feb_25_cow_agenda_

feb_25_cow_agenda_
Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District
COMMITTEE-OF-THE-WHOLE
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2015, 10:00 AM
Regional District Board Room, 3008 Fifth Avenue, Port Alberni, BC
AGENDA
1.
CALL TO ORDER
PAGE #
Recognition of Traditional Territories.
2.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
(motion to approve, including late items required 2/3 majority vote)
3.
DECLARATIONS
(conflict of interest or gifts)
4.
PETITIONS, DELEGATIONS & PRESENTATIONS
a.
5.
2-16
Mr. Pat Deakin, Economic Development Officer, City of Port Alberni
regarding Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District Contribution to City of
Port Alberni Economic Development for 2015.
REQUEST FOR DECISIONS & BYLAWS
a.
REQUEST FOR DECISION
Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District Parks & Trails Strategic Plan
M-Irg/H. Adair-Plan Presentation
17-18
19-119
THAT the Committee of the Whole recommend to the Board of Directors:
1. approval of the Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District Parks & Trails Strategic
Plan;
2. establish the ACRD Parks & Trails Advisory Committee with representation
from all areas; and
3. appoint two Directors to the ACRD Parks & Trails Advisory Committee to
advise the Board of Directors on implementation of the Regional Parks & Trails
Strategic Plan
6.
OTHER BUSINESS
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NEW BUSINESS
8
ADJOURN
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CITY OF PORT ALBERNI
City Hall
4850 Argyle Street
Port Alberni, B.C. V9Y 1V8
Tel. (250) 723-2146 Fax: (250) 723-1003
COMMENTS TO THE BOARD OF THE ACRD
RE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT WORK PLAN FOR 2015
From the Economic Development Manager, City of Port Alberni
Bottom Line Recommendation:
Increase the contribution to the economic development function to enable an investment in a regional economic development action plan.
Rationalization for a Regional Economic Development Action Plan
After a great deal of discussion last year, there were 8 deliverables identified for the Board’s investment in Economic Development in 2014.
They were as follows:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Support the Agricultural Development Committee
Help revitalize the ACRD Website, to accommodate promotion of the region and business friendly links
Transportation Committee
Airports
Economic Lunch (‘Turnaround Narrative’)
Bamfield Support
Recruitment Video
Labour Force Gap Analysis
Of those, only the first four received attention and each to varying degrees.
However I have no trouble in saying the Regional District got more than its money worth. $26,504 from the City’s Economic Development
budget was invested in the Alberni Valley Regional Airport work: $21,504 for the Business Case and $5,000 for the geotechnical work to confirm
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the existing runway could handle larger aircraft. This exceeds the contribution provided by the Regional District to the Economic Development
function last year. Moreover, it does not put a value on the time invested by the Economic Development Manager in the four initiatives that
were attended to.
While I believe there is significant value in each of the other projects that were identified for 2014, but not addressed, I am of the opinion that
we should be working to a current regional economic development action plan rather than to one-off projects.
I know there is a reluctance to invest money in this type of work. I know there is a sentiment to the effect that these reports or studies just
gather dust. I have presented one or two former Regional District Boards with summaries of recommendations from previous ‘economic
development’ type studies. Except for the Alberni Valley Agricultural Plan, they are included here for your convenience. Some of the studies
date back decades. Some of the recommendations have been implemented; some that haven’t been may still be relevant. I have provided a
column to the right of each recommendation for your comments. You may conclude after reading these we could just ‘cherry pick’ the
recommendations that haven’t been implemented and are still relevant for our work in 2015. You may see these as evidence that the plans are
not followed so we shouldn’t spend money on another.
However times have changed since these were done and we need a fresh look at opportunities and challenges in the economic sectors that
make sense for us. It is my opinion that we would all be more confident about investing money in economic development work, knowing that
what was being done was according to a relevant ‘game plan’. ICET will match any funds we put into this work (up to a maximum of $30,000)
through their Economic Development Readiness Program. They have a relatively short turn-around time on these applications.
Therefore I am asking that you increase the contribution to the economic development function to enable an investment in a regional economic
development action plan. Regardless of your decision, I am committed to continuing work on the first four items in the 2014 ACRD Economic
Development Deliverables.
Sincerely
Pat Deakin
Economic Development Manager
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VANCOUVER ISLAND AND SUNSHINE COAST REGION AIR TRANSPORTATION OUTLOOK 2008
Prepared by InterVISTAS Consulting Inc.
RECOMMENDATIONS
Regional Development and Essential Services Airport Improvement
Plan
1. Addition of approved airport lighting to enhance access and
Medevac helicopter use at AVRA.
2. Provide regional jet/corporate jet capability at the Tofino Airport
to provide important transportation access to this difficult to
reach destination. CYAZ
3. Develop airport certification standards for IFR day/night
operations for both scheduled and non-scheduled passenger
service improvements. CYAZ
4. Infrastructure has degraded and requires re-development to
airport certification standards for IFR day-night operations.
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COMMENTS
A DECADE OF CHANGE: SHAPING THE FUTURE
COASTAL COMMUNITY NETWORK – 10TH ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE OF COASTAL
COMMUNITIES – 2002
Prepared by The Coastal Community Network
RECOMMENDATIONS
1.
The provincial and federal governments should work with
coastal communities and First Nations to develop similar policies
and abundant financing for the establishment of communitybased licence banks, community development quotas and/or
aquatic trusts which could provide coastal communities access to
adjacent fisheries resources and allow them to partner with
industry stakeholders for the purposes of community economic
development. These should be established with the view to
allowing communities to establish public-private partnerships in
ocean industries.
2.
The Coastal Community Network should also establish a
community forest working group in partnership with other
interested community organizations to develop a community
consensus on forest tenure policy reform for the provincial
government.
COMMENTS
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ALBERNI-CLAYOQUOT REGIONAL DISTRICT ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY – 1998
Prepared by the Economic Development Commission
RECOMMENDATIONS
1.
To develop new education and training opportunities for
skills related to growth sectors within the region
 To enhance access to technology and technology training
opportunities
 To create a range of entrepreneurial training and
experiences for youth
 To develop training opportunities targeting existing and new
Value-Added Manufacturing, Tourism, or Conservation
activities
 To establish a market type of cooperative or other collective
operation on the tourist corridor
2.
To enhance tourism destination sites, events and access within
the Valley in order to increase tourist stays
 To enhance existing festivals and/or create and market a
new festival with appeal to visitors
 To establish scheduled flights into Port Alberni
 To establish the Link Hwy.
 To support the efforts of the Design Guideline Review
Committee as an initial stage in local revitalization
 To develop and market heritage tourism vacation packages
 To continue to explore funding for infrastructure related to
Sports Tourism and conference facilities
 To support existing eco-tourism operators in efforts to
develop eco-tourism promotion and packages
 To continue to seek funds for the development of the
Harbour Quay waterfront, marina, and hotel
 To establish additional signage at both entrances to the City
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COMMENTS
3.
To increase the number and range of value-added wood
manufacturing activities in the valley
 To increase local access to fibre through a community forest
license and waste/scrap wood utilization
 To support the growth of existing manufacturers through
marketing, financing & expansion activities
4.
To establish a common vision for development between the
Labour Movement and the Business Community
 To bring together key stakeholders as a focus group to
identify and prioritize issues and opportunities around this
goal
 To undertake one joint initiative in the next year around a
common concern
5.
To increase access to Investment Capital for entrepreneurs
and major development projects
 To explore models for local Venture Capital funds and


funding support from Western Economic Diversification
To continue to market development opportunities externally
To plan an Investment Fair
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ECONOMIC TRANSITION AND DIVERSIFICATION STRATEGY FOR THE CLAYOQUOT
PHASE 1 REPORT – JANUARY 1998
Prepared by Ference Weicker & Company
RECOMMENDATIONS
1.
Form the committee that will oversee economic development
activities in the Clayoquot
The Economic Development Committee should first
meet to:
- Review the composition, roles and responsibilities of the
Committee;
- Confirm the geographic area to be included; and
- Confirm the process to be followed in preparing the
economic transition and diversification strategy.
2.
Develop a detailed work plan for the study
The work plan should include an effective communication
and marketing strategy to create public awareness of the
process and to promote public participation.
3.
Stage a series of public meetings in the region
Key steps to include in each public meeting are:
- Review the results of Phase I of the Project;
- Review the process for completing Phase II;
- Obtain input regarding the vision and goals of the
strategy; and
- Outline other means through which individuals can
provide input into the development of the strategy. For
example, individuals should have the opportunity to
make written submissions to add information or make
arguments for or against a given direction for
development.
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COMMENTS
4.
Conduct a survey of a sample of residents from the region
5.
Stage a meeting of the Economic Development Committee
to review the results to date
A meeting of the Steering Committees should then be
convened to:
- Review the results of the public meetings and surveys;
- Adopt the vision statements and goals for the strategy;
- Develop criteria for evaluating and prioritizing
- Review the materials for sector and cross-sectoral
workshops
6.
Strike the sector and cross-sectoral committees
Committees could be established in the areas of:
- Forestry;
- Fisheries;
- Aquaculture;
- Tourism;
- Retail Trade, Construction and Services;
- Business Support Services (such as financing, counseling, and
training);
- Human Resource Development; and
- Infrastructure Development
7.
Stage the sectoral and cross-sectoral workshops
8.
Conduct further research, as required, to refine the
strategies identified by the committees
9.
Stage a second meeting of the sector and cross-sectoral
committees to reviews the results of the research and
finalize the strategies
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10.
Stage a meeting of the Steering Committee to review and
prioritize the strategies identified
11.
Prepare an implementation plan for the economic
development strategy
12.
Develop a monitoring and evaluation plan to assess the
progress made over time in implementing the economic
transition and diversification strategy
13.
Prepare a draft report of the economic transition and
diversification strategy.
14.
Obtain feedback from the public and from other organizations
regarding the proposed economic development strategy
15.
After consideration of the feedback received, prepare a final
copy of the economic transition and diversification strategy.
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INVENTING OUR FUTURE 2000 AND BEYOND
AN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY FOR THE REGIONAL DISTRICT OF ALBERNI-CLAYOQUOT
Prepared by the communities of: Port Alberni, Ucluelet, Tofino and Bamfield
RECOMMENDATIONS
1.
Community Facelift
 Identify public image problem to outside world Arts
community to develop attractions (e.g. land, taxation)
independence and self reliant community.
2.
Educate Labour Market Movement (re: Business Needs)
 Organize a forum as part of a long term strategy in order to
create common purpose, self-empowerment of the
individual and new ways to operating together.
 Jointly sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce, PACES, and
the Labour Council.
 Forum should be structured to ensure quality of
participation and model values of respect and personal
responsibility.
3.
Venture Capital Fund
 Survey Community for needs and ideas
 Narrow down to 2 or 3 solid ideas
 Investigate and do feasibility studies
 Present to Capital Venture group, local and outside city
4.
Advanced Technology Training
 Improved access to technology and create a comfortable
environment
 Linking technology to jobs (e.g. workplace demonstrations)
 Variety of learning media (e.g. formal and informal prior
learning assessment
STATUS OF RECOMMENDATION
RELEVANCE / COMMENTS
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
Encourage technology based job creation
5.
Arts/Culture Attractions
 “Pump ‘em Up” Committee
 Lobby City Hall (licensing, venues/events)
 Arts and or Cultural festival
 Global direct marketing (approach international market)
6.
Link Highway
 Gazette existing route to Comox
 Pave 10 km each year from each end to make only one lane
(12”) to start, promote as Adventure Highway
 Improve over time (width, road bed, bridges)
 Extend to Cowichan using same methodology
7.
Manufacture products from recyclables/wood
 Education and training for making finished wood products
 More accessibility for logging debris, blow downs and
hardwood
 More timber and wood available for local value-added
manufacturers
 Develop links and interconnections between wood
manufacturers and value-added manufacturers, check out
time links developed on Olympic Peninsula
8.
Cottage Industries
 Sales location (Highway #4)
 Cooperative marketing
 Small business resources
 Co-op enterprises
9.
Entrepreneurship Training
 Survey to determine ideas and needs with regards to
business so that specific training can be offered.
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ECONOMIC ACCESSIBILITY OF THE ALBERNI-CLAYOQUOT REGION – 1987
Prepared by Novacorp Consulting Inc. in association with: The Economic Planning Group of
Canada and Willis, Cunliffe, Tait and Company Ltd.
RECOMMENDATIONS
1.
In 1987 this report developed a number of specific
conclusions concerning a new access road development to
Port Alberni. The writers of the report did not specifically
recommend any of the four access route options outlined below:
 Benefits are expected to exceed costs for Routes 1, 2, 3 and
5 and any one or combination of these access route
developments would advantageous to the study area
economy.
 Both Route #2 (Horne Lake) and Route #3 (Comox Lake) can
be considered as improved and shortened access to the
Comox Valley and the northern part of Vancouver island
since the distance between Port Alberni and Courtenay
varies only slightly between these alternatives.
 Except for the Horne Lake alternative (Route #2), the paved
road sub-option demonstrates consistently high benefit: cost
ratios compared to the gravel sub-option and this higher
caliber of road should be encouraged due primarily to the
tourism benefits expected to be generated.

STATUS OF RECOMMENDATION
RELEVANCE / COMMENTS
Concentration on new access road development should
clearly take place and receive priority over improvements to
the existing Highway #4 based on this benefit: cost
evaluation.
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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY FOR REGIONAL DISTRICT OF ALBERNI CLAYOQUOT 1982
Prepared by local citizens, the Economic Development Commission and Regional District of
Alberni-Clayoquot
RECOMMENDATIONS
1.
Strategic Goals for Development by Economic Sector
The following economic sector opportunities worthy of
attention, support, and action within the Regional District of
Alberni-Clayoquot are:
 Manufacturing/processing especially “Value Added” wood
products:
 Further processing of the area’s wood supply
 “Value added” manufacturing of specialty wood products
for market in Japan, Europe and the State of California. (I.e.
semi-finished wood blanks for the furniture industry, home
improvement components, boat lumber, ladder stock,
mouldings and sash and door blanks, components for
traditional Japanese homes).
 Research and development of products utilizing nontraditional species of wood (alder, ash, aspen)
 Further processing of the area’s seafood
 Creating value added products from presently utilized and
underutilized seafood raw materials.
 Identifying new processing techniques and market for nontraditional species.
 Diversification of existing manufacturing facilities
 New product diversification – development of products to
meet changing demographics.
 New market development.
 Explore opportunities for “Strategic Alliances”.
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STATUS OF RECOMMENDATION
RELEVANCE / COMMENTS


Tourism:
 Assist Port Alberni in becoming a much more important
“staging area” for vacationers wishing to visit the west coast
communities of Bamfield, Tofino, and Ucluelet.
 The key to increasing the role of the tourist industry is to
secure investment in attractions/facilities which will increase
the number of visitors to the region and their length of stay
and their opportunity to spend more dollars.
 Regional specialty tour packages (i.e. industrial,
adventure/wilderness tours).
 Mini specialty cruises complementing the Lady Rose
 Guiding services and fresh water oriented fish camps
 Wood tours (demonstration/model and working forests)
 Golf, scuba diving, skiing, hiking packages (both for
individuals and families).
 “Tourism product” enhancement – tourism destination
theme attractions (expanding on heritage etc.)
 Further enhancements of the waterfronts and harbours of
Port Alberni, Tofino, Ucluelet and Bamfield.
 Development of additional festivals (i.e. visual and
performing arts) especially evening attractions which would
encourage overnight stays.
 Stimulate a small to mid-size conference business into the
region.
 Development of enhanced tourism infrastructure (i.e.
accommodation, attraction, transportation, retail services.
The Seafood Industry:
 New aquaculture ventures, establishment of hatcheries,
fish feed mills, and other support services such as a
reduction plant will bring additional economic benefit to the
region.
 Further benefits will also be accrued from the local
manufacture of boats and other specialty metal products.
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 Catching and processing of existing non-traditional sea foods
e.g. eels, hake, sea urchins, gooey ducks, roe-on-kelp,
octopus, etc.
 Retail and Service (particularly in view of changing age
demographics) and population increases
 Agriculture:
 Given the present trend in agriculture to fewer and larger
capital intensive farms, the greatest potential for growth in
this industry probably lies in the expansion of existing
operations.
 There are opportunities for exotic and specialty products
to fill niche markets. (llamas, ostriches, kiwi fruit,
blueberries).
 Some opportunity exists to explore new methods of
processing, packaging. (i.e. new ice cream products, canning
mushrooms etc.)
 Enhanced marketing of “Quay Farmer’s Market” potential.
 Educational Services
 Mining
 Energy
j:\economicdevelopment\strategic plan\ed strategic plan status report _presentation to rd.docx
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3008 Fifth Avenue, Port Alberni, B.C. CANADA V9Y 2E3
Telephone (250) 720-2700 FAX: (250) 723-1327
REQUEST FOR DECISION
To:
Russell Dyson, Chief Administrative Officer; and Committee of the Whole
From:
Heather Adair, Jr Planner
Meeting Date: February 18, 2015
Subject:
Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District Parks & Trails Strategic Plan
Recommendation:
THAT the Committee of the Whole recommend to the Board of Directors:
1. approval of the Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District Parks & Trails Strategic Plan;
2. establish the ACRD Parks & Trails Advisory Committee with representation from all areas; and
3. appoint two Directors to the ACRD Parks & Trails Advisory Committee to advise the Board of
Directors on implementation of the Regional Parks & Trails Strategic Plan
Desired Outcome:
Implementation of the Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District Parks & Trails Strategic Plan will expand the
Regional Parks Service for all electoral areas. An important objective of the Plan is to address equity and
look for opportunities to provide a more inclusive Regional Parks Service.
Summary:
The Parks & Trails Strategic Plan highlights the following:
• the Plan is a higher level plan that provides for an overall vision and purpose for parks and trails
in the Regional District;
• provides an action plan for how to meet local resident needs through the provision of park
opportunities for recreation and leisure activities, as well as future land acquisitions;
• provides recommendations and action to protect various terrestrial and marine ecosystems and
critical habitat within the region;
• the Plan was developed with public and First Nations’ input. Open houses were held twice in
each of the following communities; Bamfield, Ucluelet, Tofino, and Port Alberni;
• provides a list of existing parks and trails along with a wish list for future acquisitions.
Implementation Priorities for 2015:
1. Maintain the parks and trails we currently manage. For example, licence requirements of the
Alberni Inlet Trail require ongoing maintenance. We are currently working on an interpretive
signs project with multiple partners for the Alberni Inlet Trail.
Members: City of Port Alberni, District of Ucluelet, District of Tofino, Yuułuʔiłʔatḥ Government, Huu-ay-aht First Nations, Uchucklesaht Tribe
Electoral Areas "A" (Bamfield), "B" (Beaufort), "C" (Long Beach), "D" (Sproat Lake), "E" (Beaver Creek) and "F" (Cherry Creek)
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2. Expand parks and trails in the Bamfield Area. Staff recommends that preference be given to the
Bamfield/Anacla connector trail.
3. Staff recommends that the Parks & Trails Advisory Committee identify a regional park or trail
opportunity on the west coast.
Background:
In 2006, the Alberni Valley Trails Planning Study was completed and in 2008, the Regional Parks and
Trails Policy Report was completed. These two reports identified a need for an overall plan for regional
parks and trails. In 2013, the Regional Board instructed staff to proceed with developing a Regional
Parks Plan.
Time Requirements – Staff & Elected Officials:
Two directors will be required to be appointed to the Regional Parks Committee. The amount of staff
time to implement the Parks & Trails Strategic Plan will depend on the budget the Regional Parks Service
is provided.
Financial:
The implementation priorities 2015 can be achieved with the proposed Regional Parks budget. If the
Board wishes to further develop regional parks in 2015, the 2015 budget should be amended.
Policy or Legislation:
An approved Regional Parks & Trails Strategic Plan is required for most successful grant applications.
Submitted by: ________________________________________________________
Heather Adair, Jr Planner
Reviewed by:
________________________________________________________
Mike Irg, Manager of Planning & Development
Approved by:
________________________________________________________
Russell Dyson, Chief Administrative Officer
Members: City of Port Alberni, District of Ucluelet, District of Tofino, Yuułuʔiłʔatḥ Government, Huu-ay-aht First Nations, Uchucklesaht Tribe
Electoral Areas "A" (Bamfield), "B" (Beaufort), "C" (Long Beach), "D" (Sproat Lake), "E" (Beaver Creek) and "F" (Cherry Creek)
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ALBERNI‐CLAYOQUOT REGIONAL DISTRICT PARKS & TRAILS STRATEGIC PLAN DRAFT February 2015 19
February2015ACRDParks&TrailsStrategicPlan
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This document was prepared by Valhalla Trails Ltd with assistance provided by Landworks Consultants. Thanks are extended to the Parks and Trails Planning Committee for their time, guidance and thoughtful input towards this project. Alberni‐Clayoquot Regional District Mike Irg, Manger of Planning & Development Lori Wilson, Mapping and Computer Technician Heather Adair, Junior Planner Parks & Trails Planning Committee Tara Atleo, Ahousaht First Nation Tyson Atleo, Ahousaht First Nation Libby Avis, Alberni Valley Enhancement Association Larry Baird, Yuułuʔiłʔatḥ First Nation Barb Baker, Alberni Valley Brian Callender, Alberni Valley Harold Carlson, Alberni Valley Outdoor Club Judy Carlson, Alberni Valley Outdoor Club Jackie Chambers, Sproat Lake Parks Commission Jeff Cook, Huu‐ay‐aht First Nation Jolleen Dick, Hupacasath First Nation Monty Horton, Uchucklesaht Tribe John Jack, Huu‐ay‐aht First Nation Richard Kudra, Alberni Valley Matt Kupnicki, Sproat Lake Parks Commission Carlos Mack, Toquaht Nation Sandy McRuer, Alberni Valley Emma Neill, Tofino Sarah Robinson, Toquaht Nation Karla Robison, District of Ucluelet Anne Stewart, Bamfield Jack Thompson, Ditidaht First Nation We would also like to recognize the contribution of the agencies, community organizations, agencies, and individual members of the public for their input and consideration of this plan. 2 20
February2015ACRDParks&TrailsStrategicPlan
EXECUTIVESUMMARY
The ACRD is the quintessential west coast outdoor playground. With oceans, rivers and mountains running from peak to sea, there are amazing recreational opportunities for everyone. The ACRD is home to a wide array of world renowned and regionally significant destinations and natural assets like the West Coast Trail, Pacific Rim National Park, Tofino and Ucluelet, Bamfield, Mt. Arrowsmith, and the Alberni Inlet. The regionʹs abundant forests, lakes, beaches and mountains attract people from far and wide, year round. In 2006 an Alberni Valley Trails Planning Study was completed and in 2008 the Alberni Clayoquot Regional District (ACRD) completed a Regional Parks & Trails Policy Report. The Policy report identified a need for an overall plan for regional parks and trails. In 2014 the Parks & Trails Planning Committee was formed to provide input and collaborate with Valhalla Trails Ltd on the Parks & Trails Strategic Plan. The Parks & Trails Strategic Plan is intended to provide a comprehensive and strategic parks plan for the ACRD that will guide park and trail development over the next ten years. 3 21
February2015ACRDParks&TrailsStrategicPlan
Table of Contents PART 1: INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................... 7 1.1 PARK BENEFITS .................................................................................................................................... 8 1.2 CURRENT TRENDS ............................................................................................................................... 9 1.3 TRENDS ................................................................................................................................................ 9 PART 2: PARK PLANNING ............................................................................................................................ 12 2.1 POLITICAL FRAMEWORK ................................................................................................................... 12 2.2 VISIONARY LAND USE PLANNING ..................................................................................................... 13 2.3 LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT PLANNING POWERS ............................................................................... 13 2.4 WHAT IS A REGIONAL PARKS & TRAILS STRATEGIC PLAN ................................................................. 13 2.5 OFFICIAL COMMUNITY PLANS AND PARKS ....................................................................................... 13 2.6 PARKS PLANNING TOOLS .................................................................................................................. 14 PART 3: KEY OPPORTUNITIES ...................................................................................................................... 16 PART 4: VISION ............................................................................................................................................ 17 4.1 FOUR‐P COMMUNITY VALUES .......................................................................................................... 17 PART 5: COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT ......................................................................................................... 18 5.1 REGIONAL PARKS & TRAILS PLANNING COMMITTEE ....................................................................... 18 5.2 COMMUNITY INPUT .......................................................................................................................... 18 5.3 KEY OUTCOMES OF PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT ...................................................................................... 19 PART 6: ACTION PLAN ................................................................................................................................. 20 6.1 REGIONAL PARKS & TRAILS STRATEGIC PLAN GOALS ....................................................................... 20 6.2 GOALS (In no order of priority) ......................................................................................................... 20 6.2.1 GOAL 1: GOVERNANCE .............................................................................................................. 21 6.2.2 GOAL 2: ACQUISITION ................................................................................................................ 23 6.2.3 GOAL 3: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ......................................................................................... 25 6.2.4 GOAL 4: PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT .................................................................................. 27 6.2.5 GOAL 5: VOLUNTEERS ................................................................................................................ 31 6.2.6 GOAL 6: PARTNERSHIPS ............................................................................................................. 32 6.2.7 GOAL 7: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION................................................................................... 33 PART 7: EXISTING ACRD PARKS ................................................................................................................... 34 7.1 PARKS WITHIN ACRD ......................................................................................................................... 34 7.2 EXISTING PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENTS ............................................................................................. 34 4 22
February2015ACRDParks&TrailsStrategicPlan
7.3 ACRD COMMUNITY PARKS ................................................................................................................ 34 7.4 COMMUNITY PARKS AND RECREATION COMMISSIONS .................................................................. 34 7.4.1 CENTENNIAL PARK ..................................................................................................................... 35 7.4.2 WEST PARK ................................................................................................................................. 35 7.4.3 CHINA CREEK REGIONAL PARK ................................................................................................... 35 7.4.4 MOUNT ARROWSMITH .............................................................................................................. 36 7.4.5 WILLOWBRAE TRAIL ................................................................................................................... 36 7.4.6 ALBERNI INLET TRAIL .................................................................................................................. 36 7.4.7 EVERGREEN PARK....................................................................................................................... 36 7.4.8 BOAT LAUNCH AT GREAT CENTRAL LAKE .................................................................................. 37 7.4.9 COUGAR SMITH PARK ................................................................................................................ 37 7.4.10 FABER PARK .............................................................................................................................. 37 7.4.11 LOG TRAIN TRAIL ...................................................................................................................... 37 7.4.12 OTHER PARKS ........................................................................................................................... 37 PART 8: MANAGEMENT CHALLENGES ........................................................................................................ 38 8.1 UNIQUE MANAGEMENT PRESCRIPTIONS AND GOVERNANCE POLICIES .......................................... 38 8.2 LIABILITY ............................................................................................................................................ 38 PART 9: PARK CLASSIFICATIONS .................................................................................................................. 39 9.1 PROPOSED PARK CLASSIFICATIONS .................................................................................................. 39 PART 10: ACQUISITION ............................................................................................................................... 42 10.1 GENERAL ACQUISITION CRITERIA ................................................................................................... 42 10.2 COMMUNITY WISH LIST .................................................................................................................. 42 PART 11: FORMALIZING AND FUNDING PARKS AND TRAILS ...................................................................... 43 PART 12: IMPLEMENTATION OPTIONS ....................................................................................................... 45 PART 13: SUSTAINABLE PARKS DESIGN ...................................................................................................... 46 13.1 SUSTAINABLE TRAILS ....................................................................................................................... 47 13.2 ACRD PARKS AND TRAILS ................................................................................................................ 47 13.3 TRAIL STANDARDS ........................................................................................................................... 48 Appendix A ACRD Region Wide Parks & Trails Inventory Appendix B Chronology of Past Planning Work Appendix C Sample Trail Access Agreement Appendix D Community Profile Appendix E Public Engagement Report 5 23
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Appendix F ACRD Parks and Trails Policy Matrix Map 1 Orthophoto of Established Parks, Trails, and Government Boundaries Map 2 Map of Proposed & Established Parks & Trails Table 1 ACRD Political Framework Table 2 ACRD Land Ownership Table 3 Land Protection Toolbox Table 4 ACRD Existing Parks Table 5 Typical Park Classification Table 6 Parkland Acquisition and Funding Options Table 7 Implementation Options Figure 1 ACRD Park & Trails Strategic Plan Goals 6 24
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PART1:INTRODUCTION
The Parks & Trails Strategic Plan provides a foundation to meet the long term recreation and conservation needs of the regional district. It is a flexible document that can be easily adapted and updated to meet the future needs and changing values of individual communities and residents. A consultative community‐based approach was taken to identify current park needs and issues, as well as key park parcels for acquisition and development. The plan provides opportunities for expansion and the creation of new parks and trails for the future. The following goals of the Parks & Trails Strategic Plan have been provided to assist with the development and implementation of a strategy for sustainable regional parks and trails within the ACRD, recognizing that parks and trails are essential to the physical, ecological, social and economic well‐being of all ACRD residents and visitors. The goals are not listed in order of priority. GOAL #1: GOVERNANCE To create a plan that meets the needs of the entire ACRD and its varying communities, providing a fiscally responsible, yet employ flexible and alternative approaches to finance and budgeting for parks and trails. GOAL #2: ACQUISITION To acquire Crown and other lands for regional parks purposes as outlined in the Parks & Trails Strategic Plan over time and as the opportunity arises. GOAL #3: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT To provide opportunities for tourism and local economic development through enhanced parks and trails, including their amenities, connecting infrastructure and program opportunities within the ACRD. GOAL #4 PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT To ensure that parks and trail systems and facilities are designed and managed to minimize impacts on the environment and maintenance costs, while promoting healthy communities and alternative modes of transportation where possible. To protect and enhance parks, trails, related assets and infrastructure within the ACRD through routine maintenance and ongoing monitoring. GOAL #5 VOLUNTEERS To ensure local community and government involvement and leadership 7 25
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GOAL #6 PARTNERSHIPS To develop alternatives for managing recreation resources in partnership with key land owners, outdoors groups and First Nations. GOAL #7 ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION To ensure the protection of ecosystems and natural resources within the ACRD’s regional park system. 1.1PARKBENEFITS
There are many benefits associated with parks and their use including the following: • protecting plants, wildlife; and their unique native ecosystems • rich and diverse parks and trail experiences • environmental awareness and protection • health and well‐being • economic development • tourism opportunities • social interaction • cultural enrichment • exercise and sports • spiritual, intellectual and emotional connection with nature • alternative transportation • community linkages • regional connectivity and travel routes • sustainable park & trail infrastructure design, standards & construction techniques  barrier free access 8 26
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1.2CURRENTTRENDS
As the west coast of Vancouver Island is a key destination for many travelers around the world, there is an opportunity for the ACRD to develop strategies that aim to enhance local economic benefits while at the same time improving local parks services for residents and visitors. Parks opportunities play a significant role in helping people to choose where they want to live, recreate and vacation and they add considerably to a region’s quality of life in helping to define the culture of place. Studies also show that parks and trails add to real estate value and the local economy. Parks departments and their plans are organized in different ways depending on the needs and focus of the community. Traditional parks plans have elements such as ball fields, arenas, tennis courts, skate parks, pathways and swimming pools. Presently, there is a shift for land managers to locate traditional recreational infrastructure in urban areas where the populations are the greatest, and to have less costly, nature based infrastructure in outlying areas. Lower maintenance, sustainable infrastructure includes elements such as trailheads, composting toilets, benches and picnic tables, viewing platforms, boardwalks, trails and fishing docks. 1.3TRENDS
Present trends show that rural parks departments and their staff are a key community resource, who are able to assist with local economic development and tourism initiatives through a wide range of possible outdoor recreation services. These opportunities can be supported in a region such as the ACRD and may include the following:  PARKS CLASSIFICATION SYSTEMS: aim to provide a balanced, yet a broad range of parks types, accommodating a range of users and their unique needs  PASSIVE RECREATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES: Formalizing experiences for hiking, cycling, bird watching, fishing, kayaking, canoeing, cross‐country ski and snowshoeing through legal access, maps, signage, web‐based information, safety plans etc.  GEO‐TOURISM DESTINATIONS: Geo‐tourism incorporates the concept of sustainable tourism—that destinations should remain unspoiled for future generations—while allowing for ways to protect a place’s character. Geo‐tourism also takes a principle from its ecotourism cousin,—that tourism revenue should promote conservation—and extends it to culture and history as well, that is all distinctive assets of a place. Geo‐
tourism destinations are parks or natural area destinations that include interpretive elements based on local culture, history or the unique geography of a place. 9 27
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
PEDESTRIAN, CYCLING INFRASTRUCTURE OR EQUESTRIAN TRAIL ACCESS: provide alternative modes of transportation such as trails, boardwalks, bridges, alleyways, and separated road‐side or off road pathways, cable cars, shuttle systems, alternative modes of transportation and linkages to key community destinations including regional parks and trails. 
