1 6 C T
Troubleshooting
Chapter
6
1
In This Chapter...
Troubleshooting Direction................................................................ 6–2
PLC unit Troubleshooting................................................................. 6–3
Power Supply Troubleshooting......................................................... 6–5
I/O Module Troubleshooting............................................................. 6–6
Troubleshooting Electrical Noise Problems...................................... 6–10
Error Codes..................................................................................... 6–11
Chapter 6: Troubleshooting
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Troubleshooting Direction
Use this section to figure out where to start when troubleshooting CLICK PLC problems.
Problem with
power supply?
Go to
Page 6-5
6–2
Problem with
PLC unit?
Go to
Page 6-3
Problem with
I/O modules?
Go to
Page 6-6
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Chapter 6: Troubleshooting
PLC unit Troubleshooting
PLC unit issues are grouped according to their function. Use the illustration below to find the
appropriate document page numbers for issues with different PLC unit functions.
Problem with
toggle switch?
Go to
Page 6-3
C0-00DD1-D
Problem with
LED indicators?
Go to
Page 6-4
Problem with I/O?
Go to
Page 6-6
Toggle Switch
Switch is in RUN position
When the toggle switch is in the RUN position, the PLC unit should normally be in Run
mode (indicated by the RUN LED being ON), unless the PLC has been placed in Stop mode
by a peripheral device through one of the communication ports. To put the PLC unit in Run
mode, move the toggle switch to the STOP position and then switch it back again to the RUN
position. If the RUN LED then remains off, check the PWR and ERR LED indicators per the
chart shown below.
LED Status*
PWR
OFF
ERR
ON
Necessary action
There is insufficient power for the PLC unit. Check the power cable and input voltage.
There is an error in the PLC unit. Connect the CLICK programming software to read the
error information. See the “Error Codes” section at the end of this chapter for error message
instructions.
* I f you see LED indications different from the ones shown in this table, refer to the “LED Indicators Troubleshooting”
section for further explanations.
Switch is in STOP position
When the toggle switch is in STOP position, the PLC unit should be in Stop mode (indicated
by the RUN LED being OFF). Cycle power to the PLC. If the PLC unit starts up in Run
mode, with toggle switch in STOP position, it means the PLC unit does not recognize the
toggle switch position correctly. Please replace the PLC unit.
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LED Indicators
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The CLICK PLC performs many pre-defined diagnostic routines with every PLC scan, using
onboard diagnostics that can detect various errors or failures in the PLC. LEDs on the face of
the PLC will indicate for specific errors.
The 3 LEDs located next to the RUN/STOP switch power, (PWR, RUN and ERR) indicate
the status of the PLC unit. The remainer of the LED indicators are discussed in later sections
of this chapter:
• TX1/RX1/TX2/RX2/TX3/RX3 & LINK/ACT – Chapter 2
• LED indicators for I/O – Chapter 2
LED
Status
On
PWR Blinking
RUN
Meaning
The PLC is powered
correctly.
The PLC input
power is not
sufficient.
Necessary action
No action is necessary.
Check the voltage on the terminal located on the bottom of the PLC. The input voltage
should be 20-28 VDC. Also check the power input wiring & terminal connections. The
power supply may need to be replaced.
Check the voltage on the terminal located on the bottom of the PLC. The input voltage
should be 20-28 VDC. Also check the power input wiring & terminal connections. The
power supply may need to be replaced.
If the toggle switch next to the LED indicators is in RUN position, no action is necessary. If
the toggle switch is in STOP position, cycle power the PLC. If the PLC unit starts up in Run
mode, it means that the PLC unit does not recognize the toggle switch position correctly,
and the PLC unit must be replaced.
When a C0-04RTD or C0-04THM is installed in the CLICK PLC system, the RUN LED blinks
for up to 11 seconds to indicate that the PLC unit is initializing the analog input module
after power-up. If the RUN LED keeps blinking after the initial 11 seconds, power cycle
the CLICK PLC system. If the symptom remains, replace the PLC unit and/or the analog
input module.
Off
There is no power
to the PLC.
On
The PLC is in RUN
mode.
Blinking
The PLC is
initializing the
C0-04RTD or
C0-04THM.
Off
If the toggle switch next to the LED indicators is in STOP position, no action is necessary.
