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TM11-5895-932-14&P
TM11-5895-932-14&P
No
HEADQUARTERS
DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
11-5895-932-14&P
WASHINGTON DC, 26 January 1978
OPERATOR’S, ORGANIZATIONAL, DIRECT SUPPORT,
AND GENERAL SUPPORT MAINTENANCE MANUAL
INCLUDING REPAIR PARTS AND
SPECIAL TOOLS LISTS
FOR
FACILITIES !N PLACE,
PATCH
D TEST FACILITY
LETTERKENNY ARMY DEPOT, PENNSYLVANIA
REPORTING OF ERRORS
You can improve this manual by recommending improvements using DA Form
2028-2 (Test) located in the hack of the manual. Simply tear out the self-addresed
form, fill it out as shown on the sample, foid it where shown, and drop it in the mail.
If there are no blank DA Form 2028-2 (Test ) forms in the back of the manual, use the
standard DA Form 2028 (Recommended Changes to Publications and Blank Forms)
and forward to Commander, US Army Electronics Command, ATTN: DRSEL-MA-Q,
Fort Monmouth. NJ 07703
In either case. a rep1y will be furnished direct to you
CHAPTER
Section
1
I General
Scope
Indexes of equipment publications
Forms are recorded
Administrative storage
Destruction of Army Material
Section
II
Description and d
Purpose and use
Tabulated data
CHAPTER
2
C H A P T E R
3
Section
I
Paragraph
Page
1-1
1-2
1-3
1-4
1-5
1-1
1-1
1-1
1-1
1-1
INTRODUCTION
1-6
1-7
1-8
1-9
1-10
1-11
1-1
1-1
1-1
1-1
1-15
1-33
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-6
3-1
3-1
i
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Paragraph
II
CHAPTER 4
Section
I
CHAPTER
3-2
3-3
3-1
Patching operations
Patching. general
Patching for equipment substitution
Testing patches
Patching for fault location
3-4
3-5
3-6
3-7
3-2
3-2
3-4
3-4
MAINTENANCE
General
Scope of maintenance
Materials and test equipment required for organizational maintenance
4-1
4-2
4-1
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-7
4-8
4-9
4-1
4-1
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-4
4-10
4-11
4-12
4-13
4-14
4-4
4-4
4-7
4-7
4-7
5-1
5-2
5-3
5-4
5-1
5-1
Troubleshooting
Genera:
Troubleshooting the communication channel
Station drawings
Use of troubleshooting charts
Troubleshooting chart for major alarm panel
5. COMPONENT FUNCTIONING
General
Patching modules
Major alarm panel
Power circuits
A
REFERENCES
B
COMPONENTS OF END ITEM LISTS (Not Applicable)
C
ADDITIONAL AUTHORIZATION LISTS (Not Applicable)
D
EXPENDABLE SUPPLIES AND MATERIALS LISTS (Not Applicable)
APPENDIX
E
DIRECT SUPPORT AND GENERAL SUPPORT MAINTENANCE REPAIR
PARTS AND SPECIAL TOOLS LISTS (INCLUDING DEPOT
MAINTENANCE REPAIR PARTS AND SPECIAL TOOLS)
Section
I
APPENDIX
Group
Group
ii
3-1
Duties of PTF personnel
Maintenance of records
II. Preventive maintenance procedures
Preventive maintenance
Preventive maintenance checks and service periods
Daily and weekly preventive maintenance checks and service chart
Monthly preventive maintenance checks and service charts
Quarterly preventive maintenance checks and service charts
Cleaning
Touchup painting
instructions
III
Page
Introduction
II Repair Parts List
00 Letterkenny Automated Telecommunications Center Transmission Facilities
and Remote Subsystems
01 WU Modem Bay
0101 Cabinet CY-3397A/G (Modified)
02 WU Modem Bay (See Group 01 for Listing of Parts)
0201 Cabinet CY-3397A/G (Modified)
(See Group 0101 for Listing Parts)
03 Future Equipment Bay (See Group 01 for Listing of Parts)
0301 Cabinet CY-3397A/G (Modified)
See Group OlOl for Listing of Parts)
04 Future Equipment Bay
0401 Cabinet CY-3397A/G (Modified)
(See Group 0101 for Listing of Parts)
0402 Relay Component Modem
4-1
5-3
5-5
A-l
E-l
E-5
E-5
E-5
E-5
E-5
E-5
TM11-5895-932-14&P
G r o u p
05 Future Equipment Bay (See Group 01 for Listing of Parts)
0501 Cabinet CY-3397A/G (Modified)
(See Group 0101 for Listing of Parts)
06 Black Distribution Frame Bay
0601 Cabinet CY-3397A/G (Modified)
(See Group 0101 for Listing of Parts)
07 Black DC Patch Bay
0701 Cabinet CY-3397A/G (Modified)
(See Group 0101 for Listing of Parts)
0702 Multi-Circuit Patch Panel (Panel 1, Circuits 1 to 16)
0703 Multi-Circuit Patch Panel (Panel 2, Circuits 17 to 32)
(See Group 0702 for Listing of Parts)
0704 Multi-Circuit Patch Panel (Panel 3, Circuits 33 to 48)
(See Group 0702 for Listing of Parts)
0705 Lo-Level DC Patch Panel (No1)
0706 Lo-Level DC Patch Panel (No 2)
(See Group 0705 for Listing of Parts)
0707 Miscellaneous Patch Panel
0708 Interbay Patch Panel. DC (See Group 0707 for Listing of Parts)
08 Test Bay
0801 Cabinet CY-3397A/G (Modified)
(See Group 0101 for Listing of Parts)
0802 Noise Measuring Set (Northeast TTS-37BR)
[See TM 11-6625- 2426- 15 for Parts)
0803 Test Set (Bert 901) (Commercial Repair) (No Parts Authorized)
0804 Oscilloscope (Textronic R561 B)
(See TM 11-6625- 1706- 15 for Parts)
0805 Transmission Measuring Set (HP 3550BR)
[See TM 11-6625-602- 15 for Parts)
0806 Miscellaneous Patch Panel (See Group 0707 for Listing of Parts)
0807 VF Interbay Patch Panel (See Group 0707 for Listing of Parts)
0808 DC Interbay Patch Panel (See Group 0708 for Listing of Parts)
09 VF Entrance Frame and Patch Bay
0901 Cabinet CY-3397A/G (Modified)
(See Group 0101 for Listing of Parts)
0902 Dual Speaker Panel Commercial Repair (No Parts Authorized)
0903 2W Audio Patch Panel (Panel 1 Circuits 1 to 12)
0904 2W Audio Patch Panel (Panel 2, Circuits 13 to 24)
(See Group 0903 for Listing of Parts)
0905 2W Audio Patch Panel (Panel 3, Circuits 25 to 36)
(See Group 0903 for Listing of Parts)
0906 2W Audio Patch Panel (Panel 4 Circuits 37 to 48)
(See Group 0903 for Listing of Parts)
0907 Patch Panel. Interbay (See Group 0707 for Listing of Parts)
0908 Intercom Handset Webster HS521 (No Parts Authorized)
10 Miscellaneous Equipment Bay
1001 Cabinet CY-3397A/G (Modified)
(See Group 0101 for Listing of Parts)
1002 Blank Panel W Audible Alarm (Commercial Repair)
(No Parts Authorized)
1003 Black Alarm Panel, Major-Minor Alarm
100301 Circuit Board Assembly (-48V)
1004 Intercom (Webster R-2812A) (Commercia1 Repair)
(No Parts Authorized)
1005 High Level DC Patch (Xmit)
1006 High Level DC Patch (Rec) (See Group 1005 for Listing of Parts)
1007 48VDC Power Supply (Sala 28- 1561-2) (Commercial Repair)
(No Parts Authorized)
11 Red Patch (Secure) Bay
Cabinet CY-3397A/G (Modified)
11
(See Group 0101 for Listing of Parts)
1102 Multi-Circuit Patch Panel (Panel 1 Circuits 1 to 16)
(See Group 0702 for Listing of Parts)
1103 Multi-Circuit Patch Panel (Panel 2 Circuits 17 to 32)
(See Group 0702 for Listing of Parts)
Paragraph
Page
E-6
E-6
E-6
E-6
E-7
E-7
E-7
E-7
E-8
E-8
E-8
E-9
E-9
i
i
i
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Paragraph
Group
Section
APPENDIX
1104 Multi-Circuit Patch Panel (Panel 3, Circuits 33 to 48)
(See Group 0702 for Listing of Parts)
1105 DC Low Level Patch Panel W/OCK and LP (Xmit)
1106 DC Low Level Patch Panel W/OCK and LP (Rec)
(See Group 11 (5 for Listing of Parts)
1107 Miscellaneous Patch Panel (See Group 0707 for Listing of Parts)
12 Red Frame Bay
1201 Cabinet CY-3397A/G (Modified)
(See Group 001 for Listing of Parts)
13 Red Patch (Unsecured) Bay
1301 Cabinet CY-3397A/G (Modified)
(See Group 0101 for Listing of Parts)
1302 Blank Panel W/Audible Alarm (Commercial Repair)
(No Parts Authorized)
1303 Alarm Panel, Major-Minor Alarm
(See Group 1003 for Listing of Parts)
130301 Circuit Board Assembly (-48V)
(See Group 100301 for Listing of Parts)
1304 Multi-Circuit Patch Panel (Panel 1, Circuits 1 to 16)
(See Group 0702 for Listing of Parts)
1305 Multi-Circuit Patch Panel (Panel 2, Circuits 17 to 32)
(See Group 0702 for Listing of Parts)
1306 Multi-Circuit Patch Panel (Panel 3, Circuits 33 to 48)
(See Group 0702 for Listing of Parts)
1307 DC Low Level Patch Panel W/OCK and LP (Xmit)
(See Group 1105 for Listing of Parts!
1308 DC Low Level Patch Panel W/0CK and LP (Rec)
(See Group 1105 for Listing of Parts)
1309 Miscellaneous Patch Panel (See Group 0707 for Listing of Parts)
1310 48 VDC Power Supply (Sala 28-1561-2) (Commercial Repair)
(No Parts Authorized)
14 Red/Black Isolator Bay
1401 Cabinet CY-3397A/G (Modified)
(See Group 0101 for Listing of Parts)
15 Future Bay
1501 Cabinet CY-3397A/G (Modified)
(See Group 0101 for Listing of Parts)
16 KG-34 Bay
1601 Cabinet CY-3397A/G (Modified
(See Group 0101 for Listing of Parts)
17 Comsec Autodin Ckt No 2 Bay
1701 Cabinet CY-3397A/G (Modified)
(See Group 0101 for Listing of Parts)
18 Comsec Auodin Ckt No 1 Bay
1801 Cabinet CY-3397A/G (Modified)
(See Group 0101 for Listing of Parts)
19 Telephone Intercomm Station (Webster “Teletalk")
III
Special Tools List (Not Applicable)
IV
National Stock Number and Part Number Index (Not Applicable)
F OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF SOLA CVDC POWER SUPPLY.