INTERACTIVE INTERPRETIVE ACTIVITIES: such as geo‐caching, structured orienteering activities, touch tanks, scaled models, night parks, colouring books, games or scavenger hunts maps in or out of doors provide activities that get people out to parks and appreciate them. 
LONG DISTANCE TRAIL EXPERIENCES: for hikers, cyclists and equestrians, the development of hut to hut systems, bed and breakfasts or interspersed camping opportunities such as the West Coast Trail and the Alberni Inlet trail allow for multi‐day adventures. 
MULTIPLE ACTIVITY FAMILY DESTINATIONS: include the provision of multiple family friendly activities in a common area allowing families to enjoy different recreational experiences at the same time, without having to travel great distances. For example, having a dog park and bike park close to a stacked loop trail system, children’s play areas nearby tennis courts, sports fields and skate parks. 
OUTDOOR RECREATION PROGRAMMING: such as daycamps, nature programs etc. can play a significant role in the development of community, parks and trail appreciation and stewardship. 
NATURAL OUTDOOR PLAY AREAS: Made of natural materials such as landscaped berms, tunnels of arching bushes, log balance beams, mini zip lines, tyrolean traverses and other structures that challenge balance and strength skills and that are designed for all ages. 
BLUE ROUTES, KAYAK AND SMALL BOAT DOCKING FACILITIES: formalized boating routes for canoes and kayaks with nearby parking facilities for kayaks, canoes and other small water craft and may include portages, fishing and camping infrastructure. 
CAMPSITES, PICNIC SITES, OUTDOOR GROUP BARBEQUE FACILITIES: these can be used as rental opportunities for the public or a revenue source for the regional district. 
UNIQUE WATER CROSSINGS AND FEATURE PLAY AREAS: such as trestles, cable cars, suspension bridges, ziplines, boardwalks, stepping stones in rivers or creeks. 10 28
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
VIEWING AREAS: with scenic overlooks and covered picnic platforms. 
PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENTS: between government and non‐profit trail user organizations allow for public trail access. 
INTERPRETIVE EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES AND NATURAL HISTORY OR CULTURAL MUSEUMS: interpretive elements and signage designed to be of interest to all ages and backgrounds. 
ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION: pedestrian and cycling infrastructure, boating infrastructure to allow people recreational experiences for tourists and local residents alike. 
PUBLIC ART: and recreation experiences combined can enhance the experience and celebrate local artists and culture. 
EDIBLE TRAIL EXPERIENCES: trails leading to key food and culture destinations that can be experienced by boat, bike or horseback safely and away from traffic and roads if possible. Popular edible trails may include farm trails, seafood circle or wine loops. 11 29
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PART2:PARKPLANNING
2.1POLITICALFRAMEWORK
The regional district includes 31,061 (2011 census) residents and covers 6,596.58 km2 (2,546.95 sq mi). The Alberni Clayoquot Regional District is home to several layers of government including three municipalities, six electoral areas and ten First Nations. ELECTORAL AREAS Area A‐ Bamfield Area B‐ Beaufort MUNICIPALITIES
Tofino FIRST NATIONS Yuułuʔiłʔatḥ Ucluelet Uchucklesaht Port Alberni Tseshaht Area D‐ Sproat Lake Ahousaht Area E‐ Beaver Creek Hupacasath Area F‐ Cherry Creek Hesquiaht Tla‐o‐qui‐aht Huu‐ay‐aht Ditidaht Toquaht Area C‐ Long Beach Table 1. ACRD Political Framework Uchucklesaht Tribe, Toquaht Nation, Huu‐ay‐aht First Nations, Yuułuʔiłʔatḥ Government are treaty First Nations, three of which are participating members of the Regional District and one that will join in the next seven years. The remaining six First Nations are at various levels of the treaty process. Each electoral area has policies within its official community plan directing local level actions for parks and trails. Some of the First Nations within the region have developed or are developing policies and planning guidelines for managing their parks and trail systems. As well, the province and Parks Canada work under unique park and forest land management prescriptions that meet their organizational goals. Appendix F ACRD Parks and Trails Policy Matrix provides an outline of all existing documentation related to the parks and trail planning process that has been prepared to date. The ACRD established its regional parks function in 1970. The Regional District recognizes the need for interagency cooperation between electoral areas, first nations, as well as federal, provincial, regional and municipal governments. For the purposes of this plan, the ACRD will be divided into three sub‐regions including the general rural areas surrounding Long Beach, Bamfield, and the Alberni Valley. The purpose of these sub‐regions is to address the project goal Number One, which is to provide a plan that meets the needs of the entire ACRD and its varying communities. The strategy provided in this plan includes recommendations for ACRD policies to manage and develop existing and future regional parks as well as suggestions for managing recreation resources in partnership with land owners, outdoor groups, and First Nations. 12 30
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LAND OWNERSHIP AND USE DESIGNATIONS
First Nation (Treaty Land & Indian Reserves 18,883 ha Parks Canada 42,034 ha BC Parks 290,780 ha Forestry Tenures (Crown Land) 340,908 ha (TFL, Woodlot, etc.) Community Forest 13,352 ha ACRD Parks 735 ha Table 2. ACRD Land Ownership 2.2VISIONARYLANDUSEPLANNING
A parks and trails plan is a strategic planning document that covers the entire regional district in scope. It should provide a broad overall vision and purpose for parks and trails within the ACRD. The plan and implementation strategy is generally prepared to be put in place over a defined period, while providing direction for achieving the community’s vision for parks and trails. Regional parks and trails should to be viewed from a larger land use management context. It is impossible for the ACRD to protect every environmentally significant site, wildlife habitat or corridor in the region within the regional park and trail system. Ultimately, ecologically‐based land use planning and management techniques are the most effective methods for protecting the environment, however, regional parks and trails master planning can help. 2.3LOCALGOVERNMENTACTPLANNINGPOWERS
The ACRD was granted the function of regional parks in 1970 pursuant to section 766 of the Municipal Act through Letters Patent. The ACRD is empowered to undertake the acquisition, development, maintenance and operation of regional parks under the provision of the Local Government Act. 2.4WHATISAREGIONALPARKS&TRAILSSTRATEGICPLAN
The Regional Parks & Trails Strategic Plan is a higher level plan than Regional Park Management plans. It provides the purpose of the proposed system and an action plan for how to meet local resident needs through the provision of parks opportunities for recreation and leisure activities, as well as future land acquisitions. This strategic plan was derived from a community‐feedback based classification system customized to balance recreational needs and the protection of resources. It provides recommendations and actions to protect various terrestrial and marine ecosystems and the critical habitat within the region. It provides an overview of existing parks and trails, as well as an inventory of key destinations and unique experiences for outdoor, cultural and recreational pursuits that are proposed for future parks acquisitions. Past planning work has been reviewed and referenced in Appendix B. 2.5OFFICIALCOMMUNITYPLANSANDPARKS
Official Community Plans (OCP) and previous studies such as the 2008 Trails Policy Report, the 2006 Alberni Valley Trails Planning Study and other studies were prepared in to address some of the issues surrounding ACRD parks goals. Each electoral area OCP has indicated the following: 13 31
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“The Regional District will build or assist in building, acquire, provide or otherwise encourage through development approvals not less than one kilometer of pathway of trail per year within the Plan area”. Appendix F of this document provides a summary matrix of parks planning policies from all of the ACRDs Official Community Plans. This appendix was developed to help highlight some of the key values that have been identified for parks in the OCP planning process as well as other relevant documentation. Some of the general topics from the ACRD OCP planning processes that overlap into the Regional Parks Strategic Plan include: • environmental protection • recreational use • climate change • social development • healthy lifestyles • alternative transportation • viable agriculture • preservation of rural character • heritage and culture • land acquisition • economic development 2.6PARKSPLANNINGTOOLS
The ACRD has a range of land use planning and regulatory tools that can be used to achieve responsible land use and environmental protection on public and private lands. The formal zoning designation of “parks” as a land use allows the regional district to protect environmentally sensitive areas or areas. Other planning tools that can be employed include those outlined in Table 3. The toolbox below provides an overview of the tools for protecting and growing a parks system. 14 32
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PROTECTION TOOL LAND PROTECTION TOOLBOX
DEFINE
STEWARDSHIP Stewardship is an ethic that embodies the responsible planning and management of resources. Through various stewardship activities ACRD parks can be protected and enhanced. May include volunteer coordination, interpretive opportunities or public education activities CONSERVATION under section 219 of the Land Titles Act a covenant may be registered against the title to land, in favor COVENANT of a municipality or a conservation body (usually a non‐profit organization), to protect land or a feature of the land such as important trees. The purpose is to ensure that the land or specified amenity remains in its natural state a RGS provides a broad regional vision, goals and REGIONAL policies for managing region‐wide growth and GROWTH development STRATEGY USE (RGS) EXAMPLE
bear‐awareness programs, forest fire interpretive opportunities, signage or volunteer tree planting days tree conservation covenant or wetland protection covenant regional approach for acquisition to plan and construct long distance trails including funding plan preparations an OCP provides long term plans for specific areas, linking trails to key neighbourhood destinations, including goals and policies for environmental providing and funding parks protection and community parks. Each of the programs within each electoral municipalities and electoral areas within the area ACRD has an OCP DPAs can also prescribe best DEVELOPMENT OCPs can designate DPAs for the purpose of management practices such as protecting environmentally significant sites or PERMIT AREAS using Low Impact unique areas. For instance, the majority of OCPs (DPAS) establish DPAs along watercourses to protect their Developments (LIDs), storm water runoff riparian areas zoning bylaws can be used to establish setbacks Setbacks from watercourses, ZONING from environmentally sensitive features hazardous areas and nest trees BYLAWS OFFICIAL COMMUNITY PLANS (OCPS) DEVELOPMENT A regional district can acquire parkland as well as Restrictive covenant and setbacks from a ravine edge place restrictive covenants on land parcels to APPROVAL protect environmentally or culturally sensitive PROCESS Wayfinding: welcome kiosks, orientation maps, directional arrows. Interpretive: panels/displays depicting local habitat, geology or culture. Regulatory: No Dogs, No fires, No camping Scheduled nature hikes, trail PROGRAMING A variety of parks programs can be arranged by maintenance days, bird the regional district to help promote parks and trails. These are great opportunities to get support watching sessions, art in the park etc from the community as well as teaching them to become stewards of the parks system SIGNAGE EDUCATION features through re‐zoning, subdivision & development permit approval process A unified signage program provides an opportunity for the community to brand the parks system. There are generally three types: wayfinding, interpretive and regulatory Table 3. Land Protection Toolbox 15 33
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PART3:KEYOPPORTUNITIES
This plan provides a diversity and where possible a representative sample of local and regional parks and recreation opportunities in the regional district by planning and developing one or more regional or community parks or trails within in each of the sub‐regions of the Regional District. The key opportunities identified through the public and community input process can be viewed as gaps within the existing system. These include the following: 1. community linkages and trail experiences 2. access to separate motorized and non‐motorized recreational use opportunities 3. access to waterfront and marine based recreation opportunities 4. providing a variety of active and passive recreation options 5. protection of environmental resources, sensitive areas, wildlife corridors, watershed and endangered/listed species 6. accessible, rollable trail experiences for those with physical challenges 7. development of art and culture experiences and preservation of resources through interpretation Map 1 provides an orthophoto with established parks & trails as well as government boundaries. Future regional park acquisitions will be based upon the key opportunities provided as well as a “wish‐list” of regional parks that were gathered through public consultation efforts. Map 2 provides a map with proposed and established parks & trails in the ACRD. 16 34
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PART4:VISION
4.1FOUR‐PCOMMUNITYVALUES
As a result of the public engagement process, the following community service interests were identified: 1) PROTECTION  represent and protect an array of regionally significant natural and cultural areas  educate residents and visitors about local natural resource protection and enhancement for future generations 2) 

3) 


4) 

PEOPLE stimulate economic development through outdoor recreation based tourism opportunities encourage sustainable alternatives for transportation linking communities, parks and key destinations in the ACRD PARKS invest in sustainable parks and trail infrastructure through the use of green building and other best management techniques utilize construction standards and best management practices to reduce environmental impacts, greenhouse gases and climate impacts develop a long distance, multi‐use “regional” trail system that connects Bamfield, the Alberni Valley, Tofino and Ucluelet PROGRAMS provide diverse, regionally significant outdoor recreation activities that are accessible and friendly to all ages and abilities provide opportunities for local residents and visitors to have a high quality of life, healthy lifestyle choices and opportunities for outdoor recreation MISSION ACRD will work will all citizens to be good stewards of our environment, and to provide safe and welcoming opportunities to play, learn, contemplate, and build community. VISION Developing community and culture through Protection, People, Parks, and Programs. 17 35
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PART5:COMMUNITYENGAGEMENT
5.1REGIONALPARKS&TRAILSPLANNINGCOMMITTEE
To ensure transparency and a community‐based approach for the project, the ACRD established a volunteer Parks and Trail Plan Committee. The committee was formed in the summer of 2013, with an initial volunteer membership of approximately twelve people. This number grew over the subsequent six months up to 24 volunteers from a range of electoral areas. This valuable group of local residents represented a wide spectrum of interests from all reaches of the district, helping to share their knowledge of the rural areas and spread the word about the project. The steering committee issues and concerns identified throughout the process have been recorded and form part of the background for this plan. 5.2COMMUNITYINPUT
A comprehensive community input strategy was developed for all areas of the ACRD that included open houses in Bamfield, Tofino, Ucluelet and Port Alberni in the fall of 2013. A Forestry Day event was held in Port Alberni, followed by the initial four open houses in each of the main population centers of the regional district. These included Bamfield, Port Alberni, Tofino and Ucluelet. All of the open houses were advertised in local newspapers and on the ACRD website. Where possible, social media was used to inform residents about the project and to encourage them to come and provide their input. More than 120 people participated in the open houses. Participants were asked to provide their ideas on a number of topics related to parks and trails. Three main exercises were offered including a large map to illustrate the scale of the district and to help people to identify places that they felt should be protected or designated as regionally significant to parks or trails. Secondly, participants were asked to interact and write on large posters that asked a range of questions related to the project. They were also asked to “wish upon a leaf” to contribute their most important ideas to the committee. Appendix E Public Engagement Report, provides an example of a communication tool to inform public about the Parks & Trails Strategic Plan. 18 36
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5.3KEYOUTCOMESOFPUBLICENGAGEMENT
Among others, there were two key outcomes of the public engagement process. These included: 1) An ACRD Regional Wide Parks & Trails Inventory (see Appendix A) 2) a general level of support for a park land acquisition tax from all three sub‐regions. Most open house participants were willing to pay a minimum of $20.00 or more in property taxes for new parks per household. In 2014 an average house valued at $200,000 was taxed $0.20. 19 37
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PART6:ACTIONPLAN
6.1REGIONALPARKS&TRAILSSTRATEGICPLANGOALS
To ensure that the Regional Parks Service effectively serves and benefits all residents of the ACRD, the following target areas and goals have been established. These goals will help to guide the plan’s vision and implementation program over the next ten years. Directive policies and actions have also been created to support each goal with descriptive tasks and an implementation timeframe. For the purposes of this section, short term = 1‐3 years, medium term = 3‐5 years, long term= 5‐
10 years. Later sections in this document provide options for implementation based on costs, liability, effectiveness and long term capacity building with regard to implementation of these goals. 6.2GOALS(Innoorderofpriority)
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Governance Acquisition Economic Development Parks Planning and Management Volunteers Partnerships Environmental Protection Goals
Governance
Acquisition
Economic Development
Parks Planning and Management
Volunteers
Partnerships
Environmental Protection
Figure 1. ACRD Parks & Trails Strategic Plan Goals 20 38
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6.2.1GOAL1:GOVERNANCE
To create a plan that meets the needs of the entire ACRD and its varying communities, providing a fiscally responsible, yet employ flexible and alternative approaches to finance and budgeting for parks and trails. POLICIES: 1) that the ACRD Board of Directors adopt the Parks & Trails Strategic Plan. 2) that the ACRD Board of Directors reassess the Parks & Trails Strategic Plan periodically, evaluating its effectiveness in relation to current and future regional parks and trails needs. 3) that a geographically balanced approach to the parks system be adopted to serve all ACRD residents fairly as provided in this plan’s regionally focused classification system. 4) That parks development plans do not exceed the fiscal ability of the regional district to maintain all facilities and sites to an acceptable standard. 5) that strategic funding options provided in the Parks & Trails Strategic Plan be considered for the acquisition of proposed regional park sites and the ongoing management of amenities and regional parks 6) that the regional board consider the establishment of a regional parkland acquisition fund 7) that the regional board utilize the parkland acquisition criteria provided in this plan to evaluate property before accepting or purchasing it for park purposes 8) that a range of funding sources and partnering opportunities be evaluated by staff each year to ensure that no opportunities are overlooked by the regional district to act on potential acquisitions or to secure available funds 9) that each year staff be requested to include parks acquisition and maintenance programs in the annual budget 10) that the district examine alternative funding options including development cost charges, provincial or other grants for regional parks, borrowing in accordance with the provision of the Local Government Act, donations, user fees, federal/provincial employment programs, provincial lottery funds, grants and community incentive programs 11) that the regional district consider lease or rent of property on a seasonal or longer‐
term basis for the purpose of operating a concession or other commercial enterprise 12) that the regional district allow for the temporary placement and operation of a concession or commercial enterprise for special events that occur in a regional park 13) that resources acquired from parkland such as hay and firewood be considered for sale with the acquired funds used for regional parks development. 14) that the regional district consider selling annual use permits to groups who may pose negative impacts to trails or parks within the ACRD to offset maintenance costs and provide enhanced user experiences for those groups. 15) that the ACRD consider taxes for regional parks purposes as supported by residents during the public engagement process 21 39
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16) that the regional board adopt a policy to allocate taxes for regional parks purposes on a regional basis ACTIONS: TASK NOTES
1) Seek ACRD Board approval of the Parks & Trails Strategic Plan 2) Formalize a regional parks plan that services the sub regions of the regional district 3) Update the Parks & Trails Annual reports should include a Strategic Plan general review of projects accomplished and the plan should be updated every 3‐5 years 4) Establish a regional parks acquisition fund 5) Establish a regional parks tax levy TIMEFRAME
Short term Short term Short term Short term Short, medium, and long term 6) Identify sources of funding and coordinate projects to meet criteria in order to attain funds 7) Establish a sub‐regional budget for regional parks that includes acquisition, maintenance and capital programs 8) Develop an annual report for the regional Board and Parks Commission outlining annual progress in ACRD regional parks and trails 9) Develop short, medium and long term funding strategy and budget for attaining & maintaining existing and proposed Regional Parks. Short term Medium term Short term Short term 22 40
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6.2.2GOAL2:ACQUISITION
To acquire Crown and other lands for regional parks purposes as outlined in the Regional Parks Master Plan over time and as the opportunity arises. POLICIES: 1) that the regional district provide a range of park types promoting access to recreational amenities, land protection, partnerships and economic development fairly between each sub‐region. 2) that the regional district consider acquiring lands for parks purposes that reflect the various parks classifications and acquisition criteria prescribed in the Parks & Trails Strategic Plan. 3) that each site be evaluated against the acquisition criteria provided in the Parks & Trails Strategic Plan. 4) that proposed regional parks identified in the plan be considered for acquisition over time as opportunities arise and as limited resources allow. 5) that the regional district consider alternative methods for acquiring regional parks including purchase, lease, municipal/school district/ provincial park transfer, private donations, dedication of land through the subdivision and approval systems including cash in lieu, easements, rights‐of‐way, permitted use/access agreements and license of occupation. 6) that the regional park acquisition and development process, include a preliminary ownership assessment of each proposed regional park or trail. The assessment should evaluate the following: • site analysis including; ecology, hydrology, land ownership, hazardous conditions, partnership opportunities, and existing level of protection in the nearby geographical area • social and cultural significance • emergency planning • land acquisition costs • potential park design concepts • construction development costs • operation, maintenance and monitoring costs 23 41
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7) that staff monitor acquisition opportunities for future parks in each sub‐region and implement the parks planning and acquisition tools when necessary to secure future parcels and or agreements. 8) A Parks & Trails Strategic Plan has limitations both jurisdictionally and financially. Consequently, there are areas and trails which may be beyond the scope of this plan, but which are still of high recreational and environmental importance to the community. ACRD recognises this and is supportive of efforts of other levels of government, First Nations, NGO’s and community groups to protect and/or acquire such properties. These include, but are not necessarily limited to the properties and trails identified in Appendix A”. ACTIONS: TASK 1) Continually monitor opportunities for land acquisition 2) Conduct a preliminary ownership assessment of each proposed park/ trail NOTES
Staff and board members should develop transparent relations with realtors, private land owners and partners who may have common interests in park preservation and community needs for parks This assessment should include the items outlined in policy #6 TIMEFRAME
Ongoing Short term 3) Review each sites potential as outlined by the classification system and research the conceptual options possible for acquiring the lands identified See page 43 for the classification system Short term 4) Explore options for funding including grants to purchase park lands Short term 5) Ensure public involvement and board approval The Regional Board will be required to approve the long term maintenance as well as the land transfer Once formally acquired, staff should begin a management planning process for each new regional park Short term 6) Acquire approved park sites as outlined in the Parks & Trails Strategic Plan Short term 24 42
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6.2.3GOAL3:ECONOMICDEVELOPMENT
To develop opportunities for tourism and local economic development through enhanced parks and trails, including their amenities, connecting infrastructure and program opportunities within the ACRD. POLICIES: 1) that the ACRD work with the private sector to build partnerships, economic development and enhanced tourism destinations and opportunities (business sector, First Nations, non‐profits, etc) through parks, trails and outdoor recreation amenities and services. 2) that a Regional Parks Tourism, Communications and Marketing Strategy be developed with the regional board, local chamber of commerce, tourism agencies, First Nations, potential partners and the public’s input. The strategy should be developed to raise awareness about ACRD parks and trails, its vision, goals and objectives for the purposes of local investment, tourism and overall local confidence in the Parks Service. 3) That the regional district considers branding to create a consistent and professional image for ACRD Regional Parks across the region. The Parks Tourism, Communications and Marketing Strategy should develop a website, tourism guides, brochures, signage, maps, public facilities, digital and social media and other tools to assist with describing, marketing and branding ACRD regional parks through the use of uniform, simple, user‐
friendly designs, colours, materials etc. 4) that parks management plans be created with consideration given to economic development and partnership opportunities and revenue generating projects and programs. 5) that the ACRD board consider First Nation culture names in the design of signage and infrastructure to demonstrate cultural diversity and promote geo‐ tourism opportunities where appropriate. For example, the sea to sky highway signage installed for the Olympic Games between Vancouver and Whistler. 25 43
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ACTIONS: TASK 1) Work with economic development organizations, the ACRD Board and consultants to determine a Parks Tourism, Communications and Marketing Strategy that is inclusive and sets an overall vision for involvement of regional parks in the greater ACRD economic development realm 2) Seek Board approval for the Parks Tourism, Communications and Marketing Strategy before moving ahead with any new lower level signage, communications and branding strategy NOTES
Include:  Vision • Target audiences • Signage‐wayfinding, regulatory, and interpretive • Material selections for parks amenities • Website, printed materials etc. TIMEFRAME
Ongoing It is important that the new regional parks function be branded in a recognizable way across the ACRD. To promote continuity and develop a community support for the new program Short term 3) Develop management plans that include revenue generating mechanisms To promote diversity in programming, learning opportunities and interesting experiences for locals and visitors Short, medium, and long term 26 44
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6.2.4GOAL4:PLANNINGANDMANAGEMENT