The PLC is in STOP If the switch is in RUN position and you want to put the PLC unit in Run mode, toggle
the switch to STOP position and then back to RUN position. If the RUN LED stays off,
mode.
connect the CLICK programming software to read the error information. See the “Error
Codes” section at the end of this chapter for error message instructions.
On
There is an error.
ERR Blinking
Off
Connect the CLICK programming software to check the error. See the “Error Codes”
section at the end of this chapter for error message instructions.
Warnings do not prevent the PLC unit from running. However, you should check what
are active. Connect the CLICK programming software to read the warning
There is a warning. warnings
information. See the “Error Codes” section at the end of this chapter for error message
instructions.
There is no error.
No action is necessary.
Errors (ERR LED on)
Errors which may cause the system to function improperly, perhaps causing a safety problem. The PLC will automatically
switch from RUN Mode to STOP Mode. (In STOP Mode all outputs are turned off.) If the PLC is already in STOP Mode
when an error is detected, the PLC will not allow a transition to RUN Mode until the error has been corrected.
Examples of errors:
• I/O module error
• System configuration error
• Memory check error
• Project file error
Warnings (ERR LED blinking)
Warnings that require attention, but do not cause improper operation. They do not cause or prevent any PLC mode
transitions. The application program can use system control bits to detect warnings, and even take the system to an orderly
shutdown or switch the PLC to STOP Mode if desired. Examples of warnings:
• Lost SRAM data
• Battery low voltage
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Chapter 6: Troubleshooting
Power Supply Troubleshooting
When the PWR LED is ON, the CLICK PLC is receiving enough power for operation. Verify
the power input voltage at the bottom connector on the PLC unit; the input voltage should
be 20-28 VDC.
The input voltage measures less than 20V DC
Remove the bottom connector from the CLICK PLC unit and measure the voltage again.
If the voltage at the connector then measures more than 20V DC, the power supply cannot
provide enough current for the CLICK PLC. Replace the power supply with a higher output
current power supply. Check the power budget to determine the current required from the
power supply (see below).
If the voltage still measures less than 20V DC with the connector removed from the PLC,
and the power supply voltage is not adjustable, then the power supply cannot be used for the
CLICK PLC. Replace the power supply with another one.
The input voltage measures greater than 28V DC
If the output current of the power supply is adjustable, decrease the output voltage. If the
output voltage cannot be lowered to less than 28V DC, replace the power supply with another
one.
How to check the power budget
You can use the programming software to check the power budget of the CLICK PLC:
• Connect the PLC to a computer running the CLICK programming software.
• From the software menus, connect the software to the PLC by selecting PLC and Connect...
• From the software menus, select Setup and System Configuration...
• The System Configuration Setup window opens, and displays the Power Budget in mA required
by the PLC system. The PLC power supply must be capable of providing more current than the
Power Budget amount.
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I/O Module Troubleshooting
First, check the status of the PWR LED indicators on the I/O modules. If the PWR LED on
the PLC unit is on, but there are I/O modules which have PWR LEDs that are off, check the
connections between the modules. If the I/O module PWR LEDs remain off, replace those
modules.
Troubleshooting input modules is slightly different from troubleshooting output modules.
Please refer to the proper subsection:
• Input module troubleshooting
• Output module troubleshooting
Input Module Troubleshooting
The input modules (including the PLC built-in inputs) can have the following symptoms:
Symptom
Necessary Action
Input signal is on, but Check the external power input voltage on the terminal block.
the LED indicator on Check whether the terminal block is attached correctly.
the module is off.
If the input voltage is correct but the LED indicator is still off, replace the input module.
Check whether the PLC unit RUN LED is ON. If not, put the PLC in RUN mode.
the I/O configuration with the programming software. (See “How to Check the I/O
The LED indicator is Check
on, but the PLC does Configuration” on the next page.)
not work as expected. Connect the programming software and check the X bit related to the input point that is on.
(See “How to Check the I/O Status” later in this section for instructions.)
If the X bit is off, replace the input module.
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Chapter 6: Troubleshooting
Output Module Troubleshooting
The output modules (including the PLC built-in outputs) can have the following symptoms:
Symptom
Necessary Action
Check the external power input voltage on the terminal block.
Check whether the terminal block is attached correctly.
