup unit (BBU) is installed and charged. It provides
a good balance between data protection and performance.
NOTE: The Write Policy depends on the status of the battery backup unit (BBU). If the
BBU is not present, is low, is failed, or is being charged, the default Write Policy will
switch to Write Through, which provides better data protection.

I/O policy: The I/O policy applies to reads on a specific virtual drive. It does not
affect the read ahead cache.
— Cached IO: In this mode, all reads are buffered in cache memory.
— Direct IO: (the default) In this mode, reads are not buffered in cache memory.
Data is transferred to the cache and the host concurrently. If the same data block
is read again, it comes from cache memory.
Cached IO provides faster processing, and Direct IO ensures that the cache and
the host contain the same data.

Access policy: Select the type of data access that is allowed for this virtual drive.
— Read/Write: (the default) Allow read/write access. This is the default.
— Read Only: Allow read-only access.
— Blocked: Do not allow access.
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
Disk cache policy: Select a cache setting for this drive:
— Enabled: Enable the disk cache.
— Disabled: Disable the disk cache.
— Unchanged: (the default) Leave the current disk cache policy unchanged.
8.1.2
Optimum Controller settings
for CacheCade
Write Policy: Write Back
IO Policy: Cached IO
Read Policy: No Read Ahead
Stripe Size: 64 KB
8.1.3
Optimum Controller settings
for FastPath
Write Policy: Write Through
IO Policy: Direct IO
Read Policy: No Read Ahead
Stripe Size: 64 KB
8.1.4
Creating a Virtual Drive Using
Simple Configuration
Simple configuration is the quickest and easiest way to create a new storage
configuration. When you select simple configuration mode, the system creates the best
configuration possible using the available drives.
NOTE: You cannot created spanned drives using the simple configuration procedure.
To create spanned drives, use the advanced configuration procedure described in
Section 8.1.5, Creating a Virtual Drive Using Advanced Configuration.
Follow these steps to create a new storage configuration in simple configuration mode.
1. Perform either of the following steps:
a. Right-click the controller node in the device tree in the left frame of the
MegaRAID Storage Manager window and select Create Virtual Drive.
b. Select the controller node and select Go To>Controller>Create Virtual Drive in
the menu bar, as shown in Figure 141.
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Figure 141:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Virtual Drive Creation Menu
The dialog box for the configuration mode (simple or advanced) appears, as shown in
Figure 142.
Figure 142:
Virtual Drive Simple Configuration Mode
2. Click Simple and press Next.
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If there are no unconfigured drives available, you have the option to use free
capacity of an existing drive group, as shown in Figure 143. The Create Virtual
drive-Summary screen appears as shown in Figure 145.
If unconfigured drives are available, Figure 144 appears, and you can go to step 4.
Figure 143:
Using the Free Capacity of an Existing Drive Group
3. Check the option Use Unconfigured drives (create new drive group) and press Next.
The Create Virtual Drive screen appears, as shown in Figure 144. If there are different
types of drives attached to the controller, such as HDD, SDD, SAS, and SATA, there is
an option to allow drive type mixing.
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Figure 144:
Create Virtual Drive Screen
4. If you want to allow different types of drives in a configuration, click the check box
Use the drive type mixing.
NOTE: For best results, do not use drive type mixing.
5. Select the RAID level desired for the virtual drive.
When you use simple configuration, the RAID controller supports RAID levels 1, 5,
and 6. In addition, it supports independent drives (configured as RAID 0). The
screen text gives a brief description of the RAID level that you select. The RAID levels
that you can choose depend on the number of drives available. To learn more about
RAID levels, see Chapter 2, Introduction to RAID.
6. Click the Assign a hot spare check box if you want to assign a dedicated hot spare
to the new virtual drive.
If an unconfigured good drive is available, that drive is assigned as a hot spare. Hot
spares are drives that are available to replace failed drives automatically in a
redundant virtual drive (RAID 1, RAID 5, or RAID 6).
7. Click the Use drive security check box if you want to set a drive security method.
The LSI SafeStore™ Data Security Service encrypts data and provides disk-based key
management for your data security solution. This solution protects the data in the
event of theft or loss of drives. Refer to Section 11.5, LSI SafeStore Encryption Services
for more information about the SafeStore feature.
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8. Use the drop-down menu in the Virtual drives field to choose how many virtual
drives you want to create.
9. Select the capacity of the virtual drive(s).
Each virtual drive has the same capacity.
10. Click Next.
The Create Virtual Drive - Summary window appears, as shown in Figure 145. This
window shows the selections you made for simple configuration.
Figure 145:
Create Virtual Drive - Summary Window
11. Click Back to return to the previous screen to change any selections or click Finish
to accept and complete the configuration.
The new virtual drive is created after you click Finish. After the configuration is
completed, a dialog box notifies you that the virtual drives were created
successfully.
NOTE: If you create a large configuration using drives that are in Power-Save mode, it
could take several minutes to spin up the drives. A progress bar appears as the drives
spin up. If any of the selected unconfigured drives fail to spin up, a box appears that
identifies the drive or drives.
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8.1.5
Creating a Virtual Drive Using
Advanced Configuration
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The advanced configuration procedure provides an easy way to create a new storage
configuration. Advanced configuration gives you greater flexibility than simple
configuration because you can select the drives and the virtual drive parameters when
you create a virtual drive. In addition, you can use the advanced configuration
procedure to create spanned drive groups.
Follow these steps to create a new storage configuration in the advanced configuration
mode. This example shows the configuration of a spanned drive group.
1. Perform either of the following steps to bring up the Configuration Wizard:
a. Right click on the controller node in the device tree in the left frame of the
MegaRAID Storage Manager window and select Create Virtual Drive.
b. Select the controller node and select Go To->Controller->Create Virtual Drive
in the menu bar, as shown in Figure 146.
Figure 146:
Virtual Drive Creation Menu
The dialog box shown in Figure 147 appears.
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Figure 147:
Virtual Drive Advanced Configuration Mode
2. Click Advanced and then click Next.
The Create Drive Group Settings screen appears, as shown in Figure 148.
Figure 148:
Create Drive Group Settings Screen
3. Select the following items on the Create Drive Group Settings screen:
a. Select the RAID level desired for the drive group from the drop-down menu. To
make a spanned drive, select RAID 10, RAID 50, or RAID 60 in the RAID level
field.
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Drive Group 0 and Span 0 appear in the Drive groups field when you select
RAID 10, 50, or 60.
The RAID controller supports RAID levels 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, and 60. In addition, it
supports independent drives (configured as RAID 0 and RAID 00). The screen
text gives a brief description of the RAID level you select. RAID levels you can
choose depend on the number of drives available. To learn more about RAID
levels, see Chapter 2, Introduction to RAID.
b. Scroll down the menu for the Drive security method field if you want to set a
drive security method.
The drive security feature provides the ability to encrypt data and use
disk-based key management for your data security solution. This solution
provides protection to the data in the event of theft or loss of drives. See
Section 11.5, LSI SafeStore Encryption Services, for more information about drive
security and encryption.
c. Select unconfigured drives from the list of drives and click Add> to add them to
the drive group.
The selected drives appear under Span 0 below Drive Group 0, as shown in
Figure 149.
Figure 149:
Span 0 of Drive Group 0
d. Click Create Span to create a second span in the drive group.
e. Select unconfigured drives from the list of drives and click Add> to add them to
the second drive group.
The selected drives appear under Span 1 below Drive Group 0, as shown in
Figure 150.
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Figure 150:
Span 0 and Span 1 of Drive Group 0
f. Click Create Drive Group to make a drive group with the spans.
g. Click Next to complete this step.
The Virtual drive settings window appears, as shown in Figure 151. The drive
group and the default virtual drive settings appear. The options to update the
virtual drive or remove the virtual drive are grayed out until you create the
virtual drive.
NOTE: The parameters in the Virtual drive settings window display in disabled mode
(grayed out) for SAS-Integrated RAID (IR) controllers because these parameters do not
apply to SAS-IR controllers.
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Figure 151:
Virtual Drive Settings Window
NOTE: If you select Write Back with BBU as the Write policy, and there is no battery, or
the battery is low or failed, or the battery is running through a re-learn cycle, the Write
policy switches to Write Through. This eliminates the risk of data loss in case of power
failure. A message screen notifies you of this change.
4. Change any virtual drive settings, if desired.
See Section 8.1.1, Selecting Virtual Drive Settings for more information about the
virtual drive settings.
5. Click Create Virtual Drive.
The new virtual drive appears under the drive group. The options Update Virtual
Drive and Remove Virtual Drive are available. Update Virtual Drive allows you to
change the virtual drive settings and Remove Virtual Drive allows you to delete
the virtual drive.
6. Click Next.
The Create Virtual Drive - Summary window appears, as shown in Figure 152. This
window shows the selections you made for advanced configuration.
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Figure 152:
Create Virtual Drive Summary Window
7. Click Back to return to the previous screen to change any selections or click Finish
to accept and complete the configuration.
After you click Finish, the new storage configuration is created and initialized.
NOTE: If you create a large configuration using drives that are in Power-Save mode, it
could take several minutes to spin up the drives. A progress bar appears as the drives
spin up. If any of the selected unconfigured drives fail to spin up, a box appears to
identify the drive or drives.
After the configuration is completed, a dialog box notifies you that the virtual drives
were created successfully. If more drive capacity exists, the dialog box asks whether
you want to create more virtual drives. If no more drive capacity exists, you are
prompted to close the configuration session.
8. Select Yes or No to indicate whether you want to create additional virtual drives.
If you select Yes, the system takes you to the Create Virtual Drive screen, as shown in
Figure 144. If you select No, the utility asks whether you want to close the wizard.
9. If you selected No in the previous step, select Yes or No to indicate whether you
want to close the wizard.
If you select Yes, the configuration procedure closes. If you select No, the dialog box
closes and you remain on the same page.
8.2
Converting JBOD Drives
to Unconfigured Good
You can convert JBOD drives to Unconfigured Good using Create Virtual Drive or Make
Unconfigured Good drive option with a single configuration.
Perform the following steps to configure JBOD to Unconfigured Good drives by using
any one of the following options.
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
Right-click the controller node in the device tree in the left frame of the MegaRAID
Storage Manager window and select Create Virtual Drive.

Select the controller node and select Go To>Controller>Create Virtual Drive.
The Create Virtual Drive - JBOD to Unconfigured Good Conversion wizard
appears as shown in the following figure.
Figure 153:
JBOD Drives
The JBOD drives field displays the available JBOD drives available in the system.
10. Choose the drives which you want to be configured as Unconfigured Good, and
select the check box before "Do not convert JBOD drives to unconfigured good drives".
NOTE: If you do not like to make any JBOD as Unconfigured good drive(s), select the
check-box before “ Do not convert JBOD drives to unconfigured good drives”, then the
MSM application skips changing any selected JBOD to unconfigured good drive.
11. Click Next.
The Create Virtual drive Screen appears as shown in Figure 144.
8.2.1
Converting JBOD to
Unconfigured Good from the MSM
Window
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You can also convert JBOD to Unconfigured Good by clicking the Controller >Make
UnConfigured Good option from the main MSM window.
The Make Configured Good dialog box appears as shown in the following figure.
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Figure 154:
Make Configured Good
12. Select the JBOD drives to be configured as Unconfigured Good.
13. Click OK.
The selected JBOD drives are configured as Unconfigured Good.
8.3
Adding Hot Spare Drives
Hot spares are drives that are available to automatically replace failed drives in a RAID 1,
RAID 5, RAID 6, RAID 10, RAID 50, or RAID 60 virtual drive. Dedicated hot spares can be
used to replace failed drives in a selected drive group only. Global hot spares are
available to any virtual drive on a specific controller.
To add a dedicated or global hot spare drive, follow these steps:
1. Select the Physical tab in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager main
menu, and click the icon of an unused drive.
For each drive, the screen displays the port number, enclosure number, slot number,
drive state, drive capacity, and drive manufacturer.
2. Select Go To>Physical Drive>Assign (G)lobal Hot Spare or Go To>Physical
Drive>Assign (D)edicated Hot Spare.
3. If you selected Assign(De)dicated Hotspare, select a drive group from the list that
appears. The hot spare is dedicated to the drive group that you select.
If you selected Assign (G)lobal Hotspare, skip this step and go to the next step. The
hot spare is available to any virtual drive on a specific controller.
4. Click Go to create the hot spare.
The drive state for the drive changes to dedicated or global hot spare, depending
on your selection.
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8.4
Changing Adjustable
Task Rates
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Follow these steps if you need to change the adjustable rates for rebuilds, and other
system tasks that run in the background:
NOTE: LSI recommends that you leave the adjustable task rates at their default settings
to achieve the best system performance. If you raise the task rates above the defaults,
foreground tasks will run more slowly and it might seem that the system is not
responding. If you lower the task rates below the defaults, rebuilds and other
background tasks might run very slowly and might not complete within a reasonable
time. If you decide to change the values, record the original default value here so you
can restore them later, if necessary:
Rebuild Rate: ____________
Background Initialization (BGI) Rate: ____________
Check Consistency Rate: ____________
1. Select a controller icon in the Physical tab or the Logical tab in the left panel of the
MegaRAID Storage Manager window.
2. Select Go To>Controller>Set Adjustable Task Rates from the menu bar, as shown
in Figure 155.
Figure 155:
Set Adjustable Task Rates Menu
The Set Adjustable Task Rates screen appears, as shown in Figure 156.
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Figure 156:
Set Adjustable Task Rates Menu
3. Enter changes, as needed, to the following task rates:
—
—
—
—
—
Rebuild Rate
Patrol Read
Background Initialization (BGI) (for fast initialization)
Check Consistency (for consistency checks).
Reconstruction
Each task rate can be set from 0 to 100 percent. The higher the number, the faster
the activity runs in the background, possibly impacting other system tasks.
4. Click OK to accept the new task rates.
5. When the warning message appears, click OK to confirm that you want to change
the task rates.
8.5
Changing Power Settings
The RAID controller includes Dimmer Switch™ technology that conserves energy by
placing certain unused drives into Power-Save mode. In Power-Save mode, the drives
use less energy, and the fan and the enclosure require less energy to cool and house
the drives, respectively. Also, this technology helps avoid application timeouts caused
by spin-up delays and drive wear caused by excessive spin-up/down cycles.
You can use the Power Settings field in MSM to choose whether to allow unconfigured
drives or hot spares to enter Power-Save mode.
NOTE: The Dimmer Switch technology is enabled by default.
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When they are in the Power-Save mode, unconfigured drives and drives configured as
hot spares (dedicated or global) can be spun down. When spun down, the drives stay in
Power-Save mode except for periodic maintenance, including:

Periodic background media scans (Patrol Read) to find and correct media defects to
avoid losing data redundancy (hot spare drives only)

Use of a hot spare to rebuild a degraded drive group (hot spare drives only)

