ORDINANCE - AMENDS Ordinance No. 90-98, Comprehensive Plan & Development Regulations

ORDINANCE - AMENDS Ordinance No. 90-98, Comprehensive Plan & Development Regulations
ORDINANCE NUMBER 36-00
AMENDMENTS TO TilE MASON COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AND
DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS
AN ORDINANCE amending the Mason County Comprehensive Plan, August 1998, and
amending development regulations as follows : the Mason County Development Regulations,
Ordinance 82-96, Sections 1.03.010 to 1.03.033, and Chapter 1.06; and Title 16 of the Mason
County Code, Sections 16.08.014, 16.28.170, and Chapters 16.23 and 16.22, under the authority
of Chapters 36.70 and 36.70A RCW.
WHEREAS, the Board of County Commissioners held a public hearing on April 4, 2000, to
consider the comments of the Planning Commission, the Mason County Planning Department and
citizens on the proposed amendments;
WHEREAS, these amendments are intended to comply with the Order of the Western Washington
Growth Management Hearings Board of January 14, 1999;
WHEREAS, the Mason County Board of County Commissioners formulated its decision after the
public hearing and has approved findings of fact to support its decision as ATTACHMENT A;
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT HEREBY ORDAINED, that the Board of County Commissioners
of Mason County hereby approves and ADOPTS the amendments to the Mason County
Comprehensive Plan and development regulations as discussed and as compiled in
ATTACHMENT B,
DATED this 1st day of May, 2000.
Board of County Commissioners
Mason County, Washington
ATTEST:
APPROVED AS TO FORM:
ATTACHMENT A- ORDINANCE 36-00
Mason County Board of County Commissioners
Comprehensive Plan and Development Regulation Amendments
May 1, 2000
FINDINGS OF FACT
1.
Under consideration is a proposal to amend the Mason County Comprehensive Plan and some of
the related development regulations. The changes are proposed to address the concerns of the
Western Washington Growth Management Hearings Board in case #96-2-0023. The changes
incorporate amendments made to the Growth Management Act (GMA) in 1997.
2.
The county performed a substantial public participation process and the record provides
background information on the proposal. Public participation includes public workshops and
public hearings before the Planning Commission and a public hearing by the Board of
Commissioners.
3.
The capital facilities plan for Belfair.
Discussion.
Amendments to the capital facilities element of the Mason County Comprehensive Plan address
the provision of wastewater treatment services to the Belfair urban growth area. Mason County is
adopting a phased approach. The intent is to have the Belfair system operational for part of the
urban growth area by 2006, with service expanded throughout Belfair over the next eight to ten
years. The first phase would build the treatment facility and provide service to approximately 700
acres near SR 3, SR 300, and the Old Belfair Highway areas with connection elsewhere possible.
The County is currently in the information gathering phase of the provision ofwastewater service.
A study by consultants (Gray & Osborne, Inc., April 1997) together with a report from a citizens
group (Belfair/Hood Canal Sewer Facilities Advisory Committee, June 1999) has assessed the
need for and cost of a community-based wastewater system. The total cost of providing the first
phase is estimated to be $11.2 million. The project is expected to enter into the design phase in
2003, with project completion within two years ofthe start date.
Financing the system will rely on connection services to cover debt service and monthly operation
and maintenance fees. Initial funding for the first phase assumes a grant award of $5.0 million and
the balance in a 0% interest State Revolving Fund loan. These grants and loans will be from state
(Department of Ecology) or federal sources. Mason County might also need to look at private
funding sources or a combination of public and private sources. The county has not yet sought
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funding, but is in the process of doing a benefit analysis and a median household income survey.
The completion ofthe facility plan and additional public review is necessary before the plans will
be finalized.
Expansion ofthe service to the entire urban growth area is expected by 2014. Total cost, inclusive
of Phase 1, is estimated at $30 million to be financed through a combination offees, state lowinterest loans and grants.
Because the sewer development is still in the planning stages, the county adopted in policy GLU 4
a requirement that progress on the provision of sewer to Belfair be revisited in a year. This
supplements the existing requirement in policy CF-108, which requires that as the capital facilities
plan is changed, the land use element be revisited on at least a biennial basis to retain consistency.
Finding.
Amendments to the capital facilities element show that adequate provision has been made for the
development of sewer for the Belfair urban growth area.
4.
Planning Policies and Development Regulations for the Belfair Urban Growth Area
Discussion.
Amendments to the county Comprehensive Plan provide a number of policies that will guide
development in Belfair in the transition period during which public sewer will not be available to
all of the urban area. In addition, amendments to the development regulations implement these
policies. These policies supplement existing regulations for the Belfair urban growth area. Some
of these regulations apply throughout the county. These include regulations such as the critical
areas and subdivisions regulations. Some of the regulations are specific to the urban area. These
include land use and development which are regulated specifically in the Belfair urban growth area
in the Development Regulations, Ordinance 82-96. Residential development is regulated in
section 1.03.032 and related sections. Other land uses are determined in 1.03.030 and related
sections. These regulations provide for urban levels of development in Belfair. The current
amendments supplement these regulations by providing for the transition to sewer in Belfair. A
work plan, as discussed below, has been developed to complete the subarea planning for Belfair.
Such work includes determining appropriate boundaries for the different districts within Belfair.
Once these are determined and other issues are addressed, amendments to the regulations will be
adopted.
Mason County's strategy for providing for the transition to sewer follow the proven approaches
used by Spokane and Pierce County (as noted in the letters from Dennis Hanberg). That is- the
proposed provision of sewer service is phased, and the form of possible development is dependent
on the phasing ofthe sewer. In areas where sewer is available, development must connect to the
sewer. Elsewhere, development can proceed prior to the availability of sewers, provided that
appropriate provisions are made for future connection to sewers, provided that a future urban
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intensity of development is enabled by the present development, and provided that the present
development is required to connect with the sewers when available and/or to not contest efforts to
expand sewer availability to the site. These provisions are contained in the amendments to the
capital facility policies for the Belfair urban growth area in Chapter III of the Plan. A new section
in the development regulations, 1. 03.031, contains requirements that a binding site plan be
prepared within the Belfair urban growth area for commercial, industrial, or mixed use
development when sewer is not available. If sewer is within 500 feet, then connection with the
system is required as provided in 1.03.030. The distance was increased to 500 feet in order to
capture the second tier of development along SR 3 that may be some immediately on the road. In
the case of subdivisions, when sewer is not available, new development must provide for an urban
density of build-out. Policies in the Plan are applied by the requirements in Title 16, Subdivisions
and Plats, that such approvals require conformance with the comprehensive plan.
Finding.
The amendments provide for urban levels of development and for a smooth transition from the
current conditions in Belfair to the future build-out of Belfair at urban levels of development
supported by a public sewer system.
5.
Limited Areas of More Intensive Rural Development (LAMIRDS)
The Growth Management Hearings Board has concluded the following: That questions regarding
maximum density for RAC's and RCC's and Population allocation to RAC's must be answered.
The Board also concluded that: "RAC' s, which are areas of more intense rural activity, have
population allotted to them in the CP. Thus, a land capacity analysis of some type must be used
to size them properly." (P. 21, Case #96-2-0023, Jan, 14, 1999)
In response to the Board's findings, the County has:
•
Reviewed the Board's order, andre-reviewed the Growth management Act, with special
attention to the 1997 amendments RCW 36.70A.070 (5)(d).
•
Reviewed the historical settlement patterns in the County and documented which existed
prior to 1990 through aerial photographs dated, 1989, obtained from the Washington
State Department ofNatural Resources.
Determined which areas should be established as UGA' s based on present development
•
pattern, future potential for infill at urban densities, the availability of urban services, such
as sewer and water, the citizens' wishes, pending building permits and known
development plans, environmental constraints, location within the county, location on
major transportation corridors within the County, "sense of place" and historical function
in the settlement pattern of the County. (See Task Report one and two for the analysis of
Allyn as a UGA.)
•
Devised goals and policies to establish the new UGA classification for Allyn .
Allocated urban population to Allyn, and did a land capacity study to determine what
•
amount of land would be needed to meet the population allocation and to provide
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
supporting services. This study subtracted out 25% ofthe land as unsuitable for
development due to its environmentally critical nature. Services such as fire, water, sewer
and storm water were evaluated to determine if they could be upgraded to provide urban
level services.
Determined which areas should be established as limited areas of more intensive rural
development (LAMIRDS), as characterized in the RCW 36.70A.070(5)(d). Devised a
land use classification system for the Comprehensive Plan to include LAMIRDS.
Obtained orthophotos of the LAMIRD areas from the Washington State Department of
Natural Resources. These aerial photos were taken in 1989, the closest photos to the date
of July 1, 1990, as required in RCW 36.70A.070 for establishing LAMIRDS.
Reviewed the photos with later aerial photography to determine how many uses might be
made nonconforming by drawing boundaries based on the built environment of July 1,
1990.
Reviewed the critical areas maps for the LAMIRD areas.
Identified the major transportation corridors and their relationships to the LAMIRDS.
Reviewed the settlement pattern in the county and determined what function the
LAMIRDS perform.
Identified the land uses within the LAMIRDS.
Completed a land capacity study for the RAC's, established a density for new platting, (1
du/2.5 acres) and established an overall average density, recognizing the existence of
small, historically platted lots and their potential for development (1 du/acre).
Established a population projection for the RAC' s, compared the land capacity within the
1998 boundaries, and drew new reduced boundaries that reflected this land demand for the
new population at the new density.
Considered in establishing boundaries the critical areas, existing neighborhoods, major
topographical features, and major transportation features.
Met with citizens throughout the County and obtained their ideas for the future of these
LAMIRDS.
Reviewed the North Bay- Case Inlet sewer studies as to the potential for urban services
for Allyn.
To meet the concerns of the GMHB and to provide a Comprehensive Plan that reflected the land
settlement pattern in Mason County and provided guidance for the future of that land, the County
revised its land classification system to more closely reflect the 1997 revisions to the Growth
Management Act. The County has established by policy and map a new UGA for Allyn and
allocated urban population growth to this UGA. The County also established by policy and map,
a new classification of rural lands, the Limited Areas of More Intense Rural Development.
(LAMIRDS). These LAMIRDS are not characterized by urban development or urban services
and yet are not characterized by low density rural residential, commercial and/or industrial uses.
This classification has the following subcategories in a hierarchy, beginning with the more
intensely developed, following the guidance of36.70A.070 (5)(d).
Rural Activity Centers, RAC 's. This revision drops Allyn from this category, and continues to
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include Union, Hoodsport, and Taylor Town. The RAC's were distinguished by policy to be of
two types. Union and Hoodsport are to continue to provide a mix ofland uses such as smallscale commercial/industrial and large and small lot single family and low density multiple family.
The large-scale lots, large by urban standards, will accommodate new platting. The small lots are
those already in existence as of 1990, some of which may not be buildable due to health
department and other county regulations. This policy direction continues the viability of the two
RAC's through very limited infill.
The second type ofRAC is Taylor Town. Taylor Town is not allocated any population growth,
as it is in proximity to a number of viable residential areas, both urban and ruraL It does not need
to provide for residential uses. Taylor Town does have unique market attractiveness due to its
location along SR 101, a major travel corridor between South Sound communities, the Olympic
Peninsula, and recreational facilities. Current land uses in the vicinity include some rural
residential (including farms, ranches, forestry, open space, wetlands) and businesses ofboth local
and regional nature. The challenge was to capture the existing businesses, preserve the rural uses,
which are interspersed among the businesses, and protect the rural areas from future strip
development.
The boundaries of Taylor Town are drawn tightly around the existing businesses in operation
since before 1990. Hence Taylor Town has a northern component and a southern component.
In-between rural uses are not included in the boundaries. This captures the most ofthe existing
businesses and industries, allows them to continue, and provides very limited infill for similar
enterprises. A subarea plan to provide more design guidance and further land use control is part
of the future work program for the Mason County Planning Department. This area has been
reduced by about 43% or 240 acres from the 1998 designation, and boundaries drawn around the
built environment in existence since before 1990. A number ofbusinesses in the vicinity are not
included in the boundaries because they came into existence after 1990. These businesses will
become legal nonconforming, fit into the rural business categories of the plan, or may request
designation as LAMIRDS, if they can fit the requirements established in the Comprehensive Plan
based on RCW 36.70A.070 (5)(d).
The RAC's were allocated very limited population growth for the life of the Comprehensive Plan.
They are established by policy and mapped, using the criteria found in RCW
36.70A.070(5)(d)(iv). These areas were in existence on July 1, 1990, are located on major
highways in the County, and serve to provide limited rural residential living, commercial and
industrial uses on smaller lots not served by urban services. Developed prior to 1990, both Union
and Hoodsport have some already platted historical small lots. Many of these lots are
undeveloped and appear, at first glance, to have infill potentiaL Taylor Town does not have these
small, residential, historically platted lots and has developed, instead, as a commercial/rural,
resource industrial area utilizing the transportation network afforded by SR 10 1.
Union: new population: 200 people
Hoodsport: new population: 170
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Taylor Town: new population 0
Boundaries of Union include the areas characterized by more intensely developed rural uses, as
shown on the 1989 aerial photo. Lands which are not platted to these densities have been deleted.
Some limited infill is available, however the Union area contains steep slopes which are not
conducive to intense rural development. Land available for development is estimated at 260
acres. Land demand is estimated at 362 acres, assuming residential densities at the maximum
allowed in rural activity centers. However, there are only 5 parcels identified which are available
for development and over 5 acres. At 2.5 acres per lot, land divisions would allow at most 11
additional lots. Most existing businesses are captured within the boundaries of the RAC. Those
which are not, become rural businesses and may be legal nonconforming, depending on the
legality of their establishment. The overall acreage ofUnion has been reduced by 65% or 820
acres.
Boundaries of Hoodsport include the areas characterized by more intensely developed rural uses,
as shown on the 1989 aerial photo and areas that are platted at higher rural densities and served
by PUD # 1 with public water. One area of unplatted land within the Hoodsport RAC is between
the areas of more intensely platted rural development with public water, and the more historically
platted area of Hoodsport nearer to Hood Canal. Some of the land within the Hoodsport RAC is
environmentally constrained and will not be developed to maximum rural densities.
The amended boundary ofthe Hoodsport RAC reduces the 1998 boundary significantly, removing
22% or almost 160 acres. The boundary is determined by considering the need to preserve the
character and community ofHoodsport, the investment in public services (upgrading and the need
to preserve the character and community ofHoodsport, the investment in public services
(upgrading and expansion of the water system), and to provide for the population expected at
Hoodsport.
At the same time, the amendments increase the population expected for Hoodsport from an
increase of 88 people to 170 people, increase the household size to 2. 5 persons per household,
and decrease the density of the residential development from 2 to 4 units an acre to 1 unit to 2.5
acres. The net effect of these changes is that, using the land availability and land demand analysis
used consistently through the planning process, the estimated gross total acres of land within the
RAC is 584 acres, the net land available is 336 acres and the netland demand is 309 acres. There
is only a 25 acre difference between the land demand and supply.
The amended Hoodsport boundary captures more of the development that makes up the
community. In addition to the Hoodsport Winery, the amended boundary includes 54 more
residences, a church, fire station, and three businesses. This development is not as dense as that of
the downtown area ofHoodsport, but it is a significant part of the community and it is more dense
than will be allowed in the future in the rural area, excluding limited designated areas, such as this
one. Hoodsport is also one of the few places in the northern part of the county which provides
services to surrounding rural areas and to the traveling public. Therefore, Hoodsport is of a
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different character than Union and Taylor Town.
The Hoodsport area is served by existing roads and a water system. As documented in letters and
testimony, the PUD 1 is improving the water system for Hoodsport and will have extra capacity
to serve the community along with the need to add connections to the support higher costs of the
system. This rural service allows for a higher density of rural development, which must be
contained to avoid pressures for sprawl. The amended boundary is intended to prevent sprawl.
The amended Hoodsport boundary is generally regular or follows natural features. The boundary
follows quarter section lines on the north, west and south sides and the shoreline on the east side.
The boundary jogs in the northwest to exclude almost a quarter section of undeveloped land and
jogs in the southwest to include more ofthe developed shoreline area.
The amended boundary of Hoodsport complies with the GMA as a limited area of more intensive
rural development, specifically RCW 36.70A.070(5)(d)(i), by establishing logical outer boundaries
that control the amount of development in an area of existing more intensive development using
the criteria required in the act. The boundaries are regular and/or follow natural features. The
proposal preserves the character and nature ofthe community. The area included in the RAC is
sized appropriately to the estimated population growth and non-residential land demand. The area
is provided with rural services and can accommodate additional growth.
Hamlets, formerly named Rural Community Centers in the 1998 Comprehensive Plan. (See the
Chart in the EIS-Addendum which lists the new areas designated as Hamlets, and the areas in the
1998 plan which are no longer Hamlets but remain in the rural area.) Hamlets, established by
policy and mapped, were not allocated population growth, as by policy, they are not areas where
new small lot residential growth will occur. Instead, these existing areas located throughout the
rural parts of the County, have served the surrounding rural area with limited commercial services
and may have small-scale rural industrial uses, existing since 1990. They may include some
existing residential uses, but are not envisioned as continuing to be areas of new small lot rural
residential development. Boundaries ofHamlets are drawn based on 1989 aerial photos showing
the extent of the built environment, consideration for boundaries of neighborhoods,
consideration of topographic features, consideration of critical areas, and consideration of roads
and other man-made features which demarcate areas.
Hamlets are designated and bounded in order to preserve existing settlements in their present
configuration, allow for very limited infill, provide services to surrounding rural residents, and to
preserve their rural character.
The Isolated Commercial Industrial Areas. These small-scale areas were in existence in 1990,
and have provided a job base for Mason County, either through commercial or industrial uses.
They were mapped by:
•
Review of 1989 aerial photos showing the built area,
Consultation with the owner as to the exact ownership of the properties in question,
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•
•
•
Review of the number and types of jobs provided by the business and its place in the
provision of rural jobs for the County,
Review of existing business and plans for the properties for the future,
Consideration of critical areas and topographical features,
Review of the transportation corridors available to get product to market.
Isolated Recreational/Tourist Areas. These small-scale areas have captured the tourist services
demand for Mason County, Historically the County has been recognized for its scenic beauty, its
proximity to Seattle and other western Washington urban areas. its abundant recreational
attributes. These areas developed in response to the tourist trade and have been in existence since
before 1990. They were mapped by:
•
Review of 1989 aerial photos showing the built area,
•
Consultation with the property owners as to the exact ownership of the properties in
question,
•
· Review of existing businesses and plans for the properties for the future,
•
Review of the number and types of jobs provided by the business and its place in the
provision of rural jobs for the County,
•
Consideration of critical areas and topographical features,
•
Review of the transportation corridors available to get tourists to the facilities,
•
Review of the natural attributes that attract tourism to the area.
6.
Densities in Rural Areas
A.
The GMHB has concluded the following:
The County has failed to demonstrate that its amendments to the CP and DRs have eliminated
substantial interference with the act.
The ordinance continues to allow non-rural densities in rural areas.
The failure to preclude lot sizes as small as 12,500 square feet still substantially interferes with the
goals of the act.
B.
Through its comprehensive plan amendment process, the county has adopted policy RU521, setting forth criteria for establishing a variety of densities in rural areas. Using the criteria as
stated in that policy, Mason County further adopted a "Rural Densities Map" that establishes a
range of rural densities ofbetween 1 dwelling unit per 5 acres ofland (1:5) and 1:20. Whereas
the previous plan showed 100% ofthe rural areas (excluding RACs and RCCs) at a density of
1:5, the revised plan now shows the following:
DENSITY
PERCENTAGE
OF RURAL AREA
1:5
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43%
1:10
14%
1:20
42%
There was some public comment requesting that long-term commercial forest inholding lands be
revisited as part of the rural areas. The inholding lands were designated in the county Resource
Ordinance and were not an issue remanded in the January 1999 GMHB order or in any of the
orders by the GMHB. The county determined that there was no new information provided to
form a basis for revisiting the topic and no requirement under the order. D
C.
In well-defined and limited areas in RACs and residential LAMIRDS, maximum residential
densities of 1:2.5 are permitted.
The county has increased its minimum lot size in rural areas from 12,500 to 20,000 square
D.
feet.
E.
The county recognizes that there exists a fundamental misunderstanding of the relationship
between minimum lot size and maximum density. By permitting smaller lots while retaining
density requirements, the county is pursuing a strategy of preserving open space. As an example,
when a 20,000 square foot lot is created in an area with a maximum density of 1:5, approximately
4. 5 acres of land remains preserved as open space.
F.
By establishing a variety oflower rural densities, and by increasing the minimum lot size
permitted in rural areas, and by ensuring that the lower densities established will result in the
retention of open space in rural areas; Mason County has taken affirmative steps to ensure that
rural development will not occur in a manner that results in urban densities or the need for urban
services.
G.
The actions taken by Mason County as summarized above appropriately balance the goals
ofthe Act.
7.
Cluster Development and Bonus Densities
A
The GMHB has concluded the following:
County cluster development regulations still allow bonus densities with a maximum residential
density of 1:2.5.
There is no cap to the number of clusters permitted within a development.
These provisions do not comply with the Act.
The county's cluster development regulations would result in non-rural densities at a magnitude
that demand urban services, and do not remove substantial interference with the goals of the act.
B.
The county has adopted changes in both its policies and in its regulations that provide for
the following: D
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•
•
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Bonus densities will not be granted for subdivisions in areas where the permitted
development density is 1:5.
Bonus densities for cluster developments in other areas will not result in a density of
greater than 1 :5.
The size of a cluster development is reduced from ten to eight lots.
The open space buffer between clusters is increased from 50 to 100 feet.
C.
Cluster development is encouraged by Mason County as a method to promote the
conservation of open space, and thus to preserve the character of rural areas of the county. The
bonus provisions of the county's cluster development regulations require rigorous provisions for
open space and good site design. These provisions will ensure that proposed developments will
minimize the impact of development, especially in rural areas.
D.
The actions taken by Mason County as summarized above appropriately balance the goals
ofthe Act.
8.
Matrix and Range of Uses in Rural Areas
A.
The GMHB has concluded the following:
The GMA calls for LAMIRDS to be subject to minimization and containment
The GMA calls for rural areas to accommodate appropriate rural uses not characterized by urban
growth, and consistent with rural character.
The matrix of permitted uses in rural areas goes far beyond resource-based uses.
The range and number of uses in rural areas does not preclude future need for urban services.
The county erred in defining businesses with up to 50 people as "small scale."
B.
During the preparation of its Comprehensive Plan and Development Regulations, Mason
County elected to forego a more traditional zoning ordinance in favor of performance-based
development standards. This approach was intended to preserve a maximum amount of flexibility
in accommodating the needs of property owners, while ensuring that development occurred in a
manner consistent with the intent of the Act. These standards limited the intensity of uses and
required stringent buffer yard standards, prohibiting from rural areas only those uses that would
clearly run afoul ofGMA by virtue oftheir scale or intensity. The listing of permitted uses in both
urban and rural areas was formatted in a matrix that sought to simplifY the options available to
property owners. However, this matrix of permitted uses was never intended to be a "standalone" document. Rather, it was intended to be viewed within the wider context of the entire
ordinance; i.e., the overall impact of the range of uses permitted within a given area may best be
determined by also examining the restrictions place on the scale and intensity of the use (buffer
requirements, lot and building size restrictions, height limits, etc.). In rejecting this approach, the
GMHB has expressed its opinion that the range of uses permitted in rural areas would per se lead
Page 10
to urban patterns of development in these areas.
C.
In the course of amending its Comprehensive Plan, the county has examined the issue of
the permissible range and scale of rural uses through the following:
A review of the language of the Act, including recent amendments;
A review of the study, Business Demographics and the Impact of Land Use Restrictions on the
Mason County Economy, Phase 1 (June, 1999), published by the Mason County Economic
Development Council (EDC).
A thorough discussion of the issue at more than a dozen public meetings held throughout the
county, including hearings before the Planning Commission and the Board of County
Commissioners; and
A review of previous GMHB decisions on the subject:
D.
The county has also relied to a great extent on recommendations contained in the
publication Keeping the Rural Vision: Protecting Rural Character and Planning for Rural
Development (June 1999). This document, published by the State ofWashington Department of
Community, Trade and Economic Development, outlines strategies for containing development in
rural areas while permitting appropriate levels of development to occur.
E.
The county has adopted a number of changes to MCC 1.03.020, the Matrix ofPermitted
Uses. Among these changes are the following:
A r~duction of the number of uses permitted in rural areas;
A limitation on several types of uses to require a Special Use permit in rural areas;
A further restriction that other types of uses in rural areas are permitted only if they are tourist
related or resource based;
A reduction in the number and types of uses that are permitted as a cottage industry.
A clarification is provided to indicate that fuel storage tanl<:s are accessory uses
The Board of County Commissioners has agreed that these proposed changes address and
F.
comply with the findings of the GMHB. The longer-term work program that has been advocated
by many of the stakeholders in this process is the development of a traditional zoning ordinance to
replace the performance-based standards now in effect. With the financial encouragement that
has been provided by the state's Department of Community, Trade and Economic Development,
it is anticipated that a zoning ordinance can be drafted during the early part of the coming
calendar year.
G.
For larger-scale businesses that existed in rural areas as of July 1, 1990, the Act has been
amended to permit their continuance by designating them as "Limited Areas ofMore Intense
Rural Development," or LAMIRDS. The county has adopted this designation, and these existing
businesses are thus recognized as conforming uses. They would be permitted to re-develop or
expand within reasonable limits
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H.
More intensive land uses permitted in rural areas include resource-dependent industries,
tourist-related businesses, and rail-dependent uses. Plan amendments include definitions of these
terms that are intended to clarifY their meaning within the context of GMA, and to provide a
greater range of options for land uses in the county's rural areas that are consistent with the Act.
I.
The county has amended its definition of"small-scale business" to 20 employees. D
J.
While the range of permitted uses in rural areas still includes more than resource-based
uses, it is intended to limit rural development in a manner that precludes the need for urban
services. Such development will not promote sprawl.
K.
The actions taken by Mason County as summarized above appropriately balance the goals
ofthe Act.
9.
Open Space Map.
Discussion.
The Open Space Map is the map in the county Comprehensive Plan which is titled "Future Land
Use- Open Space" and is Figure IV-6.2. This map shows Long-Term Commercial Forest lands,
Agricultural Resource Lands, local parks, state parks and other state lands, the Olympic Nation
Park and the Olympic National Forest, land slide hazard areas and their associated buffers, flood
ways, streams and their associated vegetation area, wetlands and their associated buffer areas, and
major utility corridors. Each of these areas are shown on other maps in the Plan, except state
parks, other state lands, and floodways. The glossary of the Plan defines greenbelts and open
corridors synonymously.
The Open Space Map was remanded to the county because the GMA requires the identification of
open spaces and possible open space corridors (RCW 36.70A.070 and RCW 36.70A.l60). The
Open Space Map, adopted in 1998, was not published in time for review at the prior Hearings
Board hearing on the Plan. Page 13 ofthe Order states: "The County remains in noncompliance
regarding this aspect until all parties have had an opportunity to review the map and respond."