If it is a DC sinking, relay, or AC output, check the voltage between the output and the
The module LED
common. If the output is working correctly, the voltage should be close to zero.
indicator is ON, but
there is no output.
If it is a sourcing output, check the voltage between the output and the 24 VDC input.
If the output is working correctly, the voltage should be close to zero.
If the LED indicator is ON, but the output voltage is not correct, replace the output module.
Check whether the PLC unit RUN LED is ON. If not, put the PLC in RUN mode.
Check the I/O configuration with the programming software.
The module LED
(See “How to Check the I/O Configuration” below.)
indicator is OFF, even
Connect the programming software and check whether the Y bit related to the output point
though the output
is ON.
status bit (Y---) is
If the Y bit is not actually ON, use the override feature to manually turn the Y bit ON.
supposed to be ON.
(See “How to Check the I/O Status” on the next page.)
If the Y bit is ON, but the output is OFF, replace the output module.
The module LED
indicator is OFF, but
the output is sending
an ON signal to the
field device.
Leakage current can be a problem when connecting field devices to I/O modules. False input
signals can be generated when the leakage current of the output point is great enough to
turn on the connected input device.
To correct this issue, install a resistor in parallel with the input or output of the circuit. The
value of this resistor will depend on the amount of leakage current and the voltage applied,
but usually a 10k to 20k ohm resistor will work. Ensure that the wattage rating of the
resistor is correct for your application.
How to Check the I/O Configuration
You can use the CLICK programming software to check the I/O configuration that the PLC
is recognizing:
• Connect the PLC to a computer running the CLICK programming software.
• From the software menus, connect the software to the PLC by selecting PLC and Connect...
• From the software menus, select Setup and System Configuration...
• The System Configuration Setup window opens, and displays all of the CLICK module types the
PLC recognizes that are connected in the PLC system.
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How to Check the I/O Status
You can use CLICK programming software Data View window to check the I/O status in the
PLC unit.
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Warning: Only authorized personnel fully familiar with all aspects of the application should make changes
to the program. Make sure that you thoroughly consider the impact of any changes to minimize the risk
of personal injury or damage to equipment. Specifically, forcing inputs and outputs to their ON state will
cause externally connected equipment to operate.
Open or create a data view window by selecting Monitor and Data View from either the menu
bar, the Navigation window, or the Data View icon.
MENU BAR
ICON
NAVIGATION
WINDOW
To add new memory addresses to a Data View window:
• Click on an empty Address field to bring up a small browser button.
• Click the browser button to open the Address Picker window.
• From the Address Picker window, click the Pickup Mode button, select the desired I/O or
memory location, and then click OK to add that address into the data view.
To troubleshoot I/O from the Data View window:
• Connect to PLC unit
• Force outputs on/off, then check actual outputs to see whether they are actually on or off.
• Edit, Write All New Values, or double click individual output Write icon.
• Externally turn inputs on or off, then check their status in data view. Inputs cannot be
forced from Data View.
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Chapter 6: Troubleshooting
Replacement of I/O modules
Warning: The CLICK PLC does not have hot swap capability. Do not disconnect or replace any I/O
modules without first shutting off power to the PLC PLC unit.
Before replacing an I/O module, please consider the cause of the module problem. If you
suspect that another device may have caused the failure in the module, that device may also
cause the same failure in the replacement module. As a precaution, you may want to check
power supplies or other devices connected to the failed module before replacing it.
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Troubleshooting Electrical Noise Problems
Electrical Noise Problems
Noise is one of the most difficult problems to diagnose. Electrical noise can enter a system in
many different ways and can fall into one of two categories, conducted noise or radiated noise.
It may be difficult to determine how the noise is entering the system, but the corrective actions
are similar for both types of noise problems.
• Conducted noise is electrical interference introduced into the system by way of an attached
wire, panel connection, etc. The interference may enter through an I/O circuit, a power supply
connection, the communication ground connection, or the chassis ground connection.
• Radiated noise is electrical interference introduced into the system without a direct electrical
connection, much in the same manner as radio waves.
Reducing Electrical Noise
Although electrical noise cannot be completely eliminated, it can be reduced to a level
that will not adversely affect the system.
