UCSD_GE-300001_safety_manual_rev_J
UC San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0826
La Jolla, CA 92093-0826
________________________________________________________________________
University of California, San Diego
Englekirk Structural Engineering
Center (ESEC)
Site Safety Manual
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Document No. GE-300001 Rev. J
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La Jolla, CA 92093-0826
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REVISION HISTORY
Revision
Change
Description
Approval List
Release
B
Original
MD
January 2007
C
Edit
MD
March 2007
D
Edit
MD
August 2007
E
Edit
MD
October 2007
F
Edit/Additions
MD
May 2009
G
Edit/Additions
MD
May 2009
H
Edit/Additions
MD
July 2009
I
Edit/Additions
MD
August 2009
J
Edit/Additions
MD
April 2010
Date
Approval List
MD
AG
è Michael Dyson-Department Safety Coordinator
è Andrew Gunthardt-Associate Development Engineer
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9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0826
La Jolla, CA 92093-0826
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NOTICE: EMPLOYEES ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR FOLLOWING THE
CORRECT AND CURRENT REVISION OF THE DOCUMENT
Englekirk Structural Engineering Center Commitment to Safety
The University of California San Diego and Englekirk Structural Engineering
Center are committed to achieving excellence in providing a healthy and safe
working environment, and to supporting environmentally sound practices in
the conduct of University activities. It is University policy to comply with all
applicable health, safety, and environmental protection laws, regulations and
requirements.
NEES-UCSD Health and Safety
Safety and health at the NEES facility in San Diego are integrated into daily
activities. They are important responsibilities of all employees at all levels.
We will maintain a safety and health program conforming to the best practices
of organizations of this type. To be successful, such a program must embody
the proper attitudes toward injury and illness prevention on the part of
department heads, principals, supervisors and employees. A well functioning
health and safety program requires collaboration among management and
employees, as well as among employees and their co-workers. Only through
a synergetic effort can an effective health and safety program thrive.
The health and safety of every employee is a high priority. Management
accepts responsibility for providing a safe working environment and
employees are expected to take responsibility for performing work in
accordance with safe standards and practices. Health and safety will only be
achieved through teamwork. Everyone must join together in promoting health
and safety and take every reasonable measure to assure safe working
conditions exist within the company.
___________________________
__________________________
Andrew Gunthardt
Associate Development Engineer
Gilbert Hegemier
Lab Director/Department Chair
___________________________
__________________________
Michael Dyson
Dev. Tech./Safety Coordinator
Kris Morris
Safety Program Manager
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Table of Contents
1.
2.
Introduction to ESEC Manual ................................................................................................... 8
1.1
General Description........................................................................................................ 8
1.2
Purpose of Manual ......................................................................................................... 8
Responsible Parties .................................................................................................................. 8
2.1
Frequency ....................................................................................................................... 8
2.2
References ...................................................................................................................... 9
3.
OSHA Action Plan ................................................................................................................... 10
4.
Injury Illness Prevention Program (IIPP) at ESEC ................................................................... 11
4.1
5.
6.
Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP) UCSD ...................................................... 11
4.1.1
Introduction ............................................................................................................. 11
4.1.2
Goals......................................................................................................................... 12
4.1.3
Statutory Authority .................................................................................................. 12
4.1.4
Responsibility ........................................................................................................... 12
4.1.5
Compliance............................................................................................................... 13
4.1.6
Hazard Identification................................................................................................ 14
4.1.7
Accident Investigations ............................................................................................ 15
4.1.8
Injury, Illness, Automobile Accident Reporting ....................................................... 15
4.1.9
Hazard Mitigation .................................................................................................... 17
4.1.10
Training ................................................................................................................ 17
4.1.11
Communication ................................................................................................... 18
4.1.12
Documentation .................................................................................................... 20
ESEC Site Safety Requirements .............................................................................................. 21
5.1
General Site Safety Rules.............................................................................................. 21
5.2
Machinery and Vehicles ............................................................................................... 24
5.3
Fork Lifts ....................................................................................................................... 25
5.4
Powered Work Platforms ............................................................................................. 28
Lockout/Blockout Policy ........................................................................................................ 30
6.1
Purpose......................................................................................................................... 30
6.2
Scope ............................................................................................................................ 30
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7.
8.
6.3
Responsibility ............................................................................................................... 30
6.4
Authorization................................................................................................................ 30
6.5
Procedures.................................................................................................................... 30
6.6
Special Provisions ......................................................................................................... 31
6.7
Lockout/Tagout for Hydraulic lines at ESEC ................................................................. 32
Machine Shop and Tool Training ........................................................................................... 32
7.1
Introduction.................................................................................................................. 32
7.2
Responsibilities ............................................................................................................. 32
7.3
Personal Protective Equipment .................................................................................... 32
7.4
Clothes and Hair ........................................................................................................... 32
7.5
Controls ........................................................................................................................ 32
Use of Tools and Equipment .................................................................................................. 33
8.1
Purpose......................................................................................................................... 33
8.2
Training Records ........................................................................................................... 33
8.3
Common Sense of Tool Use.......................................................................................... 33
8.4
The Right Tool for the Right Job ................................................................................... 33
8.5
Hand Tools .................................................................................................................... 34
8.6
Hand Tool Training ....................................................................................................... 34
8.6.1
Screwdrivers............................................................................................................. 34
8.6.2
Wrenches ................................................................................................................. 35
8.6.3
Hammers/Chisels ..................................................................................................... 35
8.6.4
Nails .......................................................................................................................... 36
8.6.5
Come-a-Long ............................................................................................................ 36
8.6.6
Hammer/Smack-Wrench ......................................................................................... 37
8.6.7
Ladders ..................................................................................................................... 37
8.6.8
Scaffolds ................................................................................................................... 38
8.7
Electric Power Tools ..................................................................................................... 39
8.7.1
Electric Extension Cords ........................................................................................... 39
8.7.2
Table, Radial, and Miter Saw ................................................................................... 40
8.7.3
Stationary Sander ..................................................................................................... 41
8.7.4
Abrasive Saw ............................................................................................................ 41
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8.7.5
Stationary Grinder.................................................................................................... 42
8.7.5.1
8.7.6
14” Band Saw ........................................................................................................... 43
8.7.7
Drill Press ................................................................................................................. 43
8.7.8
Portable Electric Tools ............................................................................................. 44
8.7.9
Circular Saw.............................................................................................................. 45
8.7.9.1
Preventing Saw Kickback ..................................................................................... 46
8.7.10
Reciprocating Saw................................................................................................ 47
8.7.11
Jig Saw.................................................................................................................. 48
8.7.12
Portable Band Saw ............................................................................................... 49
8.7.13
Percussion Tools .................................................................................................. 51
8.7.14
Portable Drill ........................................................................................................ 52
8.7.15
Pneumatic Nail Gun ............................................................................................. 53
8.8
9.
Changing/Facing Grinder Wheel.......................................................................... 42
Dywidag Systems Safety and Operating Instructions................................................... 54
Personal Protective Equipment ............................................................................................. 56
10.
Hazard Communication .................................................................................................... 57
10.1
11.
Storage/Disposal of Hazardous Waste ......................................................................... 57
Emergency Action Plan ..................................................................................................... 61
11.1
Emergency Guide ......................................................................................................... 64
12.
Natural Hazards ................................................................................................................ 65
13.
Facility Specific Safety Requirements ............................................................................... 65
13.1
Blast Simulator-Technical Support Working Group (TSWG) ........................................ 66
13.1.1
13.2
Blast Simulator Specific Safety ............................................................................ 66
Large High Performance Outdoor Shake Table (LHPOST) ............................................ 66
Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) .......................................................... 66
National Science Foundation (NSF) ........................................................................................... 66
13.2.1
LHPOST Specific Safety ........................................................................................ 67
13.3
Soil Foundation Structure Interaction (SFSI) California Department of Transportation
and Port of Los Angeles Soil Pit ................................................................................................. 67
13.3.1
Safety Procedures for Working on Soil Pit Set-up ............................................... 67
14.
Appendix A ........................................................................................................................ 69
15.
Appendix B ........................................................................................................................ 71
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15.1
Hazard Identification Form........................................................................................... 71
15.2
UCSD Accident Investigation Report ............................................................................ 72
15.3
Employee Safety Recommendation Form .................................................................... 73
15.4
Supervisor’s Safety Meeting ......................................................................................... 74
15.5
New Laboratory Worker Checklist ............................................................................... 75
15.6
UCSD Office Safety Inspection...................................................................................... 76
15.7
Shop and Studio Safety Inspection Checklist ............................................................... 78
15.8
Supplemental Hazard assessment and Correction....................................................... 82
15.9
Job Hazard Analysis ...................................................................................................... 83
15.10
Hazard Assessment and Correction Worksheet ...................................................... 86
15.11
Unsafe Conditions Recommendations ..................................................................... 87
15.12
Employee Safety Review .......................................................................................... 89
15.13
Hot Work Permit Checklist ....................................................................................... 91
15.14
Daily Stationary Scaffold Inspection Checklist ......................................................... 92
15.15
Fall Protection Inspection Checklist ......................................................................... 94
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1. Introduction to ESEC Manual
1.1 General Description
These safe practice rules are intended for use in all laboratory activities.
Furthermore, general safety orders as per California Code of Regulations,
Title 8 and UCSD policies are enforced in the laboratory. All employees are
expected to adhere to applicable OSHA Standards outlined in 29 CFR Part
1910.
ESEC staff is required to follow all Cal/OSHA and UCSD rules and
regulations with appropriate action taken for noncompliance as listed in the
“Compliance” section of the IIPP Program in this manual.
The term “employee/staff/personnel” used in this document refers to any
individuals working in the laboratory.
1.2 Purpose of Manual
The purpose of the Site Safety Manual is to help researchers, employees,
and students recognize, evaluate, and control hazards in their laboratory.
2. Responsible Parties
While safety is a concerted effort of all staff; Englekirk Center does employ a
fulltime Safety Officer who reports directly to management. A hierarchy of
staff responsible for safety is as follows:
Gilbert Hegemier- Lab Director/Department Chair
Andrew Gunthardt-Associate Development Engineer
Michael Dyson-Safety Officer/Development Technician
Development Technician Staff, Electronics Staff, and Administrative Staff
2.1 Frequency
These practices are to be performed at all times while at ESEC.
Annual Site Safety Audits will be conducted by Environment, Health & Safety
Department as well as ESEC staff; additionally ESEC staff will conduct
monthly Site Safety Audits using forms from the Injury and Illness Prevention
Program.
Annual training is performed through EH&S as well as Englekirk Center staff
in areas such as Hazardous Waste Handling, Pollution Prevention,
Ergonomics, Tool Training and Fall Protection.
Additional training of staff, as needed, in areas such as OSHA Compliance,
Rigging and Lifting Safety, and Safe Hydraulics Maintenance performed by
independent companies.
ESEC also employs a full time Safety Coordinator who reports to
management on safety issues and reports to and works with EH&S on safety
compliance.
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2.2 References
OSHA Standards 29 Part 1910, 1926
California Code of Regulations, Title 8
UCSD electronic documents accessible on Blink website.
Power Tool Institute, Inc. http://www.powertoolinstitute.com/who.html
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3. OSHA Action Plan
California Occupational Safety and Health Act (Cal/OSHA) safety inspections
are made by the California Division of Industrial Safety without advance
notice. Insofar as it is possible, inspections must be conducted in a manner
compatible with University operations.
If contacted by Cal/OSHA personnel UCSD staff shall immediately contact
UCSD-ESEC Management at x43528 or x46686 and Environment Health &
Safety for instructions: Bruce Bowers x26676, Jon Schmidt x43782, or Kriston
Morris x46027.
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4. Injury Illness Prevention Program (IIPP) at ESEC
UCSD and Englekirk Center are committed to maintaining a safe working
environment. An effective Safety Plan incorporates training of employees to
increase their awareness of the role everyone shares in providing a safe
workplace. All employees are required to complete a UCSD EH&S IIPP
course within 90 days of employment. Records of completion are stored
digitally (accessible by each employee) and a hard copy is kept on file with
the Site Safety Coordinator in the North trailer. For further information see
the Injury Illness Prevention Program section 4.1 in this manual and Injury
Illness Prevention Program in Appendix A.
Annual training is performed through EH&S as well as Englekirk Center staff
in areas such as Hazardous Waste Handling, Pollution Prevention,
Ergonomics, Tool Training and Fall Protection.
Additional training of staff as needed in areas such as OSHA Compliance,
Rigging and Lifting Safety, and Safe Hydraulics Maintenance training
performed by independent companies.
Records of training completion are stored digitally (UCSD training accessible
by each employee) and/or a hard copy is kept on file with the Site Safety
Coordinator in the North trailer.
An important aspect of the Injury Illness Prevention Program is periodic
Safety Audits. Annual Safety Audits are conducted by the Environment,
Health & Safety Department as well as annual Safety Audits conducted by
Englekirk Center staff to ensure safety standards are adhered to as well as
address any new safety concerns. ESEC staff will utilize inspection forms
from the Injury an Illness Prevention Program section 15.7 in Appendix B.
For further information also see Self Safety Audit in Appendix A.
4.1 Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP) UCSD
4.1.1 Introduction
In order to maintain a safe and healthful work environment at UCSD, the Office
of Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S) has developed this overall Injury
and Illness Prevention Program for all employees to follow. This document
describes the goals, statutory authority, and the responsibilities of all employees
and students under the Program. It addresses Compliance, Hazard Identification,
Accident Investigation, Hazard Mitigation, Training, Hazard Communication, and
Program Documentation. By making employee safety a high priority for every
UCSD employee we can reduce injuries and illnesses, increase productivity, and
promote a safer and healthier environment for all individuals at UCSD.
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4.1.2 Goals
Diligent implementation of this program will reap many benefits for UCSD. Most
notably it will:
1.
Protect the health and safety of employees. Decrease the potential risk of
disease, illness, injury and harmful exposures to UCSD personnel.
2.
Reduce workers’ compensation claims and costs.
3.
Improve efficiency by reducing the time spent replacing or reassigning
injured employees, as well as reduce the need to find and train
replacement employees.
4.
Improve employee morale and efficiency as employees see that their
safety is important to management.
5.
Minimize the potential for penalties assessed by various enforcement
agencies by maintaining compliance with health and safety codes.
4.1.3 Statutory Authority
California Labor Code Section 6401.7.
California Code of Regulations Title 8, Sections 1509 and 3203
4.1.4 Responsibility
The ultimate responsibility for establishing and maintaining effective
environmental, health, and safety policies specific to campus facilities and
operations rests with the Chancellor. General policies that govern the activities
and responsibilities of the environment, health, and safety program are established
under his final authority.
It is the responsibility of Deans, Directors, Department Chairs, Department
Heads, Principal Investigators, managers, and supervisors to develop procedures
that ensure effective compliance with the Injury and Illness Prevention Program
(IIPP), as well as other university health and safety policies related to operations
under their control.
Supervisors, including managers and Principal Investigators, are responsible
for enforcement of this Program among the employees or students under their
direction by carrying out the various duties outlined herein, setting acceptable
safety policies and procedures for each employee to follow, and ensuring that
employees receive the general safety training offered by EH&S (or equivalent).
Each manager and supervisor must also ensure that appropriate job specific safety
training is received, and that safety responsibilities are clearly outlined in the job
descriptions which govern the employees under their direction. Supervising others
also carries the responsibility for knowing how to safely accomplish the tasks
assigned each employee, for purchasing appropriate personal protective
equipment, and for evaluating employee compliance.
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Immediate responsibility for workplace health and safety rests with each
individual employee and/or student. Employees and students are responsible for
following the established work procedures and safety guidelines in their area, as
well as those identified in this Program and in the UCSD General Chemical
Safety Guidelines. Employees and students are also responsible for using the
personal protective equipment issued to protect them from identified hazards, and
for reporting any unsafe conditions to their supervisors.
Environment, Health & Safety is responsible for developing and managing this
Injury and Illness Prevention Program. Additional responsibilities include
providing consultation to the UCSD community on matters of health and safety;
monitoring and advising personnel using radiation, carcinogens and other
hazardous materials; interpreting external regulations and recommending
appropriate compliance strategies.
4.1.5 Compliance
Compliance with this Injury and Illness Prevention Program will be achieved in
the following manner:
1.
Managers and supervisors will set positive examples for working safely
and require that all staff under their direction work safely.
2.
Managers and supervisors will use all disciplinary procedures available to
them to ensure that employees follow established safety policies and
procedures. Performance evaluations, verbal counseling, written warnings
and other forms of disciplinary action are available.
3.
Managers and supervisors will identify the resources necessary to provide
a safe work environment for their employees and include them in budget
requests.
4.
Managers and supervisors will establish appropriate means of recognition
for employees who demonstrate safe work practices.
5.
Supervisors in the building maintenance divisions must also enforce the
Code of Safe Practices sent as an addendum to this Program, and post a
copy on their employee bulletin boards.
UCSD has developed this comprehensive Injury and Illness Prevention Program
to enhance the health and safety of its faculty, staff, and students. Each
department is responsible for implementing the Program as outlined in the
following pages.
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4.1.6 Hazard Identification
A health and safety inspection program is essential in order to reduce unsafe
conditions that may expose faculty, staff, students and visitors to incidents that
could result in personal injuries or property damage. It is the responsibility of
each department to ensure that appropriate, systematic safety inspections are
conducted periodically.