Update of Disk Data Format (DDF) and other metadata when you make changes to
RAID configurations (hot spare drives and unconfigured drives)
NOTE: If your controller does not support this option, the Power Settings field does
not display.
Follow these steps to change the power-save setting.
1. Select a controller icon in the Physical tab or the Logical tab in the left panel of the
MegaRAID Storage Manager window.
2. Select Go To>Controller>Power Settings from the menu bar.
The Power Settings dialog box displays, as shown in the following figure.
Figure 157:
Power-Save Mode Check box
3. Click the check box Allow unconfigured drives to enter Power-Save mode and then
click OK.
The second Power Settings screen appears, as shown in the following figure.
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Figure 158:
Spin Down Time Delay Setting
4. Enter the time delay in minutes before the unconfigured drives spin down
automatically.
After the specified time, the drives spin down automatically.
5. Click OK.
Your power settings are saved. In the Physical tab of the main menu screen, the
nodes for the unconfigured good drives that are spun down appear with Powersave after their status.
8.5.1
Enhanced Dimmer Switch
Power Settings
This section helps you change the power-save settings using the Dimmer Switch
Enhancement (using the Power-Save mode).
1. Select a controller icon in the Physical tab or the Logical tab in the left panel of the
MegaRAID Storage Manager window.
2. Select Go To>Controller>Manage Power Settings from the menu bar.
The Manage Power Save Settings screen appears as displayed in the following
figure.
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Figure 159:
Manage Power Save Settings screen
3. Select the Unconfigured Drives check box to let the controller enable the
unconfigured drives to enter the Power-Save mode.
4. Select the Hot spare Drives check box to let the controller enable the Hot spare
drives to enter the Power-Save mode.
5. Select the Configured Drives check box to let the controller enable the Configured
drives to enter the Power-Save mode.
6. Select the Drive standby time (Alt+d) using the drop-down selector from the Drive
standby time field.
NOTE: The Drive Standby time drop-down selector will be enabled only if any of the
check boxes above are checked. The drive standby time can be 30 mins, 1hr, 1.30 hrs,
2hrs through 24 hrs.
7. Select the Power-Save mode using the drop-down selector from the Select PowerSave mode field. The mode can be Auto, Max or Max without cache.
NOTE: The Select Power-Save mode drop-down selector is enabled only if the
Configured drives check box is selected. The Max without cache mode option depends
on the firmware settings.
8. Click OK. The Power-Save settings are saved.
After you click OK, the following dialog box appears.
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Figure 160:
Power-Save Settings
If you do not specify the Power-Save settings in the Manage Power Save Settings
screen as shown in Figure 159, the following dialog box appears.
Figure 161:
8.5.2
Power Save Settings Advanced
Power-Save Settings Not Saved
You can schedule the drive active time by selecting the Start time and End time in the
Power Save Settings - Advanced screen.
Perform the following steps to schedule the drive active time.
1. Click the Advanced button in the Manage Power Save Settings screen as shown in
Figure 159.
2. The Power Save Settings - Advanced screen is displayed in the following figure.
Figure 162:
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Power Save Settings - Advanced
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3. Select the Start time and End time using the drop-down selector from the Schedule
drive active time field.
4. Click OK.
The drive active time for the configured drives is scheduled.
NOTE: Select the Do not schedule drive active time check box, if you do not want to
schedule the drive active time.
8.5.3
Automatically Spin up Drives
The Dimmer Switch technology also allows the controller to automatically spun up the
drives that are in Power-Save mode.
Perform the following steps to arrive at the Manage Power Save Settings screen.
1. Right click on Drive group > Manage Power Settings.
The Manage Power Save Settings screen appears as shown in the following figure.
Figure 163:
Manage Power Save Settings - Automatically Spin up
2. Select the Power-Save mode from the drop-down selector.
The values can be Max, Max without cache, Auto, None, and controller defined in the
same order.
NOTE: The Controller defined option enables the system to inherit the controller PowerSave mode for online drives.
3. Click OK.
The Power-Save mode is saved.
8.5.4
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Power-Save Mode
The Power-Save mode can be set during creation of the VD by using the Select power
save mode field in the Create Drive Group - Drive Group Settings screen as
displayed in the following figure.
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Figure 164:
8.5.5
Power Save Mode - SSD Drives
If you select the Max and Max without cache mode in the Select power save mode field
in Figure 164, and select one or more SSD drives, and click Create Drive Group, the
following confirmation dialog box appears.
Figure 165:
8.6
Changing Virtual Drive
Properties
Create Drive Group - Drive Group Settings (Automatic Spin Up)
Power-Save Mode - SSD Drives
You can change the Read Policy, Write Policy, and other virtual drive properties at any
time after a virtual drive is created. Follow these steps to change the virtual drive
properties.
1. Select a virtual drive icon in the Physical tab or the Logical tab in the left panel of
the MegaRAID Storage Manager window.
2. Select Go To>Virtual Drive>Set Virtual Drive Properties from the menu bar, as
shown in Figure 166.
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Figure 166:
Set Virtual Drive Properties Menu
The Set Virtual Drive Properties dialog box displays, as shown in Figure 8.6.
Figure 167:
Set Virtual Drive Properties Screen
3. Change the virtual drive properties as needed.
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For information about these properties, see Section 8.1.1, Selecting Virtual Drive
Settings.
4. Click Ok to accept the changes.
The virtual drive settings are updated.
8.7
Changing a Virtual Drive
Configuration
You can use the Modify Drive Group Wizard in MSM to change the configuration of a
virtual drive by adding drives to the virtual drive, removing drives from it, or changing
its RAID level.
CAUTION: Be sure to back up the data on the virtual drive before you change its
configuration.
NOTE: You cannot change the configuration of a RAID 10, or RAID 50, or RAID 60 virtual
drive. You cannot change a RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, or RAID 6 configuration if two or
more virtual drives are defined on a single drive group. (The Logical view tab shows
which drive groups and drives are used by each virtual drive.)
8.7.1
Accessing the Modify Drive
Group Wizard
NOTE: The Modify Drive Group Wizard was previously known as the Reconstruction
Wizard.
Perform the following steps to access the Modify Drive Group Wizard options:
1. Click the Logical tab in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager main
menu screen.
2. Select a drive group in the left panel of the window.
3. Select Go To> Drive Group>Modify Drive Group on the menu bar, or right-click
the virtual drive icon to access the Modify Drive Group Wizard.
A warning appears about rebooting virtual drives containing boot partitions that
are undergoing RAID level migration or capacity expansion operations. Back up
your data before you proceed.
f
Figure 168:
Reboot Warning Message
4. Select Confirm and click Yes.
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A warning to back up your data appears, as shown in Figure 169.
Figure 169:
Warning to Back up Data
5. Select Confirm and click Yes.
The Modify Drive Group Wizard screen appears, as shown in Figure 170.
f
Figure 170:
Modify Drive Group Wizard
The following sections explain the Modify Drive Group Wizard options.
8.7.2
Adding a Drive or Drives to a
Configuration
CAUTION: Be sure to back up the data on the virtual drive before you add a drive to it.
Follow these steps to add a drive or drives to a configuration with the Modify Drive
Group Wizard.
1. Click the Logical tab in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window.
2. Select a drive group in the left panel of the window.
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3. Select Go To> Drive Group>Modify Drive Group on the menu bar, or right-click
the virtual drive icon to access the Modify Drive Group Wizard.
The Modify Drive Group Wizard appears.
Figure 171:
Modify Drive Group Wizard
4. Select the RAID level that you want to change ("migrate") the drive group to and
click Next.
The following screen appears. It lists the drives you can add and it states whether
you have to add a minimum number of drives to change the RAID level from the
current level to the new RAID level.
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Figure 172:
Add Drive(s) to the Current Configuration Screen
5. Click the check box next to any unconfigured drives that you want to add and then
click Next.
NOTE: The drive(s) you add must have the same capacity as or greater capacity than the
drives already in the drive group, or you cannot change the RAID level.
The Summary screen appears. This screen shows the current settings and what the
settings will be after the drives are added.
Figure 173:
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6. Review the configuration information.
You can click Back if you need to change any selections.
7. Click Finish to accept the changes.
A confirmation message appears. The message states that this operation cannot be
aborted and asks whether you want to continue.
8. Click Yes to accept and complete the addition of the drives to the drive group.
8.7.3
Removing a Drive from a
Configuration
CAUTION: Be sure to back up the data on the virtual drive before you remove a drive
from it.
Follow these steps to remove a drive from a RAID 1, RAID 5, or RAID 6 configuration.
NOTE: This option is not available for RAID 0 configurations.
1. Click the Logical tab in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager main
menu screen.
2. Click a drive icon in the left panel of the screen.
3. Select Go To> Physical Drive>Make Drive Offline on the menu bar, or right-click
the drive and select Make Drive Offline from the menu.
A confirmation message appears. The message states that this operation cannot be
aborted and asks whether you want to continue.
4. Click Yes to accept and complete the removal of the drive from the drive group.
8.7.4
Replacing a Drive
CAUTION: Be sure to back up the data on the virtual drive before you replace a drive.
Follow these steps to add a replacement drive and copy the data from the drive that
was removed to the replacement drive.
1. Click the Logical tab in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window.
2. Select a drive in the left panel of the window.
3. Select Go To> Physical Drive>Replace Physical Drive on the menu bar, or
right-click the virtual drive icon to access the Modify Drive Group Wizard.
The screen with the replacement drive appears, as shown in Figure 174.
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Figure 174:
Drive Replacement Window
4. Select a replacement drive.
A confirmation message appears.
5. Click Yes.
This replaces a drive and copies the data to the selected component.
8.7.5
Migrating the RAID Level of a
Virtual Drive
As the amount of data and the number of drives in your system increase, you can use
RAID-level migration to change a virtual drive from one RAID level to another. You do
not have to power down or reboot the system when you make this change.
When you migrate a virtual drive to another RAID level, you can keep the same number
of drives, or you can add drives. In some cases, you have to add a certain number of
drives to migrate the virtual drive from one RAID level to another. The screen indicates
the minimum number of drives you are required to add, if so.
CAUTION: Be sure to back up the data on the virtual drive before you change the RAID
level.
Follow these steps to change the RAID level of the virtual drive with the Modify Drive
Group Wizard:
1. Click the Logical tab in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window.
2. Select a drive group in the left panel of the window.
3. Select Go To> Drive Group>Modify Drive Group on the menu bar, or right-click
the virtual drive icon to access the Modify Drive Group Wizard.
The Modify Drive Group Wizard appears.
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Figure 175:
Modify Drive Group Wizard
4. On the Modify Drive Group Wizard screen, select the RAID level that you want to
change ("migrate") the drive group to and click Next.
The following screen appears. The screen states the number of drives that you have
to add to change the RAID level from the current level to a new RAID level that
require more drives.
Figure 176:
Add Drive(s) to the Current Configuration Screen
5. Select the unconfigured drive or drives to add and then click Next.
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NOTE: The drive(s) you add must have the same capacity as or greater capacity than the
drives already in the drive group, or you cannot change the RAID level.
The Summary screen appears. This screen shows the current settings and what the
settings will be after the drives are added.
Figure 177:
Modify Drive Group Summary Screen
6. Review the configuration information.
You can click Back if you need to change any selections.
7. Click Finish to accept the changes.
A confirmation message appears. The message states that this operation cannot be
aborted and asks whether you want to continue.
8. Click Yes to accept and complete the migration to the new RAID level.
The operation begins on the virtual disk. To monitor the progress of the RAID level
change, select Manage-> Show Progress in the menu bar.
8.7.6
New Drives Attached to a
MegaRAID Controller
When you insert a new drive on a MegaRAID system, if the inserted drive does not
contain valid DDF metadata, the drive displays as JBOD for MegaRAID Entry level
controllers, such as the SAS 9240-4i/8i. If the drive does contain valid DDF metadata, its
drive state is Unconfigured Good.
A new drive in JBOD drive state is exposed to the host operating system as a
stand-alone drive. Drives in JBOD drive state are not part of the RAID configuration
because they do not have valid DDF records. The operating system can install and run
anything on JBOD drives.
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Chapter 8: Configuration | Deleting a Virtual Drive
Automatic rebuilds always occur when the drive slot status changes, for example, when
you insert a drive or remove a drive, so that a hot spare can be used. However, a new
drive in JBOD drive state (without a valid DDF record), does not perform an automatic
rebuild.
To start an automatic rebuild on the new JBOD drive, you have to change the drive
state from JBOD to Unconfigured Good. (Rebuilds start only on Unconfigured Good
drives.) After you set the drive state to Unconfigured Good, the drive state information
always remains on the drive, and you can use the drive for configuration.
See Section 4.12.3.3, Troubleshooting Information for more information about DDF and
metadata. See Section 10.5, Making a Drive Offline or Missing for the procedure to
change a drive to the Unconfigured Good drive state.
8.8
Deleting a Virtual Drive
CAUTION: Be sure to back up the data that is on the virtual drive before you delete it.
Be sure that the operating system is not installed on this virtual drive.
You can delete virtual drives to rearrange the storage space. To delete a virtual drive,
follow these steps.
1. Back up all user data that is on the virtual drive you want to delete.
2. On the MegaRAID Storage Manager main menu screen, select the Logical tab, and
click the icon of the virtual drive you want to delete.
3. Select Go To>Virtual Drive>Delete Virtual Drive.
4. When the warning messages appear, click Yes to confirm that you want to delete
the virtual drive.
NOTE: You are asked twice if you want to delete a virtual disk to avoid deleting the
virtual disk by mistake.
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Chapter 9: Monitoring System Events and Storage Devices | Monitoring System Events
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Chapter 9
Monitoring System Events and Storage Devices
This chapter explains how to use MegaRAID Storage Manager software to monitor the
status of drives, virtual drives, and other storage devices.
9.1
Monitoring System
Events
The MegaRAID Storage Manager utility monitors the activity and performance of all
controllers in the system and the storage devices connected to them. When an event
occurs (such as the creation of a new virtual drive or the removal of a drive) an event
message appears in the log at the bottom of the MegaRAID Storage Manager main
menu screen, as shown in Figure 178.
You can use MegaRAID Storage Manager to alert you about events. There are settings
are for the delivery of alerts, the severity level of events, exceptions, and e-mail settings.
Figure 178:
Event Information Window
Each message that appears in the event log has a severity level that indicates the
importance of the event, as shown in Table 133, a date and timestamp, and a brief
description. You can click an event to display the same information in a window. (For a
list of all events, see Appendix A, Events and Messages).
Table 133: Event Severity Levels
Severity Level
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Meaning
Information
Informational message. No user action is necessary.
Warning
Some component might be close to a failure point.
Critical
A component has failed, but the system has not lost data.
Fatal
A component has failed, and data loss has occurred or will occur.
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The Log menu has four options:
9.2
Configuring Alert
Notifications

Save Log: Saves the current log to a .log file.

Save Log Text: Saves the current log in .txt format.

View Saved Log: Enables you to load a local .log file.

Clear Log: Clears the current log information. You have the option of saving the log
first.
The Alert Notification Configuration feature allows you to control and configure the
alerts that MegaRAID Storage Manager software sends when various system events
occur.
To access this screen, select Tools->Configure Alerts on the main menu screen, as
shown in Figure 179.
Figure 179:
Alert Notification Configuration Menu
The Alerts Notification Configuration screen appears, as shown in Figure 180. The
screen contains three tabs: Alert Settings, Mail Server, and E-mail. You can use each
tab to perform tasks for that topic.
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Figure 180:
Alerts Notification Configuration Screen
You can select the Alert Settings tab to perform the following actions:

Select the methods for the delivery of alerts.

Change the severity level of events.

Save an .xml backup file of the entire alert configuration.

Load all of the values from a previously saved backup into the dialog to edit or send
to the monitor.
NOTE: When you load a saved backup file, all unsaved changes made in the current
session are lost.
You can select the Mail Server tab to perform the following actions:

Enter or edit the sender e-mail address.

Enter the SMTP server.

Require authentification of the e-mail server.

Save an .xml backup file of the entire alert configuration.

Load all of the values from a previously saved backup into the dialog to edit or send
to the monitor.
NOTE: When you load a saved backup file, all unsaved changes made in the current
session will be lost.
You can select the E-mail tab to perform the following actions:

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
Send test messages to the recipient e-mail addresses.

Remove e-mail addresses of recipients of alert notifications.

Save an .xml backup file of the entire alert configuration.

Load all of the values from a previously saved backup into the dialog to edit or send
to the monitor.
NOTE: When you load a saved backup file, all unsaved changes made in the current
session will be lost.
9.2.1
Setting Alert Delivery Methods
You can select the methods used to send alert deliveries, including by popup, e-mail,
system log, or MSM log. You can select the alert delivery methods for each event
severity level (Information, Warning, Critical and Fatal).
Perform the following steps to select the alert delivery methods:
1. On the Alerts Notification Configuration screen, click the Alerts Setting tab.
2. Under the Alerts Delivery Methods heading, select one of the severity levels.
3. Click Edit.
The Alert Notification Delivery Methods dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 181.
Figure 181:
Alert Notification Delivery Methods Dialog Box
4. Select the desired alert delivery methods for alert notifications at the event severity
level.
5. Click OK to set the delivery methods used for the severity level that you selected.
9.2.2
Changing Alert Delivery
Methods for Individual Events
You can change the alert delivery options for an event without changing the severity
level.
1. On the Alerts Notification Configuration screen, click the Alerts Setting tab.
The the Alerts Setting portion of the screen appears, as shown in Figure 180.
2. Click Change Individual Events.
The Change Individual Events dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 182. The
dialog box shows the events by their ID number, description, and severity level.
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Figure 182:
Change Individual Events Dialog Box
3. Click an event in the list to select it.
The current alert delivery methods appear for the selected event under the Alert
Delivery Methods heading.
4. Select the desired alert delivery methods for the event.
5. Press ESC to return to the Alerts Notification Configuration screen.
6. Click OK.
This saves all of the changes made to the event.
9.2.3
Changing the Severity Level for
Individual Events
To change the event severity level for a specific event, perform the following steps:
NOTE: See Table 133 for details about the severity levels.
1. On the Alerts Notification Configuration screen, click the Alerts Setting tab.
The Alerts Setting portion of the screen appears.
2. Click Change Individual Events.
The Change Individual Events dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 182. The
dialog box shows the events by their ID number, description, and severity level.
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3. Click an event in the list to select it.
The current alert delivery methods appear for the selected event.
4. Click the Severity cell for the event.
The Event Severity drop-down menu appears for that event, as shown in Figure 183.
Figure 183:
Change Individual Events Severity Level Menu
5. Select a different severity level for the event from the menu.
6. Press ESC to return to the Alerts Notification Configuration screen.
7. Click OK to save all of the changes made to the events.
9.2.4
Multiple Events Displayed in a
Single Pop-up Window
You can view multiple events in a single pop-up window as shown in the following
figure.
Figure 184:
9.2.5
Entering or Editing the Sender
E-mail Address and SMTP Server
Pop-up for Multiple Events
You can use the Alerts Notification Configuration screen to enter or edit the sender
e-mail address and the SMTP server.
1. On the Alerts Notification Configuration screen, click the Mail Server tab.
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The Mail Server options appear, as shown in Figure 185.
Figure 185:
Mail Server Options
2. Enter a new sender e-mail address in the Sender e-mail address field or edit the
existing sender e-mail address.
3. Click OK.
9.2.6
Authenticating a Server
You can use the Alerts Notification Configuration screen to authenticate the SMTP
server, providing an extra level of security. The authentication check box enables the
User name and Password fields when selected by default. Clearing the check box
disables these fields.
Perform the following steps to enter or edit the address:
1. On the Alerts Notification Configuration screen, click the Mail Server tab.
The Mail Server options appears, as shown in Figure 185.
The authentication check box is selected by default.
2. Enter a user name in the User name field.
3. Enter the password in the Password field.
4. Click OK.
9.2.7
Saving Backup Configurations
You can save an .xml backup file of the entire alert configuration.
This includes all the settings on the three tabs.
1. On the Alerts Notification Configuration screen, click the Alert Setting tab, Mail
Server tab, or E-mail tab.
2. Click Save Backup.
The drive directory appears.
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3. Enter a filename with an .xml extension for the backup configuration (in the format
filename.xml).
4. Click Save.
The drive directory disappears.
5. Click OK.
The backup configuration is saved and the Alert Notification Configuration screen
closes.
9.2.8
Loading Backup
Configurations
You can load all of the values from a previously saved backup into the dialog (all tabs)
to edit or send to the monitor.
NOTE: If you choose to load a backup configuration and the Configure Alerts dialog
currently contains changes that have not yet been sent to the monitor, the changes will
be lost. You are prompted to confirm your choice.
1. On the Alerts Notification Configuration screen, click the Alert Setting tab, Mail
Server tab, or E-mail tab.
2. Click Load Backup.
A message warns that when you load a saved backup file, all unsaved changes
made in the current session will be lost.
3. Click Yes.
The drive directory appears, from which you can select a backup configuration to
load.
4. Select the backup configuration file (it should be in .xml format).
5. Click Open.
The drive directory disappears.
6. Click OK.
The backup configuration is loaded and the Alerts Notification Configuration screen
closes.
9.2.9
Adding E-mail Addresses of
Recipients of Alert Notifications
The E-mail tab portion of the Alerts Notification Configuration screen shows the e-mail
addresses of recipients of the alert notifications. MegaRAID Storage Manager sends
alert notifications to those e-mail addresses. Use the screen to add or remove e-mail
addresses of recipients, and to send test messages to recipients that you add.
To add e-mail addresses of recipients of the alert notifications, perform the following
steps:
1. Click the E-mail tab on the Event Notification Configuration screen.
The E-mail section of the screen appears, as shown in Figure 186.
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Figure 186:
E-mail Settings
2. Enter the e-mail address you want to add in the New recipient email address field.
3. Click Add.
The new e-mail address appears in the Recipient email addresses field.
9.2.10 Testing E-mail Addresses of
Recipients of Alert Notifications
Use the E-mail tab portion of the Alerts Notification Configuration screen to send test
messages to the e-mail addresses that you added for the recipients of alert
notifications.
1. Click the E-mail tab on the Event Notification Configuration screen.
The E-mail section of the screen appears, as shown in Figure 186.
2. Click an e-mail address in the Recipient e-mail addresses field.
3. Click Test.
4. Confirm whether the test message was sent to the e-mail address.
If MegaRAID Storage Manager cannot send an e-mail message to the e-mail
address, an error message appears.
9.2.11 Removing E-mail Addresses of
Recipients of Alert Notifications
Use the E-mail tab portion of the Alerts Notification Configuration screen to remove
e-mail addresses of the recipients of alert notifications.
1. Click the E-mail tab on the Event Notification Configuration screen.
The E-mail section of the screen appears, as shown in Figure 186.
2. Click an e-mail address in the Recipient e-mail addresses field.
The Remove button, which was grayed out, is now active.
3. Click Remove.
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The e-mail address is deleted from the list.
9.3
Monitoring Controllers
When MegaRAID Storage Manager software is running, you can see the status of all
controllers in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window. If the controller
is operating normally, the controller icon looks like this:
. If the controller has failed,
a small red circle appears to the right of the icon. (See Section 7.2.1,
Dashboard/PhysicalView/Logical View for a complete list of device icons.)
To display complete controller information, click a controller icon in the left panel of the
MegaRAID Storage Manager window. The controller properties display in the right
panel, as shown in Figure 187.
Figure 187:
Controller Properties
Most of the information on this screen is self-explanatory. Note the following:

The Rebuild Rate, Patrol Read Rate, Reconstruction Rate, Consistency Check Rate, and
BGI Rate (background initialization) are all user selectable. For more information, see
Section 8.4, Changing Adjustable Task Rates.

The BBU Present field indicates whether a battery backup unit is installed.