• Most noise problems result from improper grounding of the system. A good earth ground can be
the single most effective way to correct noise problems. If a ground is not available, install a ground
rod as close to the system as possible. Ensure that all ground wires are single point grounds, and are
not daisy chained from one device to another. Ground other metal enclosures near the system. A
loose wire can act as a large antenna, introducing noise into the system; so, tighten all connections
in your system. Loose ground wires are more susceptible to noise than the other wires in your
system. Review Chapter 3: Installation and Wiring, if you have questions regarding how to ground
your system.
• Electrical noise can enter the system through the power source for the PLC and I/O circuits.
Installing an isolation transformer for all AC sources can correct this problem. DC sources should
be well-grounded, good quality power supplies.
• Separate input wiring from output wiring. Never run low-voltage I/O wiring close to high voltage
wiring.
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Chapter 6: Troubleshooting
Error Codes
When there is an Error or Warning, the error code is stored in the System Data register SD1.
When an Error occurs during the operation, the CLICK PLC system goes to the STOP mode
immediately and the ERR LED on the PLC unit turns on. On the other hand, when a
Warning occurs during the operation, the CLICK PLC system stays in RUN mode and the
ERR LED on the PLC unit starts blinking.
In the error code tables that follow, the Category column indicates whether the error code is
an Error or a Warning. If any of the Warnings listed is critical for your control system, add an
additional ladder program to put the CLICK PLC system in STOP mode when that specific
Warning occurs. Here is an example.
Example
By turning the System Control bit
SC50 on, the CLICK PLC system
goes in the STOP mode.
X102 turns on when the analog
I/O module in the I/O1 position is
missing external 24 VDC input.
PLC Error Codes
Error Status
Code Flag*
101
Error
Name
I/O Module
SC20
Error
Category
Causes
There are more than 8 I/O
modules.
Error
At least one I/O module was
added to the CLICK PLC during
operation.
An I/O module has failed.
102
SC21
System
Config
Error
Error
The current system configuration
does not match the configuration
saved in the project file.
Solutions
A CLICK PLC system can support up to 8 I/O modules.
Remove any excessive I/O modules.
Power off the CLICK PLC and check the connection of the
I/O modules. Then power on the CLICK PLC again. If the
problem remains, connect the CLICK software to the PLC
and check the System Configuration. If there is any I/O
module that is not shown in the System Configuration,
replace it.
Connect the CLICK software to the CLICK PLC and check
the system configuration. If there is any I/O module that
is used in the PLC system but not shown in the System
Configuration window, replace the I/O module.
Connect the CLICK software to the CLICK PLC and
open the System Configuration window. Modify the
current configuration of the CLICK PLC to match the
configuration in the project file, or uncheck the ‘Start-up
I/O Config Check’ option if you want to use the current
configuration.
* The Status Flags are turned ON when the related errors occur.
Error code table continued on next page.
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Error Codes (continued)
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PLC Error Codes
Error Status
Code Flag*
Error
Name
Category
Causes
Solutions
103
SC22
I/O Config
Error
Error
Power off the CLICK PLC and check the connection of the
I/O modules. Then power on the CLICK PLC again. If the
problem remains, connect the CLICK software to the PLC
and check the System Configuration. If there is any I/O
module that is not shown in the System Configuration,
replace it.
Connect the CLICK software to the CLICK PLC and open
System Configuration window. If there is any I/O
The PLC unit can not access one the
module that is used in the PLC system but not shown
or more I/O modules.
in the System Configuration window, replace the I/O
module.
104
SC23
Memory
Check
Error
Error
There is a memory check error.
105
Project File
SC24
Error
At least one I/O module was
removed from the CLICK PLC
during operation.
Error
106
SC25
Firmware
Version
Error
Error
107
SC26
Watchdog
Timer Error
Error
201
202
203
SC27
There is no project file in the
CLICK PLC.
The project file stored in the
CLICK PLC is corrupted.
The project file was written on a
newer version of CLICK software.
The firmware in the CLICK PLC is
too old to execute the project.
The PLC scan time exceeded the
watchdog timer setup.
The data in the SRAM was
Lost SRAM
Warning lost while the CLICK PLC was
Data
powered off.
SC28
Battery
Low
Voltage
SC29
Battery
Replacement
Power cycle the CLICK PLC. If the same error occurs
again, download the project again and/or try the ‘Reset to
Factory Default’ command. If the same error still occurs,
replace the PLC unit.