To ensure that parks and trail systems and facilities are designed and managed to minimize impacts on the environment and maintenance costs, while promoting healthy communities and alternative modes of transportation where possible. POLICIES: 1) that the ACRD adopt the Regional Parks & Trails Strategic Plan and utilize the parks classifications contained herein. 2) that standards for parks and trails be developed and incorporated into management plans with sustainable layout and design techniques in order to save regional parks funds over the long term, protect the environment, improve user accessibility and safety as well as the overall condition and experience of all parks trails within the ACRD. 3) that partnership opportunities with local businesses, First Nations, non‐profit groups, Search and Rescue organizations, other government organizations and user groups be identified within the management planning process to public involvement and community partnerships. 4) that estimates be prepared for all parks and trail improvements in the case that grant applications can be made for development for each park classification. 5) that parks facilities provided are designed with sustainable best management practices and green building technologies (solar, composting, rainwater reuse, LIDs, xeriscaping, green roofs etc.) to minimize long term infrastructure maintenance costs for the region. 6) that a safety plan be developed for the ACRD parks system that includes codes of conduct, a public awareness strategy for parks, emergency evacuation planning and procedures, emergency access planning for remote sites, communications with local emergency coordinators, environmental response programs and risk management procedures for all major parks systems. 7) that the ACRD develop a regional parks system that complements existing and future ACRD local government plans such as Official Community Plans and those of First Nations, other government agencies, landowners and interested groups within the region. 8) Annually, staff, contractor or the management authority for a regional park shall submit to the regional board for review and approval updated regional park management plans showing the revised maps and photographs of proposed new facilities, parking areas, trails, site accesses and other servicing details prior to any site disturbance or development. 9) that formal, linear park connections be developed to connect to the various park types as classification system identified in the Parks & Trails Strategic Plan. 10) that pedestrian, wheelchair, cycling, boater and equestrian trails and park linkages be developed through the region to encourage alternative modes of travel and to improve the quality of life and health of local residents and visitors to the ACRD. a. that lands be acquired when possible and parks and trails be designed to encourage alternative modes of transportation, 27 45
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b. that shorter and more efficient route options be sought through the development planning process to where possible to improve pedestrian, cycling, boating and equestrian alternative transportation options 11) that public accesses and pedestrian loop opportunities between beaches and key community destinations be considered a high priority for trail system design. 12) that a stacked loop system with varying lengths of experiences (1 k, 2.5 k, 5 k, 10 k) be considered within micro/ local area trail systems. 13) that regional park management plans be required to comply with the legislation, regulations and standards provided by the provincial government and regional district bylaws. 14) that management plans for each of the ACRD parks be prepared and include the following elements: 
inventory all assets including structures and signage •
public engagement on park function, need and sustainable design options •
analysis of strengths and challenges associated with each site •
provision of innovative and green design solutions •
provision of the following guiding principles on accessibility and universal design: 1) Provide opportunities for accessible outdoor experiences that promote a sense of dignity and independence for visitors. 2) Promote universal design in representative natural landscapes throughout the regional parks and trails system. 3) Acknowledge accessibility and universal design as a primary consideration in any new development or retrofitting project in regional parks and trails. •
public safety and risk management planning •
tourism and economic development opportunities and partnerships •
mapped site assessment •
natural elements •
ecosystem description and environmental assessments •
conceptual phased plans for development •
estimated time frames and phasing potential •
overall costs for materials, labour, mobilization, planning and design •
potential new park lands •
maintenance and monitoring schedule and costs •
identification of partnership opportunities for the plan including those that may benefit from grants/funding. 15) that undeveloped park lands be indicated as passive parks (use at your own risk). 16) that ACRD communicate with forest companies regarding logging road access. 28 46
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17) that standards be developed and sustainable designs be required for all ACRD parks and trails in order to minimize erosion and environmental impacts, reduce maintenance costs, improve accessibility, and ACRD liability over the long term. 18) that park management authorities outline a maintenance plan indicating the required works to be undertaken, who will undertake the work and the frequency and cost of works. Photo documentation depicting before and after works as well as GPS data collection of inventories will help. 19) to ensure the yearly status, costs and locations of infrastructure within the greater parks system. 20) that park developments follow the uses permitted in the parks classification system to ensure that a broad cross section of each classification is achieved in each sub‐region of the ACRD. For example that water/beach accesses provide residents and visitors sufficient and quality access to beaches, lakes and rivers. 21) that ACRD trails are sustainably designed with the intention of achieving grades of less than 15 percent and averages of 10‐12 percent maximum as outlined in Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resources Recreation Manual, Chapter 10. 22) that parks include a maintenance and monitoring program within their parks management plans, paying special attention to carrying capacity and costs of maintenance over the long term. 23) create standardized signage for the entire ACRD. 29 47
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ACTIONS: TASK 1. Incorporate standards for parks and trails into management plans with sustainable layout and design techniques 2. Develop Regional Parks Management Plans for  Mt Arrowsmith  China Creek Park  Alberni Inlet Trail 3. Develop parks management plans for proposed regional parks, assuming the ACRD has full ownership or management responsibility to the sites identified. 4. Prepare cost estimates 5. Seek approval from the Board to proceed with project development 6. Formally capture all parks infrastructure and legally permitted trails in the ACRD 7. that a study of Ministry of Transportation road right‐of‐
ways to waterfront or beaches be conducted to secure water access 8. that existing trails of significance adopt a phasing plan 9. that a trail assessment be conducted for the regional district NOTES
to save funds over the long term and improve user safety and the overall condition and experience of all parks trails within the ACRD, use standards such as the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resources standards found in the Recreation Manual, Chapter 10 for new trails in the ACRD and for enhancement of existing trails in the system Management plans should include research and development of field based information before decision making takes place. Include BC Parks Geocaching Policy. TIMEFRAME
Short term Management plans should include research and development of field based information before decision making takes place. Medium term Estimates for costs of all management plan improvements should be created in the case that grant applications can be made for developments to each park classification Research funding opportunities for management plan implementation and development. Matching funds may be required on behalf of the ACRD. use GPS, photographs and create a database document using ArcView GIS mapping system for all park types. Use annotation describing ownership or legal arrangements An inventory of all MOT rights of way leading to water will help to determine access. Inventory data may include; photographs, steepness of slope, social values, beach type, uses and activities Short term to upgrade sections steeper than 15 % or that require drainage & or other site improvements on sections that are not sustainable compile a mapped inventory all of the legal & formalized layers of trail between the various levels of government Short term Short term ongoing medium term short, medium term short term 30 48
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6.2.5GOAL5:VOLUNTEERS
To ensure local community and government involvement and leadership. POLICIES: 1)
that the regional district establish a regional parks and trails committee. This committee should be empowered with a regional mandate to meet the goals set out in this plan and to be a sounding board for ACRD staff and future parks staff member, as well as the regional board on uses related to regional parks. 2)
that the regional district develop and implement a volunteer strategy for the regional parks program. This strategy might include trail building & maintenance, volunteer wardens, interpretive opportunities, park and trail recreation programs and events. 3)
that the ACRD consider augmenting staff resources with board approved, structured and supervised volunteer programs and partnerships. ACTIONS: TASK 1) Develop a regional parks volunteer strategy NOTES
TIMEFRAME
This document provides rewarding tasks for all ages and abilities & including term limits for formal positions, provides diverse opportunities to attract a wide range of participants. Strategy should outline the frame of reference for the committee, other volunteer programs, stakeholders, partnership opportunities, programs & events. Work to expand the diversity of user group volunteers (bike, motorized, etc). Increased volunteer management and coordination is recommended to oversee parks planning, volunteer work and project management. Ongoing 2) Seek Board approval for the Parks Tourism, Communications and Marketing Strategy before moving ahead with new lower level signage, communications and branding strategy 6 year term maximum. Members may 3) Develop management plans reapply after 1 year. Term limits that include revenue encourage inclusiveness & diversify & generating mechanisms long term implementation of the program. Committee should be representative of the ACRD region & hold spots vacant until a person from the appropriate area is found. 6 or 9 positions total. A staff member should oversee the parks committee to ensure effective communication, leadership & support. Short term Short term 31 49
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6.2.6GOAL6:PARTNERSHIPS
To develop alternatives for managing recreation resources in partnership with key land owners, outdoors groups, First Nations, and Non‐Governmental Organizations (NGO). POLICIES: 1)
2)
that partnerships should be developed with private lands owners, municipalities, First Nations, BC Parks, Parks Canada, post secondary institutions, and other agencies with a stake in the land management of sensitive ecosystems within the ACRD as well as where economic development or grant funding opportunities through tourism may be viable. Partnerships should be developed to create multi‐layered parks and trail experiences that are appealing to all ages, backgrounds and abilities. ACTIONS: TASK NOTES
1) Develop a Regional Parks Commission include key partners within the TIMEFRAME
short term community such as Island Timberlands, municipalities and First Nation involvement 2) Encourage involvement of a diversity of partners include a broad spectrum of short and long interests for the long term term sustainability of the parks and trails program. Involve key land owners and stakeholders in planning and land acquisition efforts 32 50
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6.2.7GOAL7:ENVIRONMENTALPROTECTION
To ensure the protection of natural resources within the ACRD’s regional park system. POLICIES: 1)
That recreational access be balanced with the preservation and enhancement of natural resources 2)
That management plans be prepared to identify and approve recreational activities and trail alignments within each regional park 3)
That opportunities for enhanced recreational activities be explored within the ACRD 4)
That recreational and interpretive opportunities and facilities be developed to establish a stewardship presence within ACRD regional parks 5)
That responsible use of the area be promoted by providing limited, non‐obtrusive, durable and attractive signage to orient and inform parks and trail users about sensitive resources within ACRD regional parks 6)
That ACRD regional parks become the centerpiece for environmental education and interpretation ACTIONS: TASK NOTES
1) That management plans be developed for regional parks that management plans provide for sustainable parks and trail design, route alignments and interpretive opportunities that minimize impacts to sensitive resources 2) That carrying capacity is tracked through visitor use monitoring and photo monitoring, visitor management and enforcement if required. TIMEFRAME
Short, medium, and long term Short and long term 33 51
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PART7:EXISTINGACRDPARKS
7.1PARKSWITHINACRD
From the perspective of mountain to coast outdoor experiences, the Alberni Clayoquot Regional District is fortunate to have a wide range of opportunities found through both parks and trails. A comprehensive list of all parks (local, provincial and national) and trails within the regional district is contained in Appendix A. Presently, the ACRD owns several properties throughout the regional district that have park zoning. Some of these parcels are vacant lands that are unused while others function as parks or other use. The regional district also has partnership agreements in place permitting legal park or trail use, and access on properties that are owned by other jurisdictions. Map 1 provides a spatial overview of the established parks & trails in the ACRD. 7.2EXISTINGPARTNERSHIPAGREEMENTS
The ACRD holds liability insurance coverage which allows the public to use certain parks under a licence of occupation or a partnership agreement. The tools for parks partnerships are essential for expanding the regional parks system. 7.3ACRDCOMMUNITYPARKS
Within the ACRD, local electoral area community parks focus on local neighbourhoods. Generally, they provide features such as children’s playgrounds, tennis courts and neighborhood trails. They have been designed to serve nearby communities and are funded by the individual electoral areas in which they are located. 7.4COMMUNITYPARKSANDRECREATIONCOMMISSIONS
Advisory community park commissions exist in electoral areas A (Bamfield) and D (Sproat Lake) as both of these areas have small neighbourhood parks. Sproat Lake has also begun work on a community trail system. Electoral areas F (Cherry Creek) and E (Beaver Creek) have advisory recreation commissions. 34 52
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ACRD EXISTING PARKS
LONG BEACH BAMFIELD
ALBERNI VALLEY
EXISTING REGIONAL PARKS
Alberni Inlet Trail (Licence Agreement) China Creek Regional Park Mount Arrowsmith Willowbrae Park Centennial Park Waterfront Parcel A Waterfront Parcel B West Park (West Bamfield) EXISTING COMMUNITY PARKS
Cougar Smith Park Evergreen Park Faber Park Boat Launch Great Central Lake EXISTING PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENTS
Salmon Beach Public Square (Permit Agreement) Log Train Trail (Lease Agreement) Table 4. ACRD Existing Parks The following section provides a general overview of the ACRDs existing parks. 7.4.1CENTENNIALPARK
This ACRD owned 14 acre site is located in east Bamfield and serves many important purposes for the local residents and visitors. An Information Centre with gift shop is staffed throughout the summer season, while two gazebos with BBQ grills, playground equipment, washrooms, and a pay phone are available for visitors year round. The campsite includes fire pits, a cookhouse, and showers. A boat launch with associated moorage for several boats, a paved sports arena for street hockey and basketball, and community gardens with 20 beds are also on site. The Bamfield Memorial Pavilion is available for memorial services and public performances at this park. There is also a pump‐out station for RV’s and boats, as well as water hoses. For more information please call 250 728‐3006. http://bamfieldcommunity.ca/resources/visitors/parks‐and‐recreation‐information. 7.4.2WESTPARK
West Park, located in West Bamfield, has a community garden, playground, picnic area, and ball field. 7.4.3CHINACREEKREGIONALPARK
China Creek Regional Park was originally owned and operated by the province as a provincial park. In the 1980’s it was transferred to the ACRD. Since then, its primary role has been to provide camping opportunities for people fishing. The park is under lease to the Port Alberni Port Authority which operates a marina on the adjoining foreshore. As of 2008, a new twenty year lease was negotiated providing a percentage of campground fees returned to the regional 35 53
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district for regional park purposes. China Creek has 250 campsites, 170 of which are serviced. The China Creek Marina provides amenities to campers as well as 188 boat slips. 7.4.4MOUNTARROWSMITH
Mt. Arrowsmith at 1819 meters is the highest mountain in southern Vancouver Island. Its location makes it accessible to a broad population and the park has multiple trail routes that provide alpine hiking and mountain biking opportunities for all levels of experience and fitness. Arrowsmith is situated just east of the head of the Alberni Inlet between the Englishman and Cameron River watersheds in a region where the distance from tidewater on the Pacific to that on the Strait of Georgia at Parksville is a mere 40km. Most routes on the mountain can be undertaken as a day trip from cars. There are numerous trailheads accessible, depending on the time of year and routes selected. The ACRD owns the northern Mt. Arrowsmith Regional Park, however the park is located within the Regional District of Nanaimo (who also own the southern Mt. Arrowsmith Massif) The RDN has acquired crown land on the adjoining massif of Mount Arrowsmith. With the demise of the ski area, the ACRD has approached RDN to see whether it has an interest in acquiring the regional park on Mt. Cokely Ridge and managing it jointly with the massif. 7.4.5WILLOWBRAETRAIL
Willowbrae Park on the north end Ucluelet Inlet. This is currently an undeveloped community park. 7.4.6ALBERNIINLETTRAIL
The Alberni Inlet Trail is classified as a Regional Park and is one of the most scenic trails in the Alberni Valley, with spectacular views over the Alberni Inlet, Mount Arrowsmith and the City of Port Alberni. Stage 1 of this linear park stretches southwards from Ship Creek Road just south of the City of Port Alberni, 13 km to China Creek Regional Park. Stage 2 takes the trail further south from Underwood Cove along the historic CNPR trail route to Franklin River. ACRD holds a ‘Licence’ from Island Timberlands for the portions of the trail located on Island Timberlands private lands. 7.4.7EVERGREENPARK
This 8.84 ha park, located in the Beaver Creek Electoral Area E was formerly an elementary school property. Current amenities include 3.9 ha of open space, informal trails, a 3342m2 riding arena for equestrian activities. The park is well suited for equestrian activities, although routine maintenance, repair and development are needed. 36 54
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7.4.8BOATLAUNCHATGREATCENTRALLAKE
This area was acquired by the ACRD through a subdivision and provides water access to Great Central Lake. 7.4.9COUGARSMITHPARK
This 2.4 ha community park is located in the Sproat Lake Electoral Area and was formerly an elementary school. The amenities at this park include: bike park, tennis courts, ball field, playground, basketball courts, and a covered picnic area. 7.4.10FABERPARK
This park provides water access for the upland residents of Sproat Lake. There is a public dock for use. 7.4.11LOGTRAINTRAIL
ACRD holds a ‘Lease’ for recreational use from the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure. The Log Train Trail Lease starts at the power line between Block 80 and Lot 17 (east of the Cherry Creek Golf Course) continues northwest to Woolsey Road. 7.4.12OTHERPARKS
There are several areas within the regional district where the ACRD has acquired land through the subdivision process. These lands are zoned as park and are generally passive parks. Examples of these passive parks includes lands at; Willowbrae Rd, Faber Rd, Highland Drive, Karen Place, Bloedel Dr. A donation of private land for park purposes was made adjacent to the Beaver Creek Firehall called Nordstrom Park. 37 55
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PART8:MANAGEMENTCHALLENGES
8.1UNIQUEMANAGEMENTPRESCRIPTIONSANDGOVERNANCEPOLICIES
The lands within the ACRD are owned by several layers of government as well as private landowners who include forestry companies. Until recently, the public had the ability to recreate freely within private forestry lands. This permission was granted in the past because users were most often forestry workers who had become “weekend stewards” of the land. Unfortunately, today, a few of the many recreationalists pose considerable threats to forest land owners. These few recreationalists have caused forest fires, become lost, camped illegally, left trash, dumped refuse and generally behaved disrespectfully. As the forestry owners are liable for incidents on their properties, they in some cases have limited access or closed access altogether. It is for this reason that the public is no longer permitted to freely recreate on private forestry lands. In the future, forest companies may be open to discussions surrounding public access if the regional district or volunteer groups carry individual insurance policies and if formal agreements are drawn up to cover the liability risks and the costs of damages incurred. Appendix C provides an example of an access agreement that can be put in place between two or more parties. It is important to understand that each land owner may have their own set of regulating policies and procedures and that the ACRD is a unique land manager. Policies adopted by the ACRD will only apply to ACRD lands unless partnership agreements can be formally arranged, legally permitting activities and uses between the signed land owners. 8.2LIABILITY
A number of liability issues and concerns have been raised through the public engagement process and also by the consultants during field work. Some of their key issues and concerns include fire, vandalism, theft and environmental destruction including erosion and vegetation loss. The implementation of a regional parks program would provide the following benefits and help to mitigate some of the detrimental impacts currently ongoing.  When parks and trails are designed and built to a specific standard, the level of risk and liability to the landowner or easement holder is greatly reduced.  Park managers (land owners or those who are legally accountable for protecting the land) have the ability and responsibility to manage trails and users to avoid conflict, reduce impacts on the environment and improve the overall trail experience for all users.  Local government can purchase lands or work in partnership with other public or private land owners to formalize public access for trails 38 56
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

Agreements can be made whereby land management groups (such as insured non‐
profits) can hold the liability insurance for a formally agreed upon trail easement across private property when the owner is favorable to public access. (Insurance can be approximately $1500 ‐ $2500 per year so the non‐profit must be organized and likely have paying members who annually cover these costs) Incentives such as tax deductions or land swaps are some of the tools that land management agencies use to reward private land holders for allowing public access through their lands. PART9:PARKCLASSIFICATIONS
A rich and diverse parks and trails inventory should include a variety of types such as marine parks, open space areas, nature preserves, neighbourhood parks, linear parks, community gardens, active recreation parks, special purpose parks, nature trails, canoe/kayak routes, and roadside pathways. Most park systems are predicated upon a classification system that defines the characteristics of each type of park category (e.g. community playgrounds, natural recreation parks, wilderness parks, etc.) and a set of park standards which help to define the minimally acceptable levels of service and facilities for each category. This information is generally provided in site specific park management plans. The following Park Classification System was developed to represent the unique landscapes and biogeoclimatic regions that are characteristics of the Alberni‐Clayoquot Regional District. The classifications provide an overview of the management needs that are required for the wide range of possible facilities and services that may be envisioned for each park. 9.1PROPOSEDPARKCLASSIFICATIONS
The following classification system has been customized for the ACRD to ensure that the future regional parks system considers the wide range of sensitive ecosystems and landscapes as well as recreational needs for the broader community. Appendix D provides a Community Profile which outlines the biogeoclimatic zones of the ACRD as well as a list of endangered, threatened and listed species. A total of 32 new sites have been identified in the six park classifications for the ACRD Regional Parks system. In order to represent and preserve the environmental, recreational, cultural and heritage values identified by the ACRD community, six park land classifications have been defined as follows: 39 57
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CLASSIFICATION TYPE BEACH ACCESS / MARINE TRAIL ACTIVE RECREATION AREA TRAIL TYPICAL PARK CLASSIFICATIONS
PURPOSE Intended to provide year‐round public access to and from the shores of the ocean, lakes, rivers, wetlands, wetland, estuaries and waterways. The intensity of development is dependent on the sensitivity and characteristics of each site and may provide for a connected network of water‐
based destinations and amenities where multiple water based activities can be promoted in a safe, legal and sustainable manner. Marine recreation infrastructure is recommended for the beach accesses and marine trails. Some designated routes may consider having toilet facilities, drinking water, fire pits, camp sites, picnic facilities, emergency shelters, evacuation routes and safety information, access permits and check in‐out procedures. Educational opportunities are possible to encourage respect for oceans, rivers, lakes and watersheds and their habitats. Intended to provide year‐round opportunities for promoting community and active, healthy lifestyles through the development of recreational assets such as arenas, sports fields, equestrian facilities, leisure centers, exercise loops, frisbee golf courses, bike parks, pump tracks, skate parks, dog parks, camp sites and regional playgrounds. A wide range of indoor and outdoor recreation opportunities should be capable of sustaining a high level and variety of recreational and other public use activities and locations. Active recreation areas may be regional destinations or community serving and may be associated with waterfront access. Provide a year‐round linear corridor access to defined or multiple user groups. Trails provide the legal and physical structure for trail‐based recreation activities as well as local pedestrian and cycling commuter options. They aim to link communities, key regional destinations, provide access to areas having scenic and special interest qualities, and or national or provincial recreation opportunities. They can also be located within regional district parks and other recreation sites. The regional trail system is funded by the regional parks function and the community trails are funded through community parks. OPPORTUNITIES (USES) Beach activities, fishing, swimming,
picnicking, canoeing/kayaking, sailing, windsurfing, kite boarding, paddle boarding and where appropriate, boat launching. Event and festival hosting rock climbing, nature appreciation, outdoor exercise loops, dog walking,
geocaching, frisbee golf, camping, mountain bike skill development, sports fields, equestrian facilities, leisure center, events and festival hosting non‐motorized trail based activities including walking, hiking, bicycling, horseback riding, cross country skiing, horse‐drawn carriages, electric scooters, events and festival hosting 40 58
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CONSERVATION AREA ARTS/CULTURAL DESTINATION OFF HIGHWAY VEHICLE PARK Provide for low‐impact, passive outdoor recreation opportunities such as nature appreciation and wilderness hiking. Focus is on conservation and protection of natural values of the area. These areas could be further classified to include wilderness preserve which could protect highly sensitive, locally or regionally unique and significant natural areas and endangered or provincially red listed species. Levels of visitor use and development are contingent upon the capacity of the “preserved feature” to withstand use. Wilderness preserves may or may not serve recreational needs with trails or public access. IBAs (important bird areas as designated by the province are a good example of sites that should be protected within conservation areas. Celebrates a regionally significant destination, or cultural feature such as First Nations or heritage destinations. These regionally significant destinations promote public appreciation and understanding of the site, celebrate the legacy of key ACRD people and events. A formalized system of destinations linked together by OHV trails specifically designed, but not limited to motorized use. Parks infrastructure might include toilets, drinking water, campsites, interpretive opportunities walking, hiking, cycling, horseback riding in some areas, nature appreciation, picnicking and leisure and interpretive activities, events and festival hosting regional facility development for events and programming of various activities. Interpretive facilities, nature center, museums, art galleries, community gathering places, event and festival hosting. ATVs, OHVs, dirt bikes, snowmobiles, and other motorized users. The parks are open to other users, however at their own risk and level of enjoyment. Fee based camping or hut to hut experiences should be encouraged. Event and festival hosting Table 5. Typical Park Classifications 41 59
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PART10:ACQUISITION
10.1GENERALACQUISITIONCRITERIA
Four main goals for parks acquisition have been identified for the ACRD regional parks program. The following criteria must be met for each land parcel being considered for acquisition. 1) Protecting large intact areas Larger areas offer more protected interior habitat, shown to be required breeding and other life functions such as resting, foraging, hiding for many species. Studies have shown that habitat patches over 30 acres support breeding bird populations. Larger areas are also more efficient to manage and allow for more community access. 2) Protecting sites with exceptional biodiversity values (habitats and species) A site may demonstrate exceptional values based on its ability to support habitats and species identified as rare or under threat in region or province, or because of its condition in providing highly functioning ecological habitat, with relatively few invasive species. 3) Improving connectivity within a regional system of natural areas Long‐term sustainability of the natural area system depends on connectivity to larger protected areas outside of the municipal areas and between large protected natural area parks within urban areas. Connectivity is important for both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, allowing migration between large habitat areas. 4) Buffering current natural areas Common threats to urban natural areas include conflicting land uses and invasive species on their boundaries. Buffering currently protected areas can help reduce these threats, make management more efficient, and provide access to neighborhoods and a network of pedestrian and bicycle trails. 10.2COMMUNITYWISHLIST