The Alarm Present field and the Alarm Enabled field indicate whether the controller
has an alarm to alert the user with an audible tone when there is an error or
problem on the controller.
The controller properties are defined in Appendix C.
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9.4
Monitoring Drives
When MegaRAID Storage Manager software is running, you can see the status of all
drives in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window. If the drive is
operating normally, its icon looks like this:
.
If the drive has failed, a small red circle appears to the right of the icon, like this:
(See Section 7.2.1, Dashboard/PhysicalView/Logical View for a complete list of device
icons.)
.
To display complete drive information, click a drive icon in the left panel of the
MegaRAID Storage Manager window. The drive properties appear in the right panel, as
shown in Figure 188.
Figure 188:
Drive Information
The information on this panel is self-explanatory. There are no user-selectable
properties for physical devices. Icons for other storage devices such as CD-ROM drives
and DAT drives can also appear in the left panel.
The Power Status property shows On when a drive is spun up and Powersave when a
drive is spun down. Note that CacheCade software drives and other drives that never
spin down still show On.
If the drives are in a drive enclosure, you can identify which drive is represented by each
drive LED on the enclosure. Follow these steps to locate the drive:
1. Click the drive icon in the left panel.
2. Click Go To>Physical Drive>Start Locating Drive.
The LED on the drive in the enclosure starts blinking to show its location.
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NOTE: LEDs on drives that are global hot spares do not blink.
3. To stop the drive LED on the enclosure from blinking, select Go To>Physical
Drive>Stop Locating Drive.
The drive properties are defined in the Glossary.
To display a graphical view of a drive, click a drive icon in the left panel of the MegaRAID
Storage Manager window, and click the Graphical View tab. In Graphical View, the
drive’s storage capacity is color coded according to the legend shown on the screen:
configured space is blue, available space is white, and reserved space is red. When you
select a virtual drive from the drop-down menu, the drive space used by that virtual
drive is displayed in green.
9.5
Running a Patrol Read
A patrol read periodically verifies all sectors of drives connected to a controller,
including the system reserved area in the RAID configured drives. A patrol read can be
used for all RAID levels and for all hot spare drives. This operation is initiated only when
the controller is idle for a defined time period and has no other background activities.
You can set the patrol read properties and start the patrol read operation, or you can
start the patrol read without changing the properties.
To set the patrol read properties and then start a patrol read, follow these steps:
1. Click a controller icon in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager main
menu.
2. Select Go To>Controller>Set Patrol Read Properties.
Figure 189:
Start Patrol Read Menu
The Patrol Read - Set properties screen displays, as shown in Figure 190.
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Figure 190:
Patrol Read Configuration
3. Select a mode for a patrol read. The options are:
— Automatic: Patrol read runs automatically at the time interval you specify on
this screen.
— Manual: Patrol read runs only when you manually start it by selecting Start
Patrol Read from the controller Options panel.
— Disabled: Patrol read does not run.
4. Specify a maximum count of drives to include in the patrol read. The count must be
from 1 to 255.
5. Click virtual drives in the list under the heading Virtual Drives to include in the
patrol read and click Add > or click Add All >> to include all of the virtual drives.
6. (Optional) Change the frequency at which the patrol read will run.
The default frequency is weekly (168 hours), which is suitable for most
configurations. The other options are hourly, daily, and monthly.
NOTE: LSI recommends that you leave the patrol read frequency and other patrol read
settings at the default values to achieve the best system performance. If you decide to
change the values, record the original default value here so you can restore them later,
if necessary:
Patrol Read Frequency: ___________________
Continuous Patrolling: Enabled/Disabled
Patrol Read Task Rate: ___________________
7. (Optional) Set Patrol Read to run at a specific time.
The default is for the patrol read to start when you click OK on this screen. To
change the default so that the patrol read starts at a specific time, follow these steps
(otherwise, skip this step and proceed to the next step):
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a. Uncheck the box Perform Patrol Read when I click OK.
b. Select the month, year, day, and time to start patrol read.
8. Click OK to enable your patrol read selections.
NOTE: Patrol read does not report on its progress while it is running. The patrol read
status is reported in the event log only.
To start a patrol read without changing the patrol read properties, follow these steps:
1. Click a controller icon in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager main
menu screen.
2. Select Go To>Controller>Start Patrol Read in the menu bar.
3. When prompted, click Yes to confirm that you want to start a patrol read.
9.5.1
Patrol Read Task Rates
You have the option to change the patrol read task rate. The task rate determines the
amount of system resources that are dedicated to a patrol read when it is running. LSI
recommends, however, that you leave the patrol read task rate at its default setting.
If you raise the task rate above the default, foreground tasks will run more slowly and it
might seem that the system is not responding. If you lower the task rate below the
default, rebuilds and other background tasks might run very slowly and might not
complete within a reasonable time. For more information, about the patrol read task
rate, see Section 8.4, Changing Adjustable Task Rates
9.6
Monitoring Virtual Drives
When MegaRAID Storage Manager is running, you can see the status of all virtual
drives. If a virtual drive is operating normally, the icon looks like this:
. If the virtual
drive is running in Degraded mode (for example, if a drive has failed), a small yellow
circle appears to the right of the icon:
. A red circle indicates that the virtual drive
has failed and data has been lost.
When the Logical tab is selected, the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager
window shows which drives are used by each virtual drive. The same drive can be used
by multiple virtual drives.
To display complete virtual drive information, click the Logical tab in the left panel and
click a virtual drive icon in the left panel. The properties appear in the right panel. All
virtual drive properties are defined in Chapter C, Glossary. Figure 191 shows the
Properties panel for a virtual drive.
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Figure 191:
Virtual Drive Properties
The RAID level, stripe size, and access policy of the virtual drive are set when it is
configured.
NOTE: You can change the read policy, write policy, and other virtual drive properties.
See Section 8.6, Changing Virtual Drive Properties for the procedure you can use to
change these properties.
If the drives in the virtual drive are in an enclosure, you can identify them by making
their LEDs blink. To do this, follow these steps:
1. Click the virtual drive icon in the left panel.
2. Click Go To>Virtual Drive>Start Locating Virtual Drive or right-click a virtual
drive and select Start Locating Virtual Drive from the menu.
The LEDs on the drives in the virtual drive start blinking (except for hot spare
drives).
3. To stop the LEDs from blinking, click Go To>Virtual Drive>Stop Locating Virtual
Drive.
9.7
Monitoring Enclosures
9.8
Monitoring Battery
Backup Units
When MegaRAID Storage Manager software is running, you can see the status of all
enclosures connected to the server by selecting the Physical tab in the left panel. If an
enclosure is operating normally, the icon looks like this:
. If the enclosure is not
functioning normally—for example, if a fan has failed—a small yellow or red circle
appears to the right of the icon.
When MegaRAID Storage Manager is running, you can monitor the status of all of the
BBUs connected to controllers in the server. If a BBU is operating normally, the icon
looks like this:
. If it has failed, a red dot appears next to the icon.
To show the properties for a BBU, perform the following steps:
1. On the main menu screen, click the Physical tab to open the physical view.
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2. Select the BBU icon in the left panel.
The BBU properties appear in the right panel. The BBU properties include the following:
9.8.1
Battery Learn Cycle

The number of times the BBU has been recharged (Cycle Count)

The full capacity of the BBU, plus the percentage of its current state of charge, and
the estimated time until it will be depleted

The current BBU temperature, voltage, current, and remaining capacity

If the battery is charging, the estimated time until it is fully charged
Learn Cycle is a battery calibration operation performed by the controller periodically
to determine the condition of the battery. You can start battery learn cycles manually or
automatically. To choose automatic battery learn cycles, enable automatic learn cycles.
To choose manual battery learn cycles, disable automatic learn cycles.
If you enable automatic learn cycles, you can delay the start of the learn cycles for up to
168 hours (7 days). If you disable automatic learn cycles, you can start the learn cycles
manually, and you can choose to receive a reminder to start a manual learn cycle.
9.8.1.1 Setting Learn Cycle
Properties
To set the learn cycle properties, perform the following steps:
1. Click the Physical tab to open the physical view.
2. Select the BBU icon in the left panel.
3. Click the Go To>BBU>Set Learn Cycle Properties.
The BBU operations screen appears.
4. On the BBU operations screen, click Enable automatic learn cycles and click Go.
You can delay the start of the next learn cycle by up to 7 days (168 hours) using the
Delay next learn cycle field.
5. To disable automatic learn cycles, click Disable automatic learn cycles and then
click Go.
You can start the learn cycles manually. In addition, you can check the box next to the
field Remind me when to start a learn cycle to receive a reminder to start a manual
learn cycle.
9.8.1.2 Starting a Learn Cycle
Manually
To start the learn cycle properties manually, perform the following steps:
1. Click the Physical tab to open the physical view.
2. Select the BBU icon in the left panel.
3. Click the Go To>BBU>Start Learn Cycle.
Another way to start the learn cycle is to right-click the BBU icon and select Start Learn
Cycle from the menu.
9.9
Monitoring Rebuilds and
Other Processes
MegaRAID Storage Manager software allows you to monitor the progress of rebuilds
and other lengthy operations in the Group Show Progress window.
Follow these steps to monitor the progress of these operations.
1. Open this window, shown in Figure 192, by selecting Manage>Show Progress on
the menu bar.
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Figure 192:
Group Show Progress Menu
The Group Show Progress window appears, as shown in Figure 193.
Figure 193:
Group Show Progress Window
Operations on virtual drives appear in the left panel of the Group Show Progress
window, and operations on drives appear in the right panel. The following
operations appear in this window:
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
Background or foreground initialization of a virtual drive (see Section 10.1,
Initializing a Virtual Drive)

Rebuild (see Section 10.4, Rebuilding a Drive)

Modify Drive Group (see Section 8.7, Changing a Virtual Drive Configuration)
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
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Check Consistency (see Section 10.2, Running a Consistency Check)
2. (Optional) Click Abort All to abort all ongoing processes.
3. Click Close to close the window.
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Chapter 10: Maintaining and Managing Storage Configurations | Initializing a Virtual Drive
Chapter 10
Maintaining and Managing Storage Configurations
This chapter explains how to use MegaRAID Storage Manager software to maintain and
manage storage configurations.
10.1
Initializing a Virtual Drive
To initialize a virtual drive after completing the configuration process, follow these
steps:
1. Select the Logical tab in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager main
menu, and click the icon of the virtual drive that you want to initialize.
2. Select Go To>Virtual Drive>Start Initialization.
The initialize dialog box appears.
3. Select the virtual drive(s) to initialize.
CAUTION: Initialization erases all data on the virtual drive. Make sure to back up any
data you want to keep before you initialize. Make sure the operating system is not
installed on the virtual drive you are initializing.
4. Select the Fast Initialization check box if you want to use this option.
If you leave the box unchecked, MegaRAID Storage Manager software will run a Full
Initialization on the virtual drive. (For more information, see Section 8.1.1, Selecting
Virtual Drive Settings)
5. Click Start to begin the initialization.
You can monitor the progress of the initialization. See Section 9.9, Monitoring
Rebuilds and Other Processes for more information.
10.1.1
Running a Group Initialization
Initialization prepares the storage medium for use. You can run an initialization on
multiple drives at one time. Follow these steps to run a group consistency check.
1. Click Manage>Initialize.
The Group Consistency Check appears, as shown in Figure 198.
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Figure 194:
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Group Initialization Dialog Box
2. Check the virtual drives to run the initialization on or click Select All to select all of
the virtual drives.
3. Click Start.
You can monitor the progress of the group initialization. See Section 9.9, Monitoring
Rebuilds and Other Processes for more information.
10.2 Running a Consistency
Check
The Consistency Check operation verifies correctness of the data in virtual drives that
use RAID levels 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, and 60. (RAID 0 does not provide data redundancy). For
example, in a system with parity, checking consistency means computing the data on
one drive and comparing the results to the contents of the parity drive.
You should run a consistency check on fault-tolerant virtual drives periodically. You
must run the consistency check if you suspect that the virtual drive data might be
corrupted. Be sure to back up the data before running a consistency check if you think
the data might be corrupted.
To run a consistency check, first set the consistency check properties and then
schedule the consistency check. This section explains how to set the properties,
schedule the check, and run the consistency check.
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10.2.1 Setting the Consistency Check
Settings
Follow these steps to set the properties for a consistency check:
1. Click the Physical tab or Logical tab and select the controller.
2. Click Go To>Controller>Set Consistency Check Properties.
Figure 195 shows the consistency check properties menu item.
Figure 195:
Set Consistency Check Properties Option
The Set Consistency Check Properties dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 196.
Figure 196:
Set Consistency Check Properties Dialog Box
3. Choose one of the two options:
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— Stop Consistency Check on Error: The RAID controller stops the consistency
check operation if the utility finds an error.
— Continue Consistency Check and Fix Errors: The RAID controller continues the
consistency check if the utility finds and error, and then fixes the errors.
4. Click Ok.
10.2.2
Check
Scheduling a Consistency
Follow these steps to set the properties for a consistency check:
1. Click the Physical tab or Logical tab and select the controller.
2. Click Go To>Controller>Schedule Consistency Check.
The Schedule Consistency dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 196.
Figure 197:
Schedule Consistency Check Dialog Box
3. Perform the following steps to schedule the consistency check:
a. Select how often to run the consistency check from the drop-down menu.
You can click Advanced for more detailed date options.
b. (Optional) Check the Run consistency check continuously check box.
c. Select the month, day, and year on which to start the consistency check.
d. Select the time of day to start the consistency check.
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4. Click Ok.
You can monitor the progress of the consistency check. See Section 9.9, Monitoring
Rebuilds and Other Processes for more information.
10.2.3
Check
Running a Group Consistency
You can run a consistency check on multiple drives at one time. Follow these steps to
run a group consistency check.
1. Click Manage>Check Consistency.
The Group Consistency Check appears, as shown in Figure 198.
Figure 198:
Group Consistency Check Dialog Box
2. Check the virtual drives to run the consistency check on or click Select All to select
all of the virtual drives.
3. Click Start.
You can monitor the progress of the group consistency check. See Section 9.9,
Monitoring Rebuilds and Other Processes for more information.
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10.3
Scanning for New Drives
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You can use the Scan for Foreign Configuration option to find drives with foreign
configurations. A foreign configuration is a RAID configuration that already exists on a
replacement set of physical disks that you install in a computer system. In addition, if
one or more drives are removed from a configuration, by a cable pull or drive removal,
for example, the configuration on those drives is considered a foreign configuration by
the RAID controller. Drives that are foreign are listed on the physical drives list with a
special symbol in MegaRAID Storage Manager.
The utility allows you to import the existing configuration to the RAID controller or clear
the configuration so you can create a new configuration using these drives. You can
preview the foreign configuration before you decide whether to import it.
MegaRAID Storage Manager software normally detects newly installed drives and
displays icons for them in the MegaRAID Storage Manager window. If for some reason
MegaRAID Storage Manager software does not detect a new drive (or drives), you can
use the Scan for Foreign Configuration command to find it.
Follow these steps to scan for a foreign configuration:
1. Select a controller icon in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window.
2. Select Go To>Controller>Scan for Foreign Configuration.
If MegaRAID Storage Manager software detects any new drives, it displays a list of
them on the screen. If not, it notifies you that no foreign configuration is found.
3. Follow the instructions on the screen to complete the drive detection.
10.4
Rebuilding a Drive
If a single drive in a RAID 1, RAID 5, RAID 10, or RAID 50 virtual drive fails, the system is
protected from data loss. A RAID 6 virtual drive can survive two failed drives. If hot
spare disks are available, a failed drive is rebuilt automatically without any user
intervention. A failed drive must be replaced, and the data on the drive must be rebuilt
on a new drive to restore the system to fault tolerance. (You can choose to rebuild the
data on the failed drive if the drive is still operational.) If hot spare drives are available,
the failed drive is rebuilt automatically without any user intervention.
If a drive has failed, a red circle appears to the right of the drive icon:
. A small
yellow circle appears to the right of the icon of the virtual drive that uses this drive:
. This indicates that the virtual drive is in a degraded state; the data is still safe, but
data could be lost if another drive fails.
Follow these steps if you need to rebuild a drive:
1. Right-click the icon of the failed drive, and select Rebuild.
2. Click Yes when the warning message appears. If the drive is still good, a rebuild will
start.
You can monitor the progress of the rebuild in the Group Show Progress window by
selecting Manage>Show Progress. If the drive cannot be rebuilt, an error message
appears. Continue with the next step.
3. Shut down the system, disconnect the power cord, and open the computer case.
4. Replace the failed drive with a new drive of equal capacity.
5. Close the computer case, reconnect the power cord, and restart the computer.
6. Restart the MegaRAID Storage Manager software.
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Chapter 10: Maintaining and Managing Storage Configurations | Making a Drive Offline or
Missing
When the new drive spins up, the drive icon changes back to normal status, and the
rebuild process begins automatically. You can monitor the progress of the rebuild in
the Group Show Progress window by selecting Manage>Show Progress.
10.5 Making a Drive Offline or
Missing
If a drive is currently part of a redundant configuration and you want to use it in
another configuration, you can use MegaRAID Storage Manager commands to remove
the drive from the first configuration and change the drive state to Unconfigured Good.
CAUTION: After you perform this procedure, all data on that drive is lost.
To remove the drive from the configuration without harming the data on the virtual
drive, follow these steps:
1. In the MegaRAID Storage Manager main menu, click Go To>Physical Drive>Make
Drive (O)ffline.
The drive status changes to Offline.
2. Click Go To>Physical Drive>(M)ark Drive as Missing.
The drive status changes to Unconfigured Good.
CAUTION: After you perform this step, the data on this drive is no longer valid.
3. If necessary, create a hot spare drive for the virtual drive from which you have
removed the drive. (See Section 8.3, Adding Hot Spare Drives.)
When a hot spare is available, the data on the virtual drive will be rebuilt. You can
now use the removed drive for another configuration.
CAUTION: If MegaRAID Storage Manager software detects that a drive in a virtual drive
has failed, it makes the drive offline. If this happens, you must remove the drive and
replace it. You cannot make the drive usable for another configuration by using the
Mark physical disk as missing and Rescan commands.
10.6
Upgrading the Firmware
MegaRAID Storage Manager software enables you to easily upgrade the controller
firmware.
To avoid data loss because of dirty cache on the controller, the utility forces the virtual
disks into Write through mode after a firmware upgrade. It is in this mode until the
server reboots. In Write through mode, the controller sends a data transfer completion
signal to the host when the disk subsystem has received all the data in a transaction.
This way, in case of a power outage, the controller does not discard the dirty cache.
Follow these steps to upgrade the firmware:
1. In the MegaRAID Storage Manager main menu, click Go To>Controller>Update
Controller Firmware.
2. Click Browse to locate the .rom update file, as shown in Figure 199.
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Figure 199:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Locate the Controller Firmware File
3. After you locate the file, click OK.
MegaRAID Storage Manager software displays the version of the existing firmware
and the version of the new firmware file.
4. When you are prompted to indicate whether you want to upgrade the firmware,
click Yes.
The controller is updated with the new firmware code contained in the .rom file.
5. Reboot the system after the new firmware is flashed.
The new firmware does not take effect until reboot.
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Chapter 11
Using MegaRAID® Advanced Software
This chapter describes the MegaRAID advanced software offered by MegaRAID Storage
Manager (MSM) for certain MegaRAID SAS 6Gb/s RAID controllers and explains how to
use these features.
11.1 MegaRAID Advanced
Software
The MegaRAID advanced software are features that MegaRAID Storage Manager (MSM)
and WebBIOS support on certain MegaRAID SAS 6Gb/s RAID controllers. The following
MegaRAID SAS 6Gb/s RAID controllers support advanced software features that offer
improved performance, data protection, and availability:

MegaRAID SAS 9260-4i

MegaRAID SAS 9260-8i

MegaRAID SAS 9280-4i4e
NOTE: Record your controller serial number in a safe location in case you need to
contact LSI.
NOTE: Back up your data before you make a change in the system configuration. Failure
to do so could result in data loss.
11.2 Recovery Advanced
Software
11.2.1
MegaRAID Software Licensing
11.2.2 Managing MegaRAID
Advanced Software
The MegaRAID advanced software include the following features.