Catalog Number 28- 1561-2
G MAINTENANCE ALLOCATION
i v
Page
E-9
E-9
E-10
E-10
E-10
E-10
E-10
E-10
E-10
F - 1
G-l
TM11-5895-932-14&P
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
NUMBER
l-l
1-2
1-3
1-4
1-5
1-6
1-7
1-8
1-9
1-10
1-11
1-12
1-13
1-14
1-15
1-16
1-17
1-18
1-19
1-20
1-21
1-22
1-23
1-24
1-25
2-1
2-2
2-3
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-5
4-1
5-1
5-2
5-3
5-4
5-5
5-6
F-l
TITLE
Patch and Test Facility. Floor Plan
Patch and Test Facility. Row 1 Equipment Bays
Row 1 Equipment Bays, Configuration Diagram
Modem Bays 13,14,15
Signal Cable Connections to Modems
Black IDF Bay 16
Black Patch Bay 17
Cable Connections to Bay 17
Test Bay 18
Cable Connections to Bay 18
VF Frame & Patch Bay 19
Terminal Blocks on Rear of Bay 19
Cable Connections to Bay 19
Misc Bay 110
Cable Connections to Upper-Half of Bay 110
Cable Connections to Lower-Half of Bay 110
Patch and Test Facility, Row 2 Equipment Bays
Row 2 Equipment Bays, Configuration Diagram
Red Sec Patch Bay 21
Cable Connections to Bay 21
Red IDF Bay 22
Red Unsec Patch Bay 23
Cable Connections to Bay 23
Red/Black Isolator Bay 24
Row 3 Equipment Bays, Configuration Diagram
Data Processing Installation (DPI), Circuit Block Diagram
Voice Frequency Circuits, Block Diagram
Typical Circuit Configurations
Patching for Modem Substitution
Patching for Isolator Substitution
Typical Patching Arrangement for DCS Testing of AUTODIN Lines
Test Plug and Test Cord Use, Simplified Schematic Diagram
Typical BERT 901 Patching Arrangement
Troubleshooting the Communication Chain
Patch Modules. Simplified Schematic.
Major Alarm Panel, Schematic Diagram
AC Power Schematic. Black Power Panel (Main Room)
AC Power Schematic. Black Power Panel (COMSEC Room)
AC Power Schematic. Red Power Panel (COMSEC Room)
DC Power Distribution
Sola CVDC Power Supply 28-1561-2, Schematic Diagram
PAGE
NO
1-3
1- 5
1-7
1-9
1-11
1-12
1-13
1-14
1-16
1-17
1-18
1-19
1-20
1-21
1-22
1-23
1-24
1-25
1-27
1-28
1-29
1-30
1-31
1-32
1-33
2-3
2-5
2-7
3-1
3-5
3-6
3-8
3-9
4-6
5-2
5-4
5-6
5-7
5-8
5-9
v
TM11-5895-932-14&P
CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION
Section 1. GENERAL
1-1. Scope
a. This manual describes the Patch and Test
Facility at Letterkenny Army Depot, Chambersburg, Pennsylvania and provides instructions
for operating and maintaining the facility
equipment. A repair parts list (app B) is also
included.
b. Throughout this manual references are made
to other publications that cover equipment in the
facility. A complete listing of applicable
publications is provided in appendix A.
1-2. Indexes of Equipment Publications
a. DA Pam 310-4. R&r to the latest issue of
DA Pam 310-4 to determine whether there are new
editions, changes, or additional publications
pertaining to the equipment.
b. DA Pam 310-7. Refer to DA Pam 310-7 to
determine whether there are modification work
orders (MWOs) pertaining to the equipment.
1-3. Forms and Records
Equipment. Use equipment forms and records in
accordance with instructions in TM 38-750.
b. Station Operation and Maintenance. Use
forms and records in accordance with instructions
in the station Standard Operating Procedures
(SOP).
c. Plant-In-Place Records. Changes, corrections
and updating of Plant-In-Place Records (para 3-3)
should be reported to US Army Communications
Electronics Engineering Installation Agency (CEDFER), Fort Huachuca, Arizona 85613.
1-4. Administrative Storage
The procedures for administrative storage are
outlined in TM 740-90-1; however, the exact
procedure in repacking for limited storage depends
on the materials available and the conditions under
which the equipment is to be stored.
1-5. Destruction of Army Materiel
Refer to TM 750-244-2 for demolition procedures
for electronic equipment.
a. Reports of Maintenance and Unsatisfactory
Section II. DESCRIPTION AND DATA
1-6. Purpose and Use
The patch and test facility (PTF) installed at this
station provides a centralized point, which is part
of the Automated Telecommunication Center
rmy Depot in Chamthe interconnection of
Additionally, the PTF
provides access to all
incoming and outgoing communication lines,
transmission security, and line, and component
DC High level
DC Low level
Multichannel Jack appearances
COMSEC Facilities
AC Power
Red and black
DC Power Supplies
48 Vdc
1-7. Tabulated Data
Red/Black Isolation
( a p p A )
of installed
Circuits (FDX)
Autodin
Remote terminals
Patching Facilities
2/wire jack
appearances
VF
Number
2ea
18 ea (expandable to 24)
12ea
Number
48
Alarms
(Audible alarm and alarm
panel light)
Isolator
12 trans. 12 Rec
12 trans. 12 Rec
48 (3 bays)
KG- 13 (2 operation, 2 spare)
KG-34
120/208.3 phase 60 Hz
(supplied from three separate power distribution
panels)
Uses
Alarm panel signaling.
H/L- L/L operation and
testing purposes
Modulated light sources and
photosensitive receivers
Conditions
Loss of power, door open, high
temp(l30°)
1-8. Description of Patch and Test
General
Facility,
The Patch and Test Facility (PTF) is part of the
1 - 1
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Automated Telecommunications Center (ATCC) at
Letterkenny Army Depot. The PTF is installed in
the communications center in building 3, along
with the Automated Multimedia Exchange
(AMME) which it serves. The PTF equipment is
1-2
laid out in three rows (figure l-l) in two rooms,
using standard cabinets which accept 19 inch rackmounted equipment/components and provide
housing for cable distribution frames.
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure l-l Patch and Test Facility Floor Plan.
1
-
3
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Cable ducts for carrying signal and power cables
between the cabinets are installed under the floor.
Conduits from the cable ducts bring the cables and
power under the center of the cabinets. In addition, a
large conduit is connected between the signal line
filter panel (located in the ceiling) into the cable duct
to carry the entrance signal cable in the PTF. Power
for operating the cabinet components is taken from
outlets installed in the rear of cabinets or are wired
directly. The COMSEC equipment bays (3.1 through
3.4) in the cryptovault are part of special circuits not
covered in this manual.
1-9. Row 1 Equipment Bays
The Row 1 equipment bays are located in the left
side of the comcenter. Row 1 equipments (fig. 1-2)
include Western Union bay 1.1, modem bays 1.3,
1 - 4
1.4, and 1.5, black IDF bay 1.6, black patch bay
1.7, test equipment bay 1.8, VF frame and patch
bay 1.9, and miscellaneous bay 1.10. The Western
Union and Timplex modems are furnished and
maintained by contractors. A configuration of
equipment bays is shown in figure 1.3.
a. Western Union Bay 1.1. Western Union
(WU) modems are installed in bay 1.1. The cabinet
is connected to the underground cable ducts with
conduits that carry signal cables and black power.
The signal cable terminates on the VR entrance
frame (channels 47 and 48).
b. Modem Bays 1.3, 1.4, and 1.5 (fig.
1-4). Modem bay 1.3 contains a WU Codex 9600
Data Modem, an associated patch panel, and eight
additional WU 2200/24
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 1-2 Patch and Test Facility, Row 1 Equipment Rays
1 - 5
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 1-4 Modem Bays 13 14 15
1 - 9
TM11-5895-932-14&P
modems. Modem bay 1.4 contains four WU
2200/24 modems and the Versitron equipment for
the Communications Line Interface (CLI). Modem
bay 1.5 contains eight Timplex modems with
associated power supplies and a MDS power
supply. Signal cables connect on the rear of each
individual modem (fig. 1-5).
c. Black IDF Bay 1.6 (fig. 1-6) The black IDF
bay contains cable terminating blocks mounted on
a metal frame. The cable blocks are used to terminate and/or crossconnect signal cables on the
black side of the signal path through the PTF.
d. Black Patch Buy 1.7 (fig 1-7). The black
patch bay contains seven patch modules (patch
panels) and a rollout shelf. Three patch panels are
multicircuit or 12-wire types. Each multicircuit
module handles 16 each 12-wire data circuits which
1-10
am connected between the AMME (COMP) and
appropriated circuit modems (modem) by cable
connectors on the rear of the module Two dc
patch modules are of the 2-wire type, each containing 12 normalled through circuits and used for
low level dc patching (black). The bottom panels
are used for miscellaneous (MISC) and interbay
(INT BAY) 2-wire connections and has facilities
for 48 two-wire patch connections. All permanent
connections to the patch panels are at the rear of
the bay (fig. 1-8). The MISC patch panel has the
first 8 rows (top and bottom jacks) connected to
the monitor (MON IN) jack strip of each
multichannel patch panel. The INT BAY panel is
tied directly (jack to jack) to the INT BAY patch
panel (dc) on bay 1.8.
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 1-5 Signal Cable Connections to Moderns
1-11
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 1-6
1-12
TM11-5895-932-l4&P
Figure 1-7 Black Patch Bay 1 7
1-13
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Flgure 1-8 Cable Connections to Bay 17
1-14
TM11-5895-932-14&P
e. Test Buy 1.8 (fig. 1-9). Test bay equipment
consists of four items of test equipment, two interbay (INT BAY) patch panels, one miscellaneous
(MISC) panel, and a pullout shelf. Each INT BAY
patch panel provides connections to another bay
(through its INT BAY patch) (dc to dc, vf to vf).
The MISC patch panel provides external patching
to all test equipment. Teat equipment power input
connections are made at the cabinet rear, along
with the signal and cable connectors (fig. 1-10).
f. VF Frame & Patch Bay 1.9 (fig. 1 -11). Bay
1.9 contains a dual speaker panel, four two-wire vf
patch modules, and INT BAY patch module (vf),
and cable terminal blocks located on the bottom of
the rack (fig. 1-12). Each 2W jack panel has the
capability for 24 two-wire normal through circuits.
Connections are made through connectors on the
rear of the patching modules to the cable terminal
blocks (fig. 1-13). The main signal cable from the
signal line filter panel (in the ceiling) is connected
to the terminating blocks.
g. Miscellaneous Equipment Bay 1.10 (fig.
1-14). Bay 1.10 is designated the miscellaneous
equipment bay. It contains the audible alarm, the
black alarm panel, intercom, 48-vdc power supply,
and two high-level dc patch panels. All wiring
connections (signal and power) are made on the
rear of the components (figs. 1-16 and 1-16).
1-10. Row 2 Equipment Bays
The Row 2 equipment bays (fig. 1-17) are located
in the Crypto Vault area and includes two red
patch bays (secure and unsecure), one red IDF
bay, and two isolator bays (red and black). A
configuration of Equipment bays is shown in figure
1-18.
1 - 1 5
TM11-5895-932-148&P
Figure 1-9 Test Bay 1.8
1-16
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 1-10 Cable Connections to Bay 18
1-17
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 1-11 VF Frame and Patch Bay 19
1-18
T M 1 1 - 5 8 9 5 - 9 3 2 - 1 4 & P
Figure 1 12
1 - 1 9
T M 1 1 - 5 8 9 5 - 9 3 2 - 1 4 & P
Figure 1-13
1-20
Cable Connectlons to Bay 19
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 1-14 Misc Bay 1 10
1-21
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 1 15 Cable Connections to Upper Half of Bay 1 10
1-22
T M 1 1 - 5 8 9 5 - 9 3 2 - 1 4 & P
Figure 1-16 Cable Connections to Lower Half of Bay 1 10
1-23
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure
1 - 2 4
1-17
Patch and Test Facility, Row 2 Equipment Bays
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 1-18 Row 2 Equipment Bays, Configuration Diagram
1
-
2
5
TM11-5895-932-14&P
a. Red Sec Patch Bay 2.1 (Secure) (fig.