As a result of these criteria, Appendix A provides a comprehensive list of sites and experiences that were identified either through public engagement, meetings, and official community plans as opportunities for regional parks and trails. Each community suggestion has been classified as per community needs and relative area/ sub region to show equal representation across the ACRD. 42 60
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PART11:FORMALIZINGANDFUNDINGPARKSANDTRAILS
It is likely that the funds necessary to acquire lands under the regional parks and trails program will be greater than funds budgeted. Therefore, the regional board will need to be strategic in the investment of the regional park funds. A key objective of a regional parks program might be to continually build partnerships and to have financial leveraging arrangements made with other levels of governments, grant funding organizations, land trusts, community groups and developers to secure acquisition of lands for regional parks. Having options and a flexible strategy in place will help to expand opportunities to achieve priorities identified in this plan. The timing of lands becoming available for acquisition by the regional district may be influenced by a number of factors including: 1) funding availability (both ACRD and external funding partnership arrangements such as grants and fundraising campaigns), 2) coordination with other levels of government and 3) willingness or needs of the landowner. Lands to be acquired under a Regional Parks and Trails Program must be consistent with the Regional Parks & Trails Strategic Plan, unless otherwise approved by the Board. To achieve this objective, the Plan recommends establishment of one or more of the following funding options to support the Regional Parks Program objectives. ACQUISITION PARKLAND ACQUISITION AND FUNDING OPTIONS Regional Parkland Tax Acquisition Fund Regional parks has the capacity to establish a regional parks levy under a regional parks program. The funds annually generated in this fund would be applied towards land acquisition opportunities that arise for proposed regional park sites identified in the plan. The Regional Parkland Acquisition Fund (RPAF) would be maintained separately from the annual budget to operate the regional parks and trails system, with expenditure of the funds only on land purchased for regional parks and trails. The funds accumulated would be dependent upon the rate established and the duration or the tax, which will require direction and approval from the regional board. An average range of tax contribution to regional district regional parks on Vancouver Island is $30.00 per household in 2014. Long‐term Borrowing Bylaw (LTBB) One of the advantages of a LTBB is long term amortizations, (20 years +) which provide the capacity to respond to near term acquisition opportunities without being limited to funds available under the current year’s budget. While the total cost of borrowing may be greater through Long Term Borrowing, an advantage is the capacity to spread out repayments over a number of budget years versus a “pay‐as‐you go” approach which could require significant budget allocation demands of the Board in any given year. A second advantage of long term borrowing is the ability for existing and future residents to contribute proportionally to the acquisition of regional park sites over time. Existing residents are not unnecessarily burdened in the short term with acquisition costs of regional park sites that provide long term outdoor recreation and environmental benefits for the region as a whole. Regional board approval of a Long Term Borrowing Bylaw to support land acquisition would require public confirmation through an alternative approval process. ACRD Parks Endowment Fund The regional board could establish a regional parks and trails donation/endowment fund that would accept monetary gifts for parcels that meet the land acquisition criteria outlined in this plan. Such a fund could be further supported and promoted by a volunteer group, 43 61
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ACCESS FUNDING with administrative assistance and oversight by ACRD Parks. Annual Allocation The allocation of funds will be annually determined by the ACRD Board for the management, operation and provision of amenities within regional parks and trails. The level of funding approved annually by the regional board will foremost be applied to upgrade existing infrastructure so that it is efficient and sustainable with regard to upkeep costs safe operation and maintenance service levels. In future years, annual budget consideration should be guided in part by the number of new regional park sites acquired under the regional parks and trails program, the management plans for each new site reviewed and adopted by the Regional Board and for budgetary considerations of the Regional Board as influenced by other funded programs and priorities within the Regional District. Incentives It is possible for local governments to provide tax incentives to property owners for allowing public access across their lands and also for donation of time or materials to the ACRD for park improvement purposes. Grant Grants are non‐repayable funds disbursed by one party (grant makers), often a government department, corporation, foundation or trust, to a recipient, often (but not always) a nonprofit entity, educational institution, business or an individual. In order to receive a grant, some form of “Grant Writing” often referred to as either a proposal or an application is usually required. There are many grants available to local governments and their partners for well‐planned projects. ACRD Park Legacy/ Donation Fund A legacy fund could be established with continual opportunities for business or the public to donate to ongoing parks and trails projects. This fund could include donations for commemorative programs and or items such as tree planting, benches, viewing platforms, bike racks, bridges, cabins, shelters, boardwalk planks etc. A list of key donors could be established to celebrate their support of the community and regional parks. Tax credits should be provided for donors who make contributions to a legacy fund. Development Cost Charges Authorization under the Local Government Act permits establishment of development cost
charges (DCCs) as monetary charges that local governments can apply to new developments to assist in providing specific services to residents of those new developments. The provision of parks is one of the services for which DCCs can be charged. While park DCCs are commonly applied at the municipal level for municipal and community parks, the application of DCCs have also recently begun to be applied in B.C. for regional parks. Right of Way/ A right of way is a non‐possessory right of use and/or entry onto the real property of Easement another without possessing it. It is best typified in the right of way which one landowner, A, may enjoy over the land of another, B. An easement is considered as a property right in itself at common law and is still treated as a type of property in most jurisdictions. Easements can be granted and defined to serve specific purposes such as access to a given parcel of land or conservation as described below. Lease A lease is a contractual arrangement calling for the lessee (user) to pay the lessor (owner) for use of an asset. 44 62
February2015ACRDParks&TrailsStrategicPlan
Conservation Easement Access Easement The ACRD can create conservation easements with private landowners to permanently protect certain conservation values in the ACRD. These values include wildlife habitats, rich agricultural lands, and scenic landscapes, among others. These easements not only restrict certain types of development, they also require that the Conservancy partner with current and future easement landowners to help steward the land. Access easements are formally written permission agreements allowing the “grantee” access to a parcel of land owned by the “grantor” for purposes such as trail use, fishing use, hunting or gathering. Table 6. Parkland Acquisition and Funding Options PART12:IMPLEMENTATIONOPTIONS
WEIGHING FACTORS Staffing Options OPTION ONE OPTION TWO
OPTION THREE
REMAIN STATUS QUO (Staff oversees contractors and volunteer operations) HIRE CONTRACTOR (Develop management and other recommended plans. Parks contractor can be hired to organize volunteer programs and events for regional parks) Same costs to ACRD, contractor would operate on a contract basis. MEDIUM Volunteers are self‐regulating under part time staff guidance. Volunteers do not always work in an effective manner without guidance and often become overworked and burnt out. LOW MEDIUM HIRE PARKS STAFF (Develop management and other recommended plans. This new staff member can oversee volunteer programs and events for the regional parks) Costs of a new employee, however costs may be offset by new tax levy and or grants available once the Strategic Plan is adopted and individual management plan projects are determined. HIGH Parks manager can oversee volunteer programs and set priorities and budgets based on a common vision. When guided by a staff member full time, volunteers are provided with meaningful, encouraging work. They are less likely to burn out. HIGH LOW LOW MEDIUM HIGH MEDIUM LOW HIGH SLOW MEDIUM Same cost as currently funded by ACRD. LOW Volunteers can be Volunteer self‐regulating under Happiness part‐time staff Scale guidance. LOW Liability (Public HIGH Relations & Success of Program) Cost Effectiveness Long Term Public Support Timeframe FAST Table 7. Implementation Options 45 63
February2015ACRDParks&TrailsStrategicPlan
PART13:SUSTAINABLEPARKSDESIGN
Sections 877 and 941 of the Local Government Act provide policies made for parks planning and the reduction of greenhouse gases. Local Government Act regulations require regional districts to conserve and protect water, natural resources and air quality through the reduction of greenhouse gases. As a result, nature based recreational choices are not only becoming popular, they are also becoming a requirement. Nature‐based activities require less capital costs up front and also require less maintenance over the long term, making them a sustainable choice. Within the field of parks and recreation, the commitment to sustainable management practices provides an opportunity to address many of our most pressing challenges, such as ensuring the design and construction of parks is balanced with long‐term maintenance requirements, enhancing community lifestyles, and reducing the consumption of resources. Sustainable parks are designed, constructed and operated to address issues facing the community and surrounding region, such as storm water management or improving air quality by promoting alternative transportation, reducing motor vehicle trips, and even planting trees. New aesthetic forms emerge for parks when based on sustainable development concepts, starting with initial consideration of the surrounding landscape around the park. Sustainable Parks can significantly decrease water use by reducing irrigation needs through the use of rain gardens and recycled water. Sustainable (Green) park buildings typically save up to 60% in annual energy costs when compared to conventional building designs. Building operational costs are also substantially lower. Planning, designing, constructing, and operating Sustainable Parks can and should include the following elements where possible:  minimizing environmental impacts from the onset through sensitive siting of a park/trail within the landscape and careful consideration of the various uses within the park boundaries • protecting and enhancing habitat areas • educating the public about the value of natural resource stewardship • incorporating rain water reuse, grey water for irrigation, efficient irrigation systems, etc. • recycling waste products and striving to limit waste as much as possible • minimizing pollution impacts resulting from park features and user activities • utilizing green building techniques (e.g., solar power, natural lighting) to reduce energy costs  promoting alternative forms of transportation (e.g., greenways, bike trails, safe routes  reducing maintenance and operations costs  involving the public as partners, customers, volunteers, participants, stakeholders, etc.  encouraging partnerships with various organizations noxious and invasive plant management control and planning 46 64
February2015ACRDParks&TrailsStrategicPlan
13.1SUSTAINABLETRAILS
Within a growing number of jurisdictions, including the ACRD communities are showing an increased desire and need for linear parks, also known as trails. Trails are essential for assisting pedestrian, cycling, equestrian and other users to connect to and from key destinations within a region. The benefits of a trail network must be balanced with the need to protect our natural environment. Trail design and construction must: • strive to have minimal impacts on our natural surroundings • be designed with consideration of the local environment and the intended use • avoid sensitive areas and protect our sensitive assets • adhere to best techniques and to prescribed standards • include efforts in public education and enforcement Trails that adversely impact the environment will not only have a low aesthetic value, but will also incur a high maintenance cost. Sustainable trails are trails that are designed and constructed to minimize erosion and environmental degradation. They are safe and pose minimal liability risk to land managers. Sustainable trails can range from easy to difficult depending on the design and steepness of grades, the width of the trail and the alignment chosen. Sustainable trails can be challenging and winding or breathtaking and open, and they can be designed to accommodate all users including mountain bikers and equestrians. They do require routine maintenance and monitoring to preserve their longevity and function. The requirement to build sustainable trails for safety and liability reasons, has been brought into place by several levels of government including other regional districts, Parks Canada, BC Parks and the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure. By requiring sustainable layout and construction standards early in the process minimal erosion and environmental degradation will result, as well as low long term maintenance costs. 13.2ACRDPARKSANDTRAILS
The ACRD has a myriad of existing parks and trails and unique outdoor experiences. These include early farm trails, historic logging routes, abandoned paved roads, and animal trails that have become people or “social trail” routes. Social trails are trails created by human beings or animals that have been worn into the ground from taking the path of least resistance to a particular destination. In spite of advanced planning in some cases or little planning in others, many of the trails in the ACRD are at present, not legal or formalized. Some trails follow paths that were previously created by wild animals and do not meet basic layout standards that require maximum conformation to grades and slope. As a result, sections 47 65
February2015ACRDParks&TrailsStrategicPlan
of existing trails may not be sustainable. Evidence exists in the parks, trail corridors and open spaces as the trails have become degraded from soil loss and erosion resulting in damage to local vegetation and habitat. Without sustainable grades the trail system will not last. It will become eroded and dangerous and will require significant maintenance over the long term. This said, trails in the ACRD pass through some of Vancouver Island’s most fragile ecosystems and therefore need to be sustainable through good design. By respecting local landscapes and ecosystems, trails can be used to help to conserve sensitive lands and not contribute to overuse and environmental degradation. 13.3TRAILSTANDARDS
Trail standards have been provided by the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Recreation Manual, Chapter 10 and could be directly applied to the ACRD regional parks system. 48 66
Appendix A ACRD Regional Wide Parks & Trails Inventory & Public Wish List for Acquisition
18‐Feb‐15
The location and safety of these trails, parks are not known and must be assessed by users. The information in this appendix was gathered through public input meetings within the Regional District and will be refined and prioritized by Parks Committee and is therefore a working document.
Area
Park Trail Other
√
√
√
√
Centennial Park
West Park
Waterfront Parcel A
Waterfront Parcel B
√
Area (ha's), Length (km's)
5.7 ha
0.9 ha
0.7 ha
1.0 ha
Type
Active Recreation/Community Park/Campsite
Community Park ‐ Passive Park
Community Park ‐ Passive Park
Community Park ‐ Passive Park
Winston Ave
Sarita Falls, River, Park
Pachena Lake
Ross Islets
Deer Group
Bamfield to Anacla Trail
Telegraph Trail to Alberni Valley
Future Trail
Conservation Area, Rec Site
Conservation Area, Rec Site
Beach Access, Marine Trail
Beach Access, Marine Trail
Future Trail
Historic Trail √
Grappler Inlet
Waterfront Boardwalk
Execution Rock
Beach Access, Marine Trail. Boat Launch
Wooden Boardwalk
Beach Access, Marine Trail
√
√
Alberni Inlet Trail
Runner's Trail
29.9 km
20.1 km
Trail Trail
√
√
Cape Beale
West Coast Trail
4.5 km
75 km
Trail
Trail
√
Keeha Beach
3.5km
Trail
√
√
√
√
√
√
Bamfield
Name
√
√
Eagle Bay Island
√
Broken Group
Ahousaht Wild Side Trail
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
Possible Conservation Area
11 km
Trail
Wild Pacific Trail
Kennedy Lake Access Trail
Tonquin Sinking Site
Cougar Annie's Garden
Tofino Mudflats
Virgin Falls
Cannery Bay
Pretty Girl Lake
Hey Creek River Corridor
1645 ha
Trail
Trail to Rec Site
Cultural Destination
Cultural Destination
Wildlife Management Area (WMA)
Rec Site, Possible Conservation Area
Possible Conservation Area
Possible Conservation Area
Possible Conservation Area
Bedwell River Trail
17 km
Trail
Access
Land Ownership
Bamfield West Bamfield
West Bamfield
West Bamfield
ACRD
ACRD
ACRD
ACRD
West Bamfield
Parking lot at Sarita Falls
MOT Right‐of‐Way
Comments
Zoned for Park
Zoned for Park
Zoned for Park
Stair Ladders needed. Would create circle route in W. Bamfield. West Coast Trail crew may be interested in helping with stair ladders. MOT
Various
Various
MOT
HFN
Ship Creek Rd, China Creek Campground Parking Lot, Franklin River Parking Lot. Crown and Island Timberlands (Licence) Stage 1 & 2 complete. Stage 3 not completed. Crown and Island Timberlands Strenuous hike through fairly flat terrain. A 1.8m tide or lower is required to cross the tidal flats on the way to the Trailhead at the end of South Bamfield PRNPR
Cape Beale Lighthouse. Road.
Bamfield ‐ Port Renfrew
PRNPR
Trailhead at the end of South Bamfield Road to Pacific Ocean
PRNPR
Fairly flat, muddy. Fallen trees.
Island at South End of Eagle Bay, North of Brady's Beach
Crown Land
Paddle from Bamfield or Toquart Bay, or take Kayak on Francis Barkley boat to Beach walking. Crown Land. There is a need for better Sechart Lodge. access.
Ahousaht
Crown/Ahousaht
User fee applies. Lighthouse Loop 2.6km, Big Beach Section 1km, Brown's Ucluelet
District of Ucluelet
Beach 4km. Kennedy Lake
Provincial or PRNPR?
District of Tofino
Crown?
Clayoquot Sound
Private Land
Tofino
Crown
Crown
Private Land
Crown Land
?
Boat up Bedwell Sound, hike along Partly in Strathcona Provincial Park. Connects to Bedwell Bedwell River to You Creek
Crown/Private
Lake Route in Strathcona Provincial Park. 67
Appendix A ACRD Regional Wide Parks & Trails Inventory & Public Wish List for Acquisition
18‐Feb‐15
The location and safety of these trails, parks are not known and must be assessed by users. The information in this appendix was gathered through public input meetings within the Regional District and will be refined and prioritized by Parks Committee and is therefore a working document.
Long Beach
Area
Park Trail Other
Name
Area (ha's), Length (km's)
Type
√
Clayoquot Valley Witness Trail
29 km
Trail
√
√
Gold Mine
Great Cedar and Hanging Garden
3 km
2.5 km
Trail
Trail
√
Hesquiat Peninsula (Escalante)
32 km
Trail
√
Lone Cone
5 km
Trail
√
Nuu‐chah‐nulth Trail
2.5 km
Trail
√
Schooner Cove Trail
0.8 km
Trail
√
Shorepine Bog
0.8 km Trail
√
South Beach Trail
0.8 km
Trail
√
Spruce Fringe 1.5 km Trail
√
√
Triple Peak
Willowbrae Trail
1.4 km
Trail
Trail
√
Halfmoon Bay Trail
0.5 km
Trail
√
√
Tofino‐Ucluelet Multi‐Use (Future)
Tonquin Beach Trail
6 km
Trail
Trail
√
Long Beach Rainforest
Lower Valley below Sydney Creek Power Project
Waterfront Boardwalk in Tofino
2 km
Trail
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
68
√
Access
Land Ownership
Trailhead on 560 logging road near Highway 4, part in Clayoquot Arm Provincial Park. ?
Tofino‐Ucluelet Highway along Lost Shoe Creek to Florencia Bay.
PRNPR
Meares Island
Crown Escalante Point to Boat Basin in Hesquiat Peninsula Provincial Park
Crown
Kakawis Village to Lone Cone Peak, Meares Island
Crown
Long Beach behind Wickaninnish Interpretive Centre to Florencia Bay via Quisitis headlands. PRNPR
North end of Long Beach
PRNPR
On Wickaninnish Road, 300m south of the Florencia Bay turnoff. PRNPR
South Beach Trail branches from the Nuu‐
chah‐nulth Trail. PRNPR
Due west of Long Beach Rainforest Trail
Highway 4 onto Marion Main Line for 11km. BCTS aware of the importance of this road. End of Willowbrae Road
Halfmoon Bay Trail branches from the Willowbrae Trail 1.3 km from the end of Willowbrae Road. Easy loop.
Difficult, allow 1 week. Cross several First Nations Lands.
Steep, 721m to peak.
Interpretive Trail
Access to Schooner Cove may be cut off during high tides. Some stairs
Crown Land
PRNPR
Difficult, technical climb.
Long flight of stairs
PRNPR
Long flight of stairs
Parallels Tofino‐Ucluelet Highway
PRNPR
District of Tofino
Easy, very heavily used
Potential for expansion to Middle Beach
Either side of Tofino‐Ucluelet Highway
PRNPR
Two boardwalk trails, 1km each. ?
District of Tofino
Port Alberni to Tofino Junction Trail
Marine Access area
Meares Island Loop Trail
Salmon Beach Public Square
Historical Trail
Future water access
Salmon Beach Village
MOT
PRNPR
Crown?
Crown Right‐of‐Way
Access to Clayoquot Provincial Park Future Access
Access to Clayoquot Provincial Park
?
Cavers Trail
Part through crown land; difficult. >915 elevation gain. Needs maintenance. PRNPR
Possible Conservation Area
Future Trail
Permit
Comments
Unsure of location. Administrative building, tennis courts, playground
Access is through the Kennedy River microhydro project (Tla‐o‐qui‐
aht FN). Pedestrian access ok. Appendix A ACRD Regional Wide Parks & Trails Inventory & Public Wish List for Acquisition
18‐Feb‐15
The location and safety of these trails, parks are not known and must be assessed by users. The information in this appendix was gathered through public input meetings within the Regional District and will be refined and prioritized by Parks Committee and is therefore a working document.
Area
Park Trail Other
√
Name
Clayoquot Valley Witness Trail
√
√
5040 Trail
√
Alberni Inlet Trail
Type
Trail
Access
Trailhead on 560 logging road near Highway 4, part in Clayoquot Arm Provincial Park. Possible Conservation Area
Trail
29.9 km
Land Ownership
Comments
?
Part through crown land; difficult. >915 elevation gain. Remote and unmaintained. Crown
Access is through the Kennedy River microhydro project (Tla‐o‐qui‐
aht FN). Pedestrian access ok. From Highway 4 up bluff on west side of Mackenzie Range peaks.
Provincial Trail
Difficult, technical, and rough. >10 hours. 9km on Marion Main (4WD)
Crown Land. Moderate access to alpine. Great views. Need for road and trail to be preserved. Provides access to Nahmint. Advantage of being halfway between west coast and Port Alberni. Potential draw for tourists. Trail Crown
Crown and Island Timberlands (Lease)
Stage 1 & 2 complete. Stage 3 not completed. Located in RDN, but owned by ACRD. http://www.rdn.bc.ca/cms.asp?wpID=1429 http://rdn.bc.ca/cms/wpattachments/wpID1429atID1705.p
Mount Arrowsmith Regional Park
Cokley Trail, Rousseau Trail
Island Timberlands Logging Road
ACRD
√
√
Mount Arrowsmith Massif
Sproat Lake Access
Conservation Area & Several Trails
Future Access
Island Timberlands Logging Road
RDN
Unknown until location identified
Managed by RDN. Saddle, Judges, unjudges, Snow Gulley
√
Somass Estuary
Conservation Area
Tseshaht/Crown/Ducks Unlimited
Right‐of‐Way, Easements exist for many user groups.
√
√
√
√
√
Meconella Bluff
Cranberry Swamp
Corrigan Creek
Cold Creek Falls
Jacks Peak
√
Nahmint Valley
√
Boy Scout Beach (Great Central Lake)
Unmaintained Campsite √
China Creek Campground
Marina and Campground (Serviced)
Community Forest Trails. Weiner Falls, Teodore Trail, Sproat Lake Lookout Trail
Trail
Hole in the Wall
Trail and Tourist Attraction
√
√
29 km
Mt. Pogo
Climbers Trail (Mackenzie Climbers Trail)
√
√
Area (ha's), Length (km's)
√
Conservation Area
Conservation Area
Conservation Area
Conservation Area
Stirling Arm & Faber Road
Log Train Trail @ Horne Lake Rd
Log Trail Trail A 1 ha section contains approx. 40% of the Canadian population of Meconella oregana (White Meconella). Red listed species and is significant nationally and provincially. http://www.goert.ca/documents/SAR_manual/Meconella_
oregana.pdf Potential to create a formal trail link between Private Land. Was in RDN, now in ACRD Horne Lake and LTT. RDN interest in reactivating trail. ?
Unsure of location
Crown
Timberwest/IT?
Beauforts
?
Same vicinity as 5040, but harder access. Nahmint Lake FS Rec Site os also on this forestry access road. Crown
This forestry access road provides important access to Klitsa Brooke George Trail, Nahmin & Adder Peaks. Crown
ACRD owned, leased to Port Alberni Port Authority
Bamfield Main Road
Sutton Pass off Highway 4 (4WD). Community Forest has two separate areas, one @ W. end of Sproat Lake and one north of Sproat Lake. Crown
Highway 4 opposite Candy Store ‐ Dangerous parking ‐ adjacent to busy highway. IT/Crown
Mount Adder Access Trail (access to alpine, good direct access from highway), Weiner Falls 69
Appendix A ACRD Regional Wide Parks & Trails Inventory & Public Wish List for Acquisition
18‐Feb‐15
The location and safety of these trails, parks are not known and must be assessed by users. The information in this appendix was gathered through public input meetings within the Regional District and will be refined and prioritized by Parks Committee and is therefore a working document.
Area
Park Trail Other
√
Type
Access
Proposed future access through to Stamp River
√
Evergreen Park
8.8 ha
Open riding ring, informal trails
Fayette Road, Beaver Creek. √
Cougar Smith Park
2.4 ha
Community Park
9025 Faber Road
ACRD
4 km
Proposed future access through to Stamp River
Trail
Trail
Alberni Inlet Trail
Willow Road, Beaver Creek
Private Land
IT?
Crown
4.1 km
Trail access to the Stamp River
Coleman Road, through Greenmax Woodlot. Near Alberni Valley Airport
Trail and Tourist Attraction
Trail
Behind Candy Store (Alberni Highway)
Access from end of Mallory Drive
√
District Lot 109 Land Ownership
Private Land
ACRD and Crown (ACRD leases from Crown).
√
Alberni Valley
Name
Area (ha's), Length (km's)
√
√
District Lot 101
Alberni Inlet Scout Camp Trail
Maplehurst Trail System √
√
Greenmax Anglers Trail
Taylor Arm Fire Trail
√
√
Alberni Lookout
Polly's Point
Orange Bridge to Kleekhoot Reserve Trails
√
√
Stokes Canyon to Roger Creek Trail
Cross Country Ski Trails to Adder, & Sutton Pass
Brigade Lake Trail
Port Alberni to Cameron Lake crossing the Log Train Trail
McKenzie Slough (DL 158)
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
√
70
√
√
Log Train Trail
McLean Mill Park
Taylor Arm Old Log Dump
Roger Creek Nature Trial System
Turtle Lake Wetlands
McLaughlin Watershed
Future Trail
Trail
15.4 km
Trail
Trail
Trail
Conservation Purposes
Trail
National Historic Site
Beach Access
Trail
Conservation
Future Conservation Purposes
Crown
?
IT/Crown
Tseshaht (IR#2)
Comments
Potential purchase as a regional park. No discussions with land owner have taken place. Excellent site for campsite, day use and boat launch. Maintenance, repairs, and needed. Playground, bike skills park, tennis court, ball field, basketball court, covered picnic area. Private property adjoining the Store Pool in DL 101 on the east bank trail between Stamp Falls Park and the AV Sportsmen's Association lease in DL 160. No discussions with land owner have taken place.
Easy, elevation gain 100m, about 2 hours
Easy, elevation gain 50m, approximately 3 hours return. Has Section 56 Forest Recreation Trail designation. Private Land, well used
Indian Reserve
MOT
Access from Highway 4
IT and other private lands
Near Taylor River Bridge
Crown
Crown?
Davenport Rd (unbuilt)
Maebelle/Mozart Road to Woolsey Road. Provides access to Beaufort Range, to Horne Lake Trail and to McLean Mill Historic Site.
Access from Highway 4. IT/Timberwest
Crown
MOT leased to ACRD for northern section. City of Port Alberni
IT?
Crown
IT
IT
Old trails on NE Cokley in Arrowsmith Ski Park. Adder access through Community Forest. 4WD access to trailhead.
No known route. Old pre‐contact trail to Horne Lake from Log Train Trail at Horne Lake Rd. Easy walking, horseback riding, biking. Lease from Ministry of Transportation. Maintenance is needed, including bridge crossings. Need for more formal access
Easy. Connects with Log Train Trail and Hupacasath Woodlot. Needs Section 56 maintenance agreement. Consideration of a loop trail from Rogers Creek Nature Trail to the hospital via the C&N trails and back along the LTT to Rogers. Also potential wheelchair link from hospital to LTT. Short, but would require work because of swamp.
Fishing Access
Appendix A ACRD Regional Wide Parks & Trails Inventory & Public Wish List for Acquisition
18‐Feb‐15
The location and safety of these trails, parks are not known and must be assessed by users. The information in this appendix was gathered through public input meetings within the Regional District and will be refined and prioritized by Parks Committee and is therefore a working document.
Area
Park Trail Other
Name
Area (ha's), Length (km's)
Type
√
√
Brooke George (Mount Klitsa)
Gibson Klitsa
√
Della Falls
√
√
Della Lake/Love Lake
Faber Road Path
√
Fossli Park Trails
2.5km
Trail
√
Passive Reflector
2km
Trail
Trail
Trail
16km
Trail
Trail
Trail
√
Robertson Creek Hatchery
√
√
Stamp Long River Trail
7.5km
Teodore Trail & Sproat Lake Lookout Trail
√
√
√
Ward Lake
Powerline Park (to Lacy Lake)
Alberni Mountain Bike Trails
4.5km
√
Father and Son Lake
3km
Trail
√
Mount Hankin
3km
Sproat Lake Community Hall ‐ Future Dog Park. Trail
2km
Trail
√
√
Grouch Grind
√
Mt Porter
Elizabeth Lake
√
Limestone Mountain
North End of Kitsuksis Dyke to McLean Mill
Bigmore Park Reserve
Equestrial Trails ‐ McLean Mill
√
√
√
3km
Trail Trail
Trail
Trail Trail
Bike Trail
Trail
Future Trail Reserve
Horse Trail
Access
Land Ownership
Starts from south side of Mount Klitsa at end of NH600 logging road (from Nahmint River Main) to summit of Mount Klitsa. Crown
Crown
Head of Great Central Lake to Della Falls Strathcona Provincial Park
Della Falls Trail to Della Lake ‐ 1km. Della Falls Trail to Love Lake
Strathcona Provincial Park
Roadside Path
MOT
Stirling Arm logging road
Crown Land
Trailhead on Canal Main logging road to microwave tower
First 2km (upper) trail from Fish Hatchery parking lot to Great Central Lake; second 1km (lower) trail along Stamp River to picnic site. Stamp River Provincial Park to Barker Road
Robertson Creek Hatchery and IT
Comments
Intermediate to difficult, about 4 hours to summit, +‐ 1000m in elevation gain. Connects to Brooke George Trail and Brigade Trail.