MegaRAID FastPath

MegaRAID Recovery

MegaRAID CacheCade

MegaRAID RAID 6

MegaRAID RAID 5
MegaRAID Software licensing authorizes you to enable the MegaRAID advanced
software features present in the MSM application. You have to obtain the activation key
to enable, and use the advanced software features present in the controller. You can
also implement the rehosting process by configuring the key vault, if you want to
transfer the advanced features from one controller to another.
The MegaRAID Advanced Software wizard allows you to use the advanced software
features. To enable the activation key to use the advanced controller features:
1. Select the Physical view or the Logical view tab in the left panel of the MegaRAID
Storage Manager window, and click a controller icon.
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2. Choose either of the following options:
a. Select Go To>Controller >Manage MegaRAID Advanced Software Options,
b. Click Manage MegaRAID Advanced Software Options from the dash board
under the feature portlet.
The Manage MegaRAID Advanced Software Options wizard appears as shown in
the following figure.
Figure 200:
Manage MegaRAID Advanced Software Options
The Activated MegaRAID Advanced Software fields consist of Advanced Software,
License, and Mode columns.
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
The Advanced Software column displays the list of advanced softwares present in
the controller.

The License column displays the license details for the list of advanced softwares
present in the Advanced Software column. The license details validates if the
software is under trial period, or if it can be used without any trial period
(Unlimited).

The Mode column displays the current status of the advanced software. The current
status can be Secured, Not secured, or Factory installed.
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NOTE: The Mode column appears only if the keyvault is present.
3. Click the LSI Advanced Software License Management Portal link to obtain the license
authorization code and activation key.
If you click the Benefits of each MegaRAID Advanced Software link, you can access
http://www.lsi.com/channel/products/advanced_software. If you click the Tips on
activating MegaRAID Advanced Software link, you can access
www.lsi.com/channel/licensing.
Both the Safe ID field and the Serial Number field consists of a pre-defined value
generated by the controller. Alternatively, you can copy the value and paste it in the
text box for the applicable field.
4. Click Activate.
The Activate MegaRAID Advanced Software – Choose Method wizard appears as
shown in the following figure.
11.2.3
Activation Key
Figure 201: Activate MegaRAID Advanced Software – Choose Method
Perform the following steps to enter the Activation key.
1. Click the LSI Advanced Software License Management Portal link to obtain a
License Authorization Code (LAC) and Activation Key.
2. Use any one of the following options to enter the activation key:
a. Select the Enter an Activation Key option, and enter the activation key in the
text box provided below the Activation Key field.
b. Select the Select an Activation Key file, and click Browse to get the path of the
activation Key file.
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3. Click Next.
After you click Next, the Activate MegaRAID Advanced Software – Summary
wizard appears as shown in Figure 202.
ELSE
Depending on the relevant scenarios the application responds by displaying
corresponding messages as shown in Application Scenarios and Messages.
11.2.4 Advanced MegaRAID Software
Status Summary
After you enter the activation key, and click Next as shown in Figure 201, the Activate
MegaRAID Advanced Software – Summary wizard displays the list of the advanced
softwares along with their former status and new status in the controller.
— The Advanced Software column displays the currently available software in the
controller.
— The Former Status column displays the status of the available advanced
software prior to entering the activation key.
— The New Status column displays the status of the available advanced software,
after entering the activation key.
Figure 202:
Activate MegaRAID Advanced Software – Summary
4. Click Finish.
The status of the advanced software is enabled, and the advanced features are
secured in the Key Vault.
5. Click Cancel to cancel this action.
11.2.5 Application Scenarios and
Messages
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
Scenario # 1
If you enter an invalid activation key, the following message appears.
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Figure 203:

Invalid Activation Key
Scenario # 2
If you enter an incorrect activation key file, the following message appears.
Figure 204:

Incorrect Activation Key
Scenario # 3
If you enter an incorrect activation key, and if there is a mismatch between the
activation key and the controller, the following message appears.
Figure 205:
Activation Key Mismatch
NOTE: Entering a space in the Activation Key field disables the Next button in
Figure 201.
If you click Cancel in the Activate MegaRAID Advanced Software – Choose Method,
as shown in Figure 201, the following confirmation dialog box appears.
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Figure 206:
11.2.6 Activating an Unlimited Key
Over a Trial Key
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Confirmation Dialog Box
When you activate an unlimited key over a trial key, a message, "The existing trial key will
be deactivated and all the advanced software associated with it will be disabled" appears
as shown in the following figure.
Figure 207:
Activating an Unlimited Key over a Trial Key
NOTE: Except the yellow shading, the other shading of the text is provided for easy
understanding in the relevant screens.
11.2.6.1 Activating a Trial
Software
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When you activate a trial software, a message "This trial software expires in 30 days"
appears as shown in the following figure.
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Figure 208:
11.2.6.2 Activating the Unlimited
Key
When you activate the unlimited key or a trial key, a message "Review the summary and
go back if you need to make corrections" appears as shown in the following figure.
Figure 209:
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Activating a Trial Software
Activating an Unlimited Key
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11.2.6.3 Reusing the Activation
Key
If you are using an existing activated key, the features get transferred to the keyvault,
and the message shown in the following figure appears.
Figure 210:
11.2.6.4 Securing Advanced
MegaRAID Software
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Reusing the Activation Key
When you want to transfer the advanced software from the controller to keyvault, use
the Securing Advanced MegaRAID Software - Confirmation wizard. This is a
conditional wizard, and appears only when the keyvault and the unsecured keys exist.
1. Select any one of the following options to view the Securing Advanced MegaRAID
Software - Confirmation wizard.
2. Select the Physical View tab in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager
main menu, and click a controller icon.
3. Select Go To>Controller>Manage MegaRAID Advanced Software Options
wizard.
Figure 211:
Securing Advanced MegaRAID Software
4. Select the Confirm check box, if you want to secure the advanced software.
After you select the check box, the Yes button gets enabled. This implies that the
advanced software is secured in the keyvault.
If the advanced software is not secured, the Secure MegaRAID Advanced
Software - Confirmation dialog box appears as shown in Figure 206.
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11.2.7 Configuring Keyvault
(Re-hosting process)
Rehosting is a process of transferring the advanced software features from one
controller to another. To implement the rehosting process, you must configure the
Configure Key Vault button in the Manage MegaRAID Software Options wizard as
shown in Figure 200.
Choose any one of the following options to configure the Key vault.
1. Click the Configure Key Vault button in the Manage MegaRAID Advanced
Software options wizard in Figure 200.
2. Select Go To>Controller >Manage Premium Feature.
The Configure Key Vault-Confirm Re-Hosting Process wizard appears as shown
in the following figure.
Figure 212:
Configure Key Vault
3. Select the "I acknowledge that I have completed the re-hosting process in the LSI
Advanced Software License Management Portal" check box.
4. Click Next.
The Configure key Vault- Secure Advanced Software options wizard appears as
shown in the following figure.
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Figure 213:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Configure Key Vault - Secure Advanced Software Options
5. Click Finish; the advanced software options are secured in the keyvault.
NOTE: The Next button in the Configure Key Vault wizard (See Figure 212) is enabled
only if you select the check box.
NOTE: This wizard is conditional and pops up only if the rehosting process is necessary,
and when both the keyvault and the unsecured keys are present at the same time.
11.2.8
Rehosting Complete
If you want to transfer the advanced software options from one controller to another,
use the rehosting process. The rehosting process makes sure that these options are
secured in the keyvault. You have to configure the keyvault to complete the rehosting
process.
Choose any one of the following options to complete the rehosting process.

Click the Configure Key Vault button from the Manage MegaRAID Advanced
Software Options wizard.

Select Go To>Controller >Manage MegaRAID Advanced Software Options
wizard.
The Re-hosting process - Complete wizard appears as shown in the following
figure.
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Figure 214:
Confirm Rehosting
6. Select "I acknowledge that I have completed the re-hosting process in the LSI Advanced
Software License Management Portal" check box if you want to complete the
rehosting process.
This makes sure that the advanced software features are transferred to the
controller.
7. Click Cancel if you do not want the re-hosting process.
11.2.9
Deactivate Trial Software
When you want to deactivate a trial software, use the Deactivate All Trial Software
wizard.
Perform the following steps to enable the deactivate trial software button.
1. Click the Deactivate All Trial Software button in the Manage MegaRAID
Advanced Software Options wizard as shown in Figure 200.
The Deactivate All Trial Software - Confirmation dialog box appears as shown in
the following figure.
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Figure 215:
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Deactivate All Trial Software
2. Select the Confirm check box, if you want to deactivate the software, which are
used with a trial key.
3. Click Yes.
The trial software is deactivated.
11.2.10 MegaRAID Recovery
MegaRAID Recovery, also known as Snapshot, offers a simplified way to recover data
and provides automatic protection for the boot volume. You can use the Recovery
feature to take a snapshot of a volume and to restore a volume or file. Snapshot
functionality allows you to capture data changes to the volume, and, if data is deleted
accidentally or maliciously, you can restore the data from the view or roll back to a
snapshot at a previous point-in-time (PiT). MegaRAID Recovery supports up to eight
snapshots of PiTs for each volume.
Each Recovery PiT volume snapshot is typically a fraction of the original volume size,
because it tracks only the changes that are made to a volume after the PiT is created.
Disk space for PiTs is reserved in the Snapshot Repository virtual drive, and the PiT is
expanded in small increments as new data is written to the volume. Multiple PiTs of
each volume can be retained online, enabling frequent snapshots to be stored in a
space-efficient manner.
11.2.11 Recovery Scenarios
There are three primary scenarios in which to use the Recovery feature:
1. Restore the missing or deleted files (restore from view) with the following steps:
a. Discover which file is missing or corrupted.
b. Review the Snapshot views of the file content (also known as "mounting" af
snapshot) from each PiT until you find an earlier version of the missing or
corrupted file. A mounted view appears as another drive letter in the Windows
Explorer screen.
c. Drag and drop the earlier version of the file from Snapshot view back into the
online storage volume that was the source of the Snapshot.
2. If there is a corrupt volume or operating system, roll back the volume to a previous
state with the following steps:
a. Restart the system and press Ctrl+H during POST (Power-on Self Test).
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b. In the WebBIOS screen, select the corrupted virtual drive and on the next screen
that appears, select the option Adv Opers.
c. Select Rollback and designate the most recent PiT from the drop-down list.
d. Click Go and then exit WebBIOS.
The system reboots.
e. Begin debug/verification procedures on the volume.
You can follow these same steps to roll back to previous PiTs.
3. Reduce the risk of extended downtime during application updates/upgrades in the
IT center with the following steps:
a. When the application is offline, take a snapshot of the application volume.
b. Install each patch individually and test for any new defects that might have been
introduced.
c. Take a snapshot after you test each patch and determine that it is clean.
d. If a defect is introduced, roll back to the previous installation and bypass the
installation of the defective patch.
NOTE: If the volume is still damaged, continue to select from the next most current PiT
to the oldest.
11.2.12 Enabling the Recovery
Advanced Software
You can enable the Recovery advanced software in MSM. When you enable Recovery,
you create two virtual drives, one as a Snapshot Base or a source and the other as a
Snapshot Repository. The base virtual drive contains the data that is stored in the
repository virtual drive.
Follow these steps to enable MegaRAID Recovery.
1. Select the Logical tab on the main menu screen for the Logical view.
2. Select and highlight a virtual drive from the list of virtual drives.
This is the Snapshot Base virtual drive.
NOTE: A Base virtual drive and a Repository virtual drive can be associated with the
same drives or a common set of drives, or the two virtual drives can be located on two
completely separate set of drives. Using a separate set of drives for the Base virtual drive
and the Repository virtual drives provides a performance advantage over using a
common set of drives.
3. Select Go To->Virtual Drive->Enable MegaRAID Recovery on the menu bar, as
shown in Figure 216.
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Figure 216:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Enable MegaRAID Recovery Menu Option
The Enable MegaRAID Recovery Wizard appears, as shown in Figure 217. This wizard
allows you to select the virtual drive (VD) to use as the snapshot repository.
11.2.13 Snapshot Repository
You can select an existing VD, or create a new VD for the snapshot repository.
Select any one of the options to select or create a new VD.

Select the VD to use as the Snapshot Repository in the Snapshot Repository field
from the Enable MegaRAID Recovery Wizard wizard as shown in Figure 217.

Click the Create New button to create a new VD to use as the Snapshot Repository.
When you create a new VD, the newly created VD gets appended to the existing
rows in the Snapshot Repository field.
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Figure 217:
Enable MegaRAID Recovery Wizard
The Snapshot Repository field displays the details of the default VDs existing in
the system, if there are any.
—
—
—
—
The Name — Displays the name of the VD.
The Status — Displays the status of the VD.
The Available Capacity — Displays the available capacity on the VD.
The Total Capacity — Displays the total capacity of the VD.
If the default VDs do not exist in the system, the Snapshot Repository field
columns will be blank.
The status of the VD can be optimal, degraded, or partially degraded.
4. In the Select Capacity field, use the drop-down selector to select the appropriate
capacity to use for changes to the base VD.
The capacity depends on how write-intensive the application snapshots are. The
available capacity is the largest free block of capacity on the snapshot repository
VD.
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NOTE: Refer to the tips provided for allocating capacity in Figure 217.
NOTE: If you designate all of the capacity for the Virtual Drive Repository, you cannot
use the same virtual drive as a repository for other volumes.
5. Click Next.
The Enable MegaRAID Recovery wizard- Displaying the selected Virtual Drive
appears as shown in Figure 218. This wizard lets you to select the VD to be used as
the snapshot repository.
11.2.14 Selecting the Virtual Drive
You can select the VD to use as the snapshot repository, and also allocate the capacity
for the VD from the snapshot repository.
Perform these steps to select the VD in the Snapshot Repository field:
1. Select the VD to be used as the snapshot repository to hold the snap-shot
information. The selected VD gets highlighted as shown in the following figure.
Figure 218:
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Enable MegaRAID Recovery Wizard- Displaying the selected Virtual Drive
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2. In the Select Capacity field, use the drop-down selector to select the appropriate
capacity to use for changes to the base VD.
3. Click Next.
The Enable MegaRAID Recovery wizard - Create Snapshot Schedule wizard
appears as shown in Figure 219. This wizard lets you to schedule the snapshots.
11.2.15 Scheduling Snapshots
You can select an existing snapshot schedule or create a new snapshot schedule for the
VD.
Follow these steps to schedule snapshots.
1. Select any one of the options shown in the Enable MegaRAID Recovery - Create
Snapshot Schedule wizard in Figure 219 to schedule snapshots using the radio
button.
Figure 219:

Enable MegaRAID Recovery - Create Snapshot Schedule
Add virtual drive to the existing schedule — This option allows you to add a VD to a
pre-existing schedule already defined in the system.
The Schedule field displays the schedule details of the VD.
— The Frequency column — Displays the frequency of the daily or weekly
snapshot schedule.
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— The Next Snapshot column — Displays the date and time of the next scheduled
snapshot.
— The Scheduled Virtual Drives column — Represents the details of the default
VDs present in the system.

Create new schedule — This option allows you to create a new schedule to the VD.
— In the Frequency field, use the drop-down selector to select the frequency of
the snapshot (daily or weekly).
— In the Time field, use the drop-down selector to select the time of the scheduled
snapshot.

Do not schedule any automatic snapshots — This option prevents you from
capturing automatic snapshots from the system.
2. Click Next.
The Enable MegaRAID Recovery - Editing Snapshot Properties wizard appears
as shown in Figure 220. You can edit the settings for automatic snapshots.
11.2.16 Editing Snapshots
You can edit the property settings that are already defined for the automatic snapshots
using the options as shown in the following figure.
Figure 220:
Enable MegaRAID Recovery- Editing Snapshot Properties
Select any one of the options shown in Figure 220 to edit the snapshots.

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Automatically delete the oldest snapshot —This option automatically deletes the
oldest snap shot present in the system.
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
Stop taking snapshots — This option, prevents the application from taking the
snapshots.

Take a snapshot on every reboot(recommended for boot virtual drives) — To use
this option, select the check box next to the Take a snapshot on every reboot
(recommended for boot virtual drives) field.
This option provides you a snapshot taken on boot after each successful shutdown.
You can use this snapshot of the boot VD to restore the operating system on the VD
if it becomes corrupted.
3. Click Finish.
A Confirm Enable Snapshots dialog box appears. This dialog box prompts you to
make sure whether you want to enable snapshots on VD or not.
Figure 221:
Confirm Enable Snapshots
4. If the answer is Yes, select the Confirm check box.
When you select the Confirm check box, the Yes button gets enabled. The
snapshots get enabled on the VD.
This VD becomes a snapshot repository. Use it only for storing snapshot-related
data.
5. If you click No, the snapshots will not be enabled on the selected VD.
CAUTION: After you enable the snapshots on this VD, you cannot change the allocated
percentage of capacity or the snapshot repository without first disabling the snapshots
and losing any snapshot data.
11.2.17 Snapshot Base Details
You can view the snapshot base details of the virtual base drive.
Follow these steps to view the details of the snapshot of the virtual base drive.
1. Select the Logical tab on the main menu from the MegaRAID Storage Manager
screen.
2. Click a base virtual drive in the left frame.
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After you click the base virtual drive, the base virtual drive information appears in the
right frame of the Properties tab under Snapshot Base Details (marked pink in the
following figure).
Figure 222:
11.2.18 Manage Snapshots
Snapshot Base details
You can create snapshots, delete snapshots, create views, and also edit, pause, or delete
schedules using the Manage Snapshots wizard.
1. Select Go To->Virtual Drive->Manage Snapshot wizard on the menu bar, as
shown in Figure 223.
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Figure 223:
Manage Snapshots
You can edit the snapshot schedule using the Edit Schedule button, pause the
snapshot schedule using the Pause button, and delete the snapshot schedule using
the Delete button.
The Snapshot field displays the snapshot details.

The Name column displays the name of the snapshot.

The Status column displays the status of the snapshot.

The Capacity Used column displays the capacity consumed by the snapshot.
You can create the snapshot using the Create Snapshot button, and delete the
snapshot using the Delete Snapshot button.
In the View Details field, you can create a view using the Create View button, and edit
the settings for automatic snapshots using the Advanced button.
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11.2.19 Editing Schedule
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
You can edit the schedule using the Edit Schedule screen. You can change the
frequency of the snapshot, the day in which the snapshot needs to be taken, and the
time during which the snapshot needs to be taken.
1. Click the Edit Schedule button in the Manage Snapshots wizard in Figure 223, if
you want to edit the snapshot schedule. The Edit Schedule screen appears as
shown in Figure 224.
Figure 224:
Edit Schedule

In the Frequency field, use the drop-down selector to edit the frequency of the
snapshot already taken. The frequency can be daily or weekly.