Download a project file into the CLICK PLC.
Download the project file into the CLICK PLC again.
Connect the CLICK software to the CLICK PLC and update
the firmware of the PLC unit.
Connect the CLICK software to the PLC and check the
maximum PLC scan time and the watchdog timer setup.
The Basic PLC units do not have a battery back-up, but
they have a capacitor that will hold memory for a few
days. The data in the SRAM is lost if the CLICK PLC
is powered off for long enough for the capacitor to
discharge. In this case, the CLICK PLC initializes the data
in the SRAM automatically. This also applies to Standard
and Analog PLC units if a battery is not installed.
Replace the battery (ADC part #: D2-BAT-1).
Also, set the new battery installation date and the
Battery voltage is too low to retain anticipated replacement date in the CLICK programming
Warning
software if the Battery Replacement Notification option is
data in the SRAM.
selected.
(Pull-down menu: Setup > Battery Backup Setup)
Warning
The anticipated battery
replacement date has passed.
Replace the battery (ADC part #: D2-BAT-1).
Also, set the new battery installation date and the
anticipated replacement date in the CLICK programming
software.
(Pull-down menu: Setup > Battery Backup Setup)
* The SC bits are turned ON when the related errors occur.
Error code table continued on next page.
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Error Codes (continued)
PLC Error Codes
Error Status
Code Flag*
Error
Name
IO1
Module
Error
IO2
Module
Error
IO3
Module
Error
IO4
Module
Error
IO5
Module
Error
IO6
Module
Error
IO7
Module
Error
IO8
Module
Error
IO1
Missing
24V
301
X101
302
X201
303
X301
304
X401
305
X501
306
X601
307
X701
308
X801
310
X102
311
X103
IO1 CH1
Burnout
312
X106
IO1 CH2
Burnout
313
X109
IO1 CH3
Burnout
314
X112
IO1 CH4
Burnout
320
X202
IO2
Missing
24V
321
X203
IO2 CH1
Burnout
322
X206
IO2 CH2
Burnout
Category
Causes
Solutions
Error
The analog I/O module in I/O1
position is not functioning.
Power cycle the CLICK PLC. If the same error occurs
again, replace the analog I/O module.
Error
The analog I/O module in I/O2
position is not functioning.
Power cycle the CLICK PLC. If the same error occurs
again, replace the analog I/O module.
Error
The analog I/O module in I/O3
position is not functioning.
Power cycle the CLICK PLC. If the same error occurs
again, replace the analog I/O module.
Error
The analog I/O module in I/O4
position is not functioning.
Power cycle the CLICK PLC. If the same error occurs
again, replace the analog I/O module.
Error
The analog I/O module in I/O5
position is not functioning.
Power cycle the CLICK PLC. If the same error occurs
again, replace the analog I/O module.
Error
The analog I/O module in I/O6
position is not functioning.
Power cycle the CLICK PLC. If the same error occurs
again, replace the analog I/O module.
Error
The analog I/O module in I/O7
position is not functioning.
Power cycle the CLICK PLC. If the same error occurs
again, replace the analog I/O module.
Error
The analog I/O module in I/O8
position is not functioning.
Power cycle the CLICK PLC. If the same error occurs
again, replace the analog I/O module.
The analog I/O module in I/
Warning O1 position is missing external
24VDC input.
CH1 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O1 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
CH2 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O1 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
CH3 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O1 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
CH4 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O1 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
The analog I/O module in I/
Warning O2 position is missing external
24VDC input.
CH1 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O2 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
CH2 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O2 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
Appy 24 VDC to the analog I/O module.
Check the wiring for CH1.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Check the wiring for CH2.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Check the wiring for CH3.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Check the wiring for CH4.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Appy 24 VDC to the analog I/O module.
Check the wiring for CH1.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Check the wiring for CH2.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
* The Status Flags are turned ON when the related errors occur.
Error code table continued on next page.