A. Scheduled Safety Inspections:
Upon initial implementation of this Program, inspections of all work areas
will be conducted. All inspections will be documented using the attached
forms (or equivalent) with appropriate abatement of any hazards detected.
Thereafter, safety inspections will be conducted at the frequency described
below:
B.
1.
Office environments - Annual inspections of all office areas will be
conducted to detect and eliminate any hazardous conditions that
may exist. The attached Office Safety Inspection form (or
equivalent) will be used.
2.
Shops, cafeterias, warehouses, stores, docks, etc. - Semi-annual
inspections of all potentially hazardous areas will be conducted to
detect and eliminate any hazardous conditions that may exist. The
attached Facility Safety Inspection form (or equivalent) will be
used.
3.
Laboratories - Semi-annual inspections of all laboratories will be
conducted to detect and eliminate any hazardous conditions that
may exist. In addition, all guidelines in the General Chemical
Safety Guidelines will be followed.
4.
Medical clinics - Semi-annual inspections of all medical clinic
areas will be conducted to detect and eliminate any hazardous
conditions that may exist. The attached Medical Clinics Inspection
form (or equivalent) will be used.
Unscheduled Safety Inspections:
1.
Additional safety inspections will be conducted whenever new
equipment or changes in procedures that present new hazards are
introduced into the workplace.
2.
Environment, Health & Safety will conduct periodic unscheduled
safety inspections of all potentially hazardous areas to assist in the
maintenance of a safe and healthful workplace.
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3.
Safety reviews will be conducted when occupational accidents
occur to identify and correct hazards that may have contributed to
the accident.
4.
Environment, Health & Safety is available for consultation and
assistance in conducting these various hazard assessments.
4.1.7 Accident Investigations
Supervisors will investigate all accidents, injuries, occupational illnesses, and
near-miss incidents to identify the causal factors or attendant hazards. Appropriate
repairs or procedural changes will be implemented promptly to mitigate the
hazards implicated in these events.
Use the Accident Investigation form to record pertinent information and retain a
copy to serve as proper documentation, section 15.2 in Appendix B.
Serious occupational injuries, illnesses or exposures to hazardous substances,
as defined by Cal/OSHA, must be reported to EH&S no later than eight
hours after they become known to the supervisor. These include injuries that
cause permanent disfigurement or require hospitalization for a period in excess of
24 hours. EH&S will contact Cal/OSHA, if necessary. An accident investigation
will be conducted by EH&S in conjunction with a representative from the injured
employee's department.
4.1.8 Injury, Illness, Automobile Accident Reporting
In the event of a medical emergency alert coworkers and call 9-1-1.
What to Do if a Work-Related Injury or Illness Occurs
If you are injured or develop a job-related illness as a result of your UCSD
employment, follow the procedures below.
1. Notify your supervisor when an injury or illness occurs.
a. Notify your supervisor immediately if you experience a workrelated injury or illness.
b. Employee or supervisor: Follow the steps below to report the
injury or illness to the Workers’ Compensation Office.
2. Report injury or illness to the UCSD Workers’ Compensation
Office.
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a. Print an Employee Injury Incident Report form (PDF) (Word). PDF
link: http://www-ehs.ucsd.edu/riskmgmt/forms/EIR.pdf Word link:
http://www-ehs.ucsd.edu/riskmgmt/forms/EIR.doc
b. Complete the information according to instructions on the form.
Note: Both the employee and the supervisor have a section of the form to
complete. If the employee is unable to complete his or her section, the
supervisor must complete it for the employee.
3. Immediately fax the completed sections of the form to the Workers’
Compensation Office: (858) 534-5202.
Important: Supervisors must report all work-related deaths, catastrophes, and
serious injuries or illnesses within 8 hours to the UCSD Workers’
Compensation Office. Reporting delays could result in Cal/OSHA fines.
A serious injury or illness is one that requires inpatient hospitalization, or
in which an employee suffers a loss of any member of the body or suffers
any serious degree of permanent disfigurement.
4. If necessary, seek medical treatment.
o 24-hour walk-in service:
§ Thornton Hospital Emergency Room, (858) 657-7600
§ UCSD Medical Center (Hillcrest) Emergency Room, (619)
543-6400
o By appointment only:
§ UCSD Center for Occupational & Environmental
Medicine, (619) 471-9210
See Injury and Illness Prevention Program in Appendix A for web links
and additional information.
Automobile Accident
If you are involved in an auto accident involving a UCSD vehicle:
Complete the Vehicle Accident/ Incident Reporting Packet contained in
the glove compartment of the UCSD vehicle. Or, to order a Vehicle
Accident/ Incident Reporting Packet, contact Risk Management, (858)
534-3820, or Fleet Services, (858) 534-3485. Return the completed packet
to Fleet Services, Mail Code 0033.
See Vehicle Accident in Appendix A.
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4.1.9 Hazard Mitigation
All hazards identified will be promptly investigated and alternate procedures
implemented as indicated. The university recognizes that hazards range from
imminent dangers to hazards of relatively low risk. Corrective actions or plans,
including suitable timetables for completion, are the responsibility of the
department. EH&S consultation is available to determine appropriate abatement
actions. The attached Hazard Identification form, section 15.1, can be used to
document identified hazards and the resulting action taken to abate them.
For serious hazards that present an imminent danger to life or limb,
immediate action will be taken to mitigate the hazard. The Department
Chair/Head, EH&S, and all affected employees will be notified of the hazard. If
the hazard cannot be immediately abated, all personnel will be removed from the
affected area. Access to the area will be controlled until the safety of personnel
can be assured.
If continued use of the area or equipment must be maintained, then affected
personnel will be provided with the proper training, protective equipment, or
other safeguards deemed necessary to protect them from the hazard.
Serious concealed dangers will be reported to Environment, Health & Safety
at (858) 534-3660, in accordance with UCSD PPM 516-7.3. If the serious
concealed danger cannot be abated within 15 days, then it will also be made
known to all affected employees in writing.
Environment, Health & Safety is available for consultation and assistance on
matters involving hazard mitigation and for deciding what constitutes a "serious
concealed danger." All external reporting requirements will be directed to EH&S.
4.1.10 Training
Effective dissemination of safety information lies at the very heart of a successful
Injury and Illness Prevention Program. All employees must be trained in general
safe work practices. In addition, specific instruction with respect to hazards
unique to each employee's job assignment will be provided.
A.
General Safe Work Practices:
At a minimum, all employees will be trained in the following:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Fire safety, evacuation and emergency procedures
Earthquake preparedness
Campus emergency management
Safe computer workstation use (if applicable)
Hazard communication and awareness
(use of Material Safety Data Sheets)
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Attendance at one of the regularly scheduled general Injury & Illness Prevention
Program or Laboratory Safety for Professionals/IIPP classes will meet this
requirement.
B.
Specific Safe Work Practices:
In addition to this general training, each employee will be instructed how
to protect themselves from the hazards specific to their individual job
duties. At a minimum, this entails how to use workplace equipment, safe
handling of hazardous materials, and use of personal protective
equipment. Training must be completed before beginning to work on
assigned equipment, and whenever new hazards or changes in
procedures are implemented.
Managers are responsible for providing supervisors with the training
necessary to familiarize themselves with the safety and health hazards
their employees are exposed to.
It is the responsibility of each supervisor to know the hazards related to
his/her employee's job tasks, and ensure they receive appropriate training.
1.
Supervisors will ensure that all employees receive general and jobspecific training prior to initial or new job assignments.
2.
Supervisors will ensure that employees are trained whenever new
substances, processes, procedures or equipment are introduced to
the workplace that may create new hazards. Training must also be
given when new or previously unrecognized hazards are brought to
a supervisor's attention.
3.
All training will be documented and kept in department files. The
attached Employee Training Checklist form (or equivalent) can be
used for this purpose.
4.1.11 Communication
Effective two-way communication that involves employee input on matters
of workplace safety is essential to maintaining an effective Injury and Illness
Prevention Program. To foster better safety communication the following
guidelines will be implemented:
The department will use an employee bulletin board for posting
information on safety in a location accessible to all employees. If a fire
exit corridor location is chosen, the bulletin board should be enclosed
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behind glass. Changes in protocol, safety bulletins, accident statistics,
training announcements, and other safety information will be posted as
they become available.
Managers and supervisors will provide time at periodic staff meetings
(building maintenance personnel must meet at least every 10 working
days) to discuss safety topics. Status reports will be given on safety
inspections, hazard mitigation projects, and accident investigation results,
as well as feedback to previous employee suggestions. Employees will be
encouraged to participate and give suggestions without fear of reprisal.
The attached Supervisor's Safety Meeting form (or equivalent) should be
used to document attendance and topics covered.
The department will use Material Safety Data Sheets as one form of
employer to employee communication. Additional communication
methods include:
Posters
Newsletters
General Chemical Safety Guidelines
Operator Manuals
Code of Safe Practices
Standard Operating Procedures
Meetings
Bulletins
Manuals
Warning Labels
Employees are encouraged to bring to the University's attention any potential
health or safety hazard that may exist in the work area. A mechanism for
anonymous employee input, such as a suggestion box or mail station for safety
suggestions, hazard identification, complaints, etc., which is accessible to all
employees will be implemented. The attached Employee Safety Recommendation
form section 15.3 (or equivalent) can be used for this purpose. These forms may
also be sent directly to EH&S for follow-up (Mail Code 0920).
Employees are advised that there are no reprisals for expressing a concern,
comment, suggestion, or complaint about a safety matter and that adherence to
safe work practices and proper use of personal protective equipment are integral
parts of workplace safety.
Supervisors will follow up all suggestions and investigate the concerns brought up
through these communication methods, utilizing EH&S assistance if needed.
Feedback to the employees is critical, and must be provided for effective two-way
communication.
Compliance will be reinforced by appropriate comments on performance
evaluations.
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Non-compliance will be addressed by:
•
•
An immediate discussion between the supervisor and the employee who is
discovered working in an unsafe manner
Appropriate disciplinary action up to dismissal
The department will pursue readily understandable health and safety
communications for dissemination to all affected employees.
4.1.12 Documentation
Many standards and regulations of Cal/OSHA contain requirements for the
maintenance and retention of records for occupational injuries and illnesses,
medical surveillance, exposure monitoring, inspections, and other activities
relevant to occupational health and safety. To comply with these regulations, as
well as to demonstrate that the critical elements of this Injury and Illness
Prevention Program are being implemented, the following records will be kept
on file in the department for at least the length of time indicated below:
1.
Copies of all IIPP Safety Inspection forms. Retain 5 years.
2.
Copies of all Hazard Identification forms. Retain 5 years.
3.
Copies of all Accident Investigation forms. Retain 5 years.
4.
Copies of all Employee training documents. Retain for duration of each
individual's employment. Enrollment Central provides access to an
employee's training history, listing courses registered for and completed
via Enrollment Central.
5.
Copies of all safety postings and safety meeting agendas. Retain 5 years.
6.
Copies of the Annual Accident Statistic Summaries. Retain 5 years.
7.
Copies of employee exposure records, registered carcinogen records, or
other required employee health and safety records. Retain 30 years or for
the duration of each individual's employment if greater than 30 years.
The department will ensure that these records are kept in their files, and
present them to Cal/OSHA or other regulatory agency representatives if
requested. Review of these records will be conducted by EH&S during routine
inspections to measure compliance with the Program.
A safe and healthy workplace must be the goal of everyone at UCSD, with
responsibility shared by management and staff alike. If you have any questions
regarding this Injury and Illness Prevention Program, please contact Environment,
Health and Safety at (858) 534-3660, [email protected]
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Resources: (Also See Appendix A & B)
•
•
•
•
•
Injury & Illness Prevention Program Training
IIPP Forms (also found in Appendix B)
Enrollment Central (for training history of programs completed via Enrollment
Central)
Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
EH&S Safety Training Manager
5. ESEC Site Safety Requirements
5.1 General Site Safety Rules
1. All persons shall follow these safe practice rules; render every possible aid
to safe operations and report all unsafe conditions or practices to their
supervisor.
2. Supervisors shall insist on employees observing and following all safe
practice rules and shall take such action as is necessary to obtain
compliance.
3. All employees shall be given frequent accident prevention instructions.
Safety practices shall be discussed at least every 10 working days, safety
meeting minutes will be kept on file with the Site Safety Coordinator in the
North trailer.
4. Horseplay, scuffling and other acts that tend to have an adverse affect on
employee health or safety shall be prohibited.
5. Work shall be well planned and supervised to prevent injuries in the
handling of materials and in working with equipment.
6. A Job Hazard/Site Analysis shall be performed prior to work taking place
and updated as needed during work progress. UCSD EH&S Department
guidelines observed for Integrated Safety and Environmental
Management, see Appendix B section 15.9 and Job Hazard Analysis in
Appendix A.
7. No one shall knowingly be permitted or required to work while the
employee’s ability or alertness is so impaired by fatigue, illness or other
causes that it might unnecessarily expose the employee or others to
injury.
8. Cal-OSHA standards for Heat Stress will be observed and discussed
during summer months in our safety meetings every 10 working days.
See UCSD EH&S Department guidelines for Heat Stress in Appendix A.
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9. All employees must wear hard hats and steel toed shoes while working.
Visitors must wear hard hats and closed-toed shoes at all times while on
the premises.
10. Employees shall not enter manholes, underground vaults, chambers,
tanks, or similar places that receive little ventilation, unless it has been
determined by the employee’s supervisor that it is safe to enter and
Confined Space Entry Log has been completed.
11. Employees shall be instructed to insure that all machinery guards and
other protective devices are in proper places and adjusted. They shall
report deficiencies promptly to their supervisor. See Tool Training
sections 7 & 8 in this document.
12. Workers shall not handle or tamper with any electrical equipment,
machinery, air or water lines in a manner not within the scope of their
duties, unless they have received proper instructions from their supervisor
or designee.
13. All injuries shall be reported promptly to the supervisor so that
arrangements can be made for medical or first aid treatment. See section
15.2 in Appendix B as well as Injury or Illness Reporting in Appendix A.
14. When lifting heavy objects up to 50# or more, use the large muscles of the
leg instead of the back muscles which are much smaller. Keep your back
straight and hold the load close to your body. See UCSD EH&S
Department guidelines for Lift and Carry also Manual Lifting in Appendix
A.
15. Materials, tools, or other objects shall not be thrown from buildings or
structures until proper precautions are taken to protect others from the
falling objects.
16. Employees shall cleanse hands thoroughly after handling hazardous
materials and follow precautions listed on the corresponding Material
Safety Data Sheet. Use the following Internet link to access current
Material Safety Data Sheets. (MSDS LINK) See MSDS in Appendix A.
17. Appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) will be used
according to USCD EH&S Department guidelines see section 9 and
Personal Protective Equipment in Appendix A.
18. Staff shall practice proper precautions for exposure to Blood Borne
Pathogens as outlined by UCSD EH&S Department, see Blood Borne
Pathogens in Appendix A.
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In the event human body fluids require clean up due to an injury, only
trained personnel are allowed to clean up spills with approved clean up
kits. If no trained personnel are present, secure the area and notify the
University EH&S department for instructions.
You are responsible for keeping your immediate work area clean and
sanitary. If you become aware of needs beyond general housekeeping,
report your concern to your supervisor.
All equipment and working surfaces must be cleaned and decontaminated
using sanitizing cleanser after contact with blood or other potentially
infectious materials.
If you get blood or other potentially infectious materials in your eyes, nose,
mouth, or on broken skin:
•
•
•
Immediately flood the exposed area with water and clean any
wound with soap and water or a skin disinfectant if available.
Report this immediately to your employer.
Seek immediate medical attention and notify UCSD EH&S
Biosaftey at (858) 534-5366.
19. Gasoline shall not be used for cleaning purposes.
20. No burning, welding or other source of ignition shall be applied to any
enclosed space, until it has first been determined that no possibility of
explosion exists. Welding operations are performed outdoors by certified
welders. Staff shall complete a Hot Work Permit Checklist prior to
performing welding or burning operations. Staff welding certifications are
kept on site with the Department Safety Coordinator in the North Trailer.
See Hot Work Permit Checklist section 15.3 Appendix B as well as
Fire/Life Safety in Appendix A.
21. Storage of Flammable materials is stored in Flammables Cabinets
away from possible ignition sources and shall be in accordance with
UCSD EH&S Department guidelines please see Flammable Storage in
Appendix A.
22. Compressed gasses shall be shall be handled and stored properly with
oxygen being stored a minimum of 20 feet away from fuel gas. Storage
and handling of compressed gasses shall be practiced as outlined by
UCSD EH&S Department, see Compressed Gasses in Appendix A.
23. Any damage to scaffolds, false-work, ladders, or supporting structures
shall be immediately reported to the supervisor. Do not use damaged
supporting structures. See Ladders in the Tool Training section 8.6.7
as well as Elevated Work in Appendix A.
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Scaffolding use shall conform to CCR Title 8, Chapter 4, Subchapter 4.
Construction Safety Orders Article 21, Scaffolds §1637. Scaffolding
erection shall be performed by competent staff or authorized contractor.
A daily inspection of erected scaffolding shall be conducted by the site
safety officer or other competent staff, records shall be kept on site with
the safety officer in the North trailer.
See Scaffold in Tool Training section 8.6.8, and the Daily Scaffold
Inspection Checklist section 15.14 in Appendix B, and California Code of
Regulations, Title 8 for Scaffold standards at www.dir.ca.gov .
24. Ground straps must be applied to the receiving can for any transfer of
flammable solvents into metal containers.