In the Day field, use the drop-down selector to edit the day of the snapshot already
taken. The days can be from Monday through Sunday.

In the Time field, use the drop-down selector to edit the time of the snapshot
already taken.
After you select all of the above fields, the virtual drives matching these fields
appear in the Virtual drives on this schedule check box.
2. Select the Virtual drives on this schedule check box and click OK.
The virtual drive details are edited.
11.2.20 Advanced Settings
You can edit the settings for the automatic snapshots. You can automatically delete the
oldest snapshot, or stop taking snapshots, or take a snapshot on every reboot.
1. Click Advanced in the Manage Snapshots wizard as shown in Figure 223.
The Advanced screen appears as shown in Figure 225.
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Figure 225:
Advanced Settings
You can edit the settings by selecting,

Automatically delete the oldest snapshot option, if you want to delete the oldest
snapshot.

Stop taking snapshots option, if you want to stop taking snapshots.

Take a snapshot on every reboot (recommended for boot virtual drive) option,
if you want a snapshot on every reboot.
2. Click OK.
The settings are edited.
11.2.21 Create View
You can create views using the Create View button present in the Manage Snapshots
area under the View Details field. The view provides the snapshot details of the VD
available at that particular time.
Follow these steps to create views of the snapshots.
1. Click Create View button in the Manage Snapshots wizard in as shown in
Figure 223.
The Create View screen appears as shown in Figure 226.
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Figure 226:
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Create View
2. In the View name field, enter the view name. For example, view.
3. In the Write capacity field, use the drop-down selector to allocate capacity for
writes to the view.
4. Click OK.
The capacity is allocated for writes to the view.
11.2.22 Viewing Snapshot Details
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If the view details of the snapshot are available at that particular time for the VD, these
details appear under the view details in the Manage snapshots wizard as shown in
Figure 227.
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Figure 227:
11.2.23 No View Details for Snapshot
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View Details
When there is no view for the snapshot, the following message appears in the View
details area as shown in Figure 228.
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Figure 228:
11.2.24 No Snapshot Schedule
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
No view present for the snapshot
When there are virtual drives with no snapshot schedule, the following message
appears as shown in Figure 229.
.
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Figure 229:
11.2.25 Creating Views
Virtual drives with no snapshot schedule

Click Add to Schedule to add a snapshot schedule.

Click New Schedule to add a new snapshot schedule.
After you create the snapshots, you can create views of the PiT snapshots. You can
search the views to find a snapshot that does not contain the corrupt data or a
snapshot that contains the deleted data, depending on the situation.
Follow these steps to create views of the snapshots.
1. Click the Logical view on the main menu screen.
2. Click the Snapshot Base virtual drive in the left frame.
3. Click the Snapshots tab in the right frame.
This screen shows the Snapshot Base details and any existing snapshots.
4. Click Create View in the right frame.
The Create View screen appears, as shown in Figure 230.
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Create View Screen
5. Enter the name of the view in the Enter View name field
6. Enter the capacity in the Available Capacity field to set aside in the snapshot.
This is a percentage of the Repository virtual drive capacity.
7. Click OK.
This creates the view of the Point-in-Time snapshot of the volume.
11.2.26 Restoring by Rolling Back to a
Snapshot
You can roll back to a previous Point-in-Time snapshot to recover an entire volume. This
action is often used where there are malicious files that cannot be traced. Reboot the
system, and then roll back to that snapshot.
Follow these steps to roll back the volume version to an earlier version.
1. After you determine there are malicious or corrupt files, start the WebBIOS
configuration utility by pressing Ctrl+H during POST.
2. Click the Snapshot Base virtual drive in the right frame.
3. Select Adv Opers at the bottom of the screen.
4. Select Rollback and then designate a snapshot PiT from the drop-down list.
5. Click Go.
6. Exit WebBIOS and reboot the system.
NOTE: If the operating system is corrupted and cannot boot, go to Section 4.10.7,
Restoring a Virtual Drive by Rolling Back to a Snapshot, in the WebBIOS Configuration
Utility.
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11.2.27 Restoring from a View
Chapter 11: Using MegaRAID® Advanced Software | CacheCade Advanced Software
After you discover that a file, record, or file system is missing or deleted, you can
restoring the data from a view. You can mount any PiT to create an instant view of the
data at a previous point-in-time. Then you can restore the data in MSM and
drag-and-drop the lost data and/or files back into the source data virtual drive volume.
Follow these steps to restore a file from view.
1. Mount a view of the file content from each PiT until you find the missing file.
2. Drag and drop the missing file from Snapshot view back into the online storage
volume that was the source of the Snapshot.
11.2.28 Deleting a Snapshot
NOTE: You can delete only the oldest snapshot.
Follow these steps to delete a snapshot.
1. Select the Logical tab on the main menu screen for the Logical view.
2. Click the Snapshot Base virtual drive in the left frame.
3. Click the Snapshots tab in the right frame.
This screen shows the Snapshot Base details and any existing snapshots.
4. Click the oldest snapshot in the time line.
5. Click the Delete Snapshot button.
This deletes the oldest snapshot.
11.3 CacheCade Advanced
Software
MegaRAID CacheCade improves application performance by expanding the MegaRAID
read-caching capacity. The CacheCade feature uses high-performing CacheCade
software as a secondary tier of cache to provide faster reads and to maximize
transactional I/O performance.
Using CacheCade software as controller cache allows for very large data sets to be
present in cache, delivering up to a performance improvement that is 50 times greater
than regular cache in read-intensive applications, such as online transaction processing
(OLTP), and file and Web server workloads. The solution is designed to accelerate the
I/O performance of HDD-based drive groups while only requiring a small investment in
CacheCade software technology.
To support full-throughput for multiple direct-attached CacheCade software, this
feature reduces IO-processing overhead in the 2108-chip-based MegaRAID controllers.
CacheCade offers performance equivalent to flash-based controllers and better
performance for RAID 5 and RAID 6 when compared to Fusion I/O.
11.3.1 Using the CacheCade
Advanced Software
Perform the following steps to use the CacheCade advanced software.
1. Click a RAID controller icon in the left frame.
2. Click Controller>Create CacheCade on the menu bar, as shown in Figure 231.
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Create CacheCade Menu Option
The Wizard screen appears.
3. Click on unconfigured CacheCade software drives in the left frame to select the
drives for the CacheCade drive group, as shown in Figure 232.
Figure 232:
CacheCade Wizard Screen
After you select the unconfigured drives, the Add > button is available.
4. Click Add > to move the selected drives to the drive group in the right frame, as
shown in Figure 233.
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Figure 233:
CacheCade Drive Group Screen
After you move the selected drives, the Create CacheCade™ Drive Group button is
available.
5. Click Create CacheCade™ Drive Group.
6. Click Next.
Use the next screen that appears to select parameters for the cache disk.
7. Enter a name for the CacheCade virtual drive in the CacheCade VD name field and
click Create.
Depending on the number of drives, you might have the option to set the capacity
of the CacheCade drive.
The CacheCade drive group icon appears in the menu screen, as shown in
Figure 234.
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CacheCade Drive Group Icon
8. Click Next.
The summary screen appears, as shown in Figure 235. This screen displays the drive
group name, the number of drives, the total capacity, the free capacity, the
CacheCade virtual drive name, and the capacity being used.
Figure 235:
CacheCade Virtual Drive Summary Screen
9. Click Finish.
A confirmation message displays after the CacheCade virtual drive is successfully
created.
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Chapter 11: Using MegaRAID® Advanced Software | FastPath Advanced Software
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The CacheCade drive icon appears next to the RAID controller in the left frame, as
shown in Figure 236.
Figure 236:
11.4 FastPath Advanced
Software
CacheCade Drive Icon in MegaRAID Storage Manager
MegaRAID FastPath is a high-performance IO accelerator for CacheCade software drive
groups connected to a MegaRAID controller card. CacheCade software has a read
performance advantage over HDDs and use less power. This feature dramatically
boosts storage subsystem bandwidth and overall transactional application
performance when used with a 6Gb/s MegaRAID SATA+SAS controller.
The FastPath feature supports full optimization of CacheCade software and hard disk
drive (HDD) virtual disk groups to deliver an improvement in read and write IOPS that is
three times greater than MegaRAID controllers not utilizing FastPath technology. Also,
the FastPath advanced software is faster and more cost-effective than current
flash-based adapter card solutions.
11.4.1
Setting FastPath Options
Perform the following steps to use the FastPath advanced software.
1. Select the Logical tab on the main menu screen for the Logical view.
2. Click a virtual drive icon in the left frame.
3. Click Virtual Drive>Set Virtual Drive Properties on the menu bar, as shown in
Figure 237.
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Set Virtual Drive Properties Menu
The Set Virtual Drive Properties screen appears. It shows the default settings for
the FastPath advanced software. The default settings are:
—
—
—
—
Write Policy: Write Thru
IO Policy: Direct IO
Read Policy: No Read Ahead
Dish Cache Policy: Enabled
4. Click OK.
A confirmation screen displays.
5. Click the Confirm check box and click Yes to confirm that you want to set the virtual
drive properties.
11.5 LSI SafeStore Encryption
Services
LSI SafeStore Encryption Services offer the ability to encrypt data on the drives and use
the drive-based key management to provide data security. This solution provides data
protection in the event of theft or loss of physical drives. If you remove a
self-encrypting drive from its storage system or the server in which it resides, the data
on that drive is encrypted, and becomes useless to anyone who attempts to access it
without the appropriate security authorization.
This section describes how to enable, change, and disable the drive security, and how
to import a foreign configuration using the SafeStore Encryption Services advanced
software.
The SafeStore Encryption Services advanced software provides drive security to create
secure virtual drives by using the External Key Management (EKM) and the Local Key
Management (LKM).
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11.5.1
EKM
Enabling Drive Security using

Enabling Drive Security using EKM

Enabling Drive Security using LKM
EKM is used for key management when large number of systems are deployed. You can
automate and manage the life cycle of keys and unlock configurations using EKM.
Yet another important feature of EKM is that you can use it without human intervention
to perform operations like drive migration and controller replacement.
MegaRAID accomplishes the task of obtaining keys by interacting with the EKM agent.
The EKM agent talks to the EKM server (EKMS) through a network and gets the security
key for the controller.
Keys are retrieved or created to perform the following tasks:

Create secure VDs.

Insert drives to replace failed drives in a secure configuration.

Re-key the system based on EKMS policies or user request.

Gain access to a secured configuration during boot.

Unlock and import secured drives during migration.
Perform the following configurations to enable the drive security to create secure VD
using the EKM mode with the support of EKM servers.
11.5.2
Supporting EKM mode

EKM mode is supported by MSM, and EKMS is present.

EKM mode is supported by MSM, and EKMS is not present.

Change the current security settings, or switch between the modes.

Change the security settings when the user is in EKM, and wants to switch to LKM.

Import Foreign Drives.
When you choose EKM for drive security, and decide to configure, EKM mode is
supported, and EKMS is present, the application responds to different behaviors
depending on the scenarios at that particular time.
The first scenario occurs when EKM is enabled, and the second scenario occurs when
EKM is enabled and EKMS is present. The details of this scenario are described further in
this section.
Perform the following steps to configure, EKM mode is supported, and EKMS is present.
1. Select the Physical View tab in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager
window, and click a controller icon.
2. Choose any one of the following options to arrive at the Drive Security Choose
Mode wizard.
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010

Select Go To >Controller>Enable Drive Security in the main navigation bar in the
top portion of the MSM screen.

Right-click the controller icon, and click Enable Drive Security menu. The Drive
Security Choose Mode wizard appears as shown in the following figure.
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Drive Security Choose Mode
3. Select External Key management (EKM).
4. Click OK.
After you click OK, two scenarios occur based on the availability of EKMS.

Scenario # 1
EKM is enabled.
When EKM is enabled, you can see the confirmation message as shown in the following
figure. The message displayed makes sure that the security is enabled on the controller
using EKMS.
Figure 239:
Confirm External Key Management Mode Enabled
NOTE: On the right side frame of the controller properties, in Drive Security
Properties, you can see EKM supported is ’Yes’.
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
Scenario # 2
EKM is selected, and EKMS is not present.
When EKM is selected and EKMS is not present, you have to restart the system. When
you restart the system, the system restart message appears as shown in the following
figure.
Figure 240:
System Restart
When the system restarts the boot agent generates the security keys for the controller.
NOTE: If the MSM application does not support EKM, the EKM option is greyed out.
11.5.3
Change Security Settings- LKM
When you select the Change Security Settings in the Change Security wizard as
shown in Figure 241, two options are provided for you. If you select the first option,
Change current security settings, you can change the drive security settings on the
controller. If you select the second option, Switch to External Key Management
(EKM) mode, you can switch from LKM mode to EKM mode.
Perform the following steps to configure the Change Security Settings wizard.
1. Select the Physical View tab in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager
window, and click a controller icon.
2. Choose any one of the following options to enable the Change Security Settings
wizard.
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010

Select Go To >Controller>Change Security Settings in the main navigation bar
present in the top portion of the MSM screen.

Right-click the controller icon, and click Change Security Settings. The Change
Security Settings wizard appears as shown in the following figure.
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Figure 241:
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Change Security Settings
3. Select the Change current security settings option in Figure 241, if you want to
change the drive security settings on the controller using the LKM mode.
When you select this option, the details of the Change current security settings
given in Section 11.5.10, Changing the Drive Security Settings is displayed.
4. Select Switch to External key management (EKM) mode, if you want to switch
over from LKM mode to EKM mode.
5. Click OK.
After you click OK, the authentication drive security key is generated internally by
the system.
11.5.3.1 Authentication Drive
Security Key
After you obtain the authentication drive security key from the EKM mode, enter the
authentication drive security key in the Authentication Drive Security Key dialog box
as shown in the following figure.
.
Figure 242:
Authentication Drive Security Key
If you enter a valid authentication key, a confirmation message indicating that EKM is
enabled is displayed as shown in the following figure.
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Figure 243:
Confirmation message when EKM is enabled
Based on the application’s response at that particular time, you come across two
scenarios,
Scenario #1, if EKMS is selected and EKMS is not present
Scenario #2, if you enter a wrong security key in the Authentication Drive Security
Key dialog box in Figure 242.

Scenario # 1
EKM is selected and EKMS is not present.
When EKM is selected and EKMS is not present, restart the system, and during
re-boot the boot agent generates the security keys.
When you restart the system, the system restart message appears as shown in the
following figure.
Figure 244:

System Restart
Scenario #2
Entering a wrong security key.
If you enter a wrong security key in the Authentication Drive Security Key dialog box
in Figure 242, an error message is displayed as shown in the following figure.
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Figure 245:
11.5.4
Change Security Settings - EKM
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Error Message when user enters wrong security key
When you select the Change Security Settings in the Change Security wizard as
shown in Figure 246, two options are offered to you.
If you select the first option, Change current security settings, you can traverse to the
EKM mode.
If you select the second option, Switch to Local Key Management (LKM) mode, you
can switch over to LKM mode.
Perform the following steps to configure the Change Security Settings wizard.
1. Select the Physical View tab in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager
window, and click a controller icon.
2. Choose any one of the following options to enable the Change Security Settings
wizard.

Select Go To >Controller>Change Security Settings in the main navigation bar
present in the top portion of the MSM screen.

Right-click the controller icon, and click Change Security Settings.
The Change Security Settings wizard appears as shown in the following figure.
Figure 246:
Change Security Settings
When you select the Change current security settings option, a different EKM key for
the controller is generated.
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Based on the application’s response two scenarios occur,
Scenario #1, when EKM server is present
Scenario #2, when EKM server is not present

Scenario # 1
EKM server is present.
If the EKM server is present, a confirmation message indicating that the drive security is
enabled on the controller as shown in Figure 247 is displayed.
Figure 247:

EKMS server is present
Scenario # 2
EKM server is not present.
If the EKM server is not present, restart your system, and during re-boot, the boot agent
generates the security keys.
When you restart the system, the system restart message appears as shown in the
following figure.
Figure 248:
System Restart
NOTE: If you select the Switch to Local key Management (LKM) mode in the Change
Security settings wizard in Figure 246, you can view the details of LKM in Enabling
Drive Security using LKM.
11.5.5
Importing Foreign Drives
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
You can import the foreign drives in the LKM or EKM mode. Depending on the mode
selected and the secured drives, the following scenarios occur.
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
Import Foreign Drives — LKM mode, EKM Secured Locked Drives are present.

Import Foreign Drives — EKM mode, LKM secured locked drives are present.

Import Foreign Drives — EKM mode, EKM secured locked drives are present.
Perform the following steps to configure the Scan Foreign Configuration wizard.
1. Select the Physical View tab in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager
window, and click a controller icon.
2. Choose any one of the following options to enable the Scan Foreign
Configuration wizard.

Right-click the controller node in the device tree in the left frame of the MegaRAID
Storage Manager window, and select Scan Foreign Configuration.

Select Go To>Controller>Scan Foreign Configuration in the main navigation bar
present in the top portion of the MSM screen.
If a Foreign Configuration is detected, the “Foreign Configuration Detected” screen
appears. If you choose “Import” and click OK, the Unlock Foreign drives wizard
appears as shown in Figure 250.
11.5.6
LKM
Importing Foreign Drives to
When the VD is secured with the EKM mode, and if you change the security settings
from the EKM mode to LKM mode, and want to import those foreign configured VDs,
then the following dialog box appears.
Figure 249:
11.5.7
EKM
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Importing Foreign Drives to
Importing Foreign Drives- EKM to LKM
When the VD is secured with the LKM mode, and want to switch from LKM to EKM, and
if the VD is in Foreign state, and if you want to import those foreign configuration, you
must provide the LKM key for each VD.
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Figure 250:
Unlock Foreign Drives

The locked drives field display the drives that are locked with the LKM mode.

The Security Key displays the LKM security key for the VD.
After you enter the security key in the Security key field, the system tries to unlock
each of the locked foreign drives using the security key. If at least one drive is unlocked,
then the Import preview screen appears. If no drives are unlocked, the Incorrect
security Key dialog appears.
11.5.8
EKM
Importing Foreign Drives to
When VD is secured with EKM mode, and if that VD is in Foreign state, and if you switch
to LKM mode, and if you want to import to the foreign configuration, then the dialog
box appears as shown in the following figure.
Figure 251:
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Switch to EKM Mode
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11.5.9
LKM
Enabling Drive Security using
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
This section describes how to enable, change, and disable the drive security, and how
to import a foreign configuration using the SafeStore Encryption Services advanced
software.
To enable security on the drives, you need to perform the following actions to set drive
security:

Enter a security key identifier.
A security key identifier appears whenever you have to enter a security key. If you
have more than one security key, the identifier helps you determine which security
key to enter.