The county received no comment on this issue until April 27, 2000 in a letter from Mr. Diehl. The
total comment was "We are concerned that the proposed plan does not adequately identifY open
space corridors within and between urban growth areas. We note that the inclusion of wetlands
and/or agricultural lands in the Belfair Urban Growth Area would not satisfY the need to protect
wildlife corridors within this UGA." While noting that the GMA allows both critical areas and
agricultural resource lands in urban growth areas, the amendment does respond the specific
identification of open space corridors. As the map is updated to show revisions in the some of the
features it contains, such as the designated urban growth areas, it will identifY as open space
corridors those features already shown on the map which are open space corridors. Specifically,
these are rivers, streams, and utility corridors.
Finding.
Findings of Fact- Page 12
As amended to identify open space corridors/greenbelts within and between urban growth areas,
the open space map complies with the GMA requirements to depict open spaces and open space
corridors.
10.
Environmental Impact Statement
A
The GMHB has concluded the following:
The Final Environmental Impact Statement must be brought into conformance.
County has erred in not proposing and analyzing alternatives based on a compliant population
projection.
The County has reevaluated the original population projections. This process finally
evolved to proposing and analyzing alternatives based on a compliant population projection.
B.
The County has:
analyzed the previous population projections in earlier planning documents and found errors and
omissions; e.g., inclusion of the Shelton Correctional Facility in computations for household size;
discrepancy in housing units counts between data sources.
consulted with the Washington State Office ofFinancial Management to get the most updated
numbers and approach for the County.
Reviewed with the Washington State Office of Financial Management the growth of counties
surrounding Mason to determine any "spill over effects."
reviewed the use of a separate persons per household figure for each watershed.
reviewed the actual figures for pph size for each watershed as proposed by the previous plan, and
found some errors and discrepancies.
Compared watershed household size with other studies, such as the North Case Inlet Sewer Study
and the Belfair Sewer Study, and found that a household size of2.5 was used for estimating size,
impact, and capacity.
used United States Census data collection methods and assumptions for household size.
reviewed building permit data to find trends.
The County has taken the following actions:
Corrected the errors and omissions in the earlier study.
used a smaller population projection figure for estimating growth for Mason County to 2014 in
this preferred alternative.
Revised all previous population projections to the same figure used in #2 above, for all previous
alternatives. Land demand and impacts are calculated on the revised population figure for all
alternatives.
Used one pph figure throughout the county.
Revised the persons per household figure to be consistent with OFM, Census Data, and Sewer
Study data.
Reviewed the changes with the public in a series of 7 public meetings held around the county in
Findings ofFact- Page 13
Fall 1999.
C.
Discussion
The population projections were reduced by 9, 792 persons. Based on housing permit data and
population determinations by OFM for the years 1995-1999, this figure more closely represented
the actual growth within the County. The trends toward the high growth scenario were no
longer evident. Therefore this figure is a more representative projection for the future. It is
within the OFM projection range, and represents their medium projection. The earlier figure used
in other alternatives represented the top of the OFM range.
The person per household figure is reduced by 0.7. With this reduction and the reduction in total
projected population, the number of housing units needed throughout the county is reduced by
5,655 units. Fewer people, fewer units translates to less environmental impact overall and
allowed the County to focus the remaining units in more urban settlement patterns, thus meeting
the Board's concerns on rural sprawl and over allocation of rural land in small lot sizes.
When the population figures were decided, the County then revised its matrix showing impacts
for each of the preceding alternatives dating back to 1995. Each alternative was based on the
same increase of25,344 new people. Other assumptions for the alternatives were calculated
based on the percentages allocated in the previous FSEIS e.g. 20.8% of the total expected new
population was allocated to Shelton in Alt. 1 and 79.2% was allocated to the rural lands. The
same percentages were used to calculate the increase of the 25,344, the new revised population
figure to Shelton and to the rural area. This decision was based on the fact that the previous
alternatives had different settlement patterns as their basic assumptions. (See Table 1 EIS
addendum.)
With the revised matrix, other impacts were then calculated and reflected in Table 1b, EIS
addendum. The EIS addendum concentrates on comparing the Revised Preferred Alternative
(April 2000) with the previous alternatives. Alternative 2 was the most impacting of all
alternatives in that it allocated population to many areas including the rural area in low-density
patterns.
D.
These changes made by the County address the Growth Management Act, 36.70 AB and
C and meet the requirements ofRCW 43.21, SEPA. The Addendum to the EIS compared apples
with apples; analyzed a revised preferred alternative with lesser impacts than other alternatives
previous analyzed; showed comparative impacts between the alternatives; and suggested
mitigation measures.
E.
The actions taken by Mason County as summarized above appropriately balance the goals
ofthe Act.
Findings ofFact- Page 14
11.
Work Program
In preparing amendments to the Mason County Comprehensive Plan and regulations, a number of
issues were raised which need further refinement to the plan or development regulations. These
issues constitute a work program that the county intends to pursue over the next year to 18
months.
An industrial lands study needs to be done to identify existing industrial areas, the need for land in
the future, the available land supply suitable for such development, the availability and need for
services to such land, and possible changes to facilities or regulations that would provide
adequate and appropriate land. The study will distinguish these issues for both rural and urban
areas. This project will be started in cooperation with other interested groups as soon as it can be
arraigned.
Drafts for the possible adoption of zoning for the Shelton UGA are presently being developed:
This continues the discussion began with the City of Shelton on possible Mason County
regulations within the Shelton UGA which will closely match existing city requirements. As work
on this has already begun, the effort will be completed within the next six months. The regulations
will be reviewed and may be refined after an industrial lands study is done.
Refinements of the Belfair UGA planning will be done. The existing plans develop a vision of how
the Belfair UGA should develop. However, the plans so far created are not specific enough in
certain areas, especially mapping of the different districts, to be implemented at this time. This
may also be affected by on-going investigation into the provision of sewer to the urban area.
Significant work on this has been done, so it will be possible to complete the first part of this,
draft revisions to the plan and regulations, within the next six to nine months. The regulations will
be reviewed and may be refined after an industrial lands study is done.
For the next 180 days, it is expected that the public will provide new infonnation on the rural area
existing conditions that can be taken into account in mapping of the rural residential densities and
in the designation of rural areas of more intensive development.. Processing this information will
be done over the next year.
The industrial lands study will also provide part of the basis for a review of the Development
Regulation Matrix. This will examine alternative regulations, such as zoning, to implement the
county plan and replace the current Matrix of Permitted Uses. Included in this would be an
examination of unresolved issues regarding rural commercial/industrial or tourist/recreational uses .
and areas, and industrial land needs for the urban or rural areas. This phase will follow after the
completion ofthe industrial lands study.
Subarea planning for the Taylor Town RAC will be done and a subarea committee will be created
to refine the boundaries and regulations that apply to this area. This may not be begun for a year
or after the industrial lands study is complete
A subarea committee to refine the boundaries and regulations that apply to the Hoodsport RAC including possibilities for future conversion to an urban growth area - will be set up in
Findings ofFact- Page 15
coordination with other groups. This work may not be begun for a year and is dependent on work
being done by other agencies on water systems and possible sewer systems.
12.
The Board finds that the amendments are consistent with the county-wide planning policies.
13.
The Board finds that the City of Shelton is in agreement with the Shelton urban growth area
boundaries and the changes to the county-wide planning policies.
14.
The Board finds that the proposal addresses the order of the Growth Management Hearings
Board, as discussed above.
15.
The Board finds that, with the amendments used to address issues that were raised after the
Planning Commission recommendation, the proposed amendments balance the goals of the Mason
County comprehensive plan and the goals of the Growth Management Act.
From the preceding findings, it is concluded amendments to the Mason County Comprehensive
Plan, August 1998, should be adopted as proposed and moved by the Board.
Mason County Board of County Commissioners
Date
These findings approved by the Planning Commission in support of their recommendation.
ce~=ssion
Findings ofFact- Page 16
;?e~~
ATTACHMENT B - ORDINANCE 36-00
Amended sections of the Mason County Comprehensive Plan and specific development
regulations.
Mason CounQ! Comprehensive f
August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Goals
. Chapter II
PLANNING GOALS AND THE INTEGRA TED PLANNING PROCESS
Il-l INTRODUCTION
Mason County used an integrated GMA/SEP A process in its comprehensive planning effort.
This integrated approach has allowed the County to meet its GMA and SEP A requirements
through a single; unified process. Mason County's unified process includes public
participation, documentation of existing conditions, establishing goals and objectives,
identifying alternatives, conducting impact and consistency analyses, identifying mitigation
measures, and preparing documents. This chapter presents an overview ofMason County's
integrated process and related public involvement. It also presents the goals developed for
the plan, and the county-wide planning policies which guided the plan's formation and are
integrated into it.
II-2 PUBLIC PARTICIPATION
Overview
Both GMA and SEPA recognize public participation as a critical aspect of the planning
process. Both acts provide wide latitude in creating the public participation and agency
coordination process to suit the needs of individual jurisdictions. GMA requires, and
SEP A encourages, early and continuous public participation in the development and
amendment of comprehensive plans and development regulations. Further, GMA's
Procedural Criteria strongly recommend engaging the community in a "visioning" process to
identify common community values and ideals, and to describe an image of the community's
future. In addition, SEP A requires notice, comment, agency coordination, public meetings,
and public hearings.
Mason County framed its public participation strategy to comply with these requirements.
The strategy included a Growth Management Advisory Committee (GMAC) representing all
sub-areas of Mason County, an Ad Hoc Committee, and the Mason County Planning
Commission. It also included general public involvement during the following key steps of
its Comprehensive planning process:
I.
Community Visioning
II.
Community Goals/Countywide Planning Policies
III.
Plan Objectives and Alternatives
IV.
Designation of Critical Areas and Resource Lands
V.
Impact Analysis and Mitigation
VI.
Comprehensive Plan and EIS Documents
The community visioning process and expanded scoping process are summarized here. The
public participation activities for Community Goals/Countywide Planning Policies are
described in section II-3, Plan Goals. Similarly, the public participation activities for Plan
Page II. 1
Mason County Comprehensive Ptc
August. 1998
(Revised May 20001
Planning Goals
Objectives and Alternatives, Impact Analyses and Mitigation, and Comprehensive Plan and
EIS Documents are described in those corresponding sections of this chapter.
Community Visioning
Mason County's Vision Statement translates the community's values, hopes and goals into a
unified vision for the future. The county involved a broad range of community members in
its visioning process. The process included a vision survey, public meetings, and a random
sample telephone survey of registered voters. The vision statement provides a guide to the
comprehensive plan.
Mason County Vision Statement
Mason County will remain a primarily rural county where residents will enjoy peace and
quiet, privacy, natural views, and rural enterprise. Although rural character means different
things to different people, aspects of it include: natural vistas, wildlife, and natural
eco.systems; fewer restrictions and more privacy than in an urban area; the easy operation
of resource based industries such as timber, mining and agriculture; and the close ties of
family and community to the land
The Urban Areas
The City of Shelton and the communities of Belfair and Allyn will serve as the County's
principal economic, civic, and social centers. Each will have a core business area anchored
by retail, service industries, government, and education facilities. Shelton will also hosts a
multi-county medical industry that serves the Olympic Peninsula region, and regional retail
centered in the City's Olympic Highway North area. The three urban areas will provide a
strong employment and tax base.
The Rural Areas
Natural resources will continue to provide the foundation of the County's economy. Forestry,
agriculture, aquaculture including shellfish and other fisheries industries, Christmas tree
farming and mining will provide employment for County residents. The County's abundance
qfnatural amenities including mountains, lakes, rivers, and wildlife will continue to support
the County's thriving tourist industries, including Master Planned Resorts. The County's
land use regulations will protect natural resource lands and industries against encroachment
from incompatible, competing uses.
Housing
Residential growth within the County will be centered in Shelton urban area, the
communityies qf Allyn and Belfair, and a new fully contained community. Mason County
will offer a range of affordable rural and urban housing choices including single family,
multifamily, and mixed-use.
Page II.2
Mason County Comprehensive Ph_ ·August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Goals
The Environment and Open Space
Mason County will protect the environment in a way which is compatible with the needs of
a growing population. One focus will be watersheds and their water quality. The county will
also conserve an open space network that will include wildlife habitat and corridors,
greenways, estuaries, parks, trails and campgrounds. This system will help preserve the
County:s· environment and mral character, support the County's tourism industry, and meet
the recreation needs of County residents.
11-3 PLAN GOALS
Overview
The Growth Management Act identifies thirteen goals to guide counties and cities in the
development and adoption of comprehensive plans. These thirteen goals pertain to: urban
growth, reduction of sprawl, transportation, housing, economic development, property rights,
permits, natural resource industries, open space and recreation, environment, citizen
participation and coordination, public facilities and services, and historic preservation. Mason
County's Countywide Planning Policies (CWPPs) evolved from GMA's thirteen goals and
the public input gained through the County's Visioning Process. Further, Mason County and
the City of Shelton jointly participated in formulation of Mason County's Countywide
Planning Policies (CWPPs). These policies have se~ed as the underlying goals for
preparation ofMason County's draft Comprehensive Plan.
Public Participation
Mason County organized a public process for developing the Countywide Planning Policies
(CWPPs). That process established a Joint City/County Elected Official Review Board
(Board). This Board included the commissioners from both Mason County and the City of
Shelton. The Board was guided by the requirements of House
Bill 1025 and the Mason County/City of Shelton Regional Strategy Agreement.
In addition, the Board used a twelve-step process for preparing the CWPPs. The approach
focused on coordination among Mason County, the City of Shelton, and other public
agencies. TABLE II.2 identifies the groups that participated in the preparation of the
CWPPs:
Sewer Districts
IWater Districts
Fire Districts
School Districts
Port Districts
!Hospital Districts
Squaxin Island Tribe
The Skokomish Tribe
Page II.3
Mason Countjl Comprehensive Pt..
·August. 1998
(Revised May 20001
Planning Goals
County/City Public Works Depts.
Mason County Fire Marshal
!Public Utilities District No. I
Public Utilities District No. 3
County/City Budget Directors
County/City Planning Departments
Shelton Planning Advisory Committee
Economic Development Council
City of Shelton Fire Department
County/City Parks Departments
Shelton/Mason Chamber of Commerce
County/City Criminal Justice Dept.
!Peninsula Regional Transportation Planning Mason County Growth Management
Organization (RTPO)
Advisory Committee (GMAC)
The first draft ofthe CWPPs was completed in late January, 1992. The draft went
through an informal review and revision period that ended in March of 1992. The formal
review period for the CWPPs began in May, 1992 and continued through August, 1992.
Public hearings were held in May and June of 1992. CWPPs were revised to reflect input
received through the public review process and the public
hearings. Mason County and the City of Shelton jointly adopted the Countywide Planning
Policies on August 17, 1992.
Community Goals/Countywide Planning Policies
Mason County's Comprehensive Plan addresses each of the thirteen GMA goals according
to the vision shared by County residents. The following discussion identifies Mason
County's Countywide Planning Policies, organized by the GMA goal they address. The
policies appear as adopted.
Urban Growth
GMA encourages concentrating development in urban areas where adequate public facilities
and services exist, or can be provided within a reasonable amount of time.
In conjunction with the City of Shelton, Mason County adopted County-Wide Planning
Policies (CWPP), some of which deal specifically with the issue of urban growth and are
designed to alleviate negative aspects of growth.
CWPP 1.1.
Designate Urban Growth areas around the incorporated city of Shelton and
two unincorporated areas ofBelfair and Allyn where:
infrastructure exists, infrastructure is planned, as identified in an approved Capital Facilities
Plan, or services can be reasonably and economically extended,
where there is a sufficient supply of environmentally sound land to support urban densities
and urban growth forecasted for the 20 year planning cycle, and
where the community's vision has identified its area as an Urban Growth Area.
Page II.4
Mason County Comprehensive Pt...
-August. 1998
(Revised May 2000!
Planning Goals
CWPP 1. 4
Encouraged mixed use developments, multi-family developments, employment
centers, and other urban land uses are appropriate development to be encouraged within
designated Growth Areas, in order to protect rural character in the remainder of the County.
CWPP 3.8
Encourage development in Growth Areas where:
- infrastructure exists or is planned; or
- infrastructure is provided by the developer
according to locally established minimum urban standards
Reduce .~prawl
GMA discourages the inappropriate conversion of undeveloped land into sprawling, low
density development. Several ofMason County's CWPPs are designed to reduce the impacts
of growth, including sprawl, in areas outside ofUGAs.
CWPP 2.1
Rural areas now exist throughout Mason County that contribute a large
measure of the quality of life enjoyed by residents. These areas are characterized by low
housing densities, wilderness and recreational living opportunities, and open space. Other
rural qualities include peace and quiet, low traffic volumes, natural views, privacy, and
personal freedom. Intensive development will not be encouraged in these rural areas due to
the difficulty of providing cost-effective services, or because their disappearance from the
landscape would seriously detract from the desired character ofthe county. Rural areas of
Mason County should be designated as such and protected from encroachment by intensive
development. Rural areas include those portions of the County that lie outside designated
growth areas, master planned communities, and destination resorts, and may have lower
standards of infrastructure and service that reflect and maintain this rural character.
CWPP 2.2
values.
Comprehensive plan policies will be designed to protect rural lifestyles and
CWPP 5.3
Establish Level of Service standards in Growth Areas that ensure adequate
services to prevent out-migration due to congestion.
CWPP 5.3a Establish a rural land use system that provides for continued vitiality of limited
areas of more intensive rural development. The categories of these areas include rural activity
areas, hamlets, commercial/industrial areas, and tourist/recreational areas.
Transportation
GMA encourages development of efficient, multi-modal transportation systems that are based
on regional priorities and are coordinated with county and city comprehensive plans.
CWPP 5. 1
Encourage efficient multimodal transportation systems that are based on
regional priorities and coordinated with county and city comprehensive plans.
Page U.S
Mason County Comprehensive Ph _ ·August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Goals
CWPP 5 .2
Establish Level of Service standards that encourage densities in Growth Areas
where services as public transit, pedestrian, car-pooling, etc., are available.
CWPP 5.3b Establish Level of Service standards in Growth Areas which ensure adequate
service to prevent out-migration due to congestion.
CWPP5.4
Protect functions of designated high volume corridors by restricting individual
access points.
CWPP 5.5
Promote interconnecting street networks which provide alternative routes.
CWPP 5. 6
Encourage alternative transportation modes by providing service in growth
areas such as bikeways, sidewalks, transit, etc.
CWPP 5. 7
Ensure that cooperative planning efforts continue with the Peninsula Regional
Transportation Policy Organization and that policies ofthe County and the organization are
consistent and coordinated, with the Comprehensive Plan as the guiding document for Mason
County.
CWPP 5. 8
The County and the cities and other community growth areas therein should
work cooperatively with the Mason County Transit Authority (MCT A) to provide equitable
public Transit throughout the County.
Housing
GMA encourages the availability of affordable housing to all economic segments of the
population, promotes a variety of residential densities and housing types, and encourages
preservation of existing the housing stock.
CWPP 6.1
Encourage the availability of affordable housing to all economic segments of
the population, promote a variety of residential
densities and housing types, and encourage preservation of existing housing stock.
CWPP 6.2
Define and establish the need for affordable housing through development of
a Housing Plan.
CWPP 6.3
Encourage affordable housing in urban areas through innovative land use
techniques including infill housing incentives, smaller urban lots in urban areas, mixed use,
multifamily units, density bonuses for affordable units. Encourage affordable housing in rural
areas by utilizing the supply of existing platted smaller lots which can meet applicable
subdivision, environmental and building regulations, and ensuring existing legally built lots
retain their conforming status, and by allowing manufactured housing in both urban and rural
areas. It is recognized that the techniques for encouraging affordable housing will differ in
rural and urban areas.
Page II.6
Mason County Comprehensive P.
August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Goals
CWPP 6.4
The housing and land use elements of the Comprehensive Plans for Mason
County and its cities will include an assessment of land availability and general criteria for
siting special purpose housing within the Urban Growth Areas to ensure that such housing
can be accommodated.
CWPP 6.5
Within the Urban Growth Areas, a wide range ofhousing types, densities, and
mixtures will be encouraged.
CWPP 6. 6
As part of a comprehensive program to address the affordability issue, examine
current local regulations and policies for impacts
on housing cost. Prior to adoption of any new ordinance or regulation affecting homebuilding, evaluate the impact on the provision of affordable housing options.
CWPP.6.7
Ensure an adequate supply ofurban land and affordable housing by drawing
Growth Area boundaries which acc01mnodate the Medium Growth Scenario for population
into the year 2014, recognize environmentally sensitive constraints, provide for a market
factor, accommodate supporting new commercial, industrial and public/quasi public uses, and
utility and facility infrastructure land needs.
CWPP 6.8
Affordable housing should be convenient to public transportation, maJor
employment centers, and public services.
CWPP 6.9
Affordable housing needs will be examined in both city and rural contexts.
Strategies to address housing affordability will reflect local definitions of affordable housing,
urban and rural values, cost and availability of land, infrastructure cost, private property
rights, and broad-based citizen involvement.
Economic Development
GMA encourages economic development that is consistent with adopted comprehensive
plans, promotes economic opportunity for all citizens of the County, especially for
unemployed and disadvantaged persons, and encourages growth in areas experiencing
insufficient economic growth, all within the capacities of the County's natural resources,
public services and public facilities.
CWPP 8.1
Encourage economic development throughout the County that is consistent
with adopted comprehensive · plans, promote economic opportunity for all citizens of the
County, especially for unemployed and disadvantaged persons, and encourage growth in areas
experiencing insufficient economic growth, all within the capacities ofthe County's natural
resources, public services and public facilities.
CWPP. 8.2
Maintain and enhance natural resource-based industries including productive
timber, agriculture, mining and fisheries industries. Encourage the conservation of
productive natural resources, and discourage incompatible uses. Assure that adjacent land
uses do not contribute to the demise of the long term commercial forest and agricultural
production lands and the resource based industries associated with these areas.
Page Il.7
Mason Coun!J' Comprehensive p,_
CWPP 8.3
August. 1998
(Revised Mav 2000)
Planning Goals
Establish coordinated incentives to promote economic development
with respect to Vision Statements and Goals for each community.
CWPP 8.4
Promote economic development activities where services needed by such
activities already exist or can be easily and economically provided.
CWPP 8. 5
Promote economic development where off-site impacts, such as transportation,
can be effectively managed.
CWPP 8. 6
Discourage development activities in environmentally sensitive areas which
may have a detrimental effect on public health, safety, environment, and fiscal integrity of the
area.
CWPP 8.7
Increase economic vitality in Mason County through the creation of jobs that
provide livable wages and which promote economic diversity, stabilization, and maintenance
of a high quality environment.
CWPP 8.8
Support school district, post secondary, and higher education efforts including
vocational education training, and education of a highly trained, technically skilled citizenry.
Property Rights
GMA states that "property rights of landowners shall be protected from arbitrary and
discriminatory actions. Further, Private property shall not be taken for public use without just
compensation having been made.
CWPP 10.1 Property rights of landowners shall be protected from arbitrary and
discriminatory actions. Private property shall not be taken for public use without just
compensation having been made.
Permits
Both GMA and Mason County express that "applications for permits should be processed in
a timely and fair manner to ensure predictability (CWPP 10.2)."
CWPP 10.2 Applications for permits should be processed in a timely and fair manner to
ensure predictability.
Resource Industries
GMA recommends Counties maintain and enhance natural resource based industries including
productive timber, agriculture, mining, and fisheries industries, and encourage the
conservation of productive forest lands and productive agricultural lands, and discourage
incompatible uses.
Page lt8
Mason Countv Comprehensive P,
August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Goals
CWPP 8.2
Maintain and enhance natural resource based industries including productive
timber, agriculture, and fisheries industries. Encourage the conservation of productive forest
lands and productive agricultural lands, and discourage incompatible uses.
Open Space
GMA encourages the retention of open space and development of recreational opportunities.
GMA further encourages conservation offish and wildlife habitat, and increased access to
naturalresource lands, water and developed parks
CWPP 3.2
Encourage retention of open space and development of· recreational
opportunities.
CWPP 3. 4
Encourage increased access to publicly owned natural resource lands. Protect
existing public access to shorelines and water. Encourage acquisition of lands to provide
additional public shoreline and water access.
CWPP 3.5
Encourage the development of parks.
CWPP 1. 5
Designate and map open space areas in coordination within the incorporated
and unincorporated areas designated as Urban Growth Areas. Criteria for designation shall
include:
•
lands that do or can provide multiple use open space,
•
are environmentally unique and or fragile,
•
can act as separators between incompatible land uses,
•
have been used historically by the public and are included in the UGA' s vision
statement.
Provide incentives and regulations that provide accessible public open space or protect
environmentally important areas without compromising private property rights.
CWPP 1.5a IdentifY and prioritize open space areas, both urban and rural, which should
be purchased with public funds or conserved through other public means such as conservation
easements, life estates, and/or conveyance to a land trust. Assure that private property rights
are protected. Through regulations and/or incentives, continue to allow low-impact rural uses
and densities in environmentally fragile areas designated as open space, consistent with critical
area regulations.
Environment
GMA strives to protect the environment and enhance the quality of life, including air and
water quality, and the availability of water.
CWPP 3. 6
Protect the environment and enhance the quality oflife, including air and water
quality, and the availability ofwater.
Page II.9
Mason County Comprehensive F.
·August. 1998
(Revised May 20001
Planning Goals
CWPP 3.10 In order to protect public health and water quality, septic systems and/or
appropriate alternative disposal systems will be encouraged where appropriate in rural areas,
according to adopted County health codes. Alternative sewage collection and treatment
systems with tight lines should be considered as an option when needed when public health
is in jeopardy, and or to correct environmental damage and when consistent with land use
designations in the Comprehensive Plan. Development permits and/or franchises for sewage
treatment systems should be granted when consistent with the Comprehensive Plan.
CWPP 3 .11 Mason County and the cities therein shall protect drinking water supplies from
contamination, maintain potable water in adequate supply, and identify and reserve future
supplies.
CWPP 8.6
Discourage development activities in environmentally sensitive areas which
may have a detrimental effect on public health, safety, environment, and fiscal integrity of the
area.
Citizen Participation
GMA encourages the involvement of citizens in the planning process and coordination
between communities and jurisdictions to reconcile conflicts.
CWPP 10.3
Encourages the involvement of citizens in the planning process and
coordination between communities and jurisdictions to reconcile conflicts.
CWPP 7.1
Mason County and the cities within will establish joint procedures for
review of land development activities within the cities' Growth Areas.
Facilities/Services
GMA strives to ensure that public facilities and services necessary to support development
shall be adequate to serve the development at the time of occupancy without decreasing the
level of service provided.
CWPP 3.1
Ensure that those public facilities and services necessary to support
development shall be adequate to serve the development at the time of occupancy without
decreasing current levels below locally established minimum standards.
CWPP 4.1
Mason County and the cities therein, along with public participation, shall
develop a cooperative regional process to site essential public facilities of regional and
statewide importance. The objective of the process shall be to ensure that such facilities are
located so as to protect the environmental quality, optimize access and usefulness to all
jurisdictions, and equitably distribute benefits/burdens through out the region or county.