25. Maintain all work areas as clean and dry as possible. Wipe up spills
promptly.
26. All electrical work must be performed in compliance with the Electrical
Safety Orders, Title 8, California Code of Regulations and shall be
conducted by competent electrician.
27. Fall protection shall be used in accordance with CCR Title 8, Chapter 4,
Subchapter 4. Construction Safety Orders Article 24 Fall Protection.
ESEC mandates the use of fall protection when working on surfaces
above 6 feet and when using a Power work platform (manlift). Annual fall
protection training is provided by the Department Safety Coordinator (or
other competent staff) and recorded in Fall Protection training log held on
site with the Site Safety Coordinator in the North trailer. See Fall
Protection Inspection Checklist section 15.15.
5.2 Machinery and Vehicles
1. Only licensed authorized staff shall operate machinery or equipment.
Operators are required to receive outside training and use appropriate
PPE’s
2.
Lab staff is required to obtain a forklift operator’s license prior to
operating lift equipment. See Forklift section 5.3 for safe operating
rules. (A copy of all issued licenses is kept on file with the Department
Safety Coordinator in the North trailer).
3.
Lab staff are the only operators approved for the use of overhead/mobile
crane equipment.
Staff is responsible for all rigging and lifting
operations. Mobile crane operators shall be licensed to use, UCSD
owned and maintained, Large Hydraulic mobile crane at Englekirk
Center. Licensure shall be attained by the National Commission for the
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Certification of Crane Operators and a copy shall be kept on site with the
Department Safety Coordinator in the North trailer.
4.
Mobile crane use shall be in compliance with OSHA Standards outlined
in
29 CFR 1910.180.
5.
Powered Work Platforms shall be in compliance with CAL/OSHA Title
8 Regulations Chapter 4, Subchapter 7, Article 24. A safety harness is
required when operating the Power Work Platform. See Powered Work
Platforms section 5.4 for Operating Conditions.
6.
Employees operating UCSD vehicles are required to follow UCSD
Vehicle Driver Responsibilities and all applicable California State
Laws.
Department vehicles will be maintained according to
manufacturers’ recommendations at the UCSD Fleet Services. See
Vehicle Driver Responsibilities in Appendix A.
7.
Loose or frayed clothing, long hair, dangling ties, loose jewelry, finger
rings, etc., shall not be worn around moving machinery or other sources
of entanglement.
8.
Shields and work rests must be in place on all grinding wheels during
use.
9.
Machinery shall not be serviced, repaired or adjusted while in operation,
nor shall lubricating of moving parts be attempted, except on equipment
that is designed or fitted with safeguards to protect the person
performing the work.
10. Lockout procedures shall be followed before repairing, adjusting or
servicing equipment powered by hazardous energy sources.
11. Employees shall not work under vehicles supported by jacks or chain
hoists without protective blocking that will prevent injury if jacks or hoists
should fail.
12. Air hoses shall not be disconnected at compressors until the hose line
has been bled.
5.3 Fork Lifts
Operation of forklifts and other powered industrial trucks is restricted to
trained and licensed personnel.
A training program consists of the following elements and materials:
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a. Operating instructions, warnings and precautions for type of truck
b. Similarities and differences to automobiles
c. Control and instrumentation location and use
d. Engine or motor operation
e. Steering and maneuvering
f. Visibility
g. Fork and attachment limitations and use
h. Vehicle capacity
i. Vehicle stability
j. Vehicle inspection and maintenance
k. Refueling or charging batteries
l. Operating limitations
m. Other operating instructions, warnings or precautions listed in the
operator’s manual
Workplace-Related Topics
n.
o.
p.
q.
r.
s.
t.
u.
v.
Surface conditions where truck is used
Load composition and stability
Load stacking, unstacking and transport
Pedestrian traffic
Narrow aisle and restricted area operation
Operation in hazardous locations
Ramp and sloped surface operation
Unique or potentially hazardous conditions
Operating the vehicle in closed environments
Note: Because powered industrial trucks are manufactured by different
companies with various models available, the training must be specific to
the operating characteristics of the specific powered industrial truck the
employee will be using.
The following rules apply to all use of forklifts and other Powered Industrial
Trucks (PITs) at the Lab:
•
•
•
•
•
Do not operate any forklift or PIT unless you have operator training.
Do not operate any forklift or PIT until a daily inspection has been
performed.
Estimate the weight of the rated load to assure that you do not
exceed the rated load capacity of PITs.
Always ensure the load is against the backrest.
Follow all safety rules regarding speed, parking, loading, unloading,
and moving loads. Operators should use extreme caution when
operating on ramps, grades, or inclines.
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• Always drive an unloaded forklift with the forks on the downhill side.
Drive down forward and back up.
•
Never turn a forklift sideways on a ramp.
•
Check the floor loading limit before a PIT enters an area. The floor
must safely support the forklift, the load, and all materials that are
already in the area.
Drive material-moving equipment forward going up a ramp and
backward going down a ramp. Note: Pallet jacks should not be
used on ramps, unless the load is securely strapped to the pallet
and the pallet is strapped to the pallet jack platform.
Never allow traffic or personnel to pass under a raised load, nor
allow a load to pass over personnel or traffic.
Do not allow passengers to be carried on any PIT unless it is
specifically equipped by the manufacturer to carry passengers.
Never leave an elevated load unattended. Lower the forks to the
floor, set the brake, and turn off the PIT before leaving the PIT
unattended.
Keep traffic lanes and loading areas clear and appropriately
marked.
Store materials in work rooms or designated storage areas only. Do
not use hallways, fan lofts, or boiler and equipment rooms as
storage areas.
•
•
•
•
•
•
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• Do not allow exits, passageways, or access to equipment to
become obstructed by either stored materials or materials and
equipment in use.
• Arrange stored materials safely to prevent tipping, falling,
collapsing, rolling, spreading, or any other unsafe motion.
• Modifications of PITs and addition of equipment to PITSs may only
be performed by the PIT manufacturer or by qualified PIT
mechanics with the approval of the manufacturer.
• Do not use front-end attachments other than factory-installed
attachments; make sure that the truck is equipped with a plate that
identifies the attachments, shows the approximate weight of the
truck with attachments, and shows the lifting capacity of the truck
with attachments at maximum lift elevation with the load laterally
centered.
• All forklift trucks must carry fire extinguishers, usually 2-1/2lbs ABC,
regardless of their location classification.
• Only trained operators shall replace LPG tanks on forklift trucks or
charge batteries. Battery changing may be performed only by
trained and authorized PIT service personnel
5.4 Powered Work Platforms
Powered work platforms have a telescoping or extensible boom with a
personnel platform attached.
Operating Conditions
Extensible boom work platforms must be operated under the following
conditions:
•
•
•
•
Two operators must be present at all times. One operator must be present
on the work platform and the other stationed on the ground to assist in the
operation and perform any emergency duties.
All units must be inspected prior to each shift's use and must not be
operated if found to be unsafe.
All personnel occupying the work platform must wear an approved safety
harness and lanyard properly attached to the equipment.
Outriggers, if provided, must be used as recommended by the
manufacturer.
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• Unless recommended for such use by the manufacturer, no extensible
boom work platforms are to be used on an inclined surface. No unit may
be used on an incline over 5% or in winds over 25 mph.
• All units must have upper and lower control devices.
• Units equipped with outriggers must not be relocated while personnel are
on the work platform in an elevated position and must not elevate
personnel without the stability of outriggers.
Identification
The following must be displayed on all work platforms in a permanent
manner:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Special warnings, cautions, or restrictions necessary for safe operation.
Make, model, and manufacturer's name and address.
Rated work load capacity.
Maximum platform height.
Instructions to study operating manual.
Chart, schematic, or scale showing capacities of all combinations in their
operating positions and cautions or restrictions, or both, regarding
operation of all alternate configurations or combinations of alternate
configurations.
Inspections
•
•
Daily Inspection: All units must be inspected prior to each shift's use.
Inspections must include all items recommended by the manufacturer's
manual.
Preventive Maintenance: All units must receive preventive maintenance at
intervals no longer than recommended in the manufacturer's manual.
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6. Lockout/Blockout Policy
6.1 Purpose
This policy establishes specific written procedures for the protection of
personnel from injury due to unexpected energizing of equipment during
service, operation, and repair. This will be accomplished by isolating the
energy source serving the equipment in question, and apply a lockout /
blockout device to the equipment and/or energy isolating control device.
Multiple energy sources will require isolation and lockout/ blockout of each
source individually.
6.2 Scope
This policy applies to all operations and maintenance activities involving
hazardous machinery and/or energy sources (electrical, hydraulic,
pneumatic, mechanical, thermal, chemical, nuclear, etc.). In this context,
hazardous implies the ability to kill or injure personnel in the affected area.
6.3 Responsibility
Supervisors will provide all necessary equipment for performing the
operation or maintenance duties safely, as well as all safety locks, keys,
tags, and training to ensure the safety of employees. Supervisors will
survey all hazardous energy sources, and implement this procedure for
lockout / blockout at each location. Supervisors will periodically inspect for
compliance with this policy, enforce its provisions, and maintain the
necessary documentation of training, lock issue, etc. Employees will be
responsible for knowing and following the procedures contained in this
policy.
ESEC staff are required to use a Key in/out log for any lockout
procedures. Keys, locks, and log records are kept in a locked cabinet in
the control room accessible by ESEC staff only.
6.4 Authorization
California Code of Regulations Title 8, Section 3314
Code of Federal Regulations Title 29, Section 1910.147
6.5 Procedures
1. Prior to performing maintenance or service on equipment energized by a
hazardous energy source that can endanger personnel, the energy
isolating mechanism or mechanisms must be identified. After turning off all
operational controls, the energy source or sources must then be isolated
(disengage power at a breaker or disconnect switch, close shut-off valve,
etc.) by an authorized employee knowledgeable in the specific hazards of
the equipment being serviced. Note: Push buttons, selector switches, and
other control-circuit type devices are not energy isolating devices.
2. If a lock can be applied to the energy-isolating device in the closed
position, the authorized employee who will perform the maintenance or be
exposed to the danger must apply one. In addition, a sturdy, prominent tag
that states “Danger – Do Not Operate” must also be applied to the energyisolating device. The tag must also identify the department, employee, and
date the lockout was initiated. If a lock cannot be applied, then the tag
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described above will suffice. However, take any other feasible precautions
to afford protection that approaches lockout level. A second tag must also
be applied to the equipment being serviced in a position that is
immediately obvious to personnel who might attempt to operate the
equipment.
3. Locks must be sturdy with individual keys. Sharing of keys is not allowed.
A spare key is acceptable if stored in a supervisor’s area for emergency
use only. In addition, the locks must be conspicuous, easily recognized
between all service personnel as lockout / blockout devices, and used for
no other purpose.
4. Any stored energy in the equipment being serviced must be safely
discharged and all moving parts returned to a safe resting position. Use
appropriate blocks if a hazard still exists from equipment cycling or gravity.
5. Test the effectiveness of the lockout by attempting to operate the
equipment while de-energized.
6. After maintenance is complete, clear all personnel and tools from the
hazardous area and verify that all operational controls are in the off
position. The lock and/or tag on the energy-isolating device can then be
removed, but only by the employee who applied them. For shift
changes or other unique applications, adopt an official method for
transferring responsibility for lock removal to the incoming employee.
7. Engage energizing device or devices for normal operation.
6.6 Special Provisions
1. For complex systems, use a written checklist to ensure proper steps are
taken for lockout, clearance, and startup. ESEC does not have
personnel shift changes or multi-departmental work being performed
on our system and therefore does not operate a complex system.
2. For work involving more than one employee, use a hasp or other device
that can accept numerous locks – one from each individual performing
work on the equipment. Energizing is not allowed until each employee
removes his or her particular lock.
3. For work involving outside contractors working with UCSD employees,
inform a responsible employee from each firm about this policy and
require its application.
4. For equipment that must be serviced while energized, a written procedure
must be adopted that affords effective protection to the personnel
performing the work. Supervisors must supply any special tools required
to ensure this protection.
5. The only exception to this policy is for equipment that has no stored
energy, and can be de-energized from one point source that is under the
direct control of the employee performing the repairs (i.e., an electrical
cord that can be unplugged and kept at an employee’s feet during repair).
Address questions about this policy to UCSD Environment, Health &
Safety, General Safety Division, (858) 534-3660.
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6.7 Lockout/Tagout for Hydraulic lines at ESEC
1. In the event that hydraulic hoses need to be disconnected, the main
electrical source for the hydraulic pumps will be locked and tagged with
appropriate person(s) signing tags. Additionally, inline valves may be
closed, locked, and tagged with appropriate person(s) signing tags. Locks
and keys will be signed out.
2. The person(s) signing Tags will be responsible for assuring the hydraulic
hoses are reconnected and in working order before the locks and tags are
removed.
3. A “Key-in/out” log will be maintained and kept in the control room.
7. Machine Shop and Tool Training
7.1 Introduction
a. All employees will be provided with proper shop safety
information such as tool training, personal protective
equipment, etc. from lab personnel.
b. Standard operating procedures for machine and equipment will be
trained by competent laboratory personnel.
c. All machine maintenance will be conducted by competent
laboratory personnel.
7.2 Responsibilities
a. If you don’t know how to do something, ASK!
b. Do not leave machines running unattended.
c. Operators need to inspect their machines before using them to
make sure all guards are in place, all emergency stop devices
work properly, and the machine is in generally safe condition.
d. Do not slow down the machines by touching it.
7.3 Personal Protective Equipment
a. All personnel must wear safety glasses when operating machines.
b. Hearing protection (ear muffs or ear plugs) is available.
7.4 Clothes and Hair
a. Anyone with long hair or a long beard, tie it up before operating
machinery.
b. No loose clothing, ties, scarves, etc. when working the shop area.
c. Loose jewelry must be removed before operating machinery.
7.5 Controls
a. All machine guards must be installed and functioning properly.
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8. Use of Tools and Equipment
8.1 Purpose
The purpose of tool training is to instruct staff in the safe use of shop tools,
identify hazards of specific tools, and create safety awareness during tool
use.
8.2 Training Records
The Department Safety Coordinator at Englekirk Center will keep and
maintain training records for all employees who use shop tools, located in
the North Trailer.
8.3 Common Sense of Tool Use
In all aspects of work employees should practice common sense, perhaps
more so when hand and power tools are involved.
Common sense on the job is irreplaceable.
Points to consider
• Always wear the proper personal protective equipment.
• Don’t over exert yourself – get help with heavy tasks.
• Don’t over extend yourself when on ladders – and risk losing your
balance.
• Always use the proper tool for the job.
• Concentrate on your work.
• Look for unsafe acts or unsafe working conditions – and then report them.
• Watch out for others – remember you are part of a team.
• Ask the following questions before you begin to work:
• Are the conditions safe to do the work?
• Are the methods we are going to use safe?
• Does everyone know what to do?
• Does everyone know how to do it?
• Can I fall, get struck by, get caught between or under, or get electrocuted
on this job?
8.4 The Right Tool for the Right Job
One way to get injured on the job is using the wrong tool for the job. Two
important points to remember when using hand tools is the selection of the
tool for the job and the use of the tool for the job.
Some key points to remember:
• Misuse Resulting From:
• Ignorance.
• Poor attitudes.
• Production demands.
• General Points:
• Keep your tools clean and in good condition.
• Choose the right tool for a specific job.
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• Never use a tool not designed for the job you are doing.
• Never carry tools in your pockets.
• When chipping or cutting, wear eye protection.
• Be wary of the effect of your actions on others nearby workers.
• Use a pulling motion to operate hand tools rather than a pushing method.
• Never leave hand tools in areas where they may be kicked off onto lower
levels or where they may be a tripping hazard.
• Never improvise.
• Don’t adapt or use “cheaters.”
• Never remove an electrical cord by jerking it; pull it away from power by
the plug.
• Always be sure that power tools are electrically safe
8.5 Hand Tools
All too frequently, hand tools are used improperly or when they are
defective. Since we use hand tools continually, it is important they be used
properly.
General Hand Tool Rules
• Always use the right tool for the right job.
• Use only tools in good condition.
• Keep tools sharpened.
• Store tools properly.
• When chipping, always wear safety glasses.
• Never throw tools to co-workers.
• Never use a tool in such a way that you will be injured if it slips.
8.6 Hand Tool Training
8.6.1 Screwdrivers
The screwdriver is one of the most commonly misused hand tools. While
it is designed to tighten or loosen screws, you can also find it being used
as a pry bar, punch or chisel. When that happens, the screwdriver can
slip. When it slips, it can cause an injury or ruins the tool.
Proper Care
•
The handle should be tight, smooth and not slippery.
•
The shank should be true and straight.
•
The bit should be flat, with the end at a right angle with the shank.
•
Keep the bit square edged.
•
When sharpening, be use not to remove the bit temper.
•
Keep the bit and handle clear and free of grease and oil.
Proper Use
•
Always use the proper size bit to fit the screw head.
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•
Keep the bit square to the screw head.
•
Never use pliers on a screwdriver; if possible, use a vise.
•
Never use as a pry, chisel, punch or lever.
•
Use only a standard screwdriver on a standard screw; Phillips head
on a Phillips head screw.
•
Select the right length for the job; don’t try to improvise.
•
Always use a screwdriver with an insulated handle for electrical
work.