1-19). Six patching modules and a pullout shelf
are installed in the front panel of red dc patch bay
2.1. Three patch modules are 12-wire types con16 individual patch circuits. Two patch
modules are 2-wire type containing 12 individual
patch circuits each. The last patch module is used
for miscellaneous (MISC) circuits containing 48
individual patch modules. The first eight rows (top
and bottom) are wired to the monitor (MON IN)
test pins of each multichannel patch panel. All
connections to the patch panels are made at the
mar of the bay (fig. 1-20).
b. Red IDF Bay 2.2 (fig. 1-21). The red IDF
contains cable terminal blocks mounted on a metal
frame. The blocks are used to terminate and
crow-connect circuits within the PTF.
c. Red Unsec Patch Buy 2.3 (Unsecure) (fig.
1-26
1-22). Bay 2.3 is designated the red dc patch bay.
It contains six patching modules: three 16 circuit,
12-wire patching modules, two 12 circuit, 2-wire
patch modules, and one miscellaneous (MISC)
patch module (48, 2-wire jack appearances), a
major alarm panel, and an alarm buzzer. All
connections to the patch panels are made at the
rear of the bay (fig. 1-23).
d. Red/Black Isolator Bay 2.4 (fig. 1-24). Two
separate side by side cabinets, using special radio
frequency (rf) door seals and a series of clamps
around the edges to hold the doors tightly closed,
are used to house the red/black isolator circuitry.
Black and red signals and power are connected
through conduits from under the floor cable ducts
into the cabinets. The right cabinet contains all the
black signals, the left cabinet the red signals.
T M 1 1 - 5 8 9 5 - 9 3 2 - 1 4 & P
Figure 1-19 Red Sec Patch Bay 2 1
1-27
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 1-20 Cable Connections to Bay 21
1-28
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 1-21 Red IDF Bay 22
1-29
T M 1 1 - 5 8 9 5 - 9 3 2 - 1 4 & P
Figure 1-22 Red Unsec Patch Bay 23
1-30
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 1-23 Cable Connections to Bay 23
1-31
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 1-24 Red Black Isolator Bay 24
l-32
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 1-25 Row 3 Equipment Bays, Configuration Diagram
1-33
T M 1 1 - 5 8 9 5 - 9 3 2 - 1 4 &
CHAPTER 2
FACILITY
ClRCUlT
2-1. General
This chapter provides an introduction to the
circuits and signals that are handled by the PTF.
The introduction is made on a block diagram and
simplified circuit diagram level. Complete circuit
details including pin numbers, and cable routing is
available in the plant-in-place records (para 3-3)
which are available at every telecommunication
station. Detailed functioning of the individual
items of equipment represented by the blocks in
the block diagram is covered in separate manuals
(app A).
2-2. Station Description
a. The PTF described in this manual is part of
the Automated Telecommunications Station at
Letterkenny Army Depot, Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. The station itself is a Defense Communication System (DCS) Automatic Digital
Network (AUTODIN) tributary station, part of a
worldwide system of tributaries interconnected
through 19 Automatic Switching Centers (ASC),
which function to route messages and data traffic
between tributaries. Each ASC essentially functions to receive, store, and forward messages
between tributaries and ASCs but also performs
other functions in connection with the traffic it
handles, such as error indication, proper delivery
address, timely delivery (automatic time mark),
and message security. The ASC also contains
equipment which is used to interface with different
types of equipment contained at the tributary
stations and to transmit and receive the digital
messages on the voice frequency communications
channels used between stations.
b. For the purpose of this discussion the Letterkenny Automated Telecommunications Station
can be separated into three functional sections: the
Patch and Test Facility (PTF), the Automated
Multimedia Exchange (AMME);
and a system of
remote terminals.
(1) PTF. The patch and test portion of the
station is used to terminate all communication
lines for the station. It contains equipment for
DESCRIPTION
minals. As with the ASCs, AMME also performs
other functions in connection with the transmission
of the data and message traffic. The AMME
contains equipment to record all traffic; send
traffic to the proper remote terminal (if addressed
properly), provide AUTODIN routing symbols on
outgoing messages; and other message handling
functions. The AMME equipment is leased and
maintained by a private contractor.
(3) Remote terminals. There are several
different equipment configurations used at the
remote terminals. The equipments required depends
on the traffic intended to the remote terminal
(narrative teletype or fast speed data). A remote
terminal may have any combination of a card
reader, a card punch, a line printer, and a visual
display unit (VDU); fast data systems have
equipments unique to their needs.
2-3. Facility Signal Block Diagram
a. Station Signal Routing (fig. 2-1). The signal
flow for received and transmitted traffic to the
telecommunications station passes through the
PTF. The received signal flow from the ASC enters
the station through signal line filters to the PTF,
is processed and fed to AMME, where the heading
is read, and fed back through the PTF to the
intended remote terminal. A transmitted signal
from a remote terminal follows the reverse of a
received signal, from the remote terminal to the
PTF, to AMME, back to PTF, and then to the
ASC.
b. ASC Signal. The signal received from, and
also transmitted to the ASC, is a data message
which has been incrypted for message security and
changed to an analog signal for transmittal on the
voice frequency lines between stations. On the
block diagram (fig. 2-1) the ASC signal is shown
entering the PTF at the signal line filter panel
(SLF).
(1) The ASC signal proceeds through the PTF
to and from the AMME through several significant
blocks. The blocks represent equipment which
either modifies the signal, such as the modem or
cryptobay, or provides access to the signal for
testing, such as the patch panel blocks. The
signal line filter panel, which contains a separate,
shielded, low pass filter for every signal line that
enters the PTF, prevents the signal lines from
radiating unwanted and possibly security compromising signals.
2-1
TM11-5895-932-l4&P
(2) The Western Union (WU) modulatordemodulator (modem) requires four wires input on
the ASC side of the equipment and twelve wires
2 - 2
output on the AMME side of the equipment. Half of
each wire set (six lines) is used for receiving, the
other half for transmitting.
T M 1 1 - 5 8 9 5 - 9 3 2 - 1 4 & P
Figure 2-1 Data Processing Installation (DPI) Circuit, Block Diagram
2-3
TM11-5895-932-14&P
(a) The signal on the ASC side of the WU
a carrier or tone at 1800 Hz. The carrier
is frequency modulated (fm) at the digital rate
(2400 bits /second) with the data (message) information. The purpose of the WU modem is to
convert the signal received from the ASC to
digital, direct current signal, for use by the
AMME and convert the digital signal originating
in the AMME to the fm signal transmitted to the
ASC. The baud rates to the ASC are 1200 and
4800.
(b) On the AMME side of the WU modem,
data, control and clock signals are exchanged with
the AMME. The data contains the message information received from or to be transmitted to the
ASC. The control signals are dc levels which are
exchanged between the AMME and the modem
which allows the AMME to control the modem.
The clock signals am used in controlling the
transfer of the individual data bits between the
AMME and the modem.
(3) The Communication Security (COMSEC)
equipment provides for security of the data
(message) transmitted by encrypting them
automatically. Received data, which has been
encrypted at the ASC, is decrypted automatically
in the crypto equipment. The COMSEC equipment
provides a dividing point between red and black
signal lines.
(4) As the communication lines move between
the AMME and the signal line filter panel they
encounter three patch panels: the vf, the red dc,
and the black dc. The lines normally pass through
the patch panels but can be interrupted or
monitored by use of patch cords or plugs. The
patch panels are used for testing, rerouting and
modem is
2-4
monitoring signals at different points in the signal
routing chain.
c. Remote Terminal Signal (fig. 2-2). The information and data flow between the AMME and
the remote terminals are voice frequency (vf) signals
(analog) compared to the digital data between the
AMME and ASC. The remote terminal lines are
shown entering the PTF.
(1) Following the circuits through from the
AMME through the PTF, several significant
blocks are encountered. The most significant block
is the modem (modulator/demodulator) which
transposes the dc digital signal (used in the
AMME) into the analog frequency signal which is
used on the voice frequency transmission lines to
the individual remote terminals. The second most
significant black is the red/black isolator which
functions to electrically separate the red signal
from the black signal wiring. Other blocks
remaining are the patch panel blocks and the
signal line filter panel. The patch panels and the
signal line filter panel function in the same manner
as in the AUTODIN signal line described
previously.
(2) The teletype dc circuit channels pass
through the PTF low and high level dc black patch
panels. They can be wired through the red-black
isolators, red dc patch panel, digital line interface
unit low-high dc interface, and signal line filter
panel. The remote terminals for these lines are
teletypewriters and require high level dc voltages
to operate. The function of a digital line interface
unit (DLIU) is to transpose the low level digital
signals used in the AMME to high level signals
used to transmit the message. Other blocks in the
PTF signal flow function as previously explained.
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 2-2 Voice Frequency Circuits, Block Diagram
2 - 5
T M 1 1 - 5 8 9 5 - 9 3 2 - l 4 & P
2-4. Circuit Configurations
The circuits that pass through the PTF can be
placed in three general categories: the teletype (dc)
lines, the AUTODIN lines, and the lines to the
remote terminals (vf) (both secure and unsecure).
The simplified diagram (fig. 2-3) shows the
configurations and symbols that represent the
major equipment blocks and interface.
a. DC lines. The dc lines handle low speed
teletpye signals as shown on the left hand side of
the diagram. Moving across the diagram from left
to right, the line encounters the red dc patch as
showon by the symbol for two normal through and
two monitor jacks. The circle symbols on the line
represent terminals in the distribution frame to
which the wire pairs are connected and can be
identified on the station as-built cross-connect
drawings. The red-black isolators, which provide
isolation of the red wiring from the black wiring;
the black dc patch; the DLIU which changes the
low level signals used by AMME to high level
2-6
signal sent to the teletypewriter terminals; and the
high level dc patch panel.
b. AUTODIN Lines. The AUTODIN lines
handle the two AUTODIN duplex lines that travel
through the PTF. Shown on the left side of the
diagram is the station entrance at the signal line
filter and two sets of panel jacks at the vf patch
panel. Following the signal through to the AMME
there is the WU modem block, the black dc patch
panel, the WU junction box, and the red dc patch.
The WU modem functions to modulate the AMME
signal or transmission to the ASC and demodulate
the signal from the ASC. The signal between
modem and AMME is carried on 12 wires and
requires a special 12-wire patch panel. Six wires
are used for each direction of signal flow. The WU
junction box is the entrance point to the COMSEC
devices; it also provides for switching in spare
COMSEC units and testing by connecting the
transmit and received lines together (back-to-back
testing).
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 2-3 Typical Circuit Configurations
2-7
TM11-5895-932-14&P
c. Remote Terminal Lines The remote terminal
lines am configured similar to the AUTODIN lines
in that they are duplex (send and receive at the
same time) and use a modem Following the lines
from the left side of figure 2 -3, there is the signal
line filter panel, the vf patch panel, modem, the
black dc patch panel, the red/black isolators
(unsecure circuits) or COMSEC (secure circuits)
and the red dc patch panel (secure or unsecure).
2-8
The modem performs the same function as the WU
modem does, that is, it modulates the signal for
transmission on voice frequency lines and
demodulates the vf line signal for use by AMME.
The red/black isolators provide a means of
isolating the red signal wiring from the black
signal wiring as previously explained for the unsecure circuits.
TM11-5895-932-14&P
CHAPTER 3
PATCH AND TEST FACILITY OPERATIONS
Section 1. OPERATIONAL PRACTICES AND METHODS
3-1. General
The purpose of this chapter is to identify and
establish
maintenance
responsibilities and
procedures which will contribute to successful PTF
operation. While there are many aspects to
successful PTF operation, there are none more
important than those described in this chapter.
When PTF personnel become familiar with
procedures in this chapter and with the circuits
of the PTF and its equipment, they will be contributing to the successful PTF operation.
Information contained herein will aid operating
personnel and bring out the importance of
maintaining accurate maintenance data. It also
points out many items which could be overlooked
by maintenance personnel. This information should
especially be read and studied by new personnel to
familiarize themselves with proper station
operating procedures.