CWPP 4.2
Major public facilities that generate substantial travel demand should be sited
along or near major transportation and public transit corridors.
Page II.lO
Mason County Comprehensive Pi<
AufJUSt. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planninf{ Goals
CWPP 4.3
Sharing of corridors for major utilities, trails and other transportation rights
of way is encouraged.
Historic Preservation
GMA states that jurisdictions should "identify and encourage the preservation of lands, site,
and structures that have historical or archeological significance.
CWPP 3. 7
Identify and encourage the preservation oflands, sites, and structures that have
historical or archeological significance.
Il-4 PLAN OBJECTIVES and ALTERNATIVES
Overview
GMA emphasizes and SEP A requires, the use of objectives as an important means of
formulating and evaluating the proposed Comprehensive Plan. Mason County's Vision
Statement and goals, as stated through the Countywide Planning Policies, provided the
framework for developing the County's Major Plan Objectives.
Mason County's draft Plan/EIS presents and evaluates four alternatives and a preferred
alternative to determine which alternative(s) can feasibly attain the community's objectives.
Mason County's integrated approach complies with GMA' s requirement to develop a plan
based on planning goals, and SEP A's requirement to describe and evaluate plan alternatives
through th~ community's goals and objectives.
Plan
O~jectives
Mason County's Growth Management Advisory Committee used the Vision Statement and
Goals to identify objectives that the County's Comprehensive Plan should achieve. Those
objectives include preserve air and water quality; support a resource-based economy; maintain
rural lifestyle; create flexibility in land management; foster land and housing affordability; and
encourage employment and a strong tax base.
I. Preserve Air and Water Quality
Appropriate regulation of land use and development throughout the County to maintain air
and water quality. This includes coordination with state and regional agencies responsible for
protecting of air and water resources.
2. Support Resource-Based Economy
Appropriate regulation ofland use and development oflands adjacent to Resource Lands to
help encourage the long term viability ofMason County's resource-based economy.
3. Maintain Rural L{festyle
Page II. 11
Mason County Comprehensive Pt,
August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Goals
Appropriate regulation ofland and development throughout the County to maintain the sense
of community, safety, peace, and lack of crowding. New development should consider on-site
views of trees and water, and use the natural environment to buffer/screen one home from
another.
4. Flexibility in Land Management
Use of flexible land use and development regulations and management practices, such as
performance zoning, to preserve personal property rights, promote well-designed
development, and to protect the natural environment.
5. Affordability
Appropriate land use and development regulations throughout the County to maintain
affordable land, housing, and public services.
6. Encourage Employment and Strong Tax Base
Appropriate regulation of land use and development throughout the County to encourage
economic expansion, the creation of high paying jobs, and broadening the County's tax
base.
Plan Alternatives
Comprehensive Plan alternatives were part of a decision-making process that began with
Visioning and progressed through development of Community Goals, and Major Plan
Objectives. This process was used because both GMA and SEP A emphasize goals,
objectives and alternatives as important means for formulating and evaluating the
Comprehensive Plan. Fallowing an extensive evaluation of numerous broad range
alternatives, the Growth Management Advisory Committee (GMAC) identified four
Comprehensive Plan Alternatives to be advanced for SEP A analysis in the draft Plan/EIS.
Initially, the GMAC considered 10 broad range alternatives for the County's draft Plan/EIS.
Those alternatives included No Action as required by SEPA, 5 urban options, and 4 rural
concepts. Through an assessment process that evaluated the alternatives based on Mason
County's Vision Statement, community goals, and Major Plan Objectives, the GMAC refined
the 10 broad range alternatives into four for further consideration. Those alternatives,
including "No Action" and three others, contain a range of ideas and growth concepts
intended to encourage evaluation of growth management issues facing Mason County. They
presented alternative approaches to the designation and location of Urban Growth Areas,
Fully Contained Communities, Working Rural Areas, and Rural Lands including Rural
Activity Centers, Rural Community Centers, and Rural Areas. They also presented alternative
standards for residential and non-residential development.
After a series of public workshops and committee meetings, a preliminary preferred
alternative was developed. The county then proceeded to produce the "Draft Mason County
Page II. 12
Mason County Comprehensive Pt,
August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Goals
Comprehensive Plan and Environmental Impact Statement, November, 1995" and released
it for public comment.
Taking the public comment received, the draft plan was revised to produce this document.
Policies
The GMAC also developed broad policy categories to further describe the four alternatives.
Those policies included general policies and alternative~specific policies. The general policies
applied to all alternatives. The alternative-specific policies applied to a single alternative. The
policies addressed:
TABLE TI-4: GMA Policy Cate~ories
Urban Growth Areas
Rural Lands
Resource Lands
Critical Areas
Open Space
Water Quality and Quantity
Housing
Utilities
Capital Facilities
Transportation
Il-5 IMPACTS AND MITIGATION MEASURES
Growth causes numerous impacts on the environment. Potential impacts on the natural
environment include increased storm water runoff and air emissions as well as decreased or
altered habitat for fish and wildlife. Potential impacts on the built environment include
increased demands for housing, transportation and other capital facilities, and utilities.
Impact Analvses
Both GMA and SEP A require that the County analyze impacts associated with the proposed
comprehensive plan alternatives and provide information regarding those impacts. GMA
requires that the County collect and analyze data for resource lands, the mandatory plan
elements, and urban growth areas. It also requires the County to review drainage, flooding,
and stormwater runoff through the land use element. SEP A requires that the County analyze
impacts to both the natural and built environments. Discussion ofthis is to be found in the
Comprehensive Plan Environmental Impact Statement.
Page II. 13
Mason County Comprehensive Ph,
August . 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Goals
Mitigation Measures
GMA was adopted in large part to reduce a number of growth related impacts on the natural
and built environment. SEP A describes these various ways of reducing growth related
impacts as mitigation. There are a number of ways in which fulfilling GMA' s requirements
will assist Mason County in identifYing mitigation measures, and in some cases, serve as
mitigation. Discussion of this is to be found in the Comprehensive Plan Environmental
Impact Statement.
Public Process
In preparation for this comprehensive plan, Mason County used a three-step public process
to review impacts and mitigation associated with the County's comprehensive plan. The steps
included the following:
1.
An Ad Hoc Committee to review and guide revisions to preliminary drafts of the
County's draft Plan/EIS and preparation of the Final EIS
2.
Public comment received in response to issuance ofthe County's draft
Plan/EIS; and
3.
Public input received at public meetings and hearings on the draft
Plan/EIS.
Page II.l4
Mason County Comprehensive rtan- August. 1998
(Revised May 20001
Planning Policies
CHAPTER III
Planning Policies
INTRODUCTION
The planning policies herein are intended to guide capital investment and land use
decisions in implementing the Future Land Use Plan of Mason Comity. At the end of
some of the policy sections, the policies contained in applicable Subarea plans have also
been included. For those subarea plans which have been adopted by the county, this plan
will replace those plans. For Harstine Island, this plan has some planning policies
intended to apply only to that area. Where a general policy and a subarea policy conflict,
the more restrictive policy will apply; and where they are equally restrictive, the more
specific policy will apply. The original numbering scheme used in the individual Subarea
plans has been maintained to allow easy reference to the location in the document where
the policy originally appeared.
In addition to the planning policies contained in this chapter, there are planning policies
for transportation and capital facilities in those respective chapters.
111-1 GENERAL LAND USE
Goal: Assure compliance with the Growth Management Act, the County-Wide Planning
Policies, the Comprehensive plan and Land Use Map in all adopted land use, environmental
and development regulations and subsequent land use decisions and approvals.
GLU 1:
Ensure opportunities for continuous public participation into decision making
on the Comprehensive Planning process and implementation of the Plan.
Acknowledge and protect the rights of private property owners when doing
GLU 2:
comprehensive planning and implementation; prohibit arbitrary and discriminatory actions and
preserve reasonable uses for properties which fall under the regulations.
GLU 3:
Review and amend the Comprehensive Plan on a minimum of once every five
years, and if needed on an annual basis, consistent with the requirements of the GMA.
Revisions to the Land Use Map and/or implementing regulations shall be in compliance with
the Comprehensive Plan policies and criteria.
GLU 4:
Designate Belfair and Allyn as UGA's in recognition of their progression
towards urban level sewer and water services. Progress towards water and sewer provision
should be revisited through a Comprehensive Plan review conducted one year from the
passage ofthis update.
III-1.1
Mason County Comprehensive rum- August. 1998
(Revised Mczy 2000)
Planning Policies .
GL U 5:
Establish a process by which the Comprehensive Plan and Land Use Map may
be amended in accordance with RCW 36.70A.
5: 1 Designate four categories of Comprehensive Plan amendments to be considered during
the annual review of the Comprehensive Plan: Policy Amendments, Map Amendments,
General Amendments, Site Specific Amendments (i.e. LAMIRDS).
5:2 Allow submission of requests to the County for map amendments related to: errors in
mapping rural densities, uses; errors in mapping boundaries of UGA's, RAC's, Hamlets;
errors in mapping other LAMIRDS~ errors in interpretation of criteria for land use
designations.
5:3 Mapping errors that are clearly erroneous based on inaccurate information or technical
error may be corrected at the discretion of the Board of County Commissioners within 180
days of passage of this update. Map corrections of this nature shall not require a
Comprehensive Plan amendment. After the 180 days, mapping errors will be processed as
part of the annual comprehensive plan amendment cycle.
GLU 6:
Establish a land use system, which recognizes and designates urban and rural
areas in the following ways:
URBAN GROWTH AREAS
City of Shelton
Belfair
Allyn
Fully Contained Community
RURAL LANDS
Limited Areas ofMore Intensive Rural Development (LAMIRDS)
Rural Activity Centers (RAC)
Hamlets (HAMLET)
Isolated areas of Commercial/Industrial Uses (IACI)
Isolated areas ofRecreational/Tourist Uses (IART)
Rural Areas
RESOURCE AREAS
Long Term Commercial Forest Lands
Long Term Commercial Agriculture Lands
Mineral Lands, which are mapped as overlay areas.
GLU 6a:
Allow for urban population to be allocated to a Fully Contained Community
which would meet the requirements ofRCW 36.70A.350.
GLU 7:
Designate urban growth areas based on the following criteria:
the area has environmentally appropriate land capacity for and is willing to accommodate
urban growth as agreed upon in the Comprehensive Plan, and the area has existing urban
IIJ-1.2
Mason County Comprehensive rtan- August. 1998
(Revised Mrzy 2000!
Planning Policies
residential development at urban densities (minimum 4du/acre) and a variety of other uses
(e.g. commercial, industrial, public, institutional etc.) that are found in urban areas; or the area
has both urban and non-rural densities (1-3 du/acre) and uses (such as some commercial,
industrial, institutional, public) and the capacity and desire to allow in:fill at urban densities
with urban uses.
GLU 7a : Allow for the development of a Fully Contained Community when
a)
the area will be developed as a cohesive community through a master planning
process and a comprehensive plan amendment such as a fully contained community; and
b)
the area has or will have by the time of occupancy (a) public water system( s) and (b)
a public sewer system capable of expanding to meet growth consistent with the
Comprehensive Plan, and consistent with RCW 36.70A.070(3); and
c)
the area has an existing sense of place and community identity; and
d)
the area can provide open space and greenbelt lands to serve as recreational areas and
use as urban separators; and
e)
the area is served by or can be served by a multimodal transportation system and·
adopts methods to provide multimodal facilities.
GLU 7b: Review the Rural Activity Center designations yearly to determine if any are
candidates for a new UGA designation, based on the criteria in GLU 7. It is not intended that
the Taylor Town Rural Activity Center be reviewed or considered for designation as an urban
growth area during this planning period (ending 2014).
GLU 7c: Locate urban growth in designated cities, unincorporated UGA's or in designated
new fully contained communities.
GLU 8:
Ensure that development within UGA's promotes compact, and
efficient land use patterns and reduces the inappropriate conversion of undeveloped land into
sprawling, low density development. (Formerly U-100)
GLU 9:
Ensure that urban growth areas are sized to accommodate new urban
growth through the year 2014, recognizing the limited development potential of
environmentally sensitive areas, a market factor, and space for utilities and facilities.
GLU 10:
Ensure that urban growth areas accommodate urban uses such as residential
commercial, institutional, religious, industrial, public facilities, utilities, recreational facilities,
open spaces and greenbelts and combinations of the above.
GLU 11:
Ensure urban residential densities of at least 4 dwelling units per net acre in
UGA's, and provide for both single and multiple family dwellings, which are served by a
combination of both existing public facilities and services and any additional needed public
facilities and services provided by either public or private sources, with municipal utilities as
the preferred service providers within municipal boundaries.
GLU 12:
Ensure commercial uses in urban growth areas that serve a regional market
as well as citizens of the UGA' s, and include retail, service, financial, and institutional uses
II1-1.3
Mason County Comprehensive rtan- August. 1998
(Revised May 2(}()())
Planning Policies
of a small, medium and large size.
GLU 13:
Ensure industrial uses are allowed in UGA' s varying in size from small to
larger, located in appropriate areas, which can accommodate parking, loading, storage, and
disposition ofby products.
GLU 14:
Ensure that urban areas have urban services such as public sewer and water
systems, stonn water management systems, streets and utilities, capable of servicing the land
uses located there. If the unincorporated UGA has sewer service, as a passage of this plan,
existing urban sized legally platted lots may develop consistent with regulations. If the UGA
is presently without sewers as of passage of the plan, existing legally platted lots may develop
consistent with County Health Department regulations for on-site septic services, provided
that enviromnental degradation is avoided and urban densities may be achieved in the future
as evidenced in platting, site design, conditions on the plat, and no-contest agreements to the
extension of sewer.
GLU 15:
Promote development, which supports multimodal forms oftransportation and
encourages pedestrian activities.
GLU 16:
Allow for a fully contained community, which meets the criteria in Policy GLU
7 and other applicable regulations.
GLU 17:
Designate Limited Areas of More Intensive Rural Development with
established development patterns that meet the guidelines and criteria ofRCW 36.70A.070
(5)(d). These include:
•
Mixed use communities with a broad mix of densities and uses, including residential,
commercial, industrial and sometimes public uses, called Rural Activity Centers.
(RAC) These include Union, Hoodsport and Taylor Town.
•
Very small clusters of limited industrial uses and/or commercial services and a few
residences, which provide for limited convenience shopping and serve the immediate
needs for rural and remote residents. These areas, called Hamlets (H), include
Bayshore, Dayton, Deer Creek, Eldon, Grapeview, Lake Cushman, Lilliwaup,
Matlock, Potlatch, Spencer Lake, and Tahuya ..
•
Existing rural industrial/commercial uses and tourism/recreational uses that are
dispersed throughout Mason County and occur on isolated sites devoted to a
relatively small-scale commercial/industrial/recreation/tourism use. These are called
Isolated Commercial/Industrial Areas (!CIA) and Isolated Recreation/Tourism Areas.
(IRTA)
NOTE: Mason County also acknowledges that the Commercial/Industrial/Recreation/Tourist
area ofKamilche and the Skokomish 101 North Corridor exist and serve a broad population
benefiting the entire county, even though they are not regulated by this plan because they are
located on Tribal Lands.
II1-1.4
Mason County Comprehensive nan- August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
GLU 18:
Adopt boundaries and other measures needed to contain these LAMIRDS,
ensuring that uses shall not extend beyond the logical outer boundaries of the area.
Boundaries are delineated predominately by the built environment as of July 1, 1990, and
recognize existing neighborhoods, critical areas, roads and other natural boundaries. Limited
population allocations are made to LAMIRDS, recognizing the constraints on their
development potential in RCW 365.70A.070 (5)(d) and in the GMHB order of Jan. 14,1999.
Infill development is permitted in these areas, provided that such development does not
contribute to a pattern of sprawl.
GLU 19:
Ensure that RAC's continue as Limited Areas of More Intense Rural
Development, with little or no residential growth directed towards them, but with existing
uses within the boundaries considered conforming and new developments allowed when
fitting rural standards. New development should concentrate on limited small-scale
commercial/industrial that serves the needs of the RAC residents, traveling public, and
surrounding remote area residents. Residential development shall be limited in RAC's.
GLU 20:
Allocate limited population growth figures for the planning cycle of2014 to
RAC' s: Hoodsport: keep recognizing the very limited availability of land that is not
environmentally constrained, boundaries of the built environment. Taylor Town: 0 new
people, emphasizing the use of this land for limited commercial and industrial development.
Union: keep recognizing the limited availability of land within the boundaries ofthe RAC,
and its environmental constraints.
III-1.5
Mason CounfJ' Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
III-2 URBAN GROWTH AREAS
General Policies
U-101 Exterior lighting on new development should be shielded or obscured to prevent
excessive glare on public streets or walkways, or in adjacent residential areas.
U-102 New development should provide adequate parking and space for loading and
unloading of persons, materials and goods.
U-1 03 New development should provide adequate access for emergency vehicles.
U-104 A variety ofuses and densities should be encouraged within the Urban Growth Areas
(UGAs).
U-1 05 Development in UGAs should support multi-modal forms of transportation and
encourage pedestrian activities.
U-106 Shoreline development in UGAs should include a variety ofwater dependent, water
related, and recreational uses.
U-1 07 New Development within the UGAs should occur in areas where public facilities and
services are already available, or are planned.
U-1 08 Urban Growth Boundaries should provide a sufficient amount of developable land to
minimize negative impacts on land and housing costs within the UGAs.
Shelton
U-150 The following definitions are intended to apply only to the City of Shelton urban
growth area:
A.
"City" means the City of Shelton
B.
"County" means County ofMason
C.
"Urban Growth Area (UGA)" means the area described in this Comprehensive Plan
adjacent to the City of Shelton
D.
"Subdivisions"means short plats, long plats, and large lot subdivisions as regulated
by Title 16 of Mason County Code
E.
"Urban density" means no less than 3 dwelling units per net acre
F.
"Urban services" or "urban type services" means City water service, City sewer
service, public streets and roads.
Page III-2.1
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
U-151 The following development policies are intended to apply only within the City of
Shelton urban growth area:
A.
Land Use Policies
Al.
Provide for appropriate and desired land use patterns as growth occurs.
Policies
Ala. Growth should be guided toward the creation of compact, efficient patterns of land
use and the reduction of sprawl;
Urban development in the Shelton area should be directed into areas already
characterized by urban type growth or adjacent to such areas as defined by the designation
ofthe Shelton Urban Growth boundary.
No development should be allowed that results in a reduction of adopted levels of
service. Rural and urban levels of service shall be adopted for the Urban Growth Area. The
LOS applied shall be consistent with the type of service available.
Alb. Consistent and compatible land use patterns should be established within the UGA
through a cooperative planning process between the City and County. Consistency should
be based on joint agreement, review of the Future Land Use Map, and review of the
description of land uses within each depicted land use area provided in the Shelton
Comprehensive Plan. In order to establish and maintain such land use patterns, the County
shall adopt land use controls for that area. The County shall work with the City so that these
land use controls are maintained in general consistency with City's Future Land Use Map and
land use controls.
A2.
Land use patterns should be established that are consistent with eventual provision of
urban type services.
Policies
A2a. Subdivision ofland shall facilitate current or eventual residential development at urban
densities.
A2b. In areas within the Urban Growth Area, where public sewer and water are not
available, subdivisions must be designed to allow more intensive development when such
services become available. This can be accomplished on one ofthe following two ways:
Alternative #1
Page III-2.2
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 2000!
Planning Policies
Before annexation or before urban services are otherwise available at a property, subdivision
shall be to urban densities. However, development may be allowed wherein non-urban
services are provided on several lots in support of development on others.
Alternative #2
Before annexation or before urban services are otherwise available on a property, subdivision
of the property may provide for a number oflots meeting the definition of urban density while
the remainder of the property is maint~ined as a single large lot. The large lot portion may
be used to site non-urban type services such as wells and septic systems to serve development
on the smaller, urban size, lots. Eventual provision of urban services to such properties shall
be as per policy B. below.
A2c. Specific improvements bringing properties subdivided in one of the ways discussed
above to city standards may be deferred until City services are provided. This deferment will
only be granted if, as a condition of approval of such subdivisions, an obligation to bring the
property to specified city standard at that time is provided as an attachment to title.
A3.
Whether roads provided in new subdivisions are public or private, the layout of the
roadways should support the modified grid street pattern of the City of Shelton. Use of cuide-sacs should be minimized.
A4.
When water or sewer lines are installed for use prior to connection to city utilities, the
lines should be sized to meet the future system requirements and standards.
B.
The county supports the following Policies for extension of City utilities to areas
within the UGA:
B 1.
City Utilities may be extended to properties within the UGA either upon annexation
or through the creation of a Utility Extension Agreement with the owners of properties not
annexed.
B2.
No utility extension will be permitted to any unannexed property within the UGA
unless a Utility Extension Agreement is signed between the owner of the subject property and
the City of Shelton. The Agreement shall provide for the following;
B2a. Utility Extension Agreements will be an instrument recorded against the title of the
property and the responsibilities therein shall transfer to successors in ownership of all or part
ofthe property.
Page III-2.3
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
B2b. Extension and hook up must not result in lowering of service delivery below adopted
City LOS standards. Hook ups outside of the City shall not be permitted until such standards
are adopted.
B2c. Sewer extensions will not be allowed without demonstration that equivalent I&I will
be removed from the system or a contribution to a sewer system I&I mitigation fund is made.
B2d. Water hook-up will not be allowed until a contribution to a source development fund
is made by property owner/developer.
B2e, Extensions will not be permitted unless agreement 1s made to pay a system
development charge as identified by the City in a rate study.
B2f. All costs for utility system extension, steps necessary to maintain LOS, sewer system
I&I removal fund contributions, water source development fund contributions and system
development charges shall be born by the property owner served.
B2g. All served property must have a commitment to annex when contiguous and requested
by City placed on title.
B2h. All utility users shall be subject to rates and surcharges as established by the City of
Shelton.
B2i.
In the event that a Utility Extension Agreement is made in an area that is served by
a State Department of Health approved water system, that system may continue to be
operated by the present owners or their satellite management agency. Fire flow, service line
size, and main size will remain until State DOH requires an upgrade for a green operating
permit.
B3.
In addition to all conditions listed in section B2(a-I) above, the following must be
provided in Utility Extension Agreements reached to extend City services to new
development not vested by virtue of a complete development application before signature of
this Joint Planning Agreement;
B3a. City owned utilities will only be extended to land uses consistent with the City's
Comprehensive Plan Future Land Use Map as determined by the City.
B3b. City owned utilities will only be extended to development meeting city development
standards.
Page III-2.4
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
B3c. When extended to residential development, city owned utilities will only be extended
to development that meets the definition of urban densities as per Joint Planning Agreement
and is consistent with the policies for subdivision of land therein.
B3 d. Storm water systems shall be designed and constructed in compliance with the
requirements of the Washington State Department ofEcology's Storm water Management
Manual for the Puget Sound Basin and all adopted storm water master plans or storm water
ordinances and basin plans. Those properties designated by these plans as draining to City
of Shelton owned and maintained facilities shall be included in the City Storm Water Utility
Program.
C.
Policies for Transportation
C 1.
Assure that roads and streets provided to development facilitate urban-type densities
Policies
C 1a. Subdivisions shall provide for current or eventual streets on a grid or modified grid
pattern providing access to property, and to adjacent properties where appropriate, consistent
with urban densities as provided in policy A2a.
D.
Policies on standards for new development.
D 1.
Assure that new on-site development occurs to standards that do not result in future
inconsistencies with City standards.
Policies
D 1a. On site development standards for sidewalks, landscaping, signage, not otherwise
deferred as per section A2b, shall be consistent with City standards.
E.
Policies on Annexation
E 1.
To minimize inefficient provision of essential urban services, annexation within the
UGA shall be facilitated whenever desired by property owners, or when necessary for efficient
service prov1s1on.
Policies
E 1a.
Annexation of unincorporated islands as they occur shall be encouraged.
Page III-2.5
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 2()()())
Planning Policies
E2.
The jurisdictions will discuss formulas and methods for amortization of sales tax
benefit lost by the County after annexation.
E3.
The jurisdictions will discuss fonnulas and methods for amortization of County owned
capital facilities transferred to the City as a result of annexation.
F.
Policies on Joint Planning
Jurisdiction for areas within the Urban Growth Area shall rest with Mason County until
annexation. The County shall provide for joint planning and review of development
proposals according to the following policies;
F 1.
The County and the City shall each notify the other of any discretionary land use
permit or development proposal within the Urban Growth Area or within 1000 feet of the
UGA boundary. Such notification shall be adequate to provide opportunity to review and
comment on such applications prior to action designated body. of jurisdiction.
F2.
All threshold detenninations pursuant to the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA)
issued by the County for proposals within the UGA or within 1000 feet of the UGA, will be
provided to the City. All such threshold determinations issued by the City for projects or
areas within 1000 feet of the City boundary shall be provided to the County. Such notice
shall be adequate to provide County staff with opportunity to review and comment on such
actions prior to expiration of comment periods.
F3.
The County and City shall each take due heed of comments offered by the other
regarding any application for discretionary land use permits being processed by the other.
Each jurisdiction shall have formal standing for appeal of decisions made by the other on such
matters.
Belfair
BUGA 1
Adopt the Belfair Village Plan 1999 by reference into this Plan.
Urban Growth Area Boundary Policies
BUGA 2
Establish boundaries for the Belfair UGA which accommodate the projected
urban population for the year 2014 and provide:
•
Sufficient land to accommodate housing needs for single family, multifamily and
mixed use development
•
Sufficient land to accommodate utilities, facilities and transportation infrastructure for
an urban area
•
Sufficient land for institutional uses
Page III-2.6
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
•
•
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
Sufficient land to provide supporting commercial and industrial services for the
present and projected population, regional population and traveling public
Sufficient and well-located land to capitalize on the industrial potential within the
area: regional roads, active rail lines, proximity to Kitsap County and the Puget Sound
area,
Sufficient land for a market factor.
U-200 The Urban Growth Boundary for the community of Belfair should be of sufficient size
to accommodate growth which is 25% greater than projected.
U-201 The Urban Growth Boundary should reflect the abilities of service purveyors to
provide urban levels of facilities and services during the 20-year planning period.
BUGA 3
Protect the environmentally sensitive areas of Theler Wetlands, the Union
River Valley, and the steep slopes east of SR 3 from detrimental development pressures and
impacts by the designation of major portions of the valley as rural, by encouraging clustering
of development on the flatter and more stable portions of the steep slopes, and by
consideration of either rural designations or additional development standards for
development adjacent to the Theler Wetlands.
BUGA 4
Ensure the development of an integrated, planned community where people
will be able to work and live, by permitting residential and compatible business uses to
develop in close proximity to each other, with strong functional and aesthetic links, through
the implementation of strict performance standards.
U-205 Mason County should plan for a variety of uses in the Belfair UGA, including
residential, open space, public facilities, cultural facilities, and commercial, retail and industrial
uses.
U-206 Mason County should minimize land use conflicts in the Belfair UGA through the use
of appropriate buffering and performance standards, and ensure compatibility among
residential, commercial, and industrial land uses.