8.6.2 Wrenches
Proper Care
•
Inspect on a regular basis
•
Replace sprung jaws, cages and faces
•
Replace all bent handles
•
Keep the jaws sharp
•
Keep the wrench clean and free of grease and oil.
Proper Use
•
Always use the proper size wrench for the job.
•
Never use a shim to make a wrong size wrench fit a nut.
•
Never use a piece of pipe on the handle to increase your leverage.
(Slip hazard.)
•
Don’t use a wrench as a substitute for a hammer.
•
Don’t pound on a wrench to try to loosen a frozen bolt. Use
penetrating oil.
•
Always pull a wrench toward you—never push away. (Slip hazard.)
•
See that the wrench jaws are sharp and can bite the nut.
8.6.3 Hammers/Chisels
One of the most common causes of hand injuries is from the improper
use of hammers and chisels. Both are responsible for a high number of
eye injuries as a result of flying nails, metal or concrete chips.
Chisel Use
•
Never use a chisel with a mushroomed head.
•
Always wear eye protection.
•
Hold the chisel between the thumb and forefingers – don’t make a
fist around the chisel.
•
Do not grip a chisel if your hands are numb.
•
If another worker is nearby, place yourself between the other worker
and the chipping area.
•
Always use sharp chisels.
Hammer Use
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•
Use the right type of hammer for the job.
•
Only use hammers in good condition.
•
Use only hammers to drive objects.
•
Always grip the hammer close to the end and grip it tightly.
•
Whenever possible, wear eye protection, and ear protection.
•
Always concentrate on the striking point.
•
Strike blows as squarely as possible.
•
Be sure there is an unobstructed back swing.
•
Don’t strike blows with the side of the hammer.
•
Never strike a hammer or tempered tool with another hammer.
•
Always keep your hammer free of grease and oil.
•
Never allow someone else to hold a nail or chisel while striking it.
8.6.4 Nails
You would think that nails are not a very important subject. However,
many minor injuries on the job are a result of punctures, scrapes, and
cuts resulting from nails that were not properly removed from lumber and
other debris.
Driving Nails:
•
Be sure your hammer is in good condition.
•
Always hit the nail squarely, especially on the first blow.
•
Always hit with the blow's 90 degrees to the nail head.
•
Make sure the back swing is unobstructed; claws can hurt.
•
Be consistent—“groove” your swing.
•
Concentrate on the head of the nail.
Pulling Nails:
•
Always pull or bend nails when stripping.
•
Use the right pulling device for the job.
•
If needed, use a block of wood as a fulcrum. It will make the job
much easier.
•
Keep scrap materials in neat piles and out of walkways.
8.6.5 Come-a-Long
Come-a-Long is a common name for a ratcheting cable winch, used to
pull or hoist heavy objects.
Proper Care
•
The cables should be free of kinks and frays, remove from service if
cable is frayed.
Proper Use
•
Be sure you use within rated load.
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•
Be sure to secure the ends to something which will also carry the
intended load.
8.6.6 Hammer/Smack-Wrench
A hammer-wrench or smack-wrench is a wrench designed to be hit with
a mallet or sledge hammer to achieve greater clamping force than a
hand wrench would provide.
Proper Use
•
Be sure you have the right size wrench.
•
Assure no one or thing will be in your swing radius, especially if you
miss with the hammer.
•
Always wear safety glasses and ear protection.
8.6.7 Ladders
Injuries in the workplace because of ladder are commonplace. Falls from
ladders can be as painful as a fall from a roof; about a third of all
reported falls are falls from ladders. (*) Many of the fall related injuries
result from the improper use or the use of a defective ladder.
Step/extension ladders are made to access/egress upper levels, not to
be used as work platforms. The following safe work rules should be
observed when working with ladders.
(*) 1993-94 Study: 238 of 705 falls based on an OSHA study.
Inspection
•
Look for missing or loose cleats at the bottom.
•
Look for loose or missing screws, bolts or nails on job made ladders
•
Look for cracked, broken, split, dented or badly worn rungs, cleats
or side rails.
•
Splinters on wood ladders.
•
Corrosion on metal ladders.
Proper Ladder Use
•
Always use the right ladder for the right job.
•
Don’t set your ladder in a walkway or door opening.
•
Keep the area at the top and bottom of the ladder clear of tool cords,
tools, material and garbage.
•
Always set the ladder on solid footing.
•
Use a twenty-five percent (25%) angle on the slope of the ladder.
•
When using extension ladders, the three (3) top rungs must extend
beyond the landing platform. (Or the top of an extension ladder must
be 36” (3 feet) above the landing.
•
Don’t lean to the side when on a ladder or you may tip over.
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Do not carry tools or materials on a ladder. Use both hands when
climbing a ladder to grab onto the side rails. If it is necessary to
move material or tools up a ladder, first climb up, then pull up the
work with a hand line.
•
Only one person on a ladder at a time (unless the ladder is double
cleated).
•
Always secure the top of the ladder to prevent it from sliding.
•
Never lean a step ladder; always fully open a step ladder.
•
Always face the ladder.
•
Always tie off the ladder; that way it stays where you put it.
8.6.8 Scaffolds
Scaffolds allow for greater personnel mobility than ladders. They
provide access to materials and tools directly where the work is being
performed.
A Daily Stationary Scaffold Inspection Checklist is required before
using erected scaffolding; see Daily Stationary Scaffold Inspection
Checklist section 15.14 in Appendix B.
Safe Use
•
Follow the manufacturer's instructions when erecting the scaffold.
•
Do not work on scaffolds outside during stormy or windy weather.
•
Do not climb on scaffolds that wobble or lean to one side.
•
Initially inspect the scaffold prior to mounting it. Do not use a
scaffold if any pulley, block, hook or fitting is visibly worn, cracked,
rusted or otherwise damaged.
•
Do not use any scaffold tagged "Out of Service".
•
Do not use unstable objects such as barrels, boxes, loose brick or
concrete blocks to support scaffolds or planks.
•
Do not work on platforms or scaffolds unless they are fully planked.
•
Do not use a scaffold unless guardrails and all flooring are in place.
•
Level the scaffold after each move. Do not extend adjusting leg
screws more than 12 inches.
•
Do not walk or work beneath a scaffold unless a wire mesh has
been installed between the midrail and the toeboard or planking.
•
Use your safety belts and lanyards when working on scaffolding at a
height of 10 feet or more above ground level. Attach the lanyard to a
secure member of the scaffold.
•
Do not climb the cross braces for access to the scaffold. Use the
ladder.
•
Do not jump from, to, or between scaffolding.
•
Do not slide down cables, ropes or guys used for bracing.
•
Keep both feet on the decking. Do not sit or climb on the guardrails.
•
Do not lean out from the scaffold. Do not rock the scaffold.
•
Keep the scaffold free of scraps, loose tools, tangled lines and other
obstructions.
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Do not throw anything "overboard" unless a spotter is available. Use
the debris chutes or lower things by hoist or by hand.
•
Do not move a mobile scaffold if anyone is on the scaffold.
•
Chock the wheels of the rolling scaffold, using the wheel blocks, and
also lock the wheels by using your foot to depress the wheel-lock,
before using the scaffold.
8.7 Electric Power Tools
Electric power tools come in all shapes and sizes and are designed to do
almost anything. The following rules should be remembered when using
electrical power tools:
Inspect for the following:
•
Be sure the cord is properly grounded and double insulated
•
Broken or defective cords
•
Defective terminal connections
•
Defective plugs
•
Defective or loose switches
•
Brushes that spark excessively
•
Never use a tool unless the guards are in place and in working
order.
Before using the tool:
•
Remove the chuck or adjusting key
•
Firmly secure the work
•
Be sure you have firm footing
Always use proper personal protective equipment and remove
dangerous items:
•
Do NOT wear gloves when operating machinery with rotating parts.
•
Always wear safety glasses or goggles
•
Do not wear loose clothing/jewelry
•
Never adjust the tool when it is plugged in.
•
Disconnect the tool when finished or when not using.
•
Maintain good housekeeping.
•
Avoid working in wet areas whenever possible. When you do, wear
insulating materials such as rubber gloves or a rubber vest.
8.7.1 Electric Extension Cords
Extension cords need to be continuous with double insulation.
Inspect for the following:
•
Broken or defective cords
•
Defective terminal connections
•
Defective plugs
•
Spliced or taped cuts in any part of the insulation
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•
If any defects are found; remove from service.
8.7.2 Table, Radial, and Miter Saw
We all recognize how important our hands are to our employability.
Table, Radial, and Miter saws are the surest and cleanest way to lose a
finger or a hand. Much of this is a result of getting used to operating a
saw and then losing respect for it. That is why it is so important that we
review the common safety rules pertaining to the operation of a
stationary saw.
Two common types of saws: Table saw; radial arm /miter saw.
General Operating Rules:
•
Never operate without all guards in place, especially the blade
guard.
•
Be sure you stand in the correct position—always allow for kick
back.
•
Maintain good footing.
•
Never allow other workers to work or rest when they are exposed to
kick back.
•
Maintain good housekeeping in the saw area.
•
Never use your hands to run lumber through the blade or to clean
off sawdust. Get a push-stick and a brush.
•
Do NOT wear gloves when operating saws, the blade may grab the
glove and pull your hand into the blades cutting radius.
•
Never use a saw with a dull blade. (Note: When you go to change a
blade, make sure the power is disconnected and you control the
switch.)
•
Don’t crowd (i.e., pinch) a blade especially when cross-cutting.
•
Don’t wear loose clothing around a saw.
•
Always wear eye protection.
•
Be wary of warped lumber.
•
Look for nails, screws or other contaminants if re-using wood.
•
Be wary of “fly back” (also called kick back) when ripping.
•
Keep the blade set so it just barely makes the desired cut.
•
Keep your material supported, plan ahead for the support of the cut
pieces.
Saw Blade Rules
•
Always keep the blade sharp.
•
Use the right blade for the materials being cut.
•
Never change blades while the saw is plugged in.
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8.7.3 Stationary Sander
The stationary sander is used to grind or sand wood and metal. It has a
belt sander as well as a disc sander; each grinding surface is capable of
pulling your work into itself if you are not careful. Each grinding surface
is also capable of pulling you into the grinding surface if you are not
careful.
General Safety Rules
•
Do not wear gloves when operating rotating machinery.
•
When grinding steel keep clear any flammable material such as
solvents, paper, and rags; the sander does produce sparks which
could easily start a fire.
•
Use only grounded or double-insulated tools.
•
Use only extension cords that are in good condition.
•
Make sure there is an assured grounding program or ground fault
interrupter (GFI) being used.
•
Make sure all work areas are as dry as possible.
•
Never do maintenance work on the sander while it is plugged in.
•
Always remain alert.
Guard Rules
•
Make sure all guards are operable before use.
8.7.4 Abrasive Saw
An abrasive saw is primarily used in cutting ferrous and non-ferrous
metals. Special precautions are needed when cutting metal versus
wood.
General Safety Rules
•
Use only grounded or double-insulated tools.
•
Use only extension cords that are in good condition.
•
Make sure there is an assured grounding program or ground fault
interrupter (GFI) being used.
•
Make sure all work areas are as dry as possible.
•
Never do maintenance work on the saw while it is plugged in.
•
Make sure your material is clamped and supported at both ends to
prevent kick up if a cut piece should fall.
•
Always remain alert.
•
Do NOT use the side of the blade as a grinder.
•
Check the blade for damage prior to use.
•
Keep clear any flammable material such as solvents, paper, and
rags; the saw does produce sparks which may easily start a fire.
Guard Rules
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Make sure all guards are operable before use.
•
Do not use the saw if it has a defective guard.
•
Never block any of the guards open.
8.7.5 Stationary Grinder
The stationary grinder is used to grind metal. It has a turning wheel
capable of pulling you and/or your work piece into itself. Damaged
grinder wheels may shatter and cause serious injury
General Safety Rules
•
Wear Safety glasses.
•
Do not wear gloves when operating rotating machinery.
•
Do not use the side of the grinder wheel; it is not designed for this
purpose.
•
Keep clear any flammable material such as solvents, paper, and
rags; the grinder does produce sparks which may easily start a fire.
•
Use only grounded or double-insulated tools.
•
Make sure there is an assured grounding program or ground fault
interrupter (GFI) being used.
•
Make sure all work areas are as dry as possible.
•
Never do maintenance work on the saw while it is plugged in.
•
Always remain alert.
Guard Rules
•
Make sure all guards are operable before use.
•
The proper spacing of the tool rest shall not exceed 1/8 inch, and
the spacing of the tongue guard shall not exceed 1/4 inch.
•
There shall not be any alterations made to manufacturers’ guards
which would result in less protection or malfunction.
8.7.5.1
Changing/Facing Grinder Wheel
Changing the wheel
• Be sure to unplug the machine when changing the grinder wheel.
• Immediately before mounting the wheel, inspect for damage and
PERFORM A RING TEST on the wheel.
Steps to perform a ring test:
1. Visually inspect wheel for damage
2. Hold wheel by the arbor and lightly tap side of wheel with
non-metallic object, such as a screwdriver handle. You should
hear a “ringing” sound if the wheel is not cracked or damaged.
-If you hear a dead sound the wheel should not be used.
• Check spindle speed before mounting wheel to be certain it does
not exceed maximum operating speed marked on wheel.
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Facing the wheel
Use the facing tool to even the grinding surface to eliminate
grooves which would increase the allowable gap of the tool rest.
8.7.6 14” Band Saw
Band saws may be used to cut wood or metals; however you need to be
sure of the type of blade installed before you make a cut.
General Safety Rules
•
Wear Safety glasses.
•
Do not wear gloves when operating rotating machinery.
•
Use only grounded or double-insulated tools.
•
Use only extension cords that are in good condition.
•
Make sure there is an assured grounding program or ground fault
interrupter (GFI) being used.
•
Make sure all work areas are as dry as possible.
•
Never do maintenance work on the saw while it is plugged in.
•
Always remain alert.
Guard Rules
•
Make sure all guards are operable before use.
•
Do not use the saw if it has a defective guard.
•
Never block any of the guards open.
•
Drive wheels shall be fully encased.
•
All portions of the blade shall be fully enclosed, except for the
working portion between the blade guides and the table.
8.7.7 Drill Press
A drill press makes drilling much easier, especially in metal. It is also a
powerful piece of machinery which requires extra care when operating.
General Safety Rules
•
Always wear safety goggles or safety glasses with side shields
complying with current national standard, and a full face shield when
needed.
•
Wear hearing protection during extended periods of operation.
•
Do not wear gloves, loose clothing, jewelry or any dangling objects
that may catch in rotating parts or accessories. Tie back long hair.
•
Remove material or debris from the area that might be ignited by hot
chips.
•
Make certain the chuck key is removed before starting the tool.
The key can be thrown at high velocity if not removed.
•
Be sure belt guards are installed and functioning properly.
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•
Never hold the workpiece by hand. To prevent the workpiece and
backup material from spinning, set them against the left side of the
drill support column. Secure the workpiece with a clamp or the
appropriate fixture if it is too short to reach the column.
•
Carefully set the drill press speed appropriate for both the type of
material and bit size you are using.
Operating Safety Rules
•
Do not touch the bit or chips. Drill bits and cuttings are hot
immediately after drilling.
•
If something goes wrong, never attempt to correct a problem with
the drill operating. Shut if off and unplug it if possible.
•
Never reach around or under the working head, or grab the chuck to
stop a drill press. This can result in hand puncture or other serious
injury.
•
Always shut off, unplug if possible, and lock the press if a lock
is available, and store the key.
•
Use a vacuum, brush or rake to remove cuttings.
•
Remove burrs and chips from a drilled hole. When making deep
holes, clean out the hole frequently.
•
Lubricate drill bit when drilling metal.
•
Reduce the drilling pressure when the drill begins to break through
the workpiece. This action prevents drill from pulling into the work
and breaking.
•
Keep drill bits clean and sharp. Dull drills are a common cause of
breakage.
•
Keep floor around the drill press free of oil and grease.
•
Keep the working surface clean of scraps, tools and materials.
•
Keep guards in place and in good working order.
8.7.8 Portable Electric Tools
The use of portable electric power tools is one of the most common
occurrences on a construction project today. It is important to remember
that electricity always seeks a path of least resistance and often that is
through a defective cord into the worker’s body. This is especially true if
the worker is exposed to wet weather or has been sweating.
The following safety rules discuss the safe use of portable electric
tools:
•
Use only equipment that is in good condition.
•
Be sure the tool is properly grounded.
•
Always report the following:
•
Defective or broken cords;
•
Bad connections to power terminals;
•
Defective or broken plugs;
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•
Defective or loose switches;
•
Brushes causing sparks.
•
Never overstrain the tool thus overloading the motor.
•
Never use an un-insulated tool without a grounding plug.
•
Avoid working in wet areas unless a ground fault interrupter circuit is
used.
•
Never use a tool in the presence of flammable vapors or gases
unless it is designed for such use.
8.7.9 Circular Saw
The circular saw is one of the most common power tools found in
residential construction. It is also one of the most abused being tossed
around, kicked out of the way, but depended on to get the job done.
General Safety Rules
•
Use only grounded or double-insulated tools.
•
Use only extension cords that are in good condition.
•
Make sure there is an assured grounding program or ground fault
interrupter (GFI) being used. (See Electrical section for more
information.)
•
Make sure all work areas are as dry as possible.
•
Never do maintenance work on the saw while it is plugged in.
•
Never ever use your leg as a sawhorse.
•
Always remain alert.