3-2. Duties of PTF Personnel
The basic duties of PTF personnel is to maintain
communication. Maintaining communications can
be further broken down to restoration of failure
and maintaining circuit quality. Both of these
functions require a knowledge of the circuit status
at all times. The basic requirements can be further
divided into individual duties below:
a. Perform quality control checks and tests on
circuits and equipment in the PTF.
b. Provide assistance to the ASCs and remote
terminals in the checking of circuits.
c. Substitute equipment or channels for
maintenance purposes or to isolate circuit and
equipment faults.
d. Answering fault alarms and restore communications.
e. Perform the required administration and
recordkeeping.
f. Troubleshooting and repair of station
equipment.
g. Maintenance of records (para 3 -3).
3-3. Maintenance of Records
Maintenance of records, as defined here, is to
insure that all the PTF technical data (technical
manuals, plant-in-place records, circuit drawings,
circuit and switch markings) is up to date and
complete. PTF records are divided into the
following categories.
a. Plant-in-Place Records. Plant-in-place records
are those engineering drawings, cable run lists,
planning documents, etc., which show the site
electronic equipment installation. These records also
show planning for future changes and are essential
to site operation.
(1) Plant-in-place records (sometimes called
“as-builts”) are prepared by the engineering/installation agency. The plant-in-place records are
first developed as part of the engineering plan done
prior to the construction update of a communication station. After the work on the communication station is completed, the plant-in-place
records must be updated to document the installation and become the basis of any new additions or future station planning.
(2) Plant-in-place records are also used by
operation and maintenance (0 and M) personnel as
maintenance data. This is because plant-in-place
records show all circuit and wiring connections
made in the telecommunications station. Corrected
copies of the original drawings must be retained at
the telecommunication site and used as a guide in
troubleshooting and fault location.
(3) Prior to site construction, errors can
appear in the plant-in-place records as they are
being produced. These errors should become obvious during the installation process as equipment
is installed and connected. Usually the mistakes
can be corrected during the electrical testing of the
site. Corrections to the plant-in-place records are
made on prints (by installation personnel) and sent
to the engineer/installation agency for correction of
the originals. Corrected prints are returned to the
telecommunication site for use in troubleshooting,
circuit and wiring tracing, etc. While the
corrections are made by the installation personnel,
site O and M personnel have the responsibility to
insure that all corrections are indeed completely
accurate and portray the equipment as installed.
(4) The importance of accurate and complete
plant-in-place records cannot be overemphasized.
They are needed by the communication engineering
agency to document the site equipment and circuits and to provide information for updating,
modernizing or expanding the site at some future
date. Plant-in-place records are also used daily by
the site personnel for circuit tracing and
troubleshooting. If this circuit tracing or
3-1
TM11-5895-932-14&P
troubleshooting is brought about in an effort to
restore communications, a faulty or incorrect
diagram can add hours onto the time of the
communications outage. Simple fault location
becomes a long drawn out procedure when a faulty
drawing complicates it even more. Plant-in-place
records must be accurate and complete prior to
time of the failure which interrupts communications.
b. Equipment Manuals. The equipment manuals
which come under the heading of station records
are all manuals, commercial and military, that
cover the individual items of station equipment.
These items of equipment are either mounted in a
rack or, in the case of the red/black isolators, are
whole equipment racks. They are generally not
built by the installation/engineering agency but
procured as a separate item from a separate
company. A list of equipment manuals is included
in appendix A.
c. Reference Publications Reference publications
which should be included in the station records are
those manuals, documents and other data which
provide background, standards, or testing information. A list of these types of documents are
included in appendix A.
d. Locally Prepared Data. Locally prepared
data which is included as part of station records
are the patch board labels. labels on the power
load centers denoting circuit breaker application,
any simplified patching diagram placed on patch
bays, and trouble logs. In general, any instruction
or aid to operation and troubleshooting of the
equipment can be considered part of the station
records.
Section II. PATCHING OPERATIONS
3-4. Patching, General
a. The communication lines or paths that run
through the PTF are provided with patch boards
which are connected between equipments and at
the line entrance and exit points. The patch boards
are equipped with jacks that allow for either a
parallel circuit connection for monitoring (MON) or
a series connection which opens the circuit and
connects another circuit in its place. The series
jacks on the patch boards are used for testing and
temporarily
circuit
paths for
rearranging
troubleshooting and for the restoration of communications.
b. Successful patching requires knowledge of the
circuits and equipments, a technique that comes
from practice, and adherence to certain
precautionary measures.
(1) Circuit Knowledge. Knowledge of the
circuits and the type of signals they handle is
essential for proper patching. Like signals have to
be patched to like signals. Signal paths must be
maintained, i.e., output from one item of equipment must go into the input of the equipment
patched to.
(2) Operational Spares. Operation spare lines
and equipment must be maintained. Standby
equipment maintained in these spare circuits are
used when patching around a defective item.
(3) Precautions. Patches should not be made
haphazardly, without thought to the interruption
of traffic. Always know what is on the circuit to be
interrupted. When possible, coordinate with others
affected so that when circuits are patched no
traffic is being passed.
3-2
(4) Technique. Develop
the
habit
of
rechecking your cord and plug positions just prior
to completing the patch. Set the patch up with the
cable plugs only loosely set into the patch jacks.
Then recheck the signal flow prior to plugging in
the idle sections: then plug in idle section fully;
and finally complete the patch by setting in (or
throwing) the plugs to the active line section
simultaneously.
(5) Prohibitions. Although the PTF was
designed to minimize the chances that red and
black circuits can be patched together, operators
should especially be alert to this possibility. Red
circuits must not be patched to black circuits. The
electrical Isolation of circuits provided by the
red/black isolator cabinets must not be ignored.
3-5. Patching for Equipment Substitution
Examples of typical patch cord connections are
provided here to illustrate connections for patching-in substitute equipment. PTF personnel
should examine the diagrams to understand the
principles involved.
a. Modem Substitution (fig. 3-1). This patch
removes the modem on circuit number 2 and
substitutes a spare modem from circuit number 21.
At bay 1.7, a multicircuit patch cord is connected
from the COMP jack of channel 2 to the MODEM
jack of channel (circuit) 21. On the vf frame and
patch bay 1.9, two 2-wire patch cords connect the
modem transmit and receive lines from circuit 21
to the lines of circuit 2.
TM11-5895-932-14*P
Figure 3-1. Patching for Modem Substitution
3-3
TM11-5895-932-14&P
b. Isolator Substitution (fig. 3-2). Isolator
substitution involves the multicircuit (12-wire)
patch cords. In this case, it is assumed that
operational spares for the isolators are connected
to circuit 19. On the black patch, the MODEM
jack of circuit 2 is connected to the COMP jack of
circuit 19. On the other side of the isolator cabinet
(red dc unsecure patch), the MODEM jack of
circuit 19 is connected to the COMP jack of circuit
number 2 to complete the patch.
3-6. Testing Patches
Testing patches, as described here, are defined as
those patches which connect the analog test
equipment (noise measuring set, transmission
measuring set) into the vf lines. The patching
arrangements for these patches are shown on
figure 3-3. A schematic and a drawing
representing the way the actual patch cords are set
up are shown. PTF personnel should study this
3 - 4
diagram prior to performing patching for testing.
The types of tests, the performance standards and
procedures to be used for these tests are contained
in various DCA manuals, listed in appendix A.
3-7. Patching for Fault Location
Patching for fault location includes loopback by
use of special test cords and plugs and use of the
BERT for troubleshooting.
a. Loopback Loopback is a method for connecting the transmitting lines of a communication
device to its received lines. The purpose of the
loopback is so that a standard, or test message
may be sent from and to the communication device
for comparison of the transmitted to the received
message for testing purposes. At the PTF, request
for loopback comes from either the AMME or the
remote terminals. Two special loopback cables and
one special plug are provided at the PTF. The use
of the cables and plug is illustrated in figure 3 -4.
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 3-2 Patching for Isolator Substitution
3-5
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 3-3 Typical Patching Arrangement for DCS Testing of AUTODIN Lines
3-6
TM11-5895-932-14&P
(1) Black Test Patch Cord. The black test
cord is identified by the plug ends. One end has
three pins and the other nine pins. It is used for
looping back the AMME signal as shown in figure
3-4B.
(2) Red Test Patch Cord. The red test cord is
identified by the plug ends. One end has three pins
and the other has five pins. It is used in conjunction with the red test plug for looping back a
secure remote terminal line and is shown in figure
3-4C.
(3) Red Test Plug. The red test plug is used
to loop back a remote terminal signal as shown in
the diagram, figure 3-4C and D.
b. BERT Patching. When the BERT is used for
troubleshooting, as described in chapter 4, it is
connected and patched into the system as shown in
figure 3-5.
3-7
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 3-4 Test Plug and Test Cord Use, Simplified Schematic Diagram
3 - 8
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 3-5. Typical BERT 901 Patching Arrangement
3 - 9
TM11-5895-932-l4&P
CHAPTER 4
MAINTENANCE
Section I. GENERAL
4-1. Scope of the Maintenance
4-2. Materials and Test Equipment Required for
Maintenance for a PTF includes the following
functions:
a. Daily and weekly preventive maintenance
checks and services (para 4-5).
b. Monthly preventive maintenance checks and
services (para 4-6).
c. Quarterly preventive maintenance checks and
services (para 4-7).
d. Cleaning (para 4-8).
e. Touchup painting (para 4-9).
f. Troubleshooting.
Organizational Maintenance
a. Materials.
(1) Lint-free cloth.
(2) Brush (MIL-G-7241).
(3) Distilled water.
(4) Lubricating oil,
general purpose,
preservative (PL Special).
(5) Fine sandpaper, No. 000.
b. Test Equipment. All rack-mounted test
equipment in test bay 1.8 and that listed in
Appendix G, Maintenance Allocation.
Section II. PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES
4-3. Preventive Maintenance
Preventive maintenance is the systematic care,
inspection, and servicing of equipment to maintain
it in serviceable condition and assure maximum
operational capability. Preventive maintenance is
the responsibility of PTF maintenance personnel.
a. Systematic Care. The procedures given in
paragraphs 4-4, 4-5. 4-6, and 4-7 cover routine
systematic care and cleaning essential to proper
upkeep and operation of the equipment.
b. Preventive Maintenance Checks and Services. The preventive maintenance checks and
service charts (paras 4-5 through 4-7) outline
functions to be performed at specific intervals
(para 4-4). These checks and services are to
maintain equipment in good general (physical)
condition and in good operating condition. To
assist maintenance personnel in maintaining the
equipment in peak condition, the charts indicate
what to check, how to check, and the normal
conditions. The reference column lists the
paragraphs or manuals that contain detailed repair
or replacement procedures. If a defect is noted that
cannot be remedied by the PTF maintenance
personnel, refer to a high category of maintenance
or repair.
4-4. Preventive Maintenance Checks and Service
Periods
Preventive maintenance checks and services of the
PTF are required on a daily, weekly, monthly, and
quarterly basis, unless otherwise directed by the
station commander.
a. Paragraph 4-5 specifies checks and services
that must be accomplished weekly and under the
special conditions listed below.
(1) When the equipment is initially installed.
(2) When the equipment is reinstalled after
removal for any reason.
(3) At least once each month if the equipment
is maintained in standby condition.
b. Paragraphs 4-6 and 4-7 specify additional
maintenance checks and services that must be
performed monthly and quarterly, respectively.
4-5. Daily and Weekly Preventive Maintenance
Checks and Service Charts
Perform the maintenance functions indicated in the
daily and weekly preventive maintenance checks
and service charts below, daily and weekly,
respectively. Adjustment of the maintenance interval must be made to compensate for any
unusual operating conditions.
4-1
TM11-5895-932-14&P
References
None
a
Para 4-8
b None
None
None
Sequence
No
References
Item to be inspected
Para 4-8
1
Cleanliness
2
Connectors
Check cables and connectors for secure fit
3
Mounting
Check to be sure that the units are securely mounted.