Capital Facility Policies
U-202 The County should define the levels of service necessary to support urban levels of
development in the UGA.
BUGA 5
Assure the orderly transition from rural to urban uses for Belfair by :
•
Phasing sewer provision,
•
Allowing urban development based on sewer provision
Page III-2.7
Mason Counry Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
"
..
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
Allowing appropriate transitional development in areas where sewers will be
provided,
Allowing rural densities and development in areas which cannot meet 'transitional
development standards.
BUGA 5a
In areas within the Urban Growth Area, where public sewer and water are not
available, subdivisions must be designed to allow more intensive development when such
services become available. This can be accomplished in one of the following two ways:
Alternative # 1
Before urban services are available at a property, subdivision shall be to urban densities.
However, development may be allowed wherein non-urban services are provided on several
lots in support of development on others.
Alternative #2
Before urban services are otherwise available on a property, subdivision of the property may
provide for a number of lots meeting the definition of urban density while the remainder of
the property is maintained as a single large lot. The large lot portion may be used to site nonurban type services such as wells and septic systems to serve development on the smaller,
urban size, lots. Provisions shall be made for the future urban services to such properties as
provided below.
BUGA Sal
Development shall facilitate the achievement of future urban needs for the
area, such as for proper street system, utilities, services and orderly platting, so that desirable
future urban development is not precluded by uncoordinated development. Development
regulations shall specify when improvements are required at the time of subdivision, when the
improvements are required to be obligated at time of subdivision, and/or when provisions for
future improvements are required at time of subdivision. Approval shall require a waiver of
protest to the future formation of a utility local improvement district for the purpose of
constructing sewer mains to serve the area in which the property is located.
BUGA 5a2
When water or sewer lines are installed for use prior to connection to public
utilities, the lines should be sized to meet the future system requirements and standards.
BUGA 5b
All lots developed for any uses in the Phase 1 sewer service area prior to the
availability of public sewer may be required to install side sewer pipelines, if the approved
waste water treatment plan or design determines that it is appropriate, in order to provide for
future connection of all such structures to the public sewerage system when it becomes
available. All lots developed for any uses outside of the Phase 1 area shall be required to
connect to the public sewer system when it becomes available as a condition of approval,
except for single family residences.
Page III-2.8
Mason Countjl Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 20001
Planning Policies
U-203 Urban services and facilities within the Belfair UGA that are required to meet the
needs of new development should be planning to be available within six years of the
completion of development to meet the levels of services established for such services and
facilities.
BUGA 6
Designate a Phase I sewer provision area that includes the downtown core of
Belfair. This area is where sewer should be provided to first. Encourage urban development
of mixed uses to locate there, based on provision of services, good site design and adequate
transportation facilities.
BUGA 7
Designate a Phase 2 sewer provisions area located outside the downtown core
of Belfair. This area is intended to be provided with sewer service after Phase 1 is serviced.
U-204 Facilities and services in the Belfair UGA should be sufficient to accommodate
seasonal increases in population.
BUGA 8
In the interim, before sewer is provided, allow mixed-use urban-level
development to proceed if the proposal can demonstrate it can meet the following criteria:
•
It complies with the applicable health regulations and other Mason County building
regulations; e.g. critical areas, storm water management, etc.
•
It provides a binding site plan which shows how the current proposal will be
accommodated and how the remainder of the site will accommodate and not preclude
urban services and densities.
•
Sewer pipelines appropriately designed for future connection to the community sewer
system will be installed from the plumbed structure to the lot line.
•
A waiver of protest is given to the future formation of a utility local improvement
district for the purpose of constructing sewer mains to serve the area.
•
A binding site plan is prepared for the development.
BUGA 9
The binding site plan for development in areas not yet served by sewer should
also show how the development would address the following:
•
Buffers
•
Landscaping
•
Traffic access and parking standards
•
Height and scale in relation to surrounding uses and future uses
•
Vegetation removal
"
Storm water
"
Lot coverage
•
Compatibility with surrounding existing and future uses
Residential Policies
Page III-2.9
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
U-300 Residential development within the Belfair Urban Growth Area should encourage and
promote a wide range of housing types, densities and mixtures.
U-301 The Belfair Urban Growth Area should encourage and support a wide range of
housing opportunities for special populations including: independent living; assisted living;
and congregate care facilities as single uses or within mixed-use developments.
U-302 Residential densities should be based on neighborhood character and the community's
ability to provide the required public facilities and services.
U-303 Redevelopment to higher densities in underdeveloped areas should be determined by
compatibility with surrounding uses, adequacy of public facilities and services, parking and
neighborhood character.
U-304 Infill development should be consistent with the character of established
neighborhoods, and incorporate some of the distinguishing design features of those
neighborhoods.
U-305 Residential development should include open spaces, green belts and wildlife
corridors.
U-306 A network of pedestrian and bicycle paths should link neighborhoods to one another
and facilities such as parks, schools, transit systems, business and retail areas.
U-307 New and revitalized neighborhoods should incorporate centrally located, limited-use
retail development which is compatible with the neighborhood. These uses may include small
grocery stores, laundromats, personal services, service stations, diners and coffee shops.
U-308 New and redeveloped neighborhoods should include a multiple use open space to
promote pedestrian activity and help establish a sense of neighborhood pride and identity.
U-309 New residential development shall be reasonably accessible to public transportation.
New subdivisions should incorporate transit facilities into their site designs.
U-3 10 Residential development should occur within the confines of both the natural and built
environments.
U-311 A wide range of affordable housing should be made available through the use of
innovative land use techniques such as mixed-use, planned unit development, infill housing
incentives, density bonuses, etc.
U-312 Existing housing stock should be preserved.
Page III-2.10
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
U-313 Affordable housing should be convenient to public transportation, employment
centers, and public services.
U-314 New residential development should, where possible, give preference to "grid" street
patterns.
U-315 The use of upper story apartments shall be encouraged as a housing option in
downtown buildings.
U-316 New residential development should set aside land for parks and open space.
Commercial Policies
U-400 Commercial development should be accessible to all modes oftransportation, and all
segments of the population.
U-40 1 Commercial zones should be established to meet the needs of the surrounding
community or neighborhood.
U-402 Commercial uses should include retail sales, personal and professional services,
professional offices, theaters, cultural uses, recreation, small appliance repair and similar uses,
home occupations, and public meeting places.
U-403 New or redeveloped retail uses should provide ground floor, street :front space for
retail activity.
U-404 Commercial uses in mixed-use developments should be located and designed to
preserve quiet and privacy for residents.
U-405 Redevelopment ofunderdeveloped commercial areas should be encouraged.
U-406 Development and redevelopment should address surrounding uses, adequacy of public
facilities and services, parking, signage, design and neighborhood characteristics.
U-407 Site development standards should guide siting of new development within the Urban
Growth Area.
U-408 Mature vegetation should retained in new development, infill, and redevelopment
areas.
U-409 Landscaping in cotmnercial areas are encouraged to make use of native plants and
vegetation.
Page III-2.11
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
Industrial Development
U-501 Industrial uses should be buffered against incompatible uses to minimize hazards to
and nuisance from surrounding land use.
U-500 Appropriate areas should be identified for industrial or mixed use development within
the Belfair urban growth area. Appropriate areas may include those already characterized by
this type of development; where infrastructure exists, is planned, or will be provided by the
developer; where off-site impacts, such as transportation, can be effectively managed; where
services needed by the activities already exist or can be easily and economically provided; and
away from environmentally sensitive areas, which may have detrimental effects on public
health, safety, the environment, and the fiscal integrity of the area.
U-502 Industrial development should use best management practices to comply with
enviromnental regulations and to minimize negative environmental impacts.
Open Space and Recreation
U-600 Potential sites for open spaces and parks within the Urban Growth Areas should be
identified and prioritized. Where possible, these areas should be acquired either through
purchase or land donations according to the availability of funds and the priority site.
U-601 The Belfair UGA should provide a variety of open spaces ranging from protected
critical areas to developed multi-use parks.
U-602 A network of open spaces or greenbelts should link existing and new developments.
U-603 Community residents should participate in development of parks and open spaces.
U-604 Open spaces, neighborhood parks and recreation facilities should be located within
the UGA.
Be((air Village Planning E(fort
The citizens of Belfair have been working for over five years on a plan for their area. The
Belfair Planning Group was formed to assist county officials understand ideas and issues
about designating Belfair as a Growth Area. The group was selected to represent a diversity
of community views, and was assisted by Professor Richard U ntermann of the University of
Washington. The group accepted that for Mason County to remain rural, growth had to
occur around Belfair and other centers.
Page III-2.12
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
The group met for three long sessions, discussing the complexities of converting a strip center
that had grown somewhat haphazardly over the years, into a compact, denser village with
opportunity for employment, housing and character. Much time was spent discussing wetland
and water quality issues, with the remainder spent discussing the size of the Growth Area, the
type of community Belfair should become, and how to get there. The group produced a plan
for Belfair in 1996, much of which was incorporated in the Plan. Subsequently, the planning
group was expanded and additional work was done to produce additional detail about the
nature and form of the village. The Belfair Village Plan 1999 is the product of this work and
is hereby incorporated in this Plan in order to guide future regulation and development in
Belfair. The following is based on the work of that group and subsequent public workshops
and public hearings.
Belfair Growth Goals should include the folloWing:
1.
Become a compact, rural village, with a variety of housing and job opportunities,
including sufficient affordable housing to meet the county's growth goals;
Preserve and enhance the saltwater marshes and ensure wetland protection as Belfair
2.
grows;
3.
Strengthen Belfair's economic vitality.
These goals might be accomplished by~
A.
Protecting the marsh and wetlands. The center of the Belfair is dominated by the
famous and productive Theler Marsh and the scenic Union River Valley. Anticipated growth
must not damage or destroy these sensitive lands. Rather, growth should use the wetland
amenity and correct past errors and problems.
A.1
Consider defining the growth area so it can be economically sewered, to enhance
water quality.
A.2
Consider developing a range of densities within Belfair to protect the wetlands and
marshes, together with strict Perfonl).ance Standards for lands along the Theler Marsh (west
ofSR-3), and within the Union River Valley's 100 year flood plain. As part of the GMA, the
County should:
A. 2. a develop appropriate "runoff and sewer performance standards" to ensure new growth
doesn't pollute the wetlands;
A.2.b institute 'buffer zones options' between new development and wetlands or marshes;
A.2.c reduce the size and type of road and parking requirements;
Page III-2.13
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
A.2.d explore alternative sewer options to replace septic adjacent to marshes and wetlands.
A. 3
Insure reserve growth areas are available should the designated growth area cause
harm to the wetlands.
Feature the marsh in the area's economic development. Belfair's future economy
B.
seems wedded to tourism and moderate commercial and industrial expansion. Developing
Belfair into an attractive and fully functioning village could attract and support modest
industrial expansion, and capture more dollars from the thousands of tourists who visit the
marshes and wetlands.
B. I
Build on the 'Ecologic Destination' amenities in the area- the marshes, wetlands, state
parks, Hood Canal, DNR lands, etc., to attract and capture more tourists, and should include:
B .1. a clean up of some of the visual eyesores along the highway - the low density storage,
parking and low intensity auto dependent uses. Encourage the development of tourist
support services (hotel, picnic areas, parking, shops, etc.) Between SR-3 and the marsh;
B.l.b construction of sidewalks along SR-3, the village and recreation center to encourage
tourist and resident walking. Extend the marsh walk connecting the recreation center to the
village, complete with shelters, benches, interpretive signage, etc.
B. 1. c creation of an organization to foster tourist development on lands south of the village
(with State Tourist Office, Chamber, etc.).
C.
Create an old-fashioned "village" in Belfair at SR-3 intersection, reminiscent of small
towns like Sisters and Cannon Beach in Oregon, or LaConner and Leavenworth in
Washington, or Eureka and Pleasanton (a planned community) in California - all 'user
friendly' small towns.
C. I
Convert the Old Belfair Highway and portions of SR-3 to a main street, complete with
on-street parking and sidewalks, beginning at the "Y'' and extending north and south. Locate
new stores near the sidewalk, with parking at the rear or alongside buildings.
C.2
Concentrate commercial development.
Traditional villages have commercial
development concentrated within several blocks ofthe village center. Belfair's commercial
development extends along almost 3 miles of SR-3, producing a strip mall look and feel. No
businesses need relocate, however, future commercial development should be concentrated
within Yz mile of the village center.
D.
Ensure new housing and employment opportunities.
Page III-2.14
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised Mczy 20001
Planning Policies
D.l
Designate land as 'mixed use' for employment growth. This land would be master
planned when development was to occur and could include some higher density residential.
These lands include:
D.l.a land within 1;2 mile ofthe village and along SR-3 north ofthe village;
D.1.b. portions of Section 28 and 33 near the bypass;
D. 1. c land within the growth area, 10 acres or larger, with performance standards to protect
the wetlands and neighbors.
0.2
Encourage pockets of clustered or small lot housing to serve a variety of needs,
reminiscent of housing around small towns.
D.2.a Increase residential density near the village with small lot single family, duplexes and
small scale apartments to a maximum density of six (6) dwelling units per acre.
D.2.b Encourage housing east of the highway, edging up the hill, with small lot and clustered
single family or duplexes to a density of four (4) density units per acre. Housing on lands
steeper than 3 0% should be clustered on the leveler portions, to a maximum density of two
(2) density units per acre. Though housing is often forbidden from slopes, it is more typically
used when in close proximity to towns, villages and jobs.
E.
Implementation
E.1
Performance Standards. Mason County desires to direct growth and the quality of
community development with 'Performance Standards'. Performance Standards should be
developed for three broad categories of land use - residential, mixed use and conservation.
E.1.a Residential Perfonnance Standards would allow increased residential density as small
lot single family, duplexes or small scale apartments to a maximum density of six (6) dwelling
units per acre when within 1;2 mile of a full scale shopping and service, meeting buffer
Performance Standards to protect against pollution of the conservation lands.
E.l.b Housing within one (1) mile offull scale shopping services, small lot and clustered
single family or duplexes to a density of four (4) density units per acre. Housing on lands
steeper than 30% must be clustered on the leveler portions, to a maximum density of two (2)
density units per acre, meeting buffer Performance Standards to protect against pollution of
the conservation lands.
Page III-2.15
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 20001
Planning Policies
E. 1.c Mixed use lands would serve industrial, office park, commercial and housing.
Performance Standards would guide development toward 'Urban' practices, with reduced
parking requirements, narrower roads, buffers, etc.
E.l.d Conservation lands would be those between SR-3 and the Theler Marshes and could
be developed for tourist or residential uses with strict adherence to buffer Performance
Standards that protected the wetland or marshes.
E. 1. e Develop variable buffer widths for the residential and commercial uses that could be
reduced in width with upgrading of planting and runoff control for visual buffer, runoff buffer
and habitat buffers, each reduced by special planting, grading, fences, swales, etc.
F.
Sewers.
Lack of sewers has caused spotty, low intensity development, with limited employment
possibilities in Belfair. A compact growth area is designated to enhance the possibility that
it could all be sewered, thereby allowing room for development and protection of water
quality. Mason County should direct it's sewer consultant to explore innovative smaller scale
sewer treatment options that allow different densities of development.
G.
Streamline the permit process within Belfair's growth area by eliminating short plats
and fostering easy plating for traditional small lot blocks, clustering and PUDs.
Monitor development demand and designate lands north and south ofBelfair for future urban
growth should the current land not be sufficient. This approach acknowledges that having
too much land available for development causes sprawl.
H.
Spearhead new village transportation standards and improvements. These include
narrower and simpler road standards and reconstruction of the main streets, hopefully by the
Highway Department, complete with sidewalks and on-street parking. Find ways to improve
the transit system.
Allyn Subarea Planning Effort
The Allyn Subarea Plan Committee is a group of citizens who have been working for over a
year to develop a plan to be included as an amendment to the Mason County Comprehensive
Plan. In 1998, the committee proposed a vision statement for the subarea, boundaries for the
subarea, and goals and objectives to apply within the entire Allyn Subarea. The following
goals and objectives are intended to apply only within the Allyn Subarea.
Vision Statement for the Allyn Subarea
Page III-2.16
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
Allyn is a small community located in an area of great natural beauty. As the community
grows, we envision protection and preservation of its unique natural resources, including
North Bay, Sherwood Creek, the views and vistas of upland Allyn, and the forests and lakes
to the west.
The future Village of Allyn should provide an attractive, safe, child-friendly environment for
its growing local population, including adequate infrastructure, housing, shopping,
transportation, and recreation.
The Village should encourage development of facilities which will attract tourists. This will
leverage the natural beauty of Allyn and stimulate economic activity with dollars from outside
the area.
The Village should set aside appropriate areas for commercial and light industrial
development in order to provide family wage jobs for local residents and increase the tax
base.
Allyn Goal 1:
To protect and preserve natural beauty and resources including North Bay, Sherwood Creek,
the views and vistas of upland Allyn, and the forests and lakes to the west.
Pursue enforcement of existing State rules and regulations and County ordinances, and
creation of suitable new ordinances which preserve those natural resources that make Allyn
a community valued by its residents:
a)
Water quality; fresh, salt, and ground water
b)
Natural vegetation
c)
Views overlooking North Bay
1.
2.
Acquisition of small parcels of property, development rights, easements or density
credits to maintain natural resources, view areas, access points to the shore and pedestrian
walkways to meet goals in the plan.
Allyn Goal 2:
To provide an attractive, safe, child-friendly enviromnent for its growing local population.
Objectives:
1.
a)
Infrastructure
Provide adequate water system & fireflow.
Page III-2.17
Mason Counfj! Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
b)
Provide provisions and improvements to provide storm water control system and
continuing storm water control enforcement sufficient to avoid historic flooding within Allyn,
and avoid storm water based pollution.
c)
Secure traffic calming devices on SR 3 to reduce the disruption to Village life as fast
traffic cuts off the uphill development from the waterfront and businesses on the east side of
the highway.
d)
Support completion ofthe sewer system.
e)
Provide greater availability of public utilities and services such as telephone services.
f)
Consider establishment of a grade school within the Village.
g)
Develop appropriate lighting design guidelines to promote a comfortable village
atmosphere and enhance safety:
2.
Housing
a)
Promote a diverse population in Allyn by providing a mix of housing choices,
including homes for first time buyers, rental housing, and moderate income housing.
b)
Permit housing and retail in the same structures/location.
3.
Shopping
a)
Encourage the development of locally owned, distinctive retail businesses which are
compatible with the Village concept designed into a village square.
b)
Establish village design guidelines for new construction.
4.
Transportation
a)
Develop a road system in the proposed core business area (Wheelwright Road) with
open circulation to commercial and residential areas and adequate parking.
b)
Develop pedestrian ways to create a safe, pedestrian friendly community.
5.
Recreation
a)
Provide a Village recreation area including a ball field and a playground area for
young children
Allyn Goal3:
To develop facilities which will attract tourists and stimulate economic activity with dollars
from outside the area.
Objectives:
1.
Provide an extended, improved dock with facilities for boaters, including a pumping
station for holding tanks.
2.
Provide public walkways for access to the shoreline.
3.
Provide commercial lodging for visitors coming to the area for recreation.
Page III-2.18
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
4.
Establish a common theme for public signage identifYing historic areas, public
buildings, recreation facilities, and other buildings and facilities open to the public such as golf
courses, churches, parks, etc.
5.
Provide recommendations for signage for private business, with input from those
businesses, which will make Allyn an inviting place to stop and spend money.
6.
Preservation ofthe historic landmarks ofthe Allyn community, including:
a)
the historic St. Hugh's Church
b)
the Indian petroglyphs on the beach
c)
the Allyn School bell
d)
Drum Street, which leads to the Port dock.
7.
Incorporate a common public green space into the plan.
Allvn Goal 4:
To set aside appropriate areas for commercial and light industrial development to provide
family wage jobs for local residents and increase the tax base.
Objectives:
1.
Designation of area(s) for light manufacturing.
2.
Designation of area(s) for commercial development.
3.
Encourage provision of providing public utility services to these areas.
4.
Encourage development of aquaculture and other water based commerce.
Note: Objectives 1 and 2 would require additional information to determine what tax benefits
could/would accrue from various types of development , since Allyn has not incorporated.
Page III-2.19
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 2000!
Planning Policies
III-3 RURAL LANDS
LIMITED AREAS OF MORE INTENSIVE RURAL DEVELOPMENT
Rural Activity Centers
General Policies
RU-1 00
Designated Rural Activity Centers (RACs) should include: Hoodsport, Taylor
Town, and Union.
RU-101
Development in RACs should protect critical areas.
RU-1 02
Shoreline development in RACs should include a variety of water dependent,
water-related, and recreation uses.
· RU-103
Retail, commercial, and office buildings in RACs should be developed with
standards for building height, lot coverage and setbacks that implement the vision for that
particular RAC and are consistent with rural services and facilities.
RU-104
New residential platting (development) densities for new development in
RAC's should be no more than 1 dwelling unit for every/2.5 acres, and existing residential
development may rebuild and/or expand as long as it remains consistent with existing RAC
development, meets density requirements and does not require or expect urban services.
RU-105
Provide a variety of open spaces ranging from protected critical areas to
developed parks in rural activity centers.
RU-1 06
New development should be designed so that any additional traffic generated
does not have a significant adverse impact on surrounding development.
RU-107
New development should be served by adequate facilities for water supply,
wastewater disposal, electricity, and storm drainage.
RU-108
New development should provide adequate access for emergency vehicles.
RU-109
Proposed uses producing intense glare or heat should be conducted within an
enclosed building or effectively screened in such a manner as to make the glare or heat
imperceptible from any point along the property line.
Page III-3.1
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
RU-11 0
Exterior lighting on new development should be sufficiently shielded or
obscured in such a manner that excessive glare will be prevented on public streets or
walkways, or in adjacent residential areas.
RU-111
Features of new mixed use development, including buildings, circulation, open
space and landscaping, should be designed and arranged to maximize the opportunity for
privacy by residents.
RU-112
New development should provide adequate parking and space for the loading
and unloading of persons, materials and goods.
RU-113
New development should protect existing trees and shrubs, or provide new
landscaping in order to screen utility boxes, parking areas, loading areas, trash containers,
outside storage areas, and blank walls or fences from roadways, pedestrian areas and public
vtew.
RU-114
New development adjacent to existing or approved public parks or open space
areas should provide for access to these areas from the development.
RU-115
Buildings and other elements such as fences, signage, and parking facilities
should be designed and placed on the site so that they are consistent with established
neighborhood character.
RU-116
New development should adapt to the physical characteristics ofthe site and
mtmmtze disturbance of topography, water bodies, streams, wetlands, wildlife habitat,
vegetation and other natural features.
RU-117
Building design should be appropriate for the rural uses and activities intended
on the site and contribute positively to neighborhood character.
RU-118
New development should provide for the preservation and/or adaptive use of
historic or cultural resources.
RU-119
Setbacks for buildings and other site elements such as fences and parking
facilities should be consistent with setbacks established in the surrounding neighborhood.
Residential Policies
RU-120
Mason County should encourage and promote rural lot sizes in RAC's at a
density of 1 du/2.5 acres for new platting and development, and allow continued development
Page III-3.2
Mason County Comprehensive Pl(m- August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
for historically legally platted lots for single family uses, and small scale multifamily uses such
as accessory units, duplexes and triplexes when meeting all applicable regulations. This
approach will help provide affordable housing choices for all income levels.
RU-120a:
Recognize the economic development potential available in the location of
Taylor Town on SR 101, and limit its new RAC development to
commerciaVindustriaVtourism uses, capitalizing on its unique position as a gateway to Mason
County.
RU-122
Mason County should encourage new residential development to occur in
RACs where adequate facilities and services can be provided.
RU-123
New residential development in RACs should achieve an average density of
1 dwelling unit per acre. This average density may be achieved by a combination of single
family, small-scale multifamily and mixed-use developments on new plats of 1 dwelling unit
per 2.5 acres and historical existing lots ..
RU-124
New multifamily uses in RACs should be developed as mother-in-law units as
an accessory to a primary residences; accessory dwelling units, and small-scale multifamily
such as duplex and triplexes .
RU-126
A range of living environments should be provided for within RACs. This
includes housing for special populations, independent living, assisted living, and care facilities
as single uses or within mixed-use developments for no more than 8 clients per use.
RU-128
Group homes are allowed in RACs.
RU-130
Allow mixed use ofresidential and commercial uses within the same structure
or adjacent to each other in rural activity centers.
Non-Residential Policies
RU-140
Retail uses within RACs should provide for the everyday shopping and
personal services needs of local residents and residents of the surrounding Rural Area.
RU-141
Retail uses within RACs should provide for tourist services and attractions to
support Mason County's tourist industry.
RU-142
Allow commercial development in RACs. such as business and professional
services, light fabrication and assembly, tourism, institutional uses, and wholesale trade.
Page III-3.3
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
RU-144
(Revised May 2000!
Planning Policies
Mixed use residential and business uses should be encouraged within RACs.
RU-145
Commercial uses within commercial/residential mixed-use developments
should be located and designed to preserve quiet and privacy for residents.
RU-146
Allow redevelopment of under developed commercial areas within RAC's to
rural intensities considering such factors as surrounding uses, adequacy of public facilities,
services, and continued neighborhood economic and social vitality, consistent with RCW
36.70A.070(5) provisions for limited areas of more intensive rural development.
RU-147
Commercial or industrial development in portions ofthe RAC that directly
abut Rural Areas should be buffered to provide a transition to lower intensity rural uses.
RU-148
Resource-based and light industrial development within an RAC, when
allowed by the community plan, should be designed and operated to prevent leaking, spilling,
or draining of toxic materials into groundwater, streams, or other water bodies.
RU-149
All vehicle repair, painting and body work activities, including the storage of
refuse and vehicle parts, should be designed to take place within an enclosed and sightobscuring structure.
RU-150
Mason County should allow the development of high profile, commercial
recreation uses within RACs and evaluate them based on the proposed use, density/intensity
of proposed development, design and materials, vehicle access, water supply, wastewater
disposal, and storm water run-off/drainage.
RU -151
Existing industrial and commercial uses should be allowed to expand in Rural
Activity Centers, provided that: they do not require urban levels of government service, they
do not conflict with natural resource based uses, and they are compatible with surrounding
rural uses.
RU-152
Resource-basedindustrial and commercial uses should be allowed to locate
or expand in Rural Activity Centers, provided that: they meet the criteria for rural uses, they
do not require urban levels of service, they do not conflict with natural resource based uses,
and they are compatible with surrounding rural uses, and their expansion does not occur
outside the boundary ofthe rural activity center, consistent with RCW 36.70A070 (5) limited
areas of more intensive rural development.
Hamlets
Page III-3.4
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
RU-200
Designated Hamlets should include Bayshore, Dayton, Deer Creek, Eldon,
Grapeview, Lake Cushman, Lilliwaup, Matlock, Potlatch, Spencer Lake, and Tahuya.
RU-201
Hamlets should provide community identity and serve as community centers
for surrounding rural residents.