Intermediate, approximately 7 hours one way
Difficult ‐ Very Difficult
In highway right‐of‐way
Partially within Fossli Provincial Park. Moderate Elevation Gain, 60m. Private Land, easy route, used by bikes and ATV's. Easy, may be overgrown
Moderate, elevation gain 50m, about 3 hours one way.
Highway 4 onto logging road for 3.2km
From Highway 4 to Ward Lake (2km) and beyond
Crown land, Community Forest
Private Land, easy. Access has been logged.
Moderate, nice views
Private Land
Accessed off Log Train Trail
End of Thistle Mine Road to Rec site on Father and Son Lake, trail circles lake
From Coulson Sawmill on Alberni Inlet to Mount Hankin
Crown land, very good. Recent logging.
Private Land, trail logged over. +580m
From Horne Lake Rd, just off Log Train Trail (DL290)
Private Land (timberwest), and Crown
Above Doran Lake. Heavily waterbarred FSR 500 & 511. Crown Land. Jack Todd Trail
The higher part of Platzer Creek Loop, future link to Platzer Creek
Beautiful destination with distant views into Strathcona Park
From loggings roads to 1,470m summit
Lot 1, DL 110, Park 1977
Private
Need input from Horse community
71
Appendix A ACRD Regional Wide Parks & Trails Inventory & Public Wish List for Acquisition
18‐Feb‐15
The location and safety of these trails, parks are not known and must be assessed by users. The information in this appendix was gathered through public input meetings within the Regional District and will be refined and prioritized by Parks Committee and is therefore a working document.
Area
Park Trail Other
√
Name
Area (ha's), Length (km's)
Crown Land Reserve (Part of DL 149)
ACRD Alberni‐Clayoquot Regional District
MOT Ministry of Transportation
HFN Huu‐ay‐aht First Nation
FLNR Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
PRNPR Pacific Rim National Park Reserve
YG
Ucluelet Government
IT
Island Timberlands
72
Type
Reserve
Access
Land Ownership
Comments
South bank of Sproat River, adjacent to Seaton Park. Riverfront portion of the property provides angling access and could be part of Sproat River Corridor. Appendix B - Chronology of Past Planning Work
ALBERNI-CLAYOQUOT REGIONAL DISTRICT
R E G I O N A L PA R K S A N D T R A I L S M A S T E R P L A N
WORKING CHRONOLOGY OF BACKGROUND INFORMATION RELATED TO EXISTING ACRD PARKS AND TRAILS
DATE
CONTACT
OUTCOME or DOCUMENT
2003/4 Rare & Sensitive Ecosystems Inventory for TFL 44 produced by Weyerhauser
Copy available from Kevin Head, West Coast Aquatic
2006
Alberni Valley Trails Planning Study
Friends of the Log Train Trail Society
2007
Review of the Port Alberni Forest Industry: Recommended development of trail
system to promote tourism. Stressed need to resolve access issues created by
removal of private lands
Province of British Columbia Ministry of Forests and
Range Operations Division
2008
Regional Parks and Trails Policy Report
ACRD
2009
State of the Park Report, Pacific Rim National Park
As the first step in management planning, Pacific Rim’s State of the Park Report
built a strong foundation. Drawing upon both scientific research and First Nations’ traditional knowledge, the report presents a compelling picture of where
the park is today.
Parks Canada
http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/bc/pacificrim/plan.
aspx
2010
Park Management Plan, Pacific Rim National Park
A park management plan is a document that provides strategic direction for
how Parks Canada, First Nations, stakeholders, and the general public can manage the park for the long term. It outlines the park’s goals, actions necessary to
preserve its natural and cultural resources while providing services for our visitors. Decisions related to land use, research, and programming are made based
on the management plan. Management plans are updated every five years.
Parks Canada
http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/bc/pacificrim/plan.
aspx
20102011
Annual Management Plan Implementation Report- Pacific Rim National Park
Since management planning is a continuous cycle of consultation, decisionmaking, implementation, monitoring, and reporting, this Annual Report serves
as a “report card” to partners, stakeholders, and the public. It ensures that our
progress-to-date is shared. This brief summary outlines our accomplishments
since the Plan was tabled in Parliament in June 2010.
Parks Canada
http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/bc/pacificrim/plan.
aspx
20002012
BC Parks is responsible for the designation, management and conservation of
a system of ecological reserves, provincial parks and recreation areas located
throughout the province. British Columbia’s parks and protected areas contain
nationally and internationally significant natural and cultural features and outdoor experiences. The provincial system of parks is dedicated to the protection
of natural environments for the inspiration, use and enjoyment of the public.
View purpose statements and zoning plans for all BC parks within the ACRD
ie) Clayoquot Arm Provincial Park to view complexity of layers to consider with
management prescriptions
BC Parks
73
ALBERNI-CLAYOQUOT REGIONAL DISTRICT
R E G I O N A L PA R K S A N D T R A I L S M A S T E R P L A N
2011
City of Port Alberni Parks and Recreation Department Parks Map and Table of
Parks and Playgrounds
City of Port Alberni
2008
Regional Parks and Trails Policy Report
2007
Parks and Recreation Master Plan includes descriptions of the regions parks,
open spaces, trails and facilities
ACRD
District of Tofino
2013
Parks and Recreaton Master Plan (coming soon!)
District of Tofino
Lions Park
Recreation Hall Park
George Fraser Memorial Park
Frank Jones Memorial Park
Edna Batchelor Park formerly Discovery Park
(not yet refurbished)
Fraser Lane Park
He-Tin-Kis Park – Forested Trail
Big Beach Picnic Park
Little Beach Park
Ucluelet existing district parks and trails
2011
Parks Map
Lyche Road Park
Small Craft Harbour Park
Terrace Beach
Seaplane Base Park
Wild Pacific Trail
Multi-purpose Sports Field
Skateboard Park
Basketball Court
BMX Bike Track
Tot Park
City of Port Alberni
WEST COAST
1994
1995
74
Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation and Ecotrust InternaWorkshop Report of the Kennedy Lake Salmonid Technical Working Group,
Tofino In early 1992, the Tla-o-qui-aht First nation and Ecotrust formed the Ken- tional, I. Parnell; D.R. Marmorek
nedy Lake Technical Working group(KLTWG). The long term goal of the working
group is to rebuild Kennedy Lake sockeye stocks to levels that can again sustain
a healthy fishery for Native fishers and other fishing interests.
R.I.G. Morrison; R.W. Butler; G.W. Beyersbergen;
The Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network (WHSRN) is an international conservation initiative designed to protect the key habitats and resources H.L. Dickson; A. Bourget; P.W. Hicklin; J.P. Goossen; R.K. Ross; C.L. Trevor-Gratto
used by shorebirds throughout their migration ranges. Many species of shorebirds depend on a chain of critically important sites to complete their annual
migrations, and for conservation to be successful, all the links in the chain need
to be preserved. This report provides an updated inventory of potential WHSRN
sites in non-Arctic areas of Canada. It summarizes information currently available on locations meeting criteria for inclusion in the Western Hemisphere
Shorebird Reserve Network both for a wide range of shorebird species found
on migration and for the endangered Piping Plover, Charadrius melodus.
ALBERNI-CLAYOQUOT REGIONAL DISTRICT
R E G I O N A L PA R K S A N D T R A I L S M A S T E R P L A N
2000
The community of the Clayoquot Sound UNESCO Biosphere Reserve Region will
live sustainably in a healthy ecosystem, with a diversified economy and strong,
vibrant and united cultures while embracing the Nuu-chah–nulth First Nations
“living” philosophies of Iisaak (living respectfully), Qwa’ aak qin teechmis (life in
the balance), and Hishuk ish ts’awalk (everything is one and interconnected).
This vision was articulated to the CBT during
public consultations with the residents of the
Clayoquot Sound UNESCO Biosphere Reserve
Region Community in 2000.
2007
Ecological Integrity in the Core Areas of Clayoquot Sound Biosphere Reserve
and the Threat of Adjacent Land Use
Christie Morrison
MOUNT ARROWSMITH
2008
Establishing GLORIA Long-term Alpine Monitoring in Southwestern British Columbia, Canada (Survey done in 2006)
2007
Establishing the first Canadian sites of the Global Observation Research Initiative in Alpine environments (GLORIA) in southwestern BC
Kristina Swerhun1, Department of Geography,
University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia
V8N 3R4 Glen Jamieson, Mount Arrowsmith
Biosphere Foundation, P.O. Box 217, Parksville,
British Columbia V9P 2G4 Dan J. Smith, University of Victoria Tree-Ring Laboratory, Department of Geography, University of Victoria,
Victoria, British Columbia V8N 3R4 and Nancy
J. Turner, School of Environmental Studies,
University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia
V8W 2Y
Kristina Swerhun B.Sc., University of Victoria, 2007
GARRY OAK ECOSYSTEM PROTECTION
2005
Map of Garry Oak survey within the Port Alberni area
2008
Excel spreadsheet of Garry Oaks, location, diameter
McKENZIE SLOUGH
2005
Notes on status, desrcription etc.
(undeveloped 17 hectare (42.5 acre) parcel of land with approximately 990
metres (3,250 feet) of river frontage)
Rick and Libby Avis (see full report for more
details)
75
ALBERNI-CLAYOQUOT REGIONAL DISTRICT
R E G I O N A L PA R K S A N D T R A I L S M A S T E R P L A N
STAMP – SOMASS RIVER SYSTEM, ACCESS INVENTORY
19701980
No formal designation achieved, but MacMillan Bloedel unofficially designates
Johnstone Island as the “J.V. Clyne Bird Sanctuary”.
19801990
Two unsuccessful attempts made to have the estuary designated as an ecological reserve.
19902001
Vancouver Island Land Use Plan identifies the Somass Estuary as one of two
Goal 2 areas in the Alberni Valley.
2001
Purchase of 100 hectares in Somass Estuary by Pacific Estuary Conservation
Program & Ducks Unlimited
20012007
Somass Estuary Management Plan completed
2003
Stamp-Somass River Conservation Project (Put together as part of a proposal to Rick and Libby Avis
the Nature Trust of BC.)
2006
Biological Values of the Stamp-Somas River System
2006
Stamp- Somass River System Access Inventory
Alberni Valley Enhancement Association, Libby
and Rick Avis
2006
AVEA completes contract with the Ministry of Environment, identifying improved access opportunities on the river and conservation options.
Libby and Rick Avis
200607
construction of the Stamp Long River Anglers’ Trail and the Greenmax Trail
2007
Somass River Estuary Management Plan
2007
Discussions held between the Nature Trust, AVEA and Island Timberlands. Company subsequently decided not to proceed.
2007
Stamp River & wetlands - Nature Trust areas of interest
2013
Brief History of Recent Conservation Efforts on the Stamp-Somass River to 2007 Libby and Rick Avis
Somass Estuary Management Committee
Libby and Rick Avis
TRAILS
1995
76
Wild Side Trail-From Ahousaht Village a trail was used for centuries to reach the wild beaches on the west side of Flores Island. In
1995, under the guidance of the elders from Ahousaht Village, a 16 km trail was completed to restore this vital route. This was no easy
task considering the significant undergrowth that had developed over the years.
ALBERNI-CLAYOQUOT REGIONAL DISTRICT
R E G I O N A L PA R K S A N D T R A I L S M A S T E R P L A N
2001
Tofino Multi Use Trail- The multi-use path is a pave path running adjacent to the Pacific Rim Highway for approximately 6km. The path
is very well used and in 2001 and 2006 surveys noted that it is the most popular recreation facility in the District. Plan recommendation to encourage the development of the path through Pacific Rim National Park to connect to Ucluelet.
1999
The Wild Pacific Trail- the Clayoquot Biosphere Trust, the Creek Bed Foundation via Tides Canada, the National Trails Coalition, the
Government of B.C., the District of Ucluelet, the Wild Pacific Trail Society and private land owners such as Ocean West. The Wild
Pacific Trail began in 1999, with contributions from the Government of Canada, Western Economic Diversification Canada, Community
Futures Development Corp., Interfor, and Weyerhaeuser Co. Ltd.
2005
Trail list with preliminary ownership (needs to be reviewed) Libby Avis
2006
Alberni Valley Trails Planning Study - Established major trail corridors. Written by Friends of the Log Trail Trail, AV Outdoor Club, ACRD
2006
Alberni Valley Trail Guide (2nd edition) AV Outdoor Club, Alberni Environmental Coalition
2008
Provincially established trails in the ACRD (From Frank Ullmann- FLNRO, July 2008)
Note : Eligible for FIA funding
Lost Shoe (Ucluelet junction)
Canoe Creek (Kennedy River)
Bedwell River (Clayoquot Sound)
McKenzie Climbers Trail (Still useable?)
Fossili Access Trail
Gibson-Klitsa (Sutton Creek-Brigade Lake-and beyond)
Nahmint Lake (Blackie’s Beach)
Equine Loop on LTT
Wildside (on Flores Island)
Father and Son Lakes
Labour Day Lake
Stamp River (Greenmax)
2008
Port Alberni Forest Operations
Island Timberlands Limited Partnership
2010
The Wild Pacific Trail society is dedicated to the promotion, protection and expansion of a scenic network of walking trails that showcases the unique natural and cultural treasures of the Ucluelet peninsula
2010
Runners trail completed from Headquarters Bay on the Aberni Inlet to Francis Lake
2013
Alberni Inlet Trail - Phase 1 completed from City of Port Alberni to China Creek
ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
PUBLIC ADVISORY GROUP, Recreation Access Inventory (List of trails)
77
ALBERNI-CLAYOQUOT REGIONAL DISTRICT
R E G I O N A L PA R K S A N D T R A I L S M A S T E R P L A N
2011
Vancouver Island Spine Trail Association (VISTA) 5 year strategic plan
In 2012:
Build a coalition of support among local clubs and businesses to approach regional districts.
Propose endorsement of trail concept in all RD parks, BC Parks, and land-use plans and seek permission to consult on the route of
choice.
Launch a comprehensive youth program as part of the VI Spine Series, building upon success from “Mountaineering with Kids” in
2011. This program will educate through use of the VI Spine Trail, and through possible funding, will educate by trail building.
Propose endorsement of trail concept by all First Nations whose traditional territory overlaps. In 2013:
Negotiate a single macro route with land owners, regional districts, BC Parks and First Nations based on input provided during consultation
Revisit this strategic business plan, seek funding for further feasibility studies, micro- route selection and segments construction
where possible.
Support regional districts and BC Parks to complete engineering studies with route selection and bridge engineering, where required.
In 2014 and 2015:
Support construction of major segments, identify of suitable contractors, standards for trail design and use of volunteers.
Seek feature article about the VI Spine Trail in “Outdoor Magazine” based on construction of the VI Spine or involving a group of youth
travelling the entire distance of the Spine with support from skilled backcountry travellers. In 2016:
Complete construction of major segments of the VI Spine.
Fund raise for the provision of unified signage. Cooperate with regional districts, BC Parks, land owners and other coincidental trail
agencies.
Develop maps and facilitate completion of guidebook.
Seek additional opportunities for feature length media stories in magazines, TV, YouTube, national radio, etc. to promote the Spine
opening.
When trail is complete, launch VI Spine opening ceremony to correspond with the 2016 Series.
78
2013
The Runners Trail Completion Report to Island Coastal Econmic Trust City of Port Alberni- Tseshaht First Nation
2013
Alberni Inlet Trail - Phase 1 completed from City of Port Alberni to China Creek
110-5 Ganner Drive
Galiano Island, BC VON 1P0
Ph: (250) 539-3050
Draft Private Landowner's Agreement
Date:
Property owner(s), address:
Re: {Legal description and civic address) (the "Lands")
The Galiano Trails Society (the "Society") was incorporated on 16 July 2010 as a response to a desire by the
community to develop a system of trails for use by members of the community and by visitors to the area. The
Society is a non-profit organization.
In order to fulfil its objective of developing an integrated system of trails, the Society proposes to develop trails
on private lands and, specifically, we are requesting permission to develop a trail (the "Trail") on your property,
which are the Lands described above, in the location outlined on the attached map.
We ask that you agree to allow for the development, maintenance and use of the Trail on the Lands on the
following terms. If you consent, we ask you to sign the copy of this letter and return it to us. This will then
form the agreement (the "License") between you as the owner(s) of the lands and the Society pertaining to the
use of the Trail.
The Society's obligations
1. The Society will pay you the sum of $1 for entering into this License;
2. The Society will keep the Trail in a safe and clean condition;
3. The Society will improve and maintain the Trail at the Society's cost;
4. The Society will not remove any trees from the Lands without your permission;
5. The Society will post signs at its cost for the proper and safe use of the Trail and will remove such signs upon
the termination of this License;
6. The Society will not use chain saws and power equipment during periods of high fire risk;
7. The Society will obtain, pay for, and maintain in force, during the term of this agreement, a general liability
insurance policy with respect to the society's use and occupation of the Trail, and will name you as an
additional insured. This insurance policy will insure against bodily injury, including death, and property
damage arising out of such use and occupation of the Trail under the License.
8. The Society will indemnify and save you harmless against any and all claims (except those arising
from your own fault or negligence) including all damages, liabilities, expenses and costs arising
directly or indirectly from the granting of this License and the use and occupation of the Trail;
79
Appendix C - Sample Trails Access Agreement
The Galiano Trails Society
9. The Society will give you ninety (90) days written choice if the Society wishes to terminate this
license early and the License will then terminate at the end of such ninety day period. The Society
may terminate this license for any reason.
10. In the event that the insurance is allowed to lapse, this License will immediately
come to an end.
You agree:
11. You agree to grant to the Society the right to the use and occupation of the Trail on the Lands for
pedestrian use and hiking by the general public for a period of five (5) years from the date of this
agreement;
12. You agree to allow the Society to maintain and make such improvements to the Trail as the Society
considers necessary, subject to paragraphs 2 through 6 above. Such improvements and maintenance
will be done at the Society's cost;
13. You agree to allow the Society to post signs on the Lands informing the public as to proper and safe
use of the Trail, and to publish maps showing the Trail;
14. You agree to give the Society ninety (90) days written notice if you wish to terminate this License
early and the license will tehn terminate at the end of such ninety day period. You may terminate
this license for any reason.
15. You agree to inform the Society if you sell the Lands. This License will terminate automatically
upon completion of such sale unless renewed by the new owner.
The Galiano Trails Society
________________________________, Director
Name:
The foregoing is hereby agreed to this
day of
Name:
Witness:
Name:
Address:
80
, 2011.
COMMUNITY PROFILE
Appendix D - Community Profile
Appendix A
81
Yuuluilath
Uchucklesaht
Hesquiaht
Huuayaht
Tseshaht
Ahousaht
THE PEOPLE
PEOPLE
POPULATION: 31 061(2011)
GROWTH RATE: 1.3 % (20062011)
FIRST NATIONS COMMUNITIES: 10
82
Tofino
Ucluelet
Port Alberni
Bamfield
Dididaht
Hupacasath
bcstats.gov.bc.ca
Toquaht
URBAN POPULATIONS:
• Bamfield:155
• Tofino:1876
• Ucluelet:1627
• PortAlberni:17743
Tla-o-qui-aht
DWELLINGS OCCUPIED: 13 339
83
THE ECONOMY
ECONOMY
THE
The Alberni Valley’s forests consist
primarily of Douglas Fir, Hemlock, YellowCedarandWesternRedCedar.
Mostoftheoldgrowthforestshave
beenloggedwithcurrentlogging
comingfromsecondgrowthforests.A
large paper mill, Catalyst Paper, Port
AlberniDivisionsitsontheedgeofthe
Alberni Inlet. There is also a lumber mill,
AlberniPacificDivision,thatalsositson
theinlet.Severalsmallersawmillsexist
throughout the valley. Farming is also
practisedinthevalley.
Port Alberni also serves as a hub for
those travelling to the West Coast of
VancouverIsland,includingUcluelet,
TofinoandPacificRimNationalPark.As
commoditiestendtobemuchpricierin
theseremoteareas,campersandtravellersoftendotheirshoppinginPort
Alberni before continuing their journey.
Thishasresultedindevelopmentalong
theJohnstonRoad(Highway4)corridor,
includingseveralbigboxretailers,
grocerystoresandstripmalldevelopments. Previously, eco-tourism companies have set up shop in the Alberni
Valley,takingadvantageofthecity’s
locationonthefringeofwildernessyet
proximatelocationtoVancouverand
Victoria.Forexample,there’sakayaking,ATVtouring,awindsurfinganda
glidercompany.(L.Avis)
84
Tofinoconsistsofapproximately1,876
residentsonthewestcoastofVancouverIsland,inBritishColumbia,Canada,
locatedatthewesternterminusof
Highway4,onthetipoftheEsowista
Peninsula,atthesouthernedgeof
ClayoquotSound.Thesettlementof
Tofinotookplacein1909,inhonour
of1792SpanishcommandersGaliano
andValdés,cartographyinstructor
AdmiralVicenteTofiño.
Tranquil Ucluelet hasdramaticbackdropforworking,living,andrecreating. The town of Ucluelet offers
beaches,multi-usesportsfields,communityparks,waterfrontpromenades,
restaurants,uniqueshopsandgalleries,aminiaquariumandarangeof
accommodationchoices.Themottoof
Uclueletis“LivingontheEdge”duein
part to its location on a peninsula surroundedbywater.
Apopulartouristdestinationinthesummer,Tofino’spopulationswellstomany
timesitswintersize.Itattractssurfers,
nature lovers, campers, whale watchers,fishermen,oranyonejustlooking
to be close to nature. In the winter it is
not as bustling, although many people
visitTofinoandthewestcoasttowatch
stormsonthewater.ClosetoTofino
isLongBeach,ascenicandpopular
year-rounddestination,atthePacific
Rim National Park Reserve.
LocatedbesideLongBeachinBC’sPacificRimNationalParkReserve,people
cometoUclueletforsurfing,hiking,
kayaking,fishing,diving,camping,
whaleandbearwatching,beachcombingandstormwatching.
Asaresortcommunity,Tofinohasa
numberoffestivalsincluding;thePacificRimWhaleFestival,TofinoShorebird
Festival,TofinoFoodandWineFestival,
TofinoLanternFestival,“ArtintheGardens,”andtheO’NeillColdwaterSurf
Classic. The highlight of November is
the Clayoquot Oyster Festival.
TheWildPacificTrailisbecomingthe
focus of many Ucluelet vacations, with
itsuniqueshorelinetrailsandocean
vistas.ThePacificRimNationalPark
Reserveofferslongsandybeachesfor
picnicking,hiking,surfing,andother
water activities. The Kwisitis Visitor
Centrehaseducationalprogramsand
activities.TheBrokenGroupIslands,
aunitofthePacificRimNationalPark
Reserve,isaccessiblefromUclueletand
offersworldclasskayakinganddiving
opportunities. The town of Ucluelet itselfoffersspas,shopsandgalleries,as
wellasawaterfrontpromenadealong
theinnersideoftheUcluthPeninsula.
BamfieldwaspopulatedbyHuu-ay-ahtofthe
Nuu-chah-nulth,thelocalindigenouspeople.
Bamfieldwasnamedafterthefirstgovernment
agentofthearea,WilliamEddyBanfield.In
1902,theBamfieldcablestationwasconstructedasthewesternterminusofaworldwide
underseatelegraphcablecalledbysomethe
AllRedLineasitpassedonlythroughcountries
andterritoriescontrolledbytheBritishEmpire,
whichwerecolouredredonthemap.
AMarineandFisherieslifesavingstationon
thePacificcoastwasestablishedatBamfield
in1907.Itwasthefirstlifesavingstationon
Canada’sPacificCoast.In1953thecablewas
extendeduptheAlberniInlettoPortAlberni
andthelocalstationwasclosedonJune20,
1959.TheBamfieldMarineSciencesCentrebeganoperationsbytheendof1972.Itbecame
the largest employer in the community since.
CommercialfishingwasbasedinBamfieldup
tothemid-1980s.Bamfieldisalsothenorthern
terminus of the West Coast Trail, a hiking trail
builtin1907alongthewestcoastofVancouverIslandtohelpsurvivorsofthearea’smany
shipwrecksfindtheirwaybacktocivilization.
Thetrailruns77km(48mi)kilometresalong
extremelyruggedterrain.
TodayBamfieldisprimarilyatouristdestination,
either for the West Coast Trail, ocean kayakingorsportfishing.Theresearchactivitiesat
theBamfieldMarineSciencesCentreattracts
hundredsofresearcherseveryyearandoffers
crediteduniversitycoursesthroughitsfiveassociateduniversities.
BIOGEOCLIMATIC ZONES
BIOGEOCLIMATIC
ZONES
Biogeoclimatic zones are defined as “a geographic area having similar patterns of energy flow, vegetation and soils as a result of a broadly homogenous
macroclimate.”(for.gov.bc.ca)Biogeoclimaticzonessupportawidevarietyofwildlife,vegetationandtreespecies.TheACRDhostsseveralbiogeoclimaticzones,makingitoneofthemostecologicallydiverseregionaldistrictsintheprovince.Ofthe
14zonesrepresentedinBC,threearefoundintheACRD.
Alpine Tundra
Thiszoneistheharshestandleast-populatedbiozoneintheProvince.Itoccupiesthe
highelevationsofmountainousareas,andisespeciallycommonintheCoastRange.
Theterraininthiszoneisdominatedbyice,snow,rock,andglaciers.Climateisamajorbarriertolife;thegrowingseasonisextremelyshort.Meanaveragetemperature
usuallyrangesfrom0°C(32°F)to4°C(39°F),andeveninsummertheaverage
temperaturedoesnotexceed10°C(50°F).Thezoneseesheavyprecipitation,usuallyintheformofsnow.Treesarerarelyfoundinthiszone,andwhentheydogrow,
theytakethelow,sprawlingKrummholzform.Shrubsarecommon,especiallydwarf
evergreenspecies.Grasses,heath,andsedgesarealsopresent.Wetterareassee
alargervarietyofplantspecies.Higherelevationsareexclusivelytherealmofthe
lichens.Duetoitsharshwinters,fewanimalsliveinthezoneyear-round.However,in
thespring,summer,andfall,manyspeciesarefound.
AlpineTundra
Mountain Hemlock
Coastal Westerm Hemlock
85
Coastal Western Hemlock
The Western Hemlock, Tsuga heterophylla, is the dominant species on the west coast of
NorthAmerica.Alargetree,itusuallygrowsupto70meterstalland2.5metersindiameter.TheWesternHemlockcanbefoundreadilythroughouttheforestsinAlberta,British
Columbia,Alaska,Montana,Idaho,Washington,OregonandCaliforniabetweenthesea
levelandupto2000melevationincoastaltosub-alpineforests.Itisthedominantspecies within this range. In low elevation coastal forests on the west coast of North America,
itsharesdominancewiththeSpruce;intheslightlydrierwesternCascadeRangeitshares
dominancewiththeDouglas-fir.