4
Operation
During normal operation. observe that the
mechanical action of each switch and control IS
smooth and free of binding
None
5
Lamps
Check all indicating lamps Replace defective
lamps
None
None
None
4-6. Monthly Preventive Maintenance Checks and
made to compensate for any unusual operating
Service Charts
Perform the maintenance functions indicated in the
monthly preventive maintenance checks and
service chart below, once each month. A month is
defined as approximately 30 calendar days.
Adjustment of the maintenance interval must be
conditions. Equipment maintained in a standby
condition must have monthly preventive checks
and service. Equipment in limited storage requires
services before operation but not daily and weekly
preventive maintenance.
4-2
TM11-5895-932-14&P
a Patch and Test Facility (Monthly).
Sequence
No
Inspect the station grounding system
Grounding System
Check all hinges. latches, and metal-to-metal
moving parts, as necessary
a Clean and paint bare metal parts
b Clean all air filters
Movable parts
Para 4-8 and 4-9
Cables, wires, and cords
Repair insulation cuts and abrasions with electrical
insulation tape
None
Electrical system
Report any indication of defective switches, switchplates, outlets, and receptacles to Post Maintenance
None
Equipment mountings
Check to see that equipment mounting racks.
frames, shelves, braces, and clamps are not bent.
broken, or out of shape to endanger equipment or
personnel
None
Fuses
Check fuses at equipment Replace defective fuses
Verify that all operating fuses are of the correct
value Check spare fuses for proper value and quantity
None
(Monthly). Perform periodic
b. Equipment
checks and services on each equipment in the
facility (app A).
4-7.
References
Procedure
Item to be inspected
entive Maintenance Checks
ly
and Service Charts
required on the PTF. Periodic daily, weekly and
monthly services constitute a part of the quarterly
preventive maintenance checks and services and
must be performed concurrently. All deficiencies
will be recorded and corrected.
Quarterly preventive maintenance checks are
a. Patch and Test Facility (Quarterly).
Sequence
No
I
References
Item to be inspected
1
Publications
Check to see that all publications are complete.
serviceable. and current
None
2
Mounting
Verify that all bolts, nuts, and washers are correctly positioned and properly tightened Check for
cracked, bent, or broken brackets
None
3
Spare parts
Check all spare parts for general condition and
method of storage There should be no evidence of
overstock. and all shortages must be on requisition
None
b. Equipment (Quarterly).
Sequence
No
Item to be inspected
P r o c e d u r e
R e f e r e n c e s
1
Completeness
See that the equipment
2
Preservation
Check all surfaces for evidence of fungus Remove
rust and corrosion and spot-paw bare spots
Para 4-8 and para 4-9
Verify that plugs. sockets, and lacks are clean, mltact. and not loose fitting
None
3
Connections
I
IS
complete
Appendix B
4-3
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Sequence
No
I
Item to be Inspected
Procedure
4
Pluck-out items
Inspect clamps and sealing of pluck out items
Check for wrong. bent or broken parts
5
Knobs, dials and switches
While making the operating checks. observe that
the mechanical action of each knob dial, and switch
is smooth and free of external or internal binding
4-8. Cleaning
a. Remove dust and loose dirt from the exterior
surfaces with a clean, soft cloth.
WARNING
The fumes of trichloroethane are toxic.
Provide thorough ventilation whenever
used. DO NOT use near an open flame.
Trichloroethane is not flammable but
exposure of the fumes to an open flame or
hot metal forms highly toxic phosgene gas.
b. Remove grease and ground-in dirt from the
equipment; use a cloth dampened (not wet) with
trichloroethane.
CAUTION
Do Not use trichloroethane on plastic
display windows. Damage to equipment
may result.
c. Clean indicator glass; use a soft, clean cloth.
If difficulty in removing dirt occurs, dampen the
cloth with water. Mild soap may be used to make
cleaning more effective.
4-9. Touchup Painting Instructions
a When the finish on the exterior of the
equipment has been scarred or damaged, corrosion
may be prevented by touching-up the surfaces.
Touchup the surface as outlined in (1), (2), and (3)
below.
(1) Use No. 000 sandpaper to clean the
surface down to the bare metal; obtain a bright,
clean finish.
(2) Sand the area back to solid paint and
feather the paint edge that leads to exposed metal.
(3) Wipe the area clean and apply to metal
surfaces, one coat of zinc chromate metal primer
and two thin finish coats of enamel.
b. When a touchup paint job is necessary, apply
paint with a small brush.
Section III. TROUBLESHOOTING
4-10. General
a. Troubleshooting in the PTF involves determining which item is defective and then locating the
defect in the item or equipment unit. The first approach or step is on a system basis, to find out what
item of equipment is faulty in a series of equipment
that make up the communications chain. The typical
communication chain would be composed of the
AMME, red/black isolators, modem, the communication lines, the modem at the remote site, and
the remote terminal equipment. A fault in any item
will degrade or interrupt communications. The first
part of a troubleshooting procedure is to determine
which is the faulty equipment and remove it from the
system and restore communications. The second
step is to fix the faulty item of equipment.
b. The time required between steps one and two in
the troubleshooting procedure depends on the
complexity of the trouble. The simpler type troubles
which involve a complete breakdown, such as a
power supply failure which provides an alarm indication, can be located almost immediately.
Troubles that degrade the signal or increase the
errors received in a message require more time
because they require the use of test equipment and
test procedures.
4-4
c. Wow the second step or repairing the faulty
item of equipment is accomplished, depends on the
maintenance concept for that item. For example, if
the equipment is maintained by a contractor, PTF
personnel would simply take the equipment out of
service and notify the contractor. When the
equipment is to be maintained at the PTF, it is taken
out of service and repaired, u s i n g t h e
troubleshooting procedure in the applicable
equipment manual.
d. Troubleshooting procedures in this section
cover the procedure used in the first troubleshooting
step, that is, locating the faulty equipment in the
communication chain (para 4-11) and a
troubleshooting chart for a specific equipment item
which does not have its own manual. The PTF
equipment item that does not have its own manual is
the major alarm panel. The troubleshooting chart
(para 4-14) will aid in locating the defective component of the faulty major alarm panel. All other
equipment items have their own manuals, listed in
appendix A, which contains troubleshooting data for
the repair of the item.
4 -11. Troubleshooting the Communication Channel
a.
The communication chain which connects the
TM11-5895-932-14&P
AMME to the remote terminal equipment has
several functional areas that can degrade communications. The functional areas are shown on the
block diagram. figure 4-1. The degradation of
communication is a more significant problem to the
repairman that the complete failure which is usually
quite easily pinpointed to a single defective
equipment. In the communication chain shown, a
diagnostic program can be run on the AMME and
the terminal equipment. to determine whether they
are degrading the system. The transmission system,
represented by the modems and communication
lines, require a special item of test equipment, a bit
error rate tester (BERT). It generates a known
digital signal that can be transmitted to itself for the
purpose of determining any errors created in the
transmission. The number of errors are received by
the BERT and totalized and the total provides an
indication of the quality of the transmission medium
or circuits being tested. That is, a high number of
errors represents a transmission through faulty
circuits whereas a low number of errors recorded
represents normal transmission.
4-5
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 4-1 Troubleshooting the Communication Chain
4 - 6
TM11-5895-932-14&P
b. Use of the BERT in testing a typical communications system is shown in figure 4-1. In this
case, the BERT is connected into the modem side of
he black patch panel to supply signals to the
modem, the communications lines, and the remote
terminal modem. The lines are looped back at the
mints shown separately, progressing from left to
right on the diagram At each loopback point, the
BERT is operated and the number of errors
totalized. is noted. A significant increase in errors,
caused by the addition of a loopback segment,
pinpoints the cause of the trouble to that added
segment. If the modems prove defective by this
method, they should be replaced. If the communications lines prove defective they should be
further tested, using conventional analog techniques
and then report this trouble, symptom, and
measurement to the maintenance personnel
responsible for the communications lines
4-12. Station Drawings
In addition to this manual, a considerable amount of
maintenance data which is used for troubleshooting,
is contained in the station drawings. Site personnel
must become familiar with the information contained
in them and in their use, numbering system, order,
’
4-14. Troubleshooting C hart
for
Trouble symptom
Major
Alarm
--- __. - -
No audible tone from audible indicator with a switch illuminated
etc. Source of the information contained in the
station drawings are as follows:
a. Cable runs-routing through cable ducts
b. Cable pair color coding connections
c. Cross connection diagrams
d Location, stenciling of terminal blocks
e. Schematic diagrams
(1) Fuse and alarm panels
(2) Patch panels.
(3) Major alarm panel
f. Connection and distribution of
(1) DC power.
(2) AC power.
(3) Intercom.
4-13. Use of Troubleshooting Charts
Troubleshooting of this facility is based upon
malfunctions that may occur during normal
operation of the equipment in the system When a
trouble occurs, refer to the “Trouble Symptom”
column in the chart Perform the checks and
corrective measures indicated in the “Check and
Corrective Maintenance” column to locate and clear
the trouble.
Panel.
Probable trouble
- - - - - -
a Tellite has been pressed, locking
out audible tone
b Gnd from alarm panel not being
extended to audible indicator
c Gnd not being extended through
alarm panel
- f
h
Check and corrective
_ _ - --
maintenance
-
Check for trouble as indicated by
switch line
Provide ground to audible indicator with jumper wire If
alarm does not sound check for
voltage at audible indicator If
voltage is present audible indicator is defective
(1) If alarm sounds when ground
is provided, circuit trace ground
back to alarm panel
(1) If voltage is not found at
alarm, trace voltage back to -48
vdc power supply
If no ground is found coming out
of alarm panel it will be
necessary to remove alarm panel
from rack to gain access to the
component parts With the top
and bottom covers removed. make
a continuity check from the pm
number corresponding t o t h e
illuminated lamp to switch pins
NC1
COM1
Refer
to
LBAD-D-33163, symbol SW3.
for switch location If continuity
is obtained on COM1 but not
NC1, this indicates a defective
switch Care must be taken to
insure that the (+) lead of the
VOM IS connected to the
corresponding lead (1-45) This
4-7
TM11-5895-932-14&P
4-14. Troubleshooting Chart for Major Alarm Panel.
Item
4 - 8
Trouble symptom
Probable trouble
Audible tone from alarm converter
without any lamp indication on
alarm panels
Defective lamp in switch
Equipment is known to be in an
alarm condition with no alarm
indication given
Gnd n o t b e i n g e x t e n d e d f r o m
equipment to alarm panel.
Audible alarm interrupted only while
switch is pressed
Switch is defective
Check and corrective maintenance
(Continued)
will forward bias the diode in the
circuit, thus insuring a valid
VOM reading If continuity is
not obtained at either NC1 or
COM1. check associated diode
Refer to parts list, symbol CR1.
parts location
I Press switch SW1. All switches
should glow red. Press switch
SW2 All switches should glow
amber If any switch fads to glow
in either color, replace associated
bulb
b If all switches fail to light. check
circuit breaker located on front
panel Reset if found deactivated
Remove connector from back of alarm
panel, locate pm associated with
equipment a l a r m a n d c h e c k f o r
ground
If ground is found, internal wiring
of alarm panel is defective
b If no ground is found, circuit trace
wiring back to IDF where ground
originates Use station drawing
showing the alarm wiring
n order to check the switch coil, it
will be necessary to remove the panel
from the hay to gain access to the
component parts With the top and
bottom covers removed. a reading of
approximately 340 ohms across pins 4
and 5 indicates a good coil, while an
reading will require the
open
replacement of the switch
TM11-5895-932-14&P
CHAPTER 5
COMPONENT FUNCTIONING
5-1. General
This chapter covers the functioning of items
manufactured by Lexinton-Blue Grass Army Depot
and installed in the PTF. These items do not have
their own individual manuals but are covered in this
manual and in the station drawings. The station
drawings cover the complete schematic and how the
item is connected into the station.