Guard Rules
•
Make sure all guards are operable before use.
•
Do not use the saw if it has a defective guard.
•
Never block any of the guards open.
•
Always check before setting the saw down to be sure that the blade
guard does not jam open.
Saw Blade Rules
•
Always keep the blade sharp. Dull blades cause binding, stalling
and possible kickback. Dull blades also waste power and reduce
motor and switch life.
•
Use the right blade for the materials being cut. Check this carefully:
Does it have the proper size and shape arbor hole? Is the speed
marked on the blade at least as high as the no load RPM on the
saw’s nameplate?
•
Never change blades while the saw is plugged in.
Operating Safety Rules
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Before starting a circular saw be sure the power cord and extension
cord are out of the blade path and are sufficiently long to freely
complete the cut. A sudden jerk or pulling on the cord can cause
loss of control of the saw and a serious accident.
•
For maximum control, hold the saw firmly with both hands after
securing the workpiece. Clamp workpieces. Check frequently to be
sure clamps remain secure.
•
Never hold a workpiece in your hand or across your leg when
sawing.
•
Avoid cutting small pieces of material which can’t be properly
secured, and material on which the base of the saw (shoe) cannot
properly rest.
•
When making a “blind” cut (you can’t see behind what is being cut),
be sure that hidden electrical wiring, water pipes or any mechanical
hazards are not in the blade path. If wires are present, they must be
disconnected at the power source by a qualified person or avoided.
Contact with live wires could cause lethal shock or fire. Water pipes
should be drained and capped. Always hold the tool by the insulated
grasping surfaces.
•
Set blade depth to no more than 1/8 in. to 1/4 in. greater than the
¼ckness of the material being cut.
•
When you start your saw allow the blade to reach full speed before
the workpiece is contacted.
•
Be alert to the possibility of the blade binding and kickback
occurring, (see “Preventing Portable Circular Saw Kickback”).
•
If a fence or guard board is used, be certain the blade is kept
parallel with it.
•
NEVER overreach!
•
Crowded, cluttered conditions that can cause tripping or loss of
balance are particularly dangerous.
•
When making a partial cut, or if power is interrupted, release the
trigger immediately and don’t remove the saw until the blade has
come to a complete stop.
•
Never reach under the saw or workpiece.
•
Portable circular saws are not designed for cutting logs, or roots,
trimming trees or shrubs. These are very hazardous practices.
•
Switch the tool off after a cut is completed, and keep the saw away
from your body until the blade stops.
•
Unplug, clean and store the tool in a safe, dry place after use.
8.7.9.1
Preventing Saw Kickback
Kickback is a sudden reaction to a pinched blade, causing an
uncontrolled portable tool to lift up and out of the workpiece toward
the operator. Kickback is the result of tool misuse and/or incorrect
operating procedures or conditions.
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Take these specific precautions to help prevent kickback when
using any type of circular saw:
• Keep saw blades sharp. A sharp blade will tend to cut its way out of
a pinching condition.
• Make sure the blade has adequate set in the teeth. Tooth set
provides clearance between the sides of the blade and the
workpiece, thus minimizing the probability of binding. Some saw
blades have hollow ground sides instead of tooth set to provide
clearance.
• Keep saw blades clean. A buildup of pitch or sap on the surface of
the saw blade increases the thickness of the blade and also
increases the friction on the blade surface. These conditions cause
an increase in the likelihood of a kickback.
• Be very cautious of stock which is pitchy, knotty or warped. These
are most likely to create pinching conditions and possible kickback.
• Always hold the saw firmly with both hands.
• Release the switch immediately if the blade binds or the saw stalls.
• Support large panels so they will not pinch the blade. Use a straight
edge as a guide for ripping.
• Never remove the saw from a cut while the blade is rotating.
• Never use a bent, broken or warped saw blade. The probability of
binding and resultant kickback is greatly increased by these
conditions.
• Overheating a saw blade can cause it to warp and result in a
kickback. Buildup of sap on the blades, insufficient set, dullness,
and unguided cuts, can all cause an over heated blade and
kickback.
• Never set a blade deeper than is required to cut the workpiece 1/8
in. to 1/4 in. greater than the ¼ckness of the stock is sufficient. This
minimizes the amount of saw blade surface exposed and reduces
the probability and severity if any kickback does occur.
• Minimize blade pinching by placing the saw shoe on the clamped,
supported portion of the workpiece and allowing the cut off piece to
fall away freely.
8.7.10 Reciprocating Saw
The versatility of the reciprocating saw, in cutting metal, pipe, wood and
other materials has made it a widely used tool. By design, it is a simple
tool to handle. Its few demands for safe use, however, are very
important.
General Safety Rules
•
Blades can break. Always wear safety goggles or safety glasses
with side shields complying with current national standard, and a full
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face shield when needed. Use a dust mask in dusty work conditions.
Wear hearing protection during extended periods of operation.
•
Do not wear loose clothing, jewelry or any dangling objects that may
catch in moving parts or accessories. Tie back long hair.
•
Use sharp blades. Dull blades can produce excessive heat, make
sawing difficult, result in forcing the tool, and possibly cause an
accident.
Operating Safety Rules
•
Without exception, use the blade specifically recommended for the
job being done. Check your owner/operators manual carefully
concerning this.
•
Position yourself to maintain full control of the tool, and avoid cutting
above shoulder height.
•
To minimize blade flexing and provide a smooth cut, use the
shortest blade that will to the job.
•
The workpiece must be clamped securely, and the shoe of the saw
held firmly against the work to prevent operator injury and blade
breakage.
•
When plunge-cutting, use a blade designed for that purpose.
Maintain firm contact between the saw’s shoe and the material
being cut.
•
When making a “blind” cut (you can’t see behind what is being cut),
be sure that hidden electrical wiring, or water pipes are not in the
path of the cut. If wires are present, they must be disconnected at
their power source by a qualified person or avoided, to prevent the
possibility of lethal shock or fire. Water pipes must be drained and
capped.
•
Always hold the tool by the insulated grouping surfaces.
•
When making anything other than a through cut, allow the tool to
come to a complete stop before removing the blade from the
workpiece. This prevents breakage of the blade, and possible loss
of tool control.
•
Remember that the blade and blade clamp may be hot immediately
after cutting. Avoid contact until they have cooled.
You expose yourself to unnecessary hazards if these or any
manufacturers’ instructions are not followed.
8.7.11 Jig Saw
Portable jig/saber saws are light weight and generally easy to handle.
For this reason, carelessness can easily enter the picture.
General Safety Rules
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•
Always wear safety goggles or safety glasses with side shields
complying with current national standard, and a full face shield when
needed. Use a dust mask in dusty work conditions. Wear hearing
protection during extended periods of operation.
•
Do not wear loose clothing, jewelry or any dangling objects that may
catch in moving parts or accessories. Tie back long hair.
•
The tool should be unplugged before checking or installing blades or
accessories.
Operating Safety Rules
•
Check carefully that the blades are adequately secured in position
before plugging in. Make sure the cord is out of your way and not in
the line of cut.
•
Firmly position the tool’s base plate/shoe on the workpiece before
turning on the tool.
•
Keep your hands and fingers well clear of moving parts.
•
After making partial cuts, turn the tool off and remove the blade from
the workpiece only after the blade has fully stopped.
•
Know what is behind a cut before you make it. Be sure that hidden
electrical wiring, water pipes, hazardous objects of any kind are not
in the path of the cut. If wires are present, they must be
disconnected by a qualified person at their power source to prevent
the possibility of lethal shock. Water pipes must be drained and
capped. Always hold the tool by the insulated grasping surfaces.
•
When plunge (pocket) cutting, use a blade designed for that
purpose and follow the manufacturer’s recommended procedures.
•
Maintain firm contact between the base and the material being cut,
throughout cutting procedures.
•
Remember that the blade and blade clamp may be hot immediately
after cutting. Keep your hands away until cooled down.
•
Never overreach. It can be hazardous with small tools.
•
Do not leave saws unattended — unplug and secure the tool
immediately after use. It is the type of tool that children can readily
pick up and cause injury.
8.7.12 Portable Band Saw
The portable band saw is used to cut various metals though its
capacities are limited. Be sure you can complete the cut before you
begin.
General Safety Rules
•
Use only blades which are 1,140 mm (44-7/8”) long; 13 mm (1/2”)
wide; and 0.5 mm (0.020”) thick.
•
Check the blade carefully for cracks or damage before operation.
Replace cracked or damaged blade immediately.
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•
Secure the workpiece firmly. When cutting a bundle of workpieces,
be sure that all the workpieces are secured together firmly before
cutting.
•
Cutting workpieces covered with oil can cause the blade to come off
unexpectedly. Wipe off all excess oil from workpieces before
cutting.
•
Never use cutting oil as a cutting lubricant, Use only Makita cutting
wax.
•
Do not wear gloves during operation.
•
Hold the tool firmly with both hands.
•
When cutting metal, be cautious of hot flying chips.
•
Do not leave the tool running unattended.
•
Do not tough the blade of the workpiece immediately after operation;
they y be extremely hot and could burn your skin.
Installing or Removing Blade
•
Always be sure that the tool is switched off and unplugged before
installing or removing the blade.
•
Oil on the blade can cause the blade to slip or come off
unexpectedly. Wipe off all excess oil with a cloth before installing the
blade.
•
Use caution when handling the blades so that you are not cut by
their sharp teeth.
•
Insert the blade between the bearings of one blade guide first and
then into the other blade guide. The blade back should contact the
bearings in the lower portion of the blade guides.
•
Position the blade around the wheels and insert the other side of the
blade within the blade guard until the blade back contacts the
bottom of the blade guard.
•
Hold the blade in place and turn the blade tightening lever
counterclockwise until it hits against the protrusion on the frame.
This places proper tension on the blade. Make sure that the blade is
correctly positioned within the blade guard and around the wheels.
•
Start and stop the tool two or three times to make sure that the
blade runs properly on the wheels.
•
CAUTION: While making sure the blade runs on the wheels
properly, keep your body away from the blade area.
•
To remove the blade, follow the installation procedures in reverse.
•
CAUTION: When turning the blade tightening lever clockwise to
release the tension on the blade, the blade may come off
unexpectedly. Be careful.
Operating Safety Rules
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•
CAUTION: Never use cutting oil or apply excessive amount of wax
to the blade. It may cause the blade to slip or come off
unexpectedly.
•
When cutting cast iron, do not use any cutting lubricant.
•
It is important to keep at least two teeth in the cut.
•
Turn the tool on and wait until the blade attains full speed. Gently
lower blade into the cut. The weight of the tool or slightly pressing
the tool down will supply adequate pressure for the cutting. Do no
force the tool.
•
As you reach the end of a cut, release pressure and, without
actually raising the tool, lift it slightly so that it will not fall against the
workpiece.
•
CAUTION: Applying excessive pressure to the tool or twisting the
tool my cause bevel cutting or damage the blade.
8.7.13 Percussion Tools
Hammers, Rotary Hammer and Hammer Drills: This family of tools is
primarily associated with masonry applications as varied as chipping,
drilling, anchor setting and breaking of pavement. They range from pistol
grip types to large demolition hammers.
General Safety Rules
•
Normal operating modes include hammering, hammering with rotary
motion and rotation or drilling only. Many models incorporate a
varied combination of the above modes.
•
Capacity is normally rated in maximum diameter displayed on the
nameplate. Do not attempt to use a bit larger than that which is
specified unless otherwise recommended in the owner/operators
manual.
•
Before operating, compare the date on the nameplate with the
voltage source and be sure that the voltage and frequency are
compatible.
•
Always wear safety goggles or safety glasses with side shields
complying with current national standard, and a full face shield when
needed. Use a dust mask in dusty work conditions. Wear hearing
protection during extended periods of operation.
•
Do not wear gloves, loose clothing, jewelry or any dangling objects
that may catch in rotating parts or accessories. Tie back long hair.
Operating Safety Rules
•
For maximum control and to resist torque caused by unexpected
stalls, use the auxiliary handles provided with the tool.
•
Do not tamper with clutches on those models that provide them.
Have the clutch settings checked at the manufacturer’s service
facility at the intervals recommended in the owner/operators manual.
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•
Check for subsurface hazards such as electrical conductors or water
lines before drilling or breaking blindly into a surface. If wires are
present, they must be disconnected at the power source by a
qualified person, or be certain they are avoided to prevent the
possibility of lethal shock or fire. Water pipes must be drained and
capped. Always hold the tool by the insulated grasping surfaces.
•
Do not force the tool. Percussion tools are designed to hit with a
predetermined force. Added pressure by the operator only causes
operator fatigue, excessive bit wear and reduced control.
•
Keep the operators work area clear of debris.
•
Always provide firm footing.
8.7.14 Portable Drill
Available in a wide variety of types and capacities, portable power drills
are undoubtedly the most used power tools in the world. Because of
their handiness and application to a very wide range of jobs, drills often
receive very heavy usage. For this reason your safety demands that you
carefully check capacity limitations and accessory recommendations of
your drill. See the owner/operators manual.
General Safety Rules
•
Be sure the trigger switch actuates properly. It should turn the tool
“on” and return to the “off” position after release.
•
If equipped with a lock-on, be sure it releases freely.
•
Check carefully for loose power cord connections and frays or
damage to the cord. Replace damaged tool and extension cords
immediately.
•
Be sure the chuck is tightly secured to the spindle. This is especially
important on reversible type drills.
•
Tighten the drill bit securely as prescribed by the owner/operators
manual. The chuck key must be removed from the chuck before
starting the drill. A flying key can be an injury inflicting missile.
•
Check auxiliary handles, if part of the tool. Be sure they are securely
installed. Always use the auxiliary drill handle when provided. It
gives you more control of the drill, especially if stalled conditions
occur. Grasp the drill firmly by insulated surfaces.
•
Always wear safety goggles or safety glasses with side shields
complying with current national standard, and a full face shield when
needed. Use a dust mask in dusty work conditions. Wear hearing
protection during extended periods of operation.
•
Do not wear gloves, loose clothing, jewelry or any dangling objects
that may catch in rotating parts or accessories. Tie back long hair.
Operating Safety Rules
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•
Always hold or brace the tool securely. Brace against stationary
objects for maximum control. If drilling in a clockwise (forward)
direction, brace the drill to prevent a counter clockwise reaction.
•
Don’t force a drill — apply enough pressure to keep the drill bit
cutting smoothly. If the drill slows down, relieve the pressure.
Forcing the drill can cause the motor to overheat, damage the bit,
and reduce operator control.
•
If the drill binds in the work, release the trigger immediately—unplug
the drill from the power source, and then remove the bit from the
workpiece. If you suspect that the drill operation you are performing
can potentially bind, then under no circumstances should you
actuate any switch “lock-on” that may be available to you.
•
Never attempt to free a jammed bit by starting and stopping the drill.
As you approach hole-breakthrough, grip or brace the drill firmly,
reduce pressure and allow the bit to pass through the hold easily.
•
Always have firm footing when drilling. Brace or position yourself
very carefully when working on ladders and scaffolding. Be sure of
your balance and control before you start the job.
•
Unplug the tool before changing bits, accessories or attachments.
•
And remember — when drilling blindly (you can’t see behind what is
being cut), check carefully for possible electrical wiring or pipes in
your path. If wires are present, they must be disconnected at their
power source by a qualified person or avoided to prevent possibility
of lethal shock. Water pipes must be avoided or always capped.
Always hold the tool by the insulated grasping surfaces, if provided.
•
Remove materials or debris from the area that might be ignited by
hot chips.
8.7.15 Pneumatic Nail Gun
The most popular nailing device used in light and heavy construction is
the pneumatic nail gun. It uses the force from compressed air to drive
nails through hard surfaces.
General Safety Rules for Nail Gun Use
•
Always wear safety glasses.
•
Never use a nail gun with the nose guard safety spring missing.
•
Never rest the gun against any part of your body, or try to climb a
ladder with the gun cradled against your body.
•
Do not hold the trigger down unless you’re purposefully firing the
tool. This is especially important when descending ladders.
•
Keep people out of range of fire. Exercise extreme caution when
using an air tool around another worker.
•
Never point the tool at anyone. Treat the tool like a firearm. Never
assume the tool is empty.
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•
Disconnect the air hose before clearing a jam or making
adjustments.
•
Do not fire the tool unless the nose is firmly pressed against a work
piece.
•
Use only compressed air to power the tool, not bottled gas. Do not
exceed the manufacturer’s specified air pressure for the tool.
•
Keep your free hand safely out of the way of the tool.
•
Do not operate the tool around flammables.
•
Nail top to bottom when nailing wall sheathing in a vertical position.
•
Nail from the eaves to the ridge when nailing roof sheathing, this
way you will not back off the edge of the roof.
•
Move forward, not backward, when nailing horizontal areas.
•
Secure the hose when working on scaffolding, to prevent the weight
of the hose from dragging the tool off the scaffold if you set the tool
down.
•
Other risks to guard against while using a nail gun include being hit
by one of the nail gun’s attachments or fastener used with the tool,
and being hit by flying wood chips and nails.
8.8 Dywidag Systems Safety and Operating Instructions
Post Tensioning Jacks
WARNING: Read all safety and operating instructions and warnings before
starting any work or operation. NEVER stand or allow anyone to stand
directly behind, or above, or below a jack when stressing operations are
under way.