Enter a security key.
After you create a security key, you have the option to create secure virtual drives
using the key. You have to use the security key to perform certain operations.
You can improve security by entering a password. To provide additional security, you
can require the password whenever anyone boots the server.
Perform the following steps to enable drive security.
1. Select the Physical View tab in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager
window, and click a controller icon.
2. Select Go To>Controller>Change Drive Security>Enable.
The Enable Drive Security screen appears as shown in the following figure.
Figure 252:
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Enable Drive Security - Security Key Identifier
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3. Use the default security key identifier or enter a new security key identifier.
NOTE: If you create more than one security key, make sure that you change the security
key identifier. Otherwise, you cannot differentiate between the security keys.
4. Click Suggest Security Key to have the system create a security key or you can
enter a new security key.
5. Enter the new security key again to confirm, as shown in Figure 253.
NOTE: If you forget the security key, you will lose access to your data. Be sure to
record your security key information. You might need to enter the security key to
perform certain operations.
The security key is case-sensitive. It must be between 8 and 32 characters and
contain at least one number, one lowercase letter, one uppercase letter, and one
non-alphanumeric character (e.g. < > @ +). The space character is not permitted.
NOTE: Non-US keyboard users must be careful not to enter DBCS characters in the
security key field. Firmware works with the ASCII character set only.
Figure 253 shows the security key entered and confirmed on this screen.
Figure 253:
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Enable Drive Security - Security Key
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6. (Optional) Select the Pause for password at boot time check box.
If you choose this option, you have to enter the password whenever you boot the
server.
7. (Optional) Select the Enforce strong password security check box.
If you choose this option, make sure the password is between eight and thirty-two
characters and contain at least one number, one lowercase letter, one uppercase
letter, and one non-alphanumeric character (e.g. < > @ +). The space character is not
permitted. The password is case-sensitive.
8. (Optional) Enter a password in the Password field and then enter the same
password in the Confirm field, as shown in Figure 254.
Warning messages appear if there is a mismatch between the characters entered in
the Password field and the Confirm field, or if there is an invalid character entered.
CAUTION: Be sure to record the password. If you lose the password, you could lose
access to your data.
Figure 254 shows the password entered and confirmed on this screen.
Figure 254:
Enable Drive Security - Password
9. Click Next.
The Confirm Enable Drive Security screen appears, as shown in Figure 255, to show
the changes requested to the drive security settings.
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CAUTION: If you forget the security key, you will lose access to your data. Be sure
to record your security key. You might need to enter the security key to perform certain
operations.
Figure 255:
Confirm Create Security Key Screen
10. Click the check box I recorded the security settings for future reference and then
click Yes to confirm that you want to enable drive security on this controller and
have recorded the security settings for future reference.
MSM enables drive security and returns you to the main menu.
11.5.10 Changing the Drive Security
Settings
Perform the following steps to change the encryption settings for the security key
identifier, security key, and password.
1. Select the Physical View tab in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager
main menu, and click a controller icon.
2. Select Go To>Controller>Change Drive Security.
The Change Security Settings – Introduction screen appears. This screen lists the
actions you can perform, which include editing the security key identifier, security
key, and the password.
3. Click Next.
The Change Security Settings - Security Key ID screen appears.
4. Keep the existing security key identifier or enter a new security key identifier.
NOTE: If you change the security key, LSI highly recommends that you change the
security key identifier. Otherwise, you cannot differentiate between the security keys.
5. Click Next.
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The Change Security Settings - Security Key screen appears.
6. Click Use the existing drive security key to use the existing drive security key or
enter a new security key and then enter the new security key again to confirm.
CAUTION: If you forget the security key, you will lose access to your data. Be sure
to record your security key information. You might need to enter the security key to
perform certain operations.
The security key is case-sensitive. It must be between 8 and 32 characters and
contain at least one number, one lowercase letter, one uppercase letter, and one
non-alphanumeric character (e.g. < > @ +). The space character is not permitted.
NOTE: Non-US keyboard users must be careful not to enter DBCS characters in the
security key field. Firmware works with the ASCII character set only.
7. Click Next.
The Authenticate Drive Security Settings Screen appears. Authentification is
required for the changes that you requested to the drive security settings.
8. Enter the current security key to authenticate the changes.
The Change Security Settings - Password screen appears.
9. If you choose to, click the option to use a password in addition to the security key.
10. If you chose to use a password, either enter the existing password or enter a new
password, and enter the password again to confirm.
The text box for the passphrase can hold up to 32 characters. The key must be at
least eight characters.
The next screen that appears describes the changes you made and asks you
whether you want to confirm these changes.
11. Click the check box to confirm that you have recorded the security settings for
future reference and then click Yes to confirm that you want to change the drive
security settings.
MSM updates the existing configuration on the controller to use the new security
settings and returns you to the main menu.
11.5.11 Disabling Drive Security
NOTE: If you disable drive security, your existing data is not secure and you cannot
create any new secure virtual drives. Disabling drive security does not affect the security
of data on foreign drives. If you removed any drives that were previously secured, you
still need to enter the password when you import them. Otherwise, you cannot access
the data on those drives.
NOTE: If there are any secure drive groups on the controller, you cannot disable drive
security. A warning screen appears if you attempt to do so. To disable drive security, you
must first delete the virtual drives on all of the secure drive groups.
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Perform the following steps to disable drive security.
1. Select the Physical View tab in the left panel of the MegaRAID Storage Manager
main menu, and click a controller icon.
2. Select Go To>Controller>Disable Drive Security, as shown in Figure 256.
Figure 256:
Disable Drive Security Option
The Confirm Disable Drive Security screen appears.
3. To disable drive security, click Yes.
MSM disables drive security and returns you to the main menu.
NOTE: If you disable drive security, you cannot create any new encrypted virtual drives
and the data on all encrypted unconfigured drives will be erased. Disabling drive
security will not affect the security or data of foreign drives.
11.5.12 Importing or Clearing a
Foreign Configuration
A foreign configuration is a RAID configuration that already exists on a replacement set
of drives that you install in a computer system. You can use MSM to import the foreign
configuration to the RAID controller or to clear the foreign configuration so you can
create a new configuration using these drives.
To import a foreign configuration, you must do the following:
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010

Enable security to allow importation of locked foreign configurations. (You can
import unsecured or unlocked configurations when security is disabled.)

Run a scan for foreign configurations.

If a locked foreign configuration is present and security is enabled, enter the
security key and unlock the configuration.

Import the foreign configuration.
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In addition, if one or more drives are removed from a configuration, by a cable pull or
drive removal for example, the configuration on those drives is considered a foreign
configuration by the RAID controller.
Verify whether any drives are left to import as the locked drives can use different
security keys. If there are any drives left, repeat the import process for the remaining
drives. After all the drives are imported, there is no configuration to import.
NOTE: When you create a new configuration, MSM shows only the unconfigured drives.
Drives that have existing configurations, including foreign configurations, will not
appear. To use drives with existing configurations, you must first clear the configuration
on those drives.
Perform the following steps to import or clear a configuration.
1. Enable drive security to allow importation of locked foreign drives. See
Section 11.5.9, Enabling Drive Security using LKM for the procedure used to enable
drive security.
2. After you create a security key, right-click the controller icon and click Scan for
Foreign Configuration.
If there are locked drives (security is enabled), the Unlock foreign drives dialog box
appears.
3. Enter the security key to unlock the configuration.
The Foreign Configuration Detected screen appears, as shown in Figure 257.
Figure 257:
Foreign Configuration Detected Screen
4. Click Import to import the foreign configuration from all of the foreign drives, Clear
to remove the configuration from all foreign drives, or Advanced to preview and
import specific foreign configurations.
5. Click OK.
NOTE: The operation cannot be reversed after it is started. Imported drives display as
Online in the MegaRAID Storage Manager menu.
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6. Repeat the import process for any remaining drives.
Because locked drive can use different security key, you must verify whether there
are any remaining drives to imported.
NOTE: When you create a new configuration, MSM shows only the unconfigured drives.
Drives that have existing configurations, including foreign configurations, will not
appear. To use drives with existing configurations, you must first clear the configuration
on those drives.
11.5.12.1 Foreign Configurations
in Cable Pull and Drive Removal
Scenarios
If one or more drives are removed from a configuration, by a cable pull or drive
removal, for example, the configuration on those drives is considered a foreign
configuration by the RAID controller.
The following scenarios can occur with cable pulls or drive removals. Use the Foreign
Configuration Preview screen to import or clear the foreign configuration in each
case.
NOTE: If you want to import the foreign configuration in any of the following scenarios,
you should have all of the drives in the enclosure before you perform the import
operation.

Scenario #1: If all of the drives in a configuration are removed and re-inserted, the
controller considers the drives to have foreign configurations.
Import or clear the foreign configuration. If you select Import, automatic rebuilds
will occur in redundant virtual drives.
NOTE: Start a consistency check immediately after the rebuild is complete to ensure
data integrity for the virtual drives.
See Section 10.2, Running a Consistency Check for more information about checking data
consistency.

Scenario #2: If some of the drives in a configuration are removed and re-inserted,
the controller considers the drives to have foreign configurations.
Import or clear the foreign configuration. If you select Import, automatic rebuilds
will occur in redundant virtual drives.
NOTE: Start a consistency check immediately after the rebuild is complete to ensure
data integrity for the virtual drives.
See Section 10.2, Running a Consistency Check for more information about checking data
consistency.

LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Scenario #3: If all of the drives in a virtual drive are removed, but at different times,
and re-inserted, the controller considers the drives to have foreign configurations.
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Import or clear the foreign configuration. If you select Import, all drives that were
pulled before the virtual drive became offline will be imported and then
automatically rebuilt. Automatic rebuilds will occur in redundant virtual drives.