Establish boundaries around Hamlets that reflect the built enviromnent as of
RU-201a
July 1, 1990, reflect natural neighborhoods, recognize roads, rivers and other natural
boundaries, and prevent low density sprawl,
RU-202
Hamlets may provide additional compact and small scale civic and retail uses
to meet the convenience needs of surrounding rural residents and tourists. Uses that should
be allowed in Hamlets include gas stations, schools, post offices, grocery stores, lodging,
restaurants, and community centers or meeting halls.
RU-203
Public services and public facilities shall be limited to those necessary to serve
the non-residential uses and shall be provided in a manner that does not permit low-density
sprawl.
RU-204
Commercial uses allowed within Hamlets and evaluate them based on the
proposed use, density/intensity of proposed development, design and materials, vehicle
access, water supply, wastewater disposal, and storm water run-off/drainage.
RU-205
Rural Area.
The residential policies for the Hamlets shall be the same policies as for the
RU-206
Allow existing industrial and commercial uses to expand in Hamlets, provided
that: they do not require urban levels of service, they do not conflict with natural resource
based uses, they are compatible with surrounding rural uses, they do not induce low-density
sprawl, they stay within the boundaries of the Hamlet; and they meet the requirements of rural
cmmnercial/industrial uses in policies RU 146, 151, 152, and 201a.
RU-207
Allow location or expansion of resource based industrial, commercial uses and/
or recreational/tourist uses and small scale businesses in Hamlets provided that: they do not
require urban levels of govermnent service, any public services or facilities provided for the
development are limited to that necessary for the development, they do not permit or induce
low-density sprawl, they are compatible with surrounding rural uses, and they stay within the
boundaries of the Hamlet.
Isolated Commercial/Industrial Uses
Page III-3.5
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
RU-21 0
Create a land use designation that identifies Isolated Rural
Commercial/Industrial uses and designate based on the following criteria:
commercial/industrial stand-alone uses or a small group of associated uses, limited
area/limited ownerships per business, only residential uses on premises are associated with
private residences of owners/managers, do not require urban services, will not induce urban
growth, boundaries can contain uses to reduce the potential for sprawl, have been in existence
in since July 1, 1990, and are located at least one mile from an already existing similar
designated use.
RU-211
Designate Isolated Rural Commercial/Industrial Uses on the Comprehensive
Plan Land Use map, with types of uses allowed and boundaries of those uses based on the
following criteria: the need to preserve the character of existing natural neighborhoods and
communities, physical boundaries such as bodies of water, streets, and highways, and land
fonns and contours, the prevention of abnormally irregular boundaries, the ability to provide
public facilities and public services in a manner that does not permit low-density sprawl, and
the boundaries are based on the built environment of this use/area as it existed on July 1,
1990, Examples include: Bucks Prairie, Bear Creek, Benson/Woodland market, Dalby, Eldon,
Happy Hollow, Lake Cushman, Lake Limerick, Park Place, Purdy Canyon, Nahwatzel,
Stretch Island Fruit, Sunset Beach, and the Union Gas Station.
RU-211a
Isolated Rural/Commercial/Industrial Uses and Tourist/Recreational Uses not
mapped during this Comprehensive Plan amendment, may request such mapping within 180
days of the passage of this amendment, or subsequently as part of the annual amendment
process.
RU-213
Establish a process for reviewing requests for LAMIRD boundary and use
designation for isolated commercial/industrial uses (non-resource related) that includes the
following criteria:
a) Boundary should not exceed acreage of built environment as it existed on July 1,1990
unless: Such boundaries would split property ownership.
b) The request fits with industrial/commercial needs established in an adopted industrial needs
study or an adopted economic development plan for the County.
c) Additional acreage requested is less than a 10% increase over the July 1, 1990 boundary
acreage.
d) New boundary and/or use would not be incompatible with existing rural uses.
e) New boundary and /or use would not jeopardize open spl;lce and recreational areas
identified in the County's open space plan.
f) New boundary and/or use can meet critical areas ordinances and other applicable
environment protection regulations.
Page III-3.6
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 20001
Planning Policies
g) New boundary and/or use will not require urban services or act as an inducer to low
density sprawl development.
h) New boundary and/or use will not require additional transportation facilities or reduce
existing transportation facilities below an accepted level of rural service.
i) New boundary and/or use can be made visually compatible with the surrounding rural area.
j) New boundary and/or use avoids creating new nonconforming uses.
RU 214
Require a special use permit if an isolated rural commercial/industrial
use/area requests a boundary extension exceeding 10% of its 1990 boundary or adds more
than 30 acres to its area. Criteria for evaluating the special use should be based on RU 213.
Tourist Recreational Uses
RU 215
Create a land use designation that identifies Isolated Recreational/Tourism
Related uses and designates and maps them based on the following criteria:
a) have been in existence in since July 1, 1990,
b) boundaries can contain uses to reduce the potential for sprawl and may not include the
entire parcel if a portion of the parcel is undeveloped,
c) recreation/tourism uses relies on rural location and setting,
d) limited areas/limited ownerships,
e) does not include residential development except for seasonal tourist lodging and private
residences of owners/managers,
f) public services and facilities limited to those necessary to serve recreational or tourist use
and are not available to adjacent non-recreational use parcels,
h) do not require urban services,
i) will not induce urban growth,
j) are located at least one mile from an already existing similar designated use, and
k) will avoid creating new nonconforming uses.
RU 216
Define small scale recreational or tourist uses as those ·uses reliant upon the
rural setting, incorporating the scenic and natural features of the land. These uses may
include uses similar to campgrounds, fish ponds, hot springs, trails, boat launches and docks,
outdoor/recreational equipment rental, private parks, recreational cultural or religious retreats
(nonresidential), mini golf, historic sites, gardens open to the public, animal viewing farms or
wild game farms, horse arenas and stables, shooting ranges, music festivals, festivals sites,
artist colonies, lodging, and marinas. This policy should not be interpreted to permit new
residential development or a Master Planned Resort pursuant to RCW 36.70A.360.
RU 217
Limit rural services and rural facilities to those necessary to serve the
recreational or tourist uses and provided in a manner that does not permit low density sprawl.
Page III-3.7
(Revised May 20001
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
Planning Policies
RU 218
Permit recreational/tourist uses that meet the following criteria: uses are
compatible with rural character of adjacent lands; uses provide landscape buffers and physical
setbacks from major transportation corridors, ensuring visual compatibility with surrounding
rural areas; uses ensure the protection of critical areas, surface and ground water resources;
uses ensure protection from conflicts with resource lands of long standing significance; uses
preserve the character of the existing natural neighborhoods.
RU 218a
Allow for the siting of new recreational vehicle parks in the rural area if the
following criteria are met: Parks are designed for temporary stay ofRV's not to exceed 180
days; Parks can meet all environmental, health, safety and land use requirements; Parks meet
the criteria ofRU 218.
FULLY CONTAINED COMMUNITY
RU-330
The future location of a new Fully Contained Community may be proposed
within Rural Lands.
RU-332
following:
A.
B.
C.
A proposal for a new Fully Contained C01rununity (FCC) reqmres the
Redesignation of the area proposed for the FCC to Urban;
Allocation of population reserve appropriate to the site; and
A master plan for the entire site.
RU-333
The master plan for the new FCC should include the following:
A.
A land use plan that provides for residential, retail, commercial, industrial,
institutional, recreation, and open space uses. The plan will provide for buffers between the
fully contained community and any adjacent urban growth area. The plan will also provide
for a range of housing types so that affordable housing will be available to households with
a broad range of income levels.
B.
A transportation plan that addresses linkages to the existing road network, and access,
circulation, classification, and phasing of transportation facilities within the FCC. The plan
must address and implement transit-oriented site planning and traffic demand management
programs.
C.
A capital facilities plan that addresses how the FCC will link to existing facilities and
the types and phasing of new public facilities and services to be provided within the FCC. The
capital facilities plan shall include a program for assessing impact fees as provided in RCW
82.02.050, unless such a program has been previously adopted by the county and is applicable
Page III-3.8
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 20001
Planning Policies
to the proposal. Approval of the proposal shall not be allowed prior to the adoption of an
applicable impact fee ordinance.
D.
FCC.
A development or phasing plan that identifies the schedule of development of the
E.
Development standards and design guidelines for projects within the FCC.
F.
Enviromnental analysis that assesses the potential adverse environmental impacts and
identifies mitigation measures. The analysis shall include an evaluation ofthe compliance of
the plan with the adopted county critical area regulations.
G.
Proof of adequate potable water to service the proposed development.
H.
The plan for the fully contained community shall provide for the mitigation of impacts
on resource lands designated by the county.
RU-334
The county may cooperate with the development of a Fully Contained
Community by assisting in obtaining grants or other funding sources for off-site public facility
improvements, or by adding to its own capital facilities plan public improvements on-site or
off-site, which are supportive of the development plan. For example, the development of a
county recreation area or open space area within or in the vicinity of the Fully Contained
Community.
RU-335
Among other findings, the county shall determine before approval of the plan
for the fully contained community that it is consistent with the county's adopted critical area
regulations.
RU-336
The allocation of population to fully contained communities shall be done on
a project-by-project basis only from the available population identified and reserved in the
Mason County Comprehensive Plan. This population reserve for fully contained communities
shall revised and a new reserve established no more often than once every five years as a part
of the designation or review of urban growth areas.
RU-337
The approval of an application for a new fully contained community shall be
considered an amendment to the Mason County Comprehensive Plan.
MASTER PLANNED RESORT
RU-340
Master Planned Resorts (MPR) may be allowed outside of urban growth areas,
provided that they comply with the applicable requirements, goals and policies.
Page III-3.9
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised Mczy 20001
Planning Policies
RU-341
A proposal for a MPR should include a development plan for the entire site.
RU-342
The master plan for the new MPR should include the following:
A
A land use plan that identifies and locates the proposed uses within the MPR;
B.
A transportation plan that addresses linkages to the existing road network, and access,
circulation, classification, and phasing of transportation facilities within the MPR;
C.
A capital facilities plan that addresses how the MPR will link to existing facilities and
the types and phasing of new public facilities and services to be provided within the MPR;
D.
A development or phasing plan that identifies the schedule of development of the
MPR;
E.
Development standards and design guidelines for projects within the MPR; and
F.
Environmental analysis that assesses the potential adverse environmental impacts and
identifies mitigation measures.
G.
Proof of adequate potable water to service the proposed development.
RU-343
New urban or suburban development in the vicinity of the Master Planned
Resort is prohibited unless such areas are designated as urban growth areas.
RU-344
Approval of a Master Planned Resort shall only be made after a finding by the
county that the land is better suited and has more long-term importance, for the Master
Planned Resort than for the commercial harvesting of timber or agricultural production, if the
land has been designated as long-term commercial forest land or agricultural land under RCW
36.70A.170.
R U-34 5
Approval of a Master Planned Resort shall only be made after a finding by the
county that the off-site and on-site infrastructure impacts will be fully considered and
mitigated.
RU-346
Approval of a Master Planned Resort shall only be made after a finding by the
county that the resort plan is consistent with the development regulations established for
critical areas.
RURAL AREAS
Page III-3 .1 0
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 20001
Planning Policies
General Policies
RU-500
In RAs, features of the rural landscape should be dominant. Uses other than
farms, pastures, farm buildings, forestry, wood lots, and other resource-related industries,
should be buffered or screened from public rights-of-ways and adjacent properties.
RU 500a
Ensure that rural residential development preserves rural character, protects
rural community identity, is compatible with surrounding land uses, and minimizes
infrastructure needs.
RU-501
New development in RAs should be guided by performance standards and
design guidelines to enhance rural character, protect critical areas, and tailor development to
the characteristics of individual sites.
RU-502
Residential uses in RAs should be at densities that can be sustained by rural
levels of service for water, wastewater, drainage, police, fire, and schools.
RU-503
Utilities and services in RAs should be provided at levels suitable to rural
densities including on-site septic systems, private wells or community water systems, and
roads with gravel shoulders and open roadside drainage.
RU-505
Other uses that should be allowed in RAs include tourism, horticulture, low
profile recreation, home-based businesses and cottage industries accessory to a primary
residential use, and other small scale businesses.
RU-506
Land use and proposed development along the shoreline, streams, or adjacent
uplands should provide protection from any increases in stormwater runoff and nonpoint
pollution which degrade water quality.
RU-507
Existing forestry, agriculture, aquaculture, and mineral extraction in Rural
Areas should have a preferential right to continue and not be subject to nuisance claims if new
development changes the character of the areas surrounding those uses.
RU-508
Existing conunercial and industrial uses in Rural Areas should have a right to
continue and not be subject to nuisance claims if operating in compliance with County
regulations.
RU-509
Proposed roads in Rural Areas, subject to review by the Fire Marshall, should
be evaluated for impacts to areas traffic patterns; location in relation to topography, soils, and
critical areas; and adequacy if roads rights-of -way and easement.
Page lll-3 .11
Mason Countv Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 20001
Planning Policies
RU-51 0
The improvement of shoulders along roads and old highway spurs for
pedestrian, bicycle, and recreational use should be encouraged.
RU-511
On-site sewage systems in Rural Areas should be maintained in a condition
that will ensure longevity, protect public health, and prevent contamination of surface and
ground waters.
RU-512
Adjacent residential uses and non-residential uses in the Rural Area should be
buffered or screened from each other. Existing uses will not be required to provide buffers
or screens, except in the case of the expansion or intensification of use.
Residential Policies
RU-520
Provide for a range of rural residential densities and housing types for all lands
within the Rural Area as follows: limited areas of 1 dwelling unit per 2.5 acres, one dwelling
unit per 5 acres, 1 dwelling unit per 10 acres, one dwelling unit per 20 acres. Clustering is
allowed under these densities. Map these densities on the Comprehensive Plan Land Use
Map.
RU 521: Use the following criteria to establish rural densities and for assignment
throughout the County for mapping decisions:
Land Use Designation
Criteria
Principal Land use
Rural Residential LAMIRD
Single family;
Located in limited and well-defined areas
2.5 acre
Recreational
where land is already platted and
(1 du/2.5)
developed at this or higher density.
Other uses as allowed
Individual undeveloped properties of
in the Table ofUses
twenty acres or less in size may be
included if at least 75% of their boundary
includes land platted and developed at
higher densities.
Rural Residential
5 acre
( 1 du/5)
Single family plats with an established
Single family
pattern of lots five acres or smaller,
generally built out.
Lots of five acres or smaller adjacent to
Other uses as allowed
in the Table ofUses
RAC's and Hamlets.
Overlay designation for areas of preexisting platted sub-divisions with lots less
than five acres, but not built out
Page III-3.12
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised Mav 2000!
Planning Policies
Areas with a predominant pattern of five
acre platting but may include 10 and 20
acre parcels; where existing infrastructure
will support development. Infrastructure
includes public roads, electrical service,
water service,.
Are not critical or resource lands
Rural Residential
10 acre
1 dull 0 acres
Single family plats with an established
pattern of similarly sized lots
Single Family
Similar sized lots adjacent to UGA' s, or Other uses allowed in
the fully contained community, serving as athe Table ofUses
transition, and
Transition between 1/5 and 1/20
Located in shoreline areas with similarly
sized parcels, or
Located in areas adjacent to county arterial
roads capable of handling additional traffic
impacts with other service available such
as electricity or school buses, or
Lands affected by critical areas
Rural Residential
20 acre
1du/20 acres
Single family plats with established pattern Single family
of similarly sized lots surrounding the area
on 75% ofits boundaries
Located in shoreline areas with similarly Non resource
forestry or
sized parcels
agriculture
Lands affected by at least 2 critical areas Other uses allowed as
in Table ofUses
Lands adjacent to forest resource lands
At request of property owner for Forestry
/agriculture/open space taxation and/or
·uses.
RU-52la
Consider redesignation of rural lands from 1 dwelling unit per 20 acres to 1
dwelling unit per 10 acres if the criteria in RU-521 (1du/10 ac) can be met.
Page III-3.13
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
RU-522
objectives:
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
Residential subdivisions in RAs should be designed to achieve the following
A.
Locate development on the most suitable soils for on-site sewage disposal (in
unsewered areas);
B.
Locate development on the least fertile soils and in manner which maximizes the
potential for the remaining usable or other resource based uses;
C.
Locate development to reduce impacts to resource uses, and to allow new
development to be visually absorbed by natural landscape features;
D.
Locate development in such a manner that the common boundary between new lots
and preserved open space is minimized in length;
E.
Locate development beneath ridge lines, and where it is least likely to block or
interrupt scenic vistas;
F.
Locate the resource use or open space parcel or conservation easements contiguous
with any abutting designated resource use parcel, open space, greenbelt, agricultural land,
forest lands, public preserves, parks or schools, terrestrial management area, wildlife corridor,
or aquatic management vegetative area; and
Locate residences clustered in groups of no more than 8 to 10 units, which are buffered from
each other.
Cottage Industries.
RU 523
Foster low impact cottage industries in the rural area in order to accommodate
economic and employment opportunities outside ofRAC's, Hamlets and UGA's.
RU 524A
Pennit Cottage Industries conducted as an accessory use within a single family
dwelling or building accessory to a dwelling and which are wholly incidental and subordinate
to the residential use of the property throughout the unincorporated portions of the County
subject to the following criteria:
Cottage industry is defined as limited small scale commercial or industrial activities including
fabrication or production of goods or provision of services which are conducted without
adverse impacts on the surrounding environment. The scale of the operation is considerably
less than would require an outright rezone to industrial or commercial districts.
A cottage industry may include but is not limited to occupations such as tailoring,
upholstering, weaving, baking, ceramic making, painting, sculpting, accounting, cosmetology,
and the repair of personal items, computer software development, carpentry, metal working,
and black smithing.
Page III-3.14
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 20001
Planning Policies
Cottage industries are permitted in order to provide opportunities to supplement a family
income, start up a business, or establish a work place at home. A cottage industry shall not
grow beyond the scale permitted for such activities unless it is moved to a location designated
for commercial or industrial uses.
Cottage industries should be considered independent of, and unconnected to, the rights that
run with the property.
Cottage industry activities shall consist of a limited-scale service or fabrication.
A cottage industry shall involve the owner or lessee of the property who shall reside within
the dwelling unit, and shall not employ on the premises more than five (5) non-residents. A
temporary increase in the number of employees is permitted to accommodate a business that
is seasonal in nature. However, not more than five additional persons shall be employed on
a temporary basis (up to six weeks) without a Special Use Permit.
More than one cottage industry may be allowed, in or on the same premises provided that:
all of the criteria above are met, no more than 5 nonresident employees shall be allowed to
work on-site regardless of the number of home based businesses, and each home-based
business shall be owned and operated by a permanent resident.
There shall be no alterations to the outside appearance of the buildings or premises that
are not consistent with the residential use of the property, or other visible evidence of the
conduct of such cottage industry, other than one sign of thirty-two square feet in size or
smaller.
A cottage industry shall not be disruptive to the use of adjacent properties. No equipment
or process shall be used in such home occupations which creates excessive noise,
vibration, glare, fumes, odors, or electrical interference detectable to the normal senses off
the property.
The cottage industry shall not create excessive traffic to the local road network, nor
require parking facilities above and beyond that already contained on the site or needed to
conduct the business.
The following activities shall be limited in rural residential areas and shall be incidental to
the primary nature of the cottage industry: parking; storage of heavy equipment; storage
of materials for use on other properties.
Non-Residential Policies
Page III-3. 15
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 20001
Planning Policies
RU-530
Existing industrial and commercial uses should be allowed to expand in
Rural Areas, provided that: they do not require urban levels of government service, they
do not conflict with natural resource based uses, they are compatible with surrounding
rural uses, any public services or facilities provided for the development shall be limited to
that necessary for the development and shall not be provided in a manner which permits
low-density sprawl, critical areas are protected, and they are contained on the existing lot.
RU-531
Resource-based industrial and commercial uses should be allowed to locate
or expand in Rural Areas, provided that: they do not require urban levels of government
service, they do not conflict with natural resource based uses, they are compatible with
surrounding rural uses, any public services or facilities provided for the development shall
be limited to that necessary for the development and shall not be provided in a manner
which permits low-density sprawl, and critical areas are protected.
RU-532
Recreational and tourist uses and isolated small-scale businesses should be
allowed to be developed in the Rural Areas, provided that: they do not require urban
levels of government service, they do not conflict with natural resource based uses, they
are compatible with surrounding rural uses, any public services or facilities provided for
the development shall be limited to that necessary for the development and shall not be
provided in a manner which permits low-density sprawl, and critical areas are protected.
RU-532a
Provide limited expansion opportunities for existing isolated non-residential
nonconforming uses in the rural area that provide job opportunities for rural residents and
that are not consistent with isolated commercial/industrial rural use designations. Nonconforming means that it was not in existence as of July 1, 1990, and can not be classified
as one of the new uses allowed in the rural area. To expand the business must: obtain a
special use permit, expand on a one-time basis with the total square footage determined on
the area in use as of August 1998, expand no more than a maximum of 50% of the
existing building footprint or 50% of the existing outdoor working area provided that the
total expansion will not exceed 2, 000 square feet.
The expansion must meet the following standards:
•
be visually compatible with surrounqing neighborhood and rural area
•
will not cause detrimental impacts to adjacent properties or to existing easements
•
will not result in a small operation now dominating an area
•
will not constitute new urban growth in a rural area
•
will not require urban public services and facilities
•
will not detrimentally impact the productive use of the surrounding resource lands
•
will not detrimentally impact surrounding critical areas
•
will not change the visual character of the property or structure in a way that
significantly effects the visual character of the surrounding rural area.
Page III-3.16
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
A use may take advantage of one-time expansion opportunity provided to the existing
rural business if it meets the above criteria. A change to a new use does not create any
new expansion opportunities or rights.
The maximum lot coverage of the gross impervious surface area shall not exceed 25% of
the acreage.
Provide for a change ofuse of an existing, isolated rural business ifit meets
RU-532b
the following criteria:
•
does not result in an average increase of more than 10% in vehicle trips per day
•
contains parking on site so that it does not overflow into adjoining roads or
properties
•
does not need urban levels or service
•
does not require increased transportation infrastructure
•
does not cause impacts from noise, light, and/or glare on adjoining properties.
Harstine Island Sub-Area Plan
B-1
Residential Land Use, including Water Systems and Shoreline Development.
B-1-a: Establish subdivision design standards which minimize site disturbance, preserve
the natural beauty of the Island, minimize the visual impact of the development, ensure
privacy of residents and maintenance of rural character.
Innovative techniques in site planning, such as open space, common areas,
B-1-a • 1:
clustering and development rights purchase or transfer should be encouraged to protect
the rural atmosphere on the Island.
Suggested Implementation: Subdivision development should be designed to encourage
open space with conservation easements to ensure its continuance. A program providing
density bonuses should be developed by the County to encourage the following: retention
of large percentages of a site in native ground cover and over story; no disturbance buffer
zones; additional screening of houses through increased buffers; trails and wildlife
corridors; separation of vehicular and pedestrian traffic through the use ofbuffers, trails,
bikeways and other means; coordination with adjacent landowners to provide continuity
of open space, natural systems, greenways and corridors.
B-1-a•2:
Encourage use of community and multi-party water systems.
B-1-a•3:
Conserve the forest features of the Island.
Page III-3 .17
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
Suggested Implementation: Traditional plant species should be retained on development
sites. Open space and building sites should contain sufficient overstory and other
indigenous vegetation to maintain the forested character of the Island. Retaining trees
along shorelines should be encouraged.
Roads should be kept as narrow as safety allows to encourage drivers to
B-1-a • 4:
slow down. Extensive cutting of vegetation along the shoulders of property should be
discouraged as it alters the character of the roadways. Numbers of roads and driveways
should be kept to a minimum.
B-1-a• 5:
Utilities should be located with regard to minimizing their visual impact.
Buffers of natural vegetation should be encouraged to help buildings,
B-1-a • 6:
roads, and utilities blend into the natural environment.
B-1-a • 7:
Extensive clearing for development should not be done on steep slopes.
Setbacks should be sufficient to allow some screening by vegetation of houses viewed
from adjacent roads or waterways, so that from most perspectives the predominant view is
ofthe property's vegetation, not its improvements. Building designs which offer a sense
of integrity with the landscape should be promoted.
B-1-a • 8:
Care should be taken to limit the amount of impervious surface area on any
lot (i.e., house, driveway, concrete walk, etc.).
B-1-b: Promote residential densities which maintain the rural character ofthe Island.
B-1-b • 1:
Develop a density map that would result in the largest number of new lots
being at least one living unit per 5 acres, some lots at 2 1/2 units per acre and the smallest
portion being sized to shorelands requirements. In areas where development has already
occurred, allow higher density. In areas where no development has occurred, promote
lower density. Lots already platted shall be vested as conforming with this plan as of the
plans adoption.
When the Mason County Shoreline Master Program is revised next year,
B-1-b • 2:
particular attention should be paid to the need for increasing minimum lot size, providing
additional setbacks and for protecting vegetation, especially overstory, at the shoreline.
The minimums under the current "Rural" designation are 100 feet of shoreline with a 25
foot setback and a 20,000 square-feet minimum lot size.
B-3
Industrial and Commercial Land Use
Page III-3.18
Mason County Comprehensive Plan" August. 1998
(Revised May 2000!
Planning Policies
B-3-a: Discourage or prohibit industrial development in the subarea.
B-3-a • 1:
Design standards for industries should be developed.
B-3-b: Design standards for commercial activity on the Island need to be established to
ensure resident's privacy.
A plan with an accompanying map should be developed identifYing what
B-3-b • 1:
types of commercial activity are allowed and what areas of the Island are zoned for
commercial activity. ·
Suggested Implementation: Prohibit apartments, commercial office space, miniwarehouses. Limit retail business uses to areas zoned for possible commercial. Businesses
should be limited to those that service the island population.
B-3-c • 2:
Commercial development be subject to design review to ensure
compatibility with rural character of the Island
Suggested Implementation: Use a design team to review plans for sight development,
architecture, landscaping, parking, signage, and building height.
B-3-d:
Ensure that the natural beauty of the Island is not impaired nor the rural
character compromised as a result of commercial development.
Setbacks and aesthetic considerations, including landscaping, should be
B-3-d • 1:
required when creating new lots for commercial development and when siting buildings.
B-11
Public Nuisances
B-11-a:
To implement regulations that would offer relieffrom objectionable and
offensive activities.
Ordinances shall be written that prohibit activities found to be injurious to
B-11-a 1:
health, indecent or offensive to the senses, or interferes with the rights of others to enjoy
their property. Following are some samples: loud music, barking dogs, animals not under
control, roaming livestock, tire dumps, indiscriminate disposal ofwaste, etc. This list is
not inclusive.
Southeast Mason County Sub-Area Plan
D.
RESIDENTIAL LAND USE
Page III-3.19
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised Mav 2000)
Planning Policies
AI:
The physical capabilities of development sites and the potential impact on
surrounding properties should determine the site suitability of proposed developments in
the subarea. To attain this policy, the following density standards are recommended:
a.
Each parcel currently below 5 acres in size may be developed for an individual
single-family residence.
b.
For parcels 5 acres to 10 acres in size which were legally created prior to the
adoption of this Plan, parcel owners shall have the right to divide this property into lots,
the smallest of which is not less than 2.5 acres in size.
c.