TheclimateoftheregionwhereWesternHemlocksarelocatedischaracterizedbylong,
mild,andwetwinters,andrelativelysunnyanddrysummers.Duringwintertimethehemlockexperiencethemostgrowth.Especiallyonthecoast,wherewindscanreachsustained
speeds of above 100km/hour, the Hemlock have an advantage over the other shorter,
weakertreesbybeingabletobetterwithstandthemoreextremeclimates.ThemeanaveragetemperaturethroughoutWesternHemlock’srangeinBCisaround3-5degreescelsius.
Mountain Hemlock
TheMountainHemlock,Tsugamertensiana,isacloserelativeofthemoredominantWesternHemlock.Amedium-sizedtree,itusuallygrowsupto50meterstalland1.5metersin
diameteratthebase.NativetothewestcoastofNorthAmerica,thebarkofthemountain
hemlockisthinandgrayincolor.Itscrownisinaconicshapeinyoungtreesandgradually
takingonacylindricalshapeasthetreegrows.Itsneedlesaresoft,blunt-tipped,andslightlyflattened.Theconesaresmallbutlong.Themountainhemlockprefersopenconditions
withsufficientlight,anditcantoleratesevere,coldweatherbetterthanmanyotherspecies.
Themountainhemlockiswelladaptedtodealwithheavysnowfallandiceformations.The
Mountain Hemlock shares much territory with the Western Hemlock. In BC, mountain hemlockscanbefoundfromsealeveluptoabout1000mofelevation.Asthemountainhemlock
growstothetreelineonthecoastalmountainslopes,thebestplacetofinditspicturesque
qualities are in the high mountain areas.
86
ACRD SPECIES
AT RISK
SPECIES
AT RISK
BasedondatareceivedfromSpeciesatRisk,BCthefollowingspeciesarelistedasofconcern,threatened,endangered.
http://www.speciesatrisk.bc.ca/advancedsearch/?district=ACRD
Pearson,MikeandHealey,M.C.2012.SpeciesatRiskandLocalGovernment:aPrimerforBC.StewardshipCentreofBritishColumbia,CourtenayBC.
SUMMARY LIST FOR ACRD
NumberofSpecies
Mammals
Birds BreedingBirds Reptiles Amphibians
Fishes Insects Molluscs Vascular Plants
Mosses
Fungus
169
16
4
21
2
3
10
13
13
66
10
1
BCRedList
BC Blue List
IdentifiedWildlife
COSEWICEndangered COSEWICThreatened
COSEWIC Special Concern
SARASchedule1
ExtirpatedfomBC
Extinct Killer Whale photo: bing.com
47
110
14
12
16
21
40
0
0
Keen’sMyotisphoto:bing.com
MAMMALS
English Name
GreyWhale
HarbourPorpoise
Killer Whale
StellerSeaLion Vancouver Island
Wolverine
Killer Whale
Killer Whale
HumpbackWhale
Northern Fur Seal
Townsend’sBig-earedBat American Water Shrew
Keen’s Myotis
RooseveltElk
Wolverine
Ermine, Anguinae Subspecies
Scientific Name
COSEWIC
Eschrichtiusrobustus
SpecialConcern
Phocoenaphocoena
SpecialConcern
Orcinus orca pop. 5
Endangered
Eumetopiasjubatus
SpecialConcern
Marmot Marmota vancouverensis Endangered
Gulo gulo vancouverensis
Special Concern
Orcinus orca pop. 6
Threatened
Orcinus orca pop. 3
Threatened
Megapteranovaeangliae SpecialConcern
Callorhinus ursinus
Threatened
Corynorhinustownsendii None Sorex palustris brooksi
None
Myotis keenii
Data Deficient
Cervuscanadensisroosevelti
None Gulo gulo
Special Concern
Mustela erminea anguinae
None
SARA
Schedule1
Schedule1
Schedule 1
Schedule1
Schedule 1
None
Schedule 1
Schedule 1
Schedule1
None
None None
Schedule 3
None None
None
BC Status
Blue
Blue
Red
Blue
Red
Red
Red
Red
Blue
Red
Blue
Red
Red
Blue
None
Blue
Northern Fur Seal photo: bing.com
87
Wolverine photo: bing.com
BIRDS
English Name
Pink-footedShearwater
Short-tailed Albatross
Black-footedAlbatross
Laysan Albatross
Scientific Name
Puffinuscreatopus Phoebastria albatrus
Phoebastrianigripes
Phoebastria immutabilis
COSEWIC
Threatened
Threatened
SpecialConcern
None
SARA
Schedule1
Schedule 1
Schedule1
None
BC Status
Blue
Red
Blue
Red
BREEDING BIRDS
English Name
GreatBlueHeron MarbledMurrelet Northern Goshawk
WesternScreechOwl
Red Knot
PeregrineFalcon CommonNighthawk
CaspianTern
BarnSwallow
Olive-sidedflycatcher
Band-tailedpigeon
GreenHeron
Brandt’s Cormorant
NorthernPygmy-Owl
SootyGrouse
TuftedPuffin
White-tailedPtarmigan
Cassin’sAuklet
Common Murre
Scientific Name
Ardeaherodiasfannini
Brachyramphusmarmoratus Accipiter gentilis laingi
Megascopskennicottiikennicottii
Calidris canutus
Falcoperegrinuspealei
Chordeilesminor Hydroprognecaspia
Hirundorustica
Contopuscooperi Patagioenasfasciata
Butoridesvirescens Phalacrocorax penicillatus
Glaucidiumgnomaswarthi Dendragapusfuliginosus
Fraterculacirrhata Lagopusleucurasaxatilis
Ptychoramphusaleuticus
Uria aalge
COSEWIC
SpecialConcern Threatened
Threatened
Threatened
Endangered
SpecialConcern Threatened
NotatRisk
Threatened
Threatened
SpecialConcern None
None
None
None
None
None
CandidateforListing
None
SARA
Schedule1
Schedule1
Schedule 1
Schedule1
Schedule 1
Schedule1
Schedule1
None
None
Schedule1
Schedule1
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Scientific Name
Chrysemys picta pop. 1
Dermochelys coriacea
COSEWIC
Endangered
Endangered
SARA
Schedule 1
Schedule 1
BC Status
Blue
Blue
Red
Blue
Red
Blue
Yellow
Blue
Blue
Blue
Blue
Blue
Red
Blue
Blue
Blue
Blue
Blue
Red
ShortTailedAlbatrossphoto:bing.com
WesternPaintedTurtlephoto:bing.com
REPTILES
English Name
Western Painted Turtle
Leatherback Turtle
BC Status
Red
Red
Common Murre photo: bing.com
AMPHIBIANS
English Name
NorthernRed-leggedFrog
WesternToad
WanderingSalamander
Scientific Name
Ranaaurora
Anaxyrusboreas Aneidesvagrans COSEWIC
SpecialConcern
SpecialConcern
None
COSEWIC
Special Concern
Endangered
Endangered
SpecialConcern
SpecialConcern
SARA
Schedule1
Schedule1
None
SARA
Schedule 1
None
Schedule1
Schedule1
None
BC Status
Blue
Blue
Blue
BC Status
Red
Yellow
None
None
None
FISHES
English Name
Scientific Name
Green Sturgeon
Acipenser medirostris
Coho Salmon (interior Fraser populations)Oncorhynchus kisutch
BaskingShark
Cetorhinusmaximus
Rougheyerockfish Sebastesaleutianus
YelloweyeRockfish Sebastesruberrimus
88
Green Sturgeon photo: bing.com
Insects
English Name
DunSkipper
Monarch
BlueDasher
AutumnMeadowhawk
Edwards’ Beach Moth
QuatsinoCaveAmphipod WesternPineElfin,
Johnson’s Hairstreak
Common Woodnymph,
WesternBrandedSkipper,
Phoebus’Parnassian,
Boisduval’sBlue, Zerene Fritillary,
Scientific Name
Euphyesvestris Danausplexippus
Pachydiplaxlongipennis Sympetrumvicinum
Anarta edwardsii
Stygobromusquatsinensis Callophryseryphonsheltonensis
Callophrys johnsoni
Cercyonis pegala incana
Hesperiacoloradooregonia
Parnassiussmintheusolympiannus
Plebejusicarioidesblackmorei
Speyeria zerene bremnerii
COSEWIC
Threatened
SpecialConcern None None Endangered
None None None
None
CandidateforListing
None None None
SARA
Schedule1
Schedule1
None None Schedule 1
None None None
None
None None None None
Scientific Name
Hemphillia dromedarius
Haliotis kamtschatkana
Ostreaconchaphila
Hemphilliaglandulosa
Pristilomajohnsoni
Prophysaonvanattae
Carychiumoccidentale
Monadeniafidelis
Zonitoidesnitidus Fossaria vancouverensis
Deroceras hesperium
Nearctula sp. 1
Promenetus umbilicatellus
COSEWIC
Threatened
Threatened
SpecialConcern
SpecialConcern
None None None None None None
Data Deficient
Special Concern
None
SARA
Schedule 1
Schedule 1
Schedule1
Schedule1
None None None None None None
None
Schedule 1
None
BC Status
Blue
Blue
Blue
Blue
Red
Blue
Blue
Red
Red
Blue
Blue
Blue
Red
CommonWoodnymphphoto:bing.com
Molluscs
English Name
Dromedary Jumping-slug
Northern Abalone
OlympiaOyster WartyJumping-slug
BroadwhorlTightcoil
ScarletbackTaildropper WesternThorn PacificSideband BlackGloss
Fossaria Species 1
Evening Fieldslug
Threaded Vertigo
Umbilicate Sprite
BC Status
Red
Red
Blue
Blue
Blue
Blue
Blue
Blue
Blue
Red
Red
Red
Blue
DromedaryJumpingSlugphoto:bing.com
Northern Abalone photo: bing.com
Vascular Plants
English Name
Short-tailed rush
Knotgrass
Pink Sand-verbena
White Meconella
White-top Aster
Tall Woolly-heads
Cup Clover
AngledBitterCress
Scientific Name
Juncus brevicaudatus
Paspalum
Abronia umbellata var. breviflora
Meconella oregana
Sericocarpus rigidus
Psilocarphus elatior
Trifolium Cyathifernum
Cardamineangulata
COSEWIC
None
None
Endangered
Endangered
Special Concern
Endangered
None
None SARA
None
None
Schedule 1
Schedule 1
Schedule 1
Schedule 1
None
None BC Status
Red
Red
Red
Red
Red
Red
Red
Blue
White Meconella photo: bing.com
89
Small Headed Tarweed
White Lip Rein Orchid
Owyhee Mudwort
Chairmaker’s Bulrush
CaliforniaWax-myrtle
Waterwort Water-milfoil
NorthernAdder’s-tongue
RedwoodSorrel Fringed Pinesap
BlackKnotweed Smith’sFairybells Oregon Selaginella
Graceful Arrow-grass
Howell’sViolet Hemizonella minima
Piperia candida
Limosella acaulis
Schoenoplectus americanus
Myricacalifornica
Myriophyllum quitense
Ophioglossumpusillum
Oxalisoregana Pleuricospora fimbriolata
Polygonumparonychia
Prosartessmithii Selaginella oregana
Triglochin concinna
Violahowellii
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Scientific Name
Dicranodontiumasperulum
Diphyscium foliosum
Ditrichum schimperi
Epipterygiumtozeri
Orthotrichum rivulare
Platyhypnidiumriparioides
Pohlia pacifica
Pohlia sphagnicola
Sphagnum subobesum
Trichostomum crispulum
COSEWIC
None None
None
None None
None None
None
None
None
Scientific Name
Leiodermasorediatum
COSEWIC
None None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Red
Red
Red
Red
Blue
Blue
Blue
Blue
Red
Blue
Blue
Red
Red
Blue
Fringedpinesapphoto:bing.com
Mosses
English Name
LacksaCommonName Lacks a Common Name
Lacks a Common Name
LacksaCommonName Lacks a Common Name
LacksaCommonName Lacks a Common Name
Lacks a Common Name
Lacks a Common Name
Lacks a Common Name
SARA
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
BC Status
Blue
Blue
Blue
Blue
Blue
Blue
Red
Blue
Blue
Blue
Oregon Selaginella photo: bing.com
Fungus
English Name
Feltedelf
90
SARA
None
BC Status
Blue
PinkSandverbenaphoto:bing.com
PohliaPacificaphoto:bing.com
Appendix E - Public Engagement Report
REGIONAL PARKS AND TRAILS MASTER PLAN
A news publication by Valhalla Trails Ltd.
REPORT
Winter 2013
Regional Parks and Trail Plan, a first for the ACRD The Alberni Clayoquot Regional District (ACRD) is undergoing its first Regional Parks and Trail planning process. Mid 2013, the regional district issued a request for proposals and Valhalla Trails Ltd. was selected to lead the project in partnership with ACRD staff and sub consulting firm Landworks LLC. The idea for the project was initially craft‐ ed in the 2008 Regional Parks and Trails Policy Report. This important document sets the foundation for the new plan and has helped to determine some of the key goals which include: • an overall vision and plan for regional parks and trails within the ACRD • a plan that meets the unique needs of the entire ACRD and its varying communities • to ensure that the regional parks service benefits all residents of the ACRD • to ensure local community and govern‐ ment involvement and leadership • to provide an implementation strategy to support and enhance a competitive, sustainable (economically, environmentally and socially) regional parks service VTL’s Planning Director, Danica Rice plans to involve the community as much as they are willing to create a solid vision for the future of regional parks and trails within the expansive ACRD. The regional district includes 30,664 (2006 census) residents and covers 6,596.58 km2 (2,546.95 sq mi). The aim will be to define a vision that re‐ flects the broad interests of the entire community and to determine appropriate and realistic courses of action for future regional parks, protected areas and trails. THIS ISSUE PAGE 2 Volunteer Committee Members Community Engagement 3‐13 Fall Community Workshop Results CONTACT Danica Rice, MCIP, RPP Planning Director Valhalla Trails Ltd. 250‐710‐9822 [email protected] • to provide recommendations for policies for management and to develop existing and future regional parks • to develop alternatives for managing recreation resources in partnership with land owners, outdoors groups and First Nations. 91
Volunteer Committee Members To ensure transparency and a democratic approach for the project, the ACRD has established a volunteer Parks and Trail Plan Committee. This valuable group rep‐ resents a wide spectrum of interests, with members representing all reaches of the district. To date, the committee has been instrumental in steering the process and in helping to spread the word for gaining public support and key ideas. Over the next few months, members will play an im‐ portant role ensuring that the interests of the public are addressed in the plan. The Community Engagement committee members include: 1. Anne Stewart, Bamfield 2. Barb Baker, Alberni Valley 3. Brian Callender, Alberni Valley 4. Carlos Mack, Toquaht 5. Charlie Clappis, Huu‐ay‐aht 6. Charlie Cootes, Uchucklesaht 7. Emma Neill, Tofino 8. Harold Carlsson, Alberni Valley 9. Jackie Chambers, Alberni Valley 10. Jeff Cook, Huu‐ay‐aht 11. Jack Thompson, Dididaht 12. John Jack, Huu‐ay‐aht 13. Jolleen Dick, Hupacasath 14. Judy Carlsson, Alberni Valley 15. Karla Robison, Ucluelet 16. Larry Baird, Yuułuʔiłʔatḥ 17. Libby Avis, Alberni Valley 18. Monty Horton, Uchucklesaht 19. Richard Kudra, Alberni Valley 20. Sarah Robinson, Toquaht 21. Sandy McRuer, Alberni Valley 22. Tara Atleo, Wild Pacific Trail 23. Tyson Atleo, Ahousaht To date, five community engagement events have been held across the region. In the fall of 2013, a Forestry Day event was held in Port Alberni, followed by four open houses in each of the main popula‐ tion centers of the regional district. These included Bamfield, Port Alberni, Tofino and Ucluelet. All of the open houses were ad‐ vertised in local newspapers and on the ACRD website. Where possible, social me‐ dia was used to inform residents about the project and to encourage them to come and provide their input. More than 117 people participated in the open houses. Participants were asked to provide their ideas on a number of top‐ Lastly, participants were asked to “wish upon a leaf ” in order to provide their most important ideas to the project. REGIONAL PARKS AND TRAILS MASTER PLAN
REGIONAL PARKS AND TRAILS MASTER PLAN
1. PLACES THAT I WOULD LIKE TO SEE PROTECTED AS REGIONAL PARK INCLUDE: 4. A GOOD REGIONAL TOURISM EXPERIENCE WOULD BE: EXISTING ACRD REGIONAL PARKS AND TRAILS ALBERNI INLET TRAIL MT. ARROWSMITH MASSIF LOG TRAIN TRAIL The ACRD also owns several small parcels throughout the region that serve as local parks, trail linkages, beach accesses etc. PARKS AND TRAILS AREAS OF INTEREST PLACES THAT HAVE VALUE TO ME THAT I
WOULD LIKE TO SEE PROTECTED INCLUDE:
3. MY FAVOURITE OUTDOOR ACTIVITY IS: HIKING BIKING KAYAKING MOUNTAIN BIKING SWIMMING PROTECTION CELEBRATION ACQUISITION TOURISM MONITORING SURFING 6. I WOULD SUPPORT AN INCREASE IN TAXATION TO PROTECT AND ACQUIRE PARKLANDS AND TO IMPROVE THE ACRD PARKS SYSTEM. (CURRENTLY, THERE IS NO TAX IN PLACE FOR PARK LAND DEDICATION OR IM‐ PROVEMENT.) AMOUNT per CHECK TO VOTE $10.00 SAILING $20.00 CANOEING 5. CONCERNS I HAVE ABOUT REGIONAL PARKS AND TRAILS INCLUDE: CAMPING $50.00 $100.00 HUNTING BIRD WATCHING SUPPORT HORSEBACK RIDING ACRD COMMUNITY PROTECTION LEGAL ACCESS ACRD STEWARDSHIP TRANSPORTATION RECREATION WHAT IS YOUR VISION LOCAL PUBLICAGENCIES GOVERNMENT
USERS SUSTAINABILITY
OUR PUBLIC PROCESS COMMUNITY PRIVATELAND FIRSTNATIONS
OWNERS TELL US WHAT YOU THINK! 92
• Places that I would like to see protect‐ ed as regional park include: • A good regional trail connection would be: • My favourite outdoor activity is: • A good regional tourism experience would be: • Concerns I have about regional parks and trails include: • I would support an X amount ($10.00. $20.00, $50.00, $100.00) increase in taxation to protect and acquire park‐ land and to improve the ACRD park system • General ideas and open comments ALBERNI-CLAYOQUOT REGIONAL DISTRICT
2. A GOOD REGIONAL TRAIL CONNECTION WOULD BE: ALBERNI-CLAYOQUOT REGIONAL DISTRICT
REGIONAL PARKS AND TRAILS MASTER PLAN
Secondly, participants were asked to write on large scale posters to comment on a range of topics related to the project. These included the following thought pro‐ voking phrases: ALBERNI-CLAYOQUOT REGIONAL DISTRICT
The ACRD is undergoing a regional parks and trail plan for the entire regional district which spans from Mt. Arrowsmith to the West Coast and from Bamfield up to Strathcona Park. ics related to parks and trails. Three main exercises were offered. These included a large scale map to help illustrate the scale of the district and to help people to identify places that might be protected or designated as significant to future regional parks or trails. GENERAL IDEAS OR COMMENTS: SKI TOURING SKIING TRAIL RUNNING WISH UPON A LEAF What are your hopes and concerns for parks and trails in the ACRD EVERYBODY NEEDS PARKS AND TRAILS Open House Results REGIONAL TRAIL CONNECTIONS The results of the engagement process are provided in this section. Please note that minimal editing has taken place in order to preserve the tone and content provided by the public. Bamfield Bamfield • • PLACES TO PROTECT AS A REGIONAL PARK • • • • • Bamfield • Sarita river and lake • no logging or hydro dams • freshwater recreation i.e Sarita and Pachena lake • Deer group islands: Edward, King Fleming, etc. • places that would also work as re‐ gional parks with Huuayaht First Na‐ tion (such as Ross islets for paddling) Port Alberni • • • • • • • • Tofino • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Meconella Bluff ex‐Boy Scout access trail Mclaughland watershed VIP (yes!) Cold creek trails and falls trails to Arrowsmith, Cokely (Gully etc) Nahmint/ 5040 / Jack’s Peak/ Mt. Ad‐ der / Klitsa Inlet (CNPR) Trail, PA to Headquarters Inlet Trail continue to Bamfield Cougar Annie’s garden (+6) wild fish routes‐ habitat, salmon, stone fish, black cod, ling etc. Tofino Mudflats (+5) last stand of old growth (+3) animal migration routes (+2) intact ancient forests (+2) Virgin Falls Mount Pogo shore bird areas where feed and float Lone Cone trail and lookout more marine protected areas and fish sanctuaries buy Cannery Bay Pretty Girl‐intact wilderness gem Satchey Creek river corridors and connections to the ocean connect the parks with wildlife and ecosystem corridors (Sydney PP must include lower river valley) Ucluelet • • Port Alberni • • • • • • Inlet trail to Cowichan trail system Horne Lake access Cameron Lake railway, Parksville to
Port Alberni Log Train, Anglers Trail, Greenmax Traditional First Nations trails Horne Lake linking to coasts community forest to Taylor Arm fire trail and Doran Lake Tofino • • • • • • • • • Tofino to Ukee (+2) Bedwell sound to Della Falls (with ac‐ cess to bedwell trail from inlet) Tofino to Ucluelet via PRNP (+ 4) West coast trail‐ telegraph trail (Bamfield to Ucluelet)‐ Wild Pacific trail‐ Tofino Clayoquot Witness trail to Alberni Valley (+2) Pioneer Walk (Ucluelet to Tofino via Florencia and Long beaches) hiking trail with campsites around Meares island Bedwell to Strathcona Lodge, maybe connect to Della Falls Mt Adder and Sutton Pass need to be kept open in the winter months for skiers • • • • • • • • • • • • Sarita Falls Pachena Lake D.O.V Trails (Wild Pacific trail connect to National Park) seniors boardwalk trail connecting new seniors housing old wagon trails could be horse trails connecting Cowichan to Port Alberni and the coast A trail along the whole coast, Port Al‐ berni to Tofino (parts of it exist now) hiking/boat tours with info about local ecosystems / animals / history rock climbing crags salmon snorkeling at Sarita and Nitnat surf tours by boat stand up paddle (marine and local lakes) sustainable, enjoyable more signed trail head loops seeing a multi use trail joining Anacla and Bamfield Port Alberni • hiking and scenic views • consistently managed and promoted • Stukes canyon to Rogers Creek • promote Log Train trail for tourists (big
race) (yes) • waterfront hotel and boardwalk • more council attention focused on out‐ door recreation tourism promotion Tofino • multi‐day kayaking with campsites (similar to Broken Islands) (+6) • Better access for bird viewing (i.e Tofino mudflats) (+3) • River trip on Lower Kennedy River(+3) • Swimming in Upper Kennedy River • Activities for tourists and get away places for locals • Less development‐ more resources for education...for everything (+1) • a kayaking, marine trail with designated improved campsites (+3) • Sydney Valley sleep over • good views of our own beautiful water, beach, mountain, forest, etc. • guided adventures to tell history and info on areas • ungulate studies and west coast wilder‐ ness education center Ucluelet Ucluelet • Bamfield/Anacla parks to road to port Alberni (x 5 checks) also on old Tele‐ graph trail but connect with above far end or clear out at Pachena end Pachena‐Keeha‐Bamfield Grappler too Binnad trail (not clear) Safety: John mass donation Huuayaht projects list Old life saving/ lighthouse trails with cooperation of Parks Canada and Huuayaht First Nation REGIONAL TOURISM EXPERIENCES • • • • • naturally protected areas (habitat for wildlife) being disrupted garbage from human activity (what you pack in, pack out, take only pictures, leave only footprints) protection of watersheds trees‐ build build the trail without cutting down any home to many species boardwalks, protect the forest floor 93
Appendix F - Parks and Trails Policy Matrix
DOCUMENT LGA RURAL AREAS (B, D, E and F) OCPS Ba = Bamfield, Be = Beaufort, BC = Beaver Creek, CC = Cherry Creek, LB = Long Beach, PA = Port Alberni, SL = Sproat Lake, To = Tofino, Uc = Ucluelet SUBJECT REFERENCE PARK TRAIL
GENERAL LAND USE
AREA (Objectives/policies) (Objectives/policies) (Objectives/policies) OCP must include: s.877 (1) b, b) Approximate location and type of d) restrictions on the use of land that is subject to hazardous d, f present and proposed public facilities conditions or that is environmentally sensitive to development parks including...parks… f) Recreational and public utility land use environmental protection recreational use s.877 (3) Targets for the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) climate emissions in the area covered by the plan, and change policies and actions of the local governmental proposed with respect to achieving those targets COMMUNITY GOALS social growth economic growth environmental protection viable agricultural industry healthy lifestyle preserve rural character General Planning Be 3.0 …enhance the integrity of environmental, social, economic, Objectives BC 3.0 cultural and recreational values of the Plan area as development CC 3.0 occurs. SL 3.0 Ba 3.2.1 Sustainability principles and best practices in all aspects of land Be 3.1.1 use planning, development and management BC 3.1.1 CC 3.1.1 SL 3.1.1 Ba 3.2.2. Minimize the potential for land use conflict and danger from Be 3.1.2 natural hazards BC 3.1.2 CC 3.1.2 SL 3.1.2 Be 3.1.3 Support public access to all water features
BC 3.1.3 CC 3.1.3 SL 3.1.3 Ba 3.2.4 Facilitate a wide variety of opportunities for economic activity and Be 3.1.4 employment within the Plan area BC 3.1.4 CC 3.1.4 SL 3.1.4 General Ba 3.3.2 Preserve/consider the integrity of the natural environment and Planning Be 3.2.1 the protection of residents and the built environment in all Policies BC 3.2.1 planning and development matters. CC 3.2.1 SL 3.2.1 94
1 Agricultural Use Policies Commercial Use Objective Commercial Use Policy Rural Use Objective Parks and Recreation Use Objectives Ba 3.3.8 Be 3.2.5 BC 3.2.4 CC 3.2.6 SL 3.2.6 Be 3.2.6 BC 3.2.5 CC 3.2.7 SL 3.2.5 Ba 3.3.17 Be 3.2.10 BC 3.2.9 CC 3.2.11 SL 3.2.10 Ba 3.3.17 Be 3.2.11 BC 3.2.10 CC 3.2.12 SL 3.2.11 Ba 3.3.22 Be 3.2.18 BC 3.2.20 CC 3.2.19 SL 3.2.19 Ba 3.3.34 Be 3.2.19 BC 3.2.21 CC 3.2.20 SL 3.2.20 Be 4.2.5 BC 4.2.5 CC 4.2.5 SL 4.2.5 Be 7.1.2 BC 5.1.2 CC 7.1.3 Be 7.2.1 BC 5.2.4 CC 7.2.6 SL 8.2.6 Be 8.1.1 BC 7.1.1 CC 8.1.1 SL 9.1.1 Be 10.1.1 BC 11.1.1 CC 12.1.1 SL 17.1.1 Be 10.1.2 BC 11.1.2 CC 12.1.2 SL 17.1.2 Be 10.1.3 Require a treed and vegetated buffer between agricultural land and non agricultural development …(BC) Guide to Edge Planning Acquire public access to water bodies as parkland dedications through the subdivision process where feasible… Recognize/permit parks, trails, roads and utilities in all designations as specified by the zoning bylaw. Consider temporary use permits within all land use designations, in accordance with section 921 of the LGA Encourage land‐use patterns that do not compromise the ecological integrity and rural character of the plan area. Encourage development and accompanying road systems to be constructed in a manner in keeping with the natural environment Encourage the interim use of agricultural lands for forestry, silviculture, open space and recreational uses that will not impair the future agricultural viability of those lands. Encourage tourism and other economic development opportunities Work with the Economic Development Office to promote economic development, tourism and recreational opportunities Maintain the predominantly rural character of this area.