1. Equipment Covered Here:
a. Jack: 1 – 3/4” Stressing System
b. PumpTC PE554 115 volt single phase, 30 amps.
c. Hoses: 19,000 psi bursting pressure
d. Pressure Gauges: 10,000 psi, 100 psi gradations
2. Safety Instructions
1. Observe all relevant OSHA standards e.g. use of protective clothing and
devices, grounding of electrical equipment, control of work area, etc.
2. All system components must be in good working condition prior to use.
Inspect daily for signs of wear or damage. Do not use if grippers are worn
excessively, hoses are cracked, pressure gauge is inoperable, or other
defects are observed.
3. After inspection, test-run system (see Operating Instructions) to insure that
all components are in proper working order.
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4. Stressing operations must be under the direct control of a superintendent
experienced in such operations.
5. Operators must wear proper personal protective equipment (hard hats,
safety glasses, shoes, gloves and long sleeves, etc.) while operating
equipment.
6. Stressing unit should be securely tethered to the structure at all times. In
the event a tendon breaks during the stressing operation, the tether will
prevent the unit from falling.
7. Operating personnel must keep feet from becoming entangled in the
hydraulic hoses while stressing.
8. No one should be allowed to stand behind, directly above, or below the
jack when stressing operations are under way.
9. Never exceed the maximum allowable stressing pressure. (Check
Calibrations accompanying equipment).
10. Make certain jack is in the fully closed position when moving from tendon
to tendon. Do not activate pump while moving the jack.
11. Do not attempt to service the equipment beyond that described in the
operating instructions. All other servicing should be referred to qualified
DSI service personnel.
3. Operating Instructions
a. Preparation
1. Proper and complete connection of the hydraulic lines is vital to the safe
operation of the equipment. Connect hydraulic hoses from pump stress
port to jack stress port, from pump return port to jack return port and from
the pump seating port to ram seating port. Fully engage all fittings hand
tight.
WARNING: Improper or incomplete coupling of hydraulic hoses may cause
injury or death to personnel, or severe damage to equipment.
2. Visually inspect concrete around the anchor. If should be free of voids.
3. Be sure the jack is equipped for the bar size to be stressed. Check the
wrench sleeve for fit over the hex or anchor nut. Be sure the pull rod, pull
rod nut, and coupler are the correct size and in good condition.
4. Check that oil level in pump is adequate.
5. Connect the hydraulic pump to 115V AC 60HZ 30 amp power source.
Extension cords should be 3 wires, 12 gauge minimum with a maximum
length of 50 ft. Further distances will damage the pump motor and will
interfere with stressing.
6. Proper lifting equipment must be available prior to commencing.
7. Lift equipment by lifting harness only. Never use hydraulic lines for
moving, carrying or adjusting of equipment.
b.Bleeding the Jack (See stressing for operation of Jack)
1. Tilt jack so rear fitting is higher than front (approximately 30 degrees) and
facing up.
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2. Advance ram until piston is fully extended. When piston is fully extended,
the gauge pressure will rise sharply. (DO NOT EXCEED 500 PSI).
c. Stressing
1. Put pump motor switch in “Remote” position.
2. Place pump valve handle in return position, position B.
3. Depress pendent switch and return piston fully.
4. Hand tighten anchor nut to bar until plate is contracted. Failure to do so
can damage the internal components of the jack.
5. Be sure bar extension beyond anchor nut is at least ½ coupler length plus
1 inch.
6. Engage pull rod coupler ½ its length on pull rod, using the proper size
Allen wrench tighten set screw.
7. Engage pull rod and coupler fully onto the bar.
WARNING: To avoid serious accidents, pull rod coupler must be fully
engaged.
8. Place pump valve in Stress position; position A, close check valve on
stressing line (if installed).
9. Extend piston between ¼” and ½”.
10. Place jack over bar, nut, pull rod coupler and pull rod. Jack wrench sleeve
must slide over hex on anchor and bearing nose must be flat on bearing
plate.
11. Install pull not until in contact the ball plate on rear of the jack.
12. Depress remote pendant switch on pump and stress tendon to desired
load. Never exceed the maximum gauges pressures (refer to calibration
report for max pressure).
13. Measure total bar elongation between bearing plate and any fixed
reference point on bar before and after stressing.
14. Use ratchet handle to tighten nut to plate. DO NOT use “cheater” bar.
CAUTION: Tightening of anchor nut with ratchet should be performed
while ram is in motion.
15. Switch valve to Position B. and slowly open the check valve. Once the
pressure on the gauge is zero, activate the pump retracting the ram.
WARNING: NEVER EXCEED 500 PSI IN RETRACT.
9. Personal Protective Equipment
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is provided for staff and visitors of
Englekirk Center. Staff is expected to use appropriate PPE during their daily
work.
Personal Protective Equipment shall be used according to UCSD EH&S
guidelines see Personal Protective Equipment in Appendix A.
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10. Hazard Communication
Hazard Communication at Englekirk Center is used to inform staff, students
and others engaged in work at the facility of the possible chemical hazards
which they may encounter. An ongoing Hazardous Materials list is kept on
file with the Department Safety Coordinator in the North trailer. A binder of
Material Safety Data Sheets is kept in the Pump House at the East entrance
as well as on file with the Department Safety Coordinator in the North trailer.
Hazard Communication and Hazardous Materials Storage/Handling shall
conform to UCSD EH&S guidelines see Hazard Communication in Appendix
A.
10.1
Storage/Disposal of Hazardous Waste
How to Store and Dispose of Hazardous Chemical Waste
Summary: Follow these guidelines for selecting containers and safely storing hazardous chemical
waste until it’s collected by Environment, Health & Safety (EH&S).
Are you in the right place? These guidelines are for hazardous chemical waste only.
• If your waste is radioactive, see How to Store and Dispose of Radioactive Waste.
• If your waste is biohazardous, see How to Package and Dispose of Biohazardous and Medical
Waste.
Select a topic:
• Hazardous or extremely hazardous?
• Storage area
• Labeling
• Containers
• Liquids
• Dry solids
• Empty containers
• Unknowns
• Time and quantity limits
What to do/How to do it
Determine if you have “hazardous” or “extremely hazardous” material.
Guidelines are
different for hazardous and extremely hazardous chemical waste.
• Check the list of Known Hazardous and Extremely Hazardous Wastes for your material.
• If your material is listed as hazardous, use the guidelines on this page.
• If your material is listed as extremely hazardous, proceed to How to Store and Dispose of
Extremely Hazardous Chemical Waste.
Designate a hazardous waste storage area.
• Hazardous waste sign
• Select an area that is:
o
Near where the waste is generated
o
Under the control of lab personnel
o
Out of the way of normal lab activities
• Label the area with a “Danger – Hazardous Waste” sign.
Request signs from EH&S Environmental Management Facility, (858) 534-2753.
• Make the area easily accessible and recognizable to EH&S waste technicians.
• Note: Fume hoods may be used to temporarily store small quantities of waste materials, but
should not serve as designated waste storage areas.
Select appropriate containers.
• Chemical compatibility:
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o
Choose a container chemically compatible with the material it will hold. Chemicals must
not react with, weaken, or dissolve the container or lid.
o
Follow these basic compatibility guidelines:
§
Acids or bases: Do not store in metal.
§
Hydrofluoric acid: Do not store in glass.
§
Gasoline (solvents): Do not store or transport in lightweight polyethylene
containers such as milk jugs.
o
Read Chemical Compatibility Guidelines for more detailed information.
• Caps and closure:
o
Use waste containers with leak-proof, screw-on caps so contents can’t leak if a container
tips over. Corks, parafilm, and beakers are not acceptable.
o
If necessary, transfer waste material to a container that can be securely closed. Label the
new container.
o
Keep waste containers closed except when adding waste.
o
Wipe down containers prior to your scheduled collection date.
• Size:
o
Choose appropriately sized containers. Store smaller quantities in smaller containers. It’s
not cost effective to dispose of 50 milliliters of material in a 4 liter container.
• Secondary containment:
o
Always place your container in a secondary container to:
§
Capture spills and leaks from the primary container
§
Segregate incompatible hazardous wastes, such as acids and bases
o
A secondary container must be chemically compatible and able to hold 110% of the
volume of waste stored in the primary container(s). Lab trays and dishpans are frequently used for
secondary containment.
o
EH&S provides free secondary containers for 20-liter (5-gallon) waste containers. Request
these secondary containers from the EH&S Environmental Management Facility, (858) 534-2753.
Label every waste container with a hazardous waste tag.
• Attach a completed hazardous waste tag to the container before you begin using the container
to accumulate and store waste.
• Cross out all other labels on the container. (Don’t obliterate the original product label; waste
technicians need to see what the container held before it was designated as a waste receptacle.)
Read about liquid waste requirements.
• Do not overfill liquid waste containers. Leave a sizable amount of head space in the container to
allow for expansion and safe transportation — 10% head space is a good rule of thumb.
• Do not mix solids with liquid waste. Containers found to contain solids during processing by
EH&S hazardous waste technicians will be returned to the generator for separation. See guidelines for
solid chemical waste below.
• Liquid-filled small containers such as vials and Eppendorf tubes:
o
Double-bag containers in clear plastic bags to allow visual inspection by EH&S waste
technicians.
o
Containers bagged together must contain liquids or liquid mixtures with the same
chemical constituents.
o
Seal each bag individually.
o
Accurately list the bag’s contents and chemical constituents on the hazardous waste tag.
• Organic solvents:
o
Halogenated and non-halogenated organic solvents may be mixed together in the same
waste container. Contact the EH&S Environmental Management Facility, (858) 534-2753, if you want
to pour other chemical constituents in the same waste container.
o
Do not combine organic solvents with toxic metal waste!
o
Contact the EH&S Environmental Management Facility, (858) 534-2753, if you’re using
toxic metal compounds. Examples of metals include arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead,
mercury, selenium, silver, copper, nickel, and zinc.
• Oils: EH&S sends waste petroleum oils to be recycled.
o
Accumulate recyclable oil separately from oils contaminated with solvents, halogens,
laboratory chemicals, or fuels.
• Oils containing traces of mercury, lead, or other regulated metals are excluded from the recycling
program. Notify EH&S on the hazardous waste tag if your oil waste may contain these materials.
Read about requirements for dry, solid waste.
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• Chemically contaminated solid waste includes three categories that are packaged differently for
disposal: lab trash, dry chemicals, and sharps and piercing objects.
• Lab trash: Examples include absorbent paper products, Kim Wipes, gloves, benchcoat, and other
lab supplies. Follow these guidelines:
o
Double-bag the waste in clear plastic bags to allow visual inspection by EH&S waste
technicians. If contents cannot be visually inspected, EH&S cannot collect the bag.
o
Seal each bag individually.
o
Accurately list the bag’s contents and chemical constituents on the hazardous waste tag.
• Dry chemicals:
o
Dispose of solid reagent chemicals in the manufacturer’s container.
o
Label the container with a hazardous waste tag.
• Sharps and piercing objects: Sharps are items capable of puncturing, piercing, or tearing regular
waste bags. Examples include pipettes, pipette tips, and broken glass. Sharps require special
packaging.
• Read How to Dispose of Sharps and Piercing Objects for details.
What to do with empty containers that once held hazardous chemicals.
• Disposal of these containers depends on the container’s size, what it’s made of, and the hazardous
material it once contained.
• Read How to Dispose of Empty Hazardous Materials Containers for details.
Follow these guidelines for “unknowns” or unidentified chemical waste.
• Unknown or unidentified chemicals are considered hazardous waste. Processing and disposal of
unknowns is particulary expensive because they must be handled with great care and caution. Please
make every effort to avoid “unknowns” by diligently labeling and dating inventory.
• Once found, ask others working in the area if they know what the material is.
• If the material can be identified:
o
Label it with a hazardous waste tag.
• If the material can’t be identified:
o
Label it with a hazardous waste tag.
o
Write “Unknown” on the tag.
o
Write on the waste tag any known information. Include:
§
Type of lab that material was found in (chemistry, organic or inorganic, biology,
DNA research, etc.)
§
Where the material was discovered in the lab (under a fume hood with other
organics, on a shelf with inorganics or salts, etc.)
§
Age of the material
• Request a hazardous waste collection.
• Contact the EH&S Environmental Management Facility, (858) 534-2753, if you need assistance
with unknowns.
Storage time and quantity limits before waste must be collected.
• Keep UCSD in compliance. Request a hazardous waste collection before time or quantity limits are
reached.
• Time: All hazardous waste must be collected within 90 days from when waste is first put into
containers.
• Quantity: Up to 55 gallons of any individual hazardous waste may be stored before it must be
collected.
o
When 55 gallons or more of hazardous waste accumulates, the waste must be collected
within three days.
• Read How to Request a Hazardous Waste Collection for details.
If you are a UCSD employee and have questions, contact the EH&S Environmental Management
Facility, (858) 534-2753.
Notice: Disposal of hazardous waste using sinks, intentional evaporation, or as regular trash is
against the law. Campus laboratories must abide by strict state and federal waste disposal
requirements. You may be held liable for violations of applicable laws.
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How to Store and Dispose of Hazardous Chemical Waste reproduced
from the following Internet link:
http://blink.ucsd.edu/Blink/External/Topics/How_To/0,1260,13036,00.html
Contact the Department Safety Coordinator (858-688-0307) or Environment,
Health & Safety department (858-534-3660), or access the web link above for
further information.
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11. Emergency Action Plan
Control Building/Pump House
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Emergency Phone Numbers
Fire................................................................. 911
Police ............................................................. 911
Medical .......................................................... 911
Thornton Emergency Room ....................... 77600
Poison Control Center.................... 800-876-4766
UCSD Emergency Status Phone No.888-308-8273
Calmly state:
• Your name
• Building and room location of emergency
• Nature of the emergency: fire, chemical spill, etc.
• Injuries?
• Hazards present which may affect responding emergency personnel
• A phone number near the scene where you can be reached
Building Evacuation
•
•
•
•
•
•
Quickly move to the outside of the building using the nearest door marked
with an EXIT sign.
Close and secure all doors as you leave. Take your keys with you.
Be certain all persons in the area are evacuated immediately.
Help those who need special assistance—disabled, small children, etc.
Report immediately to the designated assembly area (see map above) to
do a headcount.
Wait for instructions from emergency response personnel.
Fire Procedures
IN CASE OF SMALL FIRE
•
•
•
•
Call 911.
IF YOU HAVE BEEN TRAINED to use a fire extinguisher, while keeping
an exit available behind you, bring the extinguisher within six feet of the
fire.
Pull the pin located in the extinguisher’s handle, aim the nozzle at the
base of the fire.
Squeeze the handles and sweep from side to side at the base of the fire
until it is out.
IN CASE OF LARGE FIRE
•
•
Pull the fire alarm and call Campus Police at 911. Alert people in the area
to begin evacuation using the stairs--not the elevators.
Close door to confine the fire.
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• Move to your designated assembly area upwind from the building.
• Have persons knowledgeable about the incident and location assist
emergency personnel.
Earthquakes
DURING HEAVY SHAKING
•
•
•
Get under a desk, table, door arch or stairwell. If none are available, move
against an interior wall and cover your head with your arms. Remain under
cover until the movement subsides.
Stay away from large windows, shelving systems or tall room partitions.
After shaking has stopped, survey your immediate area for trapped or
injured persons and ruptured utilities. Evacuate the building using the
stairs—not the elevators. Move to your designated assembly area and
await further instructions from emergency personnel.
ESEC also utilizes UCSD’s Emergency Guide see Emergency Guide in
Appendix A.
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11.1
Emergency Guide
Summary: The Emergency Guide contains standard emergency response
procedures for UCSD.
The Emergency Guide contains essential phone numbers and "what to do in
case of...?" information for UCSD employees and students.
Fire
Earthquake
Biological spill
Needlestick / Exposure to blood or body
fluids
Radiation spill
Chemical spill
Acts of violence
Personal injury
Evacuation considerations for people
with disabilities
Utility failure
Bomb threat
Emergency response resources:
Emergencies and emergency planning
Essential Phone Numbers (Environment, Health and Safety)
How to Report a Crime or Emergency
Questions about emergency preparedness at UCSD? Contact Continuity &
Emergency Services, (858) 534-1064 or 534-3823.
Questions about production and distribution of the Emergency Guide?
Contact Environment, Health & Safety, (858) 534-9745.
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12. Natural Hazards
Due to the location of ESEC, we are at risk of contact with venomous snakes
and spiders. If bitten by a venomous snake or spider seek immediate medical
attention and have a coworker try to make a positive identification.
Below you will find steps to take until medical attention is provided.
Avoid snakes:
1. If a rattlesnake is found indoors, call 911 for assistance
2. Stay alert when walking near canyons or undeveloped land
3. If you see a snake, do not disturb it. Move away quickly
4. If you hear a rattlesnake, stand still until you are sure of its
location, then move away quickly.
5. Never step or reach into an area you cannot see.
Rattlesnake bites:
1. Remain calm.
2. Call 911 and get the victim to the hospital immediately.
3. Immobilize the bitten limb. Do not apply a tourniquet or constriction
band and do not attempt to cut the wound or suck out the venom. Do not
apply ice to the wound.
4. Wash the skin over the bite with soap and water. Cover the wound.
If bitten by a black widow spider:
1. Make a positive identification if possible. If the bite is on an arm or a leg,
tie a snug bandage above the bite to help slow or halt the venom’s spread.