5-2. Patching Modules
(fig. 5-1)
There are four different types of patching modules
(patch panels) used in the PTF. The differences are
based on the type of signals that the patch panels are
designed to handle. There are four different types of
signals involved in the PTF. These are the dc signals
5 - 1
from the modem to the AMME. the audio
which enter and leave the PTF, the low level I
signal transmitted between the DLIU and AMME
and the high level signal output from the
Each type signal has a special requiremen
special type of patch panel.
a. 12-Wire Patch Panel. The 12-wire patch
is required for the signal between the AMME
the modem Of the 12 wires, six are required
the transmitting signals; the other six ca
receiving signals A series of three 12-wire jack
used for each of 16 circuits in the module. T
two normal through and one monitor jack
circuit.
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 5-1 Patch Modules, Simplified Schemata.
5-2
TM11-5895-932-14&P
(1) Following the circuit path from the AMME
to the modem through the patch module, there is a
separate 12-wire connector for the wires from the
AMME, a normal through jack (marked COMP),
another normal through jack (marked MODEM), to
a separate connector for the 12 wires to the modem.
A 12-wire jack, marked MON, is also connected to
the circuit for monitoring purposes.
(2) During patching operations, one end of a
patch cord connected to the COMP jack breaks the
through connection to the MODEM jack and puts
the lines from the AMME in series with the patch
cord. The other end of the patch cord transfers the
wires to another circuit which would be connected to
the MODEM jack. The connection into the MODEM
jack disconnects the through circuit connection and
puts the patch cord in series connection to the
modem.
b. 2-Wire Audio Module. The 2-wire audio module
is used in the vf entrance jack field. A module
handles twenty-four 2-wire circuits, using four 2wire jacks arranged vertically for each 2-wire circuit.
There are two normal through and two monitor jacks
for each 2-wire circuit. A duplex circuit uses two
vertical jack sets; one for the transmit line and one
for the receive line.
(1) A 2-wire line connected to pins 1 and 2 on Cl
(fig. 5-1B), proceeds through the equipment as
follows: from Cl to the LINE jack; from the LINE
jack to C2 where it is looped around by P1; from C2
to the EQUIP jack: and then from the EQUIP jack
to the equipment side of the line at Cl. Two jacks,
marked MON, are used for monitoring lines connected to the equipment and the line jacks.
(2) For patching, a 2-wire patch cord is used for
each transmit and receive line. Connecting to the
LINE jack, the patch cord is in series with the line
side of the patch panel and the equipment side of the
patch panel is disconnected by action of the LINE
jack. To transfer the line to another circuit’s
equipment line, the second end of the patch cord is
inserted into the EQUIP jack of that circuit. This
disconnects the line from the equipment in that
circuit and completes the patch.
c. Low Level Patch Module. The low level patch
module is configured the same as the 2-wire audio
patch modules. That is, there are two normal
through and two monitor jacks for each circuit and
24 circuits for each module.
(1) Following the circuit shown in figure 5-1C,
the line is connected to the LINE normal though
jack and the equipment is connected to the EQUIP
normal through jack. Parallel connections from both
the LINE and EQUIP jacks are two monitor jacks
marked LINE and EQUIP. Both monitor jacks are
isolated by 16K resistors from the communication
lines to reduce any possible loading from monitoring
equipment.
(2) Patching for this module is the same as the
2-wire audio module explained above, that is, a 2wire patch cord set into a normal through jack to
break the communication line and reroute it to a new
path.
d. Hi Level DC Patch Modules. The high level dc
patch module is used to patch the high level (120
vdc) teletype signals (output of the DLIU) The
patch module is configured similar to the other 2wire patch modules; that is, four vertical jacks for
each circuit, 24 circuits to the module
(1) Following the line connections to the
equipment connections on the diagram (fig. 5-1D),
an arrangement different from the ones previously
encountered is found. One wire of each circuit pair is
muted through a monitor jack before connecting to
the normal through patch jacks. In this case each
monitoring jack (MON) is connected in series with
the lines rather than as before, in parallel.
(2) The patching principal for this module is the
same as previously encountered. The patch cord
inserted into the normal through jack breaks the
circuit and the patch cord is used to transpose the
wires to another circuit number. Monitoring,
however, is entirely different because instead of a
parallel connection, a series one is used. The series
connection provides a means of connecting a dc
milliammeter in series with the line for measuring
and setting the telegraph current.
5-3. Major Alarm Panel
The major alarm panel operates as an indicator for
remote troubles and centralized, within a single
panel, alarm controls for up to 45 alarm circuits.
Each alarm circuit condition is displayed by a
lighted segment of the front panel, which is also a
switch used for removing the audio alarm. Each item
which provides an alarm input to the alarm panel can
be designated a major alarm The major alarm
conditions are displayed in different colors.
a. Considering first the external circuits which
connect to the major alarm panel on figure 5-2, there
is a possibility of 90 inputs for alarms. Each alarm is
signalled by a ground input to pins 1 through 45 on
the main connector. Pins 46 and 47 are outputs
(grounds) which go to an audible indicator, causing
it to sound. Other pins on the main connector are dc
ground and input power and negative 48 volts direct
current.
5-3
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 5-2 Major Alarm Panel Schematic Diagram
5 - 4
TM11-5895-932-14&P
b. Internal circuits are 45 identical switches and
components used for controlling the alarm and items
common to all circuits such as power.
(1) Following an alarm ground, generated by
the closing of a switch, left side of figure 5-2,
through the main connector pin 1, the following
action occurs: diode CR1 and CR2 are forward
biased; one path of current flows through CR1,
indicating lamps (part of S2), voltage dropping
resistor R1, to the negative power supply connected
at pins 57 through 60 of the main connector. The
indicating lamps are part of switch S2 and cause the
segment on the front panel representing the alarm to
light, signaling the alarm condition.
(2) The other current path is through diode
CR2 through the relay contacts to pin 46 of the main
connector . This path provides an interuptable
output ground (at pin 46) which goes to the audible
alarm. The other side of the audible alarm (not
shown) is connected to the -48 vdc supply. The
current path is from the negative 48 vdc supply to
the audible alarm; to pin 46 on the alarm panel;
through the normally closed switch contact of S2;
through forward biased diode CR2; to pin 1 on the
main connector on the alarm panel.
(3) As the result of the alarm ground input to
the alarm panel, the indicator lamps light and the
audible alarm sounds. The operator responding to
the alarm, presses the alarm switch (lighted panel
segment) on the alarm panel front. This action
silences the audible alarm and sets the alarm switch
into the manual lock, or latch position.
(4) The electrical circuit that is set up when the
operator presses the alarm switch results in
energizing the coil in S2 (alarm switch). Current flow
is now routed through limiting resistor, R2, through
the coil of S2, which holds the armature and switch
S2 in the locked position, and through diode CR2 to
ground. This condition holds until the alarm ground
on the input to the alarm panel is removed by
clearing the trouble which caused the alarm.
(5) To test the lamps on the alarm panel, switch
S1 is provided. When the switch is pressed, a ground
is connected to the input of all 45 alarm switch
circuits. They are all similar to circuit #1 shown.
Diodes CR3 and CR135 are forward biased and
current flows through each individual lamp from the
negative power supply.
5-4. Power Circuits
NOTE
Main ac power is first distributed through
the distribution box located near the door.
Power for operation of the patch and test facility are
provided as follows: alternating current (ac) is
provided through power distribution boxes located
in the main room and crypto vault (fig. l-l); direct
current (dc) is provided by the dc power supply
located in bay 1.10. Schematic and wiring diagrams
for power distribution are provided by figures 5-3,
5-4, 5-5, and 5-6.
5-5
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 5-3. Ac Power Schematic, Black Power Panel (Main Room).
5-6
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 5-4 Ac Power Schematic, Black Power Panel (COMSEC Room)
5 - 7
TM11-5895-932-14&P
5 - 8
Figure 5-5 AC Power Schematic, Red Power Panel (COMSEC Room)
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Figure 5-6 DC Power Distribution
5-9
TM11-5895-932-14&P
APPENDIX A
REFERENCES
The following publications contain information applicable to the maintenance of the
Patch and Test Facility, Letterkenny Army Depot, Pennsylvania.
Index of Technical Manuals, Technical Bulletins, Supply Manuals
DA Pam 310-4
(Types 7, 8, and 9) Supply Bulletins, and Lubrication Orders.
US
Army Equipment Index of Modifications Work Orders.
DA Pam 310-7
Field Instructions for Painting and Preserving Electronics ComTB 43-0118
mand Equipment Including Camouflage Pattern Painting of
Electrical Equipment Shelters.
Organizational Maintenance Manual: Test Set, Teletypewriter
TM 11-6626-620-12
AN/UGM-1.
Operator’s Organizational, Direct Support and General Support
TM 11-6625664-14
Maintenance Repair Parts and Special Tools List (Including Depot
Maintenance Repair Parts and Special Tools List) for Multimeter
AN/USM-223.
Operator’s, Organizational, Direct Support, General Support and
TM 11-6625-2426-16
Depot Maintenance Manual: Northeast Electronics Corporation
Noise-Level-Vu Measuring Set Model TTS-37B.
Operator’s, Organizational, Direct Support, and General Support
TM 11-6626-2658-14
Maintenance Manual for Oscilloscope AN/USM-281C.
The Army Maintenance Management Systems (TAMMS).
TM 38-750
Administrative Storage of Equipment.
TM 740-90-1
Procedures for Destruction of Electronics Materiel to Prevent
TM 750-244-2
Enemy Use.
COMMERCIAL MANUALS
NOTE
The following commercial manuals may be procured from the
associated contractor listed below.
Operating and Service
Manual
Operating Manual
Operating and
Service Manual
Operating and
Service Manual
Operating and
Service Manual
Operators
Instruction Manual
Data Error Analyzer Model 1645A (P/N 01646-90905
Dated Oct 1976)
Hewlett-Packard Company
P.O. Box 301
Loveland, Colorado 80537
Portable Test Set HP-3550B (P/N 03650-90005,
dated Feb 1973)
Hewlett-Packard Company
Oscillator 204C/204D (P/N 00204 -90003)
Hewlett-Packard Company
Patch Panel 353A (P/N 00363 -9003)
Hew let&Packard Company
AC Voltmeter 403B (P/N 00403 -90013)
Hewlett-Packard Company
Oscilloscope 7603/R7603 (P/N 070-1310-00)
Tektronix, Inc.
P.O. Box 500
Beaverton, Oregon 97005
Type 7B53A/7B53AN Dual Time Base Plug-In
(P/N 070-1262-60)
Tektronix, Inc.
A-l
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Technical Manual
Installation and Servvice Instructions
Instruction Manual
Instruction Manual
Technical Manual
Technical Manual
Technical Manual
Technical Manual
Type 7B53A/7B53AN Dual Time Base Plug-In
(P/N 070-1342-00)
Tektronix, Inc.
Type 7A18/7A18N Dual Trace Amplifer
(P/N 070-1126-01)
Tektronix, Inc.
Multicircuit Patch Panels, (P/N 153-004A(16))
Cooke Engineering Co.
900 Slaters Lane
Alexandria, Virginia
Dual Speaker Panel
Engineered Devices Company, Inc.
680 Bizzel Drive
Lexington, Kentucky 40504
Intercom, Teletalk, R2812A, Bulletin 211-45326-1
Faraday, Inc.
805 South Maumee Street
Tecumseh, Michigan 49286
Intercom, Teletalk, R2812A, Bulletin 211-46170
Faraday, Inc.