Scenario #4: If the drives in a non-redundant virtual drive are removed, the
controller considers the drives to have foreign configurations.
Import or clear the foreign configuration. No rebuilds will occur after the import
operation because there is no redundant data to rebuild the drives.
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Appendix A: Events and Messages | Error Levels
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Appendix A
Events and Messages
This appendix lists the MegaRAID Storage Manager events that can appear in the event
log.
MegaRAID Storage Manager software monitors the activity and performance of all
controllers in the workstation and the devices attached to them. When an event occurs,
such as the start of an initialization, an event message appears in the log at the bottom
of the MegaRAID Storage Manager window.
A.1
Error Levels
Each message that appears in the event log has an error level that indicates the severity
of the event, as shown in Table 134.
Table 134: Event Error Levels
Error Level
A.2
Event Messages
Meaning
Information
Informational message. No user action is necessary.
Warning
Some component might be close to a failure point.
Critical
A component has failed, but the system has not lost data.
Fatal
A component has failed, and data loss has occurred or will occur.
Table 135 lists all of the MegaRAID Storage Manager event messages. The event
message descriptions include placeholders for specific values that are determined
when the event is generated. For example, in message No. 1 in the Event Messages
table, “%s” is replaced by the firmware version, which is read from the firmware when
the event is generated.
Table 135: Event Messages
Number
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Type
Event Text
0x0000
Information
MegaRAID firmware initialization started (PCI ID
%04x/%04x/%04x/%04x)
0x0001
Information
MegaRAID firmware version %s
0x0002
Fatal
Unable to recover cache data from TBBU
0x0003
Information
Cache data recovered from TBBU successfully
0x0004
Information
Configuration cleared
0x0005
Warning
Cluster down; communication with peer lost
0x0006
Information
Virtual drive %s ownership changed from %02x to %02x
0x0007
Information
Alarm disabled by user
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Table 135: Event Messages (Continued)
Number
Page 374
Type
Event Text
0x0008
Information
Alarm enabled by user
0x0009
Information
Background initialization rate changed to %d%%
0x000a
Fatal
Controller cache discarded due to memory/battery problems
0x000b
Fatal
Unable to recover cache data due to configuration mismatch
0x000c
Information
Cache data recovered successfully
0x000d
Fatal
Controller cache discarded due to firmware version
incompatibility
0x000e
Information
Consistency Check rate changed to %d%%
0x000f
Fatal
Fatal firmware error: %s
0x0010
Information
Factory defaults restored
0x0011
Information
Flash downloaded image corrupt
0x0012
Critical
Flash erase error
0x0013
Critical
Flash timeout during erase
0x0014
Critical
Flash error
0x0015
Information
Flashing image: %s
0x0016
Information
Flash of new firmware image(s) complete
0x0017
Critical
Flash programming error
0x0018
Critical
Flash timeout during programming
0x0019
Critical
Flash chip type unknown
0x001a
Critical
Flash command set unknown
0x001b
Critical
Flash verify failure
0x001c
Information
Flush rate changed to %d seconds
0x001d
Information
Hibernate command received from host
0x001e
Information
Event log cleared
0x001f
Information
Event log wrapped
0x0020
Fatal
Multi-bit ECC error: ECAR=%x, ELOG=%x, (%s)
0x0021
Warning
Single-bit ECC error: ECAR=%x, ELOG=%x, (%s)
0x0022
Fatal
Not enough controller memory
0x0023
Information
Patrol Read complete
0x0024
Information
Patrol Read paused
0x0025
Information
Patrol Read Rate changed to %d%%
0x0026
Information
Patrol Read resumed
0x0027
Information
Patrol Read started
0x0028
Information
Reconstruction rate changed to %d%%"
0x0029
Information
Drive group modification rate changed to %d%%
0x002a
Information
Shutdown command received from host
0x002b
Information
Test event: %s
0x002c
Information
Time established as %s; (%d seconds since power on)
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Appendix A: Events and Messages | Event Messages
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Table 135: Event Messages (Continued)
Number
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Type
Event Text
0x002d
Information
User entered firmware debugger
0x002e
Warning
Background Initialization aborted on %s
0x002f
Warning
Background Initialization corrected medium error (%s at %lx
0x0030
Information
Background Initialization completed on %s
0x0031
Fatal
Background Initialization completed with uncorrectable
errors on %s
0x0032
Fatal
Background Initialization detected uncorrectable double
medium errors (%s at %lx on %s)
0x0033
Critical
Background Initialization failed on %s
0x0034
Progress
Background Initialization progress on %s is %s
0x0035
Information
Background Initialization started on %s
0x0036
Information
Policy change on %s from %s to %s
0x0038
Warning
Consistency Check aborted on %s
0x0039
Warning
Consistency Check corrected medium error (%s at %lx
0x003a
Information
Consistency Check done on %s
0x003b
Information
Consistency Check done with corrections on %s
0x003c
Fatal
Consistency Check detected uncorrectable double medium
errors (%s at %lx on %s)
0x003d
Critical
Consistency Check failed on %s
0x003e
Fatal
Consistency Check completed with uncorrectable data on %s
0x003f
Warning
Consistency Check found inconsistent parity on %s at strip
%lx
0x0040
Warning
Consistency Check inconsistency logging disabled on %s (too
many inconsistencies)
0x0041
Progress
Consistency Check progress on %s is %s
0x0042
Information
Consistency Check started on %s
0x0043
Warning
Initialization aborted on %s
0x0044
Critical
Initialization failed on %s
0x0045
Progress
Initialization progress on %s is %s
0x0046
Information
Fast initialization started on %s
0x0047
Information
Full initialization started on %s
0x0048
Information
Initialization complete on %s
0x0049
Information
LD Properties updated to %s (from %s)
0x004a
Information
Reconstruction complete on %s
0x004b
Fatal
Reconstruction of %s stopped due to unrecoverable errors
0x004c
Fatal
Reconstruct detected uncorrectable double medium errors
(%s at %lx on %s at %lx)
0x004d
Progress
Reconstruction progress on %s is %s
0x004e
Information
Reconstruction resumed on %s
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Appendix A: Events and Messages | Event Messages
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Table 135: Event Messages (Continued)
Number
Page 376
Type
Event Text
0x004f
Fatal
Reconstruction resume of %s failed due to configuration
mismatch
0x0050
Information
Reconstruction started on %s
0x0051
Information
State change on %s from %s to %s
0x0052
Information
Drive Clear aborted on %s
0x0053
Critical
Drive Clear failed on %s (Error %02x)
0x0054
Progress
Drive Clear progress on %s is %s
0x0055
Information
Drive Clear started on %s
0x0056
Information
Drive Clear completed on %s
0x0057
Warning
Error on %s (Error %02x)
0x0058
Information
Format complete on %s
0x0059
Information
Format started on %s
0x005a
Critical
Hot Spare SMART polling failed on %s (Error %02x)
0x005b
Information
Drive inserted: %s
0x005c
Warning
Drive %s is not supported
0x005d
Warning
Patrol Read corrected medium error on %s at %lx
0x005e
Progress
Patrol Read progress on %s is %s
0x005f
Fatal
Patrol Read found an uncorrectable medium error on %s at
%lx
0x0060
Critical
Predictive failure: CDB: %s
0x0061
Fatal
Patrol Read puncturing bad block on %s at %lx
0x0062
Information
Rebuild aborted by user on %s
0x0063
Information
Rebuild complete on %s
0x0064
Information
Rebuild complete on %s
0x0065
Critical
Rebuild failed on %s due to source drive error
0x0066
Critical
Rebuild failed on %s due to target drive error
0x0067
Progress
Rebuild progress on %s is %s
0x0068
Information
Rebuild resumed on %s
0x0069
Information
Rebuild started on %s
0x006a
Information
Rebuild automatically started on %s
0x006b
Critical
Rebuild stopped on %s due to loss of cluster ownership
0x006c
Fatal
Reassign write operation failed on %s at %lx
0x006d
Fatal
Unrecoverable medium error during rebuild on %s at %lx
0x006e
Information
Corrected medium error during recovery on %s at %lx
0x006f
Fatal
Unrecoverable medium error during recovery on %s at %lx
0x0070
Information
Drive removed: %s
0x0071
Warning
Unexpected sense: %s, CDB%s, Sense: %s
0x0072
Information
State change on %s from %s to %s
0x0073
Information
State change by user on %s from %s to %s
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Appendix A: Events and Messages | Event Messages
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Table 135: Event Messages (Continued)
Number
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Type
Event Text
0x0074
Warning
Redundant path to %s broken
0x0075
Information
Redundant path to %s restored
0x0076
Information
Dedicated Hot Spare Drive %s no longer useful due to deleted
drive group
0x0077
Critical
SAS topology error: Loop detected
0x0078
Critical
SAS topology error: Unaddressable device
0x0079
Critical
SAS topology error: Multiple ports to the same SAS address
0x007a
Critical
SAS topology error: Expander error
0x007b
Critical
SAS topology error: SMP timeout
0x007c
Critical
SAS topology error: Out of route entries
0x007d
Critical
SAS topology error: Index not found
0x007e
Critical
SAS topology error: SMP function failed
0x007f
Critical
SAS topology error: SMP CRC error
0x0080
Critical
SAS topology error: Multiple subtractive
0x0081
Critical
SAS topology error: Table to table
0x0082
Critical
SAS topology error: Multiple paths
0x0083
Fatal
Unable to access device %s
0x0084
Information
Dedicated Hot Spare created on %s (%s)
0x0085
Information
Dedicated Hot Spare %s disabled
0x0086
Critical
Dedicated Hot Spare %s no longer useful for all drive groups
0x0087
Information
Global Hot Spare created on %s (%s)
0x0088
Information
Global Hot Spare %s disabled
0x0089
Critical
Global Hot Spare does not cover all drive groups
0x008a
Information
Created %s}
0x008b
Information
Deleted %s}
0x008c
Information
Marking LD %s inconsistent due to active writes at shutdown
0x008d
Information
Battery Present
0x008e
Warning
Battery Not Present
0x008f
Information
New Battery Detected
0x0090
Information
Battery has been replaced
0x0091
Critical
Battery temperature is high
0x0092
Warning
Battery voltage low
0x0093
Information
Battery started charging
0x0094
Information
Battery is discharging
0x0095
Information
Battery temperature is normal
0x0096
Fatal
Battery has failed and cannot support data retention. Please
replace the battery.
0x0097
Information
Battery relearn started
0x0098
Information
Battery relearn in progress
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Appendix A: Events and Messages | Event Messages
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Table 135: Event Messages (Continued)
Number
Page 378
Type
Event Text
0x0099
Information
Battery relearn completed
0x009a
Critical
Battery relearn timed out
0x009b
Information
Battery relearn pending: Battery is under charge
0x009c
Information
Battery relearn postponed
0x009d
Information
Battery relearn will start in 4 days
0x009e
Information
Battery relearn will start in 2 day
0x009f
Information
Battery relearn will start in 1 day
0x00a0
Information
Battery relearn will start in 5 hours
0x00a1
Information
Battery removed
0x00a2
Information
Current capacity of the battery is below threshold
0x00a3
Information
Current capacity of the battery is above threshold
0x00a4
Information
Enclosure (SES) discovered on %s
0x00a5
Information
Enclosure (SAFTE) discovered on %s
0x00a6
Critical
Enclosure %s communication lost
0x00a7
Information
Enclosure %s communication restored
0x00a8
Critical
Enclosure %s fan %d failed
0x00a9
Information
Enclosure %s fan %d inserted
0x00aa
Critical
Enclosure %s fan %d removed
0x00ab
Critical
Enclosure %s power supply %d failed
0x00ac
Information
Enclosure %s power supply %d inserted
0x00ad
Critical
Enclosure %s power supply %d removed
0x00ae
Critical
Enclosure %s SIM %d failed
0x00af
Information
Enclosure %s SIM %d inserted
0x00b0
Critical
Enclosure %s SIM %d removed
0x00b1
Warning
Enclosure %s temperature sensor %d below warning
threshold
0x00b2
Critical
Enclosure %s temperature sensor %d below error threshold
0x00b3
Warning
Enclosure %s temperature sensor %d above warning
threshold
0x00b4
Critical
Enclosure %s temperature sensor %d above error threshold
0x00b5
Critical
Enclosure %s shutdown
0x00b6
Warning
Enclosure %s not supported; too many enclosures connected
to port
0x00b7
Critical
Enclosure %s firmware mismatch
0x00b8
Warning
Enclosure %s sensor %d bad
0x00b9
Critical
Enclosure %s phy %d bad
0x00ba
Critical
Enclosure %s is unstable
0x00bb
Critical
Enclosure %s hardware error
0x00bc
Critical
Enclosure %s not responding
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Appendix A: Events and Messages | Event Messages
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Table 135: Event Messages (Continued)
Number
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Type
Event Text
0x00bd
Information
SAS/SATA mixing not supported in enclosure; Drive %s
disabled
0x00be
Information
Enclosure (SES) hotplug on %s was detected, but is not
supported
0x00bf
Information
Clustering enabled
0x00c0
Information
Clustering disabled
0x00c1
Information
Drive too small to be used for auto-rebuild on %s
0x00c2
Information
BBU enabled; changing WT virtual drives to WB
0x00c3
Warning
BBU disabled; changing WB virtual drives to WT
0x00c4
Warning
Bad block table on drive %s is 80% full
0x00c5
Fatal
Bad block table on drive %s is full; unable to log block %lx
0x00c6
Information
Consistency Check Aborted due to ownership loss on %s
0x00c7
Information
Background Initialization (BGI) Aborted Due to Ownership
Loss on %s
0x00c8
Critical
Battery/charger problems detected; SOH Bad
0x00c9
Warning
Single-bit ECC error: ECAR=%x, ELOG=%x, (%s); warning
threshold exceeded
0x00ca
Critical
Single-bit ECC error: ECAR=%x, ELOG=%x, (%s); critical
threshold exceeded
0x00cb
Critical
Single-bit ECC error: ECAR=%x, ELOG=%x, (%s); further
reporting disabled
0x00cc
Critical
Enclosure %s Power supply %d switched off
0x00cd
Information
Enclosure %s Power supply %d switched on
0x00ce
Critical
Enclosure %s Power supply %d cable removed
0x00cf
Information
Enclosure %s Power supply %d cable inserted
0x00d0
Information
Enclosure %s Fan %d returned to normal
0x00d1
Information
BBU Retention test was initiated on previous boot
0x00d2
Information
BBU Retention test passed
0x00d3
Critical
BBU Retention test failed!
0x00d4
Information
NVRAM Retention test was initiated on previous boot
0x00d5
Information
NVRAM Retention test passed
0x00d6
Critical
NVRAM Retention test failed!
0x00d7
Information
%s test completed %d passes successfully
0x00d8
Critical
%s test FAILED on %d pass. Fail data: errorOffset=%x
goodData=%x badData=%x
0x00d9
Information
Self check diagnostics completed
0x00da
Information
Foreign Configuration detected
0x00db
Information
Foreign Configuration imported
0x00dc
Information
Foreign Configuration cleared
0x00dd
Warning
NVRAM is corrupt; reinitializing
Page 379
Appendix A: Events and Messages | Event Messages
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Table 135: Event Messages (Continued)
Number
Page 380
Type
Event Text
0x00de
Warning
NVRAM mismatch occurred
0x00df
Warning
SAS wide port %d lost link on PHY %d
0x00e0
Information
SAS wide port %d restored link on PHY %d
0x00e1
Warning
SAS port %d, PHY %d has exceeded the allowed error rate
0x00e2
Warning
Bad block reassigned on %s at %lx to %lx
0x00e3
Information
Controller Hot Plug detected
0x00e4
Warning
Enclosure %s temperature sensor %d differential detected
0x00e5
Information
Drive test cannot start. No qualifying drives found
0x00e6
Information
Time duration provided by host is not sufficient for self check
0x00e7
Information
Marked Missing for %s on drive group %d row %d
0x00e8
Information
Replaced Missing as %s on drive group %d row %d
0x00e9
Information
Enclosure %s Temperature %d returned to normal
0x00ea
Information
Enclosure %s Firmware download in progress
0x00eb
Warning
Enclosure %s Firmware download failed
0x00ec
Warning
%s is not a certified drive
0x00ed
Information
Dirty cache data discarded by user
0x00ee
Information
Drives missing from configuration at boot
0x00ef
Information
Virtual drives (VDs) missing drives and will go offline at boot:
%s
0x00f0
Information
VDs missing at boot: %s
0x00f1
Information
Previous configuration completely missing at boot
0x00f2
Information
Battery charge complete
0x00f3
Information
Enclosure %s fan %d speed changed
0x00f4
Information
Dedicated spare %s imported as global due to missing arrays
0x00f5
Information
%s rebuild not possible as SAS/SATA is not supported in an
array
0x00f6
Information
SEP %s has been rebooted as a part of enclosure firmware
download. SEP will be unavailable until this process
completes.
0x00f7
Information
Inserted PD: %s Info: %s
0x00f8
Information
Removed PD: %s Info: %s
0x00f9
Information
VD %s is now OPTIMAL
0x00fa
Warning
VD %s is now PARTIALLY DEGRADED
0x00fb
Critical
VD %s is now DEGRADED
0x00fc
Fatal
VD %s is now OFFLINE
0x00fd
Warning
Battery requires reconditioning; please initiate a LEARN cycle
0x00fe
Warning
VD %s disabled because RAID-5 is not supported by this RAID
key
0x00ff
Warning
VD %s disabled because RAID-6 is not supported by this
controller
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Appendix A: Events and Messages | Event Messages
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Table 135: Event Messages (Continued)
Number
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Type
Event Text
0x0100
Warning
VD %s disabled because SAS drives are not supported by this
RAID key
0x0101
Warning
PD missing: %s
0x0102
Warning
Puncturing of LBAs enabled
0x0103
Warning
Puncturing of LBAs disabled
0x0104
Critical
Enclosure %s EMM %d not installed
0x0105
Information
Package version %s
0x0106
Warning
Global affinity Hot Spare %s commissioned in a different
enclosure
0x0107
Warning
Foreign configuration table overflow
0x0108
Warning
Partial foreign configuration imported, PDs not imported:%s
0x0109
Information
Connector %s is active
0x010a
Information
Board Revision %s
0x010b
Warning
Command timeout on PD %s, CDB:%s
0x010c
Warning
PD %s reset (Type %02x)
0x010d
Warning
VD bad block table on %s is 80% full
0x010e
Fatal
VD bad block table on %s is full; unable to log block %lx (on
%s at %lx)
0x010f
Fatal
Uncorrectable medium error logged for %s at %lx (on %s at
%lx)
0x0110
Information
VD medium error corrected on %s at %lx
0x0111
Warning
Bad block table on PD %s is 100% full
0x0112
Warning
VD bad block table on PD %s is 100% full
0x0113
Fatal
Controller needs replacement, IOP is faulty
0x0114
Information
CopyBack started on PD %s from PD %s
0x0115
Information
CopyBack aborted on PD %s and src is PD %s
0x0116
Information
CopyBack complete on PD %s from PD %s
0x0117
Progress
CopyBack progress on PD %s is %s
0x0118
Information
CopyBack resumed on PD %s from %s
0x0119
Information
CopyBack automatically started on PD %s from %s
0x011a
Critical
CopyBack failed on PD %s due to source %s error
0x011b
Warning
Early Power off warning was unsuccessful
0x011c
Information
BBU FRU is %s
0x011d
Information
%s FRU is %s
0x011e
Information
Controller hardware revision ID %s
0x011f
Warning
Foreign import shall result in a backward incompatible
upgrade of configuration metadata
0x0120
Information
Redundant path restored for PD %s
0x0121
Warning
Redundant path broken for PD %s
0x0122
Information
Redundant enclosure EMM %s inserted for EMM %s
Page 381
Appendix A: Events and Messages | Event Messages
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Table 135: Event Messages (Continued)
Number
Page 382
Type
Event Text
0x0123
Information
Redundant enclosure EMM %s removed for EMM %s
0x0124
Warning
Patrol Read can't be started, as PDs are either not ONLINE, or
are in a VD with an active process, or are in an excluded VD
0x0125
Information
Copyback aborted by user on PD %s and src is PD %s
0x0126
Critical
Copyback aborted on hot spare %s from %s, as hot spare
needed for rebuild
0x0127
Warning
Copyback aborted on PD %s from PD %s, as rebuild required
in the array
0x0128
Fatal
Controller cache discarded for missing or offline VD %s
When a VD with cached data goes offline or missing during
runtime, the cache for the VD is discarded. Because the VD is
offline, the cache cannot be saved.
0x0129
Information
Copyback cannot be started as PD %s is too small for src PD
%s
0x012a
Information
Copyback cannot be started on PD %s from PD %s, as
SAS/SATA is not supported in an array
0x012b
Information
Microcode update started on PD %s
0x012c
Information
Microcode update completed on PD %s
0x012d
Warning
Microcode update timeout on PD %s
0x012e
Warning
Microcode update failed on PD %s
0x012f
Information
Controller properties changed
0x0130
Information
Patrol Read properties changed
0x0131
Information
CC Schedule properties changed
0x0132
Information
Battery properties changed
0x0133
Warning
Periodic Battery Relearn is pending. Please initiate manual
learn cycle as Automatic learn is not enabled
0x0134
Information
Drive security key created
0x0135
Information
Drive security key backed up
0x0136
Information
Drive security key from escrow, verified
0x0137
Information
Drive security key changed
0x0138
Warning
Drive security key, re-key operation failed
0x0139
Warning
Drive security key is invalid
0x013a
Information
Drive security key destroyed
0x013b
Warning
Drive security key from escrow is invalid
0x013c
Information
VD %s is now secured
0x013d
Warning
VD %s is partially secured
0x013e
Information
PD %s security activated
0x013f
Information
PD %s security disabled
0x0140
Information
PD %s is reprovisioned
0x0141
Information
PD %s security key changed
0x0142
Fatal
Security subsystem problems detected for PD %s
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Appendix A: Events and Messages | Event Messages
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Table 135: Event Messages (Continued)
Number
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Type
Event Text
0x0143
Fatal
Controller cache pinned for missing or offline VD %s
0x0144
Fatal
Controller cache pinned for missing or offline VDs: %s
0x0145
Information
Controller cache discarded by user for VDs: %s
0x0146
Information
Controller cache destaged for VD %s
0x0147
Warning
Consistency Check started on an inconsistent VD %s
0x0148
Warning
Drive security key failure, cannot access secured
configuration
0x0149
Warning
Drive security password from user is invalid
0x014a
Warning
Detected error with the remote battery connector cable
0x014b
Information
Power state change on PD %s from %s to %s
0x014c
Information
Enclosure %s element (SES code 0x%x) status changed
0x014d
Information
PD %s rebuild not possible as HDD/CacheCade software mix
is not supported in a drive group
0x014e
Information
Copyback cannot be started on PD %s from %s, as
HDD/CacheCade software mix is not supported in a drive
group
0x014f
Information
VD bad block table on %s is cleared
0x0150
Caution
SAS topology error: 0x%lx
0x0151
Information
VD cluster of medium errors corrected for %s at %lx (on %s at
%lx)
0x0152
Information
Controller requests a host bus rescan
0x0153
Information
Controller repurposed and factory defaults restored
0x0154
Information
Drive security key binding updated
0x0155
Information
Drive security is in EKM mode
0x0156
Warning
Drive security failed to communicate with EKMS
0x0157
Information
%s needs key to be %s %s
0x0158
Warning
%s secure failed
0x0159
Critical
Controller encountered a fatal error and was reset
0x015a
Information
Snapshots enabled on %s (Repository %s)
0x015b
Information
Snapshots disabled on %s (Repository %s) by the user
0x015c
Critical
Snapshots disabled on %s (Repository %s), due to a fatal error
0x015d
Information
Snapshot created on %s at %s
0x015e
Information
Snapshot deleted on %s at %s
0x015f
Information
View created at %s to a snapshot at %s for %s
0x0160
Information
View at %s is deleted, to snapshot at %s for %s
0x0161
Information
Snapshot rollback started on %s from snapshot at %s
0x0162
Fatal
Snapshot rollback on %s internally aborted for snapshot at %s
0x0163
Information
Snapshot rollback on %s completed for snapshot at %s
0x0164
Information
Snapshot rollback progress for snapshot at %s, on %s is %s
0x0165
Warning
Snapshot space for %s in snapshot repository %s, is 80%% full
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Appendix A: Events and Messages | Event Messages
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Table 135: Event Messages (Continued)
Number
Page 384
Type
Event Text
0x0166
Critical
Snapshot space for %s in snapshot repository %s, is full
0x0167
Warning
View at %s to snapshot at %s, is 80%% full on snapshot
repository %s
0x0168
Critical
View at %s to snapshot at %s, is full on snapshot repository %s
0x0169
Critical
Snapshot repository lost for %s
0x016a
Warning
Snaphot repository restored for %s
0x016b
Critical
Snapshot encountered an unexpected internal error: 0x%lx
0x016c
Information
Auto Snapshot enabled on %s (snapshot repository %s)
0x016d
Information
Auto Snapshot disabled on %s (snapshot repository %s)
0x016e
Critical
Configuration command could not be committed to disk,
please retry
0x016f
Information
COD on %s updated as it was stale
0x0170
Warning
Power state change failed on %s (from %s to %s)
0x0171
Warning
%s is not available
0x0172
Information
%s is available
0x0173
Information
%s is used for CacheCade(TM) with capacity 0x%lx logical
blocks
0x0174
Information
%s is using CacheCade(TM) %s
0x0175
Information
%s is no longer using CacheCade(TM) %s
0x0176
Critical
Snapshot deleted due to resource constraints for %s in
snapshot repository %s
0x0177
Warning
Auto Snapshot failed for %s in snapshot repository %s
0x0178
Warning
Controller reset on-board expander
0x0179
Warning
CacheCade(TM) (%s) capacity changed and is now 0x%lx
logical blocks
0x017a
Warning
Battery cannot initiate transparent learn cycles
0x017b
Information
Premium feature %s key was applied for - %s
0x017c
Information
Snapshot schedule properties changed on %s
0x017d
Information
Snapshot scheduled action is due on %s
0x017e
Information
Performance Metrics: collection command 0x%lx
0x017f
Information
Premium feature %s key was transferred - %s
0x0180
Information
Premium feature serial number %s
0x0181
Warning
Premium feature serial number mismatched. Key-vault serial
num - %s
0x0182
Warning
Battery cannot support data retention for more than %d
hours. Please replace the battery
0x0183
Information
%s power policy changed to %s (from %s)
0x0184
Warning
%s cannot transition to max power savings
0x0185
Information
Host driver is loaded and operational
0x0186
Information
%s mirror broken
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Appendix A: Events and Messages | Event Messages
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Table 135: Event Messages (Continued)
Number
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Type
Event Text
0x0187
Information
%s mirror joined
0x0188
Warning
%s link %d failure in wide port
0x0189
Information
%s link %d restored in wide port
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Appendix A: Events and Messages | Event Messages
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LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Appendix B: MegaCLI Error Messages | Error Messages and Descriptions
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Appendix B
MegaCLI Error Messages
This appendix lists the MegaCLI error messages.
The MegaCLI Configuration Utility is a command line interface application you can use
to manage MegaRAID SAS RAID controllers. See Chapter 5 for more information about
the MegaCLI utility and commands.
B.1
Error Messages and
Descriptions
Each message that appears in the event log has an error level that indicates the severity
of the event, as shown in Table 136.
Table 136: Error Messages and Descriptions
Number
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Event Text
0x00
Command completed successfully
0x01
Invalid command
0x02
DCMD opcode is invalid
0x03
Input parameters are invalid
0x04
Invalid sequence number
0x05
Abort isn't possible for the requested command
0x06
Application 'host' code not found
0x07
Application already in use - try later
0x08
Application not initialized
0x09
Given array index is invalid
0x0a
Unable to add missing drive to array, as row has no empty
slots
0x0b
Some of the CFG resources conflict with each other or the
current config
0x0c
Invalid device ID / select-timeout
0x0d
Drive is too small for requested operation
0x0e
Flash memory allocation failed
0x0f
Flash download already in progress
0x10
Flash operation failed
0x11
Flash image was bad
0x12
Downloaded flash image is incomplete
0x13
Flash OPEN was not done
0x14
Flash sequence is not active
0x15
Flush command failed
0x16
Specified application doesn't have host-resident code
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Appendix B: MegaCLI Error Messages | Error Messages and Descriptions
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Table 136: Error Messages and Descriptions (Continued)
Number
Page 388
Event Text
0x17
LD operation not possible - CC is in progress
0x18
LD initialization in progress
0x19
LBA is out of range
0x1a
Maximum LDs are already configured
0x1b
LD is not OPTIMAL
0x1c
LD Rebuild is in progress
0x1d
LD is undergoing reconstruction
0x1e
LD RAID level is wrong for requested operation
0x1f
Too many spares assigned
0x20
Scratch memory not available - try command again later
0x21
Error writing MFC data to SEEPROM
0x22
Required HW is missing (i.e. Alarm or BBU)
0x23
Item not found
0x24
LD drives are not within an enclosure
0x25
PD CLEAR operation is in progress
0x26
Unable to use SATA(SAS) drive to replace SAS(SATA)
0x27
Patrol Read is disabled
0x28
Given row index is invalid
0x2d
SCSI command done, but non-GOOD status was received-see
mf.hdr.extStatus for SCSI_STATUS
0x2e
IO request for MFI_CMD_OP_PD_SCSI failed - see extStatus
for DM error
0x2f
Matches SCSI RESERVATION_CONFLICT
0x30
One or more of the flush operations failed
0x31
FW real-time currently not set
0x32
Command issues while FW in wrong state (i.e. GET RECON
when op not active)
0x33
LD is not OFFLINE - IO not possible
0x34
Peer controller rejected request (possibly due to resource
conflict)
0x35
Unable to inform peer of communication changes (retry
might be appropriate)
0x36
LD reservation already in progress
0x37
I2C errors were detected
0x38
PCI errors occurred during XOR/DMA operation
0x39
Diagnostics failed - see event log for details
0x3a
Unable to process command as boot messages are pending
0x3b
Returned in case if foreign configurations are incomplete
0x3d
Returned in case if a command is tried on unsupported
hardware
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Appendix B: MegaCLI Error Messages | Error Messages and Descriptions
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Table 136: Error Messages and Descriptions (Continued)
Number
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Event Text
0x3e
CC scheduling is disabled
0x3f
PD CopyBack operation is in progress
0x40
Selected more than one PD per array
0x41
Microcode update operation failed
0x42
Unable to process command as drive security feature is not
enabled
0x43
Controller already has a lock key
0x44
Lock key cannot be backed-up
0x45
Lock key backup cannot be verified
0x46
Lock key from backup failed verification
0x47
Rekey operation not allowed, unless controller already has a
lock key
0x48
Lock key is not valid, cannot authenticate
0x49
Lock key from escrow cannot be used
0x4a
Lock key backup (pass-phrase) is required
0x4b
Secure LD exist
0x4c
LD secure operation is not allowed
0x4d
Reprovisioning is not allowed
0x4e
Drive security type (FDE or non-FDE) is not appropriate for
requested operation
0x4f
LD encryption type is not supported
0x50
Cannot mix FDE and non-FDE drives in same array
0x51
Cannot mix secure and unsecured LD in same array
0x52
Secret key not allowed
0x53
Physical device errors were detected
0x54
Controller has LD cache pinned
0x55
Requested operation is already in progress
0x56
Another power state set operation is in progress
0x57
Power state of device is not correct
0x58
No PD is available for patrol read
0x59
Controller reset is required
0x5a
No EKM boot agent detected
0x5b
No space on the snapshot repository VD
0x5c
For consistency SET PiTs, some PiT creations might fail and
some succeed
0xFF
Invalid status - used for polling command completion
Page 389
Appendix B: MegaCLI Error Messages | Error Messages and Descriptions
Page 390
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Appendix C: Glossary |
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
Appendix C
Glossary
This appendix provides a glossary for terms used in this document.
access policy
A virtual drive property indicating what kind of access is allowed for a particular virtual
drive. The possible values are Read/Write, Read Only, or Blocked.
alarm enabled
A controller property that indicates whether the controller’s onboard alarm is enabled.
alarm present
A controller property that indicates whether the controller has an onboard alarm. If
present and enabled, the alarm is sounded for certain error conditions.
array
BBU present
BGI rate
BIOS
cache
cache flush interval
See drive group.
A controller property that indicates whether the controller has an onboard battery
backup unit to provide power in case of a power failure.
A controller property indicating the rate at which the background initialization of
virtual drives will be carried out.
Basic Input/Output System. The computer BIOS is stored on a flash memory chip. The
BIOS controls communications between the microprocessor and peripheral devices,
such as the keyboard and the video controller, and miscellaneous functions, such as
system messages.
Fast memory that holds recently accessed data. Use of cache memory speeds
subsequent access to the same data. When data is read from or written to main
memory, a copy is also saved in cache memory with the associated main memory
address. The cache memory software monitors the addresses of subsequent reads to
see if the required data is already stored in cache memory. If it is already in cache
memory (a cache hit), it is read from cache memory immediately and the main memory
read is aborted (or not started). If the data is not cached (a cache miss), it is fetched
from main memory and saved in cache memory.
A controller property that indicates how often the data cache is flushed.
caching
The process of using a high speed memory buffer to speed up a computer system’s
overall read/write performance. The cache can be accessed at a higher speed than a
drive subsystem. To improve read performance, the cache usually contains the most
recently accessed data, as well as data from adjacent drive sectors. To improve write
performance, the cache can temporarily store data in accordance with its write back
policies.
capacity
A property that indicates the amount of storage space on a drive or virtual drive.
coerced capacity
coercion mode
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
A drive property indicating the capacity to which a drive has been coerced (forced) to
make it compatible with other drives that are nominally the same capacity. For
example, a 4-GB drive from one manufacturer might be 4,196 MB, and a 4-GB from
another manufacturer might be 4,128 MB. These drives could be coerced to a usable
capacity of 4,088 MB each for use in a drive group in a storage configuration.
A controller property indicating the capacity to which drives of nominally identical
capacity are coerced (forced) to make them usable in a storage configuration.
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Appendix C: Glossary |
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consistency check
consistency check rate
An operation that verifies that all stripes in a virtual drive with a redundant RAID level
are consistent and that automatically fixes any errors. For RAID 1 drive groups, this
operation verifies correct mirrored data for each stripe.
The rate at which consistency check operations are run on a computer system.
controller
A chip that controls the transfer of data between the microprocessor and memory or
between the microprocessor and a peripheral device such as a drive. RAID controllers
perform RAID functions such as striping and mirroring to provide data protection.
MegaRAID Storage Manager software runs on LSI SAS controllers.
copyback
The procedure used to copy data from a source drive of a virtual drive to a destination
drive that is not a part of the virtual drive. The copyback operation is often used to
create or restore a specific physical configuration for a drive group (for example, a
specific arrangement of drive group members on the device I/O buses). The copyback
operation can be run automatically or manually.
Typically, a drive fails or is expected to fail, and the data is rebuilt on a hot spare. The
failed drive is replaced with a new drive. Then the data is copied from the hot spare to
the new drive, and the hot spare reverts from a rebuild drive to its original hot spare
status. The copyback operation runs as a background activity, and the virtual drive is
still available online to the host.
current write policy
default write policy
device ID