Ensure that the bandage is not so tight as to cut off circulation
2. Use a cold cloth or a cloth filled with ice at the location of the bite
3. Seek medical attention immediately
For more information, contact:
• Emergencies
EH&S: (858) 534-3660 weekdays, 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Campus Police: (858) 534-4375
• Non-emergencies (typical response time: 1 working day)
Campus and SIO facilities: ([email protected])
Medical Center facilities: ([email protected])
13. Facility Specific Safety Requirements
General safety during testing at all test facilities at Englekirk Center
All employees and visitors shall be removed to a designated safe viewing
area while tests are performed. All tests shall be conducted by competent
staff. All General Site Safety rules will be observed; in addition, facility
specific safety procedures will be observed as outlined below.
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13.1
Blast Simulator-Technical Support Working Group (TSWG)
The TSWG Blast Simulator is a unique test device that incorporates high
pressure hydraulic oil and high pressure nitrogen to generate high
velocity, high impact test conditions. The test machine incorporates
unique procedures to insure safety to laboratory personnel and to
laboratory visitors.
13.1.1 Blast Simulator Specific Safety
The following procedures are basic in nature with concise and
specific Standard Operating Procedures kept digitally at the
Englekirk Center on the W: drive in Site Documentation folder.
1. Testing and maintenance
A. Safety Procedures
a.Identify and mark debris fields based on potential projectiles,
such as concrete, breakaway bolts, and instrumentation
b.Establish and clearly mark personnel and visitor viewing
areas
c.Use radio communications between control room, viewing
areas, and personnel in load rig/specimen area
d.Monitor safety cameras around test equipment and debris
fields
B. Charge Nitrogen Accumulators with Compressed Nitrogen
a.Inspect Nitrogen tank and connections for damage
b.Notify personnel that system will begin charging
c.At terminal, monitor pressures and advise personnel
C. Emergency Shutdown
a.Emergency Stop Button Locations
1. On the Control Desk
2. In the pit
3. On the mezzanine
4. On the HPS Front Panel
5. Notify personnel and viewers once safe to approach
a. Advise of system status and residual pressure
b. Advise of continuation of hazard potential and safety
equipment requirements
13.2 Large High Performance Outdoor Shake Table (LHPOST)
Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES)
National Science Foundation (NSF)
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13.2.1 LHPOST Specific Safety
The following procedures are basic in nature with concise and
specific Standard Operating Procedures kept digitally at the
Englekirk Center on the W: drive in Site Documentation folder.
1. Before test
A. General inspection and walk around.
a. ensure there are no persons in the pit (no one allowed below
grade when hydraulic pressure is at high pressure).
b. ensure table will be unobstructed in its stroke pattern, both
above and below table.
2. During test
A. Monitor tub cameras for presence of people and hydraulic leaks.
B. Monitor visitor activity (e.g. delivery men, observers, cleaning
crew) to
safeguard against entrance into pump house or dangerous areas
around the shake table.
C. Put up ‘Danger Do Not Enter/Authorized Personnel Only’ sign.
No one is allowed to enter into pump house pit area while
hydraulic pump are in high-pressure mode.
3. After test
A. If experiment is stopped due to an unexpected incident, prohibit
access of unauthorized personnel to the pump house and/or
dangerous areas around the shake table indefinitely.
B. If experiment concludes successfully prohibit access of
unauthorized personnel to: the pump house and/or dangerous
areas around the shake table until pumps are off, a walk around
above and below the table have been performed, spilled oil has
been wiped up and the area around the table is generally safe.
4. Maintenance
A. Maintenance shall only be done when the high-pressure
hydraulics are shut off.
B. Charging Nitrogen Accumulators with Compressed Nitrogen
a. Inspect Nitrogen tank and connections for damage
b. Notify personnel that system will begin charging
c. Carry an Oxygen sensor to monitor for oxygen deficiency
13.3
Soil Foundation Structure Interaction (SFSI) California
Department of Transportation and Port of Los Angeles Soil Pit
13.3.1 Safety Procedures for Working on Soil Pit Set-up
This portion of the facility is not currently active; however, the
following procedures are basic in nature with concise and specific
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Standard Operating Procedures kept digitally at the Englekirk
Center on the W: drive in Site Documentation folder.
1. Safety procedures pertaining to excavations will be followed
according to:
OSHA Standards 29 CFR 1926.650, .651, and .652.
For more information contact the Department Safety
Coordinator or access the following Internet link:
http://www.osha.gov/dts/osta/otm/otm_v/otm_v_2.html
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14. Appendix A
Title
Blood Born
Pathogens
Compressed Gases
Elevated work,
Ladder and Lift
Safety
Emergency Guide
Fire/Life Safety
Flammable Storage
Hazard
Communication
Heat Stress
Injury Illness
Prevention Program
Injury or Illness
Reporting
Job Hazard Analysis
Lift and Carry
Lockout/Tagout
Manual
Lifting/Ergonomics
MSDS
Personal Protective
Equipment
Self Safety Audit
Map to link
Go to http://blink.ucsd.edu/ ∟ Safety tab ∟Research Safety link ∟
Biosafety link ∟ Blood Born Pathogen
Go to http://blink.ucsd.edu/ ∟ Safety tab ∟ Research Safety link ∟
Lab & Chemical Safety Link ∟ Standard operating procedure
section ∟ Compressed Gas
Go to http://blink.ucsd.edu/ ∟ Safety tab ∟ Trades Safety link ∟
Resources link ∟ Ladders and Lifts section ∟ Ladders and Lifts
Safety
Go to http://blink.ucsd.edu/ ∟ Safety tab ∟ Research Safety link ∟
Lab & Chemical Safety Link ∟ Emergency preparedness and
response section ∟ UCSD Emergency Guide
Go to http://blink.ucsd.edu/ ∟ Safety tab ∟ Safety Resources link ∟
Fire/Life Safety
Go to http://blink.ucsd.edu/ ∟ Safety tab ∟ Safety Resources link ∟
Fire/Life Safety ∟ Flammables Storage section ∟ Flammable and
Combustible liquids Overview
Go to http://blink.ucsd.edu/ ∟ Safety tab ∟ Research Safety link ∟
Lab & Chemical Safety Link ∟ Managing Safety section ∟ Hazard
Communication Program
Go to http://blink.ucsd.edu/ ∟ Safety tab ∟ Safety Training link ∟
Menu link ∟General Safety section ∟ Heat Illness Prevention
Go to http://blink.ucsd.edu/ ∟ Safety tab ∟ Safety Resources link ∟
Injury and Illness Prevention
Go to http://blink.ucsd.edu/ ∟ Safety tab ∟ Safety Resources link ∟
Accident Reporting
Go to http://blink.ucsd.edu/ ∟ Safety tab ∟ Safety Resources link ∟
Injury and Illness Prevention ∟ IIPP Document (PDF or WORD)∟
Section I and IIPP section of this manual
ALSO:
Go to http://blink.ucsd.edu/ ∟ Safety tab ∟ Trades Safety link ∟
Resources link ∟ Hazard Awareness section ∟ Integrated Safety
and Environment Management Overview
Go to http://blink.ucsd.edu/ ∟ Safety tab ∟ Ergonomics link ∟
Healthy Back link ∟ How to Safely Lift and Carry
Go to http://blink.ucsd.edu/ ∟ Safety tab ∟ Trades Safety link ∟
Resources link ∟ Lockout/Blockout section ∟ Lockout/Blockout
Go to http://blink.ucsd.edu/ ∟ Safety tab ∟ Ergonomics link ∟ Menu
Go to http://blink.ucsd.edu/ ∟ Safety tab ∟ MSDS link ∟ MSDS
Sources link ∟ ChemQuik link
Go to http://blink.ucsd.edu/ ∟ Safety tab ∟ Trades Safety link ∟
Occupational Health link ∟ Personal Protective Equipment
Go to http://blink.ucsd.edu/ ∟ Safety tab ∟ Safety Resources link ∟
Injury and Illness Prevention ∟ IIPP Background section IIPP
Documents click PDF or WORD link ∟ UCSD OFFICE SAFETY
INSPECTION and SHOPS & STUDIO SAFETY INSPECTION
CHECKLIST sections and IIPP section of this manual
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Title
Map to link
Vehicle Accident
Vehicle Driver
Responsibility
Go to http://blink.ucsd.edu/ ∟ Facilities tab ∟ Facilities Resources
∟ Facilities Management link ∟ Vehicles and driving section ∟
UCSD Vehicle Accident/incident Reporting
Go to http://blink.ucsd.edu/ ∟ Safety tab ∟Safety Training link ∟
Menu link ∟ Risk Management section ∟ UCSD Vehicles Driver
Responsibility Training
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15. Appendix B
15.1
Hazard Identification Form
University of California, San Diego
Inspection Location _________________________
Department __________________________
Supervisor _____________________________________ Phone _____________________
Identification
Description of Hazard
Mitigation
Date Observed
Abatement Action Taken
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Date Abated
UC San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0826
La Jolla, CA 92093-0826
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15.2
UCSD Accident Investigation Report
In accordance with the UCSD Injury & Illness Prevention Program (IIPP), supervisors
are responsible for investigating all injuries sustained by employees working under their
direction.
Department __________________________ Investigation Date ______________________________
Person Conducting Investigation/Phone _________________________________________________
Date of Accident/Injury/Illness ________________________________________________________
Name of Injured Employee/Phone ______________________________________________________
Describe the Injury/Illness ____________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
Location of Incident _________________________________________________________________
Describe what happened ______________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
Names/Phones of Witnesses ___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
What Workplace Condition/Practice/Equipment contributed to the incident?
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
What Corrective Actions have been taken to Prevent Re-occurrence? ________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
What Additional Actions are still needed to Prevent Re-occurrence? (consider
training, personal protective equipment, and written procedures)
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
Person Responsible for Corrective Actions ______________________________________________
Date Corrective Actions were implemented ______________________________________________
Signature of Person Investigating this Incident ___________________________________________
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15.3
Employee Safety Recommendation Form
University of California, San Diego
Location ______________________________ Department ____________________________
Supervisor _________________________________________ Date _____________________
Identification of Safety or Health Hazard
Suggestion for Abatement of the Safety or Health Hazard
1. Do Not Write Below This Line
2. Date Complaint Investigated:
3. Investigated By:
4. Action Taken:
5. Date Action Was Reported to the Employee:
6. Comments:
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15.4
Supervisor’s Safety Meeting
University of California, San Diego
Department ________________________________________ Date _____________________
Division ______________________________ Supervisor _____________________________
Employees Present:
Safety Topics Discussed:
Supervisor’s Signature
Comments
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15.5
New Laboratory Worker Checklist
UCSD NEW LABORATORY WORKERS CHECKLIST, _____________________________________ lab
(PI name)
Complete this form for all lab personnel. See http://blink.ucsd.edu/go/labchemtrain
for information on training requirements.
For all lab workers:
o Attend Lab Safety Principles/IIPP training, date: __________________________________
o Discuss any hazardous lab procedures
Radioactive materials users:
o Attend Basic Radiation Safety Seminar, date: _____________________________________
o Submit a Radioisotope User Enrollment form
Biohazard users:
o Discuss biohazard issues
o Attend required Biosaftey classes:
Bloodborne Pathogens, Viral Vectors, BL3 Orientation, date(s) _______________________
__________________________________________________________________________
Orientation to lab-specific safety procedures:
o Locations of:
o Fire extinguishers and pull stations
o Eye wash/douse showers
o First aid kits
o Hazardous materials spill kits
o Evacuation procedures, personnel lists, and gathering point
o Laboratory chemical storage locations
o Laboratory procedures for chemical safety information:
o MSDS access – www.ucmsds.com or other source
o Locations and type of written lab safety procedures, including any labrequired approvals
o Location and safe use procedures for engineering controls:
o Chemical fume hoods and biological safety cabinets
o Other engineering controls
o Laboratory procedures for personal protective equipment:
o Gloves
o Lab coats
o Eye protection
o Other
o Laboratory waste disposal practices, including locations and supplies
Area Safety Coordinator: _____________________________________________________________
New worker: ________________________________________________________________________
(print name)
(signature)
(date)
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15.6
UCSD Office Safety Inspection
University of California, San Diego
Location ___________________________ Date____________ Phone ___________________________________
Supervisor __________________________ Department _______________________________________________
Inspector ___________________________ Job title __________________________________________________
Administration and training
Yes o No o
N/A o
Yes o No o
N/A o
Yes o No o
N/A o
Yes o No o
N/A o
Yes o No o
N/A o
Yes o No o
N/A o
1. Are all safety records maintained in a centralized file for easy
access? Are they current?
2. Have all employees attended Injury & Illness Prevention Program
training? If not, what percentage has attended?
3. Does the department have a completed Emergency Action Plan?
Are employees being trained on its contents?
4. Are chemical products used in the office being purchased in small
quantities? Are Material Safety Data Sheets needed?
5. Are the Cal/OSHA information poster, Workers’ Compensation
bulletin, annual accident summary (must be posed during February,
at a minimum), and Emergency Response Guide flipchart posted? Is
Safety Briefs newsletter being received and posted?
6. Are annual workplace inspections being performed and documented?
General safety
Yes o No o
N/A o
Yes o No o
N/A o
Yes o No o
N/A o
Yes o No o
N/A o
Yes o No o
N/A o
Yes o No o
N/A o
Yes o No o
N/A o
Yes o No o
N/A o
7. Are exits, fire alarms, pullboxes, and sprinklers clearly marked and
unobstructed?
8. Are aisles and corridors unobstructed to allow unimpeded
evacuations?
9. Is a clearly identified, unobstructed, charged, currently inspected and
tagged, wall-mounted fire extinguisher available within 75 feet of all
work areas? For extinguisher service, contact PPS at (858) 534-0317.
10. Are ergonomic issues being addressed for employees using
computers?
11. Is a fully stocked first-aid kit available? Is the location known to all
employees in the area?
12. Are cabinets, shelves, and furniture over five feet tall secured to
prevent toppling during earthquakes?
13. Are books and heavy items and equipment stored on low shelves and
secured to prevent them from falling on people during earthquakes?
14. Is the office kept clean of trash and recyclable materials promptly
removed?
UCSD OFFICE SAFETY INSPECTION
Electrical safety
Yes o No o
N/A o
Yes o No o
Yes o No o
N/A o
N/A o
15. Are plugs, cords, electrical panels, and receptacles in good
condition? No exposed conductors or broken insulation?
16. Are circuit breaker panels accessible and labeled?
17. Are fused power strips being used in lieu of receptacle adapters?
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Yes o No o
Yes o No o
N/A o
N/A o
Yes o No o
N/A o
Yes o No o
N/A o
Are additional outlets needed in some areas?
18. Is lighting adequate throughout the work environment?
19. Are extension cords being used correctly? They must not run through
walls, doors, ceiling, or prevent a trip hazard running across aisles.
Extension cords are for temporary use only.
20. Are portable electric heaters being used? If so, use a fused power
strip if necessary, and locate the heater away from combustible
materials.
21. Is the paper cutter guard in place?
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15.7
Shop and Studio Safety Inspection Checklist
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO
ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH & SAFETY
SHOPS & STUDIO SAFETY INSPECTION CHECKLIST
DEPARTMENT:
LOCATION/SHOP:
SUPERVISOR:
INSPECTOR:
DATE:
BLDG/RM NO:
PHONE/EMAIL:
JOB TITLE:
13
TRAINING:
Mandatory Training current/documented (IIPP, HAZCOM, EAP)
14
Shop specific safety training conducted/documented as required
15
Training provided (site specific)
16
Confined Space Program in place where required
17
Fall Protection Program in place where required
18
Forklift Safety Training in place where appropriate
19
Lockout/Tag Out program in place where required
20
Inspection program for power tools/extension cords
21
CPR training for required workers (Electrical Trades)
24
WALKING/WORKING SURFACES:
Floors clean and dry
25
Storage of materials/equipment not protruding and/or cluttered
26
Trip hazards (electrical cords, debris) not present
27
Soiled rags/trash disposed of daily
28
Stairs safe (secure rails, treads)
29
Ladders safe (safe feet, inspected, tight rungs)
30
Guard rails installed around floor openings, lofts and catwalks to prevent falls > 30"
31
Scaffolding- >5' have top/mid rails, toe-board, mud sills, wheels locked
ELECTRICAL:
34
All disconnects/breakers labeled - panels posted with Arc Flash warnings
35
36" minimum access clearance around circuit breaker panels
36
Energized/live parts of equipment are secured/not exposed
37
Circuits grounded/Ground pins on plugs
38
Electrical cords inspected (not frayed, damaged, etc.)