For parcels greater than 10 acres in size, one of the following options shall apply:
1)
Land may be divided to a density of one single-family residence per 2.5 acres by
using the following density bonus strategy:
For every single-family residential lot planned into an "Open Space Development", one
additional single-family residential lot may be added to the development, provided that at
least 50% of the total land base is designated as open space. (see open space development
chart in appendix for example densities per acreage.)
The designated open space parcel may be used for agriculture, forestry, passive recreation,
stormwater detention areas, community water systems, on-site sewage disposal systems,
and critical areas (i.e. wetlands, steep slopes, wildlife habitat, etc.).
The acreage not allocated to each individual lot shall be managed as open space by the
original owner or through an open space maintenance agreement with individual lot
owners (an example of a model open space agreement is in the Appendix). The following
two statements should be placed on the face of the plat at the time of recording of the
open space development:
a)
an open space maintenance agreement does exist, and
b)
the rights to development of this acreage, other than the allowed open space uses
previously mentioned, are no longer available on this parcel or parcels ofland.
One single-family residence per 5 acres may be created using conventional land
2)
segregation methods.
A2:
Innovative techniques in site planning, such as the creation of open space and
common areas and the use of clustering of individual lots and buildings, should be used in
the design of all land division proposals in the subarea.
Page III-3.20
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
A3:
Incentives to help design development proposals, such as density bonus,
conservation easements, and community-held open space, should be encouraged, but
permitted only in locations where land capability will allow denser development.
A4:
Residential housing developments, which include a mix of housing types and
provides common open space or recreational areas, should be encouraged so that
developinents are planned in a manner which best preserves rural character, protects
critical areas and adjacent property owners, and provides necessary facilities.
A5:
Residential development should be discouraged adjacent to existing industrial areas
or those areas designated for future industrial use within the subarea. New residential
development adjacent to existing industrial uses should provide some buffering according
to performance standards; however, the county will encourage the joint provision of a
buffer in these cases. If clustering or density transfers are used in a land division, then the
open space or resource areas or parcels should be used to provide separation.
A6:
When a local entity (county or state) takes land by eminent domain or negotiation
for a project of public purposes and reduces the size of affected properties, those affected
parcels should have the rights afforded to them that were available prior to the eminent
domain or negotiation action.
A7:
The evaluation of land division proposals in the subarea should consider the
impacts to existing and planned infrastructure, such as sewage disposal, water supply,
traffic and circulation, and fire safety.
AS:
In determining site suitability of shoreline development activities, potential short
and long term impacts to water quality should be considered, as well as any reasonable
alternative actions and/or mitigation measures.
A9:
The site design of developments should not adversely impact the current levels of
water quality and should avoid any risk of decertification of existing shellfish beds (When
a shellfish bed is decertified, commercial harvest of shellfish for human consumption
becomes illegal.)
A 10: Accessory Dwelling Units should be permitted for each primary residence provided
the land and the septic system are capable to support the additional use. Accessory living
quarters should be limited to 800 square feet in size, should only be used for immediate
family members, and should not be rented or leased.
All: As recommended in the Totten-Little Skookum Watershed Action Plan, shorelines
in the subarea should be redesignated to Conservancy Shoreline Environment, to restrict
land divisions that create new lots each less than 200 feet wide.
Page III-3.21
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August. 1998
E.
(Revised May 2000)
Planning Policies
COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL LAND USES
A 1:
Commercial and industrial development should be designed and located to
minimize adverse impacts by noise, lights, and visual obstruction of the proposed use.
A2:
Site development of commercial and industrial land uses should integrate
stormwater retention standards in the preparation, construction, and operation of the land
use.
A3:
The operation of commercial and industrial land uses should not discharge wastes
directly into the waters of the State.
A4:
Industries which threaten ground or surface water should be prohibited from
locating within the planning area if the business or use cannot ensure protection of these
resources.
B 1:
Additional commercial and industrial development in the subarea should be located
adjacent to existing commercial and industrial locations in the narrow corridor along
Highway 101, north of the Highway l 01 - 108 intersection.
B2:
New and future industries seeking to locate in the planning area should be low
impact, meet all performance standards for other permitted uses, and be clustered at
designated locations which are physically suitable for the proposed land uses.
B3:
Existing commercial and industrial developments should be allowed to continue
and expand, provided that such expansion results in no significant adverse environmental
impacts, the expansion can comply with the performance standards for similar uses in the
Rural Area, and the expansion does not require the extension of an urban level of
governmental services.
B4:
Existing commercial or industrial uses should have a preferential right to continue
and not be subject to nuisance claims; provided that these uses are incompliance with
local, state, federal laws and regulations.
B5:
Existing commercial and industrial uses are encouraged to use setback landscaping
along their property lines. New cmmnercial and industrial uses should be required to
provide setback landscaping between that use and adjacent land uses.
Page III-3.22
A1ason Countv Comprehensive Plan- Au;;ust, 1998
(Revised Mav 2000)
Land Use
Chapter IV
LAND USE
IV-1 INTRODUCTION
The Washington State Growth Management Act requires counties planning under the act to adopt
a comprehensive plan that includes a land use element and a rural element. The land use element
identifies the proposed distribution of land uses and addresses other concerns such as the protection
of groundwater quality and quantity, drainage, flooding, and storm water run-off and potential
mitigation measures. The rural element addresses rural lands in the county which are not specially
designated for urban growth or natural resource use. Because of the interconnection of the two
elements, both elements have been included in the Land Use Chapter.
Purpose of The Land Use Element
The land use element identifies the existing land use conditions throughout Mason County, projects
the land requirements to the year 2014 to meet projected growth, and determines how that growth
should be accommodated, given the goals and policies developed in the plan.
Oven1iew of the Land Use Plan
The lands of Mason County, which are within the jurisdiction ofthe county have been divided into
three categories of performance districts. These are urban growth areas, resource lands, and rural
lands. Each ofthese categories is described below.
Urban Growth Areas
An urban growth area is an area where more intensive development is planned, along with the
infrastructure needed to service this growth. All cities, including the City of Shelton, are defined as
urban growth areas. In addition, other unincorporated areas may be designated for urban growth
when additional land is needed to accommodate the expected population increases and job growth.
The urban growth areas which are designated in Mason County include the City of Shelton, with a
portion of its surrounding area, and the unincorporated communities of Allyn and Belfair. These
communities currently support a mix of residential, commercial, industrial, civic, and public uses.
Within Shelton, Allyn and Belfair, residential uses provide a variety of housing choices including
medium to high density single family and multifamily. Commercial development includes retail and
Page IV-1.1
J..dason County Comprehensive Plan - Au'?ust. 1998
(Revised Mav 2000)
Land Use
other business uses. Industrial uses may include light and heavy industry, production, manufacturing,
and resource-based uses. In addition, a broad range of civic and public facilities such as schools,
churches, libraries, parks, courts, and City and County government exist within these communities.
Rural Lands
Rural lands are divided into several classifications. These classifications identifY performance districts
through which rural growth will be managed. These districts include the following:
Limited Areas ofMore Intensive Rural Development (LAMIRD)
•
Rural Activity Centers (RAC)
•
Hamlets
•
Rural Commercial/Industrial Areas
•
Rural Tourist/Recreational Areas
Fully Contained Community (FCC)
Master Planned Resort (MPR)
Rural Area (RA)
The Rural Activity Centers (RACs) include Hoodsport, Taylor Town and Union. Hamlets include
Bayshore,. Dayton, Deer Creek, Eldon, Grapeview, Lake Cushman, Lilliwaup, Matlock, Potlatch,
Spencer Lake, and Tahuya. The Rural Area is divided into several different areas shown on the Future
Land Use Map. These areas reflect different allowed residential densities of one dwelling per 2.5
acres, one dwelling per five acres, one dwelling per ten acres and one dwelling per twenty acres. Also
among the rural lands are Rural Tourist/Recreational Areas and Commercial/ Industrial Areas that
are also mapped.
In addition, the ability to designate new fully contained communities has been created in this plan.
The fully contained communities are new urban growth areas that can be designated through a
comprehensive plan amendment on land which was previously designated as rural land. Urban
population growth may be allocated to the new communities when they are created. Criteria are
established in the plan for evaluating proposals for new fully contained communities when such
changes are considered.
The rural lands are described in more detail in the rural lands section of the Land Use chapter, section
IV-8. Policies for rural lands are located in the Planning Policies chapter, section III-3.
Resource Lands
Resource Lands are those areas in the county which have been identified as especially important for
the long-tenn commercial production oftimber and agricultural goods or for the extraction of mineral
resources. As such, they receive special protection to discourage their conversion to other uses.
Mason County has designated and protected three types of resource lands. These are Long-Term
Page IV-1.2
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August, 1998
(Revised Mav 2000)
Land Use
Commercial Forest Lands, Agricultural Resource Lands, and Mineral Resource Lands of long-term
commercial significance. The county also designated forest Inholding Lands which are subject to
special restrictions to protect adjacent Long-Term Commercial Forest Lands. In addition to
designating these resource lands, the county has adopted protections for agricultural and forest land
uses elsewhere in the county.
More infonnation on the resource lands can be found in the Land Use chapter, section IV-5. Policies
regarding these lands are in the Planning Policies chapter, section III-4.
Watersheds·
Land use and land planning is also organized by watersheds. Mason County includes seven
watersheds: Case Inlet, Chehalis, Hood Canal, Lower Hood Canal, Oakland Bay, Skokomish, and
Totten-Little Skookum. (See FIGURE IV.3-l). Drainage patterns determine the boundaries of
watersheds.
Watershed management plans or action plans have been adopted for three watersheds: Totten-Little
Skookum, Oakland Bay, and Lower Hood Canal. Sub-area plans were developed for North Mason
County (the Lower Hood Canal), South-East Mason County (the Totten-Little Skookum), and
Harstine Island (part of the Totten-Little Skookum). The watershed plans were developed in
cooperation with adjoining counties which shared the watershed, the Indian Tribes, state agencies and
the public, under the guidance of the Puget Sound Water Quality Authority. Information from these
plans and goals and policies developed for them have been used in developing the Comprehensive
Plan, its policies, and its implementing regulations.
Mason County has chosen to use a watershed based planning because it provides the county with a
meaningful approach for analyzing growth impacts, preparing effective development regulations, and
establishing mitigation measures. It is based on the premise that action within one portion of a
watershed impacts environmental and biological functions in other areas of the watershed. For
example, the filling of wetland within a watershed not only impacts the area surrounding the wetland,
but also affects the watershed's overall ability to control flooding and filter out pollutants before
water reenters the groundwater system. Further, alleviating negative impacts of specific actions
within a watershed protects environmental resources throughout the entire watershed. Mason
County's watershed planning seeks to ensure adequate flood control and protect water quality,
wildlife habitat and other environmental resources.
[!rban Growth Areas - Shelton
The following goals provide a statement of the intent for the City of Shelton urban growth area. The
goals provide a basis for interpretation of the specific policies contained herein. These goals were
developed jointly by the City of Shelton and Mason County.
1.
---To establish general guidelines for orderly growth within the Urban Growth area for
Page IV-1.3
;\!Jason c-:ountv Comprehensive Plan- August, 1998
(Revised Mav 2000)
Land Use
Shelton.
2.
---To provide for cooperation between Mason County and the City of Shelton in
planning and guiding development in the Urban Growth Area. ·
3.
---To provide land owners and the public generally with certainty about the types of land
uses that will occur and or the processes that will be provided for changing those uses
as the areas urbanize.
4.
---To provide a framework for detailed land use and service provision plans and studies
that will facilitate efficient use of public funds.
5.
---To coordinate regulations and utility standards to minimize public and private costs.
6.
---To provide for land use densities and types, development standards, and provision of
urban type services within the UGA that are compatible with the City of Shelton
Comprehensive Plan.
(Please insert Future Land Use Map after this page.)
Page IV-1.4
Adason County Comprehensive Plan- August, 1998
(Revised Mav 2000)
Land Use
IV.8 RURAL LANDS
Description
The rural lands are those lands which are outside ofthe designated urban growth areas, but which are
not designated as resource lands. Mason County has created a number of performance districts by
which to regulate land use in the rural lands. These districts are described in this section. The
planning policies which control the land uses in the districts are contained in the planning policies
chapter.
Rural Character
Mason County is predominately a rural county. The rural lands element, therefore, focuses on
maintaining rural character as the County moves forward to accommodate growth during the next
20 years. Many features contribute to the rural character of Mason County. They include land
features, landscapes, and land uses. Many of the elements contributing to the county's rural character
were identified during the county's visioning process. They include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Rural Activity Centers
Hamlets
Wetlands, streams and lakes
Shorelines
Forests
Pastures and meadows
Hills and mountains
Vistas of mountains, forests, or water
Farmlands and farm buildings
Rural highways and roads
Small areas of more intense developments such as small scale commercial and industrial .
development, tourist related businesses, and small groups of residences on smaller lots.
Resource-related industries such as quarries, timber and wood processing facilities.
Rural areas also include well separated small communities located along major arterials and state
highways which serve the needs of surrounding rural residents and enterprises. These communities
are characterized by limited public services, small commercial uses, and single family houses often
on small lots. Community services may include a school, post office, fire stations, churches,
community centers and granges. There may be some multifamily development.
Page IV-8.1
Adason c-:ounty Comprehensive Plan- August, 1998
(RevisedMav 2000)
Land Use
Performance Districts
The plan makes use of rural performance districts to provide an organizing structure. The districts
are methods for accomplishing the goals and objectives of the Comprehensive Plan. Each
performance district is intended to achieve a distinct function and may allow for a variety of uses
which are consistent with that function. In addition, each performance district has a set of
performance standards with which development must comply and which ensure that the goals of the
plan are met within the district. Several classifications of rural performance districts are provided in
the plan. They include:
Limited Areas of More Intensive Rural Development (LAMIRD)
•
Rural Activity Centers (RAC)
•
Hamlets
•
Rural Commercial/Industrial Areas
•
Rural Tourist/Recreational Areas
Fully Contained Community (FCC)
Master Planned Resort (MPR)
Rural Area (RA) with residential densities of 1 unit per 5, 10, or 20 acres
Limited Areas of More Intensive Rural Development (LAMIRD)
A. Rural Activity Centers
Rural Activity Centers (RAC) include existing communities with an established settlement pattern.
These communities include a mix of uses, typically on small lots. They serve residents of the
surrounding rural area, seasonal residents, and tourists. RACs also include concentrations of
commercial, service, industrial, and civic uses but are not served by urban levels of facilities and
services. Residential areas include small lot, single-family neighborhoods and some small-scale and
low-rise multifamily housing. Businesses typically are found near or on the highway that runs through
the community. In Hoodsport the commercial development is primarily concentrated into a small
"downtown" area. Union has fewer businesses and more scattered commercial activity. Taylor Town
has small clusters of commercial development near some of the road intersections and a larger number
of businesses scattered over the area of the RAC. Existing industrial uses within RACs are often
stand-alone businesses such as welding shops, small shake mills, or food processing operations.
RACs within the County will experience some limited growth over the next 20 years. Average
residential densities will increase as much of the land has already been platted into small lots, many
of which are conforming and buildable. Business uses will likely grow somewhat. The majority of
Page IV-8.2
(Revised Mav 2000)
Afason County Comprehensive Plan- August, I 998
Land Use
growth within the RACs will focus on retail, commercial, tourism and industrial uses necessary to
support the residential growth in the Rural Area. Because of their past pattern of development and
location next to water bodies, some RACs may require some means of collective wastewater
treatment to protect water quality. However, these systems are not envisioned to be urban level
sewer systems. A feasibility study was recently completed for the Union area, and the water quality
problems of Hoodsport are being examined. Stormwater treatment may also be needed to address
the existing development. These areas are expected to have small amounts of additional commercial
and industrial development but to concentrate the growth in a way that protects the surrounding rural
area and resource lands from sprawling patterns of development. Under the state Growth
Management Act, these areas of more intensive rural development are allowed to fill in with small
scale commercial or industrial development and lower density residential development. This growth
is contained within the boundaries of the rural activity center and kept to a smaller scale and intensity
in tune with the rural character ofthe community. Conflicts with resource lands are minimized by
encouraging growth in these more compact areas, generally well removed from the resource lands.
Families seeking a rural lifestyle will not need to buy oversized lots. This makes the housing more
affordable and expands the variety of housing choices. They also need not be isolated in remote
locations so that limited services such as transit, fire protection, and police protection can be provided
more efficiently or quickly at a rural level of service.
B. Hamlets
Hamlets Rural are intended to provide a focal point and community identity for surrounding rural
areas, while they meet some of the immediate needs of the rural residents, resource dependent
industry, and visitors. They will provide a rural level of services· and facilities. Hamlets may include
one or two civic, community, or retail uses such as a post office, community center, church, grange,
or gas station. The community centers will be some distance from each other and from the urban
centers. They are not intended to compete with the urban areas or RAC's as employment centers or
cmmnercial centers. Residential development at these centers is allowed, as infill but only with Rural
Area standards. The designated area of the Hamlets will be kept small. The designated area will not
necessarily include all of the businesses or services that may be identified with the community center
in conformance with RCW 36.70A. S(d).
C. Isolated Areas of Commercial/Industrial Use
Isolated Areas ofCmmnercia!lndustrial Use presently exist in Mason County. They are small enclaves
of businesses which serve the surrounding rural residents and or industrial uses which manufacture
and export a product. These areas are intended to remain and to have the ability to expand slightly,
keeping within the rural character of the county. These businesses do not require urban services and
will not be afforded urban services in the future. These areas will have a delineated boundary based
on the built environment as July 1990, and respecting the existing neighborhood identity of the area,
and reflecting roads and natural features. Boundaries will attempt to avoid irregularity. Uses will meet
the standards set out in the Rural Area Performance Standards.
Page IV-8.3
;\;Jason County f:omprehensive Plan- Aue-ust, I 998
(Revised Mav 2000)
Land Use
D. Isolated Areas of Tourist/Recreational Use
Isolated Areas of Tourist/Recreational Use reflect existing areas in Mason County and their slight
expansion, and allow for the development of new areas. There areas consist of recreation/tourism
businesses with no permanent residences, except for those of the owners or caretakers. Such areas
may include uses such as small scale resorts, recreational vehicle parks, golf courses, and small stores
serving such uses. These existing areas will have a delineated boundary based on the built
environment as of July, 1990, respecting the existing neighborhood identity and reflecting road and
natural features. These areas must be served by appropriate rural services to the area only and cannot
contribute to urban sprawl or the extension of urban services.
Rural Areas
Rural Areas (RAs) within Mason County are those areas which are intended to maintain their rural
character, while allowing some development. In Rural Areas, the rural landscape will remain
dominant, and include a variety of protected natural features. Urban development will not be
allowed in the Rural Areas. Resource uses such as farming, forestry, aquiculture, and mining are
protected. Residential uses are allowed, provided that they are rural in character. Industrial and
commercial uses are allowed if they are resource dependent or are cottage industries operated by
residents of the property. Small-scale recreational and tourist uses consistent with a rural nature may
be allowed. Larger-scale recreational and tourist projects may be allowed under the provisions for
Master Planned Resorts. Existing commercial and industrial uses that are non-conforming will be
allowed to continue and to expand within limits. Resource dependent industrial and commercial
development will be protected from encroaching incompatible uses through performance standards
which will buffer one use from the other.
Fullv Contained Communities
A Fully Contained Community is not a designated area but a reserved capacity for new urban
development that will be characterized by urban densities and intensities, urban governmental
services, and meets the criteria established in the comprehensive plan and in RCW 36.70A.350. The
comprehensive plan has reserved population to allow the creation of new Fully Contained
Community. Fully Contained Communities can be created in the Rural Lands; however, the approval
of a Fully Contained Cotmnunity requires a comprehensive plan amendment. When a specific location
and plan for a Fully Contained Community is approved, then population will be allocated to that
project. In order to receive approval, the proposal must meet a number of criteria, which are
established in the Planning Policies Chapter of the Plan.
Master Planned Resort
Page IV-8.4
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August, 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Land Use
A Master Planned Resort is a self contained and fully integrated development in a setting of
significant natural amenities that includes short-term visitor accommodations associated with a range
of developed on-site indoor or outdoor recreation facilities. It may also include permanent residential
uses as an integrated part of the overall resort development. Development of the Master Planned
resort is controlled through the planning policies.
Page IV-8.5
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August, 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Capital Facilities
V/.3 WASTEWATER/SANITARY SEWER
System Description
Wastewater in the County is handled through a variety of mechanisms. Mason County
owns and operates two sewage treatment plants that serve local communities. The City
of Shelton has its own municipal treatment system. The Corrections Center near Shelton
and Alderbrook Inn operate their own small sewage treatment plants. The locations of
these treatment facilities are shown in FIGURE VI. 3-1.
The county is also planning on adding to its wastewater facilities. It has begun the process
of constructing a water reclamation facility and sewer collection system for the North BayCase Inlet area, including the Allyn Urban Growth Area. The construction for the Allyn
area is expected to be completed by the end of the year 2001. It has also begun the process
to provide wastewater treatment services for the Belfair Urban Growth Area. The intent
is to have the Belfair system operational for part of the urban growth area by 2006, with
service expanded throughout Belfair over the next eight to ten years. Establishment of the
service is subject to there being sufficient funding available. The county Comprehensive
Plan has a number of policies that will guide development in Belfair during the transition
period.
Most of the County is unsewered and depends on onsite treatment facilities for the
treatment of wastewater. A few large onsite systems serve a business or multiple
residences, but most domestic sewage is treated by single-residence onsite systems.
A review of many of these small individual systems is being conducted by two clean water
districts that serve local areas. The Lower Hood Canal Clean Water District was formed
in January 1994. As of March 1995, a total of 1,659 systems were inspected, 194 failures
were detected, and 62 systems were repaired. The Totten/Little Skookum Clean Water
District, formed in July 1993, has completed 1,145 system surveys, detected 97 failures,
and repaired 54 systems.
Vl.3-l
Mason County Comprehensive Plan -August, 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Capital Facilities
Inventory
County Systems
The County owns and operates Hartstene Pointe Treatment Plant and the Rustlewood
Treatment Plant. Both facilities provide secondary treatment. Secondary treatment
removes 85 percent of the biological oxygen demand (BOD) and volatile solids. Sludge
from the treatment process is collected and taken to a site in Mason County where it is
lime stabilized by a private company (Bio-Recycling) and land applied. Most of the
material accepted by the company is septage from pumping out onsite septic tanks. The
plant is located at Webb Hill and applied at the site. System components for the two plants
are detailed in TABLE VI.3-l.
Hartstene Pointe
The Hartstene Pointe facility was upgraded to secondary treatment in 1992 and serves the
Hartstene Point community. The treated effluent is discharged to Case Inlet.
Rustlewood
The Rustlewood facility is a secondary treatment facility that serves the Rustlewood
community and a small number of lots to the south. The clarified and disinfected effluent
is discharged to Pickering Passage.
Municipal Systems:
City of Shelton
The City of Shelton treatment plant is a secondary facility that serves the City of Shelton.
The current design flow is 4.0 million gallons per day (mgd). Average dry and wet
weather flows are 2.0 mgd and 3.0 to 3.5 mgd, respectively. The peak wet-weather flow,
the flow rate that approximates the impact of a 100-year stonn event, is 8.0 mgd. In this
situation, the plant exceeds design flow, but still has the capability to treat all effluent it
receives. According to the City of Shelton's 1995 Comprehensive Plan, service is limited
because of inflow and infiltration capacity problems and because the current service area
is only within the existing city limits.
The facility provides extended aeration to remove 85 percent of BOD. The processed
waste is treated by clarifiers and sludge digesters before the sludge is removed and
transported for disposal. The clarified effluent is disinfected with chlorine and discharged
V/.3-2
Mason County Comprehensive Plan -August, 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Capital Facilities
into Oakland Bay.
The City of Shelton system is expected to be capable of servicing the Shelton Urban
Growth Area within the 20-year planning horizon. Detailed information on the system and
the fmancial information for the next six-year period can be found in the City of Shelton
1995 Comprehensive Plan. The city has scheduled substantial work to be done during in
the period to 2001 , including inflow and infiltration abatement and expansion of storage
capacity. However, these plans do not include the expansion of service beyond the city
limits.
Washington State Corrections Center
A small on site secondary sewage treatment plant, operated by the Washington State
Department of Corrections, is located at the Washington State Corrections Center west of
Shelton. The treated effluent is discharged into the ground through several drain fields.
Sludge from this facility is land applied on grassland and nomnerchantable timber within
the Corrections Center's property.
System improvements were recently made and a surface spray area for effluent application
was developed on site. The capacity of the system was increased to 400,000 gpd.
Alderbrook Sanitary System (Private)
The only private sanitary sewer treatment system in Mason County is the Alderbrook
Sewage Treatment System. The facility includes a collection system for its resort facilities
and a recently upgraded secondary treatment plant. The facility employs an extended
aeration sludge system and has a capacity of 30,000 gpd. No septage is accepted at the
treatment facility.
V/.3-3
(Revised May 2000)
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August, 1998
Capital Facilities
OIXii:PIC
KCM
F._~_'un_N_e:s_co_lu_~
LI_ _
__CfE_RY
_ _ _...L__SEWER
__
Vl.3-4
~TRE"A-FlGU_~_E_ENT_:s_-_}ACl_UTJ_ES_-'
~
~
~
;:
;::!
TABLE VJ.3-I. Public Sewer Systems
1Name
Hanstene
Pointe
Average Average
Winter Summer Design
Flow Service
Flow
Flow
Area
(gpd lt . (gpd lt
Popu- (gpch
1,000) 1,000) lacres)
lation 1.0oo>
680
100
so
185
232
. Sewage
Llflt
Treatment . Dlseham Stations
County
Cilse In~et
WWTP.
2
5
8.
...
;s
t
30
Alderbrook
Rustlewood
Discharge
Capacity/
..
Private
·Shp.
i.735mm
Sbp, .
. t,735rpm
7.5 hp,
usomm·
65
15-30.
so
County
WWTP
3,0003,500
160200
2,000
4,000
. 80
to .
~
:::::-
Total
(f'eet)
Manholes
500
113
Length
8
21,100
6
18,300
4
. 20,300
""~
~-
~
;::!
~
;:
;:
)0
_.,..
"'
'-
~
Oo
I~
1
'<::
1:0'
..
Pickering
. Passa~
125 BPtn
1.750rpm @20f'eet
[email protected]
3hP.
3.450 I"Pff1 80f'eet
[email protected]
Shp,
3450_l'!m1 120 feet
Uhp.
1
3
Washington
State .
Correction
Center
[email protected]
. 45feet·
[email protected]
33f'eet
[email protected]
66f'eet
WWTP
2
Shelton
nm.
MOtor·
Cofiecl!on
'System
Diameter
(inches}
City
WWTP
Oakland
Bay .
State.
WWTP
Drain
Field
,,
..
~
8
9,200
approx
41
~
I~
N
~
.
\")
§"
,_
~
~
s:
~
Mason County Comprehensive Plan -August, 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Capital Facilities
Large Onsite Systems
Large onsite systems (3,500-14,000 gpd) such as commercial septic systems and
community drain fields are pennitted and monitored by the Washington State Department
of Health (DOH). Some of the larger onsite systems in Mason County monitored by DOH
are listed in TABLE VI.3-2.