In Write Back mode the controller sends a data transfer completion signal to the
host when the controller cache has received all of the data in a transaction.

In Write Through mode the controller sends a data transfer completion signal to the
host when the drive subsystem has received all of the data in a transaction.
A virtual drive property indicating whether the default write policy is Write Through or
Write Back. In Write Back mode the controller sends a data transfer completion signal to
the host when the controller cache has received all of the data in a transaction. In Write
Through mode the controller sends a data transfer completion signal to the host when
the drive subsystem has received all of the data in a transaction.
A controller or drive property indicating the manufacturer-assigned device ID.
device port count
A controller property indicating the number of ports on the controller.
drive cache policy
A virtual drive property indicating whether the virtual drive cache is enabled, disabled,
or unchanged from its previous setting.
drive group
A group of drives attached to a RAID controller on which one or more virtual drives can
be created. All virtual drives in the drive group use all of the drives in the drive group.
drive state
Page 392
A virtual drive property that indicates whether the virtual drive currently supports
Write Back mode or Write Through mode.
A drive property indicating the status of the drive. A drive can be in one of the
following states:

Unconfigured Good: A drive accessible to the RAID controller but not configured as
a part of a virtual drive or as a hot spare.

Hot Spare: A drive that is configured as a hot spare.

Online: A drive that can be accessed by the RAID controller and will be part of the
virtual drive.

Rebuild: A drive to which data is being written to restore full redundancy for a
virtual drive.

Failed: A drive that was originally configured as Online or Hot Spare, but on which
the firmware detects an unrecoverable error.
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Appendix C: Glossary |
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
drive subsystem
drive type
EKM

Unconfigured Bad: A drive on which the firmware detects an unrecoverable error;
the drive was Unconfigured Good or the drive could not be initialized.

Missing: A drive that was Online, but which has been removed from its location.

Offline: A drive that is part of a virtual drive but which has invalid data as far as the
RAID configuration is concerned.

None: A drive with an unsupported flag set. An Unconfigured Good or Offline drive
that has completed the prepare for removal operation.
A collection of drives and the hardware that controls them and connects them to one
or more controllers. The hardware can include an intelligent controller, or the drives can
attach directly to a system I/O bus controller.
A drive property indicating the characteristics of the drive.
External Key Management
fast initialization
A mode of initialization that quickly writes zeroes to the first and last sectors of the
virtual drive. This allows you to immediately start writing data to the virtual drive while
the initialization is running in the background.
fault tolerance
The capability of the drive subsystem to undergo a single drive failure per drive group
without compromising data integrity and processing capability. LSI SAS RAID
controllers provides fault tolerance through redundant drive groups in RAID levels 1, 5,
6, 10, 50, and 60. They also support hot spare drives and the auto-rebuild feature.
firmware
Software stored in read-only memory (ROM) or programmable ROM (PROM). Firmware
is often responsible for the behavior of a system when it is first turned on. A typical
example would be a monitor program in a system that loads the full operating system
from drive or from a network and then passes control to the operating system.
foreign configuration
A RAID configuration that already exists on a replacement set of drives that you install
in a computer system. MegaRAID Storage Manager software allows you to import the
existing configuration to the RAID controller, or you can clear the configuration so you
can create a new one.
formatting
hole
host interface
host port count
host system
hot spare
The process of writing a specific value to all data fields on a drive, to map out
unreadable or bad sectors. Because most drives are formatted when manufactured,
formatting is usually done only if a drive generates many media errors.
In MegaRAID Storage Manager, a hole is a block of empty space in a drive group that
can be used to define a virtual drive.
A controller property indicating the type of interface used by the computer host
system: for example, PCIX.
A controller property indicating the number of host data ports currently in use.
Any computer system on which the controller is installed. Mainframes, workstations,
and standalone desktop systems can all be considered host systems.
A standby drive that can automatically replace a failed drive in a virtual drive and
prevent data from being lost. A hot spare can be dedicated to a single redundant drive
group or it can be part of the global hot spare pool for all drive groups controlled by the
controller.
When a drive fails, MegaRAID Storage Manager software automatically uses a hot spare
to replace it and then rebuilds the data from the failed drive to the hot spare. Hot
spares can be used in RAID 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, and 60 storage configurations.
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Page 393
Appendix C: Glossary |
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initialization
The process of writing zeros to the data fields of a virtual drive and, in fault-tolerant
RAID levels, generating the corresponding parity to put the virtual drive in a Ready
state. Initialization erases all previous data on the drives. Drive groups will work without
initializing, but they can fail a consistency check because the parity fields have not
been generated.
IO policy
A virtual drive property indicating whether Cached I/O or Direct I/O is being used. In
Cached I/O mode, all reads are buffered in cache memory. In Direct I/O mode, reads are
not buffered in cache memory. Data is transferred to cache and the host concurrently. If
the same data block is read again, it comes from cache memory. (The IO Policy applies
to reads on a specific virtual drive. It does not affect the read ahead cache.)
learning cycle
load-balancing
LKM
A method of spreading work between two or more computers, network links, CPUs,
drives, or other resources. Load balancing is used to maximize resource use,
throughput, or response time.
Local Key Management
media error count
A drive property indicating the number of errors that have been detected on the drive
media.
migration
The process of moving virtual drives and hot spare drives from one controller to
another by disconnecting the drives from one controller and attaching them to
another one. The firmware on the new controller will detect and retain the virtual drive
information on the drives.
mirroring
The process of providing complete data redundancy with two drives by maintaining an
exact copy of one drive’s data on the second drive. If one drive fails, the contents of the
other drive can be used to maintain the integrity of the system and to rebuild the failed
drive.
multipathing
The firmware provides support for detecting and using multiple paths from the RAID
controllers to the SAS devices that are in enclosures. Devices connected to enclosures
have multiple paths to them. With redundant paths to the same port of a device, if one
path fails, another path can be used to communicate between the controller and the
device. Using multiple paths with load balancing, instead of a single path, can increase
reliability through redundancy.
name
A virtual drive property indicating the user-assigned name of the virtual drive.
non-redundant configuration
A RAID 0 virtual drive with data striped across two or more drives but without drive
mirroring or parity. This provides for high data throughput but offers no protection in
case of a drive failure.
NVRAM
Acronym for non-volatile random access memory. A storage system that does not lose
the data stored on it when power is removed. NVRAM is used to store firmware and
configuration data on the RAID controller.
NVRAM present
NVRAM size
offline
Page 394
A battery calibration operation performed by a RAID controller periodically to
determine the condition of the battery.
A controller property indicating whether an NVRAM is present on the controller.
A controller property indicating the capacity of the controller’s NVRAM.
A drive is offline when it is part of a virtual drive but its data is not accessible to the
virtual drive.
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
Appendix C: Glossary |
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
patrol read
patrol read rate
product info
product name
RAID
RAID 0
RAID 00
A process that checks the drives in a storage configuration for drive errors that could
lead to drive failure and lost data. The patrol read operation can find and sometimes fix
any potential problem with drives prior to host access. This enhances overall system
performance because error recovery during a normal I/O operation might not be
necessary.
The user-defined rate at which patrol read operations are run on a computer system.
A drive property indicating the vendor-assigned model number of the drive.
A controller property indicating the manufacturing name of the controller.
A group of multiple, independent drives that provide high performance by increasing
the number of drives used for saving and accessing data.
A RAID drive group improves input/output (I/O) performance and data availability. The
group of drives appears to the host system as a single storage unit or as multiple virtual
drives. Data throughput improves because several drives can be accessed
simultaneously. RAID configurations also improve data storage availability and fault
tolerance. Redundant RAID levels (RAID levels 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, and 60) provide data
protection.
Uses data striping on two or more drives to provide high data throughput, especially
for large files in an environment that requires no data redundancy.
Uses data striping on two or more drives in a spanned drive group to provide high data
throughput, especially for large files in an environment that requires no data
redundancy.
RAID 1
Uses data mirroring on pairs of drives so that data written to one drive is
simultaneously written to the other drive. RAID 1 works well for small databases or
other small applications that require complete data redundancy.
RAID 5
Uses data striping and parity data across three or more drives (distributed parity) to
provide high data throughput and data redundancy, especially for applications that
require random access.
RAID 6
Uses data striping and parity data across three or more drives (distributed parity) to
provide high data throughput and data redundancy, especially for applications that
require random access. RAID 6 can survive the failure of two drives.
RAID 10
A combination of RAID 0 and RAID 1 that uses data striping across two mirrored drive
groups. It provides high data throughput and complete data redundancy.
RAID 50
A combination of RAID 0 and RAID 5 that uses data striping across two drive groups
with parity data. It provides high data throughput and complete data redundancy.
RAID 60
A combination of RAID 0 and RAID 6 that uses data striping across two drive groups
with parity data. It provides high data throughput and complete data redundancy.
RAID 60 can survive the failure of two drives in each RAID set in the spanned drive
group.
RAID level
raw capacity
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
A virtual drive property indicating the RAID level of the virtual drive.
LSI SAS RAID controllers support RAID levels 0, 1, 5, 6, 10, 50, and 60.
A drive property indicating the actual full capacity of the drive before any coercion
mode is applied to reduce the capacity.
Page 395
Appendix C: Glossary |
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
read policy
A controller attribute indicating the current Read Policy mode. In Always Read Ahead
mode, the controller reads sequentially ahead of requested data and stores the
additional data in cache memory, anticipating that the data will be needed soon. This
speeds up reads for sequential data, but there is little improvement when accessing
random data. In No Read Ahead mode (known as Normal mode in WebBIOS), read
ahead capability is disabled.
rebuild
The regeneration of all data to a replacement drive in a redundant virtual drive after a
drive failure. A drive rebuild normally occurs without interrupting normal operations
on the affected virtual drive, though some degradation of performance of the drive
subsystem can occur.
rebuild rate
The percentage of central processing unit (CPU) resources devoted to rebuilding data
onto a new drive after a drive in a storage configuration has failed.
reclaim virtual drive
A method of undoing the configuration of a new virtual drive. If you highlight the
virtual drive in the Configuration Wizard and click Reclaim, the individual drives are
removed from the virtual drive configuration.
reconstruction rate
The user-defined rate at which a drive group modification operation is carried out.
redundancy
A property of a storage configuration that prevents data from being lost when one
drive fails in the configuration.
redundant configuration
A virtual drive that has redundant data on drives in the drive group that can be used to
rebuild a failed drive. The redundant data can be parity data striped across multiple
drives in a drive group, or it can be a complete mirrored copy of the data stored on a
second drive.
A redundant configuration protects the data in case a drive fails in the configuration.
revertible hot spare
When you use the Replace Member procedure, after data is copied from a hot spare to
a new drive, the hot spare reverts from a rebuild drive to its original hot spare status.
revision level
SAS
Acronym for Serial Attached SCSI. SAS is a serial, point-to-point, enterprise-level device
interface that leverages the Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) protocol set. The
SAS interface provides improved performance, simplified cabling, smaller connectors,
lower pin count, and lower power requirements when compared to parallel SCSI.
SATA
Acronym for Serial Advanced Technology Attachment. A physical storage interface
standard. SATA is a serial link that provides point-to-point connections between
devices. The thinner serial cables allow for better airflow within the system and permit
smaller chassis designs.
SCSI device type
A drive property indicating the type of the device, such as drive.
serial no.
A controller property indicating the manufacturer-assigned serial number.
strip size
The portion of a stripe that resides on a single drive in the drive group.
stripe size
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A drive property that indicates the revision level of the drive’s firmware.
A virtual drive property indicating the length of the interleaved data segments that the
RAID controller writes across multiple drives, not including parity drives. For example,
consider a stripe that contains 64 KB of drive space and has 16 KB of data residing on
each drive in the stripe. In this case, the stripe size is 64 KB and the strip size is 16 KB.
The user can select the stripe size.
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Appendix C: Glossary |
MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
striping
A technique used to write data across all drives in a virtual drive.
Each stripe consists of consecutive virtual drive data addresses that are mapped in
fixed-size units to each drive in the virtual drive using a sequential pattern. For
example, if the virtual drive includes five drives, the stripe writes data to drives one
through five without repeating any of the drives. The amount of space consumed by a
stripe is the same on each drive. Striping by itself does not provide data redundancy.
Striping in combination with parity does provide data redundancy.
subvendor ID
A controller property that lists additional vendor ID information about the controller.
uncorrectable error count
A controller property that lists the number of uncorrectable errors detected on drives
connected to the controller. If the error count reaches a certain level, a drive will be
marked as failed.
vendor ID
vendor info
virtual drive
virtual drive state
write-back
write policy
write-through
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
A controller property indicating the vendor-assigned ID number of the controller.
A drive property listing the name of the vendor of the drive.
A storage unit created by a RAID controller from one or more drives. Although a virtual
drive can be created from several drives, it is seen by the operating system as a single
drive. Depending on the RAID level used, the virtual drive can retain redundant data in
case of a drive failure.
A virtual drive property indicating the condition of the virtual drive. Examples include
Optimal and Degraded.
In Write-Back Caching mode, the controller sends a data transfer completion signal to
the host when the controller cache has received all of the data in a drive write
transaction. Data is written to the drive subsystem in accordance with policies set up by
the controller.
These policies include the amount of dirty/clean cache lines, the number of cache lines
available, and elapsed time from the last cache flush.
See Default Write Policy.
In Write-Through Caching mode, the controller sends a data transfer completion signal
to the host when the drive subsystem has received all of the data and has completed
the write transaction to the drive.
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Appendix C: Glossary |
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MegaRAID SAS Software User Guide
LSI Corporation Confidential | September 2010
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