Develop an integrated network of multi‐use trails within the plan area to connect with trails in adjacent areas. Encourage the provision of public access to lakes and rivers. Facilitate the development of a range of Facilitate the development of a range of parks and 95
2 Parks and Recreation Use Policies Heritage and Culture Objective Heritage and Culture Policies 96
BC 11.1.3 CC 12.1.3 SL 17.1.3 Be 10.1.4 BC 11.1.4 CC 12.1.4 SL 17.1.4 Be 10.2.1 BC 11.2.1 CC 12.2.1 SL 17.2.1 Be 10.2.2 BC 11.2.2 CC 12.2.2 SL 17.2.2 Be 10.2.4 BC 11.2.4 CC 12.2.4 SL 17.2.3 parks and trails.
Be 10.2.5 BC 11.2.5 CC 12.2.5 Be 10.2.6 BC 11.2.6 CC 12.2.6 SL 17.2.7 Ba 3.3.9 Be 10.2.7 BC 11.2.7 CC 12.2.7 SL 17.2.8 Require parkland dedication … where it meets stated parkland planning objectives/goals for the area or where indicated with a “P” on Map No. 2 and only consider cash in lieu of parkland where the provision of land for a park is not ideal. Be 12.2.9 BC 13.2.8 CC 14.2.12 SL 14.2.11 Be 11.1.1 BC 12.1.1 CC 13.1.1 SL 16.1.1 Be 11.2.2 BC 12.2.2 CC 13.2.2 SL 16.2.2 Be 11.2.3 BC 12.2.3 CC 13.2.3 SL 16.2.3 trails.
Incorporate environmental protection in park design, management and use. Work with the City of Port Alberni, the provincial government, private land owners and local residents to develop a comprehensive trail network. Pursue the incorporation of multi‐use paths along major roads within the community … Through the subdivision process, collaborate with the Approving Officer to obtain public access to the foreshore and to streams where appropriate, through dedication in accordance with Section 941 of the LGA. Identify, improve and provide signage for appropriate public accesses to the foreshore and streams within those rights‐of‐way for which a licence or permit has been obtained from the relevant ministry or property owner. Ensure that any trail within the ALR has, in addition to the land owner’s permission, the approval of the ALC and is designed in accordance with the specifications in A Guide to Using and Developing Trails in Farm and Ranch Areas. Encourage subdivision applicants to take into account the future development and maintenance of multi‐use paths and trails as part of the transportation system. Identify, protect and conserve archaeological and historical sites within the Plan area. Support the identification, protection and conservation of archaeological sites and features. Encourage private land owners and developers to respect archaeological features when discovered and identified. 3 Infrastructure Objective Infrastructure Policies Natural Environment & Conservation Objectives Natural Environment & Conservation Policies Be 12.1.3 BC 13.1.3 CC 14.1.3 SL 14.1.3 Be 12.2.1 BC 13.2.1 CC 14.2.1 SL 14.2.1 Provide an efficient transportation network that emphasizes non‐motorized alternatives to the motor vehicle. Be 12.2.2 BC 13.2.2 CC 14.2.2 SL 14.2.2 Be 12.2.6 BC 13.2.6 CC 14.2.7 SL 14.2.6 Be 12.2.8 BC 13.2.7 CC 14.2.8 SL 14.2.9 Be 13.1.1 BC 14.1.1 CC 15.1.1 SL 19.1.1 Be 13.1.2 BC 14.1.2 CC 15.1.2 SL 19.1.2 Be 13.1.3 BC 14.1.3 CC 15.1.3 SL 19.1.3 Be 13.1.4 BC 14.1.4 CC 15.1.4 SL 19.1.4 Ba 6.2.2 Be 13.2.2 BC 14.2.2 CC 15.2.2 SL 19.2.2 Be 13.2.5 BC 14.2.5 CC 15.2.5 SL 19.2.5 Ba 5.2.1 Be 13.2.6 BC 14.2.6 CC 15.2.6 SL 19.2.6 Be 13.2.7 BC 14.2.7 Work with residents, relevant provincial ministries, the City of Port Alberni and neighbouring jurisdictions to develop a logical, efficient and neighbourhood‐sensitive transportation network plan. Work with residents, land owners, provincial ministries and community groups, to develop safe roadside pathways and trails that parallel roads with heavy traffic. Support necessary future road development that incorporates roadside trails. Encourage the cost‐sharing of new infrastructure systems with adjacent local governments and provincial agencies to promote greater efficiency. Support the protection of environmentally‐sensitive areas and species at risk. Support the protection of the quality of surface and ground
water, fish habitat, and wetlands. Minimize opportunities for human‐wildlife conflicts.
Facilitate the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.
Protect known sensitive ecosystems, wildlife and wildfowl habitat, and environmentally‐sensitive areas. Support adherence to Bear Smart Community guidelines on the website in order to minimize human/bear conflicts. Seek guidance and financial assistance from senior governments for help in implementing its greenhouse gas emission reduction targets and policies. Discourage development in hazardous areas, including on or in close proximity to steep slopes (30% or greater), lands prone to 97
4 Be, BC, CC and SL GHG Reduction Action #1 AREA A OCP BAM‐FIELD flooding, or lands susceptible to slumping.
Encourage the use of Conservation Data Centre mapping to identify the existence of any species at risk in order to protect them when planning and implementing development plans. Ba 3.2.3 Ba 3.2.5 Ba 3.2.8 General Planning Policies Ba 3.3.9 Ba 3.3.10 Develop a range of parks and trails.
Preserve or obtain public access to the waterfront, in the form of trails, public parklands, easements over private lands, or any other mechanism that ensures that the waterfront can be reached by citizens at defined, accessible, and well‐distributed points. Require parkland dedication through the subdivision process where it meets stated parkland planning objectives/ goals for the area and cash in lieu of parkland where it does not. Ba 5.1.1 Ba 5.1.3 Ba 5.2.3 Support the development of a community compost area to create compost that could be used by citizens or in park spaces, potentially near the community landfill. 98
Encourage the use of non‐motorized forms of transportation such as walking and bicycling and the use of public transit, car‐pooling and ride‐
sharing to minimize greenhouse gas emission. Encourage the retention of natural vegetation for carbon
sequestration. Sustainability Policies Encourage the installation of bike racks at any commercial
establishment developed in the Plan area. Be, BC, CC and SL GHG Reduction Action #3 General Planning Objectives Sustainability Objectives CC 15.2.8 SL 19.2.9 Be 13.2.8 BC 14.2.8 CC 15.2.9 SL 19.2.10 Ba 5.2.8 Be 13.2.9 BC 14.2.9 CC 15.2.10 SL 19.2.11 Be 13.2.13 BC 14.2.13 CC 15.2.14 SL 19.2.15 Be 13.2.15 BC 14.2.15 CC 15.2.16 SL 19.2.18 The Regional District will build or assist in building, acquire, provide or otherwise encourage through development approvals not less than one kilometre of pathway or trail per year within the Plan area. The Regional District will work with the Trails Committee to develop a valley‐wide trails network. Retain public access to all water features.
Develop a range of parks and trails. Preserve or obtain public access to the waterfront, in the form of trails, public parklands, easements over private lands, or any other mechanism that ensures that the waterfront can be reached by citizens at defined, accessible, and well‐distributed points. Acquire and ensure public access to water bodies through the subdivision process where feasible. Live lightly on the landscape by employing thinking about sustainability in forestry, fishing, tourism, recreation, food production and residential life. Reduce greenhouse gas emissions through personal and community initiatives. 5 Ba 5.2.7 Ba 5.2.17 GHG Reduction Action #2 Natural Environment Objectives Ba 6.1.1 Ba 6.1.3 Ba 6.1.5 Ba 6.1.13 Ba 6.1.14 Ba 6.1.15 Ba 6.2.1 Ba 6.2.11 Ba 6.2.12 Ba 6.2.14 Eelgrass Protection Objective Ba 6.3.1 Eelgrass Protection Policies Ba 6.4.1 Ba 6.4.5 Infrastructure Objective Ba 7.1.8 Heritage and Culture Objective Ba 8.1.3 To encourage the recognition, protection and preservation of heritage features and sites and specifically the Natural Environment Policies Encourage the installation of bike racks at key locations in the Plan area, including commercial enterprises. Increase walkability by expanding the waterfront trail system. The RD will build or assist in building not less than one kilometre of pathway or trail per year in the Bam‐field/Anacla area. A priority will be a path connecting Bamfield and Anacla. Protect environmentally sensitive features and areas in recognition of their importance to environmental quality and benefits they provide to the local economies of Bamfield and Anacla … Protect surface water and riparian areas for fish habitat and other wildlife values. Protect the foreshore areas as important habitat for fish and wild‐
life and for the future prosperity of local residents. Maintain the public’s use and access to these important recreation areas in a manner that does not compromise the ecological integrity of the shoreline or pub users at undue risk. Recognize the need for public access to marine shorelands and foreshore areas and the development of community greenways throughout the community of Bamfield. Balance development opportune‐ties with the ecological conserva‐tion of the shoreline environment. Protect the environmental integrity of natural resources including lakes, wetlands, rivers and streams. The ACRD will support means by which ancient wildlife trees can be identified and adequately protected from felling throughout the Community Plan area. The RD will actively encourage and petition the Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre to voluntarily and legally protect and retain and preserve forested areas and tracts,, adjacent to foreshore/water, flanking Grappler Inlet/Port Desire and the Main Inlet for visual, scenic and amenity impact reasons … Swamps and wetlands within the Plan area should be retained as much as possible in their natural state as they provide natural flood storage. Where feasible, protect and restore sensitive eelgrass habitat in aquatic environments where eelgrass existed in the past or where conditions would support the development of eelgrass beds. Discourage docks, piers and mooring buoys from being located in areas containing sensitive, unique or high value habitats. Encourage boat launch ramps to be located on stable, non‐
erosional banks where a minimum amount of shoreline stabilization is necessary. Ensure the long‐term longevity and continued operation of the Public Dock facilities as the use of this infrastructure is critical to the social and economic health of the Plan area. To encourage the recognition, protection and preservation of heritage features and sites and specifically the Boardwalk and historical Lifesaving 99
6 Heritage and Culture Policies Ba 8.2.2 Ba 8.2.3 Ba 9.2.6 Identify stands of old growth trees in SW 1/4 Sec 18 TP1 and in adjacent Huu ay aht First Nation land and seek a park designation for areas with a trail network and stands of old growth forest. Ba 9.2.7 Ba 9.2.8 Residential Policy Ba 13.2.10 Comprehensive Ba 14.1.2 Forestry Objective Forestry Policies Boardwalk and historical Life Saving Trails throughout the community. The ACRD, in cooperation with the appropriate provincial and federal agencies and interested local parties, will support measures to protect heritage features and sites in the area. To that end, such protection measures will be both discretionary/voluntary and regulatory with: a) developers being encouraged to consider heritage resource concerns in their project planning and design. In this regard, the RD will endeavour to seek the designation of the Lifesaving Trail and a corridor of 10 metres on either side there as a Historic Trail, where practical; b) the ACRD may consider imple‐
mentation of a Heritage Designation Bylaw under the LGA for appropriate lands/sites; and c) the ACRD will encourage both the protection and the designation of the Lifesaving Trails as a historically significant element with the area and will ensure adequate buffers, containing the trail proper, are retained to achieve these goals. 100
Ba 9.1.2 Ba 9.2.5 Trails throughout the community. The ACRD, in cooperation with the appropriate provincial and federal agencies and interested local parties, will support measures to protect heritage features and sites in the area. To that end, such protection measures will be both discretionary/voluntary and regulatory with: a) developers being encouraged to consider heritage resource concerns in their project planning and design. In this regard, the RD will endeavour to seek the designation of the Lifesaving Trail and a corridor of 10 metres on either side there as a Historic Trail, where practical; b) the ACRD may consider imple‐mentation of a Heritage Designation Bylaw under the LGA for appropriate lands/sites; and c) the ACRD will encourage both the protection and the designation of the Lifesaving Trails as a historically significant element with the area and will ensure adequate buffers, containing the trail proper, are retained to achieve these goals. Support the identification, protection and conservation of archaeological sites and features and work with relevant provincial authorities in this area. Retain significant tree cover throughout the area.
Identify stands of old growth trees in SW 1/4 Sec 18 TP1 and in adjacent Huu ay aht First Nation land and seek a park designation for areas with a trail network and stands of old growth forest. Liaise with Huu ay aht First Nation to develop a trail network to connect with West Bamfield Community Forest Land and out to the Ancient First Nations settlement. Working with Huu ay aht First Nation, investigate the possibility of extending the West Coast Trail using original trail still in existence that will end at Community Reservoir Tower and Airport area. Lobby Parks Canada to develop their office on current Parks Canada land, adjacent to the Bamfield Medical Centre, for use as West Coast Trail Registration. The ACRD will advocate for improved public beach access through all future subdivision applications. Identify and implement appropriate placement of land uses, 7 Development Objectives Comprehensive Development Policies Ba 14.1.4 Ba 14.2.1 Ba 14.2.2 Ba 14.2.4 A CDA may also contain public parks, institutional uses, educational and recreational facilities. Places for community gathering shall be encouraged in a CDA. Ba 14.2.5 Ba 14.2.6 Parks, Trails and Recreation Objectives Ba 16.1.2 Ba 16.1.2 Ba 16.1.3 Ba 16.1.4 Ba 16.1.5 Ba 16.1.6 Parks, Trails and Recreation Policies Ba 16.2.1 Ensure the continued acquisition of lands for parks, trails and recreational uses, in appropriate locations and appropriate amounts, to service the community and the community’s needs. Recognize that permanent residents and seasonal visitors have different amenity needs and strive to accommodate a range of parks, trails and amenities that meet these needs. Preserve for passive park and recreation uses those areas which offer the best examples of the natural environment found in Bamfield, and recognize their value as green spaces, habitat areas and for carbon sequestration. Support Centennial Park as the main public park area in Bamfield. This Plan supports: a) securing the administration and operational requirements associated with both the boat launch facility and the anchoring/mooring buoys and areas density and public access to the waterfront.
Recognize the importance of the waterfront as the community’s “main street” as well as for habitat, historic values, for transportation and employment characteristics, and for the aesthetics and viewscapes afforded by the stunning coastline. Identify shoreline areas with high environmental, recreational or aesthetic values and ensure these are protected for appropriate uses. Recognize the importance of the Boardwalk and ensure that future extensions are supported in any West Bamfield waterfront or comprehensive development proposal. Walkability and connectedness shall be key features in any proposal. Ensure the continued acquisition of lands for parks, trails and recreational uses, in appropriate locations and appropriate amounts, to service the community and the community’s needs. Encourage a safe and adequate trail system appropriate to the character of the community, and extend the trail system to support the active lifestyle of Bamfield residents. Recognize that permanent residents and seasonal visitors have different amenity needs and strive to accommodate a range of parks, trails and amenities that meet these needs. Support public access to the waterfront in appropriate locations Recognize the financial limitations of a small community and of all levels of government for land acquisition, operations and maintenance. 101
8 Ba 16.2.2 Ba 16.2.3 Ba 16.2.4 Ba 16.2.5 102
adjacent to Centennial Park in Port Desire; b) allowing temporary recreational vehicle camping and tenting facilities where such uses are administered by the Bamfield Parks Commission; and c) the use of land for temporary parking relating to boat launching activities in Grappler Inlet, with MoTI approval. The RD will, through its planning, development and political role, pursue the development and operation of a new public park facility accessed from South Bamfield Road in the Northeast ¼ of Section 18; this parkspace shall be passive with the exception of a non‐
motorized canoe/kayak launch area, picnic facilities, a limited tent camping area (no serviced sites or recreational vehicle sites), parking, and washrooms. This parkspace shall connect through an upgraded trail system to Brady’s Beach and the Cape Beale Headlands. The RD will seek senior government funding to assist in the acquisition, design, production, development and operation of such a facility should the senior levels of government responsible not choose to initiate such development in a timely manner (i.e. within five years). Expand the park system on the Crown‐owned lands on Mills Peninsula; this parkspace shall have a pedestrian pathway system connecting to existing pathways on the Peninsula, including legal access to Brady’s Beach via easements or rights of way and links to the park described in Policy 16.2.2. Investigate community interest in obtaining new parkspaces/ trails in the following areas, and implement actions to obtain these lands if they are of interest to citizens in the Plan area: a) Lot A Plan 38380 b) Bamfield West: Lots 31 and 32, Plan 942 (as well as a raised boardwalk on the swamp area toward the beach) c) Plan 38971 south of Bamfield. The RD will, through its planning, development and political role, pursue the development and operation of a new public park facility accessed from South Bamfield Road in the Northeast ¼ of Section 18; this parkspace shall be passive with the exception of a non‐motorized canoe/kayak launch area, picnic facilities, a limited tent camping area (no serviced sites or recreational vehicle sites), parking, and washrooms. This parkspace shall connect through an upgraded trail system to Brady’s Beach and the Cape Beale Headlands. The RD will seek senior government funding to assist in the acquisition, design, production, development and operation of such a facility should the senior levels of government responsible not choose to initiate such development in a timely manner (i.e. within five years). Expand the park system on the Crown‐owned lands on Mills Peninsula; this parkspace shall have a pedestrian pathway system connecting to existing pathways on the Peninsula, including legal access to Brady’s Beach via easements or rights of way and links to the park described in Policy 16.2.2. Investigate community interest in obtaining new parkspaces/ trails in the following areas, and implement actions to obtain these lands if they are of interest to citizens in the Plan area: a) Lot A Plan 38380 b) Bamfield West: Lots 31 and 32, Plan 942 (as well as a raised boardwalk on the swamp area toward the beach) c) Plan 38971 south of Bamfield. Support the development of an alternative boardwalk through the marsh to offer pedestrian 9 BA 16.2.6 Ba 16.2.7 Ba 16.2.8 Use the Regional Park as well as the Local Park administrative functions to administer and fund the development and operation of parks, trails, and recreation facilities in the Plan area. Ba 16.2.10 Ba 16.2.11 Where a waterfront subdivision is proposed and park dedication is required pursuant to the Local Government Act, the ACRD shall not necessarily require the consolidation of park strips into larger areas due to the financial and maintenance limitations. Instead, these dedications shall be used primarily to provide open space view areas and access to the waterfront. Where views are to be protected, the Board may request from any developer, a visual analysis indicating existing and proposed structures for the site in relation to views from public roads, waterways and property abutting the sub‐division site. This Plan supports the designation of a buffer between the shoreline and the sub‐division to maintain public access to the waterfront, protect sensitive habitats, encourage the renewed health of marine vegetation such as eelgrass, support spawning beaches, and to encourage soil stability. Seek senior government funding to assist in the acquisition, design, production, development and operation of a new park off South Bamfield Road. Provide for park and recreation use in a manner which recognizes the financial limitations which exist at all government levels and which affect Ba 16.2.12 Ba 16.2.13 connectivity and the potential for a wildlife observation area. The RD will identify, clear and sign appropriate public accesses to the foreshore. Use the Regional Park as well as the Local Park administrative functions to administer and fund the development and operation of parks, trails, and recreation facilities in the Plan area. Investigate and action the most appropriate means by which the Lifesaving Trail can be recognized, designated and protected as being of valuable historical significance to the community. Initiate discussions with Huu ay aht First Nation on the potential of extending the West Coast Trail to Bamfield, and work with Huu ay aht First Nation on improving the advertising for the Trail through international magazines and websites. 103
10 Ba 16.2.14 land acquisition and operation and maintenance realistically. Ba 16.2.15 Ba 16.2.16 General Planning Policies Be 3.2.12 Parks and Recreation Use Policies Be 10.2.1 Permit a minimum lot size of 1 ha. for subdivision for park or community service purposes provided the intended use is civic, public or utility in nature… Be 10.2.2 Be 10.2.3 LB 3.1 a) LB 3.1 b) LB 3.3.1 c) LB 3.3.1 d) LB 3.3.1 e) LB 3.3.2 e) LB 3.3.2 f) All public and private development activities, subdivisions and rezoning applications – including road crossings, utility rights‐of‐way and trails – will be planned and implemented in a manner AREA B OCP BEAU‐FORT AREA C OCP SOUTH LONG BEACH COMMUNITY GOALS: to protect the environment to retain rural character to enhance economic opportunities to enhance community services Environmental Objectives ESA Objectives ESA Policies 104
Support the development of affordable accommodations (i.e.: hostel) and other ancillary recreational facilities for hikers who are venturing out or who have completed the West Coast Trail to encourage them to lengthen their stay in Bamfield. Advocate (to Huu ay aht First Nation for support and the province for funding) for the development of a trail alongside the logging road connecting Bamfield and Pachena Bay to improve pedestrian safety. Advocate the development of Westminister Road as a recreational trail. Work with the City of Port Alberni, the provincial government, private land owners and local residents to develop a comprehensive trail network, including the Log Train Trail. Pursue the incorporation of multi‐use paths along major roads within the community as a matter of priority and, in particular, along Beaver Creek Road. Expand the linear park system along the Stamp River and Kitsuksis Creek. To protect known areas of ecological sensitivity.
To protect aquatic and terrestrial habitat areas.
To preserve and enhance the ecological systems and diversity throughout South Long Beach. To proactively address environ‐mental issues within the Plan area. To incorporate environmental consideration in assessing growth management options, land‐use plans, transportation plans and development proposals. The ACRD encourages, wherever possible, public ownership or covenants on title of lands that are deemed to be environmentally sensitive. All public and private development activities, subdivisions and rezoning applications – including road crossings, utility rights‐of‐way and trails – will be planned and implemented in a manner that will not adversely affect or disturb environmentally‐
11 Coastal Riparian Areas Objectives Coastal Riparian Areas Policies LB 3.5.1 b) LB 3.5.1 d) LB 3.5.2 i) To retain public access to the fore‐shore and adjacent marine upland areas. To support public access to the water. LB 3.5.2 j) Natural Hazard Areas Policy LB 3.6.2 f) Wildlife Management Objective Wildlife Management Policy LB 3.7.1 a) Public access to the waterfront for passive and recreational use in the form of parkland dedication will be requested in lieu of parkland dedication in all development proposals for lands adjacent to water bodies. Any lands subject to flooding should, wherever possible, be left in a natural state or used for parks or natural preserves. LB 3.7.2 a) Heritage and Cultural Conservation Objectives Heritage and Cultural Conservation Policies LB 3.8.1 a) LB 3.8.1 b) LB 3.8.2 a) LB 3.8.2 b) LB 3.8.2 d) LB 4.1 b) LB 4.1 h) To provide adequate public parks, facilities and amenities consistent with the needs of a rural community and rural lifestyle. Land‐Use Planning Objectives Rural Residential Policies sensitive areas.
LB 3.3.2 g) that will not adversely affect or disturb environmentally‐sensitive areas. LB 4.3.2 g) The ACRD encourages all subdivisions and new development to conform to provincial policies and regulations intended to protect the natural environment. The ACRD will work with the MoTH to clear and make available to the public all publicly‐owned rights‐of‐way and road ends that access the waterfront. To encourage preventative measures to reduce human and wildlife contact. ACRD will encourage measures to reduce the risk of human and wildlife contact. These may include, but are not limited to, support promotion of a Bear Aware program and related public education, requiring bear‐proof garbage and composting manage‐
ment facilities as part of any new development, and maintaining significant habitat and travel corridors as open space. To preserve historical and cultural features.
To identify Barkley Sound foreshore, Maggie River, Twin Rivers, Ittatsoo Creek as major potential for archaeological sites. The ACRD will work with local historians and the Heritage Conservation Branch to locate, identify and record all significant heritage and cultural features and sites. The ACRD will work with First Nations, the Heritage Conservation Branch and local historians to identify First Nations archaeological and cultural sites and features. Historic and archaeological sites are sensitive to human presence. Development proposals will be reviewed in relation to existing and possible archaeological sites, and where site are apparent, such proposals will be referred to the Heritage Conservation Branch. To maintain a rural focus for new development related primarily to low‐density rural residential uses and tourism‐related residential and commercial uses. When communal water and sewage treatment is provided, the ACRD may support clustering of housing or density averaging 105
12 Rural Residential Comprehensive Development Area Objective Rural Residential Comprehensive Development Area Policies LB 4.4 c) LB 4.4.2 f) LB 4.4.2 k) An amenity bonus of up to four additional bedrooms in a lodge or resort, three additional transient campground sites, or two cabins per gross unit converted to commercial will be considered in exchange for development of trails, improvements in public access to the ocean, additional parkland or open space dedicated to ACRD over the required 5% dedication. Designs will provide a network of open space, parkland, pedestrian and bicycle trails as well as roads throughout the project that link with regional road and trail systems. The area west of the lagoon and the existing Port Albion Road alignment in this area are designated as a potential area for dedication of parkland in any future subdivision. An amenity bonus of up to four additional bedrooms in a lodge or resort, three additional transient campground sites, or two cabins per gross unit converted to commercial will be considered in exchange for development of trails, improvements in public access to the ocean, additional parkland or open space dedicated to ACRD over the required 5% dedication. An amenity bonus of up to four additional bedrooms in a lodge or resort, three additional transient campground sites, or two cabins per gross unit converted to commercial will be considered in exchange for development of trails, improvements in public access to the ocean, additional parkland or open space dedicated to ACRD over the required 5% dedication. Designs will provide a network of open space, parkland, pedestrian and bicycle trails as well as roads throughout the project that link with regional road and trail systems. An amenity bonus of up to four additional bedrooms in a lodge or resort, three additional transient campground sites, or two cabins per gross unit converted to commercial will be considered in exchange for development of trails, improvements in public access to the ocean, additional parkland or open space dedicated to ACRD over the required 5% dedication. LB 4.4.2 r) LB 4.4.2 t) Country Residential Comprehensive Development Area Objective Country Residential Comprehensive Development Area Policies LB 4.6.1 d) LB 4.6.3 k) LB 4.6.3 o) Millstream/ Willowbrae/ 106
where preservation of green space or reduction in servicing costs, including the construction of roads, would be achieved. To plan new development at densities and in locations that minimize visual impact from the water, retain significant areas of open space, and minimize impact on the natural environment and environmental features along Ucluelet Inlet. Lodges, resorts, cabins or cottages, and transient recreational vehicle and camping sites will be permitted on the basis of eight bedrooms in a lodge or resort, six transient campground sites, or four cabins, or one vacation rental residence being considered equivalent to one residential unit for the purpose of calculating gross density. LB 4.9.1 b) LB 4.9.1 c) Designs will provide a network of open space, parkland, pedestrian and bicycle trails as well as roads throughout the project that link with regional road and trail systems. To plan new development at densities and in locations that minimize visual impact from the water, retain significant areas of open space, and minimize impact on the natural environment and environmental features along Barkley Sound. Designs will provide a network of open space, parkland, pedestrian and bicycle trails as well as roads throughout the project that link with regional road and trail systems. To retain Willowbrae Trail.
To improve public access to Ucluelet Inlet estuary.