39
Extension cords not used in place of fixed wiring
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Y
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
N
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
N/A
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
Y
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
N
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
N/A
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
Y
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
N
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
N/A
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
UC San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0826
La Jolla, CA 92093-0826
________________________________________________________________________
¨ ¨
Plug/Multi tap adapters use banned
¨ ¨
Explosion proof equipment used where needed
¨ ¨
GFCI's in use in wet areas (bathrooms, near sinks)
¨ ¨
Open slots in circuit breakers panels secured
¨ ¨
Covers in place on receptacles, boxes, switches
¨ ¨
Electrical hand tools grounded or double insulated
¨ ¨
Electrical cords across walkways protected
¨ ¨
Equipment approved, UL/FM listed
¨ ¨
Spray Painting operations inside approved spray paint booths (outlets, light fixtures)
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
¨
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO
ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH & SAFETY
SHOPS & STUDIO SAFETY INSPECTION CHECKLIST
MACHINE OPERATIONS:
56
Barrier guards on moving machinery parts
57
Rotating shafts guarded
58
Point-of-operation (POO) & Pinch points guarded
59
Fan blades adequately guarded (< 1/2" opening)
60
Fixed machinery anchored to prevent movement
61
Anti-restart on woodworking machinery
62
Push-sticks provided
63
Lower portion of blades guarded
64
Belts/pulleys enclosed
65
Bench grinders (1/8" tool rest, 1/4" tongue guard maximum clearances)
66
Band saw blades guarded above guide rollers
67
Jointer guards installed with auto return
68
Radial arm saw blade guard/head auto return doesn't extend past end of table
69
Safety zones around shop equipment
70
Table saw-blade guard, splitter, anti-kickback
71
Abrasive wheels given "ring-test"
72
Shop equipment have lockable disconnect
73
Lockout/Tag Out used for equipment (maintenance/adjustments, repairs)
74
Foot treadles guarded
75
On/Off switch accessible w/o reaching across Point of Operations
76
Gas welding torches equipped with flashback arrestors
77
Arc welders properly grounded
78
Air tanks >1.5 cubic ft (11.2 gal) capacity inspected/issued permit by Cal/OSHA
79
Compressed air nozzles have relief ports to safely vent when orifice is blocked
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N/A
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UC San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0826
La Jolla, CA 92093-0826
________________________________________________________________________
82
HAZARDOUS MATERIALS:
Hazardous Materials inventory list available
83
Approved flammable lockers in use
84
Maximum storage: Flammables 60 gal., combustible 120 gal
85
Solvents >10-1 gallon containers stored in approved flammable lockers
86
Compatible storage of hazardous materials
87
Manufacturer’s label affixed/not defaced
88
Dispensing/secondary containers labeled
89
Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) available & accessible
90
Hazardous Waste properly disposed of
91
Only 1-day supply of flammable material kept outside flame locker
92
“No Smoking” signs posted & observed
93
New/Initial hazardous materials purchases approved by EH&S
94
Ventilation equipment available & used when required
95
Proper storage/containment/separation of acids
96
Dispensing containers bonded to prevent static electricity
Y
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N
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N/A
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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO
ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH & SAFETY
SHOPS & STUDIO SAFETY INSPECTION CHECKLIST
GENERAL SAFETY/ADMINISTRATION/TRAINING:
104
Required literature posted (Cal-OSHA, WC, Annual Injury & Illness Summary)
105
Aisles (minimum 44” pathway)/Building exit corridors clear/unobstructed
106
Eyewash/Deluge Showers available where required (flushed/checked weekly)
107
Personal protective equipment used and stored properly
108
Appropriate fire extinguishers charged/mounted within 75’of all work stations
109
Compressed gas cylinders properly stored and secured/capped
110
Oxygen and Acetylene cylinder storage (minimum 20’ separation)
111
Inspection performed of weight handling equipment (overhead cranes, hoists)
112
Welding curtains used
113
Seismic securing of shelving equipment > 5'
114
Space heaters have auto-tip-over switch
115
Good personal hygiene practices maintained
116
Smoking in designated areas only (>25’ from entrances, buildings, etc.)
117
Approved first aid kit available and its location known to all employees
118
Unstable storage practices/equipment
119
Employees practice safe manual lifting procedures/techniques
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N/A
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120
121
UC San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0826
La Jolla, CA 92093-0826
________________________________________________________________________
¨ ¨
Hand trucks/carts available for moving heavy awkward items
¨ ¨
Are awkward postures assumed during work tasks
ADDITIONAL FINDINGS:
Page 81 of 95
Document No. GE-300001 Rev. J
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UC San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0826
La Jolla, CA 92093-0826
________________________________________________________________________
15.8
Supplemental Hazard assessment and Correction
SCOPE: This section will outline the purpose and procedures of the
hazard assessment and correction process which is used by the company.
GENERAL INFORMATION: A detailed analysis of each job to uncover
hazards has several advantages. It can be used to identify areas of
operations that may present hazards which can be eliminated prior to the
occurrence of an injury or lost time incident. The job hazard assessment
has several key requirements.
•
•
•
•
•
•
To discover physical hazards and make decisions on how to abate
the hazard.
To uncover hazardous motions, positions, and actions which may
lead to an incident.
To detect unsafe materials being employed for the completion of a
task.
To detect necessary physical or mental skills for the operator to
safely complete tasks.
To assist in the selection of specialized equipment for the task.
To detect weaknesses in the company training programs and
improves them.
Four key analytical areas in job hazard analysis are:
c.
Analysis of tool, machine or equipment. - Involves a review
of any tool or machine that is used by a number of people. (i.e.
portable drill, power sander)
d.
Individual job assessment. - Most common of the four.
Breaks job down into simple sub-routines which are the individually
analyzed for hazards.
e.
Job classification assessment. - Rather than analyzing all
work stations where employees are doing the same operation, a
random sample of a few areas are used to represent the whole of
the task.
f.
Department assessment. - This may be necessary when a
department has “odd jobs” or incidental operations which may not
lend themselves to a normal job hazard analysis. All scenarios
must be considered when analyzing a potential hazard which does
not normally occur in everyday operations.
Page 82 of 95
Document No. GE-300001 Rev. J
UC San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0826
La Jolla, CA 92093-0826
________________________________________________________________________
15.9
Job Hazard Analysis
The job hazard analysis is the responsibility of the line supervisor.
Every job within his / her area should be analyzed for hazards on a
continuous basis. Any change in operations should indicate to the
supervisor that a new assessment should be completed. Accidents don’t
just happen; they can all be prevented if corrective measures are properly
instituted in hazardous work areas.
INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPLETION OF JOB HAZARD ANALYSIS
Use the following steps to complete a Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) for your
area of responsibility. A complete JHA for a specific job should take about
an hour. The more complex the job is, the longer the JHA will be. Do not
take any short cuts to finish a JHA quickly, you may miss a critical
element which could cause serious injury or death!
1. Identify the full range of jobs for which you are responsible.
a. List all machines, equipment (including manual material handling
devices), electrical appliances, pressure vessels and heating
elements. Include all chemicals and unusual products or conditions
in the work area.
b. List all operations and processes performed in your area. Follow
the flow of materials through the entire process and document all
separate tasks.
c. List all personnel involved in operations and keep in mind those
tasks with particularly high hazards inherent to its completion.
2. Prioritize the jobs. Some guidelines include:
a. High cost, high severity injury accidents.
b. Accident costs and injury rates (jobs known for high incidence of
accidents).
c. Repetitive jobs (can become automatic and prone to fatigue or
short cuts).
d. New jobs (do JHA prior to full operation of new machines).
e. Bottlenecks in material flow or where scrap piles develop.
f. Critical jobs which may affect entire operation if accident
happened there.
g. Complaints from employees on safety issues in job task
completion.
h. Seasonal or infrequent jobs (nobody is entirely proficient at task).
I. Manual materials handling operations (1/4 to 1/3 of all injuries).
Page 83 of 95
Document No. GE-300001 Rev. J
UC San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0826
La Jolla, CA 92093-0826
________________________________________________________________________
When jobs contain two or more of the above criteria their potential
for hazard increases and should become a high priority.
3. Utilize the Hazard Analysis and Correction Worksheet (HACW)
provided in this section to complete the JHA. Direct observation of the job
task is the best way to
approach the JHA. This action enhances the
employee’s perception that management is concerned for their safety and
they will show greater respect for the safety program as a whole.
Once the specific task and operator have been selected, follow these
steps:
1. Have the employee fill out the “employee safety review “. (at the
end of the HACW).
2. Be sure the employee is trained and knowledgeable at their job
task.
3. Explain that the purpose of the JHA is to eliminate hazards and
provide a safer workplace.
4. Observe the performance of the job.
a. Break down job into individual tasks in a progression to the
final outcome.
b. Use action verbs in your job task descriptions ( i.e...opens,
pulls, climbs).
c. record what is done, not how.
5. Check your task breakdown with employee for completeness and
get their agreement.
4. Use the information collected to identify all of the potential accident
responsibilities and inherent hazards associated with each step and list
them. Consider every possible mode of accident causation in this step
including mechanical, electrical, biological and physical initiating factors.
Complete the HACW sections which provide for the recommendation of
safe work procedures and the development of solutions to hazards which
have been uncovered. Remember to use action words and be as
complete as possible in all descriptions. Attach additional paper if the
space provided is not sufficient for complete explanation.
Your solutions should fall into one of four categories:
a.
Method Change - The implementation of a new or
better method of task completion.
b.
Engineering Revisions - Modification of equipment or
work area. Examples are guarding, ventilation, control
relocation, and task automation.
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Document No. GE-300001 Rev. J
UC San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0826
La Jolla, CA 92093-0826
________________________________________________________________________
c.
Personnel Requirements - Includes some human
resource related issues. Examples are development
of skills, retraining, scheduling, or personal protective
equipment.
d.
Process Changes - New equipment, materials,
production scheduling and controls.
5. When finished with the HACW, act on the recommendations of the
review to decrease the hazards identified. Send the original document to
your local safety coordinator for approval and action on identified hazards
beyond your abilities or authority. Retain a copy in your department record
log. Keep the last three HACW’s for each operator / job on file and review
old copies for recommendations and actions pending before you replace
them.
Page 85 of 95
Document No. GE-300001 Rev. J
UC San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0826
La Jolla, CA 92093-0826
________________________________________________________________________
15.10
Hazard Assessment and Correction Worksheet
Department: ___________________________
Supervisor Name: _________________
Date: ____________
Job \ Task \ Machine name: _____________________________
___________________________________________________________
1. Describe any accidents that have occurred on this job in the past.
2. Describe the job and the hazards present.
THE JOB (by step)
HAZARD (unsafe act / condition)
1)
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
2)
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
3)
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
4)
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
5)
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
6)
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
Page 86 of 95
Document No. GE-300001 Rev. J
UC San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0826
La Jolla, CA 92093-0826
________________________________________________________________________
15.11
Unsafe Conditions Recommendations
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
POTENTIAL UNSAFE ACTS
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR THIS JOB
1)
_______________________________________________
2)
_______________________________________________
3)
_______________________________________________
4)
_______________________________________________
5)
_______________________________________________
6)
_______________________________________________
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS OF THE JOB
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
Page 87 of 95
Document No. GE-300001 Rev. J
UC San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0826
La Jolla, CA 92093-0826
________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
SPECIAL SKILLS NEEDED FOR TASK COMPLETION
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
TRAINING NEEDED FOR THIS JOB
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________
RECCOMENDATIONS________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
____________________________________________
COMMENTS________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
__________________
Page 88 of 95
Document No. GE-300001 Rev. J
UC San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0826
La Jolla, CA 92093-0826
________________________________________________________________________
15.12
Employee Safety Review
1.
What is your job?
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
2.
Do you have minor injuries on your job?
___________________________________________________________
3.
Describe any accidents that have occurred on this job.
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
4.
1)
Your Job. (What do you do? Use action words please)
_____________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
2)
_____________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
3)
_____________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
4)
_____________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
5)
_____________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
5.
1)
Hazards of the job. (How can you hurt yourself?)
_____________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
2)
_____________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
Page 89 of 95
Document No. GE-300001 Rev. J
UC San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0826
La Jolla, CA 92093-0826
________________________________________________________________________
3)
_____________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
4)
_____________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
5)
_____________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
6.
1)
Controls. (How can you avoid being injured?)
_____________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
2)
_____________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
3)
_____________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
4)
_____________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
5)
_____________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________
Date: _________________
Department: ____________________________________
Name: ____________________________
How long at job?
__________________
(optional)
Page 90 of 95
Document No. GE-300001 Rev. J
UC San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0826
La Jolla, CA 92093-0826
________________________________________________________________________
15.13
Hot Work Permit Checklist
This Hot Work Permit is required for any Temporary operation involving open flames or
producing heat and/or sparks.
This includes; but is not limited to: brazing, cutting, grinding, soldering, torch-applied
roofing, and welding.
Required Precautions Checklist:
1. Check that available sprinklers, hose streams and fire extinguishers are in service and
operable.
2. Hot work equipment is in good working condition.
Requirements within 35 ft. (11m) of Hot Work:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Flammable liquid, dust, lint and oil deposits are removed.
Explosive atmosphere in the area is removed.
Floors are swept clean.
Combustible floors are wet down, covered with damp sand or fire-resistant sheets.
Remove other combustible material where possible. Otherwise, protect them with a FM
Approved welding Pad blanket, curtain, fire-resistant tarpaulins or metal shields.
6. All wall and floor openings covered.
7. FM Approved welding pad, blankets and curtains are installed under and around work.
8. Protect or shut down ducts and conveyors that might carry sparks to distant combustible
material.
Hot Work on Walls, Ceilings, or Roofs:
1. Construction is noncombustible and without combustible coverings or insulation.
2. Combustible material on the other side of walls, ceilings, and roofs are moved away.
Hot Work on Enclosed Equipment:
1. Enclosed equipment is cleaned of all combustible material.
2. Containers are purged of flammable liquids or vapors.
3. Pressurized vessels, piping, and equipment is removed from service, isolated and
vented.
Fire Watch/ Hot Work Area Monitoring:
1. Fire watch will be provided during hot work operations and for 60 minutes after work
including any break activity.
2. Fire watch is supplied with a sustainable fir extinguisher and where practical, a small
charge fire hose.
3. Fire watch is trained in the use of equipment and sounding alarms.
4. Fire watch may be required in adjoining areas, above and below hot work activities.
Other Precautions Taken:
Welding curtains in use, proper ventilation, and proper PPE selection/use.
Page 91 of 95
Document No. GE-300001 Rev. J
UC San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0826
La Jolla, CA 92093-0826
________________________________________________________________________
15.14
Daily Stationary Scaffold Inspection Checklist
If you answer “NO” to any of the below, action is required before scaffolding may
be used. Assure all manufacturers recommendations are followed.
Project Name:
Project Location:
Completed by:
Date:
YES NO
ACTION/COMMENTS
Scaffold components and planking in
safe condition for use and planks graded
for scaffold use?
Frame spacing and sill size capable of
carrying intended loading?
Competent person in charge of erection
and to inspection?
Sills properly placed and adequate
sized?
Screw jacks been used to level and
plumb scaffold instead of unstable
objects?
Base plates and/or screw jacks in firm
contact with sills and frame?
Scaffold is level and plumb?
Scaffold legs braced with braces
properly attached?
Guard railing in place on all open sides
and ends?
Overhead protection or wire screening
been provided where necessary?
Scaffold been tied to structure at least
every 30' in length and 26' in height?
Free standing towers been guyed or tied
every 26' in height?
Brackets, tube and clamp, and
accessories been properly placed with
nuts and bolts tightened?
Scaffold free of makeshift devices or
ladders to increase height?
Planks have minimum 12" overlap and
extend 6" beyond supports?
Toe boards properly installed?
Conditions such as power lines, wind
loading, etc. controlled?
Safe way to get on and off the scaffold
Page 92 of 95
Document No. GE-300001 Rev. J
UC San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0826
La Jolla, CA 92093-0826
________________________________________________________________________
without climbing on cross braces?
Front face within 14 inches of the work
or within three feet for outrigger
scaffolds?
Page 93 of 95
Document No. GE-300001 Rev. J
UC San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0826
La Jolla, CA 92093-0826
________________________________________________________________________
15.15
Fall Protection Inspection Checklist
Employee:___________________________Date:__________________________
Harness Manufacturer:_______________ Serial Number:_________________
ITEM
Labels
Webbing
Stitching
Rivets
Buckles
D-Rings
Grommets
Back Pad
Keepers
Service
Date
Labels
HARNESS
INSPECTION
YES/NO
Present
Legible
Cuts/Frays
Heat Damage
Abraded
Holes/Burns
Chemical Damage
UV Damage/Faded
Painted
Dirt/Grease
Cut/Broken
Pulled/Missing
Burned
Corroded
Missing
Loose
Cracked
Missing Parts
Welded
Corroded
Sharp Edges
Bent/Damaged
Cracked
Welded
Bent
Corroded
Sharp Edges
Bent
Loose
Missing
Corroded
Missing
Damaged/Cut
Missing
Damaged
Over 5 years
LANYARD (CONTINUED)
ITEM
INSPECTION YES/NO
Cut/Broken
Pulled/Missing
Burned
Cracked
Connectors
Missing Parts
Corroded
Sharp Edges
Bent/Damaged
Cuts/Frays
Shock Abs
Heat Damage
Abraded
Holes/Burns
Chemical Damage
UV
Damage/Faded
Stretched/Used
Service Date Over 5 Years
ANCHORAGE CONNECTORS
Present
Labels
Legible
Cuts/Frays
Webbing
Heat Damage
Abraded
Holes/Burns
Chemical Damage
UV
Damage/Faded
Stretched
Painted
Dirt/Grease
Cut/Broken
Stitching
Pulled/Missing
Burned
Cuts/Frays
Wear Pad
Heat Damage
Abraded
Holes/Burns
Cracked
D-Rings
Stitching
Bent
Corroded
Sharp Edges
LANYARD
Present
Legible
Page 94 of 95
Document No. GE-300001 Rev. J
UC San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0826
La Jolla, CA 92093-0826
________________________________________________________________________
Webbing
Cuts/Frays
Heat Damage
Abraded
Holes/Burns
Chemical Damage
UV Damage/Faded
Stretched
Painted
Dirt/Grease
Service Date
Page 95 of 95
Document No. GE-300001 Rev. J
Over 5 Years
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