Model TTS-37BAQ, Noise-Level-VU Measuring Set,
(P/N A0037-89-600, Issue 3, dated Mar 75)
Northeast Electronics Corporation
P.O. Box 649
Concord, New Hampshire 03301
Sola CVDC Power Supplies-Type Standard CVDC Regulated (-48 vdc 28-1561-2) (P/N 272-60416)
Sola Electric Company, Division of Sola Basic
Industries
1717 Busse Road
Elk Grove Village, Illinois 60007
Digital Isolator Model R-205
Versitron, Inc.
6310 Chillum Place NW
Washington, DC 20011
Isolation Device Model R0292S
Versitron, Inc.
Power Supply Model P-12 (P/N 11857)
Versitron, Inc.
Series T Housing, Operation, Theory and Maintenance (T612BW)
Versitron, Inc.
DEFENSE COMMUNICATION AGENCY CIRCULARS
DCAC 310-60-3
DCAD-313-70-1
DCAC 370-D95-1
DCAC 330-175-1
DCAC 300-175-9
A-2
Concept for Technical Control of the Defense Communication System.
Vol I, DCS Technical Control Policy and Facilities;
Vol II, DCS Technical Control Procedures;
Vol IV, DCS Technical Control Glossary.
System Description DCS-AUTODIN
DCS Engineering-Installation Standards Manual.
DCS Operating-Maintenance Electrical Performance
Standards.
TM11-5895-932-14&P
APPENDIX E
DIRECT SUPPORT AND GENERAL SUPP
T MAINTENANCE
SPECIAL TOOLS LISTS
A I N T E N A C E REPAIR PARTS
SPECIAL TOOLS)
Section I. INTRODUCTION
Definition
E-1. Scope
Code
This appendix lists spares and repair parts; special
tools; special test, measurement, and diagnostic
equipment (TMDE), and other special support
equipment required for performance of direct support and general support maintenance of the Letterkenny Automated Telecommunications Center
Transmission Facilities and Remote Subsystems. It
authorizes the requisitioning and issue of spares and
repair parts as indicated by the source codes.
initial issues or outfittings. Not subject to
automatic replenishment.
XD-A support item that is not stocked. When
required, item will be procured through
normal supply channels.
NOTE
Cannibalization or salvage may be used as a
source of supply for any items source coded
above except those coded XA and aircraft
support items as restricted by AR 700-42.
(2) Maintenance code Maintenance codes are
assigned to indicate the levels of maintenance
authorized to USE and REPAIR support items. The
maintenance codes are entered in the third and
fourth positions of the Uniform SMR Code format as
follows:
(a) The maintenance code entered in the third
position will indicate the lowest maintenance level
authorized to remove, replace, and use the support
item. The maintenance code entered in the third
position will indicate one of the following levels of
maintenance
E-2. General
This Repair Parts and Special Tools List is divided
into the following sections:
a. Section II. Repair Parts List. A list of spares
and repair parts authorized for use in the performance of maintenance. The list also includes parts
which must be removed for replacement of the
authorized parts. Parts lists are composed of
functional groups in numeric sequence.
b. Section III. Special Tools List Not applicable.
c. Section IV. National Stock Number and Part
Number Index. Not applicable.
d. Section IV. National Stock Number and Part
Number Index. Not applicable.
E -3. Explanation of Columns
a. Illustration. Not applicable.
b. Source, Maintenance, and Recoverability
(SMR) Codes.
(1) Source code. Source codes indicate the
manner of acquiring support items for maintenance,
repair, or overhaul of end items. Source codes are
entered in the first and second positions of the
Uniform SMR Code format as follows.
Code
Definition
PA-Item procured and stocked for anticipated or
known usage.
PD-Support item, excluding support equipment,
procured for initial issue or outfitting and
stocked only for subsequent or additional
I
Code
Application/Explanation
F-Support item is removed, replaced, used at the
direct support level.
H-Support item is removed, replaced, used at the
general support level.
D-Support items that are removed, replaced, used
at depot, mobile depot, specialized repair
activity only.
(b) The maintenance code entered in the
fourth position indicates whether the item is to be
repaired and identifies the lowest maintenance level
with the capability to perform complete repair (i.e.,
all authorized maintenance functions) This position
will contain one of the following maintenance codes:
Code
Application/Explanation
F- The lowest maintenance level capable of com-
E-1
TM11-5895-932-14&P
Code
Application/Explanation
plete repair of the support item is the direct
support level.
H-The lowest maintenance level capable of complete repair of the support item is the
general support level
D-The lowest maintenance level capable of complete repair of the support item is the depot
level.
Z-Nonreparable. No repair is authorized.
(3) Recoverability code Recoverability codes
are assigned to support items to indicate the
disposition action on unserviceable items. The
recoverability code is entered in the fifth position of
the Uniform SMR Code format as follows:
Definition
Recoverability
codes
Z-Nonreparable item. When unserviceable, condemn and dispose at the level indicated in
position 3.
F-Reparable
item.
When
uneconomically
reparable, condemn and dispose at the direct
support level.
When
uneconomically
H- Reparable item.
reparable, condemn and dispose at the
general support level.
D-Reparable item. When beyond lower level repair
capability, return to depot. Condemnation
and disposal not authorized below depot level.
Number Indicates the
c. National Stock
National stock number assigned to the item and will
be used for requisitioning purposes.
d. Part Number Indicates the primary number
used by the manufacturer (individual, company,
firm, corporation, or Government activity), which
controls the design and characteristica of the item by
means of its engineering drawings, specifications,
standards, and inspection requirements to identify
an item or range of items.
NOTE
When
E-2
a
stock
numbered
item
is
requisitioned, the part received may have a
different part number than the part being
replaced.
e. Federal Supply Code for Manufacturer
(FSCM). The FSCM is a 5-digit numeric code listed
in SB 708-42 which is used to Identify the
manufacturer, distributor, or Government agency,
etc.
f. Description. Indicates the Federal item name
and, if required, a minimum description to identify
the item.
g. Unit of Measure (U/M). Indicates the
standard of the basic quantity of the listed item as
used in performing the actual maintenance function.
This measure is expressed by a two-character
alphabetical abbreviation (e.g., ea, in, pr, etc.).
When the unit of measure differs from the unit of
issue, the lowest unit of issue that will satisfy the
required units of measure will be requisitioned.
h. Quantity Incorporated in Unit. Indicates the
quantity of the item used in the functional group,
subfunctional group, or assembly. A “V” appearing
in this column in lieu of a quantity indicates that no
specific quantity is applicable, (e.g., shims, spacers,
etc).
E-4. Special Information
National stock numbers (NSN’s) that are missing
from P source coded items have been applied for and
will be added to this TM by future change/revision
when they are entered in the Army Master Data File
(AMDF). Until the NSN’s are established and
published, submit exception requisitions to:
Commander, US Army Electronics Command,
ATTN: DRSEL-MM, Fort Monmouth, New Jersey
07703 for the part required to support your equipment.
E -5. How to Locate Repair Parts
Not applicable.
E -6. Abbreviations
Not applicable.
TM11-5895-932-14&P
SECTION
II
REPAIR
PARTS
LIST
GROUP. 00 LETTERKENNY AUTOMATED TELECOMMUNICATIONS CENTER
TRANSMISSION
FACILITIES
AND
REMOTE
SUBSYSTEMS
GROUP 01 WU MODEM BAY
GROUP 0101 CABINET CY-3397A/G (MODIFIED)
6110-00-856-2410
5930-00-989-6768
5935-00-263-4003
5930-00-501-4859
5920-00-968-3238
5920-00-403-8497
GROUP 04 FUTURE EQUIPMENT BAY
GROUP
5805-00-009-3475
E-5
0402
RELAY
COMPONENT
MODEM
TM 11-5895-932-14&P
SECTION
II
REPAIR
PARTS
LIST
GROUP
(CONTINUED)
06 BLACK DISTRIBUTION FRAME BAY
5305-00-989-6265
5310-00-877-5797
5305-00-984-6208
5310-00-877-5795
GROUP 07 BLACK DC PATCH
BAY
6935-00-098-9135
5935-00-032-9565
5995-00-508-1524
5820-01-014-7070
5995-00-518-1534
GROUP 0705 LO-LEVEL DC PATCH, PANEL (NO 1)
5935-00-847-7840
5935-00-799-2442
5305-00-984-4388
TM 11-5895-932-14&P
5905-00-195-6453
5305-00-833-8862
5310-00-595-7203
5935-00-578-2701
5935-00-194-3079
5905-00-106-1273
GROUP 0707 MISCELLANEOUS PATCH PANEL
5935-00-085-4730
5935-00-246-6421
5305-00-889-3000
5310-00-081-8087
5305-00-995-6653
5305-00-984-7361
5305-00-984-4988
5310-00-209-1366
5305-00-054-5657
5805-00-877-2965
G R O U P
0 8
T E S T
B A Y
6625-00-133-7496
6625-00-449-7652
GROUP 09 VF ENTRANCE FRAME AND PATCH BAY
CABINET CY-3397A/G (MODIFIED)
5935-00-085-4730
5935-00-246-6421
5310-00-081-8087
E - 7
TM 11-5895-932-14&P
SECTION II REPAIR PARTS LIST (CONTINUED)
5305-00-889-3000
5305-00-995-6653
5305-00-984-7361
5305-00-828-9821
5935-00-192-4805
5935-00-578-2647
5305-00-984-4988
5310-00-209-1366
GROUP 10 MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT BAY
GROUP 1003 BLACK ALARM PANEL, MAJOR-MINOR ALARM
5305-00-889-3000
5935-00-847-1840
5935-00-799-2442
5905-00-279-2656
5905-00-279-1922
5310-00-983-8483
5310-00-045-4007
5310-00-088-0553
5930-00-268-0309
5930-00-194-1548
6240-00-155-7836
GROUP 100301 CIRCUIT BOARD ASSEMBLY (-48V)
5961-00-068-4708
E
-
8
TM
11-5895-932-14&P
SECTION II REPAIR PARTS LIST (CONTINUED)
GROUP 1005 HIGH LEVEL DC PATCH (XMIT)
5935-00-194-3079
5935-00-578-2701
5310-00-209-1366
5305-00-054-5657
5305-00-984-7361
5310-00-081-8087
5305-00-889-3000
5305-00-984-4988
GROUP 11 RED PATCH (SECURE) BAY
GROUP 1105 DC LOW LEVEL PATCH PANEL W/O CK & LP (XMIT)
5935-00-847-7840
5935-00-799-2442
5305-00-984-4988
5310-00-081-8087
5905-00-195-6453
5305-00-833-8862
5310-00-595-7203
5935-00-578-2701
5935-00-194-3079
5905-00-106-1273
GROUP 12 RED FRAME BAY
E
-
9
TM 11-5895-932-14&P
SECTION II REPAIR PARTS LIST (CONTINUED)
GROUP 13 RED PATCH (UNSECURE) BAY
6350-00-102-4210
GROUP 14 RED/BLACK ISOLATOR BAY
GROUP 15 FUTURE BAY
GROUP 16 KG-34 BAY
GROUP 17 COMSEC AUTODIN CKT NO 2 BAY
GROUP COMSEC AUTODIN CKT NO 1 BAY
GROUP 19 TELEPHONE INTERCOM STATION
(WEBSTER "TELFTAK")
E - 1 0
TM 11-5895-932-14&P
APPENDIX F
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
OF SOLA CVDC POWER SUPPLY
TYPE 28-1561-2
F-l. General Description
The SOLA CVDC Power Supply Type 28-1561-2
is a regulated constant voltage power supply which
is designed to furnish regulated dc voltage. Within
the limits of the specifications, this regulated
supply will deliver regulated voltage despite
changes in input line voltage, line frequency, load
impedance and temperature as described in the
specification limits.
The power supply consists of a constant voltage
transformer (described in greater detail under
principles of operation), a rectifying means and a
filter circuit. The transformer not only converts
the incoming line voltage to the desired level, but
also is the regulating means. The rectifiers, by use
of conventional circuitry, convert the ac to dc. The
filter circuit reduces the magnitude of the ripple to
the desired specification level.