13 Thornton Road Neighbourhood Objectives Millstream/ Willowbrae/ Thornton Road Neighbourhood Policies The Junction Objective Kennedy Lake Objectives Kennedy Lake Policies LB 4.9.2 c) LB 4.9.2 d) LB 4.11.1 b) LB 4.11.2 b) LB 4.11.2 h) LB 4.11.2 i) LB 4.12.1 c) LB 4.12.1 d) LB 4.12.2 c) LB 4.12.2 d) LB 4.12.2 e) LB 4.12.2 f) LB 4.12.2 g) The ACRD encourages Parks Canada and BC Parks to establish a properly managed campground in the vicinity of the Kennedy River and Clayoquot Arm Narrows for tents, but not for recreational vehicles. LB 4.12.2 h) LB 4.12.2 i) The ACRD supports provincial govern‐ment efforts to retain a right‐of‐way along the Willowbrae Trail alignment in order to preserve public access to Florencia Bay and Half Moon Bay. The ACRD supports clearing and marking the five existing public accesses in Millstream and Willowbrae to Ucluelet Inlet: the northern end of Grant Avenue, the end of Willowbrae Road, the eastern end of Albion Crescent, the end of Lee Street and the southern end of Karn Avenue at the Millstream water system. To protect wetland areas.
Development will be considered only after an assessment of impact on the wetlands, wellhead, Lost Sloe Aquifer, and habitat has been completed to the satisfaction of the ACRD and has been found to be acceptable. The ACRD will seek the cooperation of property owners and MoTH to provide a safe continuation of the bike/pedestrian path through The Junction area. The ACRD supports the addition to current camping facilities in this area. To discourage the use of watercraft that create noise and contamination. To encourage the establishment of a managed campsite near the Kennedy River Bridge. The ACRD will work with Parks Canada and BC Parks to continue to improve public awareness and to encourage environmental responsibility by visitors and users of Kennedy Lake. The ACRD is opposed to the issuance of any tenure on crown land adjacent to or within Kennedy Lake for: i. establishment of float homes or cabins; ii. establishment of seasonally occupied dwellings; iii. establishment of moorage facilities for vessels that are, or could be, permanently or temporarily moored and occupied. The use of low‐impact, non‐motorized watercraft such as kayaks, canoes, sailboards and sailboats is encouraged. The ACRD supports efforts by Parks Canada and BC Parks to respect and retain wildlife corridors and to heighten public awareness of the presence of wildlife. The MoF and forestry tenure holders in the area are encouraged to retain road access to Kennedy River and Clayoquot Arm Narrows area and to allow public use of the access roads. The ACRD encourages BC Parks and Parks Canada to designate salmon spawning areas on Kennedy Lake as natural preserves to prohibit camping, swimming, development or other recreational 107
14 activities in these areas.
LB 4.12.2 j) Barkley Sound Marine Area Objective Barkley Sound Marine Area Policy LB 4.13.1 a) The ACRD encourages Parks Canada to retain the federal parkland adjacent to the Alberni Highway on Kennedy Lake as open space with day use only. LB 4.13.2 c) Ucluelet Inlet Objective LB 4.14.1 e) Ucluelet Inlet Policies LB 4.14.2 b) LB 4.14.2 e) LB 4.14.2 g) Public Parks and Recreation LB 4.15 Parks and Recreation Objectives LB 4.15.1 a) LB 4.15.1 b) … the residents of South Long Beach wish to see public parks, open space, greenways and trails, and areas for protection of environmental features and habitat incorporated into all existing and future residential areas. To request dedication of parkland adequate to service regional or neighbourhood needs in each new residential subdivision. LB 4.15.1 c) LB 4.15.1 d) LB 4.15.1 e) LB 4.15.2 d) The specific location of future parks or protected areas to be dedicated through the subdivision process will be determined as part of the review of new development and subdivision Parks and Recreation Policies 108
To protect the natural environmental values and habitat of the Barkley Sound. The ACRD is opposed to the issuance of any tenure on crown land adjacent to or within Barkley Sound for: i. establishment of float homes or cabins; ii. establishment of seasonally occupied dwellings; iii. establishment of moorage facilities for vessels that are, or could be, permanently or temporarily moored and occupied. To manage new on‐water and foreshore development to protect environmental values and minimize impact on upland residential use. The ACRD will work with individuals, organizations, community groups, agencies, the District of Ucluelet and First Nations to create an integrated plan to address use, management and habitat restoration and conservation in Ucluelet Harbour and Ucluelet Inlet. The ACRD will work with environmental organizations and governmental agencies to identify damaged habitat in the Inlet and to investigate options for the restoration of such habitat. The ACRD is opposed to the issuance of any tenure on crown land adjacent to or within Ucluelet Inlet for: i. establishment of float homes or cabins; ii. establishment of seasonally occupied dwellings; iii. establishment of moorage facilities for vessels that are, or could be, permanently or temporarily moored and occupied. … the residents of South Long Beach wish to see public parks, open space, greenways and trails, and areas for protection of environmental features and habitat incorporated into all existing and future residential areas. To protect significant areas of green or open space with new development areas, in addition to parkland. To preserve a significant portion of the land surrounding Ucluelet Inlet for conservation and protection of wildlife habitat. To retain and enhance existing recreational opportunities.
To encourage development of the West Coast Telegraph Trail connecting Ucluelet to Toquart Bay. 15 LB 4.15.2 e) LB 4.15.2 f) LB 4.15.2 h) LB 4.15.2 i) LB 4.15.2 j) LB 4.15.2 l) proposals. The general locations of these areas are shown by the letter “P” on Map No. 3, and are schematic or conceptual only. Development proposals and plans must identify sites considered appropriate and suitable for dedication as parkland for public use or open space and protected areas. The community’s priorities for public parkland are as follows: i. parkland and connecting trails around Ucluelet inlet; ii. waterfront, headlands and beaches, including pedestrian and boat accesses; iii. an interconnecting system of trails, pathways, greenways, open spaces and parks; iv. viewpoints; v. improvement and signage of existing parks and waterfront accesses; vi. additional community and recreational facilities as deemed desirable and as the population of South Long Beach increases; vii. significant environmental features or habitat areas. Upon subdivision of lands within the Plan area, the ACRD will request 5% dedication of parkland, payment of cash‐in‐lieu, a combination of these, or deferral … The ACRD has full discretion in determining which parkland option … is preferable. Land to be dedicated as parkland for public recreational use must be shown to be safe and not a natural hazard area. LB 4.15.2 m) LB 4.15.2 n) LB 4.15.2 o) The ACRD encourages the develop‐
ment on publicly‐owned lands of parks, The community’s priorities for public parkland are as follows: i. parkland and connecting trails around Ucluelet inlet; ii. waterfront, headlands and beaches, including pedestrian and boat accesses; iii. an interconnecting system of trails, pathways, greenways, open spaces and parks; iv. viewpoints; v. improvement and signage of existing parks and waterfront accesses; vi. additional community and recreational facilities as deemed desirable and as the population of South Long Beach increases; vii. significant environmental features or habitat areas. … a public meeting will be held before any parkland owned by the ACRD may be disposed of, transferred or exchanged. The ACRD will work with the District of Ucluelet
and property owners to plan for the extension of the bike path through The Junction and northwards along the Tofino‐Ucluelet Highway. The ACRD will work with the District of Ucluelet, First Nations, non‐governmental organizations, community groups and private organizations and landowners to support the development of the West Coast Telegraph Trail connecting Ucluelet to Toquart Bay. 109
16 LB 4.15.2 q) trails, pathways, community and recreational facilities by the following: i. non‐governmental organizations, community groups and private organizations; ii. public‐private partnerships; iii. capital projects approved by the ACRD; iv. joint‐use agreements with school authorities and neighbouring municipalities. LB 4.15.2 r) LB 4.15.2 s) LB 5.6.2 b) ACRD may identify additional parkland priorities related to local and regional needs through development of a Regional Parks Plan. Donation of land and any dedication of public land over the required 5% dedication is encouraged and will be considered as a donation to the region for the purpose of the Ecological Gifts Program and taxation purposes. LB 5.6.2 c) Resource – Private Forestry Policy LB 5.7.1 f) Resource – Crown, Forestry [and Resource] Policies LB 5.8.2 e) LB 5.8.2 f) LB 5.8.2 j) LB 5.9.2 e) LB 4.15.2 t) Light Industrial Policies 110
In new development areas, the ACRD encourages and will work with development proponents to reach a target of 20% of the development area as open space. This open space can include public parks, freshwater and marine areas, ESAs or other vegetated areas protected by covenant or included as common amenity in a strata development, trails and public access to the foreshore. ACRD will work with the Govern‐ment of BC, not‐for‐profit groups, trusts and foundations, First Nations and others to protect for conservation purposes the crown land portions of DL 20, including the former log dump. Recreational uses that require large areas such as mountain biking and equestrian trails will also be permitted. Uses located adjacent to Pacific Rim National Park are required to maintain a minimum vegetated buffer and building setback of 30 metres or more as may be required to protect park uses and values. The ACRD will work with the forestry companies and private landowners to provide public access through their lands where and when not in conflict with forestry operations. The ACRD will work with MoF and forestry companies to provide public access to Crown lands where and when not in conflict with forestry or natural resource related operations or wildlife and habitat conservation. Uses located adjacent to Pacific Rim National Park are encouraged to maintain a vegetated buffer and building setback adequate to protect park uses and values. Forestry [and Resource] uses located adjacent to Pacific Rim National Park are encouraged to maintain a minimum forested 17 buffer and building setback of 30 metres or more as may be required to protect park uses and values. LB 6.2.2 a) LB 6.2.2 i) Community Goal Commercial Use Objective Comprehensive Development Policy SL 8.1.2 SL 12.2.2 Parks and Recreation Use Policies SL 17.2.2 SL 17.2.3 SL 17.2.5 SL 17.2.6 SL 17.2.9 SL 17.2.10 Roads and Transportation Policies AREA D OCP SPROAT LAKE Marine Use Objectives SL 18.1.4 Encourage sustainable, environmentally‐sensitive, respectful use of parks and trails. Encourage provincial authorities to expand Fossli Provincial Park with some wilderness camping facilities. Marine Use Policies SL 18.2.2 SL 18.2.3 SL 17.2.11 The ACRD will work with MoTH, the District of Tofino and the District of Ucluelet to improve safety for drivers, bicyclists and pedestrians on high‐volume roads such as the Tofino‐Ucluelet Highway and Port Albion Rd. To protect the integrity and safety of the hiking/biking trail along Tofino/ Ucluelet Highway, establishment of new accesses and crossings is discouraged. Provide a diverse economy based on environmental and cultural tourism as well as more traditional resource activities. Encourage tourism, specifically ecotourism, and other economic development opportunities Where a development agreement is used, it should include the details of the development plan, servicing, parkland dedication, public access to the foreshore (if the development is adjacent to the foreshore), phasing and any other matter in accordance with … Pursue the incorporation of multi‐use paths along highways with the community and, in particular, along Highway 4, Faber Road, Stirling Arm Drive and Lakeshore Road. Expand the linear park system along the Stamp and Somass Rivers and along major creeks. Work with residents, community groups, property owners and the Sproat Lake Parks Commission to ensure that local residents have adequate access to the lakes within their neighbourhoods. Work with provincial authorities, local residents, property owners and the Sproat Lake Parks Commission to identify, improve and provide signage for public access in appropriate locations to the foreshore and streams. Work with provincial and federal authorities, land owners, community groups and businesses to promote the development in Resource areas and in provincial parks of additional day‐camp and picnic facilities, boat‐launch ramps, parking, toilets, access to the lakes, with maintenance and supervision, where appropriate, and specifically in the Taylor Arm area and, if feasible, in the Two Rivers area. Encourage sustainable, environmentally‐sensitive, respectful use of parks and trails. Distinguish between the levels and types of uses that can be support‐ed by different areas of the lakes. Designate specific areas for marina use, float‐home use and conservation. Permit the mooring of houseboats only in areas designated for 111
18 SL 18.2.4 SL 18.2.5 SL 18.2.11 SL 18.2.12 Advocacy/
water recreation SL 18.2.13 SL 18.2.18 Natural Environment Policies SL 19.2.8 SL 19.2.17 Comprehensive Development Policy BC 9.2.2 Parks and Recreation Use Policies Comprehensive Development Policy BC 11.2.3 CC 10.2.2 Parks and Recreation Use Policies CC 12.2.3 Environmental Protection Council Policies (Note: Policies selected have a potential connection to neighbouring jurisdictions or cross‐
jurisdictional implications.) 1.1 – 1 Expand the linear park system along Kitsuksis, Cherry, Rogers and Owatchet Creeks. 1.1 – 2 AREA E OCP BEAVER CREEK AREA F OCP CHERRY CREEK City of Port Alberni OCP 112
Marina use as specified by the zoning bylaw.
Permit only those structures, such as moorage, docks and fences, on the foreshore that are in compliance with the NWPA and the zoning bylaw. Work with provincial and federal authorities to increase public awareness and to provide information on sale and courteous boating and specific marine‐use areas. Support the establishment of a paddling centre at the Bomber Base site or at any other appropriate location and the continuation of the Sproat Lake Regatta. Encourage the use of non‐motorized navigational watercraft such as kayaks, canoes and sailboats and the minimization of noise from motorboats. Encourage federal authorities to establish a “Slow – no wake” speed limit near highly‐populated residential areas on Sproat Lake Encourage sustainable, environmentally‐sensitive use of the lakes and adherence to the Canada Shipping Act and Regs. Discourage any increase in the number of houseboats, wakeboard and wake‐surfing boats, oversized motorboats and ocean‐going motorboats on Sproat Lake to minimize damage to the foreshore and to shoreline improvements. Preserve areas designated for Conservation from development, construction, camping and overnight mooring. Encourage residents and visitors to be aware of the existence of cougars in the Plan area and to become familiar with encounter guidelines such as those in “Living Smart with Cougars”. Where a development agreement is used, it should include the details of the development plan, servicing, parkland dedication, public access to the foreshore (if the development is adjacent to the foreshore), phasing and any other matter in accordance with … Expand the linear park system along the Stamp and Somass Rivers. Where a development agreement is used, it should include the details of the development plan, servicing, parkland dedication, public access to the foreshore (if the development is adjacent to the foreshore), phasing and any other matter in accordance with … Expand the linear park system along Kitsuksis, Cherry, Rogers and Owatchet Creeks. Ravines, watercourses and riparian areas will be preserved in their natural state, and wherever possible, will be linked to other park spaces or natural areas to create a comprehensive network of green space. Trail opportunities within these areas may also be considered when not detrimental to the environment. Where possible, the City will consider conserving or protecting areas having significant wildlife values, and/ or significant wildlife corridors in an effort to maintain habitat and access. 19 Parks Council Policies 2.1 – 2 Bicycle & Pedestrian Corridors 8.2 The City shall attempt to evenly distribute the various scales of park space throughout the community in order to provide equivalent levels of service and access to each of the principal residential areas in the community. Parks will be located in prominent locations, designed to act as focal areas for the neighbourhoods they serve, and be connected through the pedestrian/bicycle network to other areas in the community. The City will continue to maintain City owned parks and associated facilities that are located outside of City boundaries. Bike & Pedestrian Corridors: General Council Policies 8.2.1 – 1 8.2.1 – 2 8.2.1 – 3 8.2.1 – 5 8.2.2 – 1 2.1 – 9 Trails Council Policies The provision of alternate forms of transportation is central to the creation of liveable and complete communities. It offers mobility options and greater community access for those residents that cannot or choose not to travel by automobile. … the integration of a comprehensive bicycle and pedestrian network into the overall transportation grid is essential. Residents indicate that the trail system is one of the major strengths of Port Alberni, but better overall connectivity through the development of more trails and walkways is necessary. The City supports the development of a comprehensive system of pedestrian and bicycle corridors that serve to link neighbourhoods, community services and amenities. Bicycle corridors shall be developed as follows:
‐ on‐road routes through dedicated bicycle lanes or shared automobile/ bicycle lanes as appropriate; and ‐ off‐road routes utilizing the primary trail network. Pedestrian corridors shall include: ‐ sidewalks; ‐ pathways; and ‐ trails. New developments shall provide connectivity to the existing network of bicycle and pedestrian corridors when physically possible. The development of a Trail Network Master Plan is supported. The Plan should provide for a comprehensive system of urban and natural trail opportunities, identify links to all areas of the community, identify the range of accessibility levels, consider varying categories of surfacing material and maintenance levels, and should address potential trail maintenance partnerships. 113
20 8.2.2 – 2 8.2.2 – 3 8.2.2 – 4 8.2.2 – 5 Key Community Issues: Economic Issues (Note: Policies selected have a potential connection to neighbouring jurisdictions or cross‐
jurisdictional implications.) Environmental Issues 1.6.1 Much of Tofino’s tourism strength is related to the regional resources that surround Tofino, including beaches in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, whales in the Pacific Ocean, surfing off the beaches, kayaking in, and the wilderness scenery of, Clayoquot Sound. Maintaining these resources in an attractive and accessible state will be important to sustaining tourism development. 1.6.2 Physical Development Issues 1.6.3 While tourism development has provided many benefits to the community, it has also affected use of beaches. The Tonquin Park site has been used for unauthorized camping with attendant litter despoiling the community’s beach area. Potential development of the Tonquin Beach area, including the potential inclusion of Middle Beach as a community park, could be explored as a means of reducing the negative effects of unauthorized camping. Maintaining the natural character of Tofino, preserving open space, beach access, the waterfront and access to and through the waterfront are design issues facing the community. Community Design and Land Use Goals 3.2.1 – 4 3.2.1 – 6 3.2.2 – 9 District of Tofino OCP Community Design and Land Use 114
The City shall continue to develop its comprehensive network of integrated trails which provide varying levels of access to people of all ages and mobility levels. This will include: ‐ sidewalks; ‐ footpaths; ‐ hiking trails; and ‐ hard‐surface multiple‐use trails. The City trail network shall connect to regional trails adjacent to City boundaries where possible in order to expand existing trail infrastructure and improve area access. As a method of improving waterfront access, the City will explore the feasibility of constructing a waterfront walkway in the Clutesi Haven Marina/ Victoria Quay area, and Harbour Quay area along Harbour Road. Walkway development is supported along River Road and Lugrin Creek extending between Kitsuksis Creek along Lugrin Creek to Paper Dam Mill. The City will explore opportunities to develop a portion of the E&N Railway corridor as a major greenway linkage between Northport and Southport in an effort to improve connectivity and mobility options. To promote a high quality pedestrian friendly entry to the Downtown Commercial Core and Downtown Gateway Area. To promote pedestrian and bicycle circulation that minimizes the need to drive. Promote a walkable and bikeable community and associated site planning and design. 21 Objectives 3.2.2 – 18 Tourism Development Policies 3.2.3.10 – 5 3.2.3.10 – 9 also 3.3.37 – 7 3.2.3.11 – 1 3.2.3.11 – 2 3.2.3.11 – 3 Village Centre Waterfront Policies 3.2.3.15 – 12 Community Development Objectives Parks and Recreation Policies 3.3.2 – 5 3.3.2 – 11 3.3.3.7 – 1 3.3.3.7 – 4 3.3.37 – 5 3.3.3.7 – 8 3.3.3.7 – 9 3.3.3.7 – 10 3.3.3.7 – 11 Mobility Policies Promote increased public access to Cox Bay, MacKenzie Beach, Middle Beach, and Tonquin Beach. The District will encourage the provision of increased public access to major beaches. Provision of additional public access to Cox Bay, MacKenzie Beach and Middle Beach will be required as part of subdivision and as identified in Section 5.1. Pedestrian circulation will be promoted throughout the District, including access to beaches, neighbourhoods, commercial development and places of employment. Cycling will be promoted throughout the District, including access to beaches, neighbourhoods, commercial development and employment. The District will continue to advocate the completion of the Pacific Rim Highway paved walking/cycling trail between the District of Tofino and District of Ucluelet, including passage through Pacific Rim National Park Reserve. The District will continue to promote the development of a multi‐modal trail into the Downtown Commercial Core. Promote public access to beaches. Explore the potential to further develop youth recreation opportunities and programs. The District will implement the District of Tofino Parks and Recreation Master Plan, which sets direction for the planning and management of Parks and Recreation. The District will encourage the provision of increased public access to major beaches. The District will work in consultation with landowners and businesses to identify methods to increase public access, resident parking and public facilities at MacKenzie Beach and Cox Bay, including acquisition, partnerships and other means. A pedestrian trail will be developed between Tonquin Park Road and MacKenzie Beach Road. A pedestrian trail will be identified between MacKenzie Beach Road and Hellesen Drive. Trail development in the Tonquin‐Middle Beach area will additionally accommodate a variety of activities and abilities, including a non‐motorized mountain bike cross‐country trail and wheel chair access, where possible. The District shall encourage, where appropriate, the development of pedestrian trails in conjunction with the installation and extension of infrastructure. 115
22 3.3.3.7 – 15 3.3.3.7 – 17 3.3.3.7 – 18 3.3.3.9 – 2 Existing and new pedestrian linkages and linear park land will be incorporated to form a network between and within neighbourhoods, parks, public spaces, the Village Centre and community services. 3.3.3.9 – 3 Other Jurisdictions 3.3.3.11 – 3 Tourism Policies 3.4.2.1 – 2 3.4.2.1 – 3 Environment and Natural Resources Goals 3.5.1 – 1 3.5.1 – 2 3.5.1 – 3 3.5.1 – 4 3.5.2 – 4 Heritage Policies Environment and Natural Resources Objectives New park land dedication shall be required for all subdivisions in the following forms: • linear park land will be a preferred form of park land dedication where linkage between areas of the community is desired or where access to beaches is desired; • blocks of park land will be preferred where stands of old growth trees exist; • cleared land will be accepted as parkland only if the proposed site fits the District’s long‐term recreation objectives. 116
The District will complete a greenway and trail master plan as identified in the District of Tofino Parks and Recreation Master Plan and policies set out in this Plan. Existing and new pedestrian linkages and linear park land will be incorporated to form a network between and within neighbourhoods, parks, public spaces, the Village Centre and community services. First Nations will be invited to participate in the identification and conservation of First Nation heritage sites. The District will work with First Nations to develop a protocol for the management and protection of First Nation heritage sites. This process shall consider consultation with the Archaeological Planning and Assessment Section of the Ministry of Sustainable Resource Management for archaeological sites protected under the Heritage Conservation Act. The District will work co‐operatively with the Alberni‐Clayoquot Regional District to manage the development of nearby Regional District lands to determine their effect upon the visual and ecological well‐being of the community and will, where feasible, encourage the retention of islands within the Regional District in their natural state. Development that promotes eco‐tourism will be encouraged. A range of tourism destination facilities, including camping facilities, licensed Bed and Breakfasts, small boutique accommodation, family‐based accommodation and destination resorts will be supported. To protect ecosystems
To support the importance of healthy ecosystems within the District lands and outlying regions recognizing that healthy communities and healthy environments are interdependent. To encourage conservation in Clayoquot Sound.
To encourage the maintenance of natural green space and forest cover. Promote pedestrian and bicycle use and reduce downtown traffic. 23 3.5.3.5 – 1 3.5.3.5 – 2 3.5.3.5 – 3 Guiding Principles (Note: Policies selected have a potential connection to neighbouring jurisdictions or cross‐
jurisdictional implications.) Parks, Trails and Open Space` 2.2 – 3 2.2 – 5 Develop and maintain quality parks, trails, recreation and community services for residents and visitors. 2.2 – 6 2.2 – 7 3.3 Parks, Trails and Open Space Policies 3.3 – 3 3.3 – 5 Greenway Policies District of Ucluelet OCP Greenways will be identified for public use or as natural landscapes. Public use greenways will be incorporated into the pedestrian and cycling trail system throughout the District. Natural corridor greenways will be delineated and retained as natural corridors for wildlife movement and gene pool diversity. Develop and maintain quality parks, trails, recreation and community services for residents and visitors. Maintain and enhance Ucluelet’s unique character and preserve its heritage. Protect natural areas.
Increase transportation choice.
The popular Wild Pacific Trail is the primary hiking trail in the District that runs through the south western edge of the peninsula. Ucluelet’s green space network is recognized as a valuable community asset where residents and visitors can enjoy the outdoors and beautiful scenery on foot or bicycle, and as part of an active, healthy way of life close to nature. The purpose of the Parks and Open Space designation is to protect Ucluelet’s natural beauty, enhance the District’s green space system and to support a safe environment for recreational opportunities. The parks and open space system includes nature parks, community parks, neighbourhood parks, parkettes, trails and greenbelts. Establishing a connected and defined parks and trails network further achieves other community environmental objectives by supporting the District’s targets, policies, and actions to address climate change and reduce green house gas emissions. Reducing GHGs may be positively affected by providing trails or multiuse pathways to accommodate active transportation (walking and cycling) throughout the community. The District will work with property owners and developers to: i. Further support existing green spaces (e.g. trails and playgrounds); ii. Increase green space; and iii. Create linkages between green spaces within the District (e.g. retain treed areas and securing mid‐block pedestrian connections in the Village Square) and to the outer side of the peninsula, including connections to the Wild Pacific Trail. The District may work in partnership with landowners, businesses and the development community to maintain and increase public access to the water. Some new opportunities for 117
24 increased access to the harbour include: i. A park, viewpoint or open space at the end of Matterson Drive, serving as an anchor on one end of this unique street, linking the Inner Harbour to Big Beach across the peninsula; and ii. A park, viewpoint or open space at the end of Alder Street and the City‐owned water lot. 3.3 – 7 3.3 – 8 Explore the development of a park or open space at the summit of Hyphocus Island and a trail along the perimeter of Hyphocus Island. Design will need to be sensitive to the existing context of the area to ensure that the park, open spaces and trails are well integrated with adjacent uses and natural features, such as the sewage lagoon and the island’s topography. 3.3 – 10 3.3 – 11 Tourist Commercial 3.6 ii Institutional Policies 3.8 – 3 Comprehensive Development: Master Development Agreement Areas 3.9 i Natural Environment: Environmental Policies 3.11 – 1 3.11 – 2 3.11 – 3 118
Protect and create viewpoints along the Wild Pacific Trail (WPT). The Wild Pacific Trail should follow the coastline as much as possible. All new developments will provide for a WPT route that is deemed acceptable to the District. The District of Ucluelet may work with the District of Tofino and Pacific Rim National Park to consider extending the cycling path from Ucluelet to Tofino as part of a larger cycling network. Francis Island is recognized as symbolic entrance to the Harbour. It should not be developed, without intensive investigation of environmental, hazard and archaeological considerations. Access to the beach on the island and a trail around the edge of the Island for recreational purposes may be further explored. The Wild Pacific Trail is a crucial, integral component of the comprehensive development areas. The Wild Pacific Trail is a first‐class, world renowned facility, similar in stature to Stanley Park in Vancouver. Ucluelet’s appeal as a tourist destination for all ages is based largely on the wide range of recreation opportunities available in the community. These include hiking the Wild Pacific Trail, sea kayaking, boating, fishing and cycling. The town serves as a gateway to Pacific Rim National Park, Clayoquot Sound, Barkley Sound and the Broken Group Islands. Complete a Parks and Recreation Master Plan that responds to the community’s range of recreational and physical activity needs. Land uses in the comprehensive development designation MDA areas, include: … parks and natural space; and Wild Pacific Trail. To encourage conservation of District and Regional resources. To encourage the maintenance of natural green space and forest cover and eliminate large clear cuts to accommodate development. To identify natural corridors for public and wildlife use or as natural landscapes. 25 Transportation Greenhouse Gas Policies: Transportation 3.11 – 6 4 4 4 6.3 ii – 2 6.3 ii – 10 To preserve and protect heritage features.
Develop a network of safe bicycle and pedestrian routes into and throughout the District. Encourage active forms of transportation as a viable and routine alternative to the private automobile in order to reduce GHG emissions. Focus Pedestrian and cycling improvements along Peninsula Road, Matterson Drive and Marine Drive. Expand the Wild Pacific Trail network as opportunities arise. Explore opportunities to create bike lanes and multi‐use paths within existing road allowances. 119
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