ITABLE VI.3-2.
I
Larger Onsite Systems
System
Currently Operating
Belfair Stockmarket Foods
Mission Creek Youth Camp
Sand Hill Elementary School
Park Place Market and RV Park
Fawn Lake Community System
Allyn Inn
Proposed Proiects
Squaxin Island Casino
Potlatch State Park (Reoair)
Design Flow (gpd)
5,040.
10 000
4,850
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
14,000
In meliminarv desi!.!n sta!.!e
Facilitv Needs
Mason County is currently under a state consent order with respect to sanitary sewer
collection within its jurisdiction. Improvements to both onsite sewage management and
sewer collection and treatment systems are required by DOH.
Facility needs for Mason County can be divided into different categories. The county
owns and operates the Hartstene Pointe Treatment Plant and the Rustlewood Treatment
Plant. These plants serve a limited area and are not targeted for expansions. The LOS for
wastewater facilities owned by the County includes the completion of planned treatment
plant and infiltration/inflow (I/I) improvements. Costs for these improvements are detailed
in Section VI.lO, Finance Plan. Mason County has begun construction of the North
Bay/Case Inlet water reclamation facility and sewer collection system. Some design work
still remains to be completed for the Lakeland Village Area. The sewer system serves the
Allyn Urban Growth Area. Construction should be complete and the system in operation
at the end of the year 2001. Detailed fmancial infonnation on this system is also provided
in Section VI.IO. Finally, the county is nearing completion of preliminary work on sewer
V/.3-6
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August, 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Capital Facilities
facilities for the Belfair Urban Growth. The county is contemplating construction of the
facility in two phases. The first phase would build the treatment facility and provide
service to approximately 700 acres near SR 3, SR 300, and the Old Belfair Highway areas
with connection elsewhere possible. Eventually, the entire urban area would be provided
service. Detailed financial infonnation on this system is provided in Section VI.lO
Similarly, planning by the Mason County Public Utility District #1 is expected to be done
during this time for some type of a community wastewater treatment for the Hoodsport
area Analysis is expected to be done on system alternatives to address existing
environmental and health issues and to address the possibility of a small urban growth area
to serve the community. A community wastewater system, if one is appropriate, is not
expected to be started within the six-year time frame.
Service needs for the Shelton Urban Growth Area are expected to be met in the long-run
by the City of Shelton sewer system facility. The City of Shelton is working on improving
capacity in its wastewater system, as noted above, but it has not programmed for the
expansion of service beyond the city limits in its six year financial plan.
V/.3-7
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Capital Facilities
VI. 10 FINANCE PLAN
Introduction
This section discusses Mason County capital facilities needs and related funding sources.
As required under the Growth Management Act (GMA) a six-year finance plan has been
prepared for the years 1995 to 2001 for those facilities currently, or to be, owned and
operated by the County.
The following facilities are included in this section:
¥
Water and Wastewater Systems
¥
Solid Waste Management Facilities
¥
County Administrative and Law Enforcement Buildings
¥
Parks and Recreation
¥
Stormwater Management Facilities
Only County owned and operated facilities, except for the community-based wastewater
systems for rural activity centers, are included in the finance analysis. Several alternatives
have been suggested to deal with the problem of providing water and wastewater service
in areas outside the existing utility service area in which growth is forecast. The service
area for the solid waste utility is county-wide.
The fmance plan identifies reasonably reliable funding sources, and forecasts revenue and
expenses to the year 2001. Funding varies depending on the facility. The different
financing methods, public or private, could have significant implications on the cost of
utility service. Potential funding sources that could be used to fund unanticipated needs and
shortfalls are also discussed.
V1-10.1
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August 1998
(Revised May 20001
Capital Facilities
Financial Impact Overview
The fmancial impact for capital facility improvements have been analyzed for the six year
planning period. Information on transportation can be found in the Transportation Chapter.
A summary of the six year improvement costs, revenues and financing is listed in Table
10-1. The Table displays the cost by capital facility category. The total of improvement
costs and expenditures is $76,039,000. The total identified for revenues and financing is
$78,560,000.
Table 10-1
County Owned and Operated Capital Facility
Improvement & Finance Costs
Years 1995 - 2001
Capital Facility Category
Improvement Costs
Expenditures
Finance/Revenues
$100,000
$1,002,000
$1,067,000
Water Systems
Wastewater Systems
$3,503,000
$23,611,000
$20,000
$11,230,000
$11,259,000
$19,006,000
$14,992,000
$34,789,000
$1,145,000
$2,154,000
$3,354,000
$562,000
$3,929,000
$4,480,000
$18,396,000
Solid Waste Management
County Administration & Law
Enforcement Buildings
Parks & Recreation
Stonnwater Management Facilities
Conventional Water and Wastewater Systems
The County owns and operates a combined water and wastewater utility which includes
the water supply and wastewater treatment facilities at Harstine and Rustlewood, and the
Beard's Cove water supply facility. There is no expansion in the service area planned to
accommodate new growth. Information about system improvements needed to maintain
acceptable levels of service for residents in the existing service area has been provided by
the Mason County Department of Community Development.
Table 10-2 summarizes the planned water supply capital improvements over the next six
years. Except for improvements to the Beard's Cover water reservoir ($100,000) in 1996,
there are no other planned capital improvements expected for water supply facilities. The
VI-10.2
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August 1998
(Revised Mav 2000)
Capital Facilities
improvements will be paid for out of existing capital improvement revenues. Revenues
collected from water utility fees during the six year period are to be used to fund the
Beard's Cover water reservoir improvement as well as the administrative, operations and
maintenance and capital replacement expenditures. During the six year period the revenues
remaining at each year end will continue to grow primarily because of the capital
replacement fund ($50,000/year) which is designed to off-set future capital improvement
replace costs.
Table 10-3 summarizes the planned wastewater facility capital improvements over the
same six year period. Both Rustlewood and Hartstene have planned improvements.
The Rustlewood facility will conduct Infiltration and Inflow (I&I) and treatment plan
improvements between 1996 and 1998. The Hartstene facility plans to conduct I&I
improvements in 1997. The total cost of these improvements are expected to be
$491,000.
To fmance the improvements costs the utility will have to secure a loan either through state
intergovernmental sources (Department of Ecology) or revenue bonds. In Table 10-3 a
revenue bond is used to finance the improvements. The bond will be equal to the cost of
the improvements ($491,000) and secured over a three year period as funding is needed.
The cost of the revenue bond is based on a 30 year payback at five percent interest, paid
annually.
Sewer service customers will pay for all the improvements through utility rate increases.
The cost to the customers is displayed under the operations heading in Table 10-3. Rate
increases will begin in 1997 for Rustlewood improvements will be completed. Rate
increases for Hartstene customers will increase in 1998 when the cost of servicing the bond
debt for the I&I improvements begins.
Wastewater Systems for North Bay/Case Inlet. Rural Activity Centers. and Urban Areas
The County is also in the process of developing community-based wastewater systems in
other areas of the County. The fmance tables in this section calculate planning level costs
to provide service to the North Bay/Case Inlet area, which will be constructed during the
six-year fmancial planning period. The county also has begun planning for longer range
projects to service the Belfair Urban Growth.
Vl-10.3
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August 1998
(Revised May 20001
Capital Facilities
North Bay/Case Inlet Community-Based Wastewater Treatment
The County is seeking funding to expand wastewater service in the North Bay/Case Inlet
area. A study by consultants (Gray & Osborne, Inc., May 1994) has assessed the cost of
a community-based wastewater system. The total cost of providing this system is
estimated to be approximately $17.9 million (Table 10-4). They have calculated the cost
per household to be approximately $15,838. The project is in the design phase, with
construction expected to begin in 1999 and project completion expected in 2001.
Financing the entire wastewater treatment facility and conveyance system is anticipated to
be through intergovernmental low interest loans and grants. These grants and loans will
be from state (Department of Ecology) and federal (Rural Economic and Community
Development Administration of the Department of Agriculture) sources. In addition to the
grant, Mason County currently has received from Department of Ecology (DOE) for $2.5
million, the County expects to receive another $5 million grant from DOE over the next
two years. Mason County will apply for a DOE state revolving fund of approximately
$9.2 million as well as a grant from the Rural Economic and Community Development
Administration (RECD). The RECD grant is expected to be for approximately $5.5
million.
The debt service on the DOE loan will be paid through utility assessments to customers.
The debt will be approximately $477,000 per year.
Belfair Urban Growth Area Wastewater Treatment Svstem
The County is currently in the infonnation gathering phase of the provision of wastewater
service to the Belfair Urban Growth Area. A study by consultants (Gray & Osborne, Inc.,
April 1997) together with a report from a citizens group (Belfair/Hood ·Canal Sewer
Facilities Advisory Committee, June 1999) has assessed the need for and cost of a
community-based wastewater system. The total cost of providing the first phase of a
system to serve a limited area of the Belfair Urban Growth Area is estimated to be $11.2
million. The project is expected to enter into the design phase in 2003, with project
completion within two years of the start date.
Financing the system will rely on connection services to cover debt service and monthly
operation and maintenance fees. Initial funding for the first phase assumes a grant award
of $5.0 million and the balance in a 0% interest State Revolving Fund loan. These grants
and loans will be from state (Department of Ecology) or federal sources. Mason County
might also need to look at private funding sources or a combination of public and private
sources. The county has not yet sought funding, but is in the process of doing a benefit
VI-10.4
Mason County Comprehensive Plan- August 1998
(Revised May 2000)
Capital Facilities
analysis and a median household income survey. The completion of the facility plan and
public review is necessary before the plans will be finalized.
For the first phase, as currently under consideration, the debt service on the DOE loan will
be approximately $262,224 per year. Costs per residential or commercial connection will
depend on the actual number of connections. These estimates are for the equivalent of 467
residential units. However, the facility will have capacity for additional connections and
expansion of the service area.
Expansion of the service to the entire urban growth area is expected by 2014. Total cost,
inclusive of Phase 1 , is estimated at $30 million to be financed through a combination of
fees, state low- interest loans and grants. Cost estimates are based on the current design
and costs, which could change in the future.
VI-10.5
1.03
Development Requirements
1.03.010
Permitted Uses, Generally
It is the intent of this Chapter to provide for the maximum amount of flexibility in the siting
of differing types of land uses. For this reason, the performance standards and buffer yard
However, both the
requirements found at Section 1.03.036 have been developed.
Comprehensive Plan and this Chapter recognize that some uses and densities will create
inherent conflicts with surrounding land uses, and with the intent of the Comprehensive
Plan. Thus, some uses are prohibited in some areas, and the intensity of some uses (such
as residential, expressed in dwelling units per acre, and industrial, expressed in floor area
ratio) are restricted in others.
1.03.020
Matrix of Permitted Uses
The intent of this section is to assist proponents and staff in detennining whether a proposed
land use is consistent with the appropriate policies of the Comprehensive Plan. Those
policies were formed with the intention to allow property owners and project proponents as
much flexibility as possible in the use of their property, within the constraints of the Growth
Management Act. Therefore, the following matrix is intended to identify, for the sake of
simplicity of usage, whether a particular land use fits the urban or rural character of the area
where it is proposed. However, it is recognized that such an approach is limited in its ability
to deal fairly with each unique project proposed. If a proponent can demonstrate, through
studies of such measures as trip generation, type of traffic, parking and circulation, utility
demands, environmental impacts, physical space needs, and clientele characteristics of the
use, that the land use of the project as proposed is appropriate for the location proposed,
such demonstration shall be considered by the Administrator in addition to the information
in the matrix.
1.03.021
Cottage Industries
Unless noted by an asterisk (*) any use shown in FIGURE 1.03.020, or any use permitted
pursuant to Sections 1.03.022 or 1.03.024, is permitted in any development area as a homebased occupation, or as a cottage industry. The activity shall comply with the criteria in RU542A, and shall be required to obtain a special use permit unless they comply with the
following standards:
A.
Parking areas shall accommodate residents and employees only; any provision
for additional parking shall require a Special Use Permit.
B.
The outdoor storage of merchandise or materials is allowed if they are not
visible to the public from off the site.
~oN" CoUNTY:DE"VELOPlliiENT REG"Ull:.....l'!i..TIONS, O:RI:~>.
RE'V][SION"S ~'lii'" 2 0 0 0
PA.GE
10
82-96
C.
A cottage industry shall involve the owner or lessee of the property who shall
reside within the dwelling unit, and shall not employ on the premises more than five ( 5)
non-residents. A temporary increase in the number of employees is permitted to .
accommodate a business that is seasonal in nature. However, not more than five
additional persons shall be employed on a temporary basis (up to six weeks) without a
Special Use Permit.
D.
More than one business may be allowed, in or on the same premises provided
that all of the criteria are met for all business combined.
There shall be no alterations to the outside appearance of the buildings or
E.
premises that are not consistent with the residential use of the property,or other visible
evidence of the conduct of such cottage industry, other than one sign no larger than 32
square feet.
F.
No equipment or process shall be used in such home occupations which creates
noise, vibration, glare, fumes, odors, or electrical interference detectable to the normal
senses off the property.
G.
The cottage industry shall not create an increase of 5% or more in local traffic.
DlJ:.AsON COUNTY :0E"VE:lLOPM:ENT R.EGULATIONS, 0~.
R.E"VJU3IONS Dii:AY 2 0 0 0
P.A.GE
ll
82-96
X=Pennitted Use T=pennitted onlv as tourist related use R=permitted only as resource based use S=special use pe1mit required *=not allo\ved as cottage industry
MASON COUNTY
INTERIM MATRIX OF PERMITTED USES
FIGURE 1.03.020
Land
Use
Classification
Urban
Growth
Areas
Resource
Areas
Rural
Area
Agricultural
Resource
Lands
Rural
Activity
Center
Hamlet
Accessory apartment or use
I
X
X
X
X
X
X
Adult retirement community
III
X
Adult day-care facility Oess than 8)
II
X
X
X
Adult-day care facility (greater than 8)
III
X
Description of Use
X
X
Agricultural buildings
I
X
X
X
X
Agricultural crops; orchards
I
X
X
X
X
Airport*
VI
X
Ambulance service
X
Animal Hospital
v
v
Aquaculture
IV
X
Assisted living facility*
III
X
Auction house/barn (no vehicle or livestock)
v
v
v
X
Automobile service station*
Automobile wash*
::M:Aslo:N" Co-ul!il"TY::OE:-v.ELOP:nti:El!il"T R.EGFUI....ATXOl!il"S, OR.D.
R.EVXSXOl!il"S l'll.I:A.:V 2 0 0 0
PA.G-El2
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
s
X
X
s
X
X
X
-
82-96
X
X
- - ------
, ____
I
-J
X=Pennitted Use T=pennitted only as tourist related use R=pe1mittedonly as resource based use S=special use pe1mit required *=not al!mYed as cottage industry
Land
Use
Classification
Urban
Growth
Areas
X
Automobile, sales*
v
v
!Bakery
IV
X
X
!Banks, savings & loan assoc.*
IV
X
X
IJ3ed & breakfast
IV
X
!Bicycle paths, walking trails
II, I
X
X
X
!Boat yards*
v
v
v
!Bowling Alley*
II
X
IJ3uy-back recycling center*
X
Carpenter shops (see Industry, light)
v
v
v
Carport (accessory use)
I
X
Cemeteries*
I
X
Child day care, commercial*
II
X
Child day care, family
I
X
Church
II
Non-Profit Club or lodge, private*
IV
Description of Use
Automobile, repair
!Billiard hall & pool hall*
!Blueprinting & photostatting
Cabinet shops (see Industry, light)
}3
Rural
Area
Agricultural
Resource
Lands
Rural
Activity
Center
Hamlet
X
X
X
T
X
X
T
X
X
X
X
X
T
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
I
X
X
X
X
I
X
X
T
X
X
lYLA..s<>N C011JNTYI>EVELOPllii:ENT R.ElG11JLATI<>NS, O:s.:o. 8 2 - 9 6
R.E"VISIONS ::i'lli:A"ii'" 2 0 0 0
PA..GE
Resource
Areas
X
X
X
X
X=Perrnitted Use T=pe1mitted only as tourist related use R=pe1mitted only as resource based use S=special use pe1mit required *=not allowed as cottage industry
Land
Use
Classification
Urban
Growth
Areas
Commercial outdoor recreation
II
X
Confectionery stores (see Retail sales)
N
X
X
Contractor yards
X
X
Convenience store, 3,000 sf or less
v
v
X
X
X
Cottage Industries
N
X
X
X
Department stores (see Retail sales)*
X
Dry cleaners (see Personal services)*
v
v
v
v
Dwelling, multi-family (4 family or less) *
Dwelling, multi-family (5 family or greater)*
Description of Use
Distributing facilities (see Industry, Light)
Drug stores (see Personal services)*
Resource
Areas
Rural
Area
Agricultural
Resource
Lands
X
X
X
X
Rural
Activity
Center
Hamlet
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
II
X
X
Ill
X
(See Figure 1 ..03 .034)
X
iE;lectric/neon sign assembly, servicing repair
v
X
Espresso Stands
lV
X
Fire Stations*
N
X
Flea market
Food markets & grocery stores*
v
v
Forestry
VI
Freight terminal, truck*
v
Dwelling, single-family
J:Y.I:.A.sON" CO"UN"TYI>E"VELOP:nti:EN"T ~EG"ULA.TXON"S, OR.D~EV"XSXON"S
P.A_GE14
J.\II:Ay 2 0 0 0
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
s
X
X
82-96
X
X
X
X
s
X
X=Pennitted Use T=permitted only as tourist related use R=permitted only as resource based use S=special use pennit required *=not allmYed as cottage industry
Land
Use
Classification
Urban
Growth
Areas
Resource
Areas
Rural
Area
Agricultural
Resource
Lands
Rural
Activity
Center
Hamlet
I
X
X
X
X
X
X
!Fuel storage tanks (underground, 500 gal. or less)
(accessory use)
I
X
X
X
X
X
X
!Fuel storage tanks, above ground
(accessory use)
I
X
X
X
X
X
X
IFuniture r~pair (see Industry, light)
v
X
Garage, private (accessory to dwelling)
I
X
Garage, public parking
v
X
Gravel extraction*
VI
Description of Use
fuel storage tanks (underground,
(accessory use)
> 500 gal.)
Greenhouses, private & non-commercial
X
X
X
R
R
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
I
X
Group homes
III
X
X
Hardware stores 3,000 sf or less
IV
X
X
Hardware stores more than 3,000 sf*
X
Health club*
v
v
X
Heavy Industry*
VI
X
Home occupation
I
X
X
X
X
X
X
Horticultural nursery, wholesale and retail
IV
X
X
X
X
X
X
!Hospitals*
v
X
Hotel*
IV
X
Industry, light
v
X
::nt:I:A.sON" CO"UN"'l!"Y I>E~LOPJ.YJ:ElN"T ~ElGFU::I:......A.T:XON"S, <>~~El"VXSXON"S
PA..c;;..E
15
::nli:A.Y" 2 0 0 0
82-96
X
X
X
.
X=Pennitted Use T=pennitted only as tourist related use R=pennitted only as resource based use S=special use permit required *=not allmYed as cottage industp;
Rural
Activity
Center
Rtmrl
Community
€-enter
Hamlet
T
T
X
X
X
X
X
X
s
s
X
X
Land
Use
Classification
Urban
Growth
Areas
1nn
IV
X
T
Kennels
IV
X
X
Libraries*
II
Liquor stores*
v
Livestock
IV
Locksmiths
IV
~gging
VI
!Lumber yards*
v
v
X
!Marina*
v
X
X
X
!Medical-dental clinic
IV
X
X
X
!Mining*
VI
!Mobile home park*
m
X
X
!Mobile Home Sales*
v
X
X
!Mortuaries*
IV
X
X
!Motel*
IV
X
!Motor vehicle impound yard in enclosed bldg. (see
IJndustry, light) *
v
X
Description of Use
!Machine shops, punch press up to 5 tons (see Industry,
!light)
~<>N" Co"U:N"'I"Y:DEVEL<>PlYIENT ::R.EGUI....ATX<>NS, O~D::R.E"VXSXONS ~y- 2 0 0 0
P.A.GE
}6
Resource
Areas
X
Rural
Area
X
Agricultural
Resource
Lands
X
X
X
X
R
R
R
X
X
R
82-96
R
T
T
T
X=Pe1mitted Use T=pe1mitted onlY as tourist related use R=pe1mitted only as resource based use S=special use pe1mit required *=not allm\~ed as cottage industrY
SX=pennitted use in RAC if sen·ice area dcies not include UGA, pe1mitted use in Hamlet if serYice area does not include UGA or RAC, pennitted use in RA is serYice
area is only in Rural Area, othenYise, may be permitted as a special use
Land
Use
Classification
Urban
Growth
Areas
Non-automotive, motor vehicle and related equipment
sales, rental, repair and service
v
X
Paint shop (see Industry, light) *
X
Parcel service delivery (see Industry, light)
v
v
Parking area, private
I
X
Parking area, public
IV
X
Description of Use
Resource
Areas
Rural
Area
Agricultural
Resource
Lands
Rural
Activity
Center
Hamlet
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
!Pasture
I
!Pesticide application service (see Industry, light)
v
X
X
!Pet shop
IV
X
X
!Plumbing shop (see Industry, light)
X
X
!Plumbing supply yards (see Industry, light)*
v
v
IPost Office, branch or contract station
II
X
!Post Office, distribution center or terminal*
X
!Printing establishments
v
v
!Professional offices
IV
X
tpublic parks
II
X
tpublic utility offices
I
X
!Public utility service yard*
v
X
!Radio & TV repair shops
IV
X
::J.Y.I.:A.s<>N" CO"UN"TY :DE~L<>P:M:EN"T R.EGFUL.A..TION"IS,
R.E"VIISION"IS Dli:A:Y 2 0 0 0
PA.GrE17
X
X
X
X
OR.I>-
82-96
X
X
X
sx
s
X
X
X
sx
s
sx
s
X=Pennitted Use T=pennitted only as tourist related use R=pennitted only as resource based use S=special use pem1it required *=not allmYed as cottage industrv
Land
Use
Classification
Urban
Growth
Areas
Radio & TV transmission towers (incl. cellular phone
owers)*
IV
X
Rail-dependent uses*
VI
Recreational Vehicle Park*
Agricultural
Resource
Lands
Rural
Activity
Center
Hamlet
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
II
X
T
Resource Based Industry
VI
X
R
R
Restaurant*
X
X
X
Restaurants, drive-through*
v
v
Rifle Range *
VI
Sawmills
VI
X
R
R
R
Schools, private, elementary or secondary
II
X
s
X
X
Secondhand store
X
X
Self-service storage facility*
v
v
X
X
Shoe stores or repair shop
IV
X
X
Small engine repair
X
X
Special Needs Housing
v
m
X
X
Stable
IV
Stationary store (see Retail sales)
IV
X
X
Studios (i.e. recording, artist, dancing, etc.)
IV
X
X
Taverns*
v
v
X
X
Description of Use
Theaters, enclosed*
R
Rural
Area
R
X
X
R
X
X
::ni'.I:A.soN" Coli:::TN"TY::OEIVELOPJliJ:EN"T R.EG-li:::TLATI<>NS, O:ano. 8 2 - 9 6
R.E"'TTSIONS ::nt:I:.A.."Y 2 0 0 0
P~G-E }8
Resource
Areas
X
X
X
X
X
X=Permitted Use T=pe1mitted only as tourist related use R=pe1mitted only as resource based use S=special use pe1mit required *=not allmYed as cottage industry
Description of Use
Tool sales & rental
Tourist-related uses
Land
Use
Classification
Urban
Growth
Areas
v
v
X
Resource
Areas
X
Rural
Area
X
Agricultural
Resource
Lands
Rural
Activity
Center
Hamlet
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Trailer-mix concrete plant* (resource-dependent use)
VI
Upholstering
v
v
X
Video store (rental, not adult) 3,000 s.f. or less
IV
X
X
Vocational school
n
X
s
IWarehousing
X
!Wholesale
v
v
v
X
IWreeking/Junk yards*
VI
X
Video store (rental, not adult)
IW elding shops &
> 3,000 sf*
sheets metal shops
R
X
X
l!IJ:AsON ClOUNTYDEVELOP::IIIIENT REGULATIONS, 0R.D. 82-96
l&JE;:"VISIONS ]'lli:A:Y 2 0 0 0
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}9
R
1.03.022
Uses Otherwise Permitted
The list of uses set forth in FIGURE 1.03.020 is not intended to be all-inclusive. If
an applicant proposes a use which is not listed, the Administrator shall first
determine whether the use is similar to a permitted use, utilizing the procedure set
forth in Section 1.03.024. If the Administrator can not make an affirmative
determination, then the applicant and the Administrator shall look to the
Comprehensive Plan to determine whether such use was contemplated within the
development area. The Administrator shall maintain a list of all such
determinations and interpretations for use by future applicants, which list shall be
submitted to the Board for review not less than once each year.
1.03.024
Similar Uses
The Administrator may authorize uses for all Development Areas that have similar
characteristics to uses specifically cited in Chapter 1.03.020. In making an
affirmative determination that a use is similar to one specifically cited in Chapter
1. 03.020, the Administrator shall find that the land use characteristics fit the urban
or rural character of the surrounding area by using measures such as trip generation
and type of traffic, parking and circulation, utility demands, environmental
impacts, physical space needs, and clientele characteristics of the use. In making
an affirmative determination, the Administrator should find that the use
characteristics differ by less than 10 percent from the characteristics of the use
specifically cited in Chapter 1.03.020.
1.03.026
Residential Uses as Special Uses
On any lot abutting a railroad track or airport, a Special Use Permit shall be
required for a residential use of that property. A residential dwelling located more
than one hundred fifty (150) feet from such a facility shall be exempt from this
requirement, if the lot upon which the· dwelling is to be placed is located within an
Urban Growth Area.
1.03.028
Essential Public Facilities
Essential Public Facilities shall require a Special Use Permit in any development
area.
l'll.li:.A..sON COlUNTY DEVELOP:n!IENT REGlUI....A._TIONS, 0JRD. 8 2 - 9 6
RE"VISIONS
lP.A.GE
20
:na:::.a..."Y 2 0 0 0
1.03.030
Development Requirements and Performance Standards
A.
The following development requirements and performance standards apply to all
property proposed for development which is within the jurisdiction of Mason
County. No development approval shall be given, and no building permit shall be
issued, unless the proposed development is in compliance with the provisions of
this Chapter.
B.
Nothing in this Ordinance shall be construed as prohibiting the placement of an onsite septic system in an Urban Growth Area, unless the property is located within
five hundred (500) feet of an existing sewer line which has capacity to
accommodate the proposed development. Such on-site septic system shall be
professionally sited, designed, installed, monitored and maintained. System
considerations shall include the following:
C.
1.
Meeting the regulations of the Mason County Health Department,
Washington State Department of Health, or Washington State Department
of Ecology, as appropriate.
2.
Consider advanced forms of pretreatment prior to discharge into the soil.
3.
Consider proprietary pretreatment devices to refine high strength
commercial wastes prior to soil treatment and disposal.
4.