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Error Codes (continued)
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PLC Error Codes
Error Status
Code Flag*
Error
Name
IO2 CH3
Burnout
323
X209
324
X212
330
X302
331
X303
332
X306
IO3 CH2
Burnout
333
X309
IO3 CH3
Burnout
334
X312
340
X402
341
X403
IO4 CH1
Burnout
342
X406
IO4 CH2
Burnout
343
X409
IO4 CH3
Burnout
344
X412
IO4 CH4
Burnout
350
X502
IO5
Missing
24V
351
X503
IO5 CH1
Burnout
352
X506
IO5 CH2
Burnout
353
X509
IO5 CH3
Burnout
IO2 CH4
Burnout
IO3
Missing
24V
IO3 CH1
Burnout
IO3 CH4
Burnout
IO4
Missing
24V
Category
Causes
CH3 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O2 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
CH4 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O2 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
The analog I/O module in I/O3
Warning position is missing external 24
VDC input.
CH1 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O3 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
CH2 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O3 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
CH3 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O3 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
CH4 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O3 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
The analog I/O module in I/O4
Warning position is missing external 24
VDC input.
CH1 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O4 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
CH2 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O4 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
CH3 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O4 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
CH4 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O4 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
The analog I/O module in I/O5
Warning position is missing external 24
VDC input.
CH1 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O5 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
CH2 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O5 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
CH3 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O5 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
Solutions
Check the wiring for CH3.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Check the wiring for CH4.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Appy 24 VDC to the analog I/O module.
Check the wiring for CH1.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Check the wiring for CH2.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Check the wiring for CH3.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Check the wiring for CH4.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Appy 24 VDC to the analog I/O module.
Check the wiring for CH1.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Check the wiring for CH2.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Check the wiring for CH3.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Check the wiring for CH4.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Appy 24 VDC to the analog I/O module.
Check the wiring for CH1.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Check the wiring for CH2.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Check the wiring for CH3.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
* The Status Flags are turned ON when the related errors occur.
Error code table continued on next page.
6–14
CLICK PLC Hardware User Manual, 5th Edition – C0-USER-M
Chapter 6: Troubleshooting
Error Codes (continued)
PLC Error Codes
Error Status
Code Flag*
Error
Name
IO5 CH4
Burnout
354
X512
360
X602
361
X603
362
X606
IO6 CH2
Burnout
363
X609
IO6 CH3
Burnoutt
364
X612
370
X702
371
X703
372
X706
IO7 CH2
Burnout
373
X709
IO7 CH3
Burnout
374
X712
IO7 CH4
Burnout
380
X802
IO8
Missing
24V
381
X803
IO8 CH1
Burnout
382
X806
IO8 CH2
Burnout
383
X809
IO8 CH3
Burnout
384
X812
IO8 CH4
Burnout
IO6
Missing
24V
IO6 CH1
Burnout
IO6 CH4
Burnout
IO7
Missing
24V
IO7 CH1
Burnout
Category
Causes
CH4 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O5 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
The analog I/O module in I/
Warning O6 position is missing external
24VDC input.
CH1 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O6 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
CH2 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O6 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
CH3 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O6 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
CH4 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O6 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
The analog I/O module in I/O7
Warning position is missing external 24
VDC input.
CH1 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O7 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
CH2 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O7 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
CH3 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O7 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
CH4 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O7 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
The analog I/O module in I/O8
Warning position is missing external 24
VDC input.
CH1 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O8 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
CH2 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O8 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
CH3 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O8 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
CH4 on the analog I/O module in
Warning I/O8 position senses burnout or
open circuit.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
A
B
C
D
Solutions
Check the wiring for CH4.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Appy 24 VDC to the analog I/O module.
Check the wiring for CH1.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Check the wiring for CH2.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Check the wiring for CH3.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Check the wiring for CH4.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Appy 24 VDC to the analog I/O module.
Check the wiring for CH1.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Check the wiring for CH2.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Check the wiring for CH3.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Check the wiring for CH4.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Appy 24 VDC to the analog I/O module.
Check the wiring for CH1.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Check the wiring for CH2.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Check the wiring for CH3.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
Check the wiring for CH4.
Replace the sensor if it is broken.
* The Status Flags are turned ON when the related errors occur.
CLICK PLC Hardware User Manual, 5th Edition – C0-USER-M
6–15
Chapter 6: Troubleshooting
Notes
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
A
B
C
D
6–16
CLICK PLC Hardware User Manual, 5th Edition – C0-USER-M
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