The output ripple at full load and nominal input
voltage is less than 1% RMS. The nominal output
voltage tolerance is ±1% at nominal input voltage
and full load. The output voltage is regulated to
±1% over an input line variation of 100 to 130
volts RMS.
The power supply shall not be operated in an
ambient of greater than 50° C or stored at a
temperature greater than 85° C.
F-2. Principles of Operation (Figure F-I)
The heart of the regulator is the constant voltage
transformer. A constant-voltage transformer has a
magnetic core structure different from conventional
transformers. It has a magnetic shunt with a fixed
air gap interposed between the primary and
secondary windings. The secondary winding is
shunted by a fixed ac capacitor. Upon application
of primary voltage, the secondary voltage increases
to the point at which that portion of the magnetic
core directly under the secondary winding ap
proaches saturation due to the capacitative load
connected across the secondary winding.
F-1
T M
1 1 - 8 9 5 - 9 3 2 - 1 4 & P
Figure F-l. Sola CVDC Power Supply 28-1561-2, Schematic Diagram.
F
-
2
TM 11-5895-932-14&P
As the core approaches saturation, it cannot carry
much additional magnetic flux, and the increase in
secondary voltage is less than any proportional
increase in primary voltage. Thus, a condition of
relative stability of secondary voltage is reached.
Over the range of specified primary voltage, the
core under the secondary winding is magnetically
saturated, and the voltage of the secondary changes
very little for this range of primary voltage. Due to
the magnetic shunt between the primary and
secondary windings, that part of the core under the
primary is not saturated
To equalize the small effect of increasing primary
voltage on the secondary, a compensating coil is
wound over the primary coil and is connected in
series with the secondary load circuit, but out of
phase with the secondary. Thus, when the primary
voltage increases beyond the design voltage, the
voltage in the compensating coil also increases, but
since it is out of phase with the secondary voltage,
it subtracts from the secondary voltage an amount
equal to the slight increase induced in the
secondary winding by the increase of primary
voltage. Likewise, when the primary voltage
decreases, the compensating coil voltage decreases
in proportion to the primary voltage, and subtracts
from the secondary voltage. The design is such
that the vector sum of the compensating coil
voltage and the secondary voltage is practically
constant throughout the design range of input
voltage.
Symptom
Output voltage too high
Output voltage too low
No output voltage
When the power supply is overloaded in excess of
its rated load, a point is reached where the output
voltage drops to approximately zero. Due to the
magnetic shunt in the transformer, its output
current is limited. With excessive load current, the
effect of the ac capacitor is lost: secondary flux
opposes primary flux to demagnetize the secondary
core leg and the output voltage collapses, limiting
current to approximately 150 percent
short-circuit
of full load.
F-3. Maintenance
This regulated power supply is designed for
continuous, unattended operation. Little or no
maintenance is required. If due to a component
failure maintenance is required, be sure to shut off
line voltage prior to performing any repair
operations. Discharge any residual charge on the
dc filter capacitors by connecting a jumper across
the output terminals or across the dc capacitor
terminals, or allow at least one minute to elapse
after shutting off line voltage to permit the
capacitors to discharge. The energy stored in these
capacitors could be harmful or fatal to personnel.
F-4. Circuit Analysis
The chart below lists some possible malfunctions
which may be encountered in the use of the supply
and their corresponding cause and remedy.
Corrective action
Probable trouble
a Load current less than minumum rated
load
b Line frequency too high
a Correct load current
a Load current greater than maximum
rated load
b Line voltage too low
c Line frequency too low
d Defective dc filter capacitor
e Defective ac capacitor
f Defective rectifier
a Reduce load current
a Open connection
b Open transformer winding
b Correct primary power frequency
b
c
d
e
f
increase primary voltage
Correct primary power frequency
Replace
Replace
Replace
a Check all connections and repair bad
connections
b Replace transformer
F-3
TM 11-5895-932-14&P
APPENDIX G
MAINTENANCE ALLOCATION
Section I. INTRODUCTION
G-l. General
This appendix provides a summary of the maintenance operations for Patch and Test Facility,
Letterkenny Army Depot. It authorizes categories of
maintenance for specific maintenance functions on
repairable items and componenets and the tools and
equipment required to perform each function. This
appendix may be used as an aid in planning maintenance operations.
G-2. Maintenance Function
Maintenance functions will be limited to and defined
as follows:
a. Inspect. To determine the serviceability of an
item by comparing its physical, mechanical, and/or
electrical characteristics with established standards
through examination.
b. Test. To verify serviceability and to detect
incipient failure by measuring the mechanical or
electrical characteristics of an item and comparing
those characteristics with prescribed standards.
c. Service. Operations required periodically to
keep an item in proper operating condition, i.e., to
clean (decontaminate), to preserve, to drain, to
paint, or to replenish fuel, lubricants, hydraulic
fluids, or compressed air supplies.
d. Adjust. To maintain, within prescribed limits,
by bringing into proper or exact position, or by
setting the operating characteristics to the specified
parameters.
e. Align. To adjust specified variable elements of
an item to bring about optimum or desired performance .
f Calibrate. To determine and cause corections
to be made or to be adjusted on instruments or test
measuring and diagnostic equipments used in
precision measurement. Consists of comparisons of
two instruments, one of which is a certified standard
of known accuracy, to detect and adjust any
discrepancy in the accuracy of the instrument being
compared
g. Install. The act of emplacing, seating, or
fixing into position an item, part, module (component or assembly) in a manner to allow the proper
functioning of the equipment or system.
h Replace. The act of substituting a serviceable
like type part, subassembly, or module (component
or assembly) for an unserviceable counterpart.
i Repair The application of maintenance
services (inspect, test, service, adjust, align,
calibrate, replace) or other maintenance actions
(welding, grinding, riveting, straightening, facing,
remachining, or resurfacing) to restore serviceability
to an item by correcting specific damage, fault,
malfunction, or failure in a part, subassembly,
module (component or assembly), end item, or
system. This function does not include the trial and
error replacement of running spare type items such
as fuses, lamps, or electron tubes.
j Overhaul. That maintenance effort (service/action) necessary to restore an item to a
completely serviceable/operational condition as
prescribed by maintenance standards (i.e., DMWR)
in appropriate technical publications. Overhaul is
normally the highest degree of maintenance performed by the Army. Overhaul does not normally
return an item to like new condition.
k. Rebuild. Consists of those services/actions
necessary for the restoration of unserviceable
equipment to a like new condition in accordance with
original manufacturing standards. Rebuild is the
highest degree of materiel maintenance applied to
Army equipment. The rebuild operation includes the
act of returning to zero those age measurements
(hours, miles, etc.). considered in classifying Army
equipments/components.
G-3. Column Entries
a. Column 1, Group Number. Column 1 lists
group numbers, the purpose of which is to identify
assemblies, subassemblies, and
components,
modules with the next higher assembly.
b. Column 2, Component/Assembly. Column 2
contains the noun names of components, assemblies,
subassemblies, and modules for which maintenance
is authorized.
c. Column 3, Maintenance Functions. Column 3
lists the functions to be performed on the item listed
in column 2. When items are listed without maintenance functions, it is solely for purpose of having
the group numbers in the MAC and RPSTL coincide.
d. Column 4, Maintenance Category. Column 4
specifies, by the listing of a “work time” figure in the
appropriate subcolumn(s) the lowest level of
maintenance authorized to perform the function
listed in column 3. This figure represents the active
time required to perform that maintenance function
G-1
TM 11-5895-932-14&P
at the indicated category of maintenance. If the
number or complexity of the tasks within the listed
maintenance function vary at different maintenance
categories, appropriate “work time” figures will be
shown the each category. The number of task-hours
specified by the “work time” figure represents the
average time required to restore an item (assembly,
subassembly, component, module, end item or
system) to a serviceable condition under typical field
operating conditions. This time includes preparation
time, troubleshooting time, and quality assure
ance/quality control time in addition to the time
required to perform the specific tasks identified for
the maintenance functions authorized in the
maintenance allocation chart. Subcolumns of column
4 are as follows:
C-Operator/Crew
O-Organizational
F-Direct Support
I-I-General Support
D-Depot
e. Column 5, Tools and Equipment. Column 5
specifies by code, those common tool sets (not individual tools) and special tools, test, and support
equipment required to perform the designated
function.
f. Column 6, Remarks. Column 6 contains an
alphabetic code which leads to the remark in section
IV, Remarks, which is pertinent to the item opposite
the particular code.
G-4. Tool and Test Equipment Requirements (Sect.
III)
a. Tool or Test Equipment Reference Code. The
numbers in this column coincide with the numbers
used in the tools and equipment column of the MAC.
The numbers indicate the applictable tool or test
equipment for the maintenance functions.
b. Maintenance Category. The codes in this
column indicate the maintenance category allocated
the tool or test equipment.
c. Nomenclature. This column lists the noun
name and nomenclature of the tools and test
equipment required to perform the maintenance
functions.
d. National/NATO Stock Number. This column
lists the National/NATO stock number of the
specific tool or test equipment.
e. Tool Number. This c o l u m n l i s t s t h e
manufacturer’s part number of the tool followed by
the Federal Supply Code for manufacturers (5 -digit)
in parentheses.
G-5. Remarks (Sect. IV)
a. Reference Code. This code refers to the appropriate item in section II, column 6.
b. Remarks. This column provides the required
explanatory information necessary to clarify items
appearing in section II.
(Next printed page is G-3)
G-2
SECTION II MAINTENANCE ALLOCATION CHART
PATCH AND TEST FACILITY
LETTERFRONT ARMY DEPOT
00
0 1
0101
03,
04,
a
05
0301,
0401,&
0501
0402
06
0601
F
-
3
SECTION II MAINTENANCE ALLOCATION CHART
FOR
PATCH AND TEST FACILITY
07
0701
0702
0703
0704
0705
0706
0707
0708
08
0801
G-4
SECTION II MAINTENANCE ALLOCATION CHART
F
O
R
P A T C H
A N D
T E S T
0802
0803
0804
0805
0806
0807
0808
09
0901
0902
G - 5
F A C I L I T Y
SECTION II MAINTENANCE ALLOCATION CHART
PATCH AND TEST FACILITY
LETTERKENNY ARMY DEPOT
0903
0904
0905
0906
0907
0908
10
1001
1002
1003
100301
1004
SECTION
II MAINTENANCE ALLOCATION CHART
FOR
PATCH AND TEST FACILITY
LETTERKENNY ARMY DEPOT
1005
1006
1007
11
1101
1102
1103
1104
1105
1106
1107
SECTION II MAINTENANCE ALLOCATION CHART
FOR
PATCH AND TEST FACILITY
LETTERKENNY ARMY DEPOT
12
1201
13
1301
1302
1303
130301
1304
1305
1306
1307
1308
1309
C- 8
SECTION II MAINTENANCE ALLOCATION CHART
F
O
R
P A T C H
A N D
T E S T
F A C I L I T Y
L
E
T
T
E
R
K
E
N
N
Y
1310
14
1401
15
1501
16
1601
17
1701
G-9
A
R
M
Y
D
E
P
O
T
SECTION II MAINTENANCE ALLOCATION CHART
F
O
R
PATCH AND TEST FACILITY
LETTERKENNY ARMY DEPOT
1
8
1801
19
G - 1 2
SECTION III
TOOL AND TEST EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS
FOR
PATCH AND TEST FACILITY
LETTERKENNY ARMY DEPOT
6625-00-999-7465
5180-00-605-0079
5180-00-610-8177
5180-00-064-5178
T e x t
T
L-12
e
x
t
Figure 1-3 Row 1 Equipment Bays, Configuration Diagram
TM 11-5895-932-14&P
Bays, Configuration Diagram
Figure 1-3 Row 1 Equipment
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