Disinfection prior to disposal into the more sensitive environments.
5.
System maintenance and monitoring by certified professionals under a
program managed by the Mason County Health Department.
If a septic system is proposed for placement in an area identified for sewer line
extension in the County's Capital Facilities Plan, for new development other than
single family residential construction, the County shall issue any approval for the
septic system with a condition that it be decommissioned and the property
connected to the sewer system within one year of sewer extension. Within this
.
paragraph, "new development" means any development which requires
wastewater/sanitary sewer provisions which can not be met with an existing
system.
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1.03.031
A.
•
•
Binding Site Plan Required in the Belfair Urban Growth Area
In the Belfair urban growth area and prior to the provision of public sewer to a site,
any approval for a commercial, industrial and mixed use development is required to
include a binding site plan which:
complies with the applicable health regulations and other Mason County building
regulations; e.g. critical areas, storm water management, etc.
provides for the septic needs of the current proposal and shows how the remainder of
the site will accommodate and not preclude urban services and densities, and.
provides for future sewer pipelines.
B.
The binding site plan prepared under this section shall address the following: buffers,
landscaping, traffic access and parking standards, current septic and future sewer
provisions, height and scale in relation to surrounding uses and future uses, vegetation
removal, storm water, and lot coverage.
C.
Development of the site shall be consistent with the approved site plan. Minor
modification to the site plan may be allowed by the Director, provided that all
other regulations and conditions placed on the approval are complied with.
~ON COUNTY:DEIVElLOPlli.ICElNT R.:EG~TIONS,
~EVISIONS
P.AGE
22
na.'..A.."Y 2 0 0 0
0lR:D. 8 2 - 9 6
1.03.032
Development Densities and Dimensional Requirements
A.
Development Densities. Development densities for residential development
are calculated as the allowed number of dwelling units per acre (DUlac).
For non-residential development, development densities are calculated as the
amount of building floor area allowed per gross acre of land, the "floor area
ratio" (FAR). For all Development Areas within the County, these
development densities are shown in FIGURE 1.03.032.
B.
This chapter regulates residential lot development through the use of
Standard Residential Density limits and Maximum Residential Density
limits, as contained in Figure 1. 03.032. The Standard Residential Density
shall be applied as follows:
1.
On a lot existing at the time of the initial adoption of this chapter
(June 17, 1998) and otherwise suitable for residential use, the
Standard Residential Density limit is used to determine the allowed
number of dwelling units on the site. For example, in the Rural Area
the Standard Residential Density is one dwelling unit per five acres.
Therefore, a lot of five acres would comply with the Standard
Residential Density requirement for one dwelling.
2.
If said existing lot does not have an adequate area to comply with the
applicable Standard Residential Density requirement, then one
dwelling unit may be allowed. For example, in the Rural Activtiy
Centers the Standard Residential Density is one dwelling unit per 2.5
acres. Therefore, if a lot was less than 2.5 acres, a dwelling unit
may be allowed, provided that the lot could comply with all other
applicable standards and reqirements.
3.a.
No residential lot of less than the Standard Residential Density may
. be created, except through an approved subdivision or performance
subdivision, pursant to Mason County CodeTitle 16, in which the
allowed residential density (allowed number of dwelling units) of the
entire original property is allocated to the lots created, or through the
provisions of 3b below. For example, in the Rural Area the Standard
Residential Density is one dwelling unit per five acres. Therefore, a
Rural Area property or parcel of 20 acres might be divided into three
lots of two acres each and one lot of 14 acres, provided that the 14
acre lot would have the right to only one dwelling, and could not be
further subdivided for residential purposes.
3.b
If a lot has more than one, but not more than four existing residential
l'lli:.A.sON COUNTY DEIVELOJ?lWENT R.EGULATIONS, 0R.D. 8 2 - 9 6
R.E"VISIONS l'll'.li::..A.Y 2 0 0 0
JP.AGE
23
dwellings, then the Director may approve the division of the lot in a
manner that establishes each dwelling on a separate lot. Provided that:
(1 ).
Any new lot created by this method shall be considered a
conforming lot.
(2).
The provisions of this section shall apply only to lots and
dwellings that were legally created and built.
(3).
The provisions of this section shall not apply to dwellings that
were permitted as accessory dwellings or temporary dwellings.
(4)
In approving such a subdivision ofland, the Director shall make
the following determinations:
(a)
Each dwelling shall have access by frontage or easement
to a public way;
(b)
Each dwelling shall be connected to a septic system or
sewer line adequate to serve the dwelling;
(c)
Each dwelling shall be served by a sufficient supply of
potable water; and
(d) The division of land shall occur in a manner that minimizes
any non-conformity related to minimum lot size or setback
requirement.
4.
C.
Title 16, Mason County Code, regulates land divisions in Mason
County and establishes a review process by which all applicable
regulations can be addressed. The allowable size and configuration
of any given lot in a land division is determined through this
process. Issues to be considered in establishing a minimum size for
any particular lot shall include adequate provisions for buffer yards,
as set forth in Section 1.03.036.
Dimensional Requirements. Dimensional requirements include setbacks,
building height restrictions, and maximum allowed lot coverage. These
requirements for each Development Area are set forth in FIGURE 1.03.032.
Maximum height restrictions shall not apply to storage silos, antennas,
transmission towers or water tanks.
~ON" COU"N"':II:"'li< :D:El"'!ZELOPDI.ILENT R.JEilG-U":J1:....1'11._']['][0N"S, OlRD. 8 2 - 9 6
R.JE!l"V][SION"S ::M:.A_y 2 0 0 0
PA.G-E
24
From Title 16
MASON COUNTY CODE- PLATS AND SUBDIVISIONS
CHAl'TERS
16.04
16.08
16.12
16.16
16.20
16.22
16.23
16.24
16.28
16.32
16.36
16.38
16.40
16.44
16.48
General Provisions
Definitions
Preliminary Sketch
Preliminary Plat
Final Plat
Performance Subdivisions
Cluster Subdivisions
Condominium Plats
Design Standards
Health Standards
Short Subdivisions
Large Lot Subdivisions
Modifications, Appeals, and Fees
Prohibitions, Offenses, and Penalties
Design Standards and Specifications for Plat Roads
16.08.014 Cluster. A grouping of house lots within a subdivision, separated from other clusters by open space. For the
purposes of this Title, a cluster in a rural area:
(I) shall not exceed eight (8)house lots;
(2) shall establish an open space separation between clusters of at least 100 feet in width; and
(3) shall have not more than four clusters of house lots in any development.
16.28.170 Lot Size. (a) Basic minimum requirements shall be as follows:
(1) All lots shall have a minimum average width of not less than one-third of the median length
and a minimum width at any point of twenty-five (25) feet. Widths shall be measured perpendicular to
the longitudinal median line of the lot.
(2) The minimum area of lots served by municipal sewage works shall be six thousand (6000)
square feet
(3) The minimum gross land areas of lots served by individual sewage system on each lot shall
be two acres, provided that when the lots are proposed as part of a performance subdivision or cluster
subdivision, then the minimum lot size for a residential lot shall be twenty thousand (20,000) square feet.
These minimum sizes shall be for lots proposed for single family units outside of urban growth areas.
When served by on-site septic systems, lots for single family units inside of urban growth areas and for
multiple family units shall be as approved by the Mason County Planning Commission.
(4) The area within a panhandle lot which functions as the access area shall not be computed
in detennining the minimum area.
(b) Lot areas in excess of established basic minimums may be required:
(I) When specified by the Mason County General Services Department, Environmental Health
Division;
(2) When specified by other Mason County development regulations.
(c) Environmental Health Division approval of proposed lot sizes, with respect to ability of soils to accept septic
tank eft1uents, shall be obtained pri,or to the submission of a preliminary plat.
Revisions May 2000 - Title 16, Page 1
Chapter 16.22
Performance Subdivisions
Sections:
16.22.010
16.22.020
16.22.030
16 22 031
16.22.032
16.22.034
16.22.036
16.22.037
16.22.039
16.22.040
16.22.042
16.22.044
16.22.046
16.22.050
16.22.060
Application of Regulations
Preliminary Sketch Required
Perfonnance Criteria
Minimum Lot Sizes Established
Primary Conservation Area
Secondary Conservation Areas
Additional Open Space Criteria
Site Design Considerations
Mixed Uses
Ownership, Maintenance and Use of Open Space
Ownership
Maintenance
Use
Procedures for Approval
Transfer of Density
16.22.010 Application of Re::ulations. The following regulations shall apply to any applicant for subdivision approval who
is seeking an increase in the standard density allowed in the development area in which the proposed development is located.
While additional infonnation is required of the applicant for the review of a performance subdivision, it is the intent of this
Chapter that the procedural requirements for performance subdivisions shall be no more difficult than those established for
traditional subdivisions. Perfom1ance subdivisions are not pennitted within Long-Term Commercial Forests, Mineral
Resource Areas, or Agricultural Resource Lands .
16.22.020 Preliminary Sketch Required. Any applicant submitting a proposal for a Pe1fonnance Subdivision shall submit
a preliniinmy sketch for review. In addition to the information required in Section 16.12.0 l 0, the preliminary sketch shall
show Primmy Conservation Areas, Secondmy Conservation Areas, and proposed development areas. A public hearing shall
not be required at this time. However, abutters to the property and members of the general public shall be encouraged to
attend the Plam1ing Cormnission review of the sketch plan. Public comment at this stage is intended to minimize the need
for significant plan changes during review of subsequent submittals.
16.22.030 Performance Criteria. Land proposed for development under this Chapter shall receive the residential density
bonuses allowed, provided that they meet the design and perfonnance standards set forth in this chapter7
16.23.032 Minimum Lot Sizes Established. No lot for which the construction of a residential dwelling is proposed shall
be less than 20,000 square feet in gross land area.
16.22.032 Primacy Conservation Areas. Primary Conservation Areas shall be clearly identified, and shall be set aside as
permanent open space. Primmy Conservation areas shall be included in the calculation of both standard and maximum
density allowed, but they shall not be used in calculating the percentage of pennanent open space required.
16.22.034 Secondary Conservation Areas. Secondary Conservation Areas shall be identified and shall, to the greatest
extent possible, be avoided as development areas. The minimum threshold for qualification as a Performance subdivision
is that at least fifty (50%) percent of the buildable area of the property be set aside as permanent open space. Buildable area
excludes Primmy Conservation Areas, but includes Secondmy Conservation areas. At least twenty-five (25%) of the
minimum required open space shall be suitable for active recreation purposes, but no more than fifty (50%) percent shall
Revisions May 2000 - Title 16, Page 2
be utilized for that purpose, in order to preserve a reasonable proportion of natural areas on the site. Upon reaching this
threshold, the applicant shall be entitled to a density bonus equal to fifty (50%) percent of the difference between the
Standard Residential Density and the Maximum Residential Density allowed within the particular Development Area.
16.22.036 Additional Open Space Criteria. The design of an open space area shall require the following:
A
Interconnection with designated open space on abutting properties where applicable;
B.
The preservation of important s1te features, such as rare or unusual stands of trees, unique geological features, or
important wildlife habitat; .
C.
Direct access from as many lots as possible within the development; and
D.
Minimizing the fragn1entation of the open space areas. To the greatest extent possible, the designated open space
shall be located in large, undivided areas.
E.
A curvilinear roadway design which minimizes the visual impact of houses as may be seen from the exterior of the
site.
Compliance with the provisions set forth in this Section shall entitle the applicant to a residential density bonus equal to
twenty-five (25%) percent ofthe difference between the Standard Residential Density and the Maximum Residential Density
allowed within the particular Development Area.
16.22.037 Site Desi2n Standards. The siting of house lots shall avoid the following:
A
Interruption of scenic views and vistas;
B.
Construction on hill tops or ridge lines;
C.
Direct access or frontage on existing public ways;
D.
A "linear" configuration of open space (except when following a linear site feature, such as a river, creek or
stream).
Compliance with the provisions set forth in this Section shall entitle the applicant to a residential density bonus equal to
twenty-five (25%) percent of the difference between the Standard Residential Density and the Maximum Residential Density
allowed within the particular Development Area.
16.22.039 Mixed Uses. In Urban Growth Areas, applicants are encouraged to provide a mix ofland uses in addition to
residential uses on the site, such as small-scale retail uses. Compliance with the provisions set forth in this Section shall
entitle the applicant to a residential density bonus equal to twenty-five (25%) percent of the difference between the Standard
Residential Density and the Maximum Residential Density allowed within the particular Development Area. However, in
no case shall the total of residential density bonuses allowed exceed the allowed Maximum Residential Density within the
Development Area.
16.22.040 Ownership. Maintenance and Use of Open Space. The applicant shall provide a mechanism to assure that any
required open space .is pennanently protected and maintained.
16.22.042 Ownership.
A.
The open space may be conveyed by fee simple instrument to an owner's association, to the County (subject to
County approval), or to an entity (for example, a land trust) acceptable to the County who has demonstrated
Revisions May 2000 - Title 16, Page 3
capacity to provide for the long-tenn protection and maintenance of the property.
B.
The open space may be kept by the applicant, and used for any ofthe purposes set forth in Section 16.12.046.
16.22.044 Maintenance.
Any conveyance of the required open space shall include an endowment of funds equal to at least twenty (20) times the
an11ual estimated maintenance cost, in order to assure that the property will be maintained. The requirement for an
endowment may be waived upon conveyance to an owner's associatio11, provided that the bylaws of said association shall
require regular payments from members to defray maintenance costs. The bylaws shall also include provisions for the
recovery offunds in the event of default.
16.22.046 Use.
A.
The primary uses of open space set aside pursuant to this section are active and passive recreation, protection and
preservation of critical areas, and preservation of other natural elements of impmtance to the community, and to
the residents of the development. Other uses permitted within open space areas are forestry and agriculture,
provided that these uses do not occur within any required buffer yard.
B.
Open space set aside pursuant to this Chapter may be designated by the applicant as "future development area."
Such designated area shall be kept and maintained as open space, until such time as the land may be designated
for development at urban densities. At any time after such change in land use designation occurs, the "future
development area" land may be developed in accordance with the regulations in effect at that time. Such
development shall require a new, separate application. Primary Resource Areas and buffer yards shall not be
designated as "future development areas."
16.22.050 Procedures for Approval. Preliminary approval for any performance subdivision shall follow the procedures
set forth in Chapter 16.16, except that the submittal of a preliminary sketch plan is required.
16.22.060 Transfer of Density.
Upon analysis of all of the opportunities and constraints identified on a specific parcel of land, if it is detennined that the use
of the provisions set forth in this Chapter will not result in the use of the maximum density allowed, then the applicant shall
have the right to transfer any unused development density to any parcel ofland located in an Urban Growth Area. By use
of this transfer right, maximum density allowed in the Urban Growth Area may be exceeded by up to fifty (50%) percent.
Revisions May 2000 - Title 16, Page 4
Chapter 16.23
Cluster Subdivisions
Sections:
16.23.010
16.23.020
16.23.030
16.23.032
16.23.035
16.23.040
16.23.042
16.23.044
16.23.046
16.23.048
16.23.050
16.23.060
16.23.070
Application of Regulations
Preliminary Sketch Required
Maximum Lot Sizes Established
Minimum Lot Sizes Established
Minimum Agricultural Resource Land Open Space Lot Size
Design Criteria
Primary Conservation Areas
Secondary Conservation Areas
Additional Open Space Criteria
Additional Site Design Considerations
Ownership, Maintenance and Use of Open Space
Procedures for Approval
Transfer ofDensity
16.23.010 Application of Regulations. The following regulations shall apply to any applicant for subdivision or shoJi
plat approval, where the prope1ty proposed for subdivision or short plat is located within areas designated in the Mason
County Development Regulations as Long-Term Commercial Forests, Mirieral Resource Lands, and Agricultural
Re.source Lands.
16.23.020 Preliminary Sketch Required. Any applicant submitting a proposal for a Cluster Subdivision shall submit
a preliminary sketch for review. In addition to the information required in Section 16.12.0 10, the preliminary sketch
shall show Primary Conservation Areas, Secondary Conservation Areas, and proposed development areas. A public
hearing shall not be required at this time. However, abutters to the property and members of the general public shall
be encouraged to attend the Planning Commission review of the sketch plan. Public comment at this stage is intended
to minimize the need for significant plan changes during review of subsequent submittals.
16.23.030 Maximum Lot Sizes Established. No lot for which the construction of a residential dwelling is proposed
under this Chapter shall exceed two acres in gross land area.
16.23.032 Minimum Lot Sizes Established. No lot for whichthe construction of a residential dwelling is proposed
shall be less than 20,000 square feet in gross land area.
16.23.035 Minimum Agricultural Resource Land Open Space Lot Size. Any cluster subdivision on Agrucultural
Resource Land shall provide the required open space iri a lot, or lots, each such open space lot being l 0 or more acres.
16.23.040 Design Criteria. Land proposed for development under this Chapter shall meet the design standards set forth
in this chapter.
16.23.042 Primarv Conservation Areas. Primary Conservation Areas shall be clearly identified, and shall be set aside
as permanent open space. Primary Conservation areas shall be included in the calculation of both standard and
maximun1 density allowed, but they shall not be used in calculating the percentage of permanent open space required.
16.23.044 Secondary Conservation Areas. Secondary Conservation Areas shall be identified and shall, to the greatest
extent possible, be avoided as development areas. For Agricultural Resource Lands, at least 75% of the land being
Revisions May 2000 - Title 16, Page 5
divided, not including the area of the Primary Conservation areas, shall be included in the property set aside as
pennanent open space.
16.23.046 Additional Open Space Standards. The design of an open space area shall require the following:
A
Intercomrection with designated open space on abutting properties;
B.
The preservation of imp01iant site features, such as rare or unusual stands of trees, unique geological
features, or important wildlife habitat;
C.
Direct access to the open space from as many lots as possible within the development, except for
Agricultural Resource Lands; and
D.
Minimizing the fragmentation ofthe open space areas. To the greatest extent possible, the designated
open space shall be located in large, undivided areas.
E.
A curvilinear roadway design which mininrizes the viswil inrpact of houses as may be seen from the
exterior of the site.
F.
In Agricultural Resource Lands, mclude the most productive land and any other features of the property
identified as important to agricultural productivity of the open space.
16.23.048 Additional Site Design Standards. The siting of house lots shall avoid the following:
A
B.
c
D.
Internrption of scenic views and vistas;
Construction on hill tops or ridge lines;
Direct access or frontage on existing public ways;
A "linear" configuration of open space (except when following a linear site feature, such as a river, creek
or stream).
16.23.050 Ownership, Maintenance and Use of Open Space. The applicant shall provide a mechanism to assure
that any required open space is permanently protected and maintained, in conformance with the provisions set forth in
Section 16.22.040. In Agricultural Resource Lands, no covenant or other restriction on the open space land may
prohibit the use ofthe land for agricultural purposes.
16.23.060 Procedures for Approval. Prelinrinary approval for subdivision shall follow the procedures set forth in
Chapter 16.16, except that the submittal of a prelinrinary sketch plan is required.
16.23.070 Transfer of Density. Upon analysis of all of the opportunities and constraints identified on a specific parcel
ofland, if it is detennined that the use of the provisions set forth in this Chapter will not result in the use of the maximum
density allowed, then the applicant shall have the right to transfer any unused development density to any parcel of land
located in an Urban Growth Area. By use of this transfer right, maximum density allowed in the Urban Growth Area
may be exceeded by up to fifty (50%) percent.
Revisions May 2000 - Title 16, Page 6
Figure 1.03.032 Development Densities; Dimensional Requirements
Description of Use
Standard
Residential
Density
Maximum
Residential
Density
Standard NonResidential
Density***
Maximum
Building Size
Maximum
Building
Height
Setback
Requirements
(Floor Area Ratio)
Shelton Urban Growth Area
4 dulac
8 dulac
1:1.5
nla
35'
**
Belfair Urban Growth Area
4 dulac
6 dulac
1:1.5
nla
35'
**
Allyn Urban Growth Area
4 dulac
6 dulac
1:2
10,000 sf (2)
35' (1)
**
Mirieral Resource Areas (x)
1 dul40 ac
1 dul40 ac
nla
nla
35'*
**
In-Holding Lands
1 dul5 ac
1 dul5 ac
1:20
10,000 sf
35'*
**
(a)
(a)
1:20
nla
35'*
**
1 dul5 ac
to 1 du/20
ac
1 dul 5 ac
to 1 dul10
ac
1:20
3,000 sf
35'*
**
Rural Activity Center
1/du/2.5
ac
du/2.5 ac
1:3
10,000 sf
35'
**
Hamlet
1 dul5ac
1 dul5 ac
1:5
3,000 sf
35'
**
1dul2.5ac
1du/2.5ac
1:5
3,000 sf
35'
**
Agricultural Resource Lands (x)
Rural Area
Rural Residential
resource-based activities are exempt from this requirement
(x)
clustering of residential development is required
*
(a)
see the density provisions of section 1.03.037
** see buffer yard standards
*** fire stations exempt from this requirement
(1) except that the maximum building height in the Allyn UGA is 25 feet East of State Highway 3 between Wade Street and
Evans Street (which is known as Lakeland Drive)
(2) may be increased to 20,000 sf with a Special Use Permit
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Fully Contained Community (FCC). A reserved capacity for new urban development that
will be characterized by urban densities and intensities, urban governmental services, and meets
the criteria established in the comprehensive plan and in RCW 36.70A.350.
Geologically Hazardous Areas. Areas that because of the susceptibility to erosion, sliding,
earthquake, or other geological events, are not suited to the siting of commercial, residential,
or industrial development consistent with public health or safety concerns. (RCW 36.70A.030)
Greenbelt. A linear corridor of open space which often provides passive recreation and
nonmotorized transportation opportunities, serves as a buffer between developments and
varying land uses, or creates a sense of visual relief from urban landscapes.
Groundwater. Water that fills all the unblocked pores of material lying beneath the water
table.
Growth Management Act (GMA), or Act. The Growth Management Act as enacted in 1990
and subsequently amended by the State of Washington.
Hamlet. Hamlets are intended to provide a focal point and community identity for surrounding
rural area, while they meet some of the immediate needs of rural residents, resource dependent
industry, and visitors. They may include one or two civic, community, or retail uses such as
post office, community center, church, grange, gas station, or small convenience store.
Residential uses are not included in Hamlets. They may be served by community water systems
and community sewage treatment facilities but have only rural governmental services.
Home Occupation. A business, occupation, or profession that is incidental to and carried on
within a portion of a residential dwelling unit by a member or members of the household. The
business may have up to three employees in addition to members of the household.
Household. All persons who occupy a housing unit which is intended as separate living
quarters and having direct access from the outside of the building or through a common hall.
The occupants may be a single family, one person living alone, two or more families living
together, or any other group of related or unrelated persons who share living arrangements.
(U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau ofthe Census)
Hotel. A facility offering guest lodging accommodations to the general public and providing
additional services, such as restaurants, meeting rooms, entertainment and recreational facilities.
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Public Water System. Any systems ofwater supply intended or used for human consumption
or other domestic uses, including source, treatment, storage, transmission, and distribution
facilities where water is being furnished to any community, collection, or number of individuals,
but excluding a water systems serving on single family residence. (WAC 24854)
RCW. Revised Code ofWashington.
Rehabilitation. The physical improvement, remodeling, or partial reconstruction of existing
structures rather than their demolition and replacement.
Resource Lands. Those lands which are suitable for agriculture, forest mineral extraction and
protected by resource lands regulations.
Resource-Based. a use that is dependent upon, or supports uses that are dependent upon,
natural resources including but not limited to, forestry, agriculture, aquaculture, horticulture,
and mineral extraction.
Resource-Based Industry. a manufacturing, industrial, or commercial business which requires
a location near agricultural land, forest land, or mineral resource land or aquicultural area upon
which it is dependent or supports. Examples include sawmills, plant nurseries, feed stores.
Right of Way. Land owned by a government or an easement for a certain purpose over the
land of another, used for a road, ditch, electrical transmission line, pipeline, or public facilities
such as utility or transportation corridors.
Road Adequacy Standards. Standards by which government agencies can assess whether
adequate road facilities are being provided and regulated.
Runoff. Water from rain, snowmelt, or irrigation that flows over the ground surface and
returns to streams.
Rural Activity Center (RAC). Concentrated settlements within Rural Lands that may include
a variety of residential, small scale commercial, resource-based and rural light industrial,
recreation, and public uses. They may also include a compact, pedestrian-oriented core. They
may be served by community water systems and have community sewage treatment facilities
but have only rural governmental services. They reflect an existing development pattern, but
they are not intended to expand.
Rural Areas. Rural Areas in Mason County include those areas not designated as Urban
Areas, Resource Lands, RACs, or Hamlets. They currently provide for rural residential,
fanning, forestry, recreation, and single-purpose commercial, retail, and industrial uses. These
uses are expected to continue and increase over the next 20 years. In rural Areas, the rural
landscape win remain dominant, and include a variety of protected natural features.
:nl.I::.ABON" COU"N"TY DE"VELOP:J.Y.iLEl:N"T R.JE;J<;-~TION"IS, OR.:D. 8 2 - 9 6
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Rural Lands. Those areas outside of designated Resource Lands and Urban Growth Areas.
Natural features contribute significantly to rural character of these lands. These features
include, but are not limited to, forests, farmlands, and farm buildings, pastures, meadows,
shorelines, wetlands, streams, lakes, hills and mountains. Types of uses within Rural Lands
include resource-based land uses, recreational uses, residential uses, and low intensity
nonresidential uses. Rural Lands can be served by rural governmental services and included
districts such as Rural Activity Centers, Hamlets, and Rural Areas.
Sanitary Sewer Systems. All facilities, including approved on-site disposal facilities, used in
the collection, transmission, storage, treatment or discharge of any waterborne waste, whether
domestic in origin or a combination of domestic, commercial or industrial waste. (WAC 365195-210)
Secondary Treatment. The second step in purifYing sewage which uses biological processes
in additional to settling and provides purification from 85 to 95 percent.
Seismic Hazard Areas. Areas subject to severe risk of damage as a result of earthquake
induced ground shaking, slope failure, settlement, or soil liquefaction.
Sewage. The total of organic waste and wastewater generated by residential, industrial and
commercial establishments.
Sewer. The closed pipe which carries raw sewage from a home or business to a treatment
facility.
Sewerage. The entire system of sewage collection, treatment, and disposal.
Sight Distance. The length of a roadway required which is sufficient enough to ensure safe
operation of a motor vehicle at posted speeds.
Sign. Any name, identification, description, display, or illustration which is affixed to or
reproduced directly or indirectly upon a building, structure, or piece of land, and which is used
to advertise, identifY, display, attract or direct attention to an event, object, product, place,
activity, person, institution, organization or business by any means including words, letters,
figures, design, symbols, fixtures, colors, illumination or projected images.
Single Family Dwelling. a detached building containing one dwelling unit.
Small Scale. a tenn which indicates that development regulations will limit the intensity, size,
scale, number of uses and other factors of a particular development.
Small Scale Business. Any business entity, including a sole proprietorship, coporation,
partnership, or other legal entity, that is owned and operated independently from all other
businesses, that has the purpose of making a profit, and that has twenty or fewer